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Sample records for acids inhibit growth

  1. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by polycarboxylic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth rates measured in the presence of several polycarboxyclic acids show that tetrahydrofurantetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA) and cyclopentanetetracarboxylic acid (CPTCA) are effective growth rate inhibitors at low solution concentrations (0.01 to 1 mg/L). In contrast, linear polycarbocylic acids (citric acid and tricarballylic acid) had no inhibiting effect on calcite growth rates at concentrations up to 10 mg/L. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by cyclic polycarboxyclic acids appears to involve blockage of crystal growth sites on the mineral surface by several carboxylate groups. Growth morphology varied for growth in the absence and in the presence of both THFTCA and CPTCA. More effective growth rate reduction by CPTCA relative to THFTCA suggests that inhibitor carboxylate stereochemical orientation controls calcite surface interaction with carboxylate inhibitors. ?? 20O1 Academic Press.

  2. Cinnamic Acid Increases Lignin Production and Inhibits Soybean Root Growth

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, Victor Hugo; Lima, Rogério Barbosa; dos Santos, Wanderley Dantas; Soares, Anderson Ricardo; Böhm, Paulo Alfredo Feitoza; Marchiosi, Rogério; Ferrarese, Maria de Lourdes Lucio; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Cinnamic acid is a known allelochemical that affects seed germination and plant root growth and therefore influences several metabolic processes. In the present work, we evaluated its effects on growth, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) oxidase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) activities and lignin monomer composition in soybean (Glycine max) roots. The results revealed that exogenously applied cinnamic acid inhibited root growth and increased IAA oxidase and C4H activities. The allelochemical increased the total lignin content, thus altering the sum and ratios of the p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S) lignin monomers. When applied alone or with cinnamic acid, piperonylic acid (PIP, a quasi-irreversible inhibitor of C4H) reduced C4H activity, lignin and the H, G, S monomer content compared to the cinnamic acid treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that exogenously applied cinnamic acid can be channeled into the phenylpropanoid pathway via the C4H reaction, resulting in an increase in H lignin. In conjunction with enhanced IAA oxidase activity, these metabolic responses lead to the stiffening of the cell wall and are followed by a reduction in soybean root growth. PMID:23922685

  3. Gymnemic Acids Inhibit Hyphal Growth and Virulence in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Dumontet, Vincent; Pelissier, Franck; d’Enfert, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic and polymorphic fungal pathogen that causes mucosal, disseminated and invasive infections in humans. Transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form is one of the key virulence factors in C. albicans contributing to macrophage evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. Nontoxic small molecules that inhibit C. albicans yeast-to-hypha conversion and hyphal growth could represent a valuable source for understanding pathogenic fungal morphogenesis, identifying drug targets and serving as templates for the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we have identified the triterpenoid saponin family of gymnemic acids (GAs) as inhibitor of C. albicans morphogenesis. GAs were isolated and purified from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, the Ayurvedic traditional medicinal plant used to treat diabetes. Purified GAs had no effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans yeast cells but inhibited its yeast-to-hypha conversion under several hypha-inducing conditions, including the presence of serum. Moreover, GAs promoted the conversion of C. albicans hyphae into yeast cells under hypha inducing conditions. They also inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of Aspergillus sp. Finally, GAs inhibited the formation of invasive hyphae from C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans worms and rescued them from killing by C. albicans. Hence, GAs could be useful for various antifungal applications due to their traditional use in herbal medicine. PMID:24040201

  4. Boswellic acids inhibit glioma growth: a new treatment option?

    PubMed

    Winking, M; Sarikaya, S; Rahmanian, A; Jödicke, A; Böker, D K

    2000-01-01

    Conventional malignant glioma therapy (surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy) does not yield satisfying results. The prognosis of the glioma patient depends more on the histological grading of the tumor and patient's age than on the therapy. Especially the adjuvant chemotherapy failed to date to influence survival time in glioma patients significantly. To improve results in malignant glioma therapy additional therapeutic regimes are necessary. In an earlier study we were able to show a significant reduction on perifocal edema by an extract from gum resin (EGR) accompanied with a clinical improvement in patients with malignant glioma. Also a decrease of urinary LTE4-excretion as a metabolite of leukotriene synthesis in brain tumors was observed. Furthermore we had found a proliferation inhibiting activity of the extract form EGR, the boswellic acids in cell cultures. The purpose of this experimental study was to elucidate the effects of the boswellic acids, which are constituents of an extract from gum resin on tumor growth in vivo. Female wistar rats weighing 200-250 g were treated with the drug 14 days after inoculation of C6 tumor cells into their right caudate nucleus and randomization into 4 groups. The treatment groups received different dosages and were compared to a control group without any additional treatment. Survival time of the rats in the highest dosage group (3 x 240 mg/kg body weight) was more than twice as long as in the control group (P < 0.05). In a second experiment the inhibition of tumor cell proliferation was examined. The C6 tumor cells were implanted into the caudate nucleus. Drug treatment was started immediately after implantation and stopped after 14 days. The animals were sacrificed and the brains were examined microscopically. Comparing low and high dosage of EGR treatment a significant difference in tumor volume was detected (P < 0.05). The proportion of apoptotic tumor cells in animals with high dose treatment was significantly larger than in the low dose (treatment) group (P < 0.05). These data demonstrate an influence of EGR in rat glioma growth and might represent a new therapeutic option on glioma treatment in man in future. Further experimental work on human gliomas is needed to definitively answer this question. PMID:10894362

  5. Salicylic acid antagonizes abscisic acid inhibition of shoot growth and cell cycle progression in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Ayano; Sato, Yutaka

    2014-04-01

    We analysed effects of abscisic acid (ABA, a negative regulatory hormone), alone and in combination with positive or neutral hormones, including salicylic acid (SA), on rice growth and expression of cell cycle-related genes. ABA significantly inhibited shoot growth and induced expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6. A yeast two-hybrid assay showed that OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6 interacted with OsCDKA;1 and/or OsCDKA;2. When SA was simultaneously supplied with ABA, the antagonistic effect of SA completely blocked ABA inhibition. SA also blocked ABA inhibition of DNA replication and thymidine incorporation in the shoot apical meristem. These results suggest that ABA arrests cell cycle progression by inducing expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6, which inhibit the G1/S transition, and that SA antagonizes ABA by blocking expression of OsKRP genes.

  6. Salicylic acid antagonizes abscisic acid inhibition of shoot growth and cell cycle progression in rice.

    PubMed

    Meguro, Ayano; Sato, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    We analysed effects of abscisic acid (ABA, a negative regulatory hormone), alone and in combination with positive or neutral hormones, including salicylic acid (SA), on rice growth and expression of cell cycle-related genes. ABA significantly inhibited shoot growth and induced expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6. A yeast two-hybrid assay showed that OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6 interacted with OsCDKA;1 and/or OsCDKA;2. When SA was simultaneously supplied with ABA, the antagonistic effect of SA completely blocked ABA inhibition. SA also blocked ABA inhibition of DNA replication and thymidine incorporation in the shoot apical meristem. These results suggest that ABA arrests cell cycle progression by inducing expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6, which inhibit the G1/S transition, and that SA antagonizes ABA by blocking expression of OsKRP genes. PMID:24686568

  7. Calcite crystal growth inhibition by humic substances with emphasis on hydrophobic acids from the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoch, A.R.; Reddy, M.M.; Aiken, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate minerals plays an integral role in the water chemistry of terrestrial ecosystems. Humic substances, which are ubiquitous in natural waters, have been shown to reduce or inhibit calcite crystal growth in experiments. The purpose of this study is to quantify and understand the kinetic effects of hydrophobic organic acids isolated from the Florida Everglades and a fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell, Antarctica, on the crystal growth of calcite (CaCO3). Highly reproducible calcite growth experiments were performed in a sealed reactor at constant pH, temperature, supersaturation (?? = 4.5), P(CO2) (10-3.5atm), and ionic strength (0.1 M) with various concentrations of organic acids. Higher plant-derived aquatic hydrophobic acids from the Everglades were more effective growth inhibitors than microbially derived fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell. Organic acid aromaticity correlated strongly with growth inhibition. Molecular weight and heteroatom content correlated well with growth inhibition, whereas carboxyl content and aliphatic nature did not. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  8. Galacturonic Acid Inhibits the Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on Galactose, Xylose, and Arabinose

    PubMed Central

    Huisjes, Eline H.; de Hulster, Erik; van Dam, Jan C.; Pronk, Jack T.

    2012-01-01

    The efficient fermentation of mixed substrates is essential for the microbial conversion of second-generation feedstocks, including pectin-rich waste streams such as citrus peel and sugar beet pulp. Galacturonic acid is a major constituent of hydrolysates of these pectin-rich materials. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main producer of bioethanol, cannot use this sugar acid. The impact of galacturonic acid on alcoholic fermentation by S. cerevisiae was investigated with anaerobic batch cultures grown on mixtures of glucose and galactose at various galacturonic acid concentrations and on a mixture of glucose, xylose, and arabinose. In cultures grown at pH 5.0, which is well above the pKa value of galacturonic acid (3.51), the addition of 10 g · liter?1 galacturonic acid did not affect galactose fermentation kinetics and growth. In cultures grown at pH 3.5, the addition of 10 g · liter?1 galacturonic acid did not significantly affect glucose consumption. However, at this lower pH, galacturonic acid completely inhibited growth on galactose and reduced galactose consumption rates by 87%. Additionally, it was shown that galacturonic acid strongly inhibits the fermentation of xylose and arabinose by the engineered pentose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain IMS0010. The data indicate that inhibition occurs when nondissociated galacturonic acid is present extracellularly and corroborate the hypothesis that a combination of a decreased substrate uptake rate due to competitive inhibition on Gal2p, an increased energy requirement to maintain cellular homeostasis, and/or an accumulation of galacturonic acid 1-phosphate contributes to the inhibition. The role of galacturonic acid as an inhibitor of sugar fermentation should be considered in the design of yeast fermentation processes based on pectin-rich feedstocks. PMID:22582063

  9. Growth inhibition of Cronobacter spp. strains in reconstituted powdered infant formula acidified with organic acids supported by natural stomach acidity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, S; Schnell, S; Fischer, M

    2013-09-01

    Cronobacter is associated with outbreaks of rare, but life-threatening cases of meningitis, necrotizing enterocolitis, and sepsis in newborns. This study was conducted to determine the effect of organic acids on growth of Cronobacter in laboratory medium and reconstituted powdered infant formula (PIF) as well as the bacteriostatic effect of slightly acidified infant formula when combined with neonatal gastric acidity. Inhibitory effect of seven organic acids on four acid sensitive Cronobacter strains was determined in laboratory medium with broth dilution method at pH 5.0, 5.5 and 6.0. Acetic, butyric and propionic acids were most inhibitive against Cronobacter in the laboratory medium. The killing effect of these three acids was partially buffered in reconstituted PIF. Under neonatal gastric acid condition of pH 5.0, the slightly acidified formula which did not exert inhibition effect solely reduced significantly the Cronobacter populations. A synergistic effect of formula moderately acidified with organic acid combined with the physiological infant gastric acid was visible in preventing the rapid growth of Cronobacter in neonatal stomach. The study contributed to a better understanding of the inhibitory effect of organic acids on Cronobacter growth in different matrixes and provided new ideas in terms of controlling bacteria colonization and translocation by acidified formula. PMID:23664263

  10. Plant growth inhibition by cis-cinnamoyl glucosides and cis-cinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Hiradate, Syuntaro; Morita, Sayaka; Furubayashi, Akihiro; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Harada, Jiro

    2005-03-01

    Spiraea thunbergii Sieb. contains 1-O-cis-cinnamoyl-beta-D-glucopyranose (CG) and 6-O-(4'-hydroxy-2'-methylene-butyroyl)-1-O-cis-cinnamoyl-beta-D-glucopyranose (BCG) as major plant growth inhibiting constituents. In the present study, we determined the inhibitory activity of CG and BCG on root elongation of germinated seedlings of lettuce (Lactuca sativa), pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus), red clover (Trifolium pratense), timothy (Phleum pratense), and bok choy (Brassica rapa var chinensis) in comparison with that of two well-known growth inhibitors, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and (+)-2-cis-4-trans-abscisic acid (cis-ABA), as well as two related chemicals of CG and BCG, cis-cinnamic acid (cis-CA) and trans-cinnamic acid (trans-CA). The EC50 values for CG and BCG on lettuce were roughly one-half to one-quarter of the value for cis-ABA. cis-Cinnamic acid, which is a component of CG and BCG, possessed almost the same inhibitory activity of CG and BCG, suggesting that the essential chemical structure responsible for the inhibitory activity of CG and BCG is cis-CA. The cis-stereochemistry of the methylene moiety is apparently needed for high inhibitory activity, as trans-CA had an EC50 value roughly 100 times that of CG, BCG, and cis-CA. Growth inhibition by CG, BCG, and cis-CA was influenced by the nature of the soil in the growing medium: alluvial soil preserved the bioactivity, whereas volcanic ash and calcareous soils inhibited bioactivity. These findings indicate a potential role of cis-CA and its glucosides as allelochemicals for use as plant growth regulators in agricultural fields. PMID:15898503

  11. Selective growth inhibition of human malignant melanoma cells by syringic acid-derived proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been shown that proteasome inhibition leads to growth arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and/or induction of apoptosis. However, it was found that some of these inhibitors do not induce apoptosis in several human normal cell lines. This selective activity makes proteasome inhibition a promising target for new generation of anticancer drugs. Clinical validation of the proteasome, as a therapeutic target in oncology, has been provided by the dipeptide boronic acid derivative; bortezomib. Bortezomib has proven to be effective as a single agent in multiple myeloma and some forms of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Syringic acid (4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzoic acid, 1), a known phenolic acid, was isolated from the methanol extract of Tamarix aucheriana and was shown to possess proteasome inhibitory activity. Methods Using Surflex-Dock program interfaced with SYBYL, the docking affinities of syringic acid and its proposed derivatives to 20S proteasome were studied. Several derivatives were virtually proposed, however, five derivatives: benzyl 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzoate (2), benzyl 4-(benzyloxy)-3,5-dimethoxybenzoate (3), 3'-methoxybenzyl 3,5-dimethoxy-4-(3'-methoxybenzyloxy)benzoate (4), 3'-methoxybenzyl 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzoate (5) and 3',5'-dimethoxybenzyl 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzoate (6), were selected based on high docking scores, synthesized, and tested for their anti-mitogenic activity against human colorectal, breast and malignant melanoma cells as well as normal human fibroblast cells. Results Derivatives 2, 5, and 6 showed selective dose-dependent anti-mitogenic effect against human malignant melanoma cell lines HTB66 and HTB68 with minimal cytotoxicity on colorectal and breast cancer cells as well as normal human fibroblast cells. Derivatives 2, 5 and 6 significantly (p???0.0001) inhibited the various proteasomal chymotrypsin, PGPH, and trypsin like activities. They growth arrested the growth of HTB66 cells at G1 and G2-phases. They also arrested the growth of HTB68 cells at S- and G2-phase, respectively. Moreover, derivatives 2, 5, and 6 markedly induced apoptosis (? 90%) in both HTB66 and HTB68. Conclusions Computer-derived syringic acid derivatives possess selective anti-mitogenic activity on human malignant melanoma cells that may be attributed to perturbation of cell cycle, induction of apoptosis and inhibition of various 26S proteasomal activities. PMID:23958424

  12. Acetyl-11-Keto-?-Boswellic Acid Inhibits Prostate Tumor Growth by Suppressing Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2-Mediated Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiufeng; Yi, Zhengfang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Sung, Bokyung; Qu, Weijing; Lian, Xiaoyuan; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Liu, Mingyao

    2009-01-01

    The role of angiogenesis in tumor growth and metastasis is well established. Identification of small molecule that blocks tumor angiogenesis and is safe and affordable has been a challenge in drug development. In this study, we demonstrated that acetyl-11-keto-?-boswellic acid (AKBA), an active component from an Ayurvedic medicinal plant (Boswellia serrata), could strongly inhibit tumor angiogenesis. AKBA suppressed tumor growth in the human prostate tumor xenograft mice treated daily (10 mg/kg of AKBA) after solid tumors reached about 100 mm3 (n=5). The inhibitory effect of AKBA on tumor growth was well correlated with suppression of angiogenesis. When examined for the molecular mechanism, we found that AKBA significantly inhibited blood vessel formation in the Matrigel plug assay in mice and effectively and suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced microvessel sprouting in rat aortic ring assay ex vivo. Furthermore, AKBA inhibited VEGF-induced cell proliferation, chemotactic motility, and the formation of capillary-like structures from primary cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis and in vitro kinase assay revealed that AKBA suppressed VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 kinase (KDR/Flk-1) with IC50 of 1.68 ?mol/L. Specifically, AKBA suppressed the downstream protein kinases of VEGFR2, including Src family kinase, focal adhesion kinase, extracellular signal-related kinase, AKT, mTOR, and ribosomal protein S6 kinase. Our findings suggest that AKBA potently inhibits human prostate tumor growth through inhibition of angiogenesis induced by VEGFR2 signaling pathways. PMID:19567671

  13. Inhibition of Gallic Acid on the Growth and Biofilm Formation of Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dongyan; Li, Jing; Li, Ji; Tang, Ruihua; Liu, Liu; Shi, Junling; Huang, Qingsheng; Yang, Hui

    2015-06-01

    New strategies for biofilm inhibition are becoming highly necessary because of the concerns to synthetic additives. As gallic acid (GA) is a hydrolysated natural product of tannin in Chinese gall, this research studied the effects of GA on the growth and biofilm formation of bacteria (Escherichia coli [Gram-negative] and Streptococcus mutans [Gram-positive]) under different conditions, such as nutrient levels, temperatures (25 and 37 °C) and incubation times (24 and 48 h). The minimum antimicrobial concentration of GA against the two pathogenic organisms was determined as 8 mg/mL. GA significantly affected the growth curves of both test strains at 25 and 37 °C. The nutrient level, temperature, and treatment time influenced the inhibition activity of GA on both growth and biofim formation of tested pathogens. The inhibition effect of GA on biofilm could be due to other factors in addition to the antibacterial effect. Overall, GA was most effective against cultures incubated at 37 °C for 24 h and at 25 °C for 48 h in various concentrations of nutrients and in vegetable wash waters, which indicated the potential of GA as emergent sources of biofilm control products. PMID:25974286

  14. Oleanolic acid modulates multiple intracellular targets to inhibit colorectal cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Wei, Lihui; Shen, Aling; Chu, Jianfeng; Lin, Jiumao; Peng, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Due to drug resistance and unacceptable cytotoxicity of most currently-used cancer chemotherapies, naturally occurring products have gained attention in the field of anticancer treatment. Oleanolic acid (OA) is a natural pentacyclic triterpenoic acid and a principal active compound in many medicinal herbs that have long been used to clinically treat various types of human malignancies. Using a colorectal cancer (CRC) mouse xenograft model and the cell line HT-29, we evaluated the effect of OA on tumor growth in vivo and in vitro, and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms in the present study. We found that OA significantly inhibited tumor growth in volume and weight in CRC xenograft mice. In addition, OA treatment led to the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell proliferation. OA significantly reduced the expression of Bcl-2, Cyclin D1 and CKD4, whereas Bax and p21 expression was profoundly increased after OA treatment. Furthermore, OA significantly suppressed the activation of Akt, p70S6K and MAPK signalings, but promoted p53 pathway activation. Collectively, findings from this study suggest that OA possesses a broad range of anticancer effects via modulation of multiple intracellular targets. PMID:26459864

  15. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada, USA, The Suwannee River, Georgia, USA and by polycarboxylic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Leenheer, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Calcite crystallization rates are characterized using a constant solution composition at 25°C, pH=8.5, and calcite supersaturation (?) of 4.5 in the absence and presence of fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada (BSLFA), and a fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia (SRFA). Rates are also measured in the presence and absence of low-molar mass, aliphatic-alicyclic polycarboxylic acids (PCA). BSLFA inhibits calcite crystal-growth rates with increasing BSLFA concentration, suggesting that BSLFA adsorbs at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. Calcite growth morphology in the presence of BSLFA differed from growth in its absence, supporting an adsorption mechanism of calcite-growth inhibition by BSLFA. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by BSLFA is consistent with a model indicating that polycarboxylic acid molecules present in BSLFA adsorb at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. In contrast to published results for an unfractionated SRFA, there is dramatic calcite growth inhibition (at a concentration of 1 mg/L) by a SRFA fraction eluted by pH 5 solution from XAD-8 resin, indicating that calcite growth-rate inhibition is related to specific SRFA component fractions. A cyclic PCA, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-cyclohexane hexacarboxylic acid (CHXHCA) is a strong calcite growth-rate inhibitor at concentrations less than 0.1 mg/L. Two other cyclic PCAs, 1, 1 cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (CPDCA) and 1, 1 cyclobutanedicarboxylic acid (CBDCA) with the carboxylic acid groups attached to the same ring carbon atom, have no effect on calcite growth rates up to concentrations of 10 mg/L. Organic matter ad-sorbed from the air onto the seed crystals has no effect on the measured calcite crystal-growth rates.

  16. Inhibition of tumor growth by a newly-identified activator for epidermal fatty acid binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Enyu; Singh, Puja; Zhai, Xiuhong; Li, Yan; Zhu, Ganqian; Zhang, Yuwen; Hao, Jiaqing; Chi, Young-In; Brown, Rhoderick E.; Cleary, Margot P.; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that expression of epidermal fatty acid binding protein (E-FABP) in tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) promotes macrophage anti-tumor activity by enhancing IFN? responses in tumor models. Thus, E-FABP represents a new protective factor in enhancing tumor immune surveillance against tumor development. Herein, we report the compound 5-(benzylamino)-2-(3-methylphenyl)-1,3-oxazole-4-carbonitrile (designated EI-05) as a novel E-FABP activator for inhibition of mammary tumor growth. EI-05 was selected from the ZINC compound library using molecular docking analysis based on the crystal structure of E-FABP. Although EI-05 is unable to bind E-FABP directly, it significantly increases E-FABP expression in macrophages during inflammation. Stimulation of macrophages with EI-05 remarkably enhances lipid droplet formation and IFN? production, which further promotes the anti-tumor activity of macrophages. Importantly, administering EI-05 in vivo significantly inhibits mammary tumor growth in a syngeneic mouse model. Altogether, these results suggest that EI-05 may represent a promising drug candidate for anti-tumor treatment through enhancing E-FABP activity and IFN? responses in macrophages. PMID:25796556

  17. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (?c). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and ?c=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10?4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10?4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  18. Growth inhibition of Aeromonas salmonicida and Yersinia ruckeri by disinfectants containing peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Meinelt, Thomas; Phan, Thy-My; Behrens, Sascha; Wienke, Andreas; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming; Liu, Dibo; Straus, David L

    2015-04-01

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a therapeutic agent used for disinfection in aquaculture, but it must be investigated thoroughly in order to mitigate diseases without harming the fish. Successful disinfectants (like PAA) should not leave dangerous residues in the environment in order to successfully contribute to sustainable aquaculture. The aim of our study was to compare the effectiveness of 6 commercial PAA products with different molecular PAA:H2O2 ratios to reduce bacterial growth of Aeromonas salmonicida and Yersinia ruckeri and to determine effective concentrations and exposure times. All products reduced colony-forming units (CFUs) of A. salmonicida and Y. ruckeri. Products with higher molecular PAA:H2O2 ratios inhibited growth better than products with lower molecular PAA:H2O2 ratios at the same PAA concentration; this indicates that H2O2 is not the driving force in the reduction of A. salmonicida and Y. ruckeri growth by PAA in vitro. The practical application of the products with high molecular PAA:H2O2 ratios should be prioritized if these pathogens are diagnosed. PMID:25850398

  19. Use of jasmonic acid and salicylic acid to inhibit growth of sugarbeet storage rot pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) are endogenous plant hormones that induce native plant defense responses and provide protection against a wide range of diseases. Previously, JA, applied after harvest, was shown to protect sugarbeet roots against the storage pathogens, Botrytis cinerea, P...

  20. Enhanced Lignin Monomer Production Caused by Cinnamic Acid and Its Hydroxylated Derivatives Inhibits Soybean Root Growth

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Rogério Barbosa; Salvador, Victor Hugo; dos Santos, Wanderley Dantas; Bubna, Gisele Adriana; Finger-Teixeira, Aline; Soares, Anderson Ricardo; Marchiosi, Rogério; Ferrarese, Maria de Lourdes Lucio; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Cinnamic acid and its hydroxylated derivatives (p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic and sinapic acids) are known allelochemicals that affect the seed germination and root growth of many plant species. Recent studies have indicated that the reduction of root growth by these allelochemicals is associated with premature cell wall lignification. We hypothesized that an influx of these compounds into the phenylpropanoid pathway increases the lignin monomer content and reduces the root growth. To confirm this hypothesis, we evaluated the effects of cinnamic, p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic and sinapic acids on soybean root growth, lignin and the composition of p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) monomers. To this end, three-day-old seedlings were cultivated in nutrient solution with or without allelochemical (or selective enzymatic inhibitors of the phenylpropanoid pathway) in a growth chamber for 24 h. In general, the results showed that 1) cinnamic, p-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic acids reduced root growth and increased lignin content; 2) cinnamic and p-coumaric acids increased p-hydroxyphenyl (H) monomer content, whereas p-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic acids increased guaiacyl (G) content, and sinapic acid increased sinapyl (S) content; 3) when applied in conjunction with piperonylic acid (PIP, an inhibitor of the cinnamate 4-hydroxylase, C4H), cinnamic acid reduced H, G and S contents; and 4) when applied in conjunction with 3,4-(methylenedioxy)cinnamic acid (MDCA, an inhibitor of the 4-coumarate:CoA ligase, 4CL), p-coumaric acid reduced H, G and S contents, whereas caffeic, ferulic and sinapic acids reduced G and S contents. These results confirm our hypothesis that exogenously applied allelochemicals are channeled into the phenylpropanoid pathway causing excessive production of lignin and its main monomers. By consequence, an enhanced stiffening of the cell wall restricts soybean root growth. PMID:24312480

  1. Plant Lectin Can Target Receptors Containing Sialic Acid, Exemplified by Podoplanin, to Inhibit Transformed Cell Growth and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yongquan; Acharya, Nimish K.; Han, Min; McNulty, Dean E.; Hasegawa, Hitoki; Hyodo, Toshinori; Senga, Takeshi; Geng, Jian-Guo; Kosciuk, Mary; Shin, Seung S.; Goydos, James S.; Temiakov, Dmitry; Nagele, Robert G.; Goldberg, Gary S.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death of men and women worldwide. Tumor cell motility contributes to metastatic invasion that causes the vast majority of cancer deaths. Extracellular receptors modified by ?2,3-sialic acids that promote this motility can serve as ideal chemotherapeutic targets. For example, the extracellular domain of the mucin receptor podoplanin (PDPN) is highly O-glycosylated with ?2,3-sialic acid linked to galactose. PDPN is activated by endogenous ligands to induce tumor cell motility and metastasis. Dietary lectins that target proteins containing ?2,3-sialic acid inhibit tumor cell growth. However, anti-cancer lectins that have been examined thus far target receptors that have not been identified. We report here that a lectin from the seeds of Maackia amurensis (MASL) with affinity for O-linked carbohydrate chains containing sialic acid targets PDPN to inhibit transformed cell growth and motility at nanomolar concentrations. Interestingly, the biological activity of this lectin survives gastrointestinal proteolysis and enters the cardiovascular system to inhibit melanoma cell growth, migration, and tumorigenesis. These studies demonstrate how lectins may be used to help develop dietary agents that target specific receptors to combat malignant cell growth. PMID:22844530

  2. Triterpene acids from apple peel inhibit lepidopteran larval midgut lipases and larval growth.

    PubMed

    Christeller, John T; McGhie, Tony K; Poulton, Joanne; Markwick, Ngaire P

    2014-07-01

    Fruit extracts from apple, kiwifruit, feijoa, boysenberry, and blueberry were screened for the presence of lipase inhibitory compounds against lepidopteran larval midgut crude extracts. From 120 extracts, six showed significant inhibition with an extract from the peel of Malus × domestica cv. "Big Red" showing highest levels of inhibition. Because this sample was the only apple peel sample in the initial screen, a survey of peels from seven apple cultivars was undertaken and showed that, despite considerable variation, all had inhibitory activity. Successive solvent fractionation and LC-MS of cv. "Big Red" apple peel extract identified triterpene acids as the most important inhibitory compounds, of which ursolic acid and oleanolic acid were the major components and oxo- and hydroxyl-triterpene acids were minor components. When ursolic acid was incorporated into artificial diet and fed to Epiphyas postvittana Walker (Tortricidae: Lepidoptera) larvae at 0.16% w/v, a significant decrease in larval weight was observed after 21 days. This concentration of ursolic acid is less than half the concentration reported in the skin of some apple cultivars. PMID:24753088

  3. Gambogic acid induces apoptosis and inhibits colorectal tumor growth via mitochondrial pathways

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guang-Ming; Sun, Yu; Ge, Xin; Wan, Xin; Li, Chun-Bo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of gambogic acid (GA) on apoptosis in the HT-29 human colon cancer cell line. METHODS: H-29 cells were used for in vitro experiments in this study. Relative cell viability was assessed using MTT assays. Cell apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling and Hoechst 33342 staining, and quantified by flow cytometry. Cellular ultrastructure was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to evaluate gene and protein expression levels. For in vivo experiments, BALB/c nude mice received subcutaneous injections of HT-29 cells in the right armpit. When well-established xenografts were palpable with a tumor size of 75 mm3, mice were randomly assigned to a vehicle (negative) control, positive control or GA treatment group (n = 6 each). The animals in the treatment group received one of three dosages of GA (in saline; 5, 10 or 20 mg/kg) via the caudal vein twice weekly, whereas animals in the negative and positive control groups were given equal volumes of 0.9% saline or 10 mg/kg docetaxel, respectively, via the caudal vein once weekly. RESULTS: The cell viability assay showed that GA inhibited proliferation of HT-29 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner after treatment with GA (0.00, 0.31, 0.62, 1.25, 2.50, 5.00 or 10.00 ?mol/L) for 24, 48 or 72 h. After 48 h, the percentage of apoptotic cells in cells treated with 0.00, 1.25, 2.50 and 5.00 ?mol/L GA was 1.4% ± 0.3%, 9.8% ± 1.2%, 25.7% ± 3.3% and 49.3% ± 5.8%, respectively. Ultrastructural analysis of HT-29 cells treated for 48 h with 2.5?mol/L GA revealed apoptotic bodies and condensed and fragmented nuclei. Levels of caspase-8, -9 and -3 mRNAs were significantly increased after treatment with GA (1.25, 2.50 or 5.00 ?mol/L) for 48 h (P < 0.05 for all). Protein levels of apoptosis-related factors Fas, FasL, FADD, cytochrome c, and Apaf-1 were increased in GA-treated cells, whereas levels of pro-caspase-8, -9 and -3 were significantly decreased (P < 0.05 for all). Furthermore, GA signi?cantly and dose-dependently inhibited the growth of HT-29 tumors in a mouse xenograft model (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: GA inhibits HT-29 proliferation via induction of apoptosis. The anti-cancer effects are likely mediated by death receptor (extrinsic) and mitochondrial (intrinsic) pathways. PMID:26034354

  4. Combined effects of carbonation with heating and fatty acid esters on inactivation and growth inhibition of various bacillus spores.

    PubMed

    Klangpetch, Wannaporn; Nakai, Tomoe; Noma, Seiji; Igura, Noriyuki; Shimoda, Mitsuya

    2013-09-01

    The effects of carbonation treatment (1 to 5 MPa, 30 min) plus heat treatment (30 to 80°C, 30 min) in the presence of various fatty acid esters (FAEs; 0.05 and 0.1%, wt/vol) on counts of viable Bacillus subtilis spores were investigated. FAEs or carbonation alone had no inactivation or growth inhibition effects on B. subtilis spores. However, carbonation plus heat (CH; 80°C, 5 MPa, 30 min) in the presence of mono- and diglycerol fatty acid esters markedly decreased counts of viable spores, and the spore counts did not change during storage for 30 days. The greatest decrease in viable spore counts occurred in the presence of monoglycerol fatty acid esters. Under CH conditions, inactivation and/or growth inhibition occurred at only 80°C and increased with increasing pressure. The greatest decrease in spore counts (more than 4 log units) occurred with CH (80°C, 5 MPa, 30 min) in the presence of monoglycerol fatty acid esters. However, this treatment was less effective against Bacillus coagulans and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores. PMID:23992501

  5. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Inhibit Tumor Growth in a Rat Model of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parada, Belmiro; Reis, Flávio; Cerejo, Raquel; Garrido, Patrícia; Sereno, José; Xavier-Cunha, Maria; Neto, Paula; Mota, Alfredo; Figueiredo, Arnaldo; Teixeira, Frederico

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 (?-3) fatty acids have been tested on prevention and treatment of several cancer types, but the efficacy on “in vivo” bladder cancer has not been analyzed yet. This study aimed at evaluating the chemopreventive efficacy of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) mixture in an animal model of bladder cancer. Forty-four male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups during a 20-week protocol: control; carcinogen—N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN); ?-3 (DHA + EPA); and ?-3 + BBN. BBN and ?-3 were given during the initial 8 weeks. At week 20 blood and bladder were collected and checked for the presence of urothelium lesions and tumors, markers of inflammation, proliferation, and redox status. Incidence of bladder carcinoma was, control (0%), ?-3 (0%), BBN (65%), and ?-3 + BBN (62.5%). The ?-3 + BBN group had no infiltrative tumors or carcinoma in situ, and tumor volume was significantly reduced compared to the BBN (0.9 ± 0.1?mm3 versus 112.5 ± 6.4?mm3). Also, it showed a reduced MDA/TAS ratio and BBN-induced serum CRP, TGF-?1, and CD31 were prevented. In conclusion, omega-3 fatty acids inhibit the development of premalignant and malignant lesions in a rat model of bladder cancer, which might be due to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-proliferative, and anti-angiogenic properties. PMID:23865049

  6. Conjugated eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) inhibits transplanted tumor growth via membrane lipid peroxidation in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuki, Tsuyoshi; Igarashi, Miki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2004-05-01

    Both conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have an antitumor effect. Hence, we hypothesized that a combination of conjugated double bonds and an (n-3) highly unsaturated fatty acid would produce stronger bioactivity. To verify the antitumor effect of conjugated EPA (CEPA), we transplanted DLD-1 human colon tumor cells into nude mice, and compared the tumor growth between CEPA-fed mice and CLA- and EPA-fed mice. After tumor cell inoculation, mice were assigned to 1 of 4 groups (control, CLA, EPA, and CEPA) consisting of 10 mice each. The control group received only safflower oil fatty acids, whereas the remaining groups received a mixture of safflower oil fatty acids and 20 g/100 g of total fatty acids as CLA, EPA, or CEPA. Mice were fed once every 2 d for 4 wk at a dose of 50 mg/mouse at each feeding. After 4 wk, tumor growth in CEPA-fed mice was significantly suppressed, compared with that in CLA- (P < 0.005) and EPA-fed mice (P < 0.001). DNA fragmentation in the tumor tissues of the CEPA-fed mice occurred more frequently than in the CLA- (P < 0.001) and EPA-fed mice (P < 0.001), suggesting that CEPA induced apoptosis in the tumor tissues. To further investigate the mechanism, the level of oxidative stress in the tumor tissues was determined. The CEPA-fed mice showed significant lipid peroxidation, compared with the CLA- (P < 0.001) and EPA-fed mice (P < 0.001). Therefore, we verified that CEPA has a stronger in vivo antitumor effect than EPA and CLA, and that CEPA acts through induction of apoptosis via lipid peroxidation. PMID:15113964

  7. Selective inhibition of HDAC8 decreases neuroblastoma growth in vitro and in vivo and enhances retinoic acid-mediated differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rettig, I; Koeneke, E; Trippel, F; Mueller, W C; Burhenne, J; Kopp-Schneider, A; Fabian, J; Schober, A; Fernekorn, U; von Deimling, A; Deubzer, H E; Milde, T; Witt, O; Oehme, I

    2015-01-01

    For differentiation-defective malignancies, compounds that modulate transcription, such as retinoic acid and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, are of particular interest. HDAC inhibitors are currently under investigation for the treatment of a broad spectrum of cancer diseases. However, one clinical drawback is class-specific toxicity of unselective inhibitors, limiting their full anticancer potential. Selective targeting of individual HDAC isozymes in defined tumor entities may therefore be an attractive alternative treatment approach. We have previously identified HDAC family member 8 (HDAC8) as a novel target in childhood neuroblastoma. Using small-molecule inhibitors, we now demonstrate that selective inhibition of HDAC8 exhibits antineuroblastoma activity without toxicity in two xenograft mouse models of MYCN oncogene-amplified neuroblastoma. In contrast, the unselective HDAC inhibitor vorinostat was more toxic in the same models. HDAC8-selective inhibition induced cell cycle arrest and differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Upon combination with retinoic acid, differentiation was significantly enhanced, as demonstrated by elongated neurofilament-positive neurites and upregulation of NTRK1. Additionally, MYCN oncogene expression was downregulated in vitro and tumor cell growth was markedly reduced in vivo. Mechanistic studies suggest that cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) links HDAC8- and retinoic acid-mediated gene transcription. In conclusion, HDAC-selective targeting can be effective in tumors exhibiting HDAC isozyme-dependent tumor growth in vivo and can be combined with differentiation-inducing agents. PMID:25695609

  8. Phosphorylation of InhA inhibits mycolic acid biosynthesis and growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Molle, Virginie; Gulten, Gulcin; Vilchèze, Catherine; Veyron-Churlet, Romain; Zanella-Cléon, Isabelle; Sacchettini, James C.; Jacobs, Jr, William R.; Kremer, Laurent

    2011-08-24

    The remarkable survival ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in infected hosts is related to the presence of cell wall-associated mycolic acids. Despite their importance, the mechanisms that modulate expression of these lipids in response to environmental changes are unknown. Here we demonstrate that the enoyl-ACP reductase activity of InhA, an essential enzyme of the mycolic acid biosynthetic pathway and the primary target of the anti-tubercular drug isoniazid, is controlled via phosphorylation. Thr-266 is the unique kinase phosphoacceptor, both in vitro and in vivo. The physiological relevance of Thr-266 phosphorylation was demonstrated using inhA phosphoablative (T266A) or phosphomimetic (T266D/E) mutants. Enoyl reductase activity was severely impaired in the mimetic mutants in vitro, as a consequence of a reduced binding affinity to NADH. Importantly, introduction of inhA{_}T266D/E failed to complement growth and mycolic acid defects of an inhA-thermosensitive Mycobacterium smegmatis strain, in a similar manner to what is observed following isoniazid treatment. This study suggests that phosphorylation of InhA may represent an unusual mechanism that allows M. tuberculosis to regulate its mycolic acid content, thus offering a new approach to future anti-tuberculosis drug development.

  9. Boric acid destabilizes the hyphal cytoskeleton and inhibits invasive growth of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Pointer, Benjamin R; Boyer, Michael P; Schmidt, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Exposure of Candida albicans to sub-lethal concentrations of boric acid (BA) restricts the dimorphic fungus to its yeast morphology and prevents the formation of invasive hyphae on solid substrates. Exposure to BA causes a rapid and reversible disappearance of polarisome and Spitzenkörper in growing hyphae. In BA-treated hyphae of C. albicans, actin quickly reorganizes from cytoplasmic cables to cortical patches and cell wall growth switches from an apical to an isotropic pattern. As a result of the cytoskeletal changes, the hyphal tips broaden and directional growth of hyphae ceases in the presence of BA. An analysis of homozygous deletion strains showed that mutants with constitutive or enhanced hyphal growth (tup1, nrg1, ssn6, rbf1) are BA-sensitive, demonstrating that cellular morphology is a major determinant of BA tolerance. The screening of deletion mutants also showed that deficiencies of the main activator of hyphal gene expression, Efg1, and the Rim101-signalling cascade, leading to Efg1 activation, cause BA resistance. Taken together, the data presented show that the selective inhibitory effect on BA on C. albicans hyphae is rooted in a disruption of apical cytoskeletal elements of growing hyphae. PMID:25612315

  10. Acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid inhibits prostate tumor growth by suppressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-mediated angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiufeng; Yi, Zhengfang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Sung, Bokyung; Qu, Weijing; Lian, Xiaoyuan; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Liu, Mingyao

    2009-07-15

    The role of angiogenesis in tumor growth and metastasis is well established. Identification of a small molecule that blocks tumor angiogenesis and is safe and affordable has been a challenge in drug development. In this study, we showed that acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA), an active component from an Ayurvedic medicinal plant (Boswellia serrata), could strongly inhibit tumor angiogenesis. AKBA suppressed tumor growth in the human prostate tumor xenograft mice treated daily (10 mg/kg AKBA) after solid tumors reached approximately 100 mm(3) (n = 5). The inhibitory effect of AKBA on tumor growth was well correlated with suppression of angiogenesis. When examined for the molecular mechanism, we found that AKBA significantly inhibited blood vessel formation in the Matrigel plug assay in mice and effectively suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced microvessel sprouting in rat aortic ring assay ex vivo. Furthermore, AKBA inhibited VEGF-induced cell proliferation, chemotactic motility, and the formation of capillary-like structures from primary cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis and in vitro kinase assay revealed that AKBA suppressed VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) kinase (KDR/Flk-1) with IC(50) of 1.68 micromol/L. Specifically, AKBA suppressed the downstream protein kinases of VEGFR2, including Src family kinase, focal adhesion kinase, extracellular signal-related kinase, AKT, mammalian target of rapamycin, and ribosomal protein S6 kinase. Our findings suggest that AKBA potently inhibits human prostate tumor growth through inhibition of angiogenesis induced by VEGFR2 signaling pathways. PMID:19567671

  11. Sequence-specific bacterial growth inhibition by peptide nucleic acid targeted to the mRNA binding site of 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Hatamoto, Masashi; Nakai, Kazufumi; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2009-10-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) targeted to the functional domains of 23S rRNA can inhibit translation and cell growth. However, effective inhibition of translation and cell growth using 16S rRNA-targeted PNA has still not been achieved. Here, we report that PNA targeted to the functional site of 16S rRNA could inhibit both gene expression in vitro and bacterial growth in pure culture with sequence specificity. We used 10-mer PNAs conjugated with a cell-penetrating peptide, which targeted the mRNA binding site at the 3' end of 16S rRNA. Using 0.6 microM of the peptide-PNAs, cell-free ss-galactosidase production decreased by 50%, whereas peptide-PNAs with one or two mismatches to the target sequence showed much weaker inhibition effects. To determine the growth inhibition and bactericidal effects of the peptide-PNA conjugate, we performed OD measurement and viable cell counting. We observed dose- and sequence-dependent inhibition of cell growth and bactericidal effects. These growth inhibitory effects are observed both in the Gram-negative bacterium of Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Corynebacterium efficiens, although inhibitory concentrations were different for each bacterial species. These results present possibilities for 16S rRNA sequence-based specific bacterial growth inhibition using a peptide-PNA conjugate. PMID:19578844

  12. Pachymic Acid Inhibits Growth and Induces Apoptosis of Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro and In Vivo by Targeting ER Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shujie; Swanson, Kristen; Eliaz, Isaac; McClintick, Jeanette N.; Sandusky, George E.; Sliva, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Pachymic acid (PA) is a purified triterpene extracted from medicinal fungus Poria cocos. In this paper, we investigated the anticancer effect of PA on human chemotherapy resistant pancreatic cancer. PA triggered apoptosis in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2. Comparative gene expression array analysis demonstrated that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was induced by PA through activation of heat shock response and unfolded protein response related genes. Induced ER stress was confirmed by increasing expression of XBP-1s, ATF4, Hsp70, CHOP and phospho-eIF2?. Moreover, ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) blocked PA induced apoptosis. In addition, 25 mg kg-1 of PA significantly suppressed MIA PaCa-2 tumor growth in vivo without toxicity, which correlated with induction of apoptosis and expression of ER stress related proteins in tumor tissues. Taken together, growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis by PA in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells were associated with ER stress activation both in vitro and in vivo. PA may be potentially exploited for the use in treatment of chemotherapy resistant pancreatic cancer. PMID:25915041

  13. Pachymic acid inhibits growth and induces apoptosis of pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo by targeting ER stress.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shujie; Swanson, Kristen; Eliaz, Isaac; McClintick, Jeanette N; Sandusky, George E; Sliva, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Pachymic acid (PA) is a purified triterpene extracted from medicinal fungus Poria cocos. In this paper, we investigated the anticancer effect of PA on human chemotherapy resistant pancreatic cancer. PA triggered apoptosis in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2. Comparative gene expression array analysis demonstrated that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was induced by PA through activation of heat shock response and unfolded protein response related genes. Induced ER stress was confirmed by increasing expression of XBP-1s, ATF4, Hsp70, CHOP and phospho-eIF2?. Moreover, ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) blocked PA induced apoptosis. In addition, 25 mg kg-1 of PA significantly suppressed MIA PaCa-2 tumor growth in vivo without toxicity, which correlated with induction of apoptosis and expression of ER stress related proteins in tumor tissues. Taken together, growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis by PA in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells were associated with ER stress activation both in vitro and in vivo. PA may be potentially exploited for the use in treatment of chemotherapy resistant pancreatic cancer. PMID:25915041

  14. Retinoic acid receptor antagonist BMS453 inhibits the growth of normal and malignant breast cells without activating RAR-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Munoz-Medellin, D; Kim, H T; Ostrowski, J; Reczek, P; Brown, P H

    1999-08-01

    To elucidate the role of RAR-dependent gene transcription in inhibiting breast cell growth, we have investigated the ability of retinoids to suppress growth of normal, immortal, and malignant breast cells. We compared the ability of all trans retinoic acid (atRA) to activate retinoid receptors in normal, immortal, and malignant breast cells, with its ability to inhibit the growth of these cells. Our studies demonstrate that normal breast cells are more sensitive to the growth inhibitory effect of atRA than are immortal nonmalignant breast cells and breast cancer cells. atRA activated RAR-dependent gene transcription in both atRA-sensitive and -resistant breast cells as determined by transfection of a RARE-containing reporter gene. These results demonstrate that activation of RAR-dependent gene transcription by atRA is not sufficient to inhibit growth in atRA-resistant breast cancer cells. To determine whether activation of RAR-dependent gene transcription by atRA is necessary for growth inhibition, we tested the growth suppressive effect of a retinoid (BMS453) which binds RAR receptors and transrepresses AP-1 but does not activate RAR-dependent gene expression. This retinoid inhibited the growth of normal breast cells (HMEC and 184) and T47D breast cancer cells. Breast cancer cells which were resistant to atRA, were also resistant to BMS453. Normal human breast cells were most sensitive to the anti-proliferative effects of BMS453. These results indicate that in some breast cells RAR-dependent transactivation is not necessary for retinoids to inhibit growth. Instead, retinoids may suppress growth by inhibiting transcription factors such as AP-1 through transcription factor crosstalk. PMID:10573118

  15. Gallic acid inhibits gastric cancer cells metastasis and invasive growth via increased expression of RhoB, downregulation of AKT/small GTPase signals and inhibition of NF-?B activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Hsieh-Hsun; Chang, Chi-Sen; Division of Gastroenterology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan ; Ho, Wei-Chi; Liao, Sheng-You; Lin, Wea-Lung; Department of Pathology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan ; Wang, Chau-Jong; Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated the therapeutic potential of gallic acid (GA) for controlling tumor metastasis through its inhibitory effect on the motility of AGS cells. A noteworthy finding in our previous experiment was increased RhoB expression in GA-treated cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of RhoB expression on the inhibitory effects of GA on AGS cells. By applying the transfection of RhoB siRNA into AGS cells and an animal model, we tested the effect of GA on inhibition of tumor growth and RhoB expression. The results confirmed that RhoB-siRNA transfection induced GA to inhibit AGS cells’ invasive growth involving blocking the AKT/small GTPase signals pathway and inhibition of NF-?B activity. Finally, we evaluated the effect of GA on AGS cell metastasis by colonization of tumor cells in nude mice. It showed GA inhibited tumor cells growth via the expression of RhoB. These data support the inhibitory effect of GA which was shown to inhibit gastric cancer cell metastasis and invasive growth via increased expression of RhoB, downregulation of AKT/small GTPase signals and inhibition of NF-?B activity. Thus, GA might be a potential agent in treating gastric cancer. Highlights: ? GA could downregulate AKT signal via increased expression of RhoB. ? GA inhibits metastasis in vitro in gastric carcinoma. ? GA inhibits tumor growth in nude mice model.

  16. Growth inhibition of Aeromonas salmonicida and Yersinia ruckeri by disinfectants containing peracetic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid is a therapeutic agent used for disinfection in aquaculture, but it must be investigated thoroughly in order to mitigate diseases without harmful effects to fish. These agents should not leave dangerous residues in the environment in order to successfully contribute to sustainable aq...

  17. Growth inhibition of Aeromonas salmonicida and Yersinia ruckeri by disinfectants containing peracetic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is an agent used for disinfection in aquaculture. PAA contributes to sustainable aquaculture, because it releases no harmful residue in the environment. However, there is lack of guideline about the effective application of different PAA products against various pathogens in p...

  18. Defect of synthesis of very long-chain fatty acids confers resistance to growth inhibition by inositol phosphorylceramide synthase repression in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2010-11-01

    Aureobasidin A (AbA) inhibits Aur1p, an enzyme catalysing the formation of inositol phosphorylceramide in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. AbA treatment results not only in reductions in complex sphingolipid levels but also in accumulation of ceramides, both of which are believed to lead to the growth defect caused by this inhibitor. We screened for mutants showing resistance to this drug, and found that a lack of ELO3, the gene involved in synthesis of very long-chain fatty acids, confers resistance to the inhibitor. The resistance as to growth inhibition by reduction in Aur1p activity was also confirmed by repression of AUR1 expression under the control of a tetracycline-regulatable promoter. Under the AUR1-repressive conditions, the ELO3 mutant showed reduction in the complex sphingolipid levels and the accumulation of ceramide, like wild-type cells. However, with repression of LCB1 encoding serine palmitoyltransferase or LIP1 encoding the ceramide synthase subunit, the ELO3 mutation did not confer resistance to growth inhibition induced by the impaired sphingolipid biosynthesis. Therefore, it is suggested that the ELO3 mutant shows resistance as to accumulation of ceramides, implying that the chain lengths of fatty acids in ceramide are a critical factor for the ceramide-induced growth defect under AUR1-repressive conditions. PMID:20709688

  19. High temperature stimulates acetic acid accumulation and enhances the growth inhibition and ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under fermenting conditions.

    PubMed

    Woo, Ji-Min; Yang, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Sae-Um; Blank, Lars M; Park, Jin-Byung

    2014-07-01

    Cellular responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to high temperatures of up to 42 °C during ethanol fermentation at a high glucose concentration (i.e., 100 g/L) were investigated. Increased temperature correlated with stimulated glucose uptake to produce not only the thermal protectant glycerol but also ethanol and acetic acid. Carbon flux into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle correlated positively with cultivation temperature. These results indicate that the increased demand for energy (in the form of ATP), most likely caused by multiple stressors, including heat, acetic acid, and ethanol, was matched by both the fermentation and respiration pathways. Notably, acetic acid production was substantially stimulated compared to that of other metabolites during growth at increased temperature. The acetic acid produced in addition to ethanol seemed to subsequently result in adverse effects, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. This, in turn, appeared to cause the specific growth rate, and glucose uptake rate reduced leading to a decrease of the specific ethanol production rate far before glucose depletion. These results suggest that adverse effects from heat, acetic acid, ethanol, and oxidative stressors are synergistic, resulting in a decrease of the specific growth rate and ethanol production rate and, hence, are major determinants of cell stability and ethanol fermentation performance of S. cerevisiae at high temperatures. The results are discussed in the context of possible applications. PMID:24706214

  20. Mechanism of Growth Inhibition of Human Cancer Cells by Conjugated Eicosapentaenoic Acid, an Inhibitor of DNA Polymerase and Topoisomerase

    PubMed Central

    Yonezawa, Yuko; Yoshida, Hiromi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2007-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases (topos) and DNA polymerases (pols) are involved in many aspects of DNA metabolism such as replication reactions. We found that long chain unsaturated fatty acids such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (i.e., eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)) inhibited the activities of eukaryotic pols and topos in vitro, and the inhibitory effect of conjugated fatty acids converted from EPA and DHA (cEPA and cDHA) on pols and topos was stronger than that of normal EPA and DHA. cEPA and cDHA did not affect the activities of plant and prokaryotic pols or other DNA metabolic enzymes tested. cEPA was a stronger inhibitor than cDHA with IC50 values for mammalian pols and human topos of 11.0 – 31.8 and 0.5 – 2.5 ?M, respectively. cEPA inhibited the proliferation of two human leukemia cell lines, NALM-6, which is a p53-wild type, and HL-60, which is a p53-null mutant, and the inhibitory effect was stronger than that of normal EPA. In both cell lines, cEPA arrested in the G1 phase, and increased cyclin E protein levels, indicating that it blocks the primary step of in vivo DNA replication by inhibiting the activity of replicative pols rather than topos. DNA replication-related proteins, such as RPA70, ATR and phosphorylated-Chk1/2, were increased by cEPA treatment in the cell lines, suggesting that cEPA led to DNA replication fork stress inhibiting the activities of pols and topos, and the ATR-dependent DNA damage response pathway could respond to the inhibitor of DNA replication. The compound induced cell apoptosis through both p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways in cell lines NALM-6 and HL-60, respectively. These results suggested the therapeutic potential of conjugated PUFA, such as cEPA, as a leading anti-cancer compound that inhibited pols and topos activities.

  1. Docosahexaenoic acid from a cultured microalga inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis by upregulating Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Lawrence C-M; Wong, Elaine Y-L; Ooi, Vincent E C

    2004-12-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an omega-3 fatty acid that comprises 22 carbons and 6 alternative double bonds in its hydrocarbon chain (22:6omega3). Previous studies have shown that DHA from fish oil controls the growth and development of different cancers; however, safety issues have been raised repeatedly about contamination of toxins in fish oil that makes it no longer a clean and safe source of the fatty acid. We investigated the cell growth inhibition of DHA from the cultured microalga Crypthecodinium cohnii (algal DHA [aDHA]) in human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells. aDHA exhibited growth inhibition on breast cancer cells dose-dependently by 16.0% to 59.0% of the control level after 72-h incubations with 40 to 160 microM of the fatty acid. DNA flow cytometry shows that aDHA induced sub-G(1) cells, or apoptotic cells, by 64.4% to 171.3% of the control levels after incubations with 80 mM of the fatty acid for 24, 48, and 72 h. Western blot studies further show that aDHA did not modulate the expression of proapoptotic Bax protein but induced the downregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression time-dependently, causing increases of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio by 303.4% and 386.5% after 48- and 72-h incubations respectively with the fatty acid. Results from this study suggest that DHA from the cultured microalga is also effective in controlling cancer cell growth and that downregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 is an important step in the induced apoptosis. PMID:15659818

  2. Isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating arachidonic acid metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Wang, Yuzhong; Zheng, Hao; Yu, Wei; Chai, Hongyan; Zhang, Jing; Falck, John R.; Guo, Austin M.; Yue, Jiang; Peng, Renxiu; Yang, Jing

    2013-10-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA)-derived eicosanoids and its downstream pathways have been demonstrated to play crucial roles in growth control of breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate that isoliquiritigenin, a flavonoid phytoestrogen from licorice, induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating multiple key enzymes in AA metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer. Isoliquiritigenin diminished cell viability, 5-bromo-2?-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, and clonogenic ability in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231cells, and induced apoptosis as evidenced by an analysis of cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation, flow cytometry and hoechst staining. Furthermore, isoliquiritigenin inhibited mRNA expression of multiple forms of AA-metabolizing enzymes, including phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenases (COX)-2 and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4A, and decreased secretion of their products, including prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), without affecting COX-1, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP), and leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}). In addition, it downregulated the levels of phospho-PI3K, phospho-PDK (Ser{sup 241}), phospho-Akt (Thr{sup 308}), phospho-Bad (Ser{sup 136}), and Bcl-x{sub L} expression, thereby activating caspase cascades and eventually cleaving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Conversely, the addition of exogenous eicosanoids, including PGE{sub 2}, LTB{sub 4} and a 20-HETE analog (WIT003), and caspase inhibitors, or overexpression of constitutively active Akt reversed isoliquiritigenin-induced apoptosis. Notably, isoliquiritigenin induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice, together with decreased intratumoral levels of eicosanoids and phospho-Akt (Thr{sup 308}). Collectively, these data suggest that isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating AA metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer. - Highlights: • Isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis in human breast cancer. • The proapoptotic action of isoliquiritigenin has been studied in vitro and in vivo. • Arachidonic acid metabolic network mediates isoliquiritigenin-induced apoptosis. • PI3K/Akt deactivation is asssociated with isoliquiritigenin-induced apoptosis. • Isoliquiritigenin may be a multi-target drug in the treatment of breast cancer.

  3. Ursolic Acid Inhibits Growth and Metastasis of Human Colorectal Cancer in an Orthotopic Nude Mouse Model by Targeting Multiple Cell Signaling Pathways: Chemosensitization with Capecitabine

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R.; Sung, Bokyung; Reuter, Simone; Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Deorukhkar, Amit; Diagaradjane, Parmeswaran; Wei, Caimiao; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Krishnan, Sunil; Guha, Sushovan; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Development of chemoresistance, poor prognosis, and metastasis often renders the current treatments for colorectal cancer (CRC) ineffective. Whether ursolic acid (UA), a component of numerous medicinal plants, either alone or in combination with capecitabine, can inhibit the growth and metastasis of human CRC was investigated. Experimental design The effect of UA on proliferation of colorectal cancer cell lines was examined by mitochondrial dye-uptake assay, apoptosis by esterase staining, NF-?B activation by DNA binding assay and protein expression by western blot. The effect of UA on the growth and chemosensitization was also examined in orthotopically-implanted CRC in nude mice. Results We found that UA inhibited the proliferation of different colon cancer cell lines. This is correlated with inhibition of constitutive NF-?B activation and downregulation of cell survival (Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, cFLIP, survivin), proliferative (Cyclin D1), and metastatic (MMP-9, VEGF, ICAM-1) proteins. When examined in an orthotopic nude-mice model, UA significantly inhibited tumor volume, ascites formation and distant organ metastasis, and this effect was enhanced with capecitabine. Immunohistochemistry of tumor tissue indicated that UA downregulated biomarkers of proliferation (Ki-67) and microvessel density (CD31). This effect was accompanied by suppression of NF-?B, STAT3, and ?-catenin. In addition, UA suppressed EGFR, and induced p53, and p21 expression. We also observed bioavailability of UA in the serum and tissue of animals. Conclusion Overall our results demonstrate that UA can inhibit the growth and metastasis of CRC and further enhance the therapeutic effects of capecitabine through suppression of multiple biomarkers linked to inflammation, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. PMID:22832932

  4. A mechanism of growth inhibition by abscisic acid in germinating seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana based on inhibition of plasma membrane H+-ATPase and decreased cytosolic pH, K+, and anions

    PubMed Central

    Planes, María D.; Niñoles, Regina; Rubio, Lourdes; Bissoli, Gaetano; Bueso, Eduardo; García-Sánchez, María J.; Alejandro, Santiago; Gonzalez-Guzmán, Miguel; Hedrich, Rainer; Rodriguez, Pedro L.; Fernández, José A.; Serrano, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) induces expression of defence genes in many organs, modulates ion homeostasis and metabolism in guard cells, and inhibits germination and seedling growth. Concerning the latter effect, several mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with improved capability for H+ efflux (wat1-1D, overexpression of AKT1 and ost2-1D) are less sensitive to inhibition by ABA than the wild type. This suggested that ABA could inhibit H+ efflux (H+-ATPase) and induce cytosolic acidification as a mechanism of growth inhibition. Measurements to test this hypothesis could not be done in germinating seeds and we used roots as the most convenient system. ABA inhibited the root plasma-membrane H+-ATPase measured in vitro (ATP hydrolysis by isolated vesicles) and in vivo (H+ efflux from seedling roots). This inhibition involved the core ABA signalling elements: PYR/PYL/RCAR ABA receptors, ABA-inhibited protein phosphatases (HAB1), and ABA-activated protein kinases (SnRK2.2 and SnRK2.3). Electrophysiological measurements in root epidermal cells indicated that ABA, acting through the PYR/PYL/RCAR receptors, induced membrane hyperpolarization (due to K+ efflux through the GORK channel) and cytosolic acidification. This acidification was not observed in the wat1-1D mutant. The mechanism of inhibition of the H+-ATPase by ABA and its effects on cytosolic pH and membrane potential in roots were different from those in guard cells. ABA did not affect the in vivo phosphorylation level of the known activating site (penultimate threonine) of H+-ATPase in roots, and SnRK2.2 phosphorylated in vitro the C-terminal regulatory domain of H+-ATPase while the guard-cell kinase SnRK2.6/OST1 did not. PMID:25371509

  5. Salvianolic acid B inhibits growth of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in vitro and in vivo via cyclooxygenase-2 and apoptotic pathways.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yubin; Xie, Tianpei; Korotcov, Alexandru; Zhou, Yanfei; Pang, Xiaowu; Shan, Liang; Ji, Hongguang; Sridhar, Rajagopalan; Wang, Paul; Califano, Joseph; Gu, Xinbin

    2009-05-01

    Overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in oral mucosa has been associated with increased risk of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Celecoxib is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, which inhibits COX-2 but not COX-1. This selective COX-2 inhibitor holds promise as a cancer preventive agent. Concerns about cardiotoxicity of celecoxib, limits its use in long-term chemoprevention and therapy. Salvianolic acid B (Sal-B) is a leading bioactive component of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge, which is used for treating neoplastic and chronic inflammatory diseases in China. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which Sal-B inhibits HNSCC growth. Sal-B was isolated from S. miltiorrhiza Bge by solvent extraction followed by 2 chromatographic steps. Pharmacological activity of Sal-B was assessed in HNSCC and other cell lines by estimating COX-2 expression, cell viability and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Sal-B inhibited growth of HNSCC JHU-022 and JHU-013 cells with IC(50) of 18 and 50 microM, respectively. Nude mice with HNSCC solid tumor xenografts were treated with Sal-B (80 mg/kg/day) or celecoxib (5 mg/kg/day) for 25 days to investigate in vivo effects of the COX-2 inhibitors. Tumor volumes in Sal-B treated group were significantly lower than those in celecoxib treated or untreated control groups (p < 0.05). Sal-B inhibited COX-2 expression in cultured HNSCC cells and in HNSCC cells isolated from tumor xenografts. Sal-B also caused dose-dependent inhibition of prostaglandin E(2) synthesis, either with or without lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Taken together, Sal-B shows promise as a COX-2 targeted anticancer agent for HNSCC prevention and treatment. PMID:19123475

  6. Boswellic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human colorectal cancer in orthotopic mouse model by downregulating inflammatory, proliferative, invasive and angiogenic biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vivek R; Prasad, Sahdeo; Sung, Bokyung; Gelovani, Juri G; Guha, Sushovan; Krishnan, Sunil; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2012-05-01

    Numerous cancer therapeutics were originally identified from natural products used in traditional medicine. One such agent is acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA), derived from the gum resin of the Boswellia serrata known as Salai guggal or Indian frankincense. Traditionally, it has been used in Ayurvedic medicine to treat proinflammatory conditions. In this report, we hypothesized that AKBA can affect the growth and metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC) in orthotopically implanted tumors in nude mice. We found that the oral administration of AKBA (50-200 mg/kg) dose-dependently inhibited the growth of CRC tumors in mice, resulting in decrease in tumor volumes than those seen in vehicle-treated mice without significant decreases in body weight. In addition, we observed that AKBA was highly effective in suppressing ascites and distant metastasis to the liver, lungs and spleen in orthotopically implanted tumors in nude mice. When examined for the mechanism, we found that markers of tumor proliferation index Ki-67 and the microvessel density cluster of differentiation (CD31) were significantly downregulated by AKBA treatment. We also found that AKBA significantly suppressed nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) activation in the tumor tissue and expression of proinflammatory (cyclooxygenase-2), tumor survival (bcl-2, bcl-xL, inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP-1) and survivin), proliferative (cyclin D1), invasive (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and matrix metalloproteinase-9) and angiogenic C-X-C (CXC) receptor 4 and vascular endothelial growth factor) biomarkers. When examined for serum and tissue levels of AKBA, a dose-dependent increase in the levels of the drug was detected, indicating its bioavailability. Thus, our findings suggest that this boswellic acid analog can inhibit the growth and metastasis of human CRC in vivo through downregulation of cancer-associated biomarkers. PMID:21702037

  7. Efficient delivery of ursolic acid by poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-block-poly (?-caprolactone) nanoparticles for inhibiting the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Zheng, Donghui; Ding, Jing; Xu, Huae; Li, Xiaolin; Sun, Weihao

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpenoid derived from Catharanthus trichophyllus roots, could inhibit the growth of a series of cancer cells. However, the potential for clinical application of UA is greatly hampered by its poor solubility, whereas the hydrophobicity of UA renders it a promising model drug for nanosized delivery systems. In the current study, we loaded UA into amphiphilic poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-block-poly (?-caprolactone) nanoparticles and performed physiochemical characterization as well as analysis of the releasing capacity. In vitro experiments indicated that UA-NPs inhibited the growth of liver cancer cells and induced cellular apoptosis more efficiently than did free UA. Moreover, UA-NPs significantly delayed tumor growth and localized to the tumor site when compared with the equivalent dose of UA. In addition, both Western blotting and immunohistochemistry suggested that the possible mechanism of the superior efficiency of UA-NPs is mediation by the regulation of apoptosis-related proteins. Therefore, UA-NPs show potential as a promising nanosized drug system for liver cancer therapy. PMID:25792825

  8. Acid precipitation and food quality: Inhibition of growth and survival in black ducks and mallards by dietary aluminum, calcium and phosphorus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, C.S.

    1990-01-01

    In areas impacted by acid precipitation, water chemistry of acidic ponds and streams often changes, resulting in increased mobilization of aluminum and decreased concentration of calcium carbonate. Aluminum binds with phosphorus and inhibits its uptake by organisms. Thus, invertebrate food organisms used by waterfowl may have inadequate Ca and P or elevated Al for normal growth and development. Acid rain and its effects may be one of the factors negatively impacting American black ducks (Anas rubripes) in eastern North America. One-day old mallards (A. platyrhynchos) and black ducks were placed on one of three Ca:P regimens: low:low (LL), normal:normal (NN), and low:high (LH) with each regimen divided further into three or four Al levels for 10 weeks. Forty-five % of the black ducks died on nine different diets whereas only 28% of the mallards died on three different diets. Mortality was significantly related to diet in both species. Growth rates for body weight, culmens, wings, and tarsi of both species on control diets exceeded those on many treatment diets but the differences were less apparent for mallards than for black ducks. Differences among treatments were due to both Ca:P and Al levels.

  9. Aromatic hydrocarbon receptor inhibits lysophosphatidic acid-induced vascular endothelial growth factor-A expression in PC-3 prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Pei-Yi; Lin, Yueh-Chien; Lan, Shun-Yan; Huang, Yuan-Li; Lee, Hsinyu; Department of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •LPA-induced VEGF-A expression was regulated by HIF-1? and ARNT. •PI3K mediated LPA-induced VEGF-A expression. •AHR signaling inhibited LPA-induced VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid growth factor with multiple biological functions and has been shown to stimulate cancer cell secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) and trigger angiogenesis. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), a heterodimer consisting of HIF-1? and HIF-1? (also known as aromatic hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)) subunits, is an important regulator of angiogenesis in prostate cancer (PC) through the enhancement of VEGF-A expression. In this study, we first confirmed the ability of LPA to induce VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells and then validated that LPA-induced VEGF-A expression was regulated by HIF-1? and ARNT through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation. Aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a receptor for dioxin-like compounds, functions as a transcription factor through dimerization with ARNT and was found to inhibit prostate carcinogenesis and vanadate-induced VEGF-A production. Since ARNT is a common dimerization partner of AHR and HIF-1?, we hypothesized that AHR might suppress LPA-induced VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells by competing with HIF-1? for ARNT. Here we demonstrated that overexpression and ligand activation of AHR inhibited HIF-1-mediated VEGF-A induction by LPA treatment of PC-3 cells. In conclusion, our results suggested that AHR activation may inhibit LPA-induced VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells by attenuating HIF-1? signaling, and subsequently, suppressing angiogenesis and metastasis of PC. These results suggested that AHR presents a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of PC metastasis.

  10. Caffeic Acid Derivatives Inhibit the Growth of Colon Cancer: Involvement of the PI3-K/Akt and AMPK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Pai, Man-Hui; Chiu, Hsi-Lin; Rodriguez, Raymond L.; Tang, Feng-Yao

    2014-01-01

    Background The aberrant regulation of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3-K)/Akt, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR) signaling pathways in cancer has prompted significant interest in the suppression of these pathways to treat cancer. Caffeic acid (CA) has been reported to possess important anti-inflammatory actions. However, the molecular mechanisms by which CA derivatives including caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and caffeic acid phenylpropyl ester (CAPPE), exert inhibitory effects on the proliferation of human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells have yet to be elucidated. Methodology/Principal Findings CAPE and CAPPE were evaluated for their ability to modulate these signaling pathways and suppress the proliferation of CRC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Anti-cancer effects of these CA derivatives were measured by using proliferation assays, cell cycle analysis, western blotting assay, reporter gene assay and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining assays both in vitro and in vivo. This study demonstrates that CAPE and CAPPE exhibit a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation and survival of CRC cells through the induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and augmentation of apoptotic pathways. Consumption of CAPE and CAPPE significantly inhibited the growth of colorectal tumors in a mouse xenograft model. The mechanisms of action included a modulation of PI3-K/Akt, AMPK and m-TOR signaling cascades both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, the results demonstrate novel anti-cancer mechanisms of CA derivatives against the growth of human CRC cells. Conclusions CA derivatives are potent anti-cancer agents that augment AMPK activation and promote apoptosis in human CRC cells. The structure of CA derivatives can be used for the rational design of novel inhibitors that target human CRC cells. PMID:24960186

  11. Boswellic Acid Inhibits Growth and Metastasis of Human Colorectal Cancer in Orthotopic Mouse Model By Downregulating Inflammatory, Proliferative, Invasive, and Angiogenic Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Vivek R.; Prasad, Sahdeo; Sung, Bokyung; Gelovani, Juri G.; Guha, Sushovan; Krishnan, Sunil; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous cancer therapeutics were originally identified from natural products used in traditional medicine. One such agent is acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA), derived from the gum resin of the Boswellia serrata known as Salai guggal or Indian frankincense. Traditionally it has been used in Ayurvedic medicine to treat proinflammatory conditions. In the present report, we hypothesized that AKBA can affect the growth and metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC) in orthotopically-implanted tumors in nude mice. We found that the oral administration of AKBA (50-200 mg/kg) dose-dependently inhibited the growth of CRC tumors in mice, resulting in decrease in tumor volumes than those seen in vehicle-treated mice without significant decreases in body weight. In addition, we observed that AKBA was highly effective in suppressing ascites and distant metastasis to the liver, lungs, and spleen in orthotopically-implanted tumors in nude mice. When examined for the mechanism, we found that markers of tumor proliferation index Ki-67 and the microvessel density CD31; were significantly downregulated by AKBA treatment. We also found that AKBA significantly suppressed NF-?B activation in the tumor tissue and expression of pro-inflammatory (COX2), tumor survival (bcl-2, bcl-xL, IAP-1, survivin), proliferative (cyclin D1), invasive (ICAM-1, MMP-9) and angiogenic (CXCR4 and VEGF) biomarkers. When examined for serum and tissue levels of AKBA, a dose-dependent increase in the levels of the drug was detected, indicating its bioavailability. Thus, our findings suggest that this boswellic acid analogue can inhibit the growth and metastasis of human CRC in vivo through downregulation of cancer-associated biomarkers. PMID:21702037

  12. Combination effects of salvianolic acid B with low-dose celecoxib on inhibition of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Hao, Yubin; Ji, Hongguang; Fang, Yayin; Guo, Yinhan; Sha, Wei; Zhou, Yanfei; Pang, Xiaowu; Southerland, William M; Califano, Joseph A; Gu, Xinbin

    2010-06-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) development is closely associated with inflammation. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an important mediator of inflammation. Therefore, celecoxib, a selective inhibitor of COX-2, was hailed as a promising chemopreventive agent for HNSCC. Dose-dependent cardiac toxicity limits long-term use of celecoxib, but it seems likely that this may be diminished by lowering its dose. We found that salvianolic acid B (Sal-B), isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge, can effectively suppress COX-2 expression and induce apoptosis in a variety of cancer cell lines. In this study, we report that combination of Sal-B with low-dose celecoxib results in a more pronounced anticancer effect in HNSCC than either agent alone. The combination effects were assessed in four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-06, JHU-011, JHU-013, and JHU-022) by evaluating cell viability, proliferation, and tumor xenograft growth. Cell viability and proliferation were significantly inhibited by both the combined and single-agent treatments. However, the combination treatment significantly enhanced anticancer efficacy in JHU-013 and JHU-022 cell lines compared with the single treatment regimens. A half-dose of daily Sal-B (40 mg/kg/d) and celecoxib (2.5 mg/kg/d) significantly inhibited JHU-013 xenograft growth relative to mice treated with a full dose of Sal-B or celecoxib alone. The combination was associated with profound inhibition of COX-2 and enhanced induction of apoptosis. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that combination of Sal-B, a multifunctional anticancer agent, with low-dose celecoxib holds potential as a new preventive strategy in targeting inflammatory-associated tumor development. PMID:20501859

  13. Root-to-shoot signalling when soil moisture is heterogeneous: increasing the proportion of root biomass in drying soil inhibits leaf growth and increases leaf abscisic acid concentration.

