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Sample records for acids inhibit growth

  1. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by polycarboxylic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth rates measured in the presence of several polycarboxyclic acids show that tetrahydrofurantetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA) and cyclopentanetetracarboxylic acid (CPTCA) are effective growth rate inhibitors at low solution concentrations (0.01 to 1 mg/L). In contrast, linear polycarbocylic acids (citric acid and tricarballylic acid) had no inhibiting effect on calcite growth rates at concentrations up to 10 mg/L. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by cyclic polycarboxyclic acids appears to involve blockage of crystal growth sites on the mineral surface by several carboxylate groups. Growth morphology varied for growth in the absence and in the presence of both THFTCA and CPTCA. More effective growth rate reduction by CPTCA relative to THFTCA suggests that inhibitor carboxylate stereochemical orientation controls calcite surface interaction with carboxylate inhibitors. ?? 20O1 Academic Press.

  2. Cinnamic Acid Increases Lignin Production and Inhibits Soybean Root Growth

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, Victor Hugo; Lima, Rogrio Barbosa; dos Santos, Wanderley Dantas; Soares, Anderson Ricardo; Bhm, Paulo Alfredo Feitoza; Marchiosi, Rogrio; Ferrarese, Maria de Lourdes Lucio; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Cinnamic acid is a known allelochemical that affects seed germination and plant root growth and therefore influences several metabolic processes. In the present work, we evaluated its effects on growth, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) oxidase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) activities and lignin monomer composition in soybean (Glycine max) roots. The results revealed that exogenously applied cinnamic acid inhibited root growth and increased IAA oxidase and C4H activities. The allelochemical increased the total lignin content, thus altering the sum and ratios of the p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S) lignin monomers. When applied alone or with cinnamic acid, piperonylic acid (PIP, a quasi-irreversible inhibitor of C4H) reduced C4H activity, lignin and the H, G, S monomer content compared to the cinnamic acid treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that exogenously applied cinnamic acid can be channeled into the phenylpropanoid pathway via the C4H reaction, resulting in an increase in H lignin. In conjunction with enhanced IAA oxidase activity, these metabolic responses lead to the stiffening of the cell wall and are followed by a reduction in soybean root growth. PMID:23922685

  3. Gymnemic Acids Inhibit Hyphal Growth and Virulence in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Dumontet, Vincent; Pelissier, Franck; d’Enfert, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic and polymorphic fungal pathogen that causes mucosal, disseminated and invasive infections in humans. Transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form is one of the key virulence factors in C. albicans contributing to macrophage evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. Nontoxic small molecules that inhibit C. albicans yeast-to-hypha conversion and hyphal growth could represent a valuable source for understanding pathogenic fungal morphogenesis, identifying drug targets and serving as templates for the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we have identified the triterpenoid saponin family of gymnemic acids (GAs) as inhibitor of C. albicans morphogenesis. GAs were isolated and purified from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, the Ayurvedic traditional medicinal plant used to treat diabetes. Purified GAs had no effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans yeast cells but inhibited its yeast-to-hypha conversion under several hypha-inducing conditions, including the presence of serum. Moreover, GAs promoted the conversion of C. albicans hyphae into yeast cells under hypha inducing conditions. They also inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of Aspergillus sp. Finally, GAs inhibited the formation of invasive hyphae from C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans worms and rescued them from killing by C. albicans. Hence, GAs could be useful for various antifungal applications due to their traditional use in herbal medicine. PMID:24040201

  4. Gymnemic acids inhibit hyphal growth and virulence in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Dumontet, Vincent; Pelissier, Franck; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic and polymorphic fungal pathogen that causes mucosal, disseminated and invasive infections in humans. Transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form is one of the key virulence factors in C. albicans contributing to macrophage evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. Nontoxic small molecules that inhibit C. albicans yeast-to-hypha conversion and hyphal growth could represent a valuable source for understanding pathogenic fungal morphogenesis, identifying drug targets and serving as templates for the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we have identified the triterpenoid saponin family of gymnemic acids (GAs) as inhibitor of C. albicans morphogenesis. GAs were isolated and purified from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, the Ayurvedic traditional medicinal plant used to treat diabetes. Purified GAs had no effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans yeast cells but inhibited its yeast-to-hypha conversion under several hypha-inducing conditions, including the presence of serum. Moreover, GAs promoted the conversion of C. albicans hyphae into yeast cells under hypha inducing conditions. They also inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of Aspergillus sp. Finally, GAs inhibited the formation of invasive hyphae from C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans worms and rescued them from killing by C. albicans. Hence, GAs could be useful for various antifungal applications due to their traditional use in herbal medicine. PMID:24040201

  5. Abscisic acid inhibits root growth in Arabidopsis through ethylene biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xingju; Chen, Zhizhong; Gao, Junping; Gong, Zhizhong

    2014-07-01

    When first discovered in 1963, abscisic acid (ABA) was called abscisin II because it promotes abscission. Later, researchers found that ABA accelerates abscission via ethylene. In Arabidopsis, previous studies have shown that high concentrations of ABA inhibit root growth through ethylene signaling but not ethylene production. In the present study in Arabidopsis, we found that ABA inhibits root growth by promoting ethylene biosynthesis. The ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor L-?-(2-aminoethoxyvinyl)-glycine reduces ABA inhibition of root growth, and multiple mutants of ACS (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase) are more resistant to ABA in terms of root growth than the wild-type is. Two ABA-activated calcium-dependent protein kinases, CPK4 and CPK11, phosphorylate the C-terminus of ACS6 and increase the stability of ACS6 in ethylene biosynthesis. Plants expressing an ACS6 mutant that mimics the phosphorylated form of ACS6 produce more ethylene than the wild-type. Our results reveal an important mechanism by which ABA promotes ethylene production. This mechanism may be highly conserved among higher plants. PMID:24738778

  6. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid inhibits insulin-like growth factor signaling, growth, and survival in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gary E; Chesler, Louis; Liu, Dandan; Gable, Karissa; Maddux, Betty A; Goldenberg, David D; Youngren, Jack F; Goldfine, Ira D; Weiss, William A; Matthay, Katherine K; Rosenthal, Stephen M

    2007-12-15

    Neuroblastoma is a common pediatric malignancy that metastasizes to the liver, bone, and other organs. Children with metastatic disease have a less than 50% chance of survival with current treatments. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate neuroblastoma growth, survival, and motility, and are expressed by neuroblastoma cells and the tissues they invade. Thus, therapies that disrupt the effects of IGFs on neuroblastoma tumorigenesis may slow disease progression. We show that NVP-AEW541, a specific inhibitor of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), potently inhibits neuroblastoma growth in vitro. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a phenolic compound isolated from the creosote bush (Larrea divaricata), has anti-tumor properties against a number of malignancies, has been shown to inhibit the phosphorylation and activation of the IGF-IR in breast cancer cells, and is currently in Phase I trials for prostate cancer. In the present study in neuroblastoma, NDGA inhibits IGF-I-mediated activation of the IGF-IR and disrupts activation of ERK and Akt signaling pathways induced by IGF-I. NDGA inhibits growth of neuroblastoma cells and induces apoptosis at higher doses, causing IGF-I-resistant activation of caspase-3 and a large increase in the fraction of sub-G0 cells. In addition, NDGA inhibits the growth of xenografted human neuroblastoma tumors in nude mice. These results indicate that NDGA may be useful in the treatment of neuroblastoma and may function in part via disruption of IGF-IR signaling. PMID:17486636

  7. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Inhibits Insulin-Like Growth Factor Signaling, Growth, and Survival in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Gary E.; Chesler, Louis; Liu, Dandan; Gable, Karissa; Maddux, Betty A.; Goldenberg, David D.; Youngren, Jack F.; Goldfine, Ira D.; Weiss, William A.; Matthay, Katherine K.; Rosenthal, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a common pediatric malignancy that metastasizes to the liver, bone, and other organs. Children with metastatic disease have a less than 50% chance of survival with current treatments. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate neuroblastoma growth, survival, and motility, and are expressed by neuroblastoma cells and the tissues they invade. Thus, therapies that disrupt the effects of IGFs on neuroblastoma tumorigenesis may slow disease progression. We show that NVP-AEW541, a specific inhibitor of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), potently inhibits neuroblastoma growth in vitro. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a phenolic compound isolated from the creosote bush (Larrea divaricata), has anti-tumor properties against a number of malignancies, has been shown to inhibit the phosphorylation and activation of the IGF-IR in breast cancer cells, and is currently in Phase I trials for prostate cancer. In the present study in neuroblastoma, NDGA inhibits IGF-I-mediated activation of the IGF-IR and disrupts activation of ERK and Akt signaling pathways induced by IGF-I. NDGA inhibits growth of neuroblastoma cells and induces apoptosis at higher doses, causing IGF-I-resistant activation of caspase-3 and a large increase in the fraction of sub-G0 cells. In addition, NDGA inhibits the growth of xenografted human neuroblastoma tumors in nude mice. These results indicate that NDGA may be useful in the treatment of neuroblastoma and may function in part via disruption of IGF-IR signaling. PMID:17486636

  8. Transient growth inhibition of Escherichia coli K-12 by ion chelators: "in vivo" inhibition of ribonucleic acid synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J J; Alder, C R; Fernandez-Pol, J A; Court, D; Johnson, G S

    1979-01-01

    The ion chelators picolinic acid, quinaldic acid, 1,10-phenanthroline, and 8-hydroxyquinoline, but not ethylenediaminetetraacetate, ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N-tetraacetate, or dipicolinic acid, rapidly but transiently arrest growth of Escherichia coli K-12. Cells adapt and become resistant to growth inhibition by these agents, a process which requires protein synthesis. Mn2+, at low concentrations, decreases the time required for resumption of growth. Proteins synthesized during the lag are quantitatively and qualitatively different from those synthesized during normal growth. Inhibition of growth can explained by an effect on RNA polymerase, a known metalloenzyme. Images PMID:110773

  9. Salicylic acid antagonizes abscisic acid inhibition of shoot growth and cell cycle progression in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Ayano; Sato, Yutaka

    2014-04-01

    We analysed effects of abscisic acid (ABA, a negative regulatory hormone), alone and in combination with positive or neutral hormones, including salicylic acid (SA), on rice growth and expression of cell cycle-related genes. ABA significantly inhibited shoot growth and induced expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6. A yeast two-hybrid assay showed that OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6 interacted with OsCDKA;1 and/or OsCDKA;2. When SA was simultaneously supplied with ABA, the antagonistic effect of SA completely blocked ABA inhibition. SA also blocked ABA inhibition of DNA replication and thymidine incorporation in the shoot apical meristem. These results suggest that ABA arrests cell cycle progression by inducing expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6, which inhibit the G1/S transition, and that SA antagonizes ABA by blocking expression of OsKRP genes.

  10. Salicylic acid antagonizes abscisic acid inhibition of shoot growth and cell cycle progression in rice.

    PubMed

    Meguro, Ayano; Sato, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    We analysed effects of abscisic acid (ABA, a negative regulatory hormone), alone and in combination with positive or neutral hormones, including salicylic acid (SA), on rice growth and expression of cell cycle-related genes. ABA significantly inhibited shoot growth and induced expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6. A yeast two-hybrid assay showed that OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6 interacted with OsCDKA;1 and/or OsCDKA;2. When SA was simultaneously supplied with ABA, the antagonistic effect of SA completely blocked ABA inhibition. SA also blocked ABA inhibition of DNA replication and thymidine incorporation in the shoot apical meristem. These results suggest that ABA arrests cell cycle progression by inducing expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6, which inhibit the G1/S transition, and that SA antagonizes ABA by blocking expression of OsKRP genes. PMID:24686568

  11. The lactic acid bacteria metabolite phenyllactic acid inhibits both radial growth and sporulation of filamentous fungi

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Food spoilage caused by molds is a severe problem. In food and feed, e.g. dairy products, sourdough bread and silage, lactic acid bacteria are used as starter cultures. Besides lactic and acetic acid, some strains produce other low molecular weight compounds with antifungal activities. One of these metabolites is phenyllactic acid (PLA), well known for its antifungal effect. The inhibitory effect of PLA has only partially been investigated, and the objective of this study was to elucidate in detail the antifungal properties of PLA. Results We investigated the outgrowth of individual conidia from Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium cladosporioides and Penicillium roqueforti, and observed the morphologies of resulting colonies on solid media using different acid concentrations. We found that PLA inhibits molds similar to weak acid preservatives. Furthermore, it has an additional activity: at sub-inhibitory concentrations, fungal colonies displayed slower radial growth and inhibited sporulation. The L isoform of PLA is a more potent inhibitor than the D form. Increased expression of phiA was observed during PLA treatment. This gene was initially identified as being induced by Streptomyces-produced macrolide antibiotics, and is shown to be a structural protein in developed cells. This suggests that PhiA may act as a general stress protectant in fungi. Conclusion From a food protection perspective, the results of this study support the usage of lactic acid bacteria strains synthesizing PLA as starter cultures in food and feed. Such starter cultures could inhibit spore synthesis, which would be beneficial as many food borne fungi are spread by airborne spores. PMID:24229396

  12. Auxin-Induced Ethylene Triggers Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis and Growth Inhibition1

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Hauke; Grossmann, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    The growth-inhibiting effects of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) at high concentration and the synthetic auxins 7-chloro-3-methyl-8-quinolinecarboxylic acid (quinmerac), 2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid (dicamba), 4-amino-3,6,6-trichloropicolinic acid (picloram), and naphthalene acetic acid, were investigated in cleavers (Galium aparine). When plants were root treated with 0.5 mm IAA, shoot epinasty and inhibition of root and shoot growth developed during 24 h. Concomitantly, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase activity, and ACC and ethylene production were transiently stimulated in the shoot tissue within 2 h, followed by increases in immunoreactive (+)-abscisic acid (ABA) and its precursor xanthoxal (xanthoxin) after 5 h. After 24 h of treatment, levels of xanthoxal and ABA were elevated up to 2- and 24-fold, relative to control, respectively. In plants treated with IAA, 7-chloro-3-methyl-8-quinolinecarboxylic acid, naphthalene acetic acid, 2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid, and 4-amino-3,6,6-trichloropicolinic acid, levels of ethylene, ACC, and ABA increased in close correlation with inhibition of shoot growth. Aminoethoxyvinyl-glycine and cobalt ions, which inhibit ethylene synthesis, decreased ABA accumulation and growth inhibition, whereas the ethylene-releasing ethephon promoted ABA levels and growth inhibition. In accordance, tomato mutants defective in ethylene perception (never ripe) did not produce the xanthoxal and ABA increases and growth inhibition induced by auxins in wild-type plants. This suggests that auxin-stimulated ethylene triggers ABA accumulation and the consequent growth inhibition. Reduced catabolism most probably did not contribute to ABA increase, as indicated by immunoanalyses of ABA degradation and conjugation products in shoot tissue and by pulse experiments with [3H]-ABA in cell suspensions of G. aparine. In contrast, studies using inhibitors of ABA biosynthesis (fluridone, naproxen, and tungstate), ABA-deficient tomato mutants (notabilis, flacca, and sitiens), and quantification of xanthophylls indicate that ABA biosynthesis is influenced, probably through stimulated cleavage of xanthophylls to xanthoxal in shoot tissue. PMID:11080318

  13. Auxin-induced ethylene triggers abscisic acid biosynthesis and growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hansen, H; Grossmann, K

    2000-11-01

    The growth-inhibiting effects of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) at high concentration and the synthetic auxins 7-chloro-3-methyl-8-quinolinecarboxylic acid (quinmerac), 2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid (dicamba), 4-amino-3,6, 6-trichloropicolinic acid (picloram), and naphthalene acetic acid, were investigated in cleavers (Galium aparine). When plants were root treated with 0.5 mM IAA, shoot epinasty and inhibition of root and shoot growth developed during 24 h. Concomitantly, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase activity, and ACC and ethylene production were transiently stimulated in the shoot tissue within 2 h, followed by increases in immunoreactive (+)-abscisic acid (ABA) and its precursor xanthoxal (xanthoxin) after 5 h. After 24 h of treatment, levels of xanthoxal and ABA were elevated up to 2- and 24-fold, relative to control, respectively. In plants treated with IAA, 7-chloro-3-methyl-8-quinolinecarboxylic acid, naphthalene acetic acid, 2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid, and 4-amino-3,6,6-trichloropicolinic acid, levels of ethylene, ACC, and ABA increased in close correlation with inhibition of shoot growth. Aminoethoxyvinyl-glycine and cobalt ions, which inhibit ethylene synthesis, decreased ABA accumulation and growth inhibition, whereas the ethylene-releasing ethephon promoted ABA levels and growth inhibition. In accordance, tomato mutants defective in ethylene perception (never ripe) did not produce the xanthoxal and ABA increases and growth inhibition induced by auxins in wild-type plants. This suggests that auxin-stimulated ethylene triggers ABA accumulation and the consequent growth inhibition. Reduced catabolism most probably did not contribute to ABA increase, as indicated by immunoanalyses of ABA degradation and conjugation products in shoot tissue and by pulse experiments with [(3)H]-ABA in cell suspensions of G. aparine. In contrast, studies using inhibitors of ABA biosynthesis (fluridone, naproxen, and tungstate), ABA-deficient tomato mutants (notabilis, flacca, and sitiens), and quantification of xanthophylls indicate that ABA biosynthesis is influenced, probably through stimulated cleavage of xanthophylls to xanthoxal in shoot tissue. PMID:11080318

  14. Calcite crystal growth inhibition by humic substances with emphasis on hydrophobic acids from the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, A. R.; Reddy, M. M.; Aiken, G. R.

    2000-01-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate minerals plays an integral role in the water chemistry of terrestrial ecosystems. Humic substances, which are ubiquitous in natural waters, have been shown to reduce or inhibit calcite crystal growth in experiments. The purpose of this study is to quantify and understand the kinetic effects of hydrophobic organic acids isolated from the Florida Everglades and a fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell, Antarctica, on the crystal growth of calcite (CaCO 3). Highly reproducible calcite growth experiments were performed in a sealed reactor at constant pH, temperature, supersaturation (? = 4.5), P CO2 (10 -3.5atm), and ionic strength (0.1 M) with various concentrations of organic acids. Higher plant-derived aquatic hydrophobic acids from the Everglades were more effective growth inhibitors than microbially derived fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell. Organic acid aromaticity correlated strongly with growth inhibition. Molecular weight and heteroatom content correlated well with growth inhibition, whereas carboxyl content and aliphatic nature did not.

  15. Calcite crystal growth inhibition by humic substances with emphasis on hydrophobic acids from the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoch, A.R.; Reddy, M.M.; Aiken, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate minerals plays an integral role in the water chemistry of terrestrial ecosystems. Humic substances, which are ubiquitous in natural waters, have been shown to reduce or inhibit calcite crystal growth in experiments. The purpose of this study is to quantify and understand the kinetic effects of hydrophobic organic acids isolated from the Florida Everglades and a fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell, Antarctica, on the crystal growth of calcite (CaCO3). Highly reproducible calcite growth experiments were performed in a sealed reactor at constant pH, temperature, supersaturation (?? = 4.5), P(CO2) (10-3.5atm), and ionic strength (0.1 M) with various concentrations of organic acids. Higher plant-derived aquatic hydrophobic acids from the Everglades were more effective growth inhibitors than microbially derived fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell. Organic acid aromaticity correlated strongly with growth inhibition. Molecular weight and heteroatom content correlated well with growth inhibition, whereas carboxyl content and aliphatic nature did not. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  16. Inhibition of Yeast Growth by Octanoic and Decanoic Acids Produced during Ethanolic Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Viegas, C A; Rosa, M F; S-Correia, I; Novais, J M

    1989-01-01

    The inhibition of growth by octanoic or decanoic acids, two subproducts of ethanolic fermentation, was evaluated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces marxianus in association with ethanol, the main product of fermentation. In both strains, octanoic and decanoic acids, at concentrations up to 16 and 8 mg/liter, respectively, decreased the maximum specific growth rate and the biomass yield at 30 degrees C as an exponential function of the fatty acid concentration and increased the duration of growth latency. These toxic effects increased with a decrease in pH in the range of 5.4 to 3.0, indicating that the undissociated form is the toxic molecule. Decanoic acid was more toxic than octanoic acid. The concentrations of octanoic and decanoic acids were determined during the ethanolic fermentation (30 degrees C) of two laboratory media (mineral and complex) by S. cerevisiae and of Jerusalem artichoke juice by K. marxianus. Based on the concentrations detected (0.7 to 23 mg/liter) and the kinetics of growth inhibition, the presence of octanoic and decanoic acids cannot be ignored in the evaluation of the overall inhibition of ethanolic fermentation. PMID:16347826

  17. Inhibition of Yeast Growth by Octanoic and Decanoic Acids Produced during Ethanolic Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Viegas, Cristina A.; Rosa, M. Fernanda; S-Correia, Isabel; Novais, Jlio M.

    1989-01-01

    The inhibition of growth by octanoic or decanoic acids, two subproducts of ethanolic fermentation, was evaluated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces marxianus in association with ethanol, the main product of fermentation. In both strains, octanoic and decanoic acids, at concentrations up to 16 and 8 mg/liter, respectively, decreased the maximum specific growth rate and the biomass yield at 30C as an exponential function of the fatty acid concentration and increased the duration of growth latency. These toxic effects increased with a decrease in pH in the range of 5.4 to 3.0, indicating that the undissociated form is the toxic molecule. Decanoic acid was more toxic than octanoic acid. The concentrations of octanoic and decanoic acids were determined during the ethanolic fermentation (30C) of two laboratory media (mineral and complex) by S. cerevisiae and of Jerusalem artichoke juice by K. marxianus. Based on the concentrations detected (0.7 to 23 mg/liter) and the kinetics of growth inhibition, the presence of octanoic and decanoic acids cannot be ignored in the evaluation of the overall inhibition of ethanolic fermentation. PMID:16347826

  18. Galacturonic Acid Inhibits the Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on Galactose, Xylose, and Arabinose

    PubMed Central

    Huisjes, Eline H.; de Hulster, Erik; van Dam, Jan C.; Pronk, Jack T.

    2012-01-01

    The efficient fermentation of mixed substrates is essential for the microbial conversion of second-generation feedstocks, including pectin-rich waste streams such as citrus peel and sugar beet pulp. Galacturonic acid is a major constituent of hydrolysates of these pectin-rich materials. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main producer of bioethanol, cannot use this sugar acid. The impact of galacturonic acid on alcoholic fermentation by S. cerevisiae was investigated with anaerobic batch cultures grown on mixtures of glucose and galactose at various galacturonic acid concentrations and on a mixture of glucose, xylose, and arabinose. In cultures grown at pH 5.0, which is well above the pKa value of galacturonic acid (3.51), the addition of 10 g liter?1 galacturonic acid did not affect galactose fermentation kinetics and growth. In cultures grown at pH 3.5, the addition of 10 g liter?1 galacturonic acid did not significantly affect glucose consumption. However, at this lower pH, galacturonic acid completely inhibited growth on galactose and reduced galactose consumption rates by 87%. Additionally, it was shown that galacturonic acid strongly inhibits the fermentation of xylose and arabinose by the engineered pentose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain IMS0010. The data indicate that inhibition occurs when nondissociated galacturonic acid is present extracellularly and corroborate the hypothesis that a combination of a decreased substrate uptake rate due to competitive inhibition on Gal2p, an increased energy requirement to maintain cellular homeostasis, and/or an accumulation of galacturonic acid 1-phosphate contributes to the inhibition. The role of galacturonic acid as an inhibitor of sugar fermentation should be considered in the design of yeast fermentation processes based on pectin-rich feedstocks. PMID:22582063

  19. Galacturonic acid inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on galactose, xylose, and arabinose.

    PubMed

    Huisjes, Eline H; de Hulster, Erik; van Dam, Jan C; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2012-08-01

    The efficient fermentation of mixed substrates is essential for the microbial conversion of second-generation feedstocks, including pectin-rich waste streams such as citrus peel and sugar beet pulp. Galacturonic acid is a major constituent of hydrolysates of these pectin-rich materials. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main producer of bioethanol, cannot use this sugar acid. The impact of galacturonic acid on alcoholic fermentation by S. cerevisiae was investigated with anaerobic batch cultures grown on mixtures of glucose and galactose at various galacturonic acid concentrations and on a mixture of glucose, xylose, and arabinose. In cultures grown at pH 5.0, which is well above the pK(a) value of galacturonic acid (3.51), the addition of 10 g liter(-1) galacturonic acid did not affect galactose fermentation kinetics and growth. In cultures grown at pH 3.5, the addition of 10 g liter(-1) galacturonic acid did not significantly affect glucose consumption. However, at this lower pH, galacturonic acid completely inhibited growth on galactose and reduced galactose consumption rates by 87%. Additionally, it was shown that galacturonic acid strongly inhibits the fermentation of xylose and arabinose by the engineered pentose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain IMS0010. The data indicate that inhibition occurs when nondissociated galacturonic acid is present extracellularly and corroborate the hypothesis that a combination of a decreased substrate uptake rate due to competitive inhibition on Gal2p, an increased energy requirement to maintain cellular homeostasis, and/or an accumulation of galacturonic acid 1-phosphate contributes to the inhibition. The role of galacturonic acid as an inhibitor of sugar fermentation should be considered in the design of yeast fermentation processes based on pectin-rich feedstocks. PMID:22582063

  20. Quantitative analysis of the modes of growth inhibition by weak organic acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Azmat; Orij, Rick; Brul, Stanley; Smits, Gertien J

    2012-12-01

    Weak organic acids are naturally occurring compounds that are commercially used as preservatives in the food and beverage industries. They extend the shelf life of food products by inhibiting microbial growth. There are a number of theories that explain the antifungal properties of these weak acids, but the exact mechanism is still unknown. We set out to quantitatively determine the contributions of various mechanisms of antifungal activity of these weak acids, as well as the mechanisms that yeast uses to counteract their effects. We analyzed the effects of four weak organic acids differing in lipophilicity (sorbic, benzoic, propionic, and acetic acids) on growth and intracellular pH (pH(i)) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although lipophilicity of the acids correlated with the rate of acidification of the cytosol, our data confirmed that not initial acidification, but rather the cell's ability to restore pH(i), was a determinant for growth inhibition. This pH(i) recovery in turn depended on the nature of the organic anion. We identified long-term acidification as the major cause of growth inhibition under acetic acid stress. Restoration of pH(i), and consequently growth rate, in the presence of this weak acid required the full activity of the plasma membrane ATPase Pma1p. Surprisingly, the proposed anion export pump Pdr12p was shown to play an important role in the ability of yeast cells to restore the pH(i) upon lipophilic (sorbic and benzoic) acid stress, probably through a charge interaction of anion and proton transport. PMID:23001666

  1. Quantitative Analysis of the Modes of Growth Inhibition by Weak Organic Acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Azmat; Orij, Rick; Brul, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    Weak organic acids are naturally occurring compounds that are commercially used as preservatives in the food and beverage industries. They extend the shelf life of food products by inhibiting microbial growth. There are a number of theories that explain the antifungal properties of these weak acids, but the exact mechanism is still unknown. We set out to quantitatively determine the contributions of various mechanisms of antifungal activity of these weak acids, as well as the mechanisms that yeast uses to counteract their effects. We analyzed the effects of four weak organic acids differing in lipophilicity (sorbic, benzoic, propionic, and acetic acids) on growth and intracellular pH (pHi) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although lipophilicity of the acids correlated with the rate of acidification of the cytosol, our data confirmed that not initial acidification, but rather the cell's ability to restore pHi, was a determinant for growth inhibition. This pHi recovery in turn depended on the nature of the organic anion. We identified long-term acidification as the major cause of growth inhibition under acetic acid stress. Restoration of pHi, and consequently growth rate, in the presence of this weak acid required the full activity of the plasma membrane ATPase Pma1p. Surprisingly, the proposed anion export pump Pdr12p was shown to play an important role in the ability of yeast cells to restore the pHi upon lipophilic (sorbic and benzoic) acid stress, probably through a charge interaction of anion and proton transport. PMID:23001666

  2. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibits growth of Caco-2 colon cancer cells: possible mediation by oleamide.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Kim EJ; Jun JG; Park HS; Kim SM; Ha YL; Park JH

    2002-07-01

    We have previously observed that dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibited colon tumorigenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in rats. The present study was performed to determine the mechanisms by which CLA inhibits colon cancer cell growth. CLA markedly inhibited Caco-2 cell growth, while linoleic acid (LA) slightly increased growth. Both CLA and LA increased the production of material reactive to antibodies against prostaglandin (PG)E2 and leukotriene (LT)B4, estimated by a competitive enzyme immunoassays (EIA), in a dose-dependent manner. However, the magnitude of the increase was markedly higher with CLA than that with LA, suggesting that this material was not PGE2 or LTB4. The active compound was isolated by thin-layer chromatography and the nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectra revealed that the structure was identical to that of oleamide. The purified oleamide inhibited cell growth and cross-reacted with the EIA. These results indicate that inhibition of Caco-2 cell growth by CLA may be due in part to increased oleamide production.

  3. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibits growth of Caco-2 colon cancer cells: possible mediation by oleamide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ji; Jun, Jong-Gab; Park, Hyun Suh; Kim, Si-Min; Ha, Yeong Lae; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2002-01-01

    We have previously observed that dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibited colon tumorigenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in rats. The present study was performed to determine the mechanisms by which CLA inhibits colon cancer cell growth. CLA markedly inhibited Caco-2 cell growth, while linoleic acid (LA) slightly increased growth. Both CLA and LA increased the production of material reactive to antibodies against prostaglandin (PG)E2 and leukotriene (LT)B4, estimated by a competitive enzyme immunoassays (EIA), in a dose-dependent manner. However, the magnitude of the increase was markedly higher with CLA than that with LA, suggesting that this material was not PGE2 or LTB4. The active compound was isolated by thin-layer chromatography and the nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectra revealed that the structure was identical to that of oleamide. The purified oleamide inhibited cell growth and cross-reacted with the EIA. These results indicate that inhibition of Caco-2 cell growth by CLA may be due in part to increased oleamide production. PMID:12174903

  4. Identification of self-growth-inhibiting compounds lauric acid and 7-(Z)-tetradecenoic acid from Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shinpei; Igarashi, Masayuki; Hayashi, Chigusa; Shitara, Tetsuo; Nomoto, Akio; Mizote, Tomoko; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori growth medium is usually supplemented with horse serum (HS) or FCS. However, cyclodextrin derivatives or activated charcoal can replace serum. In this study, we purified self-growth-inhibiting (SGI) compounds from H. pylori growth medium. The compounds were recovered from porous resin, Diaion HP-20, which was added to the H. pylori growth medium instead of known supplements. These SGI compounds were also identified from 2,6-di-O-methyl-?-cyclodextrin, which was supplemented in a pleuropneumonia-like organisms broth. The growth-inhibiting compounds were identified as lauric acid (LA) and 7-(Z)-tetradecenoic acid [7-(Z)-TDA]. Although several fatty acids had been identified in H. pylori, these specific compounds were not previously found in this species. However, we confirmed that these fatty acids were universally present in the cultivation medium of the H. pylori strains examined in this study. A live/dead assay carried out without HS indicated that these compounds were bacteriostatic; however, no significant growth-inhibiting effect was observed against other tested bacterial species that constituted the indigenous bacterial flora. These findings suggested that LA and 7-(Z)-TDA might play important roles in the survival of H. pylori in human stomach epithelial cells. PMID:25767109

  5. Peptide nucleic acids inhibit growth of Brucella suis in pure culture and in infected murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Parthiban; Alexander, Jeffry C; Seleem, Mohamed N; Jain, Neeta; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Wattam, Alice R; Setubal, Joo C; Boyle, Stephen M

    2013-04-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are single-stranded, synthetic nucleic acid analogues containing a pseudopeptide backbone in place of the phosphodiester sugar-phosphate. When PNAs are covalently linked to cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) they readily penetrate the bacterial cell envelope, inhibit expression of targeted genes and cause growth inhibition both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. However, the effectiveness of PNAs against Brucella, a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen, was unknown. The susceptibility of a virulent Brucella suis strain to a variety of PNAs was assessed in pure culture as well as in murine macrophages. The studies showed that some of the PNAs targeted to Brucella genes involved in DNA (polA, dnaG, gyrA), RNA (rpoB), cell envelope (asd), fatty acid (kdtA, acpP) and protein (tsf) synthesis inhibit the growth of B. suis in culture and in macrophages after 24 h of treatment. PNA treatment inhibited Brucella growth by interfering with gene expression in a sequence-specific and dose-dependent manner at micromolar concentrations. The most effective PNA in broth culture was that targeting polA at ca. 12 ?M. In contrast, in B. suis-infected macrophages, the most effective PNAs were those targeting asd and dnaG at 30 ?M; both of these PNAs had little inhibitory effect on Brucella in broth culture. The polA PNA that inhibits wild-type B. suis also inhibits the growth of wild-type Brucella melitensis 16M and Brucella abortus 2308 in culture. This study reveals the potential usefulness of antisense PNA constructs as novel therapeutic agents against intracellular Brucella. PMID:23305655

  6. Peptide nucleic acids inhibit growth of Brucella suis in pure culture and in infected murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Parthiban; Alexander, Jeffry C.; Seleem, Mohamed N.; Jain, Neeta; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Wattam, Alice R.; Setubal, Joo C.; Boyle, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are single-stranded, synthetic nucleic acid analogues containing a pseudopeptide backbone in place of the phosphodiester sugarphosphate. When PNAs are covalently linked to cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) they readily penetrate the bacterial cell envelope, inhibit expression of targeted genes and cause growth inhibition both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. However, the effectiveness of PNAs against Brucella, a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen, was unknown. The susceptibility of a virulent Brucella suis strain to a variety of PNAs was assessed in pure culture as well as in murine macrophages. The studies showed that some of the PNAs targeted to Brucella genes involved in DNA (polA, dnaG, gyrA), RNA (rpoB), cell envelope (asd), fatty acid (kdtA, acpP) and protein (tsf) synthesis inhibit the growth of B. suis in culture and in macrophages after 24 h of treatment. PNA treatment inhibited Brucella growth by interfering with gene expression in a sequence-specific and dose-dependent manner at micromolar concentrations. The most effective PNA in broth culture was that targeting polA at ca. 12 ?M. In contrast, in B. suis-infected macrophages, the most effective PNAs were those targeting asd and dnaG at 30 ?M; both of these PNAs had little inhibitory effect on Brucella in broth culture. The polA PNA that inhibits wild-type B. suis also inhibits the growth of wild-type Brucella melitensis 16M and Brucella abortus 2308 in culture. This study reveals the potential usefulness of antisense PNA constructs as novel therapeutic agents against intracellular Brucella. PMID:23305655

  7. Plant growth inhibition by cis-cinnamoyl glucosides and cis-cinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Hiradate, Syuntaro; Morita, Sayaka; Furubayashi, Akihiro; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Harada, Jiro

    2005-03-01

    Spiraea thunbergii Sieb. contains 1-O-cis-cinnamoyl-beta-D-glucopyranose (CG) and 6-O-(4'-hydroxy-2'-methylene-butyroyl)-1-O-cis-cinnamoyl-beta-D-glucopyranose (BCG) as major plant growth inhibiting constituents. In the present study, we determined the inhibitory activity of CG and BCG on root elongation of germinated seedlings of lettuce (Lactuca sativa), pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus), red clover (Trifolium pratense), timothy (Phleum pratense), and bok choy (Brassica rapa var chinensis) in comparison with that of two well-known growth inhibitors, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and (+)-2-cis-4-trans-abscisic acid (cis-ABA), as well as two related chemicals of CG and BCG, cis-cinnamic acid (cis-CA) and trans-cinnamic acid (trans-CA). The EC50 values for CG and BCG on lettuce were roughly one-half to one-quarter of the value for cis-ABA. cis-Cinnamic acid, which is a component of CG and BCG, possessed almost the same inhibitory activity of CG and BCG, suggesting that the essential chemical structure responsible for the inhibitory activity of CG and BCG is cis-CA. The cis-stereochemistry of the methylene moiety is apparently needed for high inhibitory activity, as trans-CA had an EC50 value roughly 100 times that of CG, BCG, and cis-CA. Growth inhibition by CG, BCG, and cis-CA was influenced by the nature of the soil in the growing medium: alluvial soil preserved the bioactivity, whereas volcanic ash and calcareous soils inhibited bioactivity. These findings indicate a potential role of cis-CA and its glucosides as allelochemicals for use as plant growth regulators in agricultural fields. PMID:15898503

  8. Selective growth inhibition of human malignant melanoma cells by syringic acid-derived proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been shown that proteasome inhibition leads to growth arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and/or induction of apoptosis. However, it was found that some of these inhibitors do not induce apoptosis in several human normal cell lines. This selective activity makes proteasome inhibition a promising target for new generation of anticancer drugs. Clinical validation of the proteasome, as a therapeutic target in oncology, has been provided by the dipeptide boronic acid derivative; bortezomib. Bortezomib has proven to be effective as a single agent in multiple myeloma and some forms of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Syringic acid (4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzoic acid, 1), a known phenolic acid, was isolated from the methanol extract of Tamarix aucheriana and was shown to possess proteasome inhibitory activity. Methods Using Surflex-Dock program interfaced with SYBYL, the docking affinities of syringic acid and its proposed derivatives to 20S proteasome were studied. Several derivatives were virtually proposed, however, five derivatives: benzyl 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzoate (2), benzyl 4-(benzyloxy)-3,5-dimethoxybenzoate (3), 3'-methoxybenzyl 3,5-dimethoxy-4-(3'-methoxybenzyloxy)benzoate (4), 3'-methoxybenzyl 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzoate (5) and 3',5'-dimethoxybenzyl 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzoate (6), were selected based on high docking scores, synthesized, and tested for their anti-mitogenic activity against human colorectal, breast and malignant melanoma cells as well as normal human fibroblast cells. Results Derivatives 2, 5, and 6 showed selective dose-dependent anti-mitogenic effect against human malignant melanoma cell lines HTB66 and HTB68 with minimal cytotoxicity on colorectal and breast cancer cells as well as normal human fibroblast cells. Derivatives 2, 5 and 6 significantly (p ≤ 0.0001) inhibited the various proteasomal chymotrypsin, PGPH, and trypsin like activities. They growth arrested the growth of HTB66 cells at G1 and G2-phases. They also arrested the growth of HTB68 cells at S- and G2-phase, respectively. Moreover, derivatives 2, 5, and 6 markedly induced apoptosis (≥ 90%) in both HTB66 and HTB68. Conclusions Computer-derived syringic acid derivatives possess selective anti-mitogenic activity on human malignant melanoma cells that may be attributed to perturbation of cell cycle, induction of apoptosis and inhibition of various 26S proteasomal activities. PMID:23958424

  9. Growth inhibitive effect of betulinic acid combined with tripterine on MSB-1 cells and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    An, N; Li, H Y; Zhang, X M

    2015-12-01

    Marek's disease (MD), a highly infectious lymphoproliferative disease in chickens, is caused by a cell-associated oncogenic herpesvirus, Marek's disease virus (MDV). MSB-1 is a MD-derived lymphoblastoid cell line and can induce tumors when inoculated into susceptible chickens. Betulinic acid, which is present as one of the major effective components in many traditional Chinese medicines, has recently been reported to inhibit growth of cancer cells and employed as a potential anticancer agent. Tripterine, a major active compound extracted from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, has now also shown anti-tumor activities in various cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the synergistic growth-inhibitive effect of betulinic acid combined with tripterine on MSB-1 cells and its mechanism. Viability of MSB-1 cells was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-y1)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. Cell apoptotic analysis was performed by fluorescence detection. NF-κB transcription activity was detected by measuring luciferase activity. Western blotting was used to analyze the expression of p65, IκB and Meq. Our results showed that the proliferation in the combination group was significantly decreased as compared with that of monotherapy using betulinic acid or tripterine, accompanied by an induction of apoptosis, inhibition of NF-κB transcriptional activity and its targeting oncogenic gene Meq. The results suggest that the combination of betulinic acid and tripterine at lower concentration may produce a synergistic inhibitive effect on MSB-1 cells that warrants further investigation for its potential clinical applications. PMID:26467010

  10. Endophytic bacteria improve seedling growth of sunflower under water stress, produce salicylic acid, and inhibit growth of pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Forchetti, Gabriela; Masciarelli, Oscar; Izaguirre, Mara J; Alemano, Sergio; Alvarez, Daniel; Abdala, Guillermina

    2010-12-01

    Endophytic bacterial strains SF2 (99.9% homology with Achromobacter xylosoxidans), and SF3 and SF4 (99.9% homology with Bacillus pumilus) isolated from sunflower grown under irrigation or drought were selected on the basis of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) characteristics. Aims of the study were to examine effects of inoculation with SF2, SF3, and SF4 on sunflower cultivated under water stress, to evaluate salicylic acid (SA) production by these strains in control medium or at ?a = -2.03 MPa, and to analyze effects of exogenously applied SA, jasmonic acid (JA), bacterial pellets, and bacterial supernatants on growth of pathogenic fungi Alternaria sp., Sclerotinia sp., and Verticillum sp. Growth response to bacterial inoculation was studied in two inbred lines (water stress-sensitive B59 and water stress-tolerant B71) and commercial hybrid Paraiso 24. Under both water stress and normal conditions, plant growth following inoculation was more strongly enhanced for Paraiso 24 and B71 than for B59. All three strains produced SA in control medium; levels for SF3 and SF4 were higher than for SF2. SA production was dramatically higher at ?a = -2.03 MPa. Exogenously applied SA or JA caused a significant reduction of growth for Sclerotinia and a lesser reduction for Alternaria and Verticillum. Fungal growth was more strongly inhibited by bacterial pellets than by bacterial supernatants. Our findings indicate that these endophytic bacteria enhance growth of sunflower seedlings under water stress, produce SA, and inhibit growth of pathogenic fungi. These characteristics are useful for formulation of inoculants to improve growth and yield of sunflower crops. PMID:20383767

  11. Inhibition of Gallic Acid on the Growth and Biofilm Formation of Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dongyan; Li, Jing; Li, Ji; Tang, Ruihua; Liu, Liu; Shi, Junling; Huang, Qingsheng; Yang, Hui

    2015-06-01

    New strategies for biofilm inhibition are becoming highly necessary because of the concerns to synthetic additives. As gallic acid (GA) is a hydrolysated natural product of tannin in Chinese gall, this research studied the effects of GA on the growth and biofilm formation of bacteria (Escherichia coli [Gram-negative] and Streptococcus mutans [Gram-positive]) under different conditions, such as nutrient levels, temperatures (25 and 37C) and incubation times (24 and 48h). The minimum antimicrobial concentration of GA against the two pathogenic organisms was determined as 8mg/mL. GA significantly affected the growth curves of both test strains at 25 and 37C. The nutrient level, temperature, and treatment time influenced the inhibition activity of GA on both growth and biofim formation of tested pathogens. The inhibition effect of GA on biofilm could be due to other factors in addition to the antibacterial effect. Overall, GA was most effective against cultures incubated at 37C for 24h and at 25C for 48h in various concentrations of nutrients and in vegetable wash waters, which indicated the potential of GA as emergent sources of biofilm control products. PMID:25974286

  12. Oleanolic acid modulates multiple intracellular targets to inhibit colorectal cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Wei, Lihui; Shen, Aling; Chu, Jianfeng; Lin, Jiumao; Peng, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Due to drug resistance and unacceptable cytotoxicity of most currently-used cancer chemotherapies, naturally occurring products have gained attention in the field of anticancer treatment. Oleanolic acid (OA) is a natural pentacyclic triterpenoic acid and a principal active compound in many medicinal herbs that have long been used to clinically treat various types of human malignancies. Using a colorectal cancer (CRC) mouse xenograft model and the cell line HT-29, we evaluated the effect of OA on tumor growth in vivo and in vitro, and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms in the present study. We found that OA significantly inhibited tumor growth in volume and weight in CRC xenograft mice. In addition, OA treatment led to the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell proliferation. OA significantly reduced the expression of Bcl-2, Cyclin D1 and CKD4, whereas Bax and p21 expression was profoundly increased after OA treatment. Furthermore, OA significantly suppressed the activation of Akt, p70S6K and MAPK signalings, but promoted p53 pathway activation. Collectively, findings from this study suggest that OA possesses a broad range of anticancer effects via modulation of multiple intracellular targets. PMID:26459864

  13. Metalloporphyrin synergizes with ascorbic acid to inhibit cancer cell growth through fenton chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tian, Junqiang; Peehl, Donna M; Knox, Susan J

    2010-08-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) has been reported to inhibit tumor cell growth through the generation of extracellular hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). However, the clinical utility of AA has been limited by relatively low potency and in vivo efficacy. This study reports that the metalloporphyrin, Mn(III) tetrakis(N-methylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin(5+) (MnTMPyP), has a potent synergistic cytotoxic effect when combined with AA in a variety of cancer cell lines. In the presence of MnTMPyP, the concentration of AA required to inhibit cancer cell growth was markedly reduced. In vitro (cell-free) experiments demonstrated that AA alone enhanced the Fenton reaction that produces cytotoxic hydroxyl radical (HO(*)); however, this reaction was limited by the low rate by which AA generates H(2)O(2) (Fenton reaction substrate) from O(2). MnTMPyP catalyzed H(2)O(2) generation through the AA-facilitated Mn(II <--> III)TMPyP redox cycle and thereby markedly potentiated the Fenton reaction. Accordingly, MnTMPyP and AA resulted in increased cellular levels of H(2)O(2) and HO(*) in cancer cells, which mediate the synergistic cytotoxicity of this combined treatment. This effect was inhibited by cellular enzymes that metabolize H(2)O(2), such as catalase and glutathione peroxidase, suggesting that selective killing of cancer cells deficient in such enzymes can be achieved in vivo. PMID:20735206

  14. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid inhibits transforming growth factor beta type 1 receptor activity and downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Fusheng; Pham, Johnny D; Anderson, Marc O; Youngren, Jack F

    2009-08-15

    It has been well documented that nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a phenolic lignan isolated from the creosote bush, Larrea tridentate, has anti-cancer activity in vitro and in vivo. Several mechanisms have been identified that could contribute to these actions, as NDGA directly inhibits metabolic enzymes and receptor tyrosine kinases that are established anti-cancer targets. In the present study, we show that NDGA inhibits the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) type I receptor, a serine threonine kinase receptor. In cultured cells, NDGA treatment repressed Smad2 phosphorylation induced by TGF-beta treatment and by a constitutively active mutant of TGF-beta type I receptor (T202D). NDGA also inhibited downstream transcriptional activation mediated by both TGF-beta treatment and the constitutively active mutant receptor. In vitro, NDGA inhibited TGF-beta type I receptor mediated Smad2 phosphorylation in crude cell lysates and in a purified preparation. Importantly, screening select analogs demonstrated that modification of NDGA's structure resulted in altered potency against the receptor. These results indicated that the structure of NDGA can be modified to achieve increased potency. Together our data provide a novel mechanism for NDGA activity which could help explain its anti-cancer activity, and suggest that NDGA could serve as a structural motif for developing serine/threonine kinase inhibitors with selectivity for TGF-beta type I receptor. PMID:19540220

  15. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid inhibits transforming growth factor β type 1 receptor activity and downstream signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fusheng; Anderson, Marc O.; Youngren, Jack F.

    2009-01-01

    It has been well documented that nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a phenolic lignan isolated from the creosote bush, Larrea tridentate, has anti-cancer activity in vitro and in vivo. Several mechanisms have been identified that could contribute to these actions, as NDGA directly inhibits metabolic enzymes and receptor tyrosine kinases that are established anti-cancer targets. In the present study, we show that NDGA inhibits the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) type I receptor, a serine threonine kinase receptor. In cultured cells, NDGA treatment repressed Smad2 phosphorylation induced by TGF-β treatment and by a constitutively active mutant of TGF-β type I receptor (T202D). NDGA also inhibited downstream transcriptional activation mediated by both TGF-β treatment and the constitutively active mutant receptor. In vitro, NDGA inhibited TGF-β type I receptor mediated Smad2 phosphorylation in crude cell lysates and in a purified preparation. Importantly, screening select analogs demonstrated that modification of NDGA’s structure resulted in altered potency against the receptor. These results indicated that the structure of NDGA can be modified to achieve increased potency. Together our data provide a novel mechanism for NDGA activity which could help explain its anti-cancer activity, and suggest that NDGA could serve as a structural motif for developing serine/threonine kinase inhibitors with selectivity for TGF-β type I receptor. PMID:19540220

  16. Capric acid secreted by S. boulardii inhibits C. albicans filamentous growth, adhesion and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Murzyn, Anna; Krasowska, Anna; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Dziadkowiec, Dorota; ?ukaszewicz, Marcin

    2010-01-01

    Candidiasis are life-threatening systemic fungal diseases, especially of gastro intestinal track, skin and mucous membranes lining various body cavities like the nostrils, the mouth, the lips, the eyelids, the ears or the genital area. Due to increasing resistance of candidiasis to existing drugs, it is very important to look for new strategies helping the treatment of such fungal diseases. One promising strategy is the use of the probiotic microorganisms, which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit. Such a probiotic microorganism is yeast Saccharomyces boulardii, a close relative of baker yeast. Saccharomyces boulardii cells and their extract affect the virulence factors of the important human fungal pathogen C. albicans, its hyphae formation, adhesion and biofilm development. Extract prepared from S. boulardii culture filtrate was fractionated and GC-MS analysis showed that the active fraction contained, apart from 2-phenylethanol, caproic, caprylic and capric acid whose presence was confirmed by ESI-MS analysis. Biological activity was tested on C. albicans using extract and pure identified compounds. Our study demonstrated that this probiotic yeast secretes into the medium active compounds reducing candidal virulence factors. The chief compound inhibiting filamentous C. albicans growth comparably to S. boulardii extract was capric acid, which is thus responsible for inhibition of hyphae formation. It also reduced candidal adhesion and biofilm formation, though three times less than the extract, which thus contains other factors suppressing C. albicans adherence. The expression profile of selected genes associated with C. albicans virulence by real-time PCR showed a reduced expression of HWP1, INO1 and CSH1 genes in C. albicans cells treated with capric acid and S. boulardii extract. Hence capric acid secreted by S. boulardii is responsible for inhibition of C. albicans filamentation and partially also adhesion and biofilm formation. PMID:20706577

  17. Inhibition of tumor growth by a newly-identified activator for epidermal fatty acid binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Enyu; Singh, Puja; Zhai, Xiuhong; Li, Yan; Zhu, Ganqian; Zhang, Yuwen; Hao, Jiaqing; Chi, Young-In; Brown, Rhoderick E.; Cleary, Margot P.; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that expression of epidermal fatty acid binding protein (E-FABP) in tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) promotes macrophage anti-tumor activity by enhancing IFN? responses in tumor models. Thus, E-FABP represents a new protective factor in enhancing tumor immune surveillance against tumor development. Herein, we report the compound 5-(benzylamino)-2-(3-methylphenyl)-1,3-oxazole-4-carbonitrile (designated EI-05) as a novel E-FABP activator for inhibition of mammary tumor growth. EI-05 was selected from the ZINC compound library using molecular docking analysis based on the crystal structure of E-FABP. Although EI-05 is unable to bind E-FABP directly, it significantly increases E-FABP expression in macrophages during inflammation. Stimulation of macrophages with EI-05 remarkably enhances lipid droplet formation and IFN? production, which further promotes the anti-tumor activity of macrophages. Importantly, administering EI-05 in vivo significantly inhibits mammary tumor growth in a syngeneic mouse model. Altogether, these results suggest that EI-05 may represent a promising drug candidate for anti-tumor treatment through enhancing E-FABP activity and IFN? responses in macrophages. PMID:25796556

  18. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada, USA, The Suwannee River, Georgia, USA and by polycarboxylic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Leenheer, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Calcite crystallization rates are characterized using a constant solution composition at 25°C, pH=8.5, and calcite supersaturation (Ω) of 4.5 in the absence and presence of fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada (BSLFA), and a fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia (SRFA). Rates are also measured in the presence and absence of low-molar mass, aliphatic-alicyclic polycarboxylic acids (PCA). BSLFA inhibits calcite crystal-growth rates with increasing BSLFA concentration, suggesting that BSLFA adsorbs at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. Calcite growth morphology in the presence of BSLFA differed from growth in its absence, supporting an adsorption mechanism of calcite-growth inhibition by BSLFA. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by BSLFA is consistent with a model indicating that polycarboxylic acid molecules present in BSLFA adsorb at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. In contrast to published results for an unfractionated SRFA, there is dramatic calcite growth inhibition (at a concentration of 1 mg/L) by a SRFA fraction eluted by pH 5 solution from XAD-8 resin, indicating that calcite growth-rate inhibition is related to specific SRFA component fractions. A cyclic PCA, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-cyclohexane hexacarboxylic acid (CHXHCA) is a strong calcite growth-rate inhibitor at concentrations less than 0.1 mg/L. Two other cyclic PCAs, 1, 1 cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (CPDCA) and 1, 1 cyclobutanedicarboxylic acid (CBDCA) with the carboxylic acid groups attached to the same ring carbon atom, have no effect on calcite growth rates up to concentrations of 10 mg/L. Organic matter ad-sorbed from the air onto the seed crystals has no effect on the measured calcite crystal-growth rates.

  19. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Mandi M; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E

    2016-01-01

    Many key actions of ?-3 (n-3) fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120). n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor. PMID:26821052

  20. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Mandi M.; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Many key actions of ?-3 (n-3) fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120). n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor. PMID:26821052

  1. Growth inhibition of Aeromonas salmonicida and Yersinia ruckeri by disinfectants containing peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Meinelt, Thomas; Phan, Thy-My; Behrens, Sascha; Wienke, Andreas; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming; Liu, Dibo; Straus, David L

    2015-04-01

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a therapeutic agent used for disinfection in aquaculture, but it must be investigated thoroughly in order to mitigate diseases without harming the fish. Successful disinfectants (like PAA) should not leave dangerous residues in the environment in order to successfully contribute to sustainable aquaculture. The aim of our study was to compare the effectiveness of 6 commercial PAA products with different molecular PAA:H2O2 ratios to reduce bacterial growth of Aeromonas salmonicida and Yersinia ruckeri and to determine effective concentrations and exposure times. All products reduced colony-forming units (CFUs) of A. salmonicida and Y. ruckeri. Products with higher molecular PAA:H2O2 ratios inhibited growth better than products with lower molecular PAA:H2O2 ratios at the same PAA concentration; this indicates that H2O2 is not the driving force in the reduction of A. salmonicida and Y. ruckeri growth by PAA in vitro. The practical application of the products with high molecular PAA:H2O2 ratios should be prioritized if these pathogens are diagnosed. PMID:25850398

  2. Use of jasmonic acid and salicylic acid to inhibit growth of sugarbeet storage rot pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) are endogenous plant hormones that induce native plant defense responses and provide protection against a wide range of diseases. Previously, JA, applied after harvest, was shown to protect sugarbeet roots against the storage pathogens, Botrytis cinerea, P...

  3. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10−4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10−4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  4. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) and ?-mangostin inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Guzmn-Beltrn, Silvia; Rubio-Badillo, Miguel ngel; Jurez, Esmeralda; Hernndez-Snchez, Fernando; Torres, Martha

    2016-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains as a global health problem. The prevalence of this infection is related to the association with other diseases, such as HIV, neglect treatment and misuse of antibiotics. Hence, the identification of new drugs is required to eradicate TB. Possible alternatives to existing antibiotics include pure compounds extracted from medicinal plants, which are an important source of antimicrobial agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) and ?-mangostin on Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth and bacterial survival in infected macrophages derived from the human THP-1 cell line and monocytes. Our results show that both compounds directly inhibit M. tuberculosis growth in liquid medium with Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) of 250 and 62?g/mL respectively, likely through preventing bacterial replication. In addition, NDGA and ?-mangostin were able to induce autophagy in human cells at lower concentrations (7 and 6?g/mL, respectively) and contributed to the elimination of intracellular bacteria. NDGA and ?-mangostin could be candidates for coadjuvant therapy in cases of drug-resistant TB, and their ability to enhance the immune response by promoting autophagy might contribute to TB treatment. PMID:26735610

  5. Valproic acid inhibits the growth of cervical cancer both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sami, Siraj; Hti, Naseruddin; Xu, Han-Mei; Shen, Zilong; Huang, Xiaofeng

    2008-09-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), a well-known anti-convulsant, is currently under extensive evaluation as an anti-cancer agent. It is known to exert its anti-cancer effect mainly by inhibiting the enzyme histone deacetylase I. In our study, we investigated the effects of VPA on cervical cancer both in vitro and in vivo cancer models. We examined the effects of acute VPA (0, 1.2, 2.4, 5.0 mM) treatment on cell proliferation in cervical cancer cell lines HeLa, SiHa and Ca Ski and histone acetylation, p21 and p53 gene expression in HeLa cell line. We also investigated the effect of chronic VPA administration in tumour xenograft growth studies. Our results show that with acute treatment, VPA can increase the expression of net histone H3 acetylation and up-regulate p21 expression with no effect on p53 expression. Chronic administration of VPA had a net cytostatic effect that resulted in a statistically significant reduction of tumour growth and improved survival advantages in tumour xenografts studies. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that VPA has a direct anti-angiogenic effect in tumour studies and could potentially be a promising candidate for further cervical cancer trails. PMID:18515856

  6. Milk fat conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibits growth of human mammary MCF-7 cancer cells.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, M; Devery, R; Lawless, F; Murphy, J; Stanton, C

    The relationship between growth and the antioxidant enzyme defence system in human MCF-7 (breast) cancer cells treated with bovine milk fat enriched with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) was studied. Milk enriched in CLA was obtained from cows on pasture supplemented with full fat rapeseeds and full fat soyabeans (1). Cell number decreased up to 90% (p < 0.05) and lipid peroxidation increased 15-fold (p < 0.05) following incubation of MCF-7 cells for 8 days with increasing levels of milk fat yielding CLA concentrations between 16.9 and 22.6 ppm. Growth suppression and prooxidant effects of milk fat CLA were independent of the variable composition of the milk fat samples, suggesting that CLA was the active ingredient in milk fat responsible for the cytotoxic effect. Mixtures containing isomers of CLA (c9, t11-, t10, c12-, c11, t13- and minor amounts of other isomers) and linoleic acid (LA) at similar concentrations to the milk fat samples were as effective at inhibiting growth and stimulating peroxidation of MCF-7 cells as the milk fatty acids. Incubation of the cells with the c9, t11 CLA isomer (20 ppm) or the mixture of CLA isomers (20 ppm) for 8 days resulted in a 60% decrease (p < 0.05) in viability compared with untreated controls and was significantly (p < 0.05) more effective than incubation with the t10, c12 CLA isomer (20 ppm), which caused only a 15% decrease in cell numbers under similar conditions. A 25% increase (p < 0.05) in cell proliferation occurred when LA (20 ppm) alone was incubated with MCF-7 cells for 8 days. 14C-CLA was preferentially incorporated into the phospholipid fraction of the MCF-7 cell lipids in a dose-dependent manner and CLA accumulated in cell membranes more efficiently when the cells were incubated in the presence of milk fat than the c9, t11 synthetic CLA isomer. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were induced in MCF-7 cells exposed to milk fat (containing 16.9-22.6 ppm CLA) over 8 days. The data indicate that milk fat triglyceride-bound CLA, consisting primarily of the c9, t11 isomer, was cytotoxic towards MCF-7 cells. PMID:11131667

  7. Plant Lectin Can Target Receptors Containing Sialic Acid, Exemplified by Podoplanin, to Inhibit Transformed Cell Growth and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yongquan; Acharya, Nimish K.; Han, Min; McNulty, Dean E.; Hasegawa, Hitoki; Hyodo, Toshinori; Senga, Takeshi; Geng, Jian-Guo; Kosciuk, Mary; Shin, Seung S.; Goydos, James S.; Temiakov, Dmitry; Nagele, Robert G.; Goldberg, Gary S.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death of men and women worldwide. Tumor cell motility contributes to metastatic invasion that causes the vast majority of cancer deaths. Extracellular receptors modified by ?2,3-sialic acids that promote this motility can serve as ideal chemotherapeutic targets. For example, the extracellular domain of the mucin receptor podoplanin (PDPN) is highly O-glycosylated with ?2,3-sialic acid linked to galactose. PDPN is activated by endogenous ligands to induce tumor cell motility and metastasis. Dietary lectins that target proteins containing ?2,3-sialic acid inhibit tumor cell growth. However, anti-cancer lectins that have been examined thus far target receptors that have not been identified. We report here that a lectin from the seeds of Maackia amurensis (MASL) with affinity for O-linked carbohydrate chains containing sialic acid targets PDPN to inhibit transformed cell growth and motility at nanomolar concentrations. Interestingly, the biological activity of this lectin survives gastrointestinal proteolysis and enters the cardiovascular system to inhibit melanoma cell growth, migration, and tumorigenesis. These studies demonstrate how lectins may be used to help develop dietary agents that target specific receptors to combat malignant cell growth. PMID:22844530

  8. Triterpene acids from apple peel inhibit lepidopteran larval midgut lipases and larval growth.

    PubMed

    Christeller, John T; McGhie, Tony K; Poulton, Joanne; Markwick, Ngaire P

    2014-07-01

    Fruit extracts from apple, kiwifruit, feijoa, boysenberry, and blueberry were screened for the presence of lipase inhibitory compounds against lepidopteran larval midgut crude extracts. From 120 extracts, six showed significant inhibition with an extract from the peel of Malus domestica cv. "Big Red" showing highest levels of inhibition. Because this sample was the only apple peel sample in the initial screen, a survey of peels from seven apple cultivars was undertaken and showed that, despite considerable variation, all had inhibitory activity. Successive solvent fractionation and LC-MS of cv. "Big Red" apple peel extract identified triterpene acids as the most important inhibitory compounds, of which ursolic acid and oleanolic acid were the major components and oxo- and hydroxyl-triterpene acids were minor components. When ursolic acid was incorporated into artificial diet and fed to Epiphyas postvittana Walker (Tortricidae: Lepidoptera) larvae at 0.16% w/v, a significant decrease in larval weight was observed after 21 days. This concentration of ursolic acid is less than half the concentration reported in the skin of some apple cultivars. PMID:24753088

  9. Growth inhibition of lactic acid bacteria in ham by nisin: a model approach.

    PubMed

    Kalschne, Daneysa L; Geitenes, Simone; Veit, Marilei R; Sarmento, Cleonice M P; Colla, Eliane

    2014-12-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been described as spoilage organisms in vacuum-packed cooked ham. A Fractional Factorial Design was performed to investigate the relative merits of sodium chloride, sodium lactate, sodium tripolyphosphate, sodium erythorbate, nisin and pediocin, in limiting the Lactobacillus sakei growth in broth culture. This allowed rejection of sodium chloride, sodium lactate and sodium erythorbate (no significant effects on growth), and a Central Composite Rotatable Design broth culture study was performed comparing the effects of nisin and pediocin. From this study, nisin was identified as a more important variable for inclusion into a cooked ham model (significant effects on growth parameters: logarithmic increase in the population, exponential microbial growth rate and lag phase extension). The validation of this outcome in a model formulation of vacuum-packed sliced cooked ham (0.001%, 0.007% and 0.013% of nisin) stored for 60days, confirmed the inhibitory effect of nisin on total LAB growth. PMID:25108514

  10. Gambogic acid induces apoptosis and inhibits colorectal tumor growth via mitochondrial pathways

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guang-Ming; Sun, Yu; Ge, Xin; Wan, Xin; Li, Chun-Bo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of gambogic acid (GA) on apoptosis in the HT-29 human colon cancer cell line. METHODS: H-29 cells were used for in vitro experiments in this study. Relative cell viability was assessed using MTT assays. Cell apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling and Hoechst 33342 staining, and quantified by flow cytometry. Cellular ultrastructure was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to evaluate gene and protein expression levels. For in vivo experiments, BALB/c nude mice received subcutaneous injections of HT-29 cells in the right armpit. When well-established xenografts were palpable with a tumor size of 75 mm3, mice were randomly assigned to a vehicle (negative) control, positive control or GA treatment group (n = 6 each). The animals in the treatment group received one of three dosages of GA (in saline; 5, 10 or 20 mg/kg) via the caudal vein twice weekly, whereas animals in the negative and positive control groups were given equal volumes of 0.9% saline or 10 mg/kg docetaxel, respectively, via the caudal vein once weekly. RESULTS: The cell viability assay showed that GA inhibited proliferation of HT-29 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner after treatment with GA (0.00, 0.31, 0.62, 1.25, 2.50, 5.00 or 10.00 μmol/L) for 24, 48 or 72 h. After 48 h, the percentage of apoptotic cells in cells treated with 0.00, 1.25, 2.50 and 5.00 μmol/L GA was 1.4% ± 0.3%, 9.8% ± 1.2%, 25.7% ± 3.3% and 49.3% ± 5.8%, respectively. Ultrastructural analysis of HT-29 cells treated for 48 h with 2.5μmol/L GA revealed apoptotic bodies and condensed and fragmented nuclei. Levels of caspase-8, -9 and -3 mRNAs were significantly increased after treatment with GA (1.25, 2.50 or 5.00 μmol/L) for 48 h (P < 0.05 for all). Protein levels of apoptosis-related factors Fas, FasL, FADD, cytochrome c, and Apaf-1 were increased in GA-treated cells, whereas levels of pro-caspase-8, -9 and -3 were significantly decreased (P < 0.05 for all). Furthermore, GA significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the growth of HT-29 tumors in a mouse xenograft model (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: GA inhibits HT-29 proliferation via induction of apoptosis. The anti-cancer effects are likely mediated by death receptor (extrinsic) and mitochondrial (intrinsic) pathways. PMID:26034354

  11. Metabolic effects of free fatty acids during endotoxaemia in a porcine model--free fatty acid inhibition of growth hormone secretion as a potential catabolic feedback mechanism.

    PubMed

    Buhl, M; Gjedsted, J; Granfeldt, A; Larsen, P ; Schmitz, O; Tnnesen, E; Mller, N

    2010-05-01

    Critical illness and severe inflammation are catabolic states characterised by breakdown of tissue and protein stores, by increased levels of free fatty acids, and by insulin resistance. These metabolic features contribute to morbidity and mortality. Growth hormone and insulin are the two major anabolic hormones. The present study was designed to test whether increased levels of free fatty acids (i) inhibit growth hormone secretion and (ii) induce insulin resistance during acute endotoxin exposure in a porcine model of critical illness. We studied 20 pigs for 6 h during combined anaesthesia and endotoxin infusion and a hyperinsulinaemic glucose clamp to control glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid concentrations. Pigs were randomised to two different continuous infusion rates of Intralipid resulting in different, sustained, and elevated free fatty acid concentrations (1.63 mmol l(-1) vs. 0.58 mmol l(-1), p=0.0002). Concomitantly, we observed reduced growth hormone concentrations in the group with high free fatty acid concentrations (3.5 ng ml(-1) vs. 6.6 ng ml(-1), p<0.003). No difference in insulin sensitivity, measured as the glucose infusion rate necessary to maintain euglycaemia, was observed. We conclude that high levels of free fatty acids reduce circulating growth hormone concentrations in porcine endotoxaemia; this probably constitutes a negative feedback mechanism whereby growth hormone induced-stimulation of free fatty acids release inhibit growth hormone secretion. This mechanism may further contribute to protein loss in critical illness. We found no evidence that the increment of plasma free fatty acids between groups contribute to insulin resistance in critical illness. PMID:20195947

  12. Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) inhibits expression of the Spot 14 (THRSP) and fatty acid synthase genes and impairs the growth of human breast cancer and liposarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Christina; Olsen, Arne M.; Lewis, Lionel D.; Eisenberg, Burton L.; Eastman, Alan; Kinlaw, William B.

    2010-01-01

    Spot 14 (THRSP, S14) is a nuclear protein involved in the regulation of genes required for fatty acid synthesis in normal and malignant mammary epithelial and adipose cells. Havartine and Bauman reported that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibits S14 gene expression in bovine mammary and mouse adipose tissues, and reduces milk fat production in cows. We hypothesized that CLA inhibits S14 gene expression in human breast cancer and liposarcoma cells, and that this will retard their growth. Exposure of T47D breast cancer cells to a mixture of CLA isomers reduced the expression of the S14 and fatty acid synthase (FAS) genes. The mixture caused a dose-related inhibition of T47D cell growth, as did pure c9, t11- and t10, c12-CLA, but not linoleic acid. Similar effects were observed in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Provision of 8 μM palmitate fully (CLA mix, t10, c12-CLA) or partially (c9, t11-CLA) reversed the antiproliferative effect in T47D cells. CLA likewise suppressed levels of S14 and FAS mRNAs in liposarcoma cells, and caused growth inhibition that was prevented by palmitic acid. CLA did not affect the growth of nonlipogenic HeLa cells or human fibroblasts. We conclude that, as in bovine mammary and mouse adipose cells, CLA suppresses S14 and FAS gene expression in human breast cancer and liposarcoma cells. Rescue from the antiproliferative effect of CLA by palmitic acid indicates that reduced tumor lipogenesis is a major mechanism for the anticancer effects of CLA. PMID:19116881

  13. Conjugated eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) inhibits transplanted tumor growth via membrane lipid peroxidation in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuki, Tsuyoshi; Igarashi, Miki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2004-05-01

    Both conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have an antitumor effect. Hence, we hypothesized that a combination of conjugated double bonds and an (n-3) highly unsaturated fatty acid would produce stronger bioactivity. To verify the antitumor effect of conjugated EPA (CEPA), we transplanted DLD-1 human colon tumor cells into nude mice, and compared the tumor growth between CEPA-fed mice and CLA- and EPA-fed mice. After tumor cell inoculation, mice were assigned to 1 of 4 groups (control, CLA, EPA, and CEPA) consisting of 10 mice each. The control group received only safflower oil fatty acids, whereas the remaining groups received a mixture of safflower oil fatty acids and 20 g/100 g of total fatty acids as CLA, EPA, or CEPA. Mice were fed once every 2 d for 4 wk at a dose of 50 mg/mouse at each feeding. After 4 wk, tumor growth in CEPA-fed mice was significantly suppressed, compared with that in CLA- (P < 0.005) and EPA-fed mice (P < 0.001). DNA fragmentation in the tumor tissues of the CEPA-fed mice occurred more frequently than in the CLA- (P < 0.001) and EPA-fed mice (P < 0.001), suggesting that CEPA induced apoptosis in the tumor tissues. To further investigate the mechanism, the level of oxidative stress in the tumor tissues was determined. The CEPA-fed mice showed significant lipid peroxidation, compared with the CLA- (P < 0.001) and EPA-fed mice (P < 0.001). Therefore, we verified that CEPA has a stronger in vivo antitumor effect than EPA and CLA, and that CEPA acts through induction of apoptosis via lipid peroxidation. PMID:15113964

  14. Fetal hydantoin syndrome: inhibition of placental folic acid transport as a potential mechanism for fetal growth retardation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Will, M.; Barnard, J.A.; Said, H.M.; Ghishan, F.K.

    1985-04-01

    Maternal hydantoin ingestion during pregnancy results in a well defined clinical entity termed ''fetal hydantoin syndrome''. The clinical characteristics of this syndrome includes growth retardation, and congenital anomalies. Because folic acid is essential for protein synthesis and growth, and since hydantoin interferes with intestinal transport of folic acid, the authors postulated that part of the fetal hydantoin syndrome may be due to inhibition of placental folic acid by maternal hydantoin. Therefore, they studied in vivo placental folate transport in a well-established model for fetal hydantoin syndrome in the rat. Our results indicate that maternal hydantoin ingestion, significantly decreased fetal weight and placental and fetal uptake of folate compared to controls. To determine whether maternal hydantoin ingestion has a generalized or specific effect on placental function, they examined placental and fetal zinc transport in the same model. Our results indicate that zinc transport is not altered by hydantoin ingestion. They conclude that maternal hydantoin ingestion results in fetal growth retardation which may be due in part to inhibition of placental folate transport.

