Science.gov

Sample records for acoustic-based nondestructive methods

  1. Forty years with nondestructive methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodoru, George

    1999-12-01

    The author takes the opportunity to strike the balance of his activity. He was the first establishing the qualitative and quantitative influence of curing conditions of concrete on the relations between nondestructively measured values, ultrasonic pulse velocity or attenuation and rebound indices (V,A,R) and its compressive strength. Since 1969 he had been behind a new approach for simultaneous use of concrete. The advantage of this multiple correlation concept (an off-spring of an original method for statistical quality analysis for the control of concrete quality) have been already well documented. The author established also a new criterium for the frost resistance of concrete, based on the variation of the logarithmic decrement of the vibrations (both free or forced). His activity as an expert led to the foundation of the "Engineering Society Cologne." He was entrusted with its presidency. Further examples shall inform about different field investigations carried out.

  2. Electromagnetic Imaging Methods for Nondestructive Evaluation Applications

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yiming; Liu, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic nondestructive tests are important and widely used within the field of nondestructive evaluation (NDE). The recent advances in sensing technology, hardware and software development dedicated to imaging and image processing, and material sciences have greatly expanded the application fields, sophisticated the systems design and made the potential of electromagnetic NDE imaging seemingly unlimited. This review provides a comprehensive summary of research works on electromagnetic imaging methods for NDE applications, followed by the summary and discussions on future directions. PMID:22247693

  3. Method for non-destructive testing

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2011-08-30

    Non-destructive testing method may include providing a source material that emits positrons in response to bombardment of the source material with photons. The source material is exposed to photons. The source material is positioned adjacent the specimen, the specimen being exposed to at least some of the positrons emitted by the source material. Annihilation gamma rays emitted by the specimen are detected.

  4. Emerging nondestructive inspection methods for aging aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, A; Dahlke, L; Gieske, J

    1994-01-01

    This report identifies and describes emerging nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods that can potentially be used to inspect commercial transport and commuter aircraft for structural damage. The nine categories of emerging NDI techniques are: acoustic emission, x-ray computed tomography, backscatter radiation, reverse geometry x-ray, advanced electromagnetics, including magnetooptic imaging and advanced eddy current techniques, coherent optics, advanced ultrasonics, advanced visual, and infrared thermography. The physical principles, generalized performance characteristics, and typical applications associated with each method are described. In addition, aircraft inspection applications are discussed along with the associated technical considerations. Finally, the status of each technique is presented, with a discussion on when it may be available for use in actual aircraft maintenance programs. It should be noted that this is a companion document to DOT/FAA/CT-91/5, Current Nondestructive Inspection Methods for Aging Aircraft.

  5. Nondestructive assay methods for solids containing plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Macmurdo, K.W.; Gray, L.W.; Gibbs, A.

    1984-06-01

    Specific nondestructive assay (NDA) methods, e.g. calorimetry, coincidence neutron counting, singles neutron counting, and gamma ray spectrometry, were studied to provide the Savannah River Plant with an NDA method to measure the plutonium content of solid scrap (slag and crucible) generated in the JB-Line plutonium metal production process. Results indicate that calorimetry can be used to measure the plutonium content to within about 3% in 4 to 6 hours by using computerized equilibrium sample power predictive models. Calorimetry results confirm that a bias exists in the present indirect measurement method used to estimate the plutonium content of slag and crucible. Singles neutron counting of slag and crucible can measure plutonium to only +-30%, but coincidence neutron counting methods improve measurement precision to better than +-10% in less than ten minutes. Only four portions of a single slag and crucible sample were assayed, and further study is recommended.

  6. Nondestructive methods to assess dental implant stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Tabrizi, Aydin; Berhanu, Bruk; Ochs, Mark W.

    2012-04-01

    The robustness and reliability of two nondestructive evaluation methods to assess dental prostheses stability is presented. The study aims at addressing an increasing need in the biomedical area where robust, reliable, and noninvasive methods to assess the bone-interface of dental and orthopedic implants are increasingly demanded for clinical diagnosis and direct prognosis. The methods are based on the electromechanical impedance method and on the propagation of solitary waves. Nobel Biocare® 4.3 x 13 mm implants were entrenched inside bovine rib bones that were immersed inside Normal Saline for 24 hours before test in order to avoid dehydration and simulating physiologic osmolarity of the corticocancellous bone and plasma. Afterwards the bones were immersed in a solution of nitric acid to allow material degradation, inversely simulating a bone-healing process. This process was monitored by bonding a Piezoceramic Transducer (PZT) to the abutment and measuring the electrical admittance of the PZT over time. On the other hand the bones calcium loss was calculated after immersing in acid by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy over time for comparison. Moreover a novel transducer based on the generation and detection of highly nonlinear solitary waves was used to assess the stiffness of the abutment-implant bone. In these experiments it was found that the PZT's conductance and some of the solitary waves parameters are sensitive to the degradation of the bones and was correlated to the bone calcium loss over time.

  7. A Nondestructive Method of Grain Microstructure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, J.

    2004-09-03

    Customarily, a material has been sectioned to study its internal grain microstructure and thus in the process is destroyed. Using x-rays, however, there are two nondestructive methods of determining the sources of diffraction spots and hence the internal grain microstructure of a sample. One technique consists of placing a wire in the path of a diffracted ray so that its image is prevented from appearing on the detector screen. Ray-tracing is then done to locate the source within the sample from whence the rays emanate. In this experiment, we investigate the other technique of determining source location by recording diffraction patterns at ten equally-spaced detector distances and then graphing the data with reasonable-fit lines using the least-squares fitting routine. We then perform a ray-tracing triangulation technique to pinpoint the location of the source from which the rays are coming. Cluster analyses are employed and plots of ray number versus pixel position of certain points at some particular detector distances are created. An error propagation analysis is then carried out as a check to the cluster analyses and graphs of error deviation along the detector path versus ray number are constructed. With statistical error analyses and construction of error boxes using chosen pixel error deviations and delta z error values, the best error measurement using the detector method was found to be plus/minus 100 microns. In this study, it was found that the detector method provided a much poorer resolution than the traditional wire technique of which there is a source size precision of within 1-5 microns. The detector method, though, is sufficient for large-grain material studies.

  8. Development of ultrasonic methods for the nondestructive inspection of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claytor, T. M.; Ellingson, W. A.

    1983-08-01

    Nondestructive inspection of Portland cement and refractory concrete is conducted to determine strength, thickness, presence of voids or foreign matter, presence of cracks, amount of degradation due to chemical attack, and other properties without the necessity of coring the structure (which is usually accomplished by destructively removing a sample). The state of the art of acoustic nondestructive testing methods for Portland cement and refractory concrete is reviewed. Most nondestructive work on concrete has concentrated on measuring acoustic velocity by through transmission methods. Development of a reliable pitch-catch or pulse-echo system would provide a method of measuring thickness with access from only one side of the concrete.

  9. Development of ultrasonic methods for the nondestructive inspection of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Claytor, T.N.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1983-08-01

    Nondestructive inspection of Portland cement and refractory concrete is conducted to determine strength, thickness, presence of voids or foreign matter, presence of cracks, amount of degradation due to chemical attack, and other properties without the necessity of coring the structure (which is usually accomplished by destructively removing a sample). This paper reviews the state of the art of acoustic nondestructive testing methods for Portland cement and refractory concrete. Most nondestructive work on concrete has concentrated on measuring acoustic velocity by through transmission methods. Development of a reliable pitch-catch or pulse-echo system would provide a method of measuring thickness with access from only one side of the concrete.

  10. Nondestructive tests of regenerative chambers. [evaluating nondestructive methods of determining metal bond integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Vecchies, L.; Wood, R.

    1974-01-01

    The capabilities and limitations of nondestructive evaluation methods were studied to detect and locate bond deficiencies in regeneratively cooled thrust chambers for rocket engines. Flat test panels and a cylinder were produced to simulate regeneratively cooled thrust chamber walls. Planned defects with various bond integrities were produced in the panels to evaluate the sensitivity, accuracy, and limitations of nondestructive methods to define and locate bond anomalies. Holography, acoustic emission, and ultrasonic scan were found to yield sufficient data to discern bond quality when used in combination and in selected sequences. Bonding techniques included electroforming and brazing. Materials of construction included electroformed nickel bonded to Nickel 200 and OFHC copper, electroformed copper bonded to OFHC copper, and 300 series stainless steel brazed to OFHC copper. Variations in outer wall strength, wall thickness, and defect size were evaluated for nondestructive test response.

  11. NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING METHODS FOR GEOTHERMAL PIPING.

    SciTech Connect

    BERNDT,M.L.

    2001-03-23

    Non-destructive testing is a key component of optimized plant inspection and maintenance programs. Risk based inspection, condition based maintenance and reliability centered maintenance systems all require detection, location and sizing of defects or flaws by non-destructive methods. Internal damage of geothermal piping by corrosion and erosion-corrosion is an ongoing problem requiring inspection and subsequent maintenance decisions to ensure safe and reliable performance. Conventional manual ultrasonic testing to determine remaining wall thickness has major limitations, particularly when damage is of a random and localized nature. Therefore, it is necessary to explore alternative non-destructive methods that offer potential benefits in terms of accurate quantification of size, shape and location of damage, probability of detection, ability to use on-line over long ranges, and economics. A review of non-destructive methods and their applicability to geothermal piping was performed. Based on this, ongoing research will concentrate on long range guided wave and dynamic methods.

  12. Non-destructive testing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2011-10-04

    Non-destructive testing apparatus may comprise a photon source and a source material that emits positrons in response to bombardment of the source material with photons. The source material is positionable adjacent the photon source and a specimen so that when the source material is positioned adjacent the photon source it is exposed to photons produced thereby. When the source material is positioned adjacent the specimen, the specimen is exposed to at least some of the positrons emitted by the source material. A detector system positioned adjacent the specimen detects annihilation gamma rays emitted by the specimen. Another embodiment comprises a neutron source and a source material that emits positrons in response to neutron bombardment.

  13. On-Line Nondestructive Methods for Examining Fuel Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Pardini, Allan F.; Bond, Leonard J.; Good, Morris S.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Saurwein, John J.; Gray, Joseph N.

    2007-09-15

    Tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuels, being considered for use in various advanced nuclear power reactors, consist of sub-millimeter diameter uranium oxide spheres uniformly coated to prevent the release of fission products into the reactor. About 15 billion of these spheres are needed to fuel a single reactor. Current quality control (QC) methods are manual, can destroy test specimens, and are not economically feasible. Replacing these methods with nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, automated for higher speed, will make fuel production and reactor operation economically feasible, considering the requirement for extremely large fuel particle throughput rates. This paper reports a project to develop and demonstrate nondestructive examination methods to detect and reject defective particles, and in particular progress made in the final year of a Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project . The work explored adapting, developing, and demonstrating innovative nondestructive test methods to cost-effectively assure the quality of large percentages of the fuel particles.

  14. Universal non-destructive testing method in the microwave range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, R. Yu; Fadeev, G. N.; Gerasimov, Yu V.; Kondrakova, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    Considered in this paper, a new method of nondestructive control based on the spectra of radio wave radiation of the microwave range wideband scanning receiver. It is experimentally shown that this method has a high accuracy in the determination of the frequency spectrum. This allows the method considered to reach a sensitivity of 5-6 Hz/nm.

  15. Method and apparatus for nondestructive in vivo measurement of photosynthesis

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, E.

    1988-02-22

    A device for in situ, nondestructive measurement of photosynthesis in live plants and photosynthetic microorganisms is disclosed which comprises a Clark-type oxygen electrode having a substantially transparent cathode comprised of an optical fiber having a metallic grid microetched onto its front face and sides, an anode, a substantially transparent electrolyte film, and a substantially transparent oxygen permeable membrane. The device is designed to be placed in direct contact with a photosynthetic portion of a living plant, and nondestructive, noninvasive measurement of photosynthetic oxygen production from the plant can be taken by passing light through the fiber-optic cathode, transparent electrolyte and transparent membrane, and onto the plant so that photosynthesis occurs. The oxygen thus produced by the plant is measured polarographically by the electrode. The present invention allows for rapid, nondestructive measurements of photosynthesis in living plants in a manner heretofore impossible using prior art methods. 6 figs.

  16. Method and apparatus for nondestructive in vivo measurement of photosynthesis

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, Elias

    1988-01-01

    A device for in situ, nondestructive measurement of photosynthesis in live plants and photosynthetic microorganisms is disclosed which comprises a Clark-type oxygen electrode having a substantially transparent cathode comprised of an optical fiber having a metallic grid microetched onto its front face and sides, an anode, a substantially transparent electrolyte film, and a substantially transparent oxygen permeable membrane. The device is designed to be placed in direct contact with a photosynthetic portion of a living plant, and nondestructive, noninvasive measurement of photosynthetic oxygen production from the plant can be taken by passing light through the fiber-optic cathode, transparent electroyte and transparent membrane, and onto the plant so that photosynthesis occurs. The oxygen thus produced by the plant is measured polargraphically by the electrode. The present invention allows for rapid, nondestructive measurements of photosynthesis in living plants in a manner heretofore impossible using prior art methods.

  17. Nondestructive method for measuring residual stresses in metals, a concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwebel, C. D.

    1968-01-01

    Nondestructive direct measurement of residual surface stresses in metals can be made because metal under stress has a different electrochemical solution potential than in the unstressed condition. The method uses two matched electrolytic cells to cancel extraneous effects on the actual solution potential of the metal specimen.

  18. Evaluation of methods for nondestructive testing of brazed joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanno, A.

    1968-01-01

    Evaluation of nondestructive methods of testing brazed joints reveals that ultrasonic testing is effective in the detection of nonbonds in diffusion bonded samples. Radiography provides excellent resolutions of void or inclusion defects, and the neutron radiographic technique shows particular advantage for brazing materials containing cadmium.

  19. A nondestructive method for continuously monitoring plant growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzkopf, S. H.

    1985-01-01

    In the past, plant growth generally has been measured using destructive methods. This paper describes a nondestructive technique for continuously monitoring plant growth. The technique provides a means of directly and accurately measuring plant growth over both short and long time intervals. Application of this technique to the direct measurement of plant growth rates is illustrated using corn (Zea mays L.) as an example.

  20. Uranium holdup in concrete floors: a comparison of nondestructive methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hardt, T.L.; Dedo, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    In 1978, Babcock and Wilcox ceased operations at its high-enriched uranium conversion facility in Apollo, Pennsylvania. Incorporated in the Company's action was the responsibility to clean up, recover and/or identify any an all uranium that might be held up in processing equipment, piping, and the building. By 1980, most of the historical inventory difference had been recovered from the equipment and piping, which had been removed from the plant. It was anticipated that over the 20-yr history of this facility, some special nuclear material (SNM) would be embedded in the floors of the building. The objective of this work was to develop a method to measure this material nondestructively and as accurately as possible. This paper illustrates two nondestructive methods used at the Apollo facility and then presents a comparison of the NDA to the results of destructive recovery.

  1. Method for nondestructive fuel assay of laser fusion targets

    DOEpatents

    Farnum, Eugene H.; Fries, R. Jay

    1976-01-01

    A method for nondestructively determining the deuterium and tritium content of laser fusion targets by counting the x rays produced by the interaction of tritium beta particles with the walls of the microballoons used to contain the deuterium and tritium gas mixture under high pressure. The x rays provide a direct measure of the tritium content and a means for calculating the deuterium content using the initial known D-T ratio and the known deuterium and tritium diffusion rates.

  2. Development of Nondestructive Inspection Methods for Composite Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, D. K.; Barnard, D. J.; Peters, J. J.; Dayal, V.

    2003-03-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of two complementary nondestructive inspection methods for repairs made on aircraft composite honeycomb structures: computer aided tap testing (CATT) and air-coupled ultrasonic testing (AC-UT). The CATT, being a semi-automated and quantitative technique, is exploited to map out the interior conditions of a repaired part. The same repair is also imaged with air-coupled ultrasound and both compared with the results from destructive sectioning.

  3. Nondestructive acoustic electric field probe apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a nondestructive acoustic electric field probe and its method of use. A source of acoustic pulses of arbitrary but selected shape is placed in an oil bath along with material to be tested across which a voltage is disposed and means for receiving acoustic pulses after they have passed through the material. The received pulses are compared with voltage changes across the material occurring while acoustic pulses pass through it and analysis is made thereof to determine preselected characteristics of the material.

  4. Laser heterodyne photothermal nondestructive method: extension to transparent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pencheva, V.; Penchev, S.; Naboko, V.; Toyoda, K.; Donchev, T.

    2007-03-01

    We present a contribution to the development of the laser heterodyne method of nondestructive material analysis employing photothermal displacement (PTD) probe. PTD is a dominant factor of the photothermal effect in metals and semiconductors, where the derived linear dependence on absorbed energy exhibits a fingerprint of their physical properties. Theoretical consideration of the case of transparent probe is accomplished extending thermal diffusion model. Laser double heterodyne detection is verified for opaque and transparent probes, and in the exclusive case of silicon. The achieved resolution of photothermal displacement is less than 10 -12 m well above the limits of heterodyne measurement.

  5. Nondestructive testing methods for 55-gallon, waste storage drums

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, R.H.; Hildebrand, B.P.; Hockey, R.L.; Riechers, D.M.; Spanner, J.C.; Duncan, D.R.

    1993-06-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) authorized Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to conduct a feasibility study to identify promising nondestructive testing (NDT) methods for detecting general and localized (both pitting and pinhole) corrosion in the 55-gal drums that are used to store solid waste materials at the Hanford Site. This document presents results obtained during a literature survey, identifies the relevant reference materials that were reviewed, provides a technical description of the methods that were evaluated, describes the laboratory tests that were conducted and their results, identifies the most promising candidate methods along with the rationale for these selections, and includes a work plan for recommended follow-on activities. This report contains a brief overview and technical description for each of the following NDT methods: magnetic testing techniques; eddy current testing; shearography; ultrasonic testing; radiographic computed tomography; thermography; and leak testing with acoustic detection.

  6. Total Gamma Count Rate Analysis Method for Nondestructive Assay Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cecilia R. Hoffman; Yale D. Harker

    2006-03-01

    A new approach to nondestructively characterize waste for disposal, based on total gamma response, has been developed at the Idaho Cleanup Project by CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC and Idaho State University, and is called the total gamma count rate analysis method. The total gamma count rate analysis method measures gamma interactions that produce energetic electrons or positrons in a detector. Based on previous experience with waste assays, the radionuclide content of the waste container is then determined. This approach potentially can yield minimum detection limits of less than 10 nCi/g. The importance of this method is twofold. First, determination of transuranic activity can be made for waste containers that are below the traditional minimum detection limits. Second, waste above 10 nCi/g and below 100 nCi/g can be identified, and a potential path for disposal resolved.

  7. Advanced quantitative magnetic nondestructive evaluation methods - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, J. R.; Kusenberger, F. N.; Beissner, R. E.; Matzkanin, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reviews the scale of fatigue crack phenomena in relation to the size detection capabilities of nondestructive evaluation methods. An assessment of several features of fatigue in relation to the inspection of ball and roller bearings suggested the use of magnetic methods; magnetic domain phenomena including the interaction of domains and inclusions, and the influence of stress and magnetic field on domains are discussed. Experimental results indicate that simplified calculations can be used to predict many features of these results; the data predicted by analytic models which use finite element computer analysis predictions do not agree with respect to certain features. Experimental analyses obtained on rod-type fatigue specimens which show experimental magnetic measurements in relation to the crack opening displacement and volume and crack depth should provide methods for improved crack characterization in relation to fracture mechanics and life prediction.

  8. Non-destructive evaluation method employing dielectric electrostatic ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, Jr., John H. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An acoustic nonlinearity parameter (.beta.) measurement method and system for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of materials and structural members novelly employs a loosely mounted dielectric electrostatic ultrasonic transducer (DEUT) to receive and convert ultrasonic energy into an electrical signal which can be analyzed to determine the .beta. of the test material. The dielectric material is ferroelectric with a high dielectric constant .di-elect cons.. A computer-controlled measurement system coupled to the DEUT contains an excitation signal generator section and a measurement and analysis section. As a result, the DEUT measures the absolute particle displacement amplitudes in test material, leading to derivation of the nonlinearity parameter (.beta.) without the costly, low field reliability methods of the prior art.

  9. Infrared non-destructive evaluation method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Baleine, Erwan; Erwan, James F; Lee, Ching-Pang; Stinelli, Stephanie

    2014-10-21

    A method of nondestructive evaluation and related system. The method includes arranging a test piece (14) having an internal passage (18) and an external surface (15) and a thermal calibrator (12) within a field of view (42) of an infrared sensor (44); generating a flow (16) of fluid characterized by a fluid temperature; exposing the test piece internal passage (18) and the thermal calibrator (12) to fluid from the flow (16); capturing infrared emission information of the test piece external surface (15) and of the thermal calibrator (12) simultaneously using the infrared sensor (44), wherein the test piece infrared emission information includes emission intensity information, and wherein the thermal calibrator infrared emission information includes a reference emission intensity associated with the fluid temperature; and normalizing the test piece emission intensity information against the reference emission intensity.

  10. NON-DESTRUCTIVE METHOD AND MEANS FOR FLAW DETECTION

    DOEpatents

    Hochschild, R.

    1959-03-10

    BS>An improved method is presented for the nondestructive detection of flaws in olectrictilly conductivc articles using magnetic field. According to thc method a homogoneous mignetic field is established in the test article;it right angle" to the artyicle. A probe is aligned with its axis transverse to the translates so hat th4 probe scans the surface of the test article while the axis of the robe is transverse to the direction of translation of the article. In this manner any output current obtained in thc probe is an indication of the size and location of a flaw in the article under test, with a miiiimum of signal pick- up in the probe from the established magnetic field.

  11. Nondestructive characterization methods for monolithic solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    Monolithic solid oxide fuel cells (MSOFCS) represent a potential breakthrough in fuel cell technology, provided that reliable fabrication methods can be developed. Fabrication difficulties arise in several steps of the processing: First is the fabrication of uniform thin (305 {mu}m) single-layer and trilayer green tapes (the trilayer tapes of anode/electrolyte/cathode and anode/interconnect/cathode must have similar coefficients of thermal expansion to sinter uniformly and to have the necessary electrochemical properties); Second is the development of fuel and oxidant channels in which residual stresses are likely to develop in the tapes; Third is the fabrication of a ``complete`` cell for which the bond quality between layers and the quality of the trilayers must be established; and Last, attachment of fuel and oxidant manifolds and verification of seal integrity. Purpose of this report is to assess nondestructive characterization methods that could be developed for application to laboratory, prototype, and full-scale MSOFCs.

  12. Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for ceramic coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. G.

    2007-01-01

    Various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies are being developed to advance the knowledge of ceramic coatings for components in the hot gas-path of advanced, low-emission gas-fired turbine engines. The ceramic coating systems being studied by NDE include thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and environmental barrier coatings (EBCs). TBCs are under development for vanes, blades and combustor liners to allow hotter gas path temperatures and EBCs are under development to reduce environmental damage to high temperature components made of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Data provided by NDE methods will be used to: (a) provide data to assess reliability of new coating application processes, (b) identify defective components that could cause unscheduled outages (c) track growth rates of defects during use in engines and (d) allow rational judgement for replace/repair/re-use decisions of components.

  13. Determine the Compressive Strength of Calcium Silicate Bricks by Combined Nondestructive Method

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the application of combined nondestructive method for assessment of compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks. In this case, it is a combination of the rebound hammer method and ultrasonic pulse method. Calibration relationships for determining compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks obtained from nondestructive parameter testing for the combined method as well as for the L-type Schmidt rebound hammer and ultrasonic pulse method are quoted here. Calibration relationships are known for their close correlation and are applicable in practice. The highest correlation between parameters from nondestructive measurement and predicted compressive strength is obtained using the SonReb combined nondestructive method. Combined nondestructive SonReb method was proved applicable for determination of compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks at checking tests in a production plant and for evaluation of bricks built in existing masonry structures. PMID:25276864

  14. Determine the compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks by combined nondestructive method.

    PubMed

    Brozovsky, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the application of combined nondestructive method for assessment of compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks. In this case, it is a combination of the rebound hammer method and ultrasonic pulse method. Calibration relationships for determining compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks obtained from nondestructive parameter testing for the combined method as well as for the L-type Schmidt rebound hammer and ultrasonic pulse method are quoted here. Calibration relationships are known for their close correlation and are applicable in practice. The highest correlation between parameters from nondestructive measurement and predicted compressive strength is obtained using the SonReb combined nondestructive method. Combined nondestructive SonReb method was proved applicable for determination of compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks at checking tests in a production plant and for evaluation of bricks built in existing masonry structures. PMID:25276864

  15. Baited lines: An active nondestructive collection method for burrowing crayfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loughman, Zachary J.; Foltz, David A., II; Welsh, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    A new method (baited lines) is described for the collection of burrowing crayfishes, where fishing hooks baited with earthworms and tied to monofilament leaders are used to lure crayfishes from their burrow entrances. We estimated capture rates using baited lines at four locations across West Virginia for a total of four crayfish taxa; the taxa studied were orange, blue, and blue/orange morphs of Cambarus dubius (Upland Burrowing Catfish), and C. thomai (Little Brown Mudbug). Baited-line capture rates were lowest for C. thomai (81%; n = 21 attempts) and highest for the orange morph ofC. dubius (99%; n = 13 attempts). The pooled capture rate across all taxa was 91.5% (n = 50 attempts). Baited lines represent an environmentally nondestructive method to capture burrowing crayfishes without harm to individuals, and without disturbing burrows or the surrounding area. This novel method allows for repeat captures and long-term studies, providing a useful sampling method for ecological studies of burrowing crayfishes.

  16. Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for structural ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W.A.; Koehl, R.D.; Wilson, J.A.; Stuckey, J.B.; Engel, H.P. |

    1996-04-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods using three-dimensional microfocus X-ray computed tomographic imaging (3DXCT) were employed to map axial and radial density variations in hot-gas filters and heat exchanger tubes. 3D XCT analysis was conducted on (a) two 38-mm-OD, 6.5-mm wall, SiC/SiC heat exchanger tubes infiltrated by CVI; (b) eight 10 cm diam. oxide/oxide heat exchanger tubes; and (c) one 26-cm-long Nextel fiber/SiC matrix hot-gas filter. The results show that radial and axial density uniformity as well as porosity, can be assessed by 3D XCT. NDE methods are also under development to assess thermal barrier coatings which are under development as methods to protect gas-turbine first-stage hot section metallic substrates. Further, because both shop and field joining of CFCC materials will be necessary, work is now beginning on development of NDE methods for joining.

  17. A non-destructive method for dating human remains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lail, Warren K.; Sammeth, David; Mahan, Shannon; Nevins, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The skeletal remains of several Native Americans were recovered in an eroded state from a creek bank in northeastern New Mexico. Subsequently stored in a nearby museum, the remains became lost for almost 36 years. In a recent effort to repatriate the remains, it was necessary to fit them into a cultural chronology in order to determine the appropriate tribe(s) for consultation pursuant to the Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). Because the remains were found in an eroded context with no artifacts or funerary objects, their age was unknown. Having been asked to avoid destructive dating methods such as radiocarbon dating, the authors used Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) to date the sediments embedded in the cranium. The OSL analyses yielded reliable dates between A.D. 1415 and A.D. 1495. Accordingly, we conclude that the remains were interred somewhat earlier than A.D. 1415, but no later than A.D. 1495. We believe the remains are from individuals ancestral to the Ute Mouache Band, which is now being contacted for repatriation efforts. Not only do our methods contribute to the immediate repatriation efforts, they provide archaeologists with a versatile, non-destructive, numerical dating method that can be used in many burial contexts.

  18. Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for structural ceramics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W. A.

    1998-08-19

    During the past year, the focus of our work on nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods was on the development and application of these methods to technologies such as ceramic matrix composite (CMC) hot-gas filters, CMC high-temperature heat exchangers, and CMC ceramic/ceramic joining. Such technologies are critical to the ''Vision 21 Energy-Plex Fleet'' of modular, high-efficiency, low-emission power systems. Specifically, our NDE work has continued toward faster, higher sensitivity, volumetric X-ray computed tomographic imaging with new amorphous silicon detectors to detect and measure axial and radial density variations in hot-gas filters and heat exchangers; explored the potential use of high-speed focal-plane-array infrared imaging technology to detect delaminations and variations in the thermal properties of SiC/SiC heat exchangers; and explored various NDE methods to characterize CMC joints in cooperation with various industrial partners. Work this year also addressed support of Southern Companies Services Inc., Power Systems Development Facility, where NDE is needed to assess the condition of hot-gas candle filters. This paper presents the results of these efforts.

  19. Nondestructive Method For Measuring The Scattering Coefficient Of Bulk Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenhuis, R. A. J.; ten Bosch, J. J.

    1981-05-01

    During demineralization and remineralization of dental enamel its structure changes resulting in a change of the absorption and scattering coefficients of the enamel. By measuring these coefficients during demineralization and remineralization these processes can be monitored in a non-destructive way. For this purpose an experimental arrangement was made: a fibre illuminates a spot on the sample with monochromatic light with a wave-length between 400 nm and 700 nm; a photomultiplier measures the luminance of the light back-scattered by the sample as a function of the distance from the measuring snot to the spot of illumination. In a Monte Carlo-model this luminance is simulated using the same geometry given the scattering and absorption coefficients in a sample. Then the scattering and absorption coefficients in the sample are determined by selecting the theoretical curve fitting the experimental one. Scattering coefficients below 10 mm-1 and absorption coefficients obtained with this method on calibration samples correspond well with those obtained with another method. Scattering coefficients above 10 mm-1 (paper samples) were measured ton low. This perhaps is caused by the anisotropic structure of paper sheets. The method is very suitable to measure the scattering and absorption coefficients of bulk materials.

  20. Nondestructive method for reconnecting aluminum metallization on integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Zubatkin, A D

    1979-07-01

    A failure analysis technique for reconnecting aluminum metallization on planar IC devices is described. The technique, utilizing a conductive paint deposited on the device surface, is nondestructive and easily removable. PMID:18699636

  1. Nondestructive Evaluation Methods for the Ares I Common Bulkhead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James

    2010-01-01

    A large scale bonding demonstration test article was fabricated to prove out manufacturing techniques for the current design of the NASA Ares I Upper Stage common bulkhead. The common bulkhead serves as the single interface between the liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen portions of the Upper Stage propellant tank. The bulkhead consists of spin-formed aluminum domes friction stir welded to Y-rings and bonded to a perforated phenolic honeycomb core. Nondestructive evaluation methods are being developed for assessing core integrity and the core-to-dome bond line of the common bulkhead. Detection of manufacturing defects such as delaminations between the core and face sheets as well as service life defects such as crushed or sheared core resulting from impact loading are all of interest. The focus of this work will be on the application of thermographic, shearographic, and phased array ultrasonic methods to the bonding demonstration article as well as various smaller test panels featuring design specific defect types and geometric features.

  2. Study Methods to Characterize and Implement Thermography Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    1998-01-01

    The limits and conditions under which an infrared thermographic nondestructive evaluation can be utilized to assess the quality of aerospace hardware is demonstrated in this research effort. The primary focus of this work is on applying thermography to the inspection of advanced composite structures such as would be found in the International Space Station Instrumentation Racks, Space Shuttle Cargo Bay Doors, Bantam RP-1 tank or RSRM Nose Cone. Here, the detection of delamination, disbond, inclusion and porosity type defects are of primary interest. In addition to composites, an extensive research effort has been initiated to determine how well a thermographic evaluation can detect leaks and disbonds in pressurized metallic systems "i.e. the Space Shuttle Main Engine Nozzles". In either case, research into developing practical inspection procedures was conducted and thermographic inspections were performed on a myriad of test samples, subscale demonstration articles and "simulated" flight hardware. All test samples were fabricated as close to their respective structural counterparts as possible except with intentional defects for NDE qualification. As an added benefit of this effort to create simulated defects, methods were devised for defect fabrication that may be useful in future NDE qualification ventures.

  3. Method of non-destructively inspecting a curved wall portion

    DOEpatents

    Fong, James T.

    1996-01-01

    A method of non-destructively inspecting a curved wall portion of a large and thick walled vessel for a defect by computed tomography is provided. A collimated source of radiation is placed adjacent one side of the wall portion and an array of detectors for the radiation is placed on the other side adjacent the source. The radiation from the source passing through the wall portion is then detected with the detectors over a limited angle, dependent upon the curvature of the wall of the vessel, to obtain a dataset. The source and array are then coordinately moved relative to the wall portion in steps and a further dataset is obtained at each step. The plurality of datasets obtained over the limited angle is then processed to produce a tomogram of the wall portion to determine the presence of a defect therein. In a preferred embodiment, the curved wall portion has a center of curvature so that the source and the array are positioned at each step along a respective arc curved about the center. If desired, the detector array and source can be reoriented relative to a new wall portion and an inspection of the new wall portion can be easily obtained. Further, the source and detector array can be indexed in a direction perpendicular to a plane including the limited angle in a plurality of steps so that by repeating the detecting and moving steps at each index step, a three dimensional image can be created of the wall portion.

  4. Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for structural ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W.A.; Koehl, R.D.; Stuckey, J.B.; Sun, J.G.; Engel, H.P.; Smith, R.G.

    1997-06-01

    Development of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for application to fossil energy systems continues in three areas: (a) mapping axial and radial density gradients in hot gas filters, (b) characterization of the quality of continuous fiber ceramic matrix composite (CFCC) joints and (c) characterization and detection of defects in thermal barrier coatings. In this work, X-ray computed tomographic imaging was further developed and used to map variations in the axial and radial density of two full length (2.3-m) hot gas filters. The two filters differed in through wall density because of the thickness of the coating on the continuous fibers. Differences in axial and through wall density were clearly detected. Through transmission infrared imaging with a highly sensitivity focal plane array camera was used to assess joint quality in two sets of SiC/SiC CFCC joints. High frame rate data capture suggests that the infrared imaging method holds potential for the characterization of CFCC joints. Work to develop NDE methods that can be used to evaluate electron beam physical vapor deposited coatings with platinum-aluminide (Pt-Al) bonds was undertaken. Coatings of Zirconia with thicknesses of 125 {micro}m (0.005 in.), 190 {micro}m (0.0075 in.), and 254 {micro}m (0.010 in.) with a Pt-Al bond coat on Rene N5 Ni-based superalloy were studied by infrared imaging. Currently, it appears that thickness variation, as well as thermal properties, can be assessed by infrared technology.

  5. Geophysical Methods for Non-Destructive Testing in Civil Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederleithinger, E.

    2013-12-01

    Many non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for civil engineering (e. g. ultrasonics, radar) are similar to geophysical techniques. They just differ in scale, material under investigation and vocabulary used. In spite of the fact that the same principles of physics and mathematics apply to both fields, exchange has been limited in the past. But since a few years more and more geophysical knowledge is used in civil engineering. One of the focal points in research is to improve ultrasonic testing of concrete to be able to image the inside even of large, complex structures and to detect any deterioration as early as possible. One of the main issues is the heterogeneity of concrete, including aggregates, reinforcement, cracks and many other features. Our current research focuses on three points. One is the application of state of the art geophysical migration techniques as Reverse Time Migration (RTM) to image vertical faces or the backside of voids and ducts in thick concrete structures, which isn't possible with conventional techniques used in NDT. Second, we have started to use seismic interferometric techniques to interpolate ultrasonic traces, which can't be measured directly for technical reasons. Third, we are using coda wave interferometry to detect concrete degradation due to load, fatigue, temperature or other influences as early as possible. Practical examples of the application of these techniques are given and potential future research directions will be discussed. It will be shown, how a subset of these techniques can be used for innovative monitoring systems for civil infrastructure. Imaging the interior of a concrete body by ultrasonics and reverse time migration(simulated data).

  6. Non-destructive methods for food texture assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food texture is important to the successful marketing and profitability of food products. Non-destructive sensing would allow food producers and processors to inspect, sort, grade, or track individual product items, so that they can deliver consistent, superior food products to the marketplace. Over...

  7. Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for ceramic coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W. A.; Deemer, C.; Sun, J. G.; Erdman, S.; Muliere, D.; Wheeler, B.

    2002-04-29

    Various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies are being developed to study the use of ceramic coatings on components in the hot-gas path of advanced low-emission gas-fired turbines. The types of ceramic coatings include thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and environmental barrier coatings (EBCs). TBCs are under development for vanes, blades, and combustor liners to allow hotter gas-path temperatures, and EBCs are under development to reduce environmental damage to high-temperature components made of ceramic matrix composites. The NDE methods will be used to (a) provide data to assess the reliability of new coating application processes, (b) identify defective components that could cause unscheduled outages, (c) track growth rates of defects during component use in engines, and (d) allow rational judgment for replace/repair/re-use decisions regarding components. Advances in TBC application, both electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS), are allowing higher temperatures in the hot-gas path. However, as TBCs become ''prime reliant,'' their condition at scheduled or unscheduled outages must be known. NDE methods are under development to assess the condition of the TBC for pre-spall conditions. EB-PVD test samples with up to 70 thermal cycles have been studied by a newly developed method involving polarized laser back-scatter NDE. Results suggest a correlation between the NDE laser data and the TBC/bond-coat topography. This finding is important because several theories directed toward understanding the pre-spall condition suggest that the topography in the thermally grown oxide layer changes significantly as a function of the number of thermal cycles. Tests have also been conducted with this NDE method on APS TBCs. Results suggest that the pre-spall condition is detected for these coatings. One-sided, high-speed thermal imaging also has shown promise for NDE of APS coatings. Testing of SiC/SiC composites for combustor liners

  8. The detection of fatigue cracks by nondestructive testing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, W. D.; Todd, P. H., Jr.; Frecska, S. A.; Rathke, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    X-radiographic penetrant, ultrasonic, eddy current, holographic, and acoustic emission techniques were optimized and applied to the evaluation of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy test specimens. One hundred eighteen specimens containing a total of 328 fatigue cracks were evaluated. The cracks ranged in length from 0.500 inch (1.27 cm) to 0.007 inch (0.018 cm) and in depth from 0.178 inch (0.451 cm) and 0.001 inch (0.003 cm). Specimen thicknesses were nominally 0.060 inch (0.152 cm) and 0.210 inch (0.532 cm) and surface finishes were nominally 32 and 125 rms and 64 and 200 rms respectively. Specimens were evaluated in the as-milled surface condition, in the chemically milled surface condition and, after proof loading, in a randomized inspection sequence. Results of the nondestructive test (NDT) evaluations were compared with actual crack size obtained by measurement of the fractured specimens. Inspection data was then analyzed to provide a statistical basis for determinating the threshold crack detection sensitivity (the largest crack size that would be missed) for each of the inspection techniques at a 95% probability and 95% confidence level.

  9. Optical methods for texture analyses: brief overview on approaches for nondestructive sensing of food texture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventionally food texture is measured using sensory panels or instrumentation which are destructive tests that are time consuming and potentially expensive. Ideally distributors of fresh produce and manufacturers of processed foods require a rapid method that can nondestructively measure the text...

  10. Failure analysis of electronic parts: Laboratory methods. [for destructive and nondestructive testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anstead, R. J. (Editor); Goldberg, E. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Failure analysis test methods are presented for use in analyzing candidate electronic parts and in improving future design reliability. Each test is classified as nondestructive, semidestructive, or destructive. The effects upon applicable part types (i.e. integrated circuit, transitor) are discussed. Methodology is given for performing the following: immersion tests, radio graphic tests, dewpoint tests, gas ambient analysis, cross sectioning, and ultraviolet examination.

  11. Non-destructive method for inward leakage detection of a plate evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hribernik, Ales

    2007-05-01

    A new non-destructive method was developed for the detection of refrigerant leakage at an evaporator's inflow. Nitrogen and oxygen gas were successively blown through the evaporator. A gas analyser was applied at the outflow of the evaporator and the oxygen concentration measured. It was possible to detect any leakage by investigating the oxygen concentration-time history diagram.

  12. Research on non-destructive testing method of silkworm cocoons based on image processing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yong; Kong, Qing-hua; Wei, Li-fu

    2008-03-01

    The major studied in this dissertation is the non-destructive testing method of silkworm cocoon's quality, based on the digital image processing and photoelectricity technology. Through the images collection and the data analysis, procession and calculation of the tested silkworm cocoons with the non-destructive testing technology, internet applications automatically reckon all items of the classification indexes. Finally we can conclude the classification result and the purchase price of the silkworm cocoons. According to the domestic classification standard of the silkworm cocoons, the author investigates various testing methods of silkworm cocoons which are used or have been explored at present, and devices a non-destructive testing scheme of the silkworm cocoons based on the digital image processing and photoelectricity technology. They are dissertated about the project design of the experiment. The precisions of all the implements are demonstrated. I establish Manifold mathematic models, compare them with each other and analyze the precision with technology of databank to get the best mathematic model to figure out the weight of the dried silkworm cocoon shells. The classification methods of all the complementary items are designed well and truly. The testing method has less error and reaches an advanced level of the present domestic non-destructive testing technology of the silkworm cocoons.

  13. Development of non-destructive inspection method for the performance of thermal barrier coating.

    PubMed

    Morinaga, M; Takahashi, T

    2001-05-01

    This paper shows that our proprietary non-destructive inspection method can be used to effectively measure the thermal barrier performance of the thermal barrier coating used to coat gas turbine hot parts by the results of numerical analysis and laboratory experiments. PMID:11460665

  14. Evaluation of Damage in Steels Subjected to Exploitation Loading - Destructive and Non-Destructive Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, Zbigniew L.; Mackiewicz, Sławomir; Szelążek, Jacek; Pietrzak, Krystyna; Augustyniak, Bolesław

    Damage due to creep and plastic flow is assessed using destructive and non-destructive methods in steels (40HNMA and P91). In the destructive methods the standard tension tests were carried out after prestraining and variations of the selected tension parameters were taken into account for damage identification. In order to assess a damage development during the creep and plastic deformation the tests for both steels were interrupted for a range of the selected strain magnitudes. The ultrasonic and magnetic techniques were used as the non-destructive methods for damage evaluation. The last step of the experimental programme contained microscopic observations. A very promising correlation between parameters of methods for damage development evaluation was achieved. It is well proved for the ultimate tensile stress and birefringence coefficient.

  15. Determination of the critical loads of shells by nondestructive methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, W. H.; Nassar, E. M.; Singhal, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    Two methods for determining the location of and load level to produce instability of compressed cylindrical shells are presented. The first relates the variation in the wall normal stiffness as a function of applied compressive force to the critical load. It uses the distribution of stiffness over the surface of the shell as a guide to buckle location. The second method associates the local dynamic mass with instability behavior. The test data presented show that either method will give excellent prediction capability from low-load-level data for shells of orthodox form. Neither method appears to apply to spirally stiffened shells. This is thought to be due to the fact that there is a substantial difference between the buckle pattern under axial compression and the imperfection shape induced by the normal displacement which is used to ascertain the wall stiffness and the dynamic mass.

  16. Detection of fatigue cracks by nondestructive testing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. T.; Delacy, T. J.; Stewart, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    The effectiveness was assessed of various NDT methods to detect small tight cracks by randomly introducing fatigue cracks into aluminum sheets. The study included optimizing NDT methods calibrating NDT equipment with fatigue cracked standards, and evaluating a number of cracked specimens by the optimized NDT methods. The evaluations were conducted by highly trained personnel, provided with detailed procedures, in order to minimize the effects of human variability. These personnel performed the NDT on the test specimens without knowledge of the flaw locations and reported on the flaws detected. The performance of these tests was measured by comparing the flaws detected against the flaws present. The principal NDT methods utilized were radiographic, ultrasonic, penetrant, and eddy current. Holographic interferometry, acoustic emission monitoring, and replication methods were also applied on a reduced number of specimens. Generally, the best performance was shown by eddy current, ultrasonic, penetrant and holographic tests. Etching provided no measurable improvement, while proof loading improved flaw detectability. Data are shown that quantify the performances of the NDT methods applied.

  17. Floating Ultrasonic Transducer Inspection System and Method for Nondestructive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N. (Inventor); Johnston, Patrick H. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for inspecting a structural sample using ultrasonic energy includes positioning an ultrasonic transducer adjacent to a surface of the sample, and then transmitting ultrasonic energy into the sample. Force pulses are applied to the transducer concurrently with transmission of the ultrasonic energy. A host machine processes ultrasonic return pulses from an ultrasonic pulser/receiver to quantify attenuation of the ultrasonic energy within the sample. The host machine detects a defect in the sample using the quantified level of attenuation. The method may include positioning a dry couplant between an ultrasonic transducer and the surface. A system includes an actuator, an ultrasonic transducer, a dry couplant between the transducer the sample, a scanning device that moves the actuator and transducer, and a measurement system having a pulsed actuator power supply, an ultrasonic pulser/receiver, and a host machine that executes the above method.

  18. New Acoustic Methods for Nondestructive Evaluation of Leather Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, there is no on-line test method to monitor the physical properties of semi-products such as wet blue or crust during the leather-making processes. Inferior leather semi-products, such as wet blue, cannot be downgraded earlier or removed before going through many expensive processes (incl...

  19. Nondestructive testing of adhesive bonds by nuclear quadrupole resonance method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    Inert, strain sensitive tracer, cuprous oxide, added to polymeric adhesive ensures sufficiently large signal to noise ratio in NQR system output. Method is successful, provided that RF-transparent structural materials are used between modified adhesive and probe of NQR spectrometer.

  20. Non-destructive optical methods for the study of soft tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago-Lona, Cynthia V.; Hernández-Montes, María. del Socorro; Mendoza Santoyo, F.; Muñoz, Silvino; Mendoza, Fernando

    2015-08-01

    In optical metrology, non-destructive methods allow studying some mechanical properties of the samples to investigate by using light, which leads to non-contact testing. This paper shows recent results of the application of non-destructive optical methods based on Digital Holographic Interferometry to the study biological tissues; particularly vocal folds and the tympanic membrane. The displacements data and its corresponding patterns found generates information on its characteristics that can be correlated with their physiological state. These methods prove to be an alternative viable and appropriate to characterize these soft tissues so important for the proper function of the human body. The result shows a potential impact on its possible uses in the field of otorhinolaryngology.

  1. Nondestructive Methods to Characterize Rock Mechanical Properties at Low-Temperature: Applications for Asteroid Capture Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Kara A.

    Recent government initiatives and commercial activities have targeted asteroids for in situ material characterization, manipulation, and possible resource extraction. Most of these activities and missions have proposed significant robotic components, given the risks and costs associated with manned missions. To successfully execute these robotic activities, detailed mechanical characteristics of the target space bodies must be known prior to contact, in order to appropriately plan and direct the autonomous robotic protocols. Unfortunately, current estimates of asteroid mechanical properties are based on limited direct information, and significant uncertainty remains specifically concerning internal structures, strengths, and elastic properties of asteroids. One proposed method to elucidate this information is through in situ, nondestructive testing of asteroid material immediately after contact, but prior to any manipulation or resource extraction activities. While numerous nondestructive rock characterization techniques have been widely deployed for terrestrial applications, these methods must be adapted to account for unique properties of asteroid material and environmental conditions of space. For example, asteroid surface temperatures may range from -100°C to 30°C due to diurnal cycling, and these low temperatures are especially noteworthy due to their deleterious influence on non-destructive testing. As a result, this thesis investigates the effect of low temperature on the mechanical characteristics and nondestructive technique responses of rock material. Initially, a novel method to produce low temperature rock samples was developed. Dry ice and methanol cooling baths of specific formulations were used to decrease rock to temperatures ranging from -60°C to 0°C. At these temperatures, shale, chalk, and limestone rock samples were exposed to several nondestructive and conventional mechanical tests, including Schmidt hammer, ultrasonic pulse velocity, point

  2. Multimode nondestructive detecting method for high-speed rail defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingjian; Cheng, Xingzhen; Wan, Guangnan; Liu, Ting; Fu, Ying; Wang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    It is very important to detect the surface defects of the high-speed rail for security concerns. A multimode detecting method, which integrates high resolution of optical image, high precision of photoacoustic detection and strong penetration of ultrasound detecting, is proposed for the rail defect detection. Utilizing the surface defect characteristics obtained from optical signal, the photoacoustic and ultrasound scanning region could be determined, and rail shallow and internal defect characteristics can be acquired subsequently. Eventually, fusing three modal signals mentioned above, the information of the entire rail defect, including type, extension trend and depth can be detected. It has been proved that the multimode method can improve the detecting efficiency, and enlarge the detection range in the meantime.

  3. Nondestructive spot test method for magnesium and magnesium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A method for spot test identification of magnesium and various magnesium alloys commonly used in aerospace applications is described. The spot test identification involves color codes obtained when several drops of 3 M hydrochloric acid are placed on the surface to be tested. After approximately thirty seconds, two drops of this reacted acid is transferred to each of two depressions in a spot plate for additions of other chemicals with subsequent color changes indicating magnesium or its alloy.

  4. MONTE CARLO ERROR ESTIMATION APPLIED TO NONDESTRUCTIVE ASSAY METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    R. ESTEP; ET AL

    2000-06-01

    Monte Carlo randomization of nuclear counting data into N replicate sets is the basis of a simple and effective method for estimating error propagation through complex analysis algorithms such as those using neural networks or tomographic image reconstructions. The error distributions of properly simulated replicate data sets mimic those of actual replicate measurements and can be used to estimate the std. dev. for an assay along with other statistical quantities. We have used this technique to estimate the standard deviation in radionuclide masses determined using the tomographic gamma scanner (TGS) and combined thermal/epithermal neutron (CTEN) methods. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated by a comparison of our Monte Carlo error estimates with the error distributions in actual replicate measurements and simulations of measurements. We found that the std. dev. estimated this way quickly converges to an accurate value on average and has a predictable error distribution similar to N actual repeat measurements. The main drawback of the Monte Carlo method is that N additional analyses of the data are required, which may be prohibitively time consuming with slow analysis algorithms.

  5. Nondestructive methods for early detection of damage to living plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateyeva, Natalya L.; Matvienko, Gennadii G.; Shul'gina, Lidia A.

    2004-10-01

    As a result of the accomplish experiments determine, that by a method of a laser-induced fluorescence of chlorophyll it is possible to spot for cedar an early stage of the stressful factor, bound with presence in ground <>. In our case the laboratory researches provided learning a quantitative contents chlorophyll for plants found in normal and stressful conditions on a basis spectrophotometrical of a method. Natural measurement the observations behind dynamics of a photosynthetic state means of wood plants in vivo enable. For an estimation of this state the fluorescence of chlorophyll on wavelength 685 and 740 nm was used. The optical model of a green leaf was developed for methods of a laser-induced fluorescence of chlorophyll. A experiments series on remote research of processes violation of mineral power supply and exchange in plants is carried spent. Was considered the change of the ratios of intensity of a fluorescence of chlorophyll and carotenoids at deficiency. Was designed technique for detection infringement processes of mineral nutrition and change surveyed acidity grounds on laser-induce fluorescent responses of deciduous plants.

  6. An evaluation of nondestructive methods for ceramic heat exchanger applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, J. R.; Powers, T.

    For both seeded defects and naturally occurring defects, there is little correlation between test results for small defects. This is because X-ray is sensitive to density variations and ultrasonics and scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) are sensitive to acoustic impedance variations. The grain boundaries and microporosity of the material produce a high scattering background for the acoustic methods, masking small inclusions. X-ray is insensitive to grain boundary effects and the uniform microporosity averages out over the material thickness. If minor inclusions are to be detected, X-ray must be used. Ultrasonics and SLAM are sensitive only to the presence of an open crack, not its width. If cracks are to be detected, ultrasonics or SLAM must be used. SLAM is by far the fastest method of scanning for OD cracks, but only ultrasonics will find ID cracks. Results of this first phase study give four guidelines to tube design. First, surface irregularities are a major limitation to testing. The eventual tests will be much more sensitive if surface finish can be improved. Second, porosity is another major limit to testing. Pores are not generally strength limiting in this material, but pores scatter ultrasound very badly and produce irregular densities on X-ray film, in both cases obscuring more important defect indications. Third, the dimple shape of the closed end is essentially untestable. The fourth design guideline is provided by the fractography results. In some cases, failure was initiated in or near clusters of large grains. Defect sizing depends upon the detection methods.

  7. Synchronized Electronic Shutter System and Method for Thermal Nondestructive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N. (Inventor); Winfree, William P. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The invention is a synchronized electronic shutter system (SESS) and method for same side and through transmission thermal analysis and inspection of a material for finding defects, corrosion, disbond defects, integrity of a weld and determination of paint thickness. The system comprises an infrared detector that acquires background images of the sample. A shutter then covers the detector and lamps rapidly heat the sample above ambient temperature. Shutters cover all lamps at the same time the shutter over the infrared detector is opened. The infrared detector acquires a series of temperature images over time radiated from the sample a s the sample cools down. After collecting a series of temperature images taken by the SESS, a processed image is developed using one of the group comprising time derivative calculation, temperature normalization data reduction routine, thermal diffusivity curve fitting and averaging the series of temperature images.

  8. Development of a nondestructive evaluation method for FRP bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jeff; Fox, Terra

    2010-05-01

    Open steel grids are typically used on bridges to minimize the weight of the bridge deck and wearing surface. These grids, however, require frequent maintenance and exhibit other durability concerns related to fatigue cracking and corrosion. Bridge decks constructed from composite materials, such as a Fiber-reinforced Polymer (FRP), are strong and lightweight; they also offer improved rideability, reduced noise levels, less maintenance, and are relatively easy to install compared to steel grids. This research is aimed at developing an inspection protocol for FRP bridge decks using Infrared thermography. The finite element method was used to simulate the heat transfer process and determine optimal heating and data acquisition parameters that will be used to inspect FRP bridge decks in the field. It was demonstrated that thermal imaging could successfully identify features of the FRP bridge deck to depths of 1.7 cm using a phase analysis process.

  9. Nondestructive methods of integrating energy harvesting systems for highway bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamdar, Sumedh; Zimowski, Krystian; Crawford, Richard; Wood, Kristin; Jensen, Dan

    2012-04-01

    Designing an attachment structure that is both novel and meets the system requirements can be a difficult task especially for inexperienced designers. This paper presents a design methodology for concept generation of a "parent/child" attachment system. The "child" is broadly defined as any device, part, or subsystem that will attach to any existing system, part, or device called the "parent." An inductive research process was used to study a variety of products, patents, and biological examples that exemplified the parent/child system. Common traits among these products were found and categorized as attachment principles in three different domains: mechanical, material, and field. The attachment principles within the mechanical domain and accompanying examples are the focus of this paper. As an example of the method, a case study of generating concepts for a bridge mounted wind energy harvester using the mechanical attachment principles derived from the methodology and TRIZ principles derived from Altshuller's matrix of contradictions is presented.

  10. Nondestructive methods of integrating energy harvesting systems with structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamdar, Sumedh; Zimowski, Krystian; Crawford, Richard; Wood, Kristin; Jensen, Dan

    2012-04-01

    Designing an attachment structure that is both novel and meets the system requirements can be a difficult task especially for inexperienced designers. This paper presents a design methodology for concept generation of a "parent/child" attachment system. The "child" is broadly defined as any device, part, or subsystem that will attach to any existing system, part, or device called the "parent." An inductive research process was used to study a variety of products, patents, and biological examples that exemplified the parent/child system. Common traits among these products were found and categorized as attachment principles in three different domains: mechanical, material, and field. The attachment principles within the mechanical domain and accompanying examples are the focus of this paper. As an example of the method, a case study of generating concepts for a bridge mounted wind energy harvester using the mechanical attachment principles derived from the methodology and TRIZ principles derived from Altshuller's matrix of contradictions is presented.

