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Sample records for acids tfa sources

  1. Rainwater trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in Guangzhou, South China: levels, wet deposition fluxes and source implication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiaoyun; Wang, Xinming; Ding, Xiang

    2014-01-15

    The origin of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) occurring in hydrosphere has long been a controversial issue. Hydrochlorofluorocarbons and hydrofluorocarbons (HCFCs/HFCs) as replacements of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are precursors of TFA in the atmosphere, their contribution to rainwater TFA is a concern as their ambient mixing ratios are continually growing. Here we present rainwater TFA monitored from April 2007 to March 2008 in urban Guangzhou, a central city in south China's highly industrialized and densely populated Pearl River Delta region. Rainwater TFA levels ranged 45.8-974 ng L(-1) with a median of 166 ng L(-1). TFA levels negatively correlated with rainfall amount, the yearly rainfall-weighted average for TFA was 152 ng L(-1). The annual TFA wet deposition flux was estimated to be 229 g km(-2) yr(-1), and the total wet deposition of TFA reached ~1.7 tyr(-1) in Guangzhou. The Two-Box model was applied to estimate attributions of HCFCs/HFCs and fluoropolymers to rainwater TFA assuming TFA generated was proportional to gross domestic product (GDP), gross industrial product (GIP) or number of private cars. The results revealed that the degradation of HCFCs/HFCs and fluoropolymers could explain 131.5-152.4 ng L(-1) rainwater TFA, quite near the observed rainfall-weighted annual mean of 152 ng L(-1), suggesting rainwater TFA in Guangzhou was predominantly originated from these anthropogenic precursors. HCFCs/HFCs accounted for 83.3-96.5% of rainwater TFA observed, while fluoropolymers' contributions were minor (~5%). HFC-134a alone could explain 55.9-90.0% of rainwater TFA, and its contribution would be greatly enhanced with its wide use in mobile air conditioning systems and rapid increase in ambient mixing ratios. PMID:24035981

  2. Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) mixture toxicity to the macrophytes Myriophyllum spicatum and Myriophyllum sibiricum in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Mark L; Sibley, Paul K; Mabury, Scott A; Solomon, Keith R; Muir, Derek C G

    2002-02-21

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) have been detected together in environmental water samples throughout the world. TCA may enter into aquatic systems via rainout as the degradation product of chlorinated solvents, herbicide use, as a by-product of water disinfection and from emissions of spent bleach liquor of kraft pulp mills. Sources of TFA include degradation of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) refrigerants and pesticides. These substances are phytotoxic and widely distributed in aquatic environments. A study to assess the risk of a binary mixture of TCA and TFA to macrophytes in aquatic microcosms was conducted as part of a larger study on haloacetic acids. M. spicatum and M. sibiricum were exposed to 0.1, 1, 3 and 10 mg/l of both TCA and TFA (neutralized with sodium hydroxide) in replicate (n = 3) 12000 l aquatic microcosms for 49 days in an one-way analysis of variance design. Each microcosm was stocked with 14 individual apical shoots per species. The plants were sampled at regular intervals and assessed for the somatic endpoints of plant length, root growth, number of nodes and wet and dry mass and the biochemical endpoints of chlorophyll-a, chlorophyll-b, carotenoid content and citric acid levels. Results indicate that there were statistically significant effects of the TCA/TFA mixture on certain pigment concentrations immediately after the start of exposure (2-7 days), but the plants showed no signs of stress thereafter. These data suggest that TCA/TFA mixtures at environmentally relevant concentrations do not pose a significant risk to these aquatic macrophytes. PMID:11878273

  3. Trans fatty acid intakes and food sources in the U.S. population: NHANES 1999-2002.

    PubMed

    Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Lefevre, Michael; Mensink, Ronald P; Petersen, Barbara; Fleming, Jennifer; Flickinger, Brent D

    2012-10-01

    Because of efforts to decrease trans fatty acids (TFA) in the food supply, intake should be assessed in the population to establish a baseline TFA intake. The 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) was used to identify a benchmark for TFA intake. TFA was estimated by mean, median, and quintile of intake, TFA intake data were weighted using the NHANES 4-year sample weights. The main outcome measures included TFA intake in grams per day and percentage of energy in the top 25 food sources of TFA. Data are reported for 16,669 individuals ≥ 3 years of age. Median TFA intake was 2.3 % of calories (5 g/day) with 0.9-4.5 % of energy (1.5-13.1 g/day) over different quintiles of intake. Mean TFA intake was 2.5 % of energy (6.1 g/day). The range of TFA intake in the fifth quintile was very large, i.e., 3.5-12.5 % of energy or 8.8-92.4 g/day. Increasing quintiles of TFA intake were associated with increases in total fat (26.7-37.6 % of energy), saturated fat (7.6-10.5 % of energy), and calories (for those >20 years of age: 2,416-2,583 for men and 1,679-1,886 for women). Major food sources of dietary TFA were cakes, cookies, pies, and pastries. Based on current dietary guidance to consume as little industrial TFA as possible, much progress is needed to attain this goal, including food industry efforts to remove TFA from the food supply and educating the public about making healthy food choices. PMID:22903556

  4. Trans fatty acids: has all the evidence been considered?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High intakes of industrially-produced trans fatty acids (iTFA) have been shown to increase circulating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, which has implicated iTFA in coronary heart disease risk (CHD). Partially hydrogenated oils (PHO) became a predominant source of iTFA when marga...

  5. Effects of ruminant trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease and cancer: a comprehensive review of epidemiological, clinical, and mechanistic studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are two predominant sources of dietary trans fatty acids in the food supply, those formed during the industrial partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils (iTFA) and those formed by biohydrogenation in ruminants (rTFA), including vaccenic acid and (VA) and rumenic acid [RA, a conjugated linoleic ...

  6. Trans fatty acids – A risk factor for cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Mohammad Perwaiz

    2014-01-01

    Trans fatty acids (TFA) are produced either by hydrogenation of unsaturated oils or by biohydrogenation in the stomach of ruminant animals. Vanaspati ghee and margarine have high contents of TFA. A number of studies have shown an association of TFA consumption and increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This increased risk is because TFA increase the ratio of LDL cholesterol to HDL cholesterol. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and World Health Organization have come up with the recommendation that the contents of TFA in human dietary fat should be reduced to less than 4%. There is high prevalence of CVD in Pakistan. High consumption of vanaspati ghee which contains 14.2-34.3% of TFA could be one of the factors for this increased burden of CVD in Pakistan. Consumption of dietary fat low in TFA would be helpful in reducing the risk of CVD in South Asia. Denmark by banning the sale of food items with TFA has brought down the number of deaths due to coronary heart disease by nearly 50% over a period of 20 years. Public awareness about the adverse effects of TFA on human health would be extremely important. Media can play a very effective role in educating the masses and advocating the policy for the sale of only low TFA food items. Literature sources: Google and US National Library of Medicine, National Institute of Health were the sources of papers cited in this review article. PMID:24639860

  7. Trans fatty acids - A risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Mohammad Perwaiz

    2014-01-01

    Trans fatty acids (TFA) are produced either by hydrogenation of unsaturated oils or by biohydrogenation in the stomach of ruminant animals. Vanaspati ghee and margarine have high contents of TFA. A number of studies have shown an association of TFA consumption and increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This increased risk is because TFA increase the ratio of LDL cholesterol to HDL cholesterol. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and World Health Organization have come up with the recommendation that the contents of TFA in human dietary fat should be reduced to less than 4%. There is high prevalence of CVD in Pakistan. High consumption of vanaspati ghee which contains 14.2-34.3% of TFA could be one of the factors for this increased burden of CVD in Pakistan. Consumption of dietary fat low in TFA would be helpful in reducing the risk of CVD in South Asia. Denmark by banning the sale of food items with TFA has brought down the number of deaths due to coronary heart disease by nearly 50% over a period of 20 years. Public awareness about the adverse effects of TFA on human health would be extremely important. Media can play a very effective role in educating the masses and advocating the policy for the sale of only low TFA food items. Literature sources: Google and US National Library of Medicine, National Institute of Health were the sources of papers cited in this review article. PMID:24639860

  8. Effects of TFA addition on the growth of sintered YBa2Cu3Oy superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Ryusuke; Kuroda, Keita; Kato, Teppei; Miura, O.; Yamada, K.; Kaneko, K.

    The effects of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) addition on the growth of a superconducting phase in sintered YBCO samples were investigated. YBCO samples with TFA addition were prepared by adding TFA (99.0%) to YBCO powder and then pressed into pellets and heated 1173 K - 1213 K for 12 - 20 hr in air. After the heat treatment, the TFA-added sample showed large grain sizes and highly c-axis oriented structures compared to pure YBCO samples, which indicates the enhancement of the grain growth of YBCO sintered samples by the TFA addition. The Jc (0) value and Jc/Jc (0T) properties of the sintered samples was improved by the TFA addition.

  9. Natural Rumen-Derived trans Fatty Acids Are Associated with Metabolic Markers of Cardiac Health.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Marine S; Julien, Pierre; Pérusse, Louis; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Rudkowska, Iwona

    2015-09-01

    Evidence suggests that industrial trans fatty acids (iTFA) impair lipid profiles while ruminant trans fatty acids (rTFA) may lower insulin resistance and blood pressure. The objective of this article was to determine if the plasma phospholipid percentage of rTFA is associated with a favorable cardiometabolic profile. We collected fasting blood samples from 200 individuals from Quebec city (QC, Canada) aged from 18 to 55 years old, including 100 obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg m(-2)) and 100 non-obese (BMI < 30 kg m(-2)) men and women. Fatty acid levels in plasma phospholipids were determined using gas chromatography. After separating the subjects into two groups, according to the median percentage of rTFA in plasma phospholipids, participants in the group with higher percentages of rTFA (0.86 ± 0.24 %) had higher adiponectin levels (p = 0.01) and a lower blood pressure (systolic, p = 0.005; diastolic, p = 0.04). In contrast, concentrations in plasma phospholipids of elaidic acid, a major iTFA, are positively correlated with glycemia in non-obese subjects (p = 0.01) and with both triacylglycerol (TAG) (p = 0.0007) and total cholesterol (TC) (p = 0.009) in obese subjects. These data suggest that rTFA may have beneficial effects on cardiometabolic risk factors conversely to their counterpart iTFA. Dietary sources of TFA should be taken into account in future cardiometabolic studies. PMID:26210489

  10. Ozone and TFA impacts in North America from degradation of 2,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene (HFO-1234yf), a potential greenhouse gas replacement.

    PubMed

    Luecken, Deborah J; L Waterland, Robert; Papasavva, Stella; Taddonio, Kristen N; Hutzell, William T; Rugh, John P; Andersen, Stephen O

    2010-01-01

    We use a regional-scale, three-dimensional atmospheric model to evaluate U.S. air quality effects that would result from replacing HFC-134a in automobile air conditioners in the U.S. with HFO-1234yf. Although HFO-1234yf produces tropospheric ozone, the incremental amount is small, averaging less than 0.01% of total ozone formed during the simulation. We show that this production of ozone could be compensated for by a modest improvement in air conditioner efficiency. Atmospheric decomposition of HFO-1234yf produces trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), which is subject to wet and dry deposition. Deposition and concentrations of TFA are spatially variable due to HFO-1234yf's short atmospheric lifetime, with more localized peaks and less global transport when compared to HFC-134a. Over the 2.5 month simulation, deposition of TFA in the continental U.S. from mobile air conditioners averages 0.24 kg km(-2), substantially higher than previous estimates from all sources of current hydrofluorocarbons. Automobile air conditioning HFO-1234yf emissions are predicted to produce concentrations of TFA in Eastern U.S. rainfall at least double the values currently observed from all sources, natural and man-made. Our model predicts peak concentrations in rainfall of 1264 ng L(-1), a level that is 80x lower than the lowest level considered safe for the most sensitive aquatic organisms. PMID:19994849

  11. Effect of trans fatty acid isomers from ruminant sources on risk factors of cardiovascular disease: study design and rationale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Substantial evidence clearly demonstrates the deleterious effects of industrially-produced trans fatty acids (TFA); however, data are lacking from large, well-controlled human feeding studies that directly compare the effects of industrially-produced and naturally-occurring TFA. The purpose of the c...

  12. Effective role of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) to enhance the photocatalytic activity of F-doped TiO2 prepared by modified sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsudin, Emy Marlina; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Juan, Joon Ching; Basirun, Wan Jefrey; Kandjani, Ahmad Esmaielzadeh; Bhargava, Suresh K.

    2016-03-01

    Highly photoactive mesoporous F-doped TiO2 with improved physico-chemical characteristics is achieved using modified sol-gel method. The usage of trifluoroacetic as fluorine precursor significantly modifies the morphology, size, pore shape, crystal phase, crystal structure, surface chemical state and to a lesser extent, {1 0 1} and {0 0 1} facets. The accessibility of fluoride ions on Tisbnd Osbnd Ti polymer chains during crystal growth during the sol-gel process remarkably influences the properties of catalyst. To the best of our knowledge, preparation of F-doped TiO2 using modified sol-gel and trifluoroacetic acid are limited, and still not enough. Thus this work provides additional insight by using an approach which is less hazardous, less costly and practical for large scale agile development in the photocatalysis industry.

  13. TFA from HFO-1234yf: accumulation and aquatic risk in terminal water bodies.

    PubMed

    Russell, Mark H; Hoogeweg, Gerco; Webster, Eva M; Ellis, David A; Waterland, Robert L; Hoke, Robert A

    2012-09-01

    A next-generation mobile automobile air-conditioning (MAC) refrigerant, HFO-1234yf (CF(3) CF = CH(2)), is being developed with improved environmental characteristics. In the atmosphere, it ultimately forms trifluoroacetic acid (TFA(A); CF(3)COOH), which is subsequently scavenged by precipitation and deposited on land and water as trifluoroacetate (TFA; CF(3)COO(-)). Trifluoroacetate is environmentally stable and has the potential to accumulate in terminal water bodies, that is, aquatic systems receiving inflow but with little or no outflow and with high rates of evaporation. Previous studies have estimated the emission rates of HFO-1234yf and have modeled the deposition concentrations and rates of TFA across North America. The present study uses multimedia modeling and geographic information system (GIS)-based modeling to assess the potential concentrations of TFA in terminal water bodies over extended periods. After 10 years of emissions, predicted concentrations of TFA in terminal water bodies across North America are estimated to range between current background levels (i.e., 0.01-0.22 µg/L) and 1 to 6 µg/L. After 50 years of continuous emissions, aquatic concentrations of 1 to 15 µg/L are predicted, with extreme concentrations of up to 50 to 200 µg/L in settings such as the Sonoran Desert along the California/Arizona (USA) border. Based on the relative insensitivity of aquatic organisms to TFA, predicted concentrations of TFA in terminal water bodies are not expected to impair aquatic systems, even considering potential emissions over extended periods. PMID:22730026

  14. TFA and EPA Productivities of Nannochloropsis salina Influenced by Temperature and Nitrate Stimuli in Turbidostatic Controlled Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Maren; Marxen, Kai; Schulz, Rüdiger; Vanselow, Klaus Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    The influence of different nitrate concentrations in combination with three cultivation temperatures on the total fatty acids (TFA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) content of Nannochloropsis salina was investigated. This was done by virtue of turbidostatic controlled cultures. This control mode enables the cultivation of microalgae under defined conditions and, therefore, the influence of single parameters on the fatty acid synthesis of Nannochloropsis salina can be investigated. Generally, growth rates decreased under low nitrate concentrations. This effect was reinforced when cells were exposed to lower temperatures (from 26 °C down to 17 °C). Considering the cellular TFA concentration, nitrate provoked an increase of TFA under nitrate limitation up to 70% of the biological dry mass (BDM). In contrast to this finding, the EPA content decreased under low nitrate concentrations. Nevertheless, both TFA and EPA contents increased under a low culture temperature (17 °C) compared to moderate temperatures of 21 °C and 26 °C. In terms of biotechnological production, the growth rate has to be taken into account. Therefore, for both TFA and EPA production, a temperature of 17 °C and a nitrate concentration of 1800 μmol L−1 afforded the highest productivities. Temperatures of 21 °C and 26 °C in combination with 1800 μmol L−1 nitrate showed slightly lower TFA and EPA productivities. PMID:20948904

  15. Chemical characteristics and sources of organic acids in precipitation at a semi-urban site in Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. L.; Lee, X. Q.; Cao, F.

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the chemical characteristics and sources of organic acids in precipitation in Southwest China, 105 rainwater samples were collected at a semi-urban site in Anshun from June 2007 to June 2008. Organic acids and major anions were analyzed along with pH and electrical conductivity. The pH values varied from 3.57 to 7.09 for all the rainfall events sampled, with an average of 4.67 which was typical acidic value. Formic, acetic and oxalic acids were found to be the predominant carboxylic acids and their volume weighted average (VWA) concentrations were 8.77, 6.93 and 2.84 μmol l -1, respectively. These organic acids were estimated to account for 8.1% to the total free acidity (TFA) in precipitation. The concentrations of the majority organic acids at studied site had a clear seasonal pattern, reaching higher levels during the non-growing season than those in growing season, which was attributed to dilution effect of heavy rainfall during the growing season. The seasonal variation of wet deposition flux of these organic acids confirmed higher source strength of biogenic emissions from vegetation during the growing season. Formic-to-acetic acids ratio (F/A), an indicator of primary versus secondary sources of these organic acids, suggested that primary sources from vehicular emission, biomass burning, soil and vegetation emissions were dominant sources. In addition, the lowest concentrations of organic acids were found under type S, when air masses originated from the marine (South China Sea) during Southern Asian Monsoon period. And the highest concentrations were observed in precipitation events from Northeast China (type NE), prevailing mostly during winter with the lowest rainfall.

  16. Acid rain: the impact of local sources

    SciTech Connect

    Spaite, P.; Esposito, M.P.; Szabo, M.F.; Devitt, T.W.

    1980-11-24

    It has been assumed that acid rain is predominantly a problem of long-range transport of pollutants from large fossil fuel combustion sources, namely coal-fired utilities. However, close examination of fuel use information and source emission characteristics in the Adirondacks, Florida, and California suggests that local oil burning and automotive sources may be major contributors to the occurrence of acid rain in these areas. This report describes the possible role of local combustion sources in the production of acid rain, discusses the implications of the findings, and their relevance to alternative control strategies for acid rain. Oil-fired boilers, especially the smaller commercial, industrial, and residential units, produce at least 3 to 10 times as much primary sulfate per unit of sulfur content as coal-fired units. Moreover, oil-fired units emit comparatively large quantities of catalytic compounds capable of rapidly converting still more sulfur oxide to sulfate in the atmosphere. Thus, in areas where large quantities of oil are burned, the direct impact from locally generated sulfates may equal or even exceed that produced by imported sulfates derived from distant coal-burning sources. Fuel consumption data show that large quantities of oil are being consumed in areas experiencing acid rain. Forty percent of the residual and 36 percent of the distillate oil burned in the United States is consumed in the eight-state area surrounding the Adirondacks. California is the next largest oil-consuming area and Florida is third. Nitric acid is responsible for about 30 percent of rainfall acidity in the Northeast and Florida, and for about 30 to 75 percent of the rainfall acidity in California.

  17. Teach for Australia (TFA): Can It Overcome Educational Disadvantage?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skourdoumbis, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers an alternative teacher certification pathway known as Teach for Australia (TFA) that is currently operating in the Australian state of Victoria. A discursive approach informed by critical theory is used in the paper to critically examine the specific case of TFA as an alternative teacher certification pathway charged with…

  18. Cultivating Political Powerhouses: TFA Corps Members Experiences That Shape Local Political Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Rebecca; White, Rachel; Reckhow, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, Teach for America (TFA) has invested in developing corps members as leaders. Although TFA asks corps members for a two-year commitment, TFA celebrates the achievements of alumni who have gone on to careers in politics, public policy, and advocacy. Thus, many community leaders see the arrival of TFA corps members as having a…

  19. Abundance and distribution of fatty acids in sediments of the South Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xin; Zeng, Zhigang; Chen, Shuai; Yin, Xuebo; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Ma, Yao; Yang, Baoju; Rong, Kunbo; Shu, Yunchao; Jiang, Tao

    2015-04-01

    Sediment samples obtained from the South Mid-Atlantic Ridge were studies by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for the abundance and distributions of total fatty acids (TFAs). Approximately 34 fatty acids were identified, with the chain-lengths ranging from C12 to C30. The total concentrations of TFAs (ΣTFA) ranged from 7.15 to 30.09 μg g-1 dry sediment, and ΣTFA was weakly correlated with bitumen content ( R 2 = 0.69). The ΣTFA of samples around hydrothermal areas were significantly higher than that of samples away from hydrothermal areas, indicating intense primary production and large biomass in the hydrothermal areas, and suggesting a close relationship between hydrothermal activity and ΣTFA of samples. The characteristics of the TFA composition in the present study are rich in monounsaturated fatty acids and lacking in polyunsaturated fatty acids, and the ratios between the concentrations of monounsaturated fatty acids and ΣTFAs in samples close to the hydrothermal areas, are about 0.8, but for samples far from the hydrothermal areas, they are only about 0.5. Several fatty acids ( e.g., a/iC15:0 and C16:1ω7), which are signature biomarkers for sulfur-metabolizing bacteria, show the same distribution trend as ΣTFA of samples, further highlighting the close relationship between fatty acid content and hydrothermal activity and/or hydrothermal communities. The metabolic activities of hydrothermal communities, especially those of microorganisms, are likely the main source of fatty acids in samples.

  20. TFA Tanks Focus Area midyear review report FY 2000

    SciTech Connect

    LR Roeder-Smith

    2000-05-02

    In accordance with EM's office of Science and Technology (OST), the TFA is committed to assessing the maturity of technology development projects and ensuring their readiness for implementation and subsequent deployment. The TFA conducts an annual Midyear Review to document the status of ongoing projects, reaffirm and document user commitment to selected projects, and to improve the effective deployment of technology by determining and documenting the readiness of selected projects to move ahead. Since 1995, OST has used a linear technology maturation model that spans through seven defined stages of maturity, from basic research to implementation. Application of this Stage/Gate model to technology development resulted in prescriptive and somewhat cumbersome review procedures, resulting in limited and inconsistent use. Subsequently, in February 2000, OST issued revised guidance in an effort to streamline the technology tracking and review process. While the new OST guidance reinforces peer review requirements and the use of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) for independent reviews, it also implements a simplified Gate model. The TFA is now responsible for providing auditable documentation for passing only three stages of technology maturity: ready for research (Gate 0); ready for development (Gate 2); ready for demonstration (Gate 5). The TFA Midyear Review is a key element in the overall review procedure, as the tracking evidence for all active projects is required to be available at this time. While the Midyear Report contains an overview of the status of all TFA reviews and projects, not all the reviews were conducted during the Midyear Review. The TFA used a phased approach to accomplish the Midyear Review requirements.

  1. Vaccenic acid and trans fatty acid isomers from partially hydrogenated oil both adversely affect LDL cholesterol: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evidence of the adverse effects of industrially-produced trans fatty acids (iTFA) on risk of cardiovascular disease is consistent and well documented in the scientific literature; however, the cardiovascular effects of naturally-occurring TFA synthesized in ruminant animals (rTFA), such as vaccenic ...

  2. TFaNS-Tone Fan Noise Design/Prediction System: Users' Manual TFaNS Version 1.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topol, David A.; Huff, Dennis L. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    TFaNS is the Tone Fan Noise Design/Prediction System developed by Pratt & Whitney under contract to NASA Glenn. The purpose of this system is to predict tone noise emanating from a fan stage including the effects of reflection and transmission by the rotor and stator and by the duct inlet and nozzle. The first version of this design system was developed under a previous NASA contract. Several improvements have been made to TFaNS. This users' manual shows how to run this new system. TFaNS consists of the codes that compute the acoustic properties (reflection and transmission coefficients) of the various elements and writes them to files, CUP3D Fan Noise Coupling Code that reads these files, solves the coupling problem, and outputs the desired noise predictions, and AWAKEN CFD/Measured Wake Postprocessor which reformats CFD wake predictions and/or measured wake data so they can be used by the system. This report provides information on code input and file structure essential for potential users of TFaNS.

  3. Rapid thermal decomposition for YBa2Cu3O7-δ films derived by DEA-modified TFA-MOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. Q.; Zhao, S. C.; Liu, Z. Y.; Rui, R. S.; Qiu, W. B.; Guo, Y. Q.; Li, M. J.; Yang, W. T.; Cai, C. B.

    2014-05-01

    Thermal decomposition of YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) films derived by diethanolamine (DEA)-modified trifluoroacetic acid-metal organic deposition (TFA-MOD) was investigated with respect to the understanding of the correlation between the stress releasing and rapid decomposition. It is revealed that the evaporation of DEA and the decomposition of precursor films occur simultaneously. A pyrolysis time as 20 seconds is optimal to keep the proper amount of DEA which prevents the films from severe stress during the pyrolysis. Then smooth surface of resultant films appears. In case of a pyrolysis time longer than 40 s, cracks emerge in the films accompanied with complete evaporation of DEA and appearance of Cu-rich particles, while films with pyrolysis time shorter than 10s is excessively soft, with large amount of DEA and TFA remaining in the film, implying insufficient pyrolysis.

  4. Acid rain: the relationship between sources and receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Calvert, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Acid Rain: The Relationship Between Sources and Receptors consists of a collection of papers and discussions from the third annual conference sponsored by the Acid Rain Information Clearinghouse. The conference, held in December 1986, was supported by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Gas Research Institute, and the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP).

  5. Study on sources of charging lead acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniş, C. M.; Popa, G. N.; Iagăr, A.

    2015-06-01

    The paper presents the general characteristics of lead acid batteries and two charging methods of these batteries. For charging of lead batteries was used an intelligent power source K 8012 (from Velleman). The power source allows fixing the level of the battery voltage and battery capacity. The intelligent power source uses the joint method (at constant current and, then, at constant voltage) and warning that indicates different situations in the charging process. Other method of charging presented in the paper is at constant voltage using a stabilized power source. In the paper experimental measurements were carried out using data acquisition card SER 10 BIT (from Conrad) for charging/ discharging of a lead acid battery 12V/9Ah (using an intelligent power source) and charging of another high capacity lead acid battery 12V/47Ah/390 A (using a stabilized power source). At the discharging of the lead acid batteries it were used automotive lamps as electric loads.

  6. High-rate fabrication of YBCO coated conductors using TFA-MOD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaoka, K.; Yoshizumi, M.; Usui, Y.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    The YBa2Cu3O7-y (YBCO) coated conductors derived from metal-organic deposition (MOD) method using the metal salts of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) have been developed with high critical current property. The long-length YBCO coated conductors have been fabricated by multi-turn reel-to-reel system. Increasing the thickness per single coating in the multi-turn reel-to-reel system is a cost-effective technique for fabrication of the precursor films in the calcination process. In this work, we have developed a new starting solution consisting of non-fluorine salts of yttrium 4-oxopentanoate and copper 2-ethylhexanoate with focusing on increasing the thickness per single coating for a high-rate fabrication of the YBCO coated conductors by the TFA-MOD method. The critical thickness per single coating of the film fabricated from the new starting solution was 0.54 μm/coat. High critical current of 377 A/cm-width with high critical current density (3.0 MA/cm2) was obtained in the YBCO film fabricated on CeO2 buffered LaMnO3/MgO/Gd2Zr2O-7/HastelloyTM substrates using the new starting solution at the thickness per single coating of 0.42 μm/coat.

  7. Determination of trans fatty acid levels by FTIR in processed foods in Australia.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Justine; Barr, Daniel; Sinclair, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Health authorities around the world advise 'limiting consumption of trans fatty acid', however in Australia the trans fatty acid (TFA) content is not required to be listed in the nutrition information panel unless a declaration or nutrient claim is made about fatty acids or cholesterol. Since there is limited knowledge about trans fatty acid levels in processed foods available in Australia, this study aimed to determine the levels of TFA in selected food items known to be sources of TFA from previously published studies. Food items (n=92) that contain vegetable oil and a total fat content greater than 5% were included. This criterion was used in conjunction with a review of similar studies where food items were found to contain high levels of trans fatty acids. Lipids were extracted using solvents. Gravimetric methods were used to determine total fat content and trans fatty acid levels were quantified by Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. High levels of trans fatty acids were found in certain items in the Australian food supply, with a high degree of variability. Of the samples analysed, 13 contained greater than 1 g of trans fatty acids per serving size, the highest value was 8.1 g/serving. Apart from when the nutrition information panel states that the content is less than a designated low level, food labels sold in Australia do not indicate trans fatty acid levels. We suggested that health authorities seek ways to assist consumers to limit their intakes of trans fatty acids. PMID:18818158

  8. Sources and Bioactive Properties of Conjugated Dietary Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, Alan A; Ross, Paul R; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Stanton, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    The group of conjugated fatty acids known as conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers have been extensively studied with regard to their bioactive potential in treating some of the most prominent human health malignancies. However, CLA isomers are not the only group of potentially bioactive conjugated fatty acids currently undergoing study. In this regard, isomers of conjugated α-linolenic acid, conjugated nonadecadienoic acid and conjugated eicosapentaenoic acid, to name but a few, have undergone experimental assessment. These studies have indicated many of these conjugated fatty acid isomers commonly possess anti-carcinogenic, anti-adipogenic, anti-inflammatory and immune modulating properties, a number of which will be discussed in this review. The mechanisms through which these bioactivities are mediated have not yet been fully elucidated. However, existing evidence indicates that these fatty acids may play a role in modulating the expression of several oncogenes, cell cycle regulators, and genes associated with energy metabolism. Despite such bioactive potential, interest in these conjugated fatty acids has remained low relative to the CLA isomers. This may be partly attributed to the relatively recent emergence of these fatty acids as bioactives, but also due to a lack of awareness regarding sources from which they can be produced. In this review, we will also highlight the common sources of these conjugated fatty acids, including plants, algae, microbes and chemosynthesis. PMID:26968402

  9. Coal is a potential source of naphthenic acids in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Scott, Angela C; Whittal, Randy M; Fedorak, Phillip M

    2009-03-15

    Naphthenic acids, with the general formula C(n)H(2n+Z)O(2), are found in conventional petroleums and oil sands ores. These acids are toxic to aquatic life, so their discharge from petroleum processing into receiving waters must be avoided. In a previous study, naphthenic acids were putatively identified in groundwaters from two domestic wells that were distant from petroleum sources. However, coal deposits were near these wells. In this study, waters from the two wells were extracted and analyzed by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry to unequivocally confirm the presence of naphthenic acids and other organic acids. In addition, distilled water was percolated through three crushed coal samples and the leachates were shown to contain a variety of organic acids, including naphthenic acids. These results clearly demonstrate that coal is a source of naphthenic acids and that the naphthenic acids can leach into groundwaters. Thus, the presence of naphthenic acids in waters cannot be solely attributed to petroleum or petroleum industry activities. PMID:19185332

  10. On the source of organic acid aerosol layers above clouds.

    PubMed

    Sorooshian, Armin; Lu, Miao-Ling; Brechtel, Fred J; Jonsson, Haflidi; Feingold, Graham; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2007-07-01

    During the July 2005 Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) and the August-September 2006 Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS), the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter probed aerosols and cumulus clouds in the eastern Pacific Ocean off the coast of northern California and in southeastern Texas, respectively. An on-board particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) quantified inorganic and organic acid species with < or = 5-min time resolution. Ubiquitous organic aerosol layers above cloud with enhanced organic acid levels were observed in both locations. The data suggest that aqueous-phase reactions to produce organic acids, mainly oxalic acid, followed by droplet evaporation is a source of elevated organic acid aerosol levels above cloud. Oxalic acid is observed to be produced more efficiently relative to sulfate as the cloud liquid water content increases, corresponding to larger and less acidic droplets. As derived from large eddy simulations of stratocumulus underthe conditions of MASE, both Lagrangian trajectory analysis and diurnal cloudtop evolution provide evidence that a significant fraction of the aerosol mass concentration above cloud can be accounted for by evaporated droplet residual particles. Methanesulfonate data suggest that entrainment of free tropospheric aerosol can also be a source of organic acids above boundary layer clouds. PMID:17695910

  11. Trans fatty acid content in Malaysian supermarket foods: a field-to-laboratory approach in assessing food risk.

    PubMed

    Karupaiah, Tilakavati; Tan, Hui Kuen; Ong, Wei Wen; Tan, Choon Heen; Sundram, Kalyana

    2014-01-01

    The extent of industrial trans fatty acids (TFA) in the food supply is unknown in Malaysia, whilst TFA disclosure on food labels is not mandatory by Malaysian food standards. Supermarket foods such as dairy products, fats and oils, meat products, snack foods, soups, and confectionery are commonly cited to be major contributors of TFA in the diet. A consumer survey (n = 622) was used to develop a food listing of these 'high risk' foods. TFA content of high-risk foods were analysed by gas chromatography. Food samples (n = 158) were analysed and their total TFA content were compared with Malaysian Food Standards. A wide variation in TFA content within food categories was indicated. Of the foods containing TFA, many food labels did not cite TFA content or the use of partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (PHVO) as an ingredient. Hypothesised estimates of TFA intake from these supermarket foods in a sample day's menu providing 2000 kcal projected a minimum intake of 0.5 g and a maximum intake of 5.2 g TFA. This study found there was no voluntary disclosure of TFA content on food labels or identifying PHVO as an ingredient. It appears that health education targeting consumers to minimise TFA consumption is required supported by mandatory PHVO disclosure on the food label. PMID:24872121

  12. Saturated and trans-fatty acids in UK takeaway food.

    PubMed

    Davies, Ian Glynn; Blackham, Toni; Jaworowska, Agnieszka; Taylor, Catherine; Ashton, Matthew; Stevenson, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the saturated fatty acid (SFA) and trans-fatty acid (TFA) contents of popular takeaway foods in the UK (including English, pizza, Chinese, Indian and kebab cuisine). Samples of meals were analyzed by an accredited public analyst laboratory for SFA and TFA. The meals were highly variable for SFA and TFA. English and Pizza meals had the highest median amount of SFA with 35.7 g/meal; Kebab meals were high in TFA with up to 5.2 g/meal. When compared to UK dietary reference values, some meals exceeded SFA and TFA recommendations from just one meal. Takeaway food would be an obvious target to reduce SFA and TFA contents and increase the potential of meeting UK recommendations. Strategies such as reformulation and smaller takeaway portion sizes warrant investigation. PMID:26911372

  13. Towards sustainable sources for omega-3 fatty acids production.

    PubMed

    Adarme-Vega, T Catalina; Thomas-Hall, Skye R; Schenk, Peer M

    2014-04-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docohexaenoic acid (DHA), provide significant health benefits for brain function/development and cardiovascular conditions. However, most EPA and DHA for human consumption is sourced from small fatty fish caught in coastal waters and, with depleting global fish stocks, recent research has been directed towards more sustainable sources. These include aquaculture with plant-based feeds, krill, marine microalgae, microalgae-like protists and genetically-modified plants. To meet the increasing demand for EPA and DHA, further developments are needed towards land-based sources. In particular large-scale cultivation of microalgae and plants is likely to become a reality with expected reductions in production costs, yield increasese and the adequate addressing of genetically modified food acceptance issues. PMID:24607804

  14. Unfinishedness: Striving for a Viable Partnership between TFA and Its University Partner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Barbara; Fisher, Teresa R.; Alicea, Monica; Bloxson, Kolt M.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Teach For America (TFA) affiliates with universities in most of its 40 regions nationally; however, few researchers intentionally study the content and processes of a partnership between TFA and a college of education. Purpose/Research Question/Focus of Study: To ensure that investments both organizations were making had a…

  15. TFA and the Magical Thinking of the "Best and the Brightest"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenreich, Megan; Rogers, Bethany L.

    2016-01-01

    This article draws on oral history testimonies to examine the experiences of participants in the inaugural 1990 cohort of Teach For America (TFA)--a group of young people dubbed the "best and brightest" of their generation and tasked with "saving" urban education. For 25 years, TFA has operated according to the principle of the…

  16. Training the next Teachers for America: A Proposal for Reconceptualizing TFA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Megan

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author offers suggestions for reconceptualizing the Teach for America (TFA) program. She recommends that TFA develop a residency training model with the following features: (1) Extend the program's current two-year commitment to three years; (2) Require first-year corps members to complete a residency year in an experienced…

  17. A Racio-Economic Analysis of Teach for America: Counterstories of TFA Teachers of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapayese, Yvette V.; Aldana, Ursula S.; Lara, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses Teach for America (TFA), one of the alternative education programs of the U.S. Department of Education designed to address the achievement gap of students of color in the country. Topics explored in this research include issues of racism and race in the recruitment and support of its teacher corp; how TFA educators of color…

  18. Pd layer on cube-textured substrates for MOD-TFA and PLD YBCO coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, A.; Celentano, G.; Galluzzi, V.; Rufoloni, A.; Vannozzi, A.; Augieri, A.; Ciontea, L.; Petrisor, T.; Gambardella, U.; Longo, G.; Cricenti, A.

    2008-01-01

    Pd films were deposited on rolling assisted biaxially textured substrate (RABiTS) Ni-5 at.% W in order to exploit the Pd effect of the texture sharpening with respect to that of the substrate, for the development of YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) coated conductors. The Pd sharpening effect was relevant in the out-of-plane direction where the reduction for the ω-scans' full width at half maximum (FWHM) ranged from 55 to 65%, depending on the substrate roughness. The obtained minimum values of the FWHM in the transverse rolling direction of the (002) Pd ω-scan and in the (111) Pd phi-scan were of about 2.5° and 5°, respectively. The CeO2/YSZ/CeO2 (YSZ is Y2O3-stabilised ZrO2) heterostructure of the buffer layer was developed by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). In order to transfer the sharp orientation of the Pd film, both the seed CeO2 layer and the YSZ layer were deposited at low temperatures (450 °C), low enough to avoid Pd/Ni-W interdiffusion. The YBCO, films deposited by both PLD and metal-organic deposition (MOD) using metal trifluoroacetate acid (TFA), exhibited rolling direction (005) ω-scan and the (113) phi-scan FWHM values of about 2° and 5°, respectively. In spite of the complete interdiffusion between Ni and Pd during the YBCO film deposition, the coated conductors exhibit good adherence, as well as a smooth and crack-free surface. A zero-resistance critical temperature (TC0) of 90.8 K for the MOD-TFA YBCO films and critical current-density (JC) up to 2.2 MA cm-2 at 77 K and self-field for PLD YBCO films have been obtained.

