Science.gov

Sample records for acids research database

  1. The 2013 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue and the online Molecular Biology Database Collection

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Suárez, Xosé M.; Galperin, Michael Y.

    2013-01-01

    The 20th annual Database Issue of Nucleic Acids Research includes 176 articles, half of which describe new online molecular biology databases and the other half provide updates on the databases previously featured in NAR and other journals. This year’s highlights include two databases of DNA repeat elements; several databases of transcriptional factors and transcriptional factor-binding sites; databases on various aspects of protein structure and protein–protein interactions; databases for metagenomic and rRNA sequence analysis; and four databases specifically dedicated to Escherichia coli. The increased emphasis on using the genome data to improve human health is reflected in the development of the databases of genomic structural variation (NCBI’s dbVar and EBI’s DGVa), the NIH Genetic Testing Registry and several other databases centered on the genetic basis of human disease, potential drugs, their targets and the mechanisms of protein–ligand binding. Two new databases present genomic and RNAseq data for monkeys, providing wealth of data on our closest relatives for comparative genomics purposes. The NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection, available at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/nar/database/a/, has been updated and currently lists 1512 online databases. The full content of the Database Issue is freely available online on the Nucleic Acids Research website (http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/). PMID:23203983

  2. The 2012 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue and the online Molecular Biology Database Collection.

    PubMed

    Galperin, Michael Y; Fernández-Suárez, Xosé M

    2012-01-01

    The 19th annual Database Issue of Nucleic Acids Research features descriptions of 92 new online databases covering various areas of molecular biology and 100 papers describing recent updates to the databases previously described in NAR and other journals. The highlights of this issue include, among others, a description of neXtProt, a knowledgebase on human proteins; a detailed explanation of the principles behind the NCBI Taxonomy Database; NCBI and EBI papers on the recently launched BioSample databases that store sample information for a variety of database resources; descriptions of the recent developments in the Gene Ontology and UniProt Gene Ontology Annotation projects; updates on Pfam, SMART and InterPro domain databases; update papers on KEGG and TAIR, two universally acclaimed databases that face an uncertain future; and a separate section with 10 wiki-based databases, introduced in an accompanying editorial. The NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection, available at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/nar/database/a/, has been updated and now lists 1380 databases. Brief machine-readable descriptions of the databases featured in this issue, according to the BioDBcore standards, will be provided at the http://biosharing.org/biodbcore web site. The full content of the Database Issue is freely available online on the Nucleic Acids Research web site (http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/). PMID:22144685

  3. The 2014 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue and an updated NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Suárez, Xosé M.; Rigden, Daniel J.; Galperin, Michael Y.

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue includes descriptions of 58 new molecular biology databases and recent updates to 123 databases previously featured in NAR or other journals. For convenience, the issue is now divided into eight sections that reflect major subject categories. Among the highlights of this issue are six databases of the transcription factor binding sites in various organisms and updates on such popular databases as CAZy, Database of Genomic Variants (DGV), dbGaP, DrugBank, KEGG, miRBase, Pfam, Reactome, SEED, TCDB and UniProt. There is a strong block of structural databases, which includes, among others, the new RNA Bricks database, updates on PDBe, PDBsum, ArchDB, Gene3D, ModBase, Nucleic Acid Database and the recently revived iPfam database. An update on the NCBI’s MMDB describes VAST+, an improved tool for protein structure comparison. Two articles highlight the development of the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database: one describes SCOPe, which automates assignment of new structures to the existing SCOP hierarchy; the other one describes the first version of SCOP2, with its more flexible approach to classifying protein structures. This issue also includes a collection of articles on bacterial taxonomy and metagenomics, which includes updates on the List of Prokaryotic Names with Standing in Nomenclature (LPSN), Ribosomal Database Project (RDP), the Silva/LTP project and several new metagenomics resources. The NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection, http://www.oxfordjournals.org/nar/database/c/, has been expanded to 1552 databases. The entire Database Issue is freely available online on the Nucleic Acids Research website (http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/). PMID:24316579

  4. The 2014 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue and an updated NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Suárez, Xosé M; Rigden, Daniel J; Galperin, Michael Y

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue includes descriptions of 58 new molecular biology databases and recent updates to 123 databases previously featured in NAR or other journals. For convenience, the issue is now divided into eight sections that reflect major subject categories. Among the highlights of this issue are six databases of the transcription factor binding sites in various organisms and updates on such popular databases as CAZy, Database of Genomic Variants (DGV), dbGaP, DrugBank, KEGG, miRBase, Pfam, Reactome, SEED, TCDB and UniProt. There is a strong block of structural databases, which includes, among others, the new RNA Bricks database, updates on PDBe, PDBsum, ArchDB, Gene3D, ModBase, Nucleic Acid Database and the recently revived iPfam database. An update on the NCBI's MMDB describes VAST+, an improved tool for protein structure comparison. Two articles highlight the development of the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database: one describes SCOPe, which automates assignment of new structures to the existing SCOP hierarchy; the other one describes the first version of SCOP2, with its more flexible approach to classifying protein structures. This issue also includes a collection of articles on bacterial taxonomy and metagenomics, which includes updates on the List of Prokaryotic Names with Standing in Nomenclature (LPSN), Ribosomal Database Project (RDP), the Silva/LTP project and several new metagenomics resources. The NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection, http://www.oxfordjournals.org/nar/database/c/, has been expanded to 1552 databases. The entire Database Issue is freely available online on the Nucleic Acids Research website (http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/). PMID:24316579

  5. The 2016 database issue of Nucleic Acids Research and an updated molecular biology database collection

    PubMed Central

    Rigden, Daniel J.; Fernández-Suárez, Xosé M.; Galperin, Michael Y.

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 Database Issue of Nucleic Acids Research starts with overviews of the resources provided by three major bioinformatics centers, the U.S. National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) and Swiss Institute for Bioinformatics (SIB). Also included are descriptions of 62 new databases and updates on 95 databases that have been previously featured in NAR plus 17 previously described elsewhere. A number of papers in this issue deal with resources on nucleic acids, including various kinds of non-coding RNAs and their interactions, molecular dynamics simulations of nucleic acid structure, and two databases of super-enhancers. The protein database section features important updates on the EBI's Pfam, PDBe and PRIDE databases, as well as a variety of resources on pathways, metabolomics and metabolic modeling. This issue also includes updates on popular metagenomics resources, such as MG-RAST, EBI Metagenomics, and probeBASE, as well as a newly compiled Human Pan-Microbe Communities database. A significant fraction of the new and updated databases are dedicated to the genetic basis of disease, primarily cancer, and various aspects of drug research, including resources for patented drugs, their side effects, withdrawn drugs, and potential drug targets. A further six papers present updated databases of various antimicrobial and anticancer peptides. The entire Database Issue is freely available online on the Nucleic Acids Research website (http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/). The NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection, http://www.oxfordjournals.org/nar/database/c/, has been updated with the addition of 88 new resources and removal of 23 obsolete websites, which brought the current listing to 1685 databases. PMID:26740669

  6. The 2016 database issue of Nucleic Acids Research and an updated molecular biology database collection.

    PubMed

    Rigden, Daniel J; Fernández-Suárez, Xosé M; Galperin, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 Database Issue of Nucleic Acids Research starts with overviews of the resources provided by three major bioinformatics centers, the U.S. National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) and Swiss Institute for Bioinformatics (SIB). Also included are descriptions of 62 new databases and updates on 95 databases that have been previously featured in NAR plus 17 previously described elsewhere. A number of papers in this issue deal with resources on nucleic acids, including various kinds of non-coding RNAs and their interactions, molecular dynamics simulations of nucleic acid structure, and two databases of super-enhancers. The protein database section features important updates on the EBI's Pfam, PDBe and PRIDE databases, as well as a variety of resources on pathways, metabolomics and metabolic modeling. This issue also includes updates on popular metagenomics resources, such as MG-RAST, EBI Metagenomics, and probeBASE, as well as a newly compiled Human Pan-Microbe Communities database. A significant fraction of the new and updated databases are dedicated to the genetic basis of disease, primarily cancer, and various aspects of drug research, including resources for patented drugs, their side effects, withdrawn drugs, and potential drug targets. A further six papers present updated databases of various antimicrobial and anticancer peptides. The entire Database Issue is freely available online on the Nucleic Acids Research website (http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/). The NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection, http://www.oxfordjournals.org/nar/database/c/, has been updated with the addition of 88 new resources and removal of 23 obsolete websites, which brought the current listing to 1685 databases. PMID:26740669

  7. Biological databases for human research.

    PubMed

    Zou, Dong; Ma, Lina; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Zhang

    2015-02-01

    The completion of the Human Genome Project lays a foundation for systematically studying the human genome from evolutionary history to precision medicine against diseases. With the explosive growth of biological data, there is an increasing number of biological databases that have been developed in aid of human-related research. Here we present a collection of human-related biological databases and provide a mini-review by classifying them into different categories according to their data types. As human-related databases continue to grow not only in count but also in volume, challenges are ahead in big data storage, processing, exchange and curation. PMID:25712261

  8. Biological Databases for Human Research

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Dong; Ma, Lina; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The completion of the Human Genome Project lays a foundation for systematically studying the human genome from evolutionary history to precision medicine against diseases. With the explosive growth of biological data, there is an increasing number of biological databases that have been developed in aid of human-related research. Here we present a collection of human-related biological databases and provide a mini-review by classifying them into different categories according to their data types. As human-related databases continue to grow not only in count but also in volume, challenges are ahead in big data storage, processing, exchange and curation. PMID:25712261

  9. Applicability of large databases in outcomes research.

    PubMed

    Malay, Sunitha; Shauver, Melissa J; Chung, Kevin C

    2012-07-01

    Outcomes research serves as a mechanism to assess the quality of care, cost effectiveness of treatment, and other aspects of health care. The use of administrative databases in outcomes research is increasing in all medical specialties, including hand surgery. However, the real value of databases can be maximized with a thorough understanding of their contents, advantages, and limitations. We performed a literature review pertaining to databases in medical, surgical, and epidemiologic research, with special emphasis on orthopedic and hand surgery. This article provides an overview of the available database resources for outcomes research, their potential value to hand surgeons, and suggestions to improve their effective use. PMID:22522104

  10. Correlates of Access to Business Research Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfried, John C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines potential correlates of business research database access through academic libraries serving top business programs in the United States. Results indicate that greater access to research databases is related to enrollment in graduate business programs, but not to overall enrollment or status as a public or private institution.…

  11. Database Support for Research in Public Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, James Cory

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the extent to which databases support student and faculty research in the area of public administration. A list of journals in public administration, public policy, political science, public budgeting and finance, and other related areas was compared to the journal content list of six business databases. These databases…

  12. Electronic Databases for Linguistic and Language Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oshika, Beatrice T.; Krausse, Sylvia C.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews electronic language data oriented specifically toward linguistic and language research, including machine-readable versions of established dictionaries; text databases, including newspapers and books; speech databases with phonetic/orthographic transcriptions; and bulletin boards and news groups available over computer networks. (17…

  13. NALDB: nucleic acid ligand database for small molecules targeting nucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Mishra, Subodh; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid ligand database (NALDB) is a unique database that provides detailed information about the experimental data of small molecules that were reported to target several types of nucleic acid structures. NALDB is the first ligand database that contains ligand information for all type of nucleic acid. NALDB contains more than 3500 ligand entries with detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information such as target name, target sequence, ligand 2D/3D structure, SMILES, molecular formula, molecular weight, net-formal charge, AlogP, number of rings, number of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, potential energy along with their Ki, Kd, IC50 values. All these details at single platform would be helpful for the development and betterment of novel ligands targeting nucleic acids that could serve as a potential target in different diseases including cancers and neurological disorders. With maximum 255 conformers for each ligand entry, our database is a multi-conformer database and can facilitate the virtual screening process. NALDB provides powerful web-based search tools that make database searching efficient and simplified using option for text as well as for structure query. NALDB also provides multi-dimensional advanced search tool which can screen the database molecules on the basis of molecular properties of ligand provided by database users. A 3D structure visualization tool has also been included for 3D structure representation of ligands. NALDB offers an inclusive pharmacological information and the structurally flexible set of small molecules with their three-dimensional conformers that can accelerate the virtual screening and other modeling processes and eventually complement the nucleic acid-based drug discovery research. NALDB can be routinely updated and freely available on bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. Database URL: http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php PMID:26896846

  14. NALDB: nucleic acid ligand database for small molecules targeting nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Kumar Mishra, Subodh; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid ligand database (NALDB) is a unique database that provides detailed information about the experimental data of small molecules that were reported to target several types of nucleic acid structures. NALDB is the first ligand database that contains ligand information for all type of nucleic acid. NALDB contains more than 3500 ligand entries with detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information such as target name, target sequence, ligand 2D/3D structure, SMILES, molecular formula, molecular weight, net-formal charge, AlogP, number of rings, number of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, potential energy along with their Ki, Kd, IC50 values. All these details at single platform would be helpful for the development and betterment of novel ligands targeting nucleic acids that could serve as a potential target in different diseases including cancers and neurological disorders. With maximum 255 conformers for each ligand entry, our database is a multi-conformer database and can facilitate the virtual screening process. NALDB provides powerful web-based search tools that make database searching efficient and simplified using option for text as well as for structure query. NALDB also provides multi-dimensional advanced search tool which can screen the database molecules on the basis of molecular properties of ligand provided by database users. A 3D structure visualization tool has also been included for 3D structure representation of ligands. NALDB offers an inclusive pharmacological information and the structurally flexible set of small molecules with their three-dimensional conformers that can accelerate the virtual screening and other modeling processes and eventually complement the nucleic acid-based drug discovery research. NALDB can be routinely updated and freely available on bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. Database URL: http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. PMID:26896846

  15. Research on computer virus database management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Guoquan

    2011-12-01

    The growing proliferation of computer viruses becomes the lethal threat and research focus of the security of network information. While new virus is emerging, the number of viruses is growing, virus classification increasing complex. Virus naming because of agencies' capture time differences can not be unified. Although each agency has its own virus database, the communication between each other lacks, or virus information is incomplete, or a small number of sample information. This paper introduces the current construction status of the virus database at home and abroad, analyzes how to standardize and complete description of virus characteristics, and then gives the information integrity, storage security and manageable computer virus database design scheme.

  16. Research resource: the Endometrium Database Resource (EDR).

    PubMed

    Darlington, Yolanda; Jeong, Jae-Wook; Lee, Kevin Y; Franco, Heather L; Chen, Edward S; McOwiti, Apollo; Mistretta, Toni-Ann; Steffen, David; Becnel, Lauren; DeMayo, Francesco J

    2013-03-01

    In order to understand the biology of the endometrium and potentially develop new diagnostic tools and treatments for endometrial diseases, the highly orchestrated gene expression/regulation that occurs within the uterus must first be understood. Even though a wealth of information on endometrial gene expression/regulation is available, this information is scattered across several different resources in formats that can be difficult for the average bench scientist to query, integrate, and utilize. The Endometrium Database Resource (EDR) was created as a single evolving resource for protein- and micro-RNA-encoding genes that have been shown by gene expression microarray, Northern blot, or other experiments in the literature to have their expression regulated in the uterus of humans, mice, rats, cows, domestic pigs, guinea pigs, and sheep. Genes are annotated in EDR with basic gene information (eg, gene symbol and chromosome), gene orthologs, and gene ontologies. Links are also provided to external resources for publication/s, nucleic and amino acid sequence, gene product function, and Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) phase expression graph information. The resource also allows for direct comparison of relative gene expression in different microarray experiments for genes shown in the literature to be differentially expressed in the uterus. It is available via a user-friendly, web-based interface and is available without charge or restriction to the entire scientific community. The EDR can be accessed at http://edr.research.bcm.edu. PMID:23340253

  17. Research Resource: The Endometrium Database Resource (EDR)

    PubMed Central

    Darlington, Yolanda; Jeong, Jae-Wook; Lee, Kevin Y.; Franco, Heather L.; Chen, Edward S.; McOwiti, Apollo; Mistretta, Toni-Ann; Steffen, David; DeMayo, Francesco J.

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand the biology of the endometrium and potentially develop new diagnostic tools and treatments for endometrial diseases, the highly orchestrated gene expression/regulation that occurs within the uterus must first be understood. Even though a wealth of information on endometrial gene expression/regulation is available, this information is scattered across several different resources in formats that can be difficult for the average bench scientist to query, integrate, and utilize. The Endometrium Database Resource (EDR) was created as a single evolving resource for protein- and micro-RNA-encoding genes that have been shown by gene expression microarray, Northern blot, or other experiments in the literature to have their expression regulated in the uterus of humans, mice, rats, cows, domestic pigs, guinea pigs, and sheep. Genes are annotated in EDR with basic gene information (eg, gene symbol and chromosome), gene orthologs, and gene ontologies. Links are also provided to external resources for publication/s, nucleic and amino acid sequence, gene product function, and Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) phase expression graph information. The resource also allows for direct comparison of relative gene expression in different microarray experiments for genes shown in the literature to be differentially expressed in the uterus. It is available via a user-friendly, web-based interface and is available without charge or restriction to the entire scientific community. The EDR can be accessed at http://edr.research.bcm.edu. PMID:23340253

  18. NATIVE HEALTH DATABASES: NATIVE HEALTH RESEARCH DATABASE (NHRD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Native Health Databases contain bibliographic information and abstracts of health-related articles, reports, surveys, and other resource documents pertaining to the health and health care of American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Canadian First Nations. The databases provide i...

  19. TREATABILITY DATABASE (NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Risk Management Research Laboratory has developed and is continuing to expand a database on the effectiveness of proven treatment technologies in the removal/destruction of chemicals in various types of media, including water, wastewater, soil, debris, sludge, and se...

  20. Construction of databases: advances and significance in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Long, Erping; Huang, Bingjie; Wang, Liming; Lin, Xiaoyu; Lin, Haotian

    2015-12-01

    Widely used in clinical research, the database is a new type of data management automation technology and the most efficient tool for data management. In this article, we first explain some basic concepts, such as the definition, classification, and establishment of databases. Afterward, the workflow for establishing databases, inputting data, verifying data, and managing databases is presented. Meanwhile, by discussing the application of databases in clinical research, we illuminate the important role of databases in clinical research practice. Lastly, we introduce the reanalysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cloud computing techniques, showing the most recent advancements of databases in clinical research. PMID:27215009

  1. Exhaustive Database Searching for Amino Acid Mutations in Proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hyatt, Philip Douglas; Pan, Chongle

    2012-01-01

    Amino acid mutations in proteins can be found by searching tandem mass spectra acquired in shotgun proteomics experiments against protein sequences predicted from genomes. Traditionally, unconstrained searches for amino acid mutations have been accomplished by using a sequence tagging approach that combines de novo sequencing with database searching. However, this approach is limited by the performance of de novo sequencing. The Sipros algorithm v2.0 was developed to perform unconstrained database searching using high-resolution tandem mass spectra by exhaustively enumerating all single non-isobaric mutations for every residue in a protein database. The performance of Sipros for amino acid mutation identification exceeded that of an established sequence tagging algorithm, Inspect, based on benchmarking results from a Rhodopseudomonas palustris proteomics dataset. To demonstrate the viability of the algorithm for meta-proteomics, Sipros was used to identify amino acid mutations in a natural microbial community in acid mine drainage.

  2. Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivier, J. G. J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents the objective and methodology chosen for the construction of a global emissions source database called EDGAR and the structural design of the database system. The database estimates on a regional and grid basis, 1990 annual emissions of greenhouse gases, and of ozone depleting compounds from all known sources. (LZ)

  3. Aggregated Interdisciplinary Databases and the Needs of Undergraduate Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fister, Barbara; Gilbert, Julie; Fry, Amy Ray

    2008-01-01

    After seeing growing frustration among inexperienced undergraduate researchers searching a popular aggregated interdisciplinary database, the authors questioned whether the leading interdisciplinary databases are serving undergraduates' needs. As a preliminary exploration of this question, the authors queried vendors, analyzed their marketing…

  4. [DICOM data conversion technology research for database].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiyu; Lin, Hao

    2010-12-01

    A comprehensive medical image platform built for medical images network access, measurements and virtual surgery navigation needs the support of medical image databases. The medical image database we built contains two-dimensional images and three-dimensional models. The common databases based on DICOM storing do not meet the requirements. We use the technology of DICOM conversion to convert DICOM into BMP images and indispensable data elements, and then we use the BMP images and indispensable data elements to reconstruct the three-dimensional model. The reliability of DICOM data conversion is verified, and on this basis, a human hip joint medical image database is built. Experimental results show that this method used in building the medical image database can not only meet the requirements of database application, but also greatly reduce the amount of database storage. PMID:21374999

  5. RIDE: the Research Infrastructure Database for EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailo, Daniele; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Jeffery, Keith G.; Clemenceau, Alice; Hoffmann, Thomas L.

    2013-04-01

    The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) is a European initiative which aims to promote and make possible innovative approaches for a better understanding of the physical processes laying behind natural events and geo-science phenomena (earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, unrest episodes and tsunamis etc.) by integrating existing national and trans-national Research Infrastructures (RIs). Such integration will increase access and use of the multidisciplinary data recorded by solid Earth monitoring networks, acquired in laboratory experiments and/or produced by computational simulations. Here we present the Research Infrastructures Database for EPOS (RIDE), a database containing technical information about the different RIs declared by EPOS partners and EPOS associate partners, which will eventually compose the EPOS distributed Research Infrastructure. The main goals of RIDE are (i) to allow the EPOS RI to be organized, with interactive access and information mining available to a broad community of users and stakeholders, (ii) to have a first set of information to be stored in the EPOS catalogue, which will be used as a basis for the development of EPOS Core Services, (iii) to enable EPOS partners to revise and update the current RI information, (iv) to show the contents of the EPOS integration plan to all stakeholders, (v) to facilitate the dissemination of existing data infrastructures to different communities and to promote a discussion within the community to implement the present data infrastructures. RIDE - whose driving technology is Apache CouchDB - contains at the current status detailed information on more than 200 Research Infrastructures. It enables any user to visualize RIs and sensors on a map, to carry out statistics on the stored data and to browse through the details of any RI. Based on the content of RIDE it is now possible to estimate the potential size of the new EPOS distributed RI: EPOS is going to integrate more than 7000 sensors (seismic

  6. Database Advisor: A New Tool for K-12 Research Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berteaux, Susan S.; Strong, Sandra S.

    The Database Advisor (DBA) is a tool designed to guide users to the most appropriate World Wide Web-based databases for their research. Developed in 1997 by the Science Libraries at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), DBA is a Web-based front-end to bibliographic and full-text databases to which UCSD has remote access. DBA allows the…

  7. The Cystic Fibrosis Database: Content and Research Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, William M., Jr.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes the files contained in the Cystic Fibrosis (CF) database and discusses educational and research opportunities using this database. Topics discussed include queries, evaluating the relevance of items retrieved, and use of the database in an online searching course in the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North…

  8. Acid precipitation. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the research of acid precipitation, and the resultant acidification of land and water. Topics include composition, causes, effects, sources, measurements, and controls of acid precipitation. Worldwide geographical distribution of acid precipitation and acidification are covered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Vocational Education & Training Research Database, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, Sarah, Comp.; MacKenzie, Jeanne, Comp.; Adams, Heather, Comp.; Harris, Lee-ann, Comp.

    1998-01-01

    This document contains four issues of a quarterly annotated bibliography of documents and projects in progress from Australia's VOCED database that are available through Australia's National Vocational Education and Training Clearinghouse Information Network. Introductory materials include the following: national, state, territory, and polytechnic…

  10. Comparison Shopping of Tax Research Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlan, Jean M.

    1990-01-01

    Examines and compares online sources for primary and secondary federal and state tax information. The criteria used to evaluate the four systems (CCH ACCESS, LEXIS, PHINet, and WESTLAW) include the contents of each database, search features, hardware requirements, software, pricing, availability of CD-ROM, online billing, and network…

  11. Nucleic acid crystallography: a view from the nucleic acid database.

    PubMed

    Berman, H M; Gelbin, A; Westbrook, J

    1996-01-01

    What are the future directions of the field of nucleic acid crystallography? Although there have been many duplex structures determined, the sample is still relatively small. This is especially true if one wants to derive enough information about the relationships between sequence and structure. Indeed, there are data for all the possible 10 dimer steps, but for some steps it is very limited. If the structural code resides in trimers or tetrad steps then there is simply not enough data to do meaningful statistical analyses. So the first direction that needs to be explored is the determination of more structures with more varied sequences. The other noticeable thing about the data is the shortness of the strands. While it is probably true that attempts to crystallize very long sequences will not meet with success, the idea of crystallizing sequences engineered to fit together via sticky ends such as has been done for the CAP-DNA complex (Schultz et al., 1990) should give data about the behavior of much longer stretches of DNA. The question of the effects of environment on the structure of DNA continues to be a very important one to address since DNA is rarely alone. The preliminary data we have analysed from the current sample shows that the conformation of some steps are very sensitive to packing type. Numerous studies of the hydration around DNA shows that there is a real synergy between the hydration structure and the base conformation. More data will allow further quantitation of these observations. RNA structure is the next very exciting frontier. The emerging structures of duplexes with internal loops, the two hammerhead ribozyme structures and the group I intron ribozyme have given us a glimpse of the complexity and elegance of this class of molecules. With the technology now in place to allow the determination of the structures of these molecules, the expectation is that now we will see a large increase in the number of these structures in the NDB. PMID

  12. Implementation of the FAA research and development electromagnetic database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdowall, R. L.; Grush, D. J.; Cook, D. M.; Glynn, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been assisting the FAA in developing a database of information about lightning. The FAA Research and Development Electromagnetic Database (FRED) will ultimately contain data from a variety of airborne and ground-based lightning research projects. An outline of the data currently available in FRED is presented. The data sources which the FAA intends to incorporate into FRED are listed. In addition, it describes how the researchers may access and use the FRED menu system.

  13. CottonDB: A database for cotton research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CottonDB, established in 1995, was among the first plant genome databases established by the USDA-ARS. The goal of CottonDB is to serve both as an archival and a dynamic database that incorporates data from all major categories of genetic and genomic information created by the cotton research commu...

  14. The Vocational Guidance Research Database: A Scientometric Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores-Buils, Raquel; Gil-Beltran, Jose Manuel; Caballer-Miedes, Antonio; Martinez-Martinez, Miguel Angel

    2012-01-01

    The scientometric study of scientific output through publications in specialized journals cannot be undertaken exclusively with the databases available today. For this reason, the objective of this article is to introduce the "Base de Datos de Investigacion en Orientacion Vocacional" [Vocational Guidance Research Database], based on the use of…

  15. Business Faculty Research: Satisfaction with the Web versus Library Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewald, Nancy H.; Silvius, Matthew A.

    2005-01-01

    Business faculty members teaching at undergraduate campuses of the Pennsylvania State University were surveyed in order to assess their satisfaction with free Web sources and with subscription databases for their professional research. Although satisfaction with the Web's ease of use was higher than that for databases, overall satisfaction for…

  16. Databases for multilevel biophysiology research available at Physiome.jp

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Yoshiyuki; Abe, Takeshi; Li, Li; Oka, Hideki; Nomura, Taishin; Kitano, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Physiome.jp (http://physiome.jp) is a portal site inaugurated in 2007 to support model-based research in physiome and systems biology. At Physiome.jp, several tools and databases are available to support construction of physiological, multi-hierarchical, large-scale models. There are three databases in Physiome.jp, housing mathematical models, morphological data, and time-series data. In late 2013, the site was fully renovated, and in May 2015, new functions were implemented to provide information infrastructure to support collaborative activities for developing models and performing simulations within the database framework. This article describes updates to the databases implemented since 2013, including cooperation among the three databases, interactive model browsing, user management, version management of models, management of parameter sets, and interoperability with applications. PMID:26441671

  17. Regulatory administrative databases in FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research: convergence toward a unified database.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeffrey K

    2013-04-01

    Regulatory administrative database systems within the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) are essential to supporting its core mission, as a regulatory agency. Such systems are used within FDA to manage information and processes surrounding the processing, review, and tracking of investigational and marketed product submissions. This is an area of increasing interest in the pharmaceutical industry and has been a topic at trade association conferences (Buckley 2012). Such databases in CBER are complex, not for the type or relevance of the data to any particular scientific discipline but because of the variety of regulatory submission types and processes the systems support using the data. Commonalities among different data domains of CBER's regulatory administrative databases are discussed. These commonalities have evolved enough to constitute real database convergence and provide a valuable asset for business process intelligence. Balancing review workload across staff, exploring areas of risk in review capacity, process improvement, and presenting a clear and comprehensive landscape of review obligations are just some of the opportunities of such intelligence. This convergence has been occurring in the presence of usual forces that tend to drive information technology (IT) systems development toward separate stovepipes and data silos. CBER has achieved a significant level of convergence through a gradual process, using a clear goal, agreed upon development practices, and transparency of database objects, rather than through a single, discrete project or IT vendor solution. This approach offers a path forward for FDA systems toward a unified database. PMID:23269527

  18. Sharing Heterogeneous Data: The National Database for Autism Research

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Dan; Huerta, Michael F.; McAuliffe, Matthew J.; Farber, Gregory K.

    2014-01-01

    The National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) is a secure research data repository designed to promote scientific data sharing and collaboration among autism spectrum disorder investigators. The goal of the project is to accelerate scientific discovery through data sharing, data harmonization, and the reporting of research results. Data from over 25,000 research participants are available to qualified investigators through the NDAR portal. Summary information about the available data is available to everyone through that portal. PMID:22622767

  19. Sharing heterogeneous data: the national database for autism research.

    PubMed

    Hall, Dan; Huerta, Michael F; McAuliffe, Matthew J; Farber, Gregory K

    2012-10-01

    The National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) is a secure research data repository designed to promote scientific data sharing and collaboration among autism spectrum disorder investigators. The goal of the project is to accelerate scientific discovery through data sharing, data harmonization, and the reporting of research results. Data from over 25,000 research participants are available to qualified investigators through the NDAR portal. Summary information about the available data is available to everyone through that portal. PMID:22622767

  20. An image database management system for conducting CAD research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszauskas, Nicholas; Drukker, Karen; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2007-03-01

    The development of image databases for CAD research is not a trivial task. The collection and management of images and their related metadata from multiple sources is a time-consuming but necessary process. By standardizing and centralizing the methods in which these data are maintained, one can generate subsets of a larger database that match the specific criteria needed for a particular research project in a quick and efficient manner. A research-oriented management system of this type is highly desirable in a multi-modality CAD research environment. An online, webbased database system for the storage and management of research-specific medical image metadata was designed for use with four modalities of breast imaging: screen-film mammography, full-field digital mammography, breast ultrasound and breast MRI. The system was designed to consolidate data from multiple clinical sources and provide the user with the ability to anonymize the data. Input concerning the type of data to be stored as well as desired searchable parameters was solicited from researchers in each modality. The backbone of the database was created using MySQL. A robust and easy-to-use interface for entering, removing, modifying and searching information in the database was created using HTML and PHP. This standardized system can be accessed using any modern web-browsing software and is fundamental for our various research projects on computer-aided detection, diagnosis, cancer risk assessment, multimodality lesion assessment, and prognosis. Our CAD database system stores large amounts of research-related metadata and successfully generates subsets of cases that match the user's desired search criteria.

  1. Nucleic Acid Database: a Repository of Three-Dimensional Information about Nucleic Acids

    DOE Data Explorer

    Berman, H. M.; Olson, W. K.; Beveridge, D. L.; Westbrook, J.; Gelbin, A.; Demeny, T.; Hsieh, S. H.; Srinivasan, A. R.; Schneider, B.

    The Nucleic Acid Database (NDB) provides 3-D structural information about nucleic acids.  It is a relational database designed to facilitate the easy search for nucleic acid structures using any of the stored primary or derived structural features. Reports can then be created describing any properties of the selected structures and structures may be viewed in several different formats, including the mmCIF format, the NDB Atlas format, the NDB coordinate format, or the PDB coordinate format. Browsing structure images created directly from coordinates in the repository can also be done. More than 7000 structures have been released as of May 2014. This website also includes a number of specialized tools and interfaces. The NDB Project is funded by the National Institutes of Health and has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy in the past.

  2. NIST Gas Hydrate Research Database and Web Dissemination Channel

    PubMed Central

    Kroenlein, K.; Muzny, C. D.; Kazakov, A.; Diky, V. V.; Chirico, R. D.; Frenkel, M.; Sloan, E. D.

    2010-01-01

    To facilitate advances in application of technologies pertaining to gas hydrates, a freely available data resource containing experimentally derived information about those materials was developed. This work was performed by the Thermodynamic Research Center (TRC) paralleling a highly successful database of thermodynamic and transport properties of molecular pure compounds and their mixtures. Population of the gas-hydrates database required development of guided data capture (GDC) software designed to convert experimental data and metadata into a well organized electronic format, as well as a relational database schema to accommodate all types of numerical and metadata within the scope of the project. To guarantee utility for the broad gas hydrate research community, TRC worked closely with the Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) task group for Data on Natural Gas Hydrates, an international data sharing effort, in developing a gas hydrate markup language (GHML). The fruits of these efforts are disseminated through the NIST Sandard Reference Data Program [1] as the Clathrate Hydrate Physical Property Database (SRD #156). A web-based interface for this database, as well as scientific results from the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program [2], is deployed at http://gashydrates.nist.gov. PMID:27134781

  3. Norwegian words: A lexical database for clinicians and researchers.

    PubMed

    Lind, Marianne; Simonsen, Hanne Gram; Hansen, Pernille; Holm, Elisabeth; Mevik, Bjørn-Helge

    2015-04-01

    All words have properties linked to form, meaning and usage patterns which influence how easily they are accessed from the mental lexicon in language production, perception and comprehension. Examples of such properties are imageability, phonological and morphological complexity, word class, argument structure, frequency of use and age of acquisition. Due to linguistic and cultural variation the properties and the values associated with them differ across languages. Hence, for research as well as clinical purposes, language specific information on lexical properties is needed. To meet this need, an electronically searchable lexical database with more than 1600 Norwegian words coded for more than 12 different properties has been established. This article presents the content and structure of the database as well as the search options available in the interface. Finally, it briefly describes some of the ways in which the database can be used in research, clinical practice and teaching. PMID:25588015

  4. Current research status, databases and application of single nucleotide polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Javed, R; Mukesh

    2010-07-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most frequent form of DNA variation in the genome. SNPs are genetic markers which are bi-allelic in nature and grow at a very fast rate. Current genomic databases contain information on several million SNPs. More than 6 million SNPs have been identified and the information is publicly available through the efforts of the SNP Consortium and others data bases. The NCBI plays a major role in facillating the identification and cataloging of SNPs through creation and maintenance of the public SNP database (dbSNP) by the biomedical community worldwide and stimulate many areas of biological research including the identification of the genetic components of disease. In this review article, we are compiling the existing SNP databases, research status and their application. PMID:21717869

  5. A relational database application in support of integrated neuroscience research.

    PubMed

    Rudowsky, Ira; Kulyba, Olga; Kunin, Mikhail; Ogarodnikov, Dmitri; Raphan, Theodore

    2004-12-01

    The development of relational databases has significantly improved the performance of storage, search, and retrieval functions and has made it possible for applications that perform real-time data acquisition and analysis to interact with these types of databases. The purpose of this research was to develop a user interface for interaction between a data acquisition and analysis application and a relational database using the Oracle9i system. The overall system was designed to have an indexing capability that threads into the data acquisition and analysis programs. Tables were designed and relations within the database for indexing the files and information contained within the files were established. The system provides retrieval capabilities over a broad range of media, including analog, event, and video data types. The system's ability to interact with a data capturing program at the time of the experiment to create both multimedia files as well as the meta-data entries in the relational database avoids manual entries in the database and ensures data integrity and completeness for further interaction with the data by analysis applications. PMID:15657974

  6. Gas Hydrate Research Database and Web Dissemination Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Micheal Frenkel; Kenneth Kroenlein; V Diky; R.D. Chirico; A. Kazakow; C.D. Muzny; M. Frenkel

    2009-09-30

    To facilitate advances in application of technologies pertaining to gas hydrates, a United States database containing experimentally-derived information about those materials was developed. The Clathrate Hydrate Physical Property Database (NIST Standard Reference Database {number_sign} 156) was developed by the TRC Group at NIST in Boulder, Colorado paralleling a highly-successful database of thermodynamic properties of molecular pure compounds and their mixtures and in association with an international effort on the part of CODATA to aid in international data sharing. Development and population of this database relied on the development of three components of information-processing infrastructure: (1) guided data capture (GDC) software designed to convert data and metadata into a well-organized, electronic format, (2) a relational data storage facility to accommodate all types of numerical and metadata within the scope of the project, and (3) a gas hydrate markup language (GHML) developed to standardize data communications between 'data producers' and 'data users'. Having developed the appropriate data storage and communication technologies, a web-based interface for both the new Clathrate Hydrate Physical Property Database, as well as Scientific Results from the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program was developed and deployed at http://gashydrates.nist.gov.

  7. Arabidopsis Hormone Database: a comprehensive genetic and phenotypic information database for plant hormone research in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhi-yu; Zhou, Xin; Li, Linchuan; Yu, Xiangchun; Li, Hongjiang; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Cao, Guangyu; Bai, Mingyi; Wang, Xingchun; Jiang, Caifu; Lu, Haibin; Hou, Xianhui; Qu, Lijia; Wang, Zhiyong; Zuo, Jianru; Fu, Xiangdong; Su, Zhen; Li, Songgang; Guo, Hongwei

    2009-01-01

    Plant hormones are small organic molecules that influence almost every aspect of plant growth and development. Genetic and molecular studies have revealed a large number of genes that are involved in responses to numerous plant hormones, including auxin, gibberellin, cytokinin, abscisic acid, ethylene, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, and brassinosteroid. Here, we develop an Arabidopsis hormone database, which aims to provide a systematic and comprehensive view of genes participating in plant hormonal regulation, as well as morphological phenotypes controlled by plant hormones. Based on data from mutant studies, transgenic analysis and gene ontology (GO) annotation, we have identified a total of 1026 genes in the Arabidopsis genome that participate in plant hormone functions. Meanwhile, a phenotype ontology is developed to precisely describe myriad hormone-regulated morphological processes with standardized vocabularies. A web interface (http://ahd.cbi.pku.edu.cn) would allow users to quickly get access to information about these hormone-related genes, including sequences, functional category, mutant information, phenotypic description, microarray data and linked publications. Several applications of this database in studying plant hormonal regulation and hormone cross-talk will be presented and discussed. PMID:19015126

  8. Key-linked on-line databases for clinical research.

    PubMed

    Müller, Thomas H

    2012-01-01

    Separating patient identification data from clinical data and/or information about biomaterial samples is an effective data protection measure, especially in clinical research employing "on-line", i.e., web-based, data capture. In this paper, we show that this specialised technique can be generalised into a network architecture of interconnected on-line databases potentially serving a variety of purposes. The basic idea of this approach consists of maintaining logical links, i.e., common record keys, between corresponding data structures in pairs of databases while keeping the actual key values hidden from clients. For client systems, simultaneous access to corresponding records is mediated by temporary access tokens. At the relational level, these links are represented by arbitrary unique record keys common to both databases. This architecture allows for integration of related data in different databases without replicating or permanently sharing this data in one place. Each participating on-line database can determine the degree of integration by specifying linkage keys only for those data structures that may be logically connected to other data. Logical links can de designed for specific use cases. In addition, each database controls user access by enforcing its own authorisation scheme. Another advantage is that individual database owners retain considerable leeway in adapting to changing local requirements without compromising the integration into the network. Beyond protecting individual subject identification data, this architecture permits splitting a cooperatively used data pool to achieve many kinds of objectives. Application examples could be clinical registries needing subject contact information for follow-up, biomaterial banks with or without genetic information, and automatic or assisted integration of data from electronic medical records into research data. PMID:22874246

  9. Systematically Retrieving Research: A Case Study Evaluating Seven Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Brian; Wylie, Emma; Dempster, Martin; Donnelly, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Developing the scientific underpinnings of social welfare requires effective and efficient methods of retrieving relevant items from the increasing volume of research. Method: We compared seven databases by running the nearest equivalent search on each. The search topic was chosen for relevance to social work practice with older people.…

  10. THE NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY'S CONSOLIDATED HUMAN ACTIVITY DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has combined data from 12 U.S. studies related to human activities into one comprehensive data system that can be accessed via the Internet. The data system is called the Consolidated Human Activity Database (CHAD), and it is ...

  11. THE NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY'S COMPREHENSIVE HUMAN ACTIVITY DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has combined data from nine U.S. studies related to human activities into one comprehensive data system that can be accessed via the world-wide web. The data system is called CHAD-Consolidated Human Activity Database-and it is ...

  12. Geoscience research databases for coastal Alabama ecosystem management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hummell, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    Effective management of complex coastal ecosystems necessitates access to scientific knowledge that can be acquired through a multidisciplinary approach involving Federal and State scientists that take advantage of agency expertise and resources for the benefit of all participants working toward a set of common research and management goals. Cooperative geostatic investigations have led toward building databases of fundamental scientific knowledge that can be utilized to manage coastal Alabama's natural and future development. These databases have been used to assess the occurrence and economic potential of hard mineral resources in the Alabama EFZ, and to support oil spill contingency planning and environmental analysis for coastal Alabama.

  13. The Brain Database: A Multimedia Neuroscience Database for Research and Teaching

    PubMed Central

    Wertheim, Steven L.

    1989-01-01

    The Brain Database is an information tool designed to aid in the integration of clinical and research results in neuroanatomy and regional biochemistry. It can handle a wide range of data types including natural images, 2 and 3-dimensional graphics, video, numeric data and text. It is organized around three main entities: structures, substances and processes. The database will support a wide variety of graphical interfaces. Two sample interfaces have been made. This tool is intended to serve as one component of a system that would allow neuroscientists and clinicians 1) to represent clinical and experimental data within a common framework 2) to compare results precisely between experiments and among laboratories, 3) to use computing tools as an aid in collaborative work and 4) to contribute to a shared and accessible body of knowledge about the nervous system.

  14. Databases and GIS for landslide research in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikau, Richard; Cavallin, Angelo; Jäger, Stefan

    1996-04-01

    Within the project "The Temporal occurrence and forecasting of landslides in the European Community" a review of the use of databases and GIS for landslide research has been accomplished. It shows a high potential of these techniques in storing spatial and temporal landslide data (landslide inventories) and in applying different modelling approaches to landslide hazard assessments at various scales. There are three major strategies in European landslide research using GIS and database technologies. At medium and broad scales different combinations of landslide data with factor maps (e.g. slope angle, lithology and geomorphological units) lead to static susceptibility and hazard assessments, which allow probability evaluations for future landslide occurrences. At local scales process models to simulate trajectories of paths for slope processes and deterministic slope stability models are in use. In landslide frequency analysis, temporal database information are correlated with recent and historical triggering factors (e.g. precipitation and precipitation indices) to calculate temporal probabilities for landslide forecasting. However, despite encouraging progress in applying computer technologies in European landslide research, the potential of these tools is still largely untested. Furthermore, it is clear that sophisticated technology cannot replace field work, interdisciplinary research strategies, and critical testing of the reliability of the model results.

  15. Scientist, researchers, and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Alm, L.R. )

    1989-01-01

    The role of the hidden participants in agenda-setting for environmental issues is discussed. These personnel involve academics, researchers, career bureaucrats, congressional staffers, consultants, and administration appointees below the top level. Scientists have been publicly involved in the acid rain issue from the beginning, using the media to dramatize the possible catastrophic consequences of acid rain. Presently, the scientific community is not in consensus about the solutions to the problem. Since the initial enactment of the National Acid Precipitation Act in 1980, not a single acid rain law has been passed, although many bills have been proposed. Spokesman for the coal and utility industries and Reagan administration personnel have used the scientific disagreements to delay abatement actions and refute claims that acid rain is a severe problem. Another result of the confusion is a distrust and even disdain for academic work. One possible solution to the stalemate is an accurate form for resolving scientific disputes that have a strong political component and that the forum should have a mechanism for converging on accurate science. 19 refs.

  16. [Benefits of large healthcare databases for drug risk research].

    PubMed

    Garbe, Edeltraut; Pigeot, Iris

    2015-08-01

    Large electronic healthcare databases have become an important worldwide data resource for drug safety research after approval. Signal generation methods and drug safety studies based on these data facilitate the prospective monitoring of drug safety after approval, as has been recently required by EU law and the German Medicines Act. Despite its large size, a single healthcare database may include insufficient patients for the study of a very small number of drug-exposed patients or the investigation of very rare drug risks. For that reason, in the United States, efforts have been made to work on models that provide the linkage of data from different electronic healthcare databases for monitoring the safety of medicines after authorization in (i) the Sentinel Initiative and (ii) the Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership (OMOP). In July 2014, the pilot project Mini-Sentinel included a total of 178 million people from 18 different US databases. The merging of the data is based on a distributed data network with a common data model. In the European Network of Centres for Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacovigilance (ENCEPP) there has been no comparable merging of data from different databases; however, first experiences have been gained in various EU drug safety projects. In Germany, the data of the statutory health insurance providers constitute the most important resource for establishing a large healthcare database. Their use for this purpose has so far been severely restricted by the Code of Social Law (Section 75, Book 10). Therefore, a reform of this section is absolutely necessary. PMID:26092163

  17. BAO Plate Archive Project: Digitization, Electronic Database and Research Programmes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Andreasyan, H. R.; Azatyan, N. M.; Farmanyan, S. V.; Gigoyan, K. S.; Gyulzadyan, M. V.; Khachatryan, K. G.; Knyazyan, A. V.; Kostandyan, G. R.; Mikayelyan, G. A.; Nikoghosyan, E. H.; Paronyan, G. M.; Vardanyan, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    The most important part of the astronomical observational heritage are astronomical plate archives created on the basis of numerous observations at many observatories. Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (BAO) plate archive consists of 37,000 photographic plates and films, obtained at 2.6m telescope, 1m and 0.5m Schmidt type and other smaller telescopes during 1947-1991. In 2002-2005, the famous Markarian Survey (also called First Byurakan Survey, FBS) 1874 plates were digitized and the Digitized FBS (DFBS) was created. New science projects have been conducted based on these low-dispersion spectroscopic material. A large project on the whole BAO Plate Archive digitization, creation of electronic database and its scientific usage was started in 2015. A Science Program Board is created to evaluate the observing material, to investigate new possibilities and to propose new projects based on the combined usage of these observations together with other world databases. The Executing Team consists of 11 astronomers and 2 computer scientists and will use 2 EPSON Perfection V750 Pro scanners for the digitization, as well as Armenian Virtual Observatory (ArVO) database will be used to accommodate all new data. The project will run during 3 years in 2015-2017 and the final result will be an electronic database and online interactive sky map to be used for further research projects, mainly including high proper motion stars, variable objects and Solar System bodies.

  18. Development of a combined database for meta-epidemiological research.

    PubMed

    Savović, Jelena; Harris, Ross J; Wood, Lesley; Beynon, Rebecca; Altman, Doug; Als-Nielsen, Bodil; Balk, Ethan M; Deeks, Jonathan; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Gluud, Christian; Ioannidis, John P A; Jűni, Peter; Moher, David; Pildal, Julie; Schulz, Kenneth F; Sterne, Jonathan A C

    2010-07-01

    Collections of meta-analyses assembled in meta-epidemiological studies are used to study associations of trial characteristics with intervention effect estimates. However, methods and findings are not consistent across studies. To combine data from 10 meta-epidemiological studies into a single database, and derive a harmonized dataset without overlap between meta-analyses. The database design allowed trials to be contained in different meta-analyses, multiple meta-analyses in systematic reviews, overlapping meta-analyses between systematic reviews, and multiple references to the same trial or review. Unique identifiers were assigned to each reference and used to identify duplicate trials. Sets of meta-analyses with overlapping trials were identified and duplicates removed. Overlapping trials were used to examine agreement between assessments of trial characteristics. The combined database contained 427 reviews, 454 meta-analyses and 4874 trial results. Of these, 258 meta-analyses were unique, while for 196 at least one trial overlapped with another meta-analysis. Median kappa statistics for reliability of assessments were 0.60 for sequence generation, 0.58 for allocation concealment and 0.87 for blinding. Based on inspection of sets of overlapping meta-analyses, 91 meta-analyses containing 1344 trial results were removed. Additionally, 24 duplicated trial results were removed from 16 meta-analyses, to derive a final database containing 363 meta-analyses and 3477 unique trial results. The final database will be used to examine the combined evidence on sources of bias in randomized controlled trials. The strategy used to remove overlap between meta-analyses may be of use for future empirical research. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26061467

  19. Advanced Satellite Research Project: SCAR Research Database. Bibliographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelton, Joseph N.

    1991-01-01

    The literature search was provided to locate and analyze the most recent literature that was relevant to the research. This was done by cross-relating books, articles, monographs, and journals that relate to the following topics: (1) Experimental Systems - Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), and (2) Integrated System Digital Network (ISDN) and Advance Communication Techniques (ISDN and satellites, ISDN standards, broadband ISDN, flame relay and switching, computer networks and satellites, satellite orbits and technology, satellite transmission quality, and network configuration). Bibliographic essay on literature citations and articles reviewed during the literature search task is provided.

  20. U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) multimodal signatures database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Kelly

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Multimodal Signatures Database (MMSDB) is a centralized collection of sensor data of various modalities that are co-located and co-registered. The signatures include ground and air vehicles, personnel, mortar, artillery, small arms gunfire from potential sniper weapons, explosives, and many other high value targets. This data is made available to Department of Defense (DoD) and DoD contractors, Intel agencies, other government agencies (OGA), and academia for use in developing target detection, tracking, and classification algorithms and systems to protect our Soldiers. A platform independent Web interface disseminates the signatures to researchers and engineers within the scientific community. Hierarchical Data Format 5 (HDF5) signature models provide an excellent solution for the sharing of complex multimodal signature data for algorithmic development and database requirements. Many open source tools for viewing and plotting HDF5 signatures are available over the Web. Seamless integration of HDF5 signatures is possible in both proprietary computational environments, such as MATLAB, and Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) computational environments, such as Octave and Python, for performing signal processing, analysis, and algorithm development. Future developments include extending the Web interface into a portal system for accessing ARL algorithms and signatures, High Performance Computing (HPC) resources, and integrating existing database and signature architectures into sensor networking environments.

  1. Acid precipitation. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the causes, effects, sources, and controls of acid precipitation and acidification. Techniques and technology for measurement and analysis of acid precipitation are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. French health insurance databases: What interest for medical research?

    PubMed

    Moulis, G; Lapeyre-Mestre, M; Palmaro, A; Pugnet, G; Montastruc, J-L; Sailler, L

    2015-06-01

    French health insurance databases are organized since 2003 into a huge digital data warehouse, the Système national d'information inter-régime de l'assurance maladie (SNIIR-AM). It covers the entire French population (65 million inhabitants). In order to facilitate studies on more frequent conditions, a random sample of 1/97th of national health system beneficiaries has been built since 2005, called the échantillon généraliste des bénéficiaires (EGB). The aim of this article is to describe the main characteristics of the SNIIR-AM and the EGB, to detail their accessibility according to French law, and to present their strengths and limits. It is illustrated with the most recent studies conducted in these databases. These databases include demographic, out-hospital reimbursement (including drug dispensing), medical (costly long-term diseases, occupational diseases, sick-leaves…), and in-hospital data. All these data are prospectively recorded, individualized, made anonymous and linkable. Consequently, the SNIIR-AM is a very useful data source for epidemiological, pharmacoepidemiological and health economics studies, particularly for rare diseases. The EGB is appropriate for long-term research on more frequent diseases. PMID:25547954

  3. Development of a Database for Translational Spinal Cord Injury Research

    PubMed Central

    Nielson, Jessica L.; Guandique, Cristian F.; Liu, Aiwen W.; Burke, Darlene A.; Lash, A. Todd; Moseanko, Rod; Hawbecker, Stephanie; Strand, Sarah C.; Zdunowski, Sharon; Irvine, Karen-Amanda; Brock, John H.; Nout-Lomas, Yvette S.; Gensel, John C.; Anderson, Kim D.; Segal, Mark R.; Rosenzweig, Ephron S.; Magnuson, David S.K.; Whittemore, Scott R.; McTigue, Dana M.; Popovich, Phillip G.; Rabchevsky, Alexander G.; Scheff, Stephen W.; Steward, Oswald; Courtine, Grégoire; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Tuszynski, Mark H.; Beattie, Michael S.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Efforts to understand spinal cord injury (SCI) and other complex neurotrauma disorders at the pre-clinical level have shown progress in recent years. However, successful translation of basic research into clinical practice has been slow, partly because of the large, heterogeneous data sets involved. In this sense, translational neurological research represents a “big data” problem. In an effort to expedite translation of pre-clinical knowledge into standards of patient care for SCI, we describe the development of a novel database for translational neurotrauma research known as Visualized Syndromic Information and Outcomes for Neurotrauma-SCI (VISION-SCI). We present demographics, descriptive statistics, and translational syndromic outcomes derived from our ongoing efforts to build a multi-center, multi-species pre-clinical database for SCI models. We leveraged archived surgical records, postoperative care logs, behavioral outcome measures, and histopathology from approximately 3000 mice, rats, and monkeys from pre-clinical SCI studies published between 1993 and 2013. The majority of animals in the database have measures collected for health monitoring, such as weight loss/gain, heart rate, blood pressure, postoperative monitoring of bladder function and drug/fluid administration, behavioral outcome measures of locomotion, and tissue sparing postmortem. Attempts to align these variables with currently accepted common data elements highlighted the need for more translational outcomes to be identified as clinical endpoints for therapeutic testing. Last, we use syndromic analysis to identify conserved biological mechanisms of recovery after cervical SCI between rats and monkeys that will allow for more-efficient testing of therapeutics that will need to be translated toward future clinical trials. PMID:25077610

  4. Research issues in view-based multimedia database systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenwald, L.; Speegle, G.

    1996-12-31

    Audio, video, graphics, and text can be combined into stunning multimedia presentations which enable people to learn, buy, and have fun in ways never before possible. However multimedia is often unorganized and required tremendous storage space. Typical images are measured in tens or hundreds of kilobytes. To control the amount of space needed in this new environment, this paper proposes a multimedia database management system that uses logical representations instead of physical representations, to store edited objects. Research issues associated with such a system are discussed.

  5. The FoodCast research image database (FRIDa).

    PubMed

    Foroni, Francesco; Pergola, Giulio; Argiris, Georgette; Rumiati, Raffaella I

    2013-01-01

    In recent years we have witnessed an increasing interest in food processing and eating behaviors. This is probably due to several reasons. The biological relevance of food choices, the complexity of the food-rich environment in which we presently live (making food-intake regulation difficult), and the increasing health care cost due to illness associated with food (food hazards, food contamination, and aberrant food-intake). Despite the importance of the issues and the relevance of this research, comprehensive and validated databases of stimuli are rather limited, outdated, or not available for non-commercial purposes to independent researchers who aim at developing their own research program. The FoodCast Research Image Database (FRIDa) we present here includes 877 images belonging to eight different categories: natural-food (e.g., strawberry), transformed-food (e.g., french fries), rotten-food (e.g., moldy banana), natural-non-food items (e.g., pinecone), artificial food-related objects (e.g., teacup), artificial objects (e.g., guitar), animals (e.g., camel), and scenes (e.g., airport). FRIDa has been validated on a sample of healthy participants (N = 73) on standard variables (e.g., valence, familiarity, etc.) as well as on other variables specifically related to food items (e.g., perceived calorie content); it also includes data on the visual features of the stimuli (e.g., brightness, high frequency power, etc.). FRIDa is a well-controlled, flexible, validated, and freely available (http://foodcast.sissa.it/neuroscience/) tool for researchers in a wide range of academic fields and industry. PMID:23459781

  6. The FoodCast research image database (FRIDa)

    PubMed Central

    Foroni, Francesco; Pergola, Giulio; Argiris, Georgette; Rumiati, Raffaella I.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years we have witnessed an increasing interest in food processing and eating behaviors. This is probably due to several reasons. The biological relevance of food choices, the complexity of the food-rich environment in which we presently live (making food-intake regulation difficult), and the increasing health care cost due to illness associated with food (food hazards, food contamination, and aberrant food-intake). Despite the importance of the issues and the relevance of this research, comprehensive and validated databases of stimuli are rather limited, outdated, or not available for non-commercial purposes to independent researchers who aim at developing their own research program. The FoodCast Research Image Database (FRIDa) we present here includes 877 images belonging to eight different categories: natural-food (e.g., strawberry), transformed-food (e.g., french fries), rotten-food (e.g., moldy banana), natural-non-food items (e.g., pinecone), artificial food-related objects (e.g., teacup), artificial objects (e.g., guitar), animals (e.g., camel), and scenes (e.g., airport). FRIDa has been validated on a sample of healthy participants (N = 73) on standard variables (e.g., valence, familiarity, etc.) as well as on other variables specifically related to food items (e.g., perceived calorie content); it also includes data on the visual features of the stimuli (e.g., brightness, high frequency power, etc.). FRIDa is a well-controlled, flexible, validated, and freely available (http://foodcast.sissa.it/neuroscience/) tool for researchers in a wide range of academic fields and industry. PMID:23459781

  7. Acid precipitation. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the measurement and analysis of acid rain and acidification of areas by precipitation. Both global and regionalized areas of acid rain effects are examined. Control techniques applicable to the sources and causes are discussed. (Contains a minimum of 187 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Medical research in Israel and the Israel biomedical database.