  11. Method and Apparatus for Non-Destructive Evaluation of Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfine, Neil J. (Inventor); Washabaugh, Andrew P. (Inventor); Lyons, Robert (Inventor); Thomas, Zachary (Inventor); Jablonski, David A. (Inventor); Martin, Christopher (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for characterizing composite materials for manufacturing quality assurance (QA), periodic inspection during the useful life, or for forensic analysis/material testing. System are provided that relate eddy-current sensor responses to the fiber layup of a composite structure, the presence of impact damage on a composite structure with or without a metal liner, volumetric stress within the composite, fiber tow density, and other NDE inspection requirements. Also provided are systems that determine electromagnetic material properties and material dimensions of composite materials from capacitive sensor inspection measurements. These properties are related to the presence of buried defects in non-conductive composite materials, moisture ingress, aging of the material due to service or environmental/thermal exposure, or changes in manufacturing quality.

  12. Development of a Nondestructive Method for Sexing Live Adult Sternoplax souvorowiana (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Ma, Ji; Mao, Xinfang

    2015-01-01

    The darkling beetle, Sternoplax souvorowiana (Reitter) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is flightless and lives in the Guerbantonggut desert in northwestern China. Its special eggshell structure, day-active habit, large body size, short life cycle, and ease of rearing under laboratory conditions make it an excellent model for advanced studies on desert adaptation. Determining the sex of this beetle is usually complicated by the lack of a discreet, externally visible gender-specific character. To date, dissection has been used for sex identification in this species, whereas a nondestructive means is needed for further studies of sexual dimorphism. Here, a new method based on the difference of the pigmentation pattern on the eighth tergite of each sex is described and illustrated. This method can be quickly learned, is nondestructive, is 100% accurate, and is fast enough for most applications in both the field and the laboratory. Experienced users in our laboratory routinely sex 8–10 beetles per minute. PMID:25934924

  13. A non-destructive dental method for age estimation.

    PubMed

    Kvaal, S; Solheim, T

    1994-06-01

    Dental radiographs have rarely been used in dental age estimation methods for adults and the aim of this investigation was to derive formulae for age calculation based on measurements of teeth and their radiographs. Age-related changes were studied in 452 extracted, unsectioned incisors, canines and premolars. The length of the apical translucent zone and extent of the periodontal retraction were measured on the teeth while the pulp length and width as well as root length and width were measured on the radiographs and the ratios between the root and pulp measurements calculated. For all types of teeth significant, negative Pearson's correlation coefficients were found between age and the ratios between the pulp and the root width. In this study also, the correlation between age and the length of the apical translucent zone was weaker than expected. The periodontal retraction was significantly correlated with age in maxillary premolars alone. Multiple regression analyses showed inclusion of the ratio between the measurements of the pulp and the root on the radiographs for all teeth; the length of the apical translucency in five types; and periodontal retraction in only three types of teeth. The correlation coefficients ranged from r = 0.48 to r = 0.90 between the chronological and the calculated age using the formulae from this multiple regression study. The strongest coefficients were for premolars. These formulae may be recommended for use in odontological age estimations in forensic and archaeological cases where teeth are loose or can be extracted and where it is important that the teeth are not sectioned. PMID:9227083

  14. Method and apparatus for non-destructive evaluation of composite materials with cloth surface impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madras, Eric I. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and related apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of composite materials by determination of the quantity known as Integrated Polar Backscatter, which avoids errors caused by surface texture left by cloth impressions by identifying frequency ranges associated with peaks in a power spectrum for the backscattered signal, and removing such frequency ranges from the calculation of Integrated Polar Backscatter for all scan sites on the composite material is presented.

  15. Application of Non-destructive Methods of Stress-strain State at Hazardous Production Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shram, V.; Kravtsova, Ye; Selsky, A.; Bezborodov, Yu; Lysyannikova, N.; Lysyannikov, A.

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with the sources of accidents in distillation columns, on the basis of which the most dangerous defects are detected. The analysis of the currently existing methods of non-destructive testing of the stress-strain state is performed. It is proposed to apply strain and acoustic emission techniques to continuously monitor dangerous objects, which helps prevent the possibility of accidents, as well as reduce the work.

  16. A modified positron lifetime spectrometer as method of non-destructive testing in materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. Q.; Shi, J. J.; Jiang, J.; Liu, X. B.; Wang, R. S.; Wu, Y. C.

    2015-02-01

    This paper aims to develop a new non-destructive testing (NDT) method using positron annihilation spectroscopy, a powerful tool to detect vacancy-type defects and defect's chemical environment. A positron NDT system was designed and constructed by modifying the "sandwich" structure of sample-source-sample in the conventional positron lifetime spectrometer. The positron lifetime spectra of one single sample can be measured and analyzed by subtracting the contribution of a reference sample. The feasibility and reliability of the positron NDT system have been tested by analyzing nondestructively deformation damage caused by mechanical treatment in metals and steels. This system can be used for detecting defects and damage in thick or large-size samples without cutting off the sample materials, as well as for detecting two-dimensional distribution of defects.

  17. A semi-automatic non-destructive method to quantify grapevine downy mildew sporulation.

    PubMed

    Peressotti, Elisa; Duchêne, Eric; Merdinoglu, Didier; Mestre, Pere

    2011-02-01

    The availability of fast, reliable and non-destructive methods for the analysis of pathogen development contributes to a better understanding of plant-pathogen interactions. This is particularly true for the genetic analysis of quantitative resistance to plant pathogens, where the availability of a method allowing a precise quantification of pathogen development allows the reliable detection of different genomic regions involved in the resistance. Grapevine downy mildew, caused by the biotrophic Oomycete Plasmopara viticola, is one of the most important diseases affecting viticulture. Here we report the development of a simple image analysis-based semi-automatic method for the quantification of grapevine downy mildew sporulation, requiring just a compact digital camera and the open source software ImageJ. We confirm the suitability of the method for the analysis of the interaction between grapevine and downy mildew by performing QTL analysis of resistance to downy mildew as well as analysis of the kinetics of downy mildew infection. The non-destructive nature of the method will enable comparison between the phenotypic and molecular data obtained from the very same sample, resulting in a more accurate description of the interaction, while its simplicity makes it easily adaptable to other plant-pathogen interactions, in particular those involving downy mildews. PMID:21167874

  18. Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure and constituent concentrations of a body

    DOEpatents

    Gold, Raymond; McElroy, William N.

    1986-01-01

    A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure and constituent concentrations in an object, such as reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure or the spatial constituent concentration at regions of interest within the object.

  19. A novel method for non-destructive Compton scatter imaging based on the genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi, Saleh; Jahanbakhsh, Okhtay; Alizadeh, Davood; Salehpour, Behrooz

    2013-05-01

    Compton scattering tomography is widely used in numerous applications such as biomedical imaging, nondestructive industrial testing and environmental survey, etc. This paper proposes the use of the genetic algorithm (GA), which utilizes bio-inspired mathematical models, to construct an image of the insides of a test object via the scattered photons, from a voxel within the object. A NaI(Tl) scintillation detector and a 185 MBq 137Cs gamma ray source were used in the experimental measurements. The obtained results show that the proposed GA based method performs well in constructing images of objects.

  20. Non-Destructive Evaluation Method and Apparatus for Measuring Acoustic Material Nonlinearity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An acoustic non-linearity parameter (beta) measurement method and system for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of materials and structural members obviates the need for electronic calibration of the measuring equipment. Unlike known substitutional measuring techniques requiring elaborate calibration procedures, the electrical outputs of the capacitive detector of a sample with known beta and the test sample of unknown beta are compared to determine the unknown beta. In order to provide the necessary stability of the present-inventive reference-based approach, the bandpass filters of the measurement system are maintained in a temperature-controlled environment, and the line voltage supplied to said amplifiers is well-regulated.

  1. Residual Detergent Detection Method for Nondestructive Cytocompatibility Evaluation of Decellularized Whole Lung Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zvarova, Barbora; Uhl, Franziska E; Uriarte, Juan J; Borg, Zachary D; Coffey, Amy L; Bonenfant, Nicholas R; Weiss, Daniel J; Wagner, Darcy E

    2016-05-01

    The development of reliable tissue engineering methods using decellularized cadaveric or donor lungs could potentially provide a new source of lung tissue. The vast majority of current lung decellularization protocols are detergent based and incompletely removed residual detergents may have a deleterious impact on subsequent scaffold recellularization. Detergent removal and quality control measures that rigorously and reliably confirm removal, ideally utilizing nondestructive methods, are thus critical for generating optimal acellular scaffolds suitable for potential clinical translation. Using a modified and optimized version of a methylene blue-based detergent assay, we developed a straightforward, noninvasive method for easily and reliably detecting two of the most commonly utilized anionic detergents, sodium deoxycholate (SDC) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), in lung decellularization effluents. In parallel studies, we sought to determine the threshold of detergent concentration that was cytotoxic using four different representative human cell types utilized in the study of lung recellularization: human bronchial epithelial cells, human pulmonary vascular endothelial cells (CBF12), human lung fibroblasts, and human mesenchymal stem cells. Notably, different cells have varying thresholds for either SDC or SDS-based detergent-induced cytotoxicity. These studies demonstrate the importance of reliably removing residual detergents and argue that multiple cell lines should be tested in cytocompatibility-based assessments of acellular scaffolds. The detergent detection assay presented here is a useful nondestructive tool for assessing detergent removal in potential decellularization schemes or for use as a potential endpoint in future clinical schemes, generating acellular lungs using anionic detergent-based decellularization protocols. PMID:26905643

  2. RF impedance method for nondestructive moisture content determination for in-shell peanuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandala, C. V. K.; Nelson, S. O.

    2007-04-01

    A method was developed earlier for estimating the moisture content (mc) in samples of wheat, corn and peanut kernels, nondestructively, by measuring their complex impedance values. In this method, capacitance (C), phase angle (θ) and dissipation factor (D) were measured with an impedance analyser at 1 and 5 MHz on a parallel-plate capacitor holding a few kernels of a particular commodity between the plates. These values were then used in an empirical equation based on the parameters C, θ and D, and the moisture content was calculated. The calculated mc values were within 1% of the air-oven values for about 85% of the kernel samples tested in the moisture range from 6% to 20% for wheat, corn and peanuts. However, it would be useful during drying and processing of peanuts, if the mc could be determined without shelling them. In this work, the feasibility of determining the moisture content of in-shell peanuts (pods) by similar impedance measurements was investigated. Values of capacitance, phase angle and dissipation factor measured at 24 °C and at three frequencies were used in a modified prediction equation and the moisture content was estimated within 1% of the air-oven values for over 90% of the pod samples tested in the moisture range from 6% to 25%. The method is rapid and nondestructive and may be used in the development of a commercial instrument.

  3. An accurate and nondestructive GC method for determination of cocaine on US paper currency.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yuegang; Zhang, Kai; Wu, Jingping; Rego, Christopher; Fritz, John

    2008-07-01

    The presence of cocaine on US paper currency has been known for a long time. Banknotes become contaminated during the exchange, storage, and abuse of cocaine. The analysis of cocaine on various denominations of US banknotes in the general circulation can provide law enforcement circles and forensic epidemiologists objective and timely information on epidemiology of illicit drug use and on how to differentiate money contaminated in the general circulation from banknotes used in drug transaction. A simple, nondestructive, and accurate capillary gas chromatographic method has been developed for the determination of cocaine on various denominations of US banknotes in this study. The method comprises a fast ultrasonic extraction using water as a solvent followed by a SPE cleanup process with a C(18) cartridge and capillary GC separation, identification, and quantification. This nondestructive analytical method has been successfully applied to determine the cocaine contamination in US paper currency of all denominations. Standard calibration curve was linear over the concentration range from the LOQ (2.00 ng/mL) to 100 microg/mL and the RSD less than 2.0%. Cocaine was detected in 67% of the circulated banknotes collected in Southeastern Massachusetts in amounts ranging from approximately 2 ng to 49.4 microg per note. On average, $5, 10, 20, and 50 denominations contain higher amounts of cocaine than $1 and 100 denominations of US banknotes. PMID:18646272

  4. Acoustically based fetal heart rate monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald A.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.

    1991-01-01

    The acoustically based fetal heart rate monitor permits an expectant mother to perform the fetal Non-Stress Test in her home. The potential market would include the one million U.S. pregnancies per year requiring this type of prenatal surveillance. The monitor uses polyvinylidene fluoride (PVF2) piezoelectric polymer film for the acoustic sensors, which are mounted in a seven-element array on a cummerbund. Evaluation of the sensor ouput signals utilizes a digital signal processor, which performs a linear prediction routine in real time. Clinical tests reveal that the acoustically based monitor provides Non-Stress Test records which are comparable to those obtained with a commercial ultrasonic transducer.

  5. The Evolution of Nondestructive Evaluation Methods for the Space Shuttle External Tank Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Richter, Joel D.

    2006-01-01

    Three nondestructive evaluation methods are being developed to identify defects in the foam thermal protection system (TPS) of the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET). Shearography is being developed to identify shallow delaminations, shallow voids and crush damage in the foam while terahertz imaging and backscatter radiography are being developed to identify voids and cracks in thick foam regions. The basic theory of operation along with factors affecting the results of these methods will be described. Also, the evolution of these methods from lab tools to implementation on the ET will be discussed. Results from both test panels and flight tank inspections will be provided to show the range in defect sizes and types that can be readily detected.

  6. Photonic non-destructive measurement methods for investigating the evolution of polar firn and ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, Daniel James

    When snow falls on glaciers or ice sheets, it persists for many tens, hundreds and sometimes thousands of years before becoming ice. The granular material in between fresh snow and glacial ice is known as firn and is generally 50 to 100 m thick over polar ice sheets. The compaction mechanism of firn into ice (called densification) has important glaciological ramifications in determination of ice sheet stability and related sea level rise effects via remote sensing altimetry. Firn densification is also important for correctly interpreting ice core paleoclimate records, especially those analyzing gases trapped in air bubbles within the glacial ice. Densification is thought to depend strongly on microstructure: the sizes, shapes, orientations and inter-particle bonds of the ice grains that make up polar firn. Microstructure-dependent densification is poorly understood and occurs in the region where two-thirds of the overall densification takes place. This work focuses on developing non-destructive methods for simultaneously evaluating changes in both the bulk density and microstructure of polar firn to better understand structure- dependent densification processes. The first method is an automated density gauge which uses gamma-ray transmission methods to non-destructively produce high resolution (3.3 mm) and high precision (+/-4 kg m-3) density profiles of firn and ice cores. This instrument was used to collect a density profile for the first 160 m of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide WDCO6A deep ice core. The second method involves optical scattering measurements on firn and ice cores to determine the important microstructural parameters of ice grain and air bubble size and air-ice interface surface area. These measurements are modeled using both Monte Carlo radiative transfer and ray-tracing geometric optics methods, and are then tested against experiment using digital photography of the WDC06A core. Combining the results of both bulk density and optical

  7. Compressive strength evaluation of structural lightweight concrete by non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method.

    PubMed

    Bogas, J Alexandre; Gomes, M Glória; Gomes, Augusto

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the compressive strength of a wide range of structural lightweight aggregate concrete mixes is evaluated by the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method. This study involves about 84 different compositions tested between 3 and 180 days for compressive strengths ranging from about 30 to 80 MPa. The influence of several factors on the relation between the ultrasonic pulse velocity and compressive strength is examined. These factors include the cement type and content, amount of water, type of admixture, initial wetting conditions, type and volume of aggregate and the partial replacement of normal weight coarse and fine aggregates by lightweight aggregates. It is found that lightweight and normal weight concretes are affected differently by mix design parameters. In addition, the prediction of the concrete's compressive strength by means of the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity test is studied. Based on the dependence of the ultrasonic pulse velocity on the density and elasticity of concrete, a simplified expression is proposed to estimate the compressive strength, regardless the type of concrete and its composition. More than 200 results for different types of aggregates and concrete compositions were analyzed and high correlation coefficients were obtained. PMID:23351273

  8. Non-destructive infrared analyses: a method for provenance analyses of sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowitz, Jörg; Ehling, Angela

    2008-12-01

    Infrared spectroscopy (IR spectroscopy) is commonly applied in the laboratory for mineral analyses in addition to XRD. Because such technical efforts are time and cost consuming, we present an infrared-based mobile method for non-destructive mineral and provenance analyses of sandstones. IR spectroscopy is based on activating chemical bonds. By irradiating a mineral mixture, special bonds are activated to vibrate depending on the bond energy (resonance vibration). Accordingly, the energy of the IR spectrum will be reduced thereby generating an absorption spectrum. The positions of the absorption maxima within the spectral region indicate the type of the bonds and in many cases identify minerals containing these bonds. The non-destructive reflection spectroscopy operates in the near infrared region (NIR) and can detect all common clay minerals as well as sulfates, hydroxides and carbonates. The spectra produced have been interpreted by computer using digital mineral libraries that have been especially collected for sandstones. The comparison of all results with XRD, RFA and interpretations of thin sections demonstrates impressively the accuracy and reliability of this method. Not only are different minerals detectable, but also differently ordered kaolinites and varieties of illites can be identified by the shape and size of the absorption bands. Especially clay minerals and their varieties in combination with their relative contents form the characteristic spectra of sandstones. Other components such as limonite, hematite and amorphous silica also influence the spectra. Sandstones, similar in colour and texture, often can be identified by their characteristic reflectance spectra. Reference libraries with more than 60 spectra of important German sandstones have been created to enable entirely computerized interpretations and identifications of these dimension stones. The analysis of infrared spectroscopy results is demonstrated with examples of different sandstones

  9. Non-destructive research methods applied on materials for the new generation of nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartošová, I.; Slugeň, V.; Veterníková, J.; Sojak, S.; Petriska, M.; Bouhaddane, A.

    2014-06-01

    The paper is aimed on non-destructive experimental techniques applied on materials for the new generation of nuclear reactors (GEN IV). With the development of these reactors, also materials have to be developed in order to guarantee high standard properties needed for construction. These properties are high temperature resistance, radiation resistance and resistance to other negative effects. Nevertheless the changes in their mechanical properties should be only minimal. Materials, that fulfil these requirements, are analysed in this work. The ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels and ODS steels are studied in details. Microstructural defects, which can occur in structural materials and can be also accumulated during irradiation due to neutron flux or alpha, beta and gamma radiation, were analysed using different spectroscopic methods as positron annihilation spectroscopy and Barkhausen noise, which were applied for measurements of three different FM steels (T91, P91 and E97) as well as one ODS steel (ODS Eurofer).

  10. System and method for non-destructive evaluation of surface characteristics of a magnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Jiles, David C.; Sipahi, Levent B.

    1994-05-17

    A system and a related method for non-destructive evaluation of the surface characteristics of a magnetic material. The sample is excited by an alternating magnetic field. The field frequency, amplitude and offset are controlled according to a predetermined protocol. The Barkhausen response of the sample is detected for the various fields and offsets and is analyzed. The system produces information relating to the frequency content, the amplitude content, the average or RMS energy content, as well as count rate information, for each of the Barkhausen responses at each of the excitation levels applied during the protocol. That information provides a contiguous body of data, heretofore unavailable, which can be analyzed to deduce information about the surface characteristics of the material at various depths below the surface.

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) as a nondestructive test method used for composite helicopter components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oster, Reinhold

    The first components of primary helicopter structures to be made of glass fiber reinforced plastics were the main and tail rotor blades of the Bo105 and BK117 helicopters. These blades are now successfully produced in series. New developments in rotor components, e.g. the rotor blade technology of the Bo108 and PAH2 programs, make use of very complex fiber reinforced structures to achieve simplicity and strength. Computer tomography was found to be an outstanding nondestructive test method for examining the internal structure of components. A CT scanner generates x-ray attenuation measurements which are used to produce computer reconstructed images of any desired part of an object. The system images a range of flaws in composites in a number of views and planes. Several CT investigations and their results are reported taking composite helicopter components as an example.

  12. Computed tomography (CT) as a nondestructive test method used for composite helicopter components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oster, Reinhold

    1991-09-01

    The first components of primary helicopter structures to be made of glass fiber reinforced plastics were the main and tail rotor blades of the Bo105 and BK 117 helicopters. These blades are now successfully produced in series. New developments in rotor components, e.g., the rotor blade technology of the Bo108 and PAH2 programs, make use of very complex fiber reinforced structures to achieve simplicity and strength. Computer tomography was found to be an outstanding nondestructive test method for examining the internal structure of components. A CT scanner generates x-ray attenuation measurements which are used to produce computer reconstructed images of any desired part of an object. The system images a range of flaws in composites in a number of views and planes. Several CT investigations and their results are reported taking composite helicopter components as an example.

  13. NON-DESTRUCTIVE TBC SPALLATION DETECTION BY A MICRO-INDENTATION METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Tannenbaum; B.S.-J. Kang; M.A. Alvin

    2010-06-18

    In this research, a load-based depth-sensing micro-indentation method for spallation detection and damage assessment of thermal barrier coating (TBC) materials is presented. A non-destructive multiple loading/partial unloading testing methodology was developed where in stiffness responses of TBC coupons subjected to various thermal cyclic loading conditions were analyzed to predict the spallation site and assess TBC degradation state. The measured stiffness responses at various thermal loading cycles were used to generate time-series color maps for correlation with accumulation of TBC residual stress states. The regions with higher stiffness responses can be linked to a rise in out-of-plane residual stress located near or at the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/thermally grown oxide (TGO) interface, which is ultimately responsible for initiating TBC spallation failure. A TBC thermal exposure testing plan was carried out where time-series cross-sectional microstructural analyses of damage accumulation and spallation failure associated with the evolution of bond coat/TGO/top coat composite (e.g. thickness, ratcheting, localized oxidations, etc.) of air plasma sprayed (APS) TBCs were evaluated and correlated to the measured stiffness responses at various thermal cycles. The results show that the load-based micro-indentation test methodology is capable of identifying the spallation site(s) before actual occurrence. This micro-indentation technique can be viewed as a viable non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique for determining as-manufactured and process-exposed TBCs. This technique also shows promise for the development of a portable instrument for on-line, in-situ spallation detection/prediction of industrial-size TBC turbine components.

  14. Quantitative impact characterization of aeronautical CFRP materials with non-destructive testing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefel, Denis E-mail: Rainer.Stoessel@airbus.com; Stoessel, Rainer E-mail: Rainer.Stoessel@airbus.com; Grosse, Christian

    2015-03-31

    In recent years, an increasing number of safety-relevant structures are designed and manufactured from carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) in order to reduce weight of airplanes by taking the advantage of their specific strength into account. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for quantitative defect analysis of damages are liquid- or air-coupled ultrasonic testing (UT), phased array ultrasonic techniques, and active thermography (IR). The advantage of these testing methods is the applicability on large areas. However, their quantitative information is often limited on impact localization and size. In addition to these techniques, Airbus Group Innovations operates a micro x-ray computed tomography (μ-XCT) system, which was developed for CFRP characterization. It is an open system which allows different kinds of acquisition, reconstruction, and data evaluation. One main advantage of this μ-XCT system is its high resolution with 3-dimensional analysis and visualization opportunities, which enables to gain important quantitative information for composite part design and stress analysis. Within this study, different NDT methods will be compared at CFRP samples with specified artificial impact damages. The results can be used to select the most suitable NDT-method for specific application cases. Furthermore, novel evaluation and visualization methods for impact analyzes are developed and will be presented.

  15. X-ray based methods for non-destructive testing and material characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Randolf; Fuchs, Theobald; Uhlmann, Norman

    2008-06-01

    The increasing complexity and miniaturization in the field of new materials as well as in micro-production requires in the same way improvements and technical advances in the field of micro-NDT to provide better quality data and more detailed knowledge about the internal structures of micro-components. Therefore, non-destructive methods like radioscopy, ultrasound, optical or thermal imaging increasingly gain in importance with respect to ongoing product and material development in the different phases like material characterization, production control or module reliability testing. Because of the manifold different application fields, i.e., certain physical NDT methods applied to material inspection, characterization or reliability testing, this contribution will focus on the radioscopic-based methods related to their most important applications. Today, in modern industrial quality control, X-ray transmission is used in two different ways: Two-dimensional radioscopic transmission imaging (projection technique), usually applied to inline inspection tasks in application fields like lightweight material production, electronic component soldering or food production. Computed tomography (CT) for generation of three-dimensional data, representing spatial information and density distribution of objects. CT application fields are on the one hand the understanding of production process failure or component and module inspection (completeness) and on the other hand the dimensional measuring of hidden geometrical outlines (metrology). This paper demonstrates the methods including technical set-ups (X-ray source and detector), imaging and reconstruction results and the methods for high speed and high-resolution volume data generation and evaluation.

  16. Quantitative impact characterization of aeronautical CFRP materials with non-destructive testing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefel, Denis; Stoessel, Rainer; Grosse, Christian

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of safety-relevant structures are designed and manufactured from carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) in order to reduce weight of airplanes by taking the advantage of their specific strength into account. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for quantitative defect analysis of damages are liquid- or air-coupled ultrasonic testing (UT), phased array ultrasonic techniques, and active thermography (IR). The advantage of these testing methods is the applicability on large areas. However, their quantitative information is often limited on impact localization and size. In addition to these techniques, Airbus Group Innovations operates a micro x-ray computed tomography (μ-XCT) system, which was developed for CFRP characterization. It is an open system which allows different kinds of acquisition, reconstruction, and data evaluation. One main advantage of this μ-XCT system is its high resolution with 3-dimensional analysis and visualization opportunities, which enables to gain important quantitative information for composite part design and stress analysis. Within this study, different NDT methods will be compared at CFRP samples with specified artificial impact damages. The results can be used to select the most suitable NDT-method for specific application cases. Furthermore, novel evaluation and visualization methods for impact analyzes are developed and will be presented.

  17. Microwave dielectric method for the rapid, non-destructive determination of bulk density and moisture content of peanut hull pellets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A dielectric-based method was used to determine rapidly and nondestructively moisture content and bulk density of peanut-hull pellets from free-space measurement of their dielectric properties at microwave frequencies. For moisture content determination, a permittivity-based function which allows mo...

  18. Development of vibrational spectroscopic methods to rapidly and non-destructively assess quality of chicken breast meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of Vibrational Spectroscopic Methods to Rapidly and Non-Destructively Assess Quality of Chicken Breast Meat H. Zhuang1, M. Sohn2, S. Trabelsi1 and K. Lawrence1 1Quality and Safety Assessment Research Unit, ARS-USDA, 950 College Station Road, Athens, GA 30605 2University of Georgia, De...

  19. Method and apparatus for enhancing surface absorption and emissivity in optical pulsed infrared nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yuxia; Zhang, Cunlin; Jin, Wanping; Wu, Naiming

    2009-07-01

    In the application of optical pulsed infrared NDE, the visible light absorption and IR emissivity of the detected object must be considered. One of the simple methods is spraying paint on the highly reflective and low IR emissivity surface before testing. However, for some materials such as with pore space in the surface or easily to be corrupted have to be pretreated by other method and apparatus. Two kinds of apparatus for surface pretreating are designed according to the dimension of the detected object and the testing conditions. One apparatus is independent of the former detecting system, and the other is an improvement of the former system. The basic principle of the two apparatus is covering a flexible membrane of high light absorption and IR emissivity on the specimen surface by vacuum pumping. The paper also present the applications of the method, including the detection of the metal mesh material and the honeycomb structures with aluminum coating. The experimental results show that the technique of covering thin film by vacuum pump is effective for enhancing surface absorption and emissivity; moreover, it does not pollute or damage the sample. The application of the technique has practical significance, because it extends the scope of the application of the optical pulsed thermography nondestructive evaluation.

  20. A time-domain finite element boundary integration method for ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fan; Choi, Wonjae; Skelton, Elizabeth A; Lowe, Michael J S; Craster, Richard V

    2014-12-01

    A 2-D and 3-D numerical modeling approach for calculating the elastic wave scattering signals from complex stress-free defects is evaluated. In this method, efficient boundary integration across the complex boundary of the defect is coupled with a time-domain finite element (FE) solver. The model is designed to simulate time-domain ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation in bulk media. This approach makes use of the hybrid concept of linking a local numerical model to compute the near-field scattering behavior and theoretical mathematical formulas for postprocessing to calculate the received signals. It minimizes the number of monitoring signals from the FE calculation so that the computation effort in postprocessing decreases significantly. In addition, by neglecting the conventional regular monitoring box, the region for FE calculation can be made smaller. In this paper, the boundary integral method is implemented in a commercial FE code, and it is validated by comparing the scattering signals with results from corresponding full FE models. The coupled method is then implemented in real inspection scenarios in both 2-D and 3-D, and the accuracy and the efficiency are demonstrated. The limitations of the proposed model and future works are also discussed. PMID:25474780

  1. On the performance of nondestructive testing methods in the hydroelectric turbine industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibzadeh Boukani, H.; Viens, M.; Tahan, S. A.; Gagnon, M.

    2014-03-01

    Welded joints of turbine runners are one of the most critical parts of Francis turbines due to the presence of welding discontinuity and high stress. Because of thermal cycles, solidification, cooling distortion and residual stresses, welded joints always include discontinuities of different types and sizes. Some specific parameters will limit welding flaw dimensions in some or all direction based on the joint geometry, material and welding procedure. If discontinuities of critical size remain undetected, fatigue cracks might initiate and propagate in these zones because of dynamic in-service stresses leading to high repair costs and long down times. Therefore, reliable NDT methods and good knowledge of the probability of occurrence of welding flaws is important for fatigue life estimations. Every NDT method has its weaknesses; therefore, even after meticulous inspections it is likely for some discontinuities of critical sizes to remain in the welded joint. Our objective is to clarify the probability of detection and occurrence of different types of welding flaws in hydroelectric turbine runners. Furthermore, an overview of current nondestructive inspection methods and their capability in characterizing flaw dimensions will be discussed. Finally, advanced NDT techniques, for the characterization of welded joints integrity, will be proposed.

  2. Quantitative electromechanical impedance method for nondestructive testing based on a piezoelectric bimorph cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ji; Tan, Chi; Li, Faxin

    2015-06-01

    The electromechanical impedance (EMI) method, which holds great promise in structural health monitoring (SHM), is usually treated as a qualitative method. In this work, we proposed a quantitative EMI method based on a piezoelectric bimorph cantilever using the sample’s local contact stiffness (LCS) as the identification parameter for nondestructive testing (NDT). Firstly, the equivalent circuit of the contact vibration system was established and the analytical relationship between the cantilever’s contact resonance frequency and the LCS was obtained. As the LCS is sensitive to typical defects such as voids and delamination, the proposed EMI method can then be used for NDT. To verify the equivalent circuit model, two piezoelectric bimorph cantilevers were fabricated and their free resonance frequencies were measured and compared with theoretical predictions. It was found that the stiff cantilever’s EMI can be well predicted by the equivalent circuit model while the soft cantilever’s cannot. Then, both cantilevers were assembled into a homemade NDT system using a three-axis motorized stage for LCS scanning. Testing results on a specimen with a prefabricated defect showed that the defect could be clearly reproduced in the LCS image, indicating the validity of the quantitative EMI method for NDT. It was found that the single-frequency mode of the EMI method can also be used for NDT, which is faster but not quantitative. Finally, several issues relating to the practical application of the NDT method were discussed. The proposed EMI-based NDT method offers a simple and rapid solution for damage evaluation in engineering structures and may also shed some light on EMI-based SHM.

  3. Automated nondestructive evaluation method for characterizing ceramic and metallic hot gas filters.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W. A.; Koehl, E. R.; Deemer, C.; Pastilla, P.; Wheeler, B.; Forster, G. A.

    2002-06-03

    In advanced coal-fired power generation, one technology under development to clean up hot gases before their use as fuel for gas turbines is rigid ceramic candle filters. These porous filters are typically 1.5 m long and 60 mm in diameter and are made of various ceramic materials, including clay-bonded SiC. The high costs of downtime in a large utility demands that nondestructive evaluation/characterization (NDE/C) methods be available. At shutdowns, data from such analysis are needed to decide which filters are still usable and which need to be replaced, and if possible, to estimate the remaining lifetimes. Thus our objective was to develop reliable low-cost NDE technology for these filters. Our approach was to develop NDE/C technology, referred to as acousto-ultrasonics (AU), for application to hot gas filters. Lamb waves generated by the AU method were analyzed to derive a stress wave factor (SWF). This technology was tested by comparing SWF data with the measured strength for a variety of rigid ceramic filters and was shown to work on iron-aluminide filters as well but no strength data have been obtained on the iron-aluminides at this time.

  4. Laser optoacoustic method for quantitative nondestructive evaluation of the subsurface damage depth in ground silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podymova, N. B.; Karabutov, A. A.; Cherepetskaya, E. B.

    2014-08-01

    This paper is a report on the novel laser optoacoustic method for nondestructive evaluation of the depth of the subsurface damage in ground single-crystal silicon wafers. It is based on different mechanisms of laser excitation of ultrasound by absorption of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser pulses at the fundamental wavelength: the concentration-deformation mechanism in the undamaged single-crystal silicon and the thermoelastic one in the subsurface damaged layer. Due to the uniform heating of the whole damaged layer during the laser pulse action the amplitude of the compression phase of the laser-induced ultrasonic signal is proportional to the damaged depth. The rarefaction phase of this signal arises by absorption of the remaining laser energy in the single-crystal silicon beneath the damaged layer. The empirical relation between the depth of the subsurface damage and the ratio of the amplitudes of compression and rarefaction phases of the laser-induced ultrasonic signal can be fitted by a linear function within the depth variation and the corresponding spread of the signal amplitudes. The proposed method attracts some interest for in situ control of the solid surface condition that is important in different tasks of linear and nonlinear optics.

  5. Non-destructive lichen biomass estimation in northwestern Alaska: a comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Abbey; Neitlich, Peter; Smith, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial lichen biomass is an important indicator of forage availability for caribou in northern regions, and can indicate vegetation shifts due to climate change, air pollution or changes in vascular plant community structure. Techniques for estimating lichen biomass have traditionally required destructive harvesting that is painstaking and impractical, so we developed models to estimate biomass from relatively simple cover and height measurements. We measured cover and height of forage lichens (including single-taxon and multi-taxa "community" samples, n = 144) at 73 sites on the Seward Peninsula of northwestern Alaska, and harvested lichen biomass from the same plots. We assessed biomass-to-volume relationships using zero-intercept regressions, and compared differences among two non-destructive cover estimation methods (ocular vs. point count), among four landcover types in two ecoregions, and among single-taxon vs. multi-taxa samples. Additionally, we explored the feasibility of using lichen height (instead of volume) as a predictor of stand-level biomass. Although lichen taxa exhibited unique biomass and bulk density responses that varied significantly by growth form, we found that single-taxon sampling consistently under-estimated true biomass and was constrained by the need for taxonomic experts. We also found that the point count method provided little to no improvement over ocular methods, despite increased effort. Estimated biomass of lichen-dominated communities (mean lichen cover: 84.9±1.4%) using multi-taxa, ocular methods differed only nominally among landcover types within ecoregions (range: 822 to 1418 g m-2). Height alone was a poor predictor of lichen biomass and should always be weighted by cover abundance. We conclude that the multi-taxa (whole-community) approach, when paired with ocular estimates, is the most reasonable and practical method for estimating lichen biomass at landscape scales in northwest Alaska. PMID:25079228

  6. Non-Destructive Lichen Biomass Estimation in Northwestern Alaska: A Comparison of Methods

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Abbey; Neitlich, Peter; Smith, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial lichen biomass is an important indicator of forage availability for caribou in northern regions, and can indicate vegetation shifts due to climate change, air pollution or changes in vascular plant community structure. Techniques for estimating lichen biomass have traditionally required destructive harvesting that is painstaking and impractical, so we developed models to estimate biomass from relatively simple cover and height measurements. We measured cover and height of forage lichens (including single-taxon and multi-taxa “community” samples, n = 144) at 73 sites on the Seward Peninsula of northwestern Alaska, and harvested lichen biomass from the same plots. We assessed biomass-to-volume relationships using zero-intercept regressions, and compared differences among two non-destructive cover estimation methods (ocular vs. point count), among four landcover types in two ecoregions, and among single-taxon vs. multi-taxa samples. Additionally, we explored the feasibility of using lichen height (instead of volume) as a predictor of stand-level biomass. Although lichen taxa exhibited unique biomass and bulk density responses that varied significantly by growth form, we found that single-taxon sampling consistently under-estimated true biomass and was constrained by the need for taxonomic experts. We also found that the point count method provided little to no improvement over ocular methods, despite increased effort. Estimated biomass of lichen-dominated communities (mean lichen cover: 84.9±1.4%) using multi-taxa, ocular methods differed only nominally among landcover types within ecoregions (range: 822 to 1418 g m−2). Height alone was a poor predictor of lichen biomass and should always be weighted by cover abundance. We conclude that the multi-taxa (whole-community) approach, when paired with ocular estimates, is the most reasonable and practical method for estimating lichen biomass at landscape scales in northwest Alaska. PMID:25079228

  7. Non-destructive in-situ method and apparatus for determining radionuclide depth in media

    DOEpatents

    Xu, X. George; Naessens, Edward P.

    2003-01-01

    A non-destructive method and apparatus which is based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the depth of radiological contamination in media such as concrete. An algorithm, Gamma Penetration Depth Unfolding Algorithm (GPDUA), uses point kernel techniques to predict the depth of contamination based on the results of uncollided peak information from the in-situ gamma spectroscopy. The invention is better, faster, safer, and/cheaper than the current practice in decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are slow, rough and unsafe. The invention uses a priori knowledge of the contaminant source distribution. The applicable radiological contaminants of interest are any isotopes that emit two or more gamma rays per disintegration or isotopes that emit a single gamma ray but have gamma-emitting progeny in secular equilibrium with its parent (e.g., .sup.60 Co, .sup.235 U, and .sup.137 Cs to name a few). The predicted depths from the GPDUA algorithm using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) simulations and laboratory experiments using .sup.60 Co have consistently produced predicted depths within 20% of the actual or known depth.

  8. Spatial distribution pattern analysis of subtidal macroalgae assemblages by a non-destructive rapid assessment method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinda, Xabier; Juanes, José Antonio; Puente, Araceli; Echavarri-Erasun, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    The extensive field work carried out over the last century has allowed the worldwide description of general distribution patterns and specific composition of rocky intertidal communities. However, the information concerning subtidal communities on hard substrates is more recent and scarce due to the difficulties associated with working in such environments. In this work, a non-destructive method is applied to the study and mapping of subtidal rocky bottom macroalgae assemblages on the coast of Cantabria (N Spain) which is quick, easy and economical. Gelidium corneum and Cystoseira baccata were the dominant species, however, the composition and coverage of macroalgae assemblages varied significantly at different locations and depth ranges. The high presence of Laminaria ochroleuca and Saccorhiza polyschides, characteristic of colder waters, shows the transitional character of this coastal area. The results obtained throughout this study have been very useful to the application of the European Water Framework Directive (WFD 2000/60/EC) and could be of great interest for the future conservation and management of these ecosystems (e.g. Habitats Directive 92/43/EEC).

  9. [A path-length correction method on biochemical parameter nondestructive measuring of folium].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Xuan; Zhang, Guang-Jun; Li, Qing-Bo

    2010-05-01

    Vis/NIR spectroscopy technology is capable of analyzing the content of biochemical parameter in folium rapidly and nondestructively. In the process of spectrum analysis, the variations in path-length between different samples exist, with the random light scattering and leaf thickness perturbations, which influence the precision of quantitative analysis model. In order to resolve this problem, an improved path-length correction method based on Extended Multiplicative Scattering Correction is presented. In this paper, firstly the theory of EMSC algorithm is deduced. EMSC method incorporates both chemical terms and wavelength functions to help realize the efficient separation of path-length and interest concentration. Secondly two experiments were implemented to demonstrate the validity of the method. In Experiment 1, sixteen samples of different thickness but almost the same chlorophyll content were selected, and how the path-length affects the spectrum was compared, after EMSC preprocessing, the variable coefficient of spectrum could approach the repeatability error of spectrometer. In Experiment 2, thirty-two samples of different thickness and chlorophyll content were selected. PLS model established using cross validation was employed to evaluate the efficiency of the presented algorithm. Before the preprocessing, the root mean squared error of prediction is 3.9 SPAD with 5 principal components. After preprocessing, the predicted root mean squared error is 2.2 SPAD with 12 principal components. The results indicate that the improved EMSC preprocessing method could exactly eliminate the spectrum difference caused by the path-length variations between different foliums, enhance the sensitivity of concentration and spectral data, and increase the precision of calibrated model. PMID:20672624

  10. Automatic method for synchronizing workpiece frames in twin-robot nondestructive testing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zongxing; Xu, Chunguang; Pan, Qinxue; Meng, Fanwu; Li, Xinliang

    2015-07-01

    The workpiece frames relative to each robot base frame should be known in advance for the proper operation of twin-robot nondestructive testing system. However, when two robots are separated from the workpieces, the twin robots cannot reach the same point to complete the process of workpiece frame positioning. Thus, a new method is proposed to solve the problem of coincidence between workpiece frames. Transformation between two robot base frames is initiated by measuring the coordinate values of three non-collinear calibration points. The relationship between the workpiece frame and that of the slave robot base frame is then determined according to the known transformation of two robot base frames, as well as the relationship between the workpiece frame and that of the master robot base frame. Only one robot is required to actually measure the coordinate values of the calibration points on the workpiece. This requirement is beneficial when one of the robots cannot reach and measure the calibration points. The coordinate values of the calibration points are derived by driving the robot hand to the points and recording the values of top center point(TCP) coordinates. The translation and rotation matrices relate either the two robot base frames or the workpiece and master robot. The coordinated are solved using the measured values of the calibration points according to the Cartesian transformation principle. An optimal method is developed based on exponential mapping of Lie algebra to ensure that the rotation matrix is orthogonal. Experimental results show that this method involves fewer steps, offers significant advantages in terms of operation and time-saving. A method used to synchronize workpiece frames in twin-robot system automatically is presented.

  11. Development of Natural Flaw Samples for Evaluating Nondestructive Testing Methods for Foam Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Davis, Jason; Farrington, Seth; Walker, James

    2007-01-01

    Low density polyurethane foam has been an important insulation material for space launch vehicles for several decades. The potential for damage from foam breaking away from the NASA External Tank was not realized until the foam impacts on the Columbia Orbiter vehicle caused damage to its Leading Edge thermal protection systems (TPS). Development of improved inspection techniques on the foam TPS is necessary to prevent similar occurrences in the future. Foamed panels with drilled holes for volumetric flaws and Teflon inserts to simulate debonded conditions have been used to evaluate and calibrate nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. Unfortunately the symmetric edges and dissimilar materials used in the preparation of these simulated flaws provide an artificially large signal while very little signal is generated from the actual defects themselves. In other words, the same signal are not generated from the artificial defects in the foam test panels as produced when inspecting natural defect in the ET foam TPS. A project to create more realistic voids similar to what actually occurs during manufacturing operations was began in order to improve detection of critical voids during inspections. This presentation describes approaches taken to create more natural voids in foam TPS in order to provide a more realistic evaluation of what the NDT methods can detect. These flaw creation techniques were developed with both sprayed foam and poured foam used for insulation on the External Tank. Test panels with simulated defects have been used to evaluate NDT methods for the inspection of the External Tank. A comparison of images between natural flaws and machined flaws generated from backscatter x-ray radiography, x-ray laminography, terahertz imaging and millimeter wave imaging show significant differences in identifying defect regions.

  12. Theoretical detection ranges for acoustic based manatee avoidance technology.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Richard; Niezrecki, Christopher; Beusse, Diedrich O

    2006-07-01

    The West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) has become endangered partly because of watercraft collisions in Florida's coastal waterways. To reduce the number of collisions, warning systems based upon detecting manatee vocalizations have been proposed. One aspect of the feasibility of an acoustically based warning system relies upon the distance at which a manatee vocalization is detectable. Assuming a mixed spreading model, this paper presents a theoretical analysis of the system detection capabilities operating within various background and watercraft noise conditions. This study combines measured source levels of manatee vocalizations with the modeled acoustic properties of manatee habitats to develop a method for determining the detection range and hydrophone spacing requirements for acoustic based manatee avoidance technologies. In quiet environments (background noise approximately 70 dB) it was estimated that manatee vocalizations are detectable at approximately 250 m, with a 6 dB detection threshold, In louder environments (background noise approximately 100dB) the detection range drops to 2.5 m. In a habitat with 90 dB of background noise, a passing boat with a maximum noise floor of 120 dB would be the limiting factor when it is within approximately 100 m of a hydrophone. The detection range was also found to be strongly dependent on the manatee vocalization source level. PMID:16875213

  13. Application Research on Nondestructive Testing Technology for Quality of Anchor Based on Elastic Wave Reflection Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, G.; Zhou, L.

    2014-12-01

    deconvolution, which enabled us to obtain improved signal to noise ratio and sensing precision. Through the above mentioned systematical studies, we developed a reliable nondestructive test method for both short and long anchors based on elastic wave reflection. This research is funded by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41202223)

  14. Determining the Stability of Asphalt Concrete at Varying Temperatures and Exposure Times Using Destructive and Non-Destructive Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgan, Ercan

    This study examined the effect of varying temperatures and varying exposure times on the stability of asphalt concrete using destructive and non-destructive methods. The study also looked at the relationship between destructive and non-destructive methods. In order to investigate the stability according to exposure time and environment temperature, exposure times of 1.5, 3, 4.5 and 6 h and temperatures of 30, 40 and 50°C were selected. The results showed that at the environment temperature of 17°C the stability of the asphalt core samples decreased by 40.16% at 30°C after 1.5 h and 62.39% after 6 h. At 40°C the decrease was 74.31% after 1.5 and 78.10% after 6 h. At 50°C the stability of the asphalt decreased by 83.22% after 1.5 h and 88.66% after 6 h. The results also pointed to a moderate negative relationship (R = -0.533) between second ultrasound and stability indicating that non-destructive ultrasound method can be used to predict stability.

  15. An accurate method for determining residual stresses with magnetic non-destructive techniques in welded ferromagnetic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourna, P.

    2016-03-01

    The scope of the present research work was to investigate the proper selection criteria for developing a suitable methodology for the accurate determination of residual stresses existing in welded parts. Magnetic non-destructive testing took place by the use of two magnetic non-destructive techniques: by the measurement of the magnetic Barkhausen noise and by the evaluation of the magnetic hysteresis loop parameters. The spatial distribution of residual stresses in welded metal parts by both non-destructive magnetic methods and two diffraction methods was determined. The conduction of magnetic measurements required an initial calibration of ferromagnetic steels. Based on the examined volume of the sample, all methods used were divided into two large categories: the first one was related to the determination of surface residual stress, whereas the second one was related to bulk residual stress determination. The first category included the magnetic Barkhausen noise and the X-ray diffraction measurements, while the second one included the magnetic permeability and the neutron diffraction data. The residual stresses determined by the magnetic techniques were in a good agreement with the diffraction ones.

  16. The use of non-destructive passive neutron measurement methods in dismantling and radioactive waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Jallu, F.; Allinei, P. G.; Bernard, P.; Loridon, J.; Soyer, P.; Pouyat, D.; Torreblanca, L.; Reneleau, A.

    2011-07-01

    The cleaning up and dismantling of nuclear facilities lead to a great volume of technological radioactive wastes which need to be characterized in order to be sent to the adequate final disposal or interim storage. The control and characterization can be performed with non-destructive nuclear measurements such as gamma-ray spectrometry. Passive neutron counting is an alternative when the alpha-gamma emitters cannot be detected due to the presence of a high gamma emission resulting from fission or activation products, or when the waste matrix is too absorbing for the gamma rays of interest (too dense and/or made of high atomic number elements). It can also be a complement to gamma-ray spectrometry when two measurement results must be confronted to improve the confidence in the activity assessment. Passive neutron assays involve the detection of spontaneous fission neutrons emitted by even nuclides ({sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 242}Pu, {sup 242}Cm, {sup 244}Cm...) and neutrons resulting from ({alpha}, n) reactions with light nuclides (O, F, Be...). The latter is conditioned by the presence of high {alpha}-activity radionuclides ({sup 234}U, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am...) and low-Z elements, which depends on the chemical form (metallic, oxide or fluorine) of the plutonium or uranium contaminant. This paper presents the recent application of passive neutron methods to the cleaning up of a nuclear facility located at CEA Cadarache (France), which concerns the Pu mass assessment of 2714 historic, 100 litre radioactive waste drums produced between 1980 and 1997. Another application is the dismantling and decommissioning of an uranium enrichment facility for military purposes, which involves the {sup 235}U and total uranium quantifications in about a thousand, large compressors employed in the gaseous diffusion enrichment process. (authors)

  17. Nondestructive testing and characterization of residual stress field using an ultrasonic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wentao; Xu, Chunguang; Pan, Qinxue; Song, Jianfeng

    2016-03-01

    To address the difficulty in testing and calibrating the stress gradient in the depth direction of mechanical components, a new technology of nondestructive testing and characterization of the residual stress gradient field by ultrasonic method is proposed based on acoustoelasticity theory. By carrying out theoretical analysis, the sensitivity coefficients of different types of ultrasonic are obtained by taking the low carbon steel(12%C) as a research object. By fixing the interval distance between sending and receiving transducers, the mathematical expressions of the change of stress and the variation of time are established. To design one sending-one receiving and oblique incidence ultrasonic detection probes, according to Snell law, the critically refracted longitudinal wave (LCR wave) is excited at a certain depth of the fixed distance of the tested components. Then, the relationship between the depth of LCR wave detection and the center frequency of the probe in Q235 steel is obtained through experimental study. To detect the stress gradient in the depth direction, a stress gradient LCR wave detection model is established, through which the stress gradient formula is derived by the relationship between center frequency and detecting depth. A C-shaped stress specimen of Q235 steel is designed to conduct stress loading tests, and the stress is measured with the five group probes at different center frequencies. The accuracy of ultrasonic testing is verified by X-ray stress analyzer. The stress value of each specific depth is calculated using the stress gradient formula. Accordingly, the ultrasonic characterization of residual stress field is realized. Characterization results show that the stress gradient distribution is consistent with the simulation in ANSYS. The new technology can be widely applied in the detection of the residual stress gradient field caused by mechanical processing, such as welding and shot peening.

  18. Development of nondestructive evaluation methods to characterize anomalous microstructures in titanium-6aluminum-4vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, Mark Patrick

    The main objective of this dissertation is to confirm through research the following hypothesis: "The use of nondestructive evaluation tools allows the detection of different microstructure types and allows the identification of microstructure anomalies (interior and surface) in metals and alloys." The work was conducted on Ti-6A1-4V forged bar stock, presenting a case study for a high performance structural alloy. Ti-6A1-4V is a good model material, which cannot tolerate microstructure anomalies in demanding applications. The alloy is well established with extensive documentation on physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. It is also available in many different microstructures, readily generated by heat treating. This dissertation addresses issues concerning microstructure characterization and the identification of microstructural anomalies. Specifically, this work includes (i) background research on the identification of ultrasonic and electrical characteristics of five different TP6A1-4V microstructures; (ii) an application of ultrasonic backscattering measurements to detect diffusion bonded Ti-6A1-4V microstructure changes, to simulate locally isolated remnant cast structure for billet NDI; (iii) original research on laser interferometric detection for ultrasonic phase mapping to characterize macroscopic texture in Ti-6A1-4V; and (iv) original research on eddy current electrical conductivity mapping in titanium alloys. Three original NDE methods were developed to evaluate microstructure and microstructure anomalies in Ti-6A1-4V. First, a forward scattering measurement technique was developed to spatially map the incoherent grain scattering in the forward propagation direction. These results showed, for the first time, that mapping of the forward scatter provides a basis for characterization of texture in polycrystalline titanium alloys. Second, a laser interferometric system was developed to map the signal amplitude and phase of the transmitted acoustic

  19. Mild-Vectolysis: A nondestructive DNA extraction method for vouchering sand flies and mosquitoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nondestructive techniques allow the isolation of genomic DNA, without damaging the morphological features of the specimens. Though such techniques are available for numerous insect groups, they have not been applied to any member of the medically important families of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae)...

  20. Nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H.E.

    1997-02-01

    Research reported in the thrust area of nondestructive evaluation includes: advanced 3-D imaging technologies; new techniques in laser ultrasonic testing; infrared computed tomography for thermal NDE of materials, structures, sources, and processes; automated defect detection for large laser optics; multistatic micropower impulse radar imaging for nondestructive evaluation; and multi-modal NDE for AVLIS pod shielding components.

  1. Litchi freshness rapid non-destructive evaluating method using electronic nose and non-linear dynamics stochastic resonance model

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Xiaoguo; Liu, Wei; Hui, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, litchi freshness rapid non-destructive evaluating method using electronic nose (e-nose) and non-linear stochastic resonance (SR) was proposed. EN responses to litchi samples were continuously detected for 6 d Principal component analysis (PCA) and non-linear stochastic resonance (SR) methods were utilized to analyze EN detection data. PCA method could not totally discriminate litchi samples, while SR signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) eigen spectrum successfully discriminated all litchi samples. Litchi freshness predictive model developed using SNR eigen values shows high predictive accuracy with regression coefficients R2 = 0 .99396. PMID:25920547

  2. Optical Calibration Process Developed for Neural-Network-Based Optical Nondestructive Evaluation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2004-01-01

    A completely optical calibration process has been developed at Glenn for calibrating a neural-network-based nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method. The NDE method itself detects very small changes in the characteristic patterns or vibration mode shapes of vibrating structures as discussed in many references. The mode shapes or characteristic patterns are recorded using television or electronic holography and change when a structure experiences, for example, cracking, debonds, or variations in fastener properties. An artificial neural network can be trained to be very sensitive to changes in the mode shapes, but quantifying or calibrating that sensitivity in a consistent, meaningful, and deliverable manner has been challenging. The standard calibration approach has been difficult to implement, where the response to damage of the trained neural network is compared with the responses of vibration-measurement sensors. In particular, the vibration-measurement sensors are intrusive, insufficiently sensitive, and not numerous enough. In response to these difficulties, a completely optical alternative to the standard calibration approach was proposed and tested successfully. Specifically, the vibration mode to be monitored for structural damage was intentionally contaminated with known amounts of another mode, and the response of the trained neural network was measured as a function of the peak-to-peak amplitude of the contaminating mode. The neural network calibration technique essentially uses the vibration mode shapes of the undamaged structure as standards against which the changed mode shapes are compared. The published response of the network can be made nearly independent of the contaminating mode, if enough vibration modes are used to train the net. The sensitivity of the neural network can be adjusted for the environment in which the test is to be conducted. The response of a neural network trained with measured vibration patterns for use on a vibration isolation

  3. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Thermal Spray Coating Interface Quality By Eddy Current Method

    SciTech Connect

    B. Mi; G. Zhao; R. Bayles

    2006-08-10

    Thermal spray coating is usually applied through directing molten or softened particles at very high velocities onto a substrate. An eddy current non-destructive inspection technique is presented here for thermal spray coating interface quality characterization. Several high-velocity-oxy-fuel (HVOF) coated steel plates were produced with various surface preparation conditions or spray process parameters. A quad-frequency eddy current probe was used to manually scan over the coating surface to evaluate the bonding quality. Experimental results show that different surface preparation conditions and varied process parameters can be successfully differentiated by the impedance value observed from the eddy current probe. The measurement is fairly robust and consistent. This non-contact, nondestructive, easy-to-use technique has the potential for evaluating the coating quality immediately after its application so that any defects can be corrected immediately.

