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Sample records for acquired somatic mutation

  1. Clinical significance of acquired somatic mutations in aplastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Marsh, J C W; Mufti, G J

    2016-08-01

    Aplastic anaemia (AA) is frequently associated with other disorders of clonal haemopoiesis such as paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and T-large granular lymphocytosis. Certain clones may escape the immune attack within the bone marrow environment and proliferate and attain a survival advantage over normal haemopoietic stem cells, such as trisomy 8, loss of heterozygosity of short arm of chromosome 6 and del13q clones. Recently acquired somatic mutations (SM), excluding PNH clones, have been reported in around 20-25 % of patients with AA, which predispose to a higher risk of later malignant transformation to MDS/acute myeloid leukaemia. Furthermore, certain SM, such as ASXL1 and DNMT3A are associated with poor survival following immunosuppressive therapy, whereas PIGA, BCOR/BCORL1 predict for good response and survival. Further detailed and serial analysis of the immune signature in AA is needed to understand the pathogenetic basis for the presence of clones with SM in a significant proportion of patients. PMID:27084249

  2. Processed pseudogenes acquired somatically during cancer development.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Susanna L; Shlien, Adam; Marshall, John; Pipinikas, Christodoulos P; Martincorena, Inigo; Tubio, Jose M C; Li, Yilong; Menzies, Andrew; Mudie, Laura; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Yates, Lucy; Davies, Helen; Bolli, Niccolo; Bignell, Graham R; Tarpey, Patrick S; Behjati, Sam; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Teixeira, Vitor H; Raine, Keiran; O'Meara, Sarah; Dodoran, Maryam S; Teague, Jon W; Butler, Adam P; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Santarius, Thomas; Grundy, Richard G; Malkin, David; Greaves, Mel; Munshi, Nikhil; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Bowtell, David; Martin, Sancha; Larsimont, Denis; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Boussioutas, Alex; Taylor, Jack A; Hayes, Neil D; Janes, Sam M; Futreal, P Andrew; Stratton, Michael R; McDermott, Ultan; Campbell, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Cancer evolves by mutation, with somatic reactivation of retrotransposons being one such mutational process. Germline retrotransposition can cause processed pseudogenes, but whether this occurs somatically has not been evaluated. Here we screen sequencing data from 660 cancer samples for somatically acquired pseudogenes. We find 42 events in 17 samples, especially non-small cell lung cancer (5/27) and colorectal cancer (2/11). Genomic features mirror those of germline LINE element retrotranspositions, with frequent target-site duplications (67%), consensus TTTTAA sites at insertion points, inverted rearrangements (21%), 5' truncation (74%) and polyA tails (88%). Transcriptional consequences include expression of pseudogenes from UTRs or introns of target genes. In addition, a somatic pseudogene that integrated into the promoter and first exon of the tumour suppressor gene, MGA, abrogated expression from that allele. Thus, formation of processed pseudogenes represents a new class of mutation occurring during cancer development, with potentially diverse functional consequences depending on genomic context. PMID:24714652

  3. Processed pseudogenes acquired somatically during cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Susanna L.; Shlien, Adam; Marshall, John; Pipinikas, Christodoulos P.; Martincorena, Inigo; Tubio, Jose M.C.; Li, Yilong; Menzies, Andrew; Mudie, Laura; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Yates, Lucy; Davies, Helen; Bolli, Niccolo; Bignell, Graham R.; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Behjati, Sam; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Teixeira, Vitor H.; Raine, Keiran; O’Meara, Sarah; Dodoran, Maryam S.; Teague, Jon W.; Butler, Adam P.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Santarius, Thomas; Grundy, Richard G.; Malkin, David; Greaves, Mel; Munshi, Nikhil; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Bowtell, David; Martin, Sancha; Larsimont, Denis; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Boussioutas, Alex; Taylor, Jack A.; Hayes, Neil D.; Janes, Sam M.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Stratton, Michael R.; McDermott, Ultan; Campbell, Peter J.; Provenzano, Elena; van de Vijver, Marc; Richardson, Andrea L.; Purdie, Colin; Pinder, Sarah; Mac Grogan, Gaetan; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Larsimont, Denis; Grabau, Dorthe; Sauer, Torill; Garred, Øystein; Ehinger, Anna; Van den Eynden, Gert G.; van Deurzen, C.H.M; Salgado, Roberto; Brock, Jane E.; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Giri, Dilip D.; Arnould, Laurent; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Treilleux, Isabelle; Caldas, Carlos; Chin, Suet-Feung; Fatima, Aquila; Thompson, Alastair M.; Stenhouse, Alasdair; Foekens, John; Martens, John; Sieuwerts, Anieta; Brinkman, Arjen; Stunnenberg, Henk; Span, Paul N.; Sweep, Fred; Desmedt, Christine; Sotiriou, Christos; Thomas, Gilles; Broeks, Annegein; Langerod, Anita; Aparicio, Samuel; Simpson, Peter T.; van ’t Veer, Laura; Erla Eyfjörd, Jórunn; Hilmarsdottir, Holmfridur; Jonasson, Jon G.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Wong, Bernice Huimin; Tan, Benita Kiat Tee; Hooijer, Gerrit K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer evolves by mutation, with somatic reactivation of retrotransposons being one such mutational process. Germline retrotransposition can cause processed pseudogenes, but whether this occurs somatically has not been evaluated. Here we screen sequencing data from 660 cancer samples for somatically acquired pseudogenes. We find 42 events in 17 samples, especially non-small cell lung cancer (5/27) and colorectal cancer (2/11). Genomic features mirror those of germline LINE element retrotranspositions, with frequent target-site duplications (67%), consensus TTTTAA sites at insertion points, inverted rearrangements (21%), 5′ truncation (74%) and polyA tails (88%). Transcriptional consequences include expression of pseudogenes from UTRs or introns of target genes. In addition, a somatic pseudogene that integrated into the promoter and first exon of the tumour suppressor gene, MGA, abrogated expression from that allele. Thus, formation of processed pseudogenes represents a new class of mutation occurring during cancer development, with potentially diverse functional consequences depending on genomic context. PMID:24714652

  4. Exome Sequencing in Classic Hairy Cell Leukaemia Reveals Widespread Variation in Acquired Somatic Mutations between Individual Tumours Apart from the Signature BRAF V(600)E Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Weston-Bell, Nicola J.; Tapper, Will; Gibson, Jane; Bryant, Dean; Moreno, Yurany; John, Melford; Ennis, Sarah; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Collins, Andrew R.; Sahota, Surinder S.

    2016-01-01

    In classic Hairy cell leukaemia (HCLc), a single case has thus far been interrogated by whole exome sequencing (WES) in a treatment naive patient, in which BRAF V(600)E was identified as an acquired somatic mutation and confirmed as occurring near-universally in this form of disease by conventional PCR-based cohort screens. It left open however the question whether other genome-wide mutations may also commonly occur at high frequency in presentation HCLc disease. To address this, we have carried out WES of 5 such typical HCLc cases, using highly purified splenic tumour cells paired with autologous T cells for germline. Apart from BRAF V(600)E, no other recurrent somatic mutation was identified in these HCLc exomes, thereby excluding additional acquired mutations as also prevalent at a near-universal frequency in this form of the disease. These data then place mutant BRAF at the centre of the neoplastic drive in HCLc. A comparison of our exome data with emerging genetic findings in HCL indicates that additional somatic mutations may however occur recurrently in smaller subsets of disease. As mutant BRAF alone is insufficient to drive malignant transformation in other histological cancers, it suggests that individual tumours utilise largely differing patterns of genetic somatic mutations to coalesce with BRAF V(600)E to drive pathogenesis of malignant HCLc disease. PMID:26871591

  5. Clock-like mutational processes in human somatic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Jones, Philip H.; Wedge, David C.; Sale, Julian E.; Campbell, Peter J.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-11-09

    During the course of a lifetime, somatic cells acquire mutations. Different mutational processes may contribute to the mutations accumulated in a cell, with each imprinting a mutational signature on the cell's genome. Some processes generate mutations throughout life at a constant rate in all individuals, and the number of mutations in a cell attributable to these processes will be proportional to the chronological age of the person. Using mutations from 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 cancer types, we investigated clock-like mutational processes that have been operating in normal human cells. Two mutational signatures show clock-like properties. Both exhibit different mutation rates in different tissues. However, their mutation rates are not correlated, indicating that the underlying processes are subject to different biological influences. For one signature, the rate of cell division may influence its mutation rate. This paper provides the first survey of clock-like mutational processes operating in human somatic cells.

  6. Clock-like mutational processes in human somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Jones, Philip H.; Wedge, David C.; Sale, Julian E.; Campbell, Peter J.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Stratton, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    During the course of a lifetime somatic cells acquire mutations. Different mutational processes may contribute to the mutations accumulated in a cell, with each imprinting a mutational signature on the cell’s genome. Some processes generate mutations throughout life at a constant rate in all individuals and the number of mutations in a cell attributable to these processes will be proportional to the chronological age of the person. Using mutations from 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 cancer types, we investigated clock-like mutational processes that have been operating in normal human cells. Two mutational signatures show clock-like properties. Both exhibit different mutation rates in different tissues. However, their mutation rates are not correlated indicating that the underlying processes are subject to different biological influences. For one signature, the rate of cell division may influence its mutation rate. This study provides the first survey of clock-like mutational processes operative in human somatic cells. PMID:26551669

  7. (Somatic mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The study is concerned the design of new assays that may detect rare somatic mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, which may increase upon exposure to mutagens, and thus become a marker of human exposure to such mutagens. Two assays for somatic mutation were presented, one for mitochondrial DNA deletions which was developed by the author, and one for deletions of the ADA gene which resides in the nucleus.

  8. Somatic Mutation Favors the Evolution of Diploidy

    PubMed Central

    Orr, H. A.

    1995-01-01

    Explanations of diploidy have focused on advantages gained from masking deleterious mutations that are inherited. Recent theory has shown that these explanations are flawed. Indeed, we still lack any satisfactory explanation of diploidy in species that are asexual or that recombine only rarely. Here I consider a possibility first suggested by EFROIMSON in 1932, by MULLER in 1964 and by CROW and KIMURA in 1965: diploidy may provide protection against somatic, not inherited, mutations. I both compare the mean fitness of haploid and diploid populations that are asexual and investigate the invasion of ``diploidy'' alleles in sexual populations. When deleterious mutations are partially recessive and somatic mutation is sufficiently common, somatic mutation provides a clear advantage to diploidy in both asexual and sexual species. PMID:7768451

  9. Clock-like mutational processes in human somatic cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Jones, Philip H.; Wedge, David C.; Sale, Julian E.; Campbell, Peter J.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-11-09

    During the course of a lifetime, somatic cells acquire mutations. Different mutational processes may contribute to the mutations accumulated in a cell, with each imprinting a mutational signature on the cell's genome. Some processes generate mutations throughout life at a constant rate in all individuals, and the number of mutations in a cell attributable to these processes will be proportional to the chronological age of the person. Using mutations from 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 cancer types, we investigated clock-like mutational processes that have been operating in normal human cells. Two mutational signatures show clock-like properties. Both exhibit different mutationmore » rates in different tissues. However, their mutation rates are not correlated, indicating that the underlying processes are subject to different biological influences. For one signature, the rate of cell division may influence its mutation rate. This paper provides the first survey of clock-like mutational processes operating in human somatic cells.« less

  10. Confidence-based somatic mutation evaluation and prioritization.

    PubMed

    Löwer, Martin; Renard, Bernhard Y; de Graaf, Jos; Wagner, Meike; Paret, Claudia; Kneip, Christoph; Türeci, Ozlem; Diken, Mustafa; Britten, Cedrik; Kreiter, Sebastian; Koslowski, Michael; Castle, John C; Sahin, Ugur

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled high throughput discovery of somatic mutations. Detection depends on experimental design, lab platforms, parameters and analysis algorithms. However, NGS-based somatic mutation detection is prone to erroneous calls, with reported validation rates near 54% and congruence between algorithms less than 50%. Here, we developed an algorithm to assign a single statistic, a false discovery rate (FDR), to each somatic mutation identified by NGS. This FDR confidence value accurately discriminates true mutations from erroneous calls. Using sequencing data generated from triplicate exome profiling of C57BL/6 mice and B16-F10 melanoma cells, we used the existing algorithms GATK, SAMtools and SomaticSNiPer to identify somatic mutations. For each identified mutation, our algorithm assigned an FDR. We selected 139 mutations for validation, including 50 somatic mutations assigned a low FDR (high confidence) and 44 mutations assigned a high FDR (low confidence). All of the high confidence somatic mutations validated (50 of 50), none of the 44 low confidence somatic mutations validated, and 15 of 45 mutations with an intermediate FDR validated. Furthermore, the assignment of a single FDR to individual mutations enables statistical comparisons of lab and computation methodologies, including ROC curves and AUC metrics. Using the HiSeq 2000, single end 50 nt reads from replicates generate the highest confidence somatic mutation call set. PMID:23028300

  11. Confidence-based Somatic Mutation Evaluation and Prioritization

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, Jos; Wagner, Meike; Paret, Claudia; Kneip, Christoph; Türeci, Özlem; Diken, Mustafa; Britten, Cedrik; Kreiter, Sebastian; Koslowski, Michael; Castle, John C.; Sahin, Ugur

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled high throughput discovery of somatic mutations. Detection depends on experimental design, lab platforms, parameters and analysis algorithms. However, NGS-based somatic mutation detection is prone to erroneous calls, with reported validation rates near 54% and congruence between algorithms less than 50%. Here, we developed an algorithm to assign a single statistic, a false discovery rate (FDR), to each somatic mutation identified by NGS. This FDR confidence value accurately discriminates true mutations from erroneous calls. Using sequencing data generated from triplicate exome profiling of C57BL/6 mice and B16-F10 melanoma cells, we used the existing algorithms GATK, SAMtools and SomaticSNiPer to identify somatic mutations. For each identified mutation, our algorithm assigned an FDR. We selected 139 mutations for validation, including 50 somatic mutations assigned a low FDR (high confidence) and 44 mutations assigned a high FDR (low confidence). All of the high confidence somatic mutations validated (50 of 50), none of the 44 low confidence somatic mutations validated, and 15 of 45 mutations with an intermediate FDR validated. Furthermore, the assignment of a single FDR to individual mutations enables statistical comparisons of lab and computation methodologies, including ROC curves and AUC metrics. Using the HiSeq 2000, single end 50 nt reads from replicates generate the highest confidence somatic mutation call set. PMID:23028300

  12. Germline and somatic mutations in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Smith, Miriam J

    2015-04-01

    Meningiomas arise from the arachnoid layer of the meninges that surround the brain and spine. They account for over one third of all primary central nervous system tumors in adults and confer a significant risk of location-dependent morbidity due to compression or displacement. A significant increase in risk of meningiomas is associated with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) disease through mutation of the NF2 gene. In addition, approximately 5% of individuals with schwannomatosis disease develop meningiomas, through mutation of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex subunit, SMARCB1. Recently, a second SWI/SNF complex subunit, SMARCE1, was identified as a cause of clear cell meningiomas, indicating a wider role for this complex in meningioma disease. The sonic hedgehog (SHH)-GLI1 signaling pathway gene, SUFU, has also been identified as the cause of hereditary multiple meningiomas in a large Finnish family. The recent identification of somatic mutations in components of the SHH-GLI1 and AKT1-MTOR signaling pathways indicates the potential for cross talk of these pathways in the development of meningiomas. This review describes the known meningioma predisposition genes and their links to the recently identified somatic mutations. PMID:25857641

  13. Somatic DNA mutation analysis in targeted therapy of solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    O’Toole, Sandra A.; Trent, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a disease of the genome with diverse aetiologies including the accumulation of acquired mutations throughout the genome. There has been a flood of knowledge improving our understanding of the biology and molecular genetics of melanoma, lung and colorectal cancer since the genomics era started. Translation of this knowledge into a better understanding of cell proliferation, survival and apoptosis has produced a paradigm shift in medical oncology enabling gene-based cancer treatment (called personalised or precision medicine). Somatic mutation analysis is crucial for a genomics approach since it can identify driver mutations—the “Achilles’ heel” of cancer, and support clinical decision-making through targeted therapy. Nevertheless, the applications of somatic DNA testing in cancer face many challenges such as obtaining comprehensive coverage of the cancer genome with limited DNA being available, and delivering an accurate report in a timely fashion without false-negative and false-positive results. Further advances in DNA technologies and bioinformatics will overcome these issues and maximise opportunities for targeted therapy. Somatic mutation analysis will then become an integral part of cancer management for all malignancies. PMID:26835368

  14. Human somatic mutation assays as biomarkers of carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, P.J.E.; Smith, M.T. ); Hooper, K. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper describes four assays that detect somatic gene mutations in humans: the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase assay, the glycophorin A assay, the HLA-A assay, and the sickle cell hemoglobin assay. Somatic gene mutations can be considered a biomarker of carcinogenesis, and assays for somatic mutation may assist epidemiologists in studies that attempt to identify factors associated with increased risks of cancer. Practical aspects of the use of these assays are discussed.

  15. Somatic mutations in disorders with disrupted brain connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Mutations occur during cell division in all somatic lineages. Because neurogenesis persists throughout human life, somatic mutations in the brain arise during development and accumulate with the aging process. The human brain consists of 100 billion neurons that form an extraordinarily intricate network of connections to achieve higher level cognitive functions. Due to this network architecture, perturbed neuronal functions are rarely restricted to a focal area; instead, they are often spread via the neuronal network to affect other connected areas. Although somatic diversity is an evident feature of the brain, the extent to which somatic mutations affect the neuronal structure and function and their contribution to neurological disorders associated with disrupted brain connectivity remain largely unexplored. Notably, recent reports indicate that brain somatic mutations can indeed play a critical role that leads to the structural and functional abnormalities of the brain observed in several neurodevelopmental disorders. Here, I review the extent and significance of brain somatic mutations and provide my perspective regarding these mutations as potential molecular lesions underlying relatively common conditions with disrupted brain connectivity. Moreover, I discuss emerging technical platforms that will facilitate the detection of low-frequency somatic mutations and validate the biological functions of the identified mutations in the context of brain connectivity. PMID:27282107

  16. Somatic mutations in disorders with disrupted brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Mutations occur during cell division in all somatic lineages. Because neurogenesis persists throughout human life, somatic mutations in the brain arise during development and accumulate with the aging process. The human brain consists of 100 billion neurons that form an extraordinarily intricate network of connections to achieve higher level cognitive functions. Due to this network architecture, perturbed neuronal functions are rarely restricted to a focal area; instead, they are often spread via the neuronal network to affect other connected areas. Although somatic diversity is an evident feature of the brain, the extent to which somatic mutations affect the neuronal structure and function and their contribution to neurological disorders associated with disrupted brain connectivity remain largely unexplored. Notably, recent reports indicate that brain somatic mutations can indeed play a critical role that leads to the structural and functional abnormalities of the brain observed in several neurodevelopmental disorders. Here, I review the extent and significance of brain somatic mutations and provide my perspective regarding these mutations as potential molecular lesions underlying relatively common conditions with disrupted brain connectivity. Moreover, I discuss emerging technical platforms that will facilitate the detection of low-frequency somatic mutations and validate the biological functions of the identified mutations in the context of brain connectivity. PMID:27282107

  17. High-throughput Phenotyping of Lung Cancer Somatic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Berger, Alice H; Brooks, Angela N; Wu, Xiaoyun; Shrestha, Yashaswi; Chouinard, Candace; Piccioni, Federica; Bagul, Mukta; Kamburov, Atanas; Imielinski, Marcin; Hogstrom, Larson; Zhu, Cong; Yang, Xiaoping; Pantel, Sasha; Sakai, Ryo; Watson, Jacqueline; Kaplan, Nathan; Campbell, Joshua D; Singh, Shantanu; Root, David E; Narayan, Rajiv; Natoli, Ted; Lahr, David L; Tirosh, Itay; Tamayo, Pablo; Getz, Gad; Wong, Bang; Doench, John; Subramanian, Aravind; Golub, Todd R; Meyerson, Matthew; Boehm, Jesse S

    2016-08-01

    Recent genome sequencing efforts have identified millions of somatic mutations in cancer. However, the functional impact of most variants is poorly understood. Here we characterize 194 somatic mutations identified in primary lung adenocarcinomas. We present an expression-based variant-impact phenotyping (eVIP) method that uses gene expression changes to distinguish impactful from neutral somatic mutations. eVIP identified 69% of mutations analyzed as impactful and 31% as functionally neutral. A subset of the impactful mutations induces xenograft tumor formation in mice and/or confers resistance to cellular EGFR inhibition. Among these impactful variants are rare somatic, clinically actionable variants including EGFR S645C, ARAF S214C and S214F, ERBB2 S418T, and multiple BRAF variants, demonstrating that rare mutations can be functionally important in cancer. PMID:27478040

  18. Colon and Endometrial Cancers with Mismatch Repair Deficiency can Arise from Somatic, Rather Than Germline, Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Hampel, Heather; Tomsic, Jerneja; Frankel, Wendy L.; Pearlman, Rachel; de la Chapelle, Albert; Pritchard, Colin C.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Patients with Lynch syndrome carry germline mutations in single alleles of genes encoding the MMR proteins MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2; when the second allele becomes mutated, cancer can develop. Increased screening for Lynch syndrome has identified patients with tumors that have deficiency in MMR, but no germline mutations in genes encoding MMR proteins. We investigated whether tumors with deficient MMR had acquired somatic mutations in patients without germline mutations in MMR genes using next-generation sequencing. Methods We analyzed blood and tumor samples from 32 patients with colorectal or endometrial cancer who participated in Lynch syndrome screening studies in Ohio and were found to have tumors with MMR deficiency (based on microsatellite instability and/or absence of MMR proteins in immunohistochemical analysis, without hypermethylation of MLH1), but no germline mutations in MMR genes. Tumor DNA was sequenced for MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, EPCAM, POLE and POLD1 with ColoSeq and mutation frequencies were established. Results Twenty-two of 32 patients (69%) were found to have two somatic (tumor) mutations in MMR genes encoding proteins that were lost from tumor samples, based on immunohistochemistry. Of the 10 tumors without somatic mutations in MMR genes, 3 had somatic mutations with possible loss of heterozygosity that could lead to MMR deficiency, 6 were found to be false-positive results (19%), and 1 had no mutations known to be associated with MMR deficiency. All of the tumors found to have somatic MMR mutations were of the hypermutated phenotype (>12 mutations/Mb); 6 had mutation frequencies >200 per Mb, and 5 of these had somatic mutations in POLE, which encodes a DNA polymerase. Conclusions Some patients are found to have tumors with MMR deficiency during screening for Lynch syndrome, yet have no identifiable germline mutations in MMR genes. We found that almost 70% of these patients acquire somatic mutations in MMR genes, leading to

  19. Age-related somatic mutations in the cancer genome

    PubMed Central

    Milholland, Brandon; Auton, Adam; Suh, Yousin; Vijg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with an increased risk of cancer, possibly in part because of an age-related increase in mutations in normal tissues. Due to their extremely low abundance, somatic mutations in normal tissues frequently escape detection. Tumors, as clonal expansions of single cells, can provide information about the somatic mutations present in these cells prior to tumorigenesis. Here, we used data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), to systematically study the frequency and spectrum of somatic mutations in a total of 6,969 patients and 34 different tumor types as a function of the age of the patient. After using linear modeling to control for the age structure of different tumor types, we found that the number of identified somatic mutations increases exponentially with age. Using additional data from the literature, we found that accumulation of somatic mutations is associated with cell division rate, cancer risk and cigarette smoking, with the latter also associated with a distinct spectrum of mutations. Our results confirm that aging is associated with the accumulation of somatic mutations, and strongly suggest that the level of genome instability of normal cells, modified by both endogenous and environmental factors, is the main risk factor for cancer. PMID:26384365

  20. More Frequent than Desired: Midgut Stem Cell Somatic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Ip, Y Tony

    2015-12-01

    The accumulation of somatic mutations in adult stem cells contributes to the decline of tissue functions and cancer initiation. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Siudeja et al. (2015) investigate the rate and mechanism of naturally occurring mutations in Drosophila midgut intestinal stem cells during aging and find high-frequency mutations arising from multiple mechanisms. PMID:26637937

  1. [Somatic mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The study is concerned the design of new assays that may detect rare somatic mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, which may increase upon exposure to mutagens, and thus become a marker of human exposure to such mutagens. Two assays for somatic mutation were presented, one for mitochondrial DNA deletions which was developed by the author, and one for deletions of the ADA gene which resides in the nucleus.

  2. Parkinson disease (PARK) genes are somatically mutated in cutaneous melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Yardena; Azizi, Esther; Qutob, Nouar; Inzelberg, Lilah; Domany, Eytan; Schechtman, Edna; Friedman, Eitan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether Parkinson disease (PD) genes are somatically mutated in cutaneous melanoma (CM) tissue, because CM occurs in patients with PD at higher rates than in the general population and PD is more common than expected in CM cohorts. Methods: We cross-referenced somatic mutations in metastatic CM detected by whole-exome sequencing with the 15 known PD (PARK) genes. We computed the empirical distribution of the sum of mutations in each gene (Smut) and of the number of tissue samples in which a given gene was mutated at least once (SSampl) for each of the analyzable genes, determined the 90th and 95th percentiles of the empirical distributions of these sums, and verified the location of PARK genes in these distributions. Identical analyses were applied to adenocarcinoma of lung (ADENOCA-LUNG) and squamous cell carcinoma of lung (SQUAMCA-LUNG). We also analyzed the distribution of the number of mutated PARK genes in CM samples vs the 2 lung cancers. Results: Somatic CM mutation analysis (n = 246) detected 315,914 mutations in 18,758 genes. Somatic CM mutations were found in 14 of 15 PARK genes. Forty-eight percent of CM samples carried ≥1 PARK mutation and 25% carried multiple PARK mutations. PARK8 mutations occurred above the 95th percentile of the empirical distribution for SMut and SSampl. Significantly more CM samples harbored multiple PARK gene mutations compared with SQUAMCA-LUNG (p = 0.0026) and with ADENOCA-LUNG (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The overrepresentation of somatic PARK mutations in CM suggests shared dysregulated pathways for CM and PD. PMID:27123489

  3. Identification of somatic gene mutations in penile squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ferrándiz-Pulido, Carla; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Masferrer, Emili; Vivancos, Ana; Somoza, Rosa; Marés, Roso; Valverde, Claudia; Salvador, Carlos; Placer, Jose; Morote, Juan; Pujol, Ramon M; Ramon y Cajal, Santiago; de Torres, Ines; Toll, Agusti; García-Patos, Vicente

    2015-10-01

    There is a lack of studies on somatic gene mutations and cell signaling driving penile carcinogenesis. Our objective was to analyze somatic mutations in genes downstream of EGFR in penile squamous cell carcinomas, especially the mTOR and RAS/MAPK pathways. We retrospectively analyzed somatic mutations in 10 in situ and 65 invasive penile squamous cell carcinomas by using Sequenom's Mass Spectrometry iPlex Technology and Oncocarta v1.0 Panel. The DNA was extracted from FFPE blocks and we identified somatic missense mutations in three in situ tumors and in 19 invasive tumors, mostly in PIK3CA, KRAS, HRAS, NRAS, and PDGFA genes. Somatic mutations in the PIK3CA gene or RAS family genes were neither associated with tumor grade, stage or outcome, and were equally often identified in hrHPV positive and in hrHPV negative tumors that showed no p53 expression. Mutations in PIK3CA, KRAS, and HRAS are frequent in penile squamous cell carcinoma and likely play a role in the development of p53-negative tumors. Although the presence of these mutations does not seem to correlate with tumoral behavior or outcome, they could be biomarkers of treatment failure with anti-EGFR mAb in patients with penile squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26216163

  4. Somatic LKB1 Mutations Promote Cervical Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Wingo, Shana N.; Gallardo, Teresa D.; Akbay, Esra A.; Liang, Mei-Chi; Contreras, Cristina M.; Boren, Todd; Shimamura, Takeshi; Miller, David S.; Sharpless, Norman E.; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Schorge, John O.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Castrillon, Diego H.

    2009-01-01

    Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is the etiologic agent for cervical cancer. Yet, infection with HPV is not sufficient to cause cervical cancer, because most infected women develop transient epithelial dysplasias that spontaneously regress. Progression to invasive cancer has been attributed to diverse host factors such as immune or hormonal status, as no recurrent genetic alterations have been identified in cervical cancers. Thus, the pressing question as to the biological basis of cervical cancer progression has remained unresolved, hampering the development of novel therapies and prognostic tests. Here we show that at least 20% of cervical cancers harbor somatically-acquired mutations in the LKB1 tumor suppressor. Approximately one-half of tumors with mutations harbored single nucleotide substitutions or microdeletions identifiable by exon sequencing, while the other half harbored larger monoallelic or biallelic deletions detectable by multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA). Biallelic mutations were identified in most cervical cancer cell lines; HeLa, the first human cell line, harbors a homozygous 25 kb deletion that occurred in vivo. LKB1 inactivation in primary tumors was associated with accelerated disease progression. Median survival was only 13 months for patients with LKB1-deficient tumors, but >100 months for patients with LKB1-wild type tumors (P = 0.015, log rank test; hazard ratio = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.083 to 0.77). LKB1 is thus a major cervical tumor suppressor, demonstrating that acquired genetic alterations drive progression of HPV-induced dysplasias to invasive, lethal cancers. Furthermore, LKB1 status can be exploited clinically to predict disease recurrence. PMID:19340305

  5. RADIA: RNA and DNA Integrated Analysis for Somatic Mutation Detection

    PubMed Central

    Radenbaugh, Amie J.; Ma, Singer; Ewing, Adam; Stuart, Joshua M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Zhu, Jingchun; Haussler, David

    2014-01-01

    The detection of somatic single nucleotide variants is a crucial component to the characterization of the cancer genome. Mutation calling algorithms thus far have focused on comparing the normal and tumor genomes from the same individual. In recent years, it has become routine for projects like The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to also sequence the tumor RNA. Here we present RADIA (RNA and DNA Integrated Analysis), a novel computational method combining the patient-matched normal and tumor DNA with the tumor RNA to detect somatic mutations. The inclusion of the RNA increases the power to detect somatic mutations, especially at low DNA allelic frequencies. By integrating an individual’s DNA and RNA, we are able to detect mutations that would otherwise be missed by traditional algorithms that examine only the DNA. We demonstrate high sensitivity (84%) and very high precision (98% and 99%) for RADIA in patient data from endometrial carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma from TCGA. Mutations with both high DNA and RNA read support have the highest validation rate of over 99%. We also introduce a simulation package that spikes in artificial mutations to patient data, rather than simulating sequencing data from a reference genome. We evaluate sensitivity on the simulation data and demonstrate our ability to rescue back mutations at low DNA allelic frequencies by including the RNA. Finally, we highlight mutations in important cancer genes that were rescued due to the incorporation of the RNA. PMID:25405470

  6. RADIA: RNA and DNA integrated analysis for somatic mutation detection.

    PubMed

    Radenbaugh, Amie J; Ma, Singer; Ewing, Adam; Stuart, Joshua M; Collisson, Eric A; Zhu, Jingchun; Haussler, David

    2014-01-01

    The detection of somatic single nucleotide variants is a crucial component to the characterization of the cancer genome. Mutation calling algorithms thus far have focused on comparing the normal and tumor genomes from the same individual. In recent years, it has become routine for projects like The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to also sequence the tumor RNA. Here we present RADIA (RNA and DNA Integrated Analysis), a novel computational method combining the patient-matched normal and tumor DNA with the tumor RNA to detect somatic mutations. The inclusion of the RNA increases the power to detect somatic mutations, especially at low DNA allelic frequencies. By integrating an individual's DNA and RNA, we are able to detect mutations that would otherwise be missed by traditional algorithms that examine only the DNA. We demonstrate high sensitivity (84%) and very high precision (98% and 99%) for RADIA in patient data from endometrial carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma from TCGA. Mutations with both high DNA and RNA read support have the highest validation rate of over 99%. We also introduce a simulation package that spikes in artificial mutations to patient data, rather than simulating sequencing data from a reference genome. We evaluate sensitivity on the simulation data and demonstrate our ability to rescue back mutations at low DNA allelic frequencies by including the RNA. Finally, we highlight mutations in important cancer genes that were rescued due to the incorporation of the RNA. PMID:25405470

  7. Germ-line and somatic DICER1 mutations in pineoblastoma.

    PubMed

    de Kock, Leanne; Sabbaghian, Nelly; Druker, Harriet; Weber, Evan; Hamel, Nancy; Miller, Suzanne; Choong, Catherine S; Gottardo, Nicholas G; Kees, Ursula R; Rednam, Surya P; van Hest, Liselotte P; Jongmans, Marjolijn C; Jhangiani, Shalini; Lupski, James R; Zacharin, Margaret; Bouron-Dal Soglio, Dorothée; Huang, Annie; Priest, John R; Perry, Arie; Mueller, Sabine; Albrecht, Steffen; Malkin, David; Grundy, Richard G; Foulkes, William D

    2014-10-01

    Germ-line RB-1 mutations predispose to pineoblastoma (PinB), but other predisposing genetic factors are not well established. We recently identified a germ-line DICER1 mutation in a child with a PinB. This was accompanied by loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the wild-type allele within the tumour. We set out to establish the prevalence of DICER1 mutations in an opportunistically ascertained series of PinBs. Twenty-one PinB cases were studied: Eighteen cases had not undergone previous testing for DICER1 mutations; three patients were known carriers of germ-line DICER1 mutations. The eighteen PinBs were sequenced by Sanger and/or Fluidigm-based next-generation sequencing to identify DICER1 mutations in blood gDNA and/or tumour gDNA. Testing for somatic DICER1 mutations was also conducted on one case with a known germ-line DICER1 mutation. From the eighteen PinBs, we identified four deleterious DICER1 mutations, three of which were germ line in origin, and one for which a germ line versus somatic origin could not be determined; in all four, the second allele was also inactivated leading to complete loss of DICER1 protein. No somatic DICER1 RNase IIIb mutations were identified. One PinB arising in a germ-line DICER1 mutation carrier was found to have LOH. This study suggests that germ-line DICER1 mutations make a clinically significant contribution to PinB, establishing DICER1 as an important susceptibility gene for PinB and demonstrates PinB to be a manifestation of a germ-line DICER1 mutation. The means by which the second allele is inactivated may differ from other DICER1-related tumours. PMID:25022261

  8. Somatic CALR Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms with Nonmutated JAK2

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, E.J.; Nice, F.L.; Gundem, G.; Wedge, D.C.; Avezov, E.; Li, J.; Kollmann, K.; Kent, D.G.; Aziz, A.; Godfrey, A.L.; Hinton, J.; Martincorena, I.; Van Loo, P.; Jones, A.V.; Guglielmelli, P.; Tarpey, P.; Harding, H.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.D.; Goudie, C.T.; Ortmann, C.A.; Loughran, S.J.; Raine, K.; Jones, D.R.; Butler, A.P.; Teague, J.W.; O’Meara, S.; McLaren, S.; Bianchi, M.; Silber, Y.; Dimitropoulou, D.; Bloxham, D.; Mudie, L.; Maddison, M.; Robinson, B.; Keohane, C.; Maclean, C.; Hill, K.; Orchard, K.; Tauro, S.; Du, M.-Q.; Greaves, M.; Bowen, D.; Huntly, B.J.P.; Harrison, C.N.; Cross, N.C.P.; Ron, D.; Vannucchi, A.M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Campbell, P.J.; Green, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. METHODS We performed exome sequencing of samples obtained from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. The mutation status of the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) was assessed in an additional 1345 hematologic cancers, 1517 other cancers, and 550 controls. We established phylogenetic trees using hematopoietic colonies. We assessed calreticulin subcellular localization using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. RESULTS Exome sequencing identified 1498 mutations in 151 patients, with medians of 6.5, 6.5, and 13.0 mutations per patient in samples of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, respectively. Somatic CALR mutations were found in 70 to 84% of samples of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2, in 8% of myelodysplasia samples, in occasional samples of other myeloid cancers, and in none of the other cancers. A total of 148 CALR mutations were identified with 19 distinct variants. Mutations were located in exon 9 and generated a +1 base-pair frameshift, which would result in a mutant protein with a novel C-terminal. Mutant calreticulin was observed in the endoplasmic reticulum without increased cell-surface or Golgi accumulation. Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels than patients with mutated JAK2. Mutation of CALR was detected in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Clonal analyses showed CALR mutations in the earliest phylogenetic node, a finding consistent with its role as an initiating mutation in some patients. CONCLUSIONS Somatic mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone CALR were found in a majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with

  9. Brain somatic mutations: the dark matter of psychiatric genetics?

    PubMed

    Insel, T R

    2014-02-01

    Although inherited DNA sequences have a well-demonstrated role in psychiatric disease risk, for even the most heritable mental disorders, monozygotic twins are discordant at a significant rate. The genetic variation associated with mental disorders has heretofore been based on the search for rare or common variation in blood cells. This search is based on the premise that every somatic cell shares an identical DNA sequence, so that variation found in lymphocytes should reflect variation present in brain cells. Evidence from the study of cancer cells, stem cells and now neurons demonstrate that this premise is false. Somatic mutation is common in human cells and has been implicated in a range of diseases beyond cancer. The exuberant proliferation of cortical precursors during fetal development provides a likely environment for somatic mutation in neuronal and glial lineages. Studies of rare neurodevelopmental disorders, such as hemimegencephaly, demonstrate somatic mutations in affected cortical cells that cannot be detected in unaffected parts of the brain or in peripheral cells. This perspective argues for the need to investigate somatic variation in the brain as an explanation of the discordance in monozygotic twins, a proximate cause of mental disorders in individuals with inherited risk, and a potential guide to novel treatment targets. PMID:24342990

  10. Somatic Mutation Theory - Why it's Wrong for Most Cancers.

    PubMed

    Brücher, Björn L D M; Jamall, Ijaz S

    2016-01-01

    Hysteron proteron reverses both temporal and logical order and this syllogism occurs in carcinogenesis and the somatic mutation theory (SMT): the first (somatic mutation) occurs only after the second (onset of cancer) and, therefore, observed somatic mutations in most cancers appear well after the early cues of carcinogenesis are in place. It is no accident that mutations are increasingly being questioned as the causal event in the origin of the vast majority of cancers as clinical data show little support for this theory when compared against the metrics of patient outcomes. Ever since the discovery of the double helical structure of DNA, virtually all chronic diseases came to be viewed as causally linked to one degree or another to mutations, even though we now know that genes are not simply blueprints, but rather an assemblage of alphabets that can, under non-genetic influences, be used to assemble a business letter or a work of Shakespearean literature. A minority of all cancers is indeed caused by mutations but the SMT has been applied to all cancers, and even to chemical carcinogenesis, in the absence of hard evidence of causality. Herein, we review the 100 year story of SMT and aspects that show why genes are not just blueprints, how radiation and mutation are associated in a more nuanced view, the proposed risk of cancer and bad luck, and the in vitro and in vivo evidence for a new cancer paradigm. This paradigm is scientifically applicable for the majority of non-heritable cancers and consists of a six-step sequence for the origin of cancer. This new cancer paradigm proclaims that somatic mutations are epiphenomena or later events occurring after carcinogenesis is already underway. This serves not just as a plausible alternative to SMT and explains the origin of the majority of cancers, but also provides opportunities for early interventions and prevention of the onset of cancer as a disease. PMID:27160408

  11. Biallelic BRCA2 Mutations Shape the Somatic Mutational Landscape of Aggressive Prostate Tumors.

    PubMed

    Decker, Brennan; Karyadi, Danielle M; Davis, Brian W; Karlins, Eric; Tillmans, Lori S; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2016-05-01

    To identify clinically important molecular subtypes of prostate cancer (PCa), we characterized the somatic landscape of aggressive tumors via deep, whole-genome sequencing. In our discovery set of ten tumor/normal subject pairs with Gleason scores of 8-10 at diagnosis, coordinated analysis of germline and somatic variants, including single-nucleotide variants, indels, and structural variants, revealed biallelic BRCA2 disruptions in a subset of samples. Compared to the other samples, the PCa BRCA2-deficient tumors exhibited a complex and highly specific mutation signature, featuring a 2.88-fold increased somatic mutation rate, depletion of context-specific C>T substitutions, and an enrichment for deletions, especially those longer than 10 bp. We next performed a BRCA2 deficiency-targeted reanalysis of 150 metastatic PCa tumors, and each of the 18 BRCA2-mutated samples recapitulated the BRCA2 deficiency-associated mutation signature, underscoring the potent influence of these lesions on somatic mutagenesis and tumor evolution. Among all 21 individuals with BRCA2-deficient tumors, only about half carried deleterious germline alleles. Importantly, the somatic mutation signature in tumors with one germline and one somatic risk allele was indistinguishable from those with purely somatic mutations. Our observations clearly demonstrate that BRCA2-disrupted tumors represent a unique and clinically relevant molecular subtype of aggressive PCa, highlighting both the promise and utility of this mutation signature as a prognostic and treatment-selection biomarker. Further, any test designed to leverage BRCA2 status as a biomarker for PCa must consider both germline and somatic mutations and all types of deleterious mutations. PMID:27087322

  12. Somatic Activating PIK3CA Mutations Cause Venous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Nisha; Kangas, Jaakko; Mendola, Antonella; Godfraind, Catherine; Schlögel, Matthieu J; Helaers, Raphael; Eklund, Lauri; Boon, Laurence M; Vikkula, Miikka

    2015-12-01

    Somatic mutations in TEK, the gene encoding endothelial cell tyrosine kinase receptor TIE2, cause more than half of sporadically occurring unifocal venous malformations (VMs). Here, we report that somatic mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the catalytic p110α subunit of PI3K, cause 54% (27 out of 50) of VMs with no detected TEK mutation. The hotspot mutations c.1624G>A, c.1633G>A, and c.3140A>G (p.Glu542Lys, p.Glu545Lys, and p.His1047Arg), frequent in PIK3CA-associated cancers, overgrowth syndromes, and lymphatic malformation (LM), account for >92% of individuals who carry mutations. Like VM-causative mutations in TEK, the PIK3CA mutations cause chronic activation of AKT, dysregulation of certain important angiogenic factors, and abnormal endothelial cell morphology when expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The p110α-specific inhibitor BYL719 restores all abnormal phenotypes tested, in PIK3CA- as well as TEK-mutant HUVECs, demonstrating that they operate via the same pathogenic pathways. Nevertheless, significant genotype-phenotype correlations in lesion localization and histology are observed between individuals with mutations in PIK3CA versus TEK, pointing to gene-specific effects. PMID:26637981

  13. Direct Transcriptional Consequences of Somatic Mutation in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shlien, Adam; Raine, Keiran; Fuligni, Fabio; Arnold, Roland; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Dronov, Serge; Mamanova, Lira; Rosic, Andrej; Ju, Young Seok; Cooke, Susanna L; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Davies, Helen R; Tarpey, Patrick S; Van Loo, Peter; Wedge, David C; Jones, David R; Martin, Sancha; Marshall, John; Anderson, Elizabeth; Hardy, Claire; Barbashina, Violetta; Aparicio, Samuel A J R; Sauer, Torill; Garred, Øystein; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Mariani, Odette; Boyault, Sandrine; Fatima, Aquila; Langerød, Anita; Borg, Åke; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Polyak, Kornelia; Stratton, Michael R; Campbell, Peter J

    2016-08-16

    Disordered transcriptomes of cancer encompass direct effects of somatic mutation on transcription, coordinated secondary pathway alterations, and increased transcriptional noise. To catalog the rules governing how somatic mutation exerts direct transcriptional effects, we developed an exhaustive pipeline for analyzing RNA sequencing data, which we integrated with whole genomes from 23 breast cancers. Using X-inactivation analyses, we found that cancer cells are more transcriptionally active than intermixed stromal cells. This is especially true in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors. Overall, 59% of substitutions were expressed. Nonsense mutations showed lower expression levels than expected, with patterns characteristic of nonsense-mediated decay. 14% of 4,234 rearrangements caused transcriptional abnormalities, including exon skips, exon reusage, fusions, and premature polyadenylation. We found productive, stable transcription from sense-to-antisense gene fusions and gene-to-intergenic rearrangements, suggesting that these mutation classes drive more transcriptional disruption than previously suspected. Systematic integration of transcriptome with genome data reveals the rules by which transcriptional machinery interprets somatic mutation. PMID:27498871

  14. Human mitochondrial DNA: roles of inherited and somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Eric A.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the human mitochondrial genome are known to cause an array of diverse disorders, most of which are maternally inherited, and all of which are associated with defects in oxidative energy metabolism. It is now emerging that somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are also linked to other complex traits, including neurodegenerative diseases, ageing and cancer. Here we discuss insights into the roles of mtDNA mutations in a wide variety of diseases, highlighting the interesting genetic characteristics of the mitochondrial genome and challenges in studying its contribution to pathogenesis. PMID:23154810

  15. Determination of somatic mutations in human erythrocytes by cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Langlois, R.G.; Bigbee, W.L.

    1985-06-21

    Flow cytometric assays of human erythrocytes labeled with monoclonal antibodies specific for glycophorin A were used to enumerate variant cells that appear in peripheral blood as a result of somatic gene-loss mutations in erythrocyte precursor cells. The assay was performed on erythrocytes from 10 oncology patients who had received at least one treatment from radiation or mutagenic chemotherapy at least 3 weeks before being assayed. The patients were suffering from many different malignancies (e.g., breast, renal, bone, colon and lung), and were treated with several different mutagenic therapeutics (e.g., cisplatinum, adriamycin, daunomycin, or cyclophosphamide). The frequency of these variant cells is an indication of the amount of mutagenic damage accumulated in the individual's erythropoietic cell population. Comparing these results to HPRT clonogenic assays, we find similar baseline frequencies of somatic mutation as well as similar correlation with mutagenic exposures. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Practicability of detecting somatic point mutation from RNA high throughput sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Quanhu; Zhao, Shilin; Li, Chung-I; Shyr, Yu; Guo, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Traditionally, somatic mutations are detected by examining DNA sequence. The maturity of sequencing technology has allowed researchers to screen for somatic mutations in the whole genome. Increasingly, researchers have become interested in identifying somatic mutations through RNAseq data. With this motivation, we evaluated the practicability of detecting somatic mutations from RNAseq data. Current somatic mutation calling tools were designed for DNA sequencing data. To increase performance on RNAseq data, we developed a somatic mutation caller GLMVC based on bias reduced generalized linear model for both DNA and RNA sequencing data. Through comparison with MuTect and Varscan we showed that GLMVC performed better for somatic mutation detection using exome sequencing or RNAseq data. GLMVC is freely available for download at the following website: https://github.com/shengqh/GLMVC/wiki. PMID:27046520

  17. Immunogenicity of somatic mutations in human gastrointestinal cancers.

    PubMed

    Tran, Eric; Ahmadzadeh, Mojgan; Lu, Yong-Chen; Gros, Alena; Turcotte, Simon; Robbins, Paul F; Gartner, Jared J; Zheng, Zhili; Li, Yong F; Ray, Satyajit; Wunderlich, John R; Somerville, Robert P; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2015-12-11

    It is unknown whether the human immune system frequently mounts a T cell response against mutations expressed by common epithelial cancers. Using a next-generation sequencing approach combined with high-throughput immunologic screening, we demonstrated that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from 9 out of 10 patients with metastatic gastrointestinal cancers contained CD4(+) and/or CD8(+) T cells that recognized one to three neo-epitopes derived from somatic mutations expressed by the patient's own tumor. There were no immunogenic epitopes shared between these patients. However, we identified in one patient a human leukocyte antigen-C*08:02-restricted T cell receptor from CD8(+) TILs that targeted the KRAS(G12D) hotspot driver mutation found in many human cancers. Thus, a high frequency of patients with common gastrointestinal cancers harbor immunogenic mutations that can potentially be exploited for the development of highly personalized immunotherapies. PMID:26516200

  18. Evaluation of Nine Somatic Variant Callers for Detection of Somatic Mutations in Exome and Targeted Deep Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Thomassen, Mads; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Kruse, Torben A.; Larsen, Martin Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing is extensively applied to catalogue somatic mutations in cancer, in research settings and increasingly in clinical settings for molecular diagnostics, guiding therapy decisions. Somatic variant callers perform paired comparisons of sequencing data from cancer tissue and matched normal tissue in order to detect somatic mutations. The advent of many new somatic variant callers creates a need for comparison and validation of the tools, as no de facto standard for detection of somatic mutations exists and only limited comparisons have been reported. We have performed a comprehensive evaluation using exome sequencing and targeted deep sequencing data of paired tumor-normal samples from five breast cancer patients to evaluate the performance of nine publicly available somatic variant callers: EBCall, Mutect, Seurat, Shimmer, Indelocator, Somatic Sniper, Strelka, VarScan 2 and Virmid for the detection of single nucleotide mutations and small deletions and insertions. We report a large variation in the number of calls from the nine somatic variant callers on the same sequencing data and highly variable agreement. Sequencing depth had markedly diverse impact on individual callers, as for some callers, increased sequencing depth highly improved sensitivity. For SNV calling, we report EBCall, Mutect, Virmid and Strelka to be the most reliable somatic variant callers for both exome sequencing and targeted deep sequencing. For indel calling, EBCall is superior due to high sensitivity and robustness to changes in sequencing depths. PMID:27002637

  19. CSN1 Somatic Mutations in Penile Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Feber, Andrew; Worth, Daniel C; Chakravarthy, Ankur; de Winter, Patricia; Shah, Kunal; Arya, Manit; Saqib, Muhammad; Nigam, Raj; Malone, Peter R; Tan, Wei Shen; Rodney, Simon; Freeman, Alex; Jameson, Charles; Wilson, Gareth A; Powles, Tom; Beck, Stephan; Fenton, Tim; Sharp, Tyson V; Muneer, Asif; Kelly, John D

    2016-08-15

    Other than an association with HPV infection, little is known about the genetic alterations determining the development of penile cancer. Although penile cancer is rare in the developed world, it presents a significant burden in developing countries. Here, we report the findings of whole-exome sequencing (WES) to determine the somatic mutational landscape of penile cancer. WES was performed on penile cancer and matched germline DNA from 27 patients undergoing surgical resection. Targeted resequencing of candidate genes was performed in an independent 70 patient cohort. Mutation data were also integrated with DNA methylation and copy-number information from the same patients. We identified an HPV-associated APOBEC mutation signature and an NpCpG signature in HPV-negative disease. We also identified recurrent mutations in the novel penile cancer tumor suppressor genes CSN1(GPS1) and FAT1 Expression of CSN1 mutants in cells resulted in colocalization with AGO2 in cytoplasmic P-bodies, ultimately leading to the loss of miRNA-mediated gene silencing, which may contribute to disease etiology. Our findings represent the first comprehensive analysis of somatic alterations in penile cancer, highlighting the complex landscape of alterations in this malignancy. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4720-7. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27325650

  20. Proteogenomics connects somatic mutations to signalling in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mertins, Philipp; Mani, D R; Ruggles, Kelly V; Gillette, Michael A; Clauser, Karl R; Wang, Pei; Wang, Xianlong; Qiao, Jana W; Cao, Song; Petralia, Francesca; Kawaler, Emily; Mundt, Filip; Krug, Karsten; Tu, Zhidong; Lei, Jonathan T; Gatza, Michael L; Wilkerson, Matthew; Perou, Charles M; Yellapantula, Venkata; Huang, Kuan-lin; Lin, Chenwei; McLellan, Michael D; Yan, Ping; Davies, Sherri R; Townsend, R Reid; Skates, Steven J; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Bing; Kinsinger, Christopher R; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Ding, Li; Paulovich, Amanda G; Fenyö, David; Ellis, Matthew J; Carr, Steven A

    2016-06-01

    Somatic mutations have been extensively characterized in breast cancer, but the effects of these genetic alterations on the proteomic landscape remain poorly understood. Here we describe quantitative mass-spectrometry-based proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses of 105 genomically annotated breast cancers, of which 77 provided high-quality data. Integrated analyses provided insights into the somatic cancer genome including the consequences of chromosomal loss, such as the 5q deletion characteristic of basal-like breast cancer. Interrogation of the 5q trans-effects against the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures, connected loss of CETN3 and SKP1 to elevated expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and SKP1 loss also to increased SRC tyrosine kinase. Global proteomic data confirmed a stromal-enriched group of proteins in addition to basal and luminal clusters, and pathway analysis of the phosphoproteome identified a G-protein-coupled receptor cluster that was not readily identified at the mRNA level. In addition to ERBB2, other amplicon-associated highly phosphorylated kinases were identified, including CDK12, PAK1, PTK2, RIPK2 and TLK2. We demonstrate that proteogenomic analysis of breast cancer elucidates the functional consequences of somatic mutations, narrows candidate nominations for driver genes within large deletions and amplified regions, and identifies therapeutic targets. PMID:27251275

  1. Targeted sequencing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 across a large unselected breast cancer cohort suggests that one-third of mutations are somatic

    PubMed Central

    Winter, C.; Nilsson, M. P.; Olsson, E.; George, A. M.; Chen, Y.; Kvist, A.; Törngren, T.; Vallon-Christersson, J.; Hegardt, C.; Häkkinen, J.; Jönsson, G.; Grabau, D.; Malmberg, M.; Kristoffersson, U.; Rehn, M.; Gruvberger-Saal, S. K.; Larsson, C.; Borg, Å.; Loman, N.; Saal, L. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background A mutation found in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene of a breast tumor could be either germline or somatically acquired. The prevalence of somatic BRCA1/2 mutations and the ratio between somatic and germline BRCA1/2 mutations in unselected breast cancer patients are currently unclear. Patients and methods Paired normal and tumor DNA was analyzed for BRCA1/2 mutations by massively parallel sequencing in an unselected cohort of 273 breast cancer patients from south Sweden. Results Deleterious germline mutations in BRCA1 (n = 10) or BRCA2 (n = 10) were detected in 20 patients (7%). Deleterious somatic mutations in BRCA1 (n = 4) or BRCA2 (n = 5) were detected in 9 patients (3%). Accordingly, about 1 in 9 breast carcinomas (11%) in our cohort harbor a BRCA1/2 mutation. For each gene, the tumor phenotypes were very similar regardless of the mutation being germline or somatically acquired, whereas the tumor phenotypes differed significantly between wild-type and mutated cases. For age at diagnosis, the patients with somatic BRCA1/2 mutations resembled the wild-type patients (median age at diagnosis, germline BRCA1: 41.5 years; germline BRCA2: 49.5 years; somatic BRCA1/2: 65 years; wild-type BRCA1/2: 62.5 years). Conclusions In a population without strong germline founder mutations, the likelihood of a BRCA1/2 mutation found in a breast carcinoma being somatic was ∼1/3 and germline 2/3. This may have implications for treatment and genetic counseling. PMID:27194814

  2. Oxidative Stress Is Not a Major Contributor to Somatic Mitochondrial DNA Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Itsara, Leslie S.; Kennedy, Scott R.; Fox, Edward J.; Yu, Selina; Hewitt, Joshua J.; Sanchez-Contreras, Monica; Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando; Pallanck, Leo J.

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is implicated in aging and common diseases of the elderly, including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. However, the mechanisms that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations are poorly understood. To develop a simple invertebrate model system to address this matter, we used the Random Mutation Capture (RMC) assay to characterize the age-dependent frequency and distribution of mtDNA mutations in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Because oxidative stress is a major suspect in the age-dependent accumulation of somatic mtDNA mutations, we also used the RMC assay to explore the influence of oxidative stress on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. We found that many of the features associated with mtDNA mutations in vertebrates are conserved in Drosophila, including a comparable somatic mtDNA mutation frequency (∼10−5), an increased frequency of mtDNA mutations with age, and a prevalence of transition mutations. Only a small fraction of the mtDNA mutations detected in young or old animals were G∶C to T∶A transversions, a signature of oxidative damage, and loss-of-function mutations in the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, Sod2, had no detectable influence on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. Moreover, a loss-of-function mutation in Ogg1, which encodes a DNA repair enzyme that removes oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine residues (8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine), did not significantly influence the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency of Sod2 mutants. Together, these findings indicate that oxidative stress is not a major cause of somatic mtDNA mutations. Our data instead suggests that somatic mtDNA mutations arise primarily from errors that occur during mtDNA replication. Further studies using Drosophila should aid in the identification of factors that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations. PMID:24516391

  3. Oxidative stress is not a major contributor to somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Itsara, Leslie S; Kennedy, Scott R; Fox, Edward J; Yu, Selina; Hewitt, Joshua J; Sanchez-Contreras, Monica; Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando; Pallanck, Leo J

    2014-02-01

    The accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is implicated in aging and common diseases of the elderly, including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. However, the mechanisms that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations are poorly understood. To develop a simple invertebrate model system to address this matter, we used the Random Mutation Capture (RMC) assay to characterize the age-dependent frequency and distribution of mtDNA mutations in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Because oxidative stress is a major suspect in the age-dependent accumulation of somatic mtDNA mutations, we also used the RMC assay to explore the influence of oxidative stress on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. We found that many of the features associated with mtDNA mutations in vertebrates are conserved in Drosophila, including a comparable somatic mtDNA mutation frequency (∼10(-5)), an increased frequency of mtDNA mutations with age, and a prevalence of transition mutations. Only a small fraction of the mtDNA mutations detected in young or old animals were G∶C to T∶A transversions, a signature of oxidative damage, and loss-of-function mutations in the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, Sod2, had no detectable influence on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. Moreover, a loss-of-function mutation in Ogg1, which encodes a DNA repair enzyme that removes oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine residues (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine), did not significantly influence the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency of Sod2 mutants. Together, these findings indicate that oxidative stress is not a major cause of somatic mtDNA mutations. Our data instead suggests that somatic mtDNA mutations arise primarily from errors that occur during mtDNA replication. Further studies using Drosophila should aid in the identification of factors that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations. PMID:24516391

  4. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic RAC1 mutations in melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Krauthammer, Michael; Kong, Yong; Ha, Byung Hak; Evans, Perry; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; McCusker, James P.; Cheng, Elaine; Davis, Matthew J.; Goh, Gerald; Choi, Murim; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Capatana, Ana; Holman, Edna C.; Bosenberg, Marcus; Sznol, Mario; Kluger, Harriet M.; Brash, Douglas E.; Stern, David F.; Materin, Miguel A.; Lo, Roger S.; Mane, Shrikant; Ma, Shuangge; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Lifton, Richard P.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Boggon, Titus J.; Halaban, Ruth

    2012-10-11

    We characterized the mutational landscape of melanoma, the form of skin cancer with the highest mortality rate, by sequencing the exomes of 147 melanomas. Sun-exposed melanomas had markedly more ultraviolet (UV)-like C>T somatic mutations compared to sun-shielded acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas. Among the newly identified cancer genes was PPP6C, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, which harbored mutations that clustered in the active site in 12% of sun-exposed melanomas, exclusively in tumors with mutations in BRAF or NRAS. Notably, we identified a recurrent UV-signature, an activating mutation in RAC1 in 9.2% of sun-exposed melanomas. This activating mutation, the third most frequent in our cohort of sun-exposed melanoma after those of BRAF and NRAS, changes Pro29 to serine (RAC1{sup P29S}) in the highly conserved switch I domain. Crystal structures, and biochemical and functional studies of RAC1{sup P29S} showed that the alteration releases the conformational restraint conferred by the conserved proline, causes an increased binding of the protein to downstream effectors, and promotes melanocyte proliferation and migration. These findings raise the possibility that pharmacological inhibition of downstream effectors of RAC1 signaling could be of therapeutic benefit.

  5. Brain somatic mutations in MTOR leading to focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae Seok; Lee, Jeong Ho

    2016-02-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia type II (FCDII) is a focal malformation of the developing cerebral cortex and the major cause of intractable epilepsy. However, since the molecular genetic etiology of FCD has remained enigmatic, the effective therapeutic target for this condition has remained poorly understood. Our recent study on FCD utilizing various deep sequencing platforms identified somatic mutations in MTOR (existing as low as 1% allelic frequency) only in the affected brain tissues. We observed that these mutations induced hyperactivation of the mTOR kinase. In addition, focal cortical expression of mutant MTOR using in utero electroporation in mice, recapitulated the neuropathological features of FCDII, such as migration defect, cytomegalic neuron and spontaneous seizures. Furthermore, seizures and dysmorphic neurons were rescued by the administration of mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin. This study provides the first evidence that brain somatic activating mutations in MTOR cause FCD, and suggests the potential drug target for intractable epilepsy in FCD patients. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 71-72]. PMID:26779999

  6. Somatic STAT3 Mutations in Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Koskela, Hanna L.M.; Eldfors, Samuli; Ellonen, Pekka; van Adrichem, Arjan J.; Kuusanmäki, Heikki; Andersson, Emma I.; Lagström, Sonja; Clemente, Michael J.; Olson, Thomas; Jalkanen, Sari E.; Majumder, Muntasir Mamun; Almusa, Henrikki; Edgren, Henrik; Lepistö, Maija; Mattila, Pirkko; Guinta, Kathryn; Koistinen, Pirjo; Kuittinen, Taru; Penttinen, Kati; Parsons, Alun; Knowles, Jonathan; Saarela, Janna; Wennerberg, Krister; Kallioniemi, Olli; Porkka, Kimmo; Loughran, Thomas P.; Heckman, Caroline A.; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Mustjoki, Satu

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by the expansion of clonal CD3+CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and often associated with autoimmune disorders and immune-mediated cytopenias. METHODS We used next-generation exome sequencing to identify somatic mutations in CTLs from an index patient with large granular lymphocytic leukemia. Targeted resequencing was performed in a well-characterized cohort of 76 patients with this disorder, characterized by clonal T-cell–receptor rearrangements and increased numbers of large granular lymphocytes. RESULTS Mutations in the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 gene (STAT3) were found in 31 of 77 patients (40%) with large granular lymphocytic leukemia. Among these 31 patients, recurrent mutational hot spots included Y640F in 13 (17%), D661V in 7 (9%), D661Y in 7 (9%), and N647I in 3 (4%). All mutations were located in exon 21, encoding the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain, which mediates the dimerization and activation of STAT protein. The amino acid changes resulted in a more hydrophobic protein surface and were associated with phosphorylation of STAT3 and its localization in the nucleus. In vitro functional studies showed that the Y640F and D661V mutations increased the transcriptional activity of STAT3. In the affected patients, downstream target genes of the STAT3 pathway (IFNGR2, BCL2L1, and JAK2) were up-regulated. Patients with STAT3 mutations presented more often with neutropenia and rheumatoid arthritis than did patients without these mutations. CONCLUSIONS The SH2 dimerization and activation domain of STAT3 is frequently mutated in patients with large granular lymphocytic leukemia; these findings suggest that aberrant STAT3 signaling underlies the pathogenesis of this disease. (Funded by the Academy of Finland and others.) PMID:22591296

  7. Cell-of-Origin-Specific 3D Genome Structure Acquired during Somatic Cell Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Krijger, Peter Hugo Lodewijk; Di Stefano, Bruno; de Wit, Elzo; Limone, Francesco; van Oevelen, Chris; de Laat, Wouter; Graf, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Forced expression of reprogramming factors can convert somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Here we studied genome topology dynamics during reprogramming of different somatic cell types with highly distinct genome conformations. We find large-scale topologically associated domain (TAD) repositioning and alterations of tissue-restricted genomic neighborhoods and chromatin loops, effectively erasing the somatic-cell-specific genome structures while establishing an embryonic stem-cell-like 3D genome. Yet, early passage iPSCs carry topological hallmarks that enable recognition of their cell of origin. These hallmarks are not remnants of somatic chromosome topologies. Instead, the distinguishing topological features are acquired during reprogramming, as we also find for cell-of-origin-dependent gene expression patterns. PMID:26971819

  8. Recurrent somatic mutations underlie corticotropin-independent Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yusuke; Maekawa, Shigekatsu; Ishii, Ryohei; Sanada, Masashi; Morikawa, Teppei; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Yoshida, Kenichi; Nagata, Yasunobu; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Yoshizato, Tetsuichi; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Kataoka, Keisuke; Kon, Ayana; Aoki, Kosuke; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Kume, Haruki; Miyano, Satoru; Fukayama, Masashi; Nureki, Osamu; Homma, Yukio; Ogawa, Seishi

    2014-05-23

    Cushing's syndrome is caused by excess cortisol production from the adrenocortical gland. In corticotropin-independent Cushing's syndrome, the excess cortisol production is primarily attributed to an adrenocortical adenoma, in which the underlying molecular pathogenesis has been poorly understood. We report a hotspot mutation (L206R) in PRKACA, which encodes the catalytic subunit of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA), in more than 50% of cases with adrenocortical adenomas associated with corticotropin-independent Cushing's syndrome. The L206R PRKACA mutant abolished its binding to the regulatory subunit of PKA (PRKAR1A) that inhibits catalytic activity of PRKACA, leading to constitutive, cAMP-independent PKA activation. These results highlight the major role of cAMP-independent activation of cAMP/PKA signaling by somatic mutations in corticotropin-independent Cushing's syndrome, providing insights into the diagnosis and therapeutics of this syndrome. PMID:24855271

  9. Consequences of the recurrent MYD88(L265P) somatic mutation for B cell tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wang, James Q; Jeelall, Yogesh S; Beutler, Bruce; Horikawa, Keisuke; Goodnow, Christopher C

    2014-03-10

    MYD88(L265P) has recently been discovered as an extraordinarily frequent somatic mutation in benign monoclonal IgM gammopathy, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. In this study, we analyze the consequences for antigen-activated primary B cells of acquiring MYD88(L265P). The mutation induced rapid B cell division in the absence of exogenous TLR ligands and was inhibited by Unc93b1(3d) mutation and chloroquine or TLR9 deficiency, indicating continued dependence on upstream TLR9 activation. Proliferation and NF-κB activation induced by MYD88(L265P) were nevertheless rapidly countered by the induction of TNFAIP3, an NF-κB inhibitor frequently inactivated in MYD88(L265P)-bearing lymphomas, and extinguished by Bim-dependent apoptosis. MYD88(L265P) caused self-reactive B cells to accumulate in vivo only when apoptosis was opposed by Bcl2 overexpression. These results reveal checkpoints that fortify TLR responses against aberrant B cell proliferation in response to ubiquitous TLR and BCR self-ligands and suggest that tolerance failure requires the accumulation of multiple somatic mutations. PMID:24534189

  10. Monitoring exposure to atomic bomb radiation by somatic mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Mitoshi; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    1996-05-01

    Atomic bomb survivors are a population suitable for studying the relationship between somatic mutation and cancer risk because their exposure doses are relatively well known and their dose responses in terms of cancer risk have also been thoroughly studied. An analysis has been made of erythrocyte glycophorin A (GPA) gene mutations in 1,226 atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The GPA mutation frequency (Mf) increased slightly but significantly with age at the time of measurement and with the number of cigarettes smoked. After adjustment for the effect of smoking, the Mf was significantly higher in males than in females and higher in Hiroshima than in Nagasaki. All of these characteristics of the background GPA Mf were in accord with those of solid tumor incidence obtained from an earlier epidemiological study of A-bomb survivors. Analysis of the dose effect on Mf revealed the doubling dose to be about 1.20 Sv and the minimum dose for detection of a significant increase to be about 0.24 Sv. No significant dose effect for difference in sex, city, or age at the time of bombing was observed. Interestingly, the doubling dose for the GPA Mf approximated that for solid cancer incidence (1.59 Sv). And the minimum dose for detection was not inconsistent with the data for solid cancer incidence. The dose effect was significantly higher in those diagnosed with cancer before or after measurement than in those without a history of cancer. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that somatic mutations are the main cause of excess cancer risk from radiation exposure. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Monitoring exposure to atomic bomb radiation by somatic mutation.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, M; Kyoizumi, S; Kusunoki, Y; Hirai, Y; Tanabe, K; Cologne, J B

    1996-05-01

    Atomic bomb survivors are a population suitable for studying the relationship between somatic mutation and cancer risk because their exposure doses are relatively well known and their dose responses in terms of cancer risk have also been thoroughly studied. An analysis has been made of erythrocyte glycophorin A (GPA) gene mutations in 1,226 atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The GPA mutation frequency (Mf) increased slightly but significantly with age at the time of measurement and with the number of cigarettes smoked. After adjustment for the effect of smoking, the Mf was significantly higher in males than in females and higher in Hiroshima than in Nagasaki. All of these characteristics of the background GPA Mf were in accord with those of solid tumor incidence obtained from an earlier epidemiological study of A-bomb survivors. Analysis of the dose effect on Mf revealed the doubling dose to be about 1.20 Sv and the minimum dose for detection of a significant increase to be about 0.24 Sv. No significant dose effect for difference in sex, city, or age at the time of bombing was observed. Interestingly, the doubling dose for the GPA Mf approximated that for solid cancer incidence (1.59 Sv). And the minimum dose for detection was not inconsistent with the data for solid cancer incidence. The dose effect was significantly higher in those diagnosed with cancer before or after measurement than in those without a history of cancer. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that somatic mutations are the main cause of excess cancer risk from radiation exposure. PMID:8781371

  12. Elevated Levels of Somatic Mutation in a Manifesting BRCA1 Mutation Carrier

    PubMed Central

    GRANT, Stephen G.; DAS, Rubina; CERCEO, Christina M.; RUBINSTEIN, Wendy S.; LATIMER, Jean J.

