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Sample records for acrf millimeter wave

  1. The Status of the ACRF Millimeter Wave Cloud Radars (MMCRs), the Path Forward for Future MMCR Upgrades, the Concept of 3D Volume Imaging Radar and the UAV Radar

    SciTech Connect

    P Kollias; MA Miller; KB Widener; RT Marchand; TP Ackerman

    2005-12-30

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) operates millimeter wavelength cloud radars (MMCRs) in several climatological regimes. The MMCRs, are the primary observing tool for quantifying the properties of nearly all radiatively important clouds over the ACRF sites. The first MMCR was installed at the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) site nine years ago and its original design can be traced to the early 90s. Since then, several MMCRs have been deployed at the ACRF sites, while no significant hardware upgrades have been performed. Recently, a two-stage upgrade (first C-40 Digital Signal Processors [DSP]-based, and later the PC-Integrated Radar AcQuisition System [PIRAQ-III] digital receiver) of the MMCR signal-processing units was completed. Our future MMCR related goals are: 1) to have a cloud radar system that continues to have high reliability and uptime and 2) to suggest potential improvements that will address increased sensitivity needs, superior sampling and low cost maintenance of the MMCRs. The Traveling Wave Tube (TWT) technology, the frequency (35-GHz), the radio frequency (RF) layout, antenna, the calibration and radar control procedure and the environmental enclosure of the MMCR remain assets for our ability to detect the profile of hydrometeors at all heights in the troposphere at the ACRF sites.

  2. Millimeter wave nonreciprocal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenthaler, F. R.

    1983-01-01

    The Microwave and Quantum Magnetics Group within the MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the Research Laboratory of Electronics proposed a three year research program aimed at developing coherent magnetic wave signal-processing techniques for microwave energy which may form either the primary signal or else the intermediate frequency (IF) modulation of millimeter wavelength signals-especially at frequencies in the 50-94 GHz. range. Emphasis has been placed upon developing advanced types of signal processors that make use of quasi-optical propagation of electromagnetic and magnetostatic waves propagating in high quality single crystal ferrite thin films. A strong theoretical effort is required in order to establish valid models useful for predicting device performance. We emphasized new filter and circulator designs that employ combinations of the Faraday effect, field displacement nonreciprocity and magnetostatic resonance and periodic structures.

  3. Millimeter Wave Communication through Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    Millimeter wave communication through plasma at frequencies of 35 GHz or higher shows promise in maintaining communications connectivity during rocket launch and re-entry, critical events which are typically plagued with communication dropouts. Extensive prior research into plasmas has characterized the plasma frequency at these events, and research at the Kennedy Space Center is investigating the feasibility of millimeter communication through these plasma frequencies.

  4. Millimeter-wave active probe

    DOEpatents

    Majidi-Ahy, Gholamreza; Bloom, David M.

    1991-01-01

    A millimeter-wave active probe for use in injecting signals with frequencies above 50GHz to millimeter-wave and ultrafast devices and integrated circuits including a substrate upon which a frequency multiplier consisting of filter sections and impedance matching sections are fabricated in uniplanar transmission line format. A coaxial input and uniplanar 50 ohm transmission line couple an approximately 20 GHz input signal to a low pass filter which rolls off at approximately 25 GHz. An input impedance matching section couples the energy from the low pass filter to a pair of matched, antiparallel beam lead diodes. These diodes generate odd-numberd harmonics which are coupled out of the diodes by an output impedance matching network and bandpass filter which suppresses the fundamental and third harmonics and selects the fifth harmonic for presentation at an output.

  5. Advanced millimeter wave chemical sensor.

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.

    1999-03-24

    This paper discusses the development of an advanced millimeter-wave (mm-wave) chemical sensor and its applications for environmental monitoring and arms control treaty verification. The purpose of this work is to investigate the use of fingerprint-type molecular rotational signatures in the mm-wave spectrum to sense airborne chemicals. The mm-wave spectrum to sense airborne chemicals. The mm-wave sensor, operating in the frequency range of 220-300 GHz, can work under all weather conditions and in smoky and dusty environments. The basic configuration of the mm-wave sensor is a monostatic swept-frequency radar consisting of a mm-wave sweeper, a hot-electron-bolometer or Schottky barrier detector, and a trihedral reflector. The chemical plume to be detected is situated between the transmitter/detector and the reflector. Millimeter-wave absorption spectra of chemicals in the plume are determined by measuring the swept-frequency radar return signals with and without the plume in the beam path. The problem of pressure broadening, which hampered open-path spectroscopy in the past, has been mitigated in this work by designing a fast sweeping source over a broad frequency range. The heart of the system is a Russian backward-wave oscillator (BWO) tube that can be tuned over 220-350 GHz. Using the Russian BWO tube, a mm-wave radar system was built and field-tested at the DOE Nevada Test Site at a standoff distance of 60 m. The mm-wave system detected chemical plumes very well; the detection sensitivity for polar molecules like methyl chloride was down to a concentration of 12 ppm.

  6. Millimeter wave radar clutter program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulaby, Fawwaz T.

    1989-10-01

    The overall goal of the program was to conduct experimental measurements and develop theoretical models to improve the understanding of electromagnetic wave interaction with terrain at millimeter wavelengths. The work was divided into five tasks. Tasks 1 involved the construction of calibrated scatterometer systems at 35, 94, and 140 GHz. In designing, constructing, and testing these systems, a great deal was learnt about system-design trade-offs and system stability requirements, and new calibration techniques were developed. The scatterometer systems were then used in support of the remaining tasks. The objective of Task 2 was to evaluate the effects of signal fading on the radar backscatter from terrain. Based on experiments conducted from asphalt and snow-covered surfaces, it was determined that the Rayleigh fading model is applicable at millimeter wavelengths, and a model was developed to show how frequency averaging can be used to reduce signal fading fluctuations. Task 3 involved the development of a model that relates the transmission loss of dry snow to crystal size in the 18 to 90 GHz region. In Task 4, the character of bistatic scattering from surfaces of various surface roughness and from two types of trees was examined. The bistatic data for trees proved instrumental in the development of a radar model for scattering from tree foliage at millimeter wavelengths, which was one component of Task 5. The other component of Task 5 involved the development of a model for snow.

  7. Advanced millimeter-wave transponder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazume, Susumu; Takano, Eiji

    1992-03-01

    A millimeter-wave satellite transponder with a 50 GHz/40 GHz through repeater is being developed. The key devices of the transponder are described, including the low-noise amplifier (LNA), high-power TWTA, and local oscillator. The design targets are a noise figure of less than 3 dB at 47 GHz for the LNA, an output power of over 20 W at 43 GHz for the TWTA, and a frequency stability within +/- 1 x 10 exp -7 at 7 MHz for the master oscillator.

  8. Research in millimeter wave techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    The areas of millimeter wave (MMW) research include atmospheric propagation and radiometry, advanced MMW component design with emphasis on quasi-optical techniques, and the development of MMW receivers, especially those using subharmonic mixers. Calculations of atmospheric attenuation and radiometric antenna temperature were made in the range 100 to 700 GHz, together with measurements of atmospheric antenna temperature near 95 and 183 GHz. Quasi-optical components designed include lenses, mirrors, and wire grid devices, as well as feedhorns for interference with waveguide components. Subharmonic mixers with state-of-the-art performance at 183 GHz were also developed. Each of these areas of research is summarized.

  9. Passive millimeter-wave imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Stephen K.; Davidheiser, Roger A.; Hauss, Bruce; Lee, Paul S. C.; Mussetto, Michael; Shoucri, Merit M.; Yujiri, Larry

    1993-01-01

    Millimeter-wave hardware systems are being developed. Our approach begins with identifying and defining the applications. System requirements are then specified based on mission needs using our end-to-end performance model. The model was benchmarked against existing data bases and, where data is deficient, it is acquired via field measurements. The derived system requirements are then validated with the appropriate field measurements using our imaging testbeds and hardware breadboards. The result is a final system that satisfies all the requirements of the target mission.

  10. Silicon Based Millimeter Wave and THz ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jixin; Hong, Wei; Tang, Hongjun; Yan, Pinpin; Zhang, Li; Yang, Guangqi; Hou, Debin; Wu, Ke

    In this paper, the research advances in silicon based millimeter wave and THz ICs in the State Key Laboratory of Millimeter Waves is reviewed, which consists of millimeter wave amplifiers, mixers, oscillators at Q, V and W and D band based on CMOS technology, and several research approaches of THz passive ICs including cavity and filter structures using SIW-like (Substrate Integrated Waveguide-like) guided wave structures based on CMOS and MEMs process. The design and performance of these components and devices are presented.

  11. Millimeter wave near-field study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kefauver, Neill

    1990-01-01

    The possibility is evaluated of current technology measuring large aperture millimeter wave antennas. Included are a mathematical modeling of system errors, experimental data supporting error model, predictions of system accuracy at millimeter wavelengths, advantage of near-field measurements, and a cost estimate for a facility upgrade. The use is emphasized of software compensation and other inexpensive alternatives to develop a near optimum solution to near-field measurement problems at millimeter wavelengths.

  12. Stereo images in millimeter-wave regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Jung-Young; Guschin, Vladmir P.; Yeom, Seok-Won; Kim, Shin-Hwan; Lee, Hiyoung

    2009-05-01

    A focal plane detector array in a millimeter wave imaging system can be used to acquire multiview images in millimeter wave band. Two focal plane detectors which are distanced 8mm are used to obtain a stereoscopic image pair of a scene. The pair reveals a good depth sense though its resolution is very low and enables to estimate distances of objects in the scene with a reasonable accuracy. Keywords: millimeter wave imaging system, parabolic antenna, stereoscopic image pair, focal plane detector array, depth sense, object distance.

  13. Passive Millimeter Wave Camera (PMMWC) at TRW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Engineers at TRW, Redondo Beach, California, inspect the Passive Millimeter Wave Camera, a weather-piercing camera designed to 'see' through fog, clouds, smoke and dust. Operating in the millimeter wave portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, the camera creates visual-like video images of objects, people, runways, obstacles and the horizon. A demonstration camera (shown in photo) has been completed and is scheduled for checkout tests and flight demonstration. Engineer (left) holds a compact, lightweight circuit board containing 40 complete radiometers, including antenna, monolithic millimeter wave integrated circuit (MMIC) receivers and signal processing and readout electronics that forms the basis for the camera's 1040-element focal plane array.

  14. Passive Millimeter Wave Camera (PMMWC) at TRW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Engineers at TRW, Redondo Beach, California, inspect the Passive Millimeter Wave Camera, a weather-piercing camera designed to see through fog, clouds, smoke and dust. Operating in the millimeter wave portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, the camera creates visual-like video images of objects, people, runways, obstacles and the horizon. A demonstration camera (shown in photo) has been completed and is scheduled for checkout tests and flight demonstration. Engineer (left) holds a compact, lightweight circuit board containing 40 complete radiometers, including antenna, monolithic millimeter wave integrated circuit (MMIC) receivers and signal processing and readout electronics that forms the basis for the camera's 1040-element focal plane array.

  15. Millimeter-wave personal satellite communications experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Miura, Ryu; Shiomi, Tadashi; Iid, Takashi

    1987-10-01

    The concept of experimental millimeter-wave (43/38 GHz) satellite communications systems is discussed, and five demonstrative applications (a portable video phone system, a portable news gathering and distribution system, an observation data transmission system, a communication system for the Asia-Oceanian region, and a mobile information service system) are considered. A millimeter-wave satellite transponder for ETS-VI (to be launched in 1992) is described, in addition to the frequency selection in the millimeter wave band. Key elements of the component design, including the receiver front-end, the local oscillator, and the solid state power amplifier, are also discussed.

  16. Millimeter-wave sensor image enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.; Suess, Helmut

    1989-01-01

    Images from an airborne, scanning radiometer operating at a frequency of 98 GHz have been analyzed. The millimeter-wave images were obtained in 1985-1986 using the JPL millimeter-wave imaging sensor. The goal of this study was to enhance the information content of these images and make their interpretation easier. A visual-interpretative approach was used for information extraction from the images. This included application of nonlinear transform techniques for noise reduction and for color, contrast, and edge enhancement. Results of using the techniques on selected millimeter-wave images are discussed.

  17. MILLIMETER-WAVE HIGH TEMPERATURE PROCESS MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster illustrates the benefits of millimeter-wave high temperature monitoring. The new technique demonstrates (1)improved process efficiencies, (2) improved product quality impacts, and (3)reduced environmental impact.

  18. MILLIMETER-WAVE EMISSIVITY OF CELLULAR SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A general analysis has been presented of the millimeter-wave and farinfrared spectroscopic properties of in vivo cellular systems, and of the boson radiative equilibrium with steady-state nonequilibrium molecular systems. The frequency threshhold of spectroscopic properties assoc...

  19. High power millimeter wave source development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T. V.

    1989-01-01

    High power millimeter wave sources for fusion program; ECH source development program strategy; and 1 MW, 140 GHz gyrotron experiment design philosophy are briefly outlined. This presentation is represented by viewgraphs only.

  20. The Millimeter-Wave Bolometric Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, S.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J. J.; Novak, G.; Piccirillo, L.; Timbie, P.; Tucker, G. S.

    2004-01-01

    The Millimeter-wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI) is a proposed ground-based instrument designed for a wide range of cosmological and astrophysical observations including studies of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). MBI combines the advantages of two well-developed technologies - interferometers and bolometric detectors. Interferometers have many advantages over .filled-aperture telescopes and are particularly suitable for high resolution imaging. Cooled bolometers are the highest sensitivity detectors at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. The combination of these two technologies results in an instrument with both high sensitivity and high angular resolution.

  1. Millimeter-wave antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J.; Gould, W. I., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Parabolic reflectors fabricated from Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) composite material will not distort their shape by more than 3 percent of millimeter wavelength, despite large temperature differences on reflector surfaces. CFRP has zero thermal expansion. It is derived from charred polyacrylonitrite plastic filaments that are combined with epoxy resin.

  2. Advanced radiometric millimeter-wave scene simulation: ARMSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauss, Bruce I.; Agravante, Hiroshi H.; Chaiken, Steven

    1997-06-01

    In order to predict the performance of a passive millimeter wave sensor under a variety of weather, terrain and sensor operational conditions, TRW has developed the Advanced Radiometric Millimeter-Wave Scene Simulation (ARMSS) code. This code provides a comprehensive, end-to-end scene simulation capability based on rigorous, `first-principle' physics models of the passive millimeter wave phenomenology and sensor characteristics. The ARMSS code has been extensively benchmarked against both data in the literature and a wide array of millimeter-wave-field-imaging data. The code has been used in support of numerous passive millimeter wave technology programs for interpreting millimeter wave data, establishing scene signatures, performing mission analyses, and developing system requirements for the design of millimeter wave sensor systems. In this paper, we will present details of the ARMSS code and describe its current use in defining system requirements for the passive millimeter wave camera being developed under the Passive Millimeter Wave Camera Consortium led by TRW.

  3. Advanced Microwave/Millimeter-Wave Imaging Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zuowei; Yang, Lu; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Domier, C. W.; Ito, N.; Kogi, Y.; Liang, Y.; Mase, A.; Park, H.; Sakata, E.; Tsai, W.; Xia, Z. G.; Zhang, P.

    Millimeter wave technology advances have made possible active and passive millimeter wave imaging for a variety of applications including advanced plasma diagnostics, radio astronomy, atmospheric radiometry, concealed weapon detection, all-weather aircraft landing, contraband goods detection, harbor navigation/surveillance in fog, highway traffic monitoring in fog, helicopter and automotive collision avoidance in fog, and environmental remote sensing data associated with weather, pollution, soil moisture, oil spill detection, and monitoring of forest fires, to name but a few. The primary focus of this paper is on technology advances which have made possible advanced imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations and microturbulence in fusion plasmas. Topics of particular emphasis include frequency selective surfaces, planar Schottky diode mixer arrays, electronically controlled beam shaping/steering arrays, and high power millimeter wave local oscillator and probe sources.

  4. Millimeter wave transmission systems and related devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebert, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    A survey was made of the state-of-the-art in millimeter (20 GHz to 300 GHz) wave transmission systems and related devices. The survey includes summaries of analytical studies and theoretical results that were obtained for various transmission line structures. This material was supplemented by further analysis where appropriate. The transmission line structures are evaluated in terms of electrical performance, ease of manufacture, usefulness for building other devices and compatibility with solid state devices. Descriptions of waveguide transmission lines which have commonly been used in the microwave frequency range are provided along with special attention given to the problems that these guides face when their use is extended into the millimeter wave range. Also, guides which have been introduced specifically to satisfy the requirements of millimeter wave transmission are discussed in detail.

  5. WASTE GLASS MELTER PROCESS MONITORING WITH MILLIMETER WAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Millimeter-wave technologies can provide novel and reliable online monitoring capability for many important parameters inside nuclear waste glass melters, including temperature, emissivity, density, and viscosity. The physical and analytical basis for millimeter-wave monitoring o...

  6. Sub-millimeter wave frequency heterodyne detector system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Peter H. (Inventor); Dengler, Robert (Inventor); Mueller, Eric R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to sub-millimeter wave frequency heterodyne imaging systems. More specifically, the present invention relates to a sub-millimeter wave frequency heterodyne detector system for imaging the magnitude and phase of transmitted power through or reflected power off of mechanically scanned samples at sub-millimeter wave frequencies.

  7. Sub-millimeter wave frequency heterodyne detector system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Peter H. (Inventor); Dengler, Robert (Inventor); Mueller, Eric R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to sub-millimeter wave frequency heterodyne imaging systems. More specifically, the present invention relates to a sub-millimeter wave frequency heterodyne detector system for imaging the magnitude and phase of transmitted power through or reflected power off of mechanically scanned samples at sub-millimeter wave frequencies.

  8. Millimeter wave propagation measurements from an orbiting earth satellite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Major results of the millimeter wave propagation measurements conducted with the ATS-5 satellite are reviewed. The impact of these results on millimeter wave communications systems design is outlined. Advanced millimeter wave flight experiments currently under development for the ATS-F satellite are also discussed, and their main characteristics are summarized.

  9. Millimeter-Wave Photonics for Communications and Phased Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanzer, Jeffrey A.; Wichman, Adam; Klamkin, Jonathan; McKenna, Timothy P.; Clark, Thomas R.

    2015-07-01

    This article presents recent developments in millimeter-wave communications architectures featuring broadband photonic signal generation, up-conversion and down-conversion, as well as true-time-delay photonic steering of millimeter-wave arrays. These developments will support future high-capacity millimeter-wave wireless communications by enabling broadband signals to be generated and converted between baseband and millimeter-wave carrier frequencies without electronic heterodyne systems and by permitting the use of true-time-delay beamsteering in millimeter-wave array apertures.

  10. Considerations for millimeter wave printed antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozar, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Calculated data are presented on the performance of printed antenna elements on substrates which may be electrically thick, as would be the case for printed antennas at millimeter wave frequencies. Printed dipoles and microstrip patch antennas on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), quartz, and gallium arsenide substrates are considered. Data are given for resonant length, resonant resistance, bandwidth, loss due to surface waves, loss due to dielectric heating, and mutual coupling. Also presented is an optimization procedure for maximizing or minimizing power launched into surface waves from a multielement printed antenna array. The data are calculated by a moment method solution.

  11. Millimeter wave sensor for monitoring effluents

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Bakhtiari, Sasan; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Dieckman, Stephen L.

    1995-01-01

    A millimeter-wave sensor for detecting and measuring effluents from processing plants either remotely or on-site includes a high frequency signal source for transmitting frequency-modulated continuous waves in the millimeter or submillimeter range with a wide sweep capability and a computer-controlled detector for detecting a plurality of species of effluents on a real time basis. A high resolution spectrum of an effluent, or effluents, is generated by a deconvolution of the measured spectra resulting in a narrowing of the line widths by 2 or 3 orders of magnitude as compared with the pressure broadened spectra detected at atmospheric pressure for improved spectral specificity and measurement sensitivity. The sensor is particularly adapted for remote monitoring such as where access is limited or sensor cost restricts multiple sensors as well as for large area monitoring under nearly all weather conditions.

  12. Overview of near millimeter wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, W. A.

    1981-02-01

    Near millimeter wave (NMMW) propagation problems are divided into three classes: propagation through homogeneous, turbid, and turbulent atmospheres. These classical forms include anomalous water vapor absorption in a homogeneous atmosphere as well as scintillation phenomena associated with propagation through severe weather and 'dirty battlefield' environments. Examples of the existing, inadequate, scintillation data base are given and the lack of supporting meteorological data noted. Carefully designed NMMW scintillation experiments with equally carefully designed micro-meteorological support are needed.

  13. Superconducting submillimeter and millimeter wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nahum, M.

    1992-10-20

    The series of projects described in this dissertation was stimulated by the discovery of high temperature superconductivity. Our goal was to develop useful applications which would be competitive with the current state of technology. The high-[Tc] microbolometer was developed into the most sensitive direct detector of millimeter waves, when operated at liquid nitrogen temperatures. The thermal boundary resistance of thin YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]0[sub 7-[delta

  14. Millimeter-wave antenna design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighton, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Problems and opportunities are discussed for adapting certain design features and construction techniques, developed for producing high accuracy ground based radio dishes, to producing milimeter wave dishes for space use. Specifically considered is a foldable telescope of 24 m aperture and 9.6 m focal length, composed of 37 rigid hexagonal panels, which will fit within the 4.5 m diameter x 18 m long payload limits of space shuttle. As here conceived, the telescope would be a free flyer with its own power and pointing systems. Some of the structural design features and construction procedures are considered.

  15. Millimeter Wave Holographical Inspection of Honeycomb Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, J. T.; Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.; Stefes, G.; Hepburn, Frank L.; Hepburn, Frank L.

    2007-01-01

    Multi-layered composite structures manufactured with honeycomb, foam or balsa wood cores are finding increasing utility in a variety of aerospace, transportation, and infrastructure applications. Due to the low conductivity and inhomogeneity associated with these composites standard nondestructive testing (NDT) methods are not always capable of inspecting their interior for various defects caused during the manufacturing process or as a result of in-service loading. On the contrary, microwave and millimeter wave NDT methods are well-suited for inspecting these structures since signals at these frequencies readily penetrate through these structures and reflect from different interior boundaries revealing the presence of a wide range of defects such as disbond, delamination, moisture and oil intrusion, impact damage, etc. Millimeter wave frequency spectrum spans 30 GHz - 300 GHz with corresponding wavelengths of 10 - 1 mm. Due to the inherent short wavelengths at these frequencies, one can produce high spatial resolution images of these composites either using real-antenna focused or synthetic-aperture focused methods. In addition, incorporation of swept-frequency in the latter method (i.e., holography) results in high-resolution three-dimensional images. This paper presents the basic steps behind producing such images at millimeter wave frequencies and the results of two honeycomb composite panels are demonstrated at Q-band (33-50 GHz). In addition, these results are compared to previous results using X-ray computed tomography.

  16. Millimeter wave satellite concepts, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsen, N. B.; Holland, L. D.; Thomas, R. E.; Wallace, R. W.; Gallagher, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    The identification of technologies necessary for development of millimeter spectrum communication satellites was examined from a system point of view. Development of methodology based on the technical requirements of potential services that might be assigned to millimeter wave bands for identifying the viable and appropriate technologies for future NASA millimeter research and development programs, and testing of this methodology with selected user applications and services were the goals of the program. The entire communications network, both ground and space subsystems was studied. Cost, weight, and performance models for the subsystems, conceptual design for point-to-point and broadcast communications satellites, and analytic relationships between subsystem parameters and an overall link performance are discussed along with baseline conceptual systems, sensitivity studies, model adjustment analyses, identification of critical technologies and their risks, and brief research and development program scenarios for the technologies judged to be moderate or extensive risks. Identification of technologies for millimeter satellite communication systems, and assessment of the relative risks of these technologies, was accomplished through subsystem modeling and link optimization for both point-to-point and broadcast applications.