  15. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Inhibit Tumor Growth in a Rat Model of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parada, Belmiro; Reis, Flávio; Cerejo, Raquel; Garrido, Patrícia; Sereno, José; Xavier-Cunha, Maria; Neto, Paula; Mota, Alfredo; Figueiredo, Arnaldo; Teixeira, Frederico

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids have been tested on prevention and treatment of several cancer types, but the efficacy on “in vivo” bladder cancer has not been analyzed yet. This study aimed at evaluating the chemopreventive efficacy of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) mixture in an animal model of bladder cancer. Forty-four male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups during a 20-week protocol: control; carcinogen—N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN); ω-3 (DHA + EPA); and ω-3 + BBN. BBN and ω-3 were given during the initial 8 weeks. At week 20 blood and bladder were collected and checked for the presence of urothelium lesions and tumors, markers of inflammation, proliferation, and redox status. Incidence of bladder carcinoma was, control (0%), ω-3 (0%), BBN (65%), and ω-3 + BBN (62.5%). The ω-3 + BBN group had no infiltrative tumors or carcinoma in situ, and tumor volume was significantly reduced compared to the BBN (0.9 ± 0.1 mm3 versus 112.5 ± 6.4 mm3). Also, it showed a reduced MDA/TAS ratio and BBN-induced serum CRP, TGF-β1, and CD31 were prevented. In conclusion, omega-3 fatty acids inhibit the development of premalignant and malignant lesions in a rat model of bladder cancer, which might be due to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-proliferative, and anti-angiogenic properties. PMID:23865049

  16. Combined effects of carbonation with heating and fatty acid esters on inactivation and growth inhibition of various bacillus spores.

    PubMed

    Klangpetch, Wannaporn; Nakai, Tomoe; Noma, Seiji; Igura, Noriyuki; Shimoda, Mitsuya

    2013-09-01

    The effects of carbonation treatment (1 to 5 MPa, 30 min) plus heat treatment (30 to 80C, 30 min) in the presence of various fatty acid esters (FAEs; 0.05 and 0.1%, wt/vol) on counts of viable Bacillus subtilis spores were investigated. FAEs or carbonation alone had no inactivation or growth inhibition effects on B. subtilis spores. However, carbonation plus heat (CH; 80C, 5 MPa, 30 min) in the presence of mono- and diglycerol fatty acid esters markedly decreased counts of viable spores, and the spore counts did not change during storage for 30 days. The greatest decrease in viable spore counts occurred in the presence of monoglycerol fatty acid esters. Under CH conditions, inactivation and/or growth inhibition occurred at only 80C and increased with increasing pressure. The greatest decrease in spore counts (more than 4 log units) occurred with CH (80C, 5 MPa, 30 min) in the presence of monoglycerol fatty acid esters. However, this treatment was less effective against Bacillus coagulans and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores. PMID:23992501

  17. 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Thins Pear Fruits by Inhibiting Pollen Tube Growth via Ca(2+)-ATPase-Mediated Ca(2+) Efflux.

    PubMed

    An, Yuyan; Li, Jie; Duan, Chunhui; Liu, Longbo; Sun, Yongping; Cao, Rongxiang; Wang, Liangju

    2016-01-01

    Chemical fruit thinning has become a popular practice in modern fruit orchards for achieving high quality fruits, reducing costs of hand thinning and promoting return bloom. However, most of the suggested chemical thinners are often concerned for their detrimental effects and environmental problems. 5-Aminolevulic acid (ALA) is a natural, nontoxic, biodegradable, and environment-friendly plant growth regulator. One of its outstanding roles is improving plant photosynthesis and fruit quality. Here, results showed that applying 100-200 mg/L ALA at full bloom stage significantly reduced pear fruit set. Both in vivo and in vitro studies showed that ALA significantly inhibited pollen germination and tube growth. ALA decreased not only cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) but also "tip-focused" [Ca(2+)]cyt gradient, indicating that ALA inhibited pollen tube growth by down-regulating calcium signaling. ALA drastically enhanced pollen Ca(2+)-ATPase activity, suggesting that ALA-induced decrease of calcium signaling probably resulted from activating calcium pump. The significant negative correlations between Ca(2+)-ATPase activity and pollen germination or pollen tube length further demonstrated the critical role of calcium pump in ALA's negative effect on pollen germination. Taken together, our results suggest that ALA at low concentrations is a potential biochemical thinner, and it inhibits pollen germination and tube growth via Ca(2+) efflux by activating Ca(2+)-ATPase, thereby thinning fruits by preventing fertilization. PMID:26904082

  18. 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Thins Pear Fruits by Inhibiting Pollen Tube Growth via Ca2+-ATPase-Mediated Ca2+ Efflux

    PubMed Central

    An, Yuyan; Li, Jie; Duan, Chunhui; Liu, Longbo; Sun, Yongping; Cao, Rongxiang; Wang, Liangju

    2016-01-01

    Chemical fruit thinning has become a popular practice in modern fruit orchards for achieving high quality fruits, reducing costs of hand thinning and promoting return bloom. However, most of the suggested chemical thinners are often concerned for their detrimental effects and environmental problems. 5-Aminolevulic acid (ALA) is a natural, nontoxic, biodegradable, and environment-friendly plant growth regulator. One of its outstanding roles is improving plant photosynthesis and fruit quality. Here, results showed that applying 100–200 mg/L ALA at full bloom stage significantly reduced pear fruit set. Both in vivo and in vitro studies showed that ALA significantly inhibited pollen germination and tube growth. ALA decreased not only cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) but also “tip-focused” [Ca2+]cyt gradient, indicating that ALA inhibited pollen tube growth by down-regulating calcium signaling. ALA drastically enhanced pollen Ca2+-ATPase activity, suggesting that ALA-induced decrease of calcium signaling probably resulted from activating calcium pump. The significant negative correlations between Ca2+-ATPase activity and pollen germination or pollen tube length further demonstrated the critical role of calcium pump in ALA's negative effect on pollen germination. Taken together, our results suggest that ALA at low concentrations is a potential biochemical thinner, and it inhibits pollen germination and tube growth via Ca2+ efflux by activating Ca2+-ATPase, thereby thinning fruits by preventing fertilization. PMID:26904082

  19. Retinoic acid receptor alpha mediates growth inhibition by retinoids in rat pancreatic carcinoma DSL-6A/C1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brembeck, F. H.; Kaiser, A.; Detjen, K.; Hotz, H.; Foitzik, T.; Buhr, H. J.; Riecken, E. O.; Rosewicz, S.

    1998-01-01

    During carcinogenesis, pancreatic acinar cells can dedifferentiate into ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. DSL-6A/C1 cells represent an in vitro model of this carcinogenic sequence. This study was designed to examine the effects of retinoids on cell growth in DSL-6A/C1 cells and to characterize further the molecular mechanisms underlying the antiproliferative actions of retinoids. Treatment of DSL-6A/C1 cells with retinoids results in a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth, paralleled by a retinoid-mediated transactivation of a pTK::betaRAREx2-luciferase reporter construct transiently transfected into DSL-6A/C1 cells. Retinoid receptor expression was evaluated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using subtype-specific primers and demonstrated expression of retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR-alpha), RAR-beta and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR-alpha). Using a panel of receptor subtype-specific agonists, the RAR-alpha specific agonist Ro 40-6055 was the most potent retinoid in terms of growth inhibition. Furthermore, all-trans-retinoic acid-mediated growth inhibition and transactivation was completely blocked by the RAR-alpha-specific antagonist Ro 41-5253. In summary, the RAR-alpha subtype predominantly mediates the antiproliferative effects of retinoids in DSL-6A/C1 cells. Furthermore, this cell system provides a feasible tool to study the molecular mechanisms underlying the growth inhibitory effects of retinoids in ductal pancreatic carcinoma cells derived from a primary acinar cell phenotype. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 PMID:9823968

  20. Phosphorylation of InhA inhibits mycolic acid biosynthesis and growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Molle, Virginie; Gulten, Gulcin; Vilchèze, Catherine; Veyron-Churlet, Romain; Zanella-Cléon, Isabelle; Sacchettini, James C.; Jacobs, Jr, William R.; Kremer, Laurent

    2011-08-24

    The remarkable survival ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in infected hosts is related to the presence of cell wall-associated mycolic acids. Despite their importance, the mechanisms that modulate expression of these lipids in response to environmental changes are unknown. Here we demonstrate that the enoyl-ACP reductase activity of InhA, an essential enzyme of the mycolic acid biosynthetic pathway and the primary target of the anti-tubercular drug isoniazid, is controlled via phosphorylation. Thr-266 is the unique kinase phosphoacceptor, both in vitro and in vivo. The physiological relevance of Thr-266 phosphorylation was demonstrated using inhA phosphoablative (T266A) or phosphomimetic (T266D/E) mutants. Enoyl reductase activity was severely impaired in the mimetic mutants in vitro, as a consequence of a reduced binding affinity to NADH. Importantly, introduction of inhA{_}T266D/E failed to complement growth and mycolic acid defects of an inhA-thermosensitive Mycobacterium smegmatis strain, in a similar manner to what is observed following isoniazid treatment. This study suggests that phosphorylation of InhA may represent an unusual mechanism that allows M. tuberculosis to regulate its mycolic acid content, thus offering a new approach to future anti-tuberculosis drug development.

  1. The effect of pH on the inhibition of bacterial growth by physiological concentrations of butyric acid: implications for neonates fed on suckled milk.

    PubMed

    Sun, C Q; O'Connor, C J; Turner, S J; Lewis, G D; Stanley, R A; Roberton, A M

    1998-05-15

    Butyric acid is released from milk by pre-intestinal lipases during suckling. It is also known to inhibit bacterial growth. To investigate whether butyric acid may be a significant factor in controlling bacterial growth in the stomach of pre-weaned animals, the ability of butyric acid to inhibit growth of selected bacteria was tested over physiological ranges of pH and butyric acid concentrations. Six enteric and environmental strains of bacteria were used: two strains of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus casseliflavus. At pH 4.5 and 5.0, the growth of all organisms was significantly inhibited in the presence of butyrate, and in some cases growth was completely arrested. At pH 6.0, butyric acid did not affect bacterial growth until the concentration reached 40 mM. The maximum concentration of butyric acid available in cow's milk after incubation with pre-gastric lipase is approximately 16 mM, which would be sufficient to prevent growth of the organisms tested at pH values occurring in the stomach. Therefore, butyric acid inhibition of bacterial growth may explain in part, the role of pre-intestinal lipases in young animals' natural defenses against bacteria in ingested food prior to weaning. PMID:9717513

  2. Gambogic acid inhibits growth, induces apoptosis, and overcomes drug resistance in human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    WEN, CHUANGYU; HUANG, LANLAN; CHEN, JUNXIONG; LIN, MENGMENG; LI, WEN; LU, BIYAN; RUTNAM, ZINA JEYAPALAN; IWAMOTO, AIKICHI; WANG, ZHONGYANG; YANG, XIANGLING; LIU, HUANLIANG

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of chemoresistance is a major limitation of colorectal cancer (CRC) therapies and novel biologically based therapies are urgently needed. Natural products represent a novel potential anticancer therapy. Gambogic acid (GA), a small molecule derived from Garcinia hanburyi Hook. f., has been demonstrated to be highly cytotoxic to several types of cancer cells and have low toxicity to the hematopoietic system. However, the potential role of GA in colorectal cancer and its ability to overcome the chemotherapeutic resistance in CRC cells have not been well studied. In the present study, we showed that GA directly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in both 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) sensitive and 5-FU resistant colorectal cancer cells; induced apoptosis via activating JNK signaling pathway. The data, therefore, suggested an alternative strategy to overcome 5-FU resistance in CRC and that GA could be a promising medicinal compound for colorectal cancer therapy. PMID:26397804

  3. Selective inhibition of HDAC8 decreases neuroblastoma growth in vitro and in vivo and enhances retinoic acid-mediated differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rettig, I; Koeneke, E; Trippel, F; Mueller, W C; Burhenne, J; Kopp-Schneider, A; Fabian, J; Schober, A; Fernekorn, U; von Deimling, A; Deubzer, H E; Milde, T; Witt, O; Oehme, I

    2015-01-01

    For differentiation-defective malignancies, compounds that modulate transcription, such as retinoic acid and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, are of particular interest. HDAC inhibitors are currently under investigation for the treatment of a broad spectrum of cancer diseases. However, one clinical drawback is class-specific toxicity of unselective inhibitors, limiting their full anticancer potential. Selective targeting of individual HDAC isozymes in defined tumor entities may therefore be an attractive alternative treatment approach. We have previously identified HDAC family member 8 (HDAC8) as a novel target in childhood neuroblastoma. Using small-molecule inhibitors, we now demonstrate that selective inhibition of HDAC8 exhibits antineuroblastoma activity without toxicity in two xenograft mouse models of MYCN oncogene-amplified neuroblastoma. In contrast, the unselective HDAC inhibitor vorinostat was more toxic in the same models. HDAC8-selective inhibition induced cell cycle arrest and differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Upon combination with retinoic acid, differentiation was significantly enhanced, as demonstrated by elongated neurofilament-positive neurites and upregulation of NTRK1. Additionally, MYCN oncogene expression was downregulated in vitro and tumor cell growth was markedly reduced in vivo. Mechanistic studies suggest that cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) links HDAC8- and retinoic acid-mediated gene transcription. In conclusion, HDAC-selective targeting can be effective in tumors exhibiting HDAC isozyme-dependent tumor growth in vivo and can be combined with differentiation-inducing agents. PMID:25695609

  4. Water Deficit and Abscisic Acid Cause Differential Inhibition of Shoot versus Root Growth in Soybean Seedlings : Analysis of Growth, Sugar Accumulation, and Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Creelman, R A; Mason, H S; Bensen, R J; Boyer, J S; Mullet, J E

    1990-01-01

    Roots often continue to elongate while shoot growth is inhibited in plants subjected to low-water potentials. The cause of this differential response to water deficit was investigated. We examined hypocotyl and root growth, polysome status and mRNA populations, and abscisic acid (ABA) content in etiolated soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Williams) seedlings whose growth was inhibited by transfer to low-water potential vermiculite or exogenous ABA. Both treatments affected growth and dry weight in a similar fashion. Maximum inhibition of hypocotyl growth occurred when internal ABA levels (modulated by ABA application) reached the endogenous level found in the elongating zone of seedlings grown in water-deficient vermiculite. Conversely, root growth was affected to only a slight extent in low-water potential seedlings and by most ABA treatments (in some, growth was promoted). In every seedling section examined, transfer of seedlings into low-water potential vermiculite caused ABA levels to increase approximately 5- to 10-fold over that found in well-watered seedlings. Changes in soluble sugar content, polysome status, and polysome mRNA translation products seen in low-water potential seedlings did not occur with ABA treatments sufficient to cause significant inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. These data suggest that both variation in endogenous ABA levels, and differing sensitivity to ABA in hypocotyls and roots can modulate root/shoot growth ratios. However, exogenous ABA did not induce changes in sugar accumulation, polysome status, and mRNA populations seen after transfer into low-water potential vermiculite. PMID:16667248

  5. Boric acid destabilizes the hyphal cytoskeleton and inhibits invasive growth of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Pointer, Benjamin R; Boyer, Michael P; Schmidt, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Exposure of Candida albicans to sub-lethal concentrations of boric acid (BA) restricts the dimorphic fungus to its yeast morphology and prevents the formation of invasive hyphae on solid substrates. Exposure to BA causes a rapid and reversible disappearance of polarisome and Spitzenkrper in growing hyphae. In BA-treated hyphae of C. albicans, actin quickly reorganizes from cytoplasmic cables to cortical patches and cell wall growth switches from an apical to an isotropic pattern. As a result of the cytoskeletal changes, the hyphal tips broaden and directional growth of hyphae ceases in the presence of BA. An analysis of homozygous deletion strains showed that mutants with constitutive or enhanced hyphal growth (tup1, nrg1, ssn6, rbf1) are BA-sensitive, demonstrating that cellular morphology is a major determinant of BA tolerance. The screening of deletion mutants also showed that deficiencies of the main activator of hyphal gene expression, Efg1, and the Rim101-signalling cascade, leading to Efg1 activation, cause BA resistance. Taken together, the data presented show that the selective inhibitory effect on BA on C. albicans hyphae is rooted in a disruption of apical cytoskeletal elements of growing hyphae. PMID:25612315

  6. Erythrocyte membrane modifying agents and the inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum growth: structure-activity relationships for betulinic acid analogues.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Hanne L; Franzyk, Henrik; Sairafianpour, Majid; Tabatabai, Mehrnoush; Tehrani, Mahboubeh D; Bagherzadeh, Karim; Hgerstrand, Henry; Staerk, Dan; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2004-01-01

    The natural triterpene betulinic acid and its analogues (betulinic aldehyde, lupeol, betulin, methyl betulinate and betulinic acid amide) caused concentration-dependent alterations of erythrocyte membrane shape towards stomatocytes or echinocytes according to their hydrogen bonding properties. Thus, the analogues with a functional group having a capacity of donating a hydrogen bond (COOH, CH(2)OH, CONH(2)) caused formation of echinocytes, whereas those lacking this ability (CH(3), CHO, COOCH(3)) induced formation of stomatocytes. Both kinds of erythrocyte alterations were prohibitive with respect to Plasmodium falciparum invasion and growth; all compounds were inhibitory with IC(50) values in the range 7-28 microM, and the growth inhibition correlated well with the extent of membrane curvature changes assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Erythrocytes pre-loaded with betulinic acid or its analogues and extensively washed in order to remove excess of the chemicals could not serve as hosts for P. falciparum parasites. Betulinic acid and congeners can be responsible for in vitro antiplasmodial activity of plant extracts, as shown for Zataria multiflora Boiss. (Labiatae) and Zizyphus vulgaris Lam. (Rhamnaceae). The activity is evidently due to the incorporation of the compounds into the lipid bilayer of erythrocytes, and may be caused by modifications of cholesterol-rich membrane rafts, recently shown to play an important role in parasite vacuolization. The established link between erythrocyte membrane modifications and antiplasmodial activity may provide a novel target for potential antimalarial drugs. PMID:14697777

  7. Antibody-mediated inhibition of fibroblast growth factor 19 results in increased bile acids synthesis and ileal malabsorption of bile acids in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Pai, Rama; French, Dorothy; Ma, Ning; Hotzel, Kathy; Plise, Emile; Salphati, Laurent; Setchell, Kenneth D R; Ware, Joseph; Lauriault, Veronique; Schutt, Leah; Hartley, Dylan; Dambach, Donna

    2012-04-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) represses cholesterol 7?-hydroxylase (Cyp7?1) and inhibits bile acid synthesis in vitro and in vivo. Previous studies have shown that anti-FGF19 antibody treatment reduces growth of colon tumor xenografts and prevents hepatocellular carcinomas in FGF19 transgenic mice and thus may be a useful cancer target. In a repeat dose safety study in cynomolgus monkeys, anti-FGF19 treatment (3-100 mg/kg) demonstrated dose-related liver toxicity accompanied by severe diarrhea and low food consumption. The mechanism of anti-FGF19 toxicity was investigated using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Our results show that anti-FGF19 antibody had no direct cytotoxic effect on monkey hepatocytes. Anti-FGF19 increased Cyp7?1, as expected, but also increased bile acid efflux transporter gene (bile salt export pump, multidrug resistant protein 2 [MRP2], and MRP3) expression and reduced sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and organic anion transporter 2 expression in liver tissues from treated monkeys and in primary hepatocytes. In addition, anti-FGF19 treatment increased solute transporter gene (ileal bile acid-binding protein, organic solute transporter ? [OST-?], and OST-?) expression in ileal tissues from treated monkeys but not in Caco-2 cells. However, deoxycholic acid (a secondary bile acid) increased expression of FGF19 and these solute transporter genes in Caco-2 cells. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of monkey feces showed an increase in total bile acids and cholic acid derivatives. These findings suggest that high doses of anti-FGF19 increase Cyp7?1 expression and bile acid synthesis and alter the expression of bile transporters in the liver resulting in enhanced bile acid efflux and reduced uptake. Increased bile acids alter expression of solute transporters in the ileum causing diarrhea and the enhanced enterohepatic recirculation of bile acids leading to liver toxicity. PMID:22268002

  8. ?-eleostearic acid inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells via HER2/HER3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Ren-Jie; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Jin-Jie; Xu, Jin; Dong, Wei; Zou, Zu-Quan

    2014-03-01

    ?-eleostearic acid (?-ESA) has been shown to possess antitumor activity in cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism(s) remain largely unknown. The present study was designed to investigate the antitumor effect of ?-ESA in breast cancer cells showing different expression levels of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). ?-ESA inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in the SKBR3 and T47D breast cancer cell lines. The mechanism by which cell growth was inhibited involved G0/G1 and G2/M cell cycle phase arrest. The MTT assay showed that SKBR3 cells are more sensitive to ?-ESA compared to T47D cells. Western blot analysis revealed that ?-ESA treatment not only reduced HER2/HER3 protein expression, but also increased the level of phosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog protein (PTEN), which led to decreased levels of phosphorylated Akt. Inactive Akt further reduced phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3? (GSK-3?) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)?associated death promoter (BAD) proteins. Furthermore, the level of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was found to be reduced following ?-ESA treatment. Notably, nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) was activated by ?-ESA treatment. Data of the present study showed that the antitumor activity of ?-ESA is at least partly mediated by reduction of the HER2/HER3 heterodimer protein level, activation of the Akt/BAD/Bcl-2 apoptotic pathway and inhibition of the Akt/GSK-3? survival pathway in the two breast cancer cell lines investigated in this study. Therefore, ?-ESA may be considered a beneficial dietary factor for the prevention and treatment of invasive breast cancer in cells overexpressing HER2. PMID:24425042

  9. Pachymic Acid Inhibits Growth and Induces Apoptosis of Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro and In Vivo by Targeting ER Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shujie; Swanson, Kristen; Eliaz, Isaac; McClintick, Jeanette N.; Sandusky, George E.; Sliva, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Pachymic acid (PA) is a purified triterpene extracted from medicinal fungus Poria cocos. In this paper, we investigated the anticancer effect of PA on human chemotherapy resistant pancreatic cancer. PA triggered apoptosis in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2. Comparative gene expression array analysis demonstrated that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was induced by PA through activation of heat shock response and unfolded protein response related genes. Induced ER stress was confirmed by increasing expression of XBP-1s, ATF4, Hsp70, CHOP and phospho-eIF2?. Moreover, ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) blocked PA induced apoptosis. In addition, 25 mg kg-1 of PA significantly suppressed MIA PaCa-2 tumor growth in vivo without toxicity, which correlated with induction of apoptosis and expression of ER stress related proteins in tumor tissues. Taken together, growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis by PA in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells were associated with ER stress activation both in vitro and in vivo. PA may be potentially exploited for the use in treatment of chemotherapy resistant pancreatic cancer. PMID:25915041

  10. Inhibition of microbial growth and enrichment of gamma-aminobutyric acid during germination of brown rice by electrolyzed oxidizing water.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhan-Hui; Zhang, Yan; Li, Li-Te; Curtis, Rempel B; Kong, Xiao-Lin; Fulcher, R Gary; Zhang, Gong; Cao, Wei

    2010-03-01

    Electrolyzed oxidizing water (EOW) has been regarded as a potential environmentally friendly broad spectrum microbial decontaminant. EOW with a pH of 3.0 and oxidation reduction potential of 1,079.0 mV were generated by the electrolysis of a dilute NaCl solution (20 mM) in an electrochemical cell. The effects of EOW, 1% NaClO solution, and alkaline electrolyzed water on controlling microbial growth, germination ratio, and enrichment of gamma-aminobutyric acid in germinated brown rice (GBR) were evaluated in this study. Results show that EOW was the most effective at inhibiting microbial growth during germination. Rinsing the rice grains with EOW at 12-h intervals resulted in aerobic plate count reductions of 4.82 log CFU/g, while soaking resulted in bacterial count reductions of 5.38 log CFU/g after 72 h of germination. Moreover, EOW significantly enriched gamma-aminobutyric acid content in GBR (P < 0.05); content was increased 1.6 times in grain rinsed with EOW and 1.8 times in grain soaked in EOW. The findings indicate that EOW is a feasible disinfectant for industrial GBR production. PMID:20202333

  11. Pachymic acid inhibits growth and induces apoptosis of pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo by targeting ER stress.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shujie; Swanson, Kristen; Eliaz, Isaac; McClintick, Jeanette N; Sandusky, George E; Sliva, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Pachymic acid (PA) is a purified triterpene extracted from medicinal fungus Poria cocos. In this paper, we investigated the anticancer effect of PA on human chemotherapy resistant pancreatic cancer. PA triggered apoptosis in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2. Comparative gene expression array analysis demonstrated that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was induced by PA through activation of heat shock response and unfolded protein response related genes. Induced ER stress was confirmed by increasing expression of XBP-1s, ATF4, Hsp70, CHOP and phospho-eIF2?. Moreover, ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) blocked PA induced apoptosis. In addition, 25 mg kg-1 of PA significantly suppressed MIA PaCa-2 tumor growth in vivo without toxicity, which correlated with induction of apoptosis and expression of ER stress related proteins in tumor tissues. Taken together, growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis by PA in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells were associated with ER stress activation both in vitro and in vivo. PA may be potentially exploited for the use in treatment of chemotherapy resistant pancreatic cancer. PMID:25915041

  12. Linoleic Acid-Induced Growth Inhibition of Human Gastric Epithelial Adenocarcinoma AGS Cells is Associated with Down-Regulation of Prostaglandin E2 Synthesis and Telomerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yung Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Background: Linoleic acid is the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acid in human nutrition and found in most vegetable oils and certain food products. In the present study, we investigated the effects of linoleic acid on the growth of human epithelial adenocarcinoma AGS cells. Methods: MTT assay, flow cytometry, RT-PCR and Western-blot analyses were used to investigate the effects and underlying mechanisms of linoleic acid on AGS cells. The effects of this compound were also tested on prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and telomerase activity. Results: Our data indicated that growth inhibition of AGS cells by linoleic acid treatment was associated with induction of apoptosis. Linoleic acid treatment decreased the expression levels of the cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 mRNA and protein without causing significant changes in the COX-1 levels, which was correlated with the inhibition of PGE2 synthesis. Linoleic acid treatment also decreased the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), a main determinant of the telomerase enzymatic activity, and activity of telomerase, with inhibiting the expression of c-myc in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusions: Taken together, our results indicate that linoleic acid inhibits the production of PGE2 and activity of telomerase by suppressing COX-2 and hTERT expression. PMID:25337570

  13. Growth inhibition of Aeromonas salmonicida and Yersinia ruckeri by disinfectants containing peracetic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid is a therapeutic agent used for disinfection in aquaculture, but it must be investigated thoroughly in order to mitigate diseases without harmful effects to fish. These agents should not leave dangerous residues in the environment in order to successfully contribute to sustainable aq...

  14. Growth inhibition of Aeromonas salmonicida and Yersinia ruckeri by disinfectants containing peracetic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is an agent used for disinfection in aquaculture. PAA contributes to sustainable aquaculture, because it releases no harmful residue in the environment. However, there is lack of guideline about the effective application of different PAA products against various pathogens in p...

  15. Growth inhibition of Aeromonas salmonicida and Yersinia ruckeri by disinfectants containing peracetic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid is a therapeutic agent used for disinfection, but it must be investigated in order to mitigate diseases without harmful effects to the fish. These agents should not leave dangerous residues in the environment in order to successfully contribute to sustainable aquaculture. The aim of ...

  16. Growth of Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL-B523 in an alkaline medium: suboptimal pH growth inhibition of a lactic acid bacterium.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Barry F; Fogler, H Scott

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial profile modification (BPM), a form of tertiary oil recovery, diverts water from the water-flooded high-permeability zone into the oil-bearing low-permeability zone. During field use, exopolymer-producing bacteria plug the high-permeability zone only in the immediate vicinity of the injection point (the near-well bore region). For effective BPM the plug must penetrate far into the formation. Slowing the specific growth rate, lengthening the lag phase, and slowing the polymerization rate are techniques that can prolong the onset of biopolymer gelation and extend the depth of the biological plug. In batch experiments, the growth of Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL-B523 was inhibited by the synergistic effects of high substrate loading and an alkaline pH. Exponential growth was delayed up to 190 h. It was observed that cell division was significantly retarded until the medium pH, reduced by the acid byproducts of fermentation, reached a critical value of 6.79 +/- 0.06. A mathematical model was developed to describe the relationship between specific growth rate, lag time, and medium pH. PMID:15540200

  17. Efficacy of washing meat surfaces with 2% levulinic, acetic, or lactic acid for pathogen decontamination and residual growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, C E; Smith, J V; Broadbent, J R

    2011-06-01

    We compared spray washing at 55.4 °C with 2% levulinic acid to that with lactic or acetic acid for decontamination of pathogenic bacteria inoculated onto meat surfaces, and their residual protection against later growth of pathogenic bacteria. The model systems included Escherichia coli O157:H7 on beef plate, Salmonella on chicken skin and pork belly, and Listeria monocytogenes on turkey roll. In the decontamination studies, acid washes lowered recoverable numbers of pathogens by 0.6 to 1 log/cm(2) as compared to no-wash controls, and only lactic acid lowered the number of pathogens recovered as compared to the water wash. Washing with levulinic acid at 68.3 or 76.7 °C did not result in additional decontamination of E. coli. Acetic acid prevented residual growth of E. coli and L. monocytogenes, and it reduced numbers of Salmonella on chicken skin to below recoverable levels. Overall, levulinic acid did not provide as effective decontamination as lactic acid nor residual protection as acetic acid. PMID:21251765

  18. High temperature stimulates acetic acid accumulation and enhances the growth inhibition and ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under fermenting conditions.

    PubMed

    Woo, Ji-Min; Yang, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Sae-Um; Blank, Lars M; Park, Jin-Byung

    2014-07-01

    Cellular responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to high temperatures of up to 42C during ethanol fermentation at a high glucose concentration (i.e., 100g/L) were investigated. Increased temperature correlated with stimulated glucose uptake to produce not only the thermal protectant glycerol but also ethanol and acetic acid. Carbon flux into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle correlated positively with cultivation temperature. These results indicate that the increased demand for energy (in the form of ATP), most likely caused by multiple stressors, including heat, acetic acid, and ethanol, was matched by both the fermentation and respiration pathways. Notably, acetic acid production was substantially stimulated compared to that of other metabolites during growth at increased temperature. The acetic acid produced in addition to ethanol seemed to subsequently result in adverse effects, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. This, in turn, appeared to cause the specific growth rate, and glucose uptake rate reduced leading to a decrease of the specific ethanol production rate far before glucose depletion. These results suggest that adverse effects from heat, acetic acid, ethanol, and oxidative stressors are synergistic, resulting in a decrease of the specific growth rate and ethanol production rate and, hence, are major determinants of cell stability and ethanol fermentation performance of S. cerevisiae at high temperatures. The results are discussed in the context of possible applications. PMID:24706214

  19. Perlwapin, an Abalone Nacre Protein with Three Four-Disulfide Core (Whey Acidic Protein) Domains, Inhibits the Growth of Calcium Carbonate Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Treccani, Laura; Mann, Karlheinz; Heinemann, Fabian; Fritz, Monika

    2006-01-01

    We have isolated a new protein from the nacreous layer of the shell of the sea snail Haliotis laevigata (abalone). Amino acid sequence analysis showed the protein to consist of 134 amino acids and to contain three sequence repeats of ?40 amino acids which were very similar to the well-known whey acidic protein domains of other proteins. The new protein was therefore named perlwapin. In addition to the major sequence, we identified several minor variants. Atomic force microscopy was used to explore the interaction of perlwapin with calcite crystals. Monomolecular layers of calcite crystals dissolve very slowly in deionized water and recrystallize in supersaturated calcium carbonate solution. When perlwapin was dissolved in the supersaturated calcium carbonate solution, growth of the crystal was inhibited immediately. Perlwapin molecules bound tightly to distinct step edges, preventing the crystal layers from growing. Using lower concentrations of perlwapin in a saturated calcium carbonate solution, we could distinguish native, active perlwapin molecules from denaturated ones. These observations showed that perlwapin can act as a growth inhibitor for calcium carbonate crystals in saturated calcium carbonate solution. The function of perlwapin in nacre growth may be to inhibit the growth of certain crystallographic planes in the mineral phase of the polymer/mineral composite nacre. PMID:16861275

  20. Defect of synthesis of very long-chain fatty acids confers resistance to growth inhibition by inositol phosphorylceramide synthase repression in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2010-11-01

    Aureobasidin A (AbA) inhibits Aur1p, an enzyme catalysing the formation of inositol phosphorylceramide in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. AbA treatment results not only in reductions in complex sphingolipid levels but also in accumulation of ceramides, both of which are believed to lead to the growth defect caused by this inhibitor. We screened for mutants showing resistance to this drug, and found that a lack of ELO3, the gene involved in synthesis of very long-chain fatty acids, confers resistance to the inhibitor. The resistance as to growth inhibition by reduction in Aur1p activity was also confirmed by repression of AUR1 expression under the control of a tetracycline-regulatable promoter. Under the AUR1-repressive conditions, the ELO3 mutant showed reduction in the complex sphingolipid levels and the accumulation of ceramide, like wild-type cells. However, with repression of LCB1 encoding serine palmitoyltransferase or LIP1 encoding the ceramide synthase subunit, the ELO3 mutation did not confer resistance to growth inhibition induced by the impaired sphingolipid biosynthesis. Therefore, it is suggested that the ELO3 mutant shows resistance as to accumulation of ceramides, implying that the chain lengths of fatty acids in ceramide are a critical factor for the ceramide-induced growth defect under AUR1-repressive conditions. PMID:20709688

  1. Mechanism of Growth Inhibition of Human Cancer Cells by Conjugated Eicosapentaenoic Acid, an Inhibitor of DNA Polymerase and Topoisomerase

    PubMed Central

    Yonezawa, Yuko; Yoshida, Hiromi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2007-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases (topos) and DNA polymerases (pols) are involved in many aspects of DNA metabolism such as replication reactions. We found that long chain unsaturated fatty acids such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (i.e., eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)) inhibited the activities of eukaryotic pols and topos in vitro, and the inhibitory effect of conjugated fatty acids converted from EPA and DHA (cEPA and cDHA) on pols and topos was stronger than that of normal EPA and DHA. cEPA and cDHA did not affect the activities of plant and prokaryotic pols or other DNA metabolic enzymes tested. cEPA was a stronger inhibitor than cDHA with IC50 values for mammalian pols and human topos of 11.0 – 31.8 and 0.5 – 2.5 μM, respectively. cEPA inhibited the proliferation of two human leukemia cell lines, NALM-6, which is a p53-wild type, and HL-60, which is a p53-null mutant, and the inhibitory effect was stronger than that of normal EPA. In both cell lines, cEPA arrested in the G1 phase, and increased cyclin E protein levels, indicating that it blocks the primary step of in vivo DNA replication by inhibiting the activity of replicative pols rather than topos. DNA replication-related proteins, such as RPA70, ATR and phosphorylated-Chk1/2, were increased by cEPA treatment in the cell lines, suggesting that cEPA led to DNA replication fork stress inhibiting the activities of pols and topos, and the ATR-dependent DNA damage response pathway could respond to the inhibitor of DNA replication. The compound induced cell apoptosis through both p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways in cell lines NALM-6 and HL-60, respectively. These results suggested the therapeutic potential of conjugated PUFA, such as cEPA, as a leading anti-cancer compound that inhibited pols and topos activities.

  2. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) inhibits the IGF-1 and c-erbB2/HER2/neu receptors and suppresses growth in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Youngren, Jack F; Gable, Karissa; Penaranda, Cristina; Maddux, Betty A; Zavodovskaya, Marianna; Lobo, Margaret; Campbell, Michael; Kerner, John; Goldfine, Ira D

    2005-11-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is a phenolic compound isolated from the creosote bush Larrea divaricatta that has anti-cancer activities both in vitro and in vivo. We can now attribute certain of these anti-cancer properties in breast cancer cells to the ability of NDGA to directly inhibit the function of two receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), the insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) and the c-erbB2/HER2/neu (HER2/neu) receptor. In MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, low micromolar concentrations of NDGA inhibited activation of the IGF-1R, and downstream phosphorylation of both the Akt/PKB serine kinase and the pro-apoptotic protein BAD. In mouse MCNeuA cells, NDGA also inhibited ligand independent phosphorylation of HER2/neu. To study whether this inhibitory effect in cells was due to a direct action on these receptors, we studied the IGF-1-stimulated tyrosine kinase activity of isolated IGF-1R, which was inhibited by NDGA at 10 muM or less. NDGA was also effective at inhibiting autophosphorylation of the isolated HER2/neu receptor at similar concentrations. In addition, NDGA inhibited IGF-1 specific growth of cultured breast cancer cells with an IC50 of approximately 30 muM. NDGA treatment (intraperitoneal injection 3 times per week) also decreased the activity of the IGF-1R and the HER2/neu receptor in MCNeuA cells implanted into mice. This inhibition of RTK activity was associated with decreased growth rates of MCNeuA cells in vivo. These studies indicate that the anti-breast cancer properties of NDGA are related to the inhibition of two important RTKs. Agents of this class may therefore provide new insights into potential therapies for this disease. PMID:16142439

  3. Gallic acid inhibits gastric cancer cells metastasis and invasive growth via increased expression of RhoB, downregulation of AKT/small GTPase signals and inhibition of NF-κB activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Hsieh-Hsun; Chang, Chi-Sen; Division of Gastroenterology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan ; Ho, Wei-Chi; Liao, Sheng-You; Lin, Wea-Lung; Department of Pathology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan ; Wang, Chau-Jong; Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated the therapeutic potential of gallic acid (GA) for controlling tumor metastasis through its inhibitory effect on the motility of AGS cells. A noteworthy finding in our previous experiment was increased RhoB expression in GA-treated cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of RhoB expression on the inhibitory effects of GA on AGS cells. By applying the transfection of RhoB siRNA into AGS cells and an animal model, we tested the effect of GA on inhibition of tumor growth and RhoB expression. The results confirmed that RhoB-siRNA transfection induced GA to inhibit AGS cells’ invasive growth involving blocking the AKT/small GTPase signals pathway and inhibition of NF-κB activity. Finally, we evaluated the effect of GA on AGS cell metastasis by colonization of tumor cells in nude mice. It showed GA inhibited tumor cells growth via the expression of RhoB. These data support the inhibitory effect of GA which was shown to inhibit gastric cancer cell metastasis and invasive growth via increased expression of RhoB, downregulation of AKT/small GTPase signals and inhibition of NF-κB activity. Thus, GA might be a potential agent in treating gastric cancer. Highlights: ► GA could downregulate AKT signal via increased expression of RhoB. ► GA inhibits metastasis in vitro in gastric carcinoma. ► GA inhibits tumor growth in nude mice model.

  4. Isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating arachidonic acid metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Wang, Yuzhong; Zheng, Hao; Yu, Wei; Chai, Hongyan; Zhang, Jing; Falck, John R.; Guo, Austin M.; Yue, Jiang; Peng, Renxiu; Yang, Jing

    2013-10-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA)-derived eicosanoids and its downstream pathways have been demonstrated to play crucial roles in growth control of breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate that isoliquiritigenin, a flavonoid phytoestrogen from licorice, induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating multiple key enzymes in AA metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer. Isoliquiritigenin diminished cell viability, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, and clonogenic ability in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231cells, and induced apoptosis as evidenced by an analysis of cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation, flow cytometry and hoechst staining. Furthermore, isoliquiritigenin inhibited mRNA expression of multiple forms of AA-metabolizing enzymes, including phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenases (COX)-2 and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4A, and decreased secretion of their products, including prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), without affecting COX-1, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP), and leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}). In addition, it downregulated the levels of phospho-PI3K, phospho-PDK (Ser{sup 241}), phospho-Akt (Thr{sup 308}), phospho-Bad (Ser{sup 136}), and Bcl-x{sub L} expression, thereby activating caspase cascades and eventually cleaving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Conversely, the addition of exogenous eicosanoids, including PGE{sub 2}, LTB{sub 4} and a 20-HETE analog (WIT003), and caspase inhibitors, or overexpression of constitutively active Akt reversed isoliquiritigenin-induced apoptosis. Notably, isoliquiritigenin induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice, together with decreased intratumoral levels of eicosanoids and phospho-Akt (Thr{sup 308}). Collectively, these data suggest that isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating AA metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer. - Highlights: • Isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis in human breast cancer. • The proapoptotic action of isoliquiritigenin has been studied in vitro and in vivo. • Arachidonic acid metabolic network mediates isoliquiritigenin-induced apoptosis. • PI3K/Akt deactivation is asssociated with isoliquiritigenin-induced apoptosis. • Isoliquiritigenin may be a multi-target drug in the treatment of breast cancer.

  5. Inhibition of in vitro growth of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 by probiotic Lactobacillus strains due to production of lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, M; Shimizu, K; Nomoto, K; Tanaka, R; Hamabata, T; Yamasaki, S; Takeda, T; Takeda, Y

    2001-08-15

    The inhibiting characteristics of lactic acid bacteria on Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 (three strains, clinically isolated) was investigated by using a batch fermentation system. The species such as Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota or L. acidophilus YIT 0070 exert growth inhibitory and bactericidal activities on STEC. The pH value and undissociated lactic acid (U-LA) concentration of the culture medium of STEC cocultured with L. casei or L. acidophilus dramatically lowered or increased, respectively [corrected], when compared with those of the control culture. The cytotoxic properties of U-LA on STEC strain 89020087 analyzed in vitro was divided into two phases, i.e., the bacteriostatic phase (between 3.2 to 62 mM) and the bactericidal phase (over 62 mM). These data suggest that the bactericidal effect of Lactobacillus on STEC depends on its lactic acid production and pH reductive effect. PMID:11545213

  6. Inhibition of hepatocyte growth factor-induced motility and in vitro invasion of human colon cancer cells by gamma-linolenic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, W. G.; Hiscox, S.; Hallett, M. B.; Scott, C.; Horrobin, D. F.; Puntis, M. C.

    1995-01-01

    In this study we have determined the effects of the n-6 essential fatty acid gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) on the motility and invasive/metastatic nature of the human colon cancer cell lines HT115, HT29 and HRT18. Cell motility was induced by hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) and measured by both colony scattering and dissociation from carrier beads. Invasiveness was measured in vitro by cellular invasion into extracellular matrix. At concentrations up to 100 microM (which had no effect on cell growth over the duration of the experiments) both cell motility and invasion induced by HGF/SF were markedly reduced by GLA and its lithium salt. The attachment of these cells to the extracellular matrix components (Matrigel and fibronectin) was also inhibited. There were also changes in the cell-surface E-cadherin, but not fibronectin receptor at similar concentrations. It is concluded that n-6 essential fatty acids have the ability to inhibit both motility and invasiveness of human colon cancer cells, perhaps by modifying cell-surface adhesion molecules. Images p745-a Figure 1 Figure 7 PMID:7710939

  7. THE NSAID TOLFENAMIC ACID INHIBITS BT474 AND SKBR3 BREAST CANCER CELL AND TUMOR GROWTH BY REPRESSING erbB2 EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyi; Abdelrahim, Maen; Abudayyeh, Suhaib; Lei, Ping; Safe, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Tolfenamic acid (TA) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that inhibits pancreatic cancer cell and tumor growth THROUGH decreasing expression of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors. TA also inhibits growth of erbB2-overexpressing BT474 and SKBR3 breast cancer cells; however, in contrast to pancreatic cancer cells, TA induced downregulation of erbB2 but not Sp proteins. TA-induced erbB2 downregulation was accompanied by decreased erbB2-dependent kinase activities, induction of p27, and decreased expression of cyclin D1. TA also decreased erbB2 mRNA expression and promoter activity, and this was due to decreased mRNA stability in BT474 cells and, in both cell lines, TA decreased expression of the YY1 and AP-2 transcription factors required for basal erbB2 expression. In addition, TA also inhibited tumor growth in athymic nude mice in which BT474 cells were injected into the mammary fat pad. TA represents a novel and promising new anticancer drug that targets erbB2 by decreasing transcription of this oncogene. PMID:19435870

  8. Ursolic Acid Inhibits Growth and Metastasis of Human Colorectal Cancer in an Orthotopic Nude Mouse Model by Targeting Multiple Cell Signaling Pathways: Chemosensitization with Capecitabine

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R.; Sung, Bokyung; Reuter, Simone; Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Deorukhkar, Amit; Diagaradjane, Parmeswaran; Wei, Caimiao; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Krishnan, Sunil; Guha, Sushovan; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Development of chemoresistance, poor prognosis, and metastasis often renders the current treatments for colorectal cancer (CRC) ineffective. Whether ursolic acid (UA), a component of numerous medicinal plants, either alone or in combination with capecitabine, can inhibit the growth and metastasis of human CRC was investigated. Experimental design The effect of UA on proliferation of colorectal cancer cell lines was examined by mitochondrial dye-uptake assay, apoptosis by esterase staining, NF-?B activation by DNA binding assay and protein expression by western blot. The effect of UA on the growth and chemosensitization was also examined in orthotopically-implanted CRC in nude mice. Results We found that UA inhibited the proliferation of different colon cancer cell lines. This is correlated with inhibition of constitutive NF-?B activation and downregulation of cell survival (Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, cFLIP, survivin), proliferative (Cyclin D1), and metastatic (MMP-9, VEGF, ICAM-1) proteins. When examined in an orthotopic nude-mice model, UA significantly inhibited tumor volume, ascites formation and distant organ metastasis, and this effect was enhanced with capecitabine. Immunohistochemistry of tumor tissue indicated that UA downregulated biomarkers of proliferation (Ki-67) and microvessel density (CD31). This effect was accompanied by suppression of NF-?B, STAT3, and ?-catenin. In addition, UA suppressed EGFR, and induced p53, and p21 expression. We also observed bioavailability of UA in the serum and tissue of animals. Conclusion Overall our results demonstrate that UA can inhibit the growth and metastasis of CRC and further enhance the therapeutic effects of capecitabine through suppression of multiple biomarkers linked to inflammation, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. PMID:22832932

  9. Short-chain fatty acids inhibit growth hormone and prolactin gene transcription via cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway in dairy cow anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Fa; Fu, Shou-Peng; Li, Su-Nan; Hu, Zhong-Ming; Xue, Wen-Jing; Li, Zhi-Qiang; Huang, Bing-Xu; Lv, Qing-Kang; Liu, Ju-Xiong; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) play a key role in altering carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, influence endocrine pancreas activity, and as a precursor of ruminant milk fat. However, the effect and detailed mechanisms by which SCFAs mediate bovine growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) gene transcription remain unclear. In this study, we detected the effects of SCFAs (acetate, propionate, and butyrate) on the activity of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway, GH, PRL, and Pit-1 gene transcription in dairy cow anterior pituitary cells (DCAPCs). The results showed that SCFAs decreased intracellular cAMP levels and a subsequent reduction in PKA activity. Inhibition of PKA activity decreased CREB phosphorylation, thereby inhibiting GH and PRL gene transcription. Furthermore, PTX blocked SCFAs- inhibited cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. These data showed that the inhibition of GH and PRL gene transcription induced by SCFAs is mediated by Gi activation and that propionate is more potent than acetate and butyrate in inhibiting GH and PRL gene transcription. In conclusion, this study identifies a biochemical mechanism for the regulation of SCFAs on bovine GH and PRL gene transcription in DCAPCs, which may serve as one of the factors that regulate pituitary function in accordance with dietary intake. PMID:24177567

  10. A mechanism of growth inhibition by abscisic acid in germinating seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana based on inhibition of plasma membrane H+-ATPase and decreased cytosolic pH, K+, and anions

    PubMed Central

    Planes, Mara D.; Nioles, Regina; Rubio, Lourdes; Bissoli, Gaetano; Bueso, Eduardo; Garca-Snchez, Mara J.; Alejandro, Santiago; Gonzalez-Guzmn, Miguel; Hedrich, Rainer; Rodriguez, Pedro L.; Fernndez, Jos A.; Serrano, Ramn

    2015-01-01

    The stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) induces expression of defence genes in many organs, modulates ion homeostasis and metabolism in guard cells, and inhibits germination and seedling growth. Concerning the latter effect, several mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with improved capability for H+ efflux (wat1-1D, overexpression of AKT1 and ost2-1D) are less sensitive to inhibition by ABA than the wild type. This suggested that ABA could inhibit H+ efflux (H+-ATPase) and induce cytosolic acidification as a mechanism of growth inhibition. Measurements to test this hypothesis could not be done in germinating seeds and we used roots as the most convenient system. ABA inhibited the root plasma-membrane H+-ATPase measured in vitro (ATP hydrolysis by isolated vesicles) and in vivo (H+ efflux from seedling roots). This inhibition involved the core ABA signalling elements: PYR/PYL/RCAR ABA receptors, ABA-inhibited protein phosphatases (HAB1), and ABA-activated protein kinases (SnRK2.2 and SnRK2.3). Electrophysiological measurements in root epidermal cells indicated that ABA, acting through the PYR/PYL/RCAR receptors, induced membrane hyperpolarization (due to K+ efflux through the GORK channel) and cytosolic acidification. This acidification was not observed in the wat1-1D mutant. The mechanism of inhibition of the H+-ATPase by ABA and its effects on cytosolic pH and membrane potential in roots were different from those in guard cells. ABA did not affect the in vivo phosphorylation level of the known activating site (penultimate threonine) of H+-ATPase in roots, and SnRK2.2 phosphorylated in vitro the C-terminal regulatory domain of H+-ATPase while the guard-cell kinase SnRK2.6/OST1 did not. PMID:25371509

  11. A mechanism of growth inhibition by abscisic acid in germinating seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana based on inhibition of plasma membrane H+-ATPase and decreased cytosolic pH, K+, and anions.

    PubMed

    Planes, Mara D; Nioles, Regina; Rubio, Lourdes; Bissoli, Gaetano; Bueso, Eduardo; Garca-Snchez, Mara J; Alejandro, Santiago; Gonzalez-Guzmn, Miguel; Hedrich, Rainer; Rodriguez, Pedro L; Fernndez, Jos A; Serrano, Ramn

    2015-02-01

    The stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) induces expression of defence genes in many organs, modulates ion homeostasis and metabolism in guard cells, and inhibits germination and seedling growth. Concerning the latter effect, several mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with improved capability for H(+) efflux (wat1-1D, overexpression of AKT1 and ost2-1D) are less sensitive to inhibition by ABA than the wild type. This suggested that ABA could inhibit H(+) efflux (H(+)-ATPase) and induce cytosolic acidification as a mechanism of growth inhibition. Measurements to test this hypothesis could not be done in germinating seeds and we used roots as the most convenient system. ABA inhibited the root plasma-membrane H(+)-ATPase measured in vitro (ATP hydrolysis by isolated vesicles) and in vivo (H(+) efflux from seedling roots). This inhibition involved the core ABA signalling elements: PYR/PYL/RCAR ABA receptors, ABA-inhibited protein phosphatases (HAB1), and ABA-activated protein kinases (SnRK2.2 and SnRK2.3). Electrophysiological measurements in root epidermal cells indicated that ABA, acting through the PYR/PYL/RCAR receptors, induced membrane hyperpolarization (due to K(+) efflux through the GORK channel) and cytosolic acidification. This acidification was not observed in the wat1-1D mutant. The mechanism of inhibition of the H(+)-ATPase by ABA and its effects on cytosolic pH and membrane potential in roots were different from those in guard cells. ABA did not affect the in vivo phosphorylation level of the known activating site (penultimate threonine) of H(+)-ATPase in roots, and SnRK2.2 phosphorylated in vitro the C-terminal regulatory domain of H(+)-ATPase while the guard-cell kinase SnRK2.6/OST1 did not. PMID:25371509

  12. Salvianolic Acid B Inhibits Growth of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma in vitro and in vivo via Cyclooxygenase-2 and Apoptotic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yubin; Xie, Tianpei; Korotcov, Alexandru; Zhou, Yanfei; Pang, Xiaowu; Shan, Liang; Ji, Hongguang; Sridhar, Rajagopalan; Wang, Paul; Califano, Joseph; Gu, Xinbin

    2010-01-01

    Overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in oral mucosa has been associated with increased risk of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Celecoxib is a non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, which inhibits COX-2 but not COX-1. This selective COX-2 inhibitor holds promise as a cancer preventive agent. Concerns about cardiotoxicity of celecoxib, limits its use in long term chemoprevention and therapy. Salvianolic acid B (Sal-B) is a leading bioactive component of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge, which is used for treating neoplastic and chronic inflammatory diseases in China. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which Sal-B inhibits HNSCC growth. Sal-B was isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge by solvent extraction followed by two chromatographic steps. Pharmacological activity of Sal-B was assessed in HNSCC and other cell lines by estimating COX-2 expression, cell viability and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Sal-B inhibited growth of HNSCC JHU-022 and JHU-013 cells with IC50 of 18 and 50 µM respectively. Nude mice with HNSCC solid tumor xenografts were treated with Sal-B (80mg/kg/day) or celecoxib (5mg/kg/day) for 25 days to investigate in vivo effects of the COX-2 inhibitors. Tumor volumes in Sal-B treated group were significantly lower than those in celecoxib treated or untreated control groups (p<0.05). Sal-B inhibited COX-2 expression in cultured HNSCC cells and in HNSCC cells isolated from tumor xenografts. Sal-B also caused dose-dependent inhibition of prostaglandin E2 synthesis, either with or without lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Taken together, Sal-B shows promise as a COX-2 targeted anticancer agent for HNSCC prevention and treatment. PMID:19123475

  13. Boswellic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human colorectal cancer in orthotopic mouse model by downregulating inflammatory, proliferative, invasive and angiogenic biomarkers.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Yadav VR; Prasad S; Sung B; Gelovani JG; Guha S; Krishnan S; Aggarwal BB

    2012-05-01

    Numerous cancer therapeutics were originally identified from natural products used in traditional medicine. One such agent is acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA), derived from the gum resin of the Boswellia serrata known as Salai guggal or Indian frankincense. Traditionally, it has been used in Ayurvedic medicine to treat proinflammatory conditions. In this report, we hypothesized that AKBA can affect the growth and metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC) in orthotopically implanted tumors in nude mice. We found that the oral administration of AKBA (50-200 mg/kg) dose-dependently inhibited the growth of CRC tumors in mice, resulting in decrease in tumor volumes than those seen in vehicle-treated mice without significant decreases in body weight. In addition, we observed that AKBA was highly effective in suppressing ascites and distant metastasis to the liver, lungs and spleen in orthotopically implanted tumors in nude mice. When examined for the mechanism, we found that markers of tumor proliferation index Ki-67 and the microvessel density cluster of differentiation (CD31) were significantly downregulated by AKBA treatment. We also found that AKBA significantly suppressed nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation in the tumor tissue and expression of proinflammatory (cyclooxygenase-2), tumor survival (bcl-2, bcl-xL, inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP-1) and survivin), proliferative (cyclin D1), invasive (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and matrix metalloproteinase-9) and angiogenic C-X-C (CXC) receptor 4 and vascular endothelial growth factor) biomarkers. When examined for serum and tissue levels of AKBA, a dose-dependent increase in the levels of the drug was detected, indicating its bioavailability. Thus, our findings suggest that this boswellic acid analog can inhibit the growth and metastasis of human CRC in vivo through downregulation of cancer-associated biomarkers.

  14. Boswellic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human colorectal cancer in orthotopic mouse model by downregulating inflammatory, proliferative, invasive and angiogenic biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vivek R; Prasad, Sahdeo; Sung, Bokyung; Gelovani, Juri G; Guha, Sushovan; Krishnan, Sunil; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2012-05-01

    Numerous cancer therapeutics were originally identified from natural products used in traditional medicine. One such agent is acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA), derived from the gum resin of the Boswellia serrata known as Salai guggal or Indian frankincense. Traditionally, it has been used in Ayurvedic medicine to treat proinflammatory conditions. In this report, we hypothesized that AKBA can affect the growth and metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC) in orthotopically implanted tumors in nude mice. We found that the oral administration of AKBA (50-200 mg/kg) dose-dependently inhibited the growth of CRC tumors in mice, resulting in decrease in tumor volumes than those seen in vehicle-treated mice without significant decreases in body weight. In addition, we observed that AKBA was highly effective in suppressing ascites and distant metastasis to the liver, lungs and spleen in orthotopically implanted tumors in nude mice. When examined for the mechanism, we found that markers of tumor proliferation index Ki-67 and the microvessel density cluster of differentiation (CD31) were significantly downregulated by AKBA treatment. We also found that AKBA significantly suppressed nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) activation in the tumor tissue and expression of proinflammatory (cyclooxygenase-2), tumor survival (bcl-2, bcl-xL, inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP-1) and survivin), proliferative (cyclin D1), invasive (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and matrix metalloproteinase-9) and angiogenic C-X-C (CXC) receptor 4 and vascular endothelial growth factor) biomarkers. When examined for serum and tissue levels of AKBA, a dose-dependent increase in the levels of the drug was detected, indicating its bioavailability. Thus, our findings suggest that this boswellic acid analog can inhibit the growth and metastasis of human CRC in vivo through downregulation of cancer-associated biomarkers. PMID:21702037

  15. Efficient delivery of ursolic acid by poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-block-poly (?-caprolactone) nanoparticles for inhibiting the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Zheng, Donghui; Ding, Jing; Xu, Huae; Li, Xiaolin; Sun, Weihao

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpenoid derived from Catharanthus trichophyllus roots, could inhibit the growth of a series of cancer cells. However, the potential for clinical application of UA is greatly hampered by its poor solubility, whereas the hydrophobicity of UA renders it a promising model drug for nanosized delivery systems. In the current study, we loaded UA into amphiphilic poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-block-poly (?-caprolactone) nanoparticles and performed physiochemical characterization as well as analysis of the releasing capacity. In vitro experiments indicated that UA-NPs inhibited the growth of liver cancer cells and induced cellular apoptosis more efficiently than did free UA. Moreover, UA-NPs significantly delayed tumor growth and localized to the tumor site when compared with the equivalent dose of UA. In addition, both Western blotting and immunohistochemistry suggested that the possible mechanism of the superior efficiency of UA-NPs is mediation by the regulation of apoptosis-related proteins. Therefore, UA-NPs show potential as a promising nanosized drug system for liver cancer therapy. PMID:25792825

  16. Betulinic acid inhibits colon cancer cell and tumor growth and induces proteasome-dependent and -independent downregulation of specificity proteins (Sp) transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Betulinic acid (BA) inhibits growth of several cancer cell lines and tumors and the effects of BA have been attributed to its mitochondriotoxicity and inhibition of multiple pro-oncogenic factors. Previous studies show that BA induces proteasome-dependent degradation of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in prostate cancer cells and this study focused on the mechanism of action of BA in colon cancer cells. Methods The effects of BA on colon cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis and tumor growth in vivo were determined using standardized assays. The effects of BA on Sp proteins and Sp-regulated gene products were analyzed by western blots, and real time PCR was used to determine microRNA-27a (miR-27a) and ZBTB10 mRNA expression. Results BA inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in RKO and SW480 colon cancer cells and inhibited tumor growth in athymic nude mice bearing RKO cells as xenograft. BA also decreased expression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors which are overexpressed in colon cancer cells and decreased levels of several Sp-regulated genes including survivin, vascular endothelial growth factor, p65 sub-unit of NF?B, epidermal growth factor receptor, cyclin D1, and pituitary tumor transforming gene-1. The mechanism of action of BA was dependent on cell context, since BA induced proteasome-dependent and proteasome-independent downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in SW480 and RKO cells, respectively. In RKO cells, the mechanism of BA-induced repression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 was due to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), ROS-mediated repression of microRNA-27a, and induction of the Sp repressor gene ZBTB10. Conclusions These results suggest that the anticancer activity of BA in colon cancer cells is due, in part, to downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors; however, the mechanism of this response is cell context-dependent. PMID:21864401

  17. Acid precipitation and food quality: Inhibition of growth and survival in black ducks and mallards by dietary aluminum, calcium and phosphorus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    In areas impacted by acid precipitation, water chemistry of acidic ponds and streams often changes, resulting in increased mobilization of aluminum and decreased concentration of calcium carbonate. Aluminum binds with phosphorus and inhibits its uptake by organisms. Thus, invertebrate food organisms used by waterfowl may have inadequate Ca and P or elevated Al for normal growth and development. Acid rain and its effects may be one of the factors negatively impacting American black ducks (Anas rubripes) in eastern North America. One-day old mallards (A. platyrhynchos) and black ducks were placed on one of three Ca:P regimens: low:low (LL), normal:normal (NN), and low:high (LH) with each regimen divided further into three or four Al levels for 10 weeks. Forty-five % of the black ducks died on nine different diets whereas only 28% of the mallards died on three different diets. Mortality was significantly related to diet in both species. Growth rates for body weight, culmens, wings, and tarsi of both species on control diets exceeded those on many treatment diets but the differences were less apparent for mallards than for black ducks. Differences among treatments were due to both Ca:P and Al levels.

  18. Aromatic hydrocarbon receptor inhibits lysophosphatidic acid-induced vascular endothelial growth factor-A expression in PC-3 prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Pei-Yi; Lin, Yueh-Chien; Lan, Shun-Yan; Huang, Yuan-Li; Lee, Hsinyu; Department of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •LPA-induced VEGF-A expression was regulated by HIF-1α and ARNT. •PI3K mediated LPA-induced VEGF-A expression. •AHR signaling inhibited LPA-induced VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid growth factor with multiple biological functions and has been shown to stimulate cancer cell secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) and trigger angiogenesis. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), a heterodimer consisting of HIF-1α and HIF-1β (also known as aromatic hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)) subunits, is an important regulator of angiogenesis in prostate cancer (PC) through the enhancement of VEGF-A expression. In this study, we first confirmed the ability of LPA to induce VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells and then validated that LPA-induced VEGF-A expression was regulated by HIF-1α and ARNT through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation. Aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a receptor for dioxin-like compounds, functions as a transcription factor through dimerization with ARNT and was found to inhibit prostate carcinogenesis and vanadate-induced VEGF-A production. Since ARNT is a common dimerization partner of AHR and HIF-1α, we hypothesized that AHR might suppress LPA-induced VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells by competing with HIF-1α for ARNT. Here we demonstrated that overexpression and ligand activation of AHR inhibited HIF-1-mediated VEGF-A induction by LPA treatment of PC-3 cells. In conclusion, our results suggested that AHR activation may inhibit LPA-induced VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells by attenuating HIF-1α signaling, and subsequently, suppressing angiogenesis and metastasis of PC. These results suggested that AHR presents a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of PC metastasis.

  19. Caffeic Acid Derivatives Inhibit the Growth of Colon Cancer: Involvement of the PI3-K/Akt and AMPK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Pai, Man-Hui; Chiu, Hsi-Lin; Rodriguez, Raymond L.; Tang, Feng-Yao

    2014-01-01

    Background The aberrant regulation of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3-K)/Akt, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR) signaling pathways in cancer has prompted significant interest in the suppression of these pathways to treat cancer. Caffeic acid (CA) has been reported to possess important anti-inflammatory actions. However, the molecular mechanisms by which CA derivatives including caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and caffeic acid phenylpropyl ester (CAPPE), exert inhibitory effects on the proliferation of human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells have yet to be elucidated. Methodology/Principal Findings CAPE and CAPPE were evaluated for their ability to modulate these signaling pathways and suppress the proliferation of CRC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Anti-cancer effects of these CA derivatives were measured by using proliferation assays, cell cycle analysis, western blotting assay, reporter gene assay and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining assays both in vitro and in vivo. This study demonstrates that CAPE and CAPPE exhibit a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation and survival of CRC cells through the induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and augmentation of apoptotic pathways. Consumption of CAPE and CAPPE significantly inhibited the growth of colorectal tumors in a mouse xenograft model. The mechanisms of action included a modulation of PI3-K/Akt, AMPK and m-TOR signaling cascades both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, the results demonstrate novel anti-cancer mechanisms of CA derivatives against the growth of human CRC cells. Conclusions CA derivatives are potent anti-cancer agents that augment AMPK activation and promote apoptosis in human CRC cells. The structure of CA derivatives can be used for the rational design of novel inhibitors that target human CRC cells. PMID:24960186

  20. Phosphatidic Acid Increases Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression by Stabilizing mRNA Decay and by Inhibiting Lysosomal and Proteasomal Degradation of the Internalized Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hatton, Nathaniel; Lintz, Erin; Mahankali, Madhu; Henkels, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is one of the frequent mechanisms implicated in cancer progression, and so is the overexpression of the enzyme phospholipase D (PLD) and its reaction product, phosphatidic acid (PA). However, an understanding of how these signaling molecules interact at the level of gene expression is lacking. Catalytically active PLD enhanced expression of EGFR in human breast cancer cells. Overexpression of the PLD2 isoform increased EGFR mRNA and protein expression. It also negated an EGFR downregulation mediated by small interfering RNA targeting EGFR (siEGFR). Several mechanisms contributed to the alteration in EGFR expression. First was the stabilization of EGFR transcripts as PLD2 delayed mRNA decay, which prolonged their half-lives. Second, RNase enzymatic activity was inhibited by PA. Third, protein stabilization also occurred, as indicated by PLD resistance to cycloheximide-induced EGFR protein degradation. Fourth, PA inhibited lysosomal and proteasomal degradation of internalized EGFR. PLD2 and EGFR colocalized at the cell membrane, and JAK3 phosphorylation at Tyr980/Tyr981 followed receptor endocytosis. Further, the presence of PLD2 increased stabilization of intracellular EGFR in large recycling vesicles at ∼15 min of EGF stimulation. Thus, PLD2-mediated production of PA contributed to the control of EGFR exposure to ligand through a multipronged transcriptional and posttranscriptional program during the out-of-control accumulation of EGFR signaling in cancer cells. PMID:26124282

  1. Phosphatidic Acid Increases Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression by Stabilizing mRNA Decay and by Inhibiting Lysosomal and Proteasomal Degradation of the Internalized Receptor.

    PubMed

    Hatton, Nathaniel; Lintz, Erin; Mahankali, Madhu; Henkels, Karen M; Gomez-Cambronero, Julian

    2015-09-01

    Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is one of the frequent mechanisms implicated in cancer progression, and so is the overexpression of the enzyme phospholipase D (PLD) and its reaction product, phosphatidic acid (PA). However, an understanding of how these signaling molecules interact at the level of gene expression is lacking. Catalytically active PLD enhanced expression of EGFR in human breast cancer cells. Overexpression of the PLD2 isoform increased EGFR mRNA and protein expression. It also negated an EGFR downregulation mediated by small interfering RNA targeting EGFR (siEGFR). Several mechanisms contributed to the alteration in EGFR expression. First was the stabilization of EGFR transcripts as PLD2 delayed mRNA decay, which prolonged their half-lives. Second, RNase enzymatic activity was inhibited by PA. Third, protein stabilization also occurred, as indicated by PLD resistance to cycloheximide-induced EGFR protein degradation. Fourth, PA inhibited lysosomal and proteasomal degradation of internalized EGFR. PLD2 and EGFR colocalized at the cell membrane, and JAK3 phosphorylation at Tyr980/Tyr981 followed receptor endocytosis. Further, the presence of PLD2 increased stabilization of intracellular EGFR in large recycling vesicles at ?15 min of EGF stimulation. Thus, PLD2-mediated production of PA contributed to the control of EGFR exposure to ligand through a multipronged transcriptional and posttranscriptional program during the out-of-control accumulation of EGFR signaling in cancer cells. PMID:26124282

  2. Ascorbic acid mitigation of water stress-inhibition of root growth in association with oxidative defense in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi; Xu, Qian; Huang, Bingru

    2015-01-01

    Root growth inhibition by water stress may be related to oxidative damages. The objectives of this study were to determine whether exogenous application of ascorbic acid (ASA) could mitigate root growth decline due to water stress and whether ASA effects on root growth could be regulated through activating non-enzymatic or enzymatic antioxidant systems in perennial grass species. Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb. cv. “K-31”) plants were grown in nutrient solution, and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-8000 was added into the solution to induce water stress. For exogenous ASA treatment, ASA (5 mM) was added into the solution with or without PEG-8000. Plants treated with ASA under water stress showed significantly increased root growth rate, and those roots had significantly lower content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (H2O2 and O2− content) than those without ASA treatment. Malondialdehyde content in root tips treated with ASA under water stress was also significantly reduced compared with those under water stress alone. In addition, free ascorbate and total ascorbate content were significantly higher in roots treated with ASA under water stress than those without ASA treatment. The enzymatic activities for ROS scavenging-related genes were not significantly altered by ASA treatment under water stress, while transcript abundances of genes encoding superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, dehydroascorbate reductase, and monohydroascorbate reductase showed significant decreases in the root elongation zone and significant increases in the root maturation zone treated with ASA under water stress. Transcripts of genes for expansins and xyloglucan endotransglycosylases showed increased abundances in ASA-treated root maturation zone under water stress, indicating that ASA could accelerated cell wall loosening and cell expansion. The results suggested that exogenous treatment of roots with ASA enhanced root elongation under water stress, which could be attributed by increasing non-enzymatic antioxidant production, suppressing ROS toxicity and up-regulating gene expression of cell-wall loosening proteins controlling cell expansion. PMID:26483821

  3. Salicylic acid alleviates cadmium-induced inhibition of growth and photosynthesis through upregulating antioxidant defense system in two melon cultivars (Cucumis melo L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongping; Xu, Shuang; Yang, Shaojun; Chen, Youyuan

    2015-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread toxic heavy metal that usually causes deleterious effects on plant growth and development. Salicylic acid (SA), a naturally existing phenolic compound, is involved in specific responses to various environmental stresses. To explore the role of SA in the tolerance of melon (Cucumis melo L.) to Cd stress, the influence of SA application on the growth and physiological processes was compared in the two melon cultivars Hamilv (Cd-tolerant) and Xiulv (Cd-sensitive) under Cd stress. Under 400-?M Cd treatment, Hamilv showed a higher biomass accumulation, more chlorophyll (Chl), greater photosynthesis, and less oxidative damage compared to Xiulv. Foliar spraying of 0.1 mM SA dramatically alleviated Cd-induced growth inhibition in the two melon genotypes. Simultaneously, SA pretreatment attenuated the decrease in Chl content, photosynthetic capacity, and PSII photochemistry efficiency in Cd-stressed plants. Furthermore, exogenous SA significantly reduced superoxide anion production and lipid peroxidation, followed by increase in the activities of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase, guaiacol peroxidase, catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase, and content of soluble protein and free proline in both the genotypes under Cd stress. The effect of SA was more conspicuous in Xiulv than Hamilv, reflected in the biomass, photosynthetic pigments, stomatal conductance, water use efficiency, and antioxidant enzymes. These results suggest that exogenous spray of SA can alleviate the adverse effects of Cd on the growth and photosynthesis of both the melon cultivars, mostly through promoting antioxidant defense capacity. It also indicates that SA-included protection against Cd damage is to a greater extent more pronounced in Cd-sensitive genotype than Cd-tolerant genotype. PMID:25398649

  4. All-trans-retinoic Acid Modulates the Plasticity and Inhibits the Motility of Breast Cancer Cells: ROLE OF NOTCH1 AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR (TGFβ).