  4. Evaluation of non-destructive methods for estimating biomass in marshes of the upper Texas, USA coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitbeck, M.; Grace, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    The estimation of aboveground biomass is important in the management of natural resources. Direct measurements by clipping, drying, and weighing of herbaceous vegetation are time-consuming and costly. Therefore, non-destructive methods for efficiently and accurately estimating biomass are of interest. We compared two non-destructive methods, visual obstruction and light penetration, for estimating aboveground biomass in marshes of the upper Texas, USA coast. Visual obstruction was estimated using the Robel pole method, which primarily measures the density and height of the canopy. Light penetration through the canopy was measured using a Decagon light wand, with readings taken above the vegetation and at the ground surface. Clip plots were also taken to provide direct estimates of total aboveground biomass. Regression relationships between estimated and clipped biomass were significant using both methods. However, the light penetration method was much more strongly correlated with clipped biomass under these conditions (R2 value 0.65 compared to 0.35 for the visual obstruction approach). The primary difference between the two methods in this situation was the ability of the light-penetration method to account for variations in plant litter. These results indicate that light-penetration measurements may be better for estimating biomass in marshes when plant litter is an important component. We advise that, in all cases, investigators should calibrate their methods against clip plots to evaluate applicability to their situation. ?? 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  5. A non-destructive method for measuring the mechanical properties of ultrathin films prepared by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qinglin; Xiao, Xingcheng Verbrugge, Mark W.; Cheng, Yang-Tse

    2014-08-11

    The mechanical properties of ultrathin films synthesized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) are critical for the liability of their coated devices. However, it has been a challenge to reliably measure critical properties of ALD films due to the influence from the substrate. In this work, we use the laser acoustic wave (LAW) technique, a non-destructive method, to measure the elastic properties of ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films by ALD. The measured properties are consistent with previous work using other approaches. The LAW method can be easily applied to measure the mechanical properties of various ALD thin films for multiple applications.

  6. A Rapid Ultrasonic Method for Nondestructive Thickness Mapping of Bronze Liner in Steel-Backed Bearing Sleeves

    SciTech Connect

    Fei Dong; Rebinsky, Douglas A.

    2004-02-26

    In this paper a nondestructive, automatic, ultrasonic scanning method was developed to permit rapid thickness mapping of the bronze liner in a steel-backed bearing sleeve. Because the sound velocity in bronze was unknown, an indirect two-step approach was used: the first step utilized a simultaneous velocity and thickness mapping method to measure the total wall thickness while the second step measured the thickness of the steel backing. The difference of the two obtained thickness maps yielded the thickness map of the bronze liner. Comparison to destructive examination results showed a measurement accuracy of approximately 20 {mu}m or 2%.

  7. A Rapid Ultrasonic Method for Nondestructive Thickness Mapping of Bronze Liner in Steel-Backed Bearing Sleeves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Dong; Rebinsky, Douglas A.

    2004-02-01

    In this paper a nondestructive, automatic, ultrasonic scanning method was developed to permit rapid thickness mapping of the bronze liner in a steel-backed bearing sleeve. Because the sound velocity in bronze was unknown, an indirect two-step approach was used: the first step utilized a simultaneous velocity and thickness mapping method to measure the total wall thickness while the second step measured the thickness of the steel backing. The difference of the two obtained thickness maps yielded the thickness map of the bronze liner. Comparison to destructive examination results showed a measurement accuracy of approximately 20 μm or 2%.

  8. A non-destructive n-doping method for graphene with precise control of electronic properties via atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kyu Seok; Kalode, Pranav Y.; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Kim, Hongbum; Lee, Lynn; Sung, Myung Mo

    2016-02-01

    Graphene applications require high precision control of the Fermi level and carrier concentration via a nondestructive doping method. Here, we develop an effective n-doping technique using atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnO thin films on graphene through a reactive molecular layer. This ALD doping method is nondestructive, simple, and precise. The ZnO thin films on graphene are uniform, conformal, of good quality with a low density of pinholes, and finely tunable in thickness with 1 Å resolution. We demonstrate graphene transistor control in terms of the Dirac point, carrier density, and doping state as a function of the ZnO thickness. Moreover, ZnO functions as an effective thin-film barrier against air-borne water and oxygen on the graphene, resulting in extraordinary stability in air for graphene devices. ZnO ALD was also applied to other two-dimensional materials including MoS2 and WSe2, which substantially enhanced electron mobility.Graphene applications require high precision control of the Fermi level and carrier concentration via a nondestructive doping method. Here, we develop an effective n-doping technique using atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnO thin films on graphene through a reactive molecular layer. This ALD doping method is nondestructive, simple, and precise. The ZnO thin films on graphene are uniform, conformal, of good quality with a low density of pinholes, and finely tunable in thickness with 1 Å resolution. We demonstrate graphene transistor control in terms of the Dirac point, carrier density, and doping state as a function of the ZnO thickness. Moreover, ZnO functions as an effective thin-film barrier against air-borne water and oxygen on the graphene, resulting in extraordinary stability in air for graphene devices. ZnO ALD was also applied to other two-dimensional materials including MoS2 and WSe2, which substantially enhanced electron mobility. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08016a

  9. Non-destructive high-throughput DNA extraction and genotyping methods for cotton seeds and seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiuting; Hoegenauer, Kevin A; Maeda, Andrea B V; Wang, Fei; Stelly, David M; Nichols, Robert L; Jones, Don C

    2015-05-01

    Extensive use of targeted PCR-based genotyping is precluded for many plant research laboratories by the cost and time required for DNA extraction. Using cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) as a model for plants with medium-sized seeds, we report here manual procedures for inexpensive non-destructive high-throughput extraction of DNA suitable for PCR-based genotyping of large numbers of individual seeds and seedlings. By sampling only small amounts of cotyledon tissue of ungerminated seed or young seedlings, damage is minimized, and viability is not discernibly affected. The yield of DNA from each seed or seedling is typically sufficient for 1000 or 500 PCR reactions, respectively. For seeds, the tissue sampling procedure relies on a modified 96-well plate that is used subsequently for seed storage. For seeds and seedlings, the DNA is extracted in a strongly basic DNA buffer that is later neutralized and diluted. Extracts can be used directly for high-throughput PCR-based genotyping. Any laboratory can thus extract DNA from thousands of individual seeds/seedlings per person-day at a very modest cost for consumables (~$0.05 per sample). Being non-destructive, our approach enables a wide variety of time- and resource-saving applications, such as marker-assisted selection (MAS), before planting, transplanting, and flowering. PMID:25967902

  10. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Thermal Spray Coating Interface Quality by Eddy Current Method

    SciTech Connect

    B.Mi; X. Zhao; R. Bayles

    2006-05-26

    Thermal spray coating is usually applied through directing molten or softened particles at very high velocities onto a substrate. An eddy current non-destructive inspection technique is presented here for thermal spray coating interface quality characterization. Several high-velocity-oxy-fuel (HVOF) coated steel plates were produced with different surface preparation conditions before applying the coating, e.g., grit-blasted surface, wire-brush cleaned surface, and a dirty surface. A quad-frequency eddy current probe was used to manually scan over the coating surface to evaluate the bonding quality. Experimental results show that the three surface preparation conditions can be successfully differentiated by looking into the impedance difference observed from the eddy current probe. The measurement is fairly robust and consistent. More specimens are also prepared with variations of process parameters, such as spray angle, stand-off distance, and application of corrosion protective sealant, etc. They are blindly tested to evaluate the reliability of the eddy current system. Quantitative relations between the coating bond strength and the eddy current response are also established with the support of destructive testing. This non-contact, non-destructive, easy to use technique has the potential for evaluating the coating quality immediately after its application so that any defects can be corrected immediately.

  11. A non-destructive n-doping method for graphene with precise control of electronic properties via atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyu Seok; Kalode, Pranav Y; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Kim, Hongbum; Lee, Lynn; Sung, Myung Mo

    2016-02-25

    Graphene applications require high precision control of the Fermi level and carrier concentration via a nondestructive doping method. Here, we develop an effective n-doping technique using atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnO thin films on graphene through a reactive molecular layer. This ALD doping method is nondestructive, simple, and precise. The ZnO thin films on graphene are uniform, conformal, of good quality with a low density of pinholes, and finely tunable in thickness with 1 Å resolution. We demonstrate graphene transistor control in terms of the Dirac point, carrier density, and doping state as a function of the ZnO thickness. Moreover, ZnO functions as an effective thin-film barrier against air-borne water and oxygen on the graphene, resulting in extraordinary stability in air for graphene devices. ZnO ALD was also applied to other two-dimensional materials including MoS2 and WSe2, which substantially enhanced electron mobility. PMID:26864992

  12. Quantitative nondestructive in-service evaluation of stay cables of cable-stayed bridges: methods and practical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weischedel, Herbert R.; Hoehle, Hans-Werner

    1995-05-01

    Stay cables of cable-stayed bridges have corrosion protection systems that can be elaborate. For example, such a system may simply consist of one or several coats of paint, or--more complex--of plastic pipes that are wrapped with tape and filled with grout. Frequently, these corrosion protection systems prevent visual inspections. Therefore, alternative nondestructive examination methods are called for. For example, modern dual-function electromagnetic (EM) instruments allow the simultaneous detection of external and internal localized flaws (such as external and internal broken wires and corrosion piting) and the measurement of loss of metallic cross-sectional area (typically caused by external or internal corrosion or wear). Initially developed for mining and skiing applications, these instruments have been successfully used for the inspection of stays of cable-stayed bridges, and for the inspection of guys of smoke stacks, flare stacks, broadcast towers, suspended roofs, etc. As a rule, guys and bridge cables are not subjected to wear and bending stresses. However, their safety can be compromised by corrosion caused by the failure of corrosion protection systems. Furthermore, live loads and wind forces create intermittent tensile stresses that can cause fatigue breaks of wires. This paper discusses the use of dual-function EM instruments for the detection and the nondestructive quantitative evaluation of cable deterioration. It explains the underlying principles. Experiences with this method together with field inspection results will be presented.

  13. Introducing passive acoustic filter in acoustic based condition monitoring: Motor bike piston-bore fault identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, D. P.; Panigrahi, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    Requirement of designing a sophisticated digital band-pass filter in acoustic based condition monitoring has been eliminated by introducing a passive acoustic filter in the present work. So far, no one has attempted to explore the possibility of implementing passive acoustic filters in acoustic based condition monitoring as a pre-conditioner. In order to enhance the acoustic based condition monitoring, a passive acoustic band-pass filter has been designed and deployed. Towards achieving an efficient band-pass acoustic filter, a generalized design methodology has been proposed to design and optimize the desired acoustic filter using multiple filter components in series. An appropriate objective function has been identified for genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization technique with multiple design constraints. In addition, the sturdiness of the proposed method has been demonstrated in designing a band-pass filter by using an n-branch Quincke tube, a high pass filter and multiple Helmholtz resonators. The performance of the designed acoustic band-pass filter has been shown by investigating the piston-bore defect of a motor-bike using engine noise signature. On the introducing a passive acoustic filter in acoustic based condition monitoring reveals the enhancement in machine learning based fault identification practice significantly. This is also a first attempt of its own kind.

  14. Prediction of Service Life of Cordierite-Mullite Refractory Materials by Non-Destructive Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccaccini, D. N.; Kamseu, Elie; Volkov-Husoviæ, T. D.; Cannio, M.; Romagnoli, M.; Veronesi, P.; Dlouhy, I.; Boccaccini, A. R.; Leonelli, C.

    2008-02-01

    Ultrasonic pulse velocity testing was used to perform non-destructive quality control of refractory plates used as substrates in fast firing of porcelain whitewares. The measurement of the ultrasonic velocity was used to asses the presence of internal voids or cracks originated from the manufacturing procedure. Image analysis was used to predict thermal stability of the refractory materials. Two cordierite-mullite compositions were investigated that are characterized by different microstructure morphologies and crack propagation behaviour. A brief discussion about the correlation between microstructure, crack propagation behaviour and thermal shock resistance is presented. Moreover, empirical models were developed to predict the service life of refractory plates from measured values of ultrasonic velocities in plates in the as-received state.

  15. Challenges in Integrating Nondestructive Evaluation and Finite Element Methods for Realistic Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.; Zagidulin, Dmitri; Rauser, Richard W.

    2000-01-01

    Capabilities and expertise related to the development of links between nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and finite element analysis (FEA) at Glenn Research Center (GRC) are demonstrated. Current tools to analyze data produced by computed tomography (CT) scans are exercised to help assess the damage state in high temperature structural composite materials. A utility translator was written to convert velocity (an image processing software) STL data file to a suitable CAD-FEA type file. Finite element analyses are carried out with MARC, a commercial nonlinear finite element code, and the analytical results are discussed. Modeling was established by building MSC/Patran (a pre and post processing finite element package) generated model and comparing it to a model generated by Velocity in conjunction with MSC/Patran Graphics. Modeling issues and results are discussed in this paper. The entire process that outlines the tie between the data extracted via NDE and the finite element modeling and analysis is fully described.

  16. Prediction of Service Life of Cordierite-Mullite Refractory Materials by Non-Destructive Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Boccaccini, D. N.; Kamseu, Elie; Cannio, M.; Romagnoli, M.; Veronesi, P.; Leonelli, C.; Volkov-Husoviae, T. D.; Dlouhy, I.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2008-02-15

    Ultrasonic pulse velocity testing was used to perform non-destructive quality control of refractory plates used as substrates in fast firing of porcelain whitewares. The measurement of the ultrasonic velocity was used to asses the presence of internal voids or cracks originated from the manufacturing procedure. Image analysis was used to predict thermal stability of the refractory materials. Two cordierite-mullite compositions were investigated that are characterized by different microstructure morphologies and crack propagation behaviour. A brief discussion about the correlation between microstructure, crack propagation behaviour and thermal shock resistance is presented. Moreover, empirical models were developed to predict the service life of refractory plates from measured values of ultrasonic velocities in plates in the as-received state.

  17. Electrooptical remote sensing methods as nondestructive testing and measuring techniques in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Myers, V I; Allen, W A

    1968-09-01

    Characteristics of plants that influence reflectance and emission of electromagnetic energy are discussed. Four main spectral regions are influenced by plants. These wavelength bands include the visible region of chlorophyll absorption, very near ir wavelengths, where plant structure is of major importance, the near and middle ir wavelengths, where water and CO(2) absorption predominate, and the far ir region of thermal ir emission. Soil characteristics that influence reflectance and emission of energy are discussed. Nondestructive testing techniques described include laboratory spectrophotometry, field spectrometry, color photography, radiometry, and generation of line scan imagery. Spectrophotometer and spectrometer reflectance data obtained in the laboratory and field are related to interpretation of remote sensing imagery. Model studies that permit predictions of reflectance from plant canopies are described. The principle of multispectral sensing which permits utilization of multiple wavelength channels for establishing unique plant and soil signature is reviewed. PMID:20068888

  18. Innovative real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement under large beam current irradiation for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, M.; Kamada, S.; Suda, M.; Fujii, R.; Nakamura, M.; Hoshi, M.; Sato, H.; Endo, S.; Hamano, T.; Arai, S.; Higashimata, A.

    2012-10-01

    We developed a real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement on a target under large beam current irradiation, and without any complex radiation detectors or electrical circuits. We measured the beam profiles on a target by observing the target temperature using an infrared-radiation thermometer camera. The target temperatures were increased and decreased quickly by starting and stopping the beam irradiation within 1 s in response speed. Our method could trace beam movements rapidly. The beam size and position were calibrated by measuring O-ring heat on the target. Our method has the potential to measure beam profiles at beam current over 1 mA for proton and deuteron with the energy around 3 MeV and allows accelerator operators to adjust the beam location during beam irradiation experiments without decreasing the beam current.

  19. Non-destructive genetic sampling in fish. An improved method for DNA extraction from fish fins and scales.

    PubMed

    Wasko, Adriane P; Martins, Cesar; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2003-01-01

    DNA-based studies have been one of the major interests in conservation biology of endangered species and in population genetics. As species and population genetic assessment requires a source of biological material, the sampling strategy can be overcome by non-destructive procedures for DNA isolation. An improved method for obtaining DNA from fish fins and scales with the use of an extraction buffer containing urea and further DNA purification with phenol-chloroform is described. The methodology combines the benefits of a non-destructive DNA sampling and its high efficiency. In addition, comparisons with other methodologies for isolating DNA from fish demonstrated that the present procedure also becomes a very attractive alternative to obtain large amounts of high-quality DNA for use in different molecular analyses. The DNA samples, isolated from different fish species, have been successfully used on random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) experiments, as well as on amplification of specific ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA sequences. The present DNA extraction procedure represents an alternative for population approaches and genetic studies on rare or endangered taxa. PMID:14641478

  20. Evaluation of damage evolution and material behavior in a sigma/Ti-6242 composite using nondestructive methods

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.; Karpur, P.; Stubbs, D.A.; Matikas, T.E.

    1997-12-31

    Correlations between damage, as it evolves under simulated service conditions, and the results produced from nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques are useful in establishing successful life prediction methodologies in metal-matrix composites. Traditional characterization techniques provide limited information on the failure mechanisms in metal-matrix composites because of the complexities caused by the inhomogeneous, anisotropic nature of these materials. In addition, the currently used destructive techniques yield only qualitative information on the internal damage of composites. Very little quantitative information exists correlating the internal damage with property changes in the material such as stiffness, elongation, and residual strength. This research effort correlated NDE results with the residual tensile strength of a six-ply, unidirectional BP Sigma-1240 SiC/Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo composite after being isothermally fatigued. Information obtained from these tests was used to pinpoint load levels and interruption points for subsequent interrupted fatigue tests. The following nondestructive evaluation techniques were used to evaluate the test specimens before and after fatigue testing: (1) scanning acoustic microscopy, (2) oblique incidence shear wave scanning, (3) reflector plate ultrasonic scanning, (4) immersion surface wave scanning, (5) in situ surface and longitudinal waves and, (6) X-ray radiography. This paper presents the results from each of the NDE techniques and examines the correlation among the techniques, other destructive methods, and the residual tensile strength.

  1. A nondestructive method for estimation of the fracture toughness of CrMoV rotor steels based on ultrasonic nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Nahm, Seung-Hoon; Jhang, Kyung-Young; Nam, Young-Hyun

    2003-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a nondestructive method for estimating the fracture toughness (K(IC)) of CrMoV steels used as the rotor material of steam turbines in power plants. To achieve this objective, a number of CrMoV steel samples were heat-treated, and the fracture appearance transition temperature (FATT) was determined as a function of aging time. Nonlinear ultrasonics was employed as the theoretical basis to explain the harmonic generation in a damaged material, and the nonlinearity parameter of the second harmonic wave was the experimental measure used to be correlated to the fracture toughness of the rotor steel. The nondestructive procedure for estimating the K(IC) consists of two steps. First, the correlations between the nonlinearity parameter and the FATT are sought. The FATT values are then used to estimate K(IC) using the K(IC) versus excess temperature (i.e., T-FATT) correlation that is available in the literature for CrMoV rotor steel. PMID:12919690

  2. Neutron radiography as a non-destructive method for diagnosing neutron converters for advanced thermal neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraro, A.; Albani, G.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Croci, G.; Angella, G.; Birch, J.; Cazzaniga, C.; Caniello, R.; Dell'Era, F.; Ghezzi, F.; Grosso, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Höglund, C.; Hultman, L.; Schimdt, S.; Robinson, L.; Rebai, M.; Salvato, G.; Tresoldi, D.; Vasi, C.; Tardocchi, M.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the well-known problem of 3He shortage, a series of different thermal neutron detectors alternative to helium tubes are being developed, with the goal to find valid candidates for detection systems for the future spallation neutron sources such as the European Spallation Source (ESS). A possible 3He-free detector candidate is a charged particle detector equipped with a three dimensional neutron converter cathode (3D-C). The 3D-C currently under development is composed by a series of alumina (Al2O3) lamellas coated by 1 μ m of 10B enriched boron carbide (B4C). In order to obtain a good characterization in terms of detector efficiency and uniformity it is crucial to know the thickness, the uniformity and the atomic composition of the B4C neutron converter coating. In this work a non-destructive technique for the characterization of the lamellas that will compose the 3D-C was performed using neutron radiography. The results of these measurements show that the lamellas that will be used have coating uniformity suitable for detector applications. This technique (compared with SEM, EDX, ERDA, XPS) has the advantage of being global (i.e. non point-like) and non-destructive, thus it is suitable as a check method for mass production of the 3D-C elements.

  3. Non-Destructive Measurement of Vascular Tissue Development in Stems of Miniature Tomato Using Acoustic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Kensuke; Watanabe, Eiko; Kato, Hiroshi

    The guided wave effect resembling that of annual rings found in woods and the cortical region of bones is believed to be observable in vascular tissues of herbaceous plants. The properties of acoustic waves traveling through the vascular tissue in the stem of a miniature tomato were measured using a piezoelectric pulser and receiver. The thickness of the vascular tissues and the stem's water content were measured. The detected acoustic waves showed a guided wave effect. The apparent sound velocity, va, was related to the vascular tissue thickness, tv. These results reveal that the detected acoustic waves traveled along the vascular tissues in stems. The maximum peak intensity of the detected acoustic waves, Imax was also related to t. Furthermore, wilting of the examined plants decreased the Imax, although va was not changed. The decrease in Imax might result from cavitations and embolisms with a subsequent increase in air pores in xylem tissues. These results demonstrate that the measurement of acoustic waves traveling through vascular tissue is a useful tool for the non-destructive evaluation of vascular tissue development and embolism density in xylem tissues.

  4. Nondestructive Methods and Special Test Instrumentation Supporting NASA Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, Regor; Greene, Nathanael; Cameron, Ken; Madaras, Eric; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Thesken, John; Phoenix, Leigh; Murthy, Pappu; Revilock, Duane

    2007-01-01

    Many aging composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), being used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are currently under evaluation to better quantify their reliability and clarify their likelihood of failure due to stress rupture and age-dependent issues. As a result, some test and analysis programs have been successfully accomplished and other related programs are still in progress at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) and other NASA centers, with assistance from the commercial sector. To support this effort, a group of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) experts was assembled to provide NDE competence for pretest evaluation of test articles and for application of NDE technology to real-time testing. Techniques were required to provide assurance that the test article had adequate structural integrity and manufacturing consistency to be considered acceptable for testing and these techniques were successfully applied. Destructive testing is also being accomplished to better understand the physical and chemical property changes associated with progression toward "stress rupture" (SR) failure, and it is being associated with NDE response, so it can potentially be used to help with life prediction. Destructive work also includes the evaluation of residual stresses during dissection of the overwrap, laboratory evaluation of specimens extracted from the overwrap to evaluate physical property changes, and quantitative microscopy to inform the theoretical micromechanics.

  5. A multi-inspection non-destructive testing method for quality evaluation of composite riveted structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weihan; He, Jingjing; Yang, Jingsong; Liu, Shengwang; Zhang, Weifang

    2015-03-01

    Carbon fiber composites have excellent mechanical properties, which are widely used in aerospace industry. However, 60% to 80% damages in composite occur in riveted structures. This research focuses on the quality evaluation of three major riveted structures used in mechanical connection: pressure riveted connection, hammer riveted connection and pull riveted connection. The non-destructive testing results show that the pull riveting technology introduces minimal damage to the composite, but the hammer riveted structure can be seriously damaged by the riveting technology. The pull riveted structure is an interference fit, which makes the composite plate firmly fixed. However, the fix is weak in the pressure riveted structure and the hammer riveted structure, due to the small gap between the rivets and plate. The results show that the pull riveted structure has a higher tensile strength compared with the pressure riveted structure and hammer riveted structure. The hammer riveted structure has a large dispersion in mechanical properties caused by the impact loading used in the hammer riveting technology.

  6. Non-destructive testing (NDT) of metal cracks using a high Tc rf-SQUID and eddy current method

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, D.F.; Fan, C.; Ruan, J.Z.

    1994-12-31

    A SQUID is the most sensitive device to detect change in magnetic field. A non-destructive testing (NDT) device using high temperature SQUIDs and eddy current method will be much more sensitive than those currently used eddy current systems, yet much cheaper than one with low temperature SQUIDs. In this paper, we present our study of such a NDT device using a high temperature superconducting rf-SQUID as a gradiometer sensor. The result clearly demonstrates the expected sensitivity of the system, and indicates the feasibility of building a portable HTS SQUID NDT device with the help from cryocooler industry. Such a NDT device will have a significant impact on metal corrosion or crack detection technology.

  7. Non-destructive Testing (NDT) of metal cracks using a high Tc rf-SQUID and eddy current method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, D. F.; Fan, Chang-Xin; Ruan, J. Z.; Han, S. G.; Wong, K. W.; Sun, G. F.

    1995-01-01

    A SQUID is the most sensitive device to detect change in magnetic field. A nondestructive testing (NDT) device using high temperature SQUID's and eddy current method will be much more sensitive than those currently used eddy current systems, yet much cheaper than one with low temperature SQUID's. In this paper, we present our study of such a NDT device using a high temperature superconducting rf-SQUID as a gradiometer sensor. The result clearly demonstrates the expected sensitivity of the system, and indicates the feasibility of building a portable HTS SQUID NDT device with the help from cryocooler industry. Such a NDT device will have a significant impact on metal corrosion or crack detection technology.

  8. Assessment of the probability of failure for EC nondestructive testing based on intrusive spectral stochastic finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudni, Zehor; Féliachi, Mouloud; Mohellebi, Hassane

    2014-06-01

    This work is undertaken to study the reliability of eddy current nondestructive testing (ED-NDT) when the defect concerns a change of physical property of the material. So, an intrusive spectral stochastic finite element method (SSFEM) is developed in the case of 2D electromagnetic harmonic equation. The electrical conductivity is considered as random variable and is developed in series of Hermite polynomials. The developed model is validated from measurements on NDT device and is applied to the assessment of the reliability of failure in steam generator tubing of nuclear power plants. The exploitation of the model concerns the impedance calculation of the sensor and the assessment of the reliability of failure. The random defect geometry is also considered and results are given.

  9. 29 CFR 1919.78 - Nondestructive examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nondestructive examinations. 1919.78 Section 1919.78 Labor... Nondestructive examinations. (a) Wherever it is considered necessary by the accredited person or his authorized...., examination of structure or parts by electronic, ultrasonic, or other nondestructive methods may be...

  10. Potential applicability of stress wave velocity method on pavement base materials as a non-destructive testing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahedi, Masrur

    Aggregates derived from natural sources have been used traditionally as the pavement base materials. But in recent times, the extraction of these natural aggregates has become more labor intensive and costly due to resource depletion and environmental concerns. Thus, the uses of recycled aggregates as the supplementary of natural aggregates are increasing considerably in pavement construction. Use of recycled aggregates such as recycled crushed concrete (RCA) and recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) reduces the rate of natural resource depletion, construction debris and cost. Although recycled aggregates could be used as a viable alternative of conventional base materials, strength characteristics and product variability limit their utility to a great extent. Hence, their applicability is needed to be evaluated extensively based on strength, stiffness and cost factors. But for extensive evaluation, traditionally practiced test methods are proven to be unreasonable in terms of time, cost, reliability and applicability. On the other hand, rapid non-destructive methods have the potential to be less time consuming and inexpensive along with the low variability of test results; therefore improving the reliability of estimated performance of the pavement. In this research work, the experimental program was designed to assess the potential application of stress wave velocity method as a non-destructive test in evaluating recycled base materials. Different combinations of cement treated recycled concrete aggregate (RAP) and recycled crushed concrete (RCA) were used to evaluate the applicability of stress wave velocity method. It was found that, stress wave velocity method is excellent in characterizing the strength and stiffness properties of cement treated base materials. Statistical models, based on P-wave velocity were derived for predicting the modulus of elasticity and compressive strength of different combinations of cement treated RAP, Grade-1 and Grade-2 materials. Two

  11. Method Developed for the High-Temperature Nondestructive Evaluation of Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites have emerged as candidate materials to allow higher operating temperatures (1000 to 1400 C) in gas turbine engines. A need, therefore, exists to develop nondestructive methods to evaluate material integrity at the material operating temperature by monitoring thermal and mechanical fatigue. These methods would also have potential as quality inspection tools. The goal of this investigation at the NASA Lewis Research Center is to survey and correlate the temperature-dependent damping and stiffness of advanced ceramic composite materials with imposed thermal and stress histories that simulate in-service turbine engine conditions. A typical sample size of 100 by 4 by 2 cubic millimeters, along with the specified stiffness and density, placed the fundamental vibration frequencies between 100 and 2000 Hz. A modified Forster apparatus seemed most applicable to simultaneously measure both damping and stiffness. Testing in vacuum reduced the effects of air on the measurements. In this method, a single composite sample is vibrated at its fundamental tone; then suddenly, the mechanical excitation is removed so that the sample's motion freely decays with time. Typical results are illlustrated in this paper.

  12. An Innovative Non-Destructive and Computational Method for Uranium Activity and Enrichment Verification of UF{sub 6} Cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    El-Mongy, Sayed A.; Allam, K.M.; Farid, Osama M.

    2006-07-01

    Verification of {sup 235}U enrichment in uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders is often achieved by destructive and non-destructive assay techniques. These techniques are time consuming, need suitable and similar standard, in addition to loss of the nuclear material in the case of destructive analysis. This paper introduce an innovative approach for verifying of {sup 235}U enrichment in UF{sub 6} cylinder. The approach is based on measuring dose rate ({mu}Sv/h) resulted from the emitted gamma rays of {sup 235}U at the surface of the cylinder and then calculating the activity of uranium and enrichment percentage inside the cylinder by a three dimensional model. Attenuation of the main {sup 235}U gamma transitions due to the cylinder wall (5A Type of Ni alloy) was also calculated and corrected for. The method was applied on UF{sub 6} cylinders enriched with 19.75% of {sup 235}U. The calculated enrichment was found to be 18% with 9% uncertainty. By the suggested method, the calculated total uranium activity inside one of the investigated UF{sub 6} cylinder was found close to the target (certified) value (5.6 GBq) with 9% uncertainty. The method is being developed by taking into consideration other parameters. (authors)

  13. Applications of Non-destructive methods (GPR and 3D Laser Scanner) in Historic Masonry Arch Bridge Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alani, Amir; Banks, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    There exist approximately 70,000 masonry arch bridge spans (brick and stone) in the UK with tens of thousands more throughout Europe. A significant number of these bridges are still in operation and form part of the road and rail network systems in many countries. A great majority of these bridges are in desperate need of repair and maintenance. Applications of non-destructive testing methods such as ground penetrating radar (GPR), 3D laser scanning, accelerometer sensors and vibration detecting sensors amongst many others have been used to assess and monitor such structures in the past few years. This presentation provides results of the applications of a 2GHz GPR antenna system and a 3D laser scanner on a historic masonry arch bridge (the Old Bridge, Aylesford) located in Kent, in the south east of England. The older part of the bridge (the mid-span) is 860 years old. The bridge was the subject of a major alteration in 1811. This presentation forms part of a larger ongoing study which is using the two above mentioned non-destructive methods for long-term monitoring of the bridge. The adopted survey planning strategy and technique, data acquisition and processing as well as challenges encountered during actual survey and fieldworks have been discussed in this presentation. As a result of this study the position of different layers of the deck structure has been established with the identification of the original stone base of the bridge. This information in addition to the location of a number of structural ties (anchors - remedial work carried out previously) in the absence of reliable and accurate design details proved to be extremely useful for the modelling of the bridge using the finite element method. Results of the 3D laser scanning of the bridge have also been presented which have provided invaluable data essential for the accurate modelling of the bridge as well as the long term monitoring of the bridge. 2014 EGU-GA GI3.1 Session, organised by COST Action

  14. Innovative non-destructive evaluation methods on HTR fuel at AREVA NP: towards a 100% non invasive control strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Banchet, J.; Tisseur, D.; Hermosilla Lara, S.; Piriou, M.; Bargain, R.; Guillermier, P.

    2007-07-01

    High Temperature Reactor (HTR) fuel consists in millimetric multilayered particles called TRISO, embedded, depending on the reactor design, in a pebble or cylinder-shaped graphite matrix called compact. Particles are typically composed of a 500 {mu}m fissile material kernel, a 95 {mu}m porous carbon layer called buffer, a 40 {mu}m dense pyrolytic carbon layer, a 35 {mu}m silicon carbide layer and another 40 {mu}m dense pyrolytic carbon layer. In order to ensure fuel qualification, as well as reactor safety, particles and compacts need to satisfy specifications concerning their physical characteristics and their integrity. In particular, geometrical parameters such as particle diameter and sphericity as well as layers thickness, but also layers density and the absence of structural defects such as cracks or de-cohesions need to be detected and characterized. In the past, a huge R and D work was carried out to build a TRISO particle characterization quality control plan, mainly based on particle sampling as well as destructive characterization methods. However, since then, development of industrial non-destructive evaluation techniques and devices contributed to envisage not only a non invasive control of HTR fuel, but also a 100% production control strategy. Since 2004, AREVA NP is engaged in a R and D program aiming at the development of innovative industrial nondestructive evaluation methods for HTR fuel. After investigating a number of potential techniques, some of them were selected based on their performances and/or their industrial potential. In particular, development has been carried out on high resolution X-Ray imaging allowing accurate layer thickness, layer density and structural defects characterization, X-Ray tomography offering the possibility to characterize fuel element homogeneity and determine the number of in-contact particles contained in a fuel element, infrared thermal imaging (ITI) allowing cracks detection, eddy currents (EC) enabling

  15. Nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H E

    1998-01-01

    The Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) supports initiatives that advance inspection science and technology. The goal is to provide cutting-edge technologies, that show promise for quantitative inspection and characterization tools two to three years into the future. The NDE thrust area supports a multidisciplinary team, consisting of mechanical and electronics engineers, physicists, materials and computer scientists, chemists, technicians, and radiographers. These team members include personnel that cross departments within LLNL, and some are from academia and industry, within the US and abroad. This collaboration brings together the necessary and diver disciplines to provide the key scientific and technological advancements required to meet LLNL programmatic and industrial NDE challenges. The primary contributions of the NDE thrust area this year are described in these five reports: (1) Image Recovery Techniques for X-Ray Computed Tomography for Limited-Data Environments; (2) Techniques for Enhancing Laser Ultrasonic Nondestructive Evaluation; (3) Optical Inspection of Glass-Epoxy Bonds; (4) Miniature X-Ray Source Development; and (5) Improving Computed Tomography Design and Operation Using Simulation Tools.

  16. The Role of Mathematical Methods in Efficiency Calibration and Uncertainty Estimation in Gamma Based Non-Destructive Assay - 12311

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataraman, R.; Nakazawa, D.

    2012-07-01

    Mathematical methods are being increasingly employed in the efficiency calibration of gamma based systems for non-destructive assay (NDA) of radioactive waste and for the estimation of the Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU). Recently, ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) released a standard guide for use of modeling passive gamma measurements. This is a testimony to the common use and increasing acceptance of mathematical techniques in the calibration and characterization of NDA systems. Mathematical methods offer flexibility and cost savings in terms of rapidly incorporating calibrations for multiple container types, geometries, and matrix types in a new waste assay system or a system that may already be operational. Mathematical methods are also useful in modeling heterogeneous matrices and non-uniform activity distributions. In compliance with good practice, if a computational method is used in waste assay (or in any other radiological application), it must be validated or benchmarked using representative measurements. In this paper, applications involving mathematical methods in gamma based NDA systems are discussed with several examples. The application examples are from NDA systems that were recently calibrated and performance tested. Measurement based verification results are presented. Mathematical methods play an important role in the efficiency calibration of gamma based NDA systems. This is especially true when the measurement program involves a wide variety of complex item geometries and matrix combinations for which the development of physical standards may be impractical. Mathematical methods offer a cost effective means to perform TMU campaigns. Good practice demands that all mathematical estimates be benchmarked and validated using representative sets of measurements. (authors)

  17. A non-destructive method for quantification the irradiation doses of irradiated sucrose using Vis/NIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gong, Aiping; Qiu, Zhengjun; He, Yong; Wang, Zhiping

    2012-12-01

    This article proposes a new method for fast discrimination of irradiation doses of sucrose based on visible-near infrared (Vis/NIR) spectroscopy technology. 250 sucrose samples were categorized into five groups to be irradiated at 0, 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0 kGy respectively and prepared for the discrimination analysis. The 50 samples of each group were randomly divided into a calibration set containing 40 samples, and a validation set containing the remaining 10 samples. Principal component clustering analysis (PCCA) was applied for the extraction of principal components (PCs) and for clustering analysis. The first five PCs were regarded as the inputs to develop the back propagation neural network (BPNN) model. The performance of the model was validated by the 50 unknown samples and the BPNN achieved an excellent precision and recognition ration of 100%. The results indicated that Vis/NIR spectroscopy could be utilized as a rapid and non-destructive method for the classification of different irradiation doses of irradiated sucrose. PMID:23041915

  18. A Non-destructive method to assess freshness of raw bovine milk using FT-NIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanwen; Ding, Wu; Kou, Liping; Li, Liang; Wang, Chen; Jurick, Wayne M

    2015-08-01

    A non-destructive method to analyze the freshness of raw milk was developed using a FT-NIR spectrometer and a fiber optic probe. Diffuse transmittance spectra were acquired in the spectral range 833 ~ 2,500 nm from raw milk samples collected from Northwest A&F University Animal Husbandry Station. After each spectral acquisition, quality parameters such as acidity, pH, and lactose content were measured by traditional detection methods. For all milk samples, PLS (partial least square regression), MLR (multiple linear regression), and ANN (artificial neural networks) analyses were carried out in order to develop models to predict parameters that were indicative of freshness. Predictive models showed R(2) values up to 0.9647, 0.9876 and 0.8772 for acidity, pH, and lactose content, respectively (validation set validations). The similarity analysis and classification between raw milk freshness during storage was also conducted by means of hierarchical cluster analysis. Over an 8 day storage period, the highest heterogeneity was evident between days 1 and 2. PMID:26243957

  19. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Fatigue Damage for SUS316 by Using Electromagnetic Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, M.; Tsuchida, Y.; Yakushiji, T.; Enokizono, M.

    2009-03-01

    There are some fatigue damage estimation methods for an austenitic stainless steel that uses martensitic transformation. For instance, those are the remanent magnetization method, the excitation method using the differential pick-up coil, and so on. We are researching also those two methods in our laboratory now. In the remanent magnetization method, it is well known that the relationship between fatigue damage and the remanent magnetization is simple, clear, and reproducible. In addition, the excitation method can be easily used at the job site because the special magnetizer is unnecessary. But, these methods have some disadvantages shown as follows. For instance, the former needs a special magnetizer and the latter's output signal is small. On the other hand, it is well known that the inductance of a pancake type coil put on the metallic specimen changes according to the electromagnetic properties of the metallic specimen. In this paper, the assessment method of fatigue of an austenitic stainless steel (SUS316) that uses the change by fatigue of the inductance of the pancake type coil measured with the LCR meter is shown. In addition, the fatigue evaluation performance of this method is described.

  20. Ball tonometry: a rapid, nondestructive method for measuring cell turgor pressure in thin-walled plant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lintilhac, P. M.; Wei, C.; Tanguay, J. J.; Outwater, J. O.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we describe a new method for the determination of turgor pressures in living plant cells. Based on the treatment of growing plant cells as thin-walled pressure vessels, we find that pressures can be accurately determined by observing and measuring the area of the contact patch formed when a spherical glass probe is lowered onto the cell surface with a known force. Within the limits we have described, we can show that the load (determined by precalibration of the device) divided by the projected area of the contact patch (determined by video microscopy) provides a direct, rapid, and accurate measure of the internal turgor pressure of the cell. We demonstrate, by parallel measurements with the pressure probe, that our method yields pressure data that are consistent with those from the pressure probe. Also, by incubating target tissues in stepped concentrations of mannitol to incrementally reduce the turgor pressure, we show that the pressures measured by tonometry accurately reflect the predicted changes from the osmotic potential of the bathing medium. The advantages of this new method over the pressure probe are considerable, however, in that we can move rapidly from cell to cell, taking measurements every 20 s. In addition, the nondestructive nature of the method means that we can return to the same cell repeatedly for periodic pressure measurements. The limitations of the method lie in the fact that it is suitable only for superficial cells that are directly accessible to the probe and to cells that are relatively thin walled and not heavily decorated with surface features. It is also not suitable for measuring pressures in flaccid cells.

  1. Synergistic effect of combining two nondestructive analytical methods for multielemental analysis.

    PubMed

    Toh, Yosuke; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Kimura, Atsushi; Nakamura, Shoji; Harada, Hideo; Hara, Kaoru Y; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Kitatani, Fumito; Furutaka, Kazuyoshi

    2014-12-16

    We developed a new analytical technique that combines prompt gamma-ray analysis (PGA) and time-of-flight elemental analysis (TOF) by using an intense pulsed neutron beam at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. It allows us to obtain the results from both methods at the same time. Moreover, it can be used to quantify elemental concentrations in the sample, to which neither of these methods can be applied independently, if a new analytical spectrum (TOF-PGA) is used. To assess the effectiveness of the developed method, a mixed sample of Ag, Au, Cd, Co, and Ta, and the Gibeon meteorite were analyzed. The analytical capabilities were compared based on the gamma-ray peak selectivity and signal-to-noise ratios. TOF-PGA method showed high merits, although the capability may differ based on the target and coexisting elements. PMID:25371049

  2. Endoscopic Shearography and Thermography Methods for Nondestructive Evaluation of Lined Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, S. S.; Lansing, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this research effort was the development of methods for shearographic and thermographic inspection of coatings, bonds, or laminates inside rocket fuel or oxidizer tanks, fuel lines, and other closed structures. The endoscopic methods allow imaging and inspection inside cavities that are traditionally inaccessible with shearography or thermography cameras. The techniques are demonstrated and suggestions for practical application are made in this report. Drawings of the experimental setups, detailed procedures, and experimental data are included.

  3. Endoscopic Shearography and Thermography Methods for Nondestructive Evaluation of Lined Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Matthew D.; Bullock, Michael W.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this research effort was the development of methods for shearography and thermography inspection of coatings, bonds, or laminates inside rocket fuel or oxidizer tanks, fuel lines, and other closed structures. The endoscopic methods allow imaging and inspection inside cavities which are traditionally inaccessible with shearography or thermography cameras. The techniques are demonstrated and suggestions for practical application are made in this report. Drawings of the experimental setups, detailed procedures, and experimental data are included.

  4. Nondestructive method for detecting defects in photodetector and solar cell devices

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    The invention described herein is a method for locating semiconductor device defects and for measuring the internal resistance of such devices by making use of the intrinsic distributed resistance nature of the devices. The method provides for forward-biasing a solar cell or other device while it is scanning with an optical spot. The forward-biasing is achieved with either an illuminator light source or an external current source.

  5. Nondestructive method for detecting defects in photodetector and solar cell devices

    DOEpatents

    Sawyer, David E.

    1981-01-01

    The invention described herein is a method for locating semiconductor device defects and for measuring the internal resistance of such devices by making use of the intrinsic distributed resistance nature of the devices. The method provides for forward-biasing a solar cell or other device while it is scanning with an optical spot. The forward-biasing is achieved with either an illuminator light source or an external current source.

  6. Validating a nondestructive optical method for apportioning colored particulate matter into black carbon and additional components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Beizhan; Kennedy, Daniel; Miller, Rachel L.; Cowin, James P.; Jung, Kyung-hwa; Perzanowski, Matt; Balletta, Marco; Perera, Federica P.; Kinney, Patrick L.; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2011-12-01

    Exposure of black carbon (BC) is associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes. A number of optical methods for estimating BC on Teflon filters have been adopted but most assume all light absorption is due to BC while other sources of colored particulate matter exist. Recently, a four-wavelength-optical reflectance measurement for distinguishing second hand cigarette smoke (SHS) from soot-BC was developed (Brook et al., 2010; Lawless et al., 2004). However, the method has not been validated for soot-BC nor SHS and little work has been done to look at the methodological issues of the optical reflectance measurements for samples that could have SHS, BC, and other colored particles. We refined this method using a lab-modified integrating sphere with absorption measured continuously from 350 nm to 1000 nm. Furthermore, we characterized the absorption spectrum of additional components of particulate matter (PM) on PM 2.5 filters including ammonium sulfate, hematite, goethite, and magnetite. Finally, we validate this method for BC by comparison to other standard methods. Use of synthesized data indicates that it is important to optimize the choice of wavelengths to minimize computational errors as additional components (more than 2) are added to the apportionment model of colored components. We found that substantial errors are introduced when using 4 wavelengths suggested by Lawless et al. to quantify four substances, while an optimized choice of wavelengths can reduce model-derived error from over 10% to less than 2%. For environmental samples, the method was sensitive for estimating airborne levels of BC and SHS, but not mass loadings of iron oxides and sulfate. Duplicate samples collected in NYC show high reproducibility (points consistent with a 1:1 line, R2 = 0.95). BC data measured by this method were consistent with those measured by other optical methods, including Aethalometer and Smoke-stain Reflectometer (SSR); although the SSR looses sensitivity at

  7. Validating a nondestructive optical method for apportioning colored particulate matter into black carbon and additional components

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Beizhan; Kennedy, Daniel; Miller, Rachel L.; Cowin, James P.; Jung, Kyung-hwa; Perzanowski, Matt; Balletta, Marco; Perera, Federica P.; Kinney, Patrick L.; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of black carbon (BC) is associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes. A number of optical methods for estimating BC on Teflon filters have been adopted but most assume all light absorption is due to BC while other sources of colored particulate matter exist. Recently, a four-wavelength-optical reflectance measurement for distinguishing second hand cigarette smoke (SHS) from soot-BC was developed (Brook et al., 2010; Lawless et al., 2004). However, the method has not been validated for soot-BC nor SHS and little work has been done to look at the methodological issues of the optical reflectance measurements for samples that could have SHS, BC, and other colored particles. We refined this method using a lab-modified integrating sphere with absorption measured continuously from 350 nm to 1000 nm. Furthermore, we characterized the absorption spectrum of additional components of particulate matter (PM) on PM2.5 filters including ammonium sulfate, hematite, goethite, and magnetite. Finally, we validate this method for BC by comparison to other standard methods. Use of synthesized data indicates that it is important to optimize the choice of wavelengths to minimize computational errors as additional components (more than 2) are added to the apportionment model of colored components. We found that substantial errors are introduced when using 4 wavelengths suggested by Lawless et al. to quantify four substances, while an optimized choice of wavelengths can reduce model-derived error from over 10% to less than 2%. For environmental samples, the method was sensitive for estimating airborne levels of BC and SHS, but not mass loadings of iron oxides and sulfate. Duplicate samples collected in NYC show high reproducibility (points consistent with a 1:1 line, R2 = 0.95). BC data measured by this method were consistent with those measured by other optical methods, including Aethalometer and Smoke-stain Reflectometer (SSR); although the SSR looses sensitivity at

  8. Case study of a non-destructive treatment method for the remediation of military structures containing polychlorinated biphenyl contaminated paint.

    PubMed

    Saitta, Erin K H; Gittings, Michael J; Novaes-Card, Simone; Quinn, Jacqueline; Clausen, Christian; O'Hara, Suzanne; Yestrebsky, Cherie L

    2015-08-01

    Restricted by federal regulations and limited remediation options, buildings contaminated with paint laden with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have high costs associated with the disposal of hazardous materials. As opposed to current remediation methods which are often destructive and a risk to the surrounding environment, this study suggests a non-metal treatment system (NMTS) and a bimetallic treatment system (BTS) as versatile remediation options for painted industrial structures including concrete buildings, and metal machine parts. In this field study, four areas of a discontinued Department of Defense site were treated and monitored over 3 weeks. PCB levels in paint and treatment system samples were analyzed through gas chromatography/electron capture detection (GC-ECD). PCB concentrations were reduced by 95 percent on painted concrete and by 60-97 percent on painted metal with the majority of the PCB removal occurring within the first week of application. Post treatment laboratory studies including the utilization of an activated metal treatment system (AMTS) further degraded PCBs in BTS and NMTS by up to 82 percent and 99 percent, respectively, indicating that a two-step remediation option is viable. These findings demonstrate that the NMTS and BTS can be an effective, nondestructive, remediation process for large painted structures, allowing for the reuse or sale of remediated materials that otherwise may have been disposed. PMID:25950836

  9. Application of nondestructive testing methods to study the damage zone underneath impact craters of MEMIN laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Dorothee; Poelchau, Michael H.; Stark, Florian; Grosse, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of the Multidisciplinary Experimental and Modeling Impact Research Network (MEMIN) research group, the damage zones underneath two experimentally produced impact craters in sandstone targets were investigated using several nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. The 20 × 20 × 20 cm sandstones were impacted by steel projectiles with a radius of 1.25 mm at approximately 5 km s-1, resulting in craters with approximately 6 cm diameter and approximately 1 cm depth. Ultrasound (US) tomography and vibrational analysis were applied before and after the impact experiments to characterize the damage zone, and micro-computer tomography (μ-CT) measurements were performed to visualize subsurface fractures. The newly obtained experimental data can help to quantify the extent of the damage zone, which extends to about 8 cm depth in the target. The impacted sandstone shows a local p-wave reduction of 18% below the crater floor, and a general reduction in elastic moduli by between approximately 9 and approximately 18%, depending on the type of elastic modulus. The results contribute to a better empirical and theoretical understanding of hypervelocity events and simulations of cratering processes.

  10. Quantitative nondestructive methods for the determination of ticlopidine in tablets using reflectance near-infrared and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Markopoulou, C K; Koundourellis, J E; Orkoula, M G; Kontoyannis, C G

    2008-02-01

    Two different nondestructive spectroscopy methods based on near-infrared (NIR) and Fourier transform (FT) Raman spectroscopy were developed for the determination of ticlopidine-hydrochloride (TCL) in pharmaceutical formulations and the results were compared to those obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). An NIR assay was performed by reflectance over the 850-1700 nm region using a partial least squares (PLS) prediction model, while the absolute FT-Raman intensity of TCL's most intense vibration was used for constructing the calibration curve. For both methodologies the spectra were obtained from the as-received film-coated tablets of TCL. The two quantitative techniques were built using five "manual compressed" tablets containing different concentrations and validated by evaluating the calibration model as well as the accuracy and precision. The models were applied to commercial preparations (Ticlid). The results were compared to those obtained from the application of HPLC using the methodology described by "Sanofi Research Department" and were found to be in excellent agreement, proving that NIR, using fiber-optic probes, and FT-Raman spectroscopy can be used for the fast and reliable determination of the major component in pharmaceutical analysis. PMID:18284803

  11. Verification of recursive probabilistic integration (RPI) method for fatigue life management using non-destructive inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tzikang J.; Shiao, Michael

    2016-04-01

    This paper verified a generic and efficient assessment concept for probabilistic fatigue life management. The concept is developed based on an integration of damage tolerance methodology, simulations methods1, 2, and a probabilistic algorithm RPI (recursive probability integration)3-9 considering maintenance for damage tolerance and risk-based fatigue life management. RPI is an efficient semi-analytical probabilistic method for risk assessment subjected to various uncertainties such as the variability in material properties including crack growth rate, initial flaw size, repair quality, random process modeling of flight loads for failure analysis, and inspection reliability represented by probability of detection (POD). In addition, unlike traditional Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) which requires a rerun of MCS when maintenance plan is changed, RPI can repeatedly use a small set of baseline random crack growth histories excluding maintenance related parameters from a single MCS for various maintenance plans. In order to fully appreciate the RPI method, a verification procedure was performed. In this study, MC simulations in the orders of several hundred billions were conducted for various flight conditions, material properties, and inspection scheduling, POD and repair/replacement strategies. Since the MC simulations are time-consuming methods, the simulations were conducted parallelly on DoD High Performance Computers (HPC) using a specialized random number generator for parallel computing. The study has shown that RPI method is several orders of magnitude more efficient than traditional Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. Non-destructive testing method and apparatus utilizing phase multiplication holography

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H. Dale; Prince, James M.; Davis, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    An apparatus and method for imaging of structural characteristics in test objects using radiation amenable to coherent signal processing methods. Frequency and phase multiplication of received flaw signals is used to simulate a test wavelength at least one to two orders of magnitude smaller than the actual wavelength. The apparent reduction in wavelength between the illumination and recording radiation performs a frequency translation hologram. The hologram constructed with a high synthetic frequency and flaw phase multiplication is similar to a conventional acoustic hologram construction at the high frequency.

  13. Method for in-situ nondestructive measurement of Young's modulus of plate structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jerry Qixin (Inventor); Perez, Robert J. (Inventor); DeLangis, Leo M. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for determining stiffness of a composite laminate plate entails disposing a device for generating an acoustical pulse against a surface of the plate and disposing a detecting device against the same surface spaced a known distance from the pulse-generating device, and using the pulse-generating device to emit a pulse so as to create an extensional wave in the plate. The detecting device is used to determine a time of flight of the wave over the known distance, and the wave velocity is calculated. A Young's modulus of the plate is determined based on the wave velocity. Methods for both anisotropic and quasi-isotropic laminates are disclosed.

  14. Nondestructive analysis of three-dimensional objects using a fluid displacement method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantification of three-dimensional (3-D) objects has been a real challenge in agricultural, hydrological and environmental studies. We designed and tested a method that is capable of quantifying 3-D objects using measurements of fluid displacement. The device consists of a stand that supports a mov...

  15. Device and nondestructive method to determine subsurface micro-structure in dense materials

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Jiangang

    2006-05-09

    A method and a device to detect subsurface three-dimensional micro-structure in a sample by illuminating the sample with light of a given polarization and detecting light emanating from the sample that has a different direction of polarization by means of a confocal optical system.

  16. Damage detection of carbon reinforced composites using nondestructive evaluation with ultrasound and electromagnetic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, A.; Barsanescu, P. D.; Vizureanu, P.; Stanciu, M. D.; Curtu, I.; Iftimie, N.; Steigmann, R.

    2016-06-01

    CFRP have applications among most different domains due their low density, high elastic modulus and high ultimate strength along the carbon fibers direction, no fatigue and the expansion coefficient is small. This paper presents the behavior of carbon fiber woven-PPS composites at low velocity impacts. The transversal electrical conductivity is modified due to the plastic deformation following the impacts, and thus electromagnetic procedures can be used for assessment of CFRP using a high resolution sensor with metamaterials lens and comparing the results with those obtained from ultrasound testing with phased array sensor. The area of the delamination is overestimated when the method of phased array ultrasound is used and substantially underestimated by the electromagnetic testing. There were a good agreement between the simulations with finite element method and experimental measurements.

  17. A nondestructive method for diagnostic of insulated building walls using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larbi Youcef, Mohamed H. A.; Mazioud, Atef; Bremond, Pierre; Ibos, Laurent; Candau, Yves; Piro, Michel; Filloux, Alain

    2007-04-01

    This work deals with the development of an experimental protocol for the diagnostic of multi-layered insulated building walls. First, a test bench is set up in order to measure front and back sides temperatures of standard panels. The panels considered have insulation thicknesses of 2, 6 and 10cm. The front side is heated by two halogen lamps of 500W. A CEDIP Jade Long wave infrared camera and thermocouples are used to carry out temperature measurements. In a second time, a one dimensional model based on thermal quadruples and Laplace transforms was developped under Matlab environment. Also, we developped a three dimensional model based on finite volumes using Fluent computational code. Finally, a method of identification of physical parameters is implemented by performing least square minimization based on Levenberg-Marquardt method. The experimental measurements are compared to theoretical results and by minimization we obtain thermal conductivity and diffusivity as well as thickness of the two layers.

  18. Nondestructive Evaluation of Irradiation Embrittlement of SQV2A Steel by Using Magnetic Method

    SciTech Connect

    Shiwa, Mitsuharu; Cheng Weiying; Nakahigashi, Shigeo; Komura, Ichiro; Fujiwara, Koji; Takahashi, Norio

    2006-03-06

    Irradiation embrittlement of SQV2A steel was evaluated by magnetic methods. Thermal aging (TA) and electron irradiation (EI) specimens were prepared to evaluate the thermal aging and the irradiation damage effects separately. B-H loops changed with TA and EI. Higher harmonics of AC magnetization signals were sensitive to micro-structure changing of specimens. The intensity of the 3rd harmonics increased linearly with over 100 years of equivalent operation time by Larson-Miller parameter of nuclear power plants.