    2015-01-01

    Homozygous loss of activity at the breast cancer-predisposing genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 (FANCD1) confers increased susceptibility to DNA double strand breaks, but this genotype occurs only in the tumor itself, following loss of heterozygosity at one of these loci. Thus, if these genes play a role in tumor etiology as opposed to tumor progression, they must manifest a heterozygous phenotype at the cellular level. To investigate the potential consequences of somatic heterozygosity for a BRCA1 mutation demonstrably associated with breast carcinogenesis on background somatic mutational burden, we applied the two standard assays of in vivo human somatic mutation to blood samples from a manifesting carrier of the Q1200X mutation in BRCA1 whose tumor was uniquely ascertained through an MRI screening study. The patient had an allele-loss mutation frequency of 19.4 × 10−6 at the autosomal GPA locus in erythrocytes and 17.1 × 10−6 at the X-linked HPRT locus in lymphocytes. Both of these mutation frequencies are significantly higher than expected from age-matched disease-free controls (P < 0.05). Mutation at the HPRT locus was similarly elevated in lymphoblastoid cell lines established from three other BRCA1 mutation carriers with breast cancer. Our patient’s GPA mutation frequency is below the level established for diagnosis of homozygous Fanconi anemia patients, but consistent with data from obligate heterozygotes. The increased HPRT mutation frequency is more reminiscent of data from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum, a disease characterized by UV sensitivity and deficiency in the nucleotide excision pathway of DNA repair. Therefore, this BRCA1-associated breast cancer patient manifests a unique phenotype of increased background mutagenesis that likely contributed to the development of her disease independent of loss of heterozygosity at the susceptibility locus. PMID:18158561

  13. Biological implications of somatic DDX41 p.R525H mutation in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kadono, Moe; Kanai, Akinori; Nagamachi, Akiko; Shinriki, Satoru; Kawata, Jin; Iwato, Koji; Kyo, Taiichi; Oshima, Kumi; Yokoyama, Akihiko; Kawamura, Takeshi; Nagase, Reina; Inoue, Daichi; Kitamura, Toshio; Inaba, Toshiya; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Matsui, Hirotaka

    2016-08-01

    The DDX41 gene, encoding a DEAD-box type ATP-dependent RNA helicase, is rarely but reproducibly mutated in myeloid diseases. The acquired mutation in DDX41 is highly concentrated at c.G1574A (p.R525H) in the conserved motif VI located at the C-terminus of the helicase core domain where ATP interacts and is hydrolyzed. Therefore, it is likely that the p.R525H mutation perturbs ATPase activity in a dominant-negative manner. In this study, we screened for the DDX41 mutation of CD34-positive tumor cells based on mRNA sequencing and identified the p.R525H mutation in three cases among 23 patients. Intriguingly, these patients commonly exhibited acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with peripheral blood cytopenias and low blast counts, suggesting that the mutation inhibits the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. Data from cord blood cells and leukemia cell lines suggest a role for DDX41 in preribosomal RNA processing, in which the expression of the p.R525H mutant causes a certain ribosomopathy phenotype in hematopoietic cells by suppressing MDM2-mediated RB degradation, thus triggering the inhibition of E2F activity. This study uncovered a pathogenic role of p.R525H DDX41 in the slow growth rate of tumor cells. Age-dependent epigenetic alterations or other somatic changes might collaborate with the mutation to cause AML. PMID:27174803

  14. Ultra–sensitive droplet digital PCR for detecting a low–prevalence somatic GNAQ mutation in Sturge–Weber syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Yuri; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Watanabe, Satoshi; Miyajima, Masakazu; Taguri, Masataka; Miyatake, Satoko; Miyake, Noriko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Mishima, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Akira; Arai, Hajime; Yoshiura, Ko–ichiro; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-01-01

    Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), a method for measuring target nucleic acid sequence quantity, is useful for determining somatic mutation rates using TaqMan probes. In this study, the detection limit of copy numbers of test DNA by ddPCR was determined based on Poisson distribution. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA), which strongly hybridises to target lesions, can inhibit target amplification by PCR. Therefore, by combination of PCR with PNA and ddPCR (PNA–ddPCR), the detection limit could be lowered. We reanalysed a somatic GNAQ mutation (c.548G > A) in patients with Sturge–Weber syndrome (SWS) using ddPCR and PNA–ddPCR. Importantly, among three patients previously found to be mutation negative by next–generation sequencing, two patients had the GNAQ mutation with a mutant allele frequency of less than 1%. Furthermore, we were able to find the same mutation in blood leukocyte or saliva DNA derived from four out of 40 SWS patients. Vascular anomalies and blood leukocytes originate from endothelial cells and haemangioblasts, respectively, which are both of mesodermal origin. Therefore, blood leukocytes may harbour the GNAQ mutation, depending on the time when the somatic mutation is acquired. These data suggest the possibility of diagnosis using blood DNA in some patients with SWS. PMID:26957145

  15. Ultra-sensitive droplet digital PCR for detecting a low-prevalence somatic GNAQ mutation in Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Yuri; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Watanabe, Satoshi; Miyajima, Masakazu; Taguri, Masataka; Miyatake, Satoko; Miyake, Noriko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Mishima, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Akira; Arai, Hajime; Yoshiura, Ko-ichiro; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-01-01

    Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), a method for measuring target nucleic acid sequence quantity, is useful for determining somatic mutation rates using TaqMan probes. In this study, the detection limit of copy numbers of test DNA by ddPCR was determined based on Poisson distribution. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA), which strongly hybridises to target lesions, can inhibit target amplification by PCR. Therefore, by combination of PCR with PNA and ddPCR (PNA-ddPCR), the detection limit could be lowered. We reanalysed a somatic GNAQ mutation (c.548G > A) in patients with Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) using ddPCR and PNA-ddPCR. Importantly, among three patients previously found to be mutation negative by next-generation sequencing, two patients had the GNAQ mutation with a mutant allele frequency of less than 1%. Furthermore, we were able to find the same mutation in blood leukocyte or saliva DNA derived from four out of 40 SWS patients. Vascular anomalies and blood leukocytes originate from endothelial cells and haemangioblasts, respectively, which are both of mesodermal origin. Therefore, blood leukocytes may harbour the GNAQ mutation, depending on the time when the somatic mutation is acquired. These data suggest the possibility of diagnosis using blood DNA in some patients with SWS. PMID:26957145

  16. Somatic Mutations in NEK9 Cause Nevus Comedonicus.

    PubMed

    Levinsohn, Jonathan L; Sugarman, Jeffrey L; McNiff, Jennifer M; Antaya, Richard J; Choate, Keith A

    2016-05-01

    Acne vulgaris (AV) affects most adolescents, and of those affected, moderate to severe disease occurs in 20%. Comedones, follicular plugs consisting of desquamated keratinocytes and sebum, are central to its pathogenesis. Despite high heritability in first-degree relatives, AV genetic determinants remain incompletely understood. We therefore employed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in nevus comedonicus (NC), a rare disorder that features comedones and inflammatory acne cysts in localized, linear configurations. WES identified somatic NEK9 mutations, each affecting highly conserved residues within its kinase or RCC1 domains, in affected tissue of three out of three NC-affected subjects. All mutations are gain of function, resulting in increased phosphorylation at Thr210, a hallmark of NEK9 kinase activation. We found that comedo formation in NC is marked by loss of follicular differentiation markers, expansion of keratin-15-positive cells from localization within the bulge to the entire sub-bulge follicle and cyst, and ectopic expression of keratin 10, a marker of interfollicular differentiation not present in normal follicles. These findings suggest that NEK9 mutations in NC disrupt normal follicular differentiation and identify NEK9 as a potential regulator of follicular homeostasis. PMID:27153399

  17. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Novel Somatic Mutations in Chinese Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Cai, Qiuyin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Li, Chun; Zheng, Wei; Long, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    Most breast cancer genomes harbor complex mutational landscapes. Somatic alterations have been predominantly discovered in breast cancer patients of European ancestry; however, little is known about somatic aberration in patients of other ethnic groups including Asians. In the present study, whole-exome sequencing (WES) was conducted in DNA extracted from tumor and matched adjacent normal tissue samples from eleven early onset breast cancer patients who were included in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. We discovered 159 somatic missense and ten nonsense mutations distributed among 167 genes. The most frequent 50 somatic mutations identified by WES were selected for validation using Sequenom MassARRAY system in the eleven breast cancer patients and an additional 433 tumor and 921 normal tissue/blood samples from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. Among these 50 mutations selected for validation, 32 were technically validated. Within the validated mutations, somatic mutations in the TRPM6, HYDIN, ENTHD1, and NDUFB10 genes were found in two or more tumor samples in the replication stage. Mutations in the ADRA1B, CBFB, KIAA2022, and RBM25 genes were observed once in the replication stage. To summarize, this study identified some novel somatic mutations for breast cancer. Future studies will need to be conducted to determine the function of these mutations/genes in the breast carcinogenesis. PMID:26870154

  18. Somatic RET mutation in a patient with pigmented adrenal pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Maison, Nicole; Korpershoek, Esther; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Robledo, Mercedes; de Krijger, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pheochromocytomas (PCC) and paraganglioma (PGL) are rare neuroendocrine tumors arising from chromaffin cells of the neural crest. Mutations in the RET-proto-oncogene are associated with sporadic pheochromocytoma, familial or sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2. In the past, only few cases of pigmented PCCs, PGLs, and one case of pigmented MTC have been reported in the literature. Herein, we present the case of a 77-year old woman with a history of Tako-tsubo-cardiomyopathy and laboratory, as well as radiological, high suspicion of pheochromocytoma, who underwent left-sided adrenalectomy. The 3 cm tumor, which was located on the upper pole of the left adrenal, appeared highly pigmented with dark red to black color. Histologic examinations revealed highly pleomorphic cells with bizarre, huge hyperchromatic nuclei, that immunohistochemically were positive for chromogranin A and synaptophysin, focally positive for HMB45 and negative for melan A. These clinical and pathological features led to the diagnosis of the rare variant of a melanotic ‘black’ pheochromocytoma. In our case a somatic RET mutation in exon 16 (RET c.2753T>C, p.Met918Thy) was detected by targeted next generation sequencing. In summary, this case represents a rare variant of catecholamine-producing tumor with distinct histological features. A potential relationship between the phenotype, the cellular origin and the genetic alterations is discussed. Learning points Pheochromocytoma is a rare neuroendocrine tumor. Pigmentation is seen in several types of tumors arising from the neural crest. The macroscopic black aspect can mislead to the diagnosis of a metastasis deriving from a malignant melanoma. RET mutation are seen in catecholamine and non-catecholamine producing tumors of the same cellular origin. PMID:26843961

  19. NRAS mutation is the sole recurrent somatic mutation in large congenital melanocytic nevi.

    PubMed

    Charbel, Christelle; Fontaine, Romain H; Malouf, Gabriel G; Picard, Arnaud; Kadlub, Natacha; El-Murr, Nizar; How-Kit, Alexandre; Su, Xiaoping; Coulomb-L'Hermine, Aurore; Tost, Jorg; Mourah, Samia; Aractingi, Selim; Guégan, Sarah

    2014-04-01

    Congenital melanocytic nevus (CMN) is a particular melanocytic in utero proliferation characterized by an increased risk of melanoma transformation during infancy or adulthood. NRAS and BRAF mutations have consistently been reported in CMN samples, but until recently results have been contradictory. We therefore studied a series of large and giant CMNs and compared them with small and medium CMNs using Sanger sequencing, pyrosequencing, high-resolution melting analysis, and mutation enrichment by an enhanced version of ice-COLD-PCR. Large-giant CMNs displayed NRAS mutations in 94.7% of cases (18/19). At that point, the role of additional mutations in CMN pathogenesis had to be investigated. We therefore performed exome sequencing on five specimens of large-giant nevi. The results showed that NRAS mutation was the sole recurrent somatic event found in such melanocytic proliferations. The genetic profile of small-medium CMNs was significantly different, with 70% of cases bearing NRAS mutations and 30% showing BRAF mutations. These findings strongly suggest that NRAS mutations are sufficient to drive melanocytic benign proliferations in utero. PMID:24129063

  20. GENOMIC ANALYSIS OF CANCER TISSUE REVEALS THAT SOMATIC MUTATIONS COMMONLY OCCUR IN A SPECIFIC MOTIF

    PubMed Central

    Makridakis, Nick M; Ferraz, Lúcio Fábio Caldas; Reichardt, Juergen KV

    2009-01-01

    Somatic mutations are hallmarks of cancer progression. We sequenced 26 matched human prostate tumor and constitutional DNA samples for somatic alterations in the SRD5A2, HPRT, and HSD3B2 genes, and identified 71 nucleotide substitutions. 79% (56/71) of these substitutions occur within a WKVnRRRnVWK sequence (THEMIS motif; W= A/T, K= G/T, V= G/A/C, R= purine (A/G) and n= any nucleotide), with one mismatch allowed. Literature searches identified this motif with one mismatch allowed in 66% (37/ 56) of the somatic prostate cancer mutations and in 74% (90/ 122) of the somatic breast cancer mutations found in all human genes analyzed. We also found the THEMIS motif with one allowed mismatch in 88% (23/26) of the ras1 gene somatic mutations formed in the SENCAR (SENsitive to skin CARcinogenesis) mouse model, after induction of error-prone DNA repair following mutagenic treatment. The high prevalence of the motif in each of the above mentioned cases cannot be explained by chance (p < 0.046). We further identified 27 somatic mutations in the error-prone DNA polymerase genes pol η, pol κ and pol β in these prostate cancer patients. The data suggest that most somatic nucleotide substitutions in human cancer may occur in sites that conform to the THEMIS motif. These mutations may be caused by “mutator” mutations in error-prone DNA polymerase genes. PMID:18623241

  1. Fungal Infection Increases the Rate of Somatic Mutation in Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    PubMed

    Ranade, Sonali Sachin; Ganea, Laura-Stefana; Razzak, Abdur M; García Gil, M R

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations are transmitted during mitosis in developing somatic tissue. Somatic cells bearing the mutations can develop into reproductive (germ) cells and the somatic mutations are then passed on to the next generation of plants. Somatic mutations are a source of variation essential to evolve new defense strategies and adapt to the environment. Stem rust disease in Scots pine has a negative effect on wood quality, and thus adversely affects the economy. It is caused by the 2 most destructive fungal species in Scandinavia: Peridermium pini and Cronartium flaccidum. We studied nuclear genome stability in Scots pine under biotic stress (fungus-infected, 22 trees) compared to a control population (plantation, 20 trees). Stability was assessed as accumulation of new somatic mutations in 10 microsatellite loci selected for genotyping. Microsatellites are widely used as molecular markers in population genetics studies of plants, and are particularly used for detection of somatic mutations as their rate of mutation is of a much higher magnitude when compared with other DNA markers. We report double the rate of somatic mutation per locus in the fungus-infected trees (4.8×10(-3) mutations per locus), as compared to the controls (2.0×10(-3) mutations per locus) when individual samples were analyzed at 10 different microsatellite markers. Pearson's chi-squared test indicated a significant effect of the fungal infection which increased the number of mutations in the fungus-infected trees (χ(2) = 12.9883, df = 1, P = 0.0003134). PMID:25890976

  2. The Phenotype of a Germline Mutation in PIGA: The Gene Somatically Mutated in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jennifer J.; Gropman, Andrea L.; Sapp, Julie C.; Teer, Jamie K.; Martin, Jodie M.; Liu, Cyndi F.; Yuan, Xuan; Ye, Zhaohui; Cheng, Linzhao; Brodsky, Robert A.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol glycan class A (PIGA) is involved in the first step of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. Many proteins, including CD55 and CD59, are anchored to the cell by GPI. Loss of CD55 and CD59 on erythrocytes causes complement-mediated lysis in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), a disease that manifests after clonal expansion of hematopoietic cells with somatic PIGA mutations. Although somatic PIGA mutations have been identified in many PNH patients, it has been proposed that germline mutations are lethal. We report a family with an X-linked lethal disorder involving cleft palate, neonatal seizures, contractures, central nervous system (CNS) structural malformations, and other anomalies. An X chromosome exome next-generation sequencing screen identified a single nonsense PIGA mutation, c.1234C>T, which predicts p.Arg412∗. This variant segregated with disease and carrier status in the family, is similar to mutations known to cause PNH as a result of PIGA dysfunction, and was absent in 409 controls. PIGA-null mutations are thought to be embryonic lethal, suggesting that p.Arg412∗ PIGA has residual function. Transfection of a mutant p.Arg412∗ PIGA construct into PIGA-null cells showed partial restoration of GPI-anchored proteins. The genetic data show that the c.1234C>T (p.Arg412∗) mutation is present in an affected child, is linked to the affected chromosome in this family, is rare in the population, and results in reduced, but not absent, biosynthesis of GPI anchors. We conclude that c.1234C>T in PIGA results in the lethal X-linked phenotype recognized in the reported family. PMID:22305531

  3. Mutational History of a Human Cell Lineage from Somatic to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Foad J.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Wuster, Arthur; Li, Yilong; Conte, Nathalie; Koike-Yusa, Hiroko; Kumasaka, Natsuhiko; Vallier, Ludovic; Yusa, Kosuke; Bradley, Allan

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of replicating the genetic code is fundamental. DNA repair mechanisms protect the fidelity of the genome ensuring a low error rate between generations. This sustains the similarity of individuals whilst providing a repertoire of variants for evolution. The mutation rate in the human genome has recently been measured to be 50–70 de novo single nucleotide variants (SNVs) between generations. During development mutations accumulate in somatic cells so that an organism is a mosaic. However, variation within a tissue and between tissues has not been analysed. By reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), their genomes and the associated mutational history are captured. By sequencing the genomes of polyclonal and monoclonal somatic cells and derived iPSCs we have determined the mutation rates and show how the patterns change from a somatic lineage in vivo through to iPSCs. Somatic cells have a mutation rate of 14 SNVs per cell per generation while iPSCs exhibited a ten-fold lower rate. Analyses of mutational signatures suggested that deamination of methylated cytosine may be the major mutagenic source in vivo, whilst oxidative DNA damage becomes dominant in vitro. Our results provide insights for better understanding of mutational processes and lineage relationships between human somatic cells. Furthermore it provides a foundation for interpretation of elevated mutation rates and patterns in cancer. PMID:27054363

  4. Germline BAP1 mutations misreported as somatic based on tumor-only testing.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed H; Rai, Karan; Pilarski, Robert; Davidorf, Frederick H; Cebulla, Colleen M

    2016-04-01

    We present three unrelated patients with germline mutations in BAP1 misreported as somatic mutations. All had strong family histories of cancer. One of these patients presented with an invasive breast cancer with the tumor tissue showing partial loss of the mutant rather than the wild type allele, suggesting that the germline BAP1 mutation didn't contribute to breast cancer development in this patient. This data highlights the importance of sequencing matching germline and tumor DNA for proper assessment of somatic versus germline mutation status. In patients with somatic mutations reported from laboratories carrying out tumor-only genomic testing, the possibility that a variant may be a germline mutation should be considered, especially if the personal and/or family history suggests hereditary cancer predisposition. Since tumor-only testing can reveal germline mutations, ethical issues for patients being tested should be considered including proper consent and genetic counseling. PMID:26748926

  5. Accrued somatic mutations (nucleic acid changes) trigger ALS: 2005-2015 update.

    PubMed

    Armon, Carmel

    2016-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a multilevel disease of the motor neuron system. The mechanisms triggering disease onset should be considered separately from those facilitating its spread and motor neuron death. In 2005, I brought together clinical and epidemiological evidence to support the hypothesis that acquired nucleic acid changes may trigger sporadic ALS. Since 2005, the conceptual foundations for this hypothesis have been strengthened. The journal Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis was renamed Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis & Frontotemporal Degeneration. The focal onset, with simultaneous initial maximal upper and lower motor neuron involvement in the region of onset, and patterns of spread, were characterized further. Clues from the epidemiology of sporadic ALS were affirmed by quantitative analysis, including the increase in disease incidence with age, suggesting accrual of time-dependent changes, and the confirmation of smoking as an established risk factor. Additional observations support the conclusion that accrued somatic mutations trigger onset of ALS. Muscle Nerve 53: 842-849, 2016. PMID:26799358

  6. Neurofibromatosis type 1-associated tumours: Their somatic mutational spectrum and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Somatic gene mutations constitute key events in the malignant transformation of human cells. Somatic mutation can either actively speed up the growth of tumour cells or relax the growth constraints normally imposed upon them, thereby conferring a selective (proliferative) advantage at the cellular level. Neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF1) affects 1/3,000-4,000 individuals worldwide and is caused by the inactivation of the NF1 tumour suppressor gene, which encodes the protein neurofibromin. Consistent with Knudson's two-hit hypothesis, NF1 patients harbouring a heterozygous germline NF1 mutation develop neurofibromas upon somatic mutation of the second, wild-type, NF1 allele. While the identification of somatic mutations in NF1 patients has always been problematic on account of the extensive cellular heterogeneity manifested by neurofibromas, the classification of NF1 somatic mutations is a prerequisite for understanding the complex molecular mechanisms underlying NF1 tumorigenesis. Here, the known somatic mutational spectrum for the NF1 gene in a range of NF1-associated neoplasms --including peripheral nerve sheath tumours (neurofibromas), malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours, gastrointestinal stromal tumours, gastric carcinoid, juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia, glomus tumours, astrocytomas and phaeochromocytomas -- have been collated and analysed. PMID:22155606

  7. Important role of indels in somatic mutations of human cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer is clonal proliferation that arises owing to mutations in a subset of genes that confer growth advantage. More and more cancer related genes are found to have accumulated somatic mutations. However, little has been reported about mutational patterns of insertions/deletions (indels) in these genes. Results We analyzed indels' abundance and distribution, the relative ratio between indels and somatic base substitutions and the association between those two forms of mutations in a large number of somatic mutations in the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer database. We found a strong correlation between indels and base substitutions in cancer-related genes and showed that they tend to concentrate at the same locus in the coding sequences within the same samples. More importantly, a much higher proportion of indels were observed in somatic mutations, as compared to meiotic ones. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrated a great diversity of indels at some loci of cancer-related genes. Particularly in the genes with abundant mutations, the proportion of 3n indels in oncogenes is 7.9 times higher than that in tumor suppressor genes. Conclusions There are three distinct patterns of indel distribution in somatic mutations: high proportion, great abundance and non-random distribution. Because of the great influence of indels on gene function (e.g., the effect of frameshift mutation), these patterns indicate that indels are frequently under positive selection and can often be the 'driver mutations' in oncogenesis. Such driver forces can better explain why much less frameshift mutations are in oncogenes while much more in tumor suppressor genes, because of their different function in oncogenesis. These findings contribute to our understanding of mutational patterns and the relationship between indels and cancer. PMID:20807447

  8. Somatic ERCC2 mutations are associated with a distinct genomic signature in urothelial tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaegil; Mouw, Kent W; Polak, Paz; Braunstein, Lior Z; Kamburov, Atanas; Tiao, Grace; Kwiatkowski, David J; Rosenberg, Jonathan E; Van Allen, Eliezer M; D'Andrea, Alan D; Getz, Gad

    2016-06-01

    Alterations in DNA repair pathways are common in tumors and can result in characteristic mutational signatures; however, a specific mutational signature associated with somatic alterations in the nucleotide- excision repair (NER) pathway has not yet been identified. Here we examine the mutational processes operating in urothelial cancer, a tumor type in which the core NER gene ERCC2 is significantly mutated. Analysis of three independent urothelial tumor cohorts demonstrates a strong association between somatic ERCC2 mutations and the activity of a mutational signature characterized by a broad spectrum of base changes. In addition, we note an association between the activity of this signature and smoking that is independent of ERCC2 mutation status, providing genomic evidence of tobacco-related mutagenesis in urothelial cancer. Together, these analyses identify an NER-related mutational signature and highlight the related roles of DNA damage and subsequent DNA repair in shaping tumor mutational landscape. PMID:27111033

  9. Systematic analysis of somatic mutations impacting gene expression in 12 tumour types

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jiarui; McConechy, Melissa K.; Horlings, Hugo M.; Ha, Gavin; Chun Chan, Fong; Funnell, Tyler; Mullaly, Sarah C.; Reimand, Jüri; Bashashati, Ali; Bader, Gary D.; Huntsman, David; Aparicio, Samuel; Condon, Anne; Shah, Sohrab P.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel hierarchical Bayes statistical model, xseq, to systematically quantify the impact of somatic mutations on expression profiles. We establish the theoretical framework and robust inference characteristics of the method using computational benchmarking. We then use xseq to analyse thousands of tumour data sets available through The Cancer Genome Atlas, to systematically quantify somatic mutations impacting expression profiles. We identify 30 novel cis-effect tumour suppressor gene candidates, enriched in loss-of-function mutations and biallelic inactivation. Analysis of trans-effects of mutations and copy number alterations with xseq identifies mutations in 150 genes impacting expression networks, with 89 novel predictions. We reveal two important novel characteristics of mutation impact on expression: (1) patients harbouring known driver mutations exhibit different downstream gene expression consequences; (2) expression patterns for some mutations are stable across tumour types. These results have critical implications for identification and interpretation of mutations with consequent impact on transcription in cancer. PMID:26436532

  10. Somatically Acquired LINE-1 Insertions in Normal Esophagus Undergo Clonal Expansion in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Doucet-O'Hare, Tara T; Sharma, Reema; Rodić, Nemanja; Anders, Robert A; Burns, Kathleen H; Kazazian, Haig H

    2016-09-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus (SCC) is the most common form of esophageal cancer in the world and is typically diagnosed at an advanced stage when successful treatment is challenging. Understanding the mutational profile of this cancer may identify new treatment strategies. Because somatic retrotransposition has been shown in tumors of the gastrointestinal system, we focused on LINE-1 (L1) mobilization as a source of genetic instability in this cancer. We hypothesized that retrotransposition is ongoing in SCC patients. The expression of L1 encoded proteins is necessary for retrotransposition to occur; therefore, we evaluated the expression of L1 open reading frame 1 protein (ORF1p). Using immunohistochemistry, we detected ORF1p expression in all four SCC cases evaluated. Using L1-seq, we identified and validated 74 somatic insertions in eight tumors of the nine evaluated. Of these, 12 insertions appeared to be somatic, not genetically inherited, and sub-clonal (i.e., present in less than one copy per genome equivalent) in the adjacent normal esophagus (NE), while clonal in the tumor. Our results indicate that L1 retrotransposition is active in SCC of the esophagus and that insertion events are present in histologically NE that expands clonally in the subsequent tumor. PMID:27319353

  11. BRCA somatic mutations and epigenetic BRCA modifications in serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Moschetta, M; George, A; Kaye, S B; Banerjee, S

    2016-08-01

    The significant activity of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in the treatment of germline BRCA mutation-associated ovarian cancer, which represents ∼15% of HGS cases, has recently led to European Medicines Agency and food and drug administration approval of olaparib. Accumulating evidence suggests that PARP inhibitors may have a wider application in the treatment of sporadic ovarian cancers. Up to 50% of HGS ovarian cancer patients may exhibit homologous recombination deficiency (HRD) through mechanisms including germline BRCA mutations, somatic BRCA mutations, and BRCA promoter methylation. In this review, we discuss the role of somatic BRCA mutations and BRCA methylation in ovarian cancer. There is accumulating evidence for routine somatic BRCA mutation testing, but the relevance of BRCA epigenetic modifications is less clear. We explore the challenges that need to be addressed if the full potential of these markers of HRD is to be utilised in clinical practice. PMID:27037296

  12. Somatic deleterious mutation rate in a woody plant: estimation from phenotypic data

    PubMed Central

    Bobiwash, K; Schultz, S T; Schoen, D J

    2013-01-01

    We conducted controlled crosses in populations of the long-lived clonal shrub, Vaccinium angustifolium (lowbush blueberry) to estimate inbreeding depression and mutation parameters associated with somatic deleterious mutation. Inbreeding depression level was high, with many plants failing to set fruit after self-pollination. We also compared fruit set from autogamous pollinations (pollen collected from within the same inflorescence) with fruit set from geitonogamous pollinations (pollen collected from the same plant but from inflorescences separated by several meters of branch growth). The difference between geitonogamous versus autogamous fitness within single plants is referred to as ‘autogamy depression' (AD). AD can be caused by somatic deleterious mutation. AD was significantly different from zero for fruit set. We developed a maximum-likelihood procedure to estimate somatic mutation parameters from AD, and applied it to geitonogamous and autogamous fruit set data from this experiment. We infer that, on average, approximately three sublethal, partially dominant somatic mutations exist within the crowns of the plants studied. We conclude that somatic mutation in this woody plant results in an overall genomic deleterious mutation rate that exceeds the rate measured to date for annual plants. Some implications of this result for evolutionary biology and agriculture are discussed. PMID:23778990

  13. Mutation of mitochondria genome: trigger of somatic cell transforming to cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Jianping, Du

    2010-01-01

    Nearly 80 years ago, scientist Otto Warburg originated a hypothesis that the cause of cancer is primarily a defect in energy metabolism. Following studies showed that mitochondria impact carcinogenesis to remodel somatic cells to cancer cells through modifying the genome, through maintenance the tumorigenic phenotype, and through apoptosis. And the Endosymbiotic Theory explains the origin of mitochondria and eukaryotes, on the other hands, the mitochondria also can fall back. Compared to chromosome genomes, the mitochondria genomes were not restricted by introns so they were mutated(fall back) easy. The result is that mitochondria lose function and internal environment of somatic cell become acid and evoked chromosome genomes to mutate, in the end somatic cells become cancer cells. It is the trigger of somatic cell transforming to cancer cell that mitochondria genome happen mutation and lose function. PMID:20181100

  14. The landscape of somatic mutations in protein coding genes in apparently benign human tissues carries signatures of relaxed purifying selection.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; DeGregori, James; De, Subhajyoti

    2016-03-18

    Mutations acquired during development and aging lead to inter- and intra-tissue genetic variations. Evidence linking such mutations to complex traits and diseases is rising. We detected somatic mutations in protein-coding regions in 140 benign tissue samples representing nine tissue-types (bladder, breast, liver, lung, prostate, stomach, thyroid, head and neck) and paired blood from 70 donors. A total of 80% of the samples had 2-39 mutations detectable at tissue-level resolution. Factors such as age and smoking were associated with increased burden of detectable mutations, and tissues carried signatures of distinct mutagenic processes such as oxidative DNA damage and transcription-coupled repair. Using mutational signatures, we predicted that majority of the mutations in blood originated in hematopoietic stem and early progenitor cells. Missense to silent mutations ratio and the persistence of potentially damaging mutations in expressed genes carried signatures of relaxed purifying selection. Our findings have relevance for etiology, diagnosis and treatment of diseases including cancer. PMID:26883632

  15. The landscape of somatic mutations in protein coding genes in apparently benign human tissues carries signatures of relaxed purifying selection

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; DeGregori, James; De, Subhajyoti

    2016-01-01

    Mutations acquired during development and aging lead to inter- and intra-tissue genetic variations. Evidence linking such mutations to complex traits and diseases is rising. We detected somatic mutations in protein-coding regions in 140 benign tissue samples representing nine tissue-types (bladder, breast, liver, lung, prostate, stomach, thyroid, head and neck) and paired blood from 70 donors. A total of 80% of the samples had 2–39 mutations detectable at tissue-level resolution. Factors such as age and smoking were associated with increased burden of detectable mutations, and tissues carried signatures of distinct mutagenic processes such as oxidative DNA damage and transcription-coupled repair. Using mutational signatures, we predicted that majority of the mutations in blood originated in hematopoietic stem and early progenitor cells. Missense to silent mutations ratio and the persistence of potentially damaging mutations in expressed genes carried signatures of relaxed purifying selection. Our findings have relevance for etiology, diagnosis and treatment of diseases including cancer. PMID:26883632

  16. Parental age affects somatic mutation rates in the progeny of flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Bashir, Tufail; Sailer, Christian; Gurumoorthy, Viswanathan; Ramakrishnan, Anantha Maharasi; Dhanapal, Shanmuhapreya; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2015-05-01

    In humans, it is well known that the parental reproductive age has a strong influence on mutations transmitted to their progeny. Meiotic nondisjunction is known to increase in older mothers, and base substitutions tend to go up with paternal reproductive age. Hence, it is clear that the germinal mutation rates are a function of both maternal and paternal ages in humans. In contrast, it is unknown whether the parental reproductive age has an effect on somatic mutation rates in the progeny, because these are rare and difficult to detect. To address this question, we took advantage of the plant model system Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), where mutation detector lines allow for an easy quantitation of somatic mutations, to test the effect of parental age on somatic mutation rates in the progeny. Although we found no significant effect of parental age on base substitutions, we found that frameshift mutations and transposition events increased in the progeny of older parents, an effect that is stronger through the maternal line. In contrast, intrachromosomal recombination events in the progeny decrease with the age of the parents in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner. Our results clearly show that parental reproductive age affects somatic mutation rates in the progeny and, thus, that some form of age-dependent information, which affects the frequency of double-strand breaks and possibly other processes involved in maintaining genome integrity, is transmitted through the gametes. PMID:25810093

  17. Parental Age Affects Somatic Mutation Rates in the Progeny of Flowering Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Bashir, Tufail; Sailer, Christian; Gurumoorthy, Viswanathan; Ramakrishnan, Anantha Maharasi; Dhanapal, Shanmuhapreya; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2015-01-01

    In humans, it is well known that the parental reproductive age has a strong influence on mutations transmitted to their progeny. Meiotic nondisjunction is known to increase in older mothers, and base substitutions tend to go up with paternal reproductive age. Hence, it is clear that the germinal mutation rates are a function of both maternal and paternal ages in humans. In contrast, it is unknown whether the parental reproductive age has an effect on somatic mutation rates in the progeny, because these are rare and difficult to detect. To address this question, we took advantage of the plant model system Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), where mutation detector lines allow for an easy quantitation of somatic mutations, to test the effect of parental age on somatic mutation rates in the progeny. Although we found no significant effect of parental age on base substitutions, we found that frameshift mutations and transposition events increased in the progeny of older parents, an effect that is stronger through the maternal line. In contrast, intrachromosomal recombination events in the progeny decrease with the age of the parents in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner. Our results clearly show that parental reproductive age affects somatic mutation rates in the progeny and, thus, that some form of age-dependent information, which affects the frequency of double-strand breaks and possibly other processes involved in maintaining genome integrity, is transmitted through the gametes. PMID:25810093

  18. Precise Classification of Cervical Carcinomas Combined with Somatic Mutation Profiling Contributes to Predicting Disease Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Spaans, Vivian M.; Trietsch, Marjolijn D.; Peters, Alexander A. W.; Osse, Michelle; ter Haar, Natalja; Fleuren, Gert J.; Jordanova, Ekaterina S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), adenocarcinoma (AC), and adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC) are the most common histological subtypes of cervical cancer. Differences in the somatic mutation profiles of these subtypes have been suggested. We investigated the prevalence of somatic hot-spot mutations in three well-defined cohorts of SCC, AC, and ASC and determined the additional value of mutation profiling in predicting disease outcome relative to well-established prognostic parameters. Materials and Methods Clinicopathological data were collected for 301 cervical tumors classified as SCC (n=166), AC (n=55), or ASC (n=80). Mass spectrometry was used to analyze 171 somatic hot-spot mutations in 13 relevant genes. Results In 103 (34%) tumors, 123 mutations were detected (36% in SCC, 38% in AC, and 28% in ASC), mostly in PIK3CA (20%) and KRAS (7%). PIK3CA mutations occurred more frequently in SCC than AC (25% vs. 11%, P=0.025), whereas KRAS mutations occurred more frequently in AC than SCC (24% vs. 3%, P<0.001) and ASC (24% vs. 3%, P<0.001). A positive mutation status correlated with worse disease-free survival (HR 1.57, P=0.043). In multivariate analysis, tumor diameter, parametrial infiltration, and lymph node metastasis, but not the presence of a somatic mutation, were independent predictors of survival. Conclusion Potentially targetable somatic mutations occurred in 34% of cervical tumors with different distributions among histological subtypes. Precise classification of cervical carcinomas in combination with mutation profiling is valuable for predicting disease outcome and may guide the development and selection of tumor-specific treatment approaches. PMID:26197069

  19. Novel somatic mutations and distinct molecular signature in aldosterone-producing adenomas.

    PubMed

    Åkerström, Tobias; Willenberg, Holger Sven; Cupisti, Kenko; Ip, Julian; Backman, Samuel; Moser, Ana; Maharjan, Rajani; Robinson, Bruce; Iwen, K Alexander; Dralle, Henning; D Volpe, Cristina; Bäckdahl, Martin; Botling, Johan; Stålberg, Peter; Westin, Gunnar; Walz, Martin K; Lehnert, Hendrik; Sidhu, Stan; Zedenius, Jan; Björklund, Peyman; Hellman, Per

    2015-10-01

    Aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) are found in 1.5-3.0% of hypertensive patients in primary care and can be cured by surgery. Elucidation of genetic events may improve our understanding of these tumors and ultimately improve patient care. Approximately 40% of APAs harbor a missense mutation in the KCNJ5 gene. More recently, somatic mutations in CACNA1D, ATP1A1 and ATP2B3, also important for membrane potential/intracellular Ca(2) (+) regulation, were observed in APAs. In this study, we analyzed 165 APAs for mutations in selected regions of these genes. We then correlated mutational findings with clinical and molecular phenotype using transcriptome analysis, immunohistochemistry and semiquantitative PCR. Somatic mutations in CACNA1D in 3.0% (one novel mutation), ATP1A1 in 6.1% (six novel mutations) and ATP2B3 in 3.0% (two novel mutations) were detected. All observed mutations were located in previously described hotspot regions. Patients with tumors harboring mutations in CACNA1D, ATP1A1 and ATP2B3 were operated at an older age, were more often male and had tumors that were smaller than those in patients with KCNJ5 mutated tumors. Microarray transcriptome analysis segregated KCNJ5 mutated tumors from ATP1A1/ATP2B3 mutated tumors and those without mutation. We observed significant transcription upregulation of CYP11B2, as well as the previously described glomerulosa-specific gene NPNT, in ATP1A1/ATP2B3 mutated tumors compared to KCNJ5 mutated tumors. In summary, we describe novel somatic mutations in proteins regulating the membrane potential/intracellular Ca(2) (+) levels, and also a distinct mRNA and clinical signature, dependent on genetic alteration. PMID:26285814

  20. Landscape of somatic mutations in 560 breast cancer whole-genome sequences

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nik-Zainal, Serena; Davies, Helen; Staaf, Johan; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Glodzik, Dominik; Zou, Xueqing; Martincorena, Inigo; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Martin, Sancha; Wedge, David C.; et al

    2016-06-02

    Here, we analysed whole-genome sequences of 560 breast cancers to advance understanding of the driver mutations conferring clonal advantage and the mutational processes generating somatic mutations. We found that 93 protein-coding cancer genes carried probable driver mutations. Some non-coding regions exhibited high mutation frequencies, but most have distinctive structural features probably causing elevated mutation rates and do not contain driver mutations. Mutational signature analysis was extended to genome rearrangements and revealed twelve base substitution and six rearrangement signatures. Three rearrangement signatures, characterized by tandem duplications or deletions, appear associated with defective homologous-recombination-based DNA repair: one with deficient BRCA1 function, anothermore » with deficient BRCA1 or BRCA2 function, the cause of the third is unknown. This analysis of all classes of somatic mutation across exons, introns and intergenic regions highlights the repertoire of cancer genes and mutational processes operating, and progresses towards a comprehensive account of the somatic genetic basis of breast cancer.« less

  1. Landscape of somatic mutations in 560 breast cancer whole-genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Nik-Zainal, Serena; Davies, Helen; Staaf, Johan; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Glodzik, Dominik; Zou, Xueqing; Martincorena, Inigo; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Martin, Sancha; Wedge, David C; Van Loo, Peter; Ju, Young Seok; Smid, Marcel; Brinkman, Arie B; Morganella, Sandro; Aure, Miriam R; Lingjærde, Ole Christian; Langerød, Anita; Ringnér, Markus; Ahn, Sung-Min; Boyault, Sandrine; Brock, Jane E; Broeks, Annegien; Butler, Adam; Desmedt, Christine; Dirix, Luc; Dronov, Serge; Fatima, Aquila; Foekens, John A; Gerstung, Moritz; Hooijer, Gerrit K J; Jang, Se Jin; Jones, David R; Kim, Hyung-Yong; King, Tari A; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Lee, Hee Jin; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Li, Yilong; McLaren, Stuart; Menzies, Andrew; Mustonen, Ville; O'Meara, Sarah; Pauporté, Iris; Pivot, Xavier; Purdie, Colin A; Raine, Keiran; Ramakrishnan, Kamna; Rodríguez-González, F Germán; Romieu, Gilles; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Simpson, Peter T; Shepherd, Rebecca; Stebbings, Lucy; Stefansson, Olafur A; Teague, Jon; Tommasi, Stefania; Treilleux, Isabelle; Van den Eynden, Gert G; Vermeulen, Peter; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Yates, Lucy; Caldas, Carlos; van't Veer, Laura; Tutt, Andrew; Knappskog, Stian; Tan, Benita Kiat Tee; Jonkers, Jos; Borg, Åke; Ueno, Naoto T; Sotiriou, Christos; Viari, Alain; Futreal, P Andrew; Campbell, Peter J; Span, Paul N; Van Laere, Steven; Lakhani, Sunil R; Eyfjord, Jorunn E; Thompson, Alastair M; Birney, Ewan; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; van de Vijver, Marc J; Martens, John W M; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Richardson, Andrea L; Kong, Gu; Thomas, Gilles; Stratton, Michael R

    2016-06-01

    We analysed whole-genome sequences of 560 breast cancers to advance understanding of the driver mutations conferring clonal advantage and the mutational processes generating somatic mutations. We found that 93 protein-coding cancer genes carried probable driver mutations. Some non-coding regions exhibited high mutation frequencies, but most have distinctive structural features probably causing elevated mutation rates and do not contain driver mutations. Mutational signature analysis was extended to genome rearrangements and revealed twelve base substitution and six rearrangement signatures. Three rearrangement signatures, characterized by tandem duplications or deletions, appear associated with defective homologous-recombination-based DNA repair: one with deficient BRCA1 function, another with deficient BRCA1 or BRCA2 function, the cause of the third is unknown. This analysis of all classes of somatic mutation across exons, introns and intergenic regions highlights the repertoire of cancer genes and mutational processes operating, and progresses towards a comprehensive account of the somatic genetic basis of breast cancer. PMID:27135926

  2. Prioritization of driver mutations in pancreatic cancer using cancer-specific high-throughput annotation of somatic mutations (CHASM).

    PubMed

    Carter, Hannah; Samayoa, Josue; Hruban, Ralph H; Karchin, Rachel

    2010-09-15

    Over 20,000 genes were recently sequenced in a series of 24 pancreatic cancers. We applied CHASM (Cancer-specific High-throughput Annotation of Somatic Mutations) to 963 of the missense somatic missense mutations discovered in these 24 cancers. CHASM identified putative driver mutations (false discovery rate ≤0.3) in three known pancreatic cancer driver genes (P53, SMAD4, CDKN2A). An additional 15 genes with putative driver mutations include genes coding for kinases (PIK3CG, DGKA, STK33, TTK and PRKCG), for cell cycle related proteins (NEK8), and for proteins involved in cell adhesion (CMAS, PCDHB2). These and other mutations identified by CHASM point to potential "driver genes" in pancreatic cancer that should be prioritized for additional follow-up. PMID:20581473

  3. Direct mutation analysis by high-throughput sequencing: from germline to low-abundant, somatic variants

    PubMed Central

    Gundry, Michael; Vijg, Jan

    2011-01-01

    DNA mutations are the source of genetic variation within populations. The majority of mutations with observable effects are deleterious. In humans mutations in the germ line can cause genetic disease. In somatic cells multiple rounds of mutations and selection lead to cancer. The study of genetic variation has progressed rapidly since the completion of the draft sequence of the human genome. Recent advances in sequencing technology, most importantly the introduction of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), have resulted in more than a hundred-fold reduction in the time and cost required for sequencing nucleic acids. These improvements have greatly expanded the use of sequencing as a practical tool for mutation analysis. While in the past the high cost of sequencing limited mutation analysis to selectable markers or small forward mutation targets assumed to be representative for the genome overall, current platforms allow whole genome sequencing for less than $5,000. This has already given rise to direct estimates of germline mutation rates in multiple organisms including humans by comparing whole genome sequences between parents and offspring. Here we present a brief history of the field of mutation research, with a focus on classical tools for the measurement of mutation rates. We then review MPS, how it is currently applied and the new insight into human and animal mutation frequencies and spectra that has been obtained from whole genome sequencing. While great progress has been made, we note that the single most important limitation of current MPS approaches for mutation analysis is the inability to address low-abundance mutations that turn somatic tissues into mosaics of cells. Such mutations are at the basis of intra-tumor heterogeneity, with important implications for clinical diagnosis, and could also contribute to somatic diseases other than cancer, including aging. Some possible approaches to gain access to low-abundance mutations are discussed, with a

  4. COSMIC: exploring the world's knowledge of somatic mutations in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Simon A.; Beare, David; Gunasekaran, Prasad; Leung, Kenric; Bindal, Nidhi; Boutselakis, Harry; Ding, Minjie; Bamford, Sally; Cole, Charlotte; Ward, Sari; Kok, Chai Yin; Jia, Mingming; De, Tisham; Teague, Jon W.; Stratton, Michael R.; McDermott, Ultan; Campbell, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    COSMIC, the Catalogue Of Somatic Mutations In Cancer (http://cancer.sanger.ac.uk) is the world's largest and most comprehensive resource for exploring the impact of somatic mutations in human cancer. Our latest release (v70; Aug 2014) describes 2 002 811 coding point mutations in over one million tumor samples and across most human genes. To emphasize depth of knowledge on known cancer genes, mutation information is curated manually from the scientific literature, allowing very precise definitions of disease types and patient details. Combination of almost 20 000 published studies gives substantial resolution of how mutations and phenotypes relate in human cancer, providing insights into the stratification of mutations and biomarkers across cancer patient populations. Conversely, our curation of cancer genomes (over 12 000) emphasizes knowledge breadth, driving discovery of unrecognized cancer-driving hotspots and molecular targets. Our high-resolution curation approach is globally unique, giving substantial insight into molecular biomarkers in human oncology. In addition, COSMIC also details more than six million noncoding mutations, 10 534 gene fusions, 61 299 genome rearrangements, 695 504 abnormal copy number segments and 60 119 787 abnormal expression variants. All these types of somatic mutation are annotated to both the human genome and each affected coding gene, then correlated across disease and mutation types. PMID:25355519

  5. Isolated cardiomyopathy caused by a DMD nonsense mutation in somatic mosaicism: genetic normalization in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Juan-Mateu, J; Paradas, C; Olivé, M; Verdura, E; Rivas, E; González-Quereda, L; Rodríguez, M J; Baiget, M; Gallano, P

    2012-12-01

    X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy is a pure cardiac dystrophinopathy phenotype mainly caused by DMD mutations that present a specific transcription effect in cardiac tissue. We report a 26-year-old male who presented with severe dilated cardiomyopathy and high creatine kinase. The patient did not complain of skeletal muscle weakness. A muscle biopsy showed mild dystrophic changes and a low proportion of dystrophin-negative fibres. A molecular study identified a nonsense DMD mutation (p.Arg2098X) in somatic mosaicism. The ratio of mutant versus normal allele in blood and skeletal muscle suggests selective pressure against mutant muscle cells, a process known as genetic normalization. We hypothesize that this process may have mitigated skeletal muscle symptoms in this patient. This is the second report of a DMD somatic mosaic with evidence of genetic normalization in muscle. Somatic DMD mutations should be considered in patients presenting with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:22092019

  6. Failure to Identify Somatic Mutations in Monozygotic Twins Discordant for Schizophrenia by Whole Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Nan; Guan, Li-Li; Ma, Hong; Wang, Xi-Jin; Wu, Bao-Ming; Shang, Fan-Hong; Wang, Dan; Wen, Hong; Yu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a severe, debilitating, and complex psychiatric disorder with multiple causative factors. An increasing number of studies have determined that rare variations play an important role in its etiology. A somatic mutation is a rare form of genetic variation that occurs at an early stage of embryonic development and is thought to contribute substantially to the development of SCZ. The aim of the study was to explore the novel pathogenic somatic single nucleotide variations (SNVs) and somatic insertions and deletions (indels) of SCZ. Methods: One Chinese family with a monozygotic (MZ) twin pair discordant for SCZ was included. Whole exome sequencing was performed in the co-twin and their parents. Rigorous filtering processes were conducted to prioritize pathogenic somatic variations, and all identified SNVs and indels were further confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Results: One somatic SNV and two somatic indels were identified after rigorous selection processes. However, none was validated by Sanger sequencing. Conclusions: This study is not alone in the failure to identify pathogenic somatic variations in MZ twins, suggesting that exonic somatic variations are extremely rare. Further efforts are warranted to explore the potential genetic mechanism of SCZ. PMID:26960372

  7. Single-molecule PCR: an artifact-free PCR approach for the analysis of somatic mutations.

    PubMed

    Kraytsberg, Yevgenya; Khrapko, Konstantin

    2005-09-01

    A critical review of the clone-by-clone approach to the analysis of complex spectra of somatic mutations is presented. The study of a priori unknown somatic mutations requires painstaking analysis of complex mixtures of multiple mutant and non-mutant DNA molecules. If mutant fractions are sufficiently high, these mixtures can be dissected by the cloning of individual DNA molecules and scanning of the individual clones for mutations (e.g., by sequencing). Currently, the majority of such cloning is performed using PCR fragments. However, post-PCR cloning may result in various PCR artifacts - PCR errors and jumping PCR - and preferential amplification of certain mutations. This review argues that single-molecule PCR is a simple alternative that promises to evade the disadvantages inherent to post-PCR cloning and enhance mutational analysis in the future. PMID:16149882

  8. A somatic truncating mutation in BRCA2 in a sporadic breast tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, B.H.F.; Brohm, M.; Stec, I.

    1996-10-01

    Recently, a second susceptibility gene for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, BRCA2, was cloned. The subsequent identification of heterozygous germ-line mutations confirmed its role as a predisposing factor in a subset of familial breast and ovarian cancer families. The possible involvement of BRCA2 in the sporadic forms of breast and ovarian tumors was addressed in three recent reports analyzing the gene for somatic mutations in 212 primary breast cancers and SS ovarian cancers. Although several alterations were identified, all except two changes were shown to represent germ-line mutations. Moreover, the two somatic BRCA2 alterations were found to be missense mutations resulting in a Asp309S-Glu change in one case and in a His2415Asn change in the other. Given the questionable effect of missense mutations on protein function, the role of BRCA2 in the carcinogenesis of sporadic breast tumors remains unclear. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  9. BRCA somatic and germline mutation detection in paraffin embedded ovarian cancers by next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mafficini, Andrea; Simbolo, Michele; Parisi, Alice; Rusev, Borislav; Luchini, Claudio; Cataldo, Ivana; Piazzola, Elena; Sperandio, Nicola; Turri, Giona; Franchi, Massimo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bovo, Chiara; Lawlor, Rita T.; Scarpa, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    BRCA mutated ovarian cancers respond better to platinum-based therapy and to the recently approved PARP-inhibitors. There is the need for efficient and timely methods to detect both somatic and germline mutations using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and commercially available technology. We used a commercial kit exploring all exons and 50bp exon-intron junctions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, and semiconductor next-generation sequencing (NGS) on DNA from 47 FFPE samples of high-grade serous ovarian cancers. Pathogenic mutations were found in 13/47 (28%) cancers: eight in BRCA1 and five in BRCA2. All BRCA1 and two BRCA2 mutations were germline; three BRCA2 mutations were somatic. All mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. To evaluate the performance of the NGS panel, we assessed its capability to detect the 6,953 variants described for BRCA1 and BRCA2 in ClinVar and COSMIC databases using callability analysis. 6,059 (87.1%) variants were identified automatically by the software; 829 (12.0%) required visual verification. The remaining 65 (0.9%) variants were uncallable, and would require 15 Sanger reactions to be resolved. Thus, the sensitivity of the NGS-panel was 99.1%. In conclusion, NGS performed with a commercial kit is highly efficient for detection of germline and somatic mutations in BRCA genes using routine FFPE tissue. PMID:26745875

  10. Simultaneous DNA and RNA Mapping of Somatic Mitochondrial Mutations across Diverse Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, James B.; Alaei-Mahabadi, Babak; Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Samuelsson, Tore; Gorodkin, Jan; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Larsson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the nuclear genome are required for tumor formation, but the functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are less understood. Here we identify somatic mtDNA mutations across 527 tumors and 14 cancer types, using an approach that takes advantage of evidence from both genomic and transcriptomic sequencing. We find that there is selective pressure against deleterious coding mutations, supporting that functional mitochondria are required in tumor cells, and also observe a strong mutational strand bias, compatible with endogenous replication-coupled errors as the major source of mutations. Interestingly, while allelic ratios in general were consistent in RNA compared to DNA, some mutations in tRNAs displayed strong allelic imbalances caused by accumulation of unprocessed tRNA precursors. The effect was explained by altered secondary structure, demonstrating that correct tRNA folding is a major determinant for processing of polycistronic mitochondrial transcripts. Additionally, the data suggest that tRNA clusters are preferably processed in the 3′ to 5′ direction. Our study gives insights into mtDNA function in cancer and answers questions regarding mitochondrial tRNA biogenesis that are difficult to address in controlled experimental systems. PMID:26125550

  11. BRCA somatic and germline mutation detection in paraffin embedded ovarian cancers by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mafficini, Andrea; Simbolo, Michele; Parisi, Alice; Rusev, Borislav; Luchini, Claudio; Cataldo, Ivana; Piazzola, Elena; Sperandio, Nicola; Turri, Giona; Franchi, Massimo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bovo, Chiara; Lawlor, Rita T; Scarpa, Aldo

    2016-01-12

    BRCA mutated ovarian cancers respond better to platinum-based therapy and to the recently approved PARP-inhibitors. There is the need for efficient and timely methods to detect both somatic and germline mutations using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and commercially available technology. We used a commercial kit exploring all exons and 50bp exon-intron junctions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, and semiconductor next-generation sequencing (NGS) on DNA from 47 FFPE samples of high-grade serous ovarian cancers. Pathogenic mutations were found in 13/47 (28%) cancers: eight in BRCA1 and five in BRCA2. All BRCA1 and two BRCA2 mutations were germline; three BRCA2 mutations were somatic. All mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. To evaluate the performance of the NGS panel, we assessed its capability to detect the 6,953 variants described for BRCA1 and BRCA2 in ClinVar and COSMIC databases using callability analysis. 6,059 (87.1%) variants were identified automatically by the software; 829 (12.0%) required visual verification. The remaining 65 (0.9%) variants were uncallable, and would require 15 Sanger reactions to be resolved. Thus, the sensitivity of the NGS-panel was 99.1%. In conclusion, NGS performed with a commercial kit is highly efficient for detection of germline and somatic mutations in BRCA genes using routine FFPE tissue. PMID:26745875

  12. Discovery of somatic STAT5b mutations in large granular lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Hanna L. M.; Eldfors, Samuli; Kuusanmäki, Heikki; van Adrichem, Arjan J.; Olson, Thomas; Lagström, Sonja; Andersson, Emma I.; Jerez, Andres; Clemente, Michael J.; Yan, Yiyi; Zhang, Dan; Awwad, Andy; Ellonen, Pekka; Kallioniemi, Olli; Wennerberg, Krister; Porkka, Kimmo; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Loughran, Thomas P.; Heckman, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia is characterized by clonal expansion of cytotoxic T cells or natural killer cells. Recently, somatic mutations in the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) gene were discovered in 28% to 40% of LGL leukemia patients. By exome and transcriptome sequencing of 2 STAT3 mutation-negative LGL leukemia patients, we identified a recurrent, somatic missense mutation (Y665F) in the Src-like homology 2 domain of the STAT5b gene. Targeted amplicon sequencing of 211 LGL leukemia patients revealed 2 additional patients with STAT5b mutations (N642H), resulting in a total frequency of 2% (4 of 211) of STAT5b mutations across all patients. The Y665F and N642H mutant constructs increased the transcriptional activity of STAT5 and tyrosine (Y694) phosphorylation, which was also observed in patient samples. The clinical course of the disease in patients with the N642H mutation was aggressive and fatal, clearly different from typical LGL leukemia with a relatively favorable outcome. This is the first time somatic STAT5 mutations are discovered in human cancer and further emphasizes the role of STAT family genes in the pathogenesis of LGL leukemia. PMID:23596048

  13. Somatic mutational analysis of MED12 exon 2 in uterine leiomyomas of Iranian women

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Shirin; Fatahi, Neda; Amini-Moghaddam, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are steroid-hormone dependent tumors of myometrial smooth muscle cells that affect numerous women throughout the world. Based on previous studies, we evaluated the mutations of MED12 gene which encodes a co-activator protein involved in transcription regulation of the vast majority of RNA polymerase II-dependent genes. Exon 2 of MED12 gene was genotyped by PCR-sequencing method. To determine the proportion of mutation-containing transcripts, RNA was extracted from the tissue samples and the corresponding amplified cDNA was sequenced. We observed 11 mutation positive lesions, 7 of them were located in codon 44. The c.131G>A was found to be the most common somatic mutation in this study. Our investigation also demonstrated two unreported mutations , one large deletion and one insertion. cDNA analyzing revealed that the mutated transcripts were predominantly expressed in almost all changes including the new insertion mutation c.122-123ins15. Our study provides further evidence that the MED12 somatic mutations occur in a heterozygous manner and are mostly missense mutations in codon 44. The results displayed 47.8% mutation positive lesions in Iranian patients confirming the diversity between the populations. PMID:26396919

  14. The Nucleotide Targets of Somatic Mutation and the Role of Selection in Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains of a Teleost Fish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequence analysis of H chain cDNA derived from the spleen of an individual catfish has shown that somatic mutation occurs within both the VH- and JH-encoded regions. Somatic mutation preferentially targets G and C nucleotides with approximately balanced frequencies, resulting in the predominant accu...

  15. Acquired Resistance of Lung Adenocarcinomas to Gefitinib or Erlotinib Is Associated with a Second Mutation in the EGFR Kinase Domain

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background Lung adenocarcinomas from patients who respond to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib (Iressa) or erlotinib (Tarceva) usually harbor somatic gain-of-function mutations in exons encoding the kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Despite initial responses, patients eventually progress by unknown mechanisms of “acquired” resistance. Methods and Findings We show that in two of five patients with acquired resistance to gefitinib or erlotinib, progressing tumors contain, in addition to a primary drug-sensitive mutation in EGFR, a secondary mutation in exon 20, which leads to substitution of methionine for threonine at position 790 (T790M) in the kinase domain. Tumor cells from a sixth patient with a drug-sensitive EGFR mutation whose tumor progressed on adjuvant gefitinib after complete resection also contained the T790M mutation. This mutation was not detected in untreated tumor samples. Moreover, no tumors with acquired resistance had KRAS mutations, which have been associated with primary resistance to these drugs. Biochemical analyses of transfected cells and growth inhibition studies with lung cancer cell lines demonstrate that the T790M mutation confers resistance to EGFR mutants usually sensitive to either gefitinib or erlotinib. Interestingly, a mutation analogous to T790M has been observed in other kinases with acquired resistance to another kinase inhibitor, imatinib (Gleevec). Conclusion In patients with tumors bearing gefitinib- or erlotinib-sensitive EGFR mutations, resistant subclones containing an additional EGFR mutation emerge in the presence of drug. This observation should help guide the search for more effective therapy against a specific subset of lung cancers. PMID:15737014

  16. Somatic mosaicism and the phenotypic expression of COL2A1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Nagendran, Sonali; Richards, Allan J; McNinch, Annie; Sandford, Richard N; Snead, Martin P

    2012-05-01

    Mutations in COL2A1, the gene for type II-collagen, can result in a wide variety of phenotypes depending upon the nature of the mutation. Dominant negative mutations tend to result in severe and often lethal skeletal dysplasias such as achondrogenesis type 2, Kniest dysplasia, and spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita. Stickler syndrome, a condition characterized by ophthalmological and orofacial features, deafness and arthritis, usually, but not exclusively, results from haploinsufficiency. Overlapping features of all these disorders can also be seen in the same family. Rare reports have demonstrated that phenotypic variability can be explained in some families by somatic mosaicism. Here, we describe five further examples of somatic mosaicism of COL2A1 mutations illustrating the importance of detailed clinical evaluation and molecular testing even in clinically normal parents of affected individuals. PMID:22496037

  17. Oncogene regulation. An oncogenic super-enhancer formed through somatic mutation of a noncoding intergenic element.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Marc R; Abraham, Brian J; Anders, Lars; Berezovskaya, Alla; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Durbin, Adam D; Etchin, Julia; Lawton, Lee; Sallan, Stephen E; Silverman, Lewis B; Loh, Mignon L; Hunger, Stephen P; Sanda, Takaomi; Young, Richard A; Look, A Thomas

    2014-12-12

    In certain human cancers, the expression of critical oncogenes is driven from large regulatory elements, called super-enhancers, that recruit much of the cell's transcriptional apparatus and are defined by extensive acetylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27ac). In a subset of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cases, we found that heterozygous somatic mutations are acquired that introduce binding motifs for the MYB transcription factor in a precise noncoding site, which creates a super-enhancer upstream of the TAL1 oncogene. MYB binds to this new site and recruits its H3K27 acetylase-binding partner CBP, as well as core components of a major leukemogenic transcriptional complex that contains RUNX1, GATA-3, and TAL1 itself. Additionally, most endogenous super-enhancers found in T-ALL cells are occupied by MYB and CBP, which suggests a general role for MYB in super-enhancer initiation. Thus, this study identifies a genetic mechanism responsible for the generation of oncogenic super-enhancers in malignant cells. PMID:25394790

  18. Mutascope: sensitive detection of somatic mutations from deep amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yost, Shawn E.; Alakus, Hakan; Matsui, Hiroko; Schwab, Richard B.; Jepsen, Kristen; Frazer, Kelly A.; Harismendy, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Summary: We present Mutascope, a sequencing analysis pipeline specifically developed for the identification of somatic variants present at low-allelic fraction from high-throughput sequencing of amplicons from matched tumor-normal specimen. Using datasets reproducing tumor genetic heterogeneity, we demonstrate that Mutascope has a higher sensitivity and generates fewer false-positive calls than tools designed for shotgun sequencing or diploid genomes. Availability: Freely available on the web at http://sourceforge.net/projects/mutascope/. Contact: oharismendy@ucsd.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23712659

  19. Low Prevalence of Somatic TERT Promoter Mutations in Classic Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Soyoung; Lim, Seonhee; Kwon, Hyemi; Kim, Tae Yong; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcriptional activating mutations of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) are associated with more aggressive thyroid cancer. We evaluated the significance of TERT promoter mutations in Korean patients with classic papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from four thyroid cancer cell lines and 35 fresh-frozen PTC tissues. TERT promoter mutations (C228T and C250T) and the BRAF V600E mutation were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing. Results The CC228229TT mutation in the TERT promoter was detected in BCPAP cells and the C250T mutation was found in 8505C cells. No TERT promoter mutation was observed in Cal-62 or ML-1 cells. The C228T mutation was found in only 1 of 35 (2.8%) PTCs and no C250T mutations were detected in any of the study subjects. The BRAF V600E mutation was found in 20 of 35 (57.1%) PTCs. One patient with the C228T TERT mutation also harbored the BRAF V600E mutation and developed a recurrence. Conclusion The prevalence of somatic TERT promoter mutations was low in Korean patients with classic PTC. Therefore, the prognostic role of TERT promoter mutations might be limited in this patient cohort. PMID:26676331

  20. Clonal hematopoiesis as determined by the HUMARA assay is a marker for acquired mutations in epigenetic regulators in older women.

    PubMed

    Wiedmeier, Julia Erin; Kato, Catherine; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Lee, Hyunjung; Dunlap, Jennifer; Nutt, Eric; Rattray, Rogan; McKay, Sarah; Eide, Christopher; Press, Richard; Mori, Motomi; Druker, Brian; Dao, Kim-Hien

    2016-09-01

    Recent large cohort studies revealed that healthy older individuals harbor somatic mutations that increase their risk for hematologic malignancy and all-cause cardiovascular deaths. The majority of these mutations are in chromatin and epigenetic regulatory genes (CERGs). CERGs play a key role in regulation of DNA methylation (DNMT3A and TET2) and histone function (ASXL1) and in clonal proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells. We hypothesize that older women manifesting clonal hematopoiesis, defined here as a functional phenomenon in which a hematopoietic stem cell has acquired a survival and proliferative advantage, harbor a higher frequency of somatic mutations in CERGs. The human androgen receptor gene (HUMARA) assay was used in our study to detect the presence of nonrandom X inactivation in women, a marker for clonal hematopoiesis. In our pilot study, we tested 127 blood samples from women ≥65 years old without a history of invasive cancer or hematologic malignancies. Applying stringent qualitative criteria, we found that 26% displayed clonal hematopoiesis; 52.8% displayed polyclonal hematopoiesis; and 21.3% had indeterminate patterns (too close to call by qualitative assessment). Using Illumina MiSeq next-generation sequencing, we identified somatic mutations in CERGs in 15.2% of subjects displaying clonal hematopoiesis (three ASXL1 and two DNMT3A mutations with an average variant allele frequency of 15.7%, range: 6.3%-23.3%). In a more limited sequencing analysis, we evaluated the frequency of ASXL1 mutations by Sanger sequencing and found mutations in 9.7% of the clonal samples and 0% of the polyclonal samples. By comparing several recent studies (with some caveats as described), we determined the fold enrichment of detecting CERG mutations by using the HUMARA assay as a functional screen for clonal hematopoiesis. We conclude that a functional assay of clonal hematopoiesis is enriching for older women with somatic mutations in CERGs, particularly for ASXL

  1. IMPROVED FLOW CYTOMETRIC ASSAY FOR SOMATIC MUTATIONS AT THE GLYCOPHORIN A LOCUS IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An improved method has been developed for the glycophorin A assay for somatic cell mutations in humans. he new assay, named the "BR6" assay, can be performed on a commercially available, single-beam flow cytometer, in contrast to the previously described 1W1 assay that required a...

  2. Identification of speckle-type POZ protein somatic mutations in African American prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Buckles, Eric; Qian, Chiping; Tadros, Andrew; Majumdar, Sumana; Cvitanovic, Jennifer; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Estrada, John; Wilson, John; Liu, Wanguo

    2014-01-01

    The speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) is a tumor suppressor in prostate cancer (PCa). SPOP somatic mutations have been reported in up to 15% of PCa of those of European descent. However, the genetic roles of SPOP in African American (AA)-PCa are currently unknown. We sequenced the SPOP gene to identify somatic mutations in 49 AA prostate tumors and identified three missense mutations (p.Y87C, p.F102S, and p.G111E) in five AA prostate tumors (10%) and one synonymous variant (p.I106I) in one tumor. Intriguingly, all of mutations and variants clustered in exon six, and all of the mutations altered conserved amino acids. Moreover, two mutations (p.F102S and p.G111E) have only been identified in AA-PCa to date. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed a lower level of SPOP expression in tumors carrying SPOP mutations than their matched normal prostate tissues. In addition, SPOP mutations and novel variants were detected in 5 of 27 aggressive PCa and one of 22 less aggressive PCa (P < 0.05). Further studies with increased sample size are needed to validate the clinicopathological significance of these SPOP mutations in AA-PCa. PMID:24994784

  3. Profiling of Somatic Mutations in Phaeochromocytoma and Paraganglioma by Targeted Next Generation Sequencing Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Diana; Irving, Richard; Sanna, Mario; Yao, Masahiro; Robledo, Mercedes; Neumann, Hartmut P. H.; Woodward, Emma R.; Latif, Farida; Abbs, Stephen; Maher, Eamonn R.

    2015-01-01

    At least 12 genes (FH, HIF2A, MAX, NF1, RET, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2, TMEM127, and VHL) have been implicated in inherited predisposition to phaeochromocytoma (PCC), paraganglioma (PGL), or head and neck paraganglioma (HNPGL) and a germline mutation may be detected in more than 30% of cases. Knowledge of somatic mutations contributing to PCC/PGL/HNPGL pathogenesis has received less attention though mutations in HRAS, HIF2A, NF1, RET, and VHL have been reported. To further elucidate the role of somatic mutation in PCC/PGL/HNPGL tumourigenesis, we employed a next generation sequencing strategy to analyse “mutation hotspots” in 50 human cancer genes. Mutations were identified for HRAS (c.37G>C; p.G13R and c.182A>G; p.Q61R) in 7.1% (6/85); for BRAF (c.1799T>A; p.V600E) in 1.2% (1/85) of tumours; and for TP53 (c.1010G>A; p.R337H) in 2.35% (2/85) of cases. Twenty-one tumours harboured mutations in inherited PCC/PGL/HNPGL genes and no HRAS, BRAF, or TP53 mutations occurred in this group. Combining our data with previous reports of HRAS mutations in PCC/PGL we find that the mean frequency of HRAS/BRAF mutations in sporadic PCC/PGL is 8.9% (24/269) and in PCC/PGL with an inherited gene mutation 0% (0/148) suggesting that HRAS/BRAF mutations and inherited PCC/PGL genes mutations might be mutually exclusive. We report the first evidence for BRAF mutations in the pathogenesis of PCC/PGL/HNPGL. PMID:25883647

  4. MDS-associated somatic mutations and clonal hematopoiesis are common in idiopathic cytopenias of undetermined significance

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Brian; Hall, Jeff M.; Witte, John S.; Xu, Yin; Reddy, Prashanti; Lin, Keming; Flamholz, Rachel; Dabbas, Bashar; Yung, Aine; Al-Hafidh, Jenan; Balmert, Emily; Vaupel, Christine; El Hader, Carlos; McGinniss, Matthew J.; Nahas, Shareef A.; Kines, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Establishing a diagnosis in patients suspected of having a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) can be challenging and could be informed by the identification of somatic mutations. We performed a prospective study to examine the frequency and types of mutations encountered in 144 patients with unexplained cytopenias. Based on bone marrow findings, 17% were diagnosed with MDS, 15% with idiopathic cytopenias of undetermined significance (ICUS) and some evidence of dysplasia, and 69% with ICUS and no dysplasia. Bone marrow DNA was sequenced for mutations in 22 frequently mutated myeloid malignancy genes. Somatic mutations were identified in 71% of MDS patients, 62% of patients with ICUS and some dysplasia, and 20% of ICUS patients and no dysplasia. In total, 35% of ICUS patients carried a somatic mutation or chromosomal abnormality indicative of clonal hematopoiesis. We validated these results in a cohort of 91 lower-risk MDS and 249 ICUS cases identified over a 6-month interval. Mutations were found in 79% of those with MDS, in 45% of those with ICUS with dysplasia, and in 17% of those with ICUS without dysplasia. The spectrum of mutated genes was similar with the exception of SF3B1 which was rarely mutated in patients without dysplasia. Variant allele fractions were comparable between clonal ICUS (CCUS) and MDS as were mean age and blood counts. We demonstrate that CCUS is a more frequent diagnosis than MDS in cytopenic patients. Clinical and mutational features are similar in these groups and may have diagnostic utility once outcomes in CCUS patients are better understood. PMID:26429975

  5. Copy number and targeted mutational analysis reveals novel somatic events in metastatic prostate tumors.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Christiane M; Tembe, Waibov A; Baker, Angela; Sinari, Shripad; Moses, Tracy Y; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen; Beckstrom-Sternberg, James; Barrett, Michael; Long, James; Chinnaiyan, Arul; Lowey, James; Suh, Edward; Pearson, John V; Craig, David W; Agus, David B; Pienta, Kenneth J; Carpten, John D

    2011-01-01

    Advanced prostate cancer can progress to systemic metastatic tumors, which are generally androgen insensitive and ultimately lethal. Here, we report a comprehensive genomic survey for somatic events in systemic metastatic prostate tumors using both high-resolution copy number analysis and targeted mutational survey of 3508 exons from 577 cancer-related genes using next generation sequencing. Focal homozygous deletions were detected at 8p22, 10q23.31, 13q13.1, 13q14.11, and 13q14.12. Key genes mapping within these deleted regions include PTEN, BRCA2, C13ORF15, and SIAH3. Focal high-level amplifications were detected at 5p13.2-p12, 14q21.1, 7q22.1, and Xq12. Key amplified genes mapping within these regions include SKP2, FOXA1, and AR. Furthermore, targeted mutational analysis of normal-tumor pairs has identified somatic mutations in genes known to be associated with prostate cancer including AR and TP53, but has also revealed novel somatic point mutations in genes including MTOR, BRCA2, ARHGEF12, and CHD5. Finally, in one patient where multiple independent metastatic tumors were available, we show common and divergent somatic alterations that occur at both the copy number and point mutation level, supporting a model for a common clonal progenitor with metastatic tumor-specific divergence. Our study represents a deep genomic analysis of advanced metastatic prostate tumors and has revealed candidate somatic alterations, possibly contributing to lethal prostate cancer. PMID:21147910

  6. Copy number and targeted mutational analysis reveals novel somatic events in metastatic prostate tumors

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Christiane M.; Tembe, Waibov A.; Baker, Angela; Sinari, Shripad; Moses, Tracy Y.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen; Beckstrom-Sternberg, James; Barrett, Michael; Long, James; Chinnaiyan, Arul; Lowey, James; Suh, Edward; Pearson, John V.; Craig, David W.; Agus, David B.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Carpten, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced prostate cancer can progress to systemic metastatic tumors, which are generally androgen insensitive and ultimately lethal. Here, we report a comprehensive genomic survey for somatic events in systemic metastatic prostate tumors using both high-resolution copy number analysis and targeted mutational survey of 3508 exons from 577 cancer-related genes using next generation sequencing. Focal homozygous deletions were detected at 8p22, 10q23.31, 13q13.1, 13q14.11, and 13q14.12. Key genes mapping within these deleted regions include PTEN, BRCA2, C13ORF15, and SIAH3. Focal high-level amplifications were detected at 5p13.2-p12, 14q21.1, 7q22.1, and Xq12. Key amplified genes mapping within these regions include SKP2, FOXA1, and AR. Furthermore, targeted mutational analysis of normal-tumor pairs has identified somatic mutations in genes known to be associated with prostate cancer including AR and TP53, but has also revealed novel somatic point mutations in genes including MTOR, BRCA2, ARHGEF12, and CHD5. Finally, in one patient where multiple independent metastatic tumors were available, we show common and divergent somatic alterations that occur at both the copy number and point mutation level, supporting a model for a common clonal progenitor with metastatic tumor-specific divergence. Our study represents a deep genomic analysis of advanced metastatic prostate tumors and has revealed candidate somatic alterations, possibly contributing to lethal prostate cancer. PMID:21147910

  7. Parkin Somatic Mutations Link Melanoma and Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Levin, Lotan; Srour, Shani; Gartner, Jared; Kapitansky, Oxana; Qutob, Nouar; Dror, Shani; Golan, Tamar; Dayan, Roy; Brener, Ronen; Ziv, Tamar; Khaled, Mehdi; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Samuels, Yardena; Levy, Carmit

    2016-06-20

    Epidemiological studies suggest a direct link between melanoma and Parkinson's disease (PD); however, the underlying molecular basis is unknown. Since mutations in Parkin are the major driver of early-onset PD and Parkin was recently reported to play a role in cancer development, we hypothesized that Parkin links melanoma and PD. By analyzing whole exome/genome sequencing of Parkin from 246 melanoma patients, we identified five non-synonymous mutations, three synonymous mutations, and one splice region variant in Parkin in 3.6% of the samples. In vitro analysis showed that wild-type Parkin plays a tumor suppressive role in melanoma development resulting in cell-cycle arrest, reduction of metabolic activity, and apoptosis. Using a mass spectrometry-based analysis, we identified potential Parkin substrates in melanoma and generated a functional protein association network. The activity of mutated Parkin was assessed by protein structure modeling and examination of Parkin E3 ligase activity. The Parkin-E28K mutation impairs Parkin ubiquitination activity and abolishes its tumor suppressive effect. Taken together, our analysis of genomic sequence and in vitro data indicate that Parkin is a potential link between melanoma and Parkinson's disease. Our findings suggest new approaches for early diagnosis and treatment against both diseases. PMID:27297116

  8. Characterization of Somatic Mutations in Air Pollution-Related Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xian-Jun; Yang, Min-Jun; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Gui-Zhen; Huang, Yun-Chao; Wu, Li-Chuan; Cheng, Xin; Wen, Zhe-Sheng; Huang, Jin-Yan; Zhang, Yun-Dong; Gao, Xiao-Hong; Li, Gao-Feng; He, Shui-Wang; Gu, Zhao-Hui; Ma, Liang; Pan, Chun-Ming; Wang, Ping; Chen, Hao-Bin; Hong, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Xiao-Lu; Mao, Wen-Jing; Jin, Xiao-Long; Kang, Hui; Chen, Shu-Ting; Zhu, Yong-Qiang; Gu, Wen-Yi; Liu, Zi; Dong, Hui; Tian, Lin-Wei; Chen, Sai-Juan; Cao, Yi; Wang, Sheng-Yue; Zhou, Guang-Biao

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution has been classified as Group 1 carcinogenic to humans, but the underlying tumorigenesis remains unclear. In Xuanwei City of Yunnan Province, the lung cancer incidence is among the highest in China attributed to severe air pollution generated by combustion of smoky coal, providing a unique opportunity to dissect lung carcinogenesis of air pollution. Here we analyzed the somatic mutations of 164 non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) from Xuanwei and control regions (CR) where smoky coal was not used. Whole genome sequencing revealed a mean of 289 somatic exonic mutations per tumor and the frequent C:G → A:T nucleotide substitutions in Xuanwei NSCLCs. Exome sequencing of 2010 genes showed that Xuanwei and CR NSCLCs had a mean of 68 and 22 mutated genes per tumor, respectively (p < 0.0001). We found 167 genes (including TP53, RYR2, KRAS, CACNA1E) which had significantly higher mutation frequencies in Xuanwei than CR patients, and mutations in most genes in Xuanwei NSCLCs differed from those in CR cases. The mutation rates of 70 genes (e.g., RYR2, MYH3, GPR144, CACNA1E) were associated with patients' lifetime benzo(a)pyrene exposure. This study uncovers the mutation spectrum of air pollution-related lung cancers, and provides evidence for pollution exposure–genomic mutation relationship at a large scale. PMID:26288819

  9. GNA14 Somatic Mutation Causes Congenital and Sporadic Vascular Tumors by MAPK Activation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young H; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; Qiu, Jingyao; Straub, Robert; Bruckner, Anna; Bercovitch, Lionel; Narayan, Deepak; McNiff, Jennifer; Ko, Christine; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie; Antaya, Richard; Halaban, Ruth; Choate, Keith A

    2016-08-01

    Vascular tumors are among the most common neoplasms in infants and children; 5%-10% of newborns present with or develop lesions within the first 3 months of life. Most are benign infantile hemangiomas that typically regress by 5 years of age; other vascular tumors include congenital tufted angiomas (TAs), kaposiform hemangioendotheliomas (KHEs), and childhood lobular capillary hemangiomas (LCHs). Some of these lesions can become locally invasive and unresponsive to pharmacologic intervention, leading to significant complications. Recent investigation has revealed that activating mutations in HRAS, KRAS, NRAS, GNAQ, and GNA11 can cause certain types of rare childhood vascular tumors, and we have now identified causal recurrent somatic activating mutations in GNA14 by whole-exome and targeted sequencing. We found somatic activating GNA14 c.614A>T (p.Gln205Leu) mutations in one KHE, one TA, and one LCH and a GNA11 c.547C>T (p.Arg183Cys) mutation in two LCH lesions. We examined mutation pathobiology via expression of mutant GNA14 or GNA11 in primary human endothelial cells and melanocytes. GNA14 and GNA11 mutations induced changes in cellular morphology and rendered cells growth-factor independent by upregulating the MAPK pathway. Our findings identify GNA14 mutations as a cause of childhood vascular tumors, offer insight into mechanisms of oncogenic transformation by mutations affecting Gaq family members, and identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27476652

  10. Sun exposure causes somatic second-hit mutations and angiofibroma development in tuberous sclerosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Tyburczy, Magdalena E.; Wang, Ji-an; Li, Shaowei; Thangapazham, Rajesh; Chekaluk, Yvonne; Moss, Joel; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Darling, Thomas N.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is characterized by the formation of tumors in multiple organs and is caused by germline mutation in one of two tumor suppressor genes, TSC1 and TSC2. As for other tumor suppressor gene syndromes, the mechanism of somatic second-hit events in TSC tumors is unknown. We grew fibroblast-like cells from 29 TSC skin tumors from 22 TSC subjects and identified germline and second-hit mutations in TSC1/TSC2 using next-generation sequencing. Eighteen of 22 (82%) subjects had a mutation identified, and 8 of the 18 (44%) subjects were mosaic with mutant allele frequencies of 0 to 19% in normal tissue DNA. Multiple tumors were available from four patients, and in each case, second-hit mutations in TSC2 were distinct indicating they arose independently. Most remarkably, 7 (50%) of the 14 somatic point mutations were CC>TT ultraviolet ‘signature’ mutations, never seen as a TSC germline mutation. These occurred exclusively in facial angiofibroma tumors from sun-exposed sites. These results implicate UV-induced DNA damage as a cause of second-hit mutations and development of TSC facial angiofibromas and suggest that measures to limit UV exposure in TSC children and adults should reduce the frequency and severity of these lesions. PMID:24271014

  11. Diversity and Functional Consequences of Germline and Somatic PTPN11 Mutations in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Marco; Martinelli, Simone; Stella, Lorenzo; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Flex, Elisabetta; Cordeddu, Viviana; Zampino, Giuseppe; Burgt, Ineke van der; Palleschi, Antonio; Petrucci, Tamara C.; Sorcini, Mariella; Schoch, Claudia; Foà, Robin; Emanuel, Peter D.; Gelb, Bruce D.

    2006-01-01

    Germline mutations in PTPN11, the gene encoding the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, cause Noonan syndrome (NS) and the clinically related LEOPARD syndrome (LS), whereas somatic mutations in the same gene contribute to leukemogenesis. On the basis of our previously gathered genetic and biochemical data, we proposed a model that splits NS- and leukemia-associated PTPN11 mutations into two major classes of activating lesions with differential perturbing effects on development and hematopoiesis. To test this model, we investigated further the diversity of germline and somatic PTPN11 mutations, delineated the association of those mutations with disease, characterized biochemically a panel of mutant SHP-2 proteins recurring in NS, LS, and leukemia, and performed molecular dynamics simulations to determine the structural effects of selected mutations. Our results document a strict correlation between the identity of the lesion and disease and demonstrate that NS-causative mutations have less potency for promoting SHP-2 gain of function than do leukemia-associated ones. Furthermore, we show that the recurrent LS-causing Y279C and T468M amino acid substitutions engender loss of SHP-2 catalytic activity, identifying a previously unrecognized behavior for this class of missense PTPN11 mutations. PMID:16358218

  12. Origins and functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Young Seok; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Gerstung, Moritz; Martincorena, Inigo; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Davies, Helen R; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Gundem, Gunes; Shlien, Adam; Bolli, Niccolo; Behjati, Sam; Tarpey, Patrick S; Nangalia, Jyoti; Massie, Charles E; Butler, Adam P; Teague, Jon W; Vassiliou, George S; Green, Anthony R; Du, Ming-Qing; Unnikrishnan, Ashwin; Pimanda, John E; Teh, Bin Tean; Munshi, Nikhil; Greaves, Mel; Vyas, Paresh; El-Naggar, Adel K; Santarius, Tom; Collins, V Peter; Grundy, Richard; Taylor, Jack A; Hayes, D Neil; Malkin, David; Provenzano, Elena; Malcovati, Luca; Cooper, Colin; Foster, Christopher S; Warren, Anne Y; Whitaker, Hayley C; Brewer, Daniel; Eeles, Rosalind; Cooper, Colin; Neal, David; Visakorpi, Tapio; Isaacs, William B; Bova, G Steven; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Futreal, P Andrew; Lynch, Andy G; Chinnery, Patrick F; McDermott, Ultan; Stratton, Michael R; Campbell, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Recent sequencing studies have extensively explored the somatic alterations present in the nuclear genomes of cancers. Although mitochondria control energy metabolism and apoptosis, the origins and impact of cancer-associated mutations in mtDNA are unclear. In this study, we analyzed somatic alterations in mtDNA from 1675 tumors. We identified 1907 somatic substitutions, which exhibited dramatic replicative strand bias, predominantly C > T and A > G on the mitochondrial heavy strand. This strand-asymmetric signature differs from those found in nuclear cancer genomes but matches the inferred germline process shaping primate mtDNA sequence content. A number of mtDNA mutations showed considerable heterogeneity across tumor types. Missense mutations were selectively neutral and often gradually drifted towards homoplasmy over time. In contrast, mutations resulting in protein truncation undergo negative selection and were almost exclusively heteroplasmic. Our findings indicate that the endogenous mutational mechanism has far greater impact than any other external mutagens in mitochondria and is fundamentally linked to mtDNA replication. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02935.001 PMID:25271376

  13. Somatic mutation profiling of follicular thyroid cancer by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Swierniak, Michal; Pfeifer, Aleksandra; Stokowy, Tomasz; Rusinek, Dagmara; Chekan, Mykola; Lange, Dariusz; Krajewska, Jolanta; Oczko-Wojciechowska, Małgorzata; Czarniecka, Agnieszka; Jarzab, Michal; Jarzab, Barbara; Wojtas, Bartosz

    2016-09-15

    The molecular etiology of follicular thyroid tumors is largely unknown, rendering the diagnostics of these tumors challenging. The somatic alterations present in these tumors apart from RAS gene mutations and PAX8/PPARG translocations are not well described. To evaluate the profile of somatic alteration in follicular thyroid tumors, a total of 82 thyroid tissue samples derived from 48 patients were subjected to targeted Illumina HiSeq next generation sequencing of 372 cancer-related genes. New somatic alterations were identified in oncogenes (MDM2, FLI1), transcription factors and repressors (MITF, FLI1, ZNF331), epigenetic enzymes (KMT2A, NSD1, NCOA1, NCOA2), and protein kinases (JAK3, CHEK2, ALK). Single nucleotide and large structural variants were most and least frequently identified, respectively. A novel translocation in DERL/COX6C was detected. Many somatic alterations in non-coding gene regions with high penetrance were observed. Thus, follicular thyroid tumor somatic alterations exhibit complex patterns. Most tumors contained distinct somatic alterations, suggesting previously unreported heterogeneity. PMID:27283500

  14. Somatic mutations in 33 benign and malignant hot thyroid nodules in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Eszlinger, Markus; Niedziela, Marek; Typlt, Eva; Jaeschke, Holger; Huth, Sandra; Schaarschmidt, Jörg; Aigner, Thomas; Trejster, Ewa; Krohn, Knut; Bösenberg, Eileen; Paschke, Ralf

    2014-08-01

    Hot thyroid nodules (HTNs) in children are rare. Their reported malignancy rate is higher than in adults. However molecular data are rare. We present clinical and molecular data for 33 consecutive (29 benign and 4 malignant) HTNs. 17/29 Benign HTNs (59%) harbored somatic TSHR mutations. The most commonly observed mutation was M453T (in 8/29 samples). T632I and D633Y mutations were each detected twice. All other TSHR mutations were each found in one sample, including the new A538T mutation. One NRAS mutation was detected in a benign HTN with a M453T mutation. A PAX8/PPARG rearrangement was found in one malignant HTN. A T632I mutation was detected in one hot papillary thyroid carcinoma. The percentage of TSHR mutation positive HTNs in children and adolescents is within the range observed in adults. Contrary to adults, the M453T mutation is the predominant TSHR mutation in HTNs of children and adolescents. The increased malignancy rate of HTNs of children does not appear to be associated with RAS, BRAF, PAX8/PPARG and RET/PTC mutations. PMID:24915144

  15. Whole-genome sequencing of bladder cancers reveals somatic CDKN1A mutations and clinicopathological associations with mutation burden.