    PubMed

    Berns, D S; Rager-Zisman, B

    2000-11-01

    The data collected for the second edition of the Directory of Medical Research in Israel and the Israel Biomedical Database have yielded very relevant information concerning the distribution of investigators, publication activities and funding sources. The aggregate data confirm the findings of the first edition published in 1996 [2]. Those facts endorse the highly concentrated and extensive nature of medical research in the Jerusalem area, which is conducted at the Hebrew University and its affiliated hospitals. In contrast, Tel Aviv University, whose basic research staff is about two-thirds the size of the Hebrew University staff, has a more diffuse relationship with its clinical staff who are located at more than half a dozen hospitals. Ben-Gurion University in Beer Sheva and the Technion in Haifa are smaller in size, but have closer geographic contact between their clinical and basic research staff. Nonetheless, all the medical schools and affiliated hospitals have good publication and funding records. It is important to note that while some aspects of the performance at basic research institutions seem to be somewhat better than at hospitals, the records are actually quite similar despite the greater burden of clinical services at the hospitals as compared to teaching responsibilities in the basic sciences. The survey also indicates the substantial number of young investigators in the latest survey who did not appear in the first survey. While this is certainly encouraging, it is also disturbing that the funding sources are apparently decreasing at a time when young investigators are attempting to become established and the increasing burden of health care costs precludes financial assistance from hospital sources. The intensity and undoubtedly the quality of medical research in Israel remains at a level consistent with many of the more advanced western countries. This conclusion is somewhat mitigated by the fact that there is a decrease in available funding

  9. MIPS PlantsDB: a database framework for comparative plant genome research.

    PubMed

    Nussbaumer, Thomas; Martis, Mihaela M; Roessner, Stephan K; Pfeifer, Matthias; Bader, Kai C; Sharma, Sapna; Gundlach, Heidrun; Spannagl, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly increasing amount of plant genome (sequence) data enables powerful comparative analyses and integrative approaches and also requires structured and comprehensive information resources. Databases are needed for both model and crop plant organisms and both intuitive search/browse views and comparative genomics tools should communicate the data to researchers and help them interpret it. MIPS PlantsDB (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/plant/genomes.jsp) was initially described in NAR in 2007 [Spannagl,M., Noubibou,O., Haase,D., Yang,L., Gundlach,H., Hindemitt, T., Klee,K., Haberer,G., Schoof,H. and Mayer,K.F. (2007) MIPSPlantsDB-plant database resource for integrative and comparative plant genome research. Nucleic Acids Res., 35, D834-D840] and was set up from the start to provide data and information resources for individual plant species as well as a framework for integrative and comparative plant genome research. PlantsDB comprises database instances for tomato, Medicago, Arabidopsis, Brachypodium, Sorghum, maize, rice, barley and wheat. Building up on that, state-of-the-art comparative genomics tools such as CrowsNest are integrated to visualize and investigate syntenic relationships between monocot genomes. Results from novel genome analysis strategies targeting the complex and repetitive genomes of triticeae species (wheat and barley) are provided and cross-linked with model species. The MIPS Repeat Element Database (mips-REdat) and Catalog (mips-REcat) as well as tight connections to other databases, e.g. via web services, are further important components of PlantsDB. PMID:23203886

  10. Middle East, North Africa and Western Eurasia Seismic Research Database

    SciTech Connect

    O'Boyle, J L; Ruppert, S D; Hauk, T F; Dodge, D A; Ganzberger, M D; Ryall, F

    2003-07-14

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering (GNEM R&E) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has made significant progress populating a comprehensive Seismic Research Database (SRDB) used for deriving seismic calibration parameters for the Middle East, North Africa and Western Eurasia (ME/NA/WE) regions. In addition to an overview of select individual information products, we present an overview of our visualization, integration, validation, and organizational processes. Development of these processes and the LLNL SRDB was necessitated by both the very large amount of data and information involved (over 15 terabytes) and the varied data and research result formats utilized. The LLNL SRDB allows for the collection of raw and contextual seismic data used in research, provides an interface for researchers to access data, provides a framework to store research results and integrate datasets, and supports assembly, integration and dissemination of datasets to the NNSA Knowledge Base (KB). The LLNL SRDB is a flexible and extensible framework consisting of a relational database (RDB), Geographical Information System (GIS), and associated product/data visualization and data management tools. This framework is designed to accommodate large volumes of data in diverse formats from many sources (both in-house-derived research and integrated contractor products), in addition to maintaining detailed quality control and metadata. In order to efficiently organize information within the LLNL SRDB, it was necessary to automate procedures needed to create and update database tables, but a large effort is still required by technicians and scientists to load special datasets, review results of automated processing and resolve quality issues. The LLNL SRDB currently has 3 million reconciled event origins and arrivals from several global, regional and local seismic bulletins and 30 million

  11. TB database: an integrated platform for tuberculosis research.

    PubMed

    Reddy, T B K; Riley, Robert; Wymore, Farrell; Montgomery, Phillip; DeCaprio, Dave; Engels, Reinhard; Gellesch, Marcel; Hubble, Jeremy; Jen, Dennis; Jin, Heng; Koehrsen, Michael; Larson, Lisa; Mao, Maria; Nitzberg, Michael; Sisk, Peter; Stolte, Christian; Weiner, Brian; White, Jared; Zachariah, Zachariah K; Sherlock, Gavin; Galagan, James E; Ball, Catherine A; Schoolnik, Gary K

    2009-01-01

    The effective control of tuberculosis (TB) has been thwarted by the need for prolonged, complex and potentially toxic drug regimens, by reliance on an inefficient vaccine and by the absence of biomarkers of clinical status. The promise of the genomics era for TB control is substantial, but has been hindered by the lack of a central repository that collects and integrates genomic and experimental data about this organism in a way that can be readily accessed and analyzed. The Tuberculosis Database (TBDB) is an integrated database providing access to TB genomic data and resources, relevant to the discovery and development of TB drugs, vaccines and biomarkers. The current release of TBDB houses genome sequence data and annotations for 28 different Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and related bacteria. TBDB stores pre- and post-publication gene-expression data from M. tuberculosis and its close relatives. TBDB currently hosts data for nearly 1500 public tuberculosis microarrays and 260 arrays for Streptomyces. In addition, TBDB provides access to a suite of comparative genomics and microarray analysis software. By bringing together M. tuberculosis genome annotation and gene-expression data with a suite of analysis tools, TBDB (http://www.tbdb.org/) provides a unique discovery platform for TB research. PMID:18835847

  12. LLNL Middle East and North Africa research database

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppert, S.D.; Hauk, T.F.; Leach, R.

    1997-07-15

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) CTBT R{ampersand}D program has made significant progress assembling a comprehensive seismic database (DB) for events and derived parameters in the Middle East and North Africa (ME/NA). The LLNL research DB provides not only a coherent framework in which store and organize large volumes of collected seismic waveforms and associated event parameter information but also provides an efficient data processing/research environment. The DB is designed to be flexible and extensible in order to accommodate the large volumes of data in diverse formats from many sources in addition to maintaining detailed quality control and metadata. Researchers can make use of the relational nature of the DB and interactive analysis tools to quickly and efficiently process large volumes of data. Seismic waveforms have been systematically collected form a wide range of local and regional networks using numerous earthquake bulletins and converted a common format based on CSS3.O while undergoing quality control and corrections of errors. By combining traveltime observations, event characterization studies, and regional wave-propagation studies of the LLNL CTBT team, we are assembling a library of ground truth information and event location correction surfaces required to support the ME/NA regionalization program. Corrections and parameters distilled from the LLNL research DB will provide needed contributions to the DOE knowledge base for the ME/NA region and enable the USNDC and IDC to effectively verify CTBT compliance.

  13. EHME: a new word database for research in Basque language.

    PubMed

    Acha, Joana; Laka, Itziar; Landa, Josu; Salaburu, Pello

    2014-01-01

    This article presents EHME, the frequency dictionary of Basque structure, an online program that enables researchers in psycholinguistics to extract word and nonword stimuli, based on a broad range of statistics concerning the properties of Basque words. The database consists of 22.7 million tokens, and properties available include morphological structure frequency and word-similarity measures, apart from classical indexes: word frequency, orthographic structure, orthographic similarity, bigram and biphone frequency, and syllable-based measures. Measures are indexed at the lemma, morpheme and word level. We include reliability and validation analysis. The application is freely available, and enables the user to extract words based on concrete statistical criteria 1 , as well as to obtain statistical characteristics from a list of words PMID:26054360

  14. Forming a Research Question from a Multi-Center Database

    PubMed Central

    Likosky, Donald S.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: It is not uncommon for individuals to ask biostatisiticians and epidemiologists to assist them with a research project. Often the request is in the shape of statistical analyses. However, most of these requests are nothing more than missed opportunities. This manuscript focuses on the reasons underlying such a statement. Most individuals might say that the most important aspect of a study is its conclusion. Many who would disagree with this sentiment and would feel that the most important aspect of a study rather is the question it intends to address. If this question is not articulated sufficiently, any additional information stemming from the study will most likely be irrelevant. Herein, some principles for formulating (successfully) a question from a multi-center database will be described. PMID:19361039

  15. The GUDMAP database – an online resource for genitourinary research

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Simon D.; Armit, Chris; Armstrong, Jane; Brennan, Jane; Cheng, Ying; Haggarty, Bernard; Houghton, Derek; Lloyd-MacGilp, Sue; Pi, Xingjun; Roochun, Yogmatee; Sharghi, Mehran; Tindal, Christopher; McMahon, Andrew P.; Gottesman, Brian; Little, Melissa H.; Georgas, Kylie; Aronow, Bruce J.; Potter, S. Steven; Brunskill, Eric W.; Southard-Smith, E. Michelle; Mendelsohn, Cathy; Baldock, Richard A.; Davies, Jamie A.; Davidson, Duncan

    2011-01-01

    The GenitoUrinary Development Molecular Anatomy Project (GUDMAP) is an international consortium working to generate gene expression data and transgenic mice. GUDMAP includes data from large-scale in situ hybridisation screens (wholemount and section) and microarray gene expression data of microdissected, laser-captured and FACS-sorted components of the developing mouse genitourinary (GU) system. These expression data are annotated using a high-resolution anatomy ontology specific to the developing murine GU system. GUDMAP data are freely accessible at www.gudmap.org via easy-to-use interfaces. This curated, high-resolution dataset serves as a powerful resource for biologists, clinicians and bioinformaticians interested in the developing urogenital system. This paper gives examples of how the data have been used to address problems in developmental biology and provides a primer for those wishing to use the database in their own research. PMID:21652655

  16. The GUDMAP database--an online resource for genitourinary research.

    PubMed

    Harding, Simon D; Armit, Chris; Armstrong, Jane; Brennan, Jane; Cheng, Ying; Haggarty, Bernard; Houghton, Derek; Lloyd-MacGilp, Sue; Pi, Xingjun; Roochun, Yogmatee; Sharghi, Mehran; Tindal, Christopher; McMahon, Andrew P; Gottesman, Brian; Little, Melissa H; Georgas, Kylie; Aronow, Bruce J; Potter, S Steven; Brunskill, Eric W; Southard-Smith, E Michelle; Mendelsohn, Cathy; Baldock, Richard A; Davies, Jamie A; Davidson, Duncan

    2011-07-01

    The GenitoUrinary Development Molecular Anatomy Project (GUDMAP) is an international consortium working to generate gene expression data and transgenic mice. GUDMAP includes data from large-scale in situ hybridisation screens (wholemount and section) and microarray gene expression data of microdissected, laser-captured and FACS-sorted components of the developing mouse genitourinary (GU) system. These expression data are annotated using a high-resolution anatomy ontology specific to the developing murine GU system. GUDMAP data are freely accessible at www.gudmap.org via easy-to-use interfaces. This curated, high-resolution dataset serves as a powerful resource for biologists, clinicians and bioinformaticians interested in the developing urogenital system. This paper gives examples of how the data have been used to address problems in developmental biology and provides a primer for those wishing to use the database in their own research. PMID:21652655

  17. APD3: the antimicrobial peptide database as a tool for research and education

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Li, Xia; Wang, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide database (APD, http://aps.unmc.edu/AP/) is an original database initially online in 2003. The APD2 (2009 version) has been regularly updated and further expanded into the APD3. This database currently focuses on natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with defined sequence and activity. It includes a total of 2619 AMPs with 261 bacteriocins from bacteria, 4 AMPs from archaea, 7 from protists, 13 from fungi, 321 from plants and 1972 animal host defense peptides. The APD3 contains 2169 antibacterial, 172 antiviral, 105 anti-HIV, 959 antifungal, 80 antiparasitic and 185 anticancer peptides. Newly annotated are AMPs with antibiofilm, antimalarial, anti-protist, insecticidal, spermicidal, chemotactic, wound healing, antioxidant and protease inhibiting properties. We also describe other searchable annotations, including target pathogens, molecule-binding partners, post-translational modifications and animal models. Amino acid profiles or signatures of natural AMPs are important for peptide classification, prediction and design. Finally, we summarize various database applications in research and education. PMID:26602694

  18. University Real Estate Development Database: A Database-Driven Internet Research Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiewel, Wim; Kunst, Kara

    2008-01-01

    The University Real Estate Development Database is an Internet resource developed by the University of Baltimore for the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, containing over six hundred cases of university expansion outside of traditional campus boundaries. The University Real Estate Development database is a searchable collection of real estate…

  19. Acid Rain Students Do Original Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outdoor Communicator, 1984

    1984-01-01

    At Park Senior High School (Cottage Grove, Minnesota), 46 juniors and seniors planted 384 red pine seedlings in connection with their original research on acid rain, with advice from Dr. Harriet Stubbs, director of the Acid Precipitation Awareness Program (West Saint Paul), which has been developing acid rain teaching materials. (MH)

  20. Do the research goal and databases match? A checklist for a systematic approach.

    PubMed

    van Eijk, M E; Krist, L F; Avorn, J; Porsius, A; de Boer, A

    2001-12-01

    To test the appropriateness of a given database for specific research questions, we designed a checklist starting with the definition of an ideal database. This ideal database contains all relevant data on patients, providers and services. It is safe and accessible, input is always accurate, continuity is guaranteed and linkage with other information is easy. Of course no such database exists. Still these features are often taken for granted, but highly influenced by organizational processes in healthcare and prioritization. Starting with the characteristics of an ideal database, one can systematically list the required aspects for research goals and compare these with the available systems. This checklist is used to address important aspects of administrative database research and ethical issues. The increasing possibility to misuse sensitive data needs to be discussed by researchers, administrators, individuals and society. This checklist can also be valuable to others to design or interpret studies based on claims databases. PMID:11641003

  1. DBBP: database of binding pairs in protein-nucleic acid interactions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interaction of proteins with other molecules plays an important role in many biological activities. As many structures of protein-DNA complexes and protein-RNA complexes have been determined in the past years, several databases have been constructed to provide structure data of the complexes. However, the information on the binding sites between proteins and nucleic acids is not readily available from the structure data since the data consists mostly of the three-dimensional coordinates of the atoms in the complexes. Results We analyzed the huge amount of structure data for the hydrogen bonding interactions between proteins and nucleic acids and developed a database called DBBP (DataBase of Binding Pairs in protein-nucleic acid interactions, http://bclab.inha.ac.kr/dbbp). DBBP contains 44,955 hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) of protein-DNA interactions and 77,947 H-bonds of protein-RNA interactions. Conclusions Analysis of the huge amount of structure data of protein-nucleic acid complexes is labor-intensive, yet provides useful information for studying protein-nucleic acid interactions. DBBP provides the detailed information of hydrogen-bonding interactions between proteins and nucleic acids at various levels from the atomic level to the residue level. The binding information can be used as a valuable resource for developing a computational method aiming at predicting new binding sites in proteins or nucleic acids. PMID:25474259

  2. LLNL Middle East and North Africa research database

    SciTech Connect

    Dodge, D; Hauk, T; Moore, R M; O'Boyle, J; Ruppert, S

    1999-07-23

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Research and Development (CTBT R and D) program has made significant progress populating a comprehensive seismic research database (RDB) for seismic events and derived research products in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Our original ME/NA study region has enlarged and is now defined as an area including the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Southwest Asia, the Former Soviet Union and the Scandinavian/Arctic region. The LLNL RDB will facilitate calibration of all International Monitoring System (IMS) stations (primary and auxiliary) or their surrogates (if not yet installed) as well as a variety of gamma stations. The RDB provides not only a coherent framework in which to store and organize large volumes of collected seismic waveforms and associated event parameter information, but also provides an efficient data processing/research environment for deriving location and discrimination correction sur faces and capabilities. In order to accommodate large volumes of data from many sources with diverse formats the RDB is designed to be flexible and extensible in addition to maintaining detailed quality control information and associated metadata. Station parameters, instrument responses, phase pick information, and event bulletins were compiled and made available through the RDB. For seismic events in the MENA region occurring between 1976 and 1999, we have systematically assembled, quality checked and organized event waveforms; continuous seismic data from 1990 to present are archived for many stations. Currently, over 11,400 seismic events and 1.2 million waveforms are maintained in the RDB and made readily available to researchers. In addition to open sources of seismic data, we have established collaborative relationships with several ME/NA countries that have yielded additional ground truth and broadband waveform data essential for regional calibration and capability

  3. USDA food and nutrient databases provide the infrastructure for food and nutrition research, policy, and practice.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Jaspreet K C; Moshfegh, Alanna J; Holden, Joanne M; Harris, Ellen

    2013-02-01

    The USDA food and nutrient databases provide the basic infrastructure for food and nutrition research, nutrition monitoring, policy, and dietary practice. They have had a long history that goes back to 1892 and are unique, as they are the only databases available in the public domain that perform these functions. There are 4 major food and nutrient databases released by the Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center (BHNRC), part of the USDA's Agricultural Research Service. These include the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, the Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database, the Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies, and the USDA Food Patterns Equivalents Database. The users of the databases are diverse and include federal agencies, the food industry, health professionals, restaurants, software application developers, academia and research organizations, international organizations, and foreign governments, among others. Many of these users have partnered with BHNRC to leverage funds and/or scientific expertise to work toward common goals. The use of the databases has increased tremendously in the past few years, especially the breadth of uses. These new uses of the data are bound to increase with the increased availability of technology and public health emphasis on diet-related measures such as sodium and energy reduction. Hence, continued improvement of the databases is important, so that they can better address these challenges and provide reliable and accurate data. PMID:23269654

  4. Comprehensiveness of "Social Work Abstracts" as a Database for Researchers and Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The comprehensiveness of "Social Work Abstracts (SWA)" as a database was examined. Method: The coverage of articles of "Research on Social Work Practice" and "Social Work Research" in "SWA" from 1995 to 2005 was examined. "SWA" was compared with other databases on several dimensions. A case study based on the author's publications was…

  5. An integrated database to support research on Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Baehr, A.; Dunham, G.; Matsuda, Hideo; Michaels, G.; Taylor, R.; Overbeek, R.; Rudd, K.E. ); Ginsburg, A.; Joerg, D.; Kazic, T. . Dept. of Genetics); Hagstrom, R.; Zawada, D. ); Smith, C.; Yoshida, Kaoru )

    1992-01-01

    We have used logic programming to design and implement a prototype database of genomic information for the model bacterial organism Escherichia coli. This report presents the fundamental database primitives that can be used to access and manipulate data relating to the E. coli genome. The present system, combined with a tutorial manual, provides immediate access to the integrated knowledge base for E. coli chromosome data. It also serves as the foundation for development of more user-friendly interfaces that have the same retrieval power and high-level tools to analyze complex chromosome organization.

  6. NCAD, a database integrating the intrinsic conformational preferences of non-coded amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Revilla-López, Guillem; Torras, Juan; Curcó, David; Casanovas, Jordi; Calaza, M. Isabel; Zanuy, David; Jiménez, Ana I.; Cativiela, Carlos; Nussinov, Ruth; Grodzinski, Piotr; Alemán, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Peptides and proteins find an ever-increasing number of applications in the biomedical and materials engineering fields. The use of non-proteinogenic amino acids endowed with diverse physicochemical and structural features opens the possibility to design proteins and peptides with novel properties and functions. Moreover, non-proteinogenic residues are particularly useful to control the three-dimensional arrangement of peptidic chains, which is a crucial issue for most applications. However, information regarding such amino acids –also called non-coded, non-canonical or non-standard– is usually scattered among publications specialized in quite diverse fields as well as in patents. Making all these data useful to the scientific community requires new tools and a framework for their assembly and coherent organization. We have successfully compiled, organized and built a database (NCAD, Non-Coded Amino acids Database) containing information about the intrinsic conformational preferences of non-proteinogenic residues determined by quantum mechanical calculations, as well as bibliographic information about their synthesis, physical and spectroscopic characterization, conformational propensities established experimentally, and applications. The architecture of the database is presented in this work together with the first family of non-coded residues included, namely, α-tetrasubstituted α-amino acids. Furthermore, the NCAD usefulness is demonstrated through a test-case application example. PMID:20455555

  7. SHIELD: an integrative gene expression database for inner ear research

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jun; Scheffer, Déborah I.; Kwan, Kelvin Y.; Corey, David P.

    2015-01-01

    The inner ear is a highly specialized mechanosensitive organ responsible for hearing and balance. Its small size and difficulty in harvesting sufficient tissue has hindered the progress of molecular studies. The protein components of mechanotransduction, the molecular biology of inner ear development and the genetic causes of many hereditary hearing and balance disorders remain largely unknown. Inner-ear gene expression data will help illuminate each of these areas. For over a decade, our laboratories and others have generated extensive sets of gene expression data for different cell types in the inner ear using various sample preparation methods and high-throughput genome-wide approaches. To facilitate the study of genes in the inner ear by efficient presentation of the accumulated data and to foster collaboration among investigators, we have developed the Shared Harvard Inner Ear Laboratory Database (SHIELD), an integrated resource that seeks to compile, organize and analyse the genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic knowledge of the inner ear. Five datasets are currently available. These datasets are combined in a relational database that integrates experimental data and annotations relevant to the inner ear. The SHIELD has a searchable web interface with two data retrieval options: viewing the gene pages online or downloading individual datasets as data tables. Each retrieved gene page shows the gene expression data and detailed gene information with hyperlinks to other online databases with up-to-date annotations. Downloadable data tables, for more convenient offline data analysis, are derived from publications and are current as of the time of publication. The SHIELD has made published and some unpublished data freely available to the public with the hope and expectation of accelerating discovery in the molecular biology of balance, hearing and deafness. Database URL: https://shield.hms.harvard.edu PMID:26209310

  8. Emerging acid deposition research and monitoring issues

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, R.

    1997-12-31

    The research baselines established for acid rain in the 1980s position scientists and policy makers to evaluate the environmental effectiveness of the acid rain control program and to test the variety of scientific hypotheses made regarding the chemical, transport and biological processes involved in acidic deposition. Several new research questions have evolved. How effective are the emissions reductions? What is the residual risk? How have ecological recovery rates been affected and what other environmental factors influence recovery? What are the critical requirements to measure ecological change including the extent and rate while also capturing the extent and severity of emerging ecological stressors (such as watershed nitrogen saturation)? These and other questions are currently being synthesized within and outside of EPA to develop a long-term strategy to provide guidance to emerging research and monitoring issues.

  9. SHIELD: an integrative gene expression database for inner ear research.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jun; Scheffer, Déborah I; Kwan, Kelvin Y; Corey, David P

    2015-01-01

    The inner ear is a highly specialized mechanosensitive organ responsible for hearing and balance. Its small size and difficulty in harvesting sufficient tissue has hindered the progress of molecular studies. The protein components of mechanotransduction, the molecular biology of inner ear development and the genetic causes of many hereditary hearing and balance disorders remain largely unknown. Inner-ear gene expression data will help illuminate each of these areas. For over a decade, our laboratories and others have generated extensive sets of gene expression data for different cell types in the inner ear using various sample preparation methods and high-throughput genome-wide approaches. To facilitate the study of genes in the inner ear by efficient presentation of the accumulated data and to foster collaboration among investigators, we have developed the Shared Harvard Inner Ear Laboratory Database (SHIELD), an integrated resource that seeks to compile, organize and analyse the genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic knowledge of the inner ear. Five datasets are currently available. These datasets are combined in a relational database that integrates experimental data and annotations relevant to the inner ear. The SHIELD has a searchable web interface with two data retrieval options: viewing the gene pages online or downloading individual datasets as data tables. Each retrieved gene page shows the gene expression data and detailed gene information with hyperlinks to other online databases with up-to-date annotations. Downloadable data tables, for more convenient offline data analysis, are derived from publications and are current as of the time of publication. The SHIELD has made published and some unpublished data freely available to the public with the hope and expectation of accelerating discovery in the molecular biology of balance, hearing and deafness. PMID:26209310

  10. The ECLS-K Study and Database: A Resource for School Social Work Practitioners and Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Sheara A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten (ECLS-K) database to school social work practitioners and researchers. This database not only serves as a viable source for evidence-based practice pertaining to the influences of families and schools on the academic achievement of children beginning at…

  11. USDA food and nutrient databases provide the infrastructure for food and nutrition research, policy and practice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA food and nutrient databases provide the basic infrastructure for food and nutrition research, nutrition monitoring, and dietary practice. They have had a long history that goes back to 1892, and are unique, as they are the only databases available in the public domain that perform these fu...

  12. Open-Access Metabolomics Databases for Natural Product Research: Present Capabilities and Future Potential

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sean R.; Lange, Bernd Markus

    2015-01-01

    Various databases have been developed to aid in assigning structures to spectral peaks observed in metabolomics experiments. In this review article, we discuss the utility of currently available open-access spectral and chemical databases for natural products discovery. We also provide recommendations on how the research community can contribute to further improvements. PMID:25789275

  13. The Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center's Porcine Immunology and Nutrition Resource Database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several diverse genomics-based databases have developed to facilitate research with human and rodent models. Current porcine gene databases, however, lack the nutritional and immunological orientation and robust annotation to design effective molecular tools to study relevant pig models. To address ...

  14. A comprehensive clinical research database based on CDISC ODM and i2b2.

    PubMed

    Meineke, Frank A; Stäubert, Sebastian; Löbe, Matthias; Winter, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    We present a working approach for a clinical research database as part of an archival information system. The CDISC ODM standard is target for clinical study and research relevant routine data, thus decoupling the data ingest process from the access layer. The presented research database is comprehensive as it covers annotating, mapping and curation of poorly annotated source data. Besides a conventional relational database the medical data warehouse i2b2 serves as main frontend for end-users. The system we developed is suitable to support patient recruitment, cohort identification and quality assurance in daily routine. PMID:25160362

  15. Development and Validation of Army Selection and Classification Measures. Project A: Longitudinal Research Database Plan. Research Report 1356.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Lauress L.; And Others

    This report describes plans for the development of a major longitudinal research database designed to support the development and validation of new predictors of Army performance, and also new measures of Army performance against which the new predictors can be validated. The following aspects of the database are addressed: (1) the anticipated…

  16. Landslide databases for applied landslide impact research: the example of the landslide database for the Federal Republic of Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damm, Bodo; Klose, Martin

    2014-05-01

    This contribution presents an initiative to develop a national landslide database for the Federal Republic of Germany. It highlights structure and contents of the landslide database and outlines its major data sources and the strategy of information retrieval. Furthermore, the contribution exemplifies the database potentials in applied landslide impact research, including statistics of landslide damage, repair, and mitigation. The landslide database offers due to systematic regional data compilation a differentiated data pool of more than 5,000 data sets and over 13,000 single data files. It dates back to 1137 AD and covers landslide sites throughout Germany. In seven main data blocks, the landslide database stores besides information on landslide types, dimensions, and processes, additional data on soil and bedrock properties, geomorphometry, and climatic or other major triggering events. A peculiarity of this landslide database is its storage of data sets on land use effects, damage impacts, hazard mitigation, and landslide costs. Compilation of landslide data is based on a two-tier strategy of data collection. The first step of information retrieval includes systematic web content mining and exploration of online archives of emergency agencies, fire and police departments, and news organizations. Using web and RSS feeds and soon also a focused web crawler, this enables effective nationwide data collection for recent landslides. On the basis of this information, in-depth data mining is performed to deepen and diversify the data pool in key landslide areas. This enables to gather detailed landslide information from, amongst others, agency records, geotechnical reports, climate statistics, maps, and satellite imagery. Landslide data is extracted from these information sources using a mix of methods, including statistical techniques, imagery analysis, and qualitative text interpretation. The landslide database is currently migrated to a spatial database system

  17. Design and deployment of a large brain-image database for clinical and nonclinical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guo Liang; Lim, Choie Cheio Tchoyoson; Banukumar, Narayanaswami; Aziz, Aamer; Hui, Francis; Nowinski, Wieslaw L.

    2004-04-01

    An efficient database is an essential component of organizing diverse information on image metadata and patient information for research in medical imaging. This paper describes the design, development and deployment of a large database system serving as a brain image repository that can be used across different platforms in various medical researches. It forms the infrastructure that links hospitals and institutions together and shares data among them. The database contains patient-, pathology-, image-, research- and management-specific data. The functionalities of the database system include image uploading, storage, indexing, downloading and sharing as well as database querying and management with security and data anonymization concerns well taken care of. The structure of database is multi-tier client-server architecture with Relational Database Management System, Security Layer, Application Layer and User Interface. Image source adapter has been developed to handle most of the popular image formats. The database has a user interface based on web browsers and is easy to handle. We have used Java programming language for its platform independency and vast function libraries. The brain image database can sort data according to clinically relevant information. This can be effectively used in research from the clinicians" points of view. The database is suitable for validation of algorithms on large population of cases. Medical images for processing could be identified and organized based on information in image metadata. Clinical research in various pathologies can thus be performed with greater efficiency and large image repositories can be managed more effectively. The prototype of the system has been installed in a few hospitals and is working to the satisfaction of the clinicians.

  18. Healthcare Databases in Thailand and Japan: Potential Sources for Health Technology Assessment Research

    PubMed Central

    Saokaew, Surasak; Sugimoto, Takashi; Kamae, Isao; Pratoomsoot, Chayanin; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2015-01-01

    Background Health technology assessment (HTA) has been continuously used for value-based healthcare decisions over the last decade. Healthcare databases represent an important source of information for HTA, which has seen a surge in use in Western countries. Although HTA agencies have been established in Asia-Pacific region, application and understanding of healthcare databases for HTA is rather limited. Thus, we reviewed existing databases to assess their potential for HTA in Thailand where HTA has been used officially and Japan where HTA is going to be officially introduced. Method Existing healthcare databases in Thailand and Japan were compiled and reviewed. Databases’ characteristics e.g. name of database, host, scope/objective, time/sample size, design, data collection method, population/sample, and variables were described. Databases were assessed for its potential HTA use in terms of safety/efficacy/effectiveness, social/ethical, organization/professional, economic, and epidemiological domains. Request route for each database was also provided. Results Forty databases– 20 from Thailand and 20 from Japan—were included. These comprised of national censuses, surveys, registries, administrative data, and claimed databases. All databases were potentially used for epidemiological studies. In addition, data on mortality, morbidity, disability, adverse events, quality of life, service/technology utilization, length of stay, and economics were also found in some databases. However, access to patient-level data was limited since information about the databases was not available on public sources. Conclusion Our findings have shown that existing databases provided valuable information for HTA research with limitation on accessibility. Mutual dialogue on healthcare database development and usage for HTA among Asia-Pacific region is needed. PMID:26560127

  19. A Temporal Abstraction-based Extract, Transform and Load Process for Creating Registry Databases for Research.

    PubMed

    Post, Andrew; Kurc, Tahsin; Overcash, Marc; Cantrell, Dedra; Morris, Tim; Eckerson, Kristi; Tsui, Circe; Willey, Terry; Quyyumi, Arshed; Eapen, Danny; Umpierrez, Guillermo; Ziemer, David; Saltz, Joel

    2011-01-01

    In the CTSA era there is great interest in aggregating and comparing populations across institutions. These sites likely represent data differently in their clinical data warehouses and other databases. Clinical data warehouses frequently are structured in a generalized way that supports many constituencies. For research, there is a need to transform these heterogeneous data into a shared representation, and to perform categorization and interpretation to optimize the data representation for investigators. We are addressing this need by extending an existing temporal abstraction-based clinical database query system, PROTEMPA. The extended system allows specifying data types of interest in federated databases, extracting the data into a shared representation, transforming it through categorization and interpretation, and loading it into a registry database that can be refreshed. Such a registry's access control, data representation and query tools can be tailored to the needs of research while keeping local databases as the source of truth. PMID:22211179

  20. Nigeria Anopheles Vector Database: An Overview of 100 Years' Research

    PubMed Central

    Okorie, Patricia Nkem; McKenzie, F. Ellis; Ademowo, Olusegun George; Bockarie, Moses; Kelly-Hope, Louise

    2011-01-01

    Anopheles mosquitoes are important vectors of malaria and lymphatic filariasis (LF), which are major public health diseases in Nigeria. Malaria is caused by infection with a protozoan parasite of the genus Plasmodium and LF by the parasitic worm Wuchereria bancrofti. Updating our knowledge of the Anopheles species is vital in planning and implementing evidence based vector control programs. To present a comprehensive report on the spatial distribution and composition of these vectors, all published data available were collated into a database. Details recorded for each source were the locality, latitude/longitude, time/period of study, species, abundance, sampling/collection methods, morphological and molecular species identification methods, insecticide resistance status, including evidence of the kdr allele, and P. falciparum sporozoite rate and W. bancrofti microfilaria prevalence. This collation resulted in a total of 110 publications, encompassing 484,747 Anopheles mosquitoes in 632 spatially unique descriptions at 142 georeferenced locations being identified across Nigeria from 1900 to 2010. Overall, the highest number of vector species reported included An. gambiae complex (65.2%), An. funestus complex (17.3%), An. gambiae s.s. (6.5%). An. arabiensis (5.0%) and An. funestus s.s. (2.5%), with the molecular forms An. gambiae M and S identified at 120 locations. A variety of sampling/collection and species identification methods were used with an increase in molecular techniques in recent decades. Insecticide resistance to pyrethroids and organochlorines was found in the main Anopheles species across 45 locations. Presence of P. falciparum and W. bancrofti varied between species with the highest sporozoite rates found in An. gambiae s.s, An. funestus s.s. and An. moucheti, and the highest microfilaria prevalence in An. gambiae s.l., An. arabiensis, and An. gambiae s.s. This comprehensive geo-referenced database provides an essential baseline on Anopheles

  1. BIGNASim: a NoSQL database structure and analysis portal for nucleic acids simulation data

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Andrio, Pau; Cugnasco, Cesare; Codo, Laia; Becerra, Yolanda; Dans, Pablo D.; Battistini, Federica; Torres, Jordi; Goñi, Ramón; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep Ll.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is, just behind genomics, the bioinformatics tool that generates the largest amounts of data, and that is using the largest amount of CPU time in supercomputing centres. MD trajectories are obtained after months of calculations, analysed in situ, and in practice forgotten. Several projects to generate stable trajectory databases have been developed for proteins, but no equivalence exists in the nucleic acids world. We present here a novel database system to store MD trajectories and analyses of nucleic acids. The initial data set available consists mainly of the benchmark of the new molecular dynamics force-field, parmBSC1. It contains 156 simulations, with over 120 μs of total simulation time. A deposition protocol is available to accept the submission of new trajectory data. The database is based on the combination of two NoSQL engines, Cassandra for storing trajectories and MongoDB to store analysis results and simulation metadata. The analyses available include backbone geometries, helical analysis, NMR observables and a variety of mechanical analyses. Individual trajectories and combined meta-trajectories can be downloaded from the portal. The system is accessible through http://mmb.irbbarcelona.org/BIGNASim/. Supplementary Material is also available on-line at http://mmb.irbbarcelona.org/BIGNASim/SuppMaterial/. PMID:26612862

  2. BIGNASim: a NoSQL database structure and analysis portal for nucleic acids simulation data.

    PubMed

    Hospital, Adam; Andrio, Pau; Cugnasco, Cesare; Codo, Laia; Becerra, Yolanda; Dans, Pablo D; Battistini, Federica; Torres, Jordi; Goñi, Ramón; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep Ll

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is, just behind genomics, the bioinformatics tool that generates the largest amounts of data, and that is using the largest amount of CPU time in supercomputing centres. MD trajectories are obtained after months of calculations, analysed in situ, and in practice forgotten. Several projects to generate stable trajectory databases have been developed for proteins, but no equivalence exists in the nucleic acids world. We present here a novel database system to store MD trajectories and analyses of nucleic acids. The initial data set available consists mainly of the benchmark of the new molecular dynamics force-field, parmBSC1. It contains 156 simulations, with over 120 μs of total simulation time. A deposition protocol is available to accept the submission of new trajectory data. The database is based on the combination of two NoSQL engines, Cassandra for storing trajectories and MongoDB to store analysis results and simulation metadata. The analyses available include backbone geometries, helical analysis, NMR observables and a variety of mechanical analyses. Individual trajectories and combined meta-trajectories can be downloaded from the portal. The system is accessible through http://mmb.irbbarcelona.org/BIGNASim/. Supplementary Material is also available on-line at http://mmb.irbbarcelona.org/BIGNASim/SuppMaterial/. PMID:26612862

  3. Impact of IPAD on CAD/CAM database university research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, L. M.; Wozny, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    IPAD program has provided direction, focus and software products which impacted on CAD/CAM data base research and follow-on research. The relationship of IPAD to the research projects which involve the storage of geometric data in common data ase facilities such as data base machines, the exchange of data between heterogeneous data bases, the development of IGES processors, the migration of lrge CAD/CAM data base management systems to noncompatible hosts, and the value of RIM as a research tool is described.

  4. Research Update: Highlights from the Out-of-School Time Database. Number 1, April 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Family Research Project, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This Research Update synthesizes findings from the profiles of 15 research and evaluation reports added to the Out-of-School Time Program Research and Evaluation Database in December 2006. It highlights strategies for assessing program processes as well as key outcomes and features of programs that promote positive outcomes. The Harvard Family…

  5. Research Update: Highlights from the Out-of-School Time Database. Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimer, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    This "Research Update" synthesizes findings from the profiles of 13 research and evaluation reports added to the Out-of-School Time Program Research and Evaluation Database in August 2007. It highlights innovations and developments in the out-of-school time field and looks at the important benefits out-of-school time programs can provide to youth,…

  6. AB032. Opportunities for real-life respiratory research in Korea: the HIRA database and beyond

    PubMed Central

    van Boven, Job FM; Rhee, Chin-Kook; Park, Hae-Yun; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Soriano, Joan; Ming, Simon Wan Yau; Price, David; Park, Hae Sim

    2016-01-01

    Background To date, most real-life respiratory research has been conducted using databases from Europe and North America. However, over half of the World population suffering from asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are living outside these areas, limiting generalizability of previous study results. Moreover, differences in population characteristics, health care systems and treatment availability may highly impact treatment effectiveness and drug safety. In Asia, the Korean Health Insurance Review & Assessment (HIRA) database may offer interesting opportunities. To provide an overview of the opportunities for real-life respiratory research in Korea, with a focus on the HIRA database. Methods First, the contents and procedures of the HIRA database (http://www.hira.or.kr) were assessed and characterized. Subsequently, its strengths and limitations were assessed. The database was compared with some other leading databases in Korea, Asia and beyond. Lastly, some examples of its application in respiratory research projects were explored, as well as the identification of potential future research opportunities. Results The HIRA database covers the complete medical healthcare utilization data of the entire population of South Korea, that is, 50 million people, over the period 2008–2015. It provides a unique and unbiased overview of healthcare utilization and cost data (including almost all primary care, pharmacy, hospital data) on a national level. The HIRA database has been extensively described (Kim, Kim, Kim Epi Health 2014) and has been used in several previous studies including specific studies in the respiratory field, discussed elsewhere. It uses ICD-10 coding, but has no patient-reported health outcomes (such as CAT, CCQ, mMRC), lung function data or smoking status. So far, multiple reports using HIRA data have been published in high-impact respiratory journals on asthma, COPD and asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS), and more study protocols

  7. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging and electromagnetic articulography database for speech production research (TC)

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Shrikanth; Toutios, Asterios; Ramanarayanan, Vikram; Lammert, Adam; Kim, Jangwon; Lee, Sungbok; Nayak, Krishna; Kim, Yoon-Chul; Zhu, Yinghua; Goldstein, Louis; Byrd, Dani; Bresch, Erik; Ghosh, Prasanta; Katsamanis, Athanasios; Proctor, Michael

    2014-01-01

    USC-TIMIT is an extensive database of multimodal speech production data, developed to complement existing resources available to the speech research community and with the intention of being continuously refined and augmented. The database currently includes real-time magnetic resonance imaging data from five male and five female speakers of American English. Electromagnetic articulography data have also been presently collected from four of these speakers. The two modalities were recorded in two independent sessions while the subjects produced the same 460 sentence corpus used previously in the MOCHA-TIMIT database. In both cases the audio signal was recorded and synchronized with the articulatory data. The database and companion software are freely available to the research community. PMID:25190403

  8. Databases and coordinated research projects at the IAEA on atomic processes in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Chung, Hyun-Kyung

    2012-05-25

    The Atomic and Molecular Data Unit at the IAEA works with a network of national data centres to encourage and coordinate production and dissemination of fundamental data for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (A+M/PMI) processes that are relevant to the realization of fusion energy. The Unit maintains numerical and bibliographical databases and has started a Wiki-style knowledge base. The Unit also contributes to A+M database interface standards and provides a search engine that offers a common interface to multiple numerical A+M/PMI databases. Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) bring together fusion energy researchers and atomic, molecular and surface physicists for joint work towards the development of new data and new methods. The databases and current CRPs on A+M/PMI processes are briefly described here.

  9. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging and electromagnetic articulography database for speech production research (TC).

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Shrikanth; Toutios, Asterios; Ramanarayanan, Vikram; Lammert, Adam; Kim, Jangwon; Lee, Sungbok; Nayak, Krishna; Kim, Yoon-Chul; Zhu, Yinghua; Goldstein, Louis; Byrd, Dani; Bresch, Erik; Ghosh, Prasanta; Katsamanis, Athanasios; Proctor, Michael

    2014-09-01

    USC-TIMIT is an extensive database of multimodal speech production data, developed to complement existing resources available to the speech research community and with the intention of being continuously refined and augmented. The database currently includes real-time magnetic resonance imaging data from five male and five female speakers of American English. Electromagnetic articulography data have also been presently collected from four of these speakers. The two modalities were recorded in two independent sessions while the subjects produced the same 460 sentence corpus used previously in the MOCHA-TIMIT database. In both cases the audio signal was recorded and synchronized with the articulatory data. The database and companion software are freely available to the research community. PMID:25190403

  10. Databases and coordinated research projects at the IAEA on atomic processes in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Chung, Hyun-Kyung

    2012-05-01

    The Atomic and Molecular Data Unit at the IAEA works with a network of national data centres to encourage and coordinate production and dissemination of fundamental data for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (A+M/PMI) processes that are relevant to the realization of fusion energy. The Unit maintains numerical and bibliographical databases and has started a Wiki-style knowledge base. The Unit also contributes to A+M database interface standards and provides a search engine that offers a common interface to multiple numerical A+M/PMI databases. Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) bring together fusion energy researchers and atomic, molecular and surface physicists for joint work towards the development of new data and new methods. The databases and current CRPs on A+M/PMI processes are briefly described here.

  11. DOG-SPOT database for comprehensive management of dog genetic research data.

    PubMed

    Powell, Julie As; Allen, Jeremy; Sutter, Nathan B

    2010-01-01

    Research laboratories studying the genetics of companion animals have no database tools specifically designed to aid in the management of the many kinds of data that are generated, stored and analyzed. We have developed a relational database, "DOG-SPOT," to provide such a tool. Implemented in MS-Access, the database is easy to extend or customize to suit a lab's particular needs. With DOG-SPOT a lab can manage data relating to dogs, breeds, samples, biomaterials, phenotypes, owners, communications, amplicons, sequences, markers, genotypes and personnel. Such an integrated data structure helps ensure high quality data entry and makes it easy to track physical stocks of biomaterials and oligonucleotides. PMID:21159202

  12. The Pitfalls of Cyberspace and Electronic Database Research--Who Sells What to Whom for Which Audience?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Susan

    2000-01-01

    Raises questions about the validity and reliability of doing research online via the proliferation of academic databases. Finds different versions of the Lexis-Nexis database have differing search capabilities. Argues that dependence on database research findings means dependence on decisions made by a few people who design search engines and…

  13. Large-scale spatial population databases in infectious disease research

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Modelling studies on the spatial distribution and spread of infectious diseases are becoming increasingly detailed and sophisticated, with global risk mapping and epidemic modelling studies now popular. Yet, in deriving populations at risk of disease estimates, these spatial models must rely on existing global and regional datasets on population distribution, which are often based on outdated and coarse resolution data. Moreover, a variety of different methods have been used to model population distribution at large spatial scales. In this review we describe the main global gridded population datasets that are freely available for health researchers and compare their construction methods, and highlight the uncertainties inherent in these population datasets. We review their application in past studies on disease risk and dynamics, and discuss how the choice of dataset can affect results. Moreover, we highlight how the lack of contemporary, detailed and reliable data on human population distribution in low income countries is proving a barrier to obtaining accurate large-scale estimates of population at risk and constructing reliable models of disease spread, and suggest research directions required to further reduce these barriers. PMID:22433126

  14. Large-scale spatial population databases in infectious disease research.

    PubMed

    Linard, Catherine; Tatem, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    Modelling studies on the spatial distribution and spread of infectious diseases are becoming increasingly detailed and sophisticated, with global risk mapping and epidemic modelling studies now popular. Yet, in deriving populations at risk of disease estimates, these spatial models must rely on existing global and regional datasets on population distribution, which are often based on outdated and coarse resolution data. Moreover, a variety of different methods have been used to model population distribution at large spatial scales. In this review we describe the main global gridded population datasets that are freely available for health researchers and compare their construction methods, and highlight the uncertainties inherent in these population datasets. We review their application in past studies on disease risk and dynamics, and discuss how the choice of dataset can affect results. Moreover, we highlight how the lack of contemporary, detailed and reliable data on human population distribution in low income countries is proving a barrier to obtaining accurate large-scale estimates of population at risk and constructing reliable models of disease spread, and suggest research directions required to further reduce these barriers. PMID:22433126

  15. University Management of Research: A Data-Based Policy and Planning. AIR 1989 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strubbe, J.

    The development of an appropriate research policy for a university as well as for the national and international levels can be accomplished only if quantitative data and qualitative evaluations (scientific contribution, results, goal-achievement) are made available to illustrate research activities. A database is described that would enable…

  16. Acid mine drainage. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning laboratory and field analyses of acid mine drainage. Topics include site investigations and characterization, remediation and monitoring programs, contaminant treatment research, and control and abatement studies. Chemical analyses of affected areas, and evaluation of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem responses to acid drainage are also discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  17. Acid mine drainage. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning laboratory and field analyses of acid mine drainage. Topics include site investigations and characterization, remediation and monitoring programs, contaminant treatment research, and control and abatement studies. Chemical analyses of affected areas, and evaluation of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem responses to acid drainage are also discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  18. Normal values for nuclear cardiology: Japanese databases for myocardial perfusion, fatty acid and sympathetic imaging and left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kenichi

    2010-04-01

    Myocardial normal databases for stress myocardial perfusion study have been created by the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine Working Group. The databases comprised gender-, camera rotation range- and radiopharmaceutical-specific data-sets from multiple institutions, and normal database files were created for installation in common nuclear cardiology software. Based on the electrocardiography-gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), left ventricular function, including ventricular volumes, systolic and diastolic functions and systolic wall thickening were also analyzed. Normal databases for fatty acid imaging using (123)I-beta-methyl-iodophenyl-pentadecanoic acid and sympathetic imaging using (123)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine were also examined. This review provides lists and overviews of normal values for myocardial SPECT and ventricular function in a Japanese population. The population-specific approach is a key factor for proper diagnostic and prognostic evaluation. PMID:20108130

  19. Normal values for nuclear cardiology: Japanese databases for myocardial perfusion, fatty acid and sympathetic imaging and left ventricular function

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Myocardial normal databases for stress myocardial perfusion study have been created by the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine Working Group. The databases comprised gender-, camera rotation range- and radiopharmaceutical-specific data-sets from multiple institutions, and normal database files were created for installation in common nuclear cardiology software. Based on the electrocardiography-gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), left ventricular function, including ventricular volumes, systolic and diastolic functions and systolic wall thickening were also analyzed. Normal databases for fatty acid imaging using 123I-beta-methyl-iodophenyl-pentadecanoic acid and sympathetic imaging using 123I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine were also examined. This review provides lists and overviews of normal values for myocardial SPECT and ventricular function in a Japanese population. The population-specific approach is a key factor for proper diagnostic and prognostic evaluation. PMID:20108130

  20. Moving to Google Cloud: Renovation of Global Borehole Temperature Database for Climate Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Y.; Huang, S.

    2013-12-01

    Borehole temperature comprises an independent archive of information on climate change which is complementary to the instrumental and other proxy climate records. With support from the international geothermal community, a global database of borehole temperatures has been constructed for the specific purpose of the study on climate change. Although this database has become an important data source in climate research, there are certain limitations partially because the framework of the existing borehole temperature database was hand-coded some twenty years ago. A database renovation work is now underway to take the advantages of the contemporary online database technologies. The major intended improvements include 1) dynamically linking a borehole site to Google Earth to allow for inspection of site specific geographical information; 2) dynamically linking an original key reference of a given borehole site to Google Scholar to allow for a complete list of related publications; and 3) enabling site selection and data download based on country, coordinate range, and contributor. There appears to be a good match between the enhancement requirements for this database and the functionalities of the newly released Google Fusion Tables application. Google Fusion Tables is a cloud-based service for data management, integration, and visualization. This experimental application can consolidate related online resources such as Google Earth, Google Scholar, and Google Drive for sharing and enriching an online database. It is user friendly, allowing users to apply filters and to further explore the internet for additional information regarding the selected data. The users also have ways to map, to chart, and to calculate on the selected data, and to download just the subset needed. The figure below is a snapshot of the database currently under Google Fusion Tables renovation. We invite contribution and feedback from the geothermal and climate research community to make the

  1. Development of a pseudo/anonymised primary care research database: Proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    MacRury, Sandra; Finlayson, Jim; Hussey-Wilson, Susan; Holden, Samantha

    2016-06-01

    General practice records present a comprehensive source of data that could form a variety of anonymised or pseudonymised research databases to aid identification of potential research participants regardless of location. A proof-of-concept study was undertaken to extract data from general practice systems in 15 practices across the region to form pseudo and anonymised research data sets. Two feasibility studies and a disease surveillance study compared numbers of potential study participants and accuracy of disease prevalence, respectively. There was a marked reduction in screening time and increase in numbers of potential study participants identified with the research repository compared with conventional methods. Accurate disease prevalence was established and enhanced with the addition of selective text mining. This study confirms the potential for development of national anonymised research database from general practice records in addition to improving data collection for local or national audits and epidemiological projects. PMID:24935212

  2. Developments of geriatric autopsy database and Internet-based database of Japanese single nucleotide polymorphisms for geriatric research (JG-SNP).

    PubMed

    Sawabe, Motoji; Arai, Tomio; Kasahara, Ichiro; Esaki, Yukiyoshi; Nakahara, Ken-ichi; Hosoi, Takayuki; Orimo, Hajime; Takubo, Kaiyo; Murayama, Shigeo; Tanaka, Noriko

    2004-08-01

    To facilitate geriatric research on the roles of genetic polymorphisms of candidate genes, two databases were developed based on data obtained from autopsy examinations of elderly subjects: the geriatric autopsy database (GEAD) and the Japanese single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) database for geriatric research (JG-SNP) which is accessible on the Internet (http://www.tmgh.metro.tokyo.jp/jg-snp/english/E_top.html). The data for the GEAD were derived from 1074 consecutive autopsy cases (565 male and 509 female cases) with an average age of 80 years. The GEAD was installed on a stand-alone Windows 2000 server using Oracle 8i as the database application. The GEAD contains clinical diagnoses of 26 geriatric diseases, histories of smoking and alcohol consumption, pathological findings (720 items), severity of atherosclerosis, genetic polymorphism data, etc. On the JG-SNP website, case distribution corresponding to a specified SNP or disease can be searched or downloaded. Although there are several Internet-based SNP databases such as dbSNP, no databases are available at present on the web that contain both SNP data and phenotypic data. As autopsy studies can provide large amounts of accurate medical information, including the presence of undiagnosed diseases such as latent cancers, the GEAD is a unique and excellent database for research on genetic polymorphisms. PMID:15336912

  3. The Chinchilla Research Resource Database: resource for an otolaryngology disease model

    PubMed Central

    Shimoyama, Mary; Smith, Jennifer R.; De Pons, Jeff; Tutaj, Marek; Khampang, Pawjai; Hong, Wenzhou; Erbe, Christy B.; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Kerschner, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    The long-tailed chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) is an established animal model for diseases of the inner and middle ear, among others. In particular, chinchilla is commonly used to study diseases involving viral and bacterial pathogens and polymicrobial infections of the upper respiratory tract and the ear, such as otitis media. The value of the chinchilla as a model for human diseases prompted the sequencing of its genome in 2012 and the more recent development of the Chinchilla Research Resource Database (http://crrd.mcw.edu) to provide investigators with easy access to relevant datasets and software tools to enhance their research. The Chinchilla Research Resource Database contains a complete catalog of genes for chinchilla and, for comparative purposes, human. Chinchilla genes can be viewed in the context of their genomic scaffold positions using the JBrowse genome browser. In contrast to the corresponding records at NCBI, individual gene reports at CRRD include functional annotations for Disease, Gene Ontology (GO) Biological Process, GO Molecular Function, GO Cellular Component and Pathway assigned to chinchilla genes based on annotations from the corresponding human orthologs. Data can be retrieved via keyword and gene-specific searches. Lists of genes with similar functional attributes can be assembled by leveraging the hierarchical structure of the Disease, GO and Pathway vocabularies through the Ontology Search and Browser tool. Such lists can then be further analyzed for commonalities using the Gene Annotator (GA) Tool. All data in the Chinchilla Research Resource Database is freely accessible and downloadable via the CRRD FTP site or using the download functions available in the search and analysis tools. The Chinchilla Research Resource Database is a rich resource for researchers using, or considering the use of, chinchilla as a model for human disease. Database URL: http://crrd.mcw.edu PMID:27173523

  4. The Chinchilla Research Resource Database: resource for an otolaryngology disease model.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Mary; Smith, Jennifer R; De Pons, Jeff; Tutaj, Marek; Khampang, Pawjai; Hong, Wenzhou; Erbe, Christy B; Ehrlich, Garth D; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Kerschner, Joseph E

    2016-01-01

    The long-tailed chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) is an established animal model for diseases of the inner and middle ear, among others. In particular, chinchilla is commonly used to study diseases involving viral and bacterial pathogens and polymicrobial infections of the upper respiratory tract and the ear, such as otitis media. The value of the chinchilla as a model for human diseases prompted the sequencing of its genome in 2012 and the more recent development of the Chinchilla Research Resource Database (http://crrd.mcw.edu) to provide investigators with easy access to relevant datasets and software tools to enhance their research. The Chinchilla Research Resource Database contains a complete catalog of genes for chinchilla and, for comparative purposes, human. Chinchilla genes can be viewed in the context of their genomic scaffold positions using the JBrowse genome browser. In contrast to the corresponding records at NCBI, individual gene reports at CRRD include functional annotations for Disease, Gene Ontology (GO) Biological Process, GO Molecular Function, GO Cellular Component and Pathway assigned to chinchilla genes based on annotations from the corresponding human orthologs. Data can be retrieved via keyword and gene-specific searches. Lists of genes with similar functional attributes can be assembled by leveraging the hierarchical structure of the Disease, GO and Pathway vocabularies through the Ontology Search and Browser tool. Such lists can then be further analyzed for commonalities using the Gene Annotator (GA) Tool. All data in the Chinchilla Research Resource Database is freely accessible and downloadable via the CRRD FTP site or using the download functions available in the search and analysis tools. The Chinchilla Research Resource Database is a rich resource for researchers using, or considering the use of, chinchilla as a model for human disease.Database URL: http://crrd.mcw.edu. PMID:27173523

  5. YPED: An Integrated Bioinformatics Suite and Database for Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics Research

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, Christopher M.; Shifman, Mark; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Stone, Kathryn L.; Carriero, Nicholas J.; Gulcicek, Erol E.; Lam, TuKiet T.; Wu, Terence; Bjornson, Robert D.; Bruce, Can; Nairn, Angus C.; Rinehart, Jesse; Miller, Perry L.; Williams, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    We report a significantly-enhanced bioinformatics suite and database for proteomics research called Yale Protein Expression Database (YPED) that is used by investigators at more than 300 institutions worldwide. YPED meets the data management, archival, and analysis needs of a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomics research ranging from a single laboratory, group of laboratories within and beyond an institution, to the entire proteomics community. The current version is a significant improvement over the first version in that it contains new modules for liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) database search results, label and label-free quantitative proteomic analysis, and several scoring outputs for phosphopeptide site localization. In addition, we have added both peptide and protein comparative analysis tools to enable pairwise analysis of distinct peptides/proteins in each sample and of overlapping peptides/proteins between all samples in multiple datasets. We have also implemented a targeted proteomics module for automated multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)/selective reaction monitoring (SRM) assay development. We have linked YPED’s database search results and both label-based and label-free fold-change analysis to the Skyline Panorama repository for online spectra visualization. In addition, we have built enhanced functionality to curate peptide identifications into an MS/MS peptide spectral library for all of our protein database search identification results. PMID:25712262

  6. Heavy Oil Database from the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Heavy Oil Database resulted from work funded by DOE and performed at the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER). It contains information on more than 500 resevoirs in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. The information was collected in 1992 and updated periodically through 2003. Save the zipped file to your PC, then open to access the data.

  7. Analysis of Institutionally Specific Retention Research: A Comparison between Survey and Institutional Database Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caison, Amy L.