  19. 3D Ultrasonic Non-destructive Evaluation of Spot Welds Using an Enhanced Total Focusing Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasiuniene, Elena; Samaitis, Vykintas; Mazeika, Liudas; Sanderson, Ruth

    2015-02-01

    Spot welds are used to join sheets of metals in the automotive industry. When spot weld quality is evaluated using conventional ultrasonic manual pulse-echo method, the reliability of the inspection is affected by selection of the probe diameter and the positioning of the probe in the weld center. The application of a 2D matrix array is a potential solution to the aforementioned problems. The objective of this work was to develop a signal processing algorithm to reconstruct the 3D spot weld volume showing the size of the nugget and the defects in it. In order to achieve this, the conventional total focusing method was enhanced by taking into account the directivities of the single elements of the array and the divergence of the ultrasonic beam due to the propagation distance. Enhancements enabled a reduction in the background noise and uniform sensitivity at different depths to be obtained. The proposed algorithm was verified using a finite element model of ultrasonic wave propagation simulating three common spot weld conditions: a good weld, an undersized weld, and a weld containing a pore. The investigations have demonstrated that proposed method enables the determination of the size of the nugget and detection of discontinuities.

  20. Non-destructive tree root detection with geophysical methods in urban soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianden, Mitja Johannes; Weihs, Ulrich; Kuhnke, Falko; Rust, Steffen

    2010-05-01

    To assess the safety of roadside trees or as part of ecophysiological research it is often important to investigate the spatial distribution and development of tree roots. Conventionally this is done by laborious excavations or by the application of root drills which in many cases do not allow a comprehensive data collection. An indirect method for the investigation of subsurface features is ground penetrating radar (GPR). Its ability to detect tree roots has been shown by several studies (for example Hruska et al. 1999; Butnor et al. 2001; Barton et al. 2004). Another geophysical method which has been successful applied to study different aspects of tree roots is electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) (for example Hagrey 2007; Amato et al. 2008). These former studies by other authors mainly concentrated on a correlation between the measured parameters (signal amplitude and resistivity) and root-biomass on forest sites or controlled conditions. Results of Cermak et al. (2000), studying tree roots in urban areas with GPR, indicated that this method may also be useful for anthropogenic influenced areas. As a continuation of these approaches the authors have been using both techniques to study the spatial root architecture of urban trees. This research is designed to elicit the possibilities and limitations of the methods in urban areas. Reference sites have been established to quantify the methods' resolution and assess possible fields of application. These test site measurements are the basis for the interpretation of results at urban tree sites. Their results highlight the importance of 3D-measurements in urban areas because in inhomogeneous soil other reflectors (like rocks, cables, pipes, etc.) cause similar signals and bear a risk of misinterpretation. This can be minimized if detected objects have a spatial continuation and are connected to a tree. Here we present preliminary results from a combined application of both methods at the river bank of the

  1. Determination of the Optimum Harvest Window for Apples Using the Non-Destructive Biospeckle Method

    PubMed Central

    Skic, Anna; Szymańska-Chargot, Monika; Kruk, Beata; Chylińska, Monika; Pieczywek, Piotr Mariusz; Kurenda, Andrzej; Zdunek, Artur; Rutkowski, Krzysztof P.

    2016-01-01

    Determination of the optimum harvest window plays a key role in the agro-food chain as the quality of fruit depends on the right harvesting time and appropriate storage conditions during the postharvest period. Usually, indices based on destructive measurements are used for this purpose, like the De Jager Index (PFW-1), FARS index and the most popular Streif Index. In this study, we proposed a biospeckle method for the evaluation of the optimum harvest window (OHW) of the “Ligol” and “Szampion” apple cultivars. The experiment involved eight different maturity stages, of which four were followed by long cold storage and shelf life to assist the determination of the optimum harvest window. The biospeckle activity was studied in relation to standard quality attributes (firmness, acidity, starch, soluble solids content, Streif Index) and physiological parameters (respiration and ethylene emission) of both apple cultivars. Changes of biospeckle activity (BA) over time showed moderate relationships with biochemical changes during apple maturation and ripening. The harvest date suggested by the Streif Index and postharvest quality indicators matched with characteristic decrease in BA. The ability of biospeckle method to characterize the biological state of apples was confirmed by significant correlations of BA with firmness, starch index, total soluble solids and Streif Index, as well as good match with changes in carbon dioxide and ethylene emission. However, it should be noted that correlations between variables changing over time are not as meaningful as independent observations. Also, it is a well-known property of the Pearson’s correlation that its value is highly susceptible to outlier data. Due to its non-selective nature the BA reflected only the current biological state of the fruit and could be affected by many other factors. The investigations showed that the optimum harvest window for apples was indicated by the characteristic drop of BA during pre

  2. Determination of the Optimum Harvest Window for Apples Using the Non-Destructive Biospeckle Method.

    PubMed

    Skic, Anna; Szymańska-Chargot, Monika; Kruk, Beata; Chylińska, Monika; Pieczywek, Piotr Mariusz; Kurenda, Andrzej; Zdunek, Artur; Rutkowski, Krzysztof P

    2016-01-01

    Determination of the optimum harvest window plays a key role in the agro-food chain as the quality of fruit depends on the right harvesting time and appropriate storage conditions during the postharvest period. Usually, indices based on destructive measurements are used for this purpose, like the De Jager Index (PFW-1), FARS index and the most popular Streif Index. In this study, we proposed a biospeckle method for the evaluation of the optimum harvest window (OHW) of the "Ligol" and "Szampion" apple cultivars. The experiment involved eight different maturity stages, of which four were followed by long cold storage and shelf life to assist the determination of the optimum harvest window. The biospeckle activity was studied in relation to standard quality attributes (firmness, acidity, starch, soluble solids content, Streif Index) and physiological parameters (respiration and ethylene emission) of both apple cultivars. Changes of biospeckle activity (BA) over time showed moderate relationships with biochemical changes during apple maturation and ripening. The harvest date suggested by the Streif Index and postharvest quality indicators matched with characteristic decrease in BA. The ability of biospeckle method to characterize the biological state of apples was confirmed by significant correlations of BA with firmness, starch index, total soluble solids and Streif Index, as well as good match with changes in carbon dioxide and ethylene emission. However, it should be noted that correlations between variables changing over time are not as meaningful as independent observations. Also, it is a well-known property of the Pearson's correlation that its value is highly susceptible to outlier data. Due to its non-selective nature the BA reflected only the current biological state of the fruit and could be affected by many other factors. The investigations showed that the optimum harvest window for apples was indicated by the characteristic drop of BA during pre

  3. Apparatus and method for non-destructive testing using multi-frequency eddy currents

    SciTech Connect

    Hedengren, K.H.V.

    1993-08-17

    A method is described of improving eddy current flaw detection and resolution comprising the steps of: providing a plurality of probe elements; providing an alternating source of current capable of oscillating at a multiplicity of discrete frequencies; simultaneously driving said plurality of probe elements with said multiplicity of frequencies to excite discrete frequency responsive signals therefrom; scanning to acquire a corresponding multiplicity of discrete frequency responsive signals from each probe element of said plurality of probe elements; and resolving a corresponding multiplicity of eddy current images from said scan responsive multiplicity of frequency responsive signals.

  4. Bone structure studies with holographic interferometric nondestructive testing and x-ray methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvennoinen, Raimo; Nygren, Kaarlo; Rouvinen, Juha; Petrova, Valentina V.

    1994-02-01

    Changes in the biomechanics and in the molecular texture and structure of isolated radioulnar bones of subadult European moose (Alces alces L.) collected in various environmentally polluted areas of Finland were investigated by means of holographic interferometric non- destructive testing (HNDT), radiological, morphometrical, and x-ray diffraction methods. By means of small caudal-cranial bending forces, the surface movements of the lower end (distal epiphysis) of the radial bone were recorded with the HNDT method. To study bone molecular texture and structure changes under external compressing forces, the samples for x-ray diffraction analysis were taken from the upper end of the ulnar bone (olecranon tip). Results showed that the bones obtained from the Harjavalta area and those of North Karelian moose showing malnutrition and healing femoral fractures produced different HNDT pictures compared with the four normally developed North Karelian moose. In the x-ray diffraction, the Harjavalta samples showed changes in molecular texture and structure compared with the samples from the apparently normal North Karelian animals.

  5. Rapid and nondestructive method for evaluation of embryo culture media using drop coating deposition Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zufang; Sun, Yan; Wang, Jing; Du, Shengrong; Li, Yongzeng; Lin, Juqiang; Feng, Shangyuan; Lei, Jinping; Lin, Hongxin; Chen, Rong; Zeng, Haishan

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a rapid and simple method which combines drop coating deposition and Raman spectroscopy (DCDR) was developed to characterize the dry embryo culture media (ECM) droplet. We demonstrated that Raman spectra obtained from the droplet edge presented useful and characteristic signatures for protein and amino acids assessment. Using a different analytical method, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, we further confirmed that Na, K, and Cl were mainly detected in the central area of the dry ECM droplet while sulphur, an indicative of the presence of macromolecules such as proteins, was mainly found at the periphery of the droplet. In addition, to reduce sample preparation time, different temperatures for drying the droplets were tested. The results showed that drying temperature at 50°C can effectively reduce the sample preparation time to 6 min (as compared to 50 min for drying at room temperature, ˜25°C) without inducing thermal damage to the proteins. This work demonstrated that DCDR has potential for rapid and reliable metabolomic profiling of ECM in clinical applications.

  6. Nondestructive testing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Don E.; McBride, Don

    A comprehensive reference covering a broad range of techniques in nondestructive testing is presented. Based on years of extensive research and application at NASA and other government research facilities, the book provides practical guidelines for selecting the appropriate testing methods and equipment. Topics discussed include visual inspection, penetrant and chemical testing, nuclear radiation, sonic and ultrasonic, thermal and microwave, magnetic and electromagnetic techniques, and training and human factors. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  7. Distributive, Non-destructive Real-time System and Method for Snowpack Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frolik, Jeff (Inventor); Skalka, Christian (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ground-based system that provides quasi real-time measurement and collection of snow-water equivalent (SWE) data in remote settings is provided. The disclosed invention is significantly less expensive and easier to deploy than current methods and less susceptible to terrain and snow bridging effects. Embodiments of the invention include remote data recovery solutions. Compared to current infrastructure using existing SWE technology, the disclosed invention allows more SWE sites to be installed for similar cost and effort, in a greater variety of terrain; thus, enabling data collection at improved spatial resolutions. The invention integrates a novel computational architecture with new sensor technologies. The invention's computational architecture is based on wireless sensor networks, comprised of programmable, low-cost, low-powered nodes capable of sophisticated sensor control and remote data communication. The invention also includes measuring attenuation of electromagnetic radiation, an approach that is immune to snow bridging and significantly reduces sensor footprints.

  8. Nondestructive method for chemically machining crucibles or molds from their enclosed ingots and castings

    DOEpatents

    Stout, Norman D.; Newkirk, Herbert W.

    1991-01-01

    An inventive method is described for chemically machining rhenium, rhenium and tungsten alloy, and group 5b and 6b crucibles or molds from included ingots and castings comprised of oxide crystals including YAG and YAG based crystals, garnets, corundum crystals, and ceramic oxides. A mixture of potassium hydroxide and 15 to 90 weight percent of potassium nitrate is prepared and maintained at a temperature above melting and below the lower of 500 degrees centigrade or the temperature of decomposition of the mixture. The enveloping metal container together with its included oxide crystal object is rotated within the heated KOH-KNO.sub.3 mixture, until the container is safely chemically machined away from the included oxide crystal object.

  9. Nondestructive evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, S.

    1993-03-01

    This report discusses Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) thrust area which supports initiatives that advance inspection science and technology. The goal of the NDE thrust area is to provide cutting-edge technologies that have promise of inspection tools three to five years in the future. In selecting projects, the thrust area anticipates the needs of existing and future Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) programs. NDE provides materials characterization inspections, finished parts, and complex objects to find flaws and fabrication defects and to determine their physical and chemical characteristics. NDE also encompasses process monitoring and control sensors and the monitoring of in-service damage. For concurrent engineering, NDE becomes a frontline technology and strongly impacts issues of certification and of life prediction and extension. In FY-92, in addition to supporting LLNL programs and the activities of nuclear weapons contractors, NDE has initiated several projects with government agencies and private industries to study aging infrastructures and to advance manufacturing processes. Examples of these projects are (1) the Aging Airplanes Inspection Program for the Federal Aviation Administration, (2) Signal Processing of Acoustic Signatures of Heart Valves for Shiley, Inc.; and (3) Turbine Blade Inspection for the Air Force, jointly with Southwest Research Institute and Garrett. In FY-92, the primary contributions of the NDE thrust area, described in this report were in fieldable chemical sensor systems, computed tomography, and laser generation and detection of ultrasonic energy.

  10. Identifying cryptotephra units using correlated rapid, nondestructive methods: VSWIR spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence, and magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCanta, Molly C.; Hatfield, Robert G.; Thomson, Bradley J.; Hook, Simon J.; Fisher, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the frequency, magnitude, and nature of explosive volcanic eruptions is essential for hazard planning and risk mitigation. Terrestrial stratigraphic tephra records can be patchy and incomplete due to subsequent erosion and burial processes. In contrast, the marine sedimentary record commonly preserves a more complete historical record of volcanic activity as individual events are archived within continually accumulating background sediments. While larger tephra layers are often identifiable by changes in sediment color and/or texture, smaller fallout layers may also be present that are not visible to the naked eye. These cryptotephra are commonly more difficult to identify and often require time-consuming and destructive point counting, petrography, and microscopy work. Here we present several rapid, nondestructive, and quantitative core scanning methodologies (magnetic susceptibility, visible to shortwave infrared spectroscopy, and XRF core scanning) which, when combined, can be used to identify the presence of increased volcaniclastic components (interpreted to be cryptotephra) in the sedimentary record. We develop a new spectral parameter (BDI1000VIS) that exploits the absorption of the 1 µm near-infrared band in tephra. Using predetermined mixtures, BDI1000VIS can accurately identify tephra layers in concentrations >15-20%. When applied to the upper ˜270 kyr record of IODP core U1396C from the Caribbean Sea, and verified by traditional point counting, 29 potential cryptotephra layers were identified as originating from eruptions of the Lesser Antilles Volcanic Arc. Application of these methods in future coring endeavors can be used to minimize the need for physical disaggregation of valuable drill core material and allow for near-real-time recognition of tephra units, both visible and cryptotephra. This article was corrected on 23 DEC 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  11. Shake and stew: a non-destructive PCR-ready DNA isolation method from a single preserved fish larva.

    PubMed

    Alvarado Bremer, J R; Smith, B L; Moulton, D L; Lu, C-P; Cornic, M

    2014-01-01

    A rapid non-destructive alternative to isolate DNA from an individual fish larva is presented, based on the suspension of epithelial cells through vortex forces, and the release of DNA in a heated alkaline solution. DNA from >6056 fish larvae isolated using this protocol has yielded a high PCR amplification success rate (>93%), suggesting its applicability to other taxonomic groups or sources when tissue amount is the limiting factor. PMID:24383811

  12. Evaluation of Midwater Trawl Selectivity and its Influence on Acoustic-Based Fish Population Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kresimir

    Trawls are used extensively during fisheries abundance surveys to derive estimates of fish density and, in the case of acoustic-based surveys, to identify acoustically sampled fish populations. However, trawls are selective in what fish they retain, resulting in biased estimates of density, species, and size compositions. Selectivity of the midwater trawl used in acoustic-based surveys of walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) was evaluated using multiple methods. The effects of trawl selectivity on the acoustic-based survey abundance estimates and the stock assessment were evaluated for the Gulf of Alaska walleye pollock population. Selectivity was quantified using recapture, or pocket, nets attached to the outside of the trawl. Pocket net catches were modeled using a hierarchical Bayesian model to provide uncertainty in selectivity parameter estimates. Significant under-sampling of juvenile pollock by the midwater trawl was found, with lengths at 50% retention ranging from 14--26 cm over three experiments. Escapement was found to be light dependent, with more fish escaping in dark conditions. Highest escapement rates were observed in the aft of the trawl near to the codend though the bottom panel of the trawl. The behavioral mechanisms involved in the process of herding and escapement were evaluated using stereo-cameras, a DIDSON high frequency imaging sonar, and pocket nets. Fish maintained greater distances from the trawl panel during daylight, suggesting trawl modifications such as increased visibility of netting materials may evoke stronger herding responses and increased retention of fish. Selectivity and catchability of pollock by the midwater trawl was also investigated using acoustic density as an independent estimate of fish abundance to compare with trawl catches. A modeling framework was developed to evaluate potential explanatory factors for selectivity and catchability. Selectivity estimates were dependent on which vessel was used for the survey

  13. Nondestructive examination using neutron activated positron annihilation

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.; Denison, Arthur B.

    2001-01-01

    A method is provided for performing nondestructive examination of a metal specimen using neutron activated positron annihilation wherein the positron emitter source is formed within the metal specimen. The method permits in situ nondestructive examination and has the advantage of being capable of performing bulk analysis to determine embrittlement, fatigue and dislocation within a metal specimen.

  14. In situ nondestructive imaging of functional pigments in Micro-Tom tomato fruits by multi spectral imaging based on Wiener estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishidate, Izumi; Ooe, Shintaro; Todoroki, Shinsuke; Asamizu, Erika

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the functional pigments in the tomato fruits nondestructively, we propose a method based on the multispectral diffuse reflectance images estimated by the Wiener estimation for a digital RGB image. Each pixel of the multispectral image is converted to the absorbance spectrum and then analyzed by the multiple regression analysis to visualize the contents of chlorophyll a, lycopene and β-carotene. The result confirms the feasibility of the method for in situ imaging of chlorophyll a, β-carotene and lycopene in the tomato fruits.

  15. Nondestructive material characterization

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Johnson, John A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive material characterization, such as identification of material flaws or defects, material thickness or uniformity and material properties such as acoustic velocity. The apparatus comprises a pulsed laser used to excite a piezoelectric (PZ) transducer, which sends acoustic waves through an acoustic coupling medium to the test material. The acoustic wave is absorbed and thereafter reflected by the test material, whereupon it impinges on the PZ transducer. The PZ transducer converts the acoustic wave to electrical impulses, which are conveyed to a monitor.

  16. The detection of tightly closed flaws by nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. [fatigue crack formation in aluminum alloy test specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, W. D.; Rathke, R. A.; Todd, P. H., Jr.; Mullen, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    Liquid penetrant, ultrasonic, eddy current and X-radiographic techniques were optimized and applied to the evaluation of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy test specimens in integrally stiffened panel, and weld panel configurations. Fatigue cracks in integrally stiffened panels, lack-of-fusion in weld panels, and fatigue cracks in weld panels were the flaw types used for evaluation. A 2319 aluminum alloy weld filler rod was used for all welding to produce the test specimens. Forty seven integrally stiffened panels containing a total of 146 fatigue cracks, ninety three lack-of-penetration (LOP) specimens containing a total of 239 LOP flaws, and one-hundred seventeen welded specimens containing a total of 293 fatigue cracks were evaluated. Nondestructive test detection reliability enhancement was evaluated during separate inspection sequences in the specimens in the 'as-machined or as-welded', post etched and post proof loaded conditions. Results of the nondestructive test evaluations were compared to the actual flaw size obtained by measurement of the fracture specimens after completing all inspection sequences. Inspection data were then analyzed to provide a statistical basis for determining the flaw detection reliability.

  17. Applications of aerospace technology in industry: A technology transfer profile, nondestructive testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of nondestructive testing procedures by NASA and the transfer of nondestructive testing to technology to civilian industry are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) an overview of the nondestructive testing field, (2) NASA contributions to the field of nondestructive testing, (3) dissemination of NASA contributions, and (4) a transfer profile. Attachments are included which provide a brief description of common nondestructive testing methods and summarize the technology transfer reports involving NASA generated nondestructive testing technology.

  18. Development of a nondestructive method for underglaze painted tiles--demonstrated by the analysis of Persian objects from the nineteenth century.

    PubMed

    Reiche, Ina; Röhrs, Stefan; Salomon, Joseph; Kanngiesser, Birgit; Höhn, Yvonne; Malzer, Wolfgang; Voigt, Friederike

    2009-02-01

    The paper presents an analytical method developed for the nondestructive study of nineteenth-century Persian polychrome underglaze painted tiles. As an example, 9 tiles from French and German museum collections were investigated. Before this work was undertaken little was known about the materials used in pottery at that time, although the broad range of colors and shades, together with their brilliant glazes, made these objects stand out when compared with Iranian ceramics of the preceding periods and suggested the use of new pigments, colorants, and glaze compositions. These materials are thought to be related to provenance and as such appropriate criteria for art-historical attribution. The analytical method is based on the combination of different nondestructive spectroscopic techniques using microfocused beams such as proton-induced X-ray emission/proton-induced gamma-ray emission, X-ray fluorescence, 3D X-ray absorption near edge structure, and confocal Raman spectroscopy and also visible spectroscopy. It was established to address the specific difficulties these objects and the technique of underglaze painting raise. The exact definition of the colors observed on the tiles using the Natural Color System helped to attribute them to different colorants. It was possible to establish the presence of Cr- and U-based colorants as new materials in nineteenth-century Persian tilemaking. The difference in glaze composition (Pb, Sn, Na, and K contents) as well as the use of B and Sn were identified as a potential marker for different workshops. PMID:19030848

  19. Non-destructive evaluation means and method of flaw reconstruction utilizing an ultrasonic multi-viewing transducer data acquistion system

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Donald O.; Wormley, Samuel J.

    1989-03-28

    A multi-viewing ultrasound transducer acquisition system for non-destructive evaluation, flaw detection and flaw reconstruction in materials. A multiple transducer assembly includes a central transducer surrounded by a plurality of perimeter transducers, each perimeter transducer having an axis of transmission which can be angularly oriented with respect to the axis of transmission of the central transducer to intersect the axis of transmission of the central transducer. A control apparatus automatically and remotely positions the transducer assembly with respect to the material by a positioning apparatus and adjusts the pe GRANT REFERENCE This invention was conceived and reduced to practice at least in part under a grant from the Department of Energy under Contract No. W-7407-ENG-82.

  20. Low Frequency Electrical and Magnetic Methods for Non-Destructive Analysis of Fiber Dispersion in Fiber Reinforced Cementitious Composites: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Faifer, Marco; Ferrara, Liberato; Ottoboni, Roberto; Toscani, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive analysis of fiber dispersion in structural elements made of Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) and Fiber Reinforced Cementitious Composites (FRCCs) plays a significant role in the framework of quality control and performance prediction. In this paper, the research activity of the authors in the aforementioned field all over the last lustrum will be reviewed. A method based on the measurement of the inductance of a probe to be placed on the specimen will be presented and its progressive development will be described. Obtained correlation with actual fiber dispersion, as checked by means of destructive methods, as well as with the mechanical performance of the composite will also be presented, in an attempt to address the significance of the method from an engineering application perspective. PMID:23337334

  1. Low frequency electrical and magnetic methods for non-destructive analysis of fiber dispersion in fiber reinforced cementitious composites: an overview.

    PubMed

    Faifer, Marco; Ferrara, Liberato; Ottoboni, Roberto; Toscani, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive analysis of fiber dispersion in structural elements made of Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) and Fiber Reinforced Cementitious Composites (FRCCs) plays a significant role in the framework of quality control and performance prediction. In this paper, the research activity of the authors in the aforementioned field all over the last lustrum will be reviewed. A method based on the measurement of the inductance of a probe to be placed on the specimen will be presented and its progressive development will be described. Obtained correlation with actual fiber dispersion, as checked by means of destructive methods, as well as with the mechanical performance of the composite will also be presented, in an attempt to address the significance of the method from an engineering application perspective. PMID:23337334

  2. Nondestructive biomarkers in ecotoxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Fossi, M C

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this article is to attempt a concise review of the state of the art of the nondestructive biomarkers approach in vertebrates, establishing a consensus on the most useful and sensitive nondestructive biomarker techniques, and proposing research priorities for the development and validation of this promising methodology. The following topics are discussed: the advantages of the use of nondestructive strategies in biomonitoring programs and the research fields in which nondestructive biomarkers can be applied; the biological materials suitable for nondestructive biomarkers and residue analysis in vertebrates; which biomarkers lend themselves to noninvasive techniques; and the validation and implementation strategy of the nondestructive biomarker approach. Examples of applications of this methodology in the hazard assessment of endangered species are also presented. Images Figure 1. C PMID:7713034

  3. A Nondestructive Method for Measuring the RMS Length of Charge Bunches Using the Wake Field Radiation Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Shchelkunov, S.V.; Marshall, T.C.; Hirshfield, J.L.; LaPointe, M.A.

    2004-12-07

    We report progress in the development of a nondestructive technique to measure bunch rms-length in the psec range and below, and eventually in the fsec range, by measuring the high-frequency spectrum of wake field radiation which is caused by the passage of a relativistic electron bunch through a channel surrounded by a dielectric. We demonstrate both experimentally and numerically that the generated spectrum is determined by the bunch rms-length, while the choice of the axial and longitudinal charge distribution is not important. Measurement of the millimeter-wave spectrum will determine the bunch rms-length in the psec range. This has been done using a series of calibrated mesh filters and the charge bunches produced by the 50MeV rf linac system at ATF, Brookhaven. We have developed the analysis of the factors crucial for achieving good accuracy in this measurement, and find the experimental data are fully understood by the theory. We point out that this technique also may be used for measuring fsec bunch lengths, using a prepared planar wake field microstructure.

  4. An innovative method for nondestructive analysis of cast iron artifacts at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, R.A.; Helmke, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Iron ore containing elevated concentrations of trace metals was smelted at Hopewell Furnace during its 113 years of operation (1771-1883). For this study, we sampled iron ore, cast iron furnace products, slag, soil, groundwater, streamflow, and streambed sediment to determine the fate of trace metals released into the environment during the iron-smelting process. Standard techniques were used to sample and analyze all media except cast iron. We analyzed the trace-metal content of the cast iron using a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, which provided rapid, on-site, nondestructive analyses for 23 elements. The artifacts analyzed included eight cast iron stoves, a footed pot, and a kettle in the Hopewell Furnace museum. We measured elevated concentrations of arsenic, copper, lead, and zinc in the cast iron. Lead concentrations as great as 3,150 parts per million were measured in the stoves. Cobalt was detectable but not quantifiable because of interference with iron. Our study found that arsenic, cobalt, and lead were not released to soil or slag, which could pose a significant health risk to visitors and employees. Instead, our study demonstrates these heavy metals remained with the cast iron and were removed from the site.

  5. Biospectroscopy of Rhododendron indicum flowers. Non-destructive assessment of anthocyanins in petals using a reflectance-based method.

    PubMed

    Iriel, Analia; Lagorio, María Gabriela

    2009-03-01

    Reflectance spectra from pink petals of Rhododendron indicum flowers showed absorption in the NIR (1470, 1930 and 2500 nm) due to water, in the visible (533 nm, due to anthocyanins) and in the UV (broad absorption due to phenolic compounds other than anthocyanins). A linear correlation between the remission function at 533 nm and the anthocyanin content in micromol per g fresh weight has been found, allowing non-destructive quantification of anthocyanins. The remission function could be obtained either from reflectance of a group of stacked petals (Kubelka-Munk theory) or through determination of the absorption and scattering coefficients following the Pile of Plates model. The intact petals have shown fluorescence emission in the blue (400-500 nm) and in the visible around 624 nm under UV excitation. The red emission was attributed to anthocyanins whereas blue emission was assigned to other phenolic compounds. On the basis of absorption and fluorescence measurements of crude and purified extracts from the petals, the last compounds could possibly be a mixture of flavonoids and hydroxycinnamic-type plant phenolics such as ferulic acid, chlorogenic acid or others. PMID:19255674

  6. A model-based method for the characterisation of stress in magnetic materials using eddy current non-destructive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahia, Abla; Berthelot, Eric; Le Bihan and, Yann; Daniel, Laurent

    2015-03-01

    A precise knowledge of the distribution of internal stresses in materials is key to the prediction of magnetic and mechanical performance and lifetime of many industrial devices. This is the reason why many efforts have been made to develop and enhance the techniques for the non-destructive evaluation of stress. In the case of magnetic materials, the use of eddy current (EC) techniques is a promising pathway to stress evaluation. The principle is based on the significant changes in magnetic permeability of magnetic materials subjected to mechanical stress. These modifications of magnetic permeability affect in turn the signal obtained from an EC probe inspecting the material. From this principle, a numerical tool is proposed in this paper to predict the EC signal obtained from a material subjected to stress. This numerical tool is a combination of a 3D finite element approach with a magneto-mechanical constitutive law describing the effect of stress on the magnetic permeability. The model provides the variations of impedance of an EC probe as a function of stress. An experimental setup in which a magnetic material subjected to a tension stress is inspected using EC techniques is tailored in order to validate the model. A very good agreement is found between experimental and modelling results. For the Iron-Cobalt alloy tested in this study, it is shown that a uniaxial tensile stress can be detected with an error lower than 3 MPa in the range from 0 to 100 MPa.

  7. A Non-Destructive Method for Distinguishing Reindeer Antler (Rangifer tarandus) from Red Deer Antler (Cervus elaphus) Using X-Ray Micro-Tomography Coupled with SVM Classifiers

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Alexandre; Rochefort, Gael Y.; Santos, Frédéric; Le Denmat, Dominique; Salmon, Benjamin; Pétillon, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, biomedical 3D-imaging tools have gained widespread use in the analysis of prehistoric bone artefacts. While initial attempts to characterise the major categories used in osseous industry (i.e. bone, antler, and dentine/ivory) have been successful, the taxonomic determination of prehistoric artefacts remains to be investigated. The distinction between reindeer and red deer antler can be challenging, particularly in cases of anthropic and/or taphonomic modifications. In addition to the range of destructive physicochemical identification methods available (mass spectrometry, isotopic ratio, and DNA analysis), X-ray micro-tomography (micro-CT) provides convincing non-destructive 3D images and analyses. This paper presents the experimental protocol (sample scans, image processing, and statistical analysis) we have developed in order to identify modern and archaeological antler collections (from Isturitz, France). This original method is based on bone microstructure analysis combined with advanced statistical support vector machine (SVM) classifiers. A combination of six microarchitecture biomarkers (bone volume fraction, trabecular number, trabecular separation, trabecular thickness, trabecular bone pattern factor, and structure model index) were screened using micro-CT in order to characterise internal alveolar structure. Overall, reindeer alveoli presented a tighter mesh than red deer alveoli, and statistical analysis allowed us to distinguish archaeological antler by species with an accuracy of 96%, regardless of anatomical location on the antler. In conclusion, micro-CT combined with SVM classifiers proves to be a promising additional non-destructive method for antler identification, suitable for archaeological artefacts whose degree of human modification and cultural heritage or scientific value has previously made it impossible (tools, ornaments, etc.). PMID:26901355

  8. A Non-Destructive Method for Distinguishing Reindeer Antler (Rangifer tarandus) from Red Deer Antler (Cervus elaphus) Using X-Ray Micro-Tomography Coupled with SVM Classifiers.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Alexandre; Rochefort, Gael Y; Santos, Frédéric; Le Denmat, Dominique; Salmon, Benjamin; Pétillon, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, biomedical 3D-imaging tools have gained widespread use in the analysis of prehistoric bone artefacts. While initial attempts to characterise the major categories used in osseous industry (i.e. bone, antler, and dentine/ivory) have been successful, the taxonomic determination of prehistoric artefacts remains to be investigated. The distinction between reindeer and red deer antler can be challenging, particularly in cases of anthropic and/or taphonomic modifications. In addition to the range of destructive physicochemical identification methods available (mass spectrometry, isotopic ratio, and DNA analysis), X-ray micro-tomography (micro-CT) provides convincing non-destructive 3D images and analyses. This paper presents the experimental protocol (sample scans, image processing, and statistical analysis) we have developed in order to identify modern and archaeological antler collections (from Isturitz, France). This original method is based on bone microstructure analysis combined with advanced statistical support vector machine (SVM) classifiers. A combination of six microarchitecture biomarkers (bone volume fraction, trabecular number, trabecular separation, trabecular thickness, trabecular bone pattern factor, and structure model index) were screened using micro-CT in order to characterise internal alveolar structure. Overall, reindeer alveoli presented a tighter mesh than red deer alveoli, and statistical analysis allowed us to distinguish archaeological antler by species with an accuracy of 96%, regardless of anatomical location on the antler. In conclusion, micro-CT combined with SVM classifiers proves to be a promising additional non-destructive method for antler identification, suitable for archaeological artefacts whose degree of human modification and cultural heritage or scientific value has previously made it impossible (tools, ornaments, etc.). PMID:26901355

  9. Subcritical fracture propagation in rocks: An examination using the methods of fracture mechanics and non-destructive testing. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, P. L.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation of tensile rock fracture is presented with an emphasis on characterizing time dependent crack growth using the methods of fracture mechanics. Subcritical fracture experiments were performed in moist air on glass and five different rock types at crack velocities using the double torsion technique. The experimental results suggest that subcritical fracture resistance in polycrystals is dominated by microstructural effects. Evidence for gross violations of the assumptions of linear elastic fracture mechanics and double torsion theory was found in the tests on rocks. In an effort to obtain a better understanding of the physical breakdown processes associated with rock fracture, a series of nondestructive evaluation tests were performed during subcritical fracture experiments on glass and granite. Comparison of the observed process zone shape with that expected on the basis of a critical normal principal tensile stress criterion shows that the zone is much more elongated in the crack propagation direction than predicted by the continuum based microcracking model alone.

  10. Figure of Merit for Chlorine Measurement in Reinforced Concrete Using {sup 252}Cf-Based Nondestructive Testing Method

    SciTech Connect

    Habeeb H. Saleh; Richard A. Livington

    2000-11-12

    The objective of this study is to design, fabricate, and evaluate a portable system for nondestructive determination of chloride concentration in reinforced portland cement concrete (PCC) structures. The need for such an instrument arises from the massive deterioration of the reinforced PCC, which has been used to construct a major part of the highway infrastructure. This deterioration of PCC is due to corrosion of the reinforcing steel, which is greatly promoted by the chloride ions. The sources of chloride include deicing salts, set accelerator, and seawater, either in the form of concrete-mixing water or as airborne droplets from ocean spray. The system consists of a high-purity germanium detector for gamma-ray detection and a portable {sup 252}Cf neutron source. Tradeoffs in the design of the neutron source include data quality, operational efficiency, and radiation safety. The number of photons detected in the germanium detector is directly proportional to the neutron source strength and the chloride nuclei concentration in the sample under testing. Therefore, assuming a uniform distribution of chloride, the figure of merit of the number of photons detected in the detector can be expressed as F = C/SN, where C = number of (6111) keV gamma rays detected per second, N = concentration of chloride nuclei, and S = neutron source strength (n/s). Under the assumption that the neutron source strength is fixed, the figure of merit in this case can have at least two uses. One is to optimize the thermalization efficiency of the neutron moderator. The second is to evaluate how effective the detector configuration is in detecting the gamma rays generated in the concrete. Using the figure-of-merit approach, it is possible to find an optimum size of moderator. This is important for a portable system. Other variables such as source/detector separation or detector gamma-ray shielding can also be evaluated.

  11. Non-destructive identification of twisted light.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengyun; Wang, Bo; Song, Xinbing; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2016-04-01

    The non-destructive identification of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) is essential to various applications in the optical information processing. Here, we propose and demonstrate experimentally an efficient method to identify non-destructively the OAM by using a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Our schemes are applicable not only to the case with integer charges, but also to optical vortices with noninteger charges. Our Letter presents the first experimental demonstration of the non-destructive identification of twisted light with integer or noninteger topological charges, which has potential applications in the OAM-based data transmission for optical communications. PMID:27192290

  12. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Annual Report-Innovative Approaches to Automating QA/QC of Fuel Particle Production Using On-Line Nondestructive Methods for Higher Reliability.

    SciTech Connect

    Hockey, Ronald L.; Bond, Leonard J.; Ahmed, Salahuddin; Sandness, Gerald A.; Gray, Joseph N.; Batishko, Charles R.; Flake, Matthew; Panetta, Paul D.; Saurwein, John J.; Lowden, Richard A.; Good, Morris S.

    2004-04-20

    This document summarizes the activities performed and progress made in FY-03. Various approaches for automating the particle fuel production QC process using on-line nondestructive methods for higher reliability were evaluated. In this first-year of a three-year project, surrogate fuel particles made available for testing included leftovers from initial coater development runs. These particles had a high defect fraction and the particle properties spanned a wide range, providing the opportunity to examine worst-case conditions before refining the inspection methods to detect more subtle coating features. Particles specifically designed to evaluate the NDE methods being investigated under this project will be specified and fabricated at ORNL early next reporting period. The literature was reviewed for existing inspection technology and to identify many of the fuel particle conditions thought to degrade its performance. A modeling study, including the electromagnetic and techniques, showed that the in-line electromagnetic methods should provide measurable responses to missing layers, kernel diameter, and changes in coating layer thickness, with reasonable assumptions made for material conductivities. The modeling study for the ultrasonic methods provided the resonant frequencies that should be measured using the resonant ultrasound technique, and the results from these calculations were published in the proceedings for two conferences. The notion of a particle quality index to relate coating properties to fabrication process parameters was explored. Progress was made in understanding the fabrication process. GA identified key literature in this area and Saurwein (2003a) provided a literature review/summary. This literature has been reviewed. An approach previously applied to flexible manufacturing was adopted and the modification and development of the concepts to meet TRISO particle fuel manufacturing and QA/QC needs initiated. This approach establishes

  13. The RAMANITA method for non-destructive and in situ semi-quantitative chemical analysis of mineral solid-solutions by multidimensional calibration of Raman wavenumber shifts.

    PubMed

    Smith, David C

    2005-08-01

    The "RAMANITA" method, for semi-quantitative chemical analysis of mineral solid-solutions by multidimensional calibration of Raman wavenumber shifts and mathematical calculation by simultaneous equations, is published here in detail in English for the first time. It was conceived by the present writer 20 years ago for binary and ternary pyroxene and garnet systems. The mathematical description was set out in 1989, but in an abstract in an obscure French special publication. Detailed "step-by-step" calibration of two garnet ternaries, followed by their linking, in the early 1990s provided a hexary garnet database. Much later, using this garnet database, which forms part of his personal database called RAMANITA, the present writer began to develop the method by improving the terminology, automating the calculations, discussing problems and experimenting with different real chemical problems in archaeometry. Although this RAMANITA method has been very briefly mentioned in two recent books, the necessary full mathematical explanation is given only here. The method will find application in any study which requires obtaining a non-destructive semi-quantitative chemical analysis from mineral solid solutions that cannot be analysed by any destructive analytical method, in particular for archaeological, geological or extraterrestrial research projects, e.g. Recently some other workers have begun deducing chemical compositions from Raman wavenumber shifts in multivariate chemical space, but the philosophical approach is quite different. PMID:16029851

  14. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Project No. 02 103 Innovative Low Cost Approaches to Automating QA/QC of Fuel Particle Production Using On Line Nondestructive Methods for Higher Reliability Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Salahuddin; Batishko, Charles R.; Flake, Matthew; Good, Morris S.; Mathews, Royce; Morra, Marino; Panetta, Paul D.; Pardini, Allan F.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Tucker, Brian J.; Weier, Dennis R.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Gray, Joseph N.; Saurwein, John J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Lowden, Richard A.; Miller, James H.

    2006-02-28

    This Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project was tasked with exploring, adapting, developing and demonstrating innovative nondestructive test methods to automate nuclear coated particle fuel inspection so as to provide the United States (US) with necessary improved and economical Quality Assurance and Control (QA/QC) that is needed for the fuels for several reactor concepts being proposed for both near term deployment [DOE NE & NERAC, 2001] and Generation IV nuclear systems. Replacing present day QA/QC methods, done manually and in many cases destructively, with higher speed automated nondestructive methods will make fuel production for advanced reactors economically feasible. For successful deployment of next generation reactors that employ particle fuels, or fuels in the form of pebbles based on particles, extremely large numbers of fuel particles will require inspection at throughput rates that do not significantly impact the proposed manufacturing processes. The focus of the project is nondestructive examination (NDE) technologies that can be automated for production speeds and make either: (I) On Process Measurements or (II) In Line Measurements. The inspection technologies selected will enable particle “quality” qualification as a particle or group of particles passes a sensor. A multiple attribute dependent signature will be measured and used for qualification or process control decisions. A primary task for achieving this objective is to establish standard signatures for both good/acceptable particles and the most problematic types of defects using several nondestructive methods.

  15. Nondestructive Evaluation of Aircraft and Spacecraft Wiring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, John E.; Tucholski, Edward J.; Green, Robert E., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Spacecraft, and especially aircraft, often fry well past their original design lives and, therefore, the need to develop nondestructive evaluation procedures for inspection of vital structures in these craft is extremely important. One of the more recent problems is the degradation of wiring and wiring insulation. The present paper describes several nondestructive characterization methods which afford the possibility to detect wiring and insulation degradation in-situ prior to major problems with the safety of aircraft and spacecraft.

  16. Development of particle induced gamma-ray emission methods for nondestructive determination of isotopic composition of boron and its total concentration in natural and enriched samples.

    PubMed

    Chhillar, Sumit; Acharya, Raghunath; Sodaye, Suparna; Pujari, Pradeep K

    2014-11-18

    We report simple particle induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) methods using a 4 MeV proton beam for simultaneous and nondestructive determination of the isotopic composition of boron ((10)B/(11)B atom ratio) and total boron concentrations in various solid samples with natural isotopic composition and enriched with (10)B. It involves measurement of prompt gamma-rays at 429, 718, and 2125 keV from (10)B(p,αγ)(7)Be, (10)B(p, p'γ)(10)B, and (11)B(p, p'γ)(11)B reactions, respectively. The isotopic composition of boron in natural and enriched samples was determined by comparing peak area ratios corresponding to (10)B and (11)B of samples to natural boric acid standard. An in situ current normalized PIGE method, using F or Al, was standardized for total B concentration determination. The methods were validated by analyzing stoichiometric boron compounds and applied to samples such as boron carbide, boric acid, carborane, and borosilicate glass. Isotopic compositions of boron in the range of 0.247-2.0 corresponding to (10)B in the range of 19.8-67.0 atom % and total B concentrations in the range of 5-78 wt % were determined. It has been demonstrated that PIGE offers a simple and alternate method for total boron as well as isotopic composition determination in boron based solid samples, including neutron absorbers that are important in nuclear technology. PMID:25312472

  17. A demonstration of the gross count tomographic gamma scanner (GC-TGS) method for the nondestructive assay of transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Estep, R.J.; Miko, D.; Melton, S.; Rawool-Sullivan, M.W.

    1998-12-31

    The authors examined the accuracy and sensitivity levels for three variations on the TGS method: the original TGS method using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector to measure net areas of full-energy gamma-ray peaks; a modified HPGe-detector method that uses net areas for the transmission analysis and the gross count TGS (GC-TGS) method for the emission analysis; and a NaI-detector method that uses the GC-TGS method exclusively. They found that while the accuracies of the methods were comparable, the GC-TGS method boosted the sensitivity per detector by a factor of approximately two for the HPGe GC variation and four for the NaI method. The implications for improved TGS scanner design are discussed.

  18. State-of-the-art of non-destructive testing methods and technologies for application to nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggenhauser, Herbert; Naus, Dan J.

    2014-02-01

    The inspection of nuclear power plant concrete structures presents challenges different from conventional civil engineering structures. Wall thicknesses can be in excess of one meter and the structures often have increased steel reinforcement density with more complex detailing. The accessibility for any testing method may be limited due to the presence of liners and other components and there can be a number of penetrations or cast-in-place items present. The objective of the report is to present the state-of-the art of non-destructive testing methods and technologies for the inspection of thick, heavily-reinforced nuclear power plant concrete cross-sections with particular respect to: •locating steel reinforcement and identification of its cover depth •locating tendon ducts and identification of the condition of the grout materials •detection of cracking, voids, delamination, and honeycombing in concrete structures •detection of inclusions of different materials or voids adjacent to the concrete side of the containment liner •methods capable of identification of corrosion occurrence on the concrete side of the containment liner

  19. State-of-the-art of non-destructive testing methods and technologies for application to nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggenhauser, Herbert; Naus, Dan J.

    2014-02-18

    The inspection of nuclear power plant concrete structures presents challenges different from conventional civil engineering structures. Wall thicknesses can be in excess of one meter and the structures often have increased steel reinforcement density with more complex detailing. The accessibility for any testing method may be limited due to the presence of liners and other components and there can be a number of penetrations or cast-in-place items present. The objective of the report is to present the state-of-the art of non-destructive testing methods and technologies for the inspection of thick, heavily-reinforced nuclear power plant concrete cross-sections with particular respect to: •locating steel reinforcement and identification of its cover depth •locating tendon ducts and identification of the condition of the grout materials •detection of cracking, voids, delamination, and honeycombing in concrete structures •detection of inclusions of different materials or voids adjacent to the concrete side of the containment liner •methods capable of identification of corrosion occurrence on the concrete side of the containment liner.

  20. State-of-the-Art of Non-Destructive Testing Methods and Technologies for Application to Nuclear Power Plant Safety-Related Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggenhauser, Dr. Herbert; Naus, Dan J

    2014-01-01

    The inspection of nuclear power plant concrete structures presents challenges different from conventional civil engineering structures. Wall thicknesses can be in excess of one meter and the structures often have increased steel reinforcement density with more complex detailing. The accessibility for any testing method may be limited due to the presence of liners and other components and there can be a number of penetrations or cast-in-place items present. The objective of the report is to present the state-of-the art of non-destructive testing methods and technologies for the inspection of thick, heavily-reinforced nuclear power plant concrete cross-sections with particular respect to: locating steel reinforcement and identification of its cover depth locating tendon ducts and identification of the condition of the grout materials detection of cracking, voids, delamination, and honeycombing in concrete structures detection of inclusions of different materials or voids adjacent to the concrete side of the containment liner methods capable of identification of corrosion occurrence on the concrete side of the containment liner

  1. Overview of nondestructive evaluation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.

    1995-04-01

    The infrastructure in the US and the world is aging. There is an increasing awareness of the need to assess the severity of the damage occurring to the infrastructure. Limited resources preclude the replacement of all structures that need repairs or have exceeded their life times. Methods to assess the amount and severity of damage are crucial to implementing a systematic, cost effective approach to repair and/or replace the damaged structures. The challenges of inspecting aging structures without impairing their usefulness rely on a variety of technologies and techniques for nondestructive evaluation (NDE). This paper will briefly describe several nondestructive evaluation technologies that are required for inspecting a variety of systems and structures.

  2. A Nondestructive Method to Distinguish the Internal Constituent Architecture of the Intervertebral Discs Using 9.4 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wijayathunga, Vithanage N.; Ridgway, John P.; Ingham, Eileen; Treanor, Darren; Carey, Duane; Bulpitt, Andy; Magee, Derek; Damion, Robin; Wilcox, Ruth K.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. An in vitro study of the intervertebral disc (IVD) structure using 9.4T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Objective. Investigate the potential of ultrahigh-field strength MRI for higher quality 3-dimensional (3D) volumetric MRI datasets of the IVD to better distinguish structural details. Summary of Background Data. MRI has the advantages of being nondestructive and 3D in comparison to most techniques used to obtain the structural details of biological tissues, however, its poor image quality at higher resolution is a limiting factor. Ultrahigh-field MRI could improve the imaging of biological tissues but the current understanding of its application for spinal tissue is limited. Methods. 2 ovine spinal segments (C7–T1, T2–T3) containing the IVD were separately imaged using 2 sequences; 3D spin echo (multislice-multiecho) pulse sequence for the C7–T1 sample and 3D gradient echo (fast-low-angle-shot) pulse sequence for the T2–T3 sample. The C7–T1 sample was subsequently decalcified and imaged again using the same scanning parameters. Histological sections obtained from the decalcified sample were stained followed by digital scanning. Observations from corresponding MRI slices and histological sections were compared as a method of confirmation of morphology captured under MRI. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and relative-contrast values were calculated for quantitative evaluation of image quality. Results. Measurements from histology sections and corresponding MRI slices matched well. Both sequences revealed finer details of the IVD structure. Under the spin echo sequence, the annulus lamellae architecture was distinguishable and the SNR and CNR values were higher. The relative contrast was considerably higher between high (nucleus) and low (bone) signal constituents, but between the nucleus and the annulus the relative contrast was low. Under the gradient echo sequence, although the relative contrasts between

  3. Performance monitoring of large-scale autonomously healed concrete beams under four-point bending through multiple non-destructive testing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaiskos, G.; Tsangouri, E.; Aggelis, D. G.; Van Tittelboom, K.; De Belie, N.; Van Hemelrijck, D.

    2016-05-01

    Concrete is still the leading structural material due to its low production cost and great structural design flexibility. Although it is distinguished by such a high durability and compressive strength, it is vulnerable in a series of ambient and operational degradation factors which all too frequently result in crack formation that can adversely affect its mechanical performance. The autonomous healing system, using encapsulated polyurethane-based, expansive, healing agent embedded in concrete, is triggered by the crack formation and propagation and promises material repair and operational service life extension. As shown in our previous studies, the formed cracks on small-scale concrete beams are sealed and repaired by filling them with the healing agent. In the present study, the crack formation and propagation in autonomously healed, large-scale concrete beams are thoroughly monitored through a combination of non-destructive testing (NDT) methods. The ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV), using embedded low-cost and aggregate-size piezoelectric transducers, the acoustic emission (AE) and the digital image correlation (DIC) are the NDT methods which are comprehensively used. The integrated ultrasonic, acoustic and optical monitoring system introduces an experimental configuration that detects and locates the four-point bending mode fracture on large-scale concrete beams, detects the healing activation process and evaluates the subsequent concrete repair.

  4. Development and validation of a direct, non-destructive quantitative method for medroxyprogesterone acetate in a pharmaceutical suspension using FT-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    De Beer, T R M; Vergote, G J; Baeyens, W R G; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C; Verpoort, F

    2004-12-01

    A simple linear regression method was developed and statistically validated for the direct and non-destructive quantitative analysis--without sample preparation--of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in an aqueous pharmaceutical suspension (150 mg in 1.0 ml) using FT-Raman spectroscopy. The linear regression was modelled by plotting the highest peak intensity of the vector normalized spectral band between 1630 and 1590 cm-1 against different MPA standard suspension concentrations. At this band, no spectral interferences from additives in the suspension are observed. The validated model was used for the quantification of a commercial suspension (150 mg in 1.0 ml) of the commercialized preparations. The same standards and samples were used, respectively, for the development and validation of a simple linear regression model and for the quantitative determination by means of HPLC-with sample preparation-as described for the related substances of MPA in the Ph. Eur. IV. The quantification results obtained by the FT-Raman method corresponded with the claimed label concentration (150.01+/-0.96 mg/ml (n=6)). Applying the HPLC method, however, a systematic error was observed (157.77+/-0.94 mg/ml (n=6)). The direct FT-Raman method hence appears the most reliable for the quantification of the MPA component in suspension, compared to the HPLC method that requires sample preparation. The latter method provides a systematic error because the exact volume or density of a suspension sample is unknown. A precise isolation of fixed volumes from a suspension is rather unfeasible because of the continuous sagging of the suspended particles and their sticking to the used materials in the isolation process. PMID:15567288

  5. Visible and near-infrared light transmission: A hybrid imaging method for non-destructive meat quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziadi, A.; Maldague, X.; Saucier, L.; Duchesne, C.; Gosselin, R.

    2012-09-01

    Visual inspection of the amount of external marbling (intramuscular fat) on the meat surface is the official method used to assign the quality grading level of meat. However, this method is based exclusively on the analysis of the meat surface without any information about the internal content of the meat sample. In this paper, a new method using visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) light transmission is used to evaluate the quality of beef meat based on the marbling detection. It is demonstrated that using NIR light in transmission mode, it is possible to detect the fat not only on the surface, as in traditional methods, but also under the surface. Moreover, in combining the analysis of the two sides of the meat simple, it is possible to estimate the volumetric marbling which is not accessible by visual methods commonly proposed in computer vision. To the best of our knowledge, no similar work or method has been published or developed. The experimental results confirm the expected properties of the proposed method and illustrate the quality of the results obtained.

  6. The RAMANITA © method for non-destructive and in situ semi-quantitative chemical analysis of mineral solid-solutions by multidimensional calibration of Raman wavenumber shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David C.

    2005-08-01

    The "RAMANITA ©" method, for semi-quantitative chemical analysis of mineral solid-solutions by multidimensional calibration of Raman wavenumber shifts and mathematical calculation by simultaneous equations, is published here in detail in English for the first time. It was conceived by the present writer 20 years ago for binary and ternary pyroxene and garnet systems. The mathematical description was set out in 1989, but in an abstract in an obscure French special publication. Detailed "step-by-step" calibration of two garnet ternaries, followed by their linking, by M. Pinet and D.C. Smith in the early 1990s provided a hexary garnet database. Much later, using this garnet database, which forms part of his personal database called RAMANITA ©, the present writer began to develop the method by improving the terminology, automating the calculations, discussing problems and experimenting with different real chemical problems in archaeometry. Although this RAMANITA © method has been very briefly mentioned in two recent books, the necessary full mathematical explanation is given only here. The method will find application in any study which requires obtaining a non-destructive semi-quantitative chemical analysis from mineral solid solutions that cannot be analysed by any destructive analytical method, in particular for archaeological, geological or extraterrestrial research projects, e.g. from gemstones or other crystalline artworks of the cultural heritage (especially by Mobile Raman Microscopy (MRM)) in situ in museums or at archaeological sites, including under water for subaquatic archaeometry; from scientifically precious mineral microinclusions (such as garnet or pyroxene within diamond); from minerals in rocks analysed in situ on planetary bodies by a rover (especially "at distance" by telescopy). Recently some other workers have begun deducing chemical compositions from Raman wavenumber shifts in multivariate chemical space, but the philosophical approach is

  7. Traceable Quantitative Raman Microscopy and X-ray Fluorescence Analysis as Nondestructive Methods for the Characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Absorber Films.

    PubMed

    Zakel, Sabine; Pollakowski, Beatrix; Streeck, Cornelia; Wundrack, Stefan; Weber, Alfons; Brunken, Stefan; Mainz, Roland; Beckhoff, Burckhardt; Stosch, Rainer

    2016-02-01

    The traceability of measured quantities is an essential condition when linking process control parameters to guaranteed physical properties of a product. Using Raman spectroscopy as an analytical tool for monitoring the production of Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 thin-film solar cells, proper calibration with regard to chemical composition and lateral dimensions is a key prerequisite. This study shows how the multiple requirements of calibration in Raman microscopy might be addressed. The surface elemental composition as well as the integral elemental composition of the samples is traced back by reference-free X-ray fluorescence analysis. Reference Raman spectra are then generated for the relevant Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 related compounds. The lateral dimensions are calibrated with the help of a novel dimensional standard whose regular structures have been traced back to the International System of Units by metrological scanning force microscopy. On this basis, an approach for the quantitative determination of surface coverage values from lateral Raman mappings is developed together with a complete uncertainty budget. Raman and X-ray spectrometry have here been proven as complementary nondestructive methods combining surface sensitivity and in-depth information on elemental and species distribution for the reliable quality control of Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 absorbers and Cu(In1-xGax)3Se5 surface layer formation. PMID:26903563

  8. Infrared densitometry: a fast and non-destructive method for exact stratum corneum depth calculation for in vitro tape-stripping.