    PubMed

    Cazier, J-B; Rao, S R; McLean, C M; Walker, A K; Walker, A L; Wright, B J; Jaeger, E E M; Kartsonaki, C; Marsden, L; Yau, C; Camps, C; Kaisaki, P; Taylor, J; Catto, J W; Tomlinson, I P M; Kiltie, A E; Hamdy, F C

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancers are a leading cause of death from malignancy. Molecular markers might predict disease progression and behaviour more accurately than the available prognostic factors. Here we use whole-genome sequencing to identify somatic mutations and chromosomal changes in 14 bladder cancers of different grades and stages. As well as detecting the known bladder cancer driver mutations, we report the identification of recurrent protein-inactivating mutations in CDKN1A and FAT1. The former are not mutually exclusive with TP53 mutations or MDM2 amplification, showing that CDKN1A dysfunction is not simply an alternative mechanism for p53 pathway inactivation. We find strong positive associations between higher tumour stage/grade and greater clonal diversity, the number of somatic mutations and the burden of copy number changes. In principle, the identification of sub-clones with greater diversity and/or mutation burden within early-stage or low-grade tumours could identify lesions with a high risk of invasive progression. PMID:24777035

  16. Comprehensive analysis of cancer-associated somatic mutations in class I HLA genes

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Sachet A.; Rooney, Michael S.; Rajasagi, Mohini; Tiao, Grace; Dixon, Philip M.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Stevens, Jonathan; Lane, William J.; Dellagatta, Jamie L.; Steelman, Scott; Sougnez, Carrie; Cibulskis, Kristian; Kiezun, Adam; Brusic, Vladimir; Wu, Catherine J.; Getz, Gad

    2015-01-01

    Detection of somatic mutations in HLA genes using whole-exome sequencing (WES) is hampered by the high polymorphism of the HLA loci, which prevents alignment of sequencing reads to the human reference genome. We describe a computational pipeline that enables accurate inference of germline alleles of class I HLA-A, -B and -C genes and subsequent detection of mutations in these genes using the inferred alleles as a reference. Analysis of WES data from 7,930 pairs of tumor and healthy tissue from the same patient revealed 298 non-silent HLA mutations in tumors from 266 patients. These 298 mutations are enriched for likely functional mutations, including putative loss-of-function events. Recurrence of mutations suggested that these ‘hotspot’ sites were positively selected. Cancers with recurrent somatic HLA mutations were associated with upregulation of signatures of cytolytic activity characteristic of tumor infiltration by effector lymphocytes, supporting immune evasion by altered HLA function as a contributory mechanism in cancer. PMID:26372948

  17. Protein Domain-Level Landscape of Cancer-Type-Specific Somatic Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Petsalaki, Evangelia; Rolland, Thomas; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Roth, Frederick P.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying driver mutations and their functional consequences is critical to our understanding of cancer. Towards this goal, and because domains are the functional units of a protein, we explored the protein domain-level landscape of cancer-type-specific somatic mutations. Specifically, we systematically examined tumor genomes from 21 cancer types to identify domains with high mutational density in specific tissues, the positions of mutational hotspots within these domains, and the functional and structural context where possible. While hotspots corresponding to specific gain-of-function mutations are expected for oncoproteins, we found that tumor suppressor proteins also exhibit strong biases toward being mutated in particular domains. Within domains, however, we observed the expected patterns of mutation, with recurrently mutated positions for oncogenes and evenly distributed mutations for tumor suppressors. For example, we identified both known and new endometrial cancer hotspots in the tyrosine kinase domain of the FGFR2 protein, one of which is also a hotspot in breast cancer, and found new two hotspots in the Immunoglobulin I-set domain in colon cancer. Thus, to prioritize cancer mutations for further functional studies aimed at more precise cancer treatments, we have systematically correlated mutations and cancer types at the protein domain level. PMID:25794154

  18. Elevated levels of somatic mutation of the glycophorin A locus in cancer patients: Relevance for incidence of secondary cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, S.G.; Bigbee, W.L.

    1994-09-01

    The glycophorin A (GPA)-based human in vivo somatic mutation assay was used to survey a large number of newly diagnosed cancer patients presenting with a variety of solid tumors. This cancer patient population was sampled pre-therapy and frequencies of two types of variant cells determined: allele loss segregants arising by mutation, deletion, chromosome loss or gene inactivation, and allele loss and duplication segregants arising by chromosome missegregation, mitotic recombination and possibly gene conversion. When compared with matched controls, the cancer patient population exhibited significantly elevated frequencies of both types of segregants. Cancer patients undergoing genotoxic therapy with chemicals and/or ionizing radiation were then examined, yielding variable results depending on the particular agent. In patients receiving localized high dose radiotherapy there was no response with either endpoint. In most cases involving chemotherapy, a significant elevation in the frequency of allele loss variants was observed within one month of the initiation of therapy which persisted at least one erythrocyte lifetime ({approximately}4 months) post therapy. In a subset of these cases, specifically, involving the known stem cell mutagen cis-platinum, the allele loss variant cell frequency remained significantly elevated up to 7 years after treatment. These results indicate that individuals with cancer have inherently higher levels of somatic mutation and segregation, due to genetic predisposition or exposure to environmental genotoxicants, or both, and that certain types of cancer therapy add significantly to the burden of mutation. These data provide a molecular rationale for the increased frequency of secondary malignancy observed in primary cancer patients: they are at increased risk of already having or easily acquiring the necessary carcinogenic events implicated in the progression of multi-step oncogenesis.

  19. Somatic human ZBTB7A zinc finger mutations promote cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Liu, X-S; Liu, Z; Gerarduzzi, C; Choi, D E; Ganapathy, S; Pandolfi, P P; Yuan, Z-M

    2016-06-01

    We recently reported that ZBTB7A is a bona fide transcription repressor of key glycolytic genes and its downregulation in human cancer contributes to tumor metabolism. As reduced expression of ZBTB7A is found only in a subset of human cancers, we explored alternative mechanisms of its inactivation by mining human cancer genome databases. We discovered recurrent somatic mutations of ZBTB7A in multiple types of human cancers with a marked enrichment of mutations within the zinc finger domain. Functional characterization of the mutants demonstrated that mutations within the zinc finger region of ZBTB7A invariably resulted in loss of function. As a consequence, the glycolytic genes were markedly upregulated in cancer cells harboring ZBTB7A zinc finger mutation, leading to increased glycolysis and proliferation. Our study uncovers the loss-of-function mutation in ZBTB7A as a novel mechanism causing elevated glycolysis in human cancer, which carries important therapeutic implication. PMID:26455326

  20. Somatic mutations found in the healthy blood compartment of a 115-yr-old woman demonstrate oligoclonal hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Holstege, Henne; Pfeiffer, Wayne; Sie, Daoud; Hulsman, Marc; Nicholas, Thomas J.; Lee, Clarence C.; Ross, Tristen; Lin, Jue; Miller, Mark A.; Ylstra, Bauke; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Brugman, Martijn H.; Staal, Frank J.T.; Holstege, Gert; Reinders, Marcel J.T.; Harkins, Timothy T.; Levy, Samuel; Sistermans, Erik A.

    2014-01-01

    The somatic mutation burden in healthy white blood cells (WBCs) is not well known. Based on deep whole-genome sequencing, we estimate that approximately 450 somatic mutations accumulated in the nonrepetitive genome within the healthy blood compartment of a 115-yr-old woman. The detected mutations appear to have been harmless passenger mutations: They were enriched in noncoding, AT-rich regions that are not evolutionarily conserved, and they were depleted for genomic elements where mutations might have favorable or adverse effects on cellular fitness, such as regions with actively transcribed genes. The distribution of variant allele frequencies of these mutations suggests that the majority of the peripheral white blood cells were offspring of two related hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) clones. Moreover, telomere lengths of the WBCs were significantly shorter than telomere lengths from other tissues. Together, this suggests that the finite lifespan of HSCs, rather than somatic mutation effects, may lead to hematopoietic clonal evolution at extreme ages. PMID:24760347

  1. Landscape of somatic single-nucleotide and copy-number mutations in uterine serous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Siming; Choi, Murim; Overton, John D; Bellone, Stefania; Roque, Dana M; Cocco, Emiliano; Guzzo, Federica; English, Diana P; Varughese, Joyce; Gasparrini, Sara; Bortolomai, Ileana; Buza, Natalia; Hui, Pei; Abu-Khalaf, Maysa; Ravaggi, Antonella; Bignotti, Eliana; Bandiera, Elisabetta; Romani, Chiara; Todeschini, Paola; Tassi, Renata; Zanotti, Laura; Carrara, Luisa; Pecorelli, Sergio; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Ratner, Elena; Azodi, Masoud; Schwartz, Peter E; Rutherford, Thomas J; Stiegler, Amy L; Mane, Shrikant; Boggon, Titus J; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lifton, Richard P; Santin, Alessandro D

    2013-02-19

    Uterine serous carcinoma (USC) is a biologically aggressive subtype of endometrial cancer. We analyzed the mutational landscape of USC by whole-exome sequencing of 57 cancers, most of which were matched to normal DNA from the same patients. The distribution of the number of protein-altering somatic mutations revealed that 52 USC tumors had fewer than 100 (median 36), whereas 5 had more than 3,000 somatic mutations. The mutations in these latter tumors showed hallmarks of defects in DNA mismatch repair. Among the remainder, we found a significantly increased burden of mutation in 14 genes. In addition to well-known cancer genes (i.e., TP53, PIK3CA, PPP2R1A, KRAS, FBXW7), there were frequent mutations in CHD4/Mi2b, a member of the NuRD-chromatin-remodeling complex, and TAF1, an element of the core TFIID transcriptional machinery. Additionally, somatic copy-number variation was found to play an important role in USC, with 13 copy-number gains and 12 copy-number losses that occurred more often than expected by chance. In addition to loss of TP53, we found frequent deletion of a small segment of chromosome 19 containing MBD3, also a member of the NuRD-chromatin-modification complex, and frequent amplification of chromosome segments containing PIK3CA, ERBB2 (an upstream activator of PIK3CA), and CCNE1 (a target of FBXW7-mediated ubiquitination). These findings identify frequent mutation of DNA damage, chromatin remodeling, cell cycle, and cell proliferation pathways in USC and suggest potential targets for treatment of this lethal variant of endometrial cancer. PMID:23359684

  2. Landscape of somatic single-nucleotide and copy-number mutations in uterine serous carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Siming; Choi, Murim; Overton, John D.; Bellone, Stefania; Roque, Dana M.; Cocco, Emiliano; Guzzo, Federica; English, Diana P.; Varughese, Joyce; Gasparrini, Sara; Bortolomai, Ileana; Buza, Natalia; Hui, Pei; Abu-Khalaf, Maysa; Ravaggi, Antonella; Bignotti, Eliana; Bandiera, Elisabetta; Romani, Chiara; Todeschini, Paola; Tassi, Renata; Zanotti, Laura; Carrara, Luisa; Pecorelli, Sergio; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Ratner, Elena; Azodi, Masoud; Schwartz, Peter E.; Rutherford, Thomas J.; Stiegler, Amy L.; Mane, Shrikant; Boggon, Titus J.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lifton, Richard P.; Santin, Alessandro D.

    2013-01-01

    Uterine serous carcinoma (USC) is a biologically aggressive subtype of endometrial cancer. We analyzed the mutational landscape of USC by whole-exome sequencing of 57 cancers, most of which were matched to normal DNA from the same patients. The distribution of the number of protein-altering somatic mutations revealed that 52 USC tumors had fewer than 100 (median 36), whereas 5 had more than 3,000 somatic mutations. The mutations in these latter tumors showed hallmarks of defects in DNA mismatch repair. Among the remainder, we found a significantly increased burden of mutation in 14 genes. In addition to well-known cancer genes (i.e., TP53, PIK3CA, PPP2R1A, KRAS, FBXW7), there were frequent mutations in CHD4/Mi2b, a member of the NuRD–chromatin-remodeling complex, and TAF1, an element of the core TFIID transcriptional machinery. Additionally, somatic copy-number variation was found to play an important role in USC, with 13 copy-number gains and 12 copy-number losses that occurred more often than expected by chance. In addition to loss of TP53, we found frequent deletion of a small segment of chromosome 19 containing MBD3, also a member of the NuRD–chromatin-modification complex, and frequent amplification of chromosome segments containing PIK3CA, ERBB2 (an upstream activator of PIK3CA), and CCNE1 (a target of FBXW7-mediated ubiquitination). These findings identify frequent mutation of DNA damage, chromatin remodeling, cell cycle, and cell proliferation pathways in USC and suggest potential targets for treatment of this lethal variant of endometrial cancer. PMID:23359684

  3. Prevalence and clinical correlates of somatic mutation in aldosterone producing adenoma-Taiwanese population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Vin-Cent; Huang, Kuo-How; Peng, Kang-Yung; Tsai, Yao-Chou; Wu, Che-Hsiung; Wang, Shuo-Meng; Yang, Shao-Yu; Lin, Lian-Yu; Chang, Chin-Chen; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lin, Shuei-Liong; Chu, Tzong-Shinn; Wu, Kwan-Dun

    2015-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) is a common form of secondary hypertension and has significant cardiovascular consequences. Mutated channelopathy due to the activation of calcium channels has been recently described in aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA). The study involved 148 consecutive PA patients, (66 males; aged 56.3 ± 12.3years) who received adrenalectomy, and were collected from the Taiwan PA investigator (TAIPAI) group. A high rate of somatic mutation in APA was found (n = 91, 61.5%); including mutations in KCNJ5 (n = 88, 59.5%), ATP1A1 (n = 2, 1.4%), and ATP2B3 (n = 1, 0.7%); however, no mutations in CACNA1D were identified. Mutation-carriers were younger (<0.001), had lower Cyst C (p = 0.042), pulse wave velocity (p = 0.027), C-reactive protein (p = 0.042) and a lower rate of proteinuria (p = 0.031) than non-carriers. After multivariate adjustment, mutation carriers had lower serum CRP levels than non-carriers (p = 0.031. Patients with mutation also had a greater chance of recovery from hypertension after operation (p = 0.005). A high incidence of somatic mutations in APA was identified in the Taiwanese population. Mutation-carriers had lower CRP levels and a higher rate of cure of hypertension after adrenalectomy. This raises the possibility of using mutation screening as a tool in predicting long-term outcome after adrenalectomy. PMID:26066391

  4. When Morphology Meets Somatic Mutations: The New Possible Scenario in Thyroid Fine-Needle Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Esther Diana; Schmitt, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This study points to the analysis of the morphological features suggestive of somatic mutations, mostly the BRAFV600E mutation, on cytological samples of thyroid carcinomas. According to the literature, the application of ancillary techniques on cytology comes in handy as a challenging aid in ruling out a malignant outcome on both conventional and liquid-based cytological preparations. However, the evaluation of somatic mutations, including BRAFV600E, usually performed by DNA techniques, may have some limitations in a worldwide diffusion. In this perspective, few authors emphasized the morphological search for BRAFV600E mutations harbored in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and characterized by specific architectural and cellular findings (i.e. eosinophilic cells defined as 'plump cells' and sickle-shaped nuclei). Hence, the detection of eosinophilic cytoplasm of mutated PTC cells seems to suggest the possible involvement of the 'Warburg effect' pioneering the ability of cancer cells to convert glucose into lactic acid. The recent yields of immunohistochemical expression of monocarboxylate transporters in mutated PTCs may suggest the accumulation of lactate in these plump cells. Equally importantly, the detection of these morphological findings using fine-needle aspiration cytology may be helpful in triaging thyroid lesions and limiting costs. Additionally, it may lead to the stratification of the malignant risk and personalized management in cases with multifocal lesions. PMID:27288325

  5. Urinary Bladder Paragangliomas: How Immunohistochemistry Can Assist to Identify Patients With SDHB Germline and Somatic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Giubellino, Alessio; Lara, Karlena; Martucci, Victoria; Huynh, Than; Agarwal, Piyush; Pacak, Karel; Merino, Maria J

    2015-11-01

    Urinary bladder paraganglioma (paraganglioma) is a rare tumor of chromaffin cells of the sympathetic system of the urinary bladder wall. We studied 14 cases of this entity and investigated the usefulness of SDHB protein staining by immunohistochemistry (IHC) as a diagnostic tool to identify patients with bladder paragangliomas that could be associated with SDHB gene mutations, as these patients have a more aggressive disease. Eleven tumors from these patients were stained by IHC. Six of 11 tumors were negative for SDHB staining by IHC with no cytoplasmic staining in tumor cells when compared with normal tissues. Five of these 6 negative cases were confirmed to be positive for germline SDHB mutations. One case showed negative staining and no germline SDHB mutation; however, further investigation of the tumor revealed a somatic SDHB gene deletion. The remaining 5 cases showed strong cytoplasmic staining, but they were negative for the presence of SDHB mutation. They were found to be either sporadic tumors or part of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. Staining for SDHA was positive in all cases. Our study confirms that there is very good correlation between the presence of an SDHB mutation, whether germline or sporadic, and negative SDHB IHC staining in urinary bladder paragangliomas, and this is the first study to demonstrate that somatic mutations can be recognized by IHC staining. PMID:26457353

  6. Moderate malnutrition in rats induces somatic gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Martínez, M Monserrat; Cortés-Barberena, Edith; Cervantes-Ríos, Elsa; Del Carmen García-Rodríguez, María; Rodríguez-Cruz, Leonor; Ortiz-Muñiz, Rocío

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between malnutrition and genetic damage has been widely studied in human and animal models, leading to the observation that interactions between genotoxic exposure and micronutrient status appear to affect genomic stability. A new assay has been developed that uses the phosphatidylinositol glycan class A gene (Pig-a) as a reporter for measuring in vivo gene mutation. The Pig-a assay can be employed to evaluate mutant frequencies (MFs) in peripheral blood reticulocytes (RETs) and erythrocytes (RBCs) using flow cytometry. In the present study, we assessed the effects of malnutrition on mutagenic susceptibility by exposing undernourished (UN) and well-nourished (WN) rats to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) and measuring Pig-a MFs. Two week-old UN and WN male Han-Wistar rats were treated daily with 0, 20, or 40mg/kg ENU for 3 consecutive days. Blood was collected from the tail vein one day before ENU treatment (Day-1) and after ENU administration on Days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56 and 63. Pig-a MFs were measured in RETs and RBCs as the RET(CD59-) and RBC(CD59-) frequencies. In the vehicle control groups, the frequencies of mutant RETs and RBCs were significantly higher in UN rats compared with WN rats at all sampling times. The ENU treatments increased RET and RBC MFs starting at Day 7. Although ENU-induced Pig-a MFs were consistently lower in UN rats than in WN rats, these differences were not significant. To understand these responses, further studies should use other mutagens and nucleated surrogate cells and examine the types of mutations induced in UN and WN rats. PMID:26994962

  7. Somatic mutation in PIK3CA is a late event in cervical carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Verlaat, Wina; Snijders, Peter JF; van Moorsel, Marinda IH; Bleeker, Maaike; Rozendaal, Lawrence; Sie, Daoud; Ylstra, Bauke; Meijer, Chris JLM; Steenbergen, Renske DM

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Somatic mutations in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) are largely unknown. Here, we profiled 35 cervical carcinomas and 23 CIN grade 2/3 (CIN2/3) for mutations in 48 cancer‐related genes using a Next Generation Sequencing‐based cancer panel. PIK3CA exon 9 was the most frequently mutated locus in cervical carcinoma and the only mutated locus detected in CIN2/3. These PIK3CA exon 9 mutation findings were verified in a large, independent series (n = 647) covering all stages of cervical carcinogenesis using high resolution melting‐guided Sanger sequencing. PIK3CA exon 9 mutation frequency was 37.1% (13/35; 95%CI 21.2–54.0%) in cervical carcinoma, and 2.4% (5/209; 95%CI 0.5–4.7%) in CIN3. No PIK3CA exon 9 mutations were detected in CIN2 (0/144), CIN1 (0/154) and normal cervix (0/105). In a third series of 46 CIN2/3 lesions from women with a known 5‐year history of preceding high‐risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) infection, detection of PIK3CA exon 9 mutation was confined to 2 (5.4%; 95%CI 0.0–13.2%) CIN3 lesions with preceding hrHPV infection ≥5 years, and was absent in those with a short duration (<5 years) of preceding hrHPV infection. In conclusion, somatic mutation in PIK3CA represents a late event during cervical carcinogenesis, detected in a substantial subset of cervical carcinoma, but only in a minority of CIN3.

  8. Registered report: Diverse somatic mutation patterns and pathway alterations in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vidhu; Young, Lisa; Allison, Anne B; Owen, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from "Diverse somatic mutation patterns and pathway alterations in human cancers" by Kan and colleagues published in Nature in 2010 (Kan et al., 2010). The experiments to be replicated are those reported in Figures 3D-F and 4C-F. Kan and colleagues utilized mismatch repair detection (MRD) technology to identify somatic mutations in primary human tumor samples and identified a previously uncharacterized arginine 243 to histidine (R243H) mutation in the G-protein α subunit GNAO1 in breast carcinoma tissue. In Figures 3D-F, Kan and colleagues demonstrated that stable expression of mutant GNAO1R243D conferred a significant growth advantage in human mammary epithelial cells, confirming the oncogenic potential of this mutation. Similarly, expression of variants with somatic mutations in MAP2K4, a JNK pathway kinase (shown in Figures 4C-E) resulted in a significant increase in anchorage-independent growth. Interestingly, these mutants exhibited reduced kinase activity compared to wild type MAP2K4, indicating these mutations impose a dominant-negative influence to promote growth (Figure 4F). The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange and the results of the replications will be published in eLife. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11566.001 PMID:26894955

  9. Determination of somatic oncogenic mutations linked to target-based therapies using MassARRAY technology

    PubMed Central

    Llorca-Cardeñosa, Marta J.; Mongort, Cristina; Alonso, Elisa; Navarro, Samuel; Burgues, Octavio; Vivancos, Ana; Cejalvo, Juan Miguel; Perez-Fidalgo, José Alejandro; Roselló, Susana; Ribas, Gloria; Cervantes, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutation analysis represents a useful tool in selecting personalized therapy. The aim of our study was to determine the presence of common genetic events affecting actionable oncogenes using a MassARRAY technology in patients with advanced solid tumors who were potential candidates for target-based therapies. The analysis of 238 mutations across 19 oncogenes was performed in 197 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples of different tumors using the OncoCarta Panel v1.0 (Sequenom Hamburg, Germany). Of the 197 specimens, 97 (49.2%) presented at least one mutation. Forty-nine different oncogenic mutations in 16 genes were detected. Mutations in KRAS and PIK3CA were detected in 40/97 (41.2%) and 30/97 (30.9%) patients respectively. Thirty-one patients (32.0%) had mutations in two genes, 20 of them (64.5%) initially diagnosed with colorectal cancer. The co-occurrence of mutation involved mainly KRAS, PIK3CA, KIT and RET. Mutation profiles were validated using a customized panel and the Junior Next-Generation Sequencing technology (GS-Junior 454, Roche). Twenty-eight patients participated in early clinical trials or received specific treatments according to the molecular characterization (28.0%). MassARRAY technology is a rapid and effective method for identifying key cancer-driving mutations across a large number of samples, which allows for a more appropriate selection for personalized therapies. PMID:26968814

  10. Evaluation of potential genotoxicity of five food dyes using the somatic mutation and recombination test.

    PubMed

    Sarıkaya, Rabia; Selvi, Mahmut; Erkoç, Figen

    2012-08-01

    In this study, different concentrations of five food dyes (amaranth, patent blue, carminic acid, indigotine and erythrosine) have been evaluated for genotoxicity in the Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART) of Drosophila melanogaster. Standard cross was used in the experiment. Larvae including two linked recessive wing hair mutations were chronically fed at different concentrations of the test compounds in standard Drosophila Instant Medium. Feeding ended with pupation of the surviving larvae. Wings of the emerging adult flies were scored for the presence of spots of mutant cells which can result from either somatic mutation or somatic recombination. For the evaluation of genotoxic effects, the frequencies of spots per wing in the treated series were compared to the control group, which was distilled water. The present study shows that carminic acid and indigotine demonstrated negative results while erythrosine demonstrated inconclusive results. In addition 25 mg mL(-1) concentration of patent blue and 12.5, 25 and 50 mg mL(-1) concentrations of amaranth demonstrated positive results in the SMART. PMID:22482698

  11. Distinct cellular pathways select germline-encoded and somatically mutated antibodies into immunological memory

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Tomohiro; Ishige, Akiko; Hikida, Masaki; Taka, Junko; Hijikata, Atsushi; Kubo, Masato; Nagashima, Takeshi; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Okada, Mariko; Ohara, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    One component of memory in the antibody system is long-lived memory B cells selected for the expression of somatically mutated, high-affinity antibodies in the T cell–dependent germinal center (GC) reaction. A puzzling observation has been that the memory B cell compartment also contains cells expressing unmutated, low-affinity antibodies. Using conditional Bcl6 ablation, we demonstrate that these cells are generated through proliferative expansion early after immunization in a T cell–dependent but GC-independent manner. They soon become resting and long-lived and display a novel distinct gene expression signature which distinguishes memory B cells from other classes of B cells. GC-independent memory B cells are later joined by somatically mutated GC descendants at roughly equal proportions and these two types of memory cells efficiently generate adoptive secondary antibody responses. Deletion of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells significantly reduces the generation of mutated, but not unmutated, memory cells early on in the response. Thus, B cell memory is generated along two fundamentally distinct cellular differentiation pathways. One pathway is dedicated to the generation of high-affinity somatic antibody mutants, whereas the other preserves germ line antibody specificities and may prepare the organism for rapid responses to antigenic variants of the invading pathogen. PMID:23027924

  12. Genotoxicity of neutrons in Drosophila melanogaster. Somatic mutation and recombination induced by reactor neutrons.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Rincón, J; Delfín-Loya, A; Ureña-Núñez, F; Paredes, L C; Zambrano-Achirica, F; Graf, U

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes the observation of a direct relationship between the absorbed doses of neutrons and the frequencies of somatic mutation and recombination using the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) of Drosophila melanogaster. This test was used for evaluating the biological effects induced by neutrons from the Triga Mark III reactor of Mexico. Two different reactor power levels were used, 300 and 1000 kW, and two absorbed doses were tested for each power level: 1.6 and 3.2 Gy for 300 kW and 0.84 and 1.7 Gy for 1000 kW. A linear relationship was observed between the absorbed dose and the somatic mutation and recombination frequencies. Furthermore, these frequencies were dependent on larval age: In 96-h-old larvae, the frequencies were increased considerably but the sizes of the spots were smaller than in 72-h-old larvae. The analysis of the balancer-heterozygous progeny showed a linear absorbed dose- response relationship, although the responses were clearly lower than found in the marker-trans-heterozygous flies. Approximately 65% of the genotoxicity observed is due to recombinational events. The results of the study indicate that thermal and fast neutrons are both mutagenic and recombinagenic in the D. melanogaster wing SMART, and that the frequencies are dependent on neutron dose, reactor power, and the age of the treated larvae. PMID:16038586

  13. Somatic mutations in PI3K[alpha]: Structural basis for enzyme activation and drug design

    SciTech Connect

    Gabelli, Sandra B.; Mandelker, Diana; Schmidt-Kittler, Oleg; Vogelstein, Bert; Amzel, L. Mario

    2011-09-06

    The PI3K pathway is a communication hub coordinating critical cell functions including cell survival, cell growth, proliferation, motility and metabolism. Because PI3K{alpha} harbors recurrent somatic mutations resulting in gains of function in human cancers, it has emerged as an important drug target for many types of solid tumors. Various PI3K isoforms are also being evaluated as potential therapeutic targets for inflammation, heart disease, and hematological malignancies. Structural biology is providing insights into the flexibility of the PI3Ks, and providing basis for understanding the effects of mutations, drug resistance and specificity.

  14. Somatic Mutations in PI3Kalpha: Structural Basis for Enzyme Activation and Drug Design

    SciTech Connect

    S Gabelli; D Mandelker; O Schmidt-Kittler; B Vogelstein; L Amzel

    2011-12-31

    The PI3K pathway is a communication hub coordinating critical cell functions including cell survival, cell growth, proliferation, motility and metabolism. Because PI3K{alpha} harbors recurrent somatic mutations resulting in gains of function in human cancers, it has emerged as an important drug target for many types of solid tumors. Various PI3K isoforms are also being evaluated as potential therapeutic targets for inflammation, heart disease, and hematological malignancies. Structural biology is providing insights into the flexibility of the PI3Ks, and providing basis for understanding the effects of mutations, drug resistance and specificity.

  15. A somatic MAP3K3 mutation is associated with verrucous venous malformation.

    PubMed

    Couto, Javier A; Vivero, Matthew P; Kozakewich, Harry P W; Taghinia, Amir H; Mulliken, John B; Warman, Matthew L; Greene, Arin K

    2015-03-01

    Verrucous venous malformation (VVM), also called "verrucous hemangioma," is a non-hereditary, congenital, vascular anomaly comprised of aberrant clusters of malformed dermal venule-like channels underlying hyperkeratotic skin. We tested the hypothesis that VVM lesions arise as a consequence of a somatic mutation. We performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) on VVM tissue from six unrelated individuals and looked for somatic mutations affecting the same gene in specimens from multiple persons. We observed mosaicism for a missense mutation (NM_002401.3, c.1323C>G; NP_002392, p.Iso441Met) in mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 3 (MAP3K3) in three of six individuals. We confirmed the presence of this mutation via droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) in the three subjects and found the mutation in three additional specimens from another four participants. Mutant allele frequencies ranged from 6% to 19% in affected tissue. We did not observe this mutant allele in unaffected tissue or in affected tissue from individuals with other types of vascular anomalies. Studies using global and conditional Map3k3 knockout mice have previously implicated MAP3K3 in vascular development. MAP3K3 dysfunction probably causes VVM in humans. PMID:25728774

  16. A series of 38 novel germline and somatic mutations of NIPBL in Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nizon, M; Henry, M; Michot, C; Baumann, C; Bazin, A; Bessières, B; Blesson, S; Cordier-Alex, M-P; David, A; Delahaye-Duriez, A; Delezoïde, A-L; Dieux-Coeslier, A; Doco-Fenzy, M; Faivre, L; Goldenberg, A; Layet, V; Loget, P; Marlin, S; Martinovic, J; Odent, S; Pasquier, L; Plessis, G; Prieur, F; Putoux, A; Rio, M; Testard, H; Bonnefont, J-P; Cormier-Daire, V

    2016-05-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome is a multisystemic developmental disorder mainly related to de novo heterozygous NIPBL mutation. Recently, NIPBL somatic mosaicism has been highlighted through buccal cell DNA study in some patients with a negative molecular analysis on leukocyte DNA. Here, we present a series of 38 patients with a Cornelia de Lange syndrome related to a heterozygous NIPBL mutation identified by Sanger sequencing. The diagnosis was based on the following criteria: (i) intrauterine growth retardation and postnatal short stature, (ii) feeding difficulties and/or gastro-oesophageal reflux, (iii) microcephaly, (iv) intellectual disability, and (v) characteristic facial features. We identified 37 novel NIPBL mutations including 34 in leukocytes and 3 in buccal cells only. All mutations shown to have arisen de novo when parent blood samples were available. The present series confirms the difficulty in predicting the phenotype according to the NIPBL mutation. Until now, somatic mosaicism has been observed for 20 cases which do not seem to be consistently associated with a milder phenotype. Besides, several reports support a postzygotic event for those cases. Considering these elements, we recommend a first-line buccal cell DNA analysis in order to improve gene testing sensitivity in Cornelia de Lange syndrome and genetic counselling. PMID:26701315

  17. A novel somatic MAPK1 mutation in primary ovarian mixed germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yang; Deng, Wei; Wang, Feng; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Fa-Ying; Yang, Bi-Cheng; Huang, Mei-Zhen; Guo, Jiu-Bai; Xie, Qiu-Hua; He, Ming; Huang, Ou-Ping

    2016-02-01

    A recent exome-sequencing study revealed prevalent mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) p.E322K mutation in cervical carcinoma. It remains largely unknown whether ovarian carcinomas also harbor MAPK1 mutations. As paralogous gene mutations co‑occur frequently in human malignancies, we analyzed here a total of 263 ovarian carcinomas for the presence of MAPK1 and paralogous MAPK3 mutations by DNA sequencing. A previously unreported MAPK1 p.D321N somatic mutation was identified in 2 out of 18 (11.1%) ovarian mixed germ cell tumors, while no other MAPK1 or MAPK3 mutation was detected in our samples. Of note, OCC‑115, the MAPK1‑mutated sample with bilateral cancerous ovaries affected, harbored MAPK1 mutation in the right ovary while retained the left ovary intact, implicating that the genetic alterations underlying ovarian mixed germ cell tumor may be different, even in patients with similar genetic backgrounds and tumor microenvironments. The results of evolutionary conservation and protein structure modeling analysis implicated that MAPK1 p.D321N mutation may be pathogenic. Additionally, mutations in protein phosphatase 2 regulatory subunit α (PPP2R1A), ring finger protein 43 (RNF43), DNA directed polymerase ε (POLE1), ribonuclease type III (DICER1), CCCTC‑binding factor (CTCF), ribosomal protein L22 (RPL22), DNA methyltransferase 3α (DNMT3A), transformation/transcription domain‑associated protein (TRRAP), isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)1 and IDH2 were not detected in ovarian mixed germ cell tumors, implicating these genetic alterations may be not associated with MAPK1 mutation in the development of this malignancy. The present study identified a previously unreported MAPK1 mutation in ovarian mixed germ cell tumors for the first time, and this mutation may be actively involved in the tumorigenesis of this disease. PMID:26548627

  18. Lymphatic and other vascular malformative/overgrowth disorders are caused by somatic mutations in PIK3CA

    PubMed Central

    Luks, Valerie L.; Kamitaki, Nolan; Vivero, Matthew P.; Uller, Wibke; Rab, Rashed; Bovée, Judith V.M.G.; Rialon, Kristy L.; Guevara, Carlos J.; Alomari, Ahmad I.; Greene, Arin K.; Fishman, Steven J.; Kozakewich, Harry P.W.; Maclellan, Reid A.; Mulliken, John B.; Rahbar, Reza; Spencer, Samantha A.; Trenor, Cameron C.; Upton, Joseph; Zurakowski, David; Perkins, Jonathan A.; Kirsh, Andrew; Bennett, James T; Dobyns, William B; Kurek, Kyle C.; Warman, Matthew L.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Murillo, Rudy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypothesis that somatic PIK3CA mutations would be found in patients with more common disorders including isolated lymphatic malformation (LM) and Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS). Study design We used next generation sequencing, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), and single molecule molecular inversion probes (smMIPs) to search for somatic PIK3CA mutations in affected tissue from patients seen at Boston Children’s Hospital who had an isolated LM (n=17), KTS (n=21), fibro-adipose vascular anomaly (FAVA; n=8), or congenital lipomatous overgrowth with vascular, epidermal, and skeletal anomalies syndrome (CLOVES; n = 33), the disorder for which we first identified somatic PIK3CA mutations. We also screened 5 of the more common PIK3CA mutations in a second cohort of patients with LM (n=31) from Seattle Children’s Hospital. Results Most individuals from Boston Children’s Hospital who had isolated LM (16/17) or LM as part of a syndrome, such as KTS (19/21), FAVA (4/8), and CLOVES (30/32) were somatic mosaic for PIK3CA mutations, with 5 specific PIK3CA mutations accounting for ~ 80% of cases. Seventy-four percent of patients with LM from Seattle Children’s Hospital also were somatic mosaic for 1 of 5 specific PIK3CA mutations. Many affected tissue specimens from both cohorts contained fewer than 10% mutant cells. Conclusions Somatic PIK3CA mutations are the most common cause of isolated lymphatic malformations and disorders in which lymphatic malformation is a component feature. Five PIK3CA mutations account for most cases. The search for causal mutations requires sampling of affected tissues and techniques that are capable of detecting low-level somatic mosaicism, because the abundance of mutant cells in a malformed tissue can be low. PMID:25681199

  19. Somatic ATP2A2 Mutation in a Case of Papular Acantholytic Dyskeratosis: Mosaic Darier Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knopp, E.; Saraceni, C.; Moss, J.; McNiff, J.; Choate, K.

    2016-01-01

    Papular acantholytic dyskeratosis (PAD), also known as acantholytic dermatosis of the vulvocrural (or anogenital) area, is an uncommon eruption reported predominantly in women. This entity manifests with pruritic papules in the groin/anogenital area and less commonly on the chest. The pathobiology of PAD is uncertain. A 62-year old woman presented with multiple verrucous-appearing lesions in the groin and on the chest showing acantholytic dyskeratosis on histopathology. Given histological similarity of these PAD lesions to Darier disease (DD) due to inherited ATP2A2 mutation, we screened affected and normal tissue and peripheral blood in our patient for mutations in ATP2A2. We found an identical ATP2A2 p.706D>N mutation in multiple independent PAD lesions that was not present in uninvolved skin or peripheral blood DNA. These findings establish somatic mosaicism of ATP2A2 mutations as a genetic cause for PAD. PMID:26154588

  20. Aldosterone-stimulating somatic gene mutations are common in normal adrenal glands

    PubMed Central

    Nishimoto, Koshiro; Tomlins, Scott A.; Kuick, Rork; Cani, Andi K.; Giordano, Thomas J.; Hovelson, Daniel H.; Liu, Chia-Jen; Sanjanwala, Aalok R.; Edwards, Michael A.; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.; Nanba, Kazutaka; Rainey, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) represents the most common cause of secondary hypertension, but little is known regarding its adrenal cellular origins. Recently, aldosterone-producing cell clusters (APCCs) with high expression of aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) were found in both normal and PA adrenal tissue. PA-causing aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) harbor mutations in genes encoding ion channels/pumps that alter intracellular calcium homeostasis and cause renin-independent aldosterone production through increased CYP11B2 expression. Herein, we hypothesized that APCCs have APA-related aldosterone-stimulating somatic gene mutations. APCCs were studied in 42 normal adrenals from kidney donors. To clarify APCC molecular characteristics, we used microarrays to compare the APCC transcriptome with conventional adrenocortical zones [zona glomerulosa (ZG), zona fasciculata, and zona reticularis]. The APCC transcriptome was most similar to ZG but with an enhanced capacity to produce aldosterone. To determine if APCCs harbored APA-related mutations, we performed targeted next generation sequencing of DNA from 23 APCCs and adjacent normal adrenal tissue isolated from both formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, and frozen tissues. Known aldosterone driver mutations were identified in 8 of 23 (35%) APCCs, including mutations in calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L-type, α1D-subunit (CACNA1D; 6 of 23 APCCs) and ATPase, Na+/K+ transporting, α1-polypeptide (ATP1A1; 2 of 23 APCCs), which were not observed in the adjacent normal adrenal tissue. Overall, we show three major findings: (i) APCCs are common in normal adrenals, (ii) APCCs harbor somatic mutations known to cause excess aldosterone production, and (iii) the mutation spectrum of aldosterone-driving mutations is different in APCCs from that seen in APA. These results provide molecular support for APCC as a precursor of PA. PMID:26240369

  1. Aldosterone-stimulating somatic gene mutations are common in normal adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Koshiro; Tomlins, Scott A; Kuick, Rork; Cani, Andi K; Giordano, Thomas J; Hovelson, Daniel H; Liu, Chia-Jen; Sanjanwala, Aalok R; Edwards, Michael A; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Nanba, Kazutaka; Rainey, William E

    2015-08-18

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) represents the most common cause of secondary hypertension, but little is known regarding its adrenal cellular origins. Recently, aldosterone-producing cell clusters (APCCs) with high expression of aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) were found in both normal and PA adrenal tissue. PA-causing aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) harbor mutations in genes encoding ion channels/pumps that alter intracellular calcium homeostasis and cause renin-independent aldosterone production through increased CYP11B2 expression. Herein, we hypothesized that APCCs have APA-related aldosterone-stimulating somatic gene mutations. APCCs were studied in 42 normal adrenals from kidney donors. To clarify APCC molecular characteristics, we used microarrays to compare the APCC transcriptome with conventional adrenocortical zones [zona glomerulosa (ZG), zona fasciculata, and zona reticularis]. The APCC transcriptome was most similar to ZG but with an enhanced capacity to produce aldosterone. To determine if APCCs harbored APA-related mutations, we performed targeted next generation sequencing of DNA from 23 APCCs and adjacent normal adrenal tissue isolated from both formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, and frozen tissues. Known aldosterone driver mutations were identified in 8 of 23 (35%) APCCs, including mutations in calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L-type, α1D-subunit (CACNA1D; 6 of 23 APCCs) and ATPase, Na(+)/(K+) transporting, α1-polypeptide (ATP1A1; 2 of 23 APCCs), which were not observed in the adjacent normal adrenal tissue. Overall, we show three major findings: (i) APCCs are common in normal adrenals, (ii) APCCs harbor somatic mutations known to cause excess aldosterone production, and (iii) the mutation spectrum of aldosterone-driving mutations is different in APCCs from that seen in APA. These results provide molecular support for APCC as a precursor of PA. PMID:26240369

  2. DNA polymerase ι functions in the generation of tandem mutations during somatic hypermutation of antibody genes.

    PubMed

    Maul, Robert W; MacCarthy, Thomas; Frank, Ekaterina G; Donigan, Katherine A; McLenigan, Mary P; Yang, William; Saribasak, Huseyin; Huston, Donald E; Lange, Sabine S; Woodgate, Roger; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2016-08-22

    DNA polymerase ι (Pol ι) is an attractive candidate for somatic hypermutation in antibody genes because of its low fidelity. To identify a role for Pol ι, we analyzed mutations in two strains of mice with deficiencies in the enzyme: 129 mice with negligible expression of truncated Pol ι, and knock-in mice that express full-length Pol ι that is catalytically inactive. Both strains had normal frequencies and spectra of mutations in the variable region, indicating that loss of Pol ι did not change overall mutagenesis. We next examined if Pol ι affected tandem mutations generated by another error-prone polymerase, Pol ζ. The frequency of contiguous mutations was analyzed using a novel computational model to determine if they occur during a single DNA transaction or during two independent events. Analyses of 2,000 mutations from both strains indicated that Pol ι-compromised mice lost the tandem signature, whereas C57BL/6 mice accumulated significant amounts of double mutations. The results support a model where Pol ι occasionally accesses the replication fork to generate a first mutation, and Pol ζ extends the mismatch with a second mutation. PMID:27455952

  3. A comparison of somatic mutational spectra in healthy study populations from Russia, Sweden and USA

    SciTech Connect

    Noori, P; Hou, S; Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Lambert, B

    2004-10-27

    Comparison of mutation spectra at the hypoxanthine-phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene of peripheral blood T lymphocytes may provide insight into the aetiology of somatic mutation contributing to carcinogenesis and other diseases. To increase knowledge of mutation spectra in healthy people, we have analyzed HPRT mutant T-cells of 50 healthy Russians originally recruited as controls for a study of Chernobyl clean-up workers (Jones et al. Radiation Res. 158, 2002, 424). Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions and DNA sequencing identified 161 independent mutations among 176 thioguanine resistant mutants. Forty (40) mutations affected splicing mechanisms and 27 deletions or insertions of 1 to 60 nucleotides were identified. Ninety four (94) single base substitutions were identified, including 62 different mutations at 55 different nucleotide positions, of which 19 had not previously been reported in human T-cells. Comparison of this base substitution spectrum with mutation spectra in a USA (Burkhart-Schultz et al. Carcinogenesis 17, 1996, 1871) and two Swedish populations (Podlutsky et al, Carcinogenesis 19, 1998, 557, Podlutsky et al. Mutation Res. 431, 1999, 325) revealed similarity in the type, frequency and distribution of mutations in the four spectra, consistent with aetiologies inherent in human metabolism. There were 15-19 identical mutations in the three pair-wise comparisons of Russian with USA and Swedish spectra. Intriguingly, there were 21 mutations unique to the Russian spectrum, and comparison by the Monte Carlo method of Adams and Skopek (J. Mol. Biol. 194, 1987, 391) indicated that the Russian spectrum was different from both Swedish spectra (P=0.007, 0.002) but not different from the USA spectrum (P=0.07), when Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was made (p < 0.008 required for significance). Age and smoking did not account for these differences. Other factors causing mutational differences need to be explored.

  4. Are the Somatic Mutation and Tissue Organization Field Theories of Carcinogenesis Incompatible?

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Two drastically different approaches to understanding the forces driving carcinogenesis have crystallized through years of research. These are the somatic mutation theory (SMT) and the tissue organization field theory (TOFT). The essence of SMT is that cancer is derived from a single somatic cell that has successively accumulated multiple DNA mutations, and that those mutations occur on genes which control cell proliferation and cell cycle. Thus, according to SMT, neoplastic lesions are the results of DNA-level events. Conversely, according to TOFT, carcinogenesis is primarily a problem of tissue organization: carcinogenic agents destroy the normal tissue architecture thus disrupting cell-to-cell signaling and compromising genomic integrity. Hence, in TOFT the DNA mutations are the effect, and not the cause, of the tissue-level events. Cardinal importance of successful resolution of the TOFT versus SMT controversy dwells in the fact that, according to SMT, cancer is a unidirectional and mostly irreversible disease; whereas, according to TOFT, it is curable and reversible. In this paper, our goal is to outline a plausible scenario in which TOFT and SMT can be reconciled using the framework and concepts of the self-organized criticality (SOC), the principle proven to be extremely fruitful in a wide range of disciplines pertaining to natural phenomena, to biological communities, to large-scale social developments, to technological networks, and to many other subjects of research. PMID:24324325

  5. Germline and Somatic DICER1 Mutations in a Well-Differentiated Fetal Adenocarcinoma of the Lung.

    PubMed

    de Kock, Leanne; Bah, Ismaël; Wu, Yingchen; Xie, Meiqing; Priest, John R; Foulkes, William D

    2016-03-01

    Germ-line DICER1 mutations predispose to a distinctive tumour predisposition syndrome, the DICER1 syndrome, which is associated with a spectrum of rare mainly childhood-onset tumours. In 2014, a case of well-differentiated fetal adenocarcinoma of the lung (WDFA) was reported in a 16-year-old germ-line DICER1 mutation carrier. Here we report our finding of a characteristic somatic DICER1 RNase IIIb c.5127T>A (p.Asp1709Glu) missense mutation within the WDFA, confirmed using laser capture microscopy. The child has a personal history consistent with the DICER1 syndrome: she developed a multinodular goitre at age 14 years and an ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumour at age 16 years, each of which were found to harbour a somatic DICER1 RNase IIIb missense mutation. The identification of two DICER1 "hits" in the WDFA strongly suggests that WDFA is a rare, previously-unrecognised manifestation of DICER1 syndrome. PMID:26886166

  6. Are the somatic mutation and tissue organization field theories of carcinogenesis incompatible?

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Two drastically different approaches to understanding the forces driving carcinogenesis have crystallized through years of research. These are the somatic mutation theory (SMT) and the tissue organization field theory (TOFT). The essence of SMT is that cancer is derived from a single somatic cell that has successively accumulated multiple DNA mutations, and that those mutations occur on genes which control cell proliferation and cell cycle. Thus, according to SMT, neoplastic lesions are the results of DNA-level events. Conversely, according to TOFT, carcinogenesis is primarily a problem of tissue organization: carcinogenic agents destroy the normal tissue architecture thus disrupting cell-to-cell signaling and compromising genomic integrity. Hence, in TOFT the DNA mutations are the effect, and not the cause, of the tissue-level events. Cardinal importance of successful resolution of the TOFT versus SMT controversy dwells in the fact that, according to SMT, cancer is a unidirectional and mostly irreversible disease; whereas, according to TOFT, it is curable and reversible. In this paper, our goal is to outline a plausible scenario in which TOFT and SMT can be reconciled using the framework and concepts of the self-organized criticality (SOC), the principle proven to be extremely fruitful in a wide range of disciplines pertaining to natural phenomena, to biological communities, to large-scale social developments, to technological networks, and to many other subjects of research. PMID:24324325

  7. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young June; Ahn, Kwang Sung; Kim, Minjeong; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Sang-Min; Ryu, Junghyun; Ahn, Jin Seop; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Choi, You Jung; Choi, Seong-Jun; Shim, Hosup

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM gene-targeted pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. • A novel large animal model for ataxia telangiectasia was developed. • The new model may provide an alternative to the mouse model. - Abstract: Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies.

  8. Detection of somatic BRCA1/2 mutations in ovarian cancer - next-generation sequencing analysis of 100 cases.

    PubMed

    Koczkowska, Magdalena; Zuk, Monika; Gorczynski, Adam; Ratajska, Magdalena; Lewandowska, Marzena; Biernat, Wojciech; Limon, Janusz; Wasag, Bartosz

    2016-07-01

    The overall prevalence of germline BRCA1/2 mutations is estimated between 11% and 15% of all ovarian cancers. Individuals with germline BRCA1/2 alterations treated with the PARP1 inhibitors (iPARP1) tend to respond better than patients with wild-type BRCA1/2. Additionally, also somatic BRCA1/2 alterations induce the sensitivity to iPARP1. Therefore, the detection of both germline and somatic BRCA1/2 mutations is required for effective iPARP1 treatment. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency and spectrum of germline and somatic BRCA1/2 alterations in a group of Polish patients with ovarian serous carcinoma. In total, 100 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) ovarian serous carcinoma tissues were enrolled to the study. Mutational analysis of BRCA1/2 genes was performed by using next-generation sequencing. The presence of pathogenic variants was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. In addition, to confirm the germline or somatic status of the mutation, the nonneoplastic tissue was analyzed by bidirectional Sanger sequencing. In total, 27 (28% of patient samples) mutations (20 in BRCA1 and 7 in BRCA2) were identified. For 22 of 27 patients, nonneoplastic cells were available and sequencing revealed the somatic character of two BRCA1 (2/16; 12.5%) and two BRCA2 (2/6; 33%) mutations. Notably, we identified six novel frameshift or nonsense BRCA1/2 mutations. The heterogeneity of the detected mutations confirms the necessity of simultaneous analysis of BRCA1/2 genes in all patients diagnosed with serous ovarian carcinoma. Moreover, the use of tumor tissue for mutational analysis allowed the detection of both somatic and germline BRCA1/2 mutations. PMID:27167707

  9. Somatic Mutations in CCK2R Alter Receptor Activity that Promote Oncogenic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Willard, Melinda D.; Lajiness, Mary E.; Wulur, Isabella H.; Feng, Bo; Swearingen, Michelle L.; Uhlik, Mark T.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Velculescu, Victor E.; Sjöblom, Tobias; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Powell, Steven M.; Vogelstein, Bert; Barber, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    The roles of cholecystokinin 2 receptor (CCK2R) in numerous physiologic processes in the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system are ‘well documented. There has been some evidence that CCK2R alterations play a role in cancers, but the functional significance of these alterations for tumorigenesis is unknown. We have identified six mutations in CCK2R among a panel of 140 colorectal cancers and 44 gastric cancers. We show that these mutations increase receptor activity, activate multiple downstream signaling pathways, increase cell migration, and promote angiogenesis. Our findings suggest that somatic mutations in CCK2R may promote tumorigenesis through deregulated receptor activity and highlight the importance of evaluating CCK2R inhibitors to block both the normal and mutant forms of the receptor. PMID:22516348

  10. Germline MC1R status influences somatic mutation burden in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela; Roberts, Nicola D.; Chen, Shuyang; Leacy, Finbarr P.; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Pornputtapong, Natapol; Halaban, Ruth; Krauthammer, Michael; Cui, Rutao; Timothy Bishop, D.; Adams, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The major genetic determinants of cutaneous melanoma risk in the general population are disruptive variants (R alleles) in the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene. These alleles are also linked to red hair, freckling, and sun sensitivity, all of which are known melanoma phenotypic risk factors. Here we report that in melanomas and for somatic C>T mutations, a signature linked to sun exposure, the expected single-nucleotide variant count associated with the presence of an R allele is estimated to be 42% (95% CI, 15–76%) higher than that among persons without an R allele. This figure is comparable to the expected mutational burden associated with an additional 21 years of age. We also find significant and similar enrichment of non-C>T mutation classes supporting a role for additional mutagenic processes in melanoma development in individuals carrying R alleles. PMID:27403562

  11. Germline MC1R status influences somatic mutation burden in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela; Roberts, Nicola D; Chen, Shuyang; Leacy, Finbarr P; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Pornputtapong, Natapol; Halaban, Ruth; Krauthammer, Michael; Cui, Rutao; Timothy Bishop, D; Adams, David J

    2016-01-01

    The major genetic determinants of cutaneous melanoma risk in the general population are disruptive variants (R alleles) in the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene. These alleles are also linked to red hair, freckling, and sun sensitivity, all of which are known melanoma phenotypic risk factors. Here we report that in melanomas and for somatic C>T mutations, a signature linked to sun exposure, the expected single-nucleotide variant count associated with the presence of an R allele is estimated to be 42% (95% CI, 15-76%) higher than that among persons without an R allele. This figure is comparable to the expected mutational burden associated with an additional 21 years of age. We also find significant and similar enrichment of non-C>T mutation classes supporting a role for additional mutagenic processes in melanoma development in individuals carrying R alleles. PMID:27403562

  12. Recurrent somatic mutations in ACVR1 in pediatric midline high-grade astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Fontebasso, Adam M.; Papillon-Cavanagh, Simon; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Nikbakht, Hamid; Gerges, Noha; Fiset, Pierre-Olivier; Bechet, Denise; Faury, Damien; De Jay, Nicolas; Ramkissoon, Lori; Corcoran, Aoife; Jones, David T W; Sturm, Dominik; Johann, Pascal; Tomita, Tadanori; Goldman, Stewart; Nagib, Mahmoud; Bendel, Anne; Goumnerova, Liliana; Bowers, Daniel C.; Leonard, Jeffrey R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Alden, Tord; Browd, Samuel; Geyer, J. Russell; Leary, Sarah; Jallo, George; Cohen, Kenneth; Gupta, Nalin; Prados, Michael D.; Carret, Anne-Sophie; Ellezam, Benjamin; Crevier, Louis; Klekner, Almos; Bognar, Laszlo; Hauser, Peter; Garami, Miklos; Myseros, John; Dong, Zhifeng; Siegel, Peter M.; Malkin, Hayley; Ligon, Azra; Albrecht, Steffen; Pfister, Stefan M.; Ligon, Keith L.; Majewski, Jacek; Jabado, Nada; Kieran, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Midline pediatric high-grade astrocytomas (pHGAs) are incurable with few treatment targets identified. Most tumors harbor K27M mutations on histone 3 variants. In 40 treatment-naïve midline pHGAs, 39 analyzed by whole-exome sequencing, we find additional somatic mutations specific to tumor location. Gain-of-function mutations in ACVR1 occur in tumors of the pons in conjunction with H3.1 K27M, while FGFR1 mutations/fusions occur in thalamic tumors associated with H3.3 K27M. Hyper-activation of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/ACVR1 developmental pathway in pHGAs harbouring ACVR1 mutations led to increased phospho-SMAD1/5/8 expression and up-regulation of BMP downstream early response genes in tumour cells. Global DNA methylation profiles were significantly associated with the K27M mutation regardless of the mutant H3 variant and irrespective of tumor location, supporting its role in driving the epigenetic phenotype. This significantly expands the potential treatment targets and further justifies pre-treatment biopsy in pHGA as a means to orient therapeutic efforts in this disease. PMID:24705250

  13. Prevalent Accumulation of Non-Optimal Codons through Somatic Mutations in Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xudong; Li, Guohui

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is characterized by uncontrolled cell growth, and the cause of different cancers is generally attributed to checkpoint dysregulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Recent studies have shown that non-optimal codons were preferentially adopted by genes to generate cell cycle-dependent oscillations in protein levels. This raises the intriguing question of how dynamic changes of codon usage modulate the cancer genome to cope with a non-controlled proliferative cell cycle. In this study, we comprehensively analyzed the somatic mutations of codons in human cancers, and found that non-optimal codons tended to be accumulated through both synonymous and non-synonymous mutations compared with other types of genomic substitution. We further demonstrated that non-optimal codons were prevalently accumulated across different types of cancers, amino acids, and chromosomes, and genes with accumulation of non-optimal codons tended to be involved in protein interaction/signaling networks and encoded important enzymes in metabolic networks that played roles in cancer-related pathways. This study provides insights into the dynamics of codons in the cancer genome and demonstrates that accumulation of non-optimal codons may be an adaptive strategy for cancerous cells to win the competition with normal cells. This deeper interpretation of the patterns and the functional characterization of somatic mutations of codons will help to broaden the current understanding of the molecular basis of cancers. PMID:27513638

  14. Association of CDK4 germline and BRAF somatic mutations in a patient with multiple primary melanomas and BRAF inhibitor resistance.

    PubMed

    Governa, Maurizio; Caprarella, Evelina; Dalla Pozza, Edoardo; Vigato, Enrico; Maritan, Monia; Caputo, Glenda G; Zannoni, Marina; Rosina, Paolo; Elefanti, Lisa; Stagni, Camilla; Menin, Chiara

    2015-10-01

    Many genetic alterations, including predisposing or somatic mutations, may contribute toward the development of melanoma. Although CDKN2A and CDK4 are high-penetrance genes for melanoma, MC1R is a low-penetrance gene that has been associated most consistently with the disease. Moreover, BRAF is the most frequently somatically altered oncogene and is a validated therapeutic target in melanoma. This paper reports a case of multiple primary melanoma with germline CDK4 mutation, MC1R variant, and somatic BRAF mutation in nine out of 10 melanomas, indicating that a common pathogenesis, because of a predisposing genetic background, may be shared among distinct subsequent melanomas of probable clonal origin. After 3 months of targeted therapy with BRAF inhibitor, our patient developed resistance with rapid progression of the disease leading to death. This is the first case in which early resistance to BRAF inhibitor has been reported in a patient with CDK4 germline mutation. PMID:26110554

  15. Novel Somatic Mutations in Primary Hyperaldosteronism are related to the Clinical, Radiological and Pathological Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, Ute I.; Healy, James M.; Thiel, Anne; Fonseca, Annabelle L.; Brown, Taylor C.; Kunstman, John W.; Horne, Matthew J.; Dietrich, Dimo; Riemer, Jasmin; Kücükköylü, Seher; Reimer, Esther N.; Reis, Anna-Carinna; Goh, Gerald; Kristiansen, Glen; Mahajan, Amit; Korah, Reju; Lifton, Richard P.; Prasad, Manju L.; Carling, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia are important causes of secondary hypertension. Somatic mutations in KCNJ5, CACNA1D, ATP1A1, ATP2B3 and CTNNB1 have been described in APAs. Objective To characterize clinical-pathological features in APAs and unilateral adrenal hyperplasia, and correlate them with genotypes. Design Retrospective study. Subjects and Measurements Clinical and pathological characteristics of 90 APAs and 7 diffusely or focally hyperplastic adrenal glands were reviewed, and samples were examined for mutations in known disease genes by Sanger or exome sequencing. Results Mutation frequencies were: KCNJ5, 37.1%; CACNA1D, 10.3%; ATP1A1, 8.2%; ATP2B3, 3.1%; CTNNB1, 2.1%. Previously unidentified mutations included I157K, F154C and 2 insertions (I150_G151insM and I144_E145insAI) in KCNJ5, all close to the selectivity filter, V426G_V427Q_A428_L433del in ATP2B3, and A39Efs*3 in CTNNB1. Mutations in KCNJ5 were associated with female, and other mutations with male gender (p=0.007). On computed tomography, KCNJ5-mutant tumors displayed significantly greater diameter (p=0.023), calculated area (p=0.002) and lower pre-contrast Hounsfield Units (p=0.0002) vs. tumors with mutations in other genes. Accordingly, KCNJ5-mutant tumors were predominantly comprised of lipid-rich fasciculata-like clear cells, whereas other tumors were heterogeneous (p=5×10−6 vs. non-KCNJ5 mutant and p=0.0003 vs. wild type tumors, respectively). CACNA1D mutations were present in two samples with hyperplasia without adenoma. Conclusions KCNJ5 mutant tumors appear to be associated with fasciculata-like clear cell predominant histology and tend to be larger with a characteristic imaging phenotype. Novel somatic KCNJ5 variants likely cause adenomas by loss of potassium selectivity, similar to previously described mutations. PMID:26252618

  16. Novel MED12 gene somatic mutations in women from the Southern United States with symptomatic uterine fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Laknaur, Archana; Miller, Jessica; Layman, Lawrence C.; Diamond, Michael; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2015-01-01

    Although somatic mutations in exon 2 of the mediator complex subunit 12 (MED12) gene have been reported previously in uterine fibroids in women from Finland, South Africa, and North America, the status of these mutations was not reported in the Southern United States women. The aim of this study is to determine the MED12 somatic mutations in uterine fibroids of women from Southern Unites States, which will help to better understand the contribution of MED12 mutations in fibroid tumor biology. Herein, we determined the frequency of MED12 gene exon 2 somatic mutations in 143 fibroid tumors from a total of 135 women from the Southern United States and in 50 samples of the adjacent myometrium using PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. We observed that the MED12 gene is mutated in 64.33 % (92/143) of uterine fibroid cases in the exon 2 (including deletion mutations). These mutations include 107T > G (4.3 %), 130G > C (2.8 %), 130G > A (7.0 %), 130G > T (2.8 %), 131G > C (2.1 %), 131G > A (20.2 %), and 131G > T (2.1 %). Interestingly, we identified four novel mutations in these patients: 107 T > C (12.8 %), 105A > T (2.1 %), 122T > A (2.1 %), and 92T > A (2.1 %). As expected, we did not observe any mutations in the normal myometrium. Moreover, we found a higher rate of deletion mutations (17.5 %, 25/143) in the above fibroid tumors. Our results clearly demonstrate that the MED12 gene exon 2 is frequently mutated in human uterine fibroids in Southern United States women. These results highlight the molecular pathogenesis of human uterine fibroids with the central role of MED12 somatic mutations. PMID:25325994

  17. Exome sequencing of lymphomas from three dog breeds reveals somatic mutation patterns reflecting genetic background

    PubMed Central

    Elvers, Ingegerd; Turner-Maier, Jason; Swofford, Ross; Koltookian, Michele; Johnson, Jeremy; Stewart, Chip; Zhang, Cheng-Zhong; Schumacher, Steven E.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Rosenberg, Mara; Thomas, Rachael; Mauceli, Evan; Getz, Gad; Palma, Federica Di; Modiano, Jaime F.; Breen, Matthew; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Alföldi, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoma is the most common hematological malignancy in developed countries. Outcome is strongly determined by molecular subtype, reflecting a need for new and improved treatment options. Dogs spontaneously develop lymphoma, and the predisposition of certain breeds indicates genetic risk factors. Using the dog breed structure, we selected three lymphoma predisposed breeds developing primarily T-cell (boxer), primarily B-cell (cocker spaniel), and with equal distribution of B- and T-cell lymphoma (golden retriever), respectively. We investigated the somatic mutations in B- and T-cell lymphomas from these breeds by exome sequencing of tumor and normal pairs. Strong similarities were evident between B-cell lymphomas from golden retrievers and cocker spaniels, with recurrent mutations in TRAF3-MAP3K14 (28% of all cases), FBXW7 (25%), and POT1 (17%). The FBXW7 mutations recurrently occur in a specific codon; the corresponding codon is recurrently mutated in human cancer. In contrast, T-cell lymphomas from the predisposed breeds, boxers and golden retrievers, show little overlap in their mutation pattern, sharing only one of their 15 most recurrently mutated genes. Boxers, which develop aggressive T-cell lymphomas, are typically mutated in the PTEN-mTOR pathway. T-cell lymphomas in golden retrievers are often less aggressive, and their tumors typically showed mutations in genes involved in cellular metabolism. We identify genes with known involvement in human lymphoma and leukemia, genes implicated in other human cancers, as well as novel genes that could allow new therapeutic options. PMID:26377837

  18. Genotoxic evaluation of antiepileptic drugs by Drosophila somatic mutation and recombination test.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Muammer; Sarıkaya, Rabia; Bostanci, Neslihan

    2010-10-01

    The study examines the potential genotoxicity of three antiepileptic drugs (phenytoin sodium, pregabalin, gabapentin) using the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. Trans-heterozygous (two genetic markers mwh and flr) third-instar larvae of D. melanogaster were treated with different concentrations of the test compounds. A positive correlation was observed between total mutations and the number of wings with morphologically detectable mutations. The observed mutations were classified according to size and type of mutation per wing. Phenytoin clearly increased the frequency of total spots at all concentrations above 1.25 microg/ml. Gabapentin also increased the frequency of total spots at concentrations of 40 and 80 microg/ml. This study shows that phenytoin and gabapentin have genotoxic effects according to the SMART test; however, pregabalin displays lower genotoxicity in the SMAR assay when compared with the other two antiepileptics. The results also show that all AED concentrations lower the survival rate of the flies. PMID:20600525

  19. Somatic PIK3CA mutations as a driver of sporadic venous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Castel, Pau; Carmona, F. Javier; Grego-Bessa, Joaquim; Berger, Michael F.; Viale, Agnès; Anderson, Kathryn V.; Bague, Silvia; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Baselga, Eulàlia; Baselga, José

    2016-01-01

    Venous malformations (VM) are vascular malformations characterized by enlarged and distorted blood vessel channels. VM grow over time and cause substantial morbidity because of disfigurement, bleeding, and pain, representing a clinical challenge in the absence of effective treatments (Nguyen et al., 2014; Uebelhoer et al., 2012). Somatic mutations may act as drivers of these lesions, as suggested by the identification of TEK mutations in a proportion of VM (Limaye et al., 2009). We report that activating PIK3CA mutations gives rise to sporadic VM in mice, which closely resemble the histology of the human disease. Furthermore, we identified mutations in PIK3CA and related genes of the PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)/AKT pathway in about 30% of human VM that lack TEK alterations. PIK3CA mutations promote downstream signaling and proliferation in endothelial cells and impair normal vasculogenesis in embryonic development. We successfully treated VM in mouse models using pharmacological inhibitors of PI3Kα administered either systemically or topically. This study elucidates the etiology of a proportion of VM and proposes a therapeutic approach for this disease. PMID:27030594

  20. Somatic mosaicism of PCDH19 mutation in a family with low-penetrance EFMR.

    PubMed

    Terracciano, A; Specchio, N; Darra, F; Sferra, A; Bernardina, B Dalla; Vigevano, F; Bertini, E

    2012-11-01

    The occurrence of epilepsy with mental retardation limited to females (EFMR; MIM 300088) has been recently associated to mutations in the PCDH19 gene, located on chromosome X and encoding for protocadherin 19. EFMR shows a rare X-linked inheritance wherein affected females may be segregating a mutation through unaffected transmitting males (Fabisiak and Erickson Clin Genet 38(5):353-358, 1990; Juberg and Hellman J Pediatr 79:726-732, 1971; Ryan et al. Nat Genet 17(1):92-95, 1997). The description of a pedigree segregating PCDH19 mutations from unaffected mothers to patients (Depienne et al. Hum Mutat 32:E1959-1975, 2011; Dibbens et al. Neurology 76:1514-1519, 2011) complicates disease inheritance and genetic counseling. In the present study, we describe a PCDH19 mutation segregating from an asymptomatic mother to an EFMR patient. In order to correlate the healthy phenotype with the genotype of the transmitting mother, we quantified in a few tissues the level of the mutant allele by real-time PCR, disclosing a somatic mosaicism. This finding has a great impact on genetic counseling. PMID:22949144

  1. Acquired resistance mechanisms to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer with activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutation--diversity, ductility, and destiny.

    PubMed

    Suda, Kenichi; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2012-12-01

    Lung cancers that harbor somatic activating mutations in the gene for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) depend on mutant EGFR for their proliferation and survival; therefore, lung cancer patients with EGFR mutations often dramatically respond to orally available EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, emergence of acquired resistance is virtually inevitable, thus limiting improvement in patient outcomes. To elucidate and overcome this acquired resistance, multidisciplinary basic and clinical investigational approaches have been applied, using in vitro cell line models or samples obtained from lung cancer patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. These efforts have revealed several acquired resistance mechanisms and candidates, including EGFR secondary mutations (T790M and other rare mutations), MET amplification, PTEN downregulation, CRKL amplification, high-level HGF expression, FAS-NFκB pathway activation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and conversion to small cell lung cancer. Interestingly, cancer cells harbor potential destiny and ductility together in acquiring resistance to EGFR-TKIs, as shown in in vitro acquired resistance models. Molecular mechanisms of "reversible EGFR-TKI tolerance" that occur in early phase EGFR-TKI exposure have been identified in cell line models. Furthermore, others have reported molecular markers that can predict response to EGFR-TKIs in clinical settings. Deeper understanding of acquired resistance mechanisms to EGFR-TKIs, followed by the development of molecular target drugs that can overcome the resistance, might turn this fatal disease into a chronic disorder. PMID:22736441

  2. Germline and somatic JAK2 mutations and susceptibility to chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are a group of closely related stem-cell-derived clonal proliferative diseases. Most cases are sporadic but first-degree relatives of MPN patients have a five- to seven-fold increased risk for developing an MPN. The tumors of most patients carry a mutation in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2V617F). Recently, three groups have described a strong association of JAK2 germline polymorphisms with MPN in patients positive for JAK2V617F. The somatic mutation occurs primarily on one particular germline JAK2 haplotype, which may account for as much as 50% of the risk to first-degree relatives. This finding provides new directions for unraveling the pathogenesis of MPN. PMID:19490586

  3. The human prohibitin (PHB) gene family and its somatic mutations in human tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Takaaki; Sakamoto, Takashi; Takita, Ken-ichi; Saito, Hiroko; Okui, Keiko; Nakamura, Yusuke )

    1993-09-01

    Five cosmid clones, isolated by procedures to screen genomic libraries for homologous variants of the human prohibitin gene (PHB), were analyzed to determine their genomic structures. Four of these (PHBP1-4) were found to be processed pseudogenes, each located on a different chromosome from their counter-parts on chromosome 17q21. The DNA sequence of one clone (PHBP1, on chromosome 6q25) shared a 91.3% identity at the nucleotide level with the cDNA of functional prohibitin. A large number of human tumors of the breast, ovary, liver, and lung were examined for somatic mutations in the PHB gene. Although mutations were observed in a few sporadic breast cancers, none were identified in any of the other cancers. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Toward an evolutionary model of cancer: Considering the mechanisms that govern the fate of somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rozhok, Andrii I.; DeGregori, James

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of cancer has greatly advanced since Nordling [Nordling CO (1953) Br J Cancer 7(1):68–72] and Armitage and Doll [Armitage P, Doll R (1954) Br J Cancer 8(1):1–12] put forth the multistage model of carcinogenesis. However, a number of observations remain poorly understood from the standpoint of this paradigm in its contemporary state. These observations include the similar age-dependent exponential rise in incidence of cancers originating from stem/progenitor pools differing drastically in size, age-dependent cell division profiles, and compartmentalization. This common incidence pattern is characteristic of cancers requiring different numbers of oncogenic mutations, and it scales to very divergent life spans of mammalian species. Also, bigger mammals with larger underlying stem cell pools are not proportionally more prone to cancer, an observation known as Peto’s paradox. Here, we present a number of factors beyond the occurrence of oncogenic mutations that are unaccounted for in the current model of cancer development but should have significant impacts on cancer incidence. Furthermore, we propose a revision of the current understanding for how oncogenic and other functional somatic mutations affect cellular fitness. We present evidence, substantiated by evolutionary theory, demonstrating that fitness is a dynamic environment-dependent property of a phenotype and that oncogenic mutations should have vastly different fitness effects on somatic cells dependent on the tissue microenvironment in an age-dependent manner. Combined, this evidence provides a firm basis for understanding the age-dependent incidence of cancers as driven by age-altered systemic processes regulated above the cell level. PMID:26195756

  5. Toward an evolutionary model of cancer: Considering the mechanisms that govern the fate of somatic mutations.

    PubMed

    Rozhok, Andrii I; DeGregori, James

    2015-07-21

    Our understanding of cancer has greatly advanced since Nordling [Nordling CO (1953) Br J Cancer 7(1):68-72] and Armitage and Doll [Armitage P, Doll R (1954) Br J Cancer 8(1):1-12] put forth the multistage model of carcinogenesis. However, a number of observations remain poorly understood from the standpoint of this paradigm in its contemporary state. These observations include the similar age-dependent exponential rise in incidence of cancers originating from stem/progenitor pools differing drastically in size, age-dependent cell division profiles, and compartmentalization. This common incidence pattern is characteristic of cancers requiring different numbers of oncogenic mutations, and it scales to very divergent life spans of mammalian species. Also, bigger mammals with larger underlying stem cell pools are not proportionally more prone to cancer, an observation known as Peto's paradox. Here, we present a number of factors beyond the occurrence of oncogenic mutations that are unaccounted for in the current model of cancer development but should have significant impacts on cancer incidence. Furthermore, we propose a revision of the current understanding for how oncogenic and other functional somatic mutations affect cellular fitness. We present evidence, substantiated by evolutionary theory, demonstrating that fitness is a dynamic environment-dependent property of a phenotype and that oncogenic mutations should have vastly different fitness effects on somatic cells dependent on the tissue microenvironment in an age-dependent manner. Combined, this evidence provides a firm basis for understanding the age-dependent incidence of cancers as driven by age-altered systemic processes regulated above the cell level. PMID:26195756

  6. Diphtheria toxin resistance in human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts in the in vivo somatic cell mutation test

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkins, D.J.; Wei, L.; Laurie, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    It has been shown that circulating peripheral blood lymphocytes can be used for the enumeration of 6-thioguanine-resistant cells that presumably arise by mutation in vivo. This somatic cell mutation test has been studied in lymphocytes from human populations exposed to known mutagens and/or carcinogens. The sensitivity of the test could be further enhanced by including other gene markers, since there is evidence for locus-specific differences in response to mutagens. Resistance to diphtheria toxin (Dip/sup r/) seemed like a potential marker to incorporate into the test because the mutation acts codominantly, can readily be selected in human diploid fibroblasts and Chinese hamster cells with no evidence for cell density or cross-feeding effects, and can be assayed for in nondividing cells by measuring protein synthesis inhibition. Blood samples were collected from seven individuals, and fresh, cryopreserved, or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphocytes were tested for continued DNA synthesis (TH-thymidine, autoradiography) or protein synthesis (TVS-methionine, scintillation counting). Both fresh and cryopreserved lymphocytes, stimulated to divide with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), continued to synthesize DNA in the presence of high doses of diphtheria toxin (DT). Similarly, both dividing (PHA-stimulated) and nondividing fresh lymphocytes carried on significant levels of protein synthesis even 68 hr after exposure to 100 flocculating units (LF)/ml DT. The results suggest that human T and B lymphocytes may not be as sensitive to DT protein synthesis inhibition as human fibroblast and Chinese hamster cells. For this reason, Dip/sup r/ may not be a suitable marker for the somatic cell mutation test.

