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Sample records for acquired developmental brain

  1. Hitting a Moving Target: Basic Mechanisms of Recovery from Acquired Developmental Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Giza, Christopher C.; Kolb, Bryan; Harris, Neil G.; Asarnow, Robert F.; Prins, Mayumi L.

    2009-01-01

    Acquired brain injuries represent a major cause of disability in the pediatric population. Understanding responses to developmental acquired brain injuries requires knowledge of the neurobiology of normal development, age-at-injury effects and experience-dependent neuroplasticity. In the developing brain, full recovery cannot be considered as a return to the premorbid baseline, since ongoing maturation means that cerebral functioning in normal individuals will continue to advance. Thus, the recovering immature brain has to ‘hit a moving target’ to achieve full functional recovery, defined as parity with age-matched uninjured peers. This review will discuss the consequences of developmental injuries such as focal lesions, diffuse hypoxia and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Underlying cellular and physiological mechanisms relevant to age-at-injury effects will be described in considerable detail, including but not limited to alterations in neurotransmission, connectivity/network functioning, the extracellular matrix, response to oxidative stress and changes in cerebral metabolism. Finally, mechanisms of experience-dependent plasticity will be reviewed in conjunction with their effects on neural repair and recovery. PMID:19956795

  2. Acquired Brain Injury Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Stacey Hunter

    This paper reviews the Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) Program at Coastline Community College (California). The ABI Program is a two-year, for-credit educational curriculum designed to provide structured cognitive retraining for adults who have sustained an ABI due to traumatic (such as motor vehicle accident or fall) or non-traumatic(such as…

  3. Developmental and Acquired Dyslexia: Some Observations on Jorm (1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Andrew W.

    1979-01-01

    Jorm's proposal (EJ 205 636) that developmental dyslexics resemble brain-damaged deep dyslexics is not grounded on firm evidence. Holmes' likening of developmental dyslexia to acquired surface dyslexia at least demonstrates clear similarity between the errors made by the two groups. (Author/CP)

  4. Support Network Responses to Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chleboun, Steffany; Hux, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) affects social relationships; however, the ways social and support networks change and evolve as a result of brain injury is not well understood. This study explored ways in which survivors of ABI and members of their support networks perceive relationship changes as recovery extends into the long-term stage. Two…

  5. Developmental roles of brain histamine.

    PubMed

    Panula, Pertti; Sundvik, Maria; Karlstedt, Kaj

    2014-03-01

    Histamine appears early during brain development, has been shown to regulate fetal and adult brain-derived stem cells in a receptor type-dependent manner, and has widespread actions on systems involved in arousal and movement. Developmental studies in both rodents and zebrafish have elucidated the spatiotemporal patterning of the histaminergic system and, in zebrafish, have revealed the mechanisms whereby histamine regulates the number of hypocretin/orexin (hcrt) neurons, which in turn may regulate the number of histaminergic cells. Recent demonstrations of increased numbers of histaminergic neurons in patients with narcolepsy highlight the importance, for our understanding of both normal and pathological brain function, of understanding these interactions. Here, we review recent research into the developmental roles of histamine and suggest key areas for future research. PMID:24486025

  6. Group Treatment in Acquired Brain Injury Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertisch, Hilary; Rath, Joseph F.; Langenbahn, Donna M.; Sherr, Rose Lynn; Diller, Leonard

    2011-01-01

    The current article describes critical issues in adapting traditional group-treatment methods for working with individuals with reduced cognitive capacity secondary to acquired brain injury. Using the classification system based on functional ability developed at the NYU Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (RIRM), we delineate the cognitive…

  7. Interviewing Children with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Anne-Marie; Linden, Mark; Alderdice, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    Research into the lives of children with acquired brain injury (ABI) often neglects to incorporate children as participants, preferring to obtain the opinions of the adult carer (e.g. McKinlay et al., 2002). There has been a concerted attempt to move away from this position by those working in children's research with current etiquette…

  8. Efficacy of Interdisciplinary Assessment and Treatment for Infants and Preschoolers with Congenital and Acquired Brain Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagnato, Stephen J.; Neisworth, John T.

    1985-01-01

    The study examined effectiveness of a team approach for two etiologically distinct groups of children (acquired brain injury, N=7; congenital brain injury, N=10). Results revealed significant pre-post gains for both groups. Significant team therapy effects were evident across four developmental domains and five behavioral processes. Progress was…

  9. Serotonergic Hyperactivity as a Potential Factor in Developmental, Acquired and Drug-Induced Synesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Brogaard, Berit

    2013-01-01

    Though synesthesia research has seen a huge growth in recent decades, and tremendous progress has been made in terms of understanding the mechanism and cause of synesthesia, we are still left mostly in the dark when it comes to the mechanistic commonalities (if any) among developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia. We know that many forms of synesthesia involve aberrant structural or functional brain connectivity. Proposed mechanisms include direct projection and disinhibited feedback mechanisms, in which information from two otherwise structurally or functionally separate brain regions mix. We also know that synesthesia sometimes runs in families. However, it is unclear what causes its onset. Studies of psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin, LSD and mescaline, reveal that exposure to these drugs can induce synesthesia. One neurotransmitter suspected to be central to the perceptual changes is serotonin. Excessive serotonin in the brain may cause many of the characteristics of psychedelic intoxication. Excessive serotonin levels may also play a role in synesthesia acquired after brain injury. In brain injury sudden cell death floods local brain regions with serotonin and glutamate. This neurotransmitter flooding could perhaps result in unusual feature binding. Finally, developmental synesthesia that occurs in individuals with autism may be a result of alterations in the serotonergic system, leading to a blockage of regular gating mechanisms. I conclude on these grounds that one commonality among at least some cases of acquired, developmental and drug-induced synesthesia may be the presence of excessive levels of serotonin, which increases the excitability and connectedness of sensory brain regions. PMID:24155703

  10. Serotonergic hyperactivity as a potential factor in developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Brogaard, Berit

    2013-01-01

    Though synesthesia research has seen a huge growth in recent decades, and tremendous progress has been made in terms of understanding the mechanism and cause of synesthesia, we are still left mostly in the dark when it comes to the mechanistic commonalities (if any) among developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia. We know that many forms of synesthesia involve aberrant structural or functional brain connectivity. Proposed mechanisms include direct projection and disinhibited feedback mechanisms, in which information from two otherwise structurally or functionally separate brain regions mix. We also know that synesthesia sometimes runs in families. However, it is unclear what causes its onset. Studies of psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin, LSD and mescaline, reveal that exposure to these drugs can induce synesthesia. One neurotransmitter suspected to be central to the perceptual changes is serotonin. Excessive serotonin in the brain may cause many of the characteristics of psychedelic intoxication. Excessive serotonin levels may also play a role in synesthesia acquired after brain injury. In brain injury sudden cell death floods local brain regions with serotonin and glutamate. This neurotransmitter flooding could perhaps result in unusual feature binding. Finally, developmental synesthesia that occurs in individuals with autism may be a result of alterations in the serotonergic system, leading to a blockage of regular gating mechanisms. I conclude on these grounds that one commonality among at least some cases of acquired, developmental and drug-induced synesthesia may be the presence of excessive levels of serotonin, which increases the excitability and connectedness of sensory brain regions. PMID:24155703

  11. Developmental disruptions underlying brain abnormalities in ciliopathies

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiami; Higginbotham, Holden; Li, Jingjun; Nichols, Jackie; Hirt, Josua; Ghukasyan, Vladimir; Anton, E.S.

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential conveyors of signals underlying major cell functions. Cerebral cortical progenitors and neurons have a primary cilium. The significance of cilia function for brain development and function is evident in the plethora of developmental brain disorders associated with human ciliopathies. Nevertheless, the role of primary cilia function in corticogenesis remains largely unknown. Here we delineate the functions of primary cilia in the construction of cerebral cortex and their relevance to ciliopathies, using an shRNA library targeting ciliopathy genes known to cause brain disorders, but whose roles in brain development are unclear. We used the library to query how ciliopathy genes affect distinct stages of mouse cortical development, in particular neural progenitor development, neuronal migration, neuronal differentiation and early neuronal connectivity. Our results define the developmental functions of ciliopathy genes and delineate disrupted developmental events that are integrally related to the emergence of brain abnormalities in ciliopathies. PMID:26206566

  12. Learning: How the Brain Acquires Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Beth R.

    Eight units of instruction and four projects comprise a curriculum on the brain and information processing for fourth grade students. Units, which frequently involve a guest speaker, focus on intelligence and creativity, the appearance and mechanisms of the brain, the five senses, the art and science of perception, language, reading, a field…

  13. Brain Imaging Studies of Developmental Stuttering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingham, Roger J.

    2001-01-01

    A review of research on brain imaging of developmental stuttering concludes that findings increasingly point to a failure of normal temporal lobe activation during speech that may either contribute to (or is the result of) a breakdown in the sequencing of processing among premotor regions implicated in phonologic planning. (Contains references.)…

  14. Brain Hemisphericity and Developmental Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlachos, Filippos; Andreou, Eleni; Delliou, Afroditi

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the link between brain hemisphericity and dyslexia in secondary school students, using the Preference Test (PT), a widely used self-report index of preferred hemisphere thinking styles. The hypothesis was that differences would be revealed between the dyslexic group and their peers in hemispheric preference. A total of…

  15. Time Dysperception Perspective for Acquired Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Piras, Federica; Piras, Fabrizio; Ciullo, Valentina; Danese, Emanuela; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Distortions of time perception are presented by a number of neuropsychiatric illnesses. Here we survey timing abilities in clinical populations with focal lesions in key brain structures recently implicated in human studies of timing. We also review timing performance in amnesic and traumatic brain injured patients in order to identify the nature of specific timing disorders in different brain damaged populations. We purposely analyzed the complex relationship between both cognitive and contextual factors involved in time estimation, as to characterize the correlation between timed and other cognitive behaviors in each group. We assume that interval timing is a solid construct to study cognitive dysfunctions following brain injury, as timing performance is a sensitive metric of information processing, while temporal cognition has the potential of influencing a wide range of cognitive processes. Moreover, temporal performance is a sensitive assay of damage to the underlying neural substrate after a brain insult. Further research in neurological and psychiatric patients will clarify whether time distortions are a manifestation of, or a mechanism for, cognitive and behavioral symptoms of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:24454304

  16. Learning: How the Brain Acquires Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Beth R.

    Developed to explore how individuals receive and process sensory information, this paper describes a curriculum designed for elementary students concerning the brain and information processing. The course is entitled "Mind Adventuring: Learning about How We Learn" and is structured into eight units of study. Descriptive accounts are provided for…

  17. Toward Developmental Connectomics of the Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Cao, Miao; Huang, Hao; Peng, Yun; Dong, Qi; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Imaging connectomics based on graph theory has become an effective and unique methodological framework for studying structural and functional connectivity patterns of the developing brain. Normal brain development is characterized by continuous and significant network evolution throughout infancy, childhood, and adolescence, following specific maturational patterns. Disruption of these normal changes is associated with neuropsychiatric developmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. In this review, we focused on the recent progresses regarding typical and atypical development of human brain networks from birth to early adulthood, using a connectomic approach. Specifically, by the time of birth, structural networks already exhibit adult-like organization, with global efficient small-world and modular structures, as well as hub regions and rich-clubs acting as communication backbones. During development, the structure networks are fine-tuned, with increased global integration and robustness and decreased local segregation, as well as the strengthening of the hubs. In parallel, functional networks undergo more dramatic changes during maturation, with both increased integration and segregation during development, as brain hubs shift from primary regions to high order functioning regions, and the organization of modules transitions from a local anatomical emphasis to a more distributed architecture. These findings suggest that structural networks develop earlier than functional networks; meanwhile functional networks demonstrate more dramatic maturational changes with the evolution of structural networks serving as the anatomical backbone. In this review, we also highlighted topologically disorganized characteristics in structural and functional brain networks in several major developmental neuropsychiatric disorders (e.g., autism spectrum disorders, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and developmental

  18. Toward Developmental Connectomics of the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Miao; Huang, Hao; Peng, Yun; Dong, Qi; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Imaging connectomics based on graph theory has become an effective and unique methodological framework for studying structural and functional connectivity patterns of the developing brain. Normal brain development is characterized by continuous and significant network evolution throughout infancy, childhood, and adolescence, following specific maturational patterns. Disruption of these normal changes is associated with neuropsychiatric developmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. In this review, we focused on the recent progresses regarding typical and atypical development of human brain networks from birth to early adulthood, using a connectomic approach. Specifically, by the time of birth, structural networks already exhibit adult-like organization, with global efficient small-world and modular structures, as well as hub regions and rich-clubs acting as communication backbones. During development, the structure networks are fine-tuned, with increased global integration and robustness and decreased local segregation, as well as the strengthening of the hubs. In parallel, functional networks undergo more dramatic changes during maturation, with both increased integration and segregation during development, as brain hubs shift from primary regions to high order functioning regions, and the organization of modules transitions from a local anatomical emphasis to a more distributed architecture. These findings suggest that structural networks develop earlier than functional networks; meanwhile functional networks demonstrate more dramatic maturational changes with the evolution of structural networks serving as the anatomical backbone. In this review, we also highlighted topologically disorganized characteristics in structural and functional brain networks in several major developmental neuropsychiatric disorders (e.g., autism spectrum disorders, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and developmental

  19. Students with Acquired Brain Injury. The School's Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glang, Ann, Ed.; Singer, George H. S., Ed.; Todis, Bonnie, Ed.

    Designed for educators, this book focuses on educational issues relating to students with acquired brain injury (ABI), and describes approaches that have been effective in improving the school experiences of students with brain injury. Section 1 provides an introduction to issues related to ABI in children and youth and includes: "An Overview of…

  20. Embryonal brain tumors and developmental control genes

    SciTech Connect

    Aguzzi, A.

    1995-12-31

    Cell proliferation in embryogenesis and neoplastic transformation is thought to be controlled by similar sets of regulatory genes. This is certainly true for tumors of embryonic origin, such as Ewing sarcoma, Wilms` tumor and retinoblastoma, in which developmental control genes are either activated as oncogenes to promote proliferation, or are inactivated to eliminate their growth suppressing function. However, to date little is known about the genetic events underlying the pathogenesis of medulloblastoma, the most common brain tumor in children, which still carries an unfavourable prognosis. None of the common genetic alterations identified in other neuroectodermal tumors, such as mutation of the p53 gene or amplification of tyrosine kinase receptor genes, could be uncovered as key events in the formation of medulloblastoma. The identification of regulatory genes which are expressed in this pediatric brain tumor may provide an alternative approach to gain insight into the molecular aspects of tumor formation.

  1. Spoken Persuasive Discourse Abilities of Adolescents with Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Catherine; Kirk, Cecilia; Powell, Emma

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the performance of adolescents with acquired brain injury (ABI) during a spoken persuasive discourse task. Persuasive discourse is frequently used in social and academic settings and is of importance in the study of adolescent language. Method: Participants included 8 adolescents with ABI and 8 peers…

  2. Predictors of Outcome following Acquired Brain Injury in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Abigail R.; DeMatt, Ellen; Salorio, Cynthia F.

    2009-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) in children and adolescents can result from multiple causes, including trauma, central nervous system infections, noninfectious disorders (epilepsy, hypoxia/ischemia, genetic/metabolic disorders), tumors, and vascular abnormalities. Prediction of outcomes is important, to target interventions, allocate resources,…

  3. Cognitive Rehabilitation for Children with Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slomine, Beth; Locascio, Gianna

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive deficits are frequent consequences of acquired brain injury (ABI) and often require intervention. We review the theoretical and empirical literature on cognitive rehabilitation in a variety of treatment domains including attention, memory, unilateral neglect, speech and language, executive functioning, and family involvement/education.…

  4. When words fail us: insights into language processing from developmental and acquired disorders.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Dorothy V M; Nation, Kate; Patterson, Karalyn

    2014-01-01

    Acquired disorders of language represent loss of previously acquired skills, usually with relatively specific impairments. In children with developmental disorders of language, we may also see selective impairment in some skills; but in this case, the acquisition of language or literacy is affected from the outset. Because systems for processing spoken and written language change as they develop, we should beware of drawing too close a parallel between developmental and acquired disorders. Nevertheless, comparisons between the two may yield new insights. A key feature of connectionist models simulating acquired disorders is the interaction of components of language processing with each other and with other cognitive domains. This kind of model might help make sense of patterns of comorbidity in developmental disorders. Meanwhile, the study of developmental disorders emphasizes learning and change in underlying representations, allowing us to study how heterogeneity in cognitive profile may relate not just to neurobiology but also to experience. Children with persistent language difficulties pose challenges both to our efforts at intervention and to theories of learning of written and spoken language. Future attention to learning in individuals with developmental and acquired disorders could be of both theoretical and applied value. PMID:24324244

  5. When words fail us: insights into language processing from developmental and acquired disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Dorothy V. M.; Nation, Kate; Patterson, Karalyn

    2014-01-01

    Acquired disorders of language represent loss of previously acquired skills, usually with relatively specific impairments. In children with developmental disorders of language, we may also see selective impairment in some skills; but in this case, the acquisition of language or literacy is affected from the outset. Because systems for processing spoken and written language change as they develop, we should beware of drawing too close a parallel between developmental and acquired disorders. Nevertheless, comparisons between the two may yield new insights. A key feature of connectionist models simulating acquired disorders is the interaction of components of language processing with each other and with other cognitive domains. This kind of model might help make sense of patterns of comorbidity in developmental disorders. Meanwhile, the study of developmental disorders emphasizes learning and change in underlying representations, allowing us to study how heterogeneity in cognitive profile may relate not just to neurobiology but also to experience. Children with persistent language difficulties pose challenges both to our efforts at intervention and to theories of learning of written and spoken language. Future attention to learning in individuals with developmental and acquired disorders could be of both theoretical and applied value. PMID:24324244

  6. Oxidative stress in developmental brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaharu; Miyata, Rie; Tanuma, Naoyuki

    2012-01-01

    In order to examine the involvement of oxidative stress in developmental brain disorders, we have performed immunohistochemistry in autopsy brains and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the cerebrospinal fluid and urines of patients. Here, we review our data on the hereditary DNA repair disorders, congenital metabolic errors and childhood-onset neurodegenerative disorders. First, in our studies on hereditary DNA repair disorders, increased oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation were carried out in the degeneration of basal ganglia, intracerebral calcification and cerebellar degeneration in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome and ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder, respectively. Next, congenital metabolic errors, apoptosis due to lipid peroxidation seemed to cause neuronal damage in neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis. Oxidative stress of DNA combined with reduced expression of antioxidant enzymes occurred in the lesion of the cerebral cortex in mucopolysaccharidoses and mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes. In childhood-onset neurodegenerative disorders, increased oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation may lead to motor neuron death in spinal muscular atrophy like in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In patients with dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, a triplet repeat disease, deposition of oxidative products of nucleosides and reduced expression of antioxidant enzymes were found in the lenticular nucleus. In contrast, the involvement of oxidative stress is not definite in patients with Lafora disease. Rett syndrome patients showed changes of oxidative stress markers and antioxidant power in urines, although the changes may be related to systemic complications. PMID:22411250

  7. Interventions based on the multiple connections model of reading for developmental dyslexia and acquired deep dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Berninger, V W; Lester, K; Sohlberg, M M; Mateer, C

    1991-01-01

    This paper deals with intervention strategies for developmental and acquired dyslexia. In Study 1 two alternative strategies for developmental surface dyslexia (dysfunctional connection between the whole word orthographic code and the phonetic or name code) were compared. In both the initial study and replication study, a modification of the selective reminding technique was superior to a traditional multisensory technique in beginning readers, presumably because it facilitated word finding or prelexical access to a phonetic code. In Study 2 an adolescent with acquired deep dyslexia (dysfunctional connection between letter and phonemic codes) who had had his angular gyrus (site of grapheme-phoneme correspondence) surgically removed, recovered reading function after a four-month phonemic analysis training program. Further research is needed to evaluate the efficacy of theory-based intervention strategies in children with developmental reading disorders unrelated to focal lesions and in adults with acquired reading disorders related to focal lesions. PMID:14589528

  8. Blissfully unaware: Anosognosia and anosodiaphoria after acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Gasquoine, Philip Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Historically, anosognosia referred to under-report of striking symptoms of acquired brain injury (e.g., hemiplegia) with debilitating functional consequences and was linked with anosodiaphoria, an emotional reaction of indifference. It was later extended to include under-report of all manner of symptoms of acquired brain injury by the patient compared to clinicians, family members, or functional performance. Anosognosia is related to time since onset of brain injury but not consistently to demographic variables, lesion location (except that it is more common after unilateral right than left hemispheric injury), or specific neuropsychological test scores. This review considers all manifestations of anosognosia as a unitary phenomenon with differing clinical characteristics dictated by variability in linked cognitive impairments. It is concluded that anosognosia has three chief contributing factors: (1) procedural: measurement differences across studies in terms of symptom selection and the designation of a "gold standard" of patient symptomatology; (2) psychological: a tendency towards positive self-evaluation and the avoidance of adverse information, that also occurs in neurologically intact individuals; and (3) neuropathological: an increased likelihood of error recognition failure from disconnections that disrupt feedback between injured brain regions governing specific behaviours (symptoms) and anterior cingulate/insular cortex. Anosodiaphoria is considered as an associated symptom, resulting from the same psychological and neuropathological factors. PMID:25686381

  9. Microglia and Inflammation: Impact on Developmental Brain Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chew, Li-Jin; Takanohashi, Asako; Bell, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Inflammation during the perinatal period has become a recognized risk factor for developmental brain injuries over the past decade or more. To fully understand the relationship between inflammation and brain development, a comprehensive knowledge about the immune system within the brain is essential. Microglia are resident immune cells within the…

  10. Early community outreach intervention in children with acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Emanuelson, I; Wendt, L V; Hagberg, I; Marchioni-Johansson, M; Ekberg, G; Olsson, U; Larsson, J; Egerlund, H; Lindgren, K; Pestat, C

    2003-12-01

    Ten patients with acquired brain injury were recruited over an 18 month period in the south-western health care region of Sweden in order to evaluate the costs and effectiveness of a multidisciplinary community outreach intervention programme. An experienced multidisciplinary project team was involved and patients underwent detailed functional, cognitive and motor assessments following initial contact within two weeks of injury, within six weeks of injury and at a 12-month follow-up. An individualized counselling programme was also offered. Of an expected recruitment number of 50 patients (based on epidemiological and population based figures) 10 children were reached, evaluated and followed; eight patients with traumatic brain injury (five severe, two moderate and one mild), and two patients with non-traumatic brain injury (both severe). At follow-up there was a significant improvement in motor function. No significant changes were seen in other areas of functional assessment or on neuropsychological measures although there were mild improvements in communication and behaviour functions. The financial costs per patient in the programme were deemed relatively modest compared with cost estimates of shorter-term in-patient rehabilitation. Time intensive interventions included supporting caregivers and school staff and the direct and indirect patient interventions were shown to enhance support and promote active involvement of local services. PMID:14634359

  11. Applying Brain Research To Create Developmentally Appropriate Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Stephen P.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the early childhood and primary learning environments and developmentally appropriate practices in light of the findings of brain research in the mid to late 1990s. Focuses on how the brain works, creating the optimal learning environment, developing classroom learning centers, and presenting meaningful learning experiences. Identifies…

  12. Sex Differences in Intelligence and Brain Size: A Developmental Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Proposes a developmental theory of sex differences in intelligence that states that the faster maturation and brain size growth in girls up to age 15 compensates for their smaller brain size so that sex differences in intelligence are very small. Discusses evidence that supports this theory. (SLD)

  13. Developmental Drama for Brain-Damaged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Sue

    1977-01-01

    Offers recommendations for using developmental drama including: discussion of organization of the play environment, leaders, and play groups; sensory-awareness games, movement-mime projects, and story dramatizations; and video tape utilization for play evaluation. (MH)

  14. Oculomotor rehabilitation for reading in acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ciuffreda, Kenneth J; Han, Ying; Kapoor, Neera; Ficarra, Anthony P

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess reading-related oculomotor rehabilitation in individuals with acquired brain injury. Adults with either stroke (n=5) or traumatic brain injury (n=9) participated. Training paradigms included single-line and multiple-line simulated reading, as well as basic versional tracking (fixation, saccade, and pursuit), twice per week over an 8 week period. Training modes included normal internal oculomotor visual feedback either in isolation (4 weeks) or concurrent with external oculomotor auditory feedback (4 weeks). Training effects were assessed objectively using infrared eye movement recording technology for simulated and actual reading, with the assessments occurring before, midway, and after training. In addition, the individuals were assessed subjectively using a reading rating-scale questionnaire. All reported considerably improved reading ability, and this was confirmed by several of the objective oculomotor measures. There was a trend for improvement to be better with the combined visual and auditory oculomotor feedback. Reading-related oculomotor rehabilitation produced significant gains in both the subjective and objective domains. It is believed that rapid saccadic oculomotor adaptation, as well as the training of rhythmicity and automaticity, were involved in modifying eye movement behavior to produce a more systematic approach and resultant improved reading profile. PMID:16720933

  15. Binge consumption of ethanol during pregnancy leads to significant developmental delay of mouse embryonic brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheendran, Narendran; Bake, Shameena; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2014-03-01

    Consumption of alcohol during pregnancy can be severely detrimental to the development of the brain in fetuses. This study explores the usage of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to the study the effects of maternal consumption of ethanol on brain development in mouse fetuses. On gestational day 14.5, fetuses were collected and fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde. A swept-source OCT (SSOCT) system was used to acquire 3D images of the brain of ethanol-exposed and control fetuses. The volume of right and left brain ventricles were measured and used to compare between ethanol-exposed and control fetuses. A total of 5 fetuses were used for each of the two groups. The average volumes of the right and left ventricles were measured to be 0.35 and 0.15 mm3 for ethanol-exposed and control fetuses, respectively. The results demonstrated that there is an alcohol-induced developmental delay in mouse fetal brains.

  16. Early developmental exposures shape trade-offs between acquired and innate immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, Alexander V.; Kuzawa, Christopher W.; McDade, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Life history theory predicts resource allocation trade-offs between competing functions and processes. We test the hypothesis that relative investment towards innate versus acquired immunity in humans is subject to such trade-offs and that three types of early developmental exposures are particularly salient in shaping adult immunophenotype: (i) pathogen exposure, (ii) nutritional resources; and (iii) extrinsic mortality cues. Methodology We quantified one aspect each of innate and acquired immune function, via C-reactive protein and Epstein–Barr virus antibodies, respectively, in a sample of 1248 men and women from the Philippines (ca. 21.5 years old). Early developmental exposures were assessed via long-term data collected prospectively since participants’ birth (1983–4). We calculated a standardized ratio to assess relative bias towards acquired versus innate immune function and examined its relationship to a suite of predictors via multiple regression. Results In partial support of our predictions, some of the measures of higher pathogen exposure, greater availability of nutritional resources, and lower extrinsic mortality cues in early life were associated with a bias toward acquired immunity in both men and women. The immune profile of women, in particular, appeared to be more sensitive to early life pathogen exposures than those of men. Finally, contrary to prediction, women exhibited a greater relative investment toward innate, not acquired, immunity. Conclusions and implications Early environments can exert considerable influence on the development of immunity. They affect trade-offs between innate and acquired immunity, which show adaptive plasticity and may differ in their influence in men and women. PMID:27530543

  17. Early neurovascular uncoupling in the brain during community acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis leads to microcirculatory dysfunction and therefore a disturbed neurovascular coupling in the brain. To investigate if the dysfunction is also present in less severe inflammatory diseases we studied the neurovascular coupling in patients suffering from community acquired pneumonia. Methods Patients were investigated in the acute phase of pneumonia and after recovery. The neurovascular coupling was investigated with a simultaneous electroencephalogram (EEG)-Doppler technique applying a visual stimulation paradigm. Resting EEG frequencies, visual evoked potentials as well as resting and stimulated hemodynamic responses were obtained. Disease severity was characterized by laboratory and cognitive parameters as well as related scoring systems. Data were compared to a control group. Results Whereas visually evoked potentials (VEP) remained stable a significant slowing and therefore uncoupling of the hemodynamic responses were found in the acute phase of pneumonia (Rate time: control group: 3.6 ± 2.5 vs. acute pneumonia: 1.6 ± 2.4 s; P < 0.0005). In the initial investigation, patients who deteriorated showed a decreased hemodynamic response as compared with those who recovered (gain: recovered: 15% ± 4% vs. deteriorated: 9% ± 3%, P < 0.05; control: 14% ± 5%). After recovery the coupling normalized. Conclusions Our study underlines the role of an early microcirculatory dysfunction in inflammatory syndromes that become evident in pre-septic conditions with a gradual decline according to disease severity. PMID:22520083

  18. Reorganization of Functional Connectivity as a Correlate of Cognitive Recovery in Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellanos, Nazareth P.; Paul, Nuria; Ordonez, Victoria E.; Demuynck, Olivier; Bajo, Ricardo; Campo, Pablo; Bilbao, Alvaro; Ortiz, Tomas; del-Pozo, Francisco; Maestu, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive processes require a functional interaction between specialized multiple, local and remote brain regions. Although these interactions can be strongly altered by an acquired brain injury, brain plasticity allows network reorganization to be principally responsible for recovery. The present work evaluates the impact of brain injury on…

  19. Childcare Workers' Knowledge about the Brain and Developmentally Appropriate Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zambo, Debby

    2008-01-01

    Advances in neuroscience are providing information about the brain and its development. Some researchers propose that childcare workers need to understand this information because it confirms their importance and their use of developmentally appropriate practice (DAP). Given the fact that childcare workers could benefit from this insight, it seems…

  20. Language and Brain: Neuropsychological Aspects of Developmental Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirozzolo, Francis J.

    1981-01-01

    An examination of the neuropsychology of written language is provided. An historical review of language disorders is presented to provide a framework for understanding the brain mechanisms underlying the reading process. Recent neuropsychological studies of developmental reading disability are discussed. Two distinct forms of the disorder are…

  1. On Expression Patterns and Developmental Origin of Human Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Lior; Chechik, Gal

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical substructures of the human brain have characteristic cell-types, connectivity and local circuitry, which are reflected in area-specific transcriptome signatures, but the principles governing area-specific transcription and their relation to brain development are still being studied. In adult rodents, areal transcriptome patterns agree with the embryonic origin of brain regions, but the processes and genes that preserve an embryonic signature in regional expression profiles were not quantified. Furthermore, it is not clear how embryonic-origin signatures of adult-brain expression interplay with changes in expression patterns during development. Here we first quantify which genes have regional expression-patterns related to the developmental origin of brain regions, using genome-wide mRNA expression from post-mortem adult human brains. We find that almost all human genes (92%) exhibit an expression pattern that agrees with developmental brain-region ontology, but that this agreement changes at multiple phases during development. Agreement is particularly strong in neuron-specific genes, but also in genes that are not spatially correlated with neuron-specific or glia-specific markers. Surprisingly, agreement is also stronger in early-evolved genes. We further find that pairs of similar genes having high agreement to developmental region ontology tend to be more strongly correlated or anti-correlated, and that the strength of spatial correlation changes more strongly in gene pairs with stronger embryonic signatures. These results suggest that transcription regulation of most genes in the adult human brain is spatially tuned in a way that changes through life, but in agreement with development-determined brain regions. PMID:27564987

  2. Developmental changes in NMDA receptor expression in the platyfish brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, K. M.; Schreibman, M. P.; Magliulo-Cepriano, L.

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the distribution of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in the brain of a freshwater teleost using an antibody against the R1 subunit of the receptor (NMDAR1). The primary site of localization was the nucleus olfactoretinalis (NOR), a significant gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)-containing brain nucleus. The number of cells expressing NMDAR1 in this nucleus was dependent upon developmental stage, with pubescent and mature animals displaying significantly more stained cells than immature and senescent animals. This is the first reported observation of age- and maturity-related NMDA receptor association with GnRH-containing brain areas.

  3. Acquired Brain Injury Club at a Community College: Opportunities for Support, Involvement, and Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinn, Nancy Resendes

    2009-01-01

    College students with acquired brain injuries face unique challenges. The likelihood of individuals with acquired brain injury experiencing isolation, lack of social support, and diminished self-esteem, along with cognitive impairments, is well documented in the literature. This article presents an overview of a community college's club for…

  4. Children with Acquired Brain Injury: A Silent Voice in the Ontario School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Sheila; Good, Dawn; Zinga, Dawn; Kumpf, John

    2004-01-01

    The leading cause of death and injuries in school age children is acquired brain injury (Savage & Wolcott, 1994). Each year approximately 1 in 450 school age children and 1 in 200 adolescents/young adults suffer an injury as a result of some form of acquired brain injury. Approximately 27,000 students in the Ontario school system have acquired…

  5. Developmental vitamin D deficiency causes abnormal brain development.

    PubMed

    Eyles, D W; Feron, F; Cui, X; Kesby, J P; Harms, L H; Ko, P; McGrath, J J; Burne, T H J

    2009-12-01

    There is now clear evidence that vitamin D is involved in brain development. Our group is interested in environmental factors that shape brain development and how this may be relevant to neuropsychiatric diseases including schizophrenia. The origins of schizophrenia are considered developmental. We hypothesised that developmental vitamin D (DVD) deficiency may be the plausible neurobiological explanation for several important epidemiological correlates of schizophrenia namely: (1) the excess winter/spring birth rate, (2) increased incidence of the disease in 2nd generation Afro-Caribbean migrants and (3) increased urban birth rate. Moreover we have published two pieces of direct epidemiological support for this hypothesis in patients. In order to establish the "Biological Plausibility" of this hypothesis we have developed an animal model to study the effect of DVD deficiency on brain development. We do this by removing vitamin D from the diet of female rats prior to breeding. At birth we return all dams to a vitamin D containing diet. Using this procedure we impose a transient, gestational vitamin D deficiency, while maintaining normal calcium levels throughout. The brains of offspring from DVD-deficient dams are characterised by (1) a mild distortion in brain shape, (2) increased lateral ventricle volumes, (3) reduced differentiation and (4) diminished expression of neurotrophic factors. As adults, the alterations in ventricular volume persist and alterations in brain gene and protein expression emerge. Adult DVD-deficient rats also display behavioural sensitivity to agents that induce psychosis (the NMDA antagonist MK-801) and have impairments in attentional processing. In this review we summarise the literature addressing the function of vitamin D on neuronal and non-neuronal cells as well as in vivo results from DVD-deficient animals. Our conclusions from these data are that vitamin D is a plausible biological risk factor for neuropsychiatric disorders and that

  6. Social cognition and brain morphology: implications for developmental brain dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Evans, David W; Lazar, Steven M; Boomer, K B; Mitchel, Aaron D; Michael, Andrew M; Moore, Gregory J

    2015-06-01

    The social-cognitive deficits associated with several neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders have been linked to structural and functional brain anomalies. Given the recent appreciation for quantitative approaches to behavior, in this study we examined the brain-behavior links in social cognition in healthy young adults from a quantitative approach. Twenty-two participants were administered quantitative measures of social cognition, including the social responsiveness scale (SRS), the empathizing questionnaire (EQ) and the systemizing questionnaire (SQ). Participants underwent a structural, 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedure that yielded both volumetric (voxel count) and asymmetry indices. Model fitting with backward elimination revealed that a combination of cortical, limbic and striatal regions accounted for significant variance in social behavior and cognitive styles that are typically associated with neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Specifically, as caudate and amygdala volumes deviate from the typical R > L asymmetry, and cortical gray matter becomes more R > L asymmetrical, overall SRS and Emotion Recognition scores increase. Social Avoidance was explained by a combination of cortical gray matter, pallidum (rightward asymmetry) and caudate (deviation from rightward asymmetry). Rightward asymmetry of the pallidum was the sole predictor of Interpersonal Relationships and Repetitive Mannerisms. Increased D-scores on the EQ-SQ, an indication of greater systemizing relative to empathizing, was also explained by deviation from the typical R > L asymmetry of the caudate.These findings extend the brain-behavior links observed in neurodevelopmental disorders to the normal distribution of traits in a healthy sample. PMID:24788335

  7. Episodic disorders of behaviour and affect after acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Eames, Peter Eames; Wood, Rodger Ll

    2003-01-01

    Psychological disorders that follow traumatic brain injury are possibly more complex and diverse than those associated with other forms of "brain damage". These may include organic aggressive, or organic affective syndromes that are episodic in nature and therefore require a more specific diagnosis, a different classification, and a different approach to treatment. Consequently, it is necessary for clinicians to learn to distinguish between "primary" psychiatric illnesses and those disorders of behavioural control and mood that stem specifically from brain injury. There is relatively little in the clinical literature that explains the relationship between variable states of behaviour, mood or temperament, and clinical disorders that may have long-term implications for patient management. This concept paper therefore addresses abnormalities of mood and behaviour that are episodic in character and are not recognisably included in the DSM and ICD classifications of psychological or psychiatric disorders. PMID:21854336

  8. Students with Acquired Brain Injury: A Legal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive and current synthesis of the legislation, regulations, policy interpretations, and case law concerning students with traumatic and nontraumatic brain injury from pre-K to grade 12. The primary focus is the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, but the scope extends to other applicable legal bases. The…

  9. Acquired Focal Brain Lesions in Childhood: Effects on Development and Reorganization of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chilosi, A. M.; Cipriani, P.; Pecini, C.; Brizzolara, D.; Biagi, L.; Montanaro, D.; Tosetti, M.; Cioni, G.

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper, we address brain-behaviour relationships in children with acquired aphasia, by reviewing some recent studies on the effects of focal brain lesions on language development. Timing of the lesion, in terms of its occurrence, before or after the onset of speech and language acquisition, may be a major factor determining language…

  10. Computer-Aided Relearning Activity Patterns for People with Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montero, Francisco; Lopez-Jaquero, Victor; Navarro, Elena; Sanchez, Enriqueta

    2011-01-01

    People with disabilities constitute a collective that requires continuous and customized attention, since their conditions or abilities are affected with respect to specific standards. People with "Acquired Brain Injury" (ABI), or those who have suffered brain injury at some stage after birth, belong to this collective. The treatment these people…

  11. Somatic Activation of AKT3 Causes Hemispheric Developmental Brain Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Poduri, Annapurna; Evrony, Gilad D.; Cai, Xuyu; Elhosary, Princess Christina; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lehtinen, Maria K.; Hills, L. Benjamin; Heinzen, Erin L.; Hill, Anthony; Hill, R. Sean; Barry, Brenda J.; Bourgeois, Blaise F.D.; Riviello, James J.; Barkovich, A. James; Black, Peter M.; Ligon, Keith L.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hemimegalencephaly (HMG) is a developmental brain disorder characterized by an enlarged, malformed cerebral hemisphere, typically causing epilepsy that requires surgical resection. We studied resected HMG tissue to test whether the condition might reflect somatic mutations affecting genes critical to brain development. We found that 2/8 HMG samples showed trisomy of chromosome 1q, encompassing many genes, including AKT3, which is known to regulate brain size. A third case showed a known activating mutation in AKT3 (c.49G→A, creating p.E17K) that was not present in the patient’s blood cells. Remarkably, the E17K mutation in AKT3 is exactly paralogous to E17K mutations in AKT1 and AKT2 recently discovered in somatic overgrowth syndromes. We show that AKT3 is the most abundant AKT paralogue in brain during neurogenesis and that phosphorylated AKT is abundant in cortical progenitor cells. Our data suggest that somatic mutations limited to brain could represent an important cause of complex neurogenetic disease. PMID:22500628

  12. Management of developmental speech and language disorders. Part 2: acquired conditions.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, Anne

    2016-03-01

    Many children who present with these acquired impairments of communication have a clear preceding event such as an acquired brain injury from a road traffic accident. Children often respond differently in this situation to adult presentations. They may have a period of mutism when the prognosis might look poor and yet they subsequently make rapid progress and recover speech. They have greater potential for neural plasticity and language recovery, although they often have persisting difficulties in oral and written language. Alternatively, there may be a presentation with a paroxysmal event such as a seizure or a period of depressed consciousness, and the unusual behaviour that may accompany dysphasia and dysarthria may be misinterpreted in the child, whereas for the adult with the more common 'stroke-like' presentation, it would be immediately considered. Rarely the aphasia/dysphasia may itself be the paroxysmal event where actually recognising that the child's disrupted communication is the basis of any observed behaviours can be the greater challenge. PMID:25990500

  13. Shopping with Acquired Brain Injuries, Coping Strategies and Maslowian Principles.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jonas E; Skehan, Terry; Rydén, Monica; Lagerkrans, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    A positive outcome of the modern welfare state is prolonged life expectancy. In Sweden, the expected life span has increased with approximatively 25 years during the 20th century [Statistics Sweden]. However, ageing is associated with an increased risk for acquiring cognitive and physical disabilities. This study is based on anonymized interviews with groups of older persons who experience cognitive problems and relatives. The interviewees were asked about everyday activities like shopping groceries, clothes or other necessities. The interviewees identified problems and described a series of strategies for coping. This paper uses fictionalized characters to present problems and coping strategies that the interviewees use to overcome cognitive challenges when shopping groceries. The strategies range from complete withdrawal, an increased dependency on proxies to the development of elaborate techniques to mask their problem and obtain assistance. Following the current trend in the design of the Swedish sales environment - large scale, abundance of goods and Maslowian strategies for making people stay longer (and spend more money) - accessibility in the built environment is often an absent friend. PMID:27534318

  14. Evaluation of outliers in acquired brain MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovanu, S.; (Vişan Pungǎ, M.; Moraru, L.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-processing is an important stage in the analysis of magnetic resonance images (MRI), because the effect of specific image artefacts, such as intensity inhomogeneity, noise and low contrast can adversely affect the quantitative image analysis. The image histogram is a useful tool in the analysis of MR images given that it allows a close relationship with important image features such as contrast and noise. The noise and variable contrast are elements that locally modify the quality of images. The key issue of this study derives from the fact that the spatial histogram can contain outliers indicating corrupted image information through the disorder of the bins. These aberrant errors should be excluded from the studied data sets. Here, the outliers are evaluated by using rigorous methods based on the probability theory and Chauvenet (CC), Grubbs (GC) and Peirce's (PC) criteria. In order to check the quality of the MR images, the Minkowsky (MD), Euclidean (ED) and cosine (CD) distance functions were used. They act as similarity scores between the histogram of the acquired MRI and the processed image. This analysis is necessary because, sometimes, the distance function exceeds the co-domain because of the outliers. In this paper, 32 MRIs are tested and the outliers are removed so that the distance functions generate uncorrupted and real values.

  15. In Vivo NMR Studies of the Brain with Hereditary or Acquired Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Erica B; Lee, Phil; Choi, In-Young

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic disorders, whether hereditary or acquired, affect the brain, and abnormalities of the brain are related to cellular integrity; particularly in regard to neurons and astrocytes as well as interactions between them. Metabolic disturbances lead to alterations in cellular function as well as microscopic and macroscopic structural changes in the brain with diabetes, the most typical example of metabolic disorders, and a number of hereditary metabolic disorders. Alternatively, cellular dysfunction and degeneration of the brain lead to metabolic disturbances in hereditary neurological disorders with neurodegeneration. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques allow us to assess a range of pathophysiological changes of the brain in vivo. For example, magnetic resonance spectroscopy detects alterations in brain metabolism and energetics. Physiological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detects accompanying changes in cerebral blood flow related to neurovascular coupling. Diffusion and T1/T2-weighted MRI detect microscopic and macroscopic changes of the brain structure. This review summarizes current NMR findings of functional, physiological and biochemical alterations within a number of hereditary and acquired metabolic disorders in both animal models and humans. The global view of the impact of these metabolic disorders on the brain may be useful in identifying the unique and/or general patterns of abnormalities in the living brain related to the pathophysiology of the diseases, and identifying future fields of inquiry. PMID:26610379

  16. Capitalizing on Basic Brain Processes in Developmental Algebra--Part One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughbaum, Edward D.

    2011-01-01

    Basic brain function is not a mystery. Given that neuroscientists understand the brain's basic functioning processes, one wonders what their research suggests to teachers of developmental algebra. What if we knew how to teach so as to improve understanding of the algebra taught to developmental algebra students? What if we knew how the brain…

  17. Capitalizing on Basic Brain Processes in Developmental Algebra--Part 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughbaum, Edward D.

    2011-01-01

    Basic brain function is not a mystery. Given that neuroscientists understand its basic functioning processes, one wonders what their research suggests to teachers of developmental algebra. What if we knew how to teach so as to improve understanding of the algebra taught to developmental algebra students? What if we knew how the brain processes…

  18. Acquired Brain Injury and Return to Work in Australia and New Zealand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Athanasou, James A.

    2003-01-01

    A research review of 9 Australian-New Zealand (n=1,010) and 23 international (n=2,182) studies found the overall return-to-work rates after head injury were 44% and 45% respectively. Methodological issues might have inflated these numbers. Only an estimated 7-10% of persons with acquired brain injury returned to the same job. (Contains 46…

  19. Redesigning the Scaffolding Metaphor to Suit Pupils with Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Sian A.; Skidmore, David

    2008-01-01

    This paper extends and develops the metaphor of scaffolding to take account of the specific needs of pupils with an Acquired Brain Injury (ABI), drawing on observational evidence gathered for an empirical enquiry into the learning of pupils with ABI in mainstream classroom conditions. This is an area in which there are few published studies to…

  20. Using Differential Reinforcement to Decrease Academic Response Latencies of an Adolescent with Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinicke, Megan R.; Carr, James E.; Mozzoni, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of contingency-specifying rules and a token economy to decrease the latency to comply with academic instructions by a 16-year-old girl with acquired brain injury. Results showed that treatment was successful in reducing academic response latencies. These results replicate previous research in which…

  1. Thinking Allowed: Use of Egocentric Speech after Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Sian A.; Skidmore, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the use of thinking aloud made by young people who have sustained a severe acquired brain injury (ABI). The phenomenon is compared with the concepts of egocentric speech and inner speech before the form of thinking aloud by pupils with ABI is examined. It is suggested that by using thinking aloud, this group of pupils is able…

  2. Reliability of the Motor Learning Strategy Rating Instrument for Children and Youth with Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamath, Trishna; Pfeifer, Megan; Banerjee-Guenette, Priyanka; Hunter, Theresa; Ito, Julia; Salbach, Nancy M.; Wright, Virginia; Levac, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate reliability and feasibility of the Motor Learning Strategy Rating Instrument (MLSRI) in children with acquired brain injury (ABI). The MLSRI quantifies the extent to which motor learning strategies (MLS) are used within physiotherapy (PT) interventions. Methods: PT sessions conducted by ABI team physiotherapists with a…

  3. A Review of Family Intervention Guidelines for Pediatric Acquired Brain Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Wesley R.; Paulos, Stephanie K.; Cole, Carolyn A. S.; Tankard, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric acquired brain injury (BI) not only affects the child with the injury, but also greatly impacts their family. Studies suggest there are higher rates of caregiver and sibling psychological distress after a child in the family has sustained a BI. Also, family functioning after BI impacts the child's recovery. In reviewing the literature,…

  4. The Use of Narratives to Identify Characteristics Leading to a Productive Life following Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraas, Michael R.; Calvert, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the factors leading to successful recovery and productive lifestyles after acquired brain injury (ABI). Method: Qualitative investigation examined semistructured interviews of 31 survivors of ABI. Thematic analysis followed a phenomenological approach and revealed 4 major themes and 28 subthemes in the interviews. Four…

  5. Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (Lisat-9): Reliability and Validity for Patients with Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boonstra, Anne M.; Reneman, Michiel F.; Stewart, Roy E.; Balk, Gerlof A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the reliability and discriminant validity of the Dutch version of the life satisfaction questionnaire (Lisat-9 DV) to assess patients with an acquired brain injury. The reliability study used a test-retest design, and the validity study used a cross-sectional design. The setting was the general rehabilitation…

  6. Behavioral Treatment for Pathological Gambling in Persons with Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guercio, John M.; Johnson, Taylor; Dixon, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    The present investigation examined a behavior-analytic clinical treatment package designed to reduce the pathological gambling of 3 individuals with acquired brain injury. A prior history of pathological gambling of each patient was assessed via caregiver report, psychological testing, and direct observation of gambling behavior. Using an 8-week…

  7. Efficacy of electronic portable assistive devices for people with acquired brain injury: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Charters, E; Gillett, L; Simpson, G K

    2015-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of electronic portable assistive devices (EPADs) for people with acquired brain injury. A systematic database search (OVID, CINAHL) found 541 citations published between 1989 and the end of 2012. A total of 23 reports met the inclusion/exclusion criteria, namely intervention studies (group, n-of-1) testing the efficacy of EPADs as compensatory devices for cognitive impairment for people with acquired brain injury aged 16-65 years. Study quality was rated by the PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database) scale, (randomised controlled trials), the Downes and Black tool (other group intervention studies), and the Single Case Experimental Design tool (single participant studies). Levels of evidence were determined using five levels of classification based on the Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Evidence table. Results found no Level 1 studies (RCTs with PEDro score ≥ 6), four Level 2 studies and 10 Level 3 studies. There was insufficient evidence to recommend any practice standards, but sufficient evidence to recommend the use of electronic reminder systems in supporting the everyday functioning of people with acquired brain injury as a practice guideline. Higher quality studies are required to support a broader range of compensatory roles that EPADs have the potential to play in neurorehabilitation and the long-term support of people with acquired brain injury. PMID:25121394

  8. Expressive Electronic Journal Writing: Freedom of Communication for Survivors of Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraas, Michael; Balz, Magdalen A.

    2008-01-01

    In addition to the impaired ability to effectively communicate, adults with acquired brain injury (ABI) also experience high incidences of depression, social isolation, and decreased quality of life. Expressive writing programs have been shown to be effective in alleviating these concomitant impairments in other populations including incarcerated…

  9. Acquired-resistance of bevacizumab treatment for radiation brain necrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dayong; Bian, Jianliang; Chang, Joe Y.; Yuan, Zhiyong; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The case study reported on acquired bevacizumab resistance in one patient receiving re-treatment with bevacizumab following radiation brain necrosis progression after bevacizumab was discontinued. This case offers novel and additional insight for bevacizumab treatment. Low-dose bevacizumab is effective for radiation brain necrosis, and radiation brain necrosis may progress after bevacizumab discontinuation, whereas too many cycles of bevacizumab treatment may induce drug-resistance and re-treatment failure following the progression. Therefore, more rational administration for radiation brain necrosis with bevacizumab may include three aspects: short-course treatment, timely discontinuation upon obtaining satisfactory effects (to prevent long-term medication associated resistance) and re-treatment after brain necrosis progression. PMID:26933810

  10. A Primer on Brain Imaging in Developmental Psychopathology: What Is It Good For?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Daniel S.

    2006-01-01

    This primer introduces a Special Section on brain imaging, which includes a commentary and 10 data papers presenting applications of brain imaging to questions on developmental psychopathology. This primer serves two purposes. First, the article summarizes the strength and weaknesses of various brain-imaging techniques typically employed in…

  11. Larger Brains in Medication Naive High-Functioning Subjects with Pervasive Developmental Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmen, Saskia J. M. C.; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Kemner, Chantal; Schnack, Hugo G.; Janssen, Joost; Kahn, Rene S.; van Engeland, Herman

    2004-01-01

    Background: Are brain volumes of individuals with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) still enlarged in adolescence and adulthood, and if so, is this enlargement confined to the gray and/or the white matter and is it global or more prominent in specific brain regions. Methods: Brain MRI scans were made of 21 adolescents with PDD and 21 closely…

  12. Challenges in understanding the epidemiology of acquired brain injury in India.

    PubMed

    Kamalakannan, Suresh Kumar; Gudlavalleti, Aashrai S V; Murthy Gudlavalleti, Venkata S; Goenka, Shifalika; Kuper, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    An acquired brain injury (ABI) is an injury to the brain, which is not hereditary, congenital, degenerative, or induced by birth trauma. In India, rapid urbanization, economic growth and changes in lifestyle have led to a tremendous increase in the incidence of ABI, so much so that it is being referred to as a 'silent epidemic'. Unlike developed countries, there is no well-established system for collecting and managing information on various diseases in India. Thus it is a daunting task to obtain reliable information about acquired brain injury. In the course of conducting a systematic review on the epidemiology of ABI in India, we recognized several challenges which hampered our effort. Inadequate case definition, lack of centralized reporting mechanisms, lack of population based studies, absence of standardized survey protocols and inadequate mortality statistics are some of the major obstacles. Following a standard case definition, linking multiple hospital-based registries, initiating a state or nationwide population-based registry, conducting population-based studies that are methodologically robust and introducing centralized, standard reporting mechanisms for ABI, are some of the strategies that could help facilitate a thorough investigation into the epidemiology and understanding of ABI. This may help improve policies on prevention and management of acquired brain injury in India. PMID:25745314

  13. Challenges in understanding the epidemiology of acquired brain injury in India

    PubMed Central

    Kamalakannan, Suresh Kumar; Gudlavalleti, Aashrai S.V.; Murthy Gudlavalleti, Venkata S.; Goenka, Shifalika; Kuper, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    An acquired brain injury (ABI) is an injury to the brain, which is not hereditary, congenital, degenerative, or induced by birth trauma. In India, rapid urbanization, economic growth and changes in lifestyle have led to a tremendous increase in the incidence of ABI, so much so that it is being referred to as a ‘silent epidemic’. Unlike developed countries, there is no well-established system for collecting and managing information on various diseases in India. Thus it is a daunting task to obtain reliable information about acquired brain injury. In the course of conducting a systematic review on the epidemiology of ABI in India, we recognized several challenges which hampered our effort. Inadequate case definition, lack of centralized reporting mechanisms, lack of population based studies, absence of standardized survey protocols and inadequate mortality statistics are some of the major obstacles. Following a standard case definition, linking multiple hospital-based registries, initiating a state or nationwide population-based registry, conducting population-based studies that are methodologically robust and introducing centralized, standard reporting mechanisms for ABI, are some of the strategies that could help facilitate a thorough investigation into the epidemiology and understanding of ABI. This may help improve policies on prevention and management of acquired brain injury in India. PMID:25745314

  14. Beyond utterances: distributed cognition as a framework for studying discourse in adults with acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Duff, Melissa C; Mutlu, Bilge; Byom, Lindsey; Turkstra, Lyn S

    2012-02-01

    Considerable effort has been directed at understanding the nature of the communicative deficits observed in individuals with acquired brain injuries. Yet several theoretical, methodological, and clinical challenges remain. In this article, we examine distributed cognition as a framework for understanding interaction among communication partners, interaction of communication and cognition, and interaction with the environments and contexts of everyday language use. We review the basic principles of distributed cognition and the implications for applying this approach to the study of discourse in individuals with cognitive-communication disorders. We also review a range of protocols and findings from our research that highlight how the distributed cognition approach might offer a deeper understanding of communicative mechanisms and deficits in individuals with cognitive communication impairments. The advantages and implications of distributed cognition as a framework for studying discourse in adults with acquired brain injury are discussed. PMID:22362323

  15. Predictors of Change in Participation Rates Following Acquired Brain Injury: Results of a Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anaby, Dana; Law, Mary; Hanna, Steven; DeMatteo, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was (1) to examine the changes in participation rates over 1 year among children and adolescents after acquired brain injury and (2) to explore the effect of child and family factors on these changes. Method: The participation levels of 136 children and young people (88 males; 48 females; age range 4y 11mo-17y 6mo;…

  16. Developmental Hypothyroidism Alters Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Expression in Adulthood.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Severe developmental thyroid hormone (TH) insufficiency results in alterations in brain structure/function and lasting behavioral impairments. Environmental toxicants reduce circulating levels of TH, but the disruption is modest and the doseresponse relationships of TH and neuro...

  17. The Relationship between Inadequate Oxygenation of the Brain at Birth and Developmental Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Reviewed are the causes of oxygenation deprivation during the birth process, effects on the brain, clinical manifestations, developmental consequences in terms of cognitive and motor deficits, and implications for educators. (JDD)

  18. Tackling the 'dyslexia paradox': reading brain and behavior for early markers of developmental dyslexiax.

    PubMed

    Ozernov-Palchik, Ola; Gaab, Nadine

    2016-03-01

    Developmental dyslexia is an unexplained inability to acquire accurate or fluent reading that affects approximately 5-17% of children. Dyslexia is associated with structural and functional alterations in various brain regions that support reading. Neuroimaging studies in infants and pre-reading children suggest that these alterations predate reading instruction and reading failure, supporting the hypothesis that variant function in dyslexia susceptibility genes lead to atypical neural migration and/or axonal growth during early, most likely in utero, brain development. Yet, dyslexia is typically not diagnosed until a child has failed to learn to read as expected (usually in second grade or later). There is emerging evidence that neuroimaging measures, when combined with key behavioral measures, can enhance the accuracy of identification of dyslexia risk in pre-reading children but its sensitivity, specificity, and cost-efficiency is still unclear. Early identification of dyslexia risk carries important implications for dyslexia remediation and the amelioration of the psychosocial consequences commonly associated with reading failure. WIREs Cogn Sci 2016, 7:156-176. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1383 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26836227

  19. Neurosurgical targets for compulsivity: what can we learn from acquired brain lesions?

    PubMed

    Figee, Martijn; Wielaard, Ilse; Mazaheri, Ali; Denys, Damiaan

    2013-03-01

    Treatment efficacy of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and other neurosurgical techniques in refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is greatly dependent on the targeting of relevant brain regions. Over the years, several case reports have been published on either the emergence or resolution of obsessive-compulsive symptoms due to neurological lesions. These reports can potentially serve as an important source of insight into the neuroanatomy of compulsivity and have implications for targets of DBS. For this purpose, we have reviewed all published case reports of patients with acquired or resolved obsessive-compulsive symptoms after brain lesions. We found a total of 37 case reports describing 71 patients with acquired and 6 with resolved obsessive-compulsive symptoms as a result of hemorrhaging, infarctions or removal of tumors. Behavioral symptoms following brain lesions consisted of typical obsessive-compulsive symptoms, but also symptoms within the compulsivity spectrum. These data suggests that lesions in the cortico-striato-thalamic circuit, parietal and temporal cortex, cerebellum and brainstem may induce compulsivity. Moreover, the resolution of obsessive-compulsive symptoms has been reported following lesions in the putamen, internal capsule and fronto-parietal lobe. These case reports provide strong evidence supporting the rationale for DBS in the ventral striatum and internal capsule for treatment of compulsivity and reveal the putamen and fronto-parietal cortex as promising new targets. PMID:23313647

  20. [Focal connatal acquired brain damage--sonographic study of the course of healing].