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Adriana; Affatato, Roberta; Centritto, Floriana; Fratelli, Maddalena; Kurosaki, Mami; Barzago, Maria Monica; Bolis, Marco; Terao, Mineko; Garattini, Enrico; Paroni, Gabriela

    2015-07-17

    All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) is a natural compound proposed for the treatment/chemoprevention of breast cancer. Increasing evidence indicates that aberrant regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a determinant of the cancer cell invasive and metastatic behavior. The effects of ATRA on EMT are largely unknown. In HER2-positive SKBR3 and UACC812 cells, showing co-amplification of the ERBB2 and RARA genes, ATRA activates a RARα-dependent epithelial differentiation program. In SKBR3 cells, this causes the formation/reorganization of adherens and tight junctions. Epithelial differentiation and augmented cell-cell contacts underlie the anti-migratory action exerted by the retinoid in cells exposed to the EMT-inducing factors EGF and heregulin-β1. Down-regulation of NOTCH1, an emerging EMT modulator, is involved in the inhibition of motility by ATRA. Indeed, the retinoid blocks NOTCH1 up-regulation by EGF and/or heregulin-β1. Pharmacological inhibition of γ-secretase and NOTCH1 processing also abrogates SKBR3 cell migration. Stimulation of TGFβ contributes to the anti-migratory effect of ATRA. The retinoid switches TGFβ from an EMT-inducing and pro-migratory determinant to an anti-migratory mediator. Inhibition of the NOTCH1 pathway not only plays a role in the anti-migratory action of ATRA; it is relevant also for the anti-proliferative activity of the retinoid in HCC1599 breast cancer cells, which are addicted to NOTCH1 for growth/viability. This effect is enhanced by the combination of ATRA and the γ-secretase inhibitor N-(N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl)-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester, supporting the concept that the two compounds act at the transcriptional and post-translational levels along the NOTCH1 pathway. PMID:26018078

  5. Well having inhibited microbial growth

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Brady D.; Dooley, Kirk J.

    2006-08-15

    The invention includes methods of inhibiting microbial growth in a well. A packing material containing a mixture of a first material and an antimicrobial agent is provided to at least partially fill a well bore. One or more access tubes are provided in an annular space around a casing within the well bore. The access tubes have a first terminal opening located at or above a ground surface and have a length that extends from the first terminal opening at least part of the depth of the well bore. The access tubes have a second terminal opening located within the well bore. An antimicrobial material is supplied into the well bore through the first terminal opening of the access tubes. The invention also includes well constructs.

  6. Epidermal growth factor inhibits radioiodine uptake but stimulates deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in newborn rat thyroids grown in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, S.; Spaulding, S.W. )

    1990-08-01

    We have studied the effect of altering the level of circulating epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the function and growth of newborn rat thyroids transplanted into nude mice. Preliminary studies confirmed that sialoadenectomy reduced circulating EGF levels in nude mice (from 0.17 +/- 0.02 to 0.09 +/- 0.02 ng/ml), and that ip injection of 5 micrograms EGF raised EGF levels (the peak level of 91.7 +/- 3.3 ng/ml was achieved at 30 min, with a subsequent half-life of about 1 h). The radioiodine uptake by newborn rat thyroid transplants in the sialoadenectomized and sham-operated animals correlated inversely with the circulating EGF levels determined when the mice were killed (r = -0.99). Low-dose TSH treatment (0.1 microU/day) generally stimulated the radioiodine uptake, but high-dose TSH groups (100 microU/day) were not significantly different from the control group. The 5-day nuclear (3H)thymidine labeling index was 6.8 +/- 0.5% IN newborn rat thyroid transplants grown in sialoadenectomized animals, 13.1 +/- 0.3% in sham-operated animals, and 16.8 +/- 0.5% in nude mice receiving 5 micrograms EGF ip daily. In general, both low-dose and high-dose TSH promoted DNA synthesis under low EGF conditions but were ineffective in the presence of higher levels of EGF. Adult rat thyroid transplants showed no significant responses. Although sialoadenectomy may alter other factors besides EGF, it appears that changes in the levels of circulating EGF within the physiological range affect the function and growth of newborn rat thyroid transplants. Circulating EGF may play a role in thyroid maturation and may also be involved in the regulation of thyroid function throughout life.

  7. Cyclic phosphatidic acid inhibits the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor from diabetic human coronary artery endothelial cells through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Tsukahara, Ryoko; Haniu, Hisao; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko

    2015-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a disease characterized by building up plaques formation and leads to a potentially serious condition in which arteries are clogged by fatty substances such as cholesterol. Increasing evidence suggests that atherosclerosis is accelerated in type 2 diabetes. Recent study reported that high level of alkyl glycerophosphate (AGP) was accumulated in atherosclerotic lesions. The presence of this phospholipid in mildly oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is likely to be involved in atherogenesis. It has been reported that the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma plays a key role in developing atherosclerosis. Our previous result indicates that cyclic phosphatidic acid (cPA), one of bioactive lipids, potently suppresses neointima formation by inhibiting the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR?). However, the detailed mechanism is still unclear. In this study, to elucidate the mechanism of the cPA-PPAR? axis in the coronary artery endothelium, especially in patients with type 2 diabetes, we investigated the proliferation, migration, and secretion of VEGF in human coronary artery endothelial cells from diabetes patients (D-HCAECs). AGP induced cell growth and migration; however, cPA suppressed the AGP-elicited growth and migration in D-HCAECs. Moreover, AGP increased VEGF secretion from D-HCAECs, and this event was attenuated by cPA. Taken together, these results suggest that cPA suppresses VEGF-stimulated growth and migration in D-HCAECs. These findings could be important for regulatory roles of PPAR? and VEGF in the vascular processes associated with diabetes and atherosclerosis. PMID:26007326

  8. Influence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the on the ability of fatty acids to inhibit the growth of bacteria associated with poultry processing.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the bactericidal activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids was examined. A 0.5 M concentration of caproic, caprylic, capric, and lauric acids was dissolved in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH), and then supplemented with 0, 5, or 10 mM of EDTA. T...

  9. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimetabolite L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid inhibits growth of Erwinia amylovora and acts as a seed germination-arrest factor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Xiaoyun; Azevedo, Mark D; Armstrong, Donald J; Banowetz, Gary M; Reimmann, Cornelia

    2013-02-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimetabolite L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB) shares biological activities with 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine, a related molecule produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6. We found that culture filtrates of a P.?aeruginosa strain overproducing AMB weakly interfered with seed germination of the grassy weed Poa annua and strongly inhibited growth of Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of the devastating orchard crop disease known as fire blight. AMB was active against a 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine-resistant isolate of E.?amylovora, suggesting that the molecular targets of the two oxyvinylglycines in Erwinia do not, or not entirely, overlap. The AMB biosynthesis and transport genes were shown to be organized in two separate transcriptional units, ambA and ambBCDE, which were successfully expressed from IPTG-inducible tac promoters in the heterologous host P.?fluorescens CHA0. Engineered AMB production enabled this model biocontrol strain to become inhibitory against E.?amylovora and to weakly interfere with the germination of several graminaceous seeds. We conclude that AMB production requires no additional genes besides ambABCDE and we speculate that their expression in marketed fire blight biocontrol strains could potentially contribute to disease control. PMID:23757135

  10. Inhibition of Ethylene Biosynthesis by Salicylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Charles A.; Romani, Roger J.

    1988-01-01

    Salicylic acid inhibited ethylene formation from ACC in self-buffered (pH 3.8) pear (Pyrus communis) cell suspension cultures with a K1app of about 10 micromolar after 1 to 3 hours incubation. Inhibition appeared noncompetitive. Among 22 related phenolic compounds tested, only acetylsalicylic acid showed similar levels of inhibition. Inhibition by salicylic acid was inversely dependent on the pH of the culture medium and did not require a continuous external supply of salicylate. When compared to known inhibitors of the ethylene forming enzyme, cobalt, n-propyl gallate, and dinitrophenol, inhibition by salicylic acid most closely resembled that by dinitrophenol but salicylic acid did not produce the same degree of respiratory stimulation. Results are discussed in terms of other known effects of salicylic acid on plants, pH-dependency, and the possible influence of salicylic acid on electron transport. PMID:16666393

  11. Retinoic acid suppresses growth of lesions, inhibits peritoneal cytokine secretion, and promotes macrophage differentiation in an immunocompetent mouse model of endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Wieser, Friedrich; Wu, Juanjuan; Shen, Zhaoju; Taylor, Robert N.; Sidell, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of retinoic acid (RA) on establishment and growth of endometrial lesions, peritoneal IL-6 and MCP-1 concentrations, and CD38, CD11b, F4/80 expression on peritoneal macrophages in an immunocompetent mouse model of endometriosis. Design Experimental transplantation study using mice. Setting Academic medical center. Animals C57BL/6 recipient mice and syngeneic Green Fluorescent Protein transgenic (GFP+) mice. Intervention(s) Recipient mice were inoculated with GFP+ minced uterine tissue to induce endometriosis and treated with RA (400 nmol/day) or vehicle for 17 days (3 days before to 14 days after tissue injection). Main Outcome Measure(s) Total number of GFP+ implants in recipient mice, number of implants showing visible blood vessels, total volume of established lesions per mouse, concentrations of IL-6 and MCP-1 in peritoneal fluid, expression of CD11b, F4/80 and CD38 on peritoneal macrophages. Results 17 days of RA treatment reduced the number of implants versus controls and decreased the frequency of lesions with vessels. Peritoneal washings in RA-treated animals had lower IL-6 and MCP-1 than controls 3 days after endometrial inoculation and lower levels of IL-6 on day 14 after inoculation. Concomitant with these effects on day 14, CD38, CD11b, and F4/80 were higher on macrophages from RA-treated mice vs. controls. Conclusions RA inhibits the development of endometriotic implants. This effect may be caused, at least in part, by reduced IL-6 and MCP-1 production and enhanced differentiation of peritoneal macrophages. PMID:22464761

  12. Crocetinic acid inhibits hedgehog signaling to inhibit pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Parthasarathy; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Paul, Santanu; Kwatra, Deep; Palaniyandi, Kanagaraj; Islam, Shamima; Harihar, Sitaram; Ramalingam, Satish; Gutheil, William; Putty, Sandeep; Pradhan, Rohan; Padhye, Subhash; Welch, Danny R; Anant, Shrikant; Dhar, Animesh

    2015-09-29

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the US and no significant treatment is currently available. Here, we describe the effect of crocetinic acid, which we purified from commercial saffron compound crocetin using high performance liquid chromatography. Crocetinic acid inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, it induced apoptosis. Moreover, the compound significantly inhibited epidermal growth factor receptor and Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, crocetinic acid decreased the number and size of the pancospheres in a dose-dependent manner, and suppressed the expression of the marker protein DCLK-1 (Doublecortin Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase-1) suggesting that crocetinic acid targets cancer stem cells (CSC). To understand the mechanism of CSC inhibition, the signaling pathways affected by purified crocetinic acid were dissected. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) upon binding to its cognate receptor patched, allows smoothened to accumulate and activate Gli transcription factor. Crocetinic acid inhibited the expression of both Shh and smoothened. Finally, these data were confirmed in vivo where the compound at a dose of 0.5 mg/Kg bw suppressed growth of tumor xenografts. Collectively, these data suggest that purified crocetinic acid inhibits pancreatic CSC, thereby inhibiting pancreatic tumorigenesis. PMID:26317547

  13. Crocetinic acid inhibits hedgehog signaling to inhibit pancreatic cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Parthasarathy; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Paul, Santanu; Kwatra, Deep; Palaniyandi, Kanagaraj; Islam, Shamima; Harihar, Sitaram; Ramalingam, Satish; Gutheil, William; Putty, Sandeep; Pradhan, Rohan; Padhye, Subhash; Welch, Danny R.; Anant, Shrikant; Dhar, Animesh

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the US and no significant treatment is currently available. Here, we describe the effect of crocetinic acid, which we purified from commercial saffron compound crocetin using high performance liquid chromatography. Crocetinic acid inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, it induced apoptosis. Moreover, the compound significantly inhibited epidermal growth factor receptor and Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, crocetinic acid decreased the number and size of the pancospheres in a dose-dependent manner, and suppressed the expression of the marker protein DCLK-1 (Doublecortin Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase-1) suggesting that crocetinic acid targets cancer stem cells (CSC). To understand the mechanism of CSC inhibition, the signaling pathways affected by purified crocetinic acid were dissected. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) upon binding to its cognate receptor patched, allows smoothened to accumulate and activate Gli transcription factor. Crocetinic acid inhibited the expression of both Shh and smoothened. Finally, these data were confirmed in vivo where the compound at a dose of 0.5 mg/Kg bw suppressed growth of tumor xenografts. Collectively, these data suggest that purified crocetinic acid inhibits pancreatic CSC, thereby inhibiting pancreatic tumorigenesis. PMID:26317547

  14. Novel Bioactivity of Ellagic Acid in Inhibiting Human Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yi; Chen, Wei-Fan; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying; Chou, Duen-Suey; Lin, Li-Jyun; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Chang, Chao-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranates are widely consumed either as fresh fruit or in beverage form as juice and wine. Ellagic acid possesses potent antioxidative properties; it is known to be an effective phytotherapeutic agent with antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic qualities. Ellagic acid (20 to 80??M) exhibited a potent activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen; however, it did not inhibit platelet aggregation stimulated by thrombin, arachidonic acid, or U46619. Treatment with ellagic acid (50 and 80??M) significantly inhibited platelet activation stimulated by collagen; this alteration was accompanied by the inhibition of relative [Ca2+]i mobilization, and the phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC)?2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and Akt, as well as hydroxyl radical (OH?) formation. In addition, ellagic acid also inhibited p38 MAPK and Akt phosphorylation stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. By contrast, ellagic acid did not significantly affect PKC activation and platelet aggregation stimulated by PDBu. This study is the first to show that, in addition to being considered a possible agent for preventing tumor growth, ellagic acid possesses potent antiplatelet properties. It appears to initially inhibit the PLC?2-PKC cascade and/or hydroxyl radical formation, followed by decreased phosphorylation of MAPKs and Akt, ultimately inhibiting platelet aggregation. PMID:23533502

  15. Celecoxib and tauro-ursodeoxycholic acid co-treatment inhibits cell growth in familial adenomatous polyposis derived LT97 colon adenoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Heumen, Bjorn W.H. van; Roelofs, Hennie M.J.; Morsche, Rene H.M. te; Marian, Brigitte; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Peters, Wilbert H.M.

    2012-04-15

    Chemoprevention would be a desirable strategy to avoid duodenectomy in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) suffering from duodenal adenomatosis. We investigated the in vitro effects on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and COX-2 expression of the potential chemopreventives celecoxib and tauro-ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). HT-29 colon cancer cells and LT97 colorectal micro-adenoma cells derived from a patient with FAP, were exposed to low dose celecoxib and UDCA alone or in combination with tauro-cholic acid (CA) and tauro-chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), mimicking bile of FAP patients treated with UDCA. In HT-29 cells, co-treatment with low dose celecoxib and UDCA resulted in a decreased cell growth (14-17%, p < 0.01). A more pronounced decrease (23-27%, p < 0.01) was observed in LT97 cells. Cell growth of HT-29 cells exposed to 'artificial bile' enriched with UDCA, was decreased (p < 0.001), either in the absence or presence of celecoxib. In LT97 cells incubated with 'artificial bile' enriched with UDCA, cell growth was decreased only in the presence of celecoxib (p < 0.05). No clear evidence was found for involvement of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, caspase-3, or COX-2 in the cellular processes leading to the observed changes in cell growth. In conclusion, co-treatment with low dose celecoxib and UDCA has growth inhibitory effects on colorectal adenoma cells derived from a patient with FAP, and further research on this combination as promising chemopreventive strategy is desired. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Celecoxib and UDCA acid co-treatment decreases cell growth in colon tumor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UDCA enriched 'artificial bile' decreases LT-97 cell growth only in presence of celecoxib. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCNA, caspase-3, nor COX-2 seem to be involved in the observed changes in cell growth.

  16. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Pan, Pin-Ho; Chen, Wen-Ying; Huang, Hsuan-Yi; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. PMID:24876095

  17. Exogenous acid fibroblast growth factor inhibits ischemia-reperfusion-induced damage in intestinal epithelium via regulating P53 and P21WAF-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Fu, Xiao-Bing; Ge, Shi-Li; Li, Wen-Juan; Sun, Tong-Zhu; Sheng, Zhi-Yong

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To detect the effect of acid fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) on P53 and P21WAF-1 expression in rat intestine after ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury in order to explore the protective mechanisms of aFGF. METHODS: Male rats were randomly divided into four groups, namely intestinal ischemia-reperfusion group (R), aFGF treatment group (A), intestinal ischemia group (I), and sham-operated control group (C). In group I, the animals were killed after 45 min of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion. In groups R and A, the rats sustained for 45 min of SMA occlusion and were treated with normal saline (0.15 mL) and aFGF (20 ?g/kg, 0.15 mL), then sustained at various times for up to 48 h after reperfusion. In group C, SMA was separated, but without occlusion. Apoptosis in intestinal villi was determined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling technique (TUNEL). Intestinal tissue samples were taken not only for RT-PCR to detect P53 and P21WAF-1 gene expression, but also for immunohistochemical analysis to detect P53 and P21WAF-1 protein expression and distribution. RESULTS: In histopathological study, ameliorated intestinal structures were observed at 2, 6, and 12 h after reperfusion in A group compared to R group. The apoptotic rates were (41.173.49)%, (42.835.23)%, and (53.336.92)% at 2, 6, and 12 h after reperfusion, respectively in A group, which were apparently lower than those in R group at their matched time points (50.676.95)%, (54.177.86)%, and (64.336.47)%, respectively, (P<0.05)). The protein contents of P53 and P21WAF-1 were both significantly decreased in A group compared to R group (P<0.05) at 2-12 h after reperfusion, while the mRNA levels of P53 and P21WAF-1 in A group were obviously lower than those in R group at 6-12 h after reperfusion (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: P53 and P21WAF-1 protein accumulations are associated with intestinal barrier injury induced by I-R insult, while intravenous aFGF can alleviate apoptosis of rat intestinal cells by inhibiting P53 and P21WAF-1 protein expression. PMID:16437603

  18. Acidic Fibroblast Growth Factor Promotes Vascular Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjornsson, Thorir D.; Dryjski, Maciej; Tluczek, John; Mennie, Robert; Ronan, John; Mellin, Theodore N.; Thomas, Kenneth A.

    1991-10-01

    Intravascular injury to arteries can result in thickening of the intimal smooth muscle layer adjacent to the lumen by migration and proliferation of cells from the underlying medial smooth muscle layer accompanied by deposition of extracellular matrix. This pathological response, which decreases lumen diameter, might, in part, be the result of the access of smooth muscle cells to plasma and platelet-derived growth factors as a consequence of denudation of the overlying confluent monolayer of vascular endothelial cells. Injured rat carotid arteries were treated by i.v. administration of acidic fibroblast growth factor, a heparin-binding protein that is chemotactic and mitogenic for vascular endothelial cells. The growth factor treatment resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of intimal thickening with parallel promotion of endothelial regeneration over the injured area. Therefore, acidic fibroblast growth factor might be efficacious in the prevention of restenosis caused by intimal thickening following angioplasty in humans.

  19. Growth of transplastomic cells expressing D-amino acid oxidase in chloroplasts is tolerant to D-alanine and inhibited by D-valine.

    PubMed

    Gisby, Martin F; Mudd, Elisabeth A; Day, Anil

    2012-12-01

    Dual-conditional positive/negative selection markers are versatile genetic tools for manipulating genomes. Plastid genomes are relatively small and conserved DNA molecules that can be manipulated precisely by homologous recombination. High-yield expression of recombinant products and maternal inheritance of plastid-encoded traits make plastids attractive sites for modification. Here, we describe the cloning and expression of a dao gene encoding D-amino acid oxidase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plastids. The results provide genetic evidence for the uptake of D-amino acids into plastids, which contain a target that is inhibited by D-alanine. Importantly, this nonantibiotic-based selection system allows the use of cheap and widely available D-amino acids, which are relatively nontoxic to animals and microbes, to either select against (D-valine) or for (D-alanine) cells containing transgenic plastids. Positive/negative selection with d-amino acids was effective in vitro and against transplastomic seedlings grown in soil. The dual functionality of dao is highly suited to the polyploid plastid compartment, where it can be used to provide tolerance against potential D-alanine-based herbicides, control the timing of recombination events such as marker excision, influence the segregation of transgenic plastid genomes, identify loci affecting dao function in mutant screens, and develop D-valine-based methods to manage the spread of transgenic plastids tagged with dao. PMID:23085840

  20. Growth of Transplastomic Cells Expressing d-Amino Acid Oxidase in Chloroplasts Is Tolerant to d-Alanine and Inhibited by d-Valine1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Gisby, Martin F.; Mudd, Elisabeth A.; Day, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Dual-conditional positive/negative selection markers are versatile genetic tools for manipulating genomes. Plastid genomes are relatively small and conserved DNA molecules that can be manipulated precisely by homologous recombination. High-yield expression of recombinant products and maternal inheritance of plastid-encoded traits make plastids attractive sites for modification. Here, we describe the cloning and expression of a dao gene encoding d-amino acid oxidase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plastids. The results provide genetic evidence for the uptake of d-amino acids into plastids, which contain a target that is inhibited by d-alanine. Importantly, this nonantibiotic-based selection system allows the use of cheap and widely available d-amino acids, which are relatively nontoxic to animals and microbes, to either select against (d-valine) or for (d-alanine) cells containing transgenic plastids. Positive/negative selection with d-amino acids was effective in vitro and against transplastomic seedlings grown in soil. The dual functionality of dao is highly suited to the polyploid plastid compartment, where it can be used to provide tolerance against potential d-alanine-based herbicides, control the timing of recombination events such as marker excision, influence the segregation of transgenic plastid genomes, identify loci affecting dao function in mutant screens, and develop d-valine-based methods to manage the spread of transgenic plastids tagged with dao. PMID:23085840

  1. Specific bile acids inhibit hepatic fatty acid uptake

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Biao; Park, Hyo Min; Kazantzis, Melissa; Lin, Min; Henkin, Amy; Ng, Stephanie; Song, Sujin; Chen, Yuli; Tran, Heather; Lai, Robin; Her, Chris; Maher, Jacquelyn J.; Forman, Barry M.; Stahl, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Bile acids are known to play important roles as detergents in the absorption of hydrophobic nutrients and as signaling molecules in the regulation of metabolism. Here we tested the novel hypothesis that naturally occurring bile acids interfere with protein-mediated hepatic long chain free fatty acid (LCFA) uptake. To this end stable cell lines expressing fatty acid transporters as well as primary hepatocytes from mouse and human livers were incubated with primary and secondary bile acids to determine their effects on LCFA uptake rates. We identified ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA) as the two most potent inhibitors of the liver-specific fatty acid transport protein 5 (FATP5). Both UDCA and DCA were able to inhibit LCFA uptake by primary hepatocytes in a FATP5-dependent manner. Subsequently, mice were treated with these secondary bile acids in vivo to assess their ability to inhibit diet-induced hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Administration of DCA in vivo via injection or as part of a high-fat diet significantly inhibited hepatic fatty acid uptake and reduced liver triglycerides by more than 50%. In summary, the data demonstrate a novel role for specific bile acids, and the secondary bile acid DCA in particular, in the regulation of hepatic LCFA uptake. The results illuminate a previously unappreciated means by which specific bile acids, such as UDCA and DCA, can impact hepatic triglyceride metabolism and may lead to novel approaches to combat obesity-associated fatty liver disease. PMID:22531947

  2. Inhibition of multiplication of herpes simplex virus by caffeic acid.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Keiko; Tsujimoto, Kazuko; Uozaki, Misao; Nishide, Mitsunori; Suzuki, Yukiko; Koyama, A Hajime; Yamasaki, Hisashi

    2011-10-01

    Hot water extracts of coffee grinds and commercial instant coffee solutions have been shown to exhibit marked antiviral and virucidal activities against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Specifically, it has been shown that caffeine and N-methyl-pyridinium formate inhibit the multiplication of HSV-1 in HEp-2 cells. The present study examined the virological properties and the antiviral activity of caffeic acid against HSV-1. Caffeic acid inhibited the multiplication of HSV-1 in vitro, while chlorogenic acid, a caffeic acid ester with quinic acid, did not. These reagents did not have a direct virucidal effect. The one-step growth curve of HSV-1 showed that the addition of caffeic acid at 8 h post infection (h p.i.) did not significantly affect the formation of progeny viruses. An analysis of the influence of the time of caffeic acid addition, revealed that addition at an early time post infection remarkably inhibited the formation of progeny infectious virus in the infected cells, but its addition after 6 h p.i. (i.e., the time of the completion of viral genome replication) did not efficiently inhibit this process. These results indicate that caffeic acid inhibits HSV-1 multiplication mainly before the completion of viral DNA replication, but not thereafter. Although caffeic acid showed some cytotoxicity by prolonged incubation, the observed antiviral activity is likely not the secondary result of the cytotoxic effect of the reagent, because the inhibition of the virus multiplication was observed before appearance of the notable cytotoxicity. PMID:21725588

  3. Theobromine Inhibits Uric Acid Crystallization. A Potential Application in the Treatment of Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Grases, Felix; Rodriguez, Adrian; Costa-Bauza, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the capacity of methylxanthines (caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and paraxanthine) to inhibit uric acid crystallization, and to evaluate their potential application in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis. Materials and Methods The ability of methylxathines to inhibit uric acid nucleation was assayed turbidimetrically. Crystal morphology and its modification due to the effect of theobromine were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The ability of theobromine to inhibit uric acid crystal growth on calculi fragments resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was evaluated using a flow system. Results The turbidimetric assay showed that among the studied methylxanthines, theobromine could markedly inhibit uric acid nucleation. SEM images showed that the presence of theobromine resulted in thinner uric acid crystals. Furthermore, in a flow system theobromine blocked the regrowth of post-ESWL uric acid calculi fragments. Conclusions Theobromine, a natural dimethylxanthine present in high amounts in cocoa, acts as an inhibitor of nucleation and crystal growth of uric acid. Therefore, theobromine may be clinically useful in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis. PMID:25333633

  4. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Pan, Pin-Ho; Chen, Wen-Ying; Huang, Hsuan-Yi; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  5. Inhibition of bacterial activity in acid mine drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurdeep; Bhatnagar, Miss Mridula

    1988-12-01

    Acid mine drainage water give rise to rapid growth and activity of an iron- and sulphur- oxidizing bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidians which greatly accelerate acid producing reactions by oxidation of pyrite material associated with coal and adjoining strata. The role of this bacterium in production of acid mine drainage is described. This study presents the data which demonstrate the inhibitory effect of certain organic acids, sodium benzoate, sodium lauryl sulphate, quarternary ammonium compounds on the growth of the acidophilic aerobic autotroph Thiobacillus ferrooxidians. In each experiment, 10 milli-litres of laboratory developed culture of Thiobacillus ferrooxidians was added to 250 milli-litres Erlenmeyer flask containing 90 milli-litres of 9-k media supplemented with FeSO4 7H2O and organic compounds at various concentrations. Control experiments were also carried out. The treated and untreated (control) samples analysed at various time intervals for Ferrous Iron and pH levels. Results from this investigation showed that some organic acids, sodium benzoate, sodium lauryl sulphate and quarternary ammonium compounds at low concentration (10-2 M, 10-50 ppm concentration levels) are effective bactericides and able to inhibit and reduce the Ferrous Iron oxidation and acidity formation by inhibiting the growth of Thiobacillus ferrooxidians is also discussed and presented

  6. Phytic Acid Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    W?glarz, Ludmi?a; Dzier?ewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100??M and 500??M effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (1020%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100??M and 500??M significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100??M and 500??M) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products. PMID:24260736

  7. Rapid Effects of Indoleacetic Acid and Ethylene on the Growth of Intact Pea Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Rauser, Wilfried E.; Horton, Roger F.

    1975-01-01

    Root auxanometers were used to determine the growth rates of individual intact primary roots accurately and quickly. The growth of pea (Pisum sativum L.) roots was inhibited by both indoleacetic acid and ethylene within 20 minutes. A supramaximal concentration of ethylene inhibited root growth less than did 5 to 20 ?m indoleacetic acid, indicating that inhibition of root growth by auxin was not due only to indoleacetic acid-induced ethylene production. Inhibition of root growth was largely relieved within 60 minutes of removal of both growth regulators. PMID:16659098

  8. Understanding biocatalyst inhibition by carboxylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Jarboe, Laura R.; Royce, Liam A.; Liu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are an attractive biorenewable chemical in terms of their flexibility and usage as precursors for a variety of industrial chemicals. It has been demonstrated that such carboxylic acids can be fermentatively produced using engineered microbes, such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, like many other attractive biorenewable fuels and chemicals, carboxylic acids become inhibitory to these microbes at concentrations below the desired yield and titer. In fact, their potency as microbial inhibitors is highlighted by the fact that many of these carboxylic acids are routinely used as food preservatives. This review highlights the current knowledge regarding the impact that saturated, straight-chain carboxylic acids, such as hexanoic, octanoic, decanoic, and lauric acids can have on E. coli and S. cerevisiae, with the goal of identifying metabolic engineering strategies to increase robustness. Key effects of these carboxylic acids include damage to the cell membrane and a decrease of the microbial internal pH. Certain changes in cell membrane properties, such as composition, fluidity, integrity, and hydrophobicity, and intracellular pH are often associated with increased tolerance. The availability of appropriate exporters, such as Pdr12, can also increase tolerance. The effect on metabolic processes, such as maintaining appropriate respiratory function, regulation of Lrp activity and inhibition of production of key metabolites such as methionine, are also considered. Understanding the mechanisms of biocatalyst inhibition by these desirable products can aid in the engineering of robust strains with improved industrial performance. PMID:24027566

  9. Anthranilic acid release in adenosine-inhibited cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its inhibition by thiamin.

    PubMed

    Iwashima, A; Kawasaki, Y; Kimura, Y; Hasegawa, T

    1992-10-01

    Adenosine, at 1 mM concentrations or above, was found to have a fungistatic effect on Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A substance with amethyst fluorescence was detected in the medium of adenosine-inhibited cultures of S. cerevisiae. This compound was isolated and physicochemically identified as anthranilic acid. Both the inhibition of growth and release of anthranilic acid induced by adenosine were abrogated by thiamin or by the pyrimidine portion of thiamin, 2-methyl-4-amino-5-hdroxymethyl-pyrimidine (hydroxymethyl-pyrimidine); the latter was found to restore intracellular thiamin content that had been reduced by adenosine. It was demonstrated that effects of thiamin and hydroxymethylpyrimidine on S. cerevisiae cultured with adenosine resulted from their inhibition of adenosine uptake by growing yeast cells. PMID:1426996

  10. The pro-fibrotic properties of transforming growth factor on human fibroblasts are counteracted by caffeic acid by inhibiting myofibroblast formation and collagen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mia, Masum M; Bank, Ruud A

    2016-03-01

    Fibrosis is a chronic disorder affecting many organs. A universal process in fibrosis is the formation of myofibroblasts and the subsequent collagen deposition by these cells. Transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFβ1) plays a major role in the formation of myofibroblasts, e.g. by activating fibroblasts. Currently, no treatments are available to circumvent fibrosis. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) shows a broad spectrum of biological activities, including anti-fibrotic properties in vivo in mice and rats. However, little is known about the direct effects of CAPE on fibroblasts. We have tested whether CAPE is able to suppress myofibroblast formation and collagen formation of human dermal and lung fibroblasts exposed to TGFβ1, and found that this was indeed the case. In fact, the formation of myofibroblasts by TGFβ1 and subsequent collagen formation was completely abolished by CAPE. The same was observed for fibronectin and tenascin C. The lack of myofibroblast formation is likely due to the suppression of GLI1 and GLI2 expression by CAPE because of diminished nuclear SMAD2/3 levels. Post-treatment with CAPE after myofibroblast formation even resulted in a partial reversal of myofibroblasts into fibroblasts and/or reduction in collagen formation. Major discrepancies were seen between mRNA levels of collagen type I and cells stained positive for collagen, underlining the need for protein data in fibrosis studies to make reliable conclusions. PMID:26453399

  11. Different modes of inhibition for organic acids on polyphenoloxidase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Liu, Wei; Xiong, Zhiqiang; Zou, Liqiang; Chen, Jun; Liu, Junping; Zhong, Junzhen

    2016-05-15

    It is still unclear whether the inhibitory effect of organic acid on polyphenoloxidase (PPO) is due to the reversible inhibition or decrease of pH. In this study, cinnamic acid, citric acid and malic acid inhibited PPO in different modes. Results showed that the inhibition by cinnamic acid resulted from reversible inhibition, while the decrease of pH was the main cause for citric acid and malic acid. The kinetic results showed that cinnamic acid reversibly inhibited PPO in a mixed-type manner. Fluorescence emission spectra indicated that cinnamic acid might interact with PPO and quench its intrinsic fluorescence, while the decrease of the fluorescence intensity induced by citric acid or malic acid was due to the acid-pH. Cinnamic acid bound to PPO and induced the rearrangement of secondary structure. Molecular docking result revealed cinnamic acid inserted into the hydrophobic cavity of PPO by forming π-π stacking. PMID:26775993

  12. FERMENTATION ACIDS INHIBIT AMINO ACID DEAMINATION BY CLOSTRIDIUM SPOROGENES MD1 VIA A MECHANISM INVOLVING A DECLINE IN INTRACELLULAR GLUTAMATE RATHER THAN PROTONMOTIVE FORCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fermentation acids inhibited the growth and ammonia production of the amino acid fermenting bacterium, Clostridium sporogenes MD1, but only when the pH was acidic. Such inhibition was traditionally explained by the ability of fermentation acids to act as uncouplers and decrease protonmotive force (...

  13. Regulation of intestinal mucosal growth by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Amino acids, especially glutamine (GLN) have been known for many years to stimulate the growth of small intestinal mucosa. Polyamines are also required for optimal mucosal growth, and the inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the first rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis, blocks growth. Certain amino acids, primarily asparagine (ASN) and GLN stimulate ODC activity in a solution of physiological salts. More importantly, their presence is also required before growth factors and hormones such as epidermal growth factor and insulin are able to increase ODC activity. ODC activity is inhibited by antizyme-1 (AZ) whose synthesis is stimulated by polyamines, thus, providing a negative feedback regulation of the enzyme. In the absence of amino acids mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is inhibited, whereas, mTORC2 is stimulated leading to the inhibition of global protein synthesis but increasing the synthesis of AZ via a cap-independent mechanism. These data, therefore, explain why ASN or GLN is essential for the activation of ODC. Interestingly, in a number of papers, AZ has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation, stimulate apoptosis, or increase autophagy. Each of these activities results in decreased cellular growth. AZ binds to and accelerates the degradation of ODC and other proteins shown to regulate proliferation and cell death, such as Aurora-A, Cyclin D1, and Smad1. The correlation between the stimulation of ODC activity and the absence of AZ as influenced by amino acids is high. Not only do amino acids such as ASN and GLN stimulate ODC while inhibiting AZ synthesis, but also amino acids such as lysine, valine, and ornithine, which inhibit ODC activity, increase the synthesis of AZ. The question remaining to be answered is whether AZ inhibits growth directly or whether it acts by decreasing the availability of polyamines to the dividing cells. In either case, evidence strongly suggests that the regulation of AZ synthesis is the mechanism through which amino acids influence the growth of intestinal mucosa. This brief article reviews the experiments leading to the information presented above. We also present evidence from the literature that AZ acts directly to inhibit cell proliferation and increase the rate of apoptosis. Finally, we discuss future experiments that will determine the role of AZ in the regulation of intestinal mucosal growth by amino acids. PMID:23904095

  14. Growth inhibition of thermotolerant yeast, Kluyveromyces marxianus, in hydrolysates from cassava pulp.

    PubMed

    Rugthaworn, Prapassorn; Murata, Yoshinori; Machida, Masashi; Apiwatanapiwat, Waraporn; Hirooka, Akiko; Thanapase, Warunee; Dangjarean, Hatairat; Ushiwaka, Satoru; Morimitsu, Kozo; Kosugi, Akihiko; Arai, Takamitsu; Vaithanomsat, Pilanee

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we report the inhibition of Kluyveromyces marxianus TISTR5925 growth and ethanol fermentation in the presence of furan derivatives and weak acids (acetic acid and lactic acid) at high temperatures. Cassava pulp, obtained as the waste from starch processing, was collected from 14 starch factories located in several provinces of Thailand. At a high temperature (42C), the cassava pulp hydrolysate from some starch factories strongly inhibited growth and ethanol production of both K. marxianus (strain TISTR5925) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain K3). HPLC detected high levels of lactic acid and acetic acid in the hydrolysates, suggesting that these weak acids impaired the growth of K. marxianus at high temperature. We isolated Trp-requiring mutants that had reduced tolerance to acetic acid compared to the wild-type. This sensitivity to acetic acid was suppressed by supplementation of the medium with tryptophan. PMID:24781978

  15. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester reduces the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor through the inhibition of the ROS, PI3K and HIF-1? signaling pathways in human retinal pigment epithelial cells under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Paeng, Sung Hwa; Jung, Won-Kyo; Park, Won Sun; Lee, Dae-Sung; Kim, Gi-Young; Choi, Yung Hyun; Seo, Su-Kil; Jang, Won Hee; Choi, Jung Sik; Lee, Young-Min; Park, Saegwang; Choi, Il-Whan

    2015-05-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) can lead to progressive and severe visual loss. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promotes the development of CNV. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a biologically active component of the honeybee (Apis mellifera) propolis, has been demonstrated to have several interesting biological regulatory properties. The objective of this study was to determine whether treatment with CAPE results in the inhibition of the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE cells) under hypoxic conditions and to explore the possible underlying mechanisms. An in vitro experimental model of hypoxia was used to mimic an ischemic microenvironment for the RPE cells. Human RPE cells (ARPE-19) were exposed to hypoxia with or without CAPE pre-treatment. ARPE-19 cells were used to investigate the pathway involved in the regulation of VEGF production under hypoxic conditions, based on western blot analysis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). The amount of VEGF released from the hypoxia-exposed cells was significantly higher than that of the normoxic controls. Pre-treatment with CAPE suppressed the hypoxia-induced production of VEGF in the ARPE-19 cells, and this effect was inhibited through the attenuation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and the inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT and hypoxia-inducible factor-1? (HIF-1?) expression. These in vitro findings suggest that CAPE may prove to be a novel anti-angiogenic agent for the treatment of diseases associated with CNV. PMID:25738890

  16. Stanniocalcin-2 Inhibits Mammalian Growth by Proteolytic Inhibition of the Insulin-like Growth Factor Axis*

    PubMed Central

    Jepsen, Malene R.; Kløverpris, Søren; Mikkelsen, Jakob H.; Pedersen, Josefine H.; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Laursen, Lisbeth S.; Oxvig, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian stanniocalcin-2 (STC2) is a secreted polypeptide widely expressed in developing and adult tissues. However, although transgenic expression in mice is known to cause severe dwarfism, and targeted deletion of STC2 causes increased postnatal growth, its precise biological role is still unknown. We found that STC2 potently inhibits the proteolytic activity of the growth-promoting metalloproteinase, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A). Proteolytic inhibition requires covalent binding of STC2 to PAPP-A and is mediated by a disulfide bond, which involves Cys-120 of STC2. Binding of STC2 prevents PAPP-A cleavage of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)-4 and hence release within tissues of bioactive IGF, required for normal growth. Concordantly, we show that STC2 efficiently inhibits PAPP-A-mediated IGF receptor signaling in vitro and that transgenic mice expressing a mutated variant of STC2, STC2(C120A), which is unable to inhibit PAPP-A, grow like wild-type mice. Our work identifies STC2 as a novel proteinase inhibitor and a previously unrecognized extracellular component of the IGF system. PMID:25533459

  17. Unusal pattern of product inhibition: batch acetic acid fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bar, R.; Gainer, J.L.; Kirwan, D.J.

    1987-04-20

    The limited tolerance of microorganisms to their metabolic products results in inhibited growth and product formation. The relationship between the specific growth rate, micro, and the concentration of an inhibitory product has been described by a number of mathematical models. In most cases, micro was found to be inversely proportional to the product concentration and invariably the rate of substrate utilization followed the same pattern. In this communication, the authors report a rather unusual case in which the formation rate of a product, acetic acid, increased with a decreasing growth rate of the microorganism, Acetobacter aceti. Apparently, a similar behavior was mentioned in a review report with respect to Clostridium thermocellum in a batch culture but was not published in the freely circulating literature. The fermentation of ethanol to acetic acid, C/sub 2/H/sub 5/OH + O/sub 2/ = CH/sub 3/COOH + H/sub 2/O is clearly one of the oldest known fermentations. Because of its association with the commercial production of vinegar it has been a subject of extensive but rather technically oriented studies. Suprisingly, the uncommon uncoupling between the inhibited microbial growth and the product formation appears to have been unnoticed. 13 references.

  18. Glyphosate and AMPA inhibit cancer cell growth through inhibiting intracellular glycine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingli; Lambrechts, Mark J; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Ge, Dongxia; Yin, Rutie; Xi, Mingrong; You, Zongbing

    2013-01-01

    Glycine is a nonessential amino acid that is reversibly converted from serine intracellularly by serine hydroxymethyltransferase. Glyphosate and its degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), are analogs to glycine, thus they may inhibit serine hydroxymethyltransferase to decrease intracellular glycine synthesis. In this study, we found that glyphosate and AMPA inhibited cell growth in eight human cancer cell lines but not in two immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell lines. AMPA arrested C4-2B and PC-3 cancer cells in the G1/G0 phase and inhibited entry into the S phase of the cell cycle. AMPA also promoted apoptosis in C4-2B and PC-3 cancer cell lines. AMPA upregulated p53 and p21 protein levels as well as procaspase 9 protein levels in C4-2B cells, whereas it downregulated cyclin D3 protein levels. AMPA also activated caspase 3 and induced cleavage of poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase. This study provides the first evidence that glyphosate and AMPA can inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis of cancer cells but not normal cells, suggesting that they have potentials to be developed into a new anticancer therapy. PMID:23983455

  19. Inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor-induced angiogenesis suppresses tumour growth in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. Jin; Li, Bing; Winer, Jane; Armanini, Mark; Gillett, Nancy; Phillips, Heidi S.; Ferrara, Napoleone

    1993-04-01

    THE development of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) is required for many physiological processes including embryogenesis, wound healing and corpus luteum formation1,2. Blood vessel neoformation is also important in the pathogenesis of many disorders1-5, particularly rapid growth and metastasis of solid tumours3-5. There are several potential mediators of tumour angiogenesis, including basic and acidic fibroblast growth factors, tumour necrosis factor-? and transforming factors-? and -? 1,2. But it is unclear whether any of these agents actually mediates angiogenesis and tumour growth in vivo. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and an angiogenesis inducer released by a variety of tumour cells and expressed in human tumours in situ. To test whether VEGF may be a tumour angiogenesis factor in vivo, we injected human rhabdomyosar-coma, glioblastoma multiforme or leiomyosarcoma cell lines into nude mice. We report here that treatment with a monoclonal antibody specific for VEGF inhibited the growth of the tumours, but had no effect on the growth rate of the tumour cells In vitro. The density of vessels was decreased in the antibody-treated tumours. These findings demonstrate that inhibition of the action of an angiogenic factor spontaneously produced by tumour cells may suppress tumour growth in vivo.

  20. Cell growth inhibition by sequence-specific RNA minihelices.

    PubMed Central

    Hipps, D; Schimmel, P

    1995-01-01

    RNA minihelices which reconstruct the 12 base pair acceptor-T psi C domains of transfer RNAs interact with their cognate tRNA synthetases. These substrates lack the anticodons of the genetic code and, therefore, cannot participate in steps of protein synthesis subsequent to aminoacylation. We report here that expression in Escherichia coli of either of two minihelices, each specific for a different amino acid, inhibited cell growth. Inhibition appears to be due to direct competition between the minihelix and its related tRNA for binding to their common synthetase. This competition, in turn, sharply lowers the pool of the specific charged tRNA for protein synthesis. Inhibition is relieved by single nucleotide changes which disrupt the minihelix-synthetase interaction. The results suggest that sequence-specific RNA minihelix substrates bind to cognate synthetases in vivo and can, in principle, act as cell growth regulators. Naturally occurring non-tRNA substrates for aminoacylation may serve a similar purpose. Images PMID:7664744

  1. Galactose inhibits auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles by two mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, S. P.; Cleland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Galactose inhibits auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles by at least two mechanisms. First, it inhibits auxin-induced H(+)-excretion needed for the initiation of rapid elongation. Galactose cannot be doing so by directly interfering with the ATPase since fusicoccin-induced H(+)-excretion is not affected. Secondly, galactose inhibits long-term auxin-induced growth, even in an acidic (pH 4.5) solution. This may be due to an inhibition of cell wall synthesis. However, galactose does not reduce the capacity of walls to be loosened by H+, given exogenously or excreted in response to fusicoccin.

  2. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester induced cell cycle arrest and growth inhibition in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells via regulation of Skp2, p53, p21Cip1 and p27Kip1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ping; Lin, Ching-Yu; Huo, Chieh; Hsiao, Ping-Hsuan; Su, Liang-Cheng; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Chan, Tzu-Min; Chang, Chung-Ho; Chen, Li-Tzong; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Wang, Horng-Dar; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-03-30

    Prostate cancer (PCa) patients receiving the androgen ablation therapy ultimately develop recurrent castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) within 1-3 years. Treatment with caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) suppressed cell survival and proliferation via induction of G1 or G2/M cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1, DU-145, 22Rv1, and C4-2 CRPC cells. CAPE treatment also inhibited soft agar colony formation and retarded nude mice xenograft growth of LNCaP 104-R1 cells. We identified that CAPE treatment significantly reduced protein abundance of Skp2, Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk7, Rb, phospho-Rb S807/811, cyclin A, cyclin D1, cyclin H, E2F1, c-Myc, SGK, phospho-p70S6kinase T421/S424, phospho-mTOR Ser2481, phospho-GSK3? Ser21, but induced p21Cip1, p27Kip1, ATF4, cyclin E, p53, TRIB3, phospho-p53 (Ser6, Ser33, Ser46, Ser392), phospho-p38 MAPK Thr180/Tyr182, Chk1, Chk2, phospho-ATM S1981, phospho-ATR S428, and phospho-p90RSK Ser380. CAPE treatment decreased Skp2 and Akt1 protein expression in LNCaP 104-R1 tumors as compared to control group. Overexpression of Skp2, or siRNA knockdown of p21Cip1, p27Kip1, or p53 blocked suppressive effect of CAPE treatment. Co-treatment of CAPE with PI3K inhibitor LY294002 or Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT737 showed synergistic suppressive effects. Our finding suggested that CAPE treatment induced cell cycle arrest and growth inhibition in CRPC cells via regulation of Skp2, p53, p21Cip1, and p27Kip1. PMID:25788262

  3. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester induced cell cycle arrest and growth inhibition in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells via regulation of Skp2, p53, p21Cip1 and p27Kip1

    PubMed Central

    Su, Liang-Cheng; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Chan, Tzu-Min; Chang, Chung-Ho; Chen, Li-Tzong; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Wang, Horng-Dar; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) patients receiving the androgen ablation therapy ultimately develop recurrent castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) within 1–3 years. Treatment with caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) suppressed cell survival and proliferation via induction of G1 or G2/M cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1, DU-145, 22Rv1, and C4–2 CRPC cells. CAPE treatment also inhibited soft agar colony formation and retarded nude mice xenograft growth of LNCaP 104-R1 cells. We identified that CAPE treatment significantly reduced protein abundance of Skp2, Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk7, Rb, phospho-Rb S807/811, cyclin A, cyclin D1, cyclin H, E2F1, c-Myc, SGK, phospho-p70S6kinase T421/S424, phospho-mTOR Ser2481, phospho-GSK3α Ser21, but induced p21Cip1, p27Kip1, ATF4, cyclin E, p53, TRIB3, phospho-p53 (Ser6, Ser33, Ser46, Ser392), phospho-p38 MAPK Thr180/Tyr182, Chk1, Chk2, phospho-ATM S1981, phospho-ATR S428, and phospho-p90RSK Ser380. CAPE treatment decreased Skp2 and Akt1 protein expression in LNCaP 104-R1 tumors as compared to control group. Overexpression of Skp2, or siRNA knockdown of p21Cip1, p27Kip1, or p53 blocked suppressive effect of CAPE treatment. Co-treatment of CAPE with PI3K inhibitor LY294002 or Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT737 showed synergistic suppressive effects. Our finding suggested that CAPE treatment induced cell cycle arrest and growth inhibition in CRPC cells via regulation of Skp2, p53, p21Cip1, and p27Kip1. PMID:25788262

  4. 9-Cis-retinoic acid induces growth inhibition in retinoid-sensitive breast cancer and sea urchin embryonic cells via retinoid X receptor α and replication factor C3.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Sejung; Kim, Gil Jung; Choi, Eun Ju; Yang, Hyun Ok; Lee, Dong-Sup; Sohn, Young Chang

    2012-11-01

    There is widespread interest in defining factors and mechanisms that suppress the proliferation of cancer cells. Retinoic acid (RA) is a potent suppressor of mammary cancer and developmental embryonic cell proliferation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which 9-cis-RA signaling induces growth inhibition in RA-sensitive breast cancer and embryonic cells are not apparent. Here, we provide evidence that the inhibitory effect of 9-cis-RA on cell proliferation depends on 9-cis-RA-dependent interaction of retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) with replication factor C3 (RFC3), which is a subunit of the RFC heteropentamer that opens and closes the circular proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) clamp on DNA. An RFC3 ortholog in a sea urchin cDNA library was isolated by using the ligand-binding domain of RXRα as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screening. The interaction of RFC3 with RXRα depends on 9-cis-RA and bexarotene, but not on all-trans-RA or an RA receptor (RAR)-selective ligand. Truncation and mutagenesis experiments demonstrated that the C-terminal LXXLL motifs in both human and sea urchin RFC3 are critical for the interaction with RXRα. The transient interaction between 9-cis-RA-activated RXRα and RFC3 resulted in reconfiguration of the PCNA-RFC complex. Furthermore, we found that knockdown of RXRα or overexpression of RFC3 impairs the ability of 9-cis-RA to inhibit proliferation of MCF-7 breast cancer cells and sea urchin embryogenesis. Our results indicate that 9-cis-RA-activated RXRα suppresses the growth of RA-sensitive breast cancer and embryonic cells through RFC3. PMID:22949521

  5. Investigations on dendrimer space reveal solid and liquid tumor growth-inhibition by original phosphorus-based dendrimers and the corresponding monomers and dendrons with ethacrynic acid motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Brahmi, Nabil; Mignani, Serge M.; Caron, Joachim; El Kazzouli, Sad; Bousmina, Mosto M.; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Cresteil, Thierry; Majoral, Jean-Pierre

    2015-02-01

    The well-known reactive diuretic ethacrynic acid (EA, Edecrin), with low antiproliferative activities, was chemically modified and grafted onto phosphorus dendrimers and the corresponding simple branched phosphorus dendron-like derivatives affording novel nanodevices showing moderate to strong antiproliferative activities against liquid and solid tumor cell lines, respectively.The well-known reactive diuretic ethacrynic acid (EA, Edecrin), with low antiproliferative activities, was chemically modified and grafted onto phosphorus dendrimers and the corresponding simple branched phosphorus dendron-like derivatives affording novel nanodevices showing moderate to strong antiproliferative activities against liquid and solid tumor cell lines, respectively. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05983b

  6. Dual inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 and soluble epoxide hydrolase synergistically suppresses primary tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guodong; Panigrahy, Dipak; Hwang, Sung Hee; Yang, Jun; Mahakian, Lisa M.; Wettersten, Hiromi I.; Liu, Jun-Yan; Wang, Yanru; Ingham, Elizabeth S.; Tam, Sarah; Kieran, Mark W.; Weiss, Robert H.; Ferrara, Katherine W.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandins derived from the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) from the cytochrome P450/soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathway are important eicosanoids that regulate angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. COX-2 inhibitors, which block the formation of prostaglandins, suppress tumor growth, whereas sEH inhibitors, which increase endogenous EETs, stimulate primary tumor growth and metastasis. However, the functional interactions of these two pathways in cancer are unknown. Using pharmacological inhibitors as probes, we show here that dual inhibition of COX-2 and sEH synergistically inhibits primary tumor growth and metastasis by suppressing tumor angiogenesis. COX-2/sEH dual pharmacological inhibitors also potently suppress primary tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis via selective inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. These results demonstrate a critical interaction of these two lipid metabolism pathways on tumorigenesis and suggest dual inhibition of COX-2 and sEH as a potential therapeutic strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:25024195

  7. Inhibition of connective tissue growth factor by small interfering ribonucleic acid prevents increase in extracellular matrix molecules in a rodent model of diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Jennifer L.; Kedees, Mamdouh H.; Guz, Yelena

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a profibrotic factor that induces extracellular matrix (ECM) production and angiogenesis, two processes involved in diabetic retinopathy (DR). In this study, we examined whether insulin therapy or a CTGF-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) administered to diabetic rats decreased the levels of CTGF and of selected putative downstream genes in the retina. Methods Rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes were used. Animals received either no treatment for 12 weeks or were administered constant insulin therapy. MRNA and protein levels of CTGF and select ECM genes were determined using real-time PCR and western blotting of the retina. Localization of CTGF in the retina was visualized using immunohistochemistry. A group of diabetic rats received intravitreal injection of CTGF siRNA, and the retinas were examined three days later. Results CTGF mRNA and protein significantly increased in the retinas of diabetic rats. Immunohistochemistry indicated that retinal Mller cells of diabetic rats expressed CTGF. Hyperglycemia upregulated mRNA levels of fibronectin, laminin ?1, collagen IV?3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and this increase was prevented by insulin therapy. Treatment of diabetic rats with CTGF siRNA decreased laminin ?1, collagen IV?3 mRNA, and CTGF mRNA and protein but did not affect fibronectin or vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels. Conclusions These results indicate that CTGF and ECM genes can be regulated using insulin. Importantly, these results also suggest that CTGF regulates changes in ECM molecules in DR. PMID:22511849

  8. Decorin: A Growth Factor Antagonist for Tumor Growth Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, Tero A. H.; Prince, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Decorin (DCN) is the best characterized member of the extracellular small leucine-rich proteoglycan family present in connective tissues, typically in association with or “decorating” collagen fibrils. It has substantial interest to clinical medicine owing to its antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects. Studies on DCN knockout mice have established that a lack of DCN is permissive for tumor development and it is regarded as a tumor suppressor gene. A reduced expression or a total disappearance of DCN has been reported to take place in various forms of human cancers during tumor progression. Furthermore, when used as a therapeutic molecule, DCN has been shown to inhibit tumor progression and metastases in experimental cancer models. DCN affects the biology of various types of cancer by targeting a number of crucial signaling molecules involved in cell growth, survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis. The active sites for the neutralization of different growth factors all reside in different parts of the DCN molecule. An emerging concept that multiple proteases, especially those produced by inflammatory cells, are capable of cleaving DCN suggests that native DCN could be inactivated in a number of pathological inflammatory conditions. In this paper, we review the role of DCN in cancer. PMID:26697491

  9. Decorin: A Growth Factor Antagonist for Tumor Growth Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Jrvinen, Tero A H; Prince, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Decorin (DCN) is the best characterized member of the extracellular small leucine-rich proteoglycan family present in connective tissues, typically in association with or "decorating" collagen fibrils. It has substantial interest to clinical medicine owing to its antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects. Studies on DCN knockout mice have established that a lack of DCN is permissive for tumor development and it is regarded as a tumor suppressor gene. A reduced expression or a total disappearance of DCN has been reported to take place in various forms of human cancers during tumor progression. Furthermore, when used as a therapeutic molecule, DCN has been shown to inhibit tumor progression and metastases in experimental cancer models. DCN affects the biology of various types of cancer by targeting a number of crucial signaling molecules involved in cell growth, survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis. The active sites for the neutralization of different growth factors all reside in different parts of the DCN molecule. An emerging concept that multiple proteases, especially those produced by inflammatory cells, are capable of cleaving DCN suggests that native DCN could be inactivated in a number of pathological inflammatory conditions. In this paper, we review the role of DCN in cancer. PMID:26697491

  10. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester causes p21 induction, Akt signaling reduction, and growth inhibition in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ping; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2012-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) treatment suppressed proliferation, colony formation, and cell cycle progression in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. CAPE decreased protein expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, SKP2, c-Myc, Akt1, Akt2, Akt3, total Akt, mTOR, Bcl-2, Rb, as well as phosphorylation of Rb, ERK1/2, Akt, mTOR, GSK3?, GSK3?, PDK1; but increased protein expression of KLF6 and p21(Cip1). Microarray analysis indicated that pathways involved in cellular movement, cell death, proliferation, and cell cycle were affected by CAPE. Co-treatment of CAPE with chemotherapeutic drugs vinblastine, paclitaxol, and estramustine indicated synergistic suppression effect. CAPE administration may serve as a potential adjuvant therapy for prostate cancer. PMID:22347457

  11. Further Studies of the Ability of Xyloglucan Oligosaccharides to Inhibit Auxin-Stimulated Growth 1

    PubMed Central

    Augur, Christopher; Yu, Lu; Sakai, Keiichiro; Ogawa, Tomoya; Sina, Pierre; Darvill, Alan G.; Albersheim, Peter

    1992-01-01

    The structural features required for xyloglucan oligosaccharides to inhibit 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-stimulated elongation of pea stem segments have been investigated. A nonasaccharide (XG9) containing one fucosyl-galactosyl side chain and an undecasaccharide (XG11) containing two fucosyl-galactosyl side chains were purified from endo-?-1,4-glucanase-treated xyloglucan, which had been isolated from soluble extracellular polysaccharides of suspension-cultured sycamore (Acerpseudoplatanus) cells and tested in the pea stem bioassay. A novel octasaccharide (XG8?) was prepared by treatment of XG9 with a xyloglucan oligosaccharide-specific ?-xylosidase from pea seedlings. XG8? was characterized and tested for its ability to inhibit auxin-induced growth. All three oligosaccharides, at a concentration of 0.1 microgram per milliliter, inhibited 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-stimulated growth of pea stem segments. XG11 inhibited the growth to a greater extent than did XG9. Chemically synthesized nona- and pentasaccharides (XG9, XG5) inhibited 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-stimulated elongation of pea stems to the same extent as the same oligosaccharides isolated from xyloglucan. A chemically synthesized structurally related heptasaccharide that lacked a fucosyl-galactosyl side chain did not, unlike the identical heptasaccharide isolated from xyloglucan, significantly inhibit 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-stimulated growth. PMID:16668847

  12. Inhibition against growth of glioblastoma multiforme in vitro using etoposide-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles with p-aminophenyl-?-D-manno-pyranoside and folic acid.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yung-Chih; Lee, Chia-Hao

    2015-05-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) grafted with p-aminophenyl-?-D-manno-pyranoside (APMP) and folic acid (FA) (APMP-FA-SLNs) were applied to encapsulate 4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin 9-(4,6-O-ethylidene-?-D-glucopyranoside) (etoposide) (ETP) for promoting the antiproliferation of malignant glioblastoma multiforme. ETP-loaded APMP-FA-SLNs (APMP-FA-ETP-SLNs) were used to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and retard the propagation of U87MG cells. An incorporation of APMP and FA increased the particle size, the cytotoxicity to U87MG cells, and the permeability coefficient for propidium iodide and ETP across the BBB. In addition, an increase in the APMP and FA concentration reduced the zeta potential, the grafting efficiency of APMP and FA, the dissolution rate of ETP, and the transendothelial electrical resistance. Immunochemical staining images evidenced that APMP-FA-ETP-SLNs could infiltrate the BBB via glucose transporter 1 and recognize U87MG cells via folate receptor. APMP-FA-ETP-SLNs can be an effective pharmacotherapeutic formulation in targeting delivery to the brain and in inhibitory efficacy against tumorous cells for cancer therapy. PMID:25694089

  13. Pachymic acid inhibits tumorigenesis in gallbladder carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yueguang; Lian, Peilong; Liu, Yanfeng; Xu, Kesen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gallbladder cancer, with high aggressivity and extremely poor prognosis, is the most common malignancy of the bile duct. Thus, seeking targets gallbladder tumor cells is an attractive goal towards improving clinical treatment. Material and methods: In this study, we investigated the effects of pachymic acid (PA) on the tumorigenesis of human gallbladder cancer cells. Results: We found that PA significantly reduced cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Meanwhile, cell cycle arrest at G0 phase was induced by PA. PA also significantly inhibited cancer cell migration, invasion in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, we demonstrated that cancer cell adhesion ability was suppressed dose-dependently, which may contribute to the inhibition of cell invasion. Finally, we showed that PA inhibited AKT and ERK signaling pathways. And oncoproteins, such as PCNA, ICAM-1 and RhoA which are involved intumorigenesis, were also downregulated by PA. Conclusion: Our study reveals that PA is able to inhibit gallbladder cancer tumorigenesis involving affection of AKT and ERK signaling pathways. Together, these results encourage further studies of PA as a promising candidate for gallbladder cancer therapy. PMID:26770369

  14. A chemical pollen suppressant inhibits auxin-induced growth in maize coleoptile sections

    SciTech Connect

    Vesper, M.J. ); Cross, J.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Chemical inhibitors of pollen development having a phenylcinnoline carboxylate structure were found to inhibit IAA- and 1-NAA-induced growth in maize coleoptile sections. The inhibitor (100 {mu}M) used in these experiments caused approx. 35% reduction in auxin-induced growth over the auxin concentration range of 0.3 to 100 {mu}M. Growth inhibition was noted as a lengthening of the latent period and a decrease in the rate of an auxin-induced growth response. An acid growth response to pH 5 buffer in abraded sections was not impaired. The velocity of basipetal transport of ({sup 3}H)IAA through the coleoptile sections also was not inhibited by the compound, nor was uptake of ({sup 3}H)IAA. Similarly, the inhibitor does not appear to alter auxin-induced H{sup +} secretion. We suggest that the agent targets some other process necessary for auxin-dependent growth.

  15. Mechanism of specific inhibition of phototropism by phenylacetic acid in corn seedling

    SciTech Connect

    Vierstra, R.D.; Poff, K.L.

    1981-05-01

    Using geotropism as a control for phototropism, compounds similar to phenylacetic acid that phototreact with flavins and/or have auxin-like activity were examined for their ability to specifically inhibit phototropism in corn seedlings using geotropism as a control. Results using indole-3-acetic acid, napthalene-1-acetic acid, naphthalene-2-acetic acid, phenylacetic acid, and ..beta..-phenylpyruvic acid suggest that such compounds will specifically inhibit phototropism primarily because of their photoreactivity with flavins and not their auxin activity. In addition, the in vivo concentration of phenylacetic acid required to induce specificity was well below that required to stimulate coleoptile growth. Estimates of the percentage of photoreceptor pigment inactivated by phenylacetic acid (>10%) suggest that phenylacetic acid could be used to photoaffinity label the flavoprotein involved in corn seedling phototropism.

  16. Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbs, Daniel M.; Ramachandran, Usha; Lu, Sang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Li Q.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2005-12-06

    Citric acid has been shown to act as an agent for increasing the solubility of aluminum oxyhydroxides in aqueous solutions of high (>2.47 mol/mol) hydroxide-to-aluminum ratios. Conversely, citric acid also colloidally stabilizes particles in aqueous suspensions of aluminum-containing particles. Solutions of aluminum chloride, with and without citric acid added, were titrated with NaO(aq). The presence and size of particles were determined using quasi-elastic light scattering. In solutions that contained no citric acid, particles formed instantaneously when NaOH(aq) was added but these were observed to rapidly diminish in size, disappearing at OH/Al ratios below 2.5 mol/mol. When the OH/Al ratio was raised beyond 2.5 by addingmoreNaOH(aq), suspensions of colloidally stable particles formed. Large polycations containing 13 aluminum atoms were detected by 27Al solution NMR in citric-acid-free solutions with OH/Al ratios slightly lower than 2.5. In comparison, adding citric acid to solutions of aluminum chloride inhibited the formation of large aluminum-containing polycations. The absence of the polycations prevents or retards the subsequent formation of particles, indicating that the polycations, when present, act as seeds to the formation of new particles. Particles did not form in solutions with a citric acid/aluminum ratio of 0.8 until sufficient NaOH(aq) was added to raise the OH/Al ratio to 3.29. By comparison, lower amounts of citric acid did not prevent particles from forming but did retard the rate of growth.

  17. Antiepileptic Drugs Inhibit Growth, Dimorphism, and Biofilm Mode of Growth in Human Pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Kathwate, Gunderao H; Shinde, Ravikumar B; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Exploring the potential of existing drugs for their unknown properties may offer advantages over conventional drug development by saving time and money. Candida albicans, an important human opportunist, shares many genetic properties with humans. This has encouraged us to study drugs that are not originally antifungals against C. albicans. In the present study, we have tested six antiepileptic drugs for their activities against C. albicans. Their effects on growth, time-dependent killing, yeast-to-hyphal form switching, and biofilms formation by C. albicans were studied. Out of the drugs studied, four drugs, which are ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor agonists in humans, inhibited growth, yeast-to-hyphal form switching, and biofilm formation in C. albicans. Lorazepam inhibited growth of C. albicans at 25??g/ml, followed by midazolam and diazepam (minimum inhibitory concentrations 100 and 400??g/ml, respectively). Members from other group voltage-gated sodium channel blockers failed to inhibit C. albicans. Our study has identified GABA receptor agonists used in epileptic therapy as potential candidates for antifungal drug development against the human pathogen C. albicans. PMID:26241210

  18. Bee venom inhibits growth of human cervical tumors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Myoung; Jung, Yu Yeon; Park, Mi Hee; Oh, Sang Hyun; Yun, Hye Seok; Jun, Hyung Ok; Yoo, Hwan Soo; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ung Soo; Yoon, Joo Hee; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    We studied whether bee venom (BV) inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of death receptor (DR) expressions and inactivation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) in mice. In vivo study showed that BV (1 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth. Similar inhibitory effects of BV on cancer growth in primary human cervical cancer cells were also found. BV (15 ?g/ml) also inhibited the growth of cancer cells, Ca Ski and C33Aby the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Agreed with cancer cell growth inhibition, expression of death receptors; FAS, DR3 and DR6, and DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3 and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the NF-?B activity and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with BV in tumor mice, human cancer cell and human tumor samples as well as cultured cancer cells. In addition, deletion of FAS, DR3 and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV-induced cell growth inhibitory effects as well as NF-?B inactivation. These results suggest that BV inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of FAS, DR3 and DR6 expression via inhibition of NF-?B pathway. PMID:25730901

  19. The use of sesame oil and other vegetable oils in the inhibition of human colon cancer growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Salerno, J W; Smith, D E

    1991-01-01

    Sesame contains large quantities of the essential polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), linoleic acid, in the form triglycerides. The antineoplastic properties of many PUFAs such as linoleic acid and their metabolites are known. We tested the hypothesis that natural vegetable oils, such as sesame oil and its component linoleic acid, when added to human colon adenocarcinoma cells growing in tissue culture would inhibit their growth and that normal colon cells would not be similarly affected. Three human colon cancer cell lines and one normal human colon cell line were exposed to the following: (1) pure linoleic acid; (2) lipase-digested sesame oil; (3) undigested sesame oil; (4) five additional common vegetable oils; (5) mineral oil. Linoleic acid inhibited the in vitro growth of all three malignant human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. The normal colon cell line showed dramatically less inhibition of growth. Lipase-digested sesame oil (LDSO) and undigested sesame oil (UDSO) produced greater inhibition of growth of all three malignant colon cell lines than of the normal colon cells. Five other common vegetable oils containing various amounts of PUFAs such as corn, soybean, safflower, olive and coconut oils, all in their lipase-digested form, were found to dramatically inhibit the growth of the HT-29 malignant human colon cell line. Undigested olive and safflower oils also inhibited the HT-29 cells although not as markedly as the lipase-digested oils. Mineral oil did not inhibit the growth of HT-29 cells. Both lauric and palmitic acid, which are saturated fatty acids found in abundance in coconut oil inhibits the HT-29 cells more strongly than linoleic acid, while oleic acid did not inhibit. We conclude that many vegetable oils including sesame contain in vitro antineoplastic properties and that this finding warrants further investigation both in vitro and in vivo to assess their possible chemotherapeutic potential. PMID:2018355

  20. Two Genetically Separable Phases of Growth Inhibition Induced by Blue Light in Arabidopsis Seedlings1

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Brian M.; Cho, Myeon H.; Spalding, Edgar P.

    1998-01-01

    High fluence-rate blue light (BL) rapidly inhibits hypocotyl growth in Arabidopsis, as in other species, after a lag time of 30 s. This growth inhibition is always preceded by the activation of anion channels. The membrane depolarization that results from the activation of anion channels by BL was only 30% of the wild-type magnitude in hy4, a mutant lacking the HY4 BL receptor. High-resolution measurements of growth made with a computer-linked displacement transducer or digitized images revealed that BL caused a rapid inhibition of growth in wild-type and hy4 seedlings. This inhibition persisted in wild-type seedlings during more than 40 h of continuous BL. By contrast, hy4 escaped from the initial inhibition after approximately 1 h of BL and grew faster than wild type for approximately 30 h. Wild-type seedlings treated with 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid, a potent blocker of the BL-activated anion channel, displayed rapid growth inhibition, but, similar to hy4, these seedlings escaped from inhibition after approximately 1 h of BL and phenocopied the mutant for at least 2.5 h. The effects of 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid and the HY4 mutation were not additive. Taken together, the results indicate that BL acts through HY4 to activate anion channels at the plasma membrane, causing growth inhibition that begins after approximately 1 h. Neither HY4 nor anion channels appear to participate greatly in the initial phase of inhibition. PMID:9765547

  1. Two genetically separable phases of growth inhibition induced by blue light in Arabidopsis seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, B. M.; Cho, M. H.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    High fluence-rate blue light (BL) rapidly inhibits hypocotyl growth in Arabidopsis, as in other species, after a lag time of 30 s. This growth inhibition is always preceded by the activation of anion channels. The membrane depolarization that results from the activation of anion channels by BL was only 30% of the wild-type magnitude in hy4, a mutant lacking the HY4 BL receptor. High-resolution measurements of growth made with a computer-linked displacement transducer or digitized images revealed that BL caused a rapid inhibition of growth in wild-type and hy4 seedlings. This inhibition persisted in wild-type seedlings during more than 40 h of continuous BL. By contrast, hy4 escaped from the initial inhibition after approximately 1 h of BL and grew faster than wild type for approximately 30 h. Wild-type seedlings treated with 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid, a potent blocker of the BL-activated anion channel, displayed rapid growth inhibition, but, similar to hy4, these seedlings escaped from inhibition after approximately 1 h of BL and phenocopied the mutant for at least 2.5 h. The effects of 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid and the HY4 mutation were not additive. Taken together, the results indicate that BL acts through HY4 to activate anion channels at the plasma membrane, causing growth inhibition that begins after approximately 1 h. Neither HY4 nor anion channels appear to participate greatly in the initial phase of inhibition.