    2007-01-01

    This study empirically explores the comparability of traditional survey-based retention research methodology with an alternative approach that relies on data commonly available in institutional student databases. Drawing on Tinto's [Tinto, V. (1993). "Leaving College: Rethinking the Causes and Cures of Student Attrition" (2nd Ed.), The University…

  8. Interacting with the National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) via the LONI Pipeline workflow environment.

    PubMed

    Torgerson, Carinna M; Quinn, Catherine; Dinov, Ivo; Liu, Zhizhong; Petrosyan, Petros; Pelphrey, Kevin; Haselgrove, Christian; Kennedy, David N; Toga, Arthur W; Van Horn, John Darrell

    2015-03-01

    Under the umbrella of the National Database for Clinical Trials (NDCT) related to mental illnesses, the National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) seeks to gather, curate, and make openly available neuroimaging data from NIH-funded studies of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). NDAR has recently made its database accessible through the LONI Pipeline workflow design and execution environment to enable large-scale analyses of cortical architecture and function via local, cluster, or "cloud"-based computing resources. This presents a unique opportunity to overcome many of the customary limitations to fostering biomedical neuroimaging as a science of discovery. Providing open access to primary neuroimaging data, workflow methods, and high-performance computing will increase uniformity in data collection protocols, encourage greater reliability of published data, results replication, and broaden the range of researchers now able to perform larger studies than ever before. To illustrate the use of NDAR and LONI Pipeline for performing several commonly performed neuroimaging processing steps and analyses, this paper presents example workflows useful for ASD neuroimaging researchers seeking to begin using this valuable combination of online data and computational resources. We discuss the utility of such database and workflow processing interactivity as a motivation for the sharing of additional primary data in ASD research and elsewhere. PMID:25666423

  9. Work Task Dimensions Underlying the World of Work: Research Results for Diverse Occupational Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prediger, Dale J.; Swaney, Kyle B.

    2004-01-01

    This article reports new research supporting the two bipolar work task dimensions that underlie the World-of-Work Map (WWM) and Holland's hexagon--working with data versus ideas (D/I) and working with things versus people (T/P). Three databases provided diverse perspectives on basic work tasks: (a) general nature of work (expert ratings for 1,122…

  10. Huntington's Disease Research Roster Support with a Microcomputer Database Management System

    PubMed Central

    Gersting, J. M.; Conneally, P. M.; Beidelman, K.

    1983-01-01

    This paper chronicles the MEGADATS (Medical Genetics Acquisition and DAta Transfer System) database development effort in collecting, storing, retrieving, and plotting human family pedigrees. The newest system, MEGADATS-3M, is detailed. Emphasis is on the microcomputer version of MEGADATS-3M and its use to support the Huntington's Disease research roster project. Examples of data input and pedigree plotting are included.

  11. Current Trends and New Challenges of Databases and Web Applications for Systems Driven Biological Research

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasaiah, Pradeep Kumar; Kim, Do Han

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic and rapidly evolving nature of systems driven research imposes special requirements on the technology, approach, design and architecture of computational infrastructure including database and Web application. Several solutions have been proposed to meet the expectations and novel methods have been developed to address the persisting problems of data integration. It is important for researchers to understand different technologies and approaches. Having familiarized with the pros and cons of the existing technologies, researchers can exploit its capabilities to the maximum potential for integrating data. In this review we discuss the architecture, design and key technologies underlying some of the prominent databases and Web applications. We will mention their roles in integration of biological data and investigate some of the emerging design concepts and computational technologies that are likely to have a key role in the future of systems driven biomedical research. PMID:21423387

  12. [Effective data collection in cancer research: an all-in-one database solution].

    PubMed

    Huszka, C; Dahl, E; Knüchel, R; Donner, A

    2006-01-01

    Tissue banks containing human malignant and benign tissue have become highly important for modem cancer research. They provide an excellent source of information with respect to pathological states and processes. Nowadays tissue samples can be examined using a broad variety of molecular biology methods, at the levels of DNA, RNA and protein. However, these new possibilities impose great expectations from the user side towards tissue banks and their associated databases. Nowadays a database that only manages tissue samples is not timely anymore. In fact a modern database should be capable of registering arbitraty amounts of tissue relevant information in an easily searchable way. In order to simplify the often complicated and time consuming process of data collection, we have developed a software solution that centralizes various aspects of tumor tissue banking. The main task of this software is not only to administer tissue samples but also to provide a centralized data platform for scientists which support their research. To achieve our goals we have constructed a tissue database which is supported by an Oracle System. The access to this database has been made possible with a light-weight, self-developed Java Client Program. The system possesses high levels of security and the access to information in the database is strictly controlled by preset permissions. A flexible search mechanism is also readily available for speedy data extraction according to various criteria. This solution provides us with an "All-in-one" tool for the purpose of flexible and efficient data collection and management in cancer research. PMID:17867598

  13. Immediate Dissemination of Student Discoveries to a Model Organism Database Enhances Classroom-Based Research Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Emily A.; Stover, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    Use of inquiry-based research modules in the classroom has soared over recent years, largely in response to national calls for teaching that provides experience with scientific processes and methodologies. To increase the visibility of in-class studies among interested researchers and to strengthen their impact on student learning, we have extended the typical model of inquiry-based labs to include a means for targeted dissemination of student-generated discoveries. This initiative required: 1) creating a set of research-based lab activities with the potential to yield results that a particular scientific community would find useful and 2) developing a means for immediate sharing of student-generated results. Working toward these goals, we designed guides for course-based research aimed to fulfill the need for functional annotation of the Tetrahymena thermophila genome, and developed an interactive Web database that links directly to the official Tetrahymena Genome Database for immediate, targeted dissemination of student discoveries. This combination of research via the course modules and the opportunity for students to immediately “publish” their novel results on a Web database actively used by outside scientists culminated in a motivational tool that enhanced students’ efforts to engage the scientific process and pursue additional research opportunities beyond the course. PMID:24591511

  14. DriverDBv2: a database for human cancer driver gene research.

    PubMed

    Chung, I-Fang; Chen, Chen-Yang; Su, Shih-Chieh; Li, Chia-Yang; Wu, Kou-Juey; Wang, Hsei-Wei; Cheng, Wei-Chung

    2016-01-01

    We previously presented DriverDB, a database that incorporates ∼ 6000 cases of exome-seq data, in addition to annotation databases and published bioinformatics algorithms dedicated to driver gene/mutation identification. The database provides two points of view, 'Cancer' and 'Gene', to help researchers visualize the relationships between cancers and driver genes/mutations. In the updated DriverDBv2 database (http://ngs.ym.edu.tw/driverdb) presented herein, we incorporated >9500 cancer-related RNA-seq datasets and >7000 more exome-seq datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC), and published papers. Seven additional computational algorithms (meaning that the updated database contains 15 in total), which were developed for driver gene identification, are incorporated into our analysis pipeline, and the results are provided in the 'Cancer' section. Furthermore, there are two main new features, 'Expression' and 'Hotspot', in the 'Gene' section. 'Expression' displays two expression profiles of a gene in terms of sample types and mutation types, respectively. 'Hotspot' indicates the hotspot mutation regions of a gene according to the results provided by four bioinformatics tools. A new function, 'Gene Set', allows users to investigate the relationships among mutations, expression levels and clinical data for a set of genes, a specific dataset and clinical features. PMID:26635391

  15. The European internet-based patient and research database for primary immunodeficiencies: results 2004-06.

    PubMed

    Eades-Perner, A-M; Gathmann, B; Knerr, V; Guzman, D; Veit, D; Kindle, G; Grimbacher, B

    2007-02-01

    Because primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are rare diseases, transnational studies are essential to maximize the scientific outcome and lead to improved diagnosis and therapy. Immunologists in Europe have united to determine the prevalence of PID in Europe and to establish and evaluate harmonized guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of PID as well as to improve the awareness of PID in Europe. In order to achieve this aim we have developed an internet-based database for clinical and research data on patients with PID. This database forms the platform for studies of demographics, the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and the identification of novel disease-associated genes. The database is completely secure, while providing access to researchers via a standard browser using password and encrypted log-in sessions and conforms to all European and national ethics and data protection guidelines. So far 2386 patients have been documented by 35 documenting centres in 20 countries. Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common entity, accounting for almost 30% of all entries. First statistical analyses on the quality of life of patients show the advantages of immunoglobulin replacement therapy, at the same time revealing a mean diagnostic delay of over 4 years. First studies on specific questions on selected PID are now under way. The platform of this database can be used for any type of medical condition. PMID:17223972

  16. The use of claims databases for outcomes research: rationale, challenges, and strategies.

    PubMed

    Motheral, B R; Fairman, K A

    1997-01-01

    Health care payers and policy makers need information about the cost and effectiveness of medical treatments. While randomized controlled trials historically are the primary source of medical information, they are expensive and labor-intensive, and often have limited utility for answering questions about "real-world" patient populations. These problems have led to an increasing reliance on claims database research in making policy decisions about treatment options. However, both researchers and decision makers should recognize the limitations and unique features of claims databases. Recommendations for avoiding or minimizing threats to internal validity, construct validity, and external validity are: (1) use of a study design that includes comparisons; (2) ensuring that the study design and conclusions are consistent with the database; (3) a priori conceptual modeling of the research question; (4) use of appropriate constructs; (5) explicit examination of alternative explanations for study findings; (6) sensitivity analyses of key assumptions; (7) awareness of the distinction between statistical and practical significance of findings; (8) generalization only when appropriate; and (9) reporting of relevant information. Given that any study design or data source has limitations, we hope that this paper will encourage a philosophy of methodological pluralism in outcomes research. Awareness and accurate reporting of validity issues will strengthen and extend the information resources currently available to decision makers. PMID:9152572

  17. Human gene mutation database-a biomedical information and research resource.

    PubMed

    Krawczak, M; Ball, E V; Fenton, I; Stenson, P D; Abeysinghe, S; Thomas, N; Cooper, D N

    2000-01-01

    Although 20 years have elapsed since the first single basepair substitution underlying an inherited disease in humans was characterised at the DNA level, the initiative has only recently been taken to establish central database resources for pathological genetic variants. Disease-associated gene lesions are currently collected and publicised by the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) in Cardiff, locus-specific mutation databases, and to some extent also by the Genome Database (GDB) and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). To date, HGMD represents the only comprehensive and publicly available database of gene lesions underlying human inherited disease. By July 1999, HGMD contained over 18,000 different mutations from some 900 human genes, the majority being single basepair substitutions. In addition to its potential as an information resource for clinicians and genetic counsellors, HGMD has allowed molecular geneticists to address a variety of biological questions through meta-analysis of the collated data. HGMD also promises to assist research workers in optimising mutation search strategies for a given gene. A questionnaire sent out to, and answered by, the editors of 20 key journals revealed that human genetics journals are increasingly reluctant to publish mutation reports. Electronic data submission and publication facilities are therefore urgently required. The World Wide Web (WWW) provides an excellent medium within which to combine the centralised management of basic mutation data, including rigorous quality control, with the possibility of publishing additional mutation-related information. In response to these needs, HGMD has both instituted a collaboration with Springer-Verlag GmbH, Heidelberg, to potentiate free online submission and electronic publication of human gene mutation data and developed links with the curators of locus-specific mutation databases. PMID:10612821

  18. Insight: An ontology-based integrated database and analysis platform for epilepsy self-management research.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Satya S; Ramesh, Priya; Welter, Elisabeth; Bukach, Ashley; Valdez, Joshua; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Bamps, Yvan; Stoll, Shelley; Jobst, Barbara C; Sajatovic, Martha

    2016-10-01

    We present Insight as an integrated database and analysis platform for epilepsy self-management research as part of the national Managing Epilepsy Well Network. Insight is the only available informatics platform for accessing and analyzing integrated data from multiple epilepsy self-management research studies with several new data management features and user-friendly functionalities. The features of Insight include, (1) use of Common Data Elements defined by members of the research community and an epilepsy domain ontology for data integration and querying, (2) visualization tools to support real time exploration of data distribution across research studies, and (3) an interactive visual query interface for provenance-enabled research cohort identification. The Insight platform contains data from five completed epilepsy self-management research studies covering various categories of data, including depression, quality of life, seizure frequency, and socioeconomic information. The data represents over 400 participants with 7552 data points. The Insight data exploration and cohort identification query interface has been developed using Ruby on Rails Web technology and open source Web Ontology Language Application Programming Interface to support ontology-based reasoning. We have developed an efficient ontology management module that automatically updates the ontology mappings each time a new version of the Epilepsy and Seizure Ontology is released. The Insight platform features a Role-based Access Control module to authenticate and effectively manage user access to different research studies. User access to Insight is managed by the Managing Epilepsy Well Network database steering committee consisting of representatives of all current collaborating centers of the Managing Epilepsy Well Network. New research studies are being continuously added to the Insight database and the size as well as the unique coverage of the dataset allows investigators to conduct

  19. Dental health services research utilizing comprehensive clinical databases and information technology.

    PubMed

    Hayden, W J

    1997-01-01

    Marketplace pressures for accountability in dentistry have made clear dental delivery systems' weaknesses in information generation, management, and analysis methods. Without this type of information, dentistry is unable to quantify and document the outcomes of the dental care services it provides. The Pew Health Professions Commission and the Institute of Medicine both suggest that dental schools should be among the leaders in the development and teaching of dental information capabilities, as well as the source of fundamental dental health services research. This paper argues that dental schools are the logical location for the development of valid, reliable, and acceptable health services research methods and databases. It describes the development of an insurance claims database to demonstrate the types of investigations possible, as well as the weaknesses and shortcomings of pure administrative data. PMID:9024342

  20. Second Research Coordination Meeting on Reference Database for Neutron Activation Analysis -- Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B.; Kellett, Mark A.

    2008-03-19

    The second meeting of the Co-ordinated Research Project on"Reference Database for Neutron Activation Analysis" was held at the IAEA, Vienna from 7-9 May, 2007. A summary of the presentations made by participants is given, along with reports on specifically assigned tasks and subsequent discussions. In order to meet the overall objectives of this CRP, the outputs have been reiterated and new task assignments made.

  1. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database: 2016 Update on Research.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Marshall L; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Pasquali, Sara K; Hill, Kevin D; Hornik, Christoph; O'Brien, Sean M; Shahian, David M; Habib, Robert H; Edwards, Fred H

    2016-09-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS CHSD) is the largest congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical clinical data registry in the world. With more than 400,000 total operations from nearly all centers performing pediatric and congenital heart operations in North America, the STS CHSD is an unparalleled platform for clinical investigation, outcomes research, and quality improvement activities in this subspecialty. In 2015, several major original publications reported analyses of data in the CHSD pertaining to specific diagnostic and procedural groups, age-defined cohorts, or the entire population of patients in the database. Additional publications reported the most recent development, evaluation, and application of metrics for quality measurement and reporting of pediatric and congenital heart operation outcomes. This use of the STS CHSD for outcomes research and for quality measurement continues to expand as database participation and the available wealth of data in it continue to grow. This article reviews outcomes research and quality improvement articles published in 2015 based on STS CHSD data. PMID:27492669

  2. A European Flood Database: facilitating comprehensive flood research beyond administrative boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, J.; Arheimer, B.; Aronica, G. T.; Bilibashi, A.; Boháč, M.; Bonacci, O.; Borga, M.; Burlando, P.; Castellarin, A.; Chirico, G. B.; Claps, P.; Fiala, K.; Gaál, L.; Gorbachova, L.; Gül, A.; Hannaford, J.; Kiss, A.; Kjeldsen, T.; Kohnová, S.; Koskela, J. J.; Macdonald, N.; Mavrova-Guirguinova, M.; Ledvinka, O.; Mediero, L.; Merz, B.; Merz, R.; Molnar, P.; Montanari, A.; Osuch, M.; Parajka, J.; Perdigão, R. A. P.; Radevski, I.; Renard, B.; Rogger, M.; Salinas, J. L.; Sauquet, E.; Šraj, M.; Szolgay, J.; Viglione, A.; Volpi, E.; Wilson, D.; Zaimi, K.; Blöschl, G.

    2015-06-01

    The current work addresses one of the key building blocks towards an improved understanding of flood processes and associated changes in flood characteristics and regimes in Europe: the development of a comprehensive, extensive European flood database. The presented work results from ongoing cross-border research collaborations initiated with data collection and joint interpretation in mind. A detailed account of the current state, characteristics and spatial and temporal coverage of the European Flood Database, is presented. At this stage, the hydrological data collection is still growing and consists at this time of annual maximum and daily mean discharge series, from over 7000 hydrometric stations of various data series lengths. Moreover, the database currently comprises data from over 50 different data sources. The time series have been obtained from different national and regional data sources in a collaborative effort of a joint European flood research agreement based on the exchange of data, models and expertise, and from existing international data collections and open source websites. These ongoing efforts are contributing to advancing the understanding of regional flood processes beyond individual country boundaries and to a more coherent flood research in Europe.

  3. An attempt to develop a database for epidemiological research in Semipalatinsk.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hiroaki; Apsalikov, Kazbek N; Gusev, Boris I; Galich, Boris; Madieva, Madina; Koshpessova, Gulsum; Abdikarimova, Asel; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2006-02-01

    The present paper reports progress and problems in our development of a database for comprehensive epidemiological research in Semipalatinsk whose ultimate aim is to examine the effects of low dose radiation exposure on the human body. The database was constructed and set up at the Scientific Research Institute of Radiation Medicine Ecology in 2003, and the number of data entries into the database reached 110,000 on 31 January 2005. However, we face some problems concerning size, accuracy and reliability of data which hinder full epidemiological analysis. Firstly we need fuller bias free data. The second task is to establish a committee for a discussion of the analysis, which should be composed of statisticians and epidemiologists, to conduct a research project from a long-term perspective, and carry out the collection of data effectively, along the lines of the project. Due to the insufficiency of data collected so far, our analysis is limited to showing the trends in mortality rates in the high and low dose areas. PMID:16571937

  4. Improving the U.S. EPA Toxic Release Inventory database for environmental health research.

    PubMed

    Neumann, C M

    1998-01-01

    In 1986, Congress passed the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) in response to the tragic death of thousands of people in Bhopal, India, following the accidental release of the toxic gas methyl isocyanate (MIC) from a Union Carbide facility. As a component of EPCRA, certain manufacturers are required to report annually the total mass (pounds per year, lb/yr) of toxic chemicals released into the environment (air, water, land, or underground injection), treated on-site, or shipped off-site for further waste treatment. This information is compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) into a publicly accessible database known as the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI). The TRI database is designed to encourage pollution prevention and waste reduction by increasing public access to and knowledge of environmental chemical releases. EPCRA has been generally considered by industry, government, and community representatives as one of the most successful environmental laws in U.S. history. Over the past few years, EPA has initiated a three-phased expansion to EPCRA reporting requirements that will enhance the overall usefulness of the TRI database. The focus of this article is to discuss these changes and highlight several current uses of the TRI database in environmental health research. PMID:9644330

  5. MIMIC II: a massive temporal ICU patient database to support research in intelligent patient monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saeed, M.; Lieu, C.; Raber, G.; Mark, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    Development and evaluation of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) decision-support systems would be greatly facilitated by the availability of a large-scale ICU patient database. Following our previous efforts with the MIMIC (Multi-parameter Intelligent Monitoring for Intensive Care) Database, we have leveraged advances in networking and storage technologies to develop a far more massive temporal database, MIMIC II. MIMIC II is an ongoing effort: data is continuously and prospectively archived from all ICU patients in our hospital. MIMIC II now consists of over 800 ICU patient records including over 120 gigabytes of data and is growing. A customized archiving system was used to store continuously up to four waveforms and 30 different parameters from ICU patient monitors. An integrated user-friendly relational database was developed for browsing of patients' clinical information (lab results, fluid balance, medications, nurses' progress notes). Based upon its unprecedented size and scope, MIMIC II will prove to be an important resource for intelligent patient monitoring research, and will support efforts in medical data mining and knowledge-discovery.

  6. A DICOM based radiotherapy plan database for research collaboration and reporting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westberg, J.; Krogh, S.; Brink, C.; Vogelius, I. R.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To create a central radiotherapy (RT) plan database for dose analysis and reporting, capable of calculating and presenting statistics on user defined patient groups. The goal is to facilitate multi-center research studies with easy and secure access to RT plans and statistics on protocol compliance. Methods: RT institutions are able to send data to the central database using DICOM communications on a secure computer network. The central system is composed of a number of DICOM servers, an SQL database and in-house developed software services to process the incoming data. A web site within the secure network allows the user to manage their submitted data. Results: The RT plan database has been developed in Microsoft .NET and users are able to send DICOM data between RT centers in Denmark. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) calculations performed by the system are comparable to those of conventional RT software. A permission system was implemented to ensure access control and easy, yet secure, data sharing across centers. The reports contain DVH statistics for structures in user defined patient groups. The system currently contains over 2200 patients in 14 collaborations. Conclusions: A central RT plan repository for use in multi-center trials and quality assurance was created. The system provides an attractive alternative to dummy runs by enabling continuous monitoring of protocol conformity and plan metrics in a trial.

  7. Existing data sources for clinical epidemiology: The North Denmark Bacteremia Research Database

    PubMed Central

    Schønheyder, Henrik C; Søgaard, Mette

    2010-01-01

    Bacteremia is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Improving prevention and treatment requires better knowledge of the disease and its prognosis. However, in order to study the entire spectrum of bacteremia patients, we need valid sources of information, prospective data collection, and complete follow-up. In North Denmark Region, all patients diagnosed with bacteremia have been registered in a population-based database since 1981. The information has been recorded prospectively since 1992 and the main variables are: the patient’s unique civil registration number, date of sampling the first positive blood culture, date of admission, clinical department, date of notification of growth, place of acquisition, focus of infection, microbiological species, antibiogram, and empirical antimicrobial treatment. During the time from 1981 to 2008, information on 22,556 cases of bacteremia has been recorded. The civil registration number makes it possible to link the database to other medical databases and thereby build large cohorts with detailed longitudinal data that include hospital histories since 1977, comorbidity data, and complete follow-up of survival. The database is suited for epidemiological research and, presently, approximately 60 studies have been published. Other Danish departments of clinical microbiology have recently started to record the same information and a population base of 2.3 million will be available for future studies. PMID:20865114

  8. Research for amino acids in lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, C. W.; Zumwalt, R. W.; Kuo, K.; Rash, J. J.; Aue , W. A.; Stalling, D. L.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    The study was primarily directed toward the examination of Apollo 14 lunar fines for indigenous amino acids or materials which could be converted to amino acids on hydrolysis with 6 N hydrochloric acid. Initial experiments were conducted to confirm the integrity of the derivatization reactions and reagents, and to optimize the gas-liquid chromatographic (GLC) instrumental and chromatographic system for the separation and flame ionization detection of the amino acid derivatives. In studies on the recovery of amino acids added to lunar fines, low recoveries were obtained when 10 ng of each amino acid were added to 50 mg of virgin fines, but the subsequent addition of 50 ng of each to the previously extracted sample resulted in much higher recoveries.

  9. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database: 2016 Update on Research.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, Vinay; Rankin, J Scott; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Shahian, David M; Habib, Robert H; D'Agostino, Richard S; Thourani, Vinod H; Suri, Rakesh M; Prager, Richard L; Edwards, Fred H

    2016-07-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Database (ACSD) is an international voluntary effort that is the foundation of our specialty's efforts in clinical performance assessment and quality improvement. Containing nearly 6,000,000 patient records, the ACSD is a robust resource for clinical research. Seven major original publications and four review articles were generated from the ACSD in 2015. The risk-adjusted outcome analyses and quality measures reported in these studies have made substantial contributions to inform daily clinical practice. This report summarizes the ACSD-based research efforts published in 2015. PMID:27262913

  10. Fine-grained policy control in U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) multimodal signatures database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Kelly; Grueneberg, Keith; Wood, David; Calo, Seraphin

    2014-06-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Multimodal Signatures Database (MMSDB) consists of a number of colocated relational databases representing a collection of data from various sensors. Role-based access to this data is granted to external organizations such as DoD contractors and other government agencies through a client Web portal. In the current MMSDB system, access control is only at the database and firewall level. In order to offer finer grained security, changes to existing user profile schemas and authentication mechanisms are usually needed. In this paper, we describe a software middleware architecture and implementation that allows fine-grained access control to the MMSDB at a dataset, table, and row level. Result sets from MMSDB queries issued in the client portal are filtered with the use of a policy enforcement proxy, with minimal changes to the existing client software and database. Before resulting data is returned to the client, policies are evaluated to determine if the user or role is authorized to access the data. Policies can be authored to filter data at the row, table or column level of a result set. The system uses various technologies developed in the International Technology Alliance in Network and Information Science (ITA) for policy-controlled information sharing and dissemination1. Use of the Policy Management Library provides a mechanism for the management and evaluation of policies to support finer grained access to the data in the MMSDB system. The GaianDB is a policy-enabled, federated database that acts as a proxy between the client application and the MMSDB system.

  11. Computer-Aided Systems Engineering for Flight Research Projects Using a Workgroup Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizukami, Masahi

    2004-01-01

    An online systems engineering tool for flight research projects has been developed through the use of a workgroup database. Capabilities are implemented for typical flight research systems engineering needs in document library, configuration control, hazard analysis, hardware database, requirements management, action item tracking, project team information, and technical performance metrics. Repetitive tasks are automated to reduce workload and errors. Current data and documents are instantly available online and can be worked on collaboratively. Existing forms and conventional processes are used, rather than inventing or changing processes to fit the tool. An integrated tool set offers advantages by automatically cross-referencing data, minimizing redundant data entry, and reducing the number of programs that must be learned. With a simplified approach, significant improvements are attained over existing capabilities for minimal cost. By using a workgroup-level database platform, personnel most directly involved in the project can develop, modify, and maintain the system, thereby saving time and money. As a pilot project, the system has been used to support an in-house flight experiment. Options are proposed for developing and deploying this type of tool on a more extensive basis.

  12. USDA-ARS Riesel Watersheds, Riesel, Texas, USA: Water quality research database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmel, R. Daren; Haney, Richard L.; Smith, Douglas R.; White, Michael; King, Kevin W.

    2014-10-01

    The 75 year legacy database including discharge, sediment loss, land management, and meteorological data for the USDA-ARS Riesel Watersheds, Riesel, TX, USA has been available on the web for more than a decade (www.ars.usda.gov/spa/hydro-data) and used in numerous studies and publications; however, only recently have these data been added to the Sustaining the Earth's Watersheds, Agricultural Research Data System (STEWARDS) database (www.nrrig.mwa.ars.usda.gov/stewards/stewards.html). In addition, water quality data including dissolved inorganic N and P compounds measured from more than 1000 storm runoff events, 1300 base flow sampling events (lateral subsurface return flow or seepage flow), and 157 precipitation events through 2012 were added. The objectives of this manuscript are to present relevant background information on these data, summarize the data collection and analysis methodology, present the measured data along with cursory analyses, and convey the commitment of the USDA-ARS Riesel Watersheds to long-term data accessibility and database enhancement for water quality data and research.

  13. Down syndrome: issues to consider in a national registry, research database and biobank.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Linda L; McCabe, Edward R B

    2011-01-01

    As the quality of life for individuals with Down syndrome continues to improve due to anticipatory healthcare, early intervention, mainstreaming in schools, and increased expectations, the lack of basic information regarding individuals with Down syndrome is being recognized, and the need to facilitate research through a national registry, research database and biobank is being discussed. We believe that there should not be ownership of the samples and information, but instead prefer stewardship of the samples and information to benefit the participants who provided them. We endorse a model with data and sample managers and a research review board to interface between the investigators and participants. Information and samples would be coded, and only a few data managers would know the relationship between the codes and identifying information. Research results once published should be included in an online newsletter. If appropriate, individual results should be shared with participants. A Down syndrome registry, research database and biobank should be accountable to participants, families, medical care providers, government, and funding sources. PMID:21501965

  14. Modeling the High Speed Research Cycle 2B Longitudinal Aerodynamic Database Using Multivariate Orthogonal Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, E. A.; Proffitt, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    The data for longitudinal non-dimensional, aerodynamic coefficients in the High Speed Research Cycle 2B aerodynamic database were modeled using polynomial expressions identified with an orthogonal function modeling technique. The discrepancy between the tabular aerodynamic data and the polynomial models was tested and shown to be less than 15 percent for drag, lift, and pitching moment coefficients over the entire flight envelope. Most of this discrepancy was traced to smoothing local measurement noise and to the omission of mass case 5 data in the modeling process. A simulation check case showed that the polynomial models provided a compact and accurate representation of the nonlinear aerodynamic dependencies contained in the HSR Cycle 2B tabular aerodynamic database.

  15. Exploiting research information: comments about the different databases in health care (DIMDI, OVID CD-ROM).

    PubMed

    Lappas, E

    2003-09-01

    The rapid growth of medical knowledge creates a demand for new ways of providing information. Health professionals are dealing with a variety of cases, and as they have no time to visit the library, they need filtered information instantly. Medical knowledge databases and data sets are increasingly available in electronic form, particularly on the World Wide Web. The premise of this medium is that it offers a "world of knowledge at your fingertips". The reality, however, is somewhat different, as information systems are not well integrated into clinical practice, they prove difficult to find specific information in, and contain content of varying quality. The continued evaluation of the medium in the future, should be beneficial as evidence-based resources available, and these resources are integrated into electronic medical record systems. The DIMDI and OVID CD-ROM databases are presented as vehicles of research in Bio-Medical Sciences. PMID:14514169

  16. High Tech High School Interns Develop a Mid-Ocean Ridge Database for Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudigel, D.; Delaney, R.; Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A. A.; Miller, S. P.

    2004-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridges (MOR) represent one of the most important geographical and geological features on planet Earth. MORs are the locations where plates spread apart, they are the locations of the majority of the Earths' volcanoes that harbor some of the most extreme life forms. These concepts attract much research, but mid-ocean ridges are still effectively underrepresented in the Earth science class rooms. As two High Tech High School students, we began an internship at Scripps to develop a database for mid-ocean ridges as a resource for science and education. This Ridge Catalog will be accessible via http://earthref.org/databases/RC/ and applies a similar structure, design and data archival principle as the Seamount Catalog under EarthRef.org. Major research goals of this project include the development of (1) an archival structure for multibeam and sidescan data, standard bathymetric maps (including ODP-DSDP drill site and dredge locations) or any other arbitrary digital objects relating to MORs, and (2) to compile a global data set for some of the most defining characteristics of every ridge segment including ridge segment length, depth and azimuth and half spreading rates. One of the challenges included the need of making MOR data useful to the scientist as well as the teacher in the class room. Since the basic structure follows the design of the Seamount Catalog closely, we could move our attention to the basic data population of the database. We have pulled together multibeam data for the MOR segments from various public archives (SIOExplorer, SIO-GDC, NGDC, Lamont), and pre-processed it for public use. In particular, we have created individual bathymetric maps for each ridge segment, while merging the multibeam data with global satellite bathymetry data from Smith & Sandwell (1997). The global scale of this database will give it the ability to be used for any number of applications, from cruise planning to data

  17. Aspergillus flavus Blast2GO gene ontology database: elevated growth temperature alters amino acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The availability of a representative gene ontology (GO) database is a prerequisite for a successful functional genomics study. Using online Blast2GO resources we constructed a GO database of Aspergillus flavus. Of the predicted total 13,485 A. flavus genes 8,987 were annotated with GO terms. The mea...

  18. Database and Registry Research in Orthopaedic Surgery: Part I: Claims-Based Data.

    PubMed

    Pugely, Andrew J; Martin, Christopher T; Harwood, Jared; Ong, Kevin L; Bozic, Kevin J; Callaghan, John J

    2015-08-01

    The use of large-scale national databases for observational research in orthopaedic surgery has grown substantially in the last decade, and the data sets can be grossly categorized as either administrative claims or clinical registries. Administrative claims data comprise the billing records associated with the delivery of health-care services. Orthopaedic researchers have used both government and private claims to describe temporal trends, geographic variation, disparities, complications, outcomes, and resource utilization associated with both musculoskeletal disease and treatment. Medicare claims comprise one of the most robust data sets used to perform orthopaedic research, with >45 million beneficiaries. The U.S. government, through the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, often uses these data to drive changes in health policy. Private claims data used in orthopaedic research often comprise more heterogeneous patient demographic samples, but allow longitudinal analysis similar to that offered by Medicare claims. Discharge databases, such as the U.S. National Inpatient Sample, provide a wide national sampling of inpatient hospital stays from all payers and allow analysis of associated adverse events and resource utilization. Administrative claims data benefit from the high patient numbers obtained through a majority of hospitals. Using claims, it is possible to follow patients longitudinally throughout encounters irrespective of the location of the institution delivering health care. Some disadvantages include lack of precision of ICD-9 (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision) coding schemes. Much of these data are expensive to purchase, complicated to organize, and labor-intensive to manipulate--often requiring trained specialists for analysis. Given the changing health-care environment, it is likely that databases will provide valuable information that has the potential to influence clinical practice improvement and health policy for

  19. Down syndrome: national conference on patient registries, research databases, and biobanks.

    PubMed

    Oster-Granite, Mary Lou; Parisi, Melissa A; Abbeduto, Leonard; Berlin, Dorit S; Bodine, Cathy; Bynum, Dana; Capone, George; Collier, Elaine; Hall, Dan; Kaeser, Lisa; Kaufmann, Petra; Krischer, Jeffrey; Livingston, Michelle; McCabe, Linda L; Pace, Jill; Pfenninger, Karl; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Reeves, Roger H; Rubinstein, Yaffa; Sherman, Stephanie; Terry, Sharon F; Whitten, Michelle Sie; Williams, Stephen; McCabe, Edward R B; Maddox, Yvonne T

    2011-01-01

    A December 2010 meeting, "Down Syndrome: National Conference on Patient Registries, Research Databases, and Biobanks," was jointly sponsored by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, MD, and the Global Down Syndrome Foundation (GDSF)/Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome based in Denver, CO. Approximately 70 attendees and organizers from various advocacy groups, federal agencies (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and various NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices), members of industry, clinicians, and researchers from various academic institutions were greeted by Drs. Yvonne Maddox, Deputy Director of NICHD, and Edward McCabe, Executive Director of the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome. They charged the participants to focus on the separate issues of contact registries, research databases, and biobanks through both podium presentations and breakout session discussions. Among the breakout groups for each of the major sessions, participants were asked to generate responses to questions posed by the organizers concerning these three research resources as they related to Down syndrome and then to report back to the group at large with a summary of their discussions. This report represents a synthesis of the discussions and suggested approaches formulated by the group as a whole. PMID:21835664

  20. Conference Proceedings: “Down Syndrome: National Conference on Patient Registries, Research Databases, and Biobanks”

    PubMed Central

    Oster-Granite, Mary Lou; Parisi, Melissa A.; Abbeduto, Leonard; Berlin, Dorit S.; Bodine, Cathy; Bynum, Dana; Capone, George; Collier, Elaine; Hall, Dan; Kaeser, Lisa; Kaufmann, Petra; Krischer, Jeffrey; Livingston, Michelle; McCabe, Linda L.; Pace, Jill; Pfenninger, Karl; Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Reeves, Roger H.; Rubinstein, Yaffa; Sherman, Stephanie; Terry, Sharon F.; Whitten, Michelle Sie; Williams, Stephen; McCabe, Edward R.B.; Maddox, Yvonne T.

    2011-01-01

    A December 2010 meeting, “Down Syndrome: National Conference on Patient Registries, Research Databases, and Biobanks,” was jointly sponsored by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, MD, and the Global Down Syndrome Foundation (GDSF)/Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome based in Denver, CO. Approximately 70 attendees and organizers from various advocacy groups, federal agencies (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and various NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices), members of industry, clinicians, and researchers from various academic institutions were greeted by Drs. Yvonne Maddox, Deputy Director of NICHD, and Edward McCabe, Executive Director of the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome. They charged the participants to focus on the separate issues of contact registries, research databases, and biobanks through both podium presentations and breakout session discussions. Among the breakout groups for each of the major sessions, participants were asked to generate responses to questions posed by the organizers concerning these three research resources as they related to Down syndrome and then to report back to the group at large with a summary of their discussions. This report represents a synthesis of the discussions and suggested approaches formulated by the group as a whole. PMID:21835664

  1. What Do They Tell Their Students? Business Faculty Acceptance of the Web and Library Databases for Student Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewald, Nancy H.

    2005-01-01

    Business faculty were surveyed as to their use of free Web resources and subscription databases for their own and their students' research. A much higher percentage of respondents either require or encourage Web use by their students than require or encourage database use, though most also advise use of multiple sources.

  2. Red herring in acid rain research

    SciTech Connect

    Havas, M.; Hutchinson, T.C.; Likens, G.E.

    1984-06-01

    Five common misconceptions, red herrings, regarding the effects of acid deposition on aquatic ecosystems are described in an attempt to clarify some of the confusion they have created. These misconceptions are the following: Bog lakes have been acidic for thousands of years; thus the acidification of lakes is not a recent phenomenon. The early methods for measuring pH are in error; therfore, no statements can be made regarding historical trends. Acidification of lakes and streams results from changed land use practices (forestry, agriculture, animal husbandry) and not acid deposition. The decrease in fish populations is caused by overfishing, disease, and water pollution, not acidification. Because lakes that receive identical rainfall can have considerable different pHs, regional lake acidification cannot be due to acid precipitation. It is easy to suggest a whole series of alternative, and often unlikely, explanations of the causes and consequences of acid deposition. These keep scientists busy for years assembling and examining data only to conclude that the explanation is not valid. These tactics cause, and perhaps are designed to cause, continuous delay in remedial action. They fail to take into account the large body of information that deals with the sources of the acid deposition and the seriousness of its effects.

  3. Massive Scale Cyber Traffic Analysis: A Driver for Graph Database Research

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Choudhury, S.; Haglin, David J.; Howe, Bill; Nickless, William K.; Olsen, Bryan K.

    2013-06-19

    We describe the significance and prominence of network traffic analysis (TA) as a graph- and network-theoretical domain for advancing research in graph database systems. TA involves observing and analyzing the connections between clients, servers, hosts, and actors within IP networks, both at particular times and as extended over times. Towards that end, NetFlow (or more generically, IPFLOW) data are available from routers and servers which summarize coherent groups of IP packets flowing through the network. IPFLOW databases are routinely interrogated statistically and visualized for suspicious patterns. But the ability to cast IPFLOW data as a massive graph and query it interactively, in order to e.g.\\ identify connectivity patterns, is less well advanced, due to a number of factors including scaling, and their hybrid nature combining graph connectivity and quantitative attributes. In this paper, we outline requirements and opportunities for graph-structured IPFLOW analytics based on our experience with real IPFLOW databases. Specifically, we describe real use cases from the security domain, cast them as graph patterns, show how to express them in two graph-oriented query languages SPARQL and Datalog, and use these examples to motivate a new class of "hybrid" graph-relational systems.

  4. Administrative Databases in Orthopaedic Research: Pearls and Pitfalls of Big Data.

    PubMed

    Patel, Alpesh A; Singh, Kern; Nunley, Ryan M; Minhas, Shobhit V

    2016-03-01

    The drive for evidence-based decision-making has highlighted the shortcomings of traditional orthopaedic literature. Although high-quality, prospective, randomized studies in surgery are the benchmark in orthopaedic literature, they are often limited by size, scope, cost, time, and ethical concerns and may not be generalizable to larger populations. Given these restrictions, there is a growing trend toward the use of large administrative databases to investigate orthopaedic outcomes. These datasets afford the opportunity to identify a large numbers of patients across a broad spectrum of comorbidities, providing information regarding disparities in care and outcomes, preoperative risk stratification parameters for perioperative morbidity and mortality, and national epidemiologic rates and trends. Although there is power in these databases in terms of their impact, potential problems include administrative data that are at risk of clerical inaccuracies, recording bias secondary to financial incentives, temporal changes in billing codes, a lack of numerous clinically relevant variables and orthopaedic-specific outcomes, and the absolute requirement of an experienced epidemiologist and/or statistician when evaluating results and controlling for confounders. Despite these drawbacks, administrative database studies are fundamental and powerful tools in assessing outcomes on a national scale and will likely be of substantial assistance in the future of orthopaedic research. PMID:26836377

  5. The European internet-based patient and research database for primary immunodeficiencies: results 2006-2008.

    PubMed

    Gathmann, B; Grimbacher, B; Beauté, J; Dudoit, Y; Mahlaoui, N; Fischer, A; Knerr, V; Kindle, G

    2009-09-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are rare diseases; therefore transnational studies are essential to maximize the scientific outcome and to improve diagnosis and therapy. In order to estimate the prevalence of PID in Europe as well as to establish and evaluate harmonized guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of PID, the European Society for Immunodeficiencies (ESID) has developed an internet-based database for clinical and research data on patients with PID. This database is a platform for epidemiological analyses as well as the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and the identification of novel disease-associated genes. Within 4 years, 7430 patients from 39 countries have been documented in the ESID database. Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) represents the most common entity, with 1540 patients or 20.7% of all entries, followed by isolated immunoglobulin (Ig)G subclass deficiency (546 patients, 7.4%). Evaluations show that the average life expectancy for PID patients varies from 1 to 49 years (median), depending on the type of PID. The prevalence and incidence of PID remains a key question to be answered. As the registration progress is far from finished we can only calculate minimum values for PID, with e.g. France currently showing a minimum prevalence of 3.72 patients per 100,000 inhabitants. The most frequently documented permanent treatment is immunoglobulin replacement; 2819 patients (42% of all patients alive) currently receive this form of treatment. PMID:19630863

  6. A database of chromatographic properties and mass spectra of fatty acid methyl esters from omega-3 products.

    PubMed

    Wasta, Ziar; Mjøs, Svein A

    2013-07-19

    Fatty acids in products claimed to contain oils with the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were analyzed as fatty acid methyl esters by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using electron impact ionization. To cover the variation in products on the market, the 20 products that were studied in detail were selected from a larger sample set by statistical methodology. The samples were analyzed on two different stationary phases (polyethylene glycol and cyanopropyl) and the fatty acid methyl esters were identified by methodology that combines the mass spectra and retention indices into a single score value. More that 100 fatty acids had a chromatographic area above 0.1% of the total, in at least one product. Retention indices are reported as equivalent chain lengths, and overlap patterns on the two columns are discussed. Both columns were found suitable for analysis of major and nutritionally important fatty acids, but the large number of minor compounds that may act as interferents will be problematic if low limits of quantification are required in analyses of similar sample types. A database of mass spectral libraries and equivalent chain lengths of the detected compounds has been compiled and is available online. PMID:23773584

  7. The Corvids Literature Database--500 years of ornithological research from a crow's perspective.

    PubMed

    Droege, Gabriele; Töpfer, Till

    2016-01-01

    Corvids (Corvidae) play a major role in ornithological research. Because of their worldwide distribution, diversity and adaptiveness, they have been studied extensively. The aim of the Corvids Literature Database (CLD, http://www.corvids.de/cld) is to record all publications (citation format) on all extant and extinct Crows, Ravens, Jays and Magpies worldwide and tag them with specific keywords making them available for researchers worldwide. The self-maintained project started in 2006 and today comprises 8000 articles, spanning almost 500 years. The CLD covers publications from 164 countries, written in 36 languages and published by 8026 authors in 1503 journals (plus books, theses and other publications). Forty-nine percent of all records are available online as full-text documents or deposited in the physical CLD archive. The CLD contains 442 original corvid descriptions. Here, we present a metadata assessment of articles recorded in the CLD including a gap analysis and prospects for future research. Database URL: http://www.corvids.de/cld. PMID:26868053

  8. Interacting with the National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) via the LONI Pipeline Workflow Environment

    PubMed Central

    Torgerson, Carinna M.; Quinn, Catherine; Dinov, Ivo; Liu, Zhizhong; Petrosyan, Petros; Pelphrey, Kevin; Haselgrove, Christian; Kennedy, David N.; Toga, Arthur W.; Van Horn, John Darrell

    2015-01-01

    The National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) seeks to gather, curate, and make openly available neuroimaging data from NIH-funded studies of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). NDAR has recently made its database accessible through the LONI Pipeline processing environment to enable large-scale analyses of cortical architecture and function via local, cluster, or “cloud”-based computing resources. This presents a unique opportunity to overcome many of the customary limitations to fostering biomedical neuroimaging as a science of discovery. Providing open access to primary neuroimaging data, workflow methods, and high-performance computing will increase uniformity in data collection protocols, encourage greater reliability of published data, results replication, and broaden the range of researchers now able to perform larger studies than ever before. To illustrate the use of NDAR and LONI Pipeline for performing several commonly performed neuroimaging processing steps and analyses, this paper presents example workflows useful for ASD neuroimaging researchers seeking to begin using this valuable combination of online data and computational resources. PMID:25666423

  9. The Government Finance Database: A Common Resource for Quantitative Research in Public Financial Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Kawika; Hand, Michael L; Thompson, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative public financial management research focused on local governments is limited by the absence of a common database for empirical analysis. While the U.S. Census Bureau distributes government finance data that some scholars have utilized, the arduous process of collecting, interpreting, and organizing the data has led its adoption to be prohibitive and inconsistent. In this article we offer a single, coherent resource that contains all of the government financial data from 1967-2012, uses easy to understand natural-language variable names, and will be extended when new data is available. PMID:26107821

  10. Database on Danish population-based registers for public health and welfare research.

    PubMed

    Sortsø, Camilla; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2011-07-01

    Population-based studies with information from registers can take place in Denmark due to linkage between registers at the individual level by means of a unique personal identification number (CPR-number), which all persons with residence in Denmark have. Registers with information on health can be linked to other population registers containing information on, for example, transfer payments, education, housing, income, and socioeconomic position. This article introduces a database and search engine, which is available for public health and welfare researchers as an aid to seek information on the content of important Danish registers. PMID:21898917

  11. SPIN query tools for de-identified research on a humongous database.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Clement J; Dexter, Paul; Schadow, Gunther; Chueh, Henry C; Abernathy, Greg; Hook, John; Blevins, Lonnie; Overhage, J Marc; Berman, Jules J

    2005-01-01

    The Shared Pathology Informatics Network (SPIN), a research initiative of the National Cancer Institute, will allow for the retrieval of more than 4 million pathology reports and specimens. In this paper, we describe the special query tool as developed for the Indianapolis/Regenstrief SPIN node, integrated into the ever-expanding Indiana Network for Patient care (INPC). This query tool allows for the retrieval of de-identified data sets using complex logic, auto-coded final diagnoses, and intrinsically supports multiple types of statistical analyses. The new SPIN/INPC database represents a new generation of the Regenstrief Medical Record system - a centralized, but federated system of repositories. PMID:16779093

  12. The Government Finance Database: A Common Resource for Quantitative Research in Public Financial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Kawika; Hand, Michael L.; Thompson, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative public financial management research focused on local governments is limited by the absence of a common database for empirical analysis. While the U.S. Census Bureau distributes government finance data that some scholars have utilized, the arduous process of collecting, interpreting, and organizing the data has led its adoption to be prohibitive and inconsistent. In this article we offer a single, coherent resource that contains all of the government financial data from 1967-2012, uses easy to understand natural-language variable names, and will be extended when new data is available. PMID:26107821

  13. Research Update: The materials genome initiative: Data sharing and the impact of collaborative ab initio databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anubhav; Persson, Kristin A.; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2016-05-01

    Materials innovations enable new technological capabilities and drive major societal advancements but have historically required long and costly development cycles. The Materials Genome Initiative (MGI) aims to greatly reduce this time and cost. In this paper, we focus on data reuse in the MGI and, in particular, discuss the impact of three different computational databases based on density functional theory methods to the research community. We also discuss and provide recommendations on technical aspects of data reuse, outline remaining fundamental challenges, and present an outlook on the future of MGI's vision of data sharing.

  14. Evidence-based decision-making 6: Utilization of administrative databases for health services research.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Tanvir Turin; Hemmelgarn, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    Health-care systems require reliable information on which to base health-care planning and make decisions, as well as to evaluate their policy impact. Administrative data provide important information about health services use, expenditures, clinical outcomes, and may be used to assess quality of care. With increased digitalization and accessibility of administrative databases, these data are more readily available for health service research purposes, aiding evidence-based decision-making. This chapter discusses the utility of administrative data for population-based studies of health and health care. PMID:25694328

  15. SPIN Query Tools for De-identified Research on a Humongous Database

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Clement J.; Dexter, Paul; Schadow, Gunther; Chueh, Henry C.; Abernathy, Greg; Hook, John; Blevins, Lonnie; Overhage, J. Marc; Berman, Jules J.

    2005-01-01

    The Shared Pathology Informatics Network (SPIN), a research initiative of the National Cancer Institute, will allow for the retrieval of more than 4 million pathology reports and specimens. In this paper, we describe the special query tool as developed for the Indianapolis/Regenstrief SPIN node, integrated into the ever-expanding Indiana Network for Patient care (INPC). This query tool allows for the retrieval of de-identified data sets using complex logic, auto-coded final diagnoses, and intrinsically supports multiple types of statistical analyses. The new SPIN/INPC database represents a new generation of the Regenstrief Medical Record system – a centralized, but federated system of repositories. PMID:16779093

  16. Scientific Research Database of the 2008 Ms8.0 Wenchuan Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yu, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Nearly 5 years after the 2008 Ms8.0 Wenchuan Earthquake, the Ms7.0 Lushan earthquake stroke 70km away along the same fault system. Given the tremendous life loss and property damages as well as the short time and distance intervals between the two large magnitude events, the scientific probing into their causing factors and future seismic activities in the nearby region will continue to be in the center of earthquake research in China and even the world for years to come. In the past five years, scientists have made significant efforts to study the Wenchuan earthquake from various aspects using different datasets and methods. Their studies cover a variety of topics including seismogenic environment, earthquake precursors, rupture process, co-seismic phenomenon, hazard relief, reservoir induced seismicity and more. These studies have been published in numerous journals in Chinese, English and many other languages. In addition, 54 books regarding to this earthquake have been published. The extremely diversified nature of all publications makes it very difficult and time-consuming, if not impossible, to sort out information needed by individual researcher in an efficient way. An information platform that collects relevant scientific information and makes them accessible in various ways can be very handy. With this mission in mind, the Earthquake Research Group in the Chengdu University of Technology has developed a website www.wceq.org to attack this target: (1) articles published by major journals and books are recorded into a database. Researchers will be able to find articles by topics, journals, publication dates, authors and keywords e.t.c by a few clicks; (2) to fast track the latest developments, researchers can also follow upon updates in the current month, last 90days, 180 days and 365 days by clicking on corresponding links; (3) the modern communication tools such as Facebook, Twitter and their Chinese counterparts are accommodated in this site to share

  17. Perfluoroalkyl acids : Recent activities and research progress

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a family of man-made fluorinated organic chemicals consisting of a carbon backbone typically of four to fourteen in length and a charged functional moiety (primarily carboxylate, sulfonate or phosphonate). The two most widely known PFAAs are ...

  18. Penn State researches acid mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-08-27

    A brief news item reports that work is being carried out at Penn State University on the effectiveness of sphagnum moss and other marsh-type plants in removing iron from acid mine water. A sphagnum moss bog has been established in a greenhouse at the University and field work is also being undertaken in a natural environment in Clearfield County.

  19. National Database for Autism Research (NDAR): Big Data Opportunities for Health Services Research and Health Technology Assessment.

    PubMed

    Payakachat, Nalin; Tilford, J Mick; Ungar, Wendy J

    2016-02-01

    The National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) is a US National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded research data repository created by integrating heterogeneous datasets through data sharing agreements between autism researchers and the NIH. To date, NDAR is considered the largest neuroscience and genomic data repository for autism research. In addition to biomedical data, NDAR contains a large collection of clinical and behavioral assessments and health outcomes from novel interventions. Importantly, NDAR has a global unique patient identifier that can be linked to aggregated individual-level data for hypothesis generation and testing, and for replicating research findings. As such, NDAR promotes collaboration and maximizes public investment in the original data collection. As screening and diagnostic technologies as well as interventions for children with autism are expensive, health services research (HSR) and health technology assessment (HTA) are needed to generate more evidence to facilitate implementation when warranted. This article describes NDAR and explains its value to health services researchers and decision scientists interested in autism and other mental health conditions. We provide a description of the scope and structure of NDAR and illustrate how data are likely to grow over time and become available for HSR and HTA. PMID:26446859

  20. Assessing urology and nephrology research activity in Arab countries using ISI web of science bibliometric database

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bibliometric analysis is increasingly being used for research assessment. The main objective of this study was to assess research output in Urology and Nephrology subject from the Arab countries. Original scientific articles or reviews published from the 21 Arab countries in “Urology and Nephrology” subject were screened using the ISI Web of Science database. Research productivity was evaluated based on a methodology developed and used in other bibliometric studies by analyzing the annual productivity, names of journals, citations; top 10 active institution and authors as well as country contribution to Urology and Nephrology research. Results Three thousand and seventy six documents in “urology and nephrology” subject category were retrieved from 104 journals. This represents 1.4% of the global research output in “urology and nephrology”. Four hundred and two documents (12.66%) were published in Annales D Urologie Journal. The h-index of the retrieved documents was 57. The total number of citations, at the time of data analysis, was 30401 with an average citation of 9.57 per document. Egypt, with a total publication of 1284 (40.43%) ranked first among the Arab countries in “urology and nephrology” subject category. Mansoura University in Egypt was the most productive institution with a total of 561 (15.33%) documents. Arab researchers collaborated most with researchers from the United States of America (226; 7.12%) in urology and nephrology research. Conclusion The present data reveals a good contribution of some Arab countries to the field of “urology and nephrology”. More efforts are needed by some other Arab countries to bridge the gap in urology and nephrology research. Overall, the quality of urology/nephrology research is considered relatively high as measured by h-index. Cooperation in urology/nephrology research should be encouraged in the Arab world to bridge the gap with that from developed countries. PMID:24758477

  1. Food-pics: an image database for experimental research on eating and appetite

    PubMed Central

    Blechert, Jens; Meule, Adrian; Busch, Niko A.; Ohla, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    Our current environment is characterized by the omnipresence of food cues. The sight and smell of real foods, but also graphically depictions of appetizing foods, can guide our eating behavior, for example, by eliciting food craving and influencing food choice. The relevance of visual food cues on human information processing has been demonstrated by a growing body of studies employing food images across the disciplines of psychology, medicine, and neuroscience. However, currently used food image sets vary considerably across laboratories and image characteristics (contrast, brightness, etc.) and food composition (calories, macronutrients, etc.) are often unspecified. These factors might have contributed to some of the inconsistencies of this research. To remedy this, we developed food-pics, a picture database comprising 568 food images and 315 non-food images along with detailed meta-data. A total of N = 1988 individuals with large variance in age and weight from German speaking countries and North America provided normative ratings of valence, arousal, palatability, desire to eat, recognizability and visual complexity. Furthermore, data on macronutrients (g), energy density (kcal), and physical image characteristics (color composition, contrast, brightness, size, complexity) are provided. The food-pics image database is freely available under the creative commons license with the hope that the set will facilitate standardization and comparability across studies and advance experimental research on the determinants of eating behavior. PMID:25009514

  2. Existing data sources for clinical epidemiology: The clinical laboratory information system (LABKA) research database at Aarhus University, Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Grann, Anne Fia; Erichsen, Rune; Nielsen, Anders Gunnar; Frøslev, Trine; Thomsen, Reimar W

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to the clinical laboratory information system (LABKA) research database in Northern and Central Denmark. The database contains millions of stored laboratory test results for patients living in the two Danish regions, encompassing 1.8 million residents, or one-third of the country’s population. More than 1700 different types of blood test analyses are available. Therefore, the LABKA research database represents an incredible source for studies involving blood test analyses. By record linkage of different Danish registries with the LABKA research database, it is possible to examine a large number of biomarkers as predictors of disease risk and prognosis and as markers of disease severity, and to evaluate medical treatments regarding effectiveness and possible side effects. Large epidemiological studies using routinely stored blood test results for individual patients can be performed because it is possible to link the laboratory data to high-quality individual clinical patient data in Denmark. PMID:21487452

  3. U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Mahantango Creek Watershed, Pennsylvania, United States: long-term precipitation database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A long-term precipitation database has been developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Pasture Systems and Watershed Management Research Unit (PSWMRU) to support intensive hydrologic and water quality research within WE-38, a 7.3 km**2 experimental watershed loca...

  4. EPA'S CATALYST RESEARCH PROGRAM: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF SULFURIC ACID EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sulfuric acid review conference sponsored by EPA's automotive Catalyst Research Program was held recently at Hendersonville, NC, for researchers whose work is funded by EPA. Emissions characterization research indicated that in-use catalyst-equipped vehicles emit low levels of ...

  5. MaizeGDB: The Maize Model Organism Database for Basic, Translational, and Applied Research

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Carolyn J.; Harper, Lisa C.; Schaeffer, Mary L.; Sen, Taner Z.; Seigfried, Trent E.; Campbell, Darwin A.