    PubMed

    Franek, A

    1985-06-01

    A case of a perinatal acquired focal brain lesion is reported, and the process of resorption and healing demonstrated by ultrasound. Within four weeks a cortical area of increased echogenicity was resorbed. After two months, the resulting porencephalic cyst had been transformed into glial tissue of very high echogenicity. The neurologic development of two children with such glial focus was good. These cases demonstrate that porencephalic cysts are not always the final state after resorption of a focal brain lesion. They are no reliable prognostic indicator of poor neurological outcome. Traumatic and complicated delivery, asphyxia and coagulopathy are conditions which have been found several times in connection with a focal brain lesion. In contrast to periventricular injury, prematurity does not seem to be a factor of higher risk. PMID:3895372

  1. Words and Maps: Developmental Changes in Mental Models of Spatial Information Acquired from Descriptions and Depictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uttal, David H.; Fisher, Joan A.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2006-01-01

    People acquire spatial information from many sources, including maps, verbal descriptions, and navigating in the environment. The different sources present spatial information in different ways. For example, maps can show many spatial relations simultaneously, but in a description, each spatial relation must be presented sequentially. The present…

  2. Developmental Apoptosis Mediates Entry and Positioning of Microglia in the Zebrafish Brain.

    PubMed

    Casano, Alessandra Maria; Albert, Marvin; Peri, Francesca

    2016-07-26

    In the brain, neurons that fail to assemble into functional circuits are eliminated. Their clearance depends on microglia, immune cells that colonize the CNS during embryogenesis. Despite the importance of these cells in development and disease, the mechanisms that target and position microglia within the brain are unclear. Here we show that, in zebrafish, attraction of microglia into the brain exploits differences in developmental neuronal apoptosis and that these provide a mechanism for microglial distribution. Reducing neuronal cell death results in fewer microglia, whereas increased apoptosis enhances brain colonization, resulting in more microglia at later stages. Interestingly, attraction into the brain depends on nucleotide signaling, the same signaling system used to guide microglia toward brain injuries. Finally, this work uncovers a cell-non-autonomous role for developmental apoptosis. Classically considered a wasteful process, programmed cell death is exploited here to configure the immune-neuronal interface of the brain. PMID:27425604

  3. Psychological and adjustment problems due to acquired brain lesions in pediatric patients: a comparison of vascular, infectious, and other origins.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Valentina; Galbiati, Susanna; Villa, Federica; Colombo, Katia; Recla, Monica; Adduci, Annarita; Avantaggiato, Paolo; Bardoni, Alessandra; Strazzer, Sandra

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe psychological, behavioral, and adjustment problems in children and adolescents with acquired brain lesions of different origins. Three groups of patients with acquired brain lesions (15 patients with infectious origin, 37 with vascular origin, and 15 with other origin), ranging in age from 4 to 18 years, received a psychological evaluation, including the Child Behavior Checklist for ages 4 to 18 and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale. About half of the total sample (47.8%) showed psychological problems. Difficulties varied according to the cause of the brain lesions. The most problematic patients were children with brain lesions of infectious origin, whereas children with brain lesions of vascular origin scored lower on most of the Child Behavior Checklist scales. The authors conclude that psychological and behavioral difficulties are very common among school-aged children with acquired brain lesions, and their relevance and impact must necessarily be considered. PMID:24453143

  4. STATISTICAL APPROACH TO BRAIN MORPHOMETRY DATA REQUIRED IN DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY (DNT) TESTING GUIDELINES: PROFILE ANALYSIS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brain morphometry measurements are required in test guidelines proposed by the USEPA to screen chemicals for developmental neurotoxicity. Because the DNT is a screening battery, the analysis of this data should be sensitive to dose-related changes in the pattern of brain growt...

  5. Employment Outcomes for Persons with Acquired Brain Injury. Report from the Institute on Rehabilitation Issues Study Group (20th, New Orleans, Louisiana, November 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corthell, David W., Ed.

    This document provides a resource and problem-solving guide for vocational rehabilitation counselors serving people with brain injuries acquired through trauma or other circumstances. An introduction defines acquired brain injury, characterizes the uniqueness of people with acquired brain injury, and describes community resources. Chapter 2,…

  6. Intrinsic Functional Connectivity Patterns Predict Consciousness Level and Recovery Outcome in Acquired Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xuehai; Zou, Qihong; Hu, Jin; Tang, Weijun; Mao, Ying; Gao, Liang; Zhu, Jianhong; Jin, Yi; Wu, Xin; Lu, Lu; Zhang, Yaojun; Zhang, Yao; Dai, Zhengjia; Gao, Jia-Hong; Weng, Xuchu; Northoff, Georg; Giacino, Joseph T.; He, Yong

    2015-01-01

    For accurate diagnosis and prognostic prediction of acquired brain injury (ABI), it is crucial to understand the neurobiological mechanisms underlying loss of consciousness. However, there is no consensus on which regions and networks act as biomarkers for consciousness level and recovery outcome in ABI. Using resting-state fMRI, we assessed intrinsic functional connectivity strength (FCS) of whole-brain networks in a large sample of 99 ABI patients with varying degrees of consciousness loss (including fully preserved consciousness state, minimally conscious state, unresponsive wakefulness syndrome/vegetative state, and coma) and 34 healthy control subjects. Consciousness level was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Scale and Coma Recovery Scale-Revised on the day of fMRI scanning; recovery outcome was assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale 3 months after the fMRI scanning. One-way ANOVA of FCS, Spearman correlation analyses between FCS and the consciousness level and recovery outcome, and FCS-based multivariate pattern analysis were performed. We found decreased FCS with loss of consciousness primarily distributed in the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus (PCC/PCU), medial prefrontal cortex, and lateral parietal cortex. The FCS values of these regions were significantly correlated with consciousness level and recovery outcome. Multivariate support vector machine discrimination analysis revealed that the FCS patterns predicted whether patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome/vegetative state and coma would regain consciousness with an accuracy of 81.25%, and the most discriminative region was the PCC/PCU. These findings suggest that intrinsic functional connectivity patterns of the human posteromedial cortex could serve as a potential indicator for consciousness level and recovery outcome in individuals with ABI. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Varying degrees of consciousness loss and recovery are commonly observed in acquired brain injury patients, yet the

  7. Outcomes of a multicomponent intervention on occupational performance in persons with unilateral acquired brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Hoyas, Elisabet Huertas; Pérez, Eduardo José Pedrero; Águila Maturana, Ana M.; Mota, Gloria Rojo; Piédrola, Rosa Martínez; de Heredia Torres, Marta Pérez

    2016-01-01

    Summary Complications after unilateral acquired brain injury (ABI) can affect various areas of expertise causing (depending on the location of the lesion) impairment in occupational performance. The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the concepts of occupational performance and functional independence, both before and after a multicomponent intervention including occupational therapy, in persons with unilateral brain damage. This was a longitudinal quasi-experimental pretest post-test study in a sample of 58 patients with unilateral brain injury (28 with traumatic brain injury and 30 with ischemic stroke). The patients’ level of independence was measured using the short version of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. We also measured quality of performance using the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills. The findings of this study showed that patients with injury in the right hemisphere improved more than those with left hemisphere damage (p<0.001). All the patients with ABI, especially those with right-sided injury, derived benefit from the multicomponent intervention, except in the area of motor skills. More research is needed on the specific techniques that might address such skills. PMID:27358224

  8. Developmental process emerges from extended brain-body-behavior networks

    PubMed Central

    Byrge, Lisa; Sporns, Olaf; Smith, Linda B.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of brain connectivity have focused on two modes of networks: structural networks describing neuroanatomy and the intrinsic and evoked dependencies of functional networks at rest and during tasks. Each mode constrains and shapes the other across multiple time scales, and each also shows age-related changes. Here we argue that understanding how brains change across development requires understanding the interplay between behavior and brain networks: changing bodies and activities modify the statistics of inputs to the brain; these changing inputs mold brain networks; these networks, in turn, promote further change in behavior and input. PMID:24862251

  9. Investigation of the best model to characterize diffuse correlation spectroscopy measurements acquired directly on the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdecchia, K.; Diop, M.; St. Lawrence, K.

    2015-03-01

    Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) is a non-invasive optical technique capable of monitoring tissue perfusion changes, particularly in the brain. The normalized temporal intensity autocorrelation function generated by DCS is typically characterized by assuming that the movement of erythrocytes can be modeled as a Brownian diffusion-like process instead of the expected random flow model. Carp et al. [Biomedical Optics Express, 2011] proposed a hybrid model, referred to as the hydrodynamic diffusion model, to capture both the random ballistic and diffusive nature of erythrocyte motion. The purpose of this study was to compare how well the Brownian diffusion and the hydrodynamic diffusion models characterized DCS data acquired directly on the brain, avoiding the confounding effects of scalp and skull. Data were acquired from seven pigs during normocapnia (39.9 +/- 0.7 mmHg) and hypocapnia (22.1 +/- 1.6 mmHg) with the DCS fibers placed 7 mm apart, directly on the cerebral cortex. The hydrodynamic diffusion model was found to provide a consistently better fit to the autocorrelation functions compared to the Brownian diffusion model and was less sensitive to the chosen start and end time points used in the fitting. However, the decrease in cerebral blood flow from normocapnia to hypocapnia determined was similar for the two models (-42.6 +/- 8.6 % for the Brownian model and -42.2 +/- 10.2 % for the hydrodynamic model), suggesting that the latter is reasonable for monitoring flow changes.

  10. Fast attainment of computer cursor control with noninvasively acquired brain signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradberry, Trent J.; Gentili, Rodolphe J.; Contreras-Vidal, José L.

    2011-06-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems are allowing humans and non-human primates to drive prosthetic devices such as computer cursors and artificial arms with just their thoughts. Invasive BCI systems acquire neural signals with intracranial or subdural electrodes, while noninvasive BCI systems typically acquire neural signals with scalp electroencephalography (EEG). Some drawbacks of invasive BCI systems are the inherent risks of surgery and gradual degradation of signal integrity. A limitation of noninvasive BCI systems for two-dimensional control of a cursor, in particular those based on sensorimotor rhythms, is the lengthy training time required by users to achieve satisfactory performance. Here we describe a novel approach to continuously decoding imagined movements from EEG signals in a BCI experiment with reduced training time. We demonstrate that, using our noninvasive BCI system and observational learning, subjects were able to accomplish two-dimensional control of a cursor with performance levels comparable to those of invasive BCI systems. Compared to other studies of noninvasive BCI systems, training time was substantially reduced, requiring only a single session of decoder calibration (~20 min) and subject practice (~20 min). In addition, we used standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography to reveal that the neural sources that encoded observed cursor movement may implicate a human mirror neuron system. These findings offer the potential to continuously control complex devices such as robotic arms with one's mind without lengthy training or surgery.

  11. Developmental Dyslexia, Neurolinguistic Theory and Deviations in Brain Morphology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hynd, George W.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Reviews computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies examining deviations in brain morphology. Discusses methodological and technical issues. Concludes that dyslexics show variations in specific brain regions. Suggests that neuroimaging procedures appear to provide direct evidence supporting the importance of deviations in normal…

  12. Plasticity of Nonneuronal Brain Tissue: Roles in Developmental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Willie K.; Greenough, William T.

    2004-01-01

    Neuronal and nonneuronal plasticity are both affected by environmental and experiential factors. Remodeling of existing neurons induced by such factors has been observed throughout the brain, and includes alterations in dendritic field dimensions, synaptogenesis, and synaptic morphology. The brain loci affected by these plastic neuronal changes…

  13. The "Globularization Hypothesis" of the Language-ready Brain as a Developmental Frame for Prosodic Bootstrapping Theories of Language Acquisition.

    PubMed

    Irurtzun, Aritz

    2015-01-01

    In recent research (Boeckx and Benítez-Burraco, 2014a,b) have advanced the hypothesis that our species-specific language-ready brain should be understood as the outcome of developmental changes that occurred in our species after the split from Neanderthals-Denisovans, which resulted in a more globular braincase configuration in comparison to our closest relatives, who had elongated endocasts. According to these authors, the development of a globular brain is an essential ingredient for the language faculty and in particular, it is the centrality occupied by the thalamus in a globular brain that allows its modulatory or regulatory role, essential for syntactico-semantic computations. Their hypothesis is that the syntactico-semantic capacities arise in humans as a consequence of a process of globularization, which significantly takes place postnatally (cf. Neubauer et al., 2010). In this paper, I show that Boeckx and Benítez-Burraco's hypothesis makes an interesting developmental prediction regarding the path of language acquisition: it teases apart the onset of phonological acquisition and the onset of syntactic acquisition (the latter starting significantly later, after globularization). I argue that this hypothesis provides a developmental rationale for the prosodic bootstrapping hypothesis of language acquisition (cf. i.a. Gleitman and Wanner, 1982; Mehler et al., 1988, et seq.; Gervain and Werker, 2013), which claim that prosodic cues are employed for syntactic parsing. The literature converges in the observation that a large amount of such prosodic cues (in particular, rhythmic cues) are already acquired before the completion of the globularization phase, which paves the way for the premises of the prosodic bootstrapping hypothesis, allowing babies to have a rich knowledge of the prosody of their target language before they can start parsing the primary linguistic data syntactically. PMID:26696916

  14. 18F-DOPA Uptake of Developmental Venous Anomalies in Children With Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Morana, Giovanni; Piccardo, Arnoldo; Garrè, Maria Luisa; Cabria, Manlio; Rossi, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    We report the finding of increased F-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine uptake of the brain parenchyma adjacent to developmental venous anomalies, incidentally discovered in 3 pediatric patients with diffusely infiltrating gliomas. One patient presented 3 developmental venous anomalies located distant from the tumor, whereas in the remaining 2 patients, the vascular anomalies were inside the tumoral area mimicking a focal area of increased tumor metabolism. In the setting of brain tumor imaging, focal increased F-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine uptake should be carefully interpreted in light of MRI findings, and nuclear medicine physicians should be aware of any incidental minor vascular abnormality for proper interpretation of PET data. PMID:26909711

  15. Immune endocrinological evaluation in patients with severe vascular acquired brain injuries: therapeutical approaches.

    PubMed

    Amico, Angelo Paolo; Terlizzi, Annamaria; Annamaria, Terlizzi; Megna, Marisa; Marisa, Megna; Megna, Gianfranco; Gianfranco, Megna; Damiani, Sabino; Sabino, Damiani

    2013-06-01

    It is known that in severe acquired brain injuries there is process of neuroinflammation, with the activation of a local and general stress response. In our study we considered six patients with disorders of consciousness (five in vegetative state and one in minimal consciousness state) in subacute phase, which had both a clinical assessment and a functional imaging (fMRI): in all these patients we analised blood levels of osteopontin (OPN), a cytokin involved in neuroinflammation but also in neurorepair with a still discussed role. Besides we studied the lymphocyte subsets and blood levels of some hormones (ADH, ACTH, PRL, GH, TSH, fT3, fT4). We found a positive correlation between the levels of serum osteopontin (higher than normal in all subjects) and the severity of the brain injury, especially for prognosis: actually, the patient with the lowest level has emerged from minimal consciousness state, while the one with the highest level has died a few days after the evaluation. The lymphocyte subset was altered, with a general increase of CD4+/CD3+ ratio, but without a so strict correlation with clinical severity; the only hormone with a significant increase in the worse patients was prolactin. In fMRI we detected some responses to visual and acoustic stimuli also in vegetative states, which had no clinical response to this kind of stimulation but generally have had a better prognosis. So we conclude that osteopontin could be a good marker of neuroinflammation and relate to a worse prognosis of brain injuries; the lymphocyte alterations in these disorders are not clear, but we suspect an unbalance of CD4 towards Th2; PRL is the best endocrinological marker of brain injury severity; fMRI surely plays an important role in the detection of subclinical responses and in prognostic stratification, that is still to define with more studies and statistical analysis. PMID:23701252

  16. Low glucose utilization and neurodegenerative changes caused by sodium fluoride exposure in rat's developmental brain.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunyang; Zhang, Shun; Liu, Hongliang; Guan, Zhizhong; Zeng, Qiang; Zhang, Cheng; Lei, Rongrong; Xia, Tao; Wang, Zhenglun; Yang, Lu; Chen, Yihu; Wu, Xue; Zhang, Xiaofei; Cui, Yushan; Yu, Linyu; Wang, Aiguo

    2014-03-01

    Fluorine, a toxic and reactive element, is widely prevalent throughout the environment and can induce toxicity when absorbed into the body. This study was to explore the possible mechanisms of developmental neurotoxicity in rats treated with different levels of sodium fluoride (NaF). The rats' intelligence, as well as changes in neuronal morphology, glucose absorption, and functional gene expression within the brain were determined using the Morris water maze test, transmission electron microscopy, small-animal magnetic resonance imaging and Positron emission tomography and computed tomography, and Western blotting techniques. We found that NaF treatment-impaired learning and memory in these rats. Furthermore, NaF caused neuronal degeneration, decreased brain glucose utilization, decreased the protein expression of glucose transporter 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein, and increased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the rat brains. The developmental neurotoxicity of fluoride may be closely associated with low glucose utilization and neurodegenerative changes. PMID:23982469

  17. A Principled Relation between Reading and Naming in Acquired and Developmental Anomia: Surface Dyslexia Following Impairment in the Phonological Output Lexicon.

    PubMed

    Gvion, Aviah; Friedmann, Naama

    2016-01-01

    Lexical retrieval and reading aloud are often viewed as two separate processes. However, they are not completely separate-they share components. This study assessed the effect of an impairment in a shared component, the phonological output lexicon, on lexical retrieval and on reading aloud. Because the phonological output lexicon is part of the lexical route for reading, individuals with an impairment in this lexicon may be forced to read aloud via the sublexical route and therefore show a reading pattern that is typical of surface dyslexia. To examine the effect of phonological output lexicon deficit on reading, we tested the reading of 16 Hebrew-speaking individuals with phonological output lexicon anomia, eight with acquired anomia following brain damage and eight with developmental anomia. We established that they had a phonological output lexicon deficit according to the types of errors and the effects on their naming in a picture naming task, and excluded other deficit loci in the lexical retrieval process according to a line of tests assessing their picture and word comprehension, word and non-word repetition, and phonological working memory. After we have established that the participants have a phonological output lexicon deficit, we tested their reading. To assess their reading and type of reading impairment, we tested their reading aloud, lexical decision, and written word comprehension. We found that all of the participants with phonological output lexicon impairment showed, in addition to anomia, also the typical surface dyslexia errors in reading aloud of irregular words, words with ambiguous conversion to phonemes, and potentiophones (words like "now" that, when read via the sublexical route, can be sounded out as another word, "know"). Importantly, the participants performed normally on pseudohomophone lexical decision and on homophone/potentiophone reading comprehension, indicating spared orthographic input lexicon and spared access to it and from

  18. A Principled Relation between Reading and Naming in Acquired and Developmental Anomia: Surface Dyslexia Following Impairment in the Phonological Output Lexicon

    PubMed Central

    Gvion, Aviah; Friedmann, Naama

    2016-01-01

    Lexical retrieval and reading aloud are often viewed as two separate processes. However, they are not completely separate—they share components. This study assessed the effect of an impairment in a shared component, the phonological output lexicon, on lexical retrieval and on reading aloud. Because the phonological output lexicon is part of the lexical route for reading, individuals with an impairment in this lexicon may be forced to read aloud via the sublexical route and therefore show a reading pattern that is typical of surface dyslexia. To examine the effect of phonological output lexicon deficit on reading, we tested the reading of 16 Hebrew-speaking individuals with phonological output lexicon anomia, eight with acquired anomia following brain damage and eight with developmental anomia. We established that they had a phonological output lexicon deficit according to the types of errors and the effects on their naming in a picture naming task, and excluded other deficit loci in the lexical retrieval process according to a line of tests assessing their picture and word comprehension, word and non-word repetition, and phonological working memory. After we have established that the participants have a phonological output lexicon deficit, we tested their reading. To assess their reading and type of reading impairment, we tested their reading aloud, lexical decision, and written word comprehension. We found that all of the participants with phonological output lexicon impairment showed, in addition to anomia, also the typical surface dyslexia errors in reading aloud of irregular words, words with ambiguous conversion to phonemes, and potentiophones (words like “now” that, when read via the sublexical route, can be sounded out as another word, “know”). Importantly, the participants performed normally on pseudohomophone lexical decision and on homophone/potentiophone reading comprehension, indicating spared orthographic input lexicon and spared access to it

  19. Increasing functional rehabilitation in acquired brain injury treatment: effective applications of behavioural principles.

    PubMed

    Guercio, John; Davis, Paula; Faw, Gerry; McMorrow, Martin; Ori, Lindsay; Berkowitz, Brooke; Nigra, Megan

    2002-10-01

    This paper investigated ways to increase the participation of direct care staff in the functional rehabilitation activities (FRAs) of adults with acquired brain injuries (ABIs). FRAs were rehabilitation agendas written by clinical staff for delivery by paraprofessionals. Increases in FRA completion were believed to be directly related to clinical success. These FRAs had been identified as key components in the rehabilitation programmes of the adults living within the residential facilities. Increases in FRAs were crucial in improving the quality of the rehabilitation programmes of the participants involved. The study observed four residential settings serving adults with ABIs using a multiple baseline design. The treatment approach consisted of public posting of weekly FRA documentation, incorporation of staff input, and reinforcement for documentation of FRAs. The results indicated a positive impact on the participation of staff in all of the residences in the study, consistent with implementation of the treatment package. PMID:12418998

  20. The promotion of recovery through rehabilitation after acquired brain injury in children.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Rob; Basu, Anna

    2015-01-01

    A degree of motor recovery is typically seen after acquired brain injury in children. The extent to which rehabilitation efforts can claim credit for this is disputed. Strong correlations between late impairment outcomes and early severity and impairment indices are seen both in adults and children. These correlations have been interpreted by some as evidence that recovery is largely intrinsic and that any additional rehabilitation effects are small. Such views are belied by published animal studies demonstrating the possibility of large rehabilitation effects. Animal models suggest that to achieve similar rehabilitation treatment effect sizes in clinical practice, rehabilitation 'doses' should be greater, rehabilitation efforts should start sooner, and premature accommodation of impairment should be avoided. PMID:25200439

  1. Computer-based cognitive retraining for adults with chronic acquired brain injury: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Li, Kitsum; Robertson, Julie; Ramos, Joshua; Gella, Stephanie

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a computer-based cognitive retraining (CBCR) program on improving memory and attention deficits in individuals with a chronic acquired brain injury (ABI). Twelve adults with a chronic ABI demonstrating deficits in memory and attention were recruited from a convenience sample from the community. Using a quasi-experimental one-group pretest-posttest design, a significant improvement was found in both memory and attention scores postintervention using the cognitive screening tool. This study supported the effectiveness of CBCR programs in improving cognitive deficits in memory and attention in individuals with chronic ABI. Further research is recommended to validate these findings with a larger ABI population and to investigate transfer to improvement in occupational performance that supports daily living skills. PMID:24102589

  2. Developmental Vitamin D3 deficiency alters the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Féron, F; Burne, T H J; Brown, J; Smith, E; McGrath, J J; Mackay-Sim, A; Eyles, D W

    2005-03-15

    There is growing evidence that Vitamin D(3) (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3)) is involved in brain development. We have recently shown that the brains of newborn rats from Vitamin D(3) deficient dams were larger than controls, had increased cell proliferation, larger lateral ventricles, and reduced cortical thickness. Brains from these animals also had reduced expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The aim of the current study was to examine if there were any permanent outcomes into adulthood when the offspring of Vitamin D(3) deficient dams were restored to a normal diet. The brains of adult rats were examined at 10 weeks of age after Vitamin D(3) deficiency until birth or weaning. Compared to controls animals that were exposed to transient early Vitamin D(3) deficiency had larger lateral ventricles, reduced NGF protein content, and reduced expression of a number genes involved in neuronal structure, i.e. neurofilament or MAP-2 or neurotransmission, i.e. GABA-A(alpha4). We conclude that transient early life hypovitaminosis D(3) not only disrupts brain development but leads to persistent changes in the adult brain. In light of the high incidence of hypovitaminosis D(3) in women of child-bearing age, the public health implications of these findings warrant attention. PMID:15763180

  3. Global and regional cortical connectivity maturation index (CCMI) of developmental human brain with quantification of short-range association tracts

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Minhui; Jeon, Tina; Mishra, Virendra; Du, Haixiao; Wang, Yu; Peng, Yun; Huang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    From early childhood to adulthood, synaptogenesis and synaptic pruning continuously reshape the structural architecture and neural connection in developmental human brains. Disturbance of the precisely balanced strengthening of certain axons and pruning of others may cause mental disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. To characterize this balance, we proposed a novel measurement based on cortical parcellation and diffusion MRI (dMRI) tractography, a cortical connectivity maturation index (CCMI). To evaluate the spatiotemporal sensitivity of CCMI as a potential biomarker, dMRI and T1 weighted datasets of 21 healthy subjects 2–25 years were acquired. Brain cortex was parcellated into 68 gyral labels using T1 weighted images, then transformed into dMRI space to serve as the seed region of interest for dMRI-based tractography. Cortico-cortical association fibers initiated from each gyrus were categorized into long- and short-range ones, based on the other end of fiber terminating in non-adjacent or adjacent gyri of the seed gyrus, respectively. The regional CCMI was defined as the ratio between number of short-range association tracts and that of all association tracts traced from one of 68 parcellated gyri. The developmental trajectory of the whole brain CCMI follows a quadratic model with initial decreases from 2 to 16 years followed by later increases after 16 years. Regional CCMI is heterogeneous among different cortical gyri with CCMI dropping to the lowest value earlier in primary somatosensory cortex and visual cortex while later in the prefrontal cortex. The proposed CCMI may serve as sensitive biomarker for brain development under normal or pathological conditions. PMID:27076697

  4. Global and regional cortical connectivity maturation index (CCMI) of developmental human brain with quantification of short-range association tracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Minhui; Jeon, Tina; Mishra, Virendra; Du, Haixiao; Wang, Yu; Peng, Yun; Huang, Hao

    2016-03-01

    From early childhood to adulthood, synaptogenesis and synaptic pruning continuously reshape the structural architecture and neural connection in developmental human brains. Disturbance of the precisely balanced strengthening of certain axons and pruning of others may cause mental disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. To characterize this balance, we proposed a novel measurement based on cortical parcellation and diffusion MRI (dMRI) tractography, a cortical connectivity maturation index (CCMI). To evaluate the spatiotemporal sensitivity of CCMI as a potential biomarker, dMRI and T1 weighted datasets of 21 healthy subjects 2-25 years were acquired. Brain cortex was parcellated into 68 gyral labels using T1 weighted images, then transformed into dMRI space to serve as the seed region of interest for dMRI-based tractography. Cortico-cortical association fibers initiated from each gyrus were categorized into long- and short-range ones, based on the other end of fiber terminating in non-adjacent or adjacent gyri of the seed gyrus, respectively. The regional CCMI was defined as the ratio between number of short-range association tracts and that of all association tracts traced from one of 68 parcellated gyri. The developmental trajectory of the whole brain CCMI follows a quadratic model with initial decreases from 2 to 16 years followed by later increases after 16 years. Regional CCMI is heterogeneous among different cortical gyri with CCMI dropping to the lowest value earlier in primary somatosensory cortex and visual cortex while later in the prefrontal cortex. The proposed CCMI may serve as sensitive biomarker for brain development under normal or pathological conditions.

  5. Sex Biased Gene Expression Profiling of Human Brains at Major Developmental Stages.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Zhang, Zhe; Su, Bing

    2016-01-01

    There are many differences in brain structure and function between males and females. However, how these differences were manifested during development and maintained through adulthood are still unclear. Here we present a time series analyses of genome-wide transcription profiles of the human brain, and we identified genes showing sex biased expression at major developmental stages (prenatal time, early childhood, puberty time and adulthood). We observed a great number of genes (>2,000 genes) showing between-sex expression divergence at all developmental stages with the greatest number (4,164 genes) at puberty time. However, there are little overlap of sex-biased genes among the major developmental stages, an indication of dynamic expression regulation of the sex-biased genes in the brain during development. Notably, the male biased genes are highly enriched for genes involved in neurological and psychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer's disease and autism, while no such pattern was seen for the female-biased genes, suggesting that the differences in brain disorder susceptibility between males and females are likely rooted from the sex-biased gene expression regulation during brain development. Collectively, these analyses reveal an important role of sex biased genes in brain development and neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:26880485

  6. Sex Biased Gene Expression Profiling of Human Brains at Major Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Zhang, Zhe; Su, Bing

    2016-01-01

    There are many differences in brain structure and function between males and females. However, how these differences were manifested during development and maintained through adulthood are still unclear. Here we present a time series analyses of genome-wide transcription profiles of the human brain, and we identified genes showing sex biased expression at major developmental stages (prenatal time, early childhood, puberty time and adulthood). We observed a great number of genes (>2,000 genes) showing between-sex expression divergence at all developmental stages with the greatest number (4,164 genes) at puberty time. However, there are little overlap of sex-biased genes among the major developmental stages, an indication of dynamic expression regulation of the sex-biased genes in the brain during development. Notably, the male biased genes are highly enriched for genes involved in neurological and psychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer’s disease and autism, while no such pattern was seen for the female-biased genes, suggesting that the differences in brain disorder susceptibility between males and females are likely rooted from the sex-biased gene expression regulation during brain development. Collectively, these analyses reveal an important role of sex biased genes in brain development and neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:26880485

  7. Post-traumatic growth following acquired brain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Jenny J.; Kinsella, Elaine L.; Muldoon, Orla T.; Fortune, Dónal G.

    2015-01-01

    The idea that acquired brain injury (ABI) caused by stroke, hemorrhage, infection or traumatic insult to the brain can result in post-traumatic growth (PTG) for individuals is increasingly attracting psychological attention. However, PTG also attracts controversy as a result of ambiguous empirical findings. The extent that demographic variables, injury factors, subjective beliefs, and psychological health are associated with PTG following ABI is not clear. Consequently, this systematic review and meta-analysis explores the correlates of variables within these four broad areas and PTG. From a total of 744 published studies addressing PTG in people with ABI, eight studies met inclusion criteria for detailed examination. Meta-analysis of these studies indicated that growth was related to employment, longer education, subjective beliefs about change post-injury, relationship status, older age, longer time since injury, and lower levels of depression. Results from homogeneity analyses indicated significant inter-study heterogeneity across variables. There is general support for the idea that people with ABI can experience growth, and that various demographics, injury-related variables, subjective beliefs and psychological health are related to growth. The contribution of social integration and the forming of new identities post-ABI to the experience of PTG is explored. These meta-analytic findings are however constrained by methodological limitations prevalent in the literature. Clinical and research implications are discussed with specific reference to community and collective factors that enable PTG. PMID:26321983

  8. Genetic Influences on Brain Developmental Trajectories on Neuroimaging Studies: From Infancy to Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Douet, Vanessa; Chang, Linda; Cloak, Christine; Ernst, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Human brain development has been studied intensively with neuroimaging. However, little is known about how genes influence developmental brain trajectories, even though a significant number of genes (about 10,000, or approximately one-third) in the human genome are expressed primarily in the brain and during brain development. Interestingly, in addition to showing differential expression among tissues, many genes are differentially expressed across the ages (e.g., antagonistic pleiotropy). Age-specific gene expression plays an important role in several critical events in brain development, including neuronal cell migration, synaptogenesis and neurotransmitter receptor specificity, as well as in aging and neurodegenerative disorders (e.g., Alzheimer disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). In addition, the majority of psychiatric and mental disorders are polygenic, and many have onsets during childhood and adolescence. In this review, we summarize the major findings from neuroimaging studies that link genetics with brain development, from infancy to young adulthood. Specifically, we focus on the heritability of brain structures across the ages, age-related genetic influences on brain development and sex-specific developmental trajectories. PMID:24077983

  9. Early Psychosocial Neglect Adversely Impacts Developmental Trajectories of Brain Oscillations and Their Interactions.

    PubMed

    Stamoulis, Catherine; Vanderwert, Ross E; Zeanah, Charles H; Fox, Nathan A; Nelson, Charles A

    2015-12-01

    Rhythmicity is a fundamental property of neural activity at multiple spatiotemporal scales, and associated oscillations represent a critical mechanism for communication and transmission of information across brain regions. During development, these oscillations evolve dynamically as a function of neural maturation and may be modulated by early experiences, positive and/or negative. This study investigated the impact of psychosocial deprivation associated with institutional rearing in early life and the effects of subsequent foster care intervention on developmental trajectories of neural oscillations and their cross-frequency correlations. Longitudinally acquired nontask EEGs from three cohorts of children from the Bucharest Early Intervention Project were analyzed. These included abandoned children initially reared in institutions and subsequently randomized to be placed in foster care or receive care as usual (prolonged institutional rearing) and a group of never-institutionalized children. Oscillation trajectories were estimated from 42 to 96 months, that is, 1-3 years after all children in the intervention arm of the study had been placed in foster care. Significant differences between groups were estimated for the amplitude trajectories of cognitive-related gamma, beta, alpha, and theta oscillations. Similar differences were identified as a function of time spent in institutions, suggesting that increased time spent in psychosocial neglect may have profound and widespread effects on brain activity. Significant group differences in cross-frequency coupling were estimated longitudinally between gamma and lower frequencies as well as alpha and lower frequencies. Lower cross-gamma coupling was estimated at 96 months in the group of children that remained in institutions at that age compared to the other two groups, suggesting potentially impaired communication between local and long-distance brain networks in these children. In contrast, higher cross

  10. Brain Blood Flow Related to Acoustic Laryngeal Reaction Time in Adult Developmental Stutterers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Ben C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study sought to identify patterns of impaired acoustic laryngeal reaction time as a function of response complexity parallel to metabolic measures of brain function. Findings indicated that the disruption in speech motor control for 16 adult male developmental stutterers was systematically related to metabolic asymmetry in left superior and…

  11. Social Outcomes in Childhood Brain Disorder: A Heuristic Integration of Social Neuroscience and Developmental Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeates, Keith Owen; Bigler, Erin D.; Dennis, Maureen; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, H. Gerry; Vannatta, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    The authors propose a heuristic model of the social outcomes of childhood brain disorder that draws on models and methods from both the emerging field of social cognitive neuroscience and the study of social competence in developmental psychology/psychopathology. The heuristic model characterizes the relationships between social adjustment, peer…

  12. The Developmental Brain Disorders Database (DBDB): A Curated Neurogenetics Knowledge Base With Clinical and Research Applications

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaa, Ghayda M.; Millen, Kathleen J.; Barkovich, A. James; Dobyns, William B.; Paciorkowski, Alex R.

    2014-01-01

    The number of single genes associated with neurodevelopmental disorders has increased dramatically over the past decade. The identification of causative genes for these disorders is important to clinical outcome as it allows for accurate assessment of prognosis, genetic counseling, delineation of natural history, inclusion in clinical trials, and in some cases determines therapy. Clinicians face the challenge of correctly identifying neurodevelopmental phenotypes, recognizing syndromes, and prioritizing the best candidate genes for testing. However, there is no central repository of definitions for many phenotypes, leading to errors of diagnosis. Additionally, there is no system of levels of evidence linking genes to phenotypes, making it difficult for clinicians to know which genes are most strongly associated with a given condition. We have developed the Developmental Brain Disorders Database (DBDB: https://www.dbdb.urmc.rochester.edu/home), a publicly available, online-curated repository of genes, phenotypes, and syndromes associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. DBDB contains the first referenced ontology of developmental brain phenotypes, and uses a novel system of levels of evidence for gene-phenotype associations. It is intended to assist clinicians in arriving at the correct diagnosis, select the most appropriate genetic test for that phenotype, and improve the care of patients with developmental brain disorders. For researchers interested in the discovery of novel genes for developmental brain disorders, DBDB provides a well-curated source of important genes against which research sequencing results can be compared. Finally, DBDB allows novel observations about the landscape of the neurogenetics knowledge base. PMID:24700709

  13. Novel insights into the rehabilitation of memory post acquired brain injury: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Spreij, Lauriane A.; Visser-Meily, Johanna M. A.; van Heugten, Caroline M.; Nijboer, Tanja C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) frequently results in memory impairment causing significant disabilities in daily life and is therefore a critical target for cognitive rehabilitation. Current understanding of brain plasticity has led to novel insights in remediation-oriented approaches for the rehabilitation of memory deficits. We will describe 3 of these approaches that have emerged in the last decade: Virtual Reality (VR) training, Computer-Based Cognitive Retraining (CBCR) and Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation (NBS) and evaluate its effectiveness. Methods: A systematic literature search was completed in regard to studies evaluating interventions aiming to improve the memory function after ABI. Information concerning study content and reported effectiveness were extracted. Quality of the studies and methods were evaluated. Results: A total of 786 studies were identified, 15 studies met the inclusion criteria. Three of those studies represent the VR technique, 7 studies represent CBCR and 5 studies NBS. All 3 studies found a significant improvement of the memory function after VR-based training, however these studies are considered preliminary. All 7 studies have shown that CBCR can be effective in improving memory function in patients suffering from ABI. Four studies of the 5 did not find significant improvement of the memory function after the use of NBS in ABI patients. Conclusion: On the basis of this review, CBCR is considered the most promising novel approach of the last decade because of the positive results in improving memory function post ABI. The number of studies representing VR were limited and the methodological quality low, therefore the results should be considered preliminary. The studies representing NBS did not detect evidence for the use of NBS in improving memory function. PMID:25566021

  14. Usual and Virtual Reality Video Game-Based Physiotherapy for Children and Youth with Acquired Brain Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levac, Danielle; Miller, Patricia; Missiuna, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about how therapists promote learning of functional motor skills for children with acquired brain injuries. This study explores physiotherapists' description of these interventions in comparison to virtual reality (VR) video game-based therapy. Six physiotherapists employed at a children's rehabilitation center participated in…

  15. A Systematic Review of Psychological Interventions to Alleviate Cognitive and Psychosocial Problems in Children with Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Kimberley A.; Dorris, Liam; McMillan, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Aim: It is now generally accepted that paediatric acquired brain injury (ABI) can have an impact on a child's cognitive, social, and behavioural functioning. However, the lack of guidelines on effective interventions for the affected children and their families, particularly beyond the acute recovery phase, can limit access to effective support.…

  16. Evaluation of a Reading Comprehension Strategy Package to Improve Reading Comprehension of Adult College Students with Acquired Brain Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Gina G.

    2013-01-01

    Adults with mild to moderate acquired brain injury (ABI) often pursue post-secondary or professional education after their injuries in order to enter or re-enter the job market. An increasing number of these adults report problems with reading-to-learn. The problem is particularly concerning given the growing population of adult survivors of ABI.…

  17. How Can Educational Psychologists Support the Reintegration of Children with an Acquired Brain Injury upon Their Return to School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Heather; Howe, Julia

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the process of reintegration into school for children with an acquired brain injury (ABI) and considers the role of the educational psychologist (EP) in supporting these children. Interviews were conducted with a range of professionals in two specialist settings: a specialist rehabilitation centre and a children's hospital with…

  18. Social communication features in children following moderate to severe acquired brain injury: a cross-sectional pilot study.

    PubMed

    Breau, Lynn M; Clark, Brenda; Scott, Ori; Wilkes, Courtney; Reynolds, Shawn; Ricci, Florencia; Sonnenberg, Lyn; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Rashid, Marghalara; Goez, Helly R

    2015-04-01

    We compared the social communication deficits of children with moderate to severe acquired brain injury or autism spectrum disorder, while accounting for the role of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms. Parents of 20 children aged 6 to 10 years (10 acquired brain injury; 10 autism spectrum disorder) completed the Social Communication Questionnaire, and Conners 3 Parent Short. A multivariate analysis of covariance revealed significant differences between groups in Social Communication Questionnaire restricted repetitive behavior scores, but not reciprocal social interaction or social communication. Multiple linear regressions indicated diagnosis did not predict reciprocal social interaction or social communication scores and that Conners 3 Parent Short Form hyperactivity scores were the strongest predictor of Social Communication Questionnaire reciprocal social interaction scores after accounting for age and Intelligence Quotient. The lack of difference in social communication deficits between groups may help in understanding the pathophysiology underlying the behavioral consequences of acquired brain injury. The link between hyperactivity and reciprocal interaction suggests that targeting hyperactivity may improve social outcomes in children following acquired brain injury. PMID:24659736

  19. Expressive Art for the Social and Community Integration of Adolescents with Acquired Brain Injuries: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goyal, Anita; Keightley, Michelle L.

    2008-01-01

    Adolescents with acquired brain injuries suffer from social and community withdrawal that result in isolation from their peer groups. The review highlights the evidence of effectiveness of expressive art interventions in the form of theatre for populations with difficulties in physical, emotional, cognitive, or social functioning. A systematic…

  20. Promoting Adaptive Behavior in Persons with Acquired Brain Injury, Extensive Motor and Communication Disabilities, and Consciousness Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; De Tommaso, Marina; Megna, Marisa; Badagliacca, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    These two studies extended the evidence on the use of technology-based intervention packages to promote adaptive behavior in persons with acquired brain injury and multiple disabilities. Study I involved five participants in a minimally conscious state who were provided with intervention packages based on specific arrangements of optic, tilt, or…

  1. Meeting the Needs of Persons with Acquired Brain Injury in the Republic of Ireland: A Contextual Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degeneffe, Charles Edmund; Fullerton, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article examines how the Republic of Ireland conceptualizes disability, specifically acquired brain injury (ABI); how it meets the needs of people with ABI; and its similarities and difference with the U.S. system of ABI professional care, policy, and services. The article provides ideas for improvements and innovations toward ABI…

  2. Developmental Decrease of Neuronal Chloride Concentration Is Independent of Trauma in Thalamocortical Brain Slices

    PubMed Central

    Glykys, Joseph; Staley, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    The intraneuronal chloride concentration ([Cl-]i) is paramount for determining the polarity of signaling at GABAA synapses in the central nervous system. Sectioning hippocampal brain slices increases [Cl-]i in the superficial layers. It is not known whether cutting trauma also increases [Cl-]i in the neocortex and thalamus, and whether the effects of trauma change during development. We used Cl- imaging to study the [Cl-]i vs. the distance from the cut surface in acute thalamocortical slices from mice at developmental ages ranging from post-natal day 5 (P5) to P20. We demonstrate: 1) [Cl-]i is higher in the most superficial areas in both neocortical and thalamic brain slices at all ages tested and, 2) there is a developmental decrease in [Cl-]i that is independent of acute trauma caused by brain slicing. We conclude that [Cl-]i has a developmental progression during P5-20 in both the neocortex and thalamus. However, in both brain regions and during development the neurons closest to the slicing trauma have an elevated [Cl-]i. PMID:27337272

  3. Caregiver and nurse hopes for recovery of patients with acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Mary Catherine; McGehee, Linda A; Grindel, Cecelia Gatson; Testani-Dufour, Linda

    2011-01-01

    From the moment an adolescent with acquired brain injury (ABI) is admitted to the hospital, his or her caregiver develops hopes for the recovery and future of the patient; however, rehabilitation nurses have reported that these hopes are not always congruent with the nurse's observations of the adolescent's progression. The purpose of this study was threefold: (1) explore the caregiver's hope for recovery of his or her family member who has experienced an ABI, (2) compare the nurse's hopes for the patient with ABI to those of the caregiver, and (3) identify what caregivers and nurses do to maintain hope for recovery during the rehabilitation process. This qualitative study validated that in some cases there was a disconnect between caregivers' and nurses' hopes for recovery. Four themes related to the caregiver's maintenance of hope were identified: "the importance of family," "taking one day at a time," "knowing the patient better," and "spiritual strength brings me through." Enhancing the perceptual congruence between nurse and caregiver hope during rehabilitation will ultimately improve patient outcomes. PMID:21290959

  4. Disorders of consciousness after acquired brain injury: the state of the science.

    PubMed

    Giacino, Joseph T; Fins, Joseph J; Laureys, Steven; Schiff, Nicholas D

    2014-02-01

    The concept of consciousness continues to defy definition and elude the grasp of philosophical and scientific efforts to formulate a testable construct that maps to human experience. Severe acquired brain injury results in the dissolution of consciousness, providing a natural model from which key insights about consciousness may be drawn. In the clinical setting, neurologists and neurorehabilitation specialists are called on to discern the level of consciousness in patients who are unable to communicate through word or gesture, and to project outcomes and recommend approaches to treatment. Standards of care are not available to guide clinical decision-making for this population, often leading to inconsistent, inaccurate and inappropriate care. In this Review, we describe the state of the science with regard to clinical management of patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness. We review consciousness-altering pathophysiological mechanisms, specific clinical syndromes, and novel diagnostic and prognostic applications of advanced neuroimaging and electrophysiological procedures. We conclude with a provocative discussion of bioethical and medicolegal issues that are unique to this population and have a profound impact on care, as well as raising questions of broad societal interest. PMID:24468878

  5. Developmental thyroid hormone insufficiency and brain development: A role for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)?*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for normal brain development. Even subclinical hypothyroidism experienced in utero can result in neuropsychological deficits in children despite normal thyroid status at birth. Neurotrophins have been implicated in a host of brain cellular func...

  6. Planarian brain regeneration as a model system for developmental neurotoxicology

    PubMed Central

    Hagstrom, Danielle; Cochet‐Escartin, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Freshwater planarians, famous for their regenerative prowess, have long been recognized as a valuable in vivo animal model to study the effects of chemical exposure. In this review, we summarize the current techniques and tools used in the literature to assess toxicity in the planarian system. We focus on the planarian's particular amenability for neurotoxicology and neuroregeneration studies, owing to the planarian's unique ability to regenerate a centralized nervous system. Zooming in from the organismal to the molecular level, we show that planarians offer a repertoire of morphological and behavioral readouts while also being amenable to mechanistic studies of compound toxicity. Finally, we discuss the open challenges and opportunities for planarian brain regeneration to become an important model system for modern toxicology. PMID:27499880

  7. Endocrine Disruption of Brain Sexual Differentiation by Developmental PCB Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Sarah M.; Cunningham, Stephanie L.; Patisaul, Heather B.; Woller, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, sexual differentiation of the hypothalamus occurs during prenatal and early postnatal development due in large part to sex differences in hormones. These early organizational processes are critically important for the attainment and maintenance of adult reproductive functions. We tested the hypothesis that perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) that disrupt hormonal pathways would perturb reproductive maturation and the sexually dimorphic development of neuroendocrine systems in the preoptic area (POA). Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected on gestational d 16 and 18 with vehicle (dimethylsulfoxide), Aroclor 1221 (A1221, an estrogenic PCB mix), a reconstituted PCB mixture representing those highest in human body burden (PCBs 138, 153, 180), or estradiol benzoate, an estrogenic control. Male and female pups were monitored for somatic and reproductive development. In adulthood, some rats were perfused and used for immunohistochemistry of estrogen receptor α, kisspeptin, and coexpression of Fos in GnRH neurons. Other rats were used to obtain fresh-frozen POA dissections for use in a PCR-based 48-gene expression array. Pubertal onset was advanced and estrous cyclicity irregular in endocrine-disrupted females. Furthermore, sexual differentiation of female neuroendocrine systems was masculinized/defeminized. Specifically, in the adult female anteroventral periventricular nucleus, estrogen receptor α-cell numbers and kisspeptin fiber density were significantly decreased, as was GnRH-Fos coexpression. PCR analysis identified androgen receptor, IGF-I, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit NR2b, and TGFβ1 mRNAs as significantly down-regulated in endocrine-disrupted female POAs. These data suggest that developmental PCBs profoundly impair the sexual differentiation of the female hypothalamus. PMID:21190954

  8. Social Outcomes in Childhood Brain Disorder: A Heuristic Integration of Social Neuroscience and Developmental Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Yeates, Keith Owen; Bigler, Erin D.; Dennis, Maureen; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, H. Gerry; Vannatta, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    The authors propose a heuristic model of the social outcomes of childhood brain disorder that draws on models and methods from both the emerging field of social cognitive neuroscience and the study of social competence in developmental psychology/psychopathology. The heuristic model characterizes the relationships between social adjustment, peer interactions and relationships, social problem solving and communication, social-affective and cognitive-executive processes, and their neural substrates. The model is illustrated by research on a specific form of childhood brain disorder, traumatic brain injury. The heuristic model may promote research regarding the neural and cognitive-affective substrates of children’s social development. It also may engender more precise methods of measuring impairments and disabilities in children with brain disorder and suggest ways to promote their social adaptation. PMID:17469991

  9. Developmental venous anomalies of the brain in children -- imaging spectrum and update.

    PubMed

    Linscott, Luke L; Leach, James L; Jones, Blaise V; Abruzzo, Todd A

    2016-03-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) are the most common vascular malformation of the brain and are commonly identified on routine imaging of the brain. They are typically considered incidental findings, usually with no clinical significance. However the increasing identification of DVAs as a result of improved imaging technology has led to recognition of their association with a variety of abnormal imaging findings and clinically important conditions. This pictorial essay explores the suspected embryological origin, associated imaging features, and proposed pathophysiological mechanisms of DVAs in the pediatric population. This paper emphasizes newer physiological imaging data, which suggest that DVA drainage has less physiological flexibility than otherwise normal venous drainage development. PMID:26795616

  10. Intelligent Therapy Assistant (ITA) for cognitive rehabilitation in patients with acquired brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper presents the design, development and first evaluation of an algorithm, named Intelligent Therapy Assistant (ITA), which automatically selects, configures and schedules rehabilitation tasks for patients with cognitive impairments after an episode of Acquired Brain Injury. The ITA is integrated in “Guttmann, Neuro Personal Trainer” (GNPT), a cognitive tele-rehabilitation platform that provides neuropsychological services. Methods The ITA selects those tasks that are more suitable for the specific needs of each patient, considering previous experiences, and improving the personalization of the treatment. The system applies data mining techniques to cluster the patients according their cognitive impairment profile. Then, the algorithm rates every rehabilitation task, based on its cognitive structure and the clinical impact of executions done by similar patients. Finally, it configures the most suitable degree of difficulty, depending on the impairment of the patient and his/her evolution during the treatment. Results The ITA has been evaluated during 18 months by 582 patients. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the ITA, a comparison between the traditional manual planning procedure and the one presented in this paper has been done, taking into account: a) the selected tasks assigned to rehabilitation sessions; b) the difficulty level configured for the sessions; c) and the improvement of their cognitive capacities after completing treatment. Conclusions The obtained results reveal that the rehabilitation treatment proposed by the ITA is as effective as the one performed manually by therapists, arising as a new powerful support tool for therapists. The obtained results make us conclude that the proposal done by the ITA is very close to the one done by therapists, so it is suitable for real treatments. PMID:25038823

  11. Permissive hypercapnia and risk for brain injury and developmental impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Erika W.; Sadek-Badawi, Mona; Carlton, David P.; Palta, Mari

    2008-01-01

    Objective Permissive hypercapnia is a respiratory care strategy used to reduce the risk of lung injury. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether permissive hypercapnia is associated with higher risk for intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and early childhood behavioral and functional problems than normocapnia among very low birthweight (VLBW) infants. Patients and Methods VLBW infants from a statewide cohort were eligible for this study if they were born <32 weeks gestational age and survived at least 24 hours. Infants were classified as receiving a permissive hypercapnia (N=122), normocapnia (N=235), or unclassifiable (N=791) respiratory strategy during the first 24 hours after birth according to an algorithm based on PCO2 values and respiratory treatment decisions abstracted from medical records. IVH diagnosis was also abstracted from the medical record. Behavioral and functional outcomes were assessed by parent interview at 2-3 years. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between IVH and respiratory strategy; ordinary linear regression was used to evaluate differences in behavior and function scores between children by respiratory strategy. Results Infants who received a permissive hypercapnia strategy were not more likely to have IVH than those with normocapnia (odds ratio=1.0, 95% confidence interval: 0.59, 1.8). There were no differences in any of the behavioral or functional scores between children by respiratory strategy. There was a significant interaction between care strategy and one-minute Apgar score, indicating that infants with lower Apgar scores may be at higher risk for IVH with permissive hypercapnia. Conclusion This study suggests permissive hypercapnia does not increase risk for brain injury and impairment among VLBW children. The interaction between respiratory strategy and Apgar score is a potential worrisome exception to this conclusion. Future research should further evaluate the effect of elevated PCO2 levels among

  12. [The role of psychosocial stress in childhood for structural and functional brain development:neurobiological basis of developmental psychopathology].

    PubMed

    Rothenberger, A; Hüther, G

    1997-11-01

    This review summarizes some important principles of human brain development. Special emphasis is placed on the role of psychosocial stress during childhood on the developing brain. Depending on the degree of cognitive, behavioral and socio-emotional maturation, previous experiences and actual context, psychosocial stressors may be perceived by children as being either controllable (challenge) or uncontrollable (disaster). Controllable stress experiences are associated with a preferential activation of the central and peripheral noradrenergic system, i.e., of a system endowed with the gating of cortical information processing and the facilitation and stabilization of neuronal pathways and synaptic connections involved in behavioral responding. Uncontrollable stress responses are elicited if all previously acquired behavioral or cognitive strategies are inadequate or fail to overcome the stressor. The resulting severe and long-lasting activation of the central stress responsive systems will finally lead to a full activation of the HPA system, accompanied by adrenocortical cortisol release. The major central effect of this response is the destabilization of previously established neuronal circuits and synaptic connections. Thus, severe uncontrollable psychosocial stress may act as an important trigger of and a prerequisite for the reorganization of neuronal connectivity. It may, above a certain threshold, threaten the mental and affective stability, integrity, and the future development of a child. The long-term consequences of psychosocial stress on the structural and functional maturation of the brain are documented by findings from animal research and by results in the field of developmental psychopathology in children. The role of risk and protective factors during different phases of child development is briefly summarized and the need for a biopsychosocial model concerning the relationship between human brain development and behavior is emphasized. PMID:9478077

  13. Developmental Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency Reduces Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Adults But Not in Neonates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin critical for many developmental and physiological aspects of CNS function. Severe hypothyroidism in the early neonatal period results in developmental and cognitive impairments and reductions in mRNA and protein expressio...