  17. A millimeter-wave tunneladder TWT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D.

    1988-01-01

    A millimeter-wave traveling wave tube (TWT) was developed using a dispersive, high-impedance forward wave interaction structure based on a ladder, with non-space-harmonic interaction, for a tube with high gain per inch and high efficiency. The 'TunneLadder' interaction structure combines ladder properties modified to accommodate Pierce gun beam optics in a radially magnetized PM focusing structure. The development involved the fabrication of chemically milled, shaped ladders diffusion brazed to diamond cubes which are in turn active diffusion brazed to each ridge of a doubly ridged waveguide. Cold-test data, representing the (omega)(beta) and and impedance characteristics of the modified ladder circuit, were used in small and large-signal computer programs to predict TWT gain and efficiency. The structural design emphasizes ruggedness and reliability. Actual data from tested tubes verify the predicted performance while providing broader bandwidth than expected.

  18. The Millimeter-Wave Imaging Radiometer (MIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Jackson, D. M.; Adler, R. F.; Dod, L. R.; Shiue, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Millimeter-Wave Imaging Radiometer (MIR) is a new instrument being designed for studies of airborne passive microwave retrieval of tropospheric water vapor, clouds, and precipitation parameters. The MIR is a total-power cross-track scanning radiometer for use on either the NASA ER-2 (high-altitude) or DC-8 (medium altitude) aircraft. The current design includes millimeter-wave (MMW) channels at 90, 166, 183 +/- 1,3,7, and 220 GHz. An upgrade for the addition of submillimeter-wave (SMMW) channels at 325 +/- 1,3,7 and 340 GHz is planned. The nadiral spatial resolution is approximately 700 meters at mid-altitude when operated aboard the NASA ER-2. The MIR consists of a scanhead and data acquisition system, designed for installation in the ER-2 superpod nose cone. The scanhead will house the receivers (feedhorns, mixers, local oscillators, and preamplifiers), a scanning mirror, hot and cold calibration loads, and temperature sensors. Particular attention is being given to the characterization of the hot and cold calibration loads through both laboratory bistatic scattering measurements and analytical modeling. Other aspects of the MIR and the data acquisition system are briefly discussed, and diagrams of the location of the MIR in the ER-2 superpod nosecone and of the data acquisition system are presented.

  19. Personnel and mail screening with millimeter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Sheen, David M.; Griffin, Jeffery W.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Lechelt, Wayne M.

    2005-05-01

    The detection and interdiction of biological and chemical warfare agents at point-of-entry military, government, and civilian facilities remains a high priority for security personnel. Commercial personnel and mail screening technologies for these harmful agents are still being developed and improved upon to meet all security client requirements. Millimeter-wave holographic imaging technology developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is an ideal sensor to interrogate objects concealed behind low dielectric barriers such as paper, cardboard, and clothing. It uses harmless millimeter waves to illuminate the object or person under surveillance. The waves penetrate through the low dielectric barrier and either reflects off or pass through the hidden object, depending on its material dielectric properties. The reflected signals are digitized and sent to high-speed computers to form high-resolution, three-dimensional (3-D) images. Feasibility imaging studies have been conducted to determine whether simulated biological or chemical agents concealed in mail packages or under clothing could be detected using holographic radar imaging techniques. The results of this study will be presented in this paper.

  20. Personnel and Mail Screening with Millimeter Waves

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Sheen, David M.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Lechelt, Wayne M.

    2005-08-01

    The detection and interdiction of biological and chemical warfare agents at point-of-entry military, government, and civilian facilities remains a high priority for security personnel. Commercial personnel and mail screening technologies for these harmful agents are still being developed and improved upon to meet all security client requirements. Millimeter-wave holographic imaging technology developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is an ideal sensor to interrogate objects concealed behind low dielectric barriers such as paper, cardboard, and clothing. It uses harmless millimeter waves to illuminate the object or person under surveillance. The waves penetrate through the low dielectric barrier and either reflects off or pass through the hidden object, depending on its material dielectric properties. The reflected signals are digitized and sent to high-speed computers to form high-resolution, three-dimensional (3-D) images. Feasibility imaging studies have been conducted to determine whether simulated biological or chemical agents concealed in mail packages or under clothing could be detected using holographic radar imaging techniques. The results of this study will be presented in this paper.

  1. Apparatus for millimeter-wave signal generation

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G. Allen; Hietala, Vincent M.; Zolper, John C.; Mar, Alan; Hohimer, John P.

    1999-01-01

    An opto-electronic integrated circuit (OEIC) apparatus is disclosed for generating an electrical signal at a frequency .gtoreq.10 GHz. The apparatus, formed on a single substrate, includes a semiconductor ring laser for generating a continuous train of mode-locked lasing pulses and a high-speed photodetector for detecting the train of lasing pulses and generating the electrical signal therefrom. Embodiments of the invention are disclosed with an active waveguide amplifier coupling the semiconductor ring laser and the high-speed photodetector. The invention has applications for use in OEICs and millimeter-wave monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs).

  2. Universal Millimeter-Wave Radar Front End

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Raul M.

    2010-01-01

    A quasi-optical front end allows any arbitrary polarization to be transmitted by controlling the timing, amplitude, and phase of the two input ports. The front end consists of two independent channels horizontal and vertical. Each channel has two ports transmit and receive. The transmit signal is linearly polarized so as to pass through a periodic wire grid. It is then propagated through a ferrite Faraday rotator, which rotates the polarization state 45deg. The received signal is propagated through the Faraday rotator in the opposite direction, undergoing a further 45 of polarization rotation due to the non-reciprocal action of the ferrite under magnetic bias. The received signal is now polarized at 90deg relative to the transmit signal. This signal is now reflected from the wire grid and propagated to the receive port. The horizontal and vertical channels are propagated through, or reflected from, another wire grid. This design is an improvement on the state of the art in that any transmit signal polarization can be chosen in whatever sequence desired. Prior systems require switching of the transmit signal from the amplifier, either mechanically or by using high-power millimeter-wave switches. This design can have higher reliability, lower mass, and more flexibility than mechanical switching systems, as well as higher reliability and lower losses than systems using high-power millimeter-wave switches.

  3. Novel Techniques for Millimeter-Wave Packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Martin I.; Lee, Karen A.; Kolawa, Elzbieta A.; Lowry, Lynn E.; Tulintseff, Ann N.

    1995-01-01

    A new millimeter-wave package architecture with supporting electrical, mechanical and material science experiment and analysis is presented. This package is well suited for discrete devices, monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC's) and multichip module (MCM) applications. It has low-loss wide-band RF transitions which are necessary to overcome manufacturing tolerances leading to lower per unit cost Potential applications of this new packaging architecture which go beyond the standard requirements of device protection include integration of antennas, compatibility to photonic networks and direct transitions to waveguide systems. Techniques for electromagnetic analysis, thermal control and hermetic sealing were explored. Three dimensional electromagnetic analysis was performed using a finite difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm and experimentally verified for millimeter-wave package input and output transitions. New multi-material system concepts (AlN, Cu, and diamond thin films) which allow excellent surface finishes to be achieved with enhanced thermal management have been investigated. A new approach utilizing block copolymer coatings was employed to hermetically seal packages which met MIL STD-883.

  4. Millimeter waves sensor modeling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latger, Jean; Cathala, Thierry

    2015-10-01

    Guidance of weapon systems relies on sensors to analyze targets signature. Defense weapon systems also need to detect then identify threats also using sensors. One important class of sensors are millimeter waves radar systems that are very efficient for seeing through atmosphere and/or foliage for example. This type of high frequency radar can produce high quality images with very tricky features such as dihedral and trihedral bright points, shadows and lay over effect. Besides, image quality is very dependent on the carrier velocity and trajectory. Such sensors systems are so complex that they need simulation to be tested. This paper presents a state of the Art of millimeter waves sensor models. A short presentation of asymptotic methods shows that physical optics support is mandatory to reach realistic results. SE-Workbench-RF tool is presented and typical examples of results are shown both in the frame of Synthetic Aperture Radar sensors and Real Beam Ground Mapping radars. Several technical topics are then discussed, such as the rendering technique (ray tracing vs. rasterization), the implementation (CPU vs. GP GPU) and the tradeoff between physical accuracy and performance of computation. Examples of results using SE-Workbench-RF are showed and commented.

  5. Modeling and design of millimeter wave gyroklystrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levush, B.; Blank, M.; Calame, J.; Danly, B.; Nguyen, K.; Pershing, D.; Cooke, S.; Latham, P.; Petillo, J.; Antonsen, T.

    1999-05-01

    A series of high power, high efficiency Ka-band and W-band gyroklystron experiments has been conducted recently at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Stagger tuning of the cavities for bandwidth enhancement is commonly used in the conventional multicavity klystrons. The desired stagger tuning is usually achieved via mechanical tuning of the individual cavities. However, in the millimeter wave regime, particularly, in the case of the high average power operation, it is desirable to be able to achieve the required stagger tuning by design. The NRL gyroklystron experiments explored the tradeoffs between power, bandwidth, efficiency, and gain to study the effects of large stagger tuning in millimeter wave without resorting to mechanical tuning of the cavities. Both, Ka-band and W-band, experiments demonstrated a record power-bandwidth product. The success of the experiments was due in large part to a battery of improved large-signal, stability, and cold test codes employed in the modeling and design stage. Theoretical models that provide the basis for these design simulation tools and the design methodology will be presented.

  6. Millimeter Wave Rheometry: Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Jaehun; McCloy, John S.; Crum, J. V.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2011-01-29

    A novel millimeter wave (MMW) rheometry is developed to determine the viscosity of fluid based on an unsteady film flow in an inclined plane. The method measures fringes due to MMW interference between the front and back surfaces of the fluid flowing across the field of view of a ceramic wave guide coupled to a MMW receiver. With knowledge of the dielectric constant, the interference fringe spacing is used to calculate the thickness of the fluid layer. This thickness is then transformed into the viscosity by means of a simple hydrodynamic theory. Our results show that the MMW rheometry can easily distinguish between the 30, 100, and 200 Pa•s silicone oils. The geometry of the method allows for potential industrial applications such as measuring viscosity of the flowing slag in slagging coal gasifiers. The MMW rheometry with simple modifications can be easily extended to measure important non-Newtonian fluid characteristics such as yield stress.

  7. Millimeter wave I-Q standoff biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Shaolin; Bakhtiari, Sasan; Elmer, Thomas; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Mikhelson, Ilya V.; Sahakian, Alan V.

    2012-06-01

    A continuous wave (CW) 94-GHz millimeter wave (mmW) standoff biosensor has been developed for remote biometric sensing applications. The sensor measures the demodulated in-phase (I) and quadrature-phase (Q) components of the received reflected mmW signal from a subject. Both amplitude and phase of the reflected signal are obtained from downconverted I and Q channels from the quadrature mixer. The mmW sensor can faithfully monitor human vital signs (heartbeat and respiration) at relatively long standoff distances. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) is used to extract the heartbeat, the respiration and the body motion signals. The approach allows one to deduce information about amplitude and beat-to-beat rate of the respiration and the heartbeat. Experimental results collected from a subject were analyzed and compared to the signal obtained with a three-electrode ECG monitoring instrument.

  8. Measurement techniques for millimeter wave substrate mounted MMW antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouker, M. A.; Campbell, D. P.; Gallagher, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of measurement techniques for millimeter wave substrate mounted antennas is presented. Scattering and pickup of the millimeter wave radiation on the low frequency leads is a significant problem in these measurements. Methods to reduce these effects are discussed, and preliminary work on dipole antennas at 230 GHz is presented.

  9. Integrated design and simulation for millimeter-wave antenna systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, T.; Katz, D. S.; Villegas, F. J.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the development and application of MODTool (Millimeter-wave Optics Design), a design tool that efficiently integrates existing millimeter-wave optics design software with a solid body modeler and thermal/structural analysis packages, will be discussed.

  10. The millimeter-wave bolometric interferometer (MBI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Gregory S.; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Gault, Amanda C.; Hyland, Peter O.; Malu, Siddharth; Timbie, Peter T.; Bunn, Emory F.; Keating, Brian G.; Bierman, Evan; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Ade, Peter A. R.; Piccirillo, Lucio

    2008-07-01

    We report on the design and tests of a prototype of the Millimeter-wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI). MBI is designed to make sensitive measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It combines the differencing capabilities of an interferometer with the high sensitivity of bolometers at millimeter wavelengths. The prototype, which we call MBI-4, views the sky directly through four corrugated horn antennas. MBI ultimately will have ~ 1000 antennas. These antennas have low sidelobes and nearly symmetric beam patterns, so spurious instrumental polarization from reflective optics is avoided. The MBI-4 optical band is defined by filters with a central frequency of 90 GHz. The set of baselines, determined by placement of the four antennas, results in sensitivity to CMB polarization fluctuations over the multipole range l = 150 - 270. The signals are combined with a Fizeau beam combiner and interference fringes are detected by an array of spider-web bolometers. In order to separate the visibility signals from the total power detected by each bolometer, the phase of the signal from each antenna is modulated by a ferrite-based waveguide phase shifter. Initial tests and observations have been made at Pine Bluff Observatory (PBO) outside Madison, WI.

  11. The millimeter-wave bolometric interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkov, Andrei L.; Kim, Jaiseung; Tucker, Gregory S.; Gault, Amanda; Hyland, Peter; Malu, Siddharth; Timbie, Peter T.; Bunn, Emory F.; Bierman, Evan; Keating, Brian; Murphy, Anthony; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Ade, Peter A. R.; Calderon, Carolina; Piccirillo, Lucio

    2006-06-01

    The Millimeter-Wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI) is designed for sensitive measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). MBI combines the differencing capabilities of an interferometer with the high sensitivity of bolometers at millimeter wavelengths. It views the sky directly through corrugated horn antennas with low sidelobes and nearly symmetric beam patterns to avoid spurious instrumental polarization from reflective optics. The design of the first version of the instrument with four 7-degree-FOV corrugated horns (MBI-4) is discussed. The MBI-4 optical band is defined by filters with a central frequency of 90 GHz. The set of baselines determined by the antenna separation makes the instrument sensitive to CMB polarization fluctuations over the multipole range l=150-270. In MBI-4, the signals from antennas are combined with a Fizeau beam combiner and interference fringes are detected by an array of spider-web bolometers with NTD germanium thermistors. In order to separate the visibility signals from the total power detected by each bolometer, the phase of the signal from each antenna is modulated by a ferrite-based waveguide phase shifter. Observations are planned from the Pine Bluff Observatory outside Madison, WI.

  12. The Millimeter-wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gault, Amanda C.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bierman, E.; Bunn, E. F.; Hyland, P. O.; Keating, B. G.; Korotkov, A. L.; Malu, S. S.; O'Sullivan, C.; Piccirillo, L.; Timbie, P. T.; Tucker, G. S.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the design and tests of a prototype of the Millimeter-wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI). MBI is designed to make sensitive measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It combines the differencing capabilities of an interferometer with the high sensitivity of bolometers at millimeter wavelengths. The prototype, which we call MBI-4, views the sky directly through four corrugated horn antennas. MBI ultimately will have 1000 antennas. These antennas have low sidelobes and nearly symmetric beam patterns, so spurious instrumental polarization from reflective optics is avoided. The MBI-4 optical band is defined by filters with a central frequency of 90 GHz. The set of baselines, determined by placement of the four antennas, results in sensitivity to CMB polarization fluctuations over the multipole range l = 150 - 270. The signals are combined with a Fizeau beam combiner and interference fringes are detected by an array of spiderweb bolometers. In order to separate the visibility signals from the total power detected by each bolometer, the phase of the signal from each antenna is modulated by a ferrite-based waveguide phase shifter. Initial tests and observations have been made at Pine Bluff Observatory (PBO) outside Madison, WI. This work was supported by NASA grants NAG5-12758, NNX07AG82G, the Rhode Island Space Grant and the Wisconsin Space Grant.

  13. PNNL Expert Doug McMakin Discusses Millimeter Wave Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Doug McMakin

    2011-10-01

    Electrical Engineer Doug McMakin discusses Millimeter Wave Holographic technology, which uses non-harmful, ultrahigh-frequency radio waves to penetrate clothing to detect and identify concealed objects, as well as obtain accurate body measurements.

  14. PNNL Expert Doug McMakin Discusses Millimeter Wave Technology

    ScienceCinema

    Doug McMakin

    2012-12-31

    Electrical Engineer Doug McMakin discusses Millimeter Wave Holographic technology, which uses non-harmful, ultrahigh-frequency radio waves to penetrate clothing to detect and identify concealed objects, as well as obtain accurate body measurements.

  15. Millimeter-wave concealed weapon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Wen; Juhola, Markku; Grainger, William; Wang, Beining; Manahan, Brian

    1997-02-01

    Millimeter-wave concealed weapon detection, based on the use of a fast scan short-range FMCW 94 GHz radar, was evaluated in a small business innovative research phase I under the Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP) program. The feasibility of a fast circular scan technique invented by Chang Industry has been firmly established, with handgun images recorded. This fast scan technique is essential both for remote sensing and full-body fixed site scanner applications. Although only raw image data was obtained in Phase I, we propose to apply super-resolution image enhancements and target recognition software algorithms to provide more reliable detection. Endorsement from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, to provide operational input and testing and evaluation, and the hiring of a consultant to plan for future program financing (including venture capital investment) make the project very attractive for commercialization.

  16. Millimeter wave band ultra wideband transmitter MMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Jin; Rolland, Nathalie

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new millimeter-wave (MMW) ultra wideband (UWB) transmitter MMIC which has been developed in an OMMIC 0.1 μm GaAs PHEMT foundry process (ft = 100 GHz) for 22-29 GHz vehicular radar systems. The transmitter is composed of an MMW negative resistance oscillator (NRO), a power amplifier (PA), and two UWB pulse generators (PGs). In order to convert the UWB pulse signal to MMW frequency and reduce the total power consumption, the MMW NRO is driven by one of the UWB pulse generators and the power amplifier is triggered by another UWB pulse generator. The main advantages of this transmitter are: new design, simple architecture, high-precision distance measurements, infinite ON/OFF switch ratio, and low power consumption. The total power consumption of the transmitter MMIC is 218 mW with a peak output power of 5.5 dBm at 27 GHz.

  17. Simulation of a passive millimeter wave sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahlbaum, William W.

    1993-01-01

    The visual display expected to be generated by a Passive Millimeter Wave (PMMW) camera and sensor system has been simulated on a Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The low resolution of the sensor has been simulated by graphically manipulating the scene as it is being drawn by the IRIS in real time. Camera field of view, sensor resolution, and sensor update rate are the controllable parameters. Physical effects such as lens model, radome effects, and noise have not been included at this time. An approximate dynamic model of the atmospheric phenomenology has been included which generates the gray-scale intensity values in real time for the simulated image. The gray-scale values are proportional to temperature. A snapshot capability which captures individual image frames during real-time operation has been included. These images were used to validate the approximate phenomenology model against a more rigorous physical model.

  18. Thermoreflectance temperature measurement with millimeter wave

    SciTech Connect

    Pradere, C. Caumes, J.-P.; BenKhemis, S.; Palomo, E.; Batsale, J.-C.; Pernot, G.; Dilhaire, S.

    2014-06-15

    GigaHertz (GHz) thermoreflectance technique is developed to measure the transient temperature of metal and semiconductor materials located behind an opaque surface. The principle is based on the synchronous detection, using a commercial THz pyrometer, of a modulated millimeter wave (at 110 GHz) reflected by the sample hidden behind a shield layer. Measurements were performed on aluminum, copper, and silicon bulks hidden by a 5 cm thick Teflon plate. We report the first measurement of the thermoreflectance coefficient which exhibits a value 100 times higher at 2.8 mm radiation than those measured at visible wavelengths for both metallic and semiconductor materials. This giant thermoreflectance coefficient κ, close to 10{sup −3} K{sup −1} versus 10{sup −5} K{sup −1} for the visible domain, is very promising for future thermoreflectance applications.

  19. Contact Whiskers for Millimeter Wave Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, A. R.; Grange, J. A.; Lichtenberger, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Several techniques are investigated for making short conical tips on wires (whiskers) used for contacting millimeter-wave Schottky diodes. One procedure, using a phosphoric and chromic acid etching solution (PCE), is found to give good results on 12 microns phosphor-bronze wires. Full cone angles of 60 degrees-80 degrees are consistently obtained, compared with the 15 degrees-20 degrees angles obtained with the widely used sodium hydroxide etch. Methods are also described for cleaning, increasing the tip diameter (i.e. blunting), gold plating, and testing the contact resistance of the whiskers. The effects of the whisker tip shape on the electrical resistance, inductance, and capacitance of the whiskers are studied, and examples given for typical sets of parameters.

  20. The millimeter-wave bolometric interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gault, Amanda Charlotte

    The Millimeter-wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI) is a technology demonstrator for future searches for the B-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). If observed, B-modes would be a direct probe of the energy scale of inflation, an energy scale that is impossible to reach with even the most sophisticated particle accelerators. In this thesis, I outline the technology differences between MBI and conventional interferometers, including the Faraday effect phase modulators (FPM) used both to control systematic effects and to allow for phase sensitive detection of signals. MBI is a four element adding interferometer with a Fizeau optical beam combiner. This allows simple scaling of the instrument to a large numbers of baselines without requiring complicated pair-wise correlations of signals. Interferometers have an advantage over imaging telescopes when measuring the CMB power spectrum as each baseline is sensitive to a single Fourier mode (angular scale) on the sky. Recovering individual baseline information with this combination scheme requires phase modulating the signal from each antenna. MBI performs this modulation with Faraday effect phase modulators. In these novel cryogenic devices a modulated magnetic field switches the phase of a millimeter-wave RF signal by +/- 90 degrees at frequencies up to a few Hertz. MBI's second season of observations occurred in the winter of 2009 at Pine Bluff Observatory a few miles west of Madsion, WI. We successfully observed interference fringes of a microwave test source located in the far field of the instrument that agree well with those expected from simulations. MBI has inspired a second generation bolometric interferometer, QUBIC, which will have hundreds of antennas and thousands of detectors. When it deploys in 2015, it will be sensitive enough to search for B-mode signals from the CMB.

  1. Infrared and millimeter waves: Millimeter components and techniques. Volume 15, Part VI

    SciTech Connect

    Button, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the largest information on infrared, far-infrared, submillimeter, and millimeter waves-a subject of great importance in applied physics and engineering, and particularly important with respect to research for many government agencies. Topics considered include low-noise receiver technology for near-millimeter wavelengths; a scanning airborne radiometer for 30 and 90 GHz; the self-oscillating mixer: background theory and experiments; review of dielectric image line antennas; EHF SATCOM terminal antennas; and semiconductor antennas for millimeter-wave integrated circuits.

  2. Research of active panel technology for large aperture millimeter-wave/sub-millimeter-wave telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuhao; Cui, Xiangqun

    2010-05-01

    As Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) project was completed successfully, indicating the key technology of active optics has been mastered by the Chinese astronomical community, experts of Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology (NIAOT), builders of this project, started to consider how to use the technology developed in large optical telescope such as LAMOST to improve the performance of millimeterwave / sub-millimeter-wave telescope. In order to do more research work about active optics of millimeter submillimeter band and improve the performance of Delingha 13.7m millimeter-wave telescope, researchers of NIAOT intend to upgrade the reflect panel accuracy of this telescope. This paper will introduce the preliminary work of the accuracy-upgrading task, numerical simulation of the 13.7m telescope. In this presentation, the primary reflector finite element model (FEM) construction, gravity and thermal deformation, and modal analyze are described. The result shows that the gravity and thermal distortion of the reflector are contributed mostly by the back-structure and the active support for the panels is very necessary to restrain this kind of distortion.

  3. Active and passive millimeter- and sub-millimeter-wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkie, Douglas T.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Castro, Corey; Helminger, Paul; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Moyer, Steven K.; Murrill, Steve; Halford, Carl; Griffin, Steve; Franck, Charmaine

    2005-11-01

    We have developed several millimeter/submillimeter/terahertz systems to study active and passive imaging and associated phenomenology. For measuring the transmission and scattering properties of materials, we have developed a dual rotary stage scattering system with active illumination and a Fourier Transform spectrometer. For imaging studies, we have developed a system based on a 12-inch diameter raster-scanned mirror. By interchange of active sources and both heterodyne and bolometric detectors, this system can be used in a variety of active and passive configurations. The laboratory measurements are used as inputs for, and model calibration and validation of, a terahertz imaging system performance model used to evaluate different imaging modalities for concealed weapon identification. In this paper, we will present examples of transmission and scattering measurements for common clothing as well as active imaging results that used a 640 GHz source and receiver.

  4. Millimeter wave detection of nuclear radiation - an alternative detection mechanism.

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Chien, H. T.; Heifetz, A.; Koehl, E. R.; Raptis, A. C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-08-01

    We present a nuclear radiation detection mechanism using millimeter waves as an alternative to conventional detection. It is based on the concept that nuclear radiation causes ionization of air and that if we place a dielectric material near the radiation source, it acts as a charge accumulator of the air ions. We have found that millimeter waves can interrogate the charge cloud on the dielectric material remotely. This concept was tested with a standoff millimeter wave system by monitoring the charge levels on a cardboard tube placed in an x-ray beam.

  5. Millimeter wave detection of nuclear radiation: An alternative detection mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Chien, H. T.; Heifetz, A.; Koehl, E. R.; Raptis, A. C.

    2009-08-15

    We present a nuclear radiation detection mechanism using millimeter waves as an alternative to conventional detection. It is based on the concept that nuclear radiation causes ionization of air and that if we place a dielectric material near the radiation source, it acts as a charge accumulator of the air ions. We have found that millimeter waves can interrogate the charge cloud on the dielectric material remotely. This concept was tested with a standoff millimeter wave system by monitoring the charge levels on a cardboard tube placed in an x-ray beam.

  6. Millimeter wave detection of nuclear radiation: An alternative detection mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalsami, N.; Chien, H. T.; Heifetz, A.; Koehl, E. R.; Raptis, A. C.

    2009-08-01

    We present a nuclear radiation detection mechanism using millimeter waves as an alternative to conventional detection. It is based on the concept that nuclear radiation causes ionization of air and that if we place a dielectric material near the radiation source, it acts as a charge accumulator of the air ions. We have found that millimeter waves can interrogate the charge cloud on the dielectric material remotely. This concept was tested with a standoff millimeter wave system by monitoring the charge levels on a cardboard tube placed in an x-ray beam.

  7. Millimeter wave detection of nuclear radiation: an alternative detection mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gopalsami, N; Chien, H T; Heifetz, A; Koehl, E R; Raptis, A C

    2009-08-01

    We present a nuclear radiation detection mechanism using millimeter waves as an alternative to conventional detection. It is based on the concept that nuclear radiation causes ionization of air and that if we place a dielectric material near the radiation source, it acts as a charge accumulator of the air ions. We have found that millimeter waves can interrogate the charge cloud on the dielectric material remotely. This concept was tested with a standoff millimeter wave system by monitoring the charge levels on a cardboard tube placed in an x-ray beam. PMID:19725673

  8. Millimeter wave spectra of carbonyl cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bteich, S. B.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2016-07-01

    Context. More than 30 cyanide derivatives of simple organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium, but only one dicarbonitrile has been found and that very recently. There is still a lack of high-resolution spectroscopic data particularly for dinitriles derivatives. The carbonyl cyanide molecule is a new and interesting candidate for astrophysical detection. It could be formed by the reaction of CO and CN radicals, or by substitution of the hydrogen atom by a cyano group in cyanoformaldehyde, HC(=O)CN, that has already been detected in the interstellar medium. Aims: The available data on the rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide is limited in terms of quantum number values and frequency range, and does not allow accurate extrapolation of the spectrum into the millimeter-wave range. To provide a firm basis for astrophysical detection of carbonyl cyanide we studied its millimeter-wave spectrum. Methods: The rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide was measured in the frequency range 152-308 GHz and analyzed using Watson's A- and S-reduction Hamiltonians. Results: The ground and first excited state of v5 vibrational mode were assigned and analyzed. More than 1100 distinct frequency lines of the ground state were fitted to produce an accurate set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants up to the eighth order. The frequency predictions based on these constants should be accurate enough for astrophysical searches in the frequency range up to 500 GHz and for transition involving energy levels with J ≤ 100 and Ka ≤ 42. Based on the results we searched for interstellar carbonyl cyanide in available observational data without success. Thus, we derived upper limits to its column density in different sources. This paper makes use of the following ALMA data: ADS/JAO.ALMA#2011.0.00009.SV. ALMA is a partnership of ESO (representing its member states), NSF (USA), and NINS (Japan) with NRC (Canada), NSC, and ASIAA (Taiwan), and KASI (Republic of

  9. Progress in millimeter-wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikner, David A.

    2011-03-01

    The field of millimeter-wave (MMW) imaging has progressed significantly over the last two decades. The most obvious evidence of this is the widespread use of MMW full-body scanners, now commonly found in airports. The path to this point has been the result of the work of a wide range of experts from many scientific and engineering disciplines. This article represents one perspective of this progress. The development of MMW imagers, and all their associated component technologies, image processing techniques, clever engineering, etc. has been driven by a relatively small number of interesting applications. It has been known for about 70 years that RF energy can be used to "see" through things like clouds and detect, for example, hostile aircraft. As the RF frequency goes up to 35, 100, or 340 GHz, it becomes possible to image through obscurants with much improved resolution. However, as frequency increases, attenuation increases as well, so selecting the right frequency for the application is an important point. The challenge of seeing through obscurants such as fog, smoke and dust drives one towards a MMW imaging solution. Typical applications include guiding aircraft through low visibility conditions, detecting nearby watercraft in the fog, and searching for concealed weapons. So, while these capabilities have been demonstrated numerous times over the years, the practical and affordable implementation of the systems to accomplish these goals is where the real story lies.

  10. The Millimeter-Wave Bolometric Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkov, Andrei; Ade, P. A.; Ali, S.; Bierman, E.; Bunn, E. F.; Calderon, C.; Gault, A. C.; Hyland, P. O.; Keating, B. G.; Kim, J.; Malu, S. S.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Murphy, J. A.; O'Sullivan, C.; Piccirillo, L.; Timbie, P. T.; Tucker, G. S.; Wandelt, B. D.

    2006-12-01

    We report on the status of the Millimeter-Wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI), an instrument designed for polarization measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). MBI combines the differencing capabilities of an interferometer with the high sensitivity of bolometers. The design of the ground-based four-channel version of the instrument with 7-degree-FOV corrugated horns (MBI-4) and first measurements results are discussed. Corrugated horn antennas with low sidelobes and nearly symmetric beam patterns minimize spurious instrumental polarization. The MBI-4 optical band is limited by filters with a central frequency of 90 GHz. The antenna separation is chosen so the instrument is sensitive over the multipole range l=150-270. In MBI-4, the signals from antennas are combined with a quasi-optical Fizeau beam combiner and interference fringes are detected by an array of spider-web bolometers with NTD germanium thermistors. In order to separate the visibility signals from the total power detected by each bolometer, the phase of the signal from each antenna is modulated by a ferrite-based waveguide phase shifter. First observations will be from the Pine Bluff Observatory outside Madison, WI. The project is supported by NASA.

  11. Millimeter-Wave Spectroscopy of Ethylmercury Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goubet, M.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2012-06-01

    The first millimeter-wave rotational spectrum of an organomercury compound, ethylmercury hydride (CH_3CH_2HgH), has been recorded using the Lille fast-scan spectrometer in the frequency range 120 -- 180 GHz. The spectroscopic study is complemented by quantum chemical calculations taking into account relativistic effects on the mercury atom. The very good agreement between theoretical and experimental molecular parameters validates the chosen ab initio method, in particular its capability to predict the accurate values of the quartic centrifugal distortion constants related to this type of compound. Estimations of the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants are not as predictive as the structural parameters but good enough to satisfy the spectroscopic needs. In addition, the orientation of the H--Hg--C bonds axis deduced from the experimental nuclear quadrupole coupling constants compares well with the corresponding ab initio value. From the good agreement between experimental and theoretical results, together with the observation of the six most abundant isotopes of mercury, ethylmercury hydride is unambiguously identified and its calculated equilibrium geometry is confirmed. Alekseev, E.A. et al. Radio Physics and Radio Astronomy 3 (2012) 78.

  12. Investigation of gigawatt millimeter wave source applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bruder, J.A.; Belcher, M.L.

    1991-09-01

    The Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) investigated potential applications of millimeter wave (MMW) sources with peak powers on the order of a gigawatt. This power level is representative of MMW devices such as the free electron laser (FEL) and the cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM) that are under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In addition to determining the technical requirements for these applications, the investigation considered potential users and how a high power MMW system would expand their current capabilities. Two of the more promising applications were examined in detail to include trade-off evaluations system parameters. The trade-off evaluations included overall system configuration, frequency and coherence, component availability, and performance estimates. Brainstorming sessions were held to try and uncover additional applications for a gigawatt MMW source. In setting up guidelines for the session, the need to attempt to predict applications for the years 2000 to 2030 was stressed. Also, possible non-DoD applications needed to be considered. While some of these applications could not in themselves justify the costs involved in the development of the radar system, they could be considered potential secondary applications of the system. As a result of the sessions, a number of interesting potential applications evolved including: space object identification; low angle tracking; illuminator for space-based radar; radio astronomy; space vehicle navigation; space debris location; atmospheric research; wind shear detection; electronic countermeasures; low observable detection; and long range detection via ducting.

  13. Passive millimeter wave simulation in blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakowski, Maciej

    Imaging in the millimeter wave (mmW) frequency range is being explored for applications where visible or infrared (IR) imaging fails, such as through atmospheric obscurants. However, mmW imaging is still in its infancy and imager systems are still bulky, expensive, and fragile, so experiments on imaging in real-world scenarios are difficult or impossible to perform. Therefore, a simulation system capable of predicting mmW phenomenology would be valuable in determining the requirements (e.g. resolution or noise floor) of an imaging system for a particular scenario and aid in the design of such an imager. Producing simulation software for this purpose is the objective of the work described in this thesis. The 3D software package Blender was modified to simulate the images produced by a passive mmW imager, based on a Geometrical Optics approach. Simulated imagery was validated against experimental data and the software was applied to novel imaging scenarios. Additionally, a database of material properties for use in the simulation was collected.

  14. Superconducting submillimeter and millimeter wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nahum, M.

    1992-10-20

    The series of projects described in this dissertation was stimulated by the discovery of high temperature superconductivity. Our goal was to develop useful applications which would be competitive with the current state of technology. The high-{Tc} microbolometer was developed into the most sensitive direct detector of millimeter waves, when operated at liquid nitrogen temperatures. The thermal boundary resistance of thin YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}0{sub 7-{delta}} films was subsequently measured and provided direct evidence for the bolometric response of high-{Tc} films to fast (ns) laser pulses. The low-{Tc} microbolometer was developed and used to make the first direct measurements of the frequency dependent optical efficiency of planar lithographed antennas. The hot-electron microbolometer was invented less than a year prior to the writing of this dissertation. Our analysis, presented here, indicates that it should be possible to attain up to two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than that of the best available direct detectors when operated at the same temperature. The temperature readout scheme for this device could also be used to measure the intrinsic interaction between electrons and phonons in a metal with a sensitivity that is five orders of magnitude better than in previous measurements. Preliminary measurements of quasiparticle trapping effects at the interface between a metal and a superconductor are also presented.

  15. Millimeter-wave radar sensing of airborne chemicals.

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Raptis, A. C.; Energy Technology

    2001-04-01

    This paper discusses the development of a millimeter-wave radar chemical sensor for applications in environmental monitoring and arms-control treaty verification. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of fingerprint-type molecular rotational signatures in the millimeter-wave spectrum to sense airborne chemicals. The millimeter-wave sensor, operating in the frequency range of 225-315 GHz, can work under all weather conditions and in smoky and dusty environments. The basic configuration of the millimeter-wave sensor is a monostatic swept-frequency radar that consists of a millimeter-wave sweeper, a hot-electron bolometer or Schottky barrier detector, and a corner-cube reflector. The chemical plume to be detected is situated between the transmitter/detector and reflector. Millimeter-wave absorption spectra of chemicals in the plume are determined by measuring the swept-frequency radar return signals with and without the plume in the beam path. The problem of pressure broadening, which hampered open-path spectroscopy in the past, has been mitigated in this paper by designing a fast sweeping source over a broad frequency range. The heart of the system is a backward-wave oscillator (BWO) tube that can be tuned over 220-350 GHz. Using the BWO tube, we built a millimeter-wave radar system and field-tested it at the Department of Energy Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat, near Mercury, NV, at a standoff distance of 60 m, The millimeter-wave system detected chemical plumes very well; detection sensitivity for polar molecules such as methylchloride was down to 12 ppm for a 4-m two-way pathlength.

  16. Detection of Explosives by Millimeter-wave Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2007-08-30

    Millimeter-wave imaging has emerged over the last several years as an effective method for screening people for non-metallic weapons, including explosives. Millimeter-waves are effective for personnel screening, since the waves pass through common clothing materials and are reflected by the human body and any concealed objects. Completely passive imaging systems have also been developed that rely on the natural thermal emission of millimeter-waves from the body and concealed objects. Millimeter-waves are non-ionizing and are harmless to people at low or moderate power levels. Active and passive imaging systems have been developed by several research groups, with several commercial imaging sensors becoming available recently. These systems provide images revealing concealed items, and as such, do not specifically identify detected materials. Rather, they provide indications of unusual concealed items. The design of practical, effective, high-speed (real-time or near real-time) imaging systems presents a number of scientific and engineering challenges, and this chapter will describe the current state-of-the-art in active and passive millimeter-wave imaging for personnel screening. Numerous imaging results are shown to demonstrate the effectiveness of the techniques described. The authors have been involved in the development of active wideband millimeter-wave imaging systems at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) since 1991.

  17. Millimeter-wave ICs for precision guided weapons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seashore, C. R.; Singh, D. R.

    1983-06-01

    Attention is given to the possibility to add precision guided weapons (PGW) with autonomous, all-weather capabilities based on millimeter wave sensors to the NATO forces within the next decade. Millimeter wave radar and radiometer sensors with capabilities for penetrating fog, clouds, haze, dust, and smoke are currently under development. It is pointed out that the central issue is not whether millimeter wave sensors will work in a tactical environment, but whether they can be produced in an affordable and timely fashion. It is believed that the sensor quantity and cost objectives will be satisfied. The needs and approaches for millimeter wave integrated circuit components and subassemblies for use in current precision guided weapon systems are discussed. The two main integrated circuit techniques include the hybrid and monolithic. In a production transceiver configuration, a mix between hybrid and monolithic appears to yield the best performance and seems to be most cost-effective.

  18. Millimeter-wave imaging for concealed weapon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2003-07-01

    Full body, real-time, millimeter-wave imaging systems have been developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the detection of body-worn, concealed weapons and contraband at security checkpoints. These security systems employ methods derived from microwave holography techniques that utilize phase and amplitude information recorded over a two-dimensional aperture to reconstruct a focused image of the target. Millimeter-wave imaging is well suited for the detection of concealed weapons or other contraband carried on personnel, since millimeter waves are non-ionizing, readily penetrate common clothing material, and are reflected from the human body and any concealed items. In this paper, wide-bandwidth, three-dimensional, holographic microwave imaging techniques and a full-body, planar, millimeter-wave imaging system are described.

  19. Millimeter-wave imaging for concealed weapon detection

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2003-07-16

    Full-body, real-time, millimeter-wave imaging systems have been developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the detection of body-worn, concealed weapons and contraband at security checkpoints. These security systems employ methods derived from microwave holography techniques that utilize phase and amplitude information recorded over a two-dimensional aperture to reconstruct a focused image of the target. Millimeter-wave imaging is well suited for the detection of concealed weapons or other contraband carried on personnel, since millimeter waves are non-ionizing, readily penetrate common clothing material, and are reflected from the human body and any concealed items. In this paper, wide-bandwidth, three-dimensional, holographic microwave imaging techniques and a full-body, planar, millimeter-wave imaging system are described.

  20. Monolithic millimeter-wave and picosecond electronic technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Talley, W.K.; Luhmann, N.C.

    1996-03-12

    Theoretical and experimental studies into monolithic millimeter-wave and picosecond electronic technologies have been undertaken as a collaborative project between the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California Department of Applied Science Coherent Millimeter-Wave Group under the auspices of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL. The work involves the design and fabrication of monolithic frequency multiplier, beam control, and imaging arrays for millimeter-wave imaging and radar, as well as the development of high speed nonlinear transmission lines for ultra-wideband radar imaging, time domain materials characterization and magnetic fusion plasma applications. In addition, the Coherent Millimeter-Wave Group is involved in the fabrication of a state-of-the-art X-band ({approximately}8-11 GHz) RF photoinjector source aimed at producing psec high brightness electron bunches for advanced accelerator and coherent radiation generation studies.

  1. An Ultra-Wideband Millimeter-Wave Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Markus H.; Miranda, Felix A.; Volakis, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Wideband millimeter-wave arrays are of increasing importance due to their growing use in high data rate systems, including 5G communication networks. In this paper, we present a new class of ultra-wideband millimeter wave arrays that operate from nearly 20 GHz to 90 GHz. The array is based on tightly coupled dipoles. Feeding designs and fabrication challenges are presented, and a method for suppressing feed resonances is provided.

  2. Radar applications of gigawatt sources at millimeter wave frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Bruder, J.A.; Belcher, M.L. . Research Inst.)

    1991-06-01

    The high transmit powers provided by free electron laser (FEL) sources in combination with the narrow antenna beamwidths achievable at millimeter wave (MMW) frequencies offer potential for use in a number of radar applications. Potential applications of high power millimeter wave sources include satellite imaging, low angle radar tracking, radar astronomy, and a number of other possible applications such as atmospheric research, space debris detection, and space vehicle tracking. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    KB Widener; K Johnson

    2005-01-30

    The millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) systems probe the extent and composition of clouds at millimeter wavelengths. The MMCR is a zenith-pointing radar that operates at a frequency of 35 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar will also report radar reflectivity (dBZ) of the atmosphere up to 20 km. The radar possesses a doppler capability that will allow the measurement of cloud constituent vertical velocities.

  4. The Millimeter-wave Bolometric Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyland, Peter Owen

    2008-12-01

    The Millimeter-wave Bolometeric Interferometer (MBI) is a novel instrument for measuring signals from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. MBI is a proof-of-concept designed to control systematic effects with the use of bolometers and interferometry. This scheme extends radio astronomy techniques of spatial interferometry, which rely on coherent receivers, to a system using incoherent detectors. In this thesis we outline the principles upon which MBI works and provide the reader with an understanding of both the particulars involved in the design and operation of MBI as well as the analysis of the resulting data. MBI observes the sky directly with 4 corrugated horn antennas in a band centered on l = 3 mm . A quasi-optical beam combiner forms interference fringes on an array of bolometers cooled to 300 mK. Phase modulation of the signals modulates the fringe patterns on the array and allows decoding of the visibilities formed by each pair of antennas. An altitude-azimuth mounting structure allows the horns to observe any point on the sky; rotation about the boresite extends the u - v coverage of the interferometer and allows for systematics checks and measurements of the Stokes parameters. MBI was deployed at the Pine Bluff Observatory near UW - Madison in winter 2008 for its first test observations of astronomical and artificial sources. Interference fringes were seen from a microwave generator located in the far- field, verifying our basic model of bolometric interferometry. Further analysis is needed to measure the scattering matrix of the instrument and to compare it against simulations.

  5. Cylindrical millimeter-wave imaging technique for concealed weapon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    1998-03-01

    A novel cylindrical millimeter-wave imaging technique has been developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the detection of metallic and non-metallic concealed weapons. This technique uses a vertical array of millimeter- wave antennas which is mechanically swept around a person in a cylindrical fashion. The wideband millimeter-wave data is mathematically reconstructed into a series of high- resolution images of the person being screened. Clothing is relatively transparent to millimeter-wave illumination,whereas the human body and concealed items are reflective at millimeter wavelengths. Differences in shape and reflectivity are revealed in the images and allow a human operator to detect and identify concealed weapons. A full 360 degree scan is necessary to fully inspect a person for concealed items. The millimeter-wave images can be formed into a video animation sequence in which the person appears to rotate in front of a fixed illumination source.This is s convenient method for presenting the 3D image data for analysis. This work has been fully sponsored by the FAA. An engineering prototype based on the cylindrical imaging technique is presently under development. The FAA is currently opposed to presenting the image data directly to the operator due to personal privacy concerns. A computer automated system is desired to address this problem by eliminating operator viewing of the imagery.

  6. Ferromagnetic Resonance on Micro- and Nanoferrites in Millimeter Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Konstantin; McCloy, John; Afsar, Mohammed

    2012-02-01

    Complex magnetic permeability and dielectric permittivity of micro- and nano-sized powdered barium ferrite (BaFe12O19) and strontium ferrite (SrFe12O19) have been studied in a broadband millimeter wave frequency range for the first time. Transmittance measurements have been performed using a free space quasi-optical millimeter wave spectrometer, equipped with a set of high power backward wave oscillators. Backward wave oscillators have been used as sources of tunable coherent radiation at each individual Q-, V- and W- frequency bands. Real and imaginary parts of dielectric permittivity for both types of micro- and nanoferrites have been calculated using analysis of recorded high precision transmittance spectra. Frequency dependences of the magnetic permeability have been obtained from Schl"omann's equation for partially magnetized ferrites. Tunable millimeter wave absorber, based on micro- and nano-sized powdered ferrite materials is presented.

  7. Amplifier based broadband pixel for sub-millimeter wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkozy, Stephen; Drewes, Jonathan; Leong, Kevin M. K. H.; Lai, Richard; Mei, X. B. (Gerry); Yoshida, Wayne; Lange, Michael D.; Lee, Jane; Deal, William R.

    2012-09-01

    Broadband sub-millimeter wave technology has received significant attention for potential applications in security, medical, and military imaging. Despite theoretical advantages of reduced size, weight, and power compared to current millimeter wave systems, sub-millimeter wave systems have been hampered by a fundamental lack of amplification with sufficient gain and noise figure properties. We report a broadband pixel operating from 300 to 340 GHz, biased off a single 2 V power supply. Over this frequency range, the amplifiers provide > 40 dB gain and <8 dB noise figure, representing the current state-of-art performance capabilities. This pixel is enabled by revolutionary enhancements to indium phosphide (InP) high electron mobility transistor technology, based on a sub-50 nm gate and indium arsenide composite channel with a projected maximum oscillation frequency fmax>1.0 THz. The first sub-millimeter wave-based images using active amplification are demonstrated as part of the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization Longe Range Personnel Imager Program. This development and demonstration may bring to life future sub-millimeter-wave and THz applications such as solutions to brownout problems, ultra-high bandwidth satellite communication cross-links, and future planetary exploration missions.

  8. Detecting Extrasolar Planets With Millimeter-Wave Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-01-01

    Do nearby stars have planetary systems like our own? How do such systems evolve? How common are such systems? Proposed radio observatories operating at millimeter wavelengths could start answering these questions within the next 6-10 years, according to scientists at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). Bryan Butler, Robert Brown, Richard Simon, Al Wootten and Darrel Emerson, all of NRAO, presented their findings today to the American Astronomical Society meeting in San Antonio, TX. Detecting planets circling other stars is a particularly difficult task, and only a few such planets have been discovered so far. In order to answer fundamental questions about planetary systems and their origin, scientists need to find and study many more extrasolar planets. According to the NRAO scientists, millimeter-wavelength observatories could provide valuable information about extrasolar planetary systems at all stages of their evolution. "With instruments planned by 2005, we could detect planets the size of Jupiter around a solar-type star out to a distance of 100 light-years," said Robert Brown, Associate Director of NRAO. "That means," he added, "that we could survey approximately 2,000 stars of different types to learn if they have planets this size." Millimeter waves occupy the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum between radio microwaves and infrared waves. Telescopes for observing at millimeter wavelengths utilize advanced electronic equipment similar to that used in radio telescopes observing at longer wavelengths. Millimeter-wave observatories offer a number of advantages in the search for extrasolar planets. Planned multi-antenna millimeter-wave telescopes can provide much higher resolving power, or ability to see fine detail, than current optical or infrared telescopes. Millimeter-wave observations would not be degraded by interference from the "zodiacal light" reflected by interplanetary dust, either in the extrasolar system or our own solar system

  9. ATS-F Comsat Millimeter Wave Propagation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westerlund, L. H.; Levatich, J. L.; Buige, A.

    1973-01-01

    The ATS-F Comsat Millimeter Wave Propagation Experiment has been designed to gather statistical data on the attenuation caused by rain at millimeter wave frequencies. These data will be used to determine system design parameters for future communications satellite systems operating at frequencies above 10 GHz. The experiment has 39 ground terminals transmitting at 13.2 or 17.8 GHz to a transponder on board the ATS-F satellite. The transponder retransmits these signals at 4 GHz to a central earth terminal which records their amplitudes once each second. The data will be analyzed to provide probabilities of attenuation as functions of parameters such as rainfall, location, and time. These probabilities can then be used to determine the required power margins of millimeter wave communications systems. Techniques of overcoming severe attenuation such as site diversity and the use of a spot beam to increase the power level at selected locations will also be evaluated.

  10. Millimeter-wave spectra of the Jovian planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Steffes, Paul G.

    1991-01-01

    The millimeter wave portion of the electromagnetic spectrum is critical for understanding the subcloud atmospheric structure of the Jovian planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune). This research utilizes a combination of laboratory measurements, computer modeling, and radio astronomical observation in order to obtain a better understanding of the millimeter-wave spectra of the Jovian planets. The pressure broadened absorption from gaseous ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was measured in the laboratory under simulated conditions for the Jovian atmospheres. Researchers developed new formalisms for computing the absorptivity of gaseous NH3 and H2S based on their laboratory measurements. They developed a radiative transfer and thermochemical model to predict the abundance and distribution of absorbing constituents in the Jovian atmospheres. They used the model to compute the millimeter wave emission from the Jovian planets.

  11. Millimeter-wave technology advances since 1985 and future trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinel, Holger H.

    1991-05-01

    The author focuses on finline or E-plane technology. Several examples, including AVES, a 61.5-GHz radar sensor for traffic data acquisition, are included. Monolithic integrated 60- and 94-GHz receiver circuits composed of a mixer and IF amplifier in compatible FET technology on GaAs are presented to show the state of the art in this area. A promising approach to the use of silicon technology for monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuits, called SIMMWIC, is described as well. As millimeter-wave technology has matured, increased interest has been generated for very specific applications: (1) commercial automotive applications such as intelligent cruise control and enhanced vision have attracted great interest, calling for a low-cost design approach; and (2) an almost classical application of millimeter-wave techniques is the field of radar seekers, e.g., for intelligent ammunitions, calling for high performance under extreme environmental conditions. Two examples fulfilling these requirements are described.

  12. Millimeter Wave Spectroscopy for Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Konstantin; Chen, Shu; Afsar, Mohammed; Naber, Stephen

    2009-03-01

    Broad-band millimeter wave transmittance measurements of normal and tumorous (cancerous) human breast tissue samples have been acquired in--vitro by employing a free-space, quasi-optical spectrometer. Freshly excised breast tissues were prepared and preserved in 10% neutral-buffered formalin solution before testing. Significant differences in the transmittance profiles have been found between the normal and tumorous tissues. It has been found that despite the inhomogeneity and variable structure and composition of each single tissue, the tumorous specimens consistently manifest much higher absorption level of millimeter wave radiation than the normal ones. It has been shown that free space, quasi-optical spectrometer is capable of contributing valuable insights into the dielectric properties of normal and tumorous human breast tissues and aiding in further developments of millimeter wave spectroscopy and mammography for the breast cancer diagnostics and detection.

  13. The influence of polarization on millimeter wave propagation through rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostian, C. W.; Stutzman, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    A program for the measurement and analysis of the depolarization and differential attenuation that occur when millimeter wave signals propagate through rain is described. Initial data are taken along a 1.43 km path at 17.65 GHz and a supporting theoretical model is developed to relate the propagation effects to rainfall rate and wind velocity. A block diagram of the overall experiment is included. It consists of: (1) an RF system (millimeter wave transmitter and receiver), (2) transmitting and receiving antennas, (3) a weather system with rain gauges, wind sensors, and drop counters, and (4) a digital control, processing, and data storage system.

  14. Millimeter-wave detection using resonant tunnelling diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, I.; Kidner, C.; East, J. R.; Haddad, G. I.

    1990-01-01

    A lattice-matched InGaAs/InAlAs resonant tunnelling diode is studied as a video detector in the millimeter-wave range. Tangential signal sensitivity and video resistance measurements are made as a function of bias and frequency. A tangential signal sensitivity of -37 dBm (1 MHz amplifier bandwidth) with a corresponding video resistance of 350 ohms at 40 GHz has been measured. These results appear to be the first millimeter-wave tangential signal sensitivity and video resistance results for a resonant tunnelling diode.

  15. Microsystem integration from RF to millimeter wave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vähä-Heikkilä, T.; Lahti, M.

    2015-05-01

    Radio frequency systems have been applied successfully to consumer products. Typically these radios operate up to 6 GHz. During recent years, interest towards microwave (up to 30 GHz) and millimeter wave frequencies (30 ... 300 GHz) has increased significantly. Technologies have been developed to have high performance microwave and millimeter wave components. On the other hand, integration and packaging technologies have not developed as fast while their importance is crucial especially in consumer applications. This presentation focuses to latest trends in wireless microsystem component integration and packaging trends backed up with demonstrators and measured results based on VTT's demonstrations.

  16. Low Noise Amplifier Receivers from Millimeter Wave Atmospheric Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Lim, Boon; Gaier, Todd; Tanner, Alan; Varonen, Mikko; Samoska, Lorene; Brown, Shannon; Lambrigsten, Bjorn; Reising, Steven; Tanabe, Jordan; Montes, Oliver; Dawson, Douglas; Parashare, Chaitali

    2012-01-01

    We currently achieve 3.4 dB noise figure at 183GHz and 2.1 dB noise figure at 90 GHz with our MMIC low noise amplifiers (LNAs) in room temperature. These amplifiers and the receivers we have built using them made it possible to conduct highly accurate airborne measurement campaigns from the Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle, develop millimeter wave internally calibrated radiometers for altimeter radar path delay correction, and build prototypes of large arrays of millimeter receivers for a geostationary interferometric sounder. We use the developed millimeter wave receivers to measure temperature and humidity profiles in the atmosphere and in hurricanes as well as to characterize the path delay error in ocean topography altimetry.

  17. MILLIMETER-WAVE MONITORING OF NUCLEAR WASTE GLASS MELTS - AN OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molten glass characteristics of temperature, resistivity, and viscosity can be monitored reliably in the high temperature and chemically corrosive environment of nuclear waste glass melters using millimeter-wave sensor technology. Millimeter-waves are ideally suited for such meas...

  18. The digital signal processor for the ALCOR millimeter wave radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, R. A.

    1980-11-01

    This report describes the use of an array processor for real time radar signal processing. Pulse compression, range marking, and monopulse error computation are some of the functions that will be performed in the array processor for the millimeter wave ALCOR radar augmentation. Real time software design, processor architecture, and system interfaces are discussed in the report.

  19. A Robust Waveguide Millimeter-Wave Noise Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehsan, Negar; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Solly, Michael; Macmurphy, Shawn; Lucey, Jared; Wollack, Edward

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a millimeter-wave noise source for the 160- 210 GHz frequency range. The noise source has been implemented in an E-split-block waveguide package and the internal circuitry was developed on a quartz substrate. The measured excess noise ratio at 200 GHz is 9.6 dB.

  20. A compendium of millimeter wave propagation studies performed by NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, R.; Rogers, D.; Bremer, J.

    1977-01-01

    Key millimeter wave propagation experiments and analytical results were summarized. The experiments were performed with the Ats-5, Ats-6 and Comstar satellites, radars, radiometers and rain gage networks. Analytic models were developed for extrapolation of experimental results to frequencies, locations, and communications systems.

  1. Active Millimeter-Wave and Sub-Millimeter-Wave Imaging for Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2011-09-02

    Active imaging at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths has been developed for security applications including concealed weapon detection. The physical properties that affect imaging performance are discussed along with a review of the current state-of-the-art and future potential for security imaging systems.

  2. Sensitivity of Josephson-effect millimeter-wave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohta, H.; Feldman, M. J.; Parrish, P. T.; Chiao, R. Y.

    1974-01-01

    The noise temperature and the minimum detectable temperature of a Josephson junction in video detection of microwave and millimeter-wave radiation has been calculated. We use the well-known method based on a Fokker-Planck equation. The noise temperature can be very close to ambient temperature. Because its predetection bandwidth is very wide, a Josephson-effect radio telescope receiver can have a minimum detectable temperature better than that of a traveling-wave maser.

  3. Millimeter wave technology III; Proceedings of the Meeting, Arlington, VA, April 9, 10, 1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltse, J. C.

    Various papers on millimeter wave technology are presented. The subjects addressed include: high-power millimeter and submillimeter wave lasers and gyrotrons, GaAs IMPATT sources, InP Gunn diode sources, phase and frequency control of millimeter wave source, the Fresnel zone-plate lens, uniform waveguide leaky wave antennas, microstrip dipole antennas on electrically thick substrates, measurement of antenna patterns at 94 GHz using infrared detection, and transitions in open millimeter waveguides. Also discussed are: millimeter wave subassembly packaging techniques, recent advances in millimeter wave integrated circuits and subsystems, millimeter wave active solid state devices, applications of millimeter wave imaging, contrast reversal in MMW radiometric imaging, detection of stationary ground targets by airborne MMW radars, millimeter wave polarimetric background measurements, coherent 96 GHz high power radar, high-resolution 986 GHz FM-CW solid state radar, integrated circuit radar and radiometric sensors, millimeter-wave six-ports, atmospheric turbulence measuring system, near-millimeter wave propagation instrumentation, and millimeter wave measurement by Fabry-Perot.

  4. Millimeter wave technology III; Proceedings of the Meeting, Arlington, VA, April 9, 10, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltse, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Various papers on millimeter wave technology are presented. The subjects addressed include: high-power millimeter and submillimeter wave lasers and gyrotrons, GaAs IMPATT sources, InP Gunn diode sources, phase and frequency control of millimeter wave source, the Fresnel zone-plate lens, uniform waveguide leaky wave antennas, microstrip dipole antennas on electrically thick substrates, measurement of antenna patterns at 94 GHz using infrared detection, and transitions in open millimeter waveguides. Also discussed are: millimeter wave subassembly packaging techniques, recent advances in millimeter wave integrated circuits and subsystems, millimeter wave active solid state devices, applications of millimeter wave imaging, contrast reversal in MMW radiometric imaging, detection of stationary ground targets by airborne MMW radars, millimeter wave polarimetric background measurements, coherent 96 GHz high power radar, high-resolution 986 GHz FM-CW solid state radar, integrated circuit radar and radiometric sensors, millimeter-wave six-ports, atmospheric turbulence measuring system, near-millimeter wave propagation instrumentation, and millimeter wave measurement by Fabry-Perot.

  5. Circularly polarized millimeter-wave imaging for personnel screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Lechelt, Wayne M.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.

    2005-05-01

    A novel polarimetric millimeter-wave imaging technique has been developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for concealed weapon detection applications. Wideband millimeter-wave imaging systems developed at PNNL utilize low-power, coherent, millimeter-wave illumination in the 10-100 GHz range to form high-resolution images of personnel. Electromagnetic waves in these frequency ranges easily penetrate most clothing materials and are reflected from the body and any concealed items. Three-dimensional images are formed using computer image reconstruction algorithms developed to mathematically focus the received wavefronts scattered from the target. Circular polarimetric imaging can be employed to obtain additional information from the target. Circularly polarized waves incident on relatively smooth reflecting targets are typically reversed in their rotational handedness, e.g. left-hand circular polarization (LHCP) is reflected to become right-hand circular polarization (RHCP). An incident wave that is reflected twice (or any even number) of times prior to returning to the transceiver, has its handedness preserved. Sharp features such as wires and edges tend to return linear polarization, which can be considered to be a sum of both LHCP and RHCP. These characteristics can be exploited for personnel screening by allowing differentiation of smooth features, such as the body, and sharper features present in many concealed items. Additionally, imaging artifacts due to multipath can be identified and eliminated. Laboratory imaging results have been obtained in the 10-20 GHz frequency range and are presented in this paper.

  6. Circularly Polarized Millimeter-Wave Imaging for Personnel Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Lechelt, Wayne M.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.

    2005-08-01

    A novel polarimetric millimeter-wave imaging technique has been developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for concealed weapon detection applications. Wideband millimeter-wave imaging systems developed at PNNL utilize low-power, coherent, millimeter-wave illumination in the 10-100 GHz range to form high-resolution images of personnel. Electromagnetic waves in these frequency ranges easily penetrate most clothing materials and are reflected from the body and any concealed items. Three-dimensional images are formed using computer image reconstruction algorithms developed to mathematically focus the received wavefronts scattered from the target. Circular polarimetric imaging can be employed to obtain additional information from the target. Circularly polarized waves incident on relatively smooth reflecting targets are typically reversed in their rotational handedness, e.g. left-hand circular polarization (LHCP) is reflected to become right-hand circular polarization (RHCP). An incident wave that is reflected twice (or any even number) of times prior to returning to the transceiver, has its handedness preserved. Sharp features such as wires and edges tend to return linear polarization, which can be considered to be a sum of both LHCP and RHCP. These characteristics can be exploited for personnel screening by allowing differentiation of smooth features, such as the body, and sharper features present in many concealed items. Additionally, imaging artifacts due to multipath can be identified and eliminated. Laboratory imaging results have been obtained in the 10-20 GHz frequency range and are presented in this paper.

  7. Millimeter-wave sensor image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.; Suess, Helmut

    1989-01-01

    Images of an airborne, scanning, radiometer operating at a frequency of 98 GHz, have been analyzed. The mm-wave images were obtained in 1985/1986 using the JPL mm-wave imaging sensor. The goal of this study was to enhance the information content of these images and make their interpretation easier for human analysis. In this paper, a visual interpretative approach was used for information extraction from the images. This included application of nonlinear transform techniques for noise reduction and for color, contrast and edge enhancement. Results of the techniques on selected mm-wave images are presented.

  8. Millimeter-wave Sensor Image Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.; Suess, Helmut

    1988-01-01

    Images of an airborne scanning radiometer operating at a frequency of 98 GHz were analyzed. The mm wave images were obtained using the JPL mm wave imaging sensor. The goal was to enhance the information content of these images and make their interpretation easier for human analysis. A visual interpretative approach was used for information extraction from the images. This included application of nonlinear transform techniques for noise reduction and for color, contrast, and edge enhancement. Results of the techniques on selected mm wave images are shown.

  9. Experimental millimeter-wave satellite communications system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masaaaki; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Arimoto, Yoshinori; Inoue, Akihiko; Kobayashi, Hideki; Okubo, Naofumi

    A 43/38 GHz (mm-wave) bands satellite communications experimental system featuring GEO/LEO and GEO/GEO intersatellite communications and personal communications is discussed in light of detailed performance data on the electrical model of the mm-wave transponder. Attention is given to the state-of-the-art solid-state power amplifiers, low-noise amplifiers, and personal communications terminal employed in these experiments.

  10. Nondestructive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy using dielectric focusing probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejase, Jose A.; Shane, Steven S.; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet

    2014-02-01

    A tool for interrogating objects over a wide band of frequencies with subwavelength resolution at small standoff distances (near field region) in the transmission mode using a single source and detector measurement setup in the millimeter wave band is presented. The design utilizes optics like principles for guiding electromagnetic millimeter waves from large cross-sectional areas to considerably smaller sub-wavelength areas. While plano-convex lenses can be used to focus waves to a fine resolution, they usually require a large stand-off distance thus resulting in alignment and spacing issues. The design procedure and simulation analysis of the focusing probes are presented in this study along with experimental verification of performance and imaging and spectroscopy examples. Nondestructive evaluation will find benefit from such an apparatus including biological tissue imaging, electronic package integrity testing, composite dielectric structure evaluation for defects and microfluidic sensing.

  11. Nondestructive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy using dielectric focusing probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hejase, Jose A.; Shane, Steven S.; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet

    2014-02-18

    A tool for interrogating objects over a wide band of frequencies with subwavelength resolution at small standoff distances (near field region) in the transmission mode using a single source and detector measurement setup in the millimeter wave band is presented. The design utilizes optics like principles for guiding electromagnetic millimeter waves from large cross-sectional areas to considerably smaller sub-wavelength areas. While plano-convex lenses can be used to focus waves to a fine resolution, they usually require a large stand-off distance thus resulting in alignment and spacing issues. The design procedure and simulation analysis of the focusing probes are presented in this study along with experimental verification of performance and imaging and spectroscopy examples. Nondestructive evaluation will find benefit from such an apparatus including biological tissue imaging, electronic package integrity testing, composite dielectric structure evaluation for defects and microfluidic sensing.

  12. High performance millimeter-wave microstrip circulators and isolators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Ming; Pan, J. J.

    1990-01-01

    Millimeter wave systems, phased array antennas, and high performance components all require wideband circulators (and isolators) to perform diplexing and switching, to improve isolation and Voltage Standing Wave Ratio (VSWR), and to construct IMPATT diode reflection amplifiers. Presently, most of the millimeter-wave circulators and isolators are available in the configurations of waveguide or stripline, both of which suffer from the shortcomings of bulky size/weight, narrow bandwidth, and poor compatibility with monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuits (MMIC). MMW microstrip circulators/isolators can eliminate or improve these shortcomings. Stub-tuned microstrip circulator configuration were developed utilizing the electromagnetic fields perturbation technique, the adhesion problems of microstrip metallization on new ferrite substrate were overcome, the fabrication, assembly, packaging techniques were improved, and then successfully designed, fabricated a Ka band circulator which has isolation and return loss of greater than 16dB, insertion loss less than 0.7dB. To assess the steady and reliable performance of the circulator, a temperature cycling test was done over the range of -20 to +50 C for 3 continuous cycles and found no significant impact or variation of circulator performance.

  13. Electronically steerable millimeter-wave antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.; Jose, K. A.; Kelly, James F.

    1994-05-01

    In this paper, electronically steerable microstrip and leaky wave antennas using tunable ferroelectric material are proposed. These antennas are lightweight, low volume, low profile, and conformal. They have low fabrication costs and are easily mass produced. They are thin and do not perturb the aerodynamics of a host automobile or aircraft. Linear, circular, and dual polarization are achieved with simple changes in feed position. Beam steering is accomplished by varying the relative phase between radiating elements. In planar array, both horizontal and vertical beam can be combined to provide full scanning capabilities. Tunable ceramic phase shifters are used in these antennas. In microstrip antennas, they are deposited as thin films on the feed lines whereas in the leaky wave antennas they have been used as a traveling waveguide with a ground plane on one side and metallic periodic grating on the opposite side. The dielectric properties of the ferroelectric material are changed by a bias voltage applied to the waveguide which in turn controls the leaky wave direction of the antenna. A simple experiment is presented which shows a good agreement with the theoretical prediction.

  14. Millimeter-wave spectroscopy of the SiCl+ ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kazuki; Masuda, Satoshi; Harada, Kensuke; Tanaka, Keiichi

    2016-05-01

    The millimeter-wave spectrum of the SiCl+ ion in the ground and first excited vibrational states was observed for the two isotopic (35Cl and 37Cl) species. The ion was generated in a free-space absorption cell by a hollow cathode discharge of SiCl4 diluted with He and discriminated from neutral species by the magnetic field effect on the absorption lines. The observed millimeter-wave spectrum was combined with a previously reported diode laser spectrum in an analysis to determine mass-independent Dunham coefficients as well as the mass scaling parameters. The equilibrium bond length of SiCl+ determined is re = 1.943 978(2) Å.

  15. Millimeter-wave high-resolution holographic surveillance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Sheen, David M.; Collins, H. D.; Hall, Thomas E.; Smith, Russell R.

    1994-03-01

    A prototype millimeter wave holographic surveillance system has been developed and demonstrated at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The prototype millimeter wave holographic surveillance system developed at PNL consists of a sequentially switched 2 X 64 element array coupled to a 35 GHz bi-static transceiver. The sequentially switched array of antennas can be used to obtain the holographic data at high speed by electronically sequencing the antennas along one dimension and performing a mechanical scan along the other dimension. A 1D mechanical scan can be performed in about one second. The prototype system scans an aperture of 0.75 by 2.05 m. This system has been demonstrated and images have been obtained on volunteers at Sea-Tac International airport in Seattle, Washington.

  16. Millimeter-wave generation with spiraling electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulke, B.

    1971-01-01

    The feasibility of using the interaction between a thin, solid, spiraling electron beam of 10 to 20 kV energy and a microwave cavity to generate watts of CW millimeter-wave power was investigated. Experimental results are given for several prototype devices operating at 9.4 GHz and at 94 GHz. Power outputs of 5 W, and electronic efficiencies near 3%, were obtained at X band, and moderate gain was obtained at 94 GHz. The small-signal theory gives a good fit to the X-band data, and the device behavior at 94 GHz is as expected from the given beam characteristics. The performance is limited chiefly by the velocity spread in the spiraling electron beam, and once this can be brought under control, high-power generation of millimeter waves appears quite feasible with this type of device.

  17. RF to millimeter wave integration and module technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vähä-Heikkilä, T.

    2015-04-01

    Radio Frequency (RF) consumer applications have boosted silicon integrated circuits (IC) and corresponding technologies. More and more functions are integrated to ICs and their performance is also increasing. However, RF front-end modules with filters and switches as well as antennas still need other way of integration. This paper focuses to RF front-end module and antenna developments as well as to the integration of millimeter wave radios. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed both Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramics (LTCC) and Integrated Passive Devices (IPD) integration platforms for RF and millimeter wave integrated modules. In addition to in-house technologies, VTT is using module and component technologies from other commercial sources.

  18. Estimates of millimeter wave attenuation for 18 United States cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, K. C.; Liebe, H. J.; Rush, C. M.

    1983-05-01

    Brief discussions of three mechanisms that attenuate millimeter waves in the atmosphere are presented: rain attenuation, clear air absorption, and atmospheric multipath. Propagation models were combined with meteorological statistics to obtain estimates of average year attenuation distributions for 18 cities in the United States. The estimates are presented in such a way to elucidate the restrictions on system parameters required for reliable operation, i.e. frequency, path length for terrestrial paths, and path elevation angle for earth-satellite paths. The variation imposed by the diverse climates within the United States is demonstrated. Generally, in regions that have humid climates, millimeter wave systems perform less favorably than in areas where arid or semi-arid conditions prevail.

  19. Millimeter-wave sensing of the environment: A bibliographic survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, E.; Epstein, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    This literature survey was conducted to examine the field of millimeter wave remote sensing of the environment and collect all relevant observations made in the atmospheric windows near 90, 140, and 230 GHz of ocean, terrain, man-made features, and the atmosphere. Over 170 articles and reports were examined; bibliographic references are provided for all and abstracts are quoted when available. Selected highlights were extracted from the pertinent articles.

  20. Millimeter-wave structures and drivers for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A.; Kang, Y.W.; Song, J.J.

    2000-07-24

    There is a growing interest in the development of very high gradient ({ge} GeV/meter) accelerating structures and millimeter-wave power sources. The need for very high gradient structures to be operated in W-band or at higher frequencies poses great technical challenges and demands innovations in rf science and technology to reach this goal. Requirements for microstructure fabrication and power sources based on deep x-ray lithography techniques are examined.

  1. High power millimeter wave ECRH source needs for fusion program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    This document stems from the four-day Gyrotron Symposium held at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters on June 13-16, 1983, and serves as a position paper for the Office of Fusion Energy, DOE, on high-power millimeter wave source development for Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) of plasmas. It describes the fusion program needs for gyrotron as ECH sources, their current status, and desirable development strategies.

  2. Polydimethylsiloxane membranes for millimeter-wave planar ultra flexible antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiercelin, Nicolas; Coquet, Philippe; Sauleau, Ronan; Senez, Vincent; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2006-11-01

    We present here the use of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes as a new soft polymer substrate (ɛr ap 2.67 at 77 GHz) for the realization of ultra-flexible millimeter-wave printed antennas thanks to the extremely low Young's modulus (EPDMS < 2 MPa). Ultimately this peculiar property enables one to design wide-angle mechanically beam-steering antennas and flexible conformal antennas. The experimental characterization of PDMS material in V- and W-bands highlights high loss tangent values (tanδ ap 0.04 at 77 GHz). Thus micromachining techniques have been developed to reduce dielectric losses for antenna applications at millimeter waves. Here the antenna performance is demonstrated in the 60 GHz band by considering a single microstrip patch antenna supported by a PDMS membrane over an air-filled cavity. After a brief description of the design approach using the method of moments (MoM) and the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique, the technological processes are described in detail. The input impedance and radiation patterns of the prototype are in good agreement with numerical simulations. The radiation efficiency of the micromachined antenna is equal to 60% and is in the same order as that obtained with conventional polymer bulk substrates such as Duroids. These results confirm the validity of the new technological process and assembly procedure, and demonstrate that PDMS membranes can be used to realize low-loss planar membrane-supported millimeter-wave printed circuits and radiating structures.

  3. Millimeter wave, high-resolution, holographic surveillance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMakin, D. L.; Sheen, D. M.; Collins, H. D.; Hall, T. E.; Smith, R. R.; Droppo, J. G., Jr.

    Millimeter wave holographic imaging systems capable of imaging through clothing to detect contraband, metal, plastic, or ceramic weapons may provided a practical solution to personnel inspection needs in mass transportation centers. Traditional inspection systems, such as metal detectors and x-ray imaging systems, have limitations for the detection of concealed weapons. Metal detectors are limited because they cannot detect plastic weapons and x-ray imaging systems are limited in use due to radiological health considerations. A prototype millimeter wave holographic surveillance system has been developed and demonstrated at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The prototype millimeter wave holographic surveillance system developed at PNL consists of a sequentially switched 2 (times) 64 element array coupled to a 35 GHz bi-static transceiver. The sequentially switched array of antennas can be used to obtain the holographic data at high speed by electronically sequencing the antennas along one dimension and performing a mechanical scan along the other dimension. A one-dimensional mechanical scan be be performed in about one second. The prototype system scans an aperture of 0.75 by 2.05. This system has been demonstrated and images have been obtained on volunteers at Sea-Tac International airport in Seattle, Washington.

  4. Millimeter wave, high-resolution, holographic surveillance system

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, D.L.; Sheen, D.M.; Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.; Smith, R.R.; Droppo, J.G. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    Millimeter wave holographic imaging systems capable of imaging through clothing to detect contraband, metal, plastic, or ceramic weapons may provided a practical solution to personnel inspection needs in mass transportation centers. Traditional inspection systems, such as metal detectors and x-ray imaging systems, have limitations for the detection of concealed weapons. metal detectors are limited because they cannot detect plastic weapons and x-ray imaging systems are limited in use due to radiological health considerations. A prototype millimeter wave holographic surveillance system has been developed and demonstrated at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The prototype millimeter wave holographic surveillance system developed at PNL consists of a sequentially switched 2 {times} 64 element array coupled to a 35 GHz bi-static transceiver. The sequentially switched array of antennas can be used to obtain the holographic data at high speed by electonically sequencing the antennas along one dimension and performing a mechanical scan along the other dimension. A one-dimensional mechanical scan be be performed in about one second. The prototype system scans an aperture of 0.75 by 2.05. This system has been demonstrated and images have been obtained on volunteers at Sea-Tac International airport in Seattle, Washington.

  5. A Three-Frequency Feed for Millimeter-Wave Radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Khayatian, Behrouz; Sosnowski, John B.; Johnson, Alan K.; Bruneau, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    A three-frequency millimeter-wave feed horn was developed as part of an advanced component technology task that provides components necessary for higher-frequency radiometers to meet the needs of the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. The primary objectives of SWOT are to characterize ocean sub-mesoscale processes on 10-km and larger scales in the global oceans, and to measure the global water storage in inland surface water bodies, including rivers, lakes, reservoirs, and wetlands. In this innovation, the feed provides three separate output ports in the 87-to- 97-GHz, 125-to-135-GHz, and 161-to-183- GHz bands; WR10 for the 90-GHz channel, WR8 for the 130-GHz channel, and WR5 for the 170-GHz channel. These ports are in turn connected to individual radiometer channels that will also demonstrate component technology including new PIN-diode switches and noise diodes for internal calibration integrated into each radiometer front end. For this application, a prime focus feed is required with an edge taper of approximately 20 dB at an illumination angle of 40 deg. A single polarization is provided in each band. Preliminary requirements called for a return loss of better than 15 dB, which is achieved across all three bands. Good pattern symmetry is also obtained throughout all three-frequency bands. This three-frequency broadband millimeter-wave feed also minimizes mass and provides a common focal point for all three millimeter-wave bands.

  6. Wideband RF Structure for Millimeter Wave TWTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earley, Lawrence; Carlsten, Bruce; Krawczyk, Frank; Potter, James; Sigler, Floyd; Smirnova, Evgenia; Wheat, Robert; Heath, Cynthia; Bailey, Aimee

    2006-01-01

    LANL has developed a new vane loaded waveguide RF structure for a sheet electron beam traveling wave tube (TWT). The goal was to create a new class of wideband RF structures that allow simple mechanical fabrication and have geometry suitable for interaction with sheet electron beams. We have concentrated on structures at 94 GHz. We have achieved 6% bandwidth and believe that 10% is possible. We have performed 3D electromagnetic simulations using the codes Microwave Studio and HFSS, and fabricated several aluminium cold models of RF structures at 10GHz to confirm the design. Agreement between the 10 GHz cold test data and computer simulations was excellent. An RF structure at 94GHz was fabricated using electrical discharge machining (EDM) with a 0.004 inch wire and cold tested.

  7. Detecting Extrasolar Planets With Millimeter-Wave Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-01-01

    Do nearby stars have planetary systems like our own? How do such systems evolve? How common are such systems? Proposed radio observatories operating at millimeter wavelengths could start answering these questions within the next 6-10 years, according to scientists at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). Bryan Butler, Robert Brown, Richard Simon, Al Wootten and Darrel Emerson, all of NRAO, presented their findings today to the American Astronomical Society meeting in San Antonio, TX. Detecting planets circling other stars is a particularly difficult task, and only a few such planets have been discovered so far. In order to answer fundamental questions about planetary systems and their origin, scientists need to find and study many more extrasolar planets. According to the NRAO scientists, millimeter-wavelength observatories could provide valuable information about extrasolar planetary systems at all stages of their evolution. "With instruments planned by 2005, we could detect planets the size of Jupiter around a solar-type star out to a distance of 100 light-years," said Robert Brown, Associate Director of NRAO. "That means," he added, "that we could survey approximately 2,000 stars of different types to learn if they have planets this size." Millimeter waves occupy the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum between radio microwaves and infrared waves. Telescopes for observing at millimeter wavelengths utilize advanced electronic equipment similar to that used in radio telescopes observing at longer wavelengths. Millimeter-wave observatories offer a number of advantages in the search for extrasolar planets. Planned multi-antenna millimeter-wave telescopes can provide much higher resolving power, or ability to see fine detail, than current optical or infrared telescopes. Millimeter-wave observations would not be degraded by interference from the "zodiacal light" reflected by interplanetary dust, either in the extrasolar system or our own solar system

  8. Millimeter wave satellite concepts. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsen, N. B.; Holland, L. D.; Wallace, R. W.; Kelly, D. L.; Thomas, R. E.; Gallagher, J. J.; Vogler, F. H.

    1979-01-01

    The objectives of the program were: (1) development of methodology based on the technical requirements of potential services that might be assigned to millimeter wave bands for identifying the viable and appropriate technologies for future NASA millimeter research and development programs, and (2) testing of this methodology with user applications and services. The scope of the program included the entire communications network, both ground and space subsystems. The reports include: (1) cost, weight, and performance models for the subsystems, (2) conceptual design for point-to-point and broadcast communications satellites, (3) analytic relationships between subsystem parameters and an overall link performance, (4) baseline conceptual systems, (5) sensitivity studies, (6) model adjustment analyses, (7) identification of critical technologies and their risks, (8) brief R&D program scenarios for the technologies judged to be moderate or extensive risks.

  9. Target contrast considerations in millimeter wave radiometry for airborne navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, A.

    1971-01-01

    Target signal requirements for aircraft navigation systems that use radiometric receivers which map thermally emitted power radiated by terrain or power radiated by ground-based beacons are discussed. For selected millimeter wavelength bands, microwaves suffer relatively little degradation by absorption or scattering on passage through the atmosphere, despite extreme weather variations. Interest centers on 8-millimeter waves because of component availability, portability (small size), high image resolution, and all-weather capability at this wavelength. The idea of radiometric airborne navigation is introduced. Elements of radiometry, terrain radiation, and atmospheric transmission characteristics are reviewed. Data pertaining to these elements at 8 mm wavelength are collected. Calculation of radiometric contrasts is discussed for some simple models of terrain targets.

  10. Millimeter-wave and terahertz integrated circuit antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebeiz, Gabriel M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive review of integrated circuit antennas suitable for millimeter and terahertz applications. A great deal of research was done on integrated circuit antennas in the last decade and many of the problems associated with electrically thick dielectric substrates, such as substrate modes and poor radiation patterns, have been understood and solved. Several new antennas, such as the integrated horn antenna, the dielectric-filled parabola, the Fresnel plate antenna, the dual-slot antenna, and the log-periodic and spiral antennas on extended hemispherical lenses, have resulted in excellent performance at millimeter-wave frequencies, and are covered in detail in this paper. Also, a review of the efficiency definitions used with planar antennas is given in detail in the appendix.

  11. Millimeter wave planar integrated circuit developments for communication applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, K.; Sun, C.

    Millimeter wave communication systems offer certain advantages over lower frequency systems. These advantages are related to wider bandwidth, larger data handling capacity, covert operation, and better immunity to jamming. Newer developments in the area of component technology for systems operating at millimeter wavelengths have utilized planar integrated circuits. Such circuits provide benefits of light weight, small size, and inherent low cost due to ease of high volume manufacturing. The present paper is concerned with a number of key IC components which have been developed. These components are ideally suited for direct application in advanced tactical, radar, and satellite communication systems. Attention is given to a rat-race microstrip balanced mixer, a crossbar stripline balanced mixer, and various subsystems developments.

  12. Remote detection of chemicals by millimeter-wave spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Raptis, A.C.

    1998-09-01

    This paper discusses the development and field testing of a remote chemical detection system that is based on millimeter-wave (mm-wave) spectroscopy. The mm-wave system is a monostatic swept-frequency radar that consists of a mm-wave sweeper, a hot-electron-bolometer detector, and a trihedral reflector. The chemical plume to be detected is situated between the transmitter/detector and the reflector. Millimeter-wave absorption spectra of chemicals in the plume are determined by measuring the swept-frequency radar return signals with and without the plume in the beam path. The problem of pressure broadening, which hampered open-path spectroscopy in the past, has been mitigated in this work by designing a fast sweeping source over a broad frequency range. The heart of the system is a Russian backward-wave oscillator (BWO) tube that can be tuned over 225--315 GHz. A mm-wave sweeper that includes the BWO tube was built to sweep the entire frequency range within 10 ms. The radar system was field-tested at the DOE Nevada Test Site at a standoff distance of 60 m. Methyl chloride was released from a wind tunnel that produced a 2-m diameter plume at its exit point. The mm-wave system detected methyl chloride plumes down to a concentration of 12 ppm. The measurement results agree well with model-fitted data. Remote or standoff sensing of airborne chemicals is gaining importance for arms control and treaty verification, intelligence collection, and environmental monitoring.

  13. Laminated metamaterial flat lens at millimeter-wave frequencies.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Daisuke; Yaita, Makoto; Song, Ho-Jin

    2015-09-01

    A flat and thin shape is obviously advantageous not only in terms of reducing the volume of a device, but also in handling and using it. Particularly, laminating or stacking flat devices is an intuitive and straightforward way of tailoring performance and functions. Here, we experimentally demonstrated a laminated flat lens for millimeter-wave frequencies that is based on split-ring resonators (SRRs) composed of multiple layers with different and/or identical index profiles and that exhibits characteristics that are linear combinations of those of the individual lenses. Since the characteristics of the lenses of each layer are preserved regardless of the neighbouring layers, the desired functionalities can be easily implemented simply by laminating elementary lenses designed already. When we laminated two lenses designed for bending or focusing incoming waves at 120 GHz, we clearly observed that the outgoing waves collimated and bended as desired. PMID:26368436

  14. Investigation of the Millimeter-Wave Plasma Assisted CVD Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Vikharev, A; Gorbachev, A; Kozlov, A; Litvak, A; Bykov, Y; Caplan, M

    2005-07-21

    A polycrystalline diamond grown by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique is recognized as a unique material for high power electronic devices owing to unrivaled combination of properties such as ultra-low microwave absorption, high thermal conductivity, high mechanical strength and chemical stability. Microwave vacuum windows for modern high power sources and transmission lines operating at the megawatt power level require high quality diamond disks with a diameter of several centimeters and a thickness of a few millimeters. The microwave plasma-assisted CVD technique exploited today to produce such disks has low deposition rate, which limits the availability of large size diamond disk windows. High-electron-density plasma generated by the millimeter-wave power was suggested for enhanced-growth-rate CVD. In this paper a general description of the 30 GHz gyrotron-based facility is presented. The output radiation of the gyrotron is converted into four wave-beams. Free localized plasma in the shape of a disk with diameter much larger than the wavelength of the radiation is formed in the intersection area of the wave-beams. The results of investigation of the plasma parameters, as well as the first results of diamond film deposition are presented. The prospects for commercially producing vacuum window diamond disks for high power microwave devices at much lower costs and processing times than currently available are outlined.

  15. The influence of polarization on millimeter wave propagation through rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostian, C. W.; Stutzman, W. L.; Wiley, P. H.; Marshall, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The limitations which precipitation depolarization will place on future millimeter wave earth-satellite communications systems employing orthogonal-polarization frequency sharing was studied and the possibility of improving the fade resistance of such systems either through polarization diversity operation or by the choice of the polarization(s) least subject to attenuation was examined. Efforts were confined largely to ground-based communications systems investigated during a twenty-seven month period. Plans to extend the theoretical results to satellite systems are discussed.

  16. Space-based millimeter-wave debris tracking radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Kai; Pollock, Michael A.; Skrehot, Michael K.

    1991-01-01

    NORAD system currently tracks and predicts orbits of space objects of 80 mm or larger in diameter. The small debris of less than 80 mm, traveling at high speed, could cause damage to Space Station or space vehicles. To overcome this problem, a 35 GHz space-based millimeter-wave radar system is proposed to track the particles ranging in size from 4 mm to 80 mm up to a range of 25 Km. The system requires a large phased array which should be developed in monolithic circuits for cost reduction.

  17. Precise measurement techniques of millimeter-wave power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.

    1981-06-01

    Precise power measurement techniques in the millimeter-wave region are described, with attention to a calorimetric method based on thermal balance control, on the basis of which a calorimeter for measuring effective bolometer mount efficiency has been developed. Automatic power measurement systems which incorporate digital techniques are also designed and developed, and two types of circular bolometer mount having high effective efficiency in the 100 GHz band are described. For the case of the 30 GHz band, a method which employs a coupler as a comparator and quarter-wavelength spacer is proposed which significantly reduces the influence of impedance mismatch.

  18. Millimeter-wave/infrared rectenna development at Georgia Tech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouker, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    The key design issues of the Millimeter Wave/Infrared (MMW/IR) monolithic rectenna have been resolved. The work at Georgia Tech in the last year has focused on increasing the power received by the physically small MMW rectennas in order to increase the rectification efficiency. The solution to this problem is to place a focusing element on the back side of the substrate. The size of the focusing element can be adjusted to help maintain the optimum input power density not only for different power densities called for in various mission scenarios, but also for the nonuniform power density profile of a narrow EM-beam.

  19. On the mechanisms of interaction of low-intensity millimeter waves with biological objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betskii, O. V.

    1994-01-01

    The interaction of low-intensity millimeter-band electromagnetic waves with biological objects is examined. These waves are widely used in medical practice as a means of physiotherapy for the treatment of various human disorders. Principal attention is given to the mechanisms through which millimeter waves act on the human organism.

  20. Optical techniques for millimeter-wave detection and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Christopher Arnim

    The benefits of imaging using regions of the electromagnetic spectrum outside the visible range have been known for decades. Infrared and radio frequency imaging techniques have achieved great successes in both military and civilian applications. However, there remains a range of the spectrum between these two regimes that remains relatively unexplored. Millimeter waves, or the range of wavelengths between one millimeter and one centimeter, have remained relatively unexplored as an imaging technology, largely due to the lack of sufficiently sensitive, practical detectors for passive imaging in this regime. At these short wavelengths, the diffraction limit imposed by the limited extent of the imaging aperture significantly limits attainable image resolution. Recent developments in semiconductor low-noise amplifiers have demonstrated many desirable applications for such imaging technology, but have, as yet, not been able to demonstrate the economical, small-format imagers necessary to make such imagers practical in most of the conceived applications. In this regard, I present a new approach to millimeter-wave detection based on optical modulation with subsequent carrier suppression. This approach demonstrates promise in achieving the goal of economical, high-resolution imagers with sufficient sensitivity for passive millimeter-wave imaging. In this thesis, I explain the operational requirements of such detectors, provide theoretical background for their operation, and describe current experimental results obtained using commercially available components in the 35 GHz. In addition, I describe successful efforts to fabricate modulators with improved modulation bandwidths for detection in the 95 GHz atmospheric window. These demonstration systems have attained sufficient single pixel performance to detect thermal emission with a noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) approaching 1K/ Hz at both 35 and 95 GHz. The NETDs attained correspond to sub-picowatt noise

  1. Photonic Generation of Dual-Band Power-Efficient Millimeter-Wave UWB Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Peng; Guo, Hao; Chen, Dalei; Zhou, Hua

    2015-05-01

    Ultra-wideband (UWB) technology has attracted great interest because it can provide a promising solution of future radar and short-range broadband wireless communications. The generation of millimeter-wave UWB signals using photonic approaches can reduce the high cost of the millimeter-wave electrical circuits. Moreover, it is well compatible with fiber transmission, which can effectively extend its signal coverage. In this paper, a novel approach to the photonic generation of millimeter-wave UWB signals with dual-band operation consideration is proposed. The proposed scheme can simultaneously generate millimeter-wave UWB signals in both 24 GHz and 60 GHz millimeter band, and can efficiently exploit the spectrum limit allowed by the FCC mask by using the linear combination pulse design concept. A model describing the proposed system is developed and the generation of 24/60 GHz millimeter-wave UWB signals is demonstrated via computer simulations.

  2. A superconducting tunnel junction receiver for millimeter-wave astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, S. K.; Kerr, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    The development and construction of an ultralow noise heterodyne receiver for millimeter wave astronomy is described along with its use for 115.3 GHz Co line observations. The receiver uses a Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor (SIS) quasiparticle tunnel junction mixer to convert the millimeter wave signal to a microwave intermediate frequency. Experiments aimed at quantitative verification of J. R. Tucker's quantum mixer theory are studied, to see whether it could be used as the basis for the design of a practical receiver. The experimental results were in excellent agreement with the theory, assuming the three frequency approximation. Infinite available gain and negative output resistance were observed for the first time, nonclassical effects which are not seen in conventional diode mixers. Using Tucker's theory, an SIS receiver was then designed and constructed. At 115 GHz, the single sideband receiver noise temperature is 83K, the lowest ever reported in this frequency range. A CO survey toward Cygnus-X region, using this SIS receiver on the Columbia-GISS 4 ft. telescope, is also described.

  3. Millimeter-wave diode-grid frequency doubler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jou, Christina F.; Luhmann, Neville C., Jr.; Lam, Wayne W.; Stolt, Kjell S.; Chen, Howard Z.

    1988-01-01

    Monolithic diode grids were fabricated on 2-cm square gallium-arsenide wafers in a proof-of-principle test of a quasi-optical varactor millimeter-wave frequency multiplier array concept. An equivalent circuit model based on a transmission-line analysis of plane wave illumination was applied to predict the array performance. The doubler experiments were performed under far-field illumination conditions. A second-harmonic conversion efficiency of 9.5 percent and output powers of 0.5 W were achieved at 66 GHz when the diode grid was pumped with a pulsed source at 33 GHz. This grid had 760 Schottky-barrier varactor diodes. The average series resistance was 27 ohms, the minimum capacitance was 18 fF at a reverse breakdown voltage of -3 V. The measurements indicate that the diode grid is a feasible device for generating watt-level powers at millimeter frequencies and that substantial improvement is possible by improving the diode breakdown voltage.

  4. Reflective measurement of water concentration using millimeter wave illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Shijun; Bennett, David; Taylor, Zachary; Bajwa, Neha; Tewari, Priyamvada; Maccabi, Ashkan; Culjat, Martin; Singh, Rahul; Grundfest, Warren

    2011-04-01

    THz and millimeter wave technology have shown the potential to become a valuable medical imaging tool because of its sensitivity to water and safe, non-ionizing photon energy. Using the high dielectric constant of water in these frequency bands, reflectionmode THz sensing systems can be employed to measure water content in a target with high sensitivity. This phenomenology may lead to the development of clinical systems to measure the hydration state of biological targets. Such measurements may be useful in fast and convenient diagnosis of conditions whose symptoms can be characterized by changes in water concentration such as skin burns, dehydration, or chemical exposure. To explore millimeter wave sensitivity to hydration, a reflectometry system is constructed to make water concentration measurements at 100 GHz, and the minimum detectable water concentration difference is measured. This system employs a 100 GHz Gunn diode source and Golay cell detector to perform point reflectivity measurements of a wetted polypropylene towel as it dries on a mass balance. A noise limited, minimum detectable concentration difference of less than 0.5% by mass can be detected in water concentrations ranging from 70% to 80%. This sensitivity is sufficient to detect hydration changes caused by many diseases and pathologies and may be useful in the future as a diagnostic tool for the assessment of burns and other surface pathologies.

  5. Millimeter and terahertz wave absorption in a lossy conducting layer

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, M. K.; Chiang, W. Y.; Wu, K. L.; Chu, K. R.

    2013-10-15

    Relativistic electronics research in recent years has produced powerful millimeter waves on the MW level, while also extending the frequency range into the terahertz (THz) region and beyond. These developments have opened up new horizons in applications. The current study is motivated by the associated need for high-power absorbers not readily available at such frequencies. Our focus is on effective absorber schemes which can handle high power while also possessing a structural simplicity for easy implementation. In and above the THz region, the electrical conductivity can no longer be treated as a real constant. We begin with a derivation of the field penetration depth applicable to all frequencies. Requirements to meet the intended criteria are then determined from the wave penetration and reflection properties. Design examples in the 1–1000 GHz range are illustrated, which consist of a thin lossy conducting layer on the surface of a pyramidal shaped metal base. It is shown in theory that such structures can function effectively in the millimeter and THz regions.

  6. Frequency hopping millimeter-wave reflectometry in ASDEX upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Cupido, L.; Graca, S.; Conway, G. D.; Manso, M.; Serra, F.

    2006-10-15

    Millimeter-wave reflectometers for performing density fluctuations have traditionally used either tunable fixed frequency (heterodyne and homodyne) systems or multichannel fixed frequency arrangements. Only recently novel systems were brought into operation with the ability to hop from one frequency to another over a large bandwidth, during each plasma discharge, while retaining the quality of fixed frequency phase locked sources. The new broadband fast hopping millimeter-wave reflectometer incorporates frequency synthesizers for both plasma signal and local oscillators, and the receivers are heterodyne producing full phase/amplitude outputs. Two identical systems were recently installed in (ASDEX upgrade tokamak - IPP-MPG Germany) covering the Q band (33-50 GHz) and the V band (50-75 GHz). In the present article the system is described and the particular implementation on ASDEX, using monostatic antenna system, is presented showing the possibility of correlation studies in fully optimized antenna scenarios. With both Q and V channels in operation it was possible to devise several operation schemes that are described here and a result showing the radial localization of magnetohydrodynamic activity is also presented.

  7. Computational spectral microscopy and compressive millimeter-wave holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Christy Ann

    This dissertation describes three computational sensors. The first sensor is a scanning multi-spectral aperture-coded microscope containing a coded aperture spectrometer that is vertically scanned through a microscope intermediate image plane. The spectrometer aperture-code spatially encodes the object spectral data and nonnegative least squares inversion combined with a series of reconfigured two-dimensional (2D spatial-spectral) scanned measurements enables three-dimensional (3D) (x, y, lambda) object estimation. The second sensor is a coded aperture snapshot spectral imager that employs a compressive optical architecture to record a spectrally filtered projection of a 3D object data cube onto a 2D detector array. Two nonlinear and adapted TV-minimization schemes are presented for 3D (x, y, lambda) object estimation from a 2D compressed snapshot. Both sensors are interfaced to laboratory-grade microscopes and applied to fluorescence microscopy. The third sensor is a millimeter-wave holographic imaging system that is used to study the impact of 2D compressive measurement on 3D (x, y, z) data estimation. Holography is a natural compressive encoder since a 3D parabolic slice of the object band volume is recorded onto a 2D planar surface. An adapted nonlinear TV-minimization algorithm is used for 3D tomographic estimation from a 2D and a sparse 2D hologram composite. This strategy aims to reduce scan time costs associated with millimeter-wave image acquisition using a single pixel receiver.

  8. A millimeter-wave tunneLadder TWT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquez, A.; Karp, A.; Wilson, D.; Scott, A.

    1988-01-01

    A millimeter wave traveling wave tube was developed using a dispersive, high impedance forward interaction structure based on a ladder, with non-space harmonic interaction, for a tube with high gain per unit length and high efficiency. The TunneLadder interaction structure combines ladder properties modified to accommodate Pierce gun beam optics in a radially magnetized permanent magnet focusing structure. The development involved the fabrication of chemically milled, shaped ladders diffusion brazed to diamond cubes which are in turn active-diffusion brazed to each ridge of a doubly ridged waveguide. Cold test data are presented, representing the omega-beta and impedance characteristics of the modified ladder circuit. These results were used in small and large signal computer programs to predict TWT gain and efficiency. Actual data from tested tubes verify the predicted performance while providing broader bandwidth than expected.

  9. The Millimeter-Wave Properties of Superconducting Microstrip Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vayonakis, A.; Luo, C.; Leduc, H. G.; Schoelkopf, R.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a novel technique for making high quality measurements of the millimeter-wave properties of superconducting thin-film microstrip transmission lines. Our experimental technique currently covers the 75-100 GHz band. The method is based on standing wave resonances in an open ended transmission line. We obtain information on the phase velocity and loss of the microstrip. Our data for Nb/SiO/Nb lines, taken at 4.2 K and 1.6 K, can be explained by a single set of physical parameters. Our preliminary conclusion is that the loss is dominated by the SiO dielectric, with a temperature-independent loss tangent of 5.3 +/- 0.5 x 10(exp -3) for our samples.

  10. Millimeter-wave generation via plasma three-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Robert W.; Santoru, Joseph

    1988-06-01

    Plasma three-wave mixing is a collective phenomena whereby electron-beam-driven electron plasma waves (EPWs) are nonlinearly coupled to an electromagnetic (EM) radiation field. The basic physics of three-wave mixing is investigated in the mm-wave regime and the scaling of mm-wave characteristics established with beam and plasma parameters. Our approach is to employ two counterinjected electron beams in a plasma-loaded circular waveguide to drive counterstreaming EPWs. The nonlinear coupling of these waves generates an EM waveguide mode which oscillates at twice the plasma frequency and is coupled out into rectangular waveguides. Independent control of the waveguide plasma, beam voltage, and beam current is exercised to allow a careful parametric investigation of beam transport, EPW dynamics and three-wave-mixing physics. The beam-plasma experiment, which employs a wire-anode discharge to generate high-density plasma in a 3.8 cm-diameter waveguide, has been used to generate radiation at frequencies from 7 to 60 GHz. Two cold-cathode, secondary-emission electron guns are used to excite the EPWs. Output radiation is observed only when both beams are injected, and the total beam current exceeds a threshold value of 3 A. The threshold is related to the self-magnetic pinch of each beam which increases the beam density and growth rate of the EPWs.

  11. Experimental millimeter-wave personal satellite communications system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Kimura, Shigeru; Shimada, Masaaki; Tanaka, Masato; Takahashi, Yasuhiro

    1991-01-01

    Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) has investigated an advanced millimeter (mm)-wave satellite communications system for personal use. Experiments in mm-wave personal satellite communication are to be conducted for 3 years using Japan's Engineering Test Satellite VI (ETS-VI). This paper describes an experimental mm-wave (43/38 GHz) personal satellite communication system, including an onboard transponder and an earth terminal. The on-board transponder is almost completed, and the ground experiment system is still in the design stage. The transponder employs advanced mm-wave solid state technology. It uses 38 GHz high power solid state amplifiers to accelerate the development of mm-wave solid state devices which are indispensable to personal earth terminals. The transponder consists of a 43 GHz receiver with a built-in low noise amplifier, an IF filter section with very narrow bandwidth to improve the carrier-to-noise power ratio of the weak personal communication signal, and two high power amplifiers using newly developed high power Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) metal-semiconductor field effect transistors (MESFETs).

  12. Experimental millimeter-wave personal satellite communications system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Kimura, Shigeru; Shimada, Masaaki; Tanaka, Masato; Takahashi, Yasuhiro

    1991-09-01

    Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) has investigated an advanced millimeter (mm)-wave satellite communications system for personal use. Experiments in mm-wave personal satellite communication are to be conducted for 3 years using Japan's Engineering Test Satellite VI (ETS-VI). This paper describes an experimental mm-wave (43/38 GHz) personal satellite communication system, including an onboard transponder and an earth terminal. The on-board transponder is almost completed, and the ground experiment system is still in the design stage. The transponder employs advanced mm-wave solid state technology. It uses 38 GHz high power solid state amplifiers to accelerate the development of mm-wave solid state devices which are indispensable to personal earth terminals. The transponder consists of a 43 GHz receiver with a built-in low noise amplifier, an IF filter section with very narrow bandwidth to improve the carrier-to-noise power ratio of the weak personal communication signal, and two high power amplifiers using newly developed high power Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) metal-semiconductor field effect transistors (MESFETs).

  13. Millimeter Wave Sensor For On-Line Inspection Of Thin Sheet Dielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Bakhtiari, Sasan; Gopalsami, Nachappa; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1999-03-23

    A millimeter wave sensor is provided for non-destructive inspection of thin sheet dielectric materials. The millimeter wave sensor includes a Gunn diode oscillator (GDO) source generating a mill meter wave electromagnetic energy signal having a single frequency. A heater is coupled to the GDO source for stabilizing the single frequency. A small size antenna is coupled to the GDO source for transmitting the millimeter wave electromagnetic energy signal to a sample material and for receiving a reflected millimeter wave electromagnetic energy signal from the sample material. Ferrite circulator isolators coupled between the GDO source and the antenna separate the millimeter wave electromagnetic energy signal into transmitted and received electromagnetic energy signal components and a detector detects change in both amplitude and phase of the transmitted and received electromagnetic energy signal components. A millimeter wave sensor is provided for non-destructive inspection of thin sheet dielectric materials. The millimeter wave sensor includes a Gunn diode oscillator (GDO) source generating a mill meter wave electromagnetic energy signal having a single frequency. A heater is coupled to the GDO source for stabilizing the single frequency. A small size antenna is coupled to the GDO source for transmitting the millimeter wave electromagnetic energy signal to a sample material and for receiving a reflected millimeter wave electromagnetic energy signal from the sample material. Ferrite circulator isolators coupled between the GDO source and the antenna separate the millimeter wave electromagnetic energy signal into transmitted and received electromagnetic energy signal components and a detector detects change in both amplitude and phase of the transmitted and received electromagnetic energy signal components.

  14. Millimeter wave and terahertz dielectric properties of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Usman Ansar

    Broadband dielectric properties of materials can be employed to identify, detect, and characterize materials through their unique spectral signatures. In this study, millimeter wave, submillimeter wave, and terahertz dielectric properties of biological substances inclusive of liquids, solids, and powders were obtained using Dispersive Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DFTS). Two broadband polarizing interferometers were constructed to test materials from 60 GHz to 1.2 THz. This is an extremely difficult portion of the frequency spectrum to obtain a material's dielectric properties since neither optical nor microwave-based techniques provide accurate data. The dielectric characteristics of liquids such as cyclohexane, chlorobenzene, benzene, ethanol, methanol, 1,4 dioxane, and 10% formalin were obtained using the liquid interferometer. Subsequently the solid interferometer was utilized to determine the dielectric properties of human breast tissues, which are fixed and preserved in 10% formalin. This joint collaboration with the Tufts New England Medical Center demonstrated a significant difference between the dielectric response of tumorous and non-tumorous breast tissues across the spectrum. Powders such as anthrax, flour, talc, corn starch, dry milk, and baking soda have been involved in a number of security threats and false alarms around the globe in the last decade. To be able to differentiate hoax attacks and serious security threats, the dielectric properties of common household powders were also examined using the solid interferometer to identify the powders' unique resonance peaks. A new sample preparation kit was designed to test the powder specimens. It was anticipated that millimeter wave and terahertz dielectric characterization will enable one to clearly distinguish one powder from the other; however most of the powders had relatively close dielectric responses and only Talc had a resonance signature recorded at 1.135 THz. Furthermore, due to

  15. Photonic generation of a millimeter-wave signal based on sextuple-frequency multiplication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hongwei; Chen, Minghua; Wang, Tianliang; Xie, Shizhong

    2007-05-01

    A millimeter-wave signal with sextuple-frequency multiplication of a microwave source is obtained with two cascaded optical modulators, which are driven by the same microwave source with phase deviation of pi/2 introduced by an electrical phase shifter. Without any optical filter, a wideband continuously tunable millimeter-wave signal is easily generated. PMID:17410221

  16. Photonic generation of a millimeter-wave signal based on sextuple-frequency multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hongwei; Chen, Minghua; Wang, Tianliang; Xie, Shizhong

    2007-05-01

    A millimeter-wave signal with sextuple-frequency multiplication of a microwave source is obtained with two cascaded optical modulators, which are driven by the same microwave source with phase deviation of π/2 introduced by an electrical phase shifter. Without any optical filter, a wideband continuously tunable millimeter-wave signal is easily generated.

  17. Shape-descriptor-based detection of concealed weapons in millimeter-wave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamani, Mohamed-Adel; Ferris, David D., Jr.

    2001-03-01

    Shape parameters based on circularity, Fourier descriptors, and invariant moments are studied for the automatic detection of weapons in millimeter-wave data. The data is collected by a 30-frames-per-second millimeter-wave (MMW) imager manufactured by Trex Enterprises for the detection of weapons concealed underneath a person's clothing. Results are illustrated through processing real MMW data.

  18. Passive front-ends for wideband millimeter wave electronic warfare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jastram, Nathan Joseph

    This thesis presents the analysis, design and measurements of novel passive front ends of interest to millimeter wave electronic warfare systems. However, emerging threats in the millimeter waves (18 GHz and above) has led to a push for new systems capable of addressing these threats. At these frequencies, traditional techniques of design and fabrication are challenging due to small size, limited bandwidth and losses. The use of surface micromachining technology for wideband direction finding with multiple element antenna arrays for electronic support is demonstrated. A wideband tapered slot antenna is first designed and measured as an array element for the subsequent arrays. Both 18--36 GHz and 75--110 GHz amplitude only and amplitude/phase two element direction finding front ends are designed and measured. The design of arrays using Butler matrix and Rotman lens beamformers for greater than two element direction finding over W band and beyond using is also presented. The design of a dual polarized high power capable front end for electronic attack over an 18--45 GHz band is presented. To combine two polarizations into the same radiating aperture, an orthomode transducer (OMT) based upon a new double ridge waveguide cross section is developed. To provide greater flexibility in needed performance characteristics, several different turnstile junction matching sections are tested. A modular horn section is proposed to address flexible and ever changing operational requirements, and is designed for performance criteria such as constant gain, beamwidth, etc. A multi-section branch guide coupler and low loss Rotman lens based upon the proposed cross section are also developed. Prototyping methods for the herein designed millimeter wave electronic warfare front ends are investigated. Specifically, both printed circuit board (PCB) prototyping of micromachined systems and 3D printing of conventionally machined horns are presented. A 4--8 GHz two element array with

  19. Millimeter-wave Absorption Studies of Molecules in Diffuse Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Robert; Liszt, Harvey S.

    1999-10-01

    With IRAM instruments in the last few years, we have been using compact extragalactic millimeter wave radio sources as background objects to study the absorption spectrum of diffuse interstellar gas at millimeter wavelengths. The molecular content of interstellar gas has turned out to be unexpectedly rich. Simple polyatomic molecules such as HCO+, C2H are quite ubiquitous near the Galactic plane (beta < 15o), and many species are detected in some directions (CO, HCO+, H2CO, HCN, HNC, CN, C2H, C3H2, H2S, CS, HCS+, SO, SiO). Remarkable proportionality relations are found between related species such as HCO+ and OH, or CN, HCN and HNC. The high abundance of some species is still a challenge for current models of diffuse cloud chemistry. A factor of 10 increase in the sensitivity will make such studies achievable in denser clouds, where the chemistry is still more active and where abundances are nowadays only available by emission measurements, and thus subject to uncertainties due to sometimes poorly understood line formation and excitation conditions.

  20. Passive millimeter-wave imaging for concealed article detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovberg, John A.; Galliano, Joseph A., Jr.; Clark, Stuart E.

    1997-02-01

    Passive-millimeter-wave imaging (PMI) provides a powerful sensing tool for law enforcement, allowing an unobtrusive means for detecting concealed weapons, explosives, or contraband on persons or in baggage. Natural thermal emissions at millimeter wavelengths from bodies, guns, explosives, and other articles pass easily through clothing or other concealment materials, where they can be detected and converted into conventional 2-dimensional images. A new implementation of PMI has demonstrated a large-area, near- real-time staring capability for personnel inspection at standoff ranges of greater than 10 meters. In this form, PMI does not require operator cuing based on subjective 'profiles' of suspicious appearance or behaviors, which may otherwise be construed as violations of civil rights. To the contrary, PMI detects and images heat generated by any object with no predisposition as to its nature or function (e.g. race or gender of humans). As a totally passive imaging tool, it generates no radio-frequency or other radiation which might raise public health concerns. Specifics of the new PMI architecture are presented along with a host of imaging data representing the current state- of-the-art.

  1. Beam lead quartz chips for superconducting millimeter-wave circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Robert B.; Zhang, Jian Z.; Bishop, William L.; Lichtenberger, Arthur W.; Pan, Shing-Kuo

    2003-02-01

    The assembly of superconducting millimeter and submillimeter-wave circuits often requires RF ground connections. These are usually made by soldering, wire bonding, conductive adhesive or conductive wire gaskets. The difficulty of assembly increases with frequency as chip dimensions and tolerances shrink. The assembly issues, and also the throughput requirements of large radio astronomy projects such as ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter Array), suggest the need of a beam lead technology for these circuits. Beam lead processes are already established for silicon and gallium arsenide wafers. However, niobium circuits on quartz substrates present unique difficulties. SIS junctions introduce additional thermal and chemical constraints to process development. For quartz, wet etches are isotropic and dry etches with high etch rates require large ion energies. Therefore, it is difficult to develop a conventional process in which gold pads on the substrate surface are formed into beam leads by a backside etch. Instead we have developed a topside process in which, after the mixer circuits are completed, dicing cuts are made at the finished chip dimensions but only partly through the wafer. The dicing cuts are then filled with a sacrificial material in a non-CMP process, and planarized. Gold plated pads are then defined, overhanging the planarized cuts. The sacrificial material is then removed from these cuts, leaving the gold beam leads. The wafer is then backside lapped into the cuts to the desired thickness, separating the individual chips. We discuss the new planarization scheme developed for this beam lead process and compare a variety of sacrificial materials.

  2. Quantum Tunneling Sb-Heterostructures for Millimeter Wave Radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Joel N.

    2003-03-01

    Imaging in the millimeter wavelength range has been making rapid progress as high speed electronics increase in frequency. Applications include viewing through adverse visibility conditions (fog, smoke, dust, precipitation) and also the relative transparency of clothing (concealed-weapons-detection) and some building materials (through-the-wall-detection). Atmospheric radiometry (climate assessment and weather prediction) already depend heavily on this wavelength range. Astronomical applications include incorporation in instruments for cosmic microwave background detection. An important ingredient is a diode that "rectifies" in a special way. It must convert input power, i.e., voltage squared, into a DC voltage output -- a "square-law" detector. We have recently found that quantum tunneling through an InAs/AlSb/GaAlSb heterostructure system provides the ideal physical mechanism for this purpose.1,2 We will present our results to date, demonstrating how a close coupling of semiconductor quantum tunneling theory with electrical engineering know-how have brought an "exotic" quantum phenomon to practical and economic application. 1. "Sb-heterostructure interband backward diodes" J.N. Schulman and D.H. Chow. IEEE Electron Device Letters 21, 353-355 (2000). 2. "High-Performance Antimonide-Based Heterostructure Backward Diodes for Millimeter-wave Detection" P. Fay, J. N. Schulman, S. Thomas III, D. H. Chow, Y. K. Boegeman, and K. S. Holabird, IEEE Electron Device Letters 23, 585-587 (2002).

  3. Millimeter-wave imaging of thermal and chemical signatures.

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.

    1999-03-30

    Development of a passive millimeter-wave (mm-wave) system is described for remotely mapping thermal and chemical signatures of process effluents with application to arms control and nonproliferation. Because a large amount of heat is usually dissipated in the air or waterway as a by-product of most weapons of mass destruction facilities, remote thermal mapping may be used to detect concealed or open facilities of weapons of mass destruction. We have developed a focal-plane mm-wave imaging system to investigate the potential of thermal mapping. Results of mm-wave images obtained with a 160-GHz radiometer system are presented for different target scenes simulated in the laboratory. Chemical and nuclear facilities may be identified by remotely measuring molecular signatures of airborne molecules emitted from these facilities. We have developed a filterbank radiometer to investigate the potential of passive spectral measurements. Proof of principle is presented by measuring the HDO spectral line at 80.6 GHz with a 4-channel 77-83 GHz radiometer.

  4. Near-field millimeter - wave imaging of nonmetallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Bakhtiari, S.; Raptis, A.C.

    1996-12-31

    A near-field millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging system has been designed and built in the 94-GHz range for on-line inspection of nonmetallic (dielectric) materials. The imaging system consists of a transceiver block coupled to an antenna that scans the material to be imaged; a reflector plate is placed behind the material. A quadrature IF mixer in the transceiver block enables measurement of in-phase and quadrature-phase components of reflected signals with respect to the transmitted signal. All transceiver components, with the exception of the Gunn-diode oscillator and antenna, were fabricated in uniform blocks and integrated and packaged into a compact unit (12.7 x 10.2 x 2.5 cm). The objective of this work is to test the applicability of a near-field compact mm-wave sensor for on-line inspection of sheetlike materials such as paper, fabrics, and plastics. This paper presents initial near-field mm-wave images of paper and fabric samples containing known artifacts.

  5. Millimeter-wave imaging of thermal and chemical signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1999-07-01

    Development of a passive millimeter-wave (mm-wave) system is described for remotely mapping thermal and chemical signatures of process effluents with application to arms control and nonproliferation. Because a large amount of heat is usually dissipated in the air or waterway as a by-product of most weapons of mass destruction facilities, remote thermal mapping may be used to detect concealed or open facilities of weapons of mass destruction. We have developed a focal-plane mm-wave imaging system to investigate the potential of thermal mapping. Results of mm-wave images obtained with a 160-GHz radiometer system are presented for different target scenes simulated in the laboratory. Chemical and nuclear facilities may be identified by remotely measuring molecular signatures of airborne molecules emitted from these facilities. We have developed a filterbank radiometer to investigate the potential of passive spectral measurements. Proof of principle is presented by measuring the HDO spectral line at 80.6 GHz with a 4-channel 77 - 83 GHz radiometer.

  6. Millimeter- and Submillimeter-Wave Remote Sensing Using Small Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehsan, N.; Esper, J.; Piepmeier, J.; Racette, P.; Wu, D.

    2014-01-01

    Cloud ice properties and processes play fundamental roles in atmospheric radiation and precipitation. Limited knowledge and poor representation of clouds in global climate models have led to large uncertainties about cloud feedback processes under climate change. Ice clouds have been used as a tuning parameter in the models to force agreement with observations of the radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere, and precipitation at the bottom. The lack of ice cloud measurements has left the cloud processes at intermediate altitudes unconstrained. Millimeter (mm) and submillimeter (submm)-wave radiometry is widely recognized for its potential to fill the cloud measurement gap in the middle and upper troposphere. Analyses have shown that channels from 183900 GHz offer good sensitivity to ice cloud scattering and can provide ice water path (IWP) products to an accuracy of 25 by simultaneously retrieving ice particle size (Dme) and IWP. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop a cost-effective, compact mm/submm-wave instrument for cloud observations that can be deployed on future small satellites.This paper presents a conceptual study for a mm/submm-wave instrument for multispectral measurements of ice clouds. It discusses previous work at these frequencies by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the current instrument study, as well as receiver architectures and their anticipated performance. And finally, it describes a microsatellite prototype intended for use with this mm/submm-wave instrument.

  7. Broadband notch filter design for millimeter-wave plasma diagnosticsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtula, V.; Michelsen, P. K.; Leipold, F.; Salewski, M.; Korsholm, S. B.; Meo, F.; Nielsen, S. K.; Stejner, M.; Moseev, D.; Johansen, T.

    2010-10-01

    Notch filters are integrated in plasma diagnostic systems to protect millimeter-wave receivers from intensive stray radiation. Here we present a design of a notch filter with a center frequency of 140 GHz, a rejection bandwidth of ˜900 MHz, and a typical insertion loss below 2 dB in the passband of ±9 GHz. The design is based on a fundamental rectangular waveguide with eight cylindrical cavities coupled by T-junction apertures formed as thin slits. Parameters that affect the notch performance such as physical lengths and conductor materials are discussed. The excited resonance mode in the cylindrical cavities is the fundamental TE11. The performance of the constructed filter is measured using a vector network analyzer monitoring a total bandwidth of 30 GHz. We compare the measurements with numerical simulations.

  8. Observations of ground clutter using a millimeter wave radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Matsuo; Musha, Toshimitsu; Chikara, Sakae; Saji, Keiichi; Hagiwara, Seiji

    1990-02-01

    Ground clutter was measured using a millimeter-wave radar with frequency 34.86 GHz, which is located on the campus of the University of Electro-Communications. The pulsewidth of the radar was 30 nsec. Thus the spatial resolution was as small as 4.5 m. It is found that the clutter amplitude distribution obeys a Weibull distribution with shape parameter c = 0.497 to 0.675 at depression angles of 0.8 to 1.9 deg when reflectors are ordinary terrain and such structures as landing strips at airport and buildings. To improve target detectability in such Weibull distributed ground clutter, a Weibull CFAR system will be required.

  9. The influence of polarization on millimeter wave propagation through rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostian, C. W.; Stutzman, W. L.; Wiley, P. H.; Marshall, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The influence of polarization on millimeter wave propagation through rain is investigated. The experimental equipment consisted of a 1.43 km line-of-sight path with 4-foot diameter dual-polarized parabolic reflector antennas at each end. Linearly polarized 17.65 GHz signals were transmitted with the electric field vectors at plus 45 degrees and minus 45 degrees from the vertical. These polarizations were initially chosen to maximize the measured depolarization at any given rainfall rate. Later it was discovered that the cross polarization levels measured with plus or minus 45 degree linearly polarized signals are theoretically the least sensitive to variations in drop canting angle and this choice of polarization reduces the scatter in the data.

  10. The millimeter-wave rotational spectrum of tertiary butyl isocyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiel, Z.

    1992-02-01

    The millimeter-wave rotational spectrum of tertiary butyl isocyanide, (CH 3) 3CNC, was measured in the ground state and in the first excited state of the doubly degenerate CNC bending mode vβ. Accurate spectroscopic constants for both states have been determined from frequency measurements spanning the range 146-333 GHz. The results are compared with those for tertiary butyl cyanide, for which improved ground state sextic distortion constants are reported. The experimental quartic centrifugal distortion constants and the Coriolis coupling constant ξβ are well reproduced by a rudimentary force field calculation. Coriolis coupling constants for bending modes of linear segments attached to symmetric top C3 v molecules based on a tetrahedrally substituted carbon atom are compared and factors responsible for changes in their values are identified and discussed.

  11. Passive millimeter-wave imaging for security and safety applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroyasu; Sawaya, Kunio; Mizuno, Koji; Uemura, Jun; Takeda, Masamune; Takahashi, Junichi; Yamada, Kota; Morichika, Keiichi; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Hirai, Haruyuki; Niikura, Hirotaka; Matsuzaki, Tomohiko; Kato, Shigeto; Nakada, Jun

    2010-04-01

    77 GHz passive millimeter wave (PMMW) imaging camera for the purpose of security is developed. In order to detect concealed objects in clothes without hindrance to flow of people at airport security checks, video rate imaging is realized using one-dimensional imaging sensor array of 25 elements and a flapping reflector. As receiving antennas, novel antipodal Fermi antenna (APFA) having required characteristics for passive imaging such as broad bandwidth to obtain enough power, axially symmetric directivity with 10dB beam width of 35 degrees to obtain optimum coupling with dielectric lens, narrow width geometry for high spatial resolution of imaging is used. Real-time calibration (RTC) technique is introduced to eliminate the drift of receiving circuits. Interpolation technique to improve the quality of image and marking software for screening of suspicious objects are also developed. High spatial resolution of 20 mm is obtained by using developed imaging camera.

  12. Permittivity of water at millimeter wave-lengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1976-01-01

    Work performed on the permittivity of seawater and ice at 100 GHz was described. Measurements on water covered the temperature range from 0 to 50 C, while the measurements on ice were taken near - 10 C. In addition, a small number of measurements were made on the reflectivity of absorber materials used in a previous program on research in millimeter wave techniques. Normal incidence reflectivity was measured, and the result was used to obtain the index of refraction. For the case of normal incidence, reflectivity at a fixed temperature was reproducible to 1% for values near 40%. For reflectivity measurements on ice, the lack of attenuation leads to reflection from the back surface of the sample; this complication was circumvented by using a wedge shaped sample and freezing the water in a container lined with absorber material.

  13. Display of polarization information for passive millimeter-wave imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John P.; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Dillon, Thomas E.; Eng, David L. K.; Kozacik, Stephen; Prather, Dennis W.

    2012-09-01

    A technique is described for displaying polarization information from passive millimeter-wave (mmW) sensors. This technique uses the hue of an image to display the polarization information and the lightness of an image to provide the unpolarized information. The fusion of both images is done in such a way that minimal information is lost from the unpolarized image while adding polarization information within a single image. The technique is applied to experimental imagery collected in a desert environment with two orthogonal linear polarization states of light and the results are discussed. Several objects such as footprints, ground textures, tire tracks, and shrubs display strong polarization features that are clearly visible with this technique, while materials with low polarization signatures such as metal are also clearly visible in the same image.

  14. Design of a Broadband Millimeter-Wave Monolithic IQ Mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Leijun; Wang, Zhigong; Li, Qin

    2010-05-01

    A 26˜40 GHz millimeter-wave monolithic passive IQ mixer was designed by using Win’s 0.15-µm GaAs pHEMT process. It utilizes a ring diode structure, and the performance can be improved effectively by a modified Marchand balun and U-type coupled lines. Through on-wafer measurement, the mixer shows a conversion loss of 6.6˜9 dB over a bandwidth of 26˜40 GHz, an IF bandwidth from DC to 6 GHz, an image rejection ratio of 21˜30 dB, an LO-RF isolation of above 24 dB, an LO-IF isolation of above 35 dB, and an RF-IF isolation of above 25 dB.

  15. Passive fully polarimetric W-band millimeter-wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernacki, B. E.; Kelly, J. F.; Sheen, D. M.; McMakin, D. L.; Tedeschi, J. R.; Harris, R. V.; Mendoza, A.; Hall, T. E.; Hatchell, B. K.; Valdez, P. L. J.

    2012-03-01

    We present the theory, design, and experimental results obtained from a scanning passive W-band fully polarimetric imager. Passive millimeter-wave imaging offers persistent day/nighttime imaging and the ability to penetrate dust, clouds and other obscurants, including clothing and dry soil. The single-pixel scanning imager includes both far-field and near-field fore-optics for investigation of polarization phenomena. Using both fore-optics, a variety of scenes including natural and man-made objects was imaged and these results are presented showing the utility of polarimetric imaging for anomaly detection. Analysis includes conventional Stokes-parameter based approaches as well as multivariate image analysis methods.

  16. A LEO concept for millimeter wave satellite communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. H.; Christopher, P.

    1995-01-01

    A conceptual 60 satellite LEO constellation for millimeter wave communication is discussed. It could be launched in segments, with the first 30 satellites providing high elevation angles for all time in the Northern latitudes between Miami and Thule. The second set of 30 satellites would complete the worldwide coverage with emphasis on high ground elevation angles in the densely populated temperate zones. Full earth searches for all time are used to generate probability density functions for elevation angle. The density functions are used to derive optimum frequencies for random elevation systems. The 55 degree average elevation angle and 14 degree standard deviation are seen to be acceptable for 0.997 rain availability in Washington, DC for the 40 to 47 GHz region. The 40 to 47 GHz region is nearly optimum, if 0.99 rain availability is acceptable.

  17. Airborne Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Observations of Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Racette, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports the first radiometric measurements of cirrus clouds in the frequency range of 89-325 GHz from a high-altitude aircraft flight. The measurements are conducted with a Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (MIR) on board the NASA ER-2 aircraft over a region in northern Oklahoma. Aboard the same aircraft are a cloud lidar system and a multichannel radiometer operating at the visible and infrared wavelengths. The instrument ensemble is well suited for identifying cirrus clouds. It is shown that the depressions in brightness temperatures associated with a few intense cirrus clouds occur at all frequency channels of the MIR. Estimates of total ice water path of the cirrus clouds are derived from comparisons of radiative transfer calculations and observed brightness depressions.

  18. Experimental demonstration of high power millimeter wave gyro-amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, M.; Garven, M.; Calame, J. P.; Choi, J. J.; Danly, B. G.; Levush, B.; Nguyen, K.; Pershing, D. E.

    1999-05-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory is currently investigating gyro-amplifiers as high power, broadband sources for millimeter wave radars. A three-cavity Ka-band gyroklystron achieved 225 kW peak output power with 0.82% bandwidth. At W-band, several multi-cavity gyro-amplifiers have been experimentally demonstrated. A four-cavity gyroklystron amplifier has achieved 84 kW peak output power at 34% efficiency with 370 MHz bandwidth. A five-cavity gyroklystron demonstrated 72 kW peak output power with 410 MHz bandwidth and 50 dB saturated gain. For applications requiring greater bandwidth, gyrotwystron amplifiers are also under study. A four section W-band gyrotwystron demonstrated 50 kW peak output power at 925 MHz bandwidth. The results of recent Ka-band and W-band gyro-amplifier experiments and comparisons of measured data with predictions of theory are presented.

  19. Propulsion of small launch vehicles using high power millimeter waves

    SciTech Connect

    Benford, J.; Myrabo, L.

    1994-12-31

    The use of microwave and millimeter wave beamed energy for propulsion of vehicles in the atmosphere and in space has been under study for at least 35 years. The need for improved propulsion technology is clear: chemical rockets orbit only a few percent of the liftoff mass at a cost of over $3,000/lb. The key advantage of the beamed power approach is to place the heavy and expensive components on the ground or in space, not in the vehicle. This paper, following upon the high power laser propulsion programs, uses a multi-cycle propulsion engine in which the first phase of ascent is based on the air breathing ramjet principle, a repetitive Pulsed Detonation Engine (PDE) which uses a microwave-supported detonation to heat the air working fluid, i.e., propellant. The second phase is a pure beam-heated rocket. The key factor is that high peak power is essential to this pulsed engine. This paper explores this propulsion concept using millimeter waves, the most advantageous part of the spectrum. The authors find that efficient system concepts can be developed for the beam powered launch system and that, while the capital cost may be as high as the earlier orbital transfer concepts, the operating cost is much lower. The vehicle can have payload-to-mass ratios on the order of one and cost (per pound to orbit) two orders of magnitudes less than for chemical rockets. This allows the weight of microwave powered vehicles to be very small, as low as {approximately}100 kg for test devices.

  20. Boring and Sealing Rock with Directed Energy Millimeter-Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woskov, P.; Einstein, H. H.; Oglesby, K.

    2015-12-01

    Millimeter-wave directed energy is being investigated to penetrate into deep crystalline basement rock formations to lower well costs and to melt rocks, metals, and other additives to seal wells for applications that include nuclear waste storage and geothermal energy. Laboratory tests have established that intense millimeter-wave (MMW) beams > 1 kW/cm2 can melt and/ or vaporize hard crystalline rocks. In principle this will make it possible to create open boreholes and a method to seal them with a glass/ceramic liner and plug formed from the original rock or with other materials. A 10 kW, 28 GHz commercial (CPI) gyrotron system with a launched beam diameter of about 32 mm was used to heat basalt, granite, limestone, and sandstone specimens to temperatures over 2500 °C to create melts and holes. A calibrated 137 GHz radiometer view, collinear with the heating beam, monitored real time peak rock temperature. A water load surrounding the rock test specimen primarily monitored unabsorbed power at 28 GHz. Power balance analysis of the laboratory observations shows that the temperature rise is limited by radiative heat loss, which would be expected to be trapped in a borehole. The analysis also indicates that the emissivity (absorption efficiency) in the radiated infrared range is lower than the emissivity at 28 GHz, giving the MMW frequency range an important advantage for rock melting. Strength tests on one granite type indicated that heating the rock initially weakens it, but with exposure to higher temperatures the resolidified black glassy product regains strength. Basalt was the easiest to melt and penetrate, if a melt leak path was provided, because of its low viscosity. Full beam holes up to about 50 mm diameter (diffraction increased beam size) were achieved through 30 mm thick basalt and granite specimens. Laboratory experiments to form a seal in an existing hole have also been carried out by melting rock and a simulated steel casing.

  1. Comparison of active millimeter-wave and acoustic imaging for weapon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; Collins, H. D.; Gribble, R. Parks; McMakin, Douglas L.

    1997-02-01

    Millimeter-wave holographic imaging techniques have recently been developed for personnel surveillance applications at airports and other high-security checkpoints. Millimeter- wave imaging is useful for this application since millimeter-waves easily pass through common clothing materials yet are reflected from the human body and any items concealed by clothing. This allows a high-resolution imaging system to form an image revealing items concealed on the person imaged. A prototype imaging system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory uses a scanned linear array of millimeter-wave antennas to capture wideband millimeter-wave data in approximately one second. This data is then mathematically reconstructed to form a high- resolution 3D image of the person being scanned. Millimeter- wave imaging has been demonstrated to be effective for detecting concealed weapons on personnel. Another imaging technique which could be applied to the weapon detection problem is acoustic imaging. Like millimeter-waves, ultrasonic acoustic waves can also penetrate clothing, and can be used to form relatively high-resolution images which can reveal concealed weapons on personnel. Acoustic imaging results have been obtained using wideband holographic imaging techniques nearly identical to the imaging techniques used for millimeter-wave imaging. Preliminary imaging results at 50 kHz indicate that acoustic imaging can be used to penetrate some types of common clothing materials. Hard clothing materials, such as leather on vinyl, are essentially opaque to acoustic waves at 50 kHz. In this paper, millimeter-wave and acoustic wave imaging techniques are compared for their effectiveness and suitability in weapon detection imaging systems. Experimental results from both imaging modalities are shown.

  2. Visualization of Shock Wave Driven by Millimeter Wave Plasma in a Parabolic Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Shimada, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Yuya; Shibata, Teppei; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Oda, Yasuhisa; Kajiwara, Ken; Takahashi, Koji; Kasugai, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Keishi; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2010-05-06

    By focusing a high-power millimeter wave beam generated by a 170 GHz gyrotron, a breakdown occurred and a shock wave was driven by plasma heated by following microwave energy. The shock wave and the plasma around a focal point of a parabolic thruster were visualized by a shadowgraph method, and a transition of structures between the shock wave and the plasma was observed. There was a threshold local power density to make the transition, and the propagation velocity at the transition was around 800 m/s.

  3. Interferometric millimeter wave and THz wave doppler radar

    DOEpatents

    Liao, Shaolin; Gopalsami, Nachappa; Bakhtiari, Sasan; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Elmer, Thomas

    2015-08-11

    A mixerless high frequency interferometric Doppler radar system and methods has been invented, numerically validated and experimentally tested. A continuous wave source, phase modulator (e.g., a continuously oscillating reference mirror) and intensity detector are utilized. The intensity detector measures the intensity of the combined reflected Doppler signal and the modulated reference beam. Rigorous mathematics formulas have been developed to extract bot amplitude and phase from the measured intensity signal. Software in Matlab has been developed and used to extract such amplitude and phase information from the experimental data. Both amplitude and phase are calculated and the Doppler frequency signature of the object is determined.

  4. Development of a millimeter-wave sensor for environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Bakhtiari, S.; Raptis, A.C.

    1995-06-01

    A millimeter-wave (mm-wave) sensor in the frequency range of 225-315 GHz is being developed for continuous emission monitoring of airborne effluents from industrial sites for environmental compliance monitoring and process control. Detection of chemical species is based on measuring the molecular rotational energy transitions at mm-wave frequencies. The mm-wave technique offers better transmission properties compared to optics in harsh industrial environments with smoke, dust, aerosols, and steam, as well as in adverse atmospheric conditions. The laboratory measurements indicate that polar molecules can be measured with a sensitivity of tens of parts-per-million-meter using this technology. Proof of principle of the open-path system was tested by releasing and detecting innocuous chemicals in the open air. It uses a monostatic radar configuration with transmitter and receiver on one side and a comer cube on tire other side of the plume to be measured. A wide-band swept frequency mm-wave signal is transmitted through the plume and return signal from the comer cube is detected by a hot-electron-bolometer. Absorption spectra of plume gases are measured by comparing the return signals with and without the plume in the beam path. Using signal processing based on deconvolution, high specificity of detection has been shown for resolving individual chemicals from a mixture. This technology is applicable for real-time measurement of a suite of airborne gases/vapors emitted from vents and stacks of process industries. A prototype sensor is being developed for wide-area monitoring of industrial sites and in-place monitoring of stack gases.

  5. Development of a millimeter-wave sensor for environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Bakhtiari, Sasan; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1995-10-01

    A millimeter-wave (mm-wave) sensor in the frequency range of 225-315 GHz is being developed for continuous emission monitoring for airborne effluents from industrial sites with applicability to environmental compliance monitoring and process control. Detection of chemical species is based on measuring the molecular rotational energy transitions at mm- wave frequencies. The mm-wave technique offers better transmission properties than do optics in harsh industrial environemnts such as those with smoke, dust, aerosols, and steam, as well as in adverse atmospheric conditions. Laboratory million-meter with this technology. Proof of principle of the open-path system has been tested by releasing and detecting innocuous chemicals in the open air. The system uses a monostatic radar configuration with transmitter and receiver on one side of the plume to be measured an a corner cube on the other side. A wide-band swept-frequency mm-wave signal is transmitted through the plume, and the return signal from the corner cube is detected by a hot-electron-bolometer. Aborption spectra of the plume gases are measured by comparing the return signal processing technique based on deconvolution, we have shown a high specificity of detection for resolving individual chemicals from a mixture. This technology is applicable for real-time measurement of a suite of airborne gases and vapors emitted from vents and stacks of process industries. A prototype sensor is being developed for wide-area monitoring of industrial sites and in-place monitoring of stack gases.

  6. Method and apparatus for millimeter-wave detection of thermal waves for materials evaluation

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for generating thermal waves in a sample and for measuring thermal inhomogeneities at subsurface levels using millimeter-wave radiometry. An intensity modulated heating source is oriented toward a narrow spot on the surface of a material sample and thermal radiation in a narrow volume of material around the spot is monitored using a millimeter-wave radiometer; the radiometer scans the sample point-by-point and a computer stores and displays in-phase and quadrature phase components of thermal radiations for each point on the scan. Alternatively, an intensity modulated heating source is oriented toward a relatively large surface area in a material sample and variations in thermal radiation within the full field of an antenna array are obtained using an aperture synthesis radiometer technique.

  7. Millimeter Wave and Terahertz Spectra of C-13 Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-Hong; Lees, Ronald M.; Müller, Holger S. P.; Endres, Christian P.; Lewen, Frank; Schlemmer, Stephan; Menten, Karl M.

    2009-06-01

    Methanol is a very ubiquitous molecule in space. A previous combined analysis of microwave and millimeter wave spectra of C-13 methanol together with Fourier transform far-infrared spectra was limited to the first two torsional states (i.e. v_t = 0 and 1 for J values up to 20). We have recently carried out new millimeter and terahertz measurements for ^{13}CH_3OH on several different spectrometers in the Cologne laboratory to overcome the limits in frequency and quantum number coverage. The new measurements have been carried out in the frequency windows 34-70 GHz, 75-120 GHz, 240-340 GHz, 370-500 GHz and 1.12-1.35 THz. With the new data, we are extending our previous global treatment to include the first three torsional states (i.e. v_t = 0, 1 and 2 for J values up to 30). We hope to provide the radio astronomical community with a C-13 methanol database that will have been improved substantially compared to the existing one. The new database will be available in the Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS, in support of present and future astronomical studies associated with the launch of HIFI (Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared) on board the Herschel Space Observatory, the flying of SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy) and the commissioning of ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array). Li-Hong Xu, M. S. Walsh, R. M. Lees, 1996, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 179, 269-281. Li-Hong Xu, F. J. Lovas, 1997, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data, 26, 17-156; also available in the CDMS, see ^c. H. S. P. Müller, S. Thorwirth, D. A. Roth, G. Winnewisser, 2001, Astron. Astrophys. 370, L49-L52 H. S. P. Müller, F. Schlöder, J. Stutzki, G. Winnewisser, 2005 J. Mol. Struct. 742, 215-227; web-page: http://www.astro.uni-koeln.de/cdms/.

  8. Millimeter and submillimeter wave spectra of 13C methylamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Smirnov, I. A.; Alekseev, E. A.; Halfen, D. T.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Methylamine (CH3NH2) is a light molecule of astrophysical interest, which has an intensive rotational spectrum that extends in the submillimeter wave range and far beyond, even at temperatures characteristic for the interstellar medium. It is likely for 13C isotopologue of methylamine to be identified in astronomical surveys, but there is no information available for the 13CH3NH2 millimeter and submillimeter wave spectra. Aims: In this context, to provide reliable predictions of 13CH3NH2 spectrum in millimeter and submillimeter wave ranges, we have studied rotational spectra of the 13C methylamine isotopologue in the frequency range from 48 to 945 GHz. Methods: The spectrum of 13C methylamine was recorded using conventional absorption spectrometers. The analysis of the rotational spectrum of 13C methylamine in the ground vibrational state was performed on the basis of the group-theoretical high-barrier tunneling Hamiltonian that was developed for methylamine. The available multiple observations of the parent methylamine species toward Sgr B2(N) at 1, 2, and 3 mm using the Submillimeter Telescope and the 12 m antenna of the Arizona Radio Observatory were used to make a search for interstellar 13CH3NH2. Results: In the recorded spectra, we have assigned 2721 rotational transitions that belong to the ground vibrational state of the 13CH3NH2. These measurements were fitted to the Hamiltonian model that uses 75 parameters to achieve an overall weighted rms deviation of 0.73. On the basis of these spectroscopic results, predictions of transition frequencies in the frequency range up to 950 GHz with J ≤ 50 and Ka ≤ 20 are presented. The search for interstellar 13C methylamine in available observational data was not successful and therefore only an upper limit of 6.5 × 1014 cm-2 can be derived for the column density of 13CH3NH2 toward Sgr B2(N), assuming the same source size, temperature, linewidth, and systemic velocity as for parent methylamine isotopic

  9. Image fusion based on millimeter-wave for concealed weapon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weiwen; Zhao, Yuejin; Deng, Chao; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, Yalin; Zhang, Jingshui

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes a novel multi sensors image fusion technology which is presented for concealed weapon detection (CWD). It is known to all, because of the good transparency of the clothes at millimeter wave band, a millimeter wave radiometer can be used to image and distinguish concealed contraband beneath clothes, for example guns, knives, detonator and so on. As a result, we adopt the passive millimeter wave (PMMW) imaging technology for airport security. However, in consideration of the wavelength of millimeter wave and the single channel mechanical scanning, the millimeter wave image has law optical resolution, which can't meet the need of practical application. Therefore, visible image (VI), which has higher resolution, is proposed for the image fusion with the millimeter wave image to enhance the readability. Before the image fusion, a novel image pre-processing which specifics to the fusion of millimeter wave imaging and visible image is adopted. And in the process of image fusion, multi resolution analysis (MRA) based on Wavelet Transform (WT) is adopted. In this way, the experiment result shows that this method has advantages in concealed weapon detection and has practical significance.