    2008-01-01

    In 2001 maize became the number one production crop in the world with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations reporting over 614 million tonnes produced. Its success is due to the high productivity per acre in tandem with a wide variety of commercial uses. Not only is maize an excellent source of food, feed, and fuel, but also its by-products are used in the production of various commercial products. Maize's unparalleled success in agriculture stems from basic research, the outcomes of which drive breeding and product development. In order for basic, translational, and applied researchers to benefit from others' investigations, newly generated data must be made freely and easily accessible. MaizeGDB is the maize research community's central repository for genetics and genomics information. The overall goals of MaizeGDB are to facilitate access to the outcomes of maize research by integrating new maize data into the database and to support the maize research community by coordinating group activities. PMID:18769488

  6. Shanghai RAPESEED Database: a resource for functional genomics studies of seed development and fatty acid metabolism of Brassica

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Zhang; Shi, Qiu-Ming; Niu, Ya; Xing, Mei-Qing; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2008-01-01

    The Shanghai RAPESEED Database (RAPESEED, http://rapeseed.plantsignal.cn/) was created to provide the solid platform for functional genomics studies of oilseed crops with the emphasis on seed development and fatty acid metabolism. The RAPESEED includes the resource of 8462 unique ESTs, of which 3526 clones are with full length cDNA; the expression profiles of 8095 genes and the Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE, 23 895 unique tags) and tag-to-gene data during seed development. In addition, a total of ∼14 700 M3 mutant populations were generated by ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis and related seed quality information was determined using the Foss NIR System. Further, the TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) platform was established based on the generated EMS mutant population. The relevant information was collected in RAPESEED database, which can be searched through keywords, nucleotide or protein sequences, or seed quality parameters, and downloaded. PMID:17916574

  7. The European internet-based patient and research database for primary immunodeficiencies: update 2011.

    PubMed

    Gathmann, B; Binder, N; Ehl, S; Kindle, G

    2012-03-01

    In order to build a common data pool and estimate the disease burden of primary immunodeficiencies (PID) in Europe, the European Society for Immunodeficiencies (ESID) has developed an internet-based database for clinical and research data on patients with PID. This database is a platform for epidemiological analyses as well as the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and the identification of novel disease-associated genes. Since its start in 2004, 13,708 patients from 41 countries have been documented in the ESID database. Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) represents the most common entity with 2880 patients or 21% of all entries, followed by selective immunoglobulin A (sIgA) deficiency (1424 patients, 10·4%). The total documented prevalence of PID is highest in France, with five patients per 100,000 inhabitants. The highest documented prevalence for a single disease is 1·3 per 100,000 inhabitants for sIgA deficiency in Hungary. The highest reported incidence of PID per 100,000 live births was 16·2 for the period 1999-2002 in France. The highest reported incidence rate for a single disease was 6·7 for sIgA deficiency in Spain for the period 1999-2002. The genetic cause was known in 36·2% of all registered patients. Consanguinity was reported in 8·8%, and 18·5% of patients were reported to be familial cases; 27·9% of patients were diagnosed after the age of 16. We did not observe a significant decrease in the diagnostic delay for most diseases between 1987 and 2010. The most frequently reported long-term medication is immunoglobulin replacement. PMID:22288591

  8. TarNet: An Evidence-Based Database for Natural Medicine Research

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Guomin; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Background Complex diseases seriously threaten human health. Drug discovery approaches based on “single genes, single drugs, and single targets” are limited in targeting complex diseases. The development of new multicomponent drugs for complex diseases is imperative, and the establishment of a suitable solution for drug group-target protein network analysis is a key scientific problem that must be addressed. Herbal medicines have formed the basis of sophisticated systems of traditional medicine and have given rise to some key drugs that remain in use today. The search for new molecules is currently taking a different route, whereby scientific principles of ethnobotany and ethnopharmacognosy are being used by chemists in the discovery of different sources and classes of compounds. Results In this study, we developed TarNet, a manually curated database and platform of traditional medicinal plants with natural compounds that includes potential bio-target information. We gathered information on proteins that are related to or affected by medicinal plant ingredients and data on protein–protein interactions (PPIs). TarNet includes in-depth information on both plant–compound–protein relationships and PPIs. Additionally, TarNet can provide researchers with network construction analyses of biological pathways and protein–protein interactions (PPIs) associated with specific diseases. Researchers can upload a gene or protein list mapped to our PPI database that has been manually curated to generate relevant networks. Multiple functions are accessible for network topological calculations, subnetwork analyses, pathway analyses, and compound–protein relationships. Conclusions TarNet will serve as a useful analytical tool that will provide information on medicinal plant compound-affected proteins (potential targets) and system-level analyses for systems biology and network pharmacology researchers. TarNet is freely available at http://www.herbbol.org:8001/tarnet

  9. NASA's Astromaterials Database: Enabling Research Through Increased Access to Sample Data, Metadata and Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cindy; Todd, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    The Astromaterials Acquisition & Curation Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) is the designated facility for curating all of NASA's extraterrestrial samples. Today, the suite of collections includes the lunar samples from the Apollo missions, cosmic dust particles falling into the Earth's atmosphere, meteorites collected in Antarctica, comet and interstellar dust particles from the Stardust mission, asteroid particles from Japan's Hayabusa mission, solar wind atoms collected during the Genesis mission, and space-exposed hardware from several missions. To support planetary science research on these samples, JSC's Astromaterials Curation Office hosts NASA's Astromaterials Curation digital repository and data access portal [http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/], providing descriptions of the missions and collections, and critical information about each individual sample. Our office is designing and implementing several informatics initiatives to better serve the planetary research community. First, we are re-hosting the basic database framework by consolidating legacy databases for individual collections and providing a uniform access point for information (descriptions, imagery, classification) on all of our samples. Second, we continue to upgrade and host digital compendia that summarize and highlight published findings on the samples (e.g., lunar samples, meteorites from Mars). We host high resolution imagery of samples as it becomes available, including newly scanned images of historical prints from the Apollo missions. Finally we are creating plans to collect and provide new data, including 3D imagery, point cloud data, micro CT data, and external links to other data sets on selected samples. Together, these individual efforts will provide unprecedented digital access to NASA's Astromaterials, enabling preservation of the samples through more specific and targeted requests, and supporting new planetary science research and collaborations on the samples.

  10. CottonGen: a genomics, genetics and breeding database for cotton research.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Jung, Sook; Cheng, Chun-Huai; Ficklin, Stephen P; Lee, Taein; Zheng, Ping; Jones, Don; Percy, Richard G; Main, Dorrie

    2014-01-01

    CottonGen (http://www.cottongen.org) is a curated and integrated web-based relational database providing access to publicly available genomic, genetic and breeding data for cotton. CottonGen supercedes CottonDB and the Cotton Marker Database, with enhanced tools for easier data sharing, mining, visualization and data retrieval of cotton research data. CottonGen contains annotated whole genome sequences, unigenes from expressed sequence tags (ESTs), markers, trait loci, genetic maps, genes, taxonomy, germplasm, publications and communication resources for the cotton community. Annotated whole genome sequences of Gossypium raimondii are available with aligned genetic markers and transcripts. These whole genome data can be accessed through genome pages, search tools and GBrowse, a popular genome browser. Most of the published cotton genetic maps can be viewed and compared using CMap, a comparative map viewer, and are searchable via map search tools. Search tools also exist for markers, quantitative trait loci (QTLs), germplasm, publications and trait evaluation data. CottonGen also provides online analysis tools such as NCBI BLAST and Batch BLAST. PMID:24203703

  11. Exploring novel candidate genes from the Mouse Genome Informatics database: Potential implications for avian migration research.

    PubMed

    Contina, Andrea; Bridge, Eli S; Kelly, Jeffrey F

    2016-07-01

    To search for genes associated with migratory phenotypes in songbirds, we selected candidate genes through annotations from the Mouse Genome Informatics database and assembled an extensive candidate-gene library. Then, we implemented a next-generation sequencing approach to obtain DNA sequences from the Painted Bunting genome. We focused on those sequences that were conserved across avian species and that aligned with candidate genes in our mouse library. We genotyped short sequence repeats from the following candidate genes: ADRA1d, ANKRD17, CISH and MYH7. We studied the possible correlations between allelic variations occurring in these novel candidate migration genes and avian migratory phenotypes available from the published literature. We found that allele variation at MYH7 correlated with a calculated index of speed of migration (km/day) across 11 species of songbirds. We highlight the potential of the Mouse Genome Informatics database in providing new candidate genes that might play a crucial role in regulating migration in birds and possibly in other taxa. Our research effort shows the benefits and limitations of working with extensive genomic datasets and offers a snapshot of the challenges related to cross-species validation in behavioral and molecular ecology studies. PMID:27061206

  12. Using the Turning Research Into Practice (TRIP) database: how do clinicians really search?*

    PubMed Central

    Meats, Emma; Brassey, Jon; Heneghan, Carl; Glasziou, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Clinicians and patients are increasingly accessing information through Internet searches. This study aimed to examine clinicians' current search behavior when using the Turning Research Into Practice (TRIP) database to examine search engine use and the ways it might be improved. Methods: A Web log analysis was undertaken of the TRIP database—a meta-search engine covering 150 health resources including MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, and a variety of guidelines. The connectors for terms used in searches were studied, and observations were made of 9 users' search behavior when working with the TRIP database. Results: Of 620,735 searches, most used a single term, and 12% (n = 75,947) used a Boolean operator: 11% (n = 69,006) used “AND” and 0.8% (n = 4,941) used “OR.” Of the elements of a well-structured clinical question (population, intervention, comparator, and outcome), the population was most commonly used, while fewer searches included the intervention. Comparator and outcome were rarely used. Participants in the observational study were interested in learning how to formulate better searches. Conclusions: Web log analysis showed most searches used a single term and no Boolean operators. Observational study revealed users were interested in conducting efficient searches but did not always know how. Therefore, either better training or better search interfaces are required to assist users and enable more effective searching. PMID:17443248

  13. A Green's function database platform for seismological research and education: applications and examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Sebastian; Kriegerowski, Marius; Dahm, Torsten; Simone, Cesca; Wang, Rongjiang

    2016-04-01

    The study of seismic sources from measured waveforms requires synthetic elementary seismograms (Green's functions, GF) calculated for specific earth models and source receiver geometries. Since the calculation of GFs is computationally expensive and requires careful parameter testing and quality control, pre-calculated GF databases, which can be re-used for different types of applications, can be of advantage. We developed a GF database web platform for the seismological community (http://kinherd.org/), where a researcher can share Green's function stores and retrieve synthetic seismograms on the fly for various point and extended earthquake source models for many different earth models at local, regional and global scale. This web service is part of a rich new toolset for the creation and handling of Green's functions and synthetic seismograms (http://emolch.github.com/pyrocko/gf). It can be used off-line or in client mode. We demonstrate core features of the GF platform with different applications on global, regional and local scales. These include the automatic inversion of kinematic source parameter from teleseismic body waves, the improved depth estimate of shallow induced earthquakes from regional seismological arrays, or the relative moment tensor inversion of local earthquakes from volcanic induced seismicity.

  14. Identifying clinical/translational research cohorts: ascertainment via querying an integrated multi-source database

    PubMed Central

    Hurdle, John F; Haroldsen, Stephen C; Hammer, Andrew; Spigle, Cindy; Fraser, Alison M; Mineau, Geraldine P; Courdy, Samir J

    2013-01-01

    Background Ascertainment of potential subjects has been a longstanding problem in clinical research. Various methods have been proposed, including using data in electronic health records. However, these methods typically suffer from scaling effects—some methods work well for large cohorts; others work for small cohorts only. Objective We propose a method that provides a simple identification of pre-research cohorts and relies on data available in most states in the USA: merged public health data sources. Materials and methods The Utah Population Database Limited query tool allows users to build complex queries that may span several types of health records, such as cancer registries, inpatient hospital discharges, and death certificates; in addition, these can be combined with family history information. The architectural approach incorporates several coding systems for medical information. It provides a front-end graphical user interface and enables researchers to build and run queries and view aggregate results. Multiple strategies have been incorporated to maintain confidentiality. Results This tool was rapidly adopted; since its release, 241 users representing a wide range of disciplines from 17 institutions have signed the user agreement and used the query tool. Three examples are discussed: pregnancy complications co-occurring with cardiovascular disease; spondyloarthritis; and breast cancer. Discussion and conclusions This query tool was designed to provide results as pre-research so that institutional review board approval would not be required. This architecture uses well-described technologies that should be within the reach of most institutions. PMID:23059733

  15. Using SDSS & GalaxyZoo Databases to Ask Research-able Questions in Learning Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2010-01-01

    Using Galaxy Zoo1 at: http://zoo1.galaxyzoo.org/ accessing SDSS and a multi-phase backwards faded scaffolding approach, we first ask students to classify 30 galaxies and consider proposed conclusion: "most galaxies are elliptical” based on the evidence collected. Here, student attention is isolated from generating a question or even a data collection protocol, but focused on the issue of "does the evidence match the conclusion?” The next phase focuses on generating conclusions from evidence, whereas the previous phase was focused on evaluating conclusions. Students explain their reasoning provide evidence in response to "What conclusions and generalizations can you make from the following data collected by a student in terms of do spiral galaxies generally spin clockwise or anticlockwise given that one observes 36 spirals spinning clockwise, 21 spirals spinning anticlockwise, and 16 appearing to be edge-on or unclear.” Next, students are asked to consider what evidence needs to be collected in order to complete a scientific inquiry related to a given question. Students propose what evidence is needed in order to pursue, "What fraction of galaxies observed appear to be in the process of merging with other galaxies?” Note students are explicitly asked not to actually gather data as it detracts from developing an understanding of how data collection needs to be tightly aligned with the question. And, in practice, students can intellectually engage with a data collection plan that is simply too ominous to actually collect. By this point, students have extended experience with inquiry in this domain. Students are now ready to wrestle with creating a fruitful question. Students are tasked to design an answerable research question, propose a plan to pursue evidence, collect data using the present astronomical data base and create an evidence-based conclusion about the nature and or frequency of galaxies.

  16. Propellant Mass Gauging: Database of Vehicle Applications and Research and Development Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, Franklin T.

    2008-01-01

    Gauging the mass of propellants in a tank in low gravity is not a straightforward task because of the uncertainty of the liquid configuration in the tank and the possibility of there being more than one ullage bubble. Several concepts for such a low-gravity gauging system have been proposed, and breadboard or flight-like versions have been tested in normal gravity or even in low gravity, but at present, a flight-proven reliable gauging system is not available. NASA desired a database of the gauging techniques used in current and past vehicles during ascent or under settled conditions, and during short coasting (unpowered) periods, for both cryogenic and storable propellants. Past and current research and development efforts on gauging systems that are believed to be applicable in low-gravity conditions were also desired. This report documents the results of that survey.

  17. The human studies database project: federating human studies design data using the ontology of clinical research.

    PubMed

    Sim, Ida; Carini, Simona; Tu, Samson; Wynden, Rob; Pollock, Brad H; Mollah, Shamim A; Gabriel, Davera; Hagler, Herbert K; Scheuermann, Richard H; Lehmann, Harold P; Wittkowski, Knut M; Nahm, Meredith; Bakken, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Human studies, encompassing interventional and observational studies, are the most important source of evidence for advancing our understanding of health, disease, and treatment options. To promote discovery, the design and results of these studies should be made machine-readable for large-scale data mining, synthesis, and re-analysis. The Human Studies Database Project aims to define and implement an informatics infrastructure for institutions to share the design of their human studies. We have developed the Ontology of Clinical Research (OCRe) to model study features such as design type, interventions, and outcomes to support scientific query and analysis. We are using OCRe as the reference semantics for federated data sharing of human studies over caGrid, and are piloting this implementation with several Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) institutions. PMID:21347149

  18. Acid mine drainage. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the control and treatment of acid mine drainage. Techniques discussed for treating wastes containing heavy metals include precipitation, cementation, ion exchange, charge membrane, ultrafiltration, ozonation, solvent extraction, and electrodialysis. The environmental impacts of acid mine drainage on rivers, streams, and lakes are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Acid mine drainage. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the control and treatment of acid mine drainage. Techniques discussed for treating wastes containing heavy metals include precipitation, cementation, ion exchange, charge membrane, ultrafiltration, ozonation, solvent extraction, and electrodialysis. The environmental impacts of acid mine drainage on rivers, streams, and lakes are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Creating a data exchange strategy for radiotherapy research: towards federated databases and anonymised public datasets.

    PubMed

    Skripcak, Tomas; Belka, Claus; Bosch, Walter; Brink, Carsten; Brunner, Thomas; Budach, Volker; Büttner, Daniel; Debus, Jürgen; Dekker, Andre; Grau, Cai; Gulliford, Sarah; Hurkmans, Coen; Just, Uwe; Krause, Mechthild; Lambin, Philippe; Langendijk, Johannes A; Lewensohn, Rolf; Lühr, Armin; Maingon, Philippe; Masucci, Michele; Niyazi, Maximilian; Poortmans, Philip; Simon, Monique; Schmidberger, Heinz; Spezi, Emiliano; Stuschke, Martin; Valentini, Vincenzo; Verheij, Marcel; Whitfield, Gillian; Zackrisson, Björn; Zips, Daniel; Baumann, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Disconnected cancer research data management and lack of information exchange about planned and ongoing research are complicating the utilisation of internationally collected medical information for improving cancer patient care. Rapidly collecting/pooling data can accelerate translational research in radiation therapy and oncology. The exchange of study data is one of the fundamental principles behind data aggregation and data mining. The possibilities of reproducing the original study results, performing further analyses on existing research data to generate new hypotheses or developing computational models to support medical decisions (e.g. risk/benefit analysis of treatment options) represent just a fraction of the potential benefits of medical data-pooling. Distributed machine learning and knowledge exchange from federated databases can be considered as one beyond other attractive approaches for knowledge generation within "Big Data". Data interoperability between research institutions should be the major concern behind a wider collaboration. Information captured in electronic patient records (EPRs) and study case report forms (eCRFs), linked together with medical imaging and treatment planning data, are deemed to be fundamental elements for large multi-centre studies in the field of radiation therapy and oncology. To fully utilise the captured medical information, the study data have to be more than just an electronic version of a traditional (un-modifiable) paper CRF. Challenges that have to be addressed are data interoperability, utilisation of standards, data quality and privacy concerns, data ownership, rights to publish, data pooling architecture and storage. This paper discusses a framework for conceptual packages of ideas focused on a strategic development for international research data exchange in the field of radiation therapy and oncology. PMID:25458128

  1. Creating a data exchange strategy for radiotherapy research: Towards federated databases and anonymised public datasets

    PubMed Central

    Skripcak, Tomas; Belka, Claus; Bosch, Walter; Brink, Carsten; Brunner, Thomas; Budach, Volker; Büttner, Daniel; Debus, Jürgen; Dekker, Andre; Grau, Cai; Gulliford, Sarah; Hurkmans, Coen; Just, Uwe; Krause, Mechthild; Lambin, Philippe; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Lewensohn, Rolf; Lühr, Armin; Maingon, Philippe; Masucci, Michele; Niyazi, Maximilian; Poortmans, Philip; Simon, Monique; Schmidberger, Heinz; Spezi, Emiliano; Stuschke, Martin; Valentini, Vincenzo; Verheij, Marcel; Whitfield, Gillian; Zackrisson, Björn; Zips, Daniel; Baumann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Disconnected cancer research data management and lack of information exchange about planned and ongoing research are complicating the utilisation of internationally collected medical information for improving cancer patient care. Rapidly collecting/pooling data can accelerate translational research in radiation therapy and oncology. The exchange of study data is one of the fundamental principles behind data aggregation and data mining. The possibilities of reproducing the original study results, performing further analyses on existing research data to generate new hypotheses or developing computational models to support medical decisions (e.g. risk/benefit analysis of treatment options) represent just a fraction of the potential benefits of medical data-pooling. Distributed machine learning and knowledge exchange from federated databases can be considered as one beyond other attractive approaches for knowledge generation within “Big Data”. Data interoperability between research institutions should be the major concern behind a wider collaboration. Information captured in electronic patient records (EPRs) and study case report forms (eCRFs), linked together with medical imaging and treatment planning data, are deemed to be fundamental elements for large multi-centre studies in the field of radiation therapy and oncology. To fully utilise the captured medical information, the study data have to be more than just an electronic version of a traditional (un-modifiable) paper CRF. Challenges that have to be addressed are data interoperability, utilisation of standards, data quality and privacy concerns, data ownership, rights to publish, data pooling architecture and storage. This paper discusses a framework for conceptual packages of ideas focused on a strategic development for international research data exchange in the field of radiation therapy and oncology. PMID:25458128

  2. Integrating databases for research on health and performance in small animals and horses in the Nordic countries

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In a world of limited resources, using existing databases in research is a potentially cost-effective way to increase knowledge, given that correct and meaningful results are gained. Nordic examples of the use of secondary small animal and equine databases include studies based on data from tumour registries, breeding registries, young horse quality contest results, competition data, insurance databases, clinic data, prescription data and hunting ability tests. In spite of this extensive use of secondary databases, integration between databases is less common. The aim of this presentation is to briefly review key papers that exemplify different ways of utilizing data from multiple sources, to highlight the benefits and limitations of the approaches, to discuss key issues/challenges that must be addressed when integrating data and to suggest future directions. Data from pedigree databases have been individually merged with competition data and young horse quality contest data, and true integration has also been done with canine insurance data and with equine clinical data. Data have also been merged on postal code level; i.e. insurance data were merged to a digitized map of Sweden and additional meteorological information added. In addition to all the data quality and validity issues inherent in the use of a single database, additional obstacles arise when combining information from several databases. Loss of individuals due to incorrect or mismatched identifying information can be considerable. If there are any possible biases affecting whether or not individuals can be properly linked, misinformation may result in a further reduction in power. Issues of confidentiality may be more difficult to address across multiple databases. For example, human identity information must be protected, but may be required to ensure valid merging of data. There is a great potential to better address complex issues of health and disease in companion animals and horses by integrating

  3. U.S. Department of Energy Human Subjects Research Database (HSRD) A model for internal oversight and external transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2012-12-12

    This poster introduces the Department of Energy (DOE) Human Subjects Research Database (HSRD), which contains information on all Department of Energy research projects involving human subjects that: are funded by DOE; are conducted in DOE facilities; are performed by DOE personnel; include current or former DOE or contract personnel.

  4. Searching biosignal databases by content and context: Research Oriented Integration System for ECG Signals (ROISES).

    PubMed

    Kokkinaki, Alexandra; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2012-11-01

    Technological advances in textile, biosensor and electrocardiography domain induced the wide spread use of bio-signal acquisition devices leading to the generation of massive bio-signal datasets. Among the most popular bio-signals, electrocardiogram (ECG) possesses the longest tradition in bio-signal monitoring and recording, being a strong and relatively robust signal. As research resources are fostered, research community promotes the need to extract new knowledge from bio-signals towards the adoption of new medical procedures. However, integrated access, query and management of ECGs are impeded by the diversity and heterogeneity of bio-signal storage data formats. In this scope, the proposed work introduces a new methodology for the unified access to bio-signal databases and the accompanying metadata. It allows decoupling information retrieval from actual underlying datasource structures and enables transparent content and context based searching from multiple data resources. Our approach is based on the definition of an interactive global ontology which manipulates the similarities and the differences of the underlying sources to either establish similarity mappings or enrich its terminological structure. We also introduce ROISES (Research Oriented Integration System for ECG Signals), for the definition of complex content based queries against the diverse bio-signal data sources. PMID:21397354

  5. Oncoshare: Lessons Learned from Building an Integrated Multi-institutional Database for Comparative Effectiveness Research

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Susan C; Seto, Tina; Olson, Cliff; Kenkare, Pragati; Kurian, Allison W.; Das, Amar K.

    2012-01-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) using observational data requires informatics methods for the extraction, standardization, sharing, and integration of data derived from a variety of electronic sources. In the Oncoshare project, we have developed such methods as part of a collaborative multi-institutional CER study of patterns, predictors, and outcome of breast cancer care. In this paper, we present an evaluation of the approaches we undertook and the lessons we learned in building and validating the Oncoshare data resource. Specifically, we determined that 1) the state or regional cancer registry makes the most efficient starting point for determining inclusion of subjects; 2) the data dictionary should be based on existing registry standards, such as Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER), when applicable; 3) the Social Security Administration Death Master File (SSA DMF), rather than clinical resources, provides standardized ascertainment of mortality outcomes; and 4) CER database development efforts, despite the immediate availability of electronic data, may take as long as two years to produce validated, reliable data for research. Through our efforts using these methods, Oncoshare integrates complex, longitudinal data from multiple electronic medical records and registries and provides a rich, validated resource for research on oncology care. PMID:23304372

  6. Statistical databases

    SciTech Connect

    Kogalovskii, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents a review of problems related to statistical database systems, which are wide-spread in various fields of activity. Statistical databases (SDB) are referred to as databases that consist of data and are used for statistical analysis. Topics under consideration are: SDB peculiarities, properties of data models adequate for SDB requirements, metadata functions, null-value problems, SDB compromise protection problems, stored data compression techniques, and statistical data representation means. Also examined is whether the present Database Management Systems (DBMS) satisfy the SDB requirements. Some actual research directions in SDB systems are considered.

  7. Lifestyle variables and the risk of myocardial infarction in the General Practice Research Database

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Joseph AC; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; Brophy, James M; Steele, Russell J; Opatrny, Lucie; Suissa, Samy

    2007-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this study is to estimate the association between body mass index (BMI) and the risk of first acute myocardial infarction (AMI). As a secondary objective, we considered the association between other lifestyle variables, smoking and heavy alcohol use, and AMI risk. Methods This study was conducted in the general practice research database (GPRD) which is a database based on general practitioner records and is a representative sample of the United Kingdom population. We matched cases of first AMI as identified by diagnostic codes with up to 10 controls between January 1st, 2001 and December 31st, 2005 using incidence density sampling. We used multiple imputation to account for missing data. Results We identified 19,353 cases of first AMI which were matched on index date, GPRD practice and age to 192,821 controls. There was a modest amount of missing data in the database, and the patients with missing data had different risks than those with recorded values. We adjusted our analysis for each lifestyle variable jointly and also for age, sex, and number of hospitalizations in the past year. Although a record of underweight (BMI <18.0 kg/m2) did not alter the risk for AMI (adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.00; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.87–1.11) when compared with normal BMI (18.0–24.9 kg/m2), obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) predicted an increased risk (adjusted OR: 1.41; 95% CI: 1.35–1.47). A history of smoking also predicted an increased risk of AMI (adjusted OR: 1.81; 95% CI: 1.75–1.87) as did heavy alcohol use (adjusted OR: 1.15; 95% CI: 1.06–1.26). Conclusion This study illustrates that obesity, smoking and heavy alcohol use, as recorded during routine care by a general practitioner, are important predictors of an increased risk of a first AMI. In contrast, low BMI does not increase the risk of a first AMI. PMID:18088433

  8. The Plant Organelles Database 3 (PODB3) update 2014: integrating electron micrographs and new options for plant organelle research.

    PubMed

    Mano, Shoji; Nakamura, Takanori; Kondo, Maki; Miwa, Tomoki; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi; Mimura, Tetsuro; Nagatani, Akira; Nishimura, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    The Plant Organelles Database 2 (PODB2), which was first launched in 2006 as PODB, provides static image and movie data of plant organelles, protocols for plant organelle research and external links to relevant websites. PODB2 has facilitated plant organellar research and the understanding of plant organelle dynamics. To provide comprehensive information on plant organelles in more detail, PODB2 was updated to PODB3 (http://podb.nibb.ac.jp/Organellome/). PODB3 contains two additional components: the electron micrograph database and the perceptive organelles database. Through the electron micrograph database, users can examine the subcellular and/or suborganellar structures in various organs of wild-type and mutant plants. The perceptive organelles database provides information on organelle dynamics in response to external stimuli. In addition to the extra components, the user interface for access has been enhanced in PODB3. The data in PODB3 are directly submitted by plant researchers and can be freely downloaded for use in further analysis. PODB3 contains all the information included in PODB2, and the volume of data and protocols deposited in PODB3 continue to grow steadily. We welcome contributions of data from all plant researchers to enhance the utility and comprehensiveness of PODB3. PMID:24092884

  9. NOAA's Integrated Tsunami Database: Data for improved forecasts, warnings, research, and risk assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroker, Kelly; Dunbar, Paula; Mungov, George; Sweeney, Aaron; McCullough, Heather; Carignan, Kelly

    2015-04-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has primary responsibility in the United States for tsunami forecast, warning, research, and supports community resiliency. NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and co-located World Data Service for Geophysics provide a unique collection of data enabling communities to ensure preparedness and resilience to tsunami hazards. Immediately following a damaging or fatal tsunami event there is a need for authoritative data and information. The NGDC Global Historical Tsunami Database (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/hazard/) includes all tsunami events, regardless of intensity, as well as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions that caused fatalities, moderate damage, or generated a tsunami. The long-term data from these events, including photographs of damage, provide clues to what might happen in the future. NGDC catalogs the information on global historical tsunamis and uses these data to produce qualitative tsunami hazard assessments at regional levels. In addition to the socioeconomic effects of a tsunami, NGDC also obtains water level data from the coasts and the deep-ocean at stations operated by the NOAA/NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services, the NOAA Tsunami Warning Centers, and the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) and produces research-quality data to isolate seismic waves (in the case of the deep-ocean sites) and the tsunami signal. These water-level data provide evidence of sea-level fluctuation and possible inundation events. NGDC is also building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) to support real-time forecasts, implemented at 75 US coastal communities. After a damaging or fatal event NGDC begins to collect and integrate data and information from many organizations into the hazards databases. Sources of data include our NOAA partners, the U.S. Geological Survey, the UNESCO Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) and International Tsunami Information Center

  10. The Virtual Skeleton Database: An Open Access Repository for Biomedical Research and Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Bonaretti, Serena; Pfahrer, Marcel; Niklaus, Roman; Büchler, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background Statistical shape models are widely used in biomedical research. They are routinely implemented for automatic image segmentation or object identification in medical images. In these fields, however, the acquisition of the large training datasets, required to develop these models, is usually a time-consuming process. Even after this effort, the collections of datasets are often lost or mishandled resulting in replication of work. Objective To solve these problems, the Virtual Skeleton Database (VSD) is proposed as a centralized storage system where the data necessary to build statistical shape models can be stored and shared. Methods The VSD provides an online repository system tailored to the needs of the medical research community. The processing of the most common image file types, a statistical shape model framework, and an ontology-based search provide the generic tools to store, exchange, and retrieve digital medical datasets. The hosted data are accessible to the community, and collaborative research catalyzes their productivity. Results To illustrate the need for an online repository for medical research, three exemplary projects of the VSD are presented: (1) an international collaboration to achieve improvement in cochlear surgery and implant optimization, (2) a population-based analysis of femoral fracture risk between genders, and (3) an online application developed for the evaluation and comparison of the segmentation of brain tumors. Conclusions The VSD is a novel system for scientific collaboration for the medical image community with a data-centric concept and semantically driven search option for anatomical structures. The repository has been proven to be a useful tool for collaborative model building, as a resource for biomechanical population studies, or to enhance segmentation algorithms. PMID:24220210

  11. Copernicus benefits the Norwegian Satellite Earth Observation Database for Marine and Polar Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korosov, Anton; Johannessen, Johnny

    2014-05-01

    The Norwegian Satellite Earth Observation Database for Marine and Polar Research (NORMAP) is developed for creating and maintaining a repository of Earth Observation data over the high latitude and Arctic regions to facilitate, stimulate and strengthen high quality and original multidisciplinary Earth System research, application, exploitation and education in marine, polar and climate sciences. As such it is complementing and supporting the Norwegian strategy for advancing these science disciplines in the high latitude and Arctic regions. In the international arena, NORMAP benefits and complements the EU GMES MyOcean project, and other previous GMES downstream services such as AQUAMAR, MONARCH-A, SIDARUS, etc. With the launch of the first Sentinel-1 mission NORMAP will be reinforced by the new data flow from the Copernicus Space Component. NORMAP is also acquiring data from a multitude of other satellites through the unified Copernicus system and will become one of the national thematic information services designed to benefit the environmental monitoring and support effective policy-making.

  12. A synopsis of original research projects published in scientific database in the Russian Federation.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Daria; Pavlichenko, Alexey; Karpenko, Olga; Schmeleva, Liubov; Morozov, Petr

    2015-06-01

    The article describes the current state of scientific publications in the field of psychiatry in the Russian Federation. Issues of academic dissertations, lack of access to recent Russian language research in foreign databases, and recent reforms in the Ministry of Education and Science for overcoming these limitations are discussed in detail. Four exemplary dissertation studies published in Russian language are summarized. The first research examines the contribution of patient's verbal behavior to the reliable diagnosis of mild depression, identifying objective signs for distinguishing it from normal sadness; the mood component influenced the whole mental status and was represented in both structure and semantics of patients' speech. The second paper describes the course of panic disorder with agoraphobia, with the notable results that debut of panic disorder with full-blown panic attacks, often declines to a second accompanied with agoraphobia, which after several years gives way to limited symptom attacks and decreased agoraphobic avoidance. The third study describes the high prevalence of affective and anxiety disorders in patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 and 2, and the role of personality traits in adherence to treatment in patients with poor glucose control. The fourth project uses functional MRI for probing the features of neuronal resting-state networks in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy; the association with affective symptoms provides a model for investigating the pathophysiology of mood disorder. PMID:26022056

  13. The Developmental Brain Disorders Database (DBDB): A Curated Neurogenetics Knowledge Base With Clinical and Research Applications

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaa, Ghayda M.; Millen, Kathleen J.; Barkovich, A. James; Dobyns, William B.; Paciorkowski, Alex R.

    2014-01-01

    The number of single genes associated with neurodevelopmental disorders has increased dramatically over the past decade. The identification of causative genes for these disorders is important to clinical outcome as it allows for accurate assessment of prognosis, genetic counseling, delineation of natural history, inclusion in clinical trials, and in some cases determines therapy. Clinicians face the challenge of correctly identifying neurodevelopmental phenotypes, recognizing syndromes, and prioritizing the best candidate genes for testing. However, there is no central repository of definitions for many phenotypes, leading to errors of diagnosis. Additionally, there is no system of levels of evidence linking genes to phenotypes, making it difficult for clinicians to know which genes are most strongly associated with a given condition. We have developed the Developmental Brain Disorders Database (DBDB: https://www.dbdb.urmc.rochester.edu/home), a publicly available, online-curated repository of genes, phenotypes, and syndromes associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. DBDB contains the first referenced ontology of developmental brain phenotypes, and uses a novel system of levels of evidence for gene-phenotype associations. It is intended to assist clinicians in arriving at the correct diagnosis, select the most appropriate genetic test for that phenotype, and improve the care of patients with developmental brain disorders. For researchers interested in the discovery of novel genes for developmental brain disorders, DBDB provides a well-curated source of important genes against which research sequencing results can be compared. Finally, DBDB allows novel observations about the landscape of the neurogenetics knowledge base. PMID:24700709

  14. Research and application of ORACLE performance optimizing technologies for building airplane environment resource database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianjun; Sun, Jianyong; Cheng, Conggao

    2013-03-01

    Many problems exist in processing experimental aircraft vibration (temperature, humidity) data and generating the intermediate calculations during the construction of airplane environment resource database, such as the need to deal with both structural and non-structural data, weak capacity of the client browser for data processing and massive network data transferring etc. To solve the above problems, some strategies on tuning and optimization performance of database are employed base on Oracle11g, which include data storage structure tuning, the memory configuration of the server, the disk I/O tuning and SQL statement tuning. The experimental results show that the performance of airplane environment resource database is enhanced about 80% compared with the database developed in the initial demonstration and validation phase. The application of new optimization strategies to the database construction can lay a sound foundation for finishing building airplane environment resource database.

  15. The research of network database security technology based on web service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanxing; Wen, Xiumei; Gao, Liting; Pang, Hui; Wang, Qinglin

    2013-03-01

    Database technology is one of the most widely applied computer technologies, its security is becoming more and more important. This paper introduced the database security, network database security level, studies the security technology of the network database, analyzes emphatically sub-key encryption algorithm, applies this algorithm into the campus-one-card system successfully. The realization process of the encryption algorithm is discussed, this method is widely used as reference in many fields, particularly in management information system security and e-commerce.

  16. The Digital Astronaut: An integrated modeling and database system for space biomedical research and operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Ronald J.; McPhee, Jancy C.

    2007-02-01

    The Digital Astronaut is an integrated, modular modeling and database system that will support space biomedical research and operations in a variety of fundamental ways. This system will enable the identification and meaningful interpretation of the medical and physiological research required for human space exploration, a determination of the effectiveness of specific individual human countermeasures in reducing risk and meeting health and performance goals on challenging exploration missions and an evaluation of the appropriateness of various medical interventions during mission emergencies, accidents and illnesses. Such a computer-based, decision support system will enable the construction, validation and utilization of important predictive simulations of the responses of the whole human body to the types of stresses experienced during space flight and low-gravity environments. These simulations will be essential for direct, real-time analysis and maintenance of astronaut health and performance capabilities. The Digital Astronaut will collect and integrate past and current human data across many physiological disciplines and simulations into an operationally useful form that will not only summarize knowledge in a convenient and novel way but also reveal gaps that must be filled via new research in order to effectively ameliorate biomedical risks. Initial phases of system development will focus on simulating ground-based analog systems that are just beginning to collect multidisciplinary data in a standardized way (e.g., the International Multidisciplinary Artificial Gravity Project). During later phases, the focus will shift to development and planning for missions and to exploration mission operations. Then, the Digital Astronaut system will enable evaluation of the effectiveness of multiple, simultaneously applied countermeasures (a task made difficult by the many-system physiological effects of individual countermeasures) and allow for the prescription of

  17. Modeling plant-level industrial energy demand with the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) database and the Longitudinal Research Database (LRD)

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, G.A.; Neifer, M.J.; Ross, M.H.

    1992-08-01

    This report discusses Phase 1 of a project to help the US Department of Energy determine the applicability of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) database and the Longitudinal Research Database (LRD) for industrial modeling and analysis. Research was conducted at the US Bureau of the Census; disclosure of the MECS/LRD data used as a basis for this report was subject to the Bureau`s confidentiality restriction. The project is designed to examine the plant-level energy behavior of energy-intensive industries. In Phase 1, six industries at the four-digit standard industrial classification (SIC) level were studied. The utility of analyzing four-digit SIC samples at the plant level is mixed, but the plant-level structure of the MECS/LRD makes analyzing samples disaggregated below the four-digit level feasible, particularly when the MECS/LRD data are combined with trade association or other external data. When external data are used, the validity of using value of shipments as a measure of output for analyzing energy use can also be examined. Phase 1 results indicate that technical efficiency and the distribution of energy intensities vary significantly at the plant level. They also show that the six industries exhibit monopsony-like behavior; that is, energy prices vary significantly at the plant level, with lower prices being correlated with a higher level of energy consumption. Finally, they show to what degree selected energy-intensive products are manufactured outside their primary industry.

  18. CottonGen: a genomics, genetics and breeding database for cotton research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CottonGen (http://www.cottongen.org) is a curated and integrated web-based relational database providing access to publicly available genomic, genetic and breeding data for cotton. CottonGen supercedes CottonDB and the Cotton Marker Database, with enhanced tools for easier data sharing, mining, vis...

  19. The Research Potential of the Electronic OED Database at the University of Waterloo: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Donna Lee

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the history and structure of the online database of the second edition of the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) and the software tools developed at the University of Waterloo to manipulate the unusually complex database. Four sample searches that indicate some types of problems that might be encountered are appended. (DB)

  20. Patterns of Undergraduates' Use of Scholarly Databases in a Large Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mbabu, Loyd Gitari; Bertram, Albert; Varnum, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Authentication data was utilized to explore undergraduate usage of subscription electronic databases. These usage patterns were linked to the information literacy curriculum of the library. The data showed that out of the 26,208 enrolled undergraduate students, 42% of them accessed a scholarly database at least once in the course of the entire…

  1. First Toronto Conference on Database Users. User Performance, Research Methods, and Human Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Eric; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The first of three articles reports the effectiveness of a feature-matching approach to computer retrieval of graphic information. The second discusses the use of multivariate techniques to measure perceived complexity of database searching by users. The third explores the limitations of user consultation in database design. (Author/CLB)

  2. Inconsistencies in the red blood cell membrane proteome analysis: generation of a database for research and diagnostic applications

    PubMed Central

    Hegedűs, Tamás; Chaubey, Pururawa Mayank; Várady, György; Szabó, Edit; Sarankó, Hajnalka; Hofstetter, Lia; Roschitzki, Bernd; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2015-01-01

    Based on recent results, the determination of the easily accessible red blood cell (RBC) membrane proteins may provide new diagnostic possibilities for assessing mutations, polymorphisms or regulatory alterations in diseases. However, the analysis of the current mass spectrometry-based proteomics datasets and other major databases indicates inconsistencies—the results show large scattering and only a limited overlap for the identified RBC membrane proteins. Here, we applied membrane-specific proteomics studies in human RBC, compared these results with the data in the literature, and generated a comprehensive and expandable database using all available data sources. The integrated web database now refers to proteomic, genetic and medical databases as well, and contains an unexpected large number of validated membrane proteins previously thought to be specific for other tissues and/or related to major human diseases. Since the determination of protein expression in RBC provides a method to indicate pathological alterations, our database should facilitate the development of RBC membrane biomarker platforms and provide a unique resource to aid related further research and diagnostics. Database URL: http://rbcc.hegelab.org PMID:26078478

  3. Estimation of Trans Fatty Acid Intake in Japanese Adults Using 16-Day Diet Records Based on a Food Composition Database Developed for the Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Mai; Sasaki, Satoshi; Murakami, Kentaro; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Okubo, Hitomi; Hirota, Naoko; Notsu, Akiko; Todoriki, Hidemi; Miura, Ayako; Fukui, Mitsuru; Date, Chigusa

    2010-01-01

    Background The Standard Tables of Food Composition in Japan do not include information on trans fatty acids. Previous studies estimating trans fatty acid intake among Japanese have limitations regarding the databases utilized and diet assessment methodologies. We developed a comprehensive database of trans fatty acid food composition, and used this database to estimate intake among a Japanese population. Methods The database was developed using analytic values from the literature and nutrient analysis software encompassing foods in the US, as well as values estimated from recipes or nutrient compositions. We collected 16-day diet records from 225 adults aged 30 to 69 years living in 4 areas of Japan. Trans fatty acid intake was estimated based on the database and the 16-day diet records. Results Mean total fat and trans fatty acid intake was 56.9 g/day (27.7% total energy) and 1.7 g/day (0.8% total energy), respectively, for women and 66.8 g/day (25.5% total energy) and 1.7 g/day (0.7% total energy) for men. Trans fatty acid intake accounted for greater than 1% of total energy intake, which is the maximum recommended according to the World Health Organization, in 24.4% of women and 5.7% of men, and was particularly high among women living in urban areas and those aged 30–49 years. The largest contributors to trans fatty acid intake were confectionaries in women and fats and oils in men. Conclusions Although mean trans fatty acid intake was below the maximum recommended intake of the World Health Organization, intake among subgroups was of concern. Further public health efforts to reduce trans fatty acid intake should be encouraged. PMID:20037259

  4. LLNL Middle East and North Africa and Former Soviet Union Research Database

    SciTech Connect

    O'Boyle, J.L.; Ruppert, S.D.; Hauk, T.F.; Dodge, D.; Firpo, M.

    2000-07-14

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring (GNEM) R and D program has made significant progress populating a comprehensive Seismic Research knowledge Base (SRKB) and deriving calibration parameters for the Middle East and North Africa (ME/NA) and Former Soviet Union (FSU) regions. The LLNL SRKB provides not only a coherent framework in which to store and organize very large volumes of collected seismic waveforms, associated event parameter information, and spatial contextual data, but also provides an efficient data processing/research environment for deriving location and discrimination correction surfaces. The SRKB is a flexible and extensible framework consisting of a relational database (RDB), Geographical Information System (GIS), and associated product/data visualization and data management tools. This SRKB framework is designed to accommodate large volumes of data (over 2 million waveforms from 20,000 events) in diverse formats from many sources in addition to maintaining detailed quality control and metadata. Using the SRKB framework, they are combining travel-time observations, event characterization studies, and regional tectonic models to assemble a library of ground truth information and phenomenology correction surfaces required for support of the ME/NA and FSU regionalization program. Corrections and parameters distilled from the LLNL SRKB provide needed contributions to the DOE Knowledge Base (DOE KB) for the ME/NA and FSU regions and will help improve monitoring for underground nuclear testing. The LLNL research products will facilitate calibration of IMS stations (primary and auxiliary), their surrogates (if not yet installed) and selected gamma stations necessary to complete the above tasks in the ME/NA and FSU regions. They present expanded lookup tables for critical station parameter information (including location and response) and a new integrated and reconciled event catalog dataset including

  5. Database management research for the Human Genome Project. Final progress report for period: 02/01/99 - 06/14/00

    SciTech Connect

    Bult, Carol J.

    1999-11-01

    The MouseBLAST server allows researchers to search a sequence within mouse/rodent sequence databases to find matching sequences that may be associated with mouse genes. Query results may be linked to gene detail records in the Mouse Genome Database (MGD). Searches are performed using WU-BLAST 2.0. All sequence databases are updated on a weekly basis.

  6. Unraveling the Web of Viroinformatics: Computational Tools and Databases in Virus Research

    PubMed Central

    Priyadarshini, Pragya; Vrati, Sudhanshu

    2014-01-01

    The beginning of the second century of research in the field of virology (the first virus was discovered in 1898) was marked by its amalgamation with bioinformatics, resulting in the birth of a new domain—viroinformatics. The availability of more than 100 Web servers and databases embracing all or specific viruses (for example, dengue virus, influenza virus, hepatitis virus, human immunodeficiency virus [HIV], hemorrhagic fever virus [HFV], human papillomavirus [HPV], West Nile virus, etc.) as well as distinct applications (comparative/diversity analysis, viral recombination, small interfering RNA [siRNA]/short hairpin RNA [shRNA]/microRNA [miRNA] studies, RNA folding, protein-protein interaction, structural analysis, and phylotyping and genotyping) will definitely aid the development of effective drugs and vaccines. However, information about their access and utility is not available at any single source or on any single platform. Therefore, a compendium of various computational tools and resources dedicated specifically to virology is presented in this article. PMID:25428870

  7. The Molecular Biology Database Collection: 2004 update

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Michael Y.

    2004-01-01

    The Molecular Biology Database Collection is a public resource listing key databases of value to the biologist, including those featured in this issue of Nucleic Acids Research, and other high-quality databases. All databases included in this Collection are freely available to the public. This listing aims to serve as a convenient starting point for searching the web for reliable information on various aspects of molecular biology, biochemistry and genetics. This year’s update includes 548 databases, 162 more than the previous one. The databases are organized in a hierarchical classification that should simplify finding the right database for each given task. Each database in the list comes with a recently updated brief description. The database list and the database descriptions can be accessed online at the Nucleic Acids Research web site http://nar.oupjournals.org/. The great challenge in biological research today is how to turn data into knowledge. I have met people who think data is knowledge but these people are then striving for a means of turning knowledge into understanding.Sydney Brenner. The Scientist 16[6]:12, March 18, 2002 PMID:14681349

  8. Acid precipitation. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the causes, and ecological and economic consequences of acid precipitation and deposition. Emissions of sulfur and nitrogen compounds, loading rates at specific study sites, the role of buffering materials on the acidification of lakes and streams, and the effects on aquatic life are considered. The effects on soil chemistry and vegetation are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Swedish scientists take acid-rain research to developing nations

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, T.

    1995-12-01

    In the realm of acid-rain research, Sweden looms large on the world stage. It is the country where scientists first proved more than 30 years ago that airborne chemicals could and did cross international boundaries to acidify lakes and forests far from where the pollution was generated. Now, Swedish scientists are leading an international effort to map acid-rain patterns in the developing countries of Asia, where new industrial activity seems to be recreating problems that European and North American policy makers have already taken steps to solve. Topics covered in this article include acid rain on the rise in Asia; visualizing and validating the data; funding as the key to steady research.

  10. Research and writing in the history of health sciences, 1970-1982: a quantitative analysis of NLM's HISTLINE database.

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, J J

    1985-01-01

    HISTLINE, the MEDLARS file on the history of the health sciences, was analyzed to determine predominant areas of historical research and publication in the years 1970-1982, as reflected in this database produced within the History of Medicine Division at the National Library of Medicine. Subject content, chronologic and geographic breakdowns, and subjects of biographical studies are examined in view of their frequency in the file. Speculation for the predominance of particular descriptors and individuals is presented. An examination is made of the journals publishing the most medical history. Strengths and weaknesses of the database as reflected in this study also are discussed. PMID:3888330

  11. Research and writing in the history of health sciences, 1970-1982: a quantitative analysis of NLM's HISTLINE database.

    PubMed

    Kopp, J J

    1985-04-01

    HISTLINE, the MEDLARS file on the history of the health sciences, was analyzed to determine predominant areas of historical research and publication in the years 1970-1982, as reflected in this database produced within the History of Medicine Division at the National Library of Medicine. Subject content, chronologic and geographic breakdowns, and subjects of biographical studies are examined in view of their frequency in the file. Speculation for the predominance of particular descriptors and individuals is presented. An examination is made of the journals publishing the most medical history. Strengths and weaknesses of the database as reflected in this study also are discussed. PMID:3888330

  12. Development of USDA's expanded flavonoid database: A Tool for Epidemiological Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The scientific community continues to be interested in potential links between flavonoid intakes and beneficial health effects associated with certain chronic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, some cancers and type 2 diabetes. Three separate flavonoid databases (Flavonoids (5 subclasses: fl...

  13. Genome databases

    SciTech Connect

    Courteau, J.

    1991-10-11

    Since the Genome Project began several years ago, a plethora of databases have been developed or are in the works. They range from the massive Genome Data Base at Johns Hopkins University, the central repository of all gene mapping information, to small databases focusing on single chromosomes or organisms. Some are publicly available, others are essentially private electronic lab notebooks. Still others limit access to a consortium of researchers working on, say, a single human chromosome. An increasing number incorporate sophisticated search and analytical software, while others operate as little more than data lists. In consultation with numerous experts in the field, a list has been compiled of some key genome-related databases. The list was not limited to map and sequence databases but also included the tools investigators use to interpret and elucidate genetic data, such as protein sequence and protein structure databases. Because a major goal of the Genome Project is to map and sequence the genomes of several experimental animals, including E. coli, yeast, fruit fly, nematode, and mouse, the available databases for those organisms are listed as well. The author also includes several databases that are still under development - including some ambitious efforts that go beyond data compilation to create what are being called electronic research communities, enabling many users, rather than just one or a few curators, to add or edit the data and tag it as raw or confirmed.

  14. Comprehensive research synopsis and systematic meta-analyses in Parkinson's disease genetics: The PDGene database.

    PubMed

    Lill, Christina M; Roehr, Johannes T; McQueen, Matthew B; Kavvoura, Fotini K; Bagade, Sachin; Schjeide, Brit-Maren M; Schjeide, Leif M; Meissner, Esther; Zauft, Ute; Allen, Nicole C; Liu, Tian; Schilling, Marcel; Anderson, Kari J; Beecham, Gary; Berg, Daniela; Biernacka, Joanna M; Brice, Alexis; DeStefano, Anita L; Do, Chuong B; Eriksson, Nicholas; Factor, Stewart A; Farrer, Matthew J; Foroud, Tatiana; Gasser, Thomas; Hamza, Taye; Hardy, John A; Heutink, Peter; Hill-Burns, Erin M; Klein, Christine; Latourelle, Jeanne C; Maraganore, Demetrius M; Martin, Eden R; Martinez, Maria; Myers, Richard H; Nalls, Michael A; Pankratz, Nathan; Payami, Haydeh; Satake, Wataru; Scott, William K; Sharma, Manu; Singleton, Andrew B; Stefansson, Kari; Toda, Tatsushi; Tung, Joyce Y; Vance, Jeffery; Wood, Nick W; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Young, Peter; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Khoury, Muin J; Zipp, Frauke; Lehrach, Hans; Ioannidis, John P A; Bertram, Lars

    2012-01-01

    More than 800 published genetic association studies have implicated dozens of potential risk loci in Parkinson's disease (PD). To facilitate the interpretation of these findings, we have created a dedicated online resource, PDGene, that comprehensively collects and meta-analyzes all published studies in the field. A systematic literature screen of -27,000 articles yielded 828 eligible articles from which relevant data were extracted. In addition, individual-level data from three publicly available genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were obtained and subjected to genotype imputation and analysis. Overall, we performed meta-analyses on more than seven million polymorphisms originating either from GWAS datasets and/or from smaller scale PD association studies. Meta-analyses on 147 SNPs were supplemented by unpublished GWAS data from up to 16,452 PD cases and 48,810 controls. Eleven loci showed genome-wide significant (P < 5 × 10(-8)) association with disease risk: BST1, CCDC62/HIP1R, DGKQ/GAK, GBA, LRRK2, MAPT, MCCC1/LAMP3, PARK16, SNCA, STK39, and SYT11/RAB25. In addition, we identified novel evidence for genome-wide significant association with a polymorphism in ITGA8 (rs7077361, OR 0.88, P  =  1.3 × 10(-8)). All meta-analysis results are freely available on a dedicated online database (www.pdgene.org), which is cross-linked with a customized track on the UCSC Genome Browser. Our study provides an exhaustive and up-to-date summary of the status of PD genetics research that can be readily scaled to include the results of future large-scale genetics projects, including next-generation sequencing studies. PMID:22438815

  15. ATGC: a database of orthologous genes from closely related prokaryotic genomes and a research platform for microevolution of prokaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Novichkov, Pavel S.; Ratnere, Igor; Wolf, Yuri I.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Dubchak, Inna

    2009-07-23

    The database of Alignable Tight Genomic Clusters (ATGCs) consists of closely related genomes of archaea and bacteria, and is a resource for research into prokaryotic microevolution. Construction of a data set with appropriate characteristics is a major hurdle for this type of studies. With the current rate of genome sequencing, it is difficult to follow the progress of the field and to determine which of the available genome sets meet the requirements of a given research project, in particular, with respect to the minimum and maximum levels of similarity between the included genomes. Additionally, extraction of specific content, such as genomic alignments or families of orthologs, from a selected set of genomes is a complicated and time-consuming process. The database addresses these problems by providing an intuitive and efficient web interface to browse precomputed ATGCs, select appropriate ones and access ATGC-derived data such as multiple alignments of orthologous proteins, matrices of pairwise intergenomic distances based on genome-wide analysis of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates and others. The ATGC database will be regularly updated following new releases of the NCBI RefSeq. The database is hosted by the Genomics Division at Lawrence Berkeley National laboratory and is publicly available at http://atgc.lbl.gov.

  16. Solubility Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 106 IUPAC-NIST Solubility Database (Web, free access)   These solubilities are compiled from 18 volumes (Click here for List) of the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry(IUPAC)-NIST Solubility Data Series. The database includes liquid-liquid, solid-liquid, and gas-liquid systems. Typical solvents and solutes include water, seawater, heavy water, inorganic compounds, and a variety of organic compounds such as hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons, alcohols, acids, esters and nitrogen compounds. There are over 67,500 solubility measurements and over 1800 references.

  17. Recent advances in lead-acid cell research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, E.

    1980-01-01

    The lead-acid battery still is and will be for the foreseeable future the most widely used secondary energy storage system. It will maintain this predominant role because of its highly developed technology, its low costs as compared to other secondary systems and its high reliability. During the last decade it has been demonstrated that the lead-acid system is capable of providing an attractive energy source of sufficient energy and power per unit weight and volume which allows its successful application for electric vehicle propulsion. Basic research has contributed in a worldwide effort to the improvement of active material utilization and cycle life as well. This is shown by a number of typical examples, such as the relationship between active material properties and capacity at high rates of discharge, the effect of acid stratification and others. Simultaneously, the expenditure for the maintenance of lead-acid batteries has been minimized by the development of peripheric equipment, as there are means for central-automatic water refill and recombination devices. It is shown that there is still a considerable potential for further improvement which might again strengthen the unique position of the lead-acid system in the market in comparison to competitive systems.

  18. Workshop report: Identifying opportunities for global integration of toxicogenomics databases, 26-27 June 2013, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, Diana M; Boyles, Rebecca R; Kleinjans, Jos C S; Dearry, Allen

    2014-12-01

    A joint US-EU workshop on enhancing data sharing and exchange in toxicogenomics was held at the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences. Currently, efficient reuse of data is hampered by problems related to public data availability, data quality, database interoperability (the ability to exchange information), standardization and sustainability. At the workshop, experts from universities and research institutes presented databases, studies, organizations and tools that attempt to deal with these problems. Furthermore, a case study showing that combining toxicogenomics data from multiple resources leads to more accurate predictions in risk assessment was presented. All participants agreed that there is a need for a web portal describing the diverse, heterogeneous data resources relevant for toxicogenomics research. Furthermore, there was agreement that linking more data resources would improve toxicogenomics data analysis. To outline a roadmap to enhance interoperability between data resources, the participants recommend collecting user stories from the toxicogenomics research community on barriers in data sharing and exchange currently hampering answering to certain research questions. These user stories may guide the prioritization of steps to be taken for enhancing integration of toxicogenomics databases. PMID:25326818

  19. Advances in the design, development, and deployment of the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) multimodal signatures database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Kelly; Robertson, James

    2011-06-01

    Recent advances in the design, development, and deployment of U.S. Army Research Laboratory's (ARL) Multimodal Signature Database (MMSDB) create a state-of-the-art database system with Web-based access through a Web interface designed specifically for research and development. Tens of thousands of signatures are currently available for researchers to support their algorithm development and refinement for sensors and other security systems. Each dataset is stored in (Hierarchical Data Format 5 (HDF5) format for easy modeling and storing of signatures and archived sensor data, ground truth, calibration information, algorithms, and other documentation. Archived HDF5 formatted data provides the basis for computational interoperability across a variety of tools including MATLAB, Octave, and Python. The database has a Web-based front-end with public and restricted access interfaces, along with 24/7 availability and support. This paper describes the overall design of the system, and the recent enhancements and future vision, including the ability for researchers to share algorithms, data, and documentation in the cloud, and providing an ability to run algorithms and software for testing and evaluation purposes remotely across multiple domains and computational tools. The paper will also describe in detail the HDF5 format for several multimodal sensor types.

  20. Design and utilization of a Flight Test Engineering Database Management System at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knighton, Donna L.