  14. The Effects of Exercise on Cognitive Recovery after Acquired Brain Injury in Animal Models: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wogensen, Elise; Malá, Hana; Mogensen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to review the current status of exercise as a tool to promote cognitive rehabilitation after acquired brain injury (ABI) in animal model-based research. Searches were conducted on the PubMed, Scopus, and psycINFO databases in February 2014. Search strings used were: exercise (and) animal model (or) rodent (or) rat (and) traumatic brain injury (or) cerebral ischemia (or) brain irradiation. Studies were selected if they were (1) in English, (2) used adult animals subjected to acquired brain injury, (3) used exercise as an intervention tool after inflicted injury, (4) used exercise paradigms demanding movement of all extremities, (5) had exercise intervention effects that could be distinguished from other potential intervention effects, and (6) contained at least one measure of cognitive and/or emotional function. Out of 2308 hits, 22 publications fulfilled the criteria. The studies were examined relative to cognitive effects associated with three themes: exercise type (forced or voluntary), timing of exercise (early or late), and dose-related factors (intensity, duration, etc.). The studies indicate that exercise in many cases can promote cognitive recovery after brain injury. However, the optimal parameters to ensure cognitive rehabilitation efficacy still elude us, due to considerable methodological variations between studies. PMID:26509085

  15. Evolutionary and developmental implications of asymmetric brain folding in a large primate pedigree.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Elizabeth G; Rogers, Jeffrey; Cheverud, James M

    2016-03-01

    Bilateral symmetry is a fundamental property of the vertebrate central nervous system. Local deviations from symmetry provide various types of information about the development, evolution, and function of elements within the CNS, especially the cerebral hemispheres. Here, we quantify the pattern and extent of asymmetry in cortical folding within the cerebrum of Papio baboons and assess the evolutionary and developmental implications of the findings. Analyses of directional asymmetry show a population-level trend in length measurements indicating that baboons are genetically predisposed to be asymmetrical, with the right side longer than the left in the anterior cerebrum while the left side is longer than the right posteriorly. We also find a corresponding bias to display a right frontal petalia (overgrowth of the anterior pole of the cerebral cortex on the right side). By quantifying fluctuating asymmetry, we assess canalization of brain features and the susceptibility of the baboon brain to developmental perturbations. We find that features are differentially canalized depending on their ontogenetic timing. We further deduce that development of the two hemispheres is to some degree independent. This independence has important implications for the evolution of cerebral hemispheres and their separate specialization. Asymmetry is a major feature of primate brains and is characteristic of both brain structure and function. PMID:26813679

  16. Developmental changes in the structure of the social brain in late childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Mills, Kathryn L; Lalonde, François; Clasen, Liv S; Giedd, Jay N; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Social cognition provides humans with the necessary skills to understand and interact with one another. One aspect of social cognition, mentalizing, is associated with a network of brain regions often referred to as the 'social brain.' These consist of medial prefrontal cortex [medial Brodmann Area 10 (mBA10)], temporoparietal junction (TPJ), posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) and anterior temporal cortex (ATC). How these specific regions develop structurally across late childhood and adolescence is not well established. This study examined the structural developmental trajectories of social brain regions in the longest ongoing longitudinal neuroimaging study of human brain maturation. Structural trajectories of grey matter volume, cortical thickness and surface area were analyzed using surface-based cortical reconstruction software and mixed modeling in a longitudinal sample of 288 participants (ages 7-30 years, 857 total scans). Grey matter volume and cortical thickness in mBA10, TPJ and pSTS decreased from childhood into the early twenties. The ATC increased in grey matter volume until adolescence and in cortical thickness until early adulthood. Surface area for each region followed a cubic trajectory, peaking in early or pre-adolescence before decreasing into the early twenties. These results are discussed in the context of developmental changes in social cognition across adolescence. PMID:23051898

  17. Developmental brain dysfunction: revival and expansion of old concepts based on new genetic evidence

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-De-Luca, Andres; Myers, Scott M.; Challman, Thomas D.; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Evans, David W.; Ledbetter, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders can be caused by many different genetic abnormalities that are individually rare but collectively common. Specific genetic causes, including certain copy number variants and single-gene mutations, are shared among disorders that are thought to be clinically distinct. This evidence of variability in the clinical manifestations of individual genetic variants and sharing of genetic causes among clinically distinct brain disorders is consistent with the concept of developmental brain dysfunction, a term we use to describe the abnormal brain function underlying a group of neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders and to encompass a subset of various clinical diagnoses. Although many pathogenic genetic variants are currently thought to be variably penetrant, we hypothesise that when disorders encompassed by developmental brain dysfunction are considered as a group, the penetrance will approach 100%. The penetrance is also predicted to approach 100% when the phenotype being considered is a specific trait, such as intelligence or autistic-like social impairment, and the trait could be assessed using a continuous, quantitative measure to compare probands with non-carrier family members rather than a qualitative, dichotomous trait and comparing probands with the healthy population. PMID:23518333

  18. Recommended Methods for Brain Processing and Quantitative Analysis in Rodent Developmental Neurotoxicity Studies.

    PubMed

    Garman, Robert H; Li, Abby A; Kaufmann, Wolfgang; Auer, Roland N; Bolon, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathology methods in rodent developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) studies have evolved with experience and changing regulatory guidance. This article emphasizes principles and methods to promote more standardized DNT neuropathology evaluation, particularly procurement of highly homologous brain sections and collection of the most reproducible morphometric measurements. To minimize bias, brains from all animals at all dose levels should be processed from brain weighing through paraffin embedding at one time using a counterbalanced design. Morphometric measurements should be anchored by distinct neuroanatomic landmarks that can be identified reliably on the faced block or in unstained sections and which address the region-specific circuitry of the measured area. Common test article-related qualitative changes in the developing brain include abnormal cell numbers (yielding altered regional size), displaced cells (ectopia and heterotopia), and/or aberrant differentiation (indicated by defective myelination or synaptogenesis), but rarely glial or inflammatory reactions. Inclusion of digital images in the DNT pathology raw data provides confidence that the quantitative analysis was done on anatomically matched (i.e., highly homologous) sections. Interpreting DNT neuropathology data and their presumptive correlation with neurobehavioral data requires an integrative weight-of-evidence approach including consideration of maternal toxicity, body weight, brain weight, and the pattern of findings across brain regions, doses, sexes, and ages. PMID:26296631

  19. The inner CSF–brain barrier: developmentally controlled access to the brain via intercellular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Whish, Sophie; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.; Møllgård, Kjeld; Noor, Natassya M.; Liddelow, Shane A.; Habgood, Mark D.; Richardson, Samantha J.; Saunders, Norman R.

    2015-01-01

    In the adult the interface between the cerebrospinal fluid and the brain is lined by the ependymal cells, which are joined by gap junctions. These intercellular connections do not provide a diffusional restrain between the two compartments. However, during development this interface, initially consisting of neuroepithelial cells and later radial glial cells, is characterized by “strap” junctions, which limit the exchange of different sized molecules between cerebrospinal fluid and the brain parenchyma. Here we provide a systematic study of permeability properties of this inner cerebrospinal fluid-brain barrier during mouse development from embryonic day, E17 until adult. Results show that at fetal stages exchange across this barrier is restricted to the smallest molecules (286Da) and the diffusional restraint is progressively removed as the brain develops. By postnatal day P20, molecules the size of plasma proteins (70 kDa) diffuse freely. Transcriptomic analysis of junctional proteins present in the cerebrospinal fluid-brain interface showed expression of adherens junctional proteins, actins, cadherins and catenins changing in a development manner consistent with the observed changes in the permeability studies. Gap junction proteins were only identified in the adult as was claudin-11. Immunohistochemistry was used to localize at the cellular level some of the adherens junctional proteins of genes identified from transcriptomic analysis. N-cadherin, β - and α-catenin immunoreactivity was detected outlining the inner CSF-brain interface from E16; most of these markers were not present in the adult ependyma. Claudin-5 was present in the apical-most part of radial glial cells and in endothelial cells in embryos, but only in endothelial cells including plexus endothelial cells in adults. Claudin-11 was only immunopositive in the adult, consistent with results obtained from transcriptomic analysis. These results provide information about physiological, molecular

  20. Case against Diagnosing Developmental Language Disorder by Default: A Single Case Study of Acquired Aphasia Associated with Convulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marinac, Julie V.; Harper, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to inform the diagnostic knowledge base for professionals working in the field of language disorders when classic symptoms, characteristics and sequences are not found. The information reveals the risk of diagnosis with a developmental language disorder (DLD) by default when no underlying cause can be readily identified.…

  1. Standing between Two Worlds in Harlem: A Developmental Psychopathology Perspective of Perinatally Acquired Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Ezer; Mellins, Claude Ann; Ng, Warren Yiu Kee; Robinson, Lisa-Gaye; Abrams, Elaine J.

    2008-01-01

    Perinatal HIV infection in the US continues to evolve from a fatal pediatric illness to a chronic medical condition of childhood and adolescence. Although navigating this period is influenced by multi-leveled deprivations commonly experienced by low-income minority families, HIV alters the timing and experience of developmental milestones for many…

  2. Left Brain/Right Brain Theory: Implications for Developmental Math Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchens, Anita N.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Perhaps the most dramatic failure in postsecondary education has been in the teaching of mathematical skills. The different functions of the right and left hemispheres of the brain require different approaches to education. Due to their emphasis on language and verbal processing, schools have failed to give adequate stimulation to the right side…

  3. Resting-State and Task-Based Functional Brain Connectivity in Developmental Dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Schurz, Matthias; Wimmer, Heinz; Richlan, Fabio; Ludersdorfer, Philipp; Klackl, Johannes; Kronbichler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Reading requires the interaction between multiple cognitive processes situated in distant brain areas. This makes the study of functional brain connectivity highly relevant for understanding developmental dyslexia. We used seed-voxel correlation mapping to analyse connectivity in a left-hemispheric network for task-based and resting-state fMRI data. Our main finding was reduced connectivity in dyslexic readers between left posterior temporal areas (fusiform, inferior temporal, middle temporal, superior temporal) and the left inferior frontal gyrus. Reduced connectivity in these networks was consistently present for 2 reading-related tasks and for the resting state, showing a permanent disruption which is also present in the absence of explicit task demands and potential group differences in performance. Furthermore, we found that connectivity between multiple reading-related areas and areas of the default mode network, in particular the precuneus, was stronger in dyslexic compared with nonimpaired readers. PMID:25169986

  4. Developmental expression of orphan G protein-coupled receptor 50 in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Grünewald, Ellen; Tew, Kenneth D; Porteous, David J; Thomson, Pippa A

    2012-06-20

    Mental disorders have a complex etiology resulting from interactions between multiple genetic risk factors and stressful life events. Orphan G protein-coupled receptor 50 (GPR50) has been identified as a genetic risk factor for bipolar disorder and major depression in women, and there is additional genetic and functional evidence linking GPR50 to neurite outgrowth, lipid metabolism, and adaptive thermogenesis and torpor. However, in the absence of a ligand, a specific function has not been identified. Adult GPR50 expression has previously been reported in brain regions controlling the HPA axis, but its developmental expression is unknown. In this study, we performed extensive expression analysis of GPR50 and three protein interactors using rt-PCR and immunohistochemistry in the developing and adult mouse brain. Gpr50 is expressed at embryonic day 13 (E13), peaks at E18, and is predominantly expressed by neurons. Additionally we identified novel regions of Gpr50 expression, including brain stem nuclei involved in neurotransmitter signaling: the locus coeruleus, substantia nigra, and raphe nuclei, as well as nuclei involved in metabolic homeostasis. Gpr50 colocalizes with yeast-two-hybrid interactors Nogo-A, Abca2, and Cdh8 in the hypothalamus, amygdala, cortex, and selected brain stem nuclei at E18 and in the adult. With this study, we identify a link between GPR50 and neurotransmitter signaling and strengthen a likely role in stress response and energy homeostasis. PMID:22860215

  5. Assessment of the best flow model to characterize diffuse correlation spectroscopy data acquired directly on the brain.

    PubMed

    Verdecchia, Kyle; Diop, Mamadou; Morrison, Laura B; Lee, Ting-Yim; St Lawrence, Keith

    2015-11-01

    Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) is a non-invasive optical technique capable of monitoring tissue perfusion. The normalized temporal intensity autocorrelation function generated by DCS is typically characterized by assuming that the movement of erythrocytes can be modeled as a Brownian diffusion-like process instead of by the expected random flow model. Recently, a hybrid model, referred to as the hydrodynamic diffusion model, was proposed, which combines the random and Brownian flow models. The purpose of this study was to investigate the best model to describe autocorrelation functions acquired directly on the brain in order to avoid confounding effects of extracerebral tissues. Data were acquired from 11 pigs during normocapnia and hypocapnia, and flow changes were verified by computed tomography perfusion (CTP). The hydrodynamic diffusion model was found to provide the best fit to the autocorrelation functions; however, no significant difference for relative flow changes measured by the Brownian and hydrodynamic diffusion models was observed. PMID:26600995

  6. Are orchids left and dandelions right? Frontal brain activation asymmetry and its sensitivity to developmental context.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Paz; Van Lieshout, Ryan J; Waxman, Jordana A; Boyle, Michael H; Saigal, Saroj; Schmidt, Louis A

    2014-08-01

    To clarify long-standing conceptual and empirical inconsistencies in models describing the relation between frontal brain asymmetry and emotion, we tested a theory of biological sensitivity to context. We examined whether asymmetry of alpha activation in frontal brain regions, as measured by resting electroencephalography, is sensitive to early developmental contexts. Specifically, we investigated whether frontal asymmetry moderates the association between birth weight and adult outcomes. Adults with left frontal asymmetry (LFA) who were born at extremely low birth weight exhibited high levels of attention problems and withdrawn behaviors in their 30s, whereas normal-birth-weight adults with LFA had low levels of these problem behaviors. Adults with right frontal asymmetry (RFA) displayed a relatively moderate amount of problem behavior regardless of birth weight. Our findings suggest that LFA is associated with sensitivity to developmental context and may help explain why LFA is associated with both positive and negative outcomes, whereas RFA seems to be associated with a more canalized process in some contexts. PMID:24966069

  7. The Developmental Transcriptome of the Human Brain: Implications for Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tebbenkamp, Andrew T. N.; Willsey, A. Jeremy; State, Matthew W.; Šestan, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent characterizations of the transcriptome of the developing human brain by several groups have generated comprehensive datasets on coding and noncoding RNAs that will be instrumental for illuminating the underlying biology of complex neurodevelopmental disorders. This review summarizes recent studies successfully utilizing these data to increase our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis. Recent findings Several approaches have successfully integrated developmental transcriptome data with gene discovery to generate testable hypotheses about when and where in the developing human brain disease-associated genes converge. Specifically, these include the projection neurons in the prefrontal and primary motor-somatosensory cortex during mid-fetal development in autism spectrum disorder and the frontal cortex during fetal development in schizophrenia. Summary Developmental transcriptome data is a key to interpreting disease-associated mutations and transcriptional changes. Novel approaches integrating the spatial and temporal dimensions of these data have increased our understanding of when and where pathology occurs. Refinement of spatial and temporal properties and expanding these findings to other neurodevelopmental disorders will provide critical insights for understanding disease biology. PMID:24565942

  8. Current Evidence for Developmental, Structural, and Functional Brain Defects following Prenatal Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Verreet, Tine; Quintens, Roel; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed A.

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is omnipresent. We are continuously exposed to natural (e.g., radon and cosmic) and man-made radiation sources, including those from industry but especially from the medical sector. The increasing use of medical radiation modalities, in particular those employing low-dose radiation such as CT scans, raises concerns regarding the effects of cumulative exposure doses and the inappropriate utilization of these imaging techniques. One of the major goals in the radioprotection field is to better understand the potential health risk posed to the unborn child after radiation exposure to the pregnant mother, of which the first convincing evidence came from epidemiological studies on in utero exposed atomic bomb survivors. In the following years, animal models have proven to be an essential tool to further characterize brain developmental defects and consequent functional deficits. However, the identification of a possible dose threshold is far from complete and a sound link between early defects and persistent anomalies has not yet been established. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge on brain developmental and persistent defects resulting from in utero radiation exposure and addresses the many questions that still remain to be answered. PMID:27382490

  9. Current Evidence for Developmental, Structural, and Functional Brain Defects following Prenatal Radiation Exposure.

    PubMed

    Verreet, Tine; Verslegers, Mieke; Quintens, Roel; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed A

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is omnipresent. We are continuously exposed to natural (e.g., radon and cosmic) and man-made radiation sources, including those from industry but especially from the medical sector. The increasing use of medical radiation modalities, in particular those employing low-dose radiation such as CT scans, raises concerns regarding the effects of cumulative exposure doses and the inappropriate utilization of these imaging techniques. One of the major goals in the radioprotection field is to better understand the potential health risk posed to the unborn child after radiation exposure to the pregnant mother, of which the first convincing evidence came from epidemiological studies on in utero exposed atomic bomb survivors. In the following years, animal models have proven to be an essential tool to further characterize brain developmental defects and consequent functional deficits. However, the identification of a possible dose threshold is far from complete and a sound link between early defects and persistent anomalies has not yet been established. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge on brain developmental and persistent defects resulting from in utero radiation exposure and addresses the many questions that still remain to be answered. PMID:27382490

  10. Improving the Quality of Staff and Participant Interaction in an Acquired Brain Injury Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guercio, John M.; Dixon, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Weekly observations of direct-care staff in a facility for persons with brain injury yielded less than optimal interactional style with facility residents. Following an observational baseline, staff were asked to self-rate a 15-min video sample of their interaction behavior with participants on their unit. They were then asked to compare their…

  11. Acquired Dyslexia in a Biscript Reader Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Second Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eng, Nancy; Obler, Loraine K.

    2002-01-01

    This case study examines the reading disruptions in a bilingual/biscriptal (Cantonese/English) older adult reader following traumatic brain injury. Certain characteristics of the subject's reading problems were evident in both writing systems (e.g., sensitivity to word frequency and lack of sensitivity to visual complexity) suggesting principles…

  12. Acquired differences in brain responses among monozygotic twins discordant for restrained eating.

    PubMed

    Schur, Ellen A; Kleinhans, Natalia M; Goldberg, Jack; Buchwald, Dedra S; Polivy, Janet; Del Parigi, Angelo; Maravilla, Kenneth R

    2012-01-18

    We studied whether self-reported intent to exert cognitive control over eating was associated with differences in brain response to food cues, independent of genetic background. Subjects were ten pairs of identical twins in which one twin was a restrained eater and the co-twin was unrestrained, as classified by the Herman and Polivy Restraint Scale. Before and after ingestion of a milkshake, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure brain response to photographs of objects, "fattening" food, and "non-fattening" food. At baseline, restrained eaters had greater activation in the left amygdala and the right thalamus in response to fattening food cues than did their unrestrained co-twins. When restrained eaters drank a milkshake, activation in response to fattening food photographs decreased across multiple brain areas, whereas activation induced by non-fattening food photographs increased. As compared to their unrestrained co-twins, restrained eaters who drank a milkshake had greater decreases in activation by fattening food images in the left amygdala and occipital lobe, and greater increases in activation by non-fattening food images in the medial orbitofrontal cortex. Because of the discordant monozygotic twin study design, the findings provide a rigorous level of support for the hypothesis that adopting an intention to restrain eating alters brain response to food cues. PMID:21945867

  13. The “Globularization Hypothesis” of the Language-ready Brain as a Developmental Frame for Prosodic Bootstrapping Theories of Language Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Irurtzun, Aritz

    2015-01-01

    In recent research (Boeckx and Benítez-Burraco, 2014a,b) have advanced the hypothesis that our species-specific language-ready brain should be understood as the outcome of developmental changes that occurred in our species after the split from Neanderthals-Denisovans, which resulted in a more globular braincase configuration in comparison to our closest relatives, who had elongated endocasts. According to these authors, the development of a globular brain is an essential ingredient for the language faculty and in particular, it is the centrality occupied by the thalamus in a globular brain that allows its modulatory or regulatory role, essential for syntactico-semantic computations. Their hypothesis is that the syntactico-semantic capacities arise in humans as a consequence of a process of globularization, which significantly takes place postnatally (cf. Neubauer et al., 2010). In this paper, I show that Boeckx and Benítez-Burraco's hypothesis makes an interesting developmental prediction regarding the path of language acquisition: it teases apart the onset of phonological acquisition and the onset of syntactic acquisition (the latter starting significantly later, after globularization). I argue that this hypothesis provides a developmental rationale for the prosodic bootstrapping hypothesis of language acquisition (cf. i.a. Gleitman and Wanner, 1982; Mehler et al., 1988, et seq.; Gervain and Werker, 2013), which claim that prosodic cues are employed for syntactic parsing. The literature converges in the observation that a large amount of such prosodic cues (in particular, rhythmic cues) are already acquired before the completion of the globularization phase, which paves the way for the premises of the prosodic bootstrapping hypothesis, allowing babies to have a rich knowledge of the prosody of their target language before they can start parsing the primary linguistic data syntactically. PMID:26696916

  14. Pilot study: Computer-based virtual anatomical interactivity for rehabilitation of individuals with chronic acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Simmons, C Douglas; Arthanat, Sajay; Macri, Vincent J

    2014-01-01

    Deficiencies in upper-limb motor function and executive functioning can compromise an affected individual's ability to complete everyday activities. Impaired motor and executive functioning therefore pose a risk to increasing numbers of veterans who have been diagnosed with acquired brain injury. This article reports on changes in upper-limb motor function and executive functioning of 12 adult participants with chronic acquired brain injury using a novel, computer-based, motor and cognitive rehabilitation program called PreMotor Exercise Games (PEGs). Manual muscle, goniometric range of motion, and dynamometer assessments were used to determine motor functioning while the Executive Function Performance Test measured cognitive functioning. A three-level repeated measures design was conducted to determine changes pre- and postintervention. Participants demonstrated significant improvement in shoulder (p = 0.01) and wrist (p = 0.01) range of motion and clinically relevant improvement for elbow range of motion. Participants demonstrated clinically relevant improvement in shoulder, elbow, and wrist strength. Finally, participants demonstrated significant improvement in executive functioning (p < 0.05). Using PEGs as a modality for both motor and cognitive intervention is a potentially beneficial adjunct to rehabilitation and warrants further study. PMID:25019661

  15. "You Can't Imagine Unless You've Been There Yourself": A Report on the Concerns of Parents of Children with Acquired Brain Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, George H. S.; Nixon, Charles

    This report describes a qualitative study of the experiences and perceptions of parents of children with severe acquired brain injury (ABI) and summarizes the experiences of several parents during the first year following their child's traumatic brain injury. Twenty-five parents participated in a day-long focus group, in lengthy structured…

  16. Bovine Brain: An in vitro Translational Model in Developmental Neuroscience and Neurodegenerative Research.

    PubMed

    Peruffo, Antonella; Cozzi, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Animal models provide convenient and clinically relevant tools in the research on neurodegenerative diseases. Studies on developmental disorders extensively rely on the use of laboratory rodents. The present mini-review proposes an alternative translational model based on the use of fetal bovine brain tissue. The bovine (Bos taurus) possesses a large and highly gyrencephalic brain and the long gestation period (41 weeks) is comparable to human pregnancy (38-40 weeks). Primary cultures obtained from fetal bovine brain constitute a validated in vitro model that allows examinations of neurons and/or glial cells under controlled and reproducible conditions. Physiological processes can be also studied on cultured bovine neural cells incubated with specific substrates or by electrically coupled electrolyte-oxide-semiconductor capacitors that permit direct recording from neuronal cells. Bovine neural cells and specific in vitro cell culture could be an alternative in comparative neuroscience and in neurodegenerative research, useful for studying development of normal and altered circuitry in a long gestation mammalian species. Use of bovine tissues would promote a substantial reduction in the use of laboratory animals. PMID:25072040

  17. ChIP-Seq analysis of the adult male mouse brain after developmental exposure to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Christina R; Weber, Jessica A; Labrecque, Matthew; Hessinger, Justin M; Edwards, Jeremy S; Allan, Andrea M

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to the common environmental contaminant arsenic impacts the epigenetic landscape, including DNA methylation and histone modifications, of several cell types. Developmental arsenic exposure (DAE) increases acetylation and methylation of histone proteins and the protein expression of several chromatin-modifying enzymes in the dentate gyrus (DG) subregion of the adult male mouse brain [26]. To complement and support these data, ChIP-Seq analysis of DNA associated with trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3) derived from the adult male DG after DAE was performed. DAE induced differential H3K4me3 enrichment on genes in pathways associated with cellular development and growth, cell death and survival, and neurological disorders, particularly as they relate to cancer, in the adult male brain. Comparison of H3K4me3 enrichment in controls revealed mechanisms that are potentially lacking in arsenic-exposed animals, including neurotransmission, neuronal growth and development, hormonal regulation, protein synthesis, and cellular homeostasis. New pathways impacted by arsenic include cytoskeleton organization, cell signaling, and potential disruption of immune function and warrant further investigation using this DAE paradigm in the mouse brain. PMID:26543888

  18. Modelling verbal aggression, physical aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour after acquired brain injury

    PubMed Central

    James, Andrew I. W.; Böhnke, Jan R.; Young, Andrew W.; Lewis, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the underpinnings of behavioural disturbances following brain injury is of considerable importance, but little at present is known about the relationships between different types of behavioural disturbances. Here, we take a novel approach to this issue by using confirmatory factor analysis to elucidate the architecture of verbal aggression, physical aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour using systematic records made across an eight-week observation period for a large sample (n = 301) of individuals with a range of brain injuries. This approach offers a powerful test of the architecture of these behavioural disturbances by testing the fit between observed behaviours and different theoretical models. We chose models that reflected alternative theoretical perspectives based on generalized disinhibition (Model 1), a difference between aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour (Model 2), or on the idea that verbal aggression, physical aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour reflect broadly distinct but correlated clinical phenomena (Model 3). Model 3 provided the best fit to the data indicating that these behaviours can be viewed as distinct, but with substantial overlap. These data are important both for developing models concerning the architecture of behaviour as well as for clinical management in individuals with brain injury. PMID:26136449

  19. Altered Recruitment of the Attention Network Is Associated with Disability and Cognitive Impairment in Pediatric Patients with Acquired Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Strazzer, Sandra; Rocca, Maria A.; Molteni, Erika; De Meo, Ermelinda; Recla, Monica; Valsasina, Paola; Arrigoni, Filippo; Galbiati, Susanna; Bardoni, Alessandra; Filippi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    We assessed abnormalities of brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity during a sustained attention task (Conners' Continuous Performance Test (CCPT)) in 20 right-handed pediatric acquired brain injury (ABI) patients versus 7 right-handed age-matched healthy controls, and we estimated the correlation of such abnormalities with clinical and cognitive deficits. Patients underwent the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC), Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) evaluations. During fMRI, patients and controls activated regions of the attention network. Compared to controls, ABI patients experienced a decreased average fMRI recruitment of the left cerebellum and a decreased deactivation of the left anterior cingulate cortex. With increasing task demand, compared to controls, ABI patients had an impaired ability to increase the recruitment of several posterior regions of the attention network. They also experienced a greater activation of frontal regions, which was correlated with worse performance on FIM, WISC, and fMRI CCPT. Such abnormal brain recruitment was significantly influenced by the type of lesion (focal versus diffuse axonal injury) and time elapsed from the event. Pediatric ABI patients experienced an inability to optimize attention network recruitment, especially when task difficulty was increased, which likely contributes to their clinical and cognitive deficits. PMID:26448878

  20. Clinical impact of RehaCom software for cognitive rehabilitation of patients with acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Elízabeth; Bringas, María Luisa; Salazar, Sonia; Rodríguez, Daymí; García, María Eugenia; Torres, Maydané

    2012-10-01

    We describe the clinical impact of the RehaCom computerized cognitive training program instituted in the International Neurological Restoration Center for rehabilitation of brain injury patients. Fifty patients admitted from 2008 through 2010 were trained over 60 sessions. Attention and memory functions were assessed with a pre- and post-treatment design, using the Mini-Mental State Examination, Wechsler Memory Scale and Trail Making Test (Parts A and B). Negative effects were assessed, including mental fatigue, headache and eye irritation. The program's clinical usefulness was confirmed, with 100% of patients showing improved performance in trained functions. PMID:23154316

  1. Roots of a social brain: developmental models of emerging animacy-detection mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rosa Salva, O; Mayer, U; Vallortigara, G

    2015-03-01

    Here, we review evidence of unlearned predispositions to orient toward visual and auditory cues associated with the presence of animate creatures. We concentrate on studies on chicks of galliform species, whose behavioural preferences for social partners are analyzed in a comparative perspective with respect to the human developmental literature. The emerging nature of chicks' social predispositions is discussed in relation to the underlying physiological mechanisms and to the role of genetic and environmental factors in their development. In the second part of the review, we summarize evidence on the neural substrate of the animacy detectors, again focusing on our animal model of election, the domestic chick. On the basis of a substantial amount of indirect evidence, subpallial structures, among which the optic tectum (homologous to the mammalian superior colliculus), seem to comprise the most probable candidates. We also discuss some preliminary evidence of different brain activity, measured by IEG expression, in chicks exposed to predisposed or a non-predisposed stimulus. PMID:25544151

  2. Developmental effects of irradiation on the brain of the embryo and fetus

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This publication represents an evaluation of the data relating to radiation-induced effects on the central nervous system, especially radiation-induced mental retardation;assesses the gestational age at risk and the quantitative risk at low doses;analyses these effects in the light of what is known about cell survival, proliferation, repopulation and differentiation in the development of the fetal rain;and identifies the needs for future research. Contents: Preface;Introduction;Prenatal development of the primate brain and cerebral adnexa;Developmental disorders of the central nervous system;Ionizing radiation as a central nervous system teratogen;Periods of maximum sensitivity;Risk estimates in humans;Research needs;References.

  3. A Heme Oxygenase-1 Transducer Model of Degenerative and Developmental Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Schipper, Hyman M.; Song, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a 32 kDa protein which catalyzes the breakdown of heme to free iron, carbon monoxide and biliverdin. The Hmox1 promoter contains numerous consensus sequences that render the gene exquisitely sensitive to induction by diverse pro-oxidant and inflammatory stimuli. In “stressed” astroglia, HO-1 hyperactivity promotes mitochondrial iron sequestration and macroautophagy and may thereby contribute to the pathological iron deposition and bioenergetic failure documented in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and certain neurodevelopmental conditions. Glial HO-1 expression may also impact neuroplasticity and cell survival by modulating brain sterol metabolism and the proteasomal degradation of neurotoxic proteins. The glial HO-1 response may represent a pivotal transducer of noxious environmental and endogenous stressors into patterns of neural damage and repair characteristic of many human degenerative and developmental CNS disorders. PMID:25761244

  4. Exploring social cognition in patients with apathy following acquired brain damage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Research on cognition in apathy has largely focused on executive functions. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have investigated the relationship between apathy symptoms and processes involved in social cognition. Apathy symptoms include attenuated emotional behaviour, low social engagement and social withdrawal, all of which may be linked to underlying socio-cognitive deficits. Methods We compared patients with brain damage who also had apathy symptoms against similar patients with brain damage but without apathy symptoms. Both patient groups were also compared against normal controls on key socio-cognitive measures involving moral reasoning, social awareness related to making judgements between normative and non-normative behaviour, Theory of Mind processing, and the perception of facial expressions of emotion. We also controlled for the likely effects of executive deficits and depressive symptoms on these comparisons. Results Our results indicated that patients with apathy were distinctively impaired in making moral reasoning decisions and in judging the social appropriateness of behaviour. Deficits in Theory of Mind and perception of facial expressions of emotion did not distinguish patients with apathy from those without apathy. Conclusion Our findings point to a possible socio-cognitive profile for apathy symptoms and provide initial insights into how socio-cognitive deficits in patients with apathy may affect social functioning. PMID:24450311

  5. Coping strategies in patients with acquired brain injury: relationships between coping, apathy, depression and lesion location.

    PubMed

    Finset, A; Andersson, S

    2000-10-01

    Coping strategies in individuals suffering severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), cerebrovascular accidents (CVA), or hypoxic brain injury (HBI) were investigated in relation to apathy, depression, and lesion location. Seventy patients (27 with TBI, 30 with CVA, and 13 with HBI) filled in a coping questionnaire (COPE) and were evaluated with respect to apathy and depression. A comparison sample of 71 students also filled in COPE. Patients coping strategies were similar to the comparison group, but patients tended to display less differentiated coping styles. A factor analysis indicated two dimensions of coping in the patient sample; approach oriented and avoidance oriented coping. Approach and avoidance coping sum scores, based on subscales from the two factors, were positively correlated in the patient sample, but not in the comparison group. Lack of active approach oriented coping was associated with apathy, whereas avoidant coping was associated with depression. Coping styles were not related to lesion location. Apathy was related to subcortical and right hemisphere lesions. In bivariate analyses, depression was unrelated to lesion location, but, in a MANCOVA, avoidant coping, apathy and lesion location (left hemisphere lesions) contributed to the variance in positive depressive symptoms. The consistent relationships between coping strategies and neuropsychiatric symptoms were interpreted as two dimensions of adaptational behaviour: an active vs. passive dimension and a depression--distress-avoidance dimension. PMID:11076135

  6. Brain Hyper-Connectivity and Operation-Specific Deficits during Arithmetic Problem Solving in Children with Developmental Dyscalculia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg-Lee, Miriam; Ashkenazi, Sarit; Chen, Tianwen; Young, Christina B.; Geary, David C.; Menon, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Developmental dyscalculia (DD) is marked by specific deficits in processing numerical and mathematical information despite normal intelligence (IQ) and reading ability. We examined how brain circuits used by young children with DD to solve simple addition and subtraction problems differ from those used by typically developing (TD) children who…

  7. The Contribution of Novel Brain Imaging Techniques to Understanding the Neurobiology of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Furfaro, Joyce A.; Penniman, Lauren C.; Glover, Gary H.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2005-01-01

    Studying the biological mechanisms underlying mental retardation and developmental disabilities (MR/DD) is a very complex task. This is due to the wide heterogeneity of etiologies and pathways that lead to MR/DD. Breakthroughs in genetics and molecular biology and the development of sophisticated brain imaging techniques during the last decades…

  8. Reappraisal generation after acquired brain damage: The role of laterality and cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Christian E.; Gross, James J.; Turnbull, Oliver H.

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, there has been growing interest in the neuroanatomical and neuropsychological bases of reappraisal. Findings suggest that reappraisal activates a set of areas in the left hemisphere (LH), which are commonly associated with language abilities and verbally mediated cognitive control. The main goal of this study was to investigate whether individuals with focal damage to the LH (n = 8) were more markedly impaired on a reappraisal generation task than individuals with right hemisphere lesions (RH, n = 8), and healthy controls (HC, n = 14). The reappraisal generation task consisted of a set of ten pictures from the IAPS, depicting negative events of different sorts. Participants were asked to quickly generate as many positive reinterpretations as possible for each picture. Two scores were derived from this task, namely difficulty and productivity. A second goal of this study was to explore which cognitive control processes were associated with performance on the reappraisal task. For this purpose, participants were assessed on several measures of cognitive control. Findings indicated that reappraisal difficulty – defined as the time taken to generate a first reappraisal – did not differ between LH and RH groups. However, differences were found between patients with brain injury (LH + RH) and HC, suggesting that brain damage in either hemisphere influences reappraisal difficulty. No differences in reappraisal productivity were found across groups, suggesting that neurological groups and HC are equally productive when time constraints are not considered. Finally, only two cognitive control processes inhibition and verbal fluency- were inversely associated with reappraisal difficulty. Implications for the neuroanatomical and neuropsychological bases of reappraisal generation are discussed, and implications for neuro-rehabilitation are considered. PMID:24711799

  9. Translational developmental studies of stress on brain and behavior: implications for adolescent mental health and illness?

    PubMed

    Malter Cohen, M; Tottenham, N; Casey, B J

    2013-09-26

    Adolescence is the transition from childhood to adulthood, with onset marked by puberty and the offset by relative independence from parents. Across species, it is a time of incredible change that carries increased risks and rewards. The ability of the individual to respond adequately to the mental, physical and emotional stresses of life during this time is a function of both their early environment and their present state. In this article, we focus on the effects that acute threat and chronic stress have on the brain and behavior in humans and rodents. First, we highlight developmental changes in frontolimbic function as healthy individuals transition into and out of adolescence. Second, we examine genetic factors that may enhance susceptibility to stress in one individual over another using translation from genetic mouse models to human neuroimaging. Third, we examine how the timing and nature of stress varies in its impact on brain and behavior. These findings are discussed in the context of implications for adolescent mental health and illness. PMID:23340244

  10. Translational developmental studies of stress on brain and behavior: Implications for adolescent mental health and illness?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Matthew Malter; Tottenham, Nim

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is the transition from childhood to adulthood, with onset marked by puberty and the offset by relative independence from parents. Across species, it is a time of incredible change that carries increased risks and rewards. The ability of the individual to respond adequately to the mental, physical and emotional stresses of life during this time is a function of both their early environment and their present state. In this article, we focus on the effects that acute threat and chronic stress have on the brain and behavior in humans and rodents. First, we highlight developmental changes in frontolimbic function as healthy individuals transition into and out of adolescence. Second, we examine genetic factors that may enhance susceptibility to stress in one individual over another using translation from genetic mouse models to human neuroimaging. Third, we examine how the timing and nature of stress varies in its impact on brain and behavior. These findings are discussed in the context of implications for adolescent mental health and illness. PMID:23340244

  11. Promoting social plasticity in developmental disorders with non-invasive brain stimulation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Boggio, Paulo S.; Asthana, Manish K.; Costa, Thiago L.; Valasek, Cláudia A.; Osório, Ana A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Being socially connected directly impacts our basic needs and survival. People with deficits in social cognition might exhibit abnormal behaviors and face many challenges in our highly social-dependent world. These challenges and limitations are associated with a substantial economical and subjective impact. As many conditions where social cognition is affected are highly prevalent, more treatments have to be developed. Based on recent research, we review studies where non-invasive neuromodulatory techniques have been used to promote Social Plasticity in developmental disorders. We focused on three populations where non-invasive brain stimulation seems to be a promising approach in inducing social plasticity: Schizophrenia, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Williams Syndrome (WS). There are still very few studies directly evaluating the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the social cognition of these populations. However, when considering the promising preliminary evidences presented in this review and the limited amount of clinical interventions available for treating social cognition deficits in these populations today, it is clear that the social neuroscientist arsenal may profit from non-invasive brain stimulation techniques for rehabilitation and promotion of social plasticity. PMID:26388712

  12. Network analysis of human fMRI data suggests modular restructuring after simulated acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Vargas, E; Mitchell, D G V; Greening, S G; Wahl, L M

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology underlying neurocognitive dysfunction following mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), or concussion, is poorly understood. In order to shed light on the effects of TBI at the functional network or modular level, our research groups are engaged in the acquisition and analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging data from subjects post-TBI. Complementary to this effort, in this paper we use mathematical and computational techniques to determine how modular structure changes in response to specific mechanisms of injury. In particular, we examine in detail the potential effects of focal contusions, diffuse axonal degeneration and diffuse microlesions, illustrating the extent to which functional modules are preserved or degenerated by each type of injury. One striking prediction of our study is that the left and right hemispheres show a tendency to become functionally separated post-injury, but only in response to diffuse microlesions. We highlight other key differences among the effects of the three modelled injuries and discuss their clinical implications. These results may help delineate the functional mechanisms underlying several of the cognitive sequelae associated with TBI. PMID:26463519

  13. Social cognition and its relationship to functional outcomes in patients with sustained acquired brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Ubukata, Shiho; Tanemura, Rumi; Yoshizumi, Miho; Sugihara, Genichi; Murai, Toshiya; Ueda, Keita

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in social cognition are common after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, little is known about how such deficits affect functional outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between social cognition and functional outcomes in patients with TBI. We studied this relationship in 20 patients with TBI over the course of 1 year post-injury. Patients completed neurocognitive assessments and social cognition tasks. The social cognition tasks included an emotion-perception task and three theory of mind tasks: the Faux Pas test, Reading the Mind in the Eyes (Eyes) test, and the Moving-Shapes paradigm. The Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique was used to assess functional outcomes. Compared with our database of normal subjects, patients showed impairments in all social cognition tasks. Multiple regression analysis revealed that theory of mind ability as measured by the Eyes test was the best predictor of the cognitive aspects of functional outcomes. The findings of this pilot study suggest that the degree to which a patient can predict what others are thinking is an important measure that can estimate functional outcomes over 1 year following TBI. PMID:25395854

  14. Developmentally Sensitive Interaction Effects of Genes and the Social Environment on Total and Subcortical Brain Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Arias Vásquez, Alejandro; Franke, Barbara; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2016-01-01

    Smaller total brain and subcortical volumes have been linked to psychopathology including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Identifying mechanisms underlying these alterations, therefore, is of great importance. We investigated the role of gene-environment interactions (GxE) in interindividual variability of total gray matter (GM), caudate, and putamen volumes. Brain volumes were derived from structural magnetic resonance imaging scans in participants with (N = 312) and without ADHD (N = 437) from N = 402 families (age M = 17.00, SD = 3.60). GxE effects between DAT1, 5-HTT, and DRD4 and social environments (maternal expressed warmth and criticism; positive and deviant peer affiliation) as well as the possible moderating effect of age were examined using linear mixed modeling. We also tested whether findings depended on ADHD severity. Deviant peer affiliation was associated with lower caudate volume. Participants with low deviant peer affiliations had larger total GM volumes with increasing age. Likewise, developmentally sensitive GxE effects were found on total GM and putamen volume. For total GM, differential age effects were found for DAT1 9-repeat and HTTLPR L/L genotypes, depending on the amount of positive peer affiliation. For putamen volume, DRD4 7-repeat carriers and DAT1 10/10 homozygotes showed opposite age relations depending on positive peer affiliation and maternal criticism, respectively. All results were independent of ADHD severity. The presence of differential age-dependent GxE effects might explain the diverse and sometimes opposing results of environmental and genetic effects on brain volumes observed so far. PMID:27218681

  15. Emerging roles of Na⁺/H⁺ exchangers in epilepsy and developmental brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hanshu; Carney, Karen E; Falgoust, Lindsay; Pan, Jullie W; Sun, Dandan; Zhang, Zhongling

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common central nervous system (CNS) disease characterized by recurrent transient neurological events occurring due to abnormally excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain. The CNS is affected by systemic acid-base disorders, and epileptic seizures are sensitive indicators of underlying imbalances in cellular pH regulation. Na(+)/H(+) exchangers (NHEs) are a family of membrane transporter proteins actively involved in regulating intracellular and organellar pH by extruding H(+) in exchange for Na(+) influx. Altering NHE function significantly influences neuronal excitability and plays a role in epilepsy. This review gives an overview of pH regulatory mechanisms in the brain with a special focus on the NHE family and the relationship between epilepsy and dysfunction of NHE isoforms. We first discuss how cells translocate acids and bases across the membrane and establish pH homeostasis as a result of the concerted effort of enzymes and ion transporters. We focus on the specific roles of the NHE family by detailing how the loss of NHE1 in two NHE mutant mice results in enhanced neuronal excitability in these animals. Furthermore, we highlight new findings on the link between mutations of NHE6 and NHE9 and developmental brain disorders including epilepsy, autism, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). These studies demonstrate the importance of NHE proteins in maintaining H(+) homeostasis and their intricate roles in the regulation of neuronal function. A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying NHE1, 6, and 9 dysfunctions in epilepsy formation may advance the development of new epilepsy treatment strategies. PMID:26965387

  16. Computerised cognitive training in acquired brain injury: A systematic review of outcomes using the International Classification of Functioning (ICF).

    PubMed

    Sigmundsdottir, Linda; Longley, Wendy A; Tate, Robyn L

    2016-10-01

    Computerised cognitive training (CCT) is an increasingly popular intervention for people experiencing cognitive symptoms. This systematic review evaluated the evidence for CCT in adults with acquired brain injury (ABI), focusing on how outcome measures used reflect efficacy across components of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Database searches were conducted of studies investigating CCT to treat cognitive symptoms in adult ABI. Scientific quality was rated using the PEDro-P and RoBiNT Scales. Ninety-six studies met the criteria. Most studies examined outcomes using measures of mental functions (93/96, 97%); fewer studies included measures of activities/participation (41/96, 43%) or body structures (8/96, 8%). Only 14 studies (15%) provided Level 1 evidence (randomised controlled trials with a PEDro-P score ≥ 6/10), with these studies suggesting strong evidence for CCT improving processing speed in multiple sclerosis (MS) and moderate evidence for improving memory in MS and brain tumour populations. There is a large body of research examining the efficacy of CCT, but relatively few Level 1 studies and evidence is largely limited to body function outcomes. The routine use of outcome measures of activities/participation would provide more meaningful evidence for the efficacy of CCT. The use of body structure outcome measures (e.g., neuroimaging) is a newly emerging area, with potential to increase understanding of mechanisms of action for CCT. PMID:26965034

  17. Cerebro-muscular and cerebro-cerebral coherence in patients with pre- and perinatally acquired unilateral brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Belardinelli, P; Ciancetta, L; Staudt, M; Pizzella, V; Londei, A; Birbaumer, N; Romani, G L; Braun, C

    2007-10-01

    The cerebral networks involved in motor control were analyzed in four young hemi-paretic patients (21-25 years) with pre- and perinatally acquired brain lesions (3 with left periventricular brain lesions, 1 with left schizencephaly) by means of MEG source coherence analysis. Previous TMS and fMRI studies on the same patients had investigated their residual ability to move the paretic hand by means of a reorganized primary motor cortex (M1) representation in the contralesional hemisphere. The purpose of this study is to identify the effects of such a cerebral reorganization and the related dynamic aspects which allow the patients to move the paretic arm. Patients underwent a pinch grip task (1-N isometric contraction) using their paretic and non-paretic hands in alternation. MEG signals were recorded using a whole-head 151-channel magnetoencephalograph. EMG was simultaneously recorded as a reference for coherence calculations. 3D coherence mapping was performed in the beta frequency range (14-30 Hz). This approach confirmed the relocation of motor functions from the lesioned (left) to the contralesional (right) hemisphere. In case of left, non-paretic pinch grip, coherent activity originated from contralateral (right) M1 exclusively. In the case of right (paretic) grip, coherent activity in ipsilateral M1 as well as significant coherence of ipsilateral cerebellum with both muscle activity and M1 itself was detected in 3 out of 4 subjects. As expected, the patient with no cerebellar involvement during paretic hand contraction showed the worst motor performance in the grip task. Coupling direction analysis demonstrated that throughout pinch grip the coupling direction goes from M1 to cerebellum. The present study verified the assumption that the intact hemisphere takes over motor control from the paretic (ipsilateral) hand in the presence of early unilateral brain lesion. Moreover, the role of cerebellum in motor deficit compensation and its close interaction with

  18. The Italian version of the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Trust (BIRT) personality questionnaires: five new measures of personality change after acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Basagni, Benedetta; Navarrete, Eduardo; Bertoni, Debora; Cattran, Charlotte; Mapelli, Daniela; Oddy, Michael; De Tanti, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the translation and adaptation of the BIRT personality questionnaires for the Italian population. This included the replication of validity testing and the collection of normative data. Following translation and adaptation according to cross-cultural guidelines, the questionnaires were administered as a pre-test to a sample of 20 healthy subjects and then to 10 patients. The questionnaires were then administered to 120 healthy subjects equally distributed by sex, education, and age, to collect normative data from an Italian population. The questionnaires were easily administered to both healthy subjects and patients. Statistical analysis on normative data was conducted to find the mean value for each questionnaire. This study lays the foundations for using a new instrument to assess behavioral changes after acquired brain injury on the Italian population. PMID:25981230

  19. Automatic regional analysis of DTI properties in the developmental macaque brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styner, Martin; Knickmeyer, Rebecca; Coe, Christopher; Short, Sarah J.; Gilmore, John

    2008-03-01

    Many neuroimaging studies are applied to monkeys as pathologies and environmental exposures can be studied in well-controlled settings and environment. In this work, we present a framework for the use of an atlas based, fully automatic segmentation of brain tissues, lobar parcellations, subcortical structures and the regional extraction of Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) properties. We first built a structural atlas from training images by iterative, joint deformable registration into an unbiased average image. On this atlas, probabilistic tissue maps, a lobar parcellation and subcortical structures were determined. This information is applied to each subjects structural image via affine, followed by deformable registration. The affinely transformed atlas is employed for a joint T1 and T2 based tissue classification. The deformed parcellation regions mask the tissue segmentations to define the parcellation for white and gray matter separately. Each subjects structural image is then non-rigidly matched with its DTI image by normalized mutual information, b-spline based registration. The DTI property histograms were then computed using the probabilistic white matter information for each lobar parcellation. We successfully built an average atlas using a developmental training datasets of 18 cases aged 16-34 months. Our framework was successfully applied to over 50 additional subjects in the age range of 9 70 months. The probabilistically weighted FA average in the corpus callosum region showed the largest increase over time in the observed age range. Most cortical regions show modest FA increase, whereas the cerebellums FA values remained stable. The individual methods used in this segmentation framework have been applied before, but their combination is novel, as is their application to macaque MRI data. Furthermore, this is the first study to date looking at the DTI properties of the developing macaque brain.

  20. Neuromagnetic correlates of developmental changes in endogenous high-frequency brain oscillations in children: a wavelet-based beamformer study.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jing; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yingying; Kotecha, Rupesh; Kirtman, Elijah G; Chen, Yangmei; Huo, Xiaolin; Fujiwara, Hisako; Hemasilpin, Nat; DeGrauw, Ton; Rose, Douglas

    2009-06-01

    Recent studies have found that the brain generates very fast oscillations. The objective of the present study was to investigate the spectral, spatial and coherent features of high-frequency brain oscillations in the developing brain. Sixty healthy children and 20 healthy adults were studied using a 275-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) system. MEG data were digitized at 12,000 Hz. The frequency characteristics of neuromagnetic signals in 0.5-2000 Hz were quantitatively determined with Morlet wavelet transform. The magnetic sources were volumetrically estimated with wavelet-based beamformer at 2.5 mm resolution. The neural networks of endogenous brain oscillations were analyzed with coherent imaging. Neuromagnetic activities in 8-12 Hz and 800-900 Hz were found to be the most reliable frequency bands in healthy children. The neuromagnetic signals were localized in the occipital, temporal and frontal cortices. The activities in the occipital and temporal cortices were strongly correlated in 8-12 Hz but not in 800-900 Hz. In comparison to adults, children had brain oscillations in intermingled frequency bands. Developmental changes in children were identified for both low- and high-frequency brain activities. The results of the present study suggest that the development of the brain is associated with spatial and coherent changes of endogenous brain activities in both low- and high-frequency ranges. Analysis of high-frequency neuromagnetic oscillation may provide novel insights into cerebral mechanisms of brain function. The noninvasive measurement of neuromagnetic brain oscillations in the developing brain may open a new window for analysis of brain function. PMID:19362072

  1. Developmental aspects of the rat brain insulin receptor: loss of sialic acid and fluctuation in number characterize fetal development

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, W.A. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    In this study, I have investigated the structure of the rat brain insulin receptor during fetal development. There is a progressive decrease in the apparent molecular size of the brain alpha-subunit during development: 130K on day 16 of gestation, 126K at birth, and 120K in the adult. Glycosylation was investigated as a possible reason for the observed differences in the alpha-subunit molecular size. The results show that the developmental decrease in the brain alpha-subunit apparent molecular size is due to a parallel decrease in sialic acid content. This was further confirmed by measuring the retention of autophosphorylated insulin receptors on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-Sepharose. An inverse correlation between developmental age and retention of /sup 32/P-labeled insulin receptors on the lectin column was observed. Insulin binding increases 6-fold between 16 and 20 days of gestation (61 +/- 25 (+/- SE) fmol/mg protein and 364 +/- 42 fmol/mg, respectively). Thereafter, binding in brain membranes decreases to 150 +/- 20 fmol/mg by 2 days after birth, then reaches the adult level of 63 +/- 15 fmol/mg. In addition, the degree of insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation closely parallels the developmental changes in insulin binding. Between 16 and 20 days of fetal life, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of the beta-subunit increases 6-fold. Thereafter, the extent of phosphorylation decreases rapidly, reaching adult values identical with those in 16-day-old fetal brain. These results suggest that the embryonic brain possesses competent insulin receptors whose expression changes markedly during fetal development. This information should be important in defining the role of insulin in the developing nervous system.

  2. Developmentally Regulated Expression of the Nerve Growth Factor Receptor Gene in the Periphery and Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, C. R.; Martinez, Humberto J.; Black, Ira B.; Chao, Moses V.

    1987-05-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) regulates development and maintenance of function of peripheral sympathetic and sensory neurons. A potential role for the trophic factor in brain has been detected only recently. The ability of a cell to respond to NGF is due, in part, to expression of specific receptors on the cell surface. To study tissue-specific expression of the NGF receptor gene, we have used sensitive cRNA probes for detection of NGF receptor mRNA. Our studies indicate that the receptor gene is selectively and specifically expressed in sympathetic (superior cervical) and sensory (dorsal root) ganglia in the periphery, and by the septum-basal forebrain centrally, in the neonatal rat in vivo. Moreover, examination of tissues from neonatal and adult rats reveals a marked reduction in steady-state NGF receptor mRNA levels in sensory ganglia. In contrast, a 2- to 4-fold increase was observed in the basal forebrain and in the sympathetic ganglia over the same time period. Our observations suggest that NGF receptor mRNA expression is developmentally regulated in specific areas of the nervous system in a differential fashion.

  3. The impact of acquired brain damage in terms of epidemiology, economics and loss in quality of life

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with acquired brain damage (ABD) have suffered a brain lesion that interrupts vital development in the physical, psychological and social spheres. Stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) are the two main causes. The objectives of this study were to estimate the incidence and prevalence of ABD in the population of the Basque Country and Navarre in 2008, to calculate the associated cost of the care required and finally to assess the loss in health-related quality of life. Methods On the one hand, a cross-sectional survey was carried out, in order to estimate the incidence of ABD and its consequences in terms of costs and loss in quality of life from the evolution of a sample of patients diagnosed with stroke and TBI. On the other hand, a discrete event simulation model was built that enabled the prevalence of ABD to be estimated. Finally, a calculation was made of the formal and informal costs of ABD in the population of the Basque Country and Navarre (2,750,000 people). Results The cross-sectional study showed that the incidences of ABD caused by stroke and TBI were 61.8 and 12.5 cases per 100,000 per year respectively, while the overall prevalence was 657 cases per 100,000 people. The SF-36 physical and mental component scores were 28.9 and 44.5 respectively. The total economic burden was calculated to be 382.14 million euro per year, distributed between 215.27 and 166.87 of formal and informal burden respectively. The average cost per individual was 21,040 € per year. Conclusions The main conclusion of this study is that ABD has a high impact in both epidemiological and economic terms as well as loss in quality of life. The overall prevalence obtained is equivalent to 0.7% of the total population. The substantial economic burden is distributed nearly evenly between formal and informal costs. Specifically, it was found that the physical dimensions of quality of life are the most severely affected. The prevalence-based approach showed adequate

  4. Is it time to act? The potential of acceptance and commitment therapy for psychological problems following acquired brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Kangas, Maria; McDonald, Skye

    2011-01-01

    Behaviour therapies have a well-established, useful tradition in psychological treatments and have undergone several major revisions. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and mindfulness-based approaches are considered a third wave of behavioural therapies. Emerging evidence for ACT has demonstrated that this paradigm has promising effectiveness in improving functionality and well-being in a variety of populations that have psychological disturbances and/or medical problems. In this review we first evaluate traditional cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) interventions used to manage psychological problems in distressed individuals who have sustained an acquired brain injury (ABI). We provide an overview of the ACT paradigm and the existent evidence base for this intervention. A rationale is outlined for why ACT-based interventions may have potential utility in assisting distressed individuals who have sustained a mild to moderate ABI to move forward with their lives. We also review emerging evidence that lends preliminary support to the implementation of acceptance and mindfulness-based interventions in the rehabilitation of ABI patient groups. On the basis of existent literature, we recommend that it is an opportune time for forthcoming research to rigorously test the efficacy of ACT-based interventions in facilitating ABI patient groups to re-engage in living a valued and meaningful life, in spite of their neurocognitive and physical limitations. The promising utility of testing the efficacy of the ACT paradigm in the context of multimodal rehabilitation programmes for ABI populations is also addressed. PMID:21246445

  5. Can, Want and Try: Parents’ Viewpoints Regarding the Participation of Their Child with an Acquired Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Melanie; Elliott, Catherine; Willis, Claire; Ward, Roslyn; Falkmer, Marita; Falkmer, Torbjӧrn; Gubbay, Anna; Girdler, Sonya

    2016-01-01

    Background Acquired brain injury (ABI) is a leading cause of permanent disability, currently affecting 20,000 Australian children. Community participation is essential for childhood development and enjoyment, yet children with ABI can often experience barriers to participation. The factors which act as barriers and facilitators to community participation for children with an ABI are not well understood. Aim To identify the viewpoints of parents of children with an ABI, regarding the barriers and facilitators most pertinent to community participation for their child. Methods Using Q-method, 41 parents of children with moderate/severe ABI sorted 37 statements regarding barriers and facilitators to community participation. Factor analysis identified three viewpoints. Results This study identified three distinct viewpoints, with the perceived ability to participate decreasing with a stepwise trend from parents who felt their child and family “can” participate in viewpoint one, to “want” in viewpoint two and “try” in viewpoint three. Conclusions Findings indicated good participation outcomes for most children and families, however some families who were motivated to participate experienced significant barriers. The most significant facilitators included child motivation, supportive relationships from immediate family and friends, and supportive community attitudes. The lack of supportive relationships and attitudes was perceived as a fundamental barrier to community participation. Significance This research begins to address the paucity of information regarding those factors that impact upon the participation of children with an ABI in Australia. Findings have implications for therapists, service providers and community organisations. PMID:27367231

  6. RNA Sequence Analysis of Human Huntington Disease Brain Reveals an Extensive Increase in Inflammatory and Developmental Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Labadorf, Adam; Hoss, Andrew G.; Lagomarsino, Valentina; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Hadzi, Tiffany C.; Bregu, Joli; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Gusella, James F.; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Akbarian, Schahram; Weng, Zhiping; Myers, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s Disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. Transcriptional dysregulation in the human HD brain has been documented but is incompletely understood. Here we present a genome-wide analysis of mRNA expression in human prefrontal cortex from 20 HD and 49 neuropathologically normal controls using next generation high-throughput sequencing. Surprisingly, 19% (5,480) of the 28,087 confidently detected genes are differentially expressed (FDR<0.05) and are predominantly up-regulated. A novel hypothesis-free geneset enrichment method that dissects large gene lists into functionally and transcriptionally related groups discovers that the differentially expressed genes are enriched for immune response, neuroinflammation, and developmental genes. Markers for all major brain cell types are observed, suggesting that HD invokes a systemic response in the brain area studied. Unexpectedly, the most strongly differentially expressed genes are a homeotic gene set (represented by Hox and other homeobox genes), that are almost exclusively expressed in HD, a profile not widely implicated in HD pathogenesis. The significance of transcriptional changes of developmental processes in the HD brain is poorly understood and warrants further investigation. The role of inflammation and the significance of non-neuronal involvement in HD pathogenesis suggest anti-inflammatory therapeutics may offer important opportunities in treating HD. PMID:26636579

  7. A Systematic Review of Hospital-to-School Reintegration Interventions for Children and Youth with Acquired Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Sally; Hartman, Laura R.; Reed, Nick; Gan, Caron; Thomson, Nicole; Solomon, Beverely

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We reviewed the literature on interventions that aimed to improve hospital-to-school reintegration for children and youth with acquired brain injury (ABI). ABI is the leading cause of disability among children and youth. A successful hospital-to-school reintegration process is essential to the rehabilitative process. However, little is known about the effective components of of such interventions. Methods and findings Our research team conducted a systematic review, completing comprehensive searches of seven databases and selected reference lists for relevant articles published in a peer-reviewed journal between 1989 and June 2014. We selected articles for inclusion that report on studies involving: a clinical population with ABI; sample had an average age of 20 years or younger; an intentional structured intervention affecting hospital-to-school transitions or related components; an experimental design; and a statistically evaluated health outcome. Two independent reviewers applied our inclusion criteria, extracted data, and rated study quality. A meta-analysis was not feasible due to the heterogeneity of the studies reported. Of the 6933 articles identified in our initial search, 17 articles (reporting on 350 preadolescents and adolescents, aged 4–19, (average age 11.5 years, SD: 2.21) met our inclusion criteria. They reported on interventions varying in number of sessions (one to 119) and session length (20 minutes to 4 hours). The majority of interventions involved multiple one-to-one sessions conducted by a trained clinician or educator, homework activities, and parental involvement. The interventions were delivered through different settings and media, including hospitals, schools, and online. Although outcomes varied (with effect sizes ranging from small to large), 14 of the articles reported at least one significant improvement in cognitive, social, psychological, or behavioral functioning or knowledge of ABI. Conclusions Cognitive, behavioral

  8. Evaluation of use of reading comprehension strategies to improve reading comprehension of adult college students with acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Gina G; Sohlberg, McKay Moore; Kirk, Cecilia; Fickas, Stephen; Biancarosa, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Adults with mild to moderate acquired brain injury (ABI) often pursue post-secondary or professional education after their injuries in order to enter or re-enter the job market. An increasing number of these adults report problems with reading-to-learn. The problem is particularly concerning given the growing population of adult survivors of ABI. Despite the rising need, empirical evaluation of reading comprehension interventions for adults with ABI is scarce. This study used a within-subject design to evaluate whether adult college students with ABI with no more than moderate cognitive impairments benefited from using reading comprehension strategies to improve comprehension of expository text. Integrating empirical support from the cognitive rehabilitation and special education literature, the researchers designed a multi-component reading comprehension strategy package. Participants read chapters from an introductory-level college anthropology textbook in two different conditions: strategy and no-strategy. The results indicated that reading comprehension strategy use was associated with recall of more correct information units in immediate and delayed free recall tasks; more efficient recall in the delayed free recall task; and increased accuracy recognising statements from a sentence verification task designed to reflect the local and global coherence of the text. The findings support further research into using reading comprehension strategies as an intervention approach for the adult ABI population. Future research needs include identifying how to match particular reading comprehension strategies to individuals, examining whether reading comprehension performance improves further through the incorporation of systematic training, and evaluating texts from a range of disciplines and genres. PMID:25712402

  9. BRAIN AND BLOOD TIN LEVELS IN A DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY STUDY OF DIBUTYLTIN.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dibutyltin (DBT), a widely used plastic stabilizer, is detected in the environment and human tissues. While teratological and developmental effects are known, we could find no published report of DBT effects on the developing nervous system. As part of a developmental neurotoxi...