  19. Inverse Temperature-Dependent Pathway of Cellulose Decrystallization in Trifluoroacetic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haibo; Holladay, John E.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhang, Z. Conrad

    2007-05-17

    Abstract An unusual inverse temperature-dependent pathway was observed during cellulose decrystallization in trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). Decreasing the TFA treatment temperature accelerated the cellulose decrystallization process. It took only 100 minutes to completely decrystallize cellulose at 0 °C in TFA, a result not achieved in 48 hours at 25°C in the same medium. There was neither cellulose esterification nor a change of cellulose macrofibril morphology by TFA treatment at 0 °C. Our IR data suggest that TFA molecules are present as cyclic dimers when they penetrate into crystalline cellulose regions, transforming crystalline cellulose to amorphous cellulose. The TFA cyclic dimer does not form strong hydrogen bonds with cellulose since the IR vibration frequency of the carbonyl group of the dimer molecule remained unchanged after the dimer diffused into the cellulose matrix. On the other hand, the rate of TFA penetration into the cellulose matrix was greatly retarded at higher temperatures where monomeric TFA esterification took place on the external surface of crystalline cellulose. At elevated temperatures esterification of TFA monomers with cellulose, as well as water released from the esterification reaction, inhibit the diffusion rate of TFA into the cellulose crystalline region and decreases the TFA swelling capability. Based on experimental observations, our study indicates that cellulose decrystallization does not require that solvent molecules form strong hydrogen bonds with cellulose.

  20. Lesquerella: A Domestic Source of Hydroxy Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Lesquerella is a source of three different hydroxy fatty acids (HFA) in their seed oil with applications as a renewable raw material replacement for fossil fuel products. Lesquerella fendleri is the primary species from this genus in the process of commercialization and contains a HFA simi...

  1. Membrane-based continuous remover of trifluoroacetic acid in mobile phase for LC-ESI-MS analysis of small molecules and proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhigui; Zhang, Jialing; Xing, Jiawei; Bai, Yu; Liao, Yiping; Liu, Huwei

    2012-07-01

    We developed a "continuous" trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) remover based on electrodialysis with bipolar membrane for online coupling of liquid chromatography (LC) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) using TFA containing mobile phase. With the TFA remover as an interface, the TFA anion in the mobile phase was removed based on electrodialysis mechanism, and meanwhile, the anion exchange membrane was self-regenerated by the hydroxide ions produced by the bipolar membrane. So the remover could continuously work without any additional regeneration process. The established LC-TFA remover-MS system has been successfully applied for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of small molecules as well as proteins. PMID:22528206

  2. Membrane-Based Continuous Remover of Trifluoroacetic Acid in Mobile Phase for LC-ESI-MS Analysis of Small Molecules and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhigui; Zhang, Jialing; Xing, Jiawei; Bai, Yu; Liao, Yiping; Liu, Huwei

    2012-07-01

    We developed a "continuous" trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) remover based on electrodialysis with bipolar membrane for online coupling of liquid chromatography (LC) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) using TFA containing mobile phase. With the TFA remover as an interface, the TFA anion in the mobile phase was removed based on electrodialysis mechanism, and meanwhile, the anion exchange membrane was self-regenerated by the hydroxide ions produced by the bipolar membrane. So the remover could continuously work without any additional regeneration process. The established LC-TFA remover-MS system has been successfully applied for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of small molecules as well as proteins.

  3. A biogenic source of oxalic acid in marine aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, M.; Rinaldi, M.; Ceburnis, D.; O'Dowd, C.; Sciare, J.; Burrows, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Oxalic acid has been often observed in marine aerosol, nevertheless, given the ubiquitous character and the high concentrations found in polluted environments, its origin has often been attributed to continental sources. In this work, we present the results of oxalic acid analyses, on aerosol samples collected at Mace Head (Ireland, 53°20’N, 9°54’W) and Amsterdam Island (Indian Ocean, 37°48’S, 77°34’E), supporting the existence of a biogenic source of oxalic acid over the oceans. Measurements cover the year 2006, at the Northern Hemisphere site, and the period 2003-2007, at the Southern Hemisphere one. Aerosol oxalic acid was detected in clean marine air masses in concentrations ranging from 2.7 to 39 ng m-3, at Mace Head, and from 0.31 to 17 ng m-3, at Amsterdam Island. In both hemispheres, oxalic acid concentration showed a clear seasonal trend, with maxima in spring-summer and minima in the fall-winter period, in analogy with other marine biogenic aerosol components (e.g., MSA and amines). Oxalic acid was distributed along the whole aerosol size spectrum, with the major contribution given by the 1.0-2.0 µm size range, and by the lower accumulation mode (0.25-0.5 µm). Given the observed size distributions, marine aerosol oxalic acid can be assumed as the result of the combination of different formation processes, among which in-cloud oxidation of gaseous precursors [1] and photochemical degradation of biogenic unsaturated fatty acids [2] are likely the most important. Among aerosol oxalic acid precursors, glyoxal is the most likely candidate in the marine boundary layer, as a source of glyoxal over the oceans has recently been discovered by satellite observations [3] and confirmed by in situ measurements [4]. In support of this hypothesis, SCIAMACHY satellite retrieved glyoxal column concentrations, over the two sampling sites, resulted characterized by a clear seasonal trend, resembling the aerosol oxalic acid one. [1] Warneck, Atmospheric

  4. Contents of total fat, fatty acids, starch, sugars and dietary fibre in Swedish market basket diets.

    PubMed

    Becker, W; Eriksson, A; Haglund, M; Wretling, S

    2015-05-14

    The typical dietary supply of total fat, fatty acids, starch, sugars, polyols and dietary fibre in Sweden was assessed from analyses of market baskets (MB) purchased in 2005 and 2010. MB were based on food balance sheets, with each basket comprising about 130 foods, which represented more than 90% of annual dietary supply. Foods were divided into ten to twelve categories. In 2010, total fat contributed 34% of energy (E%), SFA 14.3 E%, MUFA 12.8 E%, PUFA 4.6 E%, n-6 fatty acids 3.6 E%, n-3 fatty acids 1.0 E% and trans-fatty acids (TFA) 0.5 E%. Glycaemic carbohydrates contributed 47 E%, monosaccharides 9 E%, sucrose 11 E%, disaccharides 15 E% and total sugars 24 E%. Added sugars contributed about 15 E%. Dietary fibre content was about 1.7 g/MJ in the 2010 MB. Compared with the 2005 MB, the dietary supply of TFA and dietary fibre was lower, otherwise differences were small. The present MB survey shows that the content of SFA and added sugars was higher than the current Nordic Nutrition Recommendations, while the content of PUFA and especially dietary fibre was lower. TFA levels decreased and dietary supply was well below the recommendations of the WHO. These results emphasise a focus on quality and food sources of fat and carbohydrates, limiting foods rich in SFA and added sugars and replacing them with foods rich in dietary fibre and cis-unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:25989998

  5. A large and ubiquitous source of atmospheric formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, D. B.; Baasandorj, M.; Farmer, D. K.; Thornton, J. A.; Baumann, K.; Brophy, P.; Chaliyakunnel, S.; de Gouw, J. A.; Graus, M.; Hu, L.; Koss, A.; Lee, B. H.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Neuman, J. A.; Paulot, F.; Peischl, J.; Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Warneke, C.; Williams, B. J.; Xu, J.

    2015-06-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is one of the most abundant acids in the atmosphere, with an important influence on precipitation chemistry and acidity. Here we employ a chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem CTM) to interpret recent airborne and ground-based measurements over the US Southeast in terms of the constraints they provide on HCOOH sources and sinks. Summertime boundary layer concentrations average several parts-per-billion, 2-3× larger than can be explained based on known production and loss pathways. This indicates one or more large missing HCOOH sources, and suggests either a key gap in current understanding of hydrocarbon oxidation or a large, unidentified, direct flux of HCOOH. Model-measurement comparisons implicate biogenic sources (e.g., isoprene oxidation) as the predominant HCOOH source. Resolving the unexplained boundary layer concentrations based (i) solely on isoprene oxidation would require a 3× increase in the model HCOOH yield, or (ii) solely on direct HCOOH emissions would require approximately a 25× increase in its biogenic flux. However, neither of these can explain the high HCOOH amounts seen in anthropogenic air masses and in the free troposphere. The overall indication is of a large biogenic source combined with ubiquitous chemical production of HCOOH across a range of precursors. Laboratory work is needed to better quantify the rates and mechanisms of carboxylic acid production from isoprene and other prevalent organics. Stabilized Criegee intermediates (SCIs) provide a large model source of HCOOH, while acetaldehyde tautomerization accounts for ~ 15% of the simulated global burden. Because carboxylic acids also react with SCIs and catalyze the reverse tautomerization reaction, HCOOH buffers against its own production by both of these pathways. Based on recent laboratory results, reaction between CH3O2 and OH could provide a major source of atmospheric HCOOH; however, including this chemistry degrades the model simulation of CH3OOH and NOx

  6. A large and ubiquitous source of atmospheric formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, D. B.; Baasandorj, M.; Farmer, D. K.; Thornton, J. A.; Baumann, K.; Brophy, P.; Chaliyakunnel, S.; de Gouw, J. A.; Graus, M.; Hu, L.; Koss, A.; Lee, B. H.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Neuman, J. A.; Paulot, F.; Peischl, J.; Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Warneke, C.; Williams, B. J.; Xu, J.

    2015-02-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is one of the most abundant acids in the atmosphere, with an important influence on precipitation chemistry and acidity. Here we employ a chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to interpret recent airborne and ground-based measurements over the US Southeast in terms of the constraints they provide on HCOOH sources and sinks. Summertime boundary layer concentrations average several parts-per-billion, 2-3× larger than can be explained based on known production and loss pathways. This indicates one or more large missing HCOOH sources, and suggests either a key gap in current understanding of hydrocarbon oxidation or a large, unidentified, direct flux of HCOOH. Model-measurement comparisons implicate biogenic sources (e.g., isoprene oxidation) as the predominant HCOOH source. Resolving the unexplained boundary layer concentrations based: (i) solely on isoprene oxidation would require a 3× increase in the model HCOOH yield, or (ii) solely on direct HCOOH emissions would require approximately a 25× increase in its biogenic flux. However, neither of these can explain the high HCOOH amounts seen in anthropogenic air masses and in the free troposphere. The overall indication is of a large biogenic source combined with ubiquitous chemical production of HCOOH across a range of precursors. Laboratory work is needed to better quantify the rates and mechanisms of carboxylic acid production from isoprene and other prevalent organics. Stabilized Criegee intermediates (SCIs) provide a large model source of HCOOH, while acetaldehyde tautomerization accounts for ~ 15% of the simulated global burden. Because carboxylic acids also react with SCIs and catalyze the reverse tautomerization reaction, HCOOH buffers against its own production by both of these pathways. Based on recent laboratory results, reaction between CH3O2 and OH could provide a major source of atmospheric HCOOH; however, including this chemistry degrades the model simulation of CH3OOH and NOx:CH3OOH

  7. WRF/Chem study of dry and wet deposition of trifluoroacetic acid produced from the atmospheric degradation of a few short-lived HFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; McKeen, S. A.; Kim, S.; Ahmadov, R.; Grell, G. A.; Talukdar, R. K.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) is the prevalent (used in >80% passenger cars and commercial vehicles worldwide) refrigerant in automobile air conditioning units (MACs). With an atmospheric lifetime of ~14 years and a global warming potential (GWP) of 1430 on a 100-year time horizon, HFC-134a does not meet current and expected requirements for MAC refrigerants in many parts of the world. Therefore, substitutes with lower GWP are being sought. One of the simplest way to achieve lower GWP is to use chemicals with shorter atmospheric lifetimes. In this work, we investigate the dry and wet deposition and the rainwater concentration of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) produced by the atmospheric oxidation of 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (TFP) and 1,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropene (PFP). The WRF/Chem model was used to calculate dry and wet TFA deposition over the contiguous USA during the May-September 2006 period that would result from replacing HFC-134a in MACs with a 1:1 molar ratio mixture of 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (TFP) and 1,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropene (PFP). The simulation is evaluated by comparing observations of precipitation and sulfate wet deposition at stations of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP). Simulated precipitation and sulfate wet deposition correlate well with the observations, but exhibit a positive bias for precipitation and a negative bias for sulfate wet deposition. Atmospheric lifetimes of TFP and PFP against oxidation by the hydroxyl radical OH, a prognostic species in WRF/Chem, are ~5 and ~4 days in the simulation, respectively. The model setup allows the attribution of dry and wet TFA deposition to individual source regions (California, Houston, Chicago, and the remaining contiguous USA in this work). TFA deposition is highest in the eastern USA because of numerous large sources and high precipitation in the region. West of the Continental Divide, TFA deposition is significantly lower, and its origin is dominated by emissions from

  8. Vortex creep in TFA-YBCO nanocomposite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouco, V.; Bartolomé, E.; Maiorov, B.; Palau, A.; Civale, L.; Obradors, X.; Puig, T.

    2014-11-01

    Vortex creep in YBa2Cu3O7 - x (YBCO) films grown from the trifluoracetate (TFA) chemical route with BaZrO3 and Ba2YTaO6 second-phase nanoparticles (NPs) has been investigated by magnetic relaxation measurements. We observe that in YBCO nanocomposites the phenomenological crossover line from the elastic to the plastic creep regime is shifted to higher magnetic fields and temperatures. The origin of this shift lies on the new isotropic-strong vortex pinning contribution appearing in these nanocomposites, induced by local lattice distortions. As a consequence, we demonstrate that the addition of non-coherent NPs produces a decrease in the creep rate S in most of the phase diagram, particularly, in the range of fields and temperatures (T\\gt 60 K, {{μ }0}H\\gt 0.5 T) relevant for large scale applications.

  9. Nutritional properties of trans fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Sambaiah, K; Lokesh, B R

    1999-08-01

    The role of trans fatty acids (TFA) present in partially hydrogenated fats widely consumed in food and their link with coronary heart disease has been examined in this review. Most of the studies carried out have been on the effects of TFA on blood-lipid profile. The perceived effects of TFA intake depend on the fat or oil with which they are compared and appears to be in between that of dietary saturated fats and monounsaturated fatty acids. When compared to saturated fat, TFA intake shows lower levels of total and LDL-cholesterol in blood. But when both TFA and saturated fatty acids are compared with cis fatty acids or native unhydrogenated oil, increase in total and LDL-cholesterol are noted. The effects of TFA on HDL-cholesterol and Lp(a) are not clearly established. The undesirable effects of TFA can be overcome by inclusion of essential fatty acids at a minimum of 2 energy per cent level in the diet. The link between trans fatty acid intake and coronary heart disease (CHD) are not unequivocally established. PMID:10650721

  10. Trifluoroacetic acid as excipient destabilizes melittin causing the selective aggregation of melittin within the centrin-melittin-trifluoroacetic acid complex.

    PubMed

    Pastrana-Rios, Belinda; Del Valle Sosa, Liliana; Santiago, Jorge

    2015-07-01

    Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) may be the cause of the bottleneck in high resolution structure determination for protein-peptide complexes. Fragment based drug design often involves the use of synthetic peptides which contain TFA (excipient). Our goal was to explore the effects of this excipient on a model complex: centrin-melittin-TFA. We performed Fourier transform infrared, two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopies and spectral simulations to analyze the amide I'/I'* band for the components and the ternary complex. Melittin (MLT) was observed to have increased helicity upon its interaction with centrin, followed by the thermally induced aggregation of MLT within the ternary complex in the TFA presence. PMID:26798810

  11. Overview of trans fatty acids: biochemistry and health effects.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Swati; Passi, Santosh Jain; Misra, Anoop

    2011-01-01

    Trans fatty acids (TFA) are unsaturated fatty acids that contain at least one non-conjugated double bond in the trans configuration, resulting in a straighter shape. TFA present in our diet can either be industrially produced and ruminant or natural. The major process contributing to formation of industrial TFA is hydrogenation of vegetable oils. Thermal processes such as edible oil refining and frying also lead to the formation of TFA while, ruminant/natural TFA is formed in the rumen of ruminant animals through bio-hydrogenation. Industrial TFA poses severe effects on our health like cardiovascular problems, insulin resistance, infertility in women, compromised fetal development and cognitive decline. There are strict regulations for limiting/removing the TFA content from food supply across the world. However in India, there is scarcity of data on TFA content in foods and their consumption levels. Given the alarmingly rising trend of diabetes and cardiovascular disease in India, removal of TFA from the food supply along with generating awareness among the masses in this regard is of immense importance. PMID:22813572

  12. Evaluation of nitrous acid sources and sinks in urban outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Elliott T.; Griffin, Robert J.; Steiner, Allison L.; Dibb, Jack; Scheuer, Eric; Gong, Longwen; Rutter, Andrew P.; Cevik, Basak K.; Kim, Saewung; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James

    2016-02-01

    Intensive air quality measurements made from June 22-25, 2011 in the outflow of the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) metropolitan area are used to evaluate nitrous acid (HONO) sources and sinks. A two-layer box model was developed to assess the ability of established and recently identified HONO sources and sinks to reproduce observations of HONO mixing ratios. A baseline model scenario includes sources and sinks established in the literature and is compared to scenarios including three recently identified sources: volatile organic compound-mediated conversion of nitric acid to HONO (S1), biotic emission from the ground (S2), and re-emission from a surface nitrite reservoir (S3). For all mechanisms, ranges of parametric values span lower- and upper-limit values. Model outcomes for 'likely' estimates of sources and sinks generally show under-prediction of HONO observations, implying the need to evaluate additional sources and variability in estimates of parameterizations, particularly during daylight hours. Monte Carlo simulation is applied to model scenarios constructed with sources S1-S3 added independently and in combination, generally showing improved model outcomes. Adding sources S2 and S3 (scenario S2/S3) appears to best replicate observed HONO, as determined by the model coefficient of determination and residual sum of squared errors (r2 = 0.55 ± 0.03, SSE = 4.6 × 106 ± 7.6 × 105 ppt2). In scenario S2/S3, source S2 is shown to account for 25% and 6.7% of the nighttime and daytime budget, respectively, while source S3 accounts for 19% and 11% of the nighttime and daytime budget, respectively. However, despite improved model fit, there remains significant underestimation of daytime HONO; on average, a 0.15 ppt/s unknown daytime HONO source, or 67% of the total daytime source, is needed to bring scenario S2/S3 into agreement with observation. Estimates of 'best fit' parameterizations across lower to upper-limit values results in a moderate reduction of the unknown

  13. Fatty acid composition of Swedish bakery products, with emphasis on trans-fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Trattner, Sofia; Becker, Wulf; Wretling, Sören; Öhrvik, Veronica; Mattisson, Irene

    2015-05-15

    Trans-fatty acids (TFA) have been associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease, by affecting blood lipids and inflammation factors. Current nutrition recommendations emphasise a limitation of dietary TFA intake. The aim of this study was to investigate fatty acid composition in sweet bakery products, with emphasis on TFA, on the Swedish market and compare fatty acid composition over time. Products were sampled in 2001, 2006 and 2007 and analysed for fatty acid composition by using GC. Mean TFA levels were 0.7% in 2007 and 5.9% in 2001 of total fatty acids. In 1995-97, mean TFA level was 14.3%. In 2007, 3 of 41 products had TFA levels above 2% of total fatty acids. TFA content had decreased in this product category, while the proportion of saturated (SFA) and polyunsaturated (PUFA) fatty acids had increased, mostly through increased levels of 16:0 and 18:2 n-6, respectively. The total fat content remained largely unchanged. PMID:25577101

  14. Influence of Nitrogen Source, Thiamine, and Light on Biosynthesis of Abscisic Acid by Cercospora rosicola Passerini

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Shirley M.; Maier, Vincent P.; Echols, Linda C.

    1981-01-01

    Abscisic acid production by Cercospora rosicola Passerini in liquid shake culture was measured with different amino acids in combination and singly as nitrogen sources and with different amounts of thiamine in the media. Production of abscisic acid was highest with aspartic acid-glutamic acid and aspartic acid-glutamic acid-serine mixtures as nitrogen sources. Single amino acids that supported the highest production of abscisic acid were asparagine and monosodium glutamate. Thiamine was important for abscisic acid production. Leucine inhibited abscisic acid production. C. rosicola produced abscisic acid in the dark, but production more than doubled in the presence of light. PMID:16345761

  15. Sources of acidic storm flow in an Appalachian Headwater Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swistock, Bryan R.; Dewalle, David R.; Sharpe, William E.

    1989-10-01

    A study was conducted to quantify the source of increased dissolved aluminum concentrations during acidic storm flows on a small Pennsylvania stream. Data for six episodes during fall 1986 and spring 1987 showed depressions in stream pH and increases in sulfates, conductivity, dissolved organic carbon, and dissolved aluminum. Flow separation analyses were conducted using 18O as a tracer in a three-component mass balance tracer model. Results showed that soil water and groundwater are the dominant flow sources, accounting for approximately 20 and 75% of total flow during storms, respectively. Channel precipitation generally provided less than 5% of total flows. Hydrograph separation using aluminum agreed with 18O results, while other chemical parameters produced unsatisfactory results. The data support Hewlett's (1982) variable source area concept of storm flow generation with inputs of older, deep circulating groundwater from low-elevation source areas early in an event and later inputs of younger soil water and possibly shallow groundwater from expanding source areas at higher elevations. The results suggest that the most toxic runoff events for aquatic life occur during large storms when the greatest inputs of soil water cause elevated stream dissolved aluminum concentrations. Reductions in storm flow acidity and dissolved aluminum concentrations on this catchment will be most dependent upon changes in soil water and/or groundwater chemistry.

  16. Extracellular Nucleic Acids in Urine: Sources, Structure, Diagnostic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Bryzgunova, O. E.; Laktionov, P. P.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free nucleic acids (cfNA) may reach the urine through cell necrosis or apoptosis, active secretion of nucleic acids by healthy and tumor cells of the urinary tract, and transport of circulating nucleic acids (cir- NA) from the blood into primary urine. Even though urinary DNA and RNA are fragmented, they can be used to detect marker sequences. MicroRNAs are also of interest as diagnostic probes. The stability of cfNA in the urine is determined by their structure and packaging into supramolecular complexes and by nuclease activity in the urine. This review summarizes current data on the sources of urinary cfNA, their structural features, diagnostic potential and factors affecting their stability. PMID:26483959

  17. Characterization of French Coriander Oil as Source of Petroselinic Acid.

    PubMed

    Uitterhaegen, Evelien; Sampaio, Klicia A; Delbeke, Elisabeth I P; De Greyt, Wim; Cerny, Muriel; Evon, Philippe; Merah, Othmane; Talou, Thierry; Stevens, Christian V

    2016-01-01

    Coriander vegetable oil was extracted from fruits of French origin in a 23% yield. The oil was of good quality, with a low amount of free fatty acids (1.8%) and a concurrently high amount of triacylglycerols (98%). It is a rich source of petroselinic acid (C18:1n-12), an important renewable building block, making up 73% of all fatty acids, with also significant amounts of linoleic acid (14%), oleic acid (6%), and palmitic acid (3%). The oil was characterized by a high unsaponifiable fraction, comprising a substantial amount of phytosterols (6.70 g/kg). The main sterol markers were β-sitosterol (35% of total sterols), stigmasterol (24%), and Δ⁷-stigmastenol (18%). Squalene was detected at an amount of 0.2 g/kg. A considerable amount of tocols were identified (500 mg/kg) and consisted mainly of tocotrienols, with γ-tocotrienol as the major compound. The phospholipid content was low at 0.3%, of which the main phospholipid classes were phosphatidic acid (33%), phosphatidylcholine (25%), phosphatidylinositol (17%), and phosphatidylethanolamine (17%). About 50% of all phospholipids were non-hydratable. The β-carotene content was low at 10 mg/kg, while a significant amount of chlorophyll was detected at about 11 mg/kg. An iron content of 1.4 mg/kg was determined through element analysis of the vegetable oil. The influence of fruit origin on the vegetable oil composition was shown to be very important, particularly in terms of the phospholipids, sterols, and tocols composition. PMID:27617992

  18. Crystal growth of YBCO coated conductors by TFA MOD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizumi, M.; Nakanishi, T.; Matsuda, J.; Nakaoka, K.; Sutoh, Y.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    2008-09-01

    The crystal growth mechanism of TFA (trifluoroacetates)-MOD (metal organic deposition) derived YBa 2Cu 3O y has been investigated to understand the process for higher production rates of the conversion process. YBCO films were prepared by TFA-MOD on CeO 2/Gd 2Zr 2O 7/Hastelloy C276 substrates. The growth rates of YBCO derived from Y:Ba:Cu = 1:2:3 and 1:1.5:3 starting solutions were investigated by XRD and TEM analyses. YBCO growth proceeds in two steps of the epitaxial one from the substrate and solid state reaction. The overall growth rate estimated from the residual amounts of BaF 2 with time measured by XRD is proportional to a square root of P(H 2O). The trend was independent of the composition of starting solutions, however, the growth rate obtained from the 1:1.5:3 starting solutions was high as twice as that of 1:2:3, which could not be explained by the composition of BaF 2 included in the precursor films. On the other hand, the growth rate measured from the thickness of the YBCO quenched film at the same process time showed no difference between the samples of 1:2:3 and 1:1.5:3. The epitaxial growth rate of 1:1.5:3 was also the same as the overall growth rate of that, which means there was no solid state reaction to form YBCO after the epitaxial growth. The YBCO growth mechanism was found to be as follows; YBCO crystals nucleate at the surface of the substrate and epitaxially grow into the precursor by layer-by-layer by a manner with trapping unreacted particles. The amounts of YBCO and the unreacted particles trapped in the YBCO film are independent of the composition of the starting solution in this step. Unreacted particles react with each other to form YBCO and pores by solid state reaction as long as there is BaF 2 left in the film. The Ba-poor starting solution gives little BaF 2 left in the film and so the solid state reaction is completed within a short time, resulting in the fast overall growth rate.

  19. Evaluation of the Impact of Ruminant Trans Fatty Acids on Human Health: Important Aspects to Consider.

    PubMed

    Kuhnt, Katrin; Degen, Christian; Jahreis, Gerhard

    2016-09-01

    The definition and evaluation of trans fatty acids (TFA) with regard to foodstuffs and health hazard are not consistent. Based on the current situation, the term should be restricted only to TFA with isolated double bonds in trans-configuration. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) should be separately assessed. Ideally, the origin of the consumed fat should be declared, i.e., ruminant TFA (R-TFA) and industrial TFA (non-ruminant; I-TFA). In ruminant fat, more than 50% of R-TFA consists of vaccenic acid (C18:1 t11). In addition, natural CLA, i.e., c9,t11 CLA is also present. Both are elevated in products from organic farming. In contrast to elaidic acid (t9) and t10, which occur mainly in partially hydrogenated industrial fat, t11 is partially metabolized into c9,t11 CLA via Δ9-desaturation. This is the major metabolic criterion used to differentiate between t11 and other trans C18:1. t11 indicates health beneficial effects in several studies. Moreover, CLA in milk fat is associated with the prevention of allergy and asthma. An analysis of the few studies relating to R-TFA alone makes clear that no convincing adverse physiological effect can be attributed to R-TFA. Only extremely high R-TFA intakes cause negative change in blood lipids. In conclusion, in most European countries, the intake of R-TFA is assessed as being low to moderate. Restriction of R-TFA would unjustifiably represent a disadvantage for organic farming of milk. PMID:25746671

  20. Trends in Trans Fatty Acids Reformulations of US Supermarket and Brand-Name Foods From 2007 Through 2011

    PubMed Central

    Otite, Fadar O.; Jacobson, Michael F.; Dahmubed, Aspan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Although some US food manufacturers have reduced trans fatty acids (TFA) in their products, it is unknown how much TFA is being reduced, whether pace of reformulation has changed over time, or whether reformulations vary by food type or manufacturer. Methods In 2007, we identified 360 brand-name products in major US supermarkets that contained 0.5 g TFA or more per serving. In 2008, 2010, and 2011, product labels were re-examined to determine TFA content; ingredients lists were also examined in 2011 for partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (PHVO). We assessed changes in TFA content among the 270 products sold in all years between 2007 and 2011 and conducted sensitivity analyses on the 90 products discontinued after 2007. Results By 2011, 178 (66%) of the 270 products had reduced TFA content. Most reformulated products (146 of 178, 82%) reduced TFA to less than 0.5 g per serving, although half of these 146 still contained PHVO. Among all 270 products, mean TFA content decreased 49% between 2007 and 2011, from 1.9 to 0.9 g per serving. Yet, mean TFA reduction slowed over time, from 30.3% (2007–2008) to 12.1% (2008–2010) to 3.4% (2010–2011) (P value for trend < .001). This slowing pace was due to both fewer reformulations among TFA-containing products at start of each period and smaller TFA reductions among reformulated products. Reformulations also varied substantially by both food category and manufacturer, with some eliminating or nearly eliminating TFA and others showing no significant changes. Sensitivity analyses were similar to main findings. Conclusions Some US products and food manufacturers have made progress in reducing TFA, but substantial variation exists by food type and by parent company, and overall progress has significantly slowed over time. Because TFA consumption is harmful even at low levels, our results emphasize the need for continued efforts toward reformulating or discontinuing foods to eliminate PHVO. PMID:23701722

  1. Trifluoroacetic Acid Level in the Atmosphere of Beijing and Its Relationship with PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Junyu; Zhang, Jianbo

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of Trifluoroacetic Acid (TFA), one of the main degradation products of HCFC-123, HCFC-124 and HFC-134a, were detected in Beijing, China between 2013 and 2014. By analyzing the 137 atmospheric samples, the results showed that the annual mean atmospheric concentration of TFA was 1459±223 pg•m-3. TFA was mainly distributed in gaseous phase, for the concentration was 1396±225 pg•m-3, while that in particle phase was 62±8 pg•m-3. Considering the frequent occurrence of hazy weather in Beijing, the relationship between TFA and PM2.5 in atmosphere was analyzed. The correlation analysis shows that the proportion of particle phase in atmosphere concentration of TFA and mass concentration of PM2.5 are positively correlated with each other (P<0.001), indicating the particles have an absorption effect on TFA. At the same time, when mass concentration of PM2.5 in atmosphere is high, atmospheric concentration of TFA is relatively low. According to the correlation analysis, mass concentration of PM2.5 and atmospheric concentration of TFA are negatively correlated with each other (P=0.005). The main reason is very likely that particle's extinction for light can be enhanced as particle level rises, which causes TFA precursors photolysis to weaken. The results indicate that PM2.5 has a significant impact on TFA.

  2. Chemical transformations of CO2 in trifluoroacetic acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnetskaya, M. V.; Ivanova, M. S.; Svichkarev, O. M.; Budynina, E. M.; Mel'nikov, M. Ya.

    2013-05-01

    It is established that a conversion reaction of carbon dioxide takes place at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in aqueous solutions of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), which leads to the formation of oxalic acid and heavier polymerized products.

  3. Uprooting an abscisic acid paradigm: Shoots are the primary source.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Scott A M; Manzi, Matías; Ross, John J; Brodribb, Timothy J; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2016-06-01

    In the past, a conventional wisdom has been that abscisic acid (ABA) is a xylem-transported hormone that is synthesized in the roots, while acting in the shoot to close stomata in response to a decrease in plant water status. Now, however, evidence from two studies, which we have conducted independently, challenges this root-sourced ABA paradigm. We show that foliage-derived ABA has a major influence over root development and that leaves are the predominant location for ABA biosynthesis during drought stress. PMID:27031537

  4. Occurrence and sources of perfluoroalkyl acids in Italian river basins.

    PubMed

    Valsecchi, Sara; Rusconi, Marianna; Mazzoni, Michela; Viviano, Gaetano; Pagnotta, Romano; Zaghi, Carlo; Serrini, Giuliana; Polesello, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a survey on the occurrence and sources of 11 perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAA) in the main river basins in Italy, covering about 40% of the Italian surface area and 45% of the Italian population. Total concentrations of PFAA ranged fromacids (PFCA), 6% PFOS and 1% long chain PFCA. PFOA and PFOS loads, evaluated in the present work, represent 10% and 2% of the estimated European loads, respectively. In Italy the most important sources of PFAA are two chemical plants which produce fluorinated polymers and intermediates, sited in the basin of rivers Po and Brenta, respectively, whose overall emission represents 57% of the total estimated PFAA load. Both rivers flow into the Adriatic Sea, raising concern for the marine ecosystem also because a significant PFOS load (0.3ty(-1)) is still present. Among the remaining activities, tanneries and textile industries are relevant sources of respectively PFBS and PFOA, together with short chain PFCA. As an example, the total PFAA load (0.12ty(-1)) from the textile district of Prato is equivalent to the estimated domestic emission of the whole population in all the studied basins. PMID:25108894

  5. Intake of trans fatty acid in Japanese university students.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Terue; Shigemitsu, Sachiko; Adachi, Naoko; Hagiwara, Chie; Miyagi, Shigeji; Shinjo, Sumie; Maruyama, Takenori; Sugano, Michihiro

    2010-01-01

    Because trans fatty acids (TFAs) are a potent risk factor for coronary heart disease, it is important to know the amount of TFA consumed. We estimated TFA intakes of Japanese university students by direct measurement. Subjects included 118 students (57 males and 61 females) in two regions of Japan: Kanto (Tokyo area) and Okinawa. A dietary survey was conducted over six consecutive days using dietary records and photographic records. A single-day meal in the survey period was reproduced to measure TFA content by gas chromatography. The median values of TFA intakes (and energy percentage) estimated by the contents of reproduced meals for men were 0.43 g/d (0.22%) in Kanto and 0.30 g/d (0.14%) in Okinawa. Corresponding values for women were 0.49 g/d (0.29%) and 0.73 g/d (0.35%), respectively. Compared to the group with a low TFA intake, the subjects with a high TFA intake consumed significantly more energy from total fat and saturated fatty acids, and had a high ratio of TFA/linoleic acid. In addition, multiple regression analysis showed the intakes of TFA were positively associated with those of saturated fatty acids and groups of nonessential groceries such as cookies, cakes and pastries. In conclusion, the TFA intakes of these survey subjects were relatively lower than the WHO recommended energy ratio (<1%). However, nutritional education on dietary habits seems indispensable for those subjects who are consuming high volumes of TFA. PMID:20651456

  6. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid sources and evaluation of their nutritional and functional properties

    PubMed Central

    Abedi, Elahe; Sahari, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have clearly shown the importance of polyunsaturated fatty acids (as essential fatty acids) and their nutritional value for human health. In this review, various sources, nutritional properties, and metabolism routes of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) are introduced. Since the conversion efficiency of linoleic acid (LA) to arachidonic acid (AA) and also α-linolenic acid (ALA) to docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosatetraenoic acid (EPA) is low in humans, looking for the numerous sources of AA, EPA and EPA fatty acids. The sources include aquatic (fish, crustaceans, and mollusks), animal sources (meat, egg, and milk), plant sources including 20 plants, most of which were weeds having a good amount of LC-PUFA, fruits, herbs, and seeds; cyanobacteria; and microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, microalgae, and diatoms). PMID:25473503

  7. Degradation and Isotope Source Tracking of Glyphosate and Aminomethylphosphonic Acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Joshi, Sunendra R; Jaisi, Deb P

    2016-01-27

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine], an active ingredient of the herbicide Roundup, and its main metabolite, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), have been frequently reported to be present in soils and other environments and thus have heightened public concerns on their potential adverse effects. Understanding the fate of these compounds and differentiating them from other naturally occurring compounds require a toolbox of methods that can go beyond conventional methods. Here, we applied individual isotope labeling technique whereby each compound or mineral involved in the glyphosate and AMPA degradation reaction was either synthesized or chosen to have distinct (18)O/(16)O ratios so that the source of incorporated oxygen in the orthophosphate generated and corresponding isotope effect during C-P bond cleavage could be identified. Furthermore, we measured original isotope signatures of a few commercial glyphosate sources to identify their source-specific isotope signatures. Our degradation kinetics results showed that the rate of glyphosate degradation was higher than that of AMPA in all experimental conditions, and both the rate and extent of degradation were lowest under anoxic conditions. Oxygen isotope ratios (δ(18)OP) of orthophosphate generated from glyphosate and AMPA degradation suggested that one external oxygen atom from ambient water, not from dissolved oxygen or mineral, was incorporated into orthophosphate with the other three oxygen atoms inherited from the parent molecule. Interestingly, δ(18)OP values of all commercial glyphosate products studied were found to be the lightest among all orthophosphates known so far. Furthermore, isotope composition was found to be unaffected due to variable degradation kinetics, light/dark, and oxic/anoxic conditions. These results highlight the importance of phosphate oxygen isotope ratios as a nonconventional tool to potentially distinguish glyphosate sources and products from other organophosphorus compounds

  8. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: ACRYLIC ACID MANUFACTURE; STATE-OF-THE-ART

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes data on air emissions from the production of acrylic acid. Hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxide are emitted from various operations. Hydrocarbon emissions consist of acetaldehyde, acetic acid, acetone acrolein, acrylic acid, benzene, phenol, pr...

  9. A 17-fold increase of trifluoroacetic acid in landscape waters of Beijing, China during the last decade.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Zihan; Wu, Jing; Hu, Xia; Li, Li; Guo, Junyu; Zhang, Boya; Hu, Jianxin; Zhang, Jianbo

    2015-06-01

    The concentrations of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) were measured in urban landscape waters, tap water and snows in Beijing, China in 2012. Compared with the 2002 measurements, a 17-fold increase from 23-98ngL(-1) to 345-828ngL(-1) was observed for TFA concentrations in urban landscape waters, and an obvious increase from not detected (n.d.) to 155ngL(-1) occurred to TFA in tap water. By flux estimation between air and water interface, the remarkable increase of TFA was attributable to dry and wet deposition. The quantitative water-air-sediment interaction (QWASI) model simulated TFAs in various environmental media and showed that, over 99% of TFA distributed in water bodies. Our results recommend that measures are needed to control the increase of TFA in China. PMID:25262947

  10. Microstructure of YBCO thin films prepared by TFA-MOD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagino, I.; Matsumoto, K.; Adachi, H.; Miyata, S.; Yoshizumi, M.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    2010-11-01

    The microstructure of the recently developed coated conductors was investigated by using electron back scatter diffraction pattern (EBSP). We prepared TFA (trifluoroacetates)-MOD (metal organic deposition) derived YBa 2Cu 3O 7-x (YBCO) films on CeO 2/LaMnO 3/IBAD-MgO/Gd 2Zr 2O 7/Hastelloy C276 substrates of 1 cm-width. The EBSP observation showed that there was a difference of surface microstructure between the midsection and the end of TFA-MOD YBCO film layer in the direction of width. This is attributed not to the local difference of the biaxial texture of CeO 2 top layer but to the local difference of growth condition during TFA-MOD process.