    PubMed

    Hahn, T; Hansen, S; Neumann, D; Kostka, K-H; Lehr, C-M; Muys, L; Schaefer, U F

    2010-01-01

    The investigation of drug penetration into the stratum corneum (SC) by tape-stripping requires an accurate measure of the amount of SC on each tape-strip in order to determine the depth inside the SC. This study applies infrared densitometry (IR-D) to in vitro tape-stripping using the novel Squame Scan(R) 850A. The device had recently been shown to provide accurate measurements of the SC depth for tape-stripping in vivo. Furthermore, the suitability of IR-D for determining the endpoint of tape-stripping, i.e. complete SC removal, was tested. The SC depth was computed from the IR-D data of sequential tape-strips and compared to the results of a protein assay as gold standard. IR-D provided accurate depth results both for freshly excised skin and for skin stored frozen for up to 3 months. In addition, the lower limit of quantification of IR-D indicates the complete removal of the SC (less than 5% of the total SC remaining) and can be used for adjusting the number of tapes applied in situ. Therefore, IR-D is an accurate, fast and non-destructive method for SC depth determination. PMID:20173360

  9. A NEW NON-DESTRUCTIVE METHOD FOR CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF PARTICULATE MATTER FILTERS: THE CASE OF MANGANESE AIR POLLUTION IN VALLECAMONICA (ITALY)

    PubMed Central

    Borgese, Laura; Zacco, Annalisa; Pal, Sudipto; Bontempi, Elza; Lucchini, Roberto; Zimmerman, Neil; Depero, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) is a well-established technique for chemical analysis, but it is mainly employed for quality control in the electronics semiconductor industry. The capability to analyze liquid and uniformly thin solid samples makes this technique suitable for other applications, and especially in the very critical field of environmental analysis. Comparison with standard methods like Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) show that TXRF is a practical, accurate, and reliable technique in occupational settings. Due to the greater sensitivity necessary in trace heavy metal detection, TXRF is also suitable for environmental chemical analysis. In this paper we show that based on appropriate standards, TXRF can be considered for non-destructive routine quantitative analysis of environmental matrices such as air filters. This work has been developed in the frame of the EU-FP6 PHIME (Public Health Impact of long-term, low-level Mixed element Exposure in susceptible population strata) Integrated Project (www.phime.org). The aim of this work was to investigate Mn air pollution in the area of Vallecamonica (Italy). PMID:21315919

  10. Nondestructive Testing Eddy Current Equipment, Methods and Applications RQA/M1-5330.12 (V-II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C. Marshall Space Flight Center.

    As one in the series of programmed instruction handbooks, prepared by the U. S. space program, home study material is presented in this volume concerning familiarization and orientation on eddy current testing. The subject is presented under the following headings: Test Coils, Methods and Indications, and Applications. High product quality and…

  11. A rapid, non-invasive and non-destructive method for studying swelling behavior and microstructure variations of hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqiong; Li, Xiunan; Chen, Chao; Zhao, Dawei; Su, Zhiguo; Ma, Guanghui; Yu, Rong

    2016-10-20

    A new method for studying swelling behavior of hydrogels was developed based on low field NMR (LF-NMR). This method is established on these facts: firstly, internal water (water trapped in hydrogel) and external water (water outside of hydrogel) correspond to different components of transverse relaxation time (T2); secondly, T2 component amplitude is proportional to relative water content; and finally, T2 value is closely related to mesh size of hydrogel network, the main effect being due to the overall concentration (degree of swelling). This method was successfully applied to swelling ratio determination of chitosan/glutaraldehyde (CS/GA) hydrogels in situ, and the results had better accuracy and repeatability compared with that of weighing method. Furthermore, swelling kinetics at different pH and microstructure of CS/GA hydrogels was well elucidated based on T2. It is clearly showed that LF-NMR provides a powerful tool for probing processes related to water transport and microstructure variation of hydrogels. PMID:27474678

  12. Neutrons and Photons in Nondestructive Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, J. F.; Wells, D. P.; Hunt, A. W.

    2011-02-01

    Active, nondestructive interrogation with neutrons and photons has seen a renaissance in recent years, owing to a broad spectrum of important applications in security, nuclear nonproliferation, contraband detection and materials analysis. Active methods are of high interest for such applications because they provide at least an order of magnitude greater sensitivity than passive methods. Accelerator-based neutron and photon active methods exploit two important factors to attain greater sensitivity: these are (i) the control of interrogating beam properties such as directionality, energy, intensity, polarization and the temporal distribution of radiation; (ii) well-founded, low energy nuclear physics that yields distinct "signatures" for elemental and isotopic content. This review addresses accelerator-based neutron and photon nondestructive testing methods and issues when applied to modern and emerging wide-ranging challenges in nondestructive detection.

  13. Summary of nondestructive testing theory and practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meister, R. P.; Randall, M. D.; Mitchell, D. K.; Williams, L. P.; Pattee, H. E.

    1972-01-01

    The ability to fabricate design critical and man-rated aerospace structures using materials near the limits of their capabilities requires a comprehensive and dependable assurance program. The quality assurance program must rely heavily on nondestructive testing methods for thorough inspection to assess properties and quality of hardware items. A survey of nondestructive testing methods is presented to provide space program managers, supervisors and engineers who are unfamiliar with this technical area with appropriate insight into the commonly accepted nondestructive testing methods available, their interrelationships, used, advantages and limitations. Primary emphasis is placed on the most common methods: liquid penetrant, magnetic particle, radiography, ultrasonics and eddy current. A number of the newer test techniques including thermal, acoustic emission, holography, microwaves, eddy-sonic and exo-electron emission, which are beginning to be used in applications of interest to NASA, are also discussed briefly.

  14. Sensitivity and Calibration of Non-Destructive Evaluation Method That Uses Neural-Net Processing of Characteristic Fringe Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    2003-01-01

    This paper answers some performance and calibration questions about a non-destructive-evaluation (NDE) procedure that uses artificial neural networks to detect structural damage or other changes from sub-sampled characteristic patterns. The method shows increasing sensitivity as the number of sub-samples increases from 108 to 6912. The sensitivity of this robust NDE method is not affected by noisy excitations of the first vibration mode. A calibration procedure is proposed and demonstrated where the output of a trained net can be correlated with the outputs of the point sensors used for vibration testing. The calibration procedure is based on controlled changes of fastener torques. A heterodyne interferometer is used as a displacement sensor for a demonstration of the challenges to be handled in using standard point sensors for calibration.

  15. Development of a Rapid, Nondestructive Method to Measure Aqueous Carbonate in High Salinity Brines Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, L.; Phillips-Lander, C. M.; Elwood Madden, A. S.; Parnell, S.; Elwood Madden, M.

    2015-12-01

    Traditional methods of quantitative analysis are often ill-suited to determining the bulk chemistry of high salinity brines due to their corrosive and clogging properties. Such methods are also often difficult to apply remotely in planetary environments. However, Raman spectroscopy can be used remotely without physical contact with the fluid and is not affected by many ionic brines. Developing methods to study aqueous carbonates is vital to future study of brines on Mars and other planetary bodies, as they can reveal important information about modern and ancient near-surface aqueous processes. Both sodium carbonate standards and unknown samples from carbonate mineral dissolution experiments in high salinity brines were analyzed using a 532 nm laser coupled to an inVia Renishaw spectrometer to collect carbonate spectra from near-saturated sodium chloride and sodium sulfate brines. A calibration curve was determined by collecting spectra from solutions of known carbonate concentrations mixed with a pH 13 buffer and a near-saturated NaCl or Na2SO4 brine matrix. The spectra were processed and curve fitted to determine the height ratio of the carbonate peak at 1066 cm-1 to the 1640 cm-1 water peak. The calibration curve determined using the standards was then applied to the experimental data after accounting for dilutions. Concentrations determined based on Raman spectra were compared against traditional acid titration measurements. We found that the two techniques vary by less than one order of magnitude. Further work is ongoing to verify the method and apply similar techniques to measure aqueous carbonate concentrations in other high salinity brines.Traditional methods of quantitative analysis are often ill-suited to determining the bulk chemistry of high salinity brines due to their corrosive and clogging properties. Such methods are also often difficult to apply remotely in planetary environments. However, Raman spectroscopy can be used remotely without physical

  16. Nondestructive decontamination of mortar and concrete by electro-kinetic methods: application to the extraction of radioactive heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Castellote, Marta; Andrade, Carmen; Alonso, Cruz

    2002-05-15

    Because the service lives of nuclear power plants are limited to a certain number of years, the need for the management of quite a large volume of radioactive contaminated concrete arises, which, in most cases, was not taken into account when the capacities of the low and medium activity repositories were designed. Therefore, the decontamination of these structures would be of great interest in order to declassify the wastes as radioactive and manage them as conventional ones. This research studies the reliability of the application of electrical fields to decontaminate radioactive contaminated concrete. Three series of decontamination experiments have been carried out, using Cs+, Sr2-, Co2+, and Fe3+ ions added during casting and that have penetrated from the outside, testing carbonated and uncarbonated matrixes, and using laboratory devices as well as the homemade device for in situ application named "honeycomb device". As a result, the application of electrical fields to concrete-contaminated structures has been developed as a new technique to extract radioactive ionic species from concrete. This method of decontamination has been patented by ENRESA (Spanish Company for the Management of Radioactive Wastes) in association with the IETcc. PMID:12038838

  17. Technology Review of Nondestructive Methods for Examination of Water Intrusion Areas on Hanford’s Double-Shell Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Michael L.; Pardini, Allan F.

    2008-05-09

    Under a contract with CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., PNNL has performed a review of the NDE technology and methods for examination of the concrete dome structure of Hanford’s double-shell tanks. The objective was to provide a matrix of methodologies that could be evaluated based on applicability, ease of deployment, and results that could provide information that could be used in the ongoing structural analysis of the tank dome. PNNL performed a technology evaluation with the objective of providing a critical literature review for all applicable technologies based on constraints provided by CH2M HILL. These constraints were not mandatory, but were desired. These constraints included performing the evaluation without removing any soil from the top of the tank, or if necessary, requesting that the hole diameter needed to gain access to evaluate the top of the tank structure to be no greater than approximately 12-in. in diameter. PNNL did not address the details of statistical sampling requirements as they depend on an unspecified risk tolerance. PNNL considered these during the technology evaluation and have reported the results in the remainder of this document. Many of the basic approaches to concrete inspection that were reviewed in previous efforts are still in use. These include electromagnetic, acoustic, radiographic, etc. The primary improvements in these tools have focused on providing quantitative image reconstruction, thus providing inspectors and analysts with three-dimensional data sets that allow for operator visualization of relevant abnormalities and analytical integration into structural performance models. Available instruments, such as radar used for bridge deck inspections, rely on post-processing algorithms and do not provide real-time visualization. Commercially available equipment only provides qualitative indications of relative concrete damage. It cannot be used as direct input for structural analysis to assess fitness for use and if

  18. Non-destructive thermal wave method applied to study thermal properties of fast setting time endodontic cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picolloto, A. M.; Mariucci, V. V. G.; Szpak, W.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Astrath, F. B. G.; Santos, A. D.; Moraes, J. C. S.; Bento, A. C.

    2013-11-01

    The thermal wave method is applied for thermal properties measurement in fast endodontic cement (CER). This new formula is developed upon using Portland cement in gel and it was successfully tested in mice with good biocompatibility and stimulated mineralization. Recently, thermal expansion and setting time were measured, conferring to this material twice faster hardening than the well known Angelus Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) the feature of fast hardening (˜7 min) and with similar thermal expansion (˜12 μstrain/ °C). Therefore, it is important the knowledge of thermal properties like thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity in order to match thermally the tissue environment upon its application in filling cavities of teeth. Photothermal radiometry technique based on Xe illumination was applied in CER disks 600 μm thick for heating, with prepared in four particle sizes (25, 38, 45, and 53) μm, which were added microemulsion gel with variation volumes (140, 150, 160, and 170) μl. The behavior of the thermal diffusivity CER disks shows linear decay for increase emulsion volume, and in contrast, thermal diffusivity increases with particles sizes. Aiming to compare to MTA, thermal properties of CER were averaged to get the figure of merit for thermal diffusivity as (44.2 ± 3.6) × 10-3 cm2/s, for thermal conductivity (228 ± 32) mW/cm K, the thermal effusivity (1.09 ± 0.06) W s0.5/cm2 K and volume heat capacity (5.2 ± 0.7) J/cm3 K, which are in excellent agreement with results of a disk prepared from commercial MTA-Angelus (grain size < 10 μm using 57 μl of distilled water).

  19. Non-destructive thermal wave method applied to study thermal properties of fast setting time endodontic cement

    SciTech Connect

    Picolloto, A. M.; Mariucci, V. V. G.; Szpak, W.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Astrath, F. B. G.; Bento, A. C.; Santos, A. D.; Moraes, J. C. S.

    2013-11-21

    The thermal wave method is applied for thermal properties measurement in fast endodontic cement (CER). This new formula is developed upon using Portland cement in gel and it was successfully tested in mice with good biocompatibility and stimulated mineralization. Recently, thermal expansion and setting time were measured, conferring to this material twice faster hardening than the well known Angelus Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) the feature of fast hardening (∼7 min) and with similar thermal expansion (∼12 μstrain/ °C). Therefore, it is important the knowledge of thermal properties like thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity in order to match thermally the tissue environment upon its application in filling cavities of teeth. Photothermal radiometry technique based on Xe illumination was applied in CER disks 600 μm thick for heating, with prepared in four particle sizes (25, 38, 45, and 53) μm, which were added microemulsion gel with variation volumes (140, 150, 160, and 170) μl. The behavior of the thermal diffusivity CER disks shows linear decay for increase emulsion volume, and in contrast, thermal diffusivity increases with particles sizes. Aiming to compare to MTA, thermal properties of CER were averaged to get the figure of merit for thermal diffusivity as (44.2 ± 3.6) × 10{sup −3} cm{sup 2}/s, for thermal conductivity (228 ± 32) mW/cm K, the thermal effusivity (1.09 ± 0.06) W s{sup 0.5}/cm{sup 2} K and volume heat capacity (5.2 ± 0.7) J/cm{sup 3} K, which are in excellent agreement with results of a disk prepared from commercial MTA-Angelus (grain size < 10 μm using 57 μl of distilled water)

  20. [Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Born, Martin

    2010-01-01

    These poster boards display the United Space Alliance's (USA) systems and equipment used for Nondestructive Evaluation. These include: (1) the Robotic Inspection Facility, (2) CAT-Scan and Laminography, (3) Laser Surface Profilometry, (4) Remote Eddy Current, (5) Ultrasonic Phased Array, (7) Infrared Flash Thermography, and (8) Backscatter X-Ray (BSX)

  1. Nondestructive testing of brazed rocket engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, C. J.; Hagemaier, D. J.; Meyer, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    Report details study made of nondestructive radiographic, ultrasonic, thermographic, and leak test methods used to inspect and evaluate the quality of the various brazed joints in liquid-propellant rocket engine components and assemblies. Descriptions of some of the unique equipment and methods developed are included.

  2. The Assess-and-Fix Approach: Using Non-Destructive Evaluations to Help Select Pipe Renewal Methods (WaterRF Report 4473)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nondestructive examinations (NDE) can be easily performed as part of a typical water main rehabilitation project. Once a bypass water system has been installed and the water main has been cleaned, pulling a scanning tool through the main is very straightforward. An engineer can t...

  3. NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION (NDE) OF DAMAGED STRUCTURAL CERAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, R. E.; Green, W. H.; Sands, J. M.; Yu, J. H.

    2009-03-03

    A combination of destructive and nondestructive testing methods was utilized to evaluate the impact velocity and energy conditions that caused fracture in alumina structural ceramics. Drop tower testing was used for low velocity impact with a high mass indenter and fragment simulating projectile testing was used for high velocity impact with a low mass projectile. The damaged samples were nondestructively evaluated using digital radiography and ultrasound C-scan imaging. The bulk damage detected by these techniques was compared to surface damage observed by visual inspection.

  4. Nondestructive analysis and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moslehy, Faissal A.

    1993-01-01

    This final report summarizes the achievements of project #4 of the NASA/UCF Cooperative Agreement from January 1990 to December 1992. The objectives of this project are to review NASA's NDE program at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and recommend means for enhancing the present testing capabilities through the use of improved or new technologies. During the period of the project, extensive development of a reliable nondestructive, non-contact vibration technique to determine and quantify the bond condition of the thermal protection system (TPS) tiles of the Space Shuttle Orbiter was undertaken. Experimental modal analysis (EMA) is used as a non-destructive technique for the evaluation of Space Shuttle thermal protection system (TPS) tile bond integrity. Finite element (FE) models for tile systems were developed and were used to generate their vibration characteristics (i.e. natural frequencies and mode shapes). Various TPS tile assembly configurations as well as different bond conditions were analyzed. Results of finite element analyses demonstrated a drop in natural frequencies and a change in mode shapes which correlate with both size and location of disbond. Results of experimental testing of tile panels correlated with FE results and demonstrated the feasibility of EMA as a viable technique for tile bond verification. Finally, testing performed on the Space Shuttle Columbia using a laser doppler velocimeter demonstrated the application of EMA, when combined with FE modeling, as a non-contact, non-destructive bond evaluation technique.

  5. Handbooks for nondestructive testing using ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Four handbooks have been prepared for use in teaching metal parts inspectors and quality assurance technicians the fundamentals of nondestructive testing using ultrasonic detection methods. The handbooks may be used in the shop or laboratory, or as study texts in technical schools and in the home.

  6. Nondestructive examination development and demonstration plan

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.R.

    1991-08-21

    Nondestructive examination (NDE) of waste matrices using penetrating radiation is by nature very subjective. Two candidate systems of examination have been identified for use in WRAP 1. This test plan describes a method for a comparative evaluation of different x-ray examination systems and techniques.

  7. Nondestructive Evaluation Quality Procedure: Personnel Qualification and Certification Radiographic Testing-Levels I& II

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, K; Rikard, R D; Rodriquez, J

    2003-07-01

    This Operational Procedure establishes the minimum requirements for the qualification and certification/recertification of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) personnel in the nondestructive testing (NDT) radiographic testing (RT) method. This document is in accordance with the American Society for Nondestructive Testing Recommended Practice SNT-TC-1A, 1996, except as amended herein.

  8. Nondestructive testing with thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Tarpani, José Ricardo; Maldague, Xavier P. V.

    2013-11-01

    Thermography is a nondestructive testing (NDT) technique based on the principle that two dissimilar materials, i.e., possessing different thermo-physical properties, would produce two distinctive thermal signatures that can be revealed by an infrared sensor, such as a thermal camera. The fields of NDT applications are expanding from classical building or electronic components monitoring to more recent ones such as inspection of artworks or composite materials. Furthermore, thermography can be conveniently used as a didactic tool for physics education in universities given that it provides the possibility of visualizing fundamental principles, such as thermal physics and mechanics among others.

  9. Nondestructive evaluation technique guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1973-01-01

    A total of 70 individual nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques are described. Information is presented that permits ease of comparison of the merits and limitations of each technique with respect to various NDE problems. An NDE technique classification system is presented. It is based on the system that was adopted by the National Materials Advisory Board (NMAB). The classification system presented follows the NMAB system closely with the exception of additional categories that have been added to cover more advanced techniques presently in use. The rationale of the technique is explained. The format provides for a concise description of each technique, the physical principles involved, objectives of interrogation, example applications, limitations of each technique, a schematic illustration, and key reference material. Cross-index tabulations are also provided so that particular NDE problems can be referred to appropriate techniques.

  10. Nondestructive Test Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Under the Aircraft Structural Integrity program, Langley Research Center invented a device to detect fatigue cracks in aluminum alloy plates. Krautkramer Branson obtained an exclusive license and commercialized a hand-held device, the "CrackFinder," an electromagnetic probe for nondestructive evaluation, used to scan aircraft skins for surface breaks. The technology involves an eddy current, which is an electrical current induced by an alternating magnetic field. The CrackFinder also employs an innovative self-nulling feature, where the device automatically recalibrates to zero so that each flaw detected produces a reading. Compared to conventional testing systems, the CrackFinder is affordable, small, simple to use, and needs no calibration.

  11. Magnetic nondestructive testing of rotor blade tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardelli, E.; Faba, A.; Marsili, R.; Rossi, G.; Tomassini, R.

    2015-05-01

    This paper deals with a particular magnetic nondestructive technique applied to the control of the position of the steel blades in rotating parts of turbines and engines. The working principle is based on a bridge of four identical magneto-resistive sensors. One sensor is placed near the blades, and the change in magnetic field produced by a permanent magnet and deviated by the change in position of the blade is detected by the sensor bridge. The position of the sensor is indicated, via dedicated FEM simulations, in order to have high sensitivity to the position change and high output signal. The accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed method are shown by experimental tests carried out in our laboratories. In particular, the tests indicate that the proposed magnetic nondestructive technique can be used in an almost large velocity range, and for quite different values of blade tip. The method seems also promising for the detection of blade vibrations.

  12. Nondestructive Determination of Bond Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Although many nondestructive techniques have been applied to detect disbonds in adhesive joints, no absolutely reliable nondestructive method has been developed to detect poor adhesion and evaluate the strength of bonded joints prior to the present work which used nonlinear ultrasonic methods to investigate adhesive bond cure conditions. Previously, a variety of linear and nonlinear ultrasonic methods with water coupling had been used to study aluminum-adhesive-aluminum laminates, prepared under different adhesive curing conditions, for possible bond strength determination. Therefore, in the course of this research effort, a variety of finite-amplitude experimental methods which could possibly differentiate various cure conditions were investigated, including normal and oblique incidence approaches based on nonlinear harmonic generation as well as several non-collinear two-wave interaction approaches. Test samples were mechanically scanned in various ways with respect to the focus of a transmitting transducer operated at several variable excitation frequencies and excitation levels. Even when powerful sample-related resonances were exploited by means of a frequency scanning approach, it was very difficult to isolate the nonlinear characteristics of adhesive bonds. However, a multi-frequency multi-power approach was quite successful and reliable. Ultrasonic tone burst signals at increasing power levels, over a wide frequency range, were transmitted through each bond specimen to determine its excitation dependent nonlinear harmonic resonance behavior. Relative amplitude changes were observed particularly in the higher harmonic spectral data and analyzed using a local displacement and strain analysis in the linear approximation. Two analysis approaches of the excitation-dependent data at specific resonances were found to be quite promising. One of these approaches may represent a very robust algorithm for classifying an adhesive bond as being properly cured or not

  13. Impact-acoustics-based health monitoring of tile-wall bonding integrity using principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, F.; Tso, S. K.; Hung, M. Y. Y.

    2006-06-01

    The use of the acoustic features extracted from the impact sounds for bonding integrity assessment has been extensively investigated. Nonetheless, considering the practical implementation of tile-wall non-destructive evaluation (NDE), the traditional defects classification method based directly on frequency-domain features has been of limited application because of the overlapping feature patterns corresponding to different classes whenever there is physical surface irregularity. The purpose of this paper is to explore the clustering and classification ability of principal component analysis (PCA) as applied to the impact-acoustics signature in tile-wall inspection with a view to mitigating the adverse influence of surface non-uniformity. A clustering analysis with signature acquired on sample slabs shows that impact-acoustics signatures of different bonding quality and different surface roughness are well separated into different clusters when using the first two principal components obtained. By adopting as inputs the feature vectors extracted with PCA applied, a multilayer back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN) classifier is developed for automatic health monitoring and defects classification of tile-walls. The inspection results obtained experimentally on the prepared sample slabs are presented and discussed, confirming the utility of the proposed method, particularly in dealing with tile surface irregularity.

  14. Hybrid holographic non-destructive test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An automatic hybrid holographic non-destructive testing (HNDT) method and system capable of detecting flaws or debonds contained within certain materials are described. This system incorporates the techniques of optical holography, acoustical/optical holography and holographic correlation in determining the structural integrity of a test object. An automatic processing system including a detector and automatic data processor is used in conjunction with the three holographic techniques for correlating and interpreting the information supplied by the non-destructive systems. The automatic system also includes a sensor which directly translates an optical data format produced by the holographic techniques into electrical signals and then transmits this information to a digital computer for indicating the structural properties of the test object. The computer interprets the data gathered and determines whether further testing is necessary as well as the format of this new testing procedure.

  15. Application of nondestructive assay techniques in Kazakstan

    SciTech Connect

    Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.; Butler, G.; Collins, M.

    1997-11-01

    As Kazakstan has transitioned from being part of the Soviet Union to a nonweapons state (Treaty of Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons [NPT] signatory) under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspections, significant changes have been required. Some of these changes have occurred in nuclear material protection, control, and accounting at the four nuclear facility sites in the Republic of Kazakstan. Specifically, the Republic of Kazakstan has changed from relying primarily on a subset of physical protection methods to a graded safeguards approach using a balance of material control, material accounting, and physical protection. Once more intensive material control and accounting procedures and systems are in place, a necessary step is to supply the accounting systems with measured values of high quality. This need can be met with destructive and nondestructive methods. Material control systems can also use qualitative nondestructive assay information as input. This paper will discuss the nondestructive assay techniques and systems the US Department of Energy (DOE) is providing to Kazakstan under both DOE programs and the Cooperative Threat Reduction Act as part of the nuclear material control and accounting upgrades at four facilities in Kazakstan. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Trends in nondestructive imaging of IC packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. M.; Hartfield, C. D.

    1998-11-01

    Since the industry-wide conversion to surface mount packages in the mid-1980's, nondestructive imaging of moisture induced delaminations and cracks in plastic packaged ICs by scanning acoustic microscopy has been a critically important capability. Subsurface imaging and phase analysis of echoes has allowed scanning acoustic microscopy to become the primary nondestructive technique for component level inspection of packaged ICs and is sensitive to defects that are undetectable by real time x-ray inspection. It has become the preferred method for evaluating moisture sensitivity, and for many package processes, provides more reliable detection of wire bond degradation than physical cross sectioning or conventional electrical testing. However, the introduction of new technologies such as ball grid array (BGA) and flip chip packages demands improvements in acoustic inspection techniques. Echoes from the laminated substrates in BGA packages produce interference problems. Phase inversion detection is an important advantage of pulse-echo imaging of molded surface mount packages. However, phase inversion is not always helpful for delamination detection in these new packages, due to the properties of the materials involved. The requirement to nondestructively inspect flip chip interconnect bumps has arisen. Alternative approaches such as through-transmission screening of BGAs and high frequency (>200 MHz) pulse-echo inspection of flip chip bumps are addressing these new issues. As the acoustic frequency approaches the limits dictated by attenuation, new methods of frequency-domain signal analysis will become important for routine inspection and may give acoustic microscopy a predictive capability.

  17. SQUIDs: microscopes and nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mück, Michael

    2005-03-01

    SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) are magnetic field sensores with unsurpassed sensitivity. They are amazingly versatile, being able to measure all physical quantities which can be converted to magnetic flux. They are routinely fabricated in thin film technology from two classes of superconducting materials: high-temperature superconductors (HTS) which are usually cooled to 77 K, and low-temperature superconductors (LTS), which have to be cooled to 4.2 K. SQUIDs have many applications, two of which shall be discussed in this paper. In SQUID microscopy, a SQUID scans a sample, which preferrably is at room temperature, and measures the two-dimensional magnetic field distribution at the surface of the sample. In order to achieve a relatively high spatial resolution, the stand-off distance between the sample and the SQUID is made as small as possible. SQUIDs show also promising results in the field of nondestructive testing of various materials. For example, ferromagnetic impurities in stainless steel formed by aging processes in the material can be detected with high probability, and cracks in conducting materials, for example aircraft parts, can be located using eddy current methods. Especially for the case of thick, highly conductive, or ferromagnetic materials, as well as sintered materials, it can be shown that a SQUID-based NDE system exhibits a much higher sensitivity compared to conventional eddy current NDE and ultrasonic testing.

  18. A new rapid and non-destructive method to detect tephra layers and cryptotephras: applying to the first distal tephrostratigraphic record of the Chaîne des Puys volcanic field (France).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouannic, Gwénolé; Walter-Simonnet, Anne-Véronique; Bossuet, Gilles; Delabrousse, Eric; Cubizolle, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    Tephrostratigraphy has been considerably developed for 30 years, mainly in palaeo-environmental studies. In such studies, distal tephra layers are important chronological markers, but they are also tools to establish or specify record of past eruptions of a volcanic field. Nowadays, development of effective rapid methods to detect tephra layers in sedimentary records of various compositions is a challenge. Many classic methods for detection of tephra layers, like regular sampling or magnetic susceptibility measurements, have shown their limits. Regular sampling takes a long time, and finding tephra layers remains uncertain. Moreover, magnetic susceptibility maesurements, although it is a non-destructive method, is ineffective when tephra layers are made of volcanic glass shards with differentiated magma composition. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is also a non-destructive method but it takes a very long time to analyze a core with sufficient high resolution, and measurements only concern the surface of the sediment. We propose a new method allows detection of tephra layers with, for the first time, a 3D resolution: the Computed Tomography Scan (CT- Scan). This method, regularly used in medicine, allows there to obtain pictures of materials density on 3D with inframillimetric measurement ranges. Then, it is possible to detect tephras, cryptotephras (invisible by naked eye), reworked tephra layers even when tephra layers don't outcrop at the surface of the sediment (and are therefore undetectable by usual methods like XRF and magnetic susceptibility). This method has been tried out on tephras sedimented in different types of sediments (silicated, carbonated and organic matter). Our results show that this method is very efficient for peaty environment. Used on coring carried out in Forez Mountains (French Massif Central), CT-Scan allows to detect more tephra layers than usual methods (XRF and magnetic susceptibility). Results presented here allow to build the first

  19. Nonlinear acoustic nondestructive testing for concrete durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hwai-Chung; Warnemuende, Kraig

    2000-06-01

    Several nondestructive testing methods can be used to determine the damage in a concrete structure. Linear ultrasonic techniques, e.g. pulse-velocity and amplitude attenuation, are very common in nondestructive evaluation. Velocity of propagation is not very sensitive to the degrees of damage unless a great deal of micro-damage having evolving into localized macro-damage. This transition typically takes place around 80% of the ultimate compressive strength. Amplitude attenuation is potentially more sensitive than pulse-velocity. However, this method depends strongly on the coupling conditions between transducers and concrete, hence unreliable. A baseline test of the linear acoustics of several mortar samples was conducted. These mortar samples have been previously damaged to different levels. Several other testing methods were also performed on the same samples to form a comparison. The focus is in comparing the sensitivity of a new testing method (Non-linear Acoustic NDE) with several more traditional testing methods. Non-linearity of the material stiffness is expressed in non-linear acoustics as the effect that damage and flaws have on the modulation of a signal as it propagates through the material. Spectral (non-linear) analysis is much more sensitive to lower damage states and less dependent on the repeatability of the coupling of the transducers.

  20. Nondestructive test of regenerative chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Stauffis, R.; Wood, R.

    1972-01-01

    Flat panels simulating internally cooled regenerative thrust chamber walls were fabricated by electroforming, brazing and diffusion bonding to evaluate the feasibility of nondestructive evaluation techniques to detect bonds of various strength integrities. Ultrasonics, holography, and acoustic emission were investigated and found to yield useful and informative data regarding the presence of bond defects in these structures.

  1. Quantitative nondestructive evaluation of materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Barry T.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation was undertaken to quantify damage tolerance and resistance in composite materials impacted using the drop-weight method. Tests were conducted on laminates of several different carbon-fiber composite systems, such as epoxies, modified epoxies, and amorphous and semicrystalline thermoplastics. Impacted composite specimens were examined using destructive and non-destructive techniques to establish the characteristic damage states. Specifically, optical microscopy, ultrasonic, and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to identify impact induced damage mechanisms. Damage propagation during post impact compression was also studied.

  2. Nondestructive characterization of lattice block material™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipetzky, Kirsten G.; Warren, Jeffrey M.

    2002-05-01

    Lattice Block Material™ (LBM™) is the name given to a new class of materials that makes use of the well-understood principles of trusses and space frames to create a variety of components having high strength to weight ratios. Differences in product design, materials selection, and manufacturing process, however, can lead to uncertainty as to the overall performance of a given end product. For this reason, a variety of nondestructive methods were utilized to characterize LBM™ for potential Navy applications, including, visual inspection, x-ray radiography, x-ray computed tomography, and infrared thermography.

  3. Nondestructive Evaluation of Nuclear-Grade Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis C. Kunerth; Timothy R. McJunkin

    2011-07-01

    Nondestructive Evaluation of Nuclear Grade Graphite Dennis C. Kunerth and Timothy R. McJunkin Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Falls, ID, 83415 This paper discusses the nondestructive evaluation of nuclear grade graphite performed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Graphite is a composite material highly dependent on the base material and manufacturing methods. As a result, material variations are expected within individual billets as well billet to billet and lot to lot. Several methods of evaluating the material have been explored. Particular technologies each provide a subset of information about the material. This paper focuses on techniques that are applicable to in-service inspection of nuclear energy plant components. Eddy current examination of the available surfaces provides information on potential near surface structural defects and although limited, ultrasonics can be utilized in conventional volumetric inspection. Material condition (e.g. micro-cracking and porosity induced by radiation and stress) can be derived from backscatter or acousto-ultrasound (AU) methods. Novel approaches utilizing phased array ultrasonics have been attempted to expand the abilities of AU techniques. By combining variable placement of apertures, angle and depth of focus, the techniques provide the potential to obtain parameters at various depths in the material. Initial results of the study and possible procedures for application of the techniques are discussed.

  4. Complementary Electromagnetic Non-Destructive Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Gui Yun; Wilson, John; Morozov, Maxim

    2011-06-01

    The use of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) for defect detection and failure prediction in structures and specimens is widespread in energy industries, aimed at ageing power plants and pipelines, material degradation, fatigue and radiation damage, etc. At present there are no suitable electromagnetic NDE methods for the measurement and characterization of material degradation, in irradiated samples in particular, which is very important and timely for the nuclear power industry in the UK. This paper reports recent developments in the field of electromagnetic (EM) NDE at Newcastle University, including pulsed eddy current (PEC), pulsed magnetic flux leakage (PMFL), magnetic Barkhausen emission (MBE) and magneto-acoustic emission (MAE). As different EM methods have different strengths, an integrative EM framework is introduced. Case studies through the second round robin tests organized by the Universal Network for Magnetic Non-Destructive Evaluation (UNMNDE), representing eighteen leading research groups worldwide in the area of electromagnetic NDE, are reported. Twelve samples with different ageing times and rolling reduction ratios were tested using different magnetic methods among the UNMNDE members. Based on the studies, the complementary characteristics of electromagnetic techniques for NDE are discussed.

  5. Non-destructive evaluation of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin Philip

    1996-01-01

    The composite materials have been used in aerospace industries for quite some time. Several non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods have been developed to inspect composites in order to detect flaws, matrix cracking, and delamination. These methods include ultrasonics, acoustic emission, shearography, thermography, X-ray, and digital image correlation. The NDE Branch of Marshall Space Flight Center has recently acquired a thermal imaging NDE system. The same system has been used at NASA Langley Research Center for detecting disbonds. In order to compare different NDE methods, three carbon/carbon composite panels were used for experiment using ultrasonic C-scan, shearography, and thermography methods. These panels have teflon inserts to simulate the delamination between plies in a composite panel. All three methods have successfully located the insert. The experiment and results are presented in the following sections.

  6. Recent advances in the use of non-destructive near infrared spectroscopy on intact olive fruits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this review is to illustrate the state of the art in the use of non-destructive near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for quality evaluation of intact fruit in the olive industry. First, the most recent studies regarding the application of non-destructive NIR spectroscopy methods to asse...

  7. Nondestructive ultrasonic characterization of engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, K.

    1985-01-01

    The development of an ultrasonic method for the nondestructive characterization of mechanical properties of engineering material is described. The method utilizes the nonlinearity parameter measurement which describes the anharmonic behavior of the solid through measurements of amplitudes of the fundamental and of the generated second harmonic ultrasonic waves. The nonlinearity parameter is also directly related to the acoustoelastic constant of the solid which can be determined by measuring the linear dependence of ultrasonic velocity on stress. A major advantage of measurements of the nonlinearity parameter over that of the acoustoelastic constant is that it may be determined without the application of stress on the material, which makes it more applicable for in-service nondestructive characterization. The relationships between the nonlinearity parameter of second-harmonic generation and the percentage of solid solution phase in engineering materials such as heat treatable aluminum alloys was established. The acoustoelastic constants are measured on these alloys for comparison and confirmation. A linear relationship between the nonlinearity parameter and the volume fraction of second phase precipitates in the alloys is indicated.

  8. The Method of Evaluation and Implementation of the Non-destructive Test on Aggregate denuded Concrete Structure for Irrigation and Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Hidehiko; Sato, Shushi; Hattori, Kunio

    The surfaces of the servicing concrete structure for irrigation and drainage have the denuding aggregates. Various diagnoses can't be done properly by the test method for ultrasonic pulse velocity, because close adhesion between pulse terminal and aggregate denuded concrete surface is insufficient. In this research, the solution of this problem by coating method that mediated material is applied to the concrete was examined. As a result, the ultrarapid hardening cement and the epoxy clay were suitable as a mediated material, and the method to evaluate ultrasonic pulse velocity of the coated concrete by the mediated material were clarified. Moreover, the method to evaluate rebound number and impact points of the coated concrete by the mediated material was recommended.

  9. Nondestructive Evaluation for Aerospace Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara; Cramer, Elliott; Perey, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques are important for enabling NASA's missions in space exploration and aeronautics. The expanded and continued use of composite materials for aerospace components and vehicles leads to a need for advanced NDE techniques capable of quantitatively characterizing damage in composites. Quantitative damage detection techniques help to ensure safety, reliability and durability of space and aeronautic vehicles. This presentation will give a broad outline of NASA's range of technical work and an overview of the NDE research performed in the Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Branch at NASA Langley Research Center. The presentation will focus on ongoing research in the development of NDE techniques for composite materials and structures, including development of automated data processing tools to turn NDE data into quantitative location and sizing results. Composites focused NDE research in the areas of ultrasonics, thermography, X-ray computed tomography, and NDE modeling will be discussed.

  10. NON-DESTRUCTIVE BEAM MEASUREMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.

    2004-07-05

    In high energy accelerators, especially storage rings, non-destructive beam measurements are highly desirable to minimize the impact on the beam quality. In principle, the non-destructive tools can be either passive detectors like Schottky, or active devices which excite either longitudinal or transverse beam motions for the corresponding measurements. An example of such a device is an ac dipole, a magnet with oscillating field, which can be used to achieve large coherent betatron oscillations. It has been demonstrated in the Brookhaven AGS that by adiabatically exciting the beam, the beam emittance growth due to the filamentation in the phase space can be avoided. This paper overviews both techniques in general. In particular, this paper also presents the beam tune measurement with a Schottky detector, phase advance measurements as well as nonlinear resonance measurements with the ac dipoles in the Brookhaven RHIC.

  11. An economical non-destructive method for estimating eelgrass, Zostera marina (Potamogetonaceae) leaf growth rates: formal development and use in northwestern Baja California.

    PubMed

    Solana-Arellano, Elena; Echavarria-Heras, Héctor; Franco-Vizcaíno, Ernesto

    2008-09-01

    Seagrass beds provide much of the primary production in estuaries; host many fishes and fish larvae, and abate erosion. The present study presents original analytical methods for estimating mean leaf-growth rates of eelgrass (Zostera marina). The method was calibrated by using data collected in a Z. marina meadow at Punta Banda estuary in Baja California, Mexico. The analytical assessments were based on measurements of leaf length and standard regression procedures. We present a detailed explanation of the formal procedures involved in the derivation of these analytical methods. The measured daily leaf-growth rate was 10.9 mm d(-1) leaf(-1). The corresponding value projected by our method was 10.2 mm d(-1) leaf(-). The associated standard errors were of 0.53 and 0.56 mm d(-1) leaf(-1) respectively. The method was validated by projecting leaf-growth rates from an independent data set, which gave consistent results. The use of the method to obtain the mean leaf growth rate of a transplanted plot is also illustrated. Comparison of our leaf-growth data with previously reported assessments show the significant forcing of sea-surface temperature on eelgrass leaf dynamics. The formal constructs provided here are of general scope and can be applied to equivalent eelgrass data sets in a straightforward manner. PMID:19419023

  12. Nondestructive evaluation of advanced ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, Stanley J.; Kautz, Harold E.

    1988-01-01

    A review is presented of Lewis Research Center efforts to develop nondestructive evaluation techniques for characterizing advanced ceramic materials. Various approaches involved the use of analytical ultrasonics to characterize monolythic ceramic microstructures, acousto-ultrasonics for characterizing ceramic matrix composites, damage monitoring in impact specimens by microfocus X-ray radiography and scanning ultrasonics, and high resolution computed X-ray tomography to identify structural features in fiber reinforced ceramics.

  13. Holographic system for nondestructive testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a holographic system for nondestructive testing. The system is comprised of a mirror which illuminates the test object surface; the mirror is positionable to direct illumination on an object at varying angles with respect to a line normal to the surface of the object. In this manner holograms may be produced with varying degrees of sensitivity enabling optimum observation of dimensions of deformation of an object occurring between test exposures.

  14. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Slot-Die-Coated Lithium Secondary Battery Electrodes by In-Line Laser Caliper and IR Thermography Methods-Journal Cover Page

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Born, Rachael; Maxey, L Curt; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Daniel, Claus; Wood III, David L

    2014-01-01

    Note: This is a cover page for the 'Analytical Methods' journal, which was requested by the journal editor for consideration. The article has already been published and the PTS publication ID is 44000. The acknowledgements are same as mentioned in the PTS publication ID 44000.

  15. Projection Registration Applied to Nondestructive Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, Philip R; Arrowood, Lloyd

    2010-01-01

    Registration of radiographic and computed tomography (CT) data has the potential to allow automated metrology and defect detection. While registration of the three-dimensional reconstructed data is a common task in the medical industry for registration of data sets from multiple detection systems, registration of projection sets has only seen development in the area of tomotherapy. Efforts in projection registration have employed a method named Fourier phase matching (FPM). This work discusses implementation and results for the application of the FPM method to industrial applications for the nondestructive testing (NDT) community. The FPM method has been implemented and modified for industrial application. Testing with simulated and experimental x-ray CT data shows excellent performance with respect to the resolution of the imaging system.

  16. Rapid detection of sewer defects and blockages using acoustic-based instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Ali, M T Bin; Horoshenkov, K V; Tait, S J

    2011-01-01

    Sewer flooding incidents in the UK are being increasingly associated with the presence of blockages. Blockages are difficult to deal with as although there are locations where they are more likely to occur, they do occur intermittently. In order to manage sewer blockage pro-actively sewer managers need to be able to identify the location of blockages promptly. Traditional closed-circuit television (CCTV) inspection technologies are slow and relatively expensive so are not well suited to the rapid inspection of a network. This is needed if managers are to be able to address sewer blockages proactively. This paper reports on the development of an acoustic-based sensor. The sensor was tested in a full scale sewer pipe in the laboratory and it was shown that it is able to find blockages and identify structural aspects of a sewer pipe such as a manhole and lateral connection. Analysis of the received signal will locate a blockage and also provide information on its character. The measurement is very rapid and objective and so inspections can be carried out at much faster rates than using existing CCTV technologies. PMID:22335114

  17. Airborne Ultrasonics for Nondestructive Evaluation of Leather Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our recent research has shown that besides Acoustic Emission (AE), Airborne Ultrasonics (AU) can also be applied for the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of leather quality. Implementation of these methods in the manufacturing process could save a considerable amount of money, decrease the use of ch...

  18. Nondestructive Characterization of Adhesive Bonds from Guided Wave Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mal, A.; Lih, S-S.; Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The critical role played by interface zones in the fracture and failure of composites and other bonded materials is well known. The existing nondestructive evaluation methods are generally not capable of yielding useful quantitative information of the strength of an interface.

  19. An improved sample preparation method for non-destructive analyses of fine-grained subseafloor sediments using micro-focus X-ray CT and SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uramoto, G.; Morono, Y.; Uematsu, K.; Inagaki, F.

    2012-12-01

    Spatial arrangement of particles in fine-grained marine subsurface sediments is a key factor for the physical property of sediments. The pore space provides micro-niches for chemical, physical, and microbiological components in the subsurface geosphere and biosphere. However, the standard techniques conventionally used for the sample preparation have some critical issues to understand accurate nature of fine-scale particle arrangement because of the possible deformation of micro-structures during the sample fixation. Here we tested the resin-embedding method for ocean drilling core samples, which technique has been applied mainly for biological samples. Using micro-focus X-ray CT-computed tomography and SEM we compared the images with the conventional t-butyl alcohol freeze-drying methods. Using the t-butyl alcohol freeze-dried sediment samples, we observed large number of micrometer-scale cracks in both SEM and X-CT image analyses, indicating the significant disturbance of sediment microstructure during sample processing. On the other hand, when we employed mini-coring, agar infiltration, and related biological sample-processing techniques for the resin-embedding method, no observable cracks were evident, most likely due to the rapid resin impregnation into sediments without sample drying. On SEM images of the flattened sample surface, we compared the porosity assessed with the resin-embedded samples to those measured onboard by the moisture and density method, showing a good agreement of the porosity values. In high-porosity surficial sediments embedded with resin, we observed structures that sediment particles are floating in the space, which may represent the results of physico-chemical interaction among sediment particles. However, almost no such particle arrangements were observed in t-butyl alcohol freeze-dried samples, indicating that drying of interstitial fluids may impact on the physico-chemical forces within particulate compounds. Conclusively, our

  20. Two new species of erect Bryozoa (Gymnolaemata: Cheilostomata) and the application of non-destructive imaging methods for quantitative taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Kei; Titschack, Jürgen; Baum, Daniel; Freiwald, André

    2015-01-01

    Two new species of cheilostome Bryozoa are described from continental-slope habitats off Mauritania, including canyon and cold-water coral (mound) habitats. Internal structures of both species were visualised and quantified using microcomputed tomographic (micro-CT) methods. Cellaria bafouri n. sp. is characterised by the arrangement of zooids in alternating longitudinal rows, a smooth cryptocyst, and the presence of an ooecial plate with denticles. Smittina imragueni n. sp. exhibits many similarities with Smittina cervicornis (Pallas, 1766), but differs especially in the shape and orientation of the suboral avicularium. Observations on Smittina imragueni and material labelled as Smittina cervicornis suggest that the latter represents a species group, members of which have not yet been discriminated, possibly because of high intracolony variation and marked astogenetic changes in surface morphology. Both new species are known only from the habitats where they were collected, probably reflecting the paucity of bryozoan sampling from this geographic area and depth range. Both species are able to tolerate low oxygen concentration, which is assumed to be compensated by the high nutrient supply off Mauritania. The application of micro-CT for the semiautomatic quantification of zooidal skeletal characters was successfully tested. We were able to automatically distinguish individual zooidal cavities and acquire corresponding morphological datasets. Comparing the obtained results with conventional SEM measurements allowed ascertaining the reliability of this new method. The employment of micro-CT allows the observation and quantification of previously unseen characters that can be used in describing and differentiating species that were previously indistinguishable. Furthermore, this method might help elucidate processes of colony growth and the function of individual zooids during this process. PMID:26624090

  1. Non-destructive observation of intact bacteria and viruses in water by the highly sensitive frequency transmission electric-field method based on SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • We developed a high-sensitive frequency transmission electric-field (FTE) system. • The output signal was highly enhanced by applying voltage to a metal layer on SiN. • The spatial resolution of new FTE method is 41 nm. • New FTE system enables observation of the intact bacteria and virus in water. - Abstract: The high-resolution structural analysis of biological specimens by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) presents several advantages. Until now, wet bacterial specimens have been examined using atmospheric sample holders. However, images of unstained specimens in water using these holders exhibit very poor contrast and heavy radiation damage. Recently, we developed the frequency transmission electric-field (FTE) method, which facilitates the SEM observation of biological specimens in water without radiation damage. However, the signal detection system presents low sensitivity. Therefore, a high EB current is required to generate clear images, and thus reducing spatial resolution and inducing thermal damage to the samples. Here a high-sensitivity detection system is developed for the FTE method, which enhances the output signal amplitude by hundredfold. The detection signal was highly enhanced when voltage was applied to the metal layer on silicon nitride thin film. This enhancement reduced the EB current and improved the spatial resolution as well as the signal-to-noise ratio. The spatial resolution of a high-sensitive FTE system is 41 nm, which is considerably higher than previous FTE system. New FTE system can easily be utilised to examine various unstained biological specimens in water, such as living bacteria and viruses.

  2. Non-destructive ultrasonic measurements of case depth. [in steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flambard, C.; Lambert, A.

    1978-01-01

    Two ultrasonic methods for nondestructive measurements of the depth of a case-hardened layer in steel are described. One method involves analysis of ultrasonic waves diffused back from the bulk of the workpiece. The other method involves finding the speed of propagation of ultrasonic waves launched on the surface of the work. Procedures followed in the two methods for measuring case depth are described.

  3. Nondestructive characterization of woven fabric ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, D.K.; Saini, V.; Liaw, P.K.; Yu, N.; Miriyala, N.; McHargue, C.J.; Snead, L.L.; Lowden, R.A.

    1995-10-01

    Woven fabric ceramic composites fabricated by the chemical vapor infiltration method are susceptible to high void content and inhomogeneity. The condition of such materials may be characterized nondestructively with ultrasonic methods. In this work, longitudinal and shear waves were used in the quantitative determination of elastic constants of Nicalon{trademark}/SiC composites as a function of volume percent of porosity. Elastic stiffness constants were obtained for both the in-plane and out-of-plane directions with respect to fiber fabric. The effect of porosity on the modulus of woven fabric composites was also modeled and compared to the measured results. Scan images based on the amplitude and time-of-flight of radio frequency (RF) ultrasonic pulses were used for evaluating the material homogeneity for the purpose of optimizing the manufacturing process and for correlation with the mechanical testing results.

  4. Nondestructive verification of continuous-variable entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Faria, Alencar J.

    2016-07-01

    An optical procedure in the context of continuous variables to verify bipartite entanglement without destroying both systems and their entanglement is proposed. To perform the nondestructive verification of entanglement, the method relies on beam-splitter and quantum nondemolition (QND) interactions of the signal modes with two ancillary probe modes. The probe modes are measured by homodyne detections, and the obtained information is used to feed forward modulation of signal modes, concluding the procedure. Characterizing the method by figures of merit used in QND processes, we can establish the conditions for an effectively quantum scheme. Based on such conditions, it is shown that the classical information acquired from the homodyne detections of probe modes is sufficient to verify the entanglement of the output signal modes. The processing impact due to added noise on the output entanglement is assessed in the case of Gaussian modes.

  5. Reconstruction of lake history using nondestructive methods. A first record of organic endmember in sediments using solid phase fluorescence (Lake Noir Inférieur, Aiguilles Rouges Massif, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiers, Marine; Develle, Anne-Lise; Perette, Yves; Sabatier, Pierre; Belle, Simon; Pignol, Cécile; Millet, Laurent; Arnaud, Fabien

    2015-04-01

    Mountain areas are known to be highly sensitive to environmental perturbations driven by climate changes and human activities. Thus, high altitude lake sediments represent interesting archives to reconstruct past environmental variations. Because of their difficult access and their low sedimentation rate, high resolution nondestructive methods are required to limit the loss of information induced by the use of destructive analyses. Moreover, when they are located at the top of drainage basins, their reduced catchment area leads to the dominance of organic matter in the sediment which would make interesting to complete the use of traditional high resolution sedimentary geochemistry tools, such as X-ray fluorescence (XRF) logging, by organic matter-borne high resolution signals. Here we attempt to use UV-induced solid phase fluorescence (SPF) as a promising way to analyze the organic component of environmental archives as we already showed on speleothem records. A 70cm-long core was retrieved in 2012 from the high altitude Lake Noir Inférieur (2495 a.s.l.), located in the Aiguilles Rouges Massif (Northern French Alps). The catchment area, made by gneiss and amphibolites, is almost devoid of vegetation. Thus, the high OM content (up to 23.6%) of the homogenous dark brown sediments is assumed to be essentially related to autochtonous production. The preliminary age model suggests that the core spans the last 8000 yrs. In this work, we investigated the upper 15 cm of the core which represents the last 1300 yrs. We combined the two spectroscopic methods (XRF and SPF) at a 100µm step, in order to provide a high resolution overview of both mineral and organic endmembers. The XRF core scanner analytical settings were adjusted at 10 kV and 30kV in order to detect elements from Al to Pb. SPF measurements were performed with a spectrofluorimeter and emission spectra were recorded at 256 nm and 325 nm excitation wavelengths. Different organic matter types (chlorophyll

  6. Mathematical models applied in inductive non-destructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wac-Wlodarczyk, A.; Goleman, R.; Czerwinski, D.; Gizewski, T.

    Non-destructive testing are the wide group of investigative methods of non-homogenous material. Methods of computer tomography, ultrasonic, magnetic and inductive methods still developed are widely applied in industry. In apparatus used for non-destructive tests, the analysis of signals is made on the basis of complex system answers. The answer is linearized due to the model of research system. In this paper, the authors will discuss the applications of the mathematical models applied in investigations of inductive magnetic materials. The statistical models and other gathered in similarity classes will be taken into consideration. Investigation of mathematical models allows to choose the correct method, which in consequence leads to precise representation of the inner structure of examined object. Inductive research of conductive media, especially those with ferromagnetic properties, are run with high frequency magnetic field (eddy-currents method), which considerably decrease penetration depth.

  7. Educational ultrasound nondestructive testing laboratory.

    PubMed

    Genis, Vladimir; Zagorski, Michael

    2008-09-01

    The ultrasound nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of materials course was developed for applied engineering technology students at Drexel University's Goodwin College of Professional Studies. This three-credit, hands-on laboratory course consists of two parts: the first part with an emphasis on the foundations of NDE, and the second part during which ultrasound NDE techniques are utilized in the evaluation of parts and materials. NDE applications are presented and applied through real-life problems, including calibration and use of the latest ultrasonic testing instrumentation. The students learn engineering and physical principles of measurements of sound velocity in different materials, attenuation coefficients, material thickness, and location and dimensions of discontinuities in various materials, such as holes, cracks, and flaws. The work in the laboratory enhances the fundamentals taught during classroom sessions. This course will ultimately result in improvements in the educational process ["The greater expectations," national panel report, http://www.greaterexpectations.org (last viewed February, 2008); R. M. Felder and R. Brent "The intellectual development of Science and Engineering Students. Part 2: Teaching to promote growth," J. Eng. Educ. 93, 279-291 (2004)] since industry is becoming increasingly reliant on the effective application of NDE technology and the demand on NDE specialists is increasing. NDE curriculum was designed to fulfill levels I and II NDE in theory and training requirements, according to American Society for Nondestructive Testing, OH, Recommended Practice No. SNT-TC-1A (2006). PMID:19045633

  8. Nondestructive evaluation of nuclear-grade graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Kunerth, D. C.; McJunkin, T. R.

    2012-05-17

    The material of choice for the core of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactors being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant Program is graphite. Graphite is a composite material whose properties are highly dependent on the base material and manufacturing methods. In addition to the material variations intrinsic to the manufacturing process, graphite will also undergo changes in material properties resulting from radiation damage and possible oxidation within the reactor. Idaho National Laboratory is presently evaluating the viability of conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques to characterize the material variations inherent to manufacturing and in-service degradation. Approaches of interest include x-ray radiography, eddy currents, and ultrasonics.

  9. Thermographic nondestructive evaluation: overview of recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Galmiche, Francois; Darabi, Akbar; Pilla, Mariacristina; Klein, Matthieu; Ziadi, Adel; Vallerand, Steve; Pelletier, Jean-François; Maldague, Xavier P.