  10. Capitalizing on Basic Brain Processes in Developmental Algebra--Part 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughbaum, Edward D.

    2011-01-01

    In Part Three, the author reviews the basic ideas presented in Parts One and Two while arguing why the traditional equation-solving developmental algebra curricula is not a good choice for implementing neural response strategies presented in the first two parts. He continues by showing that the developmental algebra student audience is simply…

  11. The behavioral neurogenetics of fragile X syndrome: analyzing gene-brain-behavior relationships in child developmental psychopathologies.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Allan L; Dant, Christopher C

    2003-01-01

    Analyzing gene-brain-behavior linkages in childhood neurodevelopmental disorders, a research approach called "behavioral neurogenetics," has provided new insights into understanding how both genetic and environmental factors contribute to complex variations in typical and atypical human development. Research into etiologically more homogeneous disorders, such as fragile X syndrome, in particular, allows the use of more precise metrics of genetic risk so that we can more fully understand the complex pathophysiology of childhood onset neurodevelopmental disorders. In this paper, we review our laboratory's behavioral neurogenetics research by examining gene-brain-behavior relationships in fragile X syndrome, a single-gene disorder that has become a well-characterized model for studying neurodevelopmental dysfunction in childhood. Specifically, we examine genetic influences, trajectories of cognition and behavior, variation in brain structure and function, and biological and environmental factors that influence developmental and cognitive outcomes of children with fragile X. The converging approaches across these multilevel scientific domains indicate that fragile X, which arises from disruption of a single gene leading to the loss of a specific protein, is associated with a cascade of aberrations in neurodevelopment, resulting in a central nervous system that is suboptimal with respect to structure and function. In turn, structural and functional brain alterations lead to early disruption in emotion, cognition, and behavior in the child with fragile X. The combination of molecular genetics, neuroimaging, and behavioral research have advanced our understanding of the linkages between genetic variables, neurobiological measures, IQ, and behavior. Our research and that of others demonstrates that neurobehavior and neurocognition, genetics, and neuroanatomy are all different views of the same intriguing biological puzzle, a puzzle that today is rapidly emerging into a

  12. The International Society for Developmental Psychobiology Annual Meeting Symposium: Impact of Early Life Experiences on Brain and Behavioral Development

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Regina; Wilson, Donald A.; Feldon, Joram; Yee, Benjamin K.; Meyer, Urs; Richter-Levin, Gal; Avi, Avital; Michael, Tsoory; Gruss, Michael; Bock, Jörg; Helmeke, Carina; Braun, Katharina

    2007-01-01

    Decades of research in the area of developmental psychobiology have shown that early life experience alters behavioral and brain development, which canalizes development to suit different environments. Recent methodological advances have begun to identify the mechanisms by which early life experiences cause these diverse adult outcomes. Here we present four different research programs that demonstrate the intricacies of early environmental influences on behavioral and brain development in both pathological and normal development. First, an animal model of schizophrenia is presented that suggests prenatal immune stimulation influences the postpubertal emergence of psychosis-related behavior in mice. Second, we describe a research program on infant rats that demonstrates how early odor learning has unique characteristics due to the unique functioning of the infant limbic system. Third, we present work on the rodent Octodon degus, which shows that early paternal and/or maternal deprivation alters development of limbic system synaptic density that corresponds to heightened emotionality. Fourth, ajuvenile model of stress is presented that suggests this developmental period is important in determining adulthood emotional well being. The approach of each research program is strikingly different, yet all succeed in delineating a specific aspect of early development and its effects on infant and adult outcome that expands our understanding of the developmental impact of infant experiences on emotional and limbic system development. Together, these research programs suggest that the developing organism’s developmental trajectory is influenced by environmental factors beginning in the fetus and extending through adolescence, although the specific timing and nature of the environmental influence has unique impact on adult mental health. PMID:17016842

  13. Intelligent speed adaptation as an assistive device for drivers with acquired brain injury: a single-case field experiment.

    PubMed

    Klarborg, Brith; Lahrmann, Harry; NielsAgerholm; Tradisauskas, Nerius; Harms, Lisbeth

    2012-09-01

    Intelligent speed adaptation (ISA) was tested as an assistive device for drivers with an acquired brain injury (ABI). The study was part of the "Pay as You Speed" project (PAYS) and used the same equipment and technology as the main study (Lahrmann et al., in press-a, in press-b). Two drivers with ABI were recruited as subjects and had ISA equipment installed in their private vehicle. Their speed was logged with ISA equipment for a total of 30 weeks of which 12 weeks were with an active ISA user interface (6 weeks=Baseline 1; 12 weeks=ISA period; 12 weeks=Baseline 2). The subjects participated in two semi-structured interviews concerning their strategies for driving with ABI and for driving with ISA. Furthermore, they gave consent to have data from their clinical journals and be a part of the study. The two subjects did not report any instances of being distracted or confused by ISA, and in general they described driving with ISA as relaxed. ISA reduced the percentage of the total distance that was driven with a speed above the speed limit (PDA), but the subjects relapsed to their previous PDA level in Baseline 2. This suggests that ISA is more suited as a permanent assistive device (i.e. cognitive prosthesis) than as a temporary training device. As ABI is associated with a multitude of cognitive deficits, we developed a conceptual framework, which focused on the cognitive parameters that have been shown to relate to speeding behaviour, namely "intention to speed" and "inattention to speeding". The subjects' combined status on the two independent parameters made up their "speeding profile". A comparison of the speeding profiles and the speed logs indicated that ISA in the present study was more efficient in reducing inattention to speeding than affecting intention to speed. This finding suggests that ISA might be more suited for some neuropsychological profiles than for others, and that customisation of ISA for different neuropsychological profiles may be required

  14. Effectiveness of a Very Early Stepping Verticalization Protocol in Severe Acquired Brain Injured Patients: A Randomized Pilot Study in ICU

    PubMed Central

    Bonini, Sara; Maffia, Sara; Molatore, Katia; Sebastianelli, Luca; Zarucchi, Alessio; Matteri, Diana; Ercoli, Giuseppe; Maestri, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Verticalization was reported to improve the level of arousal and awareness in patients with severe acquired brain injury (ABI) and to be safe in ICU. We evaluated the effectiveness of a very early stepping verticalization protocol on their functional and neurological outcome. Methods Consecutive patients with Vegetative State or Minimally Conscious State were enrolled in ICU on the third day after an ABI. They were randomized to undergo conventional physiotherapy alone or associated to fifteen 30-minute sessions of verticalization, using a tilt table with robotic stepping device. Once stabilized, patients were transferred to our Neurorehabilitation unit for an individualized treatment. Outcome measures (Glasgow Coma Scale, Coma Recovery Scale revised -CRSr-, Disability Rating Scale–DRS- and Levels of Cognitive Functioning) were assessed on the third day from the injury (T0), at ICU discharge (T1) and at Rehab discharge (T2). Between- and within-group comparisons were performed by the Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test, respectively. Results Of the 40 patients enrolled, 31 completed the study without adverse events (15 in the verticalization group and 16 in the conventional physiotherapy). Early verticalization started 12.4±7.3 (mean±SD) days after ABI. The length of stay in ICU was longer for the verticalization group (38.8 ± 15.7 vs 25.1 ± 11.2 days, p = 0.01), while the total length of stay (ICU+Neurorehabilitation) was not significantly different (153.2 ± 59.6 vs 134.0 ± 61.0 days, p = 0.41). All outcome measures significantly improved in both groups after the overall period (T2 vs T0, p<0.001 all), as well as after ICU stay (T1 vs T0, p<0.004 all) and after Neurorehabilitation (T2 vs T1, p<0.004 all). The improvement was significantly better in the experimental group for CRSr (T2-T0 p = 0.033, T1-T0 p = 0.006) and (borderline) for DRS (T2-T0 p = 0.040, T1-T0 p = 0.058). Conclusions A stepping verticalization

  15. Screening for Developmental Neurotoxicants using In Vitro "Brain on a Chip" Cultures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently there are thousands of chemicals in the environment that have not been screened for their potential to cause developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). The use of microelectrode array (MEA) technology allows for simultaneous extracellular measurement of action potential (spike)...

  16. Developmental precursors of social brain networks: the emergence of attentional and cortical sensitivity to facial expressions in 5 to 7 months old infants.

    PubMed

    Yrttiaho, Santeri; Forssman, Linda; Kaatiala, Jussi; Leppänen, Jukka M

    2014-01-01

    Biases in attention towards facial cues during infancy may have an important role in the development of social brain networks. The current study used a longitudinal design to examine the stability of infants' attentional biases towards facial expressions and to elucidate how these biases relate to emerging cortical sensitivity to facial expressions. Event-related potential (ERP) and attention disengagement data were acquired in response to the presentation of fearful, happy, neutral, and phase-scrambled face stimuli from the same infants at 5 and 7 months of age. The tendency to disengage from faces was highly consistent across both ages. However, the modulation of this behavior by fearful facial expressions was uncorrelated between 5 and 7 months. In the ERP data, fear-sensitive activity was observed over posterior scalp regions, starting at the latency of the N290 wave. The scalp distribution of this sensitivity to fear in ERPs was dissociable from the topography of face-sensitive modulation within the same latency range. While attentional bias scores were independent of co-registered ERPs, attention bias towards fearful faces at 5 months of age predicted the fear-sensitivity in ERPs at 7 months of age. The current results suggest that the attention bias towards fear could be involved in the developmental tuning of cortical networks for social signals of emotion. PMID:24968161

  17. Margaret Kennard (1899–1975): Not a ‘Principle’ of Brain Plasticity But a Founding Mother of Developmental Neuropsychology

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    According to the ‘Kennard Principle’, there is a negative linear relation between age at brain injury and functional outcome. Other things being equal, the younger the lesioned organism, the better the outcome. But the ‘Kennard Principle’ is neither Kennard’s nor a principle. In her work, Kennard sought to explain the factors that predicted functional outcome (age, to be sure, but also staging, laterality, location, and number of brain lesions, and outcome domain) and the neural mechanisms that altered the lesioned brain’s functionality. This paper discusses Kennard’s life and years at Yale (1931–1943); considers the genesis and scope of her work on early-onset brain lesions, which represents an empirical and theoretical foundation for current developmental neuropsychology; offers an historical explanation of why the ‘Kennard Principle’ emerged in the context of early 1970s work on brain plasticity; shows why uncritical belief in the ‘Kennard Principle’ continues to shape current research and practice; and reviews the continuing importance of her work. PMID:20079891

  18. Brain Responses to Words in 2-Year-Olds with Autism Predict Developmental Outcomes at Age 6

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, Patricia K.; Coffey-Corina, Sharon; Padden, Denise; Munson, Jeffrey; Estes, Annette; Dawson, Geraldine

    2013-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability that affects social behavior and language acquisition. ASD exhibits great variability in outcomes, with some individuals remaining nonverbal and others exhibiting average or above average function. Cognitive ability contributes to heterogeneity in autism and serves as a modest predictor of later function. We show that a brain measure (event-related potentials, ERPs) of word processing in children with ASD, assessed at the age of 2 years (N = 24), is a broad and robust predictor of receptive language, cognitive ability, and adaptive behavior at ages 4 and 6 years, regardless of the form of intensive clinical treatment during the intervening years. The predictive strength of this brain measure increases over time, and exceeds the predictive strength of a measure of cognitive ability, used here for comparison. These findings have theoretical implications and may eventually lead to neural measures that allow early prediction of developmental outcomes as well as more individually tailored clinical interventions, with the potential for greater effectiveness in treating children with ASD. PMID:23734230

  19. Developmental Changes in Narrative and Non-Narrative Discourse in Children with and without Brain Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemphill, Lowry; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This study found that three oral discourse genres (script, picture description, and replica play narration) were able to characterize development in discourse abilities in 6 children (ages 5-7) with brain injury and 43 nondisabled children. Brain-injured children produced shorter discourse performances with more off-task talk but showed…

  20. Integrating Functional Brain Neuroimaging and Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience in Child Psychiatry Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavuluri, Mani N.; Sweeney, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The use of cognitive neuroscience and functional brain neuroimaging to understand brain dysfunction in pediatric psychiatric disorders is discussed. Results show that bipolar youths demonstrate impairment in affective and cognitive neural systems and in these two circuits' interface. Implications for the diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric…

  1. Early Relationships for Healthy Brains. An interview with Developmental Psychologist Ross Thompson. Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Healthy brain development relies on the quality of early relationships. Supportive relationships and parent-child conversations buffer stress; they contribute to the cognitive and emotional stimulation that developing brains need; and the quality of parent-child conversation is important even before young children are good conversational partners.…

  2. Mutations in BMP4 Cause Eye, Brain, and Digit Developmental Anomalies: Overlap between the BMP4 and Hedgehog Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bakrania, Preeti; Efthymiou, Maria; Klein, Johannes C.; Salt, Alison; Bunyan, David J.; Wyatt, Alex; Ponting, Chris P.; Martin, Angela; Williams, Steven; Lindley, Victoria; Gilmore, Joanne; Restori, Marie; Robson, Anthony G.; Neveu, Magella M.; Holder, Graham E.; Collin, J Richard O.; Robinson, David O.; Farndon, Peter; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Gerrelli, Dianne; Ragge, Nicola K.

    2008-01-01

    Developmental ocular malformations, including anophthalmia-microphthalmia (AM), are heterogeneous disorders with frequent sporadic or non-Mendelian inheritance. Recurrent interstitial deletions of 14q22-q23 have been associated with AM, sometimes with poly/syndactyly and hypopituitarism. We identify two further cases of AM (one with associated pituitary anomalies) with a 14q22-q23 deletion. Using a positional candidate gene approach, we analyzed the BMP4 (Bone Morphogenetic Protein-4) gene and identified a frameshift mutation (c.226del2, p.S76fs104X) that segregated with AM, retinal dystrophy, myopia, brain anomalies, and polydactyly in a family and a nonconservative missense mutation (c.278A→G, p.E93G) in a highly conserved base in another family. MR imaging and tractography in the c.226del2 proband revealed a primary brain developmental disorder affecting thalamostriatal and callosal pathways, also present in the affected grandmother. Using in situ hybridization in human embryos, we demonstrate expression of BMP4 in optic vesicle, developing retina and lens, pituitary region, and digits strongly supporting BMP4 as a causative gene for AM, pituitary, and poly/syndactyly. Because BMP4 interacts with HH signaling genes in animals, we evaluated gene expression in human embryos and demonstrate cotemporal and cospatial expression of BMP4 and HH signaling genes. We also identified four cases, some of whom had retinal dystrophy, with “low-penetrant” mutations in both BMP4 and HH signaling genes: SHH (Sonic Hedgehog) or PTCH1 (Patched). We propose that BMP4 is a major gene for AM and/or retinal dystrophy and brain anomalies and may be a candidate gene for myopia and poly/syndactyly. Our finding of low-penetrant variants in BMP4 and HH signaling partners is suggestive of an interaction between the two pathways in humans. PMID:18252212

  3. Abnormal Functional Lateralization and Activity of Language Brain Areas in Typical Specific Language Impairment (Developmental Dysphasia)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guibert, Clement; Maumet, Camille; Jannin, Pierre; Ferre, Jean-Christophe; Treguier, Catherine; Barillot, Christian; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Allaire, Catherine; Biraben, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Atypical functional lateralization and specialization for language have been proposed to account for developmental language disorders, yet results from functional neuroimaging studies are sparse and inconsistent. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study compared children with a specific subtype of specific language impairment affecting…

  4. ALTERATIONS IN BRAIN PROTEIN KINASE C ISOFORMS FOLLOWING DEVELOPMENTAL EXPOSURE TO POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL MIXTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    PCBs have been shown to alter several neurochemical end-points and are implicated in the etiology of some neurological diseases. Recent in vivo studies from our laboratory indicated that developmental exposure to a commercial PCB mixture, Aroclor 1254, caused perturbations in cal...

  5. Brief Report: Neuroanatomic Observations of the Brain in Pervasive Developmental Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauman, Margaret L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews neuroanatomic studies on syndromes classified as Pervasive Developmental Disorders. Findings in autism and Asperger's syndrome suggest that these two disorders may represent a continuum along a neurobiological spectrum with a common neuroanatomic substrate, while Rett syndrome appears to be clinically and anatomically distinct…

  6. The protocol and design of a randomised controlled study on training of attention within the first year after acquired brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To describe the design of the study aiming to examine intensive targeted cognitive rehabilitation of attention in the acute (<4 months) and subacute rehabilitation phases (4–12 months) after acquired brain injury and to evaluate the effects on function, activity and participation (return to work). Methods/Design Within a prospective, randomised, controlled study 120 consecutive patients with stroke or traumatic brain injury were randomised to 20 hours of intensive attention training by Attention Process Training or by standard, activity based training. Progress was evaluated by Statistical Process Control and by pre and post measurement of functional and activity levels. Return to work was also evaluated in the post-acute phase. Primary endpoints were the changes in the attention measure, Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test and changes in work ability. Secondary endpoints included measurement of cognitive functions, activity and work return. There were 3, 6 and 12-month follow ups focussing on health economics. Discussion The study will provide information on rehabilitation of attention in the early phases after ABI; effects on function, activity and return to work. Further, the application of Statistical Process Control might enable closer investigation of the cognitive changes after acquired brain injury and demonstrate the usefulness of process measures in rehabilitation. The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov Protocol. Trial registration NCT02091453, registered: 19 March 2014. PMID:24885585

  7. Wide spectrum of developmental brain disorders from megalencephaly to focal cortical dysplasia and pigmentary mosaicism caused by mutations of MTOR

    PubMed Central

    Solovieff, Nadia; Goold, Carleton; Jansen, Laura A.; Menon, Suchithra; Timms, Andrew E.; Conti, Valerio; Biag, Jonathan D.; Adams, Carissa; Boyle, Evan August; Collins, Sarah; Ishak, Gisele; Poliachik, Sandra; Girisha, Katta M.; Yeung, Kit San; Chung, Brian Hon Yin; Rahikkala, Elisa; Gunter, Sonya A.; McDaniel, Sharon S.; Macmurdo, Colleen Forsyth; Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Martin, Beth; Leary, Rebecca; Mahan, Scott; Liu, Shanming; Weaver, Molly; Doerschner, Michael; Jhangiani, Shalini; Muzny, Donna M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Shendure, Jay; Saneto, Russell P.; Novotny, Edward J.; Wilson, Christopher J.; Sellers, William R.; Morrissey, Michael; Hevner, Robert F.; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Guerrini, Renzo; Murphy, Leon O.; Winckler, Wendy; Dobyns, William B.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), hemimegalencephaly (HMEG) and megalencephaly constitute a spectrum of malformations of cortical development with shared neuropathologic features. Collectively, these disorders are associated with significant childhood morbidity and mortality. FCD, in particular, represents the most frequent cause of intractable focal epilepsy in children. Objective To identify the underlying molecular etiology of FCD, HMEG, and diffuse megalencephaly. Design, Setting and Participants We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) on eight children with FCD or HMEG using standard depth (~50-60X) sequencing in peripheral samples (blood, saliva or skin) from the affected child and their parents, and deep (~150-180X) sequencing in affected brain tissue. We used both targeted sequencing and WES to screen a cohort of 93 children with molecularly unexplained diffuse or focal brain overgrowth (42 with FCD-HMEG, and 51 with diffuse megalencephaly). Histopathological and functional assays of PI3K-AKT-MTOR pathway activity in resected brain tissue and cultured neurons were performed to validate mutations. Main Outcomes and Measures Whole exome sequencing and targeted sequencing identified variants associated with this spectrum of developmental brain disorders. Results We identified low-level mosaic mutations of MTOR in brain tissue in four children with FCD type 2a with alternative allele fractions ranging from 0.012–0.086. We also identified intermediate level mosaic mutation of MTOR (p.Thr1977Ile) in three unrelated children with diffuse megalencephaly and pigmentary mosaicism in skin that resembles hypomelanosis of Ito. Finally, we identified a constitutional de novo mutation of MTOR (p.Glu1799Lys) in three unrelated children with diffuse megalencephaly and intellectual disability. Molecular and functional analysis in two children with FCD type 2a from whom multiple affected brain tissue samples were available revealed a gradient of alternate allele

  8. A candidate gene for developmental dyslexia encodes a nuclear tetratricopeptide repeat domain protein dynamically regulated in brain.

    PubMed

    Taipale, Mikko; Kaminen, Nina; Nopola-Hemmi, Jaana; Haltia, Tuomas; Myllyluoma, Birgitta; Lyytinen, Heikki; Muller, Kurt; Kaaranen, Minna; Lindsberg, Perttu J; Hannula-Jouppi, Katariina; Kere, Juha

    2003-09-30

    Approximately 3-10% of people have specific difficulties in reading, despite adequate intelligence, education, and social environment. We report here the characterization of a gene, DYX1C1 near the DYX1 locus in chromosome 15q21, that is disrupted by a translocation t(2;15)(q11;q21) segregating coincidentally with dyslexia. Two sequence changes in DYX1C1, one involving the translation initiation sequence and an Elk-1 transcription factor binding site (-3G --> A) and a codon (1249G --> T), introducing a premature stop codon and truncating the predicted protein by 4 aa, associate alone and in combination with dyslexia. DYX1C1 encodes a 420-aa protein with three tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains, thought to be protein interaction modules, but otherwise with no homology to known proteins. The mouse Dyx1c1 protein is 78% identical to the human protein, and the nonhuman primates differ at 0.5-1.4% of residues. DYX1C1 is expressed in several tissues, including the brain, and the protein resides in the nucleus. In human brain, DYX1C1 protein localizes to a fraction of cortical neurons and white matter glial cells. We conclude that DYX1C1 should be regarded as a candidate gene for developmental dyslexia. Detailed study of its function may open a path to understanding a complex process of development and maturation of the human brain. PMID:12954984

  9. Managing executive dysfunction following acquired brain injury and stroke using an ecologically valid rehabilitation approach: a study protocol for a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We have been investigating an ecologically valid strategy-training approach to enable adults with executive dysfunction to attain everyday life goals. Here, we report the protocol of a randomized controlled trial of the effects of this training compared to conventional therapy in a sample of community-dwelling adults with acquired brain injury and/or stroke. Methods/design We will recruit 100 community-dwelling survivors at least six months post-acquired brain injury or stroke who report executive dysfunction during a telephone interview, confirmed in pre-training testing. Following pre-training testing, participants will be randomized to the ecologically valid strategy training or conventional therapy and receive two one-hour sessions for eight weeks (maximum of 15 hours of therapy). Post-testing will occur immediately following the training and three months later. The primary outcome is self-reported change in performance on everyday life activities measured using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, a standardized, semi-structured interview. Secondary outcomes are objective measurement of performance change from videotapes of treatment session, Performance Quality Rating Scale; executive dysfunction symptoms, Behavioural Rating Inventory of Executive Function – Adult; participation in everyday life, Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory Participation Index; and ability to solve novel problems, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Profile. Discussion This study is of a novel approach to promoting improvements in attainment of everyday life goals through managing executive dysfunction using an ecologically valid strategy training approach, the Cognitive Orientation to daily Occupational Performance. This study compares the efficacy of this approach with that of conventional therapy. The approach has the potential to be a valuable treatment for people with chronic acquired brain injury and/or stroke. Trial registration clinicaltrials

  10. Developmental programming of brain and behavior by perinatal diet: focus on inflammatory mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Jessica L.; Bilbo, Staci D.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is now epidemic worldwide. Beyond associated diseases such as diabetes, obesity is linked to neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression. Alarmingly maternal obesity and high-fat diet consumption during gestation/lactation may “program” offspring longterm for increased obesity themselves, along with increased vulnerability to mood disorders. We review the evidence that programming of brain and behavior by perinatal diet is propagated by inflammatory mechanisms, as obesity and high-fat diets are independently associated with exaggerated systemic levels of inflammatory mediators. Due to the recognized dual role of these immune molecules (eg, interleukin [IL]-6, 11-1β) in placental function and brain development, any disruption of their delicate balance with growth factors or neurotransmitters (eg, serotonin) by inflammation early in life can permanently alter the trajectory of fetal brain development. Finally, epigenetic regulation of inflammatory pathways is a likely candidate for persistent changes in metabolic and brain function as a consequence of the perinatal environment. PMID:25364282

  11. REGIONAL LOCALIZATION AND DEVELOPMENTAL EXPRESSION OF THE BCR GENE IN RODENT BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Fioretos, Thoas; Voncken, Jan Willem; Baram, Tallie Z.; Kamme, Fredrik; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2013-01-01

    The BCR gene is implicated in the development of Ph-positive leukemia through its fusion with the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase gene ABL. The normal 160 kDa Bcr protein has several functional domains, and recently one specific role for Bcr was established in the regulation of respiratory burst activity in white blood cells. Bcr expression levels are relatively constant throughout mouse development until adulthood in brain and in hematopoietic tissues, a pattern that is distinctly different from that of the functionally related n-chimerin gene. In the present study, RNA in situ hybridization was used to explore the normal cellular function of Bcr in rodent brain and hematopoietic organs. The data pinpoint the high bcr expression in the brain to the hippocampal pyramidal cell layer and the dentate gyrus, and to the piriform cortex and the olfactory nuclei, reflecting a potentially interesting function for Bcr in these highly specialized brain regions. PMID:8581068

  12. Gross and histological criteria for developmental disorders in brains of schizophrenics.

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, H; Beckmann, H

    1989-01-01

    Autopsy findings and examination of histological sections from 12 schizophrenic patients and from age-matched, non-schizophrenic controls were enlarged and confirmed our previous study. Four subgroups were differentiated with gross abnormalities, in most cases with asymmetry of the temporal sulcal gyral pattern. Two types of macroscopical deviations are described. Different periods of developmental termination, concerning the sulcal gyral pattern of the temporal lobe, suggest a period in which the disturbance of the development originated which coincides with a probably genetically-induced disturbed migration in the entorhinal region toward the end of the fifth month. It is thought that the parahippocampal or entorhinal area develops differently, space- and time-wise. This may explain why migratory disturbances particularly occur in this precisely limited area. The findings in the ventral insular area are discussed, together with factors which also suggest a developmental disorder. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. a Figure 2. ac Figure 2. b Figure 2. bc PMID:2674429

  13. Brain magnetic resonance imaging in suspected extrapyramidal cerebral palsy: observations in distinguishing genetic-metabolic from acquired causes.

    PubMed

    Hoon, A H; Reinhardt, E M; Kelley, R I; Breiter, S N; Morton, D H; Naidu, S B; Johnston, M V

    1997-08-01

    Experienced clinicians recognize that some children who appear to have static cerebral palsy (CP) actually have underlying genetic-metabolic disorders. We report a series of patients with motor disorders seen in children with extrapyramidal CP in whom brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities provided important diagnostic clues in distinguishing genetic-metabolic disorders from other causes. One cause of static extrapyramidal CP, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy at the end of a term gestation, produces a characteristic pattern of hyperintense signal and atrophy in the putamen and thalamus. Other signal abnormalities and atrophy in the putamen, globus pallidus, or caudate can point to genetic-metabolic diseases, including disorders of mitochondrial and organic acid metabolism. Progress in understanding and treating genetic diseases of the developing brain makes it essential to diagnose disorders that masquerade as static CP. Brain magnetic resonance imaging is a useful diagnostic tool in the initial evaluation of children who appear to have CP. PMID:9290610

  14. Zebrafish and medaka: model organisms for a comparative developmental approach of brain asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Signore, Iskra A.; Guerrero, Néstor; Loosli, Felix; Colombo, Alicia; Villalón, Aldo; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Concha, Miguel L.

    2008-01-01

    Comparison between related species is a successful approach to uncover conserved and divergent principles of development. Here, we studied the pattern of epithalamic asymmetry in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and medaka (Oryzias latipes), two related teleost species with 115–200 Myr of independent evolution. We found that these species share a strikingly conserved overall pattern of asymmetry in the parapineal–habenular–interpeduncular system. Nodal signalling exhibits comparable spatial and temporal asymmetric expressions in the presumptive epithalamus preceding the development of morphological asymmetries. Neuroanatomical asymmetries consist of left-sided asymmetric positioning and connectivity of the parapineal organ, enlargement of neuropil in the left habenula compared with the right habenula and segregation of left–right habenular efferents along the dorsoventral axis of the interpeduncular nucleus. Despite the overall conservation of asymmetry, we observed heterotopic changes in the topology of parapineal efferent connectivity, heterochronic shifts in the timing of developmental events underlying the establishment of asymmetry and divergent degrees of canalization of embryo laterality. We offer new tools for developmental time comparison among species and propose, for each of these transformations, novel hypotheses of ontogenic mechanisms that explain interspecies variations that can be tested experimentally. Together, these findings highlight the usefulness of zebrafish and medaka as comparative models to study the developmental mechanisms of epithalamic asymmetry in vertebrates. PMID:19064351

  15. Cyp19a1 (Aromatase) Expression in the Xenopus Brain at Different Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Coumailleau, P; Kah, O

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 aromatase (P450arom; aromatase) is a microsomal enzyme involved in the production of endogeneous sex steroids by converting testosterone into oestradiol. Aromatase is the product of the cyp19a1 gene and plays a crucial role in the sexual differentiation of the brain and in the regulation of reproductive functions. In the brain of mammals and birds, expression of cyp19a1 has been demonstrated in neuronal populations of the telencephalon and diencephalon. By contrast, a wealth of evidence established that, in teleost fishes, aromatase expression in the brain is restricted to radial glial cells. The present study investigated the precise neuroanatomical distribution of cyp19a1 mRNA during brain development in Xenopus laevis (late embryonic to juvenile stages). For this purpose, we used in situ hybridisation alone or combined with the detection of a proliferative (proliferating cell nuclear antigen), glial (brain lipid binding protein, Vimentin) or neuronal (acetylated tubulin; HuC/D; NeuroβTubulin) markers. We provide evidence that cyp19a1 expression in the brain is initiated from the very early larval stage and remains strongly detected until the juvenile and adult stages. At all stages analysed, we found the highest expression of cyp19a1 in the preoptic area and the hypothalamus compared to the rest of the brain. In these two brain regions, cyp19a1-positive cells were never detected in the ventricular layers. Indeed, no co-labelling could be observed with radial glial (brain lipid binding protein, Vimentin) or dividing progenitors (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) markers. By contrast, cyp19a1-positive cells perfectly matched with the distribution of post-mitotic neurones as shown by the use of specific markers (HuC/D, acetylated tubulin and NeuroβTubulin). These data suggest that, similar to that found in other tetrapods, aromatase in the brain of amphibians is found in post-mitotic neurones and not in radial glia as reported in teleosts. PMID

  16. Structural brain abnormalities in patients with inflammatory illness acquired following exposure to water-damaged buildings: a volumetric MRI study using NeuroQuant®.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Ritchie C; House, Dennis; Ryan, James C

    2014-01-01

    Executive cognitive and neurologic abnormalities are commonly seen in patients with a chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS) acquired following exposure to the interior environment of water-damaged buildings (WDB), but a clear delineation of the physiologic or structural basis for these abnormalities has not been defined. Symptoms of affected patients routinely include headache, difficulty with recent memory, concentration, word finding, numbness, tingling, metallic taste and vertigo. Additionally, persistent proteomic abnormalities in inflammatory parameters that can alter permeability of the blood-brain barrier, such as C4a, TGFB1, MMP9 and VEGF, are notably present in cases of CIRS-WDB compared to controls, suggesting a consequent inflammatory injury to the central nervous system. Findings of gliotic areas in MRI scans in over 45% of CIRS-WDB cases compared to 5% of controls, as well as elevated lactate and depressed ratios of glutamate to glutamine, are regularly seen in MR spectroscopy of cases. This study used the volumetric software program NeuroQuant® (NQ) to determine specific brain structure volumes in consecutive patients (N=17) seen in a medical clinic specializing in inflammatory illness. Each of these patients presented for evaluation of an illness thought to be associated with exposure to WDB, and received an MRI that was evaluated by NQ. When compared to those of a medical control group (N=18), statistically significant differences in brain structure proportions were seen for patients in both hemispheres of two of the eleven brain regions analyzed; atrophy of the caudate nucleus and enlargement of the pallidum. In addition, the left amygdala and right forebrain were also enlarged. These volumetric abnormalities, in conjunction with concurrent abnormalities in inflammatory markers, suggest a model for structural brain injury in "mold illness" based on increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier due to chronic, systemic inflammation

  17. Narrative Medicine: Suggestions for Clinicians to Help Their Clients Construct a New Identity Following Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraas, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Survivors of brain injury from trauma and stroke often lose their sense of identity and face a series of lifelong obstacles that challenge their ability to integrate back into their communities and live meaningful and productive lives. Their stories provide powerful accounts of these challenges, which can inform clinical decision-making. Arguably,…

  18. Long-Term Consequences of Developmental Alcohol Exposure on Brain Structure and Function: Therapeutic Benefits of Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Klintsova, Anna Y.; Hamilton, Gillian F.; Boschen, Karen E.

    2012-01-01

    Developmental alcohol exposure both early in life and during adolescence can have a devastating impact on normal brain structure and functioning, leading to behavioral and cognitive impairments that persist throughout the lifespan. This review discusses human work as well as animal models used to investigate the effect of alcohol exposure at various time points during development, as well as specific behavioral and neuroanatomical deficits caused by alcohol exposure. Further, cellular and molecular mediators contributing to these alcohol-induced changes are examined, such as neurotrophic factors and apoptotic markers. Next, this review seeks to support the use of aerobic exercise as a potential therapeutic intervention for alcohol-related impairments. To date, few interventions, behavioral or pharmacological, have been proven effective in mitigating some alcohol-related deficits. Exercise is a simple therapy that can be used across species and also across socioeconomic status. It has a profoundly positive influence on many measures of learning and neuroplasticity; in particular, those measures damaged by alcohol exposure. This review discusses current evidence that exercise may mitigate damage caused by developmental alcohol exposure and is a promising therapeutic target for future research and intervention strategies. PMID:24961305

  19. Brain asymmetry as a potential biomarker for developmental TCDD intoxication: a dose-response study.

    PubMed Central

    Henshel, D S; Martin, J W; DeWitt, J C

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that in ovo exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and related compounds is correlated with the development of grossly asymmetric brains. This asymmetry is manifested as a difference between the two halves of the forebrain and the tecta. Previously, only wildlife species (heron, cormorant, and eagle) had been shown to manifest this response. In the wildlife studies, the frequency and degree of left-right interhemispheric differences had been correlated with the levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) in eggs from the same nest (heron, cormorant). We studied the effect of in ovo exposure to TCDD on the brain throughout development in a sensitive laboratory model (chicken). Embryos from chicken eggs (Gallus gallus) injected with one of several doses of TCDD or vehicle control were sacrificed after 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, or 20 days of incubation, or incubated to hatch and then sacrificed either within 24 hr or at 3 weeks post-hatch. Measurements of both chicken embryo and hatchling brains indicated that 1) TCDD alone induced the brain asymmetry in developing chickens; 2) this brain asymmetry was similar to that observed in animals exposed in the wild to a mixture of TCDD-related contaminants; 3) there was a dose-related increase in both the frequency and severity of brain asymmetry observed at all ages measured; and 4) the asymmetry was measurable in embryonic brains at an age when the braincase was a thin, flexible layer (embryonic day 9), implying that the effect of TCDD was directly on the developing brain and not indirectly via an effect on the braincase. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 6. A Figure 6. B Figure 6. C Figure 6. D Figure 7. PMID:9294718

  20. Automated data processing of { 1H-decoupled} 13C MR spectra acquired from human brain in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shic, Frederick; Ross, Brian

    2003-06-01

    In clinical 13C infusion studies, broadband excitation of 200 ppm of the human brain yields 13C MR spectra with a time resolution of 2-5 min and generates up to 2000 metabolite peaks over 2 h. We describe a fast, automated, observer-independent technique for processing { 1H-decoupled} 13C spectra. Quantified 13C spectroscopic signals, before and after the administration of [1- 13C]glucose and/or [1- 13C]acetate in human subjects are determined. Stepwise improvements of data processing are illustrated by examples of normal and pathological results. Variation in analysis of individual 13C resonances ranged between 2 and 14%. Using this method it is possible to reliably identify subtle metabolic effects of brain disease including Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy.

  1. Fully automated rodent brain MR image processing pipeline on a Midas server: from acquired images to region-based statistics

    PubMed Central

    Budin, Francois; Hoogstoel, Marion; Reynolds, Patrick; Grauer, Michael; O'Leary-Moore, Shonagh K.; Oguz, Ipek

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of rodent brains enables study of the development and the integrity of the brain under certain conditions (alcohol, drugs etc.). However, these images are difficult to analyze for biomedical researchers with limited image processing experience. In this paper we present an image processing pipeline running on a Midas server, a web-based data storage system. It is composed of the following steps: rigid registration, skull-stripping, average computation, average parcellation, parcellation propagation to individual subjects, and computation of region-based statistics on each image. The pipeline is easy to configure and requires very little image processing knowledge. We present results obtained by processing a data set using this pipeline and demonstrate how this pipeline can be used to find differences between populations. PMID:23964234

  2. Fully automated rodent brain MR image processing pipeline on a Midas server: from acquired images to region-based statistics.

    PubMed

    Budin, Francois; Hoogstoel, Marion; Reynolds, Patrick; Grauer, Michael; O'Leary-Moore, Shonagh K; Oguz, Ipek

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of rodent brains enables study of the development and the integrity of the brain under certain conditions (alcohol, drugs etc.). However, these images are difficult to analyze for biomedical researchers with limited image processing experience. In this paper we present an image processing pipeline running on a Midas server, a web-based data storage system. It is composed of the following steps: rigid registration, skull-stripping, average computation, average parcellation, parcellation propagation to individual subjects, and computation of region-based statistics on each image. The pipeline is easy to configure and requires very little image processing knowledge. We present results obtained by processing a data set using this pipeline and demonstrate how this pipeline can be used to find differences between populations. PMID:23964234

  3. Mathematically Gifted Children: Developmental Brain Characteristics and Their Prognosis for Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Boyle, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    Research in cognitive neuroscience suggests that the brains of mathematically gifted children are quantitatively and qualitatively different from those of average math ability. Math-gifted children exhibit signs of enhanced right-hemisphere development, and when engaged in the thinking process, tend to rely on mental imagery. They further manifest…

  4. Hard Wired for Risk: Neurological Science, "the Adolescent Brain" and Developmental Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bessant, Judith

    2008-01-01

    This article considers claims now being made about "the adolescent brain". It points out why some of those claims are problematic for methodological, social and philosophical reasons. Attention is given to how some "youth experts" and others have used this research by relying on and reinforcing prejudicial stereotypes about young people as…

  5. Emotion Regulation in the Brain: Conceptual Issues and Directions for Developmental Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Marc D.; Stieben, Jim

    2004-01-01

    Emotion regulation cannot be temporally distinguished from emotion in the brain, but activation patterns in prefrontal cortex appear to mediate cognitive control during emotion episodes. Frontal event-related potentials (ERPs) can tap cognitive control hypothetically mediated by the anterior cingulate cortex, and developmentalists have used these…

  6. Brain Connectivity in Non-Reading Impaired Children and Children Diagnosed with Developmental Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odegard, Timothy N.; Farris, Emily A.; Ring, Jeremiah; McColl, Roderick; Black, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) was used to investigate the relationship between white matter and reading abilities in reading impaired and non-reading impaired children. Seventeen children (7 non-reading impaired, 10 reading impaired) participated in this study. DTI was performed with 2 mm isotropic resolution to cover the entire brain along 30…

  7. Functional cliques in the amygdala and related brain networks driven by fear assessment acquired during movie viewing.

    PubMed

    Kinreich, Sivan; Intrator, Nathan; Hendler, Talma

    2011-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges involved in studying the brain mechanisms of fear is capturing the individual's unique instantaneous experience. Brain imaging studies to date commonly sacrifice valuable information regarding the individual real-time conscious experience, especially when focusing on elucidating the amygdala's activity. Here, we assumed that by using a minimally intrusive cue along with applying a robust clustering approach to probe the amygdala, it would be possible to rate fear in real time and to derive the related network of activation. During functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning, healthy volunteers viewed two excerpts from horror movies and were periodically auditory cued to rate their instantaneous experience of "I'm scared." Using graph theory and community mathematical concepts, data-driven clustering of the fear-related functional cliques in the amygdala was performed guided by the individually marked periods of heightened fear. Individually tailored functions derived from these amygdala activation cliques were subsequently applied as general linear model predictors to a whole-brain analysis to reveal the correlated networks. Our results suggest that by using a localized robust clustering approach, it is possible to probe activation in the right dorsal amygdala that is directly related to individual real-time emotional experience. Moreover, this fear-evoked amygdala revealed two opposing networks of co-activation and co-deactivation, which correspond to vigilance and rest-related circuits, respectively. PMID:22432905

  8. Early developmental gene enhancers affect subcortical volumes in the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Becker, Martin; Guadalupe, Tulio; Franke, Barbara; Hibar, Derrek P; Renteria, Miguel E; Stein, Jason L; Thompson, Paul M; Francks, Clyde; Vernes, Sonja C; Fisher, Simon E

    2016-05-01

    Genome-wide association screens aim to identify common genetic variants contributing to the phenotypic variability of complex traits, such as human height or brain morphology. The identified genetic variants are mostly within noncoding genomic regions and the biology of the genotype-phenotype association typically remains unclear. In this article, we propose a complementary targeted strategy to reveal the genetic underpinnings of variability in subcortical brain volumes, by specifically selecting genomic loci that are experimentally validated forebrain enhancers, active in early embryonic development. We hypothesized that genetic variation within these enhancers may affect the development and ultimately the structure of subcortical brain regions in adults. We tested whether variants in forebrain enhancer regions showed an overall enrichment of association with volumetric variation in subcortical structures of >13,000 healthy adults. We observed significant enrichment of genomic loci that affect the volume of the hippocampus within forebrain enhancers (empirical P = 0.0015), a finding which robustly passed the adjusted threshold for testing of multiple brain phenotypes (cutoff of P < 0.0083 at an alpha of 0.05). In analyses of individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we identified an association upstream of the ID2 gene with rs7588305 and variation in hippocampal volume. This SNP-based association survived multiple-testing correction for the number of SNPs analyzed but not for the number of subcortical structures. Targeting known regulatory regions offers a way to understand the underlying biology that connects genotypes to phenotypes, particularly in the context of neuroimaging genetics. This biology-driven approach generates testable hypotheses regarding the functional biology of identified associations. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1788-1800, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26890892

  9. Developmental changes in brain activation involved in the production of novel speech sounds in children.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Thyreau, Benjamin; Asano, Michiko; Asano, Kohei; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Jeong, Hyeonjeong; Sugiura, Motoaki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-08-01

    Older children are more successful at producing unfamiliar, non-native speech sounds than younger children during the initial stages of learning. To reveal the neuronal underpinning of the age-related increase in the accuracy of non-native speech production, we examined the developmental changes in activation involved in the production of novel speech sounds using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Healthy right-handed children (aged 6-18 years) were scanned while performing an overt repetition task and a perceptual task involving aurally presented non-native and native syllables. Productions of non-native speech sounds were recorded and evaluated by native speakers. The mouth regions in the bilateral primary sensorimotor areas were activated more significantly during the repetition task relative to the perceptual task. The hemodynamic response in the left inferior frontal gyrus pars opercularis (IFG pOp) specific to non-native speech sound production (defined by prior hypothesis) increased with age. Additionally, the accuracy of non-native speech sound production increased with age. These results provide the first evidence of developmental changes in the neural processes underlying the production of novel speech sounds. Our data further suggest that the recruitment of the left IFG pOp during the production of novel speech sounds was possibly enhanced due to the maturation of the neuronal circuits needed for speech motor planning. This, in turn, would lead to improvement in the ability to immediately imitate non-native speech. PMID:24585739

  10. Developmental aspects of the intracerebral microvasculature and perivascular spaces: insights into brain response to late-life diseases.

    PubMed

    Marín-Padilla, Miguel; Knopman, David S

    2011-12-01

    The development of the microvasculature of the human cerebral cortex offers insight into the response of the cerebral cortex to later-life brain injury. We describe the 3 basic and distinct components of the developmental anatomy of the cerebral cortical microvascular system. The first compartment is meningeal and, therefore, extracerebral. In addition to the major venous sinuses, arachnoidal arteries, and veins, the pial anastomotic capillary plexus that covers the surface of the developing and adult cerebral cortex represents the source of thepenetrating vessels that become the second component, the intracerebral extrinsic microvascular compartment. During embryogenesis, sprouting vascular elements from pial capillaries pierce the brain's external glial limiting membrane and penetrate the cortex. These vessels, which eventually differentiate into arterioles and venules, are separated from the cortical tissue by the extravascular Virchow-Robin compartment (V-RC) formed between the internal vascular and the external glial basal laminae. The V-RC remains open to the meningeal interstitial spaces and outside the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and acts asa prelymphatic drainage system for removal of substances that cannot be transported into the blood or catabolized intracellularly. The third element is the dense intracerebralintrinsic microvascular compartment. Intracerebral capillary vessels sprout from the perforating vessels, penetrate through the Virchow-Robin glial membrane, and enter the neuropil. Intracerebral capillaries lack smooth muscle and a V-RC and consist only of endothelial cells separated from the intracerebral space by a basal lamina. Their role as the physiological BBB is the exchange of oxygen, glucose, and small molecules. This developmental perspective highlights 3 principles: (a) the V-RC is intimately related to the cortical penetrating arterioles and venules and represents an inefficient protolymphatic system that lacks the anatomic and

  11. Global Developmental Gene Expression and Pathway Analysis of Normal Brain Development and Mouse Models of Human Neuronal Migration Defects

    PubMed Central

    Pramparo, Tiziano; Libiger, Ondrej; Jain, Sonia; Li, Hong; Youn, Yong Ha; Hirotsune, Shinji; Schork, Nicholas J.; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Heterozygous LIS1 mutations are the most common cause of human lissencephaly, a human neuronal migration defect, and DCX mutations are the most common cause of X-linked lissencephaly. LIS1 is part of a protein complex including NDEL1 and 14-3-3ε that regulates dynein motor function and microtubule dynamics, while DCX stabilizes microtubules and cooperates with LIS1 during neuronal migration and neurogenesis. Targeted gene mutations of Lis1, Dcx, Ywhae (coding for 14-3-3ε), and Ndel1 lead to neuronal migration defects in mouse and provide models of human lissencephaly, as well as aid the study of related neuro-developmental diseases. Here we investigated the developing brain of these four mutants and wild-type mice using expression microarrays, bioinformatic analyses, and in vivo/in vitro experiments to address whether mutations in different members of the LIS1 neuronal migration complex lead to similar and/or distinct global gene expression alterations. Consistent with the overall successful development of the mutant brains, unsupervised clustering and co-expression analysis suggested that cell cycle and synaptogenesis genes are similarly expressed and co-regulated in WT and mutant brains in a time-dependent fashion. By contrast, focused co-expression analysis in the Lis1 and Ndel1 mutants uncovered substantial differences in the correlation among pathways. Differential expression analysis revealed that cell cycle, cell adhesion, and cytoskeleton organization pathways are commonly altered in all mutants, while synaptogenesis, cell morphology, and inflammation/immune response are specifically altered in one or more mutants. We found several commonly dysregulated genes located within pathogenic deletion/duplication regions, which represent novel candidates of human mental retardation and neurocognitive disabilities. Our analysis suggests that gene expression and pathway analysis in mouse models of a similar disorder or within a common pathway can be used to define

  12. Inflammatory-Induced Hibernation in the Fetus: Priming of Fetal Sheep Metabolism Correlates with Developmental Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Matthias; Enot, David P.; Hodson, Mark P.; Igwe, Emeka I.; Deigner, Hans-Peter; Dean, Justin; Bolouri, Hayde; Hagberg, Henrik; Mallard, Carina

    2011-01-01

    Prenatal inflammation is considered an important factor contributing to preterm birth and neonatal mortality and morbidity. The impact of prenatal inflammation on fetal bioenergetic status and the correlation of specific metabolites to inflammatory-induced developmental brain injury are unknown. We used a global metabolomics approach to examine plasma metabolites differentially regulated by intrauterine inflammation. Preterm-equivalent sheep fetuses were randomized to i.v. bolus infusion of either saline-vehicle or LPS. Blood samples were collected at baseline 2 h, 6 h and daily up to 10 days for metabolite quantification. Animals were killed at 10 days after LPS injection, and brain injury was assessed by histopathology. We detected both acute and delayed effects of LPS on fetal metabolism, with a long-term down-regulation of fetal energy metabolism. Within the first 3 days after LPS, 121 metabolites were up-regulated or down-regulated. A transient phase (4–6 days), in which metabolite levels recovered to baseline, was followed by a second phase marked by an opposing down-regulation of energy metabolites, increased pO2 and increased markers of inflammation and ADMA. The characteristics of the metabolite response to LPS in these two phases, defined as 2 h to 2 days and at 6–9 days, respectively, were strongly correlated with white and grey matter volumes at 10 days recovery. Based on these results we propose a novel concept of inflammatory-induced hibernation of the fetus. Inflammatory priming of fetal metabolism correlated with measures of brain injury, suggesting potential for future biomarker research and the identification of therapeutic targets. PMID:22242129

  13. Developmental but not adult cannabinoid treatments persistently alter axonal and dendritic morphology within brain regions important for zebra finch vocal learning

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Marcoita T.; Soderstrom, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Prior work shows developmental cannabinoid exposure alters zebra finch vocal development in a manner associated with altered CNS physiology, including changes in patterns of CB1 receptor immunoreactivity, endocannabinoid concentrations and dendritic spine densities. These results raise questions about the selectivity of developmental cannabinoid effects: are they a consequence of a generalized developmental disruption, or are effects produced through more selective and distinct interactions with biochemical pathways that control receptor, endogenous ligand and dendritic spine dynamics? To begin to address this question we have examined effects of developmental cannabinoid exposure on the pattern and density of expression of proteins critical to dendritic (MAP2) and axonal (Nf-200) structure to determine the extent to which dendritic vs. axonal neuronal morphology may be altered. Results demonstrate developmental, but not adult cannabinoid treatments produce generalized changes in expression of both dendritic and axonal cytoskeletal proteins within brain regions and cells known to express CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Results clearly demonstrate that cannabinoid exposure during a period of sensorimotor development, but not adulthood, produce profound effects upon both dendritic and axonal morphology that persist through at least early adulthood. These findings suggest an ability of exogenous cannabinoids to alter general processes responsible for normal brain development. Results also further implicate the importance of endocannabinoid signaling to peri-pubertal periods of adolescence, and underscore potential consequences of cannabinoid abuse during periods of late-postnatal CNS development. PMID:24594017

  14. Internally and externally generated emotions in people with acquired brain injury: preservation of emotional experience after right hemisphere lesions

    PubMed Central

    Salas Riquelme, Christian E.; Radovic, Darinka; Castro, Osvaldo; Turnbull, Oliver H.

    2015-01-01

    The study of emotional changes after brain injury has contributed enormously to the understanding of the neural basis of emotion. However, little attention has been placed on the methods used to elicit emotional responses in people with brain damage. Of particular interest are subjects with right hemisphere [RH] cortical lesions, who have been described as presenting impairment in emotional processing. In this article, an internal and external mood induction procedure [MIP] was used to trigger positive and negative emotions, in a sample of 10 participants with RH damage, and 15 healthy controls. Emotional experience was registered by using a self-report questionnaire. As observed in previous studies, internal and external MIPs were equally effective in eliciting the target emotion, but the internal procedure generated higher levels of intensity. Remarkably, participants with RH lesions were equally able to experience both positive and negative affect. The results are discussed in relation to the role of the RH in the capacity to experience negative emotions. PMID:25762951

  15. Internally and externally generated emotions in people with acquired brain injury: preservation of emotional experience after right hemisphere lesions.

    PubMed

    Salas Riquelme, Christian E; Radovic, Darinka; Castro, Osvaldo; Turnbull, Oliver H

    2015-01-01

    The study of emotional changes after brain injury has contributed enormously to the understanding of the neural basis of emotion. However, little attention has been placed on the methods used to elicit emotional responses in people with brain damage. Of particular interest are subjects with right hemisphere [RH] cortical lesions, who have been described as presenting impairment in emotional processing. In this article, an internal and external mood induction procedure [MIP] was used to trigger positive and negative emotions, in a sample of 10 participants with RH damage, and 15 healthy controls. Emotional experience was registered by using a self-report questionnaire. As observed in previous studies, internal and external MIPs were equally effective in eliciting the target emotion, but the internal procedure generated higher levels of intensity. Remarkably, participants with RH lesions were equally able to experience both positive and negative affect. The results are discussed in relation to the role of the RH in the capacity to experience negative emotions. PMID:25762951

  16. Unusual development of polyoma virus in the brains of two patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Scaravilli, F; Ellis, D S; Tovey, G; Harcourt-Webster, J N; Guiloff, R J; Sinclair, E

    1989-01-01

    Two HIV-positive male patients presented with a variety of symptoms including hemiparesis, unsteadiness, progressive loss of vision and poor memory. There were multiple non-enhancing lesions shown by CT scan in the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres. Specimens obtained by burr-hole biopsy showed the features of progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML) in both cases. Electron microscopy demonstrated round and rod shaped particles of papovavirus in the nuclei and cytoplasm of oligodendrocytes and in processes of astrocytes where abnormal and florid modes of viral replication were seen. Additional features observed were viral particles suggestive of an enterovirus in Case 1 and, in both specimens, massive membrane proliferation within both nuclei and cytoplasm of infected cells together with the presence of tubuloreticular structures (TRS) in the cytoplasm of endothelial cells. At post-mortem, the brain of patient 2 showed PML and HIV encephalitis. The presence of HIV was confirmed by immunohistochemical methods. We suggest that in AIDS patients the abnormality of the immune system induced by HIV causes abnormal replication patterns of papovavirus in the brain. In addition, these cases confirm the frequent occurrence in AIDS patients of TRS, now considered to be a marker for HIV. PMID:2555730

  17. Gliotransmitter Release from Astrocytes: Functional, Developmental, and Pathological Implications in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Kazuki; Kamiya, Taichi; Tsuboi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes comprise a large population of cells in the brain and are important partners to neighboring neurons, vascular cells, and other glial cells. Astrocytes not only form a scaffold for other cells, but also extend foot processes around the capillaries to maintain the blood–brain barrier. Thus, environmental chemicals that exist in the blood stream could have potentially harmful effects on the physiological function of astrocytes. Although astrocytes are not electrically excitable, they have been shown to function as active participants in the development of neural circuits and synaptic activity. Astrocytes respond to neurotransmitters and contribute to synaptic information processing by releasing chemical transmitters called “gliotransmitters.” State-of-the-art optical imaging techniques enable us to clarify how neurotransmitters elicit the release of various gliotransmitters, including glutamate, D-serine, and ATP. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that the disruption of gliotransmission results in neuronal dysfunction and abnormal behaviors in animal models. In this review, we focus on the latest technical approaches to clarify the molecular mechanisms of gliotransmitter exocytosis, and discuss the possibility that exposure to environmental chemicals could alter gliotransmission and cause neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:26793048

  18. Visual control of manual actions: brain mechanisms in typical development and developmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Braddick, Oliver; Atkinson, Janette

    2013-11-01

    Some key stages in the development of manual actions have been discussed in this supplement based on the idea of the dorsal cortical stream as the pathway for translating visual information into action control. We argue that visual information, transmitted through specialized visuomotor dorsal-stream modules, is required in the control of manual actions for selecting and attending to the target object of the action, translating visual spatial information into motor programmes and planning a coordinated sequence of actions so as to reach an optimal end-state. In typical development, we illustrate dorsal-stream processing through results on the use of stereoscopic information to guide infants' reaches, and changes in target selection and detailed kinematics of reaches depending on age, object size, and reaching in darkness (when dorsal-stream information rapidly decays). We hypothesize 'dorsal-stream vulnerability' as a widespread feature of neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism, Williams syndrome, and children born very preterm. Such deficits, identified as abnormal visuomanual actions, are seen in bimanual coordination, visual guidance of action in the 'postbox' task, and failures in motor planning for end-state comfort. We discuss the possible application of these approaches to a wider range of disorders including developmental coordination disorder. PMID:24237273

  19. Large-Volume Reconstruction of Brain Tissue from High-Resolution Serial Section Images Acquired by SEM-Based Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kuwajima, Masaaki; Mendenhall, John M.; Harris, Kristen M.