  11. DFT study of Rb-TFA structure after high-pressure action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtzová, Eva

    2011-12-01

    The pressure-induced A-B phase transition of synthetic Rb-tetra-ferri-annite (Rb-TFA) mica was studied theoretically by means of Density Functional Theory (DFT) method. The calculations show that Rb-TFA keeps a Franzini A-type structure up to at least 5.39 GPa of pressure, whereas at higher pressure, it transforms to a Franzini B-type structure. The negative value of the tetrahedral rotation angle α = -4.68° has appeared at 5.56 GPa of calculated pressure. This result is in a relatively good agreement with experimentally estimated phase transition area in the range of 3.36-3.84 GPa. The energy difference between the A and B structures is very small (ΔE = 8 kJ/mol). The detailed analysis of the optimized structural data shows minimal changes in the structure of Rb-TFA after the pressure-induced phase transition.

  12. Development of Low AC Loss TFA-MOD Coated Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, K.; Machi, T.; Nakamura, T.; Takagi, Y.; Nakaoka, K.; Yoshizumi, M.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    TFA-MOD process is expected to be promising for future applications since it can produce high performance YBCO coated conductors (CCs) with low cost. Applying YBCO CCs to the power electric devices such as transformers and power cables, the reduction of alternating current (AC) loss for long wire is necessary. Multi-filamentation process, which is one of the most effective approaches for AC loss reduction, has been developed by the scribing process. We have developed the filamentation process using chemical etching. MOD derived CCs are, however, easily damaged in the chemical etching process due to existence of pores in a YBCO layer, resulting in critical current (Ic)-degradation and weak delamination strength. Consequently, it is difficult to scribe MOD derived CCs into 1mm-wide filaments for long length using the chemical etching process. Accordingly, we have studied a scribing process using an excimer laser without chemical etching. We defined P' value in this study as a function of irradiated laser power [J] divided by processing speed[m/s]. We studied relationship between the P' value and the results of scribing. It was found that we could scribe the C.C. with a sufficient depth in the condition of large P' value. Furthermore, we found that the Ic was degraded with further increase of the P' value. A 5 mm wide short sample was divided into 10 filaments by the excimer laser scribing process at the P' of 9[J/(m/s)]. The sample revealed reduction of the hysteresis loss down to 1/10 which could be expected from a theoretical prediction using the numbers of the filaments. Ic-degradation was suppressed as 28%, which was smaller than that of the scribed sample using chemical etching (Ic degradation was 38%). Subsequently, we applied the technique to a 100m long YBCO CC. The hysteresis loss of the 100m long MOD derived CC was reduced down to 1/10 (1/the number of filaments) after the multi-filamentation.

  13. Effect of humic acid source on humic acid adsorption onto titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Erhayem, Mohamed; Sohn, Mary

    2014-02-01

    In many studies, different humic acid (HA) sources are used interchangeably to evaluate the effect of organic matter on geochemical processes in the environment. This research looks more specifically at the effect of HA source on HA adsorption onto nano-TiO2 and how HA adsorption affects the fate and transport of nano-TiO2. In this study, six humic acids (HAs) were studied which were derived from soils (SLHA), or from sediments (SDHA) all originating from the state of Florida. Humic acid adsorption onto titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) and the sedimentation of HA-coated and uncoated nano-TiO2 were monitored by Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy. Synchronous scan fluorescence (SSF) spectroscopy was used to complement the study of HA adsorption onto nano-TiO2. Phosphate buffer was found to reduce the amount of HA adsorbed onto nano-TiO2 relative to solutions of NaCl of the same pH and ionic strength. Adsorption constant values (Kads) for HAs varied in the order SLHA>FSDHA (freshwater sedimentary HA)>ESDHA (estuarine sedimentary HA). SSF results suggested that the more highly conjugated fractions of HA, which are more prevalent in SLHAs versus SDHAs, were preferentially adsorbed. In order to better understand the relationship between adsorption and aggregation, sedimentation studies were conducted and it was found that the percentage of nano-TiO2 sedimentation was preferentially enhanced in the order of the presence of SLHA>FSDHA>ESDHA. The extent of nano-TiO2 sedimentation was decreased with increasing HA concentration. TEM imaging of nano-TiO2 confirmed that nano-TiO2 was aggregated in the presence of HAs. The findings in this study suggest that HAs from different sources influence the fate and transport of nano-TiO2 in the environment differently. PMID:24140685

  14. Study of Modified TFA-MOD Method for YBCO Film Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. S.; Lu, Y. F.; Zhang, P. X.; Yu, Z. M.; Tao, B. W.; Feng, J. Q.; Jin, L. H.

    The traditional all-TFA precursor solution for coated conductors has sensitivity to the heating rate in pyrolysis process. This sensitivity could be weakened by using a modified precursor solution, which was prepared by the mixture of yttrium trifluoroacetate, barium trifluoroacetate, and copper benzoate. The YBCO films were deposited on buffered NiW substrates (NiW/Y2O3/YSZ/CeO2) with the modified precursor solution. The texture, microstructure and superconducting properties of YBCO films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and four-probe method, respectively. The YBCO films prepared by modified TFA-MOD method demonstrated high performance.

  15. Trans fatty acids: effects on cardiometabolic health and implications for policy.

    PubMed

    Micha, R; Mozaffarian, D

    2008-01-01

    In both developed and developing countries, trans fatty acids (TFA) are largely consumed from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils. This article focuses on TFA as a modifiable dietary risk factor for cardiovascular disease, reviewing the evidence for lipid and non-lipid effects; the relations of trans fat intake with clinical endpoints; and current policy and legislative issues. In both observational cohort studies and randomized clinical trials, TFA adversely affect lipid profiles (including raising LDL and triglyceride levels, and reducing HDL levels), systemic inflammation, and endothelial function. More limited but growing evidence suggests that TFA also exacerbate visceral adiposity and insulin resistance. These potent effects of TFA on a multitude of cardiovascular risk factors are consistent with the strong associations seen in prospective cohort studies between TFA consumption and risk of myocardial infarction and coronary heart disease (CHD) death. The documented harmful effects of TFA along with the feasibility of substituting partially hydrogenated vegetable oils with healthy alternatives indicate little reason for continued presence of industrially produced TFA in food preparation and manufacturing or in home cooking fats/oils. A comprehensive strategy to eliminate the use of industrial TFA in both developed and developing countries, including education, food labeling, and policy and legislative initiatives, would likely prevent tens of thousands of CHD events worldwide each year. PMID:18996687

  16. Trans Fatty Acids: Effects on Cardiometabolic Health and Implications for Policy

    PubMed Central

    Micha, R.; Mozaffarian, D.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY In both developed and developing countries, trans fatty acids (TFA) are largely consumed from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils. This article focuses on TFA as a modifiable dietary risk factor for cardiovascular disease, reviewing the evidence for lipid and non lipid effects; the relations of trans fat intake with clinical endpoints; and current policy and legislative issues. In both observational cohort studies and randomized clinical trials, TFA adversely affect lipid profiles (including raising LDL and triglyceride levels, and reducing HDL levels), systemic inflammation, and endothelial function. More limited but growing evidence suggests that TFA also exacerbate visceral adiposity and insulin resistance. These pluripotent effects of TFA on a plethora of cardiovascular risk factors are consistent with the strong associations seen in prospective cohort studies between TFA consumption and risk of myocardial infarction and coronary heart disease (CHD) death. The documented harmful effects of TFA along with the feasibility of substituting partially hydrogenated vegetable oils with healthy alternatives indicate little reason for continued presence of industrially-produced TFA in food preparation and manufacturing or in home cooking fats/oils. A comprehensive strategy to eliminate use of industrial TFA in both developed and developing countries, including education, food labeling, and policy and legislative initiatives, would likely prevent tens of thousands of CHD events worldwide each year. PMID:18996687

  17. Animal Rennets as Sources of Dairy Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cruciata, Margherita; Sannino, Ciro; Ercolini, Danilo; Scatassa, Maria L.; De Filippis, Francesca; Mancuso, Isabella; La Storia, Antonietta; Moschetti, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    The microbial composition of artisan and industrial animal rennet pastes was studied by using both culture-dependent and -independent approaches. Pyrosequencing targeting the 16S rRNA gene allowed to identify 361 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) to the genus/species level. Among lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Streptococcus thermophilus and some lactobacilli, mainly Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus reuteri, were the most abundant species, with differences among the samples. Twelve groups of microorganisms were targeted by viable plate counts revealing a dominance of mesophilic cocci. All rennets were able to acidify ultrahigh-temperature-processed (UHT) milk as shown by pH and total titratable acidity (TTA). Presumptive LAB isolated at the highest dilutions of acidified milks were phenotypically characterized, grouped, differentiated at the strain level by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis, and subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Only 18 strains were clearly identified at the species level, as Enterococcus casseliflavus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus lactis, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, and Streptococcus thermophilus, while the other strains, all belonging to the genus Enterococcus, could not be allotted into any previously described species. The phylogenetic analysis showed that these strains might represent different unknown species. All strains were evaluated for their dairy technological performances. All isolates produced diacetyl, and 10 of them produced a rapid pH drop in milk, but only 3 isolates were also autolytic. This work showed that animal rennet pastes can be sources of LAB, mainly enterococci, that might contribute to the microbial diversity associated with dairy productions. PMID:24441167

  18. Organic Acids as Hetrotrophic Energy Sources in Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windman, T. O.; Zolotova, N.; Shock, E.

    2004-12-01

    Many thermophilic microbes are heterotrophs, but little is known about the organic compounds present in hydrothermal ecosystems. More is known about what these organisms will metabolize in lab experiments than what they do metabolize in nature. In an effort to bridge this gap, we have begun to incorporate organic analyses into ongoing research on Yellowstone hydrothermal ecosystems. After filtering at least a liter of hot spring water to minimize contamination, samples were collected into sixty-milliliter serum vials containing ultra-pure phosphoric acid, sodium hydroxide, or benzalkonium chloride. Approximately 80 sites were sampled spanning temperatures from 60 to 90°C and pH values from 2 to 9. Analytical data for organic acid anions (including formate, acetate, lactate, and succinate) were obtained by ion chromatography. Preliminary results indicate that concentrations of organic acids anions range from 5 to 300 ppb. These results can be used with other field and lab data (sulfate, sulfide, nitrate, ammonia, bicarbonate, pH, hydrogen) in thermodynamic calculations to evaluate the amounts of energy available in heterotrophic reactions. Preliminary results of such calculations show that sulfate reduction to sulfide coupled to succinate oxidation to bicarbonate yields about 6 kcal per mole of electrons transferred. When formate oxidation to bicarbonate or hydrogen oxidation to water is coupled to sulfate reduction there is less energy available by approximately a factor of two. A comparison with nitrate reduction to ammonia involving succinate and/or formate oxidation reveals several similarities. Using formate to reduce nitrate can yield about as much energy as nitrate reduction with hydrogen (typically 12 to 14 kcal per mole of electrons transferred), but using succinate can yield more than twice as much energy. In fact, reduction of nitrate with succinate can provide more energy than any of the inorganic nitrate reduction reactions involving sulfur, iron

  19. Fabrication of YBCO film approached by the '211 process' in the TFA-MOD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jun Hyung; Hern Jang, Seok; Joo, Jinho; Kim, Hyoungsub; Lee, Hee-Gyoun; Hong, Gye-Won; Kim, Chan-Joong

    2006-04-01

    We fabricated YBCO film using a new approach to the TFA-MOD method. In the fabrication process, Y2Ba1Cu1Ox and Ba3Cu5O8 powders were used as precursors (the so called '211 process'), instead of Y-, Ba-, and Cu-based acetates, and dissolved in trifluoroacetic acid followed by calcining and firing heat treatment. Consequently, we successfully synthesized YBCO film and evaluated the phase formation, texture evolution, and critical properties as a function of the calcining and firing temperature and humidity, in order to explore its possible application in coated conductor fabrication. The films were calcined at 430-460 °C and then fired at 750-800 °C in a 0-20% humidified Ar-O2 atmosphere. We observed that the amount of BaF2 phase was effectively reduced and that a sharp and strong biaxial texture formed under a humidified atmosphere, leading to increased critical properties. In addition, we found that the microstructure varied significantly with the firing temperature; the grains grew further, the film became denser, and the degree of texture and phase purity varied as the firing temperature increased. For the film fired at 775 °C after calcining at 460 °C, the critical current was found to be 39 A cm-1 width (the corresponding critical current density is 2.0 MA cm-2), which was probably attributable to such factors as the enhanced phase purity and out-of-plane texture, the moderate film density and grain size, and the crack-free surface.

  20. Naturally occurring fatty acids: source, chemistry and uses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural occurring fatty acids are a large and complex class of compounds found in plants and animals. Fatty acids are abundant and of interest because of their renewability, biodegradability, biocompatibility, low cost, and fascinating chemistry. Of the many fatty acids, only 20-25 of them are widel...

  1. National Affiliation or Local Representation: When TFA Alumni Run for School Board

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Rebecca; Linkow, Tamara Wilder

    2014-01-01

    Historically power to govern public schools has been delegated to local school boards. However, this arrangement of power has been shifting over the past half century and increasingly, local school boards are targeted as ineffective and antiquated. Teach For America (TFA), typically examined for its placement of teachers, also seeks to develop…

  2. Stream chemistry in the eastern United States. 2. Current sources of acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing-capacity streams

    SciTech Connect

    Herlihy, A.T.; Kaufmann, P.R.; Mitch, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    The authors examined anion composition in National Stream Survey (NSS) data in order to evaluate the most probable sources of current acidity in acidic and low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) streams in the eastern United States. Acidic streams that had almost no organic influence (less than 10% of total anions) and sulfate and nitrate concentrations indicative of evaporative concentration of atmospheric deposition were classified as acidic due to acidic deposition. These acidic streams were located in small forested watersheds in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands (an estimated 1950 km of stream length) and in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain (1250 km). Acidic streams affected primarily by acidic deposition but also influenced by naturally occurring organic anions accounted for another 1180 km of acidic stream length and were located in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, plateau tops in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands, and the Florida Panhandle. The total length of streams acidic due to acid mine drainage in the NSS (4590 km) was about the same as the total length of acidic streams likely affected by acidic deposition (4380 km). Acidic streams whose acid anion composition was dominated by organics were located in Florida and the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. In Florida, most of the acidic streams were organic dominated, whereas about half of the streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain were organic dominated. Organic-dominated acidic streams were not observed in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands.

  3. Stream chemistry in the eastern United States, 2, Current sources of acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing capacity streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlihy, Alan T.; Kaufmann, Philip R.; Mitch, Mark E.

    1991-04-01

    We examined anion composition in National Stream Survey (NSS) data in order to evaluate the most probable sources of current acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) streams in the eastern United States. Acidic streams that had almost no organic influence (less than 10% of total anions) and sulfate and nitrate concentrations indicative of evaporative concentration of atmospheric deposition were classified as acidic due to acidic deposition. These acidic streams were located in small (<30 km2) forested watersheds in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands (an estimated 1950 km of stream length) and in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain (1250 km). Acidic streams affected primarily by acidic deposition but also influenced by naturally occurring organic anions accounted for another 1180 km of acidic stream length and were located in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, plateau tops in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands, and the Florida Panhandle. The total length of streams acidic due to acid mine drainage in the NSS (4590 km) was about the same as the total length of acidic streams likely affected by acidic deposition (4380 km). Acidic streams whose acid anion composition was dominated by organics were located in Florida and the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. In Florida, most of the acidic streams were organic dominated, whereas about half of the streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain were organic dominated. Organic-dominated acidic streams were not observed in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands.

  4. Changes in Trans Fatty Acid Profiles for Selected Snack Foods in the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : Historically, many snack foods had been formulated with partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, the primary contributor of trans fatty acids (TFA) in the US diet. Health concerns about TFA and saturated fat intake and increased risk for chronic health disorders have prompted some manufacturers to r...

  5. Changes in Trans Fatty Acid Profiles for Selected Snack Foods in the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Historically, many snack foods had been formulated with partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, the primary contributor of trans fatty acids (TFA) in the US diet. Health concerns about TFA and saturated fat intake and increased risk for chronic health disorders have prompted some manufacturers to ref...

  6. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA): gene structure and characterization of related pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Aurelio; Mezzina, Maria; Gadaleta, Gemma

    2002-05-29

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA or Tfam) is a 25 kDa protein encoded by a nuclear gene and imported to mitochondria, where it functions as a key regulator of mammalian mitochondrial (mt) DNA transcription and replication. The coding sequence of the human mtTFA gene is reported in the literature and the sizes of few introns are known. In this paper we present the genomic structure of the human mtTFA gene along with the complete sequence of its six intronic regions. Three of the introns (I, III, VI) have been found to be less than 600 bp, while the other three were greater than 1.8 kb. In the course of this work, we discovered that, in addition to the active copy, different homologous sequences identified as processed pseudogenes psi h-mtTFA have been isolated and sequenced. Using an 'in silico' mapping approach we determined their locations on chromosomes 7, 11 and X. psi h-mtTFA locations are different from that of the gene, previously reported on chromosome 10. Transcription analysis by means of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction has shown that other than the RNA corresponding to the full-length transcript, an isoform lacking 96 bp is also present. Among the three sequenced pseudogenes only one of them located on chromosome 11 has been found to be transcribed in Jurkat cells under these culture conditions, even though transcription initiation and binding sites for different transcription factors have also been found upstream from the other two pseudogenes. PMID:12095695

  7. Aqueous-phase source of formic acid in clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chameides, W. L.; Davis, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The coupled gas- and aqueous-phase cloud chemistry of HCOOH were examined for controlling factors in the acidity of cloud and rainwater. Attention was given to the aqueous OH/HO2 system that yields an OH species that is highly reactive with other species, notably SO2 and the formaldehyde/formic acid complex. A numerical model was developed to simulate the cloud chemistry in the remote troposphere, with considerations given to CH4-CO-NO(x)-O3-H(x)O(y) system. It was determined that aqueous phase OH radicals can produce and destroy formic acid droplets in daylight conditions, as well as control formic acid levels in rainwater. It is sugested that the same types of reactions may be involved in the control of acetic acid and other organic acids.

  8. Trans fatty acids in the Portuguese food market

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Nádia; Cruz, Rebeca; Graça, Pedro; Breda, João; Casal, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Consistent evidence exist on the harmful health effects of industrial trans fatty acids (TFA). In order to have accurate data on TFA intake and implement adequate measures to reduce their intake, each country should have updated estimates of TFA content in the diet. The objective of the present study was to provide data on the TFA content in food commercialized in the Portuguese market. The results on the TFA content of 268 samples acquired between October and December 2013 are reported. Samples were categorized as margarines and shortenings (n = 16), spreadable chocolate fats (n = 6), fried potatoes and chips (n = 25), industrial bakery (n = 4), breakfast cereals (n = 3), pastry products (n = 120), seasonings (n = 5), instant soups (n = 5), instant desserts (n = 6), chocolate snacks (n = 4), microwave popcorn (n = 4), cookies, biscuits and wafers (n = 53), and fast-food (n = 13), with butter (n = 4) included for comparison purposes. TFA were quantified by gas chromatography. Total TFA content in the fat ranged from 0.06% to 30.2% (average 1.9%), with the highest average values in the “biscuits, wafers and cookies” group (3.4% TFA), followed by the pastry group (2.0%). Fifty samples (19%) had TFA superior to 2% in the fat. These findings highlight there is still much need for improvement in terms of the TFA content in Portuguese foods, particularly in traditional pastry. PMID:27274619

  9. Identifying sources of acidity and spatial distribution of acid sulfate soils in the Anglesea River catchment, southern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Vanessa; Yau, Chin; Kennedy, David

    2015-04-01

    Globally, coastal and estuarine floodplains are frequently underlain by sulfidic sediments. When exposed to oxygen, sulfidic sediments oxidise to form acid sulfate soils, adversely impacting on floodplain health and adjacent aquatic ecoystems. In eastern Australia, our understanding of the formation of these coastal and estuarine floodplains, and hence, spatial distribution of acid sulfate soils, is relatively well established. These soils have largely formed as a result of sedimentation of coastal river valleys approximately 6000 years BP when sea levels were one to two metres higher. However, our understanding of the evolution of estuarine systems and acid sulfate soil formation, and hence, distribution, in southern Australia remains limited. The Anglesea River, in southern Australia, is subjected to frequent episodes of poor water quality and low pH resulting in closure of the river and, in extreme cases, large fish kill events. This region is heavily reliant on tourism and host to a number of iconic features, including the Great Ocean Road and Twelve Apostles. Poor water quality has been linked to acid leakage from mining activities and Tertiary-aged coal seams, peat swamps and acid sulfate soils in the region. However, our understanding of the sources of acidity and distribution of acid sulfate soils in this region remains poor. In this study, four sites on the Anglesea River floodplain were sampled, representative of the main vegetation communities. Peat swamps and intertidal marshes were both significant sources of acidity on the floodplain in the lower catchment. However, acid neutralising capacity provided by carbonate sands suggests that there are additional sources of acidity higher in the catchment. This pilot study has highlighted the complexity in the links between the floodplain, upper catchment and waterways with further research required to understand these links for targeted acid management strategies.

  10. Yearly trend of dicarboxylic acids in organic aerosols from south of Sweden and source attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyder, Murtaza; Genberg, Johan; Sandahl, Margareta; Swietlicki, Erik; Jönsson, Jan Åke

    2012-09-01

    Seven aliphatic dicarboxylic acids (C3-C9) along with phthalic acid, pinic acid and pinonic acid were determined in 35 aerosol (PM10) samples collected over the year at Vavihill sampling station in south of Sweden. Mixture of dichloromethane and methanol (ratio 1:3) was preferred over water for extraction of samples and extraction was assisted by ultrasonic agitation. Analytes were derivatized using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) containing 1% trimethylsilyl chloride and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Among studied analytes, azelaic acid was found maximum with an average concentration of 6.0 ± 3.6 ng m-3 and minimum concentration was found for pimelic acid (1.06 ± 0.63 ng m-3). A correlation coefficients analysis was used for defining the possible sources of analytes. Higher dicarboxylic acids (C7-C9) showed a strong correlation with each other (correlation coefficients (r) range, 0.96-0.97). Pinic and pinonic acids showed an increase in concentration during summer. Lower carbon number dicarboxylic acids (C3-C6) and phthalic acid were found strongly correlated, but showed a poor correlation with higher carbon number dicarboxylic acids (C7-C9), suggesting a different source for them. Biomass burning, vehicle exhaust, photo-oxidation of volatile organic compounds (natural and anthropogenic emissions) were possible sources for dicarboxylic acids.

  11. Trans fatty acids adversely affect blood lipids but not intra-abdominal and liver fat deposition - a randomized trial in overweight postmenopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intake of industrially produced trans fatty acids (TFA) is, according to observational studies, associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the causal mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Besides inducing dyslipidemia, TFA intake is suspected of promoting abdominal and liv...

  12. Mitochondrial Transcription Factors TFA, TFB1 and TFB2: A Search for DNA Variants/Haplotypes and the Risk of Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Montes, Cristina; Castro, Mónica G.; Reguero, Julián R.; Perrot, Andreas; Özcelik, Cemil; Geier, Christian; Posch, Maximilian G.; Morís, César; Alvarez, Victoria; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Coto, Eliecer

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factors mtTFA, mtTFB1 and mtTFB2 are required for the replication of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), regulating the number of mtDNA copies. Mice with a mtTFA deletion showed a reduced number of mtDNA copies, a reduction in respiratory chain activity, and a characteristic dilated cardiomyopathy. DNA variants in these genes could be involved in the risk for cardiac hypertrophy (HCM). We determined the variation in the TFAM, TFB1M, and TFB2M genes (using SSCA, DHPLC, and direct sequencing) in a total of 200 HCM-patients from Spain and Germany, and in 250 healthy controls. We found several common polymorphisms that defined haplotype blocks in these genes, with frequencies that did not differ between patients and controls. We also found four novel variants in patients which were absent in the controls: -91 C > A (5'-UTR) and Ala105 > Thr in TFAM, and Thr211 > Ala and Arg256 > Lys in TFB1M. The three missense changes were in highly conserved amino acids, and could be involved in HCM-risk. In conclusion, common variants in the mitochondrial transcription factors were not associated with the risk for HCM. However, rare DNA variants (putative mutations) could be involved in the pathogenesis of HCM in a reduced number of cases. PMID:19096125

  13. Effect of different polyphenol sources on the efficiency of ellagic acid release by Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Leonardo; de la Cruz, Reynaldo; Buenrostro, José Juan; Ascacio-Valdés, Juan Alberto; Aguilera-Carbó, Antonio Francisco; Prado, Arely; Rodríguez-Herrera, Raúl; Aguilar, Cristóbal Noé

    2016-01-01

    Fungal hydrolysis of ellagitannins produces hexahydroxydiphenic acid, which is considered an intermediate molecule in ellagic acid release. Ellagic acid has important and desirable beneficial health properties. The aim of this work was to identify the effect of different sources of ellagitannins on the efficiency of ellagic acid release by Aspergillus niger. Three strains of A. niger (GH1, PSH and HT4) were assessed for ellagic acid release from different polyphenol sources: cranberry, creosote bush, and pomegranate used as substrate. Polyurethane foam was used as support for solid-state culture in column reactors. Ellagitannase activity was measured for each of the treatments. Ellagic acid was quantified by high performance liquid chromatography. When pomegranate polyphenols were used, a maximum value of ellagic acid (350.21 mg/g) was reached with A. niger HT4 in solid-state culture. The highest amount of ellagitannase (5176.81 U/l) was obtained at 8h of culture when cranberry polyphenols and strain A. niger PSH were used. Results demonstrated the effect of different polyphenol sources and A. niger strains on ellagic acid release. It was observed that the best source for releasing ellagic acid was pomegranate polyphenols and A. niger HT4 strain, which has the ability to degrade these compounds for obtaining a potent bioactive molecule such as ellagic acid. PMID:26916811

  14. Stream chemistry in the eastern United States. 2. Current sources of acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing capacity streams

    SciTech Connect

    Herlihy, A.T.; Kaufmann, P.R.; Mitch, M.E. )

    1991-04-01

    The authors examined anion composition in National Stream Survey (NSS) data in order to evaluate the most probably sources of current acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) streams in the eastern US. Acidic streams that had almost no organic influence (less than 10% of total anions) and sulfate and nitrate concentrations indicative of evaporative concentration of atmospheric deposition were classified as acidic due to acidic deposition. These acidic streams were located in small (<30 km{sup 2}) forested watersheds in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands (an estimated 1,950 km of stream length) and in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain (1,250 km). Acidic streams affected primarily by acidic deposition but also influenced by naturally occurring organic anions accounted for another 1,180 km of acidic stream length, and were located in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, plateau tops in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands, and the Florida Panhandle. The total length of streams acidic due to acid mine drainage in the NSS (4,590 km) was about the same as the total length of acidic streams likely affected by acidic deposition (4,380 km). Acidic streams whose acid anion composition was dominated by organics were located in Florida and the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. In Florida, most of the acidic streams were organic dominated, whereas about half of the streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain were organic dominated. Organic-dominated acidic streams were not observed in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands.

  15. SOURCES OF ORGANIC ACIDS IN INDOOR AIR: A FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simultaneous indoor and outdoor measurements of organic acids were made at six residential houses located in suburban New Jersey area during the summer of 1992. ach house was measured for six days and controlled for ventilation and gas combustion conditions. he study presents the...

  16. Water-tunnel study results of a TF/A-18 and F/A-18 canopy flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Steven A.; Fisher, David F.

    1990-01-01

    A water tunnel study examining the influence of canopy shape on canopy and leading edge extension flow patterns was initiated. The F/A-18 single-place canopy model and the TF/A-18 two place canopy model were the study subjects. Plan view and side view photographs showing the flow patterns created by injected colored dye are presented for 0 deg and 5 deg sideslip angles. Photographs taken at angle of attack and sideslip conditions correspond to test departure points found in flight test. Flight experience has shown that the TF/A-18 airplane departs in regions where the F/A-18 airplane is departure-resistant. The study results provide insight into the differences in flow patterns which may influence the resulting aerodynamics of the TF/A-18 and F/A-18 aircraft. It was found that at 0 deg sideslip, the TF/A-18 model has more downward flow on the sides of the canopy than the F/A-18 model. This could be indicative of flow from the leading edge extension (LEX) vortexes impinging on the sides of the wider TF/A-18 canopy. In addition, the TF/A-18 model has larger areas of asymmetric separated and unsteady flow on the LEXs and fuselage, possibly indicating a lateral and directional destabilizing effect at the conditions studied.

  17. A large underestimate of the pyrogenic source of formic acid inferred from space-borne measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaliyakunnel, S.; Millet, D. B.; Wells, K. C.; Cady-Pereira, K.; Shephard, M.

    2015-12-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is one of the most abundant carboxylic acids in the atmosphere, and a dominant source of acidity in the global troposphere. Recent work has revealed a major gap in our present understanding of the atmospheric formic acid budget, with observed concentrations much larger than can be reconciled with current estimates of its sources. In this work, we employ new space-based observations from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) satellite instrument with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to better quantify the source of atmospheric formic acid from biomass burning, and assess the degree to which this source can help close the large budget gap for this species. The space-based formic acid data reveal a severe model underestimate for HCOOH that is most prominent over tropical biomass burning regions, indicating a major missing source of organic acids from fires. Based on two independent methods for inferring the fractional contribution of fires to the measured HCOOH abundance, we find that the pyrogenic HCOOH:CO enhancement ratio measured by TES (including direct emissions plus secondary production) is 5-10 times higher than current estimates of the direct emission ratio, providing evidence of substantial secondary production of HCOOH in fire plumes. We further show that current models significantly underestimate (by a factor of 2-6) the total primary and secondary source of HCOOH from tropical fires.

  18. Improvement of Production Rate of YBCO Coated Conductors Fabricated by TFA-MOD Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaoka, K.; Yoshizumi, M.; Usui, Y.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    The metal-organic deposition (MOD) method using trifluoroacetate (TFA) salts is considered to be an effective method for inexpensively fabricating YBa2Cu3O7-y (YBCO) coated conductors with high critical current density property. The long-length TFA-MOD YBCO coated conductors have been fabricated by multi-turn reel-to-reel system. Increasing the thickness per single coating in the multi-turn reel-to-reel system is a cost-effective technique for fabrication of the precursor films in the calcination process since it reduces the number of coatings and shortens the processing time. In this work, we have developed a new starting solution consisting of non-fluorine salts of yttrium propionate and copper 2-ethylhexanoate with focusing on increasing the thickness per single coating for a high-rate fabrication of the YBCO coated conductors by the TFA-MOD method. The critical thickness per single coating of the precursor film fabricated from the new starting solution was improved to 0.44 μm/coat. Furthermore, the addition of diacetoneacrylamide in the new starting solution increased the critical thickness per single coating to 0.79 μm/coat. High critical current of 791 A/cm-width with high critical current density of 2.7 MA/cm2 was obtained using the new starting solution with diacetoneacrylamide at the thickness per single coating of 0.49 μm/coat.

  19. SOURCES OF ACIDITY IN LAKES AND STREAMS OF THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acidic surface waters in the United States sampled in the National Surface Water Survey (NSWS) were classified into three groups according to their probable sources of acidity: (1) organic-dominated waters, (2) watershed sulphate-dominated waters, and (3) deposition-dominated wat...

  20. What do we really know about the health effects of natural sources of trans fatty acids?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the food industry remains actively engaged in the development of alternatives for partially hydrogenated vegetable oils in order to reduce intake of trans fatty acids, intake of these fatty acids from natural sources remains as a small part of our diet. The question remains, are there differ...

  1. [Some considerations about the use of carbon sources in jasmonic acid production.].

    PubMed

    Almeida González, G; Klibansky Delgado, M; Altuna Seijas, B; Eng Sánchez, F; Legrá Mora, S; Armenteros Galarraga, S

    1999-09-01

    The effect of different carbon sources as sucrose, fructose, glucose and molasses were studied in relation to jasmonic acid production. The best results were obtained with a simple medium made up by final molasses, potassium nitrate and acid potassium phosphate, without the addition of other salts like Fe, Zn, Cu, Mo, etc. This alternative guaranteed a 100% increase in jasmonic acid production, compared to pattern medium, since a concentration of 2.08 g/l was obtained. PMID:18473562

  2. Liquid structure of acetic acid-water and trifluoroacetic acid-water mixtures studied by large-angle X-ray scattering and NMR.

    PubMed

    Takamuku, Toshiyuki; Kyoshoin, Yasuhiro; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Kusano, Shoji; Yamaguchi, Toshio

    2007-08-01

    The structures of acetic acid (AA), trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), and their aqueous mixtures over the entire range of acid mole fraction xA have been investigated by using large-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and NMR techniques. The results from the LAXS experiments have shown that acetic acid molecules mainly form a chain structure via hydrogen bonding in the pure liquid. In acetic acid-water mixtures hydrogen bonds of acetic acid-water and water-water gradually increase with decreasing xA, while the chain structure of acetic acid molecules is moderately ruptured. Hydrogen bonds among water molecules are remarkably formed in acetic acid-water mixtures at xATFA molecules form not a chain structure but cyclic dimers through hydrogen bonding in the pure liquid. In TFA-water mixtures O...O hydrogen bonds among water molecules gradually increase when xA decreases, and hydrogen bonds among water molecules are significantly formed in the mixtures at xATFA molecules are considerably dissociated to hydrogen ions and trifluoroacetate in the mixtures. 1H, 13C, and 19F NMR chemical shifts of acetic acid and TFA molecules for acetic acid-water and TFA-water mixtures have indicated strong relationships between a structural change of the mixtures and the acid mole fraction. On the basis of both LAXS and NMR results, the structural changes of acetic acid-water and TFA-water mixtures with decreasing acid mole fraction and the effects of fluorination of the methyl group on the structure are discussed at the molecular level. PMID:17628099

  3. Survey of duckweed diversity in Lake Chao and total fatty acid, triacylglycerol, profiles of representative strains.

    PubMed

    Tang, J; Li, Y; Ma, J; Cheng, J J

    2015-09-01

    Lemnaceae (duckweeds) are widely distributed aquatic flowering plants. Their high growth rate, starch content and suitability for bioremediation make them potential feedstock for biofuels. However, few natural duckweed resources have been investigated in China, and there is no information about total fatty acid (TFA) and triacylglycerol (TAG) composition of duckweeds from China. Here, the genetic diversity of a natural duckweed population collected from Lake Chao, China, was investigated using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The 54 strains were categorised into four species in four genera, representing 12 distinct sequence types. Strains representing Lemna aequinoctialis and Spirodela polyrhiza were predominant. Interestingly, a surprisingly high degree of genetic diversification within L. aequinoctialis was observed. The four duckweed species revealed a uniform fatty acid composition, with three fatty acids, palmitic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, accounting for more than 80% of the TFA. The TFA in biomass varied among species, ranging from 1.05% (of dry weight, DW) for L. punctata and S. polyrhiza to 1.62% for Wolffia globosa. The four duckweed species contained similar TAG contents, 0.02% mg · DW(-1). The fatty acid profiles of TAG were different from those of TFA, and also varied among the four species. The survey investigated the genetic diversity of duckweeds from Lake Chao, and provides an initial insight into TFA and TAG of four duckweed species, indicating that intraspecific and interspecific variations exist in the content and composition of both TFA and TAG in comparison with other studies. PMID:25950142

  4. 2012: no trans fatty acids in Spanish bakery products.

    PubMed

    Ansorena, Diana; Echarte, Andrea; Ollé, Rebeca; Astiasarán, Iciar

    2013-05-01

    Trans fatty acids (TFA) are strongly correlated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and other chronic diseases. Current dietary recommendations exclude bakery products from frequent consumption basically due to their traditionally high content of TFA. The aim of this work was to analyse the lipid profile of different bakery products currently commercialised in Spain and with a conventionally high fat and TFA content. Premium and store brands for each product were included in the study. No significant amounts of TFA were found in any of the analysed products, regardless the brand. TFA content ranged between 0.17 g and 0.22 g/100 g product (mean=0.19 g/100 g product). Expressed on percentage of fatty acids, the maximum value was 0.87 g/100 g fatty acids and the mean value was 0.68%. These data are significantly lower than those observed in previously published papers for these types of products, and highlighted the importance of updating food composition databases in order to accurately estimate the real and current intake of TFA. PMID:23265507

  5. Small-intestinal or colonic microbiota as a potential amino acid source in animals.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Werner G

    2015-02-01

    Factors affecting physiological impacts of the microbiome on protein nutrition are discussed for hind-gut fermenters (humans, pigs, rodents). The microbiome flourishes in all gastrointestinal organs, and is a major source of amino acids to fore-gut fermenting animals. In humans, rats and pigs the net effect of microbiome biomass synthesis on amino acid requirements is much less certain. Dietary proteins, amino acids, peptides, endogenous-secreted protein and recycled urea may all be utilized as nitrogen source by growing bacteria in the small intestine and colon. The inclusions of radiolabelled amino acid precursors will result in labeled bacteria which can be digested and absorbed in the ileum and to some degree in the colon. This does not necessarily indicate a significant nutritional role of the microbiome in humans, pigs and rodents. The physiological attributes required for small-intestinal and colon microbiome utilization are a vigorous proteolytic digestion with pancreatic or intestinal enzymes and the presence of amino acid transporters. Findings to date seem to suggest that these two physiological attributes for effective bacterial protein utilization are present in the small intestine; however, these attributes have a much lower capacity/impact in the colon. The gastrointestinal microbiome is likely a protein source of medium to high nutritional quality, but overall the microbiome is not an important amino acid source in humans and animals fed amino acids at requirement levels. PMID:25466904

  6. Dietary sources of omega 3 fatty acids: public health risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Tur, J A; Bibiloni, M M; Sureda, A; Pons, A

    2012-06-01

    Omega 3 fatty acids can be obtained from several sources, and should be added to the daily diet to enjoy a good health and to prevent many diseases. Worldwide, general population use omega-3 fatty acid supplements and enriched foods to get and maintain adequate amounts of these fatty acids. The aim of this paper was to review main scientific evidence regarding the public health risks and benefits of the dietary sources of omega-3 fatty acids. A systematic literature search was performed, and one hundred and forty-five articles were included in the results for their methodological quality. The literature described benefits and risks of algal, fish oil, plant, enriched dairy products, animal-derived food, krill oil, and seal oil omega-3 fatty acids. PMID:22591897

  7. Sources of alkalinity and acidity along an acid mine drainage remediated stream in SE Ohio: Hewett Fork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleich, K. L.; Lopez, D. A.; Bowman, J. R.; Kruse, N. A.; Mackey, A. L.; VanDervort, D.; Korenowsky, R.