    1992-01-01

    A Flight Test Engineering Database Management System (FTE DBMS) was designed and implemented at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility. The X-29 Forward Swept Wing Advanced Technology Demonstrator flight research program was chosen for the initial system development and implementation. The FTE DBMS greatly assisted in planning and 'mass production' card preparation for an accelerated X-29 research program. Improved Test Plan tracking and maneuver management for a high flight-rate program were proven, and flight rates of up to three flights per day, two times per week were maintained.

  1. [The research progress of succinic acid fermentation strains].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Zhao; Zhao, Xue-Ming

    2007-07-01

    The potential of succinic acid as an important chemical intermediates had been realized and fermentation is one of the best ways to make it possible in economical aspect. Fermentation organism is the key part of the fermentation method. The updated research developments of fermentation organisms and the fermentation characteristics and problems of them were reviewed and analyzed in this paper. Finally,the development future of fermenation organism was forecasted. PMID:17822024

  2. SU-E-P-26: Oncospace: A Shared Radiation Oncology Database System Designed for Personalized Medicine, Decision Support, and Research

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, M; Robertson, S; Moore, J; Wong, J; DeWeese, T; McNutt, T; Phillips, M; Hendrickson, K; Song, W; Kwok, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Advancement in Radiation Oncology (RO) practice develops through evidence based medicine and clinical trial. Knowledge usable for treatment planning, decision support and research is contained in our clinical data, stored in an Oncospace database. This data store and the tools for populating and analyzing it are compatible with standard RO practice and are shared with collaborating institutions. The question is - what protocol for system development and data sharing within an Oncospace Consortium? We focus our example on the technology and data meaning necessary to share across the Consortium. Methods: Oncospace consists of a database schema, planning and outcome data import and web based analysis tools.1) Database: The Consortium implements a federated data store; each member collects and maintains its own data within an Oncospace schema. For privacy, PHI is contained within a single table, accessible to the database owner.2) Import: Spatial dose data from treatment plans (Pinnacle or DICOM) is imported via Oncolink. Treatment outcomes are imported from an OIS (MOSAIQ).3) Analysis: JHU has built a number of webpages to answer analysis questions. Oncospace data can also be analyzed via MATLAB or SAS queries.These materials are available to Consortium members, who contribute enhancements and improvements. Results: 1) The Oncospace Consortium now consists of RO centers at JHU, UVA, UW and the University of Toronto. These members have successfully installed and populated Oncospace databases with over 1000 patients collectively.2) Members contributing code and getting updates via SVN repository. Errors are reported and tracked via Redmine. Teleconferences include strategizing design and code reviews.3) Successfully remotely queried federated databases to combine multiple institutions’ DVH data for dose-toxicity analysis (see below – data combined from JHU and UW Oncospace). Conclusion: RO data sharing can and has been effected according to the Oncospace

  3. USDA-ARS Riesel Watersheds, Riesel, Texas, USA: Water quality research database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 75 year legacy database including discharge, sediment loss, land management, and meteorological data for the USDA-ARS Riesel Watersheds has been available on the web for more than a decade (www.ars.usda.gov/spa/hydro-data); however, only recently have additional water quality data been added. T...

  4. Data-Based Consultation Case Study: Adaptations of Researched Best Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Givens-Ogle, Louise; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This article describes a pilot program implemented in San Juan to keep mildly handicapped and at-risk students in mainstream classrooms by providing collaborative consultation services through a school-site team approach, using data-based instruction to measure student progress in reading and social behavior change. (Author/PB)

  5. Successful Keyword Searching: Initiating Research on Popular Topics Using Electronic Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Randall M.; MacDonald, Susan Priest

    Students are using electronic resources more than ever before to locate information for assignments. Without the proper search terms, results are incomplete, and students are frustrated. Using the keywords, key people, organizations, and Web sites provided in this book and compiled from the most commonly used databases, students will be able to…

  6. Heart ‘omics’ in AGEing (HOMAGE): design, research objectives and characteristics of the common database

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Lotte; Thijs, Lutgarde; Jin, Yu; Zannad, Faiez; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Rouet, Philippe; Pinet, Florence; Bauters, Christophe; Pieske, Burkert; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Mamas, Mamas; Diez, Javier; McDonald, Kenneth; Cleland, John G. F.; Rocca, Hans-Peter Brunner-La; Heymans, Stephane; Latini, Roberto; Masson, Serge; Sever, Peter; Delles, Christian; Pocock, Stuart; Collier, Timothy; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Staessen, Jan A

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Heart failure is common in older people and its prevalence is increasing. The Heart ‘omics’ in AGEing (HOMAGE) project aims to provide a biomarker approach that will improve the early diagnosis of heart failure. A large clinical database, based on (1) prospective population studies or (2) cross-sectional, prospective studies or randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of patients at risk for or with overt cardiovascular disease will be constructed to determine most promising ‘omics’-based biomarkers to identify the risk of developing heart failure and/or comorbidities. Population studies, patient cohorts and RCTs are eligible for inclusion in the common database, if they received ethical approval to obtain and share data and have baseline information on cardiovascular risk factors. Currently, the HOMAGE database includes 43,065 subjects, from 20 studies in eight European countries, including healthy subjects from three population studies in France, Belgium and Italy (n  =  7,124), patients with heart failure (n  =  4,312) from four cohorts in the UK, Spain and Switzerland and patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease (n  =  31,629) in 13 cohorts. It is anticipated that more partners will join the consortium and enlarge the pooled data. This large merged database will be a useful resource with which to identify candidate biomarkers that play a role in the mechanism underlying the onset and progression of heart failure. PMID:25332706

  7. D Digital Model Database Applied to Conservation and Research of Wooden Construction in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Protected by the Tai-Hang Mountains, Shanxi Province, located in north central China, is a highly prosperous, densely populated valley and considered to be one of the cradles of Chinese civilization. Its continuous habitation and rich culture have given rise to a large number of temple complexes and pavilions. Among these structures, 153 can be dated as early as from the Tang dynasty (618- 907C.E.) to the end of the Yuan dynasty (1279-1368C.E.) in Southern Shanxi area. The buildings are the best-preserved examples of wooden Chinese architecture in existence, exemplifying historic building technology and displaying highly intricate architectural decoration and detailing. They have survived war, earthquakes, and, in the last hundred years, neglect. In 2005, a decade-long conservation project was initiated by the State Administration of Cultural Heritage of China (SACH) to conserve and document these important buildings. The conservation process requires stabilization, conservation of important features, and, where necessary, partial dismantlement in order to replace unsound structural elements. Project team of CHCC have developed a practical recording system that created a record of all building components prior to and during the conservation process. After that we are trying to establish a comprehensive database which include all of the 153 earlier buildings, through which we can easily entering, browse, indexing information of the wooden construction, even deep into component details. The Database can help us to carry out comparative studies of these wooden structures, and, provide important support for the continued conservation of these heritage buildings. For some of the most important wooden structure, we have established three-dimensional models. Connected the Database with 3D Digital Model based on ArcGIS, we have developed 3D Digital Model Database for these cherish buildings. The 3D Digital Model Database helps us set up an integrate information inventory

  8. A plant resource and experiment management system based on the Golm Plant Database as a basic tool for omics research

    PubMed Central

    Köhl, Karin I; Basler, Georg; Lüdemann, Alexander; Selbig, Joachim; Walther, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    and barcode labels facilitate identification and management of the material. Web pages are provided as user interfaces to facilitate maintaining the system in an environment with many desktop computers and a rapidly changing user community. Web based search tools are the basis for joint use of the material by all researchers of the institute. Conclusion The Golm Plant Database system, which is based on a relational database, collects the genetic and environmental information on plant material during its production or experimental use at the Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology. It thus provides information according to the MIAME standard for the component 'Sample' in a highly standardised format. The Plant Database system thus facilitates collaborative work and allows efficient queries in data analysis for systems biology research. PMID:18495032

  9. Experiment Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanschoren, Joaquin; Blockeel, Hendrik

    Next to running machine learning algorithms based on inductive queries, much can be learned by immediately querying the combined results of many prior studies. Indeed, all around the globe, thousands of machine learning experiments are being executed on a daily basis, generating a constant stream of empirical information on machine learning techniques. While the information contained in these experiments might have many uses beyond their original intent, results are typically described very concisely in papers and discarded afterwards. If we properly store and organize these results in central databases, they can be immediately reused for further analysis, thus boosting future research. In this chapter, we propose the use of experiment databases: databases designed to collect all the necessary details of these experiments, and to intelligently organize them in online repositories to enable fast and thorough analysis of a myriad of collected results. They constitute an additional, queriable source of empirical meta-data based on principled descriptions of algorithm executions, without reimplementing the algorithms in an inductive database. As such, they engender a very dynamic, collaborative approach to experimentation, in which experiments can be freely shared, linked together, and immediately reused by researchers all over the world. They can be set up for personal use, to share results within a lab or to create open, community-wide repositories. Here, we provide a high-level overview of their design, and use an existing experiment database to answer various interesting research questions about machine learning algorithms and to verify a number of recent studies.

  10. Databases: Beyond the Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Robert

    This presented paper offers an elementary description of database characteristics and then provides a survey of databases that may be useful to the teacher and researcher in Slavic and East European languages and literatures. The survey focuses on commercial databases that are available, usable, and needed. Individual databases discussed include:…

  11. A Hypervelocity Experimental Research Database (HERD): Support for the Wright Laboratory Armament Directorate Code Validation Program (COVAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, S.A.; Anderson, C.E. Jr.; Hertel, E.S. Jr.; Hunt, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    The Hypervelocity Experimental Research Database (HERD) described in this paper was developed to aid researchers with code validation for impacts that occur at velocities faster than the testable regime. Codes of concern include both hydrocodes and fast-running analytical or semi-empirical models used to predict the impact phenomenology and damage that results to projectiles and targets. There are several well documented experimental programs that can serve as benchmarks for code validation; these are identified and described. Recommendations for further experimentation (a canonical problem) to provide validation data are also discussed.

  12. Nucleic Acid Aptamers: Research Tools in Disease Diagnostics and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Yadava, Pramod K.

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short sequences of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) or peptide molecules which adopt a conformation and bind cognate ligands with high affinity and specificity in a manner akin to antibody-antigen interactions. It has been globally acknowledged that aptamers promise a plethora of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Although use of nucleic acid aptamers as targeted therapeutics or mediators of targeted drug delivery is a relatively new avenue of research, one aptamer-based drug “Macugen” is FDA approved and a series of aptamer-based drugs are in clinical pipelines. The present review discusses the aspects of design, unique properties, applications, and development of different aptamers to aid in cancer diagnosis, prevention, and/or treatment under defined conditions. PMID:25050359

  13. SPAM: A Canned Internet-Accessible Database of Interest to Solar Flare Researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, R. C.; Hudson, H. S.; Kiernan, E.; Metcalf, T. R.; Wulser, J.-P.

    1992-05-01

    We have established a searchable database, called SPAM (Spectroscopy and Polarimetry at Mees), which contains logs of observations made at Mees Solar Observatory (Haleakala, Maui). Of more general interest, the database also includes the Events List and Region Report from the Space Environment Laboratory (Boulder). Logs from YOHKOH are currently being added. Hence, SPAM can be used to determine, for example, whether Mees has vector magnetograms of a certain NOAA AR or whether YOHKOH has certain types of observations in specified time ranges. As well, it can be used to search the SEL database for flares with selected attributes. Included logs (and searchable attributes, in addition to date, day of year, and time) are: Mees Solar Observatory Log (instrument, NOAA AR, data type, observing setup), SEL Event List (NOAA AR, X-ray Class), SEL Region Report (NOAA AR), YOHKOH Orbit Summary, YOHKOH SXT Quiet Mode PFI Observations (latitude, longitude, X-ray and optical image size), YOHKOH Flare Observations (latitude, longitude, specific channel counts or ratios). SPAM runs on a Sun workstation at Mees Solar Observatory, and is available over Internet. Simply access (e.g., telnet) koa.ifa.hawaii.edu (128.171.167.1) from any vt100, Sun, or xterm emulator. Log on as spam (lower case); there is no password. New users are asked to read release notes and hints.

  14. Databases and Geographical Information Systems at the research/teaching interface: palaeoclimate proxies, freshwater biodiversity and the OMEGA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, David

    2013-04-01

    The Mutual Ostracod Temperature Range (MOTR) method provides Quaternary palaeotemperature range estimates based on fossil ostracod assemblages calibrated using modern distributional databases and climate data. Over the past five years, aspects of the development and application of the MOTR method have been incorporated into undergraduate teaching in two second-year modules (Global Environmental Change and Digital Worlds: Cartography, Geographical Information Systems and Modelling) via lectures and practical exercises. Consequently, several students became sufficiently interested and enthused to undertake successful major projects aimed at developing, testing and applying aspects of the method, leading in turn to postgraduate work on the same topic in two cases and in a third case to co-authorship of a research publication. Thus both research and teaching have benefited from the integration of an innovative geoscience application with undergraduate coursework. The scope of MOTR applications is being expanded from European to global via the Ostracod Metadatabase of Environmental and Geographical Attributes (OMEGA) project; the current focus is on harmonising North American and European datasets, supported by the EU-funded (FP7) BioFresh project which is building a global information platform with access to all available databases of freshwater biodiversity. Undergraduate participation will be sought to underpin a Citizen Science initiative aimed at checking, correcting and validating the geographic referencing of species' records in the databases, using datasets exported as Keyhole Markup Language files for use in Google Earth.

  15. Mapping the Iranian Research Literature in the Field of Traditional Medicine in Scopus Database 2010-2014

    PubMed Central

    GhaedAmini, Hossein; Okhovati, Maryam; Zare, Morteza; Saghafi, Zahra; Bazrafshan, Azam; GhaedAmini, Alireza; GhaedAmini, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to provide research and collaboration overview of Iranian research efforts in the field of traditional medicine during 2010-2014. Methods: This is a bibliometric study using the Scopus database as data source, using search affiliation address relevant to traditional medicine and Iran as the search strategy. Subject and geographical overlay maps were also applied to visualize the network activities of the Iranian authors. Highly cited articles (citations >10) were further explored to highlight the impact of research domains more specifically. Results: About 3,683 articles were published by Iranian authors in Scopus database. The compound annual growth rate of Iranian publications was 0.14% during 2010-2014. Tehran University of Medical Sciences (932 articles), Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (404 articles) and Tabriz Islamic Medical University (391 articles), were the leading institutions in the field of traditional medicine. Medicinal plants (72%), digestive system’s disease (21%), basics of traditional medicine (13%), mental disorders (8%) were the major research topics. United States (7%), Netherlands (3%), and Canada (2.6%) were the most important collaborators of Iranian authors. Conclusion: Iranian research efforts in the field of traditional medicine have been increased slightly over the last years. Yet, joint multi-disciplinary collaborations are needed to cover inadequately described areas of traditional medicine in the country.

  16. Construction of a rice glycoside hydrolase phylogenomic database and identification of targets for biofuel research

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rita; Cao, Peijian; Jung, Ki-Hong; Sharma, Manoj K.; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2013-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolases (GH) catalyze the hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds in cell wall polymers and can have major effects on cell wall architecture. Taking advantage of the massive datasets available in public databases, we have constructed a rice phylogenomic database of GHs (http://ricephylogenomics.ucdavis.edu/cellwalls/gh/). This database integrates multiple data types including the structural features, orthologous relationships, mutant availability, and gene expression patterns for each GH family in a phylogenomic context. The rice genome encodes 437 GH genes classified into 34 families. Based on pairwise comparison with eight dicot and four monocot genomes, we identified 138 GH genes that are highly diverged between monocots and dicots, 57 of which have diverged further in rice as compared with four monocot genomes scanned in this study. Chromosomal localization and expression analysis suggest a role for both whole-genome and localized gene duplications in expansion and diversification of GH families in rice. We examined the meta-profiles of expression patterns of GH genes in twenty different anatomical tissues of rice. Transcripts of 51 genes exhibit tissue or developmental stage-preferential expression, whereas, seventeen other genes preferentially accumulate in actively growing tissues. When queried in RiceNet, a probabilistic functional gene network that facilitates functional gene predictions, nine out of seventeen genes form a regulatory network with the well-characterized genes involved in biosynthesis of cell wall polymers including cellulose synthase and cellulose synthase-like genes of rice. Two-thirds of the GH genes in rice are up regulated in response to biotic and abiotic stress treatments indicating a role in stress adaptation. Our analyses identify potential GH targets for cell wall modification. PMID:23986771

  17. Protein structure databases with new web services for structural biology and biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Standley, Daron M; Kinjo, Akira R; Kinoshita, Kengo; Nakamura, Haruki

    2008-07-01

    The Protein Data Bank Japan (PDBj) curates, edits and distributes protein structural data as a member of the worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) and currently processes approximately 25-30% of all deposited data in the world. Structural information is enhanced by the addition of biological and biochemical functional data as well as experimental details extracted from the literature and other databases. Several applications have been developed at PDBj for structural biology and biomedical studies: (i) a Java-based molecular graphics viewer, jV; (ii) display of electron density maps for the evaluation of structure quality; (iii) an extensive database of molecular surfaces for functional sites, eF-site, as well as a search service for similar molecular surfaces, eF-seek; (iv) identification of sequence and structural neighbors; (v) a graphical user interface to all known protein folds with links to the above applications, Protein Globe. Recent examples are shown that highlight the utility of these tools in recognizing remote homologies between pairs of protein structures and in assigning putative biochemical functions to newly determined targets from structural genomics projects. PMID:18430752

  18. PGSB PlantsDB: updates to the database framework for comparative plant genome research.

    PubMed

    Spannagl, Manuel; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Bader, Kai C; Martis, Mihaela M; Seidel, Michael; Kugler, Karl G; Gundlach, Heidrun; Mayer, Klaus F X

    2016-01-01

    PGSB (Plant Genome and Systems Biology: formerly MIPS) PlantsDB (http://pgsb.helmholtz-muenchen.de/plant/index.jsp) is a database framework for the comparative analysis and visualization of plant genome data. The resource has been updated with new data sets and types as well as specialized tools and interfaces to address user demands for intuitive access to complex plant genome data. In its latest incarnation, we have re-worked both the layout and navigation structure and implemented new keyword search options and a new BLAST sequence search functionality. Actively involved in corresponding sequencing consortia, PlantsDB has dedicated special efforts to the integration and visualization of complex triticeae genome data, especially for barley, wheat and rye. We enhanced CrowsNest, a tool to visualize syntenic relationships between genomes, with data from the wheat sub-genome progenitor Aegilops tauschii and added functionality to the PGSB RNASeqExpressionBrowser. GenomeZipper results were integrated for the genomes of barley, rye, wheat and perennial ryegrass and interactive access is granted through PlantsDB interfaces. Data exchange and cross-linking between PlantsDB and other plant genome databases is stimulated by the transPLANT project (http://transplantdb.eu/). PMID:26527721

  19. PGSB PlantsDB: updates to the database framework for comparative plant genome research

    PubMed Central

    Spannagl, Manuel; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Bader, Kai C.; Martis, Mihaela M.; Seidel, Michael; Kugler, Karl G.; Gundlach, Heidrun; Mayer, Klaus F.X.

    2016-01-01

    PGSB (Plant Genome and Systems Biology: formerly MIPS) PlantsDB (http://pgsb.helmholtz-muenchen.de/plant/index.jsp) is a database framework for the comparative analysis and visualization of plant genome data. The resource has been updated with new data sets and types as well as specialized tools and interfaces to address user demands for intuitive access to complex plant genome data. In its latest incarnation, we have re-worked both the layout and navigation structure and implemented new keyword search options and a new BLAST sequence search functionality. Actively involved in corresponding sequencing consortia, PlantsDB has dedicated special efforts to the integration and visualization of complex triticeae genome data, especially for barley, wheat and rye. We enhanced CrowsNest, a tool to visualize syntenic relationships between genomes, with data from the wheat sub-genome progenitor Aegilops tauschii and added functionality to the PGSB RNASeqExpressionBrowser. GenomeZipper results were integrated for the genomes of barley, rye, wheat and perennial ryegrass and interactive access is granted through PlantsDB interfaces. Data exchange and cross-linking between PlantsDB and other plant genome databases is stimulated by the transPLANT project (http://transplantdb.eu/). PMID:26527721

  20. YM500v2: a small RNA sequencing (smRNA-seq) database for human cancer miRNome research.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei-Chung; Chung, I-Fang; Tsai, Cheng-Fong; Huang, Tse-Shun; Chen, Chen-Yang; Wang, Shao-Chuan; Chang, Ting-Yu; Sun, Hsing-Jen; Chao, Jeffrey Yung-Chuan; Cheng, Cheng-Chung; Wu, Cheng-Wen; Wang, Hsei-Wei

    2015-01-01

    We previously presented YM500, which is an integrated database for miRNA quantification, isomiR identification, arm switching discovery and novel miRNA prediction from 468 human smRNA-seq datasets. Here in this updated YM500v2 database (http://ngs.ym.edu.tw/ym500/), we focus on the cancer miRNome to make the database more disease-orientated. New miRNA-related algorithms developed after YM500 were included in YM500v2, and, more significantly, more than 8000 cancer-related smRNA-seq datasets (including those of primary tumors, paired normal tissues, PBMC, recurrent tumors, and metastatic tumors) were incorporated into YM500v2. Novel miRNAs (miRNAs not included in the miRBase R21) were not only predicted by three independent algorithms but also cleaned by a new in silico filtration strategy and validated by wetlab data such as Cross-Linked ImmunoPrecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq) to reduce the false-positive rate. A new function 'Meta-analysis' is additionally provided for allowing users to identify real-time differentially expressed miRNAs and arm-switching events according to customer-defined sample groups and dozens of clinical criteria tidying up by proficient clinicians. Cancer miRNAs identified hold the potential for both basic research and biotech applications. PMID:25398902

  1. 77 FR 66622 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) Data...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... access data or images from the NDAR Central Repository for research purposes. The primary use of this... access to study data and images from the NDAR Central Repository for research purposes. There are...

  2. Constructing a Population-Based Research Database from Routine Maternal Screening Records: A Resource for Studying Alloimmunization in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Gryfelt, Gunilla; Wikman, Agneta; Reilly, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Background Although screening for maternal red blood cell antibodies during pregnancy is a standard procedure, the prevalence and clinical consequences of non-anti-D immunization are poorly understood. The objective was to create a national database of maternal antibody screening results that can be linked with population health registers to create a research resource for investigating these issues. Study Design and Methods Each birth in the Swedish Medical Birth Register was uniquely identified and linked to the text stored in routine maternal antibody screening records in the time window from 9 months prior to 2 weeks after the delivery date. These text records were subjected to a computerized search for specific antibodies using regular expressions. To illustrate the research potential of the resulting database, selected antibody prevalence rates are presented as tables and figures, and the complete data (from more than 60 specific antibodies) presented as online moving graphical displays. Results More than one million (1,191,761) births with valid screening information from 1982–2002 constitute the study population. Computerized coverage of screening increased steadily over time and varied by region as electronic records were adopted. To ensure data quality, we restricted analysis to birth records in areas and years with a sustained coverage of at least 80%, representing 920,903 births from 572,626 mothers in 17 of the 24 counties in Sweden. During the study period, non-anti-D and anti-D antibodies occurred in 76.8/10,000 and 14.1/10,000 pregnancies respectively, with marked differences between specific antibodies over time. Conclusion This work demonstrates the feasibility of creating a nationally representative research database from the routine maternal antibody screening records from an extended calendar period. By linkage with population registers of maternal and child health, such data are a valuable resource for addressing important clinical questions

  3. RBscore&NBench: a high-level web server for nucleic acid binding residues prediction with a large-scale benchmarking database.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2016-07-01

    RBscore&NBench combines a web server, RBscore and a database, NBench. RBscore predicts RNA-/DNA-binding residues in proteins and visualizes the prediction scores and features on protein structures. The scoring scheme of RBscore directly links feature values to nucleic acid binding probabilities and illustrates the nucleic acid binding energy funnel on the protein surface. To avoid dataset, binding site definition and assessment metric biases, we compared RBscore with 18 web servers and 3 stand-alone programs on 41 datasets, which demonstrated the high and stable accuracy of RBscore. A comprehensive comparison led us to develop a benchmark database named NBench. The web server is available on: http://ahsoka.u-strasbg.fr/rbscorenbench/. PMID:27084939

  4. Research Update: Highlights from the Out-of-School Time Database. Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Erin

    2008-01-01

    This "Research Update" explores two major themes: (1) Using evaluation to shape program improvement and planning; and (2) Out-of-school time benefits to older youth and their families. Themes were culled from 13 research and evaluation reports added to the Out-of-School Time (OST) Program Research and Evaluation Bibliography in September 2008.…

  5. A spatial classification and database for management, research, and policy making: The Great Lakes aquatic habitat framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Lizhu; Riseng, Catherine M.; Mason, Lacey; Werhrly, Kevin; Rutherford, Edward; McKenna Jr, James E.; Castiglione, Chris; Johnson, Lucinda B.; Infante, Dana M.; Sowa, Scott P.; Robertson, Mike; Schaeffer, Jeff; Khoury, Mary; Gaiot, John; Hollenhurst, Tom; Brooks, Colin N.; Coscarelli, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Managing the world's largest and most complex freshwater ecosystem, the Laurentian Great Lakes, requires a spatially hierarchical basin-wide database of ecological and socioeconomic information that is comparable across the region. To meet such a need, we developed a spatial classification framework and database — Great Lakes Aquatic Habitat Framework (GLAHF). GLAHF consists of catchments, coastal terrestrial, coastal margin, nearshore, and offshore zones that encompass the entire Great Lakes Basin. The catchments captured in the database as river pour points or coastline segments are attributed with data known to influence physicochemical and biological characteristics of the lakes from the catchments. The coastal terrestrial zone consists of 30-m grid cells attributed with data from the terrestrial region that has direct connection with the lakes. The coastal margin and nearshore zones consist of 30-m grid cells attributed with data describing the coastline conditions, coastal human disturbances, and moderately to highly variable physicochemical and biological characteristics. The offshore zone consists of 1.8-km grid cells attributed with data that are spatially less variable compared with the other aquatic zones. These spatial classification zones and their associated data are nested within lake sub-basins and political boundaries and allow the synthesis of information from grid cells to classification zones, within and among political boundaries, lake sub-basins, Great Lakes, or within the entire Great Lakes Basin. This spatially structured database could help the development of basin-wide management plans, prioritize locations for funding and specific management actions, track protection and restoration progress, and conduct research for science-based decision making.

  6. BioAssay Research Database (BARD): chemical biology and probe-development enabled by structured metadata and result types.

    PubMed

    Howe, E A; de Souza, A; Lahr, D L; Chatwin, S; Montgomery, P; Alexander, B R; Nguyen, D-T; Cruz, Y; Stonich, D A; Walzer, G; Rose, J T; Picard, S C; Liu, Z; Rose, J N; Xiang, X; Asiedu, J; Durkin, D; Levine, J; Yang, J J; Schürer, S C; Braisted, J C; Southall, N; Southern, M R; Chung, T D Y; Brudz, S; Tanega, C; Schreiber, S L; Bittker, J A; Guha, R; Clemons, P A

    2015-01-01

    BARD, the BioAssay Research Database (https://bard.nih.gov/) is a public database and suite of tools developed to provide access to bioassay data produced by the NIH Molecular Libraries Program (MLP). Data from 631 MLP projects were migrated to a new structured vocabulary designed to capture bioassay data in a formalized manner, with particular emphasis placed on the description of assay protocols. New data can be submitted to BARD with a user-friendly set of tools that assist in the creation of appropriately formatted datasets and assay definitions. Data published through the BARD application program interface (API) can be accessed by researchers using web-based query tools or a desktop client. Third-party developers wishing to create new tools can use the API to produce stand-alone tools or new plug-ins that can be integrated into BARD. The entire BARD suite of tools therefore supports three classes of researcher: those who wish to publish data, those who wish to mine data for testable hypotheses, and those in the developer community who wish to build tools that leverage this carefully curated chemical biology resource. PMID:25477388

  7. [National database of German arthritis centers. Tool for health services research].

    PubMed

    Zink, A; Huscher, D; Thiele, K; Listing, J; Schneider, M

    2004-06-01

    The national database of the German Collaborative Arthritis Centers is a joint venture of German rheumatology. Since 1993, all outpatients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases treated in 1 of 24 arthritis centers have been registered once a year with a clinical record form and a patient questionnaire. The aim is to continuously monitor the current state and trends in rheumatologic health care and to gain knowledge on the outcomes and burdens of diseases as well as medical, social, and economic consequences beyond the limited perspective of randomized controlled trials. Data collected for 10 years about 145,000 patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases are available making it possible to analyze even very rare diseases with sufficient numbers of cases. Selected results concerning the health care situation in specialized and nonspecialized care, practice variations in rheumatology, and the burden of illness in various diseases are reported. PMID:15221101

  8. Comparison of 4 nutrient databases with chemical composition data from the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension trial. DASH Collaborative Research Group.

    PubMed

    McCullough, M L; Karanja, N M; Lin, P H; Obarzanek, E; Phillips, K M; Laws, R L; Vollmer, W M; O'Connor, E A; Champagne, C M; Windhauser, M M

    1999-08-01

    Accuracy of computerized nutrient databases is an important consideration in selecting a nutrient analysis system. We project compared the nutrient content of daily menus calculated from 4 microcomputer programs to chemical analysis of menus analyzed for the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) trial. Thirty-six menus were entered at 2 independent DASH sites using the ESHA Food Processor, Minnesota Nutrition Data System, Moore's Extended Nutrient Database, and Nutritionist IV databases. Food prepared according to these menus was chemically analyzed at the Food Analysis Laboratory Control Center at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Biochemistry, Blacksburg. Estimates for 13 nutrients were compared: energy, total fat, saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, polyunsaturated fat, carbohydrate, protein, cholesterol, calcium, potassium, magnesium, iron, and sodium. The overall intraclass correlation between the 2 sites' data entry was 0.998; thus, values were averaged for analyses. Databases varied significantly in their mean deviations from chemical analyses values for saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty acids, potassium, magnesium, and iron (P < .05); however, these differences were small (< 10%). Absolute deviations, which estimate the combined effect of bias and precision, were significantly different among databases for energy, saturated fatty acids, and polyunsaturated acids. Absolute differences from the laboratory values varied by < 15%, except for iron. All 4 databases were comparable in accuracy and precision and performed well. Criteria for database selection depends not only on overall database accuracy, especially for nutrients of interest, but also on the ease of use of the program, relevant features of the associated software; and cost. PMID:10450294

  9. Immediate Dissemination of Student Discoveries to a Model Organism Database Enhances Classroom-Based Research Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Emily A.; Stover, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    Use of inquiry-based research modules in the classroom has soared over recent years, largely in response to national calls for teaching that provides experience with scientific processes and methodologies. To increase the visibility of in-class studies among interested researchers and to strengthen their impact on student learning, we have…

  10. Government databases and public health research: facilitating access in the public interest.

    PubMed

    Adams, Carolyn; Allen, Judy

    2014-06-01

    Access to datasets of personal health information held by government agencies is essential to support public health research and to promote evidence-based public health policy development. Privacy legislation in Australia allows the use and disclosure of such information for public health research. However, access is not always forthcoming in a timely manner and the decision-making process undertaken by government data custodians is not always transparent. Given the public benefit in research using these health information datasets, this article suggests that it is time to recognise a right of access for approved research and that the decisions, and decision-making processes, of government data custodians should be subject to increased scrutiny. The article concludes that researchers should have an avenue of external review where access to information has been denied or unduly delayed. PMID:25087372

  11. Automatic detection of lung nodules in computed tomography images: training and validation of algorithms using public research databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarlinghi, Niccolò

    2013-09-01

    Lung cancer is one of the main public health issues in developed countries. Lung cancer typically manifests itself as non-calcified pulmonary nodules that can be detected reading lung Computed Tomography (CT) images. To assist radiologists in reading images, researchers started, a decade ago, the development of Computer Aided Detection (CAD) methods capable of detecting lung nodules. In this work, a CAD composed of two CAD subprocedures is presented: , devoted to the identification of parenchymal nodules, and , devoted to the identification of the nodules attached to the pleura surface. Both CADs are an upgrade of two methods previously presented as Voxel Based Neural Approach CAD . The novelty of this paper consists in the massive training using the public research Lung International Database Consortium (LIDC) database and on the implementation of new features for classification with respect to the original VBNA method. Finally, the proposed CAD is blindly validated on the ANODE09 dataset. The result of the validation is a score of 0.393, which corresponds to the average sensitivity of the CAD computed at seven predefined false positive rates: 1/8, 1/4, 1/2, 1, 2, 4, and 8 FP/CT.

  12. [Research and development of medical case database: a novel medical case information system integrating with biospecimen management].

    PubMed

    Pan, Shiyang; Mu, Yuan; Wang, Hong; Wang, Tong; Huang, Peijun; Ma, Jianfeng; Jiang, Li; Zhang, Jie; Gu, Bing; Yi, Lujiang

    2010-04-01

    To meet the needs of management of medical case information and biospecimen simultaneously, we developed a novel medical case information system integrating with biospecimen management. The database established by MS SQL Server 2000 covered, basic information, clinical diagnosis, imaging diagnosis, pathological diagnosis and clinical treatment of patient; physicochemical property, inventory management and laboratory analysis of biospecimen; users log and data maintenance. The client application developed by Visual C++ 6.0 was used to implement medical case and biospecimen management, which was based on Client/Server model. This system can perform input, browse, inquest, summary of case and related biospecimen information, and can automatically synthesize case-records based on the database. Management of not only a long-term follow-up on individual, but also of grouped cases organized according to the aim of research can be achieved by the system. This system can improve the efficiency and quality of clinical researches while biospecimens are used coordinately. It realizes synthesized and dynamic management of medical case and biospecimen, which may be considered as a new management platform. PMID:20481307

  13. Propulsion System Airframe Integration Issues and Aerodynamic Database Development for the Hyper-X Flight Research Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelund, Walter C.; Holland, Scott D.; Cockrell, Charles E., Jr.; Bittner, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Hyper-X Research Vehicle will provide a unique opportunity to obtain data on an operational airframe integrated scramjet propulsion system at true flight conditions. The airframe integrated nature of the scramjet engine with the Hyper-X vehicle results in a strong coupling effect between the propulsion system operation and the airframe s basic aerodynamic characteristics. Comments on general airframe integrated scramjet propulsion system effects on vehicle aerodynamic performance, stability, and control are provided, followed by examples specific to the Hyper-X research vehicle. An overview is provided of the current activities associated with the development of the Hyper-X aerodynamic database, including wind tunnel test activities and parallel CFD analysis efforts. A brief summary of the Hyper-X aerodynamic characteristics is provided, including the direct and indirect effects of the airframe integrated scramjet propulsion system operation on the basic airframe stability and control characteristics.

  14. Evidence for ASD recurrence rates and reproductive stoppage from large UK ASD research family databases.

    PubMed

    Wood, Claire L; Warnell, Frances; Johnson, Mary; Hames, Annette; Pearce, Mark S; McConachie, Helen; Parr, Jeremy R

    2015-02-01

    Following a diagnosis of a developmental disorder such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in early childhood, parents may decide to have fewer children than previously planned. The tendency for families to halt reproduction after receiving a diagnosis for one child is known as reproductive stoppage. Stoppage may lead to an underestimate of recurrence risk estimates of parents having more than one child with ASD. Using two large UK ASD family databases, we investigated recurrence rates for ASD and evidence for reproductive stoppage for both ASD and undiagnosed ASD/broader autism phenotype in a subgroup of families. Reproductive stoppage was tested for using the Mann-Whitney U-test to disprove the null hypothesis that affected and nonaffected children were distributed randomly by birth order. Dahlberg's later-sib method was used to estimate recurrence risk and take stoppage into account. Data were available from 299 families (660 children) including 327 with ASD. Ten percent of the complete families had more than one child with an ASD. Using Dahlberg's later-sib method, the recurrence risk for ASD was 24.7% overall and 50.0% in families with two or more older siblings with ASD. Children with ASD were born significantly later in families than those without ASD in all sibship combinations. This study shows strong evidence that ASD is associated with reproductive stoppage. These data have important implications for family planning and genetic counseling. PMID:25273900

  15. U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Mahantango Creek Watershed, Pennsylvania, United States: long-term water quality database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Pasture Systems and Watershed Management Research Unit (PSWMRU) has developed a long-term water quality database to support water quality research within the 7.3 km**2 WE-38 experimental watershed in east-central Pennsyl...

  16. U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Mahantango Creek Watershed, Pennsylvania, United States: long-term stream discharge database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A long-term streamflow discharge database has been developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Pasture Systems and Watershed Management Research Unit (PSWMRU) to support intensive hydrologic and water quality research within WE-38, a 7.3 km**2 experimental watersh...

  17. Improving quality of breast cancer surgery through development of a national breast cancer surgical outcomes (BRCASO) research database

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Common measures of surgical quality are 30-day morbidity and mortality, which poorly describe breast cancer surgical quality with extremely low morbidity and mortality rates. Several national quality programs have collected additional surgical quality measures; however, program participation is voluntary and results may not be generalizable to all surgeons. We developed the Breast Cancer Surgical Outcomes (BRCASO) database to capture meaningful breast cancer surgical quality measures among a non-voluntary sample, and study variation in these measures across providers, facilities, and health plans. This paper describes our study protocol, data collection methods, and summarizes the strengths and limitations of these data. Methods We included 4524 women ≥18 years diagnosed with breast cancer between 2003-2008. All women with initial breast cancer surgery performed by a surgeon employed at the University of Vermont or three Cancer Research Network (CRN) health plans were eligible for inclusion. From the CRN institutions, we collected electronic administrative data including tumor registry information, Current Procedure Terminology codes for breast cancer surgeries, surgeons, surgical facilities, and patient demographics. We supplemented electronic data with medical record abstraction to collect additional pathology and surgery detail. All data were manually abstracted at the University of Vermont. Results The CRN institutions pre-filled 30% (22 out of 72) of elements using electronic data. The remaining elements, including detailed pathology margin status and breast and lymph node surgeries, required chart abstraction. The mean age was 61 years (range 20-98 years); 70% of women were diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma, 20% with ductal carcinoma in situ, and 10% with invasive lobular carcinoma. Conclusions The BRCASO database is one of the largest, multi-site research resources of meaningful breast cancer surgical quality data in the United States

  18. Challenges of molecular nutrition research 6: the nutritional phenotype database to store, share and evaluate nutritional systems biology studies

    PubMed Central

    Bouwman, Jildau; Dragsted, Lars O.; Drevon, Christian A.; Elliott, Ruan; de Groot, Philip; Kaput, Jim; Mathers, John C.; Müller, Michael; Pepping, Fre; Saito, Jahn; Scalbert, Augustin; Radonjic, Marijana; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Travis, Anthony; Wopereis, Suzan; Evelo, Chris T.

    2010-01-01

    The challenge of modern nutrition and health research is to identify food-based strategies promoting life-long optimal health and well-being. This research is complex because it exploits a multitude of bioactive compounds acting on an extensive network of interacting processes. Whereas nutrition research can profit enormously from the revolution in ‘omics’ technologies, it has discipline-specific requirements for analytical and bioinformatic procedures. In addition to measurements of the parameters of interest (measures of health), extensive description of the subjects of study and foods or diets consumed is central for describing the nutritional phenotype. We propose and pursue an infrastructural activity of constructing the “Nutritional Phenotype database” (dbNP). When fully developed, dbNP will be a research and collaboration tool and a publicly available data and knowledge repository. Creation and implementation of the dbNP will maximize benefits to the research community by enabling integration and interrogation of data from multiple studies, from different research groups, different countries and different—omics levels. The dbNP is designed to facilitate storage of biologically relevant, pre-processed—omics data, as well as study descriptive and study participant phenotype data. It is also important to enable the combination of this information at different levels (e.g. to facilitate linkage of data describing participant phenotype, genotype and food intake with information on study design and—omics measurements, and to combine all of this with existing knowledge). The biological information stored in the database (i.e. genetics, transcriptomics, proteomics, biomarkers, metabolomics, functional assays, food intake and food composition) is tailored to nutrition research and embedded in an environment of standard procedures and protocols, annotations, modular data-basing, networking and integrated bioinformatics. The dbNP is an evolving enterprise

  19. Gypsy moths: Pest control research. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning control and research regarding gypsy moths or lymantria dispar. Both natural and synthetic controls are discussed, including parasites, viral diseases, fungal diseases, bird predation, bacterial diseases, pheromone trapping, insecticides, and physical and chemical localized protection. Laboratory and field studies on sex pheromones, environmental effects on life cycles, effects of feeding behavior, plant-insect interactions, and other research relating to the control of this forest pest are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. The epidemiology and burden of Alzheimer’s disease in Taiwan utilizing data from the National Health Insurance Research Database

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yen-Ni; Kadziola, Zbigniew; Brnabic, Alan JM; Yeh, Ju-Fen; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Hwang, Jen-Ping; Montgomery, William

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objectives of this study were to estimate the incidence, cumulative incidence, and economic burden of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in Taiwan, using data from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Materials and methods This was a retrospective, longitudinal, observational study using data from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database of the NHIRD. Patients were included in this study if they were 50 years of age or older and their records included a primary or secondary diagnosis of AD. New patients who met inclusion criteria were followed up longitudinally from 2005 to 2010. Costs were calculated for the first year following the diagnosis of AD. Results Overall, a higher percentage of women than men were diagnosed with AD (54% vs 46%, respectively). The first AD diagnosis occurred most frequently in the age of 75–84 years. The person-year incidence rate increased from 5.63/1,000 persons (95% CI, 5.32–5.94) in 2005 to 8.17/1,000 persons (95% CI, 7.78–8.57) in 2010. The cumulative incidence rate was 33.54/1,000 persons (95% CI, 32.76–34.33) in 2005–2010. The total mean inflated annual costs per patient in new Taiwan dollars (NT$) in the first year of diagnosis ranged from NT$205,413 (2009) to NT$227,110 (2005), with hospitalization representing the largest component. Conclusion AD represents a substantial burden in Taiwan, and based on the observed increase in incidence rate over time, it is likely that this burden will continue to increase. The findings reported here are consistent with previous research. The NHIRD contains extensive real-world information that can be used to conduct research, allowing us to expand our understanding of the incidence, prevalence, and burden of disease in Taiwan. PMID:27536149

  1. Linking CALL and SLA: Using the IRIS Database to Locate Research Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handley, Zöe; Marsden, Emma

    2014-01-01

    To establish an evidence base for future computer-assisted language learning (CALL) design, CALL research needs to move away from CALL versus non-CALL comparisons, and focus on investigating the differential impact of individual coding elements, that is, specific features of a technology which might have an impact on learning (Pederson, 1987).…

  2. The Development of a Video Database for Language Educational Research Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkey, Roger; Thompson, Sue; Turner, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of classroom observation data is seen as increasingly important in research on the impact of high-stakes language tests or new foreign-language programmes on students, teachers and other stakeholders. Video-recordings of language teaching and learning in classrooms impacted by such tests or programmes can provide revealing data,…

  3. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains a minimum of 96 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the rubber and plastics research association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains a minimum of 89 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Plant and Crop Databases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Databases have become an integral part of all aspects of biological research, including basic and applied plant biology. The importance of databases continues to increase as the volume of data from direct and indirect genomics approaches expands. What is not always obvious to users of databases is t...

  6. Confronting Ambiguity, Anarchy, and Crisis in Institutional Research: Using Student Unit Record Databases in Extra-Institutional Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musoba, Glenda D.; Gross, Jacob P. K.; Hossler, Don

    2008-01-01

    The world of policymaking on the campuses of colleges and universities is messy, ambiguous, and contested. In this complex environment, which Kingdon (2003) has aptly called a "policy soup," the role of institutional research is often not only to provide answers to existing policy questions but to produce information to help transform ambiguity…

  7. The Cerebral Blood Flow Biomedical Informatics Research Network (CBFBIRN) database and analysis pipeline for arterial spin labeling MRI data

    PubMed Central

    Shin, David D.; Ozyurt, I. Burak; Liu, Thomas T.

    2013-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a magnetic resonance imaging technique that provides a non-invasive and quantitative measure of cerebral blood flow (CBF). After more than a decade of active research, ASL is now emerging as a robust and reliable CBF measurement technique with increased availability and ease of use. There is a growing number of research and clinical sites using ASL for neuroscience research and clinical care. In this paper, we present an online CBF Database and Analysis Pipeline, collectively called the Cerebral Blood Flow Biomedical Informatics Research Network (CBFBIRN) that allows researchers to upload and share ASL and clinical data. In addition to serving the role as a central data repository, the CBFBIRN provides a streamlined data processing infrastructure for CBF quantification and group analysis, which has the potential to accelerate the discovery of new scientific and clinical knowledge. All capabilities and features built into the CBFBIRN are accessed online using a web browser through a secure login. In this work, we begin with a general description of the CBFBIRN system data model and its architecture, then devote the remainder of the paper to the CBFBIRN capabilities. The latter part of our work is divided into two processing modules: (1) Data Upload and CBF Quantification Module; (2) Group Analysis Module that supports three types of analysis commonly used in neuroscience research. To date, the CBFBIRN hosts CBF maps and associated clinical data from more than 1,300 individual subjects. The data have been contributed by more than 20 different research studies, investigating the effect of various conditions on CBF including Alzheimer’s, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, traumatic brain injury, HIV, caffeine usage, and methamphetamine abuse. Several example results, generated by the CBFBIRN processing modules, are presented. We conclude with the lessons learned during implementation and deployment of the CBFBIRN and our

  8. The Cerebral Blood Flow Biomedical Informatics Research Network (CBFBIRN) database and analysis pipeline for arterial spin labeling MRI data.

    PubMed

    Shin, David D; Ozyurt, I Burak; Liu, Thomas T

    2013-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a magnetic resonance imaging technique that provides a non-invasive and quantitative measure of cerebral blood flow (CBF). After more than a decade of active research, ASL is now emerging as a robust and reliable CBF measurement technique with increased availability and ease of use. There is a growing number of research and clinical sites using ASL for neuroscience research and clinical care. In this paper, we present an online CBF Database and Analysis Pipeline, collectively called the Cerebral Blood Flow Biomedical Informatics Research Network (CBFBIRN) that allows researchers to upload and share ASL and clinical data. In addition to serving the role as a central data repository, the CBFBIRN provides a streamlined data processing infrastructure for CBF quantification and group analysis, which has the potential to accelerate the discovery of new scientific and clinical knowledge. All capabilities and features built into the CBFBIRN are accessed online using a web browser through a secure login. In this work, we begin with a general description of the CBFBIRN system data model and its architecture, then devote the remainder of the paper to the CBFBIRN capabilities. The latter part of our work is divided into two processing modules: (1) Data Upload and CBF Quantification Module; (2) Group Analysis Module that supports three types of analysis commonly used in neuroscience research. To date, the CBFBIRN hosts CBF maps and associated clinical data from more than 1,300 individual subjects. The data have been contributed by more than 20 different research studies, investigating the effect of various conditions on CBF including Alzheimer's, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, traumatic brain injury, HIV, caffeine usage, and methamphetamine abuse. Several example results, generated by the CBFBIRN processing modules, are presented. We conclude with the lessons learned during implementation and deployment of the CBFBIRN and our

  9. The research on conformal acid etching process of glass ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kepeng; Guo, Peiji

    2014-08-01

    A series of experiments have been done to explore the effect of different conditions on the hydrofluoric acid etching. The hydrofluoric acid was used to etch the glass ceramic called "ZERODUR", which is invented by SCHOTT in Germany. The glass ceramic was processed into cylindrical samples. The hydrofluoric acid etching was done in a plastic beaker. The concentration of hydrofluoric acid and the etching time were changed to measure the changes of geometric tolerance and I observed the surface using a microscope in order to find an appropriate condition of hydrofluoric acid etching.

  10. The Process of Installing REDCap, a Web Based Database Supporting Biomedical Research

    PubMed Central

    Mare, I.; Hazelhurst, S.; Kramer, B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Clinical and research data are essential for patient care, research and healthcare system planning. REDCapTM is a web-based tool for research data curatorship developed at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, USA. The Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg South Africa identified the need for a cost effective data management instrument. REDCap was installed as per the user agreement with Vanderbilt University in August 2012. Objectives In order to assist other institutions that may lack the in-house Information Technology capacity, this paper describes the installation and support of REDCap and incorporates an analysis of user uptake over the first year of use. Methods We reviewed the staffing requirements, costs of installation, process of installation and necessary infrastructure and end-user requests following the introduction of REDCap at Wits. The University Legal Office and Human Research Ethics Committee were consulted regarding the REDCap end-user agreement. Bi-monthly user meetings resulted in a training workshop in August 2013. We compared our REDCap software user numbers and records before and after the first training workshop. Results Human resources were recruited from existing staff. Installation costs were limited to servers and security certificates. The total costs to provide a functional REDCap platform was less than $9000. Eighty-one (81) users were registered in the first year. After the first training workshop the user numbers increased by 59 in one month and the total number of active users to 140 by the end of August 2013. Custom software applications for REDCap were created by collaboration between clinicians and software developers. Conclusion REDCap was installed and maintained at limited cost. A small number of people with defined skills can support multiple REDCap users in two to four hours a week. End user training increased in the number of users, number of projects created and

  11. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  12. Reliability Of A Surgeon-Reported Morbidity And Mortality Database: A Comparison Of Short-Term Morbidity Between The Scoliosis Research Society And National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Databases

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Christopher T.; Pugely, Andrew J.; Gao, Yubo; Skovrlj, Branko; Lee, Nathan J.; Cho, Samuel K.; Mendoza-Lattes, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Background There exists a lack of comparison between large national healthcare databases reporting surgical morbidity and mortality. Prior authors have expressed concern that the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) membership may have underreported complications in spinal surgery. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to compare the incidence of morbidity between the SRS and National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) databases. Methods We reviewed patients enrolled between 2012 and 2013, with a total of 96,875 patients identified in the SRS dataset and 15,909 in the combined adult and pediatric NSQIP dataset. Patients were matched based on diagnostic category,and a univariate analysis was used to compare reported complication rates in the categories of perioperative infection, neurologic injury, and mortality. The SRS database only requires detailed demographic data reporting on patients that have had a complication event. We compared the demographics and comorbidities of this subgroup, and used this as a surrogate to assess the potential magnitude of confounders. Results Small differences existed between the SRS and NSQIP databases in terms of mortality (0.1% v. 0.2%), infection (1.2% v. 2%), and neurologic injury (0.8% v. 0.1%) (p<0.001 for each comparison). Infection rates were consistently lower across multiple diagnostic sub-categories in the SRS database, whereas neurologic injury rates were consistently lower in the NSQIP database. These differences reached statistical significance across several diagnostic subcategories, but the clinical magnitude of the differences was small. Amongst the patients with a complication, modest differences in comorbidities existed between the two cohorts. Conclusion Overall, the incidence of short-term morbidity and mortality was similar between the two databases. There were modest differences in comorbidities, which may explain the small differences observed in morbidity. Concerns regarding possible under

  13. Research on an expert system for database operation of simulation-emulation math models. Volume 1, Phase 1: Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, K.; Beale, G. O.; Schaffer, J. D.; Hsieh, B. J.; Padalkar, S.; Rodriguez-Moscoso, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    The results of the first phase of Research on an Expert System for Database Operation of Simulation/Emulation Math Models, is described. Techniques from artificial intelligence (AI) were to bear on task domains of interest to NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. One such domain is simulation of spacecraft attitude control systems. Two related software systems were developed to and delivered to NASA. One was a generic simulation model for spacecraft attitude control, written in FORTRAN. The second was an expert system which understands the usage of a class of spacecraft attitude control simulation software and can assist the user in running the software. This NASA Expert Simulation System (NESS), written in LISP, contains general knowledge about digital simulation, specific knowledge about the simulation software, and self knowledge.

  14. Veterans Administration Databases

    Cancer.gov

    The Veterans Administration Information Resource Center provides database and informatics experts, customer service, expert advice, information products, and web technology to VA researchers and others.

  15. Heart research advances using database search engines, Human Protein Atlas and the Sydney Heart Bank.

    PubMed

    Li, Amy; Estigoy, Colleen; Raftery, Mark; Cameron, Darryl; Odeberg, Jacob; Pontén, Fredrik; Lal, Sean; Dos Remedios, Cristobal G

    2013-10-01

    This Methodological Review is intended as a guide for research students who may have just discovered a human "novel" cardiac protein, but it may also help hard-pressed reviewers of journal submissions on a "novel" protein reported in an animal model of human heart failure. Whether you are an expert or not, you may know little or nothing about this particular protein of interest. In this review we provide a strategic guide on how to proceed. We ask: How do you discover what has been published (even in an abstract or research report) about this protein? Everyone knows how to undertake literature searches using PubMed and Medline but these are usually encyclopaedic, often producing long lists of papers, most of which are either irrelevant or only vaguely relevant to your query. Relatively few will be aware of more advanced search engines such as Google Scholar and even fewer will know about Quertle. Next, we provide a strategy for discovering if your "novel" protein is expressed in the normal, healthy human heart, and if it is, we show you how to investigate its subcellular location. This can usually be achieved by visiting the website "Human Protein Atlas" without doing a single experiment. Finally, we provide a pathway to discovering if your protein of interest changes its expression level with heart failure/disease or with ageing. PMID:23856366

  16. Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 21 Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database (Web, free access)   The Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database and NASA Archive for Protein Crystal Growth Data (BMCD) contains the conditions reported for the crystallization of proteins and nucleic acids used in X-ray structure determinations and archives the results of microgravity macromolecule crystallization studies.

  17. Humic acids: Characterization and interactions in natural and wastewater systems. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the absorptive and complexation properties of humic and fulvic acids. Characterization and the occurrence of these acids in wastewater systems and natural systems are studied. The interaction of humic substances with metallic pollutants and chlorinated hydrocarbons, and removal of humic acids by precipitation are among the topics discussed. Wastewater treatment processes are discussed in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. An integrated, ontology-driven approach to constructing observational databases for research.

    PubMed

    Hsu, William; Gonzalez, Nestor R; Chien, Aichi; Pablo Villablanca, J; Pajukanta, Päivi; Viñuela, Fernando; Bui, Alex A T

    2015-06-01

    The electronic health record (EHR) contains a diverse set of clinical observations that are captured as part of routine care, but the incomplete, inconsistent, and sometimes incorrect nature of clinical data poses significant impediments for its secondary use in retrospective studies or comparative effectiveness research. In this work, we describe an ontology-driven approach for extracting and analyzing data from the patient record in a longitudinal and continuous manner. We demonstrate how the ontology helps enforce consistent data representation, integrates phenotypes generated through analyses of available clinical data sources, and facilitates subsequent studies to identify clinical predictors for an outcome of interest. Development and evaluation of our approach are described in the context of studying factors that influence intracranial aneurysm (ICA) growth and rupture. We report our experiences in capturing information on 78 individuals with a total of 120 aneurysms. Two example applications related to assessing the relationship between aneurysm size, growth, gene expression modules, and rupture are described. Our work highlights the challenges with respect to data quality, workflow, and analysis of data and its implications toward a learning health system paradigm. PMID:25817919

  19. Developing an On-Line Astro101 Module to Mine a Research Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufnagel, B.; Lochner, J. C.; Howard, W. H., II

    2004-05-01

    We present an on-line module that helps introductory-level, non-science undergraduates extract information about neutron star binary star systems from X-ray light curves. The students interface directly with the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) data through CollegeHera. Hera is a new service offered by HEASARC that enables complete interactive analysis of archived data products (see the separate Lochner & Pence paper in this meeting). This multi-media education module is intended as a capstone activity in an introductory undergraduate Astronomy course for non-science majors. It can be used as a PC-based laboratory activity, or as a module in an on-line course. At the end of this project, the student should be able to: - Interpret the light curve of a binary star system in general - Produce an X-ray light curve from raw data collected by an X-ray satellite - Interpret the light curve he or she has produced for a particular binary system. This project guides students through a self-assessed series of activities, motivated by two real binary star systems, HT Cassiopeia and GX301-2. Learning tools include interactive-style multiple-choice questions, written answers, and an animation. The student is guided through Hera to access GX301-2 raw data from the NASA Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) telescope, and compares his or her calculation of the period to the professional literature. A file of the assessment results can be electronically saved and submitted to the professor. A laptop with internet access will be available at a related poster (Howard & Hufnagel, in this meeting) for participants to explore the module. This module required extensive cooperation with the Hera team, and was based on a module developed by JCL. Irina Nelson, formerly of the Office of University Programs at GSFC, conceived the overall project. Support for this work was provided by the Southeast Regional Clearinghouse (SERCH) and the Maryland Space Grant

  20. An open-database of Grape Harvest dates for climate research: data description and quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daux, V.; Garcia de Cortazar-Atauri, I.; Yiou, P.; Chuine, I.; Garnier, E.; Ladurie, E. Le Roy; Mestre, O.; Tardaguila, J.

    2011-11-01

    during a two-century long time-window from the early 17th to the early 19th century, while extremely early years are frequent during the 16th and since the mid-19th century. The dataset is made accessible for climate research through the Internet. It should allow a variety of climate studies, including reconstructions of atmospheric circulation over Western Europe.

  1. Acid precipitation: Effects on fresh water ecosystems. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the effects of acidification on fresh water ecosystems. Algae and diatom distribution, survival and reproduction rates of specific fish species under acid lake conditions, and tolerance to stress caused by acidic conditions in fresh water ecosystems are studied. Effects of water pH on trace metal toxicity to fresh water organisms are briefly considered. Control and reduction of acidification are excluded from this bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. Recent advances in lead-acid cell research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, E.