    PubMed

    Martin-Vertedor, Ana Isabel; Dodd, Ian C

    2011-07-01

    To determine whether root-to-shoot signalling of soil moisture heterogeneity depended on root distribution, wild-type (WT) and abscisic acid (ABA)-deficient (Az34) barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants were grown in split pots into which different numbers of seminal roots were inserted. After establishment, all plants received the same irrigation volumes, with one pot watered (w) and the other allowed to dry the soil (d), imposing three treatments (1 d: 3 w, 2 d: 2 w, 3 d: 1 w) that differed in the number of seminal roots exposed to drying soil. Root distribution did not affect leaf water relations and had no sustained effect on plant evapotranspiration (ET). In both genotypes, leaf elongation was less and leaf ABA concentrations were higher in plants with more roots in drying soil, with leaf ABA concentrations and water potentials 30% and 0.2 MPa higher, respectively, in WT plants. Whole-pot soil drying increased xylem ABA concentrations, but maximum values obtained when leaf growth had virtually ceased (100 nm in Az34, 330 nm in WT) had minimal effects (<40% leaf growth inhibition) when xylem supplied to detached shoots. Although ABA may not regulate leaf growth in vivo, genetic variation in foliar ABA concentration in the field may indicate different root distributions between upper (drier) and lower (wetter) soil layers. PMID:21410712

  14. Salicylic acid alleviates cadmium-induced inhibition of growth and photosynthesis through upregulating antioxidant defense system in two melon cultivars (Cucumis melo L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongping; Xu, Shuang; Yang, Shaojun; Chen, Youyuan

    2015-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread toxic heavy metal that usually causes deleterious effects on plant growth and development. Salicylic acid (SA), a naturally existing phenolic compound, is involved in specific responses to various environmental stresses. To explore the role of SA in the tolerance of melon (Cucumis melo L.) to Cd stress, the influence of SA application on the growth and physiological processes was compared in the two melon cultivars Hamilv (Cd-tolerant) and Xiulv (Cd-sensitive) under Cd stress. Under 400-?M Cd treatment, Hamilv showed a higher biomass accumulation, more chlorophyll (Chl), greater photosynthesis, and less oxidative damage compared to Xiulv. Foliar spraying of 0.1 mM SA dramatically alleviated Cd-induced growth inhibition in the two melon genotypes. Simultaneously, SA pretreatment attenuated the decrease in Chl content, photosynthetic capacity, and PSII photochemistry efficiency in Cd-stressed plants. Furthermore, exogenous SA significantly reduced superoxide anion production and lipid peroxidation, followed by increase in the activities of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase, guaiacol peroxidase, catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase, and content of soluble protein and free proline in both the genotypes under Cd stress. The effect of SA was more conspicuous in Xiulv than Hamilv, reflected in the biomass, photosynthetic pigments, stomatal conductance, water use efficiency, and antioxidant enzymes. These results suggest that exogenous spray of SA can alleviate the adverse effects of Cd on the growth and photosynthesis of both the melon cultivars, mostly through promoting antioxidant defense capacity. It also indicates that SA-included protection against Cd damage is to a greater extent more pronounced in Cd-sensitive genotype than Cd-tolerant genotype. PMID:25398649

  15. Ascorbic acid mitigation of water stress-inhibition of root growth in association with oxidative defense in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi; Xu, Qian; Huang, Bingru

    2015-01-01

    Root growth inhibition by water stress may be related to oxidative damages. The objectives of this study were to determine whether exogenous application of ascorbic acid (ASA) could mitigate root growth decline due to water stress and whether ASA effects on root growth could be regulated through activating non-enzymatic or enzymatic antioxidant systems in perennial grass species. Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb. cv. “K-31”) plants were grown in nutrient solution, and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-8000 was added into the solution to induce water stress. For exogenous ASA treatment, ASA (5 mM) was added into the solution with or without PEG-8000. Plants treated with ASA under water stress showed significantly increased root growth rate, and those roots had significantly lower content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (H2O2 and O2? content) than those without ASA treatment. Malondialdehyde content in root tips treated with ASA under water stress was also significantly reduced compared with those under water stress alone. In addition, free ascorbate and total ascorbate content were significantly higher in roots treated with ASA under water stress than those without ASA treatment. The enzymatic activities for ROS scavenging-related genes were not significantly altered by ASA treatment under water stress, while transcript abundances of genes encoding superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, dehydroascorbate reductase, and monohydroascorbate reductase showed significant decreases in the root elongation zone and significant increases in the root maturation zone treated with ASA under water stress. Transcripts of genes for expansins and xyloglucan endotransglycosylases showed increased abundances in ASA-treated root maturation zone under water stress, indicating that ASA could accelerated cell wall loosening and cell expansion. The results suggested that exogenous treatment of roots with ASA enhanced root elongation under water stress, which could be attributed by increasing non-enzymatic antioxidant production, suppressing ROS toxicity and up-regulating gene expression of cell-wall loosening proteins controlling cell expansion. PMID:26483821

  16. Cyclic phosphatidic acid inhibits the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor from diabetic human coronary artery endothelial cells through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Tsukahara, Ryoko; Haniu, Hisao; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko

    2015-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a disease characterized by building up plaques formation and leads to a potentially serious condition in which arteries are clogged by fatty substances such as cholesterol. Increasing evidence suggests that atherosclerosis is accelerated in type 2 diabetes. Recent study reported that high level of alkyl glycerophosphate (AGP) was accumulated in atherosclerotic lesions. The presence of this phospholipid in mildly oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is likely to be involved in atherogenesis. It has been reported that the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma plays a key role in developing atherosclerosis. Our previous result indicates that cyclic phosphatidic acid (cPA), one of bioactive lipids, potently suppresses neointima formation by inhibiting the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR?). However, the detailed mechanism is still unclear. In this study, to elucidate the mechanism of the cPA-PPAR? axis in the coronary artery endothelium, especially in patients with type 2 diabetes, we investigated the proliferation, migration, and secretion of VEGF in human coronary artery endothelial cells from diabetes patients (D-HCAECs). AGP induced cell growth and migration; however, cPA suppressed the AGP-elicited growth and migration in D-HCAECs. Moreover, AGP increased VEGF secretion from D-HCAECs, and this event was attenuated by cPA. Taken together, these results suggest that cPA suppresses VEGF-stimulated growth and migration in D-HCAECs. These findings could be important for regulatory roles of PPAR? and VEGF in the vascular processes associated with diabetes and atherosclerosis. PMID:26007326

  17. Epidermal growth factor inhibits radioiodine uptake but stimulates deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in newborn rat thyroids grown in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, S.; Spaulding, S.W. )

    1990-08-01

    We have studied the effect of altering the level of circulating epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the function and growth of newborn rat thyroids transplanted into nude mice. Preliminary studies confirmed that sialoadenectomy reduced circulating EGF levels in nude mice (from 0.17 +/- 0.02 to 0.09 +/- 0.02 ng/ml), and that ip injection of 5 micrograms EGF raised EGF levels (the peak level of 91.7 +/- 3.3 ng/ml was achieved at 30 min, with a subsequent half-life of about 1 h). The radioiodine uptake by newborn rat thyroid transplants in the sialoadenectomized and sham-operated animals correlated inversely with the circulating EGF levels determined when the mice were killed (r = -0.99). Low-dose TSH treatment (0.1 microU/day) generally stimulated the radioiodine uptake, but high-dose TSH groups (100 microU/day) were not significantly different from the control group. The 5-day nuclear (3H)thymidine labeling index was 6.8 +/- 0.5% IN newborn rat thyroid transplants grown in sialoadenectomized animals, 13.1 +/- 0.3% in sham-operated animals, and 16.8 +/- 0.5% in nude mice receiving 5 micrograms EGF ip daily. In general, both low-dose and high-dose TSH promoted DNA synthesis under low EGF conditions but were ineffective in the presence of higher levels of EGF. Adult rat thyroid transplants showed no significant responses. Although sialoadenectomy may alter other factors besides EGF, it appears that changes in the levels of circulating EGF within the physiological range affect the function and growth of newborn rat thyroid transplants. Circulating EGF may play a role in thyroid maturation and may also be involved in the regulation of thyroid function throughout life.

  18. Crocetinic acid inhibits hedgehog signaling to inhibit pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Parthasarathy; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Paul, Santanu; Kwatra, Deep; Palaniyandi, Kanagaraj; Islam, Shamima; Harihar, Sitaram; Ramalingam, Satish; Gutheil, William; Putty, Sandeep; Pradhan, Rohan; Padhye, Subhash; Welch, Danny R; Anant, Shrikant; Dhar, Animesh

    2015-09-29

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the US and no significant treatment is currently available. Here, we describe the effect of crocetinic acid, which we purified from commercial saffron compound crocetin using high performance liquid chromatography. Crocetinic acid inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, it induced apoptosis. Moreover, the compound significantly inhibited epidermal growth factor receptor and Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, crocetinic acid decreased the number and size of the pancospheres in a dose-dependent manner, and suppressed the expression of the marker protein DCLK-1 (Doublecortin Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase-1) suggesting that crocetinic acid targets cancer stem cells (CSC). To understand the mechanism of CSC inhibition, the signaling pathways affected by purified crocetinic acid were dissected. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) upon binding to its cognate receptor patched, allows smoothened to accumulate and activate Gli transcription factor. Crocetinic acid inhibited the expression of both Shh and smoothened. Finally, these data were confirmed in vivo where the compound at a dose of 0.5 mg/Kg bw suppressed growth of tumor xenografts. Collectively, these data suggest that purified crocetinic acid inhibits pancreatic CSC, thereby inhibiting pancreatic tumorigenesis. PMID:26317547

  19. Influence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the on the ability of fatty acids to inhibit the growth of bacteria associated with poultry processing.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the bactericidal activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids was examined. A 0.5 M concentration of caproic, caprylic, capric, and lauric acids was dissolved in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH), and then supplemented with 0, 5, or 10 mM of EDTA. T...

  20. Celecoxib and tauro-ursodeoxycholic acid co-treatment inhibits cell growth in familial adenomatous polyposis derived LT97 colon adenoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Heumen, Bjorn W.H. van; Roelofs, Hennie M.J.; Morsche, Rene H.M. te; Marian, Brigitte; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Peters, Wilbert H.M.

    2012-04-15

    Chemoprevention would be a desirable strategy to avoid duodenectomy in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) suffering from duodenal adenomatosis. We investigated the in vitro effects on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and COX-2 expression of the potential chemopreventives celecoxib and tauro-ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). HT-29 colon cancer cells and LT97 colorectal micro-adenoma cells derived from a patient with FAP, were exposed to low dose celecoxib and UDCA alone or in combination with tauro-cholic acid (CA) and tauro-chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), mimicking bile of FAP patients treated with UDCA. In HT-29 cells, co-treatment with low dose celecoxib and UDCA resulted in a decreased cell growth (14-17%, p < 0.01). A more pronounced decrease (23-27%, p < 0.01) was observed in LT97 cells. Cell growth of HT-29 cells exposed to 'artificial bile' enriched with UDCA, was decreased (p < 0.001), either in the absence or presence of celecoxib. In LT97 cells incubated with 'artificial bile' enriched with UDCA, cell growth was decreased only in the presence of celecoxib (p < 0.05). No clear evidence was found for involvement of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, caspase-3, or COX-2 in the cellular processes leading to the observed changes in cell growth. In conclusion, co-treatment with low dose celecoxib and UDCA has growth inhibitory effects on colorectal adenoma cells derived from a patient with FAP, and further research on this combination as promising chemopreventive strategy is desired. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Celecoxib and UDCA acid co-treatment decreases cell growth in colon tumor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UDCA enriched 'artificial bile' decreases LT-97 cell growth only in presence of celecoxib. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCNA, caspase-3, nor COX-2 seem to be involved in the observed changes in cell growth.

  1. 3-Fluoroazetidinecarboxylic Acids and trans,trans-3,4-Difluoroproline as Peptide Scaffolds: Inhibition of Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth by a Fluoroazetidine Iminosugar

    E-print Network

    : Inhibition of Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth by a Fluoroazetidine Iminosugar Zilei Liu,a Sarah F. Jenkinson glycosidases enzyme 4 10L 6 11 55 15 57 14 17 16 -Glucosidase Rice a NI b (7.2%) NI (2.7%) NI (0%) NI (2.9%) 83.4%) NI (0%) 66 NI (8.4%) -Glucosidase Almond NI (2.4%) NI (1.1%) NI (5.0%) NI (4.6%) NI (9.5%) NI (5

  2. Nickel inhibits mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W; Brant, Kelly A; Fabisiak, James P; Goetzman, Eric S

    2015-08-01

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation-the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy-in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with l-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 h), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1? (HIF1?). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1? knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1? as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:26051273

  3. Specific bile acids inhibit hepatic fatty acid uptake

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Biao; Park, Hyo Min; Kazantzis, Melissa; Lin, Min; Henkin, Amy; Ng, Stephanie; Song, Sujin; Chen, Yuli; Tran, Heather; Lai, Robin; Her, Chris; Maher, Jacquelyn J.; Forman, Barry M.; Stahl, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Bile acids are known to play important roles as detergents in the absorption of hydrophobic nutrients and as signaling molecules in the regulation of metabolism. Here we tested the novel hypothesis that naturally occurring bile acids interfere with protein-mediated hepatic long chain free fatty acid (LCFA) uptake. To this end stable cell lines expressing fatty acid transporters as well as primary hepatocytes from mouse and human livers were incubated with primary and secondary bile acids to determine their effects on LCFA uptake rates. We identified ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA) as the two most potent inhibitors of the liver-specific fatty acid transport protein 5 (FATP5). Both UDCA and DCA were able to inhibit LCFA uptake by primary hepatocytes in a FATP5-dependent manner. Subsequently, mice were treated with these secondary bile acids in vivo to assess their ability to inhibit diet-induced hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Administration of DCA in vivo via injection or as part of a high-fat diet significantly inhibited hepatic fatty acid uptake and reduced liver triglycerides by more than 50%. In summary, the data demonstrate a novel role for specific bile acids, and the secondary bile acid DCA in particular, in the regulation of hepatic LCFA uptake. The results illuminate a previously unappreciated means by which specific bile acids, such as UDCA and DCA, can impact hepatic triglyceride metabolism and may lead to novel approaches to combat obesity-associated fatty liver disease. PMID:22531947

  4. Morphokinetic Reaction of Cells of Streptococcus faecalis (ATCC 9790) to Specific Inhibition of Macromolecular Synthesis: Dependence of Mesosome Growth on Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Michael L.; Daneo-Moore, Lolita

    1972-01-01

    The application of quantitative electron microscopy to thin sections of cells of Streptococcus faecalis specifically inhibited for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid, and protein synthesis shows that septal mesosomes (i) increase in size when protein synthesis is inhibited by at least 80% while DNA synthesis proceeds at no less than 50% of the control rate and (ii) decrease in size when DNA synthesis is inhibited 50% or more during the initial 10 min of treatment. This indicates that fluctuations in mesosome size are dependent on the extent of DNA synthesis. The fluctuations in mesosome areas observed on treatment do not correlate with the kinetics of glycerol incorporation per milliliter of a culture. However, when glycerol incorporation is placed on a per cell basis, a strong correlation is observed between increases in (i) the thickness of the electron-transparent layer of the cytoplasmic membrane and (ii) the amount of glycerol incorporated per cell. It seems that the electron-transparent membrane layer may thicken to accommodate changes in lipid content when protein and lipid synthesis are uncoupled. Images PMID:4110926

  5. Theobromine Inhibits Uric Acid Crystallization. A Potential Application in the Treatment of Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Grases, Felix; Rodriguez, Adrian; Costa-Bauza, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the capacity of methylxanthines (caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and paraxanthine) to inhibit uric acid crystallization, and to evaluate their potential application in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis. Materials and Methods The ability of methylxathines to inhibit uric acid nucleation was assayed turbidimetrically. Crystal morphology and its modification due to the effect of theobromine were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The ability of theobromine to inhibit uric acid crystal growth on calculi fragments resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was evaluated using a flow system. Results The turbidimetric assay showed that among the studied methylxanthines, theobromine could markedly inhibit uric acid nucleation. SEM images showed that the presence of theobromine resulted in thinner uric acid crystals. Furthermore, in a flow system theobromine blocked the regrowth of post-ESWL uric acid calculi fragments. Conclusions Theobromine, a natural dimethylxanthine present in high amounts in cocoa, acts as an inhibitor of nucleation and crystal growth of uric acid. Therefore, theobromine may be clinically useful in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis. PMID:25333633

  6. Acidic fibroblast growth factor promotes vascular repair.

    PubMed Central

    Bjornsson, T D; Dryjski, M; Tluczek, J; Mennie, R; Ronan, J; Mellin, T N; Thomas, K A

    1991-01-01

    Intravascular injury to arteries can result in thickening of the intimal smooth muscle layer adjacent to the lumen by migration and proliferation of cells from the underlying medial smooth muscle layer accompanied by deposition of extracellular matrix. This pathological response, which decreases lumen diameter, might, in part, be the result of the access of smooth muscle cells to plasma and platelet-derived growth factors as a consequence of denudation of the overlying confluent monolayer of vascular endothelial cells. Injured rat carotid arteries were treated by i.v. administration of acidic fibroblast growth factor, a heparin-binding protein that is chemotactic and mitogenic for vascular endothelial cells. The growth factor treatment resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of intimal thickening with parallel promotion of endothelial regeneration over the injured area. Therefore, acidic fibroblast growth factor might be efficacious in the prevention of restenosis caused by intimal thickening following angioplasty in humans. Images PMID:1717983

  7. Celecoxib and tauro-ursodeoxycholic acid co-treatment inhibits cell growth in familial adenomatous polyposis derived LT97 colon adenoma cells.

    PubMed

    van Heumen, Bjorn W H; Roelofs, Hennie M J; Te Morsche, René H M; Marian, Brigitte; Nagengast, Fokko M; Peters, Wilbert H M

    2012-04-15

    Chemoprevention would be a desirable strategy to avoid duodenectomy in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) suffering from duodenal adenomatosis. We investigated the in vitro effects on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and COX-2 expression of the potential chemopreventives celecoxib and tauro-ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). HT-29 colon cancer cells and LT97 colorectal micro-adenoma cells derived from a patient with FAP, were exposed to low dose celecoxib and UDCA alone or in combination with tauro-cholic acid (CA) and tauro-chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), mimicking bile of FAP patients treated with UDCA. In HT-29 cells, co-treatment with low dose celecoxib and UDCA resulted in a decreased cell growth (14-17%, p<0.01). A more pronounced decrease (23-27%, p<0.01) was observed in LT97 cells. Cell growth of HT-29 cells exposed to 'artificial bile' enriched with UDCA, was decreased (p<0.001), either in the absence or presence of celecoxib. In LT97 cells incubated with 'artificial bile' enriched with UDCA, cell growth was decreased only in the presence of celecoxib (p<0.05). No clear evidence was found for involvement of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, caspase-3, or COX-2 in the cellular processes leading to the observed changes in cell growth. In conclusion, co-treatment with low dose celecoxib and UDCA has growth inhibitory effects on colorectal adenoma cells derived from a patient with FAP, and further research on this combination as promising chemopreventive strategy is desired. PMID:22366264

  8. Inhibition of bacterial activity in acid mine drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurdeep; Bhatnagar, Miss Mridula

    1988-12-01

    Acid mine drainage water give rise to rapid growth and activity of an iron- and sulphur- oxidizing bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidians which greatly accelerate acid producing reactions by oxidation of pyrite material associated with coal and adjoining strata. The role of this bacterium in production of acid mine drainage is described. This study presents the data which demonstrate the inhibitory effect of certain organic acids, sodium benzoate, sodium lauryl sulphate, quarternary ammonium compounds on the growth of the acidophilic aerobic autotroph Thiobacillus ferrooxidians. In each experiment, 10 milli-litres of laboratory developed culture of Thiobacillus ferrooxidians was added to 250 milli-litres Erlenmeyer flask containing 90 milli-litres of 9-k media supplemented with FeSO4 7H2O and organic compounds at various concentrations. Control experiments were also carried out. The treated and untreated (control) samples analysed at various time intervals for Ferrous Iron and pH levels. Results from this investigation showed that some organic acids, sodium benzoate, sodium lauryl sulphate and quarternary ammonium compounds at low concentration (10-2 M, 10-50 ppm concentration levels) are effective bactericides and able to inhibit and reduce the Ferrous Iron oxidation and acidity formation by inhibiting the growth of Thiobacillus ferrooxidians is also discussed and presented

  9. Luteolin, ellagic acid and punicic acid are natural products that inhibit prostate cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Li, Wenfang; Lin, Muqing; Garcia, Monika; Mulholland, David; Lilly, Michael; Martins-Green, Manuela

    2014-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second cause of cancer deaths in men in the USA. When the cancer recurs, early stages can be controlled with hormone ablation therapy to delay the rate of cancer progression but, over time, the cancer overcomes its hormone dependence, becomes highly aggressive and metastasizes. Clinical trials have shown that pomegranate juice (PJ) inhibits PCa progression. We have previously shown that the PJ components luteolin (L), ellagic acid (E) and punicic acid (P) together inhibit growth of hormone-dependent and -independent PCa cells and inhibit their migration and chemotaxis towards CXCL12, a chemokine that is important in PCa metastasis. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesized that L+E+P inhibit PCa metastasis in vivo. To test this possibility, we used a severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model in which luciferase-expressing human PCa cells were injected subcutaneously near the prostate. Tumor progression was monitored with bioluminescence imaging weekly. We found that L+E+P inhibits PC-3M-luc primary tumor growth, inhibits the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis for metastasis and none of the tumors metastasized. In addition, L+E+P significantly inhibits growth and metastasis of highly invasive Pten (-/-) ;K-ras (G12D) prostate tumors. Furthermore, L+E+P inhibits angiogenesis in vivo, prevents human endothelial cell (EC) tube formation in culture and disrupts preformed EC tubes, indicating inhibition of EC adhesion to each other. L+E+P also inhibits the angiogenic factors interleukin-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor as well as their induced signaling pathways in ECs. In conclusion, these results show that L+E+P inhibits PCa progression and metastasis. PMID:25023990

  10. MFR PAPER 1339 Phosphonoacetic Acid Inhibition of

    E-print Network

    MFR PAPER 1339 Phosphonoacetic Acid Inhibition of Channel Catfish Virus Replication Roger W. Koment The virus responsible for epizootic outbreaks of channel catfish disease was first isolated by Fijan et al and Darlington (197 [) clearly indicated the assignment of channel catfish virus (CCY) to the her- pesvirus group

  11. FERMENTATION ACIDS INHIBIT AMINO ACID DEAMINATION BY CLOSTRIDIUM SPOROGENES MD1 VIA A MECHANISM INVOLVING A DECLINE IN INTRACELLULAR GLUTAMATE RATHER THAN PROTONMOTIVE FORCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fermentation acids inhibited the growth and ammonia production of the amino acid fermenting bacterium, Clostridium sporogenes MD1, but only when the pH was acidic. Such inhibition was traditionally explained by the ability of fermentation acids to act as uncouplers and decrease protonmotive force (...

  12. Anthranilic acid release in adenosine-inhibited cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its inhibition by thiamin.

    PubMed

    Iwashima, A; Kawasaki, Y; Kimura, Y; Hasegawa, T

    1992-10-01

    Adenosine, at 1 mM concentrations or above, was found to have a fungistatic effect on Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A substance with amethyst fluorescence was detected in the medium of adenosine-inhibited cultures of S. cerevisiae. This compound was isolated and physicochemically identified as anthranilic acid. Both the inhibition of growth and release of anthranilic acid induced by adenosine were abrogated by thiamin or by the pyrimidine portion of thiamin, 2-methyl-4-amino-5-hdroxymethyl-pyrimidine (hydroxymethyl-pyrimidine); the latter was found to restore intracellular thiamin content that had been reduced by adenosine. It was demonstrated that effects of thiamin and hydroxymethylpyrimidine on S. cerevisiae cultured with adenosine resulted from their inhibition of adenosine uptake by growing yeast cells. PMID:1426996

  13. Unusal pattern of product inhibition: batch acetic acid fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bar, R.; Gainer, J.L.; Kirwan, D.J.

    1987-04-20

    The limited tolerance of microorganisms to their metabolic products results in inhibited growth and product formation. The relationship between the specific growth rate, micro, and the concentration of an inhibitory product has been described by a number of mathematical models. In most cases, micro was found to be inversely proportional to the product concentration and invariably the rate of substrate utilization followed the same pattern. In this communication, the authors report a rather unusual case in which the formation rate of a product, acetic acid, increased with a decreasing growth rate of the microorganism, Acetobacter aceti. Apparently, a similar behavior was mentioned in a review report with respect to Clostridium thermocellum in a batch culture but was not published in the freely circulating literature. The fermentation of ethanol to acetic acid, C/sub 2/H/sub 5/OH + O/sub 2/ = CH/sub 3/COOH + H/sub 2/O is clearly one of the oldest known fermentations. Because of its association with the commercial production of vinegar it has been a subject of extensive but rather technically oriented studies. Suprisingly, the uncommon uncoupling between the inhibited microbial growth and the product formation appears to have been unnoticed. 13 references.

  14. Galactose inhibits auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles by two mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, S. P.; Cleland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Galactose inhibits auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles by at least two mechanisms. First, it inhibits auxin-induced H(+)-excretion needed for the initiation of rapid elongation. Galactose cannot be doing so by directly interfering with the ATPase since fusicoccin-induced H(+)-excretion is not affected. Secondly, galactose inhibits long-term auxin-induced growth, even in an acidic (pH 4.5) solution. This may be due to an inhibition of cell wall synthesis. However, galactose does not reduce the capacity of walls to be loosened by H+, given exogenously or excreted in response to fusicoccin.

  15. Dual inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 and soluble epoxide hydrolase synergistically suppresses primary tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guodong; Panigrahy, Dipak; Hwang, Sung Hee; Yang, Jun; Mahakian, Lisa M.; Wettersten, Hiromi I.; Liu, Jun-Yan; Wang, Yanru; Ingham, Elizabeth S.; Tam, Sarah; Kieran, Mark W.; Weiss, Robert H.; Ferrara, Katherine W.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandins derived from the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) from the cytochrome P450/soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathway are important eicosanoids that regulate angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. COX-2 inhibitors, which block the formation of prostaglandins, suppress tumor growth, whereas sEH inhibitors, which increase endogenous EETs, stimulate primary tumor growth and metastasis. However, the functional interactions of these two pathways in cancer are unknown. Using pharmacological inhibitors as probes, we show here that dual inhibition of COX-2 and sEH synergistically inhibits primary tumor growth and metastasis by suppressing tumor angiogenesis. COX-2/sEH dual pharmacological inhibitors also potently suppress primary tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis via selective inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. These results demonstrate a critical interaction of these two lipid metabolism pathways on tumorigenesis and suggest dual inhibition of COX-2 and sEH as a potential therapeutic strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:25024195

  16. Cell growth inhibition by sequence-specific RNA minihelices.

    PubMed Central

    Hipps, D; Schimmel, P

    1995-01-01

    RNA minihelices which reconstruct the 12 base pair acceptor-T psi C domains of transfer RNAs interact with their cognate tRNA synthetases. These substrates lack the anticodons of the genetic code and, therefore, cannot participate in steps of protein synthesis subsequent to aminoacylation. We report here that expression in Escherichia coli of either of two minihelices, each specific for a different amino acid, inhibited cell growth. Inhibition appears to be due to direct competition between the minihelix and its related tRNA for binding to their common synthetase. This competition, in turn, sharply lowers the pool of the specific charged tRNA for protein synthesis. Inhibition is relieved by single nucleotide changes which disrupt the minihelix-synthetase interaction. The results suggest that sequence-specific RNA minihelix substrates bind to cognate synthetases in vivo and can, in principle, act as cell growth regulators. Naturally occurring non-tRNA substrates for aminoacylation may serve a similar purpose. Images PMID:7664744

  17. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester induced cell cycle arrest and growth inhibition in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells via regulation of Skp2, p53, p21Cip1 and p27Kip1

    PubMed Central

    Su, Liang-Cheng; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Chan, Tzu-Min; Chang, Chung-Ho; Chen, Li-Tzong; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Wang, Horng-Dar; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) patients receiving the androgen ablation therapy ultimately develop recurrent castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) within 1–3 years. Treatment with caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) suppressed cell survival and proliferation via induction of G1 or G2/M cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1, DU-145, 22Rv1, and C4–2 CRPC cells. CAPE treatment also inhibited soft agar colony formation and retarded nude mice xenograft growth of LNCaP 104-R1 cells. We identified that CAPE treatment significantly reduced protein abundance of Skp2, Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk7, Rb, phospho-Rb S807/811, cyclin A, cyclin D1, cyclin H, E2F1, c-Myc, SGK, phospho-p70S6kinase T421/S424, phospho-mTOR Ser2481, phospho-GSK3? Ser21, but induced p21Cip1, p27Kip1, ATF4, cyclin E, p53, TRIB3, phospho-p53 (Ser6, Ser33, Ser46, Ser392), phospho-p38 MAPK Thr180/Tyr182, Chk1, Chk2, phospho-ATM S1981, phospho-ATR S428, and phospho-p90RSK Ser380. CAPE treatment decreased Skp2 and Akt1 protein expression in LNCaP 104-R1 tumors as compared to control group. Overexpression of Skp2, or siRNA knockdown of p21Cip1, p27Kip1, or p53 blocked suppressive effect of CAPE treatment. Co-treatment of CAPE with PI3K inhibitor LY294002 or Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT737 showed synergistic suppressive effects. Our finding suggested that CAPE treatment induced cell cycle arrest and growth inhibition in CRPC cells via regulation of Skp2, p53, p21Cip1, and p27Kip1. PMID:25788262

  18. Further Studies of the Ability of Xyloglucan Oligosaccharides to Inhibit Auxin-Stimulated Growth 1

    PubMed Central

    Augur, Christopher; Yu, Lu; Sakai, Keiichiro; Ogawa, Tomoya; Sinaÿ, Pierre; Darvill, Alan G.; Albersheim, Peter

    1992-01-01

    The structural features required for xyloglucan oligosaccharides to inhibit 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-stimulated elongation of pea stem segments have been investigated. A nonasaccharide (XG9) containing one fucosyl-galactosyl side chain and an undecasaccharide (XG11) containing two fucosyl-galactosyl side chains were purified from endo-?-1,4-glucanase-treated xyloglucan, which had been isolated from soluble extracellular polysaccharides of suspension-cultured sycamore (Acerpseudoplatanus) cells and tested in the pea stem bioassay. A novel octasaccharide (XG8?) was prepared by treatment of XG9 with a xyloglucan oligosaccharide-specific ?-xylosidase from pea seedlings. XG8? was characterized and tested for its ability to inhibit auxin-induced growth. All three oligosaccharides, at a concentration of 0.1 microgram per milliliter, inhibited 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-stimulated growth of pea stem segments. XG11 inhibited the growth to a greater extent than did XG9. Chemically synthesized nona- and pentasaccharides (XG9, XG5) inhibited 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-stimulated elongation of pea stems to the same extent as the same oligosaccharides isolated from xyloglucan. A chemically synthesized structurally related heptasaccharide that lacked a fucosyl-galactosyl side chain did not, unlike the identical heptasaccharide isolated from xyloglucan, significantly inhibit 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-stimulated growth. PMID:16668847

  19. Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbs, Daniel M.; Ramachandran, Usha; Lu, Sang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Li Q.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2005-12-06

    Citric acid has been shown to act as an agent for increasing the solubility of aluminum oxyhydroxides in aqueous solutions of high (>2.47 mol/mol) hydroxide-to-aluminum ratios. Conversely, citric acid also colloidally stabilizes particles in aqueous suspensions of aluminum-containing particles. Solutions of aluminum chloride, with and without citric acid added, were titrated with NaO(aq). The presence and size of particles were determined using quasi-elastic light scattering. In solutions that contained no citric acid, particles formed instantaneously when NaOH(aq) was added but these were observed to rapidly diminish in size, disappearing at OH/Al ratios below 2.5 mol/mol. When the OH/Al ratio was raised beyond 2.5 by addingmoreNaOH(aq), suspensions of colloidally stable particles formed. Large polycations containing 13 aluminum atoms were detected by 27Al solution NMR in citric-acid-free solutions with OH/Al ratios slightly lower than 2.5. In comparison, adding citric acid to solutions of aluminum chloride inhibited the formation of large aluminum-containing polycations. The absence of the polycations prevents or retards the subsequent formation of particles, indicating that the polycations, when present, act as seeds to the formation of new particles. Particles did not form in solutions with a citric acid/aluminum ratio of 0.8 until sufficient NaOH(aq) was added to raise the OH/Al ratio to 3.29. By comparison, lower amounts of citric acid did not prevent particles from forming but did retard the rate of growth.

  20. Investigations on dendrimer space reveal solid and liquid tumor growth-inhibition by original phosphorus-based dendrimers and the corresponding monomers and dendrons with ethacrynic acid motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Brahmi, Nabil; Mignani, Serge M.; Caron, Joachim; El Kazzouli, Saïd; Bousmina, Mosto M.; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Cresteil, Thierry; Majoral, Jean-Pierre

    2015-02-01

    The well-known reactive diuretic ethacrynic acid (EA, Edecrin), with low antiproliferative activities, was chemically modified and grafted onto phosphorus dendrimers and the corresponding simple branched phosphorus dendron-like derivatives affording novel nanodevices showing moderate to strong antiproliferative activities against liquid and solid tumor cell lines, respectively.The well-known reactive diuretic ethacrynic acid (EA, Edecrin), with low antiproliferative activities, was chemically modified and grafted onto phosphorus dendrimers and the corresponding simple branched phosphorus dendron-like derivatives affording novel nanodevices showing moderate to strong antiproliferative activities against liquid and solid tumor cell lines, respectively. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05983b

  1. Candida albicans PHO81 is required for the inhibition of hyphal development by farnesoic acid.

    PubMed

    Chung, Soon-Chun; Kim, Tae-Im; Ahn, Chan-Hong; Shin, Jongheon; Oh, Ki-Bong

    2010-11-19

    Farnesoic acid is a signaling molecule that inhibits the transition from budding yeast to filament formation in Candida albicans, but the molecular mechanism regulated by this substance is unknown. In this study, we analyzed the function of CaPHO81, which is induced by farnesoic acid. The pho81? mutant cells existed exclusively as filaments under favorable yeast growth conditions. Furthermore, the inhibition of hyphal growth and repression of CPH1, EFG1, HWP1, and GAP1 mRNA expression in response to farnesoic acid were defective in pho81? mutant cells. These data suggest a role for CaPHO81 in the inhibition of hyphal development by farnesoic acid. PMID:20965180

  2. Decorin: A Growth Factor Antagonist for Tumor Growth Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, Tero A. H.; Prince, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Decorin (DCN) is the best characterized member of the extracellular small leucine-rich proteoglycan family present in connective tissues, typically in association with or “decorating” collagen fibrils. It has substantial interest to clinical medicine owing to its antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects. Studies on DCN knockout mice have established that a lack of DCN is permissive for tumor development and it is regarded as a tumor suppressor gene. A reduced expression or a total disappearance of DCN has been reported to take place in various forms of human cancers during tumor progression. Furthermore, when used as a therapeutic molecule, DCN has been shown to inhibit tumor progression and metastases in experimental cancer models. DCN affects the biology of various types of cancer by targeting a number of crucial signaling molecules involved in cell growth, survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis. The active sites for the neutralization of different growth factors all reside in different parts of the DCN molecule. An emerging concept that multiple proteases, especially those produced by inflammatory cells, are capable of cleaving DCN suggests that native DCN could be inactivated in a number of pathological inflammatory conditions. In this paper, we review the role of DCN in cancer. PMID:26697491

  3. Decorin: A Growth Factor Antagonist for Tumor Growth Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, Tero A H; Prince, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Decorin (DCN) is the best characterized member of the extracellular small leucine-rich proteoglycan family present in connective tissues, typically in association with or "decorating" collagen fibrils. It has substantial interest to clinical medicine owing to its antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects. Studies on DCN knockout mice have established that a lack of DCN is permissive for tumor development and it is regarded as a tumor suppressor gene. A reduced expression or a total disappearance of DCN has been reported to take place in various forms of human cancers during tumor progression. Furthermore, when used as a therapeutic molecule, DCN has been shown to inhibit tumor progression and metastases in experimental cancer models. DCN affects the biology of various types of cancer by targeting a number of crucial signaling molecules involved in cell growth, survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis. The active sites for the neutralization of different growth factors all reside in different parts of the DCN molecule. An emerging concept that multiple proteases, especially those produced by inflammatory cells, are capable of cleaving DCN suggests that native DCN could be inactivated in a number of pathological inflammatory conditions. In this paper, we review the role of DCN in cancer. PMID:26697491

  4. Synthesis and proteasome inhibition of glycyrrhetinic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Yu, Donglei; Ho, Phong; Qian, Keduo; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chen, Chin-Ho

    2008-07-15

    This study discovered that glycyrrhetinic acid inhibited the human 20S proteasome at 22.3microM. Esterification of the C-3 hydroxyl group on glycyrrhetinic acid with various carboxylic acid reagents yielded a series of analogs with marked improved potency. Among the derivatives, glycyrrhetinic acid 3-O-isophthalate (17) was the most potent compound with IC(50) of 0.22microM, which was approximately 100-fold more potent than glycyrrhetinic acid. PMID:18562200

  5. Two genetically separable phases of growth inhibition induced by blue light in Arabidopsis seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, B. M.; Cho, M. H.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    High fluence-rate blue light (BL) rapidly inhibits hypocotyl growth in Arabidopsis, as in other species, after a lag time of 30 s. This growth inhibition is always preceded by the activation of anion channels. The membrane depolarization that results from the activation of anion channels by BL was only 30% of the wild-type magnitude in hy4, a mutant lacking the HY4 BL receptor. High-resolution measurements of growth made with a computer-linked displacement transducer or digitized images revealed that BL caused a rapid inhibition of growth in wild-type and hy4 seedlings. This inhibition persisted in wild-type seedlings during more than 40 h of continuous BL. By contrast, hy4 escaped from the initial inhibition after approximately 1 h of BL and grew faster than wild type for approximately 30 h. Wild-type seedlings treated with 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid, a potent blocker of the BL-activated anion channel, displayed rapid growth inhibition, but, similar to hy4, these seedlings escaped from inhibition after approximately 1 h of BL and phenocopied the mutant for at least 2.5 h. The effects of 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid and the HY4 mutation were not additive. Taken together, the results indicate that BL acts through HY4 to activate anion channels at the plasma membrane, causing growth inhibition that begins after approximately 1 h. Neither HY4 nor anion channels appear to participate greatly in the initial phase of inhibition.

  6. Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid

    E-print Network

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid Daniel M. Dabbs, Usha, Washington 99352 Received March 29, 2005. In Final Form: July 29, 2005 Citric acid has been shown to act/mol) hydroxide-to-aluminum ratios. Conversely, citric acid also colloidally stabilizes particles in aqueous

  7. Bee venom inhibits growth of human cervical tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Lim; Park, Sang Ho; Kim, Tae Myoung; Jung, Yu Yeon; Park, Mi Hee; Oh, Sang Hyun; Yun, Hye Seok; Jun, Hyung Ok; Yoo, Hwan Soo; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ung Soo; Yoon, Joo Hee; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-03-30

    We studied whether bee venom (BV) inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of death receptor (DR) expressions and inactivation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) in mice. In vivo study showed that BV (1 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth. Similar inhibitory effects of BV on cancer growth in primary human cervical cancer cells were also found. BV (1-5 ?g/ml) also inhibited the growth of cancer cells, Ca Ski and C33Aby the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Agreed with cancer cell growth inhibition, expression of death receptors; FAS, DR3 and DR6, and DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3 and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the NF-?B activity and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with BV in tumor mice, human cancer cell and human tumor samples as well as cultured cancer cells. In addition, deletion of FAS, DR3 and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV-induced cell growth inhibitory effects as well as NF-?B inactivation. These results suggest that BV inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of FAS, DR3 and DR6 expression via inhibition of NF-?B pathway. PMID:25730901

  8. Bee venom inhibits growth of human cervical tumors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Myoung; Jung, Yu Yeon; Park, Mi Hee; Oh, Sang Hyun; Yun, Hye Seok; Jun, Hyung Ok; Yoo, Hwan Soo; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ung Soo; Yoon, Joo Hee; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    We studied whether bee venom (BV) inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of death receptor (DR) expressions and inactivation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) in mice. In vivo study showed that BV (1 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth. Similar inhibitory effects of BV on cancer growth in primary human cervical cancer cells were also found. BV (1–5 ?g/ml) also inhibited the growth of cancer cells, Ca Ski and C33Aby the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Agreed with cancer cell growth inhibition, expression of death receptors; FAS, DR3 and DR6, and DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3 and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the NF-?B activity and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with BV in tumor mice, human cancer cell and human tumor samples as well as cultured cancer cells. In addition, deletion of FAS, DR3 and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV-induced cell growth inhibitory effects as well as NF-?B inactivation. These results suggest that BV inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of FAS, DR3 and DR6 expression via inhibition of NF-?B pathway. PMID:25730901

  9. Novel Approaches to Inhibition of Gastric Acid Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jai Moo; Hunt, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The gastric H,K-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) is the primary target for treatment of acid-related diseases. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are weak bases composed of two moieties, a substituted pyridine with a primary pKa of about 4.0 that allows selective accumulation in the secretory canaliculus of the parietal cell, and a benzimidazole with a second pKa of about 1.0. Protonation of this benzimidazole activates these prodrugs, converting them to sulfenic acids and/or sulfenamides that react covalently with one or more cysteines accessible from the luminal surface of the ATPase. The maximal pharmacodynamic effect of PPIs as a group relies on cyclic adenosine monophosphate–driven H,K-ATPase translocation from the cytoplasm to the canalicular membrane of the parietal cell. At present, this effect can only be achieved with protein meal stimulation. Because of covalent binding, inhibitory effects last much longer than their plasma half-life. However, the short dwell-time of the drug in the blood and the requirement for acid activation impair their efficacy in acid suppression, particularly at night. All PPIs give excellent healing of peptic ulcer and produce good, but less than satisfactory, results in reflux esophagitis. PPIs combined with antibiotics eradicate Helicobacter pylori, but success has fallen to less than 80%. Longer dwell-time PPIs promise to improve acid suppression and hence clinical outcome. Potassium-competitive acid blockers (P-CABs) are another class of ATPase inhibitors, and at least one is in development. The P-CAB under development has a long duration of action even though its binding is not covalent. PPIs with a longer dwell time or P-CABs with long duration promise to address unmet clinical needs arising from an inability to inhibit nighttime acid secretion, with continued symptoms, delayed healing, and growth suppression of H. pylori reducing susceptibility to clarithromycin and amoxicillin. Thus, novel and more effective suppression of acid secretion would benefit those who suffer from acid-related morbidity, continuing esophageal damage and pain, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug–induced ulcers, and nonresponders to H. pylori eradication. PMID:20924727

  10. A novel monoclonal antibody to fibroblast growth factor 2 effectively inhibits growth of hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Park, Hangil; Chhim, Sophea; Ding, Yi; Jiang, Wei; Queen, Cary; Kim, K Jin

    2012-04-01

    Expression of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is believed to be a contributing factor to the growth of a number of tumor types, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the potential of monoclonal antibodies that neutralize FGF2 for treatment of patients with cancer has not yet been explored in clinical trials. We therefore generated a novel monoclonal antibody (mAb), GAL-F2, specific for FGF2 and characterized its properties in vitro and in vivo. GAL-F2 binds to a different epitope than several previous anti-FGF2 mAbs tested. This novel epitope was defined using chimeric FGF1/FGF2 proteins and alanine scanning mutagenesis and was shown to comprise amino acids in both the amino and carboxy regions of FGF2. GAL-F2 blocked binding of FGF2 to each of its four cellular receptors, strongly inhibited FGF2-induced proliferation and downstream signaling in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and inhibited proliferation and downstream signaling in two HCC cell lines. Moreover, GAL-F2, administered at 5 mg/kg i.p. twice weekly, potently inhibited growth of xenografts of the SMMC-7721, HEP-G2, and SK-HEP-1 human HCC cell lines in nude mice, and in some models, had a strong additive effect with an anti-VEGF mAb or sorafenib. Treatment with GAL-F2 also blocked angiogenesis and inhibited downstream cellular signaling in xenografts, indicating its antitumor mechanism of action. Our report supports clinical testing of a humanized form of the GAL-F2 mAb for treatment of HCC and potentially other cancers. PMID:22351746

  11. A Novel Monoclonal Antibody to Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 Effectively Inhibits Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihong; Park, Hangil; Chhim, Sophea; Ding, Yi; Jiang, Wei; Queen, Cary; Kim, K. Jin

    2012-01-01

    Expression of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2) is believed to be a contributing factor to the growth of a number of tumor types, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the potential of monoclonal antibodies that neutralize FGF2 for treatment of cancer patients has not yet been explored in clinical trials. We therefore generated a novel monoclonal antibody (mAb), GAL-F2, specific for FGF2 and characterized its properties in vitro and in vivo. GAL-F2 binds to a different epitope than several previous anti-FGF2 mAbs tested: this novel epitope was defined using chimeric FGF1/FGF2 proteins and alanine scanning mutagenesis and shown to comprise amino acids in both the amino and carboxy regions of FGF2. GAL-F2 blocked binding of FGF2 to each of its four cellular receptors, strongly inhibited FGF2-induced proliferation and downstream signaling in HUVEC, and inhibited proliferation and downstream signaling in two HCC cell lines. Moreover, GAL-F2, administered at 5 mg/kg i.p. twice weekly, potently inhibited growth of xenografts of the SMMC-7721, HEP-G2 and SK-HEP-1 human HCC cell lines in nude mice, and in some models had a strong additive effect with an anti-VEGF mAb or sorafenib. Treatment with GAL-F2 also blocked angiogenesis and inhibited downstream cellular signaling in xenografts, indicating its anti-tumor mechanism of action. Our report supports clinical testing of a humanized form of the GAL-F2 mAb for treatment of HCC and potentially other cancers. PMID:22351746

  12. Inhibition of growth by erythritol catabolism in Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Sperry, J F; Robertson, D C

    1975-10-01

    The growth of Brucella abortus (US-19) in a complex tryptose-yeast extract medium containing D-glucose is inhibited by 10 mM erythritol. The enzymes of the erythritol pathway, except for D-erythrulose 1-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glycero-2-tetrulose 1-phosphate:nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) 4-oxidoreductase) were detected in the soluble and membrane fractions of cell extracts. Glucose catabolism by cell extracts was inhibited by erythritol, whereas, phosphorylated intermediates of the hexose monophosphate pathway were converted to pyruvic acid with oxygen consumption. Erythritol kinase (EC 2.7.1.27; adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP): erythritol 1-phosphotransferase) was found to be eightfold higher in activity than the hexokinase in cell extracts. In vivo, ATP is apparently consumed with the accumulation of D-erythrulose 1-phosphate (D-glycero-2-tetrulose 1-phosphate) and no substrate level phosphorylation. ATP levels dropped 10-fold in 30 min after addition of erythritol to log phase cells in tryptose-yeast extract medium with D-glucose as the carbon source. These data suggest bacteriostasis in the presence of erythritol results from the ATP drain caused by erythritol kinase. PMID:170249

  13. Inhibition of growth by erythritol catabolism in Brucella abortus.

    PubMed Central

    Sperry, J F; Robertson, D C

    1975-01-01

    The growth of Brucella abortus (US-19) in a complex tryptose-yeast extract medium containing D-glucose is inhibited by 10 mM erythritol. The enzymes of the erythritol pathway, except for D-erythrulose 1-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glycero-2-tetrulose 1-phosphate:nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) 4-oxidoreductase) were detected in the soluble and membrane fractions of cell extracts. Glucose catabolism by cell extracts was inhibited by erythritol, whereas, phosphorylated intermediates of the hexose monophosphate pathway were converted to pyruvic acid with oxygen consumption. Erythritol kinase (EC 2.7.1.27; adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP): erythritol 1-phosphotransferase) was found to be eightfold higher in activity than the hexokinase in cell extracts. In vivo, ATP is apparently consumed with the accumulation of D-erythrulose 1-phosphate (D-glycero-2-tetrulose 1-phosphate) and no substrate level phosphorylation. ATP levels dropped 10-fold in 30 min after addition of erythritol to log phase cells in tryptose-yeast extract medium with D-glucose as the carbon source. These data suggest bacteriostasis in the presence of erythritol results from the ATP drain caused by erythritol kinase. PMID:170249

  14. Inhibition of fatty acid-supported mitochondrial respiration by cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Lemmi, C A; Miller, R L; Rajfer, J

    1990-12-01

    We have shown that, in addition to inhibition of the succinate-supported energy pathway (5), CS inhibition of mitochondrial Complex II activity also limits fatty acid oxidation. These results are consistent with the participation of altered lipid metabolism in CS nephrotoxicity. PMID:2288768

  15. Perfluoroalkyl Acids Inhibit Reductive Dechlorination of Trichloroethene by Repressing Dehalococcoides.

    PubMed

    Weathers, Tess S; Harding-Marjanovic, Katie; Higgins, Christopher P; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa; Sharp, Jonathan O

    2016-01-01

    The subsurface recalcitrance of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) derived from aqueous film-forming foams could have adverse impacts on the microbiological processes used for the bioremediation of co-mingled chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethene (TCE). Here, we show that reductive dechlorination by a methanogenic, mixed culture was significantly inhibited when exposed to concentrations representative of PFAA source zones (>66 mg/L total of 11 PFAA analytes, 6 mg/L each). TCE dechlorination, cis-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride production and dechlorination, and ethene generation were all inhibited at these PFAA concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the abundances of 65% of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) changed significantly when grown in the presence of PFAAs, although repression or enhancement resulting from PFAA exposure did not correlate with putative function or phylogeny. Notably, there was significant repression of Dehalococcoides (8-fold decrease in abundance) coupled with a corresponding enhancement of methane-generating Archaea (a 9-fold increase). Growth and dechlorination by axenic cultures of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 were similarly repressed under these conditions, confirming an inhibitory response of this pivotal genus to PFAA presence. These results suggest that chlorinated solvent bioattenuation rates could be impeded in subsurface environments near PFAA source zones. PMID:26636352

  16. Calcium ion involvement in growth inhibition of mechanically stressed soybean (Glycine max) seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. S.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    A 40-50% reduction in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Century 84] hypocotyl elongation occurred 24 h after application of mechanical stress. Exogenous Ca2+ at 10 mM inhibited growth by 28% if applied with the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 to the zone of maximum hypocotyl elongation. La3+ was even more inhibitory than Ca2+, especially above 5 mM. Treatment with ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethylether)-N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) alone had no effect on growth of non-stressed seedlings at the concentrations used but negated stress-induced growth reduction by 36% at 4 mM when compared to non-treated, stressed controls. Treatment with EDTA was ineffective in negating stress-induced growth inhibition. Calmodulin antagonists calmidazolium, chlorpromazine, and 48/80 also negated stress-induced growth reduction by 23, 50, and 35%, respectively.

  17. Root growth inhibition by NH4 in Arabidopsis is mediated

    E-print Network

    Kronzucker, Herbert J.

    Root growth inhibition by NH4 + in Arabidopsis is mediated by the root tip and is linked to NH4 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario, M1C 1A4, Canada ABSTRACT Root growth in higher plants is sensitive to excess ammo- nium (NH4 + ). Our study shows that contact of NH4 + with the primary root tip is both

  18. Metabolism and growth inhibition of four retinoids in head and neck squamous normal and malignant cells

    PubMed Central

    Klaassen, I; Brakenhoff, R H; Smeets, S J; Snow, G B; Braakhuis, B J M

    2001-01-01

    Isotretinoin (13- cis -retinoic acid, 13cRA) has proven to be active in chemoprevention of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Moreover, both all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) and 13cRA induce objective responses in oral premalignant lesions. After binding of retinoids to retinoic acid receptors (RARs and RXRs) dimers are formed that are able to regulate the expression of genes involved in growth and differentiation. We compared the metabolism and level of growth inhibition of 13cRA with that of ATRA, 9cRA and retinol in four HNSCC cell lines and normal oral keratinocyte cultures (OKC). These retinoid compounds are known to bind with different affinities to the retinoic acid receptors. We observed that all retinoids were similar with respect to their capacity to induce growth inhibition. One HNSCC line could be ranked as sensitive, one as moderately sensitive and the remaining two were totally insensitive; OKC were moderately sensitive. The rate at which the cells were able to catabolize the retinoid was similar for all compounds. Retinoid metabolism in HNSCC cells resulted in a profile of metabolites that was unique for each retinoid. These metabolic profiles were different in OKC. Our findings indicate that differences in retinoid receptor selectivity of these retinoids do not influence the level of growth inhibition and rate of metabolism. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11506507

  19. DASATINIB INHIBITS THE GROWTH OF MOLECULARLY HETEROGENEOUS MYELOID LEUKEMIAS

    PubMed Central

    Guerrouahen, Bella S.; Futami, Muneyoshi; Vaklavas, Christos; Kanerva, Jukka; Whichard, Zakary L.; Nwawka, Kenechi; Blanchard, Elisabeth G.; Lee, Francis Y.; Robinson, Lisa J.; Arceci, Robert; Kornblau, Steven M.; Wieder, Eric; Cayre, Yvon E.; Corey, Seth J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Dasatinib is a dual Src/Abl inhibitor, recently approved for Bcr-Abl+ leukemias with resistance or intolerance to prior therapy. Because Src kinases contribute to multiple blood cell functions by triggering a variety of signaling pathways, we hypothesized that their molecular targeting might lead to growth inhibition in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Experimental Design We studied growth factor-dependent and independent leukemic cell lines, including three cell lines expressing mutants of receptor tyrosine kinases (Flt3 or c-Kit) as well as primary AML blasts for responsiveness to dasatinib. Results Dasatinib resulted in the inhibition of Src family kinases in all cell lines and blast cells at ~10?9 M. It also inhibited mutant Flt3 or Kit tyrosine phosphorylation at ~10?6 M. Mo7e cells expressing the activating mutation (codon 816) of c-Kit were most sensitive to growth inhibition with a GI50 5×10?9 M. Primary AML blast cells exhibited growth inhibition < 10?6 M. Cell lines which showed growth inhibition at ~10?6 M demonstrated a G1 cell cycle arrest and correlated with accumulation of p21 and p27 protein. Addition of rapamycin or cytotoxic agents enhanced the growth inhibition. Dasatinib also caused the apoptosis of Mo7e cells expressing oncogenic Kit. Conclusions While all of the precise targets for dasatinib are not known, this multi-kinase inhibitor causes either growth arrest or apoptosis in molecularly heterogeneous AML. Addition of cytotoxic or targeted agents can enhance its effects. PMID:20145167

  20. Activation of Exogenous Fatty Acids to Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Cannot Bypass FabI Inhibition in Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jiangwei; Bruhn, David F; Frank, Matthew W; Lee, Richard E; Rock, Charles O

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria is a Gram-negative pathogen with phospholipids composed of straight chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, the ability to incorporate exogenous fatty acids, and lipopolysaccharides that are not essential. The FabI inhibitor, AFN-1252, was deployed as a chemical biology tool to determine whether Neisseria can bypass the inhibition of fatty acid synthesis by incorporating exogenous fatty acids. Neisseria encodes a functional FabI that was potently inhibited by AFN-1252. AFN-1252 caused a dose-dependent inhibition of fatty acid synthesis in growing Neisseria, a delayed inhibition of growth phenotype, and minimal inhibition of DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis, showing that its mode of action is through inhibiting fatty acid synthesis. Isotopic fatty acid labeling experiments showed that Neisseria encodes the ability to incorporate exogenous fatty acids into its phospholipids by an acyl-acyl carrier protein-dependent pathway. However, AFN-1252 remained an effective antibacterial when Neisseria were supplemented with exogenous fatty acids. These results demonstrate that extracellular fatty acids are activated by an acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasN) and validate type II fatty acid synthesis (FabI) as a therapeutic target against Neisseria. PMID:26567338

  1. Crystal structure of the thioesterase domain of human fatty acid synthase inhibited by orlistat

    SciTech Connect

    Pemble,C.; Johnson, L.; Kridel, S.; Lowther, W.

    2007-01-01

    Human fatty acid synthase (FAS) is uniquely expressed at high levels in many tumor types. Pharmacological inhibition of FAS therefore represents an important therapeutic opportunity. The drug Orlistat, which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, inhibits FAS, induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and inhibits the growth of prostate tumor xenografts. We determined the 2.3-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of the thioesterase domain of FAS inhibited by Orlistat. Orlistat was captured in the active sites of two thioesterase molecules as a stable acyl-enzyme intermediate and as the hydrolyzed product. The details of these interactions reveal the molecular basis for inhibition and suggest a mechanism for acyl-chain length discrimination during the FAS catalytic cycle. Our findings provide a foundation for the development of new cancer drugs that target FAS.

  2. Effect of pH alkaline salts of fatty acids on the inhibition of bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine the effect of pH on the ability of alkaline salts of three fatty acids (FA) to inhibit growth of bacteria associated with poultry processing. FA solutions were prepared by dissolving 0.5 M concentrations of caprylic, capric, or lauric acid in separate ali...

  3. Spectroscopic analysis of urinary calculi and inhibition of their growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manciu, Felicia; Durrer, William; Govani, Jayesh; Reza, Layra; Pinales, Luis

    2009-10-01

    We present here a study of kidney stone formation and growth inhibition based on a traditional medicine approach with Aquatica Lour (RAL) herbal extracts. Kidney stone material systems were synthesized in vitro using a simplified single diffusion gel growth technique. With the objective of revealing the mechanism of inhibition of calculi formation by RAL extracts, samples prepared without the presence of extract, and with the presence of extract, were analyzed using Raman, photoluminescence, and XPS. The unexpected presence of Zn revealed by XPS in a sample prepared with RAL provides an explanation for the inhibition process, and also explains the dramatic reflectance of incident light observed in attempts to obtain infrared transmission data. Raman data are consistent with the binding of the inhibitor to the oxygen of the kidney stone. Photoluminescence data corroborate with the other results to provide additional evidence of Zn-related inhibition.

  4. Proton pump inhibition--the ultimate control of acid secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Zdon, M.J.; Ballantyne, G.H.; Schafer, D.E.; Tyshkov, M.; Cambria, R.P.; Modlin, I.M.

    1986-04-01

    The cellular mechanisms of acid secretion by the parietal cell (PC) include stimulation of membrane receptors, increases in cytosolic cyclic AMP levels, and activation of protein kinase systems. These events culminate in stimulation of a membrane-based proton pump. This consists of a non-electrogenic H+-K+-ATPase which transports H+ ions into the secretory canaliculus of the PC in exchange for the cation K+. It has been proposed that blockade of this proton pump would result in inhibition of acid secretion by all classes of acid secretagogues. Thus, the effects of membrane receptor agonists as well as any agents which augment cellular cAMP levels should be inhibited. Substituted benzimidazoles are weak bases which prevent acid secretion by blocking the H+-K+-ATPase system. In order to test the above hypothesis, we investigated the effects of the substituted benzimidazole H168/68 and cimetidine (C) on histamine (H) and 8B-stimulated acid secretion. The rabbit isolated gastric gland (IGG) model was used and acid secretion assessed by the accumulation of /sup 14/C-labeled weak base aminopyrine (AP) within the IGG in response to secretagogue stimulation. H168/68 and C both inhibited H (5 X 10(-5) M)-stimulated (/sup 14/C)AP accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner (P less than 0.05). H168/68 inhibited both H- and 8B-stimulated (/sup 14/C)AP accumulation (P less than 0.05), while C inhibited only H-stimulated (/sup 14/C)AP accumulation (P less than 0.05). H168/68 suppressed (/sup 14/C)AP below even unstimulated levels of (/sup 14/C)AP accumulation. These results support the hypothesis that H168/68 inhibits the PC distal to cAMP stimulation.

  5. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F.; Kady, Ismail O.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase. PMID:25996607

  6. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kanayo; Sakaguchi, Minoru; Tanaka, Satoshi; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Takaoka, Masanori

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

  7. Growth of nitric acid hydrates on thin sulfuric acid films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Wilson, Margaret A.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1994-01-01

    Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are thought to nucleate and grow on stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs). To model this system, thin sulfuric acid films were exposed to water and nitric acid vapors (1-3 x 10(exp -4) Torr H2O and 1-2.5 x 10(exp -6) Torr HNO3) and subjected to cooling and heating cycles. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to probe the phase of the sulfuric acid and to identify the HNO3/H2O films that condensed. Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was observed to grow on crystalline sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) films. NAT also condensed in/on supercooled H2SO4 films without causing crystallization of the sulfuric acid. This growth is consistent with NAT nucleation from ternary solutions as the first step in PSC formation.

  8. Tannic Acid Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Surface Colonization in an IsaA-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Payne, David E.; Martin, Nicholas R.; Parzych, Katherine R.; Rickard, Alex H.; Underwood, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal and pathogen that is capable of forming biofilms on a variety of host tissues and implanted medical devices. Biofilm-associated infections resist antimicrobial chemotherapy and attack from the host immune system, making these infections particularly difficult to treat. In order to gain insight into environmental conditions that influence S. aureus biofilm development, we screened a library of small molecules for the ability to inhibit S. aureus biofilm formation. This led to the finding that the polyphenolic compound tannic acid inhibits S. aureus biofilm formation in multiple biofilm models without inhibiting bacterial growth. We present evidence that tannic acid inhibits S. aureus biofilm formation via a mechanism dependent upon the putative transglycosylase IsaA. Tannic acid did not inhibit biofilm formation of an isaA mutant. Overexpression of wild-type IsaA inhibited biofilm formation, whereas overexpression of a catalytically dead IsaA had no effect. Tannin-containing drinks like tea have been found to reduce methicillin-resistant S. aureus nasal colonization. We found that black tea inhibited S. aureus biofilm development and that an isaA mutant resisted this inhibition. Antibiofilm activity was eliminated from tea when milk was added to precipitate the tannic acid. Finally, we developed a rodent model for S. aureus throat colonization and found that tea consumption reduced S. aureus throat colonization via an isaA-dependent mechanism. These findings provide insight into a molecular mechanism by which commonly consumed polyphenolic compounds, such as tannins, influence S. aureus surface colonization. PMID:23208606

  9. Multiple product inhibition and growth modeling of Clostridium butyricum and Klebsiella pneumoniae in glycerol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, A.P.; Ross, A.; Biebl, H.; Tag, C.; Guenzel, B.; Deckwer, W.D. . Biochemical Engineering Division)

    1994-10-01

    The inhibition potentials of products and substrate on the growth of Clostridium butyricum and Klebsiella pneumoniae in the glycerol fermentation are examined from experimental data and with a mathematical model. Whereas the inhibition potential of externally added and self-produced 1,3-propanediol is essentially the same, butyric acid produced by the culture is more toxic than that externally added. The same seems to apply for acetic acid. The inhibitory effect of butyric acid is due to the total concentration instead of its undissociated form. For acetic acid, it cannot be distinguished between the total concentration and the undissociated form. The inhibition effects of products and substrate in the glycerol fermentation are irrespective of the strains, and, therefore, the same growth model can be used. The maximum product concentrations tolerated are 0.35 g/L for undissociated acetic acid, 10.1 g/L for total butyric acid, 16.6 g/L for ethanol, 71.4 g/L for 1,3-propanediol, and 187.6 g/L for glycerol, which are applicable to C. butyricum and K. pneumoniae growth under a variety of conditions. For 55 steady-states, which were obtained from different types of continuous cultures over a pH range of 5.3--8.5 and under both substrate limitation and substrate excess, the proposed growth model fits the experimental data with an average deviation of 17.0%. The deviation of model description from experimental values reduces of 11.4% if only the steady-states with excessive substrate are considered.

  10. All-trans retinoic acid combined with 5-Aza-2 Prime -deoxycitidine induces C/EBP{alpha} expression and growth inhibition in MLL-AF9-positive leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiki, Atsushi; Imamura, Toshihiko; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Kawashima, Sachiko; Yoshida, Hideki; Hirashima, Yoshifumi; Miyachi, Mitsuru; Yagyu, Shigeki; Nakatani, Takuya; Sugita, Kanji; Hosoi, Hajime

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested whether ATRA and 5-Aza affect AML cell differentiation and growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell differentiation and growth arrest were induced in MLL-AF9-expressing cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased expression of C/EBP{alpha}, C/EBP{epsilon}, and PU.1 were also observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MLL-AF4/AF5q31-expressing cells are less sensitive to ATRA and 5-Aza. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different MLL fusion has distinct epigenetic properties related to RA pathway. -- Abstract: The present study tested whether all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and 5-Aza-2 Prime -deoxycitidine (5-Aza) affect AML cell differentiation and growth in vitro by acting on the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein {alpha} (C/EBP{alpha}) and c-Myc axis. After exposure to a combination of these agents, cell differentiation and growth arrest were significantly higher in human and murine MLL-AF9-expressing cells than in MLL-AF4/AF5q31-expressing cells, which were partly associated with increased expression of C/EBP{alpha}, C/EBP{epsilon}, and PU.1, and decreased expression of c-Myc. These findings indicate that MLL-AF9-expressing cells are more sensitive to ATRA and 5-Aza, indicating that different MLL fusion proteins possess different epigenetic properties associated with retinoic acid pathway inactivation.

  11. Inhibition of mycotoxin-producing Aspergillus nomius vsc 23 by lactic acid bacteria and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, R; Arena, M.E.; Silva, J.; González, S.N.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of different fermenting microorganisms on growth of a mycotoxin- producing Aspergillus nomius was assayed. Two lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, all of which are widely used in fermentation and preservation of food, were assayed on their fungus inhibitory properties. Assays were carried out by simultaneous inoculation of one of the possible inhibiting microorganisms and the fungus or subsequent inoculation of one of the microorganisms followed by the fungus. All three microorganisms assayed showed growth inhibition of the mycotoxin-producing Aspergillus strain. L. rhamnosus O236, isolated from sheep milk and selected for its technological properties, showed highest fungal inhibition of the microorganisms assayed. The use of antifungal LAB with excellent technological properties rather than chemical preservatives would enable the food industry to produce organic food without addition of chemical substances. PMID:24031582

  12. Syzygium campanulatum korth methanolic extract inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Syzygium campanulatum Korth (Myrtaceae) is an evergreen shrub rich in phenolics, flavonoid antioxidants, and betulinic acid. This study sought to investigate antiangiogenic and anti-colon cancer effects of S.C. standardized methanolic extract. Methods Betulinic acid was isolated from methanolic extract by crystallization and chromatography techniques. S.C. methanolic extract was analyzed by UV-Vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, LC-MS, and HPLC. Antiangiogenic effect was studied on rat aortic rings, matrigel tube formation, cell proliferation and migration, and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Antitumor effect was studied using a subcutaneous tumor model of HCT 116 colorectal carcinoma cells established in nude mice. Results Analysis by HPLC, LC-MS and FTIR confirm presence of betulinic acid in S.C. methanolic extract. Quantitative analysis by HPLC indicates presence of betulinic acid in S.C. extract at 5.42?±?0.09% (w/w). Antiangiogenesis study showed potent inhibition of microvessels outgrowth in rat aortic rings, and studies on normal and cancer cells did not show any significant cytotoxic effect. Antiangiogenic effect was further confirmed by inhibition of tube formation on matrigel matrix that involves human endothelial cells (IC50?=?17.6?±?2.9 ?g/ml). S.C. extract also inhibited migration of endothelial cells and suppressed expression of VEGF. In vivo antiangiogenic study showed inhibition of new blood vessels in chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), and in vivo antitumor study showed significant inhibition of tumor growth due to reduction of intratumor blood vessels and induction of cell death. Conclusion Collectively, our results indicate S. campanulatum as antiangiogenic and antitumor candidate, and a new source of betulinic acid. PMID:23842450

  13. Inhibition of acidic iron corrosion by. gamma. -irradiated 2-mercaptobenzimidazole

    SciTech Connect

    Makovei, G.L.; Ushakov, V.G.; Bagin, V.K.; Shemshei, V.P.

    1987-01-01

    The authors report on the corrosion inhibition of St 3 steel in hydrochloric acid by 2-mercaptobenzimidazole previously gamma-irradiated from a cobalt 60 source over an absorbed dose range of 0.25-50 MGy. The electrochemical corrosion characteristics of the steel inhibited by both irradiated and unirradiated quantities of the inhibitor were determined under controlled conditions. The possible effects of gamma radiation on the inhibitor molecules was explored by taking their ultraviolet and infrared spectra. The authors postulate that the gamma radiation can split the -SH group from the molecule to form free sulfur in the inhibitor solution and alter the inhibitor from the thiol to the thione form. The radiation-induced accumulation of the thione form, whose inhibitive action is due to highly negative pi-electron population density at the sulfur atom, gives the irradiated imidazole consistently good inhibitive properties.

  14. 4-hydroxynonenal triggers an epidermal growth factor receptor-linked signal pathway for growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Akhand, A A; Kato, M; Yokoyama, I; Miyata, T; Kurokawa, K; Uchida, K; Nakashima, I

    1999-07-01

    Lipid peroxidation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases. As a major product of membrane lipid peroxidation, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) appears after various kinds of oxidative stress, and is known to induce cell growth inhibition. We here analysed the HNE-mediated signal transduction cascade for the growth inhibition of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. HNE dose-dependently induced phosphorylation of multiple cellular proteins including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in A431 cells, and rapidly upregulated the catalytic actions of EGFR for autophosphorylation and for phosphorylation of casein as an exogenous substrate. Immunoblot analysis by use of HNE-specific antibody demonstrated the binding of HNE to EGFR along with its activation. This binding, which did not induce cross-linking of EGFR, caused a capping of the receptor on the cell surface which mimicked the capping induced by EGF. Phosphorylation and activation of EGFR were followed by phosphorylation of adaptor protein Shc and activation of MAP kinase. Both genistein as a wide spectrum protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor and AG1478 as a specific EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation blocker inhibited activation of EGFR and MAP kinase by HNE. The same inhibitors prevented HNE-mediated growth inhibition, suggesting a close linkage between EGFR/MAP kinase activation and growth inhibition after exposure to HNE. Our results suggest that EGFR may be one of the primary targets of HNE for an oxidative stress-linked cell growth inhibition. PMID:10381396

  15. Phenylpropanoic Acid: Growth Factor for Ruminococcus albus

    PubMed Central

    Hungate, R. E.; Stack, Robert J.