    2013-12-01

    In the remediation of acid mine drainage impacted streams, it is important to locate and quantify the sources of acidity and alkalinity inputs. These parameters affect the long-term recovery of the stream habitat. Previous studies have focused on treating the remediation of AMD as point source pollution, targeting the main acid seep for remediation. However, in the interest of biological and chemical recovery, it is important to understand how sources of alkalinity and acidity, throughout the stream, affect water and sediment quality. The Hewett Fork watershed in Southeastern Ohio is impacted by AMD from the AS-14 mine complex in Carbondale, Ohio. In attempts to remediate the stream, the water is being treated with a continuous alkaline input from a calcium oxide doser. While the section of watershed furthest downstream from the doser is showing signs of recovery, the water chemistry and aquatic life near the doser are still impacted. The objective of this study is to examine and model the chemistry of the tributaries of Hewett Fork to see how they contribute to the alkalinity and acidity budgets of the main stem of the stream. By examining the inputs of tributaries into the main stem, this project aims to understand processes occurring during remediation throughout the entire stream. Discharge was measured during a dry period in October, 2012 and at a high flow in May, 2013. Field parameters such as pH, TDS, DO, alkalinity and acidity were also determined. Low flow data collected during fall sampling shows variable flow along the stream path, the stream gains water from ground water at some points while it loses water at others, potentially due to variable elevation of the water table. Flow data collected during spring sampling shows that Hewett Fork is a gaining stream during that period with inputs from groundwater contributing to increasing flow downstream. When using this data to calculate the net alkalinity load along the stream, there are areas with alkaline

  8. TFA Tank Focus Area - multiyear program plan FY98-FY00

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major radioactive waste tank remediation problem with hundreds of waste tanks containing hundreds of thousands of cubic meters of high-level waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste across the DOE complex. Approximately 80 tanks are known or assumed to have leaked. Some of the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in a safe condition and eventually remediated to minimize the risk of waste migration and/or exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. However, programmatic drivers are more ambitious than baseline technologies and budgets will support. Science and technology development investments are required to reduce the technical and programmatic risks associated with the tank remediation baselines. The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) was initiated in 1994 to serve as the DOE`s Office of Environmental Management`s (EM`s) national technology development program for radioactive waste tank remediation. The national program was formed to increase integration and realize greater benefits from DOE`s technology development budget. The TFA is responsible for managing, coordinating, and leveraging technology development to support DOE`s four major tank sites: Hanford Site (Washington), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (Idaho), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Tennessee), and Savannah River Site (SRS) (South Carolina). Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank with safety integrated into all the functions. The TFA integrates program activities across organizations that fund tank technology development EM, including the Offices of Waste Management (EM-30), Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and Science and Technology (EM-50).

  9. TFA Tanks Focus Area Multiyear Program Plan FY00-FY04

    SciTech Connect

    BA Carteret; JH Westsik; LR Roeder-Smith; RL Gilchrist; RW Allen; SN Schlahta; TM Brouns

    1999-10-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major radioactive waste tank remediation problem with hundreds of waste tanks containing hundreds of thousands of cubic meters of high-level waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste across the DOE complex. Approximately 68 tanks are known or assumed to have leaked contamination to the soil. Some of the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in a safe condition and eventually remediated to minimize the risk of waste migration and/or exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. However, programmatic drivers are more ambitious than baseline technologies and budgets will support. Science and technology development investments are required to reduce the technical and programmatic risks associated with the tank remediation baselines. The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) was initiated in 1994 to serve as the DOE Office of Environmental Management's (EM's) national technology development program. for radioactive waste tank remediation. The national program was formed to increase integration and realize greater benefits from DOE's technology development budget. The TFA is responsible for managing, coordinating, and leveraging technology development to support DOE's five major tank sites: Hanford Site (Washington), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (Idaho), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Tennessee), Savannah River Site (SRS) (South Carolina), and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) (New York). Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank with safety integrated into all the functions. The TFA integrates program activities across EM organizations that fund tank technology development, including the Offices of Waste Management (EM-30

  10. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and insulin resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have reviewed results from published studies regarding the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) intake on insulin resistance (IR) in human subjects. Evidence has been gathered from epidemiological, cross-sectional and interventions studies. Increased intake of trans fatty acids (TFA) inc...

  11. [Conjugated linolenic acids (CLnA, super CLA)--natural sources and biological activity].

    PubMed

    Białek, Agnieszka; Teryks, Marta; Tokarz, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have a wide range of biological activity. Among them conjugated fatty acids are of great interest. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), which exert a multidirectional health-benefiting influence, and conjugated linolenic acids (CLnA, super CLA) are examples of this group of fatty acids. CLnA are a group of positional and geometric isomers of octadecatrienoic acid (C18:3), which possess double bonds at positions 9, 11, 13 or 8, 10, 12 of their chain. Some vegetable oils are rich sources of CLnA, e.g. bitter melon oil (from Momordica charantia seeds) and pomegranate oil (from Punica granatum seeds). The aim of this paper was to present information concerning natural sources and health-promoting activities of conjugated linolenic acids. The presented data reveal that conjugated linolenic acids may be very useful in prevention and treatment of many diseases, especially diabetes, arteriosclerosis , obesity and cancers (mammary, prostate and colon cancer). Among many potential mechanisms of their action, the fact that some CLnA are converted by oxidoreductases into CLA is very important. It seems to be very reasonable to conduct research concerning the possibility of CLnA use in prevention of many diseases. PMID:25380206

  12. Sources and sinks of formic, acetic, and pyruvic acids over central Amazonia. II - Wet season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Andreae, M. O.; Berresheim, H.; Jacob, D. J.; Beecher, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    Potential sources and sinks of formic, acetic, and pyruvic acids over the Amazon forest were investigated using a photochemical model and data collected on gas phase concentrations of these acids in the forest canopy, boundary layer, and free troposphere over the central Amazon Basin during the 1987 wet season. It was found that the atmospheric reactions previously suggested in the literature as sources of carboxylic acids (i.e., the gas phase decomposition of isoprene, the reaction between CH3CO3 and a peroxide, and aqueous phase oxidation of CH2O) appear to be too slow to explain the observed concentrations, suggesting that other atmospheric reactions, so far unidentified, could make a major contribution to the carboxylic acid budgets.

  13. Functionalised carboxylic acids in atmospheric particles: An annual cycle revealing seasonal trends and possible sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teich, Monique; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    acids. The high concentrations in summer could lead to the conclusion that these acids are mostly formed during photochemical processes in the atmosphere. However, the concentrations in autumn were often exceeded by the ones in winter. Therefore probably other sources beside photochemical processes have to be considered. The second group consists of aromatic compounds. Because of the high concentrations in winter it can be concluded that photochemical formation plays a minor role and primary emission sources e.g., wood combustion are likely. Further evidence in determining sources of the carboxylic acids could be obtained from the air mass origin. In general, air masses transported from East have a more anthropogenic influence than the air mass inflow from West. For all aromatic carboxylic acids higher concentrations were determined during eastern inflow, indicating anthropogenic sources. This presumption is supported by high correlations with the elemental carbon (EC). Regarding the aliphatic carboxylic there is one group with higher concentrations when the air mass is transported from West and one with higher concentrations when air mass is transported from East. In summary the findings of this study reveal a clear difference in the seasonal trends of the single target acids indicating a variety of different sources.

  14. Ethyl oleate-containing nanostructured lipid carriers improve oral bioavailability of trans-ferulic acid ascompared with conventional solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongtai; Li, Zhe; Zhang, Kai; Yang, Gang; Wang, Zhi; Zhao, Jihui; Hu, Rongfeng; Feng, Nianping

    2016-09-10

    trans-Ferulic acid (TFA) has antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and cardioprotective effects, but its poor solubility in water results in unsatisfactory oral bioavailability when administered conventionally at a standard dosage. However, the limited bioavailability of TFA can be overcome by delivering it in nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs). In this study, a microemulsion (ME)-based method was used to prepare NLCs with ethyl oleate as the liquid lipid component and glyceryl behenate as the solid lipid component. These NLCs and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were then used as vehicles for TFA. Their entrapment efficiencies (EE), stability during storage, in vitro release profiles, and in vivo pharmacokinetics were compared. The NLC formulation afforded a drug entrapment efficiency that was significantly greater than that of the SLN formulation, which was made using a single solid lipid. Furthermore, the TFA that was dispersed in the disordered binary lipid matrix of the NLC formulation was more stable than that in the SLN formulation, and thus showed less expulsion from the vehicle during storage. In in vivo pharmacokinetic studies, the NLC TFA formulation yielded a greater Cmax and AUC than that produced by the SLN formulation and an aqueous TFA suspension. This showed that the oral bioavailability of TFA was markedly improved by packaging in NLCs. NLCs are thus a promising vehicle for oral TFA administration, with significant advantages over SLNs. PMID:27374194

  15. Trifluoroacetic Acid from Degradation of HCFCs and HFCs: A Three-Dimensional Modeling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotamarthi, V. R.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Tromp, T. K.; Sze, N. D.

    1998-01-01

    Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA; CF3COOH) is produced by the degradation of the halocarbon replacements HFC-134a, HCFC-124, and HCFC-123. The formation of TFA occurs by HFC/HCFC reacting with OH to yield CF3COX (X = F or CI), followed by in-cloud hydrolysis of CF3COX to form TFA. The TFA formed in the clouds may be reevaporated but is finally deposited onto the surface by washout or dry deposition. Concern has been expressed about the possible long-term accumulation of TFA in certain aquatic environments, pointing to the need to obtain information on the concentrations of TFA in rainwater over scales ranging from local to continental. Based on projected concentrations for HFC-134a, HCFC-124, and HCFC-123 of 80, 10, and 1 pptv in the year 2010, mass conservation arguments imply an annually averaged global concentration of 0.16 micro g/L if washout were the only removal mechanism for TFA. We present 3-D simulations of the HFC/HCFC precursors of TFA that include the rates of formation and deposition of TFA based on assumed future emissions. An established (GISS/Harvard/ UCI) but coarse-resolution (8 deg latitude by 10 deg longitude) chemical transport model was used. The annually averaged rainwater concentration of 0.12 micro g/L (global) was calculated for the year 2010, when both washout and dry deposition are included as the loss mechanism for TFA from the atmosphere. For some large regions in midnorthern latitudes, values are larger, 0.15-0.20 micro g/L. The highest monthly averaged rainwater concentrations of TFA for northern midlatitudes were calculated for the month of July, corresponding to 0.3-0.45 micro g/L in parts of North America and Europe. Recent laboratory experiments have suggested that a substantial amount of vibrationally excited CF3CHFO is produced in the degradation of HFC-134a, decreasing the yield of TFA from this compound by 60%. This decrease would reduce the calculated amounts of TFA in rainwater in the year 2010 by 26%, for the same projected

  16. Trifluoroacetic Acid from Degradation of HCFCs and HFCs: A Three-dimensional Modeling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotamarthi, V. R.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Tromp, T. K.; Sze, N. D.

    1998-01-01

    Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA; CF3 COOH) is produced by the degradation of the halocarbon replacements HFC-134a, HCFC-124, and HCFC-123. The formation of TFA occurs by HFC/HCFC reacting with OH to yield CF3COX (X = F or CI), followed by in-cloud hydrolysis of CF3COX to form TFA. The TFA formed in the clouds may be reevaporated but is finally deposited onto the surface by washout or dry deposition. Concern has been expressed about the possible long-term accumulation of TFA in certain aquatic environments, pointing to the need to obtain information on the concentrations of TFA in rainwater over scales ranging from local to continental. Based on projected concentrations for HFC-134a, HCFC-124, and HCFC-123 of 80, 10, and 1 pptv in the year 2010, mass conservation arguments imply an annually averaged global concentration of 0.16 microg/L if washout were the only removal mechanism for TFA. We present 3-D simulations of the HFC/HCFC precursors of TFA that include the rates of formation and deposition of TFA based on assumed future emissions. An established (GISS/Harvard/ UCI) but coarse-resolution (8 deg latitude by 10 deg longitude) chemical transport model was used. The anually averaged rainwater concentration of 0.12 gg/L (global) was calculated for the year 2010, when both washout and dry deposition are included as the loss mechanism for TFA from the atmosphere. For some large regions in midnorthern latitudes, values are larger, 0.15-0.20 microg/L. The highest monthly averaged rainwater concentrations of TFA for northern midlatitudes were calculated for the month of July, corresponding to 0.3-0.45 microg/L in parts of North America and Europe. Recent laboratory experiments have suggested that a substantial amount of vibrationally excited CF3CHFO is produced in the degradation of HFC-134a, decreasing the yield of TFA from this compound by 60%. This decrease would reduce the calculated amounts of TFA in rainwater in the year 2010 by 26%, for the same projected

  17. Trifluoroacetic Acid from Degradation of HCFCs and HFCs: A Three-Dimensional Modeling Study. Appendix P

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotamarthi, V. R.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Tromp, T. K.; Sze, N. D.; Prather, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA; CF3 COOH) is produced by the degradation of the halocarbon replacements HFC-134a, HCFC-124, and HCFC-123. The formation of TFA occurs by HFC/HCFC reacting with OH to yield CF3COX (X = F or CI), followed by in-cloud hydrolysis of CF to form TFA. The TFA formed in the clouds may be reevaporated but is finally deposited onto the surface by washout or dry deposition. Concern has been expressed about the possible long-term accumulation of TFA in certain aquatic environments, pointing to the need to obtain information on the concentrations of TFA in rainwater over scales ranging from local to continental. Based on projected concentrations for HFC-134a, HCFC-124, and HCFC-123 of 80, 10, and 1 pptv in the year 2010, mass conservation arguments imply an annually averaged global concentration of 0.16 micro g/L if washout were the only removal mechanism for TFA. We present 3-D simulations of the HFC/HCFC precursors of TFA that include the rates of formation and deposition of TFA based on assumed future emissions. An established (GISS[Harvard/ UCI) but coarse-resolution (8 deg latitude by 10 deg longitude) chemical transport model was used. The annually averaged rainwater concentration of 0.12 micro g/L (global) was calculated for the year 2010, when both washout and dry deposition are included as the loss mechanism for TFA from the atmosphere. For some large regions in midnorthern latitudes, values are larger. 0.15-0.20 micro g/L. The highest monthly averaged rainwater concentrations of TFA for northern midlatitudes were calculated for the month of July, corresponding to 0.3 - 0.45 micro g/L in parts of North America and Europe. Recent laboratory experiments have suggested that a substantial amount of vibrationally excited CF3CHFO is produced in the degradation of HFC-134a, decreasing the yield of TFA from this compound by 60%. This decrease would reduce the calculated amounts of TFA in rainwater in the year 2010 by 26%, for the same projected

  18. First Year Middle and High School Teachers' Mathematical Content Proficiency and Attitudes: Alternative Certification in the Teach for America (TFA) Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Brian R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the mathematical content proficiency middle and high school teachers have before and after their first year teaching and taking graduate coursework in the Teach for America (TFA) program, as well as what attitudes toward mathematics TFA teachers have over the first year. There was a significant increase…

  19. Pork as a Source of Omega-3 (n-3) Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Dugan, Michael E.R.; Vahmani, Payam; Turner, Tyler D.; Mapiye, Cletos; Juárez, Manuel; Prieto, Nuria; Beaulieu, Angela D.; Zijlstra, Ruurd T.; Patience, John F.; Aalhus, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Pork is the most widely eaten meat in the world, but typical feeding practices give it a high omega-6 (n-6) to omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid ratio and make it a poor source of n-3 fatty acids. Feeding pigs n-3 fatty acids can increase their contents in pork, and in countries where label claims are permitted, claims can be met with limited feeding of n-3 fatty acid enrich feedstuffs, provided contributions of both fat and muscle are included in pork servings. Pork enriched with n-3 fatty acids is, however, not widely available. Producing and marketing n-3 fatty acid enriched pork requires regulatory approval, development costs, quality control costs, may increase production costs, and enriched pork has to be tracked to retail and sold for a premium. Mandatory labelling of the n-6/n-3 ratio and the n-3 fatty acid content of pork may help drive production of n-3 fatty acid enriched pork, and open the door to population-based disease prevention polices (i.e., food tax to provide incentives to improve production practices). A shift from the status-quo, however, will require stronger signals along the value chain indicating production of n-3 fatty acid enriched pork is an industry priority. PMID:26694475

  20. Pork as a Source of Omega-3 (n-3) Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Michael E R; Vahmani, Payam; Turner, Tyler D; Mapiye, Cletos; Juárez, Manuel; Prieto, Nuria; Beaulieu, Angela D; Zijlstra, Ruurd T; Patience, John F; Aalhus, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Pork is the most widely eaten meat in the world, but typical feeding practices give it a high omega-6 (n-6) to omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid ratio and make it a poor source of n-3 fatty acids. Feeding pigs n-3 fatty acids can increase their contents in pork, and in countries where label claims are permitted, claims can be met with limited feeding of n-3 fatty acid enrich feedstuffs, provided contributions of both fat and muscle are included in pork servings. Pork enriched with n-3 fatty acids is, however, not widely available. Producing and marketing n-3 fatty acid enriched pork requires regulatory approval, development costs, quality control costs, may increase production costs, and enriched pork has to be tracked to retail and sold for a premium. Mandatory labelling of the n-6/n-3 ratio and the n-3 fatty acid content of pork may help drive production of n-3 fatty acid enriched pork, and open the door to population-based disease prevention polices (i.e., food tax to provide incentives to improve production practices). A shift from the status-quo, however, will require stronger signals along the value chain indicating production of n-3 fatty acid enriched pork is an industry priority. PMID:26694475

  1. Florets of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.): potential new sources of dietary fiber and phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qiang; Cui, Jun; Li, Hang; Liu, Jia; Zhao, Guohua

    2013-04-10

    Ray florets (Rf) and disc florets (Df) are agricultural byproducts of sunflower seeds. Their nutrition-related compounds were determined. The dietary fiber contents in Rf and Df were 42.90 mg/100 g and 58.97 mg/100 g. In both florets, palmitic, linoleic, and linolenic acids were identified as the three most abundant fatty acids, and the saturated ones constitute approximately two-thirds (w/w) of the total fatty acids. Lysine was the limiting amino acid in both florets by World Health Organization standards. Sixteen phenolic compounds, nine free and eight bound, mainly depsides, were identified in florets by RP-HPLC-DAD/ESI-TOF-MS. The free and bound phenolic compounds in Df were higher than in Rf. 1,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid was the predominant free phenolic compound in both florets. The present study revealed that the florets of sunflower are rich sources of dietary fiber, Fe, and phenols. PMID:23510166

  2. Connecting Source with Sink: The Role of Arabidopsis AAP8 in Phloem Loading of Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Santiago, James P; Tegeder, Mechthild

    2016-05-01

    Allocation of large amounts of nitrogen to developing organs occurs in the phloem and is essential for plant growth and seed development. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and many other plant species, amino acids represent the dominant nitrogen transport forms in the phloem, and they are mainly synthesized in photosynthetically active source leaves. Following their synthesis, a broad spectrum of the amino nitrogen is actively loaded into the phloem of leaf minor veins and transported within the phloem sap to sinks such as developing leaves, fruits, or seeds. Controlled regulation of the source-to-sink transport of amino acids has long been postulated; however, the molecular mechanism of amino acid phloem loading was still unknown. In this study, Arabidopsis AMINO ACID PERMEASE8 (AAP8) was shown to be expressed in the source leaf phloem and localized to the plasma membrane, suggesting its function in phloem loading. This was further supported by transport studies with aap8 mutants fed with radiolabeled amino acids and by leaf exudate analyses. In addition, biochemical and molecular analyses revealed alterations in leaf nitrogen pools and metabolism dependent on the developmental stage of the mutants. Decreased amino acid phloem loading and partitioning to sinks led to decreased silique and seed numbers, but seed protein levels were unchanged, demonstrating the importance of AAP8 function for sink development rather than seed quality. Overall, these results show that AAP8 plays an important role in source-to-sink partitioning of nitrogen and that its function affects source leaf physiology and seed yield. PMID:27016446

  3. Lipid Sources with Different Fatty Acid Profile Alters the Fatty Acid Profile and Quality of Beef from Confined Nellore Steers

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentini, Giovani; Lage, Josiane F.; Carvalho, Isabela P. C.; Messana, Juliana D.; Canesin, Roberta. C.; Reis, Ricardo A.; Berchielli, Telma T.

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effects of lipid sources with different fatty acids profile on meat fatty acids profile and beef quality traits of Nellore. A total of 45 Nellore animals with an average initial body weight of 419±11 kg (at 15±2 mo) were distributed in a completely randomized design consisting of 5 treatments and 9 replicates. The roughage feed was maize silage (600 g/kg on a dry matter [DM] basis) plus concentrate (400 g/kg on a DM basis). The dietary treatments were as follows: without fat (WF), palm oil (PO), linseed oil (LO), protected fat (PF), and soybean grains (SG). No effects of lipid sources were observed (p>0.05) on beef color, pH, water-holding capacity, and sarcomere length. Beef from cattle fed PO had greater shear-force values (p<0.05) compared to beef from cattle fed WF. Deposition of main unsaturated fatty acids (oleic, linoleic, and linolenic) was greater in treatments WF, SG, and LO, respectively, while the values of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) were greater when animals were fed LO. The inclusion of LO in the diet enhances the concentration of CLA in longissimus muscle and subcutaneous fat besides improving the atherogenicity index and elongase activity. As such, LO can be used with the aim to improve the quality of beef from confined Nellore cattle. Conversely, the use of PO is not recommended since it may increase the concentration of undesirable unsaturated fatty acids in muscle and subcutaneous fat, shear-force and the atherogenicity index. PMID:26104402

  4. Modification of egg yolk fatty acids profile by using different oil sources

    PubMed Central

    Omidi, Mohsen; Rahimi, Shaban; Karimi Torshizi, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different dietary oil sources supplementation on laying hens’ performance and fatty acids profile of egg yolks. Seventy-two 23-week-old laying hens (Tetra-SL) divided into six experimental diets (four replicates and three birds per replication) in a completely randomized design for nine weeks. Experimental diets were included: 1) control (no oil), 2) 3.00% fish oil, 3) 3.00% olive oil, 4) 3.00% grape seed oil, 5) 3.00% canola oil, and 6) 3.00% soybean oil. The diets were similar in terms of energy and protein. Egg production, egg mass, egg weight, feed intake, feed conversion ratio and fatty acid composition of egg yolk were determined at the end of the trial. The results indicated that the performance parameters were not significantly different between treatments in the entire period (p > 0.05). However, fatty acids profiles of yolk were affected by experimental diets (p < 0.05). Fish oil significantly reduced omega-6 fatty acids and increased docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in egg yolk. Also canola oil increased linolenic acid content in the egg yolk. In conclusion, fish oil increased omega-3 long-chain fatty acids and decreased omega-6 to omega-3 ratio in eggs which may have beneficial effects on human health. PMID:26261709

  5. A biogenic source of oxalic acid and glyoxal in marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, C.; Rinaldi, M.; Ceburnis, D.; O'Dowd, C.; Sciare, J.; Burrows, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of oxalic acid aerosol measurements samples performed at Mace Head (Ireland, 53°20'N, 9°54'W) and Amsterdam Island (Indian Ocean, 37°48'S, 77°34'E), supporting the existence of a biogenic source of oxalic acid over the oceans. Aerosol oxalic acid was detected in clean marine air masses in concentrations ranging from 2.7 to 39 ng m-3, at Mace Head, and from 0.31 to 17 ng m-3, at Amsterdam Island. In both hemispheres, oxalic acid concentration showed a clear seasonal trend, with maxima in spring-summer and minima in the fall-winter period, in analogy with other marine biogenic aerosol components (e.g., MSA and amines). Oxalic acid was distributed along the whole aerosol size spectrum, with the major contribution given by the 1.0-2.0 μm size range, and by the lower accumulation mode (0.25-0.5 μm). Given the observed size distributions, marine aerosol oxalic acid can be assumed as the result of the combination of different formation processes, among which in-cloud oxidation of gaseous precursors [1] and photochemical degradation of biogenic unsaturated fatty acids [2] are likely the most important. Among aerosol oxalic acid precursors, glyoxal is the most likely candidate in the marine boundary layer, as a source of glyoxal over the oceans has recently been discovered by satellite observations [3] and confirmed by in situ measurements [4]. In support of this hypothesis, SCIAMACHY satellite retrieved glyoxal column concentrations, over the two sampling sites, resulted characterized by a clear seasonal trend, resembling the aerosol oxalic acid one. [1] Warneck, Atmospheric Environment, 37, 2423-2427, 2003. [2] Kawamura & Sakaguchi, J. Geophys. Res., 104, D3, 3501-3509, 1999. [3] Fu et al., J. Geophys. Res., 113, D15303, doi:10.1029/2007JD009505, 2008 [4] Sinreich et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 10, 15075-15107, 2010.

  6. USE OF FATTY ACID STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO TO INDICATE MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCE IN TROPICAL SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory


    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotope ratio of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils as indicators of live microbial biomass levels, broad microbial community structure, and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil o...

  7. Mine Waste Technology Program. In Situ Source Control Of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of the Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 3, In Situ Source Control of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S....

  8. Weak acid extractable metals in Bramble Bay, Queensland, Australia: temporal behaviour, enrichment and source apportionment.

    PubMed

    Brady, James P; Ayoko, Godwin A; Martens, Wayde N; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2015-02-15

    Sediment samples were taken from six sampling sites in Bramble Bay, Queensland, Australia between February and November in 2012. They were analysed for a range of heavy metals including Al, Fe, Mn, Ti, Ce, Th, U, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Sb, Te, Hg, Tl and Pb. Fraction analysis, Enrichment Factors and Principal Component Analysis-Absolute Principal Component Scores (PCA-APCS) were carried out in order to assess metal pollution, potential bioavailability and source apportionment. Cr and Ni exceeded the Australian Interim Sediment Quality Guidelines at some sampling sites, while Hg was found to be the most enriched metal. Fraction analysis identified increased weak acid soluble Hg and Cd during the sampling period. Source apportionment via PCA-APCS found four sources of metals pollution, namely, marine sediments, shipping, antifouling coatings and a mixed source. These sources need to be considered in any metal pollution control measure within Bramble Bay. PMID:25537749

  9. Investigating sources and pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in aquifers in Tokyo using multiple tracers.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Keisuke; Murakami, Michio; Oguma, Kumiko; Takada, Hideshige; Takizawa, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    We employed a multi-tracer approach to investigate sources and pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in urban groundwater, based on 53 groundwater samples taken from confined aquifers and unconfined aquifers in Tokyo. While the median concentrations of groundwater PFAAs were several ng/L, the maximum concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS, 990 ng/L), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA, 1800 ng/L) and perfluorononanoate (PFNA, 620 ng/L) in groundwater were several times higher than those of wastewater and street runoff reported in the literature. PFAAs were more frequently detected than sewage tracers (carbamazepine and crotamiton), presumably owing to the higher persistence of PFAAs, the multiple sources of PFAAs beyond sewage (e.g., surface runoff, point sources) and the formation of PFAAs from their precursors. Use of multiple methods of source apportionment including principal component analysis-multiple linear regression (PCA-MLR) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acid ratio analysis highlighted sewage and point sources as the primary sources of PFAAs in the most severely polluted groundwater samples, with street runoff being a minor source (44.6% sewage, 45.7% point sources and 9.7% street runoff, by PCA-MLR). Tritium analysis indicated that, while young groundwater (recharged during or after the 1970s, when PFAAs were already in commercial use) in shallow aquifers (<50 m depth) was naturally highly vulnerable to PFAA pollution, PFAAs were also found in old groundwater (recharged before the 1950s, when PFAAs were not in use) in deep aquifers (50-500 m depth). This study demonstrated the utility of multiple uses of tracers (pharmaceuticals and personal care products; PPCPs, tritium) and source apportionment methods in investigating sources and pathways of PFAAs in multiple aquifer systems. PMID:24814036

  10. Lipids and Fatty Acids of Nudibranch Mollusks: Potential Sources of Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Zhukova, Natalia V.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular diversity of chemical compounds found in marine animals offers a good chance for the discovery of novel bioactive compounds of unique structures and diverse biological activities. Nudibranch mollusks, which are not protected by a shell and produce chemicals for various ecological uses, including defense against predators, have attracted great interest for their lipid composition. Lipid analysis of eight nudibranch species revealed dominant phospholipids, sterols and monoalkyldiacylglycerols. Among polar lipids, 1-alkenyl-2-acyl glycerophospholipids (plasmalogens) and ceramide-aminoethyl phosphonates were found in the mollusks. The fatty acid compositions of the nudibranchs differed greatly from those of other marine gastropods and exhibited a wide diversity: very long chain fatty acids known as demospongic acids, a series of non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids, including unusual 21:2∆7,13, and an abundance of various odd and branched fatty acids typical of bacteria. Symbiotic bacteria revealed in some species of nudibranchs participate presumably in the production of some compounds serving as a chemical defense for the mollusks. The unique fatty acid composition of the nudibranchs is determined by food supply, inherent biosynthetic activities and intracellular symbiotic microorganisms. The potential of nudibranchs as a source of biologically active lipids and fatty acids is also discussed. PMID:25196731

  11. Fluorescence spectroscopy as a means of distinguishing fulvic and humic acids from dissolved and sedimentary aquatic sources and terrestrial sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senesi, Nicola; Miano, Teodoro M.; Provenzano, Maria Rosaria

    Thirteen fulvic acids (FA) and humic acids (HA) isolated from river waters and sediment, marine sediments, leonardite, soils, and paleosol, have been investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy in the emission, excitation and, partly, synchronous scan excitation modes. Emission spectra are generally characterized by a unique broad band, whereas excitation spectra exhibit a variable number of peaks or shoulders of various intensity; these peaks are particularly well-resolved for sedimentary HA samples. A decrease in the relative intensity of fluorescence, which is associated with a red-shift (longer wavelengths) of both the emission maximum and the main excitation peaks, is observed when passing from dissolved aquatic and soil FA to river and marine sedimentary HA, to leonardite and soil HA, and, finally, to paleosol HA. Evident differences are shown in the relative intensity and wavelength maxima, measured in any mode, between soil FA and HA from the same source. For FA and HA of various nature and origin, the fluorescence is suggested to be caused by chemically different structural units. These units fluoresce from the blue-violet to the green and consist of variously extended, condensed, aromatic and/or heterocyclic ring systems, with a high degree of electronic conjugation and bearing suitable hydroxyl, alkoxyl and carbonyl groups (e.g. salicyl, cinnamic and hydroxybenzoic derivatives, naphtols, naphtoquinones, coumarin), and quinoline-derivatives, flavonoids and Schiffbase derivatives. Fluorescence properties of humic substances may represent an additional diagnostic criterium useful in distinguishing between FA and HA from the same or various natural sources.

  12. Batch fermentation model of propionic acid production by Propionibacterium acidipropionici in different carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Coral, Jefferson; Karp, Susan Grace; Porto de Souza Vandenberghe, Luciana; Parada, José Luis; Pandey, Ashok; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2008-12-01

    Propionic acid (PA) is widely used as additive in animal feed and also in the manufacturing of cellulose-based plastics, herbicides, and perfumes. Salts of propionic acid are used as preservative in food. PA is mainly produced by chemical synthesis. Nowadays, PA production by fermentation of low-cost industrial wastes or renewable sources has been an interesting alternative. In the present investigation, PA production by Propionibacterium acidipropionici ATCC 4965 was studied using a basal medium with sugarcane molasses (BMSM), glycerol or lactate (BML) in small batch fermentation at 30 and 36 degrees C. Bacterial growth was carried out under low dissolved oxygen concentration and without pH control. Results indicated that P. acidipropionici produced more biomass in BMSM than in other media at 30 degrees C (7.55 g l(-1)) as well as at 36 degrees C (3.71 g l(-1)). PA and biomass production were higher at 30 degrees C than at 36 degrees C in all cases studied. The best productivity was obtained by using BML (0.113 g l(-1) h(-1)), although the yielding of this metabolite was higher when using glycerol as carbon source (0.724 g g(-1)) because there was no detection of acetic acid. By the way, when using the other two carbon sources, acetic acid emerged as an undesirable by-product for further PA purification. PMID:18386184

  13. Culture strategies for lipid production using acetic acid as sole carbon source by Rhodosporidium toruloides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang-Feng; Liu, Jia-Nan; Lu, Li-Jun; Peng, Kai-Ming; Yang, Gao-Xiang; Liu, Jia

    2016-04-01

    Rhodosporidium toruloides AS 2.1389 was tested using different concentrations of acetic acid as a low-cost carbon source for the production of microbial lipids, which are good raw materials for biodiesel production. It grew and had higher lipid contents in media containing 4-20g/L acetic acid as the sole carbon source, compared with that in glucose-containing media under the same culture conditions. At acetic acid concentrations as high as 20g/L and the optimal carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (C/N) of 200 in a batch culture, the highest biomass production was 4.35g/L, with a lipid content of 48.2%. At acetic acid concentrations as low as 4g/L, a sequencing batch culture (SBC) with a C/N of 100 increased biomass production to 4.21g/L, with a lipid content of 38.6%. These results provide usable culture strategies for lipid production by R. toruloides AS 2.1389 when using diverse waste-derived volatile fatty acids. PMID:26851898

  14. Dietary starch sources affect net portal appearance of amino acids and glucose in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, T-J; Dai, Q-Z; Yin, Y-L; Zhang, J; Huang, R-L; Ruan, Z; Deng, Z; Xie, M

    2008-05-01

    Four male pigs (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire; average initial (mean ± SEM) BW = 22.5 ± 1.1 kg), fitted with permanent catheters in the portal vein, ileal vein and carotid artery, were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square experimental design to measure the effect of dietary starch sources on the net portal appearance of glucose and amino acids. Dietary starch sources were resistant starch (RS), maize, sticky rice and brown rice. Diets were provided at 0730, 1530 and 2330 h during a 6-day adjustment period and 1-day collection period. On day 7 of each period, blood samples were collected from the portal vein and carotid artery at 0730 h (prior to feeding) and hourly up to 8 h after meal. Blood samples were used to determine glucose, amino acid, packed cell volume and partial pressure of oxygen (pO2). When calculated per 100 g feed intake, cumulative portal glucose appearance was lower (P < 0.05) for resistant starch than for maize, sticky rice or brown rice up to 8 h after the meal. Cumulative portal glucose appearance was higher (P < 0.05) for sticky rice and brown rice than for other diets until 4 h after the meal, but maize had higher cumulative glucose appearance after 4 h. Net cumulative portal concentrations of most amino acids for resistant starch were also reduced (P < 0.05) than for the other starch sources. Cumulative portal appearance of amino acid represented 48.39%, 63.76%, 61.80% and 59.18% of dietary intake for resistant starch, maize, sticky rice and brown rice, respectively. Collectively, our results indicate that dietary starch sources substantially affect the appearance of amino acids and glucose in the portal circulation. PMID:22443597

  15. Present status and strategy of reel-to-reel TFA-MOD process for coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, T.; Yoshizumi, M.; Miura, M.; Nakaoka, K.; Ichikawa, Y.; Sutoh, Y.; Miyata, S.; Fukushima, H.; Yamada, Y.; Shiohara, Y.

    2009-10-01

    On the research and development of a reel-to-reel TFA-MOD (Metal Organic Deposition using Trifluoro-acetates) process, a present status is reviewed and its future strategy is addressed. As a base of the study, the 90 m long tape with uniform I c distribution of the 300 A/cm-width level was obtained on the CeO 2 buffered IBAD-Gd 2Zr 2O 7/Hastelloy C276 substrate. The tape has the 56 m region with the end-to-end I c value of 250 A, which corresponds to maximum product of I c × L of 14,000 Am. Based on the results, several directions on R&D have been studied such as “higher I c”, “higher I c- B”, “higher production rate both in coating/calcinations and crystallization steps” and lower cost buffer/substrate”. Then, an extremely high I c value of 735 A/cm-width was achieved in a short tape by the compositional control (e.g. Ba-deficient), in the starting solutions. On the efforts for achieving higher I c- B properties, high I c values of 115 and 35 A/cm-width under the magnetic fields of 1 and 3 T were obtained by the RE mixture of Y and Gd in REBCO, addition of Zr and a growth rate control process. On the other hand, the production rate for the coating/calcinations process was improved by development of new starting solutions, which uses F-free Y salt instead of TFA salt of Y. The high J c value of 1.9 MA/cm 2 was confirmed using the precursor films fabricated at a high traveling rate of 10 m/h. Concerning a higher rate in the crystallization step, the multi-turning system with a vertical gas flow system was developed. The validity of the concept was confirmed using 2-turn parts of the furnace. The high I c value of 250 A/cm-width was realized in the 5 m tape crystallized with a traveling rate of 3 m/h, which is equivalent to 15 m/h for usage of entire area of the furnace of 10-turns. Furthermore, in order to achieve the lower cost, the architecture of the coated conductor with a low cost buffer/substrate system has been developed. An IBAD buffered

  16. Development of BZO Doped YGdBCO Thick Films Using TFA-MOD Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Nakahata, K.; Yoshizumi, M.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.; Kimura, K.; Hasegawa, T.; Kato, T.; Hirayama, T.