    1980-01-01

    During the last decade it was demonstate that the lead-acid system is capable of proving an attractive energy source of sufficient energy and power per unit weight and volume which allows its sucessful application for electric vehicle propulsion. This is shown by a number of typical examples, such as the relationship between active material properties and capacity at high rates of discharge the effect of acid stratification and others. Simultaneously, the expenditure for the maintenance of lead-acid batteries was minimized by the development of peripheric equipment, as there are means for central-automatic water refill and recombination devices. It is shown that there is still a considerable potential for further improvement which might again strengthen the unique position of the lead-acid system in the market in comparison to competitive systems.

  3. Native Health Research Database

    MedlinePlus

    ... Big Lagoon Rancheria Big Pine Band Blackfeet Blue Lake Rancheria Boise Forte Caddo Cahuilla Band of Indians ... Creek Crow Crow Creek Sioux Delaware Dene Devil's Lake Sioux Dogrib Eastern Band of Cherokee Elk Valley ...

  4. Synthesis of Available Research and Databases on the Migrant Education Program. Volume I: Federal, State, and Local Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutmann, Babette; And Others

    This report examines federal, state, and local databases containing information on migrant workers and their children, identifies their common characteristics, and assesses their potential utility to inform educational policy analysis. General criteria used to evaluate each database's strengths and weaknesses include standardization, reliability,…

  5. ZIKV – CDB: A Collaborative Database to Guide Research Linking SncRNAs and ZIKA Virus Disease Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Daniel Kumazawa; Cuadros-Orellana, Sara; Pais, Fabiano Sviatopolk-Mirsky; Medeiros, Julliane Dutra; Geraldo, Juliana Assis; Gilbert, Jack; Volpini, Angela Cristina; Fernandes, Gabriel Rocha

    2016-01-01

    Background In early 2015, a ZIKA Virus (ZIKV) infection outbreak was recognized in northeast Brazil, where concerns over its possible links with infant microcephaly have been discussed. Providing a causal link between ZIKV infection and birth defects is still a challenge. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) that regulate post-transcriptional gene expression by translational repression, and play important roles in viral pathogenesis and brain development. The potential for flavivirus-mediated miRNA signalling dysfunction in brain-tissue development provides a compelling hypothesis to test the perceived link between ZIKV and microcephaly. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we applied in silico analyses to provide novel insights to understand how Congenital ZIKA Syndrome symptoms may be related to an imbalance in miRNAs function. Moreover, following World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations, we have assembled a database to help target investigations of the possible relationship between ZIKV symptoms and miRNA-mediated human gene expression. Conclusions/Significance We have computationally predicted both miRNAs encoded by ZIKV able to target genes in the human genome and cellular (human) miRNAs capable of interacting with ZIKV genomes. Our results represent a step forward in the ZIKV studies, providing new insights to support research in this field and identify potential targets for therapy. PMID:27332714

  6. Recent advances in the utility and use of the General Practice Research Database as an example of a UK Primary Care Data resource

    PubMed Central

    van Staa, Tjeerd; Puri, Shivani; Eaton, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Since its inception in the mid-1980s, the General Practice Research Database (GPRD) has undergone many changes but remains the largest validated and most utilised primary care database in the UK. Its use in pharmacoepidemiology stretches back many years with now over 800 original research papers. Administered by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency since 2001, the last 5 years have seen a rebuild of the database processing system enhancing access to the data, and a concomitant push towards broadening the applications of the database. New methodologies including real-world harm–benefit assessment, pharmacogenetic studies and pragmatic randomised controlled trials within the database are being implemented. A substantive and unique linkage program (using a trusted third party) has enabled access to secondary care data and disease-specific registry data as well as socio-economic data and death registration data. The utility of anonymised free text accessed in a safe and appropriate manner is being explored using simple and more complex techniques such as natural language processing. PMID:25083228

  7. Providing Database Services in a Nationwide Research Organisation--Coexistence of Traditional Information Services and a Modern CD-ROM/Online Hybrid Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Benjamin F.

    For the past two decades the central Information Retrieval Services of the Max Planck Society has been providing database searches for scientists in Max Planck Institutes and Research Groups throughout Germany. As a supplement to traditional search services offered by professional intermediaries, they have recently fostered the introduction of a…

  8. Data Conversion and Indexing: How To Get the Most out of Your Machine-Readable Database. DataResearch Automation Guide Series, Number Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Research Associates, Inc., St. Louis, MO.

    In today's library environment, the library's most important asset is its machine-readable database. In order to maintain this investment, Data Research Associates provides several comprehensive data conversion services, including retrospective conversion and authority control. For bibliographic records not yet in MARC (machine readable…

  9. Changes in Trans Fatty Acid Profiles for Selected Snack Foods in the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Historically, many snack foods had been formulated with partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, the primary contributor of trans fatty acids (TFA) in the US diet. Health concerns about TFA and saturated fat intake and increased risk for chronic health disorders have prompted some manufacturers to ref...

  10. Changes in Trans Fatty Acid Profiles for Selected Snack Foods in the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : Historically, many snack foods had been formulated with partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, the primary contributor of trans fatty acids (TFA) in the US diet. Health concerns about TFA and saturated fat intake and increased risk for chronic health disorders have prompted some manufacturers to r...

  11. Herbert Falk: a vital force in the renaissance of bile acid research and bile acid therapy.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Alan F

    2011-01-01

    Herbert Falk died on August 8, 2008, after a long illness. It was his vision that initiated the Bile Acid Meetings and brought to market chenodeoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid for the dissolution of cholesterol gallstones as well as the successful treatment of cholestatic liver disease. The 1st Bile Acid Meeting was a small workshop held at the University Hospital of Freiburg in 1970. Great interest in the topic was evident at that small meeting and led to a larger meeting in 1972, whose scope included both the basic and clinical aspects of bile acids. These meetings have continued at biennial intervals, the 2010 meeting being the 21st. The program has always included discussions of the most fundamental aspects of bile acid biosynthesis and metabolism as well as clinical applications of bile acid therapy. The meetings featured brief presentations, ample time for discussion, and imaginative social programs. They have always been flawlessly organized. Social programs usually included a hike through the beautiful countryside of the Black Forest followed by dinner in a rustic restaurant. Herbert Falk took part in these programs, personally welcoming every participant. In the warm glow of the 'Badische' hospitality, friendships developed, and scientific collaborations were often arranged. From a scientific standpoint, there has been enormous progress in understanding the chemistry and biology of bile acids. Herbert Falk established the Windaus Prize in 1978, and the prize has been given to individuals whose contributions moved the field forward. These bile acid meetings have been marvelous, rewarding experiences. We must all be grateful to Herbert Falk's vision in establishing the Falk Foundation that has so generously sponsored these meetings. We also express our gratitude to his widow, Ursula Falk, who continues this worthy tradition. PMID:21691101

  12. STATUS OF RESEARCH TO DEVELOP ACIDIC DRY DEPOSITION MONITORING CAPABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dry deposition is thought to be as important as wet deposition in acidifying ecosystems. However, at present acidic dry deposition of relevant particles and gases cannot be monitored directly in a quantitative manner. The U.S. EPA Workshop on Dry Deposition (Report No. EPA-600/9-...

  13. Alaska Geothermal Sites Map and Database: Bringing together legacy and new geothermal data for research, exploration and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, J. G.; Harun, N. T.; Hughes, C. A.; Weakland, J. R.; Cameron, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    , and information source. Aqueous geochemistry, a compilation of aqueous chemistry, free gas and isotopes analyses. Aqueous geochemical analyses consist of 407 aqueous geochemical analyses from 85 geothermal sites throughout Alaska. This template also includes 106 free gas analyses from 31 geothermal sites. Isotopic analyses (285) of waters from 42 geothermal sites are also contained in this geochemical data. Borehole temperature data from geothermal, and oil and gas wells are presented along with thermal depth profiles where available. Earthquakes in proximity to hot springs consists of 1,975 earthquakes that are within 5 km of thermal hot springs and may be used to detect underground movement of thermal waters. Active faults comprises active faults across Alaska (1,527) including fault type, location, orientation and slip rate. Additionally, a new comprehensive and searchable Alaska geothermal bibliography, with links to downloadable reference sources was created during this study. The completed Alaska geothermal sites map and database will be accessible to the public and industry and will enable research and development of geothermal sites in Alaska.

  14. Prototype of an Integrated Hurricane Information System for Research: Design and Implementation of the Database and Web Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P. P.; Knosp, B.; Vu, Q. A.; Hristova-Veleva, S.; Chao, Y.; Vane, D.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Su, H.; Dang, V.; Fovell, R.; Willis, J.; Tanelli, S.; Fishbein, E.; Ao, C. O.; Poulsen, W. L.; Park, K. J.; Fetzer, E.; Vazquez, J.; Callahan, P. S.; Marcus, S.; Garay, M.; Kahn, R.; Haddad, Z.

    2007-12-01

    location placemark to see the time, location, and the intensity of the hurricane. Large scale datasets, such as SST or aerosol optical depth can be overlaid on top of the hurricane track in Google Map. In addition, available satellite and in-situ data during the hurricane period are displayed as little bars in a time line organized by datasets. When clicking a little bar, pre-generated plots for the selected dataset will be displayed in a separate window together with all other datasets co-located around the same time. The raw data in user-specified format can be downloaded for further analysis or model integration. As for the 3D model data, Live Access Server (LAS) is used to provide custom subsets and on-the-fly visualization. The site is dynamically configured using a backend relational database that is designed to let users easily browse through the website to find data and plots that are pertinent to their research. In this presentation, we will describe the current status of the integrated hurricane information system prototype, the design and the implementation of the hurricane database and portal, and future enhancements.

  15. Hydrogen-bond landscapes, geometry and energetics of squaric acid and its mono- and dianions: a Cambridge Structural Database, IsoStar and computational study.

    PubMed

    Allen, Frank H; Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Wood, Peter A; Bardwell, David A

    2013-10-01

    As part of a programme of work to extend central-group coverage in the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre's (CCDC) IsoStar knowledge base of intermolecular interactions, we have studied the hydrogen-bonding abilities of squaric acid (H2SQ) and its mono- and dianions (HSQ(-) and SQ(2-)) using the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) along with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations for a range of hydrogen-bonded dimers. The -OH and -C=O groups of H2SQ, HSQ(-) and SQ(2-) are potent donors and acceptors, as indicated by their hydrogen-bond geometries in available crystal structures in the CSD, and by the attractive energies calculated for their dimers with acetone and methanol, which were used as model acceptors and donors. The two anions have sufficient examples in the CSD for their addition as new central groups in IsoStar. It is also shown that charge- and resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds involving H2SQ and HSQ(-) are similar in strength to those made by carboxylate COO(-) acceptors, while hydrogen bonds made by the dianion SQ(2-) are somewhat stronger. The study reinforces the value of squaric acid and its anions as cocrystal formers and their actual and potential importance as isosteric replacements for carboxylic acid and carboxylate functions. PMID:24056361

  16. Computer networks for financial activity management, control and statistics of databases of economic administration at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyupikova, T. V.; Samoilov, V. N.

    2003-04-01

    Modern information technologies urge natural sciences to further development. But it comes together with evaluation of infrastructures, to spotlight favorable conditions for the development of science and financial base in order to prove and protect legally new research. Any scientific development entails accounting and legal protection. In the report, we consider a new direction in software, organization and control of common databases on the example of the electronic document handling, which functions in some departments of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research.

  17. Visualization of multidimensional database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung

    2008-01-01

    The concept of multidimensional databases has been extensively researched and wildly used in actual database application. It plays an important role in contemporary information technology, but due to the complexity of its inner structure, the database design is a complicated process and users are having a hard time fully understanding and using the database. An effective visualization tool for higher dimensional information system helps database designers and users alike. Most visualization techniques focus on displaying dimensional data using spreadsheets and charts. This may be sufficient for the databases having three or fewer dimensions but for higher dimensions, various combinations of projection operations are needed and a full grasp of total database architecture is very difficult. This study reviews existing visualization techniques for multidimensional database and then proposes an alternate approach to visualize a database of any dimension by adopting the tool proposed by Kiviat for software engineering processes. In this diagramming method, each dimension is represented by one branch of concentric spikes. This paper documents a C++ based visualization tool with extensive use of OpenGL graphics library and GUI functions. Detailed examples of actual databases demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness in visualizing multidimensional databases.

  18. Database for propagation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1991-01-01

    A propagation researcher or a systems engineer who intends to use the results of a propagation experiment is generally faced with various database tasks such as the selection of the computer software, the hardware, and the writing of the programs to pass the data through the models of interest. This task is repeated every time a new experiment is conducted or the same experiment is carried out at a different location generating different data. Thus the users of this data have to spend a considerable portion of their time learning how to implement the computer hardware and the software towards the desired end. This situation may be facilitated considerably if an easily accessible propagation database is created that has all the accepted (standardized) propagation phenomena models approved by the propagation research community. Also, the handling of data will become easier for the user. Such a database construction can only stimulate the growth of the propagation research it if is available to all the researchers, so that the results of the experiment conducted by one researcher can be examined independently by another, without different hardware and software being used. The database may be made flexible so that the researchers need not be confined only to the contents of the database. Another way in which the database may help the researchers is by the fact that they will not have to document the software and hardware tools used in their research since the propagation research community will know the database already. The following sections show a possible database construction, as well as properties of the database for the propagation research.

  19. Database management research for the Human Genome Project: Progress report, 7/1/96-3/15/97

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, N.

    1997-03-01

    Progress is reported on the development of software that works in conjunction with database management systems (DBMSs) in ways that are useful for genomics. This new release of LabBase has two major advantages over the previous version, namely it runs on the Sybase relational DBMS rather than ObjectStore and offers more complete data modeling features than the previous version so is suitable for more kinds of genetic databases.

  20. Southern African Treatment Resistance Network (SATuRN) RegaDB HIV drug resistance and clinical management database: supporting patient management, surveillance and research in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Manasa, Justen; Lessells, Richard; Rossouw, Theresa; Naidu, Kevindra; Van Vuuren, Cloete; Goedhals, Dominique; van Zyl, Gert; Bester, Armand; Skingsley, Andrew; Stott, Katharine; Danaviah, Siva; Chetty, Terusha; Singh, Lavanya; Moodley, Pravi; Iwuji, Collins; McGrath, Nuala; Seebregts, Christopher J; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2014-01-01

    Substantial amounts of data have been generated from patient management and academic exercises designed to better understand the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic and design interventions to control it. A number of specialized databases have been designed to manage huge data sets from HIV cohort, vaccine, host genomic and drug resistance studies. Besides databases from cohort studies, most of the online databases contain limited curated data and are thus sequence repositories. HIV drug resistance has been shown to have a great potential to derail the progress made thus far through antiretroviral therapy. Thus, a lot of resources have been invested in generating drug resistance data for patient management and surveillance purposes. Unfortunately, most of the data currently available relate to subtype B even though >60% of the epidemic is caused by HIV-1 subtype C. A consortium of clinicians, scientists, public health experts and policy markers working in southern Africa came together and formed a network, the Southern African Treatment and Resistance Network (SATuRN), with the aim of increasing curated HIV-1 subtype C and tuberculosis drug resistance data. This article describes the HIV-1 data curation process using the SATuRN Rega database. The data curation is a manual and time-consuming process done by clinical, laboratory and data curation specialists. Access to the highly curated data sets is through applications that are reviewed by the SATuRN executive committee. Examples of research outputs from the analysis of the curated data include trends in the level of transmitted drug resistance in South Africa, analysis of the levels of acquired resistance among patients failing therapy and factors associated with the absence of genotypic evidence of drug resistance among patients failing therapy. All these studies have been important for informing first- and second-line therapy. This database is a free password-protected open source database available on

  1. Biofuel Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    Biofuel Database (Web, free access)   This database brings together structural, biological, and thermodynamic data for enzymes that are either in current use or are being considered for use in the production of biofuels.

  2. Thymectomy versus tumor resection for early-stage thymic malignancies: a Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas retrospective database analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhitao; Fu, Jianhua; Shen, Yi; Wei, Yucheng; Tan, Lijie; Zhang, Peng; Han, Yongtao; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Renquan; Li, Yin; Chen, Keneng; Chen, Hezhong; Liu, Yongyu; Cui, Youbing; Wang, Yun; Pang, Liewen; Yu, Zhentao; Zhou, Xinming; Liu, Yangchun; Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the surgical outcomes of tumor resection with or without total thymectomy for thymic epithelial tumors (TETs) using the Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas (ChART) retrospective database. Methods Patients without preoperative therapy, who underwent surgery for early-stage (Masaoka-Koga stage I and II) tumors, were enrolled for the study. They were divided into thymectomy and thymomectomy groups according to the resection extent of the thymus. Demographic and surgical outcomes were compared between the two patients groups. Results A total of 1,047 patients were enrolled, with 796 cases in the thymectomy group and 251 cases in the thymomectomy group. Improvement rate of myasthenia gravis (MG) was higher after thymectomy than after thymomectomy (91.6% vs. 50.0%, P<0.001). Ten-year overall survival was similar between the two groups (90.9% after thymectomy and 89.4% after thymomectomy, P=0.732). Overall, recurrence rate was 3.1% after thymectomy and 5.4% after thymomectomy, with no significant difference between the two groups (P=0.149). Stratified analysis revealed no significant difference in recurrence rates in Masaoka–Koga stage I tumors (3.2% vs. 1.4%, P=0.259). However in patients with Masaoka-Koga stage II tumors, recurrence was significantly less after thymectomy group than after thymomectomy (2.9% vs. 14.5%, P=0.001). Conclusions Thymectomy, instead of tumor resection alone, should still be recommended as the surgical standard for thymic malignancies, especially for stage II tumors and those with concomitant MG. PMID:27114835

  3. Clinical risk assessment of organ manifestations in systemic sclerosis: a report from the EULAR Scleroderma Trials And Research group database

    PubMed Central

    Walker, U A; Tyndall, A; Czirják, L; Denton, C; Farge‐Bancel, D; Kowal‐Bielecka, O; Müller‐Ladner, U; Bocelli‐Tyndall, C; Matucci‐Cerinic, M

    2007-01-01

    Background Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem autoimmune disease, which is classified into a diffuse cutaneous (dcSSc) and a limited cutaneous (lcSSc) subset according to the skin involvement. In order to better understand the vascular, immunological and fibrotic processes of SSc and to guide its treatment, the EULAR Scleroderma Trials And Research (EUSTAR) group was formed in June 2004. Aims and methods EUSTAR collects prospectively the Minimal Essential Data Set (MEDS) on all sequential patients fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology diagnostic criteria in participating centres. We aimed to characterise demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics of disease presentation in SSc and analysed EUSTAR baseline visits. Results In April 2006, a total of 3656 patients (1349 with dcSSc and 2101 with lcSSc) were enrolled in 102 centres and 30 countries. 1330 individuals had autoantibodies against Scl70 and 1106 against anticentromere antibodies. 87% of patients were women. On multivariate analysis, scleroderma subsets (dcSSc vs lcSSc), antibody status and age at onset of Raynaud's phenomenon, but not gender, were found to be independently associated with the prevalence of organ manifestations. Autoantibody status in this analysis was more closely associated with clinical manifestations than were SSc subsets. Conclusion dcSSc and lcSSc subsets are associated with particular organ manifestations, but in this analysis the clinical distinction seemed to be superseded by an antibody‐based classification in predicting some scleroderma complications. The EUSTAR MEDS database facilitates the analysis of clinical patterns in SSc, and contributes to the standardised assessment and monitoring of SSc internationally. PMID:17234652

  4. Classroom Research: GC Studies of Linoleic and Linolenic Fatty Acids Found in French Fries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, Janice P.; Deboise, Kristen L.; Marshall, Megan R.; Shaffer, Hannah M.; Zafar, Sara; Jones, Kevin A.; Palko, Nick R.; Mitsch, Stephen M.; Sutton, Lindsay A.; Chang, Margaret; Fromer, Ilana; Kraft, Jake; Meister, Jessica; Shah, Amar; Tan, Priscilla; Whitchurch, James

    2002-07-01

    A study of fatty-acid ratios in French fries has proved to be an excellent choice for an entry-level research class. This research develops reasoning skills and involves the subject of breast cancer, a major concern of American society. Analysis of tumor samples removed from women with breast cancer revealed high ratios of linoleic to linolenic acid, suggesting a link between the accelerated growth of breast tumors and the combination of these two fatty acids. When the ratio of linoleic to linolenic acid was approximately 9 to 1, accelerated growth was observed. Since these fatty acids are found in cooking oils, Wichita Collegiate students, under the guidance of their chemistry teacher, decided that an investigation of the ratios of these two fatty acids should be conducted. A research class was structured using a gas chromatograph for the analysis. Separation of linoleic from linolenic acid was successfully accomplished. The students experienced inductive experimental research chemistry as it applies to everyday life. The structure of this research class can serve as a model for high school and undergraduate college research curricula.

  5. Acid rain: Delays and management changes in the federal research program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program is to help resolve the scientific uncertainties associated with acid rain and determine if and how it should be controlled. It has yet to issue its first assessment report originally scheduled for release in 1985. NAPAP officials believe that, by 1990, their ongoing research program will provide sufficient new information about the causes and effects of acid rain to serve as the basis for policy recommendations.

  6. Electronic Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Martha E.

    1985-01-01

    Presents examples of bibliographic, full-text, and numeric databases. Also discusses how to access these databases online, aids to online retrieval, and several issues and trends (including copyright and downloading, transborder data flow, use of optical disc/videodisc technology, and changing roles in database generation and processing). (JN)

  7. Database Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2010-01-01

    The Internet and electronic commerce (e-commerce) generate lots of data. Data must be stored, organized, and managed. Database administrators, or DBAs, work with database software to find ways to do this. They identify user needs, set up computer databases, and test systems. They ensure that systems perform as they should and add people to the…

  8. Reflections on a decade of research by ASEAN dental faculties: analysis of publications from ISI-WOS databases from 2000 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Sirisinha, Stitaya; Koontongkaew, Sittichai; Phantumvanit, Prathip; Wittayawuttikul, Ruchareka

    2011-05-01

    This communication analyzed research publications in dentistry in the Institute of Scientific Information Web of Science databases of 10 dental faculties in the Association of South-East Asian Nations (ASEAN) from 2000 to 2009. The term used for the "all-document types" search was "Faculty of Dentistry/College of Dentistry." Abstracts presented at regional meetings were also included in the analysis. The Times Higher Education System QS World University Rankings showed that universities in the region fare poorly in world university rankings. Only the National University of Singapore and Nanyang Technological University appeared in the top 100 in 2009; 19 universities in the region, including Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand, appeared in the top 500. Data from the databases showed that research publications by dental institutes in the region fall short of their Asian counterparts. Singapore and Thailand are the most active in dental research of the ASEAN countries. PMID:25426599

  9. GOLD: The Genomes Online Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Liolios, Dinos; Chen, Amy; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Hugenholtz, Philip; Markowitz, Victor; Bernal, Alex

    Since its inception in 1997, GOLD has continuously monitored genome sequencing projects worldwide and has provided the community with a unique centralized resource that integrates diverse information related to Archaea, Bacteria, Eukaryotic and more recently Metagenomic sequencing projects. As of September 2007, GOLD recorded 639 completed genome projects. These projects have their complete sequence deposited into the public archival sequence databases such as GenBank EMBL,and DDBJ. From the total of 639 complete and published genome projects as of 9/2007, 527 were bacterial, 47 were archaeal and 65 were eukaryotic. In addition to the complete projects, there were 2158 ongoing sequencing projects. 1328 of those were bacterial, 59 archaeal and 771 eukaryotic projects. Two types of metadata are provided by GOLD: (i) project metadata and (ii) organism/environment metadata. GOLD CARD pages for every project are available from the link of every GOLD_STAMP ID. The information in every one of these pages is organized into three tables: (a) Organism information, (b) Genome project information and (c) External links. [The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2007: Status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata, Konstantinos Liolios, Konstantinos Mavromatis, Nektarios Tavernarakis and Nikos C. Kyrpides, Nucleic Acids Research Advance Access published online on November 2, 2007, Nucleic Acids Research, doi:10.1093/nar/gkm884]

    The basic tables in the GOLD database that can be browsed or searched include the following information:

    • Gold Stamp ID
    • Organism name
    • Domain
    • Links to information sources
    • Size and link to a map, when available
    • Chromosome number, Plas number, and GC content
    • A link for downloading the actual genome data
    • Institution that did the sequencing
    • Funding source
    • Database where information resides
    • Publication status and information

    • Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo)

      National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

      SRD 147 Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo) (Web, free access)   IUPAC Ionic Liquids Database, ILThermo, is a free web research tool that allows users worldwide to access an up-to-date data collection from the publications on experimental investigations of thermodynamic, and transport properties of ionic liquids as well as binary and ternary mixtures containing ionic liquids.

    • Catalyst and electrode research for phosphoric acid fuel cells

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Antoine, A. C.; King, R. B.

      1987-01-01

      An account is given of the development status of phosphoric acid fuel cells' high performance catalyst and electrode materials. Binary alloys have been identified which outperform the baseline platinum catalyst; it has also become apparent that pressurized operation is required to reach the desired efficiencies, calling in turn for the use of graphitized carbon blacks in the role of catalyst supports. Efforts to improve cell performance and reduce catalyst costs have led to the investigation of a class of organometallic cathode catalysts represented by the tetraazaannulenes, and a mixed catalyst which is a mixture of carbons catalyzed with an organometallic and a noble metal.

    • STATE ACID RAIN RESEARCH AND SCREENING SYSTEM - VERSION 1.0 USER'S MANUAL

      EPA Science Inventory

      The report is a user's manual that describes Version 1.0 of EPA's STate Acid Rain Research and Screening System (STARRSS), developed to assist utility regulatory commissions in reviewing utility acid rain compliance plans. It is a screening tool that is based on scenario analysis...

    • Backing up DMF Databases

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Cardo, Nicholas P.; Woodrow, Thomas (Technical Monitor)

      1994-01-01

      A complete backup of the Cray Data Migration Facility (DMF) databases should include the data migration databases, all media specific process' (MSP's) databases, and the journal file. The backup should be able to accomplished without impacting users or stopping DMF. The High Speed Processors group at the Numerical Aerodynamics Simulation (NAS) Facility at NASA Ames Research Center undertook the task of finding an effective and efficient way to backup all DMF databases. This has been accomplished by taking advantage of new features introduced in DMF 2.0 and adding a minor modification to the dmdaemon. This paper discusses the investigation and the changes necessary to implement these enhancements.

    • The comprehensive peptaibiotics database.

      PubMed

      Stoppacher, Norbert; Neumann, Nora K N; Burgstaller, Lukas; Zeilinger, Susanne; Degenkolb, Thomas; Brückner, Hans; Schuhmacher, Rainer

      2013-05-01

      Peptaibiotics are nonribosomally biosynthesized peptides, which - according to definition - contain the marker amino acid α-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) and possess antibiotic properties. Being known since 1958, a constantly increasing number of peptaibiotics have been described and investigated with a particular emphasis on hypocrealean fungi. Starting from the existing online 'Peptaibol Database', first published in 1997, an exhaustive literature survey of all known peptaibiotics was carried out and resulted in a list of 1043 peptaibiotics. The gathered information was compiled and used to create the new 'The Comprehensive Peptaibiotics Database', which is presented here. The database was devised as a software tool based on Microsoft (MS) Access. It is freely available from the internet at http://peptaibiotics-database.boku.ac.at and can easily be installed and operated on any computer offering a Windows XP/7 environment. It provides useful information on characteristic properties of the peptaibiotics included such as peptide category, group name of the microheterogeneous mixture to which the peptide belongs, amino acid sequence, sequence length, producing fungus, peptide subfamily, molecular formula, and monoisotopic mass. All these characteristics can be used and combined for automated search within the database, which makes The Comprehensive Peptaibiotics Database a versatile tool for the retrieval of valuable information about peptaibiotics. Sequence data have been considered as to December 14, 2012. PMID:23681723

    • Safe use of high intakes of folic acid: research challenges and paths forward.

      PubMed

      Boyles, Abee L; Yetley, Elizabeth A; Thayer, Kristina A; Coates, Paul M

      2016-07-01

      Adequate folic acid intake is an effective dietary-based prevention tool for reducing the risk of neural tube defects. Achieving adequate intake for the prevention of neural tube defects frequently requires the consumption of foods fortified with folic acid and/or the use of folic acid-containing dietary supplements. To date, research on the potential for adverse effects of high intakes of folic acid has been limited. Without such research, it is difficult to define a value for high intake. In May 2015, an expert panel was tasked with examining the available scientific literature and making research recommendations within 4 general categories of potential folate-related adverse health effects: cancer, cognition in conjunction with vitamin B12 deficiency, hypersensitivity-related outcomes, and thyroid and diabetes-related disorders. This article summarizes the expert panel's conclusions, outlines the challenges faced when reviewing the literature, and examines some of the panel's recommendations for research. PMID:27272334

    • NEUSE RIVER WATER QUALITY DATABASE

      EPA Science Inventory

      The Neuse River water quality database is a Microsoft Access application that includes multiple data tables and some associated queries. The database was developed by Prof. Jim Bowen's research group.

    • TREATABILITY DATABASE DESCRIPTION

      EPA Science Inventory

      The Drinking Water Treatability Database (TDB) presents referenced information on the control of contaminants in drinking water. It allows drinking water utilities, first responders to spills or emergencies, treatment process designers, research organizations, academics, regulato...

    • Towards secondary use of heterogeneous radio-oncological data for retrospective clinical trials: service-oriented connection of a central research database with image analysis tools

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Bougatf, Nina; Bendl, Rolf; Debus, Jürgen

      2015-03-01

      Our overall objective is the utilization of heterogeneous and distributed radio-oncological data in retrospective clinical trials. Previously, we have successfully introduced a central research database for collection of heterogeneous data from distributed systems. The next step is the integration of image analysis tools in the standard retrieval process. Hence, analyses for complex medical questions can be processed automatically and facilitated immensely. In radiation oncology recurrence analysis is a central approach for the evaluation of therapeutic concepts. However, various analysis steps have to be performed like image registration, dose transformation and dose statistics. In this paper we show the integration of image analysis tools in the standard retrieval process by connecting them with our central research database using a service-oriented approach. A concrete problem from recurrence analysis has been selected to prove our concept exemplarily. We implemented service-oriented data collection and analysis tools to use them in a central analysis platform, which is based on a work flow management system. An analysis work flow has been designed that, at first, identifies patients in the research database fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Then the relevant imaging data is collected. Finally the imaging data is analyzed automatically. After the successful work flow execution, the results are available for further evaluation by a physician. As a result, the central research database has been connected successfully with automatic data collection and image analysis tools and the feasibility of our service-oriented approach has been demonstrated. In conclusion, our approach will simplify retrospective clinical trials in our department in future.

    • A spatial classification and database for management, research, and policy making: The Great Lakes aquatic habitat framework

      EPA Science Inventory

      Managing the world’s largest and complex freshwater ecosystem, the Laurentian Great Lakes, requires a spatially hierarchical basin-wide database of ecological and socioeconomic information that are comparable across the region. To meet such a need, we developed a hierarchi...

    • Graduate Student Research Instruction: Testing an Interactive Web-Based Library Tutorial for a Health Sciences Database

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Lechner, David L.

      2005-01-01

      Interactive electronic tutorials offer flexibility in delivering library instruction; however, questions linger regarding their effectiveness compared to traditional librarian-led classroom lectures. This study examines a tutorial introducing health science students to the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature database. Half the…

  1. Generalized Database Management System Support for Numeric Database Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominick, Wayne D.; Weathers, Peggy G.

    1982-01-01

    This overview of potential for utilizing database management systems (DBMS) within numeric database environments highlights: (1) major features, functions, and characteristics of DBMS; (2) applicability to numeric database environment needs and user needs; (3) current applications of DBMS technology; and (4) research-oriented and…

  2. Development of a database for prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis: Summary report of the third research coordination meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, Richard M.; Firestone, Richard B.; Pavi, ???

    2003-04-01

    The main discussions and conclusions from the Third Co-ordination Meeting on the Development of a Database for Prompt Gamma-ray Neutron Activation Analysis are summarized in this report. All results were reviewed in detail, and the final version of the TECDOC and the corresponding software were agreed upon and approved for preparation. Actions were formulated with the aim of completing the final version of the TECDOC and associated software by May 2003.

  3. Tomato genomic resources database: an integrated repository of useful tomato genomic information for basic and applied research.

    PubMed

    Suresh, B Venkata; Roy, Riti; Sahu, Kamlesh; Misra, Gopal; Chattopadhyay, Debasis

    2014-01-01

    Tomato Genomic Resources Database (TGRD) allows interactive browsing of tomato genes, micro RNAs, simple sequence repeats (SSRs), important quantitative trait loci and Tomato-EXPEN 2000 genetic map altogether or separately along twelve chromosomes of tomato in a single window. The database is created using sequence of the cultivar Heinz 1706. High quality single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) sites between the genes of Heinz 1706 and the wild tomato S. pimpinellifolium LA1589 are also included. Genes are classified into different families. 5'-upstream sequences (5'-US) of all the genes and their tissue-specific expression profiles are provided. Sequences of the microRNA loci and their putative target genes are catalogued. Genes and 5'-US show presence of SSRs and SNPs. SSRs located in the genomic, genic and 5'-US can be analysed separately for the presence of any particular motif. Primer sequences for all the SSRs and flanking sequences for all the genic SNPs have been provided. TGRD is a user-friendly web-accessible relational database and uses CMAP viewer for graphical scanning of all the features. Integration and graphical presentation of important genomic information will facilitate better and easier use of tomato genome. TGRD can be accessed as an open source repository at http://59.163.192.91/tomato2/. PMID:24466070

  4. Tomato Genomic Resources Database: An Integrated Repository of Useful Tomato Genomic Information for Basic and Applied Research

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, B. Venkata; Roy, Riti; Sahu, Kamlesh; Misra, Gopal; Chattopadhyay, Debasis

    2014-01-01

    Tomato Genomic Resources Database (TGRD) allows interactive browsing of tomato genes, micro RNAs, simple sequence repeats (SSRs), important quantitative trait loci and Tomato-EXPEN 2000 genetic map altogether or separately along twelve chromosomes of tomato in a single window. The database is created using sequence of the cultivar Heinz 1706. High quality single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) sites between the genes of Heinz 1706 and the wild tomato S. pimpinellifolium LA1589 are also included. Genes are classified into different families. 5′-upstream sequences (5′-US) of all the genes and their tissue-specific expression profiles are provided. Sequences of the microRNA loci and their putative target genes are catalogued. Genes and 5′-US show presence of SSRs and SNPs. SSRs located in the genomic, genic and 5′-US can be analysed separately for the presence of any particular motif. Primer sequences for all the SSRs and flanking sequences for all the genic SNPs have been provided. TGRD is a user-friendly web-accessible relational database and uses CMAP viewer for graphical scanning of all the features. Integration and graphical presentation of important genomic information will facilitate better and easier use of tomato genome. TGRD can be accessed as an open source repository at http://59.163.192.91/tomato2/. PMID:24466070

  5. Database Manager

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    It is normal practice today for organizations to store large quantities of records of related information as computer-based files or databases. Purposeful information is retrieved by performing queries on the data sets. The purpose of DATABASE MANAGER is to communicate to students the method by which the computer performs these queries. This…

  6. Maize databases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter is a succinct overview of maize data held in the species-specific database MaizeGDB (the Maize Genomics and Genetics Database), and selected multi-species data repositories, such as Gramene/Ensembl Plants, Phytozome, UniProt and the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), ...

  7. Protein sequence databases.

    PubMed

    Apweiler, Rolf; Bairoch, Amos; Wu, Cathy H

    2004-02-01

    A variety of protein sequence databases exist, ranging from simple sequence repositories, which store data with little or no manual intervention in the creation of the records, to expertly curated universal databases that cover all species and in which the original sequence data are enhanced by the manual addition of further information in each sequence record. As the focus of researchers moves from the genome to the proteins encoded by it, these databases will play an even more important role as central comprehensive resources of protein information. Several the leading protein sequence databases are discussed here, with special emphasis on the databases now provided by the Universal Protein Knowledgebase (UniProt) consortium. PMID:15036160

  8. Metrology for ocean salinity and acidity- the European Metrology Research Project ENV05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitzer, Petra; Seitz, Steffen; Lago, Simona; Stoica, Daniela; Mariassy, Michal; Clough, Robert; Camões, Maria Filomena

    2013-04-01

    An overview and status report on the EMRP (European Metrology Research Project) "Metrology for ocean salinity and acidity" will be given. The project has been started in September 2011. The consortium consists of partners from ten European metrology institutes and two universities. Need for the project The project covers the thermodynamic quantities salinity, conductivity, density, speed of sound, and temperature, and the chemical quantities pH, oxygen content and composition. It aims to develop methods, standards and tools to improve the databases used for climate models. Measurement standards with well characterized uncertainties will enable calibration of in-situ observing sensor networks and satellite systems traceable to SI units. The results will improve the metrological infrastructure required for a reliable monitoring and modelling of ocean processes. This will allow scientists to measure more accurately small changes in long-term oceanographic data series. Expected results and potential impact The basis for data at higher pressure of up to 70 MPa and in a temperature range between 0 ° C and 40 ° C for the Equation of State will be improved by measurements of density, salinity and speed of sound. A novel primary conductivity sensor which can be used at high pressure will be developed, tested and linked to primary improved density measurements at the same high pressure. Improved and robust speed of sound measurement data for both high accuracy laboratory and in situ measurements of seawater, will provided by means of an ultrasonic double-reflector pulse-echo overlap technique. This also includes improved temperature measurements with an uncertainty of 5 mK. The determination of dissolved oxygen measurement methods will be optimised for the special requirements of seawater. A reduction of the uncertainty by a least a factor of three is anticipated. Harmonised pH measurement procedures will be provided to underpin the traceability of the pH data of seawater

  9. The International Database of HOme blood pressure in relation to Cardiovascular Outcome (IDHOCO): moving from baseline characteristics to research perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Niiranen, Teemu J; Thijs, Lutgarde; Asayama, Kei; Johansson, Jouni K; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Kikuya, Masahiro; Boggia, José; Hozawa, Atsushi; Sandoya, Edgardo; Stergiou, George S; Tsuji, Ichiro; Jula, Antti M; Imai, Yutaka; Staessen, Jan A

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to construct an International Database of HOme blood pressure in relation to Cardiovascular Outcome (IDHOCO). The main goal of this database is to determine outcome-based diagnostic thresholds for the self-measured home blood pressure (BP). Secondary objectives include investigating the predictive value of white-coat and masked hypertension, morning and evening BP, BP and heart rate variability, and the home arterial stiffness index. We also aim to determine an optimal schedule for home BP measurements that provides the most accurate risk stratification. Eligible studies are population-based, have fatal as well as nonfatal outcomes available for analysis, comply with ethical standards, and have been previously published in peer-reviewed journals. In a meta-analysis based on individual subject data, composite and cause-specific cardiovascular events will be related to various indexes derived by home BP measurement. The analyses will be stratified by a cohort and adjusted for the clinic BP and established cardiovascular risk factors. The database includes 6753 subjects from five cohorts recruited in Ohasama, Japan (n = 2777); Finland (n = 2075); Tsurugaya, Japan (n = 836); Didima, Greece (n = 665); and Montevideo, Uruguay (n = 400). In these five cohorts, during a total of 62 106 person-years of follow-up (mean 9.2 years), 852 subjects died and 740 participants experienced a fatal or nonfatal cardiovascular event. IDHOCO provides a unique opportunity to investigate several hypotheses that could not reliably be studied in individual studies. The results of these analyses should be of help to clinicians involved in the management of patients with suspected or established hypertension. PMID:22763485

  10. Discovery of predictive models in an injury surveillance database: an application of data mining in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Holmes, J H; Durbin, D R; Winston, F K

    2000-01-01

    A new, evolutionary computation-based approach to discovering prediction models in surveillance data was developed and evaluated. This approach was operationalized in EpiCS, a type of learning classifier system specially adapted to model clinical data. In applying EpiCS to a large, prospective injury surveillance database, EpiCS was found to create accurate predictive models quickly that were highly robust, being able to classify > 99% of cases early during training. After training, EpiCS classified novel data more accurately (p < 0.001) than either logistic regression or decision tree induction (C4.5), two traditional methods for discovering or building predictive models. PMID:11079905

  11. Hyaluronic Acid Injections Are Associated with Delay of Total Knee Replacement Surgery in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: Evidence from a Large U.S. Health Claims Database

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Roy; Lim, Sooyeol; Steen, R. Grant; Dasa, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Background The growing prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) and the medical costs associated with total knee replacement (TKR) surgery for end-stage OA motivate a search for agents that can delay OA progression. We test a hypothesis that hyaluronic acid (HA) injection is associated with delay of TKR in a dose-dependent manner. Methods and Findings We retrospectively evaluated records in an administrative claims database of ~79 million patients, to identify all patients with knee OA who received TKR during a 6-year period. Only patients with continuous plan enrollment from diagnosis until TKR were included, so that complete medical records were available. OA diagnosis was the index event and we evaluated time-to-TKR as a function of the number of HA injections. The database included 182,022 patients with knee OA who had TKR; 50,349 (27.7%) of these patients were classified as HA Users, receiving ≥1 courses of HA prior to TKR, while 131,673 patients (72.3%) were HA Non-users prior to TKR, receiving no HA. Cox proportional hazards modelling shows that TKR risk decreases as a function of the number of HA injection courses, if patient age, gender, and disease comorbidity are used as background covariates. Multiple HA injections are therefore associated with delay of TKR (all, P < 0.0001). Half of HA Non-users had a TKR by 114 days post-diagnosis of knee OA, whereas half of HA Users had a TKR by 484 days post-diagnosis (χ2 = 19,769; p < 0.0001). Patients who received no HA had a mean time-to-TKR of 0.7 years; with one course of HA, the mean time to TKR was 1.4 years (χ2 = 13,725; p < 0.0001); patients who received ≥5 courses delayed TKR by 3.6 years (χ2 = 19,935; p < 0.0001). Conclusions HA injection in patients with knee OA is associated with a dose-dependent increase in time-to-TKR. PMID:26694145

  12. Clinical and cost outcomes from different hyaluronic acid treatments in patients with knee osteoarthritis: evidence from a US health plan claims database

    PubMed Central

    Dasa, Vinod; DeKoven, Mitch; Sun, Kainan; Scott, Allan; Lim, Sooyeol

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) for knee osteoarthritis (OA) effectively reduces pain and delays total knee replacement (TKR) surgery; however, little is known about relative differences in clinical and cost outcomes among different HA products. Objective: To compare disease-specific costs and risk of TKR among patients receiving different HA treatments in a commercially insured cohort of patients with knee OA in the USA. Method: Retrospective analyses using IMS Health’s PharMetrics Plus Health Plan Claims Database were conducted by identifying knee OA patients with claims indicating initiation of HA treatment at an ‘index date’ during the selection period (2007–2010). Patients were required to be continuously enrolled in the database for 12 months preindex to 36 months postindex. A generalized linear model (GLM) with a gamma distribution and log-link function was used to model aggregate patient-based changes in disease-specific costs. A Cox proportional hazards model (PHM) was used to model the risk of TKR. Both multivariate models included covariates such as age, gender, comorbidities, and preindex healthcare costs. Results: 50,389 patients with HA treatment for knee OA were identified. 18,217 (36.2%) patients were treated with HA products indicated for five injections per treatment course (Supartz and Hyalgan). The remainder were treated with HA products indicated for fewer than five injections per treatment course, with 20,518 patients (40.7%) receiving Synvisc; 6,263 (12.4%), Euflexxa; and 5,391 (10.7%), Orthovisc. Synvisc- and Orthovisc-injected patients had greater disease-specific costs compared to Supartz/Hyalgan (9.0%, p<0.0001 and 6.8%, p=0.0050, respectively). Hazard ratios (HRs) showed a significantly higher risk of TKR for patients receiving Synvisc compared to Supartz/Hyalgan (HR=1.069, p=0.0009). Patients treated with Supartz/Hyalgan, Euflexxa, and Orthovisc had longer delays to TKR than those treated with

  13. The Stanford Tissue Microarray Database.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, Robert J; Montgomery, Kelli; Liu, Chih Long; Shah, Nigam H; Prapong, Wijan; Nitzberg, Michael; Zachariah, Zachariah K; Sherlock, Gavin J; Natkunam, Yasodha; West, Robert B; van de Rijn, Matt; Brown, Patrick O; Ball, Catherine A

    2008-01-01

    The Stanford Tissue Microarray Database (TMAD; http://tma.stanford.edu) is a public resource for disseminating annotated tissue images and associated expression data. Stanford University pathologists, researchers and their collaborators worldwide use TMAD for designing, viewing, scoring and analyzing their tissue microarrays. The use of tissue microarrays allows hundreds of human tissue cores to be simultaneously probed by antibodies to detect protein abundance (Immunohistochemistry; IHC), or by labeled nucleic acids (in situ hybridization; ISH) to detect transcript abundance. TMAD archives multi-wavelength fluorescence and bright-field images of tissue microarrays for scoring and analysis. As of July 2007, TMAD contained 205 161 images archiving 349 distinct probes on 1488 tissue microarray slides. Of these, 31 306 images for 68 probes on 125 slides have been released to the public. To date, 12 publications have been based on these raw public data. TMAD incorporates the NCI Thesaurus ontology for searching tissues in the cancer domain. Image processing researchers can extract images and scores for training and testing classification algorithms. The production server uses the Apache HTTP Server, Oracle Database and Perl application code. Source code is available to interested researchers under a no-cost license. PMID:17989087

  14. BIOMARKERS DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This database was developed by assembling and evaluating the literature relevant to human biomarkers. It catalogues and evaluates the usefulness of biomarkers of exposure, susceptibility and effect which may be relevant for a longitudinal cohort study. In addition to describing ...

  15. A Multidimensional Rasch Analysis of the Functional Independence Measure Based on the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Database.

    PubMed

    Pretz, Christopher R; Kean, Jacob; Heinemann, Allen W; Kozlowski, Allan J; Bode, Rita K; Gebhardt, Eveline

    2016-07-15

    A number of studies have evaluated the psychometric properties of the Functional Independence Measure (FIM™) using Rasch analysis, although none has done so using the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Database, a longitudinal database that captures demographic and outcome information on persons with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury across the United States. In the current study, we examine the psychometric properties of the FIM as represented by persons within this database and demonstrate that the FIM comprises three subscales representing cognitive, self-care, and mobility domains. These subscales were analyzed simultaneously using a multivariate Rasch model in combination with a time dependent concurrent calibration scheme with the goal of creating a raw score-to-logit transformation that can be used to improve the accuracy of parametric statistical analyses. The bowel and bladder function items were removed because of misfit with the motor and cognitive items. Some motor items exhibited step disorder, which was addressed by collapsing Categories 1-3 for Toileting, Stairs, Locomotion, Tub/Shower Transfers; Categories 1 and 2 for Toilet and Bed Transfers; and Categories 2 and 3 for Grooming. The strong correlations (r = 0.82-0.96) among the three subscales suggest they should be modeled together. Coefficient alpha of 0.98 indicates high internal consistency. Keyform maps are provided to enhance clinical interpretation and application of study results. PMID:26559881

  16. Specialist Bibliographic Databases.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Voronov, Alexander A; Trukhachev, Vladimir I; Kostyukova, Elena I; Gerasimov, Alexey N; Kitas, George D

    2016-05-01

    Specialist bibliographic databases offer essential online tools for researchers and authors who work on specific subjects and perform comprehensive and systematic syntheses of evidence. This article presents examples of the established specialist databases, which may be of interest to those engaged in multidisciplinary science communication. Access to most specialist databases is through subscription schemes and membership in professional associations. Several aggregators of information and database vendors, such as EBSCOhost and ProQuest, facilitate advanced searches supported by specialist keyword thesauri. Searches of items through specialist databases are complementary to those through multidisciplinary research platforms, such as PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. Familiarizing with the functional characteristics of biomedical and nonbiomedical bibliographic search tools is mandatory for researchers, authors, editors, and publishers. The database users are offered updates of the indexed journal lists, abstracts, author profiles, and links to other metadata. Editors and publishers may find particularly useful source selection criteria and apply for coverage of their peer-reviewed journals and grey literature sources. These criteria are aimed at accepting relevant sources with established editorial policies and quality controls. PMID:27134485

  17. Specialist Bibliographic Databases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Specialist bibliographic databases offer essential online tools for researchers and authors who work on specific subjects and perform comprehensive and systematic syntheses of evidence. This article presents examples of the established specialist databases, which may be of interest to those engaged in multidisciplinary science communication. Access to most specialist databases is through subscription schemes and membership in professional associations. Several aggregators of information and database vendors, such as EBSCOhost and ProQuest, facilitate advanced searches supported by specialist keyword thesauri. Searches of items through specialist databases are complementary to those through multidisciplinary research platforms, such as PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. Familiarizing with the functional characteristics of biomedical and nonbiomedical bibliographic search tools is mandatory for researchers, authors, editors, and publishers. The database users are offered updates of the indexed journal lists, abstracts, author profiles, and links to other metadata. Editors and publishers may find particularly useful source selection criteria and apply for coverage of their peer-reviewed journals and grey literature sources. These criteria are aimed at accepting relevant sources with established editorial policies and quality controls. PMID:27134485

  18. Populating a Control Point Database: A cooperative effort between the USGS, Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center and the Grand Canyon Youth Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, K. M.; Fritzinger, C.; Wharton, E.

    2004-12-01

    The Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center measures the effects of Glen Canyon Dam operations on the resources along the Colorado River from Glen Canyon Dam to Lake Mead in support of the Grand Canyon Adaptive Management Program. Control points are integral for geo-referencing the myriad of data collected in the Grand Canyon including aerial photography, topographic and bathymetric data used for classification and change-detection analysis of physical, biologic and cultural resources. The survey department has compiled a list of 870 control points installed by various organizations needing to establish a consistent reference for data collected at field sites along the 240 mile stretch of Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. This list is the foundation for the Control Point Database established primarily for researchers, to locate control points and independently geo-reference collected field data. The database has the potential to be a valuable mapping tool for assisting researchers to easily locate a control point and reduce the occurrance of unknowingly installing new control points within close proximity of an existing control point. The database is missing photographs and accurate site description information. Current site descriptions do not accurately define the location of the point but refer to the project that used the point, or some other interesting fact associated with the point. The Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center (GCMRC) resolved this problem by turning the data collection effort into an educational exercise for the participants of the Grand Canyon Youth organization. Grand Canyon Youth is a non-profit organization providing experiential education for middle and high school aged youth. GCMRC and the Grand Canyon Youth formed a partnership where GCMRC provided the logistical support, equipment, and training to conduct the field work, and the Grand Canyon Youth provided the time and personnel to complete the field work. Two data

  19. But I've already had a healthy baby: folic acid formative research with Latina mothers.

    PubMed

    Prue, Christine E; Flores, Alina L; Panissidi, Paula; Lira, Andrea

    2008-10-01

    Each year, approximately 3000 pregnancies in the United States are affected by neural tube defects (NTDs), serious birth defects of the brain and spine. Daily periconceptional consumption of folic acid can reduce the incidence of NTDs by 50%-70%. This study was designed to understand Latina mothers' folic acid awareness, knowledge, and behaviors and to capture their reactions to advertising concepts and draft educational materials. The goal of the materials was to increase folic acid consumption through the use of a daily multivitamin. This study presents three phases of research that led to the development of Spanish language print advertisements, posters, a brochure, and radio ads that promote folic acid consumption in a manner that addresses the needs of Latina mothers. PMID:18752460

  20. The PIR-International databases.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, W C; George, D G; Mewes, H W; Pfeiffer, F; Tsugita, A

    1993-01-01

    PIR-International is an association of macromolecular sequence data collection centers dedicated to fostering international cooperation as an essential element in the development of scientific databases. PIR-International is most noted for the Protein Sequence Database. This database originated in the early 1960's with the pioneering work of the late Margaret Dayhoff as a research tool for the study of protein evolution and intersequence relationships; it is maintained as a scientific resource, organized by biological concepts, using sequence homology as a guiding principle. PIR-International also maintains a number of other genomic, protein sequence, and sequence-related databases. The databases of PIR-International are made widely available. This paper briefly describes the architecture of the Protein Sequence Database, a number of other PIR-International databases, and mechanisms for providing access to and for distribution of these databases. PMID:8332528

  1. An overview of a 5-year research program on acid deposition in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; He, K.; Xu, X.; Zhang, P.; Bai, Y.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, X.; Duan, L.; Li, W.; Chai, F.

    2011-12-01

    Despite concerted research and regulative control of sulfur dioxide in China, acid rain remained a serious environmental issue, due to a sharp increase in the combustion of fossil fuel in the 2000s. In 2005, the Ministry of Science and Technology of China funded a five-year comprehensive research program on acid deposition. This talk will give an overview of the activities and the key findings from this study, covering emission, atmospheric processes, and deposition, effects on soil and stream waters, and impact on typical trees/plants in China. The main results include (1) China still experiences acidic rainfalls in southern and eastern regions, although the situation has stabilized after 2006 due to stringent control of SO2 by the Chinese Government; (2) Sulfate is the dominant acidic compound, but the contribution of nitrate has increased; (3) cloud-water composition in eastern China is strongly influenced by anthropogenic emissions; (4) the persistent fall of acid rain in the 30 years has lead to acidification of some streams/rivers and soils in southern China; (5) the studied plants have shown varying response to acid rain; (6) some new insights have been obtained on atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric transport, soil chemistry, and ecological impacts, some of which will be discussed in this talk. Compared to the situation in North America and Europe, China's acid deposition is still serious, and continued control of sulfur and nitrogen emission is required. There is an urgent need to establish a long-term observation network/program to monitor the impact of acid deposition on soil, streams/rivers/lakes, and forests.

  2. PADB : Published Association Database

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Hwanseok; Lee, Jin-Sung

    2007-01-01

    Background Although molecular pathway information and the International HapMap Project data can help biomedical researchers to investigate the aetiology of complex diseases more effectively, such information is missing or insufficient in current genetic association databases. In addition, only a few of the environmental risk factors are included as gene-environment interactions, and the risk measures of associations are not indexed in any association databases. Description We have developed a published association database (PADB; ) that includes both the genetic associations and the environmental risk factors available in PubMed database. Each genetic risk factor is linked to a molecular pathway database and the HapMap database through human gene symbols identified in the abstracts. And the risk measures such as odds ratios or hazard ratios are extracted automatically from the abstracts when available. Thus, users can review the association data sorted by the risk measures, and genetic associations can be grouped by human genes or molecular pathways. The search results can also be saved to tab-delimited text files for further sorting or analysis. Currently, PADB indexes more than 1,500,000 PubMed abstracts that include 3442 human genes, 461 molecular pathways and about 190,000 risk measures ranging from 0.00001 to 4878.9. Conclusion PADB is a unique online database of published associations that will serve as a novel and powerful resource for reviewing and interpreting huge association data of complex human diseases. PMID:17877839

  3. RD-Connect: an integrated platform connecting databases, registries, biobanks and clinical bioinformatics for rare disease research.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Rachel; Johnston, Louise; Taruscio, Domenica; Monaco, Lucia; Béroud, Christophe; Gut, Ivo G; Hansson, Mats G; 't Hoen, Peter-Bram A; Patrinos, George P; Dawkins, Hugh; Ensini, Monica; Zatloukal, Kurt; Koubi, David; Heslop, Emma; Paschall, Justin E; Posada, Manuel; Robinson, Peter N; Bushby, Kate; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2014-08-01

    Research into rare diseases is typically fragmented by data type and disease. Individual efforts often have poor interoperability and do not systematically connect data across clinical phenotype, genomic data, biomaterial availability, and research/trial data sets. Such data must be linked at both an individual-patient and whole-cohort level to enable researchers to gain a complete view of their disease and patient population of interest. Data access and authorization procedures are required to allow researchers in multiple institutions to securely compare results and gain new insights. Funded by the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme under the International Rare Diseases Research Consortium (IRDiRC), RD-Connect is a global infrastructure project initiated in November 2012 that links genomic data with registries, biobanks, and clinical bioinformatics tools to produce a central research resource for rare diseases. PMID:25029978

  4. Developing a national database to recent Hispanic/minority graduates and professionals for employmnet, procurement, consulting, and educational research opportunities with the federal government. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, G.D.; Garza, H.

    1996-09-30

    This report very briefly summarizes notable accomplishments of the grant collaboration between the Hispanic Experts Database/Minority Experts Database and the American Council on Education. The Directory of Hispanic Experts was compiled and distributed from the database. The database was expanded through several initiatives, and information dissemination was increased. The database is now available on the Internet and the World Wide Web. Restructuring of Web sites and other means of information dissemination was performed to coordinate the database with other government databases and eliminate duplication.

  5. [Research on L-Ascorbic Acid and Thiamine Based on Wide-Band Terahertz Spectroscopy Technique].