    2013-01-01

    With recent improvements in instrumentation and computational tools, serial section electron microscopy has become increasingly straightforward. A new method for imaging ultrathin serial sections is developed based on a field emission scanning electron microscope fitted with a transmitted electron detector. This method is capable of automatically acquiring high-resolution serial images with a large field size and very little optical and physical distortions. In this chapter, we describe the procedures leading to the generation and analyses of a large-volume stack of high-resolution images (64 μm × 64 μm × 10 μm, or larger, at 2 nm pixel size), including how to obtain large-area serial sections of uniform thickness from well-preserved brain tissue that is rapidly perfusion-fixed with mixed aldehydes, processed with a microwave-enhanced method, and embedded into epoxy resin. PMID:23086880

  20. Exploration of use of SenseCam to support autobiographical memory retrieval within a cognitive-behavioural therapeutic intervention following acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Brindley, Rob; Bateman, Andrew; Gracey, Fergus

    2011-10-01

    Delivering effective psychotherapy to address the significant emotional consequences of acquired brain injury (ABI) is challenged by the presence of acquired cognitive impairments, especially retrieval of detailed autobiographical memories of emotional trigger events. Initial studies using a wearable camera (SenseCam) suggest long-term improvements in autobiographical retrieval of recorded events. In this study a single-case experimental design was implemented to explore the use of SenseCam as a memory aid for a man with a specific anxiety disorder and memory and executive difficulties following ABI. We predicted that SenseCam supported rehearsal of memories of events that trigger high levels of anxiety would yield improved retrieval of both factual detail and internal state information (thoughts and feelings) compared with a conventional psychotherapy aid (automatic thought record sheets, ATRs) and no strategy. The findings indicated SenseCam supported retrieval of anxiety trigger events was superior to ATRs or no strategy in terms of both detail and internal state information, with 94% of the information being recalled in the SenseCam condition, compared to 39% for the "no strategy" and 22% for the ATR conditions. It is concluded that SenseCam may be of use as a compensatory aid in psychotherapies relying on retrieval of emotionally salient trigger events. PMID:20635299

  1. Developmental Changes in Brain Function Underlying Inhibitory Control in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Aarthi; Garver, Krista; O’Hearn, Kirsten; Nawarawong, Natalie; Liu, Ran; Minshew, Nancy; Sweeney, John; Luna, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    The development of inhibitory control—the ability to suppress inappropriate actions in order to make goal-directed responses—is often impaired in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In the present study, we examined whether the impairments in inhibitory control evident in ASD reflect—in part—differences in the development of the neural substrates of inhibitory control from adolescence into adulthood. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study on the anti-saccade task, a probe of inhibitory control, in high-functioning adolescents and adults with ASD compared to a matched group of typically developing (TD) individuals. The ASD group did not show the age-related improvements in behavioral performance from adolescence to adulthood evident in the typical group, consistent with previous behavioral work. The fMRI results indicated that much of the circuitry recruited by the ASD group was similar to the TD group. However, the ASD group demonstrated some unique patterns, including: (a) a failure to recruit the frontal eye field during response preparation in adolescence but comparable recruitment in adulthood; (b) greater recruitment of putamen in adolescence and precuneus in adolescence and adulthood than the TD group; and (c) decreased recruitment in the inferior parietal lobule relative to TD groups. Taken together, these results suggest that brain circuitry underlying inhibitory control develops differently from adolescence to adulthood in ASD. Specifically, there may be relative underdevelopment of brain processes underlying inhibitory control in ASD, which may lead to engagement of subcortical compensatory processes. PMID:25382787

  2. Brain hyper-connectivity and operation-specific deficits during arithmetic problem solving in children with developmental dyscalculia.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg-Lee, Miriam; Ashkenazi, Sarit; Chen, Tianwen; Young, Christina B; Geary, David C; Menon, Vinod

    2015-05-01

    Developmental dyscalculia (DD) is marked by specific deficits in processing numerical and mathematical information despite normal intelligence (IQ) and reading ability. We examined how brain circuits used by young children with DD to solve simple addition and subtraction problems differ from those used by typically developing (TD) children who were matched on age, IQ, reading ability, and working memory. Children with DD were slower and less accurate during problem solving than TD children, and were especially impaired on their ability to solve subtraction problems. Children with DD showed significantly greater activity in multiple parietal, occipito-temporal and prefrontal cortex regions while solving addition and subtraction problems. Despite poorer performance during subtraction, children with DD showed greater activity in multiple intra-parietal sulcus (IPS) and superior parietal lobule subdivisions in the dorsal posterior parietal cortex as well as fusiform gyrus in the ventral occipito-temporal cortex. Critically, effective connectivity analyses revealed hyper-connectivity, rather than reduced connectivity, between the IPS and multiple brain systems including the lateral fronto-parietal and default mode networks in children with DD during both addition and subtraction. These findings suggest the IPS and its functional circuits are a major locus of dysfunction during both addition and subtraction problem solving in DD, and that inappropriate task modulation and hyper-connectivity, rather than under-engagement and under-connectivity, are the neural mechanisms underlying problem solving difficulties in children with DD. We discuss our findings in the broader context of multiple levels of analysis and performance issues inherent in neuroimaging studies of typical and atypical development. PMID:25098903

  3. Developmental logics: Brain science, child welfare, and the ethics of engagement in Japan.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, Kathryn E

    2015-10-01

    This article explores the unintended consequences of the ways scholars and activists take up the science of child development to critique the Japanese child welfare system. Since World War II, Japan has depended on a system of child welfare institutions (baby homes and children's homes) to care for state wards. Opponents of institutional care advocate instead for family foster care and adoption, and cite international research on the developmental harms of institutionalizing newborns and young children during the "critical period" of the first few years. The "critical period" is understood as the time during which the caregiving a child receives shapes neurological development and later capacity to build interpersonal relationships. These discourses appear to press compellingly for system reform, the proof resting on seemingly objective knowledge about child development. However, scientific evidence of harm is often mobilized in tandem with arguments that the welfare system is rooted in Japanese culture, suggesting durability and resistance to change. Further, reform efforts that use universalizing child science as "proof" of the need for change are prone to slip into deterministic language that pathologizes the experiences of people who grew up in the system. This article explores the reasons why deterministic models of child development, rather than more open-ended models like neuroplasticity, dominate activist rhetorics. It proposes a concept, "ethics of engagement," to advocate for attention to multiple scales and domains through which interpersonal ties are experienced and embodied over time. Finally, it suggests the possibility of child welfare reform movements that take seriously the need for caring and transformative relationships throughout life, beyond the first "critical years," that do not require deterministic logics of permanent delay or damage. PMID:25530189

  4. Neonatal ventral hippocampus lesion changes nuclear restricted protein/brain (NRP/B) expression in hippocampus, cortex and striatum in developmental periods of rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Y; Yang, J; Lei, Y; Zhang, Z; Dai, Z; Chen, X; Lui, F; Zhang, J; Ling, S

    2016-04-01

    Schizophrenia is conceptualized as a neurodevelopmental disorder in which developmental alterations in immature brain systems are not clear. Rats with neonatal ventral hippocampal lesions (NVHL) can exhibit schizophrenia-like behaviors, and these rats have been widely used to study the developmental mechanisms of schizophrenia. The nuclear restricted protein/brain (NRP/B) is a nuclear matrix protein that is critical for the normal development of the neuronal system. This study assessed the effect of NVHL induced by the administration of ibotenic acid on the protein expression of NRP/B in the hippocampus, cortex and striatum in pre- and post-pubertal rats. The expressions of NeuN in various developmental periods were assessed accordingly. Sprague-Dawley rat pups were administered ibotenic acid at postnatal day (PD) 7. Western blotting and an immunofluorescence staining analysis showed that the expression of NRP/B was significantly decreased in the hippocampus, cortex and striatum of the NVHL rats at PD14, 28 and 42. The expressions of NeuN were decreased accordingly. In vitro experiment showed the NRP/B knockdown can decrease the Tuj1 expression in cultured cortical neurons. The data suggest that NVHL induces a change in NRP/B expression that affects neurons in the developmental period. PMID:26812035

  5. Care of Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kyle Bradford; Wilson, Benjamin; Weedon, Dean; Bilder, Deborah

    2015-12-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) manifest in various forms and severities, and patients with TBIs can have multiple physical and psychological comorbidities. The physician should be prepared to assess effects of the injury and associated comorbidities, and provide needed social support. Common comorbidities include cognitive changes; epilepsy; chronic pain; headache; sleep disorders; neuroendocrine disorders; dizziness and balance issues; substance abuse; depression and anxiety; dementia; and behavioral disturbances, such as aggression. Early severity and cognitive assessment after TBI is key. For patients with mild TBIs, short-term management focuses on cognitive rest, symptom management, and gradual return to regular activities. Short-term management of patients with moderate to severe TBI often requires intensive care unit admission, early psychological consultation, and use of mannitol and probiotics. Long-term care includes monitoring and managing of the physical, behavioral, emotional, and psychological comorbidities that commonly occur in patients with TBIs. Assisting patients in accessing community and government resources can be crucial for improving their independence and quality of life. PMID:26669213

  6. Analyzing collaboration networks and developmental patterns of nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD) for brain cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Ma, Jing; Kwon, Seokbeom; Zhu, Donghua

    2015-01-01

    Summary The rapid development of new and emerging science & technologies (NESTs) brings unprecedented challenges, but also opportunities. In this paper, we use bibliometric and social network analyses, at country, institution, and individual levels, to explore the patterns of scientific networking for a key nano area – nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD). NEDD has successfully been used clinically to modulate drug release and to target particular diseased tissues. The data for this research come from a global compilation of research publication information on NEDD directed at brain cancer. We derive a family of indicators that address multiple facets of research collaboration and knowledge transfer patterns. Results show that: (1) international cooperation is increasing, but networking characteristics change over time; (2) highly productive institutions also lead in influence, as measured by citation to their work, with American institutes leading; (3) research collaboration is dominated by local relationships, with interesting information available from authorship patterns that go well beyond journal impact factors. Results offer useful technical intelligence to help researchers identify potential collaborators and to help inform R&D management and science & innovation policy for such nanotechnologies. PMID:26425417

  7. Analyzing collaboration networks and developmental patterns of nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD) for brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Ma, Jing; Porter, Alan L; Kwon, Seokbeom; Zhu, Donghua

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of new and emerging science & technologies (NESTs) brings unprecedented challenges, but also opportunities. In this paper, we use bibliometric and social network analyses, at country, institution, and individual levels, to explore the patterns of scientific networking for a key nano area - nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD). NEDD has successfully been used clinically to modulate drug release and to target particular diseased tissues. The data for this research come from a global compilation of research publication information on NEDD directed at brain cancer. We derive a family of indicators that address multiple facets of research collaboration and knowledge transfer patterns. Results show that: (1) international cooperation is increasing, but networking characteristics change over time; (2) highly productive institutions also lead in influence, as measured by citation to their work, with American institutes leading; (3) research collaboration is dominated by local relationships, with interesting information available from authorship patterns that go well beyond journal impact factors. Results offer useful technical intelligence to help researchers identify potential collaborators and to help inform R&D management and science & innovation policy for such nanotechnologies. PMID:26425417

  8. Developmental changes in brain function underlying the influence of reward processing on inhibitory control

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Aarthi; Geier, Charles F; Ordaz, Sarah J; Teslovich, Theresa; Luna, Beatriz

    2011-01-01

    Adolescence is a period marked by changes in motivational and cognitive brain systems. However, the development of the interactions between reward and cognitive control processing are just beginning to be understood. Using event-related functional neuroimaging and an incentive modulated antisaccade task, we compared blood-oxygen level dependent activity underlying motivated response inhibition in children, adolescents, and adults. Behaviorally, children and adolescents performed significantly worse than adults during neutral trials. However, children and adolescents showed significant performance increases during reward trials. Adults showed no performance changes across conditions. fMRI results demonstrated that all groups recruited a similar circuitry to support task performance, including regions typically associated with rewards (striatum and orbital frontal cortex), and regions known to be involved in inhibitory control (putative frontal and supplementary eye fields, and posterior parietal cortex, and prefrontal loci). During rewarded trials adolescents showed increased activity in striatal regions, while adults demonstrated heightened activation in the OFC relative to children and adolescents. Children showed greater reliance on prefrontal executive regions that may be related to increased effort inhibiting responses. Overall, these results indicate that response inhibition is enhanced with reward contingencies over development. Adolescents’ heightened response in striatal regions may be one factor contributing to reward-biased decision making and perhaps risk taking behavior. PMID:21966352

  9. Developmental aspects of sleep slow waves: linking sleep, brain maturation and behavior.

    PubMed

    Ringli, Maya; Huber, Reto

    2011-01-01

    Sleep slow waves are the major electrophysiological features of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Although there is growing understanding of where slow waves originate and how they are generated during sleep, the function of slow waves is still largely unclear. A recently proposed hypothesis relates slow waves to the homeostatic regulation of synaptic plasticity. While several studies confirm a correlation between experimentally triggered synaptic changes and slow-wave activity (SWA), little is known about its association to synaptic changes occurring during cortical maturation. Interestingly, slow waves undergo remarkable changes during development that parallel the time course of cortical maturation. In a recent cross-sectional study including children and adolescents, the topographical distribution of SWA was analyzed with high-density electroencephalography. The results showed age-dependent differences in SWA topography: SWA was highest over posterior regions during early childhood and then shifted over central derivations to the frontal cortex in late adolescence. This trajectory of SWA topography matches the course of cortical gray maturation. In this chapter, the major changes in slow waves during development are highlighted and linked to cortical maturation and behavior. Interestingly, synaptic density and slow-wave amplitude increase during childhood are highest shortly before puberty, decline thereafter during adolescence, reaching overall stable levels during adulthood. The question arises whether SWA is merely reflecting cortical changes or if it plays an active role in brain maturation. We thereby propose a model, by which sleep slow waves may contribute to cortical maturation. We hypothesize that while there is a balance between synaptic strengthening and synaptic downscaling in adults, the balance of strengthening/formation and weakening/elimination is tilted during development. PMID:21854956

  10. Abnormal brain function of the rat neonate in a prenatal 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-induced developmental disorder model.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tetsuo; Kuwagata, Makiko; Muneoka, Katsumasa; Wakai, Chizu; Senuma, Mika; Kubo, Hiroko; Shioda, Seiji

    2012-10-01

    Neonatal brain function was investigated in a prenatal BrdU-induced developmental disorder model, which has been reported to exhibit behavioral abnormalities such as locomotor hyperactivity, impaired learning and memory, and lower anxiety in offspring. After 1h home cage deprivation we observed an increase in the number of c-Fos (neuronal activity marker) immunoreactive cells in several brain regions of the olfactory and stress-related areas in normal neonates at 11 days. Next, pregnant rats were exposed to 50mg/kg of BrdU from gestation days 9-15, and their offspring at 11 days were home-cage deprived. Compared to vehicle control, the number of c-Fos immunoreactive cells in BrdU group was found to be decreased in the piriform cortex and locus coeruleus, which are known to play an important role in neonatal learning and memory. We also analyzed Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient of the number of c-Fos immunoreactive cells, focusing on the piriform cortex and locus coeruleus versus numerous other brain areas (11 areas including amygdala). Numerous significant correlations were observed in the vehicle control group, however, correlations of the locus coeruleus disappeared in the BrdU group. By observing c-Fos immunoreactivity after home cage deprivation our study uncovers abnormal brain functions as early as postnatal day 11 in this disorder model. Based on these results, we propose a new histological approach for functional characterization of developmental disorder models. PMID:22609825

  11. EXTENDING THE ASSESSMENT OF TECHNOLOGY-AIDED PROGRAMS TO SUPPORT LEISURE AND COMMUNICATION IN PEOPLE WITH ACQUIRED BRAIN INJURY AND EXTENSIVE MULTIPLE DISABILITIES.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Buonocunto, Francesca; D'amico, Fiora; Quaranta, Sara; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; Colonna, Fabio

    2015-10-01

    Intervention programs for people with acquired brain injury and extensive motor and communication impairment need to be diversified according to their characteristics and environment. These two studies assessed two technology-aided programs for supporting leisure (i.e., access to songs and videos) and communication (i.e., expressing needs and feelings and making requests) in six of those people. The three people participating in Study 1 did not possess speech but were able to understand spoken and written sentences. Their program presented leisure and communication options through written phrases appearing on the computer screen. The three people participating in Study 2 did not possess any speech and were unable to understand spoken or written language. Their program presented leisure and communication options through pictorial images. All participants relied on a simple microswitch response to enter the options and activate songs, videos, and communication messages. The data showed that the participants of both studies learned to use the program available to them and to engage in leisure and communication independently. The importance of using programs adapted to the participants and their environment was discussed. PMID:26445152

  12. Bridging the gap between theory and practice: dynamic systems theory as a framework for understanding and promoting recovery of function in children and youth with acquired brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Levac, Danielle; DeMatteo, Carol

    2009-11-01

    A theoretical framework can help physiotherapists understand and promote recovery of function in children and youth with acquired brain injuries (ABI). Physiotherapy interventions for this population have traditionally been based in hierarchical-maturational theories of motor development emphasizing the role of the central nervous system (CNS) in controlling motor behaviour. In contrast, Dynamic Systems Theory (DST) views movement as resulting from the interaction of many subsystems within the individual, features of the functional task to be accomplished, and the environmental context in which the movement takes place. DST is now a predominant theoretical framework in pediatric physiotherapy. The purpose of this article is to describe how DST can be used to understand and promote recovery of function after pediatric ABI. A DST-based approach for children and youth with ABI does not treat the impaired CNS in isolation but rather emphasizes the role of all subsystems, including the family and the environment, in influencing recovery. The emphasis is on exploration, problem solving, and practice of functional tasks. A case scenario provides practical recommendations for the use of DST to inform physiotherapy interventions and clinical decision making in the acute phase of recovery from ABI. Future research is required to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions based in this theoretical framework. PMID:19925262

  13. Effects of a multifaceted treatment program for executive dysfunction after acquired brain injury on indications of executive functioning in daily life.

    PubMed

    Spikman, Jacoba M; Boelen, Danielle H E; Lamberts, Kirsten F; Brouwer, Wiebo H; Fasotti, Luciano

    2010-01-01

    A multicenter randomized control trial (RCT) was conducted to evaluate the effects of a treatment for dysexecutive problems after acquired brain injury (ABI) on daily life functioning. Seventy-five ABI patients were randomly allocated to either the experimental treatment, multifaceted strategy training for executive dysfunction, or a control treatment, computerized cognitive function training. Assessment took place before, directly after, and 6 months post-treatment. The primary outcome measure, the Role Resumption List (RRL), and two other follow-up measures, the Treatment Goal Attainment (TGA) and the Executive Secretarial Task (EST), were indications of daily life executive functioning. The experimental group improved significantly more over time than the controls on the RRL and attained significantly higher scores on the TGA and EST. We conclude that our treatment has resulted in significant improvements of executive functioning in daily life, lasting at least 6 months post-treatment. Although control patients' satisfaction and subjective well-being were at the same level, the experimental group had better abilities to set and accomplish realistic goals, to plan, initiate, and regulate a series of real-life tasks, and to resume previous roles with respect to work, social relations, leisure activities, and mobility. PMID:19900348

  14. Evaluating the usability of a single UK community acquired brain injury (ABI) rehabilitation service website: implications for research methodology and website design.

    PubMed

    Newby, Gavin; Groom, Christina

    2010-04-01

    Information provision is an important resource for those living with acquired brain injury (ABI) and their families. Web-based health information services are now common additions to health service provision. Ideally, they should be easy to use and provide useful, relevant and accurate information. ABI injuries do not affect individuals in the same way, and survivors can have a wide range of abilities and impairments. Therefore, any informational resource intended for this group should take account of their needs and help to compensate for their limitations. This pilot study recruited a group of individuals with ABI (of a median Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale rating of "lower moderate disability") who were clients of a UK National Health Service rehabilitation service and asked them to assess a specialised website provided by that service and hosted by their employing Primary Care Trust organisation. Participants completed a practical task and then gave their opinions on various aspects of website design, and content. They were also asked to suggest improvements and recommend additions. Overall the results were favourable. However, improvements in the legibility, layout and writing style were identified. There were also requests to add more information on the existing topics and add additional topics. The discussion also evaluates the utility of the methodology and the implications of the results for others considering constructing their own website. PMID:19941194

  15. Treatment of severe, disabling spasticity with continuous intrathecal baclofen therapy following acquired brain injury: the experience of a tertiary institution in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe Min; Law, Jia Hao; King, Nicolas Kon Kam; Rajeswaran, Deshan Kumar; Soh, Samantha; Rao, Jai Prashanth; Ng, Wai Hoe; Chua, Karen Sui Geok

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Intrathecal baclofen (ITB) therapy is a proven, effective treatment for disabling cortical spasticity. We describe the first local series of five patients with acquired brain injury (ABI) who received ITB and were followed up for 63.8 months. METHODS A retrospective review of medical and rehabilitation records of patients who received ITB therapy was carried out. Data studied included baseline demographic and injury variables, implantation data, spasticity and function, ITB dosage over time and complications. RESULTS From 2006 to 2010, a total of five patients received ITB therapy via implanted pumps about 39.4 months after ABI. Four out of five patients experienced significant reductions in their lower limb spasticity scores and improvements in global function and dependency. One patient had minor adverse events associated with baclofen-related sedation. The mean ITB dose at one year was 182.7 ± 65.6 mcg/day. CONCLUSION Our preliminary study showed encouraging long-term outcomes and safety for ITB therapy after ABI-related intractable spasticity. Individual ITB responses over time were variable, with gender differences. The outcomes experienced by our centre were comparable to those in the general ABI population, supporting the efficacy of ITB therapy for chronic disabling spasticity. PMID:26831310

  16. What are the barriers and facilitators to goal-setting during rehabilitation for stroke and other acquired brain injuries? A systematic review and meta-synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Sarah E; Tyson, Sarah F; Kirk, Susan; Parsons, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the barriers and facilitators to goal-setting during rehabilitation for stroke and other acquired brain injuries. Data sources: AMED, Proquest, CINAHL and MEDLINE. Review methods: Two reviewers independently screened, extracted data and assessed study quality using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool and undertook thematic content analysis for papers examining the barriers and facilitators to goal-setting during stroke/neurological rehabilitation (any design). Last searches were completed in May 2016. Results: Nine qualitative papers were selected, involving 202 participants in total: 88 patients, 89 health care professionals and 25 relatives of participating patients. Main barriers were: Differences in staff and patients perspectives of goal-setting; patient-related barriers; staff-related barriers, and organisational level barriers. Main facilitators were: individually tailored goal-setting processes, strategies to promote communication and understanding, and strategies to avoid disappointment and unrealistic goals. In addition, patients’ and staff’s knowledge, experience, skill, and engagement with goal-setting could be either a barrier (if these aspects were absent) or a facilitator (if they were present). Conclusion: The main barriers and facilitators to goal-setting during stroke rehabilitation have been identified. They suggest that current methods of goal-setting during inpatient/early stage stroke or neurological rehabilitation are not fit for purpose. PMID:27496701

  17. Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  18. The developmental regulation of the L2/HNK-1 and L3 carbohydrate epitopes in mouse brain. Evidence for separate control of lipid- and protein-bound epitopes.

    PubMed

    Breen, K C

    1989-04-10

    The carbohydrate epitopes L2/HNK-1 and L3 have previously been identified on various neural cell adhesion molecules and have been suggested to play a role in the mediation of cell-cell adhesion. In this study, the developmental expression of the two epitopes in soluble, membrane-bound and chloroform/methanol-extracted fractions of the constituent mouse brain regions was examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The protein-bound epitopes were shown to be uniformly developmentally regulated, with levels peaking at postnatal day 20 (P20). The epitopes in a crude chloroform/methanol fraction, however, demonstrated a different pattern, with L2 peaking earlier at postnatal day zero (P0). These results suggest a possible interaction between the control of the two pools of the epitope. PMID:2468531

  19. Acquired amusia.

    PubMed

    Clark, Camilla N; Golden, Hannah L; Warren, Jason D

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in the cognitive neuroscience of music suggest that a further review of the topic of amusia is timely. In this chapter, we first consider previous taxonomies of amusia and propose a fresh framework for understanding the amusias, essentially as disorders of cognitive information processing. We critically review current cognitive and neuroanatomic findings in the published literature on amusia. We assess the extent to which the clinical and neuropsychologic evidence in amusia can be reconciled; both with the information-processing framework we propose, and with the picture of the brain organization of music and language processing emerging from cognitive neuroscience and functional neuroimaging studies. The balance of evidence suggests that the amusias can be understood as disorders of musical object cognition targeting separable levels of an information-processing hierarchy and underpinned by specific brain network dysfunction. The neuroanatomic associations of the amusias show substantial overlap with brain networks that process speech; however, this convergence leaves scope for separable brain mechanisms based on altered connectivity and dynamics across culprit networks. The study of the amusias contributes to an increasingly complex picture of the musical brain that transcends any simple dichotomy between music and speech or other complex sounds. PMID:25726293

  20. Developmental Thyroid Hormone (TH) Disruption: In Search of Sensitive Bioindicators of Altered TH-Dependent Signaling in Brain

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for brain development, yet clear indicators of disruption at low levels of TH insufficiency have yet to be identified. Brain TH is difficult to measure, but TH-responsive genes can serve as sensitive indicators of TH action in brain. A large nu...

  1. Developmental Thyroid Hormone (TH) Disruption: In Search of Sensitive Bioindicators of Altered TH-Dependent Signaling in Brain###

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for brain development, yet clear indicators of disruption at low levels of TH insufficiency have yet to be identified. Brain TH is difficult to measure, but TH-responsive genes can serve as sensitive indicators of TH action in brain. A large nu...

  2. What is developmental dyspraxia?

    PubMed

    Dewey, D

    1995-12-01

    The idea of developmental dyspraxia has been discussed in the research literature for almost 100 years. However, there continues to be a lack of consensus regarding both the definition and description of this disorder. This paper presents a neuropsychologically based operational definition of developmental dyspraxia that emphasizes that developmental dyspraxia is a disorder of gesture. Research that has investigated the development of praxis is discussed. Further, different types of gestural disorders displayed by children and different mechanisms that underlie developmental dyspraxia are compared to and contrasted with adult acquired apraxia. The impact of perceptual-motor, language, and cognitive impairments on children's gestural development and the possible associations between these developmental disorders and developmental dyspraxia are also examined. Also, the relationship among limb, orofacial, and verbal dyspraxia is discussed. Finally, problems that exist in the neuropsychological assessment of developmental dyspraxia are discussed and recommendations concerning what should be included in such an assessment are presented. PMID:8838385

  3. Pervasive Developmental Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... surroundings, and repetitive body movements or behavior patterns. Autism (a developmental brain disorder characterized by impaired social ... TTY) Fax: 301-984-1473 MAAP Services for Autism, Asperger Syndrome, and PDD P.O. Box 524 ...

  4. Acquired hyperpigmentations*

    PubMed Central

    Cestari, Tania Ferreira; Dantas, Lia Pinheiro; Boza, Juliana Catucci

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous hyperpigmentations are frequent complaints, motivating around 8.5% of all dermatological consultations in our country. They can be congenital, with different patterns of inheritance, or acquired in consequence of skin problems, systemic diseases or secondary to environmental factors. The vast majority of them are linked to alterations on the pigment melanin, induced by different mechanisms. This review will focus on the major acquired hyperpigmentations associated with increased melanin, reviewing their mechanisms of action and possible preventive measures. Particularly prominent aspects of diagnosis and therapy will be emphasized, with focus on melasma, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, periorbital pigmentation, dermatosis papulosa nigra, phytophotodermatoses, flagellate dermatosis, erythema dyschromicum perstans, cervical poikiloderma (Poikiloderma of Civatte), acanthosis nigricans, cutaneous amyloidosis and reticulated confluent dermatitis PMID:24626644

  5. Developmental dyscalculia.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Ruth S

    2004-10-01

    Developmental dyscalculia is a specific learning disability affecting the normal acquisition of arithmetic skills. Genetic, neurobiologic, and epidemiologic evidence indicates that dyscalculia, like other learning disabilities, is a brain-based disorder. However, poor teaching and environmental deprivation have also been implicated in its etiology. Because the neural network of both hemispheres comprises the substrate of normal arithmetic skills, dyscalculia can result from dysfunction of either hemisphere, although the left parietotemporal area is of particular significance. The prevalence of developmental dyscalculia is 5 to 6% in the school-aged population and is as common in girls as in boys. Dyscalculia can occur as a consequence of prematurity and low birthweight and is frequently encountered in a variety of neurologic disorders, such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), developmental language disorder, epilepsy, and fragile X syndrome. Developmental dyscalculia has proven to be a persisting learning disability, at least for the short term, in about half of affected preteen pupils. Educational interventions for dyscalculia range from rote learning of arithmetic facts to developing strategies for solving arithmetic exercises. The long-term prognosis of dyscalculia and the role of remediation in its outcome are yet to be determined. PMID:15559892

  6. Decreased Cerebellar-Orbitofrontal Connectivity Correlates with Stuttering Severity: Whole-Brain Functional and Structural Connectivity Associations with Persistent Developmental Stuttering.

    PubMed

    Sitek, Kevin R; Cai, Shanqing; Beal, Deryk S; Perkell, Joseph S; Guenther, Frank H; Ghosh, Satrajit S

    2016-01-01

    Persistent developmental stuttering is characterized by speech production disfluency and affects 1% of adults. The degree of impairment varies widely across individuals and the neural mechanisms underlying the disorder and this variability remain poorly understood. Here we elucidate compensatory mechanisms related to this variability in impairment using whole-brain functional and white matter connectivity analyses in persistent developmental stuttering. We found that people who stutter had stronger functional connectivity between cerebellum and thalamus than people with fluent speech, while stutterers with the least severe symptoms had greater functional connectivity between left cerebellum and left orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Additionally, people who stutter had decreased functional and white matter connectivity among the perisylvian auditory, motor, and speech planning regions compared to typical speakers, but greater functional connectivity between the right basal ganglia and bilateral temporal auditory regions. Structurally, disfluency ratings were negatively correlated with white matter connections to left perisylvian regions and to the brain stem. Overall, we found increased connectivity among subcortical and reward network structures in people who stutter compared to controls. These connections were negatively correlated with stuttering severity, suggesting the involvement of cerebellum and OFC may underlie successful compensatory mechanisms by more fluent stutterers. PMID:27199712

  7. Decreased Cerebellar-Orbitofrontal Connectivity Correlates with Stuttering Severity: Whole-Brain Functional and Structural Connectivity Associations with Persistent Developmental Stuttering

    PubMed Central

    Sitek, Kevin R.; Cai, Shanqing; Beal, Deryk S.; Perkell, Joseph S.; Guenther, Frank H.; Ghosh, Satrajit S.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent developmental stuttering is characterized by speech production disfluency and affects 1% of adults. The degree of impairment varies widely across individuals and the neural mechanisms underlying the disorder and this variability remain poorly understood. Here we elucidate compensatory mechanisms related to this variability in impairment using whole-brain functional and white matter connectivity analyses in persistent developmental stuttering. We found that people who stutter had stronger functional connectivity between cerebellum and thalamus than people with fluent speech, while stutterers with the least severe symptoms had greater functional connectivity between left cerebellum and left orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Additionally, people who stutter had decreased functional and white matter connectivity among the perisylvian auditory, motor, and speech planning regions compared to typical speakers, but greater functional connectivity between the right basal ganglia and bilateral temporal auditory regions. Structurally, disfluency ratings were negatively correlated with white matter connections to left perisylvian regions and to the brain stem. Overall, we found increased connectivity among subcortical and reward network structures in people who stutter compared to controls. These connections were negatively correlated with stuttering severity, suggesting the involvement of cerebellum and OFC may underlie successful compensatory mechanisms by more fluent stutterers. PMID:27199712

  8. Differential mRNA expression of neuroimmune markers in the hippocampus of infant mice following toluene exposure during brain developmental period.

    PubMed

    Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Kunugita, Naoki; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Nakajima, Daisuke; Tsukahara, Shinji; Fujimaki, Hidekazu

    2012-02-01

    Toluene, a volatile organic compound with a wide range of industrial applications, can exert neurotoxic and immunotoxic effects. However, the effects of toluene exposure on developmental immunotoxicity in the brain have not yet been characterized. To investigate the susceptible window to toluene exposure during development and the effects of fetal and neonatal toluene exposure on the neuroimmune markers, gestational day (GD) 14 pregnant mice, postnatal day (PND) 2 and PND 8 male offspring were exposed to filtered air (control; 0 ppm), or 5 or 50 ppm toluene for 6 h per day for five consecutive days. The neuroimmune markers in the hippocampus of PND 21 were examined using a real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analysis. Mice exposed to 50 ppm toluene on PND 2-6 showed significantly increased levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α mRNAs. In contrast, NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, CCL3, NF-κB, toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and microglia marker ionized calcium binding adapter molecule (Iba)-1 mRNAs were increased significantly in mice exposed to 5 ppm toluene on PND 8-12. These results indicate that low-level toluene exposure during the late postnatal period (PND 8-12) might induce neuroinflammatory mediators via TLR4-dependent NF-κB pathway in the hippocampus of PND 21 male mice. Among the three developmental phases, PND 8-12 seems to be most sensitive to toluene exposure. This is the first study to show developmental phase- and dose-specific changes in neuroimmune markers in infant mice following toluene exposure. PMID:21381054

  9. Functional and developmental identification of a molecular subtype of brain serotonergic neuron specialized to regulate breathing dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Brust, Rachael D.; Corcoran, Andrea E.; Richerson, George B.; Nattie, Eugene; Dymecki, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Serotonergic neurons modulate behavioral and physiological responses from aggression and anxiety to breathing and thermoregulation. Disorders involving serotonin (5HT) dysregulation are commensurately heterogeneous and numerous. We hypothesized that this breadth in functionality derives in part from a developmentally determined substructure of distinct subtypes of 5HT neurons each specialized to modulate specific behaviors. We find, by manipulating developmentally defined subgroups one-by-one chemogenetically, that the Egr2-Pet1 subgroup is specialized to drive increased ventilation in response to carbon dioxide elevation and acidosis. Further, this subtype exhibits intrinsic chemosensitivity and modality-specific projections – increasing firing during hypercapnic acidosis and selectively projecting to respiratory chemosensory but not motor centers, respectively. These findings show that serotonergic regulation of the respiratory chemoreflex is mediated by a specialized molecular subtype of 5HT neuron harboring unique physiological, biophysical, and hodological properties specified developmentally, and demonstrate that the serotonergic system contains specialized modules contributing to its collective functional breadth. PMID:25497093

  10. Developmental exposure to terbutaline and chlorpyrifos: pharmacotherapy of preterm labor and an environmental neurotoxicant converge on serotonergic systems in neonatal rat brain regions

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, Justin E.; Meyer, Armando; Seidler, Frederic J.; Slotkin, Theodore A. . E-mail: t.slotkin@duke.edu

    2005-03-01

    Developmental exposure to unrelated neurotoxicants can nevertheless produce similar neurobehavioral outcomes. We examined the effects of developmental exposure to terbutaline, a tocolytic {beta}{sub 2}-adrenoceptor agonist used to arrest preterm labor, and chlorpyrifos (CPF), a widely used organophosphate pesticide, on serotonin (5HT) systems. Treatments were chosen to parallel periods typical of human developmental exposures, terbutaline (10 mg/kg) on postnatal days (PN) 2-5 and CPF (5 mg/kg) on PN11-14, with assessments conducted on PN45, comparing each agent alone as well as sequential administration of both. Although neither treatment affected growth or viability, each elicited similar alterations in factors that are critical to the function of the 5HT synapse: 5HT{sub 1A} receptors, 5HT{sub 2} receptors, and the presynaptic 5HT transporter (5HTT). Either agent elicited global increases in 5HT receptors and the 5HTT in brain regions possessing 5HT cell bodies (midbrain, brainstem) as well as in the hippocampus, which contains 5HT projections. For both terbutaline and CPF, males were affected more than females, although there were some regional disparities in the sex selectivity between the two agents. Both altered 5HT receptor-mediated cell signaling, suppressing stimulatory effects on adenylyl cyclase and enhancing inhibitory effects. When animals were exposed sequentially to both agents, the outcomes were no more than additive and, for many effects, less than additive, suggesting convergence of the two agents on a common set of developmental mechanisms. Our results indicate that 5HT systems represent a target for otherwise unrelated neuroteratogens.

  11. Effectiveness of a Wii balance board-based system (eBaViR) for balance rehabilitation: a pilot randomized clinical trial in patients with acquired brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acquired brain injury (ABI) is the main cause of death and disability among young adults. In most cases, survivors can experience balance instability, resulting in functional impairments that are associated with diminished health-related quality of life. Traditional rehabilitation therapy may be tedious. This can reduce motivation and adherence to the treatment and thus provide a limited benefit to patients with balance disorders. We present eBaViR (easy Balance Virtual Rehabilitation), a system based on the Nintendo® Wii Balance Board® (WBB), which has been designed by clinical therapists to improve standing balance in patients with ABI through motivational and adaptative exercises. We hypothesize that eBaViR, is feasible, safe and potentially effective in enhancing standing balance. Methods In this contribution, we present a randomized and controlled single blinded study to assess the influence of a WBB-based virtual rehabilitation system on balance rehabilitation with ABI hemiparetic patients. This study describes the eBaViR system and evaluates its effectiveness considering 20 one-hour-sessions of virtual reality rehabilitation (n = 9) versus standard rehabilitation (n = 8). Effectiveness was evaluated by means of traditional static and dynamic balance scales. Results The final sample consisted of 11 men and 6 women. Mean ± SD age was 47.3 ± 17.8 and mean ± SD chronicity was 570.9 ± 313.2 days. Patients using eBaViR had a significant improvement in static balance (p = 0.011 in Berg Balance Scale and p = 0.011 in Anterior Reaches Test) compared to patients who underwent traditional therapy. Regarding dynamic balance, the results showed significant improvement over time in all these measures, but no significant group effect or group-by-time interaction was detected for any of them, which suggests that both groups improved in the same way. There were no serious adverse events during treatment in either group. Conclusions The results suggest that e

  12. Brief Report: The Role of National Brain and Tissue Banks in Research on Autism and Developmental Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zielke, H. Ronald; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the establishment and work of two brain and tissue banks, which collect brain and other tissues from newly deceased individuals with autism and make these tissues available to researchers. Issues in tissue collection are identified, including the importance of advance planning, religious concerns of families, and the need for…

  13. Contextual Probability Evaluation in Autistic, Receptive Developmental Language Disorder, and Control Children: Event-Related Brain Potential Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Alan J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This study compared 20 children (ages 8-14) with either autism or receptive developmental language disorder (RDLD) to 10 controls in their ability to detect frequent and infrequent randomly presented auditory stimuli. Only the children with autism demonstrated an abnormally small amplitude of the P3b, a component of the event-related brain…

  14. Developmental dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Robin L; Pennington, Bruce F

    2015-01-01

    This review uses a levels-of-analysis framework to summarize the current understanding of developmental dyslexia's etiology, brain bases, neuropsychology, and social context. Dyslexia is caused by multiple genetic and environmental risk factors as well as their interplay. Several candidate genes have been identified in the past decade. At the brain level, dyslexia is associated with aberrant structure and function, particularly in left hemisphere reading/language networks. The neurocognitive influences on dyslexia are also multifactorial and involve phonological processing deficits as well as weaknesses in other oral language skills and processing speed. We address contextual issues such as how dyslexia manifests across languages and social classes as well as what treatments are best supported. Throughout the review, we highlight exciting new research that cuts across levels of analysis. Such work promises eventually to provide a comprehensive explanation of the disorder as well as its prevention and remediation. PMID:25594880

  15. Written Discourse and Acquired Brain Impairment: Evaluation of Structural and Semantic Features of Personal Letters from a Systemic Functional Linguistic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortensen, Lynne

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated written discourse in the form of personal letters written by ten people with aphasia following stroke and ten people with cognitive-language disorder as a consequence of traumatic brain injury, and compared their performance with 15 non brain-damaged writers. Personal letters perform the dual function of…

  16. Critical periods for chlorpyrifos-induced developmental neurotoxicity: alterations in adenylyl cyclase signaling in adult rat brain regions after gestational or neonatal exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Armando; Seidler, Frederic J; Aldridge, Justin E; Tate, Charlotte A; Cousins, Mandy M; Slotkin, Theodore A

    2004-01-01

    Developmental exposure to chlorpyrifos (CPF) alters the function of a wide variety of neural systems. In the present study we evaluated the effects in adulthood of CPF exposure of rats during different developmental windows, using the adenylyl cyclase (AC) signaling cascade, which mediates the cellular responses to numerous neurotransmitters. Animals were exposed on gestational days (GD) 9-12 or 17-20 or on postnatal days (PN) 1-4 or 11-14 and assessed at PN60. In addition to basal AC activity, we evaluated the responses to direct AC stimulants (forskolin, Mn2+) and to isoproterenol, which activates signaling through ss-adrenoceptors coupled to stimulatory G-proteins. CPF exposure in any of the four periods elicited significant changes in AC signaling in a wide variety of brain regions in adulthood. In general, GD9-12 was the least sensitive stage, requiring doses above the threshold for impaired maternal weight gain, whereas effects were obtained at subtoxic doses for all other regimens. Most of the effects were heterologous, involving signaling elements downstream from the receptors, and thus shared by multiple stimulants; superimposed on this basic pattern, there were also selective alterations in receptor-mediated responses, in G-protein function, and in AC expression and subtypes. Exposures conducted at GD17-20 and later all produced sex-selective alterations. These results suggest that developmental exposure to CPF elicits long-lasting alterations in cell-signaling cascades that are shared by multiple neurotransmitter and hormonal inputs; the resultant abnormalities of synaptic communication are thus likely to occur in widespread neural circuits and their corresponding behaviors. PMID:14998743

  17. Pericentric inversion of chromosome 11 (p14.3q21) associated with developmental delays, hypopigmented skin lesions and abnormal brain MRI findings - a new case report

    SciTech Connect

    Zachor, D.A.; Lofton, M.

    1994-09-01

    We report 3 year old male, referred for evaluation of developmental delays. Pregnancy was complicated by oligohydramnios, proteinuria and prematurity. Medical history revealed: bilateral inguinal hernia, small scrotal sac, undescended testes, developmental delays and behavioral problems. The child had: microcephaly, facial dysmorphic features, single palmar creases, hypopigmented skin lesions of variable size, intermittent exotropia and small retracted testes. Neurological examination was normal. Cognitive level was at the average range with mild delay in his adaptive behavior. Expressive language delays and severe articulation disorder were noted, as well as clumsiness, poor control and precision of gross and fine motor skills. Chromosomal analysis of peripheral leukocytes indicated that one of the number 11 chromosomes had undergone a pericentric inversion with breakpoints on the short (p) arm at band p14.3 and the long (q) arm at band q21. An MRI of the brain showed mild delay in myelinization pattern of white matter. Chromosome 11 inversion in other sites was associated with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and several malignancies. To our knowledge this is the first description of inv(11)(p14.3q21) that is associated with microcephaly, dysmorphic features, hypopigmented skin lesions and speech delay. This inversion may disrupt the expression of the involved genes. However, additional cases with the same cytogenetic anomaly are needed to explore the phenotypic significance of this disorder.

  18. Developmental exposure to terbutaline alters cell signaling in mature rat brain regions and augments the effects of subsequent neonatal exposure to the organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Armando; Seidler, Frederic J.; Aldridge, Justin E.; Slotkin, Theodore A. . E-mail: t.slotkin@duke.edu

    2005-03-01

    Exposure to apparently unrelated neurotoxicants can nevertheless converge on common neurodevelopmental events. We examined the long-term effects of developmental exposure of rats to terbutaline, a {beta}-adrenoceptor agonist used to arrest preterm labor, and the organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) separately and together. Treatments mimicked the appropriate neurodevelopmental stages for human exposures: terbutaline on postnatal days (PN) 2-5 and CPF on PN11-14, with assessments conducted on PN45. Although neither treatment affected growth or viability, each elicited alterations in CNS cell signaling mediated by adenylyl cyclase (AC), a transduction pathway shared by numerous neuronal and hormonal signals. Terbutaline altered signaling in the brainstem and cerebellum, with gender differences particularly notable in the cerebellum (enhanced AC in males, suppressed in females). By itself, CPF exposure elicited deficits in AC signaling in the midbrain, brainstem, and striatum. However, sequential exposure to terbutaline followed by CPF produced larger alterations and involved a wider spectrum of brain regions than were obtained with either agent alone. In the cerebral cortex, adverse effects of the combined treatment intensified between PN45 and PN60, suggesting that exposures alter the long-term program for development of synaptic communication, leading to alterations in AC signaling that emerge even after adolescence. These findings indicate that terbutaline, like CPF, is a developmental neurotoxicant, and reinforce the idea that its use in preterm labor may create a subpopulation that is sensitized to long-term CNS effects of organophosphorus insecticides.

  19. Fos Protein Expression in Olfactory-Related Brain Areas after Learning and after Reactivation of a Slowly Acquired Olfactory Discrimination Task in the Rat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roullet, Florence; Lienard, Fabienne; Datiche, Frederique; Cattarelli, Martine

    2005-01-01

    Fos protein immunodetection was used to investigate the neuronal activation elicited in some olfactory-related areas after either learning of an olfactory discrimination task or its reactivation 10 d later. Trained rats (T) progressively acquired the association between one odor of a pair and water-reward in a four-arm maze. Two groups of…

  20. The influences of environmental enrichment, cognitive enhancement, and physical exercise on brain development: can we alter the developmental trajectory of ADHD?

    PubMed

    Halperin, Jeffrey M; Healey, Dione M

    2011-01-01

    Attention-deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is characterized by a pervasive pattern of developmentally inappropriate inattentive, impulsive and hyperactive behaviors that typically begin during the preschool years and often persist into adulthood. The most effective and widely used treatments for ADHD are medication and behavior modification. These empirically-supported interventions are generally successful in reducing ADHD symptoms, but treatment effects are rarely maintained beyond the active intervention. Because ADHD is now generally thought of as a chronic disorder that is often present well into adolescence and early adulthood, the need for continued treatment throughout the lifetime is both costly and problematic for a number of logistical reasons. Therefore, it would be highly beneficial if treatments would have lasting effects that remain after the intervention is terminated. This review examines the burgeoning literature on the underlying neural determinants of ADHD along with research demonstrating powerful influences of environmental factors on brain development and functioning. Based upon these largely distinct scientific literatures, we propose an approach that employs directed play and physical exercise to promote brain growth which, in turn, could lead to the development of potentially more enduring treatments for the disorder. PMID:20691725

  1. Unique developmental trajectories of cortical thickness and surface area.

    PubMed

    Wierenga, Lara M; Langen, Marieke; Oranje, Bob; Durston, Sarah

    2014-02-15

    There is evidence that the timing of developmental changes in cortical volume and thickness varies across the brain, although the processes behind these differences are not well understood. In contrast to volume and thickness, the regional developmental trajectories of cortical surface area have not yet been described. The present study used a combined cross-sectional and longitudinal design with 201 MRI-scans (acquired at 1.5-T) from 135 typically developing children and adolescents. Scans were processed using FreeSurfer software and the Desikan-Killiany atlas. Developmental trajectories were estimated using mixed model regression analysis. Within most regions, cortical thickness showed linear decreases with age, whereas both cortical volume and surface area showed curvilinear trajectories. On average, maximum surface area occurred later in development than maximum volume. Global gender differences were more pronounced in cortical volume and surface area than in average thickness. Our findings suggest that developmental trajectories of surface area and thickness differ across the brain, both in their pattern and their timing, and that they also differ from the developmental trajectory of global cortical volume. Taken together, these findings indicate that the development of surface area and thickness is driven by different processes, at least in part. PMID:24246495

  2. Molecular cloning and neurotrophic activities of a protein with structural similarities to nerve growth factor: developmental and topographical expression in the brain.

    PubMed Central

    Ernfors, P; Ibáñez, C F; Ebendal, T; Olson, L; Persson, H

    1990-01-01

    We have used a pool of degenerate oligonucleotides representing all possible codons in regions of homology between brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) to prime rat hippocampal cDNAs in the polymerase chain reaction. The amplified DNA included a product with significant similarity to NGF and BDNF, which was used to isolate a 1020-nucleotide-long cDNA from a rat hippocampal library. From the nucleotide sequence, a 282-amino-acid-long protein with approximately 45% amino acid similarity to both pig BDNF and rat NGF was deduced. In the adult brain, the mRNA for this protein was predominantly expressed in hippocampus, where it was confined to a subset of pyramidal and granular neurons. The developmental expression in brain showed a clear peak shortly after birth, 1 and 2 weeks earlier than maximal expression of BDNF and NGF, respectively. It was also expressed in several peripheral tissues with the highest level in kidney. The protein, transiently expressed in COS cells, was tested on chicken embryonic neurons and readily stimulated fiber outgrowth from explanted Remak's ganglion and, to a lesser extent, the nodose ganglion. A weak, but consistent, fiber outgrowth response was also seen in the ciliary ganglion and in paravertebral sympathetic ganglia. Moreover, the protein displaced binding of NGF to its receptor, suggesting that it can interact with the NGF receptor. Thus, this factor, although structurally and functionally related to NGF and BDNF, has unique biological activities and represents a member of a family of neurotrophic factors that may cooperate to support the development and maintenance of the vertebrate nervous system. Images PMID:2164684

  3. Developmental trajectories during adolescence in males and females: a cross-species understanding of underlying brain changes

    PubMed Central

    Brenhouse, Heather C.; Andersen, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescence is a transitional period between childhood and adulthood that encompasses vast changes within brain systems that parallel some, but not all, behavioral changes. Elevations in emotional reactivity and reward processing follow an inverted U shape in terms of onset and remission, with the peak occurring during adolescence. However, cognitive processing follows a more linear course of development. This review will focus on changes within key structures and will highlight the relationships between brain changes and behavior, with evidence spanning from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in humans to molecular studies of receptor and signaling factors in animals. Adolescent changes in neuronal substrates will be used to understand how typical and atypical behaviors arise during adolescence. We draw upon clinical and preclinical studies to provide a neural framework for defining adolescence and its role in the transition to adulthood. PMID:21600919

  4. Proteomic analysis of mitochondria from embryonic and postnatal rat brains reveals response to developmental changes in energy demands

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Lance M.; Stauch, Kelly L.; Fox, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    Many biological processes converge on the mitochondria. In such systems, where many pathways converge, manipulation of the components can produce varied and far-reaching effects. Due to the centrality of the mitochondria in many cellular pathways, we decided to investigate the brain mitochondrial proteome during early development. Using a SWATH mass spectrometry-based technique, we were able to identify vast proteomic alterations between whole brain mitochondria from rats at embryonic day 18 compared to postnatal day 7. These findings include statistically significant alterations in proteins involved in glycolysis and mitochondrial trafficking/dynamics. Additionally, bioinformatic analysis enabled the identification of HIF1A and XBP1 as upstream transcriptional regulators of many of the differentially expressed proteins. These data suggest that the cell is rearranging mitochondria to accommodate special energy demands and that cytosolic proteins exert mitochondrial effects through dynamic interactions with mitochondria. PMID:25046836

  5. Aluminum-induced maternal and developmental toxicity and oxidative stress in rat brain: response to combined administration of Tiron and glutathione.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pragya; Mishra, Kaushala Prasad

    2006-04-01

    The current study was performed to assess the potential of 4,5-dihydroxy 1,3-benzene disulfonic acid di sodium salt (Tiron) and glutathione (GSH) either individually or in combination against aluminum (Al)-induced developmental toxicity in fetuses and sucklings of Wistar rats. Female rats were exposed to aluminum chloride at a dose of 345 mg/(kg day) oral from days 0 to 16 of gestation and 0 to 16 of post-partum (P.P.). Tiron and GSH were administered at a dose of 471 mg/(kg day) i.p. and 100 mg/(kg day) oral, respectively, on days 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15 and 17 of gestation and post-partum. Al caused reduction in number of corpora lutea, number of implantation sites, placental and fetal weight and stunted growth. Skeletal malformations were also observed in fetuses. Maternal toxicity was demonstrated by reduction in body weight gain. Induction of oxidative stress was also recorded in the brain of mother as well as in fetuses and sucklings after Al exposure. Significant decrease was recorded in reduced glutathione, glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) and increase was observed in TBARS and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) in brain of pregnant mothers, fetuses and sucklings. Most of the above parameters responded positively with individual therapy with Tiron, but more pronounced beneficial effects on the above-described parameters were observed when Tiron was administered in combination with GSH. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) studies also showed significantly high concentration of Al in suckling's brain and maternal blood, brain, placenta and fetal brain. Treatment with Tiron individually or in combination with glutathione, reduced the accumulation of the Al in almost all the organs studied. It is concluded that chelating agents reduced the Al-induced toxicity and Tiron was more effective in reducing blood Al concentration than glutathione

  6. Introduction to the special issue: Substance use and the adolescent brain: Developmental impacts, interventions, and longitudinal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Luciana, Monica; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W

    2015-12-01

    Adolescent substance abuse is a major public health problem, particularly given the negative brain and behavioral consequences that often occur during and following acute intoxication. Negative outcomes appear to be especially pronounced when substance use is initiated in the early adolescent years, perhaps due to neural adaptations that increase risk for substance use disorders into adulthood. Recent models to explain these epidemiological trends have focused on brain-based vulnerabilities to use as well as neurodevelopmental aberrations associated with initiation of use in substance naïve samples or through the description of case-control differences between heavy users and controls. Within this research, adolescent alcohol and marijuana users have shown relative decreases in regional gray matter volumes, substance-specific alterations in white matter volumes, deviations in microstructural integrity in white matter tracts that regulate communication between subcortical areas and higher level regulatory control regions, and deficits in functional connectivity. How these brain anomalies map onto other types of youth risk behavior and later vulnerabilities represent major questions for continued research. This special issue addresses these compelling and timely questions by introducing new methodologies, empirical relationships, and perspectives from major leaders in this field. PMID:26589541

  7. Brain phosphorylation of MeCP2 at serine 164 is developmentally regulated and globally alters its chromatin association

    PubMed Central

    Stefanelli, Gilda; Gandaglia, Anna; Costa, Mario; Cheema, Manjinder S.; Di Marino, Daniele; Barbiero, Isabella; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Ausió, Juan; Landsberger, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    MeCP2 is a transcriptional regulator whose functional alterations are responsible for several autism spectrum and mental disorders. Post-translational modifications (PTMs), and particularly differential phosphorylation, modulate MeCP2 function in response to diverse stimuli. Understanding the detailed role of MeCP2 phosphorylation is thus instrumental to ascertain how MeCP2 integrates the environmental signals and directs its adaptive transcriptional responses. The evolutionarily conserved serine 164 (S164) was found phosphorylated in rodent brain but its functional role has remained uncharacterized. We show here that phosphorylation of S164 in brain is dynamically regulated during neuronal maturation. S164 phosphorylation highly impairs MeCP2 binding to DNA in vitro and largely affects its nucleosome binding and chromatin affinity in vivo. Strikingly, the chromatin-binding properties of the global MeCP2 appear also extensively altered during the course of brain maturation. Functional assays reveal that proper temporal regulation of S164 phosphorylation controls the ability of MeCP2 to regulate neuronal morphology. Altogether, our results support the hypothesis of a complex PTM-mediated functional regulation of MeCP2 potentially involving a still poorly characterized epigenetic code. Furthermore, they demonstrate the relevance of the Intervening Domain of MeCP2 for binding to DNA. PMID:27323888

  8. Introduction to the special issue: Substance use and the adolescent brain: Developmental impacts, interventions, and longitudinal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Luciana, Monica; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent substance abuse is a major public health problem, particularly given the negative brain and behavioral consequences that often occur during and following acute intoxication. Negative outcomes appear to be especially pronounced when substance use is initiated in the early adolescent years, perhaps due to neural adaptations that increase risk for substance use disorders into adulthood. Recent models to explain these epidemiological trends have focused on brain-based vulnerabilities to use as well as neurodevelopmental aberrations associated with initiation of use in substance naïve samples or through the description of case-control differences between heavy users and controls. Within this research, adolescent alcohol and marijuana users have shown relative decreases in regional gray matter volumes, substance-specific alterations in white matter volumes, deviations in microstructural integrity in white matter tracts that regulate communication between subcortical areas and higher level regulatory control regions, and deficits in functional connectivity. How these brain anomalies map onto other types of youth risk behavior and later vulnerabilities represent major questions for continued research. This special issue addresses these compelling and timely questions by introducing new methodologies, empirical relationships, and perspectives from major leaders in this field. PMID:26589541

  9. Brain phosphorylation of MeCP2 at serine 164 is developmentally regulated and globally alters its chromatin association.