    TFA-MOD (Metal Organic Deposition using Trifluoro-acetates) process is of considerable practical concern for future applications since it can fabricate high performance coated conductors (CCs) with low cost. In this study, we developed the process for fabricating thick films in BZO nanoparticle doped Y0.77Gd0.23Ba1.5Cu3Oy (YGdBCO) CCs in order to realize high Ic values under magnetic field. The effect of RTR (Reel To Reel)-dip-coating conditions on microstructure, Jc(-B-θ) properties, etc. was investigated in order to fabricate crack-free thick and high performance films. A BZO doped YGdBCO film with uniform 3.0 μm thickness showed the high in-field Ic and Jc values of 55.6 A/cm-w and 0.18 MA/cm2@77.8K, 3T, respectively.

  17. Tracing Carbon Sources through Aquatic and Terrestrial Food Webs Using Amino Acid Stable Isotope Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Thomas; Ventura, Marc; Andersen, Nils; O’Brien, Diane M.; Piatkowski, Uwe; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Tracing the origin of nutrients is a fundamental goal of food web research but methodological issues associated with current research techniques such as using stable isotope ratios of bulk tissue can lead to confounding results. We investigated whether naturally occurring δ13C patterns among amino acids (δ13CAA) could distinguish between multiple aquatic and terrestrial primary production sources. We found that δ13CAA patterns in contrast to bulk δ13C values distinguished between carbon derived from algae, seagrass, terrestrial plants, bacteria and fungi. Furthermore, we showed for two aquatic producers that their δ13CAA patterns were largely unaffected by different environmental conditions despite substantial shifts in bulk δ13C values. The potential of assessing the major carbon sources at the base of the food web was demonstrated for freshwater, pelagic, and estuarine consumers; consumer δ13C patterns of essential amino acids largely matched those of the dominant primary producers in each system. Since amino acids make up about half of organismal carbon, source diagnostic isotope fingerprints can be used as a new complementary approach to overcome some of the limitations of variable source bulk isotope values commonly encountered in estuarine areas and other complex environments with mixed aquatic and terrestrial inputs. PMID:24069196

  18. Acidic and total primary sulfates: development of emission factors for major stationary combustion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Goklany, I.M.; Hoffnagle, G.F.; Brackbill, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    ''Best estimates'' of emission factors for major sources of acidic and total primary sulfates are developed for use in the compilation of emission inventories for the eastern U.S. These may, in turn, be used for modeling of acidic or sulfate deposition. The factors are based upon a critical evaluation of the generic measurement methods used to quantify total and acidic primary sulfate emissions, and an exhaustive review and critique of individual papers and studies available in the open literature which present measurement data on primary sulfate emissions. It develops a qualitative rating scheme which specifies the level of confidence that should be attached to the emission factor determinations. The paper concludes that much of the existing data on primary sulfates from stationary combustion sources are, probably, significantly biased upward and, therefore, inappropriate for the derivation of emission factors. Therefore, existing estimates of primary sulfate emissions for these source categories are, probably, substanitally inflated. It also concludes that, for most source categories, very little confidence can be attached to the best estimates because of the paucity of data obtained from measurement techniques which are likely to be free of systematic bias. 68 references.

  19. Tracing carbon sources through aquatic and terrestrial food webs using amino acid stable isotope fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Thomas; Ventura, Marc; Andersen, Nils; O'Brien, Diane M; Piatkowski, Uwe; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    Tracing the origin of nutrients is a fundamental goal of food web research but methodological issues associated with current research techniques such as using stable isotope ratios of bulk tissue can lead to confounding results. We investigated whether naturally occurring δ(13)C patterns among amino acids (δ(13)CAA) could distinguish between multiple aquatic and terrestrial primary production sources. We found that δ(13)CAA patterns in contrast to bulk δ(13)C values distinguished between carbon derived from algae, seagrass, terrestrial plants, bacteria and fungi. Furthermore, we showed for two aquatic producers that their δ(13)CAA patterns were largely unaffected by different environmental conditions despite substantial shifts in bulk δ(13)C values. The potential of assessing the major carbon sources at the base of the food web was demonstrated for freshwater, pelagic, and estuarine consumers; consumer δ(13)C patterns of essential amino acids largely matched those of the dominant primary producers in each system. Since amino acids make up about half of organismal carbon, source diagnostic isotope fingerprints can be used as a new complementary approach to overcome some of the limitations of variable source bulk isotope values commonly encountered in estuarine areas and other complex environments with mixed aquatic and terrestrial inputs. PMID:24069196

  20. Direct and remarkably efficient conversion of methane into acetic acid catalyzed by amavadine and related vanadium complexes. A synthetic and a theoretical DFT mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Kirillova, Marina V; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Reis, Patrícia M; da Silva, José A L; da Silva, João J R Fraústo; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2007-08-29

    Vanadium(IV or V) complexes with N,O- or O,O-ligands, i.e., [VO{N(CH2CH2O)3}], Ca[V(HIDPA)2] (synthetic amavadine), Ca[V(HIDA)2], or [Bu4N]2[V(HIDA)2] [HIDPA, HIDA = basic form of 2,2'-(hydroxyimino)dipropionic or -diacetic acid, respectively], [VO(CF3SO3)2], Ba[VO(nta)(H2O)]2 (nta = nitrilotriacetate), [VO(ada)(H2O)] (ada = N-2-acetamidoiminodiacetate), [VO(Hheida)(H2O)] (Hheida = 2-hydroxyethyliminodiacetate), [VO(bicine)] [bicine = basic form of N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)glycine], and [VO(dipic)(OCH2CH3)] (dipic = pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate), are catalyst precursors for the efficient single-pot conversion of methane into acetic acid, in trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) under moderate conditions, using peroxodisulfate as oxidant. Effects on the yields and TONs of various factors are reported. TFA acts as a carbonylating agent and CO is an inhibitor for some systems, although for others there is an optimum CO pressure. The most effective catalysts (as amavadine) bear triethanolaminate or (hydroxyimino)dicarboxylates and lead, in a single batch, to CH3COOH yields > 50% (based on CH4) or remarkably high TONs up to 5.6 x 103. The catalyst can remain active upon multiple recycling of its solution. Carboxylation proceeds via free radical mechanisms (CH3* can be trapped by CBrCl3), and theoretical calculations disclose a particularly favorable process involving the sequential formation of CH3*, CH3CO*, and CH3COO* which, upon H-abstraction (from TFA or CH4), yields acetic acid. The CH3COO* radical is formed by oxygenation of CH3CO* by a peroxo-V complex via a V{eta1-OOC(O)CH3} intermediate. Less favorable processes involve the oxidation of CH3CO* by the protonated (hydroperoxo) form of that peroxo-V complex or by peroxodisulfate. The calculations also indicate that (i) peroxodisulfate behaves as a source of sulfate radicals which are methane H-abstractors, as a peroxidative and oxidizing agent for vanadium, and as an oxidizing and coupling agent for CH3CO* and that (ii) TFA is

  1. Ac loss characteristics of YBCO superconducting tapes fabricated by TFA-MOD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwakuma, Masataka; Nigo, Masahiro; Inoue, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Naoya; Kiss, Takanobu; Funaki, Kazuo; Iijima, Yasuhiro; Saitoh, Takashi; Izumi, Teruo; Yamada, Yutaka; Shiohara, Yuu

    2005-10-01

    We investigated the ac loss properties of a YBCO superconducting tape fabricated by TFA-MOD technique. The thickness of the YBCO layer is 1.2 μm. A 6-tape stack of 50 mm in length and 10 mm in width was inserted into a saddle-shaped pickup coil. The ac loss was measured at 35-77 K by applying an external ac magnetic field. The magnetic field angle was changed by rotating the sample stack around its longitudinal axis. The effective penetration field, which corresponds to the breaking point of an ac loss curve, decreased with increasing field angle though it was much smaller than that which was estimated for a superconducting slab with the same thickness as the width of a tape. As a result, the ac loss increased monotonically with an increasing field angle against the wide surface for any amplitude. The observed field angular dependence of the ac loss agreed with the theoretically predicted one by using the observed ac losses in perpendicular magnetic field. Anyway the ac loss for a larger amplitude than the effective penetration field was proportional to the critical current density and the projective width of a tape in the direction of the applied magnetic field for any field angle and any temperature as well known. In addition we estimated the magnetic field, B, dependence of the critical current, Ic, from the observed magnetization curves. It was shown that zero-field Ic appeared to be a linear function of temperature and Ic-B characteristics was scaled with zero-field Ic. We also discussed a difference in Ic-B characteristics and its temperature dependence between TFA-MOD tapes and IBAD-PLD ones.

  2. AC loss reduction of TFA-MOD coated conductors in long length by laser scribing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, K.; Hirano, H.; Machi, T.; Takagi, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Izumi, T.

    TFA-MOD process is expected to be promising for future applications since it can produce high performance YBCO coated conductors with low cost. Applying YBCO coated conductors to the power electric devices such as transformer, cable, motors, reduction of AC loss for long wire is necessary. Multifilamentation, which is one of the effective approaches for AC loss reduction, has been developed by the scribing process. YBCO coated conductors produced by our standard TFA-MOD process delaminated into two parts by the laser scribing. The delamination was clarified to occur within the superconducting layer caused by the defects such as pores in the superconducting layer. In order to reduce the defects in the superconducting layer, we modify the heat treatment profile performed on the decomposed precursor films by applying the interim annealing(550-600°C) before crystallization heat treatment(740-770°C). The interim annealed samples had much less and smaller pores than the standard processed ones. The peel strength measured by transverse tensile test was as high as the PLD derived coated conductors which was successfully scribed into five filaments resulting in 1/5 AC loss. A 50m long YBCO coated conductor with the characteristics of 398A/cmwidth was obtained and cut into 5 mm width, followed by the laser scribing process into five filaments. The multifilamentation process was successfully performed without delamination throughout the wire. The hysteresis loss was down to 1/N (N: number of filaments), as we aimed. The IC properties of the filaments were 29±4A, indicating the wire was uniformly fabricated.

  3. Characterization of DMSO Coordination to Palladium(II) in Solution and Insights into the Aerobic Oxidation Catalyst, Pd(DMSO)2(TFA)2

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Tianning; White, Paul; Guzei, Ilia; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that Pd(DMSO)2(TFA)2 (TFA = trifluoroacetate) is an effective catalyst for a number of different aerobic oxidation reactions. Here, we provide insights into the coordination properties of DMSO to palladium(II) in both the solid state and in solution. A crystal structure of Pd(DMSO)2(TFA)2 confirms that the solid-state structure of this species has one O-bound and one S-bound DMSO ligand, and a crystallographically characterized mono-DMSO complex, trans-Pd(DMSO)(OH2)(TFA)2, exhibits an S-bound DMSO ligand. 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopic studies show that, in EtOAc and THF-d8, Pd(DMSO)2(TFA)2 consists of an equilibrium mixture of Pd(S-DMSO)(O-DMSO)(TFA)2 and Pd(S-DMSO)2(TFA)2. The O-bound DMSO is determined to be more labile than the S-bound DMSO ligand, and both DMSO ligands are more labile in THF relative to EtOAc as the solvent. DMSO coordination to PdII is substantially less favorable when the TFA ligands are replaced with acetate. An analogous carboxylate ligand effect is observed in the coordination of PdII to the bidentate sulfoxide ligand, 1,2-bis(phenylsulfinyl)ethane. DMSO coordination to Pd(TFA)2 is shown to be incomplete in AcOH-d4 and toluene-d8, resulting in PdII/DMSO adducts with < 2:1 DMSO:PdII stoichiometry. Collectively, these results provide useful insights into the coordination properties of DMSO to PdII under catalytically relevant conditions. PMID:23092381

  4. Voluntary reduction of trans-fatty acids in Latin America and the Caribbean: current situation.

    PubMed

    Monge-Rojas, Rafael; Colón-Ramos, Uriyoán; Jacoby, Enrique; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2011-02-01

    As part of the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization Trans-Fat-Free Americas initiative, 12 representatives from food industries in Latin America and the Caribbean signed a declaration stating their intention to voluntarily eliminate industrially produced trans-fatty acids (TFA) from the Americas. A year later, in order to document the extent of the voluntary reduction, each declarant was asked to describe all reformulations and reductions in the TFA content of their products. After up to six requests for data, only three declarants provided such information in detail, and three others offered an overall summary of their reformulations. Additionally, three declarants reported the barriers that limit this process: availability of oil substitutes, cost, and consumers' sensory acceptance. The content of TFA and saturated fat in the food supply in the Americas should be regulated and strictly monitored in order to adequately evaluate a reduction of TFA in the region. PMID:21437370

  5. Analysis of potential combustion source impacts on acid deposition using an independently derived inventory. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    This project had three major objectives. The first objective was to develop a fossil fuel combustion source inventory (NO/sub x/, SO/sub x/, and hydrocarbon emissions) that would be relatively easy to use and update for analyzing the impact of combustion emissions on acid deposition in the eastern United States. The second objective of the project was to use the inventory data as a basis for selection of a number of areas that, by virtue of their importance in the acid rain issue, could be further studied to assess the impact of local and intraregional combustion sources. The third objective was to conduct an analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in the areas under study, along with pertinent physical characteristics, meteorological conditions, and emission patterns of these areas, to investigate probable relationships between local and intraregional combustion sources and the deposition of acidic material. The combustion source emissions inventory has been developed for the eastern United States. It characterizes all important area sources and point sources on a county-by-county basis. Its design provides flexibility and simplicity and makes it uniquely useful in overall analysis of emission patterns in the eastern United States. Three regions with basically different emission patterns have been identified and characterized. The statistical analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in conjunction with emission patterns, wind direction, and topography has produced consistent results for each study area and has demonstrated that the wet deposition in each area reflects the characteristics of the localized area around the monitoring sites (typically 50 to 150 miles). 8 references, 28 figures, 39 tables.

  6. Development of a gas phase source for perfluoroalkyl acids to examine atmospheric sampling methods.

    PubMed

    MacInnis, John J; VandenBoer, Trevor C; Young, Cora J

    2016-06-21

    An inability to produce environmentally relevant gaseous mixing ratios of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), ubiquitous global contaminants, limits the analytical reliability of atmospheric chemists to make accurate gas and particulate measurements that are demonstrably free of interferences due to sampling artefacts. A gas phase source for PFAAs based on the acid displacement mechanism using perfluoropropionate (PFPrA), perfluorobutanoate (PFBA), perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA), and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) has been constructed. The displacement efficiency of gas phase perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) is inversely related to chain length. Decreasing displacement efficiencies for PFPrA, PFBA, PFHxA, and PFOA were 90% ± 20%, 40% ± 10%, 40% ± 10%, 9% ± 4%, respectively. Generating detectable amounts of gas phase perfluorosulfonic acids (PFSAs) was not possible. It is likely that lower vapour pressure and much higher acidity play a role in this lack of emission. PFCA emission rates were not elevated by increasing relative humidity (25%-75%), nor flow rate of carrier gas from 33-111 sccm. Overall, reproducible gaseous production of PFCAs was within the error of the production of hydrochloric acid (HCl) as a displacing acid (±20%) and was accomplished using a dry nitrogen flow of 33 ± 2 sccm. A reproducible mass emission rate of 0.97 ± 0.10 ng min(-1) (n = 8) was observed for PFBA. This is equivalent to an atmospheric mixing ratio of 12 ppmv, which is easily diluted to environmentally relevant mixing ratios of PFBA. Conversely, generating gas phase perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) by sublimating the solid acid under the same conditions produced a mass emission rate of 2800 ng min(-1), which is equivalent to a mixing ratio of 18 ppthv and over a million times higher than suspected atmospheric levels. Thus, for analytical certification of atmospheric sampling methods, generating gas phase standards for PFCAs is best accomplished using acid displacement under dry conditions

  7. Chemical transformations of methane in trifluoroacetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnetskaya, M. V.; Svichkarev, O. M.; Budynina, E. M.; Mel'nikov, M. Ya.

    2013-12-01

    The reaction of methane conversion in anhydrous trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) is shown to take place at room temperature and atmospheric pressure and to result in the formation of a resinous product. Signals of ions with molecular weights of 684 and 700 are observed in MALDI-TOF spectra of the dry residue of methane conversion products.

  8. Understanding Potential Exposure Sources of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids in the Workplace

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Mary A.; Dawson, Barbara J.; Barton, Catherine A.; Botelho, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper integrates perspectives from analytical chemistry, environmental engineering, and industrial hygiene to better understand how workers may be exposed to perfluorinated carboxylic acids when handling them in the workplace in order to identify appropriate exposure controls. Due to the dramatic difference in physical properties of the protonated acid form and the anionic form, this family of chemicals provides unique industrial hygiene challenges. Workplace monitoring, experimental data, and modeling results were used to ascertain the most probable workplace exposure sources and transport mechanisms for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and its ammonium salt (APFO). PFOA is biopersistent and its measurement in the blood has been used to assess human exposure since it integrates exposure from all routes of entry. Monitoring suggests that inhalation of airborne material may be an important exposure route. Transport studies indicated that, under low pH conditions, PFOA, the undissociated (acid) species, actively partitions from water into air. In addition, solid-phase PFOA and APFO may also sublime into the air. Modeling studies determined that contributions from surface sublimation and loss from low pH aqueous solutions can be significant potential sources of workplace exposure. These findings suggest that keeping surfaces clean, preventing accumulation of material in unventilated areas, removing solids from waste trenches and sumps, and maintaining neutral pH in sumps can lower workplace exposures. PMID:20974675

  9. Determination of primary and secondary sources of organic acids and carbonaceous aerosols using stable carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisseha, Rebeka; Saurer, Matthias; Jäggi, Maya; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Dommen, Josef; Szidat, Sönke; Samburova, Vera; Baltensperger, Urs

    Stable carbon isotope ratio ( δ13C) data can provide important information regarding the sources and the processing of atmospheric organic carbon species. Formic, acetic and oxalic acid were collected from Zurich city in August-September 2002 and March 2003 in the gas and aerosol phase, and the corresponding δ13C analysis was performed using a wet oxidation method followed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. In August, the δ13C values of gas phase formic acid showed a significant correlation with ozone (coefficient of determination ( r2) = 0.63) due to the kinetic isotope effect (KIE). This indicates the presence of secondary sources (i.e. production of organic acids in the atmosphere) in addition to direct emission. In March, both gaseous formic and acetic acid exhibited similar δ13C values and did not show any correlation with ozone, indicating a predominantly primary origin. Even though oxalic acid is mainly produced by secondary processes, the δ13C value of particulate oxalic acid was not depleted and did not show any correlation with ozone, which may be due to the enrichment of 13C during the gas - aerosol partitioning. The concentrations and δ13C values of the different aerosol fractions (water soluble organic carbon, water insoluble organic carbon, carbonate and black carbon) collected during the same period were also determined. Water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) contributed about 60% to the total carbon and was enriched in 13C compared to other fractions indicating a possible effect of gas - aerosol partitioning on δ13C of carbonaceous aerosols. The carbonate fraction in general was very low (3% of the total carbon).

  10. Alternative Sources of n-3 Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Marine Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Dulce Alves; Custódio, Luísa; Barreira, Luísa; Pereira, Hugo; Ben-Hamadou, Radhouan; Varela, João; Abu-Salah, Khalid M.

    2013-01-01

    The main source of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) in human nutrition is currently seafood, especially oily fish. Nonetheless, due to cultural or individual preferences, convenience, geographic location, or awareness of risks associated to fatty fish consumption, the intake of fatty fish is far from supplying the recommended dietary levels. The end result observed in most western countries is not only a low supply of n-3 LC-PUFA, but also an unbalance towards the intake of n-6 fatty acids, resulting mostly from the consumption of vegetable oils. Awareness of the benefits of LC-PUFA in human health has led to the use of fish oils as food supplements. However, there is a need to explore alternatives sources of LC-PUFA, especially those of microbial origin. Microalgae species with potential to accumulate lipids in high amounts and to present elevated levels of n-3 LC-PUFA are known in marine phytoplankton. This review focuses on sources of n-3 LC-PUFA, namely eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, in marine microalgae, as alternatives to fish oils. Based on current literature, examples of marketed products and potentially new species for commercial exploitation are presented. PMID:23807546

  11. Carboxylic Acid Photochemistry is a Marine Source of Glyoxal and Other Aldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, R.; Gonzalez, L.; Tinel, L.; George, C.; Volkamer, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Glyoxal is a highly water-soluble precursor in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Over land, glyoxal is known to be produced by the oxidation of volatile organic carbon (VOC) from both anthropogenic and natural sources. However, marine sources are still not well understood. Previous studies above the remote Pacific Ocean have detected typical glyoxal mixing ratios of 30-40 pptv, concentrations too high to be explained with current chemical understanding or atmospheric models. Because the lifetime of glyoxal is very short, the glyoxal found must have originated from, rather than been transported to, the open ocean. Furthermore, eddy covariance measurements indicate that an organic surface microlayer may be producing the glyoxal by as yet unknown processes. Here we present laboratory studies of the formation of glyoxal from carboxylic acids. Nonanoic, octanoic, and heptanoic acids floated on water and subjected to ultraviolet light are converted into their equivalent alkenals. Subsequent ozonolysis of the alkenals leads to the formation of glyoxal. We employ a PTR-MS to detect the alkenals, and a cavity-enhanced DOAS to detect the glyoxal. Considering the ubiquitous occurrence of carboxylic acids and their derivatives in the environment, this mechanism has the potential to be a significant source of glyoxal in the atmosphere.

  12. Amino Acids as a Source of Organic Nitrogen in Antarctic Endolithic Microbial Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, G. D.; Sun, H. J.

    2002-12-01

    In the Antarctic Dry Valleys, cryptoendolithic microbial communities occur within porous sandstone rocks. Current understanding of the mechanisms of physiological adaptation of these communities to the harsh Antarctic environment is limited, because traditional methods of studying microbial physiology are very difficult to apply to organisms with extremely low levels of metabolic activity. In order to fully understand carbon and nitrogen cycling and nutrient uptake in cryptoendolithic communities, and the metabolic costs that the organisms incur in order to survive, it is necessary to employ molecular geochemical techniques such as amino acid analysis in addition to physiological methods. Low-molecular-weight biomolecules such as amino acids can be used as tracers of carbon and nitrogen uptake and loss by microbial communities living in solid-state matrices such as rock or sediment. We have measured the concentrations and D/L ratios for several amino acids as a function of depth in a large sandstone boulder. Concentrations of both free and bound amino acids decrease by more than two orders of magnitude from the surface to the visible base of the community (approximately 1.2 cm depth), while the D/L ratios of the amino acids increase from near zero to 0.2 or greater over the same depth interval. We interpret these data as an indication that one or more community members are selectively scavenging L-amino acids as the amino acids are transported through the rock by intermittently percolating meltwater. This is consistent with the known preference of lichens for amino acids as nitrogen sources rather than inorganic nitrogen under conditions of nutrient limitation. It is not yet clear whether there is also a contribution to amino acid uptake from heterotropic bacteria associated with the cryptoendolithic community. The increase in D/L ratios with depth observed in the rock is too great to be attributable solely to the natural occurrence of D-amino acids in bacteria

  13. Source Tracking and Succession of Kimchi Lactic Acid Bacteria during Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Se Hee; Jung, Ji Young; Jeon, Che Ok

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed at evaluating raw materials as potential lactic acid bacteria (LAB) sources for kimchi fermentation and investigating LAB successions during fermentation. The bacterial abundances and communities of five different sets of raw materials were investigated using plate-counting and pyrosequencing. LAB were found to be highly abundant in all garlic samples, suggesting that garlic may be a major LAB source for kimchi fermentation. LAB were observed in three and two out of five ginger and leek samples, respectively, indicating that they can also be potential important LAB sources. LAB were identified in only one cabbage sample with low abundance, suggesting that cabbage may not be an important LAB source. Bacterial successions during fermentation in the five kimchi samples were investigated by community analysis using pyrosequencing. LAB communities in initial kimchi were similar to the combined LAB communities of individual raw materials, suggesting that kimchi LAB were derived from their raw materials. LAB community analyses showed that species in the genera Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, and Weissella were key players in kimchi fermentation, but their successions during fermentation varied with the species, indicating that members of the key genera may have different acid tolerance or growth competitiveness depending on their respective species. PMID:26133985

  14. Plant and Soil Emissions of Amines and Amino Acids: A Source of Secondary Aerosol Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. L.; Doskey, P. V.; Pypker, T. G.

    2011-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is the most abundant alkaline gas in the atmosphere and forms secondary aerosol by neutralizing sulfuric and nitric acids that are released during combustion of fossil fuels. Ammonia is primarily emitted by cropping and livestock operations. However, C2 and C3 amines (pKb 3.3-3.4), which are stronger bases than NH3 (pKb 4.7) have been observed in nuclei mode aerosol that is the precursor to secondary aerosol. Mixtures of amines and amino acids have been identified in diverse environments in aerosol, fog water, cloud water, the soluble fraction of precipitation, and in dew. Glycine (pKb 4.2), serine (pKb 4.8) and alanine (pKb 3.7 and 4.1 for the D and L forms, respectively) are typically the most abundant species. The only reported values of gas-phase glycine, serine and alanine were in marine air and ranged from 6-14 pptv. The origin of atmospheric amines and amino acids has not been fully identified, although sources are likely similar to NH3. Nitrate assimilation in plants forms glycine, serine, and L-alanine, while D-alanine is present in bacterial cell walls. Glycine is converted to serine during C3 plant photorespiration, producing CO2 and NH3. Bacteria metabolize glycine and alanine to methylamine and ethylamine via decarboxylation. Likely sources of amino acids are plants and bacteria, thus concentrations near continental sources are likely greater than those measured in marine air. The overall goal of the research is to examine seasonal variations and relationships between the exchange of CO2, NH3, amines, and amino acids with a corn/soybean rotation in the Midwest Corn Belt. The study presents gaseous profiles of organic amine compounds from various species of vegetation using a mist chamber trapping technique and analysis of the derivatized species by high pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Amino acid and amine profiles were obtained for red oak (Quercus rubra), sugar maple (Acer saccharinum), white pine (Pinus

  15. Biotechnological Production of Docosahexaenoic Acid Using Aurantiochytrium limacinum: Carbon Sources Comparison And Growth Characterization.

    PubMed

    Abad, Sergi; Turon, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Aurantiochytrium limacinum, a marine heterotrophic protist/microalga has shown interesting yields of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) when cultured with different carbon sources: glucose, pure and crude glycerol. A complete study in a lab-scale fermenter allowed for the characterization and comparison of the growth kinetic parameters corresponding to each carbon source. Artificial Marine Medium (AMM) with glucose, pure and crude glycerol offered similar biomass yields. The net growth rates (0.10-0.12 h(-1)), biomass (0.7-0.8 g cells/g Substrate) and product (0.14-0.15 g DHA/g cells) yields, as well as DHA productivity were similar using the three carbon sources. Viable potential applications to valorize crude glycerol are envisioned to avoid an environmental problem due to the excess of byproduct. PMID:26690180

  16. Biotechnological Production of Docosahexaenoic Acid Using Aurantiochytrium limacinum: Carbon Sources Comparison And Growth Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Sergi; Turon, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Aurantiochytrium limacinum, a marine heterotrophic protist/microalga has shown interesting yields of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) when cultured with different carbon sources: glucose, pure and crude glycerol. A complete study in a lab-scale fermenter allowed for the characterization and comparison of the growth kinetic parameters corresponding to each carbon source. Artificial Marine Medium (AMM) with glucose, pure and crude glycerol offered similar biomass yields. The net growth rates (0.10–0.12 h−1), biomass (0.7–0.8 g cells/g Substrate) and product (0.14–0.15 g DHA/g cells) yields, as well as DHA productivity were similar using the three carbon sources. Viable potential applications to valorize crude glycerol are envisioned to avoid an environmental problem due to the excess of byproduct. PMID:26690180

  17. Photochemical processing of diesel fuel emissions as a large secondary source of isocyanic acid (HNCO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, M. F.; Friedman, B.; Fulgham, R.; Brophy, P.; Galang, A.; Jathar, S. H.; Veres, P.; Roberts, J. M.; Farmer, D. K.

    2016-04-01

    Isocyanic acid (HNCO) is a well-known air pollutant that affects human health. Biomass burning, smoking, and combustion engines are known HNCO sources, but recent studies suggest that secondary production in the atmosphere may also occur. We directly observed photochemical production of HNCO from the oxidative aging of diesel exhaust during the Diesel Exhaust Fuel and Control experiments at Colorado State University using acetate ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Emission ratios of HNCO were enhanced, after 1.5 days of simulated atmospheric aging, from 50 to 230 mg HNCO/kg fuel at idle engine operating conditions. Engines operated at higher loads resulted in less primary and secondary HNCO formation, with emission ratios increasing from 20 to 40 mg HNCO/kg fuel under 50% load engine operating conditions. These results suggest that photochemical sources of HNCO could be more significant than primary sources in urban areas.

  18. Characterization of the fatty acid composition of lamb commercially available in northern Spain: Emphasis on the trans-18:1 and CLA content and profile.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Lamas, Leire; Barron, Luis J R; Kramer, John K G; Etaio, Iñaki; Aldai, Noelia

    2016-07-01

    A survey of commercially available lamb meat was performed in northern Spain in order to evaluate their fatty acid (FA) composition with emphasis on trans fatty acid (TFA) and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers. Samples were collected in spring (n=24) and winter (n=24) of 2013, and were obtained in about equal numbers from grocery stores and butcher-shops. Subcutaneous fat, known to be a sensitive indicator of TFA content in ruminants, was analyzed by GC-FID. In general, very few differences were observed between collection periods and type of stores because of the high variability within the groups that was believed to be associated with differences in genetics and feeding strategies. However, the 10t/11t ratio of all samples showed two clearly identifiable groups irrespective of the source: 1) when 10t/11t was >1, 10t-shifted samples; 2) when 10t/11t was ≤1, non-shifted samples where 11t-18:1 was the predominant isomer. These two groups were clearly identified and associated with distinct FAs using principal component analysis. PMID:26970291

  19. Sulphation by cultured cells. Cysteine, cysteinesulphinic acid and sulphite as sources for proteoglycan sulphate.

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, D E; Silbert, C K; Silbert, J E

    1988-01-01

    Bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, bovine aortic endothelial cells, and IMR-90 human embryonic lung fibroblasts were tested to determine their ability to use cysteine or cysteine metabolites as a source of sulphate (SO4). Cells were incubated in SO4-depleted medium containing [3H]glucosamine plus 0.2 mM-cystine, 0.3 mM-cysteinesulphinic acid or 0.3 mM-sulphite (SO3). The [3H]chondroitin sulphate produced by the different cells was found to vary considerably in degree of sulphation under these conditions. One line of smooth-muscle cells utilized cysteine effectively as a SO4 source and thus produced chondroitin sulphate which was highly sulphated. IMR-90 fibroblasts produced partly sulphated chondroitin sulphate under these conditions, while another smooth-muscle cell line could not utilize cysteine, but could utilize cysteinesulphinic acid as a partial SO4 source. In contrast with the above cells, endothelial cells could not use cysteine or cysteinesulphinic acid as a source of SO4 and produced chondroitin with almost no SO4. All of the cells were able to utilize SO3. Incubation of the cells in the SO4-depleted medium containing [35S]cysteine confirmed that only the first line of smooth-muscle cells could convert significant amounts of [35S]cysteine to 35SO4. Furthermore, the addition of 0.4 mM inorganic SO4 did not inhibit the production of SO4 from cysteine by these cells. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3138971

  20. Sulphation by cultured cells. Cysteine, cysteinesulphinic acid and sulphite as sources for proteoglycan sulphate.

    PubMed

    Humphries, D E; Silbert, C K; Silbert, J E

    1988-05-15

    Bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, bovine aortic endothelial cells, and IMR-90 human embryonic lung fibroblasts were tested to determine their ability to use cysteine or cysteine metabolites as a source of sulphate (SO4). Cells were incubated in SO4-depleted medium containing [3H]glucosamine plus 0.2 mM-cystine, 0.3 mM-cysteinesulphinic acid or 0.3 mM-sulphite (SO3). The [3H]chondroitin sulphate produced by the different cells was found to vary considerably in degree of sulphation under these conditions. One line of smooth-muscle cells utilized cysteine effectively as a SO4 source and thus produced chondroitin sulphate which was highly sulphated. IMR-90 fibroblasts produced partly sulphated chondroitin sulphate under these conditions, while another smooth-muscle cell line could not utilize cysteine, but could utilize cysteinesulphinic acid as a partial SO4 source. In contrast with the above cells, endothelial cells could not use cysteine or cysteinesulphinic acid as a source of SO4 and produced chondroitin with almost no SO4. All of the cells were able to utilize SO3. Incubation of the cells in the SO4-depleted medium containing [35S]cysteine confirmed that only the first line of smooth-muscle cells could convert significant amounts of [35S]cysteine to 35SO4. Furthermore, the addition of 0.4 mM inorganic SO4 did not inhibit the production of SO4 from cysteine by these cells. PMID:3138971

  1. Plasma concentrations of trans fatty acids in persons with Type 2 diabetes between September 2002 and April 2004

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    TransFatty acids (TFAs) increase cardiovascular disease risk. TFAs and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in the food supply may be declining, with reciprocal increases in cis-monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and saturated fatty acids (SFAs). We sought to determine whether plasma 18-carbon TFA a...

  2. A review of sources, multimedia distribution and health risks of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tieyu; Wang, Pei; Meng, Jing; Liu, Shijie; Lu, Yonglong; Khim, Jong Seong; Giesy, John P

    2015-06-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) have been recognized as emerging pollutants because of their ubiquitous occurrence in the environment, biota and humans. In order to investigate their sources, fate and environmental effects, a great number of surveys have been carried out over the past several years. In the present review, we summarized the status of sources and emission, concentration, distribution and risks of PFAAs in China. Concentrations of PFAAs, especially perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in various environmental media including water, sediment, soil, rain, snow and organisms, as well as human tissues are summarized based on the available data. Concentrations of PFAAs in aquatic systems are higher in relatively more industrialized and urbanized areas than those from the less populated and remote regions in China, indicating that their emission and distribution are closely related to regional urbanization and industrialization. PFAAs and related products have been widely used over the past several decades, which have brought about high concentrations detected in environmental matrixes, biota and even local residents. Ecological risk assessment of PFAAs is still less developed in China. Most existing studies compared concentrations of PFAAs to guideline values derived for single species to evaluate the risk. In order to reveal the transport, partitioning and degradation of PFAAs in the environment, further studies on their behavior, fate, bioaccumulation and adverse effects in different trophic levels should be conducted. PMID:25262946

  3. Measurements of gas phase acids in diesel exhaust: a relevant source of HNCO?

    PubMed

    Wentzell, Jeremy J B; Liggio, John; Li, Shao-Meng; Vlasenko, A; Staebler, Ralf; Lu, Gang; Poitras, Marie-Josée; Chan, Tak; Brook, Jeffrey R

    2013-07-16

    Gas-phase acids in light duty diesel (LDD) vehicle exhaust were measured using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS). Fuel based emission factors (EF) and NOx ratios for these species were determined under differing steady state engine operating conditions. The derived HONO and HNO3 EFs agree well with literature values, with HONO being the single most important acidic emission. Of particular importance is the quantification of the EF for the toxic species, isocyanic acid (HNCO). The emission factors for HNCO ranged from 0.69 to 3.96 mg kgfuel(-1), and were significantly higher than previous biomass burning emission estimates. Further ambient urban measurements of HNCO demonstrated a clear relationship with the known traffic markers of benzene and toluene, demonstrating for the first time that urban commuter traffic is a source of HNCO. Estimates based upon the HNCO-benzene relationship indicate that upward of 23 tonnes of HNCO are released annually from commuter traffic in the Greater Toronto Area, far exceeding the amount possible from LDD alone. Nationally, 250 to 770 tonnes of HNCO may be emitted annually from on-road vehicles, likely representing the dominant source of exposure in urban areas, and with emissions comparable to that of biomass burning. PMID:23781923

  4. Omega-3 enriched egg production: the effect of α -linolenic ω -3 fatty acid sources on laying hen performance and yolk lipid content and fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Antruejo, A; Azcona, J O; Garcia, P T; Gallinger, C; Rosmini, M; Ayerza, R; Coates, W; Perez, C D

    2011-12-01

    1. Diets high in total lipids, saturated fatty acids, trans fatty acids, and having high ω-6:ω-3 fatty acid ratios, have been shown to be related to increased instances of coronary heart disease, while diets high in ω-3 fatty acids have been shown to decrease the risk. 2. Feeding ω-3 fatty acid diets to laying hens has been shown to improve the quality of eggs produced in terms of saturation and ω-3 content. 3. A study was undertaken to determine if the ω-3 fatty acid source, when fed to hens, influences the amount transferred to eggs. 4. Flaxseed and flaxseed oil, along with chia seed and chia seed oil, were the two main sources of ω-3 fatty acid examined during the 84 d trial. 5. All α-linolenic enriched treatments yielded significantly higher ω-3 fatty acid contents per g of yolk and per yolk, than the non-α-linolenic enriched diets. Chia oil and chia seed yielded 54·5 and 63·5% more mg of ω-3 fatty acid per g of yolk for the 56 d test period, and 13·4 and 66·2% more for the 84 d test period, than flaxseed oil and flaxseed, respectively. 6. The differences in omega-3 content were significant, except for the chia oil compared with the flax oil, at the end of the trial. 7. This trial has shown that differences in conversion exist among ω-3 fatty acid sources, at least when fed to hens, and indicates that chia may hold a significant potential as a source of ω-3 fatty acid for enriching foods, thereby making these foods a healthier choice for consumers. PMID:22221241

  5. Novel heterometal-organic complexes as first single source precursors for up-converting NaY(Ln)F4 (Ln = Yb, Er, Tm) nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shashank; Ledoux, Gilles; Jeanneau, Erwann; Daniele, Stéphane; Joubert, Marie-France

    2012-02-01

    First heterometal-organic single source precursors for NaYF(4) nanomaterials as a host matrix for up-conversion emission are reported. These novel heterobimetallic derivatives NaY(TFA)(4)(diglyme) (1), [Na(triglyme)(2)][Y(2)(TFA)(7)(THF)(2)] (2) and Na(2)Y(TFA)(5)(tetraglyme) (3) (TFA = trifluoroacetate), which were fully characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, TG-DTA data as well as single crystal X-ray structures, are advantageous in terms of being anhydrous and having lower decomposition temperatures in comparison to the homometallic precursor Y(TFA)(3)(H(2)O)(3). In addition, they also contain chelating glyme ligands, which act as capping reagents during decomposition to control the NaYF(4) particle size and render them monodisperse in organic solvents. On decomposition in 1-octadecene, the molecular derivatives 1 and 3 are converted, in the absence of any surfactant or capping reagent, to cubic NaYF(4) nanocrystals at significantly lower temperatures (below 250 °C). At higher temperature, a mixture of the cubic and hexagonal phases was obtained, the relative ratio of the two phases depending on the reaction temperature. A pure hexagonal phase, which is many folds more efficient for UC emission than the cubic phase, was obtained by calcining nanocrystals of mixed phase at 400 °C. In order to co-dope this host matrix with up-converting lanthanide cations, analogous complexes NaLn(TFA)(4)(diglyme) [Ln = Er (4), Tm (5), Yb (6)] and Na(2)Ln(TFA)(5)(tetraglyme) [Ln = Er (7), Yb (8)] were also prepared and characterized. The decomposition in 1-octadecene of suitable combinations and appropriate molar ratios of these yttrium, ytterbium and erbium/thulium derivatives gave cubic and/or hexagonal NaYF(4): Yb(3+), Er(3+)/Tm(3+) nanocrystals (NCs) capped by diglyme or tetraglyme ligands, which were characterized by IR, TG-DTA data, EDX analysis and TEM studies. Surface modification of these NCs by ligand exchange reactions with poly acrylic

  6. An isotopic analysis of ionising radiation as a source of sulphuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghoff, M. B.; Bork, N.; Hattori, S.; Meusinger, C.; Nakagawa, M.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Danielache, S.; Ueno, Y.; Johnson, M. S.; Yoshida, N.; Svensmark, H.