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents a summary of recent research activities carried out at our laboratory in the field of Infrared Thermography for Nondestructive Evaluation (TNDE). First, we explore the latest developments in signal improvement. We describe three approaches: multiple pulse stimulation; the use of Synthetic Data for de-noising of the signal; and a new approach derived from the Fourier diffusion equation called the Differentiated Absolute Contrast method (DAC). Secondly, we examine the advances carried out in inverse solutions. We describe the use of the Wavelet Transform to manage pulsed thermographic data, and we present a summary on Neural Networks for TNDE. Finally, we look at the problem of complex geometry inspection. In this case, due to surface shape, heat variations might be incorrectly identified as flaws. We describe the Shape-from-Heating approach and we propose some potential research avenues to deal with this problem.

  10. Nondestructive detection and measurement of hydrogen embrittlement

    DOEpatents

    Alex, Franklin; Byrne, Joseph Gerald

    1977-01-01

    A nondestructive system and method for the determination of the presence and extent of hydrogen embrittlement in metals, alloys, and other crystalline structures subject thereto. Positron annihilation characteristics of the positron-electron annihilation within the tested material provide unique energy distribution curves for each type of material tested at each respective stage of hydrogen embrittlement. Gamma radiation resulting from such annihilation events is detected and statistically summarized by appropriate instrumentation to reveal the variations of electron activity within the tested material caused by hydrogen embrittlement therein. Such data from controlled tests provides a direct indication of the relative stages of hydrogen embrittlement in the form of unique energy distribution curves which may be utilized as calibration curves for future comparison with field tests to give on-site indication of progressive stages of hydrogen embrittlement.

  11. NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION OF CERAMIC CANDLE FILTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Roger H.L. Chen, Ph.D.; Alejandro Kiriakidis

    1999-09-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques have been used to reduce the potential mechanical failures and to improve the reliability of a structure. Failure of a structure is usually initiated at some type of flaw in the material. NDE techniques have been developed to determine the presence of flaws larger than an acceptable size and to estimate the remaining stiffness of a damaged structure (Chen, et. al, 1995). Ceramic candle filters have been tested for use in coal-fueled gas turbine systems. They protect gas turbine components from damage due to erosion. A total of one hundred and one candle filters were nondestructively evaluated in this study. Ninety-eight ceramic candle filters and three ceramic composite filters have been nondestructively inspected using dynamic characterization technique. These ceramic filters include twelve unused Coors alumina/mullite, twenty-four unused and fifteen used Schumacher-Dia-Schumalith TF-20, twenty-five unused and nine used Refractron 326, eight unused and three used Refractron 442T, one new Schumacher-T 10-20, and one used Schumacher-Dia-Schumalith F-40. All filters were subjected to a small excitation and the dynamic response was picked up by a piezoelectric accelerometer. The evaluation of experimental results was processed using digital signal analysis technique including various forms of data transformation. The modal parameters for damage assessment for the unexposed (unused) vs. exposed (used) specimen were based on two vibration parameters: natural frequencies and mode shapes. Finite Element models were built for each specimen type to understand its dynamic response. Linear elastic modal analysis was performed using eight nodes, three-dimensional isotropic solid elements. Conclusions based on our study indicate that dynamic characterization is a feasible NDE technique in studying structural properties of ceramic candle filters. It has been shown that the degradation of the filters due to long working hours (or

  12. 49 CFR 193.2321 - Nondestructive tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nondestructive tests. 193.2321 Section 193.2321 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2321 Nondestructive tests. (a) The butt welds in metal...

  13. Advances in nondestructive evaluation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Research at NASA Langley's Materials Characterization Instrumentation Section has followed the philosophy of improving the science base of nondestructive evaluation and advancing the state of the art of quantitative interpretability of physical measurements of materials. Details of several R&D programs choosen to highlight the last several years are given. Applications of these technologies are presented in the area of stress measurement, characterization of metal heat treatment, and evaluation of material internal structure. A second focus of the program is on quantitative transducers/measurements that have resulted in better data in irregular inhomogeneous materials such as composites. Examples are presented of new capabilities resulting from these advances that include fatigue and impact damage evaluation.

  14. Nondestructive evaluation of structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, Stanley J.; Baaklini, George Y.; Abel, Phillip B.

    1987-01-01

    A review is presented on research and development of techniques for nondestructive evaluation and characterization of advanced ceramics for heat engine applications. Highlighted in this review are Lewis Research Center efforts in microfocus radiography, scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM), scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM), scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM), and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). The techniques were evaluated by applying them to research samples of green and sintered silicon nitride and silicon carbide in the form of modulus-of-rupture bars containing seeded voids. Probabilities of detection of voids were determined for diameters as small as 20 microns for microfucus radiography, SLAM, and SAM. Strengths and limitations of the techniques for ceramic applications are identified. Application of ultrasonics for characterizing ceramic microstructures is also discussed.

  15. Non-Destructive Testing Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Bio-Imaging Research's technology that originated in an aerospace program has come full circle with a new aerospace adaptation called the Advanced Computed Tomography Inspection System, or ACTIS. The medical version of CT scans the human body for tumors or other abnormalities, the ACTIS system finds imperfections in aerospace structures and components, such as castings, assemblies, rocket motors and nozzles. ACTIS is described by its developer as the most versatile CT scanner available for non-destructive testing applications. ACTIS is a variable geometry system. ACTIS source and detectors can be moved closer together or farther apart to optimize the geometry for different sizes of test objects. The combination of variable geometry, three sources, and focusing detectors makes ACTIS cost effective for a broad range of applications. System can scan anything from very small turbine blades to large rocket assemblies.

  16. Non-Destructive Testing for Control of Radioactive Waste Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumeri, S.; Carrel, F.

    2015-10-01

    Characterization and control of radioactive waste packages are important issues in the management of a radioactive waste repository. Therefore, Andra performs quality control inspection on radwaste package before disposal to ensure the compliance of the radwast characteristics with Andra waste disposal specifications and to check the consistency between Andra measurements results and producer declared properties. Objectives of this quality control are: assessment and improvement of producer radwaste packages quality mastery, guarantee of the radwaste disposal safety, maintain of the public confidence. To control radiological characteristics of radwaste package, non-destructive passive methods (gamma spectrometry and neutrons counting) are commonly used. These passive methods may not be sufficient, for instance to control the mass of fissile material contained inside radwaste package. This is particularly true for large concrete hull of heterogeneous radwaste containing several actinides mixed with fission products like 137Cs. Non-destructive active methods, like measurement of photofission delayed neutrons, allow to quantify the global mass of actinides and is a promising method to quantify mass of fissile material. Andra has performed different non-destructive measurements on concrete intermediate-level short lived nuclear waste (ILW-SL) package to control its nuclear material content. These tests have allowed Andra to have a first evaluation of the performance of photofission delayed neutron measurement and to identify development needed to have a reliable method, especially for fissile material mass control in intermediate-level long lived waste package.

  17. Nondestructive characterization of ductile cast iron by magnetic adaptive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertesy, G.; Uchimoto, T.; Tomáš, I.; Takagi, T.

    2010-10-01

    This paper reports correlation of magnetic descriptors with Brinell hardness and conductivity of ductile cast iron, aiming to develop a novel nondestructive method by magnetic adaptive testing. Four series of cast iron staircase-shaped samples were investigated by this method, where different cooling rates of samples during casting resulted in different structures of each sample. The flat samples were magnetized by an attached yoke, and sensitive descriptors were obtained from a proper evaluation, based on the measurements of series of magnetic minor hysteresis loops, without magnetic saturation of the samples. Results of the nondestructive magnetic tests were compared with destructive mechanical measurements of Brinell hardness and conductivity and good correlation was found between them.

  18. Non-destructive examination system of vitreous body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Takuma; Gong, Jin; Watanabe, Yosuke; Kabir, M. Hasnat; Masato, Makino; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Nishitsuka, Koichi

    2014-04-01

    Eyeball plays a quite important role in acquiring the vision. Vitreous body occupies the largest part of the eyeball and consists of biological, elastic, transparent, gel materials. In the present medical examination, the non-destructive examination method of the vitreous body has not been well established. Here, we focus on an application of dynamic light scattering to this topic. We tried to apply our lab-made apparatus, scanning microscopic light scattering (SMILS), which was specially designed for observing the nanometer-scale network structure in gel materials. In order to examine the vitreous body using SMILS method, a commercial apparatus, nano Partica (Horiba Co. Ltd.) was also customized. We analyzed vitreous body using both the SMILS and the customized nano Partica. We successfully examined the vitreous bodies of healthy pigs in non-destructive way.

  19. Aging management of major LWR components with nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, V.N.; MacDonald, P.E.; Akers, D.W.; Sellers, C.; Murty, K.L.; Miraglia, P.Q.; Mathew, M.D.; Haggag, F.M.

    1997-12-31

    Nondestructive evaluation of material damage can contribute to continued safe, reliable, and economical operation of nuclear power plants through their current and renewed license period. The aging mechanisms active in the major light water reactor components are radiation embrittlement, thermal aging, stress corrosion cracking, flow-accelerated corrosion, and fatigue, which reduce fracture toughness, structural strength, or fatigue resistance of the components and challenge structural integrity of the pressure boundary. This paper reviews four nondestructive evaluation methods with the potential for in situ assessment of damage caused by these mechanisms: stress-strain microprobe for determining mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel and cast stainless materials, magnetic methods for estimating thermal aging damage in cast stainless steel, positron annihilation measurements for estimating early fatigue damage in reactor coolant system piping, and ultrasonic guided wave technique for detecting cracks and wall thinning in tubes and pipes and corrosion damage to embedded portion of metal containments.

  20. Nondestructive evaluation of critical composite material structural elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, John C., Jr.; Lesko, John J.; Weyers, R.

    1996-11-01

    A small span bridge that has suffered corrosive deterioration of a number of the steel structural members is in the process of being rehabilitated with glass and carbon fiber reinforced, pultruded polymer structural beams. As part of a comprehensive research program to develop methods for modeling long term durability of the composite material, nondestructive evaluation if being used to provide a preliminary assessment of the initial condition of the beams as well as to monitor the deterioration of the beams during service.

  1. Non-destructive metallurgical analysis of astrolabes utilizing synchrotron radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Newbury, B.; Stephenson, B.; Almer, J. D.; Notis, M.; Haeffner, D. R.; Slade Cargill, G., III

    2002-05-22

    From the experiments performed it is possible to determine a wide range of information about the metallurgy of the astrolabes studied. It was found that different brass alloys were used for components that were cast and those that were mechanically deformed. Chemical composition, forming history, and thickness measurements are all determined non-destructively, illustrating that this technique could be useful for many applications with metal artifact analysis where non-intrusive methods are required.

  2. Nondestructive evaluation development for process control

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W.A.; Holloway, D.L.; Sivers, E.A. ); Ling, J. . Inst. for Ceramics); Pollinger, J.P.; Yeh, H.C. . Garrett Ceramic Components Div.)

    1991-01-01

    A joint project between Garrett Ceramic Components (GCC) of Allied Signal Aerospace Corporation and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is ongoing to evaluate nondestructive characterization (NDC) methods to detect and measure process-induced variations in ceramic materials. The process methods of current focus on slip-casting and injection molding and the NDC methods being evaluated are microfocus X-ray computed tomography (XCT) and nuclear magnetic resonance computed tomography (MRCT). As part of this work, SiC whisker reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (GCC's GN-10 material) has been pressure slip-cast at two casting pressures, 15 and 40 psi; and at length/diameter ratios of 1.5, 2.5 and 3.0 with whisker contents of 20, 23, 27 and 30 wt %. Three-dimensional microfocus XCT has been used to study density variations in billets produced by different process conditions. Destructive measurement of density variation has been compared to the XCT measurements and correlations established. XCT has been shown to be able to detect <5% variations in as-cast density and these were destructively verified.

  3. Nondestructive evaluation development for process control

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W.A.; Holloway, D.L.; Sivers, E.A.; Ling, J.; Pollinger, J.P.; Yeh, H.C.

    1991-12-31

    A joint project between Garrett Ceramic Components (GCC) of Allied Signal Aerospace Corporation and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is ongoing to evaluate nondestructive characterization (NDC) methods to detect and measure process-induced variations in ceramic materials. The process methods of current focus on slip-casting and injection molding and the NDC methods being evaluated are microfocus X-ray computed tomography (XCT) and nuclear magnetic resonance computed tomography (MRCT). As part of this work, SiC whisker reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (GCC`s GN-10 material) has been pressure slip-cast at two casting pressures, 15 and 40 psi; and at length/diameter ratios of 1.5, 2.5 and 3.0 with whisker contents of 20, 23, 27 and 30 wt %. Three-dimensional microfocus XCT has been used to study density variations in billets produced by different process conditions. Destructive measurement of density variation has been compared to the XCT measurements and correlations established. XCT has been shown to be able to detect <5% variations in as-cast density and these were destructively verified.

  4. Nondestructive characterization of structural ceramic components

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W.A.; Steckenrider, J.S.; Sivers, E.A.; Ling, J.R.

    1994-06-01

    Advanced structural ceramic components under development for heat-engine applications include both monolithic and continuous fiber composites (CFC). Nondestructive characterization (NDC) methods being developed differ for each material system. For monolithic materials, characterization during processing steps is important. For many CFC, only post process characterization is possible. Many different NDC systems have been designed and built A 3D x-ray micro computed tomographic (3DXCT) imaging system has been shown to be able to map density variations to better than 3% in pressure slip cast Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} monolithic materials. In addition, 3DXCT coupled to image processing has been shown to be able to map through-thickness fiber orientations in 2D lay-ups of 0{degrees}/45{degrees}, 0{degrees}/75{degrees}, 0{degrees}/90{degrees}, in SiC/SiC CVI CFC. Fourier optics based laser scatter systems have been shown to be able to detect surface and subsurface defects (as well as microstructural variations) in monolithic Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} bearing balls. Infrared methods using photothermal excitation have been shown to be able to detect and measure thermal diffusivity differences on SiC/SiC 2D laminated CFC which have been subjected to different thermal treatments including thermal shock and oxidizing environments. These NDC methods and their applications help provide information to allow reliable usage of ceramics in advanced heat engine applications.

  5. Nondestructive electromagnetic characterization of uniaxial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Neil G.

    In this dissertation, a method for the simultaneous non-destructive extraction of the permittivity and permeability of a dielectric magnetic uniaxial anisotropic media is developed and several key contributions are demonstrated. The method utilizes a single fixture in which the MUT is clamped between two rectangular waveguides with 6" x 6" PEC flanges. The transmission and reflection coefficients are measured, then compared with theoretically calculated coefficients to find a least squares solution to the minimization problem. One of the key contributions of this work is the development of the total parallel plate spectral-domain Green's function by two independent methods. The Green's function is thereby shown to be correct in form and in physical meaning. A second significant contribution of this work to the scientific community is the evaluation of one of the inverse Fourier transform integrals in the complex plane. This significantly enhances the efficiency of the extraction code. A third significant contribution is the measurement of a number of uniaxial anisotropic materials, many of which were envisioned, designed and constructed in-house using 3D printing technology. The results are shown to be good in the transverse dimension, but mildly unstable in the longitudinal dimension. A secondary contribution of this work that warrants mention is the inclusion of a flexible, complete, working code for the extraction process. Although such codes have been written before, they have not been published in the literature for broader use.

  6. Instruction manuals for radiographic nondestructive testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Six new handbooks on the fundamentals of nondestructive test techniques supply recent information for instructing inspectors and technicians, and can be used effectively in shops or laboratories, technical schools, or home study programs.

  7. NONDESTRUCTIVE MULTIELEMENT INSTRUMENTAL NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A nondestructive instrumental neutron activation analysis procedure permitted accurate and sensitive measurement of most elements with atomic numbers between 11 and 92. The sensitivity of the procedure was dependent on each element's intrinsic characteristics and the sample matri...

  8. Nondestructive Characterization of As-Fabricated Composite Ceramic Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, W. H.; Brennan, R. E.

    2011-06-01

    Decreasing the weight of protective systems, while minimizing the decrease in ballistic performance, is an ongoing goal of the Army. Ceramic materials are currently combined with other materials in these types of structures in order to decrease weight without losing ballistic performance. This includes structures in which the ceramic material is confined in some way and in which the ceramic material is completely encapsulated. Confinement or encapsulation of ceramic material within a structure generally adds complexity and cost. Relatively simple panel specimens fabricated with ceramic tiles on aluminum backings and side confinement using steel were evaluated using nondestructive methods, including x-ray computed tomography and ultrasonic testing. The nondestructive evaluation results will be discussed and compared, including the detectability and mapping of fabrication features.

  9. Nondestructive characterization of as-fabricated composite ceramic panels

    SciTech Connect

    Green, W. H.; Brennan, R. E.

    2011-06-23

    Decreasing the weight of protective systems, while minimizing the decrease in ballistic performance, is an ongoing goal of the Army. Ceramic materials are currently combined with other materials in these types of structures in order to decrease weight without losing ballistic performance. This includes structures in which the ceramic material is confined in some way and in which the ceramic material is completely encapsulated. Confinement or encapsulation of ceramic material within a structure generally adds complexity and cost. Relatively simple panel specimens fabricated with ceramic tiles on aluminum backings and side confinement using steel were evaluated using nondestructive methods, including x-ray computed tomography and ultrasonic testing. The nondestructive evaluation results will be discussed and compared, including the detectability and mapping of fabrication features.

  10. The use of infrared thermography for nondestructive evaluation of joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meola, Carosena; Carlomagno, Giovanni M.; Squillace, Antonino; Giorleo, Giuseppe

    2004-12-01

    A junction between two similar, or dissimilar, materials represents generally a weak structural point and so it requires accurate choice of the most adequate joining technique and nondestructive evaluation of joined parts whatever the joining technique. The attention of the present paper is focused on the aid provided by infrared thermography for nondestructive evaluation of three types of joints: aluminum adhesively bonded joints, stainless steel laser welded joints and Glare ® mechanical fastened joints. Both techniques, pulse and modulated thermography with optical stimulation, are used. The attention is particularly focused on the second method because phase images are practically not affected by local nonuniform heating and/or local variation of the emissivity coefficient as thermal images.

  11. Noninvasive, Nondestructive Approaches to Cell Bioenergetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, B.; Eleff, S.; Leigh, J. S.

    1980-12-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of using NMR spectra of human limbs and larger animals for continuous, noninvasive, nondestructive evaluation of cell bioenergetics, we have constructed a relatively simple and inexpensive 31P NMR apparatus. This apparatus consists of an 18-cm (7-in.) bore superconducting magnet and appropriate transmit-receive components for Fourier transform NMR. The principal signals observed by this instrument in the tissues are due to phosphocreatine and inorganic phosphate. The apparatus can be used to detect tissue normoxia and hypoxia. The large phosphocreatine/phosphate ratio (>10:1), and the low phosphate signal from normoxic tissue (≈ 10% of the phosphocreatine signal from brain and human skeletal tissue) make an increased phosphate peak a very sensitive indicator of tissue hypoxia. Direct experiments on the human forearm and leg and the brains of dog and rabbit suggest the applicability of 31P NMR to humans and animals. This method and optical methods can both be used for quantitative determination of oxygen delivery to tissue, function of mitochondria, and the coupling of bioenergetic processes to functional activity in skeletal tissue and brain.

  12. Operation of the EPRI Nondestructive Evaluation Center

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, R.M.; Ammirato, F.V.; Becker, F.L.; Bremser, K.; Krzywosz, K.J.; MacDonald, D.E.; Nottingham, L.D.; Selby, G.P.; Shankar, R.; Stephens, H.M. Applied Research Co., Charlotte, NC )

    1989-11-01

    This report describes the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) funded nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and life assessment project activities carried out at the EPRI NDE Center in 1988. The primary support for this program is provided through contract RP 1570-2 with the EPRI Nuclear Division. Supplementary funding is provided by other contracts with the EPRI Nuclear, Coal Combustion, and Electrical Systems Divisions. The major objective of this program is to provide improved and field-qualified NDE equipment, procedures, and personnel training to the electric utility industry. A second program objective involves the validation, provision, and maintenance of life assessment codes for selected plant components. Significant assistance has been provided to the utility industry under this project in the form of improved, field-ready equipment and procedures; critically needed assessments of inspection method capability; demonstrations of effectiveness of examination methods; rapid response for critical, short-term problems; assistance with selected life assessment computer codes; and training for specific utility industry needs. These efforts have specifically involved heat exchanger, piping, steam turbine, generator, and heavy section problems. Certain components of both nuclear and fossil plants have been addressed. 56 refs., 48 figs., 13 tabs.

  13. Operation of the EPRI Nondestructive Evaluation Center

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, R.M.; Ammirato, F.V.; Becker, F.L.; Jeong, Y.H.; Krzywosz, K.J.; MacDonald, D.E.; Nottingham, L.D.; Selby, G.P.; Shankar, R.; Stephens, H.M.; Stramm, J.N.; Walker, S.M.; Willetts, A.J. Applied Research Co., Charlotte, NC )

    1990-09-01

    This report describes the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) funded nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and life assessment project activities carried out at the EPRI NDE Center in 1989. The primary support for this program is provided through contract RP 1570-2 with the EPRI Nuclear Division. Supplementary funding is provided by other contracts with the EPRI Nuclear and Generation and Storage Divisions. The major objective of this program is to provide improved and field-qualified NDE equipment, procedures, and personnel training to the electric utility industry. A second program objective involves the validation, provision, and maintenance of life assessment codes for selected plant components. Significant assistance has been provided to the utility industry under this project in the form of improved, field-theory equipment and procedures; critically needed assessments of inspection method capability; demonstrations of effectiveness of examination methods; rapid response for critical, short-term problems; assistance with selected life assessment computer codes; and training for specific utility industry needs. These efforts have specifically involved heat exchanger, piping, steam turbine, generator, and heavy section problems. Certain components of both nuclear and fossil plants have been addressed.

  14. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Characterization of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qu, Jianmin

    1999-01-01

    Adhesives and adhesive joints are widely used in various industrial applications to reduce weight and costs, and to increase reliability. For example, advances in aerospace technology have been made possible, in part, through the use of lightweight materials and weight-saving structural designs. Joints, in particular, have been and continue to be areas in which weight can be trimmed from an airframe through the use of novel attachment techniques. In order to save weight over traditional riveted designs, to avoid the introduction of stress concentrations associated with rivet holes, and to take full advantage of advanced composite materials, engineers and designers have been specifying an ever-increasing number of adhesively bonded joints for use on airframes. Nondestructive characterization for quality control and remaining life prediction has been a key enabling technology for the effective use of adhesive joints. Conventional linear ultrasonic techniques generally can only detect flaws (delamination, cracks, voids, etc) in the joint assembly. However, more important to structural reliability is the bond strength. Although strength, in principle, cannot be measured nondestructively, a slight change in material nonlinearity may indicate the onset of failure. Furthermore, microstructural variations due to aging or under-curing may also cause changes in the third order elastic constants, which are related to the ultrasonic nonlinear parameter of the polymer adhesive. It is therefore reasonable to anticipate a correlation between changes in the ultrasonic nonlinear acoustic parameter and the remaining bond strength. It has been observed that higher harmonics of the fundamental frequency are generated when an ultrasonic wave passes through a nonlinear material. It seems that such nonlinearity can be effectively used to characterize bond strength. Several theories have been developed to model this nonlinear effect. Based on a microscopic description of the nonlinear

  15. Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactive Powder Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washer, Glenn; Fuchs, Paul; Graybeal, Benjamin; Rezaizadeh, Ali

    2004-02-01

    Reactive powder concrete (RPC) has been introduced as a structural material for civil engineering applications. The material consists of a finely graded combination of cement, sand, ground quartz and silica fume which combined with water form a cement paste. Small steel fibers measuring approximately 0.2 mm in diameter and 12 mm in length are distributed throughout the cement matrix and the combined material has very high compressive strength and toughness. The material is proposed for use in the primary load bearing members in bridges, and as such nondestructive evaluation technologies are needed to evaluate material quality and monitor in-service condition. This paper reports on research to determine the effectiveness of ultrasonic testing for determining the elastic properties of RPC. Comparison between static modulus of elasticity and ultrasonic modulus measurements is presented. A system for determining elastic moduli as a quality control tool is discussed. The effect of curing conditions on ultrasonic velocities and resulting calculated moduli values is presented and compared with traditional measurement methods.

  16. Nondestructive inspection of a composite missile launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, O.; Chung, S.; Butera, M.; Valatka, T.; Triplett, M. H.; Godinez, V.

    2012-05-01

    Lighter weight alternatives are being sought to replace metallic components currently used in high performance aviation and missile systems. Benefits of lightweight, high strength carbon fiber reinforced composites in missile launchers and rocket motor cases include improved fuel economy, increased flight times, enhanced lethality and/or increased velocity. In this work, various nondestructive inspection techniques are investigated for the damage assessment of a composite missile launcher system for use in U.S. Army attack helicopters. The launcher system, which includes rails and a hardback, can be subject to impact damage from accidental tool drops, routine operation, and/or ballistic threats. The composite hardback and the launch rails both have complex geometries that can challenge the inspection process. Scanning techniques such as line scanning thermography, ultrasonic, and acousto-ultrasonics will be used and compared to determine damage detection accuracy, reliability, and efficiency. Results will also be compared with visual observations to determine if there is a correlation. The goal is to establish an inspection method that quickly and accurately assesses damage extent in order to minimize service time and return the missile system back into the field [1].

  17. Evaluation of Nondestructive Assay/Nondestructive Examination Capabilities for Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Luptak, A.J.; Bulmahn, K.D.

    1998-09-01

    This report summarizes an evaluation of the potential use of nondestructive assay (NDA) and nondestructive examination (NDE) technologies on DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF). It presents the NDA/NDE information necessary for the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) and the SNF storage sites to use when defining that role, if any, of NDA/NDE in characterization and certification processes. Note that the potential role for NDA/NDE includes confirmatory testing on a sampling basis and is not restricted to use as a primary, item-specific, data collection method. The evaluation does not attempt to serve as a basis for selecting systems for development or deployment. Information was collected on 27 systems being developed at eight DOE locations. The systems considered are developed to some degree, but are not ready for deployment on the full range of DOE SNF and still require additional development. The system development may only involve demonstrating performance on additional SNF, packaging the system for deployment, and developing calibration standards, or it may be as extensive as performing additional basic research. Development time is considered to range from one to four years. We conclude that NDA/NDE systems are capable of playing a key role in the characterization and certification of DOE SNF, either as the primary data source or as a confirmatory test. NDA/NDE systems will be able to measure seven of the nine key SNF properties and to derive data for the two key properties not measured directly. The anticipated performance goals of these key properties are considered achievable except for enrichment measurements on fuels near 20% enrichment. NDA/NDE systems can likely be developed to measure the standard canisters now being considered for co-disposal of DOE SNF. This ability would allow the preparation of DOE SNF for storage now and the characterization and certification to be finalize later.

  18. Efficient Nondestructive Evaluation of Prototype Carbon Fiber Reinforced Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary; Thom, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thermography inspection is an optic based technology that can reduce the time and cost required to inspect propellant tanks or aero structures fabricated from composite materials. Usually areas identified as suspect in the thermography inspection are examined with ultrasonic methods to better define depth, orientation and the nature of the anomaly. This combination of nondestructive evaluation techniques results in a rapid and comprehensive inspection of composite structures. Examples of application of this inspection philosophy to prototype will be presented. Methods organizing the inspection and evaluating the results will be considered.

  19. Non-Destructive Testing A Developing Tool in Science and Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lianshan

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive testing (NDT), sometimes also known as non-destructive inspection (NDI) or non-destructive examination (NDE), has been applied to solve a wide range of science and industry problems including construction, aerospace, nuclear engineering, manufacturing, space exploration, art objects, forensic studies, biological and medical fields, etc. Without any permanent changing or alteration of testing objects, NDT methods provide great advantages such as increased testing reliability, efficiency, and safety, as well as reduced time and cost. Since the second half of the 20th century, NDT technology has seen significant growth. Depending on the physical properties being measured, NDT techniques can be classified into several branches. This article will provide a brief overview of commonly used NDT methods and their up-to-date progresses including optical examination, radiography, acoustic emission, ultrasonic testing and eddy current testing. For extended reviews on many presently used NDT methods, please refer to articles by Mullins [1, 2].

  20. Guided wave nuances for ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rose, J L

    2000-01-01

    Recent developments in guided wave generation, reception, and mode control show that increased penetration power and sensitivity are possible. A tone burst function generator and appropriate signal processing are generally used. Variable angle beam and comb-type transducers are the key to this effort. Problems in tubing, piping, hidden corrosion detection in aging aircraft, adhesive and diffusion bonding, and ice detection are discussed. Additionally, sample configurations, inspection objectives, and logic are being developed for such sample problems as defect detection and analysis in lap splice joints, tear straps, cracks in a second layer, hidden corrosion in multiple layers, cracks from rivet holes, transverse cracking in a beam, and cracks in landing gear assembly. Theoretical and experimental aspects of guided wave analysis include phase velocity, group velocity, and attenuation dispersion curves; boundary element model analysis for reflection and transmission factor analysis; use of wave structure for defect detection sensitivity; source influence on the phase velocity spectrum, and the use of angle beam and comb transducer technology. Probe design and modeling considerations are being explored. Utilization of in-plane and out-of-plane displacement patterns on the surface and longitudinal power distribution across the structural cross-section are considered for improved sensitivity, penetration power, and resolution in nondestructive evaluation. Methods of controlling the phase velocity spectrum for mode and frequency selection are available. Such features as group velocity change, mode cut-off measurements, mode conversion, amplitude ratios of transmission, and reflection factors of specific mode and frequency as input will be introduced for their ability to be used in flaw and material characterization analysis. PMID:18238584

  1. Non-destructive decontamination of building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holecek, Josef; Otahal, Petr

    2015-11-01

    For nondestructive radiation decontamination of surfaces it is necessary to use varnishes, such as ARGONNE, DG1101, DG1108, etc. This text evaluates the use of manufactured strippable coatings for radiation decontamination. To evaluate decontamination capability of such coatings the following varnishes were selected and subsequently used: AZ 1-700 and AXAL 1807S. The varnishes were tested on different building materials surfaces contaminated by short-term radioisotopes of Na-24 or La-140, in water soluble or water insoluble forms. Decontamination quality was assessed by the decontamination efficiency value, defined as the proportion of removed activity to the applied activity. It was found that decontamination efficiency of both used varnishes depends not only on the form of contaminant, but in the case of application of AXAL 1807S varnish it also depends on the method of its application on the contaminated surface. The values of the decontamination efficiency for AZ1-700 varnish range from 46% for decontamination of a soluble form of the radioisotope from concrete surface to 98% for the decontamination of a soluble form of the radioisotope from ceramic tile surface. The decontamination efficiency values determined for AXAL 1807S varnish range from 48% for decontamination of a soluble form of the radioisotope from concrete surface to 96% for decontamination of an insoluble form of the radioisotope from ceramic tile surface. Comparing these values to the values given for the decontaminating varnishes we can conclude that AXAL 1807S varnish is possible to use on all materials, except highly porous materials, such as plasterboard or breeze blocks, or plastic materials. AZ 1-700 varnish can be used for all dry materials except plasterboard.

  2. Nondestructive assay of boxed radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles, W.P.; Roberts, R.J.; Jasen, W.G.

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes the problems related to the nondestructive assay (NDA) of boxed radioactive waste at the Hanford Site and how Westinghouse Hanford company (WHC) is solving the problems. The waste form and radionuclide content are described. The characteristics of the combined neutron and gamma-based measurement system are described.

  3. 49 CFR 192.243 - Nondestructive testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.243 Nondestructive... welder whose work is isolated from the principal welding activity, a sample of each welder's work...

  4. 49 CFR 192.243 - Nondestructive testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.243 Nondestructive... welder whose work is isolated from the principal welding activity, a sample of each welder's work...

  5. 49 CFR 192.243 - Nondestructive testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.243 Nondestructive... welder whose work is isolated from the principal welding activity, a sample of each welder's work...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2321 - Nondestructive tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nondestructive tests. 193.2321 Section 193.2321 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2321 - Nondestructive tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nondestructive tests. 193.2321 Section 193.2321 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY...

  8. 49 CFR 193.2321 - Nondestructive tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2321 Nondestructive tests. (a) The butt welds in metal shells... with internal design pressures at 15 psig or less, ultrasonic examinations of welds on metal containers... ultrasonic equipment is found to be out of calibration, all previous weld inspections that are suspect...

  9. 49 CFR 193.2321 - Nondestructive tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2321 Nondestructive tests. (a) The butt welds in metal shells... with internal design pressures at 15 psig or less, ultrasonic examinations of welds on metal containers... ultrasonic equipment is found to be out of calibration, all previous weld inspections that are suspect...

  10. 49 CFR 192.243 - Nondestructive testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nondestructive testing. 192.243 Section 192.243 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE:...

  11. 49 CFR 192.243 - Nondestructive testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nondestructive testing. 192.243 Section 192.243 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE:...

  12. 49 CFR 195.234 - Welds: Nondestructive testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... nondestructively tested by any process that will clearly indicate any defects that may affect the integrity of the... welding day must be nondestructively tested over the entire circumference of the weld. (e) All girth welds installed each day in the following locations must be nondestructively tested over their...

  13. Nondestructive testing of surface-bonded piezoelectric patch actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerr, Johannes K.; Krohn, Nils; Nixdorf, Klaus; Luetze, Steffen; Herold-Schmidt, Ursula; Busse, Gerhard

    1999-07-01

    Introduction of new technologies to aerospace applications necessarily requires methods of non-destructive testing suitable to evaluate structural integrity. This important task also occurred when it was decided to develop and manufacture a large Fin-Box-Demonstrator equivalent to a fighter aircraft tail equipped with surface bonded piezoceramic actuators between DaimlerChrysler Aerospace - Military Aircraft Division and DaimlerChrysler Research and Technology. The objective of this project is to prove that structural vibrations of a fighter aircraft tail fin due to buffeting can be damped actively by means of surface bonded piezoceramic actuators.

  14. Nondestructive Technique Survey for Assessing Integrity of Composite Firing Vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, A.

    2000-08-01

    The repeated use and limited lifetime of a composite tiring vessel compel a need to survey techniques for monitoring the structural integrity of the vessel in order to determine when it should be retired. Various nondestructive techniques were researched and evaluated based on their applicability to the vessel. The methods were visual inspection, liquid penetrant testing, magnetic particle testing, surface mounted strain gauges, thermal inspection, acoustic emission, ultrasonic testing, radiography, eddy current testing, and embedded fiber optic sensors. It was determined that embedded fiber optic sensor is the most promising technique due to their ability to be embedded within layers of composites and their immunity to electromagnetic interference.

  15. NON-DESTRUCTIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYZER.

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, Lucian; Hendrey, G.; Orion, I.; Prior, S.; Rogers, H.; Runion, B.; Torbert, A.

    2004-02-01

    This report describes the feasibility, calibration, and safety considerations of a non-destructive, in situ, quantitative, volumetric soil carbon analytical method based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The method can quantify values as low as 0.018 gC/cc, or about 1.2% carbon by weight with high precision under the instrument's configuration and operating conditions reported here. INS is safe and easy to use, residual soil activation declines to background values in under an hour, and no radiological requirements are needed for transporting the instrument. The labor required to obtain soil-carbon data is about 10-fold less than with other methods, and the instrument offers a nearly instantaneous rate of output of carbon-content values. Furthermore, it has the potential to quantify other elements, particularly nitrogen. New instrumentation was developed in response to a research solicitation from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE LAB 00-09 Carbon Sequestration Research Program) supporting the Terrestrial Carbon Processes (TCP) program of the Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The solicitation called for developing and demonstrating novel techniques for quantitatively measuring changes in soil carbon. The report includes raw data and analyses of a set of proof-of-concept, double-blind studies to evaluate the INS approach in the first phase of developing the instrument. Managing soils so that they sequester massive amounts of carbon was suggested as a means to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Quantifying changes in the soils' carbon stocks will be essential to evaluating such schemes and documenting their performance. Current methods for quantifying carbon in soil by excavation and core sampling are invasive, slow, labor-intensive and locally destroy the system being observed. Newly emerging technologies, such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, offer soil

  16. Infrared thermal wave non-destructive detection for the internal structure of metal Buddha head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, He-Nan; Zhang, Zhen-Wei; Lei, Yong; Qu, Liang; Gao, Fei; Feng, Li-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This paper depicts a testing technology of nondestructive infrared imaging for acquiring internal structure information of metal Buddha head. Methods applying active infrared thermal imaging nondestructive testing technology Results Data which was collected by IR camera was processed, the typical time thermograph and the curve of logarithmic temperature-time can be. get information of relative thickness in metal Buddha face. Conclusion Infrared thermal imaging technology can be detect the inside information of metal Buddha head . It is feasible to conserve heritage in infrared imaging method.

  17. Nuclear Technology. Course 26: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I. Module 26-2, Leak Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groseclose, Richard

    This second in a series of seven modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I describes the predominantly used leak test methods in nuclear power plants. More specifically, the module describes these test methods, the testing techniques, and the associated quality assurance requirements. The module follows a typical…

  18. A review of issues and strategies in nondestructive evaluation of fiber reinforced structural composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1979-01-01

    Techniques for quantitative assessment of the mechanical strength and integrity of fiber composites during manufacture and service and following repair operations are presented. Problems and approaches are discussed relative to acceptance criteria, calibrating standards, and methods for nondestructive evaluation of composites in strength-critical applications. Acousto-ultrasonic techniques provide the methods of choice in this area.

  19. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Characterization of Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ningli

    2011-12-01

    Wave propagation in porous media is studied in a wide range of technological applications. In the manufacturing industry, determining porosity of materials in the manufacturing process is required for strict quality control. In the oil industry, acoustic signals and seismic surveys are used broadly to determine the physical properties of the reservoir rock which is a porous media filled with oil or gas. In porous noise control materials, a precise prediction of sound absorption with frequency and evaluation of tortuosity are necessary. Ultrasonic nondestructive methods are a very important tool for characterization of porous materials. The dissertation deals with two types of porous media: materials with relatively low and closed porosity and materials with comparatively high and open porosity. Numerical modeling, Finite Element simulations and experimental characterization are all discussed in this dissertation. First, ultrasonic scattering is used to determine the porosity in porous media with closed pores. In order get a relationship between the porosity in porous materials and ultrasonic scattering independently and to increase the sensitivity to obtain scattering information, ultrasonic imaging methods are applied and acoustic waves are focused by an acoustic lens. To verify the technique, engineered porous acrylic plates with varying porosity are measured by ultrasonic scanning and ultrasonic array sensors. Secondly, a laser based ultrasonic technique is explored for predicting the mechanical integrity and durability of cementitious materials. The technique used involves the measurement of the phase velocity of fast and slow longitudinal waves in water saturated cement paste. The slow wave velocity is related to the specimen's tortuosity. The fast wave speed is dependent on the elastic properties of porous solid. Experimental results detailing the generation and detection of fast and slow wave waves in freshly prepared and aged water-saturated cement samples

  20. Nondestructive Assessment of Engineered Cartilage Composition by Near Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    McGoverin, Cushla M; Hanifi, Arash; Palukuru, Uday P; Yousefi, Farzad; Glenn, Padraig B M; Shockley, Michael; Spencer, Richard G; Pleshko, Nancy

    2016-03-01

    Tissue engineering presents a strategy to overcome the limitations of current tissue healing methods. Scaffolds, cells, external growth factors and mechanical input are combined in an effort to obtain constructs with properties that mimic native tissues. However, engineered constructs developed using similar culture environments can have very different matrix composition and biomechanical properties. Accordingly, a nondestructive technique to assess constructs during development such that appropriate compositional endpoints can be defined is desirable. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) analysis is a modality being investigated to address the challenges associated with current evaluation techniques, which includes nondestructive compositional assessment. In the present study, cartilage tissue constructs were grown using chondrocytes seeded onto polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds in similar environments in three separate tissue culture experiments and monitored using NIRS. Multivariate partial least squares (PLS) analysis models of NIR spectra were calculated and used to predict tissue composition, with biochemical assay information used as the reference data. Results showed that for combined data from all tissue culture experiments, PLS models were able to assess composition with significant correlations to reference values, including engineered cartilage water (at 5200 cm(-1), R = 0.68, p = 0.03), proteoglycan (at 4310 cm(-1), R = 0.82, p = 0.007), and collagen (at 4610 cm(-1), R = 0.84, p = 0.005). In addition, degradation of PGA was monitored using specific NIRS frequencies. These results demonstrate that NIR spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis provides a nondestructive modality to assess engineered cartilage, which could provide information to determine the optimal time for tissue harvest for clinical applications. PMID:26817457

  1. Microwave Nondestructive Evaluation of Dielectric Materials with a Metamaterial Lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shreiber, Daniel; Gupta, Mool; Cravey, Robin L.

    2008-01-01

    A novel microwave Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) sensor was developed in an attempt to increase the sensitivity of the microwave NDE method for detection of defects small relative to a wavelength. The sensor was designed on the basis of a negative index material (NIM) lens. Characterization of the lens was performed to determine its resonant frequency, index of refraction, focus spot size, and optimal focusing length (for proper sample location). A sub-wavelength spot size (3 dB) of 0.48 lambda was obtained. The proof of concept for the sensor was achieved when a fiberglass sample with a 3 mm diameter through hole (perpendicular to the propagation direction of the wave) was tested. The hole was successfully detected with an 8.2 cm wavelength electromagnetic wave. This method is able to detect a defect that is 0.037 lambda. This method has certain advantages over other far field and near field microwave NDE methods currently in use.

  2. Nondestructive examination of the TRMM RCS propellant tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Free, James M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper assesses the feasibility of using eddy current nondestructive examination of determine flaw sizes in completely assembled hydrazine propellant tanks. The study was performed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) project to help determine whether existing propellant tanks could meet the fracture analysis requirements of the current pressure vessel specification, MIL-STD-1522A and, therefore be used on the TRMM spacecraft. After evaluating several nondestructive test methods, eddy current testing was selected as the most promising method for determining flaw sizes on external and internal surfaces of completely assembled tanks. Tests were conducted to confirm the detection capability of the eddy current NDE, procedures were developed to inspect two candidate tanks, and the test support equipment was designed. The non-spherical tank eddy current NDE test program was terminated when the decision was made to procure new tanks for the TRMM propulsion subsystem. The information on the development phase of this test program is presented in this paper as a reference for future investigation on the subject.

  3. Nondestructive Degradation Evaluation of Ceramic Candle Filters Using Vibration Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, R.H.L.; Parthasarathy, B.

    1996-12-31

    The structural integrity of ceramic candle filters is a key element for hot gas cleanup systems, They protect the heat exchanger and gas turbine components from getting clogged and also prevent erosion. Ceramic candle filters used in the recent demonstration plant have experienced degradation and fracturing. Preliminary examination of these ceramic filters indicated that damage of the filters may have resulted from strength degradation at consistent high temperature operation, thermal transient events, excessive ash accumulation and bridging and pulse cleaning. The ceramic candle filter is a slender structure made of layers of porous materials. The structure has high acoustic attenuation which has greatly limited the conventional ultrasonic detection capability. In general, stiffness reduction of a structure will cause the change of the modal parameters of the structure. This study proposes a nondestructive approach for evaluating the structural properties of the ceramic filters using dynamic characterization method. The vibration signatures of the ceramic filters at different degradation levels are established using transient impact-response technique. Results from this study indicate that the vibration signatures of the filters can be used as an index to quantify the darnage condition of the filters. The results also indicate the feasibility of using the vibration mode shapes to predict the damage location. The application of this study can be implemented to develop a nondestructive evaluation method for future in-situ inspection of the ceramic filters.

  4. Nondestructive examination of the TRMM RCS propellant tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Free, James M.

    1993-11-01

    This paper assesses the feasibility of using eddy current nondestructive examination of determine flaw sizes in completely assembled hydrazine propellant tanks. The study was performed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) project to help determine whether existing propellant tanks could meet the fracture analysis requirements of the current pressure vessel specification, MIL-STD-1522A and, therefore be used on the TRMM spacecraft. After evaluating several nondestructive test methods, eddy current testing was selected as the most promising method for determining flaw sizes on external and internal surfaces of completely assembled tanks. Tests were conducted to confirm the detection capability of the eddy current NDE, procedures were developed to inspect two candidate tanks, and the test support equipment was designed. The non-spherical tank eddy current NDE test program was terminated when the decision was made to procure new tanks for the TRMM propulsion subsystem. The information on the development phase of this test program is presented in this paper as a reference for future investigation on the subject.

  5. Electro-thermography technique for nondestructive testing (NDT) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. S.; Hung, Y. Y.; Liu, L.

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, Electro-Thermography is introduced in nondestructive testing applications. Electro-Thermography is one of the novel active thermography techniques for nondestructive testing. It gains the advantages from the optical and electromagnetic properties in full-field, non-contact, high inspection speed, and sensitivity in geometry variation. It is mostly applicable to all kind of ferrous-metal, some composites materials. A fundamental difference among electro-thermography and other active thermography techniques are the excitation mechanism. Electro-Thermography is a combination of the electromagnetic induction and surface thermal radiation measuring technique; it used the induction method to excite the object, and then it used the radiation properties to measure the distribution of surface temperature of the object. It detects flaws by the flaw's anomalous heating and heat transfer response. The method of excitation is also different from others irradiation excitation. Electro-Thermography needs an electromagnetic coil to generate eddy current through induction to change the surface and subsurface temperature. Electro-Thermography can detect surface and sub-surface flaws, unless the flaw is too remote and tiny from the surface. Some experiments in flaw detections and other types of inspections are demonstrated.

  6. Nondestructive ultrasonic characterization of two-phase materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, K.

    1987-01-01

    The development of ultrasonic methods for the nondestructive characterization of mechanical properties of two phase engineering materials are described. The primary goal was to establish relationships between the nonlinearity parameter and the percentage of solid solution phase in two phase systems such as heat treatable aluminum alloys. The acoustoelastic constant was also measured on these alloys. A major advantage of the nonlinearity parameter over that of the acoustoelastic constant is that it may be determined without the application of stress on the material, which makes the method more applicable to inservice nondestructive characterization. The results obtained on the heat treatable 7075 and the work hardenable 5086 and 5456 aluminum alloys show that both the acoustoelastic constant and the acoustic nonlinearity parameter change considerable with the volume fraction of second phase precipitates in these aluminum alloys. A mathematical model was also developed to relate the effective acoustic nonlinearity parameter to volume fraction of second phase precipitates in an alloy. The equation is approximated to within experimental error by a linear expression for volume fractions up to approx. 10%.

  7. Nondestructive evaluation by acousto-ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1988-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonics is an ultrasonic technique that was originally devised to cope with the particular problems associated with nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of fiber/polymer composite structures. The fiber/polymer composites are more attenuating to ultrasound than any other material presently of interest. This limits the applicability of high-frequency ultrasonics. A common use of ultrasound is the imaging of flaws internal to a structure by scattering from the interface with the flaw. However, structural features of composites can scatter ultrasound internally, thus obscuring the flaws. A need relative to composites is to be able to nondestructively measure the strength of laminar boundaries in order to assess the integrity of a structure. Acousto-ultrasonics has exhibited the ability to use the internal scattering to provide information for determining the strength of laminar boundaries. Analysis of acousto-ultrasonic signals by the wave ray paths that compose it leads to waveform partitioning that enhances the sensitivity to mechanical strength parameters.

  8. Nondestructive imaging of an ultracold lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Y. S.; Chakram, S.; Aycock, L. M.; Vengalattore, M.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the nondestructive imaging of a lattice gas of ultracold bosons. Atomic fluorescence is induced in the simultaneous presence of degenerate Raman sideband cooling. The combined influence of these processes controllably cycles an atom between a dark state and a fluorescing state while eliminating heating and loss. Through spatially resolved sideband spectroscopy following the imaging sequence, we demonstrate the efficacy of this imaging technique in various regimes of lattice depth and fluorescence acquisition rate. Our work provides an important extension of quantum gas imaging to the nondestructive detection, control, and manipulation of atoms in optical lattices. In addition, our technique can also be extended to atomic species that are less amenable to molasses-based lattice imaging.

  9. Techniques for enhancing laser ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J; Chinn, D; Huber, R; Spicer, J; Thomas, G

    1999-02-16

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation is an extremely powerful tool for characterizing materials and detecting defects. A majority of the ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation is performed with piezoelectric transducers that generate and detect high frequency acoustic energy. The liquid needed to couple the high frequency acoustic energy from the piezoelectric transducers restricts the applicability of ultrasonics. For example, traditional ultrasonics cannot evaluate parts at elevated temperatures or components that would be damaged by contact with a fluid. They are developing a technology that remotely generates and detects the ultrasonic pulses with lasers and consequently there is no requirement for liquids. Thus the research in laser-based ultrasound allows them to solve inspection problems with ultrasonics that could not be done before. This technology has wide application in many Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory programs, especially when remote and/or non-contact sensing is necessary.

  10. Classifiers utilized to enhance acoustic based sensors to identify round types of artillery/mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasing, David; Desai, Sachi; Morcos, Amir

    2008-04-01

    Feature extraction methods based on the statistical analysis of the change in event pressure levels over a period and the level of ambient pressure excitation facilitate the development of a robust classification algorithm. The features reliably discriminates mortar and artillery variants via acoustic signals produced during the launch events. Utilizing acoustic sensors to exploit the sound waveform generated from the blast for the identification of mortar and artillery variants as type A, etcetera through analysis of the waveform. Distinct characteristics arise within the different mortar/artillery variants because varying HE mortar payloads and related charges emphasize varying size events at launch. The waveform holds various harmonic properties distinct to a given mortar/artillery variant that through advanced signal processing and data mining techniques can employed to classify a given type. The skewness and other statistical processing techniques are used to extract the predominant components from the acoustic signatures at ranges exceeding 3000m. Exploiting these techniques will help develop a feature set highly independent of range, providing discrimination based on acoustic elements of the blast wave. Highly reliable discrimination will be achieved with a feedforward neural network classifier trained on a feature space derived from the distribution of statistical coefficients, frequency spectrum, and higher frequency details found within different energy bands. The processes that are described herein extend current technologies, which emphasis acoustic sensor systems to provide such situational awareness.

  11. Edward's sword? - A non-destructive study of a medieval king's sword

    SciTech Connect

    Segebade, Chr.

    2013-04-19

    Non-destructive and instrumental methods including photon activation analysis were applied in an examination of an ancient sword. It was tried to find indication of forgery or, if authentic, any later processing and alteration. Metal components of the hilt and the blade were analysed by instrumental photon activation. Non-destructive metallurgical studies (hardness measurements, microscopic microstructure analysis) are briefly described, too. The results of these investigations did not yield indication of non-authenticity. This stood in agreement with the results of stylistic and scientific studies by weapon experts.

  12. Edward's sword? - A non-destructive study of a medieval king's sword

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segebade, Chr.

    2013-04-01

    Non-destructive and instrumental methods including photon activation analysis were applied in an examination of an ancient sword. It was tried to find indication of forgery or, if authentic, any later processing and alteration. Metal components of the hilt and the blade were analysed by instrumental photon activation. Non-destructive metallurgical studies (hardness measurements, microscopic microstructure analysis) are briefly described, too. The results of these investigations did not yield indication of non-authenticity. This stood in agreement with the results of stylistic and scientific studies by weapon experts.

  13. Nondestructive characterization of residual stress within CMOS-based composite microcantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendon-Hernandez, Adrian A.; Camacho-Leon, Sergio; Martinez-Chapa, Sergio O.

    2013-04-01

    Residual stress can affect the performance of thin-film micromachined structures and lead to curling in cantilevers as well as distortion in the frequency of resonant devices. As the origin of residual stress is dependent on the fabrication processes, a nondestructive method for characterization of residual stress independent of processes conditions is desirable for supporting the design of microcantilever-based microsystems. In this paper we present a nondestructive characterization of the residual stress within composite microcantilever beams providing valuable insights toward predicting their deflection profile after mechanical releasing from the substrate. The approach relies on the assumption of a linear gradient stress and a quadratic deflection profile across a composite microcantilever.

  14. Thermometric- and Acoustic-Based Beam Power Monitor for Ultra-Bright X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bentsen, Gregory; /Rochester U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A design for an average beam power monitor for ultra-bright X-ray sources is proposed that makes simultaneous use of calorimetry and radiation acoustics. Radiation incident on a solid target will induce heating and ultrasonic vibrations, both of which may be measured to give a fairly precise value of the beam power. The monitor is intended for measuring ultra-bright Free-Electron Laser (FEL) X-ray beams, for which traditional monitoring technologies such as photo-diodes or scintillators are unsuitable. The monitor consists of a Boron Carbide (B{sub 4}C) target designed to absorb most of the incident beam's energy. Resistance temperature detectors (RTD) and piezoelectric actuators are mounted on the outward faces of the target to measure the temperature changes and ultrasonic vibrations induced by the incident beam. The design was tested using an optical pulsed beam (780 nm, 120 and 360 Hz) from a Ti:sapphire oscillator at several energies between 0.8 and 2.6 mJ. The RTDs measured an increase in temperature of about 10 K over a period of several minutes. The piezoelectric sensors recorded ringing acoustic oscillations at 580 {+-} 40 kHz. Most importantly, the amplitude of the acoustic signals was observed to scale linearly with beam power up to 2 mJ of pulse energy. Above this pulse energy, the vibrational signals became nonlinear. Several causes for this nonlinearity are discussed, including amplifier saturation and piezoelectric saturation. Despite this nonlinearity, these measurements demonstrate the feasibility of such a beam power measurement device. The advantage of two distinct measurements (acoustic and thermometric) provides a useful method of calibration that is unavailable to current LCLS diagnostics tools.

  15. Development of instrumentation for magnetic nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, S.

    1991-09-23

    The use of failure-prone components in critical applications has been traditionally governed by removing such components from service prior to the expiration of their predicted life expectancy. Such early retirement of materials does not guarantee that a particular sample will not fail in actual usage. The increasing cost of such life expectancy based operation and increased demand for improved reliability in industrial settings has necessitated an alternate form of quality control. Modern applications employ nondestructive evaluation (NDE), also known as nondestructive testing (NDT), as a means of monitoring the levels and growth of defects in a material throughout its operational life. This thesis describes the modifications made to existing instrumentation used for magnetic measurements at the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation at Iowa State University. Development of a new portable instrument is also given. An overview of the structure and operation of this instrumentation is presented. This thesis discusses the application of the magnetic hysteresis and Barkhausen measurement techniques, described in Sections 1.3.1 and 1.3.2 respectively, to a number of ferromagnetic specimens. Specifically, measurements were made on a number of railroad steel specimens for fatigue characterization, and on specimens of Damascus steel and Terfenol-D for materials evaluation. 60 refs., 51 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Nondestructive evaluation of pyroshock propagation using hydrocodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Juho; Hwang, Dae-Hyeon; Jang, Jae-Kyeong; Lee, Jung-Ryul; Han, Jae-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Pyroshock or pyrotechnic shock generated by explosive events of pyrotechnic devices can induce fatal failures in electronic payloads. Therefore, understanding and estimation of pyroshock propagation through complex structures are necessary. However, an experimental approach using real pyrotechnic devices is quite burdensome because pyrotechnic devices can damage test structures and newly manufactured test structures are necessary for each experiment. Besides, pyrotechnic experiments are quite expensive, time-consuming, and dangerous. Consequently, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of pyroshock propagation without using real pyrotechnic devices is necessary. In this study, nondestructive evaluation technique for pyroshock propagation estimation using hydrocodes is proposed. First, pyroshock propagation is numerically analyzed using AUTODYN, a commercial hydrocodes. Hydrocodes can handle stress wave propagation including elastic, plastic, and shock wave in the time domain. Test structures are modeled and pyroshock time history is applied to where the pyroshock propagation originates. Numerical NDE results of pyroshock propagation on test structures are analyzed in terms of acceleration time histories and acceleration shock response spectra (SRS) results. To verify the proposed numerical methodology, impact tests using airsoft gun are performed. The numerical analysis results for the impact tests are compared with experimental results and they show good agreements. The proposed numerical techniques enable us to nondestructively characterize pyroshock propagation.