    PubMed

    Stefanelli, Gilda; Gandaglia, Anna; Costa, Mario; Cheema, Manjinder S; Di Marino, Daniele; Barbiero, Isabella; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Ausió, Juan; Landsberger, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    MeCP2 is a transcriptional regulator whose functional alterations are responsible for several autism spectrum and mental disorders. Post-translational modifications (PTMs), and particularly differential phosphorylation, modulate MeCP2 function in response to diverse stimuli. Understanding the detailed role of MeCP2 phosphorylation is thus instrumental to ascertain how MeCP2 integrates the environmental signals and directs its adaptive transcriptional responses. The evolutionarily conserved serine 164 (S164) was found phosphorylated in rodent brain but its functional role has remained uncharacterized. We show here that phosphorylation of S164 in brain is dynamically regulated during neuronal maturation. S164 phosphorylation highly impairs MeCP2 binding to DNA in vitro and largely affects its nucleosome binding and chromatin affinity in vivo. Strikingly, the chromatin-binding properties of the global MeCP2 appear also extensively altered during the course of brain maturation. Functional assays reveal that proper temporal regulation of S164 phosphorylation controls the ability of MeCP2 to regulate neuronal morphology. Altogether, our results support the hypothesis of a complex PTM-mediated functional regulation of MeCP2 potentially involving a still poorly characterized epigenetic code. Furthermore, they demonstrate the relevance of the Intervening Domain of MeCP2 for binding to DNA. PMID:27323888

  10. Albumin induces excitatory synaptogenesis through astrocytic TGF-β/ALK5 signaling in a model of acquired epilepsy following blood-brain barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Weissberg, Itai; Wood, Lydia; Kamintsky, Lyn; Vazquez, Oscar; Milikovsky, Dan Z; Alexander, Allyson; Oppenheim, Hannah; Ardizzone, Carolyn; Becker, Albert; Frigerio, Federica; Vezzani, Annamaria; Buckwalter, Marion S; Huguenard, John R; Friedman, Alon; Kaufer, Daniela

    2015-06-01

    Post-injury epilepsy (PIE) is a common complication following brain insults, including ischemic, and traumatic brain injuries. At present, there are no means to identify the patients at risk to develop PIE or to prevent its development. Seizures can occur months or years after the insult, do not respond to anti-seizure medications in over third of the patients, and are often associated with significant neuropsychiatric morbidities. We have previously established the critical role of blood-brain barrier dysfunction in PIE, demonstrating that exposure of brain tissue to extravasated serum albumin induces activation of inflammatory transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling in astrocytes and eventually seizures. However, the link between the acute astrocytic inflammatory responses and reorganization of neural networks that underlie recurrent spontaneous seizures remains unknown. Here we demonstrate in vitro and in vivo that activation of the astrocytic ALK5/TGF-β-pathway induces excitatory, but not inhibitory, synaptogenesis that precedes the appearance of seizures. Moreover, we show that treatment with SJN2511, a specific ALK5/TGF-β inhibitor, prevents synaptogenesis and epilepsy. Our findings point to astrocyte-mediated synaptogenesis as a key epileptogenic process and highlight the manipulation of the TGF-β-pathway as a potential strategy for the prevention of PIE. PMID:25836421

  11. Developmental Toxicology##

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental toxicology encompasses the study of developmental exposures, pharmacokinetics, mechanisms, pathogenesis, and outcomes potentially leading to adverse health effects. Manifestations of developmental toxicity include structural malformations, growth retardation, functi...

  12. Developmental dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Démonet, Jean-François; Taylor, Margot J; Chaix, Yves

    2004-05-01

    Developmental dyslexia, or specific reading disability, is a disorder in which children with normal intelligence and sensory abilities show learning deficits for reading. Substantial evidence has established its biological origin and the preponderance of phonological disorders even though important phenotypic variability and comorbidity have been recorded. Diverse theories have been proposed to account for the cognitive and neurological aspects of dyslexia. Findings of genetic studies show that different loci affect specific reading disability although a direct relation has not been established between symptoms and a given genomic locus. In both children and adults with dyslexia, results of neuroimaging studies suggest defective activity and abnormal connectivity between regions crucial for language functions--eg, the left fusiform gyrus for reading--and changes in brain activity associated with performance improvement after various remedial interventions. PMID:15121410

  13. Mapping Subcortical Brain Maturation during Adolescence: Evidence of Hemisphere-and Sex-Specific Longitudinal Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, Meg; Whittle, Sarah; Yücel, Murat; Vijayakumar, Nandita; Kline, Alexandria; Simmons, Julian; Allen, Nicholas B.

    2013-01-01

    Early to mid-adolescence is an important developmental period for subcortical brain maturation, but longitudinal studies of these neurodevelopmental changes are lacking. The present study acquired repeated magnetic resonance images from 60 adolescent subjects (28 female) at ages 12.5 and 16.5 years to map changes in subcortical structure volumes.…

  14. Sexually dimorphic gene regulation in brain as a target for endocrine disrupters: developmental exposure of rats to 4-methylbenzylidene camphor.

    PubMed

    Maerkel, Kirsten; Durrer, Stefan; Henseler, Manuel; Schlumpf, Margret; Lichtensteiger, Walter

    2007-01-15

    The developing neuroendocrine brain represents a potential target for endocrine active chemicals. The UV filter 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC) exhibits estrogenic activity, but also interferes with the thyroid axis. We investigated effects of pre- and postnatal exposure to 4-MBC in the same rat offspring at brain and reproductive organ levels. 4-MBC (7, 24, 47 mg/kg/day) was administered in chow to the parent generation before mating, during gestation and lactation, and to the offspring until adulthood. mRNA of estrogen target genes involved in control of sexual behavior and gonadal functions was measured by real-time RT-PCR in ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) and medial preoptic area (MPO) of adult offspring. 4-MBC exposure affected mRNA levels of ER alpha, progesterone receptor (PR), preproenkephalin (PPE) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in a sex- and region-specific manner. In order to assess possible changes in sensitivity of target genes to estrogens, offspring were gonadectomized on day 70, injected with estradiol (E2, 10 or 50 microg/kg s.c.) or vehicle on day 84, and sacrificed 6 h later. The acute induction of PR mRNA, and repression (at 6 h) of PPE mRNA by E2 was enhanced by 4-MBC in male and female VMH and female MPO, whereas male MPO exhibited reduced responsiveness of both genes. Steroid receptor coactivator SRC-1 mRNA levels were increased in female VMH and MPO. The data indicate profound sex- and region-specific alterations in the regulation of estrogen target genes at brain level. Effect patterns in baseline and E2-induced gene expression differ from those in uterus and prostate. PMID:17188730

  15. Sexually dimorphic gene regulation in brain as a target for endocrine disrupters: Developmental exposure of rats to 4-methylbenzylidene camphor

    SciTech Connect

    Maerkel, Kirsten; Durrer, Stefan; Henseler, Manuel; Schlumpf, Margret; Lichtensteiger, Walter . E-mail: Walter.Lichtensteiger@access.unizh.ch

    2007-01-15

    The developing neuroendocrine brain represents a potential target for endocrine active chemicals. The UV filter 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC) exhibits estrogenic activity, but also interferes with the thyroid axis. We investigated effects of pre- and postnatal exposure to 4-MBC in the same rat offspring at brain and reproductive organ levels. 4-MBC (7, 24, 47 mg/kg/day) was administered in chow to the parent generation before mating, during gestation and lactation, and to the offspring until adulthood. mRNA of estrogen target genes involved in control of sexual behavior and gonadal functions was measured by real-time RT-PCR in ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) and medial preoptic area (MPO) of adult offspring. 4-MBC exposure affected mRNA levels of ER alpha, progesterone receptor (PR), preproenkephalin (PPE) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in a sex- and region-specific manner. In order to assess possible changes in sensitivity of target genes to estrogens, offspring were gonadectomized on day 70, injected with estradiol (E2, 10 or 50 {mu}g/kg s.c.) or vehicle on day 84, and sacrificed 6 h later. The acute induction of PR mRNA, and repression (at 6 h) of PPE mRNA by E2 was enhanced by 4-MBC in male and female VMH and female MPO, whereas male MPO exhibited reduced responsiveness of both genes. Steroid receptor coactivator SRC-1 mRNA levels were increased in female VMH and MPO. The data indicate profound sex- and region-specific alterations in the regulation of estrogen target genes at brain level. Effect patterns in baseline and E2-induced gene expression differ from those in uterus and prostate.

  16. Developmental changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor-mediated modulations of synaptic activities in the pontine Kölliker–Fuse nucleus of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Kron, Miriam; Mörschel, Michael; Reuter, Julia; Zhang, Weiqi; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    The Kölliker–Fuse nucleus (KF), part of the respiratory network, is involved in the modulation of respiratory phase durations in response to peripheral and central afferent inputs. The KF is immature at birth. Developmental changes in its physiological and anatomical properties have yet to be investigated. Since brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is of major importance for the maturation of neuronal networks, we investigated its effects on developmental changes in the KF on different postnatal days (neonatal, P1–5; intermediate, P6–13; juvenile, P14–21) by analysing single neurones in the in vitro slice preparation and network activities in the perfused brainstem preparation in situ. The BDNF had only weak effects on the frequency of mixed excitatory and inhibitory spontaneous postsynaptic currents (sPSCs) in neonatal slice preparations. Postnatally, in the intermediate and juvenile age groups, a significant augmentation of the sPSC frequency was observed in the presence of 100 pm BDNF (+23.5 ± 12.6 and +76.7 ± 28.4%, respectively). Subsequent analyses of BDNF effects on evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) revealed significant enhancement of eEPSC amplitude of +20.8 ± 7.0% only in juvenile stages (intermediates, −13.2 ± 4.8%). On the network level, significant modulation of phrenic nerve activity following BDNF microinjection into the KF was also observed only in juveniles. The data suggest that KF neurones are subject to BDNF-mediated fast synaptic modulation after completion of postnatal maturation. After maturation, BDNF contributes to modulation of fast excitatory neurotransmission in respiratory-related KF neurones. This may be important for network plasticity associated with the processing of afferent information. PMID:17569735

  17. Developmental Courses Are Creditable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Michael E.; Rosica, Anthony D.

    1978-01-01

    Expresses position that the development of academic and interpersonal skills through developmental programs is a legitimate function of any comprehensive community/junior college and that the granting of college credit for time spent acquiring skills legitimizes learning. Also deals with objections to granting college credit for remedial courses.…

  18. SDS-coated atovaquone nanosuspensions show improved therapeutic efficacy against experimental acquired and reactivated toxoplasmosis by improving passage of gastrointestinal and blood-brain barriers.

    PubMed

    Shubar, Hend M; Lachenmaier, Sabrina; Heimesaat, Markus M; Lohman, Uwe; Mauludin, Rachmat; Mueller, Rainer H; Fitzner, Rudolf; Borner, Klaus; Liesenfeld, Oliver

    2011-02-01

    Toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE) is the most common clinical manifestation of reactivated infection with Toxoplasma gondii in immunocompromised patients that is lethal if untreated. The combination of pyrimethamine plus sulfadiazine or clindamycin is the standard therapy for the treatment of TE, but these combinations are associated with hematologic toxicity and/or life-threatening allergic reactions. Therefore, alternative treatment options are needed. Atovaquone is safe and highly effective against T. gondii in vitro, but the oral micronized solution shows poor bioavailability. We synthesized atovaquone nanosuspensions (ANSs) coated with poloxamer 188 (P188) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to improve oral bioavailability and passage through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Coating of ANSs with SDS resulted in enhanced oral bioavailability and enhanced brain uptake of atovaquone compared to Wellvone(®) in murine models of acute and reactivated toxoplasmosis as measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Parasite loads and inflammatory changes in brains of mice treated with SDS-coated ANS were significantly reduced compared to untreated controls and to Wellvone(®)-treated mice. In conclusion, nanosuspensions coated with SDS may ultimately lead to improvements in the treatment of TE and other cerebral diseases. PMID:20367080

  19. Cognitive reserve and preinjury educational attainment: effects on outcome of community-based rehabilitation for longer-term individuals with acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fortune, Dónal G; Walsh, R Stephen; Richards, Helen L

    2016-09-01

    The cognitive reserve hypothesis has been proposed to account for the mismatch between brain pathology and its clinical expression. The aim of the current research was to explore, in a longitudinal data set, the effects of level of educational attainment before brain injury (cognitive reserve) and clinical factors on the level of rehabilitation-induced changes in disability and community integration. Participants in receipt of postacute rehabilitation were assessed at induction to the service and again at between 14 and 18 months of follow-up while still in service on changes in aspects of their abilities, adjustment and participation (Mayo Portland Adaptability Indices) and community integration (Community Integration Questionnaire). Controlling for type and severity of injury, age at onset of injury and duration of time since injury, participants with higher previous educational attainment showed significantly greater changes over the course of rehabilitation on adjustment to their injury and participation, but not on abilities, or community integration following postacute rehabilitation. Level of education would appear to be an important element of cognitive reserve in brain injury that serves to aid responses to postacute rehabilitation in terms of an individual's adjustment to disability and participation. PMID:27171606

  20. Age, Plasticity, and Homeostasis In Childhood Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Maureen; Spiegler, Brenda J.; Juranek, Jenifer J.; Bigler, Erin D.; Snead, O. Carter; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2013-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that the younger the age and/or immaturity of the organism, the greater the brain plasticity, the young age plasticity privilege. This paper examines the relation of a young age to plasticity, reviewing human pediatric brain disorders, as well as selected animal models, human developmental and adult brain disorder studies. As well, we review developmental and childhood acquired disorders that involve a failure of regulatory homeostasis. Our core arguments are: Plasticity is neutral with respect to outcome. Although the effects of plasticity are often beneficial, the outcome of plasticity may be adaptive or maladaptive.The young age plasticity privilege has been overstated.Plastic change operates in concert with homeostatic mechanisms regulating change at every point in the lifespan.The same mechanisms that propel developmental change expose the immature brain to adverse events, making it more difficult for the immature than for the mature brain to sustain equilibrium between plasticity and homeostasis.Poor outcome in many neurodevelopmental disorders and childhood acquired brain insults is related to disequilibrium between plasticity and homeostasis. PMID:24096190

  1. A multidisciplinary approach to understanding developmental dyslexia within working-memory architecture: genotypes, phenotypes, brain, and instruction.

    PubMed

    Berninger, Virginia W; Raskind, Wendy; Richards, Todd; Abbott, Robert; Stock, Pat

    2008-01-01

    A unifying theoretical framework of three working memory components provides a systems perspective for discussing past and new findings in a 12-year research program that point to heterogeneity in the genetic and brain basis and behavioral expression of dyslexia: (a) codes for word-form storage and processing, (b) time-sensitive phonological and orthographic loops for maintaining information in working memory or outputting it, and (c) executive functions for language (e.g., rapid automatic switching of attention). Results, which span the genetic to neurological to behavioral levels of analysis, point to possible impairment in any one or combination of these working memory components in individuals with dyslexia. A DNA variation on chromosome 15 may be linked with the phonological word-form in the first working-memory component. A DNA variation on chromosome 6 may be linked with slow rapid automatic switching, inattention ratings, and impaired goal-directed activity ratings in the third working-memory component. Brain and behavioral findings support (a) Triple Word Form Theory: phonological, orthographic, and morphological word-forms and their parts contribute to learning to read and spell words; and (b) Cross-Word Form Mapping: in the process of learning to read and spell words children compute the inter-relationships among the three word-forms and their parts. However, children with dyslexia may require more focus on the morphological word-form and its parts and their relationships with the other two word-forms and their parts than do normal readers. Also, children with dyslexia have unusual difficulties in sustaining phonological loop function in working memory over time; their impaired orthographic loop function may interfere with learning to write alphabet letters and spell, which may be as impaired as word decoding and reading. Impaired executive functions may interfere with the efficiency of working memory in processing oral and written language. PMID

  2. Brain circuit imprints of developmental 17α-Ethinylestradiol exposure in guppies (Poecilia reticulata): persistent effects on anxiety but not on reproductive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Volkova, Kristina; Reyhanian, Nasim; Kot-Wasik, Agata; Olsén, Håkan; Porsch-Hällström, Inger; Hallgren, Stefan

    2012-09-01

    The effects of endocrine disruptors may vary with the timing of exposure. The physiological implications of adult exposure are present during and shortly after exposure while embryonic exposure can imprint changes manifested in adulthood. In this study, guppy (Poecilia reticulata) embryos were exposed to 2 and 20 ng/L of 17α-ethinylestradiol during development via the mother and reared in clean water from gestation until 6 months of age. As adults, fish exposed to 20 ng/L during development showed significantly altered behaviour in the Novel Tank test, where anxiety is determined as the tendency to remain at the bottom upon introduction into an unfamiliar tank. 17α-ethinylestradiol treatment increased the latency time before swimming to the upper half of the tank and decreased the number of transitions to the upper half. In control females the basal stress behaviour responses were significantly higher than in males, as indicated by longer latency period and fewer and shorter visits to the upper half, supporting the importance of gonadal hormones for the behaviour. The anxiety increased, however, with treatment in both sexes, suggesting that the observed response is not entirely due to feminisation of the males. Shoaling behaviour, analysed as tendency to leave a shoal of littermates, was neither sex-differentiated nor changed by treatment. Also male reproductive behaviour, brain aromatase activity and testes histology, previously shown to respond to oestrogen exposure in adult guppy, were unaffected by the developmental treatment. This suggests that the stress system in the guppy is very sensitive to 17α-ethinylestradiol, which possibly causes an early organisational imprint on the brain circuit that regulates stress reactions. PMID:22687331

  3. What does the brain of children with developmental dyslexia tell us about reading improvement? ERP evidence from an intervention study.

    PubMed

    Hasko, Sandra; Groth, Katarina; Bruder, Jennifer; Bartling, Jürgen; Schulte-Körne, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Intervention is key to managing developmental dyslexia (DD), but not all children with DD benefit from treatment. Some children improve (improvers, IMP), whereas others do not improve (non-improvers, NIMP). Neurobiological differences between IMP and NIMP have been suggested, but studies comparing IMP and NIMP in childhood are missing. The present study examined whether ERP patterns change with treatment and differ between IMP and NIMP. We investigated the ERPs of 28 children with DD and 25 control children (CON) while performing a phonological lexical decision (PLD) task before and after a 6-month intervention. After intervention children with DD were divided into IMP (n = 11) and NIMP (n = 17). In the PLD-task children were visually presented with words, pseudohomophones, pseudowords, and false fonts and had to decide whether the presented stimulus sounded like an existing German word or not. Prior to intervention IMP showed higher N300 amplitudes over fronto-temporal electrodes compared to NIMP and CON and N400 amplitudes were attenuated in both IMP and NIMP compared to CON. After intervention N300 amplitudes of IMP were comparable to those of CON and NIMP. This suggests that the N300, which has been related to phonological access of orthographic stimuli and integration of orthographic and phonological representations, might index a compensatory mechanism or precursor that facilitates reading improvement. The N400, which is thought to reflect grapheme-phoneme conversion or the access to the orthographic lexicon increased in IMP from pre to post and was comparable to CON after intervention. Correlations between N300 amplitudes pre, growth in reading ability and N400 amplitudes post indicated that higher N300 amplitudes might be important for reading improvement and increase in N400 amplitudes. The results suggest that children with DD, showing the same cognitive profile might differ regarding their neuronal profile which could further influence reading

  4. What does the brain of children with developmental dyslexia tell us about reading improvement? ERP evidence from an intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Hasko, Sandra; Groth, Katarina; Bruder, Jennifer; Bartling, Jürgen; Schulte-Körne, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Intervention is key to managing developmental dyslexia (DD), but not all children with DD benefit from treatment. Some children improve (improvers, IMP), whereas others do not improve (non-improvers, NIMP). Neurobiological differences between IMP and NIMP have been suggested, but studies comparing IMP and NIMP in childhood are missing. The present study examined whether ERP patterns change with treatment and differ between IMP and NIMP. We investigated the ERPs of 28 children with DD and 25 control children (CON) while performing a phonological lexical decision (PLD) task before and after a 6-month intervention. After intervention children with DD were divided into IMP (n = 11) and NIMP (n = 17). In the PLD–task children were visually presented with words, pseudohomophones, pseudowords, and false fonts and had to decide whether the presented stimulus sounded like an existing German word or not. Prior to intervention IMP showed higher N300 amplitudes over fronto-temporal electrodes compared to NIMP and CON and N400 amplitudes were attenuated in both IMP and NIMP compared to CON. After intervention N300 amplitudes of IMP were comparable to those of CON and NIMP. This suggests that the N300, which has been related to phonological access of orthographic stimuli and integration of orthographic and phonological representations, might index a compensatory mechanism or precursor that facilitates reading improvement. The N400, which is thought to reflect grapheme-phoneme conversion or the access to the orthographic lexicon increased in IMP from pre to post and was comparable to CON after intervention. Correlations between N300 amplitudes pre, growth in reading ability and N400 amplitudes post indicated that higher N300 amplitudes might be important for reading improvement and increase in N400 amplitudes. The results suggest that children with DD, showing the same cognitive profile might differ regarding their neuronal profile which could further influence reading

  5. Developmental Problems and Dental Morphology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, William C., Jr.; Erickson, Marilyn T.

    1973-01-01

    Ninety-five subjects (mean age 55 months) with mental retardation, learning disabilities, and/or minimal brain dysfunction and 47 control subjects (mean age 46 months) were compared to determine the relationship between developmental problems and dental morphology. (Author)

  6. Developmental changes in the expression of somatostatin receptors (1-5) in the brain, hypothalamus, pituitary and spinal cord of the human fetus.

    PubMed

    Goodyer, C G; Grigorakis, S I; Patel, Y C; Kumar, U

    2004-01-01

    The actions of somatostatin (SST) in the nervous system are mediated by specific high affinity SST receptors (SSTR1-5). However, the role of this hormone and the distribution of its receptor subtypes have not yet been defined in neural structures of the human fetus. We have analyzed four neural tissues (CNS, hypothalamus, pituitary and spinal cord) from early to midgestation for the expression of five human SSTR mRNAs, using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot approach. These fetal neural tissues all express mRNA for multiple SSTR subtypes from as early as 16 weeks of fetal life but the developmental patterns of expression vary considerably. Transcripts for SSTR1 and SSTR2A are the most widely distributed, being expressed in all four neural tissues. SSTR2A is often the earliest transcript to be detected (7.5 weeks in CNS). SSTR3 mRNA is confined to the pituitary, hypothalamus, and spinal cord. SSTR4 is expressed in fetal brain, hypothalamus and spinal cord but not pituitary. SSTR5 mRNA is detectable in the pituitary and spinal cord by 14-16 weeks of fetal life. This mapping of SSTR mRNA expression patterns in human fetal neural tissues is an important first step toward our goal of determining the role of SST in the nervous system during early stages in human development. PMID:15062986

  7. Acquired stuttering due to recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Katherine B; Turner, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Acquired (neurogenic) stuttering is a rare phenomenon seen after cerebral infarction or brain injury. Aetiology of this symptom is unclear, but recent evidence supports that it is a disturbance in the left hemispheric neural network involving the interplay between the cortex and basal ganglia. We present the case of a patient who develops acquired stuttering after a recurrence of a right temporoparietal anaplastic astrocytoma (WHO grade III). We also review other cases of acquired stuttering and known anatomical correlates. PMID:24252834

  8. New approaches to the developmental dyslexias.

    PubMed

    Temple, C M

    1984-01-01

    Although Hinshelwood (10-15), at the turn of the century, was interested in both analysis of individual cases and comparisons between acquired and developmental dyslexia, the most widespread approach to the developmental dyslexias has been the investigation of large groups of dyslexics in comparison to normal readers on a variety of tests. These studies ignore the heterogeneity of the disorder. In contrast, progress has been made in the investigation of acquired disorders of reading by conducting individual psycholinguistic analyses of reading difficulties and utilizing input from cognitive psychology to construct explanatory models and theories. Two of the disorders described and elucidated by this approach are acquired surface dyslexia, in which there is an impairment in whole word recognition and overreliance on sounding out words to obtain their pronunciation and meaning, and acquired phonological dyslexia, in which whole word recognition is good but sounding out of words and nonwords is poor. This approach has recently been used with cases of developmental dyslexia. This chapter compares and contrasts the pattern of performance of different dyslexic children when investigated in this way. Two of the children described are developmental phonological dyslexics; one is a developmental surface dyslexic. The developmental phonological dyslexics are poorer at reading words than non-words; the developmental surface dyslexic performs equally well on both. The developmental surface dyslexic is significantly influenced by spelling-to-sound regularity; the developmental phonological dyslexics are unaffected by this linguistic dimension. The developmental surface dyslexic makes more neologistic responses than the developmental phonological dyslexics, and also makes more valid errors. The developmental phonological dyslexics make derivational, pseudoderivational, and visuosemantic errors. Both groups make visual errors. The developmental phonological dyslexics are

  9. Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview the developmental toxicity resulting from exposure to perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs). The majority of studies of PFAA-induced developmental toxicity have examined effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) a...

  10. Developmental Screening

    MedlinePlus

    Learn More about Your Child’s Development: Developmental Monitoring and Screening Taking a first step, waving “bye-bye,” and pointing to something interesting are all developmental milestones, ...

  11. Developmental Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    Developmental disabilities are severe, long-term problems. They may be physical, such as blindness. They may affect mental ability, ... everyday living. There are many causes of developmental disabilities, including Genetic or chromosome abnormalities. These cause conditions ...

  12. [Community-based rehabilitation and outpatient care for patients with acquired brain injury and chronic neurological disability in Germany: continuing support for social participation and re-integration in the neurological care system?].

    PubMed

    Reuther, P; Hendrich, A; Kringler, W; Vespo, E

    2012-12-01

    In Germany a number of patients who are suffering from acquired brain injury and chronic neurological disability are either undersupplied or exposed to inappropriate care in their social environment. The number of these patients is increasing due to the changes in the procedures of care and due to demographic factors. While acute medical care and early rehabilitative treatment is accessible throughout the German health care system the necessary multimodal and competent care is rare or absent in the social participative sites such as life and occupational environments of the patients. The complex impairment of the brain, the central organ for sensorial, executive and other cognitive functions of human beings, renders the affected patient an exception in the system of medical and social care - this has only inadequately been considered in the past. The authors explain the necessity to disclose the status of a "human-with acquired-brain damage (Mensch-mit-erworbener-Hirnschädigung, MeH)" explicitly as severely disabled. The paper recommends a number of structural and procedural elements that have proven to overcome the insufficient or inappropriate support in integrating the patients suffering from acquired brain injury and chronic neurological disability in their social environment as well as for a demand-focused support with sustainable rehabilitative and ambulant follow-up procedures. Comparisons with other developed health care systems and international guidelines show that with organizing of early-supported-discharge, community-ambulation, shared-care and community-based-rehabilitation these problems have long since been identified elsewhere. Community-based and resident-oriented concepts have already been systematically implemented. In order to achieve the necessary support for the individual patient, a nation-wide development is necessary in Germany to perform the principles of the German social code and the principles of the Convention on the Rights of

  13. Acute Acquired Concomitant Esotropia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingchang; Deng, Daming; Sun, Yuan; Shen, Tao; Cao, Guobin; Yan, Jianhua; Chen, Qiwen; Ye, Xuelian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute acquired concomitant esotropia (AACE) is a rare, distinct subtype of esotropia. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the clinical characteristics and discuss the classification and etiology of AACE. Charts from 47 patients with AACE referred to our institute between October 2010 and November 2014 were reviewed. All participants underwent a complete medical history, ophthalmologic and orthoptic examinations, and brain and orbital imaging. Mean age at onset was 26.6 ± 12.2 years. Of the 18 cases with deviations ≤ 20 PD, 16 presented with diplopia at distance and fusion at near vision at the onset of deviation; differences between distance and near deviations were < 8 PD; all cases except one were treated with prism and diplopia resolved. Of the 29 cases with deviations > 20 PD, 5 were mild hypermetropic with age at onset between 5 and 19 years, 16 were myopic, and 8 were emmetropic with age at onset > 12 years; 24 were surgically treated and 5 cases remained under observation; all 24 cases achieved normal retinal correspondence or fusion or stereopsis on postoperative day 1 in synoptophore; in 23 cases diplopia or visual confusion resolved postoperatively. Of the 47 cases, brain and orbital imaging in 2 cases revealed a tumor in the cerebellopontine angle and 1 case involved spinocerebellar ataxia as revealed by genetic testing. AACE in this study was characterized by a sudden onset of concomitant nonaccommodative esotropia with diplopia or visual confusion at 5 years of age or older and the potential for normal binocular vision. We suggest that AACE can be divided into 2 subgroups consisting of patients with relatively small versus large angle deviations. Coexisting or underlying neurological diseases were infrequent in AACE. PMID:26705210

  14. Ontogenetic Shape Change in the Chicken Brain: Implications for Paleontology

    PubMed Central

    Kawabe, Soichiro; Matsuda, Seiji; Tsunekawa, Naoki; Endo, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Paleontologists have investigated brain morphology of extinct birds with little information on post-hatching changes in avian brain morphology. Without the knowledge of ontogenesis, assessing brain morphology in fossil taxa could lead to misinterpretation of the phylogeny or neurosensory development of extinct species. Hence, it is imperative to determine how avian brain morphology changes during post-hatching growth. In this study, chicken brain shape was compared at various developmental stages using three-dimensional (3D) geometric morphometric analysis and the growth rate of brain regions was evaluated to explore post-hatching morphological changes. Microscopic MRI (μMRI) was used to acquire in vivo data from living and post-mortem chicken brains. The telencephalon rotates caudoventrally during growth. This change in shape leads to a relative caudodorsal rotation of the cerebellum and myelencephalon. In addition, all brain regions elongate rostrocaudally and this leads to a more slender brain shape. The growth rates of each brain region were constant and the slopes from the growth formula were parallel. The dominant pattern of ontogenetic shape change corresponded with interspecific shape changes due to increasing brain size. That is, the interspecific and ontogenetic changes in brain shape due to increased size have similar patterns. Although the shape of the brain and each brain region changed considerably, the volume ratio of each brain region did not change. This suggests that the brain can change its shape after completing functional differentiation of the brain regions. Moreover, these results show that consideration of ontogenetic changes in brain shape is necessary for an accurate assessment of brain morphology in paleontological studies. PMID:26053849

  15. Ontogenetic Shape Change in the Chicken Brain: Implications for Paleontology.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Soichiro; Matsuda, Seiji; Tsunekawa, Naoki; Endo, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Paleontologists have investigated brain morphology of extinct birds with little information on post-hatching changes in avian brain morphology. Without the knowledge of ontogenesis, assessing brain morphology in fossil taxa could lead to misinterpretation of the phylogeny or neurosensory development of extinct species. Hence, it is imperative to determine how avian brain morphology changes during post-hatching growth. In this study, chicken brain shape was compared at various developmental stages using three-dimensional (3D) geometric morphometric analysis and the growth rate of brain regions was evaluated to explore post-hatching morphological changes. Microscopic MRI (μMRI) was used to acquire in vivo data from living and post-mortem chicken brains. The telencephalon rotates caudoventrally during growth. This change in shape leads to a relative caudodorsal rotation of the cerebellum and myelencephalon. In addition, all brain regions elongate rostrocaudally and this leads to a more slender brain shape. The growth rates of each brain region were constant and the slopes from the growth formula were parallel. The dominant pattern of ontogenetic shape change corresponded with interspecific shape changes due to increasing brain size. That is, the interspecific and ontogenetic changes in brain shape due to increased size have similar patterns. Although the shape of the brain and each brain region changed considerably, the volume ratio of each brain region did not change. This suggests that the brain can change its shape after completing functional differentiation of the brain regions. Moreover, these results show that consideration of ontogenetic changes in brain shape is necessary for an accurate assessment of brain morphology in paleontological studies. PMID:26053849

  16. Pre- and Post-Natal Stress Programming: Developmental Exposure to Glucocorticoids Causes Long-Term Brain-Region Specific Changes to Transcriptome in the Precocial Japanese Quail.

    PubMed

    Marasco, V; Herzyk, P; Robinson, J; Spencer, K A

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to stress during early development can permanently influence an individual's physiology and behaviour, and affect its subsequent health. The extent to which elevated glucocorticoids cause such long-term 'programming' remains largely untested. In the present study, using the Japanese quail as our study species, we independently manipulated exposure to corticosterone during pre- and/or post-natal development and investigated the subsequent effects on global gene expression profiles within the hippocampus and hypothalamus upon achieving adulthood. Our results showed that the changes in transcriptome profiles in response to corticosterone exposure clearly differed between the hippocampus and the hypothalamus. We also showed that these effects depended on the developmental timing of exposure and identified brain-region specific gene expression patterns that were either: (i) similarly altered by corticosterone regardless of the developmental stage in which hormonal exposure occurred or (ii) specifically and uniquely altered by either pre-natal or post-natal exposure to corticosterone. Corticosterone-treated birds showed alterations in networks of genes that included known markers of the programming actions of early-life adversity (e.g. brain-derived neurotrophic factor and mineralocorticoid receptor within the hippocampus; corticotrophin-releasing hormone and serotonin receptors in the hypothalamus). Altogether, for the first time, these findings provide experimental support for the hypothesis that exposure to elevated glucocorticoids during development may be a key hormonal signalling pathway through which the long-term phenotypic effects associated with early-life adversity emerge and potentially persist throughout the lifespan. These data also highlight that stressors might have different long-lasting impacts on the brain transcriptome depending on the developmental stage in which they are experienced; more work is now required to relate these mechanisms to

  17. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  18. Neurobehavioural effects of developmental toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Philippe; Landrigan, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disabilities, including autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, dyslexia, and other cognitive impairments, affect millions of children worldwide, and some diagnoses seem to be increasing in frequency. Industrial chemicals that injure the developing brain are among the known causes for this rise in prevalence. In 2006, we did a systematic review and identified five industrial chemicals as developmental neurotoxicants: lead, methylmercury, polychlorinated biphenyls, arsenic, and toluene. Since 2006, epidemiological studies have documented six additional developmental neurotoxicants—manganese, fluoride, chlorpyrifos, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, and the polybrominated diphenyl ethers. We postulate that even more neurotoxicants remain undiscovered. To control the pandemic of developmental neurotoxicity, we propose a global prevention strategy. Untested chemicals should not be presumed to be safe to brain development, and chemicals in existing use and all new chemicals must therefore be tested for developmental neurotoxicity. To coordinate these efforts and to accelerate translation of science into prevention, we propose the urgent formation of a new international clearinghouse. PMID:24556010

  19. Development and modulation of intrinsic membrane properties control the temporal precision of auditory brain stem neurons.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Delwen L; Gleiss, Sarah A; Berger, Christina; Kümpfbeck, Franziska S; Ammer, Julian J; Felmy, Felix

    2015-01-15

    Passive and active membrane properties determine the voltage responses of neurons. Within the auditory brain stem, refinements in these intrinsic properties during late postnatal development usually generate short integration times and precise action-potential generation. This developmentally acquired temporal precision is crucial for auditory signal processing. How the interactions of these intrinsic properties develop in concert to enable auditory neurons to transfer information with high temporal precision has not yet been elucidated in detail. Here, we show how the developmental interaction of intrinsic membrane parameters generates high firing precision. We performed in vitro recordings from neurons of postnatal days 9-28 in the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus of Mongolian gerbils, an auditory brain stem structure that converts excitatory to inhibitory information with high temporal precision. During this developmental period, the input resistance and capacitance decrease, and action potentials acquire faster kinetics and enhanced precision. Depending on the stimulation time course, the input resistance and capacitance contribute differentially to action-potential thresholds. The decrease in input resistance, however, is sufficient to explain the enhanced action-potential precision. Alterations in passive membrane properties also interact with a developmental change in potassium currents to generate the emergence of the mature firing pattern, characteristic of coincidence-detector neurons. Cholinergic receptor-mediated depolarizations further modulate this intrinsic excitability profile by eliciting changes in the threshold and firing pattern, irrespective of the developmental stage. Thus our findings reveal how intrinsic membrane properties interact developmentally to promote temporally precise information processing. PMID:25355963

  20. Modeling Developmental Transitions in Adaptive Resonance Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raijmakers, Maartje E. J.; Molenaar, Peter C. M.

    2004-01-01

    Neural networks are applied to a theoretical subject in developmental psychology: modeling developmental transitions. Two issues that are involved will be discussed: discontinuities and acquiring qualitatively new knowledge. We will argue that by the appearance of a bifurcation, a neural network can show discontinuities and may acquire…

  1. Arguments from Developmental Order.

    PubMed

    Stöckle-Schobel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I investigate a special type of argument regarding the role of development in theorizing about psychological processes and cognitive capacities. Among the issues that developmental psychologists study, discovering the ontogenetic trajectory of mechanisms or capacities underpinning our cognitive functions ranks highly. The order in which functions are developed or capacities are acquired is a matter of debate between competing psychological theories, and also philosophical conceptions of the mind - getting the role and the significance of the different steps in this order right could be seen as an important virtue of such theories. Thus, a special kind of strategy in arguments between competing philosophical or psychological theories is using developmental order in arguing for or against a given psychological claim. In this article, I will introduce an analysis of arguments from developmental order, which come in two general types: arguments emphasizing the importance of the early cognitive processes and arguments emphasizing the late cognitive processes. I will discuss their role in one of the central tools for evaluating scientific theories, namely in making inferences to the best explanation. I will argue that appeal to developmental order is, by itself, an insufficient criterion for theory choice and has to be part of an argument based on other core explanatory or empirical virtues. I will end by proposing a more concerted study of philosophical issues concerning (cognitive) development, and I will present some topics that also pertain to a full-fledged 'philosophy of development.' PMID:27242648

  2. Arguments from Developmental Order

    PubMed Central

    Stöckle-Schobel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In this article1, I investigate a special type of argument regarding the role of development in theorizing about psychological processes and cognitive capacities. Among the issues that developmental psychologists study, discovering the ontogenetic trajectory of mechanisms or capacities underpinning our cognitive functions ranks highly. The order in which functions are developed or capacities are acquired is a matter of debate between competing psychological theories, and also philosophical conceptions of the mind – getting the role and the significance of the different steps in this order right could be seen as an important virtue of such theories. Thus, a special kind of strategy in arguments between competing philosophical or psychological theories is using developmental order in arguing for or against a given psychological claim. In this article, I will introduce an analysis of arguments from developmental order, which come in two general types: arguments emphasizing the importance of the early cognitive processes and arguments emphasizing the late cognitive processes. I will discuss their role in one of the central tools for evaluating scientific theories, namely in making inferences to the best explanation. I will argue that appeal to developmental order is, by itself, an insufficient criterion for theory choice and has to be part of an argument based on other core explanatory or empirical virtues. I will end by proposing a more concerted study of philosophical issues concerning (cognitive) development, and I will present some topics that also pertain to a full-fledged ‘philosophy of development.’ PMID:27242648

  3. Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration Performance in Children with Traumatic Brain Injury and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Griffin P.; Barchard, Kimberly A.; Bello, Danielle T.; Thaler, Nicholas S.; Ringdahl, Erik; Mayfield, Joan; Allen, Daniel N.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of visuoconstructional abilities is a common part of clinical neuropsychological assessment, and the Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration (VMI; K. E. Beery & N. A. Beery, 2004) is often used for this purpose. However, few studies have examined its psychometric properties when used to assess children and…

  4. Acquired reactive perforating collagenosis.

    PubMed

    Basak, P Y; Turkmen, C

    2001-01-01

    Acquired perforating disorder has been recognized as an uncommon distinct dermatosis in which altered collagen is eliminated through the epidermis. Several disorders accompanied by itching and scratching were reported to be associated with reactive perforating collagenosis. A 67-year-old white woman diagnosed as acquired reactive perforating collagenosis with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and congestive cardiac failure is presented. PMID:11525959

  5. Phonological Treatment Efficacy and Developmental Norms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierut, Judith A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Two studies, one within subjects and the other across subjects, evaluated the efficacy of teaching sounds in developmental sequence to nine young children (ages three to five). Treatment of later-acquired phonemes led to systemwide changes in untreated sound classes, whereas treatment of early-acquired phonemes did not. Findings suggest…

  6. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a kidney transplant or blood-filtering treatments called dialysis. The cysts are more likely to develop in people who are on kidney dialysis. The chance of developing acquired cystic kidney disease ...

  7. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... tends to be more serious than other lung infections because: People in the hospital are often very sick and cannot fight off ... prevent pneumonia. Most hospitals have programs to prevent hospital-acquired infections.

  8. Fueling and imaging brain activation

    PubMed Central

    Dienel, Gerald A

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic signals are used for imaging and spectroscopic studies of brain function and disease and to elucidate the cellular basis of neuroenergetics. The major fuel for activated neurons and the models for neuron–astrocyte interactions have been controversial because discordant results are obtained in different experimental systems, some of which do not correspond to adult brain. In rats, the infrastructure to support the high energetic demands of adult brain is acquired during postnatal development and matures after weaning. The brain's capacity to supply and metabolize glucose and oxygen exceeds demand over a wide range of rates, and the hyperaemic response to functional activation is rapid. Oxidative metabolism provides most ATP, but glycolysis is frequently preferentially up-regulated during activation. Underestimation of glucose utilization rates with labelled glucose arises from increased lactate production, lactate diffusion via transporters and astrocytic gap junctions, and lactate release to blood and perivascular drainage. Increased pentose shunt pathway flux also causes label loss from C1 of glucose. Glucose analogues are used to assay cellular activities, but interpretation of results is uncertain due to insufficient characterization of transport and phosphorylation kinetics. Brain activation in subjects with low blood-lactate levels causes a brain-to-blood lactate gradient, with rapid lactate release. In contrast, lactate flooding of brain during physical activity or infusion provides an opportunistic, supplemental fuel. Available evidence indicates that lactate shuttling coupled to its local oxidation during activation is a small fraction of glucose oxidation. Developmental, experimental, and physiological context is critical for interpretation of metabolic studies in terms of theoretical models. PMID:22612861

  9. Fueling and imaging brain activation.

    PubMed

    Dienel, Gerald A

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic signals are used for imaging and spectroscopic studies of brain function and disease and to elucidate the cellular basis of neuroenergetics. The major fuel for activated neurons and the models for neuron-astrocyte interactions have been controversial because discordant results are obtained in different experimental systems, some of which do not correspond to adult brain. In rats, the infrastructure to support the high energetic demands of adult brain is acquired during postnatal development and matures after weaning. The brain's capacity to supply and metabolize glucose and oxygen exceeds demand over a wide range of rates, and the hyperaemic response to functional activation is rapid. Oxidative metabolism provides most ATP, but glycolysis is frequently preferentially up-regulated during activation. Underestimation of glucose utilization rates with labelled glucose arises from increased lactate production, lactate diffusion via transporters and astrocytic gap junctions, and lactate release to blood and perivascular drainage. Increased pentose shunt pathway flux also causes label loss from C1 of glucose. Glucose analogues are used to assay cellular activities, but interpretation of results is uncertain due to insufficient characterization of transport and phosphorylation kinetics. Brain activation in subjects with low blood-lactate levels causes a brain-to-blood lactate gradient, with rapid lactate release. In contrast, lactate flooding of brain during physical activity or infusion provides an opportunistic, supplemental fuel. Available evidence indicates that lactate shuttling coupled to its local oxidation during activation is a small fraction of glucose oxidation. Developmental, experimental, and physiological context is critical for interpretation of metabolic studies in terms of theoretical models. PMID:22612861

  10. Developmental expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits in human white and gray matter: potential mechanism of increased vulnerability in the immature brain.

    PubMed

    Jantzie, Lauren L; Talos, Delia M; Jackson, Michele C; Park, Hyun-Kyung; Graham, Dionne A; Lechpammer, Mirna; Folkerth, Rebecca D; Volpe, Joseph J; Jensen, Frances E

    2015-02-01

    The pathophysiology of perinatal brain injury is multifactorial and involves hypoxia-ischemia (HI) and inflammation. N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) are present on neurons and glia in immature rodents, and NMDAR antagonists are protective in HI models. To enhance clinical translation of rodent data, we examined protein expression of 6 NMDAR subunits in postmortem human brains without injury from 20 postconceptional weeks through adulthood and in cases of periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). We hypothesized that the developing brain is intrinsically vulnerable to excitotoxicity via maturation-specific NMDAR levels and subunit composition. In normal white matter, NR1 and NR2B levels were highest in the preterm period compared with adult. In gray matter, NR2A and NR3A expression were highest near term. NR2A was significantly elevated in PVL white matter, with reduced NR1 and NR3A in gray matter compared with uninjured controls. These data suggest increased NMDAR-mediated vulnerability during early brain development due to an overall upregulation of individual receptors subunits, in particular, the presence of highly calcium permeable NR2B-containing and magnesium-insensitive NR3A NMDARs. These data improve understanding of molecular diversity and heterogeneity of NMDAR subunit expression in human brain development and supports an intrinsic prenatal vulnerability to glutamate-mediated injury; validating NMDAR subunit-specific targeted therapies for PVL. PMID:24046081

  11. Developmental Expression of N-Methyl-d-Aspartate (NMDA) Receptor Subunits in Human White and Gray Matter: Potential Mechanism of Increased Vulnerability in the Immature Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jantzie, Lauren L.; Talos, Delia M.; Jackson, Michele C.; Park, Hyun-Kyung; Graham, Dionne A.; Lechpammer, Mirna; Folkerth, Rebecca D.; Volpe, Joseph J.; Jensen, Frances E.

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of perinatal brain injury is multifactorial and involves hypoxia-ischemia (HI) and inflammation. N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) are present on neurons and glia in immature rodents, and NMDAR antagonists are protective in HI models. To enhance clinical translation of rodent data, we examined protein expression of 6 NMDAR subunits in postmortem human brains without injury from 20 postconceptional weeks through adulthood and in cases of periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). We hypothesized that the developing brain is intrinsically vulnerable to excitotoxicity via maturation-specific NMDAR levels and subunit composition. In normal white matter, NR1 and NR2B levels were highest in the preterm period compared with adult. In gray matter, NR2A and NR3A expression were highest near term. NR2A was significantly elevated in PVL white matter, with reduced NR1 and NR3A in gray matter compared with uninjured controls. These data suggest increased NMDAR-mediated vulnerability during early brain development due to an overall upregulation of individual receptors subunits, in particular, the presence of highly calcium permeable NR2B-containing and magnesium-insensitive NR3A NMDARs. These data improve understanding of molecular diversity and heterogeneity of NMDAR subunit expression in human brain development and supports an intrinsic prenatal vulnerability to glutamate-mediated injury; validating NMDAR subunit-specific targeted therapies for PVL. PMID:24046081

  12. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: neuroradiologic findings.

    PubMed

    Kelly, W M; Brant-Zawadzki, M

    1983-11-01

    Central nervous system complications depicted by CT in ten patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are described. Three patients had multifocal intra-axial enhancing lesions representing atypical brain abscesses (two with toxoplasmosis, one with candidiasis). A fourth patient with multifocal "ring" lesions whose biopsy was interpreted as suggestive of toxoplasmosis responded poorly to treatment. Following his death three months later of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, autopsy revealed primary intracerebral immunoblastic lymphoma. One patient had Kaposi sarcoma involving the right frontal lobe (seen as an enhancing mass on the CT scan). CT findings in the remaining five patients revealed mild to moderate enlargement of cerebrospinal fluid spaces (including ventricles and basal cisternae) as a result of cryptococcal meningitis in three patients and "aseptic" meningitis in two. The two patients in whom early biopsy confirmed toxoplasmosis responded well to anti-infective therapy, resulting in dramatic clinical recoveries. PMID:6622693

  13. Watching the fetal brain at 'rest'.

    PubMed

    Schöpf, V; Kasprian, G; Brugger, P C; Prayer, D

    2012-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has allowed insights into the spatiotemporal distribution of human brain networks. According to the neurophysiological property of the fetal brain to generate spontaneous activity, we aimed to determine the feasibility of investigating the maturation of intrinsic networks, beginning at gestational week 20 in healthy human fetuses by combining resting-state fMRI and an analytical approach, independent component analysis (ICA). In this study, functional images of 16 fetuses with morphologically normal brain development, from 20 to 36 gestational weeks of age, were acquired on a 1.5T unit (Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands) using single-shot, gradient-recalled echo-planar imaging. After preprocessing (motion correction, brain extraction), images were analyzed using single-subject ICA. We visualized a bilateral occipital network and medial and lateral prefrontal activity pattern that involved the future Brodmann areas 9-11. Furthermore, there was one either predominantly right (3/7 cases) or left (4/7 cases) hemispheric lateralized network that involved the superior temporal cortical regions (Brodmann areas 22 and 39). Frequency oscillations were in the range of 0.01-0.06Hz for all networks. This study shows that resting-state networks (RSNs) are shaped and are detectable in utero. Further investigations of resting-state measurements in the fetus may therefore allow developmental brain activity monitoring and may provide insights into early brain function. PMID:22044604

  14. Developmental delay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrition support is essential for the care of the child with developmental delay. After a thorough evaluation, an individualized intervention plan that accounts for the child’s nutrition status, feeding ability, and medical condition may be determined. Nutrition assessments may be performed at leas...

  15. [Developmental Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue contains contributions by parents, practitioners, researchers, administrators, and providers of technical assistance, which explore aspects of the complex process of developmental assessment of infants and young children. They describe what is helpful and what can be harmful in current assessment practice. They offer…

  16. Probabilistic maps of the white matter tracts with known associated functions on the neonatal brain atlas: Application to evaluate longitudinal developmental trajectories in term-born and preterm-born infants.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Kentaro; Chang, Linda; Yamakawa, Robyn; Hayama, Sara; Buchthal, Steven; Alicata, Daniel; Andres, Tamara; Castillo, Deborrah; Oishi, Kumiko; Skranes, Jon; Ernst, Thomas; Oishi, Kenichi

    2016-03-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been widely used to investigate the development of the neonatal and infant brain, and deviations related to various diseases or medical conditions like preterm birth. In this study, we created a probabilistic map of fiber pathways with known associated functions, on a published neonatal multimodal atlas. The pathways-of-interest include the superficial white matter (SWM) fibers just beneath the specific cytoarchitectonically defined cortical areas, which were difficult to evaluate with existing DTI analysis methods. The Jülich cytoarchitectonic atlas was applied to define cortical areas related to specific brain functions, and the Dynamic Programming (DP) method was applied to delineate the white matter pathways traversing through the SWM. Probabilistic maps were created for pathways related to motor, somatosensory, auditory, visual, and limbic functions, as well as major white matter tracts, such as the corpus callosum, the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and the middle cerebellar peduncle, by delineating these structures in eleven healthy term-born neonates. In order to characterize maturation-related changes in diffusivity measures of these pathways, the probabilistic maps were then applied to DTIs of 49 healthy infants who were longitudinally scanned at three time-points, approximately five weeks apart. First, we investigated the normal developmental pattern based on 19 term-born infants. Next, we analyzed 30 preterm-born infants to identify developmental patterns related to preterm birth. Last, we investigated the difference in diffusion measures between these groups to evaluate the effects of preterm birth on the development of these functional pathways. Term-born and preterm-born infants both demonstrated a time-dependent decrease in diffusivity, indicating postnatal maturation in these pathways, with laterality seen in the corticospinal tract and the optic radiation. The comparison between term- and preterm

  17. Unraveling the Miswired Connectome: A Developmental Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Di Martino, Adriana; Fair, Damien A.; Kelly, Clare; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Castellanos, F. Xavier; Thomason, Moriah E.; Craddock, R. Cameron; Luna, Beatriz; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Milham, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The vast majority of mental illnesses can be conceptualized as developmental disorders of neural interactions within the connectome, or developmental miswiring. The recent maturation of pediatric in vivo brain imaging is bringing within reach the identification of clinically meaningful brain-based biomarkers of developmental disorders. Even more auspicious, is the ability to study the evolving connectome throughout life, beginning in utero, which promises to move the field from topological phenomenology to etiological nosology. Here, we scope advances in pediatric imaging of the brain connectome as the field faces the challenge of unraveling developmental miswiring. We highlight promises while also providing a pragmatic review of the many obstacles ahead that must be overcome to significantly impact public health. PMID:25233316

  18. Unraveling the miswired connectome: a developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Adriana; Fair, Damien A; Kelly, Clare; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Castellanos, F Xavier; Thomason, Moriah E; Craddock, R Cameron; Luna, Beatriz; Leventhal, Bennett L; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Milham, Michael P

    2014-09-17

    The vast majority of mental illnesses can be conceptualized as developmental disorders of neural interactions within the connectome, or developmental miswiring. The recent maturation of pediatric in vivo brain imaging is bringing the identification of clinically meaningful brain-based biomarkers of developmental disorders within reach. Even more auspicious is the ability to study the evolving connectome throughout life, beginning in utero, which promises to move the field from topological phenomenology to etiological nosology. Here, we scope advances in pediatric imaging of the brain connectome as the field faces the challenge of unraveling developmental miswiring. We highlight promises while also providing a pragmatic review of the many obstacles ahead that must be overcome to significantly impact public health. PMID:25233316

  19. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach. PMID:26186969

  20. Acquired von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Petrini, P

    1999-05-01

    Acquired von Willebrand disease (AvWD) is a syndrome that has clinical and laboratory features similar to hereditary vWD. In contrast to the latter it occurs in patients without a family history of previous bleeding tendency. PMID:23401904

  1. Developmental decisions

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, David V.; Saito, Richard Mako

    2012-01-01

    The small nematode C. elegans is characterized by developing through a highly coordinated, reproducible cell lineage that serves as the basis of many studies focusing on the development of multi-lineage organisms. Indeed, the reproducible cell lineage enables discovery of developmental defects that occur in even a single cell. Only recently has attention been focused on how these animals modify their genetically programmed cell lineages to adapt to altered environments. Here, we summarize the current understanding of how C. elegans responds to food deprivation by adapting their developmental program in order to conserve energy. In particular, we highlight the AMPK-mediated and insulin-like growth factor signaling pathways that are the principal regulators of induced cell cycle quiescence. PMID:22510569

  2. Analysis of the contribution of experimental bias, experimental noise, and inter-subject biological variability on the assessment of developmental trajectories in diffusion MRI studies of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Neda; Nayak, Amritha; Walker, Lindsay; Irfanoglu, M. Okan; Albert, Paul S.; Pierpaoli, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Metrics derived from the diffusion tensor, such as fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) have been used in many studies of postnatal brain development. A common finding of previous studies is that these tensor-derived measures vary widely even in healthy populations. This variability can be due to inherent inter-individual biological differences as well as experimental noise. Moreover, when comparing different studies, additional variability can be introduced by different acquisition protocols. In this study we examined scans of 61 individuals (aged 4–22 years) from the NIH MRI study of normal brain development. Two scans were collected with different protocols (low and high resolution). Our goal was to separate the contributions of biological variability and experimental noise to the overall measured variance, as well as to assess potential systematic effects related to the use of different protocols. We analyzed FA and MD in seventeen regions of interest. We found that biological variability for both FA and MD varies widely across brain regions; biological variability is highest for FA in the lateral part of the splenium and body of the corpus callosum along with the cingulum and the superior longitudinal fasciculus, and for MD in the optic radiations and the lateral part of the splenium. These regions with high inter-individual biological variability are the most likely candidates for assessing genetic and environmental effects in the developing brain. With respect to protocol-related effects, the lower resolution acquisition resulted in higher MD and lower FA values for the majority of regions compared with the higher resolution protocol. However, the majority of the regions did not show any age–protocol interaction, indicating similar trajectories were obtained irrespective of the protocol used. PMID:25583609

  3. Sense and antisense transcripts of the developmentally regulated murine hsp70.2 gene are expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping areas in the adult brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the spatial pattern of expression of a member of the hsp70 gene family, hsp70.2, in the mouse central nervous system. Surprisingly, RNA blot analysis and in situ hybridization revealed abundant expression of an 'antisense' hsp70.2 transcript in several areas of adult mouse brain. Two different transcripts recognized by sense and antisense riboprobes for the hsp70.2 gene were expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping neuronal populations. RNA blot analysis revealed low levels of the 2.7 kb transcript of hsp70.2 in several areas of the brain, with highest signal in the hippocampus. Abundant expression of a slightly larger (approximately 2.8 kb) 'antisense' transcript was detected in several brain regions, notably in the brainstem, cerebellum, mesencephalic tectum, thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus. In situ hybridization revealed that the sense and antisense transcripts were both predominantly neuronal and localized to the same cell types in the granular layer of the cerebellum, trapezoid nucleus of the superior olivary complex, locus coeruleus and hippocampus. The hsp70.2 antisense transcripts were particularly abundant in the frontal cortex, dentate gyrus, subthalamic nucleus, zona incerta, superior and inferior colliculi, central gray, brainstem, and cerebellar Purkinje cells. Our findings have revealed a distinct cellular and spatial localization of both sense and antisense transcripts, demonstrating a new level of complexity in the function of the heat shock genes.

  4. Developmental changes in the activities of aromatic amino acid decarboxylase and catechol-O-methyl transferase in the porcine brain: a positron emission tomography study.