  2. Shoot-derived abscisic acid promotes root growth.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Scott A M; Brodribb, Timothy J; Ross, John J

    2016-03-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a major role in regulating root growth. Most work to date has investigated the influence of root-sourced ABA on root growth during water stress. Here, we tested whether foliage-derived ABA could be transported to the roots, and whether this foliage-derived ABA had an influence on root growth under well-watered conditions. Using both application studies of deuterium-labelled ABA and reciprocal grafting between wild-type and ABA-biosynthetic mutant plants, we show that both ABA levels in the roots and root growth in representative angiosperms are controlled by ABA synthesized in the leaves rather than sourced from the roots. Foliage-derived ABA was found to promote root growth relative to shoot growth but to inhibit the development of lateral roots. Increased root auxin (IAA) levels in plants with ABA-deficient scions suggest that foliage-derived ABA inhibits root growth through the root growth-inhibitor IAA. These results highlight the physiological and morphological importance, beyond the control of stomata, of foliage-derived ABA. The use of foliar ABA as a signal for root growth has important implications for regulating root to shoot growth under normal conditions and suggests that leaf rather than root hydration is the main signal for regulating plant responses to moisture. PMID:26514625

  3. Synthesis and proteasome inhibition of glycyrrhetinic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Yu, Donglei; Ho, Phong; Qian, Keduo; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chen, Chin-Ho

    2008-07-15

    This study discovered that glycyrrhetinic acid inhibited the human 20S proteasome at 22.3microM. Esterification of the C-3 hydroxyl group on glycyrrhetinic acid with various carboxylic acid reagents yielded a series of analogs with marked improved potency. Among the derivatives, glycyrrhetinic acid 3-O-isophthalate (17) was the most potent compound with IC(50) of 0.22microM, which was approximately 100-fold more potent than glycyrrhetinic acid. PMID:18562200

  4. Accumulation of Polyhydroxyalkanoic Acid Containing Large Amounts of Unsaturated Monomers in Pseudomonas fluorescens BM07 Utilizing Saccharides and Its Inhibition by 2-Bromooctanoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Joo; Choi, Mun Hwan; Kim, Tae-Un; Yoon, Sung Chul

    2001-01-01

    A psychrotrophic bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens BM07, which is able to accumulate polyhydroxyalkanoic acid (PHA) containing large amounts of 3-hydroxy-cis-5-dodecenoate unit up to 35 mol% in the cell from unrelated substrates such as fructose, succinate, etc., was isolated from an activated sludge in a municipal wastewater treatment plant. When it was grown on heptanoic acid (C7) to hexadecanoic acid (C16) as the sole carbon source, the monomer compositional characteristics of the synthesized PHA were similar to those observed in other fluorescent pseudomonads belonging to rRNA homology group I. However, growth on stearic acid (C18) led to no PHA accumulation, but instead free stearic acid was stored in the cell. The existence of the linkage between fatty acid de novo synthesis and PHA synthesis was confirmed by using inhibitors such as acrylic acid and two other compounds, 2-bromooctanoic acid and 4-pentenoic acid, which are known to inhibit ?-oxidation enzymes in animal cells. Acrylic acid completely inhibited PHA synthesis at a concentration of 4 mM in 40 mM octanoate-grown cells, but no inhibition of PHA synthesis occurred in 70 mM fructose-grown cells in the presence of 1 to 5 mM acrylic acid. 2-Bromooctanoic acid and 4-pentenoic acid were found to much inhibit PHA synthesis much more strongly in fructose-grown cells than in octanoate-grown cells over concentrations ranging from 1 to 5 mM. However, 2-bromooctanoic acid and 4-pentenoic acid did not inhibit cell growth at all in the fructose media. Especially, with the cells grown on fructose, 2-bromooctanoic acid exhibited a steep rise in the percent PHA synthesis inhibition over a small range of concentrations below 100 ?M, a finding indicative of a very specific inhibition, whereas 4-pentenoic acid showed a broad, featureless concentration dependence, suggesting a rather nonspecific inhibition. The apparent inhibition constant Ki (the concentration for 50% inhibition of PHA synthesis) for 2-bromooctanoic acid was determined to be 60 ?M, assuming a single-site binding of the inhibitor at a specific inhibition site. Thus, it seems likely that a coenzyme A thioester derivative of 2-bromooctanoic acid specifically inhibits an enzyme linking the two pathways, fatty acid de novo synthesis and PHA synthesis. We suggest that 2-bromooctanoic acid can substitute for the far more expensive (2,000 times) and cell-growth-inhibiting PHA synthesis inhibitor, cerulenin. PMID:11679314

  5. Vitamin C inhibits staphylococcus aureus growth and enhances the inhibitory effect of quercetin on growth of Escherichia coli in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Johanna; Jaakkola, Mari; Mki, Marianne; Kilpelinen, Pekka; Virtanen, Vesa

    2012-11-01

    Quercetin is a natural flavonoid possessing a number of health beneficial effects. Its bioactivity is restricted by low solubility and sensitivity to oxidative degradation, factors that are often ignored in laboratory studies. We studied the antimicrobial effects of quercetin on Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus plantarum at concentrations at which it is soluble and investigated how the antioxidant vitamin C modulates these activities. S. aureus was the most sensitive of the studied bacteria. After 12 hours of culturing, 90?M quercetin decreased the growth of S. aureus to 75?% of the value for a control culture. 1?mM vitamin C combined with 90?M quercetin diminished the growth of S. aureus drastically to 3?% of that of the control culture supplemented with vitamin C only. Interestingly, vitamin C by itself inhibited the growth of S. aureus as well, and 5?mM vitamin C inhibited growth completely. The growth inhibition of E. coli was slightly but significantly better in the presence of both quercetin and vitamin C than in the presence of quercetin alone. Probiotic L.plantarum was resistant to quercetin in the presence and absence of vitamin C. Enhancement of quercetin's antimicrobial activity by vitamin C is partly explained by the stabilizing effect of vitamin C on quercetin. Even though the acidity of vitamin C contributes to the inhibition of S. aureus growth, neutralized vitamin C also inhibits the growth efficiently even without quercetin. Our results suggest that vitamin C affects the metabolism of S. aureus and that these changes are likely to result in the observed growth inhibition. Although vitamin C itself is a powerful antioxidant, its aerobic metabolism increases oxidative stress on bacterial cells. Vitamin C may therefore be a safe and natural alternative for restricting the growth of S. aureus when non-toxicity is required. PMID:23059632

  6. AUXIN-INDUCED SPROUT GROWTH INHIBITION: ROLE OF ENDOGENOUS ETHYLENE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of endogenous ethylene in auxin-mediated tuber sprout growth inhibition was determined in potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Russet Burbank) minitubers. Treatment of tubers with biologically active auxins resulted in transient, dose-dependent increase in ethylene production and inhibition of...

  7. Inhibition of growth of Zymomonas mobilis by model compounds found in lignocellulosic hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During the pretreatment of biomass feedstocks and subsequent conditioning prior to saccharification, many toxic compounds are produced or introduced which inhibit microbial growth and in many cases, production of ethanol. An understanding of the toxic effects of compounds found in hydrolysate is critical to improving sugar utilization and ethanol yields in the fermentation process. In this study, we established a useful tool for surveying hydrolysate toxicity by measuring growth rates in the presence of toxic compounds, and examined the effects of selected model inhibitors of aldehydes, organic and inorganic acids (along with various cations), and alcohols on growth of Zymomonas mobilis 8b (a ZM4 derivative) using glucose or xylose as the carbon source. Results Toxicity strongly correlated to hydrophobicity in Z. mobilis, which has been observed in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae for aldehydes and with some exceptions, organic acids. We observed Z. mobilis 8b to be more tolerant to organic acids than previously reported, although the carbon source and growth conditions play a role in tolerance. Growth in xylose was profoundly inhibited by monocarboxylic organic acids compared to growth in glucose, whereas dicarboxylic acids demonstrated little or no effects on growth rate in either substrate. Furthermore, cations can be ranked in order of their toxicity, Ca++ >?>?Na+?>?NH4+?>?K+. HMF (5-hydroxymethylfurfural), furfural and acetate, which were observed to contribute to inhibition of Z. mobilis growth in dilute acid pretreated corn stover hydrolysate, do not interact in a synergistic manner in combination. We provide further evidence that Z. mobilis 8b is capable of converting the aldehydes furfural, vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and to some extent syringaldehyde to their alcohol forms (furfuryl, vanillyl, 4-hydroxybenzyl and syringyl alcohol) during fermentation. Conclusions Several key findings in this report provide a mechanism for predicting toxic contributions of inhibitory components of hydrolysate and provide guidance for potential process development, along with potential future strain improvement and tolerance strategies. PMID:23837621

  8. The rhizobacterium Arthrobacter agilis produces dimethylhexadecylamine, a compound that inhibits growth of phytopathogenic fungi in vitro.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Becerra, Crisanto; Macías-Rodríguez, Lourdes I; López-Bucio, José; Flores-Cortez, Idolina; Santoyo, Gustavo; Hernández-Soberano, Christian; Valencia-Cantero, Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    Plant diseases caused by fungal pathogens such as Botrytis cinerea and the oomycete Phytophthora cinnamomi affect agricultural production worldwide. Control of these pests can be done by the use of fungicides such as captan, which may have deleterious effects on human health. This study demonstrates that the rhizobacterium Arthrobacter agilis UMCV2 produces volatile organic compounds that inhibit the growth of B. cinerea in vitro. A single compound from the volatile blends, namely dimethylhexadecylamine (DMHDA), could inhibit the growth of both B. cinerea and P. cinnamomi when supplied to the growth medium in low concentrations. DMHDA also inhibited the growth of beneficial fungi Trichoderma virens and Trichoderma atroviride but at much higher concentrations. DMHDA-related aminolipids containing 4, 8, 10, 12, and 14 carbons in the alkyl chain were tested for their inhibitory effect on the growth of the pathogens. The results show that the most active compound from those tested was dimethyldodecylamine. This effect correlates with a decrease in the number of membrane lipids present in the mycelium of the pathogen including eicosanoic acid, (Z)-9-hexadecenoic acid, methyl ester, and (Z)-9-octadecenoic acid, methyl ester. Strawberry leaflets treated with DMHDA were not injured by the compound. These data indicate that DMHDA and related compounds, which can be produced by microorganisms may effectively inhibit the proliferation of certain plant pathogens. PMID:23674267

  9. Perfluoroalkyl Acids Inhibit Reductive Dechlorination of Trichloroethene by Repressing Dehalococcoides.

    PubMed

    Weathers, Tess S; Harding-Marjanovic, Katie; Higgins, Christopher P; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa; Sharp, Jonathan O

    2016-01-01

    The subsurface recalcitrance of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) derived from aqueous film-forming foams could have adverse impacts on the microbiological processes used for the bioremediation of co-mingled chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethene (TCE). Here, we show that reductive dechlorination by a methanogenic, mixed culture was significantly inhibited when exposed to concentrations representative of PFAA source zones (>66 mg/L total of 11 PFAA analytes, 6 mg/L each). TCE dechlorination, cis-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride production and dechlorination, and ethene generation were all inhibited at these PFAA concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the abundances of 65% of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) changed significantly when grown in the presence of PFAAs, although repression or enhancement resulting from PFAA exposure did not correlate with putative function or phylogeny. Notably, there was significant repression of Dehalococcoides (8-fold decrease in abundance) coupled with a corresponding enhancement of methane-generating Archaea (a 9-fold increase). Growth and dechlorination by axenic cultures of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 were similarly repressed under these conditions, confirming an inhibitory response of this pivotal genus to PFAA presence. These results suggest that chlorinated solvent bioattenuation rates could be impeded in subsurface environments near PFAA source zones. PMID:26636352

  10. Ozone selectively inhibits growth of human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sweet, F; Kao, M S; Lee, S C; Hagar, W L; Sweet, W E

    1980-08-22

    The growth of human cancer cells from lung, breast, and uterine tumors was selectively inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by ozone at 0.3 to 0.8 part per million of ozone in ambient air during 8 days of culture. Human lung diploid fibroblasts served as noncancerous control cells. The presence of ozone at 0.3 to 0.5 part per million inhibited cancer cell growth 40 and 60 percent, respectively. The noncancerous lung cells were unaffected at these levels. Exposure to ozone at 0.8 part per million inhibited cancer cell growth more than 90 percent and control cell growth less than 50 percent. Evidently, the mechanisms for defense against ozone damage are impaired in human cancer cells. PMID:7403859

  11. Human cytomegalovirus. IV. Specific inhibition of virus-induced DNA polymerase activity and viral DNA replication by phosphonoacetic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, E S

    1975-01-01

    Phosphonoacetic acid specifically inhibited human cytomegalovirus DNA synthesis in virus-infected human fibroblasts as detected by virus-specific nucleic acid hybridization. Inhibition was reversible; viral DNA synthesis resumed upon the removal of the drug. The compound partially inhibited DNA synthesis of host cells in the log phase of growth but had little effect on confluent cells. Studies of partially purified enzymes indicated that phosphonoacetic acid specifically inhibited virus-induced DNA polymerase and had only a slight effect on normal host cell enzymes. The drug was shown to interact directly with virus-induced enzyme but not with the template-primers. PMID:172657

  12. Calcium ion involvement in growth inhibition of mechanically stressed soybean (Glycine max) seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. S.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    A 40-50% reduction in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Century 84] hypocotyl elongation occurred 24 h after application of mechanical stress. Exogenous Ca2+ at 10 mM inhibited growth by 28% if applied with the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 to the zone of maximum hypocotyl elongation. La3+ was even more inhibitory than Ca2+, especially above 5 mM. Treatment with ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethylether)-N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) alone had no effect on growth of non-stressed seedlings at the concentrations used but negated stress-induced growth reduction by 36% at 4 mM when compared to non-treated, stressed controls. Treatment with EDTA was ineffective in negating stress-induced growth inhibition. Calmodulin antagonists calmidazolium, chlorpromazine, and 48/80 also negated stress-induced growth reduction by 23, 50, and 35%, respectively.

  13. Transcriptional profile of maize roots under acid soil growth

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Aluminum (Al) toxicity is one of the most important yield-limiting factors of many crops worldwide. The primary symptom of Al toxicity syndrome is the inhibition of root growth leading to poor water and nutrient absorption. Al tolerance has been extensively studied using hydroponic experiments. However, unlike soil conditions, this method does not address all of the components that are necessary for proper root growth and development. In the present study, we grew two maize genotypes with contrasting tolerance to Al in soil containing toxic levels of Al and then compared their transcriptomic responses. Results When grown in acid soil containing toxic levels of Al, the Al-sensitive genotype (S1587-17) showed greater root growth inhibition, more Al accumulation and more callose deposition in root tips than did the tolerant genotype (Cat100-6). Transcriptome profiling showed a higher number of genes differentially expressed in S1587-17 grown in acid soil, probably due to secondary effects of Al toxicity. Genes involved in the biosynthesis of organic acids, which are frequently associated with an Al tolerance response, were not differentially regulated in both genotypes after acid soil exposure. However, genes related to the biosynthesis of auxin, ethylene and lignin were up-regulated in the Al-sensitive genotype, indicating that these pathways might be associated with root growth inhibition. By comparing the two maize lines, we were able to discover genes up-regulated only in the Al-tolerant line that also presented higher absolute levels than those observed in the Al-sensitive line. These genes encoded a lipase hydrolase, a retinol dehydrogenase, a glycine-rich protein, a member of the WRKY transcriptional family and two unknown proteins. Conclusions This work provides the first characterization of the physiological and transcriptional responses of maize roots when grown in acid soil containing toxic levels of Al. The transcriptome profiles highlighted several pathways that are related to Al toxicity and tolerance during growth in acid soil. We found several genes that were not found in previous studies using hydroponic experiments, increasing our understanding of plant responses to acid soil. The use of two germplasms with markedly different Al tolerances allowed the identification of genes that are a valuable tool for assessing the mechanisms of Al tolerance in maize in acid soil. PMID:20828383

  14. Monomethylarsonous acid inhibited endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis in human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Lei; Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-05-15

    Human exposure to arsenic in drinking water is a widespread public health concern, and such exposure is known to be associated with many human diseases. The detailed molecular mechanisms about how arsenic species contribute to the adverse human health effects, however, remain incompletely understood. Monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] is a highly toxic and stable metabolite of inorganic arsenic. To exploit the mechanisms through which MMA(III) exerts its cytotoxic effect, we adopted a quantitative proteomic approach, by coupling stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) with LC-MS/MS analysis, to examine the variation in the entire proteome of GM00637 human skin fibroblasts following acute MMA(III) exposure. Among the ∼ 6500 unique proteins quantified, ∼ 300 displayed significant changes in expression after exposure with 2 μM MMA(III) for 24 h. Subsequent analysis revealed the perturbation of de novo cholesterol biosynthesis, selenoprotein synthesis and Nrf2 pathways evoked by MMA(III) exposure. Particularly, MMA(III) treatment resulted in considerable down-regulation of several enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. In addition, real-time PCR analysis showed reduced mRNA levels of select genes in this pathway. Furthermore, MMA(III) exposure contributed to a distinct decline in cellular cholesterol content and significant growth inhibition of multiple cell lines, both of which could be restored by supplementation of cholesterol to the culture media. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of MMA(III) may arise, at least in part, from the down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis enzymes and the resultant decrease of cellular cholesterol content. - Highlights: • MMA(III)-induced perturbation of the entire proteome of GM00637 cells is studied. • Quantitative proteomic approach revealed alterations of multiple cellular pathways. • MMA(III) inhibits de novo cholesterol biosynthesis. • MMA(III) perturbs Nrf2 pathway and selenoprotein synthesis.

  15. Growth of Toxoplasma gondii is inhibited by aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides targeting acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Zuther, E; Johnson, J J; Haselkorn, R; McLeod, R; Gornicki, P

    1999-11-01

    Aryloxyphenoxypropionates, inhibitors of the plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) of grasses, also inhibit Toxoplasma gondii ACC. Clodinafop, the most effective of the herbicides tested, inhibits growth of T. gondii in human fibroblasts by 70% at 10 microM in 2 days and effectively eliminates the parasite in 2-4 days at 10-100 microM. Clodinafop is not toxic to the host cell even at much higher concentrations. Parasite growth inhibition by different herbicides is correlated with their ability to inhibit ACC enzyme activity, suggesting that ACC is a target for these agents. Fragments of genes encoding the biotin carboxylase domain of multidomain ACCs of T. gondii, Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium knowlesi, and Cryptosporidium parvum were sequenced. One T. gondii ACC (ACC1) amino acid sequence clusters with P. falciparum ACC, P. knowlesi ACC, and the putative Cyclotella cryptica chloroplast ACC. Another sequence (ACC2) clusters with that of C. parvum ACC, probably the cytosolic form. PMID:10557330

  16. Growth of Toxoplasma gondii is inhibited by aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides targeting acetyl-CoA carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Zuther, E.; Johnson, J. J.; Haselkorn, R.; McLeod, R.; Gornicki, P.

    1999-01-01

    Aryloxyphenoxypropionates, inhibitors of the plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) of grasses, also inhibit Toxoplasma gondii ACC. Clodinafop, the most effective of the herbicides tested, inhibits growth of T. gondii in human fibroblasts by 70% at 10 ?M in 2 days and effectively eliminates the parasite in 24 days at 10100 ?M. Clodinafop is not toxic to the host cell even at much higher concentrations. Parasite growth inhibition by different herbicides is correlated with their ability to inhibit ACC enzyme activity, suggesting that ACC is a target for these agents. Fragments of genes encoding the biotin carboxylase domain of multidomain ACCs of T. gondii, Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium knowlesi, and Cryptosporidium parvum were sequenced. One T. gondii ACC (ACC1) amino acid sequence clusters with P. falciparum ACC, P. knowlesi ACC, and the putative Cyclotella cryptica chloroplast ACC. Another sequence (ACC2) clusters with that of C. parvum ACC, probably the cytosolic form. PMID:10557330

  17. Metabolism and growth inhibition of four retinoids in head and neck squamous normal and malignant cells

    PubMed Central

    Klaassen, I; Brakenhoff, R H; Smeets, S J; Snow, G B; Braakhuis, B J M

    2001-01-01

    Isotretinoin (13- cis -retinoic acid, 13cRA) has proven to be active in chemoprevention of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Moreover, both all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) and 13cRA induce objective responses in oral premalignant lesions. After binding of retinoids to retinoic acid receptors (RARs and RXRs) dimers are formed that are able to regulate the expression of genes involved in growth and differentiation. We compared the metabolism and level of growth inhibition of 13cRA with that of ATRA, 9cRA and retinol in four HNSCC cell lines and normal oral keratinocyte cultures (OKC). These retinoid compounds are known to bind with different affinities to the retinoic acid receptors. We observed that all retinoids were similar with respect to their capacity to induce growth inhibition. One HNSCC line could be ranked as sensitive, one as moderately sensitive and the remaining two were totally insensitive; OKC were moderately sensitive. The rate at which the cells were able to catabolize the retinoid was similar for all compounds. Retinoid metabolism in HNSCC cells resulted in a profile of metabolites that was unique for each retinoid. These metabolic profiles were different in OKC. Our findings indicate that differences in retinoid receptor selectivity of these retinoids do not influence the level of growth inhibition and rate of metabolism. 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11506507

  18. Effect of pseudolaric acid B on gastric cancer cells: Inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke-Shen; Gu, Xue-Feng; Li, Ping; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Ya-Shuang; Yao, Zhen-Jiang; Qu, Nai-Qiang; Wang, Bin-You

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of pseudolaric acid B on the growth of human gastric cancer cell line, AGS, and its possible mechanism of action. METHODS: Growth inhibition by pseudolaric acid B was analyzed using MTT assay. Apoptotic cells were detected using Hoechst 33258 staining, and confirmed by DNA fragmentation analysis. Western blot was used to detect the expression of apoptosis-regulated gene Bcl-2, caspase 3, and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). RESULTS: Pseudolaric acid B inhibited the growth of AGS cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner by arresting the cells at G2/M phase, which was accompanied with a decrease in the levels of cdc2. AGS cells treated with pseudolaric acid B showed typical characteristics of apoptosis including chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation. Moreover, treatment of AGS cells with pseudolaric acid B was also associated with decreased levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, activation of caspase-3, and proteolytic cleavage of PARP-1. CONCLUSION: Pseudolaric acid B can dramatically suppress the AGS cell growth by inducing apoptosis after G2/M phase arrest. These findings are consistent with the possibility that G2/M phase arrest is mediated by the down-regulation of cdc2 levels. The data also suggest that pseudolaric acid B can trigger apoptosis by decreasing Bcl-2 levels and activating caspase-3 protease. PMID:16437677

  19. Spectroscopic analysis of urinary calculi and inhibition of their growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manciu, Felicia; Durrer, William; Govani, Jayesh; Reza, Layra; Pinales, Luis

    2009-10-01

    We present here a study of kidney stone formation and growth inhibition based on a traditional medicine approach with Aquatica Lour (RAL) herbal extracts. Kidney stone material systems were synthesized in vitro using a simplified single diffusion gel growth technique. With the objective of revealing the mechanism of inhibition of calculi formation by RAL extracts, samples prepared without the presence of extract, and with the presence of extract, were analyzed using Raman, photoluminescence, and XPS. The unexpected presence of Zn revealed by XPS in a sample prepared with RAL provides an explanation for the inhibition process, and also explains the dramatic reflectance of incident light observed in attempts to obtain infrared transmission data. Raman data are consistent with the binding of the inhibitor to the oxygen of the kidney stone. Photoluminescence data corroborate with the other results to provide additional evidence of Zn-related inhibition.

  20. Interamino Acid Inhibition of Transport in Higher Plants 12

    PubMed Central

    Kinraide, Thomas B.

    1981-01-01

    Data from published experiments were analyzed to determine the number and specificities of amino acid transport channels in cells of higher plants. Each experiment measured the uptake of a labeled amino acid in the presence of unlabeled amino acids, used one at a time, in the incubating medium. The observed interamino acid inhibitions can be accounted for by two transport channels, each with characteristic affinities that were computed from the observed interamino acid inhibitions. The first channel is a general transport system with the following relative affinities for the amino acids: methionine 75, alanine 75, phenylalanine 64, tyrosine 64, leucine 63, cysteine 58, serine 57, glycine 56, tryptophan 54, glutamine 51, threonine 49, valine 44, isoleucine 44, glutamic acid 44, proline 43, histidine 33, lysine 32, asparagine 22, arginine 22, aspartic acid 18. The second channel is a basic amino acid tranport system with relative affinities for arginine, lysine, and histidine of 66, 39, and 21, respectively. The affinities for the other acids in the second channel are lower. Despite considerable diversity in the species, tissues, and solute concentrations employed in the experiments, multiple regression equations (Y = ? + ?1X1 + ?X2, in which Y is the observed transport inhibition and X1 and X2 are the relative transport affinities of the two channels) account for 50 to 99% of the variance in all but six experiments, five of which employed unusually high solute concentrations. PMID:16662102

  1. Acriflavine inhibits HIF-1 dimerization, tumor growth, and vascularization.

    PubMed

    Lee, KangAe; Zhang, Huafeng; Qian, David Z; Rey, Sergio; Liu, Jun O; Semenza, Gregg L

    2009-10-20

    HIF-1 is a heterodimeric transcription factor that mediates adaptive responses to hypoxia and plays critical roles in cancer progression. Using a cell-based screening assay we have identified acriflavine as a drug that binds directly to HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha and inhibits HIF-1 dimerization and transcriptional activity. Pretreatment of mice bearing prostate cancer xenografts with acriflavine prevented tumor growth and treatment of mice bearing established tumors resulted in growth arrest. Acriflavine treatment inhibited intratumoral expression of angiogenic cytokines, mobilization of angiogenic cells into peripheral blood, and tumor vascularization. These results provide proof of principle that small molecules can inhibit dimerization of HIF-1 and have potent inhibitory effects on tumor growth and vascularization. PMID:19805192

  2. Acriflavine inhibits HIF-1 dimerization, tumor growth, and vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, KangAe; Zhang, Huafeng; Qian, David Z.; Rey, Sergio; Liu, Jun O.; Semenza, Gregg L.

    2009-01-01

    HIF-1 is a heterodimeric transcription factor that mediates adaptive responses to hypoxia and plays critical roles in cancer progression. Using a cell-based screening assay we have identified acriflavine as a drug that binds directly to HIF-1? and HIF-2? and inhibits HIF-1 dimerization and transcriptional activity. Pretreatment of mice bearing prostate cancer xenografts with acriflavine prevented tumor growth and treatment of mice bearing established tumors resulted in growth arrest. Acriflavine treatment inhibited intratumoral expression of angiogenic cytokines, mobilization of angiogenic cells into peripheral blood, and tumor vascularization. These results provide proof of principle that small molecules can inhibit dimerization of HIF-1 and have potent inhibitory effects on tumor growth and vascularization. PMID:19805192

  3. Growth of nitric acid hydrates on thin sulfuric acid films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Wilson, Margaret A.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1994-01-01

    Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are thought to nucleate and grow on stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs). To model this system, thin sulfuric acid films were exposed to water and nitric acid vapors (1-3 x 10(exp -4) Torr H2O and 1-2.5 x 10(exp -6) Torr HNO3) and subjected to cooling and heating cycles. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to probe the phase of the sulfuric acid and to identify the HNO3/H2O films that condensed. Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was observed to grow on crystalline sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) films. NAT also condensed in/on supercooled H2SO4 films without causing crystallization of the sulfuric acid. This growth is consistent with NAT nucleation from ternary solutions as the first step in PSC formation.

  4. Acid inhibition of CRA`s: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, M.L.; Cassidy, J.M.; Lancaster, K.R.; McCoy, T.H.

    1994-12-31

    This paper will review the brief history in the literature of the inhibition of corrosion resistant alloys (CRA`s) in acidic stimulation fluids. This review primarily discusses the problems associated with inhibiting 13% Cr and 22% Cr duplex steels in hydrochloric (HCI) and hydrochloric-hydrofluoric (HCl-HF) acid systems using low alloy inhibitors and the successes achieved using high alloy inhibitors. Other areas briefly discussed are the repassivation of 13% Cr and 22% Cr, effect on nickel-based alloys and use of organic acids.

  5. Inhibition of plant fatty acid synthesis by nitroimidazoles.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A V; Harwood, J L; Stratford, M R; Stumpf, P K

    1981-01-01

    1. The effect of the addition of a number of nitroimidazoles was tested on fatty acid synthesis by germinating pea seeds, isolated lettuce chloroplasts and a soluble fraction from pea seeds. 2. All the compounds tested had a marked inhibition on stearate desaturation by lettuce chloroplasts and on the synthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids by pea seeds. 3. In contrast, the effect of the drugs on total fatty acid synthesis from [14C]acetate in chloroplasts was related to the compound's electron reduction potentials. 4. Of the compounds used, only metronidazole had a marked inhibition on palmitate elongation in the systems tested. 5. The mechanism of inhibition of plant fatty acid synthesis by nitroimidazoles is discussed and the possible relevance of these findings to their neurotoxicity is suggested. PMID:7325993

  6. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F; Kady, Ismail O

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase. PMID:25996607

  7. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F.; Kady, Ismail O.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase. PMID:25996607

  8. All-trans retinoic acid combined with 5-Aza-2 Prime -deoxycitidine induces C/EBP{alpha} expression and growth inhibition in MLL-AF9-positive leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiki, Atsushi; Imamura, Toshihiko; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Kawashima, Sachiko; Yoshida, Hideki; Hirashima, Yoshifumi; Miyachi, Mitsuru; Yagyu, Shigeki; Nakatani, Takuya; Sugita, Kanji; Hosoi, Hajime

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested whether ATRA and 5-Aza affect AML cell differentiation and growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell differentiation and growth arrest were induced in MLL-AF9-expressing cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased expression of C/EBP{alpha}, C/EBP{epsilon}, and PU.1 were also observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MLL-AF4/AF5q31-expressing cells are less sensitive to ATRA and 5-Aza. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different MLL fusion has distinct epigenetic properties related to RA pathway. -- Abstract: The present study tested whether all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and 5-Aza-2 Prime -deoxycitidine (5-Aza) affect AML cell differentiation and growth in vitro by acting on the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein {alpha} (C/EBP{alpha}) and c-Myc axis. After exposure to a combination of these agents, cell differentiation and growth arrest were significantly higher in human and murine MLL-AF9-expressing cells than in MLL-AF4/AF5q31-expressing cells, which were partly associated with increased expression of C/EBP{alpha}, C/EBP{epsilon}, and PU.1, and decreased expression of c-Myc. These findings indicate that MLL-AF9-expressing cells are more sensitive to ATRA and 5-Aza, indicating that different MLL fusion proteins possess different epigenetic properties associated with retinoic acid pathway inactivation.

  9. Lysosomotropic amines inhibit mitogenesis induced by growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    King, A C; Hernaez-Davis, L; Cuatrecasas, P

    1981-01-01

    The stimulation of DNA synthesis by epidermal growth factor, insulin, and serum is inhibited by a variety of alkylamines when present for the duration of the stimulatory preincubation (20-24 hr). These results contradict an earlier report [Maxfield, F. R., Davies, P. J. A., Klempner, L., Willingham, M. C. & Pastan, I. (1979) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 76, 5731-5735] and can be explained by differences in incubation conditions. The most straightforward interpretation of our results is that the mitogenic activities of growth factors are blocked by agents that inhibit the intracellular processing of hormone-receptor complexes. Therefore, the continued internalization and degradation of growth factors or their receptors within cells may play an important role in inducing mitogenesis in cultured human fibroblasts and may explain the prolonged requirement for epidermal growth factor in the culture medium (8 hr) to elicit a mitogenic response. We also found that bacitracin, a potent inhibitor of the enzyme transglutaminase, neither prevents receptor internalization or degradation in human fibroblasts nor inhibits the mitogenic activity of epidermal growth factor. These results suggest that transglutaminase activity may not be relevant to the mechanisms of growth-factor-induced receptor internalization or mitogenesis. PMID:6262764

  10. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kanayo; Sakaguchi, Minoru; Tanaka, Satoshi; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Takaoka, Masanori

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

  11. Phenylpropanoic Acid: Growth Factor for Ruminococcus albus

    PubMed Central

    Hungate, R. E.; Stack, Robert J.

    1982-01-01

    Phenylpropanoic acid accounted for part of the stimulatory effect of rumen fluid on the rate of growth and of cellulose digestion by cultures of Ruminococcus albus strain 8 grown on a chemically defined medium. As little as 3 ?M concentration gave maximum response. PMID:16346069

  12. Polyphosphate Inhibition of Growth of Pseudomonads From Poultry Meat

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, R. Paul; Straka, Robert P.; Garibaldi, John A.

    1964-01-01

    Both commercial polyphosphates and equivalent mixtures of chemically pure polyphosphates inhibited the growth of nonfluorescent pseudomonads in a synthetic medium. Fluorescent strains grew after a short lag. Inhibition was not caused by high pH, but rather by chelation of metal ions essential to the growth of the bacteria. Mg++ and the natural competitive chelators, pyoverdine and bacteriological peptone, reversed the inhibition. Chilling chicken carcasses overnight in slush ice containing 3 and 8% polyphosphates lengthened subsequent shelf-life 17 and 25%, respectively. Chickens held in continuous contact with 3 and 8% solutions of polyphosphates during storage at 2.2 C kept 17 and 67% longer, respectively. Only fluorescent strains developed in the presence of 3 and 8% polyphosphates. Chickens held in antiseptic ice containing 8% polyphosphates kept 60% longer than did those in water ice. PMID:14239583

  13. Crystal structure of the thioesterase domain of human fatty acid synthase inhibited by orlistat

    SciTech Connect

    Pemble,C.; Johnson, L.; Kridel, S.; Lowther, W.

    2007-01-01

    Human fatty acid synthase (FAS) is uniquely expressed at high levels in many tumor types. Pharmacological inhibition of FAS therefore represents an important therapeutic opportunity. The drug Orlistat, which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, inhibits FAS, induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and inhibits the growth of prostate tumor xenografts. We determined the 2.3-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of the thioesterase domain of FAS inhibited by Orlistat. Orlistat was captured in the active sites of two thioesterase molecules as a stable acyl-enzyme intermediate and as the hydrolyzed product. The details of these interactions reveal the molecular basis for inhibition and suggest a mechanism for acyl-chain length discrimination during the FAS catalytic cycle. Our findings provide a foundation for the development of new cancer drugs that target FAS.

  14. Inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell growth by inhibition of fibronectin matrix assembly.

    PubMed

    Mercurius, K O; Morla, A O

    1998-03-23

    The regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation by the fibronectin matrix was tested by treating human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs) with a recombinant fragment of fibronectin (protein III1-C) that has previously been shown to modulate fibronectin matrix assembly. III1-C inhibited HUASMC proliferation by 75% to 90%. The inhibition of growth was time dependent; III1-C had no effect on DNA synthesis after 0 to 5 hours of treatment but did have an effect at 24 hours and beyond. III1-C did not stimulate apoptosis in these cells, indicating that the inhibition of proliferation was not due to an induction of programmed cell death. The effects of III1-C on cell growth were only specific for normal diploid smooth muscle cells. III1-C had no effect on the proliferation of IMR-90 fibroblasts, endothelial cells, NIH 3T3 cells, or the rat aortic smooth muscle cell line A7r5. However, III1-C did inhibit proliferation by primary rat aortic smooth muscle cells. An analysis of HUASMC fibronectin receptor (integrin alpha5beta1) distribution revealed that III1-C did not inhibit alpha5beta1 localization to focal contacts. Moreover, III1-C had no effect on the relative expression levels of seven different integrin subunits on HUASMCs. However, III1-C did inhibit fibronectin matrix assembly by rat aortic smooth muscle cells, HUASMCs, A7r5 cells, IMR-90 cells, and endothelial cells. An analysis of fibronectin synthesis indicated that the inhibition of fibronectin matrix assembly by III1-C was not due solely to a decrease in fibronectin synthesis. Finally, treatment of HUASMCs with anti-fibronectin monoclonal antibody L8 (which is known to inhibit fibronectin matrix assembly) also decreased the rate of HUASMC DNA synthesis. These results demonstrate that III1-C inhibits VSMC proliferation and suggest that this effect may be mediated by the inhibition of fibronectin matrix assembly. PMID:9529159

  15. Activation of Exogenous Fatty Acids to Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Cannot Bypass FabI Inhibition in Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jiangwei; Bruhn, David F; Frank, Matthew W; Lee, Richard E; Rock, Charles O

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria is a Gram-negative pathogen with phospholipids composed of straight chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, the ability to incorporate exogenous fatty acids, and lipopolysaccharides that are not essential. The FabI inhibitor, AFN-1252, was deployed as a chemical biology tool to determine whether Neisseria can bypass the inhibition of fatty acid synthesis by incorporating exogenous fatty acids. Neisseria encodes a functional FabI that was potently inhibited by AFN-1252. AFN-1252 caused a dose-dependent inhibition of fatty acid synthesis in growing Neisseria, a delayed inhibition of growth phenotype, and minimal inhibition of DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis, showing that its mode of action is through inhibiting fatty acid synthesis. Isotopic fatty acid labeling experiments showed that Neisseria encodes the ability to incorporate exogenous fatty acids into its phospholipids by an acyl-acyl carrier protein-dependent pathway. However, AFN-1252 remained an effective antibacterial when Neisseria were supplemented with exogenous fatty acids. These results demonstrate that extracellular fatty acids are activated by an acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasN) and validate type II fatty acid synthesis (FabI) as a therapeutic target against Neisseria. PMID:26567338

  16. Multiple product inhibition and growth modeling of Clostridium butyricum and Klebsiella pneumoniae in glycerol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, A.P.; Ross, A.; Biebl, H.; Tag, C.; Guenzel, B.; Deckwer, W.D. . Biochemical Engineering Division)

    1994-10-01

    The inhibition potentials of products and substrate on the growth of Clostridium butyricum and Klebsiella pneumoniae in the glycerol fermentation are examined from experimental data and with a mathematical model. Whereas the inhibition potential of externally added and self-produced 1,3-propanediol is essentially the same, butyric acid produced by the culture is more toxic than that externally added. The same seems to apply for acetic acid. The inhibitory effect of butyric acid is due to the total concentration instead of its undissociated form. For acetic acid, it cannot be distinguished between the total concentration and the undissociated form. The inhibition effects of products and substrate in the glycerol fermentation are irrespective of the strains, and, therefore, the same growth model can be used. The maximum product concentrations tolerated are 0.35 g/L for undissociated acetic acid, 10.1 g/L for total butyric acid, 16.6 g/L for ethanol, 71.4 g/L for 1,3-propanediol, and 187.6 g/L for glycerol, which are applicable to C. butyricum and K. pneumoniae growth under a variety of conditions. For 55 steady-states, which were obtained from different types of continuous cultures over a pH range of 5.3--8.5 and under both substrate limitation and substrate excess, the proposed growth model fits the experimental data with an average deviation of 17.0%. The deviation of model description from experimental values reduces of 11.4% if only the steady-states with excessive substrate are considered.

  17. Saccharin and Cyclamate Inhibit Binding of Epidermal Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, L. S.

    1981-02-01

    The binding of 125I-labeled mouse epidermal growth factor (EGF) to 18 cell lines, including HeLa (human carcinoma), MDCK (dog kidney cells), HTC (rat hepatoma), K22 (rat liver), HF (human foreskin), GM17 (human skin fibroblasts), XP (human xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts), and 3T3-L1 (mouse fibroblasts), was inhibited by saccharin and cyclamate. The human cells were more sensitive to inhibition by these sweeteners than mouse or rat cells. EGF at doses far above the physiological levels reversed the inhibition in rodent cells but not in HeLa cells. In HeLa cells, the doses of saccharin and cyclamate needed for 50% inhibition were 3.5 and 9.3 mg/ml, respectively. Glucose, 2-deoxyglucose, sucrose, and xylitol did not inhibit EGF binding. Previous studies have shown that phorbol esters, strongly potent tumor promoters, also inhibit EGF binding to tissue culture cells. To explain the EGF binding inhibition by such greatly dissimilar molecules as phorbol esters, saccharin, and cyclamate, it is suggested that they operate through the activation of a hormone response control unit.

  18. The inhibition of crystal growth of mirabilite in aqueous solutions in the presence of phosphonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavouraki, A. I.; Koutsoukos, P. G.

    2016-02-01

    The formation of sodium sulfate decahydrate (Mirabilite) has been known to cause serious damages to structural materials both of modern and of historical buildings. Methods which can retard or completely suppress the development of mirabilte crystals are urgently needed especially as remedies or preventive measures for the preservation of the built cultural heritage. In the present work we present results on the effect of the presence of phosphonate compounds on the kinetics of crystal growth from aqueous supersaturated solutions at 18 °C using the seeded growth technique. The phosphonate compounds tested differed with respect to the number of ionizable phosphonate groups and with respect to the number of amino groups in the respective molecules. The crystal growth process was monitored by the temperature changes during the exothermic crystallization of mirabilite in the stirred supersaturated solutions. The crystal growth of mirabilite in the presence of: (1-hydroxyethylidene)-1, 1-diphosphonic acid (HEDP), amino tri (methylene phosphonic acid) (ATMP), hexamethylenediaminetetra (methylene)phosphonic acid (HTDMP), and diethylene triamine penta(methylene phosphonic acid)(DETPMP) over a range of concentrations between 0.1-5% w/w resulted in significant decrease of the rates of mirabilite crystal growth. All phosphonic compounds tested reduced the crystallization rates up to 60% in comparison with additive-free solutions. The presence of the test compounds did not cause changes of the mechanism of crystal growth which was surface diffusion controlled, as shown by the second order dependence of the rates of mirabilite crystal growth on the relative supersaturation. The excellent fit of the measured rates to a kinetic Langmuir-type model suggested that the activity of the tested inhibitors could be attributed to the adsorption and subsequent reduction of the active crystal growth sites of the seed crystals. In all cases, the inhibitory activity was reduced with increasing solution supersaturation, while the presence of DETPMP, which showed the best inhibition activity, showed the least reduction of inhibition with increasing supersaturation.

  19. Decreased growth-induced water potential: A primary cause of growth inhibition at low water potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Nonami, Hiroshi; Wu, Yajun; Boyer, J.S.

    1997-06-01

    Cell enlargement depends on a growth-induced difference in water potential to move water into the cells. Water deficits decrease this potential difference and inhibit growth. To investigate whether the decrease causes the growth inhibition, pressure was applied to the roots of soybean seedlings and the growth and potential difference were monitored in the stems. In water-limited plants, the inhibited stem growth increased when the roots were pressurized and it reverted to the previous rate when the pressure was released. The pressure around the roots was perceived as an increased turgor in the stem in small cells next to the xylem, but not in outlying cortical cells. This local effect implied that water transport was impeded by the small cells. The diffusivity for water was much less in the small cells than in the outlying cells. The small cells thus were a barrier that caused the growth-induced potential difference to be large during rapid growth, but to reverse locally during the early part of a water deficit. Such a barrier may be a frequent property of meristems. Because stem growth responded to the pressure-induced recovery of the potential difference across this barrier, we conclude that a decrease in the growth-induced potential difference was a primary cause of the inhibition.

  20. Effect of pH alkaline salts of fatty acids on the inhibition of bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine the effect of pH on the ability of alkaline salts of three fatty acids (FA) to inhibit growth of bacteria associated with poultry processing. FA solutions were prepared by dissolving 0.5 M concentrations of caprylic, capric, or lauric acid in separate ali...

  1. Inhibition of tumor-stromal interaction through HGF/Met signaling by valproic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Yohsuke; Motoki, Takahiro; Kubota, Satoshi; Takigawa, Masaharu; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Gohda, Eiichi

    2008-02-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), which is produced by surrounding stromal cells, including fibroblasts and endothelial cells, has been shown to be a significant factor responsible for cancer cell invasion mediated by tumor-stromal interactions. We found in this study that the anti-tumor agent valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, strongly inhibited tumor-stromal interaction. VPA inhibited HGF production in fibroblasts induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} without any appreciable cytotoxic effect. Other HDAC inhibitors, including butyric acid and trichostatin A (TSA), showed similar inhibitory effects on HGF production stimulated by various inducers. Up-regulations of HGF gene expression induced by PMA and EGF were also suppressed by VPA and TSA. Furthermore, VPA significantly inhibited HGF-induced invasion of HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. VPA, however, did not affect the increases in phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt in HGF-treated HepG2 cells. These results demonstrated that VPA inhibited two critical processes of tumor-stromal interaction, induction of fibroblastic HGF production and HGF-induced invasion of HepG2 cells, and suggest that those activities serve for other anti-tumor mechanisms of VPA besides causing proliferation arrest, differentiation, and/or apoptosis of tumor cells.

  2. Inhibition of Orobanche crenata seed germination and radicle growth by allelochemicals identified in cereals.

    PubMed

    Fernndez-Aparicio, Mnica; Cimmino, Alessio; Evidente, Antonio; Rubiales, Diego

    2013-10-16

    Orobanche crenata is a parasitic weed that causes severe yield losses in important grain and forage legume crops. Cereals have been reported to inhibit O. crenata parasitism when grown intercropped with susceptible legumes, but the responsible metabolites have not been identified. A number of metabolites have been reported in cereals that have allelopathic properties against weeds, pests, and pathogens. We tested the effect of several allelochemicals identified in cereals on O. crenata seed germination and radicle development. We found that 2-benzoxazolinone, its derivative 6-chloroacetyl-2-benzoxazolinone, and scopoletin significantly inhibited O. crenata seed germination. Benzoxazolinones, l-tryptophan, and coumalic acid caused the stronger inhibition of radicle growth. Also, other metabolites reduced radicle length, this inhibition being dose-dependent. Only scopoletin caused cell necrotic-like darkening in the young radicles. Prospects for their application to parasitic weed management are discussed. PMID:24044614

  3. Reversible inhibition of calcium oxalate monohydrate growth by an osteopontin phosphopeptide.

    PubMed

    Nene, Shailesh S; Hunter, Graeme K; Goldberg, Harvey A; Hutter, Jeffrey L

    2013-05-28

    Calcium oxalate, primarily as calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), is the primary constituent of most kidney stones. Certain proteins, such as osteopontin (OPN), inhibit stone formation. The complexity of stone formation and the effects of urinary proteins at various stages of the process make it hard to predict the exact physiological roles of these proteins in growth inhibition. The inhibition of crystallization due to adsorbed impurities is usually explained in terms of a model proposed in 1958 by Cabrera and Vermilyea. In this model, impurities adsorb to growth faces and pin growth steps, forcing them to curve, thus impeding their progress via the Gibbs-Thomson effect. To determine the role of OPN in the biomineralization of kidney stones, crystal growth on the {010} face of COM was examined in real time with atomic force microscopy in the presence of a synthetic peptide corresponding to amino acids 65-80 (hereafter referred to as pOPAR) of rat bone OPN. We observed clear changes in the morphology of the growth-step structure and a decrease in step velocity upon addition of pOPAR, which suggest adsorption of inhibitors on the {010} growth hillocks. Experiments in which pOPAR was replaced in the growth cell by a supersaturated solution showed that COM hillocks are able to fully recover to their preinhibited state. Our results suggest that recovery occurs through incorporation of the peptide into the growing crystal, rather than by, e.g., desorption from the growth face. This work provides new insights into the mechanism by which crystal growth is inhibited by adsorbants, with important implications for the design of therapeutic agents for kidney stone disease and other forms of pathological calcification. PMID:23611580

  4. Effects of acidity on tree pollen germination and tube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, J.S.; Van Rye, D.M.; Lassoie, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that pollen germination and tube growth are adversely affected by air pollutants. Pollutants may inhibit the function of pollen by reducing the number of pollen grains which germinate, by reducing the maximum length to which the pollen tubes grow, or by interfering with the formation of the generative cell. The paper reports on studies that are attempting to determine the effects acid rain may have on these crucial stages in the life histories of northeastern tree species. The first stage of this work assessed the effects of acidity in the growth medium on in vitro pollen germination for four deciduous forest species common to central New York State, Betula lutea (yellow birch), B. lenta (black birch), Acer saccharum (sugar maple), and Cornus florida (flowering dogwood). Measurements were taken at the end of the growth period to determine the percentage of grains which had germinated, and to estimate the average tube length. To determine the effects of pollen on the growth medium, the pH of the germination drop was measured at the end of the growth period.

  5. Syzygium campanulatum korth methanolic extract inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Syzygium campanulatum Korth (Myrtaceae) is an evergreen shrub rich in phenolics, flavonoid antioxidants, and betulinic acid. This study sought to investigate antiangiogenic and anti-colon cancer effects of S.C. standardized methanolic extract. Methods Betulinic acid was isolated from methanolic extract by crystallization and chromatography techniques. S.C. methanolic extract was analyzed by UV-Vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, LC-MS, and HPLC. Antiangiogenic effect was studied on rat aortic rings, matrigel tube formation, cell proliferation and migration, and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Antitumor effect was studied using a subcutaneous tumor model of HCT 116 colorectal carcinoma cells established in nude mice. Results Analysis by HPLC, LC-MS and FTIR confirm presence of betulinic acid in S.C. methanolic extract. Quantitative analysis by HPLC indicates presence of betulinic acid in S.C. extract at 5.42 ± 0.09% (w/w). Antiangiogenesis study showed potent inhibition of microvessels outgrowth in rat aortic rings, and studies on normal and cancer cells did not show any significant cytotoxic effect. Antiangiogenic effect was further confirmed by inhibition of tube formation on matrigel matrix that involves human endothelial cells (IC50 = 17.6 ± 2.9 μg/ml). S.C. extract also inhibited migration of endothelial cells and suppressed expression of VEGF. In vivo antiangiogenic study showed inhibition of new blood vessels in chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), and in vivo antitumor study showed significant inhibition of tumor growth due to reduction of intratumor blood vessels and induction of cell death. Conclusion Collectively, our results indicate S. campanulatum as antiangiogenic and antitumor candidate, and a new source of betulinic acid. PMID:23842450

  6. Inhibition of acid-catalyzed depolymerization of cellulose with boric acid in non-aqueous acidic media.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Haruo; Saito, Shinya; Saka, Shiro

    2008-02-01

    Boric acid inhibited the acid-catalyzed depolymerization of cellulose in sulfolane, a non-aqueous medium, at high temperature. Formation of the dehydration products such as levoglucosenone, furfural, and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural were also effectively inhibited. Similar inhibition was observed for cellooligosaccharides and starch, although the glucosidic bonds in methyl glucopyranosides and methyl cellobioside were cleaved to form alpha-d-glucofuranose cyclic 1,2:3,5-bisborate. PMID:18045577

  7. Stereocomplexes Formed From Select Oligomers of Polymer d-lactic Acid (PDLA) and l-lactate May Inhibit Growth of Cancer Cells and Help Diagnose Aggressive Cancers—Applications of the Warburg Effect

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    It is proposed that select oligomers of polymer d-lactic acid (PDLA) will form a stereocomplex with l-lactate in vivo, producing lactate deficiency in tumor cells. Those cancer cells that utilize transport of lactate to maintain electrical neutrality may cease to multiply or die because of lactate trapping, and those cancer cells that benefit from utilization of extracellular lactate may be impaired. Intracellular trapping of lactate produces a different physiology than inhibition of LDH because the cell loses the option of shuttling pyruvate to an alternative pathway to produce an anion. Conjugated with stains or fluorescent probes, PDLA oligomers may be an agent for the diagnosis of tissue lactate and possibly cell differentiation in biopsy specimens. Preliminary experimental evidence is presented confirming that PDLA in high concentrations is cytotoxic and that l-lactate forms a presumed stereocomplex with PDLA. Future work should be directed at isolation of biologically active oligomers of PDLA. PMID:21487535

  8. Novel Antifungal Peptides Produced by Leuconostoc mesenteroides DU15 Effectively Inhibit Growth of Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Muhialdin, Belal J; Hassan, Zaiton; Abu Bakar, Fatimah; Algboory, Hussein L; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-05-01

    The ability of Leuconostoc mesenteroides DU15 to produce antifungal peptides that inhibit growth of Aspergillus niger was evaluated under optimum growth conditions of 30 C for 48 h. The cell-free supernatant showed inhibitory activity against A. niger. Five novel peptides were isolated with the sequences GPFPL, YVPLF, LLHGVPLP, GPFPLEMTLGPT, and TVYPFPGPL as identified by de novo sequencing using PEAKS 6 software. Peptide LLHGVPLP was the only positively charged (cationic peptides) and peptide GPFPLEMTLGPT negatively charged (anionic), whereas the rest are neutral. The identified peptides had high hydrophobicity ratio and low molecular weights with amino acids sequences ranging from 5 to 12 residues. The mode of action of these peptides is observed under the scanning electron microscope and is due to cell lysis of fungi. This work reveals the potential of peptides from L. mesenteroides DU15 as natural antifungal preservatives in inhibiting the growth of A. niger that is implicated to the spoilage during storage. PMID:25847317

  9. Apicoplast-targeting antibacterials inhibit the growth of Babesia parasites.

    PubMed

    Aboulaila, Mahmoud; Munkhjargal, Tserendorj; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Ueno, Akio; Nakano, Yuki; Yokoyama, Miki; Yoshinari, Takeshi; Nagano, Daisuke; Katayama, Koji; El-Bahy, Nasr; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2012-06-01

    The apicoplast housekeeping machinery, specifically apicoplast DNA replication, transcription, and translation, was targeted by ciprofloxacin, thiostrepton, and rifampin, respectively, in the in vitro cultures of four Babesia species. Furthermore, the in vivo effect of thiostrepton on the growth cycle of Babesia microti in BALB/c mice was evaluated. The drugs caused significant inhibition of growth from an initial parasitemia of 1% for Babesia bovis, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s) of 8.3, 11.5, 12, and 126.6 ?M for ciprofloxacin, thiostrepton, rifampin, and clindamycin, respectively. The IC(50)s for the inhibition of Babesia bigemina growth were 15.8 ?M for ciprofloxacin, 8.2 ?M for thiostrepton, 8.3 ?M for rifampin, and 206 ?M for clindamycin. The IC(50)s for Babesia caballi were 2.7 ?M for ciprofloxacin, 2.7 ?M for thiostrepton, 4.7 ?M for rifampin, and 4.7 ?M for clindamycin. The IC(50)s for the inhibition of Babesia equi growth were 2.5 ?M for ciprofloxacin, 6.4 ?M for thiostrepton, 4.1 ?M for rifampin, and 27.2 ?M for clindamycin. Furthermore, an inhibitory effect was revealed for cultures with an initial parasitemia of either 10 or 7% for Babesia bovis or Babesia bigemina, respectively. The three inhibitors caused immediate death of Babesia bovis and Babesia equi. The inhibitory effects of ciprofloxacin, thiostrepton, and rifampin were confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR. Thiostrepton at a dose of 500 mg/kg of body weight resulted in 77.5% inhibition of Babesia microti growth in BALB/c mice. These results implicate the apicoplast as a potential chemotherapeutic target for babesiosis. PMID:22391527

  10. Apicoplast-Targeting Antibacterials Inhibit the Growth of Babesia Parasites

    PubMed Central

    AbouLaila, Mahmoud; Munkhjargal, Tserendorj; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Ueno, Akio; Nakano, Yuki; Yokoyama, Miki; Yoshinari, Takeshi; Nagano, Daisuke; Katayama, Koji; El-Bahy, Nasr; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2012-01-01

    The apicoplast housekeeping machinery, specifically apicoplast DNA replication, transcription, and translation, was targeted by ciprofloxacin, thiostrepton, and rifampin, respectively, in the in vitro cultures of four Babesia species. Furthermore, the in vivo effect of thiostrepton on the growth cycle of Babesia microti in BALB/c mice was evaluated. The drugs caused significant inhibition of growth from an initial parasitemia of 1% for Babesia bovis, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of 8.3, 11.5, 12, and 126.6 ?M for ciprofloxacin, thiostrepton, rifampin, and clindamycin, respectively. The IC50s for the inhibition of Babesia bigemina growth were 15.8 ?M for ciprofloxacin, 8.2 ?M for thiostrepton, 8.3 ?M for rifampin, and 206 ?M for clindamycin. The IC50s for Babesia caballi were 2.7 ?M for ciprofloxacin, 2.7 ?M for thiostrepton, 4.7 ?M for rifampin, and 4.7 ?M for clindamycin. The IC50s for the inhibition of Babesia equi growth were 2.5 ?M for ciprofloxacin, 6.4 ?M for thiostrepton, 4.1 ?M for rifampin, and 27.2 ?M for clindamycin. Furthermore, an inhibitory effect was revealed for cultures with an initial parasitemia of either 10 or 7% for Babesia bovis or Babesia bigemina, respectively. The three inhibitors caused immediate death of Babesia bovis and Babesia equi. The inhibitory effects of ciprofloxacin, thiostrepton, and rifampin were confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR. Thiostrepton at a dose of 500 mg/kg of body weight resulted in 77.5% inhibition of Babesia microti growth in BALB/c mice. These results implicate the apicoplast as a potential chemotherapeutic target for babesiosis. PMID:22391527

  11. Trophosome of the Deep-Sea Tubeworm Riftia pachyptila Inhibits Bacterial Growth.

    PubMed

    Klose, Julia; Aistleitner, Karin; Horn, Matthias; Krenn, Liselotte; Dirsch, Verena; Zehl, Martin; Bright, Monika

    2016-01-01

    The giant tubeworm Riftia pachyptila lives in symbiosis with the chemoautotrophic gammaproteobacterium Cand. Endoriftia persephone. Symbionts are released back into the environment upon host death in high-pressure experiments, while microbial fouling is not involved in trophosome degradation. Therefore, we examined the antimicrobial effect of the tubeworm's trophosome and skin. The growth of all four tested Gram-positive, but only of one of the tested Gram-negative bacterial strains was inhibited by freshly fixed and degrading trophosome (incubated up to ten days at either warm or cold temperature), while no effect on Saccharomyces cerevisiae was observed. The skin did not show antimicrobial effects. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the ethanol supernatant of fixed trophosomes lead to the tentative identification of the phospholipids 1-palmitoleyl-2-lyso-phosphatidylethanolamine, 2-palmitoleyl-1-lyso-phosphatidylethanolamine and the free fatty acids palmitoleic, palmitic and oleic acid, which are known to have an antimicrobial effect. As a result of tissue autolysis, the abundance of the free fatty acids increased with longer incubation time of trophosome samples. This correlated with an increasing growth inhibition of Bacillus subtilis and Listeria welshimeri, but not of the other bacterial strains. Therefore, the free fatty acids produced upon host degradation could be the cause of inhibition of at least these two bacterial strains. PMID:26730960

  12. Trophosome of the Deep-Sea Tubeworm Riftia pachyptila Inhibits Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Klose, Julia; Aistleitner, Karin; Horn, Matthias; Krenn, Liselotte; Dirsch, Verena; Zehl, Martin; Bright, Monika

    2016-01-01

    The giant tubeworm Riftia pachyptila lives in symbiosis with the chemoautotrophic gammaproteobacterium Cand. Endoriftia persephone. Symbionts are released back into the environment upon host death in high-pressure experiments, while microbial fouling is not involved in trophosome degradation. Therefore, we examined the antimicrobial effect of the tubeworm’s trophosome and skin. The growth of all four tested Gram-positive, but only of one of the tested Gram-negative bacterial strains was inhibited by freshly fixed and degrading trophosome (incubated up to ten days at either warm or cold temperature), while no effect on Saccharomyces cerevisiae was observed. The skin did not show antimicrobial effects. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the ethanol supernatant of fixed trophosomes lead to the tentative identification of the phospholipids 1-palmitoleyl-2-lyso-phosphatidylethanolamine, 2-palmitoleyl-1-lyso-phosphatidylethanolamine and the free fatty acids palmitoleic, palmitic and oleic acid, which are known to have an antimicrobial effect. As a result of tissue autolysis, the abundance of the free fatty acids increased with longer incubation time of trophosome samples. This correlated with an increasing growth inhibition of Bacillus subtilis and Listeria welshimeri, but not of the other bacterial strains. Therefore, the free fatty acids produced upon host degradation could be the cause of inhibition of at least these two bacterial strains. PMID:26730960

  13. Glycation inhibits trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-induced whey protein precipitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four different WPI saccharide conjugates were successfully prepared to test whether glycation could inhibit WPI precipitation induced by trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Conjugates molecular weights after glycation were analyzed with SDS-PAGE. No significant secondary structure change due to glycation wa...

  14. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Song, Jie; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  15. Inhibition of citrus fungal pathogens by using lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gerez, C L; Carbajo, M S; Rolln, G; Torres Leal, G; Font de Valdez, G

    2010-08-01

    The effect of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on pathogenic fungi was evaluated and the metabolites involved in the antifungal effect were characterized. Penicillium digitatum (INTA 1 to INTA 7) and Geotrichum citri-aurantii (INTA 8) isolated from decayed lemon from commercial packinghouses were treated with imazalil and guazatine to obtain strains resistant to these fungicides. The most resistant strains (4 fungal strains) were selected for evaluating the antifungal activity of 33 LAB strains, among which only 8 strains gave positive results. The antifungal activity of these LAB strains was related to the production of lactic acid, acetic acid, and phenyllactic acid (PLA). A central composite design and the response surface methodology were used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of the organic acids produced by the LAB cultures. The antifungal activity of lactic acid was directly related to its concentration; however, acetic acid and PLA showed a peak of activity at 52.5 and 0.8 mM, respectively, with inhibition rates similar to those obtained with Serenade((R)) (3.0 ppm) imazalil (50 ppm) and guazatine (50 ppm). Beyond the peak of activity, a reduction in effectiveness of both acetic acid and PLA was observed. Comparing the inhibition rate of the organic acids, PLA was about 66- and 600-fold more effective than acetic acid and lactic acid, respectively. This study presents evidences on the antifungal effect of selected LAB strains and their end products. Studies are currently being undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness in preventing postharvest diseases on citrus fruits. PMID:20722936

  16. Inhibition of mycotoxin-producing Aspergillus nomius vsc 23 by lactic acid bacteria and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Muoz, R; Arena, M.E.; Silva, J.; Gonzlez, S.N.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of different fermenting microorganisms on growth of a mycotoxin- producing Aspergillus nomius was assayed. Two lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, all of which are widely used in fermentation and preservation of food, were assayed on their fungus inhibitory properties. Assays were carried out by simultaneous inoculation of one of the possible inhibiting microorganisms and the fungus or subsequent inoculation of one of the microorganisms followed by the fungus. All three microorganisms assayed showed growth inhibition of the mycotoxin-producing Aspergillus strain. L. rhamnosus O236, isolated from sheep milk and selected for its technological properties, showed highest fungal inhibition of the microorganisms assayed. The use of antifungal LAB with excellent technological properties rather than chemical preservatives would enable the food industry to produce organic food without addition of chemical substances. PMID:24031582

  17. 2-Alkynoic fatty acids inhibit topoisomerase IB from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Carballeira, Nstor M; Cartagena, Michelle; Sanabria, David; Tasdemir, Deniz; Prada, Christopher F; Reguera, Rosa M; Balaa-Fouce, Rafael

    2012-10-01

    2-Alkynoic fatty acids display antimycobacterial, antifungal, and pesticidal activities but their antiprotozoal activity has received little attention. In this work we synthesized the 2-octadecynoic acid (2-ODA), 2-hexadecynoic acid (2-HDA), and 2-tetradecynoic acid (2-TDA) and show that 2-ODA is the best inhibitor of the Leishmania donovani DNA topoisomerase IB enzyme (LdTopIB) with an EC(50)=5.30.7?M. The potency of LdTopIB inhibition follows the trend 2-ODA>2-HDA>2-TDA, indicating that the effectiveness of inhibition depends on the fatty acid carbon chain length. All of the studied 2-alkynoic fatty acids were less potent inhibitors of the human topoisomerase IB enzyme (hTopIB) as compared to LdTopIB. 2-ODA also displayed in vitro activity against Leishmania donovani (IC(50)=11.0?M), but it was less effective against other protozoa, Trypanosoma cruzi (IC(50)=48.1?M) and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (IC(50)=64.5?M). The antiprotozoal activity of the 2-alkynoic fatty acids, in general, followed the trend 2-ODA>2-HDA>2-TDA. The experimental information gathered so far indicates that 2-ODA is a promising antileishmanial compound. PMID:22932312

  18. Growth inhibition of pathogenic bacteria by sulfonylurea herbicides.

    PubMed

    Kreisberg, Jason F; Ong, Nicholas T; Krishna, Aishwarya; Joseph, Thomas L; Wang, Jing; Ong, Catherine; Ooi, Hui Ann; Sung, Julie C; Siew, Chern Chiang; Chang, Grace C; Biot, Fabrice; Cuccui, Jon; Wren, Brendan W; Chan, Joey; Sivalingam, Suppiah P; Zhang, Lian-Hui; Verma, Chandra; Tan, Patrick

    2013-03-01

    Emerging resistance to current antibiotics raises the need for new microbial drug targets. We show that targeting branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) biosynthesis using sulfonylurea herbicides, which inhibit the BCAA biosynthetic enzyme acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS), can exert bacteriostatic effects on several pathogenic bacteria, including Burkholderia pseudomallei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. Our results suggest that targeting biosynthetic enzymes like AHAS, which are lacking in humans, could represent a promising antimicrobial drug strategy. PMID:23263008

  19. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibits human gastric cancer tumor growth in nude mice via the inhibition of glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    XIAN, SHU-LIN; CAO, WEI; ZHANG, XIAO-DONG; LU, YUN-FEI

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells primarily depend upon glycolysis in order to gain energy. Therefore, the inhibition of glycolysis may inhibit tumor growth. Our previous study demonstrated that 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation in vitro. However, the ability of 3-BrPA to suppress tumor growth in vivo, and its underlying mechanism, have yet to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of 3-BrPA in an animal model of gastric cancer. It was identified that 3-BrPA exhibited strong inhibitory effects upon xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. In addition, the antitumor function of 3-BrPA exhibited a dose-effect association, which was similar to that of the chemotherapeutic agent, 5-fluorouracil. Furthermore, 3-BrPA exhibited low toxicity in the blood, liver and kidneys of the nude mice. The present study hypothesized that the inhibitory effect of 3-BrPA is achieved through the inhibition of hexokinase activity, which leads to the downregulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) expression, the upregulation of Bcl-2-associated X protein expression and the subsequent activation of caspase-3. These data suggest that 3-BrPA may be a novel therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:25621044

  20. Inhibition of mycobacterial alanine racemase activity and growth by thiadiazolidinones.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yashang; Mootien, Sara; Shoen, Carolyn; Destefano, Michelle; Cirillo, Pier; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A; Yeung, Kacheong R; Ledizet, Michel; Cynamon, Michael H; Aristoff, Paul A; Koski, Raymond A; Kaplan, Paul A; Anthony, Karen G

    2013-07-15

    The genus Mycobacterium includes non-pathogenic species such as M. smegmatis, and pathogenic species such as M. tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB). Treatment of TB requires a lengthy regimen of several antibiotics, whose effectiveness has been compromised by the emergence of resistant strains. New antibiotics that can shorten the treatment course and those that have not been compromised by bacterial resistance are needed. In this study, we report that thiadiazolidinones, a relatively little-studied heterocyclic class, inhibit the activity of mycobacterial alanine racemase, an essential enzyme that converts l-alanine to d-alanine for peptidoglycan synthesis. Twelve members of the thiadiazolidinone family were evaluated for inhibition of M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis alanine racemase activity and bacterial growth. Thiadiazolidinones inhibited M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis alanine racemases to different extents with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) ranging from <0.03 to 28?M and 23 to >150?M, respectively. The compounds also inhibited the growth of these bacteria, including multidrug resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for drug-susceptible M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis ranged from 6.25?g/ml to 100?g/ml, and from 1.56 to 6.25?g/ml for drug-resistant M. tuberculosis. The in vitro activities of thiadiazolidinones suggest that this family of compounds might represent starting points for medicinal chemistry efforts aimed at developing novel antimycobacterial agents. PMID:23680030

  1. Equol inhibits growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of mouse antral follicles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, Sharada; Gao, Liying; Gonnering, Marni; Helferich, William; Flaws, Jodi A

    2016-03-15

    Equol is a non-steroidal estrogen metabolite produced by microbial conversion of daidzein, a major soy isoflavone, in the gut of some humans and many animal species. Isoflavones and their metabolites can affect endogenous estradiol production, action, and metabolism, potentially influencing ovarian follicle function. However, no studies have examined the effects of equol on intact ovarian antral follicles, which are responsible for sex steroid synthesis and further development into ovulatory follicles. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that equol inhibits antral follicle growth, increases follicle atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis in the adult mouse ovary. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or equol (600nM, 6μM, 36μM, and 100μM) for 48 and 96h. Every 24h, follicle diameters were measured to monitor growth. At 48 and 96h, the culture medium was subjected to measurement of hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis. Additionally, follicles were histologically evaluated for signs of atresia after 96h of culture. The results indicate that equol (100μM) inhibited follicle growth, altered the mRNA levels of bcl2-associated X protein and B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and induced follicle atresia. Further, equol decreased the levels of estradiol, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone, and it decreased mRNA levels of cholesterol side-chain cleavage, steroid 17-α-hydroxalase, and aromatase. Collectively, these data indicate that equol inhibits growth, increases atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of cultured mouse antral follicles. PMID:26876617

  2. Simultaneous Assessment of Acidogenesis-Mitigation and Specific Bacterial Growth-Inhibition by Dentifrices

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Sarah; Latimer, Joe; Sreenivasan, Prem K.; McBain, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Dentifrices can augment oral hygiene by inactivating bacteria and at sub-lethal concentrations may affect bacterial metabolism, potentially inhibiting acidogenesis, the main cause of caries. Reported herein is the development of a rapid method to simultaneously measure group-specific bactericidal and acidogenesis-mitigation effects of dentifrices on oral bacteria. Saliva was incubated aerobically and anaerobically in Tryptone Soya Broth, Wilkins-Chalgren Broth with mucin, or artificial saliva and was exposed to dentifrices containing triclosan/copolymer (TD); sodium fluoride (FD); stannous fluoride and zinc lactate (SFD1); or stannous fluoride, zinc lactate and stannous chloride (SFD2). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined turbidometrically whilst group-specific minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were assessed using growth media and conditions selective for total aerobes, total anaerobes, streptococci and Gram-negative anaerobes. Minimum acid neutralization concentration (MNC) was defined as the lowest concentration of dentifrice at which acidification was inhibited. Differences between MIC and MNC were calculated and normalized with respect to MIC to derive the combined inhibitory and neutralizing capacity (CINC), a cumulative measure of acidogenesis-mitigation and growth inhibition. The overall rank order for growth inhibition potency (MIC) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was: TD> SFD2> SFD1> FD. Acidogenesis-mitigation (MNC) was ordered; TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1. CINC was ordered TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1 aerobically and TD> FD> SFD1> SFD2 anaerobically. With respect to group-specific bactericidal activity, TD generally exhibited the greatest potency, particularly against total aerobes, total anaerobes and streptococci. This approach enables the rapid simultaneous evaluation of acidity mitigation, growth inhibition and specific antimicrobial activity by dentifrices. PMID:26882309

  3. Simultaneous Assessment of Acidogenesis-Mitigation and Specific Bacterial Growth-Inhibition by Dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Sarah; Latimer, Joe; Sreenivasan, Prem K; McBain, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Dentifrices can augment oral hygiene by inactivating bacteria and at sub-lethal concentrations may affect bacterial metabolism, potentially inhibiting acidogenesis, the main cause of caries. Reported herein is the development of a rapid method to simultaneously measure group-specific bactericidal and acidogenesis-mitigation effects of dentifrices on oral bacteria. Saliva was incubated aerobically and anaerobically in Tryptone Soya Broth, Wilkins-Chalgren Broth with mucin, or artificial saliva and was exposed to dentifrices containing triclosan/copolymer (TD); sodium fluoride (FD); stannous fluoride and zinc lactate (SFD1); or stannous fluoride, zinc lactate and stannous chloride (SFD2). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined turbidometrically whilst group-specific minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were assessed using growth media and conditions selective for total aerobes, total anaerobes, streptococci and Gram-negative anaerobes. Minimum acid neutralization concentration (MNC) was defined as the lowest concentration of dentifrice at which acidification was inhibited. Differences between MIC and MNC were calculated and normalized with respect to MIC to derive the combined inhibitory and neutralizing capacity (CINC), a cumulative measure of acidogenesis-mitigation and growth inhibition. The overall rank order for growth inhibition potency (MIC) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was: TD> SFD2> SFD1> FD. Acidogenesis-mitigation (MNC) was ordered; TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1. CINC was ordered TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1 aerobically and TD> FD> SFD1> SFD2 anaerobically. With respect to group-specific bactericidal activity, TD generally exhibited the greatest potency, particularly against total aerobes, total anaerobes and streptococci. This approach enables the rapid simultaneous evaluation of acidity mitigation, growth inhibition and specific antimicrobial activity by dentifrices. PMID:26882309

  4. FH535 inhibited metastasis and growth of pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Yao; Liang, Rong-Rui; Chen, Kai; Shen, Meng; Tian, Ya-Li; Li, Dao-Ming; Duan, Wei-Ming; Gui, Qi; Gong, Fei-Ran; Lian, Lian; Li, Wei; Tao, Min

    2015-01-01

    FH535 is a small-molecule inhibitor of the Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway, which a substantial body of evidence has proven is activated in various cancers, including pancreatic cancer. Activation of the Wnt/?-catenin pathway plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. We investigated the inhibitory effect of FH535 on the metastasis and growth of pancreatic cancer cells. Western blotting and luciferase reporter gene assay indicated that FH535 markedly inhibited Wnt/?-catenin pathway viability in pancreatic cancer cells. In vitro wound healing, invasion, and adhesion assays revealed that FH535 significantly inhibited pancreatic cancer cell metastasis. We also observed the inhibitory effect of FH535 on pancreatic cancer cell growth via the tetrazolium and plate clone formation assays. Microarray analyses suggested that changes in the expression of multiple genes could be involved in the anti-cancer effect of FH535 on pancreatic cancer cells. Our results indicate for the first time that FH535 inhibits pancreatic cancer cell metastasis and growth, providing new insight into therapy of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26185454

  5. FH535 inhibited metastasis and growth of pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meng-Yao; Liang, Rong-Rui; Chen, Kai; Shen, Meng; Tian, Ya-Li; Li, Dao-Ming; Duan, Wei-Ming; Gui, Qi; Gong, Fei-Ran; Lian, Lian; Li, Wei; Tao, Min

    2015-01-01

    FH535 is a small-molecule inhibitor of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, which a substantial body of evidence has proven is activated in various cancers, including pancreatic cancer. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. We investigated the inhibitory effect of FH535 on the metastasis and growth of pancreatic cancer cells. Western blotting and luciferase reporter gene assay indicated that FH535 markedly inhibited Wnt/β-catenin pathway viability in pancreatic cancer cells. In vitro wound healing, invasion, and adhesion assays revealed that FH535 significantly inhibited pancreatic cancer cell metastasis. We also observed the inhibitory effect of FH535 on pancreatic cancer cell growth via the tetrazolium and plate clone formation assays. Microarray analyses suggested that changes in the expression of multiple genes could be involved in the anti-cancer effect of FH535 on pancreatic cancer cells. Our results indicate for the first time that FH535 inhibits pancreatic cancer cell metastasis and growth, providing new insight into therapy of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26185454

  6. Effect of organic acids on the growth and fermentation of ethanologenic Escherichia coli LY01

    SciTech Connect

    Zaldivar, J.; Ingram, L.O.