    2012-06-01

    Sulphuric acid is an important factor in aerosol nucleation and growth. It has been shown that ions enhance the formation of sulphuric acid aerosols, but the exact mechanism has remained undetermined. Furthermore some studies have found a deficiency in the sulphuric acid budget, suggesting a missing source. In this study the production of sulphuric acid from SO2 through a number of different pathways is investigated. The production methods are standard gas phase oxidation by OH radicals produced by ozone photolysis with UV light, liquid phase oxidation by ozone, and gas phase oxidation initiated by gamma rays. The distributions of stable sulphur isotopes in the products and substrate were measured using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All methods produced sulphate enriched in 34S and we find an enrichment factor (δ34S) of 8.7 ± 0.4‰ (1 standard deviation) for the UV-initiated OH reaction. Only UV light (Hg emission at 253.65 nm) produced a clear non-mass-dependent excess of 33S. The pattern of isotopic enrichment produced by gamma rays is similar, but not equal, to that produced by aqueous oxidation of SO2 by ozone. This, combined with the relative yields of the experiments, suggests a mechanism in which ionising radiation may lead to hydrated ion clusters that serve as nanoreactors for S(IV) to S(VI) conversion.

  7. An isotope view on ionising radiation as a source of sulphuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghoff, M. B.; Bork, N.; Hattori, S.; Meusinger, C.; Nakagawa, M.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Danielache, S.; Ueno, Y.; Johnson, M. S.; Yoshida, N.; Svensmark, H.

    2012-02-01

    Sulphuric acid is an important factor in aerosol nucleation and growth. It has been shown that ions enhance the formation of sulphuric acid aerosols, but the exact mechanism has remained undetermined. Furthermore some studies have found a deficiency in the sulphuric acid budget, suggesting a missing source. In this study the production of sulphuric acid from SO2 through a number of different pathways is investigated. The production methods are standard gas phase oxidation by OH radicals produced by ozone photolysis with UV light, liquid phase oxidation by ozone, and gas phase oxidation initiated by gamma rays. The distributions of stable sulphur isotopes in the products and substrate were measured using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All methods produced sulphate enriched in 34S and we find a δ34S value of 8.7 ± 0.4‰ (1 standard deviation) for the UV-initiated OH reaction. Only UV light (Hg emission at 253.65 nm) produced a clear non-mass-dependent excess of 33S. The pattern of isotopic enrichment produced by gamma rays is similar, but not equal, to that produced by aqueous oxidation of SO2 by ozone. This, combined with the relative yields of the experiments, suggests a mechanism in which ionising radiation may lead to hydrated ion clusters that serve as nanoreactors for S(IV) to S(VI) conversion.

  8. An isotopic view of ionising radiation as a source of sulphuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghoff, M. B.; Bork, N.; Hattori, S.; Meusinger, C.; Nakagawa, M.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Danielache, S. O.; Ueno, Y.; Johnson, M. S.; Yoshida, N.; Svensmark, H.

    2012-04-01

    Sulphuric acid is an important factor in aerosol nucleation and growth. It has been shown that ions enhance the formation of sulphuric acid aerosols, but the exact mechanism remains undetermined. Furthermore some studies have found a deficiency in the sulphuric acid budget, suggesting a missing source. In this study the production of sulphuric acid from SO2 through a number of different pathways is investigated. The production methods are standard gas phase oxidation by OH radicals produced by ozone photolysis with UV light, liquid phase oxidation by ozone, and gas phase oxidation initiated by gamma rays. The distributions of stable sulphur isotopes in the products and substrate were measured using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All methods produced sulphate enriched in 34S and we find a d34S value of 8.7 ± 0.4 ‰ (1 standard deviation) for the UV-initiated OH reaction. Only UV light (Hg emission at 253.65 nm) produced a clear non-mass-dependent excess of 33S. The pattern of isotopic enrichment produced by gamma rays is similar, but not equal, to that produced by aqueous oxidation of SO2 by ozone. This, combined with the relative yields of the experiments, suggests a mechanism in which ionising radiation may lead to hydrated ion clusters that serve as nanoreactors for S(IV) to S(VI) conversion.

  9. Acyl-acyl carrier protein as a source of fatty acids for bacterial bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, D.M.; Meighen, E.A.

    1985-09-01

    Pulse-chase experiments with (/sup 3/H)tetradecanoic acid and ATP showed that the bioluminescence-related 32-kDa acyltransferase from Vibrio harveyi can specifically catalyze the deacylation of a /sup 3/H-labeled 18-kDa protein observed in extracts of this bacterium. The 18-kDa protein has been partially purified and its physical and chemical properties strongly indicate that it is fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP). Both this V. harveyi (/sup 3/H)acylprotein and (/sup 3/H)palmitoyl-ACP from Escherichia coli were substrates in vitro for either the V. harveyi 32-kDa acyltransferase or the analogous enzyme (34K) from Photobacterium phosphoreum. TLC analysis indicated that the hexane-soluble product of the reaction is fatty acid. No significant cleavage of either E. coli or V. harveyi tetradecanoyl-ACP was observed in extracts of these bacteria unless the 32-kDa or 34K acyltransferase was present. Since these enzymes are believed to be responsible for the supply of fatty acids for reduction to form the aldehyde substrate of luciferase, the above results suggest that long-chain acyl-ACP is the source of fatty acids for bioluminescence.

  10. γ Actinorhodin a natural and attorney source for synthetic dye to detect acid production of fungi

    PubMed Central

    Manikprabhu, Deene; Lingappa, K.

    2013-01-01

    Colors from natural sources are gaining popularity because synthetic colors are carcinogenic. Natural colors are obtained from plants or microorganisms. Pigments produced by microorganisms have advantages over plant pigments, due to their ease of use and reliability. In the present study, a blue pigment producing actinomycete klmp33 was isolated from the Gulbarga region in India. The isolate was identified based on morphologic, microscopic, and biochemical characterization, and 16S rRNA sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the isolates showed a close relationship with Streptomyces coelicolor. Pigment produced by the isolate was analyzed using UV–visible spectroscopy, thin-layer chromatography, Fourier transform infrared and liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy analysis, and was identified as γ actinorhodin. γ-Actinorhodin is used as a pH indicator which deviates from acid to non-acid. Moreover, it subrogates synthetic dye. PMID:23961232

  11. INTERACTION OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF CHLORINE WITH MALIC ACID, TARTARIC ACID, AND VARIOUS FRUIT JUICES, A SOURCE OF MUTAGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interactions of aqueous solutions of chlorine with some fruit acids (citric acid, DL-malic acid, and L-tartaric acid) at different pH values were studied. iethyl ether extraction followed by GC/MS analysis indicated that a number of mutagens (certain chlorinated propanones an...

  12. The synthesis and accumulation of stearidonic acid in transgenic plants: a novel source of 'heart-healthy' omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-López, Noemí; Haslam, Richard P; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Larson, Tony R; Graham, Ian A; Napier, Johnathan A; Sayanova, Olga

    2009-09-01

    Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have a proven role in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease and precursor disease states such as metabolic syndrome. Although most studies have focussed on the predominant omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oils (eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid), recent evidence suggests similar health benefits from their common precursor, stearidonic acid. Stearidonic acid is a Delta6-unsaturated C18 omega-3 fatty acid present in a few plant species (mainly the Boraginaceae and Primulaceae) reflecting the general absence of Delta6-desaturation from higher plants. Using a Delta6-desaturase from Primula vialii, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis and linseed lines accumulating stearidonic acid in their seed lipids. Significantly, the P. vialiiDelta6-desaturase specifically only utilises alpha-linolenic acid as a substrate, resulting in the accumulation of stearidonic acid but not omega-6 gamma-linolenic acid. Detailed lipid analysis revealed the accumulation of stearidonic acid in neutral lipids such as triacylglycerol but an absence from the acyl-CoA pool. In the case of linseed, the achieved levels of stearidonic acid (13.4% of triacylglycerols) are very similar to those found in the sole natural commercial plant source (Echium spp.) or transgenic soybean oil. However, both those latter oils contain gamma-linolenic acid, which is not normally present in fish oils and considered undesirable for heart-healthy applications. By contrast, the stearidonic acid-enriched linseed oil is essentially devoid of this fatty acid. Moreover, the overall omega-3/omega-6 ratio for this modified linseed oil is also significantly higher. Thus, this nutritionally enhanced linseed oil may have superior health-beneficial properties. PMID:19702757

  13. Direct FTIR analysis of isolated trans fatty acids in edible oils using disposable polyethylene film.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lirong; Zhu, Xufei; Chen, Xiumei; Sun, Daijun; Yu, Xiuzhu

    2015-10-15

    A new transmission-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy method has been developed to determine trans fatty acids (TFA) content in edible oils using disposable polyethylene (PE) film as a spectral acquisition accessory. Calibration standards were devised by gravimetrically adding TFA to TFA-free oil. The response was measured at 990-945 cm(-1) against the baseline. A linear relationship between the areas in the spectral regions 1670-1625 cm(-1) and 990-945 cm(-1) in TFA-free oil samples was established to compensate for interference due to underlying triacylglycerol absorptions in the trans measurement region (990-945 cm(-1)). Subsequently, the area measured at 990-945 cm(-1) was corrected for interference, using the linear equation obtained, to determine TFA content. Results indicated that the PE film-based FTIR method for analyzing TFA content in edible oils was simple and rapid, and could be used effectively as an alternative to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry methods. PMID:25952899

  14. Perfluoroalkylation of Unactivated Alkenes with Acid Anhydrides as the Perfluoroalkyl Source.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Shintaro; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2016-07-18

    An efficient perfluoroalkylation of unactivated alkenes with perfluoro acid anhydrides was developed. Copper salts play a crucial role as a catalyst to achieve allylic perfluoroalkylation with the in situ generated bis(perfluoroacyl) peroxides. Furthermore, carboperfluoroalkylation of alkene bearing an aromatic ring at an appropriate position on the carbon side chain was found to proceed under metal-free conditions to afford carbocycles or heterocycles bearing a perfluoroalkyl group. This method, which makes use of readily available perfluoroalkyl sources, offers a convenient and powerful tool for introducing a perfluoroalkyl group onto an sp(3) carbon to construct synthetically useful skeletons. PMID:27254318

  15. Effect of Interim Annealing on Mechanical Strength of TFA-MOD Derived YBCO Coated Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Y.; Nakaoka, K.; Nakamura, T.; Yoshizumi, M.; Kiss, T.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    TFA-MOD derived YBCO tapes are expected for many applications due to cost-efficiency. In some applications, uniformity and mechanical strength are required for tapes. A 205 m-long YBCO tape was fabricated with high and uniform Ic performance throughout the tape by adopting the interim annealing before the conversion process. The effect of the interim annealing on the crystal growth mechanism of YBCO has been studied focusing on the relationship between the interim annealing conditions and delamination, in this work. Delamination strength was evaluated in the samples prepared with and without interim annealing by the stud pull method. Measurements were carried out on 50 different points for each sample and the results were analyzed statistically. The difference between the two samples was remarkably seen in the delamination strength below 60 MPa. The conventionally annealed sample had more points with low delamination strength below 60 MPa than the interim annealed one. The cross sectional images of both samples observed by SEM showed that there were few pores within the interim annealed superconducting layer, although conventional superconducting layer had many pores. These results suggest that the pores within YBCO layer might be origins to be propagated for delamination at low strength.

  16. Development of BZO Doped YGdBCO High Performance Long CCs Using TFA-MOD Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Yoshizumi, M.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.; Kimura, K.; Hasegawa, T.

    TFA-MOD (Metal Organic Deposition using Trifluoro-acetates) process is of considerable practical concern for future applications since it can fabricate high performance coated conductors (CCs) with low cost. We have previously reported the success in fabricating a short sample of BaZrO3 (BZO) nanoparticles dispersed Y0.77Gd0.23Ba1.5Cu3Oy (YGdBCO) thick films with high Ic values under magnetic field (67.8A/cm-w, @77K, 3T). To make thick CCs for long length, it is important to study the effect of process parameters varying with time. In this study, we investigated the effect of coating solution characteristics such as viscosity etc., which could vary with time due to evaporation of solvent, on the transverse film thickness distribution by using Reel-To-Reel (RTR)-dip coating method. We successfully fabricated BZO doped YGdBCO calcined films with 2.5 μm thickness without crack and delamination over 200 m in length. The precursor films were crystallized by the batch type furnace at SWCC Showa Cable Systems Co., Ltd. resulting in the 124 m long CC with high Ic minimum value of 50 A/cm-w at 77 K and 3 T.

  17. Improvement of magnetic properties for long YGdBCO coated conductors using TFA-MOD process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Kazunari; Hironaga, Ryusuke; Koizumi, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Tatsunori; Nakanishi, Tatsuhisa; Aoki, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Takayo; Takahashi, Yasuo; Yoshizumi, Masateru; Izumi, Teruo; Shiohara, Yuh

    YxGd(1-x)Ba2Cu3Oy(YGdBCO) coated conductors (CCs) containing artificial pinning centers (APCs) were fabricated by the trifluoroacetate-metalorganic deposition (TFA-MOD) method using a batch heat-treatment process, which have been industrially applied to fabricate long superconducting tapes which have high critical current (Ic) have been successfully manufactured. From the viewpoint of applications, the characteristics in magnetic fields become further important and one solution has been showed by Miura et al. [1,2] as introduction of APCs such as BaZrO3 (BZO). We applied their technique to our CCs fabrication process. The heat-treatment conditions, specifically total gas pressure, oxygen concentration and crystallization temperature, were optimized for the batch heat-treatment process. A 40 m-long YGdBCO CC in which APCs are introduced was fabricated, and it has Ic value of 320 A/cm-width (critical current density (Jc) value of 2.2 MA/cm2) in self-field and 20 A/cm-width at 3 T in Liq. N2.

  18. Improvement of Film Thickness Uniformity in TFA-MOD Coated Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, K.; Nakahata, K.; Yoshizumi, M.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    TFA-MOD process is expected to be promising for future applications since it can produce high performance YBCO coated conductors with low cost. The dip-coating is adopted as the coating process because of its simplicity and controllability of the overall film thickness. Dip-coated films have uniform thickness along longitudinal direction, but not necessary in transverse direction. In the case of thicker films, the more cracks form during processing at the thicker region near the edges generate and propagate mainly due to tensile and bending strain. So we have to suppress the thickness distribution in transverse direction for thicker films for high IC values. In this study, we found that the thickness distribution was firstly given by meniscus shape and then the solution flew down till it's dried. The solution in the center region drops more since it is slowly dried compared with the edge region. Then, we developed a drying process, which accelerates the drying by blowing hot gas to prevent the coated solutions from dropping. As a result, the thickness uniformity was improved; the thickness ratio of the thick region (edge) to the flat one (center) was improved from 1.35 to 1.07. Furthermore, we successfully produced ~1.5 μm thick films with high critical current density values (> 2MA/cm2) by the new coating process including the force drying step.

  19. Cloud partitioning of isocyanic acid (HNCO) and evidence of secondary source of HNCO in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Wentzell, J. J. B.; Mcdonald, A. M.; Toom-Sauntry, D.; Leaitch, W. R.; Modini, R. L.; Corrigan, A. L.; Russell, L. M.; Noone, K. J.; Schroder, J. C.; Bertram, A. K.; Hawkins, L. N.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Liggio, J.

    2014-10-01

    Although isocyanic acid (HNCO) may cause a variety of health issues via protein carbamylation and has been proposed as a key compound in smoke-related health issues, our understanding of the atmospheric sources and fate of this toxic compound is currently incomplete. To address these issues, a field study was conducted at Mount Soledad, La Jolla, CA, to investigate partitioning of HNCO to clouds and fogs using an Acetate Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer coupled to a ground-based counterflow virtual impactor. The first field evidence of cloud partitioning of HNCO is presented, demonstrating that HNCO is dissolved in cloudwater more efficiently than expected based on the effective Henry's law solubility. The measurements also indicate evidence for a secondary, photochemical source of HNCO in ambient air at this site.

  20. l-dehydroascorbic acid can substitute l-ascorbic acid as dietary vitamin C source in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Frikke-Schmidt, Henriette; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin C deficiency globally affects several hundred million people and has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality in numerous studies. In this study, bioavailability of the oxidized form of vitamin C (l-dehydroascorbic acid or DHA)—commonly found in vitamin C containing food products prone to oxidation—was studied. Our aim was to compare tissue accumulation of vitamin C in guinea pigs receiving different oral doses of either ascorbate or DHA. In all tissues tested (plasma, liver, spleen, lung, adrenal glands, kidney, muscle, heart, and brain), only sporadic differences in vitamin C accumulation from ascorbate or DHA were observed except for the lowest dose of DHA (0.25 mg/ml in the drinking water), where approximately half of the tissues had slightly yet significantly less vitamin C accumulation than from the ascorbate source. As these results contradicted data from rats, we continued to explore the ability to recycle DHA in blood, liver and intestine in guinea pigs, rats and mice. These investigations revealed that guinea pigs have similar recycling capacity in red blood cells as observed in humans, while rats and mice do not have near the same ability to reduce DHA in erythrocytes. In liver and intestinal homogenates, guinea pigs also showed a significantly higher ability to recycle DHA compared to rats and mice. These data demonstrate that DHA in guinea pigs—as in humans—is almost as effective as ascorbate as vitamin C source when it comes to taking up and storing vitamin C and further suggest that the guinea pig is superior to other rodents in modeling human vitamin C homeostasis. PMID:26609560

  1. L-dehydroascorbic acid can substitute l-ascorbic acid as dietary vitamin C source in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Frikke-Schmidt, Henriette; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Vitamin C deficiency globally affects several hundred million people and has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality in numerous studies. In this study, bioavailability of the oxidized form of vitamin C (l-dehydroascorbic acid or DHA)-commonly found in vitamin C containing food products prone to oxidation-was studied. Our aim was to compare tissue accumulation of vitamin C in guinea pigs receiving different oral doses of either ascorbate or DHA. In all tissues tested (plasma, liver, spleen, lung, adrenal glands, kidney, muscle, heart, and brain), only sporadic differences in vitamin C accumulation from ascorbate or DHA were observed except for the lowest dose of DHA (0.25mg/ml in the drinking water), where approximately half of the tissues had slightly yet significantly less vitamin C accumulation than from the ascorbate source. As these results contradicted data from rats, we continued to explore the ability to recycle DHA in blood, liver and intestine in guinea pigs, rats and mice. These investigations revealed that guinea pigs have similar recycling capacity in red blood cells as observed in humans, while rats and mice do not have near the same ability to reduce DHA in erythrocytes. In liver and intestinal homogenates, guinea pigs also showed a significantly higher ability to recycle DHA compared to rats and mice. These data demonstrate that DHA in guinea pigs-as in humans-is almost as effective as ascorbate as vitamin C source when it comes to taking up and storing vitamin C and further suggest that the guinea pig is superior to other rodents in modeling human vitamin C homeostasis. PMID:26609560

  2. In Vivo Performance of a Novel Fluorinated Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agent for Functional Analysis of Bile Acid Transport

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A novel trifluorinated cholic acid derivative, CA-lys-TFA, was designed and synthesized for use as a tool to measure bile acid transport noninvasively using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the present study, the in vivo performance of CA-lys-TFA for measuring bile acid transport by MRI was investigated in mice. Gallbladder CA-lys-TFA content was quantified using MRI and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Results in wild-type (WT) C57BL/6J mice were compared to those in mice lacking expression of Asbt, the ileal bile acid transporter. 19F signals emanating from the gallbladders of WT mice 7 h after oral gavage with 150 mg/kg CA-lys-TFA were reproducibly detected by MRI. Asbt-deficient mice administered the same dose had undetectable 19F signals by MRI, and gallbladder bile CA-lys-TFA levels were 30-fold lower compared to WT animals. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of in vivo imaging of an orally absorbed drug using 19F MRI. Fluorinated bile acid analogues have potential as tools to measure and detect abnormal bile acid transport by MRI. PMID:24708306

  3. Surface and free tropospheric sources of methanesulfonic acid over the tropical Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuzhong; Wang, Yuhang; Gray, Burton A.; Gu, Dasa; Mauldin, L.; Cantrell, Chris; Bandy, Alan R.

    2014-07-28

    The production of sulfate aerosols through marine sulfur chemistry is critical to the climate system. However, not all sulfur compounds have been studied in detail. One such compound is methanesulfonic acid (MSA). In this study, we use a one-dimensional chemical transport model to analyze observed vertical profiles of gas-phase MSA during the Pacific Atmospheric Sulfur Experiment (PASE). The observed sharp decrease in MSA from the surface to 600m implies a surface source of 4.0×107 molecules/cm2/s. Evidence suggests that this source is photolytically enhanced. We also find that the observed large increase of MSA from the boundary layer into the lower free troposphere (1000-2000m) results mainly from the degassing of MSA from dehydrated aerosols. We estimate a source of 1.2×107 molecules/cm2/s through this pathway. This source of soluble MSA potentially provides an important precursor for new particle formation in the free troposphere over tropics, affecting the climate system through aerosol-cloud interactions.

  4. A medium-chain fatty acid as an alternative energy source in mouse preimplantation development

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Mitsutoshi; Takanashi, Kazumi; Hamatani, Toshio; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Akutsu, Hidenori; Fukunaga, Tomoko; Ogawa, Seiji; Sugawara, Kana; Shinoda, Kosaku; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kuji, Naoaki; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Tomita, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    To further optimize the culturing of preimplantation embryos, we undertook metabolomic analysis of relevant culture media using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS). We detected 28 metabolites: 23 embryo-excreted metabolites including 16 amino acids and 5 media-derived metabolites (e.g., octanoate, a medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA)). Due to the lack of information on MCFAs in mammalian preimplantation development, this study examined octanoate as a potential alternative energy source for preimplantation embryo cultures. No embryos survived in culture media lacking FAs, pyruvate, and glucose, but supplementation of octanoate rescued the embryonic development. Immunoblotting showed significant expression of acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, important enzymes for ß-oxidation of MCFAs, in preimplantation embryo. Furthermore, CE-TOFMS traced [1-13C8] octanoate added to the culture media into intermediate metabolites of the TCA cycle via ß-oxidation in mitochondria. These results are the first demonstration that octanoate could provide an efficient alternative energy source throughout preimplantation development. PMID:23226596

  5. Occurrence and point source characterization of perfluoroalkyl acids in sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Alder, Alfredo C; van der Voet, Juergen

    2015-06-01

    The occurrence and levels of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) emitted from specific pollution sources into the aquatic environment in Switzerland were studied using digested sewage sludges from 45 wastewater treatment plants in catchments containing a wide range of potential industrial emitters. Concentrations of individual PFAAs show a high spatial and temporal variability, which infers different contributions from industrial technologies and activities. Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) was generally the predominant PFAA with concentrations varying between 4 and 2440μgkg(-1) (median 75μgkg(-1)). Elevated emissions were especially observed in catchments capturing discharges from metal plating industries (median 82μgkg(-1)), aqueous firefighting foams (median 215μgkg(-1)) and landfill leachates (median 107μgkg(-1)). Some elevated perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) levels could be attributed to emissions from textile finishing industries with concentrations up to 233μgkg(-1) in sewage sludge. Assuming sorption to sludge for PFOS and PFCAs of 15% and 2%, respectively, concentrations in wastewater effluents up to the low μgL(-1) level were estimated. Even if wastewater may be expected to be diluted between 10 and 100 times by the receiving waters, elevated concentrations may be reached at specific locations. Although sewage sludge is a minor compartment for PFAAs in WWTPs, these investigations are helpful for the identification of hot-spots from industrial emitters as well as to estimate monthly average concentrations in wastewater. PMID:25176581

  6. The effects of trans-fatty acids on TAG regulation in mice depend on dietary unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Saín, Juliana; González, Marcela Aída; Lavandera, Jimena Verónica; Scalerandi, María Victoria; Bernal, Claudio Adrián

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of trans-fatty acids (TFA) on liver and serum TAG regulation in mice fed diets containing different proportions of n-3, n-6 and n-9 unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) from olive (O), maize (C) or rapeseed (R) oils partially substituted or not with TFA (Ot, Ct and Rt, respectively). Male CF1 mice were fed (30 d) one of these diets. The effects of the partial substitution (1 %, w/w) of different UFA with TFA on the activity and expression of hepatic enzymes involved in lipogenesis and fatty acids oxidation were evaluated, as well as their transcription factor expressions. Some of the mechanisms involved in the serum TAG regulation, hepatic VLDL rich in TAG (VLDL-TAG) secretion rate and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity were assessed. In liver, TFA induced an increase in TAG content in the Ot and Rt groups, and this effect was associated with an imbalance between lipogenesis and β-oxidation. In the Ot group, exacerbated lipogenesis may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the liver steatosis induced by TFA, whereas in Rt it has been related to a decreased β-oxidation, compared with their respective controls. The enhanced hepatic VLDL-TAG secretion in the Ot and Rt groups was compensated with a differential removal of TAG by LPL enzyme in extrahepatic tissues, leading to unchanged serum TAG levels. In brief, the effects of low levels of TFA on liver and serum TAG regulation in mice depend on the dietary proportions of n-3, n-6 and n-9 UFA. PMID:27464460

  7. Presence and sources of anthropogenic perfluoroalkyl acids in high-consumption tap-water based beverages.

    PubMed

    Eschauzier, Christian; Hoppe, Maria; Schlummer, Martin; de Voogt, Pim

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the presence and sources of perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs) in tap water and corresponding tap-water based beverages such as coffee and cola collected in the city of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Exposure pathways studies have shown that low concentrations of PFAA in tap water already may pose a high contribution to daily human exposure. Tap water samples (n=4) had higher concentrations of PFAAs than the corresponding post-mixed cola (n=4). The lower PFAA levels in the cola were attributed to the pre-treatment of tap water in the mixing machines and dilution with cola syrup. In coffee samples from a coffee machine perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) at 4 ng L(-1) was the dominating analyte (n=12). The concentrations of PFHpA, PFOA and non branched PFOS were found to be significantly higher in manually (self) brewed coffee than in the corresponding tap water (n=4). The contribution from short-chain PFAA analogs could not be quantified due to low recoveries. Leaching experiments at different temperatures were performed with fluoropolymers-containing tubes to investigate the potential of leaching from tubes used in beverage preparation (n=16). Fluoropolymer tubes showed leaching of PFAAs at high (80°C) temperature but its relevance for contamination of beverages in practice is small. The specific contribution from perfluoropolymer tubing inside the beverage preparation machines could not be assessed since no information was available from the manufacturers. The present study shows that although different beverage preparation processes possibly affect the concentrations of PFAAs encountered in the final consumed product, the water used for preparation remains the most important source of PFAAs. This in turn has implications for areas where drinking water is contaminated. Tap-water based beverages will possibly be an additional source of human exposure to PFAAs and need to be considered in exposure modeling. PMID:22939265

  8. Nitrous acid (HONO) during polar spring in Barrow, Alaska: A net source of OH radicals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villena, G.; Wiesen, P.; Cantrell, C. A.; Flocke, F.; Fried, A.; Hall, S. R.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Knapp, D.; Kosciuch, E.; Mauldin, R. L., III; McGrath, J. A.; Montzka, D.; Richter, D.; Ullmann, K.; Walega, J.; Weibring, P.; Weinheimer, A.; Staebler, R. M.; Liao, J.; Huey, L. G.; Kleffmann, J.

    2011-07-01

    HONO was measured by a LOPAP instrument (LOng Path Absorption Photometer) for one month during the OASIS spring 2009 campaign in Barrow, Alaska. HONO concentrations between ≤ 0.4 pptv (DL) and ˜500 pptv were measured. The very high concentrations observed on several days were caused by local direct emissions and were highly correlated with the NOx and CO data. When only "clean days" were considered, average HONO concentrations varied between ≤ 0.4 - 10 pptv. Average HONO/NOx and HONO/NOy ratios of ˜6% and ˜1% were observed, respectively, in good agreement with other remote LOPAP measurement data, but lower than measured in most other polar regions by other methods. The strong correlation between sharp peaks of OH and HONO during daytime, which was not observed for any other measured radical precursor, suggested that HONO photolysis was a major source of OH radicals in Barrow. This was supported by calculated net OH radical production by HONO and O3 photolysis for which the contribution of O3 (2%) could be neglected compared to that of HONO (98%). A net extra HONO/OH source necessary to explain elevated HONO levels during daytime of up to 90 pptv/h was determined, which was highly correlated with the actinic flux. Accordingly, a photochemical HONO source is proposed here, in good agreement with recent studies. From the higher correlation of the net HONO source with ? and [NO2] compared to ? and [NO3-], photosensitized conversion of NO2 on humic acid containing snow surfaces may be a more likely source of HONO in the polar atmosphere of Barrow than nitrate photolysis.

  9. Patterns of organic acids exuded by pioneering fungi from a glacier forefield are affected by carbohydrate sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Ivano; Goren, Asena; Schlumpf, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Bare soils in the area of retreating glaciers are ideal environments to study the role of microorganisms in the early soil formation and in processes of mineral weathering. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the source of carbohydrate would influence the patterns of organic acids exuded by fungal species. Three pioneering fungus species, isolated from fine granitic sediments in front of the Damma glacier from the central Swiss Alps, have previously been found to have the capability to exude organic acids and dissolve granite powder. In batch experiments, various carbohydrates, including glucose, cellulose, pectin, pollen, and cell remnants of cyanobacteria, fungi, and algae, were applied as carbohydrate sources and the patterns of exuded organic acids recorded. The results showed that two fungi, the zygomycete fungus Mucor hiemalis and the ascomycete fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, released a significantly higher amount of organic acids in dependence on specific carbohydrate sources. Pollen and algae as carbohydrate sources triggered significantly the exudation of malate in M. hiemalis, and pollen and cellulose that of oxalate in P. chrysogenum. We conclude that the occurrence of complex carbohydrate sources in nutrient-deficient deglaciated soils may positively influence the exudation of organic acids of fungi. In particular, pollen and remnants of other microorganisms can trigger the exudation of organic acids of fungi in order to promote the weathering of minerals and to make nutrients available that would otherwise be trapped in that cryospheric environment.

  10. Respiratory CO(2) as Carbon Source for Nocturnal Acid Synthesis at High Temperatures in Three Species Exhibiting Crassulacean Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Winter, K; Schröppel-Meier, G; Caldwell, M M

    1986-06-01

    TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON NOCTURNAL CARBON GAIN AND NOCTURNAL ACID ACCUMULATION WERE STUDIED IN THREE SPECIES OF PLANTS EXHIBITING CRASSULACEAN ACID METABOLISM: Mamillaria woodsii, Opuntia vulgaris, and Kalanchoë daigremontiana. Under conditions of high soil moisture, nocturnal CO(2) gain and acid accumulation had temperature optima at 15 to 20 degrees C. Between 5 and 15 degrees C, uptake of atmospheric CO(2) largely accounted for acid accumulation. At higher tissue temperatures, acid accumulation exceeded net carbon gain indicating that acid synthesis was partly due to recycling of respiratory CO(2). When plants were kept in CO(2)-free air, acid accumulation based on respiratory CO(2) was highest at 25 to 35 degrees C. Net acid synthesis occurred up to 45 degrees C, although the nocturnal carbon balance became largely negative above 25 to 35 degrees C. Under conditions of water stress, net CO(2) exchange and nocturnal acid accumulation were reduced. Acid accumulation was proportionally more decreased at low than at high temperatures. Acid accumulation was either similar over the whole temperature range (5-45 degrees C) or showed an optimum at high temperatures, although net carbon balance became very negative with increasing tissue temperatures. Conservation of carbon by recycling respiratory CO(2) was temperature dependent. At 30 degrees C, about 80% of the dark respiratory CO(2) was conserved by dark CO(2) fixation, in both well irrigated and water stressed plants. PMID:16664827

  11. Opportunities to enhance alternative sources of long-chain n-3 fatty acids within the diet.

    PubMed

    Delarue, Jacques; Guriec, Nathalie

    2014-08-01

    Health benefits or advocated health benefits of long-chain (LC) n-3 PUFA are better known by medical doctors as well as by consumers, so that consumption increases. In addition, the development of aquaculture requires more fishmeal and fish oil. Humanisation of care of companion animals is also associated with addition of LC n-3 PUFA in pet foods. The risk of the increased demand for LC n-3 PUFA is the excess harvesting of natural sources, especially of marine origin (oily fishes, krill). In order to improve sustainability, alternative sources of LC n-3 PUFA have been developed. These alternative sources are: (a) terrestrial plants naturally or genetically enriched in stearidonic acid (SDA), which bypasses the first limiting step of (i.e. ∆6 desaturase) of the biosynthesis of LC n-3 PUFA; (b) single-cell oils rich in LC n-3 PUFA (microalgae, Escherichia coli) and krill. Currently, plants rich in SDA are expensive, metabolic engineering is unfavourably accepted by consumers in many countries, cultivation of microalgae is very expensive even though their ability (for some of them) to synthesise biofuels could induce a decrease in industrial costs, and Antarctic krill harvest must be restricted. Thus, it is difficult to predict their real development in the future. PMID:24886839

  12. Wine wastes as carbon source for biological treatment of acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Costa, M C; Santos, E S; Barros, R J; Pires, C; Martins, M

    2009-05-01

    Possible use of wine wastes containing ethanol as carbon and energy source for sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) growth and activity in the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) is studied for the first time. The experiments were performed using anaerobic down-flow packed bed reactors in semi-continuous systems. The performance of two bioreactors fed with wine wastes or ethanol as carbon sources is compared in terms of sulphate reduction, metals removal and neutralization. The results show that efficient neutralization and high sulphate removal (>90%) were attained with the use of wine wastes as substrate allowing the production of effluents with concentrations below the required local legislation for irrigation waters. This is only possible provided that the AMD and wine wastes are contacted with calcite tailing, a waste material that neutralizes and provides buffer capacity to the medium. The removal of metals using wine wastes as carbon source was 61-91% for Fe and 97% for both Zn and Cu. The lower removal of iron, when wine waste is used instead of ethanol, may be due to the presence of iron-chelating compounds in the waste, which prevent the formation of iron sulphide, and partial unavailability of sulphide because of re-oxidation to elemental sulphur. However, that did not affect significantly the quality of the effluent for irrigation. This work demonstrates that wine wastes are a potential alternative to traditional SRB substrates. This finding has direct implication to sustainable operation of SRB bioreactors for AMD treatment. PMID:19201010

  13. Soil nitrous acid emissions as a major source of atmospheric reactive nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermel, M.; Oswald, R.; Behrendt, T.; Wu, D.; Su, H.; Cheng, Y.; Breuninger, C.; Moravek, A.; Mougin, E.; Delon, C.; Loubet, B.; Pommerening-Röser, A.; Sörgel, M.; Poeschl, U.; Hoffmann, T.; Andreae, M. O.; Meixner, F. X.; Trebs, I.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is known to be a major source of hydroxyl radicals (OH) in the planetary boundary layer. OH is the major oxidant of the atmosphere and strongly affects its oxidation capacity. However, soil was found to release HONO, which is in equilibrium with soil nitrite (NO2-). These emissions are thought to depend on soil pH and NO2- content and were suggested to be an important contributor to the missing source of atmospheric HONO and OH radicals. The role of total soil-derived HONO in the biogeochemical and atmospheric nitrogen cycles, however, has remained unknown. We investigated a wide range of different soils in laboratory experiments, and found that HONO emissions from soils with high nutrient content and neutral pH can be of the same magnitude as nitric oxide (NO) emissions. Consequently, the co-emission of HONO with NO could substantially enhance the source of atmospheric reactive nitrogen in remote regions, with extensive arable areas. Observed temperature dependencies and obtained activation energies indicate that the HONO emissions are mainly due to microbial nitrification processes. Laboratory sterilization and inhibition experiments with soil samples yield further new insights into underlying processes of soil HONO emissions.

  14. Use of corn steep liquor as an economical nitrogen source for biosuccinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, J. P.; Jahim, J. M.; Wu, T. Y.; Harun, S.; Mumtaz, T.