    1982-01-01

    Phenylpropanoic acid accounted for part of the stimulatory effect of rumen fluid on the rate of growth and of cellulose digestion by cultures of Ruminococcus albus strain 8 grown on a chemically defined medium. As little as 3 ?M concentration gave maximum response. PMID:16346069

  16. Effects of acidity on tree pollen germination and tube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, J.S.; Van Rye, D.M.; Lassoie, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that pollen germination and tube growth are adversely affected by air pollutants. Pollutants may inhibit the function of pollen by reducing the number of pollen grains which germinate, by reducing the maximum length to which the pollen tubes grow, or by interfering with the formation of the generative cell. The paper reports on studies that are attempting to determine the effects acid rain may have on these crucial stages in the life histories of northeastern tree species. The first stage of this work assessed the effects of acidity in the growth medium on in vitro pollen germination for four deciduous forest species common to central New York State, Betula lutea (yellow birch), B. lenta (black birch), Acer saccharum (sugar maple), and Cornus florida (flowering dogwood). Measurements were taken at the end of the growth period to determine the percentage of grains which had germinated, and to estimate the average tube length. To determine the effects of pollen on the growth medium, the pH of the germination drop was measured at the end of the growth period.

  17. Decreased growth-induced water potential: A primary cause of growth inhibition at low water potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Nonami, Hiroshi; Wu, Yajun; Boyer, J.S.

    1997-06-01

    Cell enlargement depends on a growth-induced difference in water potential to move water into the cells. Water deficits decrease this potential difference and inhibit growth. To investigate whether the decrease causes the growth inhibition, pressure was applied to the roots of soybean seedlings and the growth and potential difference were monitored in the stems. In water-limited plants, the inhibited stem growth increased when the roots were pressurized and it reverted to the previous rate when the pressure was released. The pressure around the roots was perceived as an increased turgor in the stem in small cells next to the xylem, but not in outlying cortical cells. This local effect implied that water transport was impeded by the small cells. The diffusivity for water was much less in the small cells than in the outlying cells. The small cells thus were a barrier that caused the growth-induced potential difference to be large during rapid growth, but to reverse locally during the early part of a water deficit. Such a barrier may be a frequent property of meristems. Because stem growth responded to the pressure-induced recovery of the potential difference across this barrier, we conclude that a decrease in the growth-induced potential difference was a primary cause of the inhibition.

  18. Inhibition of Carcinoma Cell Motility by Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acid (EET) Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Nithipatikom, Kasem; Brody, Daniel M.; Tang, Alan T.; Manthati, Vijaya L.; Falck, John R.; Williams, Carol L.; Campbell, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenases, CYP2C8, 2C9 and 2J2 mRNAs and proteins, were expressed in prostate carcinoma (PC-3, DU-145 and LNCaP) cells. 11,12-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (11,12-EET) was the major arachidonic acid metabolite in these cells. Blocking the EET synthesis by a selective CYP epoxygenase inhibitor (MS-PPOH) inhibited tonic (basal) invasion and migration (motility) while exogenously added EETs induced cell motility in a concentration-dependent manner. An EGFR kinase inhibitor (AG494) or a PI3 kinase inhibitor (LY294002) inhibited cell migration and reduced 11,12-EET-induced cell migration. Importantly, synthetic EET antagonists (14,15-EEZE, 14,15-EEZE-PEG and 14,15-EEZE-mSI) inhibited EET-induced cell invasion and migration. 11,12-EET induced cell stretching and myosin-actin microfilament formation as well as increased phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt (Ser473) while 14,15-EEZE inhibited these effects. These results suggest that EETs induce and EET antagonists inhibit cell motility, possibly by putative EET receptor-mediated EGFR and PI3K/Akt pathways, and suggest EET antagonists as potential therapeutic agents for prostate cancer. PMID:20804500

  19. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1?) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  20. Saturated Fatty Acid Activates but Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Inhibits Toll-like Receptor 2 Dimerized with

    E-print Network

    Lee, Won-Ha

    Saturated Fatty Acid Activates but Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Inhibits Toll-like Receptor 2 Dimerized with Toll-like Receptor 6 or 1* Received for publication, November 30, 2003, and in revised form, Massachusetts 01605 Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2 agonists from bacterial origin require acylated

  1. Gradient microfluidics enables rapid bacterial growth inhibition testing.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Qiu, Yong; Glidle, Andrew; McIlvenna, David; Luo, Qian; Cooper, Jon; Shi, Han-Chang; Yin, Huabing

    2014-03-18

    Bacterial growth inhibition tests have become a standard measure of the adverse effects of inhibitors for a wide range of applications, such as toxicity testing in the medical and environmental sciences. However, conventional well-plate formats for these tests are laborious and provide limited information (often being restricted to an end-point assay). In this study, we have developed a microfluidic system that enables fast quantification of the effect of an inhibitor on bacteria growth and survival, within a single experiment. This format offers a unique combination of advantages, including long-term continuous flow culture, generation of concentration gradients, and single cell morphology tracking. Using Escherichia coli and the inhibitor amoxicillin as one model system, we show excellent agreement between an on-chip single cell-based assay and conventional methods to obtain quantitative measures of antibiotic inhibition (for example, minimum inhibition concentration). Furthermore, we show that our methods can provide additional information, over and above that of the standard well-plate assay, including kinetic information on growth inhibition and measurements of bacterial morphological dynamics over a wide range of inhibitor concentrations. Finally, using a second model system, we show that this chip-based systems does not require the bacteria to be labeled and is well suited for the study of naturally occurring species. We illustrate this using Nitrosomonas europaea, an environmentally important bacteria, and show that the chip system can lead to a significant reduction in the period required for growth and inhibition measurements (<4 days, compared to weeks in a culture flask). PMID:24548044

  2. Inhibition of protein synthesis may explain the bactericidal properties of hypochlorous acid produced by phagocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, S.M.; Davies, K.J.A.

    1986-05-01

    The authors find that hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) inhibit protein synthesis in E. coli: HOCl is similarly ordered 10x more efficient than H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. This result may underlie the mechanism of bacterial killing by phagocytes, which use H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and myeloperoxidase (MPO) to oxidize Cl/sup -/ to HOCl. Protein synthesis (/sup 3/H-leu incorporation) was completely inhibited by 50..mu..M HOCl, whereas 50..mu..M H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ only gave similarly ordered 10% inhibition. Complete inhibition by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ was only observed at concentrations < 0.5 mM. HOCl was also a more potent inhibitor of cell growth (cultured in M9 medium + glucose) than was H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. No growth occurred at 50..mu..M HOCl: in contrast 0.5 mM H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ was required for similar results. During time-course experiments it was found that the inhibition of cell growth by both HOCl and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ reached a maximum within 30 min (at any concentration used). HOCl reacts avidly with amino groups to form N-chloroamines but H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is unreactive. Amino acids (ala, lys, met, trp) or taurine (all at 10 mM) prevented the effects of HOCl but did not affect H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ results. There was an excellent correlation between decreased protein synthesis and diminished cell growth. Inhibition of cell growth was not explained by proteolysis (release of acid-soluble counts), or by loss of membrane integrity. They propose that inhibition of protein synthesis may be a fundamental aspect of the bactericidal functions of phagocytes, and that the production of HOCl by MPO represents a quantitative advantage over H/sub 2/O/sub 2/.

  3. Growth Inhibition of Pathogenic Bacteria by Sulfonylurea Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Kreisberg, Jason F.; Ong, Nicholas T.; Krishna, Aishwarya; Joseph, Thomas L.; Wang, Jing; Ong, Catherine; Ooi, Hui Ann; Sung, Julie C.; Siew, Chern Chiang; Chang, Grace C.; Biot, Fabrice; Cuccui, Jon; Wren, Brendan W.; Chan, Joey; Sivalingam, Suppiah P.; Zhang, Lian-Hui; Verma, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Emerging resistance to current antibiotics raises the need for new microbial drug targets. We show that targeting branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) biosynthesis using sulfonylurea herbicides, which inhibit the BCAA biosynthetic enzyme acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS), can exert bacteriostatic effects on several pathogenic bacteria, including Burkholderia pseudomallei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. Our results suggest that targeting biosynthetic enzymes like AHAS, which are lacking in humans, could represent a promising antimicrobial drug strategy. PMID:23263008

  4. Macrokinetics of magnesium sulfite oxidation inhibited by ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Lidong, Wang; Yongliang, Ma; Wendi, Zhang; Qiangwei, Li; Yi, Zhao; Zhanchao, Zhang

    2013-08-15

    Magnesia flue gas desulfurization is a promising process for small to medium scale industrial coal-fired boilers in order to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions, in which oxidation control of magnesium sulfite is of great importance for the recycling of products. Effects of four inhibitors were compared by kinetic experiments indicating that ascorbic acid is the best additive, which retards the oxidation process of magnesium sulfite in trace presence. The macrokinetics of magnesium sulfite oxidation inhibited by ascorbic acid were studied. Effects of the factors, including ascorbic acid concentration, magnesium sulfite concentration, oxygen partial pressure, pH, and temperature, were investigated in a stirred reactor with bubbling. The results show that the reaction rate is -0.55 order in ascorbic acid, 0.77 in oxygen partial pressure, and zero in magnesium sulfite concentration, respectively. The apparent activation energy is 88.0 kJ mol(-1). Integrated with the kinetic model, it is concluded that the oxidation rate of magnesium sulfite inhibited by ascorbic acid is controlled by the intrinsic chemical reaction. The result provides a useful reference for sulfite recovery in magnesia desulfurization. PMID:23692683

  5. Proteasome Inhibition by Fellutamide B Induces Nerve Growth Factor Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hines, John; Groll, Michael; Fahnestock, Margaret; Crews, Craig M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Neurotrophic small molecules have the potential to aid in the treatment of neuronal injury and neurodegenerative diseases. The natural product fellutamide B, originally isolated from Penicillium fellutanum, potently induces nerve growth factor (NGF) release from fibroblasts and glial-derived cells, although the mechanism for this neurotrophic activity has not been elucidated. Here, we report that fellutamide B potently inhibits proteasome catalytic activity. High resolution structural information obtained from co-crystallization of the 20S proteasome reveals novel aspects regarding ?-subunit binding and adduct formation by fellutamide B to inhibit their hydrolytic activity. We demonstrate that fellutamide B and other proteasome inhibitors increased NGF gene transcription via a cis-acting element (or elements) in the promoter. These results demonstrate an unrecognized connection between proteasome inhibition and NGF production, suggesting a possible new strategy in the development of neurotrophic agents. PMID:18482702

  6. Proteasome inhibition by fellutamide B induces nerve growth factor synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hines, John; Groll, Michael; Fahnestock, Margaret; Crews, Craig M

    2008-05-01

    Neurotrophic small molecules have the potential to aid in the treatment of neuronal injury and neurodegenerative diseases. The natural product fellutamide B, originally isolated from Penicillium fellutanum, potently induces nerve growth factor (NGF) release from fibroblasts and glial-derived cells, although the mechanism for this neurotrophic activity has not been elucidated. Here, we report that fellutamide B potently inhibits proteasome catalytic activity. High-resolution structural information obtained from cocrystallization of the 20S proteasome reveals novel aspects regarding beta-subunit binding and adduct formation by fellutamide B to inhibit their hydrolytic activity. We demonstrate that fellutamide B and other proteasome inhibitors increased NGF gene transcription via a cis-acting element (or elements) in the promoter. These results demonstrate an unrecognized connection between proteasome inhibition and NGF production, suggesting a possible new strategy in the development of neurotrophic agents. PMID:18482702

  7. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R. (Berkeley, CA); Song, Jie (Shrewsbury, MA); Lee, Seung-Wuk (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  8. Inhibition of Mycobacterial Alanine Racemase Activity and Growth by Thiadiazolidinones

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yashang; Mootien, Sara; Shoen, Carolyn; Destefano, Michelle; Cirillo, Pier; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Yeung, Kacheong R.; Ledizet, Michel; Cynamon, Michael H.; Aristoff, Paul A.; Koski, Raymond A.; Kaplan, Paul A.; Anthony, Karen G.

    2013-01-01

    The genus Mycobacterium includes non-pathogenic species such as M. smegmatis, and pathogenic species such as M. tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB). Treatment of TB requires a lengthy regimen of several antibiotics, whose effectiveness has been compromised by the emergence of resistant strains. New antibiotics that can shorten the treatment course and those that have not been compromised by bacterial resistance are needed. In this study, we report that thiadiazolidinones, a relatively little-studied heterocyclic class, inhibit the activity of mycobacterial alanine racemase, an essential enzyme that converts L-alanine to D-alanine for peptidoglycan synthesis. Twelve members of the thiadiazolidinone family were evaluated for inhibition of M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis alanine racemase activity and bacterial growth. Thiadiazolidinones inhibited M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis alanine racemases to different extents with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) ranging from <0.03 to 28 µM and 23 to >150 µM, respectively. The compounds also inhibited the growth of these bacteria, including multidrug resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for drug-susceptible M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis ranged from 6.25 µg/ml to 100 µg/ml, and from 1.56 to 6.25 µg/ml for drug-resistant M. tuberculosis. The in vitro activities of thiadiazolidinones suggest that this family of compounds might represent starting points for medicinal chemistry efforts aimed at developing novel antimycobacterial agents. PMID:23680030

  9. Tumor suppressor XAF1 induces apoptosis, inhibits angiogenesis and inhibits tumor growth in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li Ming; Shi, Dong Mei; Dai, Qiang; Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Yao, Wei Yan; Sun, Ping Hu; Ding, Yan Fei; Qiao, Min Min; Wu, Yun Lin; Jiang, Shi Hu; Tu, Shui Ping

    2014-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP)-associated factor 1 (XAF1), a XIAP-binding protein, is a tumor suppressor gene. XAF1 was silent or expressed lowly in most human malignant tumors. However, the role of XAF1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of XAF1 on tumor growth and angiogenesis in hepatocellular cancer cells. Our results showed that XAF1 expression was lower in HCC cell lines SMMC-7721, Hep G2 and BEL-7404 and liver cancer tissues than that in paired non-cancer liver tissues. Adenovirus-mediated XAF1 expression (Ad5/F35-XAF1) significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in HCC cells in dose- and time- dependent manners. Infection of Ad5/F35-XAF1 induced cleavage of caspase -3, -8, -9 and PARP in HCC cells. Furthermore, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment significantly suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft model of liver cancer cells. Western Blot and immunohistochemistry staining showed that Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment suppressed expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is associated with tumor angiogenesis, in cancer cells and xenograft tumor tissues. Moreover, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Our results demonstrate that XAF1 inhibits tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. XAF1 may be a promising target for liver cancer treatment. PMID:24980821

  10. Tumor suppressor XAF1 induces apoptosis, inhibits angiogenesis and inhibits tumor growth in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li Ming; Shi, Dong Mei; Dai, Qiang; Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Yao, Wei Yan; Sun, Ping Hu; Ding, Yanfei; Qiao, Min Min; Wu, Yun Lin; Jiang, Shi Hu; Tu, Shui Ping

    2014-07-30

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP)-associated factor 1 (XAF1), a XIAP-binding protein, is a tumor suppressor gene. XAF1 was silent or expressed lowly in most human malignant tumors. However, the role of XAF1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of XAF1 on tumor growth and angiogenesis in hepatocellular cancer cells. Our results showed that XAF1 expression was lower in HCC cell lines SMMC-7721, Hep G2 and BEL-7404 and liver cancer tissues than that in paired non-cancer liver tissues. Adenovirus-mediated XAF1 expression (Ad5/F35-XAF1) significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in HCC cells in dose- and time- dependent manners. Infection of Ad5/F35-XAF1 induced cleavage of caspase -3, -8, -9 and PARP in HCC cells. Furthermore, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment significantly suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft model of liver cancer cells. Western Blot and immunohistochemistry staining showed that Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment suppressed expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is associated with tumor angiogenesis, in cancer cells and xenograft tumor tissues. Moreover, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Our results demonstrate that XAF1 inhibits tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. XAF1 may be a promising target for liver cancer treatment. PMID:24980821

  11. The inhibition of calcium carbonate crystal growth by the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide.

    PubMed

    Dalas, E; Chalias, A; Gatos, D; Barlos, K

    2006-08-15

    The crystal growth of calcite, the most stable calcium carbonate polymorph, in the presence of the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide (containing 48 amino acids in the ring finger configuration), has been investigated by the constant composition technique. Crystallization took place exclusively on well-characterized calcite crystals in solutions supersaturated only with respect to this calcium carbonate salt. The kinetic results indicated a surface diffusion spiral growth mechanism. The presence of the Mdm2 peptide inhibited the crystal growth of calcite by 22-58% in the concentration range tested, through adsorption onto the active growth sites of the calcite crystal surface. The kinetic results favored a Langmuir-type adsorption model, and the value of the calculated affinity constant was k(aff)=147x10(4) dm(3)mol(-1), a(ads)=0.29. PMID:16678843

  12. Inhibition of a thermophilic deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase by fullerene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianmei; Li, Bo; Chen, Zhe; Yao, Lu; Zhao, Dongxu; Yang, Xinlin; He, Min; Yu, Qun

    2007-06-01

    Enzyme inhibition by fullerene derivatives has attracted much attention. In this communication, effects of two water-solube fullerene derivatives, fullerol and trimalonic acid C60 (TMA C60) on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were investigated by using PCR of beta-actin cDNA derived from HeLa cells as an experimental model. Both fullerol and TMA C60 were found to inhibit PCR in a dose-dependent manner. PCR was ultimately inhibited while the concentrations of each compound were not less than 0.01 mM. In contrast, mannitol exerted no effects on PCR while its concentration increased up to 2 mM. Compensation experiments with Thermus aquaticus (Taq) DNA polymerase revealed that both fullerol and TMA C60 inhibited the enzymatic activity of Taq DNA polymerase, and the inhibitory potency of TMA C60 was slightly greater than that of fullerol. Our data provides some novel aspects on the enzyme inhibiting activities of fullerene derivatives. PMID:17674810

  13. Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by NOSH-aspirin: COX inhibition and modeling.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Federica; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Rao, Praveen P N; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-12-01

    We recently reported the synthesis of NOSH-aspirin, a novel hybrid that releases both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In NOSH-aspirin, the two moieties that release NO and H2S are covalently linked at the 1, 2 positions of acetyl salicylic acid, i.e. ortho-NOSH-aspirin (o-NOSH-aspirin). In the present study, we compared the effects of the positional isomers of NOSH-ASA (o-NOSH-aspirin, m-NOSH-aspirin and p-NOSH-aspirin) to that of aspirin on growth of HT-29 and HCT 15 colon cancer cells, belonging to the same histological subtype, but with different expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes; HT-29 express both COX-1 and COX-2, whereas HCT 15 is COX-null. We also analyzed the effect of these compounds on proliferation and apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Since the parent compound aspirin, inhibits both COX-1 and COX-2, we also evaluated the effects of these compounds on COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme activities and also performed modeling of the interactions between the positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin and COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. We observed that the three positional isomers of NOSH aspirin inhibited the growth of both colon cancer cell lines with IC50s in the nano-molar range. In particular in HT-29 cells the IC50s for growth inhibition were: o-NOSH-ASA, 0.04±0.011µM; m-NOSH-ASA, 0.24±0.11µM; p-NOSH-ASA, 0.46±0.17µM; and in HCT 15 cells the IC50s for o-NOSH-ASA, m-NOSH-ASA, and p-NOSH-ASA were 0.062 ±0.006µM, 0.092±0.004µM, and 0.37±0.04µM, respectively. The IC50 for aspirin in both cell lines was >5mM at 24h. The reduction of cell growth appeared to be mediated through inhibition of proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. All 3 positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin preferentially inhibited COX-1 over COX-2. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin have the same biological actions, but that o-NOSH-ASA displayed the strongest anti-neoplastic potential. PMID:26319435

  14. Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by NOSH-aspirin: COX inhibition and modeling?

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Federica; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Rao, Praveen P.N.; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported the synthesis of NOSH-aspirin, a novel hybrid that releases both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In NOSH-aspirin, the two moieties that release NO and H2S are covalently linked at the 1, 2 positions of acetyl salicylic acid, i.e. ortho-NOSH-aspirin (o-NOSH-aspirin). In the present study, we compared the effects of the positional isomers of NOSH-ASA (o-NOSH-aspirin, m-NOSH-aspirin and p-NOSH-aspirin) to that of aspirin on growth of HT-29 and HCT 15 colon cancer cells, belonging to the same histological subtype, but with different expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes; HT-29 express both COX-1 and COX-2, whereas HCT 15 is COX-null. We also analyzed the effect of these compounds on proliferation and apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Since the parent compound aspirin, inhibits both COX-1 and COX-2, we also evaluated the effects of these compounds on COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme activities and also performed modeling of the interactions between the positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin and COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. We observed that the three positional isomers of NOSH aspirin inhibited the growth of both colon cancer cell lines with IC50s in the nano-molar range. In particular in HT-29 cells the IC50s for growth inhibition were: o-NOSH-ASA, 0.04±0.011 µM; m-NOSH-ASA, 0.24±0.11 µM; p-NOSH-ASA, 0.46±0.17 µM; and in HCT 15 cells the IC50s for o-NOSH-ASA, m-NOSH-ASA, and p-NOSH-ASA were 0.062 ±0.006 µM, 0.092±0.004 µM, and 0.37±0.04 µM, respectively. The IC50 for aspirin in both cell lines was >5 mM at 24 h. The reduction of cell growth appeared to be mediated through inhibition of proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. All 3 positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin preferentially inhibited COX-1 over COX-2. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin have the same biological actions, but that o-NOSH-ASA displayed the strongest anti-neoplastic potential. PMID:26319435

  15. Studies of the effect of gibberellic acid on algal growth.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, W. K.; Sorokin, C.

    1971-01-01

    The effect of gibberellic acid on exponential growth rate of four strains of Chlorella was investigated under variety of experimental conditions. In concentrations from 10 ppm to 100 ppm, gibberellic acid was shown to have no effect on Chlorella growth. In concentration of 200 ppm, gibberellic acid exerted some unfavorable effect on algal growth.

  16. Ricinoleic acid inhibits methanogenesis and fatty acid biohydrogenation in ruminal digesta from sheep and in bacterial cultures.

    PubMed

    Ramos Morales, E; Mata Espinosa, M A; McKain, N; Wallace, R J

    2012-12-01

    Ricinoleic acid (RA; 12-hydroxy-cis-9-18:1) is the main fatty acid component of castor oil. Although a precursor for CLA synthesis in lactic acid bacteria, RA was found previously not to form CLA in ruminal digesta but to have some inhibitory properties. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the potential of RA to modulate ruminal biohydrogenation and methanogenesis. Ruminal digesta from 4 sheep receiving a mixed hay-concentrate diet was incubated in vitro with 0.167 g/L of linoleic acid (LA; cis-9,cis-12-18:2) or with a combination of LA and RA or LA and castor oil (LA, RA, and castor oil added to a final concentration of 0.167 g/L) in the presence and absence of lipase. The CLA rumenic acid (cis-9,trans-11-18:2) accumulated when either RA or castor oil and lipase was present. Vaccenic acid (VA; trans-11-18:1) also accumulated, and a decrease of the rate of production of stearic acid (SA; 18:0) was observed. When LA was incubated with castor oil in the absence of lipase, no effects on biohydrogenation were observed. Ricinoleic acid at 0.02 g/L did not affect growth of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens but it inhibited growth of Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus. Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus but not B. fibrisolvens metabolized RA to 12-hydroxystearate. Linoleic acid metabolism by B. proteoclasticus appeared to be unaffected by RA addition whereas rumenic acid accumulation increased (P = 0.015 at 12 h) when RA was added. A 28% decrease (P = 0.004) in methane was obtained in 24 h in vitro incubations of diluted buffered ruminal fluid with added 0.2 g RA/L. There was no effect on the total concentration of VFA after 24 h as a result of RA addition, but the molar proportions of acetate and butyrate were decreased (P = 0.041 and P < 0.001, respectively) whereas that of propionate increased (P < 0.001). It was concluded that, at least in vitro, RA or the combination of castor oil and lipase inhibit biohydrogenation, causing the accumulation of rumenic acid and VA, with potential health benefits for ruminant products. The effect appeared to be mediated via an inhibitory effect on the biohydrogenating activity of B. proteoclasticus. An added environmental benefit could be a concomitant decrease in methane emissions. In vivo studies are now required to confirm the potential of these additives. PMID:22829608

  17. A Flagellar Glycan-Specific Protein Encoded by Campylobacter Phages Inhibits Host Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Muhammad Afzal; Sacher, Jessica C.; van Alphen, Lieke B.; Patry, Robert T.; Szymanski, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    We previously characterized a carbohydrate binding protein, Gp047, derived from lytic Campylobacter phage NCTC 12673, as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. We also demonstrated that this protein binds specifically to acetamidino-modified pseudaminic acid residues on host flagella, but the role of this protein in the phage lifecycle remains unknown. Here, we report that Gp047 is capable of inhibiting C. jejuni growth both on solid and liquid media, an activity, which we found to be bacteriostatic. The Gp047 domain responsible for bacterial growth inhibition is localized to the C-terminal quarter of the protein, and this activity is both contact- and dose-dependent. Gp047 gene homologues are present in all Campylobacter phages sequenced to date, and the resulting protein is not part of the phage particle. Therefore, these results suggest that either phages of this pathogen have evolved an effector protein capable of host-specific growth inhibition, or that Campylobacter cells have developed a mechanism of regulating their growth upon sensing an impending phage threat. PMID:26694450

  18. A Flagellar Glycan-Specific Protein Encoded by Campylobacter Phages Inhibits Host Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Javed, Muhammad Afzal; Sacher, Jessica C; van Alphen, Lieke B; Patry, Robert T; Szymanski, Christine M

    2015-01-01

    We previously characterized a carbohydrate binding protein, Gp047, derived from lytic Campylobacter phage NCTC 12673, as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. We also demonstrated that this protein binds specifically to acetamidino-modified pseudaminic acid residues on host flagella, but the role of this protein in the phage lifecycle remains unknown. Here, we report that Gp047 is capable of inhibiting C. jejuni growth both on solid and liquid media, an activity, which we found to be bacteriostatic. The Gp047 domain responsible for bacterial growth inhibition is localized to the C-terminal quarter of the protein, and this activity is both contact- and dose-dependent. Gp047 gene homologues are present in all Campylobacter phages sequenced to date, and the resulting protein is not part of the phage particle. Therefore, these results suggest that either phages of this pathogen have evolved an effector protein capable of host-specific growth inhibition, or that Campylobacter cells have developed a mechanism of regulating their growth upon sensing an impending phage threat. PMID:26694450

  19. Mullerian inhibiting substance inhibits growth of a human ovarian cancer in nude mice.

    PubMed Central

    Donahoe, P K; Fuller, A F; Scully, R E; Guy, S R; Budzik, G P

    1981-01-01

    Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS) was investigated for its ability to inhibit growth of a human ovarian cancer in nude mice. Biologically active preparations from newborn calf testes, obtained after sequential ion exchange chromatography, delayed or prevented growth of a human ovarian cancer (HOC-21) when 2 X 10(6) cells were preincubated with them prior to subcutaneous injection of the tumor cells into Balb/C homozygous nude mice. Preincubation of a human colon carcinoma cells (SW-48) with similar preparations of MIS failed to inhibit growth of the tumor cells in nude mice. Human serous carcinomas are thought to arise from the ovarian surface epithelium, a derivative of the coelomic epithelium of the urogenital ridge, which invaginates to form the mullerian duct early in embryonic life. The neoplastic cells of serous tumors simulate morphologically the lining cells of the fallopian tube, which are derivatives of mullerian duct epithelium. This study provides physiologic confirmation of the mullerian nature of this type of tumor and suggests that MIS may ultimately prove to be effective in its therapy. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6895157

  20. Cadmium inhibits acid secretion in stimulated frog gastric mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbino, Andrea; Debellis, Lucantonio; Caroppo, Rosa; Curci, Silvana; Colella, Matilde

    2010-06-01

    Cadmium, a toxic environmental pollutant, affects the function of different organs such as lungs, liver and kidney. Less is known about its toxic effects on the gastric mucosa. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which cadmium impacts on the physiology of gastric mucosa. To this end, intact amphibian mucosae were mounted in Ussing chambers and the rate of acid secretion, short circuit current (I{sub sc}), transepithelial potential (V{sub t}) and resistance (R{sub t}) were recorded in the continuous presence of cadmium. Addition of cadmium (20 {mu}M to 1 mM) on the serosal but not luminal side of the mucosae resulted in inhibition of acid secretion and increase in NPPB-sensitive, chloride-dependent short circuit current. Remarkably, cadmium exerted its effects only on histamine-stimulated tissues. Experiments with TPEN, a cell-permeant chelator for heavy metals, showed that cadmium acts from the intracellular side of the acid secreting cells. Furthermore, cadmium-induced inhibition of acid secretion and increase in I{sub sc} cannot be explained by an action on: 1) H{sub 2} histamine receptor, 2) Ca{sup 2+} signalling 3) adenylyl cyclase or 4) carbonic anhydrase. Conversely, cadmium was ineffective in the presence of the H{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase blocker omeprazole suggesting that the two compounds likely act on the same target. Our findings suggest that cadmium affects the functionality of histamine-stimulated gastric mucosa by inhibiting the H{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase from the intracellular side. These data shed new light on the toxic effect of this dangerous environmental pollutant and may result in new avenues for therapeutic intervention in acute and chronic intoxication.

  1. Hydroxyapatite Growth Inhibition Effect of Pellicle Statherin Peptides.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Karttunen, M; Jalkanen, J; Mussi, M C M; Liao, Y; Grohe, B; Lagugné-Labarthet, F; Siqueira, W L

    2015-08-01

    In our recent studies, we have shown that in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle is a sophisticated biological structure containing a significant portion of naturally occurring salivary peptides. From a functional aspect, the identification of peptides in the acquired enamel pellicle is of interest because many salivary proteins exhibit functional domains that maintain the activities of the native protein. Among the in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle peptides that have been newly identified, 5 peptides are derived from statherin. Here, we assessed the ability of these statherin pellicle peptides to inhibit hydroxyapatite crystal growth. In addition, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. A microplate colorimetric assay was used to quantify hydroxyapatite growth. Statherin protein, 5 statherin-derived peptides, and a peptide lacking phosphate at residues 2 and 3 were analyzed. Statherin peptide phosphorylated on residues 2 and 3 indicated a significant inhibitory effect when compared with the 5 other peptides (P < 0.05). MD simulations showed a strong affinity and fast adsorption to hydroxyapatite for phosphopeptides, whereas unphosphorylated peptides interacted weakly with the hydroxyapatite. Our data suggest that the presence of a covalently linked phosphate group (at residues 2 and 3) in statherin peptides modulates the effect of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. This study provides a mechanism to account for the composition and function of acquired enamel pellicle statherin peptides that will contribute as a base for the development of biologically stable and functional synthetic peptides for therapeutic use against dental caries and/or periodontal disease. PMID:26116492

  2. Inhibition of de novo Palmitate Synthesis by Fatty Acid Synthase Induces Apoptosis in Tumor Cells by Remodeling Cell Membranes, Inhibiting Signaling Pathways, and Reprogramming Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Richard; Mordec, Kasia; Waszczuk, Joanna; Wang, Zhaoti; Lai, Julie; Fridlib, Marina; Buckley, Douglas; Kemble, George; Heuer, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of de novo palmitate synthesis via fatty acid synthase (FASN) inhibition provides an unproven approach to cancer therapy with a strong biological rationale. FASN expression increases with tumor progression and associates with chemoresistance, tumor metastasis, and diminished patient survival in numerous tumor types. TVB-3166, an orally-available, reversible, potent, and selective FASN inhibitor induces apoptosis, inhibits anchorage-independent cell growth under lipid-rich conditions, and inhibits in-vivo xenograft tumor growth. Dose-dependent effects are observed between 20–200 nM TVB-3166, which agrees with the IC50 in biochemical FASN and cellular palmitate synthesis assays. Mechanistic studies show that FASN inhibition disrupts lipid raft architecture, inhibits biological pathways such as lipid biosynthesis, PI3K–AKT–mTOR and ?-catenin signal transduction, and inhibits expression of oncogenic effectors such as c-Myc; effects that are tumor-cell specific. Our results demonstrate that FASN inhibition has anti-tumor activities in biologically diverse preclinical tumor models and provide mechanistic and pharmacologic evidence that FASN inhibition presents a promising therapeutic strategy for treating a variety of cancers, including those expressing mutant K-Ras, ErbB2, c-Met, and PTEN. The reported findings inform ongoing studies to link mechanisms of action with defined tumor types and advance the discovery of biomarkers supporting development of FASN inhibitors as cancer therapeutics. Research in context Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is a vital enzyme in tumor cell biology; the over-expression of FASN is associated with diminished patient prognosis and resistance to many cancer therapies. Our data demonstrate that selective and potent FASN inhibition with TVB-3166 leads to selective death of tumor cells, without significant effect on normal cells, and inhibits in vivo xenograft tumor growth at well-tolerated doses. Candidate biomarkers for selecting tumors highly sensitive to FASN inhibition are identified. These preclinical data provide mechanistic and pharmacologic evidence that FASN inhibition presents a promising therapeutic strategy for treating a variety of cancers. PMID:26425687

  3. Conjugated docosahexaenoic acid inhibits lipid accumulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuki, Tsuyoshi; Kawakami, Yuki; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2006-08-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), which contains a conjugated double-bond system, and n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are widely known to improve lipid metabolism. To examine the possibility that a fatty acid with a combination of these structural features might have stronger physiological effects, we prepared conjugated DHA (CDHA) by alkaline isomerization of DHA and examined its effects on lipid and sugar metabolism in rats. Rats were force fed with 200 mg of test oils [linoleic acid (LA), DHA, CLA or CDHA] everyday for 4 weeks. Compared with the animals from the other groups, those in the CDHA group showed a significant weight loss in white adipose tissue (57% of adipose tissue weight in the LA group) and significant decreases in the levels of liver triacylglycerol (TG; 65% of TG level in the LA group) as well as total cholesterol (TC; 88% of TC level in the LA group), indicating suppression of lipid accumulation in the liver and adipose tissue. In addition, plasma TG and TC levels significantly decreased (69% of TG level and 82% of TC level in the LA group), indicating improved lipid metabolism. In the liver, the fatty acid synthesis system was inhibited and the fatty acid beta-oxidation system was activated, whereas the free fatty acid, glucose and tumor necrosis factor alpha levels in the plasma were lowered following CDHA administration. Hence, intake of CDHA appears to suppress the accumulation of fat in the liver and epididymal adipose tissue and improves lipid and sugar metabolism in rats. PMID:16426831

  4. Modified Lactic Acid Bacteria Detect and Inhibit Multiresistant Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We designed Lactococcus lactis to detect Enterococcus faecalis. Upon detection, L. lactis produce and secrete antienterococcal peptides. The peptides inhibit enterococcal growth and reduce viability of enterococci in the vicinity of L. lactis. The enterococcal sex pheromone cCF10 serves as the signal for detection. Expression vectors derived from pCF10, a cCF10-responsive E. faecalis sex-pheromone conjugative plasmid, were engineered in L. lactis for the detection system. Recombinant host strains were engineered to express genes for three bacteriocins, enterocin A, hiracin JM79 and enterocin P, each with potent antimicrobial activity against E. faecalis. Sensitive detection and specific inhibition occur both in agar and liquid media. The engineered L. lactis also inhibited growth of multidrug-resistant E. faecium strains, when induced by cCF10. The presented vectors and strains can be components of a toolbox for the development of alternative antibiotic technologies targeting enterococci at the site of infection. PMID:24896372

  5. Growth Inhibition of Cronobacter sakazakii in Experimentally Contaminated Powdered Infant Formula by Kefir Supernatant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Chon, Jung-Whan; Kang, Il-Byeong; Kim, Hyunsook; Kim, Hong-Seok; Song, Kwang-Young; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2015-09-01

    Kefir is a type of fermented milk containing lactic and acetic acid bacteria and yeast. In this study, we evaluated the antimicrobial activity of kefir supernatant against Cronobacter sakazakii in powdered infant formula (PIF). In a spot-on-lawn test, the growth of 20 C. sakazakii strains, including 10 clinical and 10 food isolates, was completely inhibited in the presence of kefir supernatant. Significant differences in the diameters of inhibition zones were observed upon treatment with kefir compared with the results for Lactobacillus kefiri and Candida kefyr culture supernatants or solutions of lactic and acetic acid and ethyl alcohol in the agar well diffusion test (P < 0.05). The addition of 100 ?l of kefir supernatant to 1 ml of nutrient broth completely inhibited the growth of C. sakazakii, as evaluated by spectrophotometry. The antimicrobial activity of kefir supernatant in experimentally contaminated PIF was also tested; we found no viable C. sakazakii cells remaining in PIF rehydrated with 30% kefir supernatant solution for 1 h, demonstrating that the antimicrobial activity of kefir supernatant against C. sakazakii could be applied in real food samples. PMID:26319718

  6. Liposomal curcumin inhibits Lewis lung cancer growth primarily through inhibition of angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LIQIANG; ZHANG, JING; CAI, LULU; WEN, JING; SHI, HUASHAN; LI, DAN; GUO, FUCHUN; WANG, YONGSHENG

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin has been proven to effectively inhibit tumor growth by both targeting tumor cells and angiogenesis; however, poor water solubility limits further clinical application. In the present study, we prepared water-soluble liposomal curcumin to investigate its anti-tumor effects and the underlying mechanism. The MTT assay was used to test the anti-proliferative activities for the MS1 murine endothelial and LL/2 Lewis lung cancer cell lines. Apoptosis and cell cycle arrest induced by liposomal curcumin were analysed by flow cytometry. Anti-angiogenic agents and the resulting anti-tumor effects were investigated in a murine lung cancer model. Zebrafish were used to investigate the anti-angiogenic effect of liposomal curcumin in the development of embryos. In vitro, liposomal curcumin inhibited the proliferation of MS1 cells and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Notably, LL/2 cells showed less sensitivity to the liposomal curcumin in vitro. In vivo, the systemic administration of liposomal curcumin resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth. CD31 immunohistochemical analysis and alginate encapsulation assay revealed that angiogenesis was decreased by liposomal curcumin treatment. Angiogenesis was also suppressed in the development of zebrafish. Liposomal curcumin showed potent inhibitory activity against murine endothelial cells but not lung cancer cells. Liposomal curcumin treatment is capable of significantly inhibiting tumor growth in vivo, a process that may depend primarily on its anti-angiogenic effects. Our study also indicates that liposomal curcumin may be developed not only for cancer therapy, but also for the treatment of other angiogenesis-related diseases.

  7. Pharmacologic inhibition of JAK-STAT signaling promotes hair growth

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Sivan; Higgins, Claire A.; Cerise, Jane E.; Dai, Zhenpeng; Chen, James C.; Clynes, Raphael; Christiano, Angela M.

    2015-01-01

    Several forms of hair loss in humans are characterized by the inability of hair follicles to enter the growth phase (anagen) of the hair cycle after being arrested in the resting phase (telogen). Current pharmacologic therapies have been largely unsuccessful in targeting pathways that can be selectively modulated to induce entry into anagen. We show that topical treatment of mouse and human skin with small-molecule inhibitors of the Janus kinase (JAK)–signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway results in rapid onset of anagen and subsequent hair growth. We show that JAK inhibition regulates the activation of key hair follicle populations such as the hair germ and improves the inductivity of cultured human dermal papilla cells by controlling a molecular signature enriched in intact, fully inductive dermal papillae. Our findings open new avenues for exploration of JAK-STAT inhibition for promotion of hair growth and highlight the role of this pathway in regulating the activation of hair follicle stem cells. PMID:26601320

  8. Pharmacologic inhibition of JAK-STAT signaling promotes hair growth.

    PubMed

    Harel, Sivan; Higgins, Claire A; Cerise, Jane E; Dai, Zhenpeng; Chen, James C; Clynes, Raphael; Christiano, Angela M

    2015-10-01

    Several forms of hair loss in humans are characterized by the inability of hair follicles to enter the growth phase (anagen) of the hair cycle after being arrested in the resting phase (telogen). Current pharmacologic therapies have been largely unsuccessful in targeting pathways that can be selectively modulated to induce entry into anagen. We show that topical treatment of mouse and human skin with small-molecule inhibitors of the Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway results in rapid onset of anagen and subsequent hair growth. We show that JAK inhibition regulates the activation of key hair follicle populations such as the hair germ and improves the inductivity of cultured human dermal papilla cells by controlling a molecular signature enriched in intact, fully inductive dermal papillae. Our findings open new avenues for exploration of JAK-STAT inhibition for promotion of hair growth and highlight the role of this pathway in regulating the activation of hair follicle stem cells. PMID:26601320

  9. Xanthine oxidase inhibits growth of Plasmodium falciparum in human erythrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Berman, P A; Human, L; Freese, J A

    1991-12-01

    Malaria parasites, unable to synthesize purine de novo, use host-derived hypoxanthine preferentially as purine source. In a previous study (1990. J. Biol. Chem. 265:6562-6568), we noted that xanthine oxidase rapidly and completely depleted hypoxanthine in human erythrocytes, not by crossing the erythrocyte membrane, but rather by creating a concentration gradient which facilitated hypoxanthine efflux. We therefore investigated the ability of xanthine oxidase to inhibit growth of FCR-3, a chloroquine-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum in human erythrocytes in vitro. Parasites were cultured in human group O+ erythrocytes in medium supplemented, as required, with xanthine oxidase or chloroquine. Parasite viability was assessed by uptake of radiolabeled glycine and adenosine triphosphate-derived purine into protein and nucleic acid, respectively, by nucleic acid accumulation, by L-lactate production, and by microscopic appearance. On average, a 90% inhibition of growth was observed after 72 h of incubation in 20 mU/ml xanthine oxidase. Inhibition was notably greater than that exerted by 10(-7) M chloroquine (less than 10%) over a comparable period. The IC50 for xanthine oxidase was estimated at 0.2 mU/ml, compared to 1.5 x 10(-7) M for chloroquine. Inhibition was completely reversed by excess hypoxanthine, but was unaffected by oxygen radical scavengers, including superoxide dismutase and catalase. The data confirms that a supply of host-derived hypoxanthine is critical for nucleic acid synthesis in P. falciparum, and that depletion of erythrocyte hypoxanthine pools of chloroquine-resistant malaria infection in humans. of chloroquine-resistant malaria infection in humans. PMID:1752946

  10. Catechin-incorporated dental copolymers inhibit growth of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    MANKOVSKAIA, Alexandra; LÉVESQUE, Céline M.; PRAKKI, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To test the inhibitory growth activity of green tea catechin incorporated into dental resins compared to resins containing the broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound chlorhexidine against Streptococcus mutans in vitro. Material and Methods: The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCg) and chlorhexidine (CHX) were determined according to the microdilution method. Resin discs (5 mm x 3 mm) were prepared from Bis-GMA/TEGDMA (R1) and Bis-GMA/CH3Bis-GMA (R2) comonomers (n=9) containing: a) no drug, b) EGCg, c) CHX. Two concentrations of each drug (0.5x MIC and 1x MIC) were incorporated into the resin discs. Samples were individually immersed in a bacterial culture and incubated for 24 h at 37º C under constant agitation. Cell viability was assessed by counting the number of colonies on replica agar plates. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA, Tukey and Student t-tests (?=0.05). Results: Both resins containing EGCg and CHX showed a significant inhibition of bacterial growth at both concentrations tested (p<0.05). A significantly higher inhibition was observed in response to resins containing CHX at 0.5x MIC and 1x MIC, and EGCg at 1x MIC when compared to EGCg at 0.5x MIC. Also, EGCg at 0.5x MIC in R1 had a significantly higher growth inhibition than in R2. Conclusions: Both EGCg and CHX retained their antibacterial activity when incorporated into the resin matrix. EGCg at 1x MIC in R1 and R2 resins significantly reduced S. mutans survival at a level similar to CHX. The data generated from this study will provide advances in the field of bioactive dental materials with the potential of improving the lifespan of resin-based restorations. PMID:23739855

  11. Growth of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans on formic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Pronk, J.T.; Meijer, W.M.; Hazeu, W.; vanDijken, J.P.; Bos, P.; Kuenen, J.G. )

    1991-07-01

    A variety of acidophilic microorganisms were shown to be capable of oxidizing formate. These included Thiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 21834, which, however, could not grow on formate in normal batch cultures. However, the organism could be grown on formate when the substrate supply was growth limiting, e.g., in formate-limited chemostat cultures. The cell densities achieved by the use of the latter cultivation method were higher than cell densities reported for growth of T. ferrooxidans on ferrous iron or reduced sulfur compounds. Inhibition of formate oxidation by cell suspensions, but not cell extracts, of formate-grown T. ferrooxidans occurred at formate concentrations above 100 {mu}M. This observation explains the inability of the organism to grow on formate in batch cultures. Cells grown in formate-limited chemostat cultures retained the ability to oxidize ferrous iron at high rates. Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activities in cell extracts indicated that T. ferrooxidans employs the Calvin cycle for carbon assimilation during growth on formate. Oxidation of formate by cell extracts was NAD(P) independent.

  12. Identification of volatile compounds produced by the bacterium Burkholderia tropica that inhibit the growth of fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Tenorio-Salgado, Silvia; Tinoco, Raunel; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Caballero-Mellado, Jesus; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    It has been documented that bacteria from the Burkholderia genera produce different kinds of compounds that inhibit plant pathogens, however in Burkholderia tropica, an endophytic diazotrophic and phosphate-solubilizing bacterium isolated from a wide diversity of plants, the capacity to produce antifungal compounds has not been evaluated. In order to expand our knowledge about Burkholderia tropica as a potential biological control agent, we analyzed 15 different strains of this bacterium to evaluate their capacities to inhibit the growth of four phytopathogenic fungi, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotium rolffsi. Diverse analytical techniques, including plant root protection and dish plate growth assays and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy showed that the fungal growth inhibition was intimately associated with the volatile compounds produced by B. tropica and, in particular, two bacterial strains (MTo293 and TTe203) exhibited the highest radial mycelial growth inhibition. Morphological changes associated with these compounds, such as disruption of fungal hyphae, were identified by using photomicrographic analysis. By using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy technique, 18 volatile compounds involved in the growth inhibition mechanism were identified, including ?-pinene and limonene. In addition, we found a high proportion of bacterial strains that produced siderophores during growth with different carbon sources, such as alanine and glutamic acid; however, their roles in the antagonism mechanism remain unclear. PMID:23680857

  13. Identification of volatile compounds produced by the bacterium Burkholderia tropica that inhibit the growth of fungal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Tenorio-Salgado, Silvia; Tinoco, Raunel; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Caballero-Mellado, Jesus; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    It has been documented that bacteria from the Burkholderia genera produce different kinds of compounds that inhibit plant pathogens, however in Burkholderia tropica, an endophytic diazotrophic and phosphate-solubilizing bacterium isolated from a wide diversity of plants, the capacity to produce antifungal compounds has not been evaluated. In order to expand our knowledge about Burkholderia tropica as a potential biological control agent, we analyzed 15 different strains of this bacterium to evaluate their capacities to inhibit the growth of four phytopathogenic fungi, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotium rolffsi. Diverse analytical techniques, including plant root protection and dish plate growth assays and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy showed that the fungal growth inhibition was intimately associated with the volatile compounds produced by B. tropica and, in particular, two bacterial strains (MTo293 and TTe203) exhibited the highest radial mycelial growth inhibition. Morphological changes associated with these compounds, such as disruption of fungal hyphae, were identified by using photomicrographic analysis. By using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy technique, 18 volatile compounds involved in the growth inhibition mechanism were identified, including ?-pinene and limonene. In addition, we found a high proportion of bacterial strains that produced siderophores during growth with different carbon sources, such as alanine and glutamic acid; however, their roles in the antagonism mechanism remain unclear. PMID:23680857

  14. STATISTICAL INFERENCE FOR TUMOR GROWTH INHIBITION T/C RATIO

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    The tumor growth inhibition T/C ratio is commonly used to quantify treatment effects in drug screening tumor xenograft experiments. The T/C ratio is converted to an antitumor activity rating using an arbitrary cutoff point and often without any formal statistical inference. Here, we applied a nonparametric bootstrap method and a small sample likelihood ratio statistic to make a statistical inference of the T/C ratio, including both hypothesis testing and a confidence interval estimate. Furthermore, sample size and power are also discussed for statistical design of tumor xenograft experiments. Tumor xenograft data from an actual experiment were analyzed to illustrate the application. PMID:20721784

  15. Hyperbaric hyperoxia reversibly inhibits erythrocyte phospholipid fatty acid turnover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dise, Craig A.; Clark, James M.; Lambersten, Christian J.; Goodman, David B. P.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of hyperbaric hyperoxia on the acylation of membrane phospholipid was studied by measuring the rates of activation of exogenous tritiated oleic acid to acyl thioester and of transesterification of the thioester into membrane phospholipids in intact human erythrocytes obtained 1 h after an exposure of the subjects to a hyperbaric oxygen atmosphere (3.5 h, 100 pct O2, 3 ATA). Exposure to pure oxygen was found to inhibit both the acylation and transesterification reactions by more than 30 percent, with partial recovery detected 24 h later. On the other hand, no rate changes were observed when isolated membranes from the same batches of cells were used in similar experiments. It is suggested that the decrease in the incorporation of tritiated oleic acid after hyperbaric hyperoxia may reflect an early event in the pathogenesis of oxygen-induced cellular injury and that it may be a useful index for the assessment of the tolerance of tissues to hyperoxia.

  16. Loss of growth inhibitory effects of retinoic acid in human breast cancer cells following long-term exposure to retinoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, R; Darbre, P D

    2000-01-01

    Although retinoids are known to be inhibitory to breast cancer cell growth, a key remaining question is whether they would remain effective if administered long-term. We describe here the long-term effects of all-trans retinoic acid on two oestrogen-dependent human breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and ZR-75-1. Although both cell lines were growth inhibited by retinoic acid in the short-term in either the absence or the presence of oestradiol, prolonged culture with 1??M all-trans retinoic acid resulted in the cells acquiring resistance to the growth inhibitory effects of retinoic acid. Time courses showed that oestrogen deprivation of the cell lines resulted in upregulation of the basal non-oestrogen stimulated growth rate such that cells learned to grow at the same rate without as with oestradiol, but the cells remained growth inhibited by retinoic acid throughout. Addition of 1??M all-trans retinoic acid to steroid deprivation conditions resulted in reproducible loss of growth response to both retinoic acid and oestradiol, although the time courses were separable in that loss of growth response to retinoic acid preceded that of oestradiol. Loss of growth response to retinoic acid did not involve loss of receptors, ER as measured by steroid binding assay or RAR? as measured by Northern blotting. Function of the receptors was retained in terms of the ability of both oestradiol and retinoic acid to upregulate pS2 gene expression, but there was reduced ability to upregulate transiently transfected ERE- and RRE-linked reporter genes. Despite the accepted role of IGFBP3 in retinoic acid-mediated growth inhibition, progression to retinoic acid resistance occurred irrespective of level of IGFBP3, which remained high in the resistant MCF7 cells. Measurement of AP1 activity showed that the two cell lines had markedly different basal AP1 activities, but that progression to resistance was accompanied in both cases by a lost ability of retinoic acid to reduce AP1 activity. These results warn of potential resistance which could arise on long-term treatment with retinoic acid in a clinical situation and echo the problems of progression to endocrine resistance. It seems that whatever the constraints imposed on growth, these cells have a remarkable ability to escape from growth inhibition. However, the ability of retinoic acid to delay progression to oestrogen resistance is encouraging for endocrine therapy, and the concentration-dependence of retinoic acid resistance suggests that progression is not absolute but could be manipulated by dose. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11027432

  17. Primary Structure of Somatostatin, A Hypothalamic Peptide That Inhibits the Secretion of Pituitary Growth Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Burgus, Roger; Ling, Nicholas; Butcher, Madalyn; Guillemin, Roger

    1973-01-01

    Somatostatin, a peptide isolated from ovine hypothalamic tissue that inhibits the release of radioimmunoassayable growth hormone in vitro from rat or human pituitary cells or in vivo in rats, has the primary structure [Formula: see text]. The structure was established by submitting the carboxymethylated peptide, the carboxymethylated tryptic digest, and the chymotryptic digest of the peptide to Edman degradation. Degradation products were analyzed by amino-acid analysis, as well as in some cases by determination of N-termini by dansylation or by determination of phenylthiohydantoins by mass spectrometry. PMID:4514982

  18. Inhibition of the Thioesterase Activity of Human Fatty Acid Synthase by 1,4- and 9,10-Diones

    PubMed Central

    Odens, Herman; Lowther, Todd; Kridel, Steven; Watts, Laura; Filipponi, Lauren; Schmitt, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is the enzyme that synthesizes fatty acids de novo in human cells. Although FASN is generally expressed at low levels in most normal tissues, its expression is highly upregulated in many cancers. Consistent with this notion, inhibition of FASN activity has demonstrated potential to halt proliferation and induce cell death in vitro and to block tumor growth in vivo. Consequently, FASN is widely recognized as a valuable therapeutic target. In this report, we describe a variety of 1,4-quinones and 9,10-anthraquinones, including several natural compounds and some newly synthesized compounds, that potently inhibit the thioesterase (TE) domain of FASN. Inhibition of recombinant TE activity, inhibition of cellular FASN, and cytotoxicity in human prostate cancer cell lines and normal fibroblasts, is shown for the most potent inhibitors. Collectively, the data illustrate the novel inhibitory capacity of the 1,4-quinone and 9,10-anthraquinone pharmacophores against FASN. PMID:25177021

  19. Boric Acid Inhibits Germination and Colonization of Saprolegnia Spores In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shimaa E.; Thoen, Even; Evensen, Øystein; Skaar, Ida

    2014-01-01

    Saprolegnia infections cause severe economic losses among freshwater fish and their eggs. The banning of malachite green increased the demand for finding effective alternative treatments to control the disease. In the present study, we investigated the ability of boric acid to control saprolegniosis in salmon eggs and yolk sac fry. Under in vitro conditions, boric acid was able to decrease Saprolegnia spore activity and mycelial growth in all tested concentrations above 0.2 g/L, while complete inhibition of germination and growth was observed at a concentration of 0.8 g/L. In in vivo experiments using Atlantic salmon eyed eggs, saprolegniosis was controlled by boric acid at concentrations ranging from 0.2–1.4 g/L during continuous exposure, and at 1.0–4.0 g/L during intermittent exposure. The same effect was observed on salmon yolk sac fry exposed continuously to 0.5 g/L boric acid during the natural outbreak of saprolegniosis. During the experiments no negative impact with regard to hatchability and viability was observed in either eggs or fry, which indicate safety of use at all tested concentrations. The high hatchability and survival rates recorded following the in vivo testing suggest that boric acid is a candidate for prophylaxis and control of saprolegniosis. PMID:24699283

  20. Drugs Which Inhibit Osteoclast Function Suppress Tumor Growth through Calcium Reduction in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Liao, Jinhui; Park, Serk In; Koh, Amy J; Sadler, William D; Pienta, Kenneth J; Rosol, Thomas J; McCauley, Laurie K

    2011-01-01

    Prostate carcinoma frequently metastasizes to bone where the microenvironment facilitates its growth. Inhibition of bone resorption is effective in reducing tumor burden and bone destruction in prostate cancer. However, whether drugs that inhibit osteoclast function inhibit tumor growth independent of inhibition of bone resorption is unclear. Calcium is released during bone resorption and the calcium sensing receptor is an important regulator of cancer cell proliferation. The goal of this investigation was to elucidate the role of calcium released during bone resorption and to determine the impact of drugs which suppress bone resorption on tumor growth in bone. To compare tumor growth in a skeletal versus non-skeletal site, equal numbers of canine prostate cancer cells expressing luciferase (ACE-1luc) prostate cancer cells were inoculated into a simple collagen matrix, neonatal mouse vertebrae (vossicles), human de-proteinized bone, or a mineralized collagen matrix. Implants were placed subcutaneously into athymic mice. Luciferase activity was used to track tumor growth weekly and at one month tumors were dissected for histologic analysis. Luciferase activity and tumor size were greater in vossicles, de-proteinized bone and mineralized collagen matrix versus non-mineralized collagen implants. The human osteoblastic prostate carcinoma cell line C4-2b also grew better in a mineral rich environment with a greater proliferation of C4-2b cells reflected by Ki-67 staining. Zoledronic acid (ZA), a bisphosphonate, and recombinant OPG-Fc, a RANKL inhibitor, were administered to mice bearing vertebral implants (vossicles) containing ACE-1 osteoblastic prostate cancer cells. Vossicles or collagen matrices were seeded with ACE-1luc cells subcutaneously in athymic mice (2 vossicles, 2 collagen implants/mouse). Mice received ZA (5?g/mouse, twice/week), (OPG-Fc at 10mg/kg, 3 times/week) or vehicle, and luciferase activity was measured weekly. Histologic analysis of the tumors, vossicles and endogenous bones and serum biochemistry were performed. Antiresorptive administration was associated with decreased serum TRAP5b and reduced osteoclast numbers, increased tibia and vossicle bone areas. ZA significantly decreased bone marrow calcium concentrations without affecting serum calcium. ZA and OPG-Fc significantly inhibited tumor growth in bone but not in collagen implants. In conclusion, the inhibitory effects of ZA or OPG-Fc on prostate tumor growth in bone are mediated via blocking bone resorption and calcium release from bone. PMID:21419883

  1. 3-Aminothymidine inhibits growth of cultured human T-cell acute lymphoblastoid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ashida, N; Asano, S; Kohda, K

    1994-01-01

    N3-Aminated derivatives of thymidine, deoxyuridine and deoxycytidine were synthesized and their cell growth inhibition activity was tested using two cultured human cell lines, CCRF-HSB-2 and KB. Among the compounds tested, 3-aminothymidine showed growth inhibition activity against CCRF-HSB-2 cells and inhibited DNA synthesis in these cells. PMID:7847851

  2. Inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase by tricyclic antidepressants and analogons.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Nadine; Sharma, Deepa; Gulbins, Erich; Becker, Katrin Anne; Edelmann, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, has been used in the clinic to treat a number of disorders, in particular major depression and neuropathic pain. In the 1970s the ability of tricyclic antidepressants to inhibit acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) was discovered. The enzyme ASM catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide. ASM and ceramide were shown to play a crucial role in a wide range of diseases, including cancer, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and major depression, as well as viral (e.g., measles virus) and bacterial (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) infections. Ceramide molecules may act in these diseases by the alteration of membrane biophysics, the self-association of ceramide molecules within the cell membrane and the ultimate formation of larger ceramide-enriched membrane domains/platforms. These domains were shown to serve the clustering of certain receptors such as CD95 and may also act in the above named diseases. The potential to block the generation of ceramide by inhibiting the ASM has opened up new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of these conditions. Since amitriptyline is one of the longest used clinical drugs and side effects are well studied, it could potentially become a cheap and easily accessible medication for patients suffering from these diseases. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of current in vitro and in vivo studies and clinical trials utilizing amitriptyline to inhibit ASM and contemplate possible future applications of the drug. PMID:25228885

  3. Hypernegative supercoiling inhibits growth by causing RNA degradation.

    PubMed

    Baaklini, Imad; Usongo, Valentine; Nolent, Flora; Sanscartier, Patrick; Hraiky, Chadi; Drlica, Karl; Drolet, Marc

    2008-11-01

    Transcription-induced hypernegative supercoiling is a hallmark of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (topA) mutants. However, its physiological significance has remained unclear. Temperature downshift of a mutant yielded transient growth arrest and a parallel increase in hypernegative supercoiling that was more severe with lower temperature. Both properties were alleviated by overexpression of RNase HI. While ribosomes in extracts showed normal activity when obtained during growth arrest, mRNA on ribosomes was reduced for fis and shorter for crp, polysomes were much less abundant relative to monosomes, and protein synthesis rate dropped, as did the ratio of large to small proteins. Altered processing and degradation of lacA and fis mRNA was also observed. These data are consistent with truncation of mRNA during growth arrest. These effects were not affected by a mutation in the gene encoding RNase E, indicating that this endonuclease is not involved in the abnormal mRNA processing. They were also unaffected by spectinomycin, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, which argued against induction of RNase activity. In vitro transcription revealed that R-loop formation is more extensive on hypernegatively supercoiled templates. These results allow us, for the first time, to present a model by which hypernegative supercoiling inhibits growth. In this model, the introduction of hypernegative supercoiling by gyrase facilitates degradation of nascent RNA; overproduction of RNase HI limits the accumulation of hypernegative supercoiling, thereby preventing extensive RNA degradation. PMID:18790862

  4. Unsaturated Fatty Acids Stimulate Tumor Growth through Stabilization of ?-Catenin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeonwoo; Rodriguez-Navas, Carlos; Kollipara, Rahul K; Kapur, Payal; Pedrosa, Ivan; Brugarolas, James; Kittler, Ralf; Ye, Jin

    2015-10-20

    Some cancer cells exhibit elevated levels of free fatty acids (FAs) as well as high levels of ?-catenin, a transcriptional co-activator that promotes their growth. Here, we link these two phenomena by showing that unsaturated FAs inhibit degradation of ?-catenin. Unsaturated FAs bind to the UAS domain of Fas-associated factor 1 (FAF1), a protein known to bind ?-catenin, accelerating its degradation. FA binding disrupts the FAF1/?-catenin complex, preventing proteasomal degradation of ubiquitinated ?-catenin. This mechanism for stabilization of ?-catenin differs from that of Wnt signaling, which blocks ubiquitination of ?-catenin. In clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cells, unsaturated FAs stimulated cell proliferation through stabilization of ?-catenin. In tissues from biopsies of human ccRCC, elevated levels of unsaturated FAs correlated with increased levels of ?-catenin. Thus, targeting FAF1 may be an effective approach to treat cancers that exhibit elevated FAs and ?-catenin. PMID:26456834

  5. Acyclic sesquiterpenes released by Candida albicans inhibit growth of dermatophytes.

    PubMed

    Brasch, Jochen; Horter, Felix; Fritsch, Daniel; Beck-Jendroschek, Vera; Tröger, Armin; Francke, Wittko

    2014-01-01

    It is unresolved as to whether fungi that share a common skin habitat might in principal interact. In in vitro screening tests with Candida albicans, Trichophytum rubrum and other common dermatophytes, we found C. albicans releases volatile compounds that inhibit growth of the dermatophytes. By applying (enantioselective) gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry we identified 8 compounds among which stereochemically pure (3R,6E)-2,3-dihydrofarnesol (R-DHF) and (2E,6E)-farnesol (F-ol) were the main components. Synthetic R-DHF and its enantiomer, (3S,6E)-2,3-dihydrofarnesol (S-DHF), as well as F-ol were tested for their capacity to inhibit growth of dermatophytes in microtiter-plate assays over 62 h. All three compounds showed significant and concentration-dependent, to a certain extent even species-specific, inhibitory effects on T. rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, Microsporum canis and Epidermophyton floccosum. In general, S-DHF and F-ol had a pronounced effect on the dermatophytes, similar to or even stronger than that of fluconazole. E. floccosum was completely suppressed by 12.5??g/ml dihydrofarnesol, as was the inhibition caused by 50??g/ml fluconazole. Similarly, S-DHF- was more active against T. rubrum than fluconazole. To the best of our knowledge, 2,3-dihydrofarnesol has not yet been described as a volatile generated by microorganisms, and its inhibitory effect on dermatophytes is new to science. However, the relevance of this compound in interfungal interference in situ is unknown. In contrast, farnesol is a well-known semiochemical of C. albicans with intraspecific effects and a clear impact on other microorganisms. Mutual intermicrobial communication based on fungal volatiles therefore appears to be an exciting field for future investigations. PMID:23902158

  6. Effect of soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition on epoxyeicosatrienoic acid metabolism in human blood vessels

    E-print Network

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    Effect of soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition on epoxyeicosatrienoic acid metabolism in human on epoxyeicosatrienoic acid metabolism in human blood vessels. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 287: H2412­H2420, 2004 epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibition on epoxyei- cosatrienoic acid (EET) metabolism in intact human blood

  7. Boric acid inhibits embryonic histone deacetylases: A suggested mechanism to explain boric acid-related teratogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Di Renzo, Francesca; Cappelletti, Graziella; Broccia, Maria L.; Giavini, Erminio; Menegola, Elena . E-mail: elena.menegola@unimi.it

    2007-04-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) control gene expression by changing histonic as well as non histonic protein conformation. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) are considered to be among the most promising drugs for epigenetic treatment for cancer. Recently a strict relationship between histone hyperacetylation in specific tissues of mouse embryos exposed to two HDACi (valproic acid and trichostatin A) and specific axial skeleton malformations has been demonstrated. The aim of this study is to verify if boric acid (BA), that induces in rodents malformations similar to those valproic acid and trichostatin A-related, acts through similar mechanisms: HDAC inhibition and histone hyperacetylation. Pregnant mice were treated intraperitoneally with a teratogenic dose of BA (1000 mg/kg, day 8 of gestation). Western blot analysis and immunostaining were performed with anti hyperacetylated histone 4 (H4) antibody on embryos explanted 1, 3 or 4 h after treatment and revealed H4 hyperacetylation at the level of somites. HDAC enzyme assay was performed on embryonic nuclear extracts. A significant HDAC inhibition activity (compatible with a mixed type partial inhibition mechanism) was evident with BA. Kinetic analyses indicate that BA modifies substrate affinity by a factor {alpha} = 0.51 and maximum velocity by a factor {beta} = 0.70. This work provides the first evidence for HDAC inhibition by BA and suggests such a molecular mechanism for the induction of BA-related malformations.

  8. Dynamic light scattering study of inhibition of nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite crystals by osteopontin.

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, John R; Goiko, Maria; Mozaffari, Maryam; Bator, Daniel; Dauphinee, Ron L; Liao, Yinyin; Flemming, Roberta L; Bramble, Michael S; Hunter, Graeme K; Goldberg, Harvey A

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of isoforms of osteopontin (OPN) on the nucleation and growth of crystals from a supersaturated solution of calcium and phosphate ions. Dynamic light scattering is used to monitor the size of the precipitating particles and to provide information about their concentration. At the ion concentrations studied, immediate precipitation was observed in control experiments with no osteopontin in the solution, and the size of the precipitating particles increased steadily with time. The precipitate was identified as hydroxyapatite by X-ray diffraction. Addition of native osteopontin (nOPN) extracted from rat bone caused a delay in the onset of precipitation and reduced the number of particles that formed, but the few particles that did form grew to a larger size than in the absence of the protein. Recombinant osteopontin (rOPN), which lacks phosphorylation, caused no delay in initial calcium phosphate precipitation but severely slowed crystal growth, suggesting that rOPN inhibits growth but not nucleation. rOPN treated with protein kinase CK2 to phosphorylate the molecule (p-rOPN) produced an effect similar to that of nOPN, but at higher protein concentrations and to a lesser extent. These results suggest that phosphorylations are critical to OPN's ability to inhibit nucleation, whereas the growth of the hydroxyapatite crystals is effectively controlled by the highly acidic OPN polypeptide. This work also demonstrates that dynamic light scattering can be a powerful tool for delineating the mechanism of protein modulation of mineral formation. PMID:23457612

  9. Specificity of growth inhibition of melanoma by 4-hydroxyanisole

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, G.A.; Nathanson, L.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study using human melanoma (NEL-MI), rat hepatoma (Fu5-5), and human kidney (293-31) cell lines was undertaken in order to evaluate the antitumor activity of 4-hydroxyanisole (4-OHA) in vitro. Prior reports have indicated highly specific antitumor activity of 4-OHA against melanoma cells in vitro. This specific antitumor activity has been proposed to be due to the oxidation of 4-OHA by tyrosinase to cytotoxic oxidation products. Dose-dependent cytotoxicity was observed when cells were cultured for 72 h in the presence of 4-OHA. At 100 microM, 4-OHA produced growth inhibition of 62%, 32%, and 55% in melanoma, hepatoma, and kidney cell lines, respectively. No effect was seen at 10 microM 4-OHA. 1,000 microM 4-OHA produced 100% kill. Tyrosinase activity was detected only in melanoma cells. The effect of 100 microM 4-OHA on the incorporation of 3H DNA precursors in melanoma, hepatoma, and kidney cells was also studied. Thymidine incorporation was inhibited in all three cell lines at the lowest cell density tested, with the greatest inhibition seen on melanoma cells. As cell density increased, the effect of 4-OHA on thymidine incorporation decreased. With respect to RNA synthesis, 4-OHA significantly reduced the incorporation of uridine in all three cell lines, with the greatest effect in melanoma cells. Cell density also affected the inhibition of uridine incorporation, but to a lesser extent than that observed on thymidine incorporation. The effect of 4-OHA on leucine incorporation was modest and uninfluenced by cell density. Thus, cytotoxicity of 4-OHA may involve two different mechanisms.

  10. Corosolic Acid Inhibits Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Migration by Targeting the VEGFR2/Src/FAK Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chung-Yu; Wang, Ying-Ren; Lin, Hsuan-Yuan; Lu, Shao-Chun; Lin, Jung-Yaw

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of VEGFR2 activity has been proposed as an important strategy for the clinical treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we identified corosolic acid (CA), which exists in the root of Actinidia chinensis, as having a significant anti-cancer effect on HCC cells. We found that CA inhibits VEGFR2 kinase activity by directly interacting with the ATP binding pocket. CA down-regulates the VEGFR2/Src/FAK/cdc42 axis, subsequently decreasing F-actin formation and migratory activity in vitro. In an in vivo model, CA exhibited an effective dose (5 mg/kg/day) on tumor growth. We further demonstrate that CA has a synergistic effect with sorafenib within a wide range of concentrations. In conclusion, this research elucidates the effects and molecular mechanism for CA on HCC cells and suggests that CA could be a therapeutic or adjuvant strategy for patients with aggressive HCC. PMID:25978354

  11. Aspirin delays mesothelioma growth by inhibiting HMGB1-mediated tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H; Pellegrini, L; Napolitano, A; Giorgi, C; Jube, S; Preti, A; Jennings, C J; De Marchis, F; Flores, E G; Larson, D; Pagano, I; Tanji, M; Powers, A; Kanodia, S; Gaudino, G; Pastorino, S; Pass, H I; Pinton, P; Bianchi, M E; Carbone, M

    2015-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an inflammatory molecule that has a critical role in the initiation and progression of malignant mesothelioma (MM). Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA) is the most widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that reduces the incidence, metastatic potential and mortality of many inflammation-induced cancers. We hypothesized that ASA may exert anticancer properties in MM by abrogating the carcinogenic effects of HMGB1. Using HMGB1-secreting and -non-secreting human MM cell lines, we determined whether aspirin inhibited the hallmarks of HMGB1-induced MM cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Our data demonstrated that ASA and its metabolite, salicylic acid (SA), inhibit motility, migration, invasion and anchorage-independent colony formation of MM cells via a novel HMGB1-mediated mechanism. ASA/SA, at serum concentrations comparable to those achieved in humans taking therapeutic doses of aspirin, and BoxA, a specific inhibitor of HMGB1, markedly reduced MM growth in xenograft mice and significantly improved survival of treated animals. The effects of ASA and BoxA were cyclooxygenase-2 independent and were not additive, consistent with both acting via inhibition of HMGB1 activity. Our findings provide a rationale for the well documented, yet poorly understood antitumorigenic activity of aspirin, which we show proceeds via HMGB1 inhibition. Moreover, the use of BoxA appears to allow a more efficient HMGB1 targeting while eluding the known gastrointestinal side effects of ASA. Our findings are directly relevant to MM. Given the emerging importance of HMGB1 and its tumor-promoting functions in many cancer types, and of aspirin in cancer prevention and therapy, our investigation is poised to provide broadly applicable information. PMID:26068794

  12. Selective growth inhibition of a human malignant melanoma cell line by sesame oil in vitro.

    PubMed

    Smith, D E; Salerno, J W

    1992-06-01

    Ayurveda, an ancient and comprehensive system of natural medicine, recommends regular topical application to the skin of sesame oil, above all other oils, as a health-promoting procedure. We examined the effect of sesame oil and several other vegetable oils and their major component fatty acids on the proliferation rate of human normal and malignant melanocytes growing at similar rates in serum-free media. We found that sesame and safflower oils, both of which contain large amounts of linoleate in triglyceride form, selectively inhibited malignant melanoma growth over normal melanocytes whereas coconut, olive and mineral oils, which contain little or no linoleate as triglyceride, did not. These oils were tested at a range of 10-300 micrograms/ml. We found that of the fatty acids tested, only linoleic acid was selectively inhibitory while palmitic and oleic were not. These fatty acids were tested in the range of 3-100 micrograms/ml. These results suggest that certain vegetable oils rich in linoleic acid, such as the sesame oil, recommended for topical use by Ayurveda, may contain selective antineoplastic properties which are similar to those demonstrated for essential polyunsaturated fatty acids and their metabolites. This suggests that whole vegetable oils may have potential clinical usefulness. PMID:1502251

  13. Correlative Studies on Plant Growth and Metabolism. III. Metabolic Changes Accompanying Inhibition of the Longitudinal Growth of Stem and Root by Kinetin

    PubMed Central

    Banerji, D.; Laloraya, M. M.