    1999-07-01

    Hemicellulose residues can be hydrolyzed into a sugar syrup using dilute mineral acids. Although this syrup represents a potential feedstock for biofuel production, toxic compounds generated during hydrolysis limit microbial metabolism. Escherichia coli LY01, an ethanologenic biocatalyst engineered to ferment the mixed sugars in hemicellulose syrups, has been tested for resistance to selected organic acids that re present in hemicellulose hydrolysates. Compounds tested include aromatic acids derived from lignin (ferulic, gallic, 4-hydroxybenzoic, syringic, and vanillic acids), acetic acid from the hydrolysis of acetylxylan, and others derived from sugar destruction (furoic, formic, levulinic, and caproic acids). Toxicity was related to hydrophobicity. Combinations of acids were roughly additive as inhibitors of cell growth. When tested at concentrations that inhibited growth by 80%, none appeared to strongly inhibit glycolysis and energy generation, or to disrupt membrane integrity. Toxicity was not markedly affected by inoculum size or incubation temperature. The toxicity of all acids except gallic acid was reduced by an increase in initial pH (from pH 6.0 to pH 7.0 to pH 8.0). Together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that both aliphatic and mononuclear organic acids inhibit growth and ethanol production in LY01 by collapsing ion gradients and increasing internal anion concentrations.

  7. Tumor suppressor XAF1 induces apoptosis, inhibits angiogenesis and inhibits tumor growth in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li Ming; Shi, Dong Mei; Dai, Qiang; Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Yao, Wei Yan; Sun, Ping Hu; Ding, Yan Fei; Qiao, Min Min; Wu, Yun Lin; Jiang, Shi Hu; Tu, Shui Ping

    2014-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP)-associated factor 1 (XAF1), a XIAP-binding protein, is a tumor suppressor gene. XAF1 was silent or expressed lowly in most human malignant tumors. However, the role of XAF1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of XAF1 on tumor growth and angiogenesis in hepatocellular cancer cells. Our results showed that XAF1 expression was lower in HCC cell lines SMMC-7721, Hep G2 and BEL-7404 and liver cancer tissues than that in paired non-cancer liver tissues. Adenovirus-mediated XAF1 expression (Ad5/F35-XAF1) significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in HCC cells in dose- and time- dependent manners. Infection of Ad5/F35-XAF1 induced cleavage of caspase -3, -8, -9 and PARP in HCC cells. Furthermore, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment significantly suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft model of liver cancer cells. Western Blot and immunohistochemistry staining showed that Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment suppressed expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is associated with tumor angiogenesis, in cancer cells and xenograft tumor tissues. Moreover, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Our results demonstrate that XAF1 inhibits tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. XAF1 may be a promising target for liver cancer treatment. PMID:24980821

  8. Tumor suppressor XAF1 induces apoptosis, inhibits angiogenesis and inhibits tumor growth in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li Ming; Shi, Dong Mei; Dai, Qiang; Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Yao, Wei Yan; Sun, Ping Hu; Ding, Yanfei; Qiao, Min Min; Wu, Yun Lin; Jiang, Shi Hu; Tu, Shui Ping

    2014-07-30

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP)-associated factor 1 (XAF1), a XIAP-binding protein, is a tumor suppressor gene. XAF1 was silent or expressed lowly in most human malignant tumors. However, the role of XAF1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of XAF1 on tumor growth and angiogenesis in hepatocellular cancer cells. Our results showed that XAF1 expression was lower in HCC cell lines SMMC-7721, Hep G2 and BEL-7404 and liver cancer tissues than that in paired non-cancer liver tissues. Adenovirus-mediated XAF1 expression (Ad5/F35-XAF1) significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in HCC cells in dose- and time- dependent manners. Infection of Ad5/F35-XAF1 induced cleavage of caspase -3, -8, -9 and PARP in HCC cells. Furthermore, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment significantly suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft model of liver cancer cells. Western Blot and immunohistochemistry staining showed that Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment suppressed expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is associated with tumor angiogenesis, in cancer cells and xenograft tumor tissues. Moreover, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Our results demonstrate that XAF1 inhibits tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. XAF1 may be a promising target for liver cancer treatment. PMID:24980821

  9. Inhibition of Carcinoma Cell Motility by Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acid (EET) Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Nithipatikom, Kasem; Brody, Daniel M.; Tang, Alan T.; Manthati, Vijaya L.; Falck, John R.; Williams, Carol L.; Campbell, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenases, CYP2C8, 2C9 and 2J2 mRNAs and proteins, were expressed in prostate carcinoma (PC-3, DU-145 and LNCaP) cells. 11,12-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (11,12-EET) was the major arachidonic acid metabolite in these cells. Blocking the EET synthesis by a selective CYP epoxygenase inhibitor (MS-PPOH) inhibited tonic (basal) invasion and migration (motility) while exogenously added EETs induced cell motility in a concentration-dependent manner. An EGFR kinase inhibitor (AG494) or a PI3 kinase inhibitor (LY294002) inhibited cell migration and reduced 11,12-EET-induced cell migration. Importantly, synthetic EET antagonists (14,15-EEZE, 14,15-EEZE-PEG and 14,15-EEZE-mSI) inhibited EET-induced cell invasion and migration. 11,12-EET induced cell stretching and myosin-actin microfilament formation as well as increased phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt (Ser473) while 14,15-EEZE inhibited these effects. These results suggest that EETs induce and EET antagonists inhibit cell motility, possibly by putative EET receptor-mediated EGFR and PI3K/Akt pathways, and suggest EET antagonists as potential therapeutic agents for prostate cancer. PMID:20804500

  10. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  11. Seizure control by decanoic acid through direct AMPA receptor inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pishan; Augustin, Katrin; Boddum, Kim; Williams, Sophie; Sun, Min; Terschak, John A.; Hardege, Jörg D.; Chen, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    See Rogawski (doi:10.1093/awv369) for a scientific commentary on this article.  The medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet is an established treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy that increases plasma levels of decanoic acid and ketones. Recently, decanoic acid has been shown to provide seizure control in vivo, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we show that decanoic acid, but not the ketones β-hydroxybutryate or acetone, shows antiseizure activity in two acute ex vivo rat hippocampal slice models of epileptiform activity. To search for a mechanism of decanoic acid, we show it has a strong inhibitory effect on excitatory, but not inhibitory, neurotransmission in hippocampal slices. Using heterologous expression of excitatory ionotropic glutamate receptor AMPA subunits in Xenopus oocytes, we show that this effect is through direct AMPA receptor inhibition, a target shared by a recently introduced epilepsy treatment perampanel. Decanoic acid acts as a non-competitive antagonist at therapeutically relevant concentrations, in a voltage- and subunit-dependent manner, and this is sufficient to explain its antiseizure effects. This inhibitory effect is likely to be caused by binding to sites on the M3 helix of the AMPA-GluA2 transmembrane domain; independent from the binding site of perampanel. Together our results indicate that the direct inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission by decanoic acid in the brain contributes to the anti-convulsant effect of the medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet. PMID:26608744

  12. Seizure control by decanoic acid through direct AMPA receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pishan; Augustin, Katrin; Boddum, Kim; Williams, Sophie; Sun, Min; Terschak, John A; Hardege, Jörg D; Chen, Philip E; Walker, Matthew C; Williams, Robin S B

    2016-02-01

    SEE ROGAWSKI DOI101093/AWV369 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE:  The medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet is an established treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy that increases plasma levels of decanoic acid and ketones. Recently, decanoic acid has been shown to provide seizure control in vivo, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we show that decanoic acid, but not the ketones β-hydroxybutryate or acetone, shows antiseizure activity in two acute ex vivo rat hippocampal slice models of epileptiform activity. To search for a mechanism of decanoic acid, we show it has a strong inhibitory effect on excitatory, but not inhibitory, neurotransmission in hippocampal slices. Using heterologous expression of excitatory ionotropic glutamate receptor AMPA subunits in Xenopus oocytes, we show that this effect is through direct AMPA receptor inhibition, a target shared by a recently introduced epilepsy treatment perampanel. Decanoic acid acts as a non-competitive antagonist at therapeutically relevant concentrations, in a voltage- and subunit-dependent manner, and this is sufficient to explain its antiseizure effects. This inhibitory effect is likely to be caused by binding to sites on the M3 helix of the AMPA-GluA2 transmembrane domain; independent from the binding site of perampanel. Together our results indicate that the direct inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission by decanoic acid in the brain contributes to the anti-convulsant effect of the medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet. PMID:26608744

  13. Studies of the effect of gibberellic acid on algal growth.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, W. K.; Sorokin, C.

    1971-01-01

    The effect of gibberellic acid on exponential growth rate of four strains of Chlorella was investigated under variety of experimental conditions. In concentrations from 10 ppm to 100 ppm, gibberellic acid was shown to have no effect on Chlorella growth. In concentration of 200 ppm, gibberellic acid exerted some unfavorable effect on algal growth.

  14. Dietary rice bran component γ-oryzanol inhibits tumor growth in tumor-bearing mice.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Kim SP; Kang MY; Nam SH; Friedman M

    2012-06-01

    SCOPE: We investigated the effects of rice bran and components on tumor growth in mice.METHODS AND RESULTS: Mice fed standard diets supplemented with rice bran, γ-oryzanol, Ricetrienol®, ferulic acid, or phytic acid for 2 weeks were inoculated with CT-26 colon cancer cells and fed the same diet for two additional weeks. Tumor mass was significantly lower in the γ-oryzanol and less so in the phytic acid group. Tumor inhibition was associated with the following biomarkers: increases in cytolytic activity of splenic natural killer (NK) cells; partial restoration of nitric oxide production and phagocytosis in peritoneal macrophages increases in released the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 from macrophages; and reductions in the number of blood vessels inside the tumor. Pro-angiogenic biomarkers vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and 5-lipoxygenase-5 (5-LOX) were also significantly reduced in mRNA and protein expression by tumor genes. ELISA of tumor cells confirmed reduced expression of COX-2 and 5-LOX up to 30%. Reduced COX-2 and 5-LOX expression downregulated VEGF and inhibited neoangiogenesis inside the tumors.CONCLUSION: Induction of NK activity, activation of macrophages, and inhibition of angiogenesis seem to contribute to the inhibitory mechanism of tumor regression by γ-oryzanol.

  15. Targeting Aurora Kinase with MK-0457 Inhibits Ovarian Cancer Growth

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yvonne G.; Immaneni, Anand; Merritt, William M.; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Kim, SeungWook; Shahzad, Mian M.K.; Tsang, Yvonne T.M.; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N.; Lu, Chunhua; Kamat, Aparna A.; Han, Liz Y.; Spannuth, WhitneyA.; Nick, Alpa M.; Landen, Charles N.; Wong, Kwong K.; Gray, Michael J.; Coleman, Robert L.; Bodurka, Diane C.; Brinkley, William R.; Sood, Anil K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The Aurora kinase family plays pivotal roles in mitotic integrity and cell cycle.We sought to determine the effects of inhibiting Aurora kinase on ovarian cancer growth in an orthotopic mouse model using a small molecule pan-Aurora kinase inhibitor, MK-0457. Experimental Design We examined cell cycle regulatory effects and ascertained the therapeutic efficacy of Aurora kinase inhibition both alone and combined with docetaxel using both in vitro and in vivo ovarian cancer models. Results In vitro cytotoxicity assays with HeyA8 and SKOV3ip1 cells revealed >10-fold greater docetaxel cytotoxicity in combination with MK-0457. After in vivo dose kinetics were determined using phospho-histone H3 status, therapy experiments with the chemosensitive HeyA8 and SKOV3ip1as well as the chemoresistant HeyA8-MDR and A2780-CP20 models showed that Aurora kinase inhibition alone significantly reduced tumor burden compared with controls (P values < 0.01). Combination treatment with docetaxel resulted in significantly improved reduction in tumor growth beyond that afforded by docetaxel alone (P ≤ 0.03). Proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry revealed that MK-0457 alone and in combination with docetaxel significantly reduced cellular proliferation (P values < 0.001). Compared with controls, treatment with MK-0457 alone and in combination with docetaxel also significantly increased tumor cell apoptosis by ∼3-fold (P < 0.01). Remarkably, compared with docetaxel monotherapy, MK-0457 combined with docetaxel resulted in significantly increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions Aurora kinase inhibition significantly reduces tumor burden and cell proliferation and increases tumor cell apoptosis in this preclinical orthotopic model of ovarian cancer. The role of Aurora kinase inhibition in ovarian cancer merits further investigation in clinical trials. PMID:18765535

  16. The inhibition of calcium carbonate crystal growth by the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide.

    PubMed

    Dalas, E; Chalias, A; Gatos, D; Barlos, K

    2006-08-15

    The crystal growth of calcite, the most stable calcium carbonate polymorph, in the presence of the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide (containing 48 amino acids in the ring finger configuration), has been investigated by the constant composition technique. Crystallization took place exclusively on well-characterized calcite crystals in solutions supersaturated only with respect to this calcium carbonate salt. The kinetic results indicated a surface diffusion spiral growth mechanism. The presence of the Mdm2 peptide inhibited the crystal growth of calcite by 22-58% in the concentration range tested, through adsorption onto the active growth sites of the calcite crystal surface. The kinetic results favored a Langmuir-type adsorption model, and the value of the calculated affinity constant was k(aff)=147x10(4) dm(3)mol(-1), a(ads)=0.29. PMID:16678843

  17. Hydroxyapatite Growth Inhibition Effect of Pellicle Statherin Peptides.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Karttunen, M; Jalkanen, J; Mussi, M C M; Liao, Y; Grohe, B; Lagugn-Labarthet, F; Siqueira, W L

    2015-08-01

    In our recent studies, we have shown that in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle is a sophisticated biological structure containing a significant portion of naturally occurring salivary peptides. From a functional aspect, the identification of peptides in the acquired enamel pellicle is of interest because many salivary proteins exhibit functional domains that maintain the activities of the native protein. Among the in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle peptides that have been newly identified, 5 peptides are derived from statherin. Here, we assessed the ability of these statherin pellicle peptides to inhibit hydroxyapatite crystal growth. In addition, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. A microplate colorimetric assay was used to quantify hydroxyapatite growth. Statherin protein, 5 statherin-derived peptides, and a peptide lacking phosphate at residues 2 and 3 were analyzed. Statherin peptide phosphorylated on residues 2 and 3 indicated a significant inhibitory effect when compared with the 5 other peptides (P < 0.05). MD simulations showed a strong affinity and fast adsorption to hydroxyapatite for phosphopeptides, whereas unphosphorylated peptides interacted weakly with the hydroxyapatite. Our data suggest that the presence of a covalently linked phosphate group (at residues 2 and 3) in statherin peptides modulates the effect of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. This study provides a mechanism to account for the composition and function of acquired enamel pellicle statherin peptides that will contribute as a base for the development of biologically stable and functional synthetic peptides for therapeutic use against dental caries and/or periodontal disease. PMID:26116492

  18. Inhibition of Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis and Bud Formation by Nalidixic Acid in Hyphomicrobium neptunium

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Ronald M.; Blackman, Marcia A.

    1973-01-01

    The relationship between chromosome replication and morphogenesis in the budding bacterium Hyphomicrobium neptunium has been investigated. Nalidixic acid was found to completely inhibit deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, but not ribonucleic acid synthesis. The antibiotic was bacteriostatic to the organism for the initial 5 h of exposure; thereafter it was bacteriocidal. Observation of inhibited cultures revealed cells that had produced abnormally long stalks, but no buds. These results indicate that bud formation is coupled to chromosome replication in H. neptunium. They do not exclude the possibilities that cross wall formation and bud separation may also be coupled to chromosome replication. Images PMID:4127631

  19. Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by NOSH-aspirin: COX inhibition and modeling?

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Federica; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Rao, Praveen P.N.; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported the synthesis of NOSH-aspirin, a novel hybrid that releases both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In NOSH-aspirin, the two moieties that release NO and H2S are covalently linked at the 1, 2 positions of acetyl salicylic acid, i.e. ortho-NOSH-aspirin (o-NOSH-aspirin). In the present study, we compared the effects of the positional isomers of NOSH-ASA (o-NOSH-aspirin, m-NOSH-aspirin and p-NOSH-aspirin) to that of aspirin on growth of HT-29 and HCT 15 colon cancer cells, belonging to the same histological subtype, but with different expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes; HT-29 express both COX-1 and COX-2, whereas HCT 15 is COX-null. We also analyzed the effect of these compounds on proliferation and apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Since the parent compound aspirin, inhibits both COX-1 and COX-2, we also evaluated the effects of these compounds on COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme activities and also performed modeling of the interactions between the positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin and COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. We observed that the three positional isomers of NOSH aspirin inhibited the growth of both colon cancer cell lines with IC50s in the nano-molar range. In particular in HT-29 cells the IC50s for growth inhibition were: o-NOSH-ASA, 0.040.011M; m-NOSH-ASA, 0.240.11M; p-NOSH-ASA, 0.460.17M; and in HCT 15 cells the IC50s for o-NOSH-ASA, m-NOSH-ASA, and p-NOSH-ASA were 0.062 0.006M, 0.0920.004M, and 0.370.04M, respectively. The IC50 for aspirin in both cell lines was >5mM at 24h. The reduction of cell growth appeared to be mediated through inhibition of proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. All 3 positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin preferentially inhibited COX-1 over COX-2. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin have the same biological actions, but that o-NOSH-ASA displayed the strongest anti-neoplastic potential. PMID:26319435

  20. Mullerian inhibiting substance inhibits growth of a human ovarian cancer in nude mice.

    PubMed Central

    Donahoe, P K; Fuller, A F; Scully, R E; Guy, S R; Budzik, G P

    1981-01-01

    Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS) was investigated for its ability to inhibit growth of a human ovarian cancer in nude mice. Biologically active preparations from newborn calf testes, obtained after sequential ion exchange chromatography, delayed or prevented growth of a human ovarian cancer (HOC-21) when 2 X 10(6) cells were preincubated with them prior to subcutaneous injection of the tumor cells into Balb/C homozygous nude mice. Preincubation of a human colon carcinoma cells (SW-48) with similar preparations of MIS failed to inhibit growth of the tumor cells in nude mice. Human serous carcinomas are thought to arise from the ovarian surface epithelium, a derivative of the coelomic epithelium of the urogenital ridge, which invaginates to form the mullerian duct early in embryonic life. The neoplastic cells of serous tumors simulate morphologically the lining cells of the fallopian tube, which are derivatives of mullerian duct epithelium. This study provides physiologic confirmation of the mullerian nature of this type of tumor and suggests that MIS may ultimately prove to be effective in its therapy. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6895157

  1. Phytotoxicity of nanoparticles: inhibition of seed germination and root growth.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daohui; Xing, Baoshan

    2007-11-01

    Plants need to be included to develop a comprehensive toxicity profile for nanoparticles. Effects of five types of nanoparticles (multi-walled carbon nanotube, aluminum, alumina, zinc, and zinc oxide) on seed germination and root growth of six higher plant species (radish, rape, ryegrass, lettuce, corn, and cucumber) were investigated. Seed germination was not affected except for the inhibition of nanoscale zinc (nano-Zn) on ryegrass and zinc oxide (nano-ZnO) on corn at 2000 mg/L. Inhibition on root growth varied greatly among nanoparticles and plants. Suspensions of 2000 mg/L nano-Zn or nano-ZnO practically terminated root elongation of the tested plant species. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of nano-Zn and nano-ZnO were estimated to be near 50mg/L for radish, and about 20mg/L for rape and ryegrass. The inhibition occurred during the seed incubation process rather than seed soaking stage. These results are significant in terms of use and disposal of engineered nanoparticles. PMID:17374428

  2. Effects of the Fusarium spp. mycotoxins fusaric acid and deoxynivalenol on the growth of Ruminococcus albus and Methanobrevibacter ruminantium.

    PubMed

    May, H D; Wu, Q; Blake, C K

    2000-08-01

    The Fusarium spp. mycotoxins fusaric acid and deoxynivalenol (DON) were tested for antimicrobial activity against Ruminococcus albus and Methanobrevibacter ruminantium. The growth of both organisms was inhibited by fusaric acid as low as 15 micrograms/mL (84 microM) but not by DON, at levels as high as 100 micrograms/mL (338 microM). No synergistic inhibitory effect was observed with DON plus fusaric acid. Neither organism was able to adapt to the fusaric acid and responses of each organism to the compound were different. The optical density (OD) maximum for R. albus, but not for M. ruminantium, was diminished after 28 days incubation at concentrations of fusaric acid below 240 micrograms/mL. Inhibition of R. albus started before significant growth had occurred, while M. ruminantium doubled twice before the onset of inhibition. Responses to picolinic acid, an analog of fusaric acid, were also dramatically different between the two microorganisms with M. ruminantium exhibiting a severe lag followed by a complete recovery of growth, while R. albus was only slightly inhibited with no lag. These results suggest that the mechanism of fusaric acid inhibition is specific to each microorganism. This is the first demonstration of the common mycotoxin fusaric acid inhibiting the growth of rumen bacteria. PMID:10941514

  3. Inhibition of protein synthesis may explain the bactericidal properties of hypochlorous acid produced by phagocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, S.M.; Davies, K.J.A.

    1986-05-01

    The authors find that hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) inhibit protein synthesis in E. coli: HOCl is similarly ordered 10x more efficient than H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. This result may underlie the mechanism of bacterial killing by phagocytes, which use H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and myeloperoxidase (MPO) to oxidize Cl/sup -/ to HOCl. Protein synthesis (/sup 3/H-leu incorporation) was completely inhibited by 50..mu..M HOCl, whereas 50..mu..M H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ only gave similarly ordered 10% inhibition. Complete inhibition by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ was only observed at concentrations < 0.5 mM. HOCl was also a more potent inhibitor of cell growth (cultured in M9 medium + glucose) than was H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. No growth occurred at 50..mu..M HOCl: in contrast 0.5 mM H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ was required for similar results. During time-course experiments it was found that the inhibition of cell growth by both HOCl and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ reached a maximum within 30 min (at any concentration used). HOCl reacts avidly with amino groups to form N-chloroamines but H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is unreactive. Amino acids (ala, lys, met, trp) or taurine (all at 10 mM) prevented the effects of HOCl but did not affect H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ results. There was an excellent correlation between decreased protein synthesis and diminished cell growth. Inhibition of cell growth was not explained by proteolysis (release of acid-soluble counts), or by loss of membrane integrity. They propose that inhibition of protein synthesis may be a fundamental aspect of the bactericidal functions of phagocytes, and that the production of HOCl by MPO represents a quantitative advantage over H/sub 2/O/sub 2/.

  4. Inhibition of proteasome activity blocks Trypanosoma cruzi growth and metacyclogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Josiane; Soares, Maurilio J; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F S; Le Bloas, Rozenn; Sotomaior, Vanessa; Goldenberg, Samuel; Krieger, Marco A

    2008-09-01

    Proteasomes are intracellular complexes that control protein degradation in organisms ranging from Archaebacteria to mammals. In some parasitic protozoa, the proteasome is involved in cell differentiation and replication. In this study, we have used proteasome inhibitors to determine the biological role of proteasomes during the replication and in vitro metacyclogenesis of Trypanosoma cruzi. We used light and transmission electron microscopy to analyze morphological data and flow cytometry to analyze changes in the cell cycle. The growth of T. cruzi epimastigote culture forms in liver infusion tryptose medium was inhibited by the presence of up to 10 microM lactacystin. Inhibition was dose-dependent, with IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) of 4.35 microM after 24 or 72 h. The metacyclogenesis process in vitro was strongly (95%) inhibited by 5 microM lactacystin treatment. The adhesion phase was not affected, but the epimastigotes did not differentiate into metacyclic trypomastigotes. Most treated epimastigotes had replicated DNA, with swelling of the mitochondrion and an altered distribution of nuclear and kinetoplast DNA. Our findings suggest that inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in T. cruzi epimastigotes does not block adhesion, but disrupts cell division and affects factors triggering differentiation. PMID:18581141

  5. Pharmacologic inhibition of JAK-STAT signaling promotes hair growth.

    PubMed

    Harel, Sivan; Higgins, Claire A; Cerise, Jane E; Dai, Zhenpeng; Chen, James C; Clynes, Raphael; Christiano, Angela M

    2015-10-01

    Several forms of hair loss in humans are characterized by the inability of hair follicles to enter the growth phase (anagen) of the hair cycle after being arrested in the resting phase (telogen). Current pharmacologic therapies have been largely unsuccessful in targeting pathways that can be selectively modulated to induce entry into anagen. We show that topical treatment of mouse and human skin with small-molecule inhibitors of the Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway results in rapid onset of anagen and subsequent hair growth. We show that JAK inhibition regulates the activation of key hair follicle populations such as the hair germ and improves the inductivity of cultured human dermal papilla cells by controlling a molecular signature enriched in intact, fully inductive dermal papillae. Our findings open new avenues for exploration of JAK-STAT inhibition for promotion of hair growth and highlight the role of this pathway in regulating the activation of hair follicle stem cells. PMID:26601320

  6. Pharmacologic inhibition of JAK-STAT signaling promotes hair growth

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Sivan; Higgins, Claire A.; Cerise, Jane E.; Dai, Zhenpeng; Chen, James C.; Clynes, Raphael; Christiano, Angela M.

    2015-01-01

    Several forms of hair loss in humans are characterized by the inability of hair follicles to enter the growth phase (anagen) of the hair cycle after being arrested in the resting phase (telogen). Current pharmacologic therapies have been largely unsuccessful in targeting pathways that can be selectively modulated to induce entry into anagen. We show that topical treatment of mouse and human skin with small-molecule inhibitors of the Janus kinase (JAK)–signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway results in rapid onset of anagen and subsequent hair growth. We show that JAK inhibition regulates the activation of key hair follicle populations such as the hair germ and improves the inductivity of cultured human dermal papilla cells by controlling a molecular signature enriched in intact, fully inductive dermal papillae. Our findings open new avenues for exploration of JAK-STAT inhibition for promotion of hair growth and highlight the role of this pathway in regulating the activation of hair follicle stem cells. PMID:26601320

  7. A Flagellar Glycan-Specific Protein Encoded by Campylobacter Phages Inhibits Host Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Javed, Muhammad Afzal; Sacher, Jessica C; van Alphen, Lieke B; Patry, Robert T; Szymanski, Christine M

    2015-01-01

    We previously characterized a carbohydrate binding protein, Gp047, derived from lytic Campylobacter phage NCTC 12673, as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. We also demonstrated that this protein binds specifically to acetamidino-modified pseudaminic acid residues on host flagella, but the role of this protein in the phage lifecycle remains unknown. Here, we report that Gp047 is capable of inhibiting C. jejuni growth both on solid and liquid media, an activity, which we found to be bacteriostatic. The Gp047 domain responsible for bacterial growth inhibition is localized to the C-terminal quarter of the protein, and this activity is both contact- and dose-dependent. Gp047 gene homologues are present in all Campylobacter phages sequenced to date, and the resulting protein is not part of the phage particle. Therefore, these results suggest that either phages of this pathogen have evolved an effector protein capable of host-specific growth inhibition, or that Campylobacter cells have developed a mechanism of regulating their growth upon sensing an impending phage threat. PMID:26694450

  8. A Flagellar Glycan-Specific Protein Encoded by Campylobacter Phages Inhibits Host Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Muhammad Afzal; Sacher, Jessica C.; van Alphen, Lieke B.; Patry, Robert T.; Szymanski, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    We previously characterized a carbohydrate binding protein, Gp047, derived from lytic Campylobacter phage NCTC 12673, as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. We also demonstrated that this protein binds specifically to acetamidino-modified pseudaminic acid residues on host flagella, but the role of this protein in the phage lifecycle remains unknown. Here, we report that Gp047 is capable of inhibiting C. jejuni growth both on solid and liquid media, an activity, which we found to be bacteriostatic. The Gp047 domain responsible for bacterial growth inhibition is localized to the C-terminal quarter of the protein, and this activity is both contact- and dose-dependent. Gp047 gene homologues are present in all Campylobacter phages sequenced to date, and the resulting protein is not part of the phage particle. Therefore, these results suggest that either phages of this pathogen have evolved an effector protein capable of host-specific growth inhibition, or that Campylobacter cells have developed a mechanism of regulating their growth upon sensing an impending phage threat. PMID:26694450

  9. Human primary brain tumor cell growth inhibition in serum-free medium optimized for neuron survival.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Gregory J; LeRoux, Peter D

    2007-07-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumor in adults from which about 15,000 patients die each year in the United States. Despite aggressive surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, median survival remains only 1 year. Here we evaluate growth of primary human brain tumor cells in a defined nutrient culture medium (Neuregen) that was optimized for neuron regeneration. We hypothesized that Neuregen would inhibit tumor cell growth because of its ability to inhibit gliosis in rat brain. Tumor tissue was collected from 18 patients including 10 males and 8 females (mean age 60+/-12 years) who underwent craniotomy for newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed brain tumors. The tissue was shipped overnight in Hibernate transport medium. Tumor cells were isolated and plated in Neurobasal/serum or Neuregen on culture plastic. After 1 week, growth in Neuregen was significantly less in 9/10 glioblastoma multiforme cases, 5/5 meningioma cases and 3/3 cases of brain metastasis. Analysis of deficient formulations of Neuregen and formulations to which selected components were added back implicate no single active component. However, individual cases were sensitive to corticosterone, selenium, ethanolamine, fatty acids and/or antioxidants. Therefore, a defined culture medium that promotes neuron regeneration inhibits the growth of human primary glioblastoma, meningioma and metastatic tumor cells in culture. The possible in vivo efficacy of Neuregen for treatment of brain tumor resections remains to be determined. PMID:17537410

  10. Basic fibroblast growth factor inhibits cell proliferation in cultured avian inner ear sensory epithelia.

    PubMed

    Oesterle, E C; Bhave, S A; Coltrera, M D

    2000-08-21

    Postembryonic production of inner ear hair cells occurs after insult in nonmammalian vertebrates. Recent studies suggest that the fibroblast family of growth factors may play a role in stimulating cell proliferation in mature inner ear sensory epithelium. Effects of acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) were tested on progenitor cell division in cultured auditory and vestibular sensory epithelia taken from posthatch chickens. The effects of heparin, a glycosaminoglycan that often potentiates the effects of the FGFs, were also assessed. Tritiated-thymidine autoradiographic techniques and 5-bromo-2;-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunocytochemistry were used to identify cells synthesizing DNA. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP)-biotin nick-end-label (TUNEL) method was used to identify apoptotic cells. TUNEL and overall counts of sensory epithelial cell density were used to assess possible cytotoxic effects of the growth factors. FGF-2 inhibited DNA synthesis in vestibular and auditory sensory epithelia and was not cytotoxic at the concentrations employed. FGF-1 did not significantly alter sensory epithelial cell proliferation. Heparin by itself inhibited DNA synthesis in the vestibular sensory epithelia and failed to potentiate the effects of FGF-1 or FGF-2. Heparin was not cytotoxic at the concentrations employed. Results presented here suggest that FGF-2 may be involved in inhibiting cell proliferation or stimulating precursor cell differentiation in avian inner ear sensory epithelia. PMID:10906705

  11. Inhibition of a thermophilic deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase by fullerene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianmei; Li, Bo; Chen, Zhe; Yao, Lu; Zhao, Dongxu; Yang, Xinlin; He, Min; Yu, Qun

    2007-06-01

    Enzyme inhibition by fullerene derivatives has attracted much attention. In this communication, effects of two water-solube fullerene derivatives, fullerol and trimalonic acid C60 (TMA C60) on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were investigated by using PCR of beta-actin cDNA derived from HeLa cells as an experimental model. Both fullerol and TMA C60 were found to inhibit PCR in a dose-dependent manner. PCR was ultimately inhibited while the concentrations of each compound were not less than 0.01 mM. In contrast, mannitol exerted no effects on PCR while its concentration increased up to 2 mM. Compensation experiments with Thermus aquaticus (Taq) DNA polymerase revealed that both fullerol and TMA C60 inhibited the enzymatic activity of Taq DNA polymerase, and the inhibitory potency of TMA C60 was slightly greater than that of fullerol. Our data provides some novel aspects on the enzyme inhibiting activities of fullerene derivatives. PMID:17674810

  12. Flow injection analysis of gallic acid with inhibited electrochemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiang-Qin; Li, Feng; Pang, Yong-Qiang; Cui, Hua

    2004-04-01

    A flow injection (FI)-electrochemiluminescent (ECL) method has been developed for the determination of gallic acid, based on an inhibition effect on the Ru(bpy)(3)(2+)/tri- n-propylamine (TPrA) ECL system in pH 8.0 phosphate buffer solution. The method is simple and convenient with a determination limit of 9.0x10(-9) mol/L and a dynamic concentration range of 2x10(-8)-2x10(-5) mol/L. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 1.0% for 1.0x10(-6) mol/L gallic acid ( n=11). It was successfully applied to the determination of gallic acid in Chinese proprietary medicine-Jianming Yanhou Pian. The inhibition mechanism proposed for the quenching effect of the gallic acid on the Ru(bpy)(3)(2+)/TPrA ECL system was the interaction of electrogenerated Ru(bpy)(3)(2+*) and o-benzoquinone derivative at the electrode surface. The ECL emission spectra and UV-visible absorption spectra were applied to confirm the mechanism. PMID:14968286

  13. Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-4 Differentially Inhibits Growth Factor-induced Angiogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Contois, Liangru W.; Nugent, Desiree P.; Caron, Jennifer M.; Cretu, Alexandra; Tweedie, Eric; Akalu, Abebe; Liebes, Leonard; Friesel, Robert; Rosen, Clifford; Vary, Calvin; Brooks, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    An in-depth understanding of the molecular and cellular complexity of angiogenesis continues to advance as new stimulators and inhibitors of blood vessel formation are uncovered. Gaining a more complete understanding of the response of blood vessels to both stimulatory and inhibitory molecules will likely contribute to more effective strategies to control pathological angiogenesis. Here, we provide evidence that endothelial cell interactions with structurally altered collagen type IV may suppress the expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 (IGFBP-4), a well documented inhibitor of the IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling axis. We report for the first time that IGFBP-4 differentially inhibits angiogenesis induced by distinct growth factor signaling pathways as IGFBP-4 inhibited FGF-2- and IGF-1-stimulated angiogenesis but failed to inhibit VEGF-induced angiogenesis. The resistance of VEGF-stimulated angiogenesis to IGFBP-4 inhibition appears to depend on sustained activation of p38 MAPK as blocking its activity restored the anti-angiogenic effects of IGFBP-4 on VEGF-induced blood vessel growth in vivo. These novel findings provide new insight into how blood vessels respond to endogenous inhibitors during angiogenesis stimulated by distinct growth factor signaling pathways. PMID:22134921

  14. Osmotic Shock Inhibits Auxin-stimulated Acidification and Growth 1

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Bernard

    1977-01-01

    Cells of oat coleoptiles (Avena sativa L. cv. Garry) have been osmotically shocked in order to observe the effect of alterations of the plasma membrane on some auxin responses. When coleoptile sections were treated sequentially with 0.5 m mannitol and 1 mm Na-phosphate (pH 6.4) at 4 C, polar auxin transport and acidification by 1 mM CaCl2 were unaffected, but auxin-stimulated acidification and growth were eliminated. Shock treatment also had no effect on acid-stimulated growth or on freezing point depression by the cytoplasm. It is suggested that osmotic shock modifies a portion of the plasma membrane which interacts with auxin and eventually leads to growth. PMID:16659853

  15. Chlamydia trachomatis growth depends on eukaryotic cholesterol esterification and is affected by Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jan; Byrne, Gerald I

    2015-08-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is auxotrophic for a variety of essential metabolites. Inhibitors that interrupt host cell catabolism may inhibit chlamydial growth and reveal Chlamydia metabolite requirements. We used the known indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO)-inhibitor 4-phenyl imidazole (4-PI) to reverse Interferon (IFN)-γ-induced chlamydial growth inhibition. However, at elevated inhibitor concentrations chlamydial growth was arrested even in the absence of IFN-γ. Since 4-PI is known to interfere with cholesterol metabolism, the effect of cholesterol add-back was tested. Chlamydia growth was restored in the presence of cholesterol in serum-containing, but not serum-free medium suggesting that cholesterol and other serum components are required for growth recovery. When serum factors were tested, either cholesteryl linoleate or the combination of cholesterol and linoleic acid restored chlamydial growth. However, growth was not restored when either cholesterol or linoleic acid were added alone, suggesting that the production of cholesteryl esters from cholesterol and fatty acids was affected by 4-PI treatment. In eukaryotic cells, the enzyme Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) catalyzes the production of cholesteryl esters. When HeLa cells were treated with the ACAT-specific inhibitor 4-hydroxycinnamicacid amide C. trachomatis growth was interrupted, but was restored by the addition of cholesteryl linoleate, suggesting that ACAT activity is necessary for intracellular Chlamydia growth. PMID:25883118

  16. Polyester but not cotton or wool textiles inhibit hair growth.

    PubMed

    Shafik, A

    1993-01-01

    The effect of different types of textile fabrics on hair growth was investigated in 40 mongrel dogs divided into 5 groups. An area of 10 x 20 cm on the dog's back was shaved; half of this area was covered by a textile patch of 100% polyester material in the 1st group, 100% cotton in the 2nd group, 100% wool in the 3rd group and a 50%/50% polyester/cotton blend in the 4th group. The remaining half of the shaved area in the 4 groups as well as the whole area in the 5th group (control) were left uncovered. The textile patch was worn for 2 months. The polyester-covered hair grew at a significantly lower rate and density than in the uncovered area of the same animal and the controls (p < 0.01). The hair color was similar to that of the surrounding uncovered hair. This is in contrast to cotton- and wool-covered skin area which showed nonsignificant differences in hair density, growth rate and color (p > 0.05) against the uncovered area and controls. In the polyester-covered skin, a thinning of the epidermis of the skin was noted microscopically with fragmentation and vacuolation of the hair follicle pulp. The study has shown that the polyester material generated electrostatic potentials, which may have inhibited hair growth, whereas cotton and woolen textiles did not. Friction between the polyester textile and the skin generates electrostatic charges which are suggested to create an 'electrostatic field' that seems to be responsible for the inhibited hair growth. PMID:8274779

  17. Growth inhibition mediated by PSP94 or CRISP-3 is prostate cancer cell line specific.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Bhakti R; Breed, Ananya A; Nakhawa, Vaishali H; Jagtap, Dhanashree D; Mahale, Smita D

    2010-09-01

    The prostate secretory protein of 94 amino acids (PSP94) has been shown to interact with cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP-3) in human seminal plasma. Interestingly, PSP94 expression is reduced or lost in the majority of the prostate tumours, whereas CRISP-3 expression is upregulated in prostate cancer compared with normal prostate tissue. To obtain a better understanding of the individual roles these proteins have in prostate tumourigenesis and the functional relevance of their interaction, we ectopically expressed either PSP94 or CRISP-3 alone or PSP94 along with CRISP-3 in three prostate cell lines (PC3, WPE1-NB26 and LNCaP) and performed growth inhibition assays. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to screen prostate cell lines for PSP94 and CRISP-3 expression. Mammalian expression constructs for human PSP94 and CRISP-3 were also generated and the expression, localization and secretion of recombinant protein were assayed by transfection followed by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence assay. The effect that ectopic expression of PSP94 or CRISP-3 had on cell growth was studied by clonogenic survival assay following transfection. To evaluate the effects of co-expression of the two proteins, stable clones of PC3 that expressed PSP94 were generated. They were subsequently transfected with a CRISP-3 expression construct and subjected to clonogenic survival assay. Our results showed that PSP94 and CRISP-3 could each induce growth inhibition in a cell line specific manner. Although the growth of CRISP-3-positive cell lines was inhibited by PSP94, growth inhibition mediated by CRISP-3 was not affected by the presence or absence of PSP94. This suggests that CRISP-3 may participate in PSP94-independent activities during prostate tumourigenesis. PMID:20676114

  18. Growth Inhibition of Cronobacter sakazakii in Experimentally Contaminated Powdered Infant Formula by Kefir Supernatant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Chon, Jung-Whan; Kang, Il-Byeong; Kim, Hyunsook; Kim, Hong-Seok; Song, Kwang-Young; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2015-09-01

    Kefir is a type of fermented milk containing lactic and acetic acid bacteria and yeast. In this study, we evaluated the antimicrobial activity of kefir supernatant against Cronobacter sakazakii in powdered infant formula (PIF). In a spot-on-lawn test, the growth of 20 C. sakazakii strains, including 10 clinical and 10 food isolates, was completely inhibited in the presence of kefir supernatant. Significant differences in the diameters of inhibition zones were observed upon treatment with kefir compared with the results for Lactobacillus kefiri and Candida kefyr culture supernatants or solutions of lactic and acetic acid and ethyl alcohol in the agar well diffusion test (P < 0.05). The addition of 100 μl of kefir supernatant to 1 ml of nutrient broth completely inhibited the growth of C. sakazakii, as evaluated by spectrophotometry. The antimicrobial activity of kefir supernatant in experimentally contaminated PIF was also tested; we found no viable C. sakazakii cells remaining in PIF rehydrated with 30% kefir supernatant solution for 1 h, demonstrating that the antimicrobial activity of kefir supernatant against C. sakazakii could be applied in real food samples. PMID:26319718

  19. Cadmium inhibits acid secretion in stimulated frog gastric mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbino, Andrea; Debellis, Lucantonio; Caroppo, Rosa; Curci, Silvana; Colella, Matilde

    2010-06-01

    Cadmium, a toxic environmental pollutant, affects the function of different organs such as lungs, liver and kidney. Less is known about its toxic effects on the gastric mucosa. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which cadmium impacts on the physiology of gastric mucosa. To this end, intact amphibian mucosae were mounted in Ussing chambers and the rate of acid secretion, short circuit current (I{sub sc}), transepithelial potential (V{sub t}) and resistance (R{sub t}) were recorded in the continuous presence of cadmium. Addition of cadmium (20 {mu}M to 1 mM) on the serosal but not luminal side of the mucosae resulted in inhibition of acid secretion and increase in NPPB-sensitive, chloride-dependent short circuit current. Remarkably, cadmium exerted its effects only on histamine-stimulated tissues. Experiments with TPEN, a cell-permeant chelator for heavy metals, showed that cadmium acts from the intracellular side of the acid secreting cells. Furthermore, cadmium-induced inhibition of acid secretion and increase in I{sub sc} cannot be explained by an action on: 1) H{sub 2} histamine receptor, 2) Ca{sup 2+} signalling 3) adenylyl cyclase or 4) carbonic anhydrase. Conversely, cadmium was ineffective in the presence of the H{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase blocker omeprazole suggesting that the two compounds likely act on the same target. Our findings suggest that cadmium affects the functionality of histamine-stimulated gastric mucosa by inhibiting the H{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase from the intracellular side. These data shed new light on the toxic effect of this dangerous environmental pollutant and may result in new avenues for therapeutic intervention in acute and chronic intoxication.

  20. Mo polyoxometalate nanoparticles inhibit tumor growth and vascular endothelial growth factor induced angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenjing; Yang, Licong; Liu, Ying; Qin, Xiuying; Zhou, Yanhui; Zhou, Yunshan; Liu, Jie

    2014-06-01

    Tumor growth depends on angiogenesis, which can furnish the oxygen and nutrients that proliferate tumor cells. Thus, blocking angiogenesis can be an effective strategy to inhibit tumor growth. In this work, three typical nanoparticles based on polyoxometalates (POMs) have been prepared; we investigated their capability as antitumor and anti-angiogenesis agents. We found that Mo POM nanoparticles, especially complex 3, inhibited the growth of human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cells (HepG2) through cellular reactive oxygen species levels’ elevation and mitochondrial membrane potential damage. Complex 3 also suppressed the proliferation, migration, and tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro and chicken chorioallantoic membrane development ex vivo. Furthermore, western blot analysis of cell signaling molecules indicated that Mo POMs blocked the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-mediated ERK1/2 and AKT signaling pathways in endothelial cells. Using transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrated their cellular uptake and localization within the cytoplasm of HepG2 cells. These results indicate that, owing to the extraordinary physical and chemical properties, Mo POM nanoparticles can significantly inhibit tumor growth and angiogenesis, which makes them potential drug candidates in anticancer and anti-angiogenesis therapies.

  1. Hypernegative Supercoiling Inhibits Growth by Causing RNA Degradation?

    PubMed Central

    Baaklini, Imad; Usongo, Valentine; Nolent, Flora; Sanscartier, Patrick; Hraiky, Chadi; Drlica, Karl; Drolet, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Transcription-induced hypernegative supercoiling is a hallmark of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (topA) mutants. However, its physiological significance has remained unclear. Temperature downshift of a mutant yielded transient growth arrest and a parallel increase in hypernegative supercoiling that was more severe with lower temperature. Both properties were alleviated by overexpression of RNase HI. While ribosomes in extracts showed normal activity when obtained during growth arrest, mRNA on ribosomes was reduced for fis and shorter for crp, polysomes were much less abundant relative to monosomes, and protein synthesis rate dropped, as did the ratio of large to small proteins. Altered processing and degradation of lacA and fis mRNA was also observed. These data are consistent with truncation of mRNA during growth arrest. These effects were not affected by a mutation in the gene encoding RNase E, indicating that this endonuclease is not involved in the abnormal mRNA processing. They were also unaffected by spectinomycin, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, which argued against induction of RNase activity. In vitro transcription revealed that R-loop formation is more extensive on hypernegatively supercoiled templates. These results allow us, for the first time, to present a model by which hypernegative supercoiling inhibits growth. In this model, the introduction of hypernegative supercoiling by gyrase facilitates degradation of nascent RNA; overproduction of RNase HI limits the accumulation of hypernegative supercoiling, thereby preventing extensive RNA degradation. PMID:18790862

  2. Inhibition of Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis by Nalidixic Acid in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Javor, George T.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of low concentrations of nalidixic acid on ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis in Escherichia coli was examined. It was observed that RNA synthesis in exponentially growing cells was not significantly affected, in harmony with previous studies. However, RNA synthesis was markedly depressed by nalidixic acid during starvation for an amino acid or during chloramphenicol treatment. This effect was not caused by increased killing or inhibition of nucleoside triphosphate synthesis by nalidixic acid. The pattern of radioactive uracil incorporation into transfer RNA or ribosomes was not changed by the drug. The sensitivity of RNA synthesis to nalidixic acid in the absence of protein production may be useful in probing the amino acid control of RNA synthesis. PMID:4607671

  3. Enhancement of taxol-induced apoptosis by inhibition of NF-?B with ursorlic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunlong; Xing, Da

    2007-05-01

    Taxol is known to inhibit cell growth and triggers significant apoptosis in various cancer cells, and activation of proliferation factor NF-?B during Taxol-induced apoptosis is regarded as a main reason resulting in tumor cells resistance to Taxol. It has been found that ursorlic acid can inhibit the activation of NF-?B. In order to study whether ursorlic acid can enhance the Taxol-induced apoptosis, we use fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique and probe SCAT3 to compare the difference of caspase-3 activation between Taxol alone and Taxol combined ursorlic acid. With laser scanning confocal microscopy, we find that ursorlic acid, a nontoxic food component, sensitizes ASTC-a-1 cells more efficiently to Taxol-induced apoptosis by advanced activation of caspase 3. The result also suggests that there would be a synergistic effect between Taxol and ursorlic acid, and the more detailed mechanism of synergistic effect needs to be clarified further, such as the correlations among NF-?B, Akt, caspase 8, which leads to the advanced activation of caspase 3 during combined treatment of Taxol and ursorlic acid. Moreover, this may be a new way to improve Taxol-dependent tumor therapy.

  4. The non-metabolizable glucose analog D-glucal inhibits aflatoxin biosynthesis and promotes kojic acid production in Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Aflatoxins (AFs) are potent carcinogenic compounds produced by several Aspergillus species, which pose serious threats to human health. As sugar is a preferred carbohydrate source for AF production, we examined the possibility of using sugar analogs to inhibit AF biosynthesis. Results We showed that although D-glucal cannot be utilized by A. flavus as the sole carbohydrate source, it inhibited AF biosynthesis and promoted kojic acid production without affecting mycelial growth when applied to a glucose-containing medium. The inhibition occurred before the production of the first stable intermediate, norsolorinic acid, suggesting a complete inhibition of the AF biosynthetic pathway. Further studies showed that exogenous D-glucal in culture led to reduced accumulation of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates and reduced glucose consumption, indicating that glycolysis is inhibited. Expression analyses revealed that D-glucal suppressed the expression of AF biosynthetic genes but promoted the expression of kojic acid biosynthetic genes. Conclusions D-glucal as a non-metabolizable glucose analog inhibits the AF biosynthesis pathway by suppressing the expression of AF biosynthetic genes. The inhibition may occur either directly through interfering with glycolysis, or indirectly through reduced oxidative stresses from kojic acid biosynthesis. PMID:24742119

  5. RPA Inhibition increases Replication Stress and Suppresses Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Glanzer, Jason G.; Liu, Shengqin; Wang, Ling; Mosel, Adam; Peng, Aimin; Oakley, Greg G.

    2014-01-01

    The ATR/Chk1 pathway is a critical surveillance network that maintains genomic integrity during DNA replication by stabilizing the replication forks during normal replication to avoid replication stress. One of the many differences between normal cells and cancer cells is the amount of replication stress that occurs during replication. Cancer cells with activated oncogenes generate increased levels of replication stress. This creates an increased dependency on the ATR/Chk1 pathway in cancer cells and opens up an opportunity to preferentially kill cancer cells by inhibiting this pathway. In support of this idea, we have identified a small molecule termed HAMNO ((1Z)-1-[(2-hydroxyanilino)methylidene]naphthalen-2-one), a novel protein interaction inhibitor of replication protein A (RPA), a protein involved in the ATR/Chk1 pathway. HAMNO selectively binds the N-terminal domain of RPA70, effectively inhibiting critical RPA protein interactions which rely on this domain. HAMNO inhibits both ATR autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of RPA32 Ser33 by ATR. By itself, HAMNO treatment creates DNA replication stress in cancer cells that are already experiencing replication stress, but not in normal cells, and it acts synergistically with etoposide to kill cancer cells in vitro and slow tumor growth in vivo. Thus, HAMNO illustrates how RPA inhibitors represent candidate therapeutics for cancer treatment, providing disease selectivity in cancer cells by targeting their differential response to replication stress. PMID:25070753

  6. XIAP downregulation accompanies mebendazole growth inhibition in melanoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Doudican, Nicole A; Byron, Sara A; Pollock, Pamela M; Orlow, Seth J

    2013-02-01

    Mebendazole (MBZ) was identified as a promising therapeutic on the basis of its ability to induce apoptosis in melanoma cell lines through a B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2)-dependent mechanism. We now show that in a human xenograft melanoma model, oral MBZ is as effective as the current standard of care temozolomide in reducing tumor growth. Inhibition of melanoma growth in vivo is accompanied by phosphorylation of BCL2 and decreased levels of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP). Reduced expression of XIAP on treatment with MBZ is partially mediated by its proteasomal degradation. Furthermore, exposure of melanoma cells to MBZ promotes the interaction of SMAC/DIABLO with XIAP, thereby alleviating XIAP's inhibition on apoptosis. XIAP expression on exposure to MBZ is indicative of sensitivity to MBZ as MBZ-resistant cells do not show reduced levels of XIAP after treatment. Resistance to MBZ can be reversed partially by siRNA knockdown of cellular levels of XIAP. Our data indicate that MBZ is a promising antimelanoma agent on the basis of its effects on key antiapoptotic proteins. PMID:23059386

  7. PPAR? ligands inhibit primary tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahy, Dipak; Singer, Samuel; Shen, Lucy Q.; Butterfield, Catherine E.; Freedman, Deborah A.; Chen, Emy J.; Moses, Marsha A.; Kilroy, Susan; Duensing, Stefan; Fletcher, Christopher; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Folkman, Judah; Kaipainen, Arja

    2002-01-01

    Several drugs approved for a variety of indications have been shown to exhibit antiangiogenic effects. Our study focuses on the PPAR? ligand rosiglitazone, a compound widely used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, that PPAR? is highly expressed in tumor endothelium and is activated by rosiglitazone in cultured endothelial cells. Furthermore, we show that rosiglitazone suppresses primary tumor growth and metastasis by both direct and indirect antiangiogenic effects. Rosiglitazone inhibits bovine capillary endothelial cell but not tumor cell proliferation at low doses in vitro and decreases VEGF production by tumor cells. In our in vivo studies, rosiglitazone suppresses angiogenesis in the chick chorioallantoic membrane, in the avascular cornea, and in a variety of primary tumors. These results suggest that PPAR? ligands may be useful in treating angiogenic diseases such as cancer by inhibiting angiogenesis. PMID:12370270

  8. Tranexamic acid concentrations associated with human seizures inhibit glycine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lecker, Irene; Wang, Dian-Shi; Romaschin, Alexander D.; Peterson, Mark; Mazer, C. David; Orser, Beverley A.

    2012-01-01

    Antifibrinolytic drugs are widely used to reduce blood loss during surgery. One serious adverse effect of these drugs is convulsive seizures; however, the mechanisms underlying such seizures remain poorly understood. The antifibrinolytic drugs tranexamic acid (TXA) and ε-aminocaproic acid (EACA) are structurally similar to the inhibitory neurotransmitter glycine. Since reduced function of glycine receptors causes seizures, we hypothesized that TXA and EACA inhibit the activity of glycine receptors. Here we demonstrate that TXA and EACA are competitive antagonists of glycine receptors in mice. We also showed that the general anesthetic isoflurane, and to a lesser extent propofol, reverses TXA inhibition of glycine receptor–mediated current, suggesting that these drugs could potentially be used to treat TXA-induced seizures. Finally, we measured the concentration of TXA in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients undergoing major cardiovascular surgery. Surprisingly, peak TXA concentration in the CSF occurred after termination of drug infusion and in one patient coincided with the onset of seizures. Collectively, these results show that concentrations of TXA equivalent to those measured in the CSF of patients inhibited glycine receptors. Furthermore, isoflurane or propofol may prevent or reverse TXA-induced seizures. PMID:23187124

  9. Inhibition of endogenous dentin matrix metalloproteinases by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J.M.; Agee, K.; Sidow, S.; McNally, K.; Lindsey, K.; Borke, J.; Elsalanty, M.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Endogenous dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to extracellular collagen matrix degradation in hybrid layers following adhesive dentin bonding procedures. Endodontic irrigants, including chlorhexidine (CHX) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) may help protect the hybrid layer from this process. The objective of the present study was to determine the exposure time necessary for EDTA to inactivate endogenous MMP activity in human dentin. Methods Dentin beams (213 mm) were prepared from mid-coronal dentin of extracted third molars. The beams were demineralized in 10 wt% phosphoric acid which also activated endogenous MMPs, and were divided into four experimental groups based on exposure time to 17% EDTA (0, 1, 2 or 5 min). A generic colorimetric MMP assay measured MMP activity via absorbance at 412 nm. Data were evaluated by Kruskal Wallis ANOVA, followed by Dunns pair-wise comparisons at ? = 0.05. Results All exposure times resulted in significant inhibition (P<0.001) compared to unexposed controls. Specifically, percent inhibition for 1-, 2-, and 5-minute exposure times were 55.121.5%, 72.811.7%, and 74.719.7%, respectively. Conclusions 17% EDTA significantly inhibits endogenous MMP activity of human dentin within 12 min. This may minimize hybrid layer degradation following resin bonding procedures in the root canal space. PMID:22152622

  10. Xanthine oxidase inhibits growth of Plasmodium falciparum in human erythrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, P A; Human, L; Freese, J A

    1991-01-01

    Malaria parasites, unable to synthesize purine de novo, use host-derived hypoxanthine preferentially as purine source. In a previous study (1990. J. Biol. Chem. 265:6562-6568), we noted that xanthine oxidase rapidly and completely depleted hypoxanthine in human erythrocytes, not by crossing the erythrocyte membrane, but rather by creating a concentration gradient which facilitated hypoxanthine efflux. We therefore investigated the ability of xanthine oxidase to inhibit growth of FCR-3, a chloroquine-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum in human erythrocytes in vitro. Parasites were cultured in human group O+ erythrocytes in medium supplemented, as required, with xanthine oxidase or chloroquine. Parasite viability was assessed by uptake of radiolabeled glycine and adenosine triphosphate-derived purine into protein and nucleic acid, respectively, by nucleic acid accumulation, by L-lactate production, and by microscopic appearance. On average, a 90% inhibition of growth was observed after 72 h of incubation in 20 mU/ml xanthine oxidase. Inhibition was notably greater than that exerted by 10(-7) M chloroquine (less than 10%) over a comparable period. The IC50 for xanthine oxidase was estimated at 0.2 mU/ml, compared to 1.5 x 10(-7) M for chloroquine. Inhibition was completely reversed by excess hypoxanthine, but was unaffected by oxygen radical scavengers, including superoxide dismutase and catalase. The data confirms that a supply of host-derived hypoxanthine is critical for nucleic acid synthesis in P. falciparum, and that depletion of erythrocyte hypoxanthine pools of chloroquine-resistant malaria infection in humans. of chloroquine-resistant malaria infection in humans. Images PMID:1752946

  11. Ricinoleic acid inhibits methanogenesis and fatty acid biohydrogenation in ruminal digesta from sheep and in bacterial cultures.

    PubMed

    Ramos Morales, E; Mata Espinosa, M A; McKain, N; Wallace, R J

    2012-12-01

    Ricinoleic acid (RA; 12-hydroxy-cis-9-18:1) is the main fatty acid component of castor oil. Although a precursor for CLA synthesis in lactic acid bacteria, RA was found previously not to form CLA in ruminal digesta but to have some inhibitory properties. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the potential of RA to modulate ruminal biohydrogenation and methanogenesis. Ruminal digesta from 4 sheep receiving a mixed hay-concentrate diet was incubated in vitro with 0.167 g/L of linoleic acid (LA; cis-9,cis-12-18:2) or with a combination of LA and RA or LA and castor oil (LA, RA, and castor oil added to a final concentration of 0.167 g/L) in the presence and absence of lipase. The CLA rumenic acid (cis-9,trans-11-18:2) accumulated when either RA or castor oil and lipase was present. Vaccenic acid (VA; trans-11-18:1) also accumulated, and a decrease of the rate of production of stearic acid (SA; 18:0) was observed. When LA was incubated with castor oil in the absence of lipase, no effects on biohydrogenation were observed. Ricinoleic acid at 0.02 g/L did not affect growth of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens but it inhibited growth of Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus. Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus but not B. fibrisolvens metabolized RA to 12-hydroxystearate. Linoleic acid metabolism by B. proteoclasticus appeared to be unaffected by RA addition whereas rumenic acid accumulation increased (P = 0.015 at 12 h) when RA was added. A 28% decrease (P = 0.004) in methane was obtained in 24 h in vitro incubations of diluted buffered ruminal fluid with added 0.2 g RA/L. There was no effect on the total concentration of VFA after 24 h as a result of RA addition, but the molar proportions of acetate and butyrate were decreased (P = 0.041 and P < 0.001, respectively) whereas that of propionate increased (P < 0.001). It was concluded that, at least in vitro, RA or the combination of castor oil and lipase inhibit biohydrogenation, causing the accumulation of rumenic acid and VA, with potential health benefits for ruminant products. The effect appeared to be mediated via an inhibitory effect on the biohydrogenating activity of B. proteoclasticus. An added environmental benefit could be a concomitant decrease in methane emissions. In vivo studies are now required to confirm the potential of these additives. PMID:22829608

  12. Modified Lactic Acid Bacteria Detect and Inhibit Multiresistant Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We designed Lactococcus lactis to detect Enterococcus faecalis. Upon detection, L. lactis produce and secrete antienterococcal peptides. The peptides inhibit enterococcal growth and reduce viability of enterococci in the vicinity of L. lactis. The enterococcal sex pheromone cCF10 serves as the signal for detection. Expression vectors derived from pCF10, a cCF10-responsive E. faecalis sex-pheromone conjugative plasmid, were engineered in L. lactis for the detection system. Recombinant host strains were engineered to express genes for three bacteriocins, enterocin A, hiracin JM79 and enterocin P, each with potent antimicrobial activity against E. faecalis. Sensitive detection and specific inhibition occur both in agar and liquid media. The engineered L. lactis also inhibited growth of multidrug-resistant E. faecium strains, when induced by cCF10. The presented vectors and strains can be components of a toolbox for the development of alternative antibiotic technologies targeting enterococci at the site of infection. PMID:24896372

  13. Epidermal growth factor receptor-induced activator protein 1 activity controls density-dependent growth inhibition in normal rat kidney fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hornberg, Jorrit J; Dekker, Henk; Peters, Peter H J; Langerak, Petra; Westerhoff, Hans V; Lankelma, Jan; van Zoelen, Everardus J J

    2006-10-01

    Density-dependent growth inhibition secures tissue homeostasis. Dysfunction of the mechanisms, which regulate this type of growth control is a major cause of neoplasia. In confluent normal rat kidney (NRK) fibroblasts, epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor levels decline, ultimately rendering these cells irresponsive to EGF. Using an activator protein (AP)-1 sensitive reporter construct, we show that AP-1 activity is strongly decreased in density-arrested NRK cells, but is restored after relaxation of densitydependent growth inhibition by removing neighboring cells. EGF could not induce AP-1 activity or S-phase entry in density-arrested cells, but could do so after pretreatment with retinoic acid, which enhances EGF receptor expression. Our results support a model in which the EGF receptor regulates density-dependent growth control in NRK fibroblasts, which is reflected by EGF-induced mitogenic signaling and consequent AP-1 activity. PMID:17172655

  14. Sanguinarine Suppresses Prostate Tumor Growth and Inhibits Survivin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meng; Lou, Wei; Chun, Jae Yeon; Cho, Daniel S.; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Evans, Christopher P.; Chen, Jun; Yue, Jiao; Zhou, Qinghua; Gao, Allen C.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a frequently occurring disease and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths of men in the United States. Current treatments have proved inadequate in curing or controlling prostate cancer, and a search for agents for the management of this disease is urgently needed. Survivin plays an important role in both progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer and resistance to chemotherapy. Altered expression of survivin in prostate cancer cells is associated with cancer progression, drug/radiation resistance, poor prognosis, and short patient survival. In the present study, the authors performed a cell-based rapid screen of the Prestwick Chemical Library consisting of 1120 Food and Drug Administrationapproved compounds with known safety and bioavailability in humans to identify potential inhibitors of survivin and anticancer agents for prostate cancer. Sanguinarine, a benzophenanthridine alkaloid derived primarily from the bloodroot plant, was identified as a novel inhibitor of survivin that selectively kills prostate cancer cells over normal prostate epithelial cells. The authors found that sanguinarine inhibits survivin protein expression through protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Sanguinarine induces apoptosis and inhibits growth of human prostate cancer cells and in vivo tumor formation. Administration of sanguinarine, beginning 3 days after ectopic implantation of DU145 human prostate cancer cells, reduces both tumor weight and volume. In addition, sanguinarine sensitized paclitaxel-mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis, offering a potential therapeutic strategy for overcoming taxol resistance. These results suggest that sanguinarine may be developed as an agent either alone or in combination with taxol for treatment of prostate cancer overexpressing survivin. PMID:21318089

  15. Sanguinarine suppresses prostate tumor growth and inhibits survivin expression.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meng; Lou, Wei; Chun, Jae Yeon; Cho, Daniel S; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Evans, Christopher P; Chen, Jun; Yue, Jiao; Zhou, Qinghua; Gao, Allen C

    2010-03-01

    Prostate cancer is a frequently occurring disease and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths of men in the United States. Current treatments have proved inadequate in curing or controlling prostate cancer, and a search for agents for the management of this disease is urgently needed. Survivin plays an important role in both progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer and resistance to chemotherapy. Altered expression of survivin in prostate cancer cells is associated with cancer progression, drug/radiation resistance, poor prognosis, and short patient survival. In the present study, the authors performed a cell-based rapid screen of the Prestwick Chemical Library consisting of 1120 Food and Drug Administration-approved compounds with known safety and bioavailability in humans to identify potential inhibitors of survivin and anticancer agents for prostate cancer. Sanguinarine, a benzophenanthridine alkaloid derived primarily from the bloodroot plant, was identified as a novel inhibitor of survivin that selectively kills prostate cancer cells over "normal" prostate epithelial cells. The authors found that sanguinarine inhibits survivin protein expression through protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Sanguinarine induces apoptosis and inhibits growth of human prostate cancer cells and in vivo tumor formation. Administration of sanguinarine, beginning 3 days after ectopic implantation of DU145 human prostate cancer cells, reduces both tumor weight and volume. In addition, sanguinarine sensitized paclitaxel-mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis, offering a potential therapeutic strategy for overcoming taxol resistance. These results suggest that sanguinarine may be developed as an agent either alone or in combination with taxol for treatment of prostate cancer overexpressing survivin. PMID:21318089

  16. Inhibition by arachidonic acid and other fatty acids of dopamine uptake at the human dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nianhang; Appell, Michael; Berfield, Janet L; Reith, Maarten E A

    2003-10-01

    It is known that arachidonic acid, in addition to promoting release of dopamine, can inhibit its transport. The present study provides preliminary information on structure-activity relationships for uptake inhibition by rotating disk voltammetry in human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing the human dopamine transporter. Except for anandamide, all other fatty acids studied at a pretreatment concentration of 80 microM caused significant reductions in Vmax but not Km. Increasing saturation of the hydrocarbon tails (partial saturation: oleic acid, linoleic acid; full saturation: arachidic acid, stearic acid, stearic acid ethyl ester) removed inhibitory activity incrementally, suggesting a role for cis-unsaturation (folding/bending of hydrocarbon tails). The relative lack of effect of 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid also supports the idea that less linear structures are less inhibitory on dopamine uptake. Esterification of the free carboxylic group (arachidonic acid ethyl ester) prevented most of the inhibitory activity, arguing against mere membrane lipid disruption. Finally, the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide greatly reduced uptake Vmax accompanied by a small decrease in Km, a potentially important effect on dopaminergic neurotransmission. PMID:14575792

  17. Specificity of growth inhibition of melanoma by 4-hydroxyanisole

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, G.A.; Nathanson, L.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study using human melanoma (NEL-MI), rat hepatoma (Fu5-5), and human kidney (293-31) cell lines was undertaken in order to evaluate the antitumor activity of 4-hydroxyanisole (4-OHA) in vitro. Prior reports have indicated highly specific antitumor activity of 4-OHA against melanoma cells in vitro. This specific antitumor activity has been proposed to be due to the oxidation of 4-OHA by tyrosinase to cytotoxic oxidation products. Dose-dependent cytotoxicity was observed when cells were cultured for 72 h in the presence of 4-OHA. At 100 microM, 4-OHA produced growth inhibition of 62%, 32%, and 55% in melanoma, hepatoma, and kidney cell lines, respectively. No effect was seen at 10 microM 4-OHA. 1,000 microM 4-OHA produced 100% kill. Tyrosinase activity was detected only in melanoma cells. The effect of 100 microM 4-OHA on the incorporation of 3H DNA precursors in melanoma, hepatoma, and kidney cells was also studied. Thymidine incorporation was inhibited in all three cell lines at the lowest cell density tested, with the greatest inhibition seen on melanoma cells. As cell density increased, the effect of 4-OHA on thymidine incorporation decreased. With respect to RNA synthesis, 4-OHA significantly reduced the incorporation of uridine in all three cell lines, with the greatest effect in melanoma cells. Cell density also affected the inhibition of uridine incorporation, but to a lesser extent than that observed on thymidine incorporation. The effect of 4-OHA on leucine incorporation was modest and uninfluenced by cell density. Thus, cytotoxicity of 4-OHA may involve two different mechanisms.

  18. Reducing the serine availability complements the inhibition of the glutamine metabolism to block leukemia cell growth.