    2016-06-01

    Expensive raw materials are the driving force that leads to the shifting of the petroleum-based succinic acid production into bio-based succinic acid production by microorganisms. Cost of fermentation medium is among the main factors contributing to the total production cost of bio-succinic acid. After carbon source, nitrogen source is the second largest component of the fermentation medium, the cost of which has been overlooked for the past years. The current study aimed at replacing yeast extract- a costly nitrogen source with corn steep liquor for economical production of bio-succinic acid by Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z. In this study, a final succinic acid concentration of 20.6 g/L was obtained from the use of corn steep liquor as the nitrogen source, which was comparable with the use of yeast extract as the nitrogen source that had a final succinate concentration of 21.4 g/l. In terms of economical wise, corn steep liquor was priced at 200 /ton, which was one fifth of the cost of yeast extract at 1000 /ton. Therefore, corn steep liquor can be considered as a potential nitrogen source in biochemical industries instead of the costly yeast extract.

  15. Growth process of BaZrO3 doped YBCO films by TFA-MOD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konya, K.; Masuda, Y.; Teranishi, R.; Kiss, T.; Munetoh, S.; Yamada, K.; Yoshizumi, M.; Izumi, T.

    Crystal growth process of YBa2Cu3O7-X (YBCO) films with BaZrO3 (BZO) pinning centers were investigated to enhance JC property by controlling microstructure of the films. The YBCO films were fabricated by a metal organic deposition (MOD) method using solutions with trifluoroacetates (TFA) and Zr-salts. Quenched films were prepared by cooling them rapidly during crystallization process and crystallized phases were identified by an X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement. It is indicating that BZO forms at lower temperature than that of YBCO formation and that BZO and BaF2 are crystallized at the similar temperature range around 700°C. Then, we kept the heating temperature which is under 600°C before crystallization temperature of YBCO and investigated the effect of temperature keeping on film growth. In the film kept for more than 3 hours, BZO peak was detected by XRD measurement. However, BZO particles were not observed in the film even kept for 9 hours by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) analyses. It is indicated that growth rate of BZO is slow at 600°C. On the other hand, smaller YBCO particles and decreasing of surface roughness (Ra) were observed for the film which were kept at 600°C for 3 hours and then crystallized. This result suggests the density of YBCO film is higher than that for YBCO without that process. In summary, it can be considered that YBCO film density become high by temperature keeping process below 600°C before YBCO crystallization and that size of BZO particles are determined by heat treatment at the temperature of above 600°C

  16. Seasonal variations and source identification of selected organic acids associated with PM10 in the coastal area of Southeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shui-Ping; Schwab, James; Liu, Bi-Lian; Li, Tsung-Chang; Yuan, Chung-Shin

    2015-03-01

    component analysis results provide evidence that photochemical oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids and volatile organic compounds is the most important source of diacids. In this analysis, primary sources were found to be minor (traffic and food cooking) or non-existent (biomass burning and crustal dust). Components with high loadings of Ph and unsaturated fatty acids can be regarded as representative of primary traffic emissions.

  17. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF AN ACID MINE DRAINAGE TREATMENT PROCESS FOR SOURCE WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Ann

    2015-12-31

    Throughout Northern Appalachia and surrounding regions, hundreds of abandoned mine sites exist which frequently are the source of Acid Mine Drainage (AMD). AMD typically contains metal ions in solution with sulfate ions which have been leached from the mine. These large volumes of water, if treated to a minimum standard, may be of use in Hydraulic Fracturing (HF) or other industrial processes. This project’s focus is to evaluate an AMD water treatment technology for the purpose of providing treated AMD as an alternative source of water for HF operations. The HydroFlex™ technology allows the conversion of a previous environmental liability into an asset while reducing stress on potable water sources. The technology achieves greater than 95% water recovery, while removing sulfate to concentrations below 100 mg/L and common metals (e.g., iron and aluminum) below 1 mg/L. The project is intended to demonstrate the capability of the process to provide AMD as alternative source water for HF operations. The second budget period of the project has been completed during which Battelle conducted two individual test campaigns in the field. The first test campaign demonstrated the ability of the HydroFlex system to remove sulfate to levels below 100 mg/L, meeting the requirements indicated by industry stakeholders for use of the treated AMD as source water. The second test campaign consisted of a series of focused confirmatory tests aimed at gathering additional data to refine the economic projections for the process. Throughout the project, regular communications were held with a group of project stakeholders to ensure alignment of the project objectives with industry requirements. Finally, the process byproduct generated by the HydroFlex process was evaluated for the treatment of produced water against commercial treatment chemicals. It was found that the process byproduct achieved similar results for produced water treatment as the chemicals currently in use. Further

  18. Acid gradient across plasma membrane can drive phosphate bond synthesis in cancer cells: acidic tumor milieu as a potential energy source.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Gautam; Sen, Suvajit; Chaudhuri, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive cancers exhibit an efficient conversion of high amounts of glucose to lactate accompanied by acid secretion, a phenomenon popularly known as the Warburg effect. The acidic microenvironment and the alkaline cytosol create a proton-gradient (acid gradient) across the plasma membrane that represents proton-motive energy. Increasing experimental data from physiological relevant models suggest that acid gradient stimulates tumor proliferation, and can also support its energy needs. However, direct biochemical evidence linking extracellular acid gradient to generation of intracellular ATP are missing. In this work, we demonstrate that cancer cells can synthesize significant amounts of phosphate-bonds from phosphate in response to acid gradient across plasma membrane. The noted phenomenon exists in absence of glycolysis and mitochondrial ATP synthesis, and is unique to cancer. Biochemical assays using viable cancer cells, and purified plasma membrane vesicles utilizing radioactive phosphate, confirmed phosphate-bond synthesis from free phosphate (Pi), and also localization of this activity to the plasma membrane. In addition to ATP, predominant formation of pyrophosphate (PPi) from Pi was also observed when plasma membrane vesicles from cancer cells were subjected to trans-membrane acid gradient. Cancer cytosols were found capable of converting PPi to ATP, and also stimulate ATP synthesis from Pi from the vesicles. Acid gradient created through glucose metabolism by cancer cells, as observed in tumors, also proved critical for phosphate-bond synthesis. In brief, these observations reveal a role of acidic tumor milieu as a potential energy source and may offer a novel therapeutic target. PMID:25874623

  19. Reproductive performance of dairy cows is influenced by prepartum feed restriction and dietary fatty acid source.

    PubMed

    Colazo, M G; Hayirli, A; Doepel, L; Ambrose, D J

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of feed restriction and source of dietary fatty acids during the close-up dry period on postcalving reproductive performance of dairy cattle. Thirty-four days before expected calving, pregnant Holstein cows (n = 72; parity 1 to 5) were randomly assigned to 1 of 6 treatments. Treatments were ad libitum (AL) or 24% feed restriction (FR) in combination with 1 of 3 oilseed supplements at 8% of diet dry matter: canola, linola, or flax to enrich the rations with oleic, linoleic, or linolenic fatty acids, respectively. After calving, cows were fed a common lactation diet that contained no oilseeds. Measurements of uterus, corpus luteum, and follicles were obtained by ultrasonography twice weekly from 7 +/- 1 d after calving until the first ovulation. Cows (n = 66) were subjected to timed artificial insemination (TAI), and pregnancy was determined 32 d later. Feed-restricted cows had lower dry matter intake and lost more body weight prepartum. Energy balance (Mcal/d) was negative in FR cows prepartum but they had a less severe negative energy balance postpartum. The dietary source of fatty acid did not affect energy balance. Cows fed AL had a higher incidence of uterine infections (10/37 vs. 2/35) but tended to have fewer ovarian cysts (2/37 vs. 7/35) than FR cows. Mean (+/-SE) interval from calving to uterine involution did not differ among dietary treatments (26.8 +/- 1.8 d). Interval from calving to first ovulation was longer in cows fed canola than in those fed either linola or flax (34.7 +/- 3.1 vs. 23.7 +/- 3.2 and 21.0 +/- 3.1 d, respectively). A greater percentage of cows fed AL conceived to the first TAI (47.1 vs. 18.8) and tended to have fewer mean days open (157 +/- 10.8 vs. 191 +/- 10.1) than cows fed FR. In summary, FR cows had a lower incidence of uterine infections, but they were less fertile as reflected by a lower percent pregnancy to first TAI and increased days open. Cows fed diets enriched in

  20. Latitudinal distributions of atmospheric dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, and α-dicarbonyls over the western North Pacific: Sources and formation pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikkina, Srinivas; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Miyazaki, Yuzo

    2015-05-01

    The present study aims to assess the molecular distributions of water-soluble dicarboxylic acids (diacids: C2-C12), oxocarboxylic acids (C2-C9), and α-dicarbonyls (glyoxal and methylglyoxal) in aerosols collected over the western North Pacific (WNP) during a summer cruise (August to September 2008). The measured water-soluble organics show pronounced latitudinal distributions with higher concentrations in the region of 30°N-45°N (average 63 ng m-3) than 10°N-30°N (18 ng m-3). Mass fraction of oxalic acid (C2) in total aliphatic diacids (ΣC2-C12) showed higher values (72 ± 10%) in lower latitude (10°N-30°N) than that (56 ± 16%) in higher latitude (30°N-45°N), suggesting a photochemical production of C2 due to an increased insolation over the tropical WNP. A similar trend was found in other diagnostic ratios such as oxalic to succinic (C2/C4) and oxalic to glyoxylic acid (C2/ωC2), which further corroborate an enhanced photochemical aging over the WNP. In addition, relative abundances of oxalic acid in total diacids showed a marked increase as a function of ambient temperature, supporting their photochemical production. Constantly low concentration ratios of adipic and phthalic acids relative to azelaic acid suggest a small contribution of anthropogenic sources and an importance of oceanic sources during the study period. Significant production of C2 through oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds emitted from the sea surface is also noteworthy, as inferred from the strong linear correlations among water-soluble organic carbon, methanesulphonic acid, and oxalic acid. Sea-to-air emission of unsaturated fatty acids also contributes to formation of diacids over the WNP.

  1. Trans Fatty Acid Derived Phospholipids Show Increased Membrane Cholesterol and Reduced Receptor Activation as Compared to Their Cis Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Shui-Lin; Mitchell, Drake C.; Litman, Burton J.

    2005-01-01

    The consumption of trans fatty acid (TFA) is linked to the elevation of LDL cholesterol and is considered to be a major health risk factor for coronary heart disease. Despite several decades of extensive research on this subject, the underlying mechanism of how TFA modulates serum cholesterol levels remains elusive. In this study, we examined the molecular interaction of TFA-derived phospholipid with cholesterol and the membrane receptor rhodopsin in model membranes. Rhodopsin is a prototypical member of the G-protein coupled receptor family. It has a well-characterized structure and function and serves as a model membrane receptor in this study. Phospholipid–cholesterol affinity was quantified by measuring cholesterol partition coefficients. Phospholipid–receptor interactions were probed by measuring the level of rhodopsin activation. Our study shows that phospholipid derived from TFA had a higher membrane cholesterol affinity than their cis analogues. TFA phospholipid membranes also exhibited a higher acyl chain packing order, which was indicated by the lower acyl chain packing free volume as determined by DPH fluorescence and the higher transition temperature for rhodopsin thermal denaturation. The level of rhodopsin activation was diminished in TFA phospholipids. Since membrane cholesterol level and membrane receptors are involved in the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis, the combination of higher cholesterol content and reduced receptor activation associated with the presence of TFA–phospholipid could be factors contributing to the elevation of LDL cholesterol. PMID:15766276

  2. Pentahaloethane-based chlorofluorocarbon substitutes and halothane: Correlation of in vivo hepatic protein trifluoroacetylation and urinary trifluoroacetic acid excretion with calculated enthalpies of activation

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.W.; Jones, J.P.; Martin, J.L.; LaRosa, A.C.; Olson, M.J.; Pohl, L.R.; Anders, M.W. )

    1992-09-01

    The hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) 2,2-dichloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane (HCFC-123) and 2-chloro-1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HCFC-124) and the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) pentafluoroethane (HFC-125) are being developed as substitutes for chlorofluorocarbons that deplete stratospheric ozone. The structural similarity of these HCFCs and HFCs to halothane, which is hepatotoxic under certain circumstances, indicates that the metabolism and cellular interactions of HCFCs and HFCs must be explored. In a previous study [Harris et al. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 88, 1407], similar patterns of trifluoroacetylated proteins (TFA-proteins) were detected by immunoblotting with anti-TFA-protein antibodies in livers of rats exposed to halothane or HCFC-123. The present study extends these results and demonstrates that in vivo TFA-protein formation resulting from a 6-h exposure to a 1% atmosphere of these compounds follows the trend: halothane approximately HCFC-123 much greater than HFC-124, greater than HFC-125. The calculated enthalpies of activation of halothane, HCFC-123, HCFC-124, and HFC-125 paralleled the observed rate of trifluoroacetic acid excretion in HCFC- or HFC-exposed rats. Exposure of rats to a range of HCFC-123 concentrations indicated that TFA-protein formation was saturated at an exposure concentration between 0.01% and 0.1% HCFC-123. Deuteration of HCFC-123 decreased TFA-protein formation in vivo. Urinary trifluoroacetic acid excretion by treated rats correlated with the levels of TFA-proteins found after each of these treatments.

  3. Traditional Indian fermented foods: a rich source of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Satish Kumar, R; Kanmani, P; Yuvaraj, N; Paari, K A; Pattukumar, V; Arul, V

    2013-06-01

    This review describes the diversity of Indian fermented food and its significance as a potential source of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Fermented foods consumed in India are categorized based upon their base material. Fermented foods such as dahi, gundruk, sinki, iniziangsang, iromba, fermented rai, kanjika and handua were reported to have significant medicinal properties. Some fermented products such as koozh, dahi and kanjika are consumed unknowingly as, probiotic drinks, by local people. There are very few reports regarding isolation of LAB from Indian fermented foods available in the past; however, due to growing consciousness about potential health benefits of LAB, we now have scores of reports in this field. There is an abundant opportunity available for food microbiologists to explore the Indian fermented foods for the isolation of new LAB strains for their potential role in probiotic research. PMID:23181843

  4. Synthesis of methylphosphonic acid by marine microbes: a source for methane in the aerobic ocean

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, William W.; Griffin, Benjamin M.; Cicchillo, Robert M.; Gao, Jiangtao; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Cooke, Heather A.; Circello, Benjamin T.; Evans, Bradley S.; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Stahl, David A.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2012-01-01

    Relative to the atmosphere, much of the aerobic ocean is supersaturated with methane; however, the source of this important greenhouse gas remains enigmatic. Catabolism of methylphosphonic acid by phosphorus-starved marine microbes, with concomitant release of methane, has been suggested to explain this phenomenon, yet methylphosphonate is not a known natural product, nor has it been detected in natural systems. Further, its synthesis from known natural products would require unknown biochemistry. Here we show that the marine archaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus encodes a pathway for methylphosphonate biosynthesis and that it produces cell-associated methylphosphonate esters. The abundance of a key gene in this pathway in metagenomic datasets suggests that methylphosphonate biosynthesis is relatively common in marine microbes, providing a plausible explanation for the methane paradox. PMID:22936780

  5. Evidence of a natural marine source of oxalic acid and a possible link to glyoxal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, Matteo; Decesari, Stefano; Carbone, Claudio; Finessi, Emanuela; Fuzzi, Sandro; Ceburnis, Darius; O'Dowd, Colin D.; Sciare, Jean; Burrows, John P.; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Ervens, Barbara; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Facchini, Maria Cristina

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents results supporting the existence of a natural source of oxalic acid over the oceans. Oxalate was detected in "clean-sector" marine aerosol samples at Mace Head (Ireland) (53°20'N, 9°54'W) during 2006, and at Amsterdam Island (37°48'S, 77°34'E) from 2003 to 2007, in concentrations ranging from 2.7 to 39 ng m-3 and from 0.31 to 17 ng m-3, respectively. The oxalate concentration showed a clear seasonal trend at both sites, with maxima in spring-summer and minima in fall-winter, being consistent with other marine biogenic aerosol components (e.g., methanesulfonic acid, non-sea-salt sulfate, and aliphatic amines). The observed oxalate was distributed along the whole aerosol size spectrum, with both a submicrometer and a supermicrometer mode, unlike the dominant submicrometer mode encountered in many polluted environments. Given its mass size distribution, the results suggest that over remote oceanic regions oxalate is produced through a combination of different formation processes. It is proposed that the cloud-mediated oxidation of gaseous glyoxal, recently detected over remote oceanic regions, may be an important source of submicrometer oxalate in the marine boundary layer. Supporting this hypothesis, satellite-retrieved glyoxal column concentrations over the two sampling sites exhibited the same seasonal concentration trend of oxalate. Furthermore, chemical box model simulations showed that the observed submicrometer oxalate concentrations were consistent with the in-cloud oxidation of typical marine air glyoxal mixing ratios, as retrieved by satellite measurements, at both sites.

  6. Characterization and Acid-Mobilization Study of Iron-Containing Mineral Dust Source Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cwiertny, David M.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Hunter, Gordon J.; Laskin, Alexander; Scherer, Michelle; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2008-03-04

    Processes that solubilize the iron in mineral dust aerosols may increase the amount of iron supplied to ocean surface waters, and thereby stimulate phytoplankton productivity. It was recently proposed that mixing of mineral dusts with SO2 and HNO3 produces extremely acidic environments that favor the formation of bioavailable Fe(II). Here, four authentic mineral dust source materials (Saudi Beach sand (SB), Inland Saudi sand (IS), Saharan Sand (SS) and China Loess (CL)) and one commercial reference material (Arizona Test Dust (AZTD)) were spectroscopically characterized, and their dissolution at pH 1 was examined in aqueous batch systems. Spectroscopic analyses indicated that the bulk and near-surface region of all samples possessed similar elemental compositions and that iron was unevenly distributed among dust 10 particles. Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed Fe(III) in all samples, although SB, CL and AZTD also contained appreciable Fe(II). Both Fe(II) and Fe(III) were primarily substituted into aluminosilicates, although CL, AZTD and IS also contained Fe(III) oxides. Total iron solubility (defined as the summed concentration of dissolved Fe(II) and Fe(III) measured after 24 h) ranged 14 between 4-12% of the source materials’ iron content, but did not scale with either the surface area or the iron content of the samples. This suggests that other factors such as iron speciation and mineralogy may play a key role in iron solubility. Also, the elevated nitrate concentrations encountered from nitric acid at pH 1 suppressed dissolution of Fe(II) from AZTD, CL and SB particles, which we propose results from the surface-mediated, non-photochemical reduction of nitrate by Fe(II).

  7. Predominance and sources of alkane and fatty acid biomarkers in the surface sediments of Chitrapuzha River (South India).

    PubMed

    Sanil Kumar, K S; Nair, S M

    2015-04-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected from Chitrapuzha (Cochin) estuarine system to identify the natural and anthropogenic origin of organic matter. The distribution and sources of organic matter were assessed with the help of fatty acid and alkane biomarkers. Fatty acids ranging from C12 to C28 were identified and C16:0 was the most abundant fatty acid, which contributed between 23.5 % and 52.4 % to total fatty acids. The low levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids indicate the effective bacterial recycling of algal fatty acids during the whole settling and depositing process. Aliphatic hydrocarbons ranging from C12 to C33 were identified and the total concentration ranged from 7876 to 43,357 ng g(-1). The presence of unresolved complex mixtures and lower pristane to phytane ratios indicates the petroleum contamination in the study area. PMID:25694163

  8. [Sources, Migration and Conversion of Dissolved Alkanes, Dissolved Fatty Acids in a Karst Underground River Water, in Chongqing Area].

    PubMed

    Liang, Zuo-bing; Sun, Yu-chuan; Wang, Zun-bo; Shi, Yang; Jiang, Ze-li; Zhang, Mei; Xie, Zheng-Lan; Liao, Yu

    2015-09-01

    Dissolved alkanes and dissolved fatty acids were collected from Qingmuguan underground river in July, October 2013. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS), alkanes and fatty acids were quantitatively analyzed. The results showed that average contents of alkanes and fatty acids were 1 354 ng.L-1, 24203 ng.L-1 in July, and 667 ng.L-1, 2526 ng.L-1 in October respectively. With the increasing migration distance of dissolved alkanes and dissolved fatty acids in underground river, their contents decreased. Based on the molecular characteristic indices of alkanes, like CPI, OEP, Paq and R, dissolved alkanes were mainly originated from microorganisms in July, and aquatic plants in October. Saturated straight-chain fatty acid had the highest contents in all samples with the dominant peak in C16:0, combined with the characteristics of carbon peak, algae or bacteria might be the dominant source of dissolved fatty acids. PMID:26717680

  9. Trifluoroacetate in the environment. Evidence for sources other than HFC/HCFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, A.; Frank, H.

    1999-02-15

    The partly halogenated C{sub 2}-hydro(chloro)fluorocarbons (HFC, HCFC) 1,1,1-trifluoro-2,2-dichloroethane (HCFC-123), 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoro-2-chloroethane (HCFC-124), and 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) are CFC substitutes found at increasing levels in the atmosphere. Trifluoroacetate (TFA) is an atmospheric degradation product of these compounds and due to its persistence its potential accumulation in some aquatic ecosystems is a matter of environmental concern. The present study was undertaken to determine the present-days base level of environmental TFA and whether model calculations are in line with the actual data. Average levels of about 120 ng L{sup {minus}1} as predicted for the year 2010 are found in rain in Germany already now, slightly higher than in rain collected in Switzerland or Nevada. In the major rivers in Germany, TFA is present at average concentrations of 140 ng L{sup {minus}1}. In air, levels of 45--60 pg m{sup {minus}3} have been found in Central Europe. Between March 1995 and September 1996, a period of substantial increase in atmospheric HFC-134a mixing ratio, the TFA concentrations in air and precipitation did not significantly increase. TFA is absent in old groundwater samples, and in river water from remote locations, concentrations are low. These data suggest that the total TFA in both compartments exceeds the formation potential of currently known sources, that TFA in atmosphere and rain is regionally associated with industrial or population density, and that other unresolved sources must contribute to the present concentrations.

  10. Honeybees and beehives are rich sources for fructophilic lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Endo, Akihito; Salminen, Seppo

    2013-09-01

    Fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB) are a specific group of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) characterized and described only recently. They prefer fructose as growth substrate and inhabit only fructose-rich niches. Honeybees are high-fructose-consuming insects and important pollinators in nature, but reported to be decreasing in the wild. In the present study, we analyzed FLAB microbiota in honeybees, larvae, fresh honey and bee pollen. A total of 66 strains of LAB were isolated from samples using a selective isolation technique for FLAB. Surprisingly, all strains showed fructophilic characteristics. The 66 strains and ten FLAB strains isolated from flowers in a separate study were genotypically separated into six groups, four of which being identified as Lactobacillus kunkeei and two as Fructobacillus fructosus. One of the L. kunkeei isolates showed antibacterial activity against Melissococcus plutonius, a causative pathogen of European foulbrood, this protection being attributable to production of an antibacterial peptide or protein. Culture-independent analysis suggested that bee products and larvae contained simple Lactobacillus-group microbiota, dominated by L. kunkeei, although adult bees carried a more complex microbiota. The findings clearly demonstrate that honeybees and their products are rich sources of FLAB, and FLAB are potential candidates for future bee probiotics. PMID:23845309

  11. Preliminary study on preparation of BCNO phosphor particles using citric acid as carbon source

    SciTech Connect

    Nuryadin, Bebeh W.; Pratiwi, Tripuspita; Faryuni, Irfana D.; Iskandar, Ferry Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Khairurrijal; Ogi, Takashi; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2015-04-16

    A citric acid was used as a carbon source in the preparation of boron carbon oxy-nitride (BCNO) phosphor particles by a facile process. The preparation process was conducted at relatively low temperature 750 °C and at ambient pressure. The prepared BCNO phosphors showed a high photoluminescence (PL) performance at peak emission wavelength of 470 nm under excitation by a UV light 365 nm. The effects of carbon/boron and nitrogen/boron molar ratios on the PL properties were also investigated. The result showed that the emission spectra with a wavelength peak ranging from 444 nm to 496 nm can be obtained by varying carbon/boron ratios from 0.1 to 0.9. In addition, the observations showed that the BCNO phosphor material has two excitation peaks located at the 365 nm (UV) and 420 nm (blue). Based on these observations, we believe that the citric acid derived BCNO phosphor particles can be a promising inexpensive material for phosphor conversion-based white LED.

  12. Complement-fixing Activity of Fulvic Acid from Shilajit and Other Natural Sources

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Xie, Gang; Jutila, Mark A.; Quinn, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Shilajit has been used traditionally in folk medicine for treatment of a variety of disorders, including syndromes involving excessive complement activation. Extracts of Shilajit contain significant amounts of fulvic acid (FA), and it has been suggested that FA is responsible for many therapeutic properties of Shilajit. However, little is known regarding physical and chemical properties of Shilajit extracts, and nothing is known about their effects on the complement system. To address this issue, we fractionated extracts of commercial Shilajit using anion exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. One neutral (S-I) and two acidic (S-II and S-III) fractions were isolated, characterized, and compared with standardized FA samples. The most abundant fraction (S-II) was further fractionated into three sub-fractions (S-II-1 to S-II-3). The van Krevelen diagram showed that the Shilajit fractions are products of polysaccharide degradation, and all fractions, except S-II-3, contained type II arabinogalactan. All Shilajit fractions exhibited dose-dependent complement-fixing activity in vitro with high potency. Furthermore, we found a strong correlation between complement-fixing activity and carboxylic group content in the Shilajit fractions and other FA sources. These data provide a molecular basis to explain at least part of the beneficial therapeutic properties of Shilajit and other humic extracts. PMID:19107845

  13. A new source of whitening agent from a Thai Mulberry plant and its betulinic acid quantitation.

    PubMed

    Nattapong, Snitmatjaro; Omboon, Luanratana

    2008-06-15

    Protection of human body against the harmful ultraviolet exposure is nowadays more important and interesting. Melanin, a group of bio-pigments, acts as a natural solar filter absorbing and reflecting most of the UV radiation passing through the layer of skin. Over production of the pigments can create a health problem, hyperpigmentation. Tyrosinase is a key enzyme, which catalyzes the conversion of L-tyrosine to L-dihydroxyalanine (L-Dopa), therefore tyrosinase inhibitors are used in various skin preparations due to its pronounced effect on anti-hyperpigment. In this study, an in vitro anti-tyrosinase activity study of the extracts from a hybrid Mulberry plant obtained from Morus alba L. and Morus rotundiloba Koidz, is shown to prove as new source of Thai whitening agent. The presence of betulinic acid, as an anti-inflammatory and anti-tyrosinase activity agent, is also reported. The study develops the technique of HPLC quantitation of betulinic acid and its relation to anti-tyrosinase activity of the whole parts of Thai Mulberry. PMID:18569714

  14. Photocatalytic degradation of commercially sourced naphthenic acids by TiO2-graphene composite nanomaterial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juncheng; Wang, Lin; Tang, Jingchun; Ma, Jianli

    2016-04-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a major contributor to the toxicity in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), which is produced by hot water extraction of bitumen. NAs are extremely difficult to be degraded due to its complex ring and side chain structure. Photocatalysis is recognized as a promising technology in the removal of refractory organic pollutants. In this work, TiO2-graphene (P25-GR) composites were synthesized by means of solvothermal method. The results showed that P25-GR composite exhibited better photocatalytic activity than pure P25. The removal efficiency of naphthenic acids in acid solution was higher than that in neutral and alkaline solutions. It was the first report ever known on the photodegradation of NAs based on graphene, and this process achieved a higher removal rate than other photocatalysis degradation of NAs in a shorter reaction time. LC/MS analysis showed that macromolecular NAs (carbon number 17-22, z value -2) were easy to be degraded than the micromolecular ones (carbon number 11-16, z value -2). Furthermore, the reactive oxygen species that play the main role in the photocatalysis system were studied. It was found that holes and ·OH were the main reactive species in the UV/P25-GR photocatalysis system. Given the high removal efficiency of refractory organic pollutants and the short degradation time, photodegradation based on composite catalysts has a broad and practical prospect. The study on the photodegradation of commercially sourced NAs may provide a guidance for the degradation of OSPW NAs by this method. PMID:26874061

  15. The Acid-Secreting Parietal Cell as an Endocrine Source of Sonic Hedgehog During Gastric Repair

    PubMed Central

    Engevik, Amy C.; Feng, Rui; Yang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) has been shown to regulate wound healing in various tissues. Despite its known function in tissue regeneration, the role of Shh secreted from the gastric epithelium during tissue repair in the stomach remains unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that Shh secreted from the acid-secreting parietal cell is a fundamental circulating factor that drives gastric repair. A mouse model expressing a parietal cell-specific deletion of Shh (PC-ShhKO) was generated using animals bearing loxP sites flanking exon 2 of the Shh gene (Shhflx/flx) and mice expressing a Cre transgene under the control of the H+,K+-ATPase β-subunit promoter. Shhflx/flx, the H+,K+-ATPase β-subunit promoter, and C57BL/6 mice served as controls. Ulcers were induced via acetic acid injury. At 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 days after the ulcer induction, gastric tissue and blood samples were collected. Parabiosis experiments were used to establish the effect of circulating Shh on ulcer repair. Control mice exhibited an increased expression of Shh in the gastric tissue and plasma that correlated with the repair of injury within 7 days after surgery. PC-ShhKO mice showed a loss of ulcer repair and reduced Shh tissue and plasma concentrations. In a parabiosis experiment whereby a control mouse was paired with a PC-ShhKO littermate and both animals subjected to gastric injury, a significant increase in the circulating Shh was measured in both parabionts. Elevated circulating Shh concentrations correlated with the repair of gastric ulcers in the PC-ShhKO parabionts. Therefore, the acid-secreting parietal cell within the stomach acts as an endocrine source of Shh during repair. PMID:24092639

  16. Thermolysis of fluoropolymers as a potential source of halogenated organic acids in the environment.

    PubMed

    Ellis, D A; Mabury, S A; Martin, J W; Muir, D C

    2001-07-19

    Following the introduction of hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbon (HFCs) gases as replacements for the ozone-destroying chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), it has been discovered that HCFCs/HFCs can degrade in the atmosphere to produce trifluoroacetic acid, a compound with no known loss mechanisms in the environment, and higher concentrations in natural waters have been shown to be mildly phytotoxic. Present environmental levels of trifluooracetic acid are not accounted by HCFC/HFC degradation alone. Here we report that thermolysis of fluorinated polymers, such as the commercial polymers Teflon and Kel-F, can also produce trifluoroacetate and the similar compound chlorodifluoroacetate. This can occur either directly, or indirectly via products that are known to degrade to these haloacetates in the atmosphere. The environmental significance of these findings is confirmed by modelling, which indicates that the thermolysis of fluoropolymers in industrial and consumer high-temperature applications (ovens, non-stick cooking utensils and combustion engines) is likely to be a significant source of trifluoroacetate in urban rain water ( approximately 25 ng l-1, as estimated for Toronto). Thermolysis also leads to longer chain polyfluoro- and/or polychlorofluoro- (C3-C14) carboxylic acids which may be equally persistent. Some of these products have recently been linked with possible adverse health and environmental impacts and are being phased out of the US market. Furthermore, we detected CFCs and fluorocarbons-groups that can destroy ozone and act as greenhouse gases, respectively-among the other thermal degradation products, suggesting that continued use of fluoropolymers may also exacerbate stratospheric ozone-depletion and global warming. PMID:11460160

  17. Amino acids as possible alternative nitrogen source for growth of Euglena gracilis Z in life support systems.

    PubMed

    Richter, P R; Liu, Y; An, Y; Li, X; Nasir, A; Strauch, S M; Becker, I; Krüger, J; Schuster, M; Ntefidou, M; Daiker, V; Haag, F W M; Aiach, A; Lebert, M

    2015-01-01

    In recent times Euglena gracilis Z was employed as primary producer in closed environmental life-support system (CELSS), e.g. in space research. The photosynthetic unicellular flagellate is not capable of utilizing nitrate, nitrite, and urea as nitrogen source. Therefore, ammonium is supplied as an N-source in the lab (provided as diammonium-dihydrogenphosphate, (NH4)2HPO4) to E. gracilis cultures. While nitrate exerts low toxicity to organisms, ammonium is harmful for many aquatic organisms especially, at high pH-values, which causes the ionic NH4+ (low toxicity) to be partially transformed into the highly toxic ammonia, NH3. In earlier reports, Euglena gracilis was described to grow with various amino acids as sole N-source. Our aim was to investigate alternatives for (NH4)2HPO4 as N-source with lower toxicity for organisms co-cultivated with Euglena in a CELSS. The growth kinetics of Euglena gracilis cultures was determined in the presence of different amino acids (glycine, glutamine, glutamic acid, leucine, and threonine). In addition, uptake of those amino acids by the cells was measured. Cell growth in the presence of glycine and glutamine was quite comparable to the growth in (NH4)2HPO4 containing cultures while a delay in growth was observed in the presence of leucine and threonine. Unlike, aforementioned amino acids glutamate consumption was very poor. Cell density and glutamate concentration were almost unaltered throughout the experiment and the culture reached the stationary phase within 8 days. The data are compared with earlier studies in which utilization of amino acids in Euglena gracilis was investigated. All tested amino acids (glutamate with limitations) were found to have the potential of being an alternative N-source for Euglena gracilis. Hence, these amino acids can be used as a non-toxic surrogate for (NH4)2HPO4. PMID:26177616

  18. Amino acids as possible alternative nitrogen source for growth of Euglena gracilis Z in life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, P. R.; Liu, Y.; An, Y.; Li, X.; Nasir, A.; Strauch, S. M.; Becker, I.; Krüger, J.; Schuster, M.; Ntefidou, M.; Daiker, V.; Haag, F. W. M.; Aiach, A.; Lebert, M.

    2015-01-01

    In recent times Euglena gracilis Z was employed as primary producer in closed environmental life-support system (CELSS), e.g. in space research. The photosynthetic unicellular flagellate is not capable of utilizing nitrate, nitrite, and urea as nitrogen source. Therefore, ammonium is supplied as an N-source in the lab (provided as diammonium-dihydrogenphosphate, (NH4)2HPO4) to E. gracilis cultures. While nitrate exerts low toxicity to organisms, ammonium is harmful for many aquatic organisms especially, at high pH-values, which causes the ionic NH+4 (low toxicity) to be partially transformed into the highly toxic ammonia, NH3. In earlier reports, Euglena gracilis was described to grow with various amino acids as sole N-source. Our aim was to investigate alternatives for (NH4)2HPO4 as N-source with lower toxicity for organisms co-cultivated with Euglena in a CELSS. The growth kinetics of Euglena gracilis cultures was determined in the presence of different amino acids (glycine, glutamine, glutamic acid, leucine, and threonine). In addition, uptake of those amino acids by the cells was measured. Cell growth in the presence of glycine and glutamine was quite comparable to the growth in (NH4)2HPO4 containing cultures while a delay in growth was observed in the presence of leucine and threonine. Unlike, aforementioned amino acids glutamate consumption was very poor. Cell density and glutamate concentration were almost unaltered throughout the experiment and the culture reached the stationary phase within 8 days. The data are compared with earlier studies in which utilization of amino acids in Euglena gracilis was investigated. All tested amino acids (glutamate with limitations) were found to have the potential of being an alternative N-source for Euglena gracilis. Hence, these amino acids can be used as a non-toxic surrogate for (NH4)2HPO4.

  19. Polysaccharides isolated from sugar beet pulp by quaternization under acidic conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet pulp was extracted and chemically modified under acidic conditions using glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride in the presence of trifuoroacetic (TFA), HCl or H3PO4. The goal was to find out how the type of acid used and quaternization could affect the yield of soluble polysaccharide, its mo...

  20. Influence of acid-induced conformational variability on protein separation in reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bobály, Balázs; Tóth, Eszter; Drahos, László; Zsila, Ferenc; Visy, Júlia; Fekete, Jenő; Vékey, Károly

    2014-01-17

    Influence of acid concentration in the mobile phase on protein separation was studied in a wide concentration range using trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and formic acid (FA). At low, 0.001-0.01 (v/v%) TFA concentration and appropriate solvent strength proteins elute before the column's dead time. This is explained by the proteins having a structured, but relatively extended conformation in the eluent; and are excluded from the pores of the stationary phase. Above ca. 0.01-0.05 (v/v%) TFA concentration proteins undergo further conformational change, leading to a compact, molten globule-like structure, likely stabilized by ion pairing. Proteins in this conformation enter the pores and are retained on the column. The results suggest a pore exclusion induced separation related to protein conformation. This effect is influenced by the pH and type of acid used, and is likely to involve ion-pair formation. The TFA concentration needed to result in protein folding (and therefore to observe retention on the column) depends on the protein; and therefore can be utilized to improve chromatographic performance. Conformation change was monitored by circular dichroism spectroscopy and mass spectrometry; and it was shown that not only TFA but FA can also induce molten globule formation. PMID:24373532

  1. Effects of Dried Algae Schizochytrium Sp., A Rich Source of Docosahexaenoic Acid, on Growth, Fatty Acid Composition, and Sensory Quality of Channel Catfish Ictalurus Punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effect of supplementation of dried algae Schizochytrium sp., a rich source of 22:6 n-3, on growth, fatty acid composition, and sensory quality of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. Five isonitrogenous (28% crude protein) and isocaloric (2.78 kcal...

  2. TFA-MOD (Metal Organic Deposition Using Trifluoroacetates) Films with Thickness Greater Than 1 Micron by a Single Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Takeshi; Hayashi, Mariko; Fuke, Hiroyuki

    The key to obtaining films with thickness greater than 1 micron by a single TFA-MOD deposition is a crack-preventing material. The ratio of fluorine atoms to total fluorine and hydrogen atoms (RF) of the chemical is important for forming excellent superconducting films. Although hydrogen atoms lead to carbon residue, which fatally deteriorates superconducting properties of the resulting film, hydrogen atoms form strong hydrogen bonds with trifluoroacetates and have an excellent crack-prevention effect. The RF range from 0.75 to 0.96 is effective for obtaining single-coated, thick, high-critical-current-density superconducting films.

  3. Nitric acid in polar stratospheric clouds - Similar temperature of nitric acid condensation and cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Snetsinger, Kenneth G.; Hamill, Patrick; Goodman, Jindra K.; Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1990-01-01

    As shown independently by two different techniques, nitric acid aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) both form below similar threshold temperatures. This supports the idea that the PSC particles involved in chlorine activation and ozone depletion in the winter polar stratosphere are composed of nitric acid. One technique used to show this is the inertial impaction of nitric acid aerosols using an Er-2 aircraft; the other method is remote sensing of PSCs by the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM II) satellite borne optical sensor. Both procedures were in operation during the Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition in 1989, and the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment in 1987. Analysis of Arctic particles gathered in situ indicates the presence of nitric acid below a 'first appearance' temperature Tfa = 202 K. This is the same highest temperature at which PSCs are seen by the SAM II satellite. In comparison, a 'first appearance' temperature Tfa = 198 K as found for the Antarctic samples.

  4. Utilization of rapeseed pellet from fatty acid methyl esters production as an energy source.

    PubMed

    Ciunel, Krzysztof; Klugmann-Radziemska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Rapeseed pellet - crushed seed residue from oil extraction is a by-product of fatty acid methyl esters production process. As other types of biomass, it can either be burned directly in furnaces or processed to increase its energetic value. Biomass is renewable, abundant and has domestic usage; the sources ofbiomass can help the world reduce its dependence on petroleum products, fossil coal and natural gas. Energetically effective utilization of rapeseed pellet could substantially improve the economic balance of an individual household in which biodiesel for fulfilling the producer's own energetic demand is obtained. In this article, the experimental results of combusting rapeseed pellet in a calorimeter, combustion in a boiler heater and the analysis of the emissions level of different pollutants in exhaust fumes during different stages of biomass boiler operation are presented. It has been proved that the pellet, a by-product of biodiesel production, is not only a valuable substitute of animal fodder, but also an excellent renewable and environmentally friendly energy source, viable for use in household tap water heating installations. PMID:24600857

  5. Photolysis of nitrous acid as a primary source of OH radicals indoors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Alvarez, E.; Amedro, D.; Afif, C.; Gligorovski, S.; Schoemacker, C.; Fittschen, C. M.; Doussin, J.; Wortham, H.

    2013-12-01

    Hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important oxidant in the atmosphere controlling its self- oxidizing capacity. The main sources of OH radicals are the photolysis of ozone and the photolysis of nitrous acid (HONO). Due to the attenuation of solar radiation in the indoor environment, the possibility of OH formation through photolytic pathways indoors has been, up to now, ignored. We present the first direct measurement of OH radicals in the indoor environment. To the present moment, only indirect measurements based on the follow-up of different tracers or model studies had been carried out. The measurements were carried out between July, 19 and July, 30, 2011 in a classroom of 170 m3 with two large windows, oriented northwest. The effect of different concentrations of NO2 and RH were tested for their effect on the generation of HONO. In order to measure the generation of OH radicals under different light intensities, the experiments were performed at three different periods during the day, corresponding to different light intensity levels: 1) (11 a.m. to 15.00 p.m.), 2) (15.00 p.m. to 19.00 p.m.) and 3) (21.00 p.m. to 00:30 a.m.). A pool of state-of-the-art analytical instrumentation was deployed to tackle the objectives set. We measured OH radical concentrations of up to 1.8 106 cm-3 in the indoor environment (Gomez Alvarez et al., 2013). We also show that photolysis is an important source of OH radicals indoors under certain conditions, i.e. direct solar irradiation inside the room. HONO was the most probable precursor, considering the different sources leading to OH formation by photolysis. Additionally, the OH concentrations were found to follow a linear dependence with J(HONO) [HONO]. This was also supported by employing a simple quasi-photostationary state model (PSS) on the OH radical budget. These findings force a change in our understanding of indoor air quality as the reactivity linked to OH would involve formation of secondary species through chemical

  6. Glucosamine as carbon source for amino acid-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Uhde, Andreas; Youn, Jung-Won; Maeda, Tomoya; Clermont, Lina; Matano, Christian; Krämer, Reinhard; Wendisch, Volker F; Seibold, Gerd M; Marin, Kay

    2013-02-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum grows with a variety of carbohydrates and carbohydrate derivatives as sole carbon sources; however, growth with glucosamine has not yet been reported. We isolated a spontaneous mutant (M4) which is able to grow as fast with glucosamine as with glucose as sole carbon source. Glucosamine also served as a combined source of carbon, energy and nitrogen for the mutant strain. Characterisation of the M4 mutant revealed a significantly increased expression of the nagB gene encoding the glucosamine-6P deaminase NagB involved in degradation of glucosamine, as a consequence of a single mutation in the promoter region of the nagAB-scrB operon. Ectopic nagB overexpression verified that the activity of the NagB enzyme is in fact the growth limiting factor under these conditions. In addition, glucosamine uptake was studied, which proved to be unchanged in the wild-type and M4 mutant strains. Using specific deletion strains, we identified the PTS(Glc) transport system to be responsible for glucosamine uptake in C. glutamicum. The affinity of this uptake system for glucosamine was about 40-fold lower than that for its major substrate glucose. Because of this difference in affinity, glucosamine is efficiently taken up only if external glucose is absent or present at low concentrations. C. glutamicum was also examined for its suitability to use glucosamine as substrate for biotechnological purposes. Upon overexpression of the nagB gene in suitable C. glutamicum producer strains, efficient production of both the amino acid L-lysine and the diamine putrescine from glucosamine was demonstrated. PMID:22854894

  7. Biological treatment of acidic coal refuse using sulphate-reducing bacteria with chicken manure as carbon source.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Haixia

    2014-01-01

    The performance of using chicken manure as carbon source to promote sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) activity within acidic coal refuse to prevent the generation of acidic leachate was investigated in batch and column bioreactors. The bioreactors showed satisfactory performance in biological sulphate reduction, evidenced by the increase in effluent pH, high removal efficiencies of sulphate and metals, and the presence of large numbers of SRB. Scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analysis of the formed precipitate indicated the formation of metal sulphides. Chicken manure was observed to play an important role in this treatment, which could not only provide carbon source but also reduce the adverse effect of strong acidity and metal toxicity on SRB activity. Metal removal could be mainly attributed to sulphides precipitation and sorption to chicken manure. This study indicated that SRB with chicken manure could be a novel alternative used for the prevention of acidic leachate from coal refuse. PMID:25189842

  8. Flux pinning properties of TFA-MOD (Y,Gd)Ba2Cu3Ox tapes with BaZrO3 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awaji, Satoshi; Namba, Masafumi; Watanabe, Kazuo; Miura, Masashi; Yoshizumi, Masateru; Izumi, Teruo; Shiohara, Yuh

    2010-01-01

    A high critical current density Jc with a nearly isotropic angular dependence at 77.3 K was recently obtained by the introduction of nanoparticles to (Y,RE)Ba2Cu3Oy (RE123, RE = Sm, Gd)-coated conductors prepared by trifluoroacetate metal-organic deposition (TFA-MOD). The flux pinning properties were evaluated on the basis of detailed measurements of the upper critical field, the irreversibility field and the critical current density of the TFA-MOD RE123-coated conductor. We found that strong random pinning by the BaZrO3 nanoparticles and weak c-axis correlated pinning by twin boundaries functioned cooperatively in nanoparticles introduced to (Y, Gd)123-coated conductors prepared by TFA-MOD. The coexistence of two different pinning centers played an important role in the nearly isotropic angular dependence of Jc.

  9. The first experimental observation of the higher-energy trans conformer of trifluoroacetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apóstolo, R. F. G.; Bazsó, Gábor; Bento, R. R. F.; Tarczay, G.; Fausto, R.

    2016-12-01

    We report here the first experimental observation of the higher-energy conformer of trifluoroacetic acid (trans-TFA). The new conformer was generated by selective narrowband near-infrared vibrational excitation of the lower-energy cis-TFA conformer isolated in cryogenic matrices (Ar, Kr, N2) and shown to spontaneously decay to this latter form in the various matrix media, by tunneling. The decay rates in the different matrices were measured and compared with those of the trans conformers of other carboxylic acids in similar experimental conditions. The experimental studies received support from quantum chemistry calculations undertaken at various levels of approximation, which allowed a detailed characterization of the relevant regions of the potential energy surface of the molecule and the detailed assignment of the infrared spectra of the two conformers in the various matrices. Noteworthly, in contrast to cis-TFA that has its trifluoromethyl group eclipsed with the Cdbnd O bond of the carboxylic moiety, trans-TFA has the trifluoromethyl group eclipsed with the Csbnd O bond. This unusual structure of trans-TFA results from the fact that the relative orientation of the CF3 and COOH groups in this geometry facilitates the establishment of an intramolecular hydrogen-bond-like interaction between the OH group and the closely located in-plane fluorine atom of the CF3 moiety.

  10. Rapid incorporation of docosahexaenoic acid from dietary sources into brain microsomal, synaptosomal and mitochondrial membranes in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Manabe, S; Wada, O; Crawford, M A

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the incorporation of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from several dietary sources into the brain tissue and intracellular organelles in mice which had been fed a 5% palm oil (low n-3 fatty acid level) diet for 8 or 11 weeks. The percentages of DHA in the tissues of mice fed 5% representative oils for 30 days or 5% purified n-3 fatty acid diets for 6 days were analyzed using gas chromatography. The percentage of DHA in the brain was ranked in the following order: the salmon oil diet group > the sardine oil diet group > > the perilla oil diet group > > the lard and palm oil diet groups for the 30 day feeding trial; and the DHA diet group > > the eicosapentaenoic acid and alpha-linolenic acid diet groups for the 6 day feeding trial. The percentage of arachidonic acid showed a more dramatic decrease than that of docosapentaenoic acid. These results reflected the plasma fatty acid concentrations, but were not as pronounced as the changes observed in the plasma. The majority of the DHA incorporated into the brain was recovered in microsomal, synaptosomal, and mitochondrial fractions separated by density gradient centrifugation. These membrane fractions took up DHA within several days. These results suggest that the intake of DHA itself increases the DHA level of brain membranes more rapidly than intake of the precursors in animals fed a low n-3 fatty acid level diet. PMID:9285258

  11. Detection of sudden structural damage using blind source separation and time-frequency approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morovati, V.; Kazemi, M. T.

    2016-05-01

    Seismic signal processing is one of the most reliable methods of detecting the structural damage during earthquakes. In this paper, the use of the hybrid method of blind source separation (BSS) and time-frequency analysis (TFA) is explored to detect the changes in the structural response data. The combination of the BSS and TFA is applied to the seismic signals due to the non-stationary nature of them. Firstly, the second-order blind identification technique is used to decompose the response signal of structural vibration into modal coordinate signals which will be mono-components for TFA. Then each mono-component signal is analyzed to extract instantaneous frequency of structure. Numerical simulations and a real-world seismic-excited structure with time-varying frequencies show the accuracy and robustness of the developed algorithm. TFA of extracted sources shows that used method can be successfully applied to structural damage detection. The results also demonstrate that the combined method can be used to identify the time instant of structural damage occurrence more sharply and effectively than by the use of TFA alone.

  12. Application of environmental forensics to identify the sources of ground water contamination using amino acid "finger print"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Kim, J.; Park, J.; Nam, Y.; Lee, J.; Yoo, E.; Kim, H.; Lee, W.; Choe, S.; Han, J.

    2011-12-01

    The analysis of patterns of amino acids of the leachate from livestock burial site and the wastewater from the manure treatment plant was performed to trace the source of NO3-N contamination in groundwater near mass burial sites. Amino acid was analyzed with LC-MSMS using ODS-II column after the derivatiztion with PITC (phenylisothiocyanate) by following Edman Method. The average concentration of amino acid in the burial leachate was 531.90 mg/L and livestock wastewater was 1.75 mg/L. The concentration of burial leachate is about 300 times higher than that of livestock wastewater. The order of the concentration of each amino acid which were commonly detected in leachate was Valin > Leucine > Isoleucin. On the other hands, livestock wastewater showed different trend (Alanine > Lysine > Valine). Six amino acids among 20 amino acids which were stably detected in leachate and livestock wastewater were selected and compared with peak pattern. By determining the relative ratio of concentrations of amino acids (Ile/Val, Leu/Trp, Val/Trp, Lys/Leu, Lys/Ile, Met/Lys) in the same sample, the sources of the contamination was concluded. Based on this analysis using those indicators, samples affected by livestock wastewater were 43.0% (324 samples) and samples influenced by fertilizer or compost were 57.0% (470 samples) among 754 samples. Any sample among 754 samples didn't seem to be effected by leachate of nearby burial site.

  13. Reactions of Methanesulfonic Acid with Amines and Ammonia as a Source of New Particles in Air.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haihan; Varner, Mychel E; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2016-03-01

    New particle formation (NPF) from gaseous precursors as a significant source of aerosol needs to be better understood to accurately predict the impacts on visibility, climate change, and human health. While ternary nucleation of sulfuric acid, amines/NH3, and water is recognized as a significant driver for NPF, increasing evidence suggests a contribution from methanesulfonic acid (MSA) and amines under certain conditions. Here we report the formation of particles 2.5-10 nm in diameter from the reactions of MSA with methylamine (MA), dimethylamine (DMA), and NH3 at reaction times of 2.3-7.8 s in a flow reactor and compare these particles with those previously reported to be formed from reaction with trimethylamine (TMA). The effects of water vapor and concentrations of gaseous precursors on the particle number concentration and particle size were studied. The presence of water significantly enhances particle formation and growth. Under similar experimental conditions, particle number concentrations decrease in the order MA ≫ TMA ≈ DMA ≫ NH3, where NH3 is 2-3 orders of magnitude less efficient than DMA. Quantum chemical calculations of likely intermediate clusters were carried out to provide insights into the role of water and the different capacities of amines/NH3 in particle formation. Both gas-phase basicity and hydrogen-bonding capacity of amines/NH3 contribute to the potential for particles to form and grow. Our results indicate that, although amines typically have concentrations 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than that of NH3 in the atmosphere, they still play an important role in driving NPF. PMID:26379061

  14. TFaNS Tone Fan Noise Design/Prediction System. Volume 2; User's Manual; 1.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topol, David A.; Eversman, Walter

    1999-01-01

    TFaNS is the Tone Fan Noise Design/Prediction System developed by Pratt & Whitney under contract to NASA Lewis (presently NASA Glenn). The purpose of this system is to predict tone noise emanating from a fan stage including the effects of reflection and transmission by the rotor and stator and by the duct inlet and nozzle. These effects have been added to an existing annular duct/isolated stator noise prediction capability. TFaNS consists of: the codes that compute the acoustic properties (reflection and transmission coefficients) of the various elements and write them to files. CUP3D: Fan Noise Coupling Code that reads these files, solves the coupling problem, and outputs the desired noise predictions. AWAKEN: CFD/Measured Wake Postprocessor which reformats CFD wake predictions and/or measured wake data so it can be used by the system. This volume of the report provides information on code input and file structure essential for potential users of TFANS. This report is divided into three volumes: Volume 1. System Description, CUP3D Technical Documentation, and Manual for Code Developers; Volume 2. User's Manual, TFANS Vers. 1.4; Volume 3. Evaluation of System Codes.

  15. A Field Measurement of Isocyanic Acid (HNCO): Evidence of a Secondary Source and Presence in Cloud Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Lee, A.; Liggio, G.; Wentzell, J. J.; Leaitch, W. R.; Macdonald, A.; Toom-Sauntry, D.; Modini, R. L.; Corrigan, A. L.; Russell, L. M.; Schroder, J.; Bertram, A. K.; Hawkins, L. N.

    2013-12-01

    Isocyanic acid (HNCO) has been shown to cause a variety of adverse health effects via protein carbamylation reactions. It is proposed as a key compound in smoke related health issues due to its well-known sources, biomass burning and cigarette smoke. In spite of this, our understanding of the atmospheric fate of this toxic compound is incomplete. More ambient measurements are needed to elucidate additional sources and to better characterize the sinks of HNCO in the atmosphere. The recent development of the Acetate Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Acid-CIMS) has enabled on-line measurement of HNCO at ambient mixing ratios. Ambient measurements of HNCO were performed in La Jolla, CA during the spring/summer of 2012, using the Acid-CIMS. HNCO mixing ratios were found to be approximately 150 pptv during the night, but typically increased to over 300 pptv in the early afternoon. From the observed diurnal profile and the correlation of HNCO with temperature and other secondary compounds (e.g. nitric acid), we report evidence of a secondary, photochemical source of HNCO. The observed HNCO likely arose as a combination of primary and secondary sources. We have also detected HNCO in cloudwater by coupling the Acid-CIMS to a Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first field evidence of cloud scavenging of HNCO. Our result show that the cloud scavenging of HNCO may be more efficient than predicted from its effective Henry's law constant. Campaign-averaged diurnal profiles of Black Carbon (BC), isocyanic acid (HNCO) and nitric acid (HNO3). Dotted lines show the averaged time of sunrise and sunset during the campaign.

  16. Connecting Source with Sink: The Role of Arabidopsis AAP8 in Phloem Loading of Amino Acids1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, James P.; Tegeder, Mechthild

    2016-01-01

    Allocation of large amounts of nitrogen to developing organs occurs in the phloem and is essential for plant growth and seed development. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and many other plant species, amino acids represent the dominant nitrogen transport forms in the phloem, and they are mainly synthesized in photosynthetically active source leaves. Following their synthesis, a broad spectrum of the amino nitrogen is actively loaded into the phloem of leaf minor veins and transported within the phloem sap to sinks such as developing leaves, fruits, or seeds. Controlled regulation of the source-to-sink transport of amino acids has long been postulated; however, the molecular mechanism of amino acid phloem loading was still unknown. In this study, Arabidopsis AMINO ACID PERMEASE8 (AAP8) was shown to be expressed in the source leaf phloem and localized to the plasma membrane, suggesting its function in phloem loading. This was further supported by transport studies with aap8 mutants fed with radiolabeled amino acids and by leaf exudate analyses. In addition, biochemical and molecular analyses revealed alterations in leaf nitrogen pools and metabolism dependent on the developmental stage of the mutants. Decreased amino acid phloem loading and partitioning to sinks led to decreased silique and seed numbers, but seed protein levels were unchanged, demonstrating the importance of AAP8 function for sink development rather than seed quality. Overall, these results show that AAP8 plays an important role in source-to-sink partitioning of nitrogen and that its function affects source leaf physiology and seed yield. PMID:27016446

  17. Different sources of dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and their effects on antibody responses in chickens.

    PubMed

    Parmentier, H K; Awati, A; Nieuwland, M G B; Schrama, J W; Sijben, J W C

    2002-09-01

    1. Effects of linoleic and linolenic acid provided via different oil sources on total antibody (Ab) titres, Ab isotypes after primary and secondary immunisation, and cutaneous hypersensitivity (CH) responses to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and maleyl-BSA, respectively, were studied in pullets fed on one of 4 diets. The diets were the basal control diet enriched with either sunflower oil or safflower oil as sources of linoleic acid, and linseed oil as a source of linolenic acid, tested against a control diet supplemented with animal fat. 2. Total Ab and immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype responses to BSA were affected by diet after primary, and diet x immunisation effects after secondary immunisation. Higher total Ab and IgG titres to BSA were found especially after primary immunisation in birds given the sunflower oil enriched diet, whereas birds given sunflower oil mounted significantly lower IgM titres to BSA after primary and secondary immunisation. The antibody responses to maleyl-BSA were affected by diet after primary, and immunisation x diet interactions after secondary immunisation. Sunflower oil enhanced total and IgG Ab titres to maleyl-BSA after primary immunisation, but decreased IgM titres to maleyl-BSA after primary and secondary immunisation. Cutaneous hypersensitivity responses to BSA and maleyl-BSA were not affected by the diet. 3. It is concluded that modulation of the magnitude and isotype of Ab responses of poultry to T cell-dependent antigens is affected not only by type of essential fatty acids, but also by their source. In the present study the n-6 source, sunflower oil, showed strong enhancement of primary Ab responses, directed to both Th2 and Th1 antigens. On the other hand, the different effects of safflower oil imply that constituents other than n-6 acids within dietary plant oils may affect immune responsiveness. 4. The relationship between magnitude and isotype of Ab responsiveness, type of antigen, and essential fatty acids is discussed. PMID

  18. Use of O and S Isotopes to Define Sources of Water and Sulfate in Acid Mine Drainage Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earnest, D.

    2001-12-01

    Coal mining in Maryland, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and other states has resulted in acid mine drainage problems in rivers throughout the region. The underground workings at the Kempton Mine have been abandoned since the 1950's, and the water filling these mines is discharged at a rate of 6,000,000 gallons per day into the headwaters of the Potomac River. This water has an average pH of 3.0 and an average dissolved load of 1 g/L. Evaluation of the mitigation options requires identification of water and acidity sources. We are using isotopic compositions of mine drainage waters to define hydrologic sources, flow paths, and acid sources. Water samples were taken monthly of mine water and other local sources. Oxygen isotope analyses are conducted on these samples. Seasonal variations in δ ^{18}O composition of mine drainage would suggest significant rapid meteoric input. Little or no variation in \\delta18O composition would suggest that mine drainage is derived primarily from groundwater sources or that the residence time in the mine is long. Sulfate precipitated as barite from these samples is analyzed for δ ^{34}S and \\delta18O. There is significantly more sulfate in the mine drainage waters than there is iron. The isotopic signature is used to determine whether the sulfur source is pyritic or organic. Sulfate δ 18O data are used to distinguish between sub-aerial and sub-aqueous oxidation of sulfur.

  19. Static corrosion of construction materials exposed to superphosphoric acid made from various sources of phosphate rock

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.T.; McDonald, C.L.; McGill, K.E.

    1994-10-01

    Corrosion tests were performed with various construction materials, such as carbon steel, cast iron, stainless steels, nickel and nickel-based alloys, copper and its alloys, aluminum alloy, zirconium alloy, and tantalum, exposed to wet-process superphosphoric acids (approximately 70% P{sub 2}O{sub 5}) from all the suppliers in the United States and to a technical-grade (55% P{sub 2}O{sub 5}) acid made by the electric furnace process. The study was conducted in response to reports from pipe-reactor users of excessive corrosion by superphosphoric acids and electric furnace acid. Test temperatures were ambient (approximately 21{degrees}C or 70{degrees}F), 66{degrees}C (150{degrees}F), and 93{degrees}C (200{degrees}F). Test results showed that temperature was a significant factor in acid corrosivity. Electric furnace acid was more corrosive than the superphosphoric acids. Carbon steel, cast iron, and aluminum alloy were not resistant to either the superphosphoric acids or the electric furnace acid. Nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and nickel-molybdenum (Ni-Mo) based alloys and tantalum exhibited adequate corrosion resistance in the superphosphoric acids and the electric furnace acid. Stainless steels performed well in all test acids at all test temperatures with some exceptions in the electric furnace acid at 93{degrees}C. Zirconium alloy, copper and its alloys, pure nickel, and Monel 400 provided adequate corrosion resistance to all test acids at ambient temperature only.

  20. Identification of the subsurface sulfide bodies responsible for acidity in Río Tinto source water, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ortiz, David; Fernández-Remolar, David C.; Granda, Ángel; Quesada, Cecilio; Granda, Teresa; Prieto-Ballesteros, Olga; Molina, Antonio; Amils, Ricardo

    2014-04-01

    The acidic waters of the Río Tinto rise from several acidic springs that emerge in the area surrounding Peña de Hierro (Fernández-Remolar et al., 2005). These springs are located above minor normal faults that act as natural conduits for the water from the underlying deep aquifer. Although it has been suggested that the acidity of the river originates from the biooxidation of massive and stockwork sulfides (Fernández-Remolar et al., 2008a), the location of the source for these acidic solutions has not previously been established. This lack of evidence has been used to suggest that the acidity of the Río Tinto may be the product of the most conspicuous of the possible source, the extensive mining of the area over approximately the last 5000 years (Davis et al., 2000). In this paper, we report resistivity and time-domain electromagnetic sounding data from the Río Tinto aquifer to a depth of ∼600 m, revealing the locations for the acidic sources. Both types of data support the presence of two distinct geological units that we interpret as thrust sheets emplaced onto each other during the Variscan orogeny of the Carboniferous. These units, both of which contain massive and stockwork sulfides, act as the aquifer for the acidic waters of the Río Tinto. Under this scenario, which is in agreement with the geological record of the Río Tinto fluvial system for the past 6 Ma (Moreno et al., 2003), our results imply that mining activity had little influence on the generation of the acidic river waters.

  1. Stable carbon isotope analysis of nucleic acids to trace sources of dissolved substrates used by estuarine bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Coffin, R B; Velinsky, D J; Devereux, R; Price, W A; Cifuentes, L A

    1990-01-01

    The natural abundance of stable carbon isotopes measured in bacterial nucleic acids extracted from estuarine bacterial concentrates was used to trace sources of organic matter for bacteria in aquatic environments. The stable carbon isotope ratios of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and nucleic acids extracted from cultures resembled those of the carbon source on which bacteria were grown. The carbon isotope discrimination between the substrate and total cell carbon from bacterial cultures averaged 2.3% +/- 0.6% (n = 13). Furthermore, the isotope discrimination between the substrate and nucleic acids extracted from bacterial cultures was 2.4% +/- 0.4% (n = 10), not significantly different from the discrimination between bacteria and the substrate. Estuarine water samples were prefiltered through 1-micron-pore-size cartridge filters. Bacterium-sized particles in the filtrates were concentrated with tangential-flow filtration and centrifugation, and nucleic acids were then extracted from these concentrates. Hybridization with 16S rRNA probes showed that approximately 90% of the nucleic acids extracted on two sample dates were of eubacterial origin. Bacteria and nucleic acids from incubation experiments using estuarine water samples enriched with dissolved organic matter from Spartina alterniflora and Cyclotella caspia had stable carbon isotope values similar to those of the substrate sources. In a survey that compared diverse estuarine environments, stable carbon isotopes of bacteria grown in incubation experiments ranged from -31.9 to -20.5%. The range in isotope values of nucleic acids extracted from indigenous bacteria from the same waters was similar, -27.9 to -20.2%. Generally, the lack of isotope discrimination between bacteria and nucleic acids that was noted in the laboratory was observed in the field.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:2389930

  2. Omega-3 fatty acid production from enzyme saccharified hemp hydrolysate using a novel marine thraustochytrid strain.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Adarsha; Abraham, Reinu E; Barrow, Colin J; Puri, Munish

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a newly isolated marine thraustochytrid strain, Schizochytrium sp. DT3, was used for omega-3 fatty acid production by growing on lignocellulose biomass obtained from local hemp hurd (Cannabis sativa) biomass. Prior to enzymatic hydrolysis, hemp was pretreated with sodium hydroxide to open the biomass structure for the production of sugar hydrolysate. The thraustochytrid strain was able to grow on the sugar hydrolysate and accumulated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). At the lowest carbon concentration of 2%, the PUFAs productivity was 71% in glucose and 59% in the sugars hydrolysate, as a percentage of total fatty acids. Saturated fatty acids (SFAs) levels were highest at about 49% of TFA using 6% glucose as the carbon source. SFAs of 41% were produced using 2% of SH. This study demonstrates that SH produced from lignocellulose biomass is a potentially useful carbon source for the production of omega-3 fatty acids in thraustochytrids, as demonstrated using the new strain, Schizochytrium sp. DT3. PMID:25497057

  3. Neonatal and fetal exposure to trans-fatty acid retards early growth and adiposity while adversely affecting glucose in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, Kylie; Sajadian, Soraya; Jenkins, Kurt A.; Wilson, Martha D.; Carr, J. Jeffery; Wagner, Janice D.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2010-01-01

    Industrially produced trans fatty acids (TFAs) consumed in western diets are incorporated into maternal and fetal tissues, and are passed linearly to offspring via breast milk. We hypothesized that TFA exposure in utero and during lactation in infants would promote obesity and poor glycemic control as compared to unmodified fatty acids. We further hypothesized that in utero exposure alone may program for these outcomes in adulthood. To test this hypothesis we fed female C57/BL6 mice identical western diets that differed only in cis- or trans-isomers of C18:1 and then aimed to determine whether maternal transfer of TFAs through pregnancy and lactation alters growth, body composition and glucose metabolism. Mice were unexposed, exposed during pregnancy, during lactation, or throughout pregnancy and lactation to TFA. Body weight and composition (by computed tomography), and glucose metabolism we assessed at weaning and adulthood. TFA exposure through breast milk caused significant early growth retardation (p<0.001) and higher fasting glucose (p=0.01) but insulin sensitivity was not different. Elevated plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 in mice consuming TFA-enriched milk (p=0.02) may contribute to later catch-up growth, leanness and preserved peripheral insulin sensitivity observed in these mice. Mice exposed to TFA in utero underwent rapid early neonatal growth with TFA-free breast milk and had significantly impaired insulin sensitivity (p<0.05) and greater abdominal fat (p=0.01). We conclude that very early catch-up growth resulted in impaired peripheral insulin sensitivity in this model of diet-related fetal and neonatal programming. TFA surprisingly retarded growth and adiposity while still adversely affecting glucose metabolism. PMID:20650350

  4. An analytical method for trifluoroacetic Acid in water and air samples using headspace gas chromatographic determination of the methyl ester.

    PubMed

    Zehavi, D; Seiber, J N

    1996-10-01

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of trace levels of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), an atmospheric breakdown product of several of the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) replacements for the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) refrigerants, in water and air. TFA is derivatized to the volatile methyl trifluoroacetate (MTFA) and determined by automated headspace gas chromatography (HSGC) with electron-capture detection or manual HSGC using GC/MS in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The method is based on the reaction of an aqueous sample containing TFA with dimethyl sulfate (DMS) in concentrated sulfuric acid in a sealed headspace vial under conditions favoring distribution of MTFA to the vapor phase. Water samples are prepared by evaporative concentration, during which TFA is retained as the anion, followed by extraction with diethyl ether of the acidified sample and then back-extraction of TFA (as the anion) in aqueous bicarbonate solution. The extraction step is required for samples with a relatively high background of other salts and organic materials. Air samples are collected in sodium bicarbonate-glycerin-coated glass denuder tubes and prepared by rinsing the denuder contents with water to form an aqueous sample for derivatization and analysis. Recoveries of TFA from spiked water, with and without evaporative concentration, and from spiked air were quantitative, with estimated detection limits of 10 ng/mL (unconcentrated) and 25 pg/mL (concentrated 250 mL:1 mL) for water and 1 ng/m(3) (72 h at 5 L/min) for air. Several environmental air, fogwater, rainwater, and surface water samples were successfully analyzed; many showed the presence of TFA. PMID:21619278

  5. Growth of bacteria on 3-nitropropionic acid as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Shirley F; Shin, Kwanghee A; Payne, Rayford B; Spain, Jim C

    2010-06-01

    3-Nitropropionic acid (3NPA) is a widespread nitroaliphatic toxin found in a variety of legumes and fungi. Several enzymes have been reported that can transform the compound, but none led to the mineralization of 3NPA. We report here the isolation of bacteria that grow on 3NPA and its anion, propionate-3-nitronate (P3N), as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. Experiments with resting cells, cell extracts, and purified enzymes indicate that the pathway involves conversion of 3NPA to P3N, which upon denitration yields malonic semialdehyde, nitrate, nitrite, and traces of H(2)O(2). Malonic semialdehyde is decarboxylated to acetyl coenzyme A. The gene that encodes the enzyme responsible for the denitration of P3N was cloned and expressed, and the enzyme was purified. Stoichiometry of the reaction indicates that the enzyme is a monooxygenase. The gene sequence is related to a large group of genes annotated as 2-nitropropane dioxygenases, but the P3N monooxygenase and closely related enzymes form a cluster within COG2070 that differs from previously characterized 2-nitropropane dioxygenases by their substrate specificities and reaction products. The results suggest that the P3N monooxygenases enable bacteria to exploit 3NPA in natural habitats as a growth substrate. PMID:20382807

  6. Infusions of artichoke and milk thistle represent a good source of phenolic acids and flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carla; Barros, Lillian; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2015-01-01

    Cynara scolymus L. (artichoke) and Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertn (milk thistle) are two herbs well-known for their efficiency in the prevention/treatment of liver injuries, among other chronic diseases. Therefore, the aim of this work was to characterize specific bioactive components, phenolic compounds, in hydromethanolic extracts but also in infusions (the most commonly used preparations) obtained from the whole plant of milk thistle and artichoke. The phenolic profiles were accessed using HPLC-DAD-MS/ESI. Infusions of both species presented higher phenolic contents than the hydromethanolic extracts. Milk thistle presented a similar phenolic composition between the two preparations, revealing only differences in the quantities obtained. Nevertheless, artichoke revealed a slightly different profile considering infusion and hydromethanolic extracts. Apigenin-7-O-glucuronide was the major flavonoid found in milk thistle, while luteolin-7-O-glucuronide was the most abundant in artichoke. Therefore, infusions of both artichoke and milk thistle represent a good source of bioactive compounds, especially phenolic acids and flavonoids. PMID:25367590

  7. Evaluation of the Strecker synthesis as a source of amino acids on carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, N. R.; Peterson, Etta; Chang, S.

    1991-01-01

    The Strecker synthesis (SS) has been proposed as the source of amino acids (AA) formed during aqueous alteration of carbonaceous chondrites. It is postulated that the aldehyde and ketone precursors of the meteoritic AA originated in interstellar syntheses and accreted on the meteorite parent body along with other reactant species in cometesimal ices. The SS has been run with formaldehyde, acetyldehyde, propionaldehyde, acetone, and methyl ketone as starting materials. To study the effect of minerals on the reaction, the SS was run in the presence and absence of dust from the Allende meteorite using deuterated aldehydes and ketones as starting materials. The products were studied by GC/MS. With the exception of glycine, the retention of deuterium in the AA was greater than 90 pct. Some D exchange with water does occur, however, and determination of the rate of exchange as a function of pH and temperature may allow some bounds to be placed on the duration of parent body aqueous alteration. The retention of D by the AA under conditions studied thus far is consistent with the model that a SS starting from interstellar aldehydes and ketones led to the production of meteoritic AA.

  8. Light-source-dependent role of nitrate and humic acid in tetracycline photolysis: kinetics and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Niu, Junfeng; Li, Yang; Wang, Wenlong

    2013-09-01

    To elucidate the environmental fate of tetracycline (TC), we reported the light-source-dependent dual effects of humic acid (HA) and NO3(-) on TC photolysis. TC photolysis rate was highly pH- and concentration-dependent, and was especially enhanced at higher pH and lower initial TC concentrations. Under UV-254 and UV-365 irradiation, HA inhibited TC photolysis through competitive photoabsorption or reactive oxygen species (ROS) quenching with TC; under solar and xenon lamp irradiation, TC photolysis was enhanced at low HA concentration due to its photosensitization, whereas was suppressed at high HA concentration due to competitive photoabsorption or ROS quenching with TC. Similarly, the effect of NO3(-) on TC photolysis varied with light irradiation conditions. Even under the same light irradiation conditions, the effects of HA or NO3(-) on TC photolysis varied with their concentrations. The electron spin resonance spectrometer and ROS scavenger experiments demonstrated that TC photolysis was involved in O2(-)-mediated self-sensitized photolysis. The photolysis pathways were involved in hydroxylation and loss of some groups. More toxic intermediates than TC were generated under different light irradiation conditions. These results can provide insight into the potential fate and transformation of TC in surficial waters. PMID:23618345

  9. Sources of mycosporine-like amino acids in planktonic Chlorella-bearing ciliates (Ciliophora)

    PubMed Central

    SONNTAG, BETTINA; SUMMERER, MONIKA; SOMMARUGA, RUBEN

    2007-01-01

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are a family of secondary metabolites known to protect organisms exposed to solar UV radiation. We tested their distribution among several planktonic ciliates bearing Chlorella isolated from an oligo-mesotrophic lake in Tyrol, Austria. In order to test the origin of these compounds, the MAAs were assessed by high performance liquid chromatography in both the ciliates and their symbiotic algae. Considering all Chlorella-bearing ciliates, we found: (i) seven different MAAs (mycosporine-glycine, palythine, asterina-330, shinorine, porphyra-334, usujirene, palythene); (ii) one to several MAAs per species and (iii) qualitative and quantitative seasonal changes in the MAAs (e.g. in Pelagodileptus trachelioides). In all species tested, concentrations of MAAs were always <1% of ciliate dry weight. Several MAAs were also identified in the Chlorella isolated from the ciliates, thus providing initial evidence for their symbiotic origin. In Uroleptus sp., however, we found evidence for a dietary source of MAAs. Our results suggest that accumulation of MAAs in Chlorella-bearing ciliates represents an additional benefit of this symbiosis and an adaptation for survival in sunlit, UV-exposed waters.

  10. Root-zone acidity affects relative uptake of nitrate and ammonium from mixed nitrogen sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessey, J. K.; Henry, L. T.; Chaillou, S.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Soybean plants (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Ransom) were grown for 21 days on 4 sources of N (1.0 mM NO3-, 0.67 mM NO3- plus 0.33 mM NH4+, 0.33 mM NO3- plus 0.67 mM NH4+, and 1.0 mM NH4+) in hydroponic culture with the acidity of the nutrient solution controlled at pH 6.0, 5.5, 5.0, and 4.5. Dry matter and total N accumulation of the plants was not significantly affected by N-source at any of the pH levels except for decreases in these parameters in plants supplied solely with NH4+ at pH 4.5. Shoot-to-root ratios increased in plants which had an increased proportion [correction of proporiton] of NH4(+)-N in their nutrient solutions at all levels of root-zone pH. Uptake of NO3- and NH4+ was monitored daily by ion chromatography as depletion of these ions from the replenished hydroponic solutions. At all pH levels the proportion of either ion that was absorbed increased as the ratio of that ion increased in the nutrient solution. In plants which were supplied with sources of NO3- plus NH4+, NH4+ was absorbed at a ratio of 2:1 over NO3- at pH 6.0. As the pH of the root-zone declined, however, NH4+ uptake decreased and NO3- uptake increased. Thus, the NH4+ to NO3- uptake ratio declined with decreases in root-zone pH. The data indicate a negative effect of declining root-zone pH on NH4+ uptake and supports a hypothesis that the inhibition of growth of plants dependent on NH4(+)-N at low pH is due to a decline in NH4+ uptake and a consequential limitation of growth by N stress.