    1967-01-01

    Kinetin-induced expansion of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) cotyledons and inhibition of root are accompanied by parallel changes in protein nitrogen. However, during its inhibition of the longitudinal growth and water uptake of hypocotyl and pea (Pisum sativum) epicotyl sections kinetin markedly stimulates protein synthesis. Kinetin seems to separate auxin induced effects on protein synthesis and water uptake and indicates that water uptake and protein synthesis may not necessarily be correlated. In contrast to gibberellic acid, kinetin restricts in lettuce seedlings, the mobilization of nitrogen reserves from the cotyledons, and kinetin induced growth is accompanied by a high protein nitrogen/soluble-nitrogen ratio which is characteristic of growth in light. Growth in light may be under the dominant control of kinins. PMID:16656545

  14. Alpha lipoic acid inhibits proliferation and epithelial mesenchymal transition of thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Min Ji; Kim, Won Gu; Lim, Seonhee; Choi, Hyun-Jeung; Sim, Soyoung; Kim, Tae Yong; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2016-01-01

    The naturally occurring short-chain fatty acid, ?-lipoic acid (ALA) is a powerful antioxidant which is clinically used for treatment of diabetic neuropathy. Recent studies suggested the possibility of ALA as a potential anti-cancer agent, because it could activate adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibit transforming growth factor-? (TGF?) pathway. In this study, we evaluate the effects of ALA on thyroid cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We performed in vitro cell proliferation analysis using BCPAP, HTH-83, CAL-62 and FTC-133 cells. ALA suppressed thyroid cancer cell proliferation through activation of AMPK and subsequent down-regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-S6 signaling pathway. Low-dose ALA, which had minimal effects on cell proliferation, also decreased cell migration and invasion of BCPAP, CAL-62 and HTH-83 cells. ALA inhibited epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) evidently by increase of E-cadherin and decreases of activated ?-catenin, vimentin, snail, and twist in these cells. ALA suppressed TGF? production and inhibited induction of p-Smad2 and twist by TGF?1 or TGF?2. These findings indicate that ALA reduces cancer cell migration and invasion through suppression of TGF? production and inhibition of TGF? signaling pathways in thyroid cancer cells. ALA also significantly suppressed tumor growth in mouse xenograft model using BCPAP and FTC-133 cells. This is the first study to show anti-cancer effect of ALA on thyroid cancer cells. ALA could be a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of advanced thyroid cancer, possibly as an adjuvant therapy with other systemic therapeutic agents. PMID:26463583

  15. {2-[1-(3-Methoxycarbonylmethyl-1H-indol-2-yl)-1-methyl-ethyl]-1H-indol-3-yl}-acetic Acid Methyl Ester Inhibited Hepatocellular Carcinoma Growth in Bel-7402 Cells and Its Resistant Variants by Activation of NOX4 and SIRT3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ye; Wang, Wenjing; Xu, Xiaoxue; Sun, Shiyue; Xu, Xiaoyu; Qu, Xian-jun

    2015-01-01

    {2-[1-(3-Methoxycarbonylmethyl-1H-indol-2-yl)-1-methyl-ethyl]-1H-indol-3-yl}-acetic acid methyl ester (MIAM) is a novel indole compound, which possessed high efficacy against many cancers xenografted in mice without obvious toxicity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of MIAM on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) Bel-7402 cells and its resistant variants Bel-7402/5FU. MIAM inhibited the growth of HCC more potent in Bel-7402/5FU cells than its parent cells. MIAM increased cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, induced cell apoptosis, and arrested cell cycle in G0/G1 phase. MIAM might exert its action on Bel-7402/5FU cells through activation of NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4)/p22phox, Sirtuin3 (SIRT3)/SOD2, and SIRT3/p53/p21Waf1/Cip pathways. MIAM might inhibit HCC growth through the modulation of SIRT3. When SIRT3 was silenced, the inhibitory effect of MIAM on Bel-7402/5FU was lowered, showing the characteristic of resistance against MIAM, whereas Bel-7402/5FU cells with high expression of SIRT3 by SIRT3 adenovirus infection demonstrated the high sensitivity to MIAM. These results suggested that MIAM might exert its action against Bel-7402/5FU growth through upregulation of SIRT3. We suggested that MIAM might be a promising candidate compound which could develop as a potent anticancer agent targeting NOX4 and SIRT3 activation. PMID:25961022

  16. Blockade of nonhormonal fibroblast growth factors by FP-1039 inhibits growth of multiple types of cancer.

    PubMed

    Harding, Thomas C; Long, Li; Palencia, Servando; Zhang, Hongbing; Sadra, Ali; Hestir, Kevin; Patil, Namrata; Levin, Anita; Hsu, Amy W; Charych, Deborah; Brennan, Thomas; Zanghi, James; Halenbeck, Robert; Marshall, Shannon A; Qin, Minmin; Doberstein, Stephen K; Hollenbaugh, Diane; Kavanaugh, W Michael; Williams, Lewis T; Baker, Kevin P

    2013-03-27

    The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) pathway promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis in many solid tumors. Although there has long been interest in FGF pathway inhibitors, development has been complicated: An effective FGF inhibitor must block the activity of multiple mitogenic FGF ligands but must spare the metabolic hormone FGFs (FGF-19, FGF-21, and FGF-23) to avoid unacceptable toxicity. To achieve these design requirements, we engineered a soluble FGF receptor 1 Fc fusion protein, FP-1039. FP-1039 binds tightly to all of the mitogenic FGF ligands, inhibits FGF-stimulated cell proliferation in vitro, blocks FGF- and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis in vivo, and inhibits in vivo growth of a broad range of tumor types. FP-1039 antitumor response is positively correlated with RNA levels of FGF2, FGF18, FGFR1c, FGFR3c, and ETV4; models with genetic aberrations in the FGF pathway, including FGFR1-amplified lung cancer and FGFR2-mutated endometrial cancer, are particularly sensitive to FP-1039-mediated tumor inhibition. FP-1039 does not appreciably bind the hormonal FGFs, because these ligands require a cell surface co-receptor, klotho or ?-klotho, for high-affinity binding and signaling. Serum calcium and phosphate levels, which are regulated by FGF-23, are not altered by administration of FP-1039. By selectively blocking nonhormonal FGFs, FP-1039 treatment confers antitumor efficacy without the toxicities associated with other FGF pathway inhibitors. PMID:23536011

  17. OCCURRENCE OF INHIBITORY COMPOUNDS IN SPENT GROWTH MEDIA THAT INTERFERE WITH ACID-TOLERANCE OF ENTERIC PATHOGENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the acid-tolerance ability of enteric human pathogens is critical in determining microbial food safety and the associated risk. We have discovered naturally occurring compounds in the spent growth media, which inhibit the acid tolerance ability of several enteric human pathogens when ...

  18. Olive oil compounds inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Lamy, Sylvie Ouanouki, Amira; Béliveau, Richard; Desrosiers, Richard R.

    2014-03-10

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) triggers crucial signaling processes that regulate tumor angiogenesis and, therefore, represents an attractive target for the development of novel anticancer therapeutics. Several epidemiological studies have confirmed that abundant consumption of foods from plant origin is associated with reduced risk of developing cancers. In the Mediterranean basin, the consumption of extra virgin olive oil is an important constituent of the diet. Compared to other vegetable oils, the presence of several phenolic antioxidants in olive oil is believed to prevent the occurrence of a variety of pathological processes, such as cancer. While the strong antioxidant potential of these molecules is well characterized, their antiangiogenic activities remain unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate whether tyrosol (Tyr), hydroxytyrosol (HT), taxifolin (Tax), oleuropein (OL) and oleic acid (OA), five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil, can affect in vitro angiogenesis. We found that HT, Tax and OA were the most potent angiogenesis inhibitors through their inhibitory effect on specific autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR-2 (Tyr951, Tyr1059, Tyr1175 and Tyr1214) leading to the inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) signaling. Inhibition of VEGFR-2 by these olive oil compounds significantly reduced VEGF-induced EC proliferation and migration as well as their morphogenic differentiation into capillary-like tubular structures in Matrigel. Our study demonstrates that HT, Tax and OA are novel and potent inhibitors of the VEGFR-2 signaling pathway. These findings emphasize the chemopreventive properties of olive oil and highlight the importance of nutrition in cancer prevention. - Highlights: • We investigated five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil on angiogenesis. • Hydroxytyrosol, taxifolin and oleic acid are the best angiogenesis inhibitors. • Olive oil compounds affect endothelial cell functions essential for angiogenesis. • Olive oil compounds inhibit specific autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR-2. • Hydroxytyrosol, taxifolin and oleic acid inhibit VEGFR-2 signaling pathway.

  19. Fucoidan inhibits activation and receptor binding of transforming growth factor-?1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hee; Lee, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Mee Jeong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Yang, Won Seok

    2013-03-01

    Fucoidan, a sulfated, fucose-rich polysaccharide isolated from marine brown algae, has antifibrotic effects. We investigated the biologic effects of interactions of fucoidan with transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1) and latent TGF-?1 (LTGF-?1). TGF-?1 bound to fucoidan was unable to interact with its receptor. In agreement with this, fucoidan attenuated the cellular effect of TGF-?1 as measured by phosphorylation of Smad2. Binding of fucoidan rendered LTGF-?1 resistant to activation as follows. Fucoidan inhibited furin-like proprotein convertase-mediated activation of platelet LTGF-?1 without suppression of the enzyme. In addition, acid- or heat-activation of small recombinant LTGF-?1 and acid-activation of large LTGF-?1 in cultured cell supernatant were also inhibited by fucoidan. Fucoidan is a mixture of polysaccharides of different sizes. As molecular weight of fucoidan increases, it had more inhibitory effects on TGF-?1 and LTGF-?1. In conclusion, inhibitions of LTGF-?1 activation and TGF-?1 receptor binding by fucoidan may in part account for its antifibrotic effects. PMID:23348228

  20. Bioactive compound from Pseudomonas synxantha inhibits the growth of Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Koushik; Mandal, Santanu; Mukhopadhyay, Balaram; Mandal, Nitai Chandra; Sil, Alok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a dreaded disease and the current situation demands new anti-tubercular agent(s) for the management of public health. Towards this direction, we obtained a contaminant organism on a Mycobacterium smegmatis lawn having growth inhibitory activity against the later. In the current study, efforts were targeted to identify this organism and characterize the bioactive compound from this isolate that inhibited the growth of Mycobacteria. The result revealed that the organism is a strain of Pseudomonas synxantha. Biophysical analyses including (1)H and (13)C NMR, ESI-mass spectroscopy, FTIR showed that the bioactive compound is a long chain aliphatic hydrocarbon with a terminal alyl bond and intermediate electronegative atom. The compound exhibited strong growth inhibitory activities against M. smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains H37Ra, H37Rv and BCG. Further experiments showed that both P. synxantha and its secretory metabolites are capable of inducing hemolysis of human blood. Thus the results of this study clearly indicate that the bioactive compound produced by P. Synxantha has biosurfactant activities as well as anti-myco-bacterial properties. PMID:24439826

  1. Methoxyacetic acid suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Keshab R; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Patel, Neil K; Lu, Hua; Zeng, Shelya X; Wang, Guangdi; Zhang, Changde; You, Zongbing

    2014-01-01

    Methoxyacetic acid (MAA) is a primary metabolite of ester phthalates that are used in production of consumer products and pharmaceutical products. MAA causes embryo malformation and spermatocyte death through inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Little is known about MAA’s effects on cancer cells. In this study, two immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell lines (RWPE-1 and pRNS-1-1) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, C4-2B, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with MAA at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle analysis were performed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR, Western blot, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses. We found that MAA dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. MAA-induced apoptosis was due to down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic gene baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis protein repeat containing 2 (BIRC2, also named cIAP1), leading to activation of caspases 7 and 3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. MAA-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and CDK2 expression at the late time. MAA up-regulated p21 expression through inhibition of HDAC activities, independently of p53/p63/p73. These findings demonstrate that MAA suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which suggests that MAA could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer. PMID:25606576

  2. Inhibition of Klebsiella pneumoniae Growth and Capsular Polysaccharide Biosynthesis by Fructus mume

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tien-Huang; Huang, Su-Hua; Wu, Chien-Chen; Liu, Hsin-Ho; Jinn, Tzyy-Rong; Chen, Yeh; Lin, Ching-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen isolated from liver abscess of diabetic patients in Asian countries. With the spread of multiple-drug-resistant K. pneumoniae, there is an increasing need for the development of alternative bactericides and approaches to block the production of bacterial virulence factors. Capsular polysaccharide (CPS), especially from the K1 and K2 serotypes, is considered the major determinant for K. pneumoniae virulence. We found that extracts of the traditional Chinese medicine Fructus mume inhibited the growth of K. pneumoniae strains of both serotypes. Furthermore, Fructus mume decreased the mucoviscosity, and the CPS produced in a dose-dependent manner, thus reducing bacterial resistance to serum killing. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that Fructus mume downregulated the mRNA levels of cps biosynthesis genes in both serotypes, possibly by increasing the intracellular iron concentration in K. pneumoniae. Moreover, citric acid, a major organic acid in Fructus mume extracts, was found to have an inhibitory effect on growth and CPS biosynthesis in K. pneumoniae. Taken together, our results indicate that Fructus mume not only possesses antibacterial activity against highly virulent K. pneumoniae strains but also inhibits bacterial CPS biosynthesis, thereby facilitating pathogen clearance by the host immune system. PMID:24062785

  3. Analysis of an ampicillin propyl ester prodrug which inhibits the growth of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bartzatt, Ronald; Malesa, Cynthia

    2002-10-01

    An ampicillin prodrug was synthesized by utilizing the chemical reaction of ampicillin with diazopropane (CH(3)CH(2)CHN(2)) in an organic solvent. The result is esterification of the carboxylic acid functional group. The ampicillin prodrug is a solid that forms yellow crystals which are soluble in water and LB agarose media. The ampicillin prodrug was stable for more than 10 weeks when stored at < or = 0.0 degrees C. The prodrug has reduced hydrogen-bonding capability compared with the unmodified structure of ampicillin. Evaluation of the logP parameter (the octanol/water partition coefficient) indicates that the ampicillin prodrug (logP=1.773) has increased lipophilic characteristics relative to the unmodified ampicillin structure (logP=1.06). The lipophilic substituent constant for the esterification of the carboxylic acid is 0.713, a positive value which indicates that the substituent has a lipophilic nature. The ampicillin prodrug was solubilized into LB agarose media at a concentration of 0.228 mg/ml, and was found to induce 100% growth inhibition of an ampicillin-susceptible and streptomycin-resistant Escherichia coli strain (designated DH1), and induced greater than 30% growth inhibition of an ampicillin-resistant E. coli strain (designated PKK). Synthesis of this prodrug utilizing a diazoalkane was highly efficient, with no undesirable by-products being formed. PMID:12241549

  4. Ursolic acid and oleanolic acid from Eriobotrya fragrans inhibited the viability of A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Gao, Yongshun; Song, Gang; Lin, Shunquan

    2015-02-01

    Loquat {Eriobotrya japonica (Lindl.)}, a kind of Chinese herb, has many efficacies such as anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and curing chronic bronchitis. However, reports on the pharmacological action of wild loquat extract are limited. In this work, the A549 cell line was selected to study the inhibitory effect of ursolic acid and oleanolic acid (UA, OA) from the leaves of E. fragrans. Results showed that UA/OA inhibited A549 cell viability and induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner. The cell fraction in the G0/G1 phase dramatically increased under treatment with UA/OA. Data showed that UA activated the expression of PARP. UA and OA down-regulated MMP-2 and Bcl-2; on the contrary, they up-regulated Bid. This work demonstrated that UA/OA extracted from wild loquat leaves can significantly inhibit the viability of A549 cells. PMID:25920250

  5. Blocking Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Inhibits Tumor Growth, Lymphangiogenesis, and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Larrieu-Lahargue, Frédéric; Welm, Alana L.; Bouchecareilh, Marion; Alitalo, Kari; Li, Dean Y.; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Auguste, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast Growth Factor receptor (FGFR) activity plays crucial roles in tumor growth and patient survival. However, FGF (Fibroblast Growth Factor) signaling as a target for cancer therapy has been under-investigated compared to other receptor tyrosine kinases. Here, we studied the effect of FGFR signaling inhibition on tumor growth, metastasis and lymphangiogenesis by expressing a dominant negative FGFR (FGFR-2DN) in an orthotopic mouse mammary 66c14 carcinoma model. We show that FGFR-2DN-expressing 66c14 cells proliferate in vitro slower than controls. 66c14 tumor outgrowth and lung metastatic foci are reduced in mice implanted with FGFR-2DN-expressing cells, which also exhibited better overall survival. We found 66c14 cells in the lumen of tumor lymphatic vessels and in lymph nodes. FGFR-2DN-expressing tumors exhibited a decrease in VEGFR-3 (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3) or podoplanin-positive lymphatic vessels, an increase in isolated intratumoral lymphatic endothelial cells and a reduction in VEGF-C (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-C) mRNA expression. FGFs may act in an autocrine manner as the inhibition of FGFR signaling in tumor cells suppresses VEGF-C expression in a COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) or HIF1-? (hypoxia-inducible factor-1 ?) independent manner. FGFs may also act in a paracrine manner on tumor lymphatics by inducing expression of pro-lymphangiogenic molecules such as VEGFR-3, integrin ?9, prox1 and netrin-1. Finally, in vitro lymphangiogenesis is impeded in the presence of FGFR-2DN 66c14 cells. These data confirm that both FGF and VEGF signaling are necessary for the maintenance of vascular morphogenesis and provide evidence that targeting FGFR signaling may be an interesting approach to inhibit tumor lymphangiogenesis and metastatic spread. PMID:22761819

  6. Tumor cell growth inhibition by liposome-encapsulated aromatic polyamidines.

    PubMed

    Nastruzzi, C; Gambari, R; Menegatti, E; Walde, P; Luisi, P L

    1990-08-01

    Apart from its antiproteinase activity, the aromatic polyamidine TAPP-Br [the bromo derivative of 1,3-di-(p-amidinophenoxy)-2,2-bis-(p-amidinophenoxymethyl)propane (TAPP-H)] is able to inhibit the in vitro growth of a variety of tumor cell lines, including human melanoma, and breast and kidney carcinoma. We have now shown that TAPP-Br can efficiently be encapsulated into egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles. When incorporated into these liposomes, the inhibitory effect of TAPP-Br is significantly enhanced compared with that of the free drug. Based on these promising results, a proposal is made for the delivery of this antiproliferative agent to tumor cells by using liposomes as the vehicle. PMID:2231328

  7. Inhibition of norsolorinic acid accumulation to Aspergillus parasiticus by marine actinomycetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peisheng; Shi, Cuijuan; Shen, Jihong; Wang, Kai; Gao, Xiujun; Li, Ping

    2014-11-01

    Thirty-six strains of marine actinomycetes were isolated from a sample of marine sediment collected from the Yellow Sea and evaluated in terms of their inhibitory activity on the growth of Aspergillus parasiticus and the production of norsolorinic acid using dual culture plate assay and agar diffusion methods. Among them, three strains showed strong antifungal activity and were subsequently identified as Streptomyces sp. by 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. The supernatant from the fermentation of the MA01 strain was extracted sequentially with chloroform and ethyl acetate, and the activities of the extracts were determined by tip culture assay. The assay results show that both extracts inhibited mycelium growth and toxin production, and the inhibitory activities of the extracts increased as their concentrations increased. The results of this study suggest that marine actinomycetes are biologically important for the control of mycotoxins, and that these bacteria could be used as novel biopesticides against mycotoxins.

  8. Ferulic Acid Exerts Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Tumor Activity by Targeting Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1-Mediated Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang-Wei; Jiang, Jin-Song; Lu, Wei-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Most anti-angiogenic therapies currently being evaluated target the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway; however, the tumor vasculature can acquire resistance to VEGF-targeted therapy by shifting to other angiogenesis mechanisms. Therefore, other therapeutic agents that block non-VEGF angiogenic pathways need to be evaluated. Here, we identified ferulic acid as a novel fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) inhibitor and a novel agent with potential anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer activities. Ferulic acid demonstrated inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation in response to basic fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1). In ex vivo and in vivo angiogenesis assays, ferulic acid suppressed FGF1-induced microvessel sprouting of rat aortic rings and angiogenesis. To understand the underlying molecular basis, we examined the effects of ferulic acid on different molecular components and found that ferulic acid suppressed FGF1-triggered activation of FGFR1 and phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (Akt) signaling. Moreover, ferulic acid directly inhibited proliferation and blocked the PI3K-Akt pathway in melanoma cell. In vivo, using a melanoma xenograft model, ferulic acid showed growth-inhibitory activity associated with inhibition of angiogenesis. Taken together, our results indicate that ferulic acid targets the FGFR1-mediated PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, leading to the suppression of melanoma growth and angiogenesis. PMID:26473837

  9. Bile acid signaling pathways increase stability of Small Heterodimer Partner (SHP) by inhibiting ubiquitin–proteasomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Ji; Xiao, Zhen; Kanamaluru, Deepthi; Min, Gyesik; Yau, Peter M.; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Ellis, Ewa; Strom, Steve; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H. Eric; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2009-01-01

    Small Heterodimer Partner (SHP) inhibits activities of numerous transcription factors involved in diverse biological pathways. As an important metabolic regulator, SHP plays a key role in maintaining cholesterol and bile acid homeostasis by inhibiting cholesterol conversion to bile acids. While SHP gene induction by increased bile acids is well established, whether SHP activity is also modulated remains unknown. Here, we report surprising findings that SHP is a rapidly degraded protein via the ubiquitin–proteasomal pathway and that bile acids or bile acid-induced intestinal fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) increases stability of hepatic SHP by inhibiting proteasomal degradation in an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent manner. SHP was ubiquitinated at Lys122 and Lys123, and mutation of these sites altered its stability and repression activity. Tandem mass spectrometry revealed that upon bile acid treatment, SHP was phosphorylated at Ser26, within an ERK motif in SHP, and mutation of this site dramatically abolished SHP stability. Surprisingly, SHP stability was abnormally elevated in ob/ob mice and diet-induced obese mice. These results demonstrate an important role for regulation of SHP stability in bile acid signaling in normal conditions, and that abnormal stabilization of SHP may be associated with metabolic disorders, including obesity and diabetes. PMID:19390091

  10. Aspirin Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell and Tumor Growth and Downregulates Specificity Protein (Sp) Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Lee, Syng-Ook; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is highly effective for treating colon cancer patients postdiagnosis; however, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in colon cancer are not well defined. Aspirin and its major metabolite sodium salicylate induced apoptosis and decreased colon cancer cell growth and the sodium salt of aspirin also inhibited tumor growth in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. Colon cancer cell growth inhibition was accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and decreased expression of Sp-regulated gene products including bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, VEGFR1, cyclin D1, c-MET and p65 (NF?B). Moreover, we also showed by RNA interference that ?-catenin, an important target of aspirin in some studies, is an Sp-regulated gene. Aspirin induced nuclear caspase-dependent cleavage of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and this response was related to sequestration of zinc ions since addition of zinc sulfate blocked aspirin-mediated apoptosis and repression of Sp proteins. The results demonstrate an important underlying mechanism of action of aspirin as an anticancer agent and, based on the rapid metabolism of aspirin to salicylate in humans and the high salicylate/aspirin ratios in serum, it is likely that the anticancer activity of aspirin is also due to the salicylate metabolite. PMID:23110215

  11. Labdanolic acid methyl ester (LAME) exerts anti-inflammatory effects through inhibition of TAK-1 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Cuadrado, Irene; Estevez-Braun, Ana; Instituto Canario de Investigaciones del Cáncer ; Heras, Beatriz de las

    2012-01-01

    Labdane derivatives obtained from the diterpenoid labdanediol suppressed NO and PGE{sub 2} production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. However, mechanisms involved in these inhibitory effects are not elucidated. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathways involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of labdanolic acid methyl ester (LAME) in peritoneal macrophages and examined its therapeutic effect in a mouse endotoxic shock model. LAME reduced the production of NO and PGE{sub 2} in LPS-activated macrophages. This effect involved the inhibition of NOS-2 and COX-2 gene expression, acting at the transcription level. Examination of the effects of the diterpene on NF-?B signaling showed that LAME inhibits the phosphorylation of I?B? and I?B?, preventing their degradation and the nuclear translocation of the NF-?B p65 subunit. Moreover, inhibition of MAPK signaling was also observed. A further experiment revealed that LAME inhibited the phosphorylation of transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), an upstream signaling molecule required for IKK and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation. Inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-? and IP-10 were downregulated in the presence of this compound after stimulation with LPS. Additionally, LAME also improved survival in a mouse model of endotoxemia and reduced the circulatory levels of cytokines (IL-6, TNF-?). In conclusion, these results indicate that labdane diterpene LAME significantly attenuates the pro-inflammatory response induced by LPS both in vivo and in vitro. Highlights: ? LAME reduced the production of NO and PGE{sub 2} in LPS-activated macrophages. ? IL-6, TNF-? and IP-10 were also inhibited by LAME. ? Inhibition of TAK-1 activation is the mechanism involved in this process. ? LAME improved survival in a mouse model of endotoxemia. ? LAME reduced the circulatory levels of cytokines (IL-6, TNF-?).

  12. Combination Inhibition Activity of Nisin and Ethanol on the Growth Inhibition of Pathogenic Gram Negative Bacteria and Their Application as Disinfectant Solution.

    PubMed

    Phongphakdee, Komsan; Nitisinprasert, Sunee

    2015-10-01

    Nisin and ethanol have been used as antimicrobial agents in food industry. However, nisin alone could not inhibit the growth of gram-negative bacteria, except in combination with a chelating agent, EDTA, or organic acid. This research aimed to study the survival of Escherichia coli O157: H7, Salmonella Typhimurium TISTR 292 and Salmonella Enteritidis DMST 17368 after treatment with nisin at 100, 200, 300, 500, 800, or 1000 IU/mL and ethanol at 70%, 50%, 30%, 20%, or 10% (v/v) alone and in combination. None of all nisin concentrations could reduce the growth of target strains. While 20% ethanol (v/v) having no negative effect on human health, could slightly reduce the growth of target strains. However, the combination of nisin at 500, 800 or 1000 IU/mL and 20% ethanol displayed significant growth reduction at 15 min were below 1 log CFU/mL. Thus, the minimum inhibitory concentration of nisin and ethanol was 500 IU/mL and 20% (v/v), respectively. The release of fatty acid, genetic materials and scanning electron microscope suggested that nisin-ethanol treated cells have altered permeability causing bacterial growth inhibition. Comparison treatment of combined solution and commercial chloride based sanitizer were done for all target strains on stainless steel surface. Survivals of three target strains were below 1 log CFU/mL. The result suggested that combined solution of nisin and ethanol may be a beneficial sanitizer for food industry to inhibit the growth of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella sp. PMID:26409058

  13. Kohamaic acid A, a novel sesterterpenic acid, inhibits activities of DNA polymerases from deuterostomes.

    PubMed

    Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Murakami, Chikako; Yogi, Kentaro; Ueda, Katsuhiro; Ishidoh, Tomomi; Takemura, Masaharu; Perpelescu, Marinela; Suzuki, Motoshi; Oshige, Masahiko; Yamaguchi, Toyofumi; Saneyoshi, Mineo; Yoshida, Hiromi; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2003-05-30

    We previously found and isolated a novel natural product, designated kohamaic acid A (KA-A), which inhibited the first cleavage of fertilized sea urchin eggs. In this paper, we report that this compound could selectively inhibit the activities of DNA polymerases (pol. alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon ) only from species in the deuterostome branch in the animal kingdom, like sea urchin, fish and mammals, but not from protostomes including insects (fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster) and mollusks (octopus and oyster). Inhibition of deuterostome DNA polymerases was dose dependent. IC(50) values for DNA polymerases of mammals and fish occurred at approximately 5.8-14.9 microM and those of sea urchin at 6.1-30.3 microM. In the sea urchin DNA polymerases, the activities of the replicative DNA polymerases such as alpha, delta and epsilon were more strongly inhibited than that of the repair-related pol. beta. KA-A is an inhibitor of replicative DNA polymerases from the deuterostome species, and subsequently, the inhibition of the first cleavage of fertilized sea urchin eggs might occur as a result of the suppression of DNA replication. PMID:12758147

  14. Survivin antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibits growth of gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian-Hui; Zhang, Yi-Chu; Qian, Hui-Qing

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of transfected survivin antisense oligonucleotide (ASODN) on proliferation and apoptosis of gastric cancer cells. METHODS: The authors designed ASODNs targeting different regions of survivin mRNA, including surviving ASODN1, ASODN2 and ASODN3. ASODNs were transfected into gastric cancer cell line SGC 7901, cell growth was detected by MTT assay. Cells exposed to the potent oligonucleotide were also examined for apoptosis induction by FCM and fluorescence microscopy. Semiquantitive RT-PCR and Western blot examinations were carried for expression of survivin mRNA and protein. RESULTS: ASODN3 caused a statistically significant reduction of cell viability to 60.6% (± 2.9%) (P < 0.01), while ASODN1 and ASODN2 had no such changes (P > 0.05). The cell growth was also significantly inhibited by ASODN3, compared with reversal and scrambled sequence. A significant loss of survivin mRNA was presented in ASODN3 treated cells and this was not seen in treatment with sense ODN or scramble ODN. Protein level was significantly decreased 48 h after survivin ASODN trasfected by approximately 2-fold decrease compared with untreated controls. However, ASODN3 did not induce significant apoptosis response until 48 h after transfection (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: ASODN3, which targets translation initiation part, can be identified as a most potent antisense compound. Srvivin ASODN3 may provide a novel approach to therapy of gastric cancer. PMID:15069710

  15. Nucleic Acid Conformational Changes Essential for HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein-mediated Inhibition of

    E-print Network

    Levin, Judith G.

    Nucleic Acid Conformational Changes Essential for HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein-mediated Inhibition) is a nucleic acid chaperone protein that has been shown to greatly facilitate the nucleic acid rearrangements and a TAR-containing acceptor RNA molecule, we find that when both nucleic acids are present, NC facilitates

  16. Growth of Streptomyces Hygroscopicus in Rotating-Wall Bioreactor Under Simulated Microgravity Inhibits Rapamycin Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, A.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Demain, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Growth of Streptomyces hygroscopicus under conditions of simulated microgravity in a rotating-wall bioreactor resulted in a pellet form of growth, lowered dry cell weight, and inhibition of rapamycin production. With the addition of Teflon beads to the bioreactor, growth became much less pelleted, dry cell weight increased but rapamycin production was still markedly inhibited. Growth under simulated microgravity favored extracellular production of rapamycin in contrast to a greater percentage of cell-bound rapamycin observed under normal gravity conditions.

  17. Inhibition of Fatty Acid Oxidation Modulates Immunosuppressive Functions of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Enhances Cancer Therapies.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Fokhrul; Al-Khami, Amir A; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Hernandez, Claudia; Zheng, Liqin; Reiss, Krzystoff; Valle, Luis Del; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Maj, Tomasz; Zou, Weiping; Rodriguez, Paulo C; Ochoa, Augusto C

    2015-11-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) promote tumor growth by inhibiting T-cell immunity and promoting malignant cell proliferation and migration. The therapeutic potential of blocking MDSC in tumors has been limited by their heterogeneity, plasticity, and resistance to various chemotherapy agents. Recent studies have highlighted the role of energy metabolic pathways in the differentiation and function of immune cells; however, the metabolic characteristics regulating MDSC remain unclear. We aimed to determine the energy metabolic pathway(s) used by MDSC, establish its impact on their immunosuppressive function, and test whether its inhibition blocks MDSC and enhances antitumor therapies. Using several murine tumor models, we found that tumor-infiltrating MDSC (T-MDSC) increased fatty acid uptake and activated fatty acid oxidation (FAO). This was accompanied by an increased mitochondrial mass, upregulation of key FAO enzymes, and increased oxygen consumption rate. Pharmacologic inhibition of FAO blocked immune inhibitory pathways and functions in T-MDSC and decreased their production of inhibitory cytokines. FAO inhibition alone significantly delayed tumor growth in a T-cell-dependent manner and enhanced the antitumor effect of adoptive T-cell therapy. Furthermore, FAO inhibition combined with low-dose chemotherapy completely inhibited T-MDSC immunosuppressive effects and induced a significant antitumor effect. Interestingly, a similar increase in fatty acid uptake and expression of FAO-related enzymes was found in human MDSC in peripheral blood and tumors. These results support the possibility of testing FAO inhibition as a novel approach to block MDSC and enhance various cancer therapies. Cancer Immunol Res; 3(11); 1236-47. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26025381

  18. Luteolin Inhibits Human Prostate Tumor Growth by Suppressing Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2-Mediated Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Budhraja, Amit; Wang, Xin; Ding, Songze; Wang, Lei; Hitron, Andrew; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Kim, Donghern; Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Zhuo; Luo, Jia; Shi, Xianglin

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vascular beds, is essential for tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Luteolin is a common dietary flavonoid found in fruits and vegetables. We studied the antiangiogenic activity of luteolin using in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models. In vitro studies using rat aortic ring assay showed that luteolin at non-toxic concentrations significantly inhibited microvessel sprouting and proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation of endothelial cells, which are key events in the process of angiogenesis. Luteolin also inhibited ex vivo angiogenesis as revealed by chicken egg chorioallantoic membrane assay (CAM) and matrigel plug assay. Gelatin zymographic analysis demonstrated the inhibitory effect of luteolin on the activation of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9. Western blot analysis showed that luteolin suppressed VEGF induced phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 and their downstream protein kinases AKT, ERK, mTOR, P70S6K, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in HUVECs. Proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-? level were significantly reduced by the treatment of luteolin in PC-3 cells. Luteolin (10 mg/kg/d) significantly reduced the volume and the weight of solid tumors in prostate xenograft mouse model, indicating that luteolin inhibited tumorigenesis by targeting angiogenesis. CD31 and CD34 immunohistochemical staining further revealed that the microvessel density could be remarkably suppressed by luteolin. Moreover, luteolin reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells, which were correlated with the downregulation of AKT, ERK, mTOR, P70S6K, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expressions. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that luteolin inhibits human prostate tumor growth by suppressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-mediated angiogenesis. PMID:23300633

  19. Beyond plant defense: insights on the potential of salicylic and methylsalicylic acid to contain growth of the phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Dieryckx, Cindy; Gaudin, Vanessa; Dupuy, Jean-William; Bonneu, Marc; Girard, Vincent; Job, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Using Botrytis cinerea we confirmed in the present work several previous studies showing that salicylic acid, a main plant hormone, inhibits fungal growth in vitro. Such an inhibitory effect was also observed for the two salicylic acid derivatives, methylsalicylic and acetylsalicylic acid. In marked contrast, 5-sulfosalicylic acid was totally inactive. Comparative proteomics from treated vs. control mycelia showed that both the intracellular and extracellular proteomes were affected in the presence of salicylic acid or methylsalicylic acid. These data suggest several mechanisms that could potentially account for the observed fungal growth inhibition, notably pH regulation, metal homeostasis, mitochondrial respiration, ROS accumulation and cell wall remodeling. The present observations support a role played by the phytohormone SA and derivatives in directly containing the pathogen. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002873. PMID:26528317

  20. Effects of Selenium Yeast on Oxidative Stress, Growth Inhibition, and Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chih-Hung; Hsia, Simon; Shih, Min-Yi; Hsieh, Fang-Chin; Chen, Pei-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that selenium (Se) yeast may exhibit potential anti-cancer properties; whereas the precise mechanisms remain unknown. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of Se yeast on oxidative stress, growth inhibition, and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Treatments of ER-positive MCF-7 and triple-negative MDA-MB-231 cells with Se yeast (100, 750, and 1500 ng Se/mL), methylseleninic acid (MSA, 1500 ng Se/mL), or methylselenocysteine (MSC, 1500 ng Se/mL) at a time course experiment (at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h) were analyzed. Se yeast inhibited the growth of these cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Compared with the same level of MSA, cancer cells exposure to Se yeast exhibited a lower growth-inhibitory response. The latter has also lower superoxide production and reduced antioxidant enzyme activities. Furthermore, MSA (1500 ng Se/mL)-exposed non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) have a significant growth inhibitory effect, but not Se yeast and MSC. Compared with MSA, Se yeast resulted in a greater increase in the early apoptosis in MCF-7 cells as well as a lower proportion of early and late apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, nuclear morphological changes and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were observed. In conclusion, a dose of 100 to 1500 ng Se/mL of Se yeast can increase oxidative stress, and stimulate growth inhibitory effects and apoptosis induction in breast cancer cell lines, but does not affect non-tumorigenic cells. PMID:26392813

  1. Fibroblast growth factor 7 inhibits cholesterol 7{alpha}-hydroxylase gene expression in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhichao; Yu, Xuemei; Wu, Weibin; Jia, Dongwei; Chen, Yinle; Ji, Lingling; Liu, Xijun; Peng, Xiaomin; Li, Yintao; Yang, Lili; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin; Ren, Shifang; Zhang, Songwen

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FGF7 strongly and rapidly down-regulates the expression of CYP7A1 in hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FGF7 suppresses the expression of CYP7A1 via FGFR2 and downstream JNK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blocking FGF7 abrogates HSC-induced inhibition of CYP7A1 expression in hepatocytes. -- Abstract: Cholesterol 7{alpha}-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is the initial and rate-limiting enzyme for bile acid synthesis. Transcription of the CYP7A1 gene is regulated by bile acids, nuclear receptors and cytokines. Fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF7) secreted from activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) during chronic liver fibrosis regulates hepatocyte survival and liver regeneration. In the carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4})-induced fibrotic mouse liver, we demonstrated that the expression of CYP7A1 was largely decreased while the expression of FGF7 was significantly increased. We further demonstrated that FGF7 inhibited CYP7A1 gene expression in hepatocytes. Knockdown study by short interfering RNA, kinase inhibition and phosphorylation assays revealed that the suppression of CYP7A1 expression by FGF7 was mediated by FGFR2 and its downstream JNK signaling cascade. The FGF7 neutralizing antibody restored CYP7A1 expression in Hep3B cells treated with conditioned medium from HSC. In summary, the data suggest that FGF7 is a novel regulator of CYP7A1 expression in hepatocytes and may prevent hepatocytes from accumulating toxic bile acids during liver injury and fibrosis.

  2. Ascorbic Acid Inhibition of Candida albicans Hsp90-Mediated Morphogenesis Occurs via the Transcriptional Regulator Upc2

    PubMed Central

    Van Hauwenhuyse, Frédérique; Fiori, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Morphogenetic transitions of the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans are influenced by temperature changes, with induction of filamentation upon a shift from 30 to 37°C. Hsp90 was identified as a major repressor of an elongated cell morphology at low temperatures, as treatment with specific inhibitors of Hsp90 results in elongated growth forms at 30°C. Elongated growth resulting from a compromised Hsp90 is considered neither hyphal nor pseudohyphal growth. It has been reported that ascorbic acid (vitamin C) interferes with the yeast-to-hypha transition in C. albicans. In the present study, we show that ascorbic acid also antagonizes the morphogenetic change caused by hampered Hsp90 function. Further analysis revealed that Upc2, a transcriptional regulator of genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis, and Erg11, the target of azole antifungals, whose expression is in turn regulated by Upc2, are required for this antagonism. Ergosterol levels correlate with elongated growth and are reduced in cells treated with the Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin (GdA) and restored by cotreatment with ascorbic acid. In addition, we show that Upc2 appears to be required for ascorbic acid-mediated inhibition of the antifungal activity of fluconazole. These results identify Upc2 as a major regulator of ascorbic acid-induced effects in C. albicans and suggest an association between ergosterol content and elongated growth upon Hsp90 compromise. PMID:25084864

  3. Monoclonal Antibodies to Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2 Effectively Inhibit Growth of Gastric Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei-meng; Wang, Lihong; Park, Hangil; Chhim, Sophea; Tanphanich, Melanie; Yashiro, Masakazu; Kim, K. Jin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Overexpression of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2 (FGFR2) may be a causative factor of a number of human tumors, especially gastric tumors of the poorly differentiated type. We investigated whether monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against FGFR2 can inhibit the growth of tumors in xenograft models. Experimental Design We generated and characterized three mAbs that recognize different epitopes on FGFR2: GAL-FR21, GAL-FR22 and GAL-FR23. The ability of the mAbs to recognize the FGFR2IIIb and FGFR2IIIc isoforms of FGFR2 was determined, as was their ability to block binding of FGF ligands to FGFR2. The capability of the mAbs to inhibit FGF-induced FGFR2 phosphorylation and to down-modulate FGFR2 expression was also investigated. Finally, the ability of the anti-FGFR2 mAbs to inhibit tumor growth was determined by establishing xenografts of SNU-16 and OCUM-2M human gastric tumor cell lines in nude mice, treating with each mAb (0.5 – 5 mg/kg i.p. twice weekly), and monitoring tumor size. Results Of the three mAbs, GAL-FR21 binds only the FGFR2IIIb isoform, whereas GAL-FR22 and GAL-FR23 bind to both the FGFR2IIIb and FGFR2IIIc forms, with binding regions respectively in the D3, D2-D3 and D1 domains of FGFR2. GAL-FR21 and GAL-FR22 blocked the binding of FGF2, FGF7 and FGF10 to FGFR2IIIb. GAL-FR21 inhibited FGF2 and FGF7 induced phosphorylation of FGFR2, and both mAbs down-modulated FGFR2 expression on SNU-16 cells. These mAbs effectively inhibited growth of established SNU-16 and OCUM-2M xenografts in mice. Conclusions Anti-FGFR2 mAbs GAL-FR21 and GAL-FR22 have potential for the treatment of gastric and other tumors. PMID:20670946

  4. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Darin C; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K K; McElwee, Kevin J; Cheng, Kimberly M

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFN? production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51×faster), ostrich oil (1.46×faster), and rhea oil (1.64×faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35×slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFN? production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  5. Meclofenamic Acid for Inhibition of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Migration: An In Vitro Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schober, Wolfgang; Kehlbach, Rainer; Gebert, Regina; Wiskirchen, Jakub; Rodegerdts, Enno; Claussen, Claus D.; Duda, Stephan H.

    2002-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to examine the effects of meclofenamic acid on proliferation, clonogenic activity,migratory ability, cell cycle distribution and p44/42 MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinase) expression in serum-stimulated human aortic smooth muscle cells (haSMCs). Methods: haSMCs were treated with meclofenamic acid in three different concentrations (10mM, 100 mM, 200 mM) for 4 days. Then meclofenamic acid-free culture medium was supplemented until day 20. Growth kinetics were assessed. Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry.Clonogenic activity was evaluated with colony formation assays.Migratory ability was investigated by stimulation with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) in 24-well plates with 8 mm pores membrane inserts. p44/42 MAPK was detected by Western blot technique. Results: Meclofenamic acid inhibited the proliferation,clonogenic activity and migratory ability of haSMCs in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis revealed a G2/M-phase block. The p44/42MAPK was significantly reduced. Conclusion: Meclofenamic acid inhibits the proliferation and migration of haSMCs. If a sufficient dose of meclofenamic acid can be applied systemically or by local drug delivery it could be a valuable substance to prevent restenosis after angioplasty.

  6. Failure of Amino Acid Homeostasis Causes Cell Death following Proteasome Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Suraweera, Amila; Münch, Christian; Hanssum, Ariane; Bertolotti, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Summary The ubiquitin-proteasome system targets many cellular proteins for degradation and thereby controls most cellular processes. Although it is well established that proteasome inhibition is lethal, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we show that proteasome inhibition results in a lethal amino acid shortage. In yeast, mammalian cells, and flies, the deleterious consequences of proteasome inhibition are rescued by amino acid supplementation. In all three systems, this rescuing effect occurs without noticeable changes in the levels of proteasome substrates. In mammalian cells, the amino acid scarcity resulting from proteasome inhibition is the signal that causes induction of both the integrated stress response and autophagy, in an unsuccessful attempt to replenish the pool of intracellular amino acids. These results reveal that cells can tolerate protein waste, but not the amino acid scarcity resulting from proteasome inhibition. PMID:22959274

  7. Purified Plasma Membranes Inhibit Polypeptide Growth Factor-induced DNA Synthesis

    E-print Network

    Vale, Ronald D.

    Purified Plasma Membranes Inhibit Polypeptide Growth Factor-induced DNA Synthesis in Subconfluent 3 and/or accessibility of cells to essential growth factors in the serum (4, 5). Whittenberger factors under serum-deprived conditions. Epidermal growth factor (EGF)' (8), fibroblast growth factor (FGF

  8. PPAR? inhibition modulates multiple reprogrammed metabolic pathways in kidney cancer and attenuates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Abu Aboud, Omran; Donohoe, Dallas; Bultman, Scott; Fitch, Mark; Riiff, Tim; Hellerstein, Marc; Weiss, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Kidney cancer [renal cell carcinoma (RCC)] is the sixth-most-common cancer in the United States, and its incidence is increasing. The current progression-free survival for patients with advanced RCC rarely extends beyond 1-2 yr due to the development of therapeutic resistance. We previously identified peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor-? (PPAR?) as a potential therapeutic target for this disease and showed that a specific PPAR? antagonist, GW6471, induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 in RCC cell lines associated with attenuation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. We now extend that work and show that PPAR? inhibition attenuates components of RCC metabolic reprogramming, capitalizing on the Warburg effect. The specific PPAR? inhibitor GW6471, as well as a siRNA specific to PPAR?, attenuates the enhanced fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation associated with glycolysis inhibition, and PPAR? antagonism also blocks the enhanced glycolysis that has been observed in RCC cells; this effect did not occur in normal human kidney epithelial cells. Such cell type-specific inhibition of glycolysis corresponds with changes in protein levels of the oncogene c-Myc and has promising clinical implications. Furthermore, we show that treatment with GW6471 results in RCC tumor growth attenuation in a xenograft mouse model, with minimal obvious toxicity, a finding associated with the expected on-target effects on c-Myc. These studies demonstrate that several pivotal cancer-relevant metabolic pathways are inhibited by PPAR? antagonism. Our data support the concept that targeting PPAR?, with or without concurrent inhibition of glycolysis, is a potential novel and effective therapeutic approach for RCC that targets metabolic reprogramming in this tumor. PMID:25810260

  9. Photocatalytic Inhibition of Algae Growth Using TiO2, WO3, and

    E-print Network

    Ouellette, Anthony J. A.

    drag and additional fuel consumption. Excessive algae build-up can occlude drainage pipes and foulPhotocatalytic Inhibition of Algae Growth Using TiO2, WO3, and Cocatalyst Modifications C L O V I as photocatalytic surfacing agents to inhibit the attachment and growth of Oedogonium, a sessile, filamentous algae

  10. Inhibition of bacterial, fungal and plant growth by testa extracts of Citrullus genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum & Nakai) seed exudates inhibit germination and seedling growth of several plant species and growth of pathogenic fungi and bacteria. This study was conducted to determine if extractable components in testae contribute to the inhibition. T...

  11. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa oxyvinylglycine L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid inhibits growth of Erwinia amylovora and acts as a weak seed germination-arrest factor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimetabolite L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB) is demonstrated to share biological activities with 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine, a related molecule produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6. We found that culture filtrates of a P. aeruginosa strain overproduc...

  12. Bile salts inhibit growth and induce apoptosis of human esophageal cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ru; Gong, Jun; Wang, Hui; Wang, Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effect of six bile salts, including glycoc-holate (GC), glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDC), glycodeoxy-cholate (GDC), taurocholate (TC), taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDC), taurodeoxycholate (TDC), and two bile acids including cholic acid (CA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA) on esophageal cancer Eca109 cell line. METHODS: Eca109 cells were exposed to six bile salts, two bile acids and the mixed bile salts at different concentrations for 24-72 h. 3-[4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to detect the cell proliferation. Apoptotic morphology was observed by phase-contrast video microscopy and deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Sub-G1 DNA fragmentations and early apoptosis cells were assayed by flow cytometry (FCM) with propidium iodide (PI) staining and annexin V-FITC conjugated with PI staining. Apoptosis DNA ladders on agarose were observed. Activation of caspase-3 was assayed by FCM with FITC-conjugated monoclonal rabbit anti-active caspase-3 antibody and expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax proteins were examined immunocytochemically in 500 ?mol/L-TC-induced apoptosis cells. RESULTS: Five bile salts except for GC, and two bile acids and the mixed bile salts could initiate growth inhibition of Eca109 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. TUNEL, FCM, and DNA ladder assays all demonstrated apoptosis induced by bile salts and bile acids at 500 ?mol/L, except for GC. Early apoptosis cell percentages in Eca109 cells treated with GCDC, GDC, TC, TCDC, TDC, CA at 500 ?mol/L for 12 h, DCA at 500 ?mol/L for 6 h, and mixed bile salts at 1 000 ?mol/L for 12 h were 7.5%, 8.7%, 14.8%, 8.9%, 7.8%, 9.3%, 22.6% and 12.5%, respectively, all were significantly higher than that in control (1.9%). About 22% of the cell population treated with TC at 500 ?mol/L for 24 h had detectable active caspase-3, and were higher than that in the control (1%). Immunocytochemical assay suggested that TC down-regulated Bcl-2 protein level and up-regulated Bax protein level. CONCLUSION: GCDC, GDC, TC, TCDC, TDC, CA and DCA, except for GC, can inhibit growth and induce apoptosis of esophageal cancer Eca109 cells. Activation of caspase-3, decreased Bcl-2 protein and increased Bax protein are involved in TC-induced apoptosis of Eca109 cells. PMID:16127738

  13. Identification of the conjugated linoleic acid isomer that inhibits milk fat synthesis.

    PubMed

    Baumgard, L H; Corl, B A; Dwyer, D A; Saebø, A; Bauman, D E

    2000-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are octadecadienoic fatty acids that have profound effects on lipid metabolism. Our previous work showed that CLA (mixture of isomers) markedly reduced milk fat synthesis. In this study, our objective was to evaluate the effects of specific CLA isomers. Multiparous Holstein cows were used in a 3x3 Latin square design, and treatments were 4-day abomasal infusions of 1) skim milk (control), 2) 9,11 CLA supplement, and 3) 10,12 CLA supplement. CLA supplements provided 10 g/day of the specific CLA isomer (cis-9,trans-11 or trans-10,cis-12). Treatments had no effect on intake, milk yield, or milk protein yield. Only the 10,12 CLA supplement affected milk fat, causing a 42 and 44% reduction in milk fat percentage and yield, respectively. Milk fat composition revealed that de novo synthesized fatty acids were extensively reduced. Increases in ratios of C(14:0) to C(14:1) and C(18:0) to C(18:1) indicated the 10,12 CLA supplement also altered Delta(9)-desaturase. Treatments had minimal effects on plasma concentrations of glucose, nonesterified fatty acids, insulin, or insulin-like growth factor-I. Overall, results demonstrate that trans-10,cis-12 CLA is the isomer responsible for inhibition of milk fat synthesis. PMID:10644637

  14. Possible involvement of delta-6-desaturase in control of melanoma growth by gamma-linolenic acid.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, N S; Duncan, J R

    1991-03-01

    This study examined the effects of linoleic acid (LA) and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) on BL6 melanoma growth in cell culture and of safflower oil (SFO) which contains LA and evening primrose oil (EPO) which contains GLA, on melanoma growth when grown in mice. The delta-6-desaturase activity of the melanoma cells in the two systems was also examined and an attempt made to relate the activity of the enzyme to the effects of GLA on cell and tumour growth. LA and GLA were found to be equipotent in inhibiting growth of the in vitro cultured BL6 cells which were found to contain an appreciable level of delta-6-desaturase activity. EPO was however found to be a more potent promoter of in vivo melanoma growth in mice than SFO. Melanomas grown in mice were found to lack delta-6-desaturase activity suggesting that the EPO diet, by providing GLA, was able to compensate for the loss of enzyme activity in the melanomas. The possibility that melanomas in mice have a requirement for GLA for growth while in in vitro cultured cells excess GLA inhibits the growth of the cells through an increase in lipid peroxidation is discussed. PMID:1650000

  15. Endothelin inhibits cholangiocarcinoma growth by a decrease in the vascular endothelial growth factor expression

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Giammarco; DeMorrow, Sharon; Gaudio, Eugenio; Franchitto, Antonio; Onori, Paolo; Carpino, Guido; Glaser, Shannon; Francis, Heather; Coufal, Monique; Marucci, Luca; Alvaro, Domenico; Marzioni, Marco; Horst, Trenton; Mancinelli, Romina; Benedetti, Antonio; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2009-01-01

    Background: Endothelins (ET-1, ET-2, ET-3) are peptides with vasoactive properties interacting with ETA and ETB receptors. ET-1 inhibits secretin-stimulated ductal secretion (hallmark of cholangiocyte growth) of cholestatic rats by interaction with ET receptors. Aim: The aims of the studies were to evaluate (i) the effect of ET-1 on cholangiocarcinoma growth in Mz-ChA-1 cells and nude mice and (ii) whether ET-1 regulation of cholangiocarcinoma growth is associated with changes in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), VEGF-C, VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and VEGFR-3. Methods: We determined the expression of ETA and ETB receptors on normal and malignant (Mz-ChA-1) cholangiocytes and human cholangiocarcinoma tissue and the effect of ET-1 on the proliferation and expression of VEGF-A, VEGF-C (regulators of tumour angiogenesis) and its receptors, VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3, in Mz-ChA-1 cells. In vivo, Mz-ChA-1 cells were injected into the flanks of athymic mice and injections of ET-1 or saline into the tumours were performed daily. The effect of ET-1 on tumour size, cell proliferation, apoptosis, collagen quantity and the expression of VEGF-A and VEGF-C and VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3 were measured after 73 days. Results: Higher expression of ETA and ETB was observed in malignant compared with normal cholangiocytes. ET-1 inhibited proliferation and VEGF-A, VEGF-C, VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3 expression of Mz-ChA-1 cells. Chronic ET-1 treatment decreased tumour volume, tumour cell proliferation and VEGF-A and VEGF-C expression but increased apoptosis and collagen tissue deposition compared with controls. Conclusions: Modulation of VEGF-A and VEGF-C (by ET-1) may be important for managing cholangiocarcinoma growth. PMID:19291182

  16. Quercetin induces HepG2 cell apoptosis by inhibiting fatty acid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, PENG; MAO, JUN-MIN; ZHANG, SHU-YUN; ZHOU, ZE-QUAN; TAN, YANG; ZHANG, YU

    2014-01-01

    Quercetin can inhibit the growth of cancer cells with the ability to act as a ‘chemopreventer’. Its cancer-preventive effect has been attributed to various mechanisms, including the induction of cell-cycle arrest and/or apoptosis, as well as its antioxidant functions. Quercetin can also reduce adipogenesis. Previous studies have shown that quercetin has potent inhibitory effects on animal fatty acid synthase (FASN). In the present study, activity of quercetin was evaluated in human liver cancer HepG2 cells. Intracellular FASN activity was calculated by measuring the absorption of NADPH via a spectrophotometer. MTT assay was used to test the cell viability, immunoblot analysis was performed to detect FASN expression levels and the apoptotic effect was detected by Hoechst 33258 staining. In the present study, it was found that quercetin could induce apoptosis in human liver cancer HepG2 cells with overexpression of FASN. This apoptosis was accompanied by the reduction of intracellular FASN activity and could be rescued by 25 or 50 ?M exogenous palmitic acids, the final product of FASN-catalyzed synthesis. These results suggested that the apoptosis induced by quercetin was via the inhibition of FASN. These findings suggested that quercetin may be useful for preventing human liver cancer. PMID:25009654

  17. Direct inhibition of retinoic acid catabolism by fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Hellmann-Regen, Julian; Uhlemann, Ria; Regen, Francesca; Heuser, Isabella; Otte, Christian; Endres, Matthias; Gertz, Karen; Kronenberg, Golo

    2015-09-01

    Recent evidence from animal and human studies suggests neuroprotective effects of the SSRI fluoxetine, e.g., in the aftermath of stroke. The underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be fully defined. Because of its effects on the cytochrome P450 system (CYP450), we hypothesized that neuroprotection by fluoxetine is related to altered metabolism of retinoic acid (RA), whose CYP450-mediated degradation in brain tissue constitutes an important step in the regulation of its site-specific auto- and paracrine actions. Using traditional pharmacological in vitro assays, the effects of fluoxetine on RA degradation were probed in crude synaptosomes from rat brain and human-derived SH-SY5Y cells, and in cultures of neuron-like SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, retinoid-dependent effects of fluoxetine on neuronal survival following glutamate exposure were investigated in rat primary neurons cells using specific retinoid receptor antagonists. Experiments revealed dose-dependent inhibition of synaptosomal RA degradation by fluoxetine along with dose-dependent increases in RA levels in cell cultures. Furthermore, fluoxetine's neuroprotective effects against glutamate excitotoxicity in rat primary neurons were demonstrated to partially depend on RA signaling. Taken together, these findings demonstrate for the first time that the potent, pleiotropic antidepressant fluoxetine directly interacts with RA homeostasis in brain tissue, thereby exerting its neuroprotective effects. PMID:25981674

  18. Expansins are involved in cell growth mediated by abscisic acid and indole-3-acetic acid under drought stress in wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mei-rong; Han, Yang-yang; Feng, Ya-nan; Li, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2012-04-01

    Expansin protein is a component of the cell wall generally accepted to be the key regulator of cell wall extension during plant growth. Plant hormones regulate expansin gene expression as well as plant growth during drought stress. However, the relationship between expansin and plant hormone is far from clear. Here, we studied the involvement of expansin in plant cell growth mediated by the hormones indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and abscisic acid (ABA) under osmotic stress which was induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG)-6000. Wheat coleoptiles from a drought-resistant cultivar HF9703 and a drought-sensitive cultivar 921842 were used to evaluate cell growth and expansin activity. Osmotic stress induced the accumulation of ABA. ABA induced expansin activity mainly by enhancing expansin expression, since ABA induced cell wall basification via decreasing plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity, which was unfavorable for expansin activity. Although ABA induced expansin activity and cell wall extension, treatment with exogenous ABA and/or fluridone (FLU, an ABA inhibitor) suggested that ABA was involved in the coleoptile growth inhibition during osmotic stress. IAA application to detached coleoptiles also enhanced coleoptile growth and increased expansin activity, but unlike ABA, IAA-induced expansin activity was mainly due to the decrease of cell wall pH by increasing plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity. Compared with drought-sensitive cultivar, the drought-resistant cultivar could maintain greater expansin activity and cell wall extension, which was contributive to its resultant faster growth under water stress. PMID:22076248

  19. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Michael B.; Arena, Christopher B.; Bittleman, Katelyn R.; DeWitt, Matthew R.; Cho, Hyung J.; Szot, Christopher S.; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M.; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250?ns and 100??s and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100??s, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5??s in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models. PMID:26459930

  20. Further evidence that naphthoquinone inhibits Toxoplasma gondii growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Luciana Lemos Rangel; Portes, Juliana de Araujo; de Araújo, Marlon Heggdorne; Silva, Jéssica Lays Sant'ana; Rennó, Magdalena Nascimento; Netto, Chaquip Daher; da Silva, Alcides José Monteiro; Costa, Paulo Roberto Ribeiro; De Souza, Wanderley; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; DaMatta, Renato Augusto

    2015-12-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a widely disseminated disease caused by Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular protozoan parasite. Standard treatment causes many side effects, such as depletion of bone marrow cells, skin rashes and gastrointestinal implications. Therefore, it is necessary to find chemotherapeutic alternatives for the treatment of this disease. It was shown that a naphthoquinone derivative compound is active against T. gondii, RH strain, with an IC50 around 2.5 ?M. Here, three different naphthoquinone derivative compounds with activity against leukemia cells and breast carcinoma cell were tested against T. gondii (RH strain) infected LLC-MK2 cell line. All the compounds were able to inhibit parasite growth in vitro, but one of them showed an IC50 activity below 1 ?M after 48 h of treatment. The compounds showed low toxicity to the host cell. In addition, these compounds were able to induce tachyzoite-bradyzoite conversion confirmed by morphological changes, Dolichus biflorus lectin cyst wall labeling and characterization of amylopectin granules in the parasites by electron microscopy analysis using the Thierry technique. Furthermore, the compounds induced alterations on the ultrastructure of the parasite. Taken together, our results point to the naphthoquinone derivative (LQB 151) as a potential compound for the development of new drugs for the treatment of toxoplasmosis. PMID:26335616

  1. Inhibition of Trypanosoma cruzi growth by medical plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Schinella, G R; Tournier, H A; Prieto, J M; Ríos, J L; Buschiazzo, H; Zaidenberg, A

    2002-12-01

    This study describes the screening of extracts obtained from 18 plants and two fungi used in the Chinese and Mediterranean traditional medicines on epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. The extracts were tested against epimastigote of T. cruzi Bra C15C2 clone in vitro at 27 degrees C and at a concentration of 250 microg/ml in axenic culture. Angelica dahurica, A. pubescens, A. sinensis, Astragalus membranaceus, Coptis chinensis, Haplophyllum hispanicum, Phellodendron amurense, Poria cocos, Ranunculus sceleratus and Scutellaria baicalensis showed significant effects against the parasite with a percentage of growth inhibition between 20 and 100%. C. chinensis and R. sceleratus showed the greatest activity with IC(50) values of 1.7 microg/ml for C. chinensis and 10.7 microg/ml for R. sceleratus. These activities are greater than that of allopurinol. C. chinesis and R. sceleratus extracts did not show cytotoxic effects on rat polimorphonuclear cells using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and lactic dehydrogenase assays. These results allowed us to suggest that R. sceleratus and C. chinensis could be a source of new compounds clinically active against T. cruzi. PMID:12490214

  2. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Sano, Michael B; Arena, Christopher B; Bittleman, Katelyn R; DeWitt, Matthew R; Cho, Hyung J; Szot, Christopher S; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W; Davalos, Rafael V

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250?ns and 100??s and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100??s, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5??s in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models. PMID:26459930

  3. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Michael B.; Arena, Christopher B.; Bittleman, Katelyn R.; Dewitt, Matthew R.; Cho, Hyung J.; Szot, Christopher S.; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M.; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2015-10-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250?ns and 100??s and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100??s, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5??s in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models.

  4. Inhibition of Akt inhibits growth of glioblastoma and glioblastoma stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Gallia, Gary L; Tyler, Betty M; Hann, Christine L; Siu, I-Mei; Giranda, Vincent L; Vescovi, Angelo L; Brem, Henry; Riggins, Gregory J

    2009-02-01

    A commonly activated signaling cascade in many human malignancies, including glioblastoma multiforme, is the Akt pathway. This pathway can be activated via numerous upstream alterations including genomic amplification of epidermal growth factor receptor, PTEN deletion, or PIK3CA mutations. In this study, we screened phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt small-molecule inhibitors in an isogenic cell culture system with an activated Akt pathway secondary to a PIK3CA mutation. One small molecule, A-443654, showed the greatest selective inhibition of cells with the mutant phenotype. Based on these findings, this inhibitor was screened in vitro against a panel of glioblastoma multiforme cell lines. All cell lines tested were sensitive to A-443654 with a mean IC(50) of approximately 150 nmol/L. An analogue of A-443654, methylated at a region that blocks Akt binding, was on average 36-fold less active. Caspase assays and dual flow cytometric analysis showed an apoptotic mechanism of cell death. A-443654 was further tested in a rat intracranial model of glioblastoma multiforme. Animals treated intracranially with polymers containing A-443654 had significantly extended survival compared with control animals; animals survived 79% and 43% longer than controls when A-443654-containing polymers were implanted simultaneously or in a delayed fashion, respectively. This small molecule also inhibited glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells with similar efficacy compared with traditionally cultured glioblastoma multiforme cell lines. These results suggest that local delivery of an Akt small-molecule inhibitor is effective against experimental intracranial glioma, with no observed resistance to glioblastoma multiforme cells grown in stem cell conditions. PMID:19208828

  5. Aluminum stress inhibits root growth and alters physiological and metabolic responses in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Shuvasish; Sharma, Parul

    2014-12-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) roots were treated with aluminum (Al3+) in calcium chloride (CaCl2) solution (pH 4.7) and growth responses along with physiological and metabolic changes were investigated. Al3+ treatment for 7d resulted in a dose dependent decline of seed germination and inhibition of root growth. A significant (p ? 0.05) decline in fresh and dry biomass were observed after 7d of Al3+ stress.The root growth (length) was inhibited after 24 and 48 h of stress imposition. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels increased significantly (p ? 0.05) with respect to control in Al3+ treated roots. The hematoxylin and Evans blue assay indicated significant (p ? 0.05) accumulation of Al3+ in the roots and loss of plasma membrane integrity respectively. The time-course evaluation of lipid peroxidation showed increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) after 12, 24 and 48 h of stress imposition. Al3+ treatment did not alter the MDA levels after 2 or 4 h of stress, however, a minor increase was observed after 6 and 10 h of treatment. The proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the perchloric acid extracts showed variation in the abundance of metabolites and suggested a major metabolic shift in chickpea root during Al3+ stress. The key differences that were observed include changes in energy metabolites. Accumulation of phenolic compounds suggested its possible role in Al3+ exclusion in roots during stress. The results suggested that Al3+ alters growth pattern in chickpea and induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that causes physiological and metabolic changes. PMID:25394801

  6. Role of exogenously supplied ferulic and p-coumaric acids in mimicking the mode of action of acetolactate synthase inhibiting herbicides.

    PubMed

    Orcaray, Luis; Igal, María; Zabalza, Ana; Royuela, Mercedes

    2011-09-28

    Chlorsulfuron and imazethapyr (herbicides that inhibit acetolactate synthase; ALS, EC 4.1.3.18) produced a strong accumulation of hydroxycinnamic acids that was related to the induction of the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (EC 2.5.2.54). The exogenous application of two hydroxycinnamic acids, ferulic and p-coumaric acids, to pea plants resulted in their internal accumulation, arrested growth, carbohydrate and quinate accumulation in the leaves, and the induction of ethanolic fermentation. These effects resemble some of the physiological effects detected after acetolactate synthase inhibition and suggest important roles for ferulic and p-coumaric acids in the mode of action of herbicides inhibiting the biosynthesis of branched chain amino acids. PMID:21870840

  7. Ginkgolic acid suppresses the development of pancreatic cancer by inhibiting pathways driving lipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Suxia; Lei, Jianjun; Xu, Qinhong; Chen, Xin; Jiang, Zhengdong; Nan, Ligang; Li, Jiahui; Chen, Ke; Han, Liang; Wang, Zheng; Li, Xuqi; Wu, Erxi; Huo, Xiongwei

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgolic acid (GA) is a botanical drug extracted from the seed coat of Ginkgo biloba L. with a wide range of bioactive properties, including anti-tumor effect. However, whether GA has antitumor effect on pancreatic cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms have yet to be investigated. In this study, we show that GA suppressed the viability of cancer cells but has little toxicity on normal cells, e.g, HUVEC cells. Furthermore, treatment of GA resulted in impaired colony formation, migration, and invasion ability and increased apoptosis of cancer cells. In addition, GA inhibited the de novo lipogenesis of cancer cells through inducing activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and downregulated the expression of key enzymes (e.g. acetyl-CoA carboxylase [ACC], fatty acid synthase [FASN]) involved in lipogenesis. Moreover, the in vivo experiment showed that GA reduced the expression of the key enzymes involved in lipogenesis and restrained the tumor growth. Taken together, our results suggest that GA may serve as a new candidate against tumor growth of pancreatic cancer partially through targeting pathway driving lipogenesis. PMID:25895130

  8. Ginkgolic acid suppresses the development of pancreatic cancer by inhibiting pathways driving lipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiguang; Duan, Wanxing; Han, Suxia; Lei, Jianjun; Xu, Qinhong; Chen, Xin; Jiang, Zhengdong; Nan, Ligang; Li, Jiahui; Chen, Ke; Han, Liang; Wang, Zheng; Li, Xuqi; Wu, Erxi; Huo, Xiongwei

    2015-08-28

    Ginkgolic acid (GA) is a botanical drug extracted from the seed coat of Ginkgo biloba L. with a wide range of bioactive properties, including anti-tumor effect. However, whether GA has antitumor effect on pancreatic cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms have yet to be investigated. In this study, we show that GA suppressed the viability of cancer cells but has little toxicity on normal cells, e.g, HUVEC cells. Furthermore, treatment of GA resulted in impaired colony formation, migration, and invasion ability and increased apoptosis of cancer cells. In addition, GA inhibited the de novo lipogenesis of cancer cells through inducing activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and downregulated the expression of key enzymes (e.g. acetyl-CoA carboxylase [ACC], fatty acid synthase [FASN]) involved in lipogenesis. Moreover, the in vivo experiment showed that GA reduced the expression of the key enzymes involved in lipogenesis and restrained the tumor growth. Taken together, our results suggest that GA may serve as a new candidate against tumor growth of pancreatic cancer partially through targeting pathway driving lipogenesis. PMID:25895130

  9. Inhibition of Smooth Muscle Proliferation by Urea-Based Alkanoic Acids via Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated

    E-print Network

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    Inhibition of Smooth Muscle Proliferation by Urea-Based Alkanoic Acids via Peroxisome Proliferator cell proliferation. We examined the possibility that urea-based alkanoic acids activate the nuclear--These results show that attenuation of smooth muscle cell proliferation by urea-based alkanoic acids is mediated

  10. Competitive inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat meat products by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Amézquita, A; Brashears, M M

    2002-02-01

    Forty-nine strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), isolated from commercially available ready-to-eat (RTE) meat products, were screened for their ability to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes at refrigeration (5 degrees C) temperatures on agar spot tests. The three most inhibitory strains were identified as Pediococcus acidilactici, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus paracasei by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Their antilisterial activity was quantified in associative cultures in deMan Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) broth at 5 degrees C for 28 days, resulting in a pathogen reduction of 3.5 log10 cycles compared to its initial level. A combined culture of these strains was added to frankfurters and cooked ham coinoculated with L. monocytogenes, vacuum packaged, and stored at 5 degrees C for 28 days. Bacteriostatic activity was observed in cooked ham, whereas bactericidal activity was observed in frankfurters. Numbers of L. monocytogenes were 4.2 to 4.7 log10 and 2.6 log10 cycles lower than controls in frankfurters and cooked ham, respectively, after the 28-day refrigerated storage. In all cases, numbers of LAB increased by only 1 log10 cycle. The strain identified as P. acidilactici was possibly a bacteriocin producer, whereas the antilisterial activity of the other two strains was due to the production of organic acids. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the antilisterial activity detected in frankfurters whether the LAB strains were used individually or as combined cultures. Further studies over a 56-day period indicated no impact on the quality of the product. This method represents a potential antilisterial intervention in RTE meats, because it inhibited the growth of the pathogen at refrigeration temperatures without causing sensory changes. PMID:11848562

  11. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibits EGF-induced cell transformation via reduction of cyclin D1 mRNA stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingjie; Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 57 Old Forge Rd, Tuxedo, NY 10987 ; Ouyang, Weiming; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Yu, Yonghui; Wang, York; Li, Xuejun; Huang, Chuanshu

    2012-09-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibiting cancer cell growth has been associated with its downregulation of cyclin D1 protein expression at transcription level or translation level. Here, we have demonstrated that SAHA inhibited EGF-induced Cl41 cell transformation via the decrease of cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. We found that SAHA treatment resulted in the dramatic inhibition of EGF-induced cell transformation, cyclin D1 protein expression and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. Further studies showed that SAHA downregulation of cyclin D1 was only observed with endogenous cyclin D1, but not with reconstitutionally expressed cyclin D1 in the same cells, excluding the possibility of SAHA regulating cyclin D1 at level of protein degradation. Moreover, SAHA inhibited EGF-induced cyclin d1 mRNA level, whereas it did not show any inhibitory effect on cyclin D1 promoter-driven luciferase reporter activity under the same experimental conditions, suggesting that SAHA may decrease cyclin D1 mRNA stability. This notion was supported by the results that treatment of cells with SAHA decreased the half-life of cyclin D1 mRNA from 6.95 h to 2.57 h. Consistent with downregulation of cyclin D1 mRNA stability, SAHA treatment also attenuated HuR expression, which has been well-characterized as a positive regulator of cyclin D1 mRNA stability. Thus, our study identifies a novel mechanism responsible for SAHA inhibiting cell transformation via decreasing cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest in Cl41 cells. -- Highlights: ? SAHA inhibits cell transformation in Cl41 cells. ? SAHA suppresses Cyclin D1 protein expression. ? SAHA decreases cyclin D1 mRNA stability.