  7. Profiling of somatic mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with FLT3-ITD at diagnosis and relapse.

    PubMed

    Garg, Manoj; Nagata, Yasunobu; Kanojia, Deepika; Mayakonda, Anand; Yoshida, Kenichi; Haridas Keloth, Sreya; Zang, Zhi Jiang; Okuno, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Ding, Ling-Wen; Alpermann, Tamara; Sun, Qiao-Yang; Lin, De-Chen; Chien, Wenwen; Madan, Vikas; Liu, Li-Zhen; Tan, Kar-Tong; Sampath, Abhishek; Venkatesan, Subhashree; Inokuchi, Koiti; Wakita, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Chng, Wee Joo; Kham, Shirley-Kow Yin; Yeoh, Allen Eng-Juh; Sanada, Masashi; Schiller, Joanna; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Kornblau, Steven M; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Haferlach, Torsten; Lill, Michael; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Shih, Lee-Yung; Blau, Igor-Wolfgang; Blau, Olga; Yang, Henry; Ogawa, Seishi; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2015-11-26

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with an FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutation is an aggressive hematologic malignancy with a grave prognosis. To identify the mutational spectrum associated with relapse, whole-exome sequencing was performed on 13 matched diagnosis, relapse, and remission trios followed by targeted sequencing of 299 genes in 67 FLT3-ITD patients. The FLT3-ITD genome has an average of 13 mutations per sample, similar to other AML subtypes, which is a low mutation rate compared with that in solid tumors. Recurrent mutations occur in genes related to DNA methylation, chromatin, histone methylation, myeloid transcription factors, signaling, adhesion, cohesin complex, and the spliceosome. Their pattern of mutual exclusivity and cooperation among mutated genes suggests that these genes have a strong biological relationship. In addition, we identified mutations in previously unappreciated genes such as MLL3, NSD1, FAT1, FAT4, and IDH3B. Mutations in 9 genes were observed in the relapse-specific phase. DNMT3A mutations are the most stable mutations, and this DNMT3A-transformed clone can be present even in morphologic complete remissions. Of note, all AML matched trio samples shared at least 1 genomic alteration at diagnosis and relapse, suggesting common ancestral clones. Two types of clonal evolution occur at relapse: either the founder clone recurs or a subclone of the founder clone escapes from induction chemotherapy and expands at relapse by acquiring new mutations. Relapse-specific mutations displayed an increase in transversions. Functional assays demonstrated that both MLL3 and FAT1 exert tumor-suppressor activity in the FLT3-ITD subtype. An inhibitor of XPO1 synergized with standard AML induction chemotherapy to inhibit FLT3-ITD growth. This study clearly shows that FLT3-ITD AML requires additional driver genetic alterations in addition to FLT3-ITD alone. PMID:26438511

  8. Comparative induction of somatic eye-color mutations and sex-linked recessive lethals in Drosophila melanogaster by tryptophan pyrolysates.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, K; Inagaki, E; Uchibori, M; Kondo, S

    1983-12-01

    The mutagenicities of the products of pyrolysis of tryptophan, Trp-P-1 and Trp-P-2, on Drosophila melanogaster were examined by measuring the effects of these compounds in inducing recessive lethals and somatic eye-color mutations. Since negative results have already been obtained by the standard procedure in males, Trp-P-1 and Trp-P-2 (0.75 to 6 mg/ml) in sucrose solution were given to females for assay of recessive lethal mutations in X-chromosomes. These compounds caused a marginal increase above the control level in the mutation frequency. For the assay of effects on somatic eye-color mutations, Trp-P-1 (200 and 400 ppm) and Trp-P-2 (400 and 800 ppm) were fed to male larvae of a tester strain carrying a genetically unstable marker set of z and w+ on the X-chromosome. These compounds caused dose-dependent increases above the control level in somatic eye-color mutations in adults. It is concluded that, under the conditions used, the somatic eye-color mutation system was more sensitive than the recessive lethal system to the mutagenic effects of tryptophan pyrolysates. PMID:6419091

  9. Analysis of protein coding mutations in hiPSCs and their possible role during somatic cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Sergio; Gore, Athurva; Li, Zhe; Panopoulos, Athanasia D.; Montserrat, Nuria; Fung, Ho-Lim; Giorgetti, Alessandra; Bilic, Josipa; Batchelder, Erika M.; Zaehres, Holm; Schöler, Hans R.; Zhang, Kun; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) contain genomic structural variations and point mutations in coding regions. However, these studies have focused on fibroblast-derived hiPSCs, and it is currently unknown whether the use of alternative somatic cell sources with varying reprogramming efficiencies would result in different levels of genetic alterations. Here we characterize the genomic integrity of eight hiPSC lines derived from five different non-fibroblast somatic cell types. We show that protein-coding mutations are a general feature of the hiPSC state and are independent of somatic cell source. Furthermore, we analyze a total of 17 point mutations found in hiPSCs and demonstrate that they do not generally facilitate the acquisition of pluripotency and thus are not likely to provide a selective advantage for reprogramming. PMID:23340422

  10. Somatic mosaicism in families with hemophilia B: 11% of germline mutations originate within a few cell divisions post-fertilization

    SciTech Connect

    Knoell, A.; Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E.

    1994-09-01

    Previous molecular estimates of mosaicism in the dystrophin and other genes generally have focused on the transmission of the mutated allele to two or more children by an individual without the mutation in leukocyte DNA. We have analyzed 414 families with hemophilia B by direct genomic sequencing and haplotype analysis, and have deduced the origin of mutation in 56 families. There was no origin individual who transmitted a mutant allele to more than one child. However, somatic mosaicism was detected by sequence analysis of four origin individuals (3{female} and 1{male}). The sensitivity of this analysis is typically one part in ten. In one additional female who had close to a 50:50 ratio of mutant to normal alleles, three of four noncarrier daughters inherited the haplotype associated with the mutant allele. This highlights a caveat in molecular analysis: a presumptive carrier in a family with sporadic disease does not necessarily have a 50% probability of transmitting the mutant allele to her offspring. After eliminating those families in which mosaicism could not be detected because of a total gene deletion or absence of DNA from a deduced origin individual, 5 of 43 origin individuals exhibited somatic mosaicism at a level that reflects a mutation within the first few cell divisions after fertilization. In one patient, analysis of cervical scrapings and buccal mucosa confirm the generalized distribution of somatic mutation. Are the first few cell divisions post-fertilization highly mutagenic, or do mutations at later divisions also give rise to somatic mosaicism? To address this question, DNA from origin individuals are being analyzed to detect somatic mosaicism at a sensitivity of 1:1000. Single nucleotide primer extension (SNuPE) has been utilized in eight families to date and no mosaicism has been detected. When the remaining 30 samples are analyzed, it will be possible to compare the frequency of somatic mosaicism at 0.1-10% with that of {ge}10%.

  11. SomamiR 2.0: a database of cancer somatic mutations altering microRNA-ceRNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Anindya; Cui, Yan

    2016-01-01

    SomamiR 2.0 (http://compbio.uthsc.edu/SomamiR) is a database of cancer somatic mutations in microRNAs (miRNA) and their target sites that potentially alter the interactions between miRNAs and competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNA) including mRNAs, circular RNAs (circRNA) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA). Here, we describe the recent major updates to the SomamiR database. We expanded the scope of the database by including somatic mutations that impact the interactions between miRNAs and two classes of non-coding RNAs, circRNAs and lncRNAs. Recently, a large number of miRNA target sites have been discovered by newly emerged high-throughput technologies for mapping the miRNA interactome. We have mapped 388 247 somatic mutations to the experimentally identified miRNA target sites. The updated database also includes a list of somatic mutations in the miRNA seed regions, which contain the most important guiding information for miRNA target recognition. A recently developed webserver, miR2GO, was integrated with the database to provide a seamless pipeline for assessing functional impacts of somatic mutations in miRNA seed regions. Data and functions from multiple sources including biological pathways and genome-wide association studies were updated and integrated with SomamiR 2.0 to make it a better platform for functional analysis of somatic mutations altering miRNA-ceRNA interactions. PMID:26578591

  12. Somatic IDH1 mutation in a pituitary adenoma of a patient with Maffucci syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuyu; Hong, Christopher S; Feng, Jie; Yang, Chunzhang; Chittiboina, Prashant; Zhang, Junting; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2016-06-01

    Maffucci syndrome is a rare disease characterized by multiple enchondromas and soft-tissue hemangiomas. Additionally, neuroendocrine tumors including pituitary adenomas have been described in these patients. The underlying genetic etiology lies in somatic mosaicism of mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) or isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2). This report describes a patient with Maffucci syndrome who presented with intracranial tumors of the skull base and suprasellar region. The patient underwent resection of both intracranial tumors, revealing histopathological diagnoses of chondrosarcoma and pituitary adenoma. DNA sequencing of the tumors was performed to identify common IDH1/2 mutations. Clinical, radiological, and biochemical assessments were performed. Genotypic studies used standard Sanger sequencing in conjunction with a target-specific peptide nucleic acid to detect IDH1 mutations in tumor tissues. DNA sequencing demonstrated identical IDH1 mutations (c.394C > T) in both tumors. To the authors' knowledge, this report provides the first genetic evidence for the inclusion of pituitary adenomas among tumors characterizing Maffucci syndrome. In patients who are newly diagnosed with Maffucci syndrome, it is appropriate to monitor for development of pituitary pathology and neuroendocrine dysfunction. PMID:26473790

  13. Somatic Activating Mutations in GNAQ and GNA11 Are Associated with Congenital Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Ayturk, Ugur M; Couto, Javier A; Hann, Steven; Mulliken, John B; Williams, Kaitlin L; Huang, August Yue; Fishman, Steven J; Boyd, Theonia K; Kozakewich, Harry P W; Bischoff, Joyce; Greene, Arin K; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-04-01

    Congenital hemangioma is a rare vascular tumor that forms in utero. Postnatally, the tumor either involutes quickly (i.e., rapidly involuting congenital hemangioma [RICH]) or partially regresses and stabilizes (i.e., non-involuting congenital hemangioma [NICH]). We hypothesized that congenital hemangiomas arise due to somatic mutation and performed massively parallel mRNA sequencing on affected tissue from eight participants. We identified mutually exclusive, mosaic missense mutations that alter glutamine at amino acid 209 (Glu209) in GNAQ or GNA11 in all tested samples, at variant allele frequencies (VAF) ranging from 3% to 33%. We verified the presence of the mutations in genomic DNA using a combination of molecular inversion probe sequencing (MIP-seq) and digital droplet PCR (ddPCR). The Glu209 GNAQ and GNA11 missense variants we identified are common in uveal melanoma and have been shown to constitutively activate MAPK and/or YAP signaling. When we screened additional archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) congenital cutaneous and hepatic hemangiomas, 4/8 had GNAQ or GNA11 Glu209 variants. The same GNAQ or GNA11 mutation is found in both NICH and RICH, so other factors must account for these tumors' different postnatal behaviors. PMID:27058448

  14. Ultrasensitive Detection of Multiplexed Somatic Mutations Using MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mosko, Michael J; Nakorchevsky, Aleksey A; Flores, Eunice; Metzler, Heath; Ehrich, Mathias; van den Boom, Dirk J; Sherwood, James L; Nygren, Anders O H

    2016-01-01

    Multiplex detection of low-frequency mutations is becoming a necessary diagnostic tool for clinical laboratories interested in noninvasive prognosis and prediction. Challenges include the detection of minor alleles among abundant wild-type alleles, the heterogeneous nature of tumors, and the limited amount of available tissue. A method that can reliably detect minor variants <1% in a multiplexed reaction using a platform amenable to a variety of throughputs would meet these requirements. We developed a novel approach, UltraSEEK, for high-throughput, multiplexed, ultrasensitive mutation detection and used it for detection of mutant sequence mixtures as low as 0.1% minor allele frequency. The process consisted of multiplex PCR, followed by mutation-specific, single-base extension using chain terminators labeled with a moiety for solid phase capture. The captured and enriched products were then identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. For verification, we successfully analyzed ultralow fractions of mutations in a set of characterized cell lines, and included a direct comparison to droplet digital PCR. Finally, we verified the specificity in a set of 122 paired tumor and circulating cell-free DNA samples from melanoma patients. Our results show that the UltraSEEK chemistry is a particularly powerful approach for the detection of somatic variants, with the potential to be an invaluable resource to investigators in saving time and material without compromising analytical sensitivity and accuracy. PMID:26596526

  15. Exome sequencing identifies somatic mutations of DNA methyltransferase gene DNMT3A in acute monocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiao-Jing; Xu, Jie; Gu, Zhao-Hui; Pan, Chun-Ming; Lu, Gang; Shen, Yang; Shi, Jing-Yi; Zhu, Yong-Mei; Tang, Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Liang, Wen-Xue; Mi, Jian-Qing; Song, Huai-Dong; Li, Ke-Qin; Chen, Zhu; Chen, Sai-Juan

    2011-04-01

    Abnormal epigenetic regulation has been implicated in oncogenesis. We report here the identification of somatic mutations by exome sequencing in acute monocytic leukemia, the M5 subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M5). We discovered mutations in DNMT3A (encoding DNA methyltransferase 3A) in 23 of 112 (20.5%) cases. The DNMT3A mutants showed reduced enzymatic activity or aberrant affinity to histone H3 in vitro. Notably, there were alterations of DNA methylation patterns and/or gene expression profiles (such as HOXB genes) in samples with DNMT3A mutations as compared with those without such changes. Leukemias with DNMT3A mutations constituted a group of poor prognosis with elderly disease onset and of promonocytic as well as monocytic predominance among AML-M5 individuals. Screening other leukemia subtypes showed Arg882 alterations in 13.6% of acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AML-M4) cases. Our work suggests a contribution of aberrant DNA methyltransferase activity to the pathogenesis of acute monocytic leukemia and provides a useful new biomarker for relevant cases. PMID:21399634

  16. Somatic mutations of DICER1 and KMT2D are frequent in intraocular medulloepitheliomas.

    PubMed

    Sahm, Felix; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Meyer, Jochen; Schrimpf, Daniel; Eberhart, Charles G; Hovestadt, Volker; Capper, David; Lambo, Sander; Ryzhova, Marina; Schüller, Ulrich; Zheludkova, Olga; Kumirova, Ella; Lichter, Peter; von Deimling, Andreas; Jones, David T W; Pfister, Stefan M; Kool, Marcel; Korshunov, Andrey

    2016-05-01

    Intraocular medulloepithelioma (IO-MEPL) is an uncommon embryonal neuroepithelial neoplasm of the eye. Little is known about the cytogenetics, molecular biology, and pathogenesis of this tumor. In the present study we investigated the mutational landscape of 19 IO-MEPL using targeted next-generation sequencing. Routinely prepared paraffin-embedded samples were assessed with high-coverage genome sequencing on the Illumina NextSeq 500 platform using a customized gene panel set covering the coding region of 130 genes. This revealed several notable genomic alterations, including mutations of DICER1 (6 tumors) and KMT2D (also known as MLL2; 5 tumors)-which are frequently recurrent and mutually exclusive molecular events for IO-MEPL. Non-recurrent mutations in the cancer-associated genes BRCA2, BRCA1, NOTCH2, CDH1, and GSE1 were also identified. IO-MEPL samples harboring a DICER1 mutation disclosed few chromosomal alterations and formed a separate DNA methylation cluster, indicating potential differences in genetic and epigenetic events arising perhaps from the presence of this aberration in the tumor genome. The high proportion of recurrent somatic DICER1 and KMT2D mutations in this series of sporadic IO-MEPL points to their likely important roles in the molecular pathogenesis of these rare embryonal tumors, and perhaps suggests the existence of distinct molecular variants of IO-MEPL. Although the precise role of these recurrent mutations in the development of IO-MEPL, and their relationship to pro-oncogenic molecular mechanisms, have yet to be determined, unraveling their roles could eventually be exploited for nonsurgical therapies of these neoplasms. PMID:26841698

  17. Identical mitochondrial somatic mutations unique to chronic periodontitis and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Pallavi, Tokala; Chandra, Rampalli Viswa; Reddy, Aileni Amarender; Reddy, Bavigadda Harish; Naveen, Anumala

    2016-01-01

    Context: The inflammatory processes involved in chronic periodontitis and coronary artery diseases (CADs) are similar and produce reactive oxygen species that may result in similar somatic mutations in mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (mtDNA). Aims: The aims of the present study were to identify somatic mtDNA mutations in periodontal and cardiac tissues from subjects undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery and determine what fraction was identical and unique to these tissues. Settings and Design: The study population consisted of 30 chronic periodontitis subjects who underwent coronary artery surgery after an angiogram had indicated CAD. Materials and Methods: Gingival tissue samples were taken from the site with deepest probing depth; coronary artery tissue samples were taken during the coronary artery bypass grafting procedures, and blood samples were drawn during this surgical procedure. These samples were stored under aseptic conditions and later transported for mtDNA analysis. Statistical Analysis Used: Complete mtDNA sequences were obtained and aligned with the revised Cambridge reference sequence (NC_012920) using sequence analysis and auto assembler tools. Results: Among the complete mtDNA sequences, a total of 162 variations were spread across the whole mitochondrial genome and present only in the coronary artery and the gingival tissue samples but not in the blood samples. Among the 162 variations, 12 were novel and four of the 12 novel variations were found in mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 complex I gene (33.3%). Conclusions: Analysis of mtDNA mutations indicated 162 variants unique to periodontitis and CAD. Of these, 12 were novel and may have resulted from destructive oxidative forces common to these two diseases. PMID:27041832

  18. Aneuploidy, the somatic mutation that makes cancer a species of its own.

    PubMed

    Duesberg, P; Rasnick, D

    2000-10-01

    The many complex phenotypes of cancer have all been attributed to "somatic mutation." These phenotypes include anaplasia, autonomous growth, metastasis, abnormal cell morphology, DNA indices ranging from 0.5 to over 2, clonal origin but unstable and non-clonal karyotypes and phenotypes, abnormal centrosome numbers, immortality in vitro and in transplantation, spontaneous progression of malignancy, as well as the exceedingly slow kinetics from carcinogen to carcinogenesis of many months to decades. However, it has yet to be determined whether this mutation is aneuploidy, an abnormal number of chromosomes, or gene mutation. A century ago, Boveri proposed cancer is caused by aneuploidy, because it correlates with cancer and because it generates "pathological" phenotypes in sea urchins. But half a century later, when cancers were found to be non-clonal for aneuploidy, but clonal for somatic gene mutations, this hypothesis was abandoned. As a result aneuploidy is now generally viewed as a consequence, and mutated genes as a cause of cancer although, (1) many carcinogens do not mutate genes, (2) there is no functional proof that mutant genes cause cancer, and (3) mutation is fast but carcinogenesis is exceedingly slow. Intrigued by the enormous mutagenic potential of aneuploidy, we undertook biochemical and biological analyses of aneuploidy and gene mutation, which show that aneuploidy is probably the only mutation that can explain all aspects of carcinogenesis. On this basis we can now offer a coherent two-stage mechanism of carcinogenesis. In stage one, carcinogens cause aneuploidy, either by fragmenting chromosomes or by damaging the spindle apparatus. In stage two, ever new and eventually tumorigenic karyotypes evolve autocatalytically because aneuploidy destabilizes the karyotype, ie. causes genetic instability. Thus, cancer cells derive their unique and complex phenotypes from random chromosome number mutation, a process that is similar to regrouping assembly lines

  19. Somatic mutations contribute to genotypic diversity in sterile and fertile populations of the threatened shrub, Grevillea rhizomatosa (Proteaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Gross, C. L.; Nelson, Penelope A.; Haddadchi, Azadeh; Fatemi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Grevillea rhizomatosa is a spreading shrub which exhibits multiple breeding strategies within a narrow area in the fire-prone heathlands of eastern Australia. Reproductive strategies include self-compatibility, self-incompatibility and clonality (with and without sterility). The close proximity of contrasting breeding systems provides an opportunity to explore the evolution of sterility and to compare and contrast the origins of genotypic diversity (recombinant or somatic) against degrees of sexual expression. Methods ISSR markers for 120 band positions (putative loci) were used to compare genetic diversity among five populations at a macro-scale of 5 m between samples (n = 244 shrubs), and at a micro-scale of nearest neighbours for all plants in five 25-m2 quadrats with contrasting fertilities (n = 162 shrubs). Nearest-neighbour sampling included several clusters of connected ramets. Matrix incompatibility (MIC) analyses were used to evaluate the relative contribution of recombination and somatic mutation to genotype diversity. Key Results High levels of genotypic diversity were found in all populations regardless of fertilities (fertile populations, G/N ≥ 0·94; sterile populations, G/N ≥ 0·97) and most sterile populations had a unique genetic profile. Somatic mutations were detected along connected ramets in ten out of 42 ramet clusters. MIC analyses showed that somatic mutations have contributed to diversity in all populations and particularly so in sterile populations. Conclusions Somatic mutations contribute significantly to gene diversity in sterile populations of Grevillea rhizomatosa, the accumulation of which is the likely cause of male and female sterility. High levels of genetic diversity therefore may not always be synonymous with sexual fitness and genetic health. We hypothesize that frequent fires drive selection for clonal reproduction, at the cost of flowering such that sexual functions are not maintained through selection

  20. Human Immunoglobulin (Ig)M+IgD+ Peripheral Blood B Cells Expressing the CD27 Cell Surface Antigen Carry Somatically Mutated Variable Region Genes: CD27 as a General Marker for Somatically Mutated (Memory) B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Ulf; Rajewsky, Klaus; Küppers, Ralf

    1998-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig)M+IgD+ B cells are generally assumed to represent antigen-inexperienced, naive B cells expressing variable (V) region genes without somatic mutations. We report here that human IgM+IgD+ peripheral blood (PB) B cells expressing the CD27 cell surface antigen carry mutated V genes, in contrast to CD27-negative IgM+IgD+ B cells. IgM+IgD+CD27+ B cells resemble class-switched and IgM-only memory cells in terms of cell phenotype, and comprise ∼15% of PB B lymphocytes in healthy adults. Moreover, a very small population (<1% of PB B cells) of highly mutated IgD-only B cells was detected, which likely represent the PB counterpart of IgD-only tonsillar germinal center and plasma cells. Overall, the B cell pool in the PB of adults consists of ∼40% mutated memory B cells and 60% unmutated, naive IgD+CD27− B cells (including CD5+ B cells). In the somatically mutated B cells, VH region genes carry a two- to threefold higher load of somatic mutation than rearranged Vκ genes. This might be due to an intrinsically lower mutation rate in κ light chain genes compared with heavy chain genes and/or result from κ light chain gene rearrangements in GC B cells. A common feature of the somatically mutated B cell subsets is the expression of the CD27 cell surface antigen which therefore may represent a general marker for memory B cells in humans. PMID:9802980

  1. Next-generation sequencing reveals somatic mutations that confer exceptional response to everolimus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangwoo; Kim, Sora; Ali, Siraj M.; Greenbowe, Joel R.; Yang, In Seok; Kwon, Nak-Jung; Lee, Jae Lyun; Ryu, Min-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Hee; Lee, Jeeyun; Lee, Min Goo; Kim, Hyo Song; Kim, Hyunki; Kim, Hye Ryun; Moon, Yong Wha; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Joo-Hang; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Cho, Byoung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Background Given the modest responses to everolimus, a mTOR inhibitor, in multiple tumor types, there is a pressing need to identify predictive biomarkers for this drug. Using targeted ultra-deep sequencing, we aimed to explore genomic alterations that confer extreme sensitivity to everolimus. Results We collected formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor/normal pairs from 39 patients (22 with exceptional clinical benefit, 17 with no clinical benefit) who were treated with everolimus across various tumor types (13 gastric cancers, 15 renal cell carcinomas, 2 thyroid cancers, 2 head and neck cancer, and 7 sarcomas). Ion AmpliSeqTM Comprehensive Cancer Panel was used to identify alterations across all exons of 409 target genes. Tumors were sequenced to a median coverage of 552x. Cancer genomes are characterized by 219 somatic single-nucleotide variants (181 missense, 9 nonsense, 7 splice-site) and 22 frameshift insertions/deletions, with a median of 2.1 mutations per Mb (0 to 12.4 mutations per Mb). Overall, genomic alterations with activating effect on mTOR signaling were identified in 10 of 22 (45%) patients with clinical benefit and these include MTOR, TSC1, TSC2, NF1, PIK3CA and PIK3CG mutations. Recurrently mutated genes in chromatin remodeling genes (BAP1; n = 2, 12%) and receptor tyrosine kinase signaling (FGFR4; n = 2, 12%) were noted only in patients without clinical benefit. Conclusions Regardless of different cancer types, mTOR-pathway-activating mutations confer sensitivity to everolimus. Targeted sequencing of mTOR pathway genes facilitates identification of potential candidates for mTOR inhibitors. PMID:26859683

  2. PIK3CA somatic mutations in breast cancer: Mechanistic insights from Langevin dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Mankoo, Parminder K.; Sukumar, Saraswati; Karchin, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Somatic mutations in PIK3CA (phosphati-dylinositol-3 kinase, catalytic subunit, alpha isoform) are reported in breast and other human cancers to concentrate at hotspots within its kinase and helical domains. Most of these mutations cause kinase gain of function in vitro and are associated with oncogenicity in vivo. However, little is known about the mechanisms driving tumor development. We have performed computational structural studies on a homology model of wildtype PIK3CA plus recurrent H1047R, H1047L, and P539R mutations, located in the kinase and helical domains, respectively. The time evolution of the structures show that H1047R/L mutants exhibit a larger area of the catalytic cleft between the kinase N- and C-lobes compared with the wildtype that could facilitate the entrance of substrates. This larger area might yield enhanced substrate-to-product turnover associated with oncogenicity. In addition, the H1047R/L mutants display increased kinase activation loop mobility, compared with the wildtype. The P539R mutant forms more hydrogen bonds and salt-bridge interactions than the wildtype, properties that are associated with enhanced thermostability. Mutant-specific differences in the catalytic cleft and activation loop behavior suggest that structure-based mutant-specific inhibitors can be designed for PIK3CA-positive breast cancers. PMID:18951408

  3. Exome sequencing identifies somatic mutations of DDX3X in natural killer/T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lu; Gu, Zhao-Hui; Yan, Zi-Xun; Zhao, Xia; Xie, Yin-Yin; Zhang, Zi-Guan; Pan, Chun-Ming; Hu, Yuan; Cai, Chang-Ping; Dong, Ying; Huang, Jin-Yan; Wang, Li; Shen, Yang; Meng, Guoyu; Zhou, Jian-Feng; Hu, Jian-Da; Wang, Jin-Fen; Liu, Yuan-Hua; Yang, Lin-Hua; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Jian-Min; Wang, Zhao; Peng, Zhi-Gang; Chen, Fang-Yuan; Sun, Zi-Min; Ding, Hao; Shi, Ju-Mei; Hou, Jian; Yan, Jin-Song; Shi, Jing-Yi; Xu, Lan; Li, Yang; Lu, Jing; Zheng, Zhong; Xue, Wen; Zhao, Wei-Li; Chen, Zhu; Chen, Sai-Juan

    2015-09-01

    Natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL) is a malignant proliferation of CD56(+) and cytoCD3(+) lymphocytes with aggressive clinical course, which is prevalent in Asian and South American populations. The molecular pathogenesis of NKTCL has largely remained elusive. We identified somatic gene mutations in 25 people with NKTCL by whole-exome sequencing and confirmed them in an extended validation group of 80 people by targeted sequencing. Recurrent mutations were most frequently located in the RNA helicase gene DDX3X (21/105 subjects, 20.0%), tumor suppressors (TP53 and MGA), JAK-STAT-pathway molecules (STAT3 and STAT5B) and epigenetic modifiers (MLL2, ARID1A, EP300 and ASXL3). As compared to wild-type protein, DDX3X mutants exhibited decreased RNA-unwinding activity, loss of suppressive effects on cell-cycle progression in NK cells and transcriptional activation of NF-κB and MAPK pathways. Clinically, patients with DDX3X mutations presented a poor prognosis. Our work thus contributes to the understanding of the disease mechanism of NKTCL. PMID:26192917

  4. Development of methods for characterizing fetal and adult somatic mutations detected in human erythroid precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Langlois, R.G.; Manchester, D.K.

    1994-12-31

    The glycophorin A (GPA) assay was developed to quantify somatic mutations in humans by measuring the frequency of peripheral erythrocytes with mutant phenotypes that are presumed to be progeny of mutated erythroid precursor cells. This assay has been used to identify GPA variant cells in unexposed individuals at a frequency of {approximately}10 per million erythrocytes, and to demonstrate significant increases in variant frequency after mutagenic exposures. Characterization of the mutations responsible for these variant cells requires that the assay be modified to allow flow analysis and sorting of variant erythroid precursor cells that contain nucleic acids. Cord blood samples contain low levels of both reticulocytes and nucleated erythrocytes. We have developed enrichment methods using centrifugation that yield samples containing up to 30% nucleated erythrocytes, and immunomagnetic separation methods that yield samples containing up to 90% reticulocytes. Enrichment methods for these two cell types are also being developed for adult bone marrow samples. We have confirmed that enrichment and labeling with a nucleic acid-specific dye are compatible with GPA analysis of erythrocytes, reticulocytes, and nucleated erythrocytes. Enriched samples have been successfully used for flow cytometric detection of GPA variant reticulocytes in cord blood. PCR-based analysis methods are being developed for molecular characterization of sorted variant cells at the mRNA level.

  5. The human T-cell cloning assay: identifying genotypes susceptible to drug toxicity and somatic mutation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sai-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Humans exhibit marked genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolism that contribute to high incidence of adverse effects in susceptible individuals due to altered balance between metabolic activation and detoxification. The T-cell cloning assay, which detects mutations in the gene for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT), is the most well-developed reporter system for studying specific locus mutation in human somatic cells. The assay is based on a mitogen- and growth factor-dependent clonal expansion of peripheral T-lymphocytes in which the 6-thioguanine-resistant HPRT mutants can be selected, enumerated, and collected for molecular analysis of the mutational nature. The assay provides a unique tool for studying in vivo and in vitro mutagenesis, for investigating the functional impact of common polymorphism in metabolism and repair genes, and for identifying risk genotypes for drug-induced toxicity and mutagenicity. This chapter presents a simple and reliable method for the enumeration of HPRT mutant frequency induced in vitro without using any source of recombinant interleukin-2. The other main feature is that only truly induced and unique mutants are collected for further analysis. PMID:24623236

  6. Somatic Mutations in the Notch, NF-KB, PIK3CA, and Hedgehog Pathways in Human Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Xiang; Wood, Laura; Lindman, Monica; Jones, Sian; Buckhaults, Phillip; Polyak, Kornelia; Sukumar, Saraswati; Carter, Hannah; Kim, Dewey; Karchin, Rachel; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Exome sequencing of human breast cancers has revealed a substantial number of candidate cancer genes with recurring but infrequent somatic mutations. To determine more accurately their mutation prevalence, we performed a mutation analysis of 36 novel candidate cancer genes in 96 human breast cancers. Somatic mutations with potential impact on protein function were observed in the genes ADAM12, CENTB1, CENTG1, DIP2C, GLI1, GRIN2D, HDLBP, IKBKB, KPNA5, NFKB1, NOTCH1, and OTOF. These findings strengthen the evidence for involvement of the Notch, Hedgehog, NF-KB, and PIK3CA pathways in breast cancer development, and point to novel processes that likely are involved. PMID:22302350

  7. Somatic Mutations and Genetic Variants of NOTCH1 in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Occurrence and Development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Fan; Chiang, Shang-Lun; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Chung, Chia-Min; Ko, Albert Min-Shan; Lin, You-Zhe; Lee, Chien-Hung; Lee, Ka-Wo; Chen, Mu-Kuan; Hua, Chun-Hung; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chen, Yuan-Chien; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2016-01-01

    A number of genetic variants have been associated with cancer occurrence, however it may be the acquired somatic mutations (SMs) that drive cancer development. This study investigates the potential SMs and related genetic variants associated with the occurrence and development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We identified several SMs in NOTCH1 from whole-exome sequencing and validated them in a 13-year cohort of 128 HNSCC patients using a high-resolution melting analysis and resequencing. Patients who have NOTCH1 SMs show higher 5-year relapse-free recurrence (P = 0.0013) and lower survival proportion (P = 0.0447) when the risk-associated SMs were analysed by Cox proportional hazard models. Interestingly, the NOTCH1 gene rs139994842 that shares linkage with SMs is associated with HNSCC risk (OR = 3.46), increasing when SMs in NOTCH1 are involved (OR = 7.74), and furthermore when there are SMs in conjunction to betel quid chewing (OR = 32.11), which is a related independent environmental risk factor after adjusting for substances use (alcohol, betel quid, cigarettes) and age. The findings indicate that betel quid chewing is highly associated with NOTCH1 SMs (especially with changes in EGF-like domains), and that rs139994842 may potentially serve as an early predictive and prognostic biomarker for the occurrence and development of HNSCC. PMID:27035284

  8. Somatic Mutations and Genetic Variants of NOTCH1 in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Occurrence and Development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Fan; Chiang, Shang-Lun; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Chung, Chia-Min; Ko, Albert Min-Shan; Lin, You-Zhe; Lee, Chien-Hung; Lee, Ka-Wo; Chen, Mu-Kuan; Hua, Chun-Hung; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chen, Yuan-Chien; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2016-01-01

    A number of genetic variants have been associated with cancer occurrence, however it may be the acquired somatic mutations (SMs) that drive cancer development. This study investigates the potential SMs and related genetic variants associated with the occurrence and development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We identified several SMs in NOTCH1 from whole-exome sequencing and validated them in a 13-year cohort of 128 HNSCC patients using a high-resolution melting analysis and resequencing. Patients who have NOTCH1 SMs show higher 5-year relapse-free recurrence (P = 0.0013) and lower survival proportion (P = 0.0447) when the risk-associated SMs were analysed by Cox proportional hazard models. Interestingly, the NOTCH1 gene rs139994842 that shares linkage with SMs is associated with HNSCC risk (OR = 3.46), increasing when SMs in NOTCH1 are involved (OR = 7.74), and furthermore when there are SMs in conjunction to betel quid chewing (OR = 32.11), which is a related independent environmental risk factor after adjusting for substances use (alcohol, betel quid, cigarettes) and age. The findings indicate that betel quid chewing is highly associated with NOTCH1 SMs (especially with changes in EGF-like domains), and that rs139994842 may potentially serve as an early predictive and prognostic biomarker for the occurrence and development of HNSCC. PMID:27035284

  9. Mouse model for somatic mutation at the HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl-transferase) gene: Molecular and cellular analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhart-Schultz, K.; Strout, C.L.; Jones, I.M.

    1989-07-11

    Our goal is to use the mouse to model the organismal, cellular and molecular factors that affect somatic mutagenesis in vivo. A fundamental tenet of genetic toxicology is that the principles of mutagenesis identified in one system can be used to predict the principles of mutagenesis in another system. The validity of this tenet depends upon the comparability of the systems involved. To begin to achieve an understanding of somatic mutagenesis in vivo, we have been studying mutations that occur in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) gene of lymphocytes of mice. Our in vivo model for somatic mutation allows us to analyse factors that affect somatic mutation. Having chosen the mouse, we are working with cells in which the karyotype is normal, and metabolic and DNA repair capacity are defined by the mouse strain chosen. At the organismal level, we can vary sex, age, the exposure history, and the tissue source of cells analysed. (All studies reported here have, however, used male mice.) At the cellular level, T lymphocytes and their precursors are the targets and reporters of mutation. 26 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. BCL-6 mutations in normal germinal center B cells: Evidence of somatic hypermutation acting outside Ig loci

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualucci, Laura; Migliazza, Anna; Fracchiolla, Nicola; William, Christopher; Neri, Antonino; Baldini, Luca; Chaganti, R. S. K.; Klein, Ulf; Küppers, Ralf; Rajewsky, Klaus; Dalla-Favera, Riccardo

    1998-01-01

    The molecular mechanism involved in the process of antigen-driven somatic hypermutation of Ig genes is unknown, but it is commonly believed that this mechanism is restricted to the Ig loci. B cell lymphomas commonly display multiple somatic mutations clustering in the 5′-regulatory region of BCL-6, a proto-oncogene encoding for a POZ/Zinc finger transcriptional repressor expressed in germinal center (GC) B cells and required for GC formation. To determine whether BCL-6 mutations represent a tumor-associated phenomenon or reflect a physiologic mechanism, we screened single human tonsillar GC B cells for mutations occurring in the BCL-6 5′-noncoding region and in the Ig variable heavy chain sequences. Thirty percent of GC B cells, but not naive B cells, displayed mutations in the 742 bp region analyzed within the first intron of BCL-6 (overall frequency: 5 × 10−4/bp). Accordingly, an expanded survey in lymphoid malignancies showed that BCL-6 mutations are restricted to B cell tumors displaying GC or post-GC phenotype and carrying mutated Ig variable heavy chain sequences. These results indicate that the somatic hypermutation mechanism active in GC B cells physiologically targets non-Ig sequences. PMID:9751748

  11. Frequent somatic mutations of the transcription factor ATBF1 in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaodong; Frierson, Henry F; Chen, Ceshi; Li, Changling; Ran, Qimei; Otto, Kristen B; Cantarel, Brandi L; Cantarel, Brandi M; Vessella, Robert L; Gao, Allen C; Petros, John; Miura, Yutaka; Simons, Jonathan W; Dong, Jin-Tang

    2005-04-01

    Cancer often results from the accumulation of multiple genetic alterations. Although most malignancies are sporadic, only a small number of genes have been shown to undergo frequent mutations in sporadic cancers. The long arm of chromosome 16 is frequently deleted in human cancers, but the target gene for this deletion has not been identified. Here we report that ATBF1, which encodes a transcription factor that negatively regulates AFP and MYB but transactivates CDKN1A, is a good candidate for the 16q22 tumor-suppressor gene. We narrowed the region of deletion at 16q22 to 861 kb containing ATBF1. ATBF1 mRNA was abundant in normal prostates but more scarce in approximately half of prostate cancers tested. In 24 of 66 (36%) cancers examined, we identified 22 unique somatic mutations, many of which impair ATBF1 function. Furthermore, ATBF1 inhibited cell proliferation. Hence, loss of ATBF1 is one mechanism that defines the absence of growth control in prostate cancer. PMID:15750593

  12. Effects of tannic acid on spontaneous and induced somatic mutations in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Szakmary, A; Knasmüller, S

    1991-05-01

    The effects of tannic acid (TA) alone and in combination with direct acting chemical genotoxins and gamma-radiation were investigated in Somatic Mutation and Recombination Tests (SMARTs) using Drosophila melanogaster. Treatment with TA alone (2.5-15 mmol/l) resulted in a moderate but dose dependent induction of mosaic spots in males and females, indicating that the compound possesses mutagenic and recombinogenic activity. When TA (10 mmol/l) was given simultaneously with MMS, 4-NQO and cis-DDP, a potentiating effect on their mutagenicity was observed in males whereas in females no such increase was measured. The frequency of 4-NQO induced mosaic spots in males was raised more than threefold in presence of TA, for MMS and cis-DDP the enhancement was approximately 2-fold; with gamma-radiation no synergistic effect occurred. The different response in the two sexes indicates that TA preferentially induces gene mutations and deletions but has no enhancing effect on the number of mosaic spots which are formed as a consequence of recombinogenic events. PMID:1908938

  13. Genetic instability and atherosclerosis: can somatic mutations account for the development of cardiovascular diseases?

    PubMed

    Andreassi, M G; Botto, N; Colombo, M G; Biagini, A; Clerico, A

    2000-01-01

    Several observations suggest that cancer and atherosclerosis may entail fundamentally common biological mechanisms. The accumulation of lipids and the proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are the main histological features of sclerotic plaque formation. The most prominent theory concerning the pathophysiological mechanisms of atherosclerotic plaque formation is the "inflammatory response to injury" hypothesis, which states that SMC proliferation is an inflammation-fibroproliferative reaction to different insults to the artery wall. However, recent evidence suggests that alterations at the DNA level may contribute significantly to the development of the disease. In accordance with these findings, the "monoclonal" hypothesis of atherosclerosis has been suggested. This hypothesis proposes that atherosclerosis begins as a mutation or viral infection, transforming a single, isolated smooth muscle cell into the progenitor of a proliferative clone, as seen in carcinogenesis. Studies of DNA damage in atherosclerotic tissues are lacking. Biological evidence for the hypothesis that cancer and atherosclerosis may share pathological mechanisms is discussed, emphasizing the need to perform studies investigating the involvement of somatic mutations in heart diseases. PMID:10861945

  14. Somatic PIK3CA mutations as a driver of sporadic venous malformations.

    PubMed

    Castel, Pau; Carmona, F Javier; Grego-Bessa, Joaquim; Berger, Michael F; Viale, Agnès; Anderson, Kathryn V; Bague, Silvia; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Antonescu, Cristina R; Baselga, Eulàlia; Baselga, José

    2016-03-30

    Venous malformations (VM) are vascular malformations characterized by enlarged and distorted blood vessel channels. VM grow over time and cause substantial morbidity because of disfigurement, bleeding, and pain, representing a clinical challenge in the absence of effective treatments (Nguyenet al, 2014; Uebelhoeret al, 2012). Somatic mutations may act as drivers of these lesions, as suggested by the identification ofTEKmutations in a proportion of VM (Limayeet al, 2009). We report that activatingPIK3CAmutations gives rise to sporadic VM in mice, which closely resemble the histology of the human disease. Furthermore, we identified mutations inPIK3CAand related genes of the PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)/AKT pathway in about 30% of human VM that lackTEKalterations.PIK3CAmutations promote downstream signaling and proliferation in endothelial cells and impair normal vasculogenesis in embryonic development. We successfully treated VM in mouse models using pharmacological inhibitors of PI3Kα administered either systemically or topically. This study elucidates the etiology of a proportion of VM and proposes a therapeutic approach for this disease. PMID:27030594

  15. Multilineage somatic activating mutations in HRAS and NRAS cause mosaic cutaneous and skeletal lesions, elevated FGF23 and hypophosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Young H.; Ovejero, Diana; Sugarman, Jeffrey S.; DeKlotz, Cynthia M.C.; Maruri, Ann; Eichenfield, Lawrence F.; Kelley, Patrick K.; Jüppner, Harald; Gottschalk, Michael; Tifft, Cynthia J.; Gafni, Rachel I.; Boyce, Alison M.; Cowen, Edward W.; Bhattacharyya, Nisan; Guthrie, Lori C.; Gahl, William A.; Golas, Gretchen; Loring, Erin C.; Overton, John D.; Mane, Shrikant M.; Lifton, Richard P.; Levy, Moise L.; Collins, Michael T.; Choate, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    Pathologically elevated serum levels of fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), a bone-derived hormone that regulates phosphorus homeostasis, result in renal phosphate wasting and lead to rickets or osteomalacia. Rarely, elevated serum FGF23 levels are found in association with mosaic cutaneous disorders that affect large proportions of the skin and appear in patterns corresponding to the migration of ectodermal progenitors. The cause and source of elevated serum FGF23 is unknown. In those conditions, such as epidermal and large congenital melanocytic nevi, skin lesions are variably associated with other abnormalities in the eye, brain and vasculature. The wide distribution of involved tissues and the appearance of multiple segmental skin and bone lesions suggest that these conditions result from early embryonic somatic mutations. We report five such cases with elevated serum FGF23 and bone lesions, four with large epidermal nevi and one with a giant congenital melanocytic nevus. Exome sequencing of blood and affected skin tissue identified somatic activating mutations of HRAS or NRAS in each case without recurrent secondary mutation, and we further found that the same mutation is present in dysplastic bone. Our finding of somatic activating RAS mutation in bone, the endogenous source of FGF23, provides the first evidence that elevated serum FGF23 levels, hypophosphatemia and osteomalacia are associated with pathologic Ras activation and may provide insight in the heretofore limited understanding of the regulation of FGF23. PMID:24006476

  16. Whole-exome sequencing identifies a somatic missense mutation of NBN in clear cell sarcoma of the salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Jia, Zhen; Mao, Fengbiao; Shi, Yueyi; Bu, Rong Fa; Zhang, Baorong

    2016-06-01

    Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) is a rare, low-grade carcinoma commonly located in the distal extremities of young adults involving tendons and aponeuroses. CCS is characterized by its poor prognosis due to late diagnosis, multiple local recurrence, propensity to late metastases, and a high rate of tumor-related mortality. The genetic cause for CCS is thought to be EWSR1 gene translocation. However, CCS lacking a translocation may have other, as yet uncharacterized, genetic mutations that can cause the same pathological effect. A combination of whole‑exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing of cancer tissue and venous blood from a patient diagnosed with CCS of the salivary gland revealed a somatic missense mutation, c.1061C>T (p.P354L), in exon 9 of the Nibrin gene (NBN). This somatic missense mutation led to the conversion of proline to leucine (p.P354L), resulting in deleterious effects for the NBN protein. Multiple-sequence alignments showed that codon 354, where the mutation (c.1061C>T) occurs, is located within a phylogenetically conserved region. In conclusion, we here report a somatic missense mutation c.1061C>T (p.P354L) in the NBN gene in a patient with CCS lacking an EWSR1-ATF1 fusion. Our findings broaden the genotypic spectrum of CCS and provide new molecular insight that should prove useful in the future clinical genetic diagnosis of CCS. PMID:27109316

  17. Distinctive Spatiotemporal Stability of Somatic Mutations in Metastasized Microsatellite-stable Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jesinghaus, Moritz; Wolf, Thomas; Pfarr, Nicole; Muckenhuber, Alexander; Ahadova, Aysel; Warth, Arne; Goeppert, Benjamin; Sers, Christine; Kloor, Matthias; Endris, Volker; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Weichert, Wilko

    2015-08-01

    A multistep model of disease progression and genomic landscape has been firmly established for colorectal cancer (CRC) primaries, but the genetic makeup of related metastases and the dynamics of genetic changes during metastatic progression are scarcely known. To address these issues, we used multigene high-coverage next-generation sequencing of 24 microsatellite-stable CRC primaries, matched normal tissue, and related multiple metastases to nodes, liver, lung, and brain with a CRC-specific gene panel to infer the degree of clonal evolution during metastatic progression of the disease. Somatic mutations were detected in 40% of CRC-related genes, and we observed a striking 100% genetic concordance between primary and multiple secondary sites for APC, KRAS, FBXW7, PIK3CA, BRAF, SMAD4, and ACVR2A. Except for true de novo mutations in 4 cases (affecting SYNE1, CTNNB1, TP53, and PTEN), all remaining cases (84.4%) shared the genetic lesions of the primary tumors with all investigated metastases irrespective of the site of metastasis or time lapse between primary tumor resection and the occurrence of metastatic spread. Putative biomarkers and druggable targets were identified in 25% of the cases. Our data proves that genetic alterations occurring early in CRC carcinogenesis are remarkably stable during metastatic progression, indicating (i) a very low degree of genetic heterogeneity between primary and multiple secondary sites with respect to CRC driver mutations and (ii) that genetic interrogation of archived primary tumor samples appears to be sufficient for the application of cancer precision medicine in the metastatic setting. PMID:25786087

  18. Genotyping analysis of 3 RET polymorphisms demonstrates low somatic mutation rate in Chinese Hirschsprung disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Jiang, Qian; Li, Qi; Cheng, Wei; Qiao, Guoliang; Xiao, Ping; Gan, Liang; Su, Lin; Miao, Chunyue; Li, Long

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genetic mosaicism has been reported for both coding and non-coding sequences in the RET gene in Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) patients. This study aimed to investigate somatic mutation rate in Chinese population by comparing both homozygous genotype percentage and risk allele frequency of 3 RET single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among blood and colon samples. Methods: DNA was extracted from 59 HSCR blood samples, 59 control blood samples and 76 fresh frozen colon tissue samples (grouped into ganglionic, transitional and aganglionic level). Genotype status of rs2435357 and rs2506030 was examined by competitive allele specific hydrolysis probes (Taqman) PCR technology, and rs2506004 was examined by Sanger sequencing. Homozygous genotype percentage and risk allele frequency were calculated for each type of sample and compared by chi-square test. P<0.05 was regarded as being statistically significant. Results: Colon tissue DNA samples showed similar frequency of SNPs as that of the blood DNA samples in HSCR patients, both of which are significantly higher than the control blood group (rs2435357 TT genotype: 71.2%, 74.7% versus 22.0% in HSCR blood, HSCR colon and control blood DNA respectively, P=0.000; rs2506004 AA genotype: 72.4%, 83.1% versus 25.5%, P=0.000; rs2506030 GG genotype: 79.7%, 77.2% versus 54.2%, P=0.000 and 0.004). With respect to DNA extracted from ganglionic, transitional and aganglionic levels, no statistically significant difference was demonstrated in those 3 regions (rs2435357: P=0.897; rs2506004: P=0.740; rs2506030: P=0.901). Conclusion: Our data does not support the notion that high frequency of somatic changes as an underlying etiology of Chinese HSCR population. PMID:26191260

  19. Detection of low-prevalence somatic TSC2 mutations in sporadic pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis tissues by deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Atsushi; Ando, Katsutoshi; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Mitani, Keiko; Okudera, Koji; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyatake, Satoko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Seyama, Kuniaki; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) (MIM #606690) is a rare lung disorder leading to respiratory failure associated with progressive cystic destruction due to the proliferation and infiltration of abnormal smooth muscle-like cells (LAM cells). LAM can occur alone (sporadic LAM, S-LAM) or combined with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC-LAM). TSC is caused by a germline heterozygous mutation in either TSC1 or TSC2, and TSC-LAM is thought to occur as a result of a somatic mutation (second hit) in addition to a germline mutation in TSC1 or TSC2 (first hit). S-LAM is also thought to occur under the two-hit model involving a somatic mutation and/or loss of heterozygosity in TSC2. To identify TSC1 or TSC2 changes in S-LAM patients, the two genes were analyzed by deep next-generation sequencing (NGS) using genomic DNA from blood leukocytes (n = 9), LAM tissue from lung (n = 7), LAM cultured cells (n = 4), or LAM cell clusters (n = 1). We identified nine somatic mutations in six of nine S-LAM patients (67 %) with mutant allele frequencies of 1.7-46.2 %. Three of these six patients (50 %) showed two different TSC2 mutations with allele frequencies of 1.7-28.7 %. Furthermore, at least five mutations with low prevalence (<20 % of allele frequency) were confirmed by droplet digital PCR. As LAM tissues are likely to be composed of heterogeneous cell populations, mutant allele frequencies can be low. Our results confirm the consistent finding of TSC2 mutations in LAM samples, and highlight the benefit of laser capture microdissection and in-depth allele analyses for detection, such as NGS. PMID:26563443

  20. Identification of two poorly prognosed ovarian carcinoma subtypes associated with CHEK2 germ-line mutation and non-CHEK2 somatic mutation gene signatures.

    PubMed

    Ow, Ghim Siong; Ivshina, Anna V; Fuentes, Gloria; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A

    2014-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HG-SOC), a major histologic type of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), is a poorly-characterized, heterogeneous and lethal disease where somatic mutations of TP53 are common and inherited loss-of-function mutations in BRCA1/2 predispose to cancer in 9.5-13% of EOC patients. However, the overall burden of disease due to either inherited or sporadic mutations is not known. We performed bioinformatics analyses of mutational and clinical data of 334 HG-SOC tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas to identify novel tumor-driving mutations, survival-significant patient subgroups and tumor subtypes potentially driven by either hereditary or sporadic factors. We identified a sub-cluster of high-frequency mutations in 22 patients and 58 genes associated with DNA damage repair, apoptosis and cell cycle. Mutations of CHEK2, observed with the highest intensity, were associated with poor therapy response and overall survival (OS) of these patients (P = 8.00e-05), possibly due to detrimental effect of mutations at the nuclear localization signal. A 21-gene mutational prognostic signature significantly stratifies patients into relatively low or high-risk subgroups with 5-y OS of 37% or 6%, respectively (P = 7.31e-08). Further analysis of these genes and high-risk subgroup revealed 2 distinct classes of tumors characterized by either germline mutations of genes such as CHEK2, RPS6KA2 and MLL4, or somatic mutations of other genes in the signature. Our results could provide improvement in prediction and clinical management of HG-SOC, facilitate our understanding of this complex disease, guide the design of targeted therapeutics and improve screening efforts to identify women at high-risk of hereditary ovarian cancers distinct from those associated with BRCA1/2 mutations. PMID:24879340

  1. Somatic mutations and germline sequence variants in the expressed tyrosine kinase genes of patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Zhifu; Walgren, Richard; Zhao, Yu; Kasai, Yumi; Miner, Tracie; Ries, Rhonda E.; Lubman, Olga; Fremont, Daved H.; McLellan, Michael D.; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F.; Link, Daniel C.; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.; Watson, Mark; Baty, Jack; Heath, Sharon; Shannon, William D.; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    Activating mutations in tyrosine kinase (TK) genes (eg, FLT3 and KIT) are found in more than 30% of patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML); many groups have speculated that mutations in other TK genes may be present in the remaining 70%. We performed high-throughput resequencing of the kinase domains of 26 TK genes (11 receptor TK; 15 cytoplasmic TK) expressed in most AML patients using genomic DNA from the bone marrow (tumor) and matched skin biopsy samples (“germline”) from 94 patients with de novo AML; sequence variants were validated in an additional 94 AML tumor samples (14.3 million base pairs of sequence were obtained and analyzed). We identified known somatic mutations in FLT3, KIT, and JAK2 TK genes at the expected frequencies and found 4 novel somatic mutations, JAK1V623A, JAK1T478S, DDR1A803V, and NTRK1S677N, once each in 4 respective patients of 188 tested. We also identified novel germline sequence changes encoding amino acid substitutions (ie, nonsynonymous changes) in 14 TK genes, including TYK2, which had the largest number of nonsynonymous sequence variants (11 total detected). Additional studies will be required to define the roles that these somatic and germline TK gene variants play in AML pathogenesis. PMID:18270328

  2. Managing acquired resistance in EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Forde, Patrick M; Ettinger, David S

    2015-08-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) deliver high response rates with relatively modest toxicity in patients with advanced EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer. Despite this, nearly all tumors eventually develop resistance to first-line therapy. At present, the only standard treatment option for patients with acquired resistance is cytotoxic chemotherapy. In this article, we review the latest research into methods of targeting acquired resistance to EGFR TKI therapy, including third-generation EGFR TKIs that target the T790M resistance mutation and other novel agents in development. PMID:26351816

  3. Age-Related Accumulation of Somatic Mitochondrial DNA Mutations in Adult-Derived Human iPSCs.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eunju; Wang, Xinjian; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Ma, Hong; Folmes, Clifford D L; Gutierrez, Nuria Marti; Lee, Yeonmi; Van Dyken, Crystal; Ahmed, Riffat; Li, Ying; Koski, Amy; Hayama, Tomonari; Luo, Shiyu; Harding, Cary O; Amato, Paula; Jensen, Jeffrey; Battaglia, David; Lee, David; Wu, Diana; Terzic, Andre; Wolf, Don P; Huang, Taosheng; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2016-05-01

    The genetic integrity of iPSCs is an important consideration for therapeutic application. In this study, we examine the accumulation of somatic mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) mutations in skin fibroblasts, blood, and iPSCs derived from young and elderly subjects (24-72 years). We found that pooled skin and blood mtDNA contained low heteroplasmic point mutations, but a panel of ten individual iPSC lines from each tissue or clonally expanded fibroblasts carried an elevated load of heteroplasmic or homoplasmic mutations, suggesting that somatic mutations randomly arise within individual cells but are not detectable in whole tissues. The frequency of mtDNA defects in iPSCs increased with age, and many mutations were non-synonymous or resided in RNA coding genes and thus can lead to respiratory defects. Our results highlight a need to monitor mtDNA mutations in iPSCs, especially those generated from older patients, and to examine the metabolic status of iPSCs destined for clinical applications. PMID:27151456

  4. Somatic-cell mutation induced by short exposures to cigarette smoke in urate-null, oxidative stress-sensitive Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Tomoyo; Koike, Ryota; Yuma, Yoko; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae; Suzuki, Toshinori; Negishi, Tomoe

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that a urate-null strain of Drosophila is hypersensitive to cigarette smoke (CS), and we suggested that CS induces oxidative stress in Drosophila because uric acid is a potent antioxidant. Although the carcinogenic risk of CS exposure is widely recognized; documentation of in vivo genotoxic activity of environmental CS, especially gaseous-phase CS, remains inconclusive. To date, somatic-cell mutations in Drosophila resulting from exposure to CS have not been detected via the somatic mutation and recombination test (wing spot test) with wild-type flies, a widely used Drosophila assay for the detection of somatic-cell mutation; moreover, genotoxicity has not been documented via a DNA repair test that involves DNA repair-deficient Drosophila. In this study, we used a new Drosophila strain (y v ma-l; mwh) to examine the mutagenicity induced by gaseous-phase CS; these flies are urate-null due to a mutation in ma-l, and they are heterozygous for multiple wing hair (mwh), a mutation that functions as a marker for somatic-cell mutation. In an assay with this newly developed strain, a superoxide anion-producing weed-killer, paraquat, exhibited significant mutagenicity; in contrast, paraquat was hardly mutagenic with a wild-type strain. Drosophila larvae were exposed to CS for 2, 4 or 6h, and then kept at 25°C on instant medium until adulthood. After eclosion, mutant spots, which consisted of mutant hairs on wings, were scored. The number of mutant spots increased significantly in an exposure time-dependent manner in the urate-null females (ma-l (-/-)), but not in the urate-positive females (ma-l (+/-)). In this study, we showed that short-term exposure to CS was mutagenic in this in vivo system. In addition, we obtained suggestive data regarding reactive oxygen species production in larva after CS exposure using the fluorescence probe H2DCFDA. These results suggest that oxidative damage, which might be countered by uric acid, was partly responsible

  5. Enhanced somatic mutation rates induced in stem cells of mice by low chronic exposure to ethylnitrosourea.

    PubMed Central

    Shaver-Walker, P M; Urlando, C; Tao, K S; Zhang, X B; Heddle, J A

    1995-01-01

    We have found that the somatic mutation rate at the Dlb-1 locus increases exponentially during low daily exposure to ethylnitrosourea over 4 months. This effect, enhanced mutagenesis, was not observed at a lacI transgene in the same tissue, although the two loci respond very similarly to acute doses. Since both mutations are neutral, the mutant frequency was expected to increase linearly with time in response to a constant mutagenic exposure, as it did for lacI. Enhanced mutagenesis does not result from an overall sensitization of the animals, since mice that had first been treated with a low daily dose for 90 days and then challenged with a large acute dose were not sensitized to the acute dose. Nor was the increased mutant frequency due to selection, since animals that were treated for 90 days and then left untreated for up to 60 days showed little change from the 90-day frequency. The effect is substantial: about 8 times as many Dlb-1 mutants were induced between 90 and 120 days as in the first 30 days. This resulted in a reverse dose rate effect such that 90 mg/kg induced more mutants when delivered at 1 mg/kg per day than at 3 mg/kg per day. We postulate that enhanced mutagenesis arises from increased stem cell proliferation and the preferential repair of transcribed genes. Enhanced mutagenesis may be important for risk evaluation, as the results show that chronic exposures can be more mutagenic than acute ones and raise the possibility of synergism between chemicals at low doses. PMID:8524785

  6. Screening for somatic mutations of the neurofibromatosis genes in nervous system and other solid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rangaratnam, S.; Narod, S.; Ruttledge, M.

    1994-09-01

    Von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis (NF1) and neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) are autosomal dominant inherited disorders which predispose carriers to various benign and malignant tumors. Both genes are thought to act as tumor suppressors with inactivation of both alleles resulting in abnormal cell growth. By inference from other hereditary cancer syndromes, it has been hypothesized that somatic mutation at the NF1 and NF2 loci is involved in the development of sporadic tumors of the types found with increased prevalence in these disorders. In addition to other malignancies, individuals with NF1 are at increased risk to develop astrocytomas and rhabdomyosarcomas. We have therefore screened 40 astrocytomas for LOH using three NF1-derived cDNA probes, and have found no abnormalities. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of exons of the NF1 GAP-related domain has also failed to show any variants in a total of 70 astrocytomas and 14 rhabdomyosarcomas (7 each of embryonal and alveolar types). LOH of chromosome 22 markers is known to occur in meningioma, malignant melanoma, breast cancer, and ependymoma. SSCP of all 17 exons of the NF2 gene in 27 melanoma cell lines, 42 breast cancers, and 27 pendymomas revealed no alterations. In a screen of 151 menigiomas, 26 new variants have been found, bringing our total to 50 variants in this sample. These represent inactivating mutations (frameshift, splice-site, and nonsense), determined by direct sequencing. Since the majority of these changes occur in tumors previously shown to have LOH at chromosome 22 markers flanking NF2, our results support a tumor sequence role for this gene in meningiomas. In addition, given that 40% of our tumors do not show LOH over this region, we propose that other genes are involved in the development of this latter subset of meningiomas.

  7. H7N9 influenza virus neutralizing antibodies that possess few somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Thornburg, Natalie J.; Zhang, Heng; Bangaru, Sandhya; Kose, Nurgun; Lampley, Rebecca M.; Bombardi, Robin G.; Yu, Yingchun; Graham, Stephen; Branchizio, Andre; Yoder, Sandra M.; Rock, Michael T.; Creech, C. Buddy; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Lee, David; Li, Sheng; Wilson, Ian A.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Albrecht, Randy A.; Crowe, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Avian H7N9 influenza viruses are group 2 influenza A viruses that have been identified as the etiologic agent for a current major outbreak that began in China in 2013 and may pose a pandemic threat. Here, we examined the human H7-reactive antibody response in 75 recipients of a monovalent inactivated A/Shanghai/02/2013 H7N9 vaccine. After 2 doses of vaccine, the majority of donors had memory B cells that secreted IgGs specific for H7 HA, with dominant responses against single HA subtypes, although frequencies of H7-reactive B cells ranged widely between donors. We isolated 12 naturally occurring mAbs with low half-maximal effective concentrations for binding, 5 of which possessed neutralizing and HA-inhibiting activities. The 5 neutralizing mAbs exhibited narrow breadth of reactivity with influenza H7 strains. Epitope-mapping studies using neutralization escape mutant analysis, deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, and x-ray crystallography revealed that these neutralizing mAbs bind near the receptor-binding pocket on HA. All 5 neutralizing mAbs possessed low numbers of somatic mutations, suggesting the clones arose from naive B cells. The most potent mAb, H7.167, was tested as a prophylactic treatment in a mouse intranasal virus challenge study, and systemic administration of the mAb markedly reduced viral lung titers. PMID:26950424

  8. H7N9 influenza virus neutralizing antibodies that possess few somatic mutations.

    PubMed

    Thornburg, Natalie J; Zhang, Heng; Bangaru, Sandhya; Sapparapu, Gopal; Kose, Nurgun; Lampley, Rebecca M; Bombardi, Robin G; Yu, Yingchun; Graham, Stephen; Branchizio, Andre; Yoder, Sandra M; Rock, Michael T; Creech, C Buddy; Edwards, Kathryn M; Lee, David; Li, Sheng; Wilson, Ian A; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Albrecht, Randy A; Crowe, James E

    2016-04-01

    Avian H7N9 influenza viruses are group 2 influenza A viruses that have been identified as the etiologic agent for a current major outbreak that began in China in 2013 and may pose a pandemic threat. Here, we examined the human H7-reactive antibody response in 75 recipients of a monovalent inactivated A/Shanghai/02/2013 H7N9 vaccine. After 2 doses of vaccine, the majority of donors had memory B cells that secreted IgGs specific for H7 HA, with dominant responses against single HA subtypes, although frequencies of H7-reactive B cells ranged widely between donors. We isolated 12 naturally occurring mAbs with low half-maximal effective concentrations for binding, 5 of which possessed neutralizing and HA-inhibiting activities. The 5 neutralizing mAbs exhibited narrow breadth of reactivity with influenza H7 strains. Epitope-mapping studies using neutralization escape mutant analysis, deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, and x-ray crystallography revealed that these neutralizing mAbs bind near the receptor-binding pocket on HA. All 5 neutralizing mAbs possessed low numbers of somatic mutations, suggesting the clones arose from naive B cells. The most potent mAb, H7.167, was tested as a prophylactic treatment in a mouse intranasal virus challenge study, and systemic administration of the mAb markedly reduced viral lung titers. PMID:26950424

  9. Developmental genes significantly afflicted by aberrant promoter methylation and somatic mutation predict overall survival of late-stage colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    An, Ning; Yang, Xue; Cheng, Shujun; Wang, Guiqi; Zhang, Kaitai

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is an exceedingly complicated process, which involves multi-level dysregulations, including genomics (majorly caused by somatic mutation and copy number variation), DNA methylomics, and transcriptomics. Therefore, only looking into one molecular level of cancer is not sufficient to uncover the intricate underlying mechanisms. With the abundant resources of public available data in the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database, an integrative strategy was conducted to systematically analyze the aberrant patterns of colorectal cancer on the basis of DNA copy number, promoter methylation, somatic mutation and gene expression. In this study, paired samples in each genomic level were retrieved to identify differentially expressed genes with corresponding genetic or epigenetic dysregulations. Notably, the result of gene ontology enrichment analysis indicated that the differentially expressed genes with corresponding aberrant promoter methylation or somatic mutation were both functionally concentrated upon developmental process, suggesting the intimate association between development and carcinogenesis. Thus, by means of random walk with restart, 37 significant development-related genes were retrieved from a priori-knowledge based biological network. In five independent microarray datasets, Kaplan–Meier survival and Cox regression analyses both confirmed that the expression of these genes was significantly associated with overall survival of Stage III/IV colorectal cancer patients. PMID:26691761

  10. ExScalibur: A High-Performance Cloud-Enabled Suite for Whole Exome Germline and Somatic Mutation Identification.

    PubMed

    Bao, Riyue; Hernandez, Kyle; Huang, Lei; Kang, Wenjun; Bartom, Elizabeth; Onel, Kenan; Volchenboum, Samuel; Andrade, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing has facilitated the discovery of causal genetic variants associated with human diseases at deep coverage and low cost. In particular, the detection of somatic mutations from tumor/normal pairs has provided insights into the cancer genome. Although there is an abundance of publicly-available software for the detection of germline and somatic variants, concordance is generally limited among variant callers and alignment algorithms. Successful integration of variants detected by multiple methods requires in-depth knowledge of the software, access to high-performance computing resources, and advanced programming techniques. We present ExScalibur, a set of fully automated, highly scalable and modulated pipelines for whole exome data analysis. The suite integrates multiple alignment and variant calling algorithms for the accurate detection of germline and somatic mutations with close to 99% sensitivity and specificity. ExScalibur implements streamlined execution of analytical modules, real-time monitoring of pipeline progress, robust handling of errors and intuitive documentation that allows for increased reproducibility and sharing of results and workflows. It runs on local computers, high-performance computing clusters and cloud environments. In addition, we provide a data analysis report utility to facilitate visualization of the results that offers interactive exploration of quality control files, read alignment and variant calls, assisting downstream customization of potential disease-causing mutations. ExScalibur is open-source and is also available as a public image on Amazon cloud. PMID:26271043

  11. ExScalibur: A High-Performance Cloud-Enabled Suite for Whole Exome Germline and Somatic Mutation Identification

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Kang, Wenjun; Bartom, Elizabeth; Onel, Kenan; Volchenboum, Samuel; Andrade, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing has facilitated the discovery of causal genetic variants associated with human diseases at deep coverage and low cost. In particular, the detection of somatic mutations from tumor/normal pairs has provided insights into the cancer genome. Although there is an abundance of publicly-available software for the detection of germline and somatic variants, concordance is generally limited among variant callers and alignment algorithms. Successful integration of variants detected by multiple methods requires in-depth knowledge of the software, access to high-performance computing resources, and advanced programming techniques. We present ExScalibur, a set of fully automated, highly scalable and modulated pipelines for whole exome data analysis. The suite integrates multiple alignment and variant calling algorithms for the accurate detection of germline and somatic mutations with close to 99% sensitivity and specificity. ExScalibur implements streamlined execution of analytical modules, real-time monitoring of pipeline progress, robust handling of errors and intuitive documentation that allows for increased reproducibility and sharing of results and workflows. It runs on local computers, high-performance computing clusters and cloud environments. In addition, we provide a data analysis report utility to facilitate visualization of the results that offers interactive exploration of quality control files, read alignment and variant calls, assisting downstream customization of potential disease-causing mutations. ExScalibur is open-source and is also available as a public image on Amazon cloud. PMID:26271043

  12. Homozygous calreticulin mutations in patients with myelofibrosis lead to acquired myeloperoxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Theocharides, Alexandre P A; Lundberg, Pontus; Lakkaraju, Asvin K K; Lysenko, Veronika; Myburgh, Renier; Aguzzi, Adriano; Skoda, Radek C; Manz, Markus G

    2016-06-23

    The pathogenesis of acquired myeloperoxidase (MPO) deficiency, a rare phenomenon observed in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), is unknown. MPO is a glycoprotein (GP) chaperoned by calreticulin (CALR) in the endoplasmic reticulum. Mutations in CALR are frequently found in patients with myelofibrosis (MF) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) with nonmutated Janus kinase 2 (JAK2). We hypothesized that acquired MPO deficiency in MPN could be associated with the presence of CALR mutations. A cohort of 317 patients with MPN (142 polycythemia vera [PV], 94 ET, and 81 MF) was screened for MPO deficiency. MPO deficiency was observed in 6/81 MF patients (7.4%), but not in PV or ET patients. Susceptibility to infections had been documented in 2/6 (33%) MPO-deficient patients. Five out of 6 patients with MPO deficiency carried a homozygous CALR mutation and were also deficient in eosinophilic peroxidase (EPX). In contrast, 1 patient with MF, a JAK2-V617F mutation, and MPO deficiency, carried 2 previously reported MPO mutations and showed normal EPX activity. Patients with homozygous CALR mutations had reduced MPO protein, but normal MPO messenger RNA (mRNA) levels supporting a posttranscriptional defect in MPO production. Finally, we demonstrate in vitro that in the absence of CALR, immature MPO protein precursors are degraded in the proteasome. Therefore, 4 decades after the first description of acquired MPO deficiency in MPN, we provide the molecular correlate associated with this phenomenon and evidence that CALR mutations can affect the biosynthesis of GPs. PMID:27013444

  13. Induction of mutations by tritiated water and 3H-thymidine in Drosophila melanogaster assayed by the somatic zeste-white eye mutation system.

    PubMed

    Rasmuson, A; Xamena, N; Creus, A; Marcos, R

    1988-01-01

    In order to study the mutagenic effect of exposure to tritium, Drosophila melanogaster larvae were treated with tritiated water (3H2O) or tritiated thymidine (3H-TdR) during development. Dose rates ranged from 0.0058 to 0.058 rad/h per nucleus for 3H-TdR and from 0.049 to 0.122 rad/h for 3H2O. Induction of mutations was measured by the appearance of somatic mutations in the eyes of an unstable strain of Drosophila melanogaster. Both substances caused a significant increase in mutation frequency. With the assumption that each mutation observed in this assay is caused by one DNA break, the effectiveness of tritium to create DNA breaks is estimated to be 0.20 breaks per decay for 3H-TdR and 0.27 breaks per decay for 3H2O. PMID:3128734

  14. Somatic and occult germ-line mutations in SDHD, a mitochondrial complex II gene, in nonfamilial pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Gimm, O; Armanios, M; Dziema, H; Neumann, H P; Eng, C

    2000-12-15

    Most pheochromocytomas are sporadic but about 10% are though to be hereditary. Although the etiology of most inherited pheochromocytoma is well known, little is known about the etiology of the more common sporadic tumor. Recently, germ-line mutations of SDHD, a mitochondria complex II gene, were found in patients with hereditary paraganglioma. We sought to determine whether SDHD plays a role in the development of sporadic pheochromocytomas and performed a mutation and deletion analysis of SDHD. Among 18 samples, we identified 4 heterozygous sequence variants (3 germ-line, 1 somatic). One germ-line SDHD mutation IVS1+2T>G (absent among 78 control alleles) is predicted to cause aberrant splicing. On reinvestigation, this patient was found to have a tumor of the carotid body, which was likely a paraganglioma. Another patient with malignant, extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma was found to have germ-line c.34G> A (G12S). However, this sequence variant was also found in 1 of 78 control alleles. The third, germ-line nonsense mutation R38X was found in a patient with extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma. The only somatic heterozygous mutation, c.242C>T (P81L), has been found in the germ line of two families with hereditary paraganglioma and is conserved among four eukaryotic multicellular organisms. Hence, this mutation is most likely of functional significance too. Overall, loss of heterozygosity in at least one of the two markers flanking SDHD was found in 13 tumors (72%). All of the tumors that already harbored intragenic SDHD mutations, whether germ-line or somatic, also had loss of heterozygosity. Our results indicate that SDHD plays a role in the pathogenesis of pheochromocytoma. Given the minimum estimated germline SDHD mutation frequency of 11% (maximum estimate up to 17%) in this set of apparently sporadic pheochromocytoma cases and if these data can be replicated in other populations, our observations might suggest that all such patients be considered for SDHD mutation

  15. A Dual Model for Prioritizing Cancer Mutations in the Non-coding Genome Based on Germline and Somatic Events

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Poursat, Marie-Anne; Drubay, Damien; Motz, Arnaud; Saci, Zohra; Morillon, Antonin; Michiels, Stefan; Gautheret, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We address here the issue of prioritizing non-coding mutations in the tumoral genome. To this aim, we created two independent computational models. The first (germline) model estimates purifying selection based on population SNP data. The second (somatic) model estimates tumor mutation density based on whole genome tumor sequencing. We show that each model reflects a different set of constraints acting either on the normal or tumor genome, and we identify the specific genome features that most contribute to these constraints. Importantly, we show that the somatic mutation model carries independent functional information that can be used to narrow down the non-coding regions that may be relevant to cancer progression. On this basis, we identify positions in non-coding RNAs and the non-coding parts of mRNAs that are both under purifying selection in the germline and protected from mutation in tumors, thus introducing a new strategy for future detection of cancer driver elements in the expressed non-coding genome. PMID:26588488

  16. Somatic Mutation Screening Using Archival Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissues by Fluidigm Multiplex PCR and Illumina Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Escudero-Ibarz, Leire; Moody, Sarah; Zeng, Naiyan; Clipson, Alexandra; Huang, Yuanxue; Xue, Xuemin; Grigoropoulos, Nicholas F; Barrans, Sharon; Worrillow, Lisa; Forshew, Tim; Su, Jing; Firth, Andrew; Martin, Howard; Jack, Andrew; Brugger, Kim; Du, Ming-Qing

    2015-09-01

    High-throughput somatic mutation screening using FFPE tissues is a major challenge because of a lack of established methods and validated variant calling algorithms. We aimed to develop a targeted sequencing protocol by Fluidigm multiplex PCR and Illumina sequencing and to establish a companion variant calling algorithm. The experimental protocol and variant calling algorithm were first developed and optimized against a series of somatic mutations (147 substitutions, 12 indels ranging from 1 to 33 bp) in seven genes, previously detected by Sanger sequencing of DNA from 163 FFPE lymphoma biopsy specimens. The optimized experimental protocol and variant calling algorithm were further ascertained in two separate experiments by including the seven genes as a part of larger gene panels (22 or 13 genes) using FFPE and high-molecular-weight lymphoma DNAs, respectively. We found that most false-positive variants were due to DNA degradation, deamination, and Taq polymerase errors, but they were nonreproducible and could be efficiently eliminated by duplicate experiments. A small fraction of false-positive variants appeared in duplicate, but they were at low alternative allele frequencies and could be separated from mutations when appropriate threshold value was used. In conclusion, we established a robust practical approach for high-throughput mutation screening using archival FFPE tissues. PMID:26165823

  17. Somatic hypermutation in immunity and cancer: Critical analysis of strand-biased and codon-context mutation signatures.