    PubMed

    Brust, Peter; Walter, Bernd; Hinz, Rainer; Füchtner, Frank; Müller, Marco; Steinbach, Jörg; Bauer, Reinhard

    2004-07-01

    Newborn (7-10 days old) and young (6-8 weeks old) pigs were used to study the metabolism of 6-[18F]fluoro-L-DOPA (FDOPA) in various brain regions with positron emission tomography (PET). Compartmental modeling of PET data was used to calculate the rate constants for the decarboxylation of FDOPA (k3) and for the metabolism of the resulting [18F]fluoro-dopamine (kcl). Whereas general physiological parameters such as cerebral blood flow, cerebral oxygen uptake, arterial blood gases and glucose concentration remained unchanged in young pigs as compared to newborns, a 50-200% increase of k3 in frontal cortex, striatum and mesencephalon was found. Also a 60% enhancement of kcl in the frontal cortex was measured, which is related to changes of the catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT) activity and implies a special function of this enzyme in the development of this brain region. In addition, measurement of plasma metabolites of FDOPA with HPLC was performed. The metabolism of FDOPA in young pigs was significantly faster than in newborns. Calculation of the rate constant for O-methylation of FDOPA by COMT revealed a significant elevation of this enzyme activity in young pigs compared to newborns. The increase of AADC and COMT activity with brain development is considered to be associated with special stages of neuronal maturation and tissue differentiation. PMID:15196667

  5. si-RNA inhibition of brain insulin or insulin-like growth factor receptors causes developmental cerebellar abnormalities: relevance to fetal alcohol spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In experimental models of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), cerebellar hypoplasia and hypofoliation are associated with insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) resistance with impaired signaling through pathways that mediate growth, survival, plasticity, metabolism, and neurotransmitter function. To more directly assess the roles of impaired insulin and IGF signaling during brain development, we administered intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of si-RNA targeting the insulin receptor, (InR), IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R), or IGF-2R into postnatal day 2 (P2) Long Evans rat pups and examined the sustained effects on cerebellar function, structure, and neurotransmitter-related gene expression (P20). Results Rotarod tests on P20 demonstrated significant impairments in motor function, and histological studies revealed pronounced cerebellar hypotrophy, hypoplasia, and hypofoliation in si-InR, si-IGF-1R, and si-IGF-2R treated rats. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that si-InR, and to a lesser extent si-IGF-2R, broadly inhibited expression of insulin and IGF-2 polypeptides, and insulin, IGF-1, and IGF-2 receptors in the brain. ELISA studies showed that si-InR increased cerebellar levels of tau, phospho-tau and β-actin, and inhibited GAPDH. In addition, si-InR, si-IGF-1R, and si-IGF-2R inhibited expression of choline acetyltransferase, which mediates motor function. Although the ICV si-RNA treatments generally spared the neurotrophin and neurotrophin receptor expression, si-InR and si-IGF-1R inhibited NT3, while si-IGF-1R suppressed BDNF. Conclusions early postnatal inhibition of brain InR expression, and to lesser extents, IGF-R, causes structural and functional abnormalities that resemble effects of FASD. The findings suggest that major abnormalities in brains with FASD are mediated by impairments in insulin/IGF signaling. Potential therapeutic strategies to reduce the long-term impact of prenatal alcohol exposure may include treatment with agents

  6. School Reentry for Children with Acquired Central Nervous Systems Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Joan; Porter, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Onset of acquired central nervous system (CNS) injury during the normal developmental process of childhood can have impact on cognitive, behavioral, and motor function. This alteration of function often necessitates special education programming, modifications, and accommodations in the education setting for successful school reentry. Special…

  7. The duplication 17p13.3 phenotype: analysis of 21 families delineates developmental, behavioral and brain abnormalities, and rare variant phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Curry, Cynthia J; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Grant, Erica; Gripp, Karen W; Anderson, Carol; Aylsworth, Arthur S; Saad, Taha Ben; Chizhikov, Victor V; Dybose, Giedre; Fagerberg, Christina; Falco, Michelle; Fels, Christina; Fichera, Marco; Graakjaer, Jesper; Greco, Donatella; Hair, Jennifer; Hopkins, Elizabeth; Huggins, Marlene; Ladda, Roger; Li, Chumei; Moeschler, John; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J M; Ozmore, Jillian R; Reitano, Santina; Romano, Corrado; Roos, Laura; Schnur, Rhonda E; Sell, Susan; Suwannarat, Pim; Svaneby, Dea; Szybowska, Marta; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Tervo, Raymond; Tsai, Anne Chun-Hui; Tucker, Megan; Vallee, Stephanie; Wheeler, Ferrin C; Zand, Dina J; Barkovich, A James; Aradhya, Swaroop; Shaffer, Lisa G; Dobyns, William B

    2013-08-01

    Chromosome 17p13.3 is a gene rich region that when deleted is associated with the well-known Miller-Dieker syndrome. A recently described duplication syndrome involving this region has been associated with intellectual impairment, autism and occasional brain MRI abnormalities. We report 34 additional patients from 21 families to further delineate the clinical, neurological, behavioral, and brain imaging findings. We found a highly diverse phenotype with inter- and intrafamilial variability, especially in cognitive development. The most specific phenotype occurred in individuals with large duplications that include both the YWHAE and LIS1 genes. These patients had a relatively distinct facial phenotype and frequent structural brain abnormalities involving the corpus callosum, cerebellar vermis, and cranial base. Autism spectrum disorders were seen in a third of duplication probands, most commonly in those with duplications of YWHAE and flanking genes such as CRK. The typical neurobehavioral phenotype was usually seen in those with the larger duplications. We did not confirm the association of early overgrowth with involvement of YWHAE and CRK, or growth failure with duplications of LIS1. Older patients were often overweight. Three variant phenotypes included cleft lip/palate (CLP), split hand/foot with long bone deficiency (SHFLD), and a connective tissue phenotype resembling Marfan syndrome. The duplications in patients with clefts appear to disrupt ABR, while the SHFLD phenotype was associated with duplication of BHLHA9 as noted in two recent reports. The connective tissue phenotype did not have a convincing critical region. Our experience with this large cohort expands knowledge of this diverse duplication syndrome. PMID:23813913

  8. Acquired von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shaji; Pruthi, Rajiv K; Nichols, William L

    2002-02-01

    Acquired von Willebrand disease (AvWD) is a relatively rare acquired bleeding disorder that usually occurs in elderly patients, in whom its recognition may be delayed. Patients usually present predominantly with mucocutaneous bleeding, with no previous history of bleeding abnormalities and no clinically meaningful family history. Various underlying diseases have been associated with AvWD, most commonly hematoproliferative disorders, including monoclonal gammopathies, lymphoproliferative disorders, and myeloproliferative disorders. The pathogenesis of AvWD remains incompletely understood but includes autoantibodies directed against the von Willebrand factor (vWF), leading to a more rapid clearance from the circulation or interference with its function, adsorption of vWF by tumor cells, and nonimmunologic mechanisms of destruction. Laboratory evaluation usually reveals a pattern of prolonged bleeding time and decreased levels of vWF antigen, ristocetin cofactor activity, and factor VIII coagulant activity consistent with a diagnosis of vWD. Acquired vWD is distinguished from the congenital form by age at presentation, absence of a personal and family history of bleeding disorders, and, often, presence of a hematoproliferative or autoimmune disorder. The severity of the bleeding varies considerably among patients. Therapeutic options include desmopressin and certain factor VIII concentrates that also contain vWF. Successful treatment of the associated illness can reverse the clinical and laboratory manifestations. Intravenous immunoglobulins have also shown some efficacy in the management of AvWD, especially cases associated with monoclonal gammopathies. Awareness of AvWD is essential for diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:11838652

  9. Neonatal Brain Tissue Classification with Morphological Adaptation and Unified Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Beare, Richard J.; Chen, Jian; Kelly, Claire E.; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Smyser, Christopher D.; Rogers, Cynthia E.; Loh, Wai Y.; Matthews, Lillian G.; Cheong, Jeanie L. Y.; Spittle, Alicia J.; Anderson, Peter J.; Doyle, Lex W.; Inder, Terrie E.; Seal, Marc L.; Thompson, Deanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the distribution of brain tissue types (tissue classification) in neonates is necessary for studying typical and atypical brain development, such as that associated with preterm birth, and may provide biomarkers for neurodevelopmental outcomes. Compared with magnetic resonance images of adults, neonatal images present specific challenges that require the development of specialized, population-specific methods. This paper introduces MANTiS (Morphologically Adaptive Neonatal Tissue Segmentation), which extends the unified segmentation approach to tissue classification implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) software to neonates. MANTiS utilizes a combination of unified segmentation, template adaptation via morphological segmentation tools and topological filtering, to segment the neonatal brain into eight tissue classes: cortical gray matter, white matter, deep nuclear gray matter, cerebellum, brainstem, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), hippocampus and amygdala. We evaluated the performance of MANTiS using two independent datasets. The first dataset, provided by the NeoBrainS12 challenge, consisted of coronal T2-weighted images of preterm infants (born ≤30 weeks' gestation) acquired at 30 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5), coronal T2-weighted images of preterm infants acquired at 40 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5) and axial T2-weighted images of preterm infants acquired at 40 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5). The second dataset, provided by the Washington University NeuroDevelopmental Research (WUNDeR) group, consisted of T2-weighted images of preterm infants (born <30 weeks' gestation) acquired shortly after birth (n = 12), preterm infants acquired at term-equivalent age (n = 12), and healthy term-born infants (born ≥38 weeks' gestation) acquired within the first 9 days of life (n = 12). For the NeoBrainS12 dataset, mean Dice scores comparing MANTiS with manual segmentations were all above 0.7, except for the cortical gray

  10. Inside the Adolescent Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, Stacy S.

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Jay Giedd says that the main alterations in the adolescent brain are the inverted U-shaped developmental trajectories with late childhood/early teen peaks for gray matter volume among others. Giedd adds that the adolescent brain is vulnerable to substances that artificially modulate dopamine levels since its reward system is in a state of flux.

  11. Sex- and region-specific alterations of progesterone receptor mRNA levels and estrogen sensitivity in rat brain following developmental exposure to the estrogenic UV filter 4-methylbenzylidene camphor.

    PubMed

    Maerkel, Kirsten; Lichtensteiger, Walter; Durrer, Stefan; Conscience, Marianne; Schlumpf, Margret

    2005-05-01

    Recently, we reported on in vitro and in vivo estrogenic activity of UV filters and on developmental toxicity of 4-methylbenzylidene (4-MBC) camphor [Schlumpf, M., Cotton, B., Conscience, M., Haller, V., Steinmann, B., Lichtensteiger, W., 2001a. In vitro and in vivo estrogenicity of UV screens. Environ. Health Perspect. 109, 239; Schlumpf, M., Berger, L., Cotton, B., Conscience-Egli, M., Durrer, S., Fleischmann, I., Haller, V., Maerkel, K., Lichtensteiger, W., 2001b. Estrogen active UV screens. SÖFW-J. 7, 10]. 4-MBC (7, 24, 47mg/(kgday)) was administered in chow to long Evans rats from 10 weeks before mating of the parent (F0) generation until adulthood of the F1 generation. Peripheral reproductive organs and central nervous system were studied in adult offspring. mRNA expression of progesterone receptor (PR), an estrogen-regulated gene, was investigated in medial preoptic area (MPO) and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) by real-time RT-PCR. We analyzed intact 12-week-old male and female offspring under steady state conditions and adult gonadectomized offspring 6h after a single s.c. injection of estradiol-17β (E2) (10 or 50μg/kg) in order to assess estrogen sensitivity. At steady state conditions we observed significantly higher PR mRNA expression in VMH of control females versus control males. 4-MBC exposed females exhibited a decrease in PR mRNA to levels of control males. The increase in PR mRNA in response to E2 was higher in VMH of males of both 4-MBC groups as compared to control males. PR mRNA levels were similar in MPO of control males and females. Developmental 4-MBC exposure increased PR mRNA levels in male MPO, but did not significantly change female levels. The acute response to the lower E2 dose was decreased in MPO of 4-MBC-exposed males, whereas females of the 7mg/kg dose group exhibited an increased reaction to 50μg/kg of E2. Our data indicate that developmental exposure to endocrine active chemicals such as the UV filter 4-MBC can

  12. Rethinking responsibility in offenders with acquired paedophilia: punishment or treatment?

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Frédéric; Focquaert, Farah

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the current neurobiological literature on the aetiology of developmental and acquired paedophilia and examines what the consequences could be in terms of responsibility and treatment for the latter. Addressing the question of responsibility and punishment of offenders with acquired paedophilia from a neurobiological perspective is controversial. Consequently it is essential to avoid hasty conclusions based strictly on neurobiological abnormality justifications. This study establishes a distinction between developmental and acquired paedophilia. The article investigates whether offenders who fulfil the diagnosis of acquired paedophilia should be held fully responsible, particularly in cases where the offender's conduct appears to result from volitionally controlled behaviour that is seemingly incompatible with a neurological cause. Moreover, the article explores how responsibility can be compromised when offenders with acquired paedophilia have (partially) preserved moral knowledge despite their sexual disorder. The article then examines the option of offering mandatory treatment as an alternative to imprisonment for offenders with acquired paedophilia. Furthermore, the article addresses the ethical issues related to offering any form of quasi-coercive treatment as a condition of release. This study concludes that decisions to fully or partially excuse an individual who fulfil the diagnosis of acquired paedophilia should take all relevant information into account, both neurobiological and other environmental evidence, and should proceed on a careful case by case analysis before sentencing or offering treatment. PMID:25725545

  13. Human temporal bone findings in acquired hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hald, J; Milroy, C M; Jensen, K D; Parving, A

    1991-11-01

    Histological studies of the auditory organ in patients with acquired hypothyroidism are scarce. Thus the aim of the present study was to examine the temporal bones and the brain in subjects with hypothyroidism. Four temporal bones and two brains from clinically and biochemically hypothyroid subjects were removed and evaluated by light microscopy determine to the morphological changes and deposition of neutral and acid glycosaminoglycans. An audiogram from one of the patients showed a sensorineural hearing loss, which could be ascribed to occupational noise exposure. The study revealed histological changes compatible with age and infectious disease. No accumulation of neutral or acid glycosaminoglycans could be demonstrated in the temporal bones, or in the brains. PMID:1761939

  14. Developmental dyscalculia: a dysconnection syndrome?

    PubMed

    Kucian, Karin; Ashkenazi, Simone Schwizer; Hänggi, Jürgen; Rotzer, Stephanie; Jäncke, Lutz; Martin, Ernst; von Aster, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Numerical understanding is important for everyday life. For children with developmental dyscalculia (DD), numbers and magnitudes present profound problems which are thought to be based upon neuronal impairments of key regions for numerical understanding. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible differences in white matter fibre integrity between children with DD and controls using diffusion tensor imaging. White matter integrity and behavioural measures were evaluated in 15 children with developmental dyscalculia aged around 10 years and 15 matched controls. The main finding, obtained by a whole brain group comparison, revealed reduced fractional anisotropy in the superior longitudinal fasciculus in children with developmental dyscalculia. In addition, a region of interest analysis exhibited prominent deficits in fibres of the superior longitudinal fasciculus adjacent to the intraparietal sulcus, which is thought to be the core region for number processing. To conclude, our results outline deficient fibre projection between parietal, temporal and frontal regions in children with developmental dyscalculia, and therefore raise the question of whether dyscalculia can be seen as a dysconnection syndrome. Since the superior longitudinal fasciculus is involved in the integration and control of distributed brain processes, the present results highlight the importance of considering broader domain-general mechanisms in the diagnosis and therapy of dyscalculia. PMID:23783231

  15. The development of brain network architecture.

    PubMed

    Wierenga, Lara M; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; van Dijk, Sarai; Rijks, Yvonne; de Reus, Marcel A; Durston, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    Brain connectivity shows protracted development throughout childhood and adolescence, and, as such, the topology of brain networks changes during this period. The complexity of these changes with development is reflected by regional differences in maturation. This study explored age-related changes in network topology and regional developmental patterns during childhood and adolescence. We acquired two sets of Diffusion Weighted Imaging-scans and anatomical T1-weighted scans. The first dataset included 85 typically developing individuals (53 males; 32 females), aged between 7 and 23 years and was acquired on a Philips Achieva 1.5 Tesla scanner. A second dataset (N = 38) was acquired on a different (but identical) 1.5 T scanner and was used for independent replication of our results. We reconstructed whole brain networks using tractography. We operationalized fiber tract development as changes in mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity with age. Most fibers showed maturational changes in mean and radial diffusivity values throughout childhood and adolescence, likely reflecting increasing white matter integrity. The largest age-related changes were observed in association fibers within and between the frontal and parietal lobes. Furthermore, there was a simultaneous age-related decrease in average path length (P < 0.0001), increase in node strength (P < 0.0001) as well as network clustering (P = 0.001), which may reflect fine-tuning of topological organization. These results suggest a sequential maturational model where connections between unimodal regions strengthen in childhood, followed by connections from these unimodal regions to association regions, while adolescence is characterized by the strengthening of connections between association regions within the frontal and parietal cortex. Hum Brain Mapp 37:717-729, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26595445

  16. [Acquired von Willebrand syndrome].

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (aVWS) is a rare, but probably underestimated, bleeding disorder that mimics the congenital form of von Willebrand disease (VWD) in terms of laboratory findings and clinical presentation. However, unlike congenital VWD, it arises in individuals with no personal or family history of bleeding. AVWS occurs in association with a variety of underlying disorders, including lymphoproliferative disorders, myeloproliferative disorders and cardiovascular diseases. The main pathogenic, clinical, laboratory and therapeutic aspects of this syndrome are concisely reported in this review. PMID:16913181

  17. A Developmental Approach to Gay and Lesbian Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, William P.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews the literature concerning homosexual identity development. Discusses at-risk issues (suicide, human immunodeficiency virus and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome infection, school problems) and developmental difficulties for gay and lesbian youth (sensitization, identity confusion, identity assumption, commitment). Proposes developmental…

  18. Developmental amnesia: Effect of age at injury

    PubMed Central

    Vargha-Khadem, F.; Salmond, C. H.; Watkins, K. E.; Friston, K. J.; Gadian, D. G.; Mishkin, M.

    2003-01-01

    Hypoxic–ischemic events sustained within the first year of life can result in developmental amnesia, a disorder characterized by markedly impaired episodic memory and relatively preserved semantic memory, in association with medial temporal pathology that appears to be restricted to the hippocampus. Here we compared children who had hypoxic–ischemic events before 1 year of age (early group, n = 6) with others who showed memory problems after suffering hypoxic–ischemic events between the ages of 6 and 14 years (late group, n = 5). Morphometric analyses of the whole brain revealed that, compared with age-matched controls, both groups had bilateral abnormalities in the hippocampus, putamen, and posterior thalamus, as well as in the right retrosplenial cortex. The two groups also showed similar reductions (≈40%) in hippocampal volumes. Neuropsychologically, the only significant differences between the two were on a few tests of immediate memory, where the early group surpassed the late group. The latter measures provided the only clear indication that very early injury can lead to greater functional sparing than injury acquired later in childhood, due perhaps to the greater plasticity of the infant brain. On measures of long-term memory, by contrast, the two groups had highly similar profiles, both showing roughly equivalent preservation of semantic memory combined with marked impairment in episodic memory. It thus appears that, if this selective memory disorder is a special syndrome related to the early occurrence of hypoxia-induced damage, then the effective age at injury for this syndrome extends from birth to puberty. PMID:12904585

  19. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome *

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N.J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1992-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of the utmost importance. PMID:1544049

  20. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Polverino, E; Torres Marti, A

    2011-02-01

    Despite the remarkable advances in antibiotic therapies, diagnostic tools, prevention campaigns and intensive care, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is still among the primary causes of death worldwide, and there have been no significant changes in mortality in the last decades. The clinical and economic burden of CAP makes it a major public health problem, particularly for children and the elderly. This issue provides a clinical overview of CAP, focusing on epidemiology, economic burden, diagnosis, risk stratification, treatment, clinical management, and prevention. Particular attention is given to some aspects related to the clinical management of CAP, such as the microbial etiology and the available tools to achieve it, the usefulness of new and old biomarkers, and antimicrobial and other non-antibiotic adjunctive therapies. Possible scenarios in which pneumonia does not respond to treatment are also analyzed to improve clinical outcomes of CAP. PMID:21242952

  1. Acquired Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

    PubMed Central

    Koval, Andrew; Danby, C. W. E.; Petermann, H.

    1965-01-01

    Currently, the porphyrias are classified in four main groups: congenital porphyria, acute intermittent porphyria, porphyria cutanea tarda hereditaria, and porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica. The acquired form of porphyria (porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica) occurs in older males and is nearly always associated with chronic alcoholism and hepatic cirrhosis. The main clinical changes are dermatological, with excessive skin fragility and photosensitivity resulting in erosions and bullae. Biochemically, high levels of uroporphyrin are found in the urine and stools. Treatment to date has been symptomatic and usually unsuccessful. A case of porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica is presented showing dramatic improvement of both the skin lesions and porphyrin levels in urine and blood following repeated phlebotomy. Possible mechanisms of action of phlebotomy on porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica are discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:14341652

  2. [ICU acquired neuromyopathy].

    PubMed

    Gueret, G; Guillouet, M; Vermeersch, V; Guillard, E; Talarmin, H; Nguyen, B-V; Rannou, F; Giroux-Metges, M-A; Pennec, J-P; Ozier, Y

    2013-09-01

    ICU acquired neuromyopathy (IANM) is the most frequent neurological pathology observed in ICU. Nerve and muscle defects are merged with neuromuscular junction abnormalities. Its physiopathology is complex. The aim is probably the redistribution of nutriments and metabolism towards defense against sepsis. The main risk factors are sepsis, its severity and its duration of evolution. IANM is usually diagnosed in view of difficulties in weaning from mechanical ventilation, but electrophysiology may allow an earlier diagnosis. There is no curative therapy, but early treatment of sepsis, glycemic control as well as early physiotherapy may decrease its incidence. The outcomes of IANM are an increase in morbi-mortality and possibly long-lasting neuromuscular abnormalities as far as tetraplegia. PMID:23958176

  3. Practical Aspects of Running Developmental Studies in the MEG

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Elizabeth W.

    2012-01-01

    Developmental neuroimaging studies offer a unique opportunity to gain insight into the underpinnings of various cognitive functions by examining age-related changes in brain structure and function. There is an increasing body of neuroimaging literature discussing issues related to testing children in developmental studies [8]. These deal with fMRI developmental studies and discuss methods [31], data interpretation [40], and theoretical approaches [26]. There has not yet been an equivalent discussion for MEG developmental studies. This paper will address issues specific to data acquisition, analysis, and interpretation for MEG developmental studies. PMID:21547482

  4. Developmentally-Based AIDS/HIV Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Mary E.; Bibace, Roger

    1990-01-01

    Presents a developmental approach to educating school-age children about acquired immunodeficiency syndrome/human immunodeficiency virus (AIDS/HIV). The paper describes, for three age groups, general characteristics of children's thought processes, ways in which they assimilate information about aspects of AIDS, and implications for educating…

  5. Developmental dyspraxia and developmental coordination disorder.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, M; Möbs, I

    1995-12-01

    This article discusses the role developmental dyspraxia plays in developmental coordination disorder (DCD), based upon a review of literature on apraxia, developmental dyspraxia, and DCD. Apraxia and dyspraxia have often been equated with DCD. However, it is argued that apraxia and dyspraxia primarily refer to the problems of motor sequencing and selection, which not all children with DCD exhibit. The author proposes to distinguish developmental dyspraxia from DCD. Other issues discussed include the assessment, etiology, and treatment of developmental dyspraxia and DCD, and the relationship between DCD and learning disabilities. A research agenda is offered regarding future directions to overcome current limitation. PMID:8866511

  6. Developmental alcohol and circadian clock function.

    PubMed

    Earnest, D J; Chen, W J; West, J R

    2001-01-01

    Studies in rats found that alcohol exposure during the early postnatal period, particularly during the brain-growth-spurt period, can result in cell loss in various brain regions and persistent behavioral impairments. Some investigators have speculated that the body's internal clock, which is located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the brain, may also be affected by developmental alcohol exposure. For example, alcohol-induced damage to the SCN cells and their function could result in disturbances of the circadian timekeeping function, and these disturbances might contribute to the behavioral impairments and affective disorders observed in people prenatally exposed to alcohol. Preliminary findings of studies conducted in rats suggest that developmental alcohol exposure may indeed interfere with circadian clock function as evidenced by a shortened circadian sleep-wake cycle and changes in the release of certain brain chemicals (i.e., neuropeptides) by SCN cells. PMID:11584552

  7. Developmental Thyroid Hormone Disruption: Prevalence, Environmental Contaminants and Neurodevelopmental Consequences

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are critical for growth and development and particularly brain development. There are numerous environmental agents that lead to marginal reductions of circulating TH. Although it is clear that severe developmental hypothyroidism is profoundly detrimental to...

  8. An enhanced and sensitive autocrine stimulation by transforming growth factor-alpha is acquired in the brain metastatic variant of a human non-small-cell lung cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Fang, K

    1996-12-01

    Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha)-mediated autocrine regulation in human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells NCI-H226 and its brain metastatic variant H226Br were compared. An enhanced TGF-alpha-induced dose-dependent mitogenic responsiveness in H226Br cells was observed. Neutralising antibody that binds TGF-alpha inhibits H226Br cell growth more effectively than NCI-H226 cell growth. Binding assay with 125I-labelled epidermal growth factor (EGF) revealed that H226Br has two types of EGF receptors (EGFRs), whereas the parental cell line, NCI-H226, has only one. H226Br cells contain twice as many EGFRs as H226 cells, as proved by Scatchard analysis and immune kinase assay. Northern analysis indicated that there is more EGFR transcript in H226Br than in NCI-H226, indicating a transcriptional EGFR gene elevation during metastasis progression. The level of accumulated immunoactive TGF-alpha is lower in the conditioned medium of H226Br than in that of NCI-H226. demonstrating down-regulation of TGF-alpha transcript. The accumulated data suggest an elevated and sensitive autocrine modulation by TGF-alpha and EGFR in immortalising the brain metastatic variant cells that were derived from a human NSCLC squamous cell line. PMID:8956792

  9. What Aspects of Face Processing Are Impaired in Developmental Prosopagnosia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grand, Richard; Cooper, Philip A.; Mondloch, Catherine J.; Lewis, Terri L.; Sagiv, Noam; de Gelder, Beatrice; Maurer, Daphne

    2006-01-01

    Developmental prosopagnosia (DP) is a severe impairment in identifying faces that is present from early in life and that occurs despite no apparent brain damage and intact visual and intellectual function. Here, we investigated what aspects of face processing are impaired/spared in developmental prosopagnosia by examining a relatively large group…

  10. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... confer control of X and therefore will file as an acquiring person. Because A held the plant prior to the... within two persons, “A” and “B.” Under this section, if V is to acquire corporation X, both “A” and “B... person. Examples: 1. Assume that person “Q” will acquire voting securities of corporation X held by...

  11. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... confer control of X and therefore will file as an acquiring person. Because A held the plant prior to the... within two persons, “A” and “B.” Under this section, if V is to acquire corporation X, both “A” and “B... person. Examples: 1. Assume that person “Q” will acquire voting securities of corporation X held by...

  12. Developmental stress impairs performance on an association task in male and female songbirds, but impairs auditory learning in females only.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Tara M; Morgan, Amanda; MacDougall-Shackleton, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    In songbirds, early-life environments critically shape song development. Many studies have demonstrated that developmental stress impairs song learning and the development of song-control regions of the brain in males. However, song has evolved through signaller-receiver networks and the effect stress has on the ability to receive auditory signals is equally important, especially for females who use song as an indicator of mate quality. Female song preferences have been the metric used to evaluate how developmental stress affects auditory learning, but preferences are shaped by many non-cognitive factors and preclude the evaluation of auditory learning abilities in males. To determine whether developmental stress specifically affects auditory learning in both sexes, we subjected juvenile European starlings, Sturnus vulgaris, to either an ad libitum or an unpredictable food supply treatment from 35 to 115 days of age. In adulthood, we assessed learning of both auditory and visual discrimination tasks. Females reared in the experimental group were slower than females in the control group to acquire a relative frequency auditory task, and slower than their male counterparts to acquire an absolute frequency auditory task. There was no difference in auditory performance between treatment groups for males. However, on the colour association task, birds from the experimental group committed more errors per trial than control birds. There was no correlation in performance across the cognitive tasks. Developmental stress did not affect all cognitive processes equally across the sexes. Our results suggest that the male auditory system may be more robust to developmental stress than that of females. PMID:26238792

  13. Neuropathophysiology of Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Quillinan, Nidia; Herson, Paco S; Traystman, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    Every year in the United States, millions of individuals incur ischemic brain injury from stroke, cardiac arrest, or traumatic brain injury. These acquired brain injuries can lead to death or long-term neurologic and neuropsychological impairments. The mechanisms of ischemic and traumatic brain injury that lead to these deficiencies result from a complex interplay of interdependent molecular pathways, including excitotoxicity, acidotoxicity, ionic imbalance, oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. This article reviews several mechanisms of brain injury and discusses recent developments. Although much is known from animal models of injury, it has been difficult to translate these effects to humans. PMID:27521191

  14. Revealing latent value of clinically acquired CTs of traumatic brain injury through multi-atlas segmentation in a retrospective study of 1,003 with external cross-validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Kelly, Patrick D.; Asman, Andrew J.; Kang, Hakmook; Patel, Mayur B.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Medical imaging plays a key role in guiding treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and for diagnosing intracranial hemorrhage; most commonly rapid computed tomography (CT) imaging is performed. Outcomes for patients with TBI are variable and difficult to predict upon hospital admission. Quantitative outcome scales (e.g., the Marshall classification) have been proposed to grade TBI severity on CT, but such measures have had relatively low value in staging patients by prognosis. Herein, we examine a cohort of 1,003 subjects admitted for TBI and imaged clinically to identify potential prognostic metrics using a "big data" paradigm. For all patients, a brain scan was segmented with multi-atlas labeling, and intensity/volume/texture features were computed in a localized manner. In a 10-fold crossvalidation approach, the explanatory value of the image-derived features is assessed for length of hospital stay (days), discharge disposition (five point scale from death to return home), and the Rancho Los Amigos functional outcome score (Rancho Score). Image-derived features increased the predictive R2 to 0.38 (from 0.18) for length of stay, to 0.51 (from 0.4) for discharge disposition, and to 0.31 (from 0.16) for Rancho Score (over models consisting only of non-imaging admission metrics, but including positive/negative radiological CT findings). This study demonstrates that high volume retrospective analysis of clinical imaging data can reveal imaging signatures with prognostic value. These targets are suited for follow-up validation and represent targets for future feature selection efforts. Moreover, the increase in prognostic value would improve staging for intervention assessment and provide more reliable guidance for patients.

  15. Toward a Narrower, More Pragmatic View of Developmental Dyspraxia

    PubMed Central

    Steinman, Kyle J.; Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Denckla, Martha B.

    2010-01-01

    Apraxia traditionally refers to impaired ability to carry out skilled movements in the absence of fundamental sensorimotor, language, or general cognitive impairment sufficient to preclude them. The child neurology literature includes a much broader and varied usage of the term developmental dyspraxia. It has been used to describe a wide range of motor symptoms, including clumsiness and general coordination difficulties, in various developmental disorders (including autistic spectrum disorders, developmental language disorders, and perinatal stroke). We argue for the need to restrict use of the term developmental dyspraxia to describe impaired performance of skilled gestures, recognizing that, unlike acquired adult-onset apraxia, coexisting sensory and motor problems may also be present. PMID:20032517

  16. Toward a narrower, more pragmatic view of developmental dyspraxia.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Kyle J; Mostofsky, Stewart H; Denckla, Martha B

    2010-01-01

    Apraxia traditionally refers to impaired ability to carry out skilled movements in the absence of fundamental sensorimotor, language, or general cognitive impairment sufficient to preclude them. The child neurology literature includes a much broader and varied usage of the term developmental dyspraxia. It has been used to describe a wide range of motor symptoms, including clumsiness and general coordination difficulties, in various developmental disorders (including autistic spectrum disorders, developmental language disorders, and perinatal stroke). We argue for the need to restrict use of the term developmental dyspraxia to describe impaired performance of skilled gestures, recognizing that, unlike acquired adult-onset apraxia, coexisting sensory and motor problems can also be present. PMID:20032517

  17. Disrupted white matter connectivity underlying developmental dyslexia: A machine learning approach.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zaixu; Xia, Zhichao; Su, Mengmeng; Shu, Hua; Gong, Gaolang

    2016-04-01

    Developmental dyslexia has been hypothesized to result from multiple causes and exhibit multiple manifestations, implying a distributed multidimensional effect on human brain. The disruption of specific white-matter (WM) tracts/regions has been observed in dyslexic children. However, it remains unknown if developmental dyslexia affects the human brain WM in a multidimensional manner. Being a natural tool for evaluating this hypothesis, the multivariate machine learning approach was applied in this study to compare 28 school-aged dyslexic children with 33 age-matched controls. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging were acquired to extract five multitype WM features at a regional level: white matter volume, fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity. A linear support vector machine (LSVM) classifier achieved an accuracy of 83.61% using these MRI features to distinguish dyslexic children from controls. Notably, the most discriminative features that contributed to the classification were primarily associated with WM regions within the putative reading network/system (e.g., the superior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, thalamocortical projections, and corpus callosum), the limbic system (e.g., the cingulum and fornix), and the motor system (e.g., the cerebellar peduncle, corona radiata, and corticospinal tract). These results were well replicated using a logistic regression classifier. These findings provided direct evidence supporting a multidimensional effect of developmental dyslexia on WM connectivity of human brain, and highlighted the involvement of WM tracts/regions beyond the well-recognized reading system in dyslexia. Finally, the discriminating results demonstrated a potential of WM neuroimaging features as imaging markers for identifying dyslexic individuals. PMID:26787263

  18. The Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience of Functional Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    Developmental cognitive neuroscience is a rapidly growing field that examines the relationships between biological development and cognitive ability. In the past decade, there has been ongoing refinement of concepts and methodology related to the study of "functional connectivity" among distributed brain regions believed to underlie cognition and…

  19. Developmental Outcomes after Early Prefrontal Cortex Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eslinger, Paul J.; Flaherty-Craig, Claire V.; Benton, Arthur L.

    2004-01-01

    The neuropsychological bases of cognitive, social, and moral development are minimally understood, with a seemingly wide chasm between developmental theories and brain maturation models. As one approach to bridging ideas in these areas, we review 10 cases of early prefrontal cortex damage from the clinical literature, highlighting overall clinical…

  20. Developmental Dyslexia: A Review of Biological Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galaburda, Albert M.

    1985-01-01

    The author considers cerebral dominance and brain asymmetry, the development of the cerebral cortex and examples of aberrancy, and diseases of the immune system, all of which relate to recent anatomical and epidemiological findings in developmental dyslexia. These discoveries have led to testable hypotheses which may enhance current understandings…

  1. Toward a Developmental Neurobiology of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polleux, Franck; Lauder, Jean M.

    2004-01-01

    Autism is a complex, behaviorally defined, developmental brain disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 1,000. It is now clear that autism is not a disease, but a syndrome with a strong genetic component. The etiology of autism is poorly defined both at the cellular and the molecular levels. Based on the fact that seizure activity is…

  2. Astrocytes and Developmental White Matter Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen, Ellora; Levison, Steven W.

    2006-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness that the astrocytes in the immature periventricular white matter are vulnerable to ischemia and respond to inflammation. Here we provide a synopsis of the articles that have evaluated the causes and consequences of developmental brain injuries to white matter astrocytes as well as the consequences of several…

  3. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and MRI reveal no evidence for brain mitochondrial dysfunction in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Neva M; Shaw, Dennis W W; Richards, Todd L; Estes, Annette M; Friedman, Seth D; Petropoulos, Helen; Artru, Alan A; Dager, Stephen R

    2012-01-01

    Brain mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as an etiologic factor in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((1)HMRS) and MRI were used to assess for evidence of brain mitochondrial dysfunction in longitudinal samples of children with ASD or developmental delay (DD), and cross-sectionally in typically developing (TD) children at 3-4, 6-7 and 9-10 years-of-age. A total of 239 studies from 130 unique participants (54ASD, 22DD, 54TD) were acquired. (1)HMRS and MRI revealed no evidence for brain mitochondrial dysfunction in the children with ASD. Findings do not support a substantive role for brain mitochondrial abnormalities in the etiology or symptom expression of ASD, nor the widespread use of hyperbaric oxygen treatment that has been advocated on the basis of this proposed relationship. PMID:21404085

  4. Developmental Dynamics of Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Danielle; Banerjee, Abhishek; Sur, Mriganka

    2016-01-01

    Rett Syndrome was long considered to be simply a disorder of postnatal development, with phenotypes that manifest only late in development and into adulthood. A variety of recent evidence demonstrates that the phenotypes of Rett Syndrome are present at the earliest stages of brain development, including developmental stages that define neurogenesis, migration, and patterning in addition to stages of synaptic and circuit development and plasticity. These phenotypes arise from the pleotropic effects of MeCP2, which is expressed very early in neuronal progenitors and continues to be expressed into adulthood. The effects of MeCP2 are mediated by diverse signaling, transcriptional, and epigenetic mechanisms. Attempts to reverse the effects of Rett Syndrome need to take into account the developmental dynamics and temporal impact of MeCP2 loss. PMID:26942018

  5. Developmental Dynamics of Rett Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Danielle; Banerjee, Abhishek; Sur, Mriganka

    2016-01-01

    Rett Syndrome was long considered to be simply a disorder of postnatal development, with phenotypes that manifest only late in development and into adulthood. A variety of recent evidence demonstrates that the phenotypes of Rett Syndrome are present at the earliest stages of brain development, including developmental stages that define neurogenesis, migration, and patterning in addition to stages of synaptic and circuit development and plasticity. These phenotypes arise from the pleotropic effects of MeCP2, which is expressed very early in neuronal progenitors and continues to be expressed into adulthood. The effects of MeCP2 are mediated by diverse signaling, transcriptional, and epigenetic mechanisms. Attempts to reverse the effects of Rett Syndrome need to take into account the developmental dynamics and temporal impact of MeCP2 loss. PMID:26942018

  6. 4D MEMRI atlas of neonatal FVB/N mouse brain development.

    PubMed

    Szulc, Kamila U; Lerch, Jason P; Nieman, Brian J; Bartelle, Benjamin B; Friedel, Miriam; Suero-Abreu, Giselle A; Watson, Charles; Joyner, Alexandra L; Turnbull, Daniel H

    2015-09-01

    The widespread use of the mouse as a model system to study brain development has created the need for noninvasive neuroimaging methods that can be applied to early postnatal mice. The goal of this study was to optimize in vivo three- (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) manganese (Mn)-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) approaches for acquiring and analyzing data from the developing mouse brain. The combination of custom, stage-dependent holders and self-gated (motion-correcting) 3D MRI sequences enabled the acquisition of high-resolution (100-μm isotropic), motion artifact-free brain images with a high level of contrast due to Mn-enhancement of numerous brain regions and nuclei. We acquired high-quality longitudinal brain images from two groups of FVB/N strain mice, six mice per group, each mouse imaged on alternate odd or even days (6 3D MEMRI images at each day) covering the developmental stages between postnatal days 1 to 11. The effects of Mn-exposure, anesthesia and MRI were assessed, showing small but significant transient effects on body weight and brain volume, which recovered with time and did not result in significant morphological differences when compared to controls. Metrics derived from deformation-based morphometry (DBM) were used for quantitative analysis of changes in volume and position of a number of brain regions. The cerebellum, a brain region undergoing significant changes in size and patterning at early postnatal stages, was analyzed in detail to demonstrate the spatiotemporal characterization made possible by this new atlas of mouse brain development. These results show that MEMRI is a powerful tool for quantitative analysis of mouse brain development, with great potential for in vivo phenotype analysis in mouse models of neurodevelopmental diseases. PMID:26037053

  7. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... acquired person is the pre-acquisition ultimate parent entity of the entity. (ii) The value of an... directors of B. A is deemed to be acquiring all of the assets of B as a result. (g) Transfers of patent... transfer of patent rights covered by this paragraph constitutes an asset acquisition; and (3) Patent...

  8. Translating Developmental Neuroscience to Substance Use Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Riggs, Nathaniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Several preventive interventions have demonstrated efficacy in reducing substance use. However, opportunities exist to further improve prevention approaches. The application of recent advances in developmental neuroscience can inform the design, implementation, and evaluation of substance use prevention programs. This paper first briefly describes the developmental integration of the prefrontal cortex with emotion and motivation centers of the brain, and the implications of this process for substance use vulnerability. Discussed next are specific examples of how developmental neuroscience can inform prevention timing, development, and evaluation. Contextual considerations are then suggested including a critical role for schools in substance misuse prevention. Finally, current theoretical and methodological challenges to the translation of developmental neuroscience to substance use prevention are discussed. PMID:26236576

  9. Human brain evolution: harnessing the genomics (r)evolution to link genes, cognition, and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Genevieve; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of the human brain has resulted in numerous specialized features including higher cognitive processes, such as language. The combination of our newfound communication expertise together with the process of transgenerational evolution at the epigenetic level has led to an exponential increase in human knowledge and abilities. In balance with these beneficent attainments though, the human brain has also acquired vulnerabilities to neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, which reflect genetic and environmental factors. To understand the mechanisms of this disease susceptibility, a deeper appreciation of the developmental processes and their relationship to underlying features of brain evolution will be necessary. Knowledge of whole genome sequence and structural variation via high throughput sequencing technology provides an unprecedented opportunity to view human evolution at high resolution. However, phenotype discovery is a critical component of these endeavors and the use of non-traditional model organisms will also be critical for piecing together a complete picture. Ultimately, the union of developmental studies of the brain with studies of unique phenotypes in a myriad of species will result in a more thorough model of the groundwork the human brain built upon. Furthermore, these integrative approaches should provide important insights into human diseases. PMID:20955931

  10. Cortical Volume and Developmental Instability Are Independent Predictors of General Intellectual Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoma, Robert J.; Yeo, Ronald A.; Gangestad, Steven W.; Halgren, Eric; Sanchez, Natalie M.; Lewine, Jeffrey D.

    2005-01-01

    Measures of developmental instability (DI) reflect developmental disruptions due to genetic and environmental perturbations during normal development. DI might be expected to influence the developmental course of brain development and hence intelligence, and several studies indicate this to be the case. The factors that mediate this relationship…

  11. Children Acquire Emotion Categories Gradually

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widen, Sherri C.; Russell, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Some accounts imply that basic-level emotion categories are acquired early and quickly, whereas others imply that they are acquired later and more gradually. Our study examined this question for fear, happiness, sadness, and anger in the context of children's categorization of emotional facial expressions. Children (N=168, 2-5 years) first labeled…

  12. Using Developmental Trajectories to Understand Developmental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Michael S. C.; Annaz, Dagmara; Ansari, Daniel; Scerif, Gaia; Jarrold, Chris; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, the authors present a tutorial on the use of developmental trajectories for studying language and cognitive impairments in developmental disorders and compare this method with the use of matching. Method: The authors assess the strengths, limitations, and practical implications of each method. The contrast between the…

  13. Developmental Biodynamics: Brain, Body, Behavior Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockman, Jeffrey J.; Thelen, Esther

    1993-01-01

    Advances in the neurosciences, biomechanics, and behavior sciences, along with attempts to integrate theories and findings across these disciplines, have led to a renewed interest in the study of motor development. Considers the contributions that have led to the reinvigoration of this field of study and its new interdisciplinary outlook. (MDM)

  14. Brain disorders and the biological role of music.

    PubMed

    Clark, Camilla N; Downey, Laura E; Warren, Jason D

    2015-03-01

    Despite its evident universality and high social value, the ultimate biological role of music and its connection to brain disorders remain poorly understood. Recent findings from basic neuroscience have shed fresh light on these old problems. New insights provided by clinical neuroscience concerning the effects of brain disorders promise to be particularly valuable in uncovering the underlying cognitive and neural architecture of music and for assessing candidate accounts of the biological role of music. Here we advance a new model of the biological role of music in human evolution and the link to brain disorders, drawing on diverse lines of evidence derived from comparative ethology, cognitive neuropsychology and neuroimaging studies in the normal and the disordered brain. We propose that music evolved from the call signals of our hominid ancestors as a means mentally to rehearse and predict potentially costly, affectively laden social routines in surrogate, coded, low-cost form: essentially, a mechanism for transforming emotional mental states efficiently and adaptively into social signals. This biological role of music has its legacy today in the disordered processing of music and mental states that characterizes certain developmental and acquired clinical syndromes of brain network disintegration. PMID:24847111

  15. Brain disorders and the biological role of music

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Camilla N.; Downey, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite its evident universality and high social value, the ultimate biological role of music and its connection to brain disorders remain poorly understood. Recent findings from basic neuroscience have shed fresh light on these old problems. New insights provided by clinical neuroscience concerning the effects of brain disorders promise to be particularly valuable in uncovering the underlying cognitive and neural architecture of music and for assessing candidate accounts of the biological role of music. Here we advance a new model of the biological role of music in human evolution and the link to brain disorders, drawing on diverse lines of evidence derived from comparative ethology, cognitive neuropsychology and neuroimaging studies in the normal and the disordered brain. We propose that music evolved from the call signals of our hominid ancestors as a means mentally to rehearse and predict potentially costly, affectively laden social routines in surrogate, coded, low-cost form: essentially, a mechanism for transforming emotional mental states efficiently and adaptively into social signals. This biological role of music has its legacy today in the disordered processing of music and mental states that characterizes certain developmental and acquired clinical syndromes of brain network disintegration. PMID:24847111

  16. Language and the Developing Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliot, Lise

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the centers of language in the brain and the critical period for language acquisition. Explains developmental milestones of language development--receptive language, babbling, short phrases, full sentences--in the context of brain development. Emphasizes parents' role in language development, including talking to the child, dialogic…

  17. Reading, Complexity and the Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goswami, Usha

    2008-01-01

    Brain imaging offers a new technology for understanding the acquisition of reading by children. It can contribute novel evidence concerning the key mechanisms supporting reading, and the brain systems that are involved. The extensive neural architecture that develops to support efficient reading testifies to the complex developmental processes…

  18. Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDDs): Overview Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs) are a primary focus of the NICHD’s ...

  19. Trade-offs between acquired and innate immune defenses in humans

    PubMed Central

    McDade, Thomas W.; Georgiev, Alexander V.; Kuzawa, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Immune defenses provide resistance against infectious disease that is critical to survival. But immune defenses are costly, and limited resources allocated to immunity are not available for other physiological or developmental processes. We propose a framework for explaining variation in patterns of investment in two important subsystems of anti-pathogen defense: innate (non-specific) and acquired (specific) immunity. The developmental costs of acquired immunity are high, but the costs of maintenance and activation are relatively low. Innate immunity imposes lower upfront developmental costs, but higher operating costs. Innate defenses are mobilized quickly and are effective against novel pathogens. Acquired responses are less effective against novel exposures, but more effective against secondary exposures due to immunological memory. Based on their distinct profiles of costs and effectiveness, we propose that the balance of investment in innate versus acquired immunity is variable, and that this balance is optimized in response to local ecological conditions early in development. Nutritional abundance, high pathogen exposure and low signals of extrinsic mortality risk during sensitive periods of immune development should all favor relatively higher levels of investment in acquired immunity. Undernutrition, low pathogen exposure, and high mortality risk should favor innate immune defenses. The hypothesis provides a framework for organizing prior empirical research on the impact of developmental environments on innate and acquired immunity, and suggests promising directions for future research in human ecological immunology. PMID:26739325

  20. Trade-offs between acquired and innate immune defenses in humans.

    PubMed

    McDade, Thomas W; Georgiev, Alexander V; Kuzawa, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    Immune defenses provide resistance against infectious disease that is critical to survival. But immune defenses are costly, and limited resources allocated to immunity are not available for other physiological or developmental processes. We propose a framework for explaining variation in patterns of investment in two important subsystems of anti-pathogen defense: innate (non-specific) and acquired (specific) immunity. The developmental costs of acquired immunity are high, but the costs of maintenance and activation are relatively low. Innate immunity imposes lower upfront developmental costs, but higher operating costs. Innate defenses are mobilized quickly and are effective against novel pathogens. Acquired responses are less effective against novel exposures, but more effective against secondary exposures due to immunological memory. Based on their distinct profiles of costs and effectiveness, we propose that the balance of investment in innate versus acquired immunity is variable, and that this balance is optimized in response to local ecological conditions early in development. Nutritional abundance, high pathogen exposure and low signals of extrinsic mortality risk during sensitive periods of immune development should all favor relatively higher levels of investment in acquired immunity. Undernutrition, low pathogen exposure, and high mortality risk should favor innate immune defenses. The hypothesis provides a framework for organizing prior empirical research on the impact of developmental environments on innate and acquired immunity, and suggests promising directions for future research in human ecological immunology. PMID:26739325

  1. Developmental Science and Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geidner, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Developmental counseling is a promising model integrating theory and practice. A. E. Ivey's (2000; A. E. Ivey & O. F. Goncalves, 1988) work is discussed as a template for proposing a more comprehensive developmental perspective. Where A. E. Ivey's model renders a case for cognition, the current article encompasses other developmental systems…

  2. The Domain of Developmental Psychopathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sroufe, L. Alan; Rutter, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Describes how developmental psychopathology differs from related disciplines, including abnormal psychology, psychiatry, clinical child psychology, and developmental psychology. Points out propositions underlying a developmental perspective and discusses implications for research in developmental psychopathology. (Author/RH)

  3. Neuropathology of Acquired Cerebral Trauma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1987-01-01

    To help educators understand the cognitive and behavioral sequelae of cerebral injury, the neuropathology of traumatic brain injury and the main neuropathological features resulting from trauma-related brain damage are reviewed. A glossary with definitions of 37 neurological terms is appended. (Author/DB)

  4. Saguenay Youth Study: a multi-generational approach to studying virtual trajectories of the brain and cardio-metabolic health.

    PubMed

    Paus, T; Pausova, Z; Abrahamowicz, M; Gaudet, D; Leonard, G; Pike, G B; Richer, L

    2015-02-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Saguenay Youth Study (SYS) and its parental arm. The overarching goal of this effort is to develop trans-generational models of developmental cascades contributing to the emergence of common chronic disorders, such as depression, addictions, dementia and cardio-metabolic diseases. Over the past 10 years, we have acquired detailed brain and cardio-metabolic phenotypes, and genome-wide genotypes, in 1029 adolescents recruited in a population with a known genetic founder effect. At present, we are extending this dataset to acquire comparable phenotypes and genotypes in the biological parents of these individuals. After providing conceptual background for this work (transactions across time, systems and organs), we describe briefly the tools employed in the adolescent arm of this cohort and highlight some of the initial accomplishments. We then outline in detail the phenotyping protocol used to acquire comparable data in the parents. PMID:25454417

  5. Developmental constraints on behavioural flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Holekamp, Kay E.; Swanson, Eli M.; Van Meter, Page E.