    PubMed

    Li, Chun; Li, Miao; Jiang, Ling

    2015-03-01

    We employed terahertz time-domain spectra (THz-TDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) to measure the terahertz spectroscopy of L-ascorbic acid and thiamine in the frequency region ranging from 0.10 to 3.50 THz. Molecular models of two vitamins have been shown, and based on above two spectroscopies, we compared the differences about the absorption spectra between the L-ascorbic acid and the thiamine. The measured results show that the absorption spectra obtained based on THz-TDS and FTIR are completely consistent in the frequency range of 0.70 to 3.00 THz. New fingerprint peaks obtained by the FTIR in the low frequency region from 0.30 to 0.50 THz in terms of high sensitive silicon bolometer detector, which are not found by the THz-TDS. Furthermore, several bands at 8.75, 8.85, 9.00, 9.30 and 10.30 THz, fingerprint peaks have been found in the frequency region from 8.00 to 12.00 THz for the thiamine sample obtained by the FTIR. Measurement results indicate the absorption spectra depend on the ratio of polyethylene powder mixed with the L-ascorbic acid. L-ascorbic acid has a lower absorption ability at THz band, so pure samples should be used for testing experiment. In addition, we calculated the refractive index for the two samples. This study has important implications for the discriminatory analysis of vitamins and the establishment of vitamin spectroscopy standard database. PMID:26117861

  6. Navigating Public Microarray Databases

    PubMed Central

    Bähler, Jürg

    2004-01-01

    With the ever-escalating amount of data being produced by genome-wide microarray studies, it is of increasing importance that these data are captured in public databases so that researchers can use this information to complement and enhance their own studies. Many groups have set up databases of expression data, ranging from large repositories, which are designed to comprehensively capture all published data, through to more specialized databases. The public repositories, such as ArrayExpress at the European Bioinformatics Institute contain complete datasets in raw format in addition to processed data, whilst the specialist databases tend to provide downstream analysis of normalized data from more focused studies and data sources. Here we provide a guide to the use of these public microarray resources. PMID:18629145

  7. Nuclear Science References Database

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko, B.; Běták, E.; Singh, B.; Totans, J.

    2014-06-15

    The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center (http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr)

  8. Navigating public microarray databases.

    PubMed

    Penkett, Christopher J; Bähler, Jürg

    2004-01-01

    With the ever-escalating amount of data being produced by genome-wide microarray studies, it is of increasing importance that these data are captured in public databases so that researchers can use this information to complement and enhance their own studies. Many groups have set up databases of expression data, ranging from large repositories, which are designed to comprehensively capture all published data, through to more specialized databases. The public repositories, such as ArrayExpress at the European Bioinformatics Institute contain complete datasets in raw format in addition to processed data, whilst the specialist databases tend to provide downstream analysis of normalized data from more focused studies and data sources. Here we provide a guide to the use of these public microarray resources. PMID:18629145

  9. A Child Development, Behavior Modification Research, and Data-Based Model for Training Teachers of Young Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Alice H.

    Presented is the text of a slide-tape presentation on staff training at the model preschool center of the Child Development and Mental Retardation Center (CDMRC) at the University of Washington in Seattle. The CDMRC is said to consist of a medical research unit, a clinical training unit, a behavioral research unit, and an experimental education…

  10. SWISS-PROT: connecting biomolecular knowledge via a protein database.

    PubMed

    Gasteiger, E; Jung, E; Bairoch, A

    2001-07-01

    With the explosive growth of biological data, the development of new means of data storage was needed. More and more often biological information is no longer published in the conventional way via a publication in a scientific journal, but only deposited into a database. In the last two decades these databases have become essential tools for researchers in biological sciences. Biological databases can be classified according to the type of information they contain. There are basically three types of sequence-related databases (nucleic acid sequences, protein sequences and protein tertiary structures) as well as various specialized data collections. It is important to provide the users of biomolecular databases with a degree of integration between these databases as by nature all of these databases are connected in a scientific sense and each one of them is an important piece to biological complexity. In this review we will highlight our effort in connecting biological information as demonstrated in the SWISS-PROT protein database. PMID:11488411

  11. Development of a dish-based, semi-quantitative FFQ for the Korean diet and cancer research using a database approach.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Kyung; Kim, Dong Woo; Kim, Jeongseon; Park, Sohee; Joung, Hyojee; Song, Won O; Paik, Hee Young

    2011-04-01

    We used a database approach in developing a dish-based, semi-quantitative FFQ for Korean diet and cancer research. Cancer-related dietary factors (CRDF) recognised in the scientific community and dietary intake data from the 2001 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the 2002 Korean National Nutrition Survey by Season were used. The list of dishes (n 993) was those reported to be consumed by individuals over 30 years of age during all four seasons. The resulting 112-dish list was selected using contribution analyses and variability analyses to detect between-person variation for CRDF and non-CRDF nutrients. Variations of each dish were grouped into one dish for the final list of 112 dishes, which were then linked to the nutrient database. The final 112 dish items consisted of nine Korean staple dishes, including rice and noodles, twenty-five soups and stews, fifty-four side dishes, nine beverages, nine fruit dishes and six alcoholic beverages. The percentage coverages of energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate and alcohol intake in the selected 112 dishes were 82·4, 76·4, 68·9, 86·0 and 99·8 %, respectively. Dietary exposure to cancer-related Korean dietary factors can be assessed by this new dish-based, semi-quantitative FFQ. This new instrument can calculate the intake of CRDF along with non-CRDF nutrient intake for cancer research. PMID:21092384

  12. Database of small research watersheds for the territory of former Soviet Union as a source of data for improving hydrological models and their parameterizations in different geographical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva, Liudmila; Semenova, Olga

    2013-04-01

    One of widely claimed problems in modern modelling hydrology is lack of available information to investigate hydrological processes and improve their representation in the models. In spite of this, one hardly might confidently say that existing "traditional" data sources have been already fully analyzed and made use of. There existed the network of research watersheds in USSR called water-balance stations where comprehensive and extensive hydrometeorological measurements were conducted according to more or less single program during the last 40-60 years. The program (where not ceased) includes observations of discharges in several, often nested and homogeneous, small watersheds, meteorological elements, evaporation, soil temperature and moisture, snow depths, etc. The network covered different climatic and landscape zones and was established in the middle of the last century with the aim of investigation of the runoff formation in different conditions. Until recently the long-term observational data accompanied by descriptions and maps had existed only in hard copies. It partly explains why these datasets are not enough exploited yet and very rarely or even never were used for the purposes of hydrological modelling although they seem to be much more promising than implementation of the completely new measuring techniques not detracting from its importance. The goal of the presented work is development of a database of observational data and supportive materials from small research watersheds across the territory of the former Soviet Union. The first version of the database will include the following information for 12 water-balance stations across Russia, Ukraine, Kazahstan and Turkmenistan: daily values of discharges (one or several watersheds), air temperature, humidity, precipitation (one or several gauges), soil and snow state variables, soil and snow evaporation. The stations will cover desert and semi desert, steppe and forest steppe, forest, permafrost and

  13. VAMDC FP7 project and STARK-B database: C II Stark broadening parameters for white dwarf atmospheres research

    SciTech Connect

    Larbi-Terzi, Neila; Ben Nessib, Nebil; Sahal-Brechot, Sylvie; Dimitrijevic, Milan S.

    2010-11-23

    Stark broadening parameters of C II lines were determined within 3s-np spectral series within the semiclassical perturbation method. The atomic energy levels needed for calculations were taken from TOPBASE as well as the oscillator strengths, calculated additionally using the Coulomb approximation (the method of Bates and Damgaard). The both results were compared and the disagreement is found only in one case where the configuration mixing allows a forbidden transition to a close perturbing energy level. Calculations were performed for plasma conditions relevant for atmospheres of DQ white dwarfs and for a new type of white dwarfs, with surface composed mostly of carbon, discovered in 2007 by Dufour et al.. The aim of this work is to provide accurate C II Stark broadening data, which are crucial for this type of white dwarf atmosphere modellisation. Obtained results will be included in STARK-B database (http://stark-b.obspm.fr/), entering in the FP7 project of European Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center VAMDC aiming at building an interoperable e-Infrastructure for the exchange of atomic and molecular data (http://www.vamdc.org/).

  14. Legal aspects of genetic databases for international biomedical research: the example of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC).

    PubMed

    Romeo-Casabona, Carlos; Nicolás, Pilar; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Joly, Yann; Wallace, Susan E; Chalmers, Don; Dyke, Stephanie; Kennedy, Karen; Troncoso, Antonio; Kaan, Terry; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle

    2012-01-01

    There is a noticeable lack of international regulation on personal data exchange and management in research. This article sheds light in this area by describing how the International Cancer Genome Consortium is developing policies and procedures to address the ethical and legal issues raised by the international transfer of data and results. These policies and procedures aim, first and most importantly, to safeguard the interests of the research participants and other involved stakeholders and, secondly, to facilitate the sharing of data and results to realize greater benefits from this kind of internationally collaborative genetic research. PMID:23520913

  15. Fillers used in papermaking. (Latest citations from the Paper and Board, Printing, and Packaging Industries Research Associations database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning organic and inorganic fillers used in paper products and their effect on the properties and manufacture of paper. The citations examine a variety of fillers, including natural calcium carbonate, bentonite, polymeric fillers, titanium dioxide, calcium carbonate, calcium silicate, barium sulphate, agalite, talc, clay, kaolin, limestone, mica, and ash. Filler effects on thermal strength, coloring, acidity, surface coatings, porosity, production efficiency, absorption, opacity, printability, and deposit control are presented. Also discussed are the microanalysis of fillers, recovery of fillers from wastes, availability of filler and pigment raw materials, and the determination of filler content in paper products. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. WMC Database Evaluation. Case Study Report

    SciTech Connect

    Palounek, Andrea P. T

    2015-10-29

    The WMC Database is ultimately envisioned to hold a collection of experimental data, design information, and information from computational models. This project was a first attempt at using the Database to access experimental data and extract information from it. This evaluation shows that the Database concept is sound and robust, and that the Database, once fully populated, should remain eminently usable for future researchers.

  17. Biological Databases for Behavioral Neurobiology

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Erich J.

    2014-01-01

    Databases are, at their core, abstractions of data and their intentionally derived relationships. They serve as a central organizing metaphor and repository, supporting or augmenting nearly all bioinformatics. Behavioral domains provide a unique stage for contemporary databases, as research in this area spans diverse data types, locations, and data relationships. This chapter provides foundational information on the diversity and prevalence of databases, how data structures support the various needs of behavioral neuroscience analysis and interpretation. The focus is on the classes of databases, data curation, and advanced applications in bioinformatics using examples largely drawn from research efforts in behavioral neuroscience. PMID:23195119

  18. Drinking Water Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, ShaTerea R.

    2004-01-01

    This summer I had the opportunity to work in the Environmental Management Office (EMO) under the Chemical Sampling and Analysis Team or CS&AT. This team s mission is to support Glenn Research Center (GRC) and EM0 by providing chemical sampling and analysis services and expert consulting. Services include sampling and chemical analysis of water, soil, fbels, oils, paint, insulation materials, etc. One of this team s major projects is the Drinking Water Project. This is a project that is done on Glenn s water coolers and ten percent of its sink every two years. For the past two summers an intern had been putting together a database for this team to record the test they had perform. She had successfully created a database but hadn't worked out all the quirks. So this summer William Wilder (an intern from Cleveland State University) and I worked together to perfect her database. We began be finding out exactly what every member of the team thought about the database and what they would change if any. After collecting this data we both had to take some courses in Microsoft Access in order to fix the problems. Next we began looking at what exactly how the database worked from the outside inward. Then we began trying to change the database but we quickly found out that this would be virtually impossible.

  19. The Transporter Classification Database

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.; Reddy, Vamsee S.; Tamang, Dorjee G.; Västermark, Åke

    2014-01-01

    The Transporter Classification Database (TCDB; http://www.tcdb.org) serves as a common reference point for transport protein research. The database contains more than 10 000 non-redundant proteins that represent all currently recognized families of transmembrane molecular transport systems. Proteins in TCDB are organized in a five level hierarchical system, where the first two levels are the class and subclass, the second two are the family and subfamily, and the last one is the transport system. Superfamilies that contain multiple families are included as hyperlinks to the five tier TC hierarchy. TCDB includes proteins from all types of living organisms and is the only transporter classification system that is both universal and recognized by the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. It has been expanded by manual curation, contains extensive text descriptions providing structural, functional, mechanistic and evolutionary information, is supported by unique software and is interconnected to many other relevant databases. TCDB is of increasing usefulness to the international scientific community and can serve as a model for the expansion of database technologies. This manuscript describes an update of the database descriptions previously featured in NAR database issues. PMID:24225317

  20. The history of the USDA Nematode Collection and its database: valuable resources for taxonomic research and identification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The United States Department of Agriculture Nematode Collection continues to serve as one of the largest and most comprehensive nematode repositories in the world. Nematology research in the United States began in the late 1800’s, and for many years the collections of the USDA nematologists remained...

  1. Djeen (Database for Joomla!’s Extensible Engine): a research information management system for flexible multi-technology project administration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the advance of post-genomic technologies, the need for tools to manage large scale data in biology becomes more pressing. This involves annotating and storing data securely, as well as granting permissions flexibly with several technologies (all array types, flow cytometry, proteomics) for collaborative work and data sharing. This task is not easily achieved with most systems available today. Findings We developed Djeen (Database for Joomla!’s Extensible Engine), a new Research Information Management System (RIMS) for collaborative projects. Djeen is a user-friendly application, designed to streamline data storage and annotation collaboratively. Its database model, kept simple, is compliant with most technologies and allows storing and managing of heterogeneous data with the same system. Advanced permissions are managed through different roles. Templates allow Minimum Information (MI) compliance. Conclusion Djeen allows managing project associated with heterogeneous data types while enforcing annotation integrity and minimum information. Projects are managed within a hierarchy and user permissions are finely-grained for each project, user and group. Djeen Component source code (version 1.5.1) and installation documentation are available under CeCILL license from http://sourceforge.net/projects/djeen/files and supplementary material. PMID:23742665

  2. Giving Raw Data a Chance to Talk: A Demonstration of Exploratory Visual Analytics with a Pediatric Research Database Using Microsoft Live Labs Pivot to Promote Cohort Discovery, Research, and Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Viangteeravat, Teeradache; Nagisetty, Naga Satya V. Rao

    2014-01-01

    Secondary use of large and open data sets provides researchers with an opportunity to address high-impact questions that would otherwise be prohibitively expensive and time consuming to study. Despite the availability of data, generating hypotheses from huge data sets is often challenging, and the lack of complex analysis of data might lead to weak hypotheses. To overcome these issues and to assist researchers in building hypotheses from raw data, we are working on a visual and analytical platform called PRD Pivot. PRD Pivot is a de-identified pediatric research database designed to make secondary use of rich data sources, such as the electronic health record (EHR). The development of visual analytics using Microsoft Live Labs Pivot makes the process of data elaboration, information gathering, knowledge generation, and complex information exploration transparent to tool users and provides researchers with the ability to sort and filter by various criteria, which can lead to strong, novel hypotheses. PMID:24808811

  3. Drinking Water Treatability Database (Database)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The drinking Water Treatability Database (TDB) will provide data taken from the literature on the control of contaminants in drinking water, and will be housed on an interactive, publicly-available USEPA web site. It can be used for identifying effective treatment processes, rec...

  4. Databases and data mining

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the course of the past decade, the breadth of information that is made available through online resources for plant biology has increased astronomically, as have the interconnectedness among databases, online tools, and methods of data acquisition and analysis. For maize researchers, the numbe...

  5. Database machines for large statistical databases. Final report, January 16, 1983-January 15, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Research activities have been directed towards the design and implementation of a high performance database machine for accessing, manipulating, and analyzing very large statistical data sets. Topics of discussion include statistical databases, parallel algorithms and secondary storage methods, methodology for database system performance evaluation, implementation techniques for main memory database systems, intelligent buffer management systems, Gamma-a high performance dataflow database machine, and extensible database management systems. 1 fig. (DWL)

  6. Epilepsy informatics and an ontology-driven infrastructure for large database research and patient care in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Satya S.; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Lhatoo, Samden D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The epilepsy community increasingly recognizes the need for a modern classification system that can also be easily integrated with effective informatics tools. The 2010 reports by the United States President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) identified informatics as a critical resource to improve quality of patient care, drive clinical research, and reduce the cost of health services. An effective informatics infrastructure for epilepsy, which is underpinned by a formal knowledge model or ontology, can leverage an ever increasing amount of multimodal data to improve (1) clinical decision support, (2) access to information for patients and their families, (3) easier data sharing, and (4) accelerate secondary use of clinical data. Modeling the recommendations of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification system in the form of an epilepsy domain ontology is essential for consistent use of terminology in a variety of applications, including electronic health records systems and clinical applications. In this review, we discuss the data management issues in epilepsy and explore the benefits of an ontology-driven informatics infrastructure and its role in adoption of a “data-driven” paradigm in epilepsy research. PMID:23647220

  7. A patient database application for Hereditary Deafness Epidemiology and Clinical Research (H.E.A.R.): an effort for standardization in multiple languages.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Markus; Akyildiz, Serdar; Gunhan, Ovunc; Maassen, Marcus; Rodriguez, Jorge Jesus; Zenner, Hans-Peter; Apaydin, Fazil

    2003-02-01

    One of the most challenging and neglected issues in medicine is the effective recording of the data obtained from the patients. The "European Work Group on the Genetics of Hearing Impairment," which has been working since 1996, proposed a few questionnaires to collect data regarding the phenotype, ENT findings, audiological examination findings and other special investigations. In this study, a computerized patient database application named "Izmir H.E.A.R version 1.0," written in Delphi 4.0 for Windows for recording the patients with hearing problems, is presented. The application consists of a modular form, including information about identity, genetic condition, proband query, audiology and vestibular tests, phenotype, pedigree and special examinations, which allows data entry on all these issues. It has been developed by using the guidelines of Hereditary Deafness Epidemiology and Clinical Research (H.E.A.R.) and by the experience gained within the last 10 years by the authors. The target population of the program is the ENT clinicians, audiologists, epidemiologists, geneticists and researchers in the field. The main idea is to create a program serving the needs of both the daily routine work and research purposes and to distribute this program to the above-mentioned specialists, to encourage them to try the first version and to find a standard and/or better way to collect data. For this reason, the program aims to be multilingual, and the currently available languages are English, German, Spanish and Turkish. PMID:12582784

  8. Automated database design technology and tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Stewart N. T.

    1988-01-01

    The Automated Database Design Technology and Tools research project results are summarized in this final report. Comments on the state of the art in various aspects of database design are provided, and recommendations made for further research for SNAP and NAVMASSO future database applications.

  9. Evaluation of Scientific Outputs of Kashan University of Medical Sciences in Scopus Citation Database based on Scopus, ResearchGate, and Mendeley Scientometric Measures

    PubMed Central

    Batooli, Zahra; Ravandi, Somaye Nadi; Bidgoli, Mohammad Sabahi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is essential to evaluate the impact of scientific publications through citation analysis in citation indexes. In addition, scientometric measures of social media also should be assessed. These measures include how many times the publications were read, viewed, and downloaded. The present study aimed to assess the scientific output of scholars at Kashan University of Medical Sciences by the end of March 2014 based on scientometric measures of Scopus, ResearchGate, and Mendeley. Methods A survey method was used to study the articles published in Scopus journals by scholars at Kashan University of Medical Sciences by the end of March 2014. The required data were collected from Scopus, ResearchGate, and Mendeley. The data were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Also, the Spearman correlation was used between the number of views of articles in ResearchGate with citation number of the articles in Scopus and reading frequency of the articles in Mendeley with citation number in Scopus were examined using the Spearman correlation in SPSS 16. Results Five-hundred and thirty-three articles were indexed in the Scopus Citation Database by the end of March 2014. Collectively, those articles were cited 1,315 times. The articles were covered by ResearchGate (74%) more than Mendeley (44%). In addition, 98% of the articles indexed in ResearchGate and 92% of the articles indexed in Mendeley were viewed at least once. The results showed that there was a positive correlation between the number of views of the articles in ResearchGate and Mendeley and the number of citations of the articles in Scopus. Conclusion Coverage and the number of visitors were higher in ResearchGate than in Mendeley. The increase in the number of views of articles in ResearchGate and Mendeley also increased the number of citations of the papers. Social networks, such as ResearchGate and Mendeley, also can be used as tools for the evaluation of academics and scholars based on the scientific

  10. Great Basin paleontological database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, N.; Blodgett, R.B.; Hofstra, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has constructed a paleontological database for the Great Basin physiographic province that can be served over the World Wide Web for data entry, queries, displays, and retrievals. It is similar to the web-database solution that we constructed for Alaskan paleontological data (www.alaskafossil.org). The first phase of this effort was to compile a paleontological bibliography for Nevada and portions of adjacent states in the Great Basin that has recently been completed. In addition, we are also compiling paleontological reports (Known as E&R reports) of the U.S. Geological Survey, which are another extensive source of l,egacy data for this region. Initial population of the database benefited from a recently published conodont data set and is otherwise focused on Devonian and Mississippian localities because strata of this age host important sedimentary exhalative (sedex) Au, Zn, and barite resources and enormons Carlin-type An deposits. In addition, these strata are the most important petroleum source rocks in the region, and record the transition from extension to contraction associated with the Antler orogeny, the Alamo meteorite impact, and biotic crises associated with global oceanic anoxic events. The finished product will provide an invaluable tool for future geologic mapping, paleontological research, and mineral resource investigations in the Great Basin, making paleontological data acquired over nearly the past 150 yr readily available over the World Wide Web. A description of the structure of the database and the web interface developed for this effort are provided herein. This database is being used ws a model for a National Paleontological Database (which we am currently developing for the U.S. Geological Survey) as well as for other paleontological databases now being developed in other parts of the globe. ?? 2008 Geological Society of America.

  11. Mouse genome database 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  12. Mouse genome database 2016.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  13. ARTI Refrigerant Database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1992-04-30

    The Refrigerant Database consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air- conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included, though some may be added at a later date. The database identifies sources of specific information on R-32, R-123, R-124, R- 125, R-134a, R-141b, R142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-290 (propane), R-717 (ammonia), ethers, and others as well as azeotropic and zeotropic blends of these fluids. It addresses polyalkylene glycol (PAG), ester, and other lubricants. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits.

  14. Shuttle Hypervelocity Impact Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, James L.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Lear, Dana M.

    2011-01-01

    With three missions outstanding, the Shuttle Hypervelocity Impact Database has nearly 3000 entries. The data is divided into tables for crew module windows, payload bay door radiators and thermal protection system regions, with window impacts compromising just over half the records. In general, the database provides dimensions of hypervelocity impact damage, a component level location (i.e., window number or radiator panel number) and the orbiter mission when the impact occurred. Additional detail on the type of particle that produced the damage site is provided when sampling data and definitive analysis results are available. Details and insights on the contents of the database including examples of descriptive statistics will be provided. Post flight impact damage inspection and sampling techniques that were employed during the different observation campaigns will also be discussed. Potential enhancements to the database structure and availability of the data for other researchers will be addressed in the Future Work section. A related database of returned surfaces from the International Space Station will also be introduced.

  15. Shuttle Hypervelocity Impact Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, James I.; Christiansen, Eric I.; Lear, Dana M.

    2011-01-01

    With three flights remaining on the manifest, the shuttle impact hypervelocity database has over 2800 entries. The data is currently divided into tables for crew module windows, payload bay door radiators and thermal protection system regions, with window impacts compromising just over half the records. In general, the database provides dimensions of hypervelocity impact damage, a component level location (i.e., window number or radiator panel number) and the orbiter mission when the impact occurred. Additional detail on the type of particle that produced the damage site is provided when sampling data and definitive analysis results are available. The paper will provide details and insights on the contents of the database including examples of descriptive statistics using the impact data. A discussion of post flight impact damage inspection and sampling techniques that were employed during the different observation campaigns will be presented. Future work to be discussed will be possible enhancements to the database structure and availability of the data for other researchers. A related database of ISS returned surfaces that are under development will also be introduced.

  16. Using the Reactome Database

    PubMed Central

    Haw, Robin

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the bioinformatics community in creating pathway databases. The Reactome project (a collaboration between the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, New York University Medical Center and the European Bioinformatics Institute) is one such pathway database and collects structured information on all the biological pathways and processes in the human. It is an expert-authored and peer-reviewed, curated collection of well-documented molecular reactions that span the gamut from simple intermediate metabolism to signaling pathways and complex cellular events. This information is supplemented with likely orthologous molecular reactions in mouse, rat, zebrafish, worm and other model organisms. This unit describes how to use the Reactome database to learn the steps of a biological pathway; navigate and browse through the Reactome database; identify the pathways in which a molecule of interest is involved; use the Pathway and Expression analysis tools to search the database for and visualize possible connections within user-supplied experimental data set and Reactome pathways; and the Species Comparison tool to compare human and model organism pathways. PMID:22700314

  17. GLOBAL ECOSYSTEMS DATABASE: DATABASE DOCUMENTATION AND CD-ROM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this cooperative research and development is to produce an integrated, quality controlled, global database (including time sequences) for spatially distributed modeling. he project concentrates on modern observational data, including remotely sensed data ...

  18. The Definition of a Prolonged Intensive Care Unit Stay for Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage Patients: An Application with National Health Insurance Research Database

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chien-Lung; Ting, Hsien-Wei; Huang, Hsin-Tsung

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Length of stay (LOS) in the intensive care unit (ICU) of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) patients is one of the most important issues. The disease severity, psychosocial factors, and institutional factors will influence the length of ICU stay. This study is used in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) to define the threshold of a prolonged ICU stay in sICH patients. Methods. This research collected the demographic data of sICH patients in the NHIRD from 2005 to 2009. The threshold of prolonged ICU stay was calculated using change point analysis. Results. There were 1599 sICH patients included. A prolonged ICU stay was defined as being equal to or longer than 10 days. There were 436 prolonged ICU stay cases and 1163 nonprolonged cases. Conclusion. This study showed that the threshold of a prolonged ICU stay is a good indicator of hospital utilization in ICH patients. Different hospitals have their own different care strategies that can be identified with a prolonged ICU stay. This indicator can be improved using quality control methods such as complications prevention and efficiency of ICU bed management. Patients' stay in ICUs and in hospitals will be shorter if integrated care systems are established. PMID:25126579

  19. FATE OF OCEAN DUMPED ACID-IRON WASTE IN A MERL (MARINE ECOSYSTEMS RESEARCH LABORATORY) STRATIFIED MICROCOSM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies have provided information on the short-term effects of acid-iron waste disposal at a deep water dumpsite off the coast of New Jersey. To assess the long-term effects of the acid-iron waste, an experiment was conducted at the MERL facility (Marine Ecosystems Research...

  20. Stackfile Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deVarvalho, Robert; Desai, Shailen D.; Haines, Bruce J.; Kruizinga, Gerhard L.; Gilmer, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This software provides storage retrieval and analysis functionality for managing satellite altimetry data. It improves the efficiency and analysis capabilities of existing database software with improved flexibility and documentation. It offers flexibility in the type of data that can be stored. There is efficient retrieval either across the spatial domain or the time domain. Built-in analysis tools are provided for frequently performed altimetry tasks. This software package is used for storing and manipulating satellite measurement data. It was developed with a focus on handling the requirements of repeat-track altimetry missions such as Topex and Jason. It was, however, designed to work with a wide variety of satellite measurement data [e.g., Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment -- GRACE). The software consists of several command-line tools for importing, retrieving, and analyzing satellite measurement data.

  1. [The retrospection of nucleic acids metabolism research before the 1950s].

    PubMed

    Zhang, He

    2015-09-01

    People found the guanine in the 1840s and the nucleic acid in the 1860s. But they did not know the relationship between them. Later, people found various bases, confirmed the relationship between bases and nucleic acids, and understood the three basic processes of katabolic metabolism of nucleic acids by a number of scientists, especially with Kossel's efforts. In the 1940s, Kalckar isolated and identified some key enzymes of nucleotides metabolism, as well as Buchanan and Greenberg found the two processes of synthesis of nucleotides. The model of DNA double helix came out in 1953. Kornberg proved DNA is self-replicating in 1956. Stahl, Meselson and Vinograd found the semiconservative replication mechanism of DNA in 1958. At the same time, Ochoa found the polynucleotide phosphorylase, the enzyme can catalyze the synthesis of RNA, and synthesized RNA in 1955. Kornberg synthesized DNA on the basis of Ochoa's work in 1956. So far people found the processes of genetic information flow from DNA to RNA. It contributed to the comprehensive recognition and exploration of the pathways of genetic information and made the research of gene expression and regulation possible. PMID:26813094

  2. The AMMA database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Cloche, Sophie; Eymard, Laurence; Fleury, Laurence; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Moulaye, Oumarou; Ramage, Karim

    2010-05-01

    The AMMA project includes aircraft, ground-based and ocean measurements, an intensive use of satellite data and diverse modelling studies. Therefore, the AMMA database aims at storing a great amount and a large variety of data, and at providing the data as rapidly and safely as possible to the AMMA research community. In order to stimulate the exchange of information and collaboration between researchers from different disciplines or using different tools, the database provides a detailed description of the products and uses standardized formats. The AMMA database contains: - AMMA field campaigns datasets; - historical data in West Africa from 1850 (operational networks and previous scientific programs); - satellite products from past and future satellites, (re-)mapped on a regular latitude/longitude grid and stored in NetCDF format (CF Convention); - model outputs from atmosphere or ocean operational (re-)analysis and forecasts, and from research simulations. The outputs are processed as the satellite products are. Before accessing the data, any user has to sign the AMMA data and publication policy. This chart only covers the use of data in the framework of scientific objectives and categorically excludes the redistribution of data to third parties and the usage for commercial applications. Some collaboration between data producers and users, and the mention of the AMMA project in any publication is also required. The AMMA database and the associated on-line tools have been fully developed and are managed by two teams in France (IPSL Database Centre, Paris and OMP, Toulouse). Users can access data of both data centres using an unique web portal. This website is composed of different modules : - Registration: forms to register, read and sign the data use chart when an user visits for the first time - Data access interface: friendly tool allowing to build a data extraction request by selecting various criteria like location, time, parameters... The request can

  3. JDD, Inc. Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David A., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    JDD Inc, is a maintenance and custodial contracting company whose mission is to provide their clients in the private and government sectors "quality construction, construction management and cleaning services in the most efficient and cost effective manners, (JDD, Inc. Mission Statement)." This company provides facilities support for Fort Riley in Fo,rt Riley, Kansas and the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field here in Cleveland, Ohio. JDD, Inc. is owned and operated by James Vaughn, who started as painter at NASA Glenn and has been working here for the past seventeen years. This summer I worked under Devan Anderson, who is the safety manager for JDD Inc. in the Logistics and Technical Information Division at Glenn Research Center The LTID provides all transportation, secretarial, security needs and contract management of these various services for the center. As a safety manager, my mentor provides Occupational Health and Safety Occupation (OSHA) compliance to all JDD, Inc. employees and handles all other issues (Environmental Protection Agency issues, workers compensation, safety and health training) involving to job safety. My summer assignment was not as considered "groundbreaking research" like many other summer interns have done in the past, but it is just as important and beneficial to JDD, Inc. I initially created a database using a Microsoft Excel program to classify and categorize data pertaining to numerous safety training certification courses instructed by our safety manager during the course of the fiscal year. This early portion of the database consisted of only data (training field index, employees who were present at these training courses and who was absent) from the training certification courses. Once I completed this phase of the database, I decided to expand the database and add as many dimensions to it as possible. Throughout the last seven weeks, I have been compiling more data from day to day operations and been adding the

  4. The Neotoma Paleoecology Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, E. C.; Ashworth, A. C.; Barnosky, A. D.; Betancourt, J. L.; Bills, B.; Booth, R.; Blois, J.; Charles, D. F.; Graham, R. W.; Goring, S. J.; Hausmann, S.; Smith, A. J.; Williams, J. W.; Buckland, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Neotoma Paleoecology Database (www.neotomadb.org) is a multiproxy, open-access, relational database that includes fossil data for the past 5 million years (the late Neogene and Quaternary Periods). Modern distributional data for various organisms are also being made available for calibration and paleoecological analyses. The project is a collaborative effort among individuals from more than 20 institutions worldwide, including domain scientists representing a spectrum of Pliocene-Quaternary fossil data types, as well as experts in information technology. Working groups are active for diatoms, insects, ostracodes, pollen and plant macroscopic remains, testate amoebae, rodent middens, vertebrates, age models, geochemistry and taphonomy. Groups are also active in developing online tools for data analyses and for developing modules for teaching at different levels. A key design concept of NeotomaDB is that stewards for various data types are able to remotely upload and manage data. Cooperatives for different kinds of paleo data, or from different regions, can appoint their own stewards. Over the past year, much progress has been made on development of the steward software-interface that will enable this capability. The steward interface uses web services that provide access to the database. More generally, these web services enable remote programmatic access to the database, which both desktop and web applications can use and which provide real-time access to the most current data. Use of these services can alleviate the need to download the entire database, which can be out-of-date as soon as new data are entered. In general, the Neotoma web services deliver data either from an entire table or from the results of a view. Upon request, new web services can be quickly generated. Future developments will likely expand the spatial and temporal dimensions of the database. NeotomaDB is open to receiving new datasets and stewards from the global Quaternary community

  5. Data Extraction and Management in Networks of Observational Health Care Databases for Scientific Research: A Comparison of EU-ADR, OMOP, Mini-Sentinel and MATRICE Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Gini, Rosa; Schuemie, Martijn; Brown, Jeffrey; Ryan, Patrick; Vacchi, Edoardo; Coppola, Massimo; Cazzola, Walter; Coloma, Preciosa; Berni, Roberto; Diallo, Gayo; Oliveira, José Luis; Avillach, Paul; Trifirò, Gianluca; Rijnbeek, Peter; Bellentani, Mariadonata; van Der Lei, Johan; Klazinga, Niek; Sturkenboom, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We see increased use of existing observational data in order to achieve fast and transparent production of empirical evidence in health care research. Multiple databases are often used to increase power, to assess rare exposures or outcomes, or to study diverse populations. For privacy and sociological reasons, original data on individual subjects can’t be shared, requiring a distributed network approach where data processing is performed prior to data sharing. Case Descriptions and Variation Among Sites: We created a conceptual framework distinguishing three steps in local data processing: (1) data reorganization into a data structure common across the network; (2) derivation of study variables not present in original data; and (3) application of study design to transform longitudinal data into aggregated data sets for statistical analysis. We applied this framework to four case studies to identify similarities and differences in the United States and Europe: Exploring and Understanding Adverse Drug Reactions by Integrative Mining of Clinical Records and Biomedical Knowledge (EU-ADR), Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership (OMOP), the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) Mini-Sentinel, and the Italian network—the Integration of Content Management Information on the Territory of Patients with Complex Diseases or with Chronic Conditions (MATRICE). Findings: National networks (OMOP, Mini-Sentinel, MATRICE) all adopted shared procedures for local data reorganization. The multinational EU-ADR network needed locally defined procedures to reorganize its heterogeneous data into a common structure. Derivation of new data elements was centrally defined in all networks but the procedure was not shared in EU-ADR. Application of study design was a common and shared procedure in all the case studies. Computer procedures were embodied in different programming languages, including SAS, R, SQL, Java, and C++. Conclusion: Using our conceptual framework

  6. Database Marketplace 2002: The Database Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol; Baker, Gayle; Robinson, William

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the database industry over the past year, including new companies and services, company closures, popular database formats, popular access methods, and changes in existing products and services. Lists 33 firms and their database services; 33 firms and their database products; and 61 company profiles. (LRW)

  7. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program: Acidic deposition: An inventory of non-Federal research, monitoring, and assessment information

    SciTech Connect

    Herrick, C.N.

    1990-01-01

    The Acid Precipitation Act of 1990 (Title VII of the Energy Security Act of 1980, P.L. 96-294) established the Interagency Task Force on Acid Precipitation to develop and implement the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). The information included in the document was provided to NAPAP's Task Group Leaders and State-of-Science and State-of-Technology authors in July 1989. The early release was intended to assure that the authors would be aware of the information at an early phase in the assessment production process.

  8. CIRRIE DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    International rehabilitation research published between 1990 and the present. Over 18,000 citations. In addition to indexing from mainstream journals and Internet sites, CIRRIE also includes citations to resources not readily available to U.S. researchers. There are over 18,000 c...

  9. Are IBD patients more likely to have a prior diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome? Report of a case-control study in the General Practice Research Database

    PubMed Central

    Siffledeen, Jesse; Fleming, Kate M

    2014-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients are sometimes first diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which may be construed as a misdiagnosis. Objective The objective of this article is to determine if this occurs more than expected by chance. Methods We conducted a case-control study nested in the General Practice Research Database. We selected incident cases of IBD and up to 10 matched controls for each. We assessed the proportions with IBS recorded prior to the IBD diagnosis and variation by age, sex, and calendar time. We compared proportions affected in fixed time periods and conducted conditional logistic regression to derive odds ratios. Results The 20, 193 cases were three times as likely as controls to have a prior record of IBS. Fifteen per cent of IBD cases and 5% of controls had IBS coded before diagnosis with 11% having a code for IBS over one year before IBD (cf. 5% of controls) and 6% over five years earlier (cf. 3%). These figures roughly doubled if typical antispasmodic therapies were assumed to represent IBS diagnoses. Conclusion If excess IBS diagnoses represent misdiagnoses of IBD, our results suggest that about 10% of IBD patients are misdiagnosed and in 3% of cases this may persist for five or more years. PMID:25452846

  10. The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR): a model organism database providing a centralized, curated gateway to Arabidopsis biology, research materials and community.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Seung Yon; Beavis, William; Berardini, Tanya Z; Chen, Guanghong; Dixon, David; Doyle, Aisling; Garcia-Hernandez, Margarita; Huala, Eva; Lander, Gabriel; Montoya, Mary; Miller, Neil; Mueller, Lukas A; Mundodi, Suparna; Reiser, Leonore; Tacklind, Julie; Weems, Dan C; Wu, Yihe; Xu, Iris; Yoo, Daniel; Yoon, Jungwon; Zhang, Peifen

    2003-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is the most widely-studied plant today. The concerted efforts of over 11 000 researchers and 4000 organizations around the world are generating a rich diversity and quantity of information and materials. This information is made available through a comprehensive on-line resource called the Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) (http://arabidopsis.org), which is accessible via commonly used web browsers and can be searched and downloaded in a number of ways. In the last two years, efforts have been focused on increasing data content and diversity, functionally annotating genes and gene products with controlled vocabularies, and improving data retrieval, analysis and visualization tools. New information include sequence polymorphisms including alleles, germplasms and phenotypes, Gene Ontology annotations, gene families, protein information, metabolic pathways, gene expression data from microarray experiments and seed and DNA stocks. New data visualization and analysis tools include SeqViewer, which interactively displays the genome from the whole chromosome down to 10 kb of nucleotide sequence and AraCyc, a metabolic pathway database and map tool that allows overlaying expression data onto the pathway diagrams. Finally, we have recently incorporated seed and DNA stock information from the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (ABRC) and implemented a shopping-cart style on-line ordering system. PMID:12519987

  11. Trends in sexually transmitted infections in general practice 1990-2000: population based study using data from the UK general practice research database

    PubMed Central

    Cassell, Jackie A; Mercer, Catherine H; Sutcliffe, Lorna; Petersen, Irene; Islam, Amir; Brook, M Gary; Ross, Jonathan D; Kinghorn, George R; Simms, Ian; Hughes, Gwenda; Majeed, Azeem; Stephenson, Judith M; Johnson, Anne M; Hayward, Andrew C

    2006-01-01

    Objective To describe the contribution of primary care to the diagnosis and management of sexually transmitted infections in the United Kingdom, 1990-2000, in the context of increasing incidence of infections in genitourinary medicine clinics. Design Population based study. Setting UK primary care. Participants Patients registered in the UK general practice research database. Main outcome measures Incidence of diagnosed sexually transmitted infections in primary care and estimation of the proportion of major such infections diagnosed in primary care. Results An estimated 23.0% of chlamydia cases in women but only 5.3% in men were diagnosed and treated in primary care during 1998-2000, along with 49.2% cases of non-specific urethritis and urethral discharge in men and 5.7% cases of gonorrhoea in women and 2.9% in men. Rates of diagnosis in primary care rose substantially in the late 1990s. Conclusions A substantial and increasing number of sexually transmitted infections are diagnosed and treated in primary care in the United Kingdom, with sex ratios differing from those in genitourinary medicine clinics. Large numbers of men are treated in primary care for presumptive sexually transmitted infections. PMID:16439371

  12. Biomedical term mapping databases.

    PubMed

    Wren, Jonathan D; Chang, Jeffrey T; Pustejovsky, James; Adar, Eytan; Garner, Harold R; Altman, Russ B

    2005-01-01

    Longer words and phrases are frequently mapped onto a shorter form such as abbreviations or acronyms for efficiency of communication. These abbreviations are pervasive in all aspects of biology and medicine and as the amount of biomedical literature grows, so does the number of abbreviations and the average number of definitions per abbreviation. Even more confusing, different authors will often abbreviate the same word/phrase differently. This ambiguity impedes our ability to retrieve information, integrate databases and mine textual databases for content. Efforts to standardize nomenclature, especially those doing so retrospectively, need to be aware of different abbreviatory mappings and spelling variations. To address this problem, there have been several efforts to develop computer algorithms to identify the mapping of terms between short and long form within a large body of literature. To date, four such algorithms have been applied to create online databases that comprehensively map biomedical terms and abbreviations within MEDLINE: ARGH (http://lethargy.swmed.edu/ARGH/argh.asp), the Stanford Biomedical Abbreviation Server (http://bionlp.stanford.edu/abbreviation/), AcroMed (http://medstract.med.tufts.edu/acro1.1/index.htm) and SaRAD (http://www.hpl.hp.com/research/idl/projects/abbrev.html). In addition to serving as useful computational tools, these databases serve as valuable references that help biologists keep up with an ever-expanding vocabulary of terms. PMID:15608198

  13. LQTS gene LOVD database.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Moss, Arthur; Cong, Peikuan; Pan, Min; Chang, Bingxi; Zheng, Liangrong; Fang, Quan; Zareba, Wojciech; Robinson, Jennifer; Lin, Changsong; Li, Zhongxiang; Wei, Junfang; Zeng, Qiang; Qi, Ming

    2010-11-01

    The Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders that predisposes young individuals to ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. LQTS is mainly caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of cardiac ion channels (KCNQ1, KCNH2,SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2). Many other genes involved in LQTS have been described recently(KCNJ2, AKAP9, ANK2, CACNA1C, SCNA4B, SNTA1, and CAV3). We created an online database(http://www.genomed.org/LOVD/introduction.html) that provides information on variants in LQTS-associated genes. As of February 2010, the database contains 1738 unique variants in 12 genes. A total of 950 variants are considered pathogenic, 265 are possible pathogenic, 131 are unknown/unclassified, and 292 have no known pathogenicity. In addition to these mutations collected from published literature, we also submitted information on gene variants, including one possible novel pathogenic mutation in the KCNH2 splice site found in ten Chinese families with documented arrhythmias. The remote user is able to search the data and is encouraged to submit new mutations into the database. The LQTS database will become a powerful tool for both researchers and clinicians. PMID:20809527

  14. Identifying gaps for research prioritisation: Global burden of external causes of injury as reflected in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews☆

    PubMed Central

    Karimkhani, Chante; Trikha, Ritika; Aksut, Baran; Jones, Trevor; Boyers, Lindsay N.; Schlichte, Megan; Pederson, Hannah; Okland, Tyler; DiGuiseppi, Carolyn; Nasser, Mona; Naghavi, Mohsen; Vos, Theo; Yoong, Sze Lin; Wolfenden, Luke; Murray, Christopher J.L.; Dellavalle, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Burden of disease should impact research prioritisation. Objective To analyse the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and determine whether systematic reviews and protocols accurately represent disease burden, as measured by disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2010 Study. Methods Two investigators collected GBD disability metrics for 12 external causes of injury in the GBD 2010 Study. These external causes were then assessed for systematic review and protocol representation in CDSR. Data was collected during the month of April 2015. There were no study participants aside from the researchers. Percentage of total 2010 DALYs, 2010 DALY rank, and median DALY percent change from 1990 to 2010 of the 12 external causes of injury were compared with CDSR representation of systematic reviews and protocols. Data were analysed for correlation using Spearman rank correlation. Results Eleven of the 12 causes were represented by at least one systematic review or protocol in CDSR; the category collective violence and legal intervention had no representation in CDSR. Correlation testing revealed a strong positive correlation that was statistically significant. Representation of road injury; interpersonal violence; fire, heat, and hot substances; mechanical forces; poisonings, adverse effect of medical treatment, and animal contact was well aligned with respect to DALY. Representation of falls was greater compared to DALY, while self-harm, exposure to forces of nature, and other transport injury representation was lower compared to DALY. Conclusions and relevance CDSR representation of external causes of injury strongly correlates with disease burden. The number of systematic reviews and protocols was well aligned for seven out of 12 causes of injury. These results provide high-quality and transparent data that may guide future prioritisation decisions. PMID:26804937

  15. Construction of a Geographical Database of Classical-Archaic Manufactures, Found in the Survey of the Greek Colony Himera (sicily, Italy). Application and Methodologies for AN Experimental Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papa, M. A.; Tardo, V.

    2011-09-01

    This research has analysed the distribution of ceramic finds from classical and archaic ages in the territory of the ancient Greek colony Himera, a town situated near Termini Imerese, in the province of Palermo (Sicily, Italy), which has been the site of systematic excavations carried out by the University of Palermo since the Sixties. The study of about 1500 ceramic fragments, dated back to the 6th-5th century B.C., has allowed to develop an approach to the understanding of the role played by ceramics in the relations between different societies and cultures. Besides the most common analysis factors for the ceramic manufactures, such as their production and distribution, a major factor is the way the manufactures were used. From this wider perspective, a new methodology has been developed about information potential of functional analysis. The interpretation of data about the manufacture distribution was made by means of GIS methodologies, querying the alphanumerical classification database and relating the manufacture typological data to the geo-cartographic ones by means of applying intersite-level spatial analysis. Thus, each archaeological piece of information about the finds can be analysed in relation to the territory geo-morphological features and the obtained data can be processed with specific software environments, in order to suggest reconstruction models for the anthropic landscape, based on the relation between coeval sites and distance from specific environment features — for example, distance from water sources, raw materials, road condition etc. The computer application used for data handling, presentation and analysis, becomes this way a tool of research aimed at the comprehension of settlement dynamics in the historical scenery. This study is the occasion to propose such an analysis system of cultural heritage as a new tool to promote it and to increase its value, applying a territorial context related methodology founded on scientific

  16. Information Literacy Skills: Comparing and Evaluating Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grismore, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this database comparison is to express the importance of teaching information literacy skills and to apply those skills to commonly used Internet-based research tools. This paper includes a comparison and evaluation of three databases (ProQuest, ERIC, and Google Scholar). It includes strengths and weaknesses of each database based…

  17. Unifying Memory and Database Transactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Ricardo J.; Lourenço, João M.

    Software Transactional Memory is a concurrency control technique gaining increasing popularity, as it provides high-level concurrency control constructs and eases the development of highly multi-threaded applications. But this easiness comes at the expense of restricting the operations that can be executed within a memory transaction, and operations such as terminal and file I/O are either not allowed or incur in serious performance penalties. Database I/O is another example of operations that usually are not allowed within a memory transaction. This paper proposes to combine memory and database transactions in a single unified model, benefiting from the ACID properties of the database transactions and from the speed of main memory data processing. The new unified model covers, without differentiating, both memory and database operations. Thus, the users are allowed to freely intertwine memory and database accesses within the same transaction, knowing that the memory and database contents will always remain consistent and that the transaction will atomically abort or commit the operations in both memory and database. This approach allows to increase the granularity of the in-memory atomic actions and hence, simplifies the reasoning about them.

  18. Development of web based database on biochemical characteristics of rapeseed-mustard.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Bala, Manju

    2013-01-01

    Rapeseed-mustard oil is an essential dietary component, in India. The modification of rapeseed- mustard for fatty acid composition of seed oil to develop new genotypes having alternative oil and meal characteristics has been an important objective in quality breeding. Moreover, Breeding efforts in India are in progress to develop double low varieties to meet the internationally acceptable standards of oil and seed meal. So, information on the nutritional and anti-nutritional make-up of rapeseed-mustard oil and seed meal of the existing germplasm would be quite useful for the researchers especially breeders involved in the quality improvement programmes. In the present study database on biochemical characteristics of rapeseed-mustard has been developed using open source technology LAMP. The database provides the information on 14 important biochemical characters such as oil, saturated fatty acids, oleic, linoleic, linolenic, eicosenoic, erucic acid, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), ω6/ω3 ratio, protein, glucosinolate, phenol, and fiber content. It offers web interface to submit and search data in the database. The database presently comprises biochemical characteristics of germplasm accessions, advance breeding lines and notified varieties of rapeseed-mustard. The database developed will be useful to the breeders in the selection of desired genotype with specific traits. PMID:23861571

  19. Database systems for knowledge-based discovery.

    PubMed

    Jagarlapudi, Sarma A R P; Kishan, K V Radha

    2009-01-01

    Several database systems have been developed to provide valuable information from the bench chemist to biologist, medical practitioner to pharmaceutical scientist in a structured format. The advent of information technology and computational power enhanced the ability to access large volumes of data in the form of a database where one could do compilation, searching, archiving, analysis, and finally knowledge derivation. Although, data are of variable types the tools used for database creation, searching and retrieval are similar. GVK BIO has been developing databases from publicly available scientific literature in specific areas like medicinal chemistry, clinical research, and mechanism-based toxicity so that the structured databases containing vast data could be used in several areas of research. These databases were classified as reference centric or compound centric depending on the way the database systems were designed. Integration of these databases with knowledge derivation tools would enhance the value of these systems toward better drug design and discovery. PMID:19727614

  20. Curcumin Resource Database

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil; Chetia, Hasnahana; Sharma, Swagata; Kabiraj, Debajyoti; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra; Bora, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is one of the most intensively studied diarylheptanoid, Curcuma longa being its principal producer. This apart, a class of promising curcumin analogs has been generated in laboratories, aptly named as Curcuminoids which are showing huge potential in the fields of medicine, food technology, etc. The lack of a universal source of data on curcumin as well as curcuminoids has been felt by the curcumin research community for long. Hence, in an attempt to address this stumbling block, we have developed Curcumin Resource Database (CRDB) that aims to perform as a gateway-cum-repository to access all relevant data and related information on curcumin and its analogs. Currently, this database encompasses 1186 curcumin analogs, 195 molecular targets, 9075 peer reviewed publications, 489 patents and 176 varieties of C. longa obtained by extensive data mining and careful curation from numerous sources. Each data entry is identified by a unique CRDB ID (identifier). Furnished with a user-friendly web interface and in-built search engine, CRDB provides well-curated and cross-referenced information that are hyperlinked with external sources. CRDB is expected to be highly useful to the researchers working on structure as well as ligand-based molecular design of curcumin analogs. Database URL: http://www.crdb.in PMID:26220923

  1. The styrene-maleic acid copolymer: a versatile tool in membrane research.

    PubMed

    Dörr, Jonas M; Scheidelaar, Stefan; Koorengevel, Martijn C; Dominguez, Juan J; Schäfer, Marre; van Walree, Cornelis A; Killian, J Antoinette

    2016-01-01

    A new and promising tool in membrane research is the detergent-free solubilization of membrane proteins by styrene-maleic acid copolymers (SMAs). These amphipathic molecules are able to solubilize lipid bilayers in the form of nanodiscs that are bounded by the polymer. Thus, membrane proteins can be directly extracted from cells in a water-soluble form while conserving a patch of native membrane around them. In this review article, we briefly discuss current methods of membrane protein solubilization and stabilization. We then zoom in on SMAs, describe their physico-chemical properties, and discuss their membrane-solubilizing effect. This is followed by an overview of studies in which SMA has been used to isolate and investigate membrane proteins. Finally, potential future applications of the methodology are discussed for structural and functional studies on membrane proteins in a near-native environment and for characterizing protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions. PMID:26639665

  2. Database machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiefel, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The functions and performance characteristics of data base machines (DBM), including machines currently being studied in research laboratories and those currently offered on a commerical basis are discussed. The cost/benefit considerations that must be recognized in selecting a DBM are discussed, as well as the future outlook for such machines.

  3. ARTI Refrigerant Database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1992-11-09

    The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air- conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The database identifies sources of specific information on R-32, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-245ca, R-290 (propane), R- 717 (ammonia), ethers, and others as well as azeotropic and zeotropic and zeotropic blends of these fluids. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, ester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents on compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. A computerized version is available that includes retrieval software.

  4. Overlap in Bibliographic Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, William W.; Wilson, Concepcion S.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the topic of Fuzzy Set Theory to determine the overlap of coverage in bibliographic databases. Highlights include examples of comparisons of database coverage; frequency distribution of the degree of overlap; records with maximum overlap; records unique to one database; intra-database duplicates; and overlap in the top ten databases.…

  5. NUCLEAR DATABASES FOR REACTOR APPLICATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    PRITYCHENKO, B.; ARCILLA, R.; BURROWS, T.; HERMAN, M.W.; MUGHABGHAB, S.; OBLOZINSKY, P.; ROCHMAN, D.; SONZOGNI, A.A.; TULI, J.; WINCHELL, D.F.

    2006-06-05

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC): An overview of nuclear databases, related products, nuclear data Web services and publications. The NNDC collects, evaluates, and disseminates nuclear physics data for basic research and applied nuclear technologies. The NNDC maintains and contributes to the nuclear reaction (ENDF, CSISRS) and nuclear structure databases along with several others databases (CapGam, MIRD, IRDF-2002) and provides coordination for the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) and the US Nuclear Data Program (USNDP). The Center produces several publications and codes such as Atlas of Neutron Resonances, Nuclear Wallet Cards booklets and develops codes, such as nuclear reaction model code Empire.

  6. A human dietary arachidonic acid supplementation study conducted in a metabolic research unit: rationale and design.

    PubMed

    Nelson, G J; Kelley, D S; Emken, E A; Phinney, S D; Kyle, D; Ferretti, A

    1997-04-01

    While there are many reports of studies that fed arachidonic acid (AA) to animals, there are very few reports of AA feeding to humans under controlled conditions. This 130-d study was conceived as a controlled, symmetrical crossover design with healthy, adult male volunteers. They lived in the metabolic research unit (MRU) of the Western Human Nutrition Research (WHNRC) for the entire study. All food was prepared by the WHNRC kitchen. The basal (low-AA) diet consisted of natural foods (30 en% fat, 15 en% protein, and 55 en% carbohydrate), containing 210 mg/d of AA, and met the recommended daily allowance for all nutrients. The high-AA (intervention) diet was similar except that 1.5 g/d of AA in the form of a triglyceride containing 50% AA replaced an equal amount of high-oleic safflower oil in the basal diet. The subjects (ages 20 to 39) were within -10 to +20% of ideal body weight, nonsmoking, and not allowed alcohol in the MRU. Their exercise level was constant, and their body weights were maintained within 2% of entry level. Subjects were initially fed the low-AA diet for 15 d. On day 16, half of the subjects (group A) wee placed on the high-AA diet, and the other group (B) remained on the low-AA diets. On day 65, the two groups switched diets. On day 115, group B returned to the low-AA diet. This design, assuming no carryover effect, allowed us to merge the data from the two groups, with the data comparison days being 65 (low-AA) and 115 (high-AA) for group B and 130 (low-AA) and 65 (high-AA) for group A. The main indices studied were the fatty acid composition of the plasma, red blood cells, platelets, and adipose tissue; in vitro platelet aggregation, bleeding times, clotting factors; immune response as measured by delayed hypersensitivity skin tests, cellular proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to various mitogens and antigens, natural killer cell activity, and response to measles/mumps/rubella and influenza vaccines; the

  7. PMAG: Relational Database Definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keizer, P.; Koppers, A.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Genevey, A.; Staudigel, H.; Helly, J.

    2002-12-01

    site location (latitude, longitude, elevation), geography (continent, country, region), geological setting (lithospheric plate or block, tectonic setting), geological age (age range, timescale name, stratigraphic position) and materials (rock type, classification, alteration state). Each data point and method description is also related to its peer-reviewed reference [citation ID] as archived in the EarthRef Reference Database (ERR). This guarantees direct traceability all the way to its original source, where the user can find the bibliography of each PMAG reference along with every abstract, data table, technical note and/or appendix that are available in digital form and that can be downloaded as PDF/JPEG images and Microsoft Excel/Word data files. This may help scientists and teachers in performing their research since they have easy access to all the scientific data. It also allows for checking potential errors during the digitization process. Please visit the PMAG website at http://earthref.org/PMAG/ for more information.

  8. Small Business Innovations (Integrated Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Because of the diversity of NASA's information systems, it was necessary to develop DAVID as a central database management system. Under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, Ken Wanderman and Associates, Inc. designed software tools enabling scientists to interface with DAVID and commercial database management systems, as well as artificial intelligence programs. The software has been installed at a number of data centers and is commercially available.

  9. The EXOSAT database system. Available databases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, C.

    1991-02-01

    This User's Guide describes the databases that are currently available by remote login to the EXOSAT/ESTEC site of the EXOSAT database system. This includes where ever possible the following: brief descriptions of each observatory, telescope and instrument references to more complete observatory descriptions a list of the contents of each database and how it was generated, parameter descriptions.

  10. ARTI Refrigerant Database

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, J.M.

    1993-04-30

    The Refrigerant Database consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included. The database identifies sources of specific information on R-32, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-245ca, R-290 (propane), R-717 (ammonia), ethers, and others as well as azeotropic and zeotropic blends of these fluids. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, ester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. Incomplete citations or abstracts are provided for some documents to accelerate availability of the information and will be completed or replaced in future updates.

  11. ARTI refrigerant database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1997-02-01

    The Refrigerant Database is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilitates access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufacturers and those using alterative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included, though some may be added at a later date. The database identifies sources of specific information on various refrigerants. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, polyolester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. Incomplete citations or abstracts are provided for some documents. They are included to accelerate availability of the information and will be completed or replaced in future updates.

  12. ARTI refrigerant database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1998-08-01

    The Refrigerant Database is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilitates access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufactures and those using alternative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included, though some may be added at a later date. The database identifies sources of specific information on many refrigerants including propane, ammonia, water, carbon dioxide, propylene, ethers, and others as well as azeotropic and zeotropic blends of these fluids. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, polyolester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. Incomplete citations or abstracts are provided for some documents. They are included to accelerate availability of the information and will be completed or replaced in future updates.