    PubMed

    Steele, Edward J

    2016-09-01

    For 30 years two general mechanisms have competed to explain somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. The first, the DNA-based model, is focused only on DNA substrates. The modern form is the Neuberger "DNA Deamination Model" based on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and short-patch error-prone DNA repair by DNA Polymerase-η operating around AID C-to-U lesions. The other is an RNA-based mechanism or the "Reverse Transcriptase Model" of SHM which produces strand-biased mutations at A:T and G:C base pairs. This involves error-prone cDNA synthesis via an RNA-dependent DNA polymerase copying the Ig pre-mRNA template and integrating the now error-filled cDNA copy back into the normal chromosomal site. The modern form of this mechanism depends on AID dC-to-dU lesions and long tract error-prone cDNA synthesis of the transcribed strand by DNA Polymerase-η acting as a reverse transcriptase. The evidence for and against each mechanism is critically evaluated. The conclusion is that all the SHM molecular data gathered since 1980 supports directly or indirectly the RNA/RT-based mechanism. All the data and critical analyses are systematically laid out so the reader can evaluate this conclusion for themselves. Recently we have investigated whether similar RNA/RT-based mutator mechanisms explain how de novo mutations arise in somatic tissues (cancer genomes). The data analyses indeed suggest that cancers arise via dysregulated "Ig-like SHM responses" involving rogue DNA and RNA deaminations coupled to genome-wide RT events. Further, Robyn Lindley has recently shown that the strand-biased mutations in cancer genome genes are also in "codon-context." This has been termed Targeted Somatic Mutation (TSM) to highlight that mutations are far more targeted than previously thought in somatic tissues associated with disease. The TSM process implies an "in-frame DNA reader" whereby DNA and RNA deaminases at transcribed regions are guided in their mutagenic action

  18. Somatic cell mutations caused by 365 nm LED-UVA due to DNA double-strand breaks through oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xing; Ide, Naohiro; Higashi, Sho-Ichi; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Toyooka, Tatsushi; Ibuki, Yuko; Kawai, Kazuaki; Kasai, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae; Negishi, Tomoe

    2014-09-01

    Evidence is accumulating indicating that UVA (320-400 nm ultraviolet light) plays an important role in photo-carcinogenesis. UVA is thought to produce reactive oxygen species in irradiated cells through photo-activation of inherent photosensitizers, and was recently reported to cause DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in exposed cells. We have investigated the involvement of UVA in mutations and DNA damage in somatic cells using Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Using the Okazaki Large Spectrograph, we previously observed that longer wavelength UVA (>330 nm) was more mutagenic in post-replication repair-deficient D. melanogaster (mei-41) than in the nucleotide excision repair-deficient strain (mei-9). LED-light has recently been developed as a high-dose-rate UVA source. LED-UVA light (365 nm) was also more mutagenic in mei-41 than in mei-9. The mei-41 gene was shown to be an orthologue of the human ATR gene, which is involved in the repair of DSBs through phosphorylation of histone H2AX. In order to estimate the extent to which oxidative damage contributes to mutation, we established a new D. melanogaster strain (urate-null mutant) that is sensitive to oxidative damage and has a marker to detect somatic cell mutations. When somatic cell mutations were examined using this strain, LED-UVA was mutagenic in the urate-null strain at doses that were non-mutagenic in the urate-positive strain. In an effort to investigate the generation of DSBs, we examined the presence of phosphorylated histone H2AvD (H2AX D. melanogaster homologue). At high doses of LED-UVA (>800 kJ m(-2)), levels of phosphorylated H2AvD (γ-H2AvD) increased significantly in the urate-null strain. Moreover, the level of γ-H2AvD increased in the excision repair-deficient strain but not in the ATR-deficient strain following UVA-irradiation. These results supported the notion that the generation of γ-H2AvD was mediated by the function of the mei-41 gene. It was reported that ATR functions on DSB repair in D

  19. Somatic mutations of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor gene in feline hyperthyroidism: parallels with human hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Watson, S G; Radford, A D; Kipar, A; Ibarrola, P; Blackwood, L

    2005-09-01

    Hyperthyroidism is the most common endocrinopathy in cats, and is both clinically and histopathologically very similar to human toxic nodular goitre (TNG). Molecular studies on human TNG have revealed the presence of mis-sense mutations in the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) gene, most frequently in exon 10. Our hypothesis was that similar mutations exist in hyperthyroid cats. Genomic DNA was extracted from 134 hyperplastic/adenomatous nodules (from 50 hyperthyroid cats), and analysed for the presence of mutations in exon 10 of the TSHR gene. 11 different mutations were detected, one silent and 10 mis-sense, of which nine were somatic mutations. 28 of the 50 cats (67/134 nodules) had at least one mis-sense mutation. The mis-sense mutations were Met-452-->Thr in 17 cats (35 nodules), Ser-504-->Arg (two different mutational forms) in two cats (two nodules), Val-508-->Arg in one cat (three nodules), Arg-530-->Gln in one cat (two nodules), Val-557-->Leu in 13 cats (36 nodules), Thr-631-->Ala or Thr-631-->Phe (each mutation seen in one nodule of one cat), Asp-632-->Tyr in six cats (10 nodules) and Asp-632-->His in one cat (one nodule). Five of these mutations have been associated previously with human hyperthyroidism. Of the 41 cats for which more than one nodule was available, 14 had nodules with different mutations. The identification of a potential genetic basis for feline hyperthyroidism is novel, increases our understanding of the pathogenesis of this significant feline disease, and confirms its similarity to TNG. PMID:16135672

  20. Whole-exome sequencing of polycythemia vera revealed novel driver genes and somatic mutation shared by T-cells and granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Linghua; Swierczek, Sabina I.; Drummond, Jennifer; Hickman, Kimberly; Walker, Kimberly; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Wheeler, David A.; Prchal, Josef T.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the underlying molecular basis of polycythemia vera (PV), we performed whole-exome sequencing and DNA copy-number analysis of 31 JAK2V617F-positive patients and further investigated the evolution of somatic mutations using longitudinal samples. In addition to JAK2V617F and 9pUPD, we identified frequent recurrent somatic mutation in ASXL1, TET2, DNMT3A, SF3B1 and NF1. Forty two percent of patients had a somatic mutation in at least one epigenetic modifier gene. In 4 of 31 patients, variant allele abundance suggested mutation of JAK2V617F was preceded by other somatic mutations including ASXL1, DNMT3A and SF3B1. Strikingly, in 7 patients, apparent germline variants were detected at COSMIC codons in one or more PV-related genes in which we had also discovered somatic mutations across the cohort, suggesting that some pre-JAK2V617F mutations contribute to substantial T-lymphocyte progeny. This study contributes to novel understanding of the complexity of PV pathogenesis. PMID:24413320

  1. The potential utility of re-mining results of somatic mutation testing: KRAS status in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Biernacka, Anna; Tsongalis, Peter D; Peterson, Jason D; de Abreu, Francine B; Black, Candice C; Gutmann, Edward J; Liu, Xiaoying; Tafe, Laura J; Amos, Christopher I; Tsongalis, Gregory J

    2016-05-01

    KRAS mutant non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) vary in clinical outcome depending on which specific KRAS mutation is present. Shorter progression free survival has been associated with KRAS variants G12C and G12V. Cell lines with these variants depend to a greater extent on the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK signaling pathway and become more susceptible to MEK inhibition. Because different KRAS mutations may lead to altered drug sensitivity, we aimed to determine specific KRAS mutation status in a NSCLC patient cohort at our institution. A total of 502 NSCLC samples were screened for somatic mutations using the 50 gene AmpliSeq™ Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 (CHPv2). However only samples positive for variants in the KRAS gene were included in this study. Variants identified in the KRAS genes were curated using publicly available databases. The overall mutation rate in the KRAS gene was 32.7% (164/502). The most common KRAS mutations were G12C (41%), G12V (19%), and G12D (14%) along with less frequent variants. After re-mining our sequencing data, we found that more than a half of our KRAS mutant NSCLC patients could potentially benefit from the addition of a MEK inhibitor such as selumetinib to standard chemotherapeutic agents. Due to mutated KRAS, these patients will likely fail traditional anti-EGFR therapies but be eligible for newer combination therapies. PMID:27068338

  2. Ultra-deep sequencing detects ovarian cancer cells in peritoneal fluid and reveals somatic TP53 mutations in noncancerous tissues.

    PubMed

    Krimmel, Jeffrey D; Schmitt, Michael W; Harrell, Maria I; Agnew, Kathy J; Kennedy, Scott R; Emond, Mary J; Loeb, Lawrence A; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Risques, Rosa Ana

    2016-05-24

    Current sequencing methods are error-prone, which precludes the identification of low frequency mutations for early cancer detection. Duplex sequencing is a sequencing technology that decreases errors by scoring mutations present only in both strands of DNA. Our aim was to determine whether duplex sequencing could detect extremely rare cancer cells present in peritoneal fluid from women with high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOCs). These aggressive cancers are typically diagnosed at a late stage and are characterized by TP53 mutations and peritoneal dissemination. We used duplex sequencing to analyze TP53 mutations in 17 peritoneal fluid samples from women with HGSOC and 20 from women without cancer. The tumor TP53 mutation was detected in 94% (16/17) of peritoneal fluid samples from women with HGSOC (frequency as low as 1 mutant per 24,736 normal genomes). Additionally, we detected extremely low frequency TP53 mutations (median mutant fraction 1/13,139) in peritoneal fluid from nearly all patients with and without cancer (35/37). These mutations were mostly deleterious, clustered in hotspots, increased with age, and were more abundant in women with cancer than in controls. The total burden of TP53 mutations in peritoneal fluid distinguished cancers from controls with 82% sensitivity (14/17) and 90% specificity (18/20). Age-associated, low frequency TP53 mutations were also found in 100% of peripheral blood samples from 15 women with and without ovarian cancer (none with hematologic disorder). Our results demonstrate the ability of duplex sequencing to detect rare cancer cells and provide evidence of widespread, low frequency, age-associated somatic TP53 mutation in noncancerous tissue. PMID:27152024

  3. RASA1 somatic mutation and variable expressivity in capillary malformation/arteriovenous malformation (CM/AVM) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Macmurdo, Colleen F; Wooderchak-Donahue, Whitney; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Le, Jenny; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Milla, Carlos; Teng, Joyce M C; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Stevenson, David A

    2016-06-01

    Germline mutations in RASA1 are associated with capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM) syndrome. CM-AVM syndrome is characterized by multi-focal capillary malformations and arteriovenous malformations. Lymphatic anomalies have been proposed as part of the phenotype. Intrafamilial variability has been reported, suggesting modifiers and somatic events. The objective of the study was to identify somatic RASA1 "second hits" from vascular malformations associated with CM-AVM syndrome, and describe phenotypic variability. Participants were examined and phenotyped. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood on all participants. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on the proband. Using Sanger sequencing, RASA1 exon 8 was PCR-amplified to track the c.1248T>G, p.Tyr416X germline variant through the family. A skin biopsy of a capillary malformation from the proband's mother was also obtained, and next-generation sequencing was performed on DNA from the affected tissue. A familial germline heterozygous novel pathogenic RASA1 variant, c.1248T>G (p.Tyr416X), was identified in the proband and her mother. The proband had capillary malformations, chylothorax, lymphedema, and overgrowth, while her affected mother had only isolated capillary malformations. Sequence analysis of DNA extracted from a skin biopsy of a capillary malformation of the affected mother showed a second RASA1 somatic mutation (c.2245C>T, p.Arg749X). These results and the extreme variable expressivity support the hypothesis that somatic "second hits" are required for the development of vascular anomalies associated with CM-AVM syndrome. In addition, the phenotypes of the affected individuals further clarify that lymphatic manifestations are also part of the phenotypic spectrum of RASA1-related disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26969842

  4. The somatic GNAQ mutation c.548G>A (p.R183Q) is consistently found in Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyajima, Masakazu; Sugano, Hidenori; Iimura, Yasushi; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Miyake, Noriko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Arai, Hajime; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2014-12-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a neurocutaneous disorder characterized by capillary malformation (port-wine stains), and choroidal and leptomeningeal vascular malformations. Previously, the recurrent somatic mutation c.548G>A (p.R183Q) in the G-α q gene (GNAQ) was identified as causative in SWS and non-syndromic port-wine stain patients using whole-genome sequencing. In this study, we investigated somatic mutations in GNAQ by next-generation sequencing. We first performed targeted amplicon sequencing of 15 blood-brain-paired samples in sporadic SWS and identified the recurrent somatic c.548G>A mutation in 80% of patients (12 of 15). The percentage of mutant alleles in brain tissues of these 12 patients ranged from 3.6 to 8.9%. We found no other somatic mutations in any of the seven GNAQ exons in the remaining three patients without c.548G>A. These findings suggest that the recurrent somatic GNAQ mutation c.548G>A is the major determinant genetic factor for SWS and imply that other mutated candidate gene(s) may exist in SWS. PMID:25374402

  5. Somatic mutations in MAP3K5 attenuate its pro-apoptotic function in melanoma through increased binding to Thioredoxin

    PubMed Central

    Prickett, Todd D.; Zerlanko, Brad; Gartner, Jared J.; Parker, Stephen C. J.; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Lin, Jimmy C.; Teer, Jamie K.; Wei, Xiaomu; Jiang, Jiji; Chen, Guo; Davies, Michael A.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Robinson, William; Robinson, Steven; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Rosenberg, Steven, A.; Margulies, Elliott H.; Samuels, Yardena

    2013-01-01

    Patients with advanced metastatic melanoma have poor prognosis and the genetics underlying its pathogenesis are poorly understood. High throughput sequencing has allowed comprehensive discovery of somatic mutations in cancer samples. Here, upon analysis of our whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing data of 29 melanoma samples we identified several genes that harbor recurrent non-synonymous mutations. These included MAP3K5, which in a prevalence screen of 288 melanomas was found to harbor a R256C substitution in 5 cases. All MAP3K5 mutated samples were wild-type for BRAF, suggesting a mutual exclusivity for these mutations. Functional analysis of the MAP3K5 R256C mutation revealed attenuation of MKK4 activation through increased binding of the inhibitory protein thioredoxin (TXN/TRX-1/Trx); resulting in increased proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of melanoma cells. This mutation represents a potential target for the design of new therapies to treat melanoma. PMID:24008424

  6. Germline mutations in the VHL tumor suppresssor gene are similar to somatic VHL aberrations in sporadic renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Whaley, J.M.; Naglich, J.; Gelbert, L.

    1994-09-01

    A candidate gene for von Hippel Lindau disease was recently identified that led to the isolation of a partial cDNA clone with extended open reading frame without significant homology to known genes or obvious functional motifs, except for an acidic pentamer repeat domain. To further characterize the functional domains of the VHL gene and assess its involvement in hereditary and non-hereditary tumors, we performed mutation analyses and studied its expresssion in normal and tumor tissue. We identified germline mutations in 39% of VHL disease families. Moreover, 33% of sporadic RCCs, and all (6/6) sporadic RCC cell lines analyzed, showed mutations within the VHL gene. Both germline and somatic mutations included deletions, insertions, splice site mutations, missense and nonsense mutations, all of which clustered at the 3{prime} end of the corresponding partial VHL cDNA open reading frame including an alternatively-spliced exon of 123 nucleotides in length, suggesting functionally important domains encoded by the VHL gene in this region. Over 180 sporadic tumors of other types have shown no detectable base changes within the presumed coding sequence of the VHL gene to date. We conclude that the gene causing VHL has an important and specific role in the etiology of sporadic renal cell carcinomas, acts as a recessive tumor suppressor gene, and appears to encode important functional domains within the 3{prime} end of the known open reading frame.

  7. Somatic and germline CACNA1D calcium channel mutations in aldosterone-producing adenomas and primary aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, Ute I.; Goh, Gerald; Stölting, Gabriel; de Oliveira, Regina Campos; Choi, Murim; Overton, John D.; Fonseca, Annabelle L.; Korah, Reju; Starker, Lee F.; Kunstman, John W.; Prasad, Manju L.; Hartung, Erum A.; Mauras, Nelly; Benson, Matthew R.; Brady, Tammy; Shapiro, Jay R.; Loring, Erin; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Libutti, Steven K.; Mane, Shrikant; Hellman, Per; Westin, Gunnar; Åkerström, Göran; Björklund, Peyman; Carling, Tobias; Fahlke, Christoph; Hidalgo, Patricia; Lifton, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Adrenal aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) constitutively produce the salt-retaining hormone aldosterone and are a common cause of severe hypertension. Recurrent mutations in the potassium channel KCNJ5 that result in cell depolarization and Ca2+ influx cause ~40% of these tumors1. We found five somatic mutations (four altering glycine 403, one altering isoleucine 770) in CACNA1D, encoding a voltage-gated calcium channel, among 43 non-KCNJ5-mutant APAs. These mutations lie in S6 segments that line the channel pore. Both result in channel activation at less depolarized potentials, and glycine 403 mutations also impair channel inactivation. These effects are inferred to cause increased Ca2+ influx, the sufficient stimulus for aldosterone production and cell proliferation in adrenal glomerulosa2. Remarkably, we identified de novo mutations at the identical positions in two children with a previously undescribed syndrome featuring primary aldosteronism and neuromuscular abnormalities. These findings implicate gain of function Ca2+ channel mutations in aldosterone-producing adenomas and primary aldosteronism. PMID:23913001

  8. Effect of vanillin on toxicant-induced mutation and mitotic recombination in proliferating somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sinigaglia, Marialva; Reguly, Maria Luíza; de Andrade, Heloísa Helena Rodrigues

    2004-01-01

    Vanillin (VA; C8H8O3) is a flavoring agent that in previous studies has both increased and decreased the genotoxicity of chemical agents, depending on the nature of both the agent and the genetic event measured. The ability of VA to modulate the mutagenicity and recombinogenicity of three different monoalkylating agents, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU), and ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), and the intercalating agent bleomycin (BLEO) was examined using the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. While neither the mutagenicity nor the recombinagenicity of ENU or MNU was modified by posttreatment with VA, EMS-induced genetic toxicity was enhanced by as much as 30%. This overall enhancement included a synergistic increase in mitotic recombination and a lesser decrease in mutation. Posttreatment with VA also produced an increase in the genotoxicity of BLEO, which was characterized by increases of 120% and 180% for 0.5% and 1% VA, respectively. This enhancement was restricted to an increase in recombinational events, since no alteration in BLEO-induced mutation was observed. The data suggest that the major VA-modulatory action on genotoxicity in D. melanogaster is related to its synergistic effects on somatic recombination, which has a greater consequence on overall genotoxicity than its antimutagenic effects. Since the SMART assay is specifically sensitive to mitotic crossing-over, our data suggest that VA promotes toxicant-induced homologous recombination, at least in the proliferative cells of Drosophila. PMID:15515154

  9. A Convenient Cell Culture Model for CML Acquired Resistance Through BCR-ABL Mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, WenYong

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are the effective treatments for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, clinical resistance to TKIs that leads to patient relapse remains a challenge. Acquisition of BCR-ABL mutations is crucial in the resistance but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we describe a cell culture model for CML acquired resistance in which blast crisis CML cells undergo initial apoptosis upon treatment with therapeutically effective doses of TKIs, but the cells regrow quickly with development of resistance through BCR-ABL mutations. This model mimics the clinical process of acquisition of BCR-ABL mutations and will be an important tool to dissect molecular mechanisms of CML drug resistance and to explore strategies to overcome resistance. PMID:27581146

  10. Two novel ALK mutations mediate acquired resistance to the next generation ALK inhibitor alectinib

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ryohei; Friboulet, Luc; Koike, Sumie; Lockerman, Elizabeth L.; Khan, Tahsin M.; Gainor, Justin F.; Iafrate, A. John; Takeuchi, Kengo; Taiji, Makoto; Okuno, Yasushi; Fujita, Naoya; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Shaw, Alice T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The first-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) crizotinib is a standard therapy for patients with ALK-rearranged NSCLC. Several next-generation ALK-TKIs have entered the clinic and have shown promising activity in crizotinib-resistant patients. As patients still relapse even on these next-generation ALK-TKIs, we examined mechanisms of resistance to the next-generation ALK-TKI alectinib and potential strategies to overcome this resistance. Experimental Design We established a cell line model of alectinib resistance, and analyzed a resistant tumor specimen from a patient who had relapsed on alectinib. We developed Ba/F3 models harboring alectinib-resistant ALK mutations and evaluated the potency of other next-generation ALK-TKIs in these models. We tested the antitumor activity of the next-generation ALK-TKI ceritinib in the patient with acquired resistance to alectinib. To elucidate structure-activity-relationships of ALK mutations, we performed computational thermodynamic simulation with MP-CAFEE. Results We identified a novel V1180L gatekeeper mutation from the cell line model and a second novel I1171T mutation from the patient who developed resistance to alectinib. Both ALK mutations conferred resistance to alectinib as well as to crizotinib, but were sensitive to ceritinib and other next-generation ALK-TKIs. Treatment of the patient with ceritinib led to a marked response. Thermodynamics simulation suggests that both mutations lead to distinct structural alterations that decrease the binding affinity with alectinib. Conclusions We have identified two novel ALK mutations arising after alectinib exposure which are sensitive to other next generation ALK-TKIs. The ability of ceritinib to overcome alectinib-resistance mutations suggests a potential role for sequential therapy with multiple next-generation ALK-TKIs. PMID:25228534

  11. Exome and deep sequencing of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma reveal somatic mutations that affect key pathways involved in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Lasorsa, Vito Alessandro; Formicola, Daniela; Pignataro, Piero; Cimmino, Flora; Calabrese, Francesco Maria; Mora, Jaume; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Pantile, Marcella; Zanon, Carlo; De Mariano, Marilena; Longo, Luca; Hogarty, Michael D; de Torres, Carmen; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Iolascon, Achille; Capasso, Mario

    2016-04-19

    The spectrum of somatic mutation of the most aggressive forms of neuroblastoma is not completely determined. We sought to identify potential cancer drivers in clinically aggressive neuroblastoma.Whole exome sequencing was conducted on 17 germline and tumor DNA samples from high-risk patients with adverse events within 36 months from diagnosis (HR-Event3) to identify somatic mutations and deep targeted sequencing of 134 genes selected from the initial screening in additional 48 germline and tumor pairs (62.5% HR-Event3 and high-risk patients), 17 HR-Event3 tumors and 17 human-derived neuroblastoma cell lines.We revealed 22 significantly mutated genes, many of which implicated in cancer progression. Fifteen genes (68.2%) were highly expressed in neuroblastoma supporting their involvement in the disease. CHD9, a cancer driver gene, was the most significantly altered (4.0% of cases) after ALK.Other genes (PTK2, NAV3, NAV1, FZD1 and ATRX), expressed in neuroblastoma and involved in cell invasion and migration were mutated at frequency ranged from 4% to 2%.Focal adhesion and regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathways, were frequently disrupted (14.1% of cases) thus suggesting potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent disease progression.Notably BARD1, CHEK2 and AXIN2 were enriched in rare, potentially pathogenic, germline variants.In summary, whole exome and deep targeted sequencing identified novel cancer genes of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Our analyses show pathway-level implications of infrequently mutated genes in leading neuroblastoma progression. PMID:27009842

  12. Exome and deep sequencing of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma reveal somatic mutations that affect key pathways involved in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Lasorsa, Vito Alessandro; Formicola, Daniela; Pignataro, Piero; Cimmino, Flora; Calabrese, Francesco Maria; Mora, Jaume; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Pantile, Marcella; Zanon, Carlo; De Mariano, Marilena; Longo, Luca; Hogarty, Michael D.; de Torres, Carmen; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Iolascon, Achille; Capasso, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of somatic mutation of the most aggressive forms of neuroblastoma is not completely determined. We sought to identify potential cancer drivers in clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Whole exome sequencing was conducted on 17 germline and tumor DNA samples from high-risk patients with adverse events within 36 months from diagnosis (HR-Event3) to identify somatic mutations and deep targeted sequencing of 134 genes selected from the initial screening in additional 48 germline and tumor pairs (62.5% HR-Event3 and high-risk patients), 17 HR-Event3 tumors and 17 human-derived neuroblastoma cell lines. We revealed 22 significantly mutated genes, many of which implicated in cancer progression. Fifteen genes (68.2%) were highly expressed in neuroblastoma supporting their involvement in the disease. CHD9, a cancer driver gene, was the most significantly altered (4.0% of cases) after ALK. Other genes (PTK2, NAV3, NAV1, FZD1 and ATRX), expressed in neuroblastoma and involved in cell invasion and migration were mutated at frequency ranged from 4% to 2%. Focal adhesion and regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathways, were frequently disrupted (14.1% of cases) thus suggesting potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent disease progression. Notably BARD1, CHEK2 and AXIN2 were enriched in rare, potentially pathogenic, germline variants. In summary, whole exome and deep targeted sequencing identified novel cancer genes of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Our analyses show pathway-level implications of infrequently mutated genes in leading neuroblastoma progression. PMID:27009842

  13. Prospective blinded study of somatic mutation detection in cell-free DNA utilizing a targeted 54-gene next generation sequencing panel in metastatic solid tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Lanman, Richard B.; Mortimer, Stefanie; Zill, Oliver A.; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Jang, Kee Taek; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Kang, Won Ki; Lee, Woo Yong; Kim, Hee-Cheol; Park, Keunchil; Lee, Jeeyun; Talasaz, AmirAli

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing of the mutant allele fraction of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) derived from tumors is increasingly utilized to detect actionable genomic alterations in cancer. We conducted a prospective blinded study of a comprehensive cfDNA sequencing panel with 54 cancer genes. To evaluate the concordance between cfDNA and tumor DNA (tDNA), sequencing results were compared between cfDNA from plasma and genomic tumor DNA (tDNA). Utilizing next generation digital sequencing technology (DST), we profiled approximately 78,000 bases encoding 512 complete exons in the targeted genes in cfDNA from plasma. Seventy-five patients were prospectively enrolled between February 2013 and March 2014, including 61 metastatic cancer patients and 14 clinical stage II CRC patients with matched plasma and tissue samples. Using the 54-gene panel, we detected at least one somatic mutation in 44 of 61 tDNA (72.1%) and 29 of 44 (65.9%) cfDNA. The overall concordance rate of cfDNA to tDNA was 85.9%, when all detected mutations were considered. We collected serial cfDNAs during cetuximab-based treatment in 2 metastatic KRAS wild-type CRC patients, one with acquired resistance and one with primary resistance. We demonstrate newly emerged KRAS mutation in cfDNA 1.5 months before radiologic progression. Another patient had a newly emerged PIK3CA H1047R mutation on cfDNA analysis at progression during cetuximab/irinotecan chemotherapy with gradual increase in allele frequency from 0.8 to 2.1%. This blinded, prospective study of a cfDNA sequencing showed high concordance to tDNA suggesting that the DST approach may be used as a non-invasive biopsy-free alternative to conventional sequencing using tumor biopsy. PMID:26452027

  14. Estrogen receptor alpha somatic mutations Y537S and D538G confer breast cancer endocrine resistance by stabilizing the activating function-2 binding conformation

    PubMed Central

    Fanning, Sean W; Mayne, Christopher G; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Carlson, Kathryn E; Martin, Teresa A; Novick, Scott J; Toy, Weiyi; Green, Bradley; Panchamukhi, Srinivas; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Griffin, Patrick R; Shen, Yang; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Greene, Geoffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) gene (ESR1), especially Y537S and D538G, have been linked to acquired resistance to endocrine therapies. Cell-based studies demonstrated that these mutants confer ERα constitutive activity and antiestrogen resistance and suggest that ligand-binding domain dysfunction leads to endocrine therapy resistance. Here, we integrate biophysical and structural biology data to reveal how these mutations lead to a constitutively active and antiestrogen-resistant ERα. We show that these mutant ERs recruit coactivator in the absence of hormone while their affinities for estrogen agonist (estradiol) and antagonist (4-hydroxytamoxifen) are reduced. Further, they confer antiestrogen resistance by altering the conformational dynamics of the loop connecting Helix 11 and Helix 12 in the ligand-binding domain of ERα, which leads to a stabilized agonist state and an altered antagonist state that resists inhibition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12792.001 PMID:26836308

  15. ESR1 mutations as a mechanism for acquired endocrine resistance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jeselsohn, Rinath; Buchwalter, Gilles; De Angelis, Carmine; Brown, Myles; Schiff, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Most breast cancers are estrogen receptor α (ER)-positive (+) and are treated with endocrine therapies targeting ER activity. Despite efforts, the mechanisms of the frequent clinical resistance to these therapies remain largely unknown. Several recent parallel studies unveiled gain-of-function recurrent ESR1 mutations in up to 20% of patients with metastatic ER+ disease who all received endocrine therapies, which for more cases included an aromatase inhibitor. These mutations, clustered in a hotspot within the ligand-binding domain (LBD), lead to ligand independent ER activity and tumor growth, partial resistance to tamoxifen and fulvestrant, and potentially increased metastatic capacity. Together, these findings suggest that the ESR1 LBD mutations account for acquired endocrine resistance in a substantial fraction of patients with metastatic disease. The absence of detectable ESR1 mutations in treatment-naïve disease and the correlation with the number of endocrine treatments indicate a clonal expansion of rare mutant clones, selected under the pressure of treatment. New technologies to detect low/ultra rare ESR1 mutations together with tissue and liquid biopsies are required to fully expose their clinical relevance in prognosis and treatment. Pre-clinical and clinical development of rationale-based novel therapeutic strategies to inhibit these mutants has the potential to substantially improve treatment outcomes. PMID:26122181

  16. Naturally occurring dominant drug resistance mutations occur infrequently in the setting of recently acquired hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Applegate, Tanya L; Gaudieri, Silvana; Plauzolles, Anne; Chopra, Abha; Grebely, Jason; Lucas, Michaela; Hellard, Margaret; Luciani, Fabio; Dore, Gregory J; Matthews, Gail V

    2014-01-01

    Background Directly Acting Antivirals (DAAs) are predicted to transform hepatitis C (HCV) therapy, yet little is known about the prevalence of naturally occurring resistance mutations in recently acquired HCV. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and frequency of drug resistance mutations in the viral quasispecies among HIV positive and negative individuals with recent HCV. Methods The NS3 protease, NS5A and NS5B polymerase genes were amplified from fifty genotype 1a participants of the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C. Amino acid variations at sites known to be associated with possible drug resistance were analysed by ultra-deep pyrosequencing. Results Twelve percent of individuals harboured dominant resistance mutations, while 36% demonstrated non dominant resistant variants below that detectable by bulk sequencing (ie < 20%) but above a threshold of 1%. Resistance variants (< 1%) were observed at most sites associated with DAA resistance from all classes, with the exception of sofosbuvir. Conclusions Dominant resistant mutations were uncommonly observed in the setting of recent HCV. However, low level mutations to all DAA classes were observed by deep sequencing at the majority of sites, and in most individuals. The significance of these variants and impact on future treatment options remains to be determined. PMID:25105742

  17. Sequencing of the Reannotated LMNB2 Gene Reveals Novel Mutations in Patients with Acquired Partial Lipodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hegele, Robert A.; Cao, Henian; Liu, Dora M.; Costain, Gary A.; Charlton-Menys, Valentine; Rodger, N. Wilson; Durrington, Paul N.

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of acquired partial lipodystrophy (APL, also called “Barraquer-Simons syndrome”) is unknown. Genomic DNA mutations affecting the nuclear lamina protein lamin A cause inherited partial lipodystrophy but are not found in patients with APL. Because it also encodes a nuclear lamina protein (lamin B2) and its genomic structure was recently reannotated, we sequenced LMNB2 as a candidate gene in nine white patients with APL. In four patients, we found three new rare mutations in LMNB2: intron 1 −6G→T, exon 5 c.643G→A (p.R215Q; in two patients), and exon 8 c.1218G→A (p.A407T). The combined frequency of these mutations was 0.222 in the patients with APL, compared with 0.0018 in a multiethnic control sample of 1,100 subjects (P=2.1×10-7) and 0.0045 in a sample of 330 white controls (P=1.2×10-5). These novel heterozygous mutations are the first reported for LMNB2, are the first reported among patients with APL, and indicate how sequencing of a reannotated candidate gene can reveal new disease-associated mutations. PMID:16826530

  18. Mutually exclusive recurrent somatic mutations in MAP2K1 and BRAF support a central role for ERK activation in LCH pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Rikhia; Hampton, Oliver A.; Shen, Xiaoyun; Simko, Stephen J.; Shih, Albert; Abhyankar, Harshal; Lim, Karen Phaik Har; Covington, Kyle R.; Trevino, Lisa; Dewal, Ninad; Muzny, Donna M.; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Hu, Jianhong; Wang, Linghua; Lupo, Philip J.; Hicks, M. John; Bonilla, Diana L.; Dwyer, Karen C.; Berres, Marie-Luise; Poulikakos, Poulikos I.; Merad, Miriam; McClain, Kenneth L.; Wheeler, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by lesions composed of pathological CD207+ dendritic cells with an inflammatory infiltrate. BRAFV600E remains the only recurrent mutation reported in LCH. In order to evaluate the spectrum of somatic mutations in LCH, whole exome sequencing was performed on matched LCH and normal tissue samples obtained from 41 patients. Lesions from other histiocytic disorders, juvenile xanthogranuloma, Erdheim-Chester disease, and Rosai-Dorfman disease were also evaluated. All of the lesions from histiocytic disorders were characterized by an extremely low overall rate of somatic mutations. Notably, 33% (7/21) of LCH cases with wild-type BRAF and none (0/20) with BRAFV600E harbored somatic mutations in MAP2K1 (6 in-frame deletions and 1 missense mutation) that induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in vitro. Single cases of somatic mutations of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway genes ARAF and ERBB3 were also detected. The ability of MAPK pathway inhibitors to suppress MAPK kinase and ERK phosphorylation in cell culture and primary tumor models was dependent on the specific LCH mutation. The findings of this study support a model in which ERK activation is a universal end point in LCH arising from pathological activation of upstream signaling proteins. PMID:25202140

  19. JAK2V617F somatic mutation in the general population: myeloproliferative neoplasm development and progression rate

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Camilla; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Kofoed, Klaus F.; Birgens, Henrik S.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical significance of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with a myeloproliferative neoplasm has been the target of intensive research in recent years. However, there is considerably uncertainty about prognosis in JAK2V617F positive individuals without overt signs of myeloproliferative disease. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that increased JAK2V617F somatic mutation burden is associated with myeloproliferative neoplasm progression rate in the general population. Among 49,488 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study, 63 (0.1%) tested positive for the JAK2V617F mutation in the time period 2003–2008. Of these, 48 were available for re-examination in 2012. Level of JAK2V617F mutation burden was associated with myeloproliferative neoplasm progression rate, consistent with a biological continuum of increasing JAK2V617F mutation burden across increasing severity of myeloproliferative neoplasm from no disease (n=8 at re-examination) through essential thrombocythemia (n=20) and polycythemia vera (n=13) to primary myelofibrosis (n=7). Among those diagnosed with a myeloproliferative neoplasm only at re-examination in 2012, in the preceding years JAK2V617F mutation burden increased by 0.55% per year, erythrocyte volume fraction increased by 1.19% per year, and erythrocyte mean corpuscular volume increased by 1.25% per year, while there was no change in platelet count or erythropoietin levels. Furthermore, we established a JAK2V617F mutation burden cut-off point of 2% indicative of disease versus no disease; however, individuals with a mutation burden below 2% may suffer from a latent form of myeloproliferative disease revealed by a slightly larger spleen and/or slightly higher lactic acid dehydrogenase concentration compared to controls. Of all 63 JAK2V617F positive individuals, 48 were eventually diagnosed with a myeloproliferative neoplasm. PMID:24907356

  20. PPM1D Mosaic Truncating Variants in Ovarian Cancer Cases May Be Treatment-Related Somatic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Pharoah, Paul D P; Song, Honglin; Dicks, Ed; Intermaggio, Maria P; Harrington, Patricia; Baynes, Caroline; Alsop, Kathryn; Bogdanova, Natalia; Cicek, Mine S; Cunningham, Julie M; Fridley, Brooke L; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Hillemanns, Peter; Lele, Shashi; Lester, Jenny; McGuire, Valerie; Moysich, Kirsten B; Poblete, Samantha; Sieh, Weiva; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Widschwendter, Martin; Whittemore, Alice S; Dörk, Thilo; Menon, Usha; Odunsi, Kunle; Goode, Ellen L; Karlan, Beth Y; Bowtell, David D; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J

    2016-03-01

    Mosaic truncating mutations in the protein phosphatase, Mg(2+)/Mn(2+)-dependent, 1D (PPM1D) gene have recently been reported with a statistically significantly greater frequency in lymphocyte DNA from ovarian cancer case patients compared with unaffected control patients. Using massively parallel sequencing (MPS) we identified truncating PPM1D mutations in 12 of 3236 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) case patients (0.37%) but in only one of 3431 unaffected control patients (0.03%) (P = .001). All statistical tests were two-sided. A combination of Sanger sequencing, pyrosequencing, and MPS data suggested that 12 of the 13 mutations were mosaic. All mutations were identified in post-chemotherapy treatment blood samples from case patients (n = 1827) (average 1234 days post-treatment in carriers) rather than from cases collected pretreatment (less than 14 days after diagnosis, n = 1384) (P = .002). These data suggest that PPM1D variants in EOC cases are primarily somatic mosaic mutations caused by treatment and are not associated with germline predisposition to EOC. PMID:26823519

  1. Somatic c.34G>T KRAS mutation: a new prescreening test for MUTYH-associated polyposis?

    PubMed

    Aimé, Adeline; Coulet, Florence; Lefevre, Jeremie H; Colas, Chrystelle; Cervera, Pascale; Flejou, Jean-François; Lascols, Olivier; Soubrier, Florent; Parc, Yann

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the somatic c.34G>T KRAS transversion as a marker suggestive of MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP). We compared 86 adenomas and 19 colorectal cancers (CRCs) of 30 MAP patients to 135 adenomas and five CRCs of 47 familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients. The c.34G>T mutation was investigated by DNA sequencing. Secondly, the germline MUTYH gene sequence was analyzed in patients carrying c.34G>T in CRCs diagnosed between 2008 and 2012. The c.34G>T was present in 39.7% of MAP adenomas versus 1.6% of FAP adenomas (P < 0.01). Sensitivity and specificity for detecting MAP were 39.7% and 98%, respectively. Sensitivity increased with the number of adenomas tested (P = 0.039). KRAS exon 2 analysis was performed on 2239 CRC and 2.2% harbored the c.34G>T transversion. Among 28 carriers of the c.34G>T mutation, biallelic MUTYH mutations were detected in seven patients (25%). One patient did not have any polyp or family history and did not fulfill criteria for MUTYH testing. With high specificity, the c.34G>T mutation seems to be a useful and promising test for MAP. For polyposis, it may guide genetic testing toward APC or MUTYH. If routinely performed in CRC patients, it could help to diagnose MUTYH-mutation carriers, even when they don't fulfill genetic testing criteria. PMID:26056087

  2. MUFFINN: cancer gene discovery via network analysis of somatic mutation data.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ara; Shim, Jung Eun; Kim, Eiru; Supek, Fran; Lehner, Ben; Lee, Insuk

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge for distinguishing cancer-causing driver mutations from inconsequential passenger mutations is the long-tail of infrequently mutated genes in cancer genomes. Here, we present and evaluate a method for prioritizing cancer genes accounting not only for mutations in individual genes but also in their neighbors in functional networks, MUFFINN (MUtations For Functional Impact on Network Neighbors). This pathway-centric method shows high sensitivity compared with gene-centric analyses of mutation data. Notably, only a marginal decrease in performance is observed when using 10 % of TCGA patient samples, suggesting the method may potentiate cancer genome projects with small patient populations. PMID:27333808

  3. DNA methylome analysis in Burkitt and follicular lymphomas identifies differentially methylated regions linked to somatic mutation and transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Kretzmer, Helene; Bernhart, Stephan H; Wang, Wei; Haake, Andrea; Weniger, Marc A; Bergmann, Anke K; Betts, Matthew J; Carrillo-de-Santa-Pau, Enrique; Doose, Gero; Gutwein, Jana; Richter, Julia; Hovestadt, Volker; Huang, Bingding; Rico, Daniel; Jühling, Frank; Kolarova, Julia; Lu, Qianhao; Otto, Christian; Wagener, Rabea; Arnolds, Judith; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Drexler, Hans G; Eberth, Sonja; Eils, Roland; Flicek, Paul; Haas, Siegfried; Hummel, Michael; Karsch, Dennis; Kerstens, Hinrik H D; Klapper, Wolfram; Kreuz, Markus; Lawerenz, Chris; Lenze, Dido; Loeffler, Markus; López, Cristina; MacLeod, Roderick A F; Martens, Joost H A; Kulis, Marta; Martín-Subero, José Ignacio; Möller, Peter; Nagel, Inga; Picelli, Simone; Vater, Inga; Rohde, Marius; Rosenstiel, Philip; Rosolowski, Maciej; Russell, Robert B; Schilhabel, Markus; Schlesner, Matthias; Stadler, Peter F; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Küppers, Ralf; Ammerpohl, Ole; Lichter, Peter; Siebert, Reiner; Hoffmann, Steve; Radlwimmer, Bernhard

    2015-11-01

    Although Burkitt lymphomas and follicular lymphomas both have features of germinal center B cells, they are biologically and clinically quite distinct. Here we performed whole-genome bisulfite, genome and transcriptome sequencing in 13 IG-MYC translocation-positive Burkitt lymphoma, nine BCL2 translocation-positive follicular lymphoma and four normal germinal center B cell samples. Comparison of Burkitt and follicular lymphoma samples showed differential methylation of intragenic regions that strongly correlated with expression of associated genes, for example, genes active in germinal center dark-zone and light-zone B cells. Integrative pathway analyses of regions differentially methylated in Burkitt and follicular lymphomas implicated DNA methylation as cooperating with somatic mutation of sphingosine phosphate signaling, as well as the TCF3-ID3 and SWI/SNF complexes, in a large fraction of Burkitt lymphomas. Taken together, our results demonstrate a tight connection between somatic mutation, DNA methylation and transcriptional control in key B cell pathways deregulated differentially in Burkitt lymphoma and other germinal center B cell lymphomas. PMID:26437030

  4. Myeloma Ig heavy chain V region sequences reveal prior antigenic selection and marked somatic mutation but no intraclonal diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Vescio, R.A.; Cao, J.; Hong, C.H.

    1995-09-01

    The IgV{sub H} region sequence in 48 patients with multiple myeloma (MM) was analyzed to characterize the malignant cell of origin. The sequences were obtained after amplification of bone marrow cDNA by using V{sub H} family-specific and C{sub H} primers, then compared with either directly sequenced patient germ-line or published V{sub H} gene sequences to assay for somatic mutation. Because somatic hypermutation of the V{sub H} gene occurs late in B cell development, its presence has been helpful in determining the cell of origin in other B cell malignancies. Overall, a median of 8.2% of the nucleotides had evidence of substitution within each V{sub H} gene sequence (range = 2.7% to 16.5%), which is more prevalent than in any other reported tumor type. Strong evidence of prior antigenic selection pressure was also evident. The ratio of nucleotide substitutions that resulted in amino acid replacement was significantly higher in the complementarity-determining region than in the framework region (3.25 vs. 1.56, respectively; p < 0.00005). No V{sub H} gene intraclonal diversity was noted, despite sequencing multiple clones (3-16) from each patient, nor was there evidence of further V{sub H} gene somatic mutation over the course of three patients` disease. These findings strongly imply that the malignant clone in MM evolves from a cell late in B cell development. 63 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Abnormal Expressions of DNA Glycosylase Genes NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 Are Associated with Somatic Mutation Loads in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shinmura, Kazuya; Kato, Hisami; Kawanishi, Yuichi; Igarashi, Hisaki; Goto, Masanori; Tao, Hong; Inoue, Yusuke; Nakamura, Satoki; Misawa, Kiyoshi; Mineta, Hiroyuki; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of abnormalities in the DNA glycosylases NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 on human cancer have not been fully elucidated. In this paper, we found that the median somatic total mutation loads and the median somatic single nucleotide mutation loads exhibited significant inverse correlations with the median NEIL1 and NEIL2 expression levels and a significant positive correlation with the median NEIL3 expression level using data for 13 cancer types from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. A subset of the cancer types exhibited reduced NEIL1 and NEIL2 expressions and elevated NEIL3 expression, and such abnormal expressions of NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 were also significantly associated with the mutation loads in cancer. As a mechanism underlying the reduced expression of NEIL1 in cancer, the epigenetic silencing of NEIL1 through promoter hypermethylation was found. Finally, we investigated the reason why an elevated NEIL3 expression level was associated with an increased number of somatic mutations in cancer and found that NEIL3 expression was positively correlated with the expression of APOBEC3B, a potent inducer of mutations, in diverse cancers. These results suggested that the abnormal expressions of NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 are involved in cancer through their association with the somatic mutation load. PMID:27042257

  6. Mutations Associated with Acquired Resistance to PD-1 Blockade in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zaretsky, Jesse M; Garcia-Diaz, Angel; Shin, Daniel S; Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Hugo, Willy; Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Torrejon, Davis Y; Abril-Rodriguez, Gabriel; Sandoval, Salemiz; Barthly, Lucas; Saco, Justin; Homet Moreno, Blanca; Mezzadra, Riccardo; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Ruchalski, Kathleen; Shintaku, I Peter; Sanchez, Phillip J; Puig-Saus, Cristina; Cherry, Grace; Seja, Elizabeth; Kong, Xiangju; Pang, Jia; Berent-Maoz, Beata; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Graeber, Thomas G; Tumeh, Paul C; Schumacher, Ton N M; Lo, Roger S; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-09-01

    Background Approximately 75% of objective responses to anti-programmed death 1 (PD-1) therapy in patients with melanoma are durable, lasting for years, but delayed relapses have been noted long after initial objective tumor regression despite continuous therapy. Mechanisms of immune escape in this context are unknown. Methods We analyzed biopsy samples from paired baseline and relapsing lesions in four patients with metastatic melanoma who had had an initial objective tumor regression in response to anti-PD-1 therapy (pembrolizumab) followed by disease progression months to years later. Results Whole-exome sequencing detected clonal selection and outgrowth of the acquired resistant tumors and, in two of the four patients, revealed resistance-associated loss-of-function mutations in the genes encoding interferon-receptor-associated Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) or Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), concurrent with deletion of the wild-type allele. A truncating mutation in the gene encoding the antigen-presenting protein beta-2-microglobulin (B2M) was identified in a third patient. JAK1 and JAK2 truncating mutations resulted in a lack of response to interferon gamma, including insensitivity to its antiproliferative effects on cancer cells. The B2M truncating mutation led to loss of surface expression of major histocompatibility complex class I. Conclusions In this study, acquired resistance to PD-1 blockade immunotherapy in patients with melanoma was associated with defects in the pathways involved in interferon-receptor signaling and in antigen presentation. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.). PMID:27433843

  7. Somatic Mutations Predict Poor Outcome in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome After Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bejar, Rafael; Stevenson, Kristen E.; Caughey, Bennett; Lindsley, R. Coleman; Mar, Brenton G.; Stojanov, Petar; Getz, Gad; Steensma, David P.; Ritz, Jerome; Soiffer, Robert; Antin, Joseph H.; Alyea, Edwin; Armand, Philippe; Ho, Vincent; Koreth, John; Neuberg, Donna; Cutler, Corey S.; Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Recurrently mutated genes in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are pathogenic drivers and powerfully associated with clinical phenotype and prognosis. Whether these types of mutations predict outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) in patients with MDS is not known. Patients and Methods We used massively parallel sequencing to examine tumor samples collected from 87 patients with MDS before HSCT for coding mutations in 40 recurrently mutated MDS genes. Results Mutations were identified in 92% of patients, most frequently in the ASXL1 (29%), TP53 (21%), DNMT3A (18%), and RUNX1 (16%) genes. In univariable analyses, only TP53 mutations were associated with shorter overall (OS; hazard ratio [HR], 3.74; P < .001) and progression-free survival (HR, 3.97; P < .001). After adjustment for clinical variables associated with these end points, mutations in TP53 (HR, 2.30; P = .027), TET2 (HR, 2.40; P = .033), and DNMT3A (HR, 2.08; P = .049) were associated with decreased OS. In multivariable analysis including clinical variables, complex karyotype status, and candidate genes, mutations in TP53 (HR, 4.22; P ≤ .001) and TET2 (HR, 1.68; P = .037) were each independently associated with shorter OS. Nearly one half of patients (46%) carried a mutation in TP53, DNMT3A, or TET2 and accounted for 64% of deaths. Three-year OS in patients without these mutations was 59% (95% CI, 43% to 72%), versus 19% (95% CI, 9% to 33%) in patients with these mutations. Conclusion Mutations in TP53, TET2, or DNMT3A identify patients with MDS with shorter OS after HSCT. PMID:25092778

  8. Somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is facilitated by mutations in genes repressing meristematic cell divisions.

    PubMed

    Mordhorst, A P; Voerman, K J; Hartog, M V; Meijer, E A; van Went, J; Koornneef, M; de Vries, S C

    1998-06-01

    Embryogenesis in plants can commence from cells other than the fertilized egg cell. Embryogenesis initiated from somatic cells in vitro is an attractive system for studying early embryonic stages when they are accessible to experimental manipulation. Somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis offers the additional advantage that many zygotic embryo mutants can be studied under in vitro conditions. Two systems are available. The first employs immature zygotic embryos as starting material, yielding continuously growing embryogenic cultures in liquid medium. This is possible in at least 11 ecotypes. A second, more efficient and reproducible system, employing the primordia timing mutant (pt allelic to hpt, cop2, and amp1), was established. A significant advantage of the pt mutant is that intact seeds, germinated in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2, 4-D) containing liquid medium, give rise to stable embryonic cell cultures, circumventing tedious hand dissection of immature zygotic embryos. pt zygotic embryos are first distinguishable from wild type at early heart stage by a broader embryonic shoot apical meristem (SAM). In culture, embryogenic clusters originate from the enlarged SAMs. pt somatic embryos had all characteristic embryo pattern elements seen in zygotic embryos, but with higher and more variable numbers of cells. Embryogenic cell cultures were also established from seedling, of other mutants with enlarged SAMs, such as clavata (clv). pt clv double mutants showed additive effects on SAM size and an even higher frequency of seedlings producing embryogenic cell lines. pt clv double mutant plants had very short fasciated inflorescence stems and additive effects on the number of rosette leaves. This suggests that the PT and CLV genes act in independent pathways that control SAM size. An increased population of noncommitted SAM cells may be responsible for facilitated establishment of somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:9611173

  9. Somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is facilitated by mutations in genes repressing meristematic cell divisions.

    PubMed Central

    Mordhorst, A P; Voerman, K J; Hartog, M V; Meijer, E A; van Went, J; Koornneef, M; de Vries, S C

    1998-01-01

    Embryogenesis in plants can commence from cells other than the fertilized egg cell. Embryogenesis initiated from somatic cells in vitro is an attractive system for studying early embryonic stages when they are accessible to experimental manipulation. Somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis offers the additional advantage that many zygotic embryo mutants can be studied under in vitro conditions. Two systems are available. The first employs immature zygotic embryos as starting material, yielding continuously growing embryogenic cultures in liquid medium. This is possible in at least 11 ecotypes. A second, more efficient and reproducible system, employing the primordia timing mutant (pt allelic to hpt, cop2, and amp1), was established. A significant advantage of the pt mutant is that intact seeds, germinated in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2, 4-D) containing liquid medium, give rise to stable embryonic cell cultures, circumventing tedious hand dissection of immature zygotic embryos. pt zygotic embryos are first distinguishable from wild type at early heart stage by a broader embryonic shoot apical meristem (SAM). In culture, embryogenic clusters originate from the enlarged SAMs. pt somatic embryos had all characteristic embryo pattern elements seen in zygotic embryos, but with higher and more variable numbers of cells. Embryogenic cell cultures were also established from seedling, of other mutants with enlarged SAMs, such as clavata (clv). pt clv double mutants showed additive effects on SAM size and an even higher frequency of seedlings producing embryogenic cell lines. pt clv double mutant plants had very short fasciated inflorescence stems and additive effects on the number of rosette leaves. This suggests that the PT and CLV genes act in independent pathways that control SAM size. An increased population of noncommitted SAM cells may be responsible for facilitated establishment of somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:9611173

  10. Somatic mutation profiles in primary colorectal cancers and matching ovarian metastases: Identification of driver and passenger mutations

    PubMed Central

    Crobach, Stijn; Ruano, Dina; van Eijk, Ronald; Schrumpf, Melanie; Fleuren, Gertjan; van Wezel, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mutational profiles of primary colorectal cancers (CRCs) and corresponding ovarian metastases were compared. Using a custom‐made next generation sequencing panel, 115 cancer‐driving genes were analyzed in a cohort of 26 primary CRCs and 30 matching ovarian metastases (four with bilateral metastases). To obtain a complete overview of the mutational profile, low thresholds were used in bioinformatics analysis to prevent low frequency passenger mutations from being filtered out. A subset of variants was validated using Sanger and/or hydrolysis probe assays. The mutational landscape of CRC that metastasized to the ovary was not strikingly different from CRC in consecutive series. When comparing primary CRCs and their matching ovarian metastases, there was considerable overlap in the mutations of early affected genes. A subset of mutations demonstrated less overlap, presumably being passenger mutations. In particular, primary CRCs showed a substantially high number of passenger mutations. We also compared the primary CRCs and matching metastases for stratifying variants of six genes (KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, FBXW7, PTEN and PIK3CA) that select for established (EGFR directed) or future targeted therapies. In a total of 31 variants 12 were not found in either of the two locations. Tumours thus differed in the number of discordant variants between the primary tumours and matching metastases. Half of these discordant variants were definitive class 4/5 pathogenic variants. However, in terms of temporal heterogeneity, no clear relationship was observed between the number of discordant variants and the time interval between primary CRCs and the detection of ovarian metastases. This suggests that dormant metastases may be present from the early days of the primary tumours. PMID:27499925

  11. Next generation sequencing of patients with mut methylmalonic aciduria: Validation of somatic cell studies and identification of 16 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jordan; Pupavac, Mihaela; Watkins, David; Tian, Xia; Feng, Yanming; Chen, Stella; Fenter, Remington; Zhang, Victor W; Wang, Jing; Wong, Lee-Jun; Rosenblatt, David S

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in the MUT gene, which encodes the mitochondrial enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, are responsible for the mut form of methylmalonic aciduria (MMA). In this study, a next generation sequencing (NGS) based gene panel was used to analyze 53 patients that had been diagnosed with mut MMA by somatic cell complementation analysis. A total of 54 different mutations in MUT were identified in 48 patients; 16 novel mutations were identified, including 1 initiation site mutation (c.2T>C [p.M1?]), 1 missense mutation (c.566A>T [p.N189I]), 2 nonsense mutations (c.129G>A [p.W43*] and c.1975C>T [p.Q659*]), 2 mutations affecting splice sites (c.753+3A>G and c.754-2A>G), 8 small insertions, deletions, and duplications (c.29dupT [p.L10Ffs*39], c.55dupG [p.V19Gfs*30], c.631_633delGAG [p.E211del], c.795_796insT [p.M266Yfs*7], c.1061delCinsGGA [p.S354Wfs*20], c.1065_1068dupATGG [p.S357Mfs*5], c.1181dupT [p.L394Ffs*30], c.1240delG [p.E414Kfs*17]), a large insertion (c.146_147ins279), and a large deletion involving exon 13. Phenotypic rescue and cDNA analysis were used to confirm that the c.146_147ins279 and c.631_633delGAG mutations were associated with the decreased methylmalonyl-CoA mutase function observed in the patient fibroblasts. In five patients, the NGS panel did not confirm the diagnosis made by complementation analysis. One of these patients was found to carry 2 novel mutations (c.433G > A [p.E145K] and c.511A>C [p.N171H]) in the SUCLG1 gene. PMID:27233228

  12. Elevated somatic mutations at the glycophorin a (GPA) locus are associated with PAH exposure in Finnish iron foundry workers

    SciTech Connect

    Bigbee, W.L.; Dickey, C.P.; Mooney, L.A.

    1997-10-01

    The potential genotoxic effect of occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was assessed using the GPA-based in vivo somatic cell mutation assay in a group of 39 iron foundry workers. Individual exposures to benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) over a four-year period were estimated using job titles together with personal and area monitoring data. Blood samples, collected over the same period, were analyzed for the frequency of variant erythroyctes expressing GPA allele-loss (0/N) and allele-loss and duplication (N/N) phenotypes. The frequencies of these erythrocyte variants in the peripheral circulation is a measure of the level of gene-inactivating somatic mutations at the GPA reporter locus in erythroid progenitor cells thus providing an estimate of the acute and cumulative impact of exposure of bone marrow cells to genotoxic agents. Workers were stratified into two exposure categories based on estimated B[a]P levels of <5 ng/m{sup 3} (low exposure group, n=25) and {ge}5 ng/m{sup 3} (high exposure group, n=14). Linear regression analysis revealed significantly elevated frequencies of {O}/N (P=0.025), but not N/N, variants in the high exposure compared to the low exposure group with geometric mean frequency of 13.2 versus 7.9 per million cells, respectively, after adjustment for the effects of age, gender, and smoking status. These data confirm earlier results which suggested a trend toward increased {O}/N variant frequencies associated with greater B[a]P exposures and a significant positive association between the levels of leukocyte PAH-DNA adducts and T-lymphocyte HPRT locus somatic mutations in the peripheral blood of these workers. Taken together, the results demonstrate the power of these biological exposure and effect markers to reveal the impact of low levels of occupational exposure to genotoxic agents such as B[a]P in relatively small populations of workers with well-characterized exposures.

  13. Frequent somatic reversion of KRT1 mutations in ichthyosis with confetti.

    PubMed

    Choate, Keith A; Lu, Yin; Zhou, Jing; Elias, Peter M; Zaidi, Samir; Paller, Amy S; Farhi, Anita; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Crumrine, Debra; Milstone, Leonard M; Lifton, Richard P

    2015-04-01

    Widespread reversion of genetic disease is rare; however, such events are particularly evident in some skin disorders in which normal clones develop on a background of affected skin. We previously demonstrated that mutations in keratin 10 (KRT10) cause ichthyosis with confetti (IWC), a severe dominant disorder that is characterized by progressive development of hundreds of normal skin spots via revertant mosaicism. Here, we report on a clinical and histological IWC subtype in which affected subjects have red, scaly skin at birth, experience worsening palmoplantar keratoderma in childhood, and develop hundreds of normal skin spots, beginning at around 20 years of age, that increase in size and number over time. We identified a causal de novo mutation in keratin 1 (KRT1). Similar to IWC-causing KRT10 mutations, this mutation in KRT1 resulted in a C-terminal frameshift, replacing 22 C-terminal amino acids with an alternate 30-residue peptide. Mutant KRT1 caused partial collapse of the cytoplasmic intermediate filament network and mislocalized to the nucleus. As with KRT10 mutations causing IWC, reversion of KRT1 mutations occurred via mitotic recombination. Because reversion is not observed with other disease-causing keratin mutations, the results of this study implicate KRT1 and KRT10 C-terminal frameshift mutations in the high frequency of revertant mosaicism in IWC. PMID:25774499

  14. Landscape of somatic mutations and clonal evolution in mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Beà, Sílvia; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Navarro, Alba; Salaverria, Itziar; Martín-Garcia, David; Jares, Pedro; Giné, Eva; Pinyol, Magda; Royo, Cristina; Nadeu, Ferran; Conde, Laura; Juan, Manel; Clot, Guillem; Vizán, Pedro; Di Croce, Luciano; Puente, Diana A.; López-Guerra, Mónica; Moros, Alexandra; Roue, Gael; Aymerich, Marta; Villamor, Neus; Colomo, Lluís; Martínez, Antonio; Valera, Alexandra; Martín-Subero, José I.; Amador, Virginia; Hernández, Luis; Rozman, Maria; Enjuanes, Anna; Forcada, Pilar; Muntañola, Ana; Hartmann, Elena M.; Calasanz, María J.; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner; Wiestner, Adrian; Wilson, Wyndham H.; Colomer, Dolors; López-Guillermo, Armando; López-Otín, Carlos; Puente, Xose S.; Campo, Elías

    2013-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive tumor, but a subset of patients may follow an indolent clinical course. To understand the mechanisms underlying this biological heterogeneity, we performed whole-genome and/or whole-exome sequencing on 29 MCL cases and their respective matched normal DNA, as well as 6 MCL cell lines. Recurrently mutated genes were investigated by targeted sequencing in an independent cohort of 172 MCL patients. We identified 25 significantly mutated genes, including known drivers such as ataxia-telangectasia mutated (ATM), cyclin D1 (CCND1), and the tumor suppressor TP53; mutated genes encoding the anti-apoptotic protein BIRC3 and Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2); and the chromatin modifiers WHSC1, MLL2, and MEF2B. We also found NOTCH2 mutations as an alternative phenomenon to NOTCH1 mutations in aggressive tumors with a dismal prognosis. Analysis of two simultaneous or subsequent MCL samples by whole-genome/whole-exome (n = 8) or targeted (n = 19) sequencing revealed subclonal heterogeneity at diagnosis in samples from different topographic sites and modulation of the initial mutational profile at the progression of the disease. Some mutations were predominantly clonal or subclonal, indicating an early or late event in tumor evolution, respectively. Our study identifies molecular mechanisms contributing to MCL pathogenesis and offers potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24145436

  15. Frequent somatic reversion of KRT1 mutations in ichthyosis with confetti

    PubMed Central

    Choate, Keith A.; Lu, Yin; Zhou, Jing; Elias, Peter M.; Zaidi, Samir; Paller, Amy S.; Farhi, Anita; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Crumrine, Debra; Milstone, Leonard M.; Lifton, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    Widespread reversion of genetic disease is rare; however, such events are particularly evident in some skin disorders in which normal clones develop on a background of affected skin. We previously demonstrated that mutations in keratin 10 (KRT10) cause ichthyosis with confetti (IWC), a severe dominant disorder that is characterized by progressive development of hundreds of normal skin spots via revertant mosaicism. Here, we report on a clinical and histological IWC subtype in which affected subjects have red, scaly skin at birth, experience worsening palmoplantar keratoderma in childhood, and develop hundreds of normal skin spots, beginning at around 20 years of age, that increase in size and number over time. We identified a causal de novo mutation in keratin 1 (KRT1). Similar to IWC-causing KRT10 mutations, this mutation in KRT1 resulted in a C-terminal frameshift, replacing 22 C-terminal amino acids with an alternate 30-residue peptide. Mutant KRT1 caused partial collapse of the cytoplasmic intermediate filament network and mislocalized to the nucleus. As with KRT10 mutations causing IWC, reversion of KRT1 mutations occurred via mitotic recombination. Because reversion is not observed with other disease-causing keratin mutations, the results of this study implicate KRT1 and KRT10 C-terminal frameshift mutations in the high frequency of revertant mosaicism in IWC. PMID:25774499

  16. Detecting somatic mutations in genomic sequences by means of Kolmogorov–Arnold analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gurzadyan, V. G.; Yan, H.; Vlahovic, G.; Kashin, A.; Killela, P.; Reitman, Z.; Sargsyan, S.; Yegorian, G.; Milledge, G.; Vlahovic, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Kolmogorov–Arnold stochasticity parameter technique is applied for the first time to the study of cancer genome sequencing, to reveal mutations. Using data generated by next-generation sequencing technologies, we have analysed the exome sequences of brain tumour patients with matched tumour and normal blood. We show that mutations contained in sequencing data can be revealed using this technique, thus providing a new methodology for determining subsequences of given length containing mutations, i.e. its value differs from those of subsequences without mutations. A potential application for this technique involves simplifying the procedure of finding segments with mutations, speeding up genomic research and accelerating its implementation in clinical diagnostics. Moreover, the prediction of a mutation associated with a family of frequent mutations in numerous types of cancers based purely on the value of the Kolmogorov function indicates that this applied marker may recognize genomic sequences that are in extremely low abundance and can be used in revealing new types of mutations. PMID:26361546

  17. Somatic mutation of EZH2 (Y641) in follicular and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas of germinal center origin | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Morin et al. describe recurrent somatic mutations in EZH2, a polycomb group oncogene. The mutation, found in the SET domain of this gene encoding a histone methyltransferase, is found only in a subset of lymphoma samples. Specifically, EZH2 mutations are found in about 12% of follicular lymphomas (FL) and almost 23% of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) of germinal center origin. This paper goes on to demonstrate that altered EZH2 proteins, corresponding to the most frequent mutations found in human lymphomas, have reduced activity using in vitro histone methylation assays.

  18. Identification of high-confidence somatic mutations in whole genome sequence of formalin-fixed breast cancer specimens

    PubMed Central

    Yost, Shawn E.; Smith, Erin N.; Schwab, Richard B.; Bao, Lei; Jung, HyunChul; Wang, Xiaoyun; Voest, Emile; Pierce, John P.; Messer, Karen; Parker, Barbara A.; Harismendy, Olivier; Frazer, Kelly A.

    2012-01-01

    The utilization of archived, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor samples for massive parallel sequencing has been challenging due to DNA damage and contamination with normal stroma. Here, we perform whole genome sequencing of DNA isolated from two triple-negative breast cancer tumors archived for >11 years as 5 µm FFPE sections and matched germline DNA. The tumor samples show differing amounts of FFPE damaged DNA sequencing reads revealed as relatively high alignment mismatch rates enriched for C·G > T·A substitutions compared to germline samples. This increase in mismatch rate is observable with as few as one million reads, allowing for an upfront evaluation of the sample integrity before whole genome sequencing. By applying innovative quality filters incorporating global nucleotide mismatch rates and local mismatch rates, we present a method to identify high-confidence somatic mutations even in the presence of FFPE induced DNA damage. This results in a breast cancer mutational profile consistent with previous studies and revealing potentially important functional mutations. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of performing genome-wide deep sequencing analysis of FFPE archived tumors of limited sample size such as residual cancer after treatment or metastatic biopsies. PMID:22492626

  19. Omenn syndrome associated with a functional reversion due to a somatic second-site mutation in CARD11 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Pannicke, Ulrich; Lorenz, Myriam R.; Fisch, Paul; Jeelall, Yogesh; Rohr, Jan; Speckmann, Carsten; Vraetz, Thomas; Farmand, Susan; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Krüger, Marcus; Strahm, Brigitte; Henneke, Philipp; Enders, Anselm; Horikawa, Keisuke; Goodnow, Christopher; Schwarz, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Omenn syndrome (OS) is a severe immunodeficiency associated with erythroderma, lymphoproliferation, elevated IgE, and hyperactive oligoclonal T cells. A restricted T-cell repertoire caused by defective thymic T-cell development and selection, lymphopenia with homeostatic proliferation, and lack of regulatory T cells are considered key factors in OS pathogenesis. We report 2 siblings presenting with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Pneumocystis jirovecii infections and recurrent sepsis; one developed all clinical features of OS. Both carried homozygous germline mutations in CARD11 (p.Cys150*), impairing NF-κB signaling and IL-2 production. A somatic second-site mutation reverting the stop codon to a missense mutation (p.Cys150Leu) was detected in tissue-infiltrating T cells of the OS patient. Expression of p.Cys150Leu in CARD11-deficient T cells largely reconstituted NF-κB signaling. The reversion likely occurred in a prethymic T-cell precursor, leading to a chimeric T-cell repertoire. We speculate that in our patient the functional advantage of the revertant T cells in the context of persistent CMV infection, combined with lack of regulatory T cells, may have been sufficient to favor OS. This first observation of OS in a patient with a T-cell activation defect suggests that severely defective T-cell development or homeostatic proliferation in a lymphopenic environment are not required for this severe immunopathology. PMID:26289640

  20. Omenn syndrome associated with a functional reversion due to a somatic second-site mutation in CARD11 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Pannicke, Ulrich; Lorenz, Myriam R; Fisch, Paul; Jeelall, Yogesh; Rohr, Jan; Speckmann, Carsten; Vraetz, Thomas; Farmand, Susan; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Krüger, Marcus; Strahm, Brigitte; Henneke, Philipp; Enders, Anselm; Horikawa, Keisuke; Goodnow, Christopher; Schwarz, Klaus; Ehl, Stephan

    2015-10-01

    Omenn syndrome (OS) is a severe immunodeficiency associated with erythroderma, lymphoproliferation, elevated IgE, and hyperactive oligoclonal T cells. A restricted T-cell repertoire caused by defective thymic T-cell development and selection, lymphopenia with homeostatic proliferation, and lack of regulatory T cells are considered key factors in OS pathogenesis. We report 2 siblings presenting with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Pneumocystis jirovecii infections and recurrent sepsis; one developed all clinical features of OS. Both carried homozygous germline mutations in CARD11 (p.Cys150*), impairing NF-κB signaling and IL-2 production. A somatic second-site mutation reverting the stop codon to a missense mutation (p.Cys150Leu) was detected in tissue-infiltrating T cells of the OS patient. Expression of p.Cys150Leu in CARD11-deficient T cells largely reconstituted NF-κB signaling. The reversion likely occurred in a prethymic T-cell precursor, leading to a chimeric T-cell repertoire. We speculate that in our patient the functional advantage of the revertant T cells in the context of persistent CMV infection, combined with lack of regulatory T cells, may have been sufficient to favor OS. This first observation of OS in a patient with a T-cell activation defect suggests that severely defective T-cell development or homeostatic proliferation in a lymphopenic environment are not required for this severe immunopathology. PMID:26289640

  1. Site-specific somatic mitochondrial DNA point mutations in patients with thymidine phosphorylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, Yutaka; Martí, Ramon; Copeland, William C; Hirano, Michio

    2003-06-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TP). This deficiency of TP leads to increased circulating levels of thymidine (deoxythymidine, dThd) and deoxyuridine (dUrd) and has been associated with multiple deletions and depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Here we describe 36 point mutations in mtDNA of tissues and cultured cells from MNGIE patients. Thirty-one mtDNA point mutations (86%) were T-to-C transitions, and of these, 25 were preceded by 5'-AA sequences. In addition, we identified a single base-pair mtDNA deletion and a TT-to-AA mutation. Next-nucleotide effects and dislocation mutagenesis may contribute to the formation of these mutations. These results provide the first demonstration that alterations of nucleoside metabolism can induce multiple sequence-specific point mutations in humans. We hypothesize that, in patients with TP deficiency, increased levels of dThd and dUrd cause mitochondrial nucleotide pool imbalances, which, in turn, lead to mtDNA abnormalities including site-specific point mutations. PMID:12813027

  2. Genome-wide variation of the somatic mutation frequency in transgenic plants

    PubMed Central

    Kovalchuk, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga; Hohn, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    In order to analyse the frequency of point mutations in whole plants, several constructs containing single nonsense mutations in the β-glucuronidase (uidA) gene were used to generate transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Upon histochemical staining of transgenic plants, sectors indicative of transgene reactivation appeared. Reversion frequencies were in the range of 10–7–10–8 events per base pair, exceeding the previous estimates for other eukaryotes at least 100-fold. The frequency was dependent on the position of the mutation substrate within the transgene and the position of the transgene within the Arabidopsis genome. An inverse relationship between the level of transgene transcription and mutation frequency was observed in single-copy lines. DNA-damaging factors induced the mutation frequency by a factor of up to 56 for UV-C, a factor of 3 for X-rays and a factor of 2 for methyl methanesulfonate. This novel plant mutation-monitoring system allowed us to measure the frequencies of point mutation in whole plants and may be used as an alternative or complement to study the mutagenicity of different environmental factors on the higher eukaryote’s genome. PMID:10970837

  3. Site-specific somatic mitochondrial DNA point mutations in patients with thymidine phosphorylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nishigaki, Yutaka; Martí, Ramon; Copeland, William C.; Hirano, Michio

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TP). This deficiency of TP leads to increased circulating levels of thymidine (deoxythymidine, dThd) and deoxyuridine (dUrd) and has been associated with multiple deletions and depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Here we describe 36 point mutations in mtDNA of tissues and cultured cells from MNGIE patients. Thirty-one mtDNA point mutations (86%) were T-to-C transitions, and of these, 25 were preceded by 5′-AA sequences. In addition, we identified a single base-pair mtDNA deletion and a TT-to-AA mutation. Next-nucleotide effects and dislocation mutagenesis may contribute to the formation of these mutations. These results provide the first demonstration that alterations of nucleoside metabolism can induce multiple sequence-specific point mutations in humans. We hypothesize that, in patients with TP deficiency, increased levels of dThd and dUrd cause mitochondrial nucleotide pool imbalances, which, in turn, lead to mtDNA abnormalities including site-specific point mutations. PMID:12813027

  4. Estimating Exceptionally Rare Germline and Somatic Mutation Frequencies via Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Song-Ro; Arnheim, Norman; Calabrese, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We used targeted next generation deep-sequencing (Safe Sequencing System) to measure ultra-rare de novo mutation frequencies in the human male germline by attaching a unique identifier code to each target DNA molecule. Segments from three different human genes (FGFR3, MECP2 and PTPN11) were studied. Regardless of the gene segment, the particular testis donor or the 73 different testis pieces used, the frequencies for any one of the six different mutation types were consistent. Averaging over the C>T/G>A and G>T/C>A mutation types the background mutation frequency was 2.6x10-5 per base pair, while for the four other mutation types the average background frequency was lower at 1.5x10-6 per base pair. These rates far exceed the well documented human genome average frequency per base pair (~10−8) suggesting a non-biological explanation for our data. By computational modeling and a new experimental procedure to distinguish between pre-mutagenic lesion base mismatches and a fully mutated base pair in the original DNA molecule, we argue that most of the base-dependent variation in background frequency is due to a mixture of deamination and oxidation during the first two PCR cycles. Finally, we looked at a previously studied disease mutation in the PTPN11 gene and could easily distinguish true mutations from the SSS background. We also discuss the limits and possibilities of this and other methods to measure exceptionally rare mutation frequencies, and we present calculations for other scientists seeking to design their own such experiments. PMID:27341568

  5. Estimating Exceptionally Rare Germline and Somatic Mutation Frequencies via Next Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Eboreime, Jordan; Choi, Soo-Kung; Yoon, Song-Ro; Arnheim, Norman; Calabrese, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We used targeted next generation deep-sequencing (Safe Sequencing System) to measure ultra-rare de novo mutation frequencies in the human male germline by attaching a unique identifier code to each target DNA molecule. Segments from three different human genes (FGFR3, MECP2 and PTPN11) were studied. Regardless of the gene segment, the particular testis donor or the 73 different testis pieces used, the frequencies for any one of the six different mutation types were consistent. Averaging over the C>T/G>A and G>T/C>A mutation types the background mutation frequency was 2.6x10-5 per base pair, while for the four other mutation types the average background frequency was lower at 1.5x10-6 per base pair. These rates far exceed the well documented human genome average frequency per base pair (~10-8) suggesting a non-biological explanation for our data. By computational modeling and a new experimental procedure to distinguish between pre-mutagenic lesion base mismatches and a fully mutated base pair in the original DNA molecule, we argue that most of the base-dependent variation in background frequency is due to a mixture of deamination and oxidation during the first two PCR cycles. Finally, we looked at a previously studied disease mutation in the PTPN11 gene and could easily distinguish true mutations from the SSS background. We also discuss the limits and possibilities of this and other methods to measure exceptionally rare mutation frequencies, and we present calculations for other scientists seeking to design their own such experiments. PMID:27341568

  6. DNA Methylation and Somatic Mutations Converge on the Cell Cycle and Define Similar Evolutionary Histories in Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Mazor, Tali; Pankov, Aleksandr; Johnson, Brett E; Hong, Chibo; Hamilton, Emily G; Bell, Robert J A; Smirnov, Ivan V; Reis, Gerald F; Phillips, Joanna J; Barnes, Michael J; Idbaih, Ahmed; Alentorn, Agusti; Kloezeman, Jenneke J; Lamfers, Martine L M; Bollen, Andrew W; Taylor, Barry S; Molinaro, Annette M; Olshen, Adam B; Chang, Susan M; Song, Jun S; Costello, Joseph F

    2015-09-14

    The evolutionary history of tumor cell populations can be reconstructed from patterns of genetic alterations. In contrast to stable genetic events, epigenetic states are reversible and sensitive to the microenvironment, prompting the question whether epigenetic information can similarly be used to discover tumor phylogeny. We examined the spatial and temporal dynamics of DNA methylation in a cohort of low-grade gliomas and their patient-matched recurrences. Genes transcriptionally upregulated through promoter hypomethylation during malignant progression to high-grade glioblastoma were enriched in cell cycle function, evolving in parallel with genetic alterations that deregulate the G1/S cell cycle checkpoint. Moreover, phyloepigenetic relationships robustly recapitulated phylogenetic patterns inferred from somatic mutations. These findings highlight widespread co-dependency of genetic and epigenetic events throughout brain tumor evolution. PMID:26373278

  7. Somatic mutation in the wings of Drosophila melanogaster females dysgenic due to P elements when reared at 29 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Getz, C; van Schaik, N

    1991-05-01

    The possibility of somatic mobilisation of P elements in Drosophila melanogaster was investigated. Flies, trans-heterozygous for the genetic markers mwh and flr3, were obtained by crossing males containing transposition-competent P elements with females having M cytotype. The hybrid dysgenic flies were reared at 29 degrees C and their wings examined for mutant clones. The frequency of mutant spots found on the wings of the female flies was significantly higher than that of female control flies. We postulate that this increase in frequency may be due to P element mobilisation at high temperature in the wing cells of dysgenic hybrids. This is in direct contrast to the large body of research which indicates that P-transposition-mediated mutation is restricted to the germline. PMID:1851538

  8. Somatic cell mutations at the glycophorin A locus in erythrocytes of atomic bomb survivors: Implications for radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kyoizumi, Seishi; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Tanabe, Kazumi; Hirai, Yuko; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Umeki, Shigeko

    1996-07-01

    To clarify the relationship between somatic cell mutations and radiation exposure, the frequency of hemizygous mutant erythrocytes at the glycophorin A (GPA) locus was measured by flow cytometry for 1,226 heterozygous atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors in HIroshima and Nagasaki. For statistical analysis, both GPA mutant frequency and radiation dose were log-transformed to normalize skewed distributions of these variables. The GPA mutant frequency increased slightly but significantly with age at testing and with the number of cigarettes smoked. Also, mutant frequency was significantly higher in males than in females even with adjustment for smoking and was higher to Hiroshima than in Nagasaki. These characteristics of background GPA mutant frequency are qualitatively similar to those of background solid cancer incidence or mortality obtained from previous epidemiological studies of survivors. An analysis of the mutant frequency dose response using a descriptive model showed that the doubling dose is about 1.20 Sv [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.95-1.56], whereas the minimum dose for detecting a significant increase in mutant frequency is about 0.24 Sv (95% CI: 0.041-0.51). No significant effects of sex, city or age at the time of exposure on the dose response were detected. Interestingly, the doubling dose of the GPA mutant frequency was similar to that of solid cancer incidence in A-bomb survivors. This observation is in line with the hypothesis that radiation-induced somatic cell mutations are the major cause of excess cancer risk after radiation. 49 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Segregation of the fragile X mutation from a male with a full mutation: Unusual somatic instability in the FMR-1 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kambouris, M.; Bluhm, D.; Feldman, G.L.

    1996-08-09

    Fragile X syndrome is associated with an unstable CGG-repeat in the FMR-1 gene. There are few reports of affected males transmitting the FMR-l gene to offspring. We report on a family in which the propositus and his twin sister each had a full mutation with abnormal methylation. Their mother had an FMR-1 allele in the normal range and a large premutation, with normal methylation. The maternal grandmother had two normal FMR-1 alleles. The maternal grandfather had an unusual somatic FMR-1 pattern, with allele size ranging from premutation to full mutation. No allele was detectable by PCR analysis. Multiple Southern blot analyses identified a hybridization pattern that originated at a distinct premutation band and extended into the full mutation range. Methylation studies revealed a mosaic pattern with both unmethylated premutations and methylated full mutations. This individual declined formal evaluation but did not finish high school and has difficulty in reading and writing. The size of the premutation FMR-1 allele passed to his daughter is larger than his most prominent premutation allele. This is most likely due to gonadal mosaicism similar to that in his peripheral lymphocytes. Alternatively, this expansion event may have occurred during his daughter`s early embryonic development and this large premutation allele is mitotically unstable. This pattern of FMR-1 alleles in a presumably mildly affected male is highly unusual. These findings are consistent with the absence of transmission of a full fragile X mutation through an expressing male. Studies of tissue-specific FMR-1 allele expansion and FMR-1 protein expression on this individual should help to determine the correlation of the molecular findings with the phenotypic effects. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Is Increased Low-dose somatic Radiosensitivity Associated with Increased Transgenerational Germline Mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, David J.

    2008-10-02

    Using single-molecule polymerase chain reaction, the frequency of spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation at an expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) locus was studied in DNA samples extracted from sperm and bone marrow of Atm knockout (Atm+/–) heterozygous male mice. The frequency of spontaneous mutation in sperm and bone marrow in Atm+/– males did not significantly differ from that in wild-type BALB/c mice. Acute gamma-ray exposure did not affect ESTR mutation frequency in bone marrow and resulted in similar increases in sperm samples taken from Atm+/– and BALB/c males. Taken together, these results suggest that the Atm haploinsufficiency analyzed in our study does not affect spontaneous and radiation-induced ESTR mutation frequency in mice.

  11. Somatic overgrowth associated with homozygous mutations in both MAN1B1 and SEC23A

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Swati; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Wang, Tracy; Dempsey Nunez, Laura; Rosenblatt, David S.; Gibson, William T.; Gilfix, Brian; Bergeron, John J. M.; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A.