    PubMed

    Polet, Florence; Corbet, Cyril; Pinto, Adan; Rubio, Laila Illan; Martherus, Ruben; Bol, Vanesa; Drozak, Xavier; Grgoire, Vincent; Riant, Olivier; Feron, Olivier

    2016-01-12

    Leukemia cells are described as a prototype of glucose-consuming cells with a high turnover rate. The role of glutamine in fueling the tricarboxylic acid cycle of leukemia cells was however recently identified confirming its status of major anaplerotic precursor in solid tumors. Here we examined whether glutamine metabolism could represent a therapeutic target in leukemia cells and whether resistance to this strategy could arise. We found that glutamine deprivation inhibited leukemia cell growth but also led to a glucose-independent adaptation maintaining cell survival. A proteomic study revealed that glutamine withdrawal induced the upregulation of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) and phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT), two enzymes of the serine pathway. We further documented that both exogenous and endogenous serine were critical for leukemia cell growth and contributed to cell regrowth following glutamine deprivation. Increase in oxidative stress upon inhibition of glutamine metabolism was identified as the trigger of the upregulation of PHGDH. Finally, we showed that PHGDH silencing in vitro and the use of serine-free diet in vivo inhibited leukemia cell growth, an effect further increased when glutamine metabolism was blocked. In conclusion, this study identified serine as a key pro-survival actor that needs to be handled to sensitize leukemia cells to glutamine-targeting modalities. PMID:26625201

  19. Effects of food preservatives on Alternaria alternata growth and tenuazonic acid production.

    PubMed

    Combina, M; Dalcero, A M; Varsavsky, E; Chulze, S

    1999-10-01

    The effects of different organic acids on Alternaria alternata growth and tenuazonic acid production (TeA) were evaluated. Both TeA pure toxin solution and TeA production in solid medium were considered. Sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate and sodium propionate, all preservatives commonly used by food industry in Argentina, were tested. TeA was stable as pure toxin solution when was treated with the salts of organic acids used. A differential effect was observed when the preservatives were evaluated in relation to A. alternata growth and TeA production in solid medium. Levels above 10 mg/kg of sodium benzoate and potassium sorbate produced a total inhibition of fungal development and toxin biosynthesis. Sodium propionate produced a 59% decrease in A. alternata growth and total inhibition of TeA production only at the highest concentration of preservatives used. PMID:10755134

  20. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid and sodium lauryl sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Onysko, S.J.

    1984-07-01

    Acid mine drainage is formed by the weathering or oxidation of pyritic material exposed during coal mining. The rate of pyritic material oxidation can be greatly accelerated by certain acidophilic bacteria such as Thiobacillus ferrooxidans which catalyse the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage micro-organisms. Sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), an anionic surfactant has proved effective in this respect. Benzoic acid, sorbic acid and SLS at low concentrations, each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of T. ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low pH, sterile, batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations of any of the compounds.

  1. Inhibition of acidic corrosion of aluminum by triazoline derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Khamis, E. . Dept. of Chemistry); Atea, M. . Dept. of Materials Science)

    1994-02-01

    Inhibition of the corrosion of aluminum (Al) in hydrochloric acid (HCl) by some triazoline derivatives was studied in relation to the concentration of the inhibitors using gasometry, the weight-loss method, and the potentiodynamic technique. All compounds investigated were found to be inhibitors of the mixed type. The inhibitory character of the additives depended upon the +R (resonance) and +I (inductive) powers of alkyl or aryl groups of the triazoline derivatives. Inhibition was ascribed to the adsorption of the inhibitor onto the metal oxide surface following the Flory-Huggins isotherm. The compounds were adsorbed on the metal surface. Each molecule of the inhibitors occupied an average of 3.8 active sites on the metal surface. The values of activation free energies varied between [minus]30 kJ/mol and [minus]45 kJ/mol.

  2. Hypothiocyanous acid oxidation of tubulin cysteines inhibits microtubule polymerization.

    PubMed

    Clark, Hillary M; Hagedorn, Tara D; Landino, Lisa M

    2014-01-01

    Thiol oxidation is a probable outcome of cellular oxidative stress and is linked to degenerative disease progression. In addition, protein thiol redox reactions are increasingly identified as a mechanism to regulate protein structure and function. We assessed the effect of hypothiocyanous acid on the cytoskeletal protein tubulin. Total cysteine oxidation by hypothiocyanous and hypochlorous acids was monitored by labeling tubulin with 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein and by detecting higher molecular weight inter-chain tubulin disulfides by Western blot under nonreducing conditions. Hypothiocyanous acid induced nearly stoichiometric oxidation of tubulin cysteines (1.9 mol cysteine/mol oxidant) and no methionine oxidation was observed. Because disulfide reducing agents restored all the polymerization activity that was lost due to oxidant treatment, we conclude that cysteine oxidation of tubulin inhibits microtubule polymerization. Hypothiocyanous acid oxidation of tubulin cysteines was markedly decreased in the presence of 4% glycerol, a component of the tubulin purification buffer. Due to its instability and buffer- and pH-dependent reactivity, hypothiocyanous acid studies require careful consideration of reaction conditions. PMID:24215946

  3. Nitro-Fatty Acid Inhibition of Neointima Formation After Endoluminal Vessel Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Marsha P.; Rudolph, Tanja K.; Khoo, Nicholas K. H.; Motanya, Uche N.; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Wertz, Jeffrey W.; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Rudolph, Volker; Woodcock, Steven R.; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Ali, Muhammad S.; Zhang, Jifeng; Chen, Y. Eugene; Agarwal, Anupam; Freeman, Bruce A.; Bauer, Philip M.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Fatty acid nitroalkenes are endogenously-generated electrophilic byproducts of nitric oxide and nitrite-dependent oxidative inflammatory reactions. Current evidence indicates nitroalkenes support post-translational protein modifications and transcriptional activation that promote the resolution of inflammation. Objective The aim of this study was to assess whether in vivo administration of a synthetic nitroalkene could elicit anti-inflammatory actions in vivo using a murine model of vascular injury. Methods and Results The in vivo administration (21 days) of nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) inhibited neointimal hyperplasia after wire injury of the femoral artery in a murine model (OA-NO2 treatment resulted in reduced intimal area and intima to media ratio vs. vehicle (V) or oleic acid (OA) treated animals, P<0.0001). Increased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression accounted for much of the vascular protection induced by OA-NO2 in both cultured aortic smooth muscle cells and in vivo. Inhibition of heme oxygenase (HO) by Sn(IV)-protoporphyrin (SnPP) or HO-1 siRNA reversed OA-NO2 -induced inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor-stimulated rat aortic smooth muscle cell migration. The up-regulation of HO-1 expression also accounted for the anti-stenotic actions of OA-NO2 in vivo, since inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia following femoral artery injury was abolished in HO-1 mice (OA-NO2-treated WT vs. HO-1?/? mice, P=0.016). Conclusions In summary, electrophilic nitro-fatty acids induce salutary gene expression and cell functional responses that are manifested by a clinically significant outcome, inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia induced by arterial injury. PMID:19797175

  4. Inhibition of phosphatidic acid synthesis alters the structure of the Golgi apparatus and inhibits secretion in endocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Siddhanta, A; Backer, J M; Shields, D

    2000-04-21

    In mammalian cells, activation of a Golgi-associated phospholipase D by ADP-ribosylation factor results in the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to form phosphatidic acid (PA). This reaction stimulates the release of nascent secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network of endocrine cells. To understand the role of PA in mediating secretion, we have exploited the transphosphatidylation activity of phospholipase D. Rat anterior pituitary GH3 cells, which secrete growth hormone and prolactin, were treated with 1-butanol resulting in the synthesis of phosphatidylbutanol rather than PA. Under these conditions transport from the ER through the Golgi apparatus and secretion of polypeptide hormones were inhibited quantitatively. Furthermore, the in vitro synthesis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P(2)) by Golgi membranes was inhibited quantitatively. Most significantly, in the presence of 1-butanol the architecture of the Golgi apparatus was disrupted, resulting in its disassembly and fragmentation. Removal of the alcohol resulted in the rapid restoration of Golgi structure and secretion of growth hormone and prolactin. Our results suggest that PA stimulation of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) synthesis is required for maintaining the structural integrity and function of the Golgi apparatus. PMID:10766834

  5. Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA+3) Inhibits IL-7 Signaling in Mouse Pre-B Cells.

    PubMed

    Ezeh, Peace C; Xu, Huan; Lauer, Fredine T; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G; Burchiel, Scott W

    2016-02-01

    Our previously published data show that As(+3) invivo and invitro, at very low concentrations, inhibits lymphoid, but not myeloid stem cell development in mouse bone marrow. We also showed that the As(+3) metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(+3)), was responsible for the observed pre-B cell toxicity caused by As(+3). Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is the primary growth factor responsible for pre-lymphoid development in mouse and human bone marrow, and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (STAT5) is a transcriptional factor in the IL-7 signaling pathway. We found that MMA(+3) inhibited STAT5 phosphorylation at a concentration as low as 50?nM in mouse bone marrow pre-B cells. Inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation by As(+3) occurred only at a concentration of 500?nM. In the IL-7 dependent mouse pre-B 2E8 cell line, we also found selective inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation by MMA(+3), and this inhibition was dependent on effects on JAK3 phosphorylation. IL-7 receptor expression on 2E8 cell surface was also suppressed by 50?nM MMA(+3) at 18?h. As further evidence for the inhibition of STAT5, we found that the induction of several genes required in B cell development, cyclin D1, E2A, EBF1, and PAX5, were selectively inhibited by MMA(+3). Since 2E8 cells lack the enzymes responsible for the conversion of As(+3) to MMA(+3) invitro, the results of these studies suggest that As(+3) induced inhibition of pre-B cell formation invivo is likely dependent on the formation of MMA(+3) which in turn inhibits IL-7 signaling at several steps in mouse pre-B cells. PMID:26518055

  6. Inhibition of spoilage and food-borne pathogens by lactic acid bacteria isolated from fermenting tef (Eragrostis tef) dough.

    PubMed

    Nigatu, A; Gashe, B A

    1994-10-01

    A study was carried out at the Department of Biology, Addis Abeba University, in 1991 to determine the inhibitory potential of fermenting tef and the lactic acid bacteria isolated from fermenting tef dough on Salmonella spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella spp., Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. The test bacteria grew in the fermenting tef uptill 30 hr or till the pH dropped to 4.7. Thereafter, growth was inhibited and decreases in population were apparent. The results showed that the spent media from all of the four lactic acid bacterial isolates, namely, Lactobacillus spp., Pediococcus spp., Leuconostoc spp. and Streptococcus spp. inhibited the test bacteria. Acidity on its own was not responsible for the inhibition of the test bacteria. The spent medium from Streptococcus spp. showed the best inhibitory activity amongst the lactic acid bacteria. PMID:7835350

  7. Identification of volatile compounds produced by the bacterium Burkholderia tropica that inhibit the growth of fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Tenorio-Salgado, Silvia; Tinoco, Raunel; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Caballero-Mellado, Jesus; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    It has been documented that bacteria from the Burkholderia genera produce different kinds of compounds that inhibit plant pathogens, however in Burkholderia tropica, an endophytic diazotrophic and phosphate-solubilizing bacterium isolated from a wide diversity of plants, the capacity to produce antifungal compounds has not been evaluated. In order to expand our knowledge about Burkholderia tropica as a potential biological control agent, we analyzed 15 different strains of this bacterium to evaluate their capacities to inhibit the growth of four phytopathogenic fungi, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotium rolffsi. Diverse analytical techniques, including plant root protection and dish plate growth assays and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy showed that the fungal growth inhibition was intimately associated with the volatile compounds produced by B. tropica and, in particular, two bacterial strains (MTo293 and TTe203) exhibited the highest radial mycelial growth inhibition. Morphological changes associated with these compounds, such as disruption of fungal hyphae, were identified by using photomicrographic analysis. By using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy technique, 18 volatile compounds involved in the growth inhibition mechanism were identified, including ?-pinene and limonene. In addition, we found a high proportion of bacterial strains that produced siderophores during growth with different carbon sources, such as alanine and glutamic acid; however, their roles in the antagonism mechanism remain unclear. PMID:23680857

  8. Identification of volatile compounds produced by the bacterium Burkholderia tropica that inhibit the growth of fungal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Tenorio-Salgado, Silvia; Tinoco, Raunel; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Caballero-Mellado, Jesus; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    It has been documented that bacteria from the Burkholderia genera produce different kinds of compounds that inhibit plant pathogens, however in Burkholderia tropica, an endophytic diazotrophic and phosphate-solubilizing bacterium isolated from a wide diversity of plants, the capacity to produce antifungal compounds has not been evaluated. In order to expand our knowledge about Burkholderia tropica as a potential biological control agent, we analyzed 15 different strains of this bacterium to evaluate their capacities to inhibit the growth of four phytopathogenic fungi, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotium rolffsi. Diverse analytical techniques, including plant root protection and dish plate growth assays and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy showed that the fungal growth inhibition was intimately associated with the volatile compounds produced by B. tropica and, in particular, two bacterial strains (MTo293 and TTe203) exhibited the highest radial mycelial growth inhibition. Morphological changes associated with these compounds, such as disruption of fungal hyphae, were identified by using photomicrographic analysis. By using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy technique, 18 volatile compounds involved in the growth inhibition mechanism were identified, including ?-pinene and limonene. In addition, we found a high proportion of bacterial strains that produced siderophores during growth with different carbon sources, such as alanine and glutamic acid; however, their roles in the antagonism mechanism remain unclear. PMID:23680857

  9. Drugs Which Inhibit Osteoclast Function Suppress Tumor Growth through Calcium Reduction in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Liao, Jinhui; Park, Serk In; Koh, Amy J; Sadler, William D; Pienta, Kenneth J; Rosol, Thomas J; McCauley, Laurie K

    2011-01-01

    Prostate carcinoma frequently metastasizes to bone where the microenvironment facilitates its growth. Inhibition of bone resorption is effective in reducing tumor burden and bone destruction in prostate cancer. However, whether drugs that inhibit osteoclast function inhibit tumor growth independent of inhibition of bone resorption is unclear. Calcium is released during bone resorption and the calcium sensing receptor is an important regulator of cancer cell proliferation. The goal of this investigation was to elucidate the role of calcium released during bone resorption and to determine the impact of drugs which suppress bone resorption on tumor growth in bone. To compare tumor growth in a skeletal versus non-skeletal site, equal numbers of canine prostate cancer cells expressing luciferase (ACE-1luc) prostate cancer cells were inoculated into a simple collagen matrix, neonatal mouse vertebrae (vossicles), human de-proteinized bone, or a mineralized collagen matrix. Implants were placed subcutaneously into athymic mice. Luciferase activity was used to track tumor growth weekly and at one month tumors were dissected for histologic analysis. Luciferase activity and tumor size were greater in vossicles, de-proteinized bone and mineralized collagen matrix versus non-mineralized collagen implants. The human osteoblastic prostate carcinoma cell line C4-2b also grew better in a mineral rich environment with a greater proliferation of C4-2b cells reflected by Ki-67 staining. Zoledronic acid (ZA), a bisphosphonate, and recombinant OPG-Fc, a RANKL inhibitor, were administered to mice bearing vertebral implants (vossicles) containing ACE-1 osteoblastic prostate cancer cells. Vossicles or collagen matrices were seeded with ACE-1luc cells subcutaneously in athymic mice (2 vossicles, 2 collagen implants/mouse). Mice received ZA (5?g/mouse, twice/week), (OPG-Fc at 10mg/kg, 3 times/week) or vehicle, and luciferase activity was measured weekly. Histologic analysis of the tumors, vossicles and endogenous bones and serum biochemistry were performed. Antiresorptive administration was associated with decreased serum TRAP5b and reduced osteoclast numbers, increased tibia and vossicle bone areas. ZA significantly decreased bone marrow calcium concentrations without affecting serum calcium. ZA and OPG-Fc significantly inhibited tumor growth in bone but not in collagen implants. In conclusion, the inhibitory effects of ZA or OPG-Fc on prostate tumor growth in bone are mediated via blocking bone resorption and calcium release from bone. PMID:21419883

  10. 3-Aminothymidine inhibits growth of cultured human T-cell acute lymphoblastoid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ashida, N; Asano, S; Kohda, K

    1994-01-01

    N3-Aminated derivatives of thymidine, deoxyuridine and deoxycytidine were synthesized and their cell growth inhibition activity was tested using two cultured human cell lines, CCRF-HSB-2 and KB. Among the compounds tested, 3-aminothymidine showed growth inhibition activity against CCRF-HSB-2 cells and inhibited DNA synthesis in these cells. PMID:7847851

  11. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 (FGF21) Inhibits Chondrocyte Function and Growth Hormone Action Directly at the Growth Plate

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shufang; Levenson, Amy; Kharitonenkov, Alexei; De Luca, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) modulates glucose and lipid metabolism during fasting. In addition, previous evidence indicates that increased expression of FGF21 during chronic food restriction is associated with reduced bone growth and growth hormone (GH) insensitivity. In light of the inhibitory effects on growth plate chondrogenesis mediated by other FGFs, we hypothesized that FGF21 causes growth inhibition by acting directly at the long bones' growth plate. We first demonstrated the expression of FGF21, FGFR1 and FGFR3 (two receptors known to be activated by FGF21) and β-klotho (a co-receptor required for the FGF21-mediated receptor binding and activation) in fetal and 3-week-old mouse growth plate chondrocytes. We then cultured mouse growth plate chondrocytes in the presence of graded concentrations of rhFGF21 (0.01–10 μg/ml). Higher concentrations of FGF21 (5 and 10 μg/ml) inhibited chondrocyte thymidine incorporation and collagen X mRNA expression. 10 ng/ml GH stimulated chondrocyte thymidine incorporation and collagen X mRNA expression, with both effects prevented by the addition in the culture medium of FGF21 in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, FGF21 reduced GH binding in cultured chondrocytes. In cells transfected with FGFR1 siRNA or ERK 1 siRNA, the antagonistic effects of FGF21 on GH action were all prevented, supporting a specific effect of this growth factor in chondrocytes. Our findings suggest that increased expression of FGF21 during food restriction causes growth attenuation by antagonizing the GH stimulatory effects on chondrogenesis directly at the growth plate. In addition, high concentrations of FGF21 may directly suppress growth plate chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. PMID:22696219

  12. Hyperbaric hyperoxia reversibly inhibits erythrocyte phospholipid fatty acid turnover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dise, Craig A.; Clark, James M.; Lambersten, Christian J.; Goodman, David B. P.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of hyperbaric hyperoxia on the acylation of membrane phospholipid was studied by measuring the rates of activation of exogenous tritiated oleic acid to acyl thioester and of transesterification of the thioester into membrane phospholipids in intact human erythrocytes obtained 1 h after an exposure of the subjects to a hyperbaric oxygen atmosphere (3.5 h, 100 pct O2, 3 ATA). Exposure to pure oxygen was found to inhibit both the acylation and transesterification reactions by more than 30 percent, with partial recovery detected 24 h later. On the other hand, no rate changes were observed when isolated membranes from the same batches of cells were used in similar experiments. It is suggested that the decrease in the incorporation of tritiated oleic acid after hyperbaric hyperoxia may reflect an early event in the pathogenesis of oxygen-induced cellular injury and that it may be a useful index for the assessment of the tolerance of tissues to hyperoxia.

  13. Functional Amino Acids in Growth, Reproduction, and Health12

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guoyao

    2010-01-01

    Amino acids (AA) were traditionally classified as nutritionally essential or nonessential for animals and humans based on nitrogen balance or growth. A key element of this classification is that all nonessential AA (NEAA) were assumed to be synthesized adequately in the body as substrates to meet the needs for protein synthesis. Unfortunately, regulatory roles for AA in nutrition and metabolism have long been ignored. Such conceptual limitations were not recognized until recent seminal findings that dietary glutamine is necessary for intestinal mucosal integrity and dietary arginine is required for maximum neonatal growth and embryonic survival. Some of the traditionally classified NEAA (e.g. glutamine, glutamate, and arginine) play important roles in regulating gene expression, cell signaling, antioxidative responses, and immunity. Additionally, glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate are major metabolic fuels for the small intestine and they, along with glycine, regulate neurological function. Among essential AA (EAA), much emphasis has been placed on leucine (which activates mammalian target of rapamycin to stimulate protein synthesis and inhibit proteolysis) and tryptophan (which modulates neurological and immunological functions through multiple metabolites, including serotonin and melatonin). A growing body of literature leads to a new concept of functional AA, which are defined as those AA that regulate key metabolic pathways to improve health, survival, growth, development, lactation, and reproduction of organisms. Both NEAA and EAA should be considered in the classic “ideal protein” concept or formulation of balanced diets to maximize protein accretion and optimize health in animals and humans. PMID:22043449

  14. Inhibition of de novo Palmitate Synthesis by Fatty Acid Synthase Induces Apoptosis in Tumor Cells by Remodeling Cell Membranes, Inhibiting Signaling Pathways, and Reprogramming Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Richard; Mordec, Kasia; Waszczuk, Joanna; Wang, Zhaoti; Lai, Julie; Fridlib, Marina; Buckley, Douglas; Kemble, George; Heuer, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of de novo palmitate synthesis via fatty acid synthase (FASN) inhibition provides an unproven approach to cancer therapy with a strong biological rationale. FASN expression increases with tumor progression and associates with chemoresistance, tumor metastasis, and diminished patient survival in numerous tumor types. TVB-3166, an orally-available, reversible, potent, and selective FASN inhibitor induces apoptosis, inhibits anchorage-independent cell growth under lipid-rich conditions, and inhibits in-vivo xenograft tumor growth. Dose-dependent effects are observed between 20–200 nM TVB-3166, which agrees with the IC50 in biochemical FASN and cellular palmitate synthesis assays. Mechanistic studies show that FASN inhibition disrupts lipid raft architecture, inhibits biological pathways such as lipid biosynthesis, PI3K–AKT–mTOR and β-catenin signal transduction, and inhibits expression of oncogenic effectors such as c-Myc; effects that are tumor-cell specific. Our results demonstrate that FASN inhibition has anti-tumor activities in biologically diverse preclinical tumor models and provide mechanistic and pharmacologic evidence that FASN inhibition presents a promising therapeutic strategy for treating a variety of cancers, including those expressing mutant K-Ras, ErbB2, c-Met, and PTEN. The reported findings inform ongoing studies to link mechanisms of action with defined tumor types and advance the discovery of biomarkers supporting development of FASN inhibitors as cancer therapeutics. Research in context Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is a vital enzyme in tumor cell biology; the over-expression of FASN is associated with diminished patient prognosis and resistance to many cancer therapies. Our data demonstrate that selective and potent FASN inhibition with TVB-3166 leads to selective death of tumor cells, without significant effect on normal cells, and inhibits in vivo xenograft tumor growth at well-tolerated doses. Candidate biomarkers for selecting tumors highly sensitive to FASN inhibition are identified. These preclinical data provide mechanistic and pharmacologic evidence that FASN inhibition presents a promising therapeutic strategy for treating a variety of cancers.

  15. Dynamic light scattering study of inhibition of nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite crystals by osteopontin.

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, John R; Goiko, Maria; Mozaffari, Maryam; Bator, Daniel; Dauphinee, Ron L; Liao, Yinyin; Flemming, Roberta L; Bramble, Michael S; Hunter, Graeme K; Goldberg, Harvey A

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of isoforms of osteopontin (OPN) on the nucleation and growth of crystals from a supersaturated solution of calcium and phosphate ions. Dynamic light scattering is used to monitor the size of the precipitating particles and to provide information about their concentration. At the ion concentrations studied, immediate precipitation was observed in control experiments with no osteopontin in the solution, and the size of the precipitating particles increased steadily with time. The precipitate was identified as hydroxyapatite by X-ray diffraction. Addition of native osteopontin (nOPN) extracted from rat bone caused a delay in the onset of precipitation and reduced the number of particles that formed, but the few particles that did form grew to a larger size than in the absence of the protein. Recombinant osteopontin (rOPN), which lacks phosphorylation, caused no delay in initial calcium phosphate precipitation but severely slowed crystal growth, suggesting that rOPN inhibits growth but not nucleation. rOPN treated with protein kinase CK2 to phosphorylate the molecule (p-rOPN) produced an effect similar to that of nOPN, but at higher protein concentrations and to a lesser extent. These results suggest that phosphorylations are critical to OPN's ability to inhibit nucleation, whereas the growth of the hydroxyapatite crystals is effectively controlled by the highly acidic OPN polypeptide. This work also demonstrates that dynamic light scattering can be a powerful tool for delineating the mechanism of protein modulation of mineral formation. PMID:23457612

  16. Effects of Long-Chain Fatty Acids on Growth of Rumen Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Maczulak, A. E.; Dehority, B. A.; Palmquist, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of low concentrations of long-chain fatty acids (palmitic, stearic, oleic, and vaccenic) on the growth of seven species (13 strains) of rumen bacteria were investigated. Except for Bacteroides ruminicola and several strains of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, bacterial growth was not greatly affected by either palmitic or stearic acids. In contrast, growth of Selenomonas ruminantium, B. ruminicola, and one strain of B. fibrisolvens was stimulated by oleic acid, whereas the cellulolytic species were markedly inhibited by this acid. Vaccenic acid (trans ?11 18:1) had far less inhibitory effect on the cellulolytic species than oleic acid (cis ?9 18:1). Inclusion of powdered cellulose in the medium appeared to reverse both inhibitory and stimulatory effects of added fatty acids. However, there was little carry-over effect observed when cells were transferred from a medium with fatty acids to one without. Considerable variation in response to added fatty acids was noted among five strains of B. fibrisolvens. In general, exogenous long-chain fatty acids appear to have little, if any, energy-sparing effect on the growth of rumen bacteria. PMID:16345887

  17. Loss of growth inhibitory effects of retinoic acid in human breast cancer cells following long-term exposure to retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Stephen, R; Darbre, P D

    2000-11-01

    Although retinoids are known to be inhibitory to breast cancer cell growth, a key remaining question is whether they would remain effective if administered long-term. We describe here the long-term effects of all- trans retinoic acid on two oestrogen-dependent human breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and ZR-75-1. Although both cell lines were growth inhibited by retinoic acid in the short-term in either the absence or the presence of oestradiol, prolonged culture with 1 microM all- trans retinoic acid resulted in the cells acquiring resistance to the growth inhibitory effects of retinoic acid. Time courses showed that oestrogen deprivation of the cell lines resulted in upregulation of the basal non-oestrogen stimulated growth rate such that cells learned to grow at the same rate without as with oestradiol, but the cells remained growth inhibited by retinoic acid throughout. Addition of 1 microM all- trans retinoic acid to steroid deprivation conditions resulted in reproducible loss of growth response to both retinoic acid and oestradiol, although the time courses were separable in that loss of growth response to retinoic acid preceded that of oestradiol. Loss of growth response to retinoic acid did not involve loss of receptors, ER as measured by steroid binding assay or RARalpha as measured by Northern blotting. Function of the receptors was retained in terms of the ability of both oestradiol and retinoic acid to upregulate pS2 gene expression, but there was reduced ability to upregulate transiently transfected ERE- and RRE-linked reporter genes. Despite the accepted role of IGFBP3 in retinoic acid-mediated growth inhibition, progression to retinoic acid resistance occurred irrespective of level of IGFBP3, which remained high in the resistant MCF7 cells. Measurement of AP1 activity showed that the two cell lines had markedly different basal AP1 activities, but that progression to resistance was accompanied in both cases by a lost ability of retinoic acid to reduce AP1 activity. These results warn of potential resistance which could arise on long-term treatment with retinoic acid in a clinical situation and echo the problems of progression to endocrine resistance. It seems that whatever the constraints imposed on growth, these cells have a remarkable ability to escape from growth inhibition. However, the ability of retinoic acid to delay progression to oestrogen resistance is encouraging for endocrine therapy, and the concentration-dependence of retinoic acid resistance suggests that progression is not absolute but could be manipulated by dose. PMID:11027432

  18. Methoxyacetic acid suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Keshab R; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Patel, Neil K; Lu, Hua; Zeng, Shelya X; Wang, Guangdi; Zhang, Changde; You, Zongbing

    2014-01-01

    Methoxyacetic acid (MAA) is a primary metabolite of ester phthalates that are used in production of consumer products and pharmaceutical products. MAA causes embryo malformation and spermatocyte death through inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Little is known about MAAs effects on cancer cells. In this study, two immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell lines (RWPE-1 and pRNS-1-1) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, C4-2B, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with MAA at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle analysis were performed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR, Western blot, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses. We found that MAA dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. MAA-induced apoptosis was due to down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic gene baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis protein repeat containing 2 (BIRC2, also named cIAP1), leading to activation of caspases 7 and 3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. MAA-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and CDK2 expression at the late time. MAA up-regulated p21 expression through inhibition of HDAC activities, independently of p53/p63/p73. These findings demonstrate that MAA suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which suggests that MAA could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer. PMID:25606576

  19. Pseudolaric acid B inhibits proliferation in SW579 human thyroid squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    YU, JINGHUA; REN, PEIYOU; ZHONG, TING; WANG, YALIN; YAN, MINGHUI; XUE, BIANBIAN; LI, RUI; DAI, CHUNYAN; LIU, CHUNYU; CHEN, GUANG; YU, XIAO-FANG

    2015-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid is a rare and aggressive type of neoplasm, which is routinely treated with surgery; however, despite this, survival time is not commonly more than six months. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the efficacy of pseudolaric acid (PAB) as a therapeutic agent. PAB is an antitubulin agent, and in the present study, inhibition of the SW579 thyroid squamous cell carcinoma cell line by PAB was investigated. PAB was found to inhibit SW579 cell growth in a time- and dose-dependent manner via interference in ?-tubulin polymerization. However, the inhibitory role of PAB in SW579 cells was not predominantly due to apoptosis, but was due to the cytostatic status resulting from cell cycle arrest. The present study proposes that this is the underlying mechanism of the antitumor properties of PAB. During cytostatis, autophagy was activated to sustain cell survival and SW579 cell migration was inhibited. Nuclear p53 expression was observed to be reduced, however the role of reduced p53 requires further investigation. Therefore, PAB induced cytostasis, which inhibited SW579 cell growth and therefore may function as an antitubulin therapeutic agent. PMID:26460192

  20. Pseudolaric acid B inhibits proliferation in SW579 human thyroid squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinghua; Ren, Peiyou; Zhong, Ting; Wang, Yalin; Yan, Minghui; Xue, Bianbian; Li, Rui; Dai, Chunyan; Liu, Chunyu; Chen, Guang; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2015-11-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid is a rare and aggressive type of neoplasm, which is routinely treated with surgery; however, despite this, survival time is not commonly more than six months. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the efficacy of pseudolaric acid (PAB) as a therapeutic agent. PAB is an antitubulin agent, and in the present study, inhibition of the SW579 thyroid squamous cell carcinoma cell line by PAB was investigated. PAB was found to inhibit SW579 cell growth in a time? and dose?dependent manner via interference in ??tubulin polymerization. However, the inhibitory role of PAB in SW579 cells was not predominantly due to apoptosis, but was due to the cytostatic status resulting from cell cycle arrest. The present study proposes that this is the underlying mechanism of the antitumor properties of PAB. During cytostatis, autophagy was activated to sustain cell survival and SW579 cell migration was inhibited. Nuclear p53 expression was observed to be reduced, however the role of reduced p53 requires further investigation. Therefore, PAB induced cytostasis, which inhibited SW579 cell growth and therefore may function as an antitubulin therapeutic agent. PMID:26460192

  1. Possible intermolecular interaction between quinolones and biphenylacetic acid inhibits gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor sites.

    PubMed

    Akahane, K; Kimura, Y; Tsutomi, Y; Hayakawa, I

    1994-10-01

    The combination of some new quinolone antibacterial agents with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA), a metabolite of fenbufen, is known to specifically induce functional blockade of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. The mechanisms of these drug interactions were further examined. Scatchard analysis of [3H]muscimol binding to rat brain plasma membranes in the presence of enoxacin and BPAA revealed that a significant decrease in the number of muscimol binding sites was produced without affecting the affinity of binding to the receptors. In the presence of norfloxacin, BPAA inhibited muscimol binding the most potently of the six BPAA-related compounds tested. Fenbufen and 9,10-dihydro-gamma-oxo-2-phenanthrenebutyric acid also inhibited the binding, and 4-biphenylcarboxylic acid and methyl 4-biphenylacetate inhibited it slightly, but 3-benzoylpropionic acid exhibited no competitive inhibition. Accordingly, hybrid molecules of norfloxacin and BPAA were synthesized for stereochemical analysis of these drug interactions. A hybrid with a -CONH(CH2)3- chain between norfloxacin and BPAA (flexible structure) inhibited muscimol binding, and intracisternal injection of this hybrid caused clonic convulsions in mice more potently than the combination of norfloxacin and BPAA did. In contrast, a hybrid linked by -CONH- (stretched structure) showed almost no such inhibitory effect. 1H NMR analysis indicated the presence of intramolecular attraction at the quinoline ring of the hybrid exhibiting the antagonistic activity. These results suggest the possibility that quinolones and BPAA interact with the GABA receptor at nearby sites and that the binding affinity of quinolones to the GABA receptors is largely enhanced by the intermolecular interaction with BPAA. PMID:7840564

  2. Possible intermolecular interaction between quinolones and biphenylacetic acid inhibits gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor sites.

    PubMed Central

    Akahane, K; Kimura, Y; Tsutomi, Y; Hayakawa, I

    1994-01-01

    The combination of some new quinolone antibacterial agents with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA), a metabolite of fenbufen, is known to specifically induce functional blockade of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. The mechanisms of these drug interactions were further examined. Scatchard analysis of [3H]muscimol binding to rat brain plasma membranes in the presence of enoxacin and BPAA revealed that a significant decrease in the number of muscimol binding sites was produced without affecting the affinity of binding to the receptors. In the presence of norfloxacin, BPAA inhibited muscimol binding the most potently of the six BPAA-related compounds tested. Fenbufen and 9,10-dihydro-gamma-oxo-2-phenanthrenebutyric acid also inhibited the binding, and 4-biphenylcarboxylic acid and methyl 4-biphenylacetate inhibited it slightly, but 3-benzoylpropionic acid exhibited no competitive inhibition. Accordingly, hybrid molecules of norfloxacin and BPAA were synthesized for stereochemical analysis of these drug interactions. A hybrid with a -CONH(CH2)3- chain between norfloxacin and BPAA (flexible structure) inhibited muscimol binding, and intracisternal injection of this hybrid caused clonic convulsions in mice more potently than the combination of norfloxacin and BPAA did. In contrast, a hybrid linked by -CONH- (stretched structure) showed almost no such inhibitory effect. 1H NMR analysis indicated the presence of intramolecular attraction at the quinoline ring of the hybrid exhibiting the antagonistic activity. These results suggest the possibility that quinolones and BPAA interact with the GABA receptor at nearby sites and that the binding affinity of quinolones to the GABA receptors is largely enhanced by the intermolecular interaction with BPAA. PMID:7840564

  3. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition--a critical review.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Irina Sousa; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino; Ramos, Maria João

    2007-03-01

    Angiogenesis, or formation of new blood capillaries from preexisting vessels, plays both beneficial and damaging roles in the organism. It is a result of a complex balance of positive and negative regulators, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the most important pro-angiogenic factors involved in tumor angiogenesis. VEGF increases vascular permeability, which might facilitate tumor dissemination via the circulation causing a greater delivery of oxygen and nutrients; it recruits circulating endothelial precursor cells, and acts as a survival factor for immature tumor blood vessels. The endotheliotropic activities of VEGF are mediated through the VEGF-specific tyrosine-kinase receptors: VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3. VEGF and its receptors play a central role in tumor angiogenesis, and therefore the blockade of this pathway is a promising therapeutic strategy for inhibiting angiogenesis and tumor growth. A number of different strategies to inhibit VEGF signal transduction are in development and they include the development of humanized neutralizing anti-VEGF monoclonal antibodies, receptor antagonists, soluble receptors, antagonistic VEGF mutants, and inhibitors of VEGF receptor function. These agents can be divided in two broad classes, namely agents designed to target the VEGF activity and agents designed to target the surface receptor function. The main purpose of this review is to summarize all the available information regarding the importance of the pro-angiogenic factor VEGF in cancer therapy. After an overview of the VEGF family and their respective receptors, we shall focus our attention on the different VEGF-inhibitors existent nowadays. Agents based upon anti-VEGF therapy have provided solid proofs about their success, and therefore we believe that a critical review is of the utmost importance to help researchers in their future work. PMID:17348829

  4. Inhibition of Intramacrophage Growth of Penicillium marneffei by 4-Aminoquinolines

    PubMed Central

    Taramelli, Donatella; Tognazioli, Clara; Ravagnani, F.; Leopardi, O.; Giannulis, G.; Boelaert, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of chloroquine (CQ) and several 4-aminoquinoline drugs were tested against Penicillium marneffei, an opportunistic fungus that invades and grows inside macrophages and causes disseminated infection in AIDS patients. Human THP1 and mouse J774 macrophages were infected in vitro with P. marneffei conidia and treated with different doses of drugs for 24 to 48 h followed by cell lysis and the counting of P. marneffei CFU. CQ and amodiaquine exerted a dose-dependent inhibition of fungal growth, whereas quinine and artemisinin were fungistatic and not fungicidal. The antifungal activity of CQ was not due to an impairment of fungal iron acquisition in that it was not reversed by the addition of iron nitrilotriacetate, FeCl3, or iron ammonium citrate. Perl's staining indicated that CQ did not alter the ability of J774 cells to acquire iron from the medium. Most likely, CQ's antifungal activity is due to an increase in the intravacuolar pH and a disruption of pH-dependent metabolic processes. Indeed, we demonstrate that (i) bafilomycin A1 and ammonium chloride, two agents known to alkalinize intracellular vesicles by different mechanisms, were inhibitory as well and (ii) a newly synthesized 4-amino-7-chloroquinoline molecule (compound 9), lacking the terminal amino side chain of CQ that assists in drug accumulation, did not inhibit P. marneffei growth. These results suggest that CQ has a potential for use in prophylaxis of P. marneffei infections in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in countries where P. marneffei is endemic. PMID:11302809

  5. Biochemistry of growth inhibition by ammonium ions in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryll, T.; Valley, U.; Wagner, R. . Cell Culture Techniques Dept.)

    1994-06-20

    The intracellular pool of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine and UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine has been shown to act as a central target during the inhibitory action of ammonium ions in vitro cultivated mammalian cell cultures. This pool has been demonstrated to be elevated at the end of a batch cultivation and very quickly as a response to exogenously applied ammonium chloride by using four different cell lines (hybridoma, BHK, CHO, and Ltk-929). The amount of enlarged UDP aminohexoses is correlated to the inhibitor concentration and additionally dependent on the cell line. The formation of the UDP sugars is associated with a transient reduction of the UTP pool. Moreover, the quick formation of UDP-GNAC is strictly dependent on the presence of, glucose and ammonium. Both metabolites act as biochemical precursors. Additionally, the formation of UDP-GNAc after ammonium application has been shown to increase with an elevated cultivation pH and to be independent of the inhibition of transcription and translation processes. The intracellular amount of UDP-GNAc correlates with the level of growth inhibition in mammalian cell lines.

  6. Functional Characterization of Pseudomonas Contact Dependent Growth Inhibition (CDI) Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mercy, Chryslène; Ize, Bérengère; Salcedo, Suzana P.; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Bigot, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Contact-dependent inhibition (CDI) toxins, delivered into the cytoplasm of target bacterial cells, confer to host strain a significant competitive advantage. Upon cell contact, the toxic C-terminal region of surface-exposed CdiA protein (CdiA-CT) inhibits the growth of CDI- bacteria. CDI+ cells express a specific immunity protein, CdiI, which protects from autoinhibition by blocking the activity of cognate CdiA-CT. CdiA-CT are separated from the rest of the protein by conserved peptide motifs falling into two distinct classes, the “E. coli”- and “Burkholderia-type”. CDI systems have been described in numerous species except in Pseudomonadaceae. In this study, we identified functional toxin/immunity genes linked to CDI systems in the Pseudomonas genus, which extend beyond the conventional CDI classes by the variability of the peptide motif that delimits the polymorphic CdiA-CT domain. Using P. aeruginosa PAO1 as a model, we identified the translational repressor RsmA as a negative regulator of CDI systems. Our data further suggest that under conditions of expression, P. aeruginosa CDI systems are implicated in adhesion and biofilm formation and provide an advantage in competition assays. All together our data imply that CDI systems could play an important role in niche adaptation of Pseudomonadaceae. PMID:26808644

  7. Functional Characterization of Pseudomonas Contact Dependent Growth Inhibition (CDI) Systems.

    PubMed

    Mercy, Chryslne; Ize, Brengre; Salcedo, Suzana P; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Bigot, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Contact-dependent inhibition (CDI) toxins, delivered into the cytoplasm of target bacterial cells, confer to host strain a significant competitive advantage. Upon cell contact, the toxic C-terminal region of surface-exposed CdiA protein (CdiA-CT) inhibits the growth of CDI- bacteria. CDI+ cells express a specific immunity protein, CdiI, which protects from autoinhibition by blocking the activity of cognate CdiA-CT. CdiA-CT are separated from the rest of the protein by conserved peptide motifs falling into two distinct classes, the "E. coli"- and "Burkholderia-type". CDI systems have been described in numerous species except in Pseudomonadaceae. In this study, we identified functional toxin/immunity genes linked to CDI systems in the Pseudomonas genus, which extend beyond the conventional CDI classes by the variability of the peptide motif that delimits the polymorphic CdiA-CT domain. Using P. aeruginosa PAO1 as a model, we identified the translational repressor RsmA as a negative regulator of CDI systems. Our data further suggest that under conditions of expression, P. aeruginosa CDI systems are implicated in adhesion and biofilm formation and provide an advantage in competition assays. All together our data imply that CDI systems could play an important role in niche adaptation of Pseudomonadaceae. PMID:26808644

  8. Proteolytic Pathways Induced by Herbicides That Inhibit Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zulet, Amaia; Gil-Monreal, Miriam; Villamor, Joji Grace; Zabalza, Ana; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Royuela, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Background The herbicides glyphosate (Gly) and imazamox (Imx) inhibit the biosynthesis of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids, respectively. Although these herbicides inhibit different pathways, they have been reported to show several common physiological effects in their modes of action, such as increasing free amino acid contents and decreasing soluble protein contents. To investigate proteolytic activities upon treatment with Gly and Imx, pea plants grown in hydroponic culture were treated with Imx or Gly, and the proteolytic profile of the roots was evaluated through fluorogenic kinetic assays and activity-based protein profiling. Results Several common changes in proteolytic activity were detected following Gly and Imx treatment. Both herbicides induced the ubiquitin-26 S proteasome system and papain-like cysteine proteases. In contrast, the activities of vacuolar processing enzymes, cysteine proteases and metacaspase 9 were reduced following treatment with both herbicides. Moreover, the activities of several putative serine protease were similarly increased or decreased following treatment with both herbicides. In contrast, an increase in YVADase activity was observed under Imx treatment versus a decrease under Gly treatment. Conclusion These results suggest that several proteolytic pathways are responsible for protein degradation upon herbicide treatment, although the specific role of each proteolytic activity remains to be determined. PMID:24040092

  9. Selective growth inhibition of a human malignant melanoma cell line by sesame oil in vitro.

    PubMed

    Smith, D E; Salerno, J W

    1992-06-01

    Ayurveda, an ancient and comprehensive system of natural medicine, recommends regular topical application to the skin of sesame oil, above all other oils, as a health-promoting procedure. We examined the effect of sesame oil and several other vegetable oils and their major component fatty acids on the proliferation rate of human normal and malignant melanocytes growing at similar rates in serum-free media. We found that sesame and safflower oils, both of which contain large amounts of linoleate in triglyceride form, selectively inhibited malignant melanoma growth over normal melanocytes whereas coconut, olive and mineral oils, which contain little or no linoleate as triglyceride, did not. These oils were tested at a range of 10-300 micrograms/ml. We found that of the fatty acids tested, only linoleic acid was selectively inhibitory while palmitic and oleic were not. These fatty acids were tested in the range of 3-100 micrograms/ml. These results suggest that certain vegetable oils rich in linoleic acid, such as the sesame oil, recommended for topical use by Ayurveda, may contain selective antineoplastic properties which are similar to those demonstrated for essential polyunsaturated fatty acids and their metabolites. This suggests that whole vegetable oils may have potential clinical usefulness. PMID:1502251

  10. Inhibition of experimental autoimmune uveitis by amino acid copolymers.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hongen; Vistica, Barbara P; Chan, Chi-Chao; Strominger, Jack L; Gery, Igal

    2009-10-30

    Glatiramer acetate (GA), a synthetic random amino acid copolymer, poly(Y, E, A, K)n, is widely used for treatment of multiple sclerosis. It inhibits experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice by competition with the antigen and by induction of regulatory T cells. A novel copolymer, poly (F, Y, A, K)n , designated FYAK, was more effective than GA in its immunomodulatory activity in EAE. Here, FYAK and GA were compared in the amelioration of another disease model in mice, experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). When tested by co-immunization with an uveitogenic antigen, FYAK was superior to GA in its capacity to inhibit EAU induction, as well as immune processes related to this condition. Further, regulatory T-cell lines specific to FYAK were more immunosuppressive than GA-specific lines in the EAU model. The superiority of FYAK-specific lines was accompanied by higher production of Th2 cytokines. These data thus demonstrate that FYAK, a novel copolymer, is superior to GA in its capacity to inhibit immunopathogenic processes in a non-central nervous system tissue. PMID:19748134

  11. Retinoic acid inhibits NFATc1 expression and osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Balkan, Wayne; Rodríguez-Gonzalez, María; Pang, Manhui; Fernandez, Isabel; Troen, Bruce R

    2011-11-01

    Ingestion of excess vitamin A appears to correlate with an increased fracture risk, an outcome that is likely mediated by retinoic acids (RAs); these are vitamin A metabolites that have dramatic effects on skeletal development. We studied the impacts of RA and isoform-specific RA receptor (RAR) agonists (α, β, and γ) on osteoclast formation (osteoclastogenesis) in two model systems: RAW264.7 cells and murine bone marrow-derived monocytes. The pan-RAR agonists, all-trans and 9-cis RA, inhibited receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclast differentiation in a concentration-dependent manner. Isoform-specific RAR agonists (α, β, and γ) also inhibited osteoclastogenesis, with the RARα agonist producing the most consistent reductions in both osteoclast number and size and total area covered. Inhibition of osteoclastogenesis correlated with reductions in expression, DNA binding, and nuclear abundance of nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1), a transcription factor critical for osteoclastogenesis. The upregulation of three NFATc1-responsive genes, cathepsin K, dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein and osteoclast-associated receptor were similarly reduced following RA or RAR agonist exposure. These results suggest that RA blocks in vitro RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis by decreasing NFATc1 function. PMID:21384111

  12. Aspirin delays mesothelioma growth by inhibiting HMGB1-mediated tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H; Pellegrini, L; Napolitano, A; Giorgi, C; Jube, S; Preti, A; Jennings, C J; De Marchis, F; Flores, E G; Larson, D; Pagano, I; Tanji, M; Powers, A; Kanodia, S; Gaudino, G; Pastorino, S; Pass, H I; Pinton, P; Bianchi, M E; Carbone, M

    2015-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an inflammatory molecule that has a critical role in the initiation and progression of malignant mesothelioma (MM). Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA) is the most widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that reduces the incidence, metastatic potential and mortality of many inflammation-induced cancers. We hypothesized that ASA may exert anticancer properties in MM by abrogating the carcinogenic effects of HMGB1. Using HMGB1-secreting and -non-secreting human MM cell lines, we determined whether aspirin inhibited the hallmarks of HMGB1-induced MM cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Our data demonstrated that ASA and its metabolite, salicylic acid (SA), inhibit motility, migration, invasion and anchorage-independent colony formation of MM cells via a novel HMGB1-mediated mechanism. ASA/SA, at serum concentrations comparable to those achieved in humans taking therapeutic doses of aspirin, and BoxA, a specific inhibitor of HMGB1, markedly reduced MM growth in xenograft mice and significantly improved survival of treated animals. The effects of ASA and BoxA were cyclooxygenase-2 independent and were not additive, consistent with both acting via inhibition of HMGB1 activity. Our findings provide a rationale for the well documented, yet poorly understood antitumorigenic activity of aspirin, which we show proceeds via HMGB1 inhibition. Moreover, the use of BoxA appears to allow a more efficient HMGB1 targeting while eluding the known gastrointestinal side effects of ASA. Our findings are directly relevant to MM. Given the emerging importance of HMGB1 and its tumor-promoting functions in many cancer types, and of aspirin in cancer prevention and therapy, our investigation is poised to provide broadly applicable information. PMID:26068794

  13. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Onysko, S.J.; Kleinmann, R.L.P.; Erickson, P.M.

    1984-07-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans promote indirect oxidation of pyrite through the catalysis of the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron, which is an effective oxidant of pyrite. These bacteria also may catalyze direct oxidation of pyrite by oxygen. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage microorganisms. In this study, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate at low concentrations (5 to 10 mg/liter) each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low-pH, sterile batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations (5 to 50 mg/liter) of any of the compounds.

  14. Effect of organic acids on the growth and lipid accumulation of oleaginous yeast Trichosporon fermentans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Microbial lipids have drawn increasing attention in recent years as promising raw materials for biodiesel production, and the use of lignocellulosic hydrolysates as carbon sources seems to be a feasible strategy for cost-effective lipid fermentation with oleaginous microorganisms on a large scale. During the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials with dilute acid, however, various kinds of inhibitors, especially large amounts of organic acids, will be produced, which substantially decrease the fermentability of lignocellulosic hydrolysates. To overcome the inhibitory effects of organic acids, it is critical to understand their impact on the growth and lipid accumulation of oleaginous microorganisms. Results In our present work, we investigated for the first time the effect of ten representative organic acids in lignocellulosic hydrolysates on the growth and lipid accumulation of oleaginous yeast Trichosporon fermentans cells. In contrast to previous reports, we found that the toxicity of the organic acids to the cells was not directly related to their hydrophobicity. It is worth noting that most organic acids tested were less toxic than aldehydes to the cells, and some could even stimulate the growth and lipid accumulation at a low concentration. Unlike aldehydes, most binary combinations of organic acids exerted no synergistic inhibitory effects on lipid production. The presence of organic acids decelerated the consumption of glucose, whereas it influenced the utilization of xylose in a different and complicated way. In addition, all the organic acids tested, except furoic acid, inhibited the malic activity of T. fermentans. Furthermore, the inhibition of organic acids on cell growth was dependent more on inoculum size, temperature and initial pH than on lipid content. Conclusions This work provides some meaningful information about the effect of organic acid in lignocellulosic hydrolysates on the lipid production of oleaginous yeast, which is helpful for optimization of biomass hydrolysis processes, detoxified pretreatment of hydrolysates and lipid production using lignocellulosic materials. PMID:22260291

  15. Synthesis and cholinesterase inhibition of cativic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Alza, Natalia P; Richmond, Victoria; Baier, Carlos J; Freire, Eleonora; Baggio, Ricardo; Murray, Ana Paula

    2014-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with memory impairment and cognitive deficit. Most of the drugs currently available for the treatment of AD are acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors. In a preliminary study, significant AChE inhibition was observed for the ethanolic extract of Grindelia ventanensis (IC??=0.79 mg/mL). This result prompted us to isolate the active constituent, a normal labdane diterpenoid identified as 17-hydroxycativic acid (1), through a bioassay guided fractionation. Taking into account that 1 showed moderate inhibition of AChE (IC??=21.1 ?M), selectivity over butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) (IC??=171.1 ?M) and that it was easily obtained from the plant extract in a very good yield (0.15% w/w), we decided to prepare semisynthetic derivatives of this natural diterpenoid through simple structural modifications. A set of twenty new cativic acid derivatives (3-6) was prepared from 1 through transformations on the carboxylic group at C-15, introducing a C2-C6 linker and a tertiary amine group. They were tested for their inhibitory activity against AChE and BChE and some structure-activity relationships were outlined. The most active derivative was compound 3c, with an IC?? value of 3.2 ?M for AChE. Enzyme kinetic studies and docking modeling revealed that this inhibitor targeted both the catalytic active site and the peripheral anionic site of this enzyme. Furthermore, 3c showed significant inhibition of AChE activity in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, and was non-cytotoxic. PMID:25017625

  16. Kinetic-spectrophotometric determination of ascorbic acid by inhibition of the hydrochloric acid-bromate reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Rezaei, B.; Movahedinia, H.

    2002-10-01

    A new analytical method was developed for the determination of ascorbic acid in fruit juice and pharmaceuticals. The method is based on its inhibition effect on the reaction between hydrochloric acid and bromate. The decolourisation of Methyl Orange by the reaction products was used to monitor the reaction spectrophotometrically at 510 nm. The linearity range of the calibration graph depends on bromate concentration. The variable affecting the rate of the reaction was investigated. The method is simple, rapid, relatively sensitive and precise. The limit of detection is 7.610 -6 M and calibration rang is 810 -6-1.210 -3 M ascorbic acid. The relative standard deviation of seven replication determinations of 810 -6 and 210 -5 M ascorbic acid was 2.8 and 1.7%, respectively. The influence of potential interfering substance was studied. The method was successfully applied for the determination of ascorbic acid in pharmaceuticals.

  17. Boric Acid Inhibits Germination and Colonization of Saprolegnia Spores In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shimaa E.; Thoen, Even; Evensen, Øystein; Skaar, Ida

    2014-01-01

    Saprolegnia infections cause severe economic losses among freshwater fish and their eggs. The banning of malachite green increased the demand for finding effective alternative treatments to control the disease. In the present study, we investigated the ability of boric acid to control saprolegniosis in salmon eggs and yolk sac fry. Under in vitro conditions, boric acid was able to decrease Saprolegnia spore activity and mycelial growth in all tested concentrations above 0.2 g/L, while complete inhibition of germination and growth was observed at a concentration of 0.8 g/L. In in vivo experiments using Atlantic salmon eyed eggs, saprolegniosis was controlled by boric acid at concentrations ranging from 0.2–1.4 g/L during continuous exposure, and at 1.0–4.0 g/L during intermittent exposure. The same effect was observed on salmon yolk sac fry exposed continuously to 0.5 g/L boric acid during the natural outbreak of saprolegniosis. During the experiments no negative impact with regard to hatchability and viability was observed in either eggs or fry, which indicate safety of use at all tested concentrations. The high hatchability and survival rates recorded following the in vivo testing suggest that boric acid is a candidate for prophylaxis and control of saprolegniosis. PMID:24699283

  18. ABCB5-Targeted Chemoresistance Reversal Inhibits Merkel Cell Carcinoma Growth.

    PubMed

    Kleffel, Sonja; Lee, Nayoung; Lezcano, Cecilia; Wilson, Brian J; Sobolewski, Kristine; Saab, Karim R; Mueller, Hansgeorg; Zhan, Qian; Posch, Christian; Elco, Christopher P; DoRosario, Andrew; Garcia, Sarah S; Thakuria, Manisha; Wang, Yaoyu E; Wang, Linda C; Murphy, George F; Frank, Markus H; Schatton, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a highly aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer with profound but poorly understood resistance to chemotherapy, which poses a significant barrier to clinical MCC treatment. Here we show that ATP-binding cassette member B5 (ABCB5) confers resistance to standard-of-care MCC chemotherapeutic agents and provide proof-of-principle that ABCB5 blockade can inhibit human MCC tumor growth through sensitization to drug-induced cell cytotoxicity. ABCB5 expression was detected in both established MCC lines and clinical MCC specimens at levels significantly higher than those in normal skin. Carboplatin- and etoposide-resistant MCC cell lines exhibited increased expression of ABCB5, along with enhanced ABCB1 and ABCC3 transcript expression. ABCB5-expressing MCC cells in heterogeneous cancers preferentially survived treatment with carboplatin and etoposide in vitro and in human MCC xenograft-bearing mice in vivo. Moreover, patients with MCC also exhibited enhanced ABCB5 positivity after carboplatin- and etoposide-based chemotherapy, pointing to clinical significance of this chemoresistance mechanism. Importantly, ABCB5 blockade reversed MCC drug resistance and impaired tumor growth in xenotransplantation models in vivo. Our results establish ABCB5 as a chemoresistance mechanism in MCC and suggest utility of this molecular target for improved MCC therapy. PMID:26827764

  19. AP-2? inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell growth and migration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenhuan; Chen, Cheng; Liang, Zhongheng; Qiu, Junlu; Li, Xinxin; Hu, Xiang; Xiang, Shuanglin; Ding, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Jian

    2016-03-01

    Transcription factor AP-2? is involved in many types of human cancers, but its role in hepatocellular carcinogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we found that expression of AP-2? was low in 40% of human hepatocellular cancers compared with adjacent normal tissues by immunohistochemical analysis. Moreover, AP-2? expression was low or absent in hepatocellular cancer cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B, SMMC-7721 and MHHC 97-H). Human liver cancer cell lines SMMC-7721 and Hep3B stably overexpressing AP-2? were established by lentiviral infection and puromycin screening, and the ectopic expression of AP-2? was able to inhibit hepatocellular cancer cell growth and proliferation by cell viability, MTT assay and liquid colony formation invitro and invivo. Furthermore, AP-2? overexpression decreased liver cancer cell migration and invasion as assessed by wound healing and Transwell assays, increasing the sensitivity of liver cancer cells to cisplatin analyzed by MTT assays. Also AP-2? overexpression suppressed the sphere formation and renewed the ability of cancer stem cells. Finally, we found that AP-2? is epigenetically modified and modulates the levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), ?-catenin, p53, EMT, and CD133 expression in liver cancer cell lines. These results suggested that AP-2? expression is low in human hepatocellular cancers by regulating multiple signaling to affect hepatocellular cancer cell growth and migration. Therefore, AP-2? might represent a novel potential target in human hepatocellular cancer therapy. PMID:26780928

  20. Inhibition of canonical WNT signaling attenuates human leiomyoma cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Masanori; Yin, Ping; Navarro, Antonia; Moravek, Molly B.; Coon, John S.; Druschitz, Stacy A.; Gottardi, Cara J.; Bulun, Serdar E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Dysregulation of WNT signaling plays a central role in tumor cell growth and progression. Our goal was to assess the effect of three WNT/?-catenin pathway inhibitors, Inhibitor of ?-Catenin And TCF4 (ICAT), niclosamide, and XAV939 on the proliferation of primary cultures of human uterine leiomyoma cells. Design Prospective study of human leiomyoma cells obtained from myomectomy or hysterectomy. Setting University research laboratory. Patient(s) Women (n=38) aged 2753 years undergoing surgery. Intervention(s) Adenoviral ICAT overexpression or treatment with varying concentrations of niclosamide or XAV939. Main Outcome Measure(s) Cell proliferation, cell death, WNT/?-catenin target gene expression or reporter gene regulation, ?-catenin levels and cellular localization. Result(s) ICAT, niclosamide, or XAV939 inhibit WNT/?-catenin pathway activation and exert anti-proliferative effects in primary cultures of human leiomyoma cells. Conclusion(s) Three WNT/?-catenin pathway inhibitors specifically block human leiomyoma growth and proliferation, suggesting that the canonical WNT pathway may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of uterine leiomyoma. Our findings provide rationale for further preclinical and clinical evaluation of ICAT, niclosamide, and XAV939 as candidate anti-tumor agents for uterine leiomyoma. PMID:24534281

  1. Kaempferol inhibits Entamoeba histolytica growth by altering cytoskeletal functions.

    PubMed

    Bolaos, Vernica; Daz-Martnez, Alfredo; Soto, Jacqueline; Marchat, Laurence A; Sanchez-Monroy, Virginia; Ramrez-Moreno, Esther

    2015-11-01

    The flavonoid kaempferol obtained from Helianthemum glomeratum, an endemic Mexican medicinal herb used to treat gastrointestinal disorders, has been shown to inhibit growth of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites in vitro; however, the mechanisms associated with this activity have not been documented. Several works reported that kaempferol affects cytoskeleton in mammalian cells. In order to gain insights into the action mechanisms involved in the anti-amoebic effect of kaempferol, here we evaluated the effect of this compound on the pathogenic events driven by the cytoskeleton during E. histolytica infection. We also carried out a two dimensional gel-based proteomic analysis to evidence modulated proteins that could explain the phenotypical changes observed in trophozoites. Our results showed that kaempferol produces a dose-dependent effect on trophozoites growth and viability with optimal concentration being 27.7?M. Kaempferol also decreased adhesion, it increased migration and phagocytic activity, but it did not affect erythrocyte binding nor cytolytic capacity of E. histolytica. Congruently, proteomic analysis revealed that the cytoskeleton proteins actin, myosin II heavy chain and cortexillin II were up-regulated in response to kaempferol treatment. In conclusion, kaempferol anti-amoebic effects were associated with deregulation of proteins related with cytoskeleton, which altered invasion mechanisms. PMID:26620675

  2. Olive oil compounds inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Lamy, Sylvie Ouanouki, Amira; Béliveau, Richard; Desrosiers, Richard R.

    2014-03-10

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) triggers crucial signaling processes that regulate tumor angiogenesis and, therefore, represents an attractive target for the development of novel anticancer therapeutics. Several epidemiological studies have confirmed that abundant consumption of foods from plant origin is associated with reduced risk of developing cancers. In the Mediterranean basin, the consumption of extra virgin olive oil is an important constituent of the diet. Compared to other vegetable oils, the presence of several phenolic antioxidants in olive oil is believed to prevent the occurrence of a variety of pathological processes, such as cancer. While the strong antioxidant potential of these molecules is well characterized, their antiangiogenic activities remain unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate whether tyrosol (Tyr), hydroxytyrosol (HT), taxifolin (Tax), oleuropein (OL) and oleic acid (OA), five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil, can affect in vitro angiogenesis. We found that HT, Tax and OA were the most potent angiogenesis inhibitors through their inhibitory effect on specific autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR-2 (Tyr951, Tyr1059, Tyr1175 and Tyr1214) leading to the inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) signaling. Inhibition of VEGFR-2 by these olive oil compounds significantly reduced VEGF-induced EC proliferation and migration as well as their morphogenic differentiation into capillary-like tubular structures in Matrigel. Our study demonstrates that HT, Tax and OA are novel and potent inhibitors of the VEGFR-2 signaling pathway. These findings emphasize the chemopreventive properties of olive oil and highlight the importance of nutrition in cancer prevention. - Highlights: • We investigated five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil on angiogenesis. • Hydroxytyrosol, taxifolin and oleic acid are the best angiogenesis inhibitors. • Olive oil compounds affect endothelial cell functions essential for angiogenesis. • Olive oil compounds inhibit specific autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR-2. • Hydroxytyrosol, taxifolin and oleic acid inhibit VEGFR-2 signaling pathway.

  3. Inhibition of Klebsiella pneumoniae Growth and Capsular Polysaccharide Biosynthesis by Fructus mume

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tien-Huang; Huang, Su-Hua; Wu, Chien-Chen; Liu, Hsin-Ho; Jinn, Tzyy-Rong; Chen, Yeh; Lin, Ching-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen isolated from liver abscess of diabetic patients in Asian countries. With the spread of multiple-drug-resistant K. pneumoniae, there is an increasing need for the development of alternative bactericides and approaches to block the production of bacterial virulence factors. Capsular polysaccharide (CPS), especially from the K1 and K2 serotypes, is considered the major determinant for K. pneumoniae virulence. We found that extracts of the traditional Chinese medicine Fructus mume inhibited the growth of K. pneumoniae strains of both serotypes. Furthermore, Fructus mume decreased the mucoviscosity, and the CPS produced in a dose-dependent manner, thus reducing bacterial resistance to serum killing. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that Fructus mume downregulated the mRNA levels of cps biosynthesis genes in both serotypes, possibly by increasing the intracellular iron concentration in K. pneumoniae. Moreover, citric acid, a major organic acid in Fructus mume extracts, was found to have an inhibitory effect on growth and CPS biosynthesis in K. pneumoniae. Taken together, our results indicate that Fructus mume not only possesses antibacterial activity against highly virulent K. pneumoniae strains but also inhibits bacterial CPS biosynthesis, thereby facilitating pathogen clearance by the host immune system. PMID:24062785

  4. Analysis of an ampicillin propyl ester prodrug which inhibits the growth of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bartzatt, Ronald; Malesa, Cynthia

    2002-10-01

    An ampicillin prodrug was synthesized by utilizing the chemical reaction of ampicillin with diazopropane (CH(3)CH(2)CHN(2)) in an organic solvent. The result is esterification of the carboxylic acid functional group. The ampicillin prodrug is a solid that forms yellow crystals which are soluble in water and LB agarose media. The ampicillin prodrug was stable for more than 10 weeks when stored at < or = 0.0 degrees C. The prodrug has reduced hydrogen-bonding capability compared with the unmodified structure of ampicillin. Evaluation of the logP parameter (the octanol/water partition coefficient) indicates that the ampicillin prodrug (logP=1.773) has increased lipophilic characteristics relative to the unmodified ampicillin structure (logP=1.06). The lipophilic substituent constant for the esterification of the carboxylic acid is 0.713, a positive value which indicates that the substituent has a lipophilic nature. The ampicillin prodrug was solubilized into LB agarose media at a concentration of 0.228 mg/ml, and was found to induce 100% growth inhibition of an ampicillin-susceptible and streptomycin-resistant Escherichia coli strain (designated DH1), and induced greater than 30% growth inhibition of an ampicillin-resistant E. coli strain (designated PKK). Synthesis of this prodrug utilizing a diazoalkane was highly efficient, with no undesirable by-products being formed. PMID:12241549

  5. Novel steroid receptor phyto-modulator compound a inhibits growth and survival of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yemelyanov, Alexander; Czwornog, Jennifer; Gera, Lajos; Joshi, Sonali; Chatterton, Robert T; Budunova, Irina

    2008-06-15

    Androgen receptor (AR)- and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)- mediated signaling play opposite roles in prostate tumorigenesis: AR promotes prostate carcinoma (PC) development, whereas GR acts as a tumor suppressor. Compound A (CpdA) is a stable analogue of an aziridine precursor from the African shrub Salsola tuberculatiformis Botschantzev. It was shown recently that, in model cells, CpdA inhibits AR function and strongly enhances anti-inflammatory function of GR. We determined the effects of CpdA in prostate cells with different AR/GR status: (a) RWPE-1 cells (AR(low)/GR(low)), (b) PC3 and DU145 cells (GR(+)/AR(-)), (c) LNCaP cells (GR(-)/AR(+)), and (d) LNCaP-GR cells expressing both receptors. Similar to steroid hormones, CpdA induces nuclear translocation of both receptors in prostate cells. Despite this, CpdA inhibits DNA-binding and transactivation potential of AR. In addition, CpdA inhibits GR-mediated transactivation but induces GR transrepression via inhibition of several transcription factors, including nuclear factor-kappaB, AP-1, Ets-1, Elk-1, SRF, CRE/ATF, and NFATc. CpdA strongly decreases growth and induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in highly malignant PC3 and DU145 cells and in other AR/GR-expressing PC cells. The cytostatic effect of CpdA is receptor dependent: down-regulation of GR or AR expression drastically attenuates CpdA-induced PC cell growth inhibition. Finally, virtual docking analysis indicates that CpdA shares binding cavities in AR and GR ligand-binding domains with corresponding hormones and forms hydrogen bonds (H-bond) with the same amino acids that are involved in H-bond formation during steroid binding. Overall, our data suggest that CpdA is a unique dual-target steroid receptor modulator that has a high potential for PC therapy. PMID:18559523

  6. 4-methylumbelliferone inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma growth by decreasing IL-6 production and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Piccioni, Flavia; Fiore, Esteban; Bayo, Juan; Atorrasagasti, Catalina; Peixoto, Estanislao; Rizzo, Manglio; Malvicini, Mariana; Tirado-González, Irene; García, Mariana G; Alaniz, Laura; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2015-08-01

    Cirrhosis is characterized by an excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix components including hyaluronic acid (HA) and is widely considered a preneoplastic condition for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). 4-Methylumbelliferone (4MU) is an inhibitor of HA synthesis and has anticancer activity in an orthotopic HCC model with underlying fibrosis. Our aim was to explore the effects of HA inhibition by 4MU orally administered on tumor microenvironment. Hepa129 tumor cells were inoculated orthotopically in C3H/HeJ male mice with fibrosis induced by thioacetamide. Mice were orally treated with 4MU. The effects of 4MU on angiogenesis were evaluated by immunostaining of CD31 and quantification of proangiogenic factors (vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF, interleukin-6, IL-6 and C-X-C motif chemokine 12, CXCL12). IL-6 was also quantified in Hepa129 cells in vitro after treatment with 4MU. Migration of endothelial cells and tube formation were also analyzed. As a result, 4MU treatment decreases tumor growth and increased animal survival. Systemic levels of VEGF were significantly inhibited in 4MU-treated mice. Expression of CD31 was reduced after 4MU therapy in liver parenchyma in comparison with control group. In addition, mRNA expression and protein levels of IL-6 and VEGF were inhibited both in tumor tissue and in nontumoral liver parenchyma. Interestingly, IL-6 production was dramatically reduced in Kupffer cells isolated from 4MU-treated mice, and in Hepa129 cells in vitro. Besides, 4MU was able to inhibit endothelial cell migration and tube formation. In conclusion, 4MU has antitumor activity in vivo and its mechanisms of action involve an inhibition of angiogenesis and IL-6 production. 4MU is an orally available molecule with potential for HCC treatment. PMID:25882295

  7. Boric acid inhibits embryonic histone deacetylases: A suggested mechanism to explain boric acid-related teratogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Di Renzo, Francesca; Cappelletti, Graziella; Broccia, Maria L.; Giavini, Erminio; Menegola, Elena . E-mail: elena.menegola@unimi.it

    2007-04-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) control gene expression by changing histonic as well as non histonic protein conformation. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) are considered to be among the most promising drugs for epigenetic treatment for cancer. Recently a strict relationship between histone hyperacetylation in specific tissues of mouse embryos exposed to two HDACi (valproic acid and trichostatin A) and specific axial skeleton malformations has been demonstrated. The aim of this study is to verify if boric acid (BA), that induces in rodents malformations similar to those valproic acid and trichostatin A-related, acts through similar mechanisms: HDAC inhibition and histone hyperacetylation. Pregnant mice were treated intraperitoneally with a teratogenic dose of BA (1000 mg/kg, day 8 of gestation). Western blot analysis and immunostaining were performed with anti hyperacetylated histone 4 (H4) antibody on embryos explanted 1, 3 or 4 h after treatment and revealed H4 hyperacetylation at the level of somites. HDAC enzyme assay was performed on embryonic nuclear extracts. A significant HDAC inhibition activity (compatible with a mixed type partial inhibition mechanism) was evident with BA. Kinetic analyses indicate that BA modifies substrate affinity by a factor {alpha} = 0.51 and maximum velocity by a factor {beta} = 0.70. This work provides the first evidence for HDAC inhibition by BA and suggests such a molecular mechanism for the induction of BA-related malformations.

  8. Inhibition of ochratoxin A production and growth of Aspergillus species by phenolic antioxidant compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phenolic antioxidants, gallic acid, vanillic acid, protocatechuic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, catechin, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid were studied for their effects on ochratoxin A (OTA) production and fungal growth of ochratoxigenic Aspergilli. Of the 12 strains tested, which included A....