  13. Human cancer databases (review).

    PubMed

    Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Michalopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is one of the four major non‑communicable diseases (NCD), responsible for ~14.6% of all human deaths. Currently, there are >100 different known types of cancer and >500 genes involved in cancer. Ongoing research efforts have been focused on cancer etiology and therapy. As a result, there is an exponential growth of cancer‑associated data from diverse resources, such as scientific publications, genome‑wide association studies, gene expression experiments, gene‑gene or protein‑protein interaction data, enzymatic assays, epigenomics, immunomics and cytogenetics, stored in relevant repositories. These data are complex and heterogeneous, ranging from unprocessed, unstructured data in the form of raw sequences and polymorphisms to well‑annotated, structured data. Consequently, the storage, mining, retrieval and analysis of these data in an efficient and meaningful manner pose a major challenge to biomedical investigators. In the current review, we present the central, publicly accessible databases that contain data pertinent to cancer, the resources available for delivering and analyzing information from these databases, as well as databases dedicated to specific types of cancer. Examples for this wealth of cancer‑related information and bioinformatic tools have also been provided. PMID:25369839

  14. The H-Index of `An Approach to Correlate Tandem Mass Spectral Data of Peptides with Amino Acid Sequences in a Protein Database'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, Michael P.

    2015-11-01

    Over 20 years ago a remarkable paper was published in the Journal of American Society for Mass Spectrometry. This paper from Jimmy Eng, Ashley McCormack, and John Yates described the use of protein databases to drive the interpretation of tandem mass spectra of peptides. This paper now has over 3660 citations and continues to average more than 260 per year over the last decade. This is an amazing scientific achievement. The reason for this is the paper was a cutting edge development at the moment in time when genomes of organisms were being sequenced, protein and peptide mass spectrometry was growing into the field of proteomics, and the power of computing was growing quickly in accordance with Moore's law. This work by the Yates lab grew in importance as genomics, proteomics, and computation all advanced and eventually resulted in the widely used SEQUEST algorithm and platform for the analysis of tandem mass spectrometry data. This commentary provides an analysis of the impact of this paper by analyzing the citations it has generated and the impact of these citing papers.

  15. BSDB: the Biomolecule Stretching Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Sikora, Mateusz; Sulkowska, Joanna I.; Witkowski, Bartlomiej

    2011-03-01

    Despite more than a decade of experiments on single biomolecule manipulation, mechanical properties of only several scores of proteins have been measured. A characteristic scale of the force of resistance to stretching, Fmax , has been found to range between ~ 10 and 480 pN. The Biomolecule Stretching Data Base (BSDB) described here provides information about expected values of Fmax for, currently, 17 134 proteins. The values and other characteristics of the unfolding proces, including the nature of identified mechanical clamps, are available at www://info.ifpan.edu.pl/BSDB/. They have been obtained through simulations within a structure-based model which correlates satisfactorily with the available experimental data on stretching. BSDB also lists experimental data and results of the existing all-atom simulations. The database offers a Protein-Data-Bank-wide guide to mechano-stability of proteins. Its description is provided by a forthcoming Nucleic Acids Research paper. Supported by EC FUNMOL project FP7-NMP-2007-SMALL-1, and European Regional Development Fund: Innovative Economy (POIG.01.01.02-00-008/08).

  16. Current Progress and Future Research on the Production of Oxygenated Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxygenated (hydroxy-, epoxy-) fatty acids such as ricinoleic, vernolic and /or sebacic acids are high value chemicals and can be used to produce polymers and specialty chemicals. Oxygenated fatty acids also have many bioactive properties, such as antimicrobial activity against Salmonella, Staphyloc...

  17. Database tomography for commercial application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostoff, Ronald N.; Eberhart, Henry J.

    1994-01-01

    Database tomography is a method for extracting themes and their relationships from text. The algorithms, employed begin with word frequency and word proximity analysis and build upon these results. When the word 'database' is used, think of medical or police records, patents, journals, or papers, etc. (any text information that can be computer stored). Database tomography features a full text, user interactive technique enabling the user to identify areas of interest, establish relationships, and map trends for a deeper understanding of an area of interest. Database tomography concepts and applications have been reported in journals and presented at conferences. One important feature of the database tomography algorithm is that it can be used on a database of any size, and will facilitate the users ability to understand the volume of content therein. While employing the process to identify research opportunities it became obvious that this promising technology has potential applications for business, science, engineering, law, and academe. Examples include evaluating marketing trends, strategies, relationships and associations. Also, the database tomography process would be a powerful component in the area of competitive intelligence, national security intelligence and patent analysis. User interests and involvement cannot be overemphasized.

  18. Developing customer databases.

    PubMed

    Rao, S K; Shenbaga, S

    2000-01-01

    There is a growing consensus among pharmaceutical companies that more product and customer-specific approaches to marketing and selling a new drug can result in substantial increases in sales. Marketers and researchers taking a proactive micro-marketing approach to identifying, profiling, and communicating with target customers are likely to facilitate such approaches and outcomes. This article provides a working framework for creating customer databases that can be effectively mined to achieve a variety of such marketing and sales force objectives. PMID:11209474

  19. The ChEMBL bioactivity database: an update.

    PubMed

    Bento, A Patrícia; Gaulton, Anna; Hersey, Anne; Bellis, Louisa J; Chambers, Jon; Davies, Mark; Krüger, Felix A; Light, Yvonne; Mak, Lora; McGlinchey, Shaun; Nowotka, Michal; Papadatos, George; Santos, Rita; Overington, John P

    2014-01-01

    ChEMBL is an open large-scale bioactivity database (https://www.ebi.ac.uk/chembl), previously described in the 2012 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue. Since then, a variety of new data sources and improvements in functionality have contributed to the growth and utility of the resource. In particular, more comprehensive tracking of compounds from research stages through clinical development to market is provided through the inclusion of data from United States Adopted Name applications; a new richer data model for representing drug targets has been developed; and a number of methods have been put in place to allow users to more easily identify reliable data. Finally, access to ChEMBL is now available via a new Resource Description Framework format, in addition to the web-based interface, data downloads and web services. PMID:24214965

  20. The ChEMBL bioactivity database: an update

    PubMed Central

    Bento, A. Patrícia; Gaulton, Anna; Hersey, Anne; Bellis, Louisa J.; Chambers, Jon; Davies, Mark; Krüger, Felix A.; Light, Yvonne; Mak, Lora; McGlinchey, Shaun; Nowotka, Michal; Papadatos, George; Santos, Rita; Overington, John P.

    2014-01-01

    ChEMBL is an open large-scale bioactivity database (https://www.ebi.ac.uk/chembl), previously described in the 2012 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue. Since then, a variety of new data sources and improvements in functionality have contributed to the growth and utility of the resource. In particular, more comprehensive tracking of compounds from research stages through clinical development to market is provided through the inclusion of data from United States Adopted Name applications; a new richer data model for representing drug targets has been developed; and a number of methods have been put in place to allow users to more easily identify reliable data. Finally, access to ChEMBL is now available via a new Resource Description Framework format, in addition to the web-based interface, data downloads and web services. PMID:24214965

  1. Blocks database and its applications.

    PubMed

    Henikoff, J G; Henikoff, S

    1996-01-01

    Protein blocks consist of multiply aligned sequence segments without gaps that represent the most highly conserved regions of protein families. A database of blocks has been constructed by successive application of the fully automated PROTOMAT system to lists of protein family members obtained from Prosite documentation. Currently, Blocks 8.0 based on protein families documented in Prosite 12 consists of 2884 blocks representing 770 families. Searches of the Blocks Database are carried out using protein or DNA sequence queries, and results are returned with measures of significance for both single and multiple block hits. The databse has also proved useful for derivation of amino acid substitution matrices (the Blosum series) and other sets of parameters. WWW and E-mail servers provide access to the database and associated functions, including a block maker for sequences provided by the user. PMID:8743679

  2. Pyrene-functionalized oligonucleotides and locked nucleic acids (LNAs): Tools for fundamental research, diagnostics, and materials science†

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, Michael E.; Hrdlicka, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Pyrene-functionalized oligonucleotides (PFOs) are increasingly explored as tools in fundamental research, diagnostics and materials science. Their popularity is linked to the ability of pyrenes to function as polarity-sensitive and quenchable fluorophores, excimer-generating units, aromatic stacking moieties and nucleic acid duplex intercalators. These characteristics have motivated development of PFOs for detection of complementary DNA/RNA targets, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and generation of π-arrays on nucleic acid scaffolds. This Review will highlight the physical properties and applications of PFOs that are likely to provide high degree of positional control of the chromophore in nucleic acid complexes. Particular emphasis will be placed on pyrene-functionalized Locked Nucleic Acids (LNAs) since these materials display distinctive properties such as large fluorescence quantum yields, efficient discrimination of SNPs, and recognition of mixed-sequence double stranded DNA. PMID:21487621

  3. Reflective Database Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lars E.

    2009-01-01

    "Reflective Database Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a database privilege is expressed as a database query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of database access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions…

  4. Biosynthetic production of universally (13)C-labelled polyunsaturated fatty acids as reference materials for natural health product research.

    PubMed

    Le, Phuong Mai; Fraser, Catherine; Gardner, Graeme; Liang, Wei-Wan; Kralovec, Jaroslav A; Cunnane, Stephen C; Windust, Anthony J

    2007-09-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) have become important natural health products with numerous proven benefits related to brain function and cardiovascular health. Not only are omega-3 fatty acids available in a plethora of dietary supplements, but they are also increasingly being incorporated as triglycerides into conventional foods, including bread, milk, yoghurt and confectionaries. Recently, transgenic oil seed crops and livestock have been developed that enhance omega-3 fatty acid content. This diverse array of matrices presents a difficult analytical challenge and is compounded further by samples generated through clinical research. Stable isotope (13)C-labelled LCPUFA standards offer many advantages as research tools because they may be distinguished from their naturally abundant counterparts by mass spectrometry and directly incorporated as internal standards into analytical procedures. Further, (13)C-labelled LCPUFAs are safe to use as metabolic tracers to study uptake and metabolism in humans. Currently, (13)C-labelled LCPUFAs are expensive, available in limited supply and not in triglyceride form. To resolve these issues, marine heterotrophic microorganisms are being isolated and screened for LCPUFA production with a view to the efficient biosynthetic production of U-(13)C-labelled fatty acids using U-(13)C glucose as a carbon source. Of 37 isolates obtained, most were thraustochytrids, and either DHA or omega-6 docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-6) were produced as the major LCPUFA. The marine protist Hyalochlorella marina was identified as a novel source of EPA and omega-3 docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-3). As proof of principle, gram-level production of (13)C-labelled DHA has been achieved with high chemical purity ( >99%) and high (13)C incorporation levels (>90%), as confirmed by NMR and MS analyses. Finally, U-(13)C-DHA was enzymatically re-esterified to

  5. SmallSat Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petropulos, Dolores; Bittner, David; Murawski, Robert; Golden, Bert

    2015-01-01

    The SmallSat has an unrealized potential in both the private industry and in the federal government. Currently over 70 companies, 50 universities and 17 governmental agencies are involved in SmallSat research and development. In 1994, the U.S. Army Missile and Defense mapped the moon using smallSat imagery. Since then Smart Phones have introduced this imagery to the people of the world as diverse industries watched this trend. The deployment cost of smallSats is also greatly reduced compared to traditional satellites due to the fact that multiple units can be deployed in a single mission. Imaging payloads have become more sophisticated, smaller and lighter. In addition, the growth of small technology obtained from private industries has led to the more widespread use of smallSats. This includes greater revisit rates in imagery, significantly lower costs, the ability to update technology more frequently and the ability to decrease vulnerability of enemy attacks. The popularity of smallSats show a changing mentality in this fast paced world of tomorrow. What impact has this created on the NASA communication networks now and in future years? In this project, we are developing the SmallSat Relational Database which can support a simulation of smallSats within the NASA SCaN Compatability Environment for Networks and Integrated Communications (SCENIC) Modeling and Simulation Lab. The NASA Space Communications and Networks (SCaN) Program can use this modeling to project required network support needs in the next 10 to 15 years. The SmallSat Rational Database could model smallSats just as the other SCaN databases model the more traditional larger satellites, with a few exceptions. One being that the smallSat Database is designed to be built-to-order. The SmallSat database holds various hardware configurations that can be used to model a smallSat. It will require significant effort to develop as the research material can only be populated by hand to obtain the unique data

  6. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  7. Research, development, and demonstration of lead-acid batteries for electric-vehicle propulsion. Annual report for 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, D.E.

    1983-08-01

    Research programs on lead-acid batteries are reported that cover active materials utilization, active material integrity, and some technical support projects. Processing problems were encountered and corrected. Components and materials, a lead-plastic composite grid, cell designs, and deliverables are described. Cell testing is discussed, as well as battery subsystems, including fuel gage, thermal management, and electrolyte circulation. (LEW)

  8. Curcumin Resource Database.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Chetia, Hasnahana; Sharma, Swagata; Kabiraj, Debajyoti; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra; Bora, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is one of the most intensively studied diarylheptanoid, Curcuma longa being its principal producer. This apart, a class of promising curcumin analogs has been generated in laboratories, aptly named as Curcuminoids which are showing huge potential in the fields of medicine, food technology, etc. The lack of a universal source of data on curcumin as well as curcuminoids has been felt by the curcumin research community for long. Hence, in an attempt to address this stumbling block, we have developed Curcumin Resource Database (CRDB) that aims to perform as a gateway-cum-repository to access all relevant data and related information on curcumin and its analogs. Currently, this database encompasses 1186 curcumin analogs, 195 molecular targets, 9075 peer reviewed publications, 489 patents and 176 varieties of C. longa obtained by extensive data mining and careful curation from numerous sources. Each data entry is identified by a unique CRDB ID (identifier). Furnished with a user-friendly web interface and in-built search engine, CRDB provides well-curated and cross-referenced information that are hyperlinked with external sources. CRDB is expected to be highly useful to the researchers working on structure as well as ligand-based molecular design of curcumin analogs. PMID:26220923

  9. Sharing the Load: A Planning Checklist for Consortial Database Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingler, Tom

    1999-01-01

    Provides a checklist of concerns for libraries planning to implement shared research databases in a consortium environment, based on experiences at OhioLINK. Highlights include database selection criteria, licensing, pricing, funding, vendor considerations, database profiling, custom data processing, hardware selection, database access,…

  10. A database of macromolecular motions.

    PubMed Central

    Gerstein, M; Krebs, W

    1998-01-01

    We describe a database of macromolecular motions meant to be of general use to the structural community. The database, which is accessible on the World Wide Web with an entry point at http://bioinfo.mbb.yale.edu/MolMovDB , attempts to systematize all instances of protein and nucleic acid movement for which there is at least some structural information. At present it contains >120 motions, most of which are of proteins. Protein motions are further classified hierarchically into a limited number of categories, first on the basis of size (distinguishing between fragment, domain and subunit motions) and then on the basis of packing. Our packing classification divides motions into various categories (shear, hinge, other) depending on whether or not they involve sliding over a continuously maintained and tightly packed interface. In addition, the database provides some indication about the evidence behind each motion (i.e. the type of experimental information or whether the motion is inferred based on structural similarity) and attempts to describe many aspects of a motion in terms of a standardized nomenclature (e.g. the maximum rotation, the residue selection of a fixed core, etc.). Currently, we use a standard relational design to implement the database. However, the complexity and heterogeneity of the information kept in the database makes it an ideal application for an object-relational approach, and we are moving it in this direction. Specifically, in terms of storing complex information, the database contains plausible representations for motion pathways, derived from restrained 3D interpolation between known endpoint conformations. These pathways can be viewed in a variety of movie formats, and the database is associated with a server that can automatically generate these movies from submitted coordinates. PMID:9722650

  11. Overview of selected molecular biological databases

    SciTech Connect

    Rayl, K.D.; Gaasterland, T.

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the purpose, content, and design of a subset of the currently available biological databases, with an emphasis on protein databases. Databases included in this summary are 3D-ALI, Berlin RNA databank, Blocks, DSSP, EMBL Nucleotide Database, EMP, ENZYME, FSSP, GDB, GenBank, HSSP, LiMB, PDB, PIR, PKCDD, ProSite, and SWISS-PROT. The goal is to provide a starting point for researchers who wish to take advantage of the myriad available databases. Rather than providing a complete explanation of each database, we present its content and form by explaining the details of typical entries. Pointers to more complete ``user guides`` are included, along with general information on where to search for a new database.

  12. DMTB: the magnetotactic bacteria database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Lin, W.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are of interest in biogeomagnetism, rock magnetism, microbiology, biomineralization, and advanced magnetic materials because of their ability to synthesize highly ordered intracellular nano-sized magnetic minerals, magnetite or greigite. Great strides for MTB studies have been made in the past few decades. More than 600 articles concerning MTB have been published. These rapidly growing data are stimulating cross disciplinary studies in such field as biogeomagnetism. We have compiled the first online database for MTB, i.e., Database of Magnestotactic Bacteria (DMTB, http://database.biomnsl.com). It contains useful information of 16S rRNA gene sequences, oligonucleotides, and magnetic properties of MTB, and corresponding ecological metadata of sampling sites. The 16S rRNA gene sequences are collected from the GenBank database, while all other data are collected from the scientific literature. Rock magnetic properties for both uncultivated and cultivated MTB species are also included. In the DMTB database, data are accessible through four main interfaces: Site Sort, Phylo Sort, Oligonucleotides, and Magnetic Properties. References in each entry serve as links to specific pages within public databases. The online comprehensive DMTB will provide a very useful data resource for researchers from various disciplines, e.g., microbiology, rock magnetism and paleomagnetism, biogeomagnetism, magnetic material sciences and others.

  13. Rice Glycosyltransferase (GT) Phylogenomic Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ronald, Pamela

    The Ronald Laboratory staff at the University of California-Davis has a primary research focus on the genes of the rice plant. They study the role that genetics plays in the way rice plants respond to their environment. They created the Rice GT Database in order to integrate functional genomic information for putative rice Glycosyltransferases (GTs). This database contains information on nearly 800 putative rice GTs (gene models) identified by sequence similarity searches based on the Carbohydrate Active enZymes (CAZy) database. The Rice GT Database provides a platform to display user-selected functional genomic data on a phylogenetic tree. This includes sequence information, mutant line information, expression data, etc. An interactive chromosomal map shows the position of all rice GTs, and links to rice annotation databases are included. The format is intended to "facilitate the comparison of closely related GTs within different families, as well as perform global comparisons between sets of related families." [From http://ricephylogenomics.ucdavis.edu/cellwalls/gt/genInfo.shtml] See also the primary paper discussing this work: Peijian Cao, Laura E. Bartley, Ki-Hong Jung and Pamela C. Ronalda. Construction of a Rice Glycosyltransferase Phylogenomic Database and Identification of Rice-Diverged Glycosyltransferases. Molecular Plant, 2008, 1(5): 858-877.

  14. The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database.

    PubMed

    Stoesser, G; Tuli, M A; Lopez, R; Sterk, P

    1999-01-01

    The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/embl.html) constitutes Europe's primary nucleotide sequence resource. Main sources for DNA and RNA sequences are direct submissions from individual researchers, genome sequencing projects and patent applications. While automatic procedures allow incorporation of sequence data from large-scale genome sequencing centres and from the European Patent Office (EPO), the preferred submission tool for individual submitters is Webin (WWW). Through all stages, dataflow is monitored by EBI biologists communicating with the sequencing groups. In collaboration with DDBJ and GenBank the database is produced, maintained and distributed at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI). Database releases are produced quarterly and are distributed on CD-ROM. Network services allow access to the most up-to-date data collection via Internet and World Wide Web interface. EBI's Sequence Retrieval System (SRS) is a Network Browser for Databanks in Molecular Biology, integrating and linking the main nucleotide and protein databases, plus many specialised databases. For sequence similarity searching a variety of tools (e.g. Blitz, Fasta, Blast etc) are available for external users to compare their own sequences against the most currently available data in the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database and SWISS-PROT. PMID:9847133

  15. [Primary research on anti-tumor activity of panaxadiol fatty acid esters].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Hong; Zhang, Lian-Xue; Li, Xiang-Gao; Gao, Yu-Gang; Liu, Ya-Jing

    2006-11-01

    For making use of Ginseng resources and finding new anti-tumor drugs, the anti-tumor activity of three kinds of new panaxadiol fatty acid ester derivates: 3beta-acetoxy panaxadiol (I), 3beta-palmitic acid aceloxy panaxadiol (II), 3beta-octadecanoic acid aceloxy panaxadiol (Ill) and panaxaiol were compared through the method of cell stain and counting. Tumor cell was Vero cell line. Positive control was 5-FU. Blank was RPM11640 culture medium. Negative control was RPM11640 culture medium and the solvent for subjected drugs. The result showed that compound I had the strongest anti-tumor activity, second was panaxadiol, II and III had the same and the weakest antitumor activity. Furthermore, the anti-tumor activities of panaxadiol fatty acid ester derivates showed positive correlation with subjects' concentrations, but no relationship with molecular weight of fatty acid. PMID:17228662

  16. Oceans of Data: In what ways can learning research inform the development of electronic interfaces and tools for use by students accessing large scientific databases?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumhansl, R. A.; Foster, J.; Peach, C. L.; Busey, A.; Baker, I.

    2012-12-01

    The practice of science and engineering is being revolutionized by the development of cyberinfrastructure for accessing near real-time and archived observatory data. Large cyberinfrastructure projects have the potential to transform the way science is taught in high school classrooms, making enormous quantities of scientific data available, giving students opportunities to analyze and draw conclusions from many kinds of complex data, and providing students with experiences using state-of-the-art resources and techniques for scientific investigations. However, online interfaces to scientific data are built by scientists for scientists, and their design can significantly impede broad use by novices. Knowledge relevant to the design of student interfaces to complex scientific databases is broadly dispersed among disciplines ranging from cognitive science to computer science and cartography and is not easily accessible to designers of educational interfaces. To inform efforts at bridging scientific cyberinfrastructure to the high school classroom, Education Development Center, Inc. and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography conducted an NSF-funded 2-year interdisciplinary review of literature and expert opinion pertinent to making interfaces to large scientific databases accessible to and usable by precollege learners and their teachers. Project findings are grounded in the fundamentals of Cognitive Load Theory, Visual Perception, Schemata formation and Universal Design for Learning. The Knowledge Status Report (KSR) presents cross-cutting and visualization-specific guidelines that highlight how interface design features can address/ ameliorate challenges novice high school students face as they navigate complex databases to find data, and construct and look for patterns in maps, graphs, animations and other data visualizations. The guidelines present ways to make scientific databases more broadly accessible by: 1) adjusting the cognitive load imposed by the user

  17. Case mix, outcome and length of stay for admissions to adult, general critical care units in England, Wales and Northern Ireland: the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre Case Mix Programme Database

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, David A; Brady, Anthony R; Rowan, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    Introduction The present paper describes the methods of data collection and validation employed in the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre Case Mix Programme (CMP), a national comparative audit of outcome for adult, critical care admissions. The paper also describes the case mix, outcome and activity of the admissions in the Case Mix Programme Database (CMPD). Methods The CMP collects data on consecutive admissions to adult, general critical care units in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Explicit steps are taken to ensure the accuracy of the data, including use of a dataset specification, of initial and refresher training courses, and of local and central validation of submitted data for incomplete, illogical and inconsistent values. Criteria for evaluating clinical databases developed by the Directory of Clinical Databases were applied to the CMPD. The case mix, outcome and activity for all admissions were briefly summarised. Results The mean quality level achieved by the CMPD for the 10 Directory of Clinical Databases criteria was 3.4 (on a scale of 1 = worst to 4 = best). The CMPD contained validated data on 129,647 admissions to 128 units. The median age was 63 years, and 59% were male. The mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 16.5. Mortality was 20.3% in the CMP unit and was 30.8% at ultimate discharge from hospital. Nonsurvivors stayed longer in intensive care than did survivors (median 2.0 days versus 1.7 days in the CMP unit) but had a shorter total hospital length of stay (9 days versus 16 days). Results for the CMPD were comparable with results from other published reports of UK critical care admissions. Conclusions The CMP uses rigorous methods to ensure data are complete, valid and reliable. The CMP scores well against published criteria for high-quality clinical databases. PMID:15025784

  18. Case mix, outcome and length of stay for admissions to adult, general critical care units in England, Wales and Northern Ireland: the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre Case Mix Programme Database

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Introduction The present paper describes the methods of data collection and validation employed in the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre Case Mix Programme (CMP), a national comparative audit of outcome for adult, critical care admissions. The paper also describes the case mix, outcome and activity of the admissions in the Case Mix Programme Database (CMPD). Methods The CMP collects data on consecutive admissions to adult, general critical care units in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Explicit steps are taken to ensure the accuracy of the data, including use of a dataset specification, of initial and refresher training courses, and of local and central validation of submitted data for incomplete, illogical and inconsistent values. Criteria for evaluating clinical databases developed by the Directory of Clinical Databases were applied to the CMPD. The case mix, outcome and activity for all admissions were briefly summarised. Results The mean quality level achieved by the CMPD for the 10 Directory of Clinical Databases criteria was 3.4 (on a scale of 1 = worst to 4 = best). The CMPD contained validated data on 129,647 admissions to 128 units. The median age was 63 years, and 59% were male. The mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 16.5. Mortality was 20.3% in the CMP unit and was 30.8% at ultimate discharge from hospital. Nonsurvivors stayed longer in intensive care than did survivors (median 2.0 days versus 1.7 days in the CMP unit) but had a shorter total hospital length of stay (9 days versus 16 days). Results for the CMPD were comparable with results from other published reports of UK critical care admissions. Conclusions The CMP uses rigorous methods to ensure data are complete, valid and reliable. The CMP scores well against published criteria for high-quality clinical databases.

  19. Hydrologic database user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Champman, J.B.; Gray, K.J.; Thompson, C.B.

    1993-09-01

    The Hydrologic Database is an electronic filing cabinet containing water-related data for the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The purpose of the database is to enhance research on hydrologic issues at the NTS by providing efficient access to information gathered by a variety of scientists. Data are often generated for specific projects and are reported to DOE in the context of specific project goals. The originators of the database recognized that much of this information has a general value that transcends project-specific requirements. Allowing researchers access to information generated by a wide variety of projects can prevent needless duplication of data-gathering efforts and can augment new data collection and interpretation. In addition, collecting this information in the database ensures that the results are not lost at the end of discrete projects as long as the database is actively maintained. This document is a guide to using the database.

  20. Genotyping and interpretation of STR-DNA: Low-template, mixtures and database matches-Twenty years of research and development.

    PubMed

    Gill, Peter; Haned, Hinda; Bleka, Oyvind; Hansson, Oskar; Dørum, Guro; Egeland, Thore

    2015-09-01

    The introduction of Short Tandem Repeat (STR) DNA was a revolution within a revolution that transformed forensic DNA profiling into a tool that could be used, for the first time, to create National DNA databases. This transformation would not have been possible without the concurrent development of fluorescent automated sequencers, combined with the ability to multiplex several loci together. Use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) increased the sensitivity of the method to enable the analysis of a handful of cells. The first multiplexes were simple: 'the quad', introduced by the defunct UK Forensic Science Service (FSS) in 1994, rapidly followed by a more discriminating 'six-plex' (Second Generation Multiplex) in 1995 that was used to create the world's first national DNA database. The success of the database rapidly outgrew the functionality of the original system - by the year 2000 a new multiplex of ten-loci was introduced to reduce the chance of adventitious matches. The technology was adopted world-wide, albeit with different loci. The political requirement to introduce pan-European databases encouraged standardisation - the development of European Standard Set (ESS) of markers comprising twelve-loci is the latest iteration. Although development has been impressive, the methods used to interpret evidence have lagged behind. For example, the theory to interpret complex DNA profiles (low-level mixtures), had been developed fifteen years ago, but only in the past year or so, are the concepts starting to be widely adopted. A plethora of different models (some commercial and others non-commercial) have appeared. This has led to a confusing 'debate' about the 'best' to use. The different models available are described along with their advantages and disadvantages. A section discusses the development of national DNA databases, along with details of an associated controversy to estimate the strength of evidence of matches. Current methodology is limited to

  1. Developing a DNA variant database.

    PubMed

    Fung, David C Y

    2008-01-01

    Disease- and locus-specific variant databases have been a valuable resource to clinical and research geneticists. With the recent rapid developments in technologies, the number of DNA variants detected in a typical molecular genetics laboratory easily exceeds 1,000. To keep track of the growing inventory of DNA variants, many laboratories employ information technology to store the data as well as distributing the data and its associated information to clinicians and researchers via the Web. While it is a valuable resource, the hosting of a web-accessible database requires collaboration between bioinformaticians and biologists and careful planning to ensure its usability and availability. In this chapter, a series of tutorials on building a local DNA variant database out of a sample dataset will be provided. However, this tutorial will not include programming details on building a web interface and on constructing the web application necessary for web hosting. Instead, an introduction to the two commonly used methods for hosting web-accessible variant databases will be described. Apart from the tutorials, this chapter will also consider the resources and planning required for making a variant database project successful. PMID:18453092

  2. 16 years research on lactic acid production with yeast - ready for the market?

    PubMed

    Sauer, Michael; Porro, Danilo; Mattanovich, Diethard; Branduardi, Paola

    2010-01-01

    The use of plastic produced from non-renewable resources constitutes a major environmental problem of the modern society. Polylactide polymers (PLA) have recently gained enormous attention as one possible substitution of petroleum derived polymers. A prerequisite for high quality PLA production is the provision of optically pure lactic acid, which cannot be obtained by chemical synthesis in an economical way. Microbial fermentation is therefore the commercial option to obtain lactic acid as monomer for PLA production. However, one major economic hurdle for commercial lactic acid production as basis for PLA is the costly separation procedure, which is needed to recover and purify the product from the fermentation broth. Yeasts, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae (bakers yeast) offer themselves as production organisms because they can tolerate low pH and grow on mineral media what eases the purification of the acid. However, naturally yeasts do not produce lactic acid. By metabolic engineering, ethanol was exchanged with lactic acid as end product of fermentation. A vast amount of effort has been invested into the development of yeasts for lactic acid production since the first paper on this topic by Dequin and Barre appeared 1994. Now yeasts are very close to industrial exploitation - here we summarize the developments in this field. PMID:21415900

  3. The Chicago Thoracic Oncology Database Consortium: A Multisite Database Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Carey, George B; Tan, Yi-Hung Carol; Bokhary, Ujala; Itkonen, Michelle; Szeto, Kyle; Wallace, James; Campbell, Nicholas; Hensing, Thomas; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: An increasing amount of clinical data is available to biomedical researchers, but specifically designed database and informatics infrastructures are needed to handle this data effectively. Multiple research groups should be able to pool and share this data in an efficient manner. The Chicago Thoracic Oncology Database Consortium (CTODC) was created to standardize data collection and facilitate the pooling and sharing of data at institutions throughout Chicago and across the world. We assessed the CTODC by conducting a proof of principle investigation on lung cancer patients who took erlotinib. This study does not look into epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, but rather it discusses the development and utilization of the database involved. Methods:  We have implemented the Thoracic Oncology Program Database Project (TOPDP) Microsoft Access, the Thoracic Oncology Research Program (TORP) Velos, and the TORP REDCap databases for translational research efforts. Standard operating procedures (SOPs) were created to document the construction and proper utilization of these databases. These SOPs have been made available freely to other institutions that have implemented their own databases patterned on these SOPs. Results: A cohort of 373 lung cancer patients who took erlotinib was identified. The EGFR mutation statuses of patients were analyzed. Out of the 70 patients that were tested, 55 had mutations while 15 did not. In terms of overall survival and duration of treatment, the cohort demonstrated that EGFR-mutated patients had a longer duration of erlotinib treatment and longer overall survival compared to their EGFR wild-type counterparts who received erlotinib. Discussion: The investigation successfully yielded data from all institutions of the CTODC. While the investigation identified challenges, such as the difficulty of data transfer and potential duplication of patient data, these issues can be resolved

  4. Effects of aluminum and acidity of the drift, mortality, and molting of stream insects. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, W.; Haney, J.

    1986-01-01

    Responses of nine stream insects to short-term increases of acidity and aluminum concentrations in artificial streams were studied. For the mayflies studied (Stenonema modestum Ephemerella subvaria and E. catawba) drifting behavior increased when aluminum concentrations were elevated above 1 ppm and mortality was increased at pH 5. Three of the four caddisflies studied (Hydropsyche ssp., Macrostemum zebratum, and Chimarra obscurra) were affected by increased salinities in high aluminum treatments, but were not adversely affected by short-term increases in acidity or aluminum concentrations. Molting success of the insects was reduced by increased acidity.

  5. Paleomagnetic database search possible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbert, William

    I have recently finished an on-line search program which allows remote users to search the “Abase” ASCII version of the World Paleomagnetic Database developed by Lock and McElhinny [1991]. The program is very simple to use and will search the Soviet, non-Soviet, rock unit, and reference databases and create output files that can be downloaded back to a researcher's local system using the ftp command.To use Search, telnet to 130.49.3.1 (earth.eps.pitt.edu) and login as the user “Search.rdquo There is no password, and the user is asked a series of questions, which define the geographic region and ages of interest. The program will also ask for an identifier with which to create the output file names. The program has three modes of operation: text-only, Tektronix graphics, or X11l/R5 graphics; the proper choice depends on the computer hardware that is used by the searcher.

  6. Technology-Enhanced Research in the Science Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Joseph W.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a project where students use the Internet as a research tool. Discusses using e-mail to access molecular biology databases and identify proteins using amino acid sequences, obtaining complete amino acid sequences using the world wide web, using telnet to access library resources on the Internet, and various stages of protein analysis…

  7. Diaretinopathy database –A Gene database for diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vidhya, Gopalakrishnan; Anusha, Bhaskar

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, is a microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus and is a major cause of adult blindness. Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy is not well understood. Results from epidemiological studies of diabetic patients suggest that there are familial predispositions to diabetes and to diabetic retinopathy. Therefore the main purpose of this database is to help both scientists and doctors in studying the candidate genes responsible for causing diabetic retinopathy. For each candidate gene official symbol, chromosome map, number of exons, GT-AG introns, motif, polymorphic variation and 3D structure are given respectively. In addition to molecular class and function of these genes, this database also provides links to download the corresponding nucleotide and amino acid sequences in FASTA format which may be further used for computational approaches. Therefore this database will increase the understanding of the genetics underlying the development or progression of diabetic retinopathy and will have an impact on future diagnostic, prevention and intervention strategies. Availability The database is freely available at http: diaretinopathydatabase.com PMID:24966527

  8. Physiological Information Database (PID)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has developed a physiological information database (created using Microsoft ACCESS) intended to be used in PBPK modeling. The database contains physiological parameter values for humans from early childhood through senescence as well as similar data for laboratory animal spec...

  9. THE ECOTOX DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The database provides chemical-specific toxicity information for aquatic life, terrestrial plants, and terrestrial wildlife. ECOTOX is a comprehensive ecotoxicology database and is therefore essential for providing and suppoirting high quality models needed to estimate population...

  10. Network II Database

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-11-07

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Rail and Barge Network II Database is a representation of the rail and barge system of the United States. The network is derived from the Federal Rail Administration (FRA) rail database.

  11. Household Products Database: Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Types of Products Manufacturers Ingredients About the Database FAQ Product Recalls Help Glossary Contact Us More ... holders. Information is extracted from Consumer Product Information Database ©2001-2015 by DeLima Associates. All rights reserved. ...

  12. MPlus Database system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-20

    The MPlus Database program was developed to keep track of mail received. This system was developed by TRESP for the Department of Energy/Oak Ridge Operations. The MPlus Database program is a PC application, written in dBase III+'' and compiled with Clipper'' into an executable file. The files you need to run the MPLus Database program can be installed on a Bernoulli, or a hard drive. This paper discusses the use of this database.

  13. Aviation Safety Issues Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morello, Samuel A.; Ricks, Wendell R.

    2009-01-01

    The aviation safety issues database was instrumental in the refinement and substantiation of the National Aviation Safety Strategic Plan (NASSP). The issues database is a comprehensive set of issues from an extremely broad base of aviation functions, personnel, and vehicle categories, both nationally and internationally. Several aviation safety stakeholders such as the Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST) have already used the database. This broader interest was the genesis to making the database publically accessible and writing this report.

  14. The IPD and IMGT/HLA database: allele variant databases

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, James; Halliwell, Jason A.; Hayhurst, James D.; Flicek, Paul; Parham, Peter; Marsh, Steven G. E.

    2015-01-01

    The Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD) was developed to provide a centralized system for the study of polymorphism in genes of the immune system. Through the IPD project we have established a central platform for the curation and publication of locus-specific databases involved either directly or related to the function of the Major Histocompatibility Complex in a number of different species. We have collaborated with specialist groups or nomenclature committees that curate the individual sections before they are submitted to IPD for online publication. IPD consists of five core databases, with the IMGT/HLA Database as the primary database. Through the work of the various nomenclature committees, the HLA Informatics Group and in collaboration with the European Bioinformatics Institute we are able to provide public access to this data through the website http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/. The IPD project continues to develop with new tools being added to address scientific developments, such as Next Generation Sequencing, and to address user feedback and requests. Regular updates to the website ensure that new and confirmatory sequences are dispersed to the immunogenetics community, and the wider research and clinical communities. PMID:25414341

  15. Mission and Assets Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, John; Zendejas, Silvino; Gutheinz, Sandy; Borden, Chester; Wang, Yeou-Fang

    2009-01-01

    Mission and Assets Database (MADB) Version 1.0 is an SQL database system with a Web user interface to centralize information. The database stores flight project support resource requirements, view periods, antenna information, schedule, and forecast results for use in mid-range and long-term planning of Deep Space Network (DSN) assets.

  16. SATPdb: a database of structurally annotated therapeutic peptides.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sandeep; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Bhalla, Sherry; Usmani, Salman Sadullah; Gautam, Ankur; Tuknait, Abhishek; Agrawal, Piyush; Mathur, Deepika; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-01-01

    SATPdb (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/satpdb/) is a database of structurally annotated therapeutic peptides, curated from 22 public domain peptide databases/datasets including 9 of our own. The current version holds 19192 unique experimentally validated therapeutic peptide sequences having length between 2 and 50 amino acids. It covers peptides having natural, non-natural and modified residues. These peptides were systematically grouped into 10 categories based on their major function or therapeutic property like 1099 anticancer, 10585 antimicrobial, 1642 drug delivery and 1698 antihypertensive peptides. We assigned or annotated structure of these therapeutic peptides using structural databases (Protein Data Bank) and state-of-the-art structure prediction methods like I-TASSER, HHsearch and PEPstrMOD. In addition, SATPdb facilitates users in performing various tasks that include: (i) structure and sequence similarity search, (ii) peptide browsing based on their function and properties, (iii) identification of moonlighting peptides and (iv) searching of peptides having desired structure and therapeutic activities. We hope this database will be useful for researchers working in the field of peptide-based therapeutics. PMID:26527728

  17. SATPdb: a database of structurally annotated therapeutic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sandeep; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Bhalla, Sherry; Usmani, Salman Sadullah; Gautam, Ankur; Tuknait, Abhishek; Agrawal, Piyush; Mathur, Deepika; Raghava, Gajendra P.S.

    2016-01-01

    SATPdb (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/satpdb/) is a database of structurally annotated therapeutic peptides, curated from 22 public domain peptide databases/datasets including 9 of our own. The current version holds 19192 unique experimentally validated therapeutic peptide sequences having length between 2 and 50 amino acids. It covers peptides having natural, non-natural and modified residues. These peptides were systematically grouped into 10 categories based on their major function or therapeutic property like 1099 anticancer, 10585 antimicrobial, 1642 drug delivery and 1698 antihypertensive peptides. We assigned or annotated structure of these therapeutic peptides using structural databases (Protein Data Bank) and state-of-the-art structure prediction methods like I-TASSER, HHsearch and PEPstrMOD. In addition, SATPdb facilitates users in performing various tasks that include: (i) structure and sequence similarity search, (ii) peptide browsing based on their function and properties, (iii) identification of moonlighting peptides and (iv) searching of peptides having desired structure and therapeutic activities. We hope this database will be useful for researchers working in the field of peptide-based therapeutics. PMID:26527728

  18. Performance related issues in distributed database systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, Ravi

    1991-01-01

    The key elements of research performed during the year long effort of this project are: Investigate the effects of heterogeneity in distributed real time systems; Study the requirements to TRAC towards building a heterogeneous database system; Study the effects of performance modeling on distributed database performance; and Experiment with an ORACLE based heterogeneous system.

  19. The Porcine Immunology and Nutrition Resource Database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diverse genomics-based databases have been developed to facilitate research with human and rodent models. Current porcine gene databases, however, lack the nutritional and immunological orientation and robust annotation to design effective molecular tools to study relevant pig models. To address t...

  20. School District Evaluation: Database Warehouse Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adcock, Eugene P.; Haseltine, Reginald

    The Prince George's County (Maryland) school system has developed a database warehouse system as an evaluation data support tool for fulfilling the system's information demands. This paper described the Research and Evaluation Assimilation Database (READ) warehouse support system and considers the requirements for data used in evaluation and how…

  1. Database Cancellation: The "Hows" and "Whys"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Database cancellation is one of the most difficult tasks performed by a librarian. This may seem counter-intuitive but, psychologically, it is certainly true. When a librarian or a team of librarians has invested a great deal of time doing research, talking to potential users, and conducting trials before deciding to subscribe to a database, they…

  2. CONSOLIDATED HUMAN ACTIVITY DATABASE (CHAD) WEBSITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Consolidated Human Activity Database (CHAD) has been developed by ManTech Environmental for the Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). This database was created to support exposure/intake dose/risk assessments. The overall design incor...

  3. Using online databases to find peer‐reviewed journal articles on injury prevention and safety promotion research: a study of textword queries by SafetyLit users

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, David W

    2007-01-01

    Objective To assess the capacity of textword queries to provide a comprehensive listing of articles on injury prevention and safety promotion (IPSP) concepts in a literature database. Methods All terms used to search SafetyLit (a database of scholarly literature selected for its relevance to the IPSP field) during the years 2000–2005 were listed and then examined to identify terms that are synonyms for the same concept. Terms were grouped by concept, the number of queries that used terms within each concept category were summed, and the concepts were then ordered by the total number of searches for each concept category. For each textword, the proportion of all articles for that concept that could be found by using it alone was calculated. Results Each of the 25 most searched‐for concepts has 4 to 40 synonyms. Sixteen of the concepts required queries using two or more terms to find 75% of the available articles. Few searchers used a sufficient number of textword synonyms in their queries to return a complete listing of the available material. Conclusion On the basis of this study, queries using only one or two textword terms are insufficiently sensitive to find all relevant journal articles about an IPSP concept. PMID:17686932

  4. The Life Support Database system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likens, William C.

    1991-01-01

    The design and implementation of the database system are described with specific reference to data available from the Build-1 version and techniques for its utilization. The review of the initial documents for the Life Support Database is described in terms of title format and sequencing, and the users are defined as participants in NASA-sponsored life-support research. The software and hardware selections are based respectively on referential integrity and compatibility, and the implementation of the user interface is achieved by means of an applications-programming tool. The current Beta-Test implementation of the system includes several thousand acronyms and bibliographic references as well as chemical properties and exposure limits, equipment, construction materials, and mission data. In spite of modifications in the database the system is found to be effective and a potentially significant resource for the aerospace community.

  5. Vibration test methods and their experimental research on the performance of the lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Baoxiang; Wang, Hua; He, Xie

    2014-12-01

    As we know, Lead-acid battery is difficult to balance many factors such as the accuracy and the on-line testing requirement. The detecting system, as stated in this article, is based on the vibration test procedure, dynamically following the electrochemical process of the Lead-acid Battery, and collects the real-time state parameters for calculation, analysis and judgment. It also quantizes precisely the degradation and chargeability of the battery and therefore self-adapts to the ideal target values. During the test, it has not charged and discharged large current to the lead-acid battery, it only plus a smaller and shorter time of impulse voltage signal on both ends of lead-acid battery, so the battery measured is damage free, and the system energy consumption is small; Using the load compensation technology, it has solved the influence of load on the test results. What's more, the load characteristics are improved at the same time, it realized the online detection. The vibration detection is based on the adaptive fuzzy inference model which has taken various factors into account, concerning the choices of input aspects which may influence the output value. It realized a number of Lead-acid Battery voltage self-adaption and accomplished a variety of high-precise tests.

  6. Initial results from the Pawnee Eddy Correlation system for dry acid-deposition research. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Zeller, K.; Massman, W.; Stocker, D.; Fox, D.G.; Stedman, D.

    1988-01-01

    The Pawnee Grassland Eddy Correlation Dry Deposition Project is described. Instrumentation, methods of analysis, and initial data and research findings are presented. Data from this eddy correlation system show agreement with: previously observations of deposition velocities for atmospheric ozone, NO/sub 2/ and NOx; micrometeorological theory; micrometeorological site characteristics.

  7. DBGC: A Database of Human Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Cai, Mingdeng; Zhu, Zhenggang; Gu, Wenjie; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Database of Human Gastric Cancer (DBGC) is a comprehensive database that integrates various human gastric cancer-related data resources. Human gastric cancer-related transcriptomics projects, proteomics projects, mutations, biomarkers and drug-sensitive genes from different sources were collected and unified in this database. Moreover, epidemiological statistics of gastric cancer patients in China and clinicopathological information annotated with gastric cancer cases were also integrated into the DBGC. We believe that this database will greatly facilitate research regarding human gastric cancer in many fields. DBGC is freely available at http://bminfor.tongji.edu.cn/dbgc/index.do. PMID:26566288

  8. Effects of acid rain on plant microbial associations in California. Research report (final)

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.; Paul, E.A.

    1984-04-13

    The effects of simulated acid rain of pH 5.6 to 3.0, with ionic composition similar to that found in California, on Trifolium repens, Lupinus densiflorus and L. benthamii grown in two soils were tested. The interactions of treatment intensity, soil type, phosphorus uptake and mycorrhizal influences on growth, carbon fixation and allocation and nitrogen fixation were determined. Acidic treatments generally decreased plant growth, nodulation and nitrogenase activity. The exposure of plants to a large number of simulated rainfall conditions of shorter duration did not result in the negative growth effects. Plants adequately supplied with P, either as fertilizer or by mycorrhizal fungi, were much more resistant to conditions caused by acidic precipitation and in some cases growth increases were found.

  9. Lead-acid battery research and development—a vital key to winning new business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Kathryn R.

    Battery strings are operated in a partial-state-of-charge mode (PSoC) in several new and changing applications for lead-acid batteries, in which the battery is seldom, if ever, fully charged or discharged. The lead battery industry faces new challenges as additional failure modes become evident in these PSoC applications. Without overcharge, cell imbalances caused by variations in cell temperature will cause premature failures. Valve-regulated lead-acid batteries are especially susceptible because of the heat generated by oxygen recombination at the negative plate. Improved thermal properties are shown by a proprietary battery design that combines absorptive glass mat and gelled acid technologies. Well-designed power systems are also required to reduce cell-to-cell temperature variations and, thereby, increase battery life.

  10. The new IAGOS Database Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanger, Damien; Gautron, Benoit; Thouret, Valérie; Fontaine, Alain

    2016-04-01

    IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System) is a European Research Infrastructure which aims at the provision of long-term, regular and spatially resolved in situ observations of the atmospheric composition. IAGOS observation systems are deployed on a fleet of commercial aircraft. The IAGOS database is an essential part of the global atmospheric monitoring network. It contains IAGOS-core data and IAGOS-CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) data. The IAGOS Database Portal (http://www.iagos.fr, damien.boulanger@obs-mip.fr) is part of the French atmospheric chemistry data center AERIS (http://www.aeris-data.fr). The new IAGOS Database Portal has been released in December 2015. The main improvement is the interoperability implementation with international portals or other databases in order to improve IAGOS data discovery. In the frame of the IGAS project (IAGOS for the Copernicus Atmospheric Service), a data network has been setup. It is composed of three data centers: the IAGOS database in Toulouse; the HALO research aircraft database at DLR (https://halo-db.pa.op.dlr.de); and the CAMS data center in Jülich (http://join.iek.fz-juelich.de). The CAMS (Copernicus Atmospheric Monitoring Service) project is a prominent user of the IGAS data network. The new portal provides improved and new services such as the download in NetCDF or NASA Ames formats, plotting tools (maps, time series, vertical profiles, etc.) and user management. Added value products are available on the portal: back trajectories, origin of air masses, co-location with satellite data, etc. The link with the CAMS data center, through JOIN (Jülich OWS Interface), allows to combine model outputs with IAGOS data for inter-comparison. Finally IAGOS metadata has been standardized (ISO 19115) and now provides complete information about data traceability and quality.

  11. LactMed: New NLM Database on Drugs and Lactation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Research News From NIH LactMed: New NLM Database on Drugs and Lactation Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... Javascript on. Photo: Comstock LactMed, a free online database with information on drugs and lactation, is one ...

  12. Research on valve-regulated lead/acid batteries for automobiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongyu; Duan, Shuzhen

    This paper introduces design technology for automotive valve-regulated lead/acid (VRLA) batteries, such as grid alloy separator, container, positive and negative plate additives, and grid frame. Compared with conventional flooded-electrolyte lead/acid batteries, automotive VRLA batteries are influenced by high charge voltage and by high temperature. If the voltage of the automotive charging system is reduced and the battery is located outside the engine compartment of the automobile, VRLA batteries will enjoy longer service lives than flooded-electrolyte counterparts. The same assembly line can produce both automotive VRLA batteries and polyethylene envelope batteries. This reduces the production costs for automotive VRLA batteries.

  13. Pancreatic Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Joji Kurian; Kim, Min-Sik; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Nanjappa, Vishalakshi; Raju, Rajesh; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Radhakrishnan, Aneesha; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Khan, Aafaque Ahmad; Sakamuri, Sruthi; Tankala, Shantal Gupta; Singal, Mukul; Nair, Bipin; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Chatterjee, Aditi; Prasad, T S Keshava; Maitra, Anirban; Gowda, Harsha; Hruban, Ralph H; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. The etiology of pancreatic cancer is heterogeneous with a wide range of alterations that have already been reported at the level of the genome, transcriptome, and proteome. The past decade has witnessed a large number of experimental studies using high-throughput technology platforms to identify genes whose expression at the transcript or protein levels is altered in pancreatic cancer. Based on expression studies, a number of molecules have also been proposed as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of this deadly cancer. Currently, there are no repositories which provide an integrative view of multiple Omics data sets from published research on pancreatic cancer. Here, we describe the development of a web-based resource, Pancreatic Cancer Database (http://www.pancreaticcancerdatabase.org), as a unified platform for pancreatic cancer research. PCD contains manually curated information pertaining to quantitative alterations in miRNA, mRNA, and proteins obtained from small-scale as well as high-throughput studies of pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. We believe that PCD will serve as an integrative platform for scientific community involved in pancreatic cancer research. PMID:24839966

  14. Research on the acid rain under the short-term environment control measures of the Youth Olympic Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Qing, W.; Chen, Y.; Peng, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Northern China emits the most part of acid pollution of the whole nation but turns out to be in a light acid precipitation extent. Research shows that it is the carbonate particles from dust that neutralize the acid in the rainfall. Construction in southern China becomes more and more active so that alkaline dusts from construction are receiving an increasing attention. Nanjing hosts the Youth Olympic Games in 2015 and implements a strict plan to control the emission of construction dust. Thus, The Youth Olympic Games provides a good opportunity to analyze the neutralization of alkaline dusts emitted from construction in Nanjing. Experiment is conducted by collecting the total of rainfall events from June to September in 2015, besides, TSP (total suspended particles) before and after each rainfall events is collected due to find the collaboration with rainfall. Ca2+,Mg2+,K+,Na+,Sr2+,F-,Cl-,SO42-,NO3- concentrations in rain water and water soluble fraction of TSP are analyzed using ICP-OES and ICS in Nanjing University. Results showed that Ca2+and SO42- makes the major part of total ions, indicating the fact that Nanjing is suffering from a severe acid rainfall and alkaline dusts which mainly consist of Ca2+ neutralize a large number of acid particles. pH of rainfall has a good correlation with the flux of TSP. pH of rainfall keeps falling as the YOG plan starts and picking up after the YOG, which indicates that the declination of artificial alkaline dust in TSP reduces the neutralization on the acid rainfall.

  15. Introductory Course Based on a Single Problem: Learning Nucleic Acid Biochemistry from AIDS Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Neena

    2004-01-01

    In departure from the standard approach of using several problems to cover specific topics in a class, I use a single problem to cover the contents of the entire semester-equivalent biochemistry classes. I have developed a problem-based service-learning (PBSL) problem on HIV/AIDS to cover nucleic acid concepts that are typically taught in the…

  16. PHARMACOKINETIC AND MECHANISTIC RESEARCH TO IMPROVE CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT FOR DICHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorination of water containing organic material (humic, fulvic acids) results in the generation of many organic compounds, including DCA. DCA is commonly found in finished drinking water at concentrations ranging from 10-50 micrograms/liter. Several studies indicate that DCA is...

  17. An Introduction to Database Structure and Database Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Detweiler, Karen

    1984-01-01

    Enumerates principal management objectives of database management systems (data independence, quality, security, multiuser access, central control) and criteria for comparison (response time, size, flexibility, other features). Conventional database management systems, relational databases, and database machines used for backend processing are…

  18. Database and Analytical Tool Development for the Management of Data Derived from US DOE (NETL) Funded Fine Particulate (PM2.5) Research

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson P. Khosah; Frank T. Alex

    2007-02-11

    Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) was contracted by the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) to develop a state-of-the-art, scalable and robust web-accessible database application to manage the extensive data sets resulting from the DOE-NETL-sponsored ambient air monitoring programs in the upper Ohio River valley region. The data management system was designed to include a web-based user interface that will allow easy access to the data by the scientific community, policy- and decision-makers, and other interested stakeholders, while providing detailed information on sampling, analytical and quality control parameters. In addition, the system will provide graphical analytical tools for displaying, analyzing and interpreting the air quality data. The system will also provide multiple report generation capabilities and easy-to-understand visualization formats that can be utilized by the media and public outreach/educational institutions. The project is being conducted in two phases. Phase One includes the following tasks: (1) data inventory/benchmarking, including the establishment of an external stakeholder group; (2) development of a data management system; (3) population of the database; (4) development of a web-based data retrieval system, and (5) establishment of an internal quality assurance/quality control system on data management. Phase Two, which is currently underway, involves the development of a platform for on-line data analysis. Phase Two includes the following tasks: (1) development of a sponsor and stakeholder/user website with extensive online analytical tools; (2) development of a public website; (3) incorporation of an extensive online help system into each website; and (4) incorporation of a graphical representation (mapping) system into each website. The project is now into its forty-eighth month of development activities.

  19. DATABASE AND ANALYTICAL TOOL DEVELOPMENT FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF DATA DERIVED FROM US DOE (NETL) FUNDED FINE PARTICULATE (PM2.5) RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson P. Khosah; Charles G. Crawford

    2005-08-01

    Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) was contracted by the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) to develop a state-of-the-art, scalable and robust web-accessible database application to manage the extensive data sets resulting from the DOE-NETL-sponsored ambient air monitoring programs in the upper Ohio River valley region. The data management system was designed to include a web-based user interface that will allow easy access to the data by the scientific community, policy- and decision-makers, and other interested stakeholders, while providing detailed information on sampling, analytical and quality control parameters. In addition, the system will provide graphical analytical tools for displaying, analyzing and interpreting the air quality data. The system will also provide multiple report generation capabilities and easy-to-understand visualization formats that can be utilized by the media and public outreach/educational institutions. The project is being conducted in two phases. Phase One includes the following tasks: (1) data inventory/benchmarking, including the establishment of an external stakeholder group; (2) development of a data management system; (3) population of the database; (4) development of a web-based data retrieval system, and (5) establishment of an internal quality assurance/quality control system on data management. Phase Two, which is currently underway, involves the development of a platform for on-line data analysis. Phase Two includes the following tasks: (1) development of a sponsor and stakeholder/user website with extensive online analytical tools; (2) development of a public website; (3) incorporation of an extensive online help system into each website; and (4) incorporation of a graphical representation (mapping) system into each website. The project is now into its thirty-sixth month of development activities.

  20. DATABASE AND ANALYTICAL TOOL DEVELOPMENT FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF DATA DERIVED FROM US DOE (NETL) FUNDED FINE PARTICULATE (PM 2.5) RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson P. Khosah; Charles G. Crawford

    2006-02-11

    Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) was contracted by the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) to develop a state-of-the-art, scalable and robust web-accessible database application to manage the extensive data sets resulting from the DOE-NETL-sponsored ambient air monitoring programs in the upper Ohio River valley region. The data management system was designed to include a web-based user interface that will allow easy access to the data by the scientific community, policy- and decision-makers, and other interested stakeholders, while providing detailed information on sampling, analytical and quality control parameters. In addition, the system will provide graphical analytical tools for displaying, analyzing and interpreting the air quality data. The system will also provide multiple report generation capabilities and easy-to-understand visualization formats that can be utilized by the media and public outreach/educational institutions. The project is being conducted in two phases. Phase One includes the following tasks: (1) data inventory/benchmarking, including the establishment of an external stakeholder group; (2) development of a data management system; (3) population of the database; (4) development of a web-based data retrieval system, and (5) establishment of an internal quality assurance/quality control system on data management. Phase Two, which is currently underway, involves the development of a platform for on-line data analysis. Phase Two includes the following tasks: (1) development of a sponsor and stakeholder/user website with extensive online analytical tools; (2) development of a public website; (3) incorporation of an extensive online help system into each website; and (4) incorporation of a graphical representation (mapping) system into each website. The project is now into its forty-second month of development activities.