    2016-01-01

    Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified homozygous mutations in two unlinked genes, SEC23A c.1200G>C (p.M400I) and MAN1B1 c.1000C>T (p.R334C), associated with congenital birth defects in two patients from a consanguineous family. Patients presented with carbohydrate-deficient transferrin, tall stature, obesity, macrocephaly, and maloccluded teeth. The parents were healthy heterozygous carriers for both mutations and an unaffected sibling with tall stature carried the heterozygous mutation in SEC23A only. Mutations in SEC23A are responsible for craniolenticosultura dysplasia (CLSD). CLSD patients are short, have late-closing fontanels, and have reduced procollagen (pro-COL1A1) secretion because of abnormal pro-COL1A1 retention in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The mutation we identified in MAN1B1 was previously associated with reduced MAN1B1 protein and congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). CDG patients are also short, are obese, and have abnormal glycan remodeling. Molecular analysis of fibroblasts from the family revealed normal levels of SEC23A in all cells and reduced levels of MAN1B1 in cells with heterozygous or homozygous mutations in SEC23A and MAN1B1. Secretion of pro-COL1A1 was increased in fibroblasts from the siblings and patients, and pro-COL1A1 was retained in Golgi of heterozygous and homozygous mutant cells, although intracellular pro-COL1A1 was increased in patient fibroblasts only. We postulate that increased pro-COL1A1 secretion is responsible for tall stature in these patients and an unaffected sibling, and not previously discovered in patients with mutations in either SEC23A or MAN1B1. The patients in this study share biochemical and cellular characteristics consistent with mutations in MAN1B1 and SEC23A, indicating a digenic disease. PMID:27148587

  12. Somatic overgrowth associated with homozygous mutations in both MAN1B1 and SEC23A.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Swati; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Wang, Tracy; Dempsey Nunez, Laura; Rosenblatt, David S; Gibson, William T; Gilfix, Brian; Bergeron, John J M; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A

    2016-05-01

    Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified homozygous mutations in two unlinked genes, SEC23A c.1200G>C (p.M400I) and MAN1B1 c.1000C>T (p.R334C), associated with congenital birth defects in two patients from a consanguineous family. Patients presented with carbohydrate-deficient transferrin, tall stature, obesity, macrocephaly, and maloccluded teeth. The parents were healthy heterozygous carriers for both mutations and an unaffected sibling with tall stature carried the heterozygous mutation in SEC23A only. Mutations in SEC23A are responsible for craniolenticosultura dysplasia (CLSD). CLSD patients are short, have late-closing fontanels, and have reduced procollagen (pro-COL1A1) secretion because of abnormal pro-COL1A1 retention in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The mutation we identified in MAN1B1 was previously associated with reduced MAN1B1 protein and congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). CDG patients are also short, are obese, and have abnormal glycan remodeling. Molecular analysis of fibroblasts from the family revealed normal levels of SEC23A in all cells and reduced levels of MAN1B1 in cells with heterozygous or homozygous mutations in SEC23A and MAN1B1. Secretion of pro-COL1A1 was increased in fibroblasts from the siblings and patients, and pro-COL1A1 was retained in Golgi of heterozygous and homozygous mutant cells, although intracellular pro-COL1A1 was increased in patient fibroblasts only. We postulate that increased pro-COL1A1 secretion is responsible for tall stature in these patients and an unaffected sibling, and not previously discovered in patients with mutations in either SEC23A or MAN1B1. The patients in this study share biochemical and cellular characteristics consistent with mutations in MAN1B1 and SEC23A, indicating a digenic disease. PMID:27148587

  13. Somatic Point Mutations in mtDNA Control Region Are Influenced by Genetic Background and Associated with Healthy Aging: A GEHA Study

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Giuseppina; Romeo, Giuseppe; Dato, Serena; Crocco, Paolina; Bruni, Amalia C.; Hervonen, Antti; Majamaa, Kari; Sevini, Federica; Franceschi, Claudio; Passarino, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Tissue specific somatic mutations occurring in the mtDNA control region have been proposed to provide a survival advantage. Data on twins and on relatives of long-lived subjects suggested that the occurrence/accumulation of these mutations may be genetically influenced. To further investigate control region somatic heteroplasmy in the elderly, we analyzed the segment surrounding the nt 150 position (previously reported as specific of Leukocytes) in various types of leukocytes obtained from 195 ultra-nonagenarians sib-pairs of Italian or Finnish origin collected in the frame of the GEHA Project. We found a significant correlation of the mtDNA control region heteroplasmy between sibs, confirming a genetic influence on this phenomenon. Furthermore, many subjects showed heteroplasmy due to mutations different from the C150T transition. In these cases heteroplasmy was correlated within sibpairs in Finnish and northern Italian samples, but not in southern Italians. This suggested that the genetic contribution to control region mutations may be population specific. Finally, we observed a possible correlation between heteroplasmy and Hand Grip strength, one of the best markers of physical performance and of mortality risk in the elderly. Our study provides new evidence on the relevance of mtDNA somatic mutations in aging and longevity and confirms that the occurrence of specific point mutations in the mtDNA control region may represent a strategy for the age-related remodelling of organismal functions. PMID:20976236

  14. Integrative genome analyses identify key somatic driver mutations of small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Peifer, Martin; Fernández-Cuesta, Lynnette; Sos, Martin L; George, Julie; Seidel, Danila; Kasper, Lawryn H; Plenker, Dennis; Leenders, Frauke; Sun, Ruping; Zander, Thomas; Menon, Roopika; Koker, Mirjam; Dahmen, Ilona; Müller, Christian; Di Cerbo, Vincenzo; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Altmüller, Janine; Baessmann, Ingelore; Becker, Christian; de Wilde, Bram; Vandesompele, Jo; Böhm, Diana; Ansén, Sascha; Gabler, Franziska; Wilkening, Ines; Heynck, Stefanie; Heuckmann, Johannes M; Lu, Xin; Carter, Scott L; Cibulskis, Kristian; Banerji, Shantanu; Getz, Gad; Park, Kwon-Sik; Rauh, Daniel; Grütter, Christian; Fischer, Matthias; Pasqualucci, Laura; Wright, Gavin; Wainer, Zoe; Russell, Prudence; Petersen, Iver; Chen, Yuan; Stoelben, Erich; Ludwig, Corinna; Schnabel, Philipp; Hoffmann, Hans; Muley, Thomas; Brockmann, Michael; Engel-Riedel, Walburga; Muscarella, Lucia A; Fazio, Vito M; Groen, Harry; Timens, Wim; Sietsma, Hannie; Thunnissen, Erik; Smit, Egbert; Heideman, Daniëlle A M; Snijders, Peter J F; Cappuzzo, Federico; Ligorio, Claudia; Damiani, Stefania; Field, John; Solberg, Steinar; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Sänger, Jörg; Clement, Joachim H; Soltermann, Alex; Moch, Holger; Weder, Walter; Solomon, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles; Validire, Pierre; Besse, Benjamin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Brambilla, Christian; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Lorimier, Philippe; Schneider, Peter M; Hallek, Michael; Pao, William; Meyerson, Matthew; Sage, Julien; Shendure, Jay; Schneider, Robert; Büttner, Reinhard; Wolf, Jürgen; Nürnberg, Peter; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas C; Brindle, Paul K; Haas, Stefan; Thomas, Roman K

    2012-10-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive lung tumor subtype with poor prognosis. We sequenced 29 SCLC exomes, 2 genomes and 15 transcriptomes and found an extremely high mutation rate of 7.4±1 protein-changing mutations per million base pairs. Therefore, we conducted integrated analyses of the various data sets to identify pathogenetically relevant mutated genes. In all cases, we found evidence for inactivation of TP53 and RB1 and identified recurrent mutations in the CREBBP, EP300 and MLL genes that encode histone modifiers. Furthermore, we observed mutations in PTEN, SLIT2 and EPHA7, as well as focal amplifications of the FGFR1 tyrosine kinase gene. Finally, we detected many of the alterations found in humans in SCLC tumors from Tp53 and Rb1 double knockout mice. Our study implicates histone modification as a major feature of SCLC, reveals potentially therapeutically tractable genomic alterations and provides a generalizable framework for the identification of biologically relevant genes in the context of high mutational background. PMID:22941188

  15. Integrative genome analyses identify key somatic driver mutations of small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peifer, Martin; Fernández-Cuesta, Lynnette; Sos, Martin L; George, Julie; Seidel, Danila; Kasper, Lawryn H; Plenker, Dennis; Leenders, Frauke; Sun, Ruping; Zander, Thomas; Menon, Roopika; Koker, Mirjam; Dahmen, Ilona; Müller, Christian; Di Cerbo, Vincenzo; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Altmüller, Janine; Baessmann, Ingelore; Becker, Christian; de Wilde, Bram; Vandesompele, Jo; Böhm, Diana; Ansén, Sascha; Gabler, Franziska; Wilkening, Ines; Heynck, Stefanie; Heuckmann, Johannes M; Lu, Xin; Carter, Scott L; Cibulskis, Kristian; Banerji, Shantanu; Getz, Gad; Park, Kwon-Sik; Rauh, Daniel; Grütter, Christian; Fischer, Matthias; Pasqualucci, Laura; Wright, Gavin; Wainer, Zoe; Russell, Prudence; Petersen, Iver; Chen, Yuan; Stoelben, Erich; Ludwig, Corinna; Schnabel, Philipp; Hoffmann, Hans; Muley, Thomas; Brockmann, Michael; Engel-Riedel, Walburga; Muscarella, Lucia A; Fazio, Vito M; Groen, Harry; Timens, Wim; Sietsma, Hannie; Thunnissen, Erik; Smit, Egbert; Heideman, Daniëlle AM; Snijders, Peter JF; Cappuzzo, Federico; Ligorio, Claudia; Damiani, Stefania; Field, John; Solberg, Steinar; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Sänger, Jörg; Clement, Joachim H; Soltermann, Alex; Moch, Holger; Weder, Walter; Solomon, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles; Validire, Pierre; Besse, Benjamin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Brambilla, Christian; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Lorimier, Philippe; Schneider, Peter M; Hallek, Michael; Pao, William; Meyerson, Matthew; Sage, Julien; Shendure, Jay; Schneider, Robert; Büttner, Reinhard; Wolf, Jürgen; Nürnberg, Peter; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas C; Brindle, Paul K; Haas, Stefan; Thomas, Roman K

    2016-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive lung tumor subtype with poor survival1–3. We sequenced 29 SCLC exomes, two genomes and 15 transcriptomes and found an extremely high mutation rate of 7.4±1 protein-changing mutations per million basepairs. Therefore, we conducted integrated analyses of the various data sets to identify pathogenetically relevant mutated genes. In all cases we found evidence for inactivation of TP53 and RB1 and identified recurrent mutations in histone-modifying genes, CREBBP, EP300, and MLL. Furthermore, we observed mutations in PTEN, in SLIT2, and EPHA7, as well as focal amplifications of the FGFR1 tyrosine kinase gene. Finally, we detected many of the alterations found in humans in SCLC tumors from p53/Rb1-deficient mice4. Our study implicates histone modification as a major feature of SCLC, reveals potentially therapeutically tractable genome alterations, and provides a generalizable framework for identification of biologically relevant genes in the context of high mutational background. PMID:22941188

  16. Somatic mutation frequencies in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia grown in soil samples from the Bikini Island.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, S; Ishii, C

    1991-02-01

    Somatic pink mutation frequencies in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia BNL 02 clone grown for 76 days in two soil samples taken from the Bikini Island (where a hydrogen bomb explosion test had been conducted in 1954) were investigated. A significantly high mutation frequency (2.58 +/- 0.17 pink mutant events per 10(3) hairs or 1.34 +/- 0.09 pink mutant events per 10(4) hair-cell divisions) was observed for the plant grown in one of the two Bikini soil samples, as compared to the control plants (1.70 +/- 0.14 or 0.88 +/- 0.07, respectively) grown in the field soil of Saitama University. The soil sample which caused the significant increase in mutation frequency contained 6,880 +/- 330 mBq/g 137Cs, 62.5 +/- 4.4 mBq/g 60Co, and some other nuclides; a 150 microR/hr exposure rate being measured on the surface of the soil sample. The effective cumulative external exposures measured for the inflorescences of the plant grown in this soil sample averaged at most 60.8 mR, being too small to explain the significant elevation in mutation frequency observed. On the other hand, internal exposure due to uptake of radioactive nuclides was estimated to be 125 mrad (1.25 mGy) as an accumulated effective dose, mainly based on a gamma-spectrometrical analysis. However, it seemed highly likely that this value of internal exposure was a considerable underestimate, and the internal exposure was considered to be more significant than the external exposure. PMID:2064800

  17. Laminin gene LAMB4 is somatically mutated and expressionally altered in gastric and colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi Ryoung; An, Chang Hyeok; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Laminins are important in tumor invasion and metastasis as well as in maintenance of normal epithelial cell structures. However, mutation status of laminin chain-encoding genes remains unknown in cancers. Aim of this study was to explore whether laminin chain genes are mutated and expressionally altered in gastric (GC) and colorectal cancers (CRC). In a public database, we found that laminin chain genes LAMA1, LAMA3, LAMB1 and LAMB4 had mononucleotide repeats in the coding sequences that might be mutation targets in the cancers with microsatellite instability (MSI). We analyzed the genes in 88 GC and 139 CRC [high MSI (MSI-H) or stable MSI/low MSI (MSS/MSI-L)] by single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing. In the present study, we found LAMB4 (11.8% of GC and 7.6% of CRC with MSI-H), LAMA3 (2.9% of GC and 2.5 of CRC with MSI-H), LAMA1 (5.9% of GC with MSI-H) and LAMB1 frameshift mutations (1.3% of CRC with MSI-H). These mutations were not found in MSS/MSI-L (0/114). We also analyzed LAMB4 expression in GC and CRC by immunohistochemistry. Loss of LAMB4 expression was identified in 17-32% of the GC and CRC. Of note, the loss expression was more common in the cancers with LAMB4 mutation or those with MSI-H. Our data show that frameshift mutations of LAMA1, LAMA3, LAMB1 and LAMB4, and loss of LAMB4 may be features of GC and CRC with MSI-H. PMID:25257191

  18. Identification of somatic mutations in non-small cell lung carcinomas using whole-exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengyuan; Morrison, Carl; Wang, Liang; Xiong, Donghai; Vedell, Peter; Cui, Peng; Hua, Xing; Ding, Feng; Lu, Yan; James, Michael; Ebben, John D; Xu, Haiming; Adjei, Alex A; Head, Karen; Andrae, Jaime W; Tschannen, Michael R; Jacob, Howard; Pan, Jing; Zhang, Qi; Van den Bergh, Francoise; Xiao, Haijie; Lo, Ken C; Patel, Jigar; Richmond, Todd; Watt, Mary-Anne; Albert, Thomas; Selzer, Rebecca; Anderson, Marshall; Wang, Jiang; Wang, Yian; Starnes, Sandra; Yang, Ping; You, Ming

    2012-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death, with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) being the predominant form of the disease. Most lung cancer is caused by the accumulation of genomic alterations due to tobacco exposure. To uncover its mutational landscape, we performed whole-exome sequencing in 31 NSCLCs and their matched normal tissue samples. We identified both common and unique mutation spectra and pathway activation in lung adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas, two major histologies in NSCLC. In addition to identifying previously known lung cancer genes (TP53, KRAS, EGFR, CDKN2A and RB1), the analysis revealed many genes not previously implicated in this malignancy. Notably, a novel gene CSMD3 was identified as the second most frequently mutated gene (next to TP53) in lung cancer. We further demonstrated that loss of CSMD3 results in increased proliferation of airway epithelial cells. The study provides unprecedented insights into mutational processes, cellular pathways and gene networks associated with lung cancer. Of potential immediate clinical relevance, several highly mutated genes identified in our study are promising druggable targets in cancer therapy including ALK, CTNNA3, DCC, MLL3, PCDHIIX, PIK3C2B, PIK3CG and ROCK2. PMID:22510280

  19. A comprehensive assessment of somatic mutation detection in cancer using whole-genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Alioto, Tyler S.; Buchhalter, Ivo; Derdak, Sophia; Hutter, Barbara; Eldridge, Matthew D.; Hovig, Eivind; Heisler, Lawrence E.; Beck, Timothy A.; Simpson, Jared T.; Tonon, Laurie; Sertier, Anne-Sophie; Patch, Ann-Marie; Jäger, Natalie; Ginsbach, Philip; Drews, Ruben; Paramasivam, Nagarajan; Kabbe, Rolf; Chotewutmontri, Sasithorn; Diessl, Nicolle; Previti, Christopher; Schmidt, Sabine; Brors, Benedikt; Feuerbach, Lars; Heinold, Michael; Gröbner, Susanne; Korshunov, Andrey; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Butler, Adam P.; Hinton, Jonathan; Jones, David; Menzies, Andrew; Raine, Keiran; Shepherd, Rebecca; Stebbings, Lucy; Teague, Jon W.; Ribeca, Paolo; Giner, Francesc Castro; Beltran, Sergi; Raineri, Emanuele; Dabad, Marc; Heath, Simon C.; Gut, Marta; Denroche, Robert E.; Harding, Nicholas J.; Yamaguchi, Takafumi N.; Fujimoto, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Quesada, Víctor; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Nakken, Sigve; Vodák, Daniel; Bower, Lawrence; Lynch, Andrew G.; Anderson, Charlotte L.; Waddell, Nicola; Pearson, John V.; Grimmond, Sean M.; Peto, Myron; Spellman, Paul; He, Minghui; Kandoth, Cyriac; Lee, Semin; Zhang, John; Létourneau, Louis; Ma, Singer; Seth, Sahil; Torrents, David; Xi, Liu; Wheeler, David A.; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías; Campbell, Peter J.; Boutros, Paul C.; Puente, Xose S.; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Pfister, Stefan M.; McPherson, John D.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Schlesner, Matthias; Lichter, Peter; Eils, Roland; Jones, David T. W.; Gut, Ivo G.

    2015-01-01

    As whole-genome sequencing for cancer genome analysis becomes a clinical tool, a full understanding of the variables affecting sequencing analysis output is required. Here using tumour-normal sample pairs from two different types of cancer, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and medulloblastoma, we conduct a benchmarking exercise within the context of the International Cancer Genome Consortium. We compare sequencing methods, analysis pipelines and validation methods. We show that using PCR-free methods and increasing sequencing depth to ∼100 × shows benefits, as long as the tumour:control coverage ratio remains balanced. We observe widely varying mutation call rates and low concordance among analysis pipelines, reflecting the artefact-prone nature of the raw data and lack of standards for dealing with the artefacts. However, we show that, using the benchmark mutation set we have created, many issues are in fact easy to remedy and have an immediate positive impact on mutation detection accuracy. PMID:26647970

  20. A comprehensive assessment of somatic mutation detection in cancer using whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Alioto, Tyler S; Buchhalter, Ivo; Derdak, Sophia; Hutter, Barbara; Eldridge, Matthew D; Hovig, Eivind; Heisler, Lawrence E; Beck, Timothy A; Simpson, Jared T; Tonon, Laurie; Sertier, Anne-Sophie; Patch, Ann-Marie; Jäger, Natalie; Ginsbach, Philip; Drews, Ruben; Paramasivam, Nagarajan; Kabbe, Rolf; Chotewutmontri, Sasithorn; Diessl, Nicolle; Previti, Christopher; Schmidt, Sabine; Brors, Benedikt; Feuerbach, Lars; Heinold, Michael; Gröbner, Susanne; Korshunov, Andrey; Tarpey, Patrick S; Butler, Adam P; Hinton, Jonathan; Jones, David; Menzies, Andrew; Raine, Keiran; Shepherd, Rebecca; Stebbings, Lucy; Teague, Jon W; Ribeca, Paolo; Giner, Francesc Castro; Beltran, Sergi; Raineri, Emanuele; Dabad, Marc; Heath, Simon C; Gut, Marta; Denroche, Robert E; Harding, Nicholas J; Yamaguchi, Takafumi N; Fujimoto, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Quesada, Víctor; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Nakken, Sigve; Vodák, Daniel; Bower, Lawrence; Lynch, Andrew G; Anderson, Charlotte L; Waddell, Nicola; Pearson, John V; Grimmond, Sean M; Peto, Myron; Spellman, Paul; He, Minghui; Kandoth, Cyriac; Lee, Semin; Zhang, John; Létourneau, Louis; Ma, Singer; Seth, Sahil; Torrents, David; Xi, Liu; Wheeler, David A; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías; Campbell, Peter J; Boutros, Paul C; Puente, Xose S; Gerhard, Daniela S; Pfister, Stefan M; McPherson, John D; Hudson, Thomas J; Schlesner, Matthias; Lichter, Peter; Eils, Roland; Jones, David T W; Gut, Ivo G

    2015-01-01

    As whole-genome sequencing for cancer genome analysis becomes a clinical tool, a full understanding of the variables affecting sequencing analysis output is required. Here using tumour-normal sample pairs from two different types of cancer, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and medulloblastoma, we conduct a benchmarking exercise within the context of the International Cancer Genome Consortium. We compare sequencing methods, analysis pipelines and validation methods. We show that using PCR-free methods and increasing sequencing depth to ∼ 100 × shows benefits, as long as the tumour:control coverage ratio remains balanced. We observe widely varying mutation call rates and low concordance among analysis pipelines, reflecting the artefact-prone nature of the raw data and lack of standards for dealing with the artefacts. However, we show that, using the benchmark mutation set we have created, many issues are in fact easy to remedy and have an immediate positive impact on mutation detection accuracy. PMID:26647970

  1. Pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.

    1994-12-01

    While characterizing the background mutation spectrum of the Hypoxathine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene in a healthy population, an outlier with a high mutant frequency of thioguanine resistant lymphocytes was found. When studied at the age of 46, this individual had been smoking 60 cigarettes per day for 38 years. His mutant frequency was calculated at 3.6 and 4.2x10{sup {minus}4} for two sampling periods eight months apart. Sequencing analysis of the HPRT gene in his mutant thioguanine resistant T lymphocytes was done to find whether the cells had a high rate of mutation, or if the mutation was due to a single occurrence of mutation and, if so, when in the T lymphocyte development the mutation occurred. By T-cell receptor analysis it has been found that out of 35 thioguanine resistant clones there was no dominant gamma T cell receptor gene rearrangement. During my appointment in the Science & Engineering Research Semester, I found that 34 of those clones have the same base substitution of G{yields}T at cDNA position 197. Due to the consistent mutant frequency from both sampling periods and the varying T cell receptors, the high mutant frequency cannot be due to recent proliferation of a mature mutant T lymphocyte. From the TCR and DNA sequence analysis we conclude that the G{yields}T mutation must have occurred in a T lymphocyte precursor before thymic differentiation so that the thioguanine resistant clones share the same base substitution but not the same gamma T cell receptor gene.

  2. The somatic mutation profiles of 2,433 breast cancers refines their genomic and transcriptomic landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Bernard; Chin, Suet-Feung; Rueda, Oscar M.; Vollan, Hans-Kristian Moen; Provenzano, Elena; Bardwell, Helen A.; Pugh, Michelle; Jones, Linda; Russell, Roslin; Sammut, Stephen-John; Tsui, Dana W. Y.; Liu, Bin; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Abraham, Jean; Northen, Helen; Peden, John F.; Mukherjee, Abhik; Turashvili, Gulisa; Green, Andrew R.; McKinney, Steve; Oloumi, Arusha; Shah, Sohrab; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Murphy, Leigh; Bentley, David R.; Ellis, Ian O.; Purushotham, Arnie; Pinder, Sarah E.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Earl, Helena M.; Pharoah, Paul D.; Ross, Mark T.; Aparicio, Samuel; Caldas, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The genomic landscape of breast cancer is complex, and inter- and intra-tumour heterogeneity are important challenges in treating the disease. In this study, we sequence 173 genes in 2,433 primary breast tumours that have copy number aberration (CNA), gene expression and long-term clinical follow-up data. We identify 40 mutation-driver (Mut-driver) genes, and determine associations between mutations, driver CNA profiles, clinical-pathological parameters and survival. We assess the clonal states of Mut-driver mutations, and estimate levels of intra-tumour heterogeneity using mutant-allele fractions. Associations between PIK3CA mutations and reduced survival are identified in three subgroups of ER-positive cancer (defined by amplification of 17q23, 11q13–14 or 8q24). High levels of intra-tumour heterogeneity are in general associated with a worse outcome, but highly aggressive tumours with 11q13–14 amplification have low levels of intra-tumour heterogeneity. These results emphasize the importance of genome-based stratification of breast cancer, and have important implications for designing therapeutic strategies. PMID:27161491

  3. The somatic mutation profiles of 2,433 breast cancers refines their genomic and transcriptomic landscapes.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Bernard; Chin, Suet-Feung; Rueda, Oscar M; Vollan, Hans-Kristian Moen; Provenzano, Elena; Bardwell, Helen A; Pugh, Michelle; Jones, Linda; Russell, Roslin; Sammut, Stephen-John; Tsui, Dana W Y; Liu, Bin; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Abraham, Jean; Northen, Helen; Peden, John F; Mukherjee, Abhik; Turashvili, Gulisa; Green, Andrew R; McKinney, Steve; Oloumi, Arusha; Shah, Sohrab; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Murphy, Leigh; Bentley, David R; Ellis, Ian O; Purushotham, Arnie; Pinder, Sarah E; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Earl, Helena M; Pharoah, Paul D; Ross, Mark T; Aparicio, Samuel; Caldas, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The genomic landscape of breast cancer is complex, and inter- and intra-tumour heterogeneity are important challenges in treating the disease. In this study, we sequence 173 genes in 2,433 primary breast tumours that have copy number aberration (CNA), gene expression and long-term clinical follow-up data. We identify 40 mutation-driver (Mut-driver) genes, and determine associations between mutations, driver CNA profiles, clinical-pathological parameters and survival. We assess the clonal states of Mut-driver mutations, and estimate levels of intra-tumour heterogeneity using mutant-allele fractions. Associations between PIK3CA mutations and reduced survival are identified in three subgroups of ER-positive cancer (defined by amplification of 17q23, 11q13-14 or 8q24). High levels of intra-tumour heterogeneity are in general associated with a worse outcome, but highly aggressive tumours with 11q13-14 amplification have low levels of intra-tumour heterogeneity. These results emphasize the importance of genome-based stratification of breast cancer, and have important implications for designing therapeutic strategies. PMID:27161491

  4. 40 CFR 798.5300 - Detection of gene mutations in somatic cells in culture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... addition to the reporting recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following... mutant cells, and in medium without selective agent to determine the cloning efficiency. After a suitable... sensitivity to chemical mutagens, a high cloning efficiency and a low spontaneous mutation frequency....

  5. 40 CFR 798.5300 - Detection of gene mutations in somatic cells in culture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... addition to the reporting recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following... mutant cells, and in medium without selective agent to determine the cloning efficiency. After a suitable... sensitivity to chemical mutagens, a high cloning efficiency and a low spontaneous mutation frequency....

  6. Azacitidine and Sorafenib Therapy in a Pediatric Patient With Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Monosomy 7 and Somatic PTPN11 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Nathan A; Michaels, Samantha T; McMasters, Richard L; Chandra, Sharat; O'Brien, Maureen M

    2016-03-01

    Monosomy 7 is a well-documented cytogenetic aberration in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and may occur in combinations with molecular abnormalities including PTPN11 mutation. PTPN11 mutations contribute to leukemogenesis through upregulation of Ras pathway signaling. We present the case of a 3-year-old female with AML with monosomy 7 and somatic PTPN11 mutation who was refractory to conventional AML chemotherapy but responded to a novel regimen of azacitidine and sorafenib followed by stem cell transplantation. Combination therapy with azacitidine and sorafenib may be an effective therapeutic strategy for patients with AML with Ras pathway abnormalities. PMID:26485542

  7. Similarity of spontaneous germinal and in vitro somatic cell mutation rates in humans: implications for carcinogenesis and for the role of exogenous factors in "spontaneous" germinal mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kuick, R D; Neel, J V; Strahler, J R; Chu, E H; Bargal, R; Fox, D A; Hanash, S M

    1992-01-01

    The rate of spontaneous mutation resulting in electrophoretic variants per cell generation in a human lymphoblastoid cell line, on the basis of experiments described in this paper, is found to be 7.2 x 10(-8) per locus. A review of similar data on electrophoretic variants resulting from spontaneous mutation in the human germ line leads to an estimate of 3.3 x 10(-8) per locus per cell generation. It is argued that the similarity of these two estimates, despite an average cell generation time of 18.5 hr for the cultured somatic cells but about 26 days in the germ line, suggests that spontaneous mutation involving nucleotide substitutions is much more dependent on cell generation than on time. This finding permits the inference that environmental (exogenous) variables make a relatively small contribution to the rate of this type of human germinal spontaneous mutation. While in vitro somatic-cell mutation rates, such as derived in this study, provide a basis for modeling the contribution of nucleotide substitutions in multihit/clonal theories of carcinogenesis, it is also argued that the complex of events involved in carcinogenesis, including chromosomal rearrangements and mitotic recombination, could have very different individual probabilities. Estimates for the rates of these other types of mutation are needed to provide a better understanding of the manner in which multiple mutations accumulate in malignant cells. Images PMID:1495998

  8. Lung cancers with acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors occasionally harbor BRAF gene mutations but lack mutations in KRAS, NRAS, or MEK1.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kadoaki; Sequist, Lecia V; Arcila, Maria E; Moran, Teresa; Chmielecki, Juliann; Lin, Ya-Lun; Pan, Yumei; Wang, Lu; de Stanchina, Elisa; Shien, Kazuhiko; Aoe, Keisuke; Toyooka, Shinichi; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Fernandez-Cuesta, Lynnette; Fidias, Panos; Yang, James Chih-Hsin; Miller, Vincent A; Riely, Gregory J; Kris, Mark G; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Vnencak-Jones, Cindy L; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Ladanyi, Marc; Pao, William

    2012-07-31

    Acquired resistance to EGF receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) is inevitable in metastatic EGFR-mutant lung cancers. Here, we modeled disease progression using EGFR-mutant human tumor cell lines. Although five of six models displayed alterations already found in humans, one harbored an unexpected secondary NRAS Q61K mutation; resistant cells were sensitive to concurrent EGFR and MEK inhibition but to neither alone. Prompted by this finding and because RAS/RAF/MEK mutations are known mediators of acquired resistance in other solid tumors (colon cancers, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and melanomas) responsive to targeted therapies, we analyzed the frequency of secondary KRAS/NRAS/BRAF/MEK1 gene mutations in the largest collection to date of lung cancers with acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs. No recurrent NRAS, KRAS, or MEK1 mutations were found in 212, 195, or 146 patient samples, respectively, but 2 of 195 (1%) were found to have mutations in BRAF (G469A and V600E). Ectopic expression of mutant NRAS or BRAF in drug-sensitive EGFR-mutant cells conferred resistance to EGFR TKIs that was overcome by addition of a MEK inhibitor. Collectively, these positive and negative results provide deeper insight into mechanisms of acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs in lung cancer and inform ongoing clinical trials designed to overcome resistance. In the context of emerging knowledge about mechanisms of acquired resistance to targeted therapies in various cancers, our data highlight the notion that, even though solid tumors share common signaling cascades, mediators of acquired resistance must be elucidated for each disease separately in the context of treatment. PMID:22773810

  9. Somatic mutation of GRIN2A in malignant melanoma results in loss of tumor suppressor activity via aberrant NMDAR complex formation.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Todd D; Zerlanko, Brad J; Hill, Victoria K; Gartner, Jared J; Qutob, Nouar; Jiang, Jiji; Simaan, May; Wunderlich, John; Gutkind, J Silvio; Rosenberg, Steven A; Samuels, Yardena

    2014-09-01

    The ionotropic glutamate receptors (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs)) are composed of large complexes of multi-protein subunits creating ion channels in the cell plasma membranes that allow for influx or efflux of mono- or divalent cations (e.g., Ca(2+)) important for synaptic transmissions, cellular migration, and survival. Recently, we discovered the high prevalence of somatic mutations within one of the ionotropic glutamate receptors, GRIN2A, in malignant melanoma. Functional characterization of a subset of GRIN2A mutants demonstrated a loss of NMDAR complex formation between GRIN1 and GRIN2A, increased anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, and increased migration. Somatic mutation of GRIN2A results in a dominant negative effect inhibiting the tumor-suppressive phenotype of wild-type (WT) GRIN2A in melanoma. Depletion of endogenous GRIN2A in melanoma cells expressing WT GRIN2A resulted in increased proliferation compared with control. In contrast, short-hairpin RNA depletion of GRIN2A in mutant cell lines slightly reduced proliferation. Our data show that somatic mutation of GRIN2A results in increased survival, and we demonstrate the functional importance of GRIN2A mutations in melanoma and the significance that ionotropic glutamate receptor signaling has in malignant melanoma. PMID:24739903

  10. Digital PCR for quantification of recurrent and potentially actionable somatic mutations in circulating free DNA from patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Camus, Vincent; Sarafan-Vasseur, Nasrin; Bohers, Elodie; Dubois, Sydney; Mareschal, Sylvain; Bertrand, Philippe; Viailly, Pierre-Julien; Ruminy, Philippe; Maingonnat, Catherine; Lemasle, Emilie; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Cornic, Marie; Beaussire, Ludivine; Bastard, Christian; Frebourg, Thierry; Tilly, Hervé; Jardin, Fabrice

    2016-09-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive and heterogeneous malignancy harboring frequent targetable activating somatic mutations. Emerging evidence suggests that circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) can be used to detect somatic variants in DLBCL using Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) experiments. In this proof-of-concept study, we chose to develop simple and valuable digital PCR (dPCR) assays for the detection of recurrent exportin-1 (XPO1) E571K, EZH2 Y641N, and MYD88 L265P mutations in DLBCL patients, thereby identifying patients most likely to potentially benefit from targeted therapies. We demonstrated that our dPCR assays were sufficiently sensitive to detect rare XPO1, EZH2, and MYD88 mutations in plasma cfDNA, with a sensitivity of 0.05%. cfDNA somatic mutation detection by dPCR seems to be a promising technique in the management of DLBCL, in addition to NGS experiments. PMID:26883583

  11. Low frequency of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies during chronic infection even in quaternary epitope targeting antibodies containing large numbers of somatic mutations.

    PubMed

    Hicar, Mark D; Chen, Xuemin; Kalams, Spyros A; Sojar, Hakimuddin; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N; Spearman, Paul; Crowe, James E

    2016-02-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (Abs) are thought to be a critical component of an appropriate HIV vaccine response. It has been proposed that Abs recognizing conformationally dependent quaternary epitopes on the HIV envelope (Env) trimer may be necessary to neutralize diverse HIV strains. A number of recently described broadly neutralizing monoclonal Abs (mAbs) recognize complex and quaternary epitopes. Generally, many such Abs exhibit extensive numbers of somatic mutations and unique structural characteristics. We sought to characterize the native antibody (Ab) response against circulating HIV focusing on such conformational responses, without a prior selection based on neutralization. Using a capture system based on VLPs incorporating cleaved envelope protein, we identified a selection of B cells that produce quaternary epitope targeting Abs (QtAbs). Similar to a number of broadly neutralizing Abs, the Ab genes encoding these QtAbs showed extensive numbers of somatic mutations. However, when expressed as recombinant molecules, these Abs failed to neutralize virus or mediate ADCVI activity. Molecular analysis showed unusually high numbers of mutations in the Ab heavy chain framework 3 region of the variable genes. The analysis suggests that large numbers of somatic mutations occur in Ab genes encoding HIV Abs in chronically infected individuals in a non-directed, stochastic, manner. PMID:26748387

  12. AB165. Whole-exome sequencing characterizes the landscape of somatic mutations and copy number variations in testicular germ cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Song; Ye, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Background Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) is the most common malignancy among young men. We conduct this study in order to further understand the genetic determinants of TGCT. Methods Eighteen TGCTs and matched normal controls were obtained from individuals newly diagnosed with TGCT in the hospital. Genomic DNAs were extracted from these samples and whole-exome sequencing was conducted by Hiseq 2000 platform. Copy number variations were called by exomeCNV based on the BWA alignments. Potential somatic substitutions and preliminary list of somatic indels were detected by the analyzed from our data. And these detected mutations were validated by Sanger sequencing. Results We identified a total of 77 nonsynonymous mutations with a uniformly low mutation rate of 0.14 mutations/Mb per tumor, on average. Notably, no somatic SNV was identified in 16.7% (3/18) of the tumors. Nevertheless, CTNNB1 and FZD10 were previously reported related to TGCT, potentially involved in the Wnt signaling pathway, contributing to the reprogram process during human embryonal carcinoma differentiation. Besides, KIAA1486 was the only recurrent gene identified in two tumors samples. With genetic evidence from United Kingdom, our study confirmed that gain of 12p (40/60; 66.7%) is the most frequent chromosomal aberration. Conclusions Our study uncovered a uniformly low mutation rate of these tumors, consistent with previous studies, supporting the embryonical origins of TGCT. Besides, the chromosomal aberrations were invariable presence, and no somatic SNV was identified in 16.7% (3/18) of the tumors, suggesting that chromosomal aberrations held a more critical role in the tumorigenesis of TGCT.

  13. AB201. Whole-exome sequencing characterizes the landscape of somatic mutations and copy number variations in testicular germ cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Song; Zhang, Meng; Ye, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Objective Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) is the most common malignancy among young men. We conduct this study in order to further understand the genetic determinants of TGCT. Methods A total of 18 TGCTs and matched normal controls were obtained from individuals newly diagnosed with TGCT in the hospital. Genomic DNAs were extracted from these samples and whole-exome sequencing was conducted by Hiseq 2000 platform. Copy number variations were called by exomeCNV based on the BWA alignments. Potential somatic substitutions and preliminary list of somatic indels were detected by the analyzed from our data. And these detected mutations were validated by Sanger sequencing. Results We identified a total of 77 nonsynonymous mutations with a uniformly low mutation rate of 0.14 mutations/Mb per tumor on average. Notably, no somatic SNV was identified in 16.7% (3/18) of the tumors. Nevertheless, CTNNB1 and FZD10 were previously reported related to TGCT, potentially involved in the Wnt signaling pathway, contributing to the reprogram process during human embryonal carcinoma differentiation. Besides, KIAA1486 was the only recurrent gene identified in two tumors samples. With genetic evidence from United Kingdom, our study confirmed that gain of 12p (40/60; 66.7%) is the most frequent chromosomal aberration. Conclusions Our study uncovered a uniformly low mutation rate of these tumors, consistent with previous studies, supporting the embryonical origins of TGCT. Besides, the chromosomal aberrations were invariable presence, and no somatic SNV was identified in 16.7% (3/18) of the tumors, suggesting that chromosomal aberrations held a more critical role in the tumorigenesis of TGCT.

  14. Defining Early-Onset Kidney Cancer: Implications for Germline and Somatic Mutation Testing and Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Shuch, Brian; Vourganti, Srinivas; Ricketts, Christopher J.; Middleton, Lindsay; Peterson, James; Merino, Maria J.; Metwalli, Adam R.; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Linehan, W. Marston

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 5% to 8% of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is hereditary. No guidelines exist for patient selection for RCC germline mutation testing. We evaluate how age of onset could indicate the need for germline mutation testing for detection of inherited forms of kidney cancer. Patients and Methods We analyzed the age distribution of RCC cases in the SEER-17 program and in our institutional hereditary kidney cancer population. The age distributions were compared by sex, race, histology, and hereditary cancer syndrome. Models were established to evaluate the specific age thresholds for genetic testing. Results The median age of patients with RCC in SEER-17 was 64 years, with the distribution closely approaching normalcy. Statistical differences were observed by race, sex, and subtype (P < .05). The bottom decile cutoff was ≤ 46 years of age and slightly differed by sex, race, and histology. The mean and median ages at presentation of 608 patients with hereditary kidney cancer were 39.3 years and 37 years, respectively. Although age varied by specific syndrome, 70% of these cases were found to lie at or below the bottom age decile. Modeling age-based genetic testing thresholds demonstrated that the 10th percentile maximized sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion Early age of onset might be a sign of hereditary RCC. Even in the absence of clinical manifestations and personal/family history, an age of onset of 46 years or younger should trigger consideration for genetic counseling/germline mutation testing and may serve as a useful cutoff when establishing genetic testing guidelines. PMID:24378414

  15. Rapid targeted somatic mutation analysis of solid tumors in routine clinical diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Francaviglia, Ilaria; Dal Cin, Elena; Barbieri, Gianluca; Arrigoni, Gianluigi; Pecciarini, Lorenza; Doglioni, Claudio; Cangi, Maria Giulia

    2015-01-01

    Tumor genotyping is an essential step in routine clinical practice and pathology laboratories face a major challenge in being able to provide rapid, sensitive and updated molecular tests. We developed a novel mass spectrometry multiplexed genotyping platform named PentaPanel to concurrently assess single nucleotide polymorphisms in 56 hotspots of the 5 most clinically relevant cancer genes, KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, EGFR and PIK3CA for a total of 221 detectable mutations. To both evaluate and validate the PentaPanel performance,we investigated 1025 tumor specimens of 6 different cancer types (carcinomas of colon, lung, breast, pancreas, and biliary tract, and melanomas), systematically addressing sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of our platform. Sanger sequencing was also performed for all the study samples. Our data showed that PentaPanel is a high throughput and robust tool, allowing genotyping for targeted therapy selection of 10 patients in the same run, with a practical turnaround time of 2 working days. Importantly, it was successfully used to interrogate different DNAs isolated from routinely processed specimens (formalin-fixed paraffin embedded, frozen, and cytological samples), covering all the requirements of clinical tests. In conclusion, the PentaPanel platform can provide an immediate, accurate and cost effective multiplex approach for clinically relevant gene mutation analysis in many solid tumors and its utility across many diseases can be particularly relevant in multiple clinical trials, including the new basket trial approach, aiming to identify appropriate targeted drug combination strategies. PMID:26435479

  16. The free energy landscape in translational science: how can somatic mutations result in constitutive oncogenic activation?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2014-04-14

    The free energy landscape theory has transformed the field of protein folding. The significance of perceiving function in terms of conformational heterogeneity is gradually shifting the interest in the community from folding to function. From the free energy landscape standpoint the principles are unchanged: rather than considering the entire protein conformational landscape, the focus is on the ensemble around the bottom of the folding funnel. The protein can be viewed as populating one of two states: active or inactive. The basins of the two states are separated by a surmountable barrier, which allows the conformations to switch between the states. Unless the protein is a repressor, under physiological conditions it typically populates the inactive state. Ligand binding (or post-translational modification) triggers a switch to the active state. Constitutive allosteric mutations work by shifting the population from the inactive to the active state and keeping it there. This can happen by either destabilizing the inactive state, stabilizing the active state, or both. Identification of the mechanism through which they work is important since it may assist in drug discovery. Here we spotlight the usefulness of the free energy landscape in translational science, illustrating how oncogenic mutations can work in key proteins from the EGFR/Ras/Raf/Erk/Mek pathway, the main signaling pathway in cancer. Finally, we delineate the key components which are needed in order to trace the mechanism of allosteric events. PMID:24445437

  17. Next-generation sequencing discloses a nonsense mutation in the dystrophin gene from long preserved dried umbilical cord and low-level somatic mosaicism in the proband mother.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi-Ikeda, Mariko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Lee, Tomoko; Nishiyama, Masahiro; Awano, Hiroyuki; Yagi, Mariko; Unzaki, Ai; Nozu, Kandai; Nishio, Hisahide; Matsuo, Masafumi; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Toda, Tatsushi; Morioka, Ichiro; Iijima, Kazumoto

    2016-04-01

    Duchene muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscle wasting disease, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) on the X chromosome. One-third of patients are estimated to have de novo mutations. To provide in-depth genetic counseling, the comprehensive identification of mutations is mandatory. However, many DMD patients did not undergo genetic diagnosis because detailed genetic diagnosis was not available or their mutational types were difficult to identify. Here we report the genetic testing of a sporadic DMD boy, who died >20 years previously. Dried umbilical cord preserved for 38 years was the only available source of genomic DNA. Although the genomic DNA was severely degraded, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis was performed but no gross mutations found. Sanger sequencing was attempted but not conclusive. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) was performed by controlling the tagmentation during library preparation. A nonsense mutation in DMD (p.Arg2095*) was clearly identified in the proband. Consequently, the identical mutation was detected as an 11% mosaic mutation from his healthy mother. Finally, the proband's sister was diagnosed as a non-carrier of the mutation. Thus using NGS we have identified a pathogenic DMD mutation from degraded DNA and low-level somatic mosaicism, which would have been overlooked using Sanger sequencing. PMID:26740235

  18. Cloning of the Mutator Transposable Element Mua2, a Putative Regulator of Somatic Mutability of the A1-Mum2 Allele in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Qin, M.; Robertson, D. S.; Ellingboe, A. H.

    1991-01-01

    The identification of the autonomous or transposase-encoding element of the Mutator (Mu) transposable element system of maize is necessary to the characterization of the system. We reported previously that a transcript homologous to the internal region of the MuA element is associated with activity of the Mutator system. We describe here the cloning of another Mu element, designated MuA2, that cosegregates with Mutator activity as assayed by somatic instability of the a1-Mum2 allele. The MuA2 element has features typical of the transposable elements of the Mutator family, including the 210-bp terminal inverted repeats. Several lines of evidence suggest that MuA2 is an autonomous or transposase-encoding element of the Mu family: (1) MuA2 cosegregates with a genetically defined element that regulates somatic mutability of the a1-Mum2 allele; (2) MuA2 is hypomethylated while most other MuA2-hybridizing sequences in the genome are extensively methylated; (3) the increase of the copy number of MuA2 is concomitant with the increase of regulator elements; (4) MuA2-like elements are found in Mutator lines but not in non-Mutator inbreds. We propose that autonomous or transposase-encoding elements of the Mu family may be structurally conserved and MuA2-like. PMID:1661256

  19. Somatic mosaic IDH1 and IDH2 mutations are associated with enchondroma and spindle cell hemangioma in Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pansuriya, Twinkal C; van Eijk, Ronald; d'Adamo, Pio; van Ruler, Maayke A J H; Kuijjer, Marieke L; Oosting, Jan; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; van Oosterwijk, Jolieke G; Verbeke, Sofie L J; Meijer, Daniëlle; van Wezel, Tom; Nord, Karolin H; Sangiorgi, Luca; Toker, Berkin; Liegl-Atzwanger, Bernadette; San-Julian, Mikel; Sciot, Raf; Limaye, Nisha; Kindblom, Lars-Gunnar; Daugaard, Soeren; Godfraind, Catherine; Boon, Laurence M; Vikkula, Miikka; Kurek, Kyle C; Szuhai, Karoly; French, Pim J; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2011-12-01

    Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome are non-hereditary skeletal disorders characterized by multiple enchondromas (Ollier disease) combined with spindle cell hemangiomas (Maffucci syndrome). We report somatic heterozygous mutations in IDH1 (c.394C>T encoding an R132C substitution and c.395G>A encoding an R132H substitution) or IDH2 (c.516G>C encoding R172S) in 87% of enchondromas (benign cartilage tumors) and in 70% of spindle cell hemangiomas (benign vascular lesions). In total, 35 of 43 (81%) subjects with Ollier disease and 10 of 13 (77%) with Maffucci syndrome carried IDH1 (98%) or IDH2 (2%) mutations in their tumors. Fourteen of 16 subjects had identical mutations in separate lesions. Immunohistochemistry to detect mutant IDH1 R132H protein suggested intraneoplastic and somatic mosaicism. IDH1 mutations in cartilage tumors were associated with hypermethylation and downregulated expression of several genes. Mutations were also found in 40% of solitary central cartilaginous tumors and in four chondrosarcoma cell lines, which will enable functional studies to assess the role of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in tumor formation. PMID:22057234

  20. Phenotypes associated with inherited and developmental somatic mutations in genes encoding mTOR pathway components.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Anurag; Sampson, Julian R

    2014-12-01

    Mutations affecting the genes that encode upstream components in the mammalian (or mechanistic) target of rapamycin signalling pathway are associated with a group of rare inherited and developmental disorders that show overlapping clinical features. These include predisposition to a variety of benign or malignant tumours, localized overgrowth, developmental abnormalities of the brain, neurodevelopmental disorders and epilepsy. Many of these features have been linked to hyperactivation of signalling via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1, suggesting that inhibitors of this complex such as rapamycin and its derivatives may offer new opportunities for therapy. In this review we describe this group of inherited and developmental disorders and discuss recent progress in their treatment via mTORC1 inhibition. PMID:25263008

  1. Deep sequencing of gastric carcinoma reveals somatic mutations relevant to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Globally, gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death, with the majority of the health burden borne by economically less-developed countries. Methods Here, we report a genetic characterization of 50 gastric adenocarcinoma samples, using affymetrix SNP arrays and Illumina mRNA expression arrays as well as Illumina sequencing of the coding regions of 384 genes belonging to various pathways known to be altered in other cancers. Results Genetic alterations were observed in the WNT, Hedgehog, cell cycle, DNA damage and epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transition pathways. Conclusions The data suggests targeted therapies approved or in clinical development for gastric carcinoma would be of benefit to ~22% of the patients studied. In addition, the novel mutations detected here, are likely to influence clinical response and suggest new targets for drug discovery. PMID:21781349

  2. Modulatory effects of Tabebuia impetiginosa (Lamiales, Bignoniaceae) on doxorubicin-induced somatic mutation and recombination in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The wing Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART) in D. melanogaster was used to study genotoxicity of the medicinal plant Tabebuia impetiginosa. Lapachol (naphthoquinone) and β-lapachone (quinone) are the two main chemical constituents of T. impetiginosa. These compounds have several biological properties. They induce apoptosis by generating oxygen-reactive species, thereby inhibiting topoisomerases (I and II) or inducing other enzymes dependent on NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, thus affecting cell cycle checkpoints. The SMART was used in the standard (ST) version, which has normal levels of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, to check the direct action of this compound, and in the high bioactivation (HB) version, which has a high constitutive level of CYP enzymes, to check for indirect action in three different T. impetiginosa concentrations (10%, 20% or 40% w/w). It was observed that T. impetiginosa alone did not modify the spontaneous frequencies of mutant spots in either cross. The negative results observed prompted us to study this phytotherapeuticum in association with the reference mutagen doxorubicin (DXR). In co-treated series, T. impetiginosa was toxic in both crosses at higher concentration, whereas in the HB cross, it induced a considerable potentiating effect (from ~24.0 to ~95.0%) on DXR genotoxity. Therefore, further research is needed to determine the possible risks associated with the exposure of living organisms to this complex mixture. PMID:21637695

  3. Extensive tissue-related and allele-related mtDNA heteroplasmy suggests positive selection for somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingkun; Schröder, Roland; Ni, Shengyu; Madea, Burkhard; Stoneking, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Heteroplasmy in human mtDNA may play a role in cancer, other diseases, and aging, but patterns of heteroplasmy variation across different tissues have not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we analyzed complete mtDNA genome sequences at ∼3,500× average coverage from each of 12 tissues obtained at autopsy from each of 152 individuals. We identified 4,577 heteroplasmies (with an alternative allele frequency of at least 0.5%) at 393 positions across the mtDNA genome. Surprisingly, different nucleotide positions (nps) exhibit high frequencies of heteroplasmy in different tissues, and, moreover, heteroplasmy is strongly dependent on the specific consensus allele at an np. All of these tissue-related and allele-related heteroplasmies show a significant age-related accumulation, suggesting positive selection for specific alleles at specific positions in specific tissues. We also find a highly significant excess of liver-specific heteroplasmies involving nonsynonymous changes, most of which are predicted to have an impact on protein function. This apparent positive selection for reduced mitochondrial function in the liver may reflect selection to decrease damaging byproducts of liver mitochondrial metabolism (i.e., “survival of the slowest”). Overall, our results provide compelling evidence for positive selection acting on some somatic mtDNA mutations. PMID:25675502

  4. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein EBNA3C directly induces expression of AID and somatic mutations in B cells.

    PubMed

    Kalchschmidt, Jens S; Bashford-Rogers, Rachael; Paschos, Kostas; Gillman, Adam C T; Styles, Christine T; Kellam, Paul; Allday, Martin J

    2016-05-30

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme responsible for induction of sequence variation in immunoglobulins (Igs) during the process of somatic hypermutation (SHM) and also Ig class switching, can have a potent mutator phenotype in the development of lymphoma. Using various Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) recombinants, we provide definitive evidence that the viral nuclear protein EBNA3C is essential in EBV-infected primary B cells for the induction of AID mRNA and protein. Using lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) established with EBV recombinants conditional for EBNA3C function, this was confirmed, and it was shown that transactivation of the AID gene (AICDA) is associated with EBNA3C binding to highly conserved regulatory elements located proximal to and upstream of the AICDA transcription start site. EBNA3C binding initiated epigenetic changes to chromatin at specific sites across the AICDA locus. Deep sequencing of cDNA corresponding to the IgH V-D-J region from the conditional LCL was used to formally show that SHM is activated by functional EBNA3C and induction of AID. These data, showing the direct targeting and induction of functional AID by EBNA3C, suggest a novel role for EBV in the etiology of B cell cancers, including endemic Burkitt lymphoma. PMID:27217538

  5. High-throughput in vivo genotoxicity testing: an automated readout system for the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART).

    PubMed

    Lombardot, Benoit; Oh, Chun-Taek; Kwak, Jihoon; Genovesio, Auguste; Kang, Myungjoo; Hansen, Michael Adsett Edberg; Han, Sung-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxicity testing is an important component of toxicity assessment. As illustrated by the European registration, evaluation, authorization, and restriction of chemicals (REACH) directive, it concerns all the chemicals used in industry. The commonly used in vivo mammalian tests appear to be ill adapted to tackle the large compound sets involved, due to throughput, cost, and ethical issues. The somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) represents a more scalable alternative, since it uses Drosophila, which develops faster and requires less infrastructure. Despite these advantages, the manual scoring of the hairs on Drosophila wings required for the SMART limits its usage. To overcome this limitation, we have developed an automated SMART readout. It consists of automated imaging, followed by an image analysis pipeline that measures individual wing genotoxicity scores. Finally, we have developed a wing score-based dose-dependency approach that can provide genotoxicity profiles. We have validated our method using 6 compounds, obtaining profiles almost identical to those obtained from manual measures, even for low-genotoxicity compounds such as urethane. The automated SMART, with its faster and more reliable readout, fulfills the need for a high-throughput in vivo test. The flexible imaging strategy we describe and the analysis tools we provide should facilitate the optimization and dissemination of our methods. PMID:25830368

  6. Detection of somatic mutations and HPV in the saliva and plasma of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxuan; Springer, Simeon; Mulvey, Carolyn L; Silliman, Natalie; Schaefer, Joy; Sausen, Mark; James, Nathan; Rettig, Eleni M; Guo, Theresa; Pickering, Curtis R; Bishop, Justin A; Chung, Christine H; Califano, Joseph A; Eisele, David W; Fakhry, Carole; Gourin, Christine G; Ha, Patrick K; Kang, Hyunseok; Kiess, Ana; Koch, Wayne M; Myers, Jeffrey N; Quon, Harry; Richmon, Jeremy D; Sidransky, David; Tufano, Ralph P; Westra, William H; Bettegowda, Chetan; Diaz, Luis A; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Agrawal, Nishant

    2015-06-24

    To explore the potential of tumor-specific DNA as a biomarker for head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), we queried DNA from saliva or plasma of 93 HNSCC patients. We searched for somatic mutations or human papillomavirus genes, collectively referred to as tumor DNA. When both plasma and saliva were tested, tumor DNA was detected in 96% of 47 patients. The fractions of patients with detectable tumor DNA in early- and late-stage disease were 100% (n = 10) and 95% (n = 37), respectively. When segregated by site, tumor DNA was detected in 100% (n = 15), 91% (n = 22), 100% (n = 7), and 100% (n = 3) of patients with tumors of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx, respectively. In saliva, tumor DNA was found in 100% of patients with oral cavity cancers and in 47 to 70% of patients with cancers of the other sites. In plasma, tumor DNA was found in 80% of patients with oral cavity cancers, and in 86 to 100% of patients with cancers of the other sites. Thus, saliva is preferentially enriched for tumor DNA from the oral cavity, whereas plasma is preferentially enriched for tumor DNA from the other sites. Tumor DNA in saliva was found postsurgically in three patients before clinical diagnosis of recurrence, but in none of the five patients without recurrence. Tumor DNA in the saliva and plasma appears to be a potentially valuable biomarker for detection of HNSCC. PMID:26109104

  7. High-Throughput In Vivo Genotoxicity Testing: An Automated Readout System for the Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART)

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Jihoon; Genovesio, Auguste; Kang, Myungjoo; Hansen, Michael Adsett Edberg; Han, Sung-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxicity testing is an important component of toxicity assessment. As illustrated by the European registration, evaluation, authorization, and restriction of chemicals (REACH) directive, it concerns all the chemicals used in industry. The commonly used in vivo mammalian tests appear to be ill adapted to tackle the large compound sets involved, due to throughput, cost, and ethical issues. The somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) represents a more scalable alternative, since it uses Drosophila, which develops faster and requires less infrastructure. Despite these advantages, the manual scoring of the hairs on Drosophila wings required for the SMART limits its usage. To overcome this limitation, we have developed an automated SMART readout. It consists of automated imaging, followed by an image analysis pipeline that measures individual wing genotoxicity scores. Finally, we have developed a wing score-based dose-dependency approach that can provide genotoxicity profiles. We have validated our method using 6 compounds, obtaining profiles almost identical to those obtained from manual measures, even for low-genotoxicity compounds such as urethane. The automated SMART, with its faster and more reliable readout, fulfills the need for a high-throughput in vivo test. The flexible imaging strategy we describe and the analysis tools we provide should facilitate the optimization and dissemination of our methods. PMID:25830368

  8. [THE SOMATIC MUTATIONS AND ABERRANT METHYLATION AS POTENTIAL GENETIC MARKERS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER].

    PubMed

    Mikhailenko, D S; Kushlinskii, N E

    2016-02-01

    All around the world, more than 330 thousands cases of bladder cancer are registered annually hence representing actual problem of modern oncology. Still in demand are search and characteristic of new molecular markers of bladder cancer detecting in tumor cells from urinary sediment and having high diagnostic accuracy. The studies of last decade, especially using methods of genome-wide sequencing, permitted to receive a large amount of experimental data concerning development and progression of bladder cancer The review presents systematic analysis of publications available in PubMed data base mainly of last five years. The original studies of molecular genetic disorders under bladder cancer and meta-analyzes were considered This approach permitted to detected the most common local alterations of DNA under bladder cancer which can be detected using routine genetic methods indifferent clinical material and present prospective interest for development of test-systems. The molecular genetic markers of disease can be activating missense mutations in 7 and 10 exons of gene of receptor of growth factor of fibroblasts 3 (FGFR3), 9 and 20 exons of gene of Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bi-phosphate-3-kinase (PIK3CA) and mutation in -124 and -146 nucleotides in promoter of gene of catalytic subunit telomerase (TERT). The development of test-systems on the basis of aberrant methylation of CpG-islets of genes-suppressors still is seemed as a difficult task because of differences in pattern of methylation of different primary tumors at various stages of clonal evolution of bladder cancer though they can be considered as potential markers. PMID:27455559

  9. Generation of MANAbodies specific to HLA-restricted epitopes encoded by somatically mutated genes

    PubMed Central

    Skora, Andrew D.; Douglass, Jacqueline; Hwang, Michael S.; Tam, Ada J.; Blosser, Richard L.; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Cao, Jianhong; Diaz, Luis A.; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin

    2015-01-01

    Mutant epitopes encoded by cancer genes are virtually always located in the interior of cells, making them invisible to conventional antibodies. We here describe an approach to identify single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) specific for mutant peptides presented on the cell surface by HLA molecules. We demonstrate that these scFvs can be successfully converted to full-length antibodies, termed MANAbodies, targeting “Mutation-Associated Neo-Antigens” bound to HLA. A phage display library representing a highly diverse array of single-chain variable fragment sequences was first designed and constructed. A competitive selection protocol was then used to identify clones specific for mutant peptides bound to predefined HLA types. In this way, we obtained two scFvs, one specific for a peptide encoded by a common KRAS mutant and the other by a common epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant. The scFvs bound to these peptides only when the peptides were complexed with HLA-A2 (KRAS peptide) or HLA-A3 (EGFR peptide). We converted one scFv to a full-length antibody (MANAbody) and demonstrate that the MANAbody specifically reacts with mutant peptide–HLA complex even when the peptide differs by only one amino acid from the normal, WT form. PMID:26216968

  10. The use of COLD-PCR, DHPLC and GeneScanning for the highly sensitive detection of c-KIT somatic mutations in canine mast cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Gentilini, F; Mantovani, V; Turba, M E

    2015-09-01

    The conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/sequencing methods may be poorly suited for the detection of somatic mutations in canine mast cell tumour (MCT) samples owing to limited sensitivity. This study was aimed at establishing novel and more sensitive methods, assessing their limit of detection and comparing their sensitivity with conventional methods.Two different 'driver' somatic mutations of c-KIT, together with the wild-type counterparts, were cloned in plasmids to prepare standard samples with known concentrations of mutated alleles in a background of wild-type alleles; the plasmids standards were assayed using either conventional or novel, highly sensitive technique. Conventional PCR/sequencing showed a sensitivity of 50-20%. Conversely, all the novel methods obtained higher sensitivities allowed reaching as low as 2.5-1.2% of the mutated DNA.The study demonstrates that early conventional methods could likely have underestimated the prevalence of KIT mutations of MCTs, therefore affecting the assessment of their relevance in prognosis and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment effectiveness. PMID:23654224

  11. Somatic and germline mutations of the TSH receptor gene in thyroid diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Van Sande, J.; Parma, J.; Tonacchera, M.

    1995-09-01

    Under physiological circumstances, thyrotropin (TSH) is the primary hormone that controls thyroid function and growth. TSH acts by binding to its receptor at the basolateral membrane of thyroid follicular cells. The TSH receptor is a member of the large family of G protein-coupled receptors, which share a similar structural pattern: seven transmembrane segments connected by three extra and three intracellular loops. Together with the receptors for other glycoprotein hormones LH/CG and FSH, the TSH receptor has a long aminoterminal domain that has been shown to encode the specificity for hormone recognition and binding. The G protein-coupled receptors share a common mode of intracellular signalling: They control the on/off state of a variety of trimeric G proteins (G{alpha}{beta}{gamma}) by stimulating the exchange of GDP for GTP on the {alpha} subunit (G{alpha}). The result is that G{alpha} or G{beta}{gamma}, after dissociation of the trimer, will interact with downstream effectors of the receptor. In the case of the TSH receptor, the main G protein involved is Gs, which activates adenylyl cyclase via Gs{alpha}. In some species, including man, the TSH receptor is also capable of activating phospholipase C (via Gq), thus stimulating the production of diacylglycerol and inositolphosphate (IP{sub 3}). However, higher concentrations of TSH are required to activate phospholipase C, compared with adenylyl cyclase. As a consequence, the main second messenger of TSH effects on the human thyroid is cyclic AMP. The present review will summarize recent findings identifying mutations of the TSH receptor gene as a cause for thyroid diseases. 59 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Acquisition of a single EZH2 D1 domain mutation confers acquired resistance to EZH2-targeted inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Theresa; Nerle, Sujata; Pritchard, Justin; Zhao, Boyang; Rivera, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    Although targeted therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment, overcoming acquired resistance remains a major clinical challenge. EZH2 inhibitors (EZH2i), EPZ-6438 and GSK126, are currently in the early stages of clinical evaluation and the first encouraging signs of efficacy have recently emerged in the clinic. To anticipate mechanisms of resistance to EZH2i, we used a forward genetic platform combining a mutagenesis screen with next generation sequencing technology and identified a hotspot of secondary mutations in the EZH2 D1 domain (Y111 and I109). Y111D mutation within the WT or A677G EZH2 allele conferred robust resistance to both EPZ-6438 and GSK126, but it only drove a partial resistance within the Y641F allele. EZH2 mutants required histone methyltransferase (HMT) catalytic activity and the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) components, SUZ12 and EED, to drive drug resistance. Furthermore, D1 domain mutations not only blocked the ability of EZH2i to bind to WT and A677G mutant, but also abrogated drug binding to the Y641F mutant. These data provide the first cellular validation of the mechanistic model underpinning the oncogenic function of WT and mutant EZH2. Importantly, our findings suggest that acquired-resistance to EZH2i may arise in WT and mutant EZH2 patients through a single mutation that remains targetable by second generation EZH2i. PMID:26360609

  13. Afatinib increases sensitivity to radiation in non-small cell lung cancer cells with acquired EGFR T790M mutation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haixiu; Wu, Kan; Wang, Bing; Chen, Xufeng; Ma, Shenglin

    2015-01-01

    Afatinib is a second-generation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor and has shown a significant clinical benefit in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR-activating mutations. However, the potential therapeutic effects of afatinib combining with other modalities, including ionizing radiation (IR), are not well understood. In this study, we developed a gefitinib-resistant cell subline (PC-9-GR) with a secondary EGFR mutation (T790M) from NSCLC PC-9 cells after chronic exposures to increasing doses of gefitinib. The presence of afatinib significantly increases the cell killing effect of radiation in PC-9-GR cells harboring acquired T790M, but not in H1975 cells with de novo T790M or in H460 cells that express wild-type EGFR. In PC-9-GR cells, afatinib remarkable blocks baseline of EGFR and ERK phosphorylations, and causes delay of IR-induced AKT phosphorylation. Afatinib treatment also leads to increased apoptosis and suppressed DNA damage repair in irradiated PC-9-GR cells, and enhanced tumor growth inhibition when combined with IR in PC-9-GR xenografts. Our findings suggest a potential therapeutic impact of afatinib as a radiation sensitizer in lung cancer cells harboring acquired T790M mutation, providing a rationale for a clinical trial with combination of afatinib and radiation in NSCLCs with EGFR T790M mutation. PMID:25714021

  14. Somatic reversion of some copia-like induced mutations, at the white locus of Drosophila melanogaster, after treatment with alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Soriano, S; Creus, A; Marcos, R; Xamena, N

    1995-01-01

    It has been suggested that transposable elements can be associated with different types of genotoxic effects. For this reason it seems appropriate to outline suitable systems to detect changes in the phenotypic expression of the loci containing transposable elements, as well as those agents that induce such changes. The sex-linked white locus offers a suitable experimental system for studying such events because most of the spontaneous mutations at the white locus are the result of insertions of repeated mobile sequences, and it is easy to follow mutational changes of the locus due to the possibility of detecting even slight changes in eye color. Here we report the results obtained in different strains of Drosophila melanogaster with copia-like induced mutations at the white locus, after treatment with three alkylating agents: ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), and N-nitroso-N-ethylurea (ENU). The three insertional white mutants used in this work were wa4, wbf, and wsp55, with the wa2 mutation used as control because its mutant phenotype is the result of a point mutation instead of the insertion of a DNA fragment. Our data constitute evidence that EMS, MMS, and ENU induce a clear increase in the frequencies of somatic-revertant sectors in the three strains carrying a white allele with an inserted copia-like element. For the wa2 strain, whose mutant phenotype is the result of a point mutation, only ENU at the highest concentration tested is able to induce a significant increase in the somatic reversion frequency. In addition, our results indicate that the use of D. melanogaster strains with transposable elements in the white locus is suitable for detecting genotoxic damage induced by chemicals. PMID:7698106

  15. Nasal chondromesenchymal hamartomas arise secondary to germline and somatic mutations of DICER1 in the pleuropulmonary blastoma tumor-predisposition disorder

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Douglas R.; Messinger, Yoav; Williams, Gretchen M.; Yang, Jiandong; Field, Amanda; Schultz, Kris Ann P.; Harney, Laura A.; Doros, Leslie A.; Dehner, Louis P.; Hill, D. Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Background Nasal chondromesenchymal hamartoma (NCMH) is a rare nasal tumor that typically presents in young children. We previously reported on NCMH occurrence in children with pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB), a rare pulmonary dysembryonic sarcoma that is the hallmark neoplasm in the PPB-associated DICER1 tumor predisposition disorder. Methods Original pathologic materials from individuals with a PPB, PPB-associated tumor and/or a DICER1 mutation were centrally reviewed by the International PPB Registry. Paraffin-embedded NCMH tumor tissue was available in three cases. Laser-capture microdissection was used to isolate mesenchymal spindle cells and cartilage in one case for Sanger sequencing of DICER1. Results Nine patients (5F/4M) had PPB and NCMH. NCMH was diagnosed at a median age of 10 years (range 6-21years). NCMH developed 4.5 - 13 years after PPB. Presenting NCMH symptoms included chronic sinusitis and nasal congestion. Five patients had bilateral tumors. Local NCMH recurrences required several surgical resections in two patients, but all nine patients were alive at 0 – 16 years of follow-up. Pathogenic germline DICER1 mutations were found in 6/8 NCMH patients tested. In 2 of the patients with germline DICER1 mutations, somatic DICER1 missense mutations were also identified in their NCMH (E1813D; n=2). Three additional PPB patients developed other nasal lesions seen in the general population (a Schneiderian papilloma, chronic sinusitis with cysts, and allergic nasal polyps with eosinophils). Two of these patients had germline DICER1 mutations. Conclusion Pathogenic germline and somatic mutations of DICER1 in NCMH establishes that the genetic etiology of NCMH is similar to PPB, despite the disparate biological potential of these neoplasms. PMID:25118636

  16. Microglandular adenosis associated with triple-negative breast cancer is a neoplastic lesion of triple-negative phenotype harbouring TP53 somatic mutations.

    PubMed

    Guerini-Rocco, Elena; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Geyer, Felipe C; De Filippo, Maria R; Eberle, Carey A; Akram, Muzaffar; Fusco, Nicola; Ichihara, Shu; Sakr, Rita A; Yatabe, Yasushi; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Rakha, Emad A; Ellis, Ian O; Wen, Y Hannah; Weigelt, Britta; Schnitt, Stuart J; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-04-01

    Microglandular adenosis (MGA) is a rare proliferative lesion of the breast composed of small glands lacking myoepithelial cells and lined by S100-positive, oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative, and HER2-negative epithelial cells. There is evidence to suggest that MGA may constitute a non-obligate precursor of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). We sought to define the genomic landscape of pure MGA and of MGA, atypical MGA (AMGA) and associated TNBCs, and to determine whether synchronous MGA, AMGA, and TNBCs would be clonally related. Two pure MGAs and eight cases of MGA and/or AMGA associated with in situ or invasive TNBC were collected, microdissected, and subjected to massively parallel sequencing targeting all coding regions of 236 genes recurrently mutated in breast cancer or related to DNA repair. Pure MGAs lacked clonal non-synonymous somatic mutations and displayed limited copy number alterations (CNAs); conversely, all MGAs (n = 7) and AMGAs (n = 3) associated with TNBC harboured at least one somatic non-synonymous mutation (range 3-14 and 1-10, respectively). In all cases where TNBCs were analyzed, identical TP53 mutations and similar patterns of gene CNAs were found in the MGA and/or AMGA and in the associated TNBC. In the MGA/AMGA associated with TNBC lacking TP53 mutations, somatic mutations affecting PI3K pathway-related genes (eg PTEN, PIK3CA, and INPP4B) and tyrosine kinase receptor signalling-related genes (eg ERBB3 and FGFR2) were identified. At diagnosis, MGAs associated with TNBC were found to display subclonal populations, and clonal shifts in the progression from MGA to AMGA and/or to TNBC were observed. Our results demonstrate the heterogeneity of MGAs, and that MGAs associated with TNBC, but not necessarily pure MGAs, are genetically advanced, clonal, and neoplastic lesions harbouring recurrent mutations in TP53 and/or other cancer genes, supporting the notion that a subset of MGAs and AMGAs may constitute

  17. A novel acquired ALK F1245C mutation confers resistance to crizotinib in ALK-positive NSCLC but is sensitive to ceritinib.

    PubMed

    Kodityal, Sandeep; Elvin, Julia A; Squillace, Rachel; Agarwal, Nikita; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; Klempner, Samuel J; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2016-02-01

    The emergence of acquired anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) resistant mutations is a common molecular mechanism underpinning disease progression during crizotinib treatment of ALK-positive (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Identifying acquired resistance mutations in ALK is paramount for tailoring future therapy with second generation ALK inhibitors and beyond. Comprehensive genomic profiling using hybrid-capture next generation sequencing has been successful in identifying acquired ALK resistance mutations. Here we described the emergence of an ALK F1245C mutation in an advanced ALK+ NSCLC patient (EML4-ALK variant 3a/b) who developed slow disease progression after a durable response to crizotinib. The patient was eventually switched to ceritinib with on-going clinical response. This is the first patient report that ALK F1245C is an acquired resistance mutation to crizotinib that can be overcome by ceritinib. PMID:26775591

  18. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies Frequent Somatic Mutations in Cell-Cell Adhesion Genes in Chinese Patients with Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenguang; Gao, Zhibo; Li, Fei; Li, Xiangchun; Sun, Yihua; Wang, Mengyun; Li, Dan; Wang, Rui; Li, Fuming; Fang, Rong; Pan, Yunjian; Luo, Xiaoyang; He, Jing; Zheng, Liangtao; Xia, Jufeng; Qiu, Lixin; He, Jun; Ye, Ting; Zhang, Ruoxin; He, Minghui; Zhu, Meiling; Hu, Haichuan; Shi, Tingyan; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Sun, Menghong; Tian, Shilin; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Qiaoxiu; Chen, Longyun; Yin, Guangliang; Lu, Jingya; Wu, Renhua; Guo, Guangwu; Li, Yingrui; Hu, Xueda; Li, Lin; Asan; Wang, Qin; Yin, Ye; Feng, Qiang; Wang, Bin; Wang, Hang; Wang, Mingbang; Yang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Xiuqing; Yang, Huanming; Jin, Li; Wang, Cun-Yu; Ji, Hongbin; Chen, Haiquan; Wang, Jun; Wei, Qingyi

    2015-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma (SQCC) accounts for about 30% of all lung cancer cases. Understanding of mutational landscape for this subtype of lung cancer in Chinese patients is currently limited. We performed whole exome sequencing in samples from 100 patients with lung SQCCs to search for somatic mutations and the subsequent target capture sequencing in another 98 samples for validation. We identified 20 significantly mutated genes, including TP53, CDH10, NFE2L2 and PTEN. Pathways with frequently mutated genes included those of cell-cell adhesion/Wnt/Hippo in 76%, oxidative stress response in 21%, and phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase in 36% of the tested tumor samples. Mutations of Chromatin regulatory factor genes were identified at a lower frequency. In functional assays, we observed that knockdown of CDH10 promoted cell proliferation, soft-agar colony formation, cell migration and cell invasion, and overexpression of CDH10 inhibited cell proliferation. This mutational landscape of lung SQCC in Chinese patients improves our current understanding of lung carcinogenesis, early diagnosis and personalized therapy. PMID:26503331

  19. Unusual late presentation of X-linked chronic granulomatous disease in an adult female with a somatic mosaic for a novel mutation in CYBB.

    PubMed

    Wolach, Baruch; Scharf, Yitshak; Gavrieli, Ronit; de Boer, Martin; Roos, Dirk

    2005-01-01

    Most patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) have mutations in the X-linked CYBB gene that encodes gp91phox, a component of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase. The resulting X-linked form of CGD is usually manifested in boys. Rarely, X-CGD is encountered in female carriers with extreme expression of the mutated gene. Here, we report on a woman with a novel mutation in CYBB (CCG[90-92]-->GGT), predicting Tyr30Arg31-->stop, Val in gp91phox, who presented with clinical symptoms at the age of 66. The mutation was present in heterozygous form in genomic DNA from her leukocytes but was fully expressed in mRNA from these cells, indicating that in her leukocytes the X chromosome carrying the nonmutated CYBB allele had been inactivated. Indeed, only 0.4% to 2% of her neutrophils showed NADPH oxidase activity. This extreme skewing of her X-chromosome inactivation was not found in her cheek mucosal cells and is thus not due to a general defect in gene methylation on one X chromosome. Moreover, the CYBB mutation was not present in the DNA from her cheek cells and was barely detectable in the DNA from her memory T lymphocytes. Thus, this patient shows a somatic mosaic for the CYBB mutation, which probably originated during her lifetime in her bone marrow. PMID:15308575

  20. Functional EGFR germline polymorphisms may confer risk for EGFR somatic mutations in non-small cell lung cancer, with a predominant effect on exon 19 microdeletions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wanqing; He, Lijun; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Krishnaswamy, Soundararajan; Kanteti, Rajani; Wang, Yi-Ching; Salgia, Ravi; Ratain, Mark J

    2011-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the EGFR tyrosine kinase (TK) domain play a critical role in the development and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Strong genetic influence on susceptibility to these mutations has been suggested. To identify the genetic factors conferring risk for the EGFR TK mutations in NSCLC, a case-control study was conducted in 141 Taiwanese NSCLC patients by focusing on three functional polymorphisms in the EGFR gene [-216G/T, intron 1(CA)n and R497K]. Allelic imbalance (AI) of the EGFR -216G/T polymorphism was also tested in the heterozygous patients as well as in the NCI-60 cancer cell lines to further verify its function. We found that the frequencies of the alleles -216T and CA-19 are significantly higher in the patients with any mutation (p=0.032 and 0.01, respectively), in particular in those with exon 19 microdeletions (p=0.006 and 0.033, respectively), but not in the patients with L858R mutation. The -216T allele is favored to be amplified in both tumor DNA of lung cancer patients and cancer cell lines. We conclude that the local haplotype structures across the EGFR gene may favor the development of cellular malignancies and thus significantly confer risk to the occurrence of EGFR mutations in NSCLC, particularly the exon 19 microdeletions. PMID:21292812

  1. Somatic mutations in the STK11/LKB1 gene are uncommon in rare gynecological tumor types associated with Peutz-Jegher's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Connolly, D C; Katabuchi, H; Cliby, W A; Cho, K R

    2000-01-01

    Peutz-Jegher's syndrome (PJS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mucocutaneous pigmentation, hamartomatous polyposis, and predisposition to benign and malignant tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, breast, ovary, uterine cervix, and testis. Germline-inactivating mutations in one allele of the STK11/LKB1 gene at chromosome 19p13.3 have been found in most PJS patients. Although ovarian sex cord tumors with annular tubules (SCTATs) and minimal deviation adenocarcinomas (MDAs) of the uterine cervix are very rare in the general population, both tumor types occur with increased frequency in women with PJS. An earlier report indicated that the 19p13.3 region containing the STK11 gene was affected by loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in nearly 50% of MDAs of the uterine cervix. We investigated the role of STK11 mutations and LOH of the 19p13.3 region in two PJS-associated SCTATs and in five SCTATs and eight MDAs of the uterine cervix, which occurred in patients lacking features of PJS (referred to here as "sporadic" cases). Germline mutations in the STK11 gene, accompanied by LOH of markers near the wild-type STK11 allele, were found in the two PJS-associated SCTATs. Somatic mutations in the coding region of STK11 were not found in any of the sporadic SCTATs or MDAs studied, although LOH of the 19p13.3 region was seen in three of eight MDAs. Our findings indicate that STK11, like other tumor suppressor genes, is affected by biallelic inactivation in gynecological tumors of PJS patients. In addition, although LOH of the 19p13.3 region was seen in sporadic MDAs, somatic STK11 mutations are rare. A yet-to-be-defined tumor suppressor gene in the 19p13.3 region may be the specific target of inactivation in these tumors. PMID:10623683

  2. Somatic Mutations in the STK11/LKB1 Gene Are Uncommon in Rare Gynecological Tumor Types Associated with Peutz-Jegher’s Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Denise C.; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Cliby, William A.; Cho, Kathleen R.