  9. Inhibition of tomato shoot growth by over-irrigation is linked to nitrogen deficiency and ethylene.

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Antje; Dodd, Ian C

    2016-01-01

    Although physiological effects of acute flooding have been well studied, chronic effects of suboptimal soil aeration caused by over-irrigation of containerized plants have not, despite its likely commercial significance. By automatically scheduling irrigation according to soil moisture thresholds, effects of over-irrigation on soil properties (oxygen concentration, temperature and moisture), leaf growth, gas exchange, phytohormone [abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene] relations and nutrient status of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill. cv. Ailsa Craig) were studied. Over-irrigation slowly increased soil moisture and decreased soil oxygen concentration by 4%. Soil temperature was approximately 1C lower in the over-irrigated substrate. Over-irrigating tomato plants for 2 weeks significantly reduced shoot height (by 25%) and fresh weight and total leaf area (by 60-70%) compared with well-drained plants. Over-irrigation did not alter stomatal conductance, leaf water potential or foliar ABA concentrations, suggesting that growth inhibition was not hydraulically regulated or dependent on stomatal closure or changes in ABA. However, over-irrigation significantly increased foliar ethylene emission. Ethylene seemed to inhibit growth, as the partially ethylene-insensitive genotype Never ripe (Nr) was much less sensitive to over-irrigation than the wild type. Over-irrigation induced significant foliar nitrogen deficiency and daily supplementation of small volumes of 10 mM Ca(NO3 )2 to over-irrigated soil restored foliar nitrogen concentrations, ethylene emission and shoot fresh weight of over-irrigated plants to control levels. Thus reduced nitrogen uptake plays an important role in inhibiting growth of over-irrigated plants, in part by stimulating foliar ethylene emission. PMID:25950248

  10. Aspirin Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell and Tumor Growth and Downregulates Specificity Protein (Sp) Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Lee, Syng-Ook; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is highly effective for treating colon cancer patients postdiagnosis; however, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in colon cancer are not well defined. Aspirin and its major metabolite sodium salicylate induced apoptosis and decreased colon cancer cell growth and the sodium salt of aspirin also inhibited tumor growth in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. Colon cancer cell growth inhibition was accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and decreased expression of Sp-regulated gene products including bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, VEGFR1, cyclin D1, c-MET and p65 (NF?B). Moreover, we also showed by RNA interference that ?-catenin, an important target of aspirin in some studies, is an Sp-regulated gene. Aspirin induced nuclear caspase-dependent cleavage of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and this response was related to sequestration of zinc ions since addition of zinc sulfate blocked aspirin-mediated apoptosis and repression of Sp proteins. The results demonstrate an important underlying mechanism of action of aspirin as an anticancer agent and, based on the rapid metabolism of aspirin to salicylate in humans and the high salicylate/aspirin ratios in serum, it is likely that the anticancer activity of aspirin is also due to the salicylate metabolite. PMID:23110215

  11. Inhibition of Growth and Gene Expression by PNA-peptide Conjugates in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Patenge, Nadja; Pappesch, Roberto; Krawack, Franziska; Walda, Claudia; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Jacob, Anette; Hain, Torsten; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    While Streptococcus pyogenes is consistently susceptible toward penicillin, therapeutic failure of penicillin treatment has been reported repeatedly and a considerable number of patients exhibit allergic reactions to this substance. At the same time, streptococcal resistance to alternative antibiotics, e.g., macrolides, has increased. Taken together, these facts demand the development of novel therapeutic strategies. In this study, S. pyogenes growth was inhibited by application of peptide-conjugated antisense-peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) specific for the essential gyrase A gene (gyrA). Thereby, HIV-1 Tat peptide-coupled PNAs were more efficient inhibitors of streptococcal growth as compared with (KFF)3K-coupled PNAs. Peptide-anti-gyrA PNAs decreased the abundance of gyrA transcripts in S. pyogenes. Growth inhibition by antisense interference was enhanced by combination of peptide-coupled PNAs with protein-level inhibitors. Antimicrobial synergy could be detected with levofloxacin and novobiocin, targeting the gyrase enzyme, and with spectinomycin, impeding ribosomal function. The prospective application of carrier peptide-coupled antisense PNAs in S. pyogenes covers the use as an antimicrobial agent and the employment as a knock-down strategy for the investigation of virulence factor function. PMID:24193033

  12. Rice Varietal Differences in Bioactive Bran Components for Inhibition of Colorectal Cancer Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Genevieve M.; Raina, Komal; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Sushil; Agarwal, Rajesh; Chen, Ming-Hsuan; Bauer, John E.; McClung, Anna M.; Ryan, Elizabeth P.

    2013-01-01

    Rice bran chemical profiles differ across rice varieties and have not yet been analyzed for differential chemopreventive bioactivity. A diverse panel of 7 rice bran varieties was analyzed for growth inhibition of human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Inhibition varied from 0–99%, depending on the variety of bran used. Across varieties, total lipid content ranged 5–16%, individual fatty acids had 1.4 to 1.9 fold differences, vitamin E isoforms (α-, γ-, δ- tocotrienols and tocopherols) showed 1.3 to 15.2 fold differences, and differences in γ- oryzanol and total phenolics ranged between 100–275 ng/mg and 57–146 ng GAE/mg, respectively. Spearman correlation analysis was used to identify bioactive compounds implicated in CRC cell growth inhibitory activity. Total phenolics and γ- tocotrienol were positively correlated with reduced CRC cell growth (p < 0.05). Stoichiometric variation in rice bran components and differential effects on CRC viability merit further evaluation elucidate their role in dietary CRC chemoprevention. PMID:23790950

  13. Monochloramine-induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis in a rat gastric mucosal cell line.

    PubMed

    Naito, Y; Yoshikawa, T; Fujii, T; Boku, Y; Yagi, N; Dao, S; Yoshida, N; Kondo, M; Matsui, H; Ohtani-Fujita, N; Sakai, T

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that monochloramine (NH2Cl), a reaction product of NH3 and hypochlorous acid, is involved in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric mucosal damage, but how NH2Cl contributes to lesions is unclear. In the present study, the effects of NH2Cl on mucosal cell growth and the cell cycle were evaluated in vitro using a normal rat gastric mucosal cell line RGM-1. Cell viability was assessed by the Trypan Blue dye exclusion test and cell cycle patterns were determined by DNA labeling with propidium iodide and flow cytometric quantification. NH2Cl inhibited the growth of RGM-1 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Exposure of cells to NH2Cl caused a time- and dose-dependent loss of G1-phase cells with accumulation of G2/M-phase cells, and produced a fraction of subdiploid cells with oligonucleosomal DNA degradation characteristic of apoptosis. NH2Cl-induced apoptosis was confirmed by fluorescent microscopy with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide. These results suggest that NH2Cl inhibits gastric mucosal cell growth and induces apoptosis in RGM-1 cells, events that may be important in gastric mucosal damage or atrophy induced by H. pylori infection. PMID:9479646

  14. Corosolic Acid Inhibits Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Migration by Targeting the VEGFR2/Src/FAK Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chung-Yu; Wang, Ying-Ren; Lin, Hsuan-Yuan; Lu, Shao-Chun; Lin, Jung-Yaw

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of VEGFR2 activity has been proposed as an important strategy for the clinical treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we identified corosolic acid (CA), which exists in the root of Actinidia chinensis, as having a significant anti-cancer effect on HCC cells. We found that CA inhibits VEGFR2 kinase activity by directly interacting with the ATP binding pocket. CA down-regulates the VEGFR2/Src/FAK/cdc42 axis, subsequently decreasing F-actin formation and migratory activity in vitro. In an in vivo model, CA exhibited an effective dose (5 mg/kg/day) on tumor growth. We further demonstrate that CA has a synergistic effect with sorafenib within a wide range of concentrations. In conclusion, this research elucidates the effects and molecular mechanism for CA on HCC cells and suggests that CA could be a therapeutic or adjuvant strategy for patients with aggressive HCC. PMID:25978354

  15. Corosolic Acid Inhibits Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Migration by Targeting the VEGFR2/Src/FAK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Chung-Yu; Wang, Ying-Ren; Lin, Hsuan-Yuan; Lu, Shao-Chun; Lin, Jung-Yaw

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of VEGFR2 activity has been proposed as an important strategy for the clinical treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we identified corosolic acid (CA), which exists in the root of Actinidia chinensis, as having a significant anti-cancer effect on HCC cells. We found that CA inhibits VEGFR2 kinase activity by directly interacting with the ATP binding pocket. CA down-regulates the VEGFR2/Src/FAK/cdc42 axis, subsequently decreasing F-actin formation and migratory activity in vitro. In an in vivo model, CA exhibited an effective dose (5 mg/kg/day) on tumor growth. We further demonstrate that CA has a synergistic effect with sorafenib within a wide range of concentrations. In conclusion, this research elucidates the effects and molecular mechanism for CA on HCC cells and suggests that CA could be a therapeutic or adjuvant strategy for patients with aggressive HCC. PMID:25978354

  16. Betulinic acid, a bioactive pentacyclic triterpenoid, inhibits skeletal-related events induced by breast cancer bone metastases and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Se Young; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Ki Rim; Lee, Sun Kyoung; Lee, Chang Ki; Park, Kwang-Kyun Chung, Won-Yoon

    2014-03-01

    Many breast cancer patients experience bone metastases and suffer skeletal complications. The present study provides evidence on the protective and therapeutic potential of betulinic acid on cancer-associated bone diseases. Betulinic acid is a naturally occurring triterpenoid with the beneficial activity to limit the progression and severity of cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, and obesity. We first investigated its effect on breast cancer cells, osteoblastic cells, and osteoclasts in the vicious cycle of osteolytic bone metastasis. Betulinic acid reduced cell viability and the production of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), a major osteolytic factor, in MDA-MB-231 human metastatic breast cancer cells stimulated with or without tumor growth factor-β. Betulinic acid blocked an increase in the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin ratio by downregulating RANKL protein expression in PTHrP-treated human osteoblastic cells. In addition, betulinic acid inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in murine bone marrow macrophages and decreased the production of resorbed area in plates with a bone biomimetic synthetic surface by suppressing the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and cathepsin K in RANKL-induced osteoclasts. Furthermore, oral administration of betulinic acid inhibited bone loss in mice intra-tibially inoculated with breast cancer cells and in ovariectomized mice causing estrogen deprivation, as supported by the restored bone morphometric parameters and serum bone turnover markers. Taken together, these findings suggest that betulinic acid may have the potential to prevent bone loss in patients with bone metastases and cancer treatment-induced estrogen deficiency. - Highlights: • Betulinic acid reduced PTHrP production in human metastatic breast cancer cells. • Betulinic acid blocked RANKL/OPG ratio in PTHrP-stimulated human osteoblastic cells. • Betulinic acid inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow macrophages. • Betulinic acid decreased bone resorption by suppressing osteoclast activity. • Orally administered betulinic acid inhibited cancer-associated bone diseases in mice.

  17. Perception mechanism of gravity stimuli in hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of azuki bean roots.

    PubMed

    Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Hoson, Takayuki

    2003-10-01

    We reported that elongation growth of plant shoots and roots is suppressed by hypergravity, with the rate decreasing in proportion to logarithm of the magnitude of gravity. In hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of shoots, graviperception is supposed to be independent of that in gravitropism and to involve mechanoreceptors. However, the graviperception mechanism in the hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of roots is not known. In the present study, we compared the mechanism in the hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of roots with that in gravitropism. The removal of root cap did not influence hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of roots, although the gravitropic curvature was completely inhibited. Hypergravity had no effects on growth of azuki bean roots in the presence of lanthanum or gadolinium, which are blockers of mechanoreceptors. On the contrary, lanthanum or gadolinium at the same concentration did not influence gravitropism of roots. These results suggest that the graviperception mechanism in the hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of roots is independent of that in gravitropism. Hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of azuki bean roots was observed irrespective of the direction of stimuli, which disappeared in the presence of lanthanum or gadolinium. Thus, in the hypergravity-induced growth inhibition, roots may perceive the gravity signal by mechanoreceptors on the plasma membrane independently of the direction of stimuli, and may utilize it to regulate their growth rate. PMID:14676362

  18. Streptococcal glycoprotein-induced tumour cell growth inhibition involves the modulation of a pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, J.; Takamura, S.; Suzuki, S.; Nishio, M.

    1996-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of anti-tumour action of sulphydryl glycoprotein (SAGP) purified from an extract of Streptococcus pyogenes in vitro. SAGP rapidly inhibited the incorporation of nucleic acid precursors into murine fibrosarcoma (Meth A) cells before it inhibited the cell growth. SAGP-induced cell growth inhibition was diminished by incubating the cells with pertussis toxin (IAP), whereas the SAGP activity was augmented by incubating the cells with cholera toxin (CTX). Meth A cells exposed to SAGP underwent an increase in labelling of the alpha-subunit of an inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding (Gi) protein in a subsequent IAP-catalysed [32P]ADP ribosylation of the cell membrane fraction. Gi alpha labelling was not increased either in the membrane from the Meth A cells exposed to heat-inactivated SAGP or in the membrane from L929 cells exposed to SAGP, in which growth was also unaffected. By contrast, SAGP caused no alteration in labelling the alpha-subunit of stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding (Gs) protein in a subsequent CTX-catalysed ADP ribosylation of membrane fractions of Meth A and L929 cells. The amount of intracellular cAMP was decreased slightly in Meth A cells incubated with SAGP. Although the precise roles of Gs protein and adenylate cyclase in the cell growth inhibition induced by SAGP are not clear, these findings suggested that the modulation of Gi protein is involved in such SAGP-induced cellular events as the inhibition of nucleic acid synthesis and cell growth inhibition. Images Figure 1 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8611426

  19. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Darin C; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K K; McElwee, Kevin J; Cheng, Kimberly M

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFN? production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51faster), ostrich oil (1.46faster), and rhea oil (1.64faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFN? production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  20. Alpha lipoic acid inhibits proliferation and epithelial mesenchymal transition of thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Min Ji; Kim, Won Gu; Lim, Seonhee; Choi, Hyun-Jeung; Sim, Soyoung; Kim, Tae Yong; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2016-01-01

    The naturally occurring short-chain fatty acid, ?-lipoic acid (ALA) is a powerful antioxidant which is clinically used for treatment of diabetic neuropathy. Recent studies suggested the possibility of ALA as a potential anti-cancer agent, because it could activate adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibit transforming growth factor-? (TGF?) pathway. In this study, we evaluate the effects of ALA on thyroid cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We performed invitro cell proliferation analysis using BCPAP, HTH-83, CAL-62 and FTC-133cells. ALA suppressed thyroid cancer cell proliferation through activation of AMPK and subsequent down-regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-S6 signaling pathway. Low-dose ALA, which had minimal effects on cell proliferation, also decreased cell migration and invasion of BCPAP, CAL-62 and HTH-83cells. ALA inhibited epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) evidently by increase of E-cadherin and decreases of activated ?-catenin, vimentin, snail, and twist in these cells. ALA suppressed TGF? production and inhibited induction of p-Smad2 and twist by TGF?1 or TGF?2. These findings indicate that ALA reduces cancer cell migration and invasion through suppression of TGF? production and inhibition of TGF? signaling pathways in thyroid cancer cells. ALA also significantly suppressed tumor growth in mouse xenograft model using BCPAP and FTC-133cells. This is the first study to show anti-cancer effect of ALA on thyroid cancer cells. ALA could be a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of advanced thyroid cancer, possibly as an adjuvant therapy with other systemic therapeutic agents. PMID:26463583

  1. MECHANISMS OF FLUID SHEAR-INDUCED INHIBITION OF POPULATION GROWTH IN A RED-TIDE DINOFLAGELLATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Net population growth of some dinoflagellates is inhibited by fluid shear at shear stresses comparable with those generated during oceanic turbulence. Decreased net growth may occur through lowered cell division, increased mortality, or both. The dominant mechanism under various ...

  2. Choline inhibition of amino acid transport in preimplantation mouse blastocysts

    SciTech Connect

    Campione, A.L.; Haghighat, N.; Gorman, J.; Van Winkle, L.J.

    1987-05-01

    Addition of 70 mM choline chloride to Brinster's medium (140 mM Na/sup +/) inhibited uptake of approx. 1 ..mu..M (/sup 3/H)glycine, leucine, lysine and alanine in blastocysts by about 50% each during a five-minute incubation period at 37/sup 0/C, whereas 70 mM LiCl, sodium acetate and NaCl or 140 mM mannitol had no effect. They attribute the apparent linear relationship between Gly transport in blastocysts and the square of the (Na/sup +/), observed when choline was substituted for Na/sup +/ in Brinster's medium, to concomitant, concentration-dependent enhancement and inhibition of transport by Na/sup +/ and choline, respectively. As expected, Gly uptake and the (Na/sup +/) were linearly related up to 116 mM Na/sup +/, when Na/sup +/ was replaced with Li/sup +/. The rates of Na/sup +/-independent Gly and Ala uptake were <5% and <2% of the total, respectively, and similar when either Li/sup +/ or choline replaced Na/sup +/. Therefore, neither Li/sup +/ nor choline appears to substitute for Na/sup +/ in supporting Na/sup +/-dependent transport in blastocysts. Na/sup +/-independent Leu uptake was 20 times faster than Gly or Ala uptake and appeared to be inhibited by choline in blastocysts since it was about 37% slower when choline instead of Li/sup +/ was substituted for Na/sup +/. In contrast to blastocysts, choline had no effect on amino acid transport in cleavage-stage mouse embryos. The unexpected sensitivity of transport to choline in blastocysts underscores the importance of testing the effects of this substance when it is used to replace Na/sup +/ in new transport studies.

  3. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa oxyvinylglycine L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid inhibits growth of Erwinia amylovora and acts as a weak seed germination-arrest factor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimetabolite L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB) is demonstrated to share biological activities with 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine, a related molecule produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6. We found that culture filtrates of a P. aeruginosa strain overproduc...

  4. Endothelin inhibits cholangiocarcinoma growth by a decrease in the vascular endothelial growth factor expression

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Giammarco; DeMorrow, Sharon; Gaudio, Eugenio; Franchitto, Antonio; Onori, Paolo; Carpino, Guido; Glaser, Shannon; Francis, Heather; Coufal, Monique; Marucci, Luca; Alvaro, Domenico; Marzioni, Marco; Horst, Trenton; Mancinelli, Romina; Benedetti, Antonio; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2009-01-01

    Background: Endothelins (ET-1, ET-2, ET-3) are peptides with vasoactive properties interacting with ETA and ETB receptors. ET-1 inhibits secretin-stimulated ductal secretion (hallmark of cholangiocyte growth) of cholestatic rats by interaction with ET receptors. Aim: The aims of the studies were to evaluate (i) the effect of ET-1 on cholangiocarcinoma growth in Mz-ChA-1 cells and nude mice and (ii) whether ET-1 regulation of cholangiocarcinoma growth is associated with changes in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), VEGF-C, VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and VEGFR-3. Methods: We determined the expression of ETA and ETB receptors on normal and malignant (Mz-ChA-1) cholangiocytes and human cholangiocarcinoma tissue and the effect of ET-1 on the proliferation and expression of VEGF-A, VEGF-C (regulators of tumour angiogenesis) and its receptors, VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3, in Mz-ChA-1 cells. In vivo, Mz-ChA-1 cells were injected into the flanks of athymic mice and injections of ET-1 or saline into the tumours were performed daily. The effect of ET-1 on tumour size, cell proliferation, apoptosis, collagen quantity and the expression of VEGF-A and VEGF-C and VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3 were measured after 73 days. Results: Higher expression of ETA and ETB was observed in malignant compared with normal cholangiocytes. ET-1 inhibited proliferation and VEGF-A, VEGF-C, VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3 expression of Mz-ChA-1 cells. Chronic ET-1 treatment decreased tumour volume, tumour cell proliferation and VEGF-A and VEGF-C expression but increased apoptosis and collagen tissue deposition compared with controls. Conclusions: Modulation of VEGF-A and VEGF-C (by ET-1) may be important for managing cholangiocarcinoma growth. PMID:19291182

  5. Growth of Steptomyces hygroscopicus in rotating-wall bioreactor under simulated microgravity inhibits rapamycin production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, A.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Demain, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Growth of Streptomyces hygroscopicus under conditions of simulated microgravity in a rotating-wall bioreactor resulted in a pellet form of growth, lowered dry cell weight, and inhibition of rapamycin production. With the addition of Teflon beads to the bioreactor, growth became much less pelleted, dry cell weight increased but rapamycin production was still markedly inhibited. Growth under simulated microgravity favored extracellular production of rapamycin, in contrast to a greater percentage of cell-bound rapamycin observed under normal gravity conditions.

  6. Growth of Streptomyces Hygroscopicus in Rotating-Wall Bioreactor Under Simulated Microgravity Inhibits Rapamycin Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, A.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Demain, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Growth of Streptomyces hygroscopicus under conditions of simulated microgravity in a rotating-wall bioreactor resulted in a pellet form of growth, lowered dry cell weight, and inhibition of rapamycin production. With the addition of Teflon beads to the bioreactor, growth became much less pelleted, dry cell weight increased but rapamycin production was still markedly inhibited. Growth under simulated microgravity favored extracellular production of rapamycin in contrast to a greater percentage of cell-bound rapamycin observed under normal gravity conditions.

  7. Ferulic Acid Exerts Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Tumor Activity by Targeting Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1-Mediated Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang-Wei; Jiang, Jin-Song; Lu, Wei-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Most anti-angiogenic therapies currently being evaluated target the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway; however, the tumor vasculature can acquire resistance to VEGF-targeted therapy by shifting to other angiogenesis mechanisms. Therefore, other therapeutic agents that block non-VEGF angiogenic pathways need to be evaluated. Here, we identified ferulic acid as a novel fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) inhibitor and a novel agent with potential anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer activities. Ferulic acid demonstrated inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation in response to basic fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1). In ex vivo and in vivo angiogenesis assays, ferulic acid suppressed FGF1-induced microvessel sprouting of rat aortic rings and angiogenesis. To understand the underlying molecular basis, we examined the effects of ferulic acid on different molecular components and found that ferulic acid suppressed FGF1-triggered activation of FGFR1 and phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (Akt) signaling. Moreover, ferulic acid directly inhibited proliferation and blocked the PI3K-Akt pathway in melanoma cell. In vivo, using a melanoma xenograft model, ferulic acid showed growth-inhibitory activity associated with inhibition of angiogenesis. Taken together, our results indicate that ferulic acid targets the FGFR1-mediated PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, leading to the suppression of melanoma growth and angiogenesis. PMID:26473837

  8. Effects of Selenium Yeast on Oxidative Stress, Growth Inhibition, and Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chih-Hung; Hsia, Simon; Shih, Min-Yi; Hsieh, Fang-Chin; Chen, Pei-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that selenium (Se) yeast may exhibit potential anti-cancer properties; whereas the precise mechanisms remain unknown. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of Se yeast on oxidative stress, growth inhibition, and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Treatments of ER-positive MCF-7 and triple-negative MDA-MB-231 cells with Se yeast (100, 750, and 1500 ng Se/mL), methylseleninic acid (MSA, 1500 ng Se/mL), or methylselenocysteine (MSC, 1500 ng Se/mL) at a time course experiment (at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h) were analyzed. Se yeast inhibited the growth of these cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Compared with the same level of MSA, cancer cells exposure to Se yeast exhibited a lower growth-inhibitory response. The latter has also lower superoxide production and reduced antioxidant enzyme activities. Furthermore, MSA (1500 ng Se/mL)-exposed non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) have a significant growth inhibitory effect, but not Se yeast and MSC. Compared with MSA, Se yeast resulted in a greater increase in the early apoptosis in MCF-7 cells as well as a lower proportion of early and late apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, nuclear morphological changes and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were observed. In conclusion, a dose of 100 to 1500 ng Se/mL of Se yeast can increase oxidative stress, and stimulate growth inhibitory effects and apoptosis induction in breast cancer cell lines, but does not affect non-tumorigenic cells. PMID:26392813

  9. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Sano, Michael B; Arena, Christopher B; Bittleman, Katelyn R; DeWitt, Matthew R; Cho, Hyung J; Szot, Christopher S; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W; Davalos, Rafael V

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250 ns and 100 ?s and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100 ?s, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5 ?s in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models. PMID:26459930

  10. Inhibition of Trypanosoma cruzi growth by medical plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Schinella, G R; Tournier, H A; Prieto, J M; Ros, J L; Buschiazzo, H; Zaidenberg, A

    2002-12-01

    This study describes the screening of extracts obtained from 18 plants and two fungi used in the Chinese and Mediterranean traditional medicines on epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. The extracts were tested against epimastigote of T. cruzi Bra C15C2 clone in vitro at 27 degrees C and at a concentration of 250 microg/ml in axenic culture. Angelica dahurica, A. pubescens, A. sinensis, Astragalus membranaceus, Coptis chinensis, Haplophyllum hispanicum, Phellodendron amurense, Poria cocos, Ranunculus sceleratus and Scutellaria baicalensis showed significant effects against the parasite with a percentage of growth inhibition between 20 and 100%. C. chinensis and R. sceleratus showed the greatest activity with IC(50) values of 1.7 microg/ml for C. chinensis and 10.7 microg/ml for R. sceleratus. These activities are greater than that of allopurinol. C. chinesis and R. sceleratus extracts did not show cytotoxic effects on rat polimorphonuclear cells using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and lactic dehydrogenase assays. These results allowed us to suggest that R. sceleratus and C. chinensis could be a source of new compounds clinically active against T. cruzi. PMID:12490214

  11. Further evidence that naphthoquinone inhibits Toxoplasma gondii growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Luciana Lemos Rangel; Portes, Juliana de Araujo; de Araújo, Marlon Heggdorne; Silva, Jéssica Lays Sant'ana; Rennó, Magdalena Nascimento; Netto, Chaquip Daher; da Silva, Alcides José Monteiro; Costa, Paulo Roberto Ribeiro; De Souza, Wanderley; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; DaMatta, Renato Augusto

    2015-12-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a widely disseminated disease caused by Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular protozoan parasite. Standard treatment causes many side effects, such as depletion of bone marrow cells, skin rashes and gastrointestinal implications. Therefore, it is necessary to find chemotherapeutic alternatives for the treatment of this disease. It was shown that a naphthoquinone derivative compound is active against T. gondii, RH strain, with an IC50 around 2.5 μM. Here, three different naphthoquinone derivative compounds with activity against leukemia cells and breast carcinoma cell were tested against T. gondii (RH strain) infected LLC-MK2 cell line. All the compounds were able to inhibit parasite growth in vitro, but one of them showed an IC50 activity below 1 μM after 48 h of treatment. The compounds showed low toxicity to the host cell. In addition, these compounds were able to induce tachyzoite-bradyzoite conversion confirmed by morphological changes, Dolichus biflorus lectin cyst wall labeling and characterization of amylopectin granules in the parasites by electron microscopy analysis using the Thierry technique. Furthermore, the compounds induced alterations on the ultrastructure of the parasite. Taken together, our results point to the naphthoquinone derivative (LQB 151) as a potential compound for the development of new drugs for the treatment of toxoplasmosis. PMID:26335616

  12. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Michael B.; Arena, Christopher B.; Bittleman, Katelyn R.; DeWitt, Matthew R.; Cho, Hyung J.; Szot, Christopher S.; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M.; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250 ns and 100 μs and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100 μs, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5 μs in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models. PMID:26459930

  13. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Michael B.; Arena, Christopher B.; Bittleman, Katelyn R.; Dewitt, Matthew R.; Cho, Hyung J.; Szot, Christopher S.; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M.; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2015-10-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250 ns and 100 μs and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100 μs, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5 μs in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models.

  14. Growth Hormone Inhibits Hepatic De Novo Lipogenesis in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Cordoba-Chacon, Jose; Majumdar, Neena; List, Edward O; Diaz-Ruiz, Alberto; Frank, Stuart J; Manzano, Anna; Bartrons, Ramon; Puchowicz, Michelle; Kopchick, John J; Kineman, Rhonda D

    2015-09-01

    Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are reported to have low growth hormone (GH) production and/or hepatic GH resistance. GH replacement can resolve the fatty liver condition in diet-induced obese rodents and in GH-deficient patients. However, it remains to be determined whether this inhibitory action of GH is due to direct regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism. Therefore, an adult-onset, hepatocyte-specific, GH receptor (GHR) knockdown (aLivGHRkd) mouse was developed to model hepatic GH resistance in humans that may occur after sexual maturation. Just 7 days after aLivGHRkd, hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) was increased in male and female chow-fed mice, compared with GHR-intact littermate controls. However, hepatosteatosis developed only in male and ovariectomized female aLivGHRkd mice. The increase in DNL observed in aLivGHRkd mice was not associated with hyperactivation of the pathway by which insulin is classically considered to regulate DNL. However, glucokinase mRNA and protein levels as well as fructose-2,6-bisphosphate levels were increased in aLivGHRkd mice, suggesting that enhanced glycolysis drives DNL in the GH-resistant liver. These results demonstrate that hepatic GH actions normally serve to inhibit DNL, where loss of this inhibitory signal may explain, in part, the inappropriate increase in hepatic DNL observed in NAFLD patients. PMID:26015548

  15. Inhibition of norsolorinic acid accumulation to Aspergillus parasiticus by marine actinomycetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peisheng; Shi, Cuijuan; Shen, Jihong; Wang, Kai; Gao, Xiujun; Li, Ping

    2014-11-01

    Thirty-six strains of marine actinomycetes were isolated from a sample of marine sediment collected from the Yellow Sea and evaluated in terms of their inhibitory activity on the growth of Aspergillus parasiticus and the production of norsolorinic acid using dual culture plate assay and agar diffusion methods. Among them, three strains showed strong antifungal activity and were subsequently identified as Streptomyces sp. by 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. The supernatant from the fermentation of the MA01 strain was extracted sequentially with chloroform and ethyl acetate, and the activities of the extracts were determined by tip culture assay. The assay results show that both extracts inhibited mycelium growth and toxin production, and the inhibitory activities of the extracts increased as their concentrations increased. The results of this study suggest that marine actinomycetes are biologically important for the control of mycotoxins, and that these bacteria could be used as novel biopesticides against mycotoxins.

  16. Fibroblast growth factor 7 inhibits cholesterol 7{alpha}-hydroxylase gene expression in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhichao; Yu, Xuemei; Wu, Weibin; Jia, Dongwei; Chen, Yinle; Ji, Lingling; Liu, Xijun; Peng, Xiaomin; Li, Yintao; Yang, Lili; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin; Ren, Shifang; Zhang, Songwen

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FGF7 strongly and rapidly down-regulates the expression of CYP7A1 in hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FGF7 suppresses the expression of CYP7A1 via FGFR2 and downstream JNK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blocking FGF7 abrogates HSC-induced inhibition of CYP7A1 expression in hepatocytes. -- Abstract: Cholesterol 7{alpha}-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is the initial and rate-limiting enzyme for bile acid synthesis. Transcription of the CYP7A1 gene is regulated by bile acids, nuclear receptors and cytokines. Fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF7) secreted from activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) during chronic liver fibrosis regulates hepatocyte survival and liver regeneration. In the carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4})-induced fibrotic mouse liver, we demonstrated that the expression of CYP7A1 was largely decreased while the expression of FGF7 was significantly increased. We further demonstrated that FGF7 inhibited CYP7A1 gene expression in hepatocytes. Knockdown study by short interfering RNA, kinase inhibition and phosphorylation assays revealed that the suppression of CYP7A1 expression by FGF7 was mediated by FGFR2 and its downstream JNK signaling cascade. The FGF7 neutralizing antibody restored CYP7A1 expression in Hep3B cells treated with conditioned medium from HSC. In summary, the data suggest that FGF7 is a novel regulator of CYP7A1 expression in hepatocytes and may prevent hepatocytes from accumulating toxic bile acids during liver injury and fibrosis.

  17. Differential Inhibition by Ferulic Acid of Nitrate and Ammonium Uptake in Zea mays L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Bergmark, Christine L.; Jackson, William A.; Volk, Richard J.; Blum, Udo

    1992-01-01

    The influence of the allelopathic compound ferulic acid (FA) on nitrogen uptake from solutions containing both NO3− and NH4+ was examined in 8-day-old nitrogen-depleted corn (Zea mays L.) seedlings. Concurrent effects on uptake of Cl− and K+ also were assessed. The presence of 250 micromolar FA inhibited the initial (0-1 hours) rate of NO3− uptake and also prevented development of the NO3−-inducible accelerated rate. The pattern of recovery when FA was removed was interpreted as indicating a rapid relief of FA-restricted NO3− uptake activity, followed by a reinitiation of the induction of that activity. No inhibition of NO3− reduction was detected. Ammonium uptake was less sensitive than NO3− uptake to inhibition by FA. An inhibition of Cl− uptake occurred as induction of the NO3− transport system developed in the absence of FA. Alterations of Cl− uptake in the presence of FA were, therefore, a result of a beneficial effect, because NO3− uptake was restricted, and a direct inhibitory effect. The presence of FA increased the initial net K+ loss from the roots during exposure to the low K, ammonium nitrate uptake solution and delayed the recovery to positive net uptake, but it did not alter the general pattern of the response. The implications of the observations are discussed for growth of plants under natural conditions and cultural practices that foster periodic accumulation of allelopathic substances. PMID:16668689

  18. Peroxynitrite modulates acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1) activity.

    PubMed

    Bagnasco, Patricia; MacMillan-Crow, Lee Ann; Greendorfer, Jessica S; Young, Carlton J; Andrews, Lori; Thompson, John A

    2003-11-15

    To establish peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) as a mediator of acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1) function, preparations of recombinant human FGF-1 were treated with the pro-oxidant in vitro and identified amino acid modifications were correlated with biologic activity. The sequence of FGF-1 amino acid modifications induced by increasing concentrations of ONOO(-) was from cysteine oxidation to dityrosine formation, and to tyrosine/tryptophan nitration. Low steady-state ONOO(-) concentrations (10-50 microM) induced formation of dityrosine, which involved less than 0.1% of the total tyrosines. Treatment of FGF-1 with ONOO(-) induced a dose-dependent (10-50 microM) loss of sulfhydryl groups that correlated with formation of reducible (dithiothreitol, arsenite) FGF-1 aggregates containing 50% latent biologic activity. Treatment with 0.1-0.5mM ONOO(-) induced increasing formation of non-reducible, inactivated FGF-1 structures. Combination of real-time spectral analysis and electrospray mass spectroscopy revealed that six residues (Y29, Y69, Y108, Y111, Y139, and W121) were nitrated by ONOO(-). ONOO(-) treatment (0.1mM) of an active FGF-1 mutant (cysteines converted to serines) induced dose-dependent, non-reversible inhibition of biologic activity that correlated with nitration of Y108 and Y111, both of which reside within a conserved domain encompassing the putative FGF-1 receptor binding site. Collectively, these observations predict a role for low levels of ONOO(-) during secretion of FGF-1 as an extracellular complex containing latent biologic activity. High steady-state levels of ONOO(-) may induce extensive cysteine oxidation, critical tyrosine nitration, and non-reversible inactivation of FGF-1, a potential inhibitory feedback mechanism restoring cellular homeostatis during the resolution of inflammation and repair. PMID:14592461

  19. Fatty acid esters produced by Lasiodiplodia theobromae function as growth regulators in tobacco seedlings.

    PubMed

    Uranga, Carla C; Beld, Joris; Mrse, Anthony; Córdova-Guerrero, Iván; Burkart, Michael D; Hernández-Martínez, Rufina

    2016-04-01

    The Botryosphaeriaceae are a family of trunk disease fungi that cause dieback and death of various plant hosts. This work sought to characterize fatty acid derivatives in a highly virulent member of this family, Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of an isolated compound revealed (Z, Z)-9,12-ethyl octadecadienoate, (trivial name ethyl linoleate), as one of the most abundant fatty acid esters produced by L. theobromae. A variety of naturally produced esters of fatty acids were identified in Botryosphaeriaceae. In comparison, the production of fatty acid esters in the soil-borne tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, and the non-phytopathogenic fungus Trichoderma asperellum was found to be limited. Ethyl linoleate, ethyl hexadecanoate (trivial name ethyl palmitate), and ethyl octadecanoate, (trivial name ethyl stearate), significantly inhibited tobacco seed germination and altered seedling leaf growth patterns and morphology at the highest concentration (0.2 mg/mL) tested, while ethyl linoleate and ethyl stearate significantly enhanced growth at low concentrations, with both still inducing growth at 98 ng/mL. This work provides new insights into the role of naturally esterified fatty acids from L. theobromae as plant growth regulators with similar activity to the well-known plant growth regulator gibberellic acid. PMID:26926564

  20. Inhibition of Akt inhibits growth of glioblastoma and glioblastoma stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Gallia, Gary L; Tyler, Betty M; Hann, Christine L; Siu, I-Mei; Giranda, Vincent L; Vescovi, Angelo L; Brem, Henry; Riggins, Gregory J

    2009-02-01

    A commonly activated signaling cascade in many human malignancies, including glioblastoma multiforme, is the Akt pathway. This pathway can be activated via numerous upstream alterations including genomic amplification of epidermal growth factor receptor, PTEN deletion, or PIK3CA mutations. In this study, we screened phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt small-molecule inhibitors in an isogenic cell culture system with an activated Akt pathway secondary to a PIK3CA mutation. One small molecule, A-443654, showed the greatest selective inhibition of cells with the mutant phenotype. Based on these findings, this inhibitor was screened in vitro against a panel of glioblastoma multiforme cell lines. All cell lines tested were sensitive to A-443654 with a mean IC(50) of approximately 150 nmol/L. An analogue of A-443654, methylated at a region that blocks Akt binding, was on average 36-fold less active. Caspase assays and dual flow cytometric analysis showed an apoptotic mechanism of cell death. A-443654 was further tested in a rat intracranial model of glioblastoma multiforme. Animals treated intracranially with polymers containing A-443654 had significantly extended survival compared with control animals; animals survived 79% and 43% longer than controls when A-443654-containing polymers were implanted simultaneously or in a delayed fashion, respectively. This small molecule also inhibited glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells with similar efficacy compared with traditionally cultured glioblastoma multiforme cell lines. These results suggest that local delivery of an Akt small-molecule inhibitor is effective against experimental intracranial glioma, with no observed resistance to glioblastoma multiforme cells grown in stem cell conditions. PMID:19208828

  1. ROLE OF ETHYLENE IN NAPHTHALENE-MEDIATED SPROUT GROWTH INHIBITION IN POTATO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of substituted naphthalenes reversibly inhibit potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) sprout growth and may have potential as commercial sprout inhibitors. Sprout growth is also reversibly inhibited by ethylene treatment and ethylene production is often stimulated by xenobiotics. The role of endog...

  2. Inhibition of bacterial, fungal and plant growth by testa extracts of Citrullus genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum & Nakai) seed exudates inhibit germination and seedling growth of several plant species and growth of pathogenic fungi and bacteria. This study was conducted to determine if extractable components in testae contribute to the inhibition. T...

  3. Compounds in a particular production lot of tryptic soy broth inhibit Staphylococcus aureus cell growth.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Masaki; Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus Newman strain and several methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clinical isolates were grown on agar plates prepared with conventional lots of tryptic soy broth (TSB). Cell growth of these strains was inhibited on agar plates containing TSB of a particular product lot (lot A), whereas the cell growth of S. aureus RN4220 strain and several other MRSA clinical isolates was not inhibited. The cell growth of a strain of S. epidermidis was also inhibited on agar plates containing TSB of lot A, whereas the cell growth of Bacillus subtilis, Lactococcus lactis, Klebsiella pneumonia, Salmonella enterica, Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli was not inhibited. Although cell growth of the Newman strain was inhibited on agar plates containing TSB of lot A that was autoclaved in stainless steel or glass containers, cell growth inhibition was not observed when the medium was autoclaved in polypropylene containers. Compounds that inhibited the cell growth of the Newman strain were extracted from a polypropylene tube that was preincubated with liquid medium prepared from TSB of lot A. These findings suggest that polypropylene-binding compounds in TSB of lot A inhibited the cell growth of S. aureus Newman strain, some MRSA clinical isolates, and S. epidermidis. PMID:26193939

  4. Suberoyl bishydroxamic acid inhibits cellular proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest in carcinoid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Greenblatt, David Yu; Cayo, Max; Ning, Li; Jaskula-Sztul, Renata; Haymart, Megan; Kunnimalaiyaan, Muthusamy; Chen, Herbert

    2007-11-01

    Carcinoid cancers arise from the neuroendocrine cell system of the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, and other organs. Hepatic metastases are common, and patients often suffer from endocrinopathies secondary to tumor secretion of various hormones and peptides. As complete surgical resection is often not possible because of widespread disease, new therapeutic and palliative treatments are needed. In this study, we characterized the effects of suberoyl bishydroxamic acid (SBHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on the growth and neuroendocrine phenotype of carcinoid cancer cells. SBHA treatment of human gastrointestinal and pulmonary carcinoid cancer cells resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Western blot analysis showed a decrease in cyclin D1 and an increase in p21 and p27, indicating that the mechanism of this growth inhibition is cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, SBHA treatment suppressed two neuroendocrine tumor markers, chromogranin A and achaete-scute complex-like 1. These changes in the growth and neuroendocrine phenotype of carcinoid cells were associated with activation of the Notch1 signaling cascade. We conclude that SBHA shows promise as a potential anticancer agent for the treatment of patients with advanced carcinoid tumor disease. PMID:17874277

  5. Inhibiting Plasmodium falciparum growth and heme detoxification pathway using heme-binding DNA aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Niles, Jacquin C.; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    The human parasite Plasmodium falciparum enzymatically digests hemoglobin during its intra-erythrocytic developmental stages in acidic food vacuole compartments. The released heme is rapidly detoxified by polymerization into the chemically inert pigment, hemozoin. Several heme-binding anti-malarial compounds, such as chloroquine, efficiently inhibit this process, and this is believed to be the predominant mechanism by which these drugs induce parasite toxicity. In an effort to expand the biochemical tools available for exploration of this pathogen's basic biology, we chose this heme-detoxification pathway as a model system for exploring the suitability of DNA aptamers for modulating this essential parasite biochemical pathway. In this report, we demonstrate that heme-binding DNA aptamers efficiently inhibit in vitro hemozoin formation catalyzed by either a model lipid system or parasite-derived extracts just as or more potently than chloroquine. Furthermore, when parasites are grown in red cells loaded with heme-binding aptamers, their growth is significantly inhibited relative to parasites exposed to non-heme-binding DNA oligonucleotides. Both the timing of parasite-induced toxicity and the concentration of heme-binding aptamer required for inducing toxicity correlate well with the uptake of red cell cytosolic components by the parasite, and the requirement for compounds with similar in vitro hemozoin inhibitory potency to preconcentrate within the parasite before observing toxicity. Thus, these heme-binding aptamers recapitulate the in vitro hemozoin inhibition activity and induce parasite toxicity in a manner consistent with inhibition of this pathway. Altogether, these data demonstrate that aptamers can be versatile tools with applicability in functionally dissecting important P. falciparum-specific pathways both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:19633187

  6. The inhibition of two steroid-activated nicotinamideadenine dinucleotide (phosphate) transhydrogenases by folic acid and folic acid antimetabolites

    PubMed Central

    Mainwaring, W. I. P.; Williams, D. C.

    1965-01-01

    1. It was found that steroid-mediated nicotinamideadenine dinucleotide (phosphate) transhydrogenases can be inhibited in vitro by folic acid and its antimetabolites. The most potent inhibitor was methotrexate, a drug with a high therapeutic index against experimental cancer. 2. The inhibitions produced by a combination of folic acid and the analogues were additive, as were those between the folic acid compounds and antagonistic steroid hormones. PMID:14340071

  7. Bile acid signaling pathways increase stability of Small Heterodimer Partner (SHP) by inhibiting ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ji; Xiao, Zhen; Kanamaluru, Deepthi; Min, Gyesik; Yau, Peter M; Veenstra, Timothy D; Ellis, Ewa; Strom, Steve; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H Eric; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2009-04-15

    Small Heterodimer Partner (SHP) inhibits activities of numerous transcription factors involved in diverse biological pathways. As an important metabolic regulator, SHP plays a key role in maintaining cholesterol and bile acid homeostasis by inhibiting cholesterol conversion to bile acids. While SHP gene induction by increased bile acids is well established, whether SHP activity is also modulated remains unknown. Here, we report surprising findings that SHP is a rapidly degraded protein via the ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway and that bile acids or bile acid-induced intestinal fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) increases stability of hepatic SHP by inhibiting proteasomal degradation in an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent manner. SHP was ubiquitinated at Lys122 and Lys123, and mutation of these sites altered its stability and repression activity. Tandem mass spectrometry revealed that upon bile acid treatment, SHP was phosphorylated at Ser26, within an ERK motif in SHP, and mutation of this site dramatically abolished SHP stability. Surprisingly, SHP stability was abnormally elevated in ob/ob mice and diet-induced obese mice. These results demonstrate an important role for regulation of SHP stability in bile acid signaling in normal conditions, and that abnormal stabilization of SHP may be associated with metabolic disorders, including obesity and diabetes. PMID:19390091

  8. Growth Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 by D-tryptophan as an incompatible solute.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Shigenobu; Nakamura, Nobutaka; Shiina, Takeo

    2015-04-01

    Under osmotic stress, bacterial cells uptake compatible solutes such as glycine-betaine to maintain homeostasis. It is unknown whether incompatible solutes exist that are similar in structure to compatible solutes but have adverse physiological effects on bacterial physiology. The objective of this study was to evaluate solute incompatibility of various amino acids against bacterial growth. Bacterial growth was evaluated by changes in optical density at 595 nm in peptone-yeast-glucose (PYG) broth. Twenty-three amino acids with L and/or D isomers were examined for the effect of bacterial growth inhibition. Among the various amino acids examined, D-tryptophan (? 40 mM) in PYG broth supplemented with 0 to 4% (wt/vol) salt inhibited the growth of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 at 25 C. D-Tryptophan (30 to 40 mM) completely inhibited the growth of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella in the presence of >3% salt, but the growth of L. monocytogenes was not completely inhibited under the same conditions. Low concentrations of salt (0 to 2% NaCl) with D-tryptophan did not significantly inhibit the growth of all bacteria except L. monocytogenes, which was relatively inhibited at 0% NaCl. The effect of D-tryptophan differed depending on the bacterial species, illustrating the difference between gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. These results indicate that the uptake of D-tryptophan as a compatible solute during osmotic stress may inhibit bacterial growth. The antibacterial effect of D-tryptophan found in this study suggests that D-tryptophan could be used as a novel preservative for controlling bacterial growth in foods. PMID:25836411

  9. Beyond plant defense: insights on the potential of salicylic and methylsalicylic acid to contain growth of the phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Dieryckx, Cindy; Gaudin, Vanessa; Dupuy, Jean-William; Bonneu, Marc; Girard, Vincent; Job, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Using Botrytis cinerea we confirmed in the present work several previous studies showing that salicylic acid, a main plant hormone, inhibits fungal growth in vitro. Such an inhibitory effect was also observed for the two salicylic acid derivatives, methylsalicylic and acetylsalicylic acid. In marked contrast, 5-sulfosalicylic acid was totally inactive. Comparative proteomics from treated vs. control mycelia showed that both the intracellular and extracellular proteomes were affected in the presence of salicylic acid or methylsalicylic acid. These data suggest several mechanisms that could potentially account for the observed fungal growth inhibition, notably pH regulation, metal homeostasis, mitochondrial respiration, ROS accumulation and cell wall remodeling. The present observations support a role played by the phytohormone SA and derivatives in directly containing the pathogen. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002873. PMID:26528317

  10. Inhibitory effects of several saturated fatty acids and their related fatty alcohols on the growth of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Kazumi; Takahashi, Miki; Yui, Satoru; Abe, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effect of 5 saturated fatty acids and their related alcohols on the growth of Candida albicans. The inhibitory effects of these compounds against the yeast and hyphal growth forms of C. albicans were examined using the modified NCCLS method and crystal violet staining, respectively. Among these compounds, capric acid inhibited both types of growth at the lowest concentration. The IC80, i.e., the concentration at which the compounds reduced the growth of C. albicans by 80% in comparison with the growth of control cells, of capric acid for the hyphal growth of this fungus, which is indispensable for its mucosal invasion, was 16.7 ?M. These fatty acids, including capric acid, have an unpleasant smell, which may limit their therapeutic use. To test them at reduced concentrations, the combined effect of these fatty acids and oligonol, a depolymerized polyphenol, was evaluated in vitro. These combinations showed potent synergistic inhibition of hyphal growth [fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index = 0.319]. Our results demonstrated that capric acid combined with oligonol could be used as an effective anti-Candida compound. It may be a candidate prophylactic or therapeutic tool against mucosal Candida infection. PMID:26781922

  11. Possible involvement of delta-6-desaturase in control of melanoma growth by gamma-linolenic acid.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, N S; Duncan, J R

    1991-03-01

    This study examined the effects of linoleic acid (LA) and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) on BL6 melanoma growth in cell culture and of safflower oil (SFO) which contains LA and evening primrose oil (EPO) which contains GLA, on melanoma growth when grown in mice. The delta-6-desaturase activity of the melanoma cells in the two systems was also examined and an attempt made to relate the activity of the enzyme to the effects of GLA on cell and tumour growth. LA and GLA were found to be equipotent in inhibiting growth of the in vitro cultured BL6 cells which were found to contain an appreciable level of delta-6-desaturase activity. EPO was however found to be a more potent promoter of in vivo melanoma growth in mice than SFO. Melanomas grown in mice were found to lack delta-6-desaturase activity suggesting that the EPO diet, by providing GLA, was able to compensate for the loss of enzyme activity in the melanomas. The possibility that melanomas in mice have a requirement for GLA for growth while in in vitro cultured cells excess GLA inhibits the growth of the cells through an increase in lipid peroxidation is discussed. PMID:1650000

  12. Amino acids and insulin in neonatal growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rate of growth during the neonatal period is greater than at any other stage of postnatal life, and a majority of the mass increase is skeletal muscle. The rapid growth of skeletal muscle in the neonate is driven by an elevated rate of protein synthesis. Neonates are very efficient at utilizin...

  13. Expansins are involved in cell growth mediated by abscisic acid and indole-3-acetic acid under drought stress in wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mei-rong; Han, Yang-yang; Feng, Ya-nan; Li, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2012-04-01

    Expansin protein is a component of the cell wall generally accepted to be the key regulator of cell wall extension during plant growth. Plant hormones regulate expansin gene expression as well as plant growth during drought stress. However, the relationship between expansin and plant hormone is far from clear. Here, we studied the involvement of expansin in plant cell growth mediated by the hormones indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and abscisic acid (ABA) under osmotic stress which was induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG)-6000. Wheat coleoptiles from a drought-resistant cultivar HF9703 and a drought-sensitive cultivar 921842 were used to evaluate cell growth and expansin activity. Osmotic stress induced the accumulation of ABA. ABA induced expansin activity mainly by enhancing expansin expression, since ABA induced cell wall basification via decreasing plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity, which was unfavorable for expansin activity. Although ABA induced expansin activity and cell wall extension, treatment with exogenous ABA and/or fluridone (FLU, an ABA inhibitor) suggested that ABA was involved in the coleoptile growth inhibition during osmotic stress. IAA application to detached coleoptiles also enhanced coleoptile growth and increased expansin activity, but unlike ABA, IAA-induced expansin activity was mainly due to the decrease of cell wall pH by increasing plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity. Compared with drought-sensitive cultivar, the drought-resistant cultivar could maintain greater expansin activity and cell wall extension, which was contributive to its resultant faster growth under water stress. PMID:22076248

  14. Inhibition by a retinoic acid receptor ? agonist of extracellular matrix remodeling mediated by human Tenon fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Orita, Tomoko; Suzuki, Katsuyoshi; Teranishi, Shinichiro; Mori, Takuya; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Scar formation is most frequently responsible for the failure of glaucoma filtration surgery. Retinoic acids are vitamin A derivatives that play diverse roles in development, immunity, and tissue repair. The effects of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) ? agonist R667 on the contractility of human Tenon fibroblasts (HTFs) cultured in a three-dimensional collagen gel as well as on intraocular pressure (IOP) in a rat model of glaucoma filtration surgery were investigated. Methods HTFs were cultured in a type I collagen gel, the contraction of which was evaluated by measurement of the gel diameter. The release of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) into culture supernatants was assessed with immunoblot analysis and gelatin zymography. Phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was examined with immunoblot analysis, and production of fibronectin and type I collagen was measured with immunoassays. Results R667 inhibited transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1)-induced collagen gel contraction mediated by HTFs in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, whereas an RAR? agonist inhibited this process to a lesser extent and an RAR? agonist had no effect. TGF-?1-induced MMP-1 and MMP-3 release, FAK phosphorylation, and fibronectin and type I collagen production in HTFs were also attenuated by R667. Furthermore, R667 lowered IOP in rats after glaucoma filtration surgery. Conclusions R667 inhibited TGF-?1-induced contraction and extracellular matrix synthesis in HTFs. Such effects might have contributed to the lowering of IOP by R667 in a rat model of glaucoma filtration surgery. RAR? agonists might thus prove effective for inhibition of scar formation after such surgery. PMID:26788029

  15. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella by combinations of oriental mustard, malic acid, and EDTA.

    PubMed

    Olaimat, Amin N; Holley, Richard A

    2014-04-01

    The antimicrobial activities of oriental mustard extract alone or combined with malic acid and EDTA were investigated against Salmonella spp. or Listeria monocytogenes at different temperatures. Five strain Salmonella or L. monocytogenes cocktails were separately inoculated in Brain Heart Infusion broth containing 0.5% (w/v) aqueous oriental mustard extract and incubated at 4 C to 21 C for 21 d. For inhibitor combination tests, Salmonella Typhimurium 02:8423 and L. monocytogenes 2-243 were individually inoculated in Mueller Hinton broth containing the mustard extract with either or both 0.2% (w/v) malic acid and 0.2% (w/v) EDTA and incubated at 10 C or 21 C for 10 to 14 d. Mustard extract inhibited growth of the L. monocytogenes cocktail at 4 C up to 21 d (2.3 log10 CFU/mL inhibition) or at 10 C for 7 d (2.4 log10 CFU/mL inhibition). Salmonella spp. viability was slightly, but significantly reduced by mustard extract at 4 C by 21 d. Although hydrolysis of sinigrin in mustard extract by both pathogens was 2 to 6 times higher at 21 C than at 4 C to 10 C, mustard was not inhibitory at 21 C, perhaps because of the instability of its hydrolysis product (allyl isothiocyanate). At 21 C, additive inhibitory effects of mustard extract with EDTA or malic acid led to undetectable levels of S. Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes by 7 d and 10 d, respectively. At 10 C, S. Typhimurium was similarly susceptible, but combinations of antimicrobials were not more inhibitory to L. monocytogenes than the individual agents. PMID:24649979

  16. Inhibition of Fatty Acid Oxidation Modulates Immunosuppressive Functions of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Enhances Cancer Therapies.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Fokhrul; Al-Khami, Amir A; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Hernandez, Claudia; Zheng, Liqin; Reiss, Krzystoff; Valle, Luis Del; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Maj, Tomasz; Zou, Weiping; Rodriguez, Paulo C; Ochoa, Augusto C

    2015-11-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) promote tumor growth by inhibiting T-cell immunity and promoting malignant cell proliferation and migration. The therapeutic potential of blocking MDSC in tumors has been limited by their heterogeneity, plasticity, and resistance to various chemotherapy agents. Recent studies have highlighted the role of energy metabolic pathways in the differentiation and function of immune cells; however, the metabolic characteristics regulating MDSC remain unclear. We aimed to determine the energy metabolic pathway(s) used by MDSC, establish its impact on their immunosuppressive function, and test whether its inhibition blocks MDSC and enhances antitumor therapies. Using several murine tumor models, we found that tumor-infiltrating MDSC (T-MDSC) increased fatty acid uptake and activated fatty acid oxidation (FAO). This was accompanied by an increased mitochondrial mass, upregulation of key FAO enzymes, and increased oxygen consumption rate. Pharmacologic inhibition of FAO blocked immune inhibitory pathways and functions in T-MDSC and decreased their production of inhibitory cytokines. FAO inhibition alone significantly delayed tumor growth in a T-cell-dependent manner and enhanced the antitumor effect of adoptive T-cell therapy. Furthermore, FAO inhibition combined with low-dose chemotherapy completely inhibited T-MDSC immunosuppressive effects and induced a significant antitumor effect. Interestingly, a similar increase in fatty acid uptake and expression of FAO-related enzymes was found in human MDSC in peripheral blood and tumors. These results support the possibility of testing FAO inhibition as a novel approach to block MDSC and enhance various cancer therapies. PMID:26025381

  17. Failure of Amino Acid Homeostasis Causes Cell Death following Proteasome Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Suraweera, Amila; Mnch, Christian; Hanssum, Ariane; Bertolotti, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Summary The ubiquitin-proteasome system targets many cellular proteins for degradation and thereby controls most cellular processes. Although it is well established that proteasome inhibition is lethal, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we show that proteasome inhibition results in a lethal amino acid shortage. In yeast, mammalian cells, and flies, the deleterious consequences of proteasome inhibition are rescued by amino acid supplementation. In all three systems, this rescuing effect occurs without noticeable changes in the levels of proteasome substrates. In mammalian cells, the amino acid scarcity resulting from proteasome inhibition is the signal that causes induction of both the integrated stress response and autophagy, in an unsuccessful attempt to replenish the pool of intracellular amino acids. These results reveal that cells can tolerate protein waste, but not the amino acid scarcity resulting from proteasome inhibition. PMID:22959274

  18. Meclofenamic Acid for Inhibition of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Migration: An In Vitro Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schober, Wolfgang; Kehlbach, Rainer; Gebert, Regina; Wiskirchen, Jakub; Rodegerdts, Enno; Claussen, Claus D.; Duda, Stephan H.

    2002-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to examine the effects of meclofenamic acid on proliferation, clonogenic activity,migratory ability, cell cycle distribution and p44/42 MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinase) expression in serum-stimulated human aortic smooth muscle cells (haSMCs). Methods: haSMCs were treated with meclofenamic acid in three different concentrations (10mM, 100 mM, 200 mM) for 4 days. Then meclofenamic acid-free culture medium was supplemented until day 20. Growth kinetics were assessed. Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry.Clonogenic activity was evaluated with colony formation assays.Migratory ability was investigated by stimulation with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) in 24-well plates with 8 mm pores membrane inserts. p44/42 MAPK was detected by Western blot technique. Results: Meclofenamic acid inhibited the proliferation,clonogenic activity and migratory ability of haSMCs in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis revealed a G2/M-phase block. The p44/42MAPK was significantly reduced. Conclusion: Meclofenamic acid inhibits the proliferation and migration of haSMCs. If a sufficient dose of meclofenamic acid can be applied systemically or by local drug delivery it could be a valuable substance to prevent restenosis after angioplasty.

  19. Acidic polyamino acids inhibit human eosinophil granule major basic protein toxicity. Evidence of a functional role for ProMBP.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, R L; Gundel, R H; Gleich, G J; Checkel, J L; Loegering, D A; Pease, L R; Hamann, K J

    1991-01-01

    Eosinophil granule major basic protein (MBP), a potent toxin for helminths and mammalian cells in vitro, is a single polypeptide chain rich in arginine. MBP has been localized on damaged helminths and tissues in hypersensitivity diseases including bronchial asthma. The MBP cDNA indicates that MBP is translated as a slightly acidic preproprotein with an acidic propart. To test the hypothesis that the acidic pro-part of proMBP inhibits the toxicity of mature MBP, acidic polyamino acids (aa) were used as antagonists of MBP toxicity to K562 cells and guinea pig tracheal epithelium and used as antagonists of MBP airway hyperresponsiveness in primates. The acidic poly aa inhibited MBP toxicity and MBP airway hyperresposiveness. The acidic poly aa inhibited MBP toxicity in a charge-dependent manner similar to that proposed for proMBP, suggesting that the acidic pro-part of proMBP functions to mask mature MBP toxicity. This inhibition was not limited to MBP, but also applied to polyarginine and eosinophil cationic protein. These acidic poly aa may be useful to inhibit the actions of a number of cationic toxins released by the eosinophil in numerous hypersensitivity diseases. Images PMID:1715886

  20. Inhibition of nitrification in municipal wastewater-treating photobioreactors: Effect on algal growth and nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Krustok, I; Odlare, M; Truu, J; Nehrenheim, E

    2016-02-01

    The effect of inhibiting nitrification on algal growth and nutrient uptake was studied in photobioreactors treating municipal wastewater. As previous studies have indicated that algae prefer certain nitrogen species to others, and because nitrifying bacteria are inhibited by microalgae, it is important to shed more light on these interactions. In this study allylthiourea (ATU) was used to inhibit nitrification in wastewater-treating photobioreactors. The nitrification-inhibited reactors were compared to control reactors with no ATU added. Microalgae had higher growth in the inhibited reactors, resulting in a higher chlorophyll a concentration. The species mix also differed, with Chlorella and Scenedesmus being the dominant genera in the control reactors and Cryptomonas and Chlorella dominating in the inhibited reactors. The nitrogen speciation in the reactors after 8days incubation was also different in the two setups, with N existing mostly as NH4-N in the inhibited reactors and as NO3-N in the control reactors. PMID:26716890

  1. Growth inhibition of cultured human leukemia cells by 3-aminothymidine and its analogue.

    PubMed

    Asano, S; Yokoyama, Y; Kohda, K

    1997-01-01

    In a previous report, we demonstrated that 3-aminothymidine (1) strongly inhibits the growth of the human T-cell acute lymphoblastoid leukemia cell line CCRF-HSB-2. In order to further study cell growth inhibition by this compound, several of its derivatives and analogues were synthesized and their growth inhibition activities examined using various cultured cell lines. Compound 1 was the most active among the compounds tested and the most effective against cells of the human T-cell acute lymphoblastoid leukemia cell line CCRF-CEM. 3-Methylthymidine (2) also inhibited the growth of CCRF-CEM cells but at a level about one thirtieth that of 1. Introduction of a methyl or acetyl group at the 3-amino group of 1 resulted in the loss of growth inhibition activity. 3-Amino- and 3-methyl-5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridines (6 and 7), the analogues of 1 and 2 both exhibited an ability to inhibit cell growth and their levels of activity were similar in extent, in spite of the difference in their 3-amino and 3-methyl groups, however, these levels were less than that of 1. Compounds 1, 2, 6 and 7 all showed evidence of growth inhibition in every human leukemia cell line examined. PMID:9137414

  2. Antarctic bacteria inhibit growth of food-borne microorganisms at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Andrea; Sharp, Richard; Russell, Nicholas J; Roller, Sibel

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify Antarctic microorganisms with the ability to produce cold-active antimicrobial compounds with potential for use in chilled food preservation. Colonies (4496) were isolated from 12 Antarctic soil samples and tested against Listeria innocua, Pseudomonas fragi and Brochothrix thermosphacta. Thirteen bacteria were confirmed as being growth-inhibitor producers (detection rate 0.29%). When tested against a wider spectrum of eight target organisms, some of the isolates also inhibited the growth of L. monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. Six inhibitor producers were psychrotrophic (growth optima between 18 and 24 degrees C), halotolerant (up to 10% NaCl) and catalase-positive; all but one were Gram-positive and oxidase-positive. The inhibitors produced by four bacteria were sensitive to proteases, suggesting a proteinaceous nature. Four of the inhibitor-producers were shown to be species of Arthrobacter, Planococcus and Pseudomonas on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences and fatty acid compositions. It was concluded that Antarctic soils represent an untapped reservoir of novel, cold-active antimicrobial-producers. PMID:19712399

  3. Inhibition of herpes virus infection in oligodendrocyte cultured cells by valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Crespillo, A J; Praena, B; Bello-Morales, R; Lerma, L; Vzquez-Calvo, A; Martn-Acebes, M A; Tabars, E; Sobrino, F; Lpez-Guerrero, J A

    2016-03-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a small fatty acid used for treatment of different neurologic diseases such as epilepsy, migraines or bipolar disorders. VPA modulates different processes of cell metabolism that can lead to alterations in susceptibility of several cell types to the infection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), as well as to exert an inhibitory effect on the replication of different enveloped viruses in cultured cells. Taken these data into account and the fact that HSV-1 has been involved in some neuropathies, we have characterized the effect of VPA on this herpesvirus infection of the differentiation/maturation-inducible human oligodendrocyte cell line HOG, which resulted more susceptible to VPA inhibition of virus growth after cell differentiation. In these cells, the role of VPA in virus entry was tackled. Incubation with VPA induced a slight but reproducible inhibition in the virus particles uptake mainly observed when the drug was added in the adsorption or early upon infection. In addition, transcription and expression of viral proteins were significantly downregulated in the presence of VPA. Remarkably, when the infective viral production was assessed, VPA dramatically blocked the detection of infectious HSV-1 particles. Herein, our results indicate that VPA treatment of HOG cells significantly reduces the effect of HSV-1 infection, virus entry and productivity without affecting cellular viability. PMID:26805038

  4. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Inhibits an Activated FGFR3 Mutant, and Blocks Downstream Signaling in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, April N.; McAndrew, Christopher W.; Donoghue, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Activating mutations within Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3), a receptor tyrosine kinase, are responsible for human skeletal dysplasias including achondroplasia and the neonatal lethal syndromes, Thanatophoric Dysplasia (TD) type I and II. Several of these same FGFR3 mutations have also been identified somatically in human cancers, including multiple myeloma, bladder carcinoma and cervical cancer. Based on reports that strongly activated mutants of FGFR3 such as the TDII (K650E) mutant signal preferentially from within the secretory pathway, the inhibitory properties of nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), which blocks protein transport through the Golgi, were investigated. NDGA was able to inhibit FGFR3 autophosphorylation both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, signaling molecules downstream of FGFR3 activation such as STAT1, STAT3 and MAPK were inhibited by NDGA treatment. Using HEK293 cells expressing activated FGFR3-TDII, together with several multiple myeloma cell lines expressing activated forms of FGFR3, NDGA generally resulted in a decrease in MAPK activation by 1 hour, and resulted in increased apoptosis over 24 hours. The effects of NDGA on activated FGFR3 derivatives targeted either to the plasma membrane or the cytoplasm were also examined. These results suggest that inhibitory small molecules such as NDGA that target a specific subcellular compartment may be beneficial in the inhibition of activated receptors such as FGFR3 that signal from the same compartment. PMID:18794123

  5. 3,5-Dihydroxybenzoic acid, a specific agonist for hydroxycarboxylic acid 1, inhibits lipolysis in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changlu; Kuei, Chester; Zhu, Jessica; Yu, Jingxue; Zhang, Li; Shih, Amy; Mirzadegan, Taraneh; Shelton, Jonathan; Sutton, Steven; Connelly, Margery A; Lee, Grace; Carruthers, Nicholas; Wu, Jiejun; Lovenberg, Timothy W

    2012-06-01

    Niacin raises high-density lipoprotein and lowers low-density lipoprotein through the activation of the ?-hydroxybutyrate receptor hydroxycarboxylic acid 2 (HCA2) (aka GPR109a) but with an unwanted side effect of cutaneous flushing caused by vascular dilation because of the stimulation of HCA2 receptors in Langerhans cells in skin. HCA1 (aka GPR81), predominantly expressed in adipocytes, was recently identified as a receptor for lactate. Activation of HCA1 in adipocytes by lactate results in the inhibition of lipolysis, suggesting that agonists for HCA1 may be useful for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Lactate is a metabolite of glucose, suggesting that HCA1 may also be involved in the regulation of glucose metabolism. The low potency of lactate to activate HCA1, coupled with its fast turnover rate in vivo, render it an inadequate tool for studying the biological role of lactate/HCA1 in vivo. In this article, we demonstrate the identification of 3-hydroxybenzoic acid (3-HBA) as an agonist for both HCA2 and HCA1, whereas 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,5-DHBA) is a specific agonist for only HCA1 (EC(50) ?150 ?M). 3,5-DHBA inhibits lipolysis in wild-type mouse adipocytes but not in HCA1-deficient adipocytes. Therefore, 3,5-DHBA is a useful tool for the in vivo study of HCA1 function and offers a base for further HCA1 agonist design. Because 3-HBA and 3,5-DHBA are polyphenolic acids found in many natural products, such as fruits, berries, and coffee, it is intriguing to speculate that other heretofore undiscovered natural substances may have therapeutic benefits. PMID:22434674

  6. Mycophenolic acid, an immunosuppressive agent, inhibits HBV replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gong, Z J; De Meyer, S; Clarysse, C; Verslype, C; Neyts, J; De Clercq, E; Yap, S H

    1999-05-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), the morpholinoethyl ester of mycophenolic acid (MPA), is currently used as an immunosuppressive agent in kidney transplant recipients. After oral administration, MMF is hydrolysed to MPA, the active compound, which is a potent inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP-DH). Inhibition of this enzyme results in a depletion of the intracellular GTP and dGTP pools. MPA has been shown to inhibit the replication of a number of viruses, including arena viruses (Junin and Tacaribe), yellow fever virus, reovirus-1, parainfluenza-3 virus, Coxsackie B4 virus, Epstein-Barr virus and human immunodeficiency virus. To examine whether MPA also has an inhibitory effect on HBV replication, experiments were performed using cultures of primary human hepatocytes and HBV-transfected, HepG2 2.2.15 cells. After in vitro infection with HBV in human hepatocytes, HBV covalently-closed-circular (ccc) DNA and HBV mRNAs were detectable in the cells during the 10 days following infection. HBV DNA and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) were also secreted into the culture medium. In the presence of 10 microg ml-1 MPA (the therapeutic serum level of MPA as an immunosuppressive agent) in culture medium, HBV ccc DNA and HBV mRNAs became undetectable 5 days after treatment was started. The secretion of HBV DNA and HBsAg into the medium was also markedly reduced. No cytotoxic effect of the drug was noted during the experiments. The effect of MPA on HBV replication was abolished by the presence of guanosine (50 microg ml-1). In HepG2 2.2.15 cells (which contain an integrated tandem dimer of the HBV genome), MPA treatment had no significant inhibitory effect on the secretion of HBV DNA and HBsAg into the culture medium. HBV ccc DNA and HBV mRNAs in HepG2 2.2.15 cells were also not affected. The observed effect of MPA on HBV replication in primary human hepatocyte cultures may involve only episomal replication and may have clinical implications, especially before integration of HBV DNA into the host genome. PMID:10607235

  7. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibits liver fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei; Wang, Xiu-Fang; Shi, Juan-Juan; Li, Ya-Ping; Yang, Ning; Zhai, Song; Dang, Shuang-Suo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the hepatoprotective effects and antioxidant activity of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in rats with liver fibrosis. METHODS: A total of 75 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to seven experimental groups: a normal group (n = 10), a vehicle group (n = 10), a model group (n = 15), a vitamin E group (n = 10), and three CAPE groups (CAPE 3, 6 and 12 mg/kg, n = 10, respectively). Liver fibrosis was induced in rats by injecting CCl4 subcutaneously, feeding with high fat forage, and administering 30% alcohol orally for 10 wk. Concurrently, CAPE (3, 6 and 12 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally administered daily for 10 wk. After that, serum total bilirubin (TBil), aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels were measured to assess hepatotoxicity. To investigate antioxidant activity of CAPE, malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) levels, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities in liver tissue were determined. Moreover, the effect of CAPE on α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), a characteristic hallmark of activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a key transcription factor for antioxidant systems, was investigated by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Compared to the model group, intraperitoneal administration of CAPE decreased TBil, ALT, and AST levels in liver fibrosis rats (P < 0.05), while serum TBil was decreased by CAPE in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the liver hydroxyproline contents in both the 6 and 12 mg/kg CAPE groups were markedly lower than that in the model group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively). CAPE markedly decreased MDA levels and, in turn, increased GSH levels, as well as CAT and SOD activities in liver fibrosis rats compared to the model group (P < 0.05). Moreover, CAPE effectively inhibited α-SMA expression while increasing Nrf2 expression compared to the model group (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: The protective effects of CAPE against liver fibrosis may be due to its ability to suppress the activation of HSCs by inhibiting oxidative stress. PMID:25852274

  8. Inhibition of growth and alteration of host cell interactions of Pasteurella multocida with natural byproducts.

    PubMed

    Salaheen, S; Almario, J A; Biswas, D

    2014-06-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a leading cause of fowl cholera in both free-range pasture and conventional/commercially raised poultry. Its infection is a serious threat to poultry health and overall flock viability. Organic poultry is comparatively more vulnerable to this pathogen. It is a significant cause of production loss and price increase of poultry products, specifically organic poultry products. Some plant products are well documented as sources of natural antimicrobials such as polyphenols found in different berry pomaces and citrus oil. Pomace, a byproduct (primarily of seeds and skins) of fruits used for juice and wine production, and citrus oil, the byproduct of citrus juice production, show promising antimicrobial activity against various pathogens. Here, we showed for the first time that blackberry and blueberry pomace extracts and citrus oil inhibited P. multocida growth. Minimum bactericidal concentrations were determined as 0.3 and 0.4 mg/mL gallic acid equivalent for blackberry and blueberry pomace extracts, respectively. Similarly, only 0.05% citrus oil (vol/vol) completely inhibited P. multocida growth. Under shaking conditions, the antimicrobial activity of both pomace extracts and citrus oil was more intensive. Even citrus oil vapor also significantly reduced the growth of P. multocida. In addition, cell surface hydrophobicity of P. multocida was increased by 2- to 3-fold and its adherence to chicken fibroblast (DF1) and bovine mammary gland (MacT) cells was reduced significantly in the presence of pomace extracts only. This study indicates that these natural products might be good alternatives to conventional antimicrobial agents, and hence, may be used as feed or water supplements to control fowl cholera and reduce production loss caused by P. multocida. PMID:24879687

  9. The H6D variant of NAG-1/GDF15 inhibits prostate xenograft growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingya; Chrysovergis, Kali; Bienstock, Rachelle J.; Shim, Minsub; Eling, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-activated gene (NAG-1), a divergent member of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily, has been implicated in many cellular processes, including inflammation, early bone formation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Recent clinical studies suggests that a C to G single nucleotide polymorphism at position 6 (histidine to aspartic acid substitution, or H6D) of the NAG-1 protein is associated with lower human prostate cancer incidence. The objective of the current study is to investigate the activity of NAG-1 H6D variant in prostate cancer tumorigenesis in vivo. Methods Human prostate cancer DU145 cells expressing the H6D NAG-1 or wild-type NAG-1 were injected subcutaneously into nude mice and tumor growth was monitored. Serum and tumor samples were collected for subsequent analysis. Results The H6D variant was more potent than the wild-type NAG-1 and inhibited tumor growth significantly compared to control mice. Mice with tumors expressing the wild-type NAG-1 have greater reduced both body weight and abdominal fat than mice with H6D variant tumors suggesting different activities of the wild-type NAG-1 and the H6D NAG-1. A significant reduction in adiponectin, leptin and IGF-1 serum levels was observed in the tumor bearing mice with a more profound reduction observed with expression of H6D variant. Cyclin D1 expression was suppressed in the tumors with a dramatic reduction observed in the tumor expressing the H6D variant. Conclusion Our data suggest that the H6D variant of NAG-1 inhibits prostate tumorigenesis by suppressing IGF-1 and Cyclin D1 expression but likely additional mechanisms are operative. PMID:21809352

  10. Baicalein upregulates DDIT4 expression which mediates mTOR inhibition and growth inhibition in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujun; Han, Ernest; Xing, Quanhua; Yan, Jin; Arrington, Amanda; Wang, Charles; Tully, Dylan; Kowolik, Claudia M; Lu, David M; Frankel, Paul H; Zhai, Jing; Wen, Wei; Horne, David; Yip, M L Richard; Yim, John H

    2015-03-28

    Baicalein is a natural flavone that exhibits anticancer properties. Using microarrays we found that DDIT4 was the highest transcript induced by baicalein in cancer cells. We confirmed in multiple cancer cell lines large, dose-related expression of DDIT4 by quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot, which correlates with growth inhibition. Time course experiments demonstrate that DDIT4 is rapidly inducible, with high expression maintained for several days in vitro. Induction of DDIT4 expression is p53 independent based on evaluation of p53 knockout cells. Since DDIT4 is known to inhibit mTORC1 activity we confirmed that baicalein suppresses phosphorylation of mTORC1 targets. Using RNA interference we demonstrate that mTORC1 activity and growth inhibition by baicalein is attenuated by knockdown of DDIT4. We furthermore demonstrate suppression of established tumors by baicalein in a mouse model of breast cancer with increased DDIT4 expression in the tumors. Finally, we demonstrate that baicalein upregulates DDIT4 and causes mTORC1 and growth inhibition in platinum resistant cancer cells in marked contrast to platinum chemotherapy treatment. These studies demonstrate that baicalein inhibits mTORC1 through DDIT4 expression, and may be useful in cancer chemotherapy and chemoprevention. PMID:25543165

  11. Inhibition of IGF-1R and Lipoxygenase by Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid (NDGA) Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Blecha, Joseph E.; Anderson, Marc O.; Chow, Jennifer M.; Guevarra, Christle C.; Pender, Celia; Penaranda, Cristina; Zavodovskaya, Marianna; Youngren, Jack F.; Berkman, Clifford E.