  12. Growth inhibition of cultured human leukemia cells by 3-aminothymidine and its analogue.

    PubMed

    Asano, S; Yokoyama, Y; Kohda, K

    1997-01-01

    In a previous report, we demonstrated that 3-aminothymidine (1) strongly inhibits the growth of the human T-cell acute lymphoblastoid leukemia cell line CCRF-HSB-2. In order to further study cell growth inhibition by this compound, several of its derivatives and analogues were synthesized and their growth inhibition activities examined using various cultured cell lines. Compound 1 was the most active among the compounds tested and the most effective against cells of the human T-cell acute lymphoblastoid leukemia cell line CCRF-CEM. 3-Methylthymidine (2) also inhibited the growth of CCRF-CEM cells but at a level about one thirtieth that of 1. Introduction of a methyl or acetyl group at the 3-amino group of 1 resulted in the loss of growth inhibition activity. 3-Amino- and 3-methyl-5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridines (6 and 7), the analogues of 1 and 2 both exhibited an ability to inhibit cell growth and their levels of activity were similar in extent, in spite of the difference in their 3-amino and 3-methyl groups, however, these levels were less than that of 1. Compounds 1, 2, 6 and 7 all showed evidence of growth inhibition in every human leukemia cell line examined. PMID:9137414

  13. Inhibition of growth and alteration of host cell interactions of Pasteurella multocida with natural byproducts.

    PubMed

    Salaheen, S; Almario, J A; Biswas, D

    2014-06-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a leading cause of fowl cholera in both free-range pasture and conventional/commercially raised poultry. Its infection is a serious threat to poultry health and overall flock viability. Organic poultry is comparatively more vulnerable to this pathogen. It is a significant cause of production loss and price increase of poultry products, specifically organic poultry products. Some plant products are well documented as sources of natural antimicrobials such as polyphenols found in different berry pomaces and citrus oil. Pomace, a byproduct (primarily of seeds and skins) of fruits used for juice and wine production, and citrus oil, the byproduct of citrus juice production, show promising antimicrobial activity against various pathogens. Here, we showed for the first time that blackberry and blueberry pomace extracts and citrus oil inhibited P. multocida growth. Minimum bactericidal concentrations were determined as 0.3 and 0.4 mg/mL gallic acid equivalent for blackberry and blueberry pomace extracts, respectively. Similarly, only 0.05% citrus oil (vol/vol) completely inhibited P. multocida growth. Under shaking conditions, the antimicrobial activity of both pomace extracts and citrus oil was more intensive. Even citrus oil vapor also significantly reduced the growth of P. multocida. In addition, cell surface hydrophobicity of P. multocida was increased by 2- to 3-fold and its adherence to chicken fibroblast (DF1) and bovine mammary gland (MacT) cells was reduced significantly in the presence of pomace extracts only. This study indicates that these natural products might be good alternatives to conventional antimicrobial agents, and hence, may be used as feed or water supplements to control fowl cholera and reduce production loss caused by P. multocida. PMID:24879687

  14. Pomegranate ellagitannin-derived metabolites inhibit prostate cancer growth and localize to the mouse prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Seeram, Navindra P; Aronson, William J; Zhang, Yanjun; Henning, Susanne M; Moro, Aune; Lee, Ru-Po; Sartippour, Maryam; Harris, Diane M; Rettig, Matthew; Suchard, Marc A; Pantuck, Allan J; Belldegrun, Arie; Heber, David

    2007-09-19

    Our group has shown in a phase II clinical trial that pomegranate juice (PJ) increases prostate specific antigen (PSA) doubling time in prostate cancer (CaP) patients with a rising PSA. Ellagitannins (ETs) are the most abundant polyphenols present in PJ and contribute greatly towards its reported biological properties. On consumption, ETs hydrolyze to release ellagic acid (EA), which is then converted by gut microflora to 3,8-dihydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b, d]pyran-6-one (urolithin A, UA) derivatives. Despite the accumulating knowledge of ET metabolism in animals and humans, there is no available data on the pharmacokinetics and tissue disposition of urolithins. Using a standardized ET-enriched pomegranate extract (PE), we sought to further define the metabolism and tissue distribution of ET metabolites. PE and UA (synthesized in our laboratory) were administered to C57BL/6 wild-type male mice, and metabolite levels in plasma and tissues were determined over 24 h. ET metabolites were concentrated at higher levels in mouse prostate, colon, and intestinal tissues as compared to other tissues after administration of PE or UA. We also evaluated the effects of PE on CaP growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice injected subcutaneously with human CaP cells (LAPC-4). PE significantly inhibited LAPC-4 xenograft growth in SCID mice as compared to vehicle control. Finally, EA and several synthesized urolithins were shown to inhibit the growth of human CaP cells in vitro. The chemopreventive potential of pomegranate ETs and localization of their bioactive metabolites in mouse prostate tissue suggest that pomegranate may play a role in CaP treatment and chemoprevention. This warrants future human tissue bioavailability studies and further clinical studies in men with CaP. PMID:17722872

  15. Fatty acid regulates gene expression and growth of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Chen, Y.; Tjandrawinata, R. R.

    2001-01-01

    It has been proposed that the omega-6 fatty acids increase the rate of tumor growth. Here we test that hypothesis in the PC-3 human prostate tumor. We found that the essential fatty acids, linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA), and the AA metabolite PGE(2) stimulate tumor growth while oleic acid (OA) and the omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) inhibited growth. In examining the role of AA in growth response, we extended our studies to analyze changes in early gene expression induced by AA. We demonstrate that c-fos expression is increased within minutes of addition in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the immediate early gene cox-2 is also increased in the presence of AA in a dose-dependent manner, while the constitutive cox-1 message was not increased. Three hours after exposure to AA, the synthesis of PGE(2) via COX-2 was also increased. Previous studies have demonstrated that AA was primarily delivered by low density lipoprotein (LDL) via its receptor (LDLr). Since it is known that hepatomas, acute myelogenous leukemia and colorectal tumors lack normal cholesterol feedback, we examined the role of the LDLr in growth regulation of the PC-3 prostate cancer cells. Analysis of ldlr mRNA expression and LDLr function demonstrated that human PC-3 prostate cancer cells lack normal feedback regulation. While exogenous LDL caused a significant stimulation of cell growth and PGE(2) synthesis, no change was seen in regulation of the LDLr by LDL. Taken together, these data show that normal cholesterol feedback of ldlr message and protein is lost in prostate cancer. These data suggest that unregulated over-expression of LDLr in tumor cells would permit increased availability of AA, which induces immediate early genes c-fos and cox-2 within minutes of uptake.

  16. A Microplate Growth Inhibition Assay for Screening Bacteriocins against Listeria monocytogenes to Differentiate Their Mode-of-Action

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Paul Priyesh; Muriana, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have historically been used in food fermentations to preserve foods and are generally-recognized-as-safe (GRAS) by the FDA for use as food ingredients. In addition to lactic acid; some strains also produce bacteriocins that have been proposed for use as food preservatives. In this study we examined the inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes 39-2 by neutralized and non-neutralized bacteriocin preparations (Bac+ preps) produced by Lactobacillus curvatus FS47; Lb. curvatus Beef3; Pediococcus acidilactici Bac3; Lactococcus lactis FLS1; Enterococcus faecium FS56-1; and Enterococcus thailandicus FS92. Activity differences between non-neutralized and neutralized Bac+ preps in agar spot assays could not readily be attributed to acid because a bacteriocin-negative control strain was not inhibitory to Listeria in these assays. When neutralized and non-neutralized Bac+ preps were used in microplate growth inhibition assays against L. monocytogenes 39-2 we observed some differences attributed to acid inhibition. A microplate growth inhibition assay was used to compare inhibitory reactions of wild-type and bacteriocin-resistant variants of L. monocytogenes to differentiate bacteriocins with different modes-of-action (MOA) whereby curvaticins FS47 and Beef3, and pediocin Bac3 were categorized to be in MOA1; enterocins FS92 and FS56-1 in MOA2; and lacticin FLS1 in MOA3. The microplate bacteriocin MOA assay establishes a platform to evaluate the best combination of bacteriocin preparations for use in food applications as biopreservatives against L. monocytogenes. PMID:26111195

  17. Acetyl-keto-?-boswellic acid inhibits cellular proliferation through a p21-dependent pathway in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Jun; Huang, Baohua; Hooi, Shing Chuan

    2006-01-01

    Although there is increasing evidence showing that boswellic acid might be a potential anticancer agent, the mechanisms involved in its action are unclear. In the present study, we showed that acetyl-keto-?-boswellic acid (AKBA) inhibited cellular growth in several colon cancer cell lines. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry showed that cells were arrested at the G1 phase after AKBA treatment. Further analysis showed that cyclin D1 and E, CDK 2 and 4 and phosphorylated Rb were decreased in AKBA-treated cells while p21 expression was increased. The growth inhibitory effect of AKBA was dependent on p21 but not p53. HCT-116 p53?/? cells were sensitized to the apoptotic effect of AKBA, suggesting that p21 may have protected cells against apoptosis by inducing a G1 arrest. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that AKBA inhibited cellular growth in colon cancer cells. These findings may have implications to the use of boswellic acids as potential anticancer agents in colon cancer. PMID:16783403

  18. Acetyl-keto-beta-boswellic acid inhibits cellular proliferation through a p21-dependent pathway in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Jun; Huang, Baohua; Hooi, Shing Chuan

    2006-08-01

    1. Although there is increasing evidence showing that boswellic acid might be a potential anticancer agent, the mechanisms involved in its action are unclear. 2. In the present study, we showed that acetyl-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA) inhibited cellular growth in several colon cancer cell lines. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry showed that cells were arrested at the G1 phase after AKBA treatment. 3. Further analysis showed that cyclin D1 and E, CDK 2 and 4 and phosphorylated Rb were decreased in AKBA-treated cells while p21 expression was increased. 4. The growth inhibitory effect of AKBA was dependent on p21 but not p53. HCT-116 p53(-/-) cells were sensitized to the apoptotic effect of AKBA, suggesting that p21 may have protected cells against apoptosis by inducing a G1 arrest.5. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that AKBA inhibited cellular growth in colon cancer cells. These findings may have implications to the use of boswellic acids as potential anticancer agents in colon cancer. PMID:16783403

  19. Amino acids and insulin in neonatal growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rate of growth during the neonatal period is greater than at any other stage of postnatal life, and a majority of the mass increase is skeletal muscle. The rapid growth of skeletal muscle in the neonate is driven by an elevated rate of protein synthesis. Neonates are very efficient at utilizin...

  20. Inhibition of fibroblast growth factor 19 reduces tumor growth by modulating beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Pai, Rama; Dunlap, Debra; Qing, Jing; Mohtashemi, Iman; Hotzel, Kathy; French, Dorothy M

    2008-07-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGF) play important roles in development, angiogenesis, and cancer. FGF19 uniquely binds to FGF receptor 4 (FGFR4). Our previous study has shown that FGF19 transgenic tumors have an activated Wnt-pathway phenotype. Wnt signaling is implicated in initiating or promoting FGF signaling in various cell types and organs. In this study, we examined whether FGF19 or inhibition of FGF19 affects the beta-catenin signaling pathway using human colon cancer cell lines (HCT116, Colo201). Our results show that FGF19 increases tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin and causes loss of beta-catenin-E-cadherin binding. FGF19 increases p-GSK3beta and active beta-catenin levels and anti-FGF19 antibody (1A6) treatment abrogates this effect of FGF19. Anti-FGF19 antibody treatment increases S33/S37/T41 phosphorylation and ubiquitination of beta-catenin. Ion-trap mass spectrometric analysis confirmed that 1A6 increases phosphorylation of beta-catenin in the NH(2) terminus. Using HCT116-paired beta-catenin knockout cells, we show that FGF19 induces TCF/LEF reporter activity in parental (WT/Delta45) and in WT/--but not in mutant (-/Delta45) cells, and that inhibition of endogenous FGF19 reduces this reporter activity, indicating that wild-type beta-catenin is accessible for modulation. FGFR4 knockdown using inducible short hairpin RNA significantly reduces the colony-forming ability in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Although cleaved caspase-3 immunoreactivity remains unchanged, the number of ki67-positive nuclei is reduced in FGFR4 knockdown tumor xenograft tissues. Consistent with the reduced beta-catenin activation, Taqman analyses show that FGF19/FGFR4 inhibition reduced beta-catenin target gene (cyclin D1, CD44, c-jun, Cox-2, UPAR) expression. These findings highlight that FGF19/FGFR4 cross-talk with beta-catenin and that pathway intervention reduces tumor growth. PMID:18593907

  1. Early Initiation of Deoxyribonucleic Acid Replication and Shortening of Generation Time Associated with Inhibition of Lateral Wall Formation by Mecillinam

    PubMed Central

    Satta, G.; Botta, G.; Canepari, P.; Fontana, R.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of mecillinam on the growth of rods of the pH-conditional morphology mutant MirM7 was studied. It has been found that mecillinam causes, coincident with transition to coccal shape, a balanced rise in the rate of viable count increase and the rate of macromolecular synthesis which lasts either until the cells enter a stationary growth phase or indefinitely, in the case of continuously diluted cultures. When the antibiotic is removed from cells which have already become coccoid, cells continue to grow at a faster rate until they resume the rod shape. No change in the per-cell rate of protein synthesis has been seen in untreated or mecillinam-treated cells before or after the change in growth rate. Studies with synchronously growing cells have shown that the antibiotic causes a shortening in the I period (initiation of deoxyribonucleic acid replication). Evaluation of the residual divisions in nalidixic acid-treated, exponential-phase cells has shown that mecillinam also shortens the D period (cell division). It is proposed that, in strain MirM7, inhibition of lateral wall elongation by the antibiotic allows the initiation of a new septum, though inhibition is still in progress. The initiation of a new septum is, in turn, responsible for both the early inibition of deoxyribonucleic acid replication and accelerated division. In the parental strain, MirA12, as well as in other sensitive gram-negative rods which divide, become cocci, and stop dividing after addition of the antibiotic, inhibition of lateral wall formation activates a feedback mechanism which prevents insertion of new septa (Satta et al., J. Bacteriol. 142:43-51, 1980). Consequently, no early initiation of deoxyribonucleic acid replication is observed, and the last division allowed by the antibiotic occurs in due time. This negative control is missing in MirM7. PMID:6270055

  2. Transformation with Oncogenic Ras and the Simian Virus 40 T Antigens Induces Caspase-Dependent Sensitivity to Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shihao; Spencer, Cody M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oncogenesis is frequently accompanied by the activation of specific metabolic pathways. One such pathway is fatty acid biosynthesis, whose induction is observed upon transformation of a wide variety of cell types. Here, we explored how defined oncogenic alleles, specifically the simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigens and oncogenic Ras12V, affect fatty acid metabolism. Our results indicate that SV40/Ras12V-mediated transformation of fibroblasts induces fatty acid biosynthesis in the absence of significant changes in the concentration of fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes. This oncogene-induced activation of fatty acid biosynthesis was found to be mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) dependent, as it was attenuated by rapamycin treatment. Furthermore, SV40/Ras12V-mediated transformation induced sensitivity to treatment with fatty acid biosynthetic inhibitors. Pharmaceutical inhibition of acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase (ACC), a key fatty acid biosynthetic enzyme, induced caspase-dependent cell death in oncogene-transduced cells. In contrast, isogenic nontransformed cells were resistant to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition. This oncogene-induced sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition was independent of the cells' growth rates and could be attenuated by supplementing the medium with unsaturated fatty acids. Both the activation of fatty acid biosynthesis and the sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition could be conveyed to nontransformed breast epithelial cells through transduction with oncogenic Ras12V. Similar to what was observed in the transformed fibroblasts, the Ras12V-induced sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition was independent of the proliferative status and could be attenuated by supplementing the medium with unsaturated fatty acids. Combined, our results indicate that specific oncogenic alleles can directly confer sensitivity to inhibitors of fatty acid biosynthesis. IMPORTANCE Viral oncoproteins and cellular mutations drive the transformation of normal cells to the cancerous state. These oncogenic alterations induce metabolic changes and dependencies that can be targeted to kill cancerous cells. Here, we find that the cellular transformation resulting from combined expression of the SV40 early region with an oncogenic Ras allele is sufficient to induce cellular susceptibility to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition. Inhibition of fatty acid biosynthesis in these cells resulted in programmed cell death, which could be rescued by supplementing the medium with nonsaturated fatty acids. Similar results were observed with the expression of oncogenic Ras in nontransformed breast epithelial cells. Combined, our results suggest that specific oncogenic alleles induce metabolic dependencies that can be exploited to selectively kill cancerous cells. PMID:25855740

  3. In vitro mechanism of inhibition of bacterial cell growth by allicin.

    PubMed Central

    Feldberg, R S; Chang, S C; Kotik, A N; Nadler, M; Neuwirth, Z; Sundstrom, D C; Thompson, N H

    1988-01-01

    Diallyl thiosulfinate (allicin) is the agent found in garlic which is responsible for the antibacterial and antifungal activity of extracts of this plant. The effect of bacteriostatic concentrations of allicin (0.2 to 0.5 mM) on the growth of Salmonella typhimurium revealed a pattern of inhibition characterized by: (i) a lag of approximately 15 min between addition of allicin and onset of inhibition, (ii) a transitory inhibition phase whose duration was proportional to allicin concentration and inversely proportional to culture density, (iii) a resumed growth phase which showed a lower rate of growth than in uninhibited controls, and (iv) an entry into stationary phase at a lower culture density. Whereas DNA and protein syntheses showed a delayed and partial inhibition by allicin, inhibition of RNA synthesis was immediate and total, suggesting that this is the primary target of allicin action. PMID:2469386

  4. Inhibition of Diabrotica Larval Growth by Patatin, the Lipid Acyl Hydrolase from Potato Tubers.

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, J. A.; Orr, G. L.; Walsh, T. A.

    1995-01-01

    Patatin, the nonspecific lipid acyl hydrolase from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers, dose-dependently inhibits the growth of southern corn rootworm (SCR) and western corn rootworm when fed to them on artificial diet. The 50% growth reduction levels are somewhat cultivar dependent, ranging from 60 to 150 [mu]g/g diet for neonate SCR larvae. A single patatin isoform also inhibits larval growth. Neonate SCR continuously exposed to patatin are halted in larval development. Treatment with di-isopropylfluorophosphate essentially eliminates patatin's phospholipase, galactolipase, and acyl hydrolase activities. SCR growth inhibition is eliminated also, indicating that patatin's serine hydrolase activity is responsible for the observed activities. Patatin-mediated phospholipolysis is highly pH and cultivar dependent, with specific activities up to 300-fold less at pH 5.5 than at pH 8.5. Esterase or phospholipase activities do not correlate with insect growth inhibition. Galactolipase activity, being cultivar and pH independent, correlates significantly with SCR growth inhibition. Insect-growth inhibition of patatin is significantly reduced with increased dietary cholesterol levels. In conclusion, patatin represents a new class of insect-control proteins with a novel mode of action possibly involving lipid metabolism. PMID:12228621

  5. Inhibition of spoilage mould conidia by acetic acid and sorbic acid involves different modes of action, requiring modification of the classical weak-acid theory.

    PubMed

    Stratford, Malcolm; Plumridge, Andrew; Nebe-von-Caron, Gerhardt; Archer, David B

    2009-11-30

    Fungal spoilage of many foods is prevented by weak-acid preservatives such as sorbic acid or acetic acid. We show that sorbic and acetic acids do not both inhibit cells by lowering of internal pH alone and that the "classical weak-acid theory" must be revised. The "classical weak-acid theory" suggests that all lipophilic acids with identical pK(a) values are equally effective as preservatives, causing inhibition by diffusion of molecular acids into the cell, dissociation, and subsequent acidification of the cytoplasm. Using a number of spoilage fungi from different genera, we have shown that sorbic acid was far more toxic than acetic acid, and no correlation existed between resistance to acetic acid and resistance to sorbic acid. The molar ratio of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) (acetic: sorbic) was 58 for Paecilomyces variotii and 14 for Aspergillus phoenicis. Using flow cytometry on germinating conidia of Aspergillusniger, acetic acid at pH 4.0 caused an immediate decline in the mean cytoplasmic pH (pH(i)) falling from neutrality to approximately pH 4.7 at the MIC (80 mM). Sorbic acid also caused a rapid but far smaller drop in pH(i), at the MIC (4.5 mM); the pH remained above pH 6.3. Over 0-5 mM, a number of other weak acids caused a similar fall in cytoplasmic pH. It was concluded that while acetic acid inhibition of A. niger conidia was due to cytoplasmic acidification, inhibition by sorbic acid was not. A possible membrane-mediated mode of action of sorbic acid is discussed. PMID:19846233

  6. Influence of some growth regulators and cations on inhibition of chlorophyll biosynthesis by lead in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, S.K. ); Srivastava, H.S. ); Tripathi, R.D. )

    1993-08-01

    Phytotoxic effects of Pb pollution are well established. In order to analyse the physiological basis of toxic symptoms and of reduced plant productivity, its effect on chlorophyll content has been examined in some plants. Thus, a decrease in total chlorophyll content during Pb supply has been observed in oats, mung beam, pea, etc. The activity of delta aminolevulinic acid dehydratase, an important enzyme in the biosynthesis of heme pigments, is inhibited by Pb in mung bean and several other species. This observation may perhaps indicate that a reduction in chlorophyll content in the presence of lead is due to an inhibition of pigment synthesis. The effect of Pb on greening maize leaf segments in the presence of various precursors of chlorophyll has been studied in the present investigation to evaluate this hypothesis. The effect of some growth regulators and cations, which could otherwise modify chlorophyll biosynthesis, has been examined to see whether the toxic effects of Pb on photosynthetic pigments could also be modified by these effectors. 16 refs., 4 tabs.

  7. Imatinib mesylate inhibits platelet derived growth factor stimulated proliferation of rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sandler, Charlotta; Joutsiniemi, Saima; Lindstedt, Ken A.; Juutilainen, Timo; Kovanen, Petri T.; Eklund, Kari K. . E-mail: kari.eklund@hus.fi

    2006-08-18

    Synovial fibroblast is the key cell type in the growth of the pathological synovial tissue in arthritis. Here, we show that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a potent mitogen for synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Inhibition of PDGF-receptor signalling by imatinib mesylate (1 {mu}M) completely abrogated the PDGF-stimulated proliferation and inhibited approximately 70% of serum-stimulated proliferation of synovial fibroblasts. Similar extent of inhibition was observed when PDGF was neutralized with anti-PDGF antibodies, suggesting that imatinib mesylate does not inhibit pathways other than those mediated by PDGF-receptors. No signs of apoptosis were detected in synovial fibroblasts cultured in the presence of imatinib. These results suggest that imatinib mesylate specifically inhibits PDGF-stimulated proliferation of synovial fibroblasts, and that inhibition of PDGF-receptors could represent a feasible target for novel antirheumatic therapies.

  8. Inhibition of prostate cancer growth by muscadine grapeskin extract and resveratrol through distinct mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytochemicals are naturally occurring compounds with demonstrated anti-tumor activities. The phytochemical resveratrol, contained in red grapes, has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth, potentially through its anti-oxidant activity. Muscadine grapes contain different phytochemical con...

  9. Inhibition of Growth of Salmonella by Native Flora of Broiler Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction Some bacteria in the cecal microflora of broilers can inhibit colonization of chicks by Salmonella. Beneficial cecal bacteria may reduce Salmonella colonization by competing for nutrients and attachment sites or by producing metabolites that inhibit Salmonella growth. The purpose of th...

  10. A ROLE FOR AMPK IN THE INHIBITION OF GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE BY POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Kohan, Alison B.; Talukdar, Indrani; Walsh, Callee M.; Salati, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Both polyunsaturated fatty acids and AMPK promote energy partitioning away from energy consuming processes, such as fatty acid synthesis, towards energy generating processes, such as ?-oxidation. In this report, we demonstrate that arachidonic acid activates AMPK in primary rat hepatocytes, and that this effect is p38 MAPK-dependent. Activation of AMPK mimics the inhibition by arachidonic acid of the insulin-mediated induction of G6PD. Similar to intracellular signaling by arachidonic acid, AMPK decreases insulin signal transduction, increasing Ser307 phosphorylation of IRS-1 and a subsequent decrease in AKT phosphorylation. Overexpression of dominant-negative AMPK abolishes the effect of arachidonic acid on G6PD expression. These data suggest a role for AMPK in the inhibition of G6PD by polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:19646964

  11. A role for AMPK in the inhibition of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by polyunsaturated fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Kohan, Alison B.; Talukdar, Indrani; Walsh, Callee M.; Salati, Lisa M.

    2009-10-09

    Both polyunsaturated fatty acids and AMPK promote energy partitioning away from energy consuming processes, such as fatty acid synthesis, towards energy generating processes, such as {beta}-oxidation. In this report, we demonstrate that arachidonic acid activates AMPK in primary rat hepatocytes, and that this effect is p38 MAPK-dependent. Activation of AMPK mimics the inhibition by arachidonic acid of the insulin-mediated induction of G6PD. Similar to intracellular signaling by arachidonic acid, AMPK decreases insulin signal transduction, increasing Ser{sup 307} phosphorylation of IRS-1 and a subsequent decrease in AKT phosphorylation. Overexpression of dominant-negative AMPK abolishes the effect of arachidonic acid on G6PD expression. These data suggest a role for AMPK in the inhibition of G6PD by polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  12. Culture at a Higher Temperature Mildly Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth but Enhances Chemotherapeutic Effects by Inhibiting Cell-Cell Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shengming; Wang, Jiangang; Xie, Bingkun; Luo, Zhiguo; Lin, Xiukun; Liao, D. Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile infections have historically been used to treat cancer. To explore the underlying mechanism, we studied chronic effects of fever on cancer cell growth and chemotherapeutic efficacy in cell culture. We found that culturing cancer cells at 39°C mildly inhibited cell growth by arresting the cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. When cells were seeded in culture dishes at a lower density, e.g. about 1000–2000 cells per 35-mm dish, the growth inhibition was much greater, manifested as many fewer cell colonies in the 39°C dishes, compared with the results at a higher density seeding, e.g. 20,000 cells per dish, suggesting that cell-cell collaboration as the Allee effect in cell culture is inhibited at 39°C. Withdrawal of cells from serum enhanced the G1 arrest at 39°C and, for some cell lines such as A549 lung cancer cells, serum replenishment failed to quickly drive the cells from the G1 into the S and G2-M phases. Therapeutic effects of several chemotherapeutic agents, including clove bud extracts, on several cancer cell lines were more potent at 39°C than at 37°C, especially when the cells were seeded at a low density. For some cell lines and some agents, this enhancement is long-lasting, i.e. continuing after the cessation of the treatment. Collectively these results suggest that hyperthermia may inhibit cancer cell growth by G1 arrest and by inhibition of cell-cell collaboration, and may enhance the efficacy of several chemotherapeutic agents, an effect which may persist beyond the termination of chemotherapy. PMID:26495849

  13. Inhibition of a Secreted Glutamic Peptidase Prevents Growth of the Fungus Talaromyces emersonii*

    PubMed Central

    O'Donoghue, Anthony J.; Mahon, Cathal S.; Goetz, David H.; O'Malley, James M.; Gallagher, Denise M.; Zhou, Min; Murray, Patrick G.; Craik, Charles S.; Tuohy, Maria G.

    2008-01-01

    The thermophilic filamentous fungus Talaromyces emersonii secretes a variety of hydrolytic enzymes that are of interest for processing of biomass into fuel. Many carbohydrases have been isolated and characterized from this fungus, but no studies had been performed on peptidases. In this study, two acid-acting endopeptidases were isolated and characterized from the culture filtrate of T. emersonii. One of these enzymes was identified as a member of the recently classified glutamic peptidase family and was subsequently named T. emersonii glutamic peptidase 1 (TGP1). The second enzyme was identified as an aspartyl peptidase (PEP1). TGP1 was cloned and sequenced and shown to exhibit 64 and 47% protein identity to peptidases from Aspergillus niger and Scytalidium lignocolum, respectively. Substrate profiling of 16 peptides determined that TGP1 has broad specificity with a preference for large residues in the P1 site, particularly Met, Gln, Phe, Lys, Glu, and small amino acids at P1? such as Ala, Gly, Ser, or Thr. This enzyme efficiently cleaves an internally quenched fluorescent substrate containing the zymogen activation sequence (kcat/Km = 2 × 105 m-1 s-1). Maximum hydrolysis occurs at pH 3.4 and 50 °C. The reaction is strongly inhibited by a transition state peptide analog, TA1 (Ki = 1.5 nm), as well as a portion of the propeptide sequence, PT1 (Ki = 32 nm). Ex vivo studies show that hyphal extension of T. emersonii in complex media is unaffected by the aspartyl peptidase inhibitor pepstatin but is inhibited by TA1 and PT1. This study provides insight into the functional role of the glutamic peptidase TGP1 for growth of T. emersonii. PMID:18687686

  14. On the role of abscisic Acid and gibberellin in the regulation of growth in rice.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann-Benning, S; Kende, H

    1992-07-01

    Submergence induces rapid elongation of rice coleoptiles (Oryza sativa L.) and of deepwater rice internodes. This adaptive feature helps rice to grow out of the water and to survive flooding. Earlier, we found that the growth response of submerged deepwater rice plants is mediated by ethylene and gibberellin (GA). Ethylene promotes growth, at least in part, by increasing the responsiveness of the internodal tissue to GA. In the present work, we examined the possibility that increased responsiveness to GA was based on a reduction in endogenous abscisic acid (ABA) levels. Submergence and treatment with ethylene led, within 3 hours, to a 75% reduction in the level of ABA in the intercalary meristem and the growing zone of deepwater rice internodes. The level of GA(1) increased fourfold during the same time period. An interaction between GA and ABA could also be shown by application of the hormones. ABA inhibited growth of submerged internodes, and GA counteracted this inhibition. Our results indicate that the growth rate of deepwater rice internodes is determined by the ratio of an endogenous growth promoter (GA) and a growth inhibitor (ABA). We also investigated whether ABA is involved in regulating the growth of rice coleoptiles. Rice seedlings were grown on solutions containing fluridone, an inhibitor of carotenoid and, indirectly, of ABA biosynthesis. Treatment with fluridone reduced the level of ABA in coleoptiles and first leaves by more than 75% and promoted coleoptile growth by more than 60%. Little or no enhancement of growth by fluridone was observed in barley, oat, or wheat. The involvement of ABA in determining the growth rate of rice coleoptiles and deepwater rice internodes may be related to the semiaquatic growth habit of this plant. PMID:16668983

  15. Inhibition of the growth of transformed and neoplastic cells by the dipeptide carnosine.

    PubMed

    Holliday, R; McFarland, G A

    1996-04-01

    Human diploid fibroblasts growth normally in medium containing physiological concentrations of the naturally occurring dipeptide carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine). These concentrations are cytotoxic to transformed and neoplastic cells lines in modified Eagle medium (MEM), whereas these cells grow vigorously in Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM) containing carnosine. This difference is due to the presence of 1 mM sodium pyruvate in DMEM. Seven human cell lines and two rodent cell lines were tested and all are strongly inhibited by carnosine in the absence of pyruvate. Experiments with HeLa cells show that anserine is similar to carnosine, but D-carnosine and homocarnosine are without effect. Also, the non-essential amino acids alanine and glutamic acid contribute to the effect of pyruvate in preventing carnosine toxicity, and oxaloacetate and alpha-ketoglutarate can substitute for pyruvate. We have used mixtures of normal MRC-5 fibroblasts and HeLa cells to demonstrate that 20 mM carnosine can selectively eliminate the tumour cells. This has obvious implications which might be exploited in in vivo and in vitro studies. Carnosine is known to react strongly with aldehyde and keto groups of sugars by Amadori reaction, and we propose that it depletes certain glycolysis intermediates. It is well known that tumour cells are more dependent on glycolysis than normal cells. A reduction of glycolysis intermediates by carnosine may deplete their energy supply, but this effect is totally reversed by pyruvate. PMID:8611433

  16. Targeting SPARC by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference inhibits cervical cancer cell growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), a calcium-binding matricellular glycoprotein, is implicated in the progressions of some cancers. However, no information has been available to date regarding the function of SPARC in cervical cancer cell growth and metastasis. Methods In this study, we isolated and established high invasive subclones and low invasive subclones from human cervical cancer cell lines HeLa and SiHa by the limited dilution method. Real-time q-RT-PCR, Western Blot and ICC were performed to investigate SPARC mRNA and protein expressions in high invasive subclones and low invasive subclones. Then lentivirus vector with SPARC shRNA was constructed and infected the highly invasive subclones. Real-time q-RT-PCR, Western Blot and ICC were also performed to investigate the changes of SPARC expression after viral infection. In functional assays, effects of SPARC knockdown on the biological behaviors of cervical cancer cells were investigated. The mechanisms of SPARC in cervical cancer proliferation, apoptosis and invasion were also researched. Results SPARC was over-expressed in the highly invasive subclones compared with the low invasive subclones. Knockdown of SPARC significantly suppressed cervical cancer cell proliferation, and induced cell cycle arrest at the G1/G0 phase through the p53/p21 pathway, also caused cell apoptosis accompanied by the decreased ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, and inhibited cell invasion and metastasis accompanied by down-regulated MMP2 and MMP9 expressions and up-regulated E-cadherin expression. Conclusion SPARC is related to the invasive phenotype of cervical cancer cells. Knockdown of SPARC significantly suppresses cervical cancer cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis and inhibits cell invasion and metastasis. SPARC as a promoter improves cervical cancer cell growth and metastasis. PMID:23050783

  17. Pharmacologic retinoid signaling and physiologic retinoic acid receptor signaling inhibit basal cell carcinoma tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    So, Po-Lin; Fujimoto, Michele A.; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer. Patients with basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome) are highly susceptible to developing many BCCs as a result of a constitutive inactivating mutation in one allele of PATCHED 1, which encodes a tumor suppressor that is a major inhibitor of Hedgehog signaling. Dysregulated Hedgehog signaling is a common feature of both hereditary and sporadic BCCs. Recently, we showed remarkable anti-BCC chemopreventive efficacy of tazarotene, a retinoid with retinoic acid receptor (RAR) ?/? specificity, in Ptch1 +/? mice when treatment was commenced before carcinogenic insults. In this study, we assessed whether the effect of tazarotene against BCC carcinogenesis is sustained after its withdrawal and whether tazarotene is effective against preexisting microscopic BCC lesions. We found that BCCs did not reappear for at least 5 months after topical drug treatment was stopped and that already developed, microscopic BCCs were susceptible to tazarotene inhibition. In vitro, tazarotene inhibited a murine BCC keratinocyte cell line, ASZ001, suggesting that its effect in vivo is by direct action on the actual tumor cells. Down-regulation of Gli1, a target gene of Hedgehog signaling and up-regulation of CRABPII, a target gene of retinoid signaling, were observed with tazarotene treatment. Finally, we investigated the effects of topical applications of other retinoid-related compounds on BCC tumorigenesis in vivo. Tazarotene was the most effective of the preparations studied, and its effect most likely was mediated by RAR? activation. Furthermore, inhibition of basal RAR signaling in the skin promoted BCC carcinogenesis, suggesting that endogenous RAR signaling restrains BCC growth. PMID:18483315

  18. Synergistic inhibition of cancer cell proliferation with a combination of ?-tocotrienol and ferulic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Eitsuka, Takahiro; Tatewaki, Naoto; Nishida, Hiroshi; Kurata, Tadao; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • ?-Tocotrienol (?-T3) and ferulic acid (FA) synergistically inhibit cancer cell growth. • The combination of ?-T3 and FA induces G1 arrest by up-regulating p21. • The synergy is attributed to an increase in the cellular concentration of ?-T3 by FA. - Abstract: Rice bran consists of many functional compounds and thus much attention has been focused on the health benefits of its components. Here, we investigated the synergistic inhibitory effects of its components, particularly ?-tocotrienol (?-T3) and ferulic acid (FA), against the proliferation of an array of cancer cells, including DU-145 (prostate cancer), MCF-7 (breast cancer), and PANC-1 (pancreatic cancer) cells. The combination of ?-T3 and FA markedly reduced cell proliferation relative to ?-T3 alone, and FA had no effect when used alone. Although ?-T3 induced G1 arrest by up-regulating p21 in PANC-1 cells, more cells accumulated in G1 phase with the combination of ?-T3 and FA. This synergistic effect was attributed to an increase in the cellular concentration of ?-T3 by FA. Our results suggest that the combination of ?-T3 and FA may present a new strategy for cancer prevention and therapy.

  19. Paracrine expression of a native soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibits tumor growth, metastasis, and mortality rate

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Corey K.; Kendall, Richard L.; Cabrera, Gustavo; Soroceanu, Liliana; Heike, Yuji; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Siegal, Gene P.; Mao, Xianzhi; Bett, Andrew J.; Huckle, William R.; Thomas, Kenneth A.; Curiel, David T.

    1998-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent and selective vascular endothelial cell mitogen and angiogenic factor. VEGF expression is elevated in a wide variety of solid tumors and is thought to support their growth by enhancing tumor neovascularization. To block VEGF-dependent angiogenesis, tumor cells were transfected with cDNA encoding the native soluble FLT-1 (sFLT-1) truncated VEGF receptor which can function both by sequestering VEGF and, in a dominant negative fashion, by forming inactive heterodimers with membrane-spanning VEGF receptors. Transient transfection of HT-1080 human fibrosarcoma cells with a gene encoding sFLT-1 significantly inhibited their implantation and growth in the lungs of nude mice following i.v. injection and their growth as nodules from cells injected s.c. High sFLT-1 expressing stably transfected HT-1080 clones grew even slower as s.c. tumors. Finally, survival was significantly prolonged in mice injected intracranially with human glioblastoma cells stably transfected with the sflt-1 gene. The ability of sFLT-1 protein to inhibit tumor growth is presumably attributable to its paracrine inhibition of tumor angiogenesis in vivo, since it did not affect tumor cell mitogenesis in vitro. These results not only support VEGF receptors as antiangiogenic targets but also demonstrate that sflt-1 gene therapy might be a feasible approach for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and growth. PMID:9671758

  20. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic, kojic and picolinic acids

    PubMed Central

    Çevik, Kübra; Ulusoy, Seyhan

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The inhibitory effects of iron chelators, and FeCl3 chelation on biofilm formation and swarming motility were investigated against an opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: The inhibitory activity of 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic acid, kojic acid and picolinic acid on biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 and three clinical isolates (P. aeruginosa PAK01, P. aeruginosa PAK02 and P. aeruginosa PAK03) were investigated, based on crystal violet assay, and swarming motility test. Results: The kojic, lipoic and picolinic acid inhibited biofilm formation by 5-33% in all tested P. aeruginosa isolates. When chelated iron was added, biofilm inhibition rates were determined to be 39-57%. Among the tested chelators against P. aeruginosa, lipoic acid (84%) and kojic acid (68%) presented the highest inhibition of swarming motility. This is the first study to report the inhibitory effect of lipoic acid on biofilm formation and swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: It is considered that lipoic and picolinic acids can serve as alternatives for the treatment of the P. aeruginosa infections by inhibiting biofilm formation. PMID:26557964

  1. Vanadate inhibition of fungal phyA and bacterial appA2 histidine acid phosphatases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungal PhyA protein, which was first identified as an acid optimum phosphomonoesterase (EC 3.1.3.8), could also serve as a vanadate haloperoxidase (EC 1.11.1.10) provided the acid phosphatase activity is shutdown by vanadate. To understand how vanadate inhibits both phytate and pNPP degrading ac...

  2. Light Inhibition of Shoot Regeneration Is Regulated by Endogenous Abscisic Acid Level in Calli Derived from Immature Barley Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Rikiishi, Kazuhide; Matsuura, Takakazu; Ikeda, Yoko; Maekawa, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Shoot regeneration in calli derived from immature barley embryos is regulated by light conditions during the callus-induction period. Barley cultivars Kanto Nijo-5 (KN5) and K-3 (K3) showed lower efficiency of shoot regeneration in a 16-h photoperiod during callus-induction than those in continuous darkness, whereas shoot regeneration was enhanced in cultures under a 16-h photoperiod in Golden Promise (GP) and Lenins (LN). These cultivars were classified as photo-inhibition type (KN5 and K3) or photo-induction type (GP and LN) according to their response to light. Contents of endogenous plant hormones were determined in calli cultured under a 16-h photoperiod and continuous darkness. In photo-inhibition type, higher accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA) was detected in calli cultured under a 16-h photoperiod, whereas calli showed lower levels of endogenous ABA in continuous darkness. However, cultivars of photo-induction type showed lower levels of ABA in calli cultured under both light conditions, similarly to photo-inhibition type in continuous darkness. Exogenous ABA inhibited the callus growth and shoot regeneration independent of light conditions in all cultivars. In photo-inhibition type, lower levels of endogenous ABA induced by ABA biosynthesis inhibitor, fluridone, reduced the photo-inhibition of shoot regeneration. Expression of ABA biosynthesis gene, HvNCED1, in calli was regulated by the light conditions. Higher expression was observed in calli cultured under a 16-h photoperiod. These results indicate that ABA biosynthesis could be activated through the higher expression of HvNCED1 in a 16-h photoperiod and that the higher accumulations of ABA inhibit shoot regeneration in the photo-inhibition type cultivars. PMID:26670930

  3. Mechanism of iron inhibition by stearic acid Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, W.; Shan, Y.; Guo, D.; Lu, T.; Xi, S.

    1995-01-01

    Many organic compounds can be adsorbed onto the interface of a metal and solution to form a thin film that inhibits the corrosion process according to a blocking and/or negative catalytic effect. Using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique, stearic acid (SA) monolayers were deposited onto the surface of an iron (Fe) electrode to study the inhibition effect and the mechanism of SA in a neutral medium. Molecular orientation and the number of deposited monolayers of SA were shown to have marked effects on inhibition of Fe corrosion. The inhibition mechanism depended mainly on blocking.

  4. Dietary agonists of TRPV1 inhibit gastric acid secretion in mice.

    PubMed

    Okumi, Hirokuni; Tashima, Kimihito; Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Namiki, Takao; Terasawa, Katsutoshi; Horie, Syunji

    2012-11-01

    Capsaicin and 6-gingerol, pungent components of chilli pepper and ginger, are known as dietary agonists of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 nerve fibers are recognized to play a role in gastric mucosal integrity in rats. In the present studies, we examined the acute effects of peroral administration of capsaicin and 6-gingerol on gastric acid secretion in conscious mice. These agents were given p.?o. 30?min before the pylorus was ligated. Oral administration of capsaicin (1.0-100?mg/kg) or 6-gingerol (1.5-50?mg/kg) significantly and dose-dependently inhibited basal acid secretion. Pretreatment with BCTC, a transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 antagonist, significantly reversed the reduced basal acid secretion by capsaicin or 6-gingerol. The combination of the lowest doses of capsaicin and 6-gingerol markedly inhibited basal acid secretion in conscious mice and this was also significantly reversed by BCTC. Moreover, the combination of the maximal dose of capsaicin and 6-gingerol inhibited basal acid secretion only to the level of a single administration of the maximal dose of capsaicin. These results suggest that the combination of capsaicin and 6-gingerol has an additive effect on the inhibition of gastric acid secretion through activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1. In separate experiments, intraduodenal administration of either capsaicin (30?mg/kg) or 6-gingerol (15?mg/kg), whose doses were observed to have a significant inhibitory effect by oral administration, tended to inhibit basal acid secretion compared with the vehicle. These results suggest that the combination of capsaicin and 6-gingerol has an additive effect on inhibition of gastric acid secretion through activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1, and oral administration of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 agonists directly stimulates transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 in the gastric lumen, resulting in a potent reduction of gastric acid secretion. PMID:23047250

  5. The Spatially Variable Inhibition by Water Deficit of Maize Root Growth Correlates with Altered

    E-print Network

    Neumann, Peter M.

    in the literature concerning increases induced by acid pH in wall-extensibility parameters, lead us to propose the root elongation zone was assayed by high resolution analyses of images of acid diffusion around roots; Peters and Felle, 1999; Tournaire-Roux et al., 2003). For example, according to the acid growth

  6. Boric acid application guidelines for intergranular corrosion inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Piskor, S.R. . Nuclear Services Div.)

    1990-12-01

    A significant fraction of the operating Pressurized Water Reactor steam generators have used or are using boric acid as an inhibitor to control stress corrosion cracking, intergranular attack, or denting. Boric acid is applied on line, or by means of crevice flushing, low power soaks, or a combination of these methods. When boric acid is used, it is important to have knowledge about its chemical and physical properties, its effect on corrosion, and its correct application. The data on these subjects may be found in a diversity of sources, which are often not readily available or convenient to use. In addition, new information has recently become available. This report has been prepared and revised to be comprehensive treatise on boric acid relevant to its application in nuclear steam generators. Relevant boric acid information from 1987--89 has been added to provide the latest available data from laboratory testing and power plant application. 5 figs.

  7. Growth Inhibition of Human Gynecologic and Colon Cancer Cells by Phyllanthus watsonii through Apoptosis Induction

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Sujatha; Abdul Wahab, Norhanom; Zainal Abidin, Nurhayati; Manickam, Sugumaran; Zakaria, Zubaidah

    2012-01-01

    Phyllanthus watsonii Airy Shaw is an endemic plant found in Peninsular Malaysia. Although there are numerous reports on the anti cancer properties of other Phyllanthus species, published information on the cytotoxicity of P. watsonii are very limited. The present study was carried out with bioassay-guided fractionation approach to evaluate the cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction capability of the P. watsonii extracts and fractions on human gynecologic (SKOV-3 and Ca Ski) and colon (HT-29) cancer cells. P. watsonii extracts exhibited strong cytotoxicity on all the cancer cells studied with IC50 values of ? 20.0 µg/mL. Hexane extract of P. watsonii was further subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation and yielded 10 fractions (PW-1?PW-10). PW-4?PW-8 portrayed stronger cytotoxic activity and was further subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation and resulted with 8 sub-fractions (PPWH-1?PPWH-8). PPWH-7 possessed greatest cytotoxicity (IC50 values ranged from 0.66 – 0.83 µg/mL) and was selective on the cancer cells studied. LC-MS/MS analysis of PPWH-7 revealed the presence of ellagic acid, geranic acid, glochidone, betulin, phyllanthin and sterol glucoside. Marked morphological changes, ladder-like appearance of DNA and increment in caspase-3 activity indicating apoptosis were clearly observed in both human gynecologic and colon cancer cells treated with P. watsonii especially with PPWH-7. The study also indicated that P. watsonii extracts arrested cell cycle at different growth phases in SKOV-3, Ca Ski and HT-29 cells. Cytotoxic and apoptotic potential of the endemic P. watsonii was investigated for the first time by bioassay-guided approach. These results demonstrated that P. watsonii selectively inhibits the growth of SKOV-3, Ca Ski and HT-29 cells through apoptosis induction and cell cycle modulation. Hence, P. watsonii has the potential to be further exploited for the discovery and development of new anti cancer drugs. PMID:22536331

  8. Vanillic Acid Inhibits Inflammatory Pain by Inhibiting Neutrophil Recruitment, Oxidative Stress, Cytokine Production, and NF?B Activation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Calixto-Campos, Cássia; Carvalho, Thacyana T; Hohmann, Miriam S N; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Fattori, Victor; Manchope, Marília F; Zarpelon, Ana C; Baracat, Marcela M; Georgetti, Sandra R; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2015-08-28

    Vanillic acid (1) is a flavoring agent found in edible plants and fruits. It is an oxidized form of vanillin. Phenolic compounds form a substantial part of plant foods used as antioxidants with beneficial biological activities. These compounds have received considerable attention because of their role in preventing human diseases. Especially, 1 presents antibacterial, antimicrobial, and chemopreventive effects. However, the mechanisms by which 1 exerts its anti-inflammatory effects in vivo are incompletely understood. Thus, the effect of 1 was evaluated in murine models of inflammatory pain. Treatment with 1 inhibited the overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, phenyl-p-benzoquinone, the second phase of the formalin test, and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Treatment with 1 also inhibited carrageenan- and CFA-induced mechanical hyperalgesia, paw edema, myeloperoxidase activity, and N-acetyl-?-D-glucosaminidase activity. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of 1 involved the inhibition of oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and NF?B activation in the carrageenan model. The present study demonstrated 1 presents analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects in a wide range of murine inflammation models, and its mechanisms of action involves antioxidant effects and NF?B-related inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:26192250

  9. Growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of Zea mays seedlings deficient in abscisic acid and gibberellic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Dickey, K.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine if gibberellic acid (GA) and/or abscisic acid (ABA) are necessary for graviresponsiveness by primary roots of Zea mays. To accomplish this objective we measured the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of seedlings in which the synthesis of ABA and GA was inhibited collectively and individually by genetic and chemical means. Roots of seedlings treated with Fluridone (an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis) and Ancymidol (an inhibitor of GA biosynthesis) were characterized by slower growth rates but not significantly different gravicultures as compared to untreated controls. Gravicurvatures of primary roots of d-5 mutants (having undetectable levels of GA) and vp-9 mutants (having undectable levels of ABA) were not significantly different from those of wild-type seedlings. Roots of seedlings in which the biosynthesis of ABA and GA was collectively inhibited were characterized by gravicurvatures not significantly different for those of controls. These results (1) indicate that drastic reductions in the amount of ABA and GA in Z. mays seedlings do not significantly alter root graviresponsiveness, (2) suggest that neither ABA nor GA is necessary for root gravicurvature, and (3) indicate that root gravicurvature is not necessarily proportional to root elongation.

  10. Sonodynamic therapy inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model

    E-print Network

    Cao, Wenwu

    Sonodynamic therapy inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model Zhongxiuzi proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube forma- tion. Furthermore, in a tumor xenograft mouse model, SDT was obtained from BD Biosci- ences. Rabbit anti-CD31 and mouse anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN.
    Harland and Liburdy (1) reported that 1.2-uT, 60-Hz magnetic fields could significantly block the inhibitory action of pharmacological levels of tamoxifen (10-7 M) on the growth of MCF-7 human br...

  12. Anaerobic growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum via mixed-acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Michel, Andrea; Koch-Koerfges, Abigail; Krumbach, Karin; Brocker, Melanie; Bott, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, a model organism in microbial biotechnology, is known to metabolize glucose under oxygen-deprived conditions to l-lactate, succinate, and acetate without significant growth. This property is exploited for efficient production of lactate and succinate. Our detailed analysis revealed that marginal growth takes place under anaerobic conditions with glucose, fructose, sucrose, or ribose as a carbon and energy source but not with gluconate, pyruvate, lactate, propionate, or acetate. Supplementation of glucose minimal medium with tryptone strongly enhanced growth up to a final optical density at 600 nm (OD600) of 12, whereas tryptone alone did not allow growth. Amino acids with a high ATP demand for biosynthesis and amino acids of the glutamate family were particularly important for growth stimulation, indicating ATP limitation and a restricted carbon flux into the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle toward 2-oxoglutarate. Anaerobic cultivation in a bioreactor with constant nitrogen flushing disclosed that CO2 is required to achieve maximal growth and that the pH tolerance is reduced compared to that under aerobic conditions, reflecting a decreased capability for pH homeostasis. Continued growth under anaerobic conditions indicated the absence of an oxygen-requiring reaction that is essential for biomass formation. The results provide an improved understanding of the physiology of C. glutamicum under anaerobic conditions. PMID:26276118

  13. Growth and citirc-acid production by Candida guilliermondii using a cellulose substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Asenjo, J.A.; Szuhay, J.; Chiu, D.

    1982-01-01

    Growth and citric-acid production by Candida guilliermondii were studied first on glucose and then on an enzymatic hydrolysate of Solka Floc. Sequential and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation have been carried out. The production of citric acid was increased by limiting the level of nitrogen in the media and thus controlling growth. The direct bioconversion (simultaneous process), which is expected to circumvent end-product inhibition of the saccharification, gave a threefold increase in the yield of biomass but not substantial effect on the production of citrate was observed. The behavior of the Candida cells as well as fermentation conditions in a cell recycle bioreactor were also investigated. Cell concentrations of 70 to 130 g/L were recycled using a microporous membrane with a small specific filtration area. 4 figures, 2 tables.

  14. The bisphosphonate zoledronic acid effectively targets lung cancer cells by inhibition of protein prenylation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fan; Li, Pengcheng; Gong, Jianhua; Zhang, Jiahong; Ma, Jingping

    2015-11-27

    Aberrant activation of oncoproteins such as members of the Ras family is common in human lung cancers. The proper function of Ras largely depends on a post-translational modification termed prenylation. Bisphosphonates have been shown to inhibit prenylation in cancer cells. In this study, we show that zoledronic acid, a third generation bisphosphonate, is effective in targeting lung cancer cells. This is achieved by the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation, through suppressing the activation of downstream Ras and EGFR signalling by zoledronic acid. The combination of zoledronic acid and paclitaxel or cisplatin (commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs for lung cancer) augmented the activity of either drug alone in in vitro lung cancer cellular system and in vivo lung xenograft mouse model. Importantly, zoledronic acid inhibits protein prenylation as shown by the increased levels of unprenylated Ras and Rap1A. In addition, the effects of zoledronic acid were reversed in the presence of geranylgeraniol and farnesol, further confirming that mechanism of zoledroinc acid's action in lung cancer cells is through prenylation inhibition. Since zoledronic acid is already available for clinic use, these results suggest that it may be an effective addition to the armamentarium of drugs for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:26498526

  15. Methyl anthranilate and ?-decalactone inhibit strawberry pathogen growth and achene Germination.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Alan H; Evans, Shane Alan; Folta, Kevin M

    2013-12-26

    Plant volatile compounds have been shown to affect microbial growth and seed germination. Here two fruity volatiles found in strawberry ( Fragaria × ananassa ), ?-decalactone ("peachlike" aroma) and methyl anthranilate ("grapelike" aroma), were tested for effects on relevant pathogens and seedling emergence. Significant growth reduction was observed for Botrytis cinerea , Colletotrichum gloeosporioides , Colletotrichum acutatum , Phomopsis obscurans , and Gnomonia fragariae at 1 mM ?-decalactone or methyl anthranilate, and 5 mM ?-decalactone or methyl anthranilate supplemented medium resulted in complete cessation of fungal growth. Phytophthora cactorum was especially sensitive to 1 mM ?-decalactone, showing complete growth inhibition. Bacteriostatic effects were observed in Xanthamonas cultures. Postharvest infestations on store-bought strawberries were inhibited with volatile treatment. The ?-decalactone volatile inhibited strawberry and Arabidopsis thaliana germination. These findings show that two compounds contributing to strawberry flavor may also contribute to shelf life and suggest that ?-decalactone may play an ecological role by preventing premature germination. PMID:24328200

  16. Fungicides effectively used for growth inhibition of several fungi could induce mycotoxin biosynthesis in toxigenic species.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Heydt, M; Stoll, D; Geisen, R

    2013-09-16

    Seven different commercial fungicides (Aliette, Rovral, Cantus, Ortiva, Luna Experience, Fenomenal and Mancozeb) were tested for their ability to inhibit the growth of the fungal species Penicillium nordicum, Penicillium verrucosum, Verticillium dahliae and Cladosporium sp. In case of the mycotoxigenic strains P. nordicum and P. verrucosum, the biosynthesis of the mycotoxins ochratoxin and citrinin was determined. Interestingly individual fungicides were only able to inhibit the growth of the analyzed fungi to some extent. In case of P. verrucosum the fungicide "Rovral", an iprodion belonging to the substance class of imidazoles, led to a decrease in the growth rate but to a strong induction of mycotoxin biosynthesis as has been described earlier for the strobilurins. Consequently before using a given fungicide to protect crops and enhance storage life, the applicability of this chemical compound should be tested not only for its ability to inhibit fungal growth but also for its effect on level of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. PMID:24036489

  17. Inhibition of 5-Oxoprolinase by 2-Imidazolidone-4-Carboxylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Werf, Paul; Stephani, Ralph A.; Orlowski, Marian; Meister, Alton

    1973-01-01

    L-2-Imidazolidone-4-carboxylic acid is an effective competitive inhibitor of the reaction catalyzed by 5-oxoprolinase, in which 5-oxo-L-proline (L-pyroglutamic acid, L-2-pyrrolidone-5-carboxylic acid, L-5-oxopyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid) is converted to L-glutamate, with concomitant cleavage of ATP to ADP and orthophosphate. L-2-Imidazolidone-4-carboxylate decreased the rate of metabolism of 5-oxo-L-[14C]proline to 14CO2 by rat-kidney slices but had no effect on the metabolism of [14C]glutamate. Mice injected with L-2-imidazolidone-4-carboxylate exhibited greatly reduced ability to metabolize 5-oxo-L-proline, but metabolized glutamate at an essentially normal rate. The findings provide an approach to an animal model for the human condition 5-oxoprolinuria, in which there is apparently a deficiency of renal 5-oxoprolinase activity. The evidence indicates that 5-oxoproline is a normal metabolite. PMID:4514988

  18. A mechanistic model of wormhole growth in carbonate matrix acidizing and acid fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, K.M.; Hill, A.D.; Sepehrnoorl, K.

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model that describes the growth and competition of wormholes during ann acidizing treatment in a carbonate formation was developed. The model is initialized with the distribution of largest pores. Wormhole characteristics (size, length, and distribution) were found too be controlled by acid-injection, diffusion, and fluid-loss rates.

  19. Ursodeoxycholic Acid but Not Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid Inhibits Proliferation and Differentiation of Human Subcutaneous Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mališová, Lucia; Ková?ová, Zuzana; Koc, Michal; Kra?merová, Jana; Štich, Vladimír; Rossmeislová, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    Stress of endoplasmic reticulum (ERS) is one of the molecular triggers of adipocyte dysfunction and chronic low inflammation accompanying obesity. ERS can be alleviated by chemical chaperones from the family of bile acids (BAs). Thus, two BAs currently used to treat cholestasis, ursodeoxycholic and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA and TUDCA), could potentially lessen adverse metabolic effects of obesity. Nevertheless, BAs effects on human adipose cells are mostly unknown. They could regulate gene expression through pathways different from their chaperone function, namely through activation of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and TGR5, G-coupled receptor. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze effects of UDCA and TUDCA on human preadipocytes and differentiated adipocytes derived from paired samples of two distinct subcutaneous adipose tissue depots, abdominal and gluteal. While TUDCA did not alter proliferation of cells from either depot, UDCA exerted strong anti-proliferative effect. In differentiated adipocytes, acute exposition to neither TUDCA nor UDCA was able to reduce effect of ERS stressor tunicamycin. However, exposure of cells to UDCA during whole differentiation process decreased expression of ERS markers. At the same time however, UDCA profoundly inhibited adipogenic conversion of cells. UDCA abolished expression of PPAR? and lipogenic enzymes already in the early phases of adipogenesis. This anti-adipogenic effect of UDCA was not dependent on FXR or TGR5 activation, but could be related to ability of UDCA to sustain the activation of ERK1/2 previously linked with PPAR? inactivation. Finally, neither BAs did lower expression of chemokines inducible by TLR4 pathway, when UDCA enhanced their expression in gluteal adipocytes. Therefore while TUDCA has neutral effect on human preadipocytes and adipocytes, the therapeutic use of UDCA different from treating cholestatic diseases should be considered with caution because UDCA alters functions of human adipose cells. PMID:24312631

  20. Ursodeoxycholic acid but not tauroursodeoxycholic acid inhibits proliferation and differentiation of human subcutaneous adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Mališová, Lucia; Ková?ová, Zuzana; Koc, Michal; Kra?merová, Jana; Stich, Vladimír; Rossmeislová, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    Stress of endoplasmic reticulum (ERS) is one of the molecular triggers of adipocyte dysfunction and chronic low inflammation accompanying obesity. ERS can be alleviated by chemical chaperones from the family of bile acids (BAs). Thus, two BAs currently used to treat cholestasis, ursodeoxycholic and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA and TUDCA), could potentially lessen adverse metabolic effects of obesity. Nevertheless, BAs effects on human adipose cells are mostly unknown. They could regulate gene expression through pathways different from their chaperone function, namely through activation of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and TGR5, G-coupled receptor. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze effects of UDCA and TUDCA on human preadipocytes and differentiated adipocytes derived from paired samples of two distinct subcutaneous adipose tissue depots, abdominal and gluteal. While TUDCA did not alter proliferation of cells from either depot, UDCA exerted strong anti-proliferative effect. In differentiated adipocytes, acute exposition to neither TUDCA nor UDCA was able to reduce effect of ERS stressor tunicamycin. However, exposure of cells to UDCA during whole differentiation process decreased expression of ERS markers. At the same time however, UDCA profoundly inhibited adipogenic conversion of cells. UDCA abolished expression of PPAR? and lipogenic enzymes already in the early phases of adipogenesis. This anti-adipogenic effect of UDCA was not dependent on FXR or TGR5 activation, but could be related to ability of UDCA to sustain the activation of ERK1/2 previously linked with PPAR? inactivation. Finally, neither BAs did lower expression of chemokines inducible by TLR4 pathway, when UDCA enhanced their expression in gluteal adipocytes. Therefore while TUDCA has neutral effect on human preadipocytes and adipocytes, the therapeutic use of UDCA different from treating cholestatic diseases should be considered with caution because UDCA alters functions of human adipose cells. PMID:24312631

  1. CH5137291, an androgen receptor nuclear translocation-inhibiting compound, inhibits the growth of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikura, Nobuyuki; Kawata, Hiromitsu; Nishimoto, Ayako; Nakamura, Ryo; Tsunenari, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Miho; Tachibana, Kazutaka; Shiraishi, Takuya; Yoshino, Hitoshi; Honma, Akie; Emura, Takashi; Ohta, Masateru; Nakagawa, Toshito; Houjo, Takao; Corey, Eva; Vessella, Robert L; Aoki, Yuko; Sato, Haruhiko

    2015-04-01

    Resistance of prostate cancer to castration is currently an unavoidable problem. The major mechanisms underlying such resistance are androgen receptor (AR) overexpression, androgen-independent activation of AR, and AR mutation. To address this problem, we developed an AR pure antagonist, CH5137291, with AR nuclear translocation-inhibiting activity, and compared its activity and characteristics with that of bicalutamide. Cell lines corresponding to the mechanisms of castration resistance were used: LNCaP-BC2 having AR overexpression and LNCaP-CS10 having androgen-independent AR activation. VCaP and LNCaP were used as hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cells. In vitro functional assay clearly showed that CH5137291 inhibited the nuclear translocation of wild-type ARs as well as W741C- and T877A-mutant ARs. In addition, it acted as a pure antagonist on the transcriptional activity of these types of ARs. In contrast, bicalutamide did not inhibit the nuclear translocation of these ARs, and showed a partial/full agonistic effect on the transcriptional activity. CH5137291 inhibited cell growth more strongly than bicalutamide in VCaP and LNCaP cells as well as in LNCaP-BC2 and LNCaP-CS10 cells in vitro. In xenograft models, CH5137291 strongly inhibited the tumor growth of LNCaP, LNCaP-BC2, and LNCaP-CS10, whereas bicalutamide showed a weaker effect in LNCaP and almost no effect in LNCaP-BC2 and LNCaP-CS10 xenografts. Levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in plasma correlated well with the antitumor effect of both agents. CH5137291 inhibited the growth of LNCaP tumors that had become resistant to bicalutamide treatment. A docking model suggested that CH5137291 intensively collided with the M895 residue of helix 12, and therefore strongly inhibited the folding of helix 12, a cause of AR agonist activity, in wild-type and W741C-mutant ARs. In cynomolgus monkeys, the serum concentration of CH5137291 increased dose-dependently and PSA level decreased 80% at 100 mg/kg. CH5137291 is expected to offer a novel therapeutic approach against major types of castration-resistant prostate cancers. PMID:25634071

  2. BRD4 inhibitor inhibits colorectal cancer growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan; Zhou, Jieqiong; Ye, Fei; Xiong, Huabao; Peng, Liang; Zheng, Zihan; Xu, Feihong; Cui, Miao; Wei, Chengguo; Wang, Xinying; Wang, Zhongqiu; Zhu, Hongfa; Lee, Peng; Zhou, Mingming; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, David Y

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications have been identified to be of great importance in cancers and lysine acetylation, which can attract the multifunctional transcription factor BRD4, has been identified as a potential therapeutic target. In this paper, we identify that BRD4 has an important role in colorectal cancer; and that its inhibition substantially wipes out tumor cells. Treatment with inhibitor MS417 potently affects cancer cells, although such effects were not always outright necrosis or apoptosis. We report that BRD4 inhibition also limits distal metastasis by regulating several key proteins in the progression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). This effect of BRD4 inhibitor is demonstrated via liver metastasis in animal model as well as migration and invasion experiments in vitro. Together, our results demonstrate a new application of BRD4 inhibitor that may be of clinical use by virtue of its ability to limit metastasis while also being tumorcidal. PMID:25603177

  3. Main and interaction effects of acetic acid, furfural, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid on growth and ethanol productivity of yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Palmqvist, E.; Grage, H.; Meinander, N.Q.; Hahn-Haegerdal, B.

    1999-04-05

    The influence of the factors acetic acid, furfural, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid on the ethanol yield (Y{sub EtOH}) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, bakers` yeast, S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581, and Candida shehatae NJ 23 was investigated using a 2{sup 3}-full factorial design with 3 centerpoints. The results indicated that acetic acid inhibited the fermentation by C. shehatae NJ 23 markedly more than by bakers` yeast, whereas no significant difference in tolerance towards the compounds was detected between the S. cerevisiae strains. Furfural and the lignin derived compound p-hydroxybenzoic acid did not affect any of the yeasts at the cell mass concentration used. The results indicated that the linear model was not adequate to describe the experimental data. Based on the results from the 2{sup 3}-full factorial experiment, an extended experiment was designed based on a central composite design to investigate the influence of the factors on the specific growth rate ({mu}), biomass yield (Y{sub x}), volumetric ethanol productivity (Q{sub EtOH}), and Y{sub EtOH}. Bakers` yeast was chosen in the extended experiment due to its better tolerance towards acetic acid, which makes it a more interesting organism for use in industrial fermentations of lignocellulosic hydrolysates.

  4. Epoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid inhibit vasopressin response in toad bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Schlondorff, D.; Petty, E.; Oates, J.A.; Jacoby, M.; Levine, S.D. Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN )

    1987-09-01

    In addition to cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways, the kidney can also metabolize arachidonic acid by a NADPH-dependent cytochrome P-450 enzyme to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs); furthermore, 5,6-EET has been shown to alter electrolyte transport across isolated renal tubules. The authors examined the effects of three ({sup 14}C-labeled)-EETs (5,6-, 11,12-, and 14,15-EET) on osmotic water flow across toad urinary bladder. All three EETs reversibly inhibited vasopressin-stimulated osmotic water flow with 5,6- and 11,12-EET being the most potent. The effects appeared to be independent of prostaglandins EETs inhibited the water flow response to forskolin but not the response to adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) or 8-BrcAMP, consistent with an effect on cAMP generation. To determine whether these effects were due to the EETs or to products of their metabolism, they examined the effects of their vicinal diol hydrolysis products, the dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids. Nonenzymatic conversion of labeled 5,6-EET to its vicinal diol occurred rapidly in the buffer, whereas 11,12-EET was hydrolyzed in a saturable manner only when incubated in the presence of bladder tissue. The dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids formed inhibited water flow in a manner paralleling that of the EETs. The data support the hypothesis that EETs and their physiologically active dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid metabolites inhibit vasopressin-stimulated water flow predominantly via inhibition of adenylate cyclase.