    2000-01-01

    Peutz-Jegher’s syndrome (PJS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mucocutaneous pigmentation, hamartomatous polyposis, and predisposition to benign and malignant tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, breast, ovary, uterine cervix, and testis. Germline-inactivating mutations in one allele of the STK11/LKB1 gene at chromosome 19p13.3 have been found in most PJS patients. Although ovarian sex cord tumors with annular tubules (SCTATs) and minimal deviation adenocarcinomas (MDAs) of the uterine cervix are very rare in the general population, both tumor types occur with increased frequency in women with PJS. An earlier report indicated that the 19p13.3 region containing the STK11 gene was affected by loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in nearly 50% of MDAs of the uterine cervix. We investigated the role of STK11 mutations and LOH of the 19p13.3 region in two PJS-associated SCTATs and in five SCTATs and eight MDAs of the uterine cervix, which occurred in patients lacking features of PJS (referred to here as “sporadic” cases). Germline mutations in the STK11 gene, accompanied by LOH of markers near the wild-type STK11 allele, were found in the two PJS-associated SCTATs. Somatic mutations in the coding region of STK11 were not found in any of the sporadic SCTATs or MDAs studied, although LOH of the 19p13.3 region was seen in three of eight MDAs. Our findings indicate that STK11, like other tumor suppressor genes, is affected by biallelic inactivation in gynecological tumors of PJS patients. In addition, although LOH of the 19p13.3 region was seen in sporadic MDAs, somatic STK11 mutations are rare. A yet-to-be-defined tumor suppressor gene in the 19p13.3 region may be the specific target of inactivation in these tumors. PMID:10623683

  3. Whole exome sequencing of relapsed/refractory patients expands the repertoire of somatic mutations in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mareschal, Sylvain; Dubois, Sydney; Viailly, Pierre-Julien; Bertrand, Philippe; Bohers, Elodie; Maingonnat, Catherine; Jaïs, Jean-Philippe; Tesson, Bruno; Ruminy, Philippe; Peyrouze, Pauline; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Fest, Thierry; Jo Molina, Thierry; Haioun, Corinne; Salles, Gilles; Tilly, Hervé; Lecroq, Thierry; Leroy, Karen; Jardin, Fabrice

    2016-03-01

    Despite the many efforts already spent to enumerate somatic mutations in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), previous whole-genome and whole-exome studies conducted on patients of mixed outcomes failed at characterizing the 30% of patients who will relapse or resist current immunochemotherapies. To address this issue, we performed whole-exome sequencing of normal/tumoral DNA pairs in 14 relapsed/refractory (R/R) patients subclassified by full-transcriptome arrays (six activated B-cell like, three germinal center B-cell like, and five primary mediastinal B-cell lymphomas), from the LNH-03 LYSA clinical trial program. Aside from well-known DLBCL features, gene and pathway level recurrence analyses proposed several interesting leads including TBL1XR1 and activating mutations in IRF4 or in the insulin regulation pathway. Sequencing-based copy number analysis defined 23 short recurrently altered regions involving genes such as REL, CDKN2A, HYAL2, and TP53. Moreover, it highlighted mutations in genes such as GNA13, CARD11, MFHAS1, and PCLO as associated with secondary variant allele amplification events. The five primary mediastinal B-cell lymphomas (PMBL), while unexpected in a R/R cohort, showed a significantly higher mutation rate (P = 0.003) and provided many insights on this classical Hodgkin lymphoma related subtype. Novel genes such as XPO1, MFHAS1, and ITPKB were found particularly mutated, along with various cytokine-based signaling pathways. Among these analyses, somatic events in the NF-κB pathway were found preponderant in the three DLBCL subtypes, confirming its major implication in DLBCL aggressiveness and pinpointing several new candidate genes. PMID:26608593

  4. A sodium channel myotonia due to a novel SCN4A mutation accompanied by acquired autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Kokunai, Yosuke; Goto, Keigo; Kubota, Tomoya; Fukuoka, Takaaki; Sakoda, Saburo; Ibi, Tohru; Doyu, Manabu; Mochizuki, Hideki; Sahashi, Ko; Takahashi, Masanori P

    2012-06-21

    Mutations of the voltage gated sodium channel gene (SCN4A) are responsible for non-dystrophic myotonia including hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, paramyotonia congenita, and sodium channel myotonia, as well as congenital myasthenic syndrome. In vitro functional analyses have demonstrated the non-dystrophic mutants to show a gain-of-function defect of the channel; a disruption of fast inactivation, an enhancement of activation, or both, while the myasthenic mutation presents a loss-of function defect. This report presents a case of non-dystrophic myotonia that is incidentally accompanied with acquired myasthenia. The patient presented a marked warm-up phenomenon of myotonia but the repeated short exercise test suggested mutations of the sodium channel. The genetic analysis identified a novel mutation, G1292D, of SCN4A. A functional study of the mutant channel revealed marked enhancement of activation and slight impairment of fast inactivation, which should induce muscle hyperexcitability. The effects of the alteration of channel function to the myasthenic symptoms were explored by using stimulation of repetitive depolarization pulses. A use-dependent channel inactivation was reduced in the mutant in comparison to normal channel, thus suggesting an opposing effect to myasthenia. PMID:22617007

  5. The nuclear deubiquitinase BAP1 is commonly inactivated by somatic mutations and 3p21.1 losses in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Bott, Matthew; Brevet, Marie; Taylor, Barry S; Shimizu, Shigeki; Ito, Tatsuo; Wang, Lu; Creaney, Jenette; Lake, Richard A; Zakowski, Maureen F; Reva, Boris; Sander, Chris; Delsite, Robert; Powell, Simon; Zhou, Qin; Shen, Ronglai; Olshen, Adam; Rusch, Valerie; Ladanyi, Marc

    2011-07-01

    Malignant pleural mesotheliomas (MPMs) often show CDKN2A and NF2 inactivation, but other highly recurrent mutations have not been described. To identify additional driver genes, we used an integrated genomic analysis of 53 MPM tumor samples to guide a focused sequencing effort that uncovered somatic inactivating mutations in BAP1 in 23% of MPMs. The BAP1 nuclear deubiquitinase is known to target histones (together with ASXL1 as a Polycomb repressor subunit) and the HCF1 transcriptional co-factor, and we show that BAP1 knockdown in MPM cell lines affects E2F and Polycomb target genes. These findings implicate transcriptional deregulation in the pathogenesis of MPM. PMID:21642991

  6. The nuclear deubiquitinase BAP1 is commonly inactivated by somatic mutations and 3p21.1 losses in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Bott, Matthew; Brevet, Marie; Taylor, Barry S; Shimizu, Shigeki; Ito, Tatsuo; Wang, Lu; Creaney, Jenette; Lake, Richard A; Zakowski, Maureen F; Reva, Boris; Sander, Chris; Delsite, Robert; Powell, Simon; Zhou, Qin; Shen, Ronglai; Olshen, Adam; Rusch, Valerie; Ladanyi, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesotheliomas (MPMs) often show CDKN2A and NF2 inactivation, but other highly recurrent mutations have not been described. To identify additional driver genes, we used an integrated genomic analysis of 53 MPM tumor samples to guide a focused sequencing effort that uncovered somatic inactivating mutations in BAP1 in 23% of MPMs. The BAP1 nuclear deubiquitinase is known to target histones (together with ASXL1 as a Polycomb repressor subunit) and the HCF1 transcriptional co-factor, and we show that BAP1 knockdown in MPM cell lines affects E2F and Polycomb target genes. These findings implicate transcriptional deregulation in the pathogenesis of MPM. PMID:21642991

  7. Somatic mutation and CDR3 lengths of immunoglobulin kappa light chains expressed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and in normal individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, S L; Lee, S K; Johnson, M L; Lavelle, J C; Fowler, P G; Koopman, W J; Schroeder, H W

    1995-01-01

    Immunoglobulin secretion by plasma cells infiltrating synovial membranes is a prominent feature of RA. Previous analyses of a cDNA library generated from synovium of RA patient BC revealed immunoglobulin kappa light chain transcripts with extensive somatic mutation, frequent N region addition, and unexpected variation in the lengths of CDR3 regions which form the center of the antigen binding site. To determine if these characteristics are present in other individuals, we performed reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequenced > or = 10 V kappa-containing amplicons from nine tissue samples: synovia of three individuals with long-standing RA (including patient BC), PBLs of two of these individuals, and PBLs or splenocytes of four normal individuals. Increased levels of somatic mutation in PBLs appeared to correlate with increased age, which may reflect accumulation of circulating memory cells and/or decreased bone marrow production of naive B lymphocytes. Two of three RA synovial samples and both RA PBL samples exhibited increased proportions of clones with unusual CDR3 lengths. Enrichment for these antibody binding sites could be due to abnormal regulation of the emerging repertoire or to selection for B lymphocytes bearing antibodies of unusual specificity, and may play a role in the pathogenesis of RA. Images PMID:7635977

  8. Somatic mosaicism and variable expressivity.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Trifiro, M A

    2001-02-01

    For more than 50 years geneticists have assumed that variations in phenotypic expression are caused by alterations in genotype. Recent evidence shows that 'simple' mendelian disorders or monogenic traits are often far from simple, exhibiting phenotypic variation (variable expressivity) that cannot be explained entirely by a gene or allelic alteration. In certain cases of androgen insensitivity syndrome caused by identical mutations in the androgen receptor gene, phenotypic variability is caused by somatic mosaicism, that is, somatic mutations that occur only in certain androgen-sensitive cells. Recently, more than 30 other genetic conditions that exhibit variable expressivity have been linked to somatic mosaicism. Somatic mutations have also been identified in diseases such as prostate and colorectal cancer. Therefore, the concept of somatic mutations and mosaicism is likely to have far reaching consequences for genetics, in particular in areas such as genetic counseling. PMID:11173116

  9. Acquired EGFR C797S mutation mediates resistance to AZD9291 in non-small cell lung cancer harboring EGFR T790M.

    PubMed

    Thress, Kenneth S; Paweletz, Cloud P; Felip, Enriqueta; Cho, Byoung Chul; Stetson, Daniel; Dougherty, Brian; Lai, Zhongwu; Markovets, Aleksandra; Vivancos, Ana; Kuang, Yanan; Ercan, Dalia; Matthews, Sarah E; Cantarini, Mireille; Barrett, J Carl; Jänne, Pasi A; Oxnard, Geoffrey R

    2015-06-01

    Here we studied cell-free plasma DNA (cfDNA) collected from subjects with advanced lung cancer whose tumors had developed resistance to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) AZD9291. We first performed next-generation sequencing of cfDNA from seven subjects and detected an acquired EGFR C797S mutation in one; expression of this mutant EGFR construct in a cell line rendered it resistant to AZD9291. We then performed droplet digital PCR on serial cfDNA specimens collected from 15 AZD9291-treated subjects. All were positive for the T790M mutation before treatment, but upon developing AZD9291 resistance three molecular subtypes emerged: six cases acquired the C797S mutation, five cases maintained the T790M mutation but did not acquire the C797S mutation and four cases lost the T790M mutation despite the presence of the underlying EGFR activating mutation. Our findings provide insight into the diversity of mechanisms through which tumors acquire resistance to AZD9291 and highlight the need for therapies that are able to overcome resistance mediated by the EGFR C797S mutation. PMID:25939061

  10. Convergence of Acquired Mutations and Alternative Splicing of CD19 Enables Resistance to CART-19 Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sotillo, Elena; Barrett, David M.; Black, Kathryn L; Bagashev, Asen; Oldridge, Derek; Wu, Glendon; Sussman, Robyn; Lanauze, Claudia; Ruella, Marco; Gazzara, Matthew R.; Martinez, Nicole M.; Harrington, Colleen T.; Chung, Elaine Y.; Perazzelli, Jessica; Hofmann, Ted J.; Maude, Shannon L.; Raman, Pichai; Barrera, Alejandro; Gill, Saar; Lacey, Simon F.; Melenhorst, Jan J.; Allman, David; Jacoby, Elad; Fry, Terry; Mackall, Crystal; Barash, Yoseph; Lynch, Kristen W.; Maris, John M.; Grupp, Stephan A.; Thomas-Tikhonenko, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    The CD19 antigen, expressed on most B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (B-ALL), can be targeted with chimeric antigen receptor–armed T cells (CART-19), but relapses with epitope loss occur in 10% to 20% of pediatric responders. We detected hemizygous deletions spanning the CD19 locus and de novo frameshift and missense mutations in exon 2 of CD19 in some relapse samples. However, we also discovered alternatively spliced CD19 mRNA species, including one lacking exon 2. Pull-down/siRNA experiments identified SRSF3 as a splicing factor involved in exon 2 retention, and its levels were lower in relapsed B-ALL. Using genome editing, we demonstrated that exon 2 skipping bypasses exon 2 mutations in B-ALL cells and allows expression of the N-terminally truncated CD19 variant, which fails to trigger killing by CART-19 but partly rescues defects associated with CD19 loss. Thus, this mechanism of resistance is based on a combination of deleterious mutations and ensuing selection for alternatively spliced RNA isoforms. Significance CART-19 yield 70% response rates in patients with B-ALL, but also produce escape variants. We discovered that the underlying mechanism is the selection for preexisting alternatively spliced CD19 isoforms with the compromised CART-19 epitope. This mechanism suggests a possibility of targeting alternative CD19 ectodomains, which could improve survival of patients with B-cell neoplasms. PMID:26516065

  11. The determination of complete human mitochondrial DNA sequences in single cells: implications for the study of somatic mitochondrial DNA point mutations

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert W.; Taylor, Geoffrey A.; Durham, Steve E.; Turnbull, Douglass M.

    2001-01-01

    Studies of single cells have previously shown intracellular clonal expansion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations to levels that can cause a focal cytochrome c oxidase (COX) defect. Whilst techniques are available to study mtDNA rearrangements at the level of the single cell, recent interest has focused on the possible role of somatic mtDNA point mutations in ageing, neurodegenerative disease and cancer. We have therefore developed a method that permits the reliable determination of the entire mtDNA sequence from single cells without amplifying contaminating, nuclear-embedded pseudogenes. Sequencing and PCR–RFLP analyses of individual COX-negative muscle fibres from a patient with a previously described heteroplasmic COX II (T7587C) mutation indicate that mutant loads as low as 30% can be reliably detected by sequencing. This technique will be particularly useful in identifying the mtDNA mutational spectra in age-related COX-negative cells and will increase our understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms by which they occur. PMID:11470889

  12. Neuronal generation from somatic stem cells: current knowledge and perspectives on the treatment of acquired and degenerative central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Corti, S; Locatelli, F; Strazzer, S; Guglieri, M; Comi, G P

    2003-06-01

    Stem cell transplantation through cell replacement or as vector for gene delivery is a potential strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Several studies have reported the transdifferentiation of different somatic stem cells into neurons in vitro or after transplantation into animal models. This observation has pointed out the perspective of using an ethical and accessible cell source to "replace" damaged neurons or provide support to brain tissue. However, recent findings such as the cell fusion phenomenon have raised some doubts about the real existence of somatic stem cell plasticity. In this review, we will discuss current evidence and controversial issues about the neuroneogenesis from various sources of somatic cells focusing on the techniques of isolation, expansion in vitro as well as the inductive factors that lead to transdifferentiation in order to identify the factors peculiar to this process. The morphological, immunochemical, and physiological criteria to correctly judge whether the neuronal transdifferentation occurred are critically presented. We will also discuss the transplantation experiments that were done in view of a possible clinical therapeutic application. Animal models of stroke, spinal cord and brain trauma have improved with Mesenchymal Stem Cells or Bone Marrow transplantation. This improvement does not seem to depend on the replacement of the lost neurons but may be due to increased expression levels of neurotrophic factors, thus suggesting a beneficial effect of somatic cells regardless of transdifferentiation. Critical understanding of available data on the mechanisms governing the cell fate reprogramming is a necessary achievement toward an effective cell therapy. PMID:12762483

  13. Small cell lung cancer transformation and T790M mutation: complimentary roles in acquired resistance to kinase inhibitors in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suda, Kenichi; Murakami, Isao; Sakai, Kazuko; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Shigeki; Sato, Katsuaki; Tomizawa, Kenji; Tomida, Shuta; Yatabe, Yasushi; Nishio, Kazuto; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancers often harbour a mutation in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene. Because proliferation and survival of lung cancers with EGFR mutation solely depend on aberrant signalling from the mutated EGFR, these tumours often show dramatic responses to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, acquiring resistance to these drugs is almost inevitable, thus a better understanding of the underlying resistance mechanisms is critical. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) transformation is a relatively rare acquired resistance mechanism that has lately attracted considerable attention. In the present study, through an in-depth analysis of multiple EGFR-TKI refractory lesions obtained from an autopsy case, we observed a complementary relationship between SCLC transformation and EGFR T790M secondary mutation (resistance mutation). We also identified analogies and differences in genetic aberration between a TKI-refractory lesion with SCLC transformation and one with EGFR T790M mutation. In particular, target sequencing revealed a TP53 P151S mutation in all pre- and post-treatment lesions. PTEN M264I mutation was identified only in a TKI-refractory lesion with SCLC transformation, while PIK3CA and RB1 mutations were identified only in pre-treatment primary tumour samples. These results provide the groundwork for understanding acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs via SCLC transformation. PMID:26400668

  14. Small cell lung cancer transformation and T790M mutation: complimentary roles in acquired resistance to kinase inhibitors in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Suda, Kenichi; Murakami, Isao; Sakai, Kazuko; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Shigeki; Sato, Katsuaki; Tomizawa, Kenji; Tomida, Shuta; Yatabe, Yasushi; Nishio, Kazuto; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancers often harbour a mutation in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene. Because proliferation and survival of lung cancers with EGFR mutation solely depend on aberrant signalling from the mutated EGFR, these tumours often show dramatic responses to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, acquiring resistance to these drugs is almost inevitable, thus a better understanding of the underlying resistance mechanisms is critical. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) transformation is a relatively rare acquired resistance mechanism that has lately attracted considerable attention. In the present study, through an in-depth analysis of multiple EGFR-TKI refractory lesions obtained from an autopsy case, we observed a complementary relationship between SCLC transformation and EGFR T790M secondary mutation (resistance mutation). We also identified analogies and differences in genetic aberration between a TKI-refractory lesion with SCLC transformation and one with EGFR T790M mutation. In particular, target sequencing revealed a TP53 P151S mutation in all pre- and post-treatment lesions. PTEN M264I mutation was identified only in a TKI-refractory lesion with SCLC transformation, while PIK3CA and RB1 mutations were identified only in pre-treatment primary tumour samples. These results provide the groundwork for understanding acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs via SCLC transformation. PMID:26400668

  15. MM-151 overcomes acquired resistance to cetuximab and panitumumab in colorectal cancers harboring EGFR extracellular domain mutations.

    PubMed

    Arena, Sabrina; Siravegna, Giulia; Mussolin, Benedetta; Kearns, Jeffrey D; Wolf, Beni B; Misale, Sandra; Lazzari, Luca; Bertotti, Andrea; Trusolino, Livio; Adjei, Alex A; Montagut, Clara; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Nering, Rachel; Bardelli, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    The anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies cetuximab and panitumumab are used to treat RAS wild-type colorectal cancers (CRCs), but their efficacy is limited by the emergence of acquired drug resistance. After EGFR blockade, about 20% of CRCs develop mutations in the EGFR extracellular domain (ECD) that impair antibody binding and are associated with clinical relapse. We hypothesized that EGFR ECD-resistant variants could be targeted by the recently developed oligoclonal antibody MM-151 that binds multiple regions of the EGFR ECD. MM-151 inhibits EGFR signaling and cell growth in preclinical models, including patient-derived cells carrying mutant EGFR. Upon MM-151 treatment, EGFR ECD mutations decline in circulating cell-free tumor DNA (ctDNA) of CRC patients who previously developed resistance to EGFR blockade. These data provide molecular rationale for the clinical use of MM-151 in patients who become resistant to cetuximab or panitumumab as a result of EGFR ECD mutations. PMID:26843189

  16. Germ-Line Mutations in the von Hippel–Lindau Tumor-Suppressor Gene Are Similar to Somatic von Hippel–Lindau Aberrations in Sporadic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Whaley, Jean M.; Naglich, Joseph; Gelbert, Lawrence; Hsia, Y. Edward; Lamiell, James M.; Green, Jane S.; Collins, Debra; Neumann, Hartmut P. H.; Laidlaw, Jana; Li, Fred P.; Klein-Szanto, Andres J. P.; Seizinger, Bernd R.; Kley, Nikolai

    1994-01-01

    von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) disease is a hereditary tumor syndrome predisposing to multifocal bilateral renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), pheochromocytomas, and pancreatic tumors, as well as angiomas and hemangioblastomas of the CNS. A candidate gene for VHL was recently identified, which led to the isolation of a partial cDNA clone with extended open reading frame, without significant homology to known genes or obvious functional motifs, except for an acidic pentamer repeat domain. To further characterize the functional domains of the VHL gene and assess its involvement in hereditary and nonhereditary tumors, we performed mutation analyses and studied its expression in normal and tumor tissue. We identified germ-line mutations in 39% of VHL disease families. Moreover, 33% of sporadic RCCs and all (6/6) sporadic RCC cell lines analyzed showed mutations within the VHL gene. Both germ-line and somatic mutations included deletions, insertions, splice-site mutations, and missense and nonsense mutations, all of which clustered at the 3' end of the corresponding partial VHL cDNA open reading frame, including an alternatively spliced exon 123 nt in length, suggesting functionally important domains encoded by the VHL gene in this region. Over 180 sporadic tumors of other types have shown no detectable base changes within the presumed coding sequence of the VHL gene to date. We conclude that the gene causing VHL has an important and specific role in the etiology of sporadic RCCs, acts as a recessive tumor-suppressor gene, and appears to encode important functional domains within the 3' end of the known open reading frame. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:7977367

  17. DNA polymerases β and λ do not directly affect Ig variable region somatic hypermutation although their absence reduces the frequency of mutations

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Carol E.; Linehan, Erin K.; Ucher, Anna J.; Bertocci, Barbara; Stavnezer, Janet

    2014-01-01

    During somatic hypermutation (SHM) of antibody variable (V) region genes, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) converts dC to dU, and dUs can either be excised by uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), by mismatch repair, or replicated over. If UNG excises the dU, the abasic site could be cleaved by AP-endonuclease (APE), introducing the single-strand DNA breaks (SSBs) required for generating mutations at A:T bp, which are known to depend upon mismatch repair and DNA Pol η. DNA Pol β or λ could instead repair the lesion correctly. To assess the involvement of Pols β and λ in SHM of antibody genes, we analyzed mutations in the VDJh4 3′ flanking region in Peyer’s patch germinal center (GC) B cells from polβ−/−polλ−/−, polλ−/−, and polβ−/− mice. We find that deficiency of either or both polymerases results in a modest but significant decrease in V region SHM, with Pol β having a greater effect, but there is no effect on mutation specificity, suggesting they have no direct role in SHM. Instead, the effect on SHM appears to be due to a role for these enzymes in GC B cell proliferation or viability. The results suggest that the BER pathway is not important during V region SHM for generating mutations at A:T bp. Furthermore, this implies that most of the SSBs required for Pol η to enter and create A:T mutations are likely generated during replication instead. These results contrast with the inhibitory effect of Pol β on mutations at the Ig Sμ locus, Sμ DSBs and class switch recombination (CSR) reported previously. We show here that B cells deficient in Pol λ or both Pol β and λ proliferate normally in culture and undergo slightly elevated CSR, as shown previously for Pol β-deficient B cells. PMID:24084171

  18. Multiple epithelial and nonepithelial tumors in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: characterization of germline and somatic mutations of the MSH2 gene and heterogeneity of replication error phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui-Len; Chao, Chung-Faye; Ding, Dah-Ching; Yu, Cheng-Ping; Chang, Cheng-Chang; Lai, Hung-Chen; Yu, Mu-Hsien; Liu, Hang-Seng; Chu, Tang-Yuan

    2004-09-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal inherited cancer syndrome characterized by germline plus somatic mutations of DNA mismatch repair genes and familial clustering of cancers of colorectum and other visceral organs. So far, to our knowledge, there has been no proof of nonepithelial tumors in association with HNPCC. Here we report on a MSH2 frameshift HNPCC family with a carrier found to have multiple primary tumors, including endometrial hyperplasia, ovarian adenocarcinoma, skin cavernous hemangioma, and skin dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP). We studied the replication error (RER) phenotype in noncoding (Bat-26, Bat-25, D2S123, D5S346, and D17S250) and coding (MSH3, MSH6, BAX, and TGFBR2 genes) DNA sequences, and characterized the germline and somatic mutations of the MSH2 gene in the tumors described above and in endometrial carcinomas from two of her affected siblings. RER was observed in an order of hyperplasic endometrium (6/10 markers), ovarian carcinoma (5/10 markers), endometrial carcinomas (4/9 and 3/10), DFSP (2/9 markers), and cavernous hemangioma (2/10 markers). All the tumors showed the same germline mutation of G5-->G6 frameshift at 183-187 and polymorphism of C1168T in a heterozygous pattern. In an endometrial carcinoma, deletion of the second allele of MSH2 was evident. Heterogeneous RER patterns were noted in multiple primary tumors of the same individual and in premalignant and malignant endometrial tumors from different individuals. The study demonstrated the two hits of the hMSH(2) gene as well as intra- and interindividual variations of RER phenotypes in HNPCC. The first characterized nonepithelial tumors in HNPCC seem to carry a limited panel of RER, including a framesift at the (A)(10) tract of TGFBR2. PMID:15350299

  19. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; de Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-01-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosaisolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosaisolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed. PMID:26676375

  20. Investigation of Somatic GNAQ, GNA11, BAP1 and SF3B1 Mutations in Ophthalmic Melanocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Jasmine H.; Wiesner, Thomas; Milman, Tatyana; Won, Helen H.; Lin, Amy; Lee, Vivian; Albert, Daniel M.; Folberg, Robert; Berger, Michael F.; Char, Devron H.; Marr, Brian; Abramson, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to use massively parallel DNA sequencing to identify GNAQ/11, BAP1 and SF3B1 mutations in ophthalmic melanocytoma. Procedures Six ophthalmic melanocytoma specimens (1 iridociliary and 5 optic nerve) were profiled for genomic alterations in GNAQ/11, BAP1 and SF3B1 using a custom deep sequencing assay. This assay uses solution phase hybridization-based exon capture and deep-coverage massively parallel DNA sequencing to interrogate all protein-coding exons and select introns. Results The only iridociliary melanocytoma showed a mutation in GNAQ but not in BAP1. Of the 2 optic-nerve melanocytomas that developed into melanoma, one had a GNAQ mutation and both a BAP1 mutation and monosomy 3. The remaining 3 optic-nerve melanocytomas did not reveal mutations in GNAQ/11 or BAP1. SF3B1 mutations were not detected in any specimen. Conclusions The presence of GNAQ mutation in some iridociliary and optic-nerve melanocytomas suggests a possible relationship between ophthalmic melanocytoma and other ophthalmic melanocytic neoplasms. BAP1 mutation may accompany the transformation of ophthalmic melanocytoma to melanoma. PMID:27239460

  1. Covalent targeting of acquired cysteines in cancer.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Marieke; Arkin, Michelle R; Dansen, Tobias B

    2016-02-01

    The thiolate side chain of cysteine has a unique functionality that drug hunters and chemical biologists have begun to exploit. For example, targeting cysteine residues in the ATP-binding pockets of kinases with thiol-reactive molecules has afforded increased selectivity and potency to drugs like imbrutinib, which inhibits the oncogene BTK, and CO-1686 and AZD9291 that target oncogenic mutant EGFR. Recently, disulfide libraries and targeted GDP-mimetics have been used to selectively label the G12C oncogenic mutation in KRAS. We reasoned that other oncogenes contain mutations to cysteine, and thus screened the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer for frequently acquired cysteines. Here, we describe the most common mutations and discuss how these mutations could be potential targets for cysteine-directed personalized therapeutics. PMID:26629855

  2. Effect of cotreatment of aspirin metabolites on mitomycin C-induced genotoxicity using the somatic mutation and recombination test in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Niikawa, Miki; Nakamura, Takeshi; Nagase, Hisamitsu

    2006-01-01

    In our previous reports, aspirin, an antipyretic analgesic, suppressed the genotoxicity of mitomycin C (MMC) in a somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. In order to reveal the mechanism of the anti-genotoxicity of aspirin, we evaluated the suppressing ability of each aspirin metabolite, such as salicylic acid (SA), salicyluric acid (SUA), gentisic acid (GA), gentisuric acid (GUA), and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), in SMART in Drosophila melanogaster using the cotreatment protocol in this report. SUA, GA, GUA, and DHBA reduced the number of the three types of spot induced by MMC without decrease of survival. These aspirin metabolites decreased the genotoxicity frequency of MMC for total spots in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, each metabolite decreased the genotoxicity frequency of MMC by approximately 80% at a dose of 40 mg/bottle, respectively. It is suggested that these metabolites are the main substances of anti-genotoxicity in the aspirin metabolic pathway. PMID:16931440

  3. Somatic mutational analysis of FAK in breast cancer: A novel gain-of-function mutation due to deletion of exon 33

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Xu-Qian; Liu, Xiang-Fan; Yao, Ling; Chen, Chang-Qiang; Gu, Zhi-Dong; Ni, Pei-Hua; Zheng, Xin-Min; Fan, Qi-Shi

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •A novel FAK splicing mutation identified in breast tumor. •FAK-Del33 mutation promotes cell migration and invasion. •FAK-Del33 mutation regulates FAK/Src signal pathway. -- Abstract: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) regulates cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and survival. We identified a novel splicing mutant, FAK-Del33 (exon 33 deletion, KF437463), in both breast and thyroid cancers through colony sequencing. Considering the low proportion of mutant transcripts in samples, this mutation was detected by TaqMan-MGB probes based qPCR. In total, three in 21 paired breast tissues were identified with the FAK-Del33 mutation, and no mutations were found in the corresponding normal tissues. When introduced into a breast cell line through lentivirus infection, FAK-Del33 regulated cell motility and migration based on a wound healing assay. We demonstrated that the expression of Tyr397 (main auto-phosphorylation of FAK) was strongly increased in FAK-Del33 overexpressed breast tumor cells compared to wild-type following FAK/Src RTK signaling activation. These results suggest a novel and unique role of the FAK-Del33 mutation in FAK/Src signaling in breast cancer with significant implications for metastatic potential.

  4. Somatic Mosaicism in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Donald; Stevens, Eric L.; Pevsner, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Somatic mosaicism refers to the occurrence of two genetically distinct populations of cells within an individual, derived from a postzygotic mutation. In contrast to inherited mutations, somatic mosaic mutations may affect only a portion of the body and are not transmitted to progeny. These mutations affect varying genomic sizes ranging from single nucleotides to entire chromosomes and have been implicated in disease, most prominently cancer. The phenotypic consequences of somatic mosaicism are dependent upon many factors including the developmental time at which the mutation occurs, the areas of the body that are affected, and the pathophysiological effect(s) of the mutation. The advent of second-generation sequencing technologies has augmented existing array-based and cytogenetic approaches for the identification of somatic mutations. We outline the strengths and weaknesses of these techniques and highlight recent insights into the role of somatic mosaicism in causing cancer, neurodegenerative, monogenic, and complex disease. PMID:25513881

  5. [3rd generation's TKI in lung cancer non-small cell EGFR-mutated having acquired a secondary T790M resistance].

    PubMed

    Brosseau, Solenn; Viala, Marie; Varga, Andréa; Planchard, David; Besse, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2015-09-01

    Activating EGFR mutations discovery and efficacy of 1st generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), such as erlotinib or gefitinib, inaugurated the beginning of personalized medicine in the treatment of EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, all patients showed a tumor progression of 10 to 16 months after the onset of TKI therapy related to molecular resistance mechanisms as T790M mutation. Till now, patients suffering from EGFR-mutated NSCLC with acquired resistance have conventional treatment options. Two new 3rd generations' TKI, AZD9291 and rociletinib, are currently being studied in phases 1-3 studies. Preliminary results show relevant therapeutic properties in patients with T790M mutated-EGFR NSCLC. This review aims to highlight these new molecules, their effectiveness and their clinical toxicities in the treatment of advanced stages of NSCLC expressing the T790M mutation. PMID:26235419

  6. Differential expression of APE1 and APE2 in germinal centers promotes error-prone repair and A:T mutations during somatic hypermutation

    PubMed Central

    Stavnezer, Janet; Linehan, Erin K.; Thompson, Mikayla R.; Habboub, Ghaith; Ucher, Anna J.; Kadungure, Tatenda; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Schrader, Carol E.

    2014-01-01

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) of antibody variable region genes is initiated in germinal center B cells during an immune response by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), which converts cytosines to uracils. During accurate repair in nonmutating cells, uracil is excised by uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), leaving abasic sites that are incised by AP endonuclease (APE) to create single-strand breaks, and the correct nucleotide is reinserted by DNA polymerase β. During SHM, for unknown reasons, repair is error prone. There are two APE homologs in mammals and, surprisingly, APE1, in contrast to its high expression in both resting and in vitro-activated splenic B cells, is expressed at very low levels in mouse germinal center B cells where SHM occurs, and APE1 haploinsufficiency has very little effect on SHM. In contrast, the less efficient homolog, APE2, is highly expressed and contributes not only to the frequency of mutations, but also to the generation of mutations at A:T base pair (bp), insertions, and deletions. In the absence of both UNG and APE2, mutations at A:T bp are dramatically reduced. Single-strand breaks generated by APE2 could provide entry points for exonuclease recruited by the mismatch repair proteins Msh2–Msh6, and the known association of APE2 with proliferating cell nuclear antigen could recruit translesion polymerases to create mutations at AID-induced lesions and also at A:T bp. Our data provide new insight into error-prone repair of AID-induced lesions, which we propose is facilitated by down-regulation of APE1 and up-regulation of APE2 expression in germinal center B cells. PMID:24927551

  7. Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome are caused by somatic mosaic mutations of IDH1 and IDH2.

    PubMed

    Amary, M Fernanda; Damato, Stephen; Halai, Dina; Eskandarpour, Malihe; Berisha, Fitim; Bonar, Fiona; McCarthy, Stan; Fantin, Valeria R; Straley, Kimberly S; Lobo, Samira; Aston, Will; Green, Claire L; Gale, Rosemary E; Tirabosco, Roberto; Futreal, Andrew; Campbell, Peter; Presneau, Nadège; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2011-12-01

    Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome are characterized by multiple central cartilaginous tumors that are accompanied by soft tissue hemangiomas in Maffucci syndrome. We show that in 37 of 40 individuals with these syndromes, at least one tumor has a mutation in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) or in IDH2, 65% of which result in a R132C substitution in the protein. In 18 of 19 individuals with more than one tumor analyzed, all tumors from a given individual shared the same IDH1 mutation affecting Arg132. In 2 of 12 subjects, a low level of mutated DNA was identified in non-neoplastic tissue. The levels of the metabolite 2HG were measured in a series of central cartilaginous and vascular tumors, including samples from syndromic and nonsyndromic subjects, and these levels correlated strongly with the presence of IDH1 mutations. The findings are compatible with a model in which IDH1 or IDH2 mutations represent early post-zygotic occurrences in individuals with these syndromes. PMID:22057236

  8. What limits affinity maturation of antibodies in Xenopus--the rate of somatic mutation or the ability to select mutants?

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M; Hsu, E; Marcuz, A; Courtet, M; Du Pasquier, L; Steinberg, C

    1992-01-01

    Although the Xenopus immunoglobulin heavy chain locus is structurally and functionally similar to mammalian IgH loci, Xenopus antibodies are limited in heterogeneity, and they mature only slightly in affinity during immune responses. During the antibody response of isogenic frogs to DNP-KLH, mu and upsilon cDNA sequences using elements of the VH1 family were cloned, sequenced and compared with germline counterparts. There were zero to four mutations per sequence, mostly single base substitutions, in the framework and CDRs 1 and 2 of VH. No mutations were found in JH. Since the point mutation rate was only 4- to 7-fold lower than that calculated for mice, affinity maturation does not seem to be limited by mutant availability. Because of a relatively low ratio of replacement to silent mutations in the CDRs and a very high ratio of GC to AT base pairs altered by mutation, it is suggested that the problem results from the absence of an effective mechanism for selecting mutants, which in turn might be related to the absence of germinal centers in Xenopus. Images PMID:1425571

  9. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic correction of a novel coagulator factor IX gene mutation ameliorates hemophilia in mouse.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yuting; Ma, Yanlin; Li, Qi; Sun, Zhenliang; Ma, Lie; Wu, Lijuan; Wang, Liren; Zeng, Li; Shao, Yanjiao; Chen, Yuting; Ma, Ning; Lu, Wenqing; Hu, Kewen; Han, Honghui; Yu, Yanhong; Huang, Yuanhua; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2016-01-01

    The X-linked genetic bleeding disorder caused by deficiency of coagulator factor IX, hemophilia B, is a disease ideally suited for gene therapy with genome editing technology. Here, we identify a family with hemophilia B carrying a novel mutation, Y371D, in the human F9 gene. The CRISPR/Cas9 system was used to generate distinct genetically modified mouse models and confirmed that the novel Y371D mutation resulted in a more severe hemophilia B phenotype than the previously identified Y371S mutation. To develop therapeutic strategies targeting this mutation, we subsequently compared naked DNA constructs versus adenoviral vectors to deliver Cas9 components targeting the F9 Y371D mutation in adult mice. After treatment, hemophilia B mice receiving naked DNA constructs exhibited correction of over 0.56% of F9 alleles in hepatocytes, which was sufficient to restore hemostasis. In contrast, the adenoviral delivery system resulted in a higher corrective efficiency but no therapeutic effects due to severe hepatic toxicity. Our studies suggest that CRISPR/Cas-mediated in situ genome editing could be a feasible therapeutic strategy for human hereditary diseases, although an efficient and clinically relevant delivery system is required for further clinical studies. PMID:26964564

  10. A Case Series of Acquired Drug Resistance-Associated Mutations in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children: An Emerging Public Health Concern in Rural Africa

    PubMed Central

    Gamell, Anna; Muri, Lukas; Ntamatungiro, Alex; Nyogea, Daniel; Luwanda, Lameck B.; Hatz, Christoph; Battegay, Manuel; Felger, Ingrid; Tanner, Marcel; Klimkait, Thomas; Letang, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    The acquisition of drug-resistance mutations among African children living with in human immunodeficiency virus on antiretroviral treatment has been scarcely reported. This threatens the overall success of antiretroviral programs and the clinical outcomes of children in care. We present a well characterized series of children from rural Tanzania with acquired drug-resistance mutations to contribute to the better understanding of this emerging public health concern. PMID:26807427

  11. Novel somatic mutations identified by whole-exome sequencing in muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    PubMed Central

    PAN, HUIXING; XU, XIAOJIAN; WU, DEYAO; QIU, QIAOCHENG; ZHOU, SHOUJUN; HE, XUEFENG; ZHOU, YUNFENG; QU, PING; HOU, JIANQUAN; HE, JUN; ZHOU, JIAN

    2016-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the one of the most commonly observed types of cancer globally. The identification of novel disease-associated genes in TCC has had a significant effect on the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer; however, there may be a large number of novel genes that have not been identified. In the present study, the exomes of two individuals who were diagnosed with muscle-invasive TCC (MI-TCC) were sequenced to investigate potential variants. Subsequently, following algorithm and filter analysis, Sanger sequencing was used to validate the results of deep sequencing. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was employed to observe the differences in HECT, C2 and WW domain-containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (HECW1) protein expression between tumor tissues and para-carcinoma tissues. A total of 6 nonsynonymous mutation genes were identified in MI-TCC, identified as copine VII, RNA binding motif protein, X-linked-like 3, acyl-CoA synthetase medium-chain family member 2A, HECW1, zinc finger protein 273 and trichohyalin. Furthermore, 5 cases were identified to possess a HECW1 gene mutation in 61 MI-TCC specimens, and all of these were point mutations located at exon 11 on chromosome 7. The mutation categories of HECW1 had 4 missense mutations and 1 nonsense mutation. IHC revealed that HECW1 protein was expressed at significantly increased levels in MI-TCC compared with normal bladder urothelium (P<0.001). The present study provided a novel approach for investigating genetic changes in the MI-TCC exome, and identified the novel mutant gene HECW1, which may possess a significant role in the pathogenesis of TCC. PMID:26893765

  12. Somatic-cell selection is a major determinant of the blood-cell phenotype in heterozygotes for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mutations causing severe enzyme deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Filosa, S.; Giacometti, N.; Wangwei, C.; De Mattia, D.; Pagnini, D.; Alfinito, F.; Schettini, F.; Luzzatto, L.; Martini, G.

    1996-01-01

    X-chromosome inactivation in mammals is regarded as an essentially random process, but the resulting somatic-cell mosaicism creates the opportunity for cell selection. In most people with red-blood-cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, the enzyme-deficient phenotype is only moderately expressed in nucleated cells. However, in a small subset of hemizygous males who suffer from chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, the underlying mutations (designated class I) cause more-severe G6PD deficiency, and this might provide an opportunity for selection in heterozygous females during development. In order to test this possibility we have analyzed four heterozygotes for class I G6PD mutations: two with G6PD Portici (1178G-->A) and two with G6PD Bari (1187C-->T). We found that in fractionated blood cell types (including erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid cell lineages) there was a significant excess of G6PD-normal cells. The significant concordance that we have observed in the degree of imbalance in the different blood-cell lineages indicates that a selective mechanism is likely to operate at the level of pluripotent blood stem cells. Thus, it appears that severe G6PD deficiency affects adversely the proliferation or the survival of nucleated blood cells and that this phenotypic characteristic is critical during hematopoiesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8808605

  13. Long-lived antigen-induced IgM plasma cells demonstrate somatic mutations and contribute to long-term protection

    PubMed Central

    Bohannon, Caitlin; Powers, Ryan; Satyabhama, Lakshmipriyadarshini; Cui, Ang; Tipton, Christopher; Michaeli, Miri; Skountzou, Ioanna; Mittler, Robert S.; Kleinstein, Steven H.; Mehr, Ramit; Lee, Frances Eun-Yun; Sanz, Ignacio; Jacob, Joshy

    2016-01-01

    Long-lived plasma cells are critical to humoral immunity as a lifelong source of protective antibodies. Antigen-activated B cells—with T-cell help—undergo affinity maturation within germinal centres and persist as long-lived IgG plasma cells in the bone marrow. Here we show that antigen-specific, induced IgM plasma cells also persist for a lifetime. Unlike long-lived IgG plasma cells, which develop in germinal centres and then home to the bone marrow, IgM plasma cells are primarily retained within the spleen and can develop even in the absence of germinal centres. Interestingly, their expressed IgV loci exhibit somatic mutations introduced by the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). However, these IgM plasma cells are probably not antigen-selected, as replacement mutations are spread through the variable segment and not enriched within the CDRs. Finally, antibodies from long-lived IgM plasma cells provide protective host immunity against a lethal virus challenge. PMID:27270306

  14. Long-lived antigen-induced IgM plasma cells demonstrate somatic mutations and contribute to long-term protection.

    PubMed

    Bohannon, Caitlin; Powers, Ryan; Satyabhama, Lakshmipriyadarshini; Cui, Ang; Tipton, Christopher; Michaeli, Miri; Skountzou, Ioanna; Mittler, Robert S; Kleinstein, Steven H; Mehr, Ramit; Lee, Francis Eun-Yun; Sanz, Ignacio; Jacob, Joshy

    2016-01-01

    Long-lived plasma cells are critical to humoral immunity as a lifelong source of protective antibodies. Antigen-activated B cells-with T-cell help-undergo affinity maturation within germinal centres and persist as long-lived IgG plasma cells in the bone marrow. Here we show that antigen-specific, induced IgM plasma cells also persist for a lifetime. Unlike long-lived IgG plasma cells, which develop in germinal centres and then home to the bone marrow, IgM plasma cells are primarily retained within the spleen and can develop even in the absence of germinal centres. Interestingly, their expressed IgV loci exhibit somatic mutations introduced by the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). However, these IgM plasma cells are probably not antigen-selected, as replacement mutations are spread through the variable segment and not enriched within the CDRs. Finally, antibodies from long-lived IgM plasma cells provide protective host immunity against a lethal virus challenge. PMID:27270306

  15. Somatic-cell selection is a major determinant of the blood-cell phenotype in heterozygotes for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mutations causing severe enzyme deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Filosa, S.; Giacometti, N.; Wangwei, C.; Martini, G.

    1996-10-01

    X-chromosome inactivation in mammals is regarded as an essentially random process, but the resulting somatic-cell mosaicism creates the opportunity for cell selection. In most people with red-blood-cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, the enzyme-deficient phenotype is only moderately expressed in nucleated cells. However, in a small subset of hemizygous males who suffer from chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, the underlying mutations (designated class I) cause more-severe G6PD deficiency, and this might provide an opportunity for selection in heterozygous females during development. In order to test this possibility we have analyzed four heterozygotes for class I G6PD mutations: two with G6PD Portici (1178G{r_arrow}A) and two with G6PD Bari (1187C{r_arrow}T). We found that in fractionated blood cell types (including erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid cell lineages) there was a significant excess of G6PD-normal cells. The significant concordance that we have observed in the degree of imbalance in the different blood-cell lineages indicates that a selective mechanism is likely to operate at the level of pluripotent blood stem cells. Thus, it appears that severe G6PD deficiency affects adversely the proliferation or the survival of nucleated blood cells and that this phenotypic characteristic is critical during hematopoiesis. 65 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Evidence that human immunoglobulin M rheumatoid factors can Be derived from the natural autoantibody pool and undergo an antigen driven immune response in which somatically mutated rheumatoid factors have lower affinities for immunoglobulin G Fc than their germline counterparts.

    PubMed

    Carayannopoulos, M O; Potter, K N; Li, Y; Natvig, J B; Capra, J D

    2000-04-01

    The question of whether immunoglobulin (Ig)M rheumatoid factors (RF) arise as the result of an abnormal expansion of already existing clones producing natural autoantibodies or emerge as new clones that are somatically mutated owing to an antigen driven immune response has never been conclusively answered. In this study, an inhibition ELISA was utilized to measure the affinities of recombinant antibodies using VH segments reverted back to their closest germline counterparts (germline revertants). In all cases, the somatically mutated parental RFs had a decreased affinity for immunoglobulin (Ig)G Fc compared to the germline revertant, indicating that the antibodies in the germline configuration had the higher affinities. This demonstrates that somatic mutation is not a prerequisite to generate disease associated antibodies. The presence of mutations in the parental IgM RFS suggests that these cells had been involved in a germinal centre reaction. As the germinal centre is the conventional site of the acquisition of mutations during an antigen driven response, these data suggest a role for germinal centres in the generation of the antibody diversity in addition to the selection of higher affinity antibodies. Assuming that only antigen selected cells survive deletion, these data support the hypothesis that IgM RFS can be derived from the natural autoantibody repertoire and result from an antigen driven response. Mechanisms controlling the survival of B cells based on the affinity/avidity of the immunoglobulin receptor are shown to be functional in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:10736104

  17. Acquired C797S Mutation upon Treatment with a T790M-Specific Third-Generation EGFR Inhibitor (HM61713) in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Haa-Na; Jung, Ki Sun; Yoo, Kwai Han; Cho, Jinhyun; Lee, Ji Yun; Lim, Sung Hee; Kim, Hae Su; Sun, Jong-Mu; Lee, Se-Hoon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Keunchil; Choi, Yoon-La; Park, Woongyang; Ahn, Myung-Ju

    2016-04-01

    T790M mutation is most common resistant mechanism to epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR) tyrosin kinase inhibitor (TKI). Several third-generation EGFR-mutant selective TKI, such as AZD9291 (AstraZeneca), Rociletinib (Clovis), or HM61713 (Hanmi) have been developed. Acquired resistant C797S mutation was known to be one of the resistance mechanisms of AZD9291, which has not been reported for HM61713 yet. This is the first case report of C797S mutation as resistance mechanism of HM61713. PMID:26749488

  18. Clonotypic Analysis of Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Sequences in Patients with Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia: Correlation with MYD88 L265P Somatic Mutation Status, Clinical Features, and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Roumelioti, Maria; Georgiou, George; Tzenou, Tatiana; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis

    2014-01-01

    We performed IGH clonotypic sequence analysis in WM in order to determine whether a preferential IGH gene rearrangement was observed and to assess IGHV mutational status in blood and/or bone marrow samples from 36 WM patients. In addition we investigated the presence of MYD88 L265P somatic mutation. After IGH VDJ locus amplification, monoclonal VDJ rearranged fragments were sequenced and analyzed. MYD88 L265P mutation was detected by AS-PCR. The most frequent family usage was IGHV3 (74%); IGHV3-23 and IGHV3-74 segments were used in 26% and 17%, respectively. Somatic hypermutation was seen in 91% of cases. MYD88 L265P mutation was found in 65,5% of patients and absent in the 3 unmutated. These findings did not correlate with clinical findings and outcome. Conclusion. IGH genes' repertoire differed in WM from those observed in other B-cell disorders with a recurrent IGHV3-23 and IGHV3-74 usage; monoclonal IGHV was mutated in most cases, and a high but not omnipresent prevalence of MYD88 L265P mutation was observed. In addition, the identification of 3 patients with unmutated IGHV gene segments, negative for the MYD88 L265P mutation, could support the hypothesis that an extra-germinal B-cell may represent the originating malignant cell in this minority of WM patients. PMID:25197661

  19. Somatic Mutation Allelic Ratio Test Using ddPCR (SMART-ddPCR): An Accurate Method for Assessment of Preferential Allelic Imbalance in Tumor DNA.

    PubMed

    de Smith, Adam J; Walsh, Kyle M; Hansen, Helen M; Endicott, Alyson A; Wiencke, John K; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which heritable genetic variants can affect tumor development has yet to be fully elucidated. Tumor selection of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) risk alleles, a phenomenon called preferential allelic imbalance (PAI), has been demonstrated in some cancer types. We developed a novel application of digital PCR termed Somatic Mutation Allelic Ratio Test using Droplet Digital PCR (SMART-ddPCR) for accurate assessment of tumor PAI, and have applied this method to test the hypothesis that heritable SNPs associated with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may demonstrate tumor PAI. These SNPs are located at CDKN2A (rs3731217) and IKZF1 (rs4132601), genes frequently lost in ALL, and at CEBPE (rs2239633), ARID5B (rs7089424), PIP4K2A (rs10764338), and GATA3 (rs3824662), genes located on chromosomes gained in high-hyperdiploid ALL. We established thresholds of AI using constitutional DNA from SNP heterozygotes, and subsequently measured allelic copy number in tumor DNA from 19-142 heterozygote samples per SNP locus. We did not find significant tumor PAI at these loci, though CDKN2A and IKZF1 SNPs showed a trend towards preferential selection of the risk allele (p = 0.17 and p = 0.23, respectively). Using a genomic copy number control ddPCR assay, we investigated somatic copy number alterations (SCNA) underlying AI at CDKN2A and IKZF1, revealing a complex range of alterations including homozygous and hemizygous deletions and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, with varying degrees of clonality. Copy number estimates from ddPCR showed high agreement with those from multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assays. We demonstrate that SMART-ddPCR is a highly accurate method for investigation of tumor PAI and for assessment of the somatic alterations underlying AI. Furthermore, analysis of publicly available data from The Cancer Genome Atlas identified 16 recurrent SCNA loci that contain heritable cancer risk SNPs associated with a

  20. Somatic Mutation Allelic Ratio Test Using ddPCR (SMART-ddPCR): An Accurate Method for Assessment of Preferential Allelic Imbalance in Tumor DNA

    PubMed Central

    de Smith, Adam J.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Hansen, Helen M.; Endicott, Alyson A.; Wiencke, John K.; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which heritable genetic variants can affect tumor development has yet to be fully elucidated. Tumor selection of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) risk alleles, a phenomenon called preferential allelic imbalance (PAI), has been demonstrated in some cancer types. We developed a novel application of digital PCR termed Somatic Mutation Allelic Ratio Test using Droplet Digital PCR (SMART-ddPCR) for accurate assessment of tumor PAI, and have applied this method to test the hypothesis that heritable SNPs associated with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may demonstrate tumor PAI. These SNPs are located at CDKN2A (rs3731217) and IKZF1 (rs4132601), genes frequently lost in ALL, and at CEBPE (rs2239633), ARID5B (rs7089424), PIP4K2A (rs10764338), and GATA3 (rs3824662), genes located on chromosomes gained in high-hyperdiploid ALL. We established thresholds of AI using constitutional DNA from SNP heterozygotes, and subsequently measured allelic copy number in tumor DNA from 19–142 heterozygote samples per SNP locus. We did not find significant tumor PAI at these loci, though CDKN2A and IKZF1 SNPs showed a trend towards preferential selection of the risk allele (p = 0.17 and p = 0.23, respectively). Using a genomic copy number control ddPCR assay, we investigated somatic copy number alterations (SCNA) underlying AI at CDKN2A and IKZF1, revealing a complex range of alterations including homozygous and hemizygous deletions and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, with varying degrees of clonality. Copy number estimates from ddPCR showed high agreement with those from multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assays. We demonstrate that SMART-ddPCR is a highly accurate method for investigation of tumor PAI and for assessment of the somatic alterations underlying AI. Furthermore, analysis of publicly available data from The Cancer Genome Atlas identified 16 recurrent SCNA loci that contain heritable cancer risk SNPs associated with a

  1. The landscape of gene fusions and somatic mutations in salivary gland neoplasms - Implications for diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Mattias K; Stenman, Göran

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies of the genomic landscape of salivary gland tumors have provided important insights into the molecular pathogenesis of these tumors. The most consistent alterations identified include a translocation-generated gene fusion network involving transcription factors, transcriptional coactivators, tyrosine kinase receptors, and other kinases. In addition, next-generation sequencing studies of a few subtypes of salivary neoplasms have revealed hotspot mutations in individual genes and mutations clustering to specific pathways frequently altered in cancer. Although limited, these studies have opened up new avenues for improved classification and targeted therapies of salivary gland cancers. In this review, we summarize the latest developments in this field, focusing on tumor types for which clinically important molecular data are available. PMID:27101980

  2. Transcriptome analysis of an apple (Malus × domestica) yellow fruit somatic mutation identifies a gene network module highly associated with anthocyanin and epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    El-Sharkawy, Islam; Liang, Dong; Xu, Kenong

    2015-01-01

    Using RNA-seq, this study analysed an apple (Malus×domestica) anthocyanin-deficient yellow-skin somatic mutant ‘Blondee’ (BLO) and its red-skin parent ‘Kidd’s D-8’ (KID), the original name of ‘Gala’, to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the mutation. A total of 3299 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between BLO and KID at four developmental stages and/or between two adjacent stages within BLO and/or KID. A weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) of the DEGs uncovered a network module of 34 genes highly correlated (r=0.95, P=9.0×10–13) with anthocyanin contents. Although 12 of the 34 genes in the WGCNA module were characterized and known of roles in anthocyanin, the remainder 22 appear to be novel. Examining the expression of ten representative genes in the module in 14 diverse apples revealed that at least eight were significantly correlated with anthocyanin variation. MdMYB10 (MDP0000259614) and MdGST (MDP0000252292) were among the most suppressed module member genes in BLO despite being undistinguishable in their corresponding sequences between BLO and KID. Methylation assay of MdMYB10 and MdGST in fruit skin revealed that two regions (MR3 and MR7) in the MdMYB10 promoter exhibited remarkable differences between BLO and KID. In particular, methylation was high and progressively increased alongside fruit development in BLO while was correspondingly low and constant in KID. The methylation levels in both MR3 and MR7 were negatively correlated with anthocyanin content as well as the expression of MdMYB10 and MdGST. Clearly, the collective repression of the 34 genes explains the loss-of-colour in BLO while the methylation in MdMYB10 promoter is likely causal for the mutation. PMID:26417021

  3. Transcriptome analysis of an apple (Malus × domestica) yellow fruit somatic mutation identifies a gene network module highly associated with anthocyanin and epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    El-Sharkawy, Islam; Liang, Dong; Xu, Kenong

    2015-12-01

    Using RNA-seq, this study analysed an apple (Malus×domestica) anthocyanin-deficient yellow-skin somatic mutant 'Blondee' (BLO) and its red-skin parent 'Kidd's D-8' (KID), the original name of 'Gala', to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the mutation. A total of 3299 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between BLO and KID at four developmental stages and/or between two adjacent stages within BLO and/or KID. A weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) of the DEGs uncovered a network module of 34 genes highly correlated (r=0.95, P=9.0×10(-13)) with anthocyanin contents. Although 12 of the 34 genes in the WGCNA module were characterized and known of roles in anthocyanin, the remainder 22 appear to be novel. Examining the expression of ten representative genes in the module in 14 diverse apples revealed that at least eight were significantly correlated with anthocyanin variation. MdMYB10 (MDP0000259614) and MdGST (MDP0000252292) were among the most suppressed module member genes in BLO despite being undistinguishable in their corresponding sequences between BLO and KID. Methylation assay of MdMYB10 and MdGST in fruit skin revealed that two regions (MR3 and MR7) in the MdMYB10 promoter exhibited remarkable differences between BLO and KID. In particular, methylation was high and progressively increased alongside fruit development in BLO while was correspondingly low and constant in KID. The methylation levels in both MR3 and MR7 were negatively correlated with anthocyanin content as well as the expression of MdMYB10 and MdGST. Clearly, the collective repression of the 34 genes explains the loss-of-colour in BLO while the methylation in MdMYB10 promoter is likely causal for the mutation. PMID:26417021

  4. First Membrane Proximal External Region-Specific Anti-HIV1 Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal IgA1 Presenting Short CDRH3 and Low Somatic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Benjelloun, Fahd; Oruc, Zeliha; Thielens, Nicole; Verrier, Bernard; Champier, Gael; Vincent, Nadine; Rochereau, Nicolas; Girard, Alexandre; Jospin, Fabienne; Chanut, Blandine; Genin, Christian; Cogné, Michel; Paul, Stephane

    2016-09-01

    Mucosal HIV-1-specific IgA have been described as being able to neutralize HIV-1 and to block viral transcytosis. In serum and saliva, the anti-HIV IgA response is predominantly raised against the envelope of HIV-1. In this work, we describe the in vivo generation of gp41-specific IgA1 in humanized α1KI mice to produce chimeric IgA1. Mice were immunized with a conformational immunogenic gp41-transfected cell line. Among 2300 clones screened by immunofluorescence microscopy, six different gp41-specific IgA with strong recognition of gp41 were identified. Two of them have strong neutralizing activity against primary HIV-1 tier 1, 2, and 3 strains and present a low rate of somatic mutations and autoreactivity, unlike what was described for classical gp41-specific IgG. Epitopes were identified and located in the hepted repeat 2/membrane proximal external region. These Abs could be of interest in prophylactic treatment to block HIV-1 penetration in mucosa or in chronically infected patients in combination with antiretroviral therapy to reduce viral load and reservoir. PMID:27481846

  5. Effects of cigarette smoking on human in vivo somatic mutation: Longitudinal sampling of smokers demonstrates a decrease in glycophorin A (GPA) allele-loss variant cell frequencies following cessation

    SciTech Connect

    Bigbee, W.L.; Langlois, R.G. ); Grant, S.G.; Jensen, R.H. ); Mooney, L.M.; Perera, F.P. )

    1993-01-01

    The human in vivo glycophorin A (GPA) assay uses immunolabeling and flow cytometry to quantitate somatic variation in erythrocytes expressing GPA allele loss and allele-loss and duplication phenotypes in peripheral blood samples. The frequency of these variant erythrocytes (V[sub f]) presumably reflects the level of somatic mutation at this locus in the nucleated hematopoietic precursor cells of the bone marrow. We have previously shown that the GPA assay is a cumulative, integrating biodosimeter of accidental, medical, and occupational exposure to chemical mutagens and ionizing radiation. Surveys of otherwise unexposed populations point to an increased GPA allele loss V[sub f] in cigarette smokers compared to nonsmokers consistent with the induction of somatic mutation by mutagenic components of tobacco smoke. To further test this association, blood samples from active heavy smokers who entered a multi-endpoint Smokender study were obtained at enrollment and at 10 wks and 6 and 12 mo following smoking cessation. Results from the first 109 individuals reveal a decrease in the mean GPA allele loss V[sub f] ranging from 9.0 [+-] 1.0 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] (n = 109) for the active smoking samples, to 9.1 [+-] 1.8 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] (n = 46), 6.0 [+-] 0.7 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] (n = 15), and 5.8 [+-] 1.6 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] (n = 8) for the three postcessation samples, respectively. No change in the GPA allele loss and duplication V[sub f] was observed, thus confining the spectrum of mutational events induced by exposure to cigarette smoke. The observed decrease in the level of somatic mutation in smokers following cessation suggests limited persistence and/or repair of tobacco-smoke-induced genetic alterations consistent with epidemiologic findings of decreased cancer risk in smokers following cessation.

  6. Identification of a homozygous JAK3 V674A mutation caused by acquired uniparental disomy in a relapsed early T-cell precursor ALL patient.

    PubMed

    Kawashima-Goto, Sachiko; Imamura, Toshihiko; Seki, Masafumi; Kato, Motohiro; Yoshida, Kenichi; Sugimoto, Atsuya; Kaneda, Daisuke; Fujiki, Atsushi; Miyachi, Mitsuru; Nakatani, Takuya; Osone, Shinya; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Taki, Tomohiko; Takita, Junko; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Ogawa, Seishi; Hosoi, Hajime

    2015-04-01

    Investigation of genetic alterations associated with relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may help to identify druggable targets for specific therapies. Early T-cell precursor ALL (ETP-ALL) is a subtype of T-ALL with poor prognosis. Although the genetic landscape of ETP-ALL has been determined, genetic alterations related to the relapse of ETP-ALL have not been fully investigated. Here, we report the first patient with relapsed pediatric ETP-ALL to exhibit a homozygous JAK3 activating mutation, V674A, caused by acquired uniparental disomy (UPD). Single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis revealed acquired UPD (aUPD) at the 19p13.3-p12 locus only in leukemic cells at relapse. Sanger sequence of the JAK3 gene, which was located at 19p13.1 and frequently mutated in ETP-ALL, was performed in paired leukemic samples to determine homozygous JAK3 V674A mutation only in relapsed leukemic cells. In contrast, leukemic cells at initial diagnosis harbored hemizygous JAK3 V674A mutation. Further, whole-exome sequencing revealed mutations in 18 genes only in relapsed samples, although none of these was recurrent in T-ALL. These findings suggest that aUPD at 19p13.1 is partly associated with relapse in this patient. Pharmacological inhibition of JAK3 may be therapeutic in such cases. PMID:25430085

  7. Somatic CRISPR–Cas9-induced mutations reveal roles of embryonically essential dynein chains in Caenorhabditis elegans cilia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjing; Yi, Peishan

    2015-01-01

    Cilium formation and maintenance require intraflagellar transport (IFT). Although much is known about kinesin-2–driven anterograde IFT, the composition and regulation of retrograde IFT-specific dynein remain elusive. Components of cytoplasmic dynein may participate in IFT; however, their essential roles in cell division preclude functional studies in postmitotic cilia. Here, we report that inducible expression of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)–Cas9 system in Caenorhabditis elegans generated conditional mutations in IFT motors and particles, recapitulating ciliary defects in their null mutants. Using this method to bypass the embryonic requirement, we show the following: the dynein intermediate chain, light chain LC8, and lissencephaly-1 regulate retrograde IFT; the dynein light intermediate chain functions in dendrites and indirectly contributes to ciliogenesis; and the Tctex and Roadblock light chains are dispensable for cilium assembly. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these components undergo biphasic IFT with distinct transport frequencies and turnaround behaviors. Together, our results suggest that IFT–dynein and cytoplasmic dynein have unique compositions but also share components and regulatory mechanisms. PMID:25778918

  8. Somatic CRISPR-Cas9-induced mutations reveal roles of embryonically essential dynein chains in Caenorhabditis elegans cilia.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjing; Yi, Peishan; Ou, Guangshuo

    2015-03-16

    Cilium formation and maintenance require intraflagellar transport (IFT). Although much is known about kinesin-2-driven anterograde IFT, the composition and regulation of retrograde IFT-specific dynein remain elusive. Components of cytoplasmic dynein may participate in IFT; however, their essential roles in cell division preclude functional studies in postmitotic cilia. Here, we report that inducible expression of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system in Caenorhabditis elegans generated conditional mutations in IFT motors and particles, recapitulating ciliary defects in their null mutants. Using this method to bypass the embryonic requirement, we show the following: the dynein intermediate chain, light chain LC8, and lissencephaly-1 regulate retrograde IFT; the dynein light intermediate chain functions in dendrites and indirectly contributes to ciliogenesis; and the Tctex and Roadblock light chains are dispensable for cilium assembly. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these components undergo biphasic IFT with distinct transport frequencies and turnaround behaviors. Together, our results suggest that IFT-dynein and cytoplasmic dynein have unique compositions but also share components and regulatory mechanisms. PMID:25778918

  9. SubClonal Hierarchy Inference from Somatic Mutations: Automatic Reconstruction of Cancer Evolutionary Trees from Multi-region Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Niknafs, Noushin; Beleva-Guthrie, Violeta; Naiman, Daniel Q.; Karchin, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Recent improvements in next-generation sequencing of tumor samples and the ability to identify somatic mutations at low allelic fractions have opened the way for new approaches to model the evolution of individual cancers. The power and utility of these models is increased when tumor samples from multiple sites are sequenced. Temporal ordering of the samples may provide insight into the etiology of both primary and metastatic lesions and rationalizations for tumor recurrence and therapeutic failures. Additional insights may be provided by temporal ordering of evolving subclones—cellular subpopulations with unique mutational profiles. Current methods for subclone hierarchy inference tightly couple the problem of temporal ordering with that of estimating the fraction of cancer cells harboring each mutation. We present a new framework that includes a rigorous statistical hypothesis test and a collection of tools that make it possible to decouple these problems, which we believe will enable substantial progress in the field of subclone hierarchy inference. The methods presented here can be flexibly combined with methods developed by others addressing either of these problems. We provide tools to interpret hypothesis test results, which inform phylogenetic tree construction, and we introduce the first genetic algorithm designed for this purpose. The utility of our framework is systematically demonstrated in simulations. For most tested combinations of tumor purity, sequencing coverage, and tree complexity, good power (≥ 0.8) can be achieved and Type 1 error is well controlled when at least three tumor samples are available from a patient. Using data from three published multi-region tumor sequencing studies of (murine) small cell lung cancer, acute myeloid leukemia, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, in which the authors reconstructed subclonal phylogenetic trees by manual expert curation, we show how different configurations of our tools can identify either a single

  10. AID AND SOMATIC HYPERMUTATION

    PubMed Central

    Maul, Robert W.; Gearhart, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    In response to an assault by foreign organisms, peripheral B cells can change their antibody affinity and isotype by somatically mutating their genomic DNA. The ability of a cell to modify its DNA is exceptional in light of the potential consequences of genetic alterations to cause human disease and cancer. Thus, as expected, this mechanism of antibody diversity is tightly regulated and coordinated through one protein, activation induced deaminase (AID). AID produces diversity by converting cytosine to uracil within the immunoglobulin loci. The deoxyuracil residue is mutagenic when paired with deoxyguanosine, since it mimics thymidine during DNA replication. Additionally, B cells can manipulate the DNA repair pathways so that deoxyuracils are not faithfully repaired. Therefore, an intricate balance exists which is regulated at multiple stages to promote mutation of immunoglobulin genes, while retaining integrity of the rest of the genome. Here we discuss and summarize the current understanding of how AID functions to cause somatic hypermutation. PMID:20510733

  11. Whole Genome Sequencing of Newly Established Pancreatic Cancer Lines Identifies Novel Somatic Mutation (c.2587G>A) in Axon Guidance Receptor Plexin A1 as Enhancer of Proliferation and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Abisoye-Ogunniyan, Abisola; Waterfall, Joshua J.; Davis, Sean; Killian, J. Keith; Pineda, Marbin; Ray, Satyajit; McCord, Matt R.; Pflicke, Holger; Burkett, Sandra Sczerba; Meltzer, Paul S.; Rudloff, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The genetic profile of human pancreatic cancers harbors considerable heterogeneity, which suggests a possible explanation for the pronounced inefficacy of single therapies in this disease. This observation has led to a belief that custom therapies based on individual tumor profiles are necessary to more effectively treat pancreatic cancer. It has recently been discovered that axon guidance genes are affected by somatic structural variants in up to 25% of human pancreatic cancers. Thus far, however, some of these mutations have only been correlated to survival probability and no function has been assigned to these observed axon guidance gene mutations in pancreatic cancer. In this study we established three novel pancreatic cancer cell lines and performed whole genome sequencing to discover novel mutations in axon guidance genes that may contribute to the cancer phenotype of these cells. We discovered, among other novel somatic variants in axon guidance pathway genes, a novel mutation in the PLXNA1 receptor (c.2587G>A) in newly established cell line SB.06 that mediates oncogenic cues of increased invasion and proliferation in SB.06 cells and increased invasion in 293T cells upon stimulation with the receptor’s natural ligand semaphorin 3A compared to wild type PLXNA1 cells. Mutant PLXNA1 signaling was associated with increased Rho-GTPase and p42/p44 MAPK signaling activity and cytoskeletal expansion, but not changes in E-cadherin, vimentin, or metalloproteinase 9 expression levels. Pharmacologic inhibition of the Rho-GTPase family member CDC42 selectively abrogated PLXNA1 c.2587G>A-mediated increased invasion. These findings provide in-vitro confirmation that somatic mutations in axon guidance genes can provide oncogenic gain-of-function signals and may contribute to pancreatic cancer progression. PMID:26962861

  12. Whole Genome Sequencing of Newly Established Pancreatic Cancer Lines Identifies Novel Somatic Mutation (c.2587G>A) in Axon Guidance Receptor Plexin A1 as Enhancer of Proliferation and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Sorber, Rebecca; Teper, Yaroslav; Abisoye-Ogunniyan, Abisola; Waterfall, Joshua J; Davis, Sean; Killian, J Keith; Pineda, Marbin; Ray, Satyajit; McCord, Matt R; Pflicke, Holger; Burkett, Sandra Sczerba; Meltzer, Paul S; Rudloff, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The genetic profile of human pancreatic cancers harbors considerable heterogeneity, which suggests a possible explanation for the pronounced inefficacy of single therapies in this disease. This observation has led to a belief that custom therapies based on individual tumor profiles are necessary to more effectively treat pancreatic cancer. It has recently been discovered that axon guidance genes are affected by somatic structural variants in up to 25% of human pancreatic cancers. Thus far, however, some of these mutations have only been correlated to survival probability and no function has been assigned to these observed axon guidance gene mutations in pancreatic cancer. In this study we established three novel pancreatic cancer cell lines and performed whole genome sequencing to discover novel mutations in axon guidance genes that may contribute to the cancer phenotype of these cells. We discovered, among other novel somatic variants in axon guidance pathway genes, a novel mutation in the PLXNA1 receptor (c.2587G>A) in newly established cell line SB.06 that mediates oncogenic cues of increased invasion and proliferation in SB.06 cells and increased invasion in 293T cells upon stimulation with the receptor's natural ligand semaphorin 3A compared to wild type PLXNA1 cells. Mutant PLXNA1 signaling was associated with increased Rho-GTPase and p42/p44 MAPK signaling activity and cytoskeletal expansion, but not changes in E-cadherin, vimentin, or metalloproteinase 9 expression levels. Pharmacologic inhibition of the Rho-GTPase family member CDC42 selectively abrogated PLXNA1 c.2587G>A-mediated increased invasion. These findings provide in-vitro confirmation that somatic mutations in axon guidance genes can provide oncogenic gain-of-function signals and may contribute to pancreatic cancer progression. PMID:26962861

  13. Hypermorphic mutation of phospholipase C, γ2 acquired in ibrutinib-resistant CLL confers BTK independency upon B-cell receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ta-Ming; Woyach, Jennifer A.; Zhong, Yiming; Lozanski, Arletta; Lozanski, Gerard; Dong, Shuai; Strattan, Ethan; Lehman, Amy; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Flynn, Joseph; Andritsos, Leslie A.; Maddocks, Kami; Jaglowski, Samantha M.; Blum, Kristie A.; Byrd, John C.; Dubovsky, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Ibrutinib has significantly improved the outcome of patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Recent reports attribute ibrutinib resistance to acquired mutations in Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK), the target of ibrutinib, as well as the immediate downstream effector phospholipase C, γ2 (PLCG2). Although the C481S mutation found in BTK has been shown to disable ibrutinib’s capacity to irreversibly bind this primary target, the detailed mechanisms of mutations in PLCG2 have yet to be established. Herein, we characterize the enhanced signaling competence, BTK independence, and surface immunoglobulin dependence of the PLCG2 mutation at R665W, which has been documented in ibrutinib-resistant CLL. Our data demonstrate that this missense alteration elicits BTK-independent activation after B-cell receptor engagement, implying the formation of a novel BTK-bypass pathway. Consistent with previous results, PLCG2R665W confers hypermorphic induction of downstream signaling events. Our studies reveal that proximal kinases SYK and LYN are critical for the activation of mutant PLCG2 and that therapeutics targeting SYK and LYN can combat molecular resistance in cell line models and primary CLL cells from ibrutinib-resistant patients. Altogether, our results engender a molecular understanding of the identified aberration at PLCG2 and explore its functional dependency on BTK, SYK, and LYN, suggesting alternative strategies to combat acquired ibrutinib resistance. PMID:25972157

  14. Suppressive effect of post- or pre-treatment of aspirin metabolite on mitomycin C-induced genotoxicity using the somatic mutation and recombination test in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Niikawa, Miki; Shin, Seizai; Nagase, Hisamitsu

    2007-01-01

    In our previous paper, we found that aspirin suppressed in a somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) of mitomycin C (MMC) in Drosophila melanogaster. In order to reveal the mechanism of bio-antimutagenicity and/or preventive effect of aspirin, we evaluated the suppressive ability of each aspirin metabolite, such as salicylic acid (SA), salicyluric acid (SUA), gentisic acid (GA), gentisuric acid (GUA) and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), in SMART in D. melanogaster using post- and pre-treatments. As for the post-treatment, SA reduced the numbers of large single and twin spots. GA reduced the small single and large single spots, and GUA reduced the single spots, large single and twin spots. The inhibition of GUA is slightly stronger than that of any other metabolites; the inhibition percentage is 49 at the dose of 5 mg/bottle. On the other hand, as for the pre-treatment, aspirin, SUA, GA and DHBA reduced the numbers of small single spots. SUA, GE and DHBA reduced the number of large single spots. Aspirin and its metabolites did not reduce the number of twin spots. The results of the present study suggest that SA, GA and GUA repair or replicate DNA-damage by MMC and SUA, GA, GUA and DHBA prevent DNA-damage by MMC. It is suggested that secondary cancer is prevented by aspirin post-treatment without losing the medicinal effectiveness (anti-tumor activity). Therefore, we consider there are effective doses and/or administration timing of aspirin and MMC to prevent secondary cancer. PMID:17275250

  15. Somatic cell mutagenesis in Drosophila: recovery of genetic damage in relation to the types of DNA lesions induced in mutationally unstable and stable X-chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Vogel, E W

    1989-03-01

    This paper reports the results of a study on the genotoxic activities of 12 mutagens and clastogens of widely differing mode of action in somatic cells in vivo, i.e., in the eye primordia of Drosophila larvae. After emergence, adult flies were monitored for aberrantly colored sectors in the compound eyes of the following genotypes: UZ males and females (zeste) carrying a genetically unstable transposable element, SZ males and females (zeste) carrying a partial duplication of the w+ locus plus a transposon insert, white-coral/white (wco/w) females, w+/w females and w+ males. The UZ and SZ marker sets make it possible to monitor shifts from zeste to red (scored as mosaic red spots, RS) and for loss of the white locus (light spots, LS). wco/w+ females were scored for mosaic twin spots (TS) and LS, w+ genotypes for just LS. The genotoxins analyzed were methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), dimethyl sulfate (DMS) and ethylnitrosourea (ENU) (alkylating), adriamycin (AM) and daunomycin (DM) (intercalating), Trenimon, Thio-TEPA and cisplatin (DDP) (cross-linking), bleomycin (strand-breaking), 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) and 9,10-dimethylanthracene (DA) (bulky monoadducts) and cytosine arabinofuranoside (inhibition of DNA synthesis). The relative mutabilities with frequencies of mosaic light spots (LS) in w+/w female as the standard (relative mutability = 1) vs. genotypes UZ (RS in male) vs. SZ (RS in male) vs. w+ (LS in male) were 1:0.6:0.2:0.3 for MMS, 1:0.09:0.05:0.7 for DDP, and 1:1.6:0.2:1.0 for ENU, ENU showed exceptional behavior in that it was the only compound for which mutational response, measured by the induction of red spots, was highest with the UZ marker set. Occurrence of large light spots (LS) in male but not in female genotypes was negatively correlated with efficiency of agents for chromosomal damage, suggesting that in the hemizygous condition, as in males, selection of damaged cells and mitotic delay may have played a significant role. In general

  16. JAK2-related pathway induces acquired erlotinib resistance in lung cancer cells harboring an epidermal growth factor receptor-activating mutation.