  17. Nondestructive Evaluation of Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamid; Rossettos, J. N.

    1997-01-01

    The final report consists of 5 published papers in referred journals and a technical letter to the technical monitor. These papers include the following: (1) Comparison of the effects of debonds and voids in adhesive; (2) On the peak shear stresses in adhesive joints with voids; (3) Nondestructive evaluation of adhesively bonded joints by acousto-ultrasonic technique and acoustic emission; (4) Multiaxial fatigue life evaluation of tubular adhesively bonded joints; (5) Theoretical and experimental evaluation of the bond strength under peeling loads. The letter outlines the progress of the research. Also included is preliminary information on the study of nondestructive evaluation of composite materials subjected to localized heat damage. The investigators studied the effects of localized heat on unidirectional fiber glass epoxy composite panels. Specimens of the fiber glass epoxy composites were subjected to 400 C heat for varying lengths of time. The specimens were subjected to nondestructive tests. The specimens were then pulled to their failure and acoustic emission of these specimens were measured. The analysis of the data was continuing as of the writing of the letter, and includes a finite element stress analysis of the problem.

  18. Quantitative non-destructive testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    The work undertaken during this period included two primary efforts. The first is a continuation of theoretical development from the previous year of models and data analyses for NDE using the Optical Thermal Infra-Red Measurement System (OPTITHIRMS) system, which involves heat injection with a laser and observation of the resulting thermal pattern with an infrared imaging system. The second is an investigation into the use of the thermoelastic effect as an effective tool for NDE. As in the past, the effort is aimed towards NDE techniques applicable to composite materials in structural applications. The theoretical development described produced several models of temperature patterns over several geometries and material types. Agreement between model data and temperature observations was obtained. A model study with one of these models investigated some fundamental difficulties with the proposed method (the primitive equation method) for obtaining diffusivity values in plates of thickness and supplied guidelines for avoiding these difficulties. A wide range of computing speeds was found among the various models, with a one-dimensional model based on Laplace's integral solution being both very fast and very accurate.

  19. Nondestructive testing for braze voids in thin panels by use of special coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Application of commercial coating to exterior of sandwich panel structures for determining presence of voids in brazed plates is discussed. Procedure for applying coating material and method of conducting nondestructive tests are explained. Illustrations are included to show appearance of voids.

  20. Nondestructive and automated testing for soil and rock properties. ASTM special technical publication 1350

    SciTech Connect

    Marr, W.A.; Fairhurst, C.E.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of the symposium was to highlight recent developments in nondestructive and automated testing for soil and rock properties. Speakers present results of recent research in these areas that have practical application for the rapid and economical testing of soil and rock. Authors were encouraged to identify which testing equipment and methods have sufficient practical application to warrant standards development.

  1. Nondestructive estimation of oil and moisture content using NIR spectroscopy in Valencia and Virginia peanuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oil and moisture content of peanuts are important factors in peanut grading. A method by which these parameters could be measured rapidly and nondestructively for peanut pods (in-shell peanuts) would be useful for the industry. In this work, an attempt was made to measure oil and moisture content of...

  2. Local nondestructive data reading in three-dimensional memory systems based on the optical Kerr effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zheltikov, Aleksei M; Koroteev, Nikolai I; Naumov, A N; Fedotov, Andrei B; Magnitskiy, Sergey A; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A

    1998-11-30

    An investigation was made of the characteristics of the optical Kerr effect in a spiropyran solution. It was found that this effect makes it possible to distinguish the coloured and uncoloured forms of spiropyran and that it represents a promising method for nondestructive data reading in three-dimensional optical memory systems based on photochromic materials. (letters to the editor)

  3. Nondestructive measurement of intensity of optical fields using spontaneous parametric down conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penin, A. N.; Kitaeva, G. KH.; Sergienko, A. V.

    1992-01-01

    Results of nondestructive measurements of intensity (photons per mode) of light from different sources are discussed. The procedure of measurement does not destroy the state of the optical field. The method is based on using the second order nonlinearity of crystal media lacking a center of symmetry and the nonclassical properties of the process of Spontaneous Parametric Down Conversion (SPDC).

  4. Using magnetic levitation for non-destructive quality control of plastic parts.

    PubMed

    Hennek, Jonathan W; Nemiroski, Alex; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Bwambok, David K; Yang, Dian; Harburg, Daniel V; Tricard, Simon; Ellerbee, Audrey K; Whitesides, George M

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic levitation (MagLev) enables rapid and non-destructive quality control of plastic parts. The feasibility of MagLev as a method to: i) rapidly assess injection-molded plastic parts for defects during process optimization, ii) monitor the degradation of plastics after exposure to harsh environmental conditions, and iii) detect counterfeit polymers by density is demonstrated. PMID:25589230

  5. Rapid, Non-Destructive Estimation of Leaf Area on Field-Grown Vitis labruscana Grapevines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three potential variables, shoot basal diameter, leaf count per shoot and shoot length, were examined as potential rapid, non-destructive methods for estimating leaf area per shoot, a frequent component of estimates of leaf area per vine. The metrics were recorded in large field-grown vines over fi...

  6. Non-destructive freeze damage detection in oranges using machine vision and ultraviolet fluorescence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A non-contact, non-destructive, and rapid method of detecting freeze damaged oranges based on ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence of the peel oil constituents visible on the peel surface was investigated. The visual appearance is different from oleocellosis in that freeze damaged oranges exhibit a fine pa...

  7. Instrumentation: Nondestructive Examination for Verification of Canister and Cladding Integrity. FY2014 Status Update

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Jones, Anthony M.

    2014-09-12

    This report documents FY14 efforts for two instrumentation subtasks under storage and transportation. These instrumentation tasks relate to developing effective nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods and techniques to (1) verify the integrity of metal canisters for the storage of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and to (2) verify the integrity of dry storage cask internals.

  8. Nondestructive Inspection Techniques for Friction Stir Weld Verification on the Space Shuttle External Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suits, Michael W.; Leak, Jeffery; Bryson, Craig

    2003-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has gained wide acceptance as a reliable joining process for aerospace hardware as witnessed by its recent incorporation into the Delta Launch vehicle cryotanks. This paper describes the development of nondestructive evaluation methods and techniques used to verify the FSW process for NASA's Space Shuttle.

  9. Nondestructive testing of ceramic engine components. Final progress report for completed CRADAs

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W.A.; Happoldt, G.P.

    1993-07-15

    This report describes a method for the nondestructive testing of ZrO{sub 2} plasma-sprayed layers with intentional disbonds. A theoretical analysis was conducted to determine the surface-temperature difference for each disbond using a given input heat pulse.

  10. Instrumentation. Nondestructive Examination for Verification of Canister and Cladding Integrity - FY2013 Status Update

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Jones, Anthony M.; Pardini, Allan F.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Crawford, Susan L.; Larche, Michael R.

    2013-09-30

    This report documents FY13 efforts for two instrumentation subtasks under storage and transportation. These instrumentation tasks relate to developing effective nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods and techniques to (1) verify the integrity of metal canisters for the storage of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and to (2) characterize hydrogen effects in UNF cladding to facilitate safe storage and retrieval.

  11. Nondestructive evaluation: A survey of NASA contributions, chapter 1, Chapter 11, cover page, acknowledgements, and contents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A survey of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technology, which is discussed in terms of popular demands for a greater degree of quality, reliability, and safety in industrial products, is presented as an overview of the NDE field to serve the needs of middle management. Three NDE methods are presented: acoustic emission, the use of coherent (laser)light, and ultrasonic holography.

  12. Holographic Nondestructive Testing: Review Of A Laser Inspection Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erf, Robert K.

    1982-10-01

    A great deal has been written about holography, especially in the years since Gabor won the Nobel Prize (1971) for his "invention and development" of the method. While it is fairly safe to state that the movie and T.V. industries are not on the verge of a revolution as a result of the highly touted three-dimensional characteristics of the process, it can be said that holography may offer considerable scientific potential in such diverse areas as computer storage, display systems, correlation techniques, medical diagnostics (acoustical holography) and radar (microwave holography), to mention just a few. Another promising application of holography, and one that has been given considerable attention at United Technologies Corporation and other industrial laboratories, is nondestructive testing. Consideration shall be given to this subject in the present paper by starting with a very brief review of holography (The Basic Tool), followed by a description of interferometric hologra-phy (Preparing the Tool for Use), and how it can be employed to nondestructively identify defects (Applying the Tool). This sets the stage for two final topics which establish the holographic process as a viable NDT technique: pulsed holography (Adapting the Tool to the Industrial Environment) and special HNDT techniques (Simplifying and Diversifying Tool Application).

  13. Operation of the EPRI nondestructive evaluation center: 1985 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Nemzek, T.A.; Stone, R.M.; Ammirato, F.V.; Becker, F.L.; Krzywosz, K.; Pherigo, G.L.; Wilson, G.H. III

    1986-08-01

    This report describes the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Nuclear Division funded nondestructive evaluation (NDE) project activities carried out at the EPRI NDE Center in 1985. The continuing objective of the Center is transfer of research and development results funded by EPRI and other related projects to useful field application. This is being accomplished by qualification and refinement of equipment and techniques, training under realistic conditions, and encouragement of greater involvement of the academic community in NDE education. Significant assistance has been provided to the nuclear utility industry under this project in the form of improved, field-ready equipment and procedures; critically needed assessments of inspection method capability; demonstrations of effectiveness of examination methods; rapid response for critical, short-term problems; and training for specific utility industry needs. This effort has specifically addressed steam generator, piping, steam turbine, and heavy section inspection problems.

  14. A sparse reconstruction algorithm for ultrasonic images in nondestructive testing.

    PubMed

    Guarneri, Giovanni Alfredo; Pipa, Daniel Rodrigues; Neves Junior, Flávio; de Arruda, Lúcia Valéria Ramos; Zibetti, Marcelo Victor Wüst

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging systems (UIS) are essential tools in nondestructive testing (NDT). In general, the quality of images depends on two factors: system hardware features and image reconstruction algorithms. This paper presents a new image reconstruction algorithm for ultrasonic NDT. The algorithm reconstructs images from A-scan signals acquired by an ultrasonic imaging system with a monostatic transducer in pulse-echo configuration. It is based on regularized least squares using a l1 regularization norm. The method is tested to reconstruct an image of a point-like reflector, using both simulated and real data. The resolution of reconstructed image is compared with four traditional ultrasonic imaging reconstruction algorithms: B-scan, SAFT, ω-k SAFT and regularized least squares (RLS). The method demonstrates significant resolution improvement when compared with B-scan-about 91% using real data. The proposed scheme also outperforms traditional algorithms in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). PMID:25905700

  15. Nondestructive testing of composite materials by holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebbeni, J.; de Smet, M.-A.

    Techniques for the nondestructive testing of composites by holographic interferometry are discussed, and results from tests analyzing carbon/epoxy composites for two types of defects, resulting from the impact of steel rods and the introduction of mylar inhomogeneities, are presented. Holographic techniques for the interferometric real-time observation of the superposition of the object and the holographic image, and for the recording on two photosensitively different plates of holographic images of the object in the neutral and deformed states, are discussed. Results show that a defect of 0.02 mm, situated at less than three layers below the observed surface, could be precisely characterized, and that for certain cases of 3-12 layers, defects could be detected by a fringe deviation. Better definition of the zone of impact was obtained by the holographic method than by an ultrasound method.

  16. Process-interactive nondestructive evaluation for metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, P. K.; Shannon, R. E.; Clark, W. G., Jr.; Harrigan, W. C., Jr.

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) has been conducted on composite products at various stages of fabrication processes including raw powders, powder mixtures, billets and final product extrusions. Eddy current was found to be effective in identifying matrix powder alloy chemistry and particle size, and in determining the mix ratio of silicon carbide (SiC) reinforcement particles in aluminum matrix alloy powders. Ultrasonic techniques were capable of identifying SiC clusters in large-scale, consolidated powder metallurgy (P/M) metal matrix composite (MMC) billets, while eddy current methods could be used to determine near-surface density variations in the billets. Multiple NDE techniques (eddy current, ultrasonics and resistivity) could be employed to quantify microstructural characteristics of composite extrusions. These results suggest that NDE methods can be integrated into manufacturing processes to provide online, closed-loop control of fabrication parameters.

  17. A Sparse Reconstruction Algorithm for Ultrasonic Images in Nondestructive Testing

    PubMed Central

    Guarneri, Giovanni Alfredo; Pipa, Daniel Rodrigues; Junior, Flávio Neves; de Arruda, Lúcia Valéria Ramos; Zibetti, Marcelo Victor Wüst

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging systems (UIS) are essential tools in nondestructive testing (NDT). In general, the quality of images depends on two factors: system hardware features and image reconstruction algorithms. This paper presents a new image reconstruction algorithm for ultrasonic NDT. The algorithm reconstructs images from A-scan signals acquired by an ultrasonic imaging system with a monostatic transducer in pulse-echo configuration. It is based on regularized least squares using a l1 regularization norm. The method is tested to reconstruct an image of a point-like reflector, using both simulated and real data. The resolution of reconstructed image is compared with four traditional ultrasonic imaging reconstruction algorithms: B-scan, SAFT, ω-k SAFT and regularized least squares (RLS). The method demonstrates significant resolution improvement when compared with B-scan—about 91% using real data. The proposed scheme also outperforms traditional algorithms in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). PMID:25905700

  18. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul L.; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J.; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2013-08-01

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds.

  19. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms.

    PubMed

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul L; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F

    2013-08-01

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds. PMID:24007051

  20. FIRST 100 T NON-DESTRUCTIVE MAGNET

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. SIMS; ET AL

    1999-10-01

    The first 100 T non-destructive (100 T ND) magnet and power supplies as currently designed are described. This magnet will be installed as part of the user facility research equipment at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 100 T ND magnet will provide a 100 T pulsed field of 5 ms duration (above 90% of full field) in a 15 mm diameter bore once per hour. Magnet operation will be non-destructive. The magnet will consist of a controlled power outer coil set which produces a 47 T platform field in a 225 mm diameter bore. Located within the outer coil set will be a 220 mm outer diameter capacitor powered insert coil. Using inertial energy storage a synchronous motor/generator will provide ac power to a set of seven ac-dc converters rated at 64 MW/80 MVA each. These converters will energize three independent coil circuits to create 170 MJ of field energy in the outer coil set at the platform field of 47 T. The insert will then be energized to produce the balance of the 100 T peak field using a 2.3 MJ, 18 kV (charged to 15 kV), 14.4 mF capacitor bank controlled with solid-state switches. The magnet will be the first of its kind and the first non-destructive, reusable 100 T pulsed magnet. The operation of the magnet will be described along with special features of its design and construction.

  1. PREFACE: III All-Russian Scientific and Practical Conference on Innovations in Non-Destructive Testing (SibTest 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-01-01

    This issue of the journal is devoted to the research and studies presented at the III All-Russian Scientific and Practical Conference on Innovations in Non-Destructive Testing SibTest. The conference was held in Altai, Russia, on 27-31 July 2015. The conference brought together experts from different countries and organizations who had a great opportunity to share knowledge during oral and poster presentations and to initiate discussions on topics that are of interest to the conference attendees. The conference aimed to discuss innovative methods and the application of advanced technologies in non-destructive testing. The conference also attempted to bring together university, academic and industrial science, to expand the co-operation of scientists from different countries in research and development and the commercialization of innovative technologies in non-destructive testing. The key themes of the conference were: ultrasonic and acoustic testing; electromagnetic and thermal testing; various types of radiation non-destructive testing; passive and active testing techniques. The conference organizers are the Institute of Non-Destructive Testing, Tomsk Polytechnic University, with the assistance of the Russian Society for Non-Destructive Testing and Technical Diagnostics, Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, National Research Tomsk State University, Moscow State Institute of Radio Engineering, Electronics and Automation.

  2. Nondestructive Technique To Assess Embrittlement In Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.

    1990-01-01

    Recent research at NASA Langley Research Center led to identification of nondestructive technique for detection of temper embrittlement in HY80 steel. Measures magnetoacoustic emission associated with reversible motion of domain walls at low magnetic fields. Of interest to engineers responsible for reliability and safety of various dynamically loaded and/or thermally cycled steel parts. Applications include testing of landing gears, naval vessels, and parts subjected to heat, such as those found in steam-pipe fittings, boilers, turbine rotors, and nuclear pressure vessels.

  3. Automation for nondestructive inspection of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss the motivation and an architectural framework for using small mobile robots as automated aids to operators of nondestructive inspection (NDI) equipment. We review the need for aircraft skin inspection, and identify the constraints in commercial airlines operations that make small mobile robots the most attractive alternative for automated aids for NDI procedures. We describe the design and performance of the robot (ANDI) that we designed, built, and are testing for deployment of eddy current probes in prescribed commercial aircraft inspections. We discuss recent work aimed at also providing robotic aids for visual inspection.

  4. Nondestructive measurement of environmental radioactive strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiba, Shuntaro; Okamiya, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Saki; Tanuma, Ryosuke; Totsuka, Yumi; Murata, Jiro

    2014-03-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident was triggered by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake. The main radioactivity concerns after the accident are I-131 (half-life: 8.0 days), Cs-134 (2.1 years), Cs-137 (30 years), Sr-89 (51 days), and Sr-90 (29 years). We are aiming to establish a new nondestructive measurement and detection technique that will enable us to realize a quantitative evaluation of strontium radioactivity without chemical separation processing. This technique is needed to detect radiation contained in foods, environmental water, and soil, to prevent us from undesired internal exposure to radiation.

  5. Nondestructive assay confirmatory assessment experiments: mixed oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lemming, J.F.

    1980-04-30

    The confirmatory assessment experiments demonstrate traceable nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of plutonium in mixed oxide powder using commercially available spontaneous-fission assay systems. The experiments illustrate two major concepts: the production of calibration materials using calorimetric assay, and the use of paired measurements for measurement assurance. Two batches of well-characterized mixed oxide powder were used to establish the random and systematic error components. The major components of an NDA measurement assurance technique to establish and maintain traceability are identified and their functions are demonstrated. 20 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Nondestructive assay measurements of GNEP related materials

    SciTech Connect

    Santi, Peter A; Crooks, William J.; Geist, William H.; Gonzales, Robert; Helland, Carolyn A.; Jackson, Jay M.; Frame, Katherine C.; Martinez, Michael M.; Scherer, Caroylnn P.; Vo, Duc T.

    2008-06-12

    Because the reprocessing technologies that are currently being considered for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) will keep various actinides commingled with plutonium at all times throughout the process, the resulting nuclear fuel that is intended for the Advanced Burner Reactor will present unique measurement challenges for the various Nondestructive Assay (NDA) techniques. In order to begin clarifying which types of materials and measurement scenarios that may exist within GNEP require the development of new measurement technologies, an initial series of measurements have been performed on materials with radiation properties that are similar to those being considered within GNEP.

  7. Nondestructive identification of the Bell diagonal state

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Jiasen; Yu Changshui; Song Heshan

    2011-03-15

    We propose a scheme for identifying an unknown Bell diagonal state. In our scheme the measurements are performed on the probe qubits instead of the Bell diagonal state. The distinct advantage is that the quantum state of the evolved Bell diagonal state ensemble plus probe states will still collapse on the original Bell diagonal state ensemble after the measurement on probe states; i.e., our identification is quantum state nondestructive. How to realize our scheme in the framework of cavity electrodynamics is also shown.

  8. Nondestructive spectroscopic and imaging techniques for quality evaluation and assessment of fish and fish products.

    PubMed

    He, Hong-Ju; Wu, Di; Sun, Da-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, people have increasingly realized the importance of acquiring high quality and nutritional values of fish and fish products in their daily diet. Quality evaluation and assessment are always expected and conducted by using rapid and nondestructive methods in order to satisfy both producers and consumers. During the past two decades, spectroscopic and imaging techniques have been developed to nondestructively estimate and measure quality attributes of fish and fish products. Among these noninvasive methods, visible/near-infrared (VIS/NIR) spectroscopy, computer/machine vision, and hyperspectral imaging have been regarded as powerful and effective analytical tools for fish quality analysis and control. VIS/NIR spectroscopy has been widely applied to determine intrinsic quality characteristics of fish samples, such as moisture, protein, fat, and salt. Computer/machine vision on the other hand mainly focuses on the estimation of external features like color, weight, size, and surface defects. Recently, by incorporating both spectroscopy and imaging techniques in one system, hyperspectral imaging cannot only measure the contents of different quality attributes simultaneously, but also obtain the spatial distribution of such attributes when the quality of fish samples are evaluated and measured. This paper systematically reviews the research advances of these three nondestructive optical techniques in the application of fish quality evaluation and determination and discuss future trends in the developments of nondestructive technologies for further quality characterization in fish and fish products. PMID:24915393

  9. Nondestructive Evaluation Program. Progress in 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Dau, G.J.; Behravesh, M.M.; Liu, S.N.; Oldberg, T.; Avioli, M.J. Jr.; Scheibel, J.R.; Sharma, D.; Norris, D.M.; Tagart, S.W. Jr.; Griesbach, T.J.

    1986-05-01

    The increasing cost of equipment for power generating plants and the potential increases in productivity and safety available through rapidly developing Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) technology led EPRI to initiate a Nondestructive Evaluation Program in 1974. To date, the major focus has been on light water reactor inspection problems; however, increased application to other systems is now under way. This report presents a comprehensive review of the EPRI effort in the NDE area. Most of the report consists of contractor-supplied progress on each current project. An organizational plan of the program is presented in overview. In addition, organization from several viewpoint is presented, e.g., in-service inspection operators, R and D personnel, and utility representatives. As the seventh in a planned series of annual progress reports on EPRI-funded NDE activities, this report also serves as the proceedings of the EPRI Joint NDE/Structural Mechanics information meeting held in Palo Alto, California, on November 20-21, 1986. It summarizes progress made since the previous EPRI Special Report NP-3821-SR was issued in May 1985. Section 1 contains information about the program organization, and the sections that follow contains contractor-supplied progress reports of each current project. The progress reports are grouped by plant components - pipe, pressure vessel, steam generator and boiler tubes, and turbine. In addition, Part 6 is devoted to discussions of technology transfer.

  10. Nondestructive evaluation techniques for enhanced bridge inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.; Benson, S.; Durbin, P.; Del Grande, N.; Haskins, J.; Brown, A.; Schneberk, D.

    1993-10-01

    Nondestructive evaluation of bridges is a critical aspect in the US aging infrastructure problem. For example in California there are 26,000 bridges, 3000 are made of steel, and of the steel bridges, 1000 are fracture critical. California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), Federal Highway Administration, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are collaborating to develop and field NDE techniques to improve bridge inspections. We have demonstrated our NDE technologies on several bridge inspection applications. An early collaboration was to ultrasonically evaluate the steel pins in the E-9 pier on the San Francisco Bay Bridge. Following the Loma-Prieta earthquake in 1989 and the road way collapse at the E-9 pier, a complete nondestructive evaluation was conducted by Caltrans inspectors and several ultrasonic indications were noted. LLNL worked with Caltrans to help identify the source of these reflections. Another project was to digitally enhance high energy radiographs of bridge components such as cable end caps. We demonstrated our ability to improve the detection of corrosion and fiber breakage inside the end cap. An extension of this technology is limited view computer tomography (CT). We implemented our limited view CT software and produced cross-sectional views of bridge cables from digitized radiographic films. Most recently, we are developing dual band infrared imaging techniques to assess bridge decks for delaminations. We have demonstrated the potential of our NDE technology for enhancing the inspection of the country`s aging bridges.

  11. Nondestructive evaluation of thick concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Dwight A.

    2015-03-01

    Concrete has been used in the construction of nuclear power plants (NPPs) due to three primary properties: its low cost, structural strength, and ability to shield radiation. Examples of concrete structures important to the safety of Light Water Reactor (LWR) plants include the containment building, spent fuel pool, and cooling towers. Use in these structures has made concrete's long-term performance crucial for the safe operation of commercial NPPs. Extending LWR operating period to 60 years and beyond will likely increase susceptibility and severity of known forms of degradation. New mechanisms of materials degradation are also possible. This creates the need to be able to nondestructively evaluate the current subsurface concrete condition of aging concrete material in NPP structures. The size and complexity of NPP containment structures and heterogeneity of Portland cement concrete make characterization of the degradation extent a difficult task. Specially designed and fabricated test specimens can provide realistic flaws that are similar to actual flaws in terms of how they interact with a particular nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique. Artificial test blocks allow the isolation of certain testing problems as well as the variation of certain parameters. Representative large heavily reinforced concrete specimens would allow for comparative testing to evaluate the state-of-the-art NDE in this area and to identify additional developments necessary to address the challenges potentially found in NPPs.

  12. Primary Water Stress Corrosion Crack Morphology and Nondestructive Evaluation Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2004-12-01

    A research program on primary stress corrosion crack (PWSCC) is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In this program, the material degradation problem in Alloys 600, 182, and 82 is being investigated with objectives that include compling a knowledge base on all cracking in nickel based materials at all degradation sites in nuclear power plants, assessing NDE methods using mockups to quantify the detection, sizing, and using mockups to quantify the detection sizing and characterization of tight cracks, and determining the role of welding processes in degradation. In this paper, the resuts of the initial literature searchs are presented. The relevant data on crack properties such as shape and orientation are presented and their impace on nondestructive evaluation (NDE) reliability is discussed.

  13. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) for Inspection of Composite Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Composite honeycomb structures are widely used in aerospace applications due to their low weight and high strength advantages. Developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection methods are essential for their safe performance. Flash thermography is a commonly used technique for composite honeycomb structure inspections due to its large area and rapid inspection capability. Flash thermography is shown to be sensitive for detection of face sheet impact damage and face sheet to core disbond. Data processing techniques, using principal component analysis to improve the defect contrast, are discussed. Limitations to the thermal detection of the core are investigated. In addition to flash thermography, X-ray computed tomography is used. The aluminum honeycomb core provides excellent X-ray contrast compared to the composite face sheet. The X-ray CT technique was used to detect impact damage, core crushing, and skin to core disbonds. Additionally, the X-ray CT technique is used to validate the thermography results.

  14. Physical model assisted probability of detection in nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Meeker, W. Q.; Thompson, R. B.

    2011-06-23

    Nondestructive evaluation is used widely in many engineering and industrial areas to detect defects or flaws such as cracks inside parts or structures during manufacturing or for products in service. The standard statistical model is a simple empirical linear regression between the (possibly transformed) signal response variables and the (possibly transformed) explanatory variables. For some applications, such a simple empirical approach is inadequate. An important alternative approach is to use knowledge of the physics of the inspection process to provide information about the underlying relationship between the response and explanatory variables. Use of such knowledge can greatly increase the power and accuracy of the statistical analysis and enable, when needed, proper extrapolation outside the range of the observed explanatory variables. This paper describes a set of physical model-assisted analyses to study the capability of two different ultrasonic testing inspection methods to detect synthetic hard alpha inclusion and flat-bottom hole defects in a titanium forging disk.

  15. Nondestructive evaluation of a ceramic matrix composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosskopf, Paul P.; Duke, John C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Monolithic ceramic materials have proven their usefulness in many applications, yet, their potential for critical structural applications is limited because of their sensitivity to small imperfections. To overcome this extreme sensitivity to small imperfections, ceramic matrix composite materials have been developed that have the ability to withstand some distributed damage. A borosilicate glass reinforced with several layers of silicon-carbide fiber mat has been studied. Four-point flexure and tension tests were performed not only to determine some of the material properties, but also to initiate a controlled amount of damage within each specimen. Acousto-ultrasonic (AU) measurements were performed periodically during mechanical testing. This paper will compare the AU results to the mechanical test results and data from other nondestructive methods including acoustic emission monitoring and X-ray radiography. It was found that the AU measurements were sensitive to the damage that had developed within the material.

  16. Physical Model Assisted Probability of Detection in Nondestructive Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Meeker, W. Q.; Thompson, R. B.

    2011-06-01

    Nondestructive evaluation is used widely in many engineering and industrial areas to detect defects or flaws such as cracks inside parts or structures during manufacturing or for products in service. The standard statistical model is a simple empirical linear regression between the (possibly transformed) signal response variables and the (possibly transformed) explanatory variables. For some applications, such a simple empirical approach is inadequate. An important alternative approach is to use knowledge of the physics of the inspection process to provide information about the underlying relationship between the response and explanatory variables. Use of such knowledge can greatly increase the power and accuracy of the statistical analysis and enable, when needed, proper extrapolation outside the range of the observed explanatory variables. This paper describes a set of physical model-assisted analyses to study the capability of two different ultrasonic testing inspection methods to detect synthetic hard alpha inclusion and flat-bottom hole defects in a titanium forging disk.

  17. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob

    2013-05-01

    We investigate non-destructive measurements of ultra-cold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. In particular, we pursue applications to dynamically controlled ultracold atoms. The dependence of the Faraday signal on laser detuning, atomic density and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. In particular the destructivity per measurement is extremely low and we illustrate this by imaging the same cloud up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration. Adding dynamic changes to system parameters, we demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. The method can be implemented particularly easily in standard imaging systems by the insertion of an extra polarizing beam splitter. These results are steps towards quantum state engineering using feedback control of ultracold atoms.

  18. Comparison of traditional nondestructive analysis of RERTR fuel plates with digital radiographic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Davidsmeier, T.; Koehl, R.; Lanham, R.; O'Hare, E.; Wiencek, T

    2008-07-15

    The current design and fabrication process for RERTR fuel plates utilizes film radiography during the nondestructive testing and characterization. Digital radiographic methods offer a potential increases in efficiency and accuracy. The traditional and digital radiographic methods are described and demonstrated on a fuel plate constructed with and average of 51% by volume fuel using the dispersion method. Fuel loading data from each method is analyzed and compared to a third baseline method to assess accuracy. The new digital method is shown to be more accurate, save hours of work, and provide additional information not easily available in the traditional method. Additional possible improvements suggested by the new digital method are also raised. (author)

  19. Study of Beamforming Techniques for Ultrasound Imaging in Nondestructive Testing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorayeb, Sleiman Riad

    Many of the innovations in modern materials testing technology make use of ultrasound. Therefore, the theory and application of ultrasound have become of extreme importance in nondestructive inspection of complete engineered systems. However, despite the fact that most of these ultrasound inspection techniques are based on well-established phenomena, two key problems pertaining to their application still remain unresolved. These problems can be identified as (1) the material being tested is assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous by nature, and (2) the scanning/data collection process, prior to the reconstruction scheme, is very time consuming. As a result, techniques for fast, accurate testing of anisotropic and nonhomogeneous media have been the focus of attention in modern non-destructive testing research. This dissertation first describes the development and implementation of a time domain synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) to reconstruct flaws imbedded within Plexiglass^{rm TM/ } and Graphite/Epoxy samples. A modification to the present SAFT algorithm is then proposed in order to improve the quality of the images produced by SAFT when applied to composites. In addition, since the finite element method (FEM) can be used to solve hyperbolic partial differential equations, which govern wave propagation, FEM solutions are used to mimic a SAFT measurement. That is, the FEM is used to simulate the action of a transducer array. This is done to study the sensitivity of parameters involved in the SAFT algorithm. Using the same FEM model as a test bed, the data independent beamformer, in its basic form, is studied to determine its performance in reducing data acquisition time. It is seen that this technique is capable of adjusting the weights of the interpolating filter (beamformer) to predict an incoming signal from a desired direction while discriminating against other signals from different directions. SAFT results indicate that the FEM model can be used as

  20. 46 CFR 151.03-38 - Nondestructive testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

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  1. 46 CFR 151.03-38 - Nondestructive testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

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  2. 46 CFR 151.03-38 - Nondestructive testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

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  3. 46 CFR 151.03-38 - Nondestructive testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... examination, radiographic examination, eddy current, and acoustic emission. ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nondestructive testing. 151.03-38 Section 151.03-38... CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-38 Nondestructive...

  4. 46 CFR 151.03-38 - Nondestructive testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... examination, radiographic examination, eddy current, and acoustic emission. ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nondestructive testing. 151.03-38 Section 151.03-38... CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-38 Nondestructive...

  5. Nondestructive elemental depth-profiling analysis by muonic X-ray measurement.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Kazuhiko; Kubo, Michael K; Nagatomo, Takashi; Higemoto, Wataru; Ito, Takashi U; Kawamura, Naritoshi; Strasser, Patrick; Shimomura, Koichiro; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Takao; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Shinohara, Atsushi; Saito, Tsutomu

    2015-05-01

    Elemental analysis of materials is fundamentally important to science and technology. Many elemental analysis methods have been developed, but three-dimensional nondestructive elemental analysis of bulk materials has remained elusive. Recently, our project team, dreamX (damageless and regioselective elemental analysis with muonic X-rays), developed a nondestructive depth-profiling elemental analysis method after a decade of research. This new method utilizes a new type of probe; a negative muon particle and high-energy muonic X-rays emitted after the muon stops in a material. We performed elemental depth profiling on an old Japanese gold coin (Tempo-Koban) using a low-momentum negative muon beam and successfully determined that the Au concentration in the coin gradually decreased with depth over a micrometer length scale. We believe that this method will be a promising tool for the elemental analysis of valuable samples, such as archeological artifacts. PMID:25901421

  6. Nondestructive evaluation of concrete dams and other structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Larry D.; Sack, Dennis A.

    1995-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of several stress-wave based nondestructive testing methods which can be used to assess the condition of concrete structures such as dams, buildings, and foundations. The specific methods to be presented include the use of the impact echo (IE) and spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) methods in the assessment of dam concrete condition (including freeze-thaw damage assessment), the use of ultrasonic pulse velocity tomography (UPV tomography) in the 2 dimensional imaging of concrete defects in walls and foundations, and the use of the crosshole sonic logging (CSL) method for rapid, accurate, and cost-effective quality assurance of drilled shaft foundations. Included in this paper are summary descriptions of each of the NDT methods used (including some underlying theory), along with brief case histories of the application of each of these methods to real-world problems. Case histories presented include the evaluation of the Rogers' Dam spillway for freeze-thaw damage and overall concrete condition, the use of the CSL method in quality assurance testing of foundations for the LA Metro Green Line, and the use of tomography for imaging a defect in a deep foundation.

  7. Nondestructive determination of the depth of planar p-n junctions by scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, J.-Y.; Gatos, H. C.

    1977-01-01

    A method was developed for measuring nondestructively the depth of planar p-n junctions in simple devices as well as in integrated-circuit structures with the electron-beam induced current (EBIC) by scanning parallel to the junction in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results were found to be in good agreement with those obtained by the commonly used destructive method of lapping at an angle to the junction and staining to reveal the junction.

  8. Rotational magnetic flux sensor with neural network for non-destructive testing

    SciTech Connect

    Enokizono, M.; Todaka, T.; Akita, M. . Faculty of Engineering); Nagata, S. . Faculty of Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    This paper presents a new non-destructive testing (NDT) method which utilizes rotational magnetic flux. In this system, the magnitude and phase value are measured and used to obtain information about defect. These values include the information about the shape or position of an unknown defect. The authors employ the neural network technique for estimation of a defect shape. The experimental results show the validity of the method.

  9. A review of issues and strategies in nondestructive evaluation of fiber reinforced structural composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1979-01-01

    The need for advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for quantitative assessment of the mechanical strength and integrity of fiber composites during manufacture and service and following repair operations is stressed. The discussion covers problems and different approaches in regard to acceptance criteria, calibration standards, and methods for NDE of composites in strength critical applications. Finally, it is concluded that acousto-ultrasonic techniques provide the 'methods of choice' in this area.

  10. Practical applications of nondestructive materials characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Robert E., Jr.

    1992-10-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques are reviewed for applications to the industrial production of materials including microstructural, physical, and chemical analyses. NDE techniques addressed include: (1) double-pulse holographic interferometry for sealed-package leak testing; (2) process controls for noncontact metals fabrication; (3) ultrasonic detections of oxygen contamination in titanium welds; and (4) scanning acoustic microscopy for the evaluation of solder bonds. The use of embedded sensors and emerging NDE concepts provides the means for controlling the manufacturing and quality of quartz crystal resonators, nickel single-crystal turbine blades, and integrated circuits. Advances in sensor technology and artificial intelligence algorithms and the use of embedded sensors combine to make NDE technology highly effective in controlling industrial materials manufacturing and the quality of the products.

  11. Nondestructive Assay Options for Spent Fuel Encapsulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, Stephen J.; Jansson, Peter

    2014-10-02

    This report describes the role that nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques and systems of NDA techniques may have in the context of an encapsulation and deep geological repository. The potential NDA needs of an encapsulation and repository facility include safeguards, heat content, and criticality. Some discussion of the facility needs is given, with the majority of the report concentrating on the capability and characteristics of individual NDA instruments and techniques currently available or under development. Particular emphasis is given to how the NDA techniques can be used to determine the heat production of an assembly, as well as meet the dual safeguards needs of 1) determining the declared parameters of initial enrichment, burn-up, and cooling time and 2) detecting defects (total, partial, and bias). The report concludes with the recommendation of three integrated systems that might meet the combined NDA needs of the encapsulation/repository facility.

  12. Quantitative nondestructive evaluation: Requirements for tomorrow's reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation (QNDE) is the technology of measurement, analysis, and prediction of the state of material/structural systems for safety, reliability, and mission assurance. QNDE has impact on everyday life from the cars we drive, the planes we fly, the buildings we work or live in, literally to the infrastructure of our world. Here, researchers highlight some of the new sciences and technologies that are part of a safer, cost effective tomorrow. Specific technologies that are discussed are thermal QNDE of aircraft structural integrity, ultrasonic QNDE for materials characterization, and technology spinoffs from aerospace to the medical sector. In each case, examples are given of how new requirements result in enabling measurement technologies, which in turn change the boundaries of design/practice.

  13. Expert system technology for nondestructive waste assay

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, G.K.; Determan, J.C.

    1998-07-01

    Nondestructive assay waste characterization data generated for use in the National TRU Program must be of known and demonstrable quality. Each measurement is required to receive an independent technical review by a qualified expert. An expert system prototype has been developed to automate waste NDA data review of a passive/active neutron drum counter system. The expert system is designed to yield a confidence rating regarding measurement validity. Expert system rules are derived from data in a process involving data clustering, fuzzy logic, and genetic algorithms. Expert system performance is assessed against confidence assignments elicited from waste NDA domain experts. Performance levels varied for the active, passive shielded, and passive system assay modes of the drum counter system, ranging from 78% to 94% correct classifications.

  14. NON-DESTRUCTIVE FLAW DETECTION APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Stateman, M.J.; Holloway, H.R.

    1957-12-17

    An apparatus is described for the non-destructive detection of flaws in electrical conducting articles. The particular feature of the detection apparatus is that a flaw in the front or back of the test article will not be masked by signals caused by the passage of the end and front of the article through the detection apparatus. The present invention alleviates the above problem by mounting detection coils on directly opposite sides of the test passageway so that the axes of the pickup coils are perpendicular to the axis of an energizing coil through which the article is passed. A flaw in the article will cause a change in the voltage induced in one pickup coil, but passage of the end or front of the article will not produce unequal signals. The signals are compared in appropriate electrical circuitry to actuate a recorder only when unequal signals are present, indicating the presence of a flaw.

  15. A study of the stress wave factor technique for nondestructive evaluation of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarrafzadeh-Khoee, A.; Kiernan, M. T.; Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II

    1986-01-01

    The acousto-ultrasonic method of nondestructive evaluation is an extremely sensitive means of assessing material response. Efforts continue to complete the understanding of this method. In order to achieve the full sensitivity of the technique, extreme care must be taken in its performance. This report provides an update of the efforts to advance the understanding of this method and to increase its application to the nondestructive evaluation of composite materials. Included are descriptions of a novel optical system that is capable of measuring in-plane and out-of-plane displacements, an IBM PC-based data acquisition system, an extensive data analysis software package, the azimuthal variation of acousto-ultrasonic behavior in graphite/epoxy laminates, and preliminary examination of processing variation in graphite-aluminum tubes.

  16. Preliminary nondestructive evaluation manual for the space shuttle. [preliminary nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pless, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) requirements are presented for some 134 potential fracture-critical structural areas identified, for the entire space shuttle vehicle system, as those possibly needing inspection during refurbishment/turnaround and prelaunch operations. The requirements include critical area and defect descriptions, access factors, recommended NDE techniques, and descriptive artwork. Requirements discussed include: Orbiter structure, external tank, solid rocket booster, and thermal protection system (development area).

  17. Nondestructive inspection of General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) girth welds

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.H.; George, T.G.; Lynch, C.

    1998-12-31

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. The GPHS is fabricated using iridium capsules, TIG welded, to contain the {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet. GPHS capsules will be utilized in the upcoming Cassini mission to explore Saturn and its moons. The physical integrity of the girth weld is important to mission safety and performance. Since experience in the past had revealed a potential for initiation of small cracks in the girth weld overlap zone, a nondestructive inspection of the capsule weld is required. A ultrasonic method was used to inspect the welds of capsules fabricated for the Galileo mission. The instrument, transducer, and method used were state of the art at the time (early 1980s). The ultrasonic instrumentation and methods used to inspect the Cassini GPHSs was significantly upgraded from those used for the Galileo mission. GPHSs that had ultrasonic reflectors that exceeded the reject specification level were subsequently inspected with radiography to provide additional engineering data used to accept/reject the heat source. This paper describes the Galileo-era ultrasonic instrumentation and methods and the subsequent upgrades made to support testing of Cassini GPHSs. Also discussed is the data obtained from radiographic examination and correlation to ultrasonic examination results.

  18. Quality parameters of mango and potential of non-destructive techniques for their measurement - a review.

    PubMed

    Jha, S N; Narsaiah, K; Sharma, A D; Singh, M; Bansal, S; Kumar, R

    2010-01-01

    The king of fruits "Mango" (Mangifera indica L.) is very nutritious and rich in carotenes. India produces about 50% of the total world's mango. Many researchers have reported the maturity indices and quality parameters for determination of harvesting time and eating quality. The methods currently used for determination of quality of mango are mostly based on the biochemical analysis, which leads to destruction of the fruits. Numerous works are being carried out to explore some non-destructive methods such as Near Infrared (NIR), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), X-ray and Computed Tomography (CT), electronic nose, machine vision and ultrasound for quality determination of fruits. This paper deals with some recent work reported on quality parameters, harvesting and post-harvest treatments in relation to quality of mango fruits and reviews on some of the potential non-destructive techniques that can be explored for quality determination of mango cultivars. PMID:23572595

  19. Nondestructive Detection of Delamination in Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Plastics Using Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsukade, Yoshimi; Kasai, Naoko; Ishiyama, Atsushi

    2001-06-01

    The use of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) in aircraft and space structures is recently increasing. We investigated the possibility of nondestructively detecting a delamination in CFRP using a low-Tc first-order gradiometric superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) loop. A CFRP plate including a thin insulator sheet between the central layers was prepared. The injected current method was adopted. The magnetic field due to the sheet was measured by a SQUID nondestructive evaluation system using the lock-in detection technique. The position and size of the sheet were successfully detected by mapping the measured field. The result agreed with that by ultrasonic testing. Future application of this method for detecting deep-lying flaws was discussed.

  20. Acousto-ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of materials using laser beam generation and detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Robert D.; Green, Robert E., Jr.

    The acousto-ultrasonic method has proven to be a most interesting technique for nondestructive evaluation of the mechanical properties of a variety of materials. Use of the technique or a modification thereof, has led to correlation of the associated stress wave factor with mechanical properties of both metals and composite materials. The method is applied to the nondestructive evaluation of selected fiber reinforced structural composites. For the first time, conventional piezoelectric transducers were replaced with laser beam ultrasonic generators and detectors. This modification permitted true non-contact acousto-ultrasonic measurements to be made, which yielded new information about the basic mechanisms involved as well as proved the feasibility of making such non-contact measurements on terrestrial and space structures and heat engine components. A state-of-the-art laser based acousto-ultrasonic system, incorporating a compact pulsed laser and a fiber-optic heterodyne interferometer, was delivered to the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  1. Proceedings of the Second Annual Symposium for Nondestructive Evaluation of Bond Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Mark J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    Ultrasonics, microwaves, optically stimulated electron emission (OSEE), and computational chemistry approaches have shown relevance to bond strength determination. Nonlinear ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation methods, however, have shown the most effectiveness over other methods on adhesive bond analysis. Correlation to changes in higher order material properties due to microstructural changes using nonlinear ultrasonics has been shown related to bond strength. Nonlinear ultrasonic energy is an order of magnitude more sensitive than linear ultrasound to these material parameter changes and to acoustic velocity changes caused by the acoustoelastic effect when a bond is prestressed. Signal correlations between non-linear ultrasonic measurements and initialization of bond failures have been measured. This paper reviews bond strength research efforts presented by university and industry experts at the Second Annual Symposium for Nondestructive Evaluation of Bond Strength organized by the NDE Sciences Branch at NASA Langley in November 1998.

  2. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy as a Non-destructive Tool for Quantification of Pesticide Residue in Apple Cuticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lixian; Wang, Yafei; Gao, Chunming; Huan, Huiting; Zhao, Binxing; Yan, Laijun

    2015-06-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), the non-destructive method to detect residue of dimethyl-dichloro-vinyl-phosphate (DDVP) pesticide in a cuticle of apple, is described. After constructing the PA experimental setup and identifying three characteristic peaks of DDVP in the near ultraviolet region, the PA spectra of an apple cuticle contaminated with DDVP were collected. The artificial neural network method was then applied to analyze data quantitatively. The results show a correlation coefficient exceeding 0.99 and a detection limit of 0.2 ppm, which is within the national food safety standard for maximum residue limits for pesticides in food (GB 2763-2012). This fact and the non-destructive character of PAS make the approach promising for detection of pesticide residue in fruits.

  3. Nondestructive evaluation of composite materials - A design philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II; Stinchcomb, W. W.; Reifsnider, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Efficient and reliable structural design utilizing fiber reinforced composite materials may only be accomplished if the materials used may be nondestructively evaluated. There are two major reasons for this requirement: (1) composite materials are formed at the time the structure is fabricated and (2) at practical strain levels damage, changes in the condition of the material, that influence the structure's mechanical performance is present. The fundamental basis of such a nondestructive evaluation capability is presented. A discussion of means of assessing nondestructively the material condition as well as a damage mechanics theory that interprets the material condition in terms of its influence on the mechanical response, stiffness, strength and life is provided.

  4. Determination of the quantum efficiency of luminescence in Mn 2+ ions in Zn 0.75Be 0.20Mn 0.05Se crystals by the nondestructive photoacoustic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliński, M.; Chrobak, Ł.; Zakrzewski, J.; Strzałkowski, K.

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents the procedure of determination of the quantum efficiency of luminescence of Mn 2+ ions in the Zn 0.75Be 0.20Mn 0.05Se crystals. The method is based on the photoacoustic - absorption spectroscopy approach. In the paper the experimental spectra of absorption, luminescence, luminescence excitation and photoacoustic spectra of the samples are presented and analyzed from the point of view of the possibility of determination of the quantum efficiency of Mn 2+ ion luminescence at room temperature. It was determined experimentally that in the investigated crystals the quantum efficiency of luminescence in the Mn 2+ ions was about 86%, 95%, 91%, 82% and 73% for the absorption peaks located at 404 nm, 431 nm, 473 nm, 504 nm and 560 nm respectively.

  5. Non-destructive analysis in a study of the religious art objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vornicu, Nicoleta; Geba, Maria; Bibire, Cristina

    2009-08-01

    The icon Descending of the Saint Spirit from Bucium Church, dating in the year 1814 and was done in tempera on wood technology. The characterization of cultural heritage materials is essential for the comprehension of their degradation mechanisms. The present study aims at identifying the pigments in the various layers, establishing the possible existence of an organic binder and scientifically evaluating the state of preservation. To this end, were used non-destructive methods, as: microscopic (SEM), XRF and spectroscopic (FTIR).

  6. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Materials via Ultraviolet Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugel, Betsy

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses the use of ultraviolet spectroscopy and imaging for the non-destructive evaluation of the degree of cure, aging, and other properties of resin-based composite materials. This method can be used in air, and is portable for field use. This method operates in reflectance, absorbance, and luminescence modes. The ultraviolet source is used to illuminate a composite surface of interest. In reflectance mode, the reflected response is acquired via the imaging system or via the spectrometer. The spectra are analyzed for organic compounds (conjugated organics) and inorganic compounds (semiconducting band-edge states; luminescing defect states such as silicates, used as adhesives for composite aerospace applications; and metal oxides commonly used as thermal coating paints on a wide range of spacecraft). The spectra are compared with a database for variation in conjugation, substitution, or length of molecule (in the case of organics) or band edge position (in the case of inorganics). This approach is useful in the understanding of material quality. It lacks the precision in defining the exact chemical structure that is found in other materials analysis techniques, but it is advantageous over methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared spectroscopy, and chromatography in that it can be used in the field to assess significant changes in chemical structure that may be linked to concerns associated with weaknesses or variations in structural integrity, without disassembly of or destruction to the structure of interest.

  7. Destructive versus non-destructive methods for geochemical analyses of ceramic artifacts: comparison of portable XRF and ICP-MS data on Bronze Age ceramics from Failaka Island (Kuwait) and Bahrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stremtan, Ciprian; Ashkanani, Hasan; Tykot, Robert H.

    2013-04-01

    glass and MACS-3 pressed powder) were also measured to check for accuracy and precision. Our preliminary data shows that most of the major and trace elemental data acquired by both methods are consistent. Some transition metals (e.g. Y, Fe, and Mn) yielded overall lower values when measured with pXRF device (ranging from 27 to 60 % difference), while Ni and Ba showed systematically higher values (20 to 53 %). If samples are chosen properly for pXRF measurements (i.e. thoroughly cleaned, fine grained, well sorted) and the device is properly calibrated, the results are comparable with DCP-OES and ICP-MS data, thus being suitable to use for geochemical fingerprinting

  8. Non-Destructive Classification Approaches for Equilibrated Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righter, K.; Harrington, R.; Schroeder, C.; Morris, R. V.

    2013-09-01

    In order to compare a few non-destructive classification techniques with the standard approaches, we have characterized a group of chondrites from the Larkman Nunatak region using magnetic susceptibility and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  9. 12. VIEW OF THE NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING EQUIPMENT BEING USED TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF THE NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING EQUIPMENT BEING USED TO DETECT FLAWS IN FABRICATED COMPONENTS. (6/76) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  10. Partially Nondestructive Continuous Detection of Individual Traveling Optical Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Mahdi; Beck, Kristin M.; Duan, Yiheng; Chen, Wenlan; Vuletić, Vladan

    2016-01-01

    We report the continuous and partially nondestructive measurement of optical photons. For a weak light pulse traveling through a slow-light optical medium (signal), the associated atomic-excitation component is detected by another light beam (probe) with the aid of an optical cavity. We observe strong correlations of gsp (2 )=4.4 (5 ) between the transmitted signal and probe photons. The observed (intrinsic) conditional nondestructive quantum efficiency ranges between 13% and 1% (65% and 5%) for a signal transmission range of 2% to 35%, at a typical time resolution of 2.5 μ s . The maximal observed (intrinsic) device nondestructive quantum efficiency, defined as the product of the conditional nondestructive quantum efficiency and the signal transmission, is 0.5% (2.4%). The normalized cross-correlation function violates the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, confirming the nonclassical character of the correlations.

  11. Nondestructive Analysis of Telescope Surfaces and Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Julie; Kintzel, Edward; Strolger, Louis; Wolff, Schuyler

    2010-10-01

    The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Western Kentucky University has a Large Chamber Scanning Electron Microscope (LCSEM) available for materials analysis. As one of 10 in the world, the capability exists for nondestructive analysis of large samples. Currently we are investigating using the LCSEM to quantify reflectivity and long-term integrity for large segments of optical elements and detectors for ground and space-based environments. Comparisons of reflectance ratios as a function of surface roughness for Al-Coated optical mirrors may be confirmed with the LCSEM. Long-term structural integrity of Al-coated thinned mirror segments at ground-based facilities due to weather (oxidation) and spaced-based high-radiation environments can be investigated. Fatigue behavior of these metallic films from active/adaptive actuation will be simulated using the LCSEM. New research possibilities across a broad multidisciplinary spectrum will be key to the success of the LCSEM facility. These partnerships will lead to the development of new and existing technologies.

  12. Nondestructive Evaluation Program: Progress in 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Avioli, M.J. Jr.; Dau, G.J.; Edmonds, J.; Gehl, S.; Liu, S.N.; Stein, J.; Viswanathan, R.; Welty, C.S.

    1988-06-01

    The increasing cost of equipment for power generating plants and the potential increases in productivity and safety available through rapidly developing Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) technology led EPRI to initiate a Nondsetructive Evaluation Program in 1974. To date, the major focus has been on light water reactor inspection problems; however, increased application to other systems is now under way. This report presents a comprehensive review of the EPRI effort in the NDE area. Most of the report consists of contractor-supplied progress reports on each current project. An organization from several viewpoints is presented, e.g., in-service inspection operators, RandD personnel, and utility representatives. As the ninth in a planned series of annual progress reports of EPRI-funded NDE activities, this report also serves as the proceedings of the Eighth Annual EPRI NDE Information Meeting held in Palo Alto, California, on November 17-18, 1987. It summarizes significant progress made since the previous EPRI Special Report NP-4902-SR was issued in July 1987. Section 1 contains information about the program organization, and the sections that follow contain contractor-supplied progress reports on each current project. The progress reports are grouped by plant components/emdash/pipe, pressure vessel, steam generator and boiler tubes, and turbine. In addition, Part 6 is devoted to discussions of technology transfer. The individual reports have been cataloged separately.

  13. Non-destructive testing and fracture mechanics: A short discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbst, Uwe; Heckel, Thomas; Carboni, Michele

    2016-02-01

    A short discussion is provided on the relationship between non-destructive testing and fracture mechanics. The basic tasks behind this are to guarantee the safety of a component at a potential hazard loading event, to specify inspection intervals or, alternatively, of demands on non-destructive testing for a fixed inspection regime, to plan accompanying actions for cases of temporary continued operation of structures in which cracks have been detected, and, finally, fatigue strength considerations which take into account initial defects.

  14. Destructive and Non-Destructive Analysis Techniques for Failure Detection of QFN Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhila, M. N.; Wedianti, S.; Suhaimi, W. S. W. M.; Aishah, I.

    2010-03-01

    One of the latest developments in packaging technology is the QFN (Quad Flat Non-Lead) packages, which is both a chip scale package and plastic encapsulated package with lead pad at the bottom. In this paper, different type of commercial QFN single die packages were characterized by using destructive and non-destructive techniques. Non-destructive techniques such as Scanning Acoustic Microscope (SAM) and X-Ray analysis were used to observe package cracking, delamination and other failure mode. Application of SAM include detection of delaminations between lead frame, die face, paddle, heat sink, cracks and plastic encapsulant. In comparison to other techniques, SAM is sensitive to detect beneath the surface of devices which would be inaccessible otherwise by both conventional optical and electron microscopy inspection methods. Destructive technique such as Field Emission Electron Microscopy (FESEM) was implemented to address the failures of the QFN single die packages such as die cracking, lifted ball bonds and other failure mode.

  15. Electromagnetic nondestructive evaluation of tempering process in AISI D2 tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahrobaee, Saeed; Kashefi, Mehrdad

    2015-05-01

    The present paper investigates the potential of using eddy current technique as a reliable nondestructive tool to detect microstructural changes during the different stages of tempering treatment in AISI D2 tool steel. Five stages occur in tempering of the steel: precipitation of ɛ carbides, formation of cementite, retained austenite decomposition, secondary hardening effect and spheroidization of carbides. These stages were characterized by destructive methods, including dilatometry, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopic observations, and hardness measurements. The microstructural changes alter the electrical resistivity/magnetic saturation, which, in turn, influence the eddy current signals. Two EC parameters, induced voltage sensed by pickup coil and impedance point detected by excitation coil, were evaluated as a function of tempering temperature to characterize the microstructural features, nondestructively. The study revealed that a good correlation exists between the EC parameters and the microstructural changes.