  5. Inhibition of ice crystal growth in ice cream mix by gelatin hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Srinivasan

    2007-12-26

    The inhibition of ice crystal growth in ice cream mix by gelatin hydrolysate produced by papain action was studied. The ice crystal growth was monitored by thermal cycling between -14 and -12 degrees C at a rate of one cycle per 3 min. It is shown that the hydrolysate fraction containing peptides in the molecular weight range of about 2000-5000 Da exhibited the highest inhibitory activity on ice crystal growth in ice cream mix, whereas fractions containing peptides greater than 7000 Da did not inhibit ice crystal growth. The size distribution of gelatin peptides formed in the hydrolysate was influenced by the pH of hydrolysis. The optimum hydrolysis conditions for producing peptides with maximum ice crystal growth inhibitory activity was pH 7 at 37 degrees C for 10 min at a papain to gelatin ratio of 1:100. However, this may depend on the type and source of gelatin. The possible mechanism of ice crystal growth inhibition by peptides from gelatin is discussed. Molecular modeling of model gelatin peptides revealed that they form an oxygen triad plane at the C-terminus with oxygen-oxygen distances similar to those found in ice nuclei. Binding of this oxygen triad plane to the prism face of ice nuclei via hydrogen bonding appears to be the mechanism by which gelatin hydrolysate might be inhibiting ice crystal growth in ice cream mix. PMID:18044830

  6. Mechanism of Poly(acrylic acid) Acceleration of Antithrombin Inhibition of Thrombin: Implications for the Design of Novel Heparin Mimics

    E-print Network

    Desai, Umesh R

    Mechanism of Poly(acrylic acid) Acceleration of Antithrombin Inhibition of Thrombin: Implications Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 Received April 19, 2005 The bridging mechanism of antithrombin inhibition of thrombin is a dominant mechanism contributing a massive 2500-fold acceleration

  7. Dual effect of metformin on growth inhibition and oestradiol production in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rice, S; Pellat, L; Ahmetaga, A; Bano, G; Mason, H D; Whitehead, S A

    2015-04-01

    Evidence has been accumulating for a role for metformin in reducing breast cancer risk in post-menopausal women. It inhibits growth of breast cancer cells via several mechanisms, primarily the AMPK/mTOR signalling pathway. Another possible protective mechanism may be the ability of metformin to inhibit aromatase activity. In the present study, we investigated the effects of metformin on the basal growth of MCF-7 cells, after oestradiol (E2) stimulation and after the inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin. Secondly, we investigated the effects of metformin on the activity of a number of steroidogenic enzymes and the mRNA expression of aromatase and steroid sulphatase (STS). High doses of metformin significantly inhibited both basal and oestrogen-stimulated cell division. Low-dose rapamycin (10-10 M) did not inhibit growth, but the addition of metformin induced a significant reduction in growth. High-dose rapamycin (10-8 M) inhibited growth, and this was further attenuated by the addition of metformin. Exposure to low (10-7 M) and high (10-4 M) doses of metformin for 7-10 days significantly reduced the conversion of androstenedione (ANDRO) and testosterone (TESTO) (both requiring aromatase), but not the conversion of oestrone or oestrone sulphate (ES) via 17?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/sulphatase to E2. This attenuation was via a downregulation in the expression of total aromatase mRNA and promoter II, whilst the expression of sulphatase was unaffected by metformin. In conclusion, plasma levels of metformin have a dual therapeutic action, first by directly inhibiting cell proliferation which can be augmented by rapamycin analogues, and secondly, by inhibiting aromatase activity and reducing the local conversion of androgens to E2. PMID:25716282

  8. Alpha cyano-4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Lamia; Arrar, Zoheir; Al Muataz, Yacoub; Suleiman, Lutfi; Négrier, Claude; Mulengi, Joseph Kajima; Boukerche, Habib

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the underlying mechanism of 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid (ACCA), on the growth of breast cancer cells and normal immortal epithelial cells, and compared their cytotoxic effects responses. Treatment of breast cancer cells (MCF-7, T47D, and MDA-231) with ACCA resulted in dose- and time-dependent decrease of cell proliferation, viability in colony formation assay, and programmed cell death (apoptosis) with minimal effects on non-tumoral cells. The ability of ACCA to suppress growth in cancer cells not expressing or containing defects in p53 gene indicates a lack of involvement of this critical tumor suppressor element in mediating ACCA-induced growth inhibition. Induction of apoptosis correlated with an increase in Bax protein, an established inducer of programmed cell death, and the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2, an established inhibitor of apoptosis. We also documented the ability of ACCA to inhibit the migration and invasion of MDA-231 cells with ACCA in vitro. Additionally, tumor growth of MDA-231 breast cancer cells in vivo was dramatically affected with ACCA. On the basis of its selective anticancer inhibitory activity on tumor cells, ACCA may represent a promising therapeutic drug that should be further evaluated as a chemotherapeutic agent for human breast cancer. PMID:24039831

  9. Mechanism of cinnamic acid-induced trypsin inhibition: A multi-technique approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongmei; Zhou, Qiuhua; Cao, Jian; Wang, Yanqing

    2013-12-01

    In order to investigate the association of the protease trypsin with cinnamic acid, the interaction was characterized by using fluorescence, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, molecular modeling and an enzymatic inhibition assay. The binding process may be outlined as follows: cinnamic acid can interact with trypsin with one binding site to form cinnamic acid-trypsin complex, resulting in inhibition of trypsin activity; the spectroscopic data show that the interaction is a spontaneous process with the estimated enthalpy and entropy changes being -8.95 kJ mol-1 and 50.70 J mol-1 K-1, respectively. Noncovalent interactions make the main contribution to stabilize the trypsin-cinnamic acid complex; cinnamic acid can enter into the primary substrate-binding pocket and alter the environment around Trp and Tyr residues.

  10. Protease Inhibition by Oleic Acid Transfer From Chronic Wound Dressings to Albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J. V.; Howley, Phyllis; Davis, Rachel M.; Mashchak, Andrew D.; Goheen, Steven C.

    2007-08-01

    High elastase and cathepsin G activities have been observed in chronic wounds. These levels can inhibit healing through degradation of growth factors, cytokines, and extracellular matrix proteins. Oleic acid (18:1) is a non-toxic elastase inhibitor with some potential for redressing the imbalance of elastase activity found in chronic wounds. Cotton wound dressing material was characterized as a transfer carrier for affinity uptake of 18:1 by albumin under conditions mimicking chronic wounds. 18:1-treated cotton was examined for its ability to bind and release the fatty acid in the presence of albumin. The mechanism of 18:1 uptake from cotton and binding by albumin was examined with both intact dressings and cotton fiber-designed chromatography. Raman spectra of the albumin-18:1 complexes under liquid-liquid equilibrium conditions revealed fully saturated albumin-18:1 complexes with a 1:1 weight ratio of albumin:18:1. Cotton chromatography under liquid-solid equilibrium conditions revealed oleic acid transfer from cotton to albumin at 27 mole equivalents of 18:1 per mole albumin. Cotton was contrasted with hydrogel, and hydrocolloid wound dressing for its comparative ability to lower elastase activity. Each dressing material evaluated was found to release 18:1 in the presence of albumin with significant inhibition of elastase activity. The 18:1-formulated wound dressings lowered elastase activity in a dose dependent manner in the order cotton gauze > hydrogel > hydrocolloid. In contrast the cationic serine protease Cathepsin G was inihibited by 18:1 within a narrow range of 18:1-cotton formulations. Four per cent Albumin solutions were most effective in binding cotton bound-18:1. However, 2% albumin was sufficient to transfer quantities of 18:1 necessary to achieve a significant elastase-lowering effect. Formulations with 128 mg 18:1/g cotton gauze had equivalent elastase lowering with 1 - 4% albumin. 18:1 bound to cotton wound dressings may have promise in the selective lowering of cationic serine protease activity useful in topical application for chronic inflammatory pathogenesis.

  11. Inhibition of Fibroblasts Reduced Head and Neck Cancer Growth by Targeting FGFR

    PubMed Central

    Sweeny, Larissa; Liu, Zhiyong; Lancaster, William; Hart, Justin; Hartman, Yolanda E.; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a complex disease process involving interactions with carcinoma associated fibroblasts and endothelial cells. We further investigated these relationships by suppressing stromal cell growth through the inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). STUDY DESIGN Preclinical investigation. SUBJECTS AND METHODS HNSCC cell lines (FADU, OSC19, Cal27, SCC1, SCC5, SCC22A), fibroblast (HS27) and endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured individually or in coculture. Proliferation was assessed following treatment with a range of physiologic concentrations of FGFR inhibitor PD173074. Mice bearing established HNSCC xenografts were treated with PD173074 (12 mg/kg) and tumor histology was analyzed for stromal composition, proliferation (Ki67 staining) and apoptosis (TUNEL staining). RESULTS In vitro, inhibition of FGFR with PD173074 dramatically reduced proliferation of fibroblasts and endothelial cells compared to untreated controls. However, HNSCC cell proliferation was not affected by inhibition of FGFR. When cocultured with fibroblasts, HNSCC cells proliferation increased by 15–80% (p<0.01). Furthermore, this fibroblasts enhanced tumor cell growth was suppressed by FGFR inhibition. Additionally, treatment of mice bearing HNSCC xenografts with PD173074 resulted in significant growth inhibition (p<0.001). Additionally, those tumors from mice treated with PD173074 had a smaller stromal component, decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. CONCLUSION Targeting the FGFR pathway in head and neck cancer acts through the stromal components to decrease HNSCC growth in vivo and in vitro. Level of Evidence Not applicable. PMID:22460537

  12. Characterizing inhibited tumor growth in stem-cell-driven non-spatial cancers.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Brenes, Ignacio A; Wodarz, Dominik; Komarova, Natalia L

    2015-12-01

    Healthy human tissue is highly regulated to maintain homeostasis. Secreted negative feedback factors that inhibit stem cell division and stem cell self-renewal play a fundamental role in establishing this control. The appearance of abnormal cancerous growth requires an escape from these regulatory mechanisms. In a previous study we found that for non-solid tumors if feedback inhibition on stem cell self-renewal is lost, but the feedback on the division rate is still intact, then the tumor dynamics are characterized by a relatively slow sub-exponential growth that we called inhibited growth. Here we characterize the cell dynamics of inhibited cancer growth by modeling feedback inhibition using Hill equations. We find asymptotic approximations for the growth rates of the stem cell and differentiated cell populations in terms of the strength of the inhibitory signal: stem cells grow as a power law t(1/k+1),and the differentiated cells grow as t(1/k), where k is the Hill coefficient in the feedback law regulating cell divisions. It follows that as the tumor grows, undifferentiated cells take up an increasingly large fraction of the population. Implications of these results for specific cancers including CML are discussed. Understanding how the regulatory mechanisms that continue to operate in cancer affect the rate of disease progression can provide important insights relevant to chronic or other slow progressing types of cancer. PMID:26344137

  13. Effects of humic acids on the growth of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, V. V.; Yakushev, A. V.; Zavgorodnyaya, Yu. A.; Byzov, B. A.; Demin, V. V.

    2010-03-01

    The influence of humic acids of different origins on the growth of bacterial cultures of different taxa isolated from the soil and the digestive tracts of earthworms ( Aporrectodea caliginosa)—habitats with contrasting conditions—was studied. More than half of the soil and intestinal isolates from the 170 tested strains grew on the humic acid of brown coal as the only carbon source. The specific growth rate of the bacteria isolated from the intestines of the earthworms was higher than that of the soil bacteria. The use of humic acids by intestinal bacteria confirms the possibility of symbiotic digestion by earthworms with the participation of bacterial symbionts. Humic acids at a concentration of 0.1 g/l stimulated the growth of the soil and intestinal bacteria strains (66 strains out of 161) on Czapek’s medium with glucose (1 g/l), probably, acting as a regulator of the cell metabolism. On the medium with the humic acid, the intestinal bacteria grew faster than the soil isolates did. The most active growth of the intestinal isolates was observed by Paenibacillus sp., Pseudomonas putida, Delftia acidovorans, Microbacterium terregens, and Aeromonas sp.; among the soil ones were the representatives of the Pseudomonas genus. A response of the bacteria to the influence of humic acids was shown at the strain level using the example of Pseudomonas representatives. The Flexom humin preparation stimulated the growth of the hydrocarbon-oxidizing Acinetobacter sp. bacteria. This effect can be used for creating a new compound with the elevated activity of bacteria that are destroyers of oil and oil products.

  14. Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) antisense effect to bacterial growth and their application potentiality in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Hatamoto, Masashi; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2010-03-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are nucleic acid analogs having attractive properties such as quiet stability against nucleases and proteases, and they form strong complexes with complementary strands of DNA or RNA. Because of this attractive nature, PNA is often used in antisense technology to inhibit gene expression and microbial cell growth with high specificity. Many bacterial antisense or antiribosomal studies using PNA oligomers have been reported so far, and parameters to design effective antisense PNAs and to improve PNA cell entry for efficient inhibition of bacterial growth have been presented. However, there are still several obstacles such as low cellular uptake of PNA while applying antisense PNAs to a complex microbial community. On overcoming these problems, the PNA antisense technique might become a very attractive tool not only for controlling the microbial growth but also for further elucidating microbial ecology in complex microbial consortia. Here, we summarize and present recent studies on the development of antimicrobial PNAs targeting mRNAs and rRNAs. In addition, the application potentiality of antisense techniques in nonclinical biotechnology fields is discussed. PMID:20135118

  15. Xanthatin, a novel potent inhibitor of VEGFR2 signaling, inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yao; Yu, Jing; Pei, Chong Gang; Li, Yun Yan; Tu, Ping; Gao, Gui Ping; Shao, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Anti-angiogenesis targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) has emerged as an important tool for cancer treatment. In this study, we described a novel VEGFR2 inhibitor, xanthatin, which inhibits tumor angiogenesis and growth. The biochemical profiles of xanthatin were investigated using kinase assay, migration assay, tube formation, Matrigel plug assay, western blot, immunofluorescence and human tumor xenograft model. Xanthatin significantly inhibited growth, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cell as well as inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated angiogenesis. In addition, it inhibited VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream signaling regulator. Moreover, xanthatin directly inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. Oral administration of xanthatin could markedly inhibit human tumor xenograft growth and decreased microvessel densities (MVD) in tumor sections. Taken together, these preclinical evaluations suggest that xanthatin inhibits angiogenesis and may be a promising anticancer drug candidate. PMID:26617743

  16. Monensin inhibits growth of bacterial contaminants from fuel ethanol plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of commercial fermentation cultures by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a common and costly problem to the fuel ethanol industry. Virginiamycin (VIR) and penicillin (PEN) are frequently used to control bacterial contamination but extensive use of antibiotics may select for strains with d...

  17. Lifespan based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model of tumor growth inhibition by anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mo, Gary; Gibbons, Frank; Schroeder, Patricia; Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Accurate prediction of tumor growth is critical in modeling the effects of anti-tumor agents. Popular models of tumor growth inhibition (TGI) generally offer empirical description of tumor growth. We propose a lifespan-based tumor growth inhibition (LS TGI) model that describes tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model, on the basis of cellular lifespan T. At the end of the lifespan, cells divide, and to account for tumor burden on growth, we introduce a cell division efficiency function that is negatively affected by tumor size. The LS TGI model capability to describe dynamic growth characteristics is similar to many empirical TGI models. Our model describes anti-cancer drug effect as a dose-dependent shift of proliferating tumor cells into a non-proliferating population that die after an altered lifespan TA. Sensitivity analysis indicated that all model parameters are identifiable. The model was validated through case studies of xenograft mouse tumor growth. Data from paclitaxel mediated tumor inhibition was well described by the LS TGI model, and model parameters were estimated with high precision. A study involving a protein casein kinase 2 inhibitor, AZ968, contained tumor growth data that only exhibited linear growth kinetics. The LS TGI model accurately described the linear growth data and estimated the potency of AZ968 that was very similar to the estimate from an established TGI model. In the case study of AZD1208, a pan-Pim inhibitor, the doubling time was not estimable from the control data. By fixing the parameter to the reported in vitro value of the tumor cell doubling time, the model was still able to fit the data well and estimated the remaining parameters with high precision. We have developed a mechanistic model that describes tumor growth based on cell division and has the flexibility to describe tumor data with diverse growth kinetics. PMID:25333487

  18. Lifespan Based Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Model of Tumor Growth Inhibition by Anticancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Gary; Gibbons, Frank; Schroeder, Patricia; Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Accurate prediction of tumor growth is critical in modeling the effects of anti-tumor agents. Popular models of tumor growth inhibition (TGI) generally offer empirical description of tumor growth. We propose a lifespan-based tumor growth inhibition (LS TGI) model that describes tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model, on the basis of cellular lifespan T. At the end of the lifespan, cells divide, and to account for tumor burden on growth, we introduce a cell division efficiency function that is negatively affected by tumor size. The LS TGI model capability to describe dynamic growth characteristics is similar to many empirical TGI models. Our model describes anti-cancer drug effect as a dose-dependent shift of proliferating tumor cells into a non-proliferating population that die after an altered lifespan TA. Sensitivity analysis indicated that all model parameters are identifiable. The model was validated through case studies of xenograft mouse tumor growth. Data from paclitaxel mediated tumor inhibition was well described by the LS TGI model, and model parameters were estimated with high precision. A study involving a protein casein kinase 2 inhibitor, AZ968, contained tumor growth data that only exhibited linear growth kinetics. The LS TGI model accurately described the linear growth data and estimated the potency of AZ968 that was very similar to the estimate from an established TGI model. In the case study of AZD1208, a pan-Pim inhibitor, the doubling time was not estimable from the control data. By fixing the parameter to the reported in vitro value of the tumor cell doubling time, the model was still able to fit the data well and estimated the remaining parameters with high precision. We have developed a mechanistic model that describes tumor growth based on cell division and has the flexibility to describe tumor data with diverse growth kinetics. PMID:25333487

  19. Ellagic acid & gallic acid from Lagerstroemia speciosa L. inhibit HIV-1 infection through inhibition of HIV-1 protease & reverse transcriptase activity

    PubMed Central

    Nutan; Modi, Manoj; Goel, Tanvi; Das, Tiyasa; Malik, Shweta; Suri, Samiksha; Rawat, Ajay Kumar Singh; Srivastava, Sharad Kumar; Tuli, Rakesh; Malhotra, Swadesh; Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Banaba (Lagerstroemia speciosa L.) extracts have been used as traditional medicines and are effective in controlling diabetes and obesity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-HIV property of the extracts prepared from the leaves and stems of banaba, and further purification and characterization of the active components. Methods: Aqueous and 50 per cent ethanolic extracts were prepared from leaves and stems of banaba and were evaluated for cytotoxicity and anti-HIV activity using in vitro reporter gene based assays. Further, three compounds were isolated from the 50 per cent ethanolic extract of banaba leaves using silica gel column chromatography and characterization done by HPLC, NMR and MS analysis. To delineate the mode of action of the active compounds, reverse transcriptase assay and protease assay were performed using commercially available kits. Results: All the extracts showed a dose dependent inhibition of HIV-1-infection in TZM-bl and CEM-GFP cell lines with a maximum from the 50 per cent ethanolic extract from leaves (IC50= 1 to 25 ?g/ml). This observation was confirmed by the virus load (p24) estimation in infected CEM-GFP cells when treated with the extracts. Gallic acid showed an inhibition in reverse transcriptase whereas ellagic acid inhibited the HIV-1 protease activity. Interpretation & conclusions: The present study shows a novel anti-HIV activity of banaba. The active components responsible for anti-HIV activity were gallic acid and ellagic acid, through inhibition of reverse transcriptase and HIV protease, respectively and hence could be regarded as promising candidates for the development of topical anti-HIV-1 agents. PMID:23640562

  20. GSK1904529A, an insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor inhibitor, inhibits glioma tumor growth, induces apoptosis and inhibits migration

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, QIANG; ZHANG, JUNXIA; CUI, QINYING; LI, XIAODONG; GAO, GE; WANG, YANFEN; XU, YUPING; GAO, XIAOQUN

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common type of primary malignancy of the central nervous system, with a poor prognosis. The therapeutic options for malignant gliomas are limited and far from satisfactory, and novel treatment strategies are urgently required to improve the outcome of the disease. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)/IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling pathway regulates cell proliferation, motility and survival. The dysregulation of this signaling pathway has been implicated in the development of malignant gliomas. In the present study, GSK1904529A, a small molecule inhibitor of IGF-1R, suppressed glioma cell viability, induced glioma cell apoptosis and inhibited glioma cell migration in vitro. In addition, GSK1904529A inhibited glioma tumor growth and induced tumor cell apoptosis in vivo. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested GSK1904529A as a promising agent for the treatment of malignant glioma. PMID:26035416

  1. In vitro inhibition of OATP-mediated uptake of phalloidin using bile acid derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Herraez, Elisa; Macias, Rocio I.R.; Vazquez-Tato, Jose; Vicens, Marta; Monte, Maria J.; Marin, Jose J.G.

    2009-08-15

    Hepatocyte uptake of phalloidin is carried out mainly by OATP1B1. We have used this compound as a prototypic substrate and assayed the ability to inhibit OATP-mediated phalloidin transport of four bile acid derivatives (BALU-1, BALU-2, BALU-3 and BALU-4) that showed positive results in preliminary screening. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes for heterologous expression of transporters, BALUs were found to inhibit taurocholic acid (TCA) transport by OATP1B1 (but not OATP1B3) as well as by rat Oatp1a1, Oatp1a4 and Oatp1b2. The study of their ability to inhibit sodium-dependent bile acid transporters revealed that the four BALUs induced an inhibition of rat Asbt-mediated TCA transport, which was similar to TCA-induced self-inhibition. Regarding human NTCP and rat Ntcp, BALU-1 differs from the other three BALUS in its lack of effect on TCA transport by these proteins. Using HPLC-MS/MS and CHO cells stably expressing OATP1B1 the ability of BALU-1 to inhibit the uptake of phalloidin itself by this transporter was confirmed. Kinetic analysis using X. laevis oocytes revealed that BALU-1-induced inhibition of OATP1B1 was mainly due to a competitive mechanism (Ki = 8 {mu}M). In conclusion, BALU-1 may be useful as a pharmacological tool to inhibit the uptake of compounds mainly taken up by OATP1B1 presumably without impairing bile acid uptake by the major carrier accounting for this process, i.e., NTCP.

  2. GROWTH OF CAMPYLOBACTER ON MEDIA SUPPLEMENTED WITH ORGANIC ACIDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter spp. are the main cause of bacterial foodborne illnesses in humans, and contaminated poultry products are major sources of campylobacteriosis. In this study, the growth of Campylobacter spp. in media supplemented with organic acids was examined. Tryptose-yeast extract basal broth mediu...

  3. GROWTH OF CAMPYLOBACTER ON MEDIA SUPPLEMENTED WITH ORGANIC ACIDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter spp. are the main cause of bacteria foodborne illnesses in humans, and contaminated poultry products are major sources of campylobaceriosis. In this study, the growth of Campylobacter spp. in media supplemented with organic acids was examined. Trypose-yeast extract basal broth medium w...

  4. MAG, myelin and overcoming growth inhibition in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    McKerracher, Lisa; Rosen, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    While neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) have the capacity to regenerate their axons after injury, they fail to do so, in part because regeneration is limited by growth inhibitory proteins present in CNS myelin. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) was the first myelin-derived growth inhibitory protein identified, and its inhibitory activity was initially elucidated in 1994 independently by the Filbin lab and the McKerracher lab using cell-based and biochemical techniques, respectively. Since that time we have gained a wealth of knowledge concerning the numerous growth inhibitory proteins that are present in myelin, and we also have dissected many of the neuronal signaling pathways that act as stop signs for axon regeneration. Here we give an overview of the early research efforts that led to the identification of myelin-derived growth inhibitory proteins, and the importance of this family of proteins for understanding neurotrauma and CNS diseases. We further provide an update on how this knowledge has been translated towards current clinical studies in regenerative medicine. PMID:26441514

  5. Effect of acid and salt concentration in fresh-pack pickles on the growth of Clostridium botulinum spores.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, K A; Chen, J K; Lerke, P A; Seeger, M L; Unverferth, J A

    1976-01-01

    The addition of various amounts of acetic acid to pureed cucumbers inoculated with Clostridium botulinum spores has shown that outgrowth is inhibited at pH 4.8 but not at pH 5.0. Inoculation experiments with whole cucumbers showed that as little as 0.9% acetic acid in the brine was sufficient to prevent outgrowth from spore inocula as high as 10(6)/cucumber. It was further shown that the rapid rate of acetic acid penetration into fresh-pack pickles prevents the growth of any C. botulinum spores that may be present. PMID:9898

  6. Tea and soybean extracts in combination with milk fermentation inhibit growth and enterocyte adherence of selected foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Danyue; Shah, Nagendra P

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the antibacterial and anti-adhesive properties of pure plant extracts (PPEs) of green tea (GT), black tea (BT) and soybean individually or in combination with milk. Fermented phenolic enriched-milk (fPEM) was prepared by combining PPEs with milk and fermented with lactic acid bacteria. Antimicrobial activity of extracts was evaluated by broth-dilution and agar diffusion assay. Anti-adhesive property of extracts was evaluated in Caco-2 cell model. Results from antibacterial tests showed that PPEs exhibited a dose-dependent growth inhibitory effect. Tea extracts were more effective in inhibiting Gram-positive bacteria while soybean extract exhibited similar effects against all pathogens tested. For fPEM, although total phenolic contents decreased compared with those in PPEs, growth inhibitory effect of fPEM containing tea extracts was greatly enhanced. All extracts showed significant inhibition against pathogen adhesion to Caco-2 cells. In particular, adhesion inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes was >89% when fPEM extracts were applied. PMID:25766833

  7. Inhibition of vitamin B12-dependent microbial growth by nitrous oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Alston, T.A. )

    1991-01-01

    In methionine-free media, nitrous oxide inhibits the growth of an auxotrophic strain of Escherichia coli lacking a cobalamin-independent pathway for the de novo synthesis of methionine. Prototrophic E. coli is similarly inhibited by nitrous oxide if the cobalamin-independent pathway is selectively depressed by sulfanilamide. Nitrous oxide thus effectively inactivates cobalamin-dependent 5-methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase in intact bacteria.

  8. Effusanin E suppresses nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell growth by inhibiting NF-?B and COX-2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Mingzhu; Zhao, Mouming; Qiu, Huijuan; Shi, Dingbo; Wang, Jingshu; Tian, Yun; Lin, Lianzhu; Deng, Wuguo

    2014-01-01

    Rabdosia serra is well known for its antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities, but no information has been available for the active compounds derived from this plant in inhibiting human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell growth. In this study, we isolated and purified a natural diterpenoid from Rabdosia serra and identified its chemical structure as effusanin E and elucidated its underlying mechanism of action in inhibiting NPC cell growth. Effusanin E significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in NPC cells. Effusanin E also induced the cleavage of PARP, caspase-3 and -9 proteins and inhibited the nuclear translocation of p65 NF-?B proteins. Moreover, effusanin E abrogated the binding of NF-?B to the COX-2 promoter, thereby inhibiting the expression and promoter activity of COX-2. Pretreatment with a COX-2 or NF-?B-selective inhibitor (celecoxib or ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate) had an additive effect on the effusanin E-mediated inhibition of proliferation, while pretreatment with an activator of NF-?B/COX-2 (lipopolysaccharides) abrogated the effusanin E-mediated inhibition of proliferation. Effusanin E also significantly suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model without obvious toxicity, furthermore, the expression of p50 NF-?B and COX-2 were down-regulated in the tumors of nude mice. These data suggest that effusanin E suppresses p50/p65 proteins to down-regulate COX-2 expression, thereby inhibiting NPC cell growth. Our findings provide new insights into exploring effusanin E as a potential therapeutic compound for the treatment of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:25333664

  9. Effusanin E Suppresses Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cell Growth by Inhibiting NF-?B and COX-2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Mingzhu; Zhao, Mouming; Qiu, Huijuan; Shi, Dingbo; Wang, Jingshu; Tian, Yun; Lin, Lianzhu; Deng, Wuguo

    2014-01-01

    Rabdosia serra is well known for its antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities, but no information has been available for the active compounds derived from this plant in inhibiting human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell growth. In this study, we isolated and purified a natural diterpenoid from Rabdosia serra and identified its chemical structure as effusanin E and elucidated its underlying mechanism of action in inhibiting NPC cell growth. Effusanin E significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in NPC cells. Effusanin E also induced the cleavage of PARP, caspase-3 and -9 proteins and inhibited the nuclear translocation of p65 NF-?B proteins. Moreover, effusanin E abrogated the binding of NF-?B to the COX-2 promoter, thereby inhibiting the expression and promoter activity of COX-2. Pretreatment with a COX-2 or NF-?B-selective inhibitor (celecoxib or ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate) had an additive effect on the effusanin E-mediated inhibition of proliferation, while pretreatment with an activator of NF-?B/COX-2 (lipopolysaccharides) abrogated the effusanin E-mediated inhibition of proliferation. Effusanin E also significantly suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model without obvious toxicity, furthermore, the expression of p50 NF-?B and COX-2 were down-regulated in the tumors of nude mice. These data suggest that effusanin E suppresses p50/p65 proteins to down-regulate COX-2 expression, thereby inhibiting NPC cell growth. Our findings provide new insights into exploring effusanin E as a potential therapeutic compound for the treatment of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:25333664

  10. Inhibition of Nitrogen Fixation in Alfalfa by Arsenate, Heavy Metals, Fluoride, and Simulated Acid Rain

    PubMed Central

    Porter, John R.; Sheridan, Richard P.

    1981-01-01

    The acute effects of aqueous solutions of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, F, and Zn ions at concentrations from 0.01 to 100 micrograms per milliliter and solutions adjusted to pH 2 to 6 with nitric or sulfuric acid were studied with respect to acetylene reduction, net photosynthesis, respiration rate, and chlorophyll content in Vernal alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv. Vernal). The effects of the various treatments on acetylene reduction varied from no demonstrable effect by any concentration of F? and 42% inhibition by 100 micrograms Pb2+ per milliliter, to 100% inhibition by 10 micrograms Cd2+ per milliliter and 100 micrograms per milliliter As, Cu2+, and Zn2+ ions. Zn2+ showed statistically significant inhibition of activity at 0.1 micrograms per milliliter. Acid treatments were not inhibitory above pH 2, at which pH nitric acid inhibited acetylene reduction activity more than did sulfuric acid. The inhibition of acetylene reduction by these ions was Zn2+ > Cd2+ > Cu2+ > AsO3? > Pb2+ > F?. The sensitivity of acetylene reduction to the ions was roughly equal to the sensitivity of photosynthesis, respiration, and chlorophyll content when Pb2+ was applied, but was 1,000 times more sensitive to Zn2+. The relationship of the data to field conditions and industrial pollution is discussed. PMID:16661858

  11. Microbial Growth Inhibition by Alternating Electric Fields in Mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lung Infection? †

    PubMed Central

    Giladi, Moshe; Porat, Yaara; Blatt, Alexandra; Shmueli, Esther; Wasserman, Yoram; Kirson, Eilon D.; Palti, Yoram

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency, low-intensity electric fields generated by insulated electrodes have previously been shown to inhibit bacterial growth in vitro. In the present study, we tested the effect of these antimicrobial fields (AMFields) on the development of lung infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in mice. We demonstrate that AMFields (10 MHz) significantly inhibit bacterial growth in vivo, both as a stand-alone treatment and in combination with ceftazidime. In addition, we show that peripheral (skin) heating of about 2°C can contribute to bacterial growth inhibition in the lungs of mice. We suggest that the combination of alternating electric fields, together with the heat produced during their application, may serve as a novel antibacterial treatment modality. PMID:20547811

  12. Overexpression of RACK1 inhibits collagen synthesis in keloid fibroblasts via inhibition of transforming growth factor-?1/Smad signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Shi, Lina; Li, Qing; Lu, Di

    2015-01-01

    Keloids are benign skin tumors characterized by collagen accumulation and hyperproliferation of fibroblasts. The receptor for activated C-kinase 1 (RACK1) was involved in liver fibrosis. However, the role of RACK1 in dermal fibrosis keloids is still unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of RACK1 on keloid fibroblasts (KFs) and transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1)-induced collagen expression and explored the underlying mechanism. We found that RACK1 was decreased in KFs, overexpression of RACK1 significantly inhibited TGF-?1-induced KFs proliferation. RACK1 also obviously inhibited the expression of TGF-?1-induced TGF-? receptor I, II, type I collagen and ?-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA) in human KFs. In addition, RACK1 suppressed the expression of TGF-?1-induced Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation in human KFs. Taken together, our study suggested that RACK1 inhibits collagen synthesis in KFs via inhibition the TGF-?1/Smad signaling pathway, and RACK1 is a potential target for treatment of the keloid disease. PMID:26629012

  13. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid inhibits urokinase synthesis by phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated LLC-PK1 cells.

    PubMed

    Rondeau, E; Guidet, B; Lacave, R; Bens, M; Sraer, J; Nagamine, Y; Ardaillou, R; Sraer, J D

    1990-11-12

    Protein kinase C (PKC) activation is regulated by Ca2+, phospholipids, diacylglycerol (DAG) and fatty acids. Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) which mimics the effect of DAG on PKC induces transcriptional activation of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) gene in LLC-PK1 cells. We examined in the present work the relationships between PKC activity, fatty acids, and u-PA synthesis in this cell line. We showed that H7, an inhibitor of PKC, inhibited the PMA-induced u-PA synthesis by LLC-PK1 cells. PMA-induced u-PA synthesis was enhanced by eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), a competitive inhibitor of both the lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways and inhibited by nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), an inhibitor of the lipoxygenase pathway. Three other unrelated lipoxygenase inhibitors (phenidone 100 microM, BW755 50 microM and diethylcarbamazine 50 microM) had no effect on u-PA biosynthesis. Two polyunsaturated fatty acids other than ETYA, arachidonic acid and linoleic acid, also potentiated the PMA effect and a lipoxygenase derivative, 12 hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12 HETE), did not modify the basal and PMA-stimulated u-PA syntheses. PKC activity purified from cytosol of LLC-PK1 cells was stimulated by addition of 16 nM PMA in vitro and this effect was blunted by simultaneous addition of 5 microM NDGA. By Northern blot analysis using a pig u-PA cDNA probe we found that PMA increased the steady state level of u-PA mRNA after 2 h of incubation and that NDGA inhibited this effect. These data suggest that NDGA inhibits PMA-stimulated PKC activity in intact cells leading to a decrease of u-PA mRNA level and u-PA biosynthesis in PMA-stimulated LLC-PK1 cells. Polyunsaturated fatty acids have opposite effects. PMID:2122915

  14. Inhibition of iron corrosion in 0.5 M sulphuric acid by metal cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiyanarayanan, S.; Jeyaprabha, C.; Muralidharan, S.; Venkatachari, G.

    2006-09-01

    Corrosion inhibitors are widely used in acid solutions during pickling and descaling. Mostly organic compounds containing N, O, and S groups are employed as inhibitors. In this study, the inhibition performance of metal cations such as Zn 2+, Mn 2+ and Ce 4+ ions in the concentration range 1-10 × 10 -3 M has been found out. The corrosion behaviour of iron in 0.5 M H 2SO 4 in the presence of metal cations is studied using polarization and impedance methods. It is found that the addition of these metal cations inhibits the corrosion markedly. The inhibition effect is in the following order Ce 4+ ? Mn 2+ > Zn 2+.

  15. Inhibition of multiplication of the prototypic arenavirus LCMV by valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Sáiz, Juan-Carlos; Ngo, Nhi; Sobrino, Francisco; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2013-08-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), a short chain fatty acid commonly used for treatment of neurological disorders, has been shown to inhibit production of infectious progeny of different enveloped viruses including the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). In this study we have investigated the mechanisms by which VPA inhibits LCMV multiplication in cultured cells. VPA reduced production of infectious LCMV progeny and virus propagation without exerting a major blockage on either viral RNA or protein synthesis, but rather affecting the cell release and specific infectivity of LCMV progeny from infected cells. Our results would support the repurposing of VPA as a candidate antiviral drug to combat arenavirus infections. PMID:23735299

  16. Pharmacological inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway prevents human rhabdomyosarcoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Naoya; Ijiri, Kosei; Ishidou, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Takuya; Nagao, Hiroko; Nagano, Satoshi; Maeda, Shingo; Komiya, Setsuro; Setoguchi, Takao

    2011-10-01

    The Hedgehog pathway functions as an organizer in embryonic development. Recent studies have shown that mutation of the PTCH1 gene involved in the Hedgehog pathway affects rhabdomyosarcoma development. However, the expression of Hedgehog pathway molecules in human rhabdomyosarcoma cells has not been well clarified. In addition, the effect of pharmacological inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway is not known. We investigated the expression of the genes involved in the Hedgehog pathway using human rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines and biopsy specimens. Further, we evaluated the effect of pharmacological inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway using cyclopamine or GANT61 by WST assay, cell proliferation assay and cell death detection assay. Real-time PCR revealed that human rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines and biopsy specimens overexpressed the following genes: Sonic hedgehog, Indian hedgehog, Desert hedgehog, PTCH1, SMO, GLI1, GLI2 and ULK3. Immunohistochemistry revealed that rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines and biopsy specimens expressed SMO and GLI2. Inhibition of SMO by cyclopamine slowed the growth of human rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines. Similarly, inhibition of GLI by GANT61 slowed the growth of human rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines. Inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptotic cell death together prevented the growth of rhabdomyosarcoma cells by cyclopamine and GANT61 treatment. Our findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway may be a useful approach for treating rhabdomyosarcoma patients. PMID:21674124

  17. Ribosomal protein metallopanstimulin-1 impairs multiple myeloma CAG cells growth and inhibits fibroblast growth factor receptor 3

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yuemeng; Pierson, Spencer; Dudney, Cross; Zeng, Yuxin; MacLeod, Veronica; Shaughnessy, John D.; Stack, Brendan C.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrated that metallopanstimulin-1 (MPS-1, RPS27) inhibited growth of tumors formed by head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells and reduced paxillin gene expression. The present study examined whether and how MPS-1 affects another type of cancer, multiple myeloma (CAG). Enhanced expression of MPS-1 dramatically inhibited CAG in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of MPS-1 resulted in decreased fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor 3 and impaired endogenous MAPK/ErK signaling. MAPK/ErK signaling was not stimulated by adding recombinant FGF2 to myeloma cells overexpressing MPS-1. These data suggest that MPS-1 suppresses CAG growth and that weakened FGF signaling may contribute to this effect. PMID:21889435

  18. Growth of Chlorella sorokiniana on a mixture of volatile fatty acids: The effects of light and temperature.

    PubMed

    Turon, V; Trably, E; Fouilland, E; Steyer, J-P

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the influence of light and temperature on Chlorella sorokiniana grown on a mixture of acetate and butyrate, two of the volatile fatty acids produced by dark fermentation. Exposure to light caused autotrophic biomass production (56% of the final biomass) and reduced the time to reach butyrate exhaustion to 7days at 25°C from 10days in the dark. For growth on acetate at the optimum temperature (35°C), the presence of butyrate reduced the growth rate (by 46%) and the carbon yield (by 36%). For successful microalgae growth on dark fermentation effluent, butyrate inhibition may be reduced by setting the temperature to 30°C and providing light. PMID:26461792

  19. Gambogic acid inhibits STAT3 phosphorylation through activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1: potential role in proliferation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Pandey, Manoj K; Yadav, Vivek R; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2011-07-01

    The transcription factor, STAT3, is associated with proliferation, survival, and metastasis of cancer cells. We investigated whether gambogic acid (GA), a xanthone derived from the resin of traditional Chinese medicine, Garcinia hanburyi (mangosteen), can regulate the STAT3 pathway, leading to suppression of growth and sensitization of cancer cells. We found that GA induced apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells that correlated with the inhibition of both constitutive and inducible STAT3 activation. STAT3 phosphorylation at both tyrosine residue 705 and serine residue 727 was inhibited by GA. STAT3 suppression was mediated through the inhibition of activation of the protein tyrosine kinases Janus-activated kinase 1 (JAK1) and JAK2. Treatment with the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor pervanadate reversed the GA-induced downregulation of STAT3, suggesting the involvement of a PTP. We also found that GA induced the expression of the PTP SHP-1. Deletion of the SHP-1 gene by siRNA suppressed the ability of GA to inhibit STAT3 activation and to induce apoptosis, suggesting the critical role of SHP-1 in its action. Moreover, GA downregulated the expression of STAT3-regulated antiapoptotic (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1), proliferative (cyclin D1), and angiogenic (VEGF) proteins, and this correlated with suppression of proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Overall, these results suggest that GA blocks STAT3 activation, leading to suppression of tumor cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. PMID:21490133

  20. Transdermal delivery of 10,11-methylenedioxycamptothecin by hyaluronic acid based nanoemulsion for inhibition of keloid fibroblast.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuanyuan; Cheng, Xiaojie; Wang, Zhiguo; Wang, Juan; Gao, Tingting; Li, Peng; Kong, Ming; Chen, Xiguang

    2014-11-01

    This study designs an alternative transdermal delivery system for 10,11-methylenedioxycamptothecin(MD-CPT) to inhibit keloid. Hyaluronic acid nanoemulsions (HANs) with nano size, negative charge and good stability were prepared as transdermal carriers. The MD-CPT loaded HANs performed desirable skin permeable capacity across human keloid skin and the drug was transferred directly to keloid lesion area. MD-CPT was delivered percutaneously higher than the control group. FITC-HANs could be successfully internalized by keloid fibroblast (KF) and deliver MD-CPT toward nucleus, inhibited the proliferation of KF, while there was no serious toxicity to normal skin fibroblasts. The growth-inhibitory effect was further clarified upon cell cycle regulation, which arrested cells at G1/S and prevented them entry into mitosis. KF gene expression demonstrated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) was significantly down-regulated and Smad7 up-regulated, which was beneficial to inhibit keloid. The study demonstrated that as transdermal delivery of MD-CPT by HANs has potential for inhibition of keloid fibroblast. PMID:25129757

  1. Statins improve survival by inhibiting spontaneous metastasis and tumor growth in a mouse melanoma model

    PubMed Central

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Takeda, Tomoya; Kino, Toshiki; Obata, Naoya; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Mashimo, Kenji; Fujiwara, Daichiro; Sakaguchi, Katsuhiko; Satou, Takao; Nishida, Shozo

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is a life-threatening disease for which no effective treatment is currently available. In melanoma cells, Rho overexpression promotes invasion and metastasis. However, the effect of statins on spontaneous metastasis and tumor growth remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of statin-mediated tumor growth and metastasis inhibition in an in vivo model. We found that statins significantly inhibited spontaneous metastasis and tumor growth. Statins inhibited the mRNA expression and enzymatic activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in vivo and also suppressed the mRNA and protein expression of very late antigens (VLAs). Moreover, statins inhibited the prenylation of Rho as well as the phosphorylation of LIM kinase, serum response factor (SRF), and c-Fos downstream of the Rho signaling pathway. In addition, statins enhanced p53, p21, and p27 expression and reduced phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase and expression of cyclin D1 and E2. These results indicate that statins suppress Rho signaling pathways, thereby inhibiting tumor metastasis and growth. Furthermore, statins markedly improved the survival rate in a metastasis model, suggesting that statins have potential clinical applications for the treatment of metastatic cancers. PMID:26693069

  2. Combination of ?-Tomatine and Curcumin Inhibits Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongli; He, Yan; Li, Yu; Du, Zhiyun; Zhang, Kun; DiPaola, Robert; Goodin, Susan; Zheng, Xi

    2015-01-01

    ?-Tomatine is a glycoalkaloid found in tomatoes and curcumin is a major yellow pigment of turmeric. In the present study, the combined effect of these two compounds on prostate cancer cells was studied. Treatment of different prostate cancer cells with curcumin or ?-tomatine alone resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Combinations of ?-tomatine and curcumin synergistically inhibited the growth and induced apoptosis in prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Effects of the ?-tomatine and curcumin combination were associated with synergistic inhibition of NF-?B activity and a potent decrease in the expression of its downstream gene Bcl-2 in the cells. Moreover, strong decreases in the levels of phospho-Akt and phosphor-ERK1/2 were found in PC-3 cells treated with ?-tomatine and curcumin in combination. In animal experiment, SCID mice with PC-3 xenograft tumors were treated with ?-tomatine and curcumin. Combination of ?-tomatine and curcumin more potently inhibited the growth of PC-3 tumors than either agent alone. Results from the present study indicate that ?-tomatine in combination with curcumin may be an effective strategy for inhibiting the growth of prostate cancer. PMID:26630272

  3. A Disalicylic Acid-Furanyl Derivative Inhibits Ephrin Binding to a Subset of Eph Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Noberini, Roberta; De, Surya K.; Zhang, Ziming; Wu, Bainan; Raveendra-Panickar, Dhanya; Chen, Vida; Vazquez, Jesus; Qin, Haina; Song, Jianxing; Cosford, Nicholas D. P.; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Pasquale, Elena B.

    2011-01-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and ephrin ligands control many physiological and pathological processes, and molecules interfering with their interaction are useful probes to elucidate their complex biological functions. Moreover, targeting Eph receptors might enable new strategies to inhibit cancer progression and pathological angiogenesis as well as promote nerve regeneration. Because our previous work suggested the importance of the salicylic acid group in antagonistic small molecules targeting Eph receptors, we screened a series of salicylic acid derivatives to identify novel Eph receptor antagonists. This identified a disalicylic acid-furanyl derivative that inhibits ephrin-A5 binding to EphA4 with an IC50 of 3 ?M in ELISA assays. This compound, which appears to bind to the ephrin-binding pocket of EphA4, also targets several other Eph receptors. Furthermore, it inhibits EphA2 and EphA4 tyrosine phosphorylation in cells stimulated with ephrin while not affecting phosphorylation of EphB2, which is not a target receptor. In endothelial cells, the disalicylic acid-furanyl derivative inhibits EphA2 phosphorylation in response to TNF? and capillary-like tube formation on Matrigel, two effects that depend on EphA2 interaction with endogenous ephrin-A1. These findings suggest that salicylic acid derivatives could be used as starting points to design new small molecule antagonists of Eph receptors. PMID:21791013

  4. Calcium influences sensitivity to growth inhibition induced by a cell surface sialoglycopeptide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, N. A.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    While studies concerning mitogenic factors have been an important area of research for many years, much less is understood about the mechanisms of action of cell surface growth inhibitors. We have purified an 18 kDa cell surface sialoglycopeptide growth inhibitor (CeReS-18) which can reversibly inhibit the proliferation of diverse cell types. The studies discussed in this article show that three mouse keratinocyte cell lines exhibit sixty-fold greater sensitivity than other fibroblasts and epithelial-like cells to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. Growth inhibition induced by CeReS-18 treatment is a reversible process, and the three mouse keratinocyte cell lines exhibited either single or multiple cell cycle arrest points, although a predominantly G0/G1 cell cycle arrest point was exhibited in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. The sensitivity of the mouse keratinocyte cell lines to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition was not affected by the degree of tumorigenic progression in the cell lines and was not due to differences in CeReS-18 binding affinity or number of cell surface receptors per cell. However, the sensitivity of both murine fibroblasts and keratinocytes could be altered by changing the extracellular calcium concentration, such that increased extracellular calcium concentrations resulted in decreased sensitivity to CeReS-18-induced proliferation inhibition. Thus the increased sensitivity of the murine keratinocyte cell lines to CeReS-18 could be ascribed to the low calcium concentration used in their propagation. Studies are currently under way investigating the role of calcium in CeReS-18-induced growth arrest. The CeReS-18 may serve as a very useful tool to study negative growth control and the signal transduction events associated with cell cycling.

  5. Inhibition of Hsp27 Radiosensitizes Head-and-Neck Cancer by Modulating Deoxyribonucleic Acid Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Guttmann, David M.; Hart, Lori; Du, Kevin; Seletsky, Andrew; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To present a novel method of tumor radiosensitization through Hsp27 knockdown using locked nucleic acid (LNA) and to investigate the role of Hsp27 in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival assays, immunoblotting, the proximity ligation assay, and ?H2AX foci analysis were conducted in SQ20B and FaDu human head-and-neck cancer cell lines treated with Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Additionally, nude mice with FaDu flank tumors were treated with fractionated radiation therapy after pretreatment with Hsp27 LNA and monitored for tumor growth. Results: Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 shRNA radiosensitized head-and-neck cancer cell lines in an Hsp27-dependent manner. Ataxia-Telangectasia Mutated-mediated DNA repair signaling was impaired in irradiated cells with Hsp27 knockdown. ATM kinase inhibition abrogated the radiosensitizing effect of Hsp27. Furthermore, Hsp27 LNA and shRNA both attenuated DNA repair kinetics after radiation, and Hsp27 was found to colocalize with ATM in both untreated and irradiated cells. Last, combined radiation and Hsp27 LNA treatment in tumor xenografts in nude mice suppressed tumor growth compared with either treatment alone. Conclusions: These results support a radiosensitizing property of Hsp27 LNA in vitro and in vivo, implicate Hsp27 in double strand break repair, and suggest that Hsp27 LNA might eventually serve as an effective clinical agent in the radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer.

  6. Anacardic Acid Inhibits the Catalytic Activity of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9

    PubMed Central

    Omanakuttan, Athira; Nambiar, Jyotsna; Harris, Rodney M.; Bose, Chinchu; Pandurangan, Nanjan; Varghese, Rebu K.; Kumar, Geetha B.; Tainer, John A.; Banerji, Asoke; Perry, J. Jefferson P.

    2012-01-01

    Cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) has been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a wide variety of pathophysiological conditions. To further define the mechanism of CNSL action, we investigated the effect of cashew nut shell extract (CNSE) on two matrix metalloproteinases, MMP-2/gelatinase A and MMP-9/gelatinase B, which are known to have critical roles in several disease states. We observed that the major constituent of CNSE, anacardic acid, markedly inhibited the gelatinase activity of 3T3-L1 cells. Our gelatin zymography studies on these two secreted gelatinases, present in the conditioned media from 3T3-L1 cells, established that anacardic acid directly inhibited the catalytic activities of both MMP-2 and MMP-9. Our docking studies suggested that anacardic acid binds into the MMP-2/9 active site, with the carboxylate group of anacardic acid chelating the catalytic zinc ion and forming a hydrogen bond to a key catalytic glutamate side chain and the C15 aliphatic group being accommodated within the relatively large S1? pocket of these gelatinases. In agreement with the docking results, our fluorescence-based studies on the recombinant MMP-2 catalytic core domain demonstrated that anacardic acid directly inhibits substrate peptide cleavage in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 11.11 ?M. In addition, our gelatinase zymography and fluorescence data confirmed that the cardol-cardanol mixture, salicylic acid, and aspirin, all of which lack key functional groups present in anacardic acid, are much weaker MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitors. Our results provide the first evidence for inhibition of gelatinase catalytic activity by anacardic acid, providing a novel template for drug discovery and a molecular mechanism potentially involved in CNSL therapeutic action. PMID:22745359

  7. Tannic Acid Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Entry into Huh7.5 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hagedorn, Curt H.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Although antiviral therapy has dramatically improved recently, a number of patients remain untreated and some do not clear infection with treatment. Viral entry is an essential step in initiating and maintaining chronic HCV infections. One dramatic example of this is the nearly 100% infection of newly transplanted livers in patients with chronic hepatitis C. HCV entry inhibitors could play a critical role in preventing HCV infection of newly transplanted livers. Tannic acid, a polymer of gallic acid and glucose molecules, is a plant-derived polyphenol that defends some plants from insects and microbial infections. It has been shown to have a variety of biological effects, including antiviral activity, and is used as a flavoring agent in foods and beverages. In this study, we demonstrate that tannic acid is a potent inhibitor of HCV entry into Huh7.5 cells at low concentrations (IC50 5.8 ?M). It also blocks cell-to-cell spread in infectious HCV cell cultures, but does not inhibit HCV replication following infection. Moreover, experimental results indicate that tannic acid inhibits an early step of viral entry, such as the docking of HCV at the cell surface. Gallic acid, tannic acid’s structural component, did not show any anti-HCV activity including inhibition of HCV entry or replication at concentrations up to 25 ?M. It is possible the tannin structure is related on the effect on HCV inhibition. Tannic acid, which is widely distributed in plants and foods, has HCV antiviral activity in cell culture at low micromolar concentrations, may provide a relative inexpensive adjuvant to direct-acting HCV antivirals and warrants future investigation. PMID:26186636

  8. Anacardic acid inhibits the catalytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Omanakuttan, Athira; Nambiar, Jyotsna; Harris, Rodney M; Bose, Chinchu; Pandurangan, Nanjan; Varghese, Rebu K; Kumar, Geetha B; Tainer, John A; Banerji, Asoke; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nair, Bipin G

    2012-10-01

    Cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) has been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a wide variety of pathophysiological conditions. To further define the mechanism of CNSL action, we investigated the effect of cashew nut shell extract (CNSE) on two matrix metalloproteinases, MMP-2/gelatinase A and MMP-9/gelatinase B, which are known to have critical roles in several disease states. We observed that the major constituent of CNSE, anacardic acid, markedly inhibited the gelatinase activity of 3T3-L1 cells. Our gelatin zymography studies on these two secreted gelatinases, present in the conditioned media from 3T3-L1 cells, established that anacardic acid directly inhibited the catalytic activities of both MMP-2 and MMP-9. Our docking studies suggested that anacardic acid binds into the MMP-2/9 active site, with the carboxylate group of anacardic acid chelating the catalytic zinc ion and forming a hydrogen bond to a key catalytic glutamate side chain and the C15 aliphatic group being accommodated within the relatively large S1' pocket of these gelatinases. In agreement with the docking results, our fluorescence-based studies on the recombinant MMP-2 catalytic core domain demonstrated that anacardic acid directly inhibits substrate peptide cleavage in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC?? of 11.11 ?M. In addition, our gelatinase zymography and fluorescence data confirmed that the cardol-cardanol mixture, salicylic acid, and aspirin, all of which lack key functional groups present in anacardic acid, are much weaker MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitors. Our results provide the first evidence for inhibition of gelatinase catalytic activity by anacardic acid, providing a novel template for drug discovery and a molecular mechanism potentially involved in CNSL therapeutic action. PMID:22745359

  9. Dietary rice component, Oryzanol, inhibits tumor growth in tumor-bearing Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scope: We investigated the effects of rice bran and components on tumor growth in mice. Methods and results: Mice fed standard diets supplemented with rice bran, '-oryzanol, Ricetrienol®, ferulic acid, or phytic acid for 2 weeks were inoculated with CT-26 colon cancer cells and fed the same diet fo...

  10. SKI knockdown inhibits human melanoma tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dahu; Lin, Qiushi; Box, Neil; Roop, Dennis; Ishii, Shunsuke; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Fan, Tao; Hornyak, Thomas J; Reed, Jon A; Stavnezer, Ed; Timchenko, Nikolai A; Medrano, Estela E

    2009-12-01

    The SKI protein represses the TGF-beta tumor suppressor pathway by associating with the Smad transcription factors. SKI is upregulated in human malignant melanoma tumors in a disease-progression manner and its overexpression promotes proliferation and migration of melanoma cells in vitro. The mechanisms by which SKI antagonizes TGF-beta signaling in vivo have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that human melanoma cells in which endogenous SKI expression was knocked down by RNAi produced minimal orthotopic tumor xenograft nodules that displayed low mitotic rate and prominent apoptosis. These minute tumors exhibited critical signatures of active TGF-beta signaling including high levels of nuclear Smad3 and p21(Waf-1), which are not found in the parental melanomas. To understand how SKI promotes tumor growth we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches and found that simultaneously to blocking the TGF-beta-growth inhibitory pathway, SKI promotes the switch of Smad3 from tumor suppression to oncogenesis by favoring phosphorylations of the Smad3 linker region in melanoma cells but not in normal human melanocytes. In this context, SKI is required for preventing TGF-beta-mediated downregulation of the oncogenic protein c-MYC, and for inducing the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, a mediator of tumor growth and angiogenesis. Together, the results indicate that SKI exploits multiple regulatory levels of the TGF-beta pathway and its deficiency restores TGF-beta tumor suppressor and apoptotic activities in spite of the likely presence of oncogenic mutations in melanoma tumors. PMID:19845874

  11. Polar biophenolics in sweet potato greens extract synergize to inhibit prostate cancer cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Gundala, Sushma R; Yang, Chunhua; Lakshminarayana, N; Asif, Ghazia; Gupta, Meenakshi V; Shamsi, Shahab; Aneja, Ritu

    2013-09-01

    Polyphenolic phytochemicals present in fruits and vegetables indisputably confer anticancer benefits upon regular consumption. Recently, we demonstrated the growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing properties of polyphenol-rich sweet potato greens extract (SPGE) in cell culture and in vivo prostate cancer xenograft models. However, the bioactive constituents remain elusive. Here, we report a bioactivity-guided fractionation of SPGE based upon differential solvent polarity using chromatographic techniques that led to the identification of a remarkably active polyphenol-enriched fraction, F5, which was ~100-fold more potent than the parent extract as shown by IC50 measurements in human prostate cancer cells. High-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet and mass spectrometric analyses of the seven SPGE fractions suggested varying abundance of the major phenols, quinic acid (QA), caffeic acid, its ester chlorogenic acid, and isochlorogenic acids, 4,5-di-CQA, 3,5-di-CQA and 3,4-di-CQA, with a distinct composition of the most active fraction, F5. Subfractionation of F5 resulted in loss of bioactivity, suggesting synergistic interactions among the constituent phytochemicals. Quantitative analyses revealed a ~2.6- and ~3.6-fold enrichment of QA and chlorogenic acid, respectively, in F5 and a definitive ratiometric relationship between the isochlorogenic acids. Daily oral administration of 400mg/kg body wt of F5 inhibited growth and progression of prostate tumor xenografts by ~75% in nude mice, as evidenced by tumor volume measurements and non-invasive real-time bioluminescence imaging. These data generate compelling grounds to further examine the chemopreventive efficacy of the most active fraction of SPGE and suggest its potential usefulness as a dietary supplement for prostate cancer management. PMID:23629419

  12. Inhibition of free radical-induced erythrocyte hemolysis by 2-O-substituted ascorbic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Takebayashi, Jun; Kaji, Hiroaki; Ichiyama, Kenji; Makino, Kazutaka; Gohda, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Itaru; Tai, Akihiro

    2007-10-15

    Inhibitory effects of 2-O-substituted ascorbic acid derivatives, ascorbic acid 2-glucoside (AA-2G), ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AA-2P), and ascorbic acid 2-sulfate (AA-2S), on 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH)-induced oxidative hemolysis of sheep erythrocytes were studied and were compared with those of ascorbic acid (AA) and other antioxidants. The order of the inhibition efficiency was AA-2S> or =Trolox=uric acid> or =AA-2P> or =AA-2G=AA>glutathione. Although the reactivity of the AA derivatives against AAPH-derived peroxyl radical (ROO(*)) was much lower than that of AA, the derivatives exerted equal or more potent protective effects on AAPH-induced hemolysis and membrane protein oxidation. In addition, the AA derivatives were found to react per se with ROO(*), not via AA as an intermediate. These findings suggest that secondary reactions between the AA derivative radical and ROO(*) play a part in hemolysis inhibition. Delayed addition of the AA derivatives after AAPH-induced oxidation of erythrocytes had already proceeded showed weaker inhibition of hemolysis compared to that of AA. These results suggest that the AA derivatives per se act as biologically effective antioxidants under moderate oxidative stress and that AA-2G and AA-2P may be able to act under severe oxidative stress after enzymatic conversion to AA in vivo. PMID:17854711

  13. Inhibition of tumor growth by histoincompatible cells expressing interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Roth, C; Mir, L M; Cressent, M; Quintin-Colonna, F; Ley, V; Fradelizi, D; Kourilsky, P

    1992-12-01

    Murine tumor cells engineered to express IL-2 have been shown to be rejected by the syngeneic host, which is then protected against a subsequent tumorigenic challenge. To assess whether IL-2 has to be produced by the tumor cells themselves, or whether its local delivery would be sufficient to promote such beneficial effects, the syngeneic tumor cells were co-inoculated with allogeneic or xenogeneic cells secreting IL-2, selected after gene transfection. In several murine systems, it was observed that this is an efficient approach for controlling the growth of the syngeneic tumor. However, animals which rejected the tumor were not protected against a subsequent challenge. Several lines of evidence indicate that NK cells play a major role in tumor rejection induced by the IL-2 expressing histoincompatible vector cells. Thus, while local delivery of IL-2 in the vicinity of a tumor might not be sufficient to promote a systemic long-term specific antitumor immune response, it can control the growth of the primary syngeneic tumor. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility of using genetically engineered histoincompatible cells (which are rejected by the host's immune system) as a transient delivery system in vivo. PMID:1286066

  14. Microbial growth on hydrocarbons: terminal branching inhibits biodegradation.

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, T L; Cantwell, S G; Brown, J L; Watt, D S; Fall, R R

    1979-01-01

    A variety of octane-utilizing bacteria and fungi were screened for growth on some terminally branched dimethyloctane derivatives to explore the effects of iso- and anteiso-termini on the biodegradability of such hydrocarbons. Of 27 microbial strains tested, only 9 were found to use any of the branched hydrocarbons tested as a sole carbon source, and then only those hydrocarbons containing at least one iso-terminus were susceptible to degradation. Anteiso-or isopropenyl termini prevented biodegradation. None of the hydrocarbonoclastic yeasts tested was able to utilize branched-hydrocarbon growth sustrates. In the case of pseudomonads containing the OCT plasmid, whole-cell oxidation of n-octane was poorly induced by terminally branched dimethyloctanes. In the presence of a gratuitous inducer of the octane-oxidizing enzymes, the iso-branched 2,7-dimethyloctane was slowly oxidized by whole cells, whereas the anteiso-branched 3,6-dimethyloctane was not oxidized at all. This microbial sampling dramatically illustrated the deleterious effect of alkyl branching, especially anteiso-terminal branching, on the biodegradation of hydrocarbons. PMID:539824

  15. MonomethylMonomethyl BranchedBranched--Chain Fatty AcidsChain Fatty Acids ... are essential for reproductive growth

    E-print Network

    Knyazev, Andrew

    MonomethylMonomethyl BranchedBranched--Chain Fatty AcidsChain Fatty Acids CH3 CH3 OH O CH3 CH3 OH O make no oocytes MonomethylMonomethyl BranchedBranched--Chain Fatty AcidsChain Fatty Acids Deficiency with sick L3, L4, ad no growth sick L3, L4, ad no growth Monomethyl Branched-Chain Fatty Acids have been

  16. WNT signaling drives cholangiocarcinoma growth and can be pharmacologically inhibited.

    PubMed

    Boulter, Luke; Guest, Rachel V; Kendall, Timothy J; Wilson, David H; Wojtacha, Davina; Robson, Andrew J; Ridgway, Rachel A; Samuel, Kay; Van Rooijen, Nico; Barry, Simon T; Wigmore, Stephen J; Sansom, Owen J; Forbes, Stuart J

    2015-03-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is typically diagnosed at an advanced stage and is refractory to surgical intervention and chemotherapy. Despite a global increase in the incidence of CC, little progress has been made toward the development of treatments for this cancer. Here we utilized human tissue; CC cell xenografts; a p53-deficient transgenic mouse model; and a non-transgenic, chemically induced rat model of CC that accurately reflects both the inflammatory and regenerative background associated with human CC pathology. Using these systems, we determined that the WNT pathway is highly activated in CCs and that inflammatory macrophages are required to establish this WNT-high state in vivo. Moreover, depletion of macrophages or inhibition of WNT signaling with one of two small molecule WNT inhibitors in mouse and rat CC models markedly reduced CC proliferation and increased apoptosis, resulting in tumor regression. Together, these results demonstrate that enhanced WNT signaling is a characteristic of CC and suggest that targeting WNT signaling pathways has potential as a therapeutic strategy for CC. PMID:25689248

  17. Salicylic acid signaling inhibits apoplastic reactive oxygen species signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are used by plants as signaling molecules during stress and development. Given the amount of possible challenges a plant face from their environment, plants need to activate and prioritize between potentially conflicting defense signaling pathways. Until recently, most studies on signal interactions have focused on phytohormone interaction, such as the antagonistic relationship between salicylic acid (SA)-jasmonic acid and cytokinin-auxin. Results In this study, we report an antagonistic interaction between SA signaling and apoplastic ROS signaling. Treatment with ozone (O3) leads to a ROS burst in the apoplast and induces extensive changes in gene expression and elevation of defense hormones. However, Arabidopsis thaliana dnd1 (defense no death1) exhibited an attenuated response to O3. In addition, the dnd1 mutant displayed constitutive expression of defense genes and spontaneous cell death. To determine the exact process which blocks the apoplastic ROS signaling, double and triple mutants involved in various signaling pathway were generated in dnd1 background. Simultaneous elimination of SA-dependent and SA-independent signaling components from dnd1 restored its responsiveness to O3. Conversely, pre-treatment of plants with SA or using mutants that constitutively activate SA signaling led to an attenuation of changes in gene expression elicited by O3. Conclusions Based upon these findings, we conclude that plants are able to prioritize the response between ROS and SA via an antagonistic action of SA and SA signaling on apoplastic ROS signaling. PMID:24898702

  18. Sphingoid bases inhibit acid-induced demineralization of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van 't Hof, Wim; Bikker, Floris J; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; Sotres, Javier; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Veerman, Enno C I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main constituent of dental enamel, is inherently susceptible to the etching and dissolving action of acids, resulting in tooth decay such as dental caries and dental erosion. Since the prevalence of erosive wear is gradually increasing, there is urgent need for agents that protect the enamel against erosive attacks. In the present study we studied in vitro the anti-erosive effects of a number of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases, which form the backbone of sphingolipids. Pretreatment of HAp discs with sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), PHS phosphate and sphinganine significantly protected these against acid-induced demineralization by 80 ± 17%, 78 ± 17%, 78 ± 7% and 81 ± 8%, respectively (p < 0.001). On the other hand, sphingomyelin, acetyl PHS, octanoyl PHS and stearoyl PHS had no anti-erosive effects. Atomic force measurement revealed that HAp discs treated with PHS were almost completely and homogeneously covered by patches of PHS. This suggests that PHS and other sphingoid bases form layers on the surface of HAp, which act as diffusion barriers against H(+) ions. In principle, these anti-erosive properties make PHS and related sphingosines promising and attractive candidates as ingredients in oral care products. PMID:25300299

  19. Growth inhibitory, antiandrogenic, and pro-apoptotic effects of punicic acid in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gasmi, Jihane; Sanderson, J Thomas

    2010-12-01

    Prostate cancer is a commonly diagnosed cancer in men, and dietary chemoprevention by pomegranate (Punica granatum) extracts has shown noticeable benefits. In this study, we investigated the growth inhibitory, antiandrogenic, and pro-apoptotic effects of 13 pure compounds found in the pomegranate in androgen-dependent LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. Cells deprived of steroid hormones were exposed to increasing concentrations (1-100 ?M) of pomegranate compounds in the presence of 0.1 nM dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and the inhibition of cell growth was measured by WST-1 colorimetric assay after a 4 day exposure. Four compounds, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), delphinidin chloride, kaempferol, and punicic acid, were found to inhibit DHT-stimulated cell growth at concentrations of 10 ?M and above. These four pomegranate compounds inhibited DHT-stimulated androgen receptor nuclear accumulation and the expression of the androgen receptor-dependent genes prostate specific antigen and steroid 5?-reductase type 1 at concentrations ?10 ?M. We determined the possible contribution of apoptosis to the observed decrease in cell growth and found that three compounds, EGCG, kaempferol, and, in particular, punicic acid, induced DNA fragmentation after a 24 h treatment, at concentrations in the 10-100 ?M range. Punicic acid, an important fatty acid in pomegranate seeds, was further found to induce intrinsic apoptosis via a caspase-dependent pathway. In conclusion, punicic acid, the main constituent of pomegranate seed (70-80%), exhibited potent growth inhibitory activities in androgen-dependent LNCaP cells, which appear to be mediated by both antiandrogenic and pro-apoptotic mechanisms. PMID:21067181

  20. Nanoelectroablation of Murine Tumors Triggers a CD8-Dependent Inhibition of Secondary Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Berridge, Jon Casey; Mallon, Zachary; Kreis, Mark; Athos, Brian; Nuccitelli, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    We have used both a rat orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model and a mouse allograft tumor model to study liver tumor ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF). We confirm that nsPEF treatment triggers apoptosis in rat liver tumor cells as indicated by the appearance of cleaved caspase 3 and 9 within two hours after treatment. Furthermore we provide evidence that nsPEF treatment leads to the translocation of calreticulin (CRT) to the cell surface which is considered a damage-associated molecular pattern indicative of immunogenic cell death. We provide direct evidence that nanoelectroablation triggers a CD8-dependent inhibition of secondary tumor growth by comparing the growth rate of secondary orthotopic liver tumors in nsPEF-treated rats with that in nsPEF-treated rats depleted of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. The growth of these secondary tumors was severely inhibited as compared to tumor growth in CD8-depleated rats, with their average size only 3% of the primary tumor size after the same one-week growth period. In contrast, when we depleted CD8+ T-cells the second tumor grew more robustly, reaching 54% of the size of the first tumor. In addition, we demonstrate with immunohistochemistry that CD8+ T-cells are highly enriched in the secondary tumors exhibiting slow growth. We also showed that vaccinating mice with nsPEF-treated isogenic tumor cells stimulates an immune response that inhibits the growth of secondary tumors in a CD8+-dependent manner. We conclude that nanoelectroablation triggers the production of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells resulting in the inhibition of secondary tumor growth. PMID:26231031

  1. Nanoelectroablation of Murine Tumors Triggers a CD8-Dependent Inhibition of Secondary Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Berridge, Jon Casey; Mallon, Zachary; Kreis, Mark; Athos, Brian; Nuccitelli, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    We have used both a rat orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model and a mouse allograft tumor model to study liver tumor ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF). We confirm that nsPEF treatment triggers apoptosis in rat liver tumor cells as indicated by the appearance of cleaved caspase 3 and 9 within two hours after treatment. Furthermore we provide evidence that nsPEF treatment leads to the translocation of calreticulin (CRT) to the cell surface which is considered a damage-associated molecular pattern indicative of immunogenic cell death. We provide direct evidence that nanoelectroablation triggers a CD8-dependent inhibition of secondary tumor growth by comparing the growth rate of secondary orthotopic liver tumors in nsPEF-treated rats with that in nsPEF-treated rats depleted of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. The growth of these secondary tumors was severely inhibited as compared to tumor growth in CD8-depleated rats, with their average size only 3% of the primary tumor size after the same one-week growth period. In contrast, when we depleted CD8+ T-cells the second tumor grew more robustly, reaching 54% of the size of the first tumor. In addition, we demonstrate with immunohistochemistry that CD8+ T-cells are highly enriched in the secondary tumors exhibiting slow growth. We also showed that vaccinating mice with nsPEF-treated isogenic tumor cells stimulates an immune response that inhibits the growth of secondary tumors in a CD8+-dependent manner. We conclude that nanoelectroablation triggers the production of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells resulting in the inhibition of secondary tumor growth. PMID:26231031

  2. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...damage which is expressed as cell killing or growth inhibition... (ii) Phase of bacterial cell growth at time of use in the...for determination of degree of cell kill. (vii) Dose-response...mutagens and carcinogens.” Cancer Research,...

  3. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...damage which is expressed as cell killing or growth inhibition... (ii) Phase of bacterial cell growth at time of use in the...for determination of degree of cell kill. (vii) Dose-response...mutagens and carcinogens.” Cancer Research,...

  4. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...damage which is expressed as cell killing or growth inhibition... (ii) Phase of bacterial cell growth at time of use in the...for determination of degree of cell kill. (vii) Dose-response...mutagens and carcinogens.” Cancer Research,...

  5. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...damage which is expressed as cell killing or growth inhibition... (ii) Phase of bacterial cell growth at time of use in the...for determination of degree of cell kill. (vii) Dose-response...mutagens and carcinogens.” Cancer Research,...

  6. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...damage which is expressed as cell killing or growth inhibition... (ii) Phase of bacterial cell growth at time of use in the...for determination of degree of cell kill. (vii) Dose-response...mutagens and carcinogens.” Cancer Research,...

  7. Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits growth of mouse ovarian antral follicles through an oxidative stress pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei Craig, Zelieann R. Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S. Gupta, Rupesh K. Flaws, Jodi A.

    2012-01-15

    Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a plasticizer that has been shown to inhibit growth of mouse antral follicles, however, little is known about the mechanisms by which DEHP does so. Oxidative stress has been linked to follicle growth inhibition as well as phthalate-induced toxicity in non-ovarian tissues. Thus, we hypothesized that DEHP causes oxidative stress and that this leads to inhibition of the growth of antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from CD-1 mice (age 31–35 days) were cultured with vehicle control (dimethylsulfoxide [DMSO]) or DEHP (1–100 ?g/ml) ± N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant at 0.25–1 mM). During culture, follicles were measured daily. At the end of culture, follicles were collected and processed for in vitro reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays to measure the presence of free radicals or for measurement of the expression and activity of various key antioxidant enzymes: Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT). The results indicate that DEHP inhibits the growth of follicles compared to DMSO control and that NAC (0.25–1 mM) blocks the ability of DEHP to inhibit follicle growth. Furthermore, DEHP (10 ?g/ml) significantly increases ROS levels and reduces the expression and activity of SOD1 compared to DMSO controls, whereas NAC (0.5 mM) rescues the effects of DEHP on ROS levels and SOD1. However, the expression and activity of GPX and CAT were not affected by DEHP treatment. Collectively, these data suggest that DEHP inhibits follicle growth by inducing production of ROS and by decreasing the expression and activity of SOD1. -- Highlights: ? DEHP inhibits growth and increases reactive oxygen species in ovarian antral follicles in vitro. ? NAC rescues the effects of DEHP on the growth and reactive oxygen species levels in follicles. ? DEHP decreases the expression and activity of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, which can be rescued by NAC, in antral follicles.

  8. Gymnemic acids inhibit sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Dawid, Corinna; Kottra, Gabor; Daniel, Hannelore; Hofmann, Thomas

    2014-06-25

    To evaluate the activity of botanicals used in Chinese Traditional Medicine as hypoglycemic agents for diabetes type II prevention and/or treatment, extracts prepared from 26 medicinal herbs were screened for their inhibitory activity on sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) by using two-electrode voltage-clamp recording of glucose uptake in Xenopus laevis oocytes microinjected with cRNA for SGLT1. Showing by far the strongest SGLT1 inhibitory effect, the phytochemicals extracted from Gymnema sylvestre (Retz.) Schult were located by means of activity-guided fractionation and identified as 3-O-?-D-glucuronopyranosyl-21-O-2-tigloyl-22-O-2-tigloyl gymnemagenin (1) and 3-O-?-D-glucuronopyranosyl-21-O-2-methylbutyryl-22-O-2-tigloyl gymnemagenin (2) by means of LC-MS/MS, UPLC-TOF/MS, and 1D/2D-NMR experiments. Both saponins exhibited low IC50 values of 5.97 (1) and 0.17 ?M (2), the latter of which was in the same range as found for the high-affinity inhibitor phlorizin (0.21 ?M). As SGLT1 is found in high levels in brush-border membranes of intestinal epithelial cells, these findings demonstrate for the first time the potential of these saponins for inhibiting electrogenic glucose uptake in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24856809

  9. Comparison of toxicity to terrestrial plants with algal growth inhibition by herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T. Jr.; Frank, M.L.

    1984-10-01

    The toxicities of 21 different herbicides to algae (Selenastrum capricornutum and Chlorella vulgaris) and to terrestrial plants (radishes, barley, and bush beans or soybeans) were compared to order to determine the feasibility of using a short-term (96-h) algal growth inhibition test for identifying chemicals having potential toxicity in a 4-week terrestrial plant bioassay. The toxicity of each test chemical, usually in combination with a commercial formulation, was evaluated at six nominal concentrations, between 0 and 100 mg/L growth medium in the algal bioassay or between 0 and 100 mg/kg substate in the terrestrial plant bioassay, in terms of both (1) the no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC), i.e., the highest concentration tested at which no significant (P < 0.05, one-sided test) reduction in algal growth rate or in terrestrial plant yield, relative to controls, was observed; and (2) the concentration at which algal growth rate or terrestrial plant yield was reduced by 50% or more relative to controls. There was generally poor agreement between results from the two types of bioassays; results from algal growth inhibition tests were not significantly correlated with results from the terrestrial plant bioassays. Overall, there was an approximately 50% chance of an algal bioassay, using Selenastrum capricornutum, successfully screening (detecting) herbicide levels that reduced terrestrial plant yield. The results indicated that algal growth inhibition tests cannot be used generically to predict phytotoxicity of herbicides to terrestrial plant species. 7 references, 14 tables.

  10. Using photons to manipulate enzyme inhibition by an azobenzene-modified nucleic acid probe

    E-print Network

    Tan, Weihong

    Using photons to manipulate enzyme inhibition by an azobenzene-modified nucleic acid probe Youngmi and concluded the feasibility of using photon energy to temporally and spatially regulate these enzymatic reactions. Thus, we can report the development of DNA probes in the form of photon-controllable (thrombin

  11. Capsaicin Inhibits Preferentially the NADH Oxidase and Growth of Transformed Cells in Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morre, D. James; Chueh, Pin-Ju; Morre, Dorothy M.

    1995-03-01

    A hormone- and growth factor-stimulated NADH oxidase of the mammalian plasma membrane, constitutively activated in transformed cells, was inhibited preferentially in HeLa, ovarian carcinoma, mammary adenocarcinoma, and HL-60 cells, all of human origin, by the naturally occurring quinone analog capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-noneamide), compared with plasma membranes from human mammary epithelial, rat liver, normal rat kidney cells, or HL-60 cells induced to differentiate with dimethyl sulfoxide. With cells in culture, capsaicin preferentially inhibited growth of HeLa, ovarian carcinoma, mammary adenocarcinoma, and HL-60 cells but was largely without effect on the mammary epithelial cells, rat kidney cells, or HL-60 cells induced to differentiate with dimethyl sulfoxide. Inhibited cells became smaller and cell death was accompanied by a condensed and fragmented appearance of the nuclear DNA, as revealed by fluorescence microscopy with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, suggestive of apoptosis. The findings correlate capsaicin inhibition of cell surface NADH oxidase activity and inhibition of growth that correlate with capsaicin-induced apoptosis.

  12. In vivo inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis and growth in tobacco ovary tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, R. D.; Galston, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    Post fertilization growth of tobacco ovary tissues treated with inhibitors of polyamine (PA) biosynthesis was examined in relation to endogenous PA titers and the activities of arginine decarboxylase (ADC, EC 4.1.1.19) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, EC 4.1.1.17). DL-alpha-Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), specific, irreversible ("suicide") inhibitors of ODC and ADC in vitro, were used to modulate PA biosynthesis in excised flowers. ODC represented >99% of the total decarboxylase activity in tobacco ovaries. In vivo inhibition of ODC with DFMO resulted in a significant decrease in PA titers, ovary fresh weight and protein content. Simultaneous inhibition of both decarboxylases by DFMO and DFMA produced only a marginally greater depression in growth and PA titers, indicating that ODC activity is rate-limiting for PA biosynthesis in these tissues. Paradoxically, DFMA alone inhibited PA biosynthesis, not as a result of a specific inhibition of ADC, but primarily through the inactivation of ODC. In vivo inhibition of ODC by DFMA appears to result from arginase-mediated hydrolysis of this inhibitor to urea and DFMO, the suicide substrate for ODC. Putrescine conjugates in tobacco appear to function as a storage form of this amine which, upon hydrolysis, may contribute to Put homeostasis during growth.

  13. Tannic Acid Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Entry into Huh7.5 Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuanghu; Chen, Ren; Hagedorn, Curt H

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Although antiviral therapy has dramatically improved recently, a number of patients remain untreated and some do not clear infection with treatment. Viral entry is an essential step in initiating and maintaining chronic HCV infections. One dramatic example of this is the nearly 100% infection of newly transplanted livers in patients with chronic hepatitis C. HCV entry inhibitors could play a critical role in preventing HCV infection of newly transplanted livers. Tannic acid, a polymer of gallic acid and glucose molecules, is a plant-derived polyphenol that defends some plants from insects and microbial infections. It has been shown to have a variety of biological effects, including antiviral activity, and is used as a flavoring agent in foods and beverages. In this study, we demonstrate that tannic acid is a potent inhibitor of HCV entry into Huh7.5 cells at low concentrations (IC50 5.8 ?M). It also blocks cell-to-cell spread in infectious HCV cell cultures, but does not inhibit HCV replication following infection. Moreover, experimental results indicate that tannic acid inhibits an early step of viral entry, such as the docking of HCV at the cell surface. Gallic acid, tannic acid's structural component, did not show any anti-HCV activity including inhibition of HCV entry or replication at concentrations up to 25 ?M. It is possible the tannin structure is related on the effect on HCV inhibition. Tannic acid, which is widely distributed in plants and foods, has HCV antiviral activity in cell culture at low micromolar concentrations, may provide a relative inexpensive adjuvant to direct-acting HCV antivirals and warrants future investigation. PMID:26186636

  14. d-Amino acids do not inhibit biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sourav; Pires, Marcos M

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria can either exist in the planktonic (free floating) state or in the biofilm (encased within an organic framework) state. Bacteria biofilms cause industrial concerns and medical complications and there has been a great deal of interest in the discovery of small molecule agents that can inhibit the formation of biofilms or disperse existing structures. Herein we show that, contrary to previously published reports, d-amino acids do not inhibit biofilm formation of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), and Staphylococcus epidermis (S. epidermis) at millimolar concentrations. We evaluated a diverse set of natural and unnatural d-amino acids and observed no activity from these compounds in inhibiting biofilm formation. PMID:25658642

  15. Inhibition of hypochlorous acid-induced cellular toxicity by nitrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteman, Matthew; Hooper, D. Craig; Scott, Gwen S.; Koprowski, Hilary; Halliwell, Barry

    2002-09-01

    Chronic inflammation results in increased nitrogen monoxide (NO) formation and the accumulation of nitrite (NO). Neutrophils stimulated by various inflammatory mediators release myeloperoxidase to produce the cytotoxic agent hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Exposure of chondrocytic SW1353 cells to HOCl resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent loss in viability, ATP, and glutathione levels. Treatment of cells with NO but not nitrate (NO) substantially decreased HOCl-dependent cellular toxicity even when NO was added at low (?M) concentrations. In contrast, NO alone (even at 1 mM concentrations) did not affect cell viability or ATP and glutathione levels. These data suggest that NO accumulation at chronic inflammatory sites, where both HOCl and NO are overproduced, may be cytoprotective against damage caused by HOCl. We propose that this is because HOCl is removed by reacting with NO to give nitryl chloride (NO2Cl), which is less damaging in our cell system. inflammation | cell toxicity | nitryl chloride | nitric oxide | arthritis

  16. Regulation of legume nodulation by acidic growth conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Brett J.; Lin, Meng-Han; Gresshoff, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Legumes represent some of the most important crop species worldwide. They are able to form novel root organs known as nodules, within which biological nitrogen fixation is facilitated through a symbiotic interaction with soil-dwelling bacteria called rhizobia. This provides legumes with a distinct advantage over other plant species, as nitrogen is a key factor for growth and development. Nodule formation is tightly regulated by the plant and can be inhibited by a number of external factors, such as soil pH. This is of significant agricultural and economic importance as much of global legume crops are grown on low pH soils. Despite this, the precise mechanism by which low pH conditions inhibits nodule development remains poorly characterized. PMID:23333963

  17. In-situ Monitoring the Inhibiting Effect of Polyphophinocarboxylic Acid on CaCO3 Scale Formation by Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.; Neville, A; Sorbie, K; Zhong, Z

    2009-01-01

    The formation of calcium carbonate mineral scale is a persistent and expensive problem in oil and gas production. The aim of this paper is to further the understanding of scale formation and inhibition by in-situ probing of crystal growth by synchrotron radiation wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) in the absence and presence of polyphosphinocarboxylic acid (PPCA) scale inhibitor. This technique offers an exciting prospect for the study of scaling.

  18. Inhibiting mitochondrial ?-oxidation selectively reduces levels of nonenzymatic oxidative polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolites in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chuck T; Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; Hopperton, Kathryn E; Domenichiello, Anthony F; Masoodi, Mojgan; Bazinet, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Schönfeld and Reiser recently hypothesized that fatty acid ?-oxidation is a source of oxidative stress in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we inhibited brain mitochondrial ?-oxidation with methyl palmoxirate (MEP) and measured oxidative polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) metabolites in the rat brain. Upon MEP treatment, levels of several nonenzymatic auto-oxidative PUFA metabolites were reduced with few effects on enzymatically derived metabolites. Our finding confirms the hypothesis that reduced fatty acid ?-oxidation decreases oxidative stress in the brain and ?-oxidation inhibitors may be a novel therapeutic approach for brain disorders associated with oxidative stress. PMID:24326387

  19. Contact dependent growth inhibition of E. coli O157:H7 by EC869 CDI system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Contact Dependent Growth Inhibition (CDI) is a recently discovered mechanism that microorganisms use to compete in various microecosystems. CDI systems express large cell surface exposed CdiA proteins with potent antimicrobial peptide tips. Many CDI systems also contain additional down...

  20. Effects of SSd Combined with Radiation on Inhibiting SMMC-7721 Hepatoma Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bao-feng; Lin, Shuai; Bai, Ming Hua; Song, Ling-qin; Min, Wei-li; Wang, Meng; Yang, Pengtao; Ma, Hong-bing; Wang, Xi-jing

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Saikosaponin-d (SSd) combined with radiotherapy on SMMC-7721 hepatoma cell lines and its mechanism. Material/Methods SMMC-7721 hepatoma cell lines are selected in our research. With MTT (methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide) method, the effects of SSd and radiation on inhibiting SMMC-7721 cell growth were investigated. We also used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to observe ultrastructural changes of cells. Colorimetry methods were used to measure content changes of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in cells. Results Both SSd and radiation inhibited the growth of SMMC-7721 cells. The combination of SSd and radiotherapy had a time-dependent synergistic effect. Radiation caused ultrastructural damage to cells, and the damage was enhanced in combination with SSd. Radiation decreased the GSH content and increased the MDA content in cells, and this effect was suppressed after the intervention of SSd. Conclusions SSd can inhibit the growth of SMMC-7721 hepatoma cell lines in vitro. Additionally, it significantly enhances the effects of radiation on inhibiting the growth of SMMC-7721 hepatoma cell lines, and up-regulates the antioxidant level after the radiotherapy. Thus, SSd could be an ideal radiotherapy sensitizer for the treatment of liver cancer. PMID:25080219

  1. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis in vitro and in vivo by targeting

    E-print Network

    Fan, Jianqing

    is associated with advanced disease stage, rapid tumor progression and poor prognosis (Bown, 2001; Brodeur, 2003ORIGINAL ARTICLE Inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis in vitro and in vivo by targeting macrophage migration inhibitory factor in human neuroblastoma Y Ren1,2 , HM Chan1 , J Fan3 , Y Xie1 , YX Chen

  2. Water Stress Inhibits Hydraulic Conductance and Leaf Growth in Rice Seedlings but Not the

    E-print Network

    Neumann, Peter M.

    Water Stress Inhibits Hydraulic Conductance and Leaf Growth in Rice Seedlings but Not the Transport of Water via Mercury-Sensitive Water Channels in the Root1 Zhongjin Lu and Peter M. Neumann* Plant of Technology, Haifa 32000, Israel The mechanisms by which moderate water stress (adding poly- ethylene glycol

  3. Abstract. Doxycycline (Dc) has been demonstrated to inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in tumor cells,

    E-print Network

    Tian, Weidong

    that apoptosis can be in- duced in HeLa cells. Western blot data demonstrated that cytochrome c (Cyt c), Smac mediate caspase-dependent apoptosis induced by doxycycline in HeLa cells J. Wua, b, T. Liua, b, J. Xiea, bAbstract. Doxycycline (Dc) has been demonstrated to inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis

  4. The angiogenesis regulator vasohibin-1 inhibits ovarian cancer growth and peritoneal dissemination and prolongs host survival

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, YOSHIFUMI; SAGA, YASUSHI; KOYANAGI, TAKAHIRO; TAKEI, YUJI; MACHIDA, SIZUO; TANEICHI, AKIYO; MIZUKAMI, HIROAKI; SATO, YASUFUMI; MATSUBARA, SHIGEKI; FUJIWARA, HIROYUKI

    2015-01-01

    Vasohibin-1 (VASH1) is expressed in vascular endothelial cells stimulated by several angiogenic growth factors and displays autocrine activity to regulate angiogenesis via a negative feedback mechanism. In this study, we investigated the effect of VASH1 on ovarian cancer progression using VASH1-expressing ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The growth ability of ovarian cancer cells engineered to express the VASH1 gene remained unchanged in vitro. However, we showed that VASH1 secretion by tumor cells inhibited the growth of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Further, animal experiments showed that VASH1 expression inhibited tumor angiogenesis and growth. In a murine model of peritoneal dissemination of ovarian cancer cells, VASH1 inhibited peritoneal dissemination and ascites, resulting in significantly prolonged survival in mice. This indicates that VASH1 exerts an antitumor effect on ovarian cancer by inhibiting angiogenesis in the tumor environment. These findings suggest that a novel therapy based on VASH1 could be a useful therapeutic strategy for ovarian cancer. PMID:26460696

  5. CCR 20th anniversary commentary: a chimeric antibody, C225, inhibits EGFR activation and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, John; Prewett, Marie; Rockwell, Patricia; Goldstein, Neil I

    2015-01-15

    Murine mAb 225 was effective against the EGFR tyrosine kinase and inhibited tumor growth in preclinical studies. A phase I trial showed safety, tumor localization, and satisfactory pharmacokinetics. Human:murine chimeric C225 retained biologic activity, which was essential for the conduct of subsequent combination therapy trials and eventual regulatory approval. PMID:25593342

  6. The angiogenesis regulator vasohibin-1 inhibits ovarian cancer growth and peritoneal dissemination and prolongs host survival.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshifumi; Saga, Yasushi; Koyanagi, Takahiro; Takei, Yuji; Machida, Sizuo; Taneichi, Akiyo; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Sato, Yasufumi; Matsubara, Shigeki; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    Vasohibin-1 (VASH1) is expressed in vascular endothelial cells stimulated by several angiogenic growth factors and displays autocrine activity to regulate angiogenesis via a negative feedback mechanism. In this study, we investigated the effect of VASH1 on ovarian cancer progression using VASH1-expressing ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The growth ability of ovarian cancer cells engineered to express the VASH1 gene remained unchanged in vitro. However, we showed that VASH1 secretion by tumor cells inhibited the growth of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Further, animal experiments showed that VASH1 expression inhibited tumor angiogenesis and growth. In a murine model of peritoneal dissemination of ovarian cancer cells, VASH1 inhibited peritoneal dissemination and ascites, resulting in significantly prolonged survival in mice. This indicates that VASH1 exerts an antitumor effect on ovarian cancer by inhibiting angiogenesis in the tumor environment. These findings suggest that a novel therapy based on VASH1 could be a useful therapeutic strategy for ovarian cancer. PMID:26460696

  7. Pollen tube growth and inhibition in distylous and homostylous Turnera and Piriqueta (Turneraceae)

    E-print Network

    Shore, Joel S.

    Pollen tube growth and inhibition in distylous and homostylous Turnera and Piriqueta (Turneraceae of pollen tubes and fluorescence microscopy. We show that sites of incompatibility occur in the stigma and upper regions of the style. There is an asymmetry between the morphs where, following selfing, pollen

  8. Guggulsterone inhibits prostate cancer growth via inactivation of Akt regulated by ATP citrate lyase signaling.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yajuan; Zeng, Yan; Tian, Jian; Islam, Mohammad Shyful; Jiang, Guoqin; Xiao, Dong

    2014-06-26

    We have shown previously that Gugggulsterone (Gug) inhibits growth of cultured LNCaP and PC-3 human prostate cancer cells by causing apoptosis induction in association with reactive-oxygen species (ROS)-dependent activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). The present study builds upon the novel observations and now reveals a novel mechanism of Gug-anticancer activity that ATP citrate lyase (ACLY)-regulated Akt inactivation is involved in Gug-mediated inhibition of prostate cancer growth. Oral gavage of Gug significantly retarded the growth of PC-3 xenografts in athymic mice without causing weight loss and any other side effects. The Gug-induced apoptosis was associated with remarkably down-regulation of Akt and ACLY in both cancer cells and xenografts tumor tissue of Gug-treated group. Ectopic expression of constitutively active Akt conferred significant protection against Gug-mediated apoptotic cell death in both cancer cells. Moreover, the Gug-induced apoptosis, and Akt and ACLY inactivation in PC-3 and LNCaP cells was intensified by siRNA-based knockdown of ACLY protein level and by pharmacological inhibition of ACLY, or was protected by the ectopic expression of ACLY. In conclusion, the present study reveals a novel mechanism of Gug-anticancer activity that Gug-inhibited prostate cancer growth is regulated by ACLY/Akt signaling axis. PMID:24980815

  9. Ionene polymers for selectively inhibiting the vitro growth of malignant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Ionene polymers of the structure ##STR1## WHERE X AND Y ARE INTEGERS FROM 3 TO 16, Z.sup.- is an anion such as a halogen and n is an integer from 50 to 150 are found to bind negatively charged mammalian cells such as malignant cells and can be utilized to selectively inhibit the growth of malignant cells in vitro.

  10. DIETARY ISOTHIOCYANATE IBERIN INHIBITS GROWTH AND INDUCES APOPTOSIS IN HUMAN GLIOBLASTOMA CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we evaluated the antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of the isothiocyanate iberin, a bioactive agent in Brassicaceae species, in human glioblastoma cells. The human glioblastoma cell cultures were treated with different concentrations of iberin and tested for growth inhibition...

  11. Growth inhibition and chromosomal instability of cultured marsupial (opossum) cells after treatment with DNA polymerase ? inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Masaharu; Kazama, Tomoko; Sakuma, Kurumi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Oshima, Teruyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The DNA replication mechanism has been well established for eutherian mammals (placental mammals such as humans, mice, and cattle), but not, to date, for metatherian mammals (marsupials such as kangaroos, koalas, and opossums). In this study, we found that dehydroaltenusin, a selective inhibitor of mammalian (eutherian) DNA polymerase ?, clearly suppressed the growth of metatherian (opossum and rat kangaroo) cultured cells. In cultured opossum (OK) cells, dehydroaltenusin also suppressed the progression of DNA replication. These results suggest that dehydroaltenusin inhibits metatherian as well as eutherian DNA replication. Dehydroaltenusin treatment of OK cells engendered fluctuations in the numbers of chromosomes in the OK cells as well as inhibition of cell growth and DNA replication. This suggests that partial inhibition of DNA replication by dehydroaltenusin causes chromosomal instability in cultured cells. PMID:21737927

  12. Morphological tranformation of calcite crystal growth by prismatic "acidic" polypeptide sequences.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, I; Giocondi, J L; Orme, C A; Collino, J; Evans, J S

    2007-02-13

    Many of the interesting mechanical and materials properties of the mollusk shell are thought to stem from the prismatic calcite crystal assemblies within this composite structure. It is now evident that proteins play a major role in the formation of these assemblies. Recently, a superfamily of 7 conserved prismatic layer-specific mollusk shell proteins, Asprich, were sequenced, and the 42 AA C-terminal sequence region of this protein superfamily was found to introduce surface voids or porosities on calcite crystals in vitro. Using AFM imaging techniques, we further investigate the effect that this 42 AA domain (Fragment-2) and its constituent subdomains, DEAD-17 and Acidic-2, have on the morphology and growth kinetics of calcite dislocation hillocks. We find that Fragment-2 adsorbs on terrace surfaces and pins acute steps, accelerates then decelerates the growth of obtuse steps, forms clusters and voids on terrace surfaces, and transforms calcite hillock morphology from a rhombohedral form to a rounded one. These results mirror yet are distinct from some of the earlier findings obtained for nacreous polypeptides. The subdomains Acidic-2 and DEAD-17 were found to accelerate then decelerate obtuse steps and induce oval rather than rounded hillock morphologies. Unlike DEAD-17, Acidic-2 does form clusters on terrace surfaces and exhibits stronger obtuse velocity inhibition effects than either DEAD-17 or Fragment-2. Interestingly, a 1:1 mixture of both subdomains induces an irregular polygonal morphology to hillocks, and exhibits the highest degree of acute step pinning and obtuse step velocity inhibition. This suggests that there is some interplay between subdomains within an intra (Fragment-2) or intermolecular (1:1 mixture) context, and sequence interplay phenomena may be employed by biomineralization proteins to exert net effects on crystal growth and morphology.

  13. Cell growth arrest by sialic acid clusters in ganglioside GM3 mimetic polymers.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Satoshi; Feng, Fei; Kume, Maya; Yamada, Kuriko; Kabayama, Kazuya; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Inokuchi, Jin-Ichi

    2007-06-01

    Ganglioside GM3, one of the sialic acid containing glycosphingolipids, is known to form clusters in lipid microdomains, which serve as platforms for effective signal transduction. In an attempt to clarify the GM3 cluster effect, we enzymatically synthesized GM3 mimetic polymer (GM3-p), with an acrylamide backbone from LacCer mimetic polymer (LacCer-p). Interestingly, GM3-p, but not LacCer-p, reversibly inhibited proliferation of NIH3T3 cells, which are normally resistant to exogenously added GM3. Moreover, we found that the introduction of carbonic acid into the acrylamide chain aided well-oriented cluster formation and enhanced the inhibitory effect of GM3-p. Since sialyllactosyl polymer and GM4 mimetic polymer, but not GM2 mimetic polymer, also inhibited cell proliferation, sialic acid-galactose units must be essential for the biological activity of GM3-p. These results suggest that the formation of sialic acid-galactose clusters is necessary for the suppressive effect of GM3-p. GM3-p treatment did not affect the serum-dependent activation of ERK1/2 or c-fos expression, but caused a reduction in the gene and/or protein expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)4, and cdk2, which are involved in the cell cycle. Therefore, GM3-p inhibits cell proliferation by reducing cyclin D1-cdk4 and cyclin E-cdk2 complexes without affecting growth factor signaling from serum to c-fos. PMID:17317719

  14. Flavonoids and 5-Aminosalicylic Acid Inhibit the Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Sonja; Klinger, Matthias; Solbach, Werner; Laskay, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been suggested to play a pathophysiological role in several autoimmune diseases. Since NET-formation in response to several biological and chemical stimuli is mostly ROS dependent, in theory any substance that inhibits or scavenges ROS could prevent ROS-dependent NET release. Therefore, in the present comprehensive study, several antioxidative substances were assessed for their capacity to inhibit NET formation of primary human neutrophils in vitro. We could show that the flavonoids (?)-epicatechin, (+)-catechin hydrate, and rutin trihydrate as well as vitamin C and the pharmacological substances N-acetyl-L-cysteine and 5-aminosalicylic acid inhibited PMA induced ROS production and NET formation. Therefore, a broad spectrum of antioxidative substances that reduce ROS production of primary human neutrophils also inhibits ROS-dependent NET formation. It is tempting to speculate that such antioxidants can have beneficial therapeutic effects in diseases associated with ROS-dependent NET formation. PMID:24381411

  15. Acid rain stimulation of Lake Michigan phytoplankton growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manny, Bruce A.; Fahnenstiel, G.L.; Gardner, W.S.

    1987-01-01

    Three laboratory experiments demonstrated that additions of rainwater to epilimnetic lake water collected in southeastern Lake Michigan stimulated chlorophyll a production more than did additions of reagent-grade water during incubations of 12 to 20 d. Chlorophyll a production did not begin until 3-5 d after the rain and lake water were mixed. The stimulation caused by additions of rain acidified to pH 3.0 was greater than that caused by additions of untreated rain (pH 4.0-4.5). Our results support the following hypotheses: (1) Acid rain stimulates the growth of phytoplankton in lake water; (2) phosphorus in rain appears to be the factor causing this stimulation. We conclude that acid rain may accelerate the growth of epilimnetic phytoplankton in Lake Michigan (and other similar lakes) during stratification when other sources of bioavailable phosphorus to the epilimnion are limited.

  16. Deguelin, a natural rotenoid, inhibits mouse myeloma cell growth in vitro via induction of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    LI, ZHENGGUANG; WU, JUN; WU, CHANGPING; JIANG, JINGTING; ZHENG, XIAO; XU, BIN; LI, MIN

    2012-01-01

    Deguelin is a naturally occurring rotenoid with strong cancer chemopreventive and antitumor activities. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor activity of deguelin against MPC-11 murine myeloma cells and the possible mechanism of action in vitro. Our results revealed that deguelin inhibited the proliferation of MPC-11 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and caused the apoptotic death of MPC-11 cells. Following exposure to deguelin, the phosphorylation of Akt was decreased. The inhibition of cell growth may be associated with decreased levels of phosphorylated Akt. Deguelin-induced apoptosis was characterized by the upregulation of Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2 and activation of caspase-3. In conclusion, deguelin inhibits murine myeloma cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis via regulation of the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and by inhibition of the activation of Akt. Its potential as an anticancer agent against multiple myeloma warrants further investigation. PMID:23226790

  17. Deguelin, a natural rotenoid, inhibits mouse myeloma cell growth in vitro via induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengguang; Wu, Jun; Wu, Changping; Jiang, Jingting; Zheng, Xiao; Xu, Bin; Li, Min

    2012-10-01

    Deguelin is a naturally occurring rotenoid with strong cancer chemopreventive and antitumor activities. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor activity of deguelin against MPC-11 murine myeloma cells and the possible mechanism of action in vitro. Our results revealed that deguelin inhibited the proliferation of MPC-11 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and caused the apoptotic death of MPC-11 cells. Following exposure to deguelin, the phosphorylation of Akt was decreased. The inhibition of cell growth may be associated with decreased levels of phosphorylated Akt. Deguelin-induced apoptosis was characterized by the upregulation of Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2 and activation of caspase-3. In conclusion, deguelin inhibits murine myeloma cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis via regulation of the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and by inhibition of the activation of Akt. Its potential as an anticancer agent against multiple myeloma warrants further investigation. PMID:23226790

  18. RRR-?-tocopheryl succinate inhibits human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cell growth by inducing apoptosis and DNA synthesis arrest

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kun; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Bai-He; Li, Yao; Liu, Fang; Guo, Jian; Yu, Wei-Ping

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of growth inhibition of human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cell with RRR-?-tocopheryl succinate (VES), a derivative of natural Vitamin E, via inducing apoptosis and DNA synthesis arrest. METHODS: Human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells were regularly incubated in the presence of VES at 5, 10 and 20 mg·L-1 (VES was dissolved in absolute ethanol and diluted in RPMI 1640 complete condition media correspondingly to a final concentration of VES and 1 mL·L-1 ethanol), succinic acid and ethanol equivalents as vehicle (VEH) control and condition media only as untreated (UT) control. Trypan blue dye exclusion analysis and MTT assay were applied to detect the cell proliferation. 37 kBq of tritiated thymidine was added to cells and [3H] TdR uptake was measured to observe DNA synthesis. Apoptotic morphology was observed by electron microscopy and DAPI staining. Flow cytometry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay were performed to detect VES-triggered apoptosis. RESULTS: VES inhibited SGC-7901 cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. The growth curve showed suppression by 24.7%, 49.2% and 68.7% following 24 h of VES treatment at 5, 10 and 20 mg·L-1, respectively, similar to the findings from MTT assay. DNA synthesis was evidently reduced by 35%, 45% and 98% after 24 h VES treatment at 20 mg·L-1 and 48 h at 10 and 20 mg·L-1, respectively. VES induced SGC-7901 cells to undergo apoptosis with typically apoptotic characteristics, including morphological changes of chromatin condensation, chromatin crescent formation/margination, nucleus fragmentation and apoptotic body formation, typical apoptotic sub-G1 peak by flow cytometry and increase of apoptotic cells by TUNEL assay in which 90% of cells underwent apoptosis after 48h of VES treatment at 20 mg·L-1. CONCLUSION: VES can inhibit human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cell growth by inducing apoptosis and DNA synthesis arrest. Inhibition of SGC-7901 cell growth by VES is dose-and time-dependent. Therefore VES can function as a potent chemotherapeutic agent against human gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:11833065

  19. Effects of acetic acid and arginine on pH elevation and growth of Bacillus licheniformis in an acidified cucumber juice medium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenquan; Meng, Xia; Breidt, Frederick; Dean, Lisa L; Arritt, Fletcher M

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus licheniformis has been shown to cause pH elevation in tomato products having an initial pH below 4.6 and metabiotic effects that can lead to the growth of pathogenic bacteria. Because of this, the organism poses a potential risk to acidified vegetable products; however, little is known about the growth and metabolism of this organism in these products. To clarify the mechanisms of pH change and growth of B. licheniformis in vegetable broth under acidic conditions, a cucumber juice medium representative of a noninhibitory vegetable broth was used to monitor changes in pH, cell growth, and catabolism of sugars and amino acids. For initial pH values between pH 4.1 to 6.0, pH changes resulted from both fermentation of sugar (lowering pH) and ammonia production (raising pH). An initial pH elevation occurred, with starting pH values of pH 4.1 to 4.9 under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and was apparently mediated by the arginine deiminase reaction of B. licheniformis. This initial pH elevation was prevented if 5 mM or greater acetic acid was present in the brine at the same pH. In laboratory media, under favorable conditions for growth, data indicated that growth of the organism was inhibited at pH 4.6 with protonated acetic acid concentrations of 10 to 20 mM, corresponding to 25 to 50 mM total acetic acid; however, growth inhibition required greater than 300 mM citric acid (10-fold excess of the amount in processed tomato products) products under similar conditions. The data indicate that growth and pH increase by B. licheniformis may be inhibited by the acetic acid present in most commercial acidified vegetable products but not by the citric acid in many tomato products. PMID:25836398

  20. Time dependent inhibition of xanthine oxidase in irradiated solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.; Pilot, T.F.; Meany, J.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The xanthine oxidase catalyzed oxidation of hypoxanthine was followed by monitoring the formation of uric acid at 290 nm. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase occurs in aqueous solutions of folic acid methotrexate and aminopterin. These compounds are known to dissociate upon exposure to ultraviolet light resulting in the formation of their respective 6-formylpteridine derivatives. The relative rates of dissociation were monitored spectrophotometrically by determining the absorbance of their 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives at 500 nm. When aqueous solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate were exposed to uv light, a direct correlation was observed between the concentrations of the 6-formylpteridine derivatives existing in solution and the ability of these solutions to inhibit xanthine oxidase. The relative potency of the respective photolysis products were estimated.

  1. Inhibition of fatty acid metabolism ameliorates disease activity in an animal model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shriver, Leah P.; Manchester, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system and a leading cause of neurological disability. The complex immunopathology and variable disease course of multiple sclerosis have limited effective treatment of all patients. Altering the metabolism of immune cells may be an attractive strategy to modify their function during autoimmunity. We examined the effect of inhibiting fatty acid metabolism in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. Mice treated with an inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the beta-oxidation of fatty acids, showed a reduction in disease severity as well as less inflammation and demyelination. Inhibition of CPT-1 in encephalitogenic T-cells resulted in increased apoptosis and reduced inflammatory cytokine production. These results suggest that disruption of fatty acid metabolism promotes downregulation of inflammation in the CNS and that this metabolic pathway is a potential therapeutic target for multiple sclerosis. PMID:22355598

  2. Honokiol inhibits the growth of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma by targeting epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tripti; Gupta, Nirzari A.; Xu, Su; Prasad, Ram; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the chemotherapeutic effect of honokiol, a phytochemical from Magnolia plant, on human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Treatment of HNSCC cell lines from different sub-sites, SCC-1 (oral cavity), SCC-5 (larynx), OSC-19 (tongue) and FaDu (pharynx) with honokiol inhibited their cell viability, which was associated with the: (i) induction of apoptosis, (ii) correction of dysregulatory cell cycle proteins of G0/G1 phase. Honokiol decreased the expression levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mTOR and their downstream signaling molecules. Treatment of FaDu and SCC-1 cell lines with rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR pathway, also reduced cell viability of HNSCC cells. Administration of honokiol by oral gavage (100 mg/kg body weight) significantly (P < 0.01-0.001) inhibited the growth of SCC-1 and FaDu xenografts in athymic nude mice, which was associated with: (i) inhibition of tumor cell proliferation, (ii) induction of apoptosis, (iii) reduced expressions of cyclins and Cdks, and (iv) inhibition of EGFR signaling pathway. Molecular docking analysis of honokiol in EGFR binding site indicated that the chemotherapeutic effect of honokiol against HNSCC is mediated through its firm binding with EGFR, which is better than that of gefitinib, a commonly used drug for HNSCC treatment. PMID:26020804

  3. Honokiol inhibits the growth of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma by targeting epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tripti; Gupta, Nirzari A; Xu, Su; Prasad, Ram; Velu, Sadanandan E; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2015-08-28

    Here, we report the chemotherapeutic effect of honokiol, a phytochemical from Magnolia plant, on human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Treatment of HNSCC cell lines from different sub-sites, SCC-1 (oral cavity), SCC-5 (larynx), OSC-19 (tongue) and FaDu (pharynx) with honokiol inhibited their cell viability, which was associated with the: (i) induction of apoptosis, (ii) correction of dysregulatory cell cycle proteins of G0/G1 phase. Honokiol decreased the expression levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mTOR and their downstream signaling molecules. Treatment of FaDu and SCC-1 cell lines with rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR pathway, also reduced cell viability of HNSCC cells. Administration of honokiol by oral gavage (100 mg/kg body weight) significantly (P < 0.01-0.001) inhibited the growth of SCC-1 and FaDu xenografts in athymic nude mice, which was associated with: (i) inhibition of tumor cell proliferation, (ii) induction of apoptosis, (iii) reduced expressions of cyclins and Cdks, and (iv) inhibition of EGFR signaling pathway. Molecular docking analysis of honokiol in EGFR binding site indicated that the chemotherapeutic effect of honokiol against HNSCC is mediated through its firm binding with EGFR, which is better than that of gefitinib, a commonly used drug for HNSCC treatment. PMID:26020804

  4. Retinoic acid inhibits histone methyltransferase Whsc1 during palatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiying; Higashihori, Norihisa; Yahiro, Kohei; Moriyama, Keiji

    2015-03-13

    Cleft lip with or without palate (CL/P) is a common congenital anomaly in humans and is thought to be caused by genetic and environmental factors. However, the epigenetic mechanisms underlying orofacial clefts are not fully understood. Here, we investigate how the overdose of retinoic acid (RA), which can induce cleft palate in mice and humans, regulates histone methyltransferase, Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome candidate 1 (WHSC1) during palatal development in mice. We treated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with 1 ?M all-trans RA and discovered that the global level of H3K36me3 was downregulated and that expression of the H3K36 methyltransferase gene, Whsc1, was reduced. The expression level of WHSC1 in embryonic palatal shelves was reduced during palatogenesis, following maternal administration of 100 mg/kg body weight of RA by gastric intubation. Furthermore, the expression of WHSC1 in palatal shelves was observed in epithelial and mesenchymal cells at all stages, suggesting an important role for palatal development. Our results suggest that the pathogenesis of cleft palate observed after excessive RA exposure is likely to be associated with a reduction in the histone methyltransferase, WHSC1. PMID:25677622

  5. Remodeling of ACL Allografts is Inhibited by Peracetic Acid Sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Gonnermann, Johannes; Kamp, Julia; Przybilla, Dorothea; Pruss, Axel

    2008-01-01

    Sterilization of allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has become an important prerequisite to prevent disease transmission. However, current sterilization techniques impair the biological or mechanical properties of such treated grafts. Peracetic acid (PAA) has been successfully used to sterilize bone allografts without these disadvantages and does not impair the mechanical properties of soft tissue grafts in vitro. We asked whether PAA sterilization would influence recellularization, restoration of crimp length and pattern, and revascularization of ACL grafts during early healing. We used an in vivo sheep model for open ACL reconstruction. We also correlated the histologic findings with the restoration of anteroposterior stability and structural properties during load-to-failure testing. PAA slowed remodeling activity at 6 and 12 weeks compared to nonsterilized allografts and autografts. The mechanical properties of PAA grafts were also reduced compared to these control groups at both time points. We conclude PAA sterilization currently should not be used to sterilize soft tissue grafts typically used in ACL reconstruction. PMID:18491201

  6. Rifampicin Inhibition of Ribonucleic Acid and Protein Synthesis in Normal and Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid-Treated Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Parlane; Speyer, Joseph

    1970-01-01

    The kinetics of ribonucleic acid (RNA) and protein synthesis in rifampicin-inhibited normal and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-treated Escherichia coli was measured. Approximately 200-fold higher external concentrations of rifampicin were needed to produce a level of inhibition in normal cells comparable to that observed in EDTA-treated cells. The rates of RNA and protein synthesis in both kinds of cells decreased exponentially, after an initial lag phase, at all rifampicin concentrations tested. The lag phase was longer and the final exponential slope less for protein synthesis than for RNA synthesis at a given rifampicin concentration. Below certain rifampicin concentrations, both the lag phase and the subsequent exponential decrease in the rates of RNA and protein synthesis were found to be rifampicin concentration dependent. At greater concentrations only the time of the lag phase was decreased by higher rifampicin concentrations, whereas the slope of the exponential decrease in the rates of RNA and protein synthesis was unaffected. In all cases, the exponential decrease continued to at least a 99.8% inhibition of the original rate of synthesis. These in vivo results are consistent with the mode of rifampicin action determined from in vitro studies; rifampicin prevents initiations of RNA polymerase on deoxyribonucleic acid, but not its propagation, by binding the enzyme essentially irreversibly. The results also indicate the size distribution of messenger RNA molecules in E. coli under our conditions. PMID:4990763

  7. Synaptic inhibition and ?-aminobutyric acid in the mammalian central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    OBATA, Kunihiko

    2013-01-01

    Signal transmission through synapses connecting two neurons is mediated by release of neurotransmitter from the presynaptic axon terminals and activation of its receptor at the postsynaptic neurons. ?-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), non-protein amino acid formed by decarboxylation of glutamic acid, is a principal neurotransmitter at inhibitory synapses of vertebrate and invertebrate nervous system. On one hand glutamic acid serves as a principal excitatory neurotransmitter. This article reviews GABA researches on; (1) synaptic inhibition by membrane hyperpolarization, (2) exclusive localization in inhibitory neurons, (3) release from inhibitory neurons, (4) excitatory action at developmental stage, (5) phenotype of GABA-deficient mouse produced by gene-targeting, (6) developmental adjustment of neural network and (7) neurological/psychiatric disorder. In the end, GABA functions in simple nervous system and plants, and non-amino acid neurotransmitters were supplemented. PMID:23574805

  8. Inhibition by antibiotics of the growth of bacterial and yeast protoplasts.

    PubMed

    SHOCKMAN, G D; LAMPEN, J O

    1962-09-01

    Shockman, Gerald D. (Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pa.) and J. Oliver Lampen. Inhibition by antibiotics of the growth of bacterial and yeast protoplasts. J. Bacteriol. 84:508-512. 1962.-The characteristics and requirements for growth of bacterial (Streptococcus faecalis) and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) protoplasts were established and the effect of a variety of antibacterial and antifungal antibiotics determined. A clear differentiation was obtained between such inhibitors of bacterial cell wall synthesis as penicillin and cycloserine, which did not prevent protoplast growth, and all others, antibacterial and antifungal, which inhibited protoplasts and intact organisms at the same range of concentration. Novobiocin, previously reported to inhibit bacterial wall synthesis, was also effective against a reaction(s) essential to the growth of S. faecalis protoplasts. The antibacterial action of streptomycin, neomycin, and kanamycin was essentially eliminated by the high salt concentration needed to maintain the protoplasts. Removal of the cell wall did not significantly increase antibiotic susceptibility of a resistant species. Protoplasts of Bacillus megaterium were insensitive to the antifungal agent, nystatin, and did not bind it to any detectable degree. Thus, the yeast or bacterial cell wall does not appear to play a major role in determining relative antibiotic susceptibility by masking internal sensitive target sites. A variety of antifungal antibiotics tested on the growth of log-phase yeast cells failed to produce osmotically fragile forms. PMID:13988638

  9. Inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro by the tyrphostin group of tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, J.; Dye, J. F.; Schachter, M.; Guillou, P. J.

    1993-01-01

    Tyrphostins are a group of low molecular weight synthetic inhibitors of protein tyrosine kinases (PTK). The intracellular domains of the receptors for epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) possess PTK activity. Since EGF, TGF-alpha and IGF-1 are considered to play an important role in the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells, we studied the effects of tyrphostins on the growth of three human pancreatic cancer cell lines (MiaPaCa-2, Panc-1 and CAV). The tyrphostins AG17, T23 and T47 all inhibited EGF and serum-stimulated DNA synthesis. AG17 was found to be the most potent of these agents and caused a dose-dependent but reversible inhibition of cell growth. Furthermore using an immunoblotting procedure we also found AG17 to inhibit EGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the MiaPaCa-2 cell line. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors may prove to be useful agents for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Images Figure 7 PMID:8260363

  10. Cystine Growth Inhibition Through Molecular Mimicry: a New Paradigm for the Prevention of Crystal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michael H.; Sahota, Amrik; Ward, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Cystinuria is a genetic disease marked by recurrent kidney stone formation, usually at a young age. It frequently leads to chronic kidney disease. Treatment options for cystinuria have been limited despite comprehensive understanding of its genetic pathophysiology. Currently available therapies suffer from either poor clinical adherence to the regimen or potentially serious adverse effects. Recently, we employed atomic force miscopy (AFM) to identify l-cystine dimethylester (CDME) as an effective molecular imposter of l-cystine, capable of inhibiting crystal growth in vitro. More recently, we demonstrated CDME’s efficacy in inhibiting l-cystine crystal growth in vivo utilizing a murine model of cystinuria. The application of AFM to discover inhibitors of crystal growth through structural mimicry suggests a novel approach to preventing and treating crystal diseases. PMID:25874348

  11. Fatty acid synthesis is inhibited by inefficient utilization of unusual fatty acids for glycerolipid assembly

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Philip D.; Johnson, Sean R.; Cao, Xia; Li, Jia; Nam, Jeong-Won; Jaworski, Jan G.; Ohlrogge, John B.; Browse, John

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of unusual fatty acids through ?-oxidation within transgenic plants has long been hypothesized as a major factor limiting the production of industrially useful unusual fatty acids in seed oils. Arabidopsis seeds expressing the castor fatty acid hydroxylase accumulate hydroxylated fatty acids up to 17% of total fatty acids in seed triacylglycerols; however, total seed oil is also reduced up to 50%. Investigations into the cause of the reduced oil phenotype through in vivo [14C]acetate and [3H]2O metabolic labeling of developing seeds surprisingly revealed that the rate of de novo fatty acid synthesis within the transgenic seeds was approximately half that of control seeds. RNAseq analysis indicated no changes in expression of fatty acid synthesis genes in hydroxylase-expressing plants. However, differential [14C]acetate and [14C]malonate metabolic labeling of hydroxylase-expressing seeds indicated the in vivo acetyl–CoA carboxylase activity was reduced to approximately half that of control seeds. Therefore, the reduction of oil content in the transgenic seeds is consistent with reduced de novo fatty acid synthesis in the plastid rather than fatty acid degradation. Intriguingly, the coexpression of triacylglycerol synthesis isozymes from castor along with the fatty acid hydroxylase alleviated the reduced acetyl–CoA carboxylase activity, restored the rate of fatty acid synthesis, and the accumulation of seed oil was substantially recovered. Together these results suggest a previously unidentified mechanism that detects inefficient utilization of unusual fatty acids within the endoplasmic reticulum and activates an endogenous pathway for posttranslational reduction of fatty acid synthesis within the plastid. PMID:24398521

  12. Lipid mediator lipoxin A4 inhibits tumor growth by targeting IL-10-producing regulatory B (Breg) cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Cheng, Qiong; Tang, Ke; Sun, Yanling; Zhang, Keke; Zhang, Yi; Luo, Shunqun; Zhang, Huafeng; Ye, Duyun; Huang, Bo

    2015-08-10

    Lipoxin A4 (LXA4), an arachidonic acid-derived anti-inflammatory lipid mediator, shows anti-tumor potential by regulating tumor immune microenvironments. However, the underlying molecular and cellular basis of this function remains unclear. IL-10-producing B (Breg) cells display tumor-promoting effects by negatively regulating anti-tumor immunity. Here we show that LXA4 inhibits tumor growth by suppressing the generation of Breg cells in tumor-bearing mice. The administration of LXA4 inhibited the induction of Breg cells. Breg cell deficiency, in turn, resulted in LXA4 losing its anti-tumor properties. Intriguingly, regulatory T (Treg) cells also had a role in this process. Targeting Breg cells by LXA4 decreased the number of Treg cells in draining lymph nodes and tumor tissues as well as enhanced cytotoxic T cell activities. In addition, we further demonstrated that LXA4 inhibited Breg cells through its dephosphorylating STAT3 and ERK. These findings unveil a new anti-tumor mechanism underlying LXA4 targeting Breg cells with potential clinical applications. PMID:25979229

  13. A Proteasome Inhibitor, Bortezomib, Inhibits Breast Cancer Growth and Reduces Osteolysis by Downregulating Metastatic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Marci D.; Liu, Julie C.; Barthel, Thomas K.; Hussain, Sadiq; Lovria, Erik; Cheng, Dengfeng; Schoonmaker, Jesse.A.; Mulay, Sudhanshu; Ayers, David C.; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Stein, Gary S.; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Lian, Jane B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The incidence of bone metastasis in advanced breast cancer exceeds 70%. Bortezomib (Bzb), a proteasome inhibitor used for the treatment of multiple myeloma, also promotes bone formation. We tested the hypothesis that proteasome inhibitors can ameliorate breast cancer osteolytic disease. Experimental Design To address the potentially beneficial effect of Bzb in reducing tumor growth in the skeleton and counteracting bone osteolysis, human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer (BrCa) cells were injected into the tibia of mice to model bone tumor growth for in vivo assessment of treatment regimens pre- and post-tumor growth. Results Controls exhibited tumor growth destroying trabecular and cortical bone and invading muscle. Bzb treatment initiated following inoculation of tumor cells strikingly reduced tumor growth, restricted tumor cells mainly to the marrow cavity, and almost completely inhibited osteolysis in the bone microenvironment over a 3–4 week period demonstrated by 18F-FDG PET, micro-CT scanning, radiography, and histology. Thus, proteasome inhibition is effective in killing tumor cells within bone. Pre-treatment with Bzb for 3 weeks prior to inoculation of tumor cells was also effective in reducing osteolysis. Our in vitro and in vivo studies indicate mechanisms by which Bzb inhibits tumor growth and reduces osteolysis result from inhibited cell proliferation, necrosis and decreased expression of factors that promote BrCa tumor progression in bone. Conclusion These findings provide a basis for a novel strategy to treat patients with breast cancer osteolytic lesions, and represent an approach for protecting the entire skeleton from metastatic bone disease. PMID:20843837

  14. Direct inhibition of Retinoblastoma phosphorylation by Nimbolide causes cell cycle arrest and suppresses glioblastoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jane; Liu, Xiaona; Henry, Heather; Gasilina, Anjelika; Nassar, Nicholas; Ghosh, Jayeeta; Clark, Jason P; Kumar, Ashish; Pauletti, Giovanni M.; Ghosh, Pradip K; Dasgupta, Biplab

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Classical pharmacology allows the use and development of conventional phytomedicine faster and more economically than conventional drugs. This approach should be tested for their efficacy in terms of complementarity and disease control. The purpose of this study was to determine the molecular mechanisms by which nimbolide, a triterpenoid found in the well-known medicinal plant Azadirachta indica controls glioblastoma (GBM) growth. Experimental Design Using in vitro signaling, anchorage-independent growth, kinase assays, and xenograft models, we investigated the mechanisms of its growth inhibition in glioblastoma. Results We show that nimbolide or an ethanol soluble fraction of A. indica leaves (Azt) that contains nimbolide as the principal cytotoxic agent is highly cytotoxic against GBM in vitro and in vivo. Azt caused cell cycle arrest, most prominently at the G1-S stage in GBM cells expressing EGFRvIII, an oncogene present in about 20-25% of GBMs. Azt/nimbolide directly inhibited CDK4/CDK6 kinase activity leading to hypophosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein, cell cycle arrest at G1-S and cell death. Independent of RB hypophosphorylation, Azt also significantly reduced proliferative and survival advantage of GBM cells in vitro and in tumor xenografts by downregulating Bcl2 and blocking growth factor induced phosphorylation of Akt, Erk1/2 and STAT3. These effects were specific since Azt did not affect mTOR or other cell cycle regulators. In vivo, Azt completely prevented initiation and inhibited progression of GBM growth. Conclusions Our preclinical findings demonstrate Nimbolide as a potent anti-glioma agent that blocks cell cycle and inhibits glioma growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24170547

  15. Growth/no growth models for Zygosaccharomyces rouxii associated with acidic, sweet intermediate moisture food products.

    PubMed

    Marvig, C L; Kristiansen, R M; Nielsen, D S

    2015-01-01

    The most notorious spoilage organism of sweet intermediate moisture foods (IMFs) is Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, which can grow at low water activity, low pH and in the presence of organic acids. Together with an increased consumer demand for preservative free and healthier food products with less sugar and fat and a traditionally long self-life of sweet IMFs, the presence of Z. rouxii in the raw materials for IMFs has made assessment of the microbiological stability a significant hurdle in product development. Therefore, knowledge on growth/no growth boundaries of Z. rouxii in sweet IMFs is important to ensure microbiological stability and aid product development. Several models have been developed for fat based, sweet IMFs. However, fruit/sugar based IMFs, such as fruit based chocolate fillings and jams, have lower pH and aw than what is accounted for in previously developed models. In the present study growth/no growth models for acidified sweet IMFs were developed with the variables aw (0.65-0.80), pH (2.5-4.0), ethanol (0-14.5% (w/w) in water phase) and time (0-90 days). Two different strains of Z. rouxii previously found to show pronounced resistance to the investigated variables were included in model development, to account for strain differences. For both strains data sets with and without the presence of sorbic acid (250 ppm on product basis) were built. Incorporation of time as an exploratory variable in the models gave the possibility to predict the growth/no growth boundaries at each time between 0 and 90 days without decreasing the predictive power of the models. The influence of ethanol and aw on the growth/no growth boundary of Z. rouxii was most pronounced in the first 30 days and 60 days of incubation, respectively. The effect of pH was almost negligible in the range of 2.5-4.0. The presence of low levels of sorbic acid (250 ppm) eliminated growth of both strains at all conditions tested. The two strains tested have previously been shown to have similar tolerance towards the single stress factors included in the study, but when the stress factors were combined the two strains showed difference in their ability to grow illustrating the importance of including more strains when developing growth/no growth models. The developed models can be useful tools for development of new acidic sweet IMFs. PMID:25306299

  16. Asiatic acid, a triterpene, inhibits cell proliferation through regulating the expression of focal adhesion kinase in multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JUNLI; AI, LISHA; LV, TINGTING; JIANG, XUDONG; LIU, FANG

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether asiatic acid (AA), a pentacyclic triterpene derived from Centella asiatica, exerts anti-proliferative effects on multiple myeloma RPMI 8226 cells and to determine the molecular mechanism underlying the anticancer action of AA. The study sought to analyze the potential role of AA on the proliferation of the RPMI 8226 cells using a 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium assay. Cell cycle arrest was detected by flow cytometry, and the expression levels of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in the myeloma cells induced by AA were analyzed using the western blotting and immunoprecipitation methods. The results indicated that AA significantly inhibited cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner and led to G2/M phase arrest at concentrations of 35 and 40 ?mol/l in the RPMI 8226 cells. The expression levels of FAK and p-FAK were distinctly decreased following AA treatment (at the concentration of 40 ?mol/l) for 24 h compared with that of the control groups. Taken together, these results demonstrated that AA was able to regulate cell cycle progression in RPMI 8226 cells, thereby significantly inhibiting cell growth. Furthermore, AA decreased the expression levels of FAK, indicating that the antitumor mechanism of AA may be associated with the inhibition of signal transduction mediated by FAK. PMID:24260073

  17. Ebselen Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Helicase Binding to Nucleic Acid and Prevents Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) is both a protease, which cleaves viral and host proteins, and a helicase that separates nucleic acid strands, using ATP hydrolysis to fuel the reaction. Many antiviral drugs, and compounds in clinical trials, target the NS3 protease, but few helicase inhibitors that function as antivirals have been reported. This study focuses on the analysis of the mechanism by which ebselen (2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3-one), a compound previously shown to be a HCV antiviral agent, inhibits the NS3 helicase. Ebselen inhibited the abilities of NS3 to unwind nucleic acids, to bind nucleic acids, and to hydrolyze ATP, and about 1 ?M ebselen was sufficient to inhibit each of these activities by 50%. However, ebselen had no effect on the activity of the NS3 protease, even at 100 times higher ebselen concentrations. At concentrations below 10 ?M, the ability of ebselen to inhibit HCV helicase was reversible, but prolonged incubation of HCV helicase with higher ebselen concentrations led to irreversible inhibition and the formation of covalent adducts between ebselen and all 14 cysteines present in HCV helicase. Ebselen analogues with sulfur replacing the selenium were just as potent HCV helicase inhibitors as ebselen, but the length of the linker between the phenyl and benzisoselenazol rings was critical. Modifications of the phenyl ring also affected compound potency over 30-fold, and ebselen was a far more potent helicase inhibitor than other, structurally unrelated, thiol-modifying agents. Ebselen analogues were also more effective antiviral agents, and they were less toxic to hepatocytes than ebselen. Although the above structure–activity relationship studies suggest that ebselen targets a specific site on NS3, we were unable to confirm binding to either the NS3 ATP binding site or nucleic acid binding cleft by examining the effects of ebselen on NS3 proteins lacking key cysteines. PMID:25126694

  18. Ceramide production mediates cinobufotalin-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Long; Chen, Yuan-Zheng; Peng, Yi; Yi, Nan; Gu, Xin-Shi; Jin, Yong; Bai, Xu-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly aggressive and lethal neoplasm with poor prognosis. The aim of this study is to investigate the anticancer activity of cinobufotalin, a bufadienolide isolated from toad venom, in cultured HCC cells, and to study the underlying mechanisms. We found that cinobufotalin (at nmol/L) significantly inhibited HCC cell growth and survival while inducing considerable cell apoptosis. Further, cinobufotalin inhibited sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) activity and induced pro-apoptotic ceramide production. Ceramide synthase-1 small hairpin RNA (shRNA)-depletion inhibited cinobufotalin-induced ceramide production and HCC cell apoptosis. On the other hand, the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor 1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP) facilitated cinobufotalin-induced ceramide production and cell apoptosis. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II), similar to cinobufotalin, increased cellular ceramide level and promoted HCC cell apoptosis. Finally, we observed that cinobufotalin inactivated Akt-S6K1 signaling in HepG2 cells, which was again inhibited by ceramide synthase-1 shRNA-depletion. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that cinobufotalin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis in cultured HCC cells through ceramide production. Cinobufotalin may be investigated as a novel anti-HCC agent. PMID:25724183

  19. Dopamine receptor antagonist thioridazine inhibits tumor growth in a murine breast cancer model

    PubMed Central

    YIN, TAO; HE, SISI; SHEN, GUOBO; YE, TINGHONG; GUO, FUCHUN; WANG, YONGSHENG

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychological factors have been shown to influence tumor progression and therapeutic response. The present study investigated the effect of the dopamine receptor antagonist thioridazine on murine breast cancer. The anti-tumor efficacy of thioridazine was assessed using a murine breast cancer model. Cell apoptosis and proliferation were analyzed in vitro using flow cytometry (FCM) and the MTT assay, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to assess Akt, phosphorylated (p)-Akt, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, p-STAT3 and p-p65 in tumor cells following treatment with thioridazine. The Ki67 index and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive apoptotic cells were assessed in the tumor sections. Thioridazine was found to reduce tumor growth, inhibit tumor cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner in vitro. Thioridazine was also found to markedly inhibit tumor proliferation and induce tumor cell apoptosis in vivo as shown by the lower Ki67 index and increase in TUNEL-positive cells. In addition, thioridazine was observed to inhibit the activation of the canonical nuclear factor ?-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway and exert anti-tumor effects by remodeling the tumor stroma, as well as inhibit angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In conclusion, thioridazine was found to significantly inhibit breast tumor growth and the potential for thioridazine to be used in cancer therapy may be re-evaluated and investigated in clinical settings. PMID:26095429

  20. Anticancer activity of MPT0G157, a derivative of indolylbenzenesulfonamide, inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mehndiratta, Samir; Lai, Ssu-Chia; Liou, Jing-Ping; Yang, Chia-Ron

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) display multifaceted functions by coordinating the interaction of signal pathways with chromatin structure remodeling and the activation of non-histone proteins; these epigenetic regulations play an important role during malignancy progression. HDAC inhibition shows promise as a new strategy for cancer therapy; three HDAC inhibitors have been approved. We previously reported that N-hydroxy-3-{4-[2-(2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-ethylsulfamoyl]-phenyl}-acrylamide (MPT0G157), a novel indole-3-ethylsulfamoylphenylacrylamide compound, demonstrated potent HDAC inhibition and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we evaluated its anti-cancer activity in vitro and in vivo. MPT0G157 treatment significantly inhibited different tumor growth at submicromolar concentration and was particularly potent in human colorectal cancer (HCT116) cells. Apoptosis and inhibited HDACs activity induced by MPT0G157 was more potent than that by the marketed drugs PXD101 (Belinostat) and SAHA (Vorinostat). In an in vivo model, MPT0G157 markedly inhibited HCT116 xenograft tumor volume and reduced matrigel-induced angiogenesis. The anti-angiogenetic effect of MPT0G157 was found to increase the hyperacetylation of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and promote hypoxia-inducible factor-1? (HIF-1?) degradation followed by down-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Our results demonstrate that MPT0G157 has potential as a new drug candidate for cancer therapy. PMID:26087180

  1. Ritonavir acts synergistically with panobinostat to enhance histone acetylation and inhibit renal cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akinori; Asano, Takako; Isono, Makoto; Ito, Keiichi; Asano, Tomohiko

    2014-11-01

    There is currently no curative treatment for advanced renal cancer. Enhancing histone acetylation is a promising epigenetic-based therapy for cancer; however, in solid tumors, the efficacy of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors alone is limited. The human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor ritonavir is also a CYP3A4 inhibitor and we hypothesized that combining ritonavir with the HDAC inhibitor panobinostat, one of the substrates of CYP3A4, may effectively eliminate renal cancer cells by enhancing the activity of panobinostat. The combination of ritonavir and panobinostat synergistically inhibited cancer cell growth and cancer cell colony formation, while only slightly inhibiting the growth of renal proximal tubule epithelial cells. This combination significantly induced apoptosis in cancer cells and this apoptosis was considered to be caspase-dependent, since the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK reduced the number of Annexin V-positive cells. In murine subcutaneous xenograft models using Caki-1 cells, a 10-day treatment with the combination of ritonavir and panobinostat significantly inhibited tumor growth. Panobinostat alone increased histone acetylation in a dose-dependent manner and the co-administration of ritonavir synergistically enhanced this acetylation. Furthermore, this combination inhibited the expression of HDACs, which may also play a role in the enhancement of histone acetylation. Thus, the present study may provide a basis for testing the combination of ritonavir and panobinostat for patients with advanced renal cancer. PMID:25279191

  2. Gastroprotective Effect of Ginger Rhizome (Zingiber officinale) Extract: Role of Gallic Acid and Cinnamic Acid in H+, K+-ATPase/H. pylori Inhibition and Anti-Oxidative Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Nanjundaiah, Siddaraju M.; Annaiah, Harish Nayaka Mysore; Dharmesh, Shylaja M.

    2011-01-01

    Zinger officinale has been used as a traditional source against gastric disturbances from time immemorial. The ulcer-preventive properties of aqueous extract of ginger rhizome (GRAE) belonging to the family Zingiberaceae is reported in the present study. GRAE at 200?mg?kg?1?b.w. protected up to 86% and 77% for the swim stress-/ethanol stress-induced ulcers with an ulcer index (UI) of 50 ± 4.0/46 ± 4.0, respectively, similar to that of lansoprazole (80%) at 30?mg?kg?1?b.w. Increased H+, K+-ATPase activity and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were observed in ulcer-induced rats, while GRAE fed rats showed normalized levels and GRAE also normalized depleted/amplified anti-oxidant enzymes in swim stress and ethanol stress-induced animals. Gastric mucin damage was recovered up to 77% and 74% in swim stress and ethanol stress, respectively after GRAE treatment. GRAE also inhibited the growth of H. pylori with MIC of 300 ± 38??g and also possessed reducing power, free radical scavenging ability with an IC50 of 6.8 ± 0.4??g?mL?1 gallic acid equivalent (GAE). DNA protection up to 90% at 0.4??g was also observed. Toxicity studies indicated no lethal effects in rats fed up to 5?g?kg?1?b.w. Compositional analysis favored by determination of the efficacy of individual phenolic acids towards their potential ulcer-preventive ability revealed that between cinnamic (50%) and gallic (46%) phenolic acids, cinnamic acid appear to contribute to better H+, K+-ATPase and Helicobacter pylori inhibitory activity, while gallic acid contributes significantly to anti-oxidant activity. PMID:19570992

  3. Chemical inhibition of fatty acid absorption and cellular uptake limits lipotoxic cell death.

    PubMed

    Ahowesso, Constance; Black, Paul N; Saini, Nipun; Montefusco, David; Chekal, Jessica; Malosh, Chrysa; Lindsley, Craig W; Stauffer, Shaun R; DiRusso, Concetta C

    2015-11-01

    Chronic elevation of plasma free fatty acid (FFA) levels is commonly associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. Experimental evidence indicates FFA and their metabolites contribute to disease development through lipotoxicity. Previously, we identified a specific fatty acid transport inhibitor CB16.2, a.k.a. Lipofermata, using high throughput screening methods. In this study, efficacy of transport inhibition was measured in four cell lines that are models for myocytes (mmC2C12), pancreatic ?-cells (rnINS-1E), intestinal epithelial cells (hsCaco-2), and hepatocytes (hsHepG2), as well as primary human adipocytes. The compound was effective in inhibiting uptake with IC50s between 3 and 6?M for all cell lines except human adipocytes (39?M). Inhibition was specific for long and very long chain fatty acids but had no effect on medium chain fatty acids (C6-C10), which are transported by passive diffusion. Derivatives of Lipofermata were evaluated to understand structural contributions to activity. Lipofermata prevented palmitate-mediated oxidative stress, induction of BiP and CHOP, and cell death in a dose-dependent manner in hsHepG2 and rnINS-1E cells, suggesting it will prevent induction of fatty acid-mediated cell death pathways and lipotoxic disease by channeling excess fatty acids to adipose tissue and away from liver and pancreas. Importantly, mice dosed orally with Lipofermata were not able to absorb (13)C-oleate demonstrating utility as an inhibitor of fatty acid absorption from the gut. PMID:26394026

  4. LRD-22, a novel dual dithiocarbamatic acid ester, inhibits Aurora-A kinase and induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiling; Li, Ridong; Li, Li; Ge, Zemei; Zhou, Rouli; Li, Runtao

    2015-02-27

    In this study we investigated the antitumor activity of the novel dual dithiocarbamatic acid ester LRD-22 in vitro and in vivo. Several cancer cell lines were employed to determine the effect of LRD-22 on cell growth, and the MTT assay showed there was a significant decrease in viable tumor cell numbers in the presence of LRD-22, especially in the HepG2 cell line. Colony formation assay also showed LRD-22 strongly inhibits HepG2 cell growth. Evaluation of the mechanism involved showed that inhibitory effects of LRD-22 on cell growth are due to induction of apoptosis and G2/M arrest. LRD-22 inhibited Aurora-A phosphorylation at Thr288 and subsequently impaired p53 phosphorylation at Ser315 which was associated with the proteasome degradation pathway. Tumor suppressor protein p53 is stabilized by this mechanism and accumulates through inhibition of Aurora-A kinase activity via treatment with LRD-22. In vivo study of HepG2 xenograft in nude mice also shows LRD-22 suppresses tumor growth at a concentration of 5 mg/kg without animals suffering loss of body weight. In conclusion, our results demonstrate LRD-22 acts as an Aurora-A kinase inhibitor to induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation in HepG2 cells, and should be considered as a promising targeting agent for HCC therapy. PMID:25645017

  5. Differential inhibition of thromboxane B2 and leukotriene B4 biosynthesis by two naturally occurring acetylenic fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Croft, K D; Beilin, L J; Ford, G L

    1987-10-17

    The seed oil of the plant Ixiolaena brevicompta is a rich source of crepenynic acid (octadec-cis-9-en-12-ynoic acid), which has been linked with extensive sheep mortalities in Western New South Wales and Queensland, Australia. A number of acetylenic fatty acids have been found to interfere with lipid and fatty acid metabolism and inhibit cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase enzymes in a variety of tissues. We have investigated the effects of crepenynic acid and ximenynic acid (octadec-trans-11-en-9-ynoic acid) on leukotriene B4 and thromboxane B2 production in rat peritoneal leukocytes and compare them with non-acetylenic compounds linoleic and ricinoleic acids. In concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 microM linoleic acid and ricinoleic acid had only minimal effects on leukotriene B4 and thromboxane B2 production in ionophore-stimulated cells. Ximenynic acid gave dose-dependent inhibition of leukotriene B4, thromboxane B2 and 6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha production. Ximenynic acid appears to be a more effective inhibitor of leukotriene B4 than crepenynic acid with an IC50 of 60 microM compared to 85 microM. On the other hand, crepenynic acid is a much more effective inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase products, having an IC50 for thromboxane B2 of less than 10 microM. Both acetylenic fatty acids inhibited phospholipase activity in these cells by 40-50% at a concentration of 100 microM but had no inhibitory effect at 10 microM. These results indicate that crepenynic acid and ximenynic acid differentially inhibit the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase products of stimulated leukocytes, and that at high doses of these fatty acids the effect on these products may be partially due to inhibition of phospholipase A2. PMID:2822134

  6. Mst1 overexpression inhibited the growth of human non-small cell lung cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xu, C M; Liu, W W; Liu, C J; Wen, C; Lu, H F; Wan, F S

    2013-08-01

    Mammalian STE20-like kinase 1 (Mst1) ubiquitously encodes serine threonine kinase, which is a 59-kDa class II GC kinase that shares 76% identity in amino-acid sequence with MST2, and is the closest mammalian homolog of Drosophila Hippo protein kinase, a major inhibitor of cell proliferation in Drosophila. Recent studies have shown that Mst1 and Mst2 perform tumor-suppressor function in a redundant manner and were originally identified as pro-apoptotic cytoplasmic kinases important for controlling cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis and organ size. We used recombinant eukaryotic expression vector containing human wild-type Mst1 gene to transfect human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 cells in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that Mst1 overexpression inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of A549 cells, promoted Yes-associated protein (YAP) (Ser127) phosphorylation and downregulated the transcriptional level of Cystein-rich protein connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), amphiregulin (AREG) and Survivin. In human NSCLC-cell-A549-xenograft models, Mst1 gene or cisplatin alone suppressed the growth of tumors and increased the cytoplasm-positive expression levels of YAP and Phospho-YAP (Ser127) proteins; however, their combination had the strongest anticancer effects. Overall, Mst1 has an important role in inhibiting the growth of NSCLC in vitro and in vivo; its antiproliferative effect is associated with induction of apoptosis through promotion of the cytoplasmic localization and phosphorylation of YAP protein at Ser127 site, indicating that Mst1 may be developed as a promising therapeutic target for NSCLC. PMID:23928732

  7. Factors related to the growth of psittacosis virus (strain 6BC) II. Purines, pyrimidines, and other components related to nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    MORGAN, H R

    1952-03-01

    In various amounts and mixtures, adenine, guanine, xanthine, hypoxanthine, thymine, thymidine, cytidylic acid, and an enzymatic digest of desoxyribonucleic acid all failed to influence the inhibition by sulfadiazine of the growth of psittacosis virus (6BC) in embryonated eggs. A number of purine analogues, including benzimidazole, 2,6-diaminopurine, and 8-azaguanine, inhibited the growth of psittacosis virus (6BC) in tissue cultures at concentrations which had no obvious toxic effects on the host tissues. The virus inhibitory action of 2,6-diaminopurine was reversed by addition of adenine and that of 8-azaguanine by guanine. The growth of psittacosis virus (6BC) was inhibited by the pteridine compounds 2-ammo-4-hydroxy-6-formylpteridine and xanthopterin, while other related substances had little or no inhibitory activity. Xanthine reversed the inhibitory effects of 2-amino-4-hydroxy-6-formylpteridine. There was no correlation between the inhibitory activity of the pteridines on xanthine oxidase and multiplication of the virus. PMID:14927793

  8. Growth inhibition of foodborne pathogens and food spoilage organisms by select raw honeys.

    PubMed

    Mundo, Melissa A; Padilla-Zakour, Olga I; Worobo, Randy W

    2004-12-01

    Twenty-seven honey samples from different floral sources and geographical locations were evaluated for their ability to inhibit the growth of seven food spoilage organisms (Alcaligenes faecalis, Aspergillus niger, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Geotrichum candidum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Penicillium expansum, Pseudomonas fluorescens) and five foodborne pathogens (Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica Ser. Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus) using an overlay inhibition assay. They were also tested for specific activity against S. aureus 9144 and B. stearothermophilus using the equivalent percent phenol test--a well diffusion assay corresponding to a dilute phenol standard curve. Honey inhibited bacterial growth due to high sugar concentration (reduced water activity), hydrogen peroxide generation, and proteinaceous compounds present in the honey. Some antibacterial activity was due to other unidentified components. The ability of honey to inhibit the growth of microorganisms varies widely, and could not be attributed to a specific floral source or demographic region produced in this study. Antibacterially active samples in this study included Montana buckwheat, tarweed, manuka, melaleuca, and saw palmetto. Furthermore, the bacteria were not uniformly affected by honey. Varying sensitivities to the antimicrobial properties were observed with four strains of S. aureus thus emphasizing the variability in the antibacterial effect of honey samples. Mold growth was not inhibited by any of the honeys tested. B. stearothermophilus, a heat-resistant spoilage bacteria, was shown to be highly sensitive to honey in both the overlay and well diffusion assays; other sensitive bacteria included A. faecalis and L. acidophilus. Non-peroxide antibacterial activity was observed in both assays; the highest instance was observed in the specific activity assay against B. stearothermophilus. Further research could indicate whether honey has potential as a preservative in minimally processed foods. PMID:15527912

  9. Ginkgetin inhibits the growth of DU?145 prostate cancer cells through inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activity

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yoon Jung; Jung, Seung-Nam; Yun, Jieun; Lee, Chang Woo; Choi, Jiyeon; Lee, Yu-Jin; Han, Dong Cho; Kwon, Byoung-Mog

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is constitutively activated in human cancers. Therefore, STAT3 is a therapeutic target of cancer drug discovery. We previously reported that natural products inhibited constitutively activated STAT3 in human prostate tumor cells. We used a dual-luciferase assay to screen 200 natural products isolated from herbal medicines and we identified ginkgetin obtained from the leaves of Ginkgo biloba L. as a STAT3 inhibitor. Ginkgetin inhibited both inducible and constitutively activated STAT3 and blocked the nuclear translocation of p-STAT3 in DU-145 prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, ginkgetin selectively inhibited the growth of prostate tumor cells stimulated with activated STAT3. Ginkgetin induced STAT3 dephosphorylation at Try705 and inhibited its localization to the nucleus, leading to the inhibition of expression of STAT3 target genes such as cell survival-related genes (cyclin D1 and survivin) and anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL). Therefore, ginkgetin inhibited the growth of STAT3-activated tumor cells. We also found that ginkgetin inhibited tumor growth in xenografted nude mice and downregulated p-STAT3Tyr705 and survivin in tumor tissues. This is the first report that ginkgetin exerts antitumor activity by inhibiting STAT3. Therefore, ginkgetin is a good STAT3 inhibitor and may be a useful lead molecule for development of a therapeutic STAT3 inhibitor. PMID:25611086

  10. Gambogic Acid Induces Apoptosis in Imatinib-Resistant Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells via Inducing Proteasome Inhibition and Caspase-Dependent Bcr-Abl Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xianping; Chen, Xin; Li, Xiaofen; Lan, Xiaoying; Zhao, Chong; Liu, Shouting; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Ningning; Liao, Siyan; Song, Wenbin; Zhou, Ping; Wang, Shunqing; Xu, Li; Wang, Xuejun; Dou, Q. Ping; Liu, Jinbao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is characterized by the constitutive activation of Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase. Bcr-Abl-T315I is the predominant mutation that causes resistance to imatinib, cytotoxic drugs, and the second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The emergence of imatinib resistance in patients with CML leads to searching for novel approaches to the treatment of CML. Gambogic acid, a small molecule derived from Chinese herb gamboges, has been approved for phase II clinical trial for cancer therapy by the Chinese Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In this study, we investigated the effect of gambogic acid on cell survival or apoptosis in CML cells bearing Bcr-Abl-T315I or wild-type Bcr-Abl. Experimental Design CML cell lines (KBM5, KBM5-T315I, and K562), primary cells from patients with CML with clinical resistance to imatinib, and normal monocytes from healthy volunteers were treated with gambogic acid, imatinib, or their combination, followed by measuring the effects on cell growth, apoptosis, and signal pathways. The in vivo antitumor activity of gambogic acid and its combination with imatinib was also assessed with nude xenografts. Results Gambogic acid induced apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition in CML cells and inhibited the growth of imatinib-resistant Bcr-Abl-T315I xenografts in nude mice. Our data suggest that GA-induced proteasome inhibition is required for caspase activation in both imatinib-resistant and -sensitive CML cells, and caspase activation is required for gambogic acid–induced Bcr-Abl downregulation and apoptotic cell death. Conclusions These findings suggest an alternative strategy to overcome imatinib resistance by enhancing Bcr-Abl downregulation with the medicinal compound gambogic acid, which may have great clinical significance in imatinib-resistant cancer therapy. PMID:24334603

  11. Arachidonic acid-induced inflammation: inhibition by dual inhibitor of arachidonic acid metabolism, SK&F 86002.

    PubMed

    Griswold, D E; Webb, E; Schwartz, L; Hanna, N

    1987-06-01

    The antiinflammatory activity of the structurally novel dual inhibitor of arachidonic acid metabolism, SK&F 86002 was evaluated using arachidonic acid-induced edema and inflammatory cell infiltration. Histological examination demonstrated extensive subcutaneous edema and neutrophil (PMN) accumulation in perivascular and interstitial locations one hour after application of arachidonic acid to the ear. SK&F 86002 and, to a lesser extent, phenidone demonstrated potent inhibition of this inflammatory response following oral and topical administration. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) displayed only topical activity. The selective cyclooxygenase inhibitors ibuprofen and naproxen were either inactive or stimulated ear swelling. Histological evaluation of the lesion in drug-treated animals revealed that SK&F 86002 impaired edema formation and caused a significant reduction in numbers of infiltrating neutrophils. Using arachidonic acid-induced peritoneal exudation, a reduction in the cellular infiltrate was observed after oral treatment with SK&F 86002 or phenidone, but not with naproxen. Taken together, these data illustrate the potent antiinflammatory effects of SK&F 86002 and support the suggestion that 5-lipoxygenase products play a significant role in both the edematous and cellular phases of arachidonic acid-induced inflammation. PMID:3108157

  12. Difference in abscisic acid perception mechanisms between closure induction and opening inhibition of stomata.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ye; Adachi, Yuji; Ye, Wenxiu; Hayashi, Maki; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Mori, Izumi C; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2013-10-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) induces stomatal closure and inhibits light-induced stomatal opening. The mechanisms in these two processes are not necessarily the same. It has been postulated that the ABA receptors involved in opening inhibition are different from those involved in closure induction. Here, we provide evidence that four recently identified ABA receptors (PYRABACTIN RESISTANCE1 [PYR1], PYRABACTIN RESISTANCE-LIKE1 [PYL1], PYL2, and PYL4) are not sufficient for opening inhibition in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). ABA-induced stomatal closure was impaired in the pyr1/pyl1/pyl2/pyl4 quadruple ABA receptor mutant. ABA inhibition of the opening of the mutant's stomata remained intact. ABA did not induce either the production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide or the alkalization of the cytosol in the quadruple mutant, in accordance with the closure phenotype. Whole cell patch-clamp analysis of inward-rectifying K(+) current in guard cells showed a partial inhibition by ABA, indicating that the ABA sensitivity of the mutant was not fully impaired. ABA substantially inhibited blue light-induced phosphorylation of H(+)-ATPase in guard cells in both the mutant and the wild type. On the other hand, in a knockout mutant of the SNF1-related protein kinase, srk2e, stomatal opening and closure, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production, cytosolic alkalization, inward-rectifying K(+) current inactivation, and H(+)-ATPase phosphorylation were not sensitive to ABA. PMID:23946352

  13. A novel decoy receptor fusion protein for FGF-2 potently inhibits tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Li, D; Wei, X; Xie, K; Chen, K; Li, J; Fang, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antiangiogenic therapies have been proven effective in cancer treatment. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) has been functionally implicated in tumour angiogenesis and is an important target of antiangiogenic therapies. The aim of this work was to develop a novel FGF-2 inhibitor for cancer therapy. Methods: Eleven fusion proteins were developed by fusing various truncated extracellular regions of FGFR1 with the Fc region of IgG1. The optimal decoy receptor fusion protein with the highest binding affinity for FGF-2 was identified by an FGF-2-binding assay and its potential antitumour effects were investigated. Results: We obtained a soluble decoy receptor fusion protein with the highest binding activity for FGF-2, named FGF-Trap. Fibroblast growth factor-Trap significantly abolished FGF-2-stimulated activation of FGF signalling as demonstrated by its suppression of FGF-2-mediated phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and Akt, upregulation of cyclins D1 and E and the increase in mRNA levels of vascular endothelial growth factor R1 and R2 (VEGFR1 and VEGFR2). Furthermore, FGF-Trap effectively suppressed FGF-2-induced proliferation and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. Most importantly, FGF-Trap potently inhibited tumour growth and angiogenesis in Caki-1 and A549 xenograft models in vivo. Conclusions: Fibroblast growth factor-Trap potently inhibits tumour growth by blocking FGF-2 signalling pathways and could be an effective therapeutic agent for cancer patients. PMID:24874473

  14. The role of calcium in growth induced by indole-3-acetic acid and gravity in the leaf-sheath pulvinus of oat (Avena sativa)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, T. G.; Burg, J.; Ghosheh, N. S.; Kaufman, P. B.

    1992-01-01

    Leaf-sheath pulvini of excised segments from oat (Avena sativa L.) were induced to grow by treatment with 10 micromoles indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), gravistimulation, or both, and the effects of calcium, EGTA, and calcium channel blockers on growth were evaluated. Unilaterally applied calcium (10 mM CaCl2) significantly inhibited IAA-induced growth in upright pulvini but had no effect on growth induced by either gravity or gravity plus IAA. Calcium alone had no effect on upright pulvini. The calcium chelator EGTA alone (10 mM) stimulated growth in upright pulvini. However, EGTA had no effect on either IAA- or gravity-induced growth but slightly diminished growth in IAA-treated gravistimulated pulvini. The calcium channel blockers lanthanum chloride (25 mM), verapamil (2.5 mM), and nifedipine (2.5 mM) greatly inhibited growth as induced by IAA (> or = 50% inhibition) or IAA plus gravity (20% inhibition) but had no effect on gravistimulated pulvini. Combinations of channel blockers were similar in effect on IAA action as individual blockers. Since neither calcium ions nor EGTA significantly affected the graviresponse of pulvini, we conclude that apoplastic calcium is unimportant in leaf-sheath pulvinus gravitropism. The observation that calcium ions and calcium channel blockers inhibit IAA-induced growth, but have no effect on gravistimulated pulvini, further supports previous observations that gravistimulation alters the responsiveness of pulvini to IAA.

  15. Picropodophyllin inhibits tumor growth of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Shu-Cheng; Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 ; Guo, Wei; Tao, Ze-Zhang

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •We identified that PPP inhibits IGF-1R/Akt pathway in NPC cells. •PPP dose-dependently inhibits NPC cell proliferation in vitro. •PPP suppresses tumor growth of NPC in nude mice. •PPP have little effect on microtubule assembly. -- Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a cell membrane receptor with tyrosine kinase activity and plays important roles in cell transformation, tumor growth, tumor invasion, and metastasis. Picropodophyllin (PPP) is a selective IGF-1R inhibitor and shows promising antitumor effects for several human cancers. However, its antitumor effects in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the antitumor activity of PPP in NPC using in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal model. We found that PPP dose-dependently decreased the IGF-induced phosphorylation and activity of IGF-1R and consequently reduced the phosphorylation of Akt, one downstream target of IGF-1R. In addition, PPP inhibited NPC cell proliferation in vitro. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of PPP for NPC cell line CNE-2 was ?1 ?M at 24 h after treatment and ?0.5 ?M at 48 h after treatment, respectively. Moreover, administration of PPP by intraperitoneal injection significantly suppressed the tumor growth of xenografted NPC in nude mice. Taken together, these results suggest targeting IGF-1R by PPP may represent a new strategy for treatment of NPCs with positive IGF-1R expression.

  16. MicroRNA-375 inhibits colorectal cancer growth by targeting PIK3CA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yihui; Tang, Qingchao; Li, Mingqi; Jiang, Shixiong; Wang, Xishan

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • miR-375 is downregulated in colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues. • miR-375 inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth by targeting PIK3CA. • miR-375 inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth in xenograft nude mice model. - Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of death from cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNAs that control gene expression by triggering RNA degradation or interfering with translation. Aberrant miRNA expression is involved in human disease including cancer. Herein, we showed that miR-375 was frequently down-regulated in human colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues when compared to normal human colon tissues. PIK3CA was identified as a potential miR-375 target by bioinformatics. Overexpression of miR-375 in SW480 and HCT15 cells reduced PIK3CA protein expression. Subsequently, using reporter constructs, we showed that the PIK3CA untranslated region (3?-UTR) carries the directly binding site of miR-375. Additionally, miR-375 suppressed CRC cell proliferation and colony formation and led to cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, miR-375 overexpression resulted in inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. SiRNA-mediated silencing of PIK3CA blocked the inhibitory effect of miR-375 on CRC cell growth. Lastly, we found overexpressed miR-375 effectively repressed tumor growth in xenograft animal experiments. Taken together, we propose that overexpression of miR-375 may provide a selective growth inhibition for CRC cells by targeting PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  17. Growth inhibition and apoptosis induction of Sulindac on Human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yun-Lin; Sun, Bo; Zhang, Xue-Jun; Wang, Sheng-Nian; He, Heng-Yi; Qiao, Min-Min; Zhong, Jie; Xu, Jia-Yu

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of sulindac in inducing growth inhibition and apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells in comparison with human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. METHODS: The human gastric cancer cell lines MKN45 and MKN28 and human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines HepG2 and SMMC7721 were used for the study. Anti-proliferative effect was measured by MTT assay, and apoptosis was determined by Hoechst-33258 staining, electronography and DNA fragmentation. The protein of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and Bcl-2 were detected by Western dot blotting. RESULTS: Sulindac could initiate growth inhibition and apoptosis of MKN45, MKN28, HepG2 and SMMC7721 cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner. Growth inhibitory activity and apoptosis were more sensitive in HepG2 cells than in SMMC7721 cells, MKN45 and MKN28 cells. After 24 h incubation with sulindac at 2 mmol•L¯¹ and 4 mmol•L¯¹, the level of COX-2 and Bcl-2 protein were lowered in MKN45, SMMC7721 and HepG2 cells but not in MKN28 cells. CONCLUSION: Sulindac could inhibit the growth of gastric cancer cells and HCC cells effectively in vitro by apoptosis induction, which was associated with regression of COX- 2 and Bcl-2 expression. The growth inhibition and apoptosis of HCC cells were greater than that of human gastric cancer cells. The different effects of apoptosis in gastric cancer cells may be related to the differentiation of the cells. PMID:11854904

  18. New Particle Formation and Growth from Methanesulfonic Acid, Amines, Water, and Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arquero, K. D.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Particles in the atmosphere can influence visibility, negatively impact human health, and affect climate. The largest uncertainty in determining global radiative forcing is attributed to atmospheric aerosols. While new particle formation in many locations is correlated with sulfuric acid in air, neither the gas-phase binary nucleation of H2SO4-H2O nor the gas-phase ternary nucleation of H2SO4-NH3-H2O alone can fully explain observations. An additional potential particle source, based on previous studies in this laboratory, is methanesulfonic acid (MSA) with amines and water vapor. However, organics are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) being a major component of particles. Organics could be involved in the initial stages of particle formation by enhancing or inhibiting nucleation from sulfuric acid or MSA, in addition to contributing to their growth to form SOA. Experiments to measure the effects of a series of organics of varying structure on particle formation and growth from MSA, amines, and water were performed in a custom-built small volume aerosol flow tube reactor. Analytical instruments and techniques include a scanning mobility particle sizer to measure particle size distributions, sampling onto a weak cation exchange resin with analysis by ion chromatography to measure amine concentrations, and filter collection and analysis by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to measure MSA concentrations. Organics were measured by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The impact of these organics on the initial particle formation as well as growth will be reported. The outcome is an improved understanding of fundamental chemistry of nucleation and growth to ultimately be incorporated into climate models to better predict how particles affect the global climate budget.

  19. Injury-induced inhibition of small intestinal protein and nucleic acid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, E.A.; Hatz, R.A.; Yarmush, M.L.; Tompkins, R.G. )

    1990-06-01

    Small intestinal mucosal weight and nutrient absorption are significantly diminished early after cutaneous thermal injuries. Because these intestinal properties are highly dependent on rates of nucleic acid and protein synthesis, in vivo incorporation of thymidine, uridine, and leucine into small intestinal deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, and proteins were measured. Deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis was markedly decreased with the lowest thymidine incorporation in the jejunum (p less than 0.01); these findings were confirmed by autoradiographic identification of radiolabeled nuclei in the intestinal crypts. Protein synthesis was decreased by 6 h postinjury (p less than 0.01) but had returned to normal by 48 h. Consistent with a decreased rate of protein synthesis, ribonucleic acid synthesis was also decreased 18 h postinjury (p less than 0.01). These decreased deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, and protein synthesis rates are not likely a result of ischemia because in other studies of this injury model, intestinal blood flow was not significantly changed by the burn injury. Potentially, factors initiating the acute inflammatory reaction may directly inhibit nucleic acid and protein synthesis and lead to alterations in nutrient absorption and intestinal barrier function after injury.

  20. Usnic acid, a lichen secondary metabolite inhibits Group A Streptococcus biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nithyanand, Paramasivam; Beema Shafreen, Raja Mohmed; Muthamil, Subramanian; Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah

    2015-01-01

    Group A Streptococci (GAS) are involved in a number of life threatening diseases and biofilm formation by these pathogens are considered as an important virulence determinant as it mediates antibiotic resistance among them. In the present study, we have explored the ability of (+)-usnic acid, a lichen secondary metabolite, as an antibiofilm agent against four serotypes of Streptococcus pyogenes causing pharyngitis. Usnic acid inhibited the biofilms of M serotypes M56, st38, M89 efficiently and the biofilm of M74 to a lesser extent. Confocal imaging of the treated samples showed that usnic acid reduced the biomass of the biofilms when compared to that of the control. Fourier Transfer Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy indicated that usnic acid reduced the cellular components (proteins and fatty acids) of the biofilms. Interestingly, the FT-IR spectrum further revealed that usnic acid probably acted upon the fatty acids of the biofilms as evident from the disappearance of a peak at 2,455-2,100 cm(-1) when compared to the control only in serotypes M56, st38 and M89 but not in M74. The present study shows, for the first time, that usnic acid can act as an effective antibiofilm agent against GAS. PMID:25367342

  1. Organochlorines inhibit acetaminophen glucuronidation by redirecting UDP-glucuronic acid towards the D-glucuronate pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Tom S. Wilson, John X.; Selliah, Subajini; Bilodeau, Marc; Zwingmann, Claudia; Poon, Raymond; O'Brien, Peter J.

    2008-11-01

    Industry-derived organochlorines are persistent environmental pollutants that are a continuing health concern. The effects of these compounds on drug metabolism are not well understood. In the current study we present evidence that the inhibition of acetaminophen (APAP) glucuronidation by minute concentrations of organochlorines correlates well with their ability to stimulate the D-glucuronate pathway leading to ascorbate synthesis. A set of 6 arylated organochlorines, including 5 PCB (polychlorinated biphenyl) congeners, were assessed for their effects on APAP glucuronidation in isolated hepatocytes from male Sprague-Dawley rats. The capacity of each organochlorine to inhibit APAP glucuronidation was found to be directly proportional to its capacity to stimulate ascorbate synthesis. PCB153, PCB28 and bis-(4-chlorophenyl sulfone) (BCPS) in increasing order were the most effective organochlorines for inhibiting APAP glucuronidation and stimulating the D-glucuronate pathway. None of the 3 inhibitors of APAP glucuronidation were able to alter the expression of UGT1A6, UGT1A7 and UGT1A8 (the major isoforms responsible for APAP glucuronidation in the rat), however, their efficacy at inhibiting APAP glucuronidation was proportional to their capacity to deplete UDP-glucuronic acid (UDPGA). BCPS-mediated inhibition of APAP glucuronidation in isolated hepatocytes had non-competitive characteristics and was insensitive to the inactivation of cytochrome P450. The effective organochlorines were also able to selectively stimulate the hydrolysis of UDPGA to UDP and glucuronate in isolated microsomes, but could not inhibit APAP glucuronidation in microsomes when UDPGA was in excess. We conclude that organochlorines are able to inhibit APAP glucuronidation in hepatocytes by depleting UDPGA via redirecting UDPGA towards the D-glucuronate pathway. Because the inhibition is non-competitive, low concentrations of these compounds could have long term inhibitory effects on the glucuronidating capacity of hepatocytes.

  2. Oleanolic acid and ursolic acid inhibit peptidoglycan biosynthesis in Streptococcus mutans UA159

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soon-Nang; Ahn, Sug-Joon; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we revealed that OA and UA significantly inhibited the expression of most genes related to peptidoglycan biosynthesis in S. mutans UA159. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to introduce the antimicrobial mechanism of OA and UA against S. mutans. PMID:26273281

  3. Connective tissue growth factor: expression in human skin in vivo and inhibition by ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Quan, Taihao; He, Tianyuan; Kang, Sewon; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2002-03-01

    Connective tissue growth factor, which is induced by transforming growth factor beta, has been reported to mediate the stimulatory actions of transforming growth factor beta on type I procollagen synthesis. Connective tissue growth factor is expressed in fibrotic disease such as scleroderma, where it is believed to promote abnormal deposition of collagen. Connective tissue growth factor expression has not been described in normal human skin or cultured skin cells, however. We report here that connective tissue growth factor mRNA is constitutively expressed in normal human skin. In situ hybridization demonstrated that connective tissue growth factor mRNA was expressed in keratinocytes throughout the epidermis and in dermal cells. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that the level of connective tissue growth factor mRNA in the epidermis and dermis of normal human skin was comparable to the level of housekeeping gene 36B4. Ultraviolet irradiation (2 minimal erythema dose, UVB/A2 source) reduced connective tissue growth factor mRNA expression throughout the epidermis and dermis in normal human skin in vivo. Connective tissue growth factor mRNA was reduced (30%) within 4 h post ultraviolet irradiation, and remained reduced (50%) 8-24 h post ultraviolet. Connective tissue growth factor mRNA and protein were also constitutively highly expressed in normal cultured human skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Ultraviolet irradiation of cultured normal human skin fibroblasts resulted in a time-dependent inhibition of connective tissue growth factor mRNA expression. At 24 h post ultraviolet, connective tissue growth factor mRNA expression was reduced 80%. Transforming growth factor beta1 rapidly induced connective tissue growth factor mRNA levels (5-fold within 4 h) in skin fibroblasts, but not keratinocytes, and this induction was attenuated 80% by ultraviolet irradiation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that ultraviolet irradiation reduced protein binding to the transforming growth factor beta/Smad responsiveness elements in the connective tissue growth factor gene promoter, in human skin in vivo and human skin fibroblasts. Constitutive expression of connective tissue growth factor in normal human skin suggests that it is a physiologic regulator of procollagen synthesis. Ultraviolet reduction of connective tissue growth factor expression may contribute to reduced procollagen synthesis observed in ultraviolet-irradiated normal human skin and human skin fibroblasts. PMID:11874477

  4. Inhibition of renal cell carcinoma angiogenesis and growth by antisense oligonucleotides targeting vascular endothelial growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Shi, W; Siemann, D W

    2002-01-01

    Angiogenesis is critical for growth and metastatic spread of solid tumours. It is tightly controlled by specific regulatory factors. Vascular endothelial growth factor has been implicated as the key factor in tumour angiogenesis. In the present studies we evaluated the effects of blocking vascular endothelial growth factor production by antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides on the growth and angiogenic activity of a pre-clinical model of renal cell carcinoma (Caki-1). In vitro studies showed that treating Caki-1 cells with antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides directed against vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA led to a reduction in expressed vascular endothelial growth factor levels sufficient to impair the proliferation and migration of co-cultured endothelial cells. The observed effects were antisense sequence specific, dose dependent, and could be achieved at a low, non-toxic concentration of phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides. When vascular endothelial growth factor antisense treated Caki-1 cells were injected into nude mice and evaluated for their angiogenic potential, the number of vessels initiated were approximately half that induced by untreated Caki-1 cells. To test the anti-tumour efficacy of vascular endothelial growth factor antisense, phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides were administrated to nude mice bearing macroscopic Caki-1 xenografts. The results showed that the systemic administration of two doses of vascular endothelial growth factor antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides given 1 and 4 days after the tumours reached a size of ?200 mm3 significantly increased the time for tumours to grow to 1000 mm3. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 119–126. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600416 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12085267

  5. Inhibition of sup 125 I-epidermal growth factor binding to cultured keratinocytes by antiproliferative molecules gamma interferon, cyclosporin A, and transforming growth factor-beta

    SciTech Connect

    Nickoloff, B.J.; Mitra, R.S. )

    1989-12-01

    The growth of cultured human keratinocytes (KC) is inhibited by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), cyclosporin A and transforming growth factor-beta, but not by tumor necrosis factor. When these antiproliferative molecules were added to KC they induced a concentration and time-dependent inhibition of {sup 125}I-epidermal growth factor (I-EGF) binding. These anti-proliferative molecules primarily reduced the number of binding sites by approximately 25%-50% without affecting the binding affinity. Tumor necrosis factor did not influence the ligand binding by I-EGF. In parallel with the ability of the antiproliferative molecules to inhibit I-EGF binding, there was an increase in transforming growth factor-alpha production. These results suggest that several different antiproliferative molecules may share a common mechanism to inhibit cell growth by reducing I-EGF binding to KC.

  6. Resistance to herbicides inhibiting the biosynthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Busi, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    Herbicides that act by inhibiting the biosynthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) have been used to control grass weeds in major crops throughout the world for the past 60 years. VLCFA-inhibiting herbicides are generally highly selective in crops, induce similar symptoms in susceptible grasses and can be found within the herbicide groups classified by the HRAC as K3 and N. Even after many years of continuous use, only 12 grass weed species have evolved resistance to VLCFA-inhibiting herbicides. Here, the cases of resistance that have evolved in major grass weed species belonging to the Avena, Echinochloa and Lolium genera in three different agricultural systems are reviewed. In particular we explore the possible reasons why VLCFA herbicides have been slow to select resistant weeds, outline the herbicide mode of action and discuss the resistance mechanisms that are most likely to have been selected. PMID:24482320

  7. Inhibition of aberrant complement activation by a dimer of acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moonhee; Wathier, Matthew; Love, Jennifer A; McGeer, Edith; McGeer, Patrick L

    2015-10-01

    We here report synthesis for the first time of the acetyl salicylic acid dimer 5,5'-methylenebis(2-acetoxybenzoic acid) (DAS). DAS inhibits aberrant complement activation by selectively blocking factor D of the alternative complement pathway and C9 of the membrane attack complex. We have previously identified aurin tricarboxylic and its oligomers as promising agents in this regard. DAS is much more potent, inhibiting erythrocyte hemolysis by complement-activated serum with an IC50 in the 100-170 nanomolar range. There are numerous conditions where self-damage from the complement system has been implicated in the pathology, including such chronic degenerative diseases of aging as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and age-related macular degeneration. Consequently, there is a high priority for the discovery and development of agents that can successfully treat such conditions. DAS holds considerable promise for being such an agent. PMID:26248865

  8. Computational Models for Drug Inhibition of the Human Apical Sodium-dependent Bile Acid Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Ekins, Sean; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E.

    2009-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) is the primary mechanism for intestinal bile acid re-absorption. In the colon, secondary bile acids increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, drugs that inhibit ASBT have the potential to increase the risk of colon cancer. The objectives of this study were to identify FDA-approved drugs that inhibit ASBT and to derive computational models for ASBT inhibition. Inhibition was evaluated using ASBT-MDCK monolayers and taurocholate as the model substrate. Computational modeling employed a HipHop qualitative approach, a Hypogen quantitative approach, as well as a modified Laplacian Bayesian modeling method using 2D descriptors. Initially, 30 compounds were screened for ASBT inhibition. A qualitative pharmacophore was developed using the most potent 11 compounds and applied to search a drug database, yielding 58 hits. Additional compounds were tested and their Ki values were measured. A 3D-QSAR and a Bayesian model were developed using 38 molecules. The quantitative pharmacophore consisted of one hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic features, and five excluded volumes. Each model was further validated with two external test sets of 30 and 19 molecules. Validation analysis showed both models exhibited good predictability in determining whether a drug is a potent or non-potent ASBT inhibitor. The Bayesian model correctly ranked the most active compounds. In summary, using a combined in vitro and computational approach, we found that many FDA-approved drugs from diverse classes, such as the dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors, are ASBT inhibitors. PMID:19673539

  9. Computational models for drug inhibition of the human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Ekins, Sean; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E

    2009-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) is the primary mechanism for intestinal bile acid reabsorption. In the colon, secondary bile acids increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, drugs that inhibit ASBT have the potential to increase the risk of colon cancer. The objectives of this study were to identify FDA-approved drugs that inhibit ASBT and to derive computational models for ASBT inhibition. Inhibition was evaluated using ASBT-MDCK monolayers and taurocholate as the model substrate. Computational modeling employed a HipHop qualitative approach, a Hypogen quantitative approach, and a modified Laplacian Bayesian modeling method using 2D descriptors. Initially, 30 compounds were screened for ASBT inhibition. A qualitative pharmacophore was developed using the most potent 11 compounds and applied to search a drug database, yielding 58 hits. Additional compounds were tested, and their K(i) values were measured. A 3D-QSAR and a Bayesian model were developed using 38 molecules. The quantitative pharmacophore consisted of one hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic features, and five excluded volumes. Each model was further validated with two external test sets of 30 and 19 molecules. Validation analysis showed both models exhibited good predictability in determining whether a drug is a potent or nonpotent ASBT inhibitor. The Bayesian model correctly ranked the most active compounds. In summary, using a combined in vitro and computational approach, we found that many FDA-approved drugs from diverse classes, such as the dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors, are ASBT inhibitors. PMID:19673539

  10. Dimethylthiourea inhibition of B16 melanoma growth and induction of phenotypic alterations; relationship to ATP levels.

    PubMed Central

    Fux, A.; Sidi, Y.; Kessler-Icekson, G.; Wasserman, L.; Novogrodsky, A.; Nordenberg, J.

    1991-01-01

    1,3 Dimethylthiourea (DMTU) has previously been shown by us to inhibit the growth of melanoma cells and to induce phenotypic alterations in these cells, including ultrastructural alterations of mitochondria. These findings raised the possibility that impaired mitochondrial function might be involved in mediating the effect of DMTU on cell growth and phenotypic expression. The present study indicates that DMTU as well as another growth inhibitory methylurea derivative, tetramethylurea (TMU) significantly decrease ATP content in the B16 melanoma cell line. 1,3 Dimethylurea (1,3DMU) and 1,1 dimethylurea (1,1DMU) which are poor growth inhibitors, do not reduce ATP content significantly. Altered energy metabolism in the DMTU-treated cells is reflected by inhibition of the activity of cytochrome c oxidase and by increased lactate levels. A cell line selected for resistance to growth inhibition by DMTU was shown to be completely resistant to induction of phenotypic alterations by DMTU. These cells possess high lactate levels, high ATP content and a somewhat decreased Na/K ATPase activity as compared to wild type B16 F10 cells. 1,3 DMTU treatment of the resistant cells leads to a decrease in the activity of the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase, similar to its effect on the wild type B16 F10 cells. DMTU also reduces ATP content moderately in the resistant cells. However, the levels of ATP do not decrease beyond those found in untreated B16 F10 wild type cells. Taken together the results suggest that decreased ATP content might be involved, at least partially, in mediating the effects of DMTU on B16 melanoma cell growth and phenotypic expression. PMID:1850608

  11. When are antifreeze proteins in solution essential for ice growth inhibition?

    PubMed

    Drori, Ran; Davies, Peter L; Braslavsky, Ido

    2015-06-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a widespread class of proteins that bind to ice and facilitate the survival of organisms under freezing conditions. AFPs have enormous potential in applications that require control over ice growth. However, the nature of the binding interaction between AFPs and ice remains the subject of debate. Using a microfluidics system developed in-house we previously showed that hyperactive AFP from the Tenebrio molitor beetle, TmAFP, remains bound to an ice crystal surface after exchanging the solution surrounding the ice crystal to an AFP-free solution. Furthermore, these surface-adsorbed TmAFP molecules sufficed to prevent ice growth. These experiments provided compelling evidence for the irreversible binding of hyperactive AFPs to ice. Here, we tested a moderately active type III AFP (AFPIII) from a fish in a similar microfluidics system. We found, in solution exchange experiments that the AFPIIIs were also irreversibly bound to the ice crystals. However, some crystals displayed "burst" growth during the solution exchange. AFPIII, like other moderately active fish AFPs, is unable to bind to the basal plane of an ice crystal. We showed that although moderate AFPs bound to ice irreversibly, moderate AFPs in solution were needed to inhibit ice growth from the bipyramidal crystal tips. Instead of binding to the basal plane, these AFPs minimized the basal face size by stabilizing other crystal planes that converge to form the crystal tips. Furthermore, when access of solution to the basal plane was physically blocked by the microfluidics device walls, we observed enhancement of the antifreeze activity. These findings provide direct evidence that the weak point of ice growth inhibition by fish AFPs is the basal plane, whereas insect AFPs, which can bind to the basal plane, are able to inhibit its growth and thereby increase antifreeze activity. PMID:25946514

  12. Bezafibrate lowers very long-chain fatty acids in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy fibroblasts by inhibiting fatty acid elongation.

    PubMed

    Engelen, Marc; Schackmann, Martin J A; Ofman, Rob; Sanders, Robert-Jan; Dijkstra, Inge M E; Houten, Sander M; Fourcade, Stéphane; Pujol, Aurora; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; Wanders, Ronald J A; Kemp, Stephan

    2012-11-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene encoding ALDP, an ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transporter located in the peroxisomal membrane. ALDP deficiency results in impaired peroxisomal ?-oxidation and the subsequent accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA; > C22:0) in plasma and tissues. VLCFA are primarily derived from endogenous synthesis by ELOVL1. Therefore inhibiting this enzyme might constitute a feasible therapeutic approach. In this paper we demonstrate that bezafibrate, a PPAR pan agonist used for the treatment of patients with hyperlipidaemia reduces VLCFA levels in X-ALD fibroblasts. Surprisingly, the VLCFA-lowering effect was independent of PPAR activation and not caused by the increase in either mitochondrial or peroxisomal fatty acid ?-oxidation capacity. In fact, our results show that bezafibrate reduces VLCFA synthesis by decreasing the synthesis of C26:0 through a direct inhibition of fatty acid elongation activity. Taken together, our data indicate bezafibrate as a potential pharmacotherapeutic treatment for X-ALD. A clinical trial is currently ongoing to evaluate the effect in patients with X-ALD. PMID:22447153

  13. Inhibition of mammalian carbonic anhydrase isoforms I-XIV with a series of phenolic acid esters.

    PubMed

    Maresca, Alfonso; Akyuz, Gulay; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-11-15

    A series of phenolic acid esters incorporating caffeic, ferulic, and p-coumaric acid, and benzyl, m/p-hydroxyphenethyl- as well as p-hydroxy-phenethoxy-phenethyl moieties were investigated for their inhibitory effects against the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). Many of the mammalian isozymes of human (h) or murine (m) origin, hCA I-hCA XII, mCA XIII and hCA XIV, were inhibited in the submicromolar range by these derivatives (with KIs of 0.31-1.03?M against hCA VA, VB, VI, VII, IX and XIV). The off-target, highly abundant isoforms hCA I and II, as well as hCA III, IV and XII were poorly inhibited by many of these esters, although the original phenolic acids were micromolar inhibitors. These phenols, like others investigated earlier, possess a CA inhibition mechanism distinct of the sulfonamides/sulfamates, clinically used drugs for the treatment of a multitude of pathologies, but with severe side effects due to hCA I/II inhibition. Unlike the sulfonamides, which bind to the catalytic zinc ion, phenols are anchored at the Zn(II)-coordinated water molecule, binding more externally within the active site cavity, and making contacts with amino acid residues at the entrance of the active site. As this is the region with the highest variability between the many CA isozymes found in mammals, this class of compounds shows isoform-selective inhibitory profiles, which may be exploited for obtaining pharmacological agents with less side effects compared to other classes of inhibitors. PMID:26498394

  14. Supporting Materials for Metal complexation inhibits the effect of oxalic acid in

    E-print Network

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Supporting Materials for Metal complexation inhibits the effect of oxalic acid in aerosols as cloud to February 12, 2002) Diameter range (m) Mean size (m) dlogD Oxalate Cl- NO3 - SO4 2- Ca2+ Na+ NH4 + Mg2+ Zn2 to August 13, 2002) Diameter range (m) Mean size (m) dlogD Oxalate Cl- NO3 - SO4 2- Ca2+ Na+ NH4 + Mg2+ Zn2

  15. Luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 signaling pathway and tumor growth in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chian, Song; Thapa, Ruby; Chi, Zhexu; Wang, Xiu Jun; Tang, Xiuwen

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • Luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 pathway in mouse liver and in xenografted tumors. • Luteolin markedly inhibits the growth of xenograft tumors. • Luteolin enhances the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin in mice in vivo. • Luteolin could serve as an adjuvant in the chemotherapy of NSCLC. - Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is over-expressed in many types of tumor, promotes tumor growth, and confers resistance to anticancer therapy. Hence, Nrf2 is regarded as a novel therapeutic target in cancer. Previously, we reported that luteolin is a strong inhibitor of Nrf2 in vitro. Here, we showed that luteolin reduced the constitutive expression of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 in mouse liver in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Further, luteolin inhibited the expression of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione transferases, decreasing the reduced glutathione in the liver of wild-type mice under both constitutive and butylated hydroxyanisole-induced conditions. In contrast, such distinct responses were not detected in Nrf2{sup ?/?} mice. In addition, oral administration of luteolin, either alone or combined with intraperitoneal injection of the cytotoxic drug cisplatin, greatly inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line A549 cells grown subcutaneously in athymic nude mice. Cell proliferation, the expression of Nrf2, and antioxidant enzymes were all reduced in tumor xenograft tissues. Furthermore, luteolin enhanced the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin. Together, our findings demonstrated that luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 pathway in vivo and can serve as an adjuvant in the chemotherapy of NSCLC.

  16. The flavonoid nobiletin inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis of ovarian cancers via the Akt pathway

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JIANCHU; CHEN, ALLEN Y.; HUANG, HAIZHI; YE, XINGQIAN; ROLLYSON, WILLIAM D.; PERRY, HALEY E.; BROWN, KATHLEEN C.; ROJANASAKUL, YON; RANKIN, GARY O.; DASGUPTA, PIYALI; CHEN, YI CHARLIE

    2015-01-01

    Despite its importance, the death rate of ovarian cancer has remained unchanged over the past five decades, demanding an improvement in prevention and treatment of this malignancy. With no known carcinogens, targeted prevention is currently unavailable, and efforts in early detection of this malignancy by screening biomarkers have failed. The inhibition of angiogenesis, also known as angioprevention, is a promising strategy to limit the growth of solid tumors, including ovarian cancers. Nobiletin, a polymethoxy flavonoid compound isolated from the tiansheng plant, has been shown to inhibit the growth of multiple types of human cancers. However, there are no reports involving the effect on nobiletin on human ovarian cancer. The present report shows that nobiletin potently decreases the viability of ovarian cancer cells in vitro. However, nobiletin does not affect the viability of normal ovarian epithelial cells at <40 ?M. The antitumor activity of nobiletin was also observed in athymic mouse models and in chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) models. The anti-neoplastic activity of nobiletin was due to its ability to inhibit angiogenesis. We also studied the molecular mechanisms by which nobiletin suppresses angiogenesis. We observed that nobiletin inhibits secretion of the key angiogenesis mediators, Akt, HIF-1?, NF-?B and vascular epithelial growth factor (VEGF) by ovarian cancer cells. Transient transfection experiments showed that nobiletin inhibits production of HIF-1? by downregulation of Akt. Such decreased levels of HIF-1? were responsible for nobiletin-induced suppression of VEGF. Our data suggest that nobiletin may be a promising anti-angiogenic agent relevant for therapy of ovarian cancers. PMID:25845666

  17. The flavonoid nobiletin inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis of ovarian cancers via the Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianchu; Chen, Allen Y; Huang, Haizhi; Ye, Xingqian; Rollyson, William D; Perry, Haley E; Brown, Kathleen C; Rojanasakul, Yon; Rankin, Gary O; Dasgupta, Piyali; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2015-06-01

    Despite its importance, the death rate of ovarian cancer has remained unchanged over the past five decades, demanding an improvement in prevention and treatment of this malignancy. With no known carcinogens, targeted prevention is currently unavailable, and efforts in early detection of this malignancy by screening biomarkers have failed. The inhibition of angiogenesis, also known as angioprevention, is a promising strategy to limit the growth of solid tumors, including ovarian cancers. Nobiletin, a polymethoxy flavonoid compound isolated from the tiansheng plant, has been shown to inhibit the growth of multiple types of human cancers. However, there are no reports involving the effect on nobiletin on human ovarian cancer. The present report shows that nobiletin potently decreases the viability of ovarian cancer cells in vitro. However, nobiletin does not affect the viability of normal ovarian epithelial cells at <40 µM. The antitumor activity of nobiletin was also observed in athymic mouse models and in chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) models. The anti-neoplastic activity of nobiletin was due to its ability to inhibit angiogenesis. We also studied the molecular mechanisms by which nobiletin suppresses angiogenesis. We observed that nobiletin inhibits secretion of the key angiogenesis mediators, Akt, HIF-1?, NF-?B and vascular epithelial growth factor (VEGF) by ovarian cancer cells. Transient transfection experiments showed that nobiletin inhibits production of HIF-1? by downregulation of Akt. Such decreased levels of HIF-1? were responsible for nobiletin-induced suppression of VEGF. Our data suggest that nobiletin may be a promising anti-angiogenic agent relevant for therapy of ovarian cancers. PMID:25845666

  18. Flavonoid Ampelopsin Inhibits the Growth and Metastasis of Prostate Cancer In Vitro and in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Feng; Gong, Yi; Li, Linglin; Abdolmaleky, Hamid M.; Zhou, Jin-Rong

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemopreventive effect of a novel flavonoid, ampelopsin (AMP) on the growth and metastasis of prostate cancer cells. AMP showed the more potent activity in inhibiting the proliferation of androgen-sensitive LNCaP and, to less extent, androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer cell lines in vitro, primarily by induction of apoptosis associated with down-regulation of bcl-2. On the other hand, AMP showed much less activity in inhibiting the proliferation of normal prostate epithelial cells than that of prostate cancer cell lines. AMP also inhibited the migration and invasion of PC-3 cells in vitro associated with down-regulation of CXCR4 expression. In the animal study using an orthotopic prostate tumor model, AMP (150 and 300 mg/kg body weight) inhibited the growth of PC-3 tumors and lymph node and lung metastases in a dose-dependent manner. Compared to the control mice, mice treated with AMP at 300 mg/kg BW had reduced final tumor weight by 49.2% (P<0.05), lymph node metastases by 54.5% (P?=?0.3) and lung metastases by 93% (P<0.05), but had no apparent alteration on food intake or body weight. The in vivo anti-growth and anti-metastasis activities of AMP were associated with induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation of prostate cancer cells, reduction of prostate tumor angiogenesis, and reduction of CXCR4 expression. Our results provide supporting evidence to warrant further investigation to develop AMP as a novel efficacious and safe candidate agent against progression and metastasis of prostate cancer. PMID:22693649

  19. Inhibition of Fatty Acid Binding Proteins Elevates Brain Anandamide Levels and Produces Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kaczocha, Martin; Rebecchi, Mario J.; Ralph, Brian P.; Teng, Yu-Han Gary; Berger, William T.; Galbavy, William; Elmes, Matthew W.; Glaser, Sherrye T.; Wang, Liqun; Rizzo, Robert C.; Deutsch, Dale G.; Ojima, Iwao

    2014-01-01

    The endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) is an antinociceptive lipid that is inactivated through cellular uptake and subsequent catabolism by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are intracellular carriers that deliver AEA and related N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) to FAAH for hydrolysis. The mammalian brain expresses three FABP subtypes: FABP3, FABP5, and FABP7. Recent work from our group has revealed that pharmacological inhibition of FABPs reduces inflammatory pain in mice. The goal of the current work was to explore the effects of FABP inhibition upon nociception in diverse models of pain. We developed inhibitors with differential affinities for FABPs to elucidate the subtype(s) that contributes to the antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors. Inhibition of FABPs reduced nociception associated with inflammatory, visceral, and neuropathic pain. The antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors mirrored their affinities for FABP5, while binding to FABP3 and FABP7 was not a predictor of in vivo efficacy. The antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors were mediated by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR?) and FABP inhibition elevated brain levels of AEA, providing the first direct evidence that FABPs regulate brain endocannabinoid tone. These results highlight FABPs as novel targets for the development of analgesic and anti-inflammatory therapeutics. PMID:24705380

  20. HDAC inhibition through valproic acid modulates the methylation profiles in human embryonic kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Ganai, Shabir Ahmad; Kalladi, Shashwath Malli; Mahadevan, Vijayalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications on the tails of core and linker histones dictate transcription and have vital roles in disease and development. Acetylation and deacetylation events enabled by histone acetyl transferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs) on the chromatin milieu are intricately involved in gene regulation. Inhibition of HDACs is emerging as a powerful strategy in regenerative therapy, transplantation, development and in nuclear reprogramming events. Valproic acid (VPA), belonging to the short-chain fatty acid group of HDAC inhibitors, modulates the epigenome altering gene expression profiles across cell lines. This work attempts to explore the methylation profiles triggered by VPA treatment on human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293) through a biochemical and computational approach. VPA treatment (for 48?h) has been observed to hypermethylate lysine 4 on the core histone H3 and confers a hypomethylation status of H3 lysine 27 in HEK 293 cells leaving the nuclear area and nuclear contour unaltered. Our structural docking and Binding Free Energy (BFE) calculations establish an active role for VPA in inhibiting the demethylase JARID1A (Jumonji, AT Rich Interactive Domain 1A) and the methyl-transferase EZH2 (Enhancer of Zeste Homologue 2). This work has also proven that VPA can inhibit the activity of proteins like GSK3? and PKC?II involved in developmental disorders. This work establishes a dynamic correlation between histone methylation events and HDAC inhibition and may define newer epigenetic strategies for treating neurodevelopmental and oncological disorders. PMID:25012937

  1. Acetylation of Beclin 1 inhibits autophagosome maturation and promotes tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ting; Li, Xuan; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Wen-Dan; Zhang, Hai-liang; Li, Dan-Dan; Deng, Rong; Qian, Xiao-Jun; Jiao, Lin; Ji, Jiao; Li, Yun-Tian; Wu, Rui-Yan; Yu, Yan; Feng, Gong-Kan; Zhu, Xiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Beclin 1, a protein essential for autophagy, regulates autophagy by interacting with Vps34 and other cofactors to form the Beclin 1 complex. Modifications of Beclin 1 may lead to the induction, inhibition or fine-tuning of the autophagic response under a variety of conditions. Here we show that Beclin 1 is acetylated by p300 and deacetylated by SIRT1 at lysine residues 430 and 437. In addition, the phosphorylation of Beclin 1 at S409 by CK1 is required for the subsequent p300 binding and Beclin 1 acetylation. Beclin 1 acetylation inhibits autophagosome maturation and endocytic trafficking by promoting the recruitment of Rubicon. In tumour xenografts, the expression of 2KR mutant Beclin 1 (substitution of K430 and K437 to arginines) leads to enhanced autophagosome maturation and tumour growth suppression. Therefore, our study identifies an acetylation-dependent regulatory mechanism governing Beclin 1 function in autophagosome maturation and tumour growth. PMID:26008601

  2. Zinc pyrithione inhibits yeast growth through copper influx and inactivation of iron-sulfur proteins.

    PubMed

    Reeder, Nancy L; Kaplan, Jerry; Xu, Jun; Youngquist, R Scott; Wallace, Jared; Hu, Ping; Juhlin, Kenton D; Schwartz, James R; Grant, Raymond A; Fieno, Angela; Nemeth, Suzanne; Reichling, Tim; Tiesman, Jay P; Mills, Tim; Steinke, Mark; Wang, Shuo L; Saunders, Charles W

    2011-12-01

    Zinc pyrithione (ZPT) is an antimicrobial material with widespread use in antidandruff shampoos and antifouling paints. Despite decades of commercial use, there is little understanding of its antimicrobial mechanism of action. We used a combination of genome-wide approaches (yeast deletion mutants and microarrays) and traditional methods (gene constructs and atomic emission) to characterize the activity of ZPT against a model yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ZPT acts through an increase in cellular copper levels that leads to loss of activity of iron-sulfur cluster-containing proteins. ZPT was also found to mediate growth inhibition through an increase in copper in the scalp fungus Malassezia globosa. A model is presented in which pyrithione acts as a copper ionophore, enabling copper to enter cells and distribute across intracellular membranes. This is the first report of a metal-ligand complex that inhibits fungal growth by increasing the cellular level of a different metal. PMID:21947398

  3. Measles virus-induced mononuclear leukocyte adherence inhibition: effect of some drugs influencing arachidonic acid metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Mayer, M

    1986-11-01

    Effect of some drugs influencing arachidonic acid metabolic pathways upon the measles virus-induced leukocyte adherence inhibition was investigated in multiple sclerosis patients and in the control group. The drugs used were natrium salicylate, ethanol, and phenidon(1-phenyl-3-pyrazolidon). Statistically significant differences were proved between multiple sclerosis patients and controls using phenidon, a drug inhibiting both cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways of the arachidonic acid metabolism. The results obtained provide suggestion on participation of arachidonic acid metabolism in the measles virus-induced leukocyte adherence inhibition phenomenon and in its alterations in multiple sclerosis. PMID:2881471

  4. Generalization of Monod kinetics for analysis of growth data with substrate inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Luong, J.H.T.

    1987-02-05

    The inhibitory effect of butanol on yeast growth has been studied for the strain Candida utilis ATCC 8205 growing aerobically on butanol under batch conditions. A mathematical expression was then proposed to fit the kinetic pattern of butanol inhibition on the specific growth rate. The maximum allowable butanol concentration above which cells do not grow was predicted to be 9.16 g/l. The proposed model appears to accurately represent the experimental data obtained in this study and the literature data developed for a variety of batch culture systems at widely ranging substrate concentrations. 20 references.

  5. Gambogic Acid Inhibits STAT3 Phosphorylation Through Activation of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase SHP-1: Potential Role in Proliferation and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Pandey, Manoj K.; Yadav, Vivek R.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), is associated with proliferation, survival, and metastasis of cancer cells. We investigated whether gambogic acid (GA), a xanthone derived from the resin of traditional Chinese medicine, Gamboge hanburyi (mangosteen), can regulate the STAT3 pathway, leading to suppression of growth and sensitization of cancer cells. We found that GA induced apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells that correlated with the inhibition of both constitutive and inducible STAT3 activation. STAT3 phosphorylation at both tyrosine residue 705 and serine residue 727 was inhibited by GA. STAT3 suppression was mediated through the inhibition of activation of the protein tyrosine kinases Janus-activated kinase (JAK) 1, and JAK2. Treatment with the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor pervanadate reversed the GA-induced down-regulation of STAT3, suggesting the involvement of a PTP. We also found that GA induced the expression of the PTP SHP-1. Deletion of the SHP-1 gene by small interfering RNA suppressed the ability of GA to inhibit STAT3 activation and to induce apoptosis, suggesting the critical role of SHP-1 in its action. Moreover, GA down-regulated the expression of STAT3-regulated antiapoptotic (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1), proliferative (cyclin D1), and angiogenic (VEGF) proteins, and this correlated with suppression of proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Overall, these results suggest that GA blocks STAT3 activation, leading to suppression of tumor cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. PMID:21490133

  6. Dual inhibition of RET and FGFR4 restrains medullary thyroid cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Shereen; Huang, Ping; Dackiw, Alan; Asa, Sylvia L

    2005-02-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer is frequently an aggressive form of carcinoma for which there are currently no effective forms of systemic therapy. These carcinomas arise as a result of activating mutations in the RET proto-oncogene transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor. We, therefore, examined the potential efficacy of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor STI571 on the growth of human TT medullary cancer cells in vitro and in xenografted severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Treatment with STI571 resulted in inhibition of RET phosphorylation, cell proliferation, tumor growth and invasiveness. Based on the profile of expression of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR), we examined the effects of FGFR tyrosine kinase inhibition using the small molecule FGFR inhibitor PD173074. This inhibitor resulted in abrogation of fibroblast growth factor-1-mediated FGFR4 phosphorylation in TT cells, an effect that was accompanied by significant arrest of cell proliferation and tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, the combination of STI571 and PD173074 resulted in greater suppression of cell proliferation in vitro and tumor control in vivo than that achieved with either agent alone. These data highlight RET and FGFR4 as therapeutic targets and suggest a potential role for the combined use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the management of inoperable medullary thyroid cancers. PMID:15709206

  7. Large plasma-membrane depolarization precedes rapid blue-light-induced growth inhibition in cucumber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalding, E. P.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Blue-light (BL)-induced suppression of elongation of etiolated Cucumis sativus L. hypocotyls began after a 30-s lag time, which was halved by increasing the fluence rate from 10 to 100 micromoles m-2 s-1. Prior to the growth suppression, the plasma-membrane of the irradiated cells depolarized by as much as 100 mV, then returned within 2-3 min to near its initial value. The potential difference measured with surface electrodes changed with an identical time course but opposite polarity. The lag time for the change in surface potential showed an inverse dependence on fluence rate, similar to the lag for the growth inhibition. Green light and red light caused neither the electrical response nor the rapid inhibition of growth. The depolarization by BL did not propagate to nonirradiated regions and exhibited a refractory period of about 10 min following a BL pulse. Fluence-response relationships for the electrical and growth responses provide correlational evidence that the plasma-membrane depolarization reflects an event in the transduction chain of this light-growth response.

  8. Pharmacologic inhibition of fatty acid oxidation sensitizes human leukemia cells to apoptosis induction

    PubMed Central

    Samudio, Ismael; Harmancey, Romain; Fiegl, Michael; Kantarjian, Hagop; Konopleva, Marina; Korchin, Borys; Kaluarachchi, Kumar; Bornmann, William; Duvvuri, Seshagiri; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Andreeff, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The traditional view is that cancer cells predominately produce ATP by glycolysis, rather than by oxidation of energy-providing substrates. Mitochondrial uncoupling — the continuing reduction of oxygen without ATP synthesis — has recently been shown in leukemia cells to circumvent the ability of oxygen to inhibit glycolysis, and may promote the metabolic preference for glycolysis by shifting from pyruvate oxidation to fatty acid oxidation (FAO). Here we have demonstrated that pharmacologic inhibition of FAO with etomoxir or ranolazine inhibited proliferation and sensitized human leukemia cells — cultured alone or on bone marrow stromal cells — to apoptosis induction by ABT-737, a molecule that releases proapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins such as Bak from antiapoptotic family members. Likewise, treatment with the fatty acid synthase/lipolysis inhibitor orlistat also sensitized leukemia cells to ABT-737, which supports the notion that fatty acids promote cell survival. Mechanistically, we generated evidence suggesting that FAO regulates the activity of Bak-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition. Importantly, etomoxir decreased the number of quiescent leukemia progenitor cells in approximately 50% of primary human acute myeloid leukemia samples and, when combined with either ABT-737 or cytosine arabinoside, provided substantial therapeutic benefit in a murine model of leukemia. The results support the concept of FAO inhibitors as a therapeutic strategy in hematological malignancies. PMID:20038799

  9. Metformin inhibits thyroid cancer cell growth, migration, and EMT through the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Baiyu; Cui, Hanzhi; Kang, Lei; Zhang, Xuelin; Jin, Zhitao; Lu, Lanmin; Fan, Zhongyi

    2015-08-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways have been shown to be activated in thyroid cancer. Recent evidences have demonstrated that the antidiabetic agent metformin, an activator of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase, can impair the proliferation and migration of cancer cells via inhibition of mTOR. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we show that metformin can inhibit mTOR pathway to impair growth and migration of the thyroid cancer cell lines. Cyclin D1 and c-Myc are important regulators of cancer cell growth, and we observed that treatment of thyroid cancer cells with metformin reduced c-Myc and cyclin D1 expression through suppression of mTOR and subsequent inhibition of P70S6K1 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation. Metformin reduced epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in thyroid carcinoma cells. Moreover, metformin regulated expression of the EMT-related markers E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and Snail. Additionally, knockdown of TSC2, the upstream regulatory molecule of mTOR pathway, or treatment of rapamycin, the mTOR inhibitor, could abolish the effects of metformin to regulate thyroid cancer cell proliferation, migration, EMT, and mTOR pathway molecules. These results indicate that metformin can suppress the proliferation, migration, and EMT of thyroid cancer cell lines by inhibiting mTOR signaling. These findings suggest that metformin and its molecular targets may be useful in thyroid carcinoma therapy. PMID:25854169

  10. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 regulates microvascular endothelial growth induced by inflammatory cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Takasawa, Wataru; Ohnuma, Kei; Hatano, Ryo; Endo, Yuko; Dang, Nam H.; Department of Rheumatology and Allergy, Research Hospital, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta} induces EC proliferation with reduction of CD26 expression. {yields} CD26 siRNA or DPP-4 inhibition enhances TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta}-induced EC proliferation. {yields} Loss of CD26/DPP-4 enhances aortic sprouting induced by TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta}. {yields} Capillary formation induced by TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta} is enahced in the CD26{sup -/-} mice. -- Abstract: CD26/DPP-4 is abundantly expressed on capillary of inflamed lesion as well as effector T cells. Recently, CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibition has been used as a novel oral therapeutic approach for patients with type 2 diabetes. While accumulating data indicate that vascular inflammation is a key feature of both micro- and macro-vascular complications in diabetes, the direct role of CD26/DPP-4 in endothelial biology is to be elucidated. We herein showed that proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor or interleukin-1 reduce expression of CD26 on microvascular endothelial cells, and that genetical or pharmacological inhibition of CD26/DPP-4 enhances endothelial growth both in vitro and in vivo. With DPP-4 inhibitors being used widely in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, our data strongly suggest that DPP-4 inhibition plays a pivotal role in endothelial growth and may have a potential role in the recovery of local circulation following diabetic vascular complications.

  11. Retinoic acid orchestrates fibroblast growth factor signalling to drive embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Stavridis, Marios P; Collins, Barry J; Storey, Kate G

    2010-03-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells fluctuate between self-renewal and the threshold of differentiation. Signalling via the fibroblast growth factor (Fgf)/Erk pathway is required to progress from this dynamic state and promote mouse ES cell differentiation. Retinoic acid also induces differentiation in many cellular contexts, but its mechanism of action in relation to Fgf/Erk signalling in ES cells is poorly understood. Here, we show for the first time that endogenous retinoid signalling is required for the timely acquisition of somatic cell fate in mouse ES cells and that exposure to retinoic acid advances differentiation by a dual mechanism: first increasing, but in the long-term decreasing, Fgf signalling. Rapid retinoid induction of Fgf8 and downstream Erk activity on day 1 in differentiation conditions may serve to ensure loss of self-renewal. However, more gradual repression of Fgf4 by retinoic acid is accompanied by an overall reduction in Erk activity on day 2, and the acquisition of neural and non-neural fates is now advanced by inhibition of Fgf signalling. So, although blocking Fgf/Erk activity is known to promote ES cell self-renewal, once cells have experienced a period of such signals, subsequent inhibition of Fgf signalling has the opposite effect and drives differentiation. We further show in the embryo that retinoid repression of Fgf signalling promotes neural differentiation onset in an analogous step in the extending embryonic body axis and so identify attenuation of Fgf signalling by retinoic acid as a conserved fundamental mechanism driving differentiation towards somatic cell fates. PMID:20179094

  12. Retinoic acid orchestrates fibroblast growth factor signalling to drive embryonic stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Stavridis, Marios P.; Collins, Barry J.; Storey, Kate G.

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells fluctuate between self-renewal and the threshold of differentiation. Signalling via the fibroblast growth factor (Fgf)/Erk pathway is required to progress from this dynamic state and promote mouse ES cell differentiation. Retinoic acid also induces differentiation in many cellular contexts, but its mechanism of action in relation to Fgf/Erk signalling in ES cells is poorly understood. Here, we show for the first time that endogenous retinoid signalling is required for the timely acquisition of somatic cell fate in mouse ES cells and that exposure to retinoic acid advances differentiation by a dual mechanism: first increasing, but in the long-term decreasing, Fgf signalling. Rapid retinoid induction of Fgf8 and downstream Erk activity on day 1 in differentiation conditions may serve to ensure loss of self-renewal. However, more gradual repression of Fgf4 by retinoic acid is accompanied by an overall reduction in Erk activity on day 2, and the acquisition of neural and non-neural fates is now advanced by inhibition of Fgf signalling. So, although blocking Fgf/Erk activity is known to promote ES cell self-renewal, once cells have experienced a period of such signals, subsequent inhibition of Fgf signalling has the opposite effect and drives differentiation. We further show in the embryo that retinoid repression of Fgf signalling promotes neural differentiation onset in an analogous step in the extending embryonic body axis and so identify attenuation of Fgf signalling by retinoic acid as a conserved fundamental mechanism driving differentiation towards somatic cell fates. PMID:20179094

  13. Heparin Inhibits Hepatocyte Growth Factor Induced Motility and Invasion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells through Early Growth Response Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Ozen, Evin; Gozukizil, Aysim; Erdal, Esra; Uren, Aykut; Bottaro, Donald P.; Atabey, Nese

    2012-01-01

    The Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF)/c-Met signaling pathway regulates hepatocyte proliferation, and pathway aberrations are implicated in the invasive and metastatic behaviors of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In addition to c-Met, heparin acts as a co-receptor to modulate pathway activity. Recently, anti-metastatic and anti-cancer effects of heparin have been reported. However, the role of heparin in the regulation of HGF signaling remains controversial and the effects of heparin on HGF-induced biological responses during hepatocarcinogenesis is not yet defined. In this study we determined the effects of heparin on HGF-induced activities of HCC cells and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here, we report for the first time that heparin inhibits HGF-induced adhesion, motility and invasion of HCC cells. In addition, heparin reduced HGF-induced activation of c-Met and MAPK in a dose-dependent manner, as well as decreased transcriptional activation and expression of Early growth response factor 1 (Egr1). HGF-induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 activation, and MT1-MMP expression, also were inhibited by heparin. Stable knockdown of Egr1 caused a significant decrease in HGF-induced invasion, as well as the activation and expression of MMPs. Parallel to these findings, the overexpression of Egr1 increased the invasiveness of HCC cells. Our results suggest that Egr1 activates HGF-induced cell invasion through the regulation of MMPs in HCC cells and heparin inhibits HGF-induced cellular invasion via the downregulation of Egr1. Therefore, heparin treatment might be a therapeutic approach to inhibit invasion and metastasis of HCC, especially for patients with active HGF/c-Met signaling. PMID:22912725

  14. Morphological investigations of disaccharide molecules for growth inhibition of ice crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Tsutomu; Nagayama, Masafumi; Shibayama, Tamaki; Gohara, Kazutoshi

    2007-02-01

    Freezing of solutions including disaccharides (trehalose, sucrose, and maltose) has been investigated by microscopic observations of freeze-fractured replicas using FE-TEM. Three typical features were observed: the smooth surface considered as the ice crystal, fine particles as the precipitated disaccharide molecules, and remaining part as the glass state of the solution. The expanded observations of fine particle and its distribution investigations suggested that it was larger than 10 nm in size and averaged approximately 20-30 nm in diameter. The smallest particle was estimated to include several hundred disaccharide molecules. Based on systematic observations of trehalose solutions regarding concentrations and freezing rates, we concluded that ice crystal growth was inhibited by trehalose molecules. Since the ice crystal size reduced exponentially with increase in trehalose concentration, we could control ice crystal size formed in the frozen material. The growth inhibition of ice crystals with trehalose resulted both from a reduction in the free water in the solution due to a significant hydration effect and from an enhancement of nucleation of the ice crystals. It was confirmed that trehalose was more effective than the other disaccharide solutions examined for inhibiting the growth of ice crystals.

  15. 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol Inhibition of Progression and Growth of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; Liu, Xichun; Xu, Duo; Guo, Wei; Zhan, Yang; Xiong, Zhenggang; Zhang, Allen; Wang, Alun R.; Fu, Xueqi; Zhang, Haitao; Zhao, Lijing; Gu, Jingkai; Dong, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Castration-resistant progression of prostate cancer after androgen deprivation therapies remains the most critical challenge in the clinical management of prostate cancer. Resurgent androgen receptor (AR) activity is an established driver of castration-resistant progression, and upregulation of the full-length AR (AR-FL) and constitutively-active AR splice variants (AR-Vs) has been implicated to contribute to the resurgent AR activity. We reported previously that ginsenoside 20(S)-protopanaxadiol-aglycone (PPD) can reduce the abundance of both AR-FL and AR-Vs. In the present study, we further showed that the effect of PPD on AR expression and target genes was independent of androgen. PPD treatment resulted in a suppression of ligand-independent AR transactivation. Moreover, PPD delayed castration-resistant regrowth of LNCaP xenograft tumors after androgen deprivation and inhibited the growth of castration-resistant 22Rv1 xenograft tumors with endogenous expression of AR-FL and AR-Vs. This was accompanied by a decline in serum prostate-specific antigen levels as well as a decrease in AR levels and mitoses in the tumors. Notably, the 22Rv1 xenograft tumors were resistant to growth inhibition by the next-generation anti-androgen enzalutamide. The present study represents the first to show the preclinical efficacy of PPD in inhibiting castration-resistant progression and growth of prostate cancer. The findings provide a rationale for further developing PPD or its analogues for prostate cancer therapy. PMID:25375370

  16. Puerariae radix isoflavones and their metabolites inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.-J.; Hou, Y.C.; Lin, C.-H.; Hsu, Y.-A.; Sheu, Jim J.C.; Lai, C.-H.; Chen, B.-H.; Lee Chao, Pei-Dawn; Wan Lei Tsai, F.-J.

    2009-01-23

    Puerariae radix (PR) is a popular natural herb and a traditional food in Asia, which has antithrombotic and anti-allergic properties and stimulates estrogenic activity. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the PR isoflavones puerarin, daidzein, and genistein on the growth of breast cancer cells. Our data revealed that after treatment with PR isoflavones, a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth occurred in HS578T, MDA-MB-231, and MCF-7 cell lines. Results from cell cycle distribution and apoptosis assays revealed that PR isoflavones induced cell apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent pathway and mediated cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Furthermore, we observed that the serum metabolites of PR (daidzein sulfates/glucuronides) inhibited proliferation of the breast cancer cells at a 50% cell growth inhibition (GI{sub 50}) concentration of 2.35 {mu}M. These results indicate that the daidzein constituent of PR can be metabolized to daidzein sulfates or daidzein glucuronides that exhibit anticancer activities. The protein expression levels of the active forms of caspase-9 and Bax in breast cancer cells were significantly increased by treatment with PR metabolites. These metabolites also increased the protein expression levels of p53 and p21. We therefore suggest that PR may act as a chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic agent against breast cancer by reducing cell viability and inducing apoptosis.

  17. Pu-erh Tea Inhibits Tumor Cell Growth by Down-Regulating Mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lanjun; Jia, Shuting; Tang, Wenru; Sheng, Jun; Luo, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Pu-erh tea is a kind of fermented tea with the incorporation of microorganisms’ metabolites. Unlike green tea, the chemical characteristics and bioactivities of Pu-erh tea are still not well understood. Using water extracts of Pu-erh tea, we analyzed the tumor cell growth inhibition activities on several genetically engineered mouse tumor cell lines. We found that at the concentration that did not affect wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) growth, Pu-erh tea extracts could inhibit tumor cell growth by down-regulated S phase and cause G1 or G2 arrest. Further study showed that Pu-erh tea extracts down-regulated the expression of mutant p53 in tumor cells at the protein level as well as mRNA level. The same concentration of Pu-erh tea solution did not cause p53 stabilization or activation of its downstream pathways in wild type cells. We also found that Pu-erh tea treatment could slightly down-regulate both HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels in tumor cells. These data revealed the action of Pu-erh tea on tumor cells and provided the possible mechanism for Pu-erh tea action, which explained its selectivity in inhibiting tumor cells without affecting wild type cells. Our data sheds light on the application of Pu-erh tea as an anti-tumor agent with low side effects. PMID:22174618

  18. Pu-erh tea inhibits tumor cell growth by down-regulating mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lanjun; Jia, Shuting; Tang, Wenru; Sheng, Jun; Luo, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Pu-erh tea is a kind of fermented tea with the incorporation of microorganisms' metabolites. Unlike green tea, the chemical characteristics and bioactivities of Pu-erh tea are still not well understood. Using water extracts of Pu-erh tea, we analyzed the tumor cell growth inhibition activities on several genetically engineered mouse tumor cell lines. We found that at the concentration that did not affect wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) growth, Pu-erh tea extracts could inhibit tumor cell growth by down-regulated S phase and cause G1 or G2 arrest. Further study showed that Pu-erh tea extracts down-regulated the expression of mutant p53 in tumor cells at the protein level as well as mRNA level. The same concentration of Pu-erh tea solution did not cause p53 stabilization or activation of its downstream pathways in wild type cells. We also found that Pu-erh tea treatment could slightly down-regulate both HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels in tumor cells. These data revealed the action of Pu-erh tea on tumor cells and provided the possible mechanism for Pu-erh tea action, which explained its selectivity in inhibiting tumor cells without affecting wild type cells. Our data sheds light on the application of Pu-erh tea as an anti-tumor agent with low side effects. PMID:22174618

  19. Ultrasound-mediated interferon {beta} gene transfection inhibits growth of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Kazuki; Department of Anatomy, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka City 814-0180 ; Feril, Loreto B.; Tachibana, Katsuro; Takahashi, Akira; Matsuo, Miki; Endo, Hitomi; Harada, Yoshimi; Nakayama, Juichiro

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Successful ultrasound-mediated transfection of melanoma (C32) cells with IFN-{beta} genes both in vitro and in vivo. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. -- Abstract: We investigated the effects of ultrasound-mediated transfection (sonotransfection) of interferon {beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene on melanoma (C32) both in vitro and in vivo. C32 cells were sonotransfected with IFN-{beta} in vitro. Subcutaneous C32 tumors in mice were sonicated weekly immediately after intra-tumor injection with IFN-{beta} genes mixed with microbubbles. Successful sonotransfection with IFN-{beta} gene in vitro was confirmed by ELISA, which resulted in C32 growth inhibition. In vivo, the growth ratio of tumors transfected with IFN-{beta} gene was significantly lower than the other experimental groups. These results may lead to a new method of treatment against melanoma and other hard-to-treat cancers.

  20. Merlin inhibits growth hormone-regulated Raf-ERKs pathways by binding to Grb2 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Hongtae; Jeun, Sin-Soo . E-mail: ssjeun@catholic.ac.kr; Kang, Seok-Gu; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2006-02-24

    Numerous studies have suggested that the NF2 protein merlin is involved in the regulation of abnormal cell growth and proliferation. In this study, to better understand the merlin's mechanisms that contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis, we examined the potential action of merlin on the cell proliferative signaling pathways in response to growth hormone (GH). Merlin effectively attenuated the GH-induced serum response element (SRE) and Elk-1-mediated transcriptional activation, as well as the endogenous SRE-regulated gene c-fos expression in NIH3T3 cells. In addition, merlin prevented the Raf-1 complex activation process, which resulted in the suppression of MAP kinase/ERK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERKs), and Elk-1 phosphorylation, which are the downstream signals of Raf-1. Moreover, it was shown that merlin interacted with endogenous growth factor receptor bound 2 (Grb2) protein and inhibited its expression. These results suggest that merlin contributes, via its protein-to-protein interaction with Grb2 and consequent inhibition of the MAPK pathways, to the regulation of the abnormal cell proliferation, and this provides a further mechanism underlying the tumor suppressor function of merlin.