    2008-01-01

    Herein we pursue the hypothesis that the structure of nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) can be refined for selective potency against the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) as a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer while diminishing its action against other cellular targets. Thus, a set of NDGA analogs (7a-7h) was prepared and examined for inhibitory potency against IGF-1R kinase and an alternative target, 15-lipoxygenase (15 LOX). The anti-cancer effects of these compounds were determined by their ability to inhibit IGF-1 mediated cell growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The design of the analogs was based upon a cursory Topliss approach in which one of NDGA’s aromatic rings was modified with various substituents. Structural modification of one of the two catechol rings of NDGA was found to have little effect upon the inhibitory potency against both kinase activity of the IGF-1R and IGF-1 mediated cell growth of MCF-7 cells. 15-LOX was found to be most sensitive to structural modifications of NDGA. From the limited series of NDGA analogs examined, the compound that exhibited the greatest selectivity for IGF-1 mediated growth compared to 15-LOX inhibition was a cyclic analog 7h with a framework similar to a natural product isolated from Larrea divaricata. The results for 7h are significant because while NDGA displays biological promiscuity, 7h exhibits greater specificity towards the breast cancer target IGF-1R with that added benefit of possessing a 10-fold weaker potency against 15-LOX, an enzyme which has a purported tumor suppressing role in breast cancer. With increased specificity and potency, 7h may serve as a new lead in developing novel therapeutic agents for breast cancer. PMID:17502145

  12. Fatty acid regulates gene expression and growth of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Chen, Y.; Tjandrawinata, R. R.

    2001-01-01

    It has been proposed that the omega-6 fatty acids increase the rate of tumor growth. Here we test that hypothesis in the PC-3 human prostate tumor. We found that the essential fatty acids, linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA), and the AA metabolite PGE(2) stimulate tumor growth while oleic acid (OA) and the omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) inhibited growth. In examining the role of AA in growth response, we extended our studies to analyze changes in early gene expression induced by AA. We demonstrate that c-fos expression is increased within minutes of addition in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the immediate early gene cox-2 is also increased in the presence of AA in a dose-dependent manner, while the constitutive cox-1 message was not increased. Three hours after exposure to AA, the synthesis of PGE(2) via COX-2 was also increased. Previous studies have demonstrated that AA was primarily delivered by low density lipoprotein (LDL) via its receptor (LDLr). Since it is known that hepatomas, acute myelogenous leukemia and colorectal tumors lack normal cholesterol feedback, we examined the role of the LDLr in growth regulation of the PC-3 prostate cancer cells. Analysis of ldlr mRNA expression and LDLr function demonstrated that human PC-3 prostate cancer cells lack normal feedback regulation. While exogenous LDL caused a significant stimulation of cell growth and PGE(2) synthesis, no change was seen in regulation of the LDLr by LDL. Taken together, these data show that normal cholesterol feedback of ldlr message and protein is lost in prostate cancer. These data suggest that unregulated over-expression of LDLr in tumor cells would permit increased availability of AA, which induces immediate early genes c-fos and cox-2 within minutes of uptake.

  13. Inhibition of fatty acid synthase induces pro-survival Akt and ERK signaling in K-Ras-driven cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yellen, Paige B.; Foster, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells with constitutive phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway activation have been associated with overexpression of the lipogenic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FAS) as a means to provide lipids necessary for cell growth. In contrast, K-Ras-driven cancer cells suppress utilization of de novo synthesized fatty acids and rely on exogenously supplied fatty acids for cell growth and membrane phospholipid biosynthesis. Consistent with a differential need for de novo fatty acid synthesis, cancer cells with activated PI3K signaling were sensitive to suppression of FAS; whereas mutant K-RAS-driven cancer cells continued to proliferate with suppressed FAS. Surprisingly, in response to FAS suppression, we observed robust increases in both Akt and ERK phosphorylation. Akt phosphorylation was dependent on the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R)/PI3K pathway and mTOR complex 2. Intriguingly, K-Ras-mediated ERK activation was dependent on N-Ras. Pharmacological inhibition of PI3K and MEK in K-Ras-driven cancer cells resulted in increased sensitivity to FAS inhibition. These data reveal a surprising sensitivity of K-Ras-driven cancer cells to FAS suppression when stimulation of Akt and Erk was prevented. As K-Ras-driven cancers are notoriously difficult to treat, these findings have therapeutic implications. PMID:25086185

  14. Placental Amino Acids Transport in Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Avagliano, Laura; Garò, Chiara; Marconi, Anna Maria

    2012-01-01

    The placenta represents a key organ for fetal growth as it acts as an interface between mother and fetus, regulating the fetal-maternal exchange of nutrients, gases, and waste products. During pregnancy, amino acids represent one of the major nutrients for fetal life, and both maternal and fetal concentrations are significantly different in pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction when compared to uncomplicated pregnancies. The transport of amino acids across the placenta is a complex process that includes the influx of neutral, anionic, and cationic amino acids across the microvilluos plasma membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast, the passage through the cytoplasm of the trophoblasts, and the transfer outside the trophoblasts across the basal membrane into the fetal circulation. In this paper, we review the transport mechanisms of amino acids across the placenta in normal pregnancies and in pregnancies complicated by intrauterine growth restriction. PMID:22997583

  15. Bismuth(III) deferiprone effectively inhibits growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774.

    PubMed

    Barton, Larry L; Lyle, Daniel A; Ritz, Nathaniel L; Granat, Alex S; Khurshid, Ali N; Kherbik, Nada; Hider, Robert; Lin, Henry C

    2016-04-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria have been implicated in inflammatory bowel diseases and ulcerative colitis in humans and there is an interest in inhibiting the growth of these sulfide-producing bacteria. This research explores the use of several chelators of bismuth to determine the most effective chelator to inhibit the growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. For our studies, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 was grown with nitrate as the electron acceptor and chelated bismuth compounds were added to test for inhibition of growth. Varying levels of inhibition were attributed to bismuth chelated with subsalicylate or citrate but the most effective inhibition of growth by D. desulfuricans was with bismuth chelated by deferiprone, 3-hydroxy-1,2-dimethyl-4(1H)-pyridone. Growth of D. desulfuricans was inhibited by 10 μM bismuth as deferiprone:bismuth with either nitrate or sulfate respiration. Our studies indicate deferiprone:bismuth has bacteriostatic activity on D. desulfuricans because the inhibition can be reversed following exposure to 1 mM bismuth for 1 h at 32 °C. We suggest that deferiprone is an appropriate chelator for bismuth to control growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria because deferiprone is relatively nontoxic to animals, including humans, and has been used for many years to bind Fe(III) in the treatment of β-thalassemia. PMID:26896170

  16. Ginkgolic acid suppresses the development of pancreatic cancer by inhibiting pathways driving lipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiguang; Duan, Wanxing; Han, Suxia; Lei, Jianjun; Xu, Qinhong; Chen, Xin; Jiang, Zhengdong; Nan, Ligang; Li, Jiahui; Chen, Ke; Han, Liang; Wang, Zheng; Li, Xuqi; Wu, Erxi; Huo, Xiongwei

    2015-08-28

    Ginkgolic acid (GA) is a botanical drug extracted from the seed coat of Ginkgo biloba L. with a wide range of bioactive properties, including anti-tumor effect. However, whether GA has antitumor effect on pancreatic cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms have yet to be investigated. In this study, we show that GA suppressed the viability of cancer cells but has little toxicity on normal cells, e.g, HUVEC cells. Furthermore, treatment of GA resulted in impaired colony formation, migration, and invasion ability and increased apoptosis of cancer cells. In addition, GA inhibited the de novo lipogenesis of cancer cells through inducing activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and downregulated the expression of key enzymes (e.g. acetyl-CoA carboxylase [ACC], fatty acid synthase [FASN]) involved in lipogenesis. Moreover, the in vivo experiment showed that GA reduced the expression of the key enzymes involved in lipogenesis and restrained the tumor growth. Taken together, our results suggest that GA may serve as a new candidate against tumor growth of pancreatic cancer partially through targeting pathway driving lipogenesis. PMID:25895130

  17. Ginkgolic acid suppresses the development of pancreatic cancer by inhibiting pathways driving lipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Suxia; Lei, Jianjun; Xu, Qinhong; Chen, Xin; Jiang, Zhengdong; Nan, Ligang; Li, Jiahui; Chen, Ke; Han, Liang; Wang, Zheng; Li, Xuqi; Wu, Erxi; Huo, Xiongwei

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgolic acid (GA) is a botanical drug extracted from the seed coat of Ginkgo biloba L. with a wide range of bioactive properties, including anti-tumor effect. However, whether GA has antitumor effect on pancreatic cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms have yet to be investigated. In this study, we show that GA suppressed the viability of cancer cells but has little toxicity on normal cells, e.g, HUVEC cells. Furthermore, treatment of GA resulted in impaired colony formation, migration, and invasion ability and increased apoptosis of cancer cells. In addition, GA inhibited the de novo lipogenesis of cancer cells through inducing activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and downregulated the expression of key enzymes (e.g. acetyl-CoA carboxylase [ACC], fatty acid synthase [FASN]) involved in lipogenesis. Moreover, the in vivo experiment showed that GA reduced the expression of the key enzymes involved in lipogenesis and restrained the tumor growth. Taken together, our results suggest that GA may serve as a new candidate against tumor growth of pancreatic cancer partially through targeting pathway driving lipogenesis. PMID:25895130

  18. Growth of Azotobacter chroococcum in chemically defined media containing p-hydroxybenzoic acid and protocatechuic acid.

    PubMed

    Juarez, B; Martinez-Toledo, M V; Gonzalez-Lopez, J

    2005-06-01

    Growth and utilization of different phenolic acids present in olive mill wastewater (OMW) by Azotobacter chroococcum were studied in chemically defined media. Growth and utilization of phenolic acids were only detected when the microorganism was cultured on p-hydroxybenzoic acid at concentration from 0.01% to 0.5% (w/v) and protocatechuic acid at concentration from 0.01% to 0.3% (w/v) as sole carbon sources suggesting that only these phenolic compounds could be utilized as a carbon source by A. chroococcum. Moreover when culture media were added with a mixture of 0.3% of protocatechuic acid and 0.3% p-hydroxybenzoic acid, the microorganism degradated in first place protocatechuic acid and once the culture medium was depleted of this compound, the degradation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid commenced very fast. PMID:15857648

  19. Gellan sulfate inhibits Plasmodium falciparum growth and invasion of red blood cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Recuenco, Frances Cagayat; Kobayashi, Kyousuke; Ishiwa, Akiko; Enomoto-Rogers, Yukiko; Fundador, Noreen Grace V.; Sugi, Tatsuki; Takemae, Hitoshi; Iwanaga, Tatsuya; Murakoshi, Fumi; Gong, Haiyan; Inomata, Atsuko; Horimoto, Taisuke; Iwata, Tadahisa; Kato, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Here, we assessed the sulfated derivative of the microbial polysaccharide gellan gum and derivatives of λ and κ-carrageenans for their ability to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 and Dd2 growth and invasion of red blood cells in vitro. Growth inhibition was assessed by means of flow cytometry after a 96-h exposure to the inhibitors and invasion inhibition was assessed by counting ring parasites after a 20-h exposure to them. Gellan sulfate strongly inhibited invasion and modestly inhibited growth for both P. falciparum 3D7 and Dd2; both inhibitory effects exceeded those achieved with native gellan gum. The hydrolyzed λ-carrageenan and oversulfated κ-carrageenan were less inhibitory than their native forms. In vitro cytotoxicity and anticoagulation assays performed to determine the suitability of the modified polysaccharides for in vivo studies showed that our synthesized gellan sulfate had low cytotoxicity and anticoagulant activity. PMID:24740150

  20. In vitro mechanism of inhibition of bacterial cell growth by allicin.

    PubMed Central

    Feldberg, R S; Chang, S C; Kotik, A N; Nadler, M; Neuwirth, Z; Sundstrom, D C; Thompson, N H

    1988-01-01

    Diallyl thiosulfinate (allicin) is the agent found in garlic which is responsible for the antibacterial and antifungal activity of extracts of this plant. The effect of bacteriostatic concentrations of allicin (0.2 to 0.5 mM) on the growth of Salmonella typhimurium revealed a pattern of inhibition characterized by: (i) a lag of approximately 15 min between addition of allicin and onset of inhibition, (ii) a transitory inhibition phase whose duration was proportional to allicin concentration and inversely proportional to culture density, (iii) a resumed growth phase which showed a lower rate of growth than in uninhibited controls, and (iv) an entry into stationary phase at a lower culture density. Whereas DNA and protein syntheses showed a delayed and partial inhibition by allicin, inhibition of RNA synthesis was immediate and total, suggesting that this is the primary target of allicin action. PMID:2469386

  1. [Combined injured effects of acid rain and lanthanum on growth of soybean seedling].

    PubMed

    Liang, Chan-juan; Pan, Dan-yun; Xu, Qiu-rong; Zhou, Qing

    2010-07-01

    Combined effects of acid rain and lanthanum on growth of soybean seedling (Glycine max) and its inherent mechanism were studied in this paper. Compared with treatments by simulated acid rain (pH 3.0, 3.5, 4.5) or rare earth La(III) (60, 100 and 300 mg x L(-1)), the decrease degree of growth parameters in combined treatments was higher, indicating that there were a synergistic effects between acid rain and La. Moreover,the inhibition effects of acid rain and La(III) were more obvious when pH value of acid rain was lower or the concentration of La(III) was higher. The changes of photosynthetic parameters were similar to those of growth, but the decrease degree of each parameter was not same in the same treatment group. The decrease degree of optimal PSII photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) and chlorophyll content (Chl) were 9.35%-22.75% and 9.14%-24.53%, respectively, lower than that of photosynthetic rate Pn (22.78%-84.7%), Hill reaction rate (15.52%-73.38%) and Mg2+ -ATPase activity (14.51%-71.54%), showing that the sensitivity of photosynthetic parameters to the combined factors was different. Furthermore, relative analysis showed that the change of Pn were mainly affected by Hill reaction rate and Mg2+ -ATPase activity, and was less influenced by Chl and Fv/Fm. It indicates that the effect of acid rain and La on each reaction in photosynthesis was different, and the inhibition of combined treatments on photosynthesis in plants was one of the main factors affecting growth of plant. PMID:20825040

  2. Ginkgolic acids and Ginkgo biloba extract inhibit Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Ryu, Shi Yong; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2014-03-17

    Infection by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC) is a worldwide problem, and there is no effective therapy. Biofilm formation is closely related to EHEC infection and is also a mechanism of antimicrobial resistance. Antibiofilm screening of 560 purified phytochemicals against EHEC showed that ginkgolic acids C15:1 and C17:1 at 5?g/ml and Ginkgo biloba extract at 100?g/ml significantly inhibited EHEC biofilm formation on the surfaces of polystyrene and glass, and on nylon membranes. Importantly, at their working concentrations, ginkgolic acids and G. biloba extract did not affect bacterial growth. Transcriptional analyses showed that ginkgolic acid C15:1 repressed curli genes and prophage genes in EHEC, and these findings were in-line with reduced fimbriae production and biofilm reductions. Interestingly, ginkgolic acids and G. biloba extract did not inhibit the biofilm formation of a commensal E. coli K-12 strain. In addition, ginkgolic acids and G. biloba extract inhibited the biofilm formation of three Staphylococcus aureus strains. The findings of this study suggest that plant secondary metabolites represent an important resource for biofilm inhibitors. PMID:24457153

  3. Brettanomyces bruxellensis: effect of oxygen on growth and acetic acid production.

    PubMed

    Aguilar Uscanga, M G; Dlia, M-L; Strehaiano, P

    2003-04-01

    The influence of the oxygen supply on the growth, acetic acid and ethanol production by Brettanomyces bruxellensis in a glucose medium was investigated with different air flow rates in the range 0-300 l h(-1 ) x (0-0.5 vvm). This study shows that growth of this yeast is stimulated by moderate aeration. The optimal oxygen supply for cellular synthesis was an oxygen transfer rate (OTR) of 43 mg O(2) l(-1) x h(-1). In this case, there was an air flow rate of 60 l h(-1) (0.1 vvm). Above this value, the maximum biomass concentration decreased. Ethanol and acetic acid production was also dependent on the level of aeration: the higher the oxygen supply, the greater the acetic acid production and the lower the ethanol production. At the highest aeration rates, we observed a strong inhibition of the ethanol yield. Over 180 l h(-1) x (0.3 vvm, OTR =105 mg O(2) l(-1) x h(-1)), glucose consumption was inhibited and a high concentration of acetic acid (6.0 g x l(-1)) was produced. The ratio of "ethanol + acetic acid" produced per mole of consumed glucose using carbon balance calculations was analyzed. It was shown that this ratio remained constant in all cases. This makes it possible to establish a stoichiometric equation between oxygen supply and metabolite production. PMID:12655458

  4. Competitive inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat meat products by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Amzquita, A; Brashears, M M

    2002-02-01

    Forty-nine strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), isolated from commercially available ready-to-eat (RTE) meat products, were screened for their ability to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes at refrigeration (5 degrees C) temperatures on agar spot tests. The three most inhibitory strains were identified as Pediococcus acidilactici, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus paracasei by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Their antilisterial activity was quantified in associative cultures in deMan Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) broth at 5 degrees C for 28 days, resulting in a pathogen reduction of 3.5 log10 cycles compared to its initial level. A combined culture of these strains was added to frankfurters and cooked ham coinoculated with L. monocytogenes, vacuum packaged, and stored at 5 degrees C for 28 days. Bacteriostatic activity was observed in cooked ham, whereas bactericidal activity was observed in frankfurters. Numbers of L. monocytogenes were 4.2 to 4.7 log10 and 2.6 log10 cycles lower than controls in frankfurters and cooked ham, respectively, after the 28-day refrigerated storage. In all cases, numbers of LAB increased by only 1 log10 cycle. The strain identified as P. acidilactici was possibly a bacteriocin producer, whereas the antilisterial activity of the other two strains was due to the production of organic acids. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the antilisterial activity detected in frankfurters whether the LAB strains were used individually or as combined cultures. Further studies over a 56-day period indicated no impact on the quality of the product. This method represents a potential antilisterial intervention in RTE meats, because it inhibited the growth of the pathogen at refrigeration temperatures without causing sensory changes. PMID:11848562

  5. Influence of some growth regulators and cations on inhibition of chlorophyll biosynthesis by lead in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, S.K. ); Srivastava, H.S. ); Tripathi, R.D. )

    1993-08-01

    Phytotoxic effects of Pb pollution are well established. In order to analyse the physiological basis of toxic symptoms and of reduced plant productivity, its effect on chlorophyll content has been examined in some plants. Thus, a decrease in total chlorophyll content during Pb supply has been observed in oats, mung beam, pea, etc. The activity of delta aminolevulinic acid dehydratase, an important enzyme in the biosynthesis of heme pigments, is inhibited by Pb in mung bean and several other species. This observation may perhaps indicate that a reduction in chlorophyll content in the presence of lead is due to an inhibition of pigment synthesis. The effect of Pb on greening maize leaf segments in the presence of various precursors of chlorophyll has been studied in the present investigation to evaluate this hypothesis. The effect of some growth regulators and cations, which could otherwise modify chlorophyll biosynthesis, has been examined to see whether the toxic effects of Pb on photosynthetic pigments could also be modified by these effectors. 16 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. Imatinib mesylate inhibits platelet derived growth factor stimulated proliferation of rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sandler, Charlotta; Joutsiniemi, Saima; Lindstedt, Ken A.; Juutilainen, Timo; Kovanen, Petri T.; Eklund, Kari K. . E-mail: kari.eklund@hus.fi

    2006-08-18

    Synovial fibroblast is the key cell type in the growth of the pathological synovial tissue in arthritis. Here, we show that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a potent mitogen for synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Inhibition of PDGF-receptor signalling by imatinib mesylate (1 {mu}M) completely abrogated the PDGF-stimulated proliferation and inhibited approximately 70% of serum-stimulated proliferation of synovial fibroblasts. Similar extent of inhibition was observed when PDGF was neutralized with anti-PDGF antibodies, suggesting that imatinib mesylate does not inhibit pathways other than those mediated by PDGF-receptors. No signs of apoptosis were detected in synovial fibroblasts cultured in the presence of imatinib. These results suggest that imatinib mesylate specifically inhibits PDGF-stimulated proliferation of synovial fibroblasts, and that inhibition of PDGF-receptors could represent a feasible target for novel antirheumatic therapies.

  7. A Microplate Growth Inhibition Assay for Screening Bacteriocins against Listeria monocytogenes to Differentiate Their Mode-of-Action.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Paul Priyesh; Muriana, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have historically been used in food fermentations to preserve foods and are generally-recognized-as-safe (GRAS) by the FDA for use as food ingredients. In addition to lactic acid; some strains also produce bacteriocins that have been proposed for use as food preservatives. In this study we examined the inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes 39-2 by neutralized and non-neutralized bacteriocin preparations (Bac+ preps) produced by Lactobacillus curvatus FS47; Lb. curvatus Beef3; Pediococcus acidilactici Bac3; Lactococcus lactis FLS1; Enterococcus faecium FS56-1; and Enterococcus thailandicus FS92. Activity differences between non-neutralized and neutralized Bac+ preps in agar spot assays could not readily be attributed to acid because a bacteriocin-negative control strain was not inhibitory to Listeria in these assays. When neutralized and non-neutralized Bac+ preps were used in microplate growth inhibition assays against L. monocytogenes 39-2 we observed some differences attributed to acid inhibition. A microplate growth inhibition assay was used to compare inhibitory reactions of wild-type and bacteriocin-resistant variants of L. monocytogenes to differentiate bacteriocins with different modes-of-action (MOA) whereby curvaticins FS47 and Beef3, and pediocin Bac3 were categorized to be in MOA1; enterocins FS92 and FS56-1 in MOA2; and lacticin FLS1 in MOA3. The microplate bacteriocin MOA assay establishes a platform to evaluate the best combination of bacteriocin preparations for use in food applications as biopreservatives against L. monocytogenes. PMID:26111195

  8. A Microplate Growth Inhibition Assay for Screening Bacteriocins against Listeria monocytogenes to Differentiate Their Mode-of-Action

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Paul Priyesh; Muriana, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have historically been used in food fermentations to preserve foods and are generally-recognized-as-safe (GRAS) by the FDA for use as food ingredients. In addition to lactic acid; some strains also produce bacteriocins that have been proposed for use as food preservatives. In this study we examined the inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes 39-2 by neutralized and non-neutralized bacteriocin preparations (Bac+ preps) produced by Lactobacillus curvatus FS47; Lb. curvatus Beef3; Pediococcus acidilactici Bac3; Lactococcus lactis FLS1; Enterococcus faecium FS56-1; and Enterococcus thailandicus FS92. Activity differences between non-neutralized and neutralized Bac+ preps in agar spot assays could not readily be attributed to acid because a bacteriocin-negative control strain was not inhibitory to Listeria in these assays. When neutralized and non-neutralized Bac+ preps were used in microplate growth inhibition assays against L. monocytogenes 39-2 we observed some differences attributed to acid inhibition. A microplate growth inhibition assay was used to compare inhibitory reactions of wild-type and bacteriocin-resistant variants of L. monocytogenes to differentiate bacteriocins with different modes-of-action (MOA) whereby curvaticins FS47 and Beef3, and pediocin Bac3 were categorized to be in MOA1; enterocins FS92 and FS56-1 in MOA2; and lacticin FLS1 in MOA3. The microplate bacteriocin MOA assay establishes a platform to evaluate the best combination of bacteriocin preparations for use in food applications as biopreservatives against L. monocytogenes. PMID:26111195

  9. Inhibition of food stimulated acid secretion by misoprostol, an orally active synthetic E1 analogue prostaglandin.

    PubMed Central

    Ramage, J K; Denton, A; Williams, J G

    1985-01-01

    The effect of 200 micrograms misoprostol (a synthetic prostaglandin E1 analogue) on food stimulated intragastric acidity has been monitored over a 9 h period in 16 normal volunteers. Misoprostol caused a significant inhibition of intragastric acidity for 2 h post-dosing, but no significant effect was seen thereafter on either basal or food stimulated acidity. PMID:3919751

  10. Growth changes of apple seedlings in response to simulated acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Forsline, P.L.; Dee, R.J.; Melious, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    In a greenhouse experiment, Malus hupehensis seedlings were treated weekly with simulated acid rain solutions ranging from pH 2.25 to pH 7.0. Necrotic lesions developed on leaves at pH 2.25 and pH 2.50 immediately after the first application at the 8-node stage. Following the 9th weekly application on seedlings with 23 to 26 nodes, lesions developed at pH levels up to 3.25. At final destructive harvest, 20% of the leaf area at pH 2.25 and 8% of the leaf area at pH 2.50 was injured. Significant growth reduction occured at these 2 pH levels. Regression analysis indicated extensive growth inhibition at pH 3.0, no growth inhibition around pH 3.5, some inhibition between pH 4.5 and pH 5.6, and normal growth at pH 7.0 in comparison to the unsprayed control. Growth was negatively correlated with lesion formation at 3 destructive harvest dates.

  11. Inhibition of prostate cancer growth by muscadine grapeskin extract and resveratrol through distinct mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytochemicals are naturally occurring compounds with demonstrated anti-tumor activities. The phytochemical resveratrol, contained in red grapes, has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth, potentially through its anti-oxidant activity. Muscadine grapes contain different phytochemical con...

  12. Role of exogenously supplied ferulic and p-coumaric acids in mimicking the mode of action of acetolactate synthase inhibiting herbicides.

    PubMed

    Orcaray, Luis; Igal, María; Zabalza, Ana; Royuela, Mercedes

    2011-09-28

    Chlorsulfuron and imazethapyr (herbicides that inhibit acetolactate synthase; ALS, EC 4.1.3.18) produced a strong accumulation of hydroxycinnamic acids that was related to the induction of the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (EC 2.5.2.54). The exogenous application of two hydroxycinnamic acids, ferulic and p-coumaric acids, to pea plants resulted in their internal accumulation, arrested growth, carbohydrate and quinate accumulation in the leaves, and the induction of ethanolic fermentation. These effects resemble some of the physiological effects detected after acetolactate synthase inhibition and suggest important roles for ferulic and p-coumaric acids in the mode of action of herbicides inhibiting the biosynthesis of branched chain amino acids. PMID:21870840

  13. [Tumor-inhibiting agents. 8. 5-Aminomethylated barbituric acid derivatives].

    PubMed

    Kreutzberger, A

    1978-01-01

    In view of the tumor inhibitory activity of various pyrimidine derivatives, investigations aimed at the structure modification of barbituric acids were performed. In accordance with the aminomethinylation principle, barbituric acids (2) are converted into 5-formimidoylbarbituric acids (4) by s-triazine (1). Aside from the free barbituric acid (2a), both 1-substituted (2b, d, and f) and 1,3-di-substituted (2c, e, and g) barbituric acids are amenable to this reaction. After introduction of the formimidoyl group into 5-position of the barbituric acid ring system, marked tumor inhibitory effects against lymphoma, lymphocytical leukemia, and luekemia L-1210, are ascertainable. PMID:582670

  14. The growth and tumor suppressor NORE1A is a cytoskeletal protein that suppresses growth by inhibition of the ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Moshnikova, Anna; Frye, Judson; Shay, Jerry W; Minna, John D; Khokhlatchev, Andrei V

    2006-03-24

    NORE1A is a growth and tumor suppressor that is inactivated in a variety of cancers. NORE1A has been shown to bind to the active Ras oncogene product. However, the mechanism of NORE1A-induced growth arrest and tumor suppression remains unknown. Using anchorage-independent growth assays, we mapped the NORE1A effector domain (the minimal region of the protein responsible for its growth-suppressive effects) to the fragment containing the central and Ras association domains of NORE1A (amino acids 191-363). Expression of the NORE1A effector domain in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells resulted in the selective inhibition of signal transduction through the ERK pathway. The full-length NORE1A (416 amino acids) and its fragments capable of growth suppression were localized to centrosomes and microtubules in normal and transformed human cells in a Ras-independent manner. A mutant that was deficient in binding to centrosomes and microtubules was also deficient in inducing cell cycle arrest. This suggests that cytoskeletal localization is required for growth-suppressive effects of NORE1A. Ras binding function was required for growth-suppressive effects of the full-length NORE1A but not for the growth-suppressive effects of the effector domain. Our studies suggest that association of NORE1A with cytoskeletal elements is essential for NORE1A-induced growth suppression and that the ERK pathway is a target for NORE1A growth-suppressive activities. PMID:16421102

  15. N-acetylcysteine inhibits germination of conidia and growth of Aspergillus spp. and Fusarium spp.

    PubMed Central

    De Lucca, A J; Walsh, T J; Daigle, D J

    1996-01-01

    N-Acetylcysteine inhibited hyphal growth and germination of conidia of Aspergillus spp. and Fusarium spp. N-Acetylcysteine inhibited conidial germination as well as or better than L-cysteine. Cysteine-related compounds may provide a potential therapeutic strategy against agriculturally and medically important fungal pathogens. PMID:8723482

  16. Inhibition of Growth of Salmonella by Native Flora of Broiler Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction Some bacteria in the cecal microflora of broilers can inhibit colonization of chicks by Salmonella. Beneficial cecal bacteria may reduce Salmonella colonization by competing for nutrients and attachment sites or by producing metabolites that inhibit Salmonella growth. The purpose of th...

  17. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibits EGF-induced cell transformation via reduction of cyclin D1 mRNA stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingjie; Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 57 Old Forge Rd, Tuxedo, NY 10987 ; Ouyang, Weiming; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Yu, Yonghui; Wang, York; Li, Xuejun; Huang, Chuanshu

    2012-09-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibiting cancer cell growth has been associated with its downregulation of cyclin D1 protein expression at transcription level or translation level. Here, we have demonstrated that SAHA inhibited EGF-induced Cl41 cell transformation via the decrease of cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. We found that SAHA treatment resulted in the dramatic inhibition of EGF-induced cell transformation, cyclin D1 protein expression and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. Further studies showed that SAHA downregulation of cyclin D1 was only observed with endogenous cyclin D1, but not with reconstitutionally expressed cyclin D1 in the same cells, excluding the possibility of SAHA regulating cyclin D1 at level of protein degradation. Moreover, SAHA inhibited EGF-induced cyclin d1 mRNA level, whereas it did not show any inhibitory effect on cyclin D1 promoter-driven luciferase reporter activity under the same experimental conditions, suggesting that SAHA may decrease cyclin D1 mRNA stability. This notion was supported by the results that treatment of cells with SAHA decreased the half-life of cyclin D1 mRNA from 6.95 h to 2.57 h. Consistent with downregulation of cyclin D1 mRNA stability, SAHA treatment also attenuated HuR expression, which has been well-characterized as a positive regulator of cyclin D1 mRNA stability. Thus, our study identifies a novel mechanism responsible for SAHA inhibiting cell transformation via decreasing cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest in Cl41 cells. -- Highlights: ? SAHA inhibits cell transformation in Cl41 cells. ? SAHA suppresses Cyclin D1 protein expression. ? SAHA decreases cyclin D1 mRNA stability.

  18. Culture at a Higher Temperature Mildly Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth but Enhances Chemotherapeutic Effects by Inhibiting Cell-Cell Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shengming; Wang, Jiangang; Xie, Bingkun; Luo, Zhiguo; Lin, Xiukun; Liao, D. Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile infections have historically been used to treat cancer. To explore the underlying mechanism, we studied chronic effects of fever on cancer cell growth and chemotherapeutic efficacy in cell culture. We found that culturing cancer cells at 39°C mildly inhibited cell growth by arresting the cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. When cells were seeded in culture dishes at a lower density, e.g. about 1000–2000 cells per 35-mm dish, the growth inhibition was much greater, manifested as many fewer cell colonies in the 39°C dishes, compared with the results at a higher density seeding, e.g. 20,000 cells per dish, suggesting that cell-cell collaboration as the Allee effect in cell culture is inhibited at 39°C. Withdrawal of cells from serum enhanced the G1 arrest at 39°C and, for some cell lines such as A549 lung cancer cells, serum replenishment failed to quickly drive the cells from the G1 into the S and G2-M phases. Therapeutic effects of several chemotherapeutic agents, including clove bud extracts, on several cancer cell lines were more potent at 39°C than at 37°C, especially when the cells were seeded at a low density. For some cell lines and some agents, this enhancement is long-lasting, i.e. continuing after the cessation of the treatment. Collectively these results suggest that hyperthermia may inhibit cancer cell growth by G1 arrest and by inhibition of cell-cell collaboration, and may enhance the efficacy of several chemotherapeutic agents, an effect which may persist beyond the termination of chemotherapy. PMID:26495849

  19. Corrosion inhibition of steel in concrete by carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Sagoe-Crentsil, K.K.; Glasser, F.P. . Dept. of Chemistry); Yilmaz, V.T. )

    1993-11-01

    Water soluble carboxylic acids have been used as corrosion inhibitors. They remain largely soluble after curing in cement for up to 90d. Corrosion current measurements are presented showing malonic acid, a dicarboxylic acid, to be a very effective corrosion inhibitor even in the presence of 2.5 wt % chloride. Unfortunately, it has an initial retarding effect on the set of Portland cement. The investigation suggests that corrosion inhibitors based on carboxylic acids remain a fruitful field of investigation.

  20. Development of poly(aspartic acid-co-malic acid) composites for calcium carbonate and sulphate scale inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mithil Kumar, N; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Jagadeesh, Dani; Kanny, K; Bux, F

    2015-01-01

    Polyaspartic acid (PSI) is suitable for the inhibition of inorganic scale deposition. To enhance its scale inhibition efficiency, PSI was modified by reacting aspartic acid with malic acid (MA) using thermal polycondensation polymerization. This reaction resulted in poly(aspartic acid-co-malic acid) (PSI-co-MA) dual polymer. The structural, chemical and thermal properties of the dual polymers were analysed by using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and gel permeation chromatography. The effectiveness of six different molar ratios of PSI-co-MA dual polymer for calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate scale inhibition at laboratory scale batch experiments was evaluated with synthetic brine solution at selected doses of polymer at 65-70C by the static scale test method. The performance of PSI-co-MA dual polymer for the inhibition of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate precipitation was compared with that of a PSI single polymer. The PSI-co-MA exhibited excellent ability to control inorganic minerals, with approximately 85.36% calcium carbonate inhibition and 100% calcium sulphate inhibition at a level of 10?mg/L PSI-co-MA, respectively. Therefore, it may be reasonably concluded that PSI-co-MA is a highly effective scale inhibitor for cooling water treatment applications. PMID:25371160

  1. Bile acid inhibition of taurocholate uptake by rat hepatocytes: role of OH groups

    SciTech Connect

    Bellentani, S.; Hardison, W.G.M.; Marchegiano, P.; Zanasi, G.; Manenti, F.

    1987-03-01

    To define further the structural specificity of the taurocholate uptake site, the authors studied the ability of a variety of taurine-conjugated bile acids with differing hydroxyl substituents on the sterol moiety to inhibit (/sup 14/C) taurocholate uptake. Rat hepatocytes isolated by collagenase perfusion were incubated in a tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane-phosphate buffer containing (/sup 14/C)taurocholate in the presence or absence of inhibitor bile acid. Stronger inhibitors were studied at a fixed concentration of 5 ..mu..M, weaker ones at 25 ..mu..M. Initial uptake velocity was measured. Uptake velocity could then be related to taurocholate concentration and a V/sub max/ and K/sub m/ could be determined by applying a nonlinear least squares fit to the data obtained with or without inhibitor. The kinetic parameters allowed the determination of the type of inhibition and of inhibition constants (K/sub i/) of the various test bile acids. The data indicate that bile acids containing a 6- or 7-OH group exhibit competitive inhibition, whereas bile acids with no 6- or 7-OH group exhibit noncompetitive inhibition. Of the compounds exhibiting competitive inhibition, K/sub i/ varied with the number of hydroxyl groups on the sterol moiety. They conclude that the presence of absence of a 6- or 7-OH group dictates the mechanism of inhibition; the number of hydroxyl substituents determines the potency of competitive inhibition.

  2. Hypergravity inhibits elongation growth of azuki bean epicotyls independently of the direction of stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Kamisaka, S.; Hoson, T.

    We examined the effects of basipetal, horizontal, and acropetal hypergravity stimulation on growth and cell wall properties of azuki bean seedlings. Horizontal and acropetal hypergravity inhibited elongation growth of epicotyls by decreasing the cell wall extensibility, as did basipetal hypergravity. Hypergravity stimulation increased the thickness of cell walls and suppressed xyloglucan breakdown regardless of direction. All hypergravity treatments increased the pH in the apoplastic fluid, which is involved in the processes of the suppression of xyloglucan breakdown. Gadolinium and lanthanum, both blockers of mechanoreceptors, nullified the growth-inhibiting effects of hypergravity. These results show that growth inhibition by hypergravity is independent of its direction in azuki bean epicotyls. The findings also suggest that mechanoreceptors on the plasma membrane perceive the gravity signal independently of its direction, and affect growth of azuki bean epicotyls.

  3. Anaerobic growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum via mixed-acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Michel, Andrea; Koch-Koerfges, Abigail; Krumbach, Karin; Brocker, Melanie; Bott, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, a model organism in microbial biotechnology, is known to metabolize glucose under oxygen-deprived conditions to l-lactate, succinate, and acetate without significant growth. This property is exploited for efficient production of lactate and succinate. Our detailed analysis revealed that marginal growth takes place under anaerobic conditions with glucose, fructose, sucrose, or ribose as a carbon and energy source but not with gluconate, pyruvate, lactate, propionate, or acetate. Supplementation of glucose minimal medium with tryptone strongly enhanced growth up to a final optical density at 600 nm (OD600) of 12, whereas tryptone alone did not allow growth. Amino acids with a high ATP demand for biosynthesis and amino acids of the glutamate family were particularly important for growth stimulation, indicating ATP limitation and a restricted carbon flux into the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle toward 2-oxoglutarate. Anaerobic cultivation in a bioreactor with constant nitrogen flushing disclosed that CO2 is required to achieve maximal growth and that the pH tolerance is reduced compared to that under aerobic conditions, reflecting a decreased capability for pH homeostasis. Continued growth under anaerobic conditions indicated the absence of an oxygen-requiring reaction that is essential for biomass formation. The results provide an improved understanding of the physiology of C. glutamicum under anaerobic conditions. PMID:26276118

  4. Inhibition of the growth of transformed and neoplastic cells by the dipeptide carnosine.

    PubMed

    Holliday, R; McFarland, G A

    1996-04-01

    Human diploid fibroblasts growth normally in medium containing physiological concentrations of the naturally occurring dipeptide carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine). These concentrations are cytotoxic to transformed and neoplastic cells lines in modified Eagle medium (MEM), whereas these cells grow vigorously in Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM) containing carnosine. This difference is due to the presence of 1 mM sodium pyruvate in DMEM. Seven human cell lines and two rodent cell lines were tested and all are strongly inhibited by carnosine in the absence of pyruvate. Experiments with HeLa cells show that anserine is similar to carnosine, but D-carnosine and homocarnosine are without effect. Also, the non-essential amino acids alanine and glutamic acid contribute to the effect of pyruvate in preventing carnosine toxicity, and oxaloacetate and alpha-ketoglutarate can substitute for pyruvate. We have used mixtures of normal MRC-5 fibroblasts and HeLa cells to demonstrate that 20 mM carnosine can selectively eliminate the tumour cells. This has obvious implications which might be exploited in in vivo and in vitro studies. Carnosine is known to react strongly with aldehyde and keto groups of sugars by Amadori reaction, and we propose that it depletes certain glycolysis intermediates. It is well known that tumour cells are more dependent on glycolysis than normal cells. A reduction of glycolysis intermediates by carnosine may deplete their energy supply, but this effect is totally reversed by pyruvate. PMID:8611433

  5. On the role of abscisic Acid and gibberellin in the regulation of growth in rice.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann-Benning, S; Kende, H

    1992-07-01

    Submergence induces rapid elongation of rice coleoptiles (Oryza sativa L.) and of deepwater rice internodes. This adaptive feature helps rice to grow out of the water and to survive flooding. Earlier, we found that the growth response of submerged deepwater rice plants is mediated by ethylene and gibberellin (GA). Ethylene promotes growth, at least in part, by increasing the responsiveness of the internodal tissue to GA. In the present work, we examined the possibility that increased responsiveness to GA was based on a reduction in endogenous abscisic acid (ABA) levels. Submergence and treatment with ethylene led, within 3 hours, to a 75% reduction in the level of ABA in the intercalary meristem and the growing zone of deepwater rice internodes. The level of GA(1) increased fourfold during the same time period. An interaction between GA and ABA could also be shown by application of the hormones. ABA inhibited growth of submerged internodes, and GA counteracted this inhibition. Our results indicate that the growth rate of deepwater rice internodes is determined by the ratio of an endogenous growth promoter (GA) and a growth inhibitor (ABA). We also investigated whether ABA is involved in regulating the growth of rice coleoptiles. Rice seedlings were grown on solutions containing fluridone, an inhibitor of carotenoid and, indirectly, of ABA biosynthesis. Treatment with fluridone reduced the level of ABA in coleoptiles and first leaves by more than 75% and promoted coleoptile growth by more than 60%. Little or no enhancement of growth by fluridone was observed in barley, oat, or wheat. The involvement of ABA in determining the growth rate of rice coleoptiles and deepwater rice internodes may be related to the semiaquatic growth habit of this plant. PMID:16668983

  6. Mechanism of inhibition caused by long-chain fatty acids in anaerobic digestion process

    SciTech Connect

    Hanaki, K.; Matsuo, T.; Nagase, M.

    1981-07-01

    The inhibitory effect of long-chain fatty acids on the anaerobic digestion process was examined in batch experiments using synthetic substrates. The addition of long-chain fatty acids caused the appearance of the lag period in the methane production from acetate and in the degradation of both long-chain fatty acids and n-butyrate. Methane production from hydrogen proceeded without lag period although its rate was lowered. Fermentation of glucose was not inhibited. Neutral fat in the whole milk was easily hydrolyzed to long-chain fatty acids, which brought about the inhibition. The addition of calcium chloride reduced the inhibitory effect of long-chain fatty acids, but it did not do so after the culture had been exposed to long-chain fatty acids for more than several hours. The addition of calcium carbonate could not reduce the inhibition because of its insolubility. (Refs. 18).

  7. Anti-angiogenic activity of conjugated linoleic acid on basic fibroblast growth factor-induced angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun-Joung; Lee, You Mie; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2003-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a potent inhibitor of mammary carcinogenesis. Cancer cells produce various angiogenic factors which stimulate host vascular endothelial cell mitogenesis and chemotaxis for their growth and metastasis. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a potent angiogenic factor that is expressed in many tumors. In this study, we found that CLA decreased bFGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation and DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. However, CLA did not inhibit endothelial cell migration. Furthermore, CLA showed a potent inhibitory effect on embryonic vasculogenesis and bFGF-induced angiogenesis in vivo. Collectively, these results suggest that CLA selectively inhibits the active proliferating endothelial cells induced by bFGF, which may explain its anti-carcinogenic properties in vivo. PMID:12684633

  8. Improvement of the antifungal activity of lactic acid bacteria by addition to the growth medium of phenylpyruvic acid, a precursor of phenyllactic acid.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Francesca; Di Biase, Mariaelena; Lattanzio, Veronica M T; Lavermicocca, Paola

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the current study was to improve the antifungal activity of eight lactic acid bacterial (LAB) strains by the addition of phenylpyruvic acid (PPA), a precursor of the antifungal compound phenyllactic acid (PLA), to a defined growth medium (DM). The effect of PPA addition on the LABs antifungal activity related to the production of organic acids (PLA, d-lactic, l-lactic, acetic, citric, formic and 4-hydroxy-phenyllactic acids) and of other phenylpyruvic-derived molecules, was investigated. In the presence of PPA the inhibitory activity (expressed as growth inhibition percentage) against fungal bread contaminants Aspergillus niger and Penicillium roqueforti significantly increased and was, even if not completely, associated to PLA increase (from a mean value of 0.44 to 0.93mM). While the inhibitory activity against Endomyces fibuliger was mainly correlated to the low pH and to lactic, acetic and p-OH-PLA acids. When the PCA analysis based on data of growth inhibition percentage and organic acid concentrations was performed, strains grown in DM+PPA separated from those grown in DM and the most active strains Lactobacillus plantarum 21B, Lactobacillus fermentum 18B and Lactobacillus brevis 18F grouped together. The antifungal activity resulted to be strain-related, based on a different mechanism of action for filamentous fungi and the yeast and was not exclusively associated to the increase of PLA. Therefore, a further investigation on the unique unidentified peak in HPLC-UV chromatograms, was performed by LC-MS/MS analysis. Actually, full scan mass spectra (negative ion mode) recorded at the retention time of the unknown compound, showed a main peak of m/z 291.0 which was consistent with the nominal mass of the molecular ion [M-H](-) of polyporic acid, a PPA derivative whose antifungal activity has been previously reported (Brewer et al., 1977). In conclusion, the addition of PPA to the growth medium contributed to improve the antifungal activity of LAB strains and resulted in the production of the polyporic acid, here ascertained in LAB strains. PMID:26827290

  9. Labdanolic acid methyl ester (LAME) exerts anti-inflammatory effects through inhibition of TAK-1 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Cuadrado, Irene; Estevez-Braun, Ana; Instituto Canario de Investigaciones del Cáncer ; Heras, Beatriz de las

    2012-01-01

    Labdane derivatives obtained from the diterpenoid labdanediol suppressed NO and PGE{sub 2} production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. However, mechanisms involved in these inhibitory effects are not elucidated. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathways involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of labdanolic acid methyl ester (LAME) in peritoneal macrophages and examined its therapeutic effect in a mouse endotoxic shock model. LAME reduced the production of NO and PGE{sub 2} in LPS-activated macrophages. This effect involved the inhibition of NOS-2 and COX-2 gene expression, acting at the transcription level. Examination of the effects of the diterpene on NF-κB signaling showed that LAME inhibits the phosphorylation of IκBα and IκBβ, preventing their degradation and the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit. Moreover, inhibition of MAPK signaling was also observed. A further experiment revealed that LAME inhibited the phosphorylation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), an upstream signaling molecule required for IKK and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation. Inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α and IP-10 were downregulated in the presence of this compound after stimulation with LPS. Additionally, LAME also improved survival in a mouse model of endotoxemia and reduced the circulatory levels of cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α). In conclusion, these results indicate that labdane diterpene LAME significantly attenuates the pro-inflammatory response induced by LPS both in vivo and in vitro. Highlights: ► LAME reduced the production of NO and PGE{sub 2} in LPS-activated macrophages. ► IL-6, TNF-α and IP-10 were also inhibited by LAME. ► Inhibition of TAK-1 activation is the mechanism involved in this process. ► LAME improved survival in a mouse model of endotoxemia. ► LAME reduced the circulatory levels of cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α).

  10. THIAMINE AND NICOTINIC ACID: ANAEROBIC GROWTH FACTORS FOR MUCOR ROUXII

    PubMed Central

    Bartnicki-Garcia, S.; Nickerson, Walter J.

    1961-01-01

    Bartnicki-Garcia, S. (Rutgers, the State University, New Brunswick, N. J.), and Walter J. Nickerson. Thiamine and nicotinic acid: Anaerobic growth factors for Mucor rouxii. J. Bacteriol. 82:142–148. 1961.—Mucor rouxii requires preformed thiamine and nicotinic acid for anaerobic growth. Such requirements are not manifested during aerobic incubation. Aerobically, the fungus was shown to be able to synthesize both vitamins. The yeastlike form and the filamentous form of anaerobically grown M. rouxii exhibit the same vitamin requirements. Thiamine can be substituted by its thiazole moiety. Under certain conditions, nicotinic acid was partly substituted by tryptophan, kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine, and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid. Anaerobically. the fungus (thiamine requiring) was about ten times more susceptible to pyrithiamine antagonism than the same organism grown aerobically (thiamine independent). PMID:16561911

  11. Acetyl-keto-?-boswellic acid inhibits cellular proliferation through a p21-dependent pathway in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Jun; Huang, Baohua; Hooi, Shing Chuan

    2006-01-01

    Although there is increasing evidence showing that boswellic acid might be a potential anticancer agent, the mechanisms involved in its action are unclear. In the present study, we showed that acetyl-keto-?-boswellic acid (AKBA) inhibited cellular growth in several colon cancer cell lines. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry showed that cells were arrested at the G1 phase after AKBA treatment. Further analysis showed that cyclin D1 and E, CDK 2 and 4 and phosphorylated Rb were decreased in AKBA-treated cells while p21 expression was increased. The growth inhibitory effect of AKBA was dependent on p21 but not p53. HCT-116 p53?/? cells were sensitized to the apoptotic effect of AKBA, suggesting that p21 may have protected cells against apoptosis by inducing a G1 arrest. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that AKBA inhibited cellular growth in colon cancer cells. These findings may have implications to the use of boswellic acids as potential anticancer agents in colon cancer. PMID:16783403

  12. BRD4 Inhibitor Inhibits Colorectal Cancer Growth and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yuan; Zhou, Jieqiong; Ye, Fei; Xiong, Huabao; Peng, Liang; Zheng, Zihan; Xu, Feihong; Cui, Miao; Wei, Chengguo; Wang, Xinying; Wang, Zhongqiu; Zhu, Hongfa; Lee, Peng; Zhou, Mingming; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, David Y.

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications have been identified to be of great importance in cancers and lysine acetylation, which can attract the multifunctional transcription factor BRD4, has been identified as a potential therapeutic target. In this paper, we identify that BRD4 has an important role in colorectal cancer; and that its inhibition substantially wipes out tumor cells. Treatment with inhibitor MS417 potently affects cancer cells, although such effects were not always outright necrosis or apoptosis. We report that BRD4 inhibition also limits distal metastasis by regulating several key proteins in the progression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). This effect of BRD4 inhibitor is demonstrated via liver metastasis in animal model as well as migration and invasion experiments in vitro. Together, our results demonstrate a new application of BRD4 inhibitor that may be of clinical use by virtue of its ability to limit metastasis while also being tumorcidal. PMID:25603177

  13. BRD4 inhibitor inhibits colorectal cancer growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan; Zhou, Jieqiong; Ye, Fei; Xiong, Huabao; Peng, Liang; Zheng, Zihan; Xu, Feihong; Cui, Miao; Wei, Chengguo; Wang, Xinying; Wang, Zhongqiu; Zhu, Hongfa; Lee, Peng; Zhou, Mingming; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, David Y

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications have been identified to be of great importance in cancers and lysine acetylation, which can attract the multifunctional transcription factor BRD4, has been identified as a potential therapeutic target. In this paper, we identify that BRD4 has an important role in colorectal cancer; and that its inhibition substantially wipes out tumor cells. Treatment with inhibitor MS417 potently affects cancer cells, although such effects were not always outright necrosis or apoptosis. We report that BRD4 inhibition also limits distal metastasis by regulating several key proteins in the progression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). This effect of BRD4 inhibitor is demonstrated via liver metastasis in animal model as well as migration and invasion experiments in vitro. Together, our results demonstrate a new application of BRD4 inhibitor that may be of clinical use by virtue of its ability to limit metastasis while also being tumorcidal. PMID:25603177

  14. Inhibition of telomerase by linear-chain fatty acids: a structural analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Masako; Ueno, Takamasa; Kasai, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Hirotada; Yoshida, Hiromi; Sugawara, Fumio; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Hayashi, Hideya; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, we have found that mono-unsaturated linear-chain fatty acids in the cis configuration with C(18) hydrocarbon chains (i.e. oleic acid) strongly inhibited the activity of human telomerase in a cell-free enzymic assay, with an IC(50) value of 8.6 microM. Interestingly, fatty acids with hydrocarbon chain lengths below 16 or above 20 carbons substantially decreased the potency of inhibition of telomerase. Moreover, the cis-mono-unsaturated C(18) linear-chain fatty acid oleic acid was the strongest inhibitor of all the fatty acids tested. A kinetic study revealed that oleic acid competitively inhibited the activity of telomerase ( K (i)=3.06 microM) with respect to the telomerase substrate primer. The energy-minimized three-dimensional structure of the linear-chain fatty acid was calculated and modelled. A molecule width of 11.53-14.26 A (where 1 A=0.1 nm) in the C(16) to C(20) fatty acid structure was suggested to be important for telomerase inhibition. The three-dimensional structure of the telomerase active site (i.e. the substrate primer-binding site) appears to have a pocket that could bind oleic acid, with the pocket being 8.50 A long and 12.80 A wide. PMID:12121150

  15. Bestatin Inhibits Cell Growth, Cell Division, and Spore Cell Differentiation in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Poloz, Yekaterina; Catalano, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Bestatin methyl ester (BME) is an inhibitor of Zn2+-binding aminopeptidases that inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in normal and cancer cells. We have used Dictyostelium as a model organism to study the effects of BME. Only two Zn2+-binding aminopeptidases have been identified in Dictyostelium to date, puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase A and B (PsaA and PsaB). PSA from other organisms is known to regulate cell division and differentiation. Here we show that PsaA is differentially expressed throughout growth and development of Dictyostelium, and its expression is regulated by developmental morphogens. We present evidence that BME specifically interacts with PsaA and inhibits its aminopeptidase activity. Treatment of cells with BME inhibited the rate of cell growth and the frequency of cell division in growing cells and inhibited spore cell differentiation during late development. Overexpression of PsaA-GFP (where GFP is green fluorescent protein) also inhibited spore cell differentiation but did not affect growth. Using chimeras, we have identified that nuclear versus cytoplasmic localization of PsaA affects the choice between stalk or spore cell differentiation pathway. Cells that overexpressed PsaA-GFP (primarily nuclear) differentiated into stalk cells, while cells that overexpressed PsaA?NLS2-GFP (cytoplasmic) differentiated into spores. In conclusion, we have identified that BME inhibits cell growth, division, and differentiation in Dictyostelium likely through inhibition of PsaA. PMID:22345351

  16. miR-29b represses intestinal mucosal growth by inhibiting translation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lan; Rao, Jaladanki N.; Zou, Tongtong; Liu, Lan; Cao, Shan; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Su, Weijie; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Gorospe, Myriam; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2013-01-01

    The epithelium of the intestinal mucosa is a rapidly self-renewing tissue in the body, and defects in the renewal process occur commonly in various disorders. microRNAs (miRNAs) posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression and are implicated in many aspects of cellular physiology. Here we investigate the role of miRNA-29b (miR-29b) in the regulation of normal intestinal mucosal growth and further validate its target mRNAs. miRNA expression profiling studies reveal that growth inhibition of the small intestinal mucosa is associated with increased expression of numerous miRNAs, including miR-29b. The simple systemic delivery of locked nucleic acidmodified, antimiR-29b-reduced endogenous miR-29b levels in the small intestinal mucosa increases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) expression and stimulates mucosal growth. In contrast, overexpression of the miR-29b precursor in intestinal epithelial cells represses CDK2 expression and results in growth arrest in G1 phase. miR-29b represses CDK2 translation through direct interaction with the cdk2 mRNA via its 3?-untranslated region (3?-UTR), whereas point mutation of miR-29b binding site in the cdk2 3?-UTR prevents miR-29binduced repression of CDK2 translation. These results indicate that miR-29b inhibits intestinal mucosal growth by repressing CDK2 translation. PMID:23904268

  17. Dynamic Adaption of Metabolic Pathways during Germination and Growth of Lily Pollen Tubes after Inhibition of the Electron Transport Chain1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Obermeyer, Gerhard; Fragner, Lena; Lang, Veronika; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of the metabolome and the transcriptome of pollen of lily (Lilium longiflorum) gave a comprehensive overview of metabolic pathways active during pollen germination and tube growth. More than 100 different metabolites were determined simultaneously by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, and expressed genes of selected metabolic pathways were identified by next-generation sequencing of lily pollen transcripts. The time-dependent changes in metabolite abundances, as well as the changes after inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, revealed a fast and dynamic adaption of the metabolic pathways in the range of minutes. The metabolic state prior to pollen germination differed clearly from the metabolic state during pollen tube growth, as indicated by principal component analysis of all detected metabolites and by detailed observation of individual metabolites. For instance, the amount of sucrose increased during the first 60 minutes of pollen culture but decreased during tube growth, while glucose and fructose showed the opposite behavior. Glycolysis, tricarbonic acid cycle, glyoxylate cycle, starch, and fatty acid degradation were activated, providing energy during pollen germination and tube growth. Inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain by antimycin A resulted in an immediate production of ethanol and a fast rearrangement of metabolic pathways, which correlated with changes in the amounts of the majority of identified metabolites, e.g. a rapid increase in ?-aminobutyric acid indicated the activation of a ?-aminobutyric acid shunt in the tricarbonic acid cycle, while ethanol fermentation compensated the reduced ATP production after inhibition of the oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:23660836

  18. Growth Inhibition of Human Gynecologic and Colon Cancer Cells by Phyllanthus watsonii through Apoptosis Induction

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Sujatha; Abdul Wahab, Norhanom; Zainal Abidin, Nurhayati; Manickam, Sugumaran; Zakaria, Zubaidah

    2012-01-01

    Phyllanthus watsonii Airy Shaw is an endemic plant found in Peninsular Malaysia. Although there are numerous reports on the anti cancer properties of other Phyllanthus species, published information on the cytotoxicity of P. watsonii are very limited. The present study was carried out with bioassay-guided fractionation approach to evaluate the cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction capability of the P. watsonii extracts and fractions on human gynecologic (SKOV-3 and Ca Ski) and colon (HT-29) cancer cells. P. watsonii extracts exhibited strong cytotoxicity on all the cancer cells studied with IC50 values of ? 20.0 g/mL. Hexane extract of P. watsonii was further subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation and yielded 10 fractions (PW-1?PW-10). PW-4?PW-8 portrayed stronger cytotoxic activity and was further subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation and resulted with 8 sub-fractions (PPWH-1?PPWH-8). PPWH-7 possessed greatest cytotoxicity (IC50 values ranged from 0.66 0.83 g/mL) and was selective on the cancer cells studied. LC-MS/MS analysis of PPWH-7 revealed the presence of ellagic acid, geranic acid, glochidone, betulin, phyllanthin and sterol glucoside. Marked morphological changes, ladder-like appearance of DNA and increment in caspase-3 activity indicating apoptosis were clearly observed in both human gynecologic and colon cancer cells treated with P. watsonii especially with PPWH-7. The study also indicated that P. watsonii extracts arrested cell cycle at different growth phases in SKOV-3, Ca Ski and HT-29 cells. Cytotoxic and apoptotic potential of the endemic P. watsonii was investigated for the first time by bioassay-guided approach. These results demonstrated that P. watsonii selectively inhibits the growth of SKOV-3, Ca Ski and HT-29 cells through apoptosis induction and cell cycle modulation. Hence, P. watsonii has the potential to be further exploited for the discovery and development of new anti cancer drugs. PMID:22536331

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN.
    Harland and Liburdy (1) reported that 1.2-uT, 60-Hz magnetic fields could significantly block the inhibitory action of pharmacological levels of tamoxifen (10-7 M) on the growth of MCF-7 human br...

  20. Inhibition of Microbial Growth by Fatty Amine Catalysts from Polyurethane Foam Test Tube Plugs

    PubMed Central

    Bach, John A.; Wnuk, Richard J.; Martin, Delano G.

    1975-01-01

    When polyurethane foam test tube plugs are autoclaved, they release volatile fatty amines that inhibit the growth of some microorganisms. The chemical structures of these amines were determined by the use of a gas chromatographmass spectrometer. They are catalysts used to produce the foam. The problem of contaminating growth media with toxic substances released from polymeric materials is discussed. PMID:1096816

  1. In vitro growth inhibition of mastitis pathogens by bovine teat skin normal flora.

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, W D; Besser, T E; Ward, A C; Corbeil, L B

    1987-01-01

    One factor contributing to differences in the susceptibility of cows to mastitis may be differences in the teat skin normal flora, which could inhibit or enhance the growth of pathogenic bacteria. Using in vitro cross-streaking methods, we found that 25% of the isolates of teat normal flora of non-lactating heifers inhibited the growth of selected mastitis pathogens, but enhancers were not detected. Gram-positive pathogens were inhibited to a greater extent than Gram-negative pathogens. Inhibition was not a characteristic of specific genera or species of normal flora, but rather a property of certain variants within a species. This phenomenon of inhibition of mastitis pathogens in vitro by normal flora may be useful as an in vivo biological control method to reduce the incidence of mastitis. PMID:3552170

  2. Cytokinin Antagonizes Abscisic Acid-Mediated Inhibition of Cotyledon Greening by Promoting the Degradation of ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5 Protein in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Chunmei; Wang, Xingchun; Feng, Jian; Hong, Sulei; Liang, Yan; Ren, Bo; Zuo, Jianru

    2014-01-01

    In higher plants, seed germination is followed by postgerminative growth. One of the key developmental events during postgerminative growth is cotyledon greening, which enables a seedling to establish photosynthetic capacity. The plant phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a vital role by inhibiting seed germination and postgerminative growth in response to dynamically changing internal and environmental cues. It has been shown that ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5 (ABI5), a basic leucine zipper transcription factor, is an important factor in the regulation of the ABA-mediated inhibitory effect on seed germination and postgerminative growth. Conversely, the phytohormone cytokinin has been proposed to promote seed germination by antagonizing the ABA-mediated inhibitory effect. However, the underpinning molecular mechanism of cytokinin-repressed ABA signaling is largely unknown. Here, we show that cytokinin specifically antagonizes ABA-mediated inhibition of cotyledon greening with minimal effects on seed germination in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that the cytokinin-antagonized ABA effect is dependent on a functional cytokinin signaling pathway, mainly involved in the cytokinin receptor gene CYTOKININ RESPONSE1/ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE KINASE4, downstream histidine phosphotransfer protein genes AHP2, AHP3, and AHP5, and a type B response regulator gene, ARR12, which genetically acts upstream of ABI5 to regulate cotyledon greening. Cytokinin has no apparent effect on the transcription of ABI5. However, cytokinin efficiently promotes the proteasomal degradation of ABI5 in a cytokinin signaling-dependent manner. These results define a genetic pathway through which cytokinin specifically induces the degradation of ABI5 protein, thereby antagonizing ABA-mediated inhibition of postgerminative growth. PMID:24443524

  3. Cytokinin antagonizes abscisic acid-mediated inhibition of cotyledon greening by promoting the degradation of abscisic acid insensitive5 protein in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Guan, Chunmei; Wang, Xingchun; Feng, Jian; Hong, Sulei; Liang, Yan; Ren, Bo; Zuo, Jianru

    2014-03-01

    In higher plants, seed germination is followed by postgerminative growth. One of the key developmental events during postgerminative growth is cotyledon greening, which enables a seedling to establish photosynthetic capacity. The plant phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a vital role by inhibiting seed germination and postgerminative growth in response to dynamically changing internal and environmental cues. It has been shown that abscisic acid insensitive5 (ABI5), a basic leucine zipper transcription factor, is an important factor in the regulation of the ABA-mediated inhibitory effect on seed germination and postgerminative growth. Conversely, the phytohormone cytokinin has been proposed to promote seed germination by antagonizing the ABA-mediated inhibitory effect. However, the underpinning molecular mechanism of cytokinin-repressed ABA signaling is largely unknown. Here, we show that cytokinin specifically antagonizes ABA-mediated inhibition of cotyledon greening with minimal effects on seed germination in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that the cytokinin-antagonized ABA effect is dependent on a functional cytokinin signaling pathway, mainly involved in the cytokinin receptor gene cytokinin response1/Arabidopsis histidine kinase4, downstream histidine phosphotransfer protein genes AHP2, AHP3, and AHP5, and a type B response regulator gene, ARR12, which genetically acts upstream of ABI5 to regulate cotyledon greening. Cytokinin has no apparent effect on the transcription of ABI5. However, cytokinin efficiently promotes the proteasomal degradation of ABI5 in a cytokinin signaling-dependent manner. These results define a genetic pathway through which cytokinin specifically induces the degradation of ABI5 protein, thereby antagonizing ABA-mediated inhibition of postgerminative growth. PMID:24443524

  4. Comparative study of ovatifolin antioxidant and growth inhibition activities.

    PubMed

    Cespedes, C L; Hoeneisen, M; Bittner, M; Becerra, J; Silva, M

    2001-09-01

    A comparative study on the effect of arturin (1), ovatifolin (3), deacetylovatifolin (5), and their 1-acetoxyarturin (2), 8-acetoxyovatifolin (4), 1,10-epoxyovatifolin (6), and 11,13-dihydroovatifolin (7) derivatives, isolated from Podanthus ovatifolius and Podanthus mitiqui, on the seedling growth, germination, and respiration of several monocot and dicot weedy target species was carried out. In addition to the inhibitory activity on the bleaching of crocin induced by alkoxyl radicals, these compounds also displayed scavenging properties toward DPPH in TLC autographic and spectrophotometric assays. The results indicate that ovatifolin (3), deacetylovatifolin (5), epoxyovatifolin (6), dihydroovatifolin (7), and the CH(2)Cl(2) extract interfere with pre-emergence of seedlings at the level of respiration. These compounds appear to have selective effects on the radicle and shoot growth of Physalis ixocarpa and Trifolium pratense. Their allelopathic effects are comparable to those of parthenolide, a know natural growth inhibitor. PMID:11559118

  5. A mechanistic model of wormhole growth in carbonate matrix acidizing and acid fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, K.M.; Hill, A.D.; Sepehrnoorl, K.

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model that describes the growth and competition of wormholes during ann acidizing treatment in a carbonate formation was developed. The model is initialized with the distribution of largest pores. Wormhole characteristics (size, length, and distribution) were found too be controlled by acid-injection, diffusion, and fluid-loss rates.

  6. Cytokine-induced inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocytic growth in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Orago, A S; Facer, C A

    1993-01-01

    The addition of recombinant cytokines to Plasmodium falciparum in vitro cultures retarded the growth of the parasite with the effect of recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2) > interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) > tumour necrosis factor-beta (TNF-beta). The process was concentration dependent, being greatest at 30,000 U/ml and required a 72-h period of continuous exposure for maximum effect. Growth inhibition, as determined morphologically and radiometrically, was a consequence of defective schizont maturation rather than inhibition of merozoite invasion. It was cumulative and detectable within one erythrocytic (48 h) growth cycle. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8428394

  7. Monensin inhibits growth of bacterial contaminants from fuel ethanol plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (