Science.gov

Sample records for acidic ribosomal proteins

  1. Identification by affinity chromatography of the eukaryotic ribosomal proteins that bind to 5.8 S ribosomal ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, N; Lin, A; Wool, I G

    1979-09-10

    The proteins that bind to rat liver 5.8 S ribosomal ribonucleic acid were identified by affinity chromatography. The nucleic acid was oxidized with periodate and coupled by its 3'-terminus to Sepharose 4B through and adipic acid dihydrazide spacer. The ribosomal proteins that associate with the immobilized 5.8 S rRNA were identified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresiss: they were L19, L8, and L6 from the 60 S subunit; and S13 and S9 from the small subparticle. Small amounts of L14, L17', L18, L27/L27', and L35', and of S11, S15, S23/S24, and S26 also were bound to the affinity column, but whether they associate directly and specifically with 5.8 S rRNA is not known. Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins did not bind to the rat liver 5.8 S rRNA affinity column. PMID:468846

  2. Ribosomal proteins: functions beyond the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Liao, Wen-Juan; Liao, Jun-Ming; Liao, Peng; Lu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Although ribosomal proteins are known for playing an essential role in ribosome assembly and protein translation, their ribosome-independent functions have also been greatly appreciated. Over the past decade, more than a dozen of ribosomal proteins have been found to activate the tumor suppressor p53 pathway in response to ribosomal stress. In addition, these ribosomal proteins are involved in various physiological and pathological processes. This review is composed to overview the current understanding of how ribosomal stress provokes the accumulation of ribosome-free ribosomal proteins, as well as the ribosome-independent functions of ribosomal proteins in tumorigenesis, immune signaling, and development. We also propose the potential of applying these pieces of knowledge to the development of ribosomal stress-based cancer therapeutics. PMID:25735597

  3. Evolutionary analyses of the 12-kDa acidic ribosomal P-proteins reveal a distinct protein of higher plant ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Szick, Kathleen; Springer, Mark; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    1998-01-01

    The P-protein complex of eukaryotic ribosomes forms a lateral stalk structure in the active site of the large ribosomal subunit and is thought to assist in the elongation phase of translation by stimulating GTPase activity of elongation factor-2 and removal of deacylated tRNA. The complex in animals, fungi, and protozoans is composed of the acidic phosphoproteins P0 (35 kDa), P1 (11–12 kDa), and P2 (11–12 kDa). Previously we demonstrated by protein purification and microsequencing that ribosomes of maize (Zea mays L.) contain P0, one type of P1, two types of P2, and a distinct P1/P2 type protein designated P3. Here we implemented distance matrices, maximum parsimony, and neighbor-joining analyses to assess the evolutionary relationships between the 12 kDa P-proteins of maize and representative eukaryotic species. The analyses identify P3, found to date only in mono- and dicotyledonous plants, as an evolutionarily distinct P-protein. Plants possess three distinct groups of 12 kDa P-proteins (P1, P2, and P3), whereas animals, fungi, and protozoans possess only two distinct groups (P1 and P2). These findings demonstrate that the P-protein complex has evolved into a highly divergent complex with respect to protein composition despite its critical position within the active site of the ribosome. PMID:9482893

  4. Ribosome clearance by FusB-type proteins mediates resistance to the antibiotic fusidic acid

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Georgina; Thompson, Gary S.; Jenkins, Huw T.; Peske, Frank; Savelsbergh, Andreas; Rodnina, Marina V.; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Homans, Steve W.; Edwards, Thomas A.; O'Neill, Alexander J.

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to the antibiotic fusidic acid (FA) in the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus usually results from expression of FusB-type proteins (FusB or FusC). These proteins bind to elongation factor G (EF-G), the target of FA, and rescue translation from FA-mediated inhibition by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that the FusB family are two-domain metalloproteins, the C-terminal domain of which contains a four-cysteine zinc finger with a unique structural fold. This domain mediates a high-affinity interaction with the C-terminal domains of EF-G. By binding to EF-G on the ribosome, FusB-type proteins promote the dissociation of stalled ribosome⋅EF-G⋅GDP complexes that form in the presence of FA, thereby allowing the ribosomes to resume translation. Ribosome clearance by these proteins represents a highly unusual antibiotic resistance mechanism, which appears to be fine-tuned by the relative abundance of FusB-type protein, ribosomes, and EF-G. PMID:22308410

  5. Ribosome clearance by FusB-type proteins mediates resistance to the antibiotic fusidic acid.

    PubMed

    Cox, Georgina; Thompson, Gary S; Jenkins, Huw T; Peske, Frank; Savelsbergh, Andreas; Rodnina, Marina V; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Homans, Steve W; Edwards, Thomas A; O'Neill, Alexander J

    2012-02-01

    Resistance to the antibiotic fusidic acid (FA) in the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus usually results from expression of FusB-type proteins (FusB or FusC). These proteins bind to elongation factor G (EF-G), the target of FA, and rescue translation from FA-mediated inhibition by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that the FusB family are two-domain metalloproteins, the C-terminal domain of which contains a four-cysteine zinc finger with a unique structural fold. This domain mediates a high-affinity interaction with the C-terminal domains of EF-G. By binding to EF-G on the ribosome, FusB-type proteins promote the dissociation of stalled ribosome⋅EF-G⋅GDP complexes that form in the presence of FA, thereby allowing the ribosomes to resume translation. Ribosome clearance by these proteins represents a highly unusual antibiotic resistance mechanism, which appears to be fine-tuned by the relative abundance of FusB-type protein, ribosomes, and EF-G. PMID:22308410

  6. Protein Synthesis with Ribosomes Selected for the Incorporation of β-Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In an earlier study, β3-puromycin was used for the selection of modified ribosomes, which were utilized for the incorporation of five different β-amino acids into Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). The selected ribosomes were able to incorporate structurally disparate β-amino acids into DHFR, in spite of the use of a single puromycin for the selection of the individual clones. In this study, we examine the extent to which the structure of the β3-puromycin employed for ribosome selection influences the regio- and stereochemical preferences of the modified ribosomes during protein synthesis; the mechanistic probe was a single suppressor tRNACUA activated with each of four methyl-β-alanine isomers (1–4). The modified ribosomes were found to incorporate each of the four isomeric methyl-β-alanines into DHFR but exhibited a preference for incorporation of 3(S)-methyl-β-alanine (β-mAla; 4), i.e., the isomer having the same regio- and stereochemistry as the O-methylated β-tyrosine moiety of β3-puromycin. Also conducted were a selection of clones that are responsive to β2-puromycin and a demonstration of reversal of the regio- and stereochemical preferences of these clones during protein synthesis. These results were incorporated into a structural model of the modified regions of 23S rRNA, which included in silico prediction of a H-bonding network. Finally, it was demonstrated that incorporation of 3(S)-methyl-β-alanine (β-mAla; 4) into a short α-helical region of the nucleic acid binding domain of hnRNP LL significantly stabilized the helix without affecting its DNA binding properties. PMID:25982410

  7. The human ubiquitin-52 amino acid fusion protein gene shares several structural features with mammalian ribosomal protein genes.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, R T; Board, P G

    1991-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones encoding ubiquitin fused to a 52 amino acid tail protein were isolated from human placental and adrenal gland cDNA libraries. The deduced human 52 amino acid tail protein is very similar to the homologous protein from other species, including the conservation of the putative metal-binding, nucleic acid-binding domain observed in these proteins. Northern blot analysis with a tail-specific probe indicated that the previously identified UbA mRNA species most likely represents comigrating transcripts of the 52 amino acid tail (UbA52) and 80 amino acid tail (UbA80) ubiquitin fusion genes. The UbA52 gene was isolated from a human genomic library and consists of five exons distributed over 3400 base pairs. One intron is in the 5' non-coding region, two interrupt the single ubiquitin coding unit, and the fourth intron is within the tail coding region. Several members of the Alu family of repetitive DNA are associated with the gene. The UbA52 promoter has several features in common with mammalian ribosomal protein genes, including its location in a CpG-rich island, initiation of transcription within a polypyrimidine tract, the lack of a consensus TATA motif, and the presence of Sp1 binding sites, observations that are consistent with the recent identification of the ubiquitin-free tail proteins as ribosomal proteins. Thus, in spite of its unusual feature of being translationally fused to ubiquitin, the 52 amino acid tail ribosomal protein is expressed from a structurally typical ribosomal protein gene. Images PMID:1850507

  8. Ribosome-inactivating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Matthew J; Dodd, Jennifer E; Hautbergue, Guillaume M

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were first isolated over a century ago and have been shown to be catalytic toxins that irreversibly inactivate protein synthesis. Elucidation of atomic structures and molecular mechanism has revealed these proteins to be a diverse group subdivided into two classes. RIPs have been shown to exhibit RNA N-glycosidase activity and depurinate the 28S rRNA of the eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit. In this review, we compare archetypal RIP family members with other potent toxins that abolish protein synthesis: the fungal ribotoxins which directly cleave the 28S rRNA and the newly discovered Burkholderia lethal factor 1 (BLF1). BLF1 presents additional challenges to the current classification system since, like the ribotoxins, it does not possess RNA N-glycosidase activity but does irreversibly inactivate ribosomes. We further discuss whether the RIP classification should be broadened to include toxins achieving irreversible ribosome inactivation with similar turnovers to RIPs, but through different enzymatic mechanisms. PMID:24071927

  9. Chlorogenic Acid Improves Neuroprotective Effect of PEP-1-Ribosomal Protein S3 Against Ischemic Insult

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Eun Hee; Kim, Dae Won; Shin, Min Jea; Kwon, Soon Won; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, Duk-Soo; Lim, Soon Sung; Kim, Joon; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik

    2011-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) possesses various biological activities such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-diabetic activities. In the present study, we examined the effect of CGA on the transduction efficiency of PEP-1-ribosomal protein S3 (PEP-1-rpS3) into cells and brain tissues, and its neuroprotective potential against ischemia/reperfusion. We found that, in the presence of CGA, the transduction efficiency of PEP-1-rpS3 into astrocytes and the CA1 region of the hippocampus was enhanced, compared to its transduction in the absence of CGA. Also, cell viability data demonstrated that the sample treated with CGA + PEP-1-rpS3 exhibited improved cell viability against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced toxicity more significantly than the sample treated with PEP-1-rpS3 alone. Also, in a gerbil ischemia model, data demonstrated that following the ischemic insult, the group treated with PEP-1-rpS3 + CGA showed markedly enhanced protection of neuron cells in CA1 region of hippocampus, compared to those treated with CGA or PEP-1-rpS3 alone. Taken together, these results suggest that CGA may improve the transduction efficiency of protein transduction domain (PTD) fusion proteins into target cells or tissues, thereby enhancing their therapeutic potential against various diseases. PMID:22355261

  10. Involvement of multiple basic amino acids in yeast ribosomal protein L1 in 5S rRNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Yeh, L C; Lee, J C

    1995-01-01

    The role of basic amino acid residues located at the C-terminal region of the yeast ribosomal protein L1 in 5S rRNA binding was characterized in vitro and in vivo. Mutant proteins containing single or multiple amino acid substitutions were generated by site-directed mutagenesis of the L1 gene carried on a plasmid. In vitro RNP formation was examined by production of the mutant protein in the presence of the RNA molecule. The thermostability of the resultant RNP was also studied. Effects of these mutations on cell viability and ribosome assembly were characterized by transformation of a conditional null L1 yeast mutant with the mutated L1 gene expressed from the plasmid. Substitution of any one of the lysine or arginine residue did not affect significantly RNA binding in vitro or cell growth in vivo. However, several mutant proteins with substitutions of two of these basic amino acids bound RNA weakly and the RNPs were less stable. Cells expressing these mutant proteins were lethal. Theoretical structural prediction of these amino acids further provided information regarding their collective contributions to RNA recognition and to interaction between the RNP and other components of the 60S ribosomal subunit. PMID:8643400

  11. Neuron-Like Networks Between Ribosomal Proteins Within the Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Poirot, Olivier; Timsit, Youri

    2016-01-01

    From brain to the World Wide Web, information-processing networks share common scale invariant properties. Here, we reveal the existence of neural-like networks at a molecular scale within the ribosome. We show that with their extensions, ribosomal proteins form complex assortative interaction networks through which they communicate through tiny interfaces. The analysis of the crystal structures of 50S eubacterial particles reveals that most of these interfaces involve key phylogenetically conserved residues. The systematic observation of interactions between basic and aromatic amino acids at the interfaces and along the extension provides new structural insights that may contribute to decipher the molecular mechanisms of signal transmission within or between the ribosomal proteins. Similar to neurons interacting through "molecular synapses", ribosomal proteins form a network that suggest an analogy with a simple molecular brain in which the "sensory-proteins" innervate the functional ribosomal sites, while the "inter-proteins" interconnect them into circuits suitable to process the information flow that circulates during protein synthesis. It is likely that these circuits have evolved to coordinate both the complex macromolecular motions and the binding of the multiple factors during translation. This opens new perspectives on nanoscale information transfer and processing. PMID:27225526

  12. Topography and stoichiometry of acidic proteins in large ribosomal subunits from Artemia salina as determined by crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiumi, T.; Wahba, A.J.; Traut, R.R.

    1987-08-01

    The 60S subunits isolated from Artemia salina ribosomes were treated with the crosslinking reagent 2-iminothiolane under mild conditions. Proteins were extracted and fractions containing crosslinked acidic proteins were obtained by stepwise elution from CM-cellulose. Each fraction was analyzed by diagonal (two-dimensional nonreducing-reducing) NaDodSO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Crosslinked proteins below the diagonal were radioiodinated and identified by two-dimensional acidic urea-NaDodSO/sub 4/ gel electrophoresis. Each of the acidic proteins P1 and P2 was crosslinked individually to the same third protein, PO. The fractions containing acidic proteins were also analyzed by two-dimensional nonequilibrium isoelectric focusing-NaDodSO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two crosslinked complexes were observed that coincide in isoelectric positions with monomeric P1 and P2, respectively. Both P1 and P2 appear to form crosslinked homodimers. These results suggest the presence in the 60S subunit of (P1)/sub 2/ and (P2)/sub 2/ dimers, each of which is anchored to PO. Protein PO appears to play the same role as L10 in Escherichia coli ribosomes and may form a pentameric complex with the two dimers in the 60S subunits.

  13. Neuron-Like Networks Between Ribosomal Proteins Within the Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Poirot, Olivier; Timsit, Youri

    2016-01-01

    From brain to the World Wide Web, information-processing networks share common scale invariant properties. Here, we reveal the existence of neural-like networks at a molecular scale within the ribosome. We show that with their extensions, ribosomal proteins form complex assortative interaction networks through which they communicate through tiny interfaces. The analysis of the crystal structures of 50S eubacterial particles reveals that most of these interfaces involve key phylogenetically conserved residues. The systematic observation of interactions between basic and aromatic amino acids at the interfaces and along the extension provides new structural insights that may contribute to decipher the molecular mechanisms of signal transmission within or between the ribosomal proteins. Similar to neurons interacting through “molecular synapses”, ribosomal proteins form a network that suggest an analogy with a simple molecular brain in which the “sensory-proteins” innervate the functional ribosomal sites, while the “inter-proteins” interconnect them into circuits suitable to process the information flow that circulates during protein synthesis. It is likely that these circuits have evolved to coordinate both the complex macromolecular motions and the binding of the multiple factors during translation. This opens new perspectives on nanoscale information transfer and processing. PMID:27225526

  14. Ribonucleic acid and ribosomes of Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Saunders, G F; Campbell, L L

    1966-01-01

    Saunders, Grady F. (University of Illinois, Urbana), and L. Leon Campbell. Ribonucleic acid and ribosomes of Bacillus stearothermophilus. J. Bacteriol. 91:332-339. 1966.-The ability of some thermophilic bacteria to grow at temperatures as high as 76 C emphasizes the remarkable thermal stability of their crucial macromolecules. An investigation of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) and ribosomes of Bacillus stearothermophilus was conducted. Washed log-phase cells were disrupted either by sonic treatment or by alumina grinding in 10(-2)m MgCl(2)-10(-2)m tris-(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane buffer, pH 7.4 (TM buffer). Ultracentrifugal analysis revealed peaks at 72.5S, 101S, and 135S, with the 101S peak being the most prominent. By lowering the Mg(++) concentration to 10(-3)m, the ribosome preparation was dissociated to give 40S, 31S, and 54S peaks. These in turn were reassociated in the presence of 10(-2)m Mg(++) to give the larger 73S and 135S particles. When heated in TM buffer, Escherichia coli ribosomes began a gradual dissociation at 58 C, and at 70 C underwent a large hyperchromic shift with a T(m) at 72.8 C. In contrast, B. stearothermophilus ribosomes did not show a hyperchromic shift below 70 C; they had a T(m) of 77.9 C. The thermal denaturation curves of the 4S, 16S, and 23S RNA from both organisms were virtually identical. The gross amino acid composition of B. stearothermophilus ribosomes showed no marked differences from that reported for E. coli ribosomes. These data suggest that the unusual thermal stability of B. stearothermophilus ribosomes may reflect either an unusual packing arrangement of the protein to the RNA or differences in the primary structure of the ribosomal proteins. PMID:5903099

  15. The identification by affinity chromatography of the rat liver ribosomal proteins that bind to elongator and initiator transfer ribonucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, N; Wool, I G; Ackerman, E; Sigler, P B

    1980-07-25

    Mixed yeast elongator-tRNAs (bulk tRNA lacking fRNAm,fMet), pure isoaccepting species of elongator-tRNAs (tRNAmMet and tRNAPhe), and purified initiator-tRNA (tRNAfMet) were each oxidized with periodate and the 3' terminus was coupled to Sepharose 4B through an adipic acid dihydrazide spacer. The rat liver ribosomal proteins that associated with the tRNAs were isolated by affinity chromatography and identified by electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels. The rat liver ribosomal proteins that were bound to the elongator-tRNA preparations were L6, L35a, and S15; small amounts of a number of other proteins also associated with the nucleic acid. When initiator-tRNA (tRNAfMet) was immobilized on Sepharose, only L6 and L35a were bound; no 40 S subunit proteins associated with initiator-tRNA. No Escherichia coli proteins formed a complex with either eukaryotic initiator- or elongator-tRNAs. PMID:7391064

  16. Ribosomal protein methyltransferases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadid, Qais; White, Jonelle; Clarke, Steven

    2016-02-12

    A significant percentage of the methyltransferasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes is devoted to methylation of the translational machinery. Methylation of the RNA components of the translational machinery has been studied extensively and is important for structure stability, ribosome biogenesis, and translational fidelity. However, the functional effects of ribosomal protein methylation by their cognate methyltransferases are still largely unknown. Previous work has shown that the ribosomal protein Rpl3 methyltransferase, histidine protein methyltransferase 1 (Hpm1), is important for ribosome biogenesis and translation elongation fidelity. In this study, yeast strains deficient in each of the ten ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae were examined for potential defects in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Like Hpm1-deficient cells, loss of four of the nine other ribosomal protein methyltransferases resulted in defects in ribosomal subunit synthesis. All of the mutant strains exhibited resistance to the ribosome inhibitors anisomycin and/or cycloheximide in plate assays, but not in liquid culture. Translational fidelity assays measuring stop codon readthrough, amino acid misincorporation, and programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, revealed that eight of the ten enzymes are important for translation elongation fidelity and the remaining two are necessary for translation termination efficiency. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation. PMID:26801560

  17. Paradigms of ribosome synthesis: Lessons learned from ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gamalinda, Michael; Woolford, John L

    2015-01-01

    The proteome in all cells is manufactured via the intricate process of translation by multimolecular factories called ribosomes. Nevertheless, these ribonucleoprotein particles, the largest of their kind, also have an elaborate assembly line of their own. Groundbreaking discoveries that bacterial ribosomal subunits can be self-assembled in vitro jumpstarted studies on how ribosomes are constructed. Until recently, ribosome assembly has been investigated almost entirely in vitro with bacterial small subunits under equilibrium conditions. In light of high-resolution ribosome structures and a more sophisticated toolkit, the past decade has been defined by a burst of kinetic studies in vitro and, importantly, also a shift to examining ribosome maturation in living cells, especially in eukaryotes. In this review, we summarize the principles governing ribosome assembly that emerged from studies focusing on ribosomal proteins and their interactions with rRNA. Understanding these paradigms has taken center stage, given the linkage between anomalous ribosome biogenesis and proliferative disorders. PMID:26779413

  18. Chloroplast ribosomes and protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E H; Boynton, J E; Gillham, N W

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with their postulated origin from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria, chloroplasts of plants and algae have ribosomes whose component RNAs and proteins are strikingly similar to those of eubacteria. Comparison of the secondary structures of 16S rRNAs of chloroplasts and bacteria has been particularly useful in identifying highly conserved regions likely to have essential functions. Comparative analysis of ribosomal protein sequences may likewise prove valuable in determining their roles in protein synthesis. This review is concerned primarily with the RNAs and proteins that constitute the chloroplast ribosome, the genes that encode these components, and their expression. It begins with an overview of chloroplast genome structure in land plants and algae and then presents a brief comparison of chloroplast and prokaryotic protein-synthesizing systems and a more detailed analysis of chloroplast rRNAs and ribosomal proteins. A description of the synthesis and assembly of chloroplast ribosomes follows. The review concludes with discussion of whether chloroplast protein synthesis is essential for cell survival. PMID:7854253

  19. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Rosaceae.

    PubMed

    Shang, Chenjing; Rougé, Pierre; Van Damme, Els J M

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are widespread among higher plants of different taxonomic orders. In this study, we report on the RIP sequences found in the genome/transcriptome of several important Rosaceae species, including many economically important edible fruits such as apple, pear, peach, apricot, and strawberry. All RIP domains from Rosaceae share high sequence similarity with conserved residues in the catalytic site and the carbohydrate binding sites. The genomes of Malus domestica and Pyrus communis contain both type 1 and type 2 RIP sequences, whereas for Prunus mume, Prunus persica, Pyrus bretschneideri, and Pyrus communis a complex set of type 1 RIP sequences was retrieved. Heterologous expression and purification of the type 1 as well as the type 2 RIP from apple allowed to characterize the biological activity of the proteins. Both RIPs from Malus domestica can inhibit protein synthesis. Furthermore, molecular modelling suggests that RIPs from Rosaceae possess three-dimensional structures that are highly similar to the model proteins and can bind to RIP substrates. Screening of the recombinant type 2 RIP from apple on a glycan array revealed that this type 2 RIP interacts with terminal sialic acid residues. Our data suggest that the RIPs from Rosaceae are biologically active proteins. PMID:27556443

  20. Studies on Pea Ribosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chu-Yung; Chia, Subrina Li-Li; Travis, Robert L.; Key, Joe L.

    1975-01-01

    Ribosomal subunits prepared by NH4Cl dissociation (0.5 m) of the monomeric ribosomes were much less active in in vitro protein synthesis than those prepared by KCl dissociation. The decrease in activity correlated with a detachment of some proteins (L2 and L9 as shown by gel electrophoresis) within the 60S ribosomal subunits. Subunits prepared with 0.3 m NH4Cl retained L2 and L9, but the activity remained low. Incubation of these 60S subunits in TKM buffer (50 mm tris [pH 7.5], 20 mm KCl, and 5 mm MgCl2) for 20 min at 37 C restored the activity almost to the level of those obtained by KCl dissociation. Treatment of the 0.3 m NH4Cl-derived 60S subunits with a protein reagent, Procion brilliant blue, prior to extraction of the ribosomal proteins resulted in the loss of L2 and L9, showing that these proteins were made accessible for dye binding. These observations suggest that a considerable degree of unfolding of the 60S subunit occurs at 0.3 m NH4Cl (this apparently leads to a preferential detachment of L2 and L9 at 0.5 m NH4Cl) and that the activity of the purified subunits depends not only on the presence of L2 and L9 but also on the organization of these proteins within the 60S subunits. Images PMID:16659254

  1. Mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs) of yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Graack, H R; Wittmann-Liebold, B

    1998-01-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs) are the counterparts in that organelle of the cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins in the host. Although the MRPs fulfil similar functions in protein biosynthesis, they are distinct in number, features and primary structures from the latter. Most progress in the eludication of the properties of individual MRPs, and in the characterization of the corresponding genes, has been made in baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). To date, 50 different MRPs have been determined, although biochemical data and mutational analysis propose a total number which is substantially higher. Surprisingly, only a minority of the MRPs that have been characterized show significant sequence similarities to known ribosomal proteins from other sources, thus limiting the deduction of their functions by simple comparison of amino acid sequences. Further, individual MRPs have been characterized functionally by mutational studies, and the regulation of expression of MRP genes has been described. The interaction of the mitochondrial ribosomes with transcription factors specific for individual mitochondrial mRNAs, and the communication between mitochondria and the nucleus for the co-ordinated expression of ribosomal constituents, are other aspects of current MRP research. Although the mitochondrial translational system is still far from being described completely, the yeast MRP system serves as a model for other organisms, including that of humans. PMID:9445368

  2. Ribosomal acidic phosphoproteins P1 and P2 are not required for cell viability but regulate the pattern of protein expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Remacha, M; Jimenez-Diaz, A; Bermejo, B; Rodriguez-Gabriel, M A; Guarinos, E; Ballesta, J P

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with either three inactivated genes (triple disruptants) or four inactivated genes (quadruple disruptants) encoding the four acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins, YP1 alpha, YP1 beta, YP2 alpha, and YP2 beta, present in this species have been obtained. Ribosomes from the triple disruptants and, obviously, those from the quadruple strain do not have bound P proteins. All disrupted strains are viable; however, they show a cold-sensitive phenotype, growing very poorly at 23 degrees C. Cell extracts from the quadruple-disruptant strain are about 30% as active as the control in protein synthesis assays and are stimulated by the addition of free acidic P proteins. Strains lacking acidic proteins do not have a higher suppressor activity than the parental strains, and cell extracts derived from the quadruple disruptant do not show a higher degree of misreading, indicating that the absence of acidic proteins does not affect the accuracy of the ribosomes. However, the patterns of protein expressed in the cells as well as in the cell-free protein system are affected by the absence of P proteins from the particles; a wild-type pattern is restored upon addition of exogenous P proteins to the cell extract. In addition, strains carrying P-protein-deficient ribosomes are unable to sporulate but recover this capacity upon transformation with one of the missing genes. These results indicate that acidic proteins are not an absolute requirement for protein synthesis but regulate the activity of the 60S subunit, affecting the translation of certain mRNAs differently. PMID:7651393

  3. Humoral and Cell-mediated Autoimmune Reactions to Human Acidic Ribosomal P2 Protein in Individuals Sensitized to Aspergillus fumigatus P2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Christina; Appenzeller, Ulrich; Seelbach, Heike; Achatz, Gernot; Oberkofler, Hannes; Breitenbach, Michael; Blaser, Kurt; Crameri, Reto

    1999-01-01

    A panel of cDNAs encoding allergenic proteins was isolated from an Aspergillus fumigatus cDNA library displayed on the surface of filamentous phage. Solid phase–immobilized serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) from A. fumigatus–allergic individuals was used to enrich phage displaying IgE-binding molecules. One of the cDNAs encoded a 11.1-kD protein that was identified as acidic ribosomal phosphoprotein type 2 (P2 protein). The allergen, formally termed rAsp f 8, shares >62% sequence identity and >84% sequence homology to corresponding eukaryotic P2 proteins, including human P2 protein. The sequences encoding human and fungal P2 protein were subcloned, expressed in Escherichia coli as His6-tagged fusion proteins, and purified by Ni2+–chelate affinity chromatography. Both recombinant P2 proteins were recognized by IgE antibodies from allergic individuals sensitized to the A. fumigatus P2 protein and elicited strong type 1–specific skin reactions in these individuals. Moreover, human and fungal P2 proteins induced proliferative responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of A. fumigatus– allergic subjects sensitized to the fungal P2 protein. These data provide strong evidence for in vitro and in vivo humoral and cell-mediated autoreactivity to human P2 protein in patients suffering from chronic A. fumigatus allergy. PMID:10224291

  4. Evaluation of DNA encoding acidic ribosomal protein P2 of Cryptosporidium parvum as a potential vaccine candidate for cryptosporidiosis

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Alvaro; Priest, Jeffrey W.; Ehigiator, Humphrey N.; McNair, Nina; Mead, Jan R.

    2011-01-01

    The Cryptosporidium parvum acidic ribosomal protein P2 (CpP2) is an important immunodominant marker in C. parvum infection. In this study, the CpP2 antigen was evaluated as a vaccine candidate using a DNA vaccine model in adult C57BL/6 IL-12 knockout (KO) mice, which are susceptible to C. parvum infection. Our data show that subcutaneous immunization in the ear with DNA encoding CpP2 (CpP2-DNA) cloned into the pUMVC4b vector induced a significant anti-CpP2 IgG antibody response that was predominantly of the IgG1 isotype. Compared to control KO mice immunized with plasmid alone, CpP2-immunized mice demonstrated specific in vitro spleen cell proliferation as well as enhanced IFN-γ production to recombinant CpP2. Further, parasite loads in CpP2 DNA-immunized mice were compared to control mice challenged with C. parvum oocysts. Although a trend in reduction of infection was observed in the CpP2 DNA-immunized mice, differences between groups were not statistically significant. These results suggest that a DNA vaccine encoding the C. parvum P2 antigen is able to provide an effective means of eliciting humoral and cellular responses and has the potential to generate protective immunity against C. parvum infection but may require using alternative vectors or adjuvant to generate a more potent and balanced response. PMID:21968447

  5. High efficacy of a 20 amino acid peptide of the acidic ribosomal protein P0 against the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mallon, Alina; Encinosa, Pedro E; Méndez-Pérez, Lídice; Bello, Yamil; Rodríguez Fernández, Rafmary; Garay, Hilda; Cabrales, Ania; Méndez, Luis; Borroto, Carlos; Estrada, Mario Pablo

    2015-06-01

    Current strategies to control cattle ticks use integrated control programs (ICP) that include vaccination. Reduction in the use of chemicals and in the cost of tick control, the delay or elimination of acaricide resistance and the decreasing of environmental pollution are the advantages of using these programs. This integrated program is potentially applicable to all genotypes of chemical resistant ticks. However, the problem here is to improve the efficacy of anti-tick vaccines. The P0 protein is a structural component of the ribosome of all organisms. We have identified an immunogenic region of ribosomal protein P0 from Rhipicephalus spp. ticks that is not very conserved compared to the orthologous protein in their hosts. A synthetic 20 amino acid peptide from this sequence was effective as a vaccine against Rhipicephalus sanguineus infestations in an immunization and challenge experiment using rabbits. In this paper, the same peptide used as vaccine against the cattle tick Rhipicephalus Boophilus microplus shows a significant diminution in the number of engorged females recovered, in the weight of females and the weight of egg masses. The number of eggs hatched was also significantly reduced for the vaccinated group, with an overall effectivity for the antigen pP0 of 96%. These results, together with the conserved sequence of the P0 peptide among ticks, suggest that this antigen could be a good broad spectrum vaccine candidate. It would be expected to be active against many species of ticks and thus has promise in an ICP for effective control of ticks and thereby to improve the efficiency and productivity of the livestock industry. PMID:25958782

  6. The quantitative assessment of the role played by basic amino acid clusters in the nuclear uptake of human ribosomal protein L7

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Lin-Ru; Chou, Chang-Wei; Lee, I-Fang; Kirby, Ralph; Lin, Alan

    2013-02-15

    In this study, we used a multiple copy (EGFP){sub 3} reporter system to establish a numeric nuclear index system to assess the degree of nuclear import. The system was first validated by a FRAP assay, and then was applied to evaluate the essential and multifaceted nature of basic amino acid clusters during the nuclear import of ribosomal protein L7. The results indicate that the sequence context of the basic cluster determines the degree of nuclear import, and that the number of basic residues in the cluster is irrelevant; rather the position of the pertinent basic residues is crucial. Moreover, it also found that the type of carrier protein used by basic cluster has a great impact on the degree of nuclear import. In case of L7, importin β2 or importin β3 are preferentially used by clusters with a high import efficiency, notwithstanding that other importins are also used by clusters with a weaker level of nuclear import. Such a preferential usage of multiple basic clusters and importins to gain nuclear entry would seem to be a common practice among ribosomal proteins in order to ensure their full participation in high rate ribosome synthesis. - Highlights: ► We introduce a numeric index system that represents the degree of nuclear import. ► The rate of nuclear import is dictated by the sequence context of the basic cluster. ► Importin β2 and β3 were mainly responsible for the N4 mediated nuclear import.

  7. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Slavov, Nikolai; Semrau, Stefan; Airoldi, Edoardo; Budnik, Bogdan; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Summary Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function. PMID:26565899

  8. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Nikolai; Semrau, Stefan; Airoldi, Edoardo; Budnik, Bogdan; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function. PMID:26565899

  9. A new system for naming ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Nenad; Beckmann, Roland; Cate, Jamie HD; Dinman, Jonathan D; Dragon, François; Ellis, Steven R; Lafontaine, Denis LJ; Lindahl, Lasse; Liljas, Anders; Lipton, Jeffrey M; McAlear, Michael A; Moore, Peter B; Noller, Harry F; Ortega, Joaquin; Panse, Vikram Govind; Ramakrishnan, V; Spahn, Christian MT; Steitz, Thomas A; Tchorzewski, Marek; Tollervey, David; Warren, Alan J; Williamson, James R; Wilson, Daniel; Yonath, Ada; Yusupov, Marat

    2015-01-01

    A system for naming ribosomal proteins is described that the authors intend to use in the future. They urge others to adopt it. The objective is to eliminate the confusion caused by the assignment of identical names to ribosomal proteins from different species that are unrelated in structure and function. In the system proposed here, homologous ribosomal proteins are assigned the same name, regardless of species. It is designed so that new names are similar enough to old names to be easily recognized, but are written in a format that unambiguously identifies them as ‘new system’ names. PMID:24524803

  10. Illuminating Parasite Protein Production by Ribosome Profiling.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Marilyn; Myler, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    While technologies for global enumeration of transcript abundance are well-developed, those that assess protein abundance require tailoring to penetrate to low-abundance proteins. Ribosome profiling circumvents this challenge by measuring global protein production via sequencing small mRNA fragments protected by the assembled ribosome. This powerful approach is now being applied to protozoan parasites including trypanosomes and Plasmodium. It has been used to identify new protein-coding sequences (CDSs) and clarify the boundaries of previously annotated CDSs in Trypanosoma brucei. Ribosome profiling has demonstrated that translation efficiencies vary widely between genes and, for trypanosomes at least, for the same gene across stages. The ribosomal proteins are themselves subjected to translational control, suggesting a means of reinforcing global translational regulation. PMID:27061497

  11. Introns regulate the production of ribosomal proteins by modulating splicing of duplicated ribosomal protein genes.

    PubMed

    Petibon, Cyrielle; Parenteau, Julie; Catala, Mathieu; Elela, Sherif Abou

    2016-05-01

    Most budding yeast introns exist in the many duplicated ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) and it has been posited that they remain there to modulate the expression of RPGs and cell growth in response to stress. However, the mechanism by which introns regulate the expression of RPGs and their impact on the synthesis of ribosomal proteins remain unclear. In this study, we show that introns determine the ratio of ribosomal protein isoforms through asymmetric paralog-specific regulation of splicing. Exchanging the introns and 3' untranslated regions of the duplicated RPS9 genes altered the splicing efficiency and changed the ratio of the ribosomal protein isoforms. Mutational analysis of the RPS9 genes indicated that splicing is regulated by variations in the intron structure and the 3' untranslated region. Together these data suggest that preferential splicing of duplicated RPGs provides a means for adjusting the ratio of different ribosomal protein isoforms, while maintaining the overall expression level of each ribosomal protein. PMID:26945043

  12. On the expansion of ribosomal proteins and RNAs in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael S; Sah, Renu; Balasubramaniam, Ambikaipakan; Sallee, Floyd R; Park, Edwards A; Parker, Steven L

    2014-07-01

    While the ribosome constitution is similar in all biota, there is a considerable increase in size of both ribosomal proteins (RPs) and RNAs in eukaryotes as compared to archaea and bacteria. This is pronounced in the large (60S) ribosomal subunit (LSU). In addition to enlargement (apparently maximized already in lower eukarya), the RP changes include increases in fraction, segregation and clustering of basic residues, and decrease in hydrophobicity. The acidic fraction is lower in eukaryote as compared to prokaryote RPs. In all eukaryote groups tested, the LSU RPs have significantly higher content of basic residues and homobasic segments than the SSU RPs. The vertebrate LSU RPs have much higher sequestration of basic residues than those of bacteria, archaea and even of the lower eukarya. The basic clusters are highly aligned in the vertebrate, but less in the lower eukarya, and only within families in archaea and bacteria. Increase in the basicity of RPs, besides helping transport to the nucleus, should promote stability of the assembled ribosome as well as the association with translocons and other intracellular matrix proteins. The size and GC nucleotide bias of the expansion segments of large LSU rRNAs also culminate in the vertebrate, and should support ribosome association with the endoplasmic reticulum and other intracellular networks. However, the expansion and nucleotide bias of eukaryote LSU rRNAs do not clearly correlate with changes in ionic parameters of LSU ribosomal proteins. PMID:24633358

  13. Decreased activity of Blastocladiella emersonii zoospore ribosomes: correlation with developmental changes in ribosome-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, A J; Wilson, J B

    1989-10-01

    Ribosomal proteins isolated from dormant zoospores were compared to the ribosomal proteins found in the active growth phase by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Zoospore ribosomes were found to contain a set of five proteins, designated Z1 to Z5, which were not present in growth phase ribosomes. The Z1-Z5 proteins were not removed by high-salt washes using either 1 M KCl or 1 M NH4 Cl. The Z1 protein is found associated with zoospore 60 S subunits while Z2-Z5 are bound to 40 S subunits. Zoospore monoribosomes and polyribosomes contain comparable levels of each of the five proteins. Approximately 60 min. after sporulation is induced, the Z1-Z5 proteins begin to accumulate on the ribosomes with the highest levels of these proteins found associated with ribosomes at the zoospore stage. During germination, the proteins gradually disappear and are not detectable on the ribosomes after 4 hr of germination. The presence of the Z1-Z5 proteins correlates with a decrease in in vitro protein synthetic activity of the fungal ribosomes. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the proteins regulate translation by completely blocking protein synthesis on a subset of ribosomes while the remainder of the ribosomes function at normal rates. PMID:2776972

  14. Crystal Structures of the uL3 Mutant Ribosome: Illustration of the Importance of Ribosomal Proteins for Translation Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Mailliot, Justine; Garreau de Loubresse, Nicolas; Yusupova, Gulnara; Meskauskas, Arturas; Dinman, Jonathan D; Yusupov, Marat

    2016-05-22

    The ribosome has been described as a ribozyme in which ribosomal RNA is responsible for peptidyl-transferase reaction catalysis. The W255C mutation of the universally conserved ribosomal protein uL3 has diverse effects on ribosome function (e.g., increased affinities for transfer RNAs, decreased rates of peptidyl-transfer), and cells harboring this mutation are resistant to peptidyl-transferase inhibitors (e.g., anisomycin). These observations beg the question of how a single amino acid mutation may have such wide ranging consequences. Here, we report the structure of the vacant yeast uL3 W255C mutant ribosome by X-ray crystallography, showing a disruption of the A-site side of the peptidyl-transferase center (PTC). An additional X-ray crystallographic structure of the anisomycin-containing mutant ribosome shows that high concentrations of this inhibitor restore a "WT-like" configuration to this region of the PTC, providing insight into the resistance mechanism of the mutant. Globally, our data demonstrate that ribosomal protein uL3 is structurally essential to ensure an optimal and catalytically efficient organization of the PTC, highlighting the importance of proteins in the RNA-centered ribosome. PMID:26906928

  15. Diversity of acid stress resistant variants of Listeria monocytogenes and the potential role of ribosomal protein S21 encoded by rpsU

    PubMed Central

    Metselaar, Karin I.; den Besten, Heidy M. W.; Boekhorst, Jos; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Zwietering, Marcel H.; Abee, Tjakko

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic response of microorganisms to environmental conditions depends on the behavior of individual cells within the population. Adverse environments can select for stable stress resistant subpopulations. In this study, we aimed to get more insight in the diversity within Listeria monocytogenes LO28 populations, and the genetic basis for the increased resistance of stable resistant fractions isolated after acid exposure. Phenotypic cluster analysis of 23 variants resulted in three clusters and four individual variants and revealed multiple-stress resistance, with both unique and overlapping features related to stress resistance, growth, motility, biofilm formation, and virulence indicators. A higher glutamate decarboxylase activity correlated with increased acid resistance. Whole genome sequencing revealed mutations in rpsU, encoding ribosomal protein S21 in the largest phenotypic cluster, while mutations in ctsR, which were previously shown to be responsible for increased resistance of heat and high hydrostatic pressure resistant variants, were not found in the acid resistant variants. This underlined that large population diversity exists within one L. monocytogenes strain and that different adverse conditions drive selection for different variants. The finding that acid stress selects for rpsU variants provides potential insights in the mechanisms underlying population diversity of L. monocytogenes. PMID:26005439

  16. Introns regulate the production of ribosomal proteins by modulating splicing of duplicated ribosomal protein genes

    PubMed Central

    Petibon, Cyrielle; Parenteau, Julie; Catala, Mathieu; Elela, Sherif Abou

    2016-01-01

    Most budding yeast introns exist in the many duplicated ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) and it has been posited that they remain there to modulate the expression of RPGs and cell growth in response to stress. However, the mechanism by which introns regulate the expression of RPGs and their impact on the synthesis of ribosomal proteins remain unclear. In this study, we show that introns determine the ratio of ribosomal protein isoforms through asymmetric paralog-specific regulation of splicing. Exchanging the introns and 3′ untranslated regions of the duplicated RPS9 genes altered the splicing efficiency and changed the ratio of the ribosomal protein isoforms. Mutational analysis of the RPS9 genes indicated that splicing is regulated by variations in the intron structure and the 3′ untranslated region. Together these data suggest that preferential splicing of duplicated RPGs provides a means for adjusting the ratio of different ribosomal protein isoforms, while maintaining the overall expression level of each ribosomal protein. PMID:26945043

  17. The tails of ubiquitin precursors are ribosomal proteins whose fusion to ubiquitin facilitates ribosome biogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finley, Daniel; Bartel, Bonnie; Varshavsky, Alexander

    1989-03-01

    Three of the four yeast ubiquitin genes encode hybrid proteins which are cleaved to yield ubiquitin and previously unidentified ribosomal proteins. The transient association between ubiquitin and these proteins promotes their incorporation into nascent ribosomes and is required for efficient ribosome biogenesis. These results suggest a novel 'chaperone' function for ubiquitin, in which its covalent association with other proteins promotes the formation of specific cellular structures.

  18. Ribosomal protein uS19 mutants reveal its role in coordinating ribosome structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Alicia M; Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A; Gulay, Suna P; Mirvis, Mary; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies identified allosteric information pathways connecting functional centers in the large ribosomal subunit to the decoding center in the small subunit through the B1a and B1b/c intersubunit bridges in yeast. In prokaryotes a single SSU protein, uS13, partners with H38 (the A-site finger) and uL5 to form the B1a and B1b/c bridges respectively. In eukaryotes, the SSU component was split into 2 separate proteins during the course of evolution. One, also known as uS13, participates in B1b/c bridge with uL5 in eukaryotes. The other, called uS19 is the SSU partner in the B1a bridge with H38. Here, polyalanine mutants of uS19 involved in the uS19/uS13 and the uS19/H38 interfaces were used to elucidate the important amino acid residues involved in these intersubunit communication pathways. Two key clusters of amino acids were identified: one located at the junction between uS19 and uS13, and a second that appears to interact with the distal tip of H38. Biochemical analyses reveal that these mutations shift the ribosomal rotational equilibrium toward the unrotated state, increasing ribosomal affinity for tRNAs in the P-site and for ternary complex in the A-site, and inhibit binding of the translocase, eEF2. These defects in turn affect specific aspects of translational fidelity. These findings suggest that uS19 plays a critical role as a conduit of information exchange between the large and small ribosomal subunits directly through the B1a, and indirectly through the B1b/c bridges. PMID:26824029

  19. Ribosomal protein uS19 mutants reveal its role in coordinating ribosome structure and function.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Alicia M; Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A; Gulay, Suna P; Mirvis, Mary; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies identified allosteric information pathways connecting functional centers in the large ribosomal subunit to the decoding center in the small subunit through the B1a and B1b/c intersubunit bridges in yeast. In prokaryotes a single SSU protein, uS13, partners with H38 (the A-site finger) and uL5 to form the B1a and B1b/c bridges respectively. In eukaryotes, the SSU component was split into 2 separate proteins during the course of evolution. One, also known as uS13, participates in B1b/c bridge with uL5 in eukaryotes. The other, called uS19 is the SSU partner in the B1a bridge with H38. Here, polyalanine mutants of uS19 involved in the uS19/uS13 and the uS19/H38 interfaces were used to elucidate the important amino acid residues involved in these intersubunit communication pathways. Two key clusters of amino acids were identified: one located at the junction between uS19 and uS13, and a second that appears to interact with the distal tip of H38. Biochemical analyses reveal that these mutations shift the ribosomal rotational equilibrium toward the unrotated state, increasing ribosomal affinity for tRNAs in the P-site and for ternary complex in the A-site, and inhibit binding of the translocase, eEF2. These defects in turn affect specific aspects of translational fidelity. These findings suggest that uS19 plays a critical role as a conduit of information exchange between the large and small ribosomal subunits directly through the B1a, and indirectly through the B1b/c bridges. PMID:26824029

  20. Precursor ribosomal ribonucleic acid and ribosome accumulation in vivo during the recovery of Salmonella typhimurium from thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Tomlins, R I; Ordal, Z J

    1971-07-01

    When cells of S. typhimurium were heated at 48 C for 30 min in phosphate buffer (pH 6.0), they became sensitive to Levine Eosin Methylene Blue Agar containing 2% NaCl (EMB-NaCl). The inoculation of injured cells into fresh growth medium supported the return of their normal tolerance to EMB-NaCl within 6 hr. The fractionation of ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) from unheated and heat-injured cells by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that after injury the 16S RNA species was totally degraded and the 23S RNA was partially degraded. Sucrose gradient analysis demonstrated that after injury the 30S ribosomal subunit was totally destroyed and the sedimentation coefficient of the 50S particle was decreased to 47S. During the recovery of cells from thermal injury, four species of rRNA accumulated which were demonstrated to have the following sedimentation coefficients: 16, 17, 23, and 24S. Under identical recovery conditions, 22, 26, and 28S precursors of the 30S ribosomal subunit and 31 and 48S precursors of the 50S ribosomal subunit accumulated along with both the 30 and 50S mature particles. The addition of chloramphenicol to the recovery medium inhibited both the maturation of 17S RNA and the production of mature 30S ribosomal subunits, but permitted the accumulation of a single 22S precursor particle. Chloramphenicol did not affect either the maturation of 24S RNA or the mechanism of formation of 50S ribosomal subunits during recovery. Very little old ribosomal protein was associated with the new rRNA synthesized during recovery. New ribosomal proteins were synthesized during recovery and they were found associated with the new rRNA in ribosomal particles. The rate-limiting step in the recovery of S. typhimurium from thermal injury was in the maturation of the newly synthesized rRNA. PMID:4935315

  1. β-Puromycin selection of modified ribosomes for in vitro incorporation of β-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Dedkova, Larisa M; Fahmi, Nour Eddine; Paul, Rakesh; del Rosario, Melissa; Zhang, Liqiang; Chen, Shengxi; Feder, Glen; Hecht, Sidney M

    2012-01-10

    Ribosomally mediated protein biosynthesis is limited to α-L-amino acids. A strong bias against β-L-amino acids precludes their incorporation into proteins in vivo and also in vitro in the presence of misacylated β-aminoacyl-tRNAs. Nonetheless, earlier studies provide some evidence that analogues of aminoacyl-tRNAs bearing β-amino acids can be accommodated in the ribosomal A-site. Both functional and X-ray crystallographic data make it clear that the exclusion of β-L-amino acids as participants in protein synthesis is a consequence of the architecture of the ribosomal peptidyltransferase center (PTC). To enable the reorganization of ribosomal PTC architecture through mutagenesis of 23S rRNA, a library of modified ribosomes having modifications in two regions of the 23S rRNA (2057-2063 and 2496-2507 or 2582-2588) was prepared. A dual selection procedure was used to obtain a set of modified ribosomes able to carry out protein synthesis in the presence β-L-amino acids and to provide evidence for the utilization of such amino acids, in addition to α-L-amino acids. β-Puromycin, a putative mimetic for β-aminoacyl-tRNAs, was used to select modified ribosome variants having altered PTC architectures, thus potentially enabling incorporation of β-L-amino acids. Eight types of modified ribosomes altered within the PTC have been selected by monitoring improved sensitivity to β-puromycin in vivo. Two of the modified ribosomes, having 2057AGCGUGA2063 and 2502UGGCAG2507 or 2502AGCCAG2507, were able to suppress UAG codons in E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and scorpion Opisthorcanthus madagascariensis peptide IsCT mRNAs in the presence of β-alanyl-tRNA(CUA). PMID:22145951

  2. Towards a classification of E. coli ribosomal proteins: A hypothetical `small ribosome' as a primitive protein-synthesizing apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Koji

    1984-12-01

    Homologies were searched among the published primary sequences of 51 E. coli ribosomal proteins, partly by ‘eye’ and partly by computer-assisted methods. By employing Moore and Goodman's alignment statistics for evaluating homology levels, 33 out of these 51 ribosomal proteins has been classified into 9 homology groups, some of which being yet tentative and remaining to be further analyzed. Taking it into consideration that most ribosomal protein genes are clustered at str- stc region, rif region and several other regions, these results strongly suggest that most or all of the contemporary ribosomal proteins must have evolved by repeated gene duplications of very few (or only one) primitive ancestral ribosomal protein gene(s). Thus it is most reasonable to propose that a ‘ small ribosome’ consisting of very few (or only one) ribosomal protein(s) must have existed as a primitive protein-synthesizing apparatus.

  3. The activity of the acidic phosphoproteins from the 80 S rat liver ribosome.

    PubMed

    MacConnell, W P; Kaplan, N O

    1982-05-25

    The selective removal of acidic phosphoproteins from the 80 S rat liver ribosome was accomplished by successive alcohol extractions at low salt concentration. The resulting core ribosomes lost over 90% of their translation activity and were unable to support the elongation factor 2 GTPase reaction. Both activities were partially restored when the dialyzed extracts were added back to the core ribosome. The binding of labeled adenosine diphosphoribosyl-elongation factor 2 to ribosomes was also affected by extraction and could be reconstituted, although not to the same extent as the GTPase activity associated with elongation factor 2 in the presence of the ribosome. The alcohol extracts of the 80 S ribosome contained mostly phosphoproteins P1 and P2 which could be dephosphorylated and rephosphorylated in solution by alkaline phosphatase and protein kinase, respectively. Dephosphorylation of the P1/P2 mixture in the extracts caused a decrease in the ability of these proteins to reactivate the polyphenylalanine synthesis activity of the core ribosome. However, treatment of the dephosphorylated proteins with the catalytic subunit of 3':5'-cAMP-dependent protein kinase in the presence of ATP reactivated the proteins when compared to the activity of the native extracts. Rabbit antisera raised against the alcohol-extracted proteins were capable of impairing both the polyphenylalanine synthesis reaction and the elongation factor 2-dependent GTPase reaction in the intact ribosomes. PMID:6121796

  4. Ribosomal History Reveals Origins of Modern Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Harish, Ajith; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the ribosome is central to our understanding of the cellular world. Most hypotheses posit that the ribosome originated in the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. However, these proposals do not link protein synthesis to RNA recognition and do not use a phylogenetic comparative framework to study ribosomal evolution. Here we infer evolution of the structural components of the ribosome. Phylogenetic methods widely used in morphometrics are applied directly to RNA structures of thousands of molecules and to a census of protein structures in hundreds of genomes. We find that components of the small subunit involved in ribosomal processivity evolved earlier than the catalytic peptidyl transferase center responsible for protein synthesis. Remarkably, subunit RNA and proteins coevolved, starting with interactions between the oldest proteins (S12 and S17) and the oldest substructure (the ribosomal ratchet) in the small subunit and ending with the rise of a modern multi-subunit ribosome. Ancestral ribonucleoprotein components show similarities to in vitro evolved RNA replicase ribozymes and protein structures in extant replication machinery. Our study therefore provides important clues about the chicken-or-egg dilemma associated with the central dogma of molecular biology by showing that ribosomal history is driven by the gradual structural accretion of protein and RNA structures. Most importantly, results suggest that functionally important and conserved regions of the ribosome were recruited and could be relics of an ancient ribonucleoprotein world. PMID:22427882

  5. Properties of the ribosome-inactivating proteins gelonin, Momordica charantia inhibitor, and dianthins.

    PubMed Central

    Falasca, A; Gasperi-Campani, A; Abbondanza, A; Barbieri, L; Stirpe, F

    1982-01-01

    The amino acid and sugar compositions of four ribosome-inactivating proteins (gelonin, Momordica charantia inhibitor, dianthin 30 and dianthin 32) were determined. The proteins are all basic glycoproteins (pI greater than 8) containing mannose (more abundant in gelonin), glucose, xylose, fucose (absent from gelonin) and glucosamine. The ribosome-inactivating properties of the proteins examined are not modified by pretreatment with N-ethylmaleimide. Precipitating and inactivating antibodies can be raised against ribosome-inactivating proteins; a weak cross-reaction was observed only between dianthin 30 and dianthin 32. Images Fig. 2. PMID:6819861

  6. Properties of the ribosome-inactivating proteins gelonin, Momordica charantia inhibitor, and dianthins.

    PubMed

    Falasca, A; Gasperi-Campani, A; Abbondanza, A; Barbieri, L; Stirpe, F

    1982-12-01

    The amino acid and sugar compositions of four ribosome-inactivating proteins (gelonin, Momordica charantia inhibitor, dianthin 30 and dianthin 32) were determined. The proteins are all basic glycoproteins (pI greater than 8) containing mannose (more abundant in gelonin), glucose, xylose, fucose (absent from gelonin) and glucosamine. The ribosome-inactivating properties of the proteins examined are not modified by pretreatment with N-ethylmaleimide. Precipitating and inactivating antibodies can be raised against ribosome-inactivating proteins; a weak cross-reaction was observed only between dianthin 30 and dianthin 32. PMID:6819861

  7. Ribosome-Inactivating and Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schrot, Joachim; Weng, Alexander; Melzig, Matthias F.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are toxins that act as N-glycosidases (EC 3.2.2.22). They are mainly produced by plants and classified as type 1 RIPs and type 2 RIPs. There are also RIPs and RIP related proteins that cannot be grouped into the classical type 1 and type 2 RIPs because of their different sizes, structures or functions. In addition, there is still not a uniform nomenclature or classification existing for RIPs. In this review, we give the current status of all known plant RIPs and we make a suggestion about how to unify those RIPs and RIP related proteins that cannot be classified as type 1 or type 2 RIPs. PMID:26008228

  8. Ribosomal Protein Rps26 Influences 80S Ribosome Assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Belyy, Alexander; Levanova, Nadezhda; Tabakova, Irina; Rospert, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The eukaryotic ribosome consists of a small (40S) and a large (60S) subunit. Rps26 is one of the essential ribosomal proteins of the 40S subunit and is encoded by two almost identical genes, RPS26a and RPS26b. Previous studies demonstrated that Rps26 interacts with the 5′ untranslated region of mRNA via the eukaryote-specific 62-YXXPKXYXK-70 (Y62–K70) motif. Those observations suggested that this peptide within Rps26 might play an important and specific role during translation initiation. By using alanine-scanning mutagenesis and engineered strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found that single amino acid substitutions within the Y62–K70 motif of Rps26 did not affect the in vivo function of the protein. In contrast, complete deletion of the Y62–K70 segment was lethal. The simultaneous replacement of five conserved residues within the Y62–K70 segment by alanines resulted in growth defects under stress conditions and produced distinct changes in polysome profiles that were indicative of the accumulation of free 60S subunits. Human Rps26 (Rps26-Hs), which displays significant homology with yeast Rps26, supported the growth of an S. cerevisiae Δrps26a Δrps26b strain. However, the Δrps26a Δrps26b double deletion strain expressing Rps26-Hs displayed substantial growth defects and an altered ratio of 40S/60S ribosomal subunits. The combined data strongly suggest that the eukaryote-specific motif within Rps26 does not play a specific role in translation initiation. Rather, the data indicate that Rps26 as a whole is necessary for proper assembly of the 40S subunit and the 80S ribosome in yeast. IMPORTANCE Rps26 is an essential protein of the eukaryotic small ribosomal subunit. Previous experiments demonstrated an interaction between the eukaryote-specific Y62–K70 segment of Rps26 and the 5′ untranslated region of mRNA. The data suggested a specific role of the Y62–K70 motif during translation initiation. Here, we report that single

  9. Genome-wide polysomal analysis of a yeast strain with mutated ribosomal protein S9

    PubMed Central

    Pnueli, Lilach; Arava, Yoav

    2007-01-01

    Background The yeast ribosomal protein S9 (S9) is located at the entrance tunnel of the mRNA into the ribosome. It is known to play a role in accurate decoding and its bacterial homolog (S4) has recently been shown to be involved in opening RNA duplexes. Here we examined the effects of changing the C terminus of S9, which is rich in acidic amino acids and extends out of the ribosome surface. Results We performed a genome-wide analysis to reveal effects at the transcription and translation levels of all yeast genes. While negligible relative changes were observed in steady-state mRNA levels, a significant number of mRNAs appeared to have altered ribosomal density. Notably, 40% of the genes having reliable signals changed their ribosomal association by more than one ribosome. Yet, no general correlations with physical or functional features of the mRNA were observed. Ribosome Density Mapping (RDM) along four of the mRNAs with increased association revealed an increase in ribosomal density towards the end of the coding region for at least two of them. Read-through analysis did not reveal any increase in read-through of a premature stop codon by the mutant strain. Conclusion The ribosomal protein rpS9 appears to be involved in the translation of many mRNAs, since altering its C terminus led to a significant change in ribosomal association of many mRNAs. We did not find strong correlations between these changes and several physical features of the mRNA, yet future studies with advanced tools may allow such correlations to be determined. Importantly, our results indicate an accumulation of ribosomes towards the end of the coding regions of some mRNAs. This suggests an involvement of S9 in ribosomal dissociation during translation termination. PMID:17711575

  10. Functions of ribosomal proteins in assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Jesús; Karbstein, Katrin; Woolford, John L

    2015-01-01

    The proteome of cells is synthesized by ribosomes, complex ribonucleoproteins that in eukaryotes contain 79-80 proteins and four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) more than 5,400 nucleotides long. How these molecules assemble together and how their assembly is regulated in concert with the growth and proliferation of cells remain important unanswered questions. Here, we review recently emerging principles to understand how eukaryotic ribosomal proteins drive ribosome assembly in vivo. Most ribosomal proteins assemble with rRNA cotranscriptionally; their association with nascent particles is strengthened as assembly proceeds. Each subunit is assembled hierarchically by sequential stabilization of their subdomains. The active sites of both subunits are constructed last, perhaps to prevent premature engagement of immature ribosomes with active subunits. Late-assembly intermediates undergo quality-control checks for proper function. Mutations in ribosomal proteins that affect mostly late steps lead to ribosomopathies, diseases that include a spectrum of cell type-specific disorders that often transition from hypoproliferative to hyperproliferative growth. PMID:25706898

  11. Functions of Ribosomal Proteins in Assembly of Eukaryotic Ribosomes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The proteome of cells is synthesized by ribosomes, complex ribonucleoproteins that in eukaryotes contain 79–80 proteins and four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) more than 5,400 nucleotides long. How these molecules assemble together and how their assembly is regulated in concert with the growth and proliferation of cells remain important unanswered questions. Here, we review recently emerging principles to understand how eukaryotic ribosomal proteins drive ribosome assembly in vivo. Most ribosomal proteins assemble with rRNA cotranscriptionally; their association with nascent particles is strengthened as assembly proceeds. Each subunit is assembled hierarchically by sequential stabilization of their subdomains. The active sites of both subunits are constructed last, perhaps to prevent premature engagement of immature ribosomes with active subunits. Late-assembly intermediates undergo quality-control checks for proper function. Mutations in ribosomal proteins that affect mostly late steps lead to ribosomopathies, diseases that include a spectrum of cell type–specific disorders that often transition from hypoproliferative to hyperproliferative growth. PMID:25706898

  12. Role of ribosomal protein mutations in tumor development (Review).

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Kaveh M; Lindström, Mikael S

    2016-04-01

    Ribosomes are cellular machines essential for protein synthesis. The biogenesis of ribosomes is a highly complex and energy consuming process that initiates in the nucleolus. Recently, a series of studies applying whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing techniques have led to the discovery of ribosomal protein gene mutations in different cancer types. Mutations in ribosomal protein genes have for example been found in endometrial cancer (RPL22), T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (RPL10, RPL5 and RPL11), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (RPS15), colorectal cancer (RPS20), and glioma (RPL5). Moreover, patients suffering from Diamond-Blackfan anemia, a bone marrow failure syndrome caused by mutant ribosomal proteins are also at higher risk for developing leukemia, or solid tumors. Different experimental models indicate potential mechanisms whereby ribosomal proteins may initiate cancer development. In particular, deregulation of the p53 tumor suppressor network and altered mRNA translation are mechanisms likely to be involved. We envisage that changes in expression and the occurrence of ribosomal protein gene mutations play important roles in cancer development. Ribosome biology constitutes a re-emerging vital area of basic and translational cancer research. PMID:26892688

  13. Role of ribosomal protein mutations in tumor development (Review)

    PubMed Central

    GOUDARZI, KAVEH M.; LINDSTRÖM, MIKAEL S.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomes are cellular machines essential for protein synthesis. The biogenesis of ribosomes is a highly complex and energy consuming process that initiates in the nucleolus. Recently, a series of studies applying whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing techniques have led to the discovery of ribosomal protein gene mutations in different cancer types. Mutations in ribosomal protein genes have for example been found in endometrial cancer (RPL22), T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (RPL10, RPL5 and RPL11), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (RPS15), colorectal cancer (RPS20), and glioma (RPL5). Moreover, patients suffering from Diamond-Blackfan anemia, a bone marrow failure syndrome caused by mutant ribosomal proteins are also at higher risk for developing leukemia, or solid tumors. Different experimental models indicate potential mechanisms whereby ribosomal proteins may initiate cancer development. In particular, deregulation of the p53 tumor suppressor network and altered mRNA translation are mechanisms likely to be involved. We envisage that changes in expression and the occurrence of ribosomal protein gene mutations play important roles in cancer development. Ribosome biology constitutes a re-emerging vital area of basic and translational cancer research. PMID:26892688

  14. A RanGTP-independent mechanism allows ribosomal protein nuclear import for ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Altvater, Martin; Nerurkar, Purnima; Peña, Cohue; Gerber, Michaela; Chang, Yiming; Caesar, Stefanie; Schubert, Olga T; Schlenstedt, Gabriel; Panse, Vikram G

    2014-01-01

    Within a single generation time a growing yeast cell imports ∼14 million ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) into the nucleus for ribosome production. After import, it is unclear how these intrinsically unstable and aggregation-prone proteins are targeted to the ribosome assembly site in the nucleolus. Here, we report the discovery of a conserved nuclear carrier Tsr2 that coordinates transfer of the r-protein eS26 to the earliest assembling pre-ribosome, the 90S. In vitro studies revealed that Tsr2 efficiently dissociates importin:eS26 complexes via an atypical RanGTP-independent mechanism that terminates the import process. Subsequently, Tsr2 binds the released eS26, shields it from proteolysis, and ensures its safe delivery to the 90S pre-ribosome. We anticipate similar carriers-termed here escortins-to securely connect the nuclear import machinery with pathways that deposit r-proteins onto developing pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:25144938

  15. A RanGTP-independent mechanism allows ribosomal protein nuclear import for ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Altvater, Martin; Nerurkar, Purnima; Peña, Cohue; Gerber, Michaela; Chang, Yiming; Caesar, Stefanie; Schubert, Olga T; Schlenstedt, Gabriel; Panse, Vikram G

    2014-01-01

    Within a single generation time a growing yeast cell imports ∼14 million ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) into the nucleus for ribosome production. After import, it is unclear how these intrinsically unstable and aggregation-prone proteins are targeted to the ribosome assembly site in the nucleolus. Here, we report the discovery of a conserved nuclear carrier Tsr2 that coordinates transfer of the r-protein eS26 to the earliest assembling pre-ribosome, the 90S. In vitro studies revealed that Tsr2 efficiently dissociates importin:eS26 complexes via an atypical RanGTP-independent mechanism that terminates the import process. Subsequently, Tsr2 binds the released eS26, shields it from proteolysis, and ensures its safe delivery to the 90S pre-ribosome. We anticipate similar carriers—termed here escortins—to securely connect the nuclear import machinery with pathways that deposit r-proteins onto developing pre-ribosomal particles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03473.001 PMID:25144938

  16. Nucleotide sequence of the tcml gene (ribosomal protein L3) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, L D; Friesen, J D

    1983-01-01

    The yeast tcml gene, which codes for ribosomal protein L3, has been isolated by using recombinant DNA and genetic complementation. The DNA fragment carrying this gene has been subcloned and we have determined its DNA sequence. The 20 amino acid residues at the amino terminus as inferred from the nucleotide sequence agreed exactly with the amino acid sequence data. The amino acid composition of the encoded protein agreed with that determined for purified ribosomal protein L3. Codon usage in the tcml gene was strongly biased in the direction found for several other abundant Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins. The tcml gene has no introns, which appears to be atypical of ribosomal protein structural genes. PMID:6305925

  17. Molecular mechanisms of ribosomal protein gene coregulation.

    PubMed

    Reja, Rohit; Vinayachandran, Vinesh; Ghosh, Sujana; Pugh, B Franklin

    2015-09-15

    The 137 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) of Saccharomyces provide a model for gene coregulation. We examined the positional and functional organization of their regulators (Rap1 [repressor activator protein 1], Fhl1, Ifh1, Sfp1, and Hmo1), the transcription machinery (TFIIB, TFIID, and RNA polymerase II), and chromatin at near-base-pair resolution using ChIP-exo, as RPGs are coordinately reprogrammed. Where Hmo1 is enriched, Fhl1, Ifh1, Sfp1, and Hmo1 cross-linked broadly to promoter DNA in an RPG-specific manner and demarcated by general minor groove widening. Importantly, Hmo1 extended 20-50 base pairs (bp) downstream from Fhl1. Upon RPG repression, Fhl1 remained in place. Hmo1 dissociated, which was coupled to an upstream shift of the +1 nucleosome, as reflected by the Hmo1 extension and core promoter region. Fhl1 and Hmo1 may create two regulatable and positionally distinct barriers, against which chromatin remodelers position the +1 nucleosome into either an activating or a repressive state. Consistent with in vitro studies, we found that specific TFIID subunits, in addition to cross-linking at the core promoter, made precise cross-links at Rap1 sites, which we interpret to reflect native Rap1-TFIID interactions. Our findings suggest how sequence-specific DNA binding regulates nucleosome positioning and transcription complex assembly >300 bp away and how coregulation coevolved with coding sequences. PMID:26385964

  18. Alveolate phylogeny inferred using concatenated ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Handy, Sara M; Place, Allen R; Delwiche, Charles F

    2011-01-01

    Dinoflagellates and apicomplexans are a strongly supported monophyletic group in rDNA phylogenies, although this phylogeny is not without controversy, particularly between the two groups. Here we use concatenated protein-coding genes from expressed sequence tags or genomic data to construct phylogenies including "typical" dinophycean dinoflagellates, a parasitic syndinian dinoflagellate, Amoebophrya sp., and two related species, Oxyrrhis marina, and Perkinsus marinus. Seventeen genes encoding proteins associated with the ribosome were selected for phylogenetic analysis. The dataset was limited for the most part by data availability from the dinoflagellates. Forty-five taxa from four major lineages were used: the heterokont outgroup, ciliates, dinoflagellates, and apicomplexans. Amoebophrya sp. was included in this phylogeny as a sole representative of the enigmatic marine alveolate or syndinian lineage. The atypical dinoflagellate O. marina, usually excluded from rDNA analyses due to long branches, was also included. The resulting phylogenies were well supported in concatenated analyses with only a few unstable or weakly supported branches; most features were consistent when different lineages were pruned from the tree or different genes were concatenated. The least stable branches involved the placement of Cryptosporidium spp. within the Apicomplexa and the relationships between P. marinus, Amoebophrya sp., and O. marina. Both bootstrap and approximately unbiased test results confirmed that P. marinus, Amoebophrya sp., O. marina, and the remaining dinoflagellates form a monophyletic lineage to the exclusion of Apicomplexa. PMID:21518081

  19. Separate domains in GCN1 for binding protein kinase GCN2 and ribosomes are required for GCN2 activation in amino acid-starved cells

    PubMed Central

    Sattlegger, Evelyn; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2000-01-01

    GCN2 stimulates GCN4 translation in amino acid-starved cells by phosphorylating the α-subunit of translation initiation factor 2. GCN2 function in vivo requires the GCN1/GCN20 complex, which binds to the N-terminal domain of GCN2. A C-terminal segment of GCN1 (residues 2052–2428) was found to be necessary and sufficient for binding GCN2 in vivo and in vitro. Overexpression of this fragment in wild-type cells impaired association of GCN2 with native GCN1 and had a dominant Gcn– phenotype, dependent on Arg2259 in the GCN1 fragment. Substitution of Arg2259 with Ala in full-length GCN1 abolished complex formation with native GCN2 and destroyed GCN1 regulatory function. Consistently, the Gcn– phenotype of gcn1-R2259A, but not that of gcn1Δ, was suppressed by overexpressing GCN2. These findings prove that GCN2 binding to the C-terminal domain of GCN1, dependent on Arg2259, is required for high level GCN2 function in vivo. GCN1 expression conferred sensitivity to paromomycin in a manner dependent on its ribosome binding domain, supporting the idea that GCN1 binds near the ribosomal acceptor site to promote GCN2 activation by uncharged tRNA. PMID:11101534

  20. Separate domains in GCN1 for binding protein kinase GCN2 and ribosomes are required for GCN2 activation in amino acid-starved cells.

    PubMed

    Sattlegger, E; Hinnebusch, A G

    2000-12-01

    GCN2 stimulates GCN4 translation in amino acid-starved cells by phosphorylating the alpha-subunit of translation initiation factor 2. GCN2 function in vivo requires the GCN1/GCN20 complex, which binds to the N-terminal domain of GCN2. A C-terminal segment of GCN1 (residues 2052-2428) was found to be necessary and sufficient for binding GCN2 in vivo and in vitro. Overexpression of this fragment in wild-type cells impaired association of GCN2 with native GCN1 and had a dominant Gcn(-) phenotype, dependent on Arg2259 in the GCN1 fragment. Substitution of Arg2259 with Ala in full-length GCN1 abolished complex formation with native GCN2 and destroyed GCN1 regulatory function. Consistently, the Gcn(-) phenotype of gcn1-R2259A, but not that of gcn1Delta, was suppressed by overexpressing GCN2. These findings prove that GCN2 binding to the C-terminal domain of GCN1, dependent on Arg2259, is required for high level GCN2 function in vivo. GCN1 expression conferred sensitivity to paromomycin in a manner dependent on its ribosome binding domain, supporting the idea that GCN1 binds near the ribosomal acceptor site to promote GCN2 activation by uncharged tRNA. PMID:11101534

  1. Modification of ribosomal RNA by ribosome-inactivating proteins from plants.

    PubMed Central

    Stirpe, F; Bailey, S; Miller, S P; Bodley, J W

    1988-01-01

    We have surveyed 14 different toxic and nontoxic ribosome-inactivating proteins from plants for the ability to act on the RNA of the eucaryotic 60 S ribosomal subunit. All of these proteins act to introduce a specific modification into 26-28 S RNA which renders the RNA sensitive to cleavage by aniline. Sequence analysis of the 5'-termini of the fragments produced by ricin and saporin following aniline cleavage indicate that both proteins possess identical specificity. Our observations support the conclusion of Endo and Tsurugi (J. Biol. Chem. 262, 8128-8130, 1987) that ricin is a specific N-glycosidase and we have located the site of this cleavage by direct sequence analysis. Our results further suggest that all plant ribosome-inactivating proteins function as specific N-glycosidases with the same specificity. Images PMID:3347493

  2. Cotranslational Protein Folding inside the Ribosome Exit Tunnel.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Ola B; Hedman, Rickard; Marino, Jacopo; Wickles, Stephan; Bischoff, Lukas; Johansson, Magnus; Müller-Lucks, Annika; Trovato, Fabio; Puglisi, Joseph D; O'Brien, Edward P; Beckmann, Roland; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2015-09-01

    At what point during translation do proteins fold? It is well established that proteins can fold cotranslationally outside the ribosome exit tunnel, whereas studies of folding inside the exit tunnel have so far detected only the formation of helical secondary structure and collapsed or partially structured folding intermediates. Here, using a combination of cotranslational nascent chain force measurements, inter-subunit fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies on single translating ribosomes, molecular dynamics simulations, and cryoelectron microscopy, we show that a small zinc-finger domain protein can fold deep inside the vestibule of the ribosome exit tunnel. Thus, for small protein domains, the ribosome itself can provide the kind of sheltered folding environment that chaperones provide for larger proteins. PMID:26321634

  3. Cotranslational Protein Folding inside the Ribosome Exit Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Ola B.; Hedman, Rickard; Marino, Jacopo; Wickles, Stephan; Bischoff, Lukas; Johansson, Magnus; Müller-Lucks, Annika; Trovato, Fabio; Puglisi, Joseph D.; O’Brien, Edward P.; Beckmann, Roland; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Summary At what point during translation do proteins fold? It is well established that proteins can fold cotranslationally outside the ribosome exit tunnel, whereas studies of folding inside the exit tunnel have so far detected only the formation of helical secondary structure and collapsed or partially structured folding intermediates. Here, using a combination of cotranslational nascent chain force measurements, inter-subunit fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies on single translating ribosomes, molecular dynamics simulations, and cryoelectron microscopy, we show that a small zinc-finger domain protein can fold deep inside the vestibule of the ribosome exit tunnel. Thus, for small protein domains, the ribosome itself can provide the kind of sheltered folding environment that chaperones provide for larger proteins. PMID:26321634

  4. Arabidopsis protein arginine methyltransferase 3 is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting precursor ribosomal RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Runlai; Liu, Chunyan; Ahmad, Ayaz; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Falong; Cao, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental and tightly regulated cellular process, including synthesis, processing, and assembly of rRNAs with ribosomal proteins. Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) have been implicated in many important biological processes, such as ribosome biogenesis. Two alternative precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing pathways coexist in yeast and mammals; however, how PRMT affects ribosome biogenesis remains largely unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis PRMT3 (AtPRMT3) is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting pre-rRNA processing. Disruption of AtPRMT3 results in pleiotropic developmental defects, imbalanced polyribosome profiles, and aberrant pre-rRNA processing. We further identify an alternative pre-rRNA processing pathway in Arabidopsis and demonstrate that AtPRMT3 is required for the balance of these two pathways to promote normal growth and development. Our work uncovers a previously unidentified function of PRMT in posttranscriptional regulation of rRNA, revealing an extra layer of complexity in the regulation of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:25352672

  5. Disassembly of yeast 80S ribosomes into subunits is a concerted action of ribosome-assisted folding of denatured protein.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Biprashekhar; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-22

    It has been shown by several groups that ribosome can assist folding of denatured protein in vitro and the process is conserved across the species. Domain V of large ribosomal rRNA which occupies the intersubunit side of the large subunit was identified as the key player responsible for chaperoning the folding process. Thus, it is conceivable that denatured protein needs to access the intersubunit space of the ribosome in order to get folded. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of release of the protein from the eukaryotic ribosome following reactivation. We have observed significant splitting of yeast 80S ribosome when incubated with the denatured BCAII protein. Energy-free disassembly mechanism functions in low Mg(+2) ion concentration for prokaryotic ribosomes. Eukaryotic ribosomes do not show significant splitting even at low Mg(+2) ion concentration. In this respect, denatured protein-induced disassembly of eukaryotic ribosome without the involvement of any external energy source is intriguing. For prokaryotic ribosomes, it was reported that the denatured protein induces ribosome splitting into subunits in order to access domain V-rRNA. In contrast, our results suggest an alternative mechanism for eukaryotic ribosomal rRNA-mediated protein folding and subsequent separation of the subunits by which release of the activated-protein occurs. PMID:26723252

  6. Cotranslational protein folding on the ribosome monitored in real time.

    PubMed

    Holtkamp, Wolf; Kokic, Goran; Jäger, Marcus; Mittelstaet, Joerg; Komar, Anton A; Rodnina, Marina V

    2015-11-27

    Protein domains can fold into stable tertiary structures while they are synthesized on the ribosome. We used a high-performance, reconstituted in vitro translation system to investigate the folding of a small five-helix protein domain-the N-terminal domain of Escherichia coli N5-glutamine methyltransferase HemK-in real time. Our observations show that cotranslational folding of the protein, which folds autonomously and rapidly in solution, proceeds through a compact, non-native conformation that forms within the peptide tunnel of the ribosome. The compact state rearranges into a native-like structure immediately after the full domain sequence has emerged from the ribosome. Both folding transitions are rate-limited by translation, allowing for quasi-equilibrium sampling of the conformational space restricted by the ribosome. Cotranslational folding may be typical of small, intrinsically rapidly folding protein domains. PMID:26612953

  7. Comprehensive analysis of phosphorylated proteins of Escherichia coli ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Soung, George Y; Miller, Jennifer L; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C

    2009-07-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in 24 Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining, and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr; or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, and L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given phosphorylation sites in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins. PMID:19469554

  8. Ribosomal Synthesis of Peptides with Multiple β-Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Tomoshige; Goto, Yuki; Suga, Hiroaki; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2016-02-17

    The compatibility of β-amino acids with ribosomal translation was studied for decades, but it has been still unclear whether the ribosome can accept various β-amino acids, and whether the ribosome can introduce multiple β-amino acids in a peptide. In the present study, by using the Escherichia coli reconstituted cell-free translation system with a reprogramed genetic code, we screened β-amino acids that give high single incorporation efficiency and used them to synthesize peptides containing multiple β-amino acids. The experiments of single β-amino acid incorporation into a peptide revealed that 13 β-amino acids are compatible with ribosomal translation. Six of the tested β-amino acids (βhGly, l-βhAla, l-βhGln, l-βhPhg, l-βhMet, and d-βhPhg) showed high incorporation efficiencies, and seven (l-βhLeu, l-βhIle, l-βhAsn, l-βhPhe, l-βhLys, d-βhAla, and d-βhLeu) showed moderate incorporation efficiencies; whereas no full-length peptide was produced using other β-amino acids (l-βhPro, l-βhTrp, and l-βhGlu). Subsequent double-incorporation experiments using β-amino acids with high single incorporation efficiency revealed that elongation of peptides with successive β-amino acids is prohibited. Efficiency of the double-incorporation of the β-amino acids was restored by the insertion of Tyr or Ile between the two β-amino acids. On the basis of these experiments, we also designed mRNA sequences of peptides, and demonstrated the ribosomal synthesis of peptides containing different types of β-amino acids at multiple positions. PMID:26807980

  9. Structures of Eukaryotic Ribosomal Stalk Proteins and Its Complex with Trichosanthin, and Their Implications in Recruiting Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins to the Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Andrew K. H.; Wong, Eddie C. K.; Lee, Ka-Ming; Wong, Kam-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIP) are RNA N-glycosidases that inactivate ribosomes by specifically depurinating a conserved adenine residue at the α-sarcin/ricin loop of 28S rRNA. Recent studies have pointed to the involvement of the C-terminal domain of the eukaryotic stalk proteins in facilitating the toxic action of RIPs. This review highlights how structural studies of eukaryotic stalk proteins provide insights into the recruitment of RIPs to the ribosomes. Since the C-terminal domain of eukaryotic stalk proteins is involved in specific recognition of elongation factors and some eukaryote-specific RIPs (e.g., trichosanthin and ricin), we postulate that these RIPs may have evolved to hijack the translation-factor-recruiting function of ribosomal stalk in reaching their target site of rRNA. PMID:25723321

  10. Small protein domains fold inside the ribosome exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Marino, Jacopo; von Heijne, Gunnar; Beckmann, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Cotranslational folding of small protein domains within the ribosome exit tunnel may be an important cellular strategy to avoid protein misfolding. However, the pathway of cotranslational folding has so far been described only for a few proteins, and therefore, it is unclear whether folding in the ribosome exit tunnel is a common feature for small protein domains. Here, we have analyzed nine small protein domains and determined at which point during translation their folding generates sufficient force on the nascent chain to release translational arrest by the SecM arrest peptide, both in vitro and in live E. coli cells. We find that all nine protein domains initiate folding while still located well within the ribosome exit tunnel. PMID:26879042

  11. A 64-kilodalton membrane protein of Bacillus subtilis covered by secreting ribosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, S; Tai, P C; Davis, B D

    1983-01-01

    The complexed (ribosome-bearing) membrane fraction of Bacillus subtilis contains several proteins (CM-proteins) that are virtually absent from the ribosome-free fraction and hence might be components of the apparatus of protein secretion. We have determined, by trypsin digestion and by labeling with a nonpenetrating reagent (diazoiodosulfanilic acid), the accessibility of four of these proteins on the two surfaces of the membrane, as exposed either in protoplasts or in inverted membrane vesicles. The 68-kilodalton protein is a transmembrane protein and the 45-kilodalton protein faces only the external surface, whereas the 31-kilodalton protein is inaccessible from either side. Of particular interest is the 64-kilodalton protein: it can be digested by trypsin, and can bind antibody, on the cytoplasmic surface, but only after the ribosomes have been released. This protein is thus evidently a component of the apparatus of protein secretion, closely covered by secreting ribosomes. Whether the other CM-proteins are also involved in protein secretion is uncertain. Images PMID:6407010

  12. Ribosomal protein gene expression is cell type specific during development in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A K; Parrish, S N; Blumberg, D D

    1999-10-01

    Starvation for amino acids initiates the developmental cycle in the cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum. Upon starvation one of the earliest developmental events is the selective loss of the ribosomal protein mRNAs from polysomes. This loss depends upon sequences in the 5' non-translated leader of the ribosomal protein (r-protein) mRNAs. Here evidence is presented which indicates that those cells which will become prestalk cells express the ribosomal protein genes during development under starvation conditions. Cells which enter the prespore pathway shut off r-protein synthesis. The promoter and 5' non-translated leader sequences from two ribosomal protein genes, the rp-L11 and the rp-S9 genes, are fused to the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase reporter gene. While beta-galactosidase enzyme activity is detected in situ in most growing cells, by 15 h of development beta-galactosidase enzyme activity is largely lost from the prespore cells although strong beta-galactosidase enzyme activity is present in the prestalk cells. These observations suggest the possibility that the ribosomal protein mRNAs are excluded from polysomes in a cell-type-specific manner. PMID:10550541

  13. Amino acid incorporation by ribosomes and polyribosomes from wheat chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Hadziyev, D; Zalik, S

    1970-01-01

    Sucrose-gradient and analytical ultracentrifugation showed that chloroplast polyribosomes from 4-day-old seedlings had mono-, di-, tri-, tetra- and traces of penta-ribosomes, in contrast with those from 7-day-old seedlings in which only the mono-, di- and traces of tri-ribosomes were present. Without Mg(2+) the polyribosomes dissociated into ribosomal subunits. The rate of l-[U-(14)C]phenylalanine incorporation was threefold greater for preparations from 4- than from 7-day-old seedlings. Incorporation by the latter was stimulated by polyuridylic acid. The rates of incorporation were similar whether the reaction mixture contained chloroplast or wheat-germ transfer RNA and amino acid synthetases purified on methylated albumin-on-kieselguhr and Sephadex G-75 columns respectively. The cofactor requirement was the same as for isolated intact chloroplasts. Osmotic rupture of chloroplasts with and without Triton X-100 revealed the presence of free and bound ribosomes. Free single ribosomes isolated by osmotic shrinkage or prepared by pancreatic ribonuclease digestion of chloroplast polyribosomes had negligible incorporation activity. This activity was increased by washing or by polyuridylic acid, but was still only a fraction of that given by polyribosomes. A comparison of incorporation activity of chloroplast polyribosomes with those from the surrounding cytoplasm showed the former to be 20 times more active. PMID:5411422

  14. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Liam K. R.; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to an in vitro translation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosome in vitro. To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection. PMID:27006457

  15. Ribosome Dwell Times and the Protein Copy Number Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorissen, Mieke; Vanderzande, Carlo

    2012-09-01

    Translation is the cellular process in which ribosomes make proteins from information encoded on messenger RNA (mRNA). We model translation with an exclusion process taking into account the experimentally determined, non-exponential, waiting time between steps of a ribosome. From numerical simulations using realistic parameter values, we determine the distribution P( E) of the number of proteins E produced by one mRNA. We find that for small E this distribution is not geometric. We present a simplified and analytically solvable model that relates P( E) to the distributions of the times to produce the first E proteins.

  16. Folding and escape of nascent proteins at ribosomal exit tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Phuong Thuy; Hoang, Trinh Xuan

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the interplay between post-translational folding and escape of two small single-domain proteins at the ribosomal exit tunnel by using Langevin dynamics with coarse-grained models. It is shown that at temperatures lower or near the temperature of the fastest folding, folding proceeds concomitantly with the escape process, resulting in vectorial folding and enhancement of foldability of nascent proteins. The concomitance between the two processes, however, deteriorates as temperature increases. Our folding simulations as well as free energy calculation by using umbrella sampling show that, at low temperatures, folding at the tunnel follows one or two specific pathways without kinetic traps. It is shown that the escape time can be mapped to a one-dimensional diffusion model with two different regimes for temperatures above and below the folding transition temperature. Attractive interactions between amino acids and attractive sites on the tunnel wall lead to a free energy barrier along the escape route of the protein. It is suggested that this barrier slows down the escape process and consequently promotes correct folding of the released nascent protein.

  17. Folding and escape of nascent proteins at ribosomal exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Bui, Phuong Thuy; Hoang, Trinh Xuan

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the interplay between post-translational folding and escape of two small single-domain proteins at the ribosomal exit tunnel by using Langevin dynamics with coarse-grained models. It is shown that at temperatures lower or near the temperature of the fastest folding, folding proceeds concomitantly with the escape process, resulting in vectorial folding and enhancement of foldability of nascent proteins. The concomitance between the two processes, however, deteriorates as temperature increases. Our folding simulations as well as free energy calculation by using umbrella sampling show that, at low temperatures, folding at the tunnel follows one or two specific pathways without kinetic traps. It is shown that the escape time can be mapped to a one-dimensional diffusion model with two different regimes for temperatures above and below the folding transition temperature. Attractive interactions between amino acids and attractive sites on the tunnel wall lead to a free energy barrier along the escape route of the protein. It is suggested that this barrier slows down the escape process and consequently promotes correct folding of the released nascent protein. PMID:26957181

  18. Dissecting the transcriptional phenotype of ribosomal protein deficiency: implications for Diamond-Blackfan Anemia.

    PubMed

    Aspesi, Anna; Pavesi, Elisa; Robotti, Elisa; Crescitelli, Rossella; Boria, Ilenia; Avondo, Federica; Moniz, Hélène; Da Costa, Lydie; Mohandas, Narla; Roncaglia, Paola; Ramenghi, Ugo; Ronchi, Antonella; Gustincich, Stefano; Merlin, Simone; Marengo, Emilio; Ellis, Steven R; Follenzi, Antonia; Santoro, Claudio; Dianzani, Irma

    2014-07-25

    Defects in genes encoding ribosomal proteins cause Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA), a red cell aplasia often associated with physical abnormalities. Other bone marrow failure syndromes have been attributed to defects in ribosomal components but the link between erythropoiesis and the ribosome remains to be fully defined. Several lines of evidence suggest that defects in ribosome synthesis lead to "ribosomal stress" with p53 activation and either cell cycle arrest or induction of apoptosis. Pathways independent of p53 have also been proposed to play a role in DBA pathogenesis. We took an unbiased approach to identify p53-independent pathways activated by defects in ribosome synthesis by analyzing global gene expression in various cellular models of DBA. Ranking-Principal Component Analysis (Ranking-PCA) was applied to the identified datasets to determine whether there are common sets of genes whose expression is altered in these different cellular models. We observed consistent changes in the expression of genes involved in cellular amino acid metabolic process, negative regulation of cell proliferation and cell redox homeostasis. These data indicate that cells respond to defects in ribosome synthesis by changing the level of expression of a limited subset of genes involved in critical cellular processes. Moreover, our data support a role for p53-independent pathways in the pathophysiology of DBA. PMID:24835311

  19. Dissecting the transcriptional phenotype of ribosomal protein deficiency: implications for Diamond-Blackfan Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Aspesi, Anna; Pavesi, Elisa; Robotti, Elisa; Crescitelli, Rossella; Boria, Ilenia; Avondo, Federica; Moniz, Hélène; Da Costa, Lydie; Mohandas, Narla; Roncaglia, Paola; Ramenghi, Ugo; Ronchi, Antonella; Gustincich, Stefano; Merlin, Simone; Marengo, Emilio; Ellis, Steven R.; Follenzi, Antonia; Santoro, Claudio; Dianzani, Irma

    2014-01-01

    Defects in genes encoding ribosomal proteins cause Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA), a red cell aplasia often associated with physical abnormalities. Other bone marrow failure syndromes have been attributed to defects in ribosomal components but the link between erythropoiesis and the ribosome remains to be fully defined. Several lines of evidence suggest that defects in ribosome synthesis lead to “ribosomal stress” with p53 activation and either cell cycle arrest or induction of apoptosis. Pathways independent of p53 have also been proposed to play a role in DBA pathogenesis. We took an unbiased approach to identify p53-independent pathways activated by defects in ribosome synthesis by analyzing global gene expression in various cellular models of DBA. Ranking-Principal Component Analysis (Ranking-PCA) was applied to the identified datasets to determine whether there are common sets of genes whose expression is altered in these different cellular models. We observed consistent changes in the expression of genes involved in cellular amino acid metabolic process, negative regulation of cell proliferation and cell redox homeostasis. These data indicate that cells respond to defects in ribosome synthesis by changing the level of expression of a limited subset of genes involved in critical cellular processes. Moreover, our data support a role for p53-independent pathways in the pathophysiology of DBA. PMID:24835311

  20. Protein-guided RNA dynamics during early ribosome assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hajin; Abeysirigunawarden, Sanjaya C.; Chen, Ke; Mayerle, Megan; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Ha, Taekjip; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2014-02-01

    The assembly of 30S ribosomes requires the precise addition of 20 proteins to the 16S ribosomal RNA. How early binding proteins change the ribosomal RNA structure so that later proteins may join the complex is poorly understood. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to observe real-time encounters between Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S4 and the 16S 5' domain RNA at an early stage of 30S assembly. Dynamic initial S4-RNA complexes pass through a stable non-native intermediate before converting to the native complex, showing that non-native structures can offer a low free-energy path to protein-RNA recognition. Three-colour FRET and molecular dynamics simulations reveal how S4 changes the frequency and direction of RNA helix motions, guiding a conformational switch that enforces the hierarchy of protein addition. These protein-guided dynamics offer an alternative explanation for induced fit in RNA-protein complexes.

  1. Cinnamomin: a multifunctional type II ribosome-inactivating protein.

    PubMed

    He, Wen-Jun; Liu, Wang-Yi

    2003-07-01

    Plant ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are a group of toxic proteins that can irreversibly inactivate ribosomes by specifically removing the conserved adenine base from the "Sarcin/Ricin domain" of the 28S RNA in ribosome. Cinnamomin is a novel type II RIP isolated in our laboratory from the mature seeds of camphor tree. Besides site-specific deadenylation of the A4324 in the Sarcin/Ricin domain of rat ribosome, this protein could also release the adenine base from DNA molecules at multiple sites and from AMP, ADP, dAMP and adenosine. Furthermore, cinnamomin displays cytotoxicity to carcinoma cells and insect larvae by modifying their ribosomal RNA. These functions possessed by cinnamomin shed a new light on the possible application of cinnamomin in the field of immunotoxin design and transgenic reagents. In this review, we introduce the major recent results on cinnamomin obtained in our laboratory, including purification of this protein, characterization of its enzymatic mechanism, structure and function, gene pattern, physiological role and its biological implications in cytotoxicity. PMID:12672471

  2. Cyclic nucleotide-independent protein kinases from ribosomes and phosphorylation of a single 40S ribosomal subunit protein in zoospores of Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Bonato, M C; da Costa Maia, J C; Juliani, M H

    1983-06-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-independent protein kinase (EC 2.7.1.37) activity was found in the nuclear cap organelle, within which ribosomes of zoospores of Blastocladiella emersonii are sequestered. Two protein kinase activities were resolved from the high-salt wash fraction of zoospore ribosomes by selective adsorption to DEAE-cellulose. Both enzymes phosphorylated in vitro a 32,000 Mr protein of the 40S ribosomal subunit. Phosphorylation of this ribosomal protein, which exhibits electrophoretic properties similar to those of mammalian ribosomal protein S6, was also observed in vivo in 32P-labeled zoospores. PMID:6853450

  3. RNA structures regulating ribosomal protein biosynthesis in bacilli.

    PubMed

    Deiorio-Haggar, Kaila; Anthony, Jon; Meyer, Michelle M

    2013-07-01

    In Bacilli, there are three experimentally validated ribosomal-protein autogenous regulatory RNAs that are not shared with E. coli. Each of these RNAs forms a unique secondary structure that interacts with a ribosomal protein encoded by a downstream gene, namely S4, S15, and L20. Only one of these RNAs that interacts with L20 is currently found in the RNA Families Database. We created, or modified, existing structural alignments for these three RNAs and used them to perform homology searches. We have determined that each structure exhibits a narrow phylogenetic distribution, mostly relegated to the Firmicute class Bacilli. This work, in conjunction with other similar work, demonstrates that there are most likely many non-homologous RNA regulatory elements regulating ribosomal protein biosynthesis that still await discovery and characterization in other bacterial species. PMID:23611891

  4. RNA structures regulating ribosomal protein biosynthesis in bacilli

    PubMed Central

    Deiorio-Haggar, Kaila; Anthony, Jon; Meyer, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    In Bacilli, there are three experimentally validated ribosomal-protein autogenous regulatory RNAs that are not shared with E. coli. Each of these RNAs forms a unique secondary structure that interacts with a ribosomal protein encoded by a downstream gene, namely S4, S15, and L20. Only one of these RNAs that interacts with L20 is currently found in the RNA Families Database. We created, or modified, existing structural alignments for these three RNAs and used them to perform homology searches. We have determined that each structure exhibits a narrow phylogenetic distribution, mostly relegated to the Firmicute class Bacilli. This work, in conjunction with other similar work, demonstrates that there are most likely many non-homologous RNA regulatory elements regulating ribosomal protein biosynthesis that still await discovery and characterization in other bacterial species. PMID:23611891

  5. Crystal structure of prokaryotic ribosomal protein L9: a bi-lobed RNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, D W; Davies, C; Gerchman, S E; Kycia, J H; Porter, S J; White, S W; Ramakrishnan, V

    1994-01-01

    The crystal structure of protein L9 from the Bacillus stearothermophilus ribosome has been determined at 2.8 A resolution using X-ray diffraction methods. This primary RNA-binding protein has a highly elongated and unusual structure consisting of two separated domains joined by a long exposed alpha-helix. Conserved, positively charged and aromatic amino acids on the surfaces of both domains probably represent the sites of specific interactions with 23S rRNA. Comparisons with other prokaryotic L9 sequences show that while the length of the connecting alpha-helix is invariant, the sequence within the exposed central region is not conserved. This suggests that the alpha-helix has an architectural role and serves to fix the relative separation and orientation of the N- and C-terminal domains within the ribosome. The N-terminal domain has structural homology to the smaller ribosomal proteins L7/L12 and L30, and the eukaryotic RNA recognition motif (RRM). Images PMID:8306963

  6. Dependency Map of Proteins in the Small Ribosomal Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Hamacher, Kay; Trylska, Joanna; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The assembly of the ribosome has recently become an interesting target for antibiotics in several bacteria. In this work, we extended an analytical procedure to determine native state fluctuations and contact breaking to investigate the protein stability dependence in the 30S small ribosomal subunit of Thermus thermophilus. We determined the causal influence of the presence and absence of proteins in the 30S complex on the binding free energies of other proteins. The predicted dependencies are in overall agreement with the experimentally determined assembly map for another organism, Escherichia coli. We found that the causal influences result from two distinct mechanisms: one is pure internal energy change, the other originates from the entropy change. We discuss the implications on how to target the ribosomal assembly most effectively by suggesting six proteins as targets for mutations or other hindering of their binding. Our results show that by blocking one out of this set of proteins, the association of other proteins is eventually reduced, thus reducing the translation efficiency even more. We could additionally determine the binding dependency of THX—a peptide not present in the ribosome of E. coli—and suggest its assembly path. PMID:16485038

  7. Ribosomal protein deficiency causes Tp53-independent erythropoiesis failure in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Gnaneshwar V; Chakraborty, Anirban; Uechi, Tamayo; Kenmochi, Naoya

    2014-04-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia is an inherited genetic disease caused by mutations in ribosomal protein genes. The disease is characterized by bone marrow failure, congenital anomalies, and a severe erythroid defect. The activation of the TP53 pathway has been suggested to be critical for the pathophysiology of Diamond-Blackfan anemia. While this pathway plays a role in the morphological defects that associate with ribosomal protein loss-of-function in animal models, its role in the erythroid defects has not been clearly established. To understand the specificity of erythroid defects in Diamond-Blackfan anemia, we knocked down five RP genes (two Diamond-Blackfan anemia-associated and three non-Diamond-Blackfan anemia-associated) in zebrafish and analyzed the effects on the developmental and erythroid phenotypes in the presence and absence of Tp53. The co-inhibition of Tp53 activity rescued the morphological deformities but did not alleviate the erythroid aplasia indicating that ribosomal protein deficiency causes erythroid failure in a Tp53-independent manner. Interestingly, treatment with L-Leucine or L-Arginine, amino acids that augment mRNA translation via mTOR pathway, rescued the morphological defects and resulted in a substantial recovery of erythroid cells. Our results suggest that altered translation because of impaired ribosome function could be responsible for the morphological and erythroid defects in ribosomal protein-deficient zebrafish. PMID:24417973

  8. Studies on membrane proteins involved in ribosome binding on the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Ribophorins have no ribosome-binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, H; Tondokoro, N; Asano, Y; Mizusawa, K; Yamagishi, R; Horigome, T; Sugano, H

    1987-01-01

    A membrane protein fraction showing affinity for ribosomes was isolated from rat liver microsomes (microsomal fractions) in association with ribosomes by treatment of the microsomes with Emulgen 913 and then solubilized from the ribosomes with sodium deoxycholate. This protein fraction was separated into two fractions, glycoproteins, including ribophorins I and II, and non-glycoproteins, virtually free from ribophorins I and II, on concanavalin A-Sepharose columns. The two fractions were each reconstituted into liposomes to determine their ribosome-binding activities. The specific binding activity of the non-glycoprotein fraction was approx. 2.3-fold higher than that of the glycoprotein fraction. The recovery of ribosome-binding capacity of the two fractions was about 85% of the total binding capacity of the material applied to a concanavalin A-Sepharose column, and about 90% of it was found in the non-glycoprotein fraction. The affinity constants of the ribosomes for the reconstituted liposomes were somewhat higher than those for stripped rough microsomes. The mode of ribosome binding to the reconstituted liposomes was very similar to that to the stripped rough microsomes, in its sensitivity to proteolytic enzymes and its strong inhibition by increasing KCl concentration. These results support the idea that ribosome binding to rat liver microsomes is not directly mediated by ribophorins I and II, but that another unidentified membrane protein(s) plays a role in ribosome binding. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:3663192

  9. The spc ribosomal protein operon of Escherichia coli: sequence and cotranscription of the ribosomal protein genes and a protein export gene.

    PubMed

    Cerretti, D P; Dean, D; Davis, G R; Bedwell, D M; Nomura, M

    1983-05-11

    The genes encoding the 52 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) of Escherichia coli are organized into approximately 19 operons scattered throughout the chromosome. One of these, the spc operon, contains the genes for ten ribosomal proteins: L14, L24, L5, S14, S8, L6, L18, S5, L30 and L15 (rp1N, rp1X, rp1E, rpsN, rpsH, rp1F, rp1R, rpsE, rpmD, and rp1O). We now report the entire 5.9 kb nucleotide sequence of the spc operon. DNA sequence analysis has confirmed the genetic organization and refined the amino acid sequence of the ten r-proteins in this operon. It has also revealed the presence of two open reading frames past the last known gene (L15) of the spc operon. One of these corresponds to a gene (pr1A or secY) which recently has been shown by others to be involved in protein export. In addition, S1 mapping experiments indicate that a significant proportion of transcription initiated from the spc operon continues not only into the two putative genes, but also without termination into the downstream alpha r-protein operon. PMID:6222285

  10. Comparative ribosomal protein sequence analyses of a phylogenetically defined genus, Pseudomonas, and its relatives.

    PubMed

    Ochi, K

    1995-04-01

    I analyzed various families of ribosomal proteins obtained from selected species belonging to the genus Pseudomonas sensu stricto and allied organisms which were previously classified in the genus Pseudomonas. Partial amino acid sequencing of L30 preparations revealed that the strains which I examined could be divided into three clusters. The first cluster, which was assigned to the genus Pseudomonas sensu stricto, included Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas mendocina, and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The second cluster included Burkholderia pickettii and Burkholderia plantarii. The third cluster, which was a deeply branching cluster in the stem of gram-negative bacteria, included Brevundimonas diminuta and Brevundimonas vesicularis. Despite the different levels of conservation of the N-terminal sequences of ribosomal protein families (the highest level of similarity was 74% for L27 proteins and the lowest level of similarity was 42% for L30 proteins), similar phylogenetic trees were constructed by using data obtained from sequence analyses of various ribosomal protein families, including the S20, S21, L27, L29, L31, L32, and L33 protein families. Thus, I demonstrated the efficacy of ribosomal protein analysis in bacterial taxonomy. PMID:7727274

  11. Essential ribosome assembly factor Fap7 regulates a hierarchy of RNA-protein interactions during small ribosomal subunit biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hellmich, Ute A; Weis, Benjamin L; Lioutikov, Anatoli; Wurm, Jan Philip; Kaiser, Marco; Christ, Nina A; Hantke, Katharina; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Schleiff, Enrico; Wöhnert, Jens

    2013-09-17

    Factor activating Pos9 (Fap7) is an essential ribosome biogenesis factor important for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit with an uncommon dual ATPase and adenylate kinase activity. Depletion of Fap7 or mutations in its ATPase motifs lead to defects in small ribosomal subunit rRNA maturation, the absence of ribosomal protein Rps14 from the assembled subunit, and retention of the nascent small subunit in a quality control complex with the large ribosomal subunit. The molecular basis for the role of Fap7 in ribosome biogenesis is, however, not yet understood. Here we show that Fap7 regulates multiple interactions between the precursor rRNA, ribosomal proteins, and ribosome assembly factors in a hierarchical manner. Fap7 binds to Rps14 with a very high affinity. Fap7 binding blocks both rRNA-binding elements of Rps14, suggesting that Fap7 inhibits premature interactions of Rps14 with RNA. The Fap7/Rps14 interaction is modulated by nucleotide binding to Fap7. Rps14 strongly activates the ATPase activity but not the adenylate kinase activity of Fap7, identifying Rps14 as an example of a ribosomal protein functioning as an ATPase-activating factor. In addition, Fap7 inhibits the RNA cleavage activity of Nob1, the endonuclease responsible for the final maturation step of the small subunit rRNA, in a nucleotide independent manner. Thus, Fap7 may regulate small subunit biogenesis at multiple stages. PMID:24003121

  12. Regulation of drug sensitivity by ribosomal protein S3a.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z B; Minden, M D; McCulloch, E A; Stahl, J

    2000-02-01

    When bcl-2 is immunoprecipitated from (32)P-labeled cell extracts of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-treated acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) blasts, a phosphorylated protein of approximately 30 kd is coprecipitated. This protein has been identified as ribosomal protein S3a. The biologic effects of S3a include favoring apoptosis and enhancing the malignant phenotype. We sought to determine whether S3a, like bcl-2, influenced the response of cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and ATRA. Cell lines were studied in which S3a was genetically increased or disrupted; increased S3a was regularly associated with increased plating efficiency and increased sensitivity to either cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) or doxorubicin (DNR). S3a did not affect the sensitivity of cells to paclitaxel. Pulse exposures to either (3)HTdR or ara-C showed a greater percentage of clonogenic cells in the S phase of the cell cycle in cells with increased S3a than in controls. Cells with increased S3a responded to ATRA by increased ara-C or DNR sensitivity, whereas cells with reduced S3a protein were either protected by ATRA or not affected. We studied cryopreserved blast cells from patients with AML or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). S3a protein levels were heterogeneous in these populations. In 32 cryopreserved blast populations, S3a levels were significantly correlated with both bcl-2 and with cell growth in culture. As in cell lines, high S3a in cryopreserved blasts was associated with ATRA-induced sensitization to ara-C. No significant association was seen between S3a levels and response to treatment. PMID:10648421

  13. Mutations in ribosomal proteins: Apoptosis, cell competition, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, Nicholas E; Kale, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Mutations affecting multiple ribosomal proteins are implicated in cancer. Using genetic mosaics in the fruit fly Drosophila, we describe 3 apoptotic mechanisms that affect Rp/Rp homozygous mutant cells, Rp/+ heterozygous cells, or Rp/+ heterozygous cells in competition with nearby wild type cells, and discuss how apoptosis might be related to cancer predisposition. PMID:27308545

  14. Ribosomal proteins of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphornia citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We developed and sequenced 88 ribosomal protein sequences for their use as genetic markers to monitor and identify current and exotic introductions of psyllids into the U.S.A. The sequences were produced and submitted as a psyllid specific dataset into the National Center for Biotechnology Informati...

  15. Mutations in ribosomal proteins: Apoptosis, cell competition, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Nicholas E.; Kale, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Mutations affecting multiple ribosomal proteins are implicated in cancer. Using genetic mosaics in the fruit fly Drosophila, we describe 3 apoptotic mechanisms that affect Rp/Rp homozygous mutant cells, Rp/+ heterozygous cells, or Rp/+ heterozygous cells in competition with nearby wild type cells, and discuss how apoptosis might be related to cancer predisposition. PMID:27308545

  16. N-terminal sequence of some ribosome-inactivating proteins.

    PubMed

    Montecucchi, P C; Lazzarini, A M; Barbieri, L; Stirpe, F; Soria, M; Lappi, D

    1989-04-01

    The N-terminal portion of some type 1 ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) isolated from the seeds of Gelonium multiflorum, Momordica charantia, Bryonia dioica, Saponaria officinalis and from the leaves of Saponaria officinalis are reported in the present paper. Their relationship with other RIPs is discussed. PMID:2753596

  17. Streptomycin affinity depends on 13 amino acids forming a loop in homology modelled ribosomal S12 protein (rpsL gene) of Lysinibacillus sphaericus DSLS5 associated with marine sponge (Tedania anhelans).

    PubMed

    Suriyanarayanan, Balasubramanian; Lakshmi, Praveena Pothuraju; Santhosh, Ramachandran Sarojini; Dhevendaran, Kandasamy; Priya, Balakrishnan; Krishna, Shivaani

    2016-06-01

    Streptomycin, an antibiotic used against microbial infections, inhibits the protein synthesis by binding to ribosomal protein S12, encoded by rpsL12 gene, and associated mutations cause streptomycin resistance. A streptomycin resistant, Lysinibacillus sphaericus DSLS5 (MIC >300 µg/mL for streptomycin), was isolated from a marine sponge (Tedania anhelans). The characterisation of rpsL12 gene showed a region having similarity to long terminal repeat sequences of murine lukemia virus which added 13 amino acids for loop formation in RpsL12; in addition, a K56R mutation which corresponds to K43R mutation present in streptomycin-resistant Escherichia coli is also present. The RpsL12 protein was modelled and compared with that of Lysinibacillus boronitolerans, Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The modelled proteins docked with streptomycin indicate compound had less affinity. The effect of loop on streptomycin resistance was analysed by constructing three different models of RpsL12 by, (i) removing both loop and mutation, (ii) removing the loop alone while retaining the mutation and (iii) without mutation having loop. The results showed that the presence of loop causes streptomycin resistance (decreases the affinity), and it further enhanced in the presence of mutation at 56th codon. Further study will help in understanding the evolution of streptomycin resistance in organisms. PMID:26198082

  18. Stage-specific synthesis of proteins complexed to ribonucleoprotein particles and ribosomes in zoospores of Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, A J; Stumhofer, P

    1981-04-01

    In Blastocladiella emersonii zoospores, a set of proteins was found associated with the ribosomes and free ribonucleoprotein particles distinct from the ribosomes and polyribosomes. These proteins were designated P120, P105, P64, P56, and P42 based on their molecular weights determined by gel electrophoresis. Synthesis of these proteins was detected only during late sporulation just before the time polyadenylated ribonucleic acid accumulates in the sporangia. These proteins banded in isopycnic metrizamide gradients at densities of 1.31 and 1.27 g/cm3, which corresponded to the densities of the ribosomes and free ribonucleoprotein particles, respectively. Comparison of the distribution of the proteins in sucrose versus metrizamide gradients suggested that P105 was removed from the free ribonucleoprotein particles before complexing with the ribosomes. During germination, these proteins disappeared from the ribosomal fractions, with kinetics corresponding to the resumption of protein synthesis. Another protein (P178) was observed to bind to the ribosomes before the onset of protein synthesis during germination. Cycloheximide did not block the addition of this protein to the monoribosomes. PMID:6086010

  19. Protein folding on the ribosome studied using NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Launay, Hélène; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of protein folding and misfolding, providing a characterization of molecular structure, dynamics and exchange processes, across a very wide range of timescales and with near atomic resolution. In recent years NMR methods have also been developed to study protein folding as it might occur within the cell, in a de novo manner, by observing the folding of nascent polypeptides in the process of emerging from the ribosome during synthesis. Despite the 2.3 MDa molecular weight of the bacterial 70S ribosome, many nascent polypeptides, and some ribosomal proteins, have sufficient local flexibility that sharp resonances may be observed in solution-state NMR spectra. In providing information on dynamic regions of the structure, NMR spectroscopy is therefore highly complementary to alternative methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, which have successfully characterized the rigid core of the ribosome particle. However, the low working concentrations and limited sample stability associated with ribosome–nascent chain complexes means that such studies still present significant technical challenges to the NMR spectroscopist. This review will discuss the progress that has been made in this area, surveying all NMR studies that have been published to date, and with a particular focus on strategies for improving experimental sensitivity. PMID:24083462

  20. Differential expression of ribosomal proteins in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Elizabeth B; Dueber, Julie C; Qualtieri, Julianne; Tedesco, Jason; Erdogan, Begum; Bosompem, Amma; Kim, Annette S

    2016-02-01

    Aberrations of ribosomal biogenesis have been implicated in several congenital bone marrow failure syndromes, such as Diamond-Blackfan anaemia, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and Dyskeratosis Congenita. Recent studies have identified haploinsufficiency of RPS14 in the acquired bone marrow disease isolated 5q minus syndrome, a subtype of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, the expression of various proteins comprising the ribosomal subunits and other proteins enzymatically involved in the synthesis of the ribosome has not been explored in non-5q minus MDS. Furthermore, differences in the effects of these expression alterations among myeloid, erythroid and megakaryocyte lineages have not been well elucidated. We examined the expression of several proteins related to ribosomal biogenesis in bone marrow biopsy specimens from patients with MDS (5q minus patients excluded) and controls with no known myeloid disease. Specifically, we found that there is overexpression of RPS24, DKC1 and SBDS in MDS. This overexpression is in contrast to the haploinsufficiency identified in the congenital bone marrow failure syndromes and in acquired 5q minus MDS. Potential mechanisms for these differences and aetiology for these findings in MDS are discussed. PMID:26408650

  1. Depurination of ribosomal RNA and inhibition of viral RNA translation by an antiviral protein of Celosia cristata.

    PubMed

    Baranwal, V K; Tumer, Nilgun E; Kapoor, H C

    2002-10-01

    An antiviral protein (25 kD) isolated from leaves of Celosia cristata (CCP 25) was tested for depurination study on ribosomal RNA from yeast. Ribosomal RNA yielded 360 nucleotide base fragment after treatment with CCP 25 indicating that CCP 25 was a ribosome inactivating protein. CCP 25 also inhibited translation of brome mosaic virus (BMV) and pokeweed mosaic virus (PMV) RNAs in rabbit reticulocyte translation system. The radioactive assay showed that incorporation of [35S]-methionine was less in translation proteins of BMV nucleic acid when CCP 25 was added to translation system. This indicated that antiviral protein from Celosia cristata not only depurinated ribosomal RNA but also inhibited translation of viral RNA in vitro. PMID:12693705

  2. The structure of SAV1646 from Staphylococcus aureus belonging to a new `ribosome-associated' subfamily of bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Chirgadze, Yuri N; Clarke, Teresa E; Romanov, Vladimir; Kisselman, Gera; Wu-Brown, Jean; Soloveychik, Maria; Chan, Tiffany S Y; Gordon, Roni D; Battaile, Kevin P; Pai, Emil F; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y

    2015-02-01

    The crystal structure of the SAV1646 protein from the pathogenic microorganism Staphylococcus aureus has been determined at 1.7 Å resolution. The 106-amino-acid protein forms a two-layer sandwich with α/β topology. The protein molecules associate as dimers in the crystal and in solution, with the monomers related by a pseudo-twofold rotation axis. A sequence-homology search identified the protein as a member of a new subfamily of yet uncharacterized bacterial `ribosome-associated' proteins with at least 13 members to date. A detailed analysis of the crystal protein structure along with the genomic structure of the operon containing the sav1646 gene allowed a tentative functional model of this protein to be proposed. The SAV1646 dimer is assumed to form a complex with ribosomal proteins L21 and L27 which could help to complete the assembly of the large subunit of the ribosome. PMID:25664743

  3. The ribosome can discriminate the chirality of amino acids within its peptidyl-transferase center.

    PubMed

    Englander, Michael T; Avins, Joshua L; Fleisher, Rachel C; Liu, Bo; Effraim, Philip R; Wang, Jiangning; Schulten, Klaus; Leyh, Thomas S; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Cornish, Virginia W

    2015-05-12

    The cellular translational machinery (TM) synthesizes proteins using exclusively L- or achiral aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs), despite the presence of D-amino acids in nature and their ability to be aminoacylated onto tRNAs by aa-tRNA synthetases. The ubiquity of L-amino acids in proteins has led to the hypothesis that D-amino acids are not substrates for the TM. Supporting this view, protein engineering efforts to incorporate D-amino acids into proteins using the TM have thus far been unsuccessful. Nonetheless, a mechanistic understanding of why D-aa-tRNAs are poor substrates for the TM is lacking. To address this deficiency, we have systematically tested the translation activity of D-aa-tRNAs using a series of biochemical assays. We find that the TM can effectively, albeit slowly, accept D-aa-tRNAs into the ribosomal aa-tRNA binding (A) site, use the A-site D-aa-tRNA as a peptidyl-transfer acceptor, and translocate the resulting peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA into the ribosomal peptidyl-tRNA binding (P) site. During the next round of continuous translation, however, we find that ribosomes carrying a P-site peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA partition into subpopulations that are either translationally arrested or that can continue translating. Consistent with its ability to arrest translation, chemical protection experiments and molecular dynamics simulations show that P site-bound peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA can trap the ribosomal peptidyl-transferase center in a conformation in which peptidyl transfer is impaired. Our results reveal a novel mechanism through which D-aa-tRNAs interfere with translation, provide insight into how the TM might be engineered to use D-aa-tRNAs, and increase our understanding of the physiological role of a widely distributed enzyme that clears D-aa-tRNAs from cells. PMID:25918365

  4. The ribosome can discriminate the chirality of amino acids within its peptidyl-transferase center

    PubMed Central

    Englander, Michael T.; Avins, Joshua L.; Fleisher, Rachel C.; Liu, Bo; Effraim, Philip R.; Wang, Jiangning; Schulten, Klaus; Leyh, Thomas S.; Gonzalez, Ruben L.; Cornish, Virginia W.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular translational machinery (TM) synthesizes proteins using exclusively L- or achiral aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs), despite the presence of D-amino acids in nature and their ability to be aminoacylated onto tRNAs by aa-tRNA synthetases. The ubiquity of L-amino acids in proteins has led to the hypothesis that D-amino acids are not substrates for the TM. Supporting this view, protein engineering efforts to incorporate D-amino acids into proteins using the TM have thus far been unsuccessful. Nonetheless, a mechanistic understanding of why D-aa-tRNAs are poor substrates for the TM is lacking. To address this deficiency, we have systematically tested the translation activity of D-aa-tRNAs using a series of biochemical assays. We find that the TM can effectively, albeit slowly, accept D-aa-tRNAs into the ribosomal aa-tRNA binding (A) site, use the A-site D-aa-tRNA as a peptidyl-transfer acceptor, and translocate the resulting peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA into the ribosomal peptidyl-tRNA binding (P) site. During the next round of continuous translation, however, we find that ribosomes carrying a P-site peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA partition into subpopulations that are either translationally arrested or that can continue translating. Consistent with its ability to arrest translation, chemical protection experiments and molecular dynamics simulations show that P site-bound peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA can trap the ribosomal peptidyl-transferase center in a conformation in which peptidyl transfer is impaired. Our results reveal a novel mechanism through which D-aa-tRNAs interfere with translation, provide insight into how the TM might be engineered to use D-aa-tRNAs, and increase our understanding of the physiological role of a widely distributed enzyme that clears D-aa-tRNAs from cells. PMID:25918365

  5. Analysis of the interactome of ribosomal protein S19 mutants.

    PubMed

    Caterino, Marianna; Aspesi, Anna; Pavesi, Elisa; Imperlini, Esther; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Ingenito, Laura; Santoro, Claudio; Dianzani, Irma; Ruoppolo, Margherita

    2014-10-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia, characterized by defective erythroid progenitor maturation, is caused in one-fourth of cases by mutations of ribosomal protein S19 (RPS19), which is a component of the ribosomal 40S subunit. Our previous work described proteins interacting with RPS19 with the aim to determine its functions. Here, two RPS19 mutants, R62W and R101H, have been selected to compare their interactomes versus the wild-type protein one, using the same functional proteomic approach that we employed to characterize RPS19 interactome. Mutations R62W and R101H impair RPS19 ability to associate with the ribosome. Results presented in this paper highlight the striking differences between the interactomes of wild-type and mutant RPS19 proteins. In particular, mutations abolish interactions with proteins having splicing, translational and helicase activity, thus confirming the role of RPS19 in RNA processing/metabolism and translational control. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000640 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000640). PMID:25069755

  6. Molecular characterization of a human gene for S28 ribosomal binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.; Borst, D.E.; Chader, G.J.

    1994-09-01

    The mechanism of ribosome action and the ribosomal binding proteins which cooperatively interact in the working of this structure are not completely understood. Theoretically, mutations in genes that encode these proteins may compromise the efficiency of protein synthesis and therefore lead to a functional disorder. In the course of our search for human genes which show homology to the C. elegans CED-4 death gene, we have serendipitously identified one of the human S28 ribosomal binding protein genes as a random fragment fused to the end of one of our putative CED-4 positive homologue clones. The cloned S28 fragment consists of 381 nucleotides with a putative open reading frame of 113 amino acids. Sequence comparisons to GenBank revealed significant homologies to ribosomal binding protein genes in other species (including the rat S28 ribosomal binding protein gene) indicating that the S28 gene sequence is highly conserved. This finding is confirmed by zooblot analysis. Significant homologies also exist to two human expressed tagged sites (HUMRIBPROB; L05091 and HSAFIF072; Z21908). Analysis of the putative S28 peptide sequence allows insights into possible functional regions of the protein. The identification of 8 distinct bands upon Southern analysis of the S28 fragments suggests that there are multiple copies of the S28 gene in the human genome. Mapping of the S28 fragment on somatic cell hybrid panels identified distinct S28 gene loci on chromosomes 1, 2, 7, 10, 11, 12, 17 expression in adult tissues (pancreas, kidney, muscle, liver, lung, placenta, brain, heart, and retina) as well as in fetal tissues (kidney, liver, lung, brain, and heart).

  7. Protein folding: When ribosomes pick the structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivertsson, Elin M.; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2014-05-01

    Anfinsen's principle tells us that the folded structure of a protein is determined solely by its sequence. Now, it has been shown that the rate at which a polypeptide chain is synthesized in the cell can affect which of two alternative folded structures it adopts.

  8. Ribosomal protein L3: Gatekeeper to the A-site

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Summary Ribosomal protein L3 (L3) is an essential and indispensable component for formation of the peptidyltransferase center. Atomic resolution ribosome structures reveal two extensions of L3 protruding deep into the core of the large subunit. The central extension of L3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated using a combination of molecular genetic, biochemical, chemical probing and molecular modeling methods. A reciprocal relationship between ribosomal affinity for eEF-1A stimulated binding of aa-tRNA and for eEF2 suggests that the central extension of L3 may function as an allosteric switch in coordinating binding of the elongation factors. Opening of the aa-tRNA accommodation corridor promoted resistance to the A-site specific translational inhibitor anisomycin, suggesting a competitive model for anisomycin resistance. These changes were also found to inhibit peptidyltransferase activity, stimulating programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, and promoting virus propagation defects. These studies provide a basis for deeper insight for rational design of small molecule antiviral therapeutics. PMID:17386264

  9. Structure determination of archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a reveals a novel protein fold

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yingang; Song, Xiaxia; Lin, Jinzhong; Xuan, Jinsong; Cui, Qiu; Wang, Jinfeng

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • The archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a has no homology to known proteins. • Three dimensional structure and backbone dynamics of L46a were determined by NMR. • The structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. • A potential rRNA-binding surface on L46a was identified. • The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed. - Abstract: Three archaea-specific ribosomal proteins recently identified show no sequence homology with other known proteins. Here we determined the structure of L46a, the most conserved one among the three proteins, from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 using NMR spectroscopy. The structure presents a twisted β-sheet formed by the N-terminal part and two helices at the C-terminus. The L46a structure has a positively charged surface which is conserved in the L46a protein family and is the potential rRNA-binding site. Searching homologous structures in Protein Data Bank revealed that the structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. The backbone dynamics identified by NMR relaxation experiments reveal significant flexibility at the rRNA binding surface. The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed by fitting the structure into a previous electron microscopy map of the ribosomal 50S subunit, which indicated that L46a contacts to domain I of 23S rRNA near a multifunctional ribosomal protein L7ae.

  10. Kinetoplast DNA-encoded ribosomal protein S12

    PubMed Central

    Aphasizheva, Inna; Maslov, Dmitri A; Aphasizhev, Ruslan

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes of Trypanosoma brucei are composed of 9S and 12S rRNAs, which are encoded by the kinetoplast genome, and more than 150 proteins encoded in the nucleus and imported from the cytoplasm. However, a single ribosomal protein RPS12 is encoded by the kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) in all trypanosomatid species examined. As typical for these organisms, the gene itself is cryptic and its transcript undergoes an extensive U-insertion/deletion editing. An evolutionary trend to reduce or eliminate RNA editing could be traced with other cryptogenes, but the invariably pan-edited RPS12 cryptogene is apparently spared. Here we inquired whether editing of RPS12 mRNA is essential for mitochondrial translation. By RNAi-mediated knockdowns of RNA editing complexes and inducible knock-in of a key editing enzyme in procyclic parasites, we could reversibly downregulate production of edited RPS12 mRNA and, by inference, synthesis of this protein. While inhibition of editing decreased edited mRNA levels, the translation of edited (Cyb) and unedited (COI) mRNAs was blocked. Furthermore, the population of SSU-related 45S complexes declined upon inactivation of editing and so did the amount of mRNA-bound ribosomes. In bloodstream parasites, which lack active electron transport chain but still require translation of ATP synthase subunit 6 mRNA (A6), both edited RPS12 and A6 mRNAs were detected in translation complexes. Collectively, our results indicate that a single ribosomal protein gene retained by the kinetoplast mitochondrion serves as a possible functional link between editing and translation processes and provide the rationale for the evolutionary conservation of RPS12 pan-editing. PMID:24270388

  11. Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6, an evolutionarily conserved regulator of ribosome biogenesis and protein translation

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianjun; Jin, Zhaoqing; Yang, Xiaohan; Li, Jian-Feng; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) as one of the molecular links between abscisic acid (ABA) signaling and its regulation on protein translation. Moreover, we identified Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6 (eIF6) as an interacting partner of RACK1. Because the interaction between RACK1 and eIF6 in mammalian cells is known to regulate the ribosome assembly step of protein translation initiation, it was hypothesized that the same process of protein translation in Arabidopsis is also regulated by RACK1 and eIF6. In this article, we analyzed the amino acid sequences of eIF6 in different species from different lineages and discovered some intriguing differences in protein phosphorylation sites that may contribute to its action in ribosome assembly and biogenesis. In addition, we discovered that, distinct from non-plant organisms in which eIF6 is encoded by a single gene, all sequenced plant genomes contain two or more copies of eIF6 genes. While one copy of plant eIF6 is expressed ubiquitously and might possess the conserved function in ribosome biogenesis and protein translation, the other copy seems to be only expressed in specific organs and therefore may have gained some new functions. We proposed some important studies that may help us better understand the function of eIF6 in plants.

  12. Analysis of interactions between ribosomal proteins and RNA structural motifs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background One important goal of structural bioinformatics is to recognize and predict the interactions between protein binding sites and RNA. Recently, a comprehensive analysis of ribosomal proteins and their interactions with rRNA has been done. Interesting results emerged from the comparison of r-proteins within the small subunit in T. thermophilus and E. coli, supporting the idea of a core made by both RNA and proteins, conserved by evolution. Recent work showed also that ribosomal RNA is modularly composed. Motifs are generally single-stranded sequences of consecutive nucleotides (ssRNA) with characteristic folding. The role of these motifs in protein-RNA interactions has been so far only sparsely investigated. Results This work explores the role of RNA structural motifs in the interaction of proteins with ribosomal RNA (rRNA). We analyze composition, local geometries and conformation of interface regions involving motifs such as tetraloops, kink turns and single extruded nucleotides. We construct an interaction map of protein binding sites that allows us to identify the common types of shared 3-D physicochemical binding patterns for tetraloops. Furthermore, we investigate the protein binding pockets that accommodate single extruded nucleotides either involved in kink-turns or in arbitrary RNA strands. This analysis reveals a new structural motif, called tripod. It corresponds to small pockets consisting of three aminoacids arranged at the vertices of an almost equilateral triangle. We developed a search procedure for the recognition of tripods, based on an empirical tripod fingerprint. Conclusion A comparative analysis with the overall RNA surface and interfaces shows that contact surfaces involving RNA motifs have distinctive features that may be useful for the recognition and prediction of interactions. PMID:20122215

  13. Yeast Ribosomal Protein L40 Assembles Late into Precursor 60 S Ribosomes and Is Required for Their Cytoplasmic Maturation*

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Most ribosomal proteins play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and function. Here, we have examined the contribution of the essential ribosomal protein L40 in these processes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Deletion of either the RPL40A or RPL40B gene and in vivo depletion of L40 impair 60 S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Polysome profile analyses reveal the accumulation of half-mers and a moderate reduction in free 60 S ribosomal subunits. Pulse-chase, Northern blotting, and primer extension analyses in the L40-depleted strain clearly indicate that L40 is not strictly required for the precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing reactions but contributes to optimal 27 SB pre-rRNA maturation. Moreover, depletion of L40 hinders the nucleo-cytoplasmic export of pre-60 S ribosomal particles. Importantly, all these defects most likely appear as the direct consequence of impaired Nmd3 and Rlp24 release from cytoplasmic pre-60 S ribosomal subunits and their inefficient recycling back into the nucle(ol)us. In agreement, we show that hemagglutinin epitope-tagged L40A assembles in the cytoplasm into almost mature pre-60 S ribosomal particles. Finally, we have identified that the hemagglutinin epitope-tagged L40A confers resistance to sordarin, a translation inhibitor that impairs the function of eukaryotic elongation factor 2, whereas the rpl40a and rpl40b null mutants are hypersensitive to this antibiotic. We conclude that L40 is assembled at a very late stage into pre-60 S ribosomal subunits and that its incorporation into 60 S ribosomal subunits is a prerequisite for subunit joining and may ensure proper functioning of the translocation process. PMID:22995916

  14. Ribosome hijacking: a role for small protein B during trans-translation

    PubMed Central

    Nonin-Lecomte, Sylvie; Germain-Amiot, Noella; Gillet, Reynald; Hallier, Marc; Ponchon, Luc; Dardel, Frédéric; Felden, Brice

    2009-01-01

    Tight recognition of codon–anticodon pairings by the ribosome ensures the accuracy and fidelity of protein synthesis. In eubacteria, translational surveillance and ribosome rescue are performed by the ‘tmRNA–SmpB' system (transfer messenger RNA–small protein B). Remarkably, entry and accommodation of aminoacylated-tmRNA into stalled ribosomes occur without a codon–anticodon interaction but in the presence of SmpB. Here, we show that within a stalled ribosome, SmpB interacts with the three universally conserved bases G530, A1492 and A1493 that form the 30S subunit decoding centre, in which canonical codon–anticodon pairing occurs. The footprints at positions A1492 and A1493 of a small decoding centre, as well as on a set of conserved SmpB amino acids, were identified by nuclear magnetic resonance. Mutants at these residues display the same growth defects as for ΔsmpB strains. The SmpB protein has functional and structural similarities with initiation factor 1, and is proposed to be a functional mimic of the pairing between a codon and an anticodon. PMID:19132006

  15. The unfolded protein response triggers site-specific regulatory ubiquitylation of 40S ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rising, Lisa; Mak, Raymond; Webb, Kristofor; Kaiser, Stephen E.; Zuzow, Nathan; Riviere, Paul; Yang, Bing; Fenech, Emma; Tang, Xin; Lindsay, Scott A.; Christianson, John C.; Hampton, Randolph Y.; Wasserman, Steven A.; Bennett, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Insults to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis activate the unfolded protein response (UPR), which elevates protein folding and degradation capacity and attenuates protein synthesis. While a role for ubiquitin in regulating the degradation of misfolded ER-resident proteins is well described, ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translational reprogramming during the UPR remains uncharacterized. Using global quantitative ubiquitin proteomics, we identify evolutionarily conserved, site-specific regulatory ubiquitylation of 40S ribosomal proteins. We demonstrate that these events occur on assembled cytoplasmic ribosomes and are stimulated by both UPR activation and translation inhibition. We further show that ER stress-stimulated regulatory 40S ribosomal ubiquitylation occurs on a timescale similar to eIF2α phosphorylation, is dependent upon PERK signaling, and is required for optimal cell survival during chronic UPR activation. In total, these results reveal regulatory 40S ribosomal ubiquitylation as a previously uncharacterized and important facet of eukaryotic translational control. PMID:26051182

  16. Effect of alpha-sarcin and ribosome-inactivating proteins on the interaction of elongation factors with ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Brigotti, M; Rambelli, F; Zamboni, M; Montanaro, L; Sperti, S

    1989-02-01

    alpha-Sarcin from Aspergillus giganteus and the ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) from higher plants inactivate the 60 S ribosomal subunit. The former is an RNAase, whereas RIPs are N-glycosidases. The site of cleavage of RNA and that of N-glycosidic depurinization are at one nucleotide distance in 28 S rRNA [Endo & Tsurugi (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 8128-8130]. The effect of alpha-sarcin and that of RIPs on the interaction of elongation factors with Artemia salina (brine shrimp) ribosomes have been investigated. alpha-Sarcin inhibits both the EF1 (elongation factor 1)-dependent binding of aminoacyl-tRNA and the GTP-dependent binding of EF2 (elongation factor 2) to ribosomes, whereas two of the RIPs tested, ricin from Ricinus communis (castor bean) and volkensin from Adenia volkensii (kilyambiti), inhibit only the latter reaction. EF2 protects ribosomes from inactivation by both alpha-sarcin and ricin. The EF1-binding site is affected only by alpha-sarcin. The sensitivity of this site to alpha-sarcin is increased by pretreatment of ribosomes with ricin. A. salina ribosomes were highly resistant to the third RIP tested, namely gelonin from Gelonium multiflorum. All four proteins tested have, however, a comparable activity on the rabbit reticulocyte-lysate system. PMID:2930482

  17. Affinity chromatography of Drosophila melanogaster ribosomal proteins to 5S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Stark, B C; Chooi, W Y

    1985-02-20

    The binding of Drosophila melanogaster ribosomal proteins to D. melanogaster 5S rRNA was studied using affinity chromatography of total ribosomal proteins (TP80) on 5S rRNA linked via adipic acid dihydrazide to Sepharose 4B. Ribosomal proteins which bound 5S rRNA at 0.3 M potassium chloride and were eluted at 1 M potassium chloride were identified as proteins 1, L4, 2/3, L14/L16, and S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Using poly A-Sepharose 4B columns as a model of non-specific binding, we found that a subset of TP80 proteins is also bound. This subset, while containing some of the proteins bound by 5S rRNA columns, was distinctly different from the latter subset, indicating that the binding to 5S rRNA was specific for that RNA species. PMID:3923010

  18. Dynamic evolution of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins in Holozoa.

    PubMed

    Scheel, Bettina M; Hausdorf, Bernhard

    2014-07-01

    We studied the highly dynamic evolution of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs) in Holozoa. Most major clades within Holozoa are characterized by gains and/or losses of MRPs. The usefulness of gains of MRPs as rare genomic changes in phylogenetics is undermined by the high frequency of secondary losses. However, phylogenetic analyses of the MRP sequences provide evidence for the Acrosomata hypothesis, a sister group relationship between Ctenophora and Bilateria. An extensive restructuring of the mitochondrial genome and, as a consequence, of the mitochondrial ribosomes occurred in the ancestor of metazoans. The last MRP genes encoded in the mitochondrial genome were either moved to the nuclear genome or were lost. The strong decrease in size of the mitochondrial genome was probably caused by selection for rapid replication of mitochondrial DNA during oogenesis in the metazoan ancestor. A phylogenetic analysis of MRPL56 sequences provided evidence for a horizontal gene transfer of the corresponding MRP gene between metazoans and Dictyostelidae (Amoebozoa). The hypothesis that the requisition of additional MRPs compensated for a loss of rRNA segments in the mitochondrial ribosomes is corroborated by a significant negative correlation between the number of MRPs and length of the rRNA. Newly acquired MRPs evolved faster than bacterial MRPs and positions in eukaryote-specific MRPs were more strongly affected by coevolution than positions in prokaryotic MRPs in accordance with the necessity to fit these proteins into the pre-existing structure of the mitoribosome. PMID:24631858

  19. Nuclear and nucleolar targeting of human ribosomal protein S6.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, C; Lipsius, E; Kruppa, J

    1995-01-01

    Chimeric proteins were constructed to define the nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of human ribosomal protein S6. The complete cDNA sequence, different cDNA fragments and oligonucleotides of the human ribosomal proteins S6, respectively, were joined to the 5' end of the entire LacZ gene of Escherichia coli by using recombinant techniques. The hybrid genes were transfected into L cells, transiently expressed, and the intracellular location of the fusion proteins was determined by their beta-galactosidase activity. Three NLSs were identified in the C-terminal half of the S6 protein. Deletion mutagenesis demonstrated that a single NLS is sufficient for targeting the corresponding S6-beta-galactosidase chimera into the nucleus. Removal of all three putative NLSs completely blocked the nuclear import of the resulting S6-beta-galactosidase fusion protein, which instead became evenly distributed in the cytoplasm. Chimeras containing deletion mutants of S6 with at least one single NLS or unmodified S6 accumulated in the nucleolus. Analysis of several constructs reveals the existence of a specific domain that is essential but not sufficient for nucleolar accumulation of S6. Images PMID:8590812

  20. Histidine Methylation of Yeast Ribosomal Protein Rpl3p Is Required for Proper 60S Subunit Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hadid, Qais; Roy, Kevin; Munroe, William; Dzialo, Maria C.; Chanfreau, Guillaume F.

    2014-01-01

    Histidine protein methylation is an unusual posttranslational modification. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the large ribosomal subunit protein Rpl3p is methylated at histidine 243, a residue that contacts the 25S rRNA near the P site. Rpl3p methylation is dependent upon the presence of Hpm1p, a candidate seven-beta-strand methyltransferase. In this study, we elucidated the biological activities of Hpm1p in vitro and in vivo. Amino acid analyses reveal that Hpm1p is responsible for all of the detectable protein histidine methylation in yeast. The modification is found on a polypeptide corresponding to the size of Rpl3p in ribosomes and in a nucleus-containing organelle fraction but was not detected in proteins of the ribosome-free cytosol fraction. In vitro assays demonstrate that Hpm1p has methyltransferase activity on ribosome-associated but not free Rpl3p, suggesting that its activity depends on interactions with ribosomal components. hpm1 null cells are defective in early rRNA processing, resulting in a deficiency of 60S subunits and translation initiation defects that are exacerbated in minimal medium. Cells lacking Hpm1p are resistant to cycloheximide and verrucarin A and have decreased translational fidelity. We propose that Hpm1p plays a role in the orchestration of the early assembly of the large ribosomal subunit and in faithful protein production. PMID:24865971

  1. Transactivation of programmed ribosomal frameshifting by a viral protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhua; Treffers, Emmely E; Napthine, Sawsan; Tas, Ali; Zhu, Longchao; Sun, Zhi; Bell, Susanne; Mark, Brian L; van Veelen, Peter A; van Hemert, Martijn J; Firth, Andrew E; Brierley, Ian; Snijder, Eric J; Fang, Ying

    2014-05-27

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF) is a widely used translational mechanism facilitating the expression of two polypeptides from a single mRNA. Commonly, the ribosome interacts with an mRNA secondary structure that promotes -1 frameshifting on a homopolymeric slippery sequence. Recently, we described an unusual -2 frameshifting (-2 PRF) signal directing efficient expression of a transframe protein [nonstructural protein 2TF (nsp2TF)] of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) from an alternative reading frame overlapping the viral replicase gene. Unusually, this arterivirus PRF signal lacks an obvious stimulatory RNA secondary structure, but as confirmed here, can also direct the occurrence of -1 PRF, yielding a third, truncated nsp2 variant named "nsp2N." Remarkably, we now show that both -2 and -1 PRF are transactivated by a protein factor, specifically a PRRSV replicase subunit (nsp1β). Embedded in nsp1β's papain-like autoproteinase domain, we identified a highly conserved, putative RNA-binding motif that is critical for PRF transactivation. The minimal RNA sequence required for PRF was mapped within a 34-nt region that includes the slippery sequence and a downstream conserved CCCANCUCC motif. Interaction of nsp1β with the PRF signal was demonstrated in pull-down assays. These studies demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that a protein can function as a transactivator of ribosomal frameshifting. The newly identified frameshifting determinants provide potential antiviral targets for arterivirus disease control and prevention. Moreover, protein-induced transactivation of frameshifting may be a widely used mechanism, potentially including previously undiscovered viral strategies to regulate viral gene expression and/or modulate host cell translation upon infection. PMID:24825891

  2. Ribosomes containing mutants of L4 ribosomal protein from Thermus thermophilus display multiple defects in ribosomal functions and sensitivity against erythromycin

    PubMed Central

    TSAGKALIA, AIKATERINI; LEONTIADOU, FOTINI; XAPLANTERI, MARIA A.; PAPADOPOULOS, GEORGIOS; KALPAXIS, DIMITRIOS L.; CHOLI-PAPADOPOULOU, THEODORA

    2005-01-01

    Protein L4 from Thermus thermophilus (TthL4) was heterologously overproduced in Escherichia coli cells. To study the implication of the extended loop of TthL4 in the exit-tunnel and peptidyltransferase functions, the highly conserved E56 was replaced by D or Q, while the semiconserved G55 was changed to E or S. Moreover, the sequence -G55E56- was inverted to -E55G56-. When we incorporated these mutants into E. coli ribosomes and investigated their impact on poly(Phe) synthesis, high variations in the synthetic activity and response to erythromycin of the resulting ribosomes were observed. In the absence of erythromycin, ribosomes harboring mutations G55E and E56D in TthL4 protein were characterized by low activity in synthesizing poly(Phe) and decreased capability in binding tRNA at the A site. On the other hand, ribosomes possessing mutations G55E, G55S, G55E-E56G, or E56Q in TthL4 protein were unexpectedly more sensitive to erythromycin. Evidence in support of these findings was drawn by in vivo experiments, assessing the erythromycin sensitivity of E. coli cells expressing wild-type or mutant TthL4 proteins. Our results emphasize the role of the extended loop of L4 ribosomal protein in the exit-tunnel and peptidyltransferase center functions. PMID:16244130

  3. Ribosomal protein L4 is a novel regulator of the MDM2-p53 loop

    PubMed Central

    He, Xia; Li, Yuhuang; Dai, Mu-Shui; Sun, Xiao-Xin

    2016-01-01

    A number of ribosomal proteins (RPs) have been shown to play a critical role in coordinating ribosome biogenesis with cell growth and proliferation by suppressing MDM2 to induce p53 activation. While how the MDM2-p53 pathway is regulated by multiple RPs is unclear, it remains to be interesting to identify additional RPs that can regulate this pathway. Here we report that ribosomal protein L4 (RPL4) directly interacts with MDM2 at the central acidic domain and suppresses MDM2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation, leading to p53 stabilization and activation. Interestingly, overexpression of RPL4 promotes the binding of MDM2 to RPL5 and RPL11 and forms a complex with RPL5, RPL11 and MDM2 in cells. Conversely, knockdown of RPL4 also induces p53 levels and p53-dependent cell cycle arrest. This p53-dependent effect requires both RPL5 and RPL11, suggesting that depletion of RPL4 triggers ribosomal stress. Together, our results reveal that balanced levels of RPL4 are critical for normal cell growth and proliferation via regulating the MDM2-p53 loop. PMID:26908445

  4. Positive modulation of RNA polymerase III transcription by ribosomal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dieci, Giorgio; Carpentieri, Andrea; Amoresano, Angela; Ottonello, Simone

    2009-02-06

    A yeast nuclear fraction of unknown composition, named TFIIIE, was reported previously to enhance transcription of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes in vitro. We show that TFIIIE activity co-purifies with a specific subset of ribosomal proteins (RPs) which, as revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, generally interact with tRNA and 5S rRNA genes, but not with a Pol II-specific promoter. Only Rpl6Ap and Rpl6Bp, among the tested RPs, were found associated to a TATA-containing tRNA{sup Ile}(TAT) gene. The RPL6A gene also emerged as a strong multicopy suppressor of a conditional mutation in the basal transcription factor TFIIIC, while RPL26A and RPL14A behaved as weak suppressors. The data delineate a novel extra-ribosomal role for one or a few RPs which, by influencing 5S rRNA and tRNA synthesis, could play a key role in the coordinate regulation of the different sub-pathways required for ribosome biogenesis and functionality.

  5. Co-evolution of Bacterial Ribosomal Protein S15 with Diverse mRNA Regulatory Structures

    PubMed Central

    Slinger, Betty L.; Newman, Hunter; Lee, Younghan; Pei, Shermin; Meyer, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    RNA-protein interactions are critical in many biological processes, yet how such interactions affect the evolution of both partners is still unknown. RNA and protein structures are impacted very differently by mechanisms of genomic change. While most protein families are identifiable at the nucleotide level across large phylogenetic distances, RNA families display far less nucleotide similarity and are often only shared by closely related bacterial species. Ribosomal protein S15 has two RNA binding functions. First, it is a ribosomal protein responsible for organizing the rRNA during ribosome assembly. Second, in many bacterial species S15 also interacts with a structured portion of its own transcript to negatively regulate gene expression. While the first interaction is conserved in most bacteria, the second is not. Four distinct mRNA structures interact with S15 to enable regulation, each of which appears to be independently derived in different groups of bacteria. With the goal of understanding how protein-binding specificity may influence the evolution of such RNA regulatory structures, we examine whether examples of these mRNA structures are able to interact with, and regulate in response to, S15 homologs from organisms containing distinct mRNA structures. We find that despite their shared RNA binding function in the rRNA, S15 homologs have distinct RNA recognition profiles. We present a model to explain the specificity patterns observed, and support this model by with further mutagenesis. After analyzing the patterns of conservation for the S15 protein coding sequences, we also identified amino acid changes that alter the binding specificity of an S15 homolog. In this work we demonstrate that homologous RNA-binding proteins have different specificity profiles, and minor changes to amino acid sequences, or to RNA structural motifs, can have large impacts on RNA-protein recognition. PMID:26675164

  6. Co-evolution of Bacterial Ribosomal Protein S15 with Diverse mRNA Regulatory Structures.

    PubMed

    Slinger, Betty L; Newman, Hunter; Lee, Younghan; Pei, Shermin; Meyer, Michelle M

    2015-12-01

    RNA-protein interactions are critical in many biological processes, yet how such interactions affect the evolution of both partners is still unknown. RNA and protein structures are impacted very differently by mechanisms of genomic change. While most protein families are identifiable at the nucleotide level across large phylogenetic distances, RNA families display far less nucleotide similarity and are often only shared by closely related bacterial species. Ribosomal protein S15 has two RNA binding functions. First, it is a ribosomal protein responsible for organizing the rRNA during ribosome assembly. Second, in many bacterial species S15 also interacts with a structured portion of its own transcript to negatively regulate gene expression. While the first interaction is conserved in most bacteria, the second is not. Four distinct mRNA structures interact with S15 to enable regulation, each of which appears to be independently derived in different groups of bacteria. With the goal of understanding how protein-binding specificity may influence the evolution of such RNA regulatory structures, we examine whether examples of these mRNA structures are able to interact with, and regulate in response to, S15 homologs from organisms containing distinct mRNA structures. We find that despite their shared RNA binding function in the rRNA, S15 homologs have distinct RNA recognition profiles. We present a model to explain the specificity patterns observed, and support this model by with further mutagenesis. After analyzing the patterns of conservation for the S15 protein coding sequences, we also identified amino acid changes that alter the binding specificity of an S15 homolog. In this work we demonstrate that homologous RNA-binding proteins have different specificity profiles, and minor changes to amino acid sequences, or to RNA structural motifs, can have large impacts on RNA-protein recognition. PMID:26675164

  7. Interplay between trigger factor and other protein biogenesis factors on the ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornemann, Thomas; Holtkamp, Wolf; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Nascent proteins emerging from translating ribosomes in bacteria are screened by a number of ribosome-associated protein biogenesis factors, among them the chaperone trigger factor (TF), the signal recognition particle (SRP) that targets ribosomes synthesizing membrane proteins to the membrane and the modifying enzymes, peptide deformylase (PDF) and methionine aminopeptidase (MAP). Here, we examine the interplay between these factors both kinetically and at equilibrium. TF rapidly scans the ribosomes until it is stabilized on ribosomes presenting TF-specific nascent chains. SRP binding to those complexes is strongly impaired. Thus, TF in effect prevents SRP binding to the majority of ribosomes, except those presenting SRP-specific signal sequences, explaining how the small amount of SRP in the cell can be effective in membrane targeting. PDF and MAP do not interfere with TF or SRP binding to translating ribosomes, indicating that nascent-chain processing can take place before or in parallel with TF or SRP binding.

  8. Ribosomal proteins produced in excess are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Sung, Min-Kyung; Reitsma, Justin M; Sweredoski, Michael J; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2016-09-01

    Ribosome assembly is an essential process that consumes prodigious quantities of cellular resources. Ribosomal proteins cannot be overproduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae because the excess proteins are rapidly degraded. However, the responsible quality control (QC) mechanisms remain poorly characterized. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of multiple proteins of the small and large yeast ribosomal subunits is suppressed. Rpl26 overexpressed from a plasmid can be detected in the nucleolus and nucleoplasm, but it largely fails to assemble into ribosomes and is rapidly degraded. However, if the endogenous RPL26 loci are deleted, plasmid-encoded Rpl26 assembles into ribosomes and localizes to the cytosol. Chemical and genetic perturbation studies indicate that overexpressed ribosomal proteins are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system and not by autophagy. Inhibition of the proteasome led to accumulation of multiple endogenous ribosomal proteins in insoluble aggregates, consistent with the operation of this QC mechanism in the absence of ribosomal protein overexpression. Our studies reveal that ribosomal proteins that fail to assemble into ribosomes are rapidly distinguished from their assembled counterparts and ubiquitinated and degraded within the nuclear compartment. PMID:27385339

  9. Molecular Genetics of Cryptopleurine Resistance in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae: Expression of a Ribosomal Protein Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Paulovich, A. G.; Thompson, J. R.; Larkin, J. C.; Li, Z.; Woolford-Jr., J. L.

    1993-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae CRY1 gene encodes the 40S ribosomal subunit protein rp59 and confers sensitivity to the protein synthesis inhibitor cryptopleurine. A yeast strain containing the cry1-δ1::URA3 null allele is viable, cryptopleurine sensitive (Cry(S)), and expresses rp59 mRNA, suggesting that there is a second functional CRY gene. The CRY2 gene has been isolated from a yeast genomic library cloned in bacteriophage λ, using a CRY1 DNA probe. The DNA sequence of the CRY2 gene contains an open reading frame encoding ribosomal protein 59 that differs at five residues from rp59 encoded by the CRY1 gene. The CRY2 gene was mapped to the left arm of chromosome X, centromere-proximal to cdc6 and immediately adjacent to ribosomal protein genes RPS24A and RPL46. Ribosomal protein 59 is an essential protein; upon sporulation of a diploid doubly heterozygous for cry1-δ2::TRP1 cry2-δ1::LEU2 null alleles, no spore clones containing both null alleles were recovered. Several results indicate that CRY2 is expressed, but at lower levels than CRY1: (1) Introduction of CRY2 on high copy plasmids into Cry(R) yeast of genotype cry1 CRY2 confers a Cry(S) phenotype. Transformation of these Cry(R) yeast with CRY2 on a low copy CEN plasmid does not confer a Cry(S) phenotype. (2) Haploids containing the cry1-δ2::TRP1 null allele have a deficit of 40S ribosomal subunits, but cry2-δ1::LEU2 strains have wild-type amounts of 40S ribosomal subunits. (3) CRY2 mRNA is present at lower levels than CRY1 mRNA. (4) Higher levels of β-galactosidase are expressed from a CRY1-lacZ gene fusion than from a CRY2-lacZ gene fusion. Mutations that alter or eliminate the last amino acid of rp59 encoded by either CRY1 or CRY2 result in resistance to cryptopleurine. Because CRY2 (and cry2) is expressed at lower levels than CRY1 (and cry1), the Cry(R) phenotype of cry2 mutants is only expressed in strains containing a cry1-δ null allele. PMID:8293976

  10. Conjugates of amino acids and peptides with 5-o-mycaminosyltylonolide and their interaction with the ribosomal exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, Anna; Makarov, Gennady; Tereshchenkov, Andrey; Korshunova, Galina; Sumbatyan, Nataliya; Golovin, Andrey; Svetlov, Maxim; Bogdanov, Alexey

    2013-11-20

    During protein synthesis the nascent polypeptide chain (NC) extends through the ribosomal exit tunnel (NPET). Also, the large group of macrolide antibiotics binds in the nascent peptide exit tunnel. In some cases interaction of NC with NPET leads to the ribosome stalling, a significant event in regulation of translation. In other cases NC-ribosome interactions lead to pauses in translation that play an important role in cotranslational folding of polypeptides emerging from the ribosome. The precise mechanism of NC recognition in NPET as well as factors that determine NC conformation in the ribosomal tunnel are unknown. A number of derivatives of the macrolide antibiotic 5-O-mycaminosyltylonolide (OMT) containing N-acylated amino acid or peptide residues were synthesized in order to study potential sites of NC-NPET interactions. The target compounds were prepared by conjugation of protected amino acids and peptides with the C23 hydroxyl group of the macrolide. These OMT derivatives showed high although varying abilities to inhibit the firefly luciferase synthesis in vitro. Three glycil-containing derivatives appeared to be strong inhibitors of translation, more potent than parental OMT. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of complexes of tylosin, OMT, and some of OMT derivatives with the large ribosomal subunit of E. coli illuminated a plausible reason for the high inhibitory activity of Boc-Gly-OMT. In addition, the MD study detected a new putative site of interaction of the nascent polypeptide chain with the NPET walls. PMID:24090034

  11. The extended loops of ribosomal proteins uL4 and uL22 of Escherichia coli contribute to ribosome assembly and protein translation.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Marlon G; Shamsuzzaman, Md; Kondopaka, Maithri; Pascual, Clarence; Zengel, Janice M; Lindahl, Lasse

    2016-07-01

    Nearly half of ribosomal proteins are composed of a domain on the ribosome surface and a loop or extension that penetrates into the organelle's RNA core. Our previous work showed that ribosomes lacking the loops of ribosomal proteins uL4 or uL22 are still capable of entering polysomes. However, in those experiments we could not address the formation of mutant ribosomes, because we used strains that also expressed wild-type uL4 and uL22. Here, we have focused on ribosome assembly and function in strains in which loop deletion mutant genes are the ONLY: sources of uL4 or uL22 protein. The uL4 and uL22 loop deletions have different effects, but both mutations result in accumulation of immature particles that do not accumulate in detectable amounts in wild-type strains. Thus, our results suggest that deleting the loops creates kinetic barriers in the normal assembly pathway, possibly resulting in assembly via alternate pathway(s). Furthermore, deletion of the uL4 loop results in cold-sensitive ribosome assembly and function. Finally, ribosomes carrying either of the loop-deleted proteins responded normally to the secM translation pausing peptide, but the uL4 mutant responded very inefficiently to the cmlA(crb) pause peptide. PMID:27257065

  12. The extended loops of ribosomal proteins uL4 and uL22 of Escherichia coli contribute to ribosome assembly and protein translation

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Marlon G.; Shamsuzzaman, Md; Kondopaka, Maithri; Pascual, Clarence; Zengel, Janice M.; Lindahl, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of ribosomal proteins are composed of a domain on the ribosome surface and a loop or extension that penetrates into the organelle's RNA core. Our previous work showed that ribosomes lacking the loops of ribosomal proteins uL4 or uL22 are still capable of entering polysomes. However, in those experiments we could not address the formation of mutant ribosomes, because we used strains that also expressed wild-type uL4 and uL22. Here, we have focused on ribosome assembly and function in strains in which loop deletion mutant genes are the only sources of uL4 or uL22 protein. The uL4 and uL22 loop deletions have different effects, but both mutations result in accumulation of immature particles that do not accumulate in detectable amounts in wild-type strains. Thus, our results suggest that deleting the loops creates kinetic barriers in the normal assembly pathway, possibly resulting in assembly via alternate pathway(s). Furthermore, deletion of the uL4 loop results in cold-sensitive ribosome assembly and function. Finally, ribosomes carrying either of the loop-deleted proteins responded normally to the secM translation pausing peptide, but the uL4 mutant responded very inefficiently to the cmlAcrb pause peptide. PMID:27257065

  13. EF-G-dependent GTPase on the ribosome. conformational change and fusidic acid inhibition.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyuk-Soo; Abedin, Sameem; Kamp, Detlev; Wilson, Daniel N; Nierhaus, Knud H; Cooperman, Barry S

    2006-02-28

    Protein synthesis studies increasingly focus on delineating the nature of conformational changes occurring as the ribosome exerts its catalytic functions. Here, we use FRET to examine such changes during single-turnover EF-G-dependent GTPase on vacant ribosomes and to elucidate the mechanism by which fusidic acid (FA) inhibits multiple-turnover EF-G.GTPase. Our measurements focus on the distance between the G' region of EF-G and the N-terminal region of L11 (L11-NTD), located within the GTPase activation center of the ribosome. We demonstrate that single-turnover ribosome-dependent EF-G GTPase proceeds according to a kinetic scheme in which rapid G' to L11-NTD movement requires prior GTP hydrolysis and, via branching pathways, either precedes P(i) release (major pathway) or occurs simultaneously with it (minor pathway). Such movement retards P(i) release, with the result that P(i) release is essentially rate-determining in single-turnover GTPase. This is the most significant difference between the EF-G.GTPase activities of vacant and translocating ribosomes [Savelsbergh, A., Katunin, V. I., Mohr, D., Peske, F., Rodnina, M. V., and Wintermeyer, W. (2003) Mol. Cell 11, 1517-1523], which are otherwise quite similar. Both the G' to L11-NTD movement and P(i) release are strongly inhibited by thiostrepton but not by FA. Contrary to the standard view that FA permits only a single round of GTP hydrolysis [Bodley, J. W., Zieve, F. J., and Lin, L. (1970) J. Biol. Chem. 245, 5662-5667], we find that FA functions rather as a slow inhibitor of EF-G.GTPase, permitting a number of GTPase turnovers prior to complete inhibition while inducing a closer approach of EF-G to the GAC than is seen during normal turnover. PMID:16489743

  14. The Genes for Cytoplasmic Ribosomal Ribonucleic Acid in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Scott, N. Steele; Ingle, J.

    1973-01-01

    The genes for cytoplasmic ribosomal RNA are partially resolved from the bulk of the DNA by CsCl equilibrium centrifugation. Although in some plants the buoyant density of the ribosomal RNA genes is as expected from the base composition of ribosomal RNA, others show a large discrepancy which cannot be due to the presence of low G-C spacer-DNA. The cross-hybridization observed with 1.3 and 0.7 × 106 molecular weight ribosomal RNAs and DNA, which varies greatly with different plant species, is not due to contamination of the ribosomal RNAs, and is specific for the ribosomal DNA of each species, probably largely restricted to those sequences coding for the two stable ribosomal RNAs. The double reciprocal plot may be used for the extrapolation of saturation values only with caution, because in these cases such plots are not linear over the whole of the hybridization reaction. PMID:16658392

  15. Ribosomal protein S14 negatively regulates c-Myc activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang; Hao, Qian; Liao, Jun-Ming; Liao, Peng; Lu, Hua

    2013-07-26

    The ribosomal gene RPS14 is associated with the cancer-prone 5q-syndrome, which is caused by an interstitial deletion of the long arm of human chromosome 5. Previously, we found that ribosomal protein S14 (RPS14) binds to and inactivates MDM2, consequently leading to p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest and growth inhibition. However, it remains elusive whether RPS14 regulates cell proliferation in a p53-independent manner. Here, we show that RPS14 interacts with the Myc homology box II (MBII) and the C-terminal basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-LZ) domains of the oncoprotein c-Myc. Further, RPS14 inhibited c-Myc transcriptional activity by preventing the recruitment of c-Myc and its cofactor, TRRAP, to the target gene promoters, as thus suppressing c-Myc-induced cell proliferation. Also, siRNA-mediated RPS14 depletion elevated c-Myc transcriptional activity determined by its target gene, Nucleolin, expression. Interestingly, RPS14 depletion also resulted in the induction of c-Myc mRNA and subsequent protein levels. Consistent with this, RPS14 promoted c-Myc mRNA turnover through an Argonaute 2 (Ago2)- and microRNA-mediated pathway. Taken together, our study demonstrates that RPS14 negates c-Myc functions by directly inhibiting its transcriptional activity and mediating its mRNA degradation via miRNA. PMID:23775087

  16. Differential effects of ribosomal proteins and Mg2+ ions on a conformational switch during 30S ribosome 5'-domain assembly.

    PubMed

    Abeysirigunawardena, Sanjaya C; Woodson, Sarah A

    2015-11-01

    Ribosomal protein S4 nucleates assembly of the 30S ribosome 5' and central domains, which is crucial for the survival of cells. Protein S4 changes the structure of its 16S rRNA binding site, passing through a non-native intermediate complex before forming native S4-rRNA contacts. Ensemble FRET was used to measure the thermodynamic stability of non-native and native S4 complexes in the presence of Mg(2+) ions and other 5'-domain proteins. Equilibrium titrations of Cy3-labeled 5'-domain RNA with Cy5-labeled protein S4 showed that Mg(2+) ions preferentially stabilize the native S4-rRNA complex. In contrast, ribosomal proteins S20 and S16 act by destabilizing the non-native S4-rRNA complex. The full cooperative switch to the native complex requires S4, S16, and S20 and is achieved to a lesser degree by S4 and S16. The resulting thermodynamic model for assembly of the 30S body illustrates how ribosomal proteins selectively bias the equilibrium between alternative rRNA conformations, increasing the cooperativity of rRNA folding beyond what can be achieved by Mg(2+) ions alone. PMID:26354770

  17. Identification of an unconventional nuclear localization signal in human ribosomal protein S2

    SciTech Connect

    Antoine, M.; Reimers, K.; Wirz, W.; Gressner, A.M.; Mueller, R.; Kiefer, P. . E-Mail: pkiefer@ukaachen.de

    2005-09-16

    Ribosomal proteins must be imported into the nucleus after being synthesized in the cytoplasm. Since the rpS2 amino acid sequence does not contain a typical nuclear localization signal, we used deletion mutant analysis and rpS2-{beta}-galactosidase chimeric proteins to identify the nuclear targeting domains in rpS2. Nuclear rpS2 is strictly localized in the nucleoplasm and is not targeted to the nucleoli. Subcellular localization analysis of deletion mutants of rpS2-{beta}-galactosidase chimeras identified a central domain comprising 72 amino acids which is necessary and sufficient to target the chimeric {beta}-galactosidase to the nucleus. The nuclear targeting domain shares no significant similarity to already characterized nuclear localization signals in ribosomal proteins or other nuclear proteins. Although a Nup153 fragment containing the importin{beta} binding site fused to VP22 blocks nuclear import of rpS2-{beta}-galactosidase fusion proteins, nuclear uptake of rpS2 could be mediated by several import receptors since it binds to importin{alpha}/{beta} and transportin.

  18. Ribosome-inactivating proteins: from plant defense to tumor attack.

    PubMed

    de Virgilio, Maddalena; Lombardi, Alessio; Caliandro, Rocco; Fabbrini, Maria Serena

    2010-11-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are EC3.2.32.22 N-glycosidases that recognize a universally conserved stem-loop structure in 23S/25S/28S rRNA, depurinating a single adenine (A4324 in rat) and irreversibly blocking protein translation, leading finally to cell death of intoxicated mammalian cells. Ricin, the plant RIP prototype that comprises a catalytic A subunit linked to a galactose-binding lectin B subunit to allow cell surface binding and toxin entry in most mammalian cells, shows a potency in the picomolar range. The most promising way to exploit plant RIPs as weapons against cancer cells is either by designing molecules in which the toxic domains are linked to selective tumor targeting domains or directly delivered as suicide genes for cancer gene therapy. Here, we will provide a comprehensive picture of plant RIPs and discuss successful designs and features of chimeric molecules having therapeutic potential. PMID:22069572

  19. Ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 signaling regulates mammalian lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Selman, Colin; Tullet, Jennifer M.A.; Wieser, Daniela; Irvine, Elaine; Lingard, Steven J.; Choudhury, Agharul I.; Claret, Marc; Al-Qassab, Hind; Carmignac, Danielle; Ramadani, Faruk; Woods, Angela; Robinson, Iain C.A.; Schuster, Eugene; Batterham, Rachel L.; Kozma, Sara C.; Thomas, George; Carling, David; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Thornton, Janet M.; Partridge, Linda; Gems, David; Withers, Dominic J.

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) protects against aging and disease but the mechanisms by which this affects mammalian lifespan are unclear. We show in mice that deletion of the nutrient-responsive mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling pathway component ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1) led to increased lifespan and resistance to age-related pathologies such as bone, immune and motor dysfunction and loss of insulin sensitivity. Deletion of S6K1 induced gene expression patterns similar to those seen in CR or with pharmacological activation of adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a conserved regulator of the metabolic response to CR. Our results demonstrate that S6K1 influences healthy mammalian lifespan, and suggest therapeutic manipulation of S6K1 and AMPK might mimic CR and provide broad protection against diseases of aging. PMID:19797661

  20. Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins: From Plant Defense to Tumor Attack

    PubMed Central

    de Virgilio, Maddalena; Lombardi, Alessio; Caliandro, Rocco; Fabbrini, Maria Serena

    2010-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are EC3.2.32.22 N-glycosidases that recognize a universally conserved stem-loop structure in 23S/25S/28S rRNA, depurinating a single adenine (A4324 in rat) and irreversibly blocking protein translation, leading finally to cell death of intoxicated mammalian cells. Ricin, the plant RIP prototype that comprises a catalytic A subunit linked to a galactose-binding lectin B subunit to allow cell surface binding and toxin entry in most mammalian cells, shows a potency in the picomolar range. The most promising way to exploit plant RIPs as weapons against cancer cells is either by designing molecules in which the toxic domains are linked to selective tumor targeting domains or directly delivered as suicide genes for cancer gene therapy. Here, we will provide a comprehensive picture of plant RIPs and discuss successful designs and features of chimeric molecules having therapeutic potential. PMID:22069572

  1. Ribosome-mediated incorporation of a non-standard amino acid into a peptide through expansion of the genetic code.

    PubMed

    Bain, J D; Switzer, C; Chamberlin, A R; Benner, S A

    1992-04-01

    One serious limitation facing protein engineers is the availability of only 20 'proteinogenic' amino acids encoded by natural messenger RNA. The lack of structural diversity among these amino acids restricts the mechanistic and structural issues that can be addressed by site-directed mutagenesis. Here we describe a new technology for incorporating non-standard amino acids into polypeptides by ribosome-based translation. In this technology, the genetic code is expanded through the creation of a 65th codon-anticodon pair from unnatural nucleoside bases having non-standard hydrogen-bonding patterns. This new codon-anticodon pair efficiently supports translation in vitro to yield peptides containing a non-standard amino acid. The versatility of the ribosome as a synthetic tool offers new possibilities for protein engineering, and compares favourably with another recently described approach in which the genetic code is simply rearranged to recruit stop codons to play a coding role. PMID:1560827

  2. Characterization and analysis of ribosomal proteins in two marine calanoid copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Huang, Yousong; Yi, Xiaoyan; Chen, Hongju; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2016-02-01

    Copepods are among the most abundant and successful metazoans in the marine ecosystem. However, genomic resources related to fundamental cellular processes are still limited in this particular group of crustaceans. Ribosomal proteins are the building blocks of ribosomes, the primary site for protein synthesis. In this study, we characterized and analyzed the cDNAs of cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) of two calanoid copepods, Pseudodiaptomus poplesia and Acartia pacifica. We obtained 79 cRP cDNAs from P. poplesia and 67 from A. pacifica by cDNA library construction/sequencing and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Analysis of the nucleic acid composition showed that the copepod cRP-encoding genes had higher GC content in the protein-coding regions (CDSs) than in the untranslated regions (UTRs), and single nucleotide repeats (>3 repeats) were common, with "A" repeats being the most frequent, especially in the CDSs. The 3'-UTRs of the cRP genes were significantly longer than the 5'-UTRs. Codon usage analysis showed that the third positions of the codons were dominated by C or G. The deduced amino acid sequences of the cRPs contained high proportions of positively charged residues and had high pI values. This is the first report of a complete set of cRP-encoding genes from copepods. Our results shed light on the characteristics of cRPs in copepods, and provide fundamental data for further studies of protein synthesis in copepods. The copepod cRP information revealed in this study indicates that additional comparisons and analysis should be performed on different taxonomic categories such as orders and families.

  3. A protein residing at the subunit interface of the bacterial ribosome.

    PubMed

    Agafonov, D E; Kolb, V A; Nazimov, I V; Spirin, A S

    1999-10-26

    Surface labeling of Escherichia coli ribosomes with the use of the tritium bombardment technique has revealed a minor unidentified ribosome-bound protein (spot Y) that is hidden in the 70S ribosome and becomes highly labeled on dissociation of the 70S ribosome into subunits. In the present work, the N-terminal sequence of the protein Y was determined and its gene was identified as yfia, an ORF located upstream the phe operon of E. coli. This 12.7-kDa protein was isolated and characterized. An affinity of the purified protein Y for the 30S subunit, but not for the 50S ribosomal subunit, was shown. The protein proved to be exposed on the surface of the 30S subunit. The attachment of the 50S subunit resulted in hiding the protein Y, thus suggesting the protein location at the subunit interface in the 70S ribosome. The protein was shown to stabilize ribosomes against dissociation. The possible role of the protein Y as ribosome association factor in translation is discussed. PMID:10535924

  4. Cross-species conservation of complementary amino acid-ribonucleobase interactions and their potential for ribosome-free encoding

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, John G. D.; Sherman, Rachel M.; Wang, Victoria M. Y.; Newman, Grace A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of amino acid-RNA nucleobase interactions in the evolution of RNA translation and protein-mRNA autoregulation remains an open area of research. We describe the inference of pairwise amino acid-RNA nucleobase interaction preferences using structural data from known RNA-protein complexes. We observed significant matching between an amino acid’s nucleobase affinity and corresponding codon content in both the standard genetic code and mitochondrial variants. Furthermore, we showed that knowledge of nucleobase preferences allows statistically significant prediction of protein primary sequence from mRNA using purely physiochemical information. Interestingly, ribosomal primary sequences were more accurately predicted than non-ribosomal sequences, suggesting a potential role for direct amino acid-nucleobase interactions in the genesis of amino acid-based ribosomal components. Finally, we observed matching between amino acid-nucleobase affinities and corresponding mRNA sequences in 35 evolutionarily diverse proteomes. We believe these results have important implications for the study of the evolutionary origins of the genetic code and protein-mRNA cross-regulation. PMID:26656258

  5. Ribosomal protein methylation in Escherichia coli: the gene prmA, encoding the ribosomal protein L11 methyltransferase, is dispensable.

    PubMed

    Vanet, A; Plumbridge, J A; Guérin, M F; Alix, J H

    1994-12-01

    The prmA gene, located at 72 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome, is the genetic determinant of ribosomal protein L11-methyltransferase activity. Mutations at this locus, prmA1 and prmA3, result in a severely undermethylated form of L11. No effect, other than the lack of methyl groups on L11, has been ascribed to these mutations. DNA sequence analysis of the mutant alleles prmA1 and prmA3 detected point mutations near the C-terminus of the protein and plasmids overproducing the wild-type and the two mutant proteins have been constructed. The wild-type PrmA protein could be crosslinked to its radiolabelled substrate, S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), by u.v. irradiation indicating that it is the gene for the methyltransferase rather than a regulatory protein. One of the mutant proteins, PrmA3, was also weakly crosslinked to SAM. Both mutant enzymes when expressed from the overproducing plasmids were capable of catalysing the incorporation of 3H-labelled methyl groups from SAM to L11 in vitro. This confirmed the observation that the mutant proteins possess significant residual activity which could account for their lack of growth phenotype. However, a strain carrying an in vitro-constructed null mutation of the prmA gene, transferred to the E. coli chromosome by homologous recombination, was perfectly viable. PMID:7715456

  6. Phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins induced by auxins in maize embryonic tissues. [Zea mays

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, L.; Aguilar, R.; Mendez, A.P.; de Jimenez, E.S.

    1990-11-01

    The effect of auxin on ribosomal protein phosphorylation of germinating maize (Zea mays) tissues was investigated. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of ({sup 32}P) ribosomal protein patterns for natural and synthetic auxin-treated tissues were performed. Both the rate of {sup 32}P incorporation and the electrophoretic patterns were dependent on {sup 32}P pulse length, suggesting that active protein phosphorylation-dephosphorylation occurred in small and large subunit proteins, in control as well as in auxin-treated tissues. The effect of ribosomal protein phosphorylation on in vitro translation was tested. Measurements of poly(U) translation rates as a function of ribosome concentration provided apparent K{sub m} values significantly different for auxin-treated and nontreated tissues. These findings suggest that auxin might exert some kind of translational control by regulating the phosphorylated status of ribosomal proteins.

  7. Autogenous Regulation of Splicing of the Transcript of a Yeast Ribosomal Protein Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabeva, Mariana D.; Post-Beittenmiller, Martha A.; Warner, Jonathan R.

    1986-08-01

    The gene for a yeast ribosomal protein, RPL32, contains a single intron. The product of this gene appears to participate in feedback control of the splicing of the intron from the transcript. This autogenous regulation of splicing provides a striking analogy to the autogenous regulation of translation of ribosomal proteins in Escherichia coli.

  8. Effects of induction of rRNA overproduction on ribosomal protein synthesis and ribosome subunit assembly in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, M; Nomura, M

    1988-01-01

    Overproduction of rRNA was artificially induced in Escherichia coli cells to test whether the synthesis of ribosomal protein (r-protein) is normally repressed by feedback regulation. When rRNA was overproduced more than twofold from a hybrid plasmid carrying the rrnB operon fused to the lambda pL promoter (pL-rrnB), synthesis of individual r-proteins increased by an average of about 60%. This demonstrates that the synthesis of r-proteins is repressed under normal conditions. The increase of r-protein production, however, for unknown reasons, was not as great as the increase in rRNA synthesis and resulted in an imbalance between the amounts of rRNA and r-protein synthesis. Therefore, only a small (less than 20%) increase in the synthesis of complete 30S and 50S ribosome subunits was detected, and a considerable fraction of the excess rRNA was degraded. Lack of complete cooperativity in the assembly of ribosome subunits in vivo is discussed as a possible explanation for the absence of a large stimulation of ribosome synthesis observed under these conditions. In addition to the induction of intact rRNA overproduction from the pL-rrnB operon, the effects of unbalanced overproduction of each of the two large rRNAs, 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA, on r-protein synthesis were examined using pL-rrnB derivatives carrying a large deletion in either the 23S rRNA gene or the 16S rRNA gene. Operon-specific derepression after 23S or 16S rRNA overproduction correlated with the overproduction of rRNA containing the target site for the operon-specific repressor r-protein. These results are discussed to explain the apparent coupling of the assembly of one ribosomal subunit with that of the other which was observed in earlier studies on conditionally lethal mutants with defects in ribosome assembly. PMID:3053641

  9. Proteins of rough microsomal membranes related to ribosome binding. I. Identification of ribophorins I and II, membrane proteins characteristics of rough microsomes

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Rat liver rough microsomes (RM) contain two integral membrane proteins which are not found in smooth microsomes (SM) and appear to be related to the presence of ribosome-binding sites. These proteins, of molecular weight 65,000 and 63,000, were designated ribophorins I and II, respectively. They were not released from the microsomal membranes by alkali or acid treatment, or when the ribosomes were detached by incubation with puromycin in a high salt medium. The anionic detergent sodium deoxycholate caused solubilization of the ribophorins, but neutral detergents led to their recovery with the sedimentable ribosomes. Ribosomal aggregates containing both ribophorins, but few other membrane proteins, were obtained from RM treated with the nonionic detergent Kyro EOB (2.5 X10(-2) M) in a low ionic strength medium. Sedimentation patterns produced by these aggregates resembled those of large polysomes but were not affected by RNase treatment. The aggregates, however, were dispersed by mild trypsinization (10 microgram trypsin for 30 min at 0 degrees C), incubation with deoxycholate, or in a medium of high salt concentration. These treatments led to a concomitant degradation or release of the ribophorins. It was estimated, from the staining intensity of protein bands in acrylamide gels, that in the Kyro EOB aggregates there were one to two molecules of each ribophorin per ribosome. Sedimentable complexes without ribosomes containing both ribophorins could also be obtained by dissolving RM previously stripped of ribosomes by puromycin- KCl using cholate, a milder detergent than DOC. Electron microscope examination of the residue obtained from RM treated with Kyro EOB showed that the rapidly sedimenting polysome-like aggregates containing the ribophorins consisted of groups of tightly packed ribosomes which were associated with remnants of the microsomal membranes. PMID:649658

  10. Proteins of rough microsomal membranes related to ribosome binding. I. Identification of ribophorins I and II, membrane proteins characteristics of rough microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kreibich, G; Ulrich, B L; Sabatini, D D

    1978-05-01

    Rat liver rough microsomes (RM) contain two integral membrane proteins which are not found in smooth microsomes (SM) and appear to be related to the presence of ribosome-binding sites. These proteins, of molecular weight 65,000 and 63,000, were designated ribophorins I and II, respectively. They were not released from the microsomal membranes by alkali or acid treatment, or when the ribosomes were detached by incubation with puromycin in a high salt medium. The anionic detergent sodium deoxycholate caused solubilization of the ribophorins, but neutral detergents led to their recovery with the sedimentable ribosomes. Ribosomal aggregates containing both ribophorins, but few other membrane proteins, were obtained from RM treated with the nonionic detergent Kyro EOB (2.5 X10(-2) M) in a low ionic strength medium. Sedimentation patterns produced by these aggregates resembled those of large polysomes but were not affected by RNase treatment. The aggregates, however, were dispersed by mild trypsinization (10 microgram trypsin for 30 min at 0 degrees C), incubation with deoxycholate, or in a medium of high salt concentration. These treatments led to a concomitant degradation or release of the ribophorins. It was estimated, from the staining intensity of protein bands in acrylamide gels, that in the Kyro EOB aggregates there were one to two molecules of each ribophorin per ribosome. Sedimentable complexes without ribosomes containing both ribophorins could also be obtained by dissolving RM previously stripped of ribosomes by puromycin-KCl using cholate, a milder detergent than DOC. Electron microscope examination of the residue obtained from RM treated with Kyro EOB showed that the rapidly sedimenting polysome-like aggregates containing the ribophorins consisted of groups of tightly packed ribosomes which were associated with remnants of the microsomal membranes. PMID:649658

  11. Identification of Methylated Proteins in the Yeast Small Ribosomal Subunit: A Role for SPOUT Methyltransferases in Protein Arginine Methylation†

    PubMed Central

    Young, Brian D.; Weiss, David I.; Zurita-Lopez, Cecilia I.; Webb, Kristofor J.; Clarke, Steven G.; McBride, Anne E.

    2012-01-01

    We have characterized the posttranslational methylation of Rps2, Rps3, and Rps27a, three small ribosomal subunit proteins in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using mass spectrometry and amino acid analysis. We found that Rps2 is substoichiometrically modified at arginine-10 by the Rmt1 methyltransferase. We demonstrated that Rps3 is stoichiometrically modified by ω-monomethylation at arginine-146 by mass spectrometric and site-directed mutagenic analyses. Substitution of alanine for arginine at position 146 is associated with slow cell growth, suggesting that the amino acid identity at this site may influence ribosomal function and/or biogenesis. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure of Rps3 in S. cerevisiae shows that arginine-146 makes contacts with the small subunit rRNA. Screening of deletion mutants encoding potential yeast methyltransferases revealed that the loss of the YOR021C gene results in the absence of methylation on Rps3. We demonstrated that recombinant Yor021c catalyzes ω-monomethylarginine formation when incubated with S-adenosylmethionine and hypomethylated ribosomes prepared from a YOR021C deletion strain. Interestingly, Yor021c belongs to the family of SPOUT methyltransferases that, to date, have only been shown to modify RNA substrates. Our findings suggest a wider role for SPOUT methyltransferases in nature. Finally, we have demonstrated the presence of a stoichiometrically methylated cysteine residue at position 39 of Rps27a in a zinc-cysteine cluster. The discovery of these three novel sites of protein modification within the small ribosomal subunit will now allow for an analysis of their functional roles in translation and possibly other cellular processes. PMID:22650761

  12. What makes ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation sensitive to amino acid limitation?

    PubMed

    Elf, Johan; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2005-06-01

    Ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation mechanisms are commonly used to control amino acid biosynthetic operons in bacteria. The mRNA leader of such an operon contains an open reading frame with "regulatory" codons, cognate to the amino acid that is synthesized by the enzymes encoded by the operon. When the amino acid is in short supply, translation of the regulatory codons is slow, which allows transcription to continue into the structural genes of the operon. When amino acid supply is in excess, translation of regulatory codons is rapid, which leads to termination of transcription. We use a discrete master equation approach to formulate a probabilistic model for the positioning of the RNA polymerase and the ribosome in the attenuator leader sequence. The model describes how the current rate of amino acid supply compared to the demand in protein synthesis (signal) determines the expression of the amino acid biosynthetic operon (response). The focus of our analysis is on the sensitivity of operon expression to a change in the amino acid supply. We show that attenuation of transcription can be hyper-sensitive for two main reasons. The first is that its response depends on the outcome of a race between two multi-step mechanisms with synchronized starts: transcription of the leader of the operon, and translation of its regulatory codons. The relative change in the probability that transcription is aborted (attenuated) can therefore be much larger than the relative change in the time it takes for the ribosome to read a regulatory codon. The second is that the general usage frequencies of codons of the type used in attenuation control are small. A small percentage decrease in the rate of supply of the controlled amino acid can therefore lead to a much larger percentage decrease in the rate of reading a regulatory codon. We show that high sensitivity further requires a particular choice of regulatory codon among several synonymous codons for the same amino acid. We

  13. A ribosome-inactivating protein in a Drosophila defensive symbiont.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Phineas T; Peng, Fangni; Boulanger, Martin J; Perlman, Steve J

    2016-01-12

    Vertically transmitted symbionts that protect their hosts against parasites and pathogens are well known from insects, yet the underlying mechanisms of symbiont-mediated defense are largely unclear. A striking example of an ecologically important defensive symbiosis involves the woodland fly Drosophila neotestacea, which is protected by the bacterial endosymbiont Spiroplasma when parasitized by the nematode Howardula aoronymphium. The benefit of this defense strategy has led to the rapid spread of Spiroplasma throughout the range of D. neotestacea, although the molecular basis for this protection has been unresolved. Here, we show that Spiroplasma encodes a ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) related to Shiga-like toxins from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and that Howardula ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is depurinated during Spiroplasma-mediated protection of D. neotestacea. First, we show that recombinant Spiroplasma RIP catalyzes depurination of 28S rRNAs in a cell-free assay, as well as Howardula rRNA in vitro at the canonical RIP target site within the α-sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) of 28S rRNA. We then show that Howardula parasites in Spiroplasma-infected flies show a strong signal of rRNA depurination consistent with RIP-dependent modification and large decreases in the proportion of 28S rRNA intact at the α-sarcin/ricin loop. Notably, host 28S rRNA is largely unaffected, suggesting targeted specificity. Collectively, our study identifies a novel RIP in an insect defensive symbiont and suggests an underlying RIP-dependent mechanism in Spiroplasma-mediated defense. PMID:26712000

  14. A ribosome-inactivating protein in a Drosophila defensive symbiont

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Phineas T.; Peng, Fangni; Boulanger, Martin J.; Perlman, Steve J.

    2016-01-01

    Vertically transmitted symbionts that protect their hosts against parasites and pathogens are well known from insects, yet the underlying mechanisms of symbiont-mediated defense are largely unclear. A striking example of an ecologically important defensive symbiosis involves the woodland fly Drosophila neotestacea, which is protected by the bacterial endosymbiont Spiroplasma when parasitized by the nematode Howardula aoronymphium. The benefit of this defense strategy has led to the rapid spread of Spiroplasma throughout the range of D. neotestacea, although the molecular basis for this protection has been unresolved. Here, we show that Spiroplasma encodes a ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) related to Shiga-like toxins from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and that Howardula ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is depurinated during Spiroplasma-mediated protection of D. neotestacea. First, we show that recombinant Spiroplasma RIP catalyzes depurination of 28S rRNAs in a cell-free assay, as well as Howardula rRNA in vitro at the canonical RIP target site within the α-sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) of 28S rRNA. We then show that Howardula parasites in Spiroplasma-infected flies show a strong signal of rRNA depurination consistent with RIP-dependent modification and large decreases in the proportion of 28S rRNA intact at the α-sarcin/ricin loop. Notably, host 28S rRNA is largely unaffected, suggesting targeted specificity. Collectively, our study identifies a novel RIP in an insect defensive symbiont and suggests an underlying RIP-dependent mechanism in Spiroplasma-mediated defense. PMID:26712000

  15. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by their dedicated chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Pausch, Patrick; Singh, Ujjwala; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Pillet, Benjamin; Murat, Guillaume; Altegoer, Florian; Stier, Gunter; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard; Bange, Gert; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Exponentially growing yeast cells produce every minute >160,000 ribosomal proteins. Owing to their difficult physicochemical properties, the synthesis of assembly-competent ribosomal proteins represents a major challenge. Recent evidence highlights that dedicated chaperone proteins recognize the N-terminal regions of ribosomal proteins and promote their soluble expression and delivery to the assembly site. Here we explore the intuitive possibility that ribosomal proteins are captured by dedicated chaperones in a co-translational manner. Affinity purification of four chaperones (Rrb1, Syo1, Sqt1 and Yar1) selectively enriched the mRNAs encoding their specific ribosomal protein clients (Rpl3, Rpl5, Rpl10 and Rps3). X-ray crystallography reveals how the N-terminal, rRNA-binding residues of Rpl10 are shielded by Sqt1's WD-repeat β-propeller, providing mechanistic insight into the incorporation of Rpl10 into pre-60S subunits. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by dedicated chaperones constitutes an elegant mechanism to prevent unspecific interactions and aggregation of ribosomal proteins on their road to incorporation. PMID:26112308

  16. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by their dedicated chaperones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pausch, Patrick; Singh, Ujjwala; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Pillet, Benjamin; Murat, Guillaume; Altegoer, Florian; Stier, Gunter; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard; Bange, Gert; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-06-01

    Exponentially growing yeast cells produce every minute >160,000 ribosomal proteins. Owing to their difficult physicochemical properties, the synthesis of assembly-competent ribosomal proteins represents a major challenge. Recent evidence highlights that dedicated chaperone proteins recognize the N-terminal regions of ribosomal proteins and promote their soluble expression and delivery to the assembly site. Here we explore the intuitive possibility that ribosomal proteins are captured by dedicated chaperones in a co-translational manner. Affinity purification of four chaperones (Rrb1, Syo1, Sqt1 and Yar1) selectively enriched the mRNAs encoding their specific ribosomal protein clients (Rpl3, Rpl5, Rpl10 and Rps3). X-ray crystallography reveals how the N-terminal, rRNA-binding residues of Rpl10 are shielded by Sqt1's WD-repeat β-propeller, providing mechanistic insight into the incorporation of Rpl10 into pre-60S subunits. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by dedicated chaperones constitutes an elegant mechanism to prevent unspecific interactions and aggregation of ribosomal proteins on their road to incorporation.

  17. Eukaryote-specific extensions in ribosomal proteins of the small subunit: Structure and function.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arnab; Komar, Anton A

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution structures of yeast ribosomes have improved our understanding of the architecture and organization of eukaryotic rRNA and proteins, as well as eukaryote-specific extensions present in some conserved ribosomal proteins. Despite this progress, assignment of specific functions to individual proteins and/or eukaryote-specific protein extensions remains challenging. It has been suggested that eukaryote-specific extensions of conserved proteins from the small ribosomal subunit may facilitate eukaryote-specific reactions in the initiation phase of protein synthesis. This review summarizes emerging data describing the structural and functional significance of eukaryote-specific extensions of conserved small ribosomal subunit proteins, particularly their possible roles in recruitment and spatial organization of eukaryote-specific initiation factors. PMID:26779416

  18. Effects of ribosome-inactivating proteins on Escherichia coli and Agrobacterium tumefaciens translation systems.

    PubMed Central

    Girbés, T; Barbieri, L; Ferreras, M; Arias, F J; Rojo, M A; Iglesias, R; Alegre, C; Escarmis, C; Stirpe, F

    1993-01-01

    The effects of 30 type 1 and of 2 (ricin and volkensin) type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) on Escherichia coli and Agrobacterium tumefaciens cell-free translation systems were compared with the effects on a rabbit reticulocyte translation system. The depurinating activity of RIPs on E. coli ribosomes was also evaluated. Only six type 1 RIPs inhibited endogenous mRNA-directed translational activity of E. coli lysates, with submicromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations. Four RIPs had similar activities on poly(U)-directed phenylalanine polymerization by E. coli ribosomes, and three RIPs inhibited poly(U)-directed polyphenylalanine synthesis by A. tumefaciens ribosomes, with submicromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations. Images PMID:8407849

  19. Ribosome reinitiation at leader peptides increases translation of bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Korolev, Semen A; Zverkov, Oleg A; Seliverstov, Alexandr V; Lyubetsky, Vassily A

    2016-01-01

    Short leader genes usually do not encode stable proteins, although their importance in expression control of bacterial genomes is widely accepted. Such genes are often involved in the control of attenuation regulation. However, the abundance of leader genes suggests that their role in bacteria is not limited to regulation. Specifically, we hypothesize that leader genes increase the expression of protein-coding (structural) genes via ribosome reinitiation at the leader peptide in the case of a short distance between the stop codon of the leader gene and the start codon of the structural gene. For instance, in Actinobacteria, the frequency of leader genes at a distance of 10-11 bp is about 70 % higher than the mean frequency within the 1 to 65 bp range; and it gradually decreases as the range grows longer. A pronounced peak of this frequency-distance relationship is also observed in Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetales, Acidobacteria, the Deinococcus-Thermus group, and Planctomycetes. In contrast, this peak falls to the distance of 15-16 bp and is not very pronounced in Firmicutes; and no such peak is observed in cyanobacteria and tenericutes. Generally, this peak is typical for many bacteria. Some leader genes located close to a structural gene probably play a regulatory role as well. PMID:27084079

  20. Ribosomal proteins as biomarkers for bacterial identification by mass spectrometry in the clinical microbiology laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Stéphanie; Ferroni, Agnès; Lotz, Aurélie; Jolley, Keith A.; Guérin, Philippe; Leto, Julie; Dauphin, Brunhilde; Jamet, Anne; Maiden, Martin C.J.; Nassif, Xavier; Armengaud, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a rapid method for identification of microorganisms that is increasingly used in microbiology laboratories. This identification is based on the comparison of the tested isolate mass spectrum with reference databases. Using Neisseria meningitidis as a model organism, we showed that in one of the available databases, the Andromas database, 10 of the 13 species-specific biomarkers correspond to ribosomal proteins. Remarkably, one biomarker, ribosomal protein L32, was subject to inter-strain variability. The analysis of the ribosomal protein patterns of 100 isolates for which whole genome sequences were available, confirmed the presence of inter-strain variability in the molecular weight of 29 ribosomal proteins, thus establishing a correlation between the sequence type (ST) and/or clonal complex (CC) of each strain and its ribosomal protein pattern. Since the molecular weight of three of the variable ribosomal proteins (L30, L31 and L32) was included in the spectral window observed by MALDI-TOF MS in clinical microbiology, i.e., 3640–12000 m/z, we were able by analyzing the molecular weight of these three ribosomal proteins to classify each strain in one of six subgroups, each of these subgroups corresponding to specific STs and/or CCs. Their detection by MALDI-TOF allows therefore a quick typing of N. meningitidis isolates. PMID:23916798

  1. Most RNAs regulating ribosomal protein biosynthesis in Escherichia coli are narrowly distributed to Gammaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yang; Deiorio-Haggar, Kaila; Anthony, Jon; Meyer, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, 12 distinct RNA structures within the transcripts encoding ribosomal proteins interact with specific ribosomal proteins to allow autogenous regulation of expression from large multi-gene operons, thus coordinating ribosomal protein biosynthesis across multiple operons. However, these RNA structures are typically not represented in the RNA Families Database or annotated in genomic sequences databases, and their phylogenetic distribution is largely unknown. To investigate the extent to which these RNA structures are conserved across eubacterial phyla, we created multiple sequence alignments representing 10 of these messenger RNA (mRNA) structures in E. coli. We find that while three RNA structures are widely distributed across many phyla of bacteria, seven of the RNAs are narrowly distributed to a few orders of Gammaproteobacteria. To experimentally validate our computational predictions, we biochemically confirmed dual L1-binding sites identified in many Firmicute species. This work reveals that RNA-based regulation of ribosomal protein biosynthesis is used in nearly all eubacterial phyla, but the specific RNA structures that regulate ribosomal protein biosynthesis in E. coli are narrowly distributed. These results highlight the limits of our knowledge regarding ribosomal protein biosynthesis regulation outside of E. coli, and the potential for alternative RNA structures responsible for regulating ribosomal proteins in other eubacteria. PMID:23396277

  2. Production of ribosome-inactivating protein from hairy root cultures of Luffa cylindrica (L.) Roem.

    PubMed

    di Toppi, L S; Gorini, P; Properzi, G; Barbieri, L; Spanò, L

    1996-09-01

    Transformed root lines of Luffa cylindrica (L.) Roem. (Cucurbitaceae) were established by inoculation of in vitro grown plantlets with wild type Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain 1855. Cloned lines of hairy roots were tested for the presence of ribosome-inactivating proteins; crude extracts inhibited protein synthesis in a reaction mixture based on rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Inhibitory activity increased during culture period, reaching a maximum value in the stationary phase. No activity could be detected in the culture medium, nor in extracts from callus and/or suspension cultures. A ribosome-inactivating protein having specific activity of 62,100 U mg protein(-1) and a molecular mass of 26-28,000 Da was purified to homogeneity. The protein showed N-glycosidase activity on rat liver ribosomes. The results demonstrate that hairy root cultures can be successfully utilized for the in vitro production of ribosome-inactivating proteins. PMID:24178273

  3. Proteins of rough microsomal membranes related to ribosome binding. II. Cross-linking of bound ribosomes to specific membrane proteins exposed at the binding sites

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Two proteins (ribophorins I and II), which are integral components of rough microsomal membranes and appear to be related to the bound ribosomes, were shown to be exposed on the surface of rat liver rough microsomes (RM) and to be in close proximity to the bound ribosomes. Both proteins were labeled when intact RM were incubated with a lactoperoxidase iodinating system, but only ribophorin I was digested during mild trypsinization of intact RM. Ribophorin II (63,000 daltons) was only proteolyzed when the luminal face of the microsomal vesicles was made accessible to trypsin by the addition of sublytical detergent concentrations. Only 30--40% of the bound ribosomes were released during trypsinization on intact RM, but ribosome release was almost complete in the presence of low detergent concentrations. Very low glutaraldehyde concentrations (0.005--0.02%) led to the preferential cross-linking of large ribosomal subunits of bound ribosomes to the microsomal membranes. This cross-linking prevented the release of subunits caused by puromycin in media of high ionic strength, but not the incorporation of [3H]puromycin into nascent polypeptide chains. SDS- acrylamide gel electrophoresis of cross-linked samples a preferential reduction in the intensity of the bands representing the ribophorins and the formation of aggregates which did not penetrate into the gels. At low methyl-4-mercaptobutyrimidate (MMB) concentrations (0.26 mg/ml) only 30% of the ribosomes were cross-linked to the microsomal membranes, as shown by the puromycin-KCl test, but membranes could still be solubilized with 1% DOC. This allowed the isolation of the ribophorins together with the sedimentable ribosomes, as was shown by electrophoresis of the sediments after disruption of the cross-links by reduction. Experiments with RM which contained only inactive ribosomes showed that the presence of nascent chains was not necessary for the reversible cross-linking of ribosomes to the membranes. These

  4. Cloning, sequencing, gene organization, and localization of the human ribosomal protein RPL23A gene

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Wufang; Christensen, M.; Eichler, E.

    1997-12-01

    The intron-containing gene for human ribosomal protein RPL23A has been cloned, sequenced, and localized. The gene is approximately 4.0 kb in length and contains five exons and four introns. All splice sites exactly match the AG/GT consensus rule. The transcript is about 0.6 kb and is detected in all tissues examined. In adult tissues, the RPL23A transcript is dramatically more abundant in pancreas, skeletal muscle, and heart, while much less abundant in kidney, brain, placenta, lung, and liver. A full-length cDNA clone of 576 nt was identified, and the nucleotide sequence was found to match the exon sequence precisely. The open reading frame encodes a polypeptide of 156 amino acids, which is absolutely conserved with the rat RPL23A protein. In the 5{prime} flanking region of the gene, a canonical TATA sequence and a defined CAAT box were found for the first time in a mammalian ribosomal protein gene. The intron-containing RPL23A gene was mapped to cytogenetic band 17q11 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Identification of sirtuin and its target as the ribosomal protein S4 in Lactobacillus paracasei.

    PubMed

    Atarashi, Hotaka; Kawasaki, Shinji; Niimura, Yoichi; Tanaka, Naoto; Okada, Sanae; Shiwa, Yuh; Endo, Akihito; Nakagawa, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuin is a protein with an enzymatic activity of NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylation. It was first identified in yeast and its homologous genes have been widely found in various organisms. In bacteria, sirtuin gene was first described as cobB, encoding a cobalamin processing enzyme; and later its potential involvement in regulating acetylation levels of metabolic enzymes, transcription factors, chemotactic proteins and others have been reported. In order to study its physiological relevance in probiotic lactic acid bacteria, we analyzed the whole genome of three L. paracasei strains. All strains tested had sirtuin homolog genes designated hereby as sirA, and one of them had an additional gene designated as sirB. Following confirmation of their coding sequences by individual gene cloning, corresponding recombinant proteins have been generated and purified. The enzymatic characterization revealed that the intrinsic NAD(+)-dependent deacetylation activity of LpSirA (protein encoded by sirA) is comparable to human SIRT1. Furthermore, by blocking sirtuin activity using nicotinamide in vivo, together with an in vitro deacetylation reaction using recombinant LpSirA, we identified one of the target proteins in the lactic acid bacteria as the 30S ribosomal protein S4 (rpsD product). PMID:27118078

  6. Crystal structure of Gib2, a signal-transducing protein scaffold associated with ribosomes in Cryptococcus neoformans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ero, Rya; Dimitrova, Valya Tenusheva; Chen, Yun; Bu, Wenting; Feng, Shu; Liu, Tongbao; Wang, Ping; Xue, Chaoyang; Tan, Suet Mien; Gao, Yong-Gui

    2015-03-01

    The atypical Gβ-like/RACK1 Gib2 protein promotes cAMP signalling that plays a central role in regulating the virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans. Gib2 contains a seven-bladed β transducin structure and is emerging as a scaffold protein interconnecting signalling pathways through interactions with various protein partners. Here, we present the crystal structure of Gib2 at a 2.2-Å resolution. The structure allows us to analyse the association between Gib2 and the ribosome, as well as to identify the Gib2 amino acid residues involved in ribosome binding. Our studies not only suggest that Gib2 has a role in protein translation but also present Gib2 as a physical link at the crossroads of various regulatory pathways important for the growth and virulence of C. neoformans.

  7. Proteins with abortifacient, ribosome inactivating, immunomodulatory, antitumor and anti-AIDS activities from Cucurbitaceae plants.

    PubMed

    Ng, T B; Chan, W Y; Yeung, H W

    1992-07-01

    1. The biochemical characteristics and biological activities of eight Cucurbitaceae plant proteins designated trichosanthin (isolated from tubers of Trichosanthes kirilowii), beta-trichosanthin (isolated from tubers of Trichosanthes cucumeroides), alpha- and beta-momorcharins (isolated from seeds of Momordica charantia), momorchochin (isolated from tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis), luffaculin (isolated from seeds of Luffa acutangula) and luffin-a and luffin-b (isolated from seeds of Luffa cylindrica), were reviewed. 2. The isolation procedures for all eight proteins are based on aqueous extraction, acetone fractionation and ion exchange chromatography. Ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration are steps which may be included to improve purification. 3. The proteins are basic in nature and possess a molecular weight of approx. 30,000. All except trichosanthin are glycoproteins. The content of Asx and Glx residues is high. The N-terminal amino acid residue is Asp. Their amino acid compositions and N-terminal amino acid sequences are similar. 4. Circular dichroism spectroscopic studies revealed that trichosanthin, alpha- and beta-momorcharins possess similar secondary but different tertiary structures. 5. Most of the proteins are immunologically distinct. 6. The proteins exhibit abortifacient, antitumor, ribosome inactivating and immunomodulatory activities. Trichosanthin manifests anti-human immunodeficiency virus activity. PMID:1397965

  8. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Stm1p facilitates ribosome preservation during quiescence

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, Natalya; Chanchorn, Ekkawit; Van Dyke, Michael W.

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p confers increased resistance to the macrolide starvation-mimic rapamycin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p maintains 80S ribosome integrity during stationary phase-induced quiescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates polysome formation following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates protein synthesis following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p is a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation. -- Abstract: Once cells exhaust nutrients from their environment, they enter an alternative resting state known as quiescence, whereby proliferation ceases and essential nutrients are obtained through internal stores and through the catabolism of existing macromolecules and organelles. One example of this is ribophagy, the degradation of ribosomes through the process of autophagy. However, some ribosomes need to be preserved for an anticipated recovery from nutrient deprivation. We found that the ribosome-associated protein Stm1p greatly increases the quantity of 80S ribosomes present in quiescent yeast cells and that these ribosomes facilitate increased protein synthesis rates once nutrients are restored. These findings suggest that Stm1p can act as a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation and restoration.

  9. Studies on the Coordination of Ribosomal Protein Assembly Events Involved in Processing and Stabilization of Yeast Early Large Ribosomal Subunit Precursors.

    PubMed

    Ohmayer, Uli; Gil-Hernández, Álvaro; Sauert, Martina; Martín-Marcos, Pilar; Tamame, Mercedes; Tschochner, Herbert; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Milkereit, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Cellular production of ribosomes involves the formation of highly defined interactions between ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) and ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs). Moreover in eukaryotic cells, efficient ribosome maturation requires the transient association of a large number of ribosome biogenesis factors (RBFs) with newly forming ribosomal subunits. Here, we investigated how r-protein assembly events in the large ribosomal subunit (LSU) rRNA domain II are coordinated with each other and with the association of RBFs in early LSU precursors of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Specific effects on the pre-ribosomal association of RBFs could be observed in yeast mutants blocked in LSU rRNA domain II assembly. Moreover, formation of a cluster of r-proteins was identified as a downstream event in LSU rRNA domain II assembly. We analyzed in more detail the functional relevance of eukaryote specific bridges established by this r-protein cluster between LSU rRNA domain II and VI and discuss how they can support the stabilization and efficient processing of yeast early LSU precursor RNAs. PMID:26642313

  10. Studies on the Coordination of Ribosomal Protein Assembly Events Involved in Processing and Stabilization of Yeast Early Large Ribosomal Subunit Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Sauert, Martina; Martín-Marcos, Pilar; Tamame, Mercedes; Tschochner, Herbert; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Milkereit, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Cellular production of ribosomes involves the formation of highly defined interactions between ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) and ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs). Moreover in eukaryotic cells, efficient ribosome maturation requires the transient association of a large number of ribosome biogenesis factors (RBFs) with newly forming ribosomal subunits. Here, we investigated how r-protein assembly events in the large ribosomal subunit (LSU) rRNA domain II are coordinated with each other and with the association of RBFs in early LSU precursors of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Specific effects on the pre-ribosomal association of RBFs could be observed in yeast mutants blocked in LSU rRNA domain II assembly. Moreover, formation of a cluster of r-proteins was identified as a downstream event in LSU rRNA domain II assembly. We analyzed in more detail the functional relevance of eukaryote specific bridges established by this r-protein cluster between LSU rRNA domain II and VI and discuss how they can support the stabilization and efficient processing of yeast early LSU precursor RNAs. PMID:26642313

  11. Cloning and characterization of a gene from Rhizobium melilotii 2011 coding for ribosomal protein S1.

    PubMed Central

    Schnier, J; Thamm, S; Lurz, R; Hussain, A; Faist, G; Dobrinski, B

    1988-01-01

    A 7 kb chromosomal DNA fragment from R. melilotii was cloned, which complemented temperature-sensitivity of an E. coli amber mutant in rpsA, the gene for ribosomal protein S1 (ES1). From complementation and maxicell analysis a 58 kd protein was identified as the homolog of protein S1 (RS1). DNA sequence analysis of the R. melilotii rpsA gene identified a protein of 568 amino acids, which showed 47% identical amino acid homology to protein S1 from E. coli. The RS1 protein lacked the two Cys residues which had been reported to play an important role for the function of ES1. Two repeats containing Shine-Dalgarno sequences were identified upstream of the structural gene. Binding studies with RNA polymerase from E. coli and Pseudomonas putida located one RNA-polymerase binding site close to the RS1 gene and another one several hundred basepairs upstream. One possible promoter was also identified by DNA sequence comparison with the corresponding E. coli promoter. Images PMID:3368316

  12. Gcn1 contacts the small ribosomal protein Rps10, which is required for full activation of the protein kinase Gcn2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Jung; Swanson, Mark J; Sattlegger, Evelyn

    2015-03-15

    In eukaryotes, amino acid deprivation leads to the accumulation of uncharged tRNAs that are detected by Gcn2 (general control non-derepressible 2), which in turn phosphorylates eIF2α (α-subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2), an essential process for overcoming starvation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, sensing amino acid shortages requires that Gcn2 binds directly to its effector protein Gcn1 and both must associate with the ribosome. Our hypothesis is that uncharged tRNAs occur in the ribosomal A-site and that Gcn1 is directly involved in transfer of this starvation signal to Gcn2. In the present paper, we provide evidence that Gcn1 directly contacts the small ribosomal protein S10 (Rps10). Gcn1 residues 1060-1777 showed a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) interaction with Rps10A. In vitro, Rps10A or Rps10B co-precipitated Gcn1[1060-1777] in an RNA-independent manner. rps10AΔ or rps10BΔ strains showed reduced eIF2α phosphorylation under replete conditions and shortly after onset of starvation, suggesting that Gcn1-mediated Gcn2 activation was impaired. Overexpression of GST-tagged Rps10 reduced growth under amino acid starvation and this was exacerbated by the Gcn1-M7A mutation known to impair Gcn1-ribosome interaction and Gcn2 activity. Under amino acid starvation, eEF3 (eukaryotic translation elongation factor 3) overexpression, known to weaken Gcn1 function on the ribosome, exacerbated the growth defect of rps10AΔ or rps10BΔ strains. Taken together, these data support the idea that Gcn1 contacts ribosome-bound Rps10 to efficiently mediate Gcn2 activation. PMID:25437641

  13. The ribosomal protein genes and Minute loci of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Marygold, Steven J; Roote, John; Reuter, Gunter; Lambertsson, Andrew; Ashburner, Michael; Millburn, Gillian H; Harrison, Paul M; Yu, Zhan; Kenmochi, Naoya; Kaufman, Thomas C; Leevers, Sally J; Cook, Kevin R

    2007-01-01

    Background Mutations in genes encoding ribosomal proteins (RPs) have been shown to cause an array of cellular and developmental defects in a variety of organisms. In Drosophila melanogaster, disruption of RP genes can result in the 'Minute' syndrome of dominant, haploinsufficient phenotypes, which include prolonged development, short and thin bristles, and poor fertility and viability. While more than 50 Minute loci have been defined genetically, only 15 have so far been characterized molecularly and shown to correspond to RP genes. Results We combined bioinformatic and genetic approaches to conduct a systematic analysis of the relationship between RP genes and Minute loci. First, we identified 88 genes encoding 79 different cytoplasmic RPs (CRPs) and 75 genes encoding distinct mitochondrial RPs (MRPs). Interestingly, nine CRP genes are present as duplicates and, while all appear to be functional, one member of each gene pair has relatively limited expression. Next, we defined 65 discrete Minute loci by genetic criteria. Of these, 64 correspond to, or very likely correspond to, CRP genes; the single non-CRP-encoding Minute gene encodes a translation initiation factor subunit. Significantly, MRP genes and more than 20 CRP genes do not correspond to Minute loci. Conclusion This work answers a longstanding question about the molecular nature of Minute loci and suggests that Minute phenotypes arise from suboptimal protein synthesis resulting from reduced levels of cytoribosomes. Furthermore, by identifying the majority of haplolethal and haplosterile loci at the molecular level, our data will directly benefit efforts to attain complete deletion coverage of the D. melanogaster genome. PMID:17927810

  14. Natural amino acids do not require their native tRNAs for efficient selection by the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Effraim, Philip R; Wang, Jiangning; Englander, Michael T; Avins, Josh; Leyh, Thomas S; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Cornish, Virginia W

    2009-12-01

    The involvement of tRNA structural elements beyond the anticodon in aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) selection by the ribosome has revealed that substrate recognition is considerably more complex than originally envisioned in the adaptor hypothesis. By combining recent breakthroughs in aa-tRNA synthesis and mechanistic and structural studies of protein synthesis, we have investigated whether aa-tRNA recognition further extends to the amino acid, which would explain various translation disorders exhibited by misacylated tRNAs. Contrary to expectation, we find that natural amino acids misacylated onto natural but non-native tRNAs are selected with efficiencies very similar to those of their correctly acylated counterparts. Despite this, small but reproducible differences in selection indeed demonstrate that the translational machinery is sensitive to the amino acid-tRNA pairing. These results suggest either that the ribosome is an exquisite sensor of natural versus unnatural amino acid-tRNA pairings and/or that aa-tRNA selection is not the primary step governing the amino acid specificity of the ribosome. PMID:19915542

  15. Regulation of the protein-conducting channel by a bound ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Gumbart, James; Trabuco, Leonardo G.; Schreiner, Eduard; Villa, Elizabeth; Schulten, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Summary During protein synthesis, it is often necessary for the ribosome to form a complex with a membrane-bound channel, the SecY/Sec61 complex, in order to translocate nascent proteins across a cellular membrane. Structural data on the ribosome-channel complex are currently limited to low-resolution cryo-electron microscopy maps, including one showing a bacterial ribosome bound to a monomeric SecY complex. Using that map along with available atomic-level models of the ribosome and SecY, we have determined, through molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF), an atomic-resolution model of the ribosome-channel complex. We characterized computationally the sites of ribosome-SecY interaction within the complex and determined the effect of ribosome binding on the SecY channel. We also constructed a model of a ribosome in complex with a SecY dimer by adding a second copy of SecY to the MDFF-derived model. The study involved 2.7-million-atom simulations over altogether nearly 50 ns. PMID:19913480

  16. YsxC, an essential protein in Staphylococcus aureus crucial for ribosome assembly/stability

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Bacterial growth and division requires a core set of essential proteins, several of which are still of unknown function. They are also attractive targets for the development of new antibiotics. YsxC is a member of a family of GTPases highly conserved across eubacteria with a possible ribosome associated function. Results Here, we demonstrate by the creation of a conditional lethal mutant that ysxC is apparently essential for growth in S. aureus. To begin to elucidate YsxC function, a translational fusion of YsxC to the CBP-ProteinA tag in the staphylococcal chromosome was made, enabling Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP) of YsxC-interacting partners. These included the ribosomal proteins S2, S10 and L17, as well as the β' subunit of the RNA polymerase. YsxC was then shown to copurify with ribosomes as an accessory protein specifically localizing to the 50 S subunit. YsxC depletion led to a decrease in the presence of mature ribosomes, indicating a role in ribosome assembly and/or stability in S. aureus. Conclusions In this study we demonstrate that YsxC of S. aureus localizes to the ribosomes, is crucial for ribosomal stability and is apparently essential for the life of S. aureus. PMID:20021644

  17. Zinc Regulates a Switch between Primary and Alternative S18 Ribosomal Proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Prisic, Sladjana; Hwang, Hyonson; Dow, Allexa; Barnaby, Omar; Pan, Tenny S.; Lonzanida, Jaymes A.; Chazin, Walter J.; Steen, Hanno; Husson, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes five putative “alternative” ribosomal proteins whose expression is repressed at high Zn2+ concentration. Each alternative protein has a primary homolog that is predicted to bind Zn2+. We hypothesized that zinc triggers a switch between these paired homologous proteins and therefore chose one of these pairs, S18-1/S18-2, to study mechanisms of the predicted competition for their incorporation into ribosomes. As predicted, our data show that Zn2+-depletion causes accumulation of both S18-2 mRNA and protein. In contrast, S18-1 mRNA levels are unchanged to slightly elevated under Zn2+-limited conditions. However the amount of S18-1 protein is markedly decreased. We further demonstrate that both S18 proteins interact with ribosomal protein S6, a committed step in ribosome biogenesis. Zn2+ is absolutely required for the S18-1/S6 interaction, while it is dispensable for S18-2/S6 dimer formation. These data suggest a model in which the S18-1 is the dominant ribosome constituent in high zinc conditions, e.g. inside of phagosomes, but that it can be replaced by S18-2 when zinc is deficient, e.g. in the extracellular milieu. Consequently, Zn2+-depletion may serve as a signal for building alternative ribosomes when M. tuberculosis is released from macrophages, to allow survival in the extracellular environment. PMID:25858183

  18. The N-terminal extension of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L20 is important for ribosome assembly, but dispensable for translational feedback control

    PubMed Central

    GUILLIER, MAUDE; ALLEMAND, FRÉDÉRIC; GRAFFE, MONIQUE; RAIBAUD, SOPHIE; DARDEL, FRÉDÉRIC; SPRINGER, MATHIAS; CHIARUTTINI, CLAUDE

    2005-01-01

    The Escherichia coli autoregulatory ribosomal protein L20 consists of two structurally distinct domains. The C-terminal domain is globular and sits on the surface of the large ribosomal subunit whereas the N-terminal domain has an extended shape and penetrates deep into the RNA-rich core of the subunit. Many other ribosomal proteins have analogous internal or terminal extensions. However, the biological functions of these extended domains remain obscure. Here we show that the N-terminal tail of L20 is important for ribosome assembly in vivo. Indeed, a truncated version of L20 without its N-terminal tail is unable to complement the deletion of rplT, the gene encoding L20. In addition, this L20 truncation confers a lethal-dominant phenotype, suggesting that the N-terminal domain is essential for cell growth because it could be required for ribosome assembly. Supporting this hypothesis, partial deletions of the N-terminal tail of the protein are shown to cause a slow-growth phenotype due to altered ribosome assembly in vivo as large amounts of intermediate 40S ribosomal particles accumulate. In addition to being a ribosomal protein, L20 also acts as an autogenous repressor. Using L20 truncations, we also show that the N-terminal tail of L20 is dispensable for autogenous control. PMID:15840820

  19. Nuclear-encoded chloroplast ribosomal protein L12 of Nicotiana tabacum: characterization of mature protein and isolation and sequence analysis of cDNA clones encoding its cytoplasmic precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Elhag, G A; Thomas, F J; McCreery, T P; Bourque, D P

    1992-01-01

    Poly(A)+ mRNA isolated from Nicotiana tabacum (cv. Petite Havana) leaves was used to prepare a cDNA library in the expression vector lambda gt11. Recombinant phage containing cDNAs coding for chloroplast ribosomal protein L12 were identified and sequenced. Mature tobacco L12 protein has 44% amino acid identity with ribosomal protein L7/L12 of Escherichia coli. The longest L12 cDNA (733 nucleotides) codes for a 13,823 molecular weight polypeptide with a transit peptide of 53 amino acids and a mature protein of 133 amino acids. The transit peptide and mature protein share 43% and 79% amino acid identity, respectively, with corresponding regions of spinach chloroplast ribosomal protein L12. The predicted amino terminus of the mature protein was confirmed by partial sequence analysis of HPLC-purified tobacco chloroplast ribosomal protein L12. A single L12 mRNA of about 0.8 kb was detected by hybridization of L12 cDNA to poly(A)+ and total leaf RNA. Hybridization patterns of restriction fragments of tobacco genomic DNA probed with the L12 cDNA suggested the existence of more than one gene for ribosomal protein L12. Characterization of a second cDNA with an identical L12 coding sequence but a different 3'-noncoding sequence provided evidence that at least two L12 genes are expressed in tobacco. Images PMID:1542565

  20. Sequence, overproduction and purification of Vibrio proteolyticus ribosomal protein L18 for in vitro and in vivo studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setterquist, R. A.; Smith, G. K.; Oakley, T. H.; Lee, Y. H.; Fox, G. E.

    1996-01-01

    A strategy suggested by comparative genomic studies was used to amplify the entire Vibrio proteolyticus (Vp) gene for ribosomal protein L18. Vp L18 and its flanking regions were sequenced and compared with the deduced amino acid (aa) sequences of other known L18 proteins. A 26-aa residue segment at the carboxy terminus contains many strongly conserved residues and may be critical for the L18 interaction with 5S rRNA. This approach should allow rapid characterization of L18 from large numbers of bacteria. Both Vp L18 and Escherichia coli (Ec) L18 were overproduced and purified using a T7 expression vector which fuses an N-terminal peptide segment (His-tag) containing 6 histidine residues to the recombinant protein. The purified fusion proteins, Vp His::L18 and Ec His::L18, were both found to bind to either the Vp 5S or Ec 5S rRNAs in vitro. Vp His::L18 protein was also shown to incorporate into Ec ribosomes in vivo. This His-tag strategy likely will have general applicability for the study of ribosomal proteins in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Sequential domain assembly of ribosomal protein S3 drives 40S subunit maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mitterer, Valentin; Murat, Guillaume; Réty, Stéphane; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Stanborough, Tamsyn; Bergler, Helmut; Leulliot, Nicolas; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes assemble by association of ribosomal RNA with ribosomal proteins into nuclear precursor particles, which undergo a complex maturation pathway coordinated by non-ribosomal assembly factors. Here, we provide functional insights into how successive structural re-arrangements in ribosomal protein S3 promote maturation of the 40S ribosomal subunit. We show that S3 dimerizes and is imported into the nucleus with its N-domain in a rotated conformation and associated with the chaperone Yar1. Initial assembly of S3 with 40S precursors occurs via its C-domain, while the N-domain protrudes from the 40S surface. Yar1 is replaced by the assembly factor Ltv1, thereby fixing the S3 N-domain in the rotated orientation and preventing its 40S association. Finally, Ltv1 release, triggered by phosphorylation, and flipping of the S3 N-domain into its final position results in the stable integration of S3. Such a stepwise assembly may represent a new paradigm for the incorporation of ribosomal proteins. PMID:26831757

  2. Yeast ribosomal protein L7 and its homologue Rlp7 are simultaneously present at distinct sites on pre-60S ribosomal particles

    PubMed Central

    Babiano, Reyes; Badis, Gwenael; Saveanu, Cosmin; Namane, Abdelkader; Doyen, Antonia; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Jacquier, Alain; Fromont-Racine, Micheline; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis requires >300 assembly factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Ribosome assembly factors Imp3, Mrt4, Rlp7 and Rlp24 have sequence similarity to ribosomal proteins S9, P0, L7 and L24, suggesting that these pre-ribosomal factors could be placeholders that prevent premature assembly of the corresponding ribosomal proteins to nascent ribosomes. However, we found L7 to be a highly specific component of Rlp7-associated complexes, revealing that the two proteins can bind simultaneously to pre-ribosomal particles. Cross-linking and cDNA analysis experiments showed that Rlp7 binds to the ITS2 region of 27S pre-rRNAs, at two sites, in helix III and in a region adjacent to the pre-rRNA processing sites C1 and E. However, L7 binds to mature 25S and 5S rRNAs and cross-linked predominantly to helix ES7Lb within 25S rRNA. Thus, despite their predicted structural similarity, our data show that Rlp7 and L7 clearly bind at different positions on the same pre-60S particles. Our results also suggest that Rlp7 facilitates the formation of the hairpin structure of ITS2 during 60S ribosomal subunit maturation. PMID:23945946

  3. The Up-Regulation of Ribosomal Proteins Further Regulates Protein Expression Profile in Female Schistosoma japonicum after Pairing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jun; Li, Chen; Wang, Suwen

    2015-01-01

    Background Pairing of Schistosoma males and females leads to and maintains female sexual maturation. However, the mechanism by which pairing facilitates sexual maturation of females is not clear. An increasing body of evidence suggests that ribosomal proteins have regulatory rather than constitutive roles in protein translation. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the effect of ribosome regulation on female sex maturation, Solexa and iTRAQ techniques were used to analyze the relationship between ribosomal gene or protein expression and sexual development of Schistosoma females. In the present study, considerably higher number of ribosomal genes or proteins were found to be differentially expressed in paired 23-day-old females. Moreover, mature female-specific proteins associated with egg production, such as ferritin-1 heavy chain and superoxide dismutase, were selectively highly expressed in paired females, rather than higher level of protein synthesis of all transcripts compared with those in unpaired 23-day-old females. Furthermore, other developmental stages were utilized to investigate different expression pattern of ribosomal proteins in females by analysing 18-day-old female schistosomula from single- or double-sex infections to determine the relationship between ribosomal protein expression pattern and development. Results showed that undeveloped 18-day-old females from single- and double-sex infections, as well as 23-day-old unpaired females, possessed similar ribosomal protein expression patterns, which were distinct from those in 23-day-old paired females. Conclusions/Significance Our findings reveal that the pairing of females and males triggers a specialized ribosomal protein expression profile which further regulates the protein profile for sexual maturation in Schistosoma japonicum, based on its gene expression profile. PMID:26070205

  4. Identification of antituberculosis agents that target ribosomal protein interactions using a yeast two-hybrid system

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuan; Li, Yan; Zhu, Yuanjun; Zhang, Jing; Li, Yongzhen; Liu, Xiao; Jiang, Wei; Yu, Shishan; You, Xue-Fu; Xiao, Chunling; Hong, Bin; Wang, Yanchang; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Si, Shuyi

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis kills about 2 million people annually and antibiotic resistance is a cause of increased mortality. Therefore, development of new antituberculosis drugs is urgent for the control of widespread tuberculosis infections. For this purpose, we performed an innovative screen to identify new agents that disrupt the function of ribosomes in M. tuberculosis. Two bacterial ribosomal proteins L12 and L10 interact with each other and constitute the stalk of the 50S ribosomal subunit, which recruits initiation and elongation factors (EFs) during translation. Therefore, the L12–L10 interaction should be essential for ribosomal function and protein synthesis. We established a yeast two-hybrid system to identify small molecules that block the interaction between L12 and L10 proteins from M. tuberculosis. Using this system, we identified two compounds T766 and T054 that show strong bactericidal activity against tuberculosis but with low toxicity to mice and other bacterial strains. Moreover, using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay, we have demonstrated that these compounds bind specifically to L12 to disrupt L12–L10 interaction. Overproduction of L12 protein, but not L10, lowers the antibacterial activity of T766 and T054, indicating that the ribosome is likely the cellular target. Therefore, our data demonstrate that this yeast two-hybrid system is a useful tool to identify unique antituberculosis agents targeting the ribosomal protein L12–L10 interaction. PMID:23045703

  5. Identification, characterization and structure analysis of a type I ribosome-inactivating protein from Sapium sebiferum (Euphorbiaceae)

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ying; Mao, Yingji; Jin, Shan; Hou, Jinyan; Du, Hua; Yang, Minglei; Wu, Lifang

    2015-08-07

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are N-glycosidases (EC3.2.2.22) that universally inactivate the ribosome, thereby inhibiting protein biosynthesis. In this study, a novel type I RIPs named SEBIN was identified in Sapium sebiferum. Nuclear acid depurine experiment showed that SEBIN had rRNA N-Glycosidase activity. Further experiment indicated that SEBIN significantly inhibited Caenorhabditis elegans development as well as resulted in worm cell apoptosis. This is the first report to evaluate RIPs toxicity using C. elegans. We proposed that SEBIN may impaire C. elegans reproduction in a DNA-damage manner besides traditional protein synthesis inhibition approach. The predicted 3D structure was modeled using threading and ab initio modeling, and the r-RNA binding residue of SEBIN was identified through the protein-ligand docking approach. It showed the amino acid residues, Glu195, Asn81, Ala82, Tyr83, Glu164, Ser163, Ile159 and Arg167, played critical roles in catalytic process. Our results provided the theoretical foundation of structure–function relationships between enzymatic properties, toxicity and structural characterization of SEBIN. - Graphical abstract: Superposition of main chains of ricin (cyan) and SEBIN (brown), and adenine binding site residues of SEBIN. - Highlights: • A Ribosome-inactivating proteins gene (SEBIN) was isolated from Sapium sebiferum. • SEBIN had DNase activity besides widely reported ribosome inactivation via N-glycosidases activity. • SEBIN significantly inhibited Caenorhabditis elegans development in vivo. • SEBIN may impaire C. elegans reproduction in a DNA-damage manner with the aid of mutant strains hus-1 and clk-2. • The possible active sites between SEBIN and the adenine of rRNA were predicted.

  6. Analysis of Blastocladiella emersonii ribosomal proteins in four two-dimensional gel electrophoresis systems.

    PubMed

    Bonato, M C; Maia, J C; Juliani, M H

    1985-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins of the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii were isolated and characterized on four different two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis systems. 40S and 60S ribosomal subunit proteins from zoospores were identified. The position of every protein was determined in each electrophoretic system using the "four-corners" method (Madjar et al., Molecular and General Genetics, 171: 121-134, 1979). Thirty-two and 39 proteins were identified in the 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits, respectively. The molecular weights of individual proteins in the 40S subunit ranged from 10 000 to 37 000, with a number-average molecular weight of 20 000. The molecular weight range for the 60S subunit was 13 000-51 000 with a number-average molecular weight of 21 000. Proteins from ribosomes of different cell types were compared and found to be qualitatively indistinguishable. The only consistent difference in the patterns of proteins was in the S6 protein of the 40S subunit, which is the major phosphoprotein of Blastocladiella ribosomes. PMID:3830281

  7. Structural basis for translational surveillance by the large ribosomal subunit-associated protein quality control complex

    PubMed Central

    Lyumkis, Dmitry; Oliveira dos Passos, Dario; Tahara, Erich B.; Webb, Kristofor; Bennett, Eric J.; Vinterbo, Staal; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.

    2014-01-01

    All organisms have evolved mechanisms to manage the stalling of ribosomes upon translation of aberrant mRNA. In eukaryotes, the large ribosomal subunit-associated quality control complex (RQC), composed of the listerin/Ltn1 E3 ubiquitin ligase and cofactors, mediates the ubiquitylation and extraction of ribosome-stalled nascent polypeptide chains for proteasomal degradation. How RQC recognizes stalled ribosomes and performs its functions has not been understood. Using single-particle cryoelectron microscopy, we have determined the structure of the RQC complex bound to stalled 60S ribosomal subunits. The structure establishes how Ltn1 associates with the large ribosomal subunit and properly positions its E3-catalytic RING domain to mediate nascent chain ubiquitylation. The structure also reveals that a distinguishing feature of stalled 60S particles is an exposed, nascent chain-conjugated tRNA, and that the Tae2 subunit of RQC, which facilitates Ltn1 binding, is responsible for selective recognition of stalled 60S subunits. RQC components are engaged in interactions across a large span of the 60S subunit surface, connecting the tRNA in the peptidyl transferase center to the distally located nascent chain tunnel exit. This work provides insights into a mechanism linking translation and protein degradation that targets defective proteins immediately after synthesis, while ignoring nascent chains in normally translating ribosomes. PMID:25349383

  8. Mapping of the RNA recognition site of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S7.

    PubMed Central

    Robert, F; Gagnon, M; Sans, D; Michnick, S; Brakier-Gingras, L

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial ribosomal protein S7 initiates the folding of the 3' major domain of 16S ribosomal RNA by binding to its lower half. The X-ray structure of protein S7 from thermophilic bacteria was recently solved and found to be a modular structure, consisting of an alpha-helical domain with a beta-ribbon extension. To gain further insights into its interaction with rRNA, we cloned the S7 gene from Escherichia coli K12 into a pET expression vector and introduced 4 deletions and 12 amino acid substitutions in the protein sequence. The binding of each mutant to the lower half of the 3' major domain of 16S rRNA was assessed by filtration on nitrocellulose membranes. Deletion of the N-terminal 17 residues or deletion of the B hairpins (residues 72-89) severely decreased S7 affinity for the rRNA. Truncation of the C-terminal portion (residues 138-178), which includes part of the terminal alpha-helix, significantly affected S7 binding, whereas a shorter truncation (residues 148-178) only marginally influenced its binding. Severe effects were also observed with several strategic point mutations located throughout the protein, including Q8A and F17G in the N-terminal region, and K35Q, G54S, K113Q, and M115G in loops connecting the alpha-helices. Our results are consistent with the occurrence of several sites of contact between S7 and the 16S rRNA, in line with its role in the folding of the 3' major domain. PMID:11105763

  9. Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleolar protein Nop7p is necessary for biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Cynthia C; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Roman, Judibelle; Harnpicharnchai, Piyanun; Woolford, John L

    2002-01-01

    To identify new gene products that participate in ribosome biogenesis, we carried out a screen for mutations that result in lethality in combination with mutations in DRS1, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleolar DEAD-box protein required for synthesis of 60S ribosomal subunits. We identified the gene NOP7that encodes an essential protein. The temperature-sensitive nop7-1 mutation or metabolic depletion of Nop7p results in a deficiency of 60S ribosomal subunits and accumulation of halfmer polyribosomes. Analysis of pre-rRNA processing indicates that nop7 mutants exhibit a delay in processing of 27S pre-rRNA to mature 25S rRNA and decreased accumulation of 25S rRNA. Thus Nop7p, like Drs1p, is required for essential steps leading to synthesis of 60S ribosomal subunits. In addition, inactivation or depletion of Nop7p also affects processing at the A0, A1, and A2 sites, which may result from the association of Nop7p with 35S pre-rRNA in 90S pre-rRNPs. Nop7p is localized primarily in the nucleolus, where most steps in ribosome assembly occur. Nop7p is homologous to the zebrafish pescadillo protein necessary for embryonic development. The Nop7 protein contains the BRCT motif, a protein-protein interaction domain through which, for example, the human BRCA1 protein interacts with RNA helicase A. PMID:11911362

  10. Alcoholic Liver Disease and the Mitochondrial Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Alan; Sykora, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Summary Chronic alcohol consumption has been shown to severely compromise mitochondrial protein synthesis. Hepatic mitochondria isolated from alcoholic animals contain decreased levels of respiratory complexes and display depressed respiration rates when compared to pair-fed controls. One underlying mechanism for this involves ethanol-elicited alterations in the structural and functional integrity of the mitochondrial ribosome. Ethanol feeding results in ribosomal changes that include decreased sedimentation rates, larger hydrodynamic volumes, increased levels of unassociated subunits and changes in the levels of specific ribosomal proteins. The methods presented in this chapter detail how to isolate mitochondrial ribosomes, determine ribosomal activity, separate ribosomes into nucleic acid and protein, and perform two-dimensional nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoretic polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to separate and subsequently identify mitochondrial ribosomal proteins. PMID:18369931

  11. In vitro expression of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein genes: autogenous inhibition of translation.

    PubMed Central

    Yates, J L; Arfsten, A E; Nomura, M

    1980-01-01

    Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L1 (0.5 micro M) was found to inhibit the synthesis of both proteins of the L11 operon, L11 and L1, but not the synthesis of other proteins directed by lambda rifd 18 DNA. Similarly, S4 (1 micro M) selectively inhibited the synthesis of three proteins of the alpha operon, S13, S11, and S4, directed by lambda spcI DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment obtained from this DNA. S8 (3.6 micro M) also showed preferential inhibitory effects on the synthesis of some proteins encoded in the spc operon, L24 and L5 (and probably S14 and S8), directed by lambda spcl DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment carrying the genes for these proteins. The inhibitory effect of L1 was observed only with L1 and not with other proteins examined, including S4 and S8. Similarly, the effect of S4 was not observed with L1 or S8, and that of S8 was not seen with L1 or S4. Inhibition was shown to take place at the level of translation rather than transcription. Thus, at least some ribosomal proteins (L1 S4, and S8) have the ability to cause selective translational inhibition of the synthesis of certain ribosomal proteins whose genes are in the same operon as their own. These results support the hypothesis that certain free ribosomal proteins not assembled into ribosomes act as "autogenous" feedback inhibitors to regulate the synthesis of ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:6445562

  12. The catalytic subunit of shiga-like toxin 1 interacts with ribosomal stalk proteins and is inhibited by their conserved C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, Andrew J; Poon, Gregory M K; Bolewska-Pedyczak, Eleonora; Srikumar, Tharan; Jeram, Stanley M; Raught, Brian; Gariépy, Jean

    2008-04-25

    Shiga-like toxin 1 (SLT-1) is a type II ribosome-inactivating protein; its A(1) domain blocks protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells by catalyzing the depurination of a single adenine base in 28 S rRNA. The molecular mechanism leading to this site-specific depurination event is thought to involve interactions with eukaryotic ribosomal proteins. Here, we present evidence that the A(1) chain of SLT-1 binds to the ribosomal proteins P0, P1, and P2. These proteins were identified from a HeLa cell lysate by tandem mass spectrometry, and subsequently confirmed to bind to SLT-1 A(1) chain by yeast-two-hybrid and pull-down experiments using candidate full-length proteins. Moreover, the removal of the last 17 amino acids of either protein P1 or P2 abolishes the interaction with the A(1) chain, whereas P0, lacking this common C terminus, still binds to the A(1) domain. In vitro pull-down experiments using fusion protein-tagged C-terminal peptides corresponding to the common 7, 11, and 17 terminal residues of P1 and P2 confirmed that the A(1) chain of SLT-1 as well as the A chain of ricin bind to this shared C-terminal peptide motif. More importantly, a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 17 amino acid C terminus of P1 and P2 was shown to inhibit the ribosome-inactivating function of the A(1) chain of SLT-1 in an in vitro transcription and translation-coupled assay. These results suggest a role for the ribosomal stalk in aiding the A(1) chain of SLT-1 and other type II ribosome-inactivating proteins in localizing its catalytic domain near the site of depurination in the 28 S rRNA. PMID:18358491

  13. Dosage Sensitivity of RPL9 and Concerted Evolution of Ribosomal Protein Genes in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Devis, Deborah; Firth, Sue M.; Liang, Zhe; Byrne, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome in higher eukaryotes is a large macromolecular complex composed of four rRNAs and eighty different ribosomal proteins. In plants, each ribosomal protein is encoded by multiple genes. Duplicate genes within a family are often necessary to provide a threshold dose of a ribosomal protein but in some instances appear to have non-redundant functions. Here, we addressed whether divergent members of the RPL9 gene family are dosage sensitive or whether these genes have non-overlapping functions. The RPL9 family in Arabidopsis thaliana comprises two nearly identical members, RPL9B and RPL9C, and a more divergent member, RPL9D. Mutations in RPL9C and RPL9D genes lead to delayed growth early in development, and loss of both genes is embryo lethal, indicating that these are dosage-sensitive and redundant genes. Phylogenetic analysis of RPL9 as well as RPL4, RPL5, RPL27a, RPL36a, and RPS6 family genes in the Brassicaceae indicated that multicopy ribosomal protein genes have been largely retained following whole genome duplication. However, these gene families also show instances of tandem duplication, small scale deletion, and evidence of gene conversion. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of RPL9 genes in angiosperm species showed that genes within a species are more closely related to each other than to RPL9 genes in other species, suggesting ribosomal protein genes undergo convergent evolution. Our analysis indicates that ribosomal protein gene retention following whole genome duplication contributes to the number of genes in a family. However, small scale rearrangements influence copy number and likely drive concerted evolution of these dosage-sensitive genes. PMID:26734020

  14. The N-terminal extension of yeast ribosomal protein L8 is involved in two major remodeling events during late nuclear stages of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Wu, Shan; Gao, Ning; Woolford, John L

    2016-09-01

    Assaying effects on pre-rRNA processing and ribosome assembly upon depleting individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) provided an initial paradigm for assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo-that each structural domain of ribosomal subunits assembles in a hierarchical fashion. However, two features suggest that a more complex pathway may exist: (i) Some r-proteins contain extensions that reach long distances across ribosomes to interact with multiple rRNA domains as well as with other r-proteins. (ii) Individual r-proteins may assemble in a stepwise fashion. For example, the globular domain of an r-protein might assemble separately from its extensions. Thus, these extensions might play roles in assembly that could not be revealed by depleting the entire protein. Here, we show that deleting or mutating extensions of r-proteins L7 (uL30) and L35 (uL29) from yeast reveal important roles in early and middle steps during 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Detailed analysis of the N-terminal terminal extension of L8 (eL8) showed that it is necessary for late nuclear stages of 60S subunit assembly involving two major remodeling events: removal of the ITS2 spacer; and reorganization of the central protuberance (CP) containing 5S rRNA and r-proteins L5 (uL18) and L11 (uL5). Mutations in the L8 extension block processing of 7S pre-rRNA, prevent release of assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 from pre-ribosomes, which is required for rotation of the CP, and block association of Sda1, the Rix1 complex, and the Rea1 ATPase involved in late steps of remodeling. PMID:27390266

  15. Cryo-electron microscopic structure of SecA protein bound to the 70S ribosome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajkumar; Kraft, Christian; Jaiswal, Rahul; Sejwal, Kushal; Kasaragod, Vikram Babu; Kuper, Jochen; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Luirink, Joen; Bhushan, Shashi

    2014-03-01

    SecA is an ATP-dependent molecular motor pumping secretory and outer membrane proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane in bacteria. SecA associates with the protein-conducting channel, the heterotrimeric SecYEG complex, in a so-called posttranslational manner. A recent study further showed binding of a monomeric state of SecA to the ribosome. However, the true oligomeric state of SecA remains controversial because SecA can also form functional dimers, and high-resolution crystal structures exist for both the monomer and the dimer. Here we present the cryo-electron microscopy structures of Escherichia coli SecA bound to the ribosome. We show that not only a monomeric SecA binds to the ribosome but also that two copies of SecA can be observed that form an elongated dimer. Two copies of SecA completely surround the tunnel exit, providing a unique environment to the nascent polypeptides emerging from the ribosome. We identified the N-terminal helix of SecA required for a stable association with the ribosome. The structures indicate a possible function of the dimeric form of SecA at the ribosome. PMID:24443566

  16. Cryo-electron Microscopic Structure of SecA Protein Bound to the 70S Ribosome*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajkumar; Kraft, Christian; Jaiswal, Rahul; Sejwal, Kushal; Kasaragod, Vikram Babu; Kuper, Jochen; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Luirink, Joen; Bhushan, Shashi

    2014-01-01

    SecA is an ATP-dependent molecular motor pumping secretory and outer membrane proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane in bacteria. SecA associates with the protein-conducting channel, the heterotrimeric SecYEG complex, in a so-called posttranslational manner. A recent study further showed binding of a monomeric state of SecA to the ribosome. However, the true oligomeric state of SecA remains controversial because SecA can also form functional dimers, and high-resolution crystal structures exist for both the monomer and the dimer. Here we present the cryo-electron microscopy structures of Escherichia coli SecA bound to the ribosome. We show that not only a monomeric SecA binds to the ribosome but also that two copies of SecA can be observed that form an elongated dimer. Two copies of SecA completely surround the tunnel exit, providing a unique environment to the nascent polypeptides emerging from the ribosome. We identified the N-terminal helix of SecA required for a stable association with the ribosome. The structures indicate a possible function of the dimeric form of SecA at the ribosome. PMID:24443566

  17. Protein-RNA Dynamics in the Central Junction Control 30S Ribosome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kris Ann; Lamichhane, Rajan; Lamichhane, Tek; Rueda, David; Cunningham, Philip R

    2016-09-11

    Interactions between ribosomal proteins (rproteins) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) facilitate the formation of functional ribosomes. S15 is a central domain primary binding protein that has been shown to trigger a cascade of conformational changes in 16S rRNA, forming the functional structure of the central domain. Previous biochemical and structural studies in vitro have revealed that S15 binds a three-way junction of helices 20, 21, and 22, including nucleotides 652-654 and 752-754. All junction nucleotides except 653 are highly conserved among the Bacteria. To identify functionally important motifs within the junction, we subjected nucleotides 652-654 and 752-754 to saturation mutagenesis and selected and analyzed functional mutants. Only 64 mutants with greater than 10% ribosome function in vivo were isolated. S15 overexpression complemented mutations in the junction loop in each of the partially active mutants, although mutations that produced inactive ribosomes were not complemented by overexpression of S15. Single-molecule Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) was used to study the Mg(2+)- and S15-induced conformational dynamics of selected junction mutants. Comparison of the structural dynamics of these mutants with the wild type in the presence and absence of S15 revealed specific sequence and structural motifs in the central junction that are important in ribosome function. PMID:27192112

  18. Specific N-terminal cleavage of ribosomal protein L27 in Staphylococcus aureus and related bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Erin A.; Caufield, J. Harry; Lyons, Charles E.; Manning, Keith A.; Dokland, Terje; Christie, Gail E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ribosomal protein L27 is a component of the eubacterial large ribosomal subunit that has been shown to play a critical role in substrate stabilization during protein synthesis. This function is mediated by the L27 N-terminus, which protrudes into the peptidyl transferase center. In this report we demonstrate that L27 in Staphylococcus aureus and other Firmicutes is encoded with an N-terminal extension that is not present in most Gram-negative organisms, and is absent from mature ribosomes. We have identified a cysteine protease, conserved among bacteria containing the L27 N-terminal extension, which performs post-translational cleavage of L27. Ribosomal biology in eubacteria has largely been studied in the Gram negative bacterium Escherichia coli; our findings indicate that there are aspects of the basic biology of the ribosome in S. aureus and other related bacteria that differ substantially from that of the E. coli ribosome. This research lays the foundation for the development of new therapeutic approaches that target this novel pathway. PMID:25388641

  19. Characterization of the ribosomal binding site in rat liver rough microsomes: ribophorins I and II, two integral membrane proteins related to ribosome binding.

    PubMed

    Kreibich, G; Czakó-Graham, M; Grebenau, R; Mok, W; Rodriguez-Boulan, E; Sabatini, D D

    1978-01-01

    Rat liver rough endoplasmic reticulum membranes (ER) contain two characteristic transmembrane glycoproteins which have been designated ribophorins I and II and are absent from smooth ER membranes. These proteins (MW 65,000 and 63,000 respectively) are related to the binding sites for ribosomes, as suggested by the following findings: i) The ribophorin content of the rough ER membranes corresponds stoichiometrically to the number of bound ribosomes; ii) ribophorins are quantitatively recovered with the bound polysomes after most other ER membrane proteins are dissolved with the nonionic detergent Kyro EOB; iii) in intact rough microsomes ribophorins can be cross-linked chemically to the ribosomes and therefore are in close proximity to them. Treatment of rough microsomes with a low Triton-X-100 concentration leads to the lateral displacement of ribosomes on the microsomal surface and to the formation of aggregates of bound ribosomes in areas of membranes which frequently invaginate into the microsomal lumen. Subfractionation of Triton-treated microsomes containing invaginations led to the recovery of smooth and "rough-inverted" vesicles. Ribophorins were present only in the latter fraction, indicating that both proteins are displaced together with the ribosomes when these aggregate without detaching. Measurements of the ribosome-binding capacity of rough and smooth microsomal membranes reconstituted after solubilization with detergents suggest that ribophorins are necessary for in vitro ribosome binding. Ribophorin-like proteins were found in rough microsomes obtained from secretory tissues of several animal species. The two proteins present in rat lacrimal gland microsomes have the same mobility as hepatocyte ribophorins and cross-react with antisera against them. PMID:723266

  20. Regulation of ribonuclease E activity by the L4 ribosomal protein of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dharam; Chang, Ssu-Jean; Lin, Pei-Hsun; Averina, Olga V.; Kaberdin, Vladimir R.; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2009-01-01

    Whereas ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) are known primarily as components of the translational machinery, certain of these r-proteins have been found to also have extraribosomal functions. Here we report the novel ability of an r-protein, L4, to regulate RNA degradation in Escherichia coli. We show by affinity purification, immunoprecipitation analysis, and E. coli two-hybrid screening that L4 interacts with a site outside of the catalytic domain of RNase E to regulate the endoribonucleolytic functions of the enzyme, thus inhibiting RNase E-specific cleavage in vitro, stabilizing mRNAs targeted by RNase E in vivo, and controlling plasmid DNA replication by stabilizing an antisense regulatory RNA normally attacked by RNase E. Broader effects of the L4-RNase E interaction on E. coli transcripts were shown by DNA microarray analysis, which revealed changes in the abundance of 65 mRNAs encoding the stress response proteins HslO, Lon, CstA, YjiY, and YaeL, as well as proteins involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and transport, transcription/translation, and DNA/RNA synthesis. Analysis of mRNA stability showed that the half lives of stress-responsive transcripts were increased by ectopic expression of L4, which normally increases along with other r-proteins in E. coli under stress conditions, and also by inactivation of RNase E. Our finding that L4 can inhibit RNase E-dependent decay may account at least in part for the elevated production of stress-induced proteins during bacterial adaptation to adverse environments. PMID:19144914

  1. Yeast ribosomal proteins: XIII. Saccharomyces cerevisiae YL8A gene, interrupted with two introns, encodes a homolog of mammalian L7.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuta, K; Hashimoto, T; Otaka, E

    1992-01-01

    We isolated and sequenced a gene, YL8A, encoding ribosomal protein YL8 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is one of the two duplicated genes encoding YL8 and is located on chromosome VII while the other is on chromosome XVI. The haploid strains carrying disrupted YL8A grew more slowly than the parent strain. The open reading frame is interrupted with two introns. The predicted amino acid sequence reveals that yeast YL8 is a homolog of mammalian ribosomal protein L7, E.coli L30 and others. Images PMID:1549461

  2. Structure and regulation of a nuclear gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that specifies MRP7, a protein of the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome.

    PubMed Central

    Fearon, K; Mason, T L

    1988-01-01

    The gene for MRP7, a 40-kilodalton protein of the large subunit of the yeast mitochondrial ribosome, was identified in a lambda gt11 expression library by immunological screening with a monoclonal antibody to MRP7. An intact copy of MRP7 was then isolated from a yeast genomic library by colony hybridization. Gene disruption showed that MRP7 protein was essential for ribosomal function. Sequencing of MRP7 revealed a coding region for a basic (pI 10.6), 43.2-kilodalton protein containing 371 amino acid residues. Amino acid residues 28 to 112 of the deduced MRP7 sequence aligned with the 84 residues of the Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L27, but no significant similarity was detected between the carboxy-terminal 259 amino acids of MRP7 and other protein sequences in existing computer data bases. Within the aligned region, there was 49% amino acid identity between MRP7 and L27, compared with the 57% identity observed between L27 and its homolog in Bacillus stearothermophilus. The steady-state levels of the MRP7 protein and its mRNA were monitored in response to catabolite repression and to increased dosage of the MRP7 gene. The response to catabolite repression was characterized by a ninefold change in the level of the protein and little, if any, change in the level of the mRNA. In cells carrying the MRP7 gene on a high-copy-number plasmid, the mRNA was increased 20-fold, but there was no significant increase in MRP7 protein. Furthermore, MRP7 mRNA and protein accumulated at normal levels in [rho0] cells, which are devoid of 21S rRNA, indicating that the protein is relatively stable in the absence of ribosome assembly. Together, these results suggest that MRP7 is regulated posttranscriptionally, probably at the level of protein synthesis rather than protein turnover. Images PMID:2851722

  3. Gene clusters for ribosomal proteins in the mitochondrial genome of a liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, M; Oda, K; Yamato, K; Ohta, E; Nakamura, Y; Nozato, N; Akashi, K; Ohyama, K

    1992-01-01

    We detected 16 genes for ribosomal proteins in the complete sequence of the mitochondrial DNA from a liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha. The genes formed two major clusters, rps12-rps7 and rps10-rpl2-rps19-rps3-rpl16-rpl5- rps14-rps8- rpl6-rps13-rps11-rps1, very similar in organization to Escherichia coli ribosomal protein operons (str and S10-spc-alpha operons, respectively). In contrast, rps2 and rps4 genes were located separately in the liverwort mitochondrial genome (the latter was part of the alpha operon in E. coli). Furthermore, several ribosomal proteins encoded by the liverwort mitochondrial genome differed substantially in size from their counterparts in E. coli and liverwort chloroplast. PMID:1620617

  4. Pokeweed Antiviral Protein, a Ribosome Inactivating Protein: Activity, Inhibition and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Domashevskiy, Artem V.; Goss, Dixie J.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses employ an array of elaborate strategies to overcome plant defense mechanisms and must adapt to the requirements of the host translational systems. Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) from Phytolacca americana is a ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) and is an RNA N-glycosidase that removes specific purine residues from the sarcin/ricin (S/R) loop of large rRNA, arresting protein synthesis at the translocation step. PAP is thought to play an important role in the plant’s defense mechanism against foreign pathogens. This review focuses on the structure, function, and the relationship of PAP to other RIPs, discusses molecular aspects of PAP antiviral activity, the novel inhibition of this plant toxin by a virus counteraction—a peptide linked to the viral genome (VPg), and possible applications of RIP-conjugated immunotoxins in cancer therapeutics. PMID:25635465

  5. Studies on crystal structures, active-centre geometry and depurinating mechanism of two ribosome-inactivating proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Q; Liu, S; Tang, Y; Jin, S; Wang, Y

    1995-01-01

    Two ribosome-inactivating proteins, trichosanthin and alpha-momorcharin, have been studied in the forms of complexes with ATP or formycin, by an X-ray-crystallographic method at 1.6-2.0 A (0.16-0.20 nm) resolution. The native alpha-momorcharin had been studied at 2.2 A resolution. Structures of trichosanthin were determined by a multiple isomorphous replacement method. Structures of alpha-momorcharin were determined by a molecular replacement method using refined trichosanthin as the searching model. Small ligands in all these complexes have been recognized and built on the difference in electron density. All these structures have been refined to achieve good results, both in terms of crystallography and of ideal geometry. These two proteins show considerable similarity in their three-dimensional folding and to that of related proteins. On the basis of these structures, detailed geometries of the active centres of these two proteins are described and are compared with those of related proteins. In all complexes the interactions between ligand atoms and protein atoms, including hydrophobic forces, aromatic stacking interactions and hydrogen bonds, are found to be specific towards the adenine base. The relationship between the sequence conservation of ribosome-inactivating proteins and their active-centre geometry was analysed. A depurinating mechanism of ribosome-inactivating proteins is proposed on the basis of these results. The N-7 atom of the substrate base group is proposed to be protonated by an acidic residue in the active centre. Images Figure 1 PMID:7619070

  6. Cochinin B, a novel ribosome-inactivating protein from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis.

    PubMed

    Chuethong, Juthamas; Oda, Kohei; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Saiki, Ikuo; Leelamanit, Wichet

    2007-03-01

    Cochinin B, a novel ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) with a molecular weight of 28 kDa, was purified from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis (Cucurbitaceae). The isolation procedure entailed ammonium sulfate precipitation, cation-exchange chromatography on SP Sepharose column and size-exclusion chromatography on Superdex 75 column with a fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) system. The first twenty N-terminal amino acid residues of Cochinin B showed homology to type I RIPs from other Momordica species. The purified Cochinin B displayed a strong inhibitory activity on protein synthesis in the cell-free rabbit reticulocyte lysate system with IC50 of 0.36 nM. Furthermore, it exhibited N-glycosidase activity and cytotoxicity against Vero cell line with IC50 higher than 1540 nM. Interestingly, Cochinin B manifested strong anti-tumor activities on human cervical epithelial carcinoma (HeLa), human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and human small cell lung cancer (NCI-H187) cell lines with IC50 of 16.9, 114 and 574 nM, respectively. PMID:17329832

  7. Ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation is controlled by TOR and modulated by PKA in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Tahmeena; Köhler, Julia R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary TOR and PKA signaling pathways control eukaryotic cell growth and proliferation. TOR activity in model fungi, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, responds principally to nutrients, e.g., nitrogen and phosphate sources, which are incorporated into the growing cell mass; PKA signaling responds to the availability of the cells' major energy source, glucose. In the fungal commensal and pathogen, Candida albicans, little is known of how these pathways interact. Here, the signal from phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (P-S6) was defined as a surrogate marker for TOR-dependent anabolic activity in C. albicans. Nutritional, pharmacologic, and genetic modulation of TOR activity elicited corresponding changes in P-S6 levels. The P-S6 signal corresponded to translational activity of a GFP reporter protein. Contributions of four PKA pathway components to anabolic activation were then examined. In high glucose concentrations, only Tpk2 was required to upregulate P-S6 to physiologic levels, whereas all four tested components were required to downregulate P-S6 in low glucose. TOR was epistatic to PKA components with respect to P-S6. In many host niches inhabited by C. albicans, glucose is scarce, with protein being available as a nitrogen source. We speculate that PKA may modulate TOR-dependent cell growth to a rate sustainable by available energy sources, when monomers of anabolic processes, such as amino acids, are abundant. PMID:26173379

  8. Balsamin, a novel ribosome-inactivating protein from the seeds of Balsam apple Momordica balsamina.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Inderdeep; Yadav, Santosh K; Hariprasad, Gururao; Gupta, R C; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Batra, Janendra K; Puri, Munish

    2012-08-01

    Plant seeds, a rich source of proteins, are considered important for their application as functional ingredients in a food system. A novel ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP), balsamin was purified from the seeds of Balsam apple, Momordica balsamina. Balsamin was purified by ion exchange chromatography on CM Sepharose and gel filtration on superdex-75. It has a molecular weight of 28 kDa as shown by SDS-PAGE analysis. Balsamin inhibits protein synthesis in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate-based cell free translation assay with an IC(50) of 90.6 ng ml(-1). It has RNA N-glycosidase activity and releases a 400-base long fragment termed the Endo fragment from 28S rRNA in the same manner as does saporin-6 from Saponaria officinalis. The N-terminal sequence analysis of the first 12 amino acids of balsamin revealed that it shares 83% similarity with type I RIP α-MMC from Momordica charantia and 50% similarity with β-MMC (from Momordica charantia), bryodin I (from Bryonia dioica) and luffin a (from Luffa cylindrica). Balsamin was further characterized by mass spectrometry. CD spectroscopic studies indicate that secondary structure of balsamin contains helix (23.5%), β-strand (24.6%), turn (20%) and random coil (31.9%). Thus RIPs activity expressed in vegetables like Momordica sp. advocates its usage in diet. PMID:22120616

  9. Reduced expression of the mouse ribosomal protein Rpl17 alters the diversity of mature ribosomes by enhancing production of shortened 5.8S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minshi; Parshin, Andrey V.; Shcherbik, Natalia; Pestov, Dimitri G.

    2015-01-01

    Processing of rRNA during ribosome assembly can proceed through alternative pathways but it is unclear whether this could affect the structure of the ribosome. Here, we demonstrate that shortage of a ribosomal protein can change pre-rRNA processing in a way that over time alters ribosome diversity in the cell. Reducing the amount of Rpl17 in mouse cells led to stalled 60S subunit maturation, causing degradation of most of the synthesized precursors. A fraction of pre-60S subunits, however, were able to complete maturation, but with a 5′-truncated 5.8S rRNA, which we named 5.8SC. The 5′ exoribonuclease Xrn2 is involved in the generation of both 5.8SC and the canonical long form of 5.8S rRNA. Ribosomes containing 5.8SC rRNA are present in various mouse and human cells and engage in translation. These findings uncover a previously undescribed form of mammalian 5.8S rRNA and demonstrate that perturbations in ribosome assembly can be a source of heterogeneity in mature ribosomes. PMID:25995445

  10. Expression of Muscle-Specific Ribosomal Protein L3-Like Impairs Myotube Growth.

    PubMed

    Chaillou, Thomas; Zhang, Xiping; McCarthy, John J

    2016-09-01

    The ribosome has historically been considered to have no cell-specific function but rather serve in a "housekeeping" capacity. This view is being challenged by evidence showing that heterogeneity in the protein composition of the ribosome can lead to the functional specialization of the ribosome. Expression profiling of different tissues revealed that ribosomal protein large 3-like (Rpl3l) is exclusively expressed in striated muscle. In response to a hypertrophic stimulus, Rpl3l expression in skeletal muscle was significantly decreased by 82% whereas expression of the ubiquitous paralog Rpl3 was significantly increased by ∼fivefold. Based on these findings, we developed the hypothesis that Rpl3l functions as a negative regulator of muscle growth. To test this hypothesis, we used the Tet-On system to express Rpl3l in myoblasts during myotube formation. In support of our hypothesis, RPL3L expression significantly impaired myotube growth as assessed by myotube diameter (-23%) and protein content (-14%). Further analysis showed that the basis of this impairment was caused by a significant decrease in myoblast fusion as the fusion index was significantly lower (-17%) with RPL3L expression. These findings are the first evidence to support the novel concept of ribosome specialization in skeletal muscle and its role in the regulation of skeletal muscle growth. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1894-1902, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26684695

  11. Protein Folding Activity of Ribosomal RNA Is a Selective Target of Two Unrelated Antiprion Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Tribouillard-Tanvier, Déborah; Dos Reis, Suzana; Gug, Fabienne; Voisset, Cécile; Béringue, Vincent; Sabate, Raimon; Kikovska, Ema; Talarek, Nicolas; Bach, Stéphane; Huang, Chenhui; Desban, Nathalie; Saupe, Sven J.; Supattapone, Surachai; Thuret, Jean-Yves; Chédin, Stéphane; Vilette, Didier; Galons, Hervé; Sanyal, Suparna; Blondel, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Background 6-Aminophenanthridine (6AP) and Guanabenz (GA, a drug currently in use for the treatment of hypertension) were isolated as antiprion drugs using a yeast-based assay. These structurally unrelated molecules are also active against mammalian prion in several cell-based assays and in vivo in a mouse model for prion-based diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report the identification of cellular targets of these drugs. Using affinity chromatography matrices for both drugs, we demonstrate an RNA-dependent interaction of 6AP and GA with the ribosome. These specific interactions have no effect on the peptidyl transferase activity of the ribosome or on global translation. In contrast, 6AP and GA specifically inhibit the ribosomal RNA-mediated protein folding activity of the ribosome. Conclusion/Significance 6AP and GA are therefore the first compounds to selectively inhibit the protein folding activity of the ribosome. They thus constitute precious tools to study the yet largely unexplored biological role of this protein folding activity. PMID:18478094

  12. Proteins and Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the most abundant substances in living organisms and cells. All proteins are constructed from the same twenty amino acids that are linked together by covalent bonds. Shorter chains of two or more amino acids can be linked by covalent bonds to form polypeptides. There are twenty amino...

  13. Scattering studies on ribosomes in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, V.

    1986-02-01

    Ribosomes are organelles that play a central role in protein synthesis. They are complexes of protein and nucleic acid, and can be analysed as two-component systems by neutron scattering. Moreover, ribosomes can be biochemically prepared that have specific proteins deuterated. Both these properties have been exploited to study the structure of the ribosome by neutron scattering. This article reviews the studies carried out on the small ribosomal subunit, and describes a recent study that has resolved a conflict between the results of two classes of experiments.

  14. E. coli metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase-E binds to the ribosome: a unique moonlighting action revealed.

    PubMed

    Shasmal, Manidip; Dey, Sandip; Shaikh, Tanvir R; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that a high degree of regulation is involved in the protein synthesis machinery entailing more interacting regulatory factors. A multitude of proteins have been identified recently which show regulatory function upon binding to the ribosome. Here, we identify tight association of a metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) with the E. coli 70S ribosome isolated from cell extract under low salt wash conditions. Cryo-EM reconstruction of the ribosome sample allows us to localize its position on the head of the small subunit, near the mRNA entrance. Our study demonstrates substantial RNA unwinding activity of AdhE which can account for the ability of ribosome to translate through downstream of at least certain mRNA helices. Thus far, in E. coli, no ribosome-associated factor has been identified that shows downstream mRNA helicase activity. Additionally, the cryo-EM map reveals interaction of another extracellular protein, outer membrane protein C (OmpC), with the ribosome at the peripheral solvent side of the 50S subunit. Our result also provides important insight into plausible functional role of OmpC upon ribosome binding. Visualization of the ribosome purified directly from the cell lysate unveils for the first time interactions of additional regulatory proteins with the ribosome. PMID:26822933

  15. E. coli metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase-E binds to the ribosome: a unique moonlighting action revealed

    PubMed Central

    Shasmal, Manidip; Dey, Sandip; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that a high degree of regulation is involved in the protein synthesis machinery entailing more interacting regulatory factors. A multitude of proteins have been identified recently which show regulatory function upon binding to the ribosome. Here, we identify tight association of a metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) with the E. coli 70S ribosome isolated from cell extract under low salt wash conditions. Cryo-EM reconstruction of the ribosome sample allows us to localize its position on the head of the small subunit, near the mRNA entrance. Our study demonstrates substantial RNA unwinding activity of AdhE which can account for the ability of ribosome to translate through downstream of at least certain mRNA helices. Thus far, in E. coli, no ribosome-associated factor has been identified that shows downstream mRNA helicase activity. Additionally, the cryo-EM map reveals interaction of another extracellular protein, outer membrane protein C (OmpC), with the ribosome at the peripheral solvent side of the 50S subunit. Our result also provides important insight into plausible functional role of OmpC upon ribosome binding. Visualization of the ribosome purified directly from the cell lysate unveils for the first time interactions of additional regulatory proteins with the ribosome. PMID:26822933

  16. Protein-RNA cross-linking in the ribosomes of yeast under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamid; Regnier, Fred

    2006-12-01

    Living systems have efficient degradative pathways for dealing with the fact that reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from cellular metabolism and the environment oxidatively damage proteins and DNA. But aggregation and cross-linking can occur as well, leading to a series of problems including disruption of cellular regulation, mutations, and even cell death. The mechanism(s) by which protein aggregation occurs and the macromolecular species involved are poorly understood. In the study reported here, evidence is provided for a new type of aggregate between proteins and RNA in ribosomes. While studying the effect of oxidative stress induced in the yeast proteome it was noted that ribosomal proteins were widely oxidized. Eighty six percent of the proteins in yeast ribosomes were found to be carbonylated after stressing yeast cell cultures with hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, many of these proteins appeared to be cross-linked based on their coelution patterns during RPC separation. Since they were not in direct contact, it was not clear how this could occur unless it was through the RNA separating them in the ribosome. This was confirmed in a multiple-step process, the first being derivatization of all carbonylated proteins in cell lysates with biotin hydrazide through Schiff base formation. Following reduction of Schiff bases with sodium cyanoborohydride, biotinylated proteins were selected from cell lysates with avidin affinity chromatography. Oxidized proteins thus captured were then selected again using boronate affinity chromatography to capture vicinal diol-containing proteins. This would include proteins cross-linked to an RNA fragment containing a ribose residue with 2',3'-hydroxyl groups. Some glycoproteins would also be selected by this process. LC/MS/MS analyses of tryptic peptides derived from proteins captured by this process along with MASCOT searches resulted in the identification of 37 ribosomal proteins that appear to be cross-linked to RNA

  17. Isolation and Characterization of an RIP (Ribosome-Inactivating Protein)-Like Protein from Tobacco with Dual Enzymatic Activity1[w

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neelam; Park, Sang-Wook; Vepachedu, Ramarao; Barbieri, Luigi; Ciani, Marialibera; Stirpe, Fiorenzo; Savary, Brett J.; Vivanco, Jorge M.

    2004-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are N-glycosidases that remove a specific adenine from the sarcin/ricin loop of the large rRNA, thus arresting protein synthesis at the translocation step. In the present study, a protein termed tobacco RIP (TRIP) was isolated from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves and purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography in combination with yeast ribosome depurination assays. TRIP has a molecular mass of 26 kD as evidenced by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and showed strong N-glycosidase activity as manifested by the depurination of yeast rRNA. Purified TRIP showed immunoreactivity with antibodies of RIPs from Mirabilis expansa. TRIP released fewer amounts of adenine residues from ribosomal (Artemia sp. and rat ribosomes) and non-ribosomal substrates (herring sperm DNA, rRNA, and tRNA) compared with other RIPs. TRIP inhibited translation in wheat (Triticum aestivum) germ more efficiently than in rabbit reticulocytes, showing an IC50 at 30 ng in the former system. Antimicrobial assays using highly purified TRIP (50 μg mL-1) conducted against various fungi and bacterial pathogens showed the strongest inhibitory activity against Trichoderma reesei and Pseudomonas solancearum. A 15-amino acid internal polypeptide sequence of TRIP was identical with the internal sequences of the iron-superoxide dismutase (Fe-SOD) from wild tobacco (Nicotiana plumbaginifolia), Arabidopsis, and potato (Solanum tuberosum). Purified TRIP showed SOD activity, and Escherichia coli Fe-SOD was observed to have RIP activity too. Thus, TRIP may be considered a dual activity enzyme showing RIP-like activity and Fe-SOD characteristics. PMID:14671015

  18. Over-represented localized sequence motifs in ribosomal protein gene promoters of basal metazoans.

    PubMed

    Perina, Drago; Korolija, Marina; Roller, Maša; Harcet, Matija; Jeličić, Branka; Mikoč, Andreja; Cetković, Helena

    2011-07-01

    Equimolecular presence of ribosomal proteins (RPs) in the cell is needed for ribosome assembly and is achieved by synchronized expression of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) with promoters of similar strengths. Over-represented motifs of RPG promoter regions are identified as targets for specific transcription factors. Unlike RPs, those motifs are not conserved between mammals, drosophila, and yeast. We analyzed RPGs proximal promoter regions of three basal metazoans with sequenced genomes: sponge, cnidarian, and placozoan and found common features, such as 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine tracts and TATA-boxes. Furthermore, we identified over-represented motifs, some of which displayed the highest similarity to motifs abundant in human RPG promoters and not present in Drosophila or yeast. Our results indicate that humans over-represented motifs, as well as corresponding domains of transcription factors, were established very early in metazoan evolution. The fast evolving nature of RPGs regulatory network leads to formation of other, lineage specific, over-represented motifs. PMID:21457775

  19. Toxicity of cinnamomin--a new type II ribosome-inactivating protein to bollworm and mosquito.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Li, X D; Yuan, J Z; Tang, Z H; Liu, W Y

    2000-03-01

    The toxicity of cinnamomin, a new type II ribosome-inactivating protein purified from the seeds of camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora), to bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera) and mosquito (Culex pipines pallens) during larval stage was tested. The LC50 of cinnamomin to bollworm larvae fed on diet containing cinnamomin was 1839 ppm and the LC50 to larvae of mosquito was 168 ppm. The gut extract of bollworm larvae could apparently hydrolyze cinnamomin. The inhibition of protein synthesis by cinnamomin was tested in in vitro translation system of bollworm larvae, and its LC50 was determined to be approx. 14 nM. Bollworm larvae ribosome treated with cinnamomin produced a specific RNA fragment (R-fragment) characterized on urea-denatured polyacrylamide gel. Evidence was provided that hidden breaks exist in the largest ribosomal RNA of bollworm larvae. PMID:10732994

  20. Ribosome-associated pentatricopeptide repeat proteins function as translational activators in mitochondria of trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Aphasizheva, Inna; Maslov, Dmitri A; Qian, Yu; Huang, Lan; Wang, Qi; Costello, Catherine E; Aphasizhev, Ruslan

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes of Trypanosoma brucei are composed of 9S and 12S rRNAs, eubacterial-type ribosomal proteins, polypeptides lacking discernible motifs and approximately 20 pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) RNA binding proteins. Several PPRs also populate the polyadenylation complex; among these, KPAF1 and KPAF2 function as general mRNA 3' adenylation/uridylation factors. The A/U-tail enables mRNA binding to the small ribosomal subunit and is essential for translation. The presence of A/U-tail also correlates with requirement for translation of certain mRNAs in mammalian and insect parasite stages. Here, we inquired whether additional PPRs activate translation of individual mRNAs. Proteomic analysis identified KRIPP1 and KRIPP8 as components of the small ribosomal subunit in mammalian and insect forms, but also revealed their association with the polyadenylation complex in the latter. RNAi knockdowns demonstrated essential functions of KRIPP1 and KRIPP8 in the actively respiring insect stage, but not in the mammalian stage. In the KRIPP1 knockdown, A/U-tailed mRNA encoding cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 declined concomitantly with the de novo synthesis of this subunit whereas polyadenylation and translation of cyb mRNA were unaffected. In contrast, the KRIPP8 knockdown inhibited A/U-tailing and translation of both CO1 and cyb mRNAs. Our findings indicate that ribosome-associated PPRs may selectively activate mRNAs for translation. PMID:26713541

  1. Ribosomal Proteins and Human Diseases: Pathogenesis, Molecular Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Nag, Subhasree; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Ming-Hai; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Jianwei; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomes are essential components of the protein synthesis machinery. The process of ribosome biogenesis is well organized and tightly regulated. Recent studies have shown that ribosomal proteins (RPs) have extraribosomal functions that are involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, DNA repair, and other cellular processes. The dysfunction of RPs has been linked to the development and progression of hematological, metabolic, and cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Perturbation of ribosome biogenesis results in ribosomal stress, which triggers activation of the p53 signaling pathway through RPs-MDM2 interactions, resulting in p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. RPs also regulate cellular functions through p53-independent mechanisms. We herein review the recent advances in several forefronts of RP research, including the understanding of their biological features and roles in regulating cellular functions, maintaining cell homeostasis, and their involvement in the pathogenesis of human diseases. We also highlight the translational potential of this research for the identification of molecular biomarkers, and in the discovery and development of novel treatments for human diseases. PMID:25164622

  2. Ribosome-associated pentatricopeptide repeat proteins function as translational activators in mitochondria of trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Aphasizheva, Inna; Maslov, Dmitri A.; Qian, Yu; Huang, Lan; Wang, Qi; Costello, Catherine E.; Aphasizhev, Ruslan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial ribosomes of Trypanosoma brucei are composed of 9S and 12S rRNAs, eubacterial-type ribosomal proteins, polypeptides lacking discernible motifs and approximately 20 pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) RNA binding proteins. Several PPRs also populate the polyadenylation complex; among these, KPAF1 and KPAF2 function as general mRNA 3′ adenylation/uridylation factors. The A/U-tail enables mRNA binding to the small ribosomal subunit and is essential for translation. The presence of A/U-tail also correlates with requirement for translation of certain mRNAs in mammalian and insect parasite stages. Here, we inquired whether additional PPRs activate translation of individual mRNAs. Proteomic analysis identified KRIPP1 and KRIPP8 as components of the small ribosomal subunit in mammalian and insect forms, but also revealed their association with the polyadenylation complex in the latter. RNAi knockdowns demonstrated essential functions of KRIPP1 and KRIPP8 in the actively respiring insect stage, but not in the mammalian stage. In the KRIPP1 knockdown, A/U-tailed mRNA encoding cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 declined concomitantly with the de novo synthesis of this subunit whereas polyadenylation and translation of cyb mRNA were unaffected. In contrast, the KRIPP8 knockdown inhibited A/U-tailing and translation of both CO1 and cyb mRNAs. Our findings indicate that ribosome-associated PPRs may selectively activate mRNAs for translation. PMID:26713541

  3. Dictyostelium ribosomal protein genes and the elongation factor 1B gene show coordinate developmental regulation which is under post-transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A K; Blumberg, D D

    1999-06-01

    Starvation for amino acids initiates the developmental program in the cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum [19, 20]. One of the earliest developmental events is the decline in ribosomal protein synthesis [2, 17, 29, 30]. The ribosomal protein mRNAs are excluded from polysomes with 20 min to 1 h following the removal of nutrients, and their mRNA levels decline sharply at about 9 h into the 24-h developmental cycle [28, 31, 35, 36]. It has been generally assumed that the decline in r-protein mRNA levels during late development reflected a decline in the transcription rate [12, 32, 43]. Here we demonstrate that this is not the case. The transcription rates of three ribosomal protein genes, rpL11, rpL23 and rpS9 as well as an elongation factor 1B gene have been determined during growth and development in Dictyostelium. Throughout growth and development the transcription rate of the ribosomal protein genes remains relatively constant at 0.2%-0.5% of the rate of rRNA transcription while the elongation factor 1B gene is transcribed at 0.4%-0.6% of the rRNA rate. This low but constant transcription rate is in contrast to a spore coat protein gene Psp D, which is transcribed at 6% of the rRNA rate in late developing cells. The elongation factor 1B gene appears to be co-regulated with the ribosomal protein genes both in terms of its transcription rate and mRNA accumulation. Dictyostelium has been a popular model for understanding signal transduction and the growth to differentiation transition, thus it is of significance that the regulation of ribosome biosynthesis in Dictyostelium resembles that of higher eukaryotes in being regulated largely at the post-transcriptional level in response to starvation as opposed to yeasts where the regulation is largely transcriptional [27]. PMID:10374261

  4. Recognition of Ribosomal Protein L11 by the Protein Trimethyltransferase PrmA

    SciTech Connect

    Demirci,H.; Gregory, S.; Dahlberg, A.; Jogl, G.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial ribosomal protein L11 is post-translationally trimethylated at multiple residues by a single methyltransferase, PrmA. Here, we describe four structures of PrmA from the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus. Two apo-PrmA structures at 1.59 and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution and a third with bound cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine at 1.75 {angstrom} each exhibit distinct relative positions of the substrate recognition and catalytic domains, revealing how PrmA can position the L11 substrate for multiple, consecutive side-chain methylation reactions. The fourth structure, the PrmA-L11 enzyme-substrate complex at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution, illustrates the highly specific interaction of the N-terminal domain with its substrate and places Lys39 in the PrmA active site. The presence of a unique flexible loop in the cofactor-binding site suggests how exchange of AdoMet with the reaction product S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine can occur without necessitating the dissociation of PrmA from L11. Finally, the mode of interaction of PrmA with L11 explains its observed preference for L11 as substrate before its assembly into the 50S ribosomal subunit.

  5. Ribosomal proteins and expressed sequence tags from Lysiphlebus testaceipes(Hymenoptera: Aphidiidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A dataset containing 101 putative ribosomal protein (RP) sequences is provided for the aphid parasitoid, Lysiphlebus testaceipes. These data were obtained as a subset from a cDNA library constructed from adult L. testaceipes, and represent one of the largest complete sets of cytoplasmic RP sequence...

  6. Synaptic Activation of Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation Occurs Locally in Activated Dendritic Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirbhoy, Patricia Salgado; Farris, Shannon; Steward, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) induces phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) in postsynaptic neurons, but the functional significance of rpS6 phosphorylation is poorly understood. Here, we show that synaptic stimulation that induces perforant path LTP triggers phosphorylation of rpS6 (p-rpS6)…

  7. The role of ribosomal proteins in the regulation of cell proliferation, tumorigenesis, and genomic integrity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xilong; Xiong, Xiufang; Sun, Yi

    2016-07-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs), the essential components of the ribosome, are a family of RNA-binding proteins, which play prime roles in ribosome biogenesis and protein translation. Recent studies revealed that RPs have additional extra-ribosomal functions, independent of protein biosynthesis, in regulation of diverse cellular processes. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of how RPs regulate apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, cell proliferation, neoplastic transformation, cell migration and invasion, and tumorigenesis through both MDM2/p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. We also discuss the roles of RPs in the maintenance of genome integrity via modulating DNA damage response and repair. We further discuss mutations or deletions at the somatic or germline levels of some RPs in human cancers as well as in patients of Diamond-Blackfan anemia and 5q- syndrome with high susceptibility to cancer development. Moreover, we discuss the potential clinical application, based upon abnormal levels of RPs, in biomarker development for early diagnosis and/or prognosis of certain human cancers. Finally, we discuss the pressing issues in the field as future perspectives for better understanding the roles of RPs in human cancers to eventually benefit human health. PMID:27294833

  8. Tempo and Mode of Gene Duplication in Mammalian Ribosomal Protein Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gajdosik, Matthew D.; Simon, Amanda; Nelson, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication has been widely recognized as a major driver of evolutionary change and organismal complexity through the generation of multi-gene families. Therefore, understanding the forces that govern the evolution of gene families through the retention or loss of duplicated genes is fundamentally important in our efforts to study genome evolution. Previous work from our lab has shown that ribosomal protein (RP) genes constitute one of the largest classes of conserved duplicated genes in mammals. This result was surprising due to the fact that ribosomal protein genes evolve slowly and transcript levels are very tightly regulated. In our present study, we identified and characterized all RP duplicates in eight mammalian genomes in order to investigate the tempo and mode of ribosomal protein family evolution. We show that a sizable number of duplicates are transcriptionally active and are very highly conserved. Furthermore, we conclude that existing gene duplication models do not readily account for the preservation of a very large number of intact retroduplicated ribosomal protein (RT-RP) genes observed in mammalian genomes. We suggest that selection against dominant-negative mutations may underlie the unexpected retention and conservation of duplicated RP genes, and may shape the fate of newly duplicated genes, regardless of duplication mechanism. PMID:25369106

  9. Enhanced pest resistance of maize leaves expressing monocot crop plant derived ribosome inactivating protein and agglutinin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although many insect resistance genes have been identified, the number of studies examining their effects in combination using transgenic systems is limited. We introduced a construct into maize containing the coding sequence for maize ribosome inactivating protein (MRIP), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA...

  10. An unexpected type of ribosomes induced by kasugamycin: A look into ancestral times of protein synthesis?

    PubMed Central

    Kaberdina, Anna Chao; Szaflarski, Witold; Nierhaus, Knud H.; Moll, Isabella

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Translation of leaderless mRNAs, lacking ribosomal recruitment signals other than the 5′-terminal AUG-initiating codon, occurs in all three domains of life. Contemporary leaderless mRNAs may therefore be viewed as molecular fossils resembling ancestral mRNAs. Here, we analyzed the phenomenon of sustained translation of a leaderless mRNA in the presence of the antibiotic kasugamycin. Unexpected from the known in vitro effects of the drug, kasugamycin induced the formation of stable ~61S ribosomes in vivo, which were proficient in selectively translating leaderless mRNA. 61S particles are devoid of more than six proteins of the small subunit including the functionally important proteins S1 and S12. The lack of these proteins could be reconciled with structural changes in the 16S rRNA. These studies provide in vivo evidence for the functionality of ribosomes devoid of multiple proteins, and shed light on the evolutionary history of ribosomes. PMID:19187763

  11. Isolation and characterization of cDNAs encoding ribosome inactivating protein from Dianthus sinensis L.

    PubMed

    Cho, H J; Lee, S J; Kim, S; Kim, B D

    2000-04-30

    To isolate a ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) gene, six plant species were surveyed for antiviral activity. Crude proteins extracted from these plants were tested for the antiviral activity against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in Nicotiana glutinosa. All the plants, Spinacia oleracea, Amaranthus lividus, Dianthus superbus, Dianthus sinensis and Celosia cristata, with an exception of Oenanthe stolonifera, presented 70-90% inhibition of viral infectivity. In an attempt to search for the RIP gene from D. sinensis, partial cDNA was obtained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the poly(A)+ RNA from D. sinensis leaves. DNA gel blot analysis showed that D. sinensis has multi-copy RIP genes. The expression of RIP gene was investigated in the flower, leaf, root and stem of D. sinensis, and was found to be most abundant in the leaf. Using the partial cDNA as a probe, seven full-length cDNAs were isolated from a library prepared from D. sinensis leaves. They were divided into three groups on the basis of their nucleotide sequence homology. The three representative clones, cDsRIP1, cDsRIP2 and cDsRIP3 were completely sequenced. They all had an open reading frame of 882 bp. The cDsRIP2 showed 79% homology with dianthin 30 and saporin genes; 59% with PAP and Mirabilis antiviral protein MAP genes. From the analysis of deduced amino acid sequences, it was predicted that D. sinensis RIP cDNAs might have a putative signal peptide of 23 amino acid residues at their N-terminus. When the cDNA was expressed in E. coli, the bacteria was unable to grow upon IPTG induction, suggesting that expression of the gene renders toxicity to E. coli cells. PMID:10850653

  12. Cryo-EM structure of the tetracycline resistance protein TetM in complex with a translating ribosome at 3.9-Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Arenz, Stefan; Nguyen, Fabian; Beckmann, Roland; Wilson, Daniel N

    2015-04-28

    Ribosome protection proteins (RPPs) confer resistance to tetracycline by binding to the ribosome and chasing the drug from its binding site. Current models for RPP action are derived from 7.2- to 16-Å resolution structures of RPPs bound to vacant or nontranslating ribosomes. Here we present a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the RPP TetM in complex with a translating ribosome at 3.9-Å resolution. The structure reveals the contacts of TetM with the ribosome, including interaction between the conserved and functionally critical C-terminal extension of TetM with a unique splayed conformation of nucleotides A1492 and A1493 at the decoding center of the small subunit. The resolution enables us to unambiguously model the side chains of the amino acid residues comprising loop III in domain IV of TetM, revealing that the tyrosine residues Y506 and Y507 are not responsible for drug-release as suggested previously but rather for intrafactor contacts that appear to stabilize the conformation of loop III. Instead, Pro509 at the tip of loop III is located directly within the tetracycline binding site where it interacts with nucleotide C1054 of the 16S rRNA, such that RPP action uses Pro509, rather than Y506/Y507, to directly dislodge and release tetracycline from the ribosome. PMID:25870267

  13. Inhibition of Protein Synthesis on the Ribosome by Tildipirosin Compared with Other Veterinary Macrolides

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Niels Møller; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Warrass, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Tildipirosin is a 16-membered-ring macrolide developed to treat bacterial pathogens, including Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida, that cause respiratory tract infections in cattle and swine. Here we evaluated the efficacy of tildipirosin at inhibiting protein synthesis on the ribosome (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 0.23 ± 0.01 μM) and compared it with the established veterinary macrolides tylosin, tilmicosin, and tulathromycin. Mutation and methylation at key rRNA nucleotides revealed differences in the interactions of these macrolides within their common ribosomal binding site. PMID:22926570

  14. Human acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins P0, P1, and P2: Analysis of cDNA clones, in vitro synthesis, and assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, B.E.; Steitz, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    cDNA clones encoding three antigenically related human ribosomal phosophoproteins (P-proteins) P0, P1, and P2 were isolated and sequenced. P1 and P2 are analogous to Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L7/L12, and P0 is likely to be an analog of L10. The three proteins have a nearly identical carboxy-terminal 17-amino-acid sequence (KEESEESD(D/E)DMGFGLFD-COOH) that is the basis of their immunological cross-reactivity. The identifies of the P1 and P2 cDNAs were confirmed by the strong similarities of their encoded amino acid sequences to published primary structures of the homologous rat, brine shrimp, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins. The P0 cDNA was initially identified by translation of hybrid-selected mRNA and immunoprecipitation of the products. To demonstrate that the coding sequences are full length, the P0, P1, and P2 cDNAs were transcribed in vitro by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and the resulting mRNAs were translated in vitro. The synthetic P0, P1, and P2 proteins were serologically and electrophoretically identical to P-proteins extracted from HeLa cells. These synthetic P-proteins were incorporated into 60S but not 40S ribosomes and also assembled into a complex similar to that described for E. coli L7/L12 and L10.

  15. Synthesis of ribosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, J R

    1989-01-01

    The assembly of a eucaryotic ribosome requires the synthesis of four ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules and more than 75 ribosomal proteins. It utilizes all three RNA polymerases; it requires the cooperation of the nucleus and the cytoplasm, the processing of RNA, and the specific interaction of RNA and protein molecules. It is carried out efficiently and is exquisitely sensitive to the needs of the cell. Our current understanding of this process in the genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reviewed. The ribosomal RNA genes are arranged in a tandem array of 100 to 200 copies. This tandem array has led to unique ways of carrying out a number of functions. Replication is asymmetric and does not initiate from every autonomously replicating sequence. Recombination is suppressed. Transcription of the major ribosomal RNA appears to involve coupling between adjacent transcription units, which are separated by the 5S RNA transcription unit. Genes for many ribosomal proteins have been cloned and sequenced. Few are linked; most are duplicated; most have an intron. There is extensive homology between yeast ribosomal proteins and those of other species. Most, but not all, of the ribosomal protein genes have one or two sites that are essential for their transcription and that bind a common transcription factor. This factor binds also to many other places in the genome, including the telomeres. There is coordinated transcription of the ribosomal protein genes under a variety of conditions. However, the cell seems to possess no mechanism for regulating the transcription of individual ribosomal protein genes in response either to a deficiency or an excess of a particular ribosomal protein. A deficiency causes slow growth. Any excess ribosomal protein is degraded very rapidly, with a half-life of 1 to 5 min. Unlike most types of cells, yeast cells appear not to regulate the translation of ribosomal proteins. However, in the case of ribosomal protein L32

  16. Fluctuations in protein synthesis from a single RNA template: Stochastic kinetics of ribosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, Ashok; Chowdhury, Debashish; Ramakrishnan, T. V.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are polymerized by cyclic machines called ribosomes, which use their messenger RNA (mRNA) track also as the corresponding template, and the process is called translation. We explore, in depth and detail, the stochastic nature of the translation. We compute various distributions associated with the translation process; one of them—namely, the dwell time distribution—has been measured in recent single-ribosome experiments. The form of the distribution, which fits best with our simulation data, is consistent with that extracted from the experimental data. For our computations, we use a model that captures both the mechanochemistry of each individual ribosome and their steric interactions. We also demonstrate the effects of the sequence inhomogeneities of real genes on the fluctuations and noise in translation. Finally, inspired by recent advances in the experimental techniques of manipulating single ribosomes, we make theoretical predictions on the force-velocity relation for individual ribosomes. In principle, all our predictions can be tested by carrying out in vitro experiments.

  17. A model of protein translation including codon bias, nonsense errors, and ribosome recycling.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Michael A; Wagner, Andreas

    2006-04-21

    We present and analyse a model of protein translation at the scale of an individual messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript. The model we develop is unique in that it incorporates the phenomena of ribosome recycling and nonsense errors. The model conceptualizes translation as a probabilistic wave of ribosome occupancy traveling down a heterogeneous medium, the mRNA transcript. Our results show that the heterogeneity of the codon translation rates along the mRNA results in short-scale spikes and dips in the wave. Nonsense errors attenuate this wave on a longer scale while ribosome recycling reinforces it. We find that the combination of nonsense errors and codon usage bias can have a large effect on the probability that a ribosome will completely translate a transcript. We also elucidate how these forces interact with ribosome recycling to determine the overall translation rate of an mRNA transcript. We derive a simple cost function for nonsense errors using our model and apply this function to the yeast (Saccharomyces cervisiae) genome. Using this function we are able to detect position dependent selection on codon bias which correlates with gene expression levels as predicted a priori. These results indirectly validate our underlying model assumptions and confirm that nonsense errors can play an important role in shaping codon usage bias. PMID:16171830

  18. The ribosomal protein S26 regulates p53 activity in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Cui, D; Li, L; Lou, H; Sun, H; Ngai, S-M; Shao, G; Tang, J

    2014-04-24

    Ribosomal proteins have emerged as novel regulators of the Mdm2-p53 feedback loop, especially in the context of ribosomal stress. RPS26 is a recently identified Diamond-Blackfan Anemia-related ribosomal protein and its role in p53 activation has not been previously explored. In this study we found knockdown of RPS26 induced p53 stabilization and activation via a RPL11-dependent mechanism, resulting in p53-dependent cell growth inhibition. Moreover, RPS26 has the ability to interact with Mdm2 and inhibits Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination that leads to p53 stabilization upon overexpression. Importantly, we discovered that RPS26 knockdown impaired p53's ability to transcriptionally activate its target genes in response to DNA damage, without affecting its stability. Accordingly, the cells lost the ability to induce G2/M cell cycle arrest. We further found that upon RPS26 knockdown, the DNA damage induced recruitment of p53 to the promoters of its target genes and p53 acetylation were both greatly reduced. In addition, RPS26 can interact with p53 independent of Mdm2 and coexist in a complex with p53 and p300. These data establish a role of RPS26 in DNA damage response by directly influencing p53 transcriptional activity, and suggest that RPS26 acts distinctively in different scenarios of p53 activation. Our finding also implicates p53 transcriptional activity control as an important mechanism of p53 regulation by ribosomal proteins. PMID:23728348

  19. The Caulobacter crescentus CgtAC Protein Cosediments with the Free 50S Ribosomal Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bin; Thayer, Desiree A.; Maddock, Janine R.

    2004-01-01

    The Obg family of GTPases is widely conserved and predicted to play an as-yet-unknown role in translation. Recent reports provide circumstantial evidence that both eukaryotic and prokaryotic Obg proteins are associated with the large ribosomal subunit. Here we provide direct evidence that the Caulobacter crescentus CgtAC protein is associated with the free large (50S) ribosomal subunit but not with 70S monosomes or with translating ribosomes. In contrast to the Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli proteins, CgtAC does not fractionate in a large complex by gel filtration, indicating a moderately weak association with the 50S subunit. Moreover, binding of CgtAC to the 50S particle is sensitive to salt concentration and buffer composition but not guanine nucleotide occupancy of CgtAC. Assays of epitope-tagged wild-type and mutant variants of CgtAC indicate that the C terminus of CgtAC is critical for 50S association. Interestingly, the addition of a C-terminal epitope tag also affected the ability of various cgtAC alleles to function in vivo. Depletion of CgtAC led to perturbations in the polysome profile, raising the possibility that CgtAC is involved in ribosome assembly or stability. PMID:14702318

  20. Ribosomal Protein P2 from apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is intrinsically a molten globule.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Pushpa; Choudhary, Sinjan; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an apicomplexan parasite, which causes toxoplasmosis. Toxoplasma P2 (TgP2) is a ribosomal protein and exists as supramolecular assembly with other proteins in the ribosome. It is also shown that TgP2 is involved in some extra ribosomal functions. However, till date the protein has evaded structural characterization by any of the known techniques. In this background, we report here a systematic study using a variety of biophysical techniques and NMR, under different conditions of pH and temperature, and deduce that TgP2 consists of only helices and unstructured regions, is a monomer at low pH but forms multimers at higher pH, and has intrinsically a molten globule structure. The C-terminal half is flexible and the helices are concentrated in the N-terminal half of the chain. The dynamism inherent to the molten globule structure may have functional implications for its extra-ribosomal functions. which is contrast to that of human P2. PMID:25866913

  1. Amino Acid Flux from Metabolic Network Benefits Protein Translation: the Role of Resource Availability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Pan; Yang, Yi; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Protein translation is a central step in gene expression and affected by many factors such as codon usage bias, mRNA folding energy and tRNA abundance. Despite intensive previous studies, how metabolic amino acid supply correlates with protein translation efficiency remains unknown. In this work, we estimated the amino acid flux from metabolic network for each protein in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using Flux Balance Analysis. Integrated with the mRNA expression level, protein abundance and ribosome profiling data, we provided a detailed description of the role of amino acid supply in protein translation. Our results showed that amino acid supply positively correlates with translation efficiency and ribosome density. Moreover, with the rank-based regression model, we found that metabolic amino acid supply facilitates ribosome utilization. Based on the fact that the ribosome density change of well-amino-acid-supplied genes is smaller than poorly-amino-acid-supply genes under amino acid starvation, we reached the conclusion that amino acid supply may buffer ribosome density change against amino acid starvation and benefit maintaining a relatively stable translation environment. Our work provided new insights into the connection between metabolic amino acid supply and protein translation process by revealing a new regulation strategy that is dependent on resource availability. PMID:26056817

  2. Control of ribosome formation in rat heart

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    Diabetes of 9 days duration produced a 17% diminution in the rate of total protein synthesis in rat hearts perfused as Langendorff preparations supplied with glucose, plasma levels of amino acids, and 400 ..mu..U/ml insulin. This reduction was attributable to a decrease in efficiency of protein synthesis and total RNA content. Total messenger RNA content decreased in diabetic hearts in proportion to the reduction in total RNA. Diabetes also resulted in diminished ribosome content as reflected by the induction in total RNA. Ribosome production was investigated by monitoring incorporation of (/sup 3/H)phenylalanine into the proteins of cytoplasmic ribosomes. Rates of ribosome formation in diabetic hearts were as fast as control rates in the presence of insulin, and were faster than control rates in the absence of the hormone. These results indicated that ribosome content fell in diabetic hearts despite unchanged or faster rates of ribosome formation.

  3. Scanning of 16S Ribosomal RNA for Peptide Nucleic Acid Targets.

    PubMed

    Górska, Anna; Markowska-Zagrajek, Agnieszka; Równicki, Marcin; Trylska, Joanna

    2016-08-25

    We have designed a protocol and server to aid in the search for putative binding sites in 16S rRNA that could be targeted by peptide nucleic acid oligomers. Various features of 16S rRNA were considered to score its regions as potential targets for sequence-specific binding that could result in inhibition of ribosome function. Specifically, apart from the functional importance of a particular rRNA region, we calculated its accessibility, flexibility, energetics of strand invasion by an oligomer, as well as similarity to human rRNA. To determine 16S rRNA flexibility in the ribosome context, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the 30S subunit in explicit solvent. We proposed a few 16S RNA target sites, and one of them was tested experimentally to verify inhibition of bacterial growth by a peptide nucleic acid oligomer. PMID:27105576

  4. Organization and nucleotide sequences of the Spiroplasma citri genes for ribosomal protein S2, elongation factor Ts, spiralin, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and an unidentified protein.

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, C; Saillard, C; Bové, J M

    1990-01-01

    The gene for spiralin, the major membrane protein of the helical mollicute Spiroplasma citri, was cloned in Escherichia coli as a 5-kilobase-pair (kbp) DNA fragment. The complete nucleotide sequence of the 5.0-kbp spiroplasmal DNA fragment was determined (GenBank accession no. M31161). The spiralin gene was identified by the size and amino acid composition of its translational product. Besides the spiralin gene, the spiroplasmal DNA fragment was found to contain five additional open reading frames (ORFs). The translational products of four of these ORFs were identified by their amino acid sequence homologies with known proteins: ribosomal protein S2, elongation factor Ts, phosphofructokinase, and pyruvate kinase, respectively encoded by the genes rpsB, tsf, pfk, and pyk. The product of the fifth ORF remains to be identified and was named protein X (X gene). The order of the above genes was tsf--X--spiralin gene--pfk--pyk. These genes were transcribed in one direction, while the gene for ribosomal protein S2 (rpsB) was transcribed in the opposite direction. Images PMID:2139649

  5. Crystal structure of bacillus subtilis YdaF protein : a putative ribosomal N-acetyltransferase.

    SciTech Connect

    Brunzelle, J. S.; Wu, R.; Korolev, S. V.; Collart, F. R.; Joachimiak, A.; Anderson, W. F.; Biosciences Division; Northwestern Univ.; Saint Louis Univ. School of Medicine

    2004-12-01

    Comparative sequence analysis suggests that the ydaF gene encodes a protein (YdaF) that functions as an N-acetyltransferase, more specifically, a ribosomal N-acetyltransferase. Sequence analysis using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) suggests that YdaF belongs to a large family of proteins (199 proteins found in 88 unique species of bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes). YdaF also belongs to the COG1670, which includes the Escherichia coli RimL protein that is known to acetylate ribosomal protein L12. N-acetylation (NAT) has been found in all kingdoms. NAT enzymes catalyze the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) to a primary amino group. For example, NATs can acetylate the N-terminal {alpha}-amino group, the {epsilon}-amino group of lysine residues, aminoglycoside antibiotics, spermine/speridine, or arylalkylamines such as serotonin. The crystal structure of the alleged ribosomal NAT protein, YdaF, from Bacillus subtilis presented here was determined as a part of the Midwest Center for Structural Genomics. The structure maintains the conserved tertiary structure of other known NATs and a high sequence similarity in the presumed AcCoA binding pocket in spite of a very low overall level of sequence identity to other NATs of known structure.

  6. Mimicking Ribosomal Unfolding of RNA Pseudoknot in a Protein Channel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyue; Xu, Xiaojun; Yang, Zhiyu; Burcke, Andrew J; Gates, Kent S; Chen, Shi-Jie; Gu, Li-Qun

    2015-12-23

    Pseudoknots are a fundamental RNA tertiary structure with important roles in regulation of mRNA translation. Molecular force spectroscopic approaches such as optical tweezers can track the pseudoknot's unfolding intermediate states by pulling the RNA chain from both ends, but the kinetic unfolding pathway induced by this method may be different from that in vivo, which occurs during translation and proceeds from the 5' to 3' end. Here we developed a ribosome-mimicking, nanopore pulling assay for dissecting the vectorial unfolding mechanism of pseudoknots. The pseudoknot unfolding pathway in the nanopore, either from the 5' to 3' end or in the reverse direction, can be controlled by a DNA leader that is attached to the pseudoknot at the 5' or 3' ends. The different nanopore conductance between DNA and RNA translocation serves as a marker for the position and structure of the unfolding RNA in the pore. With this design, we provided evidence that the pseudoknot unfolding is a two-step, multistate, metal ion-regulated process depending on the pulling direction. Most notably, unfolding in both directions is rate-limited by the unzipping of the first helix domain (first step), which is Helix-1 in the 5' → 3' direction and Helix-2 in the 3' → 5' direction, suggesting that the initial unfolding step in either pulling direction needs to overcome an energy barrier contributed by the noncanonical triplex base-pairs and coaxial stacking interactions for the tertiary structure stabilization. These findings provide new insights into RNA vectorial unfolding mechanisms, which play an important role in biological functions including frameshifting. PMID:26595106

  7. Ribosome engineering to promote new crystal forms

    SciTech Connect

    Selmer, Maria; Gao, Yong-Gui; Weixlbaumer, Albert; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2012-05-01

    Truncation of ribosomal protein L9 in T. thermophilus allows the generation of new crystal forms and the crystallization of ribosome–GTPase complexes. Crystallographic studies of the ribosome have provided molecular details of protein synthesis. However, the crystallization of functional complexes of ribosomes with GTPase translation factors proved to be elusive for a decade after the first ribosome structures were determined. Analysis of the packing in different 70S ribosome crystal forms revealed that regardless of the species or space group, a contact between ribosomal protein L9 from the large subunit and 16S rRNA in the shoulder of a neighbouring small subunit in the crystal lattice competes with the binding of GTPase elongation factors to this region of 16S rRNA. To prevent the formation of this preferred crystal contact, a mutant strain of Thermus thermophilus, HB8-MRCMSAW1, in which the ribosomal protein L9 gene has been truncated was constructed by homologous recombination. Mutant 70S ribosomes were used to crystallize and solve the structure of the ribosome with EF-G, GDP and fusidic acid in a previously unobserved crystal form. Subsequent work has shown the usefulness of this strain for crystallization of the ribosome with other GTPase factors.

  8. Ribosomal P3 protein AtP3B of Arabidopsis acts as both protein and RNA chaperone to increase tolerance of heat and cold stresses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang Ho; Lee, Young Mee; Park, Joung Hun; Nawkar, Ganesh M; Oh, Hun Taek; Kim, Min Gab; Lee, Soo In; Kim, Woe Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2016-07-01

    The P3 proteins are plant-specific ribosomal P-proteins; however, their molecular functions have not been characterized. In a screen for components of heat-stable high-molecular weight (HMW) complexes, we isolated the P3 protein AtP3B from heat-treated Arabidopsis suspension cultures. By size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), SDS-PAGE and native PAGE followed by immunoblotting with anti-AtP3B antibody, we showed that AtP3B was stably retained in HMW complexes following heat shock. The level of AtP3B mRNA increased in response to both high- and low-temperature stresses. Bacterially expressed recombinant AtP3B protein exhibited both protein and RNA chaperone activities. Knockdown of AtP3B by RNAi made plants sensitive to both high- and low-temperature stresses, whereas overexpression of AtP3B increased tolerance of both conditions. Together, our results suggest that AtP3B protects cells against both high- and low-temperature stresses. These findings provide novel insight into the molecular functions and in vivo roles of acidic ribosomal P-proteins, thereby expanding our knowledge of the protein production machinery. PMID:27004478

  9. Primary structure of dihydrofolate reductase and mitochondrial ribosomal protein L36 genes from the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus.

    PubMed

    Aimi, Tadanori; Fukuhara, Shoji; Ishiguro, Maki; Kitamoto, Yutaka; Morinaga, Tsutomu

    2004-08-01

    We amplified and sequenced the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene of the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus. Downstream of the DHFR coding region, a mitochondrial (mt) ribosomal protein L36 (RPL36) gene was discovered in the opposite orientation to DHFR gene. Putative polyadenylation signals of the two genes overlapped, both containing the 8-bp palindrome 5'-aatatatt-3'. The finding that C. cinereus DHFR gene is closely clustered with a mt protein gene strongly suggests that C. cinereus DHFR is closely related to mt function and evolution. The amino acid sequence of C. cinereus DHFR is most homologous to eukaryotic proteins such as Cryptococcus neoformans and Pneumocystis carinii DHFRs. However, the sequence of C. cinereus mt RPL36 closely resembles RPL36 of bacteria and cyanobacteria such as Synechocystis sp. and Escherichia coli. This result strongly supports the serial endosymbiotic theory of the development of ancestral eukaryotes, and suggests that C. cinereus mt RPL36 gene originated from the ancestral eubacterial genome. PMID:15620217

  10. Thiazolyl Peptide Antibiotic Biosynthesis: A Cascade of Post-translational Modifications on Ribosomal Nascent Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Christopher T.; Acker, Michael G.; Bowers, Albert A.

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotics of the thiocillin, GE2270A, and thiostrepton class, which block steps in bacterial protein synthesis, contain a trithiazolyl (tetrahydro)pyridine core that provides the architectural constraints for high affinity binding to either the 50 S ribosomal subunit or elongation factor Tu. These mature antibiotic scaffolds arise from a cascade of post-translational modifications on 50–60-residue prepeptide precursors that trim away the N-terminal leader sequences (∼40 residues) while the C-terminal 14–18 residues are converted into the mature scaffold. In the producing microbes, the genes encoding the prepeptide open reading frames are flanked in biosynthetic clusters by genes encoding post-translational modification enzymes that carry out lantibiotic-type dehydrations of Ser and Thr residues to dehydroamino acid side chains, cyclodehydration and oxidation of cysteines to thiazoles, and condensation of two dehydroalanine residues en route to the (tetrahydro)pyridine core. The trithiazolyl pyridine framework thus arises from post-translational modification of the peptide backbone of three Cys and two Ser residues of the prepeptide. PMID:20522549

  11. Targeting of Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Proteins and Ribosomes in Invertebrate Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rolls, Melissa M.; Hall, David H.; Victor, Martin; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.; Rapoport, Tom A.

    2002-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is divided into rough and smooth domains (RER and SER). The two domains share most proteins, but RER is enriched in some membrane proteins by an unknown mechanism. We studied RER protein targeting by expressing fluorescent protein fusions to ER membrane proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans. In several cell types RER and general ER proteins colocalized, but in neurons RER proteins were concentrated in the cell body, whereas general ER proteins were also found in neurites. Surprisingly RER membrane proteins diffused rapidly within the cell body, indicating they are not localized by immobilization. Ribosomes were also concentrated in the cell body, suggesting they may be in part responsible for targeting RER membrane proteins. PMID:12006669

  12. The ribosome as a missing link in prebiotic evolution II: Ribosomes encode ribosomal proteins that bind to common regions of their own mRNAs and rRNAs.

    PubMed

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Root-Bernstein, Meredith

    2016-05-21

    We have proposed that the ribosome may represent a missing link between prebiotic chemistries and the first cells. One of the predictions that follows from this hypothesis, which we test here, is that ribosomal RNA (rRNA) must have encoded the proteins necessary for ribosomal function. In other words, the rRNA also functioned pre-biotically as mRNA. Since these ribosome-binding proteins (rb-proteins) must bind to the rRNA, but the rRNA also functioned as mRNA, it follows that rb-proteins should bind to their own mRNA as well. This hypothesis can be contrasted to a "null" hypothesis in which rb-proteins evolved independently of the rRNA sequences and therefore there should be no necessary similarity between the rRNA to which rb-proteins bind and the mRNA that encodes the rb-protein. Five types of evidence reported here support the plausibility of the hypothesis that the mRNA encoding rb-proteins evolved from rRNA: (1) the ubiquity of rb-protein binding to their own mRNAs and autogenous control of their own translation; (2) the higher-than-expected incidence of Arginine-rich modules associated with RNA binding that occurs in rRNA-encoded proteins; (3) the fact that rRNA-binding regions of rb-proteins are homologous to their mRNA binding regions; (4) the higher than expected incidence of rb-protein sequences encoded in rRNA that are of a high degree of homology to their mRNA as compared with a random selection of other proteins; and (5) rRNA in modern prokaryotes and eukaryotes encodes functional proteins. None of these results can be explained by the null hypothesis that assumes independent evolution of rRNA and the mRNAs encoding ribosomal proteins. Also noteworthy is that very few proteins bind their own mRNAs that are not associated with ribosome function. Further tests of the hypothesis are suggested: (1) experimental testing of whether rRNA-encoded proteins bind to rRNA at their coding sites; (2) whether tRNA synthetases, which are also known to bind to their

  13. GATA1 and PU.1 Bind to Ribosomal Protein Genes in Erythroid Cells: Implications for Ribosomopathies

    PubMed Central

    Amanatiadou, Elsa P.; Papadopoulos, Giorgio L.; Strouboulis, John; Vizirianakis, Ioannis S.

    2015-01-01

    The clear connection between ribosome biogenesis dysfunction and specific hematopoiesis-related disorders prompted us to examine the role of critical lineage-specific transcription factors in the transcriptional regulation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes during terminal erythroid differentiation. By applying EMSA and ChIP methodologies in mouse erythroleukemia cells we show that GATA1 and PU.1 bind in vitro and in vivo the proximal promoter region of the RPS19 gene which is frequently mutated in Diamond-Blackfan Anemia. Moreover, ChIPseq data analysis also demonstrates that several RP genes are enriched as potential GATA1 and PU.1 gene targets in mouse and human erythroid cells, with GATA1 binding showing an association with higher ribosomal protein gene expression levels during terminal erythroid differentiation in human and mouse. Our results suggest that RP gene expression and hence balanced ribosome biosynthesis may be specifically and selectively regulated by lineage specific transcription factors during hematopoiesis, a finding which may be clinically relevant to ribosomopathies. PMID:26447946

  14. GATA1 and PU.1 Bind to Ribosomal Protein Genes in Erythroid Cells: Implications for Ribosomopathies.

    PubMed

    Amanatiadou, Elsa P; Papadopoulos, Giorgio L; Strouboulis, John; Vizirianakis, Ioannis S

    2015-01-01

    The clear connection between ribosome biogenesis dysfunction and specific hematopoiesis-related disorders prompted us to examine the role of critical lineage-specific transcription factors in the transcriptional regulation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes during terminal erythroid differentiation. By applying EMSA and ChIP methodologies in mouse erythroleukemia cells we show that GATA1 and PU.1 bind in vitro and in vivo the proximal promoter region of the RPS19 gene which is frequently mutated in Diamond-Blackfan Anemia. Moreover, ChIPseq data analysis also demonstrates that several RP genes are enriched as potential GATA1 and PU.1 gene targets in mouse and human erythroid cells, with GATA1 binding showing an association with higher ribosomal protein gene expression levels during terminal erythroid differentiation in human and mouse. Our results suggest that RP gene expression and hence balanced ribosome biosynthesis may be specifically and selectively regulated by lineage specific transcription factors during hematopoiesis, a finding which may be clinically relevant to ribosomopathies. PMID:26447946

  15. Eudistomin C, an Antitumor and Antiviral Natural Product, Targets 40S Ribosome and Inhibits Protein Translation.

    PubMed

    Ota, Yu; Chinen, Takumi; Yoshida, Keisuke; Kudo, Shun; Nagumo, Yoko; Shiwa, Yuh; Yamada, Ryosuke; Umihara, Hirotatsu; Iwasaki, Kotaro; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Yokoshima, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Fukuyama, Tohru; Kobayashi, Junichi; Usui, Takeo

    2016-09-01

    Eudistomin C (EudiC), a natural product, shows potent antitumor and antiviral activities, but the target molecule and the mechanism of action remain to be revealed. Here, we show that the 40S ribosome is the target in EudiC cytotoxicity. We isolated EudiC-resistant mutants from a multidrug-sensitive yeast strain, and a genetic analysis classified these YER (yeast EudiC resistance) mutants into three complementation groups. A genome-wide study revealed that the YER1-6 mutation is in the uS11 gene (RPS14A). Biotinylated EudiC pulled down Rps14p-containing complexes from 40S and 80S ribosomes, but not from the 60S ribosome. EudiC strongly inhibited translation of the wild-type strain but not of YER1-6 in cells and in vitro. These results indicate that EudiC is a protein synthesis inhibitor targeting the uS11-containing ribosomal subunit, and shows cytotoxicity by inhibiting protein translation. PMID:27304596

  16. The Arabidopsis HUELLENLOS Gene, Which Is Essential for Normal Ovule Development, Encodes a Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Debra J.; Baker, Shawn C.; Meister, Robert J.; Broadhvest, Jean; Schneitz, Kay; Gasser, Charles S.

    2001-01-01

    The HUELLENLOS (HLL) gene participates in patterning and growth of the Arabidopsis ovule. We have isolated the HLL gene and shown that it encodes a protein homologous to the L14 proteins of eubacterial ribosomes. The Arabidopsis genome also includes a highly similar gene, HUELLENLOS PARALOG (HLP), and genes for both cytosolic (L23) and chloroplast ribosome L14 proteins. Phylogenetic analysis shows that HLL and HLP differ significantly from these other two classes of such proteins. HLL and HLP fusions to green fluorescent protein were localized to mitochondria. Ectopic expression of HLP complemented the hll mutant, indicating that HLP and HLL share redundant functions. We conclude that HLL and HLP encode L14 subunits of mitochondrial ribosomes. HLL mRNA was at significantly higher levels than HLP mRNA in pistils, with the opposite pattern in leaves. This differential expression can explain the confinement of effects of hll mutations to gynoecia and ovules. Our elucidation of the nature of HLL shows that metabolic defects can have specific effects on developmental patterning. PMID:11752383

  17. NAD(+)- dependent deacetylase SIRT3 regulates mitochondrial protein synthesis by deacetylation of the ribosomal protein MRPL10

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A member of the sirtuin family of NAD (+)-dependent deacetylases, SIRT3, is located in mammalian mitochondria and is important for regulation of mitochondrial metabolism, cell survival, and longevity. In this study, MRPL10 (mitochondrial ribosomal protein L10) was identified as the major acetylated ...

  18. Hydrophilic Residues Are Crucial for Ribosomal Protein L11 (RPL11) Interaction with Zinc Finger Domain of MDM2 and p53 Protein Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Xiao, Hui; Chai, Sergio C.; Hoang, Quyen Q.; Lu, Hua

    2011-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L11 (RPL11) has been shown to activate p53 by binding to MDM2 and negating its p53 suppression activity in response to ribosomal stress. Although a mutation at Cys-305 within the zinc finger domain of MDM2 has been shown to drastically impair MDM2 interaction with RPL11 and thus escapes the inhibition by this ribosomal protein, it still remains elusive whether RPL11 inactivates MDM2 via direct action on this zinc finger domain and what is the chemical nature of this specific interaction. To define the roles of the MDM2 zinc finger in association with RPL11, we conducted hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, computational modeling, circular dichroism, and mutational analyses of the zinc finger domain of MDM2 and human RPL11. Our study reveals that RPL11 forms a stable complex with MDM2 in vitro through direct contact with its zinc finger. This binding is disrupted by single mutations of non-cysteine amino acids within the zinc finger domain of MDM2. Basic residues in RPL11 are crucial for the stable binding and RPL11 suppression of MDM2 activity toward p53. These results provide the first line of evidence for the specific interaction between RPL11 and the zinc finger of MDM2 via hydrophilic residues as well as a molecular foundation for better understanding RPL11 inhibition of MDM2 function. PMID:21903592

  19. Revealing pancrustacean relationships: Phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal protein genes places Collembola (springtails) in a monophyletic Hexapoda and reinforces the discrepancy between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background In recent years, several new hypotheses on phylogenetic relations among arthropods have been proposed on the basis of DNA sequences. One of the challenged hypotheses is the monophyly of hexapods. This discussion originated from analyses based on mitochondrial DNA datasets that, due to an unusual positioning of Collembola, suggested that the hexapod body plan evolved at least twice. Here, we re-evaluate the position of Collembola using ribosomal protein gene sequences. Results In total 48 ribosomal proteins were obtained for the collembolan Folsomia candida. These 48 sequences were aligned with sequence data on 35 other ecdysozoans. Each ribosomal protein gene was available for 25% to 86% of the taxa. However, the total sequence information was unequally distributed over the taxa and ranged between 4% and 100%. A concatenated dataset was constructed (5034 inferred amino acids in length), of which ~66% of the positions were filled. Phylogenetic tree reconstructions, using Maximum Likelihood, Maximum Parsimony, and Bayesian methods, resulted in a topology that supports monophyly of Hexapoda. Conclusion Although ribosomal proteins in general may not evolve independently, they once more appear highly valuable for phylogenetic reconstruction. Our analyses clearly suggest that Hexapoda is monophyletic. This underpins the inconsistency between nuclear and mitochondrial datasets when analyzing pancrustacean relationships. Caution is needed when applying mitochondrial markers in deep phylogeny. PMID:18366624

  20. The signal recognition particle binds to protein L23 at the peptide exit of the Escherichia coli ribosome

    PubMed Central

    GU, SHAN-QING; PESKE, FRANK; WIEDEN, HANS-JOACHIM; RODNINA, MARINA V.; WINTERMEYER, WOLFGANG

    2003-01-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) from Escherichia coli, composed of Ffh protein and 4.5S RNA, mediates membrane targeting of translating ribosomes displaying a signal or signal-anchor sequence. SRP binds at the peptide exit of the large ribosomal subunit. Structural details of the interaction are not known. Here, the position of Ffh or SRP on the ribosome was probed by using site-specific UV-induced crosslinking by p-azidophenacyl bromide (AzP) attached to a number of cysteine residues engineered into surface positions of Ffh. Efficient crosslinking to vacant ribosomes took place from two positions (AzP17 and AzP25) in the N domain of Ffh, both with Ffh and SRP. Both AzP17 and AzP25 were predominantly crosslinked to ribosomal protein L23 that is located at the peptide exit of the 50S subunit. The SRP receptor, FtsY, did not change the crosslink pattern, whereas the presence of a nascent signal peptide on the ribosome resulted in a second crosslink between Ffh(AzP17) and protein L23, indicating that binding to the nascent signal peptide induced a slightly different arrangement of SRP on the ribosome. These results indicate a model of the topographical arrangement of SRP at the peptide exit of the 50S ribosomal subunit. PMID:12702815

  1. The signal recognition particle binds to protein L23 at the peptide exit of the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shan-Qing; Peske, Frank; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Rodnina, Marina V; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang

    2003-05-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) from Escherichia coli, composed of Ffh protein and 4.5S RNA, mediates membrane targeting of translating ribosomes displaying a signal or signal-anchor sequence. SRP binds at the peptide exit of the large ribosomal subunit. Structural details of the interaction are not known. Here, the position of Ffh or SRP on the ribosome was probed by using site-specific UV-induced crosslinking by p-azidophenacyl bromide (AzP) attached to a number of cysteine residues engineered into surface positions of Ffh. Efficient crosslinking to vacant ribosomes took place from two positions (AzP17 and AzP25) in the N domain of Ffh, both with Ffh and SRP. Both AzP17 and AzP25 were predominantly crosslinked to ribosomal protein L23 that is located at the peptide exit of the 50S subunit. The SRP receptor, FtsY, did not change the crosslink pattern, whereas the presence of a nascent signal peptide on the ribosome resulted in a second crosslink between Ffh(AzP17) and protein L23, indicating that binding to the nascent signal peptide induced a slightly different arrangement of SRP on the ribosome. These results indicate a model of the topographical arrangement of SRP at the peptide exit of the 50S ribosomal subunit. PMID:12702815

  2. The Hymenopteran Tree of Life: Evidence from Protein-Coding Genes and Objectively Aligned Ribosomal Data

    PubMed Central

    Klopfstein, Seraina; Vilhelmsen, Lars; Heraty, John M.; Sharkey, Michael; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    Previous molecular analyses of higher hymenopteran relationships have largely been based on subjectively aligned ribosomal sequences (18S and 28S). Here, we reanalyze the 18S and 28S data (unaligned about 4.4 kb) using an objective and a semi-objective alignment approach, based on MAFFT and BAli-Phy, respectively. Furthermore, we present the first analyses of a substantial protein-coding data set (4.6 kb from one mitochondrial and four nuclear genes). Our results indicate that previous studies may have suffered from inflated support values due to subjective alignment of the ribosomal sequences, but apparently not from significant biases. The protein data provide independent confirmation of several earlier results, including the monophyly of non-xyelid hymenopterans, Pamphilioidea + Unicalcarida, Unicalcarida, Vespina, Apocrita, Proctotrupomorpha and core Proctotrupomorpha. The protein data confirm that Aculeata are nested within a paraphyletic Evaniomorpha, but cast doubt on the monophyly of Evanioidea. Combining the available morphological, ribosomal and protein-coding data, we examine the total-evidence signal as well as congruence and conflict among the three data sources. Despite an emerging consensus on many higher-level hymenopteran relationships, several problems remain unresolved or contentious, including rooting of the hymenopteran tree, relationships of the woodwasps, placement of Stephanoidea and Ceraphronoidea, and the sister group of Aculeata. PMID:23936325

  3. Crystal structure of a beta-finger domain of Prp8 reveals analogy to ribosomal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, K.; Heroux, A.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, R.

    2008-09-16

    Prp8 stands out among hundreds of splicing factors as a key regulator of spliceosome activation and a potential cofactor of the splicing reaction. We present here the crystal structure of a 274-residue domain (residues 1,822-2,095) near the C terminus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Prp8. The most striking feature of this domain is a {beta}-hairpin finger protruding out of the protein (hence, this domain will be referred to as the {beta}-finger domain), resembling many globular ribosomal proteins with protruding extensions. Mutations throughout the {beta}-finger change the conformational equilibrium between the first and the second catalytic step. Mutations at the base of the {beta}-finger affect U4/U6 unwinding-mediated spliceosome activation. Prp8 may insert its {beta}-finger into the first-step complex (U2/U5/U6/pre-mRNA) or U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP and stabilize these complexes. Mutations on the {beta}-finger likely alter these interactions, leading to the observed mutant phenotypes. Our results suggest a possible mechanism of how Prp8 regulates spliceosome activation. These results also demonstrate an analogy between a spliceosomal protein and ribosomal proteins that insert extensions into folded rRNAs and stabilize the ribosome.

  4. Direct TFIIA-TFIID protein contacts drive budding yeast ribosomal protein gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Layer, Justin H; Weil, P Anthony

    2013-08-01

    We have previously shown that yeast TFIID provides coactivator function on the promoters of ribosomal protein-encoding genes (RPGs) by making direct contact with the transactivator repressor activator protein 1 (Rap1). Further, our structural studies of assemblies generated with purified Rap1, TFIID, and TFIIA on RPG enhancer-promoter DNA indicate that Rap1-TFIID interaction induces dramatic conformational rearrangements of enhancer-promoter DNA and TFIID-bound TFIIA. These data indicate a previously unknown yet critical role for yeast TFIIA in the integration of activator-TFIID contacts with promoter conformation and downstream preinitiation complex formation and/or function. Here we describe the use of systematic mutagenesis to define how specific TFIIA contacts contribute to these processes. We have verified that TFIIA is required for RPG transcription in vivo and in vitro, consistent with the existence of a critical Rap1-TFIIA-TFIID interaction network. We also identified essential points of contact for TFIIA and Rap1 within the Rap1 binding domain of the Taf4 subunit of TFIID. These data suggest a mechanism for how interactions between TFIID, TFIIA, and Rap1 contribute to the high rate of transcription initiation seen on RPGs in vivo. PMID:23814059

  5. Orsay virus utilizes ribosomal frameshifting to express a novel protein that is incorporated into virions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hongbing; Franz, Carl J.; Wu, Guang; Renshaw, Hilary; Zhao, Guoyan; Firth, Andrew E.; Wang, David

    2014-02-15

    Orsay virus is the first identified virus that is capable of naturally infecting Caenorhabditis elegans. Although it is most closely related to nodaviruses, Orsay virus differs from nodaviruses in its genome organization. In particular, the Orsay virus RNA2 segment encodes a putative novel protein of unknown function, termed delta, which is absent from all known nodaviruses. Here we present evidence that Orsay virus utilizes a ribosomal frameshifting strategy to express a novel fusion protein from the viral capsid (alpha) and delta ORFs. Moreover, the fusion protein was detected in purified virus fractions, demonstrating that it is most likely incorporated into Orsay virions. Furthermore, N-terminal sequencing of both the fusion protein and the capsid protein demonstrated that these proteins must be translated from a non-canonical initiation site. While the function of the alpha–delta fusion remains cryptic, these studies provide novel insights into the fundamental properties of this new clade of viruses. - Highlights: • Orsay virus encodes a novel fusion protein by a ribosomal frameshifting mechanism. • Orsay capsid and fusion protein is translated from a non-canonical initiation site. • The fusion protein is likely incorporated into Orsay virions.

  6. Mutational analysis of S12 protein and implications for the accuracy of decoding by the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Divya; Cukras, Anthony R.; Rogers, Elizabeth J.; Southworth, Daniel R.; Green, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    The fidelity of aminoacyl-tRNA selection by the ribosome depends on a conformational switch in the decoding center of the small ribosomal subunit induced by cognate but not by near-cognate aminoacyl tRNA. The aminoglycosides paromomycin and streptomycin bind to the decoding center and induce related structural rearrangements that explain their observed effects on miscoding. Structural and biochemical studies have identified ribosomal protein S12 (as well as specific nucleotides in 16S rRNA) as a critical molecular contributor in distinguishing between cognate and near-cognate tRNA species as well as in promoting more global rearrangements in the small subunit referred to as “closure”. Here we use a mutational approach to define contributions made by two highly conserved loops in S12 to the process of tRNA selection. Most S12 variant ribosomes tested display increased levels of fidelity (a “restrictive” phenotype). Interestingly, several variants, K42A and R53A, were substantially resistant to the miscoding effects of paromomycin. Further characterization of the compromised paromomycin response identified a probable second, fidelity modulating binding site for paromomycin in the 16S rRNA that facilitates closure of the small subunit and compensates for defects associated with the S12 mutations. PMID:17967466

  7. The ribosomal protein L10/QM-like protein is a component of the NIK-mediated antiviral signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Carolina S.; Santos, Anesia A.; Machado, Joao Paulo B.; Fontes, Elizabeth P.B.

    2008-10-25

    The NIK (NSP-interacting kinase)-mediated antiviral signaling pathway was identified as a virulence target of the begomovirus nuclear shuttle protein (NSP). Here, we further characterized this layer of plant innate defense by identifying the ribosomal protein L10 (rpL10), a QM-like protein, as a downstream effector of the antiviral signaling. Although both ribosomal proteins rpL10 and rpL18 were found to associate with NIK1 through yeast two-hybrid screening, the NIK receptors specifically phosphorylated rpL10 in vitro. Furthermore, loss of rpL10 function significantly increased susceptibility to begomovirus infection, recapitulating the phenotype of nik knockout lines. Our results genetically linked rpL10 to the NIK-mediated antiviral signaling.

  8. A residue substitution in the plastid ribosomal protein L12/AL1 produces defective plastid ribosome and causes early seedling lethality in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong-Sheng; Zhang, Chang-Quan; Li, Qian-Feng; Yang, Qing-Qing; Gu, Ming-Hong; Liu, Qiao-Quan

    2016-05-01

    The plastid ribosome is essential for chloroplast biogenesis as well as seedling formation. As the plastid ribosome closely resembles the prokaryotic 70S ribosome, many plastid ribosomal proteins (PRPs) have been identified in higher plants. However, their assembly in the chloroplast ribosome in rice remains unclear. In the present study, we identified a novel rice mutant, albino lethal 1 (al1), from a chromosome segment substitution line population. The al1 mutant displayed an albino phenotype at the seedling stage and did not survive past the three-leaf stage. No other apparent differences in plant morphology were observed in the al1 mutant. The albino phenotype of the al1 mutant was associated with decreased chlorophyll content and abnormal chloroplast morphology. Using fine mapping, AL1 was shown to encode the PRPL12, a protein localized in the chloroplasts of rice, and a spontaneous single-nucleotide mutation (C/T), resulting in a residue substitution from leucine in AL1 to phenylalanine in al1, was found to be responsible for the early seedling lethality. This point mutation is located at the L10 interface feature of the L12/AL1 protein. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that there was no physical interaction between al1 and PRPL10. In addition, the mutation had little effect on the transcript abundance of al1, but had a remarkable effect on the protein abundance of al1 and transcript abundance of chloroplast biogenesis-related and photosynthesis-related genes. These results provide a first glimpse into the molecular details of L12's function in rice. PMID:26873698

  9. Mechanism of fusidic acid inhibition of RRF- and EF-G-dependent splitting of the bacterial post-termination ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Anneli; Pavlov, Michael; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2016-01-01

    The antibiotic drug fusidic acid (FA) is commonly used in the clinic against gram-positive bacterial infections. FA targets ribosome-bound elongation factor G (EF-G), a translational GTPase that accelerates both messenger RNA (mRNA) translocation and ribosome recycling. How FA inhibits translocation was recently clarified, but FA inhibition of ribosome recycling by EF-G and ribosome recycling factor (RRF) has remained obscure. Here we use fast kinetics techniques to estimate mean times of ribosome splitting and the stoichiometry of GTP hydrolysis by EF-G at varying concentrations of FA, EF-G and RRF. These mean times together with previous data on uninhibited ribosome recycling were used to clarify the mechanism of FA inhibition of ribosome splitting. The biochemical data on FA inhibition of translocation and recycling were used to model the growth inhibitory effect of FA on bacterial populations. We conclude that FA inhibition of translocation provides the dominant cause of bacterial growth reduction, but that FA inhibition of ribosome recycling may contribute significantly to FA-induced expression of short regulatory open reading frames, like those involved in FA resistance. PMID:27001509

  10. Plastid ribosomal protein S5 is involved in photosynthesis, plant development, and cold stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junxiang; Yuan, Hui; Yang, Yong; Fish, Tara; Lyi, Sangbom M; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Zhang, Lugang; Li, Li

    2016-04-01

    Plastid ribosomal proteins are essential components of protein synthesis machinery and have diverse roles in plant growth and development. Mutations in plastid ribosomal proteins lead to a range of developmental phenotypes in plants. However, how they regulate these processes is not fully understood, and the functions of some individual plastid ribosomal proteins remain unknown. To identify genes responsible for chloroplast development, we isolated and characterized a mutant that exhibited pale yellow inner leaves with a reduced growth rate in Arabidopsis. The mutant (rps5) contained a missense mutation of plastid ribosomal protein S5 (RPS5), which caused a dramatically reduced abundance of chloroplast 16S rRNA and seriously impaired 16S rRNA processing to affect ribosome function and plastid translation. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed that the rps5 mutation suppressed the expression of a large number of core components involved in photosystems I and II as well as many plastid ribosomal proteins. Unexpectedly, a number of proteins associated with cold stress responses were greatly decreased in rps5, and overexpression of the plastid RPS5 improved plant cold stress tolerance. Our results indicate that RPS5 is an important constituent of the plastid 30S subunit and affects proteins involved in photosynthesis and cold stress responses to mediate plant growth and development. PMID:27006483

  11. Plastid ribosomal protein S5 is involved in photosynthesis, plant development, and cold stress tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junxiang; Yuan, Hui; Yang, Yong; Fish, Tara; Lyi, Sangbom M.; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Zhang, Lugang; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Plastid ribosomal proteins are essential components of protein synthesis machinery and have diverse roles in plant growth and development. Mutations in plastid ribosomal proteins lead to a range of developmental phenotypes in plants. However, how they regulate these processes is not fully understood, and the functions of some individual plastid ribosomal proteins remain unknown. To identify genes responsible for chloroplast development, we isolated and characterized a mutant that exhibited pale yellow inner leaves with a reduced growth rate in Arabidopsis. The mutant (rps5) contained a missense mutation of plastid ribosomal protein S5 (RPS5), which caused a dramatically reduced abundance of chloroplast 16S rRNA and seriously impaired 16S rRNA processing to affect ribosome function and plastid translation. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed that the rps5 mutation suppressed the expression of a large number of core components involved in photosystems I and II as well as many plastid ribosomal proteins. Unexpectedly, a number of proteins associated with cold stress responses were greatly decreased in rps5, and overexpression of the plastid RPS5 improved plant cold stress tolerance. Our results indicate that RPS5 is an important constituent of the plastid 30S subunit and affects proteins involved in photosynthesis and cold stress responses to mediate plant growth and development. PMID:27006483

  12. Protein interaction mapping with ribosome-displayed using PLATO ORF libraries

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jian; Larman, H. Benjamin; Gao, Geng; Somwar, Romel; Zhang, Zijuan; Laserson, Uri; Ciccia, Alberto; Pavlova, Natalya; Church, George; Zhang, Wei; Kesari, Santosh; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying physical interactions between proteins and other molecules is a critical aspect of biological analysis. Here we describe PLATO, an in vitro method for mapping such interactions by affinity enrichment of a library of full-length open reading frames displayed on ribosomes, followed by massively parallel analysis using DNA sequencing. We demonstrate the broad utility of the method by identifying known and new interacting partners of LYN kinase, patient autoantibodies and the small molecules gefitinib and dasatinib. PMID:24336473

  13. Molecular cloning and functional identification of a ribosome inactivating/antiviral protein from leaves of post-flowering stage of Celosia cristata and its expression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Begam, Mehbuba; Kumar, Sushil; Roy, Sribash; Campanella, James J; Kapoor, H C

    2006-11-01

    A full-length cDNA clone, encoding a ribosome inactivating/antiviral protein (RIP/AVP) was isolated from the cDNA library of post-flowering stage of Celosia cristata leaves. The full-length cDNA consisted of 1015 nucleotides, with an open reading frame encoding 283 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence had a putative active site domain conserved in other ribosome inactivating/antiviral proteins (RIPs/AVPs). The coding region of the cDNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as recombinant protein of 72 kDa. The expressed fusion product was confirmed by Western analysis and purification by affinity chromatography. Both the recombinant protein (reCCP-27) and purified expressed protein (eCCP-27) inhibited translation in rabbit reticulocytes showing IC50 values at 95 ng and 45 ng, respectively. The native purified nCCP-27 has IC50 at 25 ng. The purified product also showed N-glycosidase activity towards tobacco ribosomes and antiviral activity towards tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and sunnhemp rosette virus (SRV). PMID:16996549

  14. Cloning, sequencing, and characterization of ribosomal protein and RNA polymerase genes from the region analogous to the alpha-operon of escherichia coli in halophilic archaea, halobacterium halobium.

    PubMed

    Sano, K; Taguchi, A; Furumoto, H; Uda, T; Itoh, T

    1999-10-14

    A determination was made of the nucleotide sequence of the 3215-bp region of a ribosomal protein gene cluster (HS13, HS4, HS11, and HeL18), RNA polymerase (RNA poly D), and tRNA genes (tRNAser and tRNAarg) of halophilic Archaea Halobacterium halobium, which is analogous to the alpha-operon of Escherichia coli (tRNAser-HS13-HS4-HS11-RNA poly D-tRNAarg-HeL18). The seven-gene string was preceded by a pseudoknot-like structure similar to the proposed S4 ribosomal protein binding site of the alpha-operon mRNA leader in E. coli. Using an inducible expression system H. halobium HS4 was produced in large amounts in E. coli, and immunoblot analysis showed the S4 to constitute a 21-kDa polypeptide component of the ribosome. Analysis of the deduced amino acids sequence revealed that the HS13, HS4, and HS11 sequences including the RNA polymerase subunit are more similar to their eukaryotic than to their bacterial counterparts. HeL18, located downstream of the gene cluster analogous to the E. coli alpha-operon (S13-S11-S4-RNA poly D-L17), was similar to both the eukaryotic (eL18) and eubacterial ribosomal protein L15 located in the spc-operon, but not to L17 positioned as the terminal gene of the bacterial alpha-operon. PMID:10527834

  15. The Ribosome-Sec61 Translocon Complex Forms a Cytosolically Restricted Environment for Early Polytopic Membrane Protein Folding.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Melissa A; Bandyopadhyay, Anannya; Devaraneni, Prasanna K; Woodward, Josha; Rooney, LeeAnn; Yang, Zhongying; Skach, William R

    2015-11-27

    Transmembrane topology of polytopic membrane proteins (PMPs) is established in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by the ribosome Sec61-translocon complex (RTC) through iterative cycles of translocation initiation and termination. It remains unknown, however, whether tertiary folding of transmembrane domains begins after the nascent polypeptide integrates into the lipid bilayer or within a proteinaceous environment proximal to translocon components. To address this question, we used cysteine scanning mutagenesis to monitor aqueous accessibility of stalled translation intermediates to determine when, during biogenesis, hydrophilic peptide loops of the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel are delivered to cytosolic and lumenal compartments. Results showed that following ribosome docking on the ER membrane, the nascent polypeptide was shielded from the cytosol as it emerged from the ribosome exit tunnel. Extracellular loops followed a well defined path through the ribosome, the ribosome translocon junction, the Sec61-translocon pore, and into the ER lumen coincident with chain elongation. In contrast, intracellular loops (ICLs) and C-terminalresidues exited the ribosome into a cytosolically shielded environment and remained inaccessible to both cytosolic and lumenal compartments until translation was terminated. Shielding of ICL1 and ICL2, but not the C terminus, became resistant to maneuvers that disrupt electrostatic ribosome interactions. Thus, the early folding landscape of polytopic proteins is shaped by a spatially restricted environment localized within the assembled ribosome translocon complex. PMID:26254469

  16. Crystal structure of ribosomal protein L1 from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonova, E. Yu.; Tishchenko, S. V.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Shklyaeva, A. A.; Garber, M. B.; Nikonov, S. V.; Nevskaya, N. A.

    2011-07-01

    The crystal structure of ribosomal protein L1 from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus was solved by the molecular-replacement method and refined to R cryst = 19.4% and R free = 25.1% at 2.1 Å protein consists of two domains linked together by a flexible hinge region. In the structure under consideration, the domains are in close proximity and adopt a closed conformation. Earlier, this conformation has been found in the structure of protein L1 from the bacterium Thermus thermophilus, whereas the structures of archaeal L1 proteins and the structures of all L1 proteins in the RNA-bound form have an open conformation. The fact that a closed conformation was found in the structures of two L1 proteins which crystallize in different space groups and belong to different bacteria suggests that this conformation is a characteristic feature of L1 bacterial proteins in the free form.

  17. Ribosomal Protein Mutations Result in Constitutive p53 Protein Degradation through Impairment of the AKT Pathway.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Ana T; Goos, Yvonne J; Pereboom, Tamara C; Hermkens, Dorien; Wlodarski, Marcin W; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in ribosomal protein (RP) genes can result in the loss of erythrocyte progenitor cells and cause severe anemia. This is seen in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), a pure red cell aplasia and bone marrow failure syndrome that is almost exclusively linked to RP gene haploinsufficiency. While the mechanisms underlying the cytopenia phenotype of patients with these mutations are not completely understood, it is believed that stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor protein may induce apoptosis in the progenitor cells. In stark contrast, tumor cells from zebrafish with RP gene haploinsufficiency are unable to stabilize p53 even when exposed to acute DNA damage despite transcribing wild type p53 normally. In this work we demonstrate that p53 has a limited role in eliciting the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA. In fact, we find that RP-deficient embryos exhibit the same normal p53 transcription, absence of p53 protein, and impaired p53 response to DNA damage as RP haploinsufficient tumor cells. Recently we reported that RP mutations suppress activity of the AKT pathway, and we show here that this suppression results in proteasomal degradation of p53. By re-activating the AKT pathway or by inhibiting GSK-3, a downstream modifier that normally represses AKT signaling, we are able to restore the stabilization of p53. Our work indicates that the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA is dependent on factors other than p53, and may hold clinical significance for both DBA and the increasing number of cancers revealing spontaneous mutations in RP genes. PMID:26132763

  18. Ribosomal Protein Mutations Result in Constitutive p53 Protein Degradation through Impairment of the AKT Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hermkens, Dorien; Wlodarski, Marcin W.; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in ribosomal protein (RP) genes can result in the loss of erythrocyte progenitor cells and cause severe anemia. This is seen in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), a pure red cell aplasia and bone marrow failure syndrome that is almost exclusively linked to RP gene haploinsufficiency. While the mechanisms underlying the cytopenia phenotype of patients with these mutations are not completely understood, it is believed that stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor protein may induce apoptosis in the progenitor cells. In stark contrast, tumor cells from zebrafish with RP gene haploinsufficiency are unable to stabilize p53 even when exposed to acute DNA damage despite transcribing wild type p53 normally. In this work we demonstrate that p53 has a limited role in eliciting the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA. In fact, we find that RP-deficient embryos exhibit the same normal p53 transcription, absence of p53 protein, and impaired p53 response to DNA damage as RP haploinsufficient tumor cells. Recently we reported that RP mutations suppress activity of the AKT pathway, and we show here that this suppression results in proteasomal degradation of p53. By re-activating the AKT pathway or by inhibiting GSK-3, a downstream modifier that normally represses AKT signaling, we are able to restore the stabilization of p53. Our work indicates that the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA is dependent on factors other than p53, and may hold clinical significance for both DBA and the increasing number of cancers revealing spontaneous mutations in RP genes. PMID:26132763

  19. Nucleotide sequence of the L1 ribosomal protein gene of Xenopus laevis: remarkable sequence homology among introns.

    PubMed Central

    Loreni, F; Ruberti, I; Bozzoni, I; Pierandrei-Amaldi, P; Amaldi, F

    1985-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L1 is encoded by two genes in Xenopus laevis. The comparison of two cDNA sequences shows that the two L1 gene copies (L1a and L1b) have diverged in many silent sites and very few substitution sites; moreover a small duplication occurred at the very end of the coding region of the L1b gene which thus codes for a product five amino acids longer than that coded by L1a. Quantitatively the divergence between the two L1 genes confirms that a whole genome duplication took place in Xenopus laevis approximately 30 million years ago. A genomic fragment containing one of the two L1 gene copies (L1a), with its nine introns and flanking regions, has been completely sequenced. The 5' end of this gene has been mapped within a 20-pyridimine stretch as already found for other vertebrate ribosomal protein genes. Four of the nine introns have a 60-nucleotide sequence with 80% homology; within this region some boxes, one of which is 16 nucleotides long, are 100% homologous among the four introns. This feature of L1a gene introns is interesting since we have previously shown that the activity of this gene is regulated at a post-transcriptional level and it involves the block of the normal splicing of some intron sequences. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:3841512

  20. Protein L5 is crucial for in vivo assembly of the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit central protuberance

    PubMed Central

    Korepanov, Alexey P.; Korobeinikova, Anna V.; Shestakov, Sergey A.; Garber, Maria B.; Gongadze, George M.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, ribosomes assembled in bacterial cells in the absence of essential ribosomal protein L5 were obtained. After arresting L5 synthesis, Escherichia coli cells divide a limited number of times. During this time, accumulation of defective large ribosomal subunits occurs. These 45S particles lack most of the central protuberance (CP) components (5S rRNA and proteins L5, L16, L18, L25, L27, L31, L33 and L35) and are not able to associate with the small ribosomal subunit. At the same time, 5S rRNA is found in the cytoplasm in complex with ribosomal proteins L18 and L25 at quantities equal to the amount of ribosomes. Thus, it is the first demonstration that protein L5 plays a key role in formation of the CP during assembly of the large ribosomal subunit in the bacterial cell. A possible model for the CP assembly in vivo is discussed in view of the data obtained. PMID:22821559

  1. Defect in the Formation of 70S Ribosomes Caused by Lack of Ribosomal Protein L34 Can Be Suppressed by Magnesium

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Ako; Suzuki, Shota; Kawamura, Fujio; Shiwa, Yuh; Watanabe, Satoru; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Hanai, Ryo; Ishizuka, Morio

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate the biological functions of the ribosomal protein L34, which is encoded by the rpmH gene, the rpmH deletion mutant of Bacillus subtilis and two suppressor mutants were characterized. Although the ΔrpmH mutant exhibited a severe slow-growth phenotype, additional mutations in the yhdP or mgtE gene restored the growth rate of the ΔrpmH strain. Either the disruption of yhdP, which is thought to be involved in the efflux of Mg2+, or overexpression of mgtE, which plays a major role in the import of Mg2+, could suppress defects in both the formation of the 70S ribosome and growth caused by the absence of L34. Interestingly, the Mg2+ content was lower in the ΔrpmH cells than in the wild type, and the Mg2+ content in the ΔrpmH cells was restored by either the disruption of yhdP or overexpression of mgtE. In vitro experiments on subunit association demonstrated that 50S subunits that lacked L34 could form 70S ribosomes only at a high concentration of Mg2+. These results showed that L34 is required for efficient 70S ribosome formation and that L34 function can be restored partially by Mg2+. In addition, the Mg2+ content was consistently lower in mutants that contained significantly reduced amounts of the 70S ribosome, such as the ΔrplA (L1) and ΔrplW (L23) strains and mutant strains with a reduced number of copies of the rrn operon. Thus, the results indicated that the cellular Mg2+ content is influenced by the amount of 70S ribosomes. PMID:25182490

  2. Yeast ribosomal proteins: XII. YS11 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a homologue to E. coli S4 according to the gene analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuta, K; Hashimoto, T; Suzuki, K; Otaka, E

    1991-01-01

    We isolated and sequenced a gene, YS11A, encoding ribosomal protein YS11 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. YS11A is one of two functional copies of the YS11 gene, located on chromosome XVI and transcribed in a lower amount than the other copy which is located on chromosome II. The disruption of YS11A has no effect on the growth of yeast. The 5'-flanking region contains a similar sequence to consensus UASrpg and the T-rich region. The open reading frame is interrupted with an intron located near the 5'-end. The predicted amino acid sequence reveals that yeast YS11 is a homologue to E. coli S4, one of the ram proteins, three chloroplast S4s and others out of the ribosomal protein sequences currently available. Images PMID:2041737

  3. Purification and properties of new ribosome-inactivating proteins with RNA N-glycosidase activity.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, A; Barbieri, L; Abbondanza, A; Falasca, A I; Carnicelli, D; Battelli, M G; Stirpe, F

    1990-11-30

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) similar to those already known (Stirpe & Barbieri (1986) FEBS Lett. 195, 1-8) were purified from the seeds of Asparagus officinalis (two proteins, asparin 1 and 2), of Citrullus colocynthis (two proteins, colocin 1 and 2), of Lychnis chalcedonica (lychnin) and of Manihot palmata (mapalmin), from the roots of Phytolacca americana (pokeweed antiviral protein from roots, PAP-R) and from the leaves of Bryonia dioica (bryodin-L). The two latter proteins can be considered as isoforms, respectively, of previously purified PAP, from the leaves of P. americana, and of bryodin-R, from the roots of B. dioica. All proteins have an Mr at approx, 30,000, and an alkaline isoelectric point. Bryodin-L, colocins, lychnin and mapalmin are glycoproteins. All RIPs inhibit protein synthesis by a rabbit reticulocyte lysate and phenylalanine polymerization by isolated ribosomes and alter rRNA in a similar manner as the A-chain of ricin and related toxins (Endo et al. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 5908-5912). PMID:2248976

  4. Activities of the peptidyl transferase center of ribosomes lacking protein L27

    PubMed Central

    Maracci, Cristina; Wohlgemuth, Ingo; Rodnina, Marina V.

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is the molecular machine responsible for protein synthesis in all living organisms. Its catalytic core, the peptidyl transferase center (PTC), is built of rRNA, although several proteins reach close to the inner rRNA shell. In the Escherichia coli ribosome, the flexible N-terminal tail of the ribosomal protein L27 contacts the A- and P-site tRNA. Based on computer simulations of the PTC and on previous biochemical evidence, the N-terminal α-amino group of L27 was suggested to take part in the peptidyl-transfer reaction. However, the contribution of this group to catalysis has not been tested experimentally. Here we investigate the role of L27 in peptide-bond formation using fast kinetics approaches. We show that the rate of peptide-bond formation at physiological pH, both with aminoacyl-tRNA or with the substrate analog puromycin, is independent of the presence of L27; furthermore, translation of natural mRNAs is only marginally affected in the absence of L27. The pH dependence of the puromycin reaction is unaltered in the absence of L27, indicating that the N-terminal α-amine is not the ionizing group taking part in catalysis. Likewise, L27 is not required for the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis during termination. Thus, apart from the known effect on subunit association, which most likely explains the phenotype of the deletion strains, L27 does not appear to be a key player in the core mechanism of peptide-bond formation on the ribosome. PMID:26475831

  5. Discovery of peptidylarginine deiminase-4 substrates by protein array: antagonistic citrullination and methylation of human ribosomal protein S2.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qin; Bedford, Mark T; Fast, Walter

    2011-07-01

    Peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) catalyzes the posttranslational citrullination of selected proteins in a calcium dependent manner. The PAD4 isoform has been implicated in multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, some types of cancer, and plays a role in gene regulation. However, the substrate selectivity of PAD4 is not well defined, nor is the impact of citrullination on many other pathways. Here, a high-density protein array is used as a primary screen to identify 40 previously unreported PAD4 substrates, 10 of which are selected and verified in a cell lysate-based secondary assay. One of the most prominent hits, human 40S ribosomal protein S2 (RPS2), is characterized in detail. PAD4 citrullinates the Arg-Gly repeat region of RPS2, which is also an established site for Arg methylation by protein arginine methyltransferase 3 (PRMT3). As in other systems, crosstalk is observed; citrullination and methylation modifications are found to be antagonistic to each other, suggesting a conserved posttranslational regulatory strategy. Both PAD4 and PRMT3 are found to co-sediment with the free 40S ribosomal subunit fraction from cell extracts. These findings are consistent with participation of citrullination in the regulation of RPS2 and ribosome assembly. This application of protein arrays to reveal new PAD4 substrates suggests a role for citrullination in a number of different cellular pathways. PMID:21584310

  6. Solution Structure of Ribosomal Protein L40E, a Unique C4 Zinc Finger Protein Encoded by Archaeon Sulfolobus Solfataricus

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bin; Lukin, Jonathan A.; Yee, Adelinda; Lemak, Alexander; Semesi, Anthony; Ramelot, Theresa A.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2008-01-31

    The ribosomal protein L40E from archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus is a component of the 50S ribosomal subunit. L40E is a 56-residue, highly basic protein that contains a C4 zinc finger motif, CRKC_X10_CRRC. Homologs are found in both archaea and eukaryotes but are not present in bacteria. Eukaryotic genomes encode L40E as a ubiquitin-fusion protein. L40E was absent from the crystal structure of euryarchaeota 50S ribosomal subunit. Here we report the three-dimensional solution structure of L40E by NMR spectroscopy. The structure of L40E is a three-stranded b-sheet with a simple b2b1b3 topology. There are two unique characteristics revealed by the structure. First, a large and ordered b2–b3 loop twists to pack across the one side of the protein. L40E contains a buried polar cluster comprising Lys19, Lys20, Cys22, Asn29, and Cys36. Second, the surface of L40E is almost entirely positively charged. Ten conserved basic residues are positioned on the two sides of the surface. It is likely that binding of zinc is essential in stabilizing the tertiary structure of L40E to act as a scaffold to create a broad positively charged surface for RNA and/or protein recognition. A portion of this work was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Facility, a DOE national scientific user facility.

  7. The activated glucocorticoid receptor modulates presumptive autoregulation of ribosomal protein S6 protein kinase, p70 S6K.

    PubMed

    Shah, O Jameel; Iniguez-Lluhi, Jorge A; Romanelli, Angela; Kimball, Scot R; Jefferson, Leonard S

    2002-01-25

    Protein metabolism in eukaryotic organisms is defined by a synthesis-degradation equilibrium that is subject to regulation by hormonal and nutritional signals. In mammalian tissues such as skeletal muscle, glucocorticoid hormones specify a catabolic response that influences both protein synthetic and protein degradative pathways. With regard to the former, glucocorticoids attenuate mRNA translation at two levels: translational efficiency, i.e. translation initiation, and translational capacity, i.e. ribosome biogenesis. Glucocorticoids may impair translational capacity through the ribosomal S6 protein kinase (p70 S6K), a recognized glucocorticoid target and an effector of ribosomal protein synthesis. We demonstrate here that the reduction in growth factor-activated p70 S6K activity by glucocorticoids depends upon a functional glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and that the GR is both necessary and sufficient to render p70 S6K subject to glucocorticoid regulation. Furthermore, the DNA binding and transcriptional activation but not repression properties of the GR are indispensable for p70 S6K regulation. Finally, a mutational analysis of the p70 S6K carboxyl terminus indicates that this region confers glucocorticoid sensitivity, and thus glucocorticoids may facilitate autoinhibition of the enzyme ultimately reducing the efficiency with which T389 is phosphorylated. PMID:11705993

  8. Ribosomal protein biomarkers provide root nodule bacterial identification by MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Dominik; Pothier, Joël F; Ardley, Julie; Fossou, Romain Kouakou; Pflüger, Valentin; de Meyer, Sofie; Vogel, Guido; Tonolla, Mauro; Howieson, John; Reeve, Wayne; Perret, Xavier

    2015-07-01

    Accurate identification of soil bacteria that form nitrogen-fixing associations with legume crops is challenging given the phylogenetic diversity of root nodule bacteria (RNB). The labor-intensive and time-consuming 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequencing and/or multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of conserved genes so far remain the favored molecular tools to characterize symbiotic bacteria. With the development of mass spectrometry (MS) as an alternative method to rapidly identify bacterial isolates, we recently showed that matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) can accurately characterize RNB found inside plant nodules or grown in cultures. Here, we report on the development of a MALDI-TOF RNB-specific spectral database built on whole cell MS fingerprints of 116 strains representing the major rhizobial genera. In addition to this RNB-specific module, which was successfully tested on unknown field isolates, a subset of 13 ribosomal proteins extracted from genome data was found to be sufficient for the reliable identification of nodule isolates to rhizobial species as shown in the putatively ascribed ribosomal protein masses (PARPM) database. These results reveal that data gathered from genome sequences can be used to expand spectral libraries to aid the accurate identification of bacterial species by MALDI-TOF MS. PMID:25776061

  9. Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 in the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Bonato, M C; da Silva, A M; Maia, J C; Juliani, M H

    1984-11-01

    The changes in the degree of phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 during the life cycle of the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Three phosphorylated derivatives of S6 are present throughout the entire life cycle. However, under certain germination conditions, more highly phosphorylated derivatives of S6 appear. Nonetheless, the resumption of protein synthesis that occurs during germination is not dependent on those highly phosphorylated derivatives of S6. The pattern and sites of phosphorylation of S6 labelled in vivo with [32P]orthophosphate have been compared with those of 40S ribosomal subunit labelled in vitro by partially purified protein kinases. Three major phosphopeptides were found in S6 isolated from the zoospore, while six phosphopeptides were found after zoospore germination (in germling cells). The phosphopeptide patterns of S6 phosphorylated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase and by casein kinases I and II were completely distinct. Only the cAMP-dependent protein kinase gives rise to a phosphopeptide found in 32P-labelled cells, indicating that one of sites phosphorylated in vivo is also phosphorylated in vitro by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. PMID:6092077

  10. Transient ribosomal attenuation coordinates protein synthesis and co-translational folding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gong; Hubalewska, Magdalena; Ignatova, Zoya

    2009-03-01

    Clustered codons that pair to low-abundance tRNA isoacceptors can form slow-translating regions in the mRNA and cause transient ribosomal arrest. We report that folding efficiency of the Escherichia coli multidomain protein SufI can be severely perturbed by alterations in ribosome-mediated translational attenuation. Such alterations were achieved by global acceleration of the translation rate with tRNA excess in vitro or by synonymous substitutions to codons with highly abundant tRNAs both in vitro and in vivo. Conversely, the global slow-down of the translation rate modulated by low temperature suppresses the deleterious effect of the altered translational attenuation pattern. We propose that local discontinuous translation temporally separates the translation of segments of the peptide chain and actively coordinates their co-translational folding. PMID:19198590

  11. Translation of branched-chain aminotransferase-1 transcripts is impaired in cells haploinsufficient for ribosomal protein genes.

    PubMed

    Pereboom, Tamara C; Bondt, Albert; Pallaki, Paschalina; Klasson, Tim D; Goos, Yvonne J; Essers, Paul B; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J A; Gazda, Hanna T; Holstege, Frank C P; Costa, Lydie Da; MacInnes, Alyson W

    2014-05-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a bone marrow failure syndrome linked to mutations in ribosomal protein (RP) genes that result in the impaired proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. The etiology of DBA is not completely understood; however, the ribosomal nature of the genes involved has led to speculation that these mutations may alter the landscape of messenger RNA (mRNA) translation. Here, we performed comparative microarray analysis of polysomal mRNA transcripts isolated from lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from DBA patients carrying various haploinsufficient mutations in either RPS19 or RPL11. Different spectrums of changes were observed depending on the mutant gene, with large differences found in RPS19 cells and very few in RPL11 cells. However, we find that the small number of altered transcripts in RPL11 overlap for the most part with those altered in RPS19 cells. We show specifically that levels of branched-chain aminotransferase-1 (BCAT1) transcripts are significantly decreased on the polysomes of both RPS19 and RPL11 cells and that translation of BCAT1 protein is especially impaired in cells with small RP gene mutations, and we provide evidence that this effect may be due in part to the unusually long 5'UTR of the BCAT1 transcript. The BCAT1 enzyme carries out the final step in the biosynthesis and the first step of degradation of the branched-chain amino acids leucine, isoleucine, and valine. Interestingly, several animal models of DBA have reported that leucine ameliorates the anemia phenotypes generated by RPS19 loss. Our study suggests that RP mutations affect the synthesis of specific proteins involved in regulating amino acid levels that are important for maintaining the normal proliferative capacity of hematopoietic cells. PMID:24463277

  12. Ribosomal protein L5 has a highly twisted concave surface and flexible arms responsible for rRNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, T; Yao, M; Kawamura, S; Iwasaki, K; Kimura, M; Tanaka, I

    2001-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L5 is a 5S rRNA binding protein in the large subunit and plays an essential role in the promotion of a particular conformation of 5S rRNA. The crystal structure of the ribosomal protein L5 from Bacillus stearothermophilus has been determined at 1.8 A resolution. The molecule consists of a five-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet and four alpha-helices, which fold in a way that is topologically similar to the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) domain. The molecular shape and electrostatic representation suggest that the concave surface and loop regions are involved in 5S rRNA binding. To identify amino acid residues responsible for 5S rRNA binding, we made use of Ala-scanning mutagenesis of evolutionarily conserved amino acids occurring in the beta-strands and loop regions. The mutations of Asn37 at the beta1-strand and Gln63 at the loop between helix 2 and beta3-strand as well as that of Phe77 at the tip of the loop structure between the beta2- and beta3-strands caused a significant reduction in 5S rRNA binding. In addition, the mutations of Thr90 on the beta3-strand and Ile141 and Asp144 at the loop between beta4- and beta5-strands moderately reduced the 5S rRNA-binding affinity. Comparison of these results with the more recently analyzed structure of the 50S subunit from Haloarcula marismortui suggests that there are significant differences in the structure at N- and C-terminal regions and probably in the 5S rRNA binding. PMID:11350033

  13. The ribosomal subunit assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Dlakić, Mensur

    2005-01-01

    Recent proteomic studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified nearly 200 proteins, other than the structural ribosomal proteins, that participate in the assembly of ribosomal subunits and their transport from the nucleus. In a separate line of research, proteomic studies of mature plant ribosomes have revealed considerable variability in the protein composition of individual ribosomes. PMID:16207363

  14. The ribosome in action: Tuning of translational efficiency and protein folding.

    PubMed

    Rodnina, Marina V

    2016-08-01

    The cellular proteome is shaped by the combined activities of the gene expression and quality control machineries. While transcription plays an undoubtedly important role, in recent years also translation emerged as a key step that defines the composition and quality of the proteome and the functional activity of proteins in the cell. Among the different post-transcriptional control mechanisms, translation initiation and elongation provide multiple checkpoints that can affect translational efficiency. A multitude of specific signals in mRNAs can determine the frequency of translation initiation, choice of the open reading frame, global and local elongation velocities, and the folding of the emerging protein. In addition to specific signatures in the mRNAs, also variations in the global pools of translation components, including ribosomes, tRNAs, mRNAs, and translation factors can alter translational efficiencies. The cellular outcomes of phenomena such as mRNA codon bias are sometimes difficult to understand due to the staggering complexity of covariates that affect codon usage, translation, and protein folding. Here we summarize the experimental evidence on how the ribosome-together with the other components of the translational machinery-can alter translational efficiencies of mRNA at the initiation and elongation stages and how translation velocity affects protein folding. We seek to explain these findings in the context of mechanistic work on the ribosome. The results argue in favour of a new understanding of translation control as a hub that links mRNA homeostasis to production and quality control of proteins in the cell. PMID:27198711

  15. Rice Ribosomal Protein Large Subunit Genes and Their Spatio-temporal and Stress Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Moin, Mazahar; Bakshi, Achala; Saha, Anusree; Dutta, Mouboni; Madhav, Sheshu M.; Kirti, P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs) are well-known for their role in mediating protein synthesis and maintaining the stability of the ribosomal complex, which includes small and large subunits. In the present investigation, in a genome-wide survey, we predicted that the large subunit of rice ribosomes is encoded by at least 123 genes including individual gene copies, distributed throughout the 12 chromosomes. We selected 34 candidate genes, each having 2–3 identical copies, for a detailed characterization of their gene structures, protein properties, cis-regulatory elements and comprehensive expression analysis. RPL proteins appear to be involved in interactions with other RP and non-RP proteins and their encoded RNAs have a higher content of alpha-helices in their predicted secondary structures. The majority of RPs have binding sites for metal and non-metal ligands. Native expression profiling of 34 ribosomal protein large (RPL) subunit genes in tissues covering the major stages of rice growth shows that they are predominantly expressed in vegetative tissues and seedlings followed by meiotically active tissues like flowers. The putative promoter regions of these genes also carry cis-elements that respond specifically to stress and signaling molecules. All the 34 genes responded differentially to the abiotic stress treatments. Phytohormone and cold treatments induced significant up-regulation of several RPL genes, while heat and H2O2 treatments down-regulated a majority of them. Furthermore, infection with a bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae, which causes leaf blight also induced the expression of 80% of the RPL genes in leaves. Although the expression of RPL genes was detected in all the tissues studied, they are highly responsive to stress and signaling molecules indicating that their encoded proteins appear to have roles in stress amelioration besides house-keeping. This shows that the RPL gene family is a valuable resource for manipulation of stress tolerance in

  16. Rice Ribosomal Protein Large Subunit Genes and Their Spatio-temporal and Stress Regulation.

    PubMed

    Moin, Mazahar; Bakshi, Achala; Saha, Anusree; Dutta, Mouboni; Madhav, Sheshu M; Kirti, P B

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs) are well-known for their role in mediating protein synthesis and maintaining the stability of the ribosomal complex, which includes small and large subunits. In the present investigation, in a genome-wide survey, we predicted that the large subunit of rice ribosomes is encoded by at least 123 genes including individual gene copies, distributed throughout the 12 chromosomes. We selected 34 candidate genes, each having 2-3 identical copies, for a detailed characterization of their gene structures, protein properties, cis-regulatory elements and comprehensive expression analysis. RPL proteins appear to be involved in interactions with other RP and non-RP proteins and their encoded RNAs have a higher content of alpha-helices in their predicted secondary structures. The majority of RPs have binding sites for metal and non-metal ligands. Native expression profiling of 34 ribosomal protein large (RPL) subunit genes in tissues covering the major stages of rice growth shows that they are predominantly expressed in vegetative tissues and seedlings followed by meiotically active tissues like flowers. The putative promoter regions of these genes also carry cis-elements that respond specifically to stress and signaling molecules. All the 34 genes responded differentially to the abiotic stress treatments. Phytohormone and cold treatments induced significant up-regulation of several RPL genes, while heat and H2O2 treatments down-regulated a majority of them. Furthermore, infection with a bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae, which causes leaf blight also induced the expression of 80% of the RPL genes in leaves. Although the expression of RPL genes was detected in all the tissues studied, they are highly responsive to stress and signaling molecules indicating that their encoded proteins appear to have roles in stress amelioration besides house-keeping. This shows that the RPL gene family is a valuable resource for manipulation of stress tolerance in rice

  17. Expanding the amino acid repertoire of ribosomal polypeptide synthesis via the artificial division of codon boxes.

    PubMed

    Iwane, Yoshihiko; Hitomi, Azusa; Murakami, Hiroshi; Katoh, Takayuki; Goto, Yuki; Suga, Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    In ribosomal polypeptide synthesis the library of amino acid building blocks is limited by the manner in which codons are used. Of the proteinogenic amino acids, 18 are coded for by multiple codons and therefore many of the 61 sense codons can be considered redundant. Here we report a method to reduce the redundancy of codons by artificially dividing codon boxes to create vacant codons that can then be reassigned to non-proteinogenic amino acids and thereby expand the library of genetically encoded amino acids. To achieve this, we reconstituted a cell-free translation system with 32 in vitro transcripts of transfer RNASNN (tRNASNN) (S = G or C), assigning the initiator and 20 elongator amino acids. Reassignment of three redundant codons was achieved by replacing redundant tRNASNNs with tRNASNNs pre-charged with non-proteinogenic amino acids. As a demonstration, we expressed a 32-mer linear peptide that consists of 20 proteinogenic and three non-proteinogenic amino acids, and a 14-mer macrocyclic peptide that contains more than four non-proteinogenic amino acids. PMID:27001726

  18. Expanding the amino acid repertoire of ribosomal polypeptide synthesis via the artificial division of codon boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwane, Yoshihiko; Hitomi, Azusa; Murakami, Hiroshi; Katoh, Takayuki; Goto, Yuki; Suga, Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    In ribosomal polypeptide synthesis the library of amino acid building blocks is limited by the manner in which codons are used. Of the proteinogenic amino acids, 18 are coded for by multiple codons and therefore many of the 61 sense codons can be considered redundant. Here we report a method to reduce the redundancy of codons by artificially dividing codon boxes to create vacant codons that can then be reassigned to non-proteinogenic amino acids and thereby expand the library of genetically encoded amino acids. To achieve this, we reconstituted a cell-free translation system with 32 in vitro transcripts of transfer RNASNN (tRNASNN) (S = G or C), assigning the initiator and 20 elongator amino acids. Reassignment of three redundant codons was achieved by replacing redundant tRNASNNs with tRNASNNs pre-charged with non-proteinogenic amino acids. As a demonstration, we expressed a 32-mer linear peptide that consists of 20 proteinogenic and three non-proteinogenic amino acids, and a 14-mer macrocyclic peptide that contains more than four non-proteinogenic amino acids.

  19. A novel role for poly(C) binding proteins in programmed ribosomal frameshifting

    PubMed Central

    Napthine, Sawsan; Treffers, Emmely E.; Bell, Susanne; Goodfellow, Ian; Fang, Ying; Firth, Andrew E.; Snijder, Eric J.; Brierley, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Translational control through programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) is exploited widely by viruses and increasingly documented in cellular genes. Frameshifting is induced by mRNA secondary structures that compromise ribosome fidelity during decoding of a heptanucleotide ‘slippery’ sequence. The nsp2 PRF signal of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus is distinctive in directing both −2 and −1 PRF and in its requirement for a trans-acting protein factor, the viral replicase subunit nsp1β. Here we show that the the trans-activation of frameshifting is carried out by a protein complex composed of nsp1β and a cellular poly(C) binding protein (PCBP). From the results of in vitro translation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we demonstrate that a PCBP/nsp1β complex binds to a C-rich sequence downstream of the slippery sequence and here mimics the activity of a structured mRNA stimulator of PRF. This is the first description of a role for a trans-acting cellular protein in PRF. The discovery broadens the repertoire of activities associated with poly(C) binding proteins and prototypes a new class of virus–host interactions. PMID:27257056

  20. A novel role for poly(C) binding proteins in programmed ribosomal frameshifting.

    PubMed

    Napthine, Sawsan; Treffers, Emmely E; Bell, Susanne; Goodfellow, Ian; Fang, Ying; Firth, Andrew E; Snijder, Eric J; Brierley, Ian

    2016-07-01

    Translational control through programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) is exploited widely by viruses and increasingly documented in cellular genes. Frameshifting is induced by mRNA secondary structures that compromise ribosome fidelity during decoding of a heptanucleotide 'slippery' sequence. The nsp2 PRF signal of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus is distinctive in directing both -2 and -1 PRF and in its requirement for a trans-acting protein factor, the viral replicase subunit nsp1β. Here we show that the the trans-activation of frameshifting is carried out by a protein complex composed of nsp1β and a cellular poly(C) binding protein (PCBP). From the results of in vitro translation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we demonstrate that a PCBP/nsp1β complex binds to a C-rich sequence downstream of the slippery sequence and here mimics the activity of a structured mRNA stimulator of PRF. This is the first description of a role for a trans-acting cellular protein in PRF. The discovery broadens the repertoire of activities associated with poly(C) binding proteins and prototypes a new class of virus-host interactions. PMID:27257056

  1. Purification and characterization of a novel type i ribosome inactivating protein, pachyerosin, from Pachyrhizus erosus seeds, and preparation of its immunotoxin against human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-Lin; Cheng, Yuan-Liu; Qiu, Yi; Shen, Cai-Hong; Yi, Bin; Peng, Cheng

    2014-07-01

    Pachyrhizus erosus seeds have a high protein content and are used in China due to their cytotoxic effect. Here we report the biological and pharmacological activity of the protein extracts from P. erosus seeds. A novel ribosome-inactivating protein, pachyerosin, from P. erosus seeds was successively purified to homogeneity using ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-sepharose FF, and Sephacryl S-200. Pachyerosin showed to be a type I ribosome-inactivating protein with a molecular mass of 29 kDa and an isoelectric point of 9.19. It strongly inhibited protein synthesis of rabbit reticulocyte lysate with an IC50 of 0.37 ng/mL and showed N-glycosidase activity on rat liver ribosomes with an EC50 of 85.9 pM. The N-terminal 27 amino acids of pachyerosin revealed a 60.71% sequence identity with abrin A from the seeds of Abrus precatorius. With the aim of targeting the delivery of pachyerosin, immunotoxin was prepared by conjugating pachyerosin with anti-human AFP monoclonal antibodies SM0736. The immunotoxin pachyerosin-SM0736 efficiently inhibited the growth of the human hepatoma cell line HuH-7 with an IC50 of 0.050 ± 0.004 nM, 2360 times lower than that of pachyerosin and 430 times lower than that of the immunotoxin against human gastric cancer cell line SGC7901. These results imply that pachyerosin may be used as a new promising anticancer agent. PMID:25029173

  2. Identification and fine mapping of nuclear and nucleolar localization signals within the human ribosomal protein S17.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Scott P; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Human ribosomal protein S17 (RPS17) is mutated in Diamond-Blackfan Anemia (DBA), a bone marrow disorder that fails to produce sufficient red blood cells leading to anemia. Recently, an RPS17 protein sequence was also found to be naturally inserted in the genome of hepatitis E virus (HEV) from patients chronically-infected by HEV. The role of RPS17 in HEV replication and pathogenesis remains unknown due to the lack of knowledge about how RPS17 functions at a molecular level. Understanding the biological function of RPS17 is critical for elucidating its role in virus infection and DBA disease processes. In this study we probed the subcellular distribution of normal and mutant RPS17 proteins in a human liver cell line (Huh7). RPS17 was primarily detected within the nucleus, and more specifically within the nucleoli. Using a transient expression system in which RPS17 or truncations were expressed as fusions with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP), we were able to identify and map, for the first time, two separate nuclear localization signals (NLSs), one to the first 13 amino acids of the amino-terminus of RPS17 and the other within amino acids 30-60. Additionally, we mapped amino acid sequences required for nucleolar accumulation of RPS17 to amino acids 60-70. Amino acids 60-70 possess a di-RG motif that may be necessary for nucleolar retention of RPS17. The results from this study enhance our knowledge of RSP17 and will facilitate future mechanistic studies about the roles of RSP17 in hepatitis E and DBA disease processes. PMID:25853866

  3. Slowing Translation between Protein Domains by Increasing Affinity between mRNAs and the Ribosomal Anti-Shine-Dalgarno Sequence Improves Solubility.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Kevin A; Hatridge, Taylor A; Curtis, Nicholas C; Contreras, Lydia M

    2016-02-19

    Recent studies have demonstrated that effective protein production requires coordination of multiple cotranslational cellular processes, which are heavily affected by translation timing. Until recently, protein engineering has focused on codon optimization to maximize protein production rates, mostly considering the effect of tRNA abundance. However, as it relates to complex multidomain proteins, it has been hypothesized that strategic translational pauses between domains and between distinct individual structural motifs can prevent interactions between nascent chain fragments that generate kinetically trapped misfolded peptides and thereby enhance protein yields. In this study, we introduce synthetic transient pauses between structural domains in a heterologous model protein based on designed patterns of affinity between the mRNA and the anti-Shine-Dalgarno (aSD) sequence on the ribosome. We demonstrate that optimizing translation attenuation at domain boundaries can predictably affect solubility patterns in bacteria. Exploration of the affinity space showed that modifying less than 1% of the nucleotides (on a small 12 amino acid linker) can vary soluble protein yields up to ∼7-fold without altering the primary sequence of the protein. In the context of longer linkers, where a larger number of distinct structural motifs can fold outside the ribosome, optimal synonymous codon variations resulted in an additional 2.1-fold increase in solubility, relative to that of nonoptimized linkers of the same length. While rational construction of 54 linkers of various affinities showed a significant correlation between protein solubility and predicted affinity, only weaker correlations were observed between tRNA abundance and protein solubility. We also demonstrate that naturally occurring high-affinity clusters are present between structural domains of β-galactosidase, one of Escherichia coli's largest native proteins. Interdomain ribosomal affinity is an important factor

  4. A new view of protein synthesis: mapping the free energy landscape of the ribosome using single-molecule FRET.

    PubMed

    Munro, James B; Vaiana, Andrea; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y; Blanchard, Scott C

    2008-07-01

    This article reviews the application of single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) methods to the study of protein synthesis catalyzed by the ribosome. smFRET is a powerful new technique that can be used to investigate dynamic processes within enzymes spanning many orders of magnitude. The application of wide-field smFRET imaging methods to the study of dynamic processes in the ribosome offers a new perspective on the mechanism of protein synthesis. Using this technique, the structural and kinetic parameters of tRNA motions within wild-type and specifically mutated ribosome complexes have been obtained that provide valuable new insights into the mechanism and regulation of translation elongation. The results of these studies are discussed in the context of current knowledge of the ribosome mechanism from both structural and biophysical perspectives. PMID:18286627

  5. The Ribosome Biogenesis Protein Nol9 Is Essential for Definitive Hematopoiesis and Pancreas Morphogenesis in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Bielczyk-Maczyńska, Ewa; Lam Hung, Laure; Ferreira, Lauren; Fleischmann, Tobias; Weis, Félix; Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Harvey, Steven A; Wali, Neha; Warren, Alan J; Barroso, Inês; Stemple, Derek L; Cvejic, Ana

    2015-12-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a ubiquitous and essential process in cells. Defects in ribosome biogenesis and function result in a group of human disorders, collectively known as ribosomopathies. In this study, we describe a zebrafish mutant with a loss-of-function mutation in nol9, a gene that encodes a non-ribosomal protein involved in rRNA processing. nol9sa1022/sa1022 mutants have a defect in 28S rRNA processing. The nol9sa1022/sa1022 larvae display hypoplastic pancreas, liver and intestine and have decreased numbers of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), as well as definitive erythrocytes and lymphocytes. In addition, ultrastructural analysis revealed signs of pathological processes occurring in endothelial cells of the caudal vein, emphasizing the complexity of the phenotype observed in nol9sa1022/sa1022 larvae. We further show that both the pancreatic and hematopoietic deficiencies in nol9sa1022/sa1022 embryos were due to impaired cell proliferation of respective progenitor cells. Interestingly, genetic loss of Tp53 rescued the HSPCs but not the pancreatic defects. In contrast, activation of mRNA translation via the mTOR pathway by L-Leucine treatment did not revert the erythroid or pancreatic defects. Together, we present the nol9sa1022/sa1022 mutant, a novel zebrafish ribosomopathy model, which recapitulates key human disease characteristics. The use of this genetically tractable model will enhance our understanding of the tissue-specific mechanisms following impaired ribosome biogenesis in the context of an intact vertebrate. PMID:26624285

  6. The Ribosome Biogenesis Protein Nol9 Is Essential for Definitive Hematopoiesis and Pancreas Morphogenesis in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Lauren; Fleischmann, Tobias; Weis, Félix; Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Harvey, Steven A.; Wali, Neha; Warren, Alan J.; Barroso, Inês; Stemple, Derek L.; Cvejic, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a ubiquitous and essential process in cells. Defects in ribosome biogenesis and function result in a group of human disorders, collectively known as ribosomopathies. In this study, we describe a zebrafish mutant with a loss-of-function mutation in nol9, a gene that encodes a non-ribosomal protein involved in rRNA processing. nol9 sa1022/sa1022 mutants have a defect in 28S rRNA processing. The nol9 sa1022/sa1022 larvae display hypoplastic pancreas, liver and intestine and have decreased numbers of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), as well as definitive erythrocytes and lymphocytes. In addition, ultrastructural analysis revealed signs of pathological processes occurring in endothelial cells of the caudal vein, emphasizing the complexity of the phenotype observed in nol9 sa1022/sa1022 larvae. We further show that both the pancreatic and hematopoietic deficiencies in nol9 sa1022/sa1022 embryos were due to impaired cell proliferation of respective progenitor cells. Interestingly, genetic loss of Tp53 rescued the HSPCs but not the pancreatic defects. In contrast, activation of mRNA translation via the mTOR pathway by L-Leucine treatment did not revert the erythroid or pancreatic defects. Together, we present the nol9 sa1022/sa1022 mutant, a novel zebrafish ribosomopathy model, which recapitulates key human disease characteristics. The use of this genetically tractable model will enhance our understanding of the tissue-specific mechanisms following impaired ribosome biogenesis in the context of an intact vertebrate. PMID:26624285

  7. Involvement of human ribosomal proteins in nucleolar structure and p53-dependent nucleolar stress.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Emilien; Parisot, Pascaline; Pinto-Monteiro, Celina; de Walque, Roxane; De Vleeschouwer, Christophe; Lafontaine, Denis L J

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolus is a potent disease biomarker and a target in cancer therapy. Ribosome biogenesis is initiated in the nucleolus where most ribosomal (r-) proteins assemble onto precursor rRNAs. Here we systematically investigate how depletion of each of the 80 human r-proteins affects nucleolar structure, pre-rRNA processing, mature rRNA accumulation and p53 steady-state level. We developed an image-processing programme for qualitative and quantitative discrimination of normal from altered nucleolar morphology. Remarkably, we find that uL5 (formerly RPL11) and uL18 (RPL5) are the strongest contributors to nucleolar integrity. Together with the 5S rRNA, they form the late-assembling central protuberance on mature 60S subunits, and act as an Hdm2 trap and p53 stabilizer. Other major contributors to p53 homeostasis are also strictly late-assembling large subunit r-proteins essential to nucleolar structure. The identification of the r-proteins that specifically contribute to maintaining nucleolar structure and p53 steady-state level provides insights into fundamental aspects of cell and cancer biology. PMID:27265389

  8. Involvement of human ribosomal proteins in nucleolar structure and p53-dependent nucleolar stress

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Emilien; Parisot, Pascaline; Pinto-Monteiro, Celina; de Walque, Roxane; De Vleeschouwer, Christophe; Lafontaine, Denis L. J.

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolus is a potent disease biomarker and a target in cancer therapy. Ribosome biogenesis is initiated in the nucleolus where most ribosomal (r-) proteins assemble onto precursor rRNAs. Here we systematically investigate how depletion of each of the 80 human r-proteins affects nucleolar structure, pre-rRNA processing, mature rRNA accumulation and p53 steady-state level. We developed an image-processing programme for qualitative and quantitative discrimination of normal from altered nucleolar morphology. Remarkably, we find that uL5 (formerly RPL11) and uL18 (RPL5) are the strongest contributors to nucleolar integrity. Together with the 5S rRNA, they form the late-assembling central protuberance on mature 60S subunits, and act as an Hdm2 trap and p53 stabilizer. Other major contributors to p53 homeostasis are also strictly late-assembling large subunit r-proteins essential to nucleolar structure. The identification of the r-proteins that specifically contribute to maintaining nucleolar structure and p53 steady-state level provides insights into fundamental aspects of cell and cancer biology. PMID:27265389

  9. Bryodin, a ribosome-inactivating protein from the roots of Bryonia dioica L. (white bryony).

    PubMed

    Stirpe, F; Barbieri, L; Battelli, M G; Falasca, A I; Abbondanza, A; Lorenzoni, E; Stevens, W A

    1986-12-15

    Bryodin is a strongly basic (pI greater than or equal to 9.5) glycoprotein (neutral sugar content 6.3%) with Mr 30,000, purified from the roots of Bryonia dioica (white bryony). This protein inhibits protein synthesis by a rabbit reticulocyte lysate with and ID50 (concentration causing 50% inhibition) of 0.12 nM (3.6 ng/ml) and has much less effect on protein synthesis by whole cells, with ID50 values ranging from 46 nM to 2.27 microM (1.4-67 micrograms/ml). Bryodin acts by inactivating ribosomes, with a less-than-equimolar ratio, which suggests a catalytic action. Bryodin decreases the number of local lesions induced by tobacco mosaic virus in the leaves of Nicotiana glutinosa. From all its properties, bryodin can be considered to be a ribosome-inactivating protein, similar to those already known [reviews: Barbieri & Stirpe (1982) Cancer Surveys 1, 489-520; Stirpe & Barbieri (1986) FEBS Lett. 195, 1-8]. PMID:3827858

  10. Bryodin, a ribosome-inactivating protein from the roots of Bryonia dioica L. (white bryony).

    PubMed Central

    Stirpe, F; Barbieri, L; Battelli, M G; Falasca, A I; Abbondanza, A; Lorenzoni, E; Stevens, W A

    1986-01-01

    Bryodin is a strongly basic (pI greater than or equal to 9.5) glycoprotein (neutral sugar content 6.3%) with Mr 30,000, purified from the roots of Bryonia dioica (white bryony). This protein inhibits protein synthesis by a rabbit reticulocyte lysate with and ID50 (concentration causing 50% inhibition) of 0.12 nM (3.6 ng/ml) and has much less effect on protein synthesis by whole cells, with ID50 values ranging from 46 nM to 2.27 microM (1.4-67 micrograms/ml). Bryodin acts by inactivating ribosomes, with a less-than-equimolar ratio, which suggests a catalytic action. Bryodin decreases the number of local lesions induced by tobacco mosaic virus in the leaves of Nicotiana glutinosa. From all its properties, bryodin can be considered to be a ribosome-inactivating protein, similar to those already known [reviews: Barbieri & Stirpe (1982) Cancer Surveys 1, 489-520; Stirpe & Barbieri (1986) FEBS Lett. 195, 1-8]. PMID:3827858

  11. Antibodies to ribosomal P proteins of Trypanosoma cruzi in Chagas disease possess functional autoreactivity with heart tissue and differ from anti-P autoantibodies in lupus.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D; Ferrari, I; Bergami, P L; Mahler, E; Levitus, G; Chiale, P; Hoebeke, J; Van Regenmortel, M H; Levin, M J

    1997-09-16

    Anti-P antibodies present in sera from patients with chronic Chagas heart disease (cChHD) recognize peptide R13, EEEDDDMGFGLFD, which encompasses the C-terminal region of the Trypanosoma cruzi ribosomal P1 and P2 proteins. This peptide shares homology with the C-terminal region (peptide H13 EESDDDMGFGLFD) of the human ribosomal P proteins, which is in turn the target of anti-P autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and with the acidic epitope, AESDE, of the second extracellular loop of the beta1-adrenergic receptor. Anti-P antibodies from chagasic patients showed a marked preference for recombinant parasite ribosomal P proteins and peptides, whereas anti-P autoantibodies from SLE reacted with human and parasite ribosomal P proteins and peptides to the same extent. A semi-quantitative estimation of the binding of cChHD anti-P antibodies to R13 and H13 using biosensor technology indicated that the average affinity constant was about 5 times higher for R13 than for H13. Competitive enzyme immunoassays demonstrated that cChHD anti-P antibodies bind to the acidic portions of peptide H13, as well as to peptide H26R, encompassing the second extracellular loop of the beta1 adrenoreceptor. Anti-P antibodies isolated from cChHD patients exert a positive chronotropic effect in vitro on cardiomyocytes from neonatal rats, which resembles closely that of anti-beta1 receptor antibodies isolated from the same patient. In contrast, SLE anti-P autoantibodies have no functional effect. Our results suggest that the adrenergic-stimulating activity of anti-P antibodies may be implicated in the induction of functional myocardial impairments observed in cChHD. PMID:9294205

  12. Characterization of trichobakin, a type I ribosome-inactivating protein from Trichosanthes sp. Bac Kan 8-98.

    PubMed

    Chi, P V; Truong, H Q; Ha, N T; Chung, W I; Binh, L T

    2001-10-01

    We have isolated a genomic clone encoding trichobakin (TBK), a type I ribosome-inactivating protein from the plant Trichosanthes sp. Bac Kan 8-98 (family Cucurbitaceae), by PCR using specific primers designed from the cDNA sequences of alpha-trichosanthin. The sequence encoding mature TBK was constructed in the pET-21d(+) vector for overexpression in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3). The recombinant protein was purified to homogeneity by CM-Sepharose chromatography on FPLC with a final yield of about 55 mg/l of culture. The protein has a molecular mass of about 27 kDa, as shown by SDS/PAGE and matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization MS. It was found that the protein inhibited luciferase mRNA translation in the rabbit reticulocyte cell-free system with an IC(50) value (that which causes a 50% reduction of residual translational activity) of about 3.5 pM. The rRNA N-glycosidase activity of the protein was also proved at the above-mentioned concentration after rRNAs were treated with acid aniline. PMID:11592913

  13. Characterization of the pattern of ribosomal protein L19 production during the lifecycle of Leishmania spp.

    PubMed

    de Almeida-Bizzo, Janayna Hammes; Alves, Lysangela Ronalte; Castro, Felipe F; Garcia, Juliana Bório Ferreira; Goldenberg, Samuel; Cruz, Angela Kaysel

    2014-12-01

    Leishmania is a genus of protozoan parasites causing a wide clinical spectrum of diseases in humans. Analysis of a region of chromosome 6 from Leishmania major (Iribar et al.) showed that the transcript of a putative L19 ribosomal protein (RPL19) was most abundant at the amastigote stage. We therefore decided to characterize L19 protein abundance throughout the lifecycle of Leishmania. Differential expression of the L19 gene during development has been observed for all Leishmania species studied to date (L. major, L. braziliensis, L. donovani, and L. amazonensis). Immunoblotting with polyclonal antibodies against L. major RPL19 revealed that changes to L19 protein abundance follow a similar pattern in various species. The amount of L19 protein was higher in exponentially growing promastigotes than in stationary phase promastigotes. The L19 protein was barely detectable in amastigotes, despite the abundance of L19 transcripts observed in L. major at this stage. Immunofluorescence assays showed a granular, dispersed distribution of RPL19 throughout the cytoplasm. Subcellular fractionation confirmed the presence of the protein in the ribosomal fraction, but not in the cytosol of L. major. We generated a L. major transfectant bearing a plasmid-borne L19 gene. Overproduction of the L19 transcript and protein resulted in impaired growth of the transfectants in association with high polysome peaks. We also showed by metabolic labeling that L19 overexpressing clones display low rates of translation. These data suggest that L19 overexpression affects negatively translation elongation or termination. The lack of correlation between L19 transcript and protein abundances suggest that the translation of L19 is differentially controlled during development in the various species investigated. PMID:25290356

  14. Antifungal activity of the ribosome-inactivating protein BE27 from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) against the green mould Penicillium digitatum.

    PubMed

    Citores, Lucía; Iglesias, Rosario; Gay, Carolina; Ferreras, José Miguel

    2016-02-01

    The ribosome-inactivating protein BE27 from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) leaves is an apoplastic protein induced by signalling compounds, such as hydrogen peroxide and salicylic acid, which has been reported to be involved in defence against viruses. Here, we report that, at a concentration much lower than that present in the apoplast, BE27 displays antifungal activity against the green mould Penicillium digitatum, a necrotrophic fungus that colonizes wounds and grows in the inter- and intracellular spaces of the tissues of several edible plants. BE27 is able to enter into the cytosol and kill fungal cells, thus arresting the growth of the fungus. The mechanism of action seems to involve ribosomal RNA (rRNA) N-glycosylase activity on the sarcin-ricin loop of the major rRNA which inactivates irreversibly the fungal ribosomes, thus inhibiting protein synthesis. We compared the C-terminus of the BE27 structure with antifungal plant defensins and hypothesize that a structural motif composed of an α-helix and a β-hairpin, similar to the γ-core motif of defensins, might contribute to the specific interaction with the fungal plasma membranes, allowing the protein to enter into the cell. PMID:25976013

  15. Tn9 and IS1 inserts in a ribosomal ribonucleic acid operon of Escherichia coli are incompletely polar.

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, J M; Morgan, E A

    1981-01-01

    Transcription is known to be coupled to translation in many or all bacterial operons which code for proteins. In these operons, nonsense codons which prevent normal translation often result in premature termination of transcription (polarity). However, efficient transcription of ribosomal ribonucleic acid operons (rrn operons) occurs, although rrn transcripts are not translated. It therefore seemed possible that insertion sequences and transposable elements which are polar in protein-coding operons might not be polar in rrn operons. Previously, it has been shown (E. A. Morgan, Cell 21:257-265, 1980) that Tn10 is incompletely polar in the rrnX operon. Here we show that the transposon Tn9 and the insertion sequence IS1 also incompletely polar in rrnX. In normal cells expression of sequences distal to the insertions can be detected by genetic methods. In ultraviolet-irradiated cells expression of distal sequences is about 80% of that observed in uninterrupted rrnX operons. These observations provide evidence that ribonucleic acid polymerase molecules beginning at rrnX promoters can read through Tn9 and IS1 and that, at least in ultraviolet-irradiated cells, read-through is very efficient. Images PMID:6171559

  16. The global translation profile in a ribosomal protein mutant resembles that of an eIF3 mutant

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genome-wide assays performed in Arabidopsis and other organisms have revealed that the translation status of mRNAs responds dramatically to different environmental stresses and genetic lesions in the translation apparatus. To identify additional features of the global landscape of translational control, we used microarray analysis of polysomal as well as non-polysomal mRNAs to examine the defects in translation in a poly(A) binding protein mutant, pab2 pab8, as well as in a mutant of a large ribosomal subunit protein, rpl24b/shortvalve1. Results The mutation of RPL24B stimulated the ribosome occupancy of mRNAs for nuclear encoded ribosomal proteins. Detailed analysis yielded new insights into the translational regulon containing the ribosomal protein mRNAs. First, the ribosome occupancy defects in the rpl24b mutant partially overlapped with those in a previously analyzed initiation factor mutant, eif3h. Second, a group of mRNAs with incomplete coding sequences appeared to be uncoupled from the regulon, since their dependence on RPL24B differed from regular mRNAs. Third, different sister paralogs of the ribosomal proteins differed in their translation state in the wild-type. Some sister paralogs also differed in their response to the rpl24b mutation. In contrast to rpl24b, the pab2 pab8 mutant revealed few gene specific translational defects, but a group of seed storage protein mRNAs were stimulated in their ribosome occupancy. In the course of this work, while optimizing the statistical analysis of ribosome occupancy data, we collected 12 biological replicates of translation states from wild-type seedlings. We defined 20% of mRNAs as having a high variance in their translation state. Many of these mRNAs were functionally associated with responses to the environment, suggesting that subtle variation in the environmental conditions is sensed by plants and transduced to affect the translational efficiency of hundreds of mRNAs. Conclusions These data

  17. Development of Soft Tissue Sarcomas in Ribosomal Proteins L5 and S24 Heterozygous Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kazerounian, Shideh; Ciarlini, Pedro D.S.C.; Yuan, Daniel; Ghazvinian, Roxanne; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Joshi, Mugdha; Zhang, Hong; Beggs, Alan H.; Gazda, Hanna T.

    2016-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome associated with ribosomal protein (RP) gene mutations. Recent studies have also demonstrated an increased risk of cancer predisposition among DBA patients. In this study, we report the formation of soft tissue sarcoma in the Rpl5 and Rps24 heterozygous mice. Our observation suggests that even though one wild-type allele of the Rpl5 or Rps24 gene prevents anemia in these mice, it still predisposes them to cancer development. PMID:26722357

  18. Development of Soft Tissue Sarcomas in Ribosomal Proteins L5 and S24 Heterozygous Mice.

    PubMed

    Kazerounian, Shideh; Ciarlini, Pedro D S C; Yuan, Daniel; Ghazvinian, Roxanne; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Joshi, Mugdha; Zhang, Hong; Beggs, Alan H; Gazda, Hanna T

    2016-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome associated with ribosomal protein (RP) gene mutations. Recent studies have also demonstrated an increased risk of cancer predisposition among DBA patients. In this study, we report the formation of soft tissue sarcoma in the Rpl5 and Rps24 heterozygous mice. Our observation suggests that even though one wild-type allele of the Rpl5 or Rps24 gene prevents anemia in these mice, it still predisposes them to cancer development. PMID:26722357

  19. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against the ribosome inactivating proteins dianthin32 and momochin.

    PubMed

    Porro, G; Bonardi, M A; Giovanetti, E; Lento, P; Modena, D

    1994-04-01

    Female BALB/c mice were immunized with either dianthin32 or momochin, type 1 ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) derived from Dianthus charyophyllus and Momordica cochinchinensis, respectively. Five anti-dianthin32 and 6 anti-momochin secreting hybridomas were obtained by somatic fusion of lymphocytes with myeloma cell line NS0. The monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) produced were highly specific, as demonstrated by cross-reactivity assays performed with taxonomically related and unrelated type 1 RIPs, and recognized different epitopes of the antigen. The affinity constant of anti-RIPs MAbs ranged between 10(8) M-1 and 10(10) M-1. PMID:7519581

  20. Characterization of silk gland ribosomes from a bivoltine caddisfly, Stenopsyche marmorata: translational suppression of a silk protein in cold conditions.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Takaomi; Ito, Miho; Kanamori, Mai; Shigeno, Yuta; Uchiumi, Toshio; Arai, Ryoichi; Tsukada, Masuhiro; Hirabayashi, Kimio; Ohkawa, Kousaku

    2016-01-01

    Larval Stenopsyche marmorata constructs food capture nets and fixed retreats underwater using self-produced proteinaceous silk fibers. In the Chikuma River (Nagano Prefecture, Japan) S. marmorata has a bivoltine life cycle; overwintering larvae grow slowly with reduced net spinning activity in winter. We recently reported constant transcript abundance of S. marmorata silk protein 1 (Smsp-1), a core S. marmorata silk fiber component, in all seasons, implying translational suppression in the silk gland during winter. Herein, we prepared and characterized silk gland ribosomes from seasonally collected S. marmorata larvae. Ribosomes from silk glands immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen (LN2) after dissection exhibited comparable translation elongation activity in spring, summer, and autumn. Conversely, silk glands obtained in winter did not contain active ribosomes and Smsp-1. Ribosomes from silk glands immersed in ice-cold physiological saline solution for approximately 4 h were translationally inactive, despite summer collection and Smsp-1 expression. The ribosomal inactivation occurs because of defects in the formation of 80S ribosomes, presumably due to splitting of 60S subunits containing 28S rRNA with central hidden break, in response to cold stress. These results suggest a novel-type ribosome-regulated translation control mechanism. PMID:26646291

  1. Haploinsufficiency screen highlights two distinct groups of ribosomal protein genes essential for embryonic stem cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, Simon; MacRae, Tara; Bilodeau, Mélanie; Sargeant, Tobias; Sauvageau, Guy

    2015-01-01

    In a functional genomics screen of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) with nested hemizygous chromosomal deletions, we reveal that ribosomal protein (RP) genes are the most significant haploinsufficient determinants for embryoid body (EB) formation. Hemizygocity for three RP genes (Rps5, Rps14, or Rps28), distinguished by the proximity of their corresponding protein to the ribosome's mRNA exit site, is associated with the most profound phenotype. This EB phenotype was fully rescued by BAC or cDNA complementation but not by the reduction of p53 levels, although such reduction was effective with most other RP-deleted clones corresponding to non-mRNA exit-site proteins. RNA-sequencing studies further revealed that undifferentiated ESCs hemizygous for Rps5 showed reduced expression levels of several mesoderm-specific genes as compared with wild-type counterparts. Together, these results reveal that RP gene dosage limits the differentiation, not the self-renewal, of mouse ESCs. They also highlight two separate mechanisms underlying this process, one of which is p53 independent. PMID:25646475

  2. Molecular insights into replication initiation by Qβ replicase using ribosomal protein S1

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Daijiro; Yamashita, Seisuke; Tomita, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S1, consisting of six contiguous OB-folds, is the largest ribosomal protein and is essential for translation initiation in Escherichia coli. S1 is also one of the three essential host-derived subunits of Qβ replicase, together with EF-Tu and EF-Ts, for Qβ RNA replication in E. coli. We analyzed the crystal structure of Qβ replicase, consisting of the virus-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (β-subunit), EF-Tu, EF-Ts and the N-terminal half of S1, which is capable of initiating Qβ RNA replication. Structural and biochemical studies revealed that the two N-terminal OB-folds of S1 anchor S1 onto the β-subunit, and the third OB-fold is mobile and protrudes beyond the surface of the β-subunit. The third OB-fold mainly interacts with a specific RNA fragment derived from the internal region of Qβ RNA, and its RNA-binding ability is required for replication initiation of Qβ RNA. Thus, the third mobile OB-fold of S1, which is spatially anchored near the surface of the β-subunit, primarily recruits the Qβ RNA toward the β-subunit, leading to the specific and efficient replication initiation of Qβ RNA, and S1 functions as a replication initiation factor, beyond its established function in protein synthesis. PMID:25122749

  3. Nucleolar protein GLTSCR2 stabilizes p53 in response to ribosomal stresses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S; Kim, J-Y; Kim, Y-J; Seok, K-O; Kim, J-H; Chang, Y-J; Kang, H-Y; Park, J-H

    2012-01-01

    p53 is a key regulator of cell growth and death by controlling cell cycle progression and apoptosis under conditions of stress such as DNA damage or oncogenic stimulation. As these processes are critical for cell function and inhibition of tumor development, p53 regulatory pathways are strictly monitored in cells. Recently, it was recognized that nucleolar proteins, including nucleophosmin/B23, ribosomal protein L11, and alternate reading frame (ARF), form the nucleolus-ARF-murine double minute 2 (MDM2) axis in p53 regulatory pathways, which increases p53 stability by suppressing the activity of MDM2. In this work, we show that nucleolar protein glioma tumor-suppressor candidate region gene 2 (GLTSCR2) translocates to the nucleoplasm under ribosomal stress, where it interacts with and stabilizes p53 and inhibits cell cycle progression without the involvement of the major upstream p53 regulator, ARF. Furthermore, ectopic expression of GLTSCR2 significantly suppressed growth of cancer cells in a xenograft animal model via p53-dependent pathway. Our data identify GLTSCR2 as a new member of the nucleolus–nucleoplasmic axis for p53 regulation. ARF-independent direct regulation of p53 by GLTSCR2 may be a key mechanism and therapeutic target for cell death or growth inhibition when nucleolus-ARF-p53 pathways are inactivated by genetic or epigenetic modifications of ARF, which are the second most common types of genetic change observed in human cancers. PMID:22522597

  4. Direct mass spectrometric analysis of intact proteins of the yeast large ribosomal subunit using capillary LC/FTICR

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Won; Berger, Scott J.; Martinović, Suzana; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shen, Yufeng; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.

    2002-01-01

    Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry coupled with capillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography was used to characterize intact proteins from the large subunit of the yeast ribosome. High mass measurement accuracy, achieved by “mass locking” with an internal standard from a dual electrospray ionization source, allowed identification of ribosomal proteins. Analyses of the intact proteins revealed information on cotranslational and posttranslational modifications of the ribosomal proteins that included loss of the initiating methionine, acetylation, methylation, and proteolytic maturation. High-resolution separations permitted differentiation of protein isoforms having high structural similarity as well as proteins from their modified forms, facilitating unequivocal assignments. The study identified 42 of the 43 core large ribosomal subunit proteins and 58 (of 64 possible) core large subunit protein isoforms having unique masses in a single analysis. These results demonstrate the basis for the high-throughput analyses of complex mixtures of intact proteins, which we believe will be an important complement to other approaches for defining protein modifications and their changes resulting from physiological processes or environmental perturbations. PMID:11983894

  5. Altering the ribosomal subunit ratio in yeast maximizes recombinant protein yield

    PubMed Central

    Bonander, Nicklas; Darby, Richard AJ; Grgic, Ljuban; Bora, Nagamani; Wen, Jikai; Brogna, Saverio; Poyner, David R; O'Neill, Michael AA; Bill, Roslyn M

    2009-01-01

    Background The production of high yields of recombinant proteins is an enduring bottleneck in the post-genomic sciences that has yet to be addressed in a truly rational manner. Typically eukaryotic protein production experiments have relied on varying expression construct cassettes such as promoters and tags, or culture process parameters such as pH, temperature and aeration to enhance yields. These approaches require repeated rounds of trial-and-error optimization and cannot provide a mechanistic insight into the biology of recombinant protein production. We published an early transcriptome analysis that identified genes implicated in successful membrane protein production experiments in yeast. While there has been a subsequent explosion in such analyses in a range of production organisms, no one has yet exploited the genes identified. The aim of this study was to use the results of our previous comparative transcriptome analysis to engineer improved yeast strains and thereby gain an understanding of the mechanisms involved in high-yielding protein production hosts. Results We show that tuning BMS1 transcript levels in a doxycycline-dependent manner resulted in optimized yields of functional membrane and soluble protein targets. Online flow microcalorimetry demonstrated that there had been a substantial metabolic change to cells cultured under high-yielding conditions, and in particular that high yielding cells were more metabolically efficient. Polysome profiling showed that the key molecular event contributing to this metabolically efficient, high-yielding phenotype is a perturbation of the ratio of 60S to 40S ribosomal subunits from approximately 1:1 to 2:1, and correspondingly of 25S:18S ratios from 2:1 to 3:1. This result is consistent with the role of the gene product of BMS1 in ribosome biogenesis. Conclusion This work demonstrates the power of a rational approach to recombinant protein production by using the results of transcriptome analysis to engineer

  6. Interplay of the Bacterial Ribosomal A-Site, S12 Protein Mutations and Paromomycin Binding: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Panecka, Joanna; Mura, Cameron; Trylska, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The conformational properties of the aminoacyl-tRNA binding site (A-site), and its surroundings in the Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit, are of great relevance in designing antibacterial agents. The 30S subunit A-site is near ribosomal protein S12, which neighbors helices h27 and H69; this latter helix, of the 50S subunit, is a functionally important component of an intersubunit bridge. Experimental work has shown that specific point mutations in S12 (K42A, R53A) yield hyper-accurate ribosomes, which in turn confers resistance to the antibiotic ‘paromomycin’ (even when this aminoglycoside is bound to the A-site). Suspecting that these effects can be elucidated in terms of the local atomic interactions and detailed dynamics of this region of the bacterial ribosome, we have used molecular dynamics simulations to explore the motion of a fragment of the E. coli ribosome, including the A-site. We found that the ribosomal regions surrounding the A-site modify the conformational space of the flexible A-site adenines 1492/93. Specifically, we found that A-site mobility is affected by stacking interactions between adenines A1493 and A1913, and by contacts between A1492 and a flexible side-chain (K43) from the S12 protein. In addition, our simulations reveal possible indirect pathways by which the R53A and K42A mutations in S12 are coupled to the dynamical properties of the A-site. Our work extends what is known about the atomistic dynamics of the A-site, and suggests possible links between the biological effects of hyper-accurate mutations in the S12 protein and conformational properties of the ribosome; the implications for S12 dynamics help elucidate how the miscoding effects of paromomycin may be evaded in antibiotic-resistant mutants of the bacterial ribosome. PMID:25379961

  7. Reconstitution into liposomes of membrane proteins involved in ribosome binding on rough endoplasmic reticulum. Ribosome-binding capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, M; Sakai, M; Horigome, T; Omata, S; Sugano, H

    1981-01-01

    A membrane protein fraction having a high affinity for polyribosomes was isolated from microsomal membranes of rat liver and was incorporated into liposomes made from microsomal lipids to evaluate the polyribosome-binding capacity of the reconstituted liposomes, with the following results. (1) The polyribosome binding to the reconstituted liposomes depended on the amounts of polyribosomes added to the binding mixture. (2) Liposomes made from lipids alone did not bind any polyribosomes. (3) The polyribosome-binding capacity of the reconstituted liposomes was very sensitive to proteolytic enzyme and strongly inhibited by addition of 0.1 mM-aurintricarboxylic acid or by increasing KCl concentration. These results suggest that the binding mechanism of polyribosomes to the reconstituted liposomes is much like that for rough microsomal membrane stripped of endogenous polyribosomes. PMID:7306032

  8. Purification of a new ribosome-inactivating protein from the seeds of Cinnamomum porrectum and characterization of the RNA N-glycosidase activity of the toxic protein.

    PubMed

    Li, X D; Liu, W Y; Niu, C L

    1996-12-01

    Porrectin, a new type II ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP), was purified from the seeds of the camphor tree (Cinnamomum porrectum) by affinity chromatography on acid-treated Sepharose 4B. Porrectin is a glycoprotein (M(r)64,500, sugar content 2.5%) consisting of an A-chain (M(r)30,500) and a B-chain (M(r)33,500) linked by the disulfide bond. The terminal sugar of glycan in porrectin B-chain is determined to be mannose. By non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, porrectin displayed three isoforms that have different pl values with the same molecular weight. Porrectin is a potent inhibitor of eukaryotic protein synthesis in the rabbit reticulocyte lysate system. The molecular mechanism of action of porrectin on rat liver ribosomes is demonstrated to be specific for RNA N-glycosidase. The cleavage site is the adenosine at position 4324 (rat liver 28S rRNA) embedded in the highly conserved ricin/alpha-sarcin ('R/S') domain. PMID:8997493

  9. Rabies virus phosphoprotein interacts with ribosomal protein L9 and affects rabies virus replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Youwen; Dong, Wanyu; Shi, Yuejun; Deng, Feng; Chen, Xi; Wan, Chunyun; Zhou, Ming; Zhao, Ling; Fu, Zhen F; Peng, Guiqing

    2016-01-15

    Rabies virus is a highly neurotropic virus that can cause fatal infection of the central nervous system in warm-blooded animals. The RABV phosphoprotein (P), an essential cofactor of the virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, is required for virus replication. In this study, the ribosomal protein L9, which has functions in protein translation, is identified as P-interacting cellular factor using phage display analysis. Direct binding between the L9 and P was confirmed by protein pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation analyses. It was further demonstrated that L9 translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it colocalizes with P in cells infected with RABV or transfected with P gene. RABV replication was reduced with L9 overexpression and enhanced with L9 knockdown. Thus, we propose that during RABV infection, P binds to L9 that translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, inhibiting the initial stage of RABV transcription. PMID:26655239

  10. From DNA to proteins via the ribosome: structural insights into the workings of the translation machinery.

    PubMed

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Frank, Joachim

    2010-04-01

    Understanding protein synthesis in bacteria and humans is important for understanding the origin of many human diseases and devising treatments for them. Over the past decade, the field of structural biology has made significant advances in the visualisation of the molecular machinery involved in protein synthesis. It is now possible to discern, at least in outline, the way that interlocking ribosomal components and factors adapt their conformations throughout this process. The determination of structures in various functional contexts, along with the application of kinetic and fluorescent resonance energy transfer approaches to the problem, has given researchers the frame of reference for what remains as the greatest challenge: the complete dynamic portrait of protein synthesis in the cell. PMID:20511136

  11. From DNA to proteins via the ribosome: Structural insights into the workings of the translation machinery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Understanding protein synthesis in bacteria and humans is important for understanding the origin of many human diseases and devising treatments for them. Over the past decade, the field of structural biology has made significant advances in the visualisation of the molecular machinery involved in protein synthesis. It is now possible to discern, at least in outline, the way that interlocking ribosomal components and factors adapt their conformations throughout this process. The determination of structures in various functional contexts, along with the application of kinetic and fluorescent resonance energy transfer approaches to the problem, has given researchers the frame of reference for what remains as the greatest challenge: the complete dynamic portrait of protein synthesis in the cell. PMID:20511136

  12. Dianthins, ribosome-damaging proteins with anti-viral properties from Dianthus caryophyllus L. (carnation).

    PubMed Central

    Stirpe, F; Williams, D G; Onyon, L J; Legg, R F; Stevens, W A

    1981-01-01

    1. Dianthin 30 and dianthin 32, two proteins isolated from the leaves of Diathus caryophyllus (carnation), were purified to homogeneity by chromatography on CM-cellulose. 2. The mol.wt. of dianthin 30 is 29 500 and that of dianthin 32 is 31 700. Both dianthins are glycoproteins containing mannose. 3. Dianthins inhibit protein synthesis in a lysate of rabbit reticulocytes, with an ID50 (concentration giving 50% inhibition) of 9.15 ng/ml (dianthin 30) and 3.6 ng/ml (dianthin 32). They act by damaging ribosomes in a less-than-equimolar ratio. Protein synthesis by intact cells is partially inhibited by dianthins at a concentration of 100 microgram/ml. 4. Dianthins mixed with tobacco-mosaic virus strongly decrease the number of local lesions on leaves of Nicotiana glutinosa. Images Fig. 2. PMID:7316958

  13. Genomic location of the major ribosomal protein gene locus determines Vibrio cholerae global growth and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Soler-Bistué, Alfonso; Mondotte, Juan A; Bland, Michael Jason; Val, Marie-Eve; Saleh, María-Carla; Mazel, Didier

    2015-04-01

    The effects on cell physiology of gene order within the bacterial chromosome are poorly understood. In silico approaches have shown that genes involved in transcription and translation processes, in particular ribosomal protein (RP) genes, localize near the replication origin (oriC) in fast-growing bacteria suggesting that such a positional bias is an evolutionarily conserved growth-optimization strategy. Such genomic localization could either provide a higher dosage of these genes during fast growth or facilitate the assembly of ribosomes and transcription foci by keeping physically close the many components of these macromolecular machines. To explore this, we used novel recombineering tools to create a set of Vibrio cholerae strains in which S10-spec-α (S10), a locus bearing half of the ribosomal protein genes, was systematically relocated to alternative genomic positions. We show that the relative distance of S10 to the origin of replication tightly correlated with a reduction of S10 dosage, mRNA abundance and growth rate within these otherwise isogenic strains. Furthermore, this was accompanied by a significant reduction in the host-invasion capacity in Drosophila melanogaster. Both phenotypes were rescued in strains bearing two S10 copies highly distal to oriC, demonstrating that replication-dependent gene dosage reduction is the main mechanism behind these alterations. Hence, S10 positioning connects genome structure to cell physiology in Vibrio cholerae. Our results show experimentally for the first time that genomic positioning of genes involved in the flux of genetic information conditions global growth control and hence bacterial physiology and potentially its evolution. PMID:25875621

  14. Hypoxia Strongly Affects Mitochondrial Ribosomal Proteins and Translocases, as Shown by Quantitative Proteomics of HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Paula A; Sandvik, Joe Alexander; Arntzen, Magnus Ø; Jeppesen Edin, Nina F; Christoffersen, Stine; Krengel, Ute; Pettersen, Erik O; Thiede, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important and common characteristic of many human tumors. It is a challenge clinically due to the correlation with poor prognosis and resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. Understanding the biochemical response to hypoxia would facilitate the development of novel therapeutics for cancer treatment. Here, we investigate alterations in gene expression in response to hypoxia by quantitative proteome analysis using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in conjunction with LCMS/MS. Human HeLa cells were kept either in a hypoxic environment or under normoxic conditions. 125 proteins were found to be regulated, with maximum alteration of 18-fold. In particular, three clusters of differentially regulated proteins were identified, showing significant upregulation of glycolysis and downregulation of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and translocases. This interaction is likely orchestrated by HIF-1. We also investigated the effect of hypoxia on the cell cycle, which shows accumulation in G1 and a prolonged S phase under these conditions. Implications. This work not only improves our understanding of the response to hypoxia, but also reveals proteins important for malignant progression, which may be targeted in future therapies. PMID:26421188

  15. Re-analysis of cryoEM data on HCV IRES bound to 40S subunit of human ribosome integrated with recent structural information suggests new contact regions between ribosomal proteins and HCV RNA

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Agnel Praveen; Bhat, Prasanna; Das, Saumitra; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we combine available high resolution structural information on eukaryotic ribosomes with low resolution cryo-EM data on the Hepatitis C Viral RNA (IRES) human ribosome complex. Aided further by the prediction of RNA-protein interactions and restrained docking studies, we gain insights on their interaction at the residue level. We identified the components involved at the major and minor contact regions, and propose that there are energetically favorable local interactions between 40S ribosomal proteins and IRES domains. Domain II of the IRES interacts with ribosomal proteins S5 and S25 while the pseudoknot and the downstream domain IV region bind to ribosomal proteins S26, S28 and S5. We also provide support using UV cross-linking studies to validate our proposition of interaction between the S5 and IRES domains II and IV. We found that domain IIIe makes contact with the ribosomal protein S3a (S1e). Our model also suggests that the ribosomal protein S27 interacts with domain IIIc while S7 has a weak contact with a single base RNA bulge between junction IIIabc and IIId. The interacting residues are highly conserved among mammalian homologs while IRES RNA bases involved in contact do not show strict conservation. IRES RNA binding sites for S25 and S3a show the best conservation among related viral IRESs. The new contacts identified between ribosomal proteins and RNA are consistent with previous independent studies on RNA-binding properties of ribosomal proteins reported in literature, though information at the residue level is not available in previous studies. PMID:25268799

  16. Conserved codon composition of ribosomal protein coding genes in Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae: lessons from supervised machine learning in functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kui; Kuang, Yuyu; Joseph, Jeremiah S; Kolatkar, Prasanna R

    2002-06-01

    Genomics projects have resulted in a flood of sequence data. Functional annotation currently relies almost exclusively on inter-species sequence comparison and is restricted in cases of limited data from related species and widely divergent sequences with no known homologs. Here, we demonstrate that codon composition, a fusion of codon usage bias and amino acid composition signals, can accurately discriminate, in the absence of sequence homology information, cytoplasmic ribosomal protein genes from all other genes of known function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis using an implementation of support vector machines, SVM(light). Analysis of these codon composition signals is instructive in determining features that confer individuality to ribosomal protein genes. Each of the sets of positively charged, negatively charged and small hydrophobic residues, as well as codon bias, contribute to their distinctive codon composition profile. The representation of all these signals is sensitively detected, combined and augmented by the SVMs to perform an accurate classification. Of special mention is an obvious outlier, yeast gene RPL22B, highly homologous to RPL22A but employing very different codon usage, perhaps indicating a non-ribosomal function. Finally, we propose that codon composition be used in combination with other attributes in gene/protein classification by supervised machine learning algorithms. PMID:12034849

  17. Importance of Host Cell Arginine Uptake in Francisella Phagosomal Escape and Ribosomal Protein Amounts*

    PubMed Central

    Ramond, Elodie; Gesbert, Gael; Guerrera, Ida Chiara; Chhuon, Cerina; Dupuis, Marion; Rigard, Mélanie; Henry, Thomas; Barel, Monique; Charbit, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Upon entry into mammalian host cells, the pathogenic bacterium Francisella must import host cell arginine to multiply actively in the host cytoplasm. We identified and functionally characterized an arginine transporter (hereafter designated ArgP) whose inactivation considerably delayed bacterial phagosomal escape and intracellular multiplication. Intramacrophagic growth of the ΔargP mutant was fully restored upon supplementation of the growth medium with excess arginine, in both F. tularensis subsp. novicida and F. tularensis subsp. holarctica LVS, demonstrating the importance of arginine acquisition in these two subspecies. High-resolution mass spectrometry revealed that arginine limitation reduced the amount of most of the ribosomal proteins in the ΔargP mutant. In response to stresses such as nutritional limitation, repression of ribosomal protein synthesis has been observed in all kingdoms of life. Arginine availability may thus contribute to the sensing of the intracellular stage of the pathogen and to trigger phagosomal egress. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange database with identifier PXD001584 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001584). PMID:25616868

  18. Arabidopsis ribosomal proteins control vacuole trafficking and developmental programs through the regulation of lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruixi; Sun, Ruobai; Hicks, Glenn R.; Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2015-01-01

    The vacuole is the most prominent compartment in plant cells and is important for ion and protein storage. In our effort to search for key regulators in the plant vacuole sorting pathway, ribosomal large subunit 4 (rpl4d) was identified as a translational mutant defective in both vacuole trafficking and normal development. Polysome profiling of the rpl4d mutant showed reduction in polysome-bound mRNA compared with wild-type, but no significant change in the general mRNA distribution pattern. Ribsomal profiling data indicated that genes in the lipid metabolism pathways were translationally down-regulated in the rpl4d mutant. Live imaging studies by Nile red staining suggested that both polar and nonpolar lipid accumulation was reduced in meristem tissues of rpl4d mutants. Pharmacological evidence showed that sterol and sphingolipid biosynthetic inhibitors can phenocopy the defects of the rpl4d mutant, including an altered vacuole trafficking pattern. Genetic evidence from lipid biosynthetic mutants indicates that alteration in the metabolism of either sterol or sphingolipid biosynthesis resulted in vacuole trafficking defects, similar to the rpl4d mutant. Tissue-specific complementation with key enzymes from lipid biosynthesis pathways can partially rescue both vacuole trafficking and auxin-related developmental defects in the rpl4d mutant. These results indicate that lipid metabolism modulates auxin-mediated tissue differentiation and endomembrane trafficking pathways downstream of ribosomal protein function. PMID:25535344

  19. Structural and Functional Characterization of Ribosomal Protein Gene Introns in Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Perina, Drago; Korolija, Marina; Mikoč, Andreja; Roller, Maša; Pleše, Bruna; Imešek, Mirna; Morrow, Christine; Batel, Renato; Ćetković, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are a powerful tool for studying intron evolution. They exist in all three domains of life and are much conserved. Accumulating genomic data suggest that RPG introns in many organisms abound with non-protein-coding-RNAs (ncRNAs). These ancient ncRNAs are small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) essential for ribosome assembly. They are also mobile genetic elements and therefore probably important in diversification and enrichment of transcriptomes through various mechanisms such as intron/exon gain/loss. snoRNAs in basal metazoans are poorly characterized. We examined 449 RPG introns, in total, from four demosponges: Amphimedon queenslandica, Suberites domuncula, Suberites ficus and Suberites pagurorum and showed that RPG introns from A. queenslandica share position conservancy and some structural similarity with “higher” metazoans. Moreover, our study indicates that mobile element insertions play an important role in the evolution of their size. In four sponges 51 snoRNAs were identified. The analysis showed discrepancies between the snoRNA pools of orthologous RPG introns between S. domuncula and A. queenslandica. Furthermore, these two sponges show as much conservancy of RPG intron positions between each other as between themselves and human. Sponges from the Suberites genus show consistency in RPG intron position conservation. However, significant differences in some of the orthologous RPG introns of closely related sponges were observed. This indicates that RPG introns are dynamic even on these shorter evolutionary time scales. PMID:22880015

  20. The effect of ribosomal protein S15a in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifan; Zhang, Guangxin; Li, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background: RPS15A (Ribosomal Protein S15A) promotes mRNA/ribosome interactions in translation. It is critical for the process of eukaryotic protein biosynthesis. Recently, aberrantly expressed RPS15A was found in the hepatitis virus and in malignant tumors. However, the role of RPS15A has not been fully revealed on the development of lung cancer. Method: In this study, a Tissue Microarray (TMA) of primary lung adenocarcinoma tissue specimens was carried out. Furthermore, to further investigate the function of RPS15A in lung cancer, RPS15A-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expressing lentivirus (Lv-shRPS15A) was constructed and used to infect H1299 and A549 cells. Result: Our data showed that RPS15A expression was increased in tumor tissues. Furthermore, the knockdown of RSP15A inhibited cancer cell growth and induced apoptosis in the cancer cells. Gene expression profile microarray also revealed that the P53 signaling pathway was activated in Lv-shRPS15A-infected cancer cells. Conclusion: Taken together, our results demonstrate that RPS15A is a novel oncogene in non-small cell lung cancer and may be a potential therapeutic target in lung cancer. PMID:26989627

  1. Two distinct promoter architectures centered on dynamic nucleosomes control ribosomal protein gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Knight, Britta; Kubik, Slawomir; Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Geertz, Marcel; Martin, Victoria; Dénervaud, Nicolas; Jacquet, Philippe; Ozkan, Burak; Rougemont, Jacques; Maerkl, Sebastian J; Naef, Félix; Shore, David

    2014-08-01

    In yeast, ribosome production is controlled transcriptionally by tight coregulation of the 138 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs). RPG promoters display limited sequence homology, and the molecular basis for their coregulation remains largely unknown. Here we identify two prevalent RPG promoter types, both characterized by upstream binding of the general transcription factor (TF) Rap1 followed by the RPG-specific Fhl1/Ifh1 pair, with one type also binding the HMG-B protein Hmo1. We show that the regulatory properties of the two promoter types are remarkably similar, suggesting that they are determined to a large extent by Rap1 and the Fhl1/Ifh1 pair. Rapid depletion experiments allowed us to define a hierarchy of TF binding in which Rap1 acts as a pioneer factor required for binding of all other TFs. We also uncovered unexpected features underlying recruitment of Fhl1, whose forkhead DNA-binding domain is not required for binding at most promoters, and Hmo1, whose binding is supported by repeated motifs. Finally, we describe unusually micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-sensitive nucleosomes at all RPG promoters, located between the canonical +1 and -1 nucleosomes, which coincide with sites of Fhl1/Ifh1 and Hmo1 binding. We speculate that these "fragile" nucleosomes play an important role in regulating RPG transcriptional output. PMID:25085421

  2. Structural and functional characterization of ribosomal protein gene introns in sponges.

    PubMed

    Perina, Drago; Korolija, Marina; Mikoč, Andreja; Roller, Maša; Pleše, Bruna; Imešek, Mirna; Morrow, Christine; Batel, Renato; Ćetković, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are a powerful tool for studying intron evolution. They exist in all three domains of life and are much conserved. Accumulating genomic data suggest that RPG introns in many organisms abound with non-protein-coding-RNAs (ncRNAs). These ancient ncRNAs are small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) essential for ribosome assembly. They are also mobile genetic elements and therefore probably important in diversification and enrichment of transcriptomes through various mechanisms such as intron/exon gain/loss. snoRNAs in basal metazoans are poorly characterized. We examined 449 RPG introns, in total, from four demosponges: Amphimedon queenslandica, Suberites domuncula, Suberites ficus and Suberites pagurorum and showed that RPG introns from A. queenslandica share position conservancy and some structural similarity with "higher" metazoans. Moreover, our study indicates that mobile element insertions play an important role in the evolution of their size. In four sponges 51 snoRNAs were identified. The analysis showed discrepancies between the snoRNA pools of orthologous RPG introns between S. domuncula and A. queenslandica. Furthermore, these two sponges show as much conservancy of RPG intron positions between each other as between themselves and human. Sponges from the Suberites genus show consistency in RPG intron position conservation. However, significant differences in some of the orthologous RPG introns of closely related sponges were observed. This indicates that RPG introns are dynamic even on these shorter evolutionary time scales. PMID:22880015

  3. Bactobolin Resistance Is Conferred by Mutations in the L2 Ribosomal Protein

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Josephine R.; Truong, Thao T.; Silva, Patricia M.; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R.; Carr, Gavin; Radey, Matthew; Jacobs, Michael A.; Sims, Elizabeth H.; Clardy, Jon; Greenberg, E. Peter

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Burkholderia thailandensis produces a family of polyketide-peptide molecules called bactobolins, some of which are potent antibiotics. We found that growth of B. thailandensis at 30°C versus that at 37°C resulted in increased production of bactobolins. We purified the three most abundant bactobolins and determined their activities against a battery of bacteria and mouse fibroblasts. Two of the three compounds showed strong activities against both bacteria and fibroblasts. The third analog was much less potent in both assays. These results suggested that the target of bactobolins might be conserved across bacteria and mammalian cells. To learn about the mechanism of bactobolin activity, we isolated four spontaneous bactobolin-resistant Bacillus subtilis mutants. We used genomic sequencing technology to show that each of the four resistant variants had mutations in rplB, which codes for the 50S ribosome-associated L2 protein. Ectopic expression of a mutant rplB gene in wild-type B. subtilis conferred bactobolin resistance. Finally, the L2 mutations did not confer resistance to other antibiotics known to interfere with ribosome function. Our data indicate that bactobolins target the L2 protein or a nearby site and that this is not the target of other antibiotics. We presume that the mammalian target of bactobolins involves the eukaryotic homolog of L2 (L8e). PMID:23249812

  4. High temperature, differentiation, and endoplasmic reticulum stress decrease but epigenetic and antioxidative agents increase Aspergillus ribosomal protein gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-wide gene expression assays using next-generation sequencing techniques have allowed the identification of transcriptomes in many species. Transcript abundance of ribosomal protein (RP) genes can serve as a proxy for the capacity of general transcription and synthesis of cellular proteins tha...

  5. Plastid ribosomal protein S5 plays a critical role in photosynthesis, plant development, and cold stress tolerance in arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plastid ribosomal proteins (RPs) are essential components for protein synthesis machinery and exert diverse roles in plant growth and development. Mutations in plastid RPs lead to a range of developmental phenotypes in plants. However, how they regulate these processes is not fully understood and th...

  6. Suppression of a temperature-sensitive cdc33 mutation of yeast by a multicopy plasmid expressing a Drosophila ribosomal protein.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, C; Tam, R; Clark, M; Lee, H; Sonenberg, N; Lasko, P

    1994-05-20

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae cdc33ts4-2 mutant produces a temperature-sensitive allele of the cap-binding subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor-4F (also termed eIF-4E). From a Drosophila cDNA library constructed in a multicopy yeast shuttle vector, a clone was isolated which restored the ability to grow at elevated temperature to cdc33ts4-2 cells. The rescuing Drosophila clone encodes a small ribosomal subunit protein, which we name S15a based on its molecular weight and similarity with the Brassica napus S15a ribosomal protein. Transcription of the Drosophila gene, RpS15a, occurs at all developmental stages and is enhanced during oogenesis. The ribosomal protein gene is capable of suppressing other alleles of cdc33 but not an inactivation mutation, suggesting that suppression is dependent upon the presence of the temperature-sensitive eIF-4E protein. Supporting this, Western blot analysis shows that far more eIF-4E protein is present in cdc33 yeast cells expressing the RpS15a gene than lacking it. Levels of other unrelated proteins are unaffected. We propose therefore that the expression of high levels of the Drosophila S15a ribosomal protein in the cdc33 yeast cells leads to a selective stabilization of the temperature-sensitive eIF-4E protein, which accounts for the suppression phenomenon. PMID:8182070

  7. GIGANTUS1 (GTS1), a member of Transducin/WD40 protein superfamily, controls seed germination, growth and biomass accumulation through ribosome-biogenesis protein interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background WD40 domains have been found in a plethora of eukaryotic proteins, acting as scaffolding molecules assisting proper activity of other proteins, and are involved in multi-cellular processes. They comprise several stretches of 44-60 amino acid residues often terminating with a WD di-peptide. They act as a site of protein-protein interactions or multi-interacting platforms, driving the assembly of protein complexes or as mediators of transient interplay among other proteins. In Arabidopsis, members of WD40 protein superfamily are known as key regulators of plant-specific events, biologically playing important roles in development and also during stress signaling. Results Using reverse genetic and protein modeling approaches, we characterize GIGANTUS1 (GTS1), a new member of WD40 repeat protein in Arabidopsis thaliana and provide evidence of its role in controlling plant growth development. GTS1 is highly expressed during embryo development and negatively regulates seed germination, biomass yield and growth improvement in plants. Structural modeling analysis suggests that GTS1 folds into a β-propeller with seven pseudo symmetrically arranged blades around a central axis. Molecular docking analysis shows that GTS1 physically interacts with two ribosomal protein partners, a component of ribosome Nop16, and a ribosome-biogenesis factor L19e through β-propeller blade 4 to regulate cell growth development. Conclusions Our results indicate that GTS1 might function in plant developmental processes by regulating ribosomal structural features, activities and biogenesis in plant cells. Our results suggest that GIGANTUS1 might be a promising target to engineer transgenic plants with higher biomass and improved growth development for plant-based bioenergy production. PMID:24467952

  8. The ABC-F protein EttA gates ribosome entry into the translation elongation cycle.

    PubMed

    Boël, Grégory; Smith, Paul C; Ning, Wei; Englander, Michael T; Chen, Bo; Hashem, Yaser; Testa, Anthony J; Fischer, Jeffrey J; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Frank, Joachim; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Hunt, John F

    2014-02-01

    ABC-F proteins have evaded functional characterization even though they compose one of the most widely distributed branches of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. Herein, we demonstrate that YjjK, the most prevalent eubacterial ABC-F protein, gates ribosome entry into the translation elongation cycle through a nucleotide-dependent interaction sensitive to ATP/ADP ratio. Accordingly, we rename this protein energy-dependent translational throttle A (EttA). We determined the crystal structure of Escherichia coli EttA and used it to design mutants for biochemical studies including enzymological assays of the initial steps of protein synthesis. These studies suggest that EttA may regulate protein synthesis in energy-depleted cells, which have a low ATP/ADP ratio. Consistently with this inference, EttA-deleted cells exhibit a severe fitness defect in long-term stationary phase. These studies demonstrate that an ABC-F protein regulates protein synthesis via a new mechanism sensitive to cellular energy status. PMID:24389466

  9. The ABC-F protein EttA gates ribosome entry into the translation elongation cycle

    PubMed Central

    Boël, Grégory; Smith, Paul C.; Ning, Wei; Englander, Michael T.; Chen, Bo; Hashem, Yaser; Testa, Anthony J.; Fischer, Jeffrey J.; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Frank, Joachim; Gonzalez, Ruben L.; Hunt, John F.

    2014-01-01

    ABC-F proteins have evaded functional characterization even though they comprise one of the most widely distributed branches of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. Herein, we demonstrate that YjjK, the most prevalent eubacterial ABC-F protein, gates ribosome entry into the translation elongation cycle through a nucleotide-dependent interaction sensitive to ATP/ADP ratio. Accordingly, we rename this protein Energy-dependent Translational Throttle A (EttA). We determined the crystal structure of Escherichia coli EttA and used it to design mutants for biochemical studies, including enzymological assays of the initial steps of protein synthesis. These studies suggest that EttA may regulate protein synthesis in energy-depleted cells, which have a low ATP/ADP ratio. Consistent with this inference, ΔettA cells exhibit a severe fitness defect in long-term stationary phase. These studies demonstrate that an ABC-F protein regulates protein synthesis via a novel mechanism sensitive to cellular energy status. PMID:24389466

  10. Inhibition of HIV-1 Replication by Balsamin, a Ribosome Inactivating Protein of Momordica balsamina

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zahra; Blanchet, Fabien P.; Mangeat, Bastien; Piguet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are endowed with several medicinal properties, including antiviral activity. We demonstrate here that the recently identified type I RIP from Momordica balsamina also possesses antiviral activity, as determined by viral growth curve assays and single-round infection experiments. Importantly, this activity is at play even as doses where the RIP has no cytotoxic effect. In addition, balsamin inhibits HIV-1 replication not only in T cell lines but also in human primary CD4+ T cells. This antiviral compound exerts its activity at a viral replicative step occurring later than reverse-transcription, most likely on viral protein translation, prior to viral budding and release. Finally, we demonstrate that balsamin antiviral activity is broad since it also impedes influenza virus replication. Altogether our results demonstrate that type I RIP can exert a potent anti-HIV-1 activity which paves the way for new therapeutic avenues for the treatment of viral infections. PMID:24040067

  11. Cleavage of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by the ribosome-inactivating protein from Momordica charantia.

    PubMed

    Vinkovic, M; Dunn, G; Wood, G E; Husain, J; Wood, S P; Gill, R

    2015-09-01

    The interaction of momordin, a type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein from Momordica charantia, with NADP(+) and NADPH has been investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis of complexes generated by co-crystallization and crystal soaking. It is known that the proteins of this family readily cleave the adenine-ribose bond of adenosine and related nucleotides in the crystal, leaving the product, adenine, bound to the enzyme active site. Surprisingly, the nicotinamide-ribose bond of oxidized NADP(+) is cleaved, leaving nicotinamide bound in the active site in the same position but in a slightly different orientation to that of the five-membered ring of adenine. No binding or cleavage of NADPH was observed at pH 7.4 in these experiments. These observations are in accord with current views of the enzyme mechanism and may contribute to ongoing searches for effective inhibitors. PMID:26323301

  12. Ribosomal Stalk Protein Silencing Partially Corrects the ΔF508-CFTR Functional Expression Defect.

    PubMed

    Veit, Guido; Oliver, Kathryn; Apaja, Pirjo M; Perdomo, Doranda; Bidaud-Meynard, Aurélien; Lin, Sheng-Ting; Guo, Jingyu; Icyuz, Mert; Sorscher, Eric J; Hartman Iv, John L; Lukacs, Gergely L

    2016-05-01

    The most common cystic fibrosis (CF) causing mutation, deletion of phenylalanine 508 (ΔF508 or Phe508del), results in functional expression defect of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) at the apical plasma membrane (PM) of secretory epithelia, which is attributed to the degradation of the misfolded channel at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Deletion of phenylalanine 670 (ΔF670) in the yeast oligomycin resistance 1 gene (YOR1, an ABC transporter) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phenocopies the ΔF508-CFTR folding and trafficking defects. Genome-wide phenotypic (phenomic) analysis of the Yor1-ΔF670 biogenesis identified several modifier genes of mRNA processing and translation, which conferred oligomycin resistance to yeast. Silencing of orthologues of these candidate genes enhanced the ΔF508-CFTR functional expression at the apical PM in human CF bronchial epithelia. Although knockdown of RPL12, a component of the ribosomal stalk, attenuated the translational elongation rate, it increased the folding efficiency as well as the conformational stability of the ΔF508-CFTR, manifesting in 3-fold augmented PM density and function of the mutant. Combination of RPL12 knockdown with the corrector drug, VX-809 (lumacaftor) restored the mutant function to ~50% of the wild-type channel in primary CFTRΔF508/ΔF508 human bronchial epithelia. These results and the observation that silencing of other ribosomal stalk proteins partially rescue the loss-of-function phenotype of ΔF508-CFTR suggest that the ribosomal stalk modulates the folding efficiency of the mutant and is a potential therapeutic target for correction of the ΔF508-CFTR folding defect. PMID:27168400

  13. Ribosomal Stalk Protein Silencing Partially Corrects the ΔF508-CFTR Functional Expression Defect

    PubMed Central

    Veit, Guido; Oliver, Kathryn; Apaja, Pirjo M.; Perdomo, Doranda; Bidaud-Meynard, Aurélien; Guo, Jingyu; Icyuz, Mert; Sorscher, Eric J.; Hartman IV, John L.; Lukacs, Gergely L.

    2016-01-01

    The most common cystic fibrosis (CF) causing mutation, deletion of phenylalanine 508 (ΔF508 or Phe508del), results in functional expression defect of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) at the apical plasma membrane (PM) of secretory epithelia, which is attributed to the degradation of the misfolded channel at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Deletion of phenylalanine 670 (ΔF670) in the yeast oligomycin resistance 1 gene (YOR1, an ABC transporter) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phenocopies the ΔF508-CFTR folding and trafficking defects. Genome-wide phenotypic (phenomic) analysis of the Yor1-ΔF670 biogenesis identified several modifier genes of mRNA processing and translation, which conferred oligomycin resistance to yeast. Silencing of orthologues of these candidate genes enhanced the ΔF508-CFTR functional expression at the apical PM in human CF bronchial epithelia. Although knockdown of RPL12, a component of the ribosomal stalk, attenuated the translational elongation rate, it increased the folding efficiency as well as the conformational stability of the ΔF508-CFTR, manifesting in 3-fold augmented PM density and function of the mutant. Combination of RPL12 knockdown with the corrector drug, VX-809 (lumacaftor) restored the mutant function to ~50% of the wild-type channel in primary CFTRΔF508/ΔF508 human bronchial epithelia. These results and the observation that silencing of other ribosomal stalk proteins partially rescue the loss-of-function phenotype of ΔF508-CFTR suggest that the ribosomal stalk modulates the folding efficiency of the mutant and is a potential therapeutic target for correction of the ΔF508-CFTR folding defect. PMID:27168400

  14. Revising the Taxonomic Distribution, Origin and Evolution of Ribosome Inactivating Protein Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lapadula, Walter J.; Sánchez Puerta, María Virginia; Juri Ayub, Maximiliano

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome inactivating proteins are enzymes that depurinate a specific adenine residue in the alpha-sarcin-ricin loop of the large ribosomal RNA, being ricin and Shiga toxins the most renowned examples. They are widely distributed in plants and their presence has also been confirmed in a few bacterial species. According to this taxonomic distribution, the current model about the origin and evolution of RIP genes postulates that an ancestral RIP domain was originated in flowering plants, and later acquired by some bacteria via horizontal gene transfer. Here, we unequivocally detected the presence of RIP genes in fungi and metazoa. These findings, along with sequence and phylogenetic analyses, led us to propose an alternative, more parsimonious, hypothesis about the origin and evolutionary history of the RIP domain, where several paralogous RIP genes were already present before the three domains of life evolved. This model is in agreement with the current idea of the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) as a complex, genetically redundant organism. Differential loss of paralogous genes in descendants of LUCA, rather than multiple horizontal gene transfer events, could account for the complex pattern of RIP genes across extant species, as it has been observed for other genes. PMID:24039805

  15. Ribosomal protein mutations induce autophagy through S6 kinase inhibition of the insulin pathway.

    PubMed

    Heijnen, Harry F; van Wijk, Richard; Pereboom, Tamara C; Goos, Yvonne J; Seinen, Cor W; van Oirschot, Brigitte A; van Dooren, Rowie; Gastou, Marc; Giles, Rachel H; van Solinge, Wouter; Kuijpers, Taco W; Gazda, Hanna T; Bierings, Marc B; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W

    2014-01-01

    Mutations affecting the ribosome lead to several diseases known as ribosomopathies, with phenotypes that include growth defects, cytopenia, and bone marrow failure. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), for example, is a pure red cell aplasia linked to the mutation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes. Here we show the knock-down of the DBA-linked RPS19 gene induces the cellular self-digestion process of autophagy, a pathway critical for proper hematopoiesis. We also observe an increase of autophagy in cells derived from DBA patients, in CD34+ erythrocyte progenitor cells with RPS19 knock down, in the red blood cells of zebrafish embryos with RP-deficiency, and in cells from patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS). The loss of RPs in all these models results in a marked increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation that we find is triggered by an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). We show that this increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation inhibits the insulin pathway and AKT phosphorylation activity through a mechanism reminiscent of insulin resistance. While stimulating RP-deficient cells with insulin reduces autophagy, antioxidant treatment reduces S6 kinase phosphorylation, autophagy, and stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor. Our data suggest that RP loss promotes the aberrant activation of both S6 kinase and p53 by increasing intracellular ROS levels. The deregulation of these signaling pathways is likely playing a major role in the pathophysiology of ribosomopathies. PMID:24875531

  16. Human ribosomal protein L9 is a Bax suppressor that promotes cell survival in yeast.

    PubMed

    Eid, Rawan; Sheibani, Sara; Gharib, Nada; Lapointe, Jason F; Horowitz, Avital; Vali, Hojatollah; Mandato, Craig A; Greenwood, Michael T

    2014-05-01

    The identification of a human ribosomal protein L9 (hRPL9) cDNA as a sequence capable of suppressing the lethal effects of heterologously expressed murine Bax in yeast led us to investigate its antiapoptotic potential. Using growth and viability assays, we show that yeast cells heterologously expressing hRPL9 are resistant to the growth inhibitory and lethal effects of exogenously supplied copper, indicating that it has pro-survival properties. To explore potential mechanisms, we used yeast mutants defective in all three types of programmed cell death (apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy). The ability to retain pro-survival function in all the mutants suggests that hRPL9 may regulate a common pro-death process. In contrast, the yeast RPL9 orthologues, RPL9A and RPL9B, have opposite effects when overexpressed in yeast. In effect, instead of showing resistance to stress, RPL9A and RPL9B overexpressing cells show reduced cell growth. Further analysis indicates that the effects of overexpressed RPL9A and RPL9B are not in themselves lethal, instead, they serve to increase cell doubling time. Thus, yeast RPL9s are more representative of RPs whose extra-ribosomal function is similar to that of tumor suppressors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that RPL9 represents a species- and sequence-specific regulator of cell growth and survival. PMID:24305165

  17. Reduced expression of ribosomal proteins relieves microRNA-mediated repression.

    PubMed

    Janas, Maja M; Wang, Eric; Love, Tara; Harris, Abigail S; Stevenson, Kristen; Semmelmann, Karlheinz; Shaffer, Jonathan M; Chen, Po-Hao; Doench, John G; Yerramilli, Subrahmanyam V B K; Neuberg, Donna S; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Housman, David E; Burge, Christopher B; Novina, Carl D

    2012-04-27

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate physiological and pathological processes by inducing posttranscriptional repression of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) via incompletely understood mechanisms. To discover factors required for human miRNA activity, we performed an RNAi screen using a reporter cell line of miRNA-mediated repression of translation initiation. We report that reduced expression of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) dissociated miRNA complexes from target mRNAs, leading to increased polysome association, translation, and stability of miRNA-targeted mRNAs relative to untargeted mRNAs. RNA sequencing of polysomes indicated substantial overlap in sets of genes exhibiting increased or decreased polysomal association after Argonaute or RPG knockdowns, suggesting similarity in affected pathways. miRNA profiling of monosomes and polysomes demonstrated that miRNAs cosediment with ribosomes. RPG knockdowns decreased miRNAs in monosomes and increased their target mRNAs in polysomes. Our data show that most miRNAs repress translation and that the levels of RPGs modulate miRNA-mediated repression of translation initiation. PMID:22541556

  18. The methyltransferase adaptor protein Trm112 is involved in biogenesis of both ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Sardana, Richa; Johnson, Arlen W.

    2012-01-01

    We previously identified Bud23 as the methyltransferase that methylates G1575 of rRNA in the P-site of the small (40S) ribosomal subunit. In this paper, we show that Bud23 requires the methyltransferase adaptor protein Trm112 for stability in vivo. Deletion of Trm112 results in a bud23Δ-like mutant phenotype. Thus Trm112 is required for efficient small-subunit biogenesis. Genetic analysis suggests the slow growth of a trm112Δ mutant is due primarily to the loss of Bud23. Surprisingly, suppression of the bud23Δ-dependent 40S defect revealed a large (60S) biogenesis defect in a trm112Δ mutant. Using sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis and coimmunoprecipitation, we show that Trm112 is also involved in 60S subunit biogenesis. The 60S defect may be dependent on Nop2 and Rcm1, two additional Trm112 interactors that we identify. Our work extends the known range of Trm112 function from modification of tRNAs and translation factors to both ribosomal subunits, showing that its effects span all aspects of the translation machinery. Although Trm112 is required for Bud23 stability, our results suggest that Trm112 is not maintained in a stable complex with Bud23. We suggest that Trm112 stabilizes its free methyltransferase partners not engaged with substrate and/or helps to deliver its methyltransferase partners to their substrates. PMID:22956767

  19. Fibroblast growth factor 3, a protein with a dual subcellular fate, is interacting with human ribosomal protein S2

    SciTech Connect

    Antoine, Marianne; Reimers, Kerstin; Wirz, Werner; Gressner, Axel M.; Mueller, Robert; Kiefer, Paul . E-mail: pkiefer@ukaachen.de

    2005-12-16

    The secreted isoform of fibroblast growth factor 3 (FGF3) induces a mitogenic cell response, while the nuclear form inhibits cell proliferation. Recently, we identified a nucleolar FGF3-binding protein which is implicated in processing of pre-rRNA as a possible target of nuclear FGF3 signalling. Here, we report a second candidate protein identified by a yeast two-hybrid screen for nuclear FGF3 action, ribosomal protein S2, rpS2. Recombinant rpS2 binds to in vitro translated FGF3 and to nuclear FGF3 extracted from transfected COS-1 cells. Characterization of the FGF3 binding domain of rpS2 showed that both the Arg-Gly-rich N-terminal region and a short carboxyl-terminal sequence of rpS2 are necessary for FGF3 binding. Mapping the S2 binding domains of FGF3 revealed that these domains are important for both NoBP and rpS2 interaction. Transient co-expression of rpS2 and nuclear FGF3 resulted in a reduced nucleolar localization of the FGF. These findings suggest that the nuclear form of FGF3 inhibits cell proliferation by interfering with ribosomal biogenesis.

  20. Overexpression, purification, and pharmacologic evaluation of anticancer activity of ribosomal protein L24 from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Hou, Y L; Ding, X; Hou, W; Song, B; Wang, T; Wang, F; Li, J; Zhong, J; Xu, T; Ma, B X; Zhu, H Q; Li, J H; Zhong, J C

    2013-01-01

    The ribosomal protein L24 (RPL24) belongs to the L24E family of ribosomal proteins and is located in the cytoplasm. The purpose of this study was to investigate the structure and anti-cancer function of RPL24 of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). The complementary DNA of RPL24 was cloned successfully using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technology. We constructed a recombinant expression vector containing RPL24 complementary DNA and overexpressed it in Escherichia coli using pET28a plasmids. The expression product obtained was purified using Ni-chelating affinity chromatography. The results indicated that the length of the fragment cloned is 509 bp, and it contains an open-reading frame of 474 bp encoding 157 amino acids. Primary structure analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the putative RPL24 protein is 17.78 kDa with a theoretical isoelectric point of 11.86. The RPL24 gene is readily expressed in E. coli, and the RPL24 fused with the N-terminal histidine-tagged protein to give rise to the accumulation of an expected 23.51-kDa polypeptide. The inhibitory rate in mice treated with 0.1 mg/mL RPL24, the highest of 3 doses administered, can reach 67.662%, which may be comparable to the response to mannatide. The histology of organs with tumors showed that the tissues in the RPL24 group displayed a looser arrangement compared with that in the control group. Furthermore, no obvious damage was apparent in other organs, such as heart, lung, and kidney. The data showed that the recombinant RPL24 had time and dose dependency on the cell growth inhibition rate. Human laryngeal carcinoma Hep-2 cells treated with 0.3125-10 µg/mL RPL24 for 24 h displayed significant cell growth inhibition (P < 0.05; N = 6) in assays using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol- 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide compared with that in control (untreated) cells. By contrast, human hepatoma Hep G-2 cells displayed no significant change (P > 0.05; N = 6) from control

  1. Translation Inhibition of Capped and Uncapped Viral RNAs Mediated by Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins.

    PubMed

    Vivanco, Jorge M; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2003-05-01

    ABSTRACT Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are N-glycosidases that remove specific purine residues from the sarcin/ricin (S/R) loop of the large rRNA and arrest protein synthesis at the translocation step. In addition to their enzymatic activity, RIPs have been reputed to be potent antiviral agents against many plant, animal, and human viruses. We recently showed that pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), an RIP from pokeweed, inhibits translation in cell extracts by binding to the cap structure of eukaryotic mRNA and viral RNAs and depurinating these RNAs at multiple sites downstream of the cap structure. In this study, we examined the activity of three different RIPs against capped and uncapped viral RNAs. PAP, Mirabilis expansa RIP (ME1), and the Saponaria officinalis RIP (saporin) depurinated the capped Tobacco mosaic virus and Brome mosaic virus RNAs, but did not depurinate the uncapped luciferase RNA, indicating that other type I RIPs besides PAP can distinguish between capped and uncapped RNAs. We did not detect depurination of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNAs at multiple sites by PAP or ME1. Because AMV RNAs are capped, these results indicate that recognition of the cap structure alone is not sufficient for depurination of the RNA at multiple sites throughout its sequence. Furthermore, PAP did not cause detectable depurination of uncapped RNAs from Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), Satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV), and uncapped RNA containing poliovirus internal ribosome entry site (IRES). However, in vitro translation experiments showed that PAP inhibited translation of AMV, TBSV, SPMV RNAs, and poliovirus IRES dependent translation. These results demonstrate that PAP does not depurinate every capped RNA and that PAP can inhibit translation of uncapped viral RNAs in vitro without causing detectable depurination at multiple sites. Thus, the cap structure is not the only determinant for inhibition of translation by PAP. PMID:18942981

  2. Characterization of Two Novel Type I Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins from the Storage Roots of the Andean Crop Mirabilis expansa1

    PubMed Central

    Vivanco, Jorge M.; Savary, Brett J.; Flores, Hector E.

    1999-01-01

    Two novel type I ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were found in the storage roots of Mirabilis expansa, an underutilized Andean root crop. The two RIPs, named ME1 and ME2, were purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation, cation-exchange perfusion chromatography, and C4 reverse-phase chromatography. The two proteins were found to be similar in size (27 and 27.5 kD) by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and their isoelectric points were determined to be greater than pH 10.0. Amino acid N-terminal sequencing revealed that both ME1 and ME2 had conserved residues characteristic of RIPs. Amino acid composition and western-blot analysis further suggested a structural similarity between ME1 and ME2. ME2 showed high similarity to the Mirabilis jalapa antiviral protein, a type I RIP. Depurination of yeast 26S rRNA by ME1 and ME2 demonstrated their ribosome-inactivating activity. Because these two proteins were isolated from roots, their antimicrobial activity was tested against root-rot microorganisms, among others. ME1 and ME2 were active against several fungi, including Pythium irregulare, Fusarium oxysporum solani, Alternaria solani, Trichoderma reesei, and Trichoderma harzianum, and an additive antifungal effect of ME1 and ME2 was observed. Antibacterial activity of both ME1 and ME2 was observed against Pseudomonas syringae, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Agrobacterium radiobacter, and others. PMID:10198104

  3. La Autoantigen Induces Ribosome Binding Protein 1 (RRBP1) Expression through Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES)-Mediated Translation during Cellular Stress Condition.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenqing; Li, Qi; Zhu, Ruiyu; Jin, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The function of ribosome binding protein 1 (RRBP1) is regulating the transportation and secretion of some intracellular proteins in mammalian cells. Transcription of RRBP1 is induced by various cytokines. However, few studies focused on the process of RRPB1 mRNA translation. The RRBP1 mRNA has a long 5' untranslated region that potentially formed a stable secondary structure. In this study, we show that the 5' UTR of RRBP1 mRNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Moreover, the RRBP1 expression is induced by chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel or adriamycin in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and accompanied with the increased expression of La autoantigen (La), which binds to RRBP1 IRES element and facilitates translation initiation. Interestingly, we found IRES-mediated RRBP1 translation is also activated during serum-starvation condition which can induce cytoplasmic localization of La. After mapping the entire RRBP1 5' UTR, we determine the core IRES activity is located between nt-237 and -58. Furthermore, two apical GARR loops within the functional RRBP1 IRES elements may be important for La binding. These results strongly suggest an important role for IRES-dependent translation of RRBP1 mRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma cells during cellular stress conditions. PMID:27447629

  4. Ribosomal protein S7 from Escherichia coli uses the same determinants to bind 16S ribosomal RNA and its messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Francis; Brakier-Gingras, Léa

    2001-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S7 from Escherichia coli binds to the lower half of the 3′ major domain of 16S rRNA and initiates its folding. It also binds to its own mRNA, the str mRNA, and represses its translation. Using filter binding assays, we show in this study that the same mutations that interfere with S7 binding to 16S rRNA also weaken its affinity for its mRNA. This suggests that the same protein regions are responsible for mRNA and rRNA binding affinities, and that S7 recognizes identical sequence elements within the two RNA targets, although they have dissimilar secondary structures. Overexpression of S7 is known to inhibit bacterial growth. This phenotypic growth defect was relieved in cells overexpressing S7 mutants that bind poorly the str mRNA, confirming that growth impairment is controlled by the binding of S7 to its mRNA. Interestingly, a mutant with a short deletion at the C-terminus of S7 was more detrimental to cell growth than wild-type S7. This suggests that the C-terminal portion of S7 plays an important role in ribosome function, which is perturbed by the deletion. PMID:11160889

  5. Late-assembly of human ribosomal protein S20 in the cytoplasm is essential for the functioning of the small subunit ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Lin-Ru; Chou, Chang-Wei; Wu, Jing-Ying; Kirby, Ralph; Lin, Alan

    2013-11-15

    Using immuno-fluorescent probing and Western blotting analysis, we reveal the exclusive cytoplasm nature of the small subunit ribosomal protein S20. To illustrate the importance of the cellular compartmentation of S20 to the function of small subunit 40S, we created a nuclear resident S20{sub NLS} mutant gene and examined polysome profile of cells that had been transfected with the S20{sub NLS} gene. As a result, we observed the formation of recombinant 40S carried S20{sub NLS} but this recombinant 40S was never found in the polysome, suggesting such a recombinant 40S was translation incompetent. Moreover, by the tactic of the energy depletion and restoration, we were able to restrain the nuclear-resided S20{sub NLS} in the cytoplasm. Yet, along a progressive energy restoration, we observed the presence of recombinant 40S subunits carrying the S20{sub NLS} in the polysome. This proves that S20 needs to be cytoplasmic in order to make a functional 40S subunit. Furthermore, it also implies that the assembly order of ribosomal protein in eukaryote is orderly regulated. - Highlights: • The step of S20 assembled on 40S is happened in the cytoplasm. • A small subunit assembled with a nuclear S20{sub NLS} is translational incompetence. • Using energy depletion and recovery to manipulate the cellular compartment of S20{sub NLS}. • Cytoplasm-retained S20{sub NLS} is crucial for creating a functional small subunit.

  6. La Autoantigen Induces Ribosome Binding Protein 1 (RRBP1) Expression through Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES)-Mediated Translation during Cellular Stress Condition

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wenqing; Li, Qi; Zhu, Ruiyu; Jin, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The function of ribosome binding protein 1 (RRBP1) is regulating the transportation and secretion of some intracellular proteins in mammalian cells. Transcription of RRBP1 is induced by various cytokines. However, few studies focused on the process of RRPB1 mRNA translation. The RRBP1 mRNA has a long 5′ untranslated region that potentially formed a stable secondary structure. In this study, we show that the 5′ UTR of RRBP1 mRNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Moreover, the RRBP1 expression is induced by chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel or adriamycin in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and accompanied with the increased expression of La autoantigen (La), which binds to RRBP1 IRES element and facilitates translation initiation. Interestingly, we found IRES-mediated RRBP1 translation is also activated during serum-starvation condition which can induce cytoplasmic localization of La. After mapping the entire RRBP1 5′ UTR, we determine the core IRES activity is located between nt-237 and -58. Furthermore, two apical GARR loops within the functional RRBP1 IRES elements may be important for La binding. These results strongly suggest an important role for IRES-dependent translation of RRBP1 mRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma cells during cellular stress conditions. PMID:27447629

  7. Protein costs do not explain evolution of metabolic strategies and regulation of ribosomal content: does protein investment explain an anaerobic bacterial Crabtree effect?

    PubMed

    Goel, Anisha; Eckhardt, Thomas H; Puri, Pranav; de Jong, Anne; Branco Dos Santos, Filipe; Giera, Martin; Fusetti, Fabrizia; de Vos, Willem M; Kok, Jan; Poolman, Bert; Molenaar, Douwe; Kuipers, Oscar P; Teusink, Bas

    2015-07-01

    Protein investment costs are considered a major driver for the choice of alternative metabolic strategies. We tested this premise in Lactococcus lactis, a bacterium that exhibits a distinct, anaerobic version of the bacterial Crabtree/Warburg effect; with increasing growth rates it shifts from a high yield metabolic mode [mixed-acid fermentation; 3 adenosine triphosphate (ATP) per glucose] to a low yield metabolic mode (homolactic fermentation; 2 ATP per glucose). We studied growth rate-dependent relative transcription and protein ratios, enzyme activities, and fluxes of L. lactis in glucose-limited chemostats, providing a high-quality and comprehensive data set. A three- to fourfold higher growth rate rerouted metabolism from acetate to lactate as the main fermentation product. However, we observed hardly any changes in transcription, protein levels and enzyme activities. Even levels of ribosomal proteins, constituting a major investment in cellular machinery, changed only slightly. Thus, contrary to the original hypothesis, central metabolism in this organism appears to be hardly regulated at the level of gene expression, but rather at the metabolic level. We conclude that L. lactis is either poorly adapted to growth at low and constant glucose concentrations, or that protein costs play a less important role in fitness than hitherto assumed. PMID:25828364

  8. Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation in the Nervous System: From Regulation to Function

    PubMed Central

    Biever, Anne; Valjent, Emmanuel; Puighermanal, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the phosphorylation of the 40S ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) about four decades ago, much effort has been made to uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of this post-translational modification. In the field of neuroscience, rpS6 phosphorylation is commonly used as a readout of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling activation or as a marker for neuronal activity. Nevertheless, its biological role in neurons still remains puzzling. Here we review the pharmacological and physiological stimuli regulating this modification in the nervous system as well as the pathways that transduce these signals into rpS6 phosphorylation. Altered rpS6 phosphorylation observed in various genetic and pathophysiological mouse models is also discussed. Finally, we examine the current state of knowledge on the physiological role of this post-translational modification and highlight the questions that remain to be addressed. PMID:26733799

  9. Arabidopsis ribosomal proteins control developmental programs through translational regulation of auxin response factors

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Abel; Li, Ruixi; van de Ven, Wilhelmina; Hsu, Emily; Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2012-01-01

    Upstream ORFs are elements found in the 5′-leader sequences of specific mRNAs that modulate the translation of downstream ORFs encoding major gene products. In Arabidopsis, the translational control of auxin response factors (ARFs) by upstream ORFs has been proposed as a regulatory mechanism required to respond properly to complex auxin-signaling inputs. In this study, we identify and characterize the aberrant auxin responses in specific ribosomal protein mutants in which multiple ARF transcription factors are simultaneously repressed at the translational level. This characteristic lends itself to the use of these mutants as genetic tools to bypass the genetic redundancy among members of the ARF family in Arabidopsis. Using this approach, we were able to assign unique functions for ARF2, ARF3, and ARF6 in plant development. PMID:23144218

  10. Analysis of the Linker Region Joining the Adenylation and Carrier Protein Domains of the Modular Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Bradley R.; Sundlov, Jesse A.; Drake, Eric J.; Makin, Thomas A.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetases (NRPSs) are multi-modular proteins capable of producing important peptide natural products. Using an assembly-line process the amino acid substrate and peptide intermediates are passed between the active sites of different catalytic domains of the NRPS while bound covalently to a peptidyl carrier protein (PCP) domain. Examination of the linker sequences that join the NRPS adenylation and PCP domains identified several conserved proline residues that are not found in standalone adenylation domains. We examined the roles of these proline residues and neighboring conserved sequences through mutagenesis and biochemical analysis of the reaction catalyzed by the adenylation domain and the fully reconstituted NRPS pathway. In particular, we identified a conserved LPxP motif at the start of the adenylation-PCP linker. The LPxP motif interacts with a region on the adenylation domain to stabilize a critical catalytic lysine residue belonging to the A10 motif that immediately precedes the linker. Further, this interaction with the C-terminal sub-domain of the adenylation domain may coordinate movement of the PCP with the conformational change of the adenylation domain. Through this work, we extend the conserved A10 motif of the adenylation domain and identify residues that enable proper adenylation domain function. PMID:24975514

  11. Ubiquitous Autofragmentation of Fluorescent Proteins Creates Abundant Defective Ribosomal Products (DRiPs) for Immunosurveillance.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiajie; Gibbs, James S; Hickman, Heather D; Cush, Stephanie S; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W

    2015-06-26

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and other fluorescent proteins are essential tools for biological research. When fused to peptides or proteins as a reporter, GFP enables localization and quantitation of gene products in otherwise unmanipulated live cells or organisms. We previously reported that a sizable fraction of nascent GFP is post-translationally converted into a 20-kDa Triton X-100-insoluble proteasome substrate (Qian, S. B., Princiotta, M. F., Bennink, J. R., and Yewdell, J. W. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 392-400; Dolan, B. P., Li, L., Veltri, C. A., Ireland, C. M., Bennink, J. R., and Yewdell, J. W. (2011) J. Immunol. 186, 2065-2072). Here, we show that a similarly sized fragment is generated by all GFP and red fluorescent protein family members we examined. We demonstrate that fragmentation is a by-product of GFP chromophore rearrangement. A non-rearranging GFP mutant fails to fragment and generates diminished levels of K(b)-SIINFEKL complexes when SIINFEKL is genetically fused to either the C- or N-terminal domains of GFP fusion proteins. Instructively, another fragmenting GFP mutant that cannot create the functional chromophore but still generates fragments also demonstrates diminished K(b)-SIINFEKL generation. However, the mutant and wild-type fragments differ fundamentally in that wild-type fragments are rapidly liberated from the intact molecule and degraded quickly, accounting for increased K(b)-SIINFEKL generation. In the fragmenting mutant, the fragments are generated slowly and remain associated, likely in a native conformation based on their original structural description (Barondeau, D. P., Kassmann, C. J., Tainer, J. A., and Getzoff, E. D. (2006) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128, 4685-4693). The wild-type GFP fragments represent the first biochemically defined natural defective ribosomal products to contribute peptides for immunosurveillance, enabling quantitation of peptide generation efficiency from this source of defective ribosomal products. More

  12. Ubiquitous Autofragmentation of Fluorescent Proteins Creates Abundant Defective Ribosomal Products (DRiPs) for Immunosurveillance*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jiajie; Gibbs, James S.; Hickman, Heather D.; Cush, Stephanie S.; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and other fluorescent proteins are essential tools for biological research. When fused to peptides or proteins as a reporter, GFP enables localization and quantitation of gene products in otherwise unmanipulated live cells or organisms. We previously reported that a sizable fraction of nascent GFP is post-translationally converted into a 20-kDa Triton X-100-insoluble proteasome substrate (Qian, S. B., Princiotta, M. F., Bennink, J. R., and Yewdell, J. W. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 392–400; Dolan, B. P., Li, L., Veltri, C. A., Ireland, C. M., Bennink, J. R., and Yewdell, J. W. (2011) J. Immunol. 186, 2065–2072). Here, we show that a similarly sized fragment is generated by all GFP and red fluorescent protein family members we examined. We demonstrate that fragmentation is a by-product of GFP chromophore rearrangement. A non-rearranging GFP mutant fails to fragment and generates diminished levels of Kb-SIINFEKL complexes when SIINFEKL is genetically fused to either the C- or N-terminal domains of GFP fusion proteins. Instructively, another fragmenting GFP mutant that cannot create the functional chromophore but still generates fragments also demonstrates diminished Kb-SIINFEKL generation. However, the mutant and wild-type fragments differ fundamentally in that wild-type fragments are rapidly liberated from the intact molecule and degraded quickly, accounting for increased Kb-SIINFEKL generation. In the fragmenting mutant, the fragments are generated slowly and remain associated, likely in a native conformation based on their original structural description (Barondeau, D. P., Kassmann, C. J., Tainer, J. A., and Getzoff, E. D. (2006) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128, 4685–4693). The wild-type GFP fragments represent the first biochemically defined natural defective ribosomal products to contribute peptides for immunosurveillance, enabling quantitation of peptide generation efficiency from this source of defective ribosomal products. More

  13. Translational machinery of the chaetognath Spadella cephaloptera: a transcriptomic approach to the analysis of cytosolic ribosomal protein genes and their expression

    PubMed Central

    Barthélémy, Roxane M; Chenuil, Anne; Blanquart, Samuel; Casanova, Jean-Paul; Faure, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Background Chaetognaths, or arrow worms, are small marine, bilaterally symmetrical metazoans. The objective of this study was to analyse ribosomal protein (RP) coding sequences from a published collection of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from a chaetognath (Spadella cephaloptera) and to use them in phylogenetic studies. Results This analysis has allowed us to determine the complete primary structures of 23 out of 32 RPs from the small ribosomal subunit (SSU) and 32 out of 47 RPs from the large ribosomal subunit (LSU). Ten proteins are partially determined and 14 proteins are missing. Phylogenetic analyses of concatenated RPs from six animals (chaetognath, echinoderm, mammalian, insect, mollusc and sponge) and one fungal taxa do not resolve the chaetognath phylogenetic position, although each mega-sequence comprises approximately 5,000 amino acid residues. This is probably due to the extremely biased base composition and to the high evolutionary rates in chaetognaths. However, the analysis of chaetognath RP genes revealed three unique features in the animal Kingdom. First, whereas generally in animals one RP appeared to have a single type of mRNA, two or more genes are generally transcribed for one RP type in chaetognath. Second, cDNAs with complete 5'-ends encoding a given protein sequence can be divided in two sub-groups according to a short region in their 5'-ends: two novel and highly conserved elements have been identified (5'-TAATTGAGTAGTTT-3' and 5'-TATTAAGTACTAC-3') which could correspond to different transcription factor binding sites on paralog RP genes. And, third, the overall number of deduced paralogous RPs is very high compared to those published for other animals. Conclusion These results suggest that in chaetognaths the deleterious effects of the presence of paralogous RPs, such as apoptosis or cancer are avoided, and also that in each protein family, some of the members could have tissue-specific and extra-ribosomal functions. These results are

  14. Synaptic activation of ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation occurs locally in activated dendritic domains.

    PubMed

    Pirbhoy, Patricia Salgado; Farris, Shannon; Steward, Oswald

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) induces phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) in postsynaptic neurons, but the functional significance of rpS6 phosphorylation is poorly understood. Here, we show that synaptic stimulation that induces perforant path LTP triggers phosphorylation of rpS6 (p-rpS6) locally near active synapses. Using antibodies specific for phosphorylation at different sites (ser235/236 versus ser240/244), we show that strong synaptic activation led to dramatic increases in immunostaining throughout postsynaptic neurons with selectively higher staining for p-ser235/236 in the activated dendritic lamina. Following LTP induction, phosphorylation at ser235/236 was detectable by 5 min, peaked at 30 min, and was maintained for hours. Phosphorylation at both sites was completely blocked by local infusion of the NMDA receptor antagonist, APV. Despite robust induction of p-rpS6 following high frequency stimulation, assessment of protein synthesis by autoradiography revealed no detectable increases. Exploration of a novel environment led to increases in the number of p-rpS6-positive neurons throughout the forebrain in a pattern reminiscent of immediate early gene induction and many individual neurons that were p-rpS6-positive coexpressed Arc protein. Our results constrain hypotheses about the possible role of rpS6 phosphorylation in regulating postsynaptic protein synthesis during induction of synaptic plasticity. PMID:27194793

  15. Mutation of the rice ASL2 gene encoding plastid ribosomal protein L21 causes chloroplast developmental defects and seedling death.

    PubMed

    Lin, D; Jiang, Q; Zheng, K; Chen, S; Zhou, H; Gong, X; Xu, J; Teng, S; Dong, Y

    2015-05-01

    The plastid ribosome proteins (PRPs) play important roles in plastid protein biosynthesis, chloroplast differentiation and early chloroplast development. However, the specialised functions of individual protein components of the chloroplast ribosome in rice (Oryza sativa) remain unresolved. In this paper, we identified a novel rice PRP mutant named asl2 (Albino seedling lethality 2) exhibiting an albino, seedling death phenotype. In asl2 mutants, the alteration of leaf colour was associated with chlorophyll (Chl) content and abnormal chloroplast development. Through map-based cloning and complementation, the mutated ASL2 gene was isolated and found to encode the chloroplast 50S ribosome protein L21 (RPL21c), a component of the chloroplast ribosome large subunit, which was localised in chloroplasts. ASL2 was expressed at a higher level in the plumule and leaves, implying its tissue-specific expression. Additionally, the expression of ASL2 was regulated by light. The transcript levels of the majority of genes for Chl biosynthesis, photosynthesis and chloroplast development were strongly affected in asl2 mutants. Collectively, the absence of functional ASL2 caused chloroplast developmental defects and seedling death. This report establishes the important role of RPL21c in chloroplast development in rice. PMID:25280352

  16. Pokeweed antiviral protein depurinates the sarcin/ricin loop of the rRNA prior to binding of aminoacyl-tRNA to the ribosomal A-site

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Sheila; Nourollahzadeh, Emad; Hudak, Katalin A.

    2006-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins, such as the pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), inhibit translation by depurinating the conserved sarcin/ricin loop of the large ribosomal RNA. Depurinated ribosomes are unable to bind elongation factor 2, and, thus, the translocation step of the elongation cycle is inhibited. Though the consequences of depurination are well characterized, the ribosome conformation required for depurination to take place has not been described. In this report, we correlate biochemical and genetic data to conclude that pokeweed antiviral protein depurinates the sarcin/ricin loop when the A-site of the ribosomal peptidyl-transferase center is unoccupied. We show that prior incubation of ribosomes with puromycin, an analog of the 3′-terminus of aminoacyl-tRNA, inhibits both binding and depurination by PAP in a concentration-dependent manner. Expression of PAP in the yeast strain mak8-1 results in little depurination unless the cells are lysed, a process that would promote loss of aminoacyl-tRNA from the ribosome. The mak8-1 strain is known to exhibit a higher affinity for aminoacyl-tRNA compared with wild-type cells, and therefore, its ribosomes are more resistant to PAP in vivo. These data contribute to the mechanism of action of pokeweed antiviral protein; specifically, they have uncovered the ribosomal conformation required for depurination that leads to subsequent translation inhibition. PMID:16888324

  17. DNA sequence analysis of a 10 624 bp fragment of the left arm of chromosome XV from Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals a RNA binding protein, a mitochondrial protein, two ribosomal proteins and two new open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, M J; Gamo, F J; Gancedo, C

    1996-09-01

    We have determined the sequence of a 10624 bp DNA segment located in the left arm of chromosome XV of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The sequence contains eight open reading frames (ORFs) longer than 100 amino acids. Two of them do not present significant homology with sequences found in the databases. The product of ORF o0553 is identical to the protein encoded by the gene SMF1. Internal to it there is another ORF, o0555 that is apparently expressed. The proteins encoded by ORFs o0559 and o0565 are identical to ribosomal proteins S19.e and L18 respectively. ORF o0550 encodes a protein with an RNA binding signature including RNP motifs and stretches rich in asparagine, glutamine and arginine. PMID:8896268

  18. Comparative proteomic analysis of the silkworm middle silk gland reveals the importance of ribosome biogenesis in silk protein production.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-ying; Ye, Lu-peng; Che, Jia-qian; Song, Jia; You, Zheng-ying; Yun, Ki-chan; Wang, Shao-hua; Zhong, Bo-xiong

    2015-08-01

    The silkworm middle silk gland (MSG) is the sericin synthesis and secretion unique sub-organ. The molecular mechanisms of regulating MSG protein synthesis are largely unknown. Here, we performed shotgun proteomic analysis on the three MSG subsections: the anterior (MSG-A), middle (MSG-M), and posterior (MSG-P) regions. The results showed that more strongly expressed proteins in the MSG-A were involved in multiple processes, such as silk gland development and silk protein protection. The proteins that were highly expressed in the MSG-M were enriched in the ribosome pathway. MSG-P proteins with stronger expression were mainly involved in the oxidative phosphorylation and citrate cycle pathways. These results suggest that the MSG-M is the most active region in the sericin synthesis. Furthermore, comparing the proteome of the MSG with the posterior silk gland (PSG) revealed that the specific and highly expressed proteins in the MSG were primarily involved in the ribosome and aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis pathways. These results indicate that silk protein synthesis is much more active as a result of the enhancement of translation-related pathways in the MSG. These results also suggest that enhancing ribosome biogenesis is important to the efficient synthesis of silk proteins. PMID:26051239

  19. Mice with a Mutation in the Mdm2 Gene That Interferes with MDM2/Ribosomal Protein Binding Develop a Defect in Erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Kamio, Takuya; Gu, Bai-wei; Olson, Timothy S.; Zhang, Yanping; Mason, Philip J.; Bessler, Monica

    2016-01-01

    MDM2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is an important negative regulator of tumor suppressor p53. In turn the Mdm2 gene is a transcriptional target of p53, forming a negative feedback loop that is important in cell cycle control. It has recently become apparent that the ubiquitination of p53 by MDM2 can be inhibited when certain ribosomal proteins, including RPL5 and RPL11, bind to MDM2. This inhibition, and the resulting increase in p53 levels has been proposed to be responsible for the red cell aplasia seen in Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) and in 5q- myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). DBA and 5q- MDS are associated with inherited (DBA) or acquired (5q- MDS) haploinsufficiency of ribosomal proteins. A mutation in Mdm2 causing a C305F amino acid substitution blocks the binding of ribosomal proteins. Mice harboring this mutation (Mdm2C305F), retain a normal p53 response to DNA damage, but lack the p53 response to perturbations in ribosome biogenesis. While studying the interaction between RP haploinsufficiency and the Mdm2C305F mutation we noticed that Mdm2C305F homozygous mice had altered hematopoiesis. These mice developed a mild macrocytic anemia with reticulocytosis. In the bone marrow (BM), these mice showed a significant decrease in Ter119hi cells compared to wild type (WT) littermates, while no decrease in the number of mature erythroid cells (Ter119hiCD71low) was found in the spleen, which showed compensated bone marrow hematopoiesis. In methylcellulose cultures, BFU-E colonies from the mutant mice were slightly reduced in number and there was a significant reduction in CFU-E colony numbers in mutant mice compared with WT controls (p < 0.01). This erythropoietic defect was abrogated by concomitant p53 deficiency (Trp53ko/ko). Further investigation revealed that in Mdm2C305F animals, there was a decrease in Lin-Sca-1+c-Kit+ (LSK) cells, accompanied by significant decreases in multipotent progenitor (MPP) cells (p < 0.01). Competitive BM repopulation experiments showed

  20. Mice with a Mutation in the Mdm2 Gene That Interferes with MDM2/Ribosomal Protein Binding Develop a Defect in Erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Kamio, Takuya; Gu, Bai-Wei; Olson, Timothy S; Zhang, Yanping; Mason, Philip J; Bessler, Monica

    2016-01-01

    MDM2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is an important negative regulator of tumor suppressor p53. In turn the Mdm2 gene is a transcriptional target of p53, forming a negative feedback loop that is important in cell cycle control. It has recently become apparent that the ubiquitination of p53 by MDM2 can be inhibited when certain ribosomal proteins, including RPL5 and RPL11, bind to MDM2. This inhibition, and the resulting increase in p53 levels has been proposed to be responsible for the red cell aplasia seen in Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) and in 5q- myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). DBA and 5q- MDS are associated with inherited (DBA) or acquired (5q- MDS) haploinsufficiency of ribosomal proteins. A mutation in Mdm2 causing a C305F amino acid substitution blocks the binding of ribosomal proteins. Mice harboring this mutation (Mdm2C305F), retain a normal p53 response to DNA damage, but lack the p53 response to perturbations in ribosome biogenesis. While studying the interaction between RP haploinsufficiency and the Mdm2C305F mutation we noticed that Mdm2C305F homozygous mice had altered hematopoiesis. These mice developed a mild macrocytic anemia with reticulocytosis. In the bone marrow (BM), these mice showed a significant decrease in Ter119hi cells compared to wild type (WT) littermates, while no decrease in the number of mature erythroid cells (Ter119hiCD71low) was found in the spleen, which showed compensated bone marrow hematopoiesis. In methylcellulose cultures, BFU-E colonies from the mutant mice were slightly reduced in number and there was a significant reduction in CFU-E colony numbers in mutant mice compared with WT controls (p < 0.01). This erythropoietic defect was abrogated by concomitant p53 deficiency (Trp53ko/ko). Further investigation revealed that in Mdm2C305F animals, there was a decrease in Lin-Sca-1+c-Kit+ (LSK) cells, accompanied by significant decreases in multipotent progenitor (MPP) cells (p < 0.01). Competitive BM repopulation experiments showed

  1. Ribosomal protein s15 phosphorylation mediates LRRK2 neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Ian; Kim, Jungwoo Wren; Lee, Byoung Dae; Kang, Ho Chul; Xu, Jin-Chong; Jia, Hao; Stankowski, Jeannette; Kim, Min-Sik; Zhong, Jun; Kumar, Manoj; Andrabi, Shaida A.; Xiong, Yulan; Dickson, Dennis W.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are a common cause of familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). Elevated LRRK2 kinase activity and neurodegeneration are linked, but the phosphosubstrate that connects LRRK2 kinase activity to neurodegeneration is not known. Here, we show that ribosomal protein s15 is a key pathogenic LRRK2 substrate in Drosophila and human neuron PD models. Phospho-deficient s15 carrying a threonine 136 to alanine substitution rescues dopamine neuron degeneration and age-related locomotor deficits in G2019S LRRK2 transgenic Drosophila and substantially reduces G2019S LRRK2-mediated neurite loss and cell death in human dopamine and cortical neurons. Remarkably, pathogenic LRRK2 stimulates both cap-dependent and cap-independent mRNA translation, and induces a bulk increase in protein synthesis in Drosophila, which can be prevented by phospho-deficient T136A s15. These results reveal a novel mechanism of PD pathogenesis linked to elevated LRRK2 kinase activity and aberrant protein synthesis in vivo. PMID:24725412

  2. Evolutionarily conserved autoregulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing by ribosomal protein L10a

    PubMed Central

    Takei, Satomi; Togo-Ohno, Marina; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kuroyanagi, Hidehito

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs can regulate expression of protein-coding genes by generating unproductive mRNAs rapidly degraded by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Many of the genes directly regulated by alternative splicing coupled with NMD (AS-NMD) are related to RNA metabolism, but the repertoire of genes regulated by AS-NMD in vivo is to be determined. Here, we analyzed transcriptome data of wild-type and NMD-defective mutant strains of the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans and demonstrate that eight of the 82 cytoplasmic ribosomal protein (rp) genes generate unproductively spliced mRNAs. Knockdown of any of the eight rp genes exerted a dynamic and compensatory effect on alternative splicing of its own transcript and inverse effects on that of the other rp genes. A large subunit protein L10a, termed RPL-1 in nematodes, directly and specifically binds to an evolutionarily conserved 39-nt stretch termed L10ARE between the two alternative 5′ splice sites in its own pre-mRNA to switch the splice site choice. Furthermore, L10ARE-mediated splicing autoregulation of the L10a-coding gene is conserved in vertebrates. These results indicate that L10a is an evolutionarily conserved splicing regulator and that homeostasis of a subset of the rp genes are regulated at the level of pre-mRNA splicing in vivo. PMID:26961311

  3. A new age for biomedical applications of Ribosome Inactivating Proteins (RIPs): from bioconjugate to nanoconstructs.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Elio; Di Maro, Antimo

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are enzymes (3.2.2.22) that possess N-glycosilase activity that irreversibly inhibits protein synthesis. RIPs have been found in plants, fungi, algae, and bacteria; their biological role is still under investigation, even if it has been recognized their role in plant defence against predators and viruses. Nevertheless, several studies on these toxins have been performed to evaluate their applicability in the biomedical field making RIPs selectively toxic towards target cells. Indeed, these molecules are extensively used to produce chimeric biomolecules, such as immunotoxins or protein/peptides conjugates. However, to date, clinical use of most of these bioconiujates has been limited by toxicity and immunogenicity. More recently, material sciences have provided a wide range of nanomaterials to be used as excellent vehicles for toxin-delivery, since they are characterized by improved stability, solubility, and in vivo pharmacokinetics. This review discusses progresses in the development of RIPs bioconjugates, with particular attention to the recent use of nanomaterials, whose appropriate design opens up a broad range of different possibilities to the use of RIPs in novel therapeutic approaches in human diseases. PMID:27439918

  4. Compaction of ribosomal protein S6 by sucrose occurs only under native conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, LuYang; Ferreira, José A B; Costa, Sílvia M B; Cabrita, Gonçalo J M; Otzen, Daniel E; Melo, Eduardo Pinho

    2006-02-21

    The effect of osmolyte sucrose on the stability and compaction of the folded and unfolded states of ribosomal protein S6 from Thermus thermophilus was analyzed. Confirming previous results obtained with sodium sulfate and trehalose, refolding stopped-flow measurements of S6 show that sucrose favors the conversion of the unfolded state ensemble to a highly compact structure (75% as compact as the folded state). This conversion occurs when the unfolded state is suddenly placed under native conditions and the compact state accumulates in a transient off-folding pathway. This effect of sucrose on the compaction of the unfolded state ensemble is counteracted by guanidinium hydrochloride. The compact state does not accumulate at higher guanidinium concentrations and the unfolded state ensemble does not display increased compaction in the presence of 6 M guanidinium as evaluated by collisional quenching of tryptophan fluorescence. In contrast, accessibility of the tryptophan residue of folded S6 above 1 M sucrose concentration decreased as a result of an increased compaction of the folded state. Unfolding stopped-flow measurements of S6 reflect this increased compaction of the folded state, but the unfolding pathway is not affected by sucrose. Compaction of folded and unfolded S6 induced by sucrose occurs under native conditions indicating that decreased protein conformational entropy significantly contributes to the mechanism of protein stabilization by osmolytes. PMID:16475807

  5. Erythromycin and 5S rRNA binding properties of the spinach chloroplast ribosomal protein CL22.

    PubMed Central

    Carol, P; Rozier, C; Lazaro, E; Ballesta, J P; Mache, R

    1993-01-01

    The spinach chloroplast ribosomal protein (r-protein) CL22 contains a central region homologous to the Escherichia coli r-protein L22 plus long N- and C-terminal extensions. We show in this study that the CL22 combines two properties which in E. coli ribosome are split between two separate proteins. The CL22 which binds to the 5S rRNA can also be linked to an erythromycin derivative added to the 50S ribosomal subunit. This latter property is similar to that of the E. coli L22 and suggests a similar localization in the 50S subunit. We have overproduced the r-protein CL22 and deleted forms of this protein in E. coli. We show that the overproduced CL22 binds to the chloroplast 5S rRNA and that the deleted protein containing the N- and C-terminal extensions only has lost the 5S rRNA binding property. We suggest that the central homologous regions of the CL22 contains the RNA binding domain. Images PMID:8441674

  6. Riproximin is a recently discovered type II ribosome inactivating protein with potential for treating cancer.

    PubMed

    Adwan, Hassan; Bayer, Helene; Pervaiz, Asim; Sagini, Micah; Berger, Martin R

    2014-11-01

    The development of new anticancer drugs is a salient problem and the traditional use of plants is a potentially rich source of information for detecting new molecules with antineoplastic activity. Riproximin is a recently detected cytotoxic type II ribosome inactivating protein with high selectivity for certain tumor cell lines. Its activity was recognized as the main component in a plant powder used by African healers for treating cancer. By ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase gene sequencing analysis, the powder was identified to be derived from the plant Ximenia americana. The cDNA sequence of riproximin was identified, the protein was modeled to contain one A- and a B-chain, respectively, and a reliable purification procedure from kernels of X. americana was established. Riproximin displays high but differential antiproliferative activity in a panel of human and rodent cancer cell lines, with concentrations inhibiting cell proliferation by 50% (IC50 values) that diverge by a factor of 100. Consistent antineoplastic activity was detected in colorectal and pancreatic cancer liver metastasis models in rats. The cytotoxic mechanism of action was determined to be based on cellular uptake of riproximin followed by its A-chain prompted depurination of the 28S ribosomal RNA and induction of unfolded protein response. Riproximin's specificity depended on its B-chain connected binding to cell surface glycans, the presence of which is crucial for subsequent internalization into cells and cytotoxicity. These N- and O-glycans include bi- and tri-antennary NA structures (NA2/NA3) as well as Tn3 structures (clustered Tn antigen). Riproximin was found to crosslink proteins with N- and O-glycan structure, thus indicating both types of binding sites on its B chain. Due to this crosslinking ability, riproximin is expected to show prominent cytotoxicity towards cells expressing both, NA2/NA3 and clustered Tn structures. Apart from the properties of riproximin, the plant X. americana

  7. Mutations in the Bacterial Ribosomal Protein L3 and Their Association with Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Klitgaard, Rasmus N.; Ntokou, Eleni; Nørgaard, Katrine; Biltoft, Daniel; Hansen, Lykke H.; Trædholm, Nicolai M.; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Different groups of antibiotics bind to the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) in the large subunit of the bacterial ribosome. Resistance to these groups of antibiotics has often been linked with mutations or methylations of the 23S rRNA. In recent years, there has been a rise in the number of studies where mutations have been found in the ribosomal protein L3 in bacterial strains resistant to PTC-targeting antibiotics but there is often no evidence that these mutations actually confer antibiotic resistance. In this study, a plasmid exchange system was used to replace plasmid-carried wild-type genes with mutated L3 genes in a chromosomal L3 deletion strain. In this way, the essential L3 gene is available for the bacteria while allowing replacement of the wild type with mutated L3 genes. This enables investigation of the effect of single mutations in Escherichia coli without a wild-type L3 background. Ten plasmid-carried mutated L3 genes were constructed, and their effect on growth and antibiotic susceptibility was investigated. Additionally, computational modeling of the impact of L3 mutations in E. coli was used to assess changes in 50S structure and antibiotic binding. All mutations are placed in the loops of L3 near the PTC. Growth data show that 9 of the 10 mutations were well accepted in E. coli, although some of them came with a fitness cost. Only one of the mutants exhibited reduced susceptibility to linezolid, while five exhibited reduced susceptibility to tiamulin. PMID:25845869

  8. Ribosomal ribonucleic acid isolated from Salmonella typhimurium: absence of the intact 23S species.

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, M E

    1979-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) isolated by four distinct methods and from a variety of Salmonella typhimurium strains lacked intact 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). On sucrose gradients which minimize aggregation, the vast majority of S. typhimurium rRNA sedimented as a 16S peak with a 14S shoulder. RNA from this region of the gradient was resolved into three discrete bands by electrophoresis in formamide. Two very minor S. typhimurium RNA peaks were resolved at 21S and 10S on sucrose gradients, and each peak formed discrete bands in electrophoresis. It is concluded that if S. typhimurium does possess an intact 23S rRNA species, this species is extremely "labile." The absence of isolatable S. typhimurium 23S rRNA possibly reflected in vivo processing of the rRNA before isolation. Under certain conditions, S. typhimurium rRNA formed discrete aggregates which sedimented similarly to intact Escherichia coli 23S rRNA. Images PMID:383696

  9. Protein folding: understanding the role of water and the low Reynolds number environment as the peptide chain emerges from the ribosome and folds.

    PubMed

    Sen, Siddhartha; Voorheis, H Paul

    2014-12-21

    The mechanism of protein folding during early stages of the process has three determinants. First, moving water molecules obey the rules of low Reynolds number physics without an inertial component. Molecular movement is instantaneous and size insensitive. Proteins emerging from the ribosome move and rotate without an external force if they change shape, forming and propagating helical structures that increases translocational efficiency. Forward motion ceases when the shape change or propelling force ceases. Second, application of quantum field theory to water structure predicts the spontaneous formation of low density coherent units of fixed size that expel dissolved atmospheric gases. Structured water layers with both coherent and non-coherent domains, form a sheath around the new protein. The surface of exposed hydrophobic amino acids is protected from water contact by small nanobubbles of dissolved atmospheric gases, 5 or 6 molecules on average, that vibrate, attracting even widely separated resonating nanobubbles. This force results from quantum effects, appearing only when the system is within and interacts with an oscillating electromagnetic field. The newly recognized quantum force sharply bends the peptide and is part of a dynamic field determining the pathway of protein folding. Third, the force initiating the tertiary folding of proteins arises from twists at the position of each hydrophobic amino acid, that minimizes surface exposure of the hydrophobic amino acids and propagates along the protein. When the total bend reaches 360°, the leading segment of water sheath intersects the trailing segment. This steric self-intersection expels water from overlapping segments of the sheath and by Newton׳s second law moves the polypeptide chain in an opposite direction. Consequently, with very few exceptions that we enumerate and discuss, tertiary structures are absent from proteins without hydrophobic amino acids, which control the early stages of protein

  10. The Cytotoxicity of Elderberry Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins Is Not Solely Determined by Their Protein Translation Inhibition Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Chenjing; Chen, Qiushi; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M.; De Vos, Winnok H.; Van Damme, Els J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Although the protein translation inhibition activity of ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) is well documented, little is known about the contribution of the lectin chain to the biological activity of these proteins. In this study, we compared the in vitro and intracellular activity of several S. nigra (elderberry) RIPs and non-RIP lectins. Our data demonstrate that RIPs from elderberry are much more toxic to HeLa cells than to primary fibroblasts. Differences in the cytotoxicity between the elderberry proteins correlated with differences in glycan specificity of their lectin domain, cellular uptake efficiency and intracellular destination. Despite the fact that the bulk of the RIPs accumulated in the lysosomes and partly in the Golgi apparatus, we could demonstrate effective inhibition of protein synthesis in cellula. As we also observed cytotoxicity for non-RIP lectins, it is clear that the lectin chain triggers additional pathways heralding cell death. Our data suggest that one of these pathways involves the induction of autophagy. PMID:26148207

  11. Structure of the JmjC domain-containing protein NO66 complexed with ribosomal protein Rpl8

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chengliang; Zhang, Qiongdi; Hang, Tianrong; Tao, Yue; Ma, Xukai; Wu, Minhao; Zhang, Xuan Zang, Jianye

    2015-08-28

    The structure of the complex of NO66 and Rpl8 was solved in the native state and NO66 recognizes the consensus motif NHXH . Tetramerization is required for efficient substrate binding and catalysis by NO66. The JmjC domain-containing proteins belong to a large family of oxygenases possessing distinct substrate specificities which are involved in the regulation of different biological processes, such as gene transcription, RNA processing and translation. Nucleolar protein 66 (NO66) is a JmjC domain-containing protein which has been reported to be a histone demethylase and a ribosome protein 8 (Rpl8) hydroxylase. The present biochemical study confirmed the hydroxylase activity of NO66 and showed that oligomerization is required for NO66 to efficiently catalyze the hydroxylation of Rpl8. The structures of NO66{sup 176–C} complexed with Rpl8{sup 204–224} in a tetrameric form and of the mutant protein M2 in a dimeric form were solved. Based on the results of structural and biochemical analyses, the consensus sequence motif NHXH recognized by NO66 was confirmed. Several potential substrates of NO66 were found by a BLAST search according to the consensus sequence motif. When binding to substrate, the relative positions of each subunit in the NO66 tetramer shift. Oligomerization may facilitate the motion of each subunit in the NO66 tetramer and affect the catalytic activity.

  12. Ribosomal protein S1 induces a conformational change of tmRNA; more than one protein S1 per molecule of tmRNA.

    PubMed

    Bordeau, Valérie; Felden, Brice

    2002-08-01

    tmRNA (10Sa RNA, ssrA) acts to rescue stalled bacterial ribosomes while encoding a peptide tag added trans-translationally to the nascent peptide, targeting it for proteolysis. Ribosomal protein S1 is required for tmRNA binding to isolated and poly U-programmed ribosomes. Mobility assays on native gels indicate that the binding curves of both recombinant and purified proteins S1 from E. coli is biphasic with apparent binding constants of approximately 90 and approximately 300 nM, respectively, suggesting that more than one protein interacts with tmRNA. Structural probing of native tmRNA in the presence and absence of the purified protein suggest that when S1 binds, tmRNA undergoes a significant conformational change. In the presence of the protein, nucleotides from tmRNA with enhanced (H2, H3, PK1, PK2, PK4, in and around the first triplet to be translated), or decreased (H5 and PK2), reactivity towards a probe specific for RNA single-strands are scattered throughout the molecule, with the exception of the tRNA-like domain that may be dispensable for the interaction. Converging experimental evidence suggests that ribosomal protein S1 binds to pseudoknot PK2. Previous structural studies of tmRNA in solution have revealed several discrepancies between the probing data and the phylogeny, and most of these are reconciled when analyzing tmRNA structure in complex with the protein(s). Ribosomal protein(s) S1 is proposed to set tmRNA in the mRNA mode, relieving strains that may develop when translating a looped mRNA. PMID:12457560

  13. Extremophilic 50S Ribosomal RNA-Binding Protein L35Ae as a Basis for Engineering of an Alternative Protein Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Lomonosova, Anna V; Ovchinnikova, Elena V; Kazakov, Alexei S; Denesyuk, Alexander I; Sofin, Alexander D; Mikhailov, Roman V; Ulitin, Andrei B; Mirzabekov, Tajib A; Permyakov, Eugene A; Permyakov, Sergei E

    2015-01-01

    Due to their remarkably high structural stability, proteins from extremophiles are particularly useful in numerous biological applications. Their utility as alternative protein scaffolds could be especially valuable in small antibody mimetic engineering. These artificial binding proteins occupy a specific niche between antibodies and low molecular weight substances, paving the way for development of innovative approaches in therapeutics, diagnostics, and reagent use. Here, the 50S ribosomal RNA-binding protein L35Ae from the extremophilic archaea Pyrococcus horikoshii has been probed for its potential to serve as a backbone in alternative scaffold engineering. The recombinant wild type L35Ae has a native-like secondary structure, extreme thermal stability (mid-transition temperature of 90°C) and a moderate resistance to the denaturation by guanidine hydrochloride (half-transition at 2.6 M). Chemical crosslinking and dynamic light scattering data revealed that the wild type L35Ae protein has a propensity for multimerization and aggregation correlating with its non-specific binding to a model cell surface of HEK293 cells, as evidenced by flow cytometry. To suppress these negative features, a 10-amino acid mutant (called L35Ae 10X) was designed, which lacks the interaction with HEK293 cells, is less susceptible to aggregation, and maintains native-like secondary structure and thermal stability. However, L35Ae 10X also shows lowered resistance to guanidine hydrochloride (half-transition at 2.0M) and is more prone to oligomerization. This investigation of an extremophile protein's scaffolding potential demonstrates that lowered resistance to charged chemical denaturants and increased propensity to multimerization may limit the utility of extremophile proteins as alternative scaffolds. PMID:26247602

  14. Evidence for the ability of L10 ribosomal proteins of Salmonella typhimurium and Klebsiella pneumoniae to regulate rplJL gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Paton, E B; Woodmaska, M I; Kroupskaya, I V; Zhyvoloup, A N; Matsuka, G Kh

    1990-06-01

    Genes rplJ, coding for ribosomal protein L10 of Salmonella typhimurium and Klebsiella pneumoniae, have been cloned on pUC plasmid. The resultant multicopy recombinant plasmids were detrimental for the growth of normal JM101 E. coli host cells and harmless for the mutant JF3029 host. This negative effect is the evidence for the ability of heterologous L10 proteins to regulate expression of rplJL genes in E. coli. Nucleotide sequence was determined completely for S. typhimurium rplJL' DNA portion and partially for rplJL' genes of K. pneumoniae. According to the nucleotide sequence data obtained three amino acid substitutions differ L10 proteins of S. typhimurium and E. coli and the long range, providing for the coupled translations of L10 and L7/L12 cistrons in E. coli mRNA is also valid for S. typhimurium and K. pneumoniae. PMID:2194828

  15. Ribosomal protein genes of holometabolan insects reject the Halteria, instead revealing a close affinity of Strepsiptera with Coleoptera.

    PubMed

    Longhorn, Stuart J; Pohl, Hans W; Vogler, Alfried P

    2010-06-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among holometabolan insect orders remain poorly known, despite a wealth of previous studies. In particular, past attempts to clarify the sister-group of the enigmatic order Strepsiptera with rRNA genes have led to intense debate about long-branch attraction (the 'Strepsiptera problem'), without resolving the taxonomic question at hand. Here, we appealed to alternative nuclear sequences of 27 ribosomal proteins (RPs) to generate a data matrix of 10,731 nucleotides for 22 holometabolan taxa, including two strepsipteran species. Phylogenetic relationships among holometabolan insects were analyzed under several nucleotide-coding schemes to explore differences in signal and systematic biases. Saturation and compositional bias particularly affected third positions, which greatly differed in AT content (18-72%). Such confounding factors were best reduced by R-Y coding and removal of third codon positions, resulting in more strongly supported topologies, whereas amino acid coding gave poor resolution. The placement of Strepsiptera with Coleoptera (the Coleopterida) was recovered under most coding schemes and analytical methods, if often with modest support and ambiguity. In contrast, an alternative sister-group with Diptera (the Halteria) was only found in one analysis using parsimony, and weakly supported. The topologies here generally support a Coleoptera+Strepsiptera as sister-group to Mecopterida (Siphonaptera+Mecoptera+Diptera+Lepidoptera+Trichoptera), while Hymenoptera were always recovered as sister-group to the remaining Holometabola. PMID:20348001

  16. Evolutionary relationships of a plant-pathogenic mycoplasmalike organism and Acholeplasma laidlawii deduced from two ribosomal protein gene sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, P O; Sears, B B

    1992-01-01

    The families within the class Mollicutes are distinguished by their morphologies, nutritional requirements, and abilities to metabolize certain compounds. Biosystematic classification of the plant-pathogenic mycoplasmalike organisms (MLOs) has been difficult because these organisms have not been cultured in vitro, and hence their nutritional requirements have not been determined nor have physiological characterizations been possible. To investigate the evolutionary relationship of the MLOs to other members of the class Mollicutes, a segment of a ribosomal protein operon was cloned and sequenced from an aster yellows-type MLO which is pathogenic for members of the genus Oenothera and from Acholeplasma laidlawii. The deduced amino acid sequence data from the rpl22 and rps3 genes indicate that the MLOs are more closely related to A. laidlawii than to animal mycoplasmas, confirming previous results from 16S rRNA sequence comparisons. This conclusion is also supported by the finding that the UGA codon is not read as a tryptophan codon in the MLO and A. laidlawii, in contrast to its usage in Mycoplasma capricolum. PMID:1556079

  17. Ribosomes can slide over and beyond “hungry” codons, resuming protein chain elongation many nucleotides downstream

    PubMed Central

    Gallant, Jonathan A.; Lindsley, Dale

    1998-01-01

    In cells subjected to moderate aminoacyl-tRNA limitation, the peptidyl-tRNA–ribosome complex stalled at the “hungry” codon can slide well beyond it on the messenger RNA and resume translation further downstream. This behavior is proved by unequivocal amino acid sequence data, showing a protein that lacks the bypassed sequence encoded between the hungry codon and specific landing sites. The landing sites are codons cognate to the anticodon of the peptidyl-tRNA. The efficiency of this behavior can be as high as 10–20% but declines with the length of the slide. Interposition of “trap” sites (nonproductive landing sites) in the bypassed region reduces the frequency of successful slides, confirming that the ribosome–peptidyl-tRNA complex passes through the untranslated region of the message. This behavior appears to be quite general: it can occur at the two kinds of hungry codons tested, AUA and AAG; the sliding peptidyl-tRNA can be any of three species tested, phenylalanine, tyrosine, or leucine tRNA; the peptidyl component can be either of two very different peptide sequences; and translation can resume at any of the three codons tested. PMID:9811876

  18. Multiple-Site Trimethylation of Ribosomal Protein L11 by the PrmA Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Hasan; Gregory, Steven T.; Dahlberg, Albert E.; Jogl, Gerwald

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Ribosomal protein L11 is a universally conserved component of the large subunit, and plays a significant role during initiation, elongation, and termination of protein synthesis. In Escherichia coli, the lysine methyltransferase PrmA trimethylates the N-terminal α-amino group and the ε-amino groups of Lys3 and Lys39. Here, we report four PrmA-L11 complex structures in different orientations with respect to the PrmA active site. Two structures capture the L11 N-terminal α-amino group in the active site in a trimethylated postcatalytic state and in a dimethylated state with bound S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine. Two other structures show L11 in a catalytic orientation to modify Lys39 and in a noncatalytic orientation. The comparison of complex structures in different orientations with a minimal substrate recognition complex shows that the binding mode remains conserved in all L11 orientations, and that substrate orientation is brought about by the unusual interdomain flexibility of PrmA. PMID:18611379

  19. Transition state analogues in structures of ricin and saporin ribosome-inactivating proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Meng-Chiao; Sturm, Matthew B.; Almo, Steven C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2010-01-12

    Ricin A-chain (RTA) and saporin-L1 (SAP) catalyze adenosine depurination of 28S rRNA to inhibit protein synthesis and cause cell death. We present the crystal structures of RTA and SAP in complex with transition state analogue inhibitors. These tight-binding inhibitors mimic the sarcin-ricin recognition loop of 28S rRNA and the dissociative ribocation transition state established for RTA catalysis. RTA and SAP share unique purine-binding geometry with quadruple {pi}-stacking interactions between adjacent adenine and guanine bases and 2 conserved tyrosines. An arginine at one end of the {pi}-stack provides cationic polarization and enhanced leaving group ability to the susceptible adenine. Common features of these ribosome-inactivating proteins include adenine leaving group activation, a remarkable lack of ribocation stabilization, and conserved glutamates as general bases for activation of the H{sub 2}O nucleophile. Catalytic forces originate primarily from leaving group activation evident in both RTA and SAP in complex with transition state analogues.

  20. A comparison of anti-lymphocyte immunotoxins containing different ribosome-inactivating proteins and antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Bolognesi, A; Tazzari, P L; Tassi, C; Gromo, G; Gobbi, M; Stirpe, F

    1992-01-01

    Immunotoxins were prepared with several single-chain ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs type 1) and with the A-chain of ricin linked to the F(ab')2 fragment of sheep anti-mouse IgG. The cytotoxic activity of these conjugates was tested on human lymphocytes pretreated with an anti-CD3 murine MoAb. The immunotoxins inhibited DNA synthesis in phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated lymphocytes with IC50S (concentrations causing 50% inhibition) ranging from 8.9 x 10(-13) to 5.7 x 10(-11) M (immunotoxins containing dianthin 32, saporin, pokeweed antiviral protein from seeds (PAP-S), bryodin, momordin, momorcochin, and trichokirin), 1 x 10(-8) M (immunotoxin containing gelonin) and 5 x 10(-9) M (immunotoxin containing ricin A-chain). The immunotoxin containing saporin linked to the anti-mouse IgG F(ab')2 fragment was also highly toxic to human lymphocytes pretreated with anti-CD2, -CD3, -CD5 and -CD45 MoAbs, with IC50S less than or equal to 10(-11) M. Immunotoxins were prepared also with saporin linked to MoAbs against various CD antigens. The immunotoxin prepared with the anti-CD3 antibody had the highest specific cytotoxicity to human lymphocytes. Images Fig. 2 PMID:1516253

  1. The Dedicated Chaperone Acl4 Escorts Ribosomal Protein Rpl4 to Its Nuclear Pre-60S Assembly Site

    PubMed Central

    Pillet, Benjamin; García-Gómez, Juan J.; Pausch, Patrick; Falquet, Laurent; Bange, Gert; de la Cruz, Jesús; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes are the highly complex macromolecular assemblies dedicated to the synthesis of all cellular proteins from mRNA templates. The main principles underlying the making of ribosomes are conserved across eukaryotic organisms and this process has been studied in most detail in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast ribosomes are composed of four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and 79 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins). Most r-proteins need to be transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus where they get incorporated into the evolving pre-ribosomal particles. Due to the high abundance and difficult physicochemical properties of r-proteins, their correct folding and fail-safe targeting to the assembly site depends largely on general, as well as highly specialized, chaperone and transport systems. Many r-proteins contain universally conserved or eukaryote-specific internal loops and/or terminal extensions, which were shown to mediate their nuclear targeting and association with dedicated chaperones in a growing number of cases. The 60S r-protein Rpl4 is particularly interesting since it harbours a conserved long internal loop and a prominent C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension. Here we show that both the long internal loop and the C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension are strictly required for the functionality of Rpl4. While Rpl4 contains at least five distinct nuclear localization signals (NLS), the C-terminal part of the long internal loop associates with a specific binding partner, termed Acl4. Absence of Acl4 confers a severe slow-growth phenotype and a deficiency in the production of 60S subunits. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that Acl4 can be considered as a dedicated chaperone of Rpl4. Notably, Acl4 localizes to both the cytoplasm and nucleus and it has the capacity to capture nascent Rpl4 in a co-translational manner. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dedicated chaperone Acl4 accompanies Rpl4 from the cytoplasm to its pre-60S

  2. The Dedicated Chaperone Acl4 Escorts Ribosomal Protein Rpl4 to Its Nuclear Pre-60S Assembly Site.

    PubMed

    Pillet, Benjamin; García-Gómez, Juan J; Pausch, Patrick; Falquet, Laurent; Bange, Gert; de la Cruz, Jesús; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Ribosomes are the highly complex macromolecular assemblies dedicated to the synthesis of all cellular proteins from mRNA templates. The main principles underlying the making of ribosomes are conserved across eukaryotic organisms and this process has been studied in most detail in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast ribosomes are composed of four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and 79 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins). Most r-proteins need to be transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus where they get incorporated into the evolving pre-ribosomal particles. Due to the high abundance and difficult physicochemical properties of r-proteins, their correct folding and fail-safe targeting to the assembly site depends largely on general, as well as highly specialized, chaperone and transport systems. Many r-proteins contain universally conserved or eukaryote-specific internal loops and/or terminal extensions, which were shown to mediate their nuclear targeting and association with dedicated chaperones in a growing number of cases. The 60S r-protein Rpl4 is particularly interesting since it harbours a conserved long internal loop and a prominent C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension. Here we show that both the long internal loop and the C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension are strictly required for the functionality of Rpl4. While Rpl4 contains at least five distinct nuclear localization signals (NLS), the C-terminal part of the long internal loop associates with a specific binding partner, termed Acl4. Absence of Acl4 confers a severe slow-growth phenotype and a deficiency in the production of 60S subunits. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that Acl4 can be considered as a dedicated chaperone of Rpl4. Notably, Acl4 localizes to both the cytoplasm and nucleus and it has the capacity to capture nascent Rpl4 in a co-translational manner. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dedicated chaperone Acl4 accompanies Rpl4 from the cytoplasm to its pre-60S

  3. The Ribosome: The Cell's Protein-Synthesizing Machine and How Antibiotics Disrupt It

    ScienceCinema

    Venki Ramakrishnan

    2010-01-08

    Determining the structure of the ribosome has made it possible for Ramakrishnan and his colleagues to image antibiotics bound to the ribosome, leading to a better understanding of their action, which could help in the development of novel drugs. In his ta

  4. The Ribosome: The Cell's Protein-Synthesizing Machine and How Antibiotics Disrupt It

    SciTech Connect

    Venki Ramakrishnan

    2009-10-08

    Determining the structure of the ribosome has made it possible for Ramakrishnan and his colleagues to image antibiotics bound to the ribosome, leading to a better understanding of their action, which could help in the development of novel drugs. In his ta

  5. The ribosomal protein Asc1/RACK1 is required for efficient translation of short mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Mary K; Rojas-Duran, Maria F; Gangaramani, Paritosh; Gilbert, Wendy V

    2016-01-01

    Translation is a core cellular process carried out by a highly conserved macromolecular machine, the ribosome. There has been remarkable evolutionary adaptation of this machine through the addition of eukaryote-specific ribosomal proteins whose individual effects on ribosome function are largely unknown. Here we show that eukaryote-specific Asc1/RACK1 is required for efficient translation of mRNAs with short open reading frames that show greater than average translational efficiency in diverse eukaryotes. ASC1 mutants in S. cerevisiae display compromised translation of specific functional groups, including cytoplasmic and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and display cellular phenotypes consistent with their gene-specific translation defects. Asc1-sensitive mRNAs are preferentially associated with the translational ‘closed loop’ complex comprised of eIF4E, eIF4G, and Pab1, and depletion of eIF4G mimics the translational defects of ASC1 mutants. Together our results reveal a role for Asc1/RACK1 in a length-dependent initiation mechanism optimized for efficient translation of genes with important housekeeping functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11154.001 PMID:27117520

  6. Preservation of Gene Duplication Increases the Regulatory Spectrum of Ribosomal Protein Genes and Enhances Growth under Stress.

    PubMed

    Parenteau, Julie; Lavoie, Mathieu; Catala, Mathieu; Malik-Ghulam, Mustafa; Gagnon, Jules; Abou Elela, Sherif

    2015-12-22

    In baker's yeast, the majority of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are duplicated, and it was recently proposed that such duplications are preserved via the functional specialization of the duplicated genes. However, the origin and nature of duplicated RPGs' (dRPGs) functional specificity remain unclear. In this study, we show that differences in dRPG functions are generated by variations in the modality of gene expression and, to a lesser extent, by protein sequence. Analysis of the sequence and expression patterns of non-intron-containing RPGs indicates that each dRPG is controlled by specific regulatory sequences modulating its expression levels in response to changing growth conditions. Homogenization of dRPG sequences reduces cell tolerance to growth under stress without changing the number of expressed genes. Together, the data reveal a model where duplicated genes provide a means for modulating the expression of ribosomal proteins in response to stress. PMID:26686636

  7. Small-Molecule Inhibitor Leads of Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins Developed Using the Doorstop Approach

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yuan-Ping; Park, Jewn Giew; Wang, Shaohua; Vummenthala, Anuradha; Mishra, Rajesh K.; McLaughlin, John E.; Di, Rong; Kahn, Jennifer Nielsen; Tumer, Nilgun E.; Janosi, Laszlo; Davis, Jon; Millard, Charles B.

    2011-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are toxic because they bind to 28S rRNA and depurinate a specific adenine residue from the α-sarcin/ricin loop (SRL), thereby inhibiting protein synthesis. Shiga-like toxins (Stx1 and Stx2), produced by Escherichia coli, are RIPs that cause outbreaks of foodborne diseases with significant morbidity and mortality. Ricin, produced by the castor bean plant, is another RIP lethal to mammals. Currently, no US Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccines nor therapeutics exist to protect against ricin, Shiga-like toxins, or other RIPs. Development of effective small-molecule RIP inhibitors as therapeutics is challenging because strong electrostatic interactions at the RIP•SRL interface make drug-like molecules ineffective in competing with the rRNA for binding to RIPs. Herein, we report small molecules that show up to 20% cell protection against ricin or Stx2 at a drug concentration of 300 nM. These molecules were discovered using the doorstop approach, a new approach to protein•polynucleotide inhibitors that identifies small molecules as doorstops to prevent an active-site residue of an RIP (e.g., Tyr80 of ricin or Tyr77 of Stx2) from adopting an active conformation thereby blocking the function of the protein rather than contenders in the competition for binding to the RIP. This work offers promising leads for developing RIP therapeutics. The results suggest that the doorstop approach might also be applicable in the development of other protein•polynucleotide inhibitors as antiviral agents such as inhibitors of the Z-DNA binding proteins in poxviruses. This work also calls for careful chemical and biological characterization of drug leads obtained from chemical screens to avoid the identification of irrelevant chemical structures and to avoid the interference caused by direct interactions between the chemicals being screened and the luciferase reporter used in screening assays. PMID:21455295

  8. Amino acid metabolism and protein synthesis in malarial parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, I. W.

    1977-01-01

    Malaria-infected red cells and free parasites have limited capabilities for the biosynthesis of amino acids. Therefore, the principal amino acid sources for parasite protein synthesis are the plasma free amino acids and host cell haemoglobin. Infected cells and plasmodia incorporate exogenously supplied amino acids into protein. However, the hypothesis that amino acid utilization (from an external source) is related to availability of that amino acid in haemoglobin is without universal support: it is true for isoleucine and for Plasmodium knowlesi and P. falciparum, but not for methionine, cysteine, and other amino acids, and it does not apply to P. lophurae. More by default than by direct evidence, haemoglobin is believed to be the main amino acid reservoir available to the intraerythrocytic plasmodium. Haemoglobin, ingested via the cytostome, is held in food vacuoles where auto-oxidation takes place. As a consequence, haem is released and accumulates in the vacuole as particulate haemozoin (= malaria pigment). Current evidence favours the view that haemozoin is mainly haematin. Acid and alkaline proteases (identified in crude extracts from mammalian and avian malarias) are presumably secreted directly into the food vacuole. They then digest the denatured globin and the resulting amino acids are incorporated into parasite protein. Cell-free protein synthesizing systems have been developed using P. knowlesi and P. lophurae ribosomes. In the main these systems are typically eukaryotic. Studies of amino acid metabolism are exceedingly limited. Arginine, lysine, methionine, and proline are incorporated into protein, whereas glutamic acid is metabolized via an NADP-specific glutamic dehydrogenase. Glutamate oxidation generates NADPH and auxiliary energy (in the form of α-ketoglutarate). The role of red cell glutathione in the economy of the parasite remains obscure. Important goals for future research should be: quantitative assessment of the relative importance of

  9. Purification and partial characterization of single-chain ribosome-inactivating proteins from the seeds of Phytolacca dioica L.

    PubMed

    Parente, A; De Luca, P; Bolognesi, A; Barbieri, L; Battelli, M G; Abbondanza, A; Sande, M J; Gigliano, G S; Tazzari, P L; Stirpe, F

    1993-10-19

    Three ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) similar to those already known (Stirpe et al. (1992) Bio/Technology 10, 405-412) were purified from the seeds of Phytolacca dioica. These proteins, called Phytolacca dioica RIPs (PD-S1, PD-S2 and PD-S3 RIPs), are glycoproteins, with M(r) approx. 30,000, inhibit protein synthesis by a rabbit reticulocyte lysate and phenylalanine polymerization by isolated ribosomes, and depurinate rat liver rRNA in an apparently identical manner as the A-chain of ricin and other RIPs (Endo et al. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 5908-5912). Part of the purified rat liver ribosomes appeared resistant to the action of PD-S RIPs. The most abundant protein, PD-S2 RIP, gave a weak or nil cross-reaction with sera against various other RIPs, including a pokeweed antiviral protein from the roots of Phytolacca americana. PD-S2 RIP was linked to a monoclonal antibody (Ber-H2) against the CD30 human lymphocyte antigen and the resulting immunotoxin was selectively toxic to the CD30 + Hodgkin's lymphoma-derived L540 cell line. PMID:8218414

  10. Extremophilic 50S Ribosomal RNA-Binding Protein L35Ae as a Basis for Engineering of an Alternative Protein Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Lomonosova, Anna V.; Ovchinnikova, Elena V.; Kazakov, Alexei S.; Denesyuk, Alexander I.; Sofin, Alexander D.; Mikhailov, Roman V.; Ulitin, Andrei B.; Mirzabekov, Tajib A.; Permyakov, Eugene A.; Permyakov, Sergei E.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their remarkably high structural stability, proteins from extremophiles are particularly useful in numerous biological applications. Their utility as alternative protein scaffolds could be especially valuable in small antibody mimetic engineering. These artificial binding proteins occupy a specific niche between antibodies and low molecular weight substances, paving the way for development of innovative approaches in therapeutics, diagnostics, and reagent use. Here, the 50S ribosomal RNA-binding protein L35Ae from the extremophilic archaea Pyrococcus horikoshii has been probed for its potential to serve as a backbone in alternative scaffold engineering. The recombinant wild type L35Ae has a native-like secondary structure, extreme thermal stability (mid-transition temperature of 90°C) and a moderate resistance to the denaturation by guanidine hydrochloride (half-transition at 2.6 M). Chemical crosslinking and dynamic light scattering data revealed that the wild type L35Ae protein has a propensity for multimerization and aggregation correlating with its non-specific binding to a model cell surface of HEK293 cells, as evidenced by flow cytometry. To suppress these negative features, a 10-amino acid mutant (called L35Ae 10X) was designed, which lacks the interaction with HEK293 cells, is less susceptible to aggregation, and maintains native-like secondary structure and thermal stability. However, L35Ae 10X also shows lowered resistance to guanidine hydrochloride (half-transition at 2.0M) and is more prone to oligomerization. This investigation of an extremophile protein’s scaffolding potential demonstrates that lowered resistance to charged chemical denaturants and increased propensity to multimerization may limit the utility of extremophile proteins as alternative scaffolds. PMID:26247602

  11. Yeast Rrp14p is a nucleolar protein involved in both ribosome biogenesis and cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hiroko; Horigome, Chihiro; Okada, Takafumi; Shirai, Chiharu; Mizuta, Keiko

    2007-01-01

    We previously cloned RRP14/YKL082c, whose product exhibits two-hybrid interaction with Ebp2p, a regulatory factor of assembly of 60S ribosomal subunits. Depletion of Rrp14p results in shortage of 60S ribosomal subunits and retardation of processing from 27S pre-rRNA to 25S rRNA. Furthermore, 35S pre-rRNA synthesis appears to decline in Rrp14p-depleted cells. Rrp14p interacts with regulatory factors of 60S subunit assembly and also with Utp11p and Faf1p, which are regulatory factors required for assembly of 40S ribosomal subunits. We propose that Rrp14p is involved in ribosome synthesis from the beginning of 35S pre-rRNA synthesis to assembly of the 60S ribosomal subunit. Disruption of RRP14 causes an extremely slow growth rate of the cell, a severe defect in ribosome synthesis, and a depolarized localization of cortical actin patches throughout the cell cycle. These results suggest that Rrp14p has dual functions in ribosome synthesis and polarized cell growth. PMID:17804645

  12. The RICE MINUTE-LIKE1 (RML1) gene, encoding a ribosomal large subunit protein L3B, regulates leaf morphology and plant architecture in rice

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ming; Wang, Yihua; Liu, Xi; Sun, Juan; Wang, Yunlong; Xu, Yang; Lv, Jia; Long, Wuhua; Zhu, Xiaopin; Guo, Xiuping; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Chunming; Wan, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of ribosomal proteins (RPs) are known to cause developmental abnormalities in yeast, mammals, and dicotyledonous plants; however, their effects have not been studied in rice. Here, we identifiy a ribosomal biogenesis mutant, rice minute-like1 (rml1) that displays a minute phenotype as evidenced by retarded growth and defects in the vascular system. We determine that RML1 encodes a ribosome large subunit protein 3B (RPL3B) in rice by means of map-based cloning and genetic complementation. RPL3B is abundantly expressed in all the tissues, whereas RPL3A, another RPL3 gene family member, is expressed at low levels. Notably, the expression level of RPL3A in the rml1 mutant is similar to that in the wild-type, suggesting that RPL3A provides no functional compensation for RPL3B in rml1 plants. Ribosomal profiles show that mutation of RPL3B leads to a significant reduction in free 60S ribosomal subunits and polysomes, indicating a ribosomal insufficiency in the rml1 mutant. Our results demonstrate that the ribosomal protein gene RPL3B is required for maintaining normal leaf morphology and plant architecture in rice through its regulation of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:27241493

  13. The RICE MINUTE-LIKE1 (RML1) gene, encoding a ribosomal large subunit protein L3B, regulates leaf morphology and plant architecture in rice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming; Wang, Yihua; Liu, Xi; Sun, Juan; Wang, Yunlong; Xu, Yang; Lv, Jia; Long, Wuhua; Zhu, Xiaopin; Guo, Xiuping; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Chunming; Wan, Jianmin

    2016-05-01

    Mutations of ribosomal proteins (RPs) are known to cause developmental abnormalities in yeast, mammals, and dicotyledonous plants; however, their effects have not been studied in rice. Here, we identifiy a ribosomal biogenesis mutant, rice minute-like1 (rml1) that displays a minute phenotype as evidenced by retarded growth and defects in the vascular system. We determine that RML1 encodes a ribosome large subunit protein 3B (RPL3B) in rice by means of map-based cloning and genetic complementation. RPL3B is abundantly expressed in all the tissues, whereas RPL3A, another RPL3 gene family member, is expressed at low levels. Notably, the expression level of RPL3A in the rml1 mutant is similar to that in the wild-type, suggesting that RPL3A provides no functional compensation for RPL3B in rml1 plants. Ribosomal profiles show that mutation of RPL3B leads to a significant reduction in free 60S ribosomal subunits and polysomes, indicating a ribosomal insufficiency in the rml1 mutant. Our results demonstrate that the ribosomal protein gene RPL3B is required for maintaining normal leaf morphology and plant architecture in rice through its regulation of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:27241493

  14. The Ribosomal S10 Protein Is a General Target for Decreased Tigecycline Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Beabout, Kathryn; Hammerstrom, Troy G.; Perez, Anisha Maria; Magalhães, Bárbara Freitas; Prater, Amy G.; Clements, Thomas P.; Arias, Cesar A.; Saxer, Gerda

    2015-01-01

    Tigecycline is a translational inhibitor with efficacy against a wide range of pathogens. Using experimental evolution, we adapted Acinetobacter baumannii, Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus to growth in elevated tigecycline concentrations. At the end of adaptation, 35 out of 47 replicate populations had clones with a mutation in rpsJ, the gene that encodes the ribosomal S10 protein. To validate the role of mutations in rpsJ in conferring tigecycline resistance, we showed that mutation of rpsJ alone in Enterococcus faecalis was sufficient to increase the tigecycline MIC to the clinical breakpoint of 0.5 μg/ml. Importantly, we also report the first identification of rpsJ mutations associated with decreased tigecycline susceptibility in A. baumannii, E. coli, and S. aureus. The identified S10 mutations across both Gram-positive and -negative species cluster in the vertex of an extended loop that is located near the tigecycline-binding pocket within the 16S rRNA. These data indicate that S10 is a general target of tigecycline adaptation and a relevant marker for detecting reduced susceptibility in both Gram-positive and -negative pathogens. PMID:26124155

  15. Ribosome Protein L4 is essential for Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 function

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chih-Lung; Liu, Cheng-Der; You, Ren-In; Ching, Yung-Hao; Liang, Jun; Ke, Liangru; Chen, Ya-Lin; Chen, Hong-Chi; Hsu, Hao-Jen; Liou, Je-Wen; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1)-mediated origin of plasmid replication (oriP) DNA episome maintenance is essential for EBV-mediated tumorigenesis. We have now found that EBNA1 binds to Ribosome Protein L4 (RPL4). RPL4 shRNA knockdown decreased EBNA1 activation of an oriP luciferase reporter, EBNA1 DNA binding in lymphoblastoid cell lines, and EBV genome number per lymphoblastoid cell line. EBV infection increased RPL4 expression and redistributed RPL4 to cell nuclei. RPL4 and Nucleolin (NCL) were a scaffold for an EBNA1-induced oriP complex. The RPL4 N terminus cooperated with NCL-K429 to support EBNA1 and oriP-mediated episome binding and maintenance, whereas the NCL C-terminal K380 and K393 induced oriP DNA H3K4me2 modification and promoted EBNA1 activation of oriP-dependent transcription. These observations provide new insights into the mechanisms by which EBV uses NCL and RPL4 to establish persistent B-lymphoblastoid cell infection. PMID:26858444

  16. Mutation in ribosomal protein S5 leads to spectinomycin resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Ilina, Elena N; Malakhova, Maya V; Bodoev, Ivan N; Oparina, Nina Y; Filimonova, Alla V; Govorun, Vadim M

    2013-01-01

    Spectinomycin remains a useful reserve option for therapy of gonorrhea. The emergence of multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains with decreased susceptibility to cefixime and to ceftriaxone makes it the only medicine still effective for treatment of gonorrhea infection in analogous cases. However, adoption of spectinomycin as a routinely used drug of choice was soon followed by reports of spectinomycin resistance. The main molecular mechanism of spectinomycin resistance in N. gonorrhoeae was C1192T substitution in 16S rRNA genes. Here we reported a Thr-24→Pro mutation in ribosomal protein S5 (RPS5) found in spectinomycin resistant clinical N. gonorrhoeae strain, which carried no changes in 16S rRNA. In a series of experiments, the transfer of rpsE gene allele encoding the mutant RPS5 to the recipient N. gonorrhoeae strains was analyzed. The relatively high rate of transformation [ca. 10(-5) colony-forming units (CFUs)] indicates the possibility of spread of spectinonycin resistance within gonococcal population due to the horizontal gene transfer (HGT). PMID:23847609

  17. Integrative analyses shed new light on human ribosomal protein gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zheng, Yiyu; Hu, Haiyan; Li, Xiaoman

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are important house-keeping genes that are well-known for their coordinated expression. Previous studies on RPGs are largely limited to their promoter regions. Recent high-throughput studies provide an unprecedented opportunity to study how human RPGs are transcriptionally modulated and how such transcriptional regulation may contribute to the coordinate gene expression in various tissues and cell types. By analyzing the DNase I hypersensitive sites under 349 experimental conditions, we predicted 217 RPG regulatory regions in the human genome. More than 86.6% of these computationally predicted regulatory regions were partially corroborated by independent experimental measurements. Motif analyses on these predicted regulatory regions identified 31 DNA motifs, including 57.1% of experimentally validated motifs in literature that regulate RPGs. Interestingly, we observed that the majority of the predicted motifs were shared by the predicted distal and proximal regulatory regions of the same RPGs, a likely general mechanism for enhancer-promoter interactions. We also found that RPGs may be differently regulated in different cells, indicating that condition-specific RPG regulatory regions still need to be discovered and investigated. Our study advances the understanding of how RPGs are coordinately modulated, which sheds light to the general principles of gene transcriptional regulation in mammals. PMID:27346035

  18. Sumoylation of Rap1 mediates the recruitment of TFIID to promote transcription of ribosomal protein genes.

    PubMed

    Chymkowitch, Pierre; Nguéa, Aurélie P; Aanes, Håvard; Koehler, Christian J; Thiede, Bernd; Lorenz, Susanne; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Klungland, Arne; Enserink, Jorrit M

    2015-06-01

    Transcription factors are abundant Sumo targets, yet the global distribution of Sumo along the chromatin and its physiological relevance in transcription are poorly understood. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we determined the genome-wide localization of Sumo along the chromatin. We discovered that Sumo-enriched genes are almost exclusively involved in translation, such as tRNA genes and ribosomal protein genes (RPGs). Genome-wide expression analysis showed that Sumo positively regulates their transcription. We also discovered that the Sumo consensus motif at RPG promoters is identical to the DNA binding motif of the transcription factor Rap1. We demonstrate that Rap1 is a molecular target of Sumo and that sumoylation of Rap1 is important for cell viability. Furthermore, Rap1 sumoylation promotes recruitment of the basal transcription machinery, and sumoylation of Rap1 cooperates with the target of rapamycin kinase complex 1 (TORC1) pathway to promote RPG transcription. Strikingly, our data reveal that sumoylation of Rap1 functions in a homeostatic feedback loop that sustains RPG transcription during translational stress. Taken together, Sumo regulates the cellular translational capacity by promoting transcription of tRNA genes and RPGs. PMID:25800674

  19. Ribosome Modulation Factor, an Important Protein for Cell Viability Encoded by the Polyamine Modulon*

    PubMed Central

    Terui, Yusuke; Tabei, Yuzuru; Akiyama, Mariko; Higashi, Kyohei; Tomitori, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira; Igarashi, Kazuei; Kashiwagi, Keiko

    2010-01-01

    We searched for proteins whose synthesis is enhanced by polyamines at the stationary phase of cell growth using an Escherichia coli polyamine-requiring mutant in which cell viability is greatly decreased by polyamine deficiency. The synthesis of ribosome modulation factor (RMF) was strongly enhanced by polyamines at the level of translation at the stationary phase of cell growth. In rmf mRNA, a Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence is located 11 nucleotides upstream of the initiation codon AUG. When the SD sequence was moved to the more common position 8 nucleotides upstream of the initiation codon, the degree of polyamine stimulation was reduced, although the level of RMF synthesis was markedly increased. Polyamine stimulation of RMF synthesis was found to be caused by a selective structural change of the bulged-out region of the initiation site of rmf mRNA. The decrease in cell viability caused by polyamine deficiency was prevented by the addition of a modified rmf gene whose synthesis is not influenced by polyamines. The results indicate that polyamines enhance cell viability of E. coli at least in part by enhancing RMF synthesis. PMID:20628056

  20. Compensation for differences in gene copy number among yeast ribosomal proteins is encoded within their promoters

    PubMed Central

    Zeevi, Danny; Sharon, Eilon; Lotan-Pompan, Maya; Lubling, Yaniv; Shipony, Zohar; Raveh-Sadka, Tali; Keren, Leeat; Levo, Michal; Weinberger, Adina; Segal, Eran

    2011-01-01

    Coordinate regulation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes is key for controlling cell growth. In yeast, it is unclear how this regulation achieves the required equimolar amounts of the different RP components, given that some RP genes exist in duplicate copies, while others have only one copy. Here, we tested whether the solution to this challenge is partly encoded within the DNA sequence of the RP promoters, by fusing 110 different RP promoters to a fluorescent gene reporter, allowing us to robustly detect differences in their promoter activities that are as small as ∼10%. We found that single-copy RP promoters have significantly higher activities, suggesting that proper RP stoichiometry is indeed partly encoded within the RP promoters. Notably, we also partially uncovered how this regulation is encoded by finding that RP promoters with higher activity have more nucleosome-disfavoring sequences and characteristic spatial organizations of these sequences and of binding sites for key RP regulators. Mutations in these elements result in a significant decrease of RP promoter activity. Thus, our results suggest that intrinsic (DNA-dependent) nucleosome organization may be a key mechanism by which genomes encode biologically meaningful promoter activities. Our approach can readily be applied to uncover how transcriptional programs of other promoters are encoded. PMID:22009988

  1. Integrative analyses shed new light on human ribosomal protein gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Zheng, Yiyu; Hu, Haiyan; Li, Xiaoman

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are important house-keeping genes that are well-known for their coordinated expression. Previous studies on RPGs are largely limited to their promoter regions. Recent high-throughput studies provide an unprecedented opportunity to study how human RPGs are transcriptionally modulated and how such transcriptional regulation may contribute to the coordinate gene expression in various tissues and cell types. By analyzing the DNase I hypersensitive sites under 349 experimental conditions, we predicted 217 RPG regulatory regions in the human genome. More than 86.6% of these computationally predicted regulatory regions were partially corroborated by independent experimental measurements. Motif analyses on these predicted regulatory regions identified 31 DNA motifs, including 57.1% of experimentally validated motifs in literature that regulate RPGs. Interestingly, we observed that the majority of the predicted motifs were shared by the predicted distal and proximal regulatory regions of the same RPGs, a likely general mechanism for enhancer-promoter interactions. We also found that RPGs may be differently regulated in different cells, indicating that condition-specific RPG regulatory regions still need to be discovered and investigated. Our study advances the understanding of how RPGs are coordinately modulated, which sheds light to the general principles of gene transcriptional regulation in mammals. PMID:27346035

  2. Combined heat shock protein 90 and ribosomal RNA sequence phylogeny supports multiple replacements of dinoflagellate plastids.

    PubMed

    Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Minge, Marianne A; Cavalier-Smith, Tom; Nedreklepp, Joachim M; Klaveness, Dag; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2006-01-01

    Dinoflagellates harbour diverse plastids obtained from several algal groups, including haptophytes, diatoms, cryptophytes, and prasinophytes. Their major plastid type with the accessory pigment peridinin is found in the vast majority of photosynthetic species. Some species of dinoflagellates have other aberrantly pigmented plastids. We sequenced the nuclear small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of the "green" dinoflagellate Gymnodinium chlorophorum and show that it is sister to Lepidodinium viride, indicating that their common ancestor obtained the prasinophyte (or other green alga) plastid in one event. As the placement of dinoflagellate species that acquired green algal or haptophyte plastids is unclear from small and large subunit (LSU) rRNA trees, we tested the usefulness of the heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 gene for dinoflagellate phylogeny by sequencing it from four species with aberrant plastids (G. chlorophorum, Karlodinium micrum, Karenia brevis, and Karenia mikimotoi) plus Alexandrium tamarense, and constructing phylogenetic trees for Hsp90 and rRNAs, separately and together. Analyses of the Hsp90 and concatenated data suggest an ancestral origin of the peridinin-containing plastid, and two independent replacements of the peridinin plastid soon after the early radiation of the dinoflagellates. Thus, the Hsp90 gene seems to be a promising phylogenetic marker for dinoflagellate phylogeny. PMID:16677346

  3. Ribosome Protein L4 is essential for Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 function.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chih-Lung; Liu, Cheng-Der; You, Ren-In; Ching, Yung-Hao; Liang, Jun; Ke, Liangru; Chen, Ya-Lin; Chen, Hong-Chi; Hsu, Hao-Jen; Liou, Je-Wen; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-Wen

    2016-02-23

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1)-mediated origin of plasmid replication (oriP) DNA episome maintenance is essential for EBV-mediated tumorigenesis. We have now found that EBNA1 binds to Ribosome Protein L4 (RPL4). RPL4 shRNA knockdown decreased EBNA1 activation of an oriP luciferase reporter, EBNA1 DNA binding in lymphoblastoid cell lines, and EBV genome number per lymphoblastoid cell line. EBV infection increased RPL4 expression and redistributed RPL4 to cell nuclei. RPL4 and Nucleolin (NCL) were a scaffold for an EBNA1-induced oriP complex. The RPL4 N terminus cooperated with NCL-K429 to support EBNA1 and oriP-mediated episome binding and maintenance, whereas the NCL C-terminal K380 and K393 induced oriP DNA H3K4me2 modification and promoted EBNA1 activation of oriP-dependent transcription. These observations provide new insights into the mechanisms by which EBV uses NCL and RPL4 to establish persistent B-lymphoblastoid cell infection. PMID:26858444

  4. Ribosomal protein S6 is highly expressed in non-Hodgkin lymphoma and associates with mRNA containing a 5' terminal oligopyrimidine tract.

    PubMed

    Hagner, P R; Mazan-Mamczarz, K; Dai, B; Balzer, E M; Corl, S; Martin, S S; Zhao, X F; Gartenhaus, R B

    2011-03-31

    The molecular mechanism(s) linking tumorigenesis and morphological alterations in the nucleolus are presently coming into focus. The nucleolus is the cellular organelle in which the formation of ribosomal subunits occurs. Ribosomal biogenesis occurs through the transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), rRNA processing and production of ribosomal proteins. An error in any of these processes may lead to deregulated cellular translation, evident in multiple cancers and 'ribosomopathies'. Deregulated protein synthesis may be achieved through the overexpression of ribosomal proteins as seen in primary leukemic blasts with elevated levels of ribosomal proteins S11 and S14. In this study, we demonstrate that ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) is highly expressed in primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) samples. Genetic modulation of RPS6 protein levels with specifically targeted short hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentiviruses led to a decrease in the actively proliferating population of cells compared with control shRNA. Low-dose rapamycin treatments have been shown to affect the translation of 5' terminal oligopyrimidine (5' TOP) tract mRNA, which encodes the translational machinery, implicating RPS6 in 5' TOP translation. Recently, it was shown that disruption of 40S ribosomal biogenesis through specific small inhibitory RNA knockdown of RPS6 defined RPS6 as a critical regulator of 5' TOP translation. For the first time, we show that RPS6 associates with multiple mRNAs containing a 5' TOP tract. These findings expand our understanding of the mechanism(s) involved in ribosomal biogenesis and deregulated protein synthesis in DLBCL. PMID:21102526

  5. Anti-Human Endoglin (hCD105) Immunotoxin—Containing Recombinant Single Chain Ribosome-Inactivating Protein Musarmin 1

    PubMed Central

    Barriuso, Begoña; Antolín, Pilar; Arias, F. Javier; Girotti, Alessandra; Jiménez, Pilar; Cordoba-Diaz, Manuel; Cordoba-Diaz, Damián; Girbés, Tomás

    2016-01-01

    Endoglin (CD105) is an accessory component of the TGF-β receptor complex, which is expressed in a number of tissues and over-expressed in the endothelial cells of tumor neovasculature. Targeting endoglin with immunotoxins containing type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins has proved an effective tool to reduce blood supply to B16 mice tumor xenografts. We prepared anti-endoglin immunotoxin (IT)—containing recombinant musarmin 1 (single chain ribosome-inactivating proteins) linked to the mouse anti-human CD105 44G4 mouse monoclonal antibody via N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP). The immunotoxin specifically killed L929 fibroblast mouse cells transfected with the short form of human endoglin with IC50 values in the range of 5 × 10−10 to 10−9 M. PMID:27294959

  6. Use of ribosome-inactivating proteins from Sambucus for the construction of immunotoxins and conjugates for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ferreras, José M; Citores, Lucía; Iglesias, Rosario; Jiménez, Pilar; Girbés, Tomás

    2011-05-01

    The type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) isolated from some species belonging to the Sambucus genus, have the characteristic that although being even more active than ricin inhibiting protein synthesis in cell-free extracts, they lack the high toxicity of ricin and related type 2 RIPs to intact cells and animals. This is due to the fact that after internalization, they follow a different intracellular pathway that does not allow them to reach the cytosolic ribosomes. The lack of toxicity of type 2 RIPs from Sambucus make them good candidates as toxic moieties in the construction of immunotoxins and conjugates directed against specific targets. Up to now they have been conjugated with either transferrin or anti-CD105 to target either transferrin receptor- or endoglin-overexpressing cells, respectively. PMID:22069717

  7. Diversity and Recombination of Dispersed Ribosomal DNA and Protein Coding Genes in Microsporidia

    PubMed Central

    Ironside, Joseph Edward

    2013-01-01

    Microsporidian strains are usually classified on the basis of their ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences. Although rDNA occurs as multiple copies, in most non-microsporidian species copies within a genome occur as tandem arrays and are homogenised by concerted evolution. In contrast, microsporidian rDNA units are dispersed throughout the genome in some species, and on this basis are predicted to undergo reduced concerted evolution. Furthermore many microsporidian species appear to be asexual and should therefore exhibit reduced genetic diversity due to a lack of recombination. Here, DNA sequences are compared between microsporidia with different life cycles in order to determine the effects of concerted evolution and sexual reproduction upon the diversity of rDNA and protein coding genes. Comparisons of cloned rDNA sequences between microsporidia of the genus Nosema with different life cycles provide evidence of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection. This suggests a birth and death process of evolution. However, some concerted evolution is suggested by clustering of rDNA sequences within species. Variability of protein-coding sequences indicates that considerable intergenomic variation also occurs between microsporidian cells within a single host. Patterns of variation in microsporidian DNA sequences indicate that additional diversity is generated by intragenomic and/or intergenomic recombination between sequence variants. The discovery of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection in microsporidian rRNA sequences supports the hypothesis that concerted evolution is reduced when copies of a gene are dispersed rather than repeated tandemly. The presence of intragenomic variability also renders the use of rDNA sequences for barcoding microsporidia questionable. Evidence of recombination in the single-copy genes of putatively asexual microsporidia suggests that these species may undergo cryptic sexual reproduction, a

  8. Ribosomal protein mutations in Korean patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Chae, Hyojin; Park, Joonhong; Lee, Seungok; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Yonggoo; Lee, Jae-Wook; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Cho, Bin; Jeong, Dae Chul; Kim, Jiyeon; Kim, Jung Rok; Park, Geon

    2014-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by hypoproliferative anemia, associated physical malformations and a predisposition to cancer. DBA has been associated with mutations and deletions in the large and small ribosomal protein genes, and genetic aberrations have been detected in ∼50-60% of patients. In this study, nine Korean DBA patients were screened for mutations in eight known DBA genes (RPS19, RPS24, RPS17, RPS10, RPS26, RPL35A, RPL5 and RPL11) using the direct sequencing method. Mutations in RPS19, RPS26 and RPS17 were detected in four, two and one patient, respectively. Among the mutations detected in RPS19, two mutations were novel (c.26T>A, c.357-2A>G). For the mutation-negative cases, array-CGH analysis was performed to identify copy-number variations, and no deletions involving the known DBA gene regions were identified. The relative mRNA expression of RPS19 estimated using real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed two- to fourfold reductions in RPS19 mRNA expression in three patients with RPS19 mutations, and p53 protein expression analysis by immunohistochemistry showed variable but significant nuclear staining in the DBA patients. In conclusion, heterozygous mutations in the known DBA genes RPS19, RPS26 and RPS17 were detected in seven out of nine Korean DBA patients. Among these patients, RPS19 was the most frequently mutated gene. In addition, decreased RPS19 mRNA expression and p53 overexpression were observed in the Korean DBA patients, which supports the hypothesis that haploinsufficiency and p53 hyperactivation represent a central pathway underlying the pathogenesis of DBA. PMID:24675553

  9. Phenotypically Dormant and Immature Leukaemia Cells Display Increased Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Pallis, Monica; Harvey, Tamsin; Russell, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity drives a number of key metabolic processes including growth and protein synthesis. Inhibition of the mTOR pathway promotes cellular dormancy. Since cells from patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) can be phenotypically dormant (quiescent), we examined biomarkers of their mTOR pathway activity concurrently with Ki-67 and CD71 (indicators of cycling cells) by quantitative flow cytometry. Using antibodies to phosphorylated epitopes of mTOR (S2448) and its downstream targets ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6, S235/236) and 4E-BP1 (T36/45), we documented that these phosphorylations were negligible in lymphocytes, but evident in dormant as well as proliferating subsets of both mobilised normal stem cell harvest CD34+ cells and AML blasts. Although mTOR phosphorylation in AML blasts was lower than that of the normal CD34+ cells, p-4E-BP1 was 2.6-fold higher and p-rpS6 was 22-fold higher. Moreover, in contrast to 4E-BP1, rpS6 phosphorylation was higher in dormant than proliferating AML blasts, and was also higher in the immature CD34+CD38- blast subset. Data from the Cancer Genome Atlas show that rpS6 expression is associated with that of respiratory chain enzymes in AML. We conclude that phenotypic quiescence markers do not necessarily predict metabolic dormancy and that elevated rpS6 ser235/236 phosphorylation is characteristic of AML. PMID:26985829

  10. Reduced ribosomal protein s6 phosphorylation after progressive resistance exercise in growing adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, Nathan J; Nokleby, Jessica J; Thicke, Bethany M; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate moderate intensity progressive resistance exercise (PRE) in growing adolescent rats and its effect on muscle hypertrophy (defined as an increase in fiber cross-sectional area [CSA]). We hypothesized that in adolescent animals moderate intensity PRE would increase (a) fiber CSA; (b) myosin heavy chain (MyHC) content; and (c) expression and phosphorylation of cell signaling molecules involved in translational regulation, compared with that in age-matched sedentary (SED) controls. In the PRE group, 3-week-old male rats were trained to climb a vertical ladder as a mode of PRE training such that by 10 weeks all animals in the PRE group had progressed to carry an additional 80% of their body weight per climb. In agreement with our hypotheses, we observed that 10 weeks of moderate PRE in adolescent animals was sufficient to increase the CSA of muscle fibers and increase MyHC content. The average muscle fiber CSA increased by >10%, and the total MyHC content increased by 35% (p < 0.05) in the PRE group compared with that in the SED animals. Concurrently, we investigated sustained changes in the expression and phosphorylation of key signaling molecules that are previously identified regulators of hypertrophy in adult animal models. Contrary to our hypotheses, expression and phosphorylation of the translational regulators mammalian target of rapamycin and Akt were not increased in the PRE group. In addition, we observed that the ratio of phosphorylated-to-unphosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) was reduced over sixfold in PRE animals (p < 0.05) and that total rpS6 protein levels were unchanged between PRE and SED animals (p > 0.05). We conclude that moderate intensity PRE is sufficient to induce muscle hypertrophy in adolescent animals, whereas the signaling mechanisms associated with muscle hypertrophy may differ between growing adolescents and adults. PMID:22614147

  11. Phenotypically Dormant and Immature Leukaemia Cells Display Increased Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Pallis, Monica; Harvey, Tamsin; Russell, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity drives a number of key metabolic processes including growth and protein synthesis. Inhibition of the mTOR pathway promotes cellular dormancy. Since cells from patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) can be phenotypically dormant (quiescent), we examined biomarkers of their mTOR pathway activity concurrently with Ki-67 and CD71 (indicators of cycling cells) by quantitative flow cytometry. Using antibodies to phosphorylated epitopes of mTOR (S2448) and its downstream targets ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6, S235/236) and 4E-BP1 (T36/45), we documented that these phosphorylations were negligible in lymphocytes, but evident in dormant as well as proliferating subsets of both mobilised normal stem cell harvest CD34+ cells and AML blasts. Although mTOR phosphorylation in AML blasts was lower than that of the normal CD34+ cells, p-4E-BP1 was 2.6-fold higher and p-rpS6 was 22-fold higher. Moreover, in contrast to 4E-BP1, rpS6 phosphorylation was higher in dormant than proliferating AML blasts, and was also higher in the immature CD34+CD38- blast subset. Data from the Cancer Genome Atlas show that rpS6 expression is associated with that of respiratory chain enzymes in AML. We conclude that phenotypic quiescence markers do not necessarily predict metabolic dormancy and that elevated rpS6 ser235/236 phosphorylation is characteristic of AML. PMID:26985829

  12. 4.5S ribonucleic acid, a novel ribosome component in the chloroplasts of flowering plants.

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, C M; Dyer, T A

    1979-01-01

    A species of low-molecular-weight ribosomal RNA, referred to as '4.5S rRNA', was found in addition to 5S rRNA in the large subunit of chloroplast ribosomes of a wide range of flowering plants. It was shown by sequence analysis that several variants of this RNA may occur in a plant. Furthermore, although in most flowering plants the predominant variant contains about 100 nucleotides, in the broad bean it has less than 80. It seems, therefore, to be much more diverse in size and sequence than the other ribosomal RNA species. Like 5S rRNA , it does not contain modified nucleotides and it is also unusual in having an unphosphorylated 5'-end. It is apparently neither a homologue of cytosol 5.8S rRNA nor a fragment of 23S rRNA. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:540035

  13. Mutations in 23S rRNA and Ribosomal Protein L4 Account for Resistance in Pneumococcal Strains Selected In Vitro by Macrolide Passage

    PubMed Central

    Tait-Kamradt, A.; Davies, T.; Cronan, M.; Jacobs, M. R.; Appelbaum, P. C.; Sutcliffe, J.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae mutants, selected from susceptible strains by serial passage in azithromycin, were investigated. These mutants were resistant to 14- and 15-membered macrolides, but resistance could not be explained by any clinically relevant resistance determinant [mef(A), erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(TR), msr(A), mph(A), mph(B), mph(C), ere(A), ere(B)]. An investigation into the sequences of 23S rRNAs in the mutant and parental strains revealed individual changes of C2611A, C2611G, A2058G, and A2059G (Escherichia coli numbering) in four mutants. Mutations at these residues in domain V of 23S rRNA have been noted to confer erythromycin resistance in other species. Not all four 23S rRNA alleles have to contain the mutation to confer resistance. Some of the mutations also confer coresistance to streptogramin B (C2611A, C2611G, and A2058G), 16-membered macrolides (all changes), and clindamycin (A2058G and A2059G). Interestingly, none of these mutations confer high-level resistance to telithromycin (HMR-3647). Further, two of the mutants which had no changes in their 23S rRNA sequences had changes in a highly conserved stretch of amino acids (63KPWRQKGTGRAR74) in ribosomal protein L4. One mutant contained a single amino acid change (G69C), while the other mutant had a 6-base insert, resulting in two amino acids (S and Q) being inserted between amino acids Q67 and K68. To our knowledge, this is the first description of mutations in 23S rRNA genes or ribosomal proteins in macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae strains. PMID:10898684

  14. Nuclear Protein Sam68 Interacts with the Enterovirus 71 Internal Ribosome Entry Site and Positively Regulates Viral Protein Translation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Song, Lei; Cong, Haolong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71) recruits various cellular factors to assist in the replication and translation of its genome. Identification of the host factors involved in the EV71 life cycle not only will enable a better understanding of the infection mechanism but also has the potential to be of use in the development of antiviral therapeutics. In this study, we demonstrated that the cellular factor 68-kDa Src-associated protein in mitosis (Sam68) acts as an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) trans-acting factor (ITAF) that binds specifically to the EV71 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR). Interaction sites in both the viral IRES (stem-loops IV and V) and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K homology (KH) domain of Sam68 protein were further mapped using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and biotin RNA pulldown assay. More importantly, dual-luciferase (firefly) reporter analysis suggested that overexpression of Sam68 positively regulated IRES-dependent translation of virus proteins. In contrast, both IRES activity and viral protein translation significantly decreased in Sam68 knockdown cells compared with the negative-control cells treated with short hairpin RNA (shRNA). However, downregulation of Sam68 did not have a significant inhibitory effect on the accumulation of the EV71 genome. Moreover, Sam68 was redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and interacts with cellular factors, such as poly(rC)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2) and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP), during EV71 infection. The cytoplasmic relocalization of Sam68 in EV71-infected cells may be involved in the enhancement of EV71 IRES-mediated translation. Since Sam68 is known to be a RNA-binding protein, these results provide direct evidence that Sam68 is a novel ITAF that interacts with EV71 IRES and positively regulates viral protein translation. IMPORTANCE The nuclear protein Sam68 is found as an additional new host factor that interacts with the EV71 IRES during infection

  15. Ribosomal protein L18aB is required for both male gametophyte function and embryo development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hailong; Chen, Dan; Wang, Yifan; Sun, Yang; Zhao, Jing; Sun, Mengxiang; Peng, Xiongbo

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins are involved in numerous essential cell activities in plants. However, the regulatory role in specific plant developmental processes has not yet been fully elucidated. Here we identified the new ribosomal protein L18aB, which is specifically involved in sexual reproduction and plays a critical role in male gametophyte development and embryo pattern formation. In rpl18aB mutant plants, the mature pollen grains can germinate normally, but their competitiveness for growing in the style is significantly reduced. More interestingly, RPL18aB is required in early embryogenesis. rpl18aB embryos displayed irregular cell division orientations in the early pro-embryo and arrested at the globular stage with possible, secondary pattern formation defects. Further investigations revealed that the polar transportation of auxin is disturbed in the rpl18aB mutant embryos, which may explain the observed failure in embryo pattern formation. The cell type-specific complementation of RPL18aB in rpl18aB was not able to recover the phenotype, indicating that RPL18aB may play an essential role in early cell fate determination. This work unravels a novel role in embryo development for a ribosomal protein, and provides insight into regulatory mechanism of early embryogenesis. PMID:27502163

  16. Ribosomal protein L18aB is required for both male gametophyte function and embryo development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hailong; Chen, Dan; Wang, Yifan; Sun, Yang; Zhao, Jing; Sun, Mengxiang; Peng, Xiongbo

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins are involved in numerous essential cell activities in plants. However, the regulatory role in specific plant developmental processes has not yet been fully elucidated. Here we identified the new ribosomal protein L18aB, which is specifically involved in sexual reproduction and plays a critical role in male gametophyte development and embryo pattern formation. In rpl18aB mutant plants, the mature pollen grains can germinate normally, but their competitiveness for growing in the style is significantly reduced. More interestingly, RPL18aB is required in early embryogenesis. rpl18aB embryos displayed irregular cell division orientations in the early pro-embryo and arrested at the globular stage with possible, secondary pattern formation defects. Further investigations revealed that the polar transportation of auxin is disturbed in the rpl18aB mutant embryos, which may explain the observed failure in embryo pattern formation. The cell type-specific complementation of RPL18aB in rpl18aB was not able to recover the phenotype, indicating that RPL18aB may play an essential role in early cell fate determination. This work unravels a novel role in embryo development for a ribosomal protein, and provides insight into regulatory mechanism of early embryogenesis. PMID:27502163

  17. Comparisons of Ribosomal Protein Gene Promoters Indicate Superiority of Heterologous Regulatory Sequences for Expressing Transgenes in Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Khachatoorian, Careen; Judelson, Howard S.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular genetics approaches in Phytophthora research can be hampered by the limited number of known constitutive promoters for expressing transgenes and the instability of transgene activity. We have therefore characterized genes encoding the cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins of Phytophthora and studied their suitability for expressing transgenes in P. infestans. Phytophthora spp. encode a standard complement of 79 cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. Several genes are duplicated, and two appear to be pseudogenes. Half of the genes are expressed at similar levels during all stages of asexual development, and we discovered that the majority share a novel promoter motif named the PhRiboBox. This sequence is enriched in genes associated with transcription, translation, and DNA replication, including tRNA and rRNA biogenesis. Promoters from the three P. infestans genes encoding ribosomal proteins S9, L10, and L23 and their orthologs from P. capsici were tested for their ability to drive transgenes in stable transformants of P. infestans. Five of the six promoters yielded strong expression of a GUS reporter, but the stability of expression was higher using the P. capsici promoters. With the RPS9 and RPL10 promoters of P. infestans, about half of transformants stopped making GUS over two years of culture, while their P. capsici orthologs conferred stable expression. Since cross-talk between native and transgene loci may trigger gene silencing, we encourage the use of heterologous promoters in transformation studies. PMID:26716454

  18. GUN1 Controls Accumulation of the Plastid Ribosomal Protein S1 at the Protein Level and Interacts with Proteins Involved in Plastid Protein Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tadini, Luca; Pesaresi, Paolo; Kleine, Tatjana; Rossi, Fabio; Guljamow, Arthur; Sommer, Frederik; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Masiero, Simona; Pribil, Mathias; Rothbart, Maxi; Hedtke, Boris; Grimm, Bernhard; Leister, Dario

    2016-03-01

    Developmental or metabolic changes in chloroplasts can have profound effects on the rest of the plant cell. Such intracellular responses are associated with signals that originate in chloroplasts and convey information on their physiological status to the nucleus, which leads to large-scale changes in gene expression (retrograde signaling). A screen designed to identify components of retrograde signaling resulted in the discovery of the so-called genomes uncoupled (gun) mutants. Genetic evidence suggests that the chloroplast protein GUN1 integrates signals derived from perturbations in plastid redox state, plastid gene expression, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, exerting biogenic control of chloroplast functions. However, the molecular mechanism by which GUN1 integrates retrograde signaling in the chloroplast is unclear. Here we show that GUN1 also operates in adult plants, contributing to operational control of chloroplasts. The gun1 mutation genetically interacts with mutations of genes for the chloroplast ribosomal proteins S1 (PRPS1) and L11. Analysis of gun1 prps1 lines indicates that GUN1 controls PRPS1 accumulation at the protein level. The GUN1 protein physically interacts with proteins involved in chloroplast protein homeostasis based on coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments suggest that GUN1 might transiently interact with several TPB enzymes, including Mg-chelatase subunit D (CHLD) and two other TPB enzymes known to activate retrograde signaling. Moreover, the association of PRPS1 and CHLD with protein complexes is modulated by GUN1. These findings allow us to speculate that retrograde signaling might involve GUN1-dependent formation of protein complexes. PMID:26823545

  19. X-ray sequence and crystal structure of luffaculin 1, a novel type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiaomin; Chen, Minghuang; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J; Xie, Jieming; Huang, Mingdong

    2007-01-01

    Background Protein sequence can be obtained through Edman degradation, mass spectrometry, or cDNA sequencing. High resolution X-ray crystallography can also be used to derive protein sequence information, but faces the difficulty in distinguishing the Asp/Asn, Glu/Gln, and Val/Thr pairs. Luffaculin 1 is a new type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) isolated from the seeds of Luffa acutangula. Besides rRNA N-glycosidase activity, luffaculin 1 also demonstrates activities including inhibiting tumor cells' proliferation and inducing tumor cells' differentiation. Results The crystal structure of luffaculin 1 was determined at 1.4 Å resolution. Its amino-acid sequence was derived from this high resolution structure using the following criteria: 1) high resolution electron density; 2) comparison of electron density between two molecules that exist in the same crystal; 3) evaluation of the chemical environment of residues to break down the sequence assignment ambiguity in residue pairs Glu/Gln, Asp/Asn, and Val/Thr; 4) comparison with sequences of the homologous proteins. Using the criteria 1 and 2, 66% of the residues can be assigned. By incorporating with criterion 3, 86% of the residues were assigned, suggesting the effectiveness of chemical environment evaluation in breaking down residue ambiguity. In total, 94% of the luffaculin 1 sequence was assigned with high confidence using this improved X-ray sequencing strategy. Two N-acetylglucosamine moieties, linked respectively to the residues Asn77 and Asn84, can be identified in the structure. Residues Tyr70, Tyr110, Glu159 and Arg162 define the active site of luffaculin 1 as an RNA N-glycosidase. Conclusion X-ray sequencing method can be effective to derive sequence information of proteins. The evaluation of the chemical environment of residues is a useful method to break down the assignment ambiguity in Glu/Gln, Asp/Asn, and Val/Thr pairs. The sequence and the crystal structure confirm that luffaculin 1 is a new

  20. Inter-Protein Sequence Co-Evolution Predicts Known Physical Interactions in Bacterial Ribosomes and the Trp Operon.

    PubMed

    Feinauer, Christoph; Szurmant, Hendrik; Weigt, Martin; Pagnani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Interaction between proteins is a fundamental mechanism that underlies virtually all biological processes. Many important interactions are conserved across a large variety of species. The need to maintain interaction leads to a high degree of co-evolution between residues in the interface between partner proteins. The inference of protein-protein interaction networks from the rapidly growing sequence databases is one of the most formidable tasks in systems biology today. We propose here a novel approach based on the Direct-Coupling Analysis of the co-evolution between inter-protein residue pairs. We use ribosomal and trp operon proteins as test cases: For the small resp. large ribosomal subunit our approach predicts protein-interaction partners at a true-positive rate of 70% resp. 90% within the first 10 predictions, with areas of 0.69 resp. 0.81 under the ROC curves for all predictions. In the trp operon, it assigns the two largest interaction scores to the only two interactions experimentally known. On the level of residue interactions we show that for both the small and the large ribosomal subunit our approach predicts interacting residues in the system with a true positive rate of 60% and 85% in the first 20 predictions. We use artificial data to show that the performance of our approach depends crucially on the size of the joint multiple sequence alignments and analyze how many sequences would be necessary for a perfect prediction if the sequences were sampled from the same model that we use for prediction. Given the performance of our approach on the test data we speculate that it can be used to detect new interactions, especially in the light of the rapid growth of available sequence data. PMID:26882169

  1. Inter-Protein Sequence Co-Evolution Predicts Known Physical Interactions in Bacterial Ribosomes and the Trp Operon

    PubMed Central

    Feinauer, Christoph; Szurmant, Hendrik; Weigt, Martin; Pagnani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Interaction between proteins is a fundamental mechanism that underlies virtually all biological processes. Many important interactions are conserved across a large variety of species. The need to maintain interaction leads to a high degree of co-evolution between residues in the interface between partner proteins. The inference of protein-protein interaction networks from the rapidly growing sequence databases is one of the most formidable tasks in systems biology today. We propose here a novel approach based on the Direct-Coupling Analysis of the co-evolution between inter-protein residue pairs. We use ribosomal and trp operon proteins as test cases: For the small resp. large ribosomal subunit our approach predicts protein-interaction partners at a true-positive rate of 70% resp. 90% within the first 10 predictions, with areas of 0.69 resp. 0.81 under the ROC curves for all predictions. In the trp operon, it assigns the two largest interaction scores to the only two interactions experimentally known. On the level of residue interactions we show that for both the small and the large ribosomal subunit our approach predicts interacting residues in the system with a true positive rate of 60% and 85% in the first 20 predictions. We use artificial data to show that the performance of our approach depends crucially on the size of the joint multiple sequence alignments and analyze how many sequences would be necessary for a perfect prediction if the sequences were sampled from the same model that we use for prediction. Given the performance of our approach on the test data we speculate that it can be used to detect new interactions, especially in the light of the rapid growth of available sequence data. PMID:26882169

  2. Recombineering reveals a diverse collection of ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 that confer resistance to macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Diner, Elie J; Hayes, Christopher S

    2009-02-20

    Mutations in ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 confer resistance to erythromycin and other macrolide antibiotics in a variety of bacteria. L4 and L22 have elongated loops whose tips converge in the peptide exit tunnel near the macrolide-binding site, and resistance mutations typically affect residues within these loops. Here, we used bacteriophage lambda Red-mediated recombination, or "recombineering," to uncover new L4 and L22 alleles that confer macrolide resistance in Escherichia coli. We randomized residues at the tips of the L4 and L22 loops using recombineered oligonucleotide libraries and selected the mutagenized cells for erythromycin-resistant mutants. These experiments led to the identification of 341 resistance mutations encoding 278 unique L4 and L22 proteins-the overwhelming majority of which are novel. Many resistance mutations were complex, involving multiple missense mutations, in-frame deletions, and insertions. Transfer of L4 and L22 mutations into wild-type cells by phage P1-mediated transduction demonstrated that each allele was sufficient to confer macrolide resistance. Although L4 and L22 mutants are typically resistant to most macrolides, selections carried out on different antibiotics revealed macrolide-specific resistance mutations. L22 Lys90Trp is one such allele that confers resistance to erythromycin but not to tylosin and spiramycin. Purified L22 Lys90Trp ribosomes show reduced erythromycin binding but have the same affinity for tylosin as wild-type ribosomes. Moreover, dimethyl sulfate methylation protection assays demonstrated that L22 Lys90Trp ribosomes bind tylosin more readily than erythromycin in vivo. This work underscores the exceptional functional plasticity of the L4 and L22 proteins and highlights the utility of Red-mediated recombination in targeted genetic selections. PMID:19150357

  3. Macromolecular Crowding Effects on Two Homologs of Ribosomal Protein S16: Protein-Dependent Structural Changes and Local Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mikaelsson, Therese; Ådén, Jörgen; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Johansson, Lennart B.-Å.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins function in cellular environments that are crowded with biomolecules, and in this reduced available space, their biophysical properties may differ from those observed in dilute solutions in vitro. Here, we investigated the effects of a synthetic macromolecular crowding agent, dextran 20, on the folded states of hyperthermophilic (S16Thermo) and mesophilic (S16Meso) homologs of the ribosomal protein S16. As expected for an excluded-volume effect, the resistance of the mesophilic protein to heat-induced unfolding increased in the presence of dextran 20, and chemical denaturation experiments at different fixed temperatures showed the macromolecular crowding effect to be temperature-independent. Förster resonance energy transfer experiments show that intramolecular distances between an intrinsic Trp residue and BODIPY-labeled S16Meso depend on the level of the crowding agent. The BODIPY group was attached at three specific positions in S16Meso, allowing measurements of three intraprotein distances. All S16Meso variants exhibited a decrease in the average Trp-BODIPY distance at up to 100 mg/mL dextran 20, whereas the changes in distance became anisotropic (one distance increased, two distances decreased) at higher dextran concentrations. In contrast, the two S16Thermo mutants did not show any changes in Trp-BODIPY distances upon increase of dextran 20 concentrations. It should be noted that the fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes of BODIPY attached to the two S16 homologs decreased gradually in the presence of dextran 20. To investigate the origin of this decrease, we studied the BODIPY quantum yield in three protein variants in the presence of a tyrosine-labeled dextran. The experiments revealed distinct tyrosine quenching behaviors of BODIPY in the three variants, suggesting a dynamic local interaction between dextran and one particular S16 variant. PMID:25028882

  4. Isolation of a ribosome-inactivating and abortifacient protein from seeds of Luffa acutangula.

    PubMed

    Yeung, H W; Li, W W; Ng, T B

    1991-07-01

    A glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 28,000 as estimated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was isolated from seeds of Luffa acutangula using a procedure that involved acetone precipitation, ion exchange chromatography on CM Sepharose CL-6B and gel filtration on Sephadex G-50. In immunodiffusion studies it was found to be immunologically distinct from abortifacient proteins isolated from other members of the Cucurbitaceae family including Momordica charantia, Momordica cochinchinensis, Trichosanthes kirilowii and Trichosanthes cucumeroides. There were some differences in amino acid composition among the proteins although there was a gross similarity. The protein from L. acutangula was capable of inducing mid-term abortion in mice and inhibiting protein synthesis in a cell-free system. PMID:1938101

  5. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of L30e, a ribosomal protein from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (MJ1044)

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, Sarani; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Mridula, Palappetty; Sakamoto, Keiko; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Agari, Yoshihiro; Shinkai, Akeo; Ebihara, Akio; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Sekar, Kanagaraj E-mail: sekar@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2008-02-01

    The ribosomal protein (L30e) from M. jannaschii was cloned from the gene MJ1044, expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystal belongs to the primitive tetragonal space group P4{sub 3} and diffracted to 1.9 Å resolution. In view of the biological significance of understanding the ribosomal machinery of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, the L30e ribosomal protein from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii was cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized using the microbatch-under-oil method with the crystallization conditions 40% PEG 400, 0.1 M MES pH 6.0 and 5% PEG 3000 at 291 K. A diffraction-quality crystal (0.20 × 0.20 × 0.35 mm) was obtained that belonged to the primitive tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.1, b = 46.1, c = 98.5 Å, and diffracted to a resolution of 1.9 Å. Preliminary calculations reveal that the asymmetric unit contains two monomers with a Matthews coefficient (V{sub M}) of 2.16 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}.

  6. A novel function for the 90 kDa heat-shock protein (Hsp90): facilitating nuclear export of 60 S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Schlatter, Harald; Langer, Thomas; Rosmus, Susann; Onneken, Marie-Luise; Fasold, Hugo

    2002-01-01

    Ribosomal subunits are assembled in the nucleus, and mature 40 S and 60 S subunits are exported stoichiometrically into the cytoplasm. The nuclear export of ribosomal subunits is a unidirectional, saturable and energy-dependent process. An in vitro assay for the nuclear export of 60 S ribosomal subunits involves the use of resealed nuclear envelopes. The export of ribosomal subunits from resealed nuclear envelopes is enhanced by cytoplasmic proteins. Here we present evidence that the export-promoting activity was due to the cytoplasmic 90 kDa heat-shock protein (Hsp90). Isolated, purified Hsp90 vastly enhanced the export of 60 S ribosomal subunits from resealed nuclear envelopes, while inhibition of Hsp90 function, either with the Hsp90-binding drug geldanamycin or with anti-Hsp90 antibodies, resulted in reduced release of 60 S ribosomal subunits. To confirm these findings under in vivo conditions, corresponding experiments were performed with Xenopus oocytes using microinjection techniques; the results obtained confirmed the findings obtained with resealed nuclear envelopes. These findings suggest that Hsp90 facilitates the nuclear export of 60 S ribosomal subunits, probably by chaperoning protein interactions during the export process. PMID:11879195

  7. Translation factors and ribosomal proteins control tumor onset and progression: how?

    PubMed

    Loreni, F; Mancino, M; Biffo, S

    2014-04-24

    Gene expression is shaped by translational control. The modalities and the extent by which translation factors modify gene expression have revealed therapeutic scenarios. For instance, eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)4E activity is controlled by the signaling cascade of growth factors, and drives tumorigenesis by favoring the translation of specific mRNAs. Highly specific drugs target the activity of eIF4E. Indeed, the antitumor action of mTOR complex 1 (mTORc1) blockers like rapamycin relies on their capability to inhibit eIF4E assembly into functional eIF4F complexes. eIF4E biology, from its inception to recent pharmacological targeting, is proof-of-principle that translational control is druggable. The case for eIF4E is not isolated. The translational machinery is involved in the biology of cancer through many other mechanisms. First, untranslated sequences on mRNAs as well as noncoding RNAs regulate the translational efficiency of mRNAs that are central for tumor progression. Second, other initiation factors like eIF6 show a tumorigenic potential by acting downstream of oncogenic pathways. Third, genetic alterations in components of the translational apparatus underlie an entire class of inherited syndromes known as 'ribosomopathies' that are associated with increased cancer risk. Taken together, data suggest that in spite of their evolutionary conservation and ubiquitous nature, variations in the activity and levels of ribosomal proteins and translation factors generate highly specific effects. Beside, as the structures and biochemical activities of several noncoding RNAs and initiation factors are known, these factors may be amenable to rational pharmacological targeting. The future is to design highly specific drugs targeting the translational apparatus. PMID:23644661

  8. Efficient -2 frameshifting by mammalian ribosomes to synthesize an additional arterivirus protein.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ying; Treffers, Emmely E; Li, Yanhua; Tas, Ali; Sun, Zhi; van der Meer, Yvonne; de Ru, Arnoud H; van Veelen, Peter A; Atkins, John F; Snijder, Eric J; Firth, Andrew E

    2012-10-23

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF) is a gene-expression mechanism used to express many viral and some cellular genes. In contrast, efficient natural utilization of -2 PRF has not been demonstrated previously in eukaryotic systems. Like all nidoviruses, members of the Arteriviridae (a family of positive-stranded RNA viruses) express their replicase polyproteins pp1a and pp1ab from two long ORFs (1a and 1b), where synthesis of pp1ab depends on -1 PRF. These polyproteins are posttranslationally cleaved into at least 13 functional nonstructural proteins. Here we report that porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), and apparently most other arteriviruses, use an additional PRF mechanism to access a conserved alternative ORF that overlaps the nsp2-encoding region of ORF1a in the +1 frame. We show here that this ORF is translated via -2 PRF at a conserved G_GUU_UUU sequence (underscores separate ORF1a codons) at an estimated efficiency of around 20%, yielding a transframe fusion (nsp2TF) with the N-terminal two thirds of nsp2. Expression of nsp2TF in PRRSV-infected cells was verified using specific Abs, and the site and direction of frameshifting were determined via mass spectrometric analysis of nsp2TF. Further, mutagenesis showed that the frameshift site and an unusual frameshift-stimulatory element (a conserved CCCANCUCC motif 11 nucleotides downstream) are required to direct efficient -2 PRF. Mutations preventing nsp2TF expression impair PRRSV replication and produce a small-plaque phenotype. Our findings demonstrate that -2 PRF is a functional gene-expression mechanism in eukaryotes and add another layer to the complexity of arterivirus genome expression. PMID:23043113

  9. New ribosome-inactivating proteins with polynucleotide:adenosine glycosidase and antiviral activities from Basella rubra L. and bougainvillea spectabilis Willd.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, A; Polito, L; Olivieri, F; Valbonesi, P; Barbieri, L; Battelli, M G; Carusi, M V; Benvenuto, E; Del Vecchio Blanco, F; Di Maro, A; Parente, A; Di Loreto, M; Stirpe, F

    1997-12-01

    New single-chain (type 1) ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were isolated from the seeds of Basella rubra L. (two proteins) and from the leaves of Bougainvillea spectabilis Willd. (one protein). These RIPs inhibit protein synthesis both in a cell-free system, with an IC50 (concentration causing 50% inhibition) in the 10(-10) M range, and by various cell lines, with IC50S in the 10(-8)-10(-6) M range. All three RIPs released adenine not only from rat liver ribosomes but also from Escherichia coli rRNA, polyadenylic acid, herring sperm DNA, and artichoke mottled crinkle virus (AMCV) genomic RNA, thus being polynucleotide:adenosine glycosidases. The proteins from Basella rubra had toxicity to mice similar to that of most type 1 RIPs (Barbieri et al., 1993, Biochim Biophys Acta 1154: 237-282) with an LD50 (concentration that is 50% lethal) < or = 8 mg.kg-1 body weight, whilst the RIP from Bougainvillea spectabilis had an LD50 > 32 mg.kg-1. The N-terminal sequence of the two RIPs from Basella rubra had 80-93% identity, whereas it differed from the sequence of the RIP from Bougainvillea spectabilis. When tested with antibodies against various RIPs, the RIPs from Basella gave some cross-reactivity with sera against dianthin 32, and weak cross-reactivity with momordin I and momorcochin-S, whilst the RIP from Bougainvillea did not cross-react with any antiserum tested. An RIP from Basella rubra and one from Bougainvillea spectabilis were tested for antiviral activity, and both inhibited infection of Nicotiana benthamiana by AMCV. PMID:9421927

  10. Bacterial senescence: protein oxidation in non-proliferating cells is dictated by the accuracy of the ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros, Manuel; Fredriksson, Åsa; Henriksson, Jaqueline; Nyström, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the causal factors behind the age-related oxidation of proteins during arrest of cell proliferation. A proteomic approach demonstrated that protein oxidation in non-proliferating cells is observed primarily for proteins being produced in a number of aberrant isoforms. Also, these cells exhibited a reduced translational fidelity as demonstrated by both proteomic analysis and genetic measurements of nonsense suppression. Mutants harboring hyperaccurate ribosomes exhibited a drastically attenuated protein oxidation during growth arrest. In contrast, oxidation was augmented in mutants with error-prone ribosomes. Oxidation increased concomitantly with a reduced rate of translation, indicating that the production of aberrant, and oxidized proteins, is not the result of titration of the co-translational folding machinery. The age-related accumulation of the chaperones, DnaK and GroEL, was drastically attenuated in the hyperaccurate rpsL mutant, demonstrating that the reduced translational fidelity in growth-arrested cells may also be a primary cause for the induction of the heat shock regulon. The data point to an alternative way of approaching the causal factors involved in protein oxidation in eukaryotic G0 cells. PMID:11566891

  11. Mutation of the key residue for extraribosomal function of ribosomal protein S19 cause increased grooming behaviors in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Kaitsuka, Taku; Fujino, Rika; Araki, Kimi; Tomizawa, Kazuhito; Yamamoto, Tetsuro

    2016-08-26

    Ribosomal protein S19 (RP S19) possesses ribosomal function as RP S19 monomer and extraribosomal function as cross-linked RP S19 oligomers which function as a ligand of the complement 5a (C5a) receptor (CD88). We have generated a Gln137Glu-RP S19 knock-in (KI) mouse, which is shown to possess the weakened extraribosomal function of RP S19. Because whether the extraribosomal function of RP S19 has a role in brain function had been unclear, we performed behavioral analysis on these mice and demonstrated that KI mice displayed an increased grooming behavior during open-field test and elevated plus maze test and an enhanced freezing behavior in contextual fear conditioning test. These results suggest an involvement of RP S19 oligomers in some anxiety-like behavior, especially grooming behavior. PMID:27424793

  12. Evidence that Synthesis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mitochondrially Encoded Ribosomal Protein Var1p May Be Membrane Localized

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Alessandro; Mason, Thomas L.; Fox, Thomas D.

    2003-01-01

    The 5′-untranslated leaders of mitochondrial mRNAs appear to localize translation within the organelle. VAR1 is the only yeast mitochondrial gene encoding a major soluble protein. A chimeric mRNA bearing the VAR1 untranslated regions and the coding sequence for pre-Cox2p appears to be translated at the inner membrane surface. We propose that translation of the ribosomal protein Var1p is also likely to occur in close proximity to the inner membrane. PMID:12796311

  13. Cytoskeletal protein filamin A is a nucleolar protein that suppresses ribosomal RNA gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wensheng; Lopez-Camacho, Cesar; Tang, Jen-Yang; Mendoza-Villanueva, Daniel; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Jackson, Dean A; Shore, Paul

    2012-01-31

    Filamin A (FLNA) is an actin-binding protein with a well-established role in the cytoskeleton, where it determines cell shape and locomotion by cross-linking actin filaments. Mutations in FLNA are associated with a wide range of genetic disorders. Here we demonstrate a unique role for FLNA as a nucleolar protein that associates with the RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription machinery to suppress rRNA gene transcription. We show that depletion of FLNA by siRNAs increased rRNA expression, rDNA promoter activity and cell proliferation. Immunodepletion of FLNA from nuclear extracts resulted in a decrease in rDNA promoter-driven transcription in vitro. FLNA coimmunoprecipitated with the Pol I components actin, TIF-IA, and RPA40, and their occupancy of the rDNA promoter was increased in the absence of FLNA in vivo. The FLNA actin-binding domain is essential for the suppression of rRNA expression and for inhibiting recruitment of the Pol I machinery to the rDNA promoter. These findings reveal an additional role for FLNA as a regulator of rRNA gene expression and have important implications for our understanding of the role of FLNA in human disease. PMID:22307607

  14. Genetic Selection of Peptide Aptamers That Interact and Inhibit Both Small Protein B and Alternative Ribosome-Rescue Factor A of Aeromonas veronii C4.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Chen, Yong; Wang, Dan; Tang, Yanqiong; Tang, Hongqian; Song, Haichao; Sun, Qun; Zhang, Yueling; Liu, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas veronii is a pathogenic gram-negative bacterium, which infects a variety of animals and results in mass mortality. The stalled-ribosome rescues are reported to ensure viability and virulence under stress conditions, of which primarily include trans-translation and alternative ribosome-rescue factor A (ArfA) in A. veronii. For identification of specific peptides that interact and inhibit the stalled-ribosome rescues, peptide aptamer library (pTRG-SN-peptides) was constructed using pTRG as vector and Staphylococcus aureus nuclease (SN) as scaffold protein, in which 16 random amino acids were introduced to form an exposed surface loop. In the meantime both Small Protein B (SmpB) which acts as one of the key components in trans-translation, and ArfA were inserted to pBT to constitute pBT-SmpB and pBT-ArfA, respectively. The peptide aptamer PA-2 was selected from pTRG-SN-peptides by bacterial two-hybrid system (B2H) employing pBT-SmpB or pBT-ArfA as baits. The conserved sites G133K134 and D138K139R140 of C-terminal SmpB were identified by interacting with N-terminal SN, and concurrently the residue K62 of ArfA was recognized by interacting with the surface loop of the specific peptide aptamer PA-2. The expression plasmids pN-SN or pN-PA-2, which combined the duplication origin of pRE112 with the neokanamycin promoter expressing SN or PA-2, were created and transformed into A. veronii C4, separately. The engineered A. veronii C4 which endowing SN or PA-2 expression impaired growth capabilities under stress conditions including temperatures, sucrose, glucose, potassium chloride (KCl) and antibiotics, and the stress-related genes rpoS and nhaP were down-regulated significantly by Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) when treating in 2.0% KCl. Thus, the engineered A. veronii C4 conferring PA-2 expression might be potentially attenuated vaccine, and also the peptide aptamer PA-2 could develop as anti-microbial drugs targeted to the ribosome rescued factors in A

  15. Genetic Selection of Peptide Aptamers That Interact and Inhibit Both Small Protein B and Alternative Ribosome-Rescue Factor A of Aeromonas veronii C4

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Chen, Yong; Wang, Dan; Tang, Yanqiong; Tang, Hongqian; Song, Haichao; Sun, Qun; Zhang, Yueling; Liu, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas veronii is a pathogenic gram-negative bacterium, which infects a variety of animals and results in mass mortality. The stalled-ribosome rescues are reported to ensure viability and virulence under stress conditions, of which primarily include trans-translation and alternative ribosome-rescue factor A (ArfA) in A. veronii. For identification of specific peptides that interact and inhibit the stalled-ribosome rescues, peptide aptamer library (pTRG-SN-peptides) was constructed using pTRG as vector and Staphylococcus aureus nuclease (SN) as scaffold protein, in which 16 random amino acids were introduced to form an exposed surface loop. In the meantime both Small Protein B (SmpB) which acts as one of the key components in trans-translation, and ArfA were inserted to pBT to constitute pBT-SmpB and pBT-ArfA, respectively. The peptide aptamer PA-2 was selected from pTRG-SN-peptides by bacterial two-hybrid system (B2H) employing pBT-SmpB or pBT-ArfA as baits. The conserved sites G133K134 and D138K139R140 of C-terminal SmpB were identified by interacting with N-terminal SN, and concurrently the residue K62 of ArfA was recognized by interacting with the surface loop of the specific peptide aptamer PA-2. The expression plasmids pN-SN or pN-PA-2, which combined the duplication origin of pRE112 with the neokanamycin promoter expressing SN or PA-2, were created and transformed into A. veronii C4, separately. The engineered A. veronii C4 which endowing SN or PA-2 expression impaired growth capabilities under stress conditions including temperatures, sucrose, glucose, potassium chloride (KCl) and antibiotics, and the stress-related genes rpoS and nhaP were down-regulated significantly by Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) when treating in 2.0% KCl. Thus, the engineered A. veronii C4 conferring PA-2 expression might be potentially attenuated vaccine, and also the peptide aptamer PA-2 could develop as anti-microbial drugs targeted to the ribosome rescued factors in A

  16. In Vivo Biosynthesis of a β-Amino Acid-Containing Protein.

    PubMed

    Melo Czekster, Clarissa; Robertson, Wesley E; Walker, Allison S; Söll, Dieter; Schepartz, Alanna

    2016-04-27

    It has recently been reported that ribosomes from erythromycin-resistant Escherichia coli strains, when isolated in S30 extracts and incubated with chemically mis-acylated tRNA, can incorporate certain β-amino acids into full length DHFR in vitro. Here we report that wild-type E. coli EF-Tu and phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase collaborate with these mutant ribosomes and others to incorporate β(3)-Phe analogs into full length DHFR in vivo. E. coli harboring the most active mutant ribosomes are robust, with a doubling time only 14% longer than wild-type. These results reveal the unexpected tolerance of E. coli and its translation machinery to the β(3)-amino acid backbone and should embolden in vivo selections for orthogonal translational machinery components that incorporate diverse β-amino acids into proteins and peptides. E. coli harboring mutant ribosomes may possess the capacity to incorporate many non-natural, non-α-amino acids into proteins and other sequence-programmed polymeric materials. PMID:27086674

  17. Overexpression, purification, molecular characterization and pharmacological evaluation for anticancer activity of ribosomal protein S23 from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Hou, Yiling; Ding, Xiang; Song, Bo; Wang, Fang; Hou, Wanru

    2013-06-01

    Ribosomal protein S23 (RPS23) is a component of the 40S small ribosomal subunit encoded by the RPS23 gene, which is specific to eukaryotes. The cDNA and genomic sequence of RPS23 were cloned from Ailuropoda melanoleuca (A. melanoleuca) using reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technology and touchdown PCR, respectively. The two sequences were analyzed preliminarily and the cDNA of the RPS23 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) BL21. The cDNA of RPS23 cloned from giant panda was 472 bp, and it contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 432 bp encoding 142 amino acids. The nucleotide sequence of the coding sequence showed a high degree of homology to some mammals as determined by BLAST analysis, similar to the amino acid sequence. The genomic sequence was 2,105 bp in length, with 4 exons and 3 introns. The primary structure analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the putative RPS23 protein was 15.80 kDa with a theoretical isoelectric point (pI) of 11.23. The molecular weight of the recombinant protein RPS23 was 21.5 kDa with a theoretical pI of 10.57. Topology prediction showed that there are seven different patterns of functional sites in the RPS23 protein of giant panda. RPS23 was successfully expressed in E. coli and its protein fused with the N‑terminal His‑tagged protein triggered the accumulation of an expected 21.5‑kDa polypeptide. The inhibitory rate of tumor growth in mice treated with 0.1 µg/ml RPS23 protein was 49.45%, the highest in the three doses used, which may be comparable to mannatide treatment. Histology of immune organs showed that the tissues were characterized by a regular and tight arrangement, while tumor tissues of the mice in the RPS23 group exhibited a loose arrangement compared to the control group. However, there was no obvious damage to other organs, such as the heart, lung and kidney. Investigations are currently being conducted to determine the bioactive principles of the recombinant

  18. Effect of N- and C-terminal deletions on the RNA N-glycosidase activity and the antigenicity of karasurin-A, a ribosome-inactivating protein from Trichosanthes kirilowii var. japonica.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Toshiya; Kurihara, Satoko; Yoshikawa, Takafumi; Mizukami, Hajime

    2004-12-01

    Karasurin-A, from root tubers of Trichosanthes kirilowii var. japonica, is a type I ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) that displays activity of RNA N-glycosidase to remove an adenine in the conserved sarcin/ricin loop of the largest RNA in the ribosome. We expressed recombinant proteins of karasurin-A and its various mutants with N- or C-terminal deletions in Escherichia coli as fusion proteins with maltose-binding protein (MBP), and compared their enzymatic activities and antigenicities. Muteins of karasurin-A generated by deleting either the first 100 N-terminal or the last 30 C-terminal amino acid residues lost activity of RNA N-glycosidase. The mutant proteins whose 80 N-terminal or 20 C-terminal amino acids were deleted could depurinate rRNA although the activities were decreased drastically. The antigenicities of the recombinant proteins were considerably reduced by deleting 20 amino acid residues from either N- or C-terminal regions. PMID:15672231

  19. Low-molecular-weight (4.5S) ribonucleic acid in higher-plant chloroplast ribosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Whitfeld, P R; Leaver, C J; Bottomley, W; Atchison, B

    1978-01-01

    A species of RNA that migrates on 10% (w/v) polyacrylamide gels between 5S and 4S RNA was detected in spinach chloroplasts. This RNA (referred to as 4.5 S RNA) was present in amounts equimolar to the 5S RNA and its molecular weight was estimated to be approx. 33 000. Fractionation of the chloroplast components showed that the 4.5S RNA was associated with the 50 S ribosomal subunit and that it could be removed by washing the ribosomes with a buffer containing 0.01 M-EDTA and 0.5 M-KCl. It did not appear to be a cleavage product of the labile 23 S RNA of spinach chloroplast ribosomes. When 125I-labelled 4.5 S RNA was hybridized to fragments of spinach chloroplast DNA produced by SmaI restriction endonuclease, a single fragment (mol.wt. 1.15 times 10(6)) became labelled. The same DNA fragment also hybridized to chloroplast 5 S RNA and part of the 23 S RNA. It was concluded that the coding sequence for 4.5 S RNA was part of, or immediately adjacent to, the rRNA-gene region in chloroplast DNA . A comparable RNA species was observed in chloroplasts of tobacco and pea leaves. Images Fig. 8. PMID:743229

  20. Ribosome Assembly as Antimicrobial Target

    PubMed Central

    Nikolay, Rainer; Schmidt, Sabine; Schlömer, Renate; Deuerling, Elke; Nierhaus, Knud H.

    2016-01-01

    Many antibiotics target the ribosome and interfere with its translation cycle. Since translation is the source of all cellular proteins including ribosomal proteins, protein synthesis and ribosome assembly are interdependent. As a consequence, the activity of translation inhibitors might indirectly cause defective ribosome assembly. Due to the difficulty in distinguishing between direct and indirect effects, and because assembly is probably a target in its own right, concepts are needed to identify small molecules that directly inhibit ribosome assembly. Here, we summarize the basic facts of ribosome targeting antibiotics. Furthermore, we present an in vivo screening strategy that focuses on ribosome assembly by a direct fluorescence based read-out that aims to identify and characterize small molecules acting as primary assembly inhibitors. PMID:27240412

  1. Ribosome Assembly as Antimicrobial Target.

    PubMed

    Nikolay, Rainer; Schmidt, Sabine; Schlömer, Renate; Deuerling, Elke; Nierhaus, Knud H

    2016-01-01

    Many antibiotics target the ribosome and interfere with its translation cycle. Since translation is the source of all cellular proteins including ribosomal proteins, protein synthesis and ribosome assembly are interdependent. As a consequence, the activity of translation inhibitors might indirectly cause defective ribosome assembly. Due to the difficulty in distinguishing between direct and indirect effects, and because assembly is probably a target in its own right, concepts are needed to identify small molecules that directly inhibit ribosome assembly. Here, we summarize the basic facts of ribosome targeting antibiotics. Furthermore, we present an in vivo screening strategy that focuses on ribosome assembly by a direct fluorescence based read-out that aims to identify and characterize small molecules acting as primary assembly inhibitors. PMID:27240412

  2. Slow formation of stable complexes during coincubation of minimal rRNA and ribosomal protein S4.

    PubMed

    Mayerle, Megan; Bellur, Deepti L; Woodson, Sarah A

    2011-09-23

    Ribosomal protein S4 binds and stabilizes a five-helix junction or five-way junction (5WJ) in the 5' domain of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and is one of two proteins responsible for nucleating 30S ribosome assembly. Upon binding, both protein S4 and 5WJ reorganize their structures. We show that labile S4 complexes rearrange into stable complexes within a few minutes at 42 °C, with longer coincubation leading to an increased population of stable complexes. In contrast, prefolding the rRNA has a smaller effect on stable S4 binding. Experiments with minimal rRNA fragments show that this structural change depends only on 16S residues within the S4 binding site. SHAPE (selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) chemical probing experiments showed that S4 strongly stabilizes 5WJ and the helix (H) 18 pseudoknot, which become tightly folded within the first minute of S4 binding. However, a kink in H16 that makes specific contacts with the S4 N-terminal extension, as well as a right-angle motif between H3, H4, and H18, requires a minute or more to become fully structured. Surprisingly, S4 structurally reorganizes the 530-loop and increases the flexibility of H3, which is proposed to undergo a conformational switch during 30S assembly. These elements of the S4 binding site may require other 30S proteins to reach a stable conformation. PMID:21821049

  3. Structures of proline-rich peptides bound to the ribosome reveal a common mechanism of protein synthesis inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Matthieu G.; Roy, Raktim N.; Lomakin, Ivan B.; Florin, Tanja; Mankin, Alexander S.; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    With bacterial resistance becoming a serious threat to global public health, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have become a promising area of focus in antibiotic research. AMPs are derived from a diverse range of species, from prokaryotes to humans, with a mechanism of action that often involves disruption of the bacterial cell membrane. Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs) are instead actively transported inside the bacterial cell where they bind and inactivate specific targets. Recently, it was reported that some PrAMPs, such as Bac71–35, oncocins and apidaecins, bind and inactivate the bacterial ribosome. Here we report the crystal structures of Bac71–35, Pyrrhocoricin, Metalnikowin and two oncocin derivatives, bound to the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome. Each of the PrAMPs blocks the peptide exit tunnel of the ribosome by simultaneously occupying three well characterized antibiotic-binding sites and interferes with the initiation step of translation, thereby revealing a common mechanism of action used by these PrAMPs to inactivate protein synthesis. Our study expands the repertoire of PrAMPs and provides a framework for designing new-generation therapeutics. PMID:26809677

  4. Conservation and divergence of transcriptional coregulations between box C/D snoRNA and ribosomal protein genes in Ascomycota