  16. Non-destructive imaging of buried electronic interfaces using a decelerated scanning electron beam.

    PubMed

    Hirohata, Atsufumi; Yamamoto, Yasuaki; Murphy, Benedict A; Vick, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in nanotechnology enables the production of atomically abrupt interfaces in multilayered junctions, allowing for an increase in the number of transistors in a processor. However, uniform electron transport has not yet been achieved across the entire interfacial area in junctions due to the existence of local defects, causing local heating and reduction in transport efficiency. To date, junction uniformity has been predominantly assessed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, which requires slicing and milling processes that can potentially introduce additional damage and deformation. It is therefore essential to develop an alternative non-destructive method. Here we show a non-destructive technique using scanning electron microscopy to map buried junction properties. By controlling the electron-beam energy, we demonstrate the contrast imaging of local junction resistances at a controlled depth. This technique can be applied to any buried junctions, from conventional semiconductor and metal devices to organic devices. PMID:27586090

  17. An overview of the nondestructive inspection techniques for coiled tubing and pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, R.K.

    1996-11-01

    Coiled steel tubing and pipe in the diameter range 20--90 mm (0.75--3.5 in.) are replacing conventional oilfield materials for a variety of purposes including workovers, drilling, production tubing, umbilicals, and flowlines. They offer all the advantages of long tubes with no threaded connections. Because coiled tubing is being produced to high quality standards, it is lasting longer than ever before, and the need has arisen for careful nondestructive inspection at frequent intervals to determine accumulated damage to the string and the need for repair. Currently, derating of used coiled tubing using nondestructive testing (NDT) is not performed. While NDT devices for oilfield tubulars have been well documented, little has been written regarding the NDT of coiled tubing. This paper outlines the current NDT methods used during the manufacture of new tubing and the inspection of used coiled tubing.

  18. Characterization of Heat Treated Titanium-Based Implants by Nondestructive Eddy Current and Ultrasonic Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutlu, Ilven; Ekinci, Sinasi; Oktay, Enver

    2014-06-01

    This study presents nondestructive characterization of microstructure and mechanical properties of heat treated Ti, Ti-Cu, and Ti-6Al-4V titanium-based alloys and 17-4 PH stainless steel alloy for biomedical implant applications. Ti, Ti-Cu, and 17-4 PH stainless steel based implants were produced by powder metallurgy. Ti-6Al-4V alloy was investigated as bulk wrought specimens. Effects of sintering temperature, aging, and grain size on mechanical properties were investigated by nondestructive and destructive tests comparatively. Ultrasonic velocity in specimens was measured by using pulse-echo and transmission methods. Electrical conductivity of specimens was determined by eddy current tests. Determination of Young's modulus and strength is important in biomedical implants. Young's modulus of specimens was calculated by using ultrasonic velocities. Calculated Young's modulus values were compared and correlated with experimental values.

  19. Synchronized Electronic Shutter System (SESS) for Thermal Nondestructive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a new method for thermal nondestructive evaluation. This method uses a synchronized electronic shutter system (SESS) to remove the heat lamp's influence on the thermal data during and after flash heating. There are two main concerns when using flash heating. The first concern is during the flash when the photons are reflected back into the camera. This tends to saturate the detectors and potentially introduces unknown and uncorrectable errors when curve fitting the data to a model. To address this, an electronically controlled shutter was placed over the infrared camera lens. Before firing the flash lamps, the shutter is opened to acquire the necessary background data for offset calibration. During flash heating, the shutter is closed to prevent the photons from the high intensity flash from saturating the camera's detectors. The second concern is after the flash heating where the lamps radiate heat after firing. This residual cooling introduces an unwanted transient thermal response into the data. To remove this residual effect, a shutter was placed over the flash lamps to block the infrared heat radiating from the flash head after heating. This helped to remove the transient contribution of the flash. The flash lamp shutters were synchronized electronically with the camera shutter. Results are given comparing the use of the thermal inspection with and without the shutter system.

  20. Research in nondestructive evaluation techniques for nuclear reactor concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Dwight; Smith, Cyrus

    2014-02-18

    The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting longterm environmental degradation behavior of material in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on SSCs is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e. service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enable by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of SSC degradation. The MAaD Pathway R and D Roadmap for Concrete, 'Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap', focused initial research efforts on understanding the recent concrete issues at nuclear power plants and identifying the availability of concrete samples for NDE techniques evaluation and testing. [1] An overview of the research performed by ORNL in these two areas is presented here.

  1. Nondestructive Evaluation of Metal Fatigue Using Nonlinear Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Safe-life and damage-tolerant design philosophies of high performance structures have driven the development of various methods to evaluate nondestructively the accumulation of damage in such structures resulting from cyclic loading. Although many techniques have proven useful, none has been able to provide an unambiguous, quantitative assessment of damage accumulation at each stage of fatigue from the virgin state to fracture. A method based on nonlinear acoustics is shown to provide such a means to assess the state of metal fatigue. The salient features of an analytical model are presented of the microelastic-plastic nonlinearities resulting from the interaction of an acoustic wave with fatigue-generated dislocation substructures and cracks that predictably evolve during the metal fatigue process. The interaction is quantified by the material (acoustic) nonlinearity parameter extracted from acoustic harmonic generation measurements. The parameters typically increase monotonically by several hundred percent over the fatigue life of the metal, thus providing a unique measure of the state of fatigue. Application of the model to aluminum alloy 2024-T4, 410Cb stainless steel, and IN100 nickel-base superalloy specimens fatigued using different loading conditions yields good agreement between theory and experiment. Application of the model and measurement technique to the on-site inspection of steam turbine blades is discussed.

  2. Synchronized electronic shutter system (SESS) for thermal nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a new method for thermal nondestructive evaluation. This method uses a synchronized electronic shutter system (SESS) to remove the heat lamp's influence on the thermal data during and after flash heating. There are two main concerns when using flash heating. The first concern is during the flash when the photons are reflected back into the camera. This tends to saturate the detectors and potentially introduces unknown and uncorrectable errors when curve fitting the data to a model. To address this, an electronically controlled shutter was placed over the infrared camera lens. Before firing the flash lamps, the shutter is opened to acquire the necessary background data for offset calibration. During flash heating, the shutter is closed to prevent the photons from the high intensity flash from saturating the camera's detectors. The second concern is after the flash heating where the lamps radiate heat after firing. This residual cooling introduces an unwanted transient thermal response into the data. To remove this residual effect, a shutter was placed over the flash lamps to block the infrared heat radiating from the flash head after heating. This helped to remove the transient contribution of the flash. The flash lamp shutters were synchronized electronically with the camera shutter. Results are given comparing the use of the thermal inspection with and without the shutter system.

  3. Important factors included in nondestructive readout of GMR MRAM (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Wang, Z.

    1996-04-01

    We proposed a new type of magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) using a weakly coupled GMR effect. It operates on the general principle of storing a binary digit in hard component and sensing its remanent state by switching the soft component in such a way that the magnetic state of the hard component is unaltered. It is believed that this structure could have nondestructive readout (NDRO) characteristics. However, in experiments we found that NDRO was not always achieved; i.e., NDRO was dependent on the polarity of the excitation field. We take an example for mode ``0'' (corresponding to a + remanent state). Although tests involving 3×108 plus excitation pulses indicated that the element was still stable, stability against minus disturb pulses could not be expected. The remanent state of 0 was degrading gradually and was finally destroyed after nenormous numbers of readout switching. An analytical model, in which the hard component follows the Rayleigh law, can explain the above phenomenon. It is because the irreversible magnetization processes cause disturbed states (0' or 1'). Obviously the worst case for mode 0 is being excited by continous minus pulses whereas the worst case for mode 1 is being excited by continous plus pulses. We think that two methods will be effective to eliminate the unstability. One is to obtain a rectangular hysteresis loop for the hard component. The other is to imporve the excitation method, for example, to employ bipolar pulses for excitation signals.

  4. Nondestructive evaluation of ceramic candle filter with various boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.L.; Kiriakidis, A.C.

    2005-06-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) using a dynamic characterization technique was conducted to study ceramic candle filters. Ceramic candle filters are hollow cylindrical structures made of porous ceramic materials used to protect gas turbine in coal-fired power plants. Deterioration and failure of ceramic filters occurs after being exposed to high-temperature and high-pressure operational environment over a period of time. This paper focuses on the development of an NDE method that can predict the in-situ structural stiffness of the candle filters while still being attached to the plenum. A combination of laboratory testing, theoretical analysis, and finite element method (FEM) simulations are presented. The candle filters were tested using a laser vibrometer/accelerometer setup with variable boundary restraints. A variable end-restraint Timoshenko beam equation was derived to determine the dynamic response of the candle filters with simulated in-situ boundary conditions. Results from the FEM simulation were verified with the analysis to determine the stiffness degradation of the candle filters as well as the boundary conditions. Results from this study show that the vibration characteristics can be used effectively to evaluate both the structural stiffness and the in-situ boundary restraints of the ceramic candle filters during field inspections.

  5. Research in nondestructive evaluation techniques for nuclear reactor concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Dwight; Smith, Cyrus

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting longterm environmental degradation behavior of material in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on SSCs is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e. service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enable by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of SSC degradation. The MAaD Pathway R&D Roadmap for Concrete, "Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap", focused initial research efforts on understanding the recent concrete issues at nuclear power plants and identifying the availability of concrete samples for NDE techniques evaluation and testing. [1] An overview of the research performed by ORNL in these two areas is presented here.

  6. Nondestructive characterization of the elastic constants of fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mal, Ajit K.; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1993-01-01

    Composite structural components may be subjected to a variety of defects resulting in a sharp reduction in their load carrying capacity or even catastrophic failure. Thus, it is extremely important to have the means to monitor the degradation suffered by critical components of a structure for safe operation during its service life. A nondestructive method based on ultrasonics has recently been developed for the quantitative evaluation of composite structural components during service. The experimental part of the technique uses a two-transducer, pitch-catch type arrangement to generate a variety of elastic waves within the specimen immersed in water. The recorded reflection data are then analyzed by means of a theoretical model to back out the relevant properties. In this paper the method is applied to determine the stiffness constants of unidirectional graphite/epoxy materials. The measurements are shown to be efficient and sufficiently accurate so that it can be used for early detection of material degradation in composite structural elements during service.

  7. Non-destructive evaluation of anchorage zones by ultrasonics techniques.

    PubMed

    Kharrat, M; Gaillet, L

    2015-08-01

    This work aims to evaluate the efficiency and reliability of two Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) methods for damage assessment in bridges' anchorages. The Acousto-Ultrasonic (AU) technique is compared to classical Ultrasonic Testing (UT) in terms of defect detection and structural health classification. The AU technique is firstly used on single seven-wire strands damaged by artificial defects. The effect of growing defects on the waves traveling through the strands is evaluated. Thereafter, three specimens of anchorages with unknown defects are inspected by the AU and UT techniques. Damage assessment results from both techniques are then compared. The structural health conditions of the specimens can be then classified by a damage severity criterion. Finally, a damaged anchorage socket with mastered defects is controlled by the same techniques. The UT allows the detection and localization of damaged wires. The AU technique is used to bring out the effect of defects on acoustic features by comparing a healthy and damaged anchorage sockets. It is concluded that the UT method is suitable for local and crack-like defects, whereas the AU technique enables the assessment of the global structural health of the anchorage zones. PMID:25824342

  8. Fatigue strength reduction factors for welds based on nondestructive examination

    SciTech Connect

    Hechmer, J.L.; Kuhn, E.J. III

    1999-02-01

    Based on the author`s hypothesis that nondestructive examination (NDE) has a major role in predicting the fatigue life of pressure vessels, a project was initiated to develop a defined relationship between NDE and fatigue strength reduction factors (FSRF). Even though a relationship should apply to both base metal and weld metal, the project was limited to weld metal because NDE for base metal is reasonably well established, whereas NDE for weld metal is more variable, depending on application. A matrix of FSRF was developed based on weld type (full penetration, partial penetration, and fillet weld) versus the NDE that is applied. The NDE methods that are included are radiographic testing (RT), ultrasonic testing (UT), magnetic particle testing (MT), dye penetrant testing (PT), and visual testing (VT). The first two methods (RT and UT) are volumetric examinations, and the remaining three are surface examinations. Seven combinations of volumetric and surface examinations were defined; thus, seven levels of FSRF are defined. Following the initial development of the project, a PVRC (Pressure Vessel Research Council) grant was obtained for the purpose of having a broad review. The report (Hechmer, 1998) has been accepted by PVRC. This paper presents the final matrix, the basis for the FSRF, and key definitions for accurate application of the FSRF matrix. A substantial amount of additional information is presented in the PVRC report (Hechmer, 1998).

  9. Complex Archaeological Prospection Using Combination of Non-destructive Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faltýnová, M.; Pavelka, K.; Nový, P.; Šedina, J.

    2015-08-01

    This article describes the use of a combination of non-destructive techniques for the complex documentation of a fabulous historical site called Devil's Furrow, an unusual linear formation lying in the landscape of central Bohemia. In spite of many efforts towards interpretation of the formation, its original form and purpose have not yet been explained in a satisfactory manner. The study focuses on the northern part of the furrow which appears to be a dissimilar element within the scope of the whole Devil's Furrow. This article presents detailed description of relics of the formation based on historical map searches and modern investigation methods including airborne laser scanning, aerial photogrammetry (based on airplane and RPAS) and ground-penetrating radar. Airborne laser scanning data and aerial orthoimages acquired by the Czech Office for Surveying, Mapping and Cadastre were used. Other measurements were conducted by our laboratory. Data acquired by various methods provide sufficient information to determine the probable original shape of the formation and proves explicitly the anthropological origin of the northern part of the formation (around village Lipany).

  10. Nondestructive Evaluation of Metal Fatigue Using Nonlinear Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2009-03-01

    Safe-life and damage-tolerant design philosophies of high performance structures have driven the development of various methods to evaluate nondestructively the accumulation of damage in such structures resulting from cyclic loading. Although many techniques have proven useful, none has been able to provide an unambiguous, quantitative assessment of damage accumulation at each stage of fatigue from the virgin state to fracture. A method based on nonlinear acoustics is shown to provide such a means to assess the state of metal fatigue. The salient features of an analytical model are presented of the microelastic-plastic nonlinearities resulting from the interaction of an acoustic wave with fatigue-generated dislocation substructures and cracks that predictably evolve during the metal fatigue process. The interaction is quantified by the material (acoustic) nonlinearity parameter β extracted from acoustic harmonic generation measurements. The β parameters typically increase monotonically by several hundred percent over the fatigue life of the metal, thus providing a unique measure of the state of fatigue. Application of the model to aluminum alloy 2024-T4 and 410 Cb stainless steel specimens fatigued using different loading conditions yields good agreement between theory and experiment. Application of the model and measurement technique to the on-site inspection of steam turbine blades is discussed.

  11. Nondestructive and rapid detection of potato black heart based on machine vision technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fang; Peng, Yankun; Wei, Wensong

    2016-05-01

    Potatoes are one of the major food crops in the world. Potato black heart is a kind of defect that the surface is intact while the tissues in skin become black. This kind of potato has lost the edibleness, but it's difficult to be detected with conventional methods. A nondestructive detection system based on the machine vision technology was proposed in this study to distinguish the normal and black heart of potatoes according to the different transmittance of them. The detection system was equipped with a monochrome CCD camera, LED light sources for transmitted illumination and a computer. Firstly, the transmission images of normal and black heart potatoes were taken by the detection system. Then the images were processed by algorithm written with VC++. As the transmitted light intensity was influenced by the radial dimension of the potato samples, the relationship between the grayscale value and the potato radial dimension was acquired by analyzing the grayscale value changing rule of the transmission image. Then proper judging condition was confirmed to distinguish the normal and black heart of potatoes after image preprocessing. The results showed that the nondestructive system built coupled with the processing methods was accessible for the detection of potato black heart at a considerable accuracy rate. The transmission detection technique based on machine vision is nondestructive and feasible to realize the detection of potato black heart.

  12. [Study on Non-Destructive Testing of Guqin Interior Structure Based on Computed Tomography].

    PubMed

    Zhao, De-da; Liu, Xing-e; Yang, Shu-min; Yu, Shenz; Tian, Gen-lin; Ma, Jian-feng; Wang, Qing-ping

    2015-12-01

    The wood property and production process affect quality of Guqin. At the same time, Guqin shape with cavity layout relations to the improvement of Guqin technology and inheritance, so it's very important to get the internal cavity characteristics and parameters on the condition of non-destructive the structure of Guqin. The image of interior structure in Guqin was investigated by overall scanning based on non-destructive testing technology of computed tomography, which texture of faceplate, connection method between faceplate and soleplate and interior defects were studied. The three-dimensional reconstruction of Guqin cavity was achieved through Mimics software of surface rendering method and put the two-dimensional CT tomography images convert into three-dimensional, which more complete show interior structural form in Guqin, and finally the parameter of cavity dimensions was obtained. Experimental research shows that there is significant difference in Guqin interior structure between Zhong-ni and Luo-xia type, in which the fluctuation of the interior surfacein Zhong-ni type's is larger than that in Luo-xia type; the interior volume of Zhong-ni typeis less than that of Luo-xia type, especially in Guqin neck. The accurate internal information of Guqin obtained through the computed tomography (CT) technology will provide technical support for the Guqin manufacture craft and the quality examination, as well as provide the reference in the aspect of non-destructive testing for other traditional precious internal structure research. PMID:26964242

  13. Nondestructive evaluation of near-surface residual stress in shot-peened nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Feng

    Surface enhancement methods, which produce beneficial compressive residual stresses and increased hardness in a shallow near-surface region, are widely used in a number of industrial applications, including gas-turbine engines. Nondestructive evaluation of residual stress gradients in surface-enhanced materials has great significance for turbine engine component life extension and their reliability in service. It has been recently found that, in sharp contrast with most other materials, shot-peened nickel-base superalloys exhibit an apparent increase in electrical conductivity at increasing inspection frequencies, which can be exploited for nondestructive residual stress assessment. The primary goal of this research is to develop a quantitative eddy current method for nondestructive residual stress profiles in surface-treated nickel-base superalloys. Our work have been focused on five different aspects of this issue, namely, (i) validating the noncontacting eddy current technique for electroelastic coefficients calibration, (ii) developing inversion procedures for determining the subsurface residual stress profiles from the measured apparent eddy current conductivity (AECC), (iii) predicting the adverse effect of surface roughness on the eddy current characterization of shot-peened metals, (iv) separating excess AECC caused by the primary residual stress effect from intrinsic conductivity variations caused by material inhomogeneity, and (v) investigating different mechanisms through which cold work could influence the AECC in surface-treated nickel-base superalloys. The results of this dissertation have led to a better understanding of the underlying physical phenomenon of the measured excess AECC on nickel-base engine alloys, and solved a few critical applied issues in eddy current nondestructive residual stress assessment in surface-treated engine components and, ultimately, contributed to the better utilization and safer operation of the Air Force's aging

  14. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-1, Fundamentals of Ultrasonic Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaulding, Bruce

    This first in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II introduces the student/trainee to the basic behavior of ultrasound, describes ultrasonic test equipment, and outlines the principal methods of ultrasonic testing. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1)…

  15. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) II. Module 32-3, Fundamentals of Magnetic Particle Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groseclose, Richard

    This third in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II explains the principles of magnets and magnetic fields and how they are applied in magnetic particle testing, describes the theory and methods of magnetizing test specimens, describes the test equipment used, discusses the principles and…

  16. Nondestructive Analysis of Phytochemical Components by Near Infared (NIR) Spectroscopy: Measurement of Rosmarinic Acid in Prunella Vulgaris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NIR spectroscopy has developed into a rapid nondestructive method to analyze, in a single event, an increasingly complex number of general and specific components in solid and liquid samples, including dissolved solids, acids, density, pH, microbial contamination, and percent oil, carbohydrate, prot...

  17. Aluminum analysis in biological reference material by nondestructive methods

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, S.; Arendt, A.; Keck, B.; Glascock, M.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, the determination of aluminum in biological materials has become the subject of many research projects. This interest stems from an increasing knowledge of the toxicity of aluminum to both aquatic and human life. Unfortunately, the detection of aluminum in biological materials has proven troublesome. The use of traditional chemical determinations has been shown to be very long and somewhat complicated. Several attempts have been made using neutron activation analysis, but an interfering reaction must be taken into account. In this experiment the rabbit irradiation facilities at the University of Missouri Research Reactor were used. The aluminum concentrations for eight certified reference materials are shown. When US National Bureau of Standards (NBS) value is given as certified or as an information value, results agree very well. The results for NBS 1572 citrus leaves agree, and NBS 1577 results agree very well with that of Glascock et al.

  18. Monte-Carlo Application for Nondestructive Nuclear Waste Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carasco, C.; Engels, R.; Frank, M.; Furletov, S.; Furletova, J.; Genreith, C.; Havenith, A.; Kemmerling, G.; Kettler, J.; Krings, T.; Ma, J.-L.; Mauerhofer, E.; Neike, D.; Payan, E.; Perot, B.; Rossbach, M.; Schitthelm, O.; Schumann, M.; Vasquez, R.

    2014-06-01

    Radioactive waste has to undergo a process of quality checking in order to check its conformance with national regulations prior to its transport, intermediate storage and final disposal. Within the quality checking of radioactive waste packages non-destructive assays are required to characterize their radio-toxic and chemo-toxic contents. The Institute of Energy and Climate Research - Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety of the Forschungszentrum Jülich develops in the framework of cooperation nondestructive analytical techniques for the routine characterization of radioactive waste packages at industrial-scale. During the phase of research and development Monte Carlo techniques are used to simulate the transport of particle, especially photons, electrons and neutrons, through matter and to obtain the response of detection systems. The radiological characterization of low and intermediate level radioactive waste drums is performed by segmented γ-scanning (SGS). To precisely and accurately reconstruct the isotope specific activity content in waste drums by SGS measurement, an innovative method called SGSreco was developed. The Geant4 code was used to simulate the response of the collimated detection system for waste drums with different activity and matrix configurations. These simulations allow a far more detailed optimization, validation and benchmark of SGSreco, since the construction of test drums covering a broad range of activity and matrix properties is time consuming and cost intensive. The MEDINA (Multi Element Detection based on Instrumental Neutron Activation) test facility was developed to identify and quantify non-radioactive elements and substances in radioactive waste drums. MEDINA is based on prompt and delayed gamma neutron activation analysis (P&DGNAA) using a 14 MeV neutron generator. MCNP simulations were carried out to study the response of the MEDINA facility in terms of gamma spectra, time dependence of the neutron energy spectrum

  19. Cryogenic Storage Tank Non-Destructive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work in non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of cryogenic storage tanks. Four large cryogenic tanks, constructed in 1965 with perlite insulation in the annular regions, are of concern. The construction of the tanks, two Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and two Liquid Hydrogen (LH2), are described. The loss rate for the LOX tank at Pad A is slightly higher than that for the one at Pad B. The concerns for the LH2 tank at Pad B are that there is a significantly higher boil-off rate than that at Pad A, that there is mold growth, indicative of increased heat flow, that there is a long down-time needed for repairs, and that 3 of 5 full thermal cycles have been used on the Pad B LH2 tank. The advantages and disadvantages of thermal imaging are given. A detailed description of what is visible of the structures in the infra-red is given and views of the thermal images are included. Missing Perlite is given as the probable cause of the cold spot on the Pad B LH2 tank. There is no indications of problematic cold regions on the Pad A LH2 tank, as shown by the thermal images given in the presentation. There is definite indication of a cold region on the Pad A LOX tank. There is however concerns with thermal imaging, as thermal images can be significantly effected by environmental conditions, image differences on similar days but with different wind speeds. Other effects that must be considered include ambient temperature, humidity levels/dew, and cloud reflections

  20. Nondestructive Evaluation Correlated with Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Azid, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.

    1999-01-01

    Advanced materials are being developed for use in high-temperature gas turbine applications. For these new materials to be fully utilized, their deformation properties, their nondestructive evaluation (NDE) quality and material durability, and their creep and fatigue fracture characteristics need to be determined by suitable experiments. The experimental findings must be analyzed, characterized, modeled and translated into constitutive equations for stress analysis and life prediction. Only when these ingredients - together with the appropriate computational tools - are available, can durability analysis be performed in the design stage, long before the component is built. One of the many structural components being evaluated by the NDE group at the NASA Lewis Research Center is the flywheel system. It is being considered as an energy storage device for advanced space vehicles. Such devices offer advantages over electrochemical batteries in situations demanding high power delivery and high energy storage per unit weight. In addition, flywheels have potentially higher efficiency and longer lifetimes with proper motor-generator and rotor design. Flywheels made of fiber-reinforced polymer composite material show great promise for energy applications because of the high energy and power densities that they can achieve along with a burst failure mode that is relatively benign in comparison to those of flywheels made of metallic materials Therefore, to help improve durability and reduce structural uncertainties, we are developing a comprehensive analytical approach to predict the reliability and life of these components under these harsh loading conditions. The combination of NDE and two- and three-dimensional finite element analyses (e.g., stress analyses and fracture mechanics) is expected to set a standardized procedure to accurately assess the applicability of using various composite materials to design a suitable rotor/flywheel assembly.

  1. Non-destructive Testing by Infrared Thermography Under Random Excitation and ARMA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, J. L.; Nicolas, J. L.; Candoré, J. C.; Detalle, V.

    2012-11-01

    Photothermal thermography is a non-destructive testing (NDT) method, which has many applications in the field of control and characterization of thin materials. This technique is usually implemented under CW or flash excitation. Such excitations are not adapted for control of fragile materials or for multi-frequency analysis. To allow these analyses, in this article, the use of a new control mode is proposed: infrared thermography under random excitation and auto regressive moving average analysis. First, the principle of this NDT method is presented. Then, the method is shown to permit detection, with low energy constraints, of detachments situated in mural paintings.

  2. Nondestructive Evaluation of Foam Insulation for the External Tank Return to Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Richter, Joel D.

    2006-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation methods have been developed to identify defects in the foam thermal protection system (TPS) of the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET). Terahertz imaging and backscatter radiography have been brought from prototype lab systems to production hardened inspection tools in just a few years. These methods have been demonstrated to be capable of detecting void type defects under many inches of foam which, if not repaired, could lead to detrimental foam loss. The evolution of these methods from lab tools to implementation on the ET will be discussed.

  3. Photothermal Analysis Applied To Non-Destructive Evaluation Of Paint On Polymer Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, D.; Busse, G.

    1988-10-01

    The decoration and protection quality of coatings on polymers is of considerable interest for industrial applications. However, at present there is no non-destructive (NDE) method to monitor the quality of these coatings during the manufacturing process or while they are in use. As an approach for such a method we use photothermal analysis where the propagation and reflection of optically generated thermal waves is investigated. We found that one can monitor the drying process, the effect of surface temperature treatment, and coating thickness (accuracy + 2 μm in 50 μm thickness). The information obtained with this remote NDE method is adequate for most industrial applications, eg car manufacturing.

  4. In-process nondestructive evaluation of the pultrusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fecko, David L.; Heider, Dirk; Gillespie, John W., Jr.; Steiner, Karl V.

    1995-07-01

    Substantial growth potential for composite materials exists in the private sector, where high volume, low cost production is required. Post processing inspection can represent a significant percentage of the cost of composite products. Alternate ways of assuring quality must be examined. In-process inspection can be easily adapted to continuous composite manufacturing techniques such as the pultrusion process, enabling 100% inspection. Recent research efforts at the Center for Composite Materials has focused on ways of evaluating pultruded composites on-line by using ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques. The most accurate method to date is based upon Lamb wave velocity measurements. This inspection technique uses two transducers positioned at normal incidence to the composite in a through-transmission mode to generate and receive ultrasonic waves which propagate through the sample. Careful processing of the waveform data reveals the degree of porosity in the composite samples. A series of tests were performed in-situ on an actual laboratory scale pultrusion process which accurately predicted the porosity in a 6.4 mm multiplied by 3.2 mm (0.25' multiplied by 0.125') cross-section pultruded rod over a range of 0.5% to 12% void volume fraction.

  5. Non-destructive monitoring of curing process in precast concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, S.; Ranz, J.; Fernández, R.; Albert, V.; Fuente, J. V.; Hernández, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    Currently, the use of precast concrete elements has gained importance because it offers many advantages over site-cast concrete. A disadvantage of site-cast concrete is that its properties vary according to the manufacturing method, the environment and even the operator who carried out the mixing, pouring and implementation of the concrete. Precast concrete elements are manufactured in a controlled environment (typically referred to as a precast plant) and this reduces the shrinkage and creep. One of the key properties of precast concrete is the capability to gain compressive strength rapidly under the appropriate conditions. The compressive strength determines if the precast can be stripped from the form or manipulated. This parameter is measured using destructive testing over cylindrical or cubic samples. The quality control of precast is derived from the fracture suffered by these elements, resulting in a "pass or fail" evaluation. In most cases, the solution to this problem is to allow the material to cure for a few hours until it acquires sufficient strength to handle the precast element. The focus of this paper is the description of the research project "CUREND". This project aims to design a non-destructive methodology to monitor the curing process in precast concrete. The monitoring will be performed using wireless sensor networks.

  6. Nondestructive and Real-time Measurement of Moisture in Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Yuichi; Kawase, Kodo; Mizuno, Maya; Yamashita, Masatsugu; Otani, Chiko

    We constructed a THz transillumination system for water content monitoring, and we succeeded in measuring the moisture level in plants. Our measurement system uses a widely tunable coherent THz parametric oscillator source. As target we chose for this experiment a leaf of Japanese basil. The time variation of the water content in the leaf was monitored in two situations: a leaf freshly cut which is left to dry out, and the leaf of a water stressed plant. We found by real-time measurements that the water content of a cut leaf does not decrease uniformly in time. Also, the response to water stress is delayed by about 5-10 minutes. Furthermore, we demonstrated a moisture measurement using a transillumination THz imaging system. As target we chose for this experiment a leaf of Hedera helix held between two thin plastic sheets. The change of the moisture distribution is clearly visible. These results show that the method described here can be applied to nondestructive and real-time monitoring of water content in plants.

  7. FIRST 100 T NON-DESTRUCTIVE MAGNET OUTER COIL SET

    SciTech Connect

    J. BACON; A. BACA; ET AL

    1999-09-01

    The controlled power outer coil set of the first 100 T non-destructive (100 T ND) magnet is described. This magnet will be installed as part of the user facility research equipment at the National High Magnetic Field laboratory (NHMFL) Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 100 T ND controlled power outer coil set consists of seven nested, mechanically independent externally reinforced coils. These coils, in combination, will produce a 47 T platform field in a 225-mm diameter bore. Using inertial energy storage a synchronous motor/generator provides ac power to a set of seven ac-dc converters rated at 64 MW/80 MVA each. These converters energize three independent coil circuits to create 170 MJ of field energy in the outer coil set at the platform field of 47 T. Each coil consists of a multi-layer winding of high strength conductor supported by an external high strength stainless steel shell. Coils with the highest magnetic loads will utilize a reinforcing shell fabricated from highly cold worked 301 stainless steel strip. The autofrettage conditioning method will be used to pre-stress the coils and thereby limit conductor and reinforcement strains to the elastic range. The purpose of pre-stressing the coils is to attain a design life of 10,000 full field pulses. The operation and conditioning of the coil set will be described along with special features of its design, magnetic and structural analyses and construction.

  8. High resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy system for nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    With increased demand for high resolution ultrasonic evaluation, computer based systems or work stations become essential. The ultrasonic spectroscopy method of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) was used to develop a high resolution ultrasonic inspection system supported by modern signal processing, pattern recognition, and neural network technologies. The basic system which was completed consists of a 386/20 MHz PC (IBM AT compatible), a pulser/receiver, a digital oscilloscope with serial and parallel communications to the computer, an immersion tank with motor control of X-Y axis movement, and the supporting software package, IUNDE, for interactive ultrasonic evaluation. Although the hardware components are commercially available, the software development is entirely original. By integrating signal processing, pattern recognition, maximum entropy spectral analysis, and artificial neural network functions into the system, many NDE tasks can be performed. The high resolution graphics capability provides visualization of complex NDE problems. The phase 3 efforts involve intensive marketing of the software package and collaborative work with industrial sectors.

  9. IDENTIFYING FRACTURE ORIGIN IN CERAMICS BY COMBINATION OF NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING AND DISCRETE ELEMENT ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Senapati, Rajeev; Zhang Jianmei

    2010-02-22

    Advanced ceramic materials have been extensively applied in aerospace, automobile and other industries. However, the reliability of the advanced ceramics is a major concern because of the brittle nature of the materials. In this paper, combination of nondestructive testing and numerical modeling Discrete Element Method is proposed to identify the fracture origin in ceramics. The nondestructive testing--laser scattering technology is first performed on the ceramic components to reveal the machining-induced damage such as cracks and the material-inherent flaws such as voids, then followed by the four point bending test. Discrete Element software package PFC{sup 2D} is used to simulate the four point bending test and try to identify where the fractures start. The numerical representation of the ceramic materials is done by generating a densely packed particle system using the specimen genesis procedure and then applying the suitable microparameters to the particle system. Simulation of four point bending test is performed on materials having no defects, materials having manufacturing-induced defects like cracks, and materials having material-inherent flaws like voids. The initiation and propagation of defects is modeled and the mean contact force on the loading ball is also plotted. The simulation prediction results are well in accordance with the nondestructive testing results.

  10. Non-destructive estimation of root pressure using sap flow, stem diameter measurements and mechanistic modelling

    PubMed Central

    De Swaef, Tom; Hanssens, Jochen; Cornelis, Annelies; Steppe, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Background Upward water movement in plants via the xylem is generally attributed to the cohesion–tension theory, as a response to transpiration. Under certain environmental conditions, root pressure can also contribute to upward xylem water flow. Although the occurrence of root pressure is widely recognized, ambiguity exists about the exact mechanism behind root pressure, the main influencing factors and the consequences of root pressure. In horticultural crops, such as tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), root pressure is thought to cause cells to burst, and to have an important impact on the marketable yield. Despite the challenges of root pressure research, progress in this area is limited, probably because of difficulties with direct measurement of root pressure, prompting the need for indirect and non-destructive measurement techniques. Methods A new approach to allow non-destructive and non-invasive estimation of root pressure is presented, using continuous measurements of sap flow and stem diameter variation in tomato combined with a mechanistic flow and storage model, based on cohesion–tension principles. Key Results Transpiration-driven sap flow rates are typically inversely related to stem diameter changes; however, this inverse relationship was no longer valid under conditions of low transpiration. This decoupling between sap flow rates and stem diameter variations was mathematically related to root pressure. Conclusions Root pressure can be estimated in a non-destructive, repeatable manner, using only external plant sensors and a mechanistic model. PMID:23211757

  11. Non-destructive mapping of grain orientations in 3D by laboratory X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, S. A.; Reischig, P.; Holzner, C.; Lauridsen, E. M.; Withers, P. J.; Merkle, A. P.; Feser, M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to characterise crystallographic microstructure, non-destructively and in three-dimensions, is a powerful tool for understanding many aspects related to damage and deformation mechanisms in polycrystalline materials. To this end, the technique of X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) using monochromatic synchrotron and polychromatic laboratory X-ray sources has been shown to be capable of mapping crystal grains and their orientations non-destructively in 3D. Here we describe a novel laboratory-based X-ray DCT modality (LabDCT), enabling the wider accessibility of the DCT technique for routine use and in-depth studies of, for example, temporal changes in crystallographic grain structure non-destructively over time through ‘4D’ in situ time-lapse studies. The capability of the technique is demonstrated by studying a titanium alloy (Ti-β21S) sample. In the current implementation the smallest grains that can be reliably detected are around 40 μm. The individual grain locations and orientations are reconstructed using the LabDCT method and the results are validated against independent measurements from phase contrast tomography and electron backscatter diffraction respectively. Application of the technique promises to provide important insights related to the roles of recrystallization and grain growth on materials properties as well as supporting 3D polycrystalline modelling of materials performance. PMID:26494523

  12. The thermographic nondestructive evaluation of iron aluminide green sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Michael Lee

    The recent development of manufacturing techniques for the fabrication of thin iron aluminide sheet requires advanced quantitative methods for on-line inspection. An understanding of the mechanisms responsible for flaws and the development of appropriate flaw detection methods are key elements in an effective quality management system. The first step in the fabrication of thin FeAl alloy sheet is the formation of a green sheet by cold rolling FeAl powder mixed with organic binding agents. The green sheet composite has a bulk density, which is typically less than about 3.6 g/cc. The finished sheet, with a density of about 6.1 g/cc, is obtained using a series of process steps involving binder elimination, densification, sintering, and annealing. Non-uniformities within the green sheet are the major contributor to material failure in subsequent sheet processing and the production of non-conforming finished sheet. The production environment and physical characteristics of the composite provide for unique challenges in developing a rapid nondestructive inspection capability. The method must be non-contact due to the fragile nature of the composite. Limited access to the material also demands a one-sided inspection technique. An active thermographic method providing for 100% on-line inspection within an industrial, process has been developed. This approach is cost competitive with alternative technologies, such as x-ray imaging systems, and provides the required sensitivity to the variations in material composition. The mechanism of flaw formation and the transformation of green sheet flaws into defects that appear in intermediate and finished sheet products are described. A mathematical model which describes the green sheet heat transfer propagation, in the context of the inspection technique and the compact heterogeneity, is also presented. The potential for feedback within the production process is also discussed.

  13. Nondestructive measurement of esophageal biaxial mechanical properties utilizing sonometry.

    PubMed

    Aho, Johnathon M; Qiang, Bo; Wigle, Dennis A; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Urban, Matthew W

    2016-07-01

    Malignant esophageal pathology typically requires resection of the esophagus and reconstruction to restore foregut continuity. Reconstruction options are limited and morbid. The esophagus represents a useful target for tissue engineering strategies based on relative simplicity in comparison to other organs. The ideal tissue engineered conduit would have sufficient and ideally matched mechanical tolerances to native esophageal tissue. Current methods for mechanical testing of esophageal tissues both in vivo and ex vivo are typically destructive, alter tissue conformation, ignore anisotropy, or are not able to be performed in fluid media. The aim of this study was to investigate biomechanical properties of swine esophageal tissues through nondestructive testing utilizing sonometry ex vivo. This method allows for biomechanical determination of tissue properties, particularly longitudinal and circumferential moduli and strain energy functions. The relative contribution of mucosal-submucosal layers and muscular layers are compared to composite esophagi. Swine thoracic esophageal tissues (n  =  15) were tested by pressure loading using a continuous pressure pump system to generate stress. Preconditioning of tissue was performed by pressure loading with the pump system and pre-straining the tissue to in vivo length before data was recorded. Sonometry using piezocrystals was utilized to determine longitudinal and circumferential strain on five composite esophagi. Similarly, five mucosa-submucosal and five muscular layers from thoracic esophagi were tested independently. This work on esophageal tissues is consistent with reported uniaxial and biaxial mechanical testing and reported results using strain energy theory and also provides high resolution displacements, preserves native architectural structure and allows assessment of biomechanical properties in fluid media. This method may be of use to characterize mechanical properties of tissue engineered esophageal

  14. Nondestructive measurement of esophageal biaxial mechanical properties utilizing sonometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aho, Johnathon M.; Qiang, Bo; Wigle, Dennis A.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Urban, Matthew W.

    2016-07-01

    Malignant esophageal pathology typically requires resection of the esophagus and reconstruction to restore foregut continuity. Reconstruction options are limited and morbid. The esophagus represents a useful target for tissue engineering strategies based on relative simplicity in comparison to other organs. The ideal tissue engineered conduit would have sufficient and ideally matched mechanical tolerances to native esophageal tissue. Current methods for mechanical testing of esophageal tissues both in vivo and ex vivo are typically destructive, alter tissue conformation, ignore anisotropy, or are not able to be performed in fluid media. The aim of this study was to investigate biomechanical properties of swine esophageal tissues through nondestructive testing utilizing sonometry ex vivo. This method allows for biomechanical determination of tissue properties, particularly longitudinal and circumferential moduli and strain energy functions. The relative contribution of mucosal–submucosal layers and muscular layers are compared to composite esophagi. Swine thoracic esophageal tissues (n  =  15) were tested by pressure loading using a continuous pressure pump system to generate stress. Preconditioning of tissue was performed by pressure loading with the pump system and pre-straining the tissue to in vivo length before data was recorded. Sonometry using piezocrystals was utilized to determine longitudinal and circumferential strain on five composite esophagi. Similarly, five mucosa–submucosal and five muscular layers from thoracic esophagi were tested independently. This work on esophageal tissues is consistent with reported uniaxial and biaxial mechanical testing and reported results using strain energy theory and also provides high resolution displacements, preserves native architectural structure and allows assessment of biomechanical properties in fluid media. This method may be of use to characterize mechanical properties of tissue engineered

  15. Application of Advanced Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques for Cylindrical Composite Test Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Richard E.; Roth, Donald J.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Two nondestructive methods were applied to composite cylinder samples pressurized to failure in order to determine manufacturing quality and monitor damage progression under load. A unique computed tomography (CT) image processing methodology developed at NASA Glenn Research was used to assess the condition of the as-received samples while acoustic emission (AE) monitoring was used to identify both the extent and location of damage within the samples up to failure. Results show the effectiveness of both of these methods in identifying potentially critical fabrication issues and their resulting impact on performance.

  16. Laser-Compton photon radiography for nondestructive test of bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokawa, Hiroyuki; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Kudo, Katshuhisa; Takeda, Naoto; Mikado, Tomohisa; Yamada, Kawakatsu

    2001-12-01

    Experimental results of transmission photon radiography of bulk materials using the laser-Compton photon beam in the energy range of 2-20 MeV are given. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the effectiveness and to survey a potential need and a technical limit of the present method for industrial application, such as nondestructive test of bulk materials. Several radiographs of metals, ceramics, and concrete were measured with the present method. Position resolution of the system was measured with using 10 MeV photon beam and slit. It was less than 1 mm.

  17. Proceedings: Eleventh annual EPRI nondestructive evaluation information meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Avioli, M.J. Jr.; Behravesh, M.M.; Gehl, S.M.; Lang, J.; McCloskey, T.; Stein, J.; Viswanathan, R.; Welty, C.S.

    1991-08-01

    In increasing cost of equipment for power generating plants and the potential increases in productivity and safety available through rapidly developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technology led EPRI to begin a Nondestructive Evaluation Program in 1974. The major focus has been on light water reactor (LWR) inspection problems; however, increased application to other systems is now under way. This report, NP7047-M, presents a summary of companion report NP7047- SD Nondestructive Evaluation Research Progress in 1990: Proceedings from the Eleventh Annual EPRI NDE Information Meeting.'' NP7047-SD presents EPRI's effort in the NDE area. Most of the report consists of contractor-supplied progress reports on current NDE projects. In addition, organization plans of the program are presented from different perspectives; in-service inspection vendor, R D engineer, and utility owner. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Characterization of Nitinol Laser-Weld Joints by Nondestructive Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlschlögel, Markus; Gläßel, Gunter; Sanchez, Daniela; Schüßler, Andreas; Dillenz, Alexander; Saal, David; Mayr, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Joining technology is an integral part of today's Nitinol medical device manufacturing. Besides crimping and riveting, laser welding is often applied to join components made from Nitinol to Nitinol, as well as Nitinol components to dissimilar materials. Other Nitinol joining techniques include adhesive bonding, soldering, and brazing. Typically, the performance of joints is assessed by destructive mechanical testing, on a process validation base. In this study, a nondestructive testing method—photothermal radiometry—is applied to characterize small Nitinol laser-weld joints used to connect two wire ends via a sleeve. Two different wire diameters are investigated. Effective joint connection cross sections are visualized using metallography techniques. Results of the nondestructive testing are correlated to data from destructive torsion testing, where the maximum torque at fracture is evaluated for the same joints and criteria for the differentiation of good and poor laser-welding quality by nondestructive testing are established.

  19. Determination of Flaw Type and Location Using an Expert Module in Ultrasonic Nondestructive Testing for Weld Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriari, D.; Zolfaghari, A.; Masoumi, F.

    2011-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation is explained as nondestructive testing, nondestructive inspection, and nondestructive examination. It is a desire to determine some characteristic of the object or to determine whether the object contains irregularities, discontinuities, or flaws. Ultrasound based inspection techniques are used extensively throughout industry for detection of flaws in engineering materials. The range and variety of imperfections encountered is large, and critical assessment of location, size, orientation and type is often difficult. In addition, increasing quality requirements of new standards and codes of practice relating to fitness for purpose are placing higher demands on operators. Applying of an expert knowledge-based analysis in ultrasonic examination is a powerful tool that can help assure safety, quality, and reliability; increase productivity; decrease liability; and save money. In this research, an expert module system is coupled with ultrasonic examination (A-Scan Procedure) to determine and evaluate type and location of flaws that embedded during welding parts. The processing module of this expert system is implemented based on EN standard to classify welding defects, acceptance condition and measuring of their location via echo static pattern and image processing. The designed module introduces new system that can automate evaluating of the results of A-scan method according to EN standard. It can simultaneously recognize the number and type of defects, and determine flaw position during each scan.

  20. Quantitative non-destructive evaluation of composite materials based on ultrasonic parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1987-01-01

    Research into the nondestructive evaluation of advanced reinforced composite laminates is summarized. The applicability of the Framers-Kronig equations to the nondestructive evaluation of composite materials is described.

  1. Nondestructive assay and nondestructive examination of remote-handled transuranic waste at the ORNL waste handling and packaging plant

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, F.J.; Caldwell, J.T.; Pajarito Scientific Corp. )

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to examine the use of an electron linear accelerator (LINAC) in the performance of nondestructive assay (NDA) and nondestructive examination (NDE) measurements of remote-handled transuranic wastes. The system will be used to perform waste characterization and certification activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's proposed Waste Handling and Packaging Plant. The NDA and NDE technologies which were developed for contact-handled wastes are inadequate to perform such measurements on high gamma and neutron dose-rate wastes. A single LINAC will provide the interrogating fluxes required for both NDA and NDE measurements of the wastes. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Technologies for Nondestructive Evaluation of Surfaces and Thin Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The effort included in this project included several related activities encompassing basic understanding, technological development, customer identification and commercial transfer of several methodologies for nondestructive evaluation of surfaces and thin surface coatings. Consistent with the academic environment, students were involved in the effort working with established investigators to further their training, provide a nucleus of experienced practitioners in the new technologies during their industrial introduction, and utilize their talents for project goals. As will be seen in various portions of the report, some of the effort has led to commercialization. This process has spawned other efforts related to this project which are supported from outside sources. These activities are occupying the efforts of some of the people who were previously supported within this grant and its predecessors. The most advanced of the supported technologies is thermography, for which the previous joint efforts of the investigators and NASA researchers have developed several techniques for extending the utility of straight thermographic inspection by producing methods of interpretation and analysis accessible to automatic image processing with computer data analysis. The effort reported for this technology has been to introduce the techniques to new user communities, who are then be able to add to the effective uses of existing products with only slight development work. In a related development, analysis of a thermal measurement situation in past efforts led to a new insight into the behavior of simple temperature probes. This insight, previously reported to the narrow community in which the particular measurement was made, was reported to the community of generic temperature measurement experts this year. In addition to the propagation of mature thermographic techniques, the development of a thermoelastic imaging system has been an important related development. Part of the

  3. An Instructional Program for Training Nondestructive Testing and Inspection Technicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Vernon L.

    This document, the second portion of a two-part study, is designed to provide a guide for the formal training of technicians for nondestructive testing and inspection. Information in the guide is based on results of the industrial survey discussed in Part I. The subject matter is intended to be both flexible and comprehensive, and instructional…

  4. Nondestructive diagnostics of charged particle beams in accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logachev, P. V.; Meshkov, O. I.; Starostenko, A. A.; Nikiforov, D. A.; Andrianov, A. V.; Maltseva, Yu. I.; Levichev, A. E.; Emanov, F. A.

    2016-03-01

    The basic techniques for nondestructive diagnostics and detection of losses of charged particle beams used in accelerator engineering are reviewed. The data provided may help choose the systems for diagnostics and detection of losses of beams and give a qualitative picture of the operation principles of such devices. Quantitative characteristics that define the limits of applicability of each diagnostic technique are outlined.

  5. Nondestructive Crack Detection in a Fuel System Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay; Ruffino, Norman; Wincheski, Russell; Prosser, William; Winfree, William; Russell, Richard; Bryson, Craig; Devries, Robert; Engel, James; Landy, James

    2010-01-01

    The presentation examines the background and objective of nondestructive crack detection, flow control valve assembly and poppet post flight evaluation, poppet properties. magnetic property characterization of lab data, NDE, eddy current inspection, simulation, eddy current criteria, poppet cycle testing and NDE criteria, and the use of ultrasonic surface wave for crack detection.

  6. 46 CFR 98.25-97 - Nondestructive testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nondestructive testing. 98.25-97 Section 98.25-97 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in...

  7. 46 CFR 98.25-97 - Nondestructive testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nondestructive testing. 98.25-97 Section 98.25-97 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in...

  8. 46 CFR 98.25-97 - Nondestructive testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nondestructive testing. 98.25-97 Section 98.25-97 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in...

  9. 46 CFR 98.25-97 - Nondestructive testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nondestructive testing. 98.25-97 Section 98.25-97 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in...

  10. 46 CFR 98.25-97 - Nondestructive testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nondestructive testing. 98.25-97 Section 98.25-97 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in...

  11. Microwave moisture sensor for rapid and nondestructive grading of peanuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A low-cost microwave moisture sensor operating at a single frequency for instantaneous and nondestructive determination of moisture content in peanut kernels from microwave dielectric measurements on peanut pods was developed and tested. The sensor operates at a frequency of 5.8 GHz and uses the pr...

  12. Federal Aviation Administration aging aircraft nondestructive inspection research plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seher, Chris C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper highlights the accomplishments and plans of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for the development of improved nondestructive evaluation (NDE) equipment, procedures, and training. The role of NDE in aircraft safety and the need for improvement are discussed. The FAA program participants, and coordination of activities within the program and with relevant organizations outside the program are also described.

  13. Automated Non-Destructive Testing Array Evaluation System

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, T; Zavaljevski, N; Bakhtiari, S; Miron, A; Kupperman, D

    2004-12-24

    Automated Non-Destructive Testing Array Evaluation System (ANTARES) sofeware alogrithms were developed for use on X-probe(tm) data. Data used for algorithm development and preliminary perfomance determination was obtained for USNRC mock-up at Argone and data from EPRI.

  14. Microwave Moisture Meter for Rapid and Nondestructive Grading of Peanuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A low-cost microwave moisture meter made with off-the-shelf components was developed, calibrated and tested in the laboratory and in the field for the grading of peanuts. The meter allows rapid and nondestructive determination of kernel moisture content from measurements on unshelled peanut pods. Th...

  15. A Fiber-Optic-Based Imaging System for Nondestructive Assessment of Cell-Seeded Tissue-Engineered Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Matthias C.; Whited, Bryce M.; Criswell, Tracy; Rylander, Marissa Nichole; Rylander, Christopher G.; Soker, Shay; Wang, Ge

    2012-01-01

    A major limitation in tissue engineering is the lack of nondestructive methods that assess the development of tissue scaffolds undergoing preconditioning in bioreactors. Due to significant optical scattering in most scaffolding materials, current microscope-based imaging methods cannot “see” through thick and optically opaque tissue constructs. To address this deficiency, we developed a fiber-optic-based imaging method that is capable of nondestructive imaging of fluorescently labeled cells through a thick and optically opaque scaffold, contained in a bioreactor. This imaging modality is based on the local excitation of fluorescent cells, the acquisition of fluorescence through the scaffold, and fluorescence mapping based on the position of the excitation light. To evaluate the capability and accuracy of the imaging system, human endothelial cells (ECs), stably expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP), were imaged through a fibrous scaffold. Without sacrificing the scaffolds, we nondestructively visualized the distribution of GFP-labeled cells through a ∼500 μm thick scaffold with cell-level resolution and distinct localization. These results were similar to control images obtained using an optical microscope with direct line-of-sight access. Through a detailed quantitative analysis, we demonstrated that this method achieved a resolution on the order of 20–30 μm, with 10% or less deviation from standard optical microscopy. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the penetration depth of the imaging method exceeded that of confocal laser scanning microscopy by more than a factor of 2. Our imaging method also possesses a working distance (up to 8 cm) much longer than that of a standard confocal microscopy system, which can significantly facilitate bioreactor integration. This method will enable the nondestructive monitoring of ECs seeded on the lumen of a tissue-engineered vascular graft during preconditioning in vitro, as well as for other tissue

  16. Multi-wave and hybrid imaging techniques: a new direction for nondestructive testing and structural health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuhua; Deng, Yiming; Cao, Jing; Xiong, Xin; Bai, Libing; Li, Zhaojun

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the state-of-the-art multi-wave and hybrid imaging techniques in the field of nondestructive evaluation and structural health monitoring were comprehensively reviewed. A new direction for assessment and health monitoring of various structures by capitalizing the advantages of those imaging methods was discussed. Although sharing similar system configurations, the imaging physics and principles of multi-wave phenomena and hybrid imaging methods are inherently different. After a brief introduction of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) , structure health monitoring (SHM) and their related challenges, several recent advances that have significantly extended imaging methods from laboratory development into practical applications were summarized, followed by conclusions and discussion on future directions. PMID:24287536

  17. Multi-Wave and Hybrid Imaging Techniques: A New Direction for Nondestructive Testing and Structural Health Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuhua; Deng, Yiming; Cao, Jing; Xiong, Xin; Bai, Libing; Li, Zhaojun

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the state-of-the-art multi-wave and hybrid imaging techniques in the field of nondestructive evaluation and structural health monitoring were comprehensively reviewed. A new direction for assessment and health monitoring of various structures by capitalizing the advantages of those imaging methods was discussed. Although sharing similar system configurations, the imaging physics and principles of multi-wave phenomena and hybrid imaging methods are inherently different. After a brief introduction of nondestructive evaluation (NDE), structure health monitoring (SHM) and their related challenges, several recent advances that have significantly extended imaging methods from laboratory development into practical applications were summarized, followed by conclusions and discussion on future directions. PMID:24287536

  18. Physical interpretation and development of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques applied to the quantitative characterization of textile composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1993-01-01

    In this Progress Report, we describe our current research activities concerning the development and implementation of advanced ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation methods applied to the characterization of stitched composite materials and bonded aluminum plate specimens. One purpose of this investigation is to identify and characterize specific features of polar backscatter interrogation which enhance the ability of ultrasound to detect flaws in a stitched composite laminate. Another focus is to explore the feasibility of implementing medical linear array imaging technology as a viable ultrasonic-based nondestructive evaluation method to inspect and characterize bonded aluminum lap joints. As an approach to implementing quantitative ultrasonic inspection methods to both of these materials, we focus on the physics that underlies the detection of flaws in such materials.

  19. 46 CFR 38.25-3 - Nondestructive testing-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nondestructive testing-TB/ALL. 38.25-3 Section 38.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS LIQUEFIED FLAMMABLE GASES Periodic Tests and Inspections § 38.25-3 Nondestructive testing—TB/ALL. (a) Before nondestructive testing may...

  20. 46 CFR 38.25-3 - Nondestructive testing-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nondestructive testing-TB/ALL. 38.25-3 Section 38.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS LIQUEFIED FLAMMABLE GASES Periodic Tests and Inspections § 38.25-3 Nondestructive testing—TB/ALL. (a) Before nondestructive testing may...