    2013-01-01

    We suggest that variation in mammalian behavioural flexibility not accounted for by current socioecological models may be explained in part by developmental constraints. From our own work, we provide examples of constraints affecting variation in behavioural flexibility, not only among individuals, but also among species and higher taxonomic units. We first implicate organizational maternal effects of androgens in shaping individual differences in aggressive behaviour emitted by female spotted hyaenas throughout the lifespan. We then compare carnivores and primates with respect to their locomotor and craniofacial adaptations. We inquire whether antagonistic selection pressures on the skull might impose differential functional constraints on evolvability of skulls and brains in these two orders, thus ultimately affecting behavioural flexibility in each group. We suggest that, even when carnivores and primates would theoretically benefit from the same adaptations with respect to behavioural flexibility, carnivores may nevertheless exhibit less behavioural flexibility than primates because of constraints imposed by past adaptations in the morphology of the limbs and skull. Phylogenetic analysis consistent with this idea suggests greater evolutionary lability in relative brain size within families of primates than carnivores. Thus, consideration of developmental constraints may help elucidate variation in mammalian behavioural flexibility. PMID:23569298

  6. Developmental constraints on behavioural flexibility.

    PubMed

    Holekamp, Kay E; Swanson, Eli M; Van Meter, Page E

    2013-05-19

    We suggest that variation in mammalian behavioural flexibility not accounted for by current socioecological models may be explained in part by developmental constraints. From our own work, we provide examples of constraints affecting variation in behavioural flexibility, not only among individuals, but also among species and higher taxonomic units. We first implicate organizational maternal effects of androgens in shaping individual differences in aggressive behaviour emitted by female spotted hyaenas throughout the lifespan. We then compare carnivores and primates with respect to their locomotor and craniofacial adaptations. We inquire whether antagonistic selection pressures on the skull might impose differential functional constraints on evolvability of skulls and brains in these two orders, thus ultimately affecting behavioural flexibility in each group. We suggest that, even when carnivores and primates would theoretically benefit from the same adaptations with respect to behavioural flexibility, carnivores may nevertheless exhibit less behavioural flexibility than primates because of constraints imposed by past adaptations in the morphology of the limbs and skull. Phylogenetic analysis consistent with this idea suggests greater evolutionary lability in relative brain size within families of primates than carnivores. Thus, consideration of developmental constraints may help elucidate variation in mammalian behavioural flexibility. PMID:23569298

  7. Controversies in preterm brain injury.

    PubMed

    Penn, Anna A; Gressens, Pierre; Fleiss, Bobbi; Back, Stephen A; Gallo, Vittorio

    2016-08-01

    In this review, we highlight critical unresolved questions in the etiology and mechanisms causing preterm brain injury. Involvement of neurons, glia, endogenous factors and exogenous exposures is considered. The structural and functional correlates of interrupted development and injury in the premature brain are under active investigation, with the hope that the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying developmental abnormalities in the human preterm brain can be understood, prevented or repaired. PMID:26477300

  8. Brain Growth Gains and Losses in Extremely Preterm Infants at Term.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Nelly; Alexandrou, Georgios; Blennow, Mats; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Ådén, Ulrika

    2015-07-01

    Premature exposure to the extrauterine environment negatively affects the brains' developmental trajectory. Our aim was to determine whether extremely preterm (EPT) infants, with no evidence of focal brain lesions, show morphological brain differences when compared with term-born infants. Additionally, we investigated associations between perinatal factors and neuroanatomical alterations. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging was acquired at term-equivalent age (TEA) from 47 EPT infants born before 27 weeks of gestation, and 15 healthy, term-born controls. Automatic segmentation and voxel-based morphometry-Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration through Exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) were used. Compared with controls, EPT infants displayed global reductions in cortical and subcortical gray matter, brainstem, and an increased cerebrospinal fluid volume. Regionally, they showed decreased volumes of all brain tissues, in particular cortical gray matter. Increased volumes of cortical gray and white matter were observed in regions involved in visual processing. Increasing prematurity, intraventricular hemorrhage grade I-II, and patent ductus arteriosus ligation were associated with decreased volumes and had a particular effect on the cerebellum. Concluding, EPT infants without focal brain lesions had an altered brain growth at TEA that particularly affected the gray matter, and varied when it came to the presence of perinatal risk factors. Brain growth gains in EPT infants may be related to a longer extrauterine experience. PMID:24488941

  9. Co-Occurrence of Developmental Disorders: The Case of Developmental Dyscalculia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubinsten, Orly

    2009-01-01

    Five to seven percent of children experience severe difficulties in learning mathematics and/or reading. Current trials that are focused on identifying biological markers suggest that these learning disabilities, known as Developmental Dyscalculia (DD) and Dyslexia (for reading), are due to underlying brain dysfunctions. One ongoing controversy…

  10. Brain development in childhood.

    PubMed

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2012-01-01

    Although human brain development continues throughout childhood and adolescence, it is a non-linear process both structurally and functionally. Here we review studies of brain development in healthy children from the viewpoint of structure and the perfusion of gray and white matter. Gray matter volume increases and then decreases with age, with the developmental time of the peak volume differing among brain regions in the first and second decades of life. On the other hand, white matter volume increase is mostly linear during those periods. As regards fractional anisotropy, most regions show an exponential trajectory with aging. In addition, cerebral blood flow and gray matter volume are proportional at similar developmental ages. Moreover, we show that several lifestyle choices, such as sleeping habits and breakfast staple, affect gray matter volume in healthy children. There are a number of uninvestigated important issues that require future study. PMID:23166579

  11. Genetic and early environmental influences on the serotonin system: consequences for brain development and risk for psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Booij, Linda; Tremblay, Richard E.; Szyf, Moshe; Benkelfat, Chawki

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite more than 60 years of research in the role of serotonin (5-HT) in psychopathology, many questions still remain. From a developmental perspective, studies have provided more insight into how 5-HT dysfunctions acquired in utero or early in life may modulate brain development. This paper discusses the relevance of the developmental role of 5-HT for the understanding of psychopathology. We review developmental milestones of the 5-HT system, how genetic and environmental 5-HT disturbances could affect brain development and the potential role of DNA methylation in 5-HT genes for brain development. Methods Studies were identified using common databases (e.g., PubMed, Google Scholar) and reference lists. Results Despite the widely supported view that the 5-HT system matures in early life, different 5-HT receptors, proteins and enzymes have different developmental patterns, and development is brain region–specific. A disruption in 5-HT homeostasis during development may lead to structural and functional changes in brain circuits that modulate emotional stress responses, including subcortical limbic and (pre)frontal areas. This may result in a predisposition to psychopathology. DNA methylation might be one of the underlying physiologic mechanisms. Limitations There is a need for prospective studies. The impact of stressors during adolescence on the 5-HT system is understudied. Questions regarding efficacy of drugs acting on 5-HT still remain. Conclusion A multidisciplinary and longitudinal approach in designing studies on the role of 5-HT in psychopathology might help to bring us closer to the understanding of the role of 5-HT in psychopathology. PMID:25285876

  12. Epileptic encephalopathies: Optimizing seizure control and developmental outcome.

    PubMed

    Jehi, Lara; Wyllie, Elaine; Devinsky, Orrin

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive and developmental outcomes in patients with epileptic encephalopathy are hypothesized to result from an interplay between the underlying epileptic pathologic substrate and the acquired consequences of frequent and repetitive seizures and epileptiform discharges that often straddle the interictal and ictal boundaries. This article briefly reviews the evidence related to this assumption, presents critical questions that need to be answered to clarify this relationship, and advances a set of concrete steps that may help improve developmental patient outcomes. PMID:26293588

  13. Differential Entrainment of Neuroelectric Delta Oscillations in Developmental Dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Soltész, Fruzsina; Szűcs, Denes; Leong, Victoria; White, Sonia; Goswami, Usha

    2013-01-01

    Oscillatory entrainment to the speech signal is important for language processing, but has not yet been studied in developmental disorders of language. Developmental dyslexia, a difficulty in acquiring efficient reading skills linked to difficulties with phonology (the sound structure of language), has been associated with behavioural entrainment deficits. It has been proposed that the phonological ‘deficit’ that characterises dyslexia across languages is related to impaired auditory entrainment to speech at lower frequencies via neuroelectric oscillations (<10 Hz, ‘temporal sampling theory’). Impaired entrainment to temporal modulations at lower frequencies would affect the recovery of the prosodic and syllabic structure of speech. Here we investigated event-related oscillatory EEG activity and contingent negative variation (CNV) to auditory rhythmic tone streams delivered at frequencies within the delta band (2 Hz, 1.5 Hz), relevant to sampling stressed syllables in speech. Given prior behavioural entrainment findings at these rates, we predicted functionally atypical entrainment of delta oscillations in dyslexia. Participants performed a rhythmic expectancy task, detecting occasional white noise targets interspersed with tones occurring regularly at rates of 2 Hz or 1.5 Hz. Both groups showed significant entrainment of delta oscillations to the rhythmic stimulus stream, however the strength of inter-trial delta phase coherence (ITC, ‘phase locking’) and the CNV were both significantly weaker in dyslexics, suggestive of weaker entrainment and less preparatory brain activity. Both ITC strength and CNV amplitude were significantly related to individual differences in language processing and reading. Additionally, the instantaneous phase of prestimulus delta oscillation predicted behavioural responding (response time) for control participants only. PMID:24204644

  14. Brain birth and personal identity.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D G

    1989-01-01

    The concept of brain birth has assumed a position of some significance in discussions on the status of the human embryo and on the point in embryonic development prior to which experimental procedures may be undertaken on human embryos. This paper reviews previous discussions of this concept, which have placed brain birth at various points between 12 days' and 20 weeks' gestation and which have emphasised the symmetry of brain birth and brain death. Major developmental features of brain development are outlined, including the gradualness with which new features generally appear, and also the electroencephalogram (EEG) characteristics of premature infants. From this it is concluded that, if the concept of brain birth is a valid one, it should be placed at 24-28 weeks' gestation. More importantly, it is concluded that the differences between brain development and brain death throw doubt on the concept itself. PMID:2614785

  15. Re-thinking diagnostic classification of the dysarthrias: a developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Morgan, A T; Liégeois, F

    2010-01-01

    Acquired childhood dysarthria (ACD) receives little attention in the research literature in contrast with the adult correlate of the disorder. Speech language pathologists working in this field find diagnosis and management challenging, arguably because there is no child-based dysarthria diagnostic classification. Clinicians are either dependent upon developmental speech models that are not specific to dysarthria and that ignore the neural basis of the disorder, or on adult-based neurobehavioural classification systems. Here we consider the necessary elements for developing a clinically useful and empirically driven diagnostic classification system for ACD. The paper is divided into 2 parts. First, we question whether an adult diagnostic model can be validly applied to children. Second, we propose a methodological approach to develop a classification system for ACD. Specifically, we propose that advancing knowledge in neurobehavioural correlations of ACD is contingent upon large-scale studies, likely requiring international collaboration, which pool brain and speech outcome data. Ideally, researchers across centres would apply standard protocols to: (1) characterize speech behaviour, and (2) brain structure, function and connectivity. When enough data is available to achieve statistical power, analysis could determine subgroups of dysarthria defined by speech behaviour. The commonalities of neural profiles of subgroups could then be examined to create an empirically driven theory of brain-behaviour relationships in ACD to underpin the classification system. Clinical diagnosis for children with ACD will remain limited until such data become available. PMID:20424467

  16. Multidimensional MRI-CT atlas of the naked mole-rat brain (Heterocephalus glaber).

    PubMed

    Seki, Fumiko; Hikishima, Keigo; Nambu, Sanae; Okanoya, Kazuo; Okano, Hirotaka J; Sasaki, Erika; Miura, Kyoko; Okano, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    Naked mole-rats have a variety of distinctive features such as the organization of a hierarchical society (known as eusociality), extraordinary longevity, and cancer resistance; thus, it would be worthwhile investigating these animals in detail. One important task is the preparation of a brain atlas database that provide comprehensive information containing multidimensional data with various image contrasts, which can be achievable using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Advanced MRI techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which generates high contrast images of fiber structures, can characterize unique morphological properties in addition to conventional MRI. To obtain high spatial resolution images, MR histology, DTI, and X-ray computed tomography were performed on the fixed adult brain. Skull and brain structures were segmented as well as reconstructed in stereotaxic coordinates. Data were also acquired for the neonatal brain to allow developmental changes to be observed. Moreover, in vivo imaging of naked mole-rats was established as an evaluation tool of live animals. The data obtained comprised three-dimensional (3D) images with high tissue contrast as well as stereotaxic coordinates. Developmental differences in the visual system were highlighted in particular by DTI. Although it was difficult to delineate optic nerves in the mature adult brain, parts of them could be distinguished in the immature neonatal brain. From observation of cortical thickness, possibility of high somatosensory system development replaced to the visual system was indicated. 3D visualization of brain structures in the atlas as well as the establishment of in vivo imaging would promote neuroimaging researches towards detection of novel characteristics of eusocial naked mole-rats. PMID:24391551

  17. Screening for Developmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Carol; Duran-Flores, Deborah; Dumars, Kenneth W.; Stills, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Developmental disabilities are responsible for a combination of severe physical, mental, psychological and social deficits. They develop before age 22 years and involve a little more than 1% of the population. Screening for developmental disabilities is the first step in their prevention. Various screening instruments are available for use throughout the developmental years that are designed to detect the wide variety of developmental problems that interfere with a developing person's optimal adaptation to his or her environment. The screening instruments must be inexpensive, reproducible, widely available and cost effective to the child, family and society. PMID:2413633

  18. A comprehensive transcriptional map of primate brain development.

    PubMed

    Bakken, Trygve E; Miller, Jeremy A; Ding, Song-Lin; Sunkin, Susan M; Smith, Kimberly A; Ng, Lydia; Szafer, Aaron; Dalley, Rachel A; Royall, Joshua J; Lemon, Tracy; Shapouri, Sheila; Aiona, Kaylynn; Arnold, James; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Bertagnolli, Darren; Bickley, Kristopher; Boe, Andrew; Brouner, Krissy; Butler, Stephanie; Byrnes, Emi; Caldejon, Shiella; Carey, Anita; Cate, Shelby; Chapin, Mike; Chen, Jefferey; Dee, Nick; Desta, Tsega; Dolbeare, Tim A; Dotson, Nadia; Ebbert, Amanda; Fulfs, Erich; Gee, Garrett; Gilbert, Terri L; Goldy, Jeff; Gourley, Lindsey; Gregor, Ben; Gu, Guangyu; Hall, Jon; Haradon, Zeb; Haynor, David R; Hejazinia, Nika; Hoerder-Suabedissen, Anna; Howard, Robert; Jochim, Jay; Kinnunen, Marty; Kriedberg, Ali; Kuan, Chihchau L; Lau, Christopher; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Lee, Felix; Luong, Lon; Mastan, Naveed; May, Ryan; Melchor, Jose; Mosqueda, Nerick; Mott, Erika; Ngo, Kiet; Nyhus, Julie; Oldre, Aaron; Olson, Eric; Parente, Jody; Parker, Patrick D; Parry, Sheana; Pendergraft, Julie; Potekhina, Lydia; Reding, Melissa; Riley, Zackery L; Roberts, Tyson; Rogers, Brandon; Roll, Kate; Rosen, David; Sandman, David; Sarreal, Melaine; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Shi, Shu; Sjoquist, Nathan; Sodt, Andy J; Townsend, Robbie; Velasquez, Lissette; Wagley, Udi; Wakeman, Wayne B; White, Cassandra; Bennett, Crissa; Wu, Jennifer; Young, Rob; Youngstrom, Brian L; Wohnoutka, Paul; Gibbs, Richard A; Rogers, Jeffrey; Hohmann, John G; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Hevner, Robert F; Molnár, Zoltán; Phillips, John W; Dang, Chinh; Jones, Allan R; Amaral, David G; Bernard, Amy; Lein, Ed S

    2016-07-21

    The transcriptional underpinnings of brain development remain poorly understood, particularly in humans and closely related non-human primates. We describe a high-resolution transcriptional atlas of rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) brain development that combines dense temporal sampling of prenatal and postnatal periods with fine anatomical division of cortical and subcortical regions associated with human neuropsychiatric disease. Gene expression changes more rapidly before birth, both in progenitor cells and maturing neurons. Cortical layers and areas acquire adult-like molecular profiles surprisingly late in postnatal development. Disparate cell populations exhibit distinct developmental timing of gene expression, but also unexpected synchrony of processes underlying neural circuit construction including cell projection and adhesion. Candidate risk genes for neurodevelopmental disorders including primary microcephaly, autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, and schizophrenia show disease-specific spatiotemporal enrichment within developing neocortex. Human developmental expression trajectories are more similar to monkey than rodent, although approximately 9% of genes show human-specific regulation with evidence for prolonged maturation or neoteny compared to monkey. PMID:27409810

  19. Acquired prosopagnosia: structural basis and processing impairments.

    PubMed

    Davies-Thompson, Jodie; Pancaroglu, Raika; Barton, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive models propose a hierarchy of parallel processing stages in face perception, and functional neuroimaging shows a network of regions involved in face processing. Reflecting this, acquired prosopagnosia is not a single entity but a family of disorders with different anatomic lesions and different functional deficits. One classic distinction is between an apperceptive variant, in which there is impaired perception of facial structure, and an associative/amnestic variant, in which perception is relatively intact, with subsequent problems matching perception to facial memories, because of either disconnection or loss of those memories. These disorders also have to be distinguished from people-specific amnesia, a multimodal impairment, and prosop-anomia, in which familiarity with faces is preserved but access to names is disrupted. These different disorders can be conceived as specific deficits at different processing stages in cognitive models, and suggests that these functional stages may have distinct neuroanatomic substrates. It remains to be seen whether a similar anatomic and functional variability is present in developmental prosopagnosia. PMID:24389150

  20. Acquiring synaesthesia: insights from training studies

    PubMed Central

    Rothen, Nicolas; Meier, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Synaesthesia denotes a condition of remarkable individual differences in experience characterized by specific additional experiences in response to normal sensory input. Synaesthesia seems to (i) run in families which suggests a genetic component, (ii) is associated with marked structural and functional neural differences, and (iii) is usually reported to exist from early childhood. Hence, synaesthesia is generally regarded as a congenital phenomenon. However, most synaesthetic experiences are triggered by cultural artifacts (e.g., letters, musical sounds). Evidence exists to suggest that synaesthetic experiences are triggered by the conceptual representation of their inducer stimuli. Cases were identified for which the specific synaesthetic associations are related to prior experiences and large scale studies show that grapheme-color associations in synaesthesia are not completely random. Hence, a learning component is inherently involved in the development of specific synaesthetic associations. Researchers have hypothesized that associative learning is the critical mechanism. Recently, it has become of scientific and public interest if synaesthetic experiences may be acquired by means of associative training procedures and whether the gains of these trainings are associated with similar cognitive benefits as genuine synaesthetic experiences. In order to shed light on these issues and inform synaesthesia researchers and the general interested public alike, we provide a comprehensive literature review on developmental aspects of synaesthesia and specific training procedures in non-synaesthetes. Under the light of a clear working definition of synaesthesia, we come to the conclusion that synaesthesia can potentially be learned by the appropriate training. PMID:24624072

  1. The problematic symmetry between brain birth and brain death.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D G

    1998-01-01

    The possible symmetry between the concepts of brain death and brain birth (life) is explored. Since the symmetry argument has tended to overlook the most appropriate definition of brain death, the fundamental concepts of whole brain death and higher brain death are assessed. In this way, a context is provided for a discussion of brain birth. Different writers have placed brain birth at numerous points: 25-40 days, eight weeks, 22-24 weeks, and 32-36 weeks gestation. For others, the concept itself is open to question. Apart from this, it needs to be asked whether a unitary concept is an oversimplification. The merits of defining two stages of brain birth, to parallel the two definitions of brain death, are discussed. An attempt is then made to map these various stages of brain birth and brain death onto a developmental continuum. Although the results hold biological interest, their ethical significance is less evident. Development and degeneration are not interchangeable, and definitions of death apply specifically to those who are dying, not those who are developing. I conclude that while a dual concept of brain death has proved helpful, a dual concept of brain birth still has problems, and the underlying concept of brain birth itself continues to be elusive. PMID:9752625

  2. Functional neuroanatomy of developmental dyslexia: the role of orthographic depth

    PubMed Central

    Richlan, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Orthographic depth (OD) (i.e., the complexity, consistency, or transparency of grapheme-phoneme correspondences in written alphabetic language) plays an important role in the acquisition of reading skills. Correspondingly, developmental dyslexia is characterized by different behavioral manifestations across languages varying in OD. This review focuses on the question of whether these different behavioral manifestations are associated with different functional neuroanatomical manifestations. It provides a review and critique of cross-linguistic brain imaging studies of developmental dyslexia. In addition, it includes an analysis of state-of-the-art functional neuroanatomical models of developmental dyslexia together with orthography-specific predictions derived from these models. These predictions should be tested in future brain imaging studies of typical and atypical reading in order to refine the current neurobiological understanding of developmental dyslexia, especially with respect to orthography-specific and universal aspects. PMID:24904383

  3. Acquired Equivalence Changes Stimulus Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeter, M.; Shohamy, D.; Myers, C. E.

    2009-01-01

    Acquired equivalence is a paradigm in which generalization is increased between two superficially dissimilar stimuli (or antecedents) that have previously been associated with similar outcomes (or consequents). Several possible mechanisms have been proposed, including changes in stimulus representations, either in the form of added associations or…

  4. Imaging brain plasticity after trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Zhifeng; Iraji, Armin

    2014-01-01

    The brain is highly plastic after stroke or epilepsy; however, there is a paucity of brain plasticity investigation after traumatic brain injury (TBI). This mini review summarizes the most recent evidence of brain plasticity in human TBI patients from the perspective of advanced magnetic resonance imaging. Similar to other forms of acquired brain injury, TBI patients also demonstrated both structural reorganization as well as functional compensation by the recruitment of other brain regions. However, the large scale brain network alterations after TBI are still unknown, and the field is still short of proper means on how to guide the choice of TBI rehabilitation or treatment plan to promote brain plasticity. The authors also point out the new direction of brain plasticity investigation. PMID:25206874

  5. Number development and developmental dyscalculia.

    PubMed

    von Aster, Michael G; Shalev, Ruth S

    2007-11-01

    There is a growing consensus that the neuropsychological underpinnings of developmental dyscalculia (DD) are a genetically determined disorder of 'number sense', a term denoting the ability to represent and manipulate numerical magnitude nonverbally on an internal number line. However, this spatially-oriented number line develops during elementary school and requires additional cognitive components including working memory and number symbolization (language). Thus, there may be children with familial-genetic DD with deficits limited to number sense and others with DD and comorbidities such as language delay, dyslexia, or attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder. This duality is supported by epidemiological data indicating that two-thirds of children with DD have comorbid conditions while one-third have pure DD. Clinically, they differ according to their profile of arithmetic difficulties. fMRI studies indicate that parietal areas (important for number functions), and frontal regions (dominant for executive working memory and attention functions), are under-activated in children with DD. A four-step developmental model that allows prediction of different pathways for DD is presented. The core-system representation of numerical magnitude (cardinality; step 1) provides the meaning of 'number', a precondition to acquiring linguistic (step 2), and Arabic (step 3) number symbols, while a growing working memory enables neuroplastic development of an expanding mental number line during school years (step 4). Therapeutic and educational interventions can be drawn from this model. PMID:17979867

  6. Relations between Brain and Cognitive Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Kurt W.

    1987-01-01

    The developmental pattern of concurrent synaptogenesis in rhesus monkeys is consistent with a straightforward model of relations between brain and cognitive development. Concurrent synaptogenesis is hypothesized to lay the primary cortical foundation for a series of developmental levels in middle infancy that have been empirically documented in…

  7. School reentry for children with acquired central nervous systems injuries.

    PubMed

    Carney, Joan; Porter, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Onset of acquired central nervous system (CNS) injury during the normal developmental process of childhood can have impact on cognitive, behavioral, and motor function. This alteration of function often necessitates special education programming, modifications, and accommodations in the education setting for successful school reentry. Special education is not necessarily a special classroom, but an individualized set of educational needs, determined by a multidisciplinary school team, to promote educational success. The purpose of this article is to inform those pediatricians and pediatric allied health professionals treating children with CNS injury of the systems in place to support successful school reentry and their role in contributing to developing an appropriate educational plan. PMID:19489086

  8. Developmental Programs: Survival Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, F. Eugene; Kinsey, Richard H.

    1978-01-01

    Describes major program elements of the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP)--a developmental education program at St. Edward's University, Texas, serving a population of migrant and seasonal farmworker families. Outlines steps necessary to receive funding and legislative support for developmental education programs. (DR)

  9. Genetics and Developmental Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    One of the major changes in developmental psychology during the past 50 years has been the acceptance of the important role of nature (genetics) as well as nurture (environment). Past research consisting of twin and adoption studies has shown that genetic influence is substantial for most domains of developmental psychology. Present research…

  10. Developmental Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesapeake Public Schools, VA. Office of Program Evaluation.

    The Developmental Program of the Chesapeake Public School Division (Virginia) is designed to provide a year between kindergarten and first grade for the academically able student who is not ready for the structure of the regular first grade because of physical, emotional, or social (developmental) immaturity. It is an all-day, full-year program…

  11. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy occurring with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    England, J D; Hsu, C Y; Garen, P D; Goust, J M; Biggs, P J

    1984-08-01

    A 33-year-old homosexual man with symptoms and signs of a focal brain process was subsequently found to have an acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) with biopsy-proven progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. This report reemphasizes the association of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with AIDS and probably is best viewed as another example of an opportunistic CNS infection complicating deficient cell-mediated immunity. PMID:6540476

  12. DEVELOPMENTAL DIVERSITY OF AMPHIBIANS

    PubMed Central

    Elinson, Richard P.; del Pino, Eugenia M.

    2011-01-01

    The current model amphibian, Xenopus laevis, develops rapidly in water to a tadpole which metamorphoses into a frog. Many amphibians deviate from the X. laevis developmental pattern. Among other adaptations, their embryos develop in foam nests on land or in pouches on their mother’s back or on a leaf guarded by a parent. The diversity of developmental patterns includes multinucleated oogenesis, lack of RNA localization, huge non-pigmented eggs, and asynchronous, irregular early cleavages. Variations in patterns of gastrulation highlight the modularity of this critical developmental period. Many species have eliminated the larva or tadpole and directly develop to the adult. The wealth of developmental diversity among amphibians coupled with the wealth of mechanistic information from X. laevis permit comparisons that provide deeper insights into developmental processes. PMID:22662314

  13. Developmental pathways of motor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kleven, Gale A; Bellinger, Seanceray A

    2015-05-01

    Recent evidence has revealed unique patterns of behavioral development after prenatal insult similar to those outlined in studies of adult metabolic dysfunction after prenatal malnutrition. The hallmark features of this Developmental Pathway include a prenatal insult to the nervous system (environmental or genetic) followed by a period of Silent Vulnerability, where no or few functional deficits are observed, and finally emergence of later dysfunction. Possible mechanisms leading to later dysfunction from prenatal insult may include secondary or cascade effects due to the timing of prenatal insults relative to later developing structures in the brain. Methods best employed to study the mechanisms of these pathways are microgenetic and longitudinal designs that include behavioral assessment during the prenatal period of development, and animal models such as the guinea pig. PMID:25864561

  14. Bridging the Gap: An Impact Study of Eight Developmental Summer Bridge Programs in Texas. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Elisabeth A.; Bork, Rachel Hare; Mayer, Alexander K.; Pretlow, Joshua; Wathington, Heather D.; Weiss, Madeline Joy

    2012-01-01

    Developmental summer bridge programs are a popular strategy for increasing college readiness among recent high school graduates. Aimed at providing an alternative to traditional developmental education, these programs provide accelerated and focused learning opportunities in order to help students acquire the knowledge and skills needed for…

  15. Bridging the Gap: An Impact Study of Eight Developmental Summer Bridge Programs in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Elisabeth A.; Bork, Rachel Hare; Mayer, Alexander K.; Pretlow, Joshua; Wathington, Heather D.; Weiss, Madeline Joy

    2012-01-01

    Developmental summer bridge programs are a popular strategy for increasing college readiness among recent high school graduates. Aimed at providing an alternative to traditional developmental education, these programs provide accelerated and focused learning opportunities in order to help students acquire the knowledge and skills needed for…

  16. A review of brain circuitries involved in stuttering

    PubMed Central

    Craig-McQuaide, Anna; Akram, Harith; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Tripoliti, Elina

    2014-01-01

    Stuttering has been the subject of much research, nevertheless its etiology remains incompletely understood. This article presents a critical review of the literature on stuttering, with particular reference to the role of the basal ganglia (BG). Neuroimaging and lesion studies of developmental and acquired stuttering, as well as pharmacological and genetic studies are discussed. Evidence of structural and functional changes in the BG in those who stutter indicates that this motor speech disorder is due, at least in part, to abnormal BG cues for the initiation and termination of articulatory movements. Studies discussed provide evidence of a dysfunctional hyperdopaminergic state of the thalamocortical pathways underlying speech motor control in stuttering. Evidence that stuttering can improve, worsen or recur following deep brain stimulation for other indications is presented in order to emphasize the role of BG in stuttering. Further research is needed to fully elucidate the pathophysiology of this speech disorder, which is associated with significant social isolation. PMID:25452719

  17. Sleep and developmental plasticity not just for kids.

    PubMed

    Frank, Marcos Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    In a variety of mammalian species, sleep amounts are highest during developmental periods of rapid brain development and synaptic plasticity than at any other time in life [Frank, M. G. & Heller, H. C. (1997a). Development of REM and slow wave sleep in the rat. American Journal of Physiology, 272, R1792-R1799; Jouvet-Mounier, D., Astic, L., & Lacote, D. (1970). Ontogenesis of the states of sleep in rat, cat and guinea pig during the first postnatal month. Developmental Psychobiology, 2, 216-239; Roffwarg, H. P., Muzio, J. N., & Dement, W. C. (1966). Ontogenetic development of the human sleep-dream cycle. Science, 604-619]. Many of the mechanisms governing developmental plasticity also mediate plasticity in the adult brain. Therefore, studying the role of sleep in developmental plasticity may provide insights more generally into sleep function across the lifespan. In this chapter, I review the evidence that supports a critical role for sleep in developmental brain plasticity. I begin with an overview of past studies that support a role for sleep in general brain maturation. This is followed by more recent findings in the developing visual cortex that more specifically address a possible role for sleep in cortical plasticity. PMID:21854965

  18. Simplified ontologies allowing comparison of developmental mammalian gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Adele; Hofmann, Oliver; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Hide, Winston

    2007-01-01

    Model organisms represent an important resource for understanding the fundamental aspects of mammalian biology. Mapping of biological phenomena between model organisms is complex and if it is to be meaningful, a simplified representation can be a powerful means for comparison. The Developmental eVOC ontologies presented here are simplified orthogonal ontologies describing the temporal and spatial distribution of developmental human and mouse anatomy. We demonstrate the ontologies by identifying genes showing a bias for developmental brain expression in human and mouse. PMID:17961239

  19. Congenital and Acquired Abnormalities of the Corpus Callosum: A Pictorial Essay

    PubMed Central

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesinska-Figatowska, Monika

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to illustrate the wide spectrum of lesions in the corpus callosum, both congenital and acquired: developmental abnormalities, phakomatoses, neurometabolic disorders, demyelinating diseases, infection and inflammation, vascular lesions, neoplasms, traumatic and iatrogenic injury, and others. Cases include fetuses, children, and adults with rich iconography from the authors' own archive. PMID:24027754

  20. Brain Science, Brain Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruer, John T.

    1998-01-01

    Three big ideas from brain science have arisen during the past 20 to 30 years: neural connections form rapidly early in life; critical periods occur in development; and enriched environments profoundly affect brain development during the early years. Current brain research has little to offer educational practice or policy. (10 references) (MLH)

  1. Acquired causes of intestinal malabsorption.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, F

    2016-04-01

    This review focuses on the acquired causes, diagnosis, and treatment of intestinal malabsorption. Intestinal absorption is a complex process that depends on many variables, including the digestion of nutrients within the intestinal lumen, the absorptive surface of the small intestine, the membrane transport systems, and the epithelial absorptive enzymes. Acquired causes of malabsorption are classified by focussing on the three phases of digestion and absorption: 1) luminal/digestive phase, 2) mucosal/absorptive phase, and 3) transport phase. Most acquired diseases affect the luminal/digestive phase. These include short bowel syndrome, extensive small bowel inflammation, motility disorders, and deficiencies of digestive enzymes or bile salts. Diagnosis depends on symptoms, physical examination, and blood and stool tests. There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of malabsorption. Further testing should be based on the specific clinical context and the suspected underlying disease. Therapy is directed at nutritional support by enteral or parenteral feeding and screening for and supplementation of deficiencies in vitamins and minerals. Early enteral feeding is important for intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome. Medicinal treatment options for diarrhoea in malabsorption include loperamide, codeine, cholestyramine, or antibiotics. PMID:27086886

  2. Positive Approaches: A Sexuality Guide for Teaching Developmentally Disabled Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Lisa

    This guide is intended to assist caregivers of people with development disabilities in acquiring knowledge about sexuality and skill in expressing sexuality in a safe and appropriate manner. Section 1 provides an overview of the history of sexuality and developmentally disabled individuals. The second section provides exercises for the caregiver…

  3. Political Reflections on AIDS and Developmental Disabilities: Conference Keynote Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westmorland, Timothy M.

    1989-01-01

    The keynote address of a November, 1988, symposium on developmental disabilities and the HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) examines four basic areas of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) concern in Congress: research, education, testing and discrimination protection, and health care services. (DB)

  4. Latent Classes in the Developmental Trajectories of Infant Handedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, George F.; Babik, Iryna; Sheu, Ching-Fan; Campbell, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Handedness for acquiring objects was assessed monthly from 6 to 14 months in 328 infants (182 males). A group based trajectory model identified 3 latent groups with different developmental trajectories: those with an identifiable right preference (38%) or left preference (14%) and those without an identifiable preference (48%) but with a…

  5. What Do We Know from Brain Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Pat; Brandt, Ron

    1998-01-01

    Discusses recent brain-research findings relevant for educators: the brain changes physiologically as a result of experience; IQ is not fixed at birth; some abilities are acquired more easily during certain windows of opportunity; and learning is strongly influenced by emotion. Environmental enrichment unmistakably influences the brain's growth…

  6. Brain herniation

    MedlinePlus

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  7. Developmental coordination disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Physical causes and other types of learning disabilities must be ruled out before the diagnosis can be confirmed. ... Developmental coordination disorder can lead to: Learning problems ... wanting to participate in physical activities (such as sports)

  8. Plants: Novel Developmental Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the diversity of plants. Outlines novel developmental and complex genetic processes that are specific to plants. Identifies approaches that can be used to solve problems in plant biology. Cites the advantages of using higher plants for experimental systems. (RT)

  9. Facts about Developmental Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children with kernicterus are more likely to have cerebral palsy, hearing and vision problems, and problems with their ... developmental disabilities, such as: ADHD , autism spectrum disorder , cerebral palsy , hearing loss , intellectual disability , learning disability, vision impairment , ...

  10. Developmental milestones record

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the early years is to follow your child's development. Most parents also watch for different milestones. Talk ... child's provider if you have concerns about your child's development. Closely watching a "checklist" or calendar of developmental ...

  11. Stimulus Pairing Training for Kanji Reading Skills in Students with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omori, Mikimasa; Yamamoto, Jun-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Japanese students with developmental disabilities often exhibit difficulties in reading, particularly in Kanji (ideogram) reading, and in acquiring the equivalence relations between pictures, written words, and sounds. Previous research suggested that one student with autism could acquire Kanji reading along with equivalence relations through…

  12. Development of the Brain's Functional Network Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Power, Jonathan D.; Petersen, Steven E.; Schlaggar, Bradley L.

    2013-01-01

    A full understanding of the development of the brain's functional network architecture requires not only an understanding of developmental changes in neural processing in individual brain regions but also an understanding of changes in inter-regional interactions. Resting state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) is increasingly being used to study functional interactions between brain regions in both adults and children. We briefly review methods used to study functional interactions and networks with rs-fcMRI and how these methods have been used to define developmental changes in network functional connectivity. The developmental rs-fcMRI studies to date have found two general properties. First, regional interactions change from being predominately anatomically local in children to interactions spanning longer cortical distances in young adults. Second, this developmental change in functional connectivity occurs, in general, via mechanisms of segregation of local regions and integration of distant regions into disparate subnetworks. PMID:20976563

  13. DEVELOPMENTAL HYPOTHYROIDISM ALTERS SYNAPTIC TRANSMISSION IN DENTATE GYRUS AND AREA CA1 OF HIPPOCAMPUS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hypothyroidism during critical periods of brain developmental leads to learning deficits and alterations in hippocampal structure. Neurophysiological properties of the hippocampus, however, have not been well characterized. The present study examined field potentials evoked in...

  14. ONTOGENETIC ALTERATIONS IN MOLECULAR AND STRUCTURAL CORRELATES OF DENDRITIC GROWTH FOLLOWING DEVELOPMENTAL EXPOSURE TO POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is the first report showing both molecular and structural changes in brain following developmental exposure to a neurotoxicant. It is known that perinatal exposure to a neurotoxicant, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), is associated with decreased IQ scores, impaired learnin...

  15. Mild Developmental Hypothyroidism and Trace Fear Conditioning: Role of Gender and Shock Duration.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent models of developmental thyroid hormone (TH) deficiency aptly reflect the deleterious effects of severe TH deficiencies on brain structure and function in humans. However, the impact of moderate TH insufficiencies on neurodevelopmental outcomes has proven more difficult to...

  16. Neurobiology of Developmental Dyslexia: Results of a Ten Year Research Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galaburda, Albert M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarizes research currently being conducted on the biologic underpinnings of learning disorders, particularly dyslexia. The research findings discussed are derived from studying neuroanatomic, neurophysiologic, neurogenetic, neuroimaging, and behavioral characteristics in animal models that exhibit developmental brain anomalies and…

  17. Perioperatively acquired disorders of coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Grottke, Oliver; Fries, Dietmar; Nascimento, Bartolomeu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview of acquired coagulopathies that can occur in various perioperative clinical settings. Also described are coagulation disturbances linked to antithrombotic medications and currently available strategies to reverse their antithrombotic effects in situations of severe hemorrhage. Recent findings Recent studies highlight the link between low fibrinogen and decreased fibrin polymerization in the development of acquired coagulopathy. Particularly, fibrin(ogen) deficits are observable after cardiopulmonary bypass in cardiac surgery, on arrival at the emergency room in trauma patients, and with ongoing bleeding after child birth. Regarding antithrombotic therapy, although new oral anticoagulants offer the possibility of efficacy and relative safety compared with vitamin K antagonists, reversal of their anticoagulant effect with nonspecific agents, including prothrombin complex concentrate, has provided conflicting results. Specific antidotes, currently being developed, are not yet licensed for clinical use, but initial results are promising. Summary Targeted hemostatic therapy aims to correct coagulopathies in specific clinical settings, and reduce the need for allogeneic transfusions, thus preventing massive transfusion and its deleterious outcomes. Although there are specific guidelines for reversing anticoagulation in patients treated with antiplatelet agents or warfarin, there is currently little evidence to advocate comprehensive recommendations to treat drug-induced coagulopathy associated with new oral anticoagulants. PMID:25734869

  18. Foodborne listeriosis acquired in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Silk, Benjamin J; McCoy, Morgan H; Iwamoto, Martha; Griffin, Patricia M

    2014-08-15

    Listeriosis is characterized by bacteremia or meningitis. We searched for listeriosis case series and outbreak investigations published in English by 2013, and assessed the strength of evidence for foodborne acquisition among patients who ate hospital food. We identified 30 reports from 13 countries. Among the case series, the median proportion of cases considered to be hospital-acquired was 25% (range, 9%-67%). The median number of outbreak-related illnesses considered to be hospital-acquired was 4.0 (range, 2-16). All patients were immunosuppressed in 18 of 24 (75%) reports with available data. Eight outbreak reports with strong evidence for foodborne acquisition in a hospital implicated sandwiches (3 reports), butter, precut celery, Camembert cheese, sausage, and tuna salad (1 report each). Foodborne acquisition of listeriosis among hospitalized patients is well documented internationally. The number of listeriosis cases could be reduced substantially by establishing hospital policies for safe food preparation for immunocompromised patients and by not serving them higher-risk foods. PMID:24846635

  19. Evolutionary Perspectives on Language and Brain Plasticity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deacon, Terrence W.

    2000-01-01

    This review discusses how general principles of brain development have contributed to both human brain plasticity and the acquisition of the human capacity for speech. Specifically, the role played by plastic developmental processes in the evolution and development of articulate control over vocalization in speech is examined. (Contains…

  20. Mental retardation and developmental disabilities influenced by environmental neurotoxic insults.

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, S R

    2000-01-01

    This paper sets a framework for the discussion of neurotoxicity as a potentially major contributor to the etiology of many types of mental retardation and developmental disabilities. In the past the literatures on developmental neurotoxicology and on mental retardation have evolved independently, yet we know that the developing brain is a target for neurotoxicity in the developing central nervous system through many stages of pregnancy as well as during infancy and early childhood. Our definitions and theories of mental retardation and developmental disabilities affect the models of neurotoxicity we espouse. For instance, models of developmental risk in neurotoxicology have guided environmental regulation to reduce the likelihood of neurotoxic effects. On the other hand, models of developmental risk for mental retardation aim not only at primary prevention,but also at secondary and tertiary prevention through early intervention. In the future, dynamic models of neuroplasticity based on the study of gene-brain-behavior relationships are likely to guide our views of developmental neurotoxicology and prevention of mental retardation and other disabilities. PMID:10852834

  1. Bejel: acquirable only in childhood?

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Bruce M; Rothschild, Christine; Naples, Virginia; Billard, Michel; Panero, Barbara

    2006-10-01

    Bejel clearly has a long history in the Middle East and the Sudan, but was it transmitted to Europe? As the major manifestation of bejel is presence of periosteal reaction in 20-40% of afflicted populations, absence of significant population frequency of periosteal reaction in Europe would exclude that diagnosis. Examination of skeletal populations from continental Europe revealed no significant periosteal reaction at the time of and immediately subsequent to the Crusades. Thus, there is no evidence for bejel in Europe, in spite of clear contact (the mechanism of bejel transmission in children) between warring groups, at least during the Crusades. This supports the hypothesis that bejel is a childhood-acquired disease and apparently cannot be contracted in adulthood. PMID:17049474

  2. Lymphoma in acquired generalized lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca J; Chan, Jean L; Jaffe, Elaine S; Cochran, Elaine; DePaoli, Alex M; Gautier, Jean-Francois; Goujard, Cecile; Vigouroux, Corinne; Gorden, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Acquired generalized lipodystrophy (AGL) is a rare disease thought to result from autoimmune destruction of adipose tissue. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) has been reported in two AGL patients. We report five additional cases of lymphoma in AGL, and analyze the role of underlying autoimmunity and recombinant human leptin (metreleptin) replacement in lymphoma development. Three patients developed lymphoma during metreleptin treatment (two PTCL and one ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma), and two developed lymphomas (mycosis fungoides and Burkitt lymphoma) without metreleptin. AGL is associated with high risk for lymphoma, especially PTCL. Autoimmunity likely contributes to this risk. Lymphoma developed with or without metreleptin, suggesting metreleptin does not directly cause lymphoma development; a theoretical role of metreleptin in lymphoma progression remains possible. For most patients with AGL and severe metabolic complications, the proven benefits of metreleptin on metabolic disease will likely outweigh theoretical risks of metreleptin in lymphoma development or progression. PMID:25864863

  3. Environmental Toxicants and Developmental Disabilities: A Challenge for Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koger, Susan M.; Schettler, Ted; Weiss, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    Developmental, learning, and behavioral disabilities are a significant public health problem. Environmental chemicals can interfere with brain development during critical periods, thereby impacting sensory, motor, and cognitive function. Because regulation in the United States is based on limited testing protocols and essentially requires proof of…

  4. Developmental neurotoxic effects of Malathion on 3D neurosphere system

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Mohamed; Lotfy, Ahmed; Fathy, Khaled; Makar, Maria; El-emam, Mona; El-gamal, Aya; El-gamal, Mohamed; Badawy, Ahmad; Mohamed, Wael M.Y.; Sobh, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) refers to the toxic effects induced by various chemicals on brain during the early childhood period. As human brains are vulnerable during this period, various chemicals would have significant effects on brains during early childhood. Some toxicants have been confirmed to induce developmental toxic effects on CNS; however, most of agents cannot be identified with certainty. This is because available animal models do not cover the whole spectrum of CNS developmental periods. A novel alternative method that can overcome most of the limitations of the conventional techniques is the use of 3D neurosphere system. This in-vitro system can recapitulate many of the changes during the period of brain development making it an ideal model for predicting developmental neurotoxic effects. In the present study we verified the possible DNT of Malathion, which is one of organophosphate pesticides with suggested possible neurotoxic effects on nursing children. Three doses of Malathion (0.25 μM, 1 μM and 10 μM) were used in cultured neurospheres for a period of 14 days. Malathion was found to affect proliferation, differentiation and viability of neurospheres, these effects were positively correlated to doses and time progress. This study confirms the DNT effects of Malathion on 3D neurosphere model. Further epidemiological studies will be needed to link these results to human exposure and effects data. PMID:27054080

  5. Challenging and Offending Behaviour by Adults with Developmental Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the assessment of psychiatric and behavior disorders occurring in people with developmental disorders and the problems arising when such behavior results in offenses against the law. The paper argues that a multidisciplinary approach is needed in such cases, given the complex interaction among possible brain pathology,…

  6. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  7. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  8. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  9. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries....

  10. Genetics and molecular biology of brain calcification.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hao; Zheng, Wen; Jankovic, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Brain calcification is a common neuroimaging finding in patients with neurological, metabolic, or developmental disorders, mitochondrial diseases, infectious diseases, traumatic or toxic history, as well as in otherwise normal older people. Patients with brain calcification may exhibit movement disorders, seizures, cognitive impairment, and a variety of other neurologic and psychiatric symptoms. Brain calcification may also present as a single, isolated neuroimaging finding. When no specific cause is evident, a genetic etiology should be considered. The aim of the review is to highlight clinical disorders associated with brain calcification and provide summary of current knowledge of diagnosis, genetics, and pathogenesis of brain calcification. PMID:25906927

  11. Pitfalls in developmental diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Illingworth, R S

    1987-01-01

    I have never seen a paper or chapter of a book devoted to pitfalls and mistakes in developmental diagnosis. This paper is designed to try to fill the gap. It concerns the avoidance of mistakes in developmental diagnosis and is based entirely on mistakes that I have made myself and now learned to try to avoid and on mistakes that I have seen, most of them repeatedly. I have made no mention of mistakes that could theoretically be made but that I have not personally seen. I believe that most assessment errors are due to overconfidence and to the view that developmental diagnosis is easy. Many other mistakes are due to reliance on purely objective tests with consequent omission of a detailed history and physical examination, so that factors that profoundly affect development but are not directly related to the child's mental endowment are not weighed up before an opinion is reached. PMID:2444167

  12. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    1987-02-01

    The International Planned Parenthood Medical Advisory Panel has developed recommendations to assist family planning associations in playing a more active role in the prevention and control of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Of primary importance is an effective program of information and education aimed at communicating the following facts: AIDS is a fatal disease for which there is no cure; AIDS is spread by sexual intercourse, contaminated blood, and contaminated needles; an infected woman can transmit AIDS to her fetus during pregnancy; a monogamous sexual relationship is the surest way to avoid AIDS infection; condom use is good protection; an infected person can look and feel well, yet still be able to transmit the AIDS virus; and AIDS is not spread by ordinary contact with an infected person. Family planning associations should include information on AIDS in all existing IEC projects, as well as develop new materials. Among the target audiences for IEC activities are family planning workers, family planning clients, and the general public including youth, teachers, parents, employers, and national leaders. Special attention should be given to high-risk groups such as homosexual and bisexual men, hemophiliacs, male and female prostitutes, clients of sexually transmitted disease clinics, people with many sexual partners, illegal users of intravenous drugs, and the sexual partners of those in any of these groups. Wide promotion of condom use is a priority activity for family planning organizations. PMID:12340977

  13. Infections Acquired in the Garden.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Cheston B; Cunha, Burke A

    2015-10-01

    Gardening is a wonderful pastime, and the garden is a very peaceful place to enjoy one's vacation. However, the garden may be a treacherous place for very young or compromised hosts when one takes into account the infectious potential residing in the soil, as well as the insect vectors on plants and animals. Even normal hosts may acquire a variety of infections from the soil, animals, or animal-related insect bites. The location of the garden, its natural animal and insect inhabitants, and the characteristics of the soil play a part in determining its infectious potential. The most important factor making the garden an infectious and dangerous place is the number and interaction of animals, whether they are pets or wild, that temporarily use the garden for part of their daily activities. The clinician should always ask about garden exposure, which will help in eliminating the diagnostic possibilities for the patient. The diagnostic approach is to use epidemiological principles in concert with clinical clues, which together should suggest a reasonable list of diagnostic possibilities. Organ involvement and specific laboratory tests help further narrow the differential diagnosis and determine the specific tests necessary to make a definitive diagnosis. PMID:26542044

  14. Associative Learning Through Acquired Salience

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Most associative learning studies describe the salience of stimuli as a fixed learning-rate parameter. Presumptive saliency signals, however, have also been linked to motivational and attentional processes. An interesting possibility, therefore, is that discriminative stimuli could also acquire salience as they become powerful predictors of outcomes. To explore this idea, we first characterized and extracted the learning curves from mice trained with discriminative images offering varying degrees of structural similarity. Next, we fitted a linear model of associative learning coupled to a series of mathematical representations for stimulus salience. We found that the best prediction, from the set of tested models, was one in which the visual salience depended on stimulus similarity and a non-linear function of the associative strength. Therefore, these analytic results support the idea that the net salience of a stimulus depends both on the items' effective salience and the motivational state of the subject that learns about it. Moreover, this dual salience model can explain why learning about a stimulus not only depends on the effective salience during acquisition but also on the specific learning trajectory that was used to reach this state. Our mathematical description could be instrumental for understanding aberrant salience acquisition under stressful situations and in neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and addiction. PMID:26793078

  15. Associative Learning Through Acquired Salience.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Most associative learning studies describe the salience of stimuli as a fixed learning-rate parameter. Presumptive saliency signals, however, have also been linked to motivational and attentional processes. An interesting possibility, therefore, is that discriminative stimuli could also acquire salience as they become powerful predictors of outcomes. To explore this idea, we first characterized and extracted the learning curves from mice trained with discriminative images offering varying degrees of structural similarity. Next, we fitted a linear model of associative learning coupled to a series of mathematical representations for stimulus salience. We found that the best prediction, from the set of tested models, was one in which the visual salience depended on stimulus similarity and a non-linear function of the associative strength. Therefore, these analytic results support the idea that the net salience of a stimulus depends both on the items' effective salience and the motivational state of the subject that learns about it. Moreover, this dual salience model can explain why learning about a stimulus not only depends on the effective salience during acquisition but also on the specific learning trajectory that was used to reach this state. Our mathematical description could be instrumental for understanding aberrant salience acquisition under stressful situations and in neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and addiction. PMID:26793078

  16. C9orf72 promoter hypermethylation is reduced while hydroxymethylation is acquired during reprogramming of ALS patient cells.

    PubMed

    Esanov, Rustam; Belle, Kinsley C; van Blitterswijk, Marka; Belzil, Veronique V; Rademakers, Rosa; Dickson, Dennis W; Petrucelli, Leonard; Boylan, Kevin B; Dykxhoorn, Derek M; Wuu, Joanne; Benatar, Michael; Wahlestedt, Claes; Zeier, Zane

    2016-03-01

    Among several genetic mutations known to cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9orf72 gene is the most common. In approximately 30% of C9orf72-ALS cases, 5-methylcytosine (5mC) levels within the C9orf72 promoter are increased, resulting in a modestly attenuated phenotype. The developmental timing of C9orf72 promoter hypermethylation and the reason why it occurs in only a subset of patients remain unknown. In order to model the acquisition of C9orf72 hypermethylation and examine the potential role of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from an ALS patient with C9orf72 promoter hypermethylation. Our data show that 5mC levels are reduced by reprogramming and then re-acquired upon neuronal specification, while 5hmC levels increase following reprogramming and are highest in iPSCs and motor neurons. We confirmed the presence of 5hmC within the C9orf72 promoter in post-mortem brain tissues of hypermethylated patients. These findings show that iPSCs are a valuable model system for examining epigenetic perturbations caused by the C9orf72 mutation and reveal a potential role for cytosine demethylation. PMID:26746986

  17. Pre-Clinical Models of Acquired Neonatal Seizures: Differential Effects of Injury on Function of Chloride Co-Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Kang, SK; Kadam, SD

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy [HIE] represents the most common acquired pathology associated with neonatal seizures. HIE-associated neonatal seizures are often difficult to control, due to their refractoriness to traditional anti-seizure agents. Developmentally regulated chloride gradients during early development make the neonatal brain more seizure-susceptible by depolarizing GABAAR-mediated currents, and therefore hindering inhibition by conventional anti-seizure drugs such as phenobarbital [PB] and benzodiazepines. Pharmaco-modulation of chloride co-transporters has become a current field of research in treating refractory neonatal seizures, and the basis of two clinical trials [NCT01434225; NCT00380531]. However, the recent termination of NEMO study [NCT01434225] on bumetanide, an NKCC1 antagonist, suggests that clinical utilization of bumetanide as an adjunct to treat neonatal seizures with PB may not be a viable option. Hence, re-evaluation of bumetanide as an adjunct through pre-clinical studies is warranted. Additionally, the model-specific variability in the efficacy of bumetanide in the pre-clinical models of neonatal seizures highlights the differential consequences of insults used to induce seizures in each pre-clinical model as worth exploration. Injury itself can significantly alter the function of chloride co-transporters, and therefore the efficacy of anti-seizure agents that follow. PMID:25590049

  18. 29 CFR 1952.221 - Developmental schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE PLANS FOR ENFORCEMENT OF STATE STANDARDS Tennessee § 1952.221 Developmental schedule. The Tennessee state plan is developmental. The following is the developmental schedule...

  19. Analysis of brain patterns using temporal measures

    DOEpatents

    Georgopoulos, Apostolos

    2015-08-11

    A set of brain data representing a time series of neurophysiologic activity acquired by spatially distributed sensors arranged to detect neural signaling of a brain (such as by the use of magnetoencephalography) is obtained. The set of brain data is processed to obtain a dynamic brain model based on a set of statistically-independent temporal measures, such as partial cross correlations, among groupings of different time series within the set of brain data. The dynamic brain model represents interactions between neural populations of the brain occurring close in time, such as with zero lag, for example. The dynamic brain model can be analyzed to obtain the neurophysiologic assessment of the brain. Data processing techniques may be used to assess structural or neurochemical brain pathologies.

  20. Developmental Neurotoxicology: History and Outline of Developmental Neurotoxicity Study Guidelines.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present work provides a brief review of basic concepts in developmental neurotoxicology, as well as current representative testing guidelines for evaluating developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) of xenobiotics. Historically, DNT was initially recognized as a “functional” teratoge...

  1. Building Developmental Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Enhu; Davidson, Eric H.

    2009-01-01

    Animal development is an elaborate process programmed by genomic regulatory instructions. Regulatory genes encode transcription factors and signal molecules, and their expression is under the control of cis-regulatory modules that define the logic of transcriptional responses to the inputs of other regulatory genes. The functional linkages amongst regulatory genes constitute the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) that govern cell specification and patterning in development. Constructing such networks requires identification of the regulatory genes involved and characterization of their temporal and spatial expression patterns. Interactions (activation/repression) among transcription factors or signals can be investigated by large-scale perturbation analysis, in which the function of each gene is specifically blocked. Resultant expression changes are then integrated to identify direct linkages, and to reveal the structure of the GRN. Predicted GRN linkages can be tested and verified by cis-regulatory analysis. The explanatory power of the GRN was shown in the lineage specification of sea urchin endomesoderm. Acquiring such networks is essential for a systematic and mechanistic understanding of the developmental process. PMID:19530131

  2. Hepatic encephalopathy coexists with acquired chronic hepatocerebral degeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng-Zhen; Hou, Xuan; Zhou, Tie-Qiao; Chen, Si

    2015-07-01

    Hyperkinetic extrapyramidal syndrome is the typical clinical characteristic of acquired hepatocerebral degeneration (AHD), but is usually not observed with hepatic encephalopathy (HE). We present a case of AHD coexisting with HE. Both conditions were secondary to liver cirrhosis and hepatitis C virus infection. The brain MRI showed bilateral and symmetric high T1 signal-intensity in the globus pallidus, and diffuse high signal-intensity of the hemispheric white matter on T2-FLAIR images. As we usually neglect the existence of AHD, the diagnosis is often ignored, especially when it coexists with HE. This case highlights the need to distinguish irreversible AHD from HE. PMID:26166598

  3. [Hemiballismus disclosing cerebral toxoplasmosis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Awada, A

    1993-01-01

    A 33-year-old Saudi woman presented with right hemiballismus of recent onset. Brain CT showed a left thalamo-subthalamic lesion which was thought initially to be a metastasis or a tuberculoma. The presence of severe subacute diarrhea, multiple lymphadenopathies and lymphopenia suggested an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Tests for HIV-1 infection were positive and, despite the absence of antitoxoplasma antibodies in the serum, antitoxoplasmic treatment by pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine was given. One and a half month later, both abnormal movements and CT images had disappeared. The probable source of HIV infection was imported packed red blood cells received by the patient 5 years earlier. Toxoplasmic brain abscess associated with AIDS should be considered as a possible cause of hemiballismus in young adult even in the regions where AIDS is still infrequent. PMID:8303164

  4. Acquiring local field potential information from amperometric neurochemical recordings

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Nicolelis, Miguel A.L.

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous acquisition of in vivo electrophysiological and neurochemical information is essential for understanding how endogenous neurochemicals modulate the dynamics of brain activity. However, up to now such a task has rarely been accomplished due to the major technical challenge of operating two independent recording systems simultaneously in real-time. Here we propose a simpler solution for achieving this goal by using only a standard electrochemical technique - amperometry. To demonstrate its feasibility, we compared amperometric signals with simultaneously recorded local field potential (LFP) signals. We found that the high frequency component (HFC) of the amperometric signals did not reflect neurochemical fluctuations, but instead it resembled LFPs in several aspects, including: (1) coherent spectral fluctuations; (2) clear characterization of different brain states; (3) identical hippocampal theta depth profile. As such, our findings provide the first demonstration that both LFP and local neurochemical information can be simultaneously acquired from electrochemical sensors alone. PMID:19428527

  5. Clinicopathological associations of acquired erythroblastopenia

    PubMed Central

    Gunes, Gursel; Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Yasar, Hatime Arzu; Eliacik, Eylem; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Demiroglu, Haluk; Sayinalp, Nilgun; Aksu, Salih; Etgul, Sezgin; Aslan, Tuncay; Goker, Hakan; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acquired erythroblastopenia (AE) is a rare clinical situation. It is characterized by the reduction of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow together with the low reticulocyte counts in the peripheral blood. Background: Main secondary causes of AE are drugs, Parvovirus B19 and other infectious reasons, lymphoid and myeloid neoplasia, autoimmune diseases, thymoma and pregnancy. The aim of this study is to assess the frequencies and clinical associations of AE via analyzing 12340 bone marrow samples in a retrospective manner. Material and method: Bone marrow aspirations which were obtained from patients who applied to Hacettepe University Hematology Clinic between 2002 and 2013, were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Thirty four erythroblastopenia cases were found. Patients ranged in age from 16 to 80 years with a median of 38 years. Fifteen patients were men (44%) and nineteen were women (56%). In these patients, detected causes of erythroblastopenia were MDS, idiopathic pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), parvovirus infection, post chemotherapy aplasia, plasma proliferative diseases, copper deficiency due to secondary amyloidosis, fever of unknown origin, hemophagocytic syndrome, enteric fever and legionella pneumonia. We found that between those reasons the most common causes of erythroblastopenia are MDS (17.7%) and idiopathic PRCA (17.7%). Discussion: As a result, erythroblastopenia in the bone marrow may be an early sign of MDS. In those AE cases possibility of being MDS must be kept in mind as it can be mistaken for PRCA. Conclusion: To conclude, in adults MDS without excess blast is one of the most common causes of erythroblastopenia in clinical practice and in case of erythroblastopenia the presence of MDS should be investigated. PMID:26885236

  6. Surface Sampler Arm Acquiring Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Operation of the surface sampler in obtaining Martian soil for Viking 2's molecular analysis experiment last Saturday (September 25) was closely monitored by one of the Lander cameras because of the precision required in trenching the small area--8 by 9 inches-surrounded by rocks. Dubbed 'Bonneville Salt Flats,' the exposure of thin crust appeared unique in contrast with surrounding materials and became a prime target for organic analysis in spite of potential hazards. Large rock in foreground is 8 inches high. At left, the sampler scoop has touched the surface, missing the rock at upper left by a comfortable 6 inches, and the backhoe has penetrated the surface about one-half inch. The scoop was then pulled back to sample the desired point and (second photo) the backhoe furrowed the surface pulling a piece of thin crust toward the spacecraft. The initial touchdown and retraction sequence was used to avoid a collision between a rock in the shadow of the arm and a plate joining the arm and scoop. The rock was cleared by 2 to 3 inches. The third picture was taken 8 minutes after the scoop touched the surface and shows that the collector head has acquired a quantity of soil. With surface sampler withdrawn (right), the foot-long trench is seen between the rocks. The trench is three inches wide and about 1 1/2 to 2 inches deep. The scoop reached to within 3 inches of the rock at far end of trench. Penetration appears to have left a cavernous opening roofed by the crust and only about one inch of undisturbed crust separates the deformed surface and the rock.

  7. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  8. Proposal: Developmental Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helm, Phoebe

    Three program objectives are articulated for establishing a developmental education program to increase retention and graduation rates among academically disadvantaged students at Triton College: (1) instituting horizontal (teaching basic skills) and vertical (assisting in the transfer of basic skills to students' total educational programs)…

  9. Developmental Assessment: New Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergan, John R.; Feld, Jason K.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the Management and Planning System (MAPS), a developmental assessment system initiated in Head Start. The system consists of instruments which assess preschoolers' and kindergartners' development of math, science, literacy, and social skills and children's motor development. Describes the use and benefits of MAPS observational…

  10. Mammary Glands: Developmental Changes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mammary gland progresses from the accumulation of a few cells in the embryonic ectoderm to a highly arborescent tubulo-alveolar gland capable of secreting a highly nutritious product for consumption. Throughout this progression, various changes occur during each developmental stage: prenatal, pr...

  11. Developmental Guidance Program Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon, Ann; Strub, Richard

    This packet of materials was developed for workshops provided to teams of school counselors and administrators for the purpose of developing knowledge and competencies in the delivery of a comprehensive, sequential, developmental guidance program. Section I contains a rationale, definition, and description of program components. In section II…

  12. Developmental Algorithms Have Meaning!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, John

    1997-01-01

    Adapts Stanic and McKillip's ideas for the use of developmental algorithms to propose that the present emphasis on symbolic manipulation should be tempered with an emphasis on the conceptual understanding of the mathematics underlying the algorithm. Uses examples from the areas of numeric computation, algebraic manipulation, and equation solving…

  13. Handbook of Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Samuel L., Ed.; Horner, Robert H., Ed.; Snell, Martha E., Ed.; Blacher, Jan, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This authoritative handbook reviews the breadth of current knowledge about developmental disabilities: neuroscientific and genetic foundations; the impact on health, learning, and behavior; and effective educational and clinical practices. Leading authorities analyze what works in intervening with diverse children and families, from infancy…

  14. Evolutionary Developmental Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geary, David C.; Bjorklund, David F.

    2000-01-01

    Describes evolutionary developmental psychology as the study of the genetic and ecological mechanisms that govern the development of social and cognitive competencies common to all human beings and the epigenetic (gene-environment interactions) processes that adapt these competencies to local conditions. Outlines basic assumptions and domains of…

  15. Alcoholism: A Developmental Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarter, Ralph E.; Vanyukov, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Alcoholism etiology is discussed from developmental behavior genetic perspective. Temperament features that appear to be associated with heightened risk for alcoholism are examined. Their interactions with the environment during course of development are considered within epigenetic framework and, as discussed, have ramifications for improving…

  16. Developmental Purposes of Commercial Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Practical Pointers, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Listed are 45 table, target, manipulative, active, and creative games with such developmental purposes as associative learning, tactile discrimination, and visual motor integration. Information includes the name of the item, distributor, price, description, and developmental purpose. (JYC)

  17. 17 CFR 210.8-06 - Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. 210.8-06 Section 210.8-06 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Statements of Smaller Reporting Companies § 210.8-06 Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired....

  18. 17 CFR 210.8-06 - Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. 210.8-06 Section 210.8-06 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND...-06 Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. If, during the period for which...

  19. 17 CFR 210.8-06 - Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. 210.8-06 Section 210.8-06 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND...-06 Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. If, during the period for which...

  20. 17 CFR 210.8-06 - Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. 210.8-06 Section 210.8-06 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND...-06 Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. If, during the period for which...