    PubMed

    Harada, Daijiro; Takigawa, Nagio; Ochi, Nobuaki; Ninomiya, Takashi; Yasugi, Masayuki; Kubo, Toshio; Takeda, Hiromasa; Ichihara, Eiki; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Takata, Saburo; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2012-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as gefitinib and erlotinib, are effective for non-small cell lung cancer with activating EGFR mutations. However, even in patients with an initial dramatic response to such a drug, acquired resistance develops after 6-12 months. A secondary mutation of T790M in EGFR and amplification of the MET gene account for this resistance; however, the mechanism(s) of approximately 30% of acquired resistance cases remain unknown. We established an erlotinib-resistant lung cancer cell line named PC-9/ER3 that harbors an EGFR mutation after continuously exposing PC-9 cells to erlotinib. PC-9/ER3 cells were 136-fold more resistant to erlotinib than the parental cells. Although the PC-9/ER3 cells did not carry the T790M mutation or MET amplification and had similar levels of phosphorylated (p) STAT3, pJAK2 increased in the resistant cells. It was found in the present study that 3-12 h of exposure to erlotinib in both cell lines did not affect pJAK2 expression, but did result in increased pSTAT3 expression. pAkt in PC-9/ER3 cells was less suppressed than in PC-9 cells, although pEGFR and pMAPK were markedly suppressed in both cell lines. The combined treatment of erlotinib plus a JAK2 inhibitor (JSI-124) suppressed pAkt in PC-9/ER3 cells. Similarly, the combination of erlotinib plus JSI-124 or siRNA against JAK2 restored sensitivity to erlotinib in PC-9/ER3 cells. The combination of erlotinib plus JSI-124 was also effective for reducing PC-9/ER3 tumors in a murine xenograft model. Our results suggest that the activation of JAK2 partially accounts for acquired erlotinib resistance. PMID:22712764

  17. Hypothesis: Somatic Mosaicism and Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Mutations causing genetic disorders can occur during mitotic cell division after fertilization, which is called somatic mutations. This leads to somatic mosaicism, where two or more genetically distinct cells are present in one individual. Somatic mutations are the most well studied in cancer where it plays an important role and also have been associated with some neurodegenerative disorders. The study of somatic mosaicism in Parkinson disease (PD) is only in its infancy, and a case with somatic mutation has not yet been described. However, we can speculate that a somatic mutation affecting cells in the central nervous system including substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons could lead to the development of PD through the same pathomechanisms of genetic PD even in the absence of a germ-line mutation. Theoretically, a number of genes could be candidates for genetic analysis for the presence of somatic mosaicism. Among them, SNCA and PARK2 could be the best candidates to analyze. Because analyzing brain tissues in living patients is impossible, alternative tissues could be used to indicate the genetic status of the brain. Performance of the technology is another factor to consider when analyzing the tissues. PMID:25548528

  18. Reprogramming mammalian somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Osorio, N; Urrego, R; Cibelli, J B; Eilertsen, K; Memili, E

    2012-12-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), the technique commonly known as cloning, permits transformation of a somatic cell into an undifferentiated zygote with the potential to develop into a newborn animal (i.e., a clone). In somatic cells, chromatin is programmed to repress most genes and express some, depending on the tissue. It is evident that the enucleated oocyte provides the environment in which embryonic genes in a somatic cell can be expressed. This process is controlled by a series of epigenetic modifications, generally referred to as "nuclear reprogramming," which are thought to involve the removal of reversible epigenetic changes acquired during cell differentiation. A similar process is thought to occur by overexpression of key transcription factors to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), bypassing the need for SCNT. Despite its obvious scientific and medical importance, and the great number of studies addressing the subject, the molecular basis of reprogramming in both reprogramming strategies is largely unknown. The present review focuses on the cellular and molecular events that occur during nuclear reprogramming in the context of SCNT and the various approaches currently being used to improve nuclear reprogramming. A better understanding of the reprogramming mechanism will have a direct impact on the efficiency of current SCNT procedures, as well as iPSC derivation. PMID:22979962

  19. Understanding mutagenesis through delineation of mutational signatures in human cancer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Petljak, Mia; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.

    2016-06-01

    Each individual cell within a human body acquires a certain number of somatic mutations during a course of its lifetime. These mutations originate from a wide spectra of both endogenous and exogenous mutational processes that leave distinct patterns of mutations, termed mutational signatures, embedded within the genomes of all cells. In recent years, the vast amount of data produced by sequencing of cancer genomes was coupled with novel mathematical models and computational tools to generate the first comprehensive map of mutational signatures in human cancer. Up to date, >30 distinct mutational signatures have been identified, and etiologies have been proposedmore » for many of them. This paper provides a brief historical background on examination of mutational patterns in human cancer, summarizes the knowledge accumulated since introducing the concept of mutational signatures and discusses their future potential applications and perspectives within the field.« less

  20. Understanding mutagenesis through delineation of mutational signatures in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Petljak, Mia; Alexandrov, Ludmil B

    2016-06-01

    Each individual cell within a human body acquires a certain number of somatic mutations during a course of its lifetime. These mutations originate from a wide spectra of both endogenous and exogenous mutational processes that leave distinct patterns of mutations, termed mutational signatures, embedded within the genomes of all cells. In recent years, the vast amount of data produced by sequencing of cancer genomes was coupled with novel mathematical models and computational tools to generate the first comprehensive map of mutational signatures in human cancer. Up to date, >30 distinct mutational signatures have been identified, and etiologies have been proposed for many of them. This review provides a brief historical background on examination of mutational patterns in human cancer, summarizes the knowledge accumulated since introducing the concept of mutational signatures and discusses their future potential applications and perspectives within the field. PMID:27207657

  1. Somatic mutations in the variable regions of a human IgG anti-double-stranded DNA autoantibody suggest a role for antigen in the induction of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    van Es, J H; Gmelig Meyling, F H; van de Akker, W R; Aanstoot, H; Derksen, R H; Logtenberg, T

    1991-02-01

    The processes that govern the generation of pathogenic anti-DNA autoantibodies in human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are largely unknown. Autoantibodies may arise as a consequence of polyclonal B cell activation and/or antigen-driven B cell activation and selection. The role of these processes in humoral autoimmunity may be studied by molecular genetic analysis of immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) regions of antibodies that are characteristic of SLE. We have analyzed the gene elements that encode a high affinity, IgG anti-double-stranded DNA autoantibody secreted by a monoclonal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed cell line derived from a patient with active SLE. In addition, we have identified, cloned, and sequenced the germline counterparts of the VH and VL genes expressed in this autoantibody. The comparison of both sets of gene elements shows that the autoantibody VH and VL regions harbor numerous somatic mutations characteristic of an antigen-driven immune response. The light chain expressed in this autoantibody is a somatically mutated variant of the kv325 germline gene that is frequently associated with paraproteins having autoantibody activity and with Ig molecules produced by malignant B cells that express the CD5 antigen. Furthermore, the utilized DH segment has been repeatedly found in multireactive, low affinity IgM anti-DNA autoantibodies from SLE patients and healthy individuals. These results suggest that pathogenic IgG anti-DNA autoantibodies in human SLE may arise through antigen-driven selection of somatic mutations in the gene elements that frequently encode multireactive IgM autoantibodies. PMID:1899104

  2. Acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in EGFR mutant lung cancer: Distinct natural history of patients with tumors harboring the T790M mutation

    PubMed Central

    Oxnard, Geoffrey R.; Arcila, Maria E.; Sima, Camelia S.; Riely, Gregory J.; Chmielecki, Juliann; Kris, Mark G.; Pao, William; Ladanyi, Marc; Miller, Vincent A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma develop acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) after a median of 10–16 months. In half of these cases a second EGFR mutation, T790M, underlies acquired resistance. We undertook this study to examine the clinical course of patients harboring the T790M mutation following progression on TKI. Experimental design EGFR-mutant lung cancer patients with acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs were identified as part of a prospective re-biopsy protocol where post-progression tumor specimens were collected for molecular analysis. Post-progression survival and characteristics of disease progression were compared in patients with and without T790M. Results We identified T790M in the initial re-biopsy specimens from 58/93 patients (62%, 95% confidence interval 52%–72%). T790M was more common in biopsies of lung/pleura tissue and lymph nodes than in more distant sites (p=0.014). Median post-progression survival was 16 months (interquartile range 9–29 months); patients with T790M had a significantly longer post-progression survival (p=0.036). Patients without T790M more often progressed in a previously uninvolved organ system (p=0.014) and exhibited a poorer performance status at time of progression (p=0.007). Conclusions Among patients with acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs, the presence of T790M defines a clinical subset with a relatively favorable prognosis and more indolent progression. Knowledge of T790M status is therefore important for the clinical care of these patients as well as for the optimal design and interpretation of clinical trials in this setting. PMID:21135146

  3. Ancestral Mutations Acquired in Refrex-1, a Restriction Factor against Feline Retroviruses, during its Cooption and Domestication

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Jumpei; Baba, Takuya; Kawasaki, Junna

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of ancestral retroviral infections of germ cells. Retroviral endogenization is an adaptation process for the host genome, and ERVs are gradually attenuated or inactivated by mutation. However, some ERVs that have been “domesticated” by their hosts eventually gain physiological functions, such as placentation or viral resistance. We previously reported the discovery of Refrex-1, a soluble antiretroviral factor in domestic cats that specifically inhibits infection by feline leukemia virus subgroup D (FeLV-D), a chimeric virus of FeLV, and a feline ERV, ERV-DC. Refrex-1 is a truncated envelope protein (Env) encoded by both ERV-DC7 and ERV-DC16 proviral loci. Here, we reconstituted ancestral and functional Env from ERV-DC7 and ERV-DC16 envelope genes (env) by inducing reverse mutations. Unexpectedly, ERV-DC7 and ERV-DC16 full-length Env (ERV-DC7 fl and ERV-DC16 fl), reconstructed by removing stop codons, did not produce infectious viral particles. ERV-DC7 fl and ERV-DC16 fl were highly expressed in cells but were not cleaved into surface subunits (SU) and transmembrane subunits, nor were they incorporated into virions. G407R/N427I-A429T and Y431D substitutions within the SU C-terminal domain of ERV-DC7 fl and ERV-DC16 fl, respectively, caused these dysfunctions. The residues glycine 407 and tyrosine 431 are relatively conserved among infectious gammaretroviruses, and their substitution causes the same dysfunctions as the tested retroviruses. Our results reveal that specific mutations within the SU C-terminal domain suppressed Env cleavage and incorporation into virions and indicate that these mutations contributed to the domestication of Refrex-1 through multistep events that occurred in the postintegration period. IMPORTANCE Domestic cats are colonized with various exogenous retroviruses (exRVs), such as feline leukemia virus (FeLV), and their genomes contain numerous ERVs, some of which are replication

  4. A human systemic lupus erythematosus-related anti-cardiolipin/single-stranded DNA autoantibody is encoded by a somatically mutated variant of the developmentally restricted 51P1 V[sub H] gene

    SciTech Connect

    Van Es, J.H.; Aanstoot, H.; Gmelig-Meyling, F.H.J.; Derksen, R.H.W.M.; Logtenberg, T. )

    1992-09-15

    The authors report the Ig H and L chain V region sequences from the cDNAs encoding a monoclonal human IgG anti-cardiolipin/ssDNA autoantibody (R149) derived from a patient with active SLE. Comparison with the germ-line V-gene repertoire of this patient revealed that R149 likely arose as a consequence of an Ag-driven selection process. The Ag-binding portions of the V regions were characterized by a high number of arginine residues, a property that has been associated with anti-dsDNA autoantibodies from lupus-prone mice and patients with SLE. The V[sub H] gene encoding autoantibody R149 was a somatically mutated variant of the 51P1 gene segment, which is frequently associated with the restricted fetal B cell repertoire, malignant CD5 B cells, and natural antibodies. These data suggest that in SLE patients a common antigenic stimulus may evoke anti-DNA and anti-cardiolipin autoantibodies and provide further evidence that a small set of developmentally restricted V[sub H] genes can give rise to disease-associated autoantibodies through Ag-selected somatic mutations. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  5. A meta-analysis of somatic mutations from next generation sequencing of 241 melanomas: a road map for the study of genes with potential clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Junfeng; Jia, Peilin; Hutchinson, Katherine E.; Dahlman, Kimberly B.; Johnson, Douglas; Sosman, Jeffrey; Pao, William; Zhao, Zhongming

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) has been used to characterize the overall genomic landscape of melanomas. Here, we systematically examined mutations from recently published melanoma NGS data involving 241 paired tumor-normal samples to identify potentially clinically relevant mutations. Melanomas were characterized according to an in-house clinical assay that identifies well-known specific recurrent mutations in five driver genes: BRAF (affecting V600), NRAS (G12, G13, and Q61), KIT (W557, V559, L576, K642, and D816), GNAQ (Q209), and GNA11 (Q209). Tumors with none of these mutations are termed “pan-negative”. We then mined the driver mutation-positive and pan-negative melanoma NGS data for mutations in 632 cancer genes that could influence existing or emerging targeted therapies. First, we uncovered several genes whose mutations were more likely associated with BRAF- or NRAS-driven melanomas, including TP53 and COL1A1 with BRAF, and PPP6C, KALRN, PIK3R4, TRPM6, GUCY2C, and PRKAA2 with NRAS. Second, we found that the 69 “pan-negative” melanoma genomes harbored alternate infrequent mutations in the 5 known driver genes along with many mutations in genes encoding guanine nucleotide binding protein α-subunits. Third, we identified 12 significantly mutated genes in “pan-negative” samples (ALK, STK31, DGKI, RAC1, EPHA4, ADAMTS18, EPHA7, ERBB4, TAF1L, NF1, SYK, and KDR), including 5 genes (RAC1, ADAMTS18, EPHA7, TAF1L, and NF1) with a recurrent mutation in at least 2 “pan-negative” tumor samples. This meta-analysis provides a road map for the study of additional potentially actionable genes in both driver mutation-positive and pan-negative melanomas. PMID:24755198

  6. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Lavi, Noa

    2014-01-01

    With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph−) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations) and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations) in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin) were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review. PMID:25386351

  7. Calreticulin mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Lavi, Noa

    2014-10-01

    With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph(-)) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations) and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations) in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin) were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph(-) MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review. PMID:25386351

  8. Correlation of somatic mutations with outcome after FLAMSA-busulfan sequential conditioning and allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Christopeit, Maximilian; Badbaran, Anita; Alawi, Malik; Zabelina, Tatjana; Zeck, Gaby; Wolschke, Christine; Ayuk, Francis; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2016-09-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is a curative treatment option for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Little is known about the prognostic impact of mutations, for example, in TP53 specifically after allo-HSCT. We here describe the prognostic impact of mutations in a panel of 19 genes analyzed by amplicon-based next-generation-sequencing in a uniformly treated patient cohort. Sixty-two patients with a median age of 61 yr suffered from MDS with 0-20% bone marrow blasts. International Prognostic Score was intermediate 1 (15%) and higher (79%). Conditioning uniformly was performed using a sequential approach in which FLAMSA chemotherapy was followed by Busulfan-based conditioning. Patients mostly were transplanted from an unrelated donor (77%), and 36% of patients received a graft from a mismatched donor. Median number of mutations was 2 (range 0-6). RUNX1, GATA2, TET2, and CEBPA were the genes most frequently found mutated. TP53, a factor previously reported to confer adverse prognostic impact after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, was mutated in samples from eight patients, one of which showed a silent mutation. With an estimated 5-yr overall/disease-free survival of 48 ± 7%/41 ± 7%, none of the mutations analyzed showed a prognostic impact in this analysis of the largest uniformly treated cohort thus far. This especially holds true for patients with a mutation in TP53. PMID:26680262

  9. Integrated genomic approaches identify upregulation of SCRN1 as a novel mechanism associated with acquired resistance to erlotinib in PC9 cells harboring oncogenic EGFR mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nayoung; Cho, Ahye; Watanabe, Hideo; Choi, Yoon-La; Aziz, Meraj; Kassner, Michelle; Joung, Je-Gun; Park, Angela KJ; Francis, Joshua M.; Bae, Joon Seol; Ahn, Soo-min; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Woong-Yang; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil; Koo, Jaehyung; Yin, Hongwei Holly; Cho, Jeonghee

    2016-01-01

    Therapies targeting the tyrosine kinase activity of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) have been proven to be effective in treating a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring activating EGFR mutations. Inevitably these patients develop resistance to the EGFR-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Here, we performed integrated genomic analyses using an in vitro system to uncover alternative genomic mechanisms responsible for acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs. Specifically, we identified 80 genes whose expression is significantly increased in the erlotinib-resistant clones. RNAi-based systematic synthetic lethal screening of these candidate genes revealed that suppression of one upregulated transcript, SCRN1, a secernin family member, restores sensitivity to erlotinib by enhancing inhibition of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis revealed increased levels of SCRN1 in 5 of 11 lung tumor specimens from EGFR-TKIs resistant patients. Taken together, we propose that upregulation of SCRN1 is an additional mechanism associated with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs and that its suppression serves as a novel therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in these patients. PMID:26883194

  10. Defining origins of malignant B cells: a new circulating normal human IgM(+)D(+) B-cell subset lacking CD27 expression and displaying somatically mutated IGHV genes as a relevant memory population.

    PubMed

    Weston-Bell, N; Townsend, M; Di Genova, G; Forconi, F; Sahota, S S

    2009-11-01

    In probing the cell of origin in malignant B cells, an imprint of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) region genes delineates antigen encounter, and identifying the precise pathway generating SHM in the normal B-cell counterpart becomes relevant. SHM remains the definitive memory imprint in normal human B cells, but CD27 expression also delineates memory. Recently, dye extrusion adenosine triphosphate-binding transporter assays identified circulating isotype-switched memory B cells that lacked CD27, yet exhibited low levels of SHM. To extend findings, we report a pre-switched CD27(-ve) circulating memory B-cell population in normal blood using comparable assays, and isolated CD19(+)IgM(+)D(+)CD27(-ve) cells (>99% purity) for the analysis of IGHV5/IGHV3-IGHM transcripts. Of these (n=334), approximately 78% were germ line and naive B cell derived. Strikingly, 21.9% of the transcripts were mutated. They showed 3-5 mutations (13.5% of sequences) and >5 mutations (8.4% of sequences) per transcript. Accrual of mutations in a subset of CD19(+)IgM(+)D(+)CD27(-ve) cells define a new circulating pre-switched memory B-cell pool, present in substantial numbers in the population harboring naive B cells. These CD19(+)IgM(+)D(+)CD27(-ve) memory B cells may have a distinct lineage and function, and seem relevant to understanding origins of malignant B cells, in particular those of hairy cell leukemia cells, which display mutated V genes yet lack CD27 expression. PMID:19776762

  11. Role of Structure-Based Changes due to Somatic Mutation in Highly Homologous DNA-Binding and DNA-Hydrolyzing Autoantibodies Exemplified by A23P Substitution in the VH Domain

    PubMed Central

    Kozyr, A. V.; Kolesnikov, A. V.; Khlyntseva, A. E.; Bogun, A. G.; Savchenko, G. A.; Shemyakin, I. G.; Gabibov, A. G.

    2012-01-01

    Anti-DNA autoantibodies are responsible for tissue injury in lupus. A subset of DNA-specific antibodies capable of DNA cleavage can be even more harmful after entering the living cells by destroying nuclear DNA. Origins of anti-DNA autoantibodies are not fully understood, and the mechanism of induction of DNA-cleaving activity remains speculative. The autoantibody BV04-01 derived from lupus-prone mouse is the only DNA-hydrolyzing immunoglobulin with known 3D structure. Identification and analysis of antibodies homologous to BV04-01 may help to understand molecular bases and origins of DNA-cleaving activity of autoantibodies. BLAST search identified murine anti-DNA autoantibody MRL-4 with sequences of variable region genes highly homologous to those of autoantibody BV04-01. Despite significant homology to BV04-01, not only MRL-4 had no DNA-cleaving activity, but also reversion of its unusual P23 mutation to the germline alanine resulted in a dramatic loss of affinity to DNA. Contrary to this effect, transfer of the P23 mutation to the BV04-01 has resulted in a significant drop in DNA binding and almost complete loss of catalytic activity. In the present paper we analyzed the properties of two homologous autoantibodies and mutants thereof and discussed the implications of unusual somatic mutations for the development of autoantibodies with DNA-binding and DNA-hydrolyzing activity. PMID:23193442

  12. Age-related mutations and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mason, C C; Khorashad, J S; Tantravahi, S K; Kelley, T W; Zabriskie, M S; Yan, D; Pomicter, A D; Reynolds, K R; Eiring, A M; Kronenberg, Z; Sherman, R L; Tyner, J W; Dalley, B K; Dao, K-H; Yandell, M; Druker, B J; Gotlib, J; O'Hare, T; Deininger, M W

    2016-04-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a hematologic malignancy nearly confined to the elderly. Previous studies to determine incidence and prognostic significance of somatic mutations in CMML have relied on candidate gene sequencing, although an unbiased mutational search has not been conducted. As many of the genes commonly mutated in CMML were recently associated with age-related clonal hematopoiesis (ARCH) and aged hematopoiesis is characterized by a myelomonocytic differentiation bias, we hypothesized that CMML and aged hematopoiesis may be closely related. We initially established the somatic mutation landscape of CMML by whole exome sequencing followed by gene-targeted validation. Genes mutated in ⩾10% of patients were SRSF2, TET2, ASXL1, RUNX1, SETBP1, KRAS, EZH2, CBL and NRAS, as well as the novel CMML genes FAT4, ARIH1, DNAH2 and CSMD1. Most CMML patients (71%) had mutations in ⩾2 ARCH genes and 52% had ⩾7 mutations overall. Higher mutation burden was associated with shorter survival. Age-adjusted population incidence and reported ARCH mutation rates are consistent with a model in which clinical CMML ensues when a sufficient number of stochastically acquired age-related mutations has accumulated, suggesting that CMML represents the leukemic conversion of the myelomonocytic-lineage-biased aged hematopoietic system. PMID:26648538

  13. Assessment of the genotoxic potential of two zinc oxide sources (amorphous and nanoparticles) using the in vitro micronucleus test and the in vivo wing somatic mutation and recombination test.

    PubMed

    Reis, Érica de Melo; de Rezende, Alexandre Azenha Alves; Santos, Diego Vilela; de Oliveria, Pollyanna Francielli; Nicolella, Heloisa Diniz; Tavares, Denise Crispim; Silva, Anielle Christine Almeida; Dantas, Noelio Oliveira; Spanó, Mário Antônio

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated the toxic and genotoxic potential of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) of 20 nm and the mutagenic potential of these ZnO NPs as well as that of an amorphous ZnO. Toxicity was assessed by XTT colorimetric assay. ZnO NPs were toxic at concentrations equal to or higher than 240.0 μM. Genotoxicity was assessed by in vitro Cytokinesis Block Micronucleus Assay (CBMN) in V79 cells. ZnO NPs were genotoxic at 120.0 μM. The mutagenic potential of amorphous ZnO and the ZnO NPs was assayed using the wing Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART) of Drosophila melanogaster. In the Standard cross, the amorphous ZnO and ZnO NPs were not mutagenic. Nevertheless, Marker trans-heterozygous individuals from the High bioactivation cross treated with amorphous ZnO (6.25 mM) and ZnO NPs (12.50 mM) displayed a significant increased number of mutant spots when compared with the negative control. In conclusion, the results were not dose related and indicate that only higher concentrations of ZnO NPs were toxic and able to induce genotoxicity in V79 cells. The increase in mutant spots observed in D. melanogaster was generated due to mitotic recombination, rather than mutational events. PMID:26190540

  14. Not All Next Generation Sequencing Diagnostics are Created Equal: Understanding the Nuances of Solid Tumor Assay Design for Somatic Mutation Detection

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Phillip N.; Dunlop, Charles L.M.; Elliott, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular characterization of tumors using next generation sequencing (NGS) is an emerging diagnostic tool that is quickly becoming an integral part of clinical decision making. Cancer genomic profiling involves significant challenges including DNA quality and quantity, tumor heterogeneity, and the need to detect a wide variety of complex genetic mutations. Most available comprehensive diagnostic tests rely on primer based amplification or probe based capture methods coupled with NGS to detect hotspot mutation sites or whole regions implicated in disease. These tumor panels utilize highly customized bioinformatics pipelines to perform the difficult task of accurately calling cancer relevant alterations such as single nucleotide variations, small indels or large genomic alterations from the NGS data. In this review, we will discuss the challenges of solid tumor assay design/analysis and report a case study that highlights the need to include complementary technologies (i.e., arrays) and germline analysis in tumor testing to reliably identify copy number alterations and actionable variants. PMID:26193321

  15. Targeted Next Generation Sequencing as a Reliable Diagnostic Assay for the Detection of Somatic Mutations in Tumours Using Minimal DNA Amounts from Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded Material

    PubMed Central

    Koudijs, Marco J.; Nijman, Ies; Hinrichs, John W. J.; Cuppen, Edwin; van Lieshout, Stef; Loberg, Robert D.; de Jonge, Maja; Voest, Emile E.; de Weger, Roel A.; Steeghs, Neeltje; Langenberg, Marlies H. G.; Sleijfer, Stefan; Willems, Stefan M.; Lolkema, Martijn P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Targeted Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) offers a way to implement testing of multiple genetic aberrations in diagnostic pathology practice, which is necessary for personalized cancer treatment. However, no standards regarding input material have been defined. This study therefore aimed to determine the effect of the type of input material (e.g. formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) versus fresh frozen (FF) tissue) on NGS derived results. Moreover, this study aimed to explore a standardized analysis pipeline to support consistent clinical decision-making. Method We used the Ion Torrent PGM sequencing platform in combination with the Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 to sequence frequently mutated regions in 50 cancer related genes, and validated the NGS detected variants in 250 FFPE samples using standard diagnostic assays. Next, 386 tumour samples were sequenced to explore the effect of input material on variant detection variables. For variant calling, Ion Torrent analysis software was supplemented with additional variant annotation and filtering. Results Both FFPE and FF tissue could be sequenced reliably with a sensitivity of 99.1%. Validation showed a 98.5% concordance between NGS and conventional sequencing techniques, where NGS provided both the advantage of low input DNA concentration and the detection of low-frequency variants. The reliability of mutation analysis could be further improved with manual inspection of sequence data. Conclusion Targeted NGS can be reliably implemented in cancer diagnostics using both FFPE and FF tissue when using appropriate analysis settings, even with low input DNA. PMID:26919633

  16. Induction of somatic mutations in Tradescantia clone 4430 by three phenylenediamine isomers and the antimutagenic mechanisms of diethyldithiocarbamate and ammonium meta-vanadate.

    PubMed

    Gichner, T; Cabrera Lopez, G; Wagner, E D; Plewa, M J

    1994-04-15

    Three isomers of the promutagen phenylenediamine at mM concentrations were plant-activated and induced mutation in stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone 4430. The rank order of the mutagenicity of the isomers was: o-phenylenediamine > m-phenylenediamine > p-phenylenediamine with corresponding mutagenic potencies of 5.60, 1.43, and 0.46 mutant stamen hair cells/mumole, respectively. Diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC) and ammonium meta-vanadate (vanadate) repressed the mutagenic activity of o-phenylenediamine (o-PDA) in intact plants. Based on inhibition kinetics and reaction rates, the mechanism of DEDTC antimutagenicity was attributed to the inhibition of peroxidases that are required in the plant activation of o-PDA to mutagenic product(s). Spectrophotometric measurements of equimolar concentrations of o-PDA and vanadate demonstrated that the antimutagenic property of vanadate was mainly due to its reactivity with o-PDA. PMID:7512215

  17. Developmental timing of mutations revealed by whole-genome sequencing of twins with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yussanne; Dobbins, Sara E; Sherborne, Amy L; Chubb, Daniel; Galbiati, Marta; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Micalizzi, Concetta; Tearle, Rick; Lloyd, Amy L; Hain, Richard; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S

    2013-04-30

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the major pediatric cancer. At diagnosis, the developmental timing of mutations contributing critically to clonal diversification and selection can be buried in the leukemia's covert natural history. Concordance of ALL in monozygotic, monochorionic twins is a consequence of intraplacental spread of an initiated preleukemic clone. Studying monozygotic twins with ALL provides a unique means of uncovering the timeline of mutations contributing to clonal evolution, pre- and postnatally. We sequenced the whole genomes of leukemic cells from two twin pairs with ALL to comprehensively characterize acquired somatic mutations in ALL, elucidating the developmental timing of all genetic lesions. Shared, prenatal, coding-region single-nucleotide variants were limited to the putative initiating lesions. All other nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variants were distinct between tumors and, therefore, secondary and postnatal. These changes occurred in a background of noncoding mutational changes that were almost entirely discordant in twin pairs and likely passenger mutations acquired during leukemic cell proliferation. PMID:23569245

  18. Somatic mtDNA variation is an important component of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Coxhead, Jonathan; Kurzawa-Akanbi, Marzena; Hussain, Rafiqul; Pyle, Angela; Chinnery, Patrick; Hudson, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction, mediated either through inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation or mitochondrial proteomic deficit, to Parkinson's disease (PD). Yet, despite this, the role of somatic mtDNA point mutations and specifically point-mutational burden in PD is poorly understood. Here, we take advantage of recent technical and methodological advances to examine the role of age-related and acquired mtDNA mutation in the largest study of mtDNA in postmortem PD tissue to date. Our data show that PD patients suffer an increase in mtDNA mutational burden in, but no limited to, the substantia nigra pars compacta when compared to matched controls. This mutational burden appears increased in genes encoding cytochrome c oxidase, supportive of previous protein studies of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. Accepting experimental limitations, our study confirms the important role of age-related mtDNA point mutation in the etiology of PD, moreover, by analyzing 2 distinct brain regions, we are able to show that PD patient brains are more vulnerable to mtDNA mutation overall. PMID:26639157

  19. Somatic symptom disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorder References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing, 2013. Ferri F. Somatization disorder. In: Ferri FF, ...

  20. Mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of FLT3 define a new molecular mechanism of acquired drug resistance to PTK inhibitors in FLT3-ITD-transformed hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Bagrintseva, Ksenia; Schwab, Ruth; Kohl, Tobias M; Schnittger, Susanne; Eichenlaub, Sabine; Ellwart, Joachim W; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Spiekermann, Karsten

    2004-03-15

    Activating mutations in the juxtamembrane domain (FLT3-length mutations, FLT3-LM) and in the protein tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) of FLT3 (FLT3-TKD) represent the most frequent genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and define a molecular target for therapeutic interventions by protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors. We could show that distinct activating FLT3-TKD mutations at position D835 mediate primary resistance to FLT3 PTK inhibitors in FLT3-transformed cell lines. In the presence of increasing concentrations of the FLT3 PTK inhibitor SU5614, we generated inhibitor resistant Ba/F3 FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD) cell lines (Ba/F3 FLT3-ITD-R1-R4) that were characterized by a 7- to 26-fold higher IC50 (concentration that inhibits 50%) to SU5614 compared with the parental ITD cells. The molecular characterization of ITD-R1-4 cells demonstrated that specific TKD mutations (D835N and Y842H) on the ITD background were acquired during selection with SU5614. Introduction of these dual ITD-TKD, but not single D835N or Y842H FLT3 mutants, in Ba/F3 cells restored the FLT3 inhibitor resistant phenotype. Our data show that preexisting or acquired mutations in the PTK domain of FLT3 can induce drug resistance to FLT3 PTK inhibitors in vitro. These findings provide a molecular basis for the evaluation of clinical resistance to FLT3 PTK inhibitors in patients with AML. PMID:14604974

  1. Somatization, Paranoia, and Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxman, Thomas E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Free speech of subjects with somatization and paranoia was analyzed to identify and compare self-concept dimensions reflected in their lexical choices. The somatization disorder group conveyed a sense of negativism, distress, and preoccupation with an uncertain self-identity. The paranoid patients portrayed an artificially positive, grandiose…

  2. Effect of Mutation Order on Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Nangalia, Jyoti; Silber, Yvonne; Wedge, David C.; Grinfeld, Jacob; Baxter, E. Joanna; Massie, Charles E.; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Menon, Suraj; Godfrey, Anna L.; Dimitropoulou, Danai; Guglielmelli, Paola; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Besses, Carles; Döhner, Konstanze; Harrison, Claire N.; Vassiliou, George S.; Vannucchi, Alessandro; Campbell, Peter J.; Green, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cancers result from the accumulation of somatic mutations, and their properties are thought to reflect the sum of these mutations. However, little is known about the effect of the order in which mutations are acquired. METHODS We determined mutation order in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms by genotyping hematopoietic colonies or by means of next-generation sequencing. Stem cells and progenitor cells were isolated to study the effect of mutation order on mature and immature hematopoietic cells. RESULTS The age at which a patient presented with a myeloproliferative neoplasm, acquisition of JAK2 V617F homozygosity, and the balance of immature progenitors were all influenced by mutation order. As compared with patients in whom the TET2 mutation was acquired first (hereafter referred to as “TET2-first patients”), patients in whom the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) mutation was acquired first (“JAK2-first patients”) had a greater likelihood of presenting with polycythemia vera than with essential thrombocythemia, an increased risk of thrombosis, and an increased sensitivity of JAK2-mutant progenitors to ruxolitinib in vitro. Mutation order influenced the proliferative response to JAK2 V617F and the capacity of double-mutant hematopoietic cells and progenitor cells to generate colony-forming cells. Moreover, the hematopoietic stem-and-progenitor-cell compartment was dominated by TET2 single-mutant cells in TET2-first patients but by JAK2–TET2 double-mutant cells in JAK2-first patients. Prior mutation of TET2 altered the transcriptional consequences of JAK2 V617F in a cell-intrinsic manner and prevented JAK2 V617F from up-regulating genes associated with proliferation. CONCLUSIONS The order in which JAK2 and TET2 mutations were acquired influenced clinical features, the response to targeted therapy, the biology of stem and progenitor cells, and clonal evolution in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. (Funded by Leukemia and Lymphoma Research

  3. Mutations within ICP4 acquired during in vitro attenuation do not alter virulence of recombinant Marek’s disease viruses in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek's disease (MD) is a T-cell lymphoma of chickens caused by the oncogenic Marek's disease virus (MDV). MD is primarily controlled by live-attenuated vaccines generated by repeated in vitro serial passage. Previous efforts to characterize attenuated MDVs identified numerous mutations, particularl...

  4. Somatic Literacy. Bringing Somatic Education into Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linden, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Examines the profession of physical education and what it could become if it embraced somatic work, explaining the basic concepts and processes of somatic education. Somatic education focuses on the interactions of posture, movement, emotion, thought, self-concept, and cultural values. A case study details somatic education in practice. (SM)

  5. Parental Somatic Mosaicism Is Underrecognized and Influences Recurrence Risk of Genomic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Ian M.; Yuan, Bo; Robberecht, Caroline; Pfundt, Rolph; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; McEntagart, Meriel E.; Nagamani, Sandesh C.S.; Erez, Ayelet; Bartnik, Magdalena; Wiśniowiecka-Kowalnik, Barbara; Plunkett, Katie S.; Pursley, Amber N.; Kang, Sung-Hae L.; Bi, Weimin; Lalani, Seema R.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Vast, Mala; Marks, Karen; Patton, Michael; Olofsson, Peter; Patel, Ankita; Veltman, Joris A.; Cheung, Sau Wai; Shaw, Chad A.; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Lupski, James R.; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    New human mutations are thought to originate in germ cells, thus making a recurrence of the same mutation in a sibling exceedingly rare. However, increasing sensitivity of genomic technologies has anecdotally revealed mosaicism for mutations in somatic tissues of apparently healthy parents. Such somatically mosaic parents might also have germline mosaicism that can potentially cause unexpected intergenerational recurrences. Here, we show that somatic mosaicism for transmitted mutations among parents of children with simplex genetic disease is more common than currently appreciated. Using the sensitivity of individual-specific breakpoint PCR, we prospectively screened 100 families with children affected by genomic disorders due to rare deletion copy-number variants (CNVs) determined to be de novo by clinical analysis of parental DNA. Surprisingly, we identified four cases of low-level somatic mosaicism for the transmitted CNV in DNA isolated from parental blood. Integrated probabilistic modeling of gametogenesis developed in response to our observations predicts that mutations in parental blood increase recurrence risk substantially more than parental mutations confined to the germline. Moreover, despite the fact that maternally transmitted mutations are the minority of alleles, our model suggests that sexual dimorphisms in gametogenesis result in a greater proportion of somatically mosaic transmitting mothers who are thus at increased risk of recurrence. Therefore, somatic mosaicism together with sexual differences in gametogenesis might explain a considerable fraction of unexpected recurrences of X-linked recessive disease. Overall, our results underscore an important role for somatic mosaicism and mitotic replicative mutational mechanisms in transmission genetics. PMID:25087610

  6. Prospects for cellular mutational assays in human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1984-06-29

    Practical, sensitive, and effective human cellular assays for detecting somatic and germinal mutations would have great value in environmental mutagenesis and carcinogenesis studies. Such assays would fill the void between human mutagenicity and the data that exist from short-term tests and from mutagenicity in other species. This paper discusses the following possible human cellular assays: (1) HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase) somatic cell mutation based on 6-thioguanine resistance; (2) hemoglobin somatic cell mutation assay; (3) glycophorin somatic cell mutation assay; and (4) LDH-X sperm cell mutation assay. 18 references.

  7. Emergence of Clonal Hematopoiesis in the Majority of Patients with Acquired Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Babushok, Daria V.; Perdigones, Nieves; Perin, Juan C.; Olson, Timothy S.; Ye, Wenda; Roth, Jacquelyn J.; Lind, Curt; Cattier, Carine; Li, Yimei; Hartung, Helge; Paessler, Michele E.; Frank, Dale M.; Xie, Hongbo M.; Cross, Shanna; Cockroft, Joshua D.; Podsakoff, Gregory M.; Monos, Dimitrios; Biegel, Jaclyn A.; Mason, Philip J.; Bessler, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is a non-malignant disease caused by autoimmune destruction of early hematopoietic cells. Clonal hematopoiesis is a late complication, seen in 20–25% of older patients. We hypothesized that clonal hematopoiesis in aAA is a more general phenomenon, which can arise early in disease even in younger patients. To evaluate clonal hematopoiesis in aAA, we used comparative whole exome sequencing of paired bone marrow and skin in 22 patients. We found somatic mutations in sixteen patients (72.7%) with a median disease duration of 1 year; twelve (66.7%) were patients with pediatriconset aAA. Fifty-eight mutations in 51 unique genes were primarily in pathways of immunity and transcriptional regulation. Most frequently mutated was PIGA, with 7 mutations. Only two mutations were in genes recurrently-mutated in MDS. Two patients had oligoclonal loss of HLA alleles, linking immune escape to clone emergence. Two patients had activating mutations in key signaling pathways (STAT5B(p.N642H), CAMK2G(p.T306M)). Our results suggest that clonal hematopoiesis in aAA is common, with two mechanisms emerging― immune escape and increased proliferation. Our findings expand conceptual understanding of this non-neoplastic blood disorder. Future prospective studies of clonal hematopoiesis in aAA will be critical for understanding outcomes, and for designing personalized treatment strategies. PMID:25800665

  8. Somatic symptom disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders; Somatization disorder; Somatiform disorders; Briquet syndrome; Illness anxiety disorder ... and emotionally sensitive to pain and other sensations Family ... to illness anxiety disorder . This is when a person is overly ...

  9. Somatic symptoms in depression

    PubMed Central

    Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter

    2006-01-01

    Both painful and nonpainful somatic symptoms essentially characterize clinical states of depressive mood. So far, this well-established psychopathological knowledge has been appreciated only insufficiently by the official diagnostic sys-terms of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, Text Revision (DSM-IVTR) and the ICD-10 Classification of Mental and Behavioral Disorders. Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines (ICD-10). From a perspective of primary care services, this unmet diagnostic need is deplorable, as the main mode of presenting a depression is by reporting somatic symptoms. This somatic form of presentation, however, significantly contributes to low rates of recognition in primary care. A diagnostic challenge may be seen in the differentiation of a depression with prevailing somatic symptoms from anxiety, somatoform disorders, and medical conditions. When somatic symptoms, particularly painful physical conditions, accompany the already debilitating psychiatric and behavioral symptoms of depression, the course of the illness may be more severe, implying a higher risk of early relapse, chronicity suicide, or mortality due to other natural causes, the economic burden increases considerably, the functional status may be hampered heavily, and health-related quality of life may be lowered dramatically. The neurobiological underpinnings of somatic symptoms in depression may guide more promising treatment approaches. PMID:16889108

  10. Germline mutations in BAP1 predispose to melanocytic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Thomas; Obenauf, Anna C.; Murali, Rajmohan; Fried, Isabella; Griewank, Klaus G.; Ulz, Peter; Windpassinger, Christian; Wackernagel, Werner; Loy, Shea; Wolf, Ingrid; Viale, Agnes; Lash, Alex E.; Pirun, Mono; Socci, Nicholas D.; Rütten, Arno; Palmedo, Gabriele; Abramson, David; Offit, Kenneth; Ott, Arthur; Becker, Jürgen C.; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Kutzner, Heinz; Bastian, Boris C.; Speicher, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Common acquired melanocytic nevi are benign neoplasms that are composed of small uniform melanocytes and typically present as flat or slightly elevated, pigmented lesions on the skin. We describe two families with a new autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple skin-colored, elevated melanocytic tumors. In contrast to common acquired nevi, the melanocytic neoplasms in affected family members ranged histopathologically from epithelioid nevi to atypical melanocytic proliferations that showed overlapping features with melanoma. Some affected patients developed uveal or cutaneous melanomas. Segregating with this phenotype, we found inactivating germline mutations of the BAP1 gene. The majority of melanocytic neoplasms lost the remaining wild-type allele of BAP1 by various somatic alterations. In addition, we found BAP1 mutations in a subset of sporadic melanocytic neoplasms showing histologic similarities to the familial tumors. These findings suggest that loss of BAP1 is associated with a clinically and morphologically distinct type of melanocytic neoplasm. PMID:21874003

  11. Novel germ line DDX41 mutations define families with a lower age of MDS/AML onset and lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lewinsohn, Maya; Brown, Anna L; Weinel, Luke M; Phung, Connie; Rafidi, George; Lee, Ming K; Schreiber, Andreas W; Feng, Jinghua; Babic, Milena; Chong, Chan-Eng; Lee, Young; Yong, Agnes; Suthers, Graeme K; Poplawski, Nicola; Altree, Meryl; Phillips, Kerry; Jaensch, Louise; Fine, Miriam; D'Andrea, Richard J; Lewis, Ian D; Medeiros, Bruno C; Pollyea, Daniel A; King, Mary-Claire; Walsh, Tom; Keel, Siobán; Shimamura, Akiko; Godley, Lucy A; Hahn, Christopher N; Churpek, Jane E; Scott, Hamish S

    2016-02-25

    Recently our group and others have identified DDX41 mutations both as germ line and acquired somatic mutations in families with multiple cases of late onset myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and/or acute myeloid leukemia (AML), suggesting that DDX41 acts as a tumor suppressor. To determine whether novel DDX41 mutations could be identified in families with additional types of hematologic malignancies, our group screened two cohorts of families with a diverse range of hematologic malignancy subtypes. Among 289 families, we identified nine (3%) with DDX41 mutations. As previously observed, MDS and AML were the most common malignancies, often of the erythroblastic subtype, and 1 family displayed early-onset follicular lymphoma. Five novel mutations were identified, including missense mutations within important functional domains and start-loss and splicing mutations predicted to result in truncated proteins. We also show that most asymptomatic mutation carriers have normal blood counts until malignancy develops. This study expands both the mutation and phenotypic spectra observed in families with germ line DDX41 mutations. With an increasing number of both inherited and acquired mutations in this gene being identified, further study of how DDX41 disruption leads to hematologic malignancies is critical. PMID:26712909

  12. Somatic alterations in the melanoma genome: a high-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Gast, Andreas; Scherer, Dominique; Chen, Bowang; Bloethner, Sandra; Melchert, Stephanie; Sucker, Antje; Hemminki, Kari; Schadendorf, Dirk; Kumar, Rajiv

    2010-08-01

    We performed DNA microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization to identify somatic alterations specific to melanoma genome in 60 human cell lines from metastasized melanoma and from 44 corresponding peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Our data showed gross but nonrandom somatic changes specific to the tumor genome. Although the CDKN2A (78%) and PTEN (70%) loci were the major targets of mono-allelic and bi-allelic deletions, amplifications affected loci with BRAF (53%) and NRAS (12%) as well as EGFR (52%), MITF (40%), NOTCH2 (35%), CCND1 (18%), MDM2 (18%), CCNE1 (10%), and CDK4 (8%). The amplified loci carried additional genes, many of which could potentially play a role in melanoma. Distinct patterns of copy number changes showed that alterations in CDKN2A tended to be more clustered in cell lines with mutations in the BRAF and NRAS genes; the PTEN locus was targeted mainly in conjunction with BRAF mutations. Amplification of CCND1, CDK4, and other loci was significantly increased in cell lines without BRAF-NRAS mutations and so was the loss of chromosome arms 13q and 16q. Our data suggest involvement of distinct genetic pathways that are driven either through oncogenic BRAF and NRAS mutations complemented by aberrations in the CDKN2A and PTEN genes or involve amplification of oncogenic genomic loci and loss of 13q and 16q. It also emerges that each tumor besides being affected by major and most common somatic genetic alterations also acquires additional genetic alterations that could be crucial in determining response to small molecular inhibitors that are being currently pursued. PMID:20544847

  13. Somatization, paranoia, and language.

    PubMed

    Oxman, T E; Rosenberg, S D; Schnurr, P P; Tucker, G J

    1988-02-01

    Somatization and paranoia are circumscribed distortions of reality that are impervious to the normative process of consensual validation. These distortions are often postulated as a means of bolstering lowered self-esteem. We used computerized content analysis of the free speech of patients with these disorders in order to identify and compare dimensions of self-concept reflected in their lexical choices. Interestingly, patients with these disorders differed in the themes prominent in their speech. The higher frequency categories used by the somatization disorder group conveyed an overwhelming sense of negativism, distress, and a preoccupation with an uncertain self-identity. In contrast, the categories used by the paranoid patients portrayed an artificially positive, grandiose self-image and a defensive abstractness. Our exploratory analysis suggests that circumscribed distortions of reality in somatization and paranoid disorders are not associated with the same common defensive style attempting to bolster self-esteem. PMID:3343385

  14. Acquired hyperpigmentations*

    PubMed Central

    Cestari, Tania Ferreira; Dantas, Lia Pinheiro; Boza, Juliana Catucci

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous hyperpigmentations are frequent complaints, motivating around 8.5% of all dermatological consultations in our country. They can be congenital, with different patterns of inheritance, or acquired in consequence of skin problems, systemic diseases or secondary to environmental factors. The vast majority of them are linked to alterations on the pigment melanin, induced by different mechanisms. This review will focus on the major acquired hyperpigmentations associated with increased melanin, reviewing their mechanisms of action and possible preventive measures. Particularly prominent aspects of diagnosis and therapy will be emphasized, with focus on melasma, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, periorbital pigmentation, dermatosis papulosa nigra, phytophotodermatoses, flagellate dermatosis, erythema dyschromicum perstans, cervical poikiloderma (Poikiloderma of Civatte), acanthosis nigricans, cutaneous amyloidosis and reticulated confluent dermatitis PMID:24626644

  15. Complex genetic findings in a female patient with pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency: Null mutations in the PDHX gene associated with unusual expression of the testis-specific PDHA2 gene in her somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Ana; Silva, Maria João; Pavlu-Pereira, Hana; Florindo, Cristina; Barroso, Madalena; Marques, Bárbara; Correia, Hildeberto; Oliveira, Anabela; Gaspar, Ana; Tavares de Almeida, Isabel; Rivera, Isabel

    2016-10-15

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) catalyzes a key step in the generation of cellular energy and is composed by three catalytic elements (E1, E2, E3), one structural subunit (E3-binding protein), and specific regulatory elements, phosphatases and kinases (PDKs, PDPs). The E1α subunit exists as two isoforms encoded by different genes: PDHA1 located on Xp22.1 and expressed in somatic tissues, and the intronless PDHA2 located on chromosome 4 and only detected in human spermatocytes and spermatids. We report on a young adult female patient who has PDC deficiency associated with a compound heterozygosity in PDHX encoding the E3-binding protein. Additionally, in the patient and in all members of her immediate family, a full-length testis-specific PDHA2 mRNA and a 5'UTR-truncated PDHA1 mRNA were detected in circulating lymphocytes and cultured fibroblasts, being both mRNAs translated into full-length PDHA2 and PDHA1 proteins, resulting in the co-existence of both PDHA isoforms in somatic cells. Moreover, we observed that DNA hypomethylation of a CpG island in the coding region of PDHA2 gene is associated with the somatic activation of this gene transcription in these individuals. This study represents the first natural model of the de-repression of the testis-specific PDHA2 gene in human somatic cells, and raises some questions related to the somatic activation of this gene as a potential therapeutic approach for most forms of PDC deficiency. PMID:27343776

  16. The combination of irreversible EGFR TKIs and SAHA induces apoptosis and autophagy-mediated cell death to overcome acquired resistance in EGFR T790M-mutated lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Gul; Jeong, Eun-Hui; Kim, Seo Yun; Kim, Hye-Ryoun; Kim, Cheol Hyeon

    2015-06-01

    To overcome T790M-mediated acquired resistance of lung cancer cells to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR TKIs), second generation TKIs such as BIBW2992 (afatinib) and third generation TKIs including WZ4002 have been developed. However, clinical data on their efficacy in treating T790M mutant tumors are lacking. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been reported to arrest cell growth and to lead to differentiation and apoptosis of various cancer cells, both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we assessed whether the combination of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, vorinostat), a potent HDAC inhibitor, and BIBW2992 or WZ4002 could overcome EGFR TKI resistance associated with T790M mutation in lung cancer cells. While treatment with BIBW2992 or WZ4002 alone slightly reduced the viability of PC-9G and H1975 cells, which possess T790M mutation, combining them with SAHA resulted in significantly decreased cell viability through the activation of the apoptotic pathway. This combination also enhanced autophagy occurrence and inhibition of autophagy significantly reduced the apoptosis induced by the combination treatment, showing that autophagy is required for the enhanced apoptosis. Caspase-independent autophagic cell death was also induced by the combination treatment with SAHA and either BIBW2992 or WZ4002. Finally, the combined treatment with SAHA and either BIBW2992 or WZ4002 showed an enhanced anti-tumor effect on xenografts of H1975 cells in vivo. In conclusion, the combination of new generation EGFR TKIs and SAHA may be a new strategy to overcome the acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs in T790M mutant lung cancer. PMID:25382705

  17. Shusterman on Somatic Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maattanen, Pentti

    2010-01-01

    Richard Shusterman's "Body Consciousness" aims at formulating a theory of somaesthetics and somatic experience. There has indeed been a growing interest in the role of the body in experience. Shusterman examines the arguments of six important writers who have been influential in this discussion. The emphasis on the body is natural for a…

  18. Somatic hypermutation of TCR γ V genes in the sandbar shark.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Bernstein, Harris; Ranganathan, Parvathi; Schluter, Samuel F

    2012-05-01

    In a recent publication we demonstrated that somatic hypermutation occurs in the V region of the TCR γ gene of the sandbar shark (Carcharhinus plumbeus). We hypothesize that similar mechanisms are used to generate somatic mutations in both immunoglobulin and TCR γ genes of the sharks. Two distinct patterns of mutation occur, single nucleotide mutations (point mutations) and mutations comprising 2-5 consecutive bases (tandem mutations). Our data indicates that point mutations occur by a mechanism similar to that of somatic hypermutation in immunoglobulin genes of mammals, whereas tandem mutations may be generated by an error-prone DNA polymerase with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-like activity. Shark hotspot motifs identical to those of higher vertebrates were identified. We confirm that, as in immunoglobulin of sharks and higher vertebrates, highly significant targeting of AID activity to the classical DGYW/WRCH motif occurs in somatic hypermutation of sandbar shark TCR γ V genes. Our analysis suggests that the purpose of somatic mutations in shark TCR γ V-regions is to generate a more diverse repertoire in γ/δ receptors, rather than receptors with higher affinity. PMID:21925537

  19. Genetic and somatic effects in animals maintained on tritiated water

    SciTech Connect

    Carsten, A.L.; Brooks, A.; Commerford, S.L.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    The possible genetic (dominant lethal mutations (DLM) and cytogenetic changes in the regenerating liver) and somatic (hematopoietic stem cell changes, growth and nonspecific life time shortening) effects in mice maintained on tritiated water (HTO) over two generations was investigated. Results to date are summarized. (ACR)

  20. Somatization disorders in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhulika A

    2006-02-01

    This paper reviews a wide range of somatization-related symptoms that are encountered in dermatology. These include the unexplained cutaneous sensory syndromes especially the cutaneous dysesthesias associated with pain, numbness and pruritus; traumatic memories in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) which are experienced on a sensory level as 'body memories' and may present as local or generalized pruritic states, urticaria and angioedema; and unexplained flushing reactions and profuse perspiration, in addition to unexplained exacerbations of stress-reactive dermatoses such as psoriasis and atopic eczema secondary to the autonomic hyperarousal in PTSD; classic 'pseudoneurologic' symptoms associated with dissociation including unexplained loss of touch or pain, in addition to the self-induced dermatoses such as dermatitis artefacta and trichotillomania that are encountered with dissociative states; and body dysmorphic disorder where the patient often presents with a somatic preoccupation involving the skin or hair. PMID:16451879

  1. Reprogramming of somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Rajasingh, Johnson

    2012-01-01

    Reprogramming of adult somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells may provide an attractive source of stem cells for regenerative medicine. It has emerged as an invaluable method for generating patient-specific stem cells of any cell lineage without the use of embryonic stem cells. A revolutionary study in 2006 showed that it is possible to convert adult somatic cells directly into pluripotent stem cells by using a limited number of pluripotent transcription factors and is called as iPS cells. Currently, both genomic integrating viral and nonintegrating nonviral methods are used to generate iPS cells. However, the viral-based technology poses increased risk of safety, and more studies are now focused on nonviral-based technology to obtain autologous stem cells for clinical therapy. In this review, the pros and cons of the present iPS cell technology and the future direction for the successful translation of this technology into the clinic are discussed. PMID:22917226

  2. Genetics Home Reference: familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA

    MedlinePlus

    ... N. A family harboring a germ-line N-terminal C/EBPalpha mutation and development of acute myeloid leukemia with an additional somatic C-terminal C/EBPalpha mutation. Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2010 Mar; ...

  3. Clonal leukemic evolution in myelodysplastic syndromes with TET2 and IDH1/2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tung-Liang; Nagata, Yasunobu; Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Sanada, Masashi; Okuno, Yusuke; Huang, Chein-Fuang; Liang, Der-Cherng; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Lai, Chang-Liang; Lee, En-Hui; Shih, Yu-Shu; Tanaka, Hiroko; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Lin, Tung-Huei; Wu, Jin-Hou; Miyano, Satoru; Ogawa, Seishi; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2014-01-01

    Somatic mutations of TET2, IDH1, and IDH2 have been described in myelodysplastic syndrome. The impact of these mutations on outcome of myelodysplastic syndrome and their progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia remains unclear. Mutation status of TET2, IDH1 and IDH2 was investigated in a cohort of 46 paired myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia samples and 122 non-paired cases with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, to clarify their roles in the evolution of myelodysplastic syndrome to acute myeloid leukemia. Among the 168 de novo myelodysplastic syndrome patients, the frequency of TET2, IDH1, and IDH2 mutations was 18.5%, 4.2% and 6.0%, respectively. TET2/IDH mutations had no impact on survivals, while TET2 mutations were significantly associated with rapid progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Seventeen of the 46 paired myelodysplastic syndrome/secondary acute myeloid leukemia samples harbored TET2/IDH mutations; none acquired these mutations in acute myeloid leukemia phase. Progression to acute myeloid leukemia was accompanied by evolution of a novel clone or expansion of a minor pre-existing subclone of one or more distinct mutations in 12 of the 17 cases with TET2/IDH mutations. A minor subclone in 3 cases with biallelic TET2 inactivation subsequently expanded, indicating biallelic TET2 mutations play a role in acute myeloid leukemia progression. Twelve patients acquired other genetic lesions, and/or showed increased relative mutant allelic burden of FLT3-ITD, N/K-RAS, CEBPA or RUNX1 during acute myeloid leukemia progression. Our findings provide a novel insight into the role of TET2/IDH mutation in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndrome and subsequent progression to acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:23996483

  4. [Acquired aplastic anemia].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hirohito

    2016-02-01

    Idiopathic aplastic anemia (AA) is an autoimmune disease caused by T cells. An increase in the percentage of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein-deficient cells and the presence of HLA allele-lacking leukocytes due to 6pUPD provide indirect evidence that T cells contribute to the pathophysiology of AA. Recent studies have revealed the presence of somatic mutations in MDS and/or AML candidate genes in one third of AA patients. Current treatment topics include the efficacy of eltrombopag for AA found to be refractory to immunosuppressive therapy as well as for newly diagnosed AA when administered in combination with ATG and cyclosporine. Furthermore, improved outcomes of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from unrelated donors using reduced-intensity conditioning regimens have been obtained with eltrombopag. Fludarabine-based regimens are now the mainstream approach for preconditioning and have lowered the transplant-related mortality rate. However, new problems such as mixed chimerism and secondary graft failure have arisen. Attempts to prevent GVHD more efficiently by including ATG and alemtuzumab in the preconditioning regimen are being investigated. PMID:26935624

  5. Human-induced pluripotent stem cells from blood cells of healthy donors and patients with acquired blood disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhaohui; Zhan, Huichun; Mali, Prashant; Dowey, Sarah; Williams, Donna M.; Jang, Yoon-Young; Dang, Chi V.; Spivak, Jerry L.; Moliterno, Alison R.

    2009-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells derived from somatic cells hold promise to develop novel patient-specific cell therapies and research models for inherited and acquired diseases. We and others previously reprogrammed human adherent cells, such as postnatal fibroblasts to iPS cells, which resemble adherent embryonic stem cells. Here we report derivation of iPS cells from postnatal human blood cells and the potential of these pluripotent cells for disease modeling. Multiple human iPS cell lines were generated from previously frozen cord blood or adult CD34+ cells of healthy donors, and could be redirected to hematopoietic differentiation. Multiple iPS cell lines were also generated from peripheral blood CD34+ cells of 2 patients with myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) who acquired the JAK2-V617F somatic mutation in their blood cells. The MPD-derived iPS cells containing the mutation appeared normal in phenotypes, karyotype, and pluripotency. After directed hematopoietic differentiation, the MPD-iPS cell-derived hematopoietic progenitor (CD34+CD45+) cells showed the increased erythropoiesis and gene expression of specific genes, recapitulating features of the primary CD34+ cells of the corresponding patient from whom the iPS cells were derived. These iPS cells provide a renewable cell source and a prospective hematopoiesis model for investigating MPD pathogenesis. PMID:19797525

  6. Tracking Down Mutations Cell by Cell.

    PubMed

    Kosik, Kenneth S

    2016-03-16

    Using somatic cell nuclear transfer, Hazen et al. (2016) examined clonally expanded single neurons for mutations and found ∼100 mutations from a variety of classes. Post-mitotic mutations in individual neurons represent an exploratory direction for finding fundamental origins of neurodegeneration. PMID:26985720

  7. Clonal hematopoiesis in acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Seishi

    2016-07-21

    Clonal hematopoiesis (CH) in aplastic anemia (AA) has been closely linked to the evolution of late clonal disorders, including paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which are common complications after successful immunosuppressive therapy (IST). With the advent of high-throughput sequencing of recent years, the molecular aspect of CH in AA has been clarified by comprehensive detection of somatic mutations that drive clonal evolution. Genetic abnormalities are found in ∼50% of patients with AA and, except for PIGA mutations and copy-neutral loss-of-heterozygosity, or uniparental disomy (UPD) in 6p (6pUPD), are most frequently represented by mutations involving genes commonly mutated in myeloid malignancies, including DNMT3A, ASXL1, and BCOR/BCORL1 Mutations exhibit distinct chronological profiles and clinical impacts. BCOR/BCORL1 and PIGA mutations tend to disappear or show stable clone size and predict a better response to IST and a significantly better clinical outcome compared with mutations in DNMT3A, ASXL1, and other genes, which are likely to increase their clone size, are associated with a faster progression to MDS/AML, and predict an unfavorable survival. High frequency of 6pUPD and overrepresentation of PIGA and BCOR/BCORL1 mutations are unique to AA, suggesting the role of autoimmunity in clonal selection. By contrast, DNMT3A and ASXL1 mutations, also commonly seen in CH in the general population, indicate a close link to CH in the aged bone marrow, in terms of the mechanism for selection. Detection and close monitoring of somatic mutations/evolution may help with prediction and diagnosis of clonal evolution of MDS/AML and better management of patients with AA. PMID:27121470

  8. Reprogrammed pluripotent stem cells from somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Hyun Woo; Choi, Sol; Do, Jeong Tae

    2011-06-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem (ES) cells, can differentiate into all cell types. So, these cells can be a biological resource for regenerative medicine. However, ES cells known as standard pluripotent cells have problem to be used for cell therapy because of ethical issue of the origin and immune response on the graft. Hence, recently reprogrammed pluripotent cells have been suggested as an alternative source for regenerative medicine. Somatic cells can acquire the ES cell-like pluripotency by transferring somatic cell nuclei into oocytes, by cell fusion with pluripotent cells. Retroviral-mediated introduction of four factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc can successfully reprogram somatic cells into ES cell-like pluripotent stem cells, known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. These cells closely resemble ES cells in gene expression pattern, cell biologic and phenotypic characteristics. However, to reach the eventual goal of clinical application, it is necessary to overcome the major drawbacks such as low reprogramming efficiency and genomic alterations due to viral integration. In this review, we discuss the current reprogramming techniques and mechanisms of nuclear reprogramming induced by transcription factor transduction. PMID:24298328

  9. Somatic Activation of AKT3 Causes Hemispheric Developmental Brain Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Poduri, Annapurna; Evrony, Gilad D.; Cai, Xuyu; Elhosary, Princess Christina; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lehtinen, Maria K.; Hills, L. Benjamin; Heinzen, Erin L.; Hill, Anthony; Hill, R. Sean; Barry, Brenda J.; Bourgeois, Blaise F.D.; Riviello, James J.; Barkovich, A. James; Black, Peter M.; Ligon, Keith L.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hemimegalencephaly (HMG) is a developmental brain disorder characterized by an enlarged, malformed cerebral hemisphere, typically causing epilepsy that requires surgical resection. We studied resected HMG tissue to test whether the condition might reflect somatic mutations affecting genes critical to brain development. We found that 2/8 HMG samples showed trisomy of chromosome 1q, encompassing many genes, including AKT3, which is known to regulate brain size. A third case showed a known activating mutation in AKT3 (c.49G→A, creating p.E17K) that was not present in the patient’s blood cells. Remarkably, the E17K mutation in AKT3 is exactly paralogous to E17K mutations in AKT1 and AKT2 recently discovered in somatic overgrowth syndromes. We show that AKT3 is the most abundant AKT paralogue in brain during neurogenesis and that phosphorylated AKT is abundant in cortical progenitor cells. Our data suggest that somatic mutations limited to brain could represent an important cause of complex neurogenetic disease. PMID:22500628

  10. The Somatic Genomic Landscape of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Cameron W.; Verhaak, Roel G.W.; McKenna, Aaron; Campos, Benito; Noushmehr, Houtan; Salama, Sofie R.; Zheng, Siyuan; Chakravarty, Debyani; Sanborn, J. Zachary; Berman, Samuel H.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Bernard, Brady; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Genovese, Giannicola; Shmulevich, Ilya; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Zou, Lihua; Vegesna, Rahulsimham; Shukla, Sachet A.; Ciriello, Giovanni; Yung, WK; Zhang, Wei; Sougnez, Carrie; Mikkelsen, Tom; Aldape, Kenneth; Bigner, Darell D.; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Prados, Michael; Sloan, Andrew; Black, Keith L.; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Friedman, William; Andrews, David W.; Guha, Abhijit; Iacocca, Mary; O’Neill, Brian P.; Foltz, Greg; Myers, Jerome; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Penny, Robert; Kucherlapati, Raju; Perou, Charles M.; Hayes, D. Neil; Gibbs, Richard; Marra, Marco; Mills, Gordon B.; Lander, Eric; Spellman, Paul; Wilson, Richard; Sander, Chris; Weinstein, John; Meyerson, Matthew; Gabriel, Stacey; Laird, Peter W.; Haussler, David; Getz, Gad; Chin, Lynda

    2013-01-01

    We describe the landscape of somatic genomic alterations based on multi-dimensional and comprehensive characterization of more than 500 glioblastoma tumors (GBMs). We identify several novel mutated genes as well as complex rearrangements of signature receptors including EGFR and PDGFRA. TERT promoter mutations are shown to correlate with elevated mRNA expression, supporting a role in telomerase reactivation. Correlative analyses confirm that the survival advantage of the proneural subtype is conferred by the G-CIMP phenotype, and MGMT DNA methylation may be a predictive biomarker for treatment response only in classical subtype GBM. Integrative analysis of genomic and proteomic profiles challenges the notion of therapeutic inhibition of a pathway as an alternative to inhibition of the target itself. These data will facilitate the discovery of therapeutic and diagnostic target candidates, the validation of research and clinical observations and the generation of unanticipated hypotheses that can advance our molecular understanding of this lethal cancer. PMID:24120142

  11. Common Somatic Alterations Identified in Maffucci Syndrome by Molecular Karyotyping

    PubMed Central

    Amyere, Mustapha; Dompmartin, Anne; Wouters, Vinciane; Enjolras, Odile; Kaitila, Ilkka; Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Godfraind, Catherine; Mulliken, John Butler; Boon, Laurence Myriam; Vikkula, Miikka

    2014-01-01

    Maffucci syndrome (MS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by multiple central cartilaginous tumors (enchondromas) in association with cutaneous spindle cell hemangiomas. These patients have a high incidence of malignant transformation. No familial case is known and the etiopathogenic cause remains unknown. In enchondromatosis (Ollier disease, OD), which is comprised of enchondromas only, 4 mutations in the PTHR1 gene have been identified in 4 patients; 3 were somatic and 1 was germline. No PTHR1 mutations have been detected in MS, whereas somatic IDH1 and, more rarely, IDH2 mutations have been observed in 77% of patients with MS and 81% of patients with OD. These genetic alterations are shared with other tumors, including glioma, leukemia and carcinoma. To search for underlying somatic genomic causes, we screened MS tissues using Affymetrix SNP-chips. We looked for CNVs, LOH and uniparental isodisomy (UPID) by performing pairwise analyses between allelic intensities in tumoral DNA versus the corresponding blood-extracted DNA. While common chromosomal anomalies were absent in constitutional DNA, several shared CNVs were identified in MS-associated tumors. The most frequently encountered somatic alterations were localized in 2p22.3, 2q24.3 and 14q11.2, implicating these chromosomal rearrangements in the formation of enchondromas and spindle cell hemangiomas in MS. In one chondrosarcoma specimen, large amplifications and/or deletions were observed in chromosomes 3, 6, 9, 10, 12, 13, and 19. Some of these genetic changes have been reported in other chondrosarcomas suggesting an etiopathogenic role. No LOH/UPID was observed in any Maffucci tissue. Our findings identify frequent somatic chromosomal rearrangements on 2p22.3, 2q24.3 and 14q11.2, which may unmask mutations leading to the lesions pathognomonic of MS. PMID:25565925

  12. Direct somatic lineage conversion.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Koji; Haag, Daniel; Wernig, Marius

    2015-10-19

    The predominant view of embryonic development and cell differentiation has been that rigid and even irreversible epigenetic marks are laid down along the path of cell specialization ensuring the proper silencing of unrelated lineage programmes. This model made the prediction that specialized cell types are stable and cannot be redirected into other lineages. Accordingly, early attempts to change the identity of somatic cells had little success and was limited to conversions between closely related cell types. Nuclear transplantation experiments demonstrated, however, that specialized cells even from adult mammals can be reprogrammed into a totipotent state. The discovery that a small combination of transcription factors can reprogramme cells to pluripotency without the need of oocytes further supported the view that these epigenetic barriers can be overcome much easier than assumed, but the extent of this flexibility was still unclear. When we showed that a differentiated mesodermal cell can be directly converted to a differentiated ectodermal cell without a pluripotent intermediate, it was suggested that in principle any cell type could be converted into any other cell type. Indeed, the work of several groups in recent years has provided many more examples of direct somatic lineage conversions. Today, the question is not anymore whether a specific cell type can be generated by direct reprogramming but how it can be induced. PMID:26416679

  13. Somatic complaints in frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Landqvist Waldö, Maria; Santillo, Alexander Frizell; Gustafson, Lars; Englund, Elisabet; Passant, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is associated with a broad spectrum of clinical characteristics. The objective of this study was to analyze the prevalence of unexplained somatic complaints in neuropathologically verified FTD. We also examined whether the somatic presentations correlated with protein pathology or regional brain pathology and if the patients with these somatic features showed more depressive traits. Ninety-seven consecutively neuropathologically verified FTLD patients were selected. All 97 patients were part of a longitudinal study of FTD and all medical records were systematically reviewed. The somatic complaints focused on were headache, musculoskeletal, gastro/urogenital and abnormal pain response. Symptoms of somatic character (either somatic complaints and/or abnormal pain response) were found in 40.2%. These patients did not differ from the total group with regard to gender, age at onset or duration. Six patients showed exaggerated reactions to sensory stimuli, whereas three patients showed reduced response to pain. Depressive traits were present in 38% and did not correlate with somatic complaints. Suicidal behavior was present in 17 patients, in 10 of these suicidal behavior was concurrent with somatic complaints. No clear correlation between somatic complaints and brain protein pathology, regional pathology or asymmetric hemispherical atrophy was found. Our results show that many FTD patients suffer from unexplained somatic complaints before and/or during dementia where no clear correlation can be found with protein pathology or regional degeneration. Somatic complaints are not covered by current diagnostic criteria for FTD, but need to be considered in diagnostics and care. The need for prospective studies with neuropathological follow up must be stressed as these phenomena remain unexplained, misinterpreted, bizarre and, in many cases, excruciating. PMID:25232513

  14. Somatic embryogenesis in Hedychium bousigonianum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An efficient primary somatic embryo (SE) and secondary somatic embryo (SSE) production system was developed for the ornamental ginger Hedychium bousigonianum Pierre ex Gagnepain. Addition of two ethylene inhibitors, salicylic acid (SA) and silver nitrate (AgNO3), to the culture media improved the sy...

  15. Somatic Copy Number Abnormalities and Mutations in PI3K/AKT/mTOR Pathway Have Prognostic Significance for Overall Survival in Platinum Treated Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; Werner, Lillian; Leow, Jeffrey J.; Mullane, Stephanie A.; Fay, André P.; Riester, Markus; Van Hummelen, Paul; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Choueiri, Toni K.; Van Allen, Eliezer; Rosenberg, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background An integrative analysis was conducted to identify genomic alterations at a pathway level that could predict overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced urothelial carcinoma (UC) treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients and Methods DNA and RNA were extracted from 103 formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) invasive high-grade UC samples and were screened for mutations, copy number variation (CNV) and gene expression analysis. Clinical data were available from 85 cases. Mutations were analyzed by mass-spectrometry based on genotyping platform (Oncomap 3) and genomic imbalances were detected by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis. Regions with threshold of log2 ratio ≥0.4, or ≤0.6 were defined as either having copy number gain or loss and significantly recurrent CNV across the set of samples were determined using a GISTIC analysis. Expression analysis on selected relevant UC genes was conducted using Nanostring. To define the co-occurrence pattern of mutations and CNV, we grouped genomic events into 5 core signal transduction pathways: 1) TP53 pathway, 2) RTK/RAS/RAF pathway, 3) PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, 4) WNT/CTNNB1, 5) RB1 pathway. Cox regression was used to assess pathways abnormalities with survival outcomes. Results 35 samples (41%) harbored mutations on at least one gene: TP53 (16%), PIK3CA (9%), FGFR3 (2%), HRAS/KRAS (5%), and CTNNB1 (1%). 66% of patients had some sort of CNV. PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR pathway alteration (mutations+CNV) had the greatest impact on OS (p=0.055). At a gene level, overexpression of CTNNB1 (p=0.0008) and PIK3CA (p=0.02) were associated with shorter OS. Mutational status on PIK3CA was not associated with survival. Among other individually found genomic alterations, TP53 mutations (p=0.07), mTOR gain (p=0.07) and PTEN overexpression (p=0.08) have a marginally significant negative impact on OS. Conclusions Our study suggests that targeted therapies focusing on the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR pathway genomic

  16. Sequence and Structure Signatures of Cancer Mutation Hotspots in Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Anshuman; Yi, Lin; Gowthaman, Ragul; Torkamani, Ali; Schork, Nicholas J.; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinases are the most common protein domains implicated in cancer, where somatically acquired mutations are known to be functionally linked to a variety of cancers. Resequencing studies of protein kinase coding regions have emphasized the importance of sequence and structure determinants of cancer-causing kinase mutations in understanding of the mutation-dependent activation process. We have developed an integrated bioinformatics resource, which consolidated and mapped all currently available information on genetic modifications in protein kinase genes with sequence, structure and functional data. The integration of diverse data types provided a convenient framework for kinome-wide study of sequence-based and structure-based signatures of cancer mutations. The database-driven analysis has revealed a differential enrichment of SNPs categories in functional regions of the kinase domain, demonstrating that a significant number of cancer mutations could fall at structurally equivalent positions (mutational hotspots) within the catalytic core. We have also found that structurally conserved mutational hotspots can be shared by multiple kinase genes and are often enriched by cancer driver mutations with high oncogenic activity. Structural modeling and energetic analysis of the mutational hotspots have suggested a common molecular mechanism of kinase activation by cancer mutations, and have allowed to reconcile the experimental data. According to a proposed mechanism, structural effect of kinase mutations with a high oncogenic potential may manifest in a significant destabilization of the autoinhibited kinase form, which is likely to drive tumorigenesis at some level. Structure-based functional annotation and prediction of cancer mutation effects in protein kinases can facilitate an understanding of the mutation-dependent activation process and inform experimental studies exploring molecular pathology of tumorigenesis. PMID:19834613

  17. Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Wedge, David C.; Aparicio, Samuel A.J.R.; Behjati, Sam; Biankin, Andrew V.; Bignell, Graham R.; Bolli, Niccolo; Borg, Ake; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boyault, Sandrine; Burkhardt, Birgit; Butler, Adam P.; Caldas, Carlos; Davies, Helen R.; Desmedt, Christine; Eils, Roland; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Foekens, John A.; Greaves, Mel; Hosoda, Fumie; Hutter, Barbara; Ilicic, Tomislav; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Imielinsk, Marcin; Jäger, Natalie; Jones, David T.W.; Jones, David; Knappskog, Stian; Kool, Marcel; Lakhani, Sunil R.; López-Otín, Carlos; Martin, Sancha; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Nakamura, Hiromi; Northcott, Paul A.; Pajic, Marina; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Paradiso, Angelo; Pearson, John V.; Puente, Xose S.; Raine, Keiran; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Richardson, Andrea L.; Richter, Julia; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schlesner, Matthias; Schumacher, Ton N.; Span, Paul N.; Teague, Jon W.; Totoki, Yasushi; Tutt, Andrew N.J.; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; van Buuren, Marit M.; van ’t Veer, Laura; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Waddell, Nicola; Yates, Lucy R.; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Futreal, P. Andrew; McDermott, Ultan; Lichter, Peter; Meyerson, Matthew; Grimmond, Sean M.; Siebert, Reiner; Campo, Elías; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Pfister, Stefan M.; Campbell, Peter J.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    All cancers are caused by somatic mutations. However, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here, we analysed 4,938,362 mutations from 7,042 cancers and extracted more than 20 distinct mutational signatures. Some are present in many cancer types, notably a signature attributed to the APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases, whereas others are confined to a single class. Certain signatures are associated with age of the patient at cancer diagnosis, known mutagenic exposures or defects in DNA maintenance, but many are of cryptic origin. In addition to these genome-wide mutational signatures, hypermutation localized to small genomic regions, kataegis, is found in many cancer types. The results reveal the diversity of mutational processes underlying the development of cancer with potential implications for understanding of cancer etiology, prevention and therapy. PMID:23945592

  18. Glioma Groups Based on 1p/19q, IDH, and TERT Promoter Mutations in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Decker, Paul A.; Sicotte, Hugues; Pekmezci, Melike; Rice, Terri; Kosel, Matt L.; Smirnov, Ivan V.; Sarkar, Gobinda; Caron, Alissa A.; Kollmeyer, Thomas M.; Praska, Corinne E.; Chada, Anisha R.; Halder, Chandralekha; Hansen, Helen M.; McCoy, Lucie S.; Bracci, Paige M.; Marshall, Roxanne; Zheng, Shichun; Reis, Gerald F.; Pico, Alexander R.; O’Neill, Brian P.