  10. Beamforming Based Full-Duplex for Millimeter-Wave Communication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Xiao, Zhenyu; Bai, Lin; Choi, Jinho; Xia, Pengfei; Xia, Xiang-Gen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study beamforming based full-duplex (FD) systems in millimeter-wave (mmWave) communications. A joint transmission and reception (Tx/Rx) beamforming problem is formulated to maximize the achievable rate by mitigating self-interference (SI). Since the optimal solution is difficult to find due to the non-convexity of the objective function, suboptimal schemes are proposed in this paper. A low-complexity algorithm, which iteratively maximizes signal power while suppressing SI, is proposed and its convergence is proven. Moreover, two closed-form solutions, which do not require iterations, are also derived under minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE), zero-forcing (ZF), and maximum-ratio transmission (MRT) criteria. Performance evaluations show that the proposed iterative scheme converges fast (within only two iterations on average) and approaches an upper-bound performance, while the two closed-form solutions also achieve appealing performances, although there are noticeable differences from the upper bound depending on channel conditions. Interestingly, these three schemes show different robustness against the geometry of Tx/Rx antenna arrays and channel estimation errors. PMID:27455256

  11. Beamforming Based Full-Duplex for Millimeter-Wave Communication

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Xiao, Zhenyu; Bai, Lin; Choi, Jinho; Xia, Pengfei; Xia, Xiang-Gen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study beamforming based full-duplex (FD) systems in millimeter-wave (mmWave) communications. A joint transmission and reception (Tx/Rx) beamforming problem is formulated to maximize the achievable rate by mitigating self-interference (SI). Since the optimal solution is difficult to find due to the non-convexity of the objective function, suboptimal schemes are proposed in this paper. A low-complexity algorithm, which iteratively maximizes signal power while suppressing SI, is proposed and its convergence is proven. Moreover, two closed-form solutions, which do not require iterations, are also derived under minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE), zero-forcing (ZF), and maximum-ratio transmission (MRT) criteria. Performance evaluations show that the proposed iterative scheme converges fast (within only two iterations on average) and approaches an upper-bound performance, while the two closed-form solutions also achieve appealing performances, although there are noticeable differences from the upper bound depending on channel conditions. Interestingly, these three schemes show different robustness against the geometry of Tx/Rx antenna arrays and channel estimation errors. PMID:27455256

  12. Millimeter-wave monolithic diode-grid frequency multiplier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, Joseph (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A semiconductor diode structure useful for harmonic generation of millimeter or submillimeter wave radiation from a fundamental input wave is fabricated on a GaAs substrate. A heavily doped layer of n(sup ++) GaAs is produced on the substrate and then a layer of intrinsic GaAs on said heavily doped layer on top of which a sheet of heavy doping (++) is produced. A thin layer of intrinsic GaAs grown over the sheet is capped with two metal contacts separated by a gap to produce two diodes connected back to back through the n(sup ++) layer for multiplication of frequency by an odd multiple. If only one metal contact caps the thin layer of intrinsic GaAs, the second diode contact is produced to connect to the n(sup ++) layer for multiplication of frequency by an even number. The odd or even frequency multiple is selected by a filter. A phased array of diodes in a grid will increase the power of the higher frequency generated.

  13. Polarization difference imaging for millimeter-wave in a desert environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John P.; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Stein, Edwin L., Jr.; Samluk, Jesse P.; Mackrides, Daniel G.; Prather, Dennis W.

    2010-10-01

    The low attenuation of millimeter-wave radiation propagating through sandstorms has created an interest in using millimeter-wave imagers in desert environments. The ground in desert environments can have significant differences in polarization properties depending on the angle of observation. Perturbations to the natural desert surface will change these polarization properties and by using a polarization difference technique these changes are highlighted. This technique has been applied to millimeter-wave images from a desert environment for several different objects including holes in the ground, footsteps, and changes to the surface created by digging.

  14. Millimeter-Wave Dielectric Properties of Single Crystal Ferroelectric and Dielectric Materials

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Korolev, Konstantin A.; Li, Zijing; Afsar, Mohammed N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2011-01-03

    Transmittance measurements on various single crystal ferroelectric materials over a broad millimeter-wave frequency range have been performed. Frequency dependence of the complex dielectric permittivity has been determined in the millimeter wave region for the first time. The measurements have been employed using a free-space quasi-optical millimeter-wave spectrometer equipped with a set of high power backward wave oscillators (BWOs) as sources of coherent radiation, tunable in the range from 30 - 120 GHz. The uncertainties and possible sources of instrumentation and measurement errors related to the free-space millimeter-wave technique are discussed. This work has demonstrated that precise MMW permittivities can be obtained even on small thin crystals using the BWO quasi-optical approach.

  15. Millimeter and submillimeter wave spectra of 13C-glycolaldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haykal, I.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Huet, T. R.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO) is the simplest sugar and an important intermediate in the path toward forming more complex biologically relevant molecules. Astronomical surveys of interstellar molecules, such as those available with the very sensitive ALMA telescope, require preliminary laboratory investigations of the microwave and submillimeter-wave spectra of molecular species including new isotopologs - to identify these in the interstellar media. Aims: To achieve the detection of the 13C isotopologs of glycolaldehyde in the interstellar medium, their rotational spectra in the millimeter and submillimeter-wave regions were studied. Methods: The spectra of 13CH2OHCHO and CH2OH13CHO were recorded in the 150-945 GHz spectral range in the laboratory using a solid-state submillimeter-wave spectrometer in Lille. The observed line frequencies were measured with an accuracy of 30 kHz up to 700 GHz and of 50 kHz above 700 GHz. We analyzed the spectra with a standard Watson Hamiltonian. Results: About 10 000 new lines were identified for each isotopolog. The spectroscopic parameters were determined for the ground- and the three lowest vibrational states up to 945 and 630 GHz. Previous microwave assignments of 13CH2OHCHO were not confirmed. Conclusions: The provided line-lists and sets of molecular parameters meet the needs for a first astrophysical search of 13C-glycolaldehydes. Full Tables 3 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/549/A96

  16. Microwave and millimeter-wave resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollner, T. C. L. Gerhard; Brown, Elliott R.; Goodhue, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    Several demonstrated resonant tunneling devices including oscillators, mixers, multiplexers, and a variable negative resistance are discussed. Techniques of the millimeter/submillimeter regime are also discussed.

  17. Observation and modeling of atmospheric oxygen millimeter-wave transmittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Michael Jonathan

    1998-12-01

    The Microwave Temperature Sounder (MTS) was used on multiple ascents and descents of NASA ER-2 aircraft to measure downwelling thermal atmospheric emission viewed from 0-20-km altitudes in millimeter-wave bands dominated by molecular oxygen, and to infer atmospheric opacity in these bands. The MTS includes two super-heterodyne receivers: one with eight IF channels covering 350-2000 MHz from the 118.75-GHz oxygen line and the other with a 30-200-MHz IF and a tunable LO stepped through eight frequencies from 52.7-55.6 GHz. Simulations of MTS zenith-view antenna temperatures based upon local radiosondes and the MPM92 absorption model of Liebe, et al. (50) were consistent with observations in the 52.5- 55.8 GHz band. Adjustment of the temperature dependence exponent of the 118.75-GHz linewidth from the MPM92 value of 0.8 to 0.97 ± 0.03 was found to produce significantly better agreement in observations with MTS channels centered on this line. This increase in low- temperature linewidth changes total atmospheric opacity in these channels by less than 2.5 percent. Other investigators have noted systematic discrepancies as large as several Kelvin between measured and simulated upwelling brightness temperatures, both in satellite observations of the earth in the 50-60 GHz band and in nadirial-viewed MTS observations from 20-km altitude in the band 116.7-120.8 GHz. Resolution of these biases through adjustment of the oxygen absorption model requires increases in the MPM92 expression of up to 20 percent. The utility of current and proposed satellite- based millimeter-wave temperature sounders for the monitoring of global climate, the initialization of numerical weather models, and the remote monitoring of severe weather systems is compromised by this model uncertainty. The zenith-viewing configuration through ascents and descents of the current MTS measurements are several times more sensitive to perturbation of atmospheric opacity than are space-based observations. The

  18. Compact Packaging of Photonic Millimeter-Wave Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung; Pouch, John; Miranda, Felix; Levi, Anthony F.

    2007-01-01

    A carrier structure made from a single silicon substrate is the basis of a compact, lightweight, relatively inexpensive package that holds the main optical/electronic coupling components of a photonic millimeter-wave receiver based on a lithium niobate resonator disk. The design of the package is simple and provides for precise relative placement of optical components, eliminating the need for complex, bulky positioning mechanisms like those commonly used to align optical components to optimize focus and coupling. Although a prototype of the package was fabricated as a discrete unit, the design is amenable to integration of the package into a larger photonic and/or electronic receiver system. The components (see figure) include a lithium niobate optical resonator disk of 5-mm diameter and .200- m thickness, positioned adjacent to a millimeter- wave resonator electrode. Other components include input and output coupling prisms and input and output optical fibers tipped with ball lenses for focusing and collimation, respectively. Laser light is introduced via the input optical fiber and focused into the input coupling prism. The input coupling prism is positioned near (but not in contact with) the resonator disk so that by means of evanescent-wave coupling, the input laser light in the prism gives rise to laser light propagating circumferentially in guided modes in the resonator disk. Similarly, a portion of the circumferentially propagating optical power is extracted from the disk by evanescent-wave coupling from the disk to the output coupling prism, from whence the light passes through the collimating ball lens into the output optical fiber. The lens-tipped optical fibers must be positioned at a specified focal distance from the prisms. The optical fibers and the prisms must be correctly positioned relative to the resonator disk and must be oriented to obtain the angle of incidence (55 in the prototype) required for evanescent-wave coupling of light into and out

  19. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  20. Passive millimeter-wave video camera for aviation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaca, Steven W.; Shoucri, Merit; Yujiri, Larry

    1998-07-01

    Passive Millimeter Wave (PMMW) imaging technology offers significant safety benefits to world aviation. Made possible by recent technological breakthroughs, PMMW imaging sensors provide visual-like images of objects under low visibility conditions (e.g., fog, clouds, snow, sandstorms, and smoke) which blind visual and infrared sensors. TRW has developed an advanced, demonstrator version of a PMMW imaging camera that, when front-mounted on an aircraft, gives images of the forward scene at a rate and quality sufficient to enhance aircrew vision and situational awareness under low visibility conditions. Potential aviation uses for a PMMW camera are numerous and include: (1) Enhanced vision for autonomous take- off, landing, and surface operations in Category III weather on Category I and non-precision runways; (2) Enhanced situational awareness during initial and final approach, including Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT) mitigation; (3) Ground traffic control in low visibility; (4) Enhanced airport security. TRW leads a consortium which began flight tests with the demonstration PMMW camera in September 1997. Flight testing will continue in 1998. We discuss the characteristics of PMMW images, the current state of the technology, the integration of the camera with other flight avionics to form an enhanced vision system, and other aviation applications.

  1. Active millimeter wave detection of concealed layers of dielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowring, N. J.; Baker, J. G.; Rezgui, N. D.; Southgate, M.; Alder, J. F.

    2007-04-01

    Extensive work has been published on millimetre wave active and passive detection and imaging of metallic objects concealed under clothing. We propose and demonstrate a technique for revealing the depth as well as the outline of partially transparent objects, which is especially suited to imaging layer materials such as explosives and drugs. The technique uses a focussed and scanned FMCW source, swept through many GHz to reveal this structure. The principle involved is that a parallel sided dielectric slab produces reflections at both its upper and lower surfaces, acting as a Fabry-Perot interferometer. This produces a pattern of alternating reflected peaks and troughs in frequency space. Fourier or Burg transforming this pattern into z-space generates a peak at the thickness of the irradiated sample. It could be argued that though such a technique may work for single uniform slabs of dielectric material, it will give results of little or no significance when the sample both scatters the incident radiation and gives erratic reflectivities due to its non-uniform thickness and permittivity . We show results for a variety of materials such as explosive simulants, powder and drugs, both alone and concealed under clothing or in a rucksack, which display strongly directional reflectivities at millimeter wavelengths, and whose location is well displayed by a varying thickness parameter as the millimetre beam is scanned across the target. With this system we find that samples can easily be detected at standoff distances of at least 4.6m.

  2. Passive millimeter-wave cross polarization imaging and phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, E. Lee, Jr.; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Martin, Richard D.; Samluk, Jesse P.; Wilson, John P.; Mackrides, Daniel G.; Murakowski, Janusz A.; Murakowski, Maciej; Prather, Dennis W.

    2009-05-01

    Passive millimeter-wave (mmW) imaging has many specific defense, security and safety applications, due to the fact that all terrestrial bodies above absolute zero are emissive, and these wavelengths are not scattered by normal obscurants such as haze, fog, smoke, dust, sandstorms, clouds, or fabrics. We have previously demonstrated results from the construction of a 94 GHz passive mmW far-field imaging system utilizing optical upconversion, which imaged in only horizontal polarization. The effective radiometric temperature of an object is a combination of the object's surface and scattered radiometric temperatures. The surface radiometric temperature is a function of the object's emissivity, which is polarization dependent. Imaging with radiometric temperature data from both polarizations will allow a greater identification of the scene being imaged, and allow the recognition of subtle features which were not previously observable. This additional functionality is accomplished through the installation of added equipment and programming on our system, thus allowing the simultaneous data collection of imagery in both polarizations. Herein, we present our experimental procedures, results and passive mmW images obtained by using our far-field imaging system, a brief discussion of the phenomenology observed through the application of these techniques, as well as the preliminary details regarding our work on a 3-D passive mmW simulator capable of true physical polarization dependent effective emissivity and reflectivity rendering, based on the open-source Blender engine.

  3. Passive millimeter-wave imaging in security scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Gordon N.; Appleby, Roger; Coward, Peter R.; Price, Sean

    2000-07-01

    The threat in modern life necessitates the use of security systems in many areas. Systems, whether manual search or automated, need to be able to detect concealed munitions beneath clothing and in baggage. Systems which scan people, unlike baggage, must be safe to avoid damaging those who must be repeatedly scanned. Passive millimeter wave (mmw) systems have the ability to scan people through clothing to detect concealed objects without irradiating the individual. The performance of such systems is dependent on operating frequency, which is a trade-off between resolution, clothing transmission, and material visibility. Transmission and reflection spectra of clothing, skin, and other materials which may be worn under clothing, over the frequency range 60 to 500 GHz, are presented with their implications for operating frequency. The practicalities of imaging are discussed, the differences between the indoor and outdoor situation highlighted, and the limitations of the indoor case described. Imagery of persons with concealed objects, obtained using DERA's MITRE 94 GHz mmw imager, are presented.

  4. Topics in the optimization of millimeter-wave mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, P. H.; Kerr, A. R.; Hwang, W.

    1984-01-01

    A user oriented computer program for the analysis of single-ended Schottky diode mixers is described. The program is used to compute the performance of a 140 to 220 GHz mixer and excellent agreement with measurements at 150 and 180 GHz is obtained. A sensitivity analysis indicates the importance of various diode and mount characteristics on the mixer performance. A computer program for the analysis of varactor diode multipliers is described. The diode operates in either the reverse biased varactor mode or with substantial forward current flow where the conversion mechanism is predominantly resistive. A description and analysis of a new H-plane rectangular waveguide transformer is reported. The transformer is made quickly and easily in split-block waveguide using a standard slitting saw. It is particularly suited for use in the millimeter-wave band, replacing conventional electroformed stepped transformers. A theoretical analysis of the transformer is given and good agreement is obtained with measurements made at X-band.

  5. Millimeter Wave Tunneling-Rotational Spectrum of Phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikova, L.; Daly, A. M.; Alonso, J. L.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.

    2013-06-01

    The millimeter wave spectra of phenol in the vibrational ground state and the first excited states of the bending and torsion vibrational modes have been studied in the frequency regions of 140 - 170 GHz and 280 - 360 GHz. The internal rotation of the hydroxyl group is responsible for the observed tunneling splitting into two substates (v_{t}, v_{b})^{+} and (v_{t}, v_{b})^{-} and more than 3500 distinct tunneling-rotational ^{b}R- and ^{b}Q-type transitions between them were measured and analyzed. Furthermore, accidental near degeneracies of the (+) and (-) energy levels were observed in case of the ground state and the v_{b} = 1 excited state and the analysis using a two-state effective Hamiltonian including tunneling-rotational Coriolis terms was performed. The spectroscopic constants for the first excited states of the bending and the torsion vibrational modes have been determined for the first time. The analysis of the microwave data provided very precise values of the spectroscopic constants necessary for the astrophysical search of phenol. We report a tentative detection for this molecule in the IRAM 30m line survey of Orion KL.

  6. The millimeter wave tunneling-rotational spectrum of phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesniková, L.; Daly, A. M.; Alonso, J. L.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.

    2013-07-01

    The millimeter wave spectra of phenol in the vibrational ground state and the first excited states of the bending and torsion vibrational modes have been studied in the frequency regions of 140-170 GHz and 280-360 GHz. The internal rotation of the hydroxyl group is responsible for the observed tunneling splitting into two substates (vt, vb)+ and (vt, vb)- and more than 3500 distinct tunneling-rotational bR- and bQ-type transitions between them were measured and analyzed. Furthermore, accidental near degeneracies of the (±) and (-) energy levels were observed in case of the ground state and the vb = 1 excited state and the analysis using a two-state effective Hamiltonian including tunneling-rotational Coriolis-like terms was performed. The analysis of the microwave data provided very precise values of the spectroscopic constants necessary for the astrophysical search of phenol. We report a tentative detection for this molecule in the IRAM 30m line survey of Orion KL.

  7. Induced movements of giant vesicles by millimeter wave radiation.

    PubMed

    Albini, Martina; Dinarelli, Simone; Pennella, Francesco; Romeo, Stefania; Zampetti, Emiliano; Girasole, Marco; Morbiducci, Umberto; Massa, Rita; Ramundo-Orlando, Alfonsina

    2014-07-01

    Our previous study of interaction between low intensity radiation at 53.37GHz and cell-size system - such as giant vesicles - indicated that a vectorial movement of vesicles was induced. This effect among others, i.e. elongation, induced diffusion of fluorescent dye di-8-ANEPPS, and increased attractions between vesicles was attributed to the action of the field on charged and dipolar residues located at the membrane-water interface. In an attempt to improve the understanding on how millimeter wave radiation (MMW) can induce this movement we report here a real time evaluation of changes induced on the movement of giant vesicles. Direct optical observations of vesicles subjected to irradiation enabled the monitoring in real time of the response of vesicles. Changes of the direction of vesicle movement are demonstrated, which occur only during irradiation with a "switch on" of the effect. This MMW-induced effect was observed at a larger extent on giant vesicles prepared with negatively charged phospholipids. The monitoring of induced-by-irradiation temperature variation and numerical dosimetry indicate that the observed effects in vesicle movement cannot be attributed to local heating. PMID:24704354

  8. Near-field millimeter-wave imaging for weapons detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Collins, H. D.; Hall, Thomas E.

    1993-04-01

    Various millimeter-wave imaging systems capable of imaging through clothing for the detection of contraband metal, plastic, or ceramic weapons, have been developed at PNL. Two dimensional scanned holographic systems, developed at 35, 90, and 350 GHz, are used to obtain high resolution images of metal and plastic targets concealed by clothing. Coherent single-frequency amplitude and phase data, which is gathered over a two-dimensional scanned aperture, is reconstructed to the target plane using a holographic wavefront reconstruction technique. Practical weapon detection systems require high-speed scanning. To achieve this goal, a 35 GHz linear sequentially switched array has been built and integrated into a high speed linear scanner. This system poses special challenges on calibration/signal processing of the holographic system. Further, significant improvements in speed are required to achieve real time operation. Toward this goal, a wideband scanned system which allows for a two- dimensional image formation from a one-dimensional scanned (or array) system has been developed. Signal/image processing techniques developed and implemented for this technique are a variation on conventional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) techniques which eliminate far- field and narrow-bandwidth requirements. Performance of this technique is demonstrated with imaging results obtained from a Ka-band system.

  9. Comparison of schemes for active sub-millimeter wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furxhi, Orges; Jacobs, Eddie L.

    2011-11-01

    Various schemes for active imaging require different allocations of source power and can result in different overall signal to noise ratios. At the University of Memphis we have developed an image-plane scanning device used with a single pixel detector to form video rate images of the scene. Imaging with this device requires flood illumination of the scene. Because sub-millimeter wave sources typically produce low power, it is a common belief that flood illumination results in low detected signal power and therefore low signal to noise ratios (SNR) at the detector. In this work we quantify the SNR at the detector for our system and compare it to conventional imaging systems, conjugate point imaging systems, and focal plane array imaging. Unlike the other two systems, imaging with our device requires an additional pixel formation step; therefore, the SNR at the detector is not the per-pixel SNR. We present the limits of the per-pixel SNR and discuss its dependence on various device components.

  10. Compressive sensing for direct millimeter-wave holographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Lingbo; Wang, Yingxin; Shen, Zongjun; Zhao, Ziran; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2015-04-10

    Direct millimeter-wave (MMW) holographic imaging, which provides both the amplitude and phase information by using the heterodyne mixing technique, is considered a powerful tool for personnel security surveillance. However, MWW imaging systems usually suffer from the problem of high cost or relatively long data acquisition periods for array or single-pixel systems. In this paper, compressive sensing (CS), which aims at sparse sampling, is extended to direct MMW holographic imaging for reducing the number of antenna units or the data acquisition time. First, following the scalar diffraction theory, an exact derivation of the direct MMW holographic reconstruction is presented. Then, CS reconstruction strategies for complex-valued MMW images are introduced based on the derived reconstruction formula. To pursue the applicability for near-field MMW imaging and more complicated imaging targets, three sparsity bases, including total variance, wavelet, and curvelet, are evaluated for the CS reconstruction of MMW images. We also discuss different sampling patterns for single-pixel, linear array and two-dimensional array MMW imaging systems. Both simulations and experiments demonstrate the feasibility of recovering MMW images from measurements at 1/2 or even 1/4 of the Nyquist rate. PMID:25967314

  11. Thermal Mechanisms of Millimeter Wave Stimulation of Excitable Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Mikhail G.; Priest, Michael F.; Siegel, Peter H.; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between millimeter waves (MMWs) and biological systems have received increasing attention due to the growing use of MMW radiation in technologies ranging from experimental medical devices to telecommunications and airport security. Studies have shown that MMW exposure alters cellular function, especially in neurons and muscles. However, the biophysical mechanisms underlying such effects are still poorly understood. Due to the high aqueous absorbance of MMW, thermal mechanisms are likely. However, nonthermal mechanisms based on resonance effects have also been postulated. We studied MMW stimulation in a simplified preparation comprising Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing proteins that underlie membrane excitability. Using electrophysiological recordings simultaneously with 60 GHz stimulation, we observed changes in the kinetics and activity levels of voltage-gated potassium and sodium channels and a sodium-potassium pump that are consistent with a thermal mechanism. Furthermore, we showed that MMW stimulation significantly increased the action potential firing rate in oocytes coexpressing voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels, as predicted by thermal terms in the Hodgkin-Huxley model of neurons. Our results suggest that MMW stimulation produces significant thermally mediated effects on excitable cells via basic thermodynamic mechanisms that must be taken into account in the study and use of MMW radiation in biological systems. PMID:23790370

  12. Propulsion of small launch vehicles using high power millimeter waves

    SciTech Connect

    Benford, J.; Myrabo, L.

    1994-12-31

    High power microwaves have been proposed for propulsion of vehicles and projectiles in the atmosphere and in space. The requirements in terms of high power microwave technology have not been examined in any detail. The need for improved propulsion technology is clear: chemical rockets orbit only a few percent of the liftoff mass at a cost of about 3,000$/lb. The key advantage of any beamed power approach is in placing the heavy and expensive components on the ground or in space. The authors propose a system with uses a two-stage propulsion method in which the first phase of ascent is based on the ramjet principle, a repetitive Pulsed Detonation Engine which uses a microwave-supported detonation to heat the air fuel. The second phase is a pure rocket. This paper explores this propulsion concept using millimeter waves, the most advantageous part of the spectrum. They find that efficient system concepts can be developed: the vehicle can have payload-to-mass ratios on the order of one and cost per pound to orbit one or two orders of magnitude less that chemical rockets.

  13. Millimeter-wave Molecular Line Observations of the Tornado Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, D.; Oka, T.; Tanaka, K.; Matsumura, S.; Miura, K.; Takekawa, S.

    2014-08-01

    We report the results of millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado Nebula (G357.7-0.1), which is a bright radio source behind the Galactic center region. A 15' × 15' area was mapped in the J = 1-0 lines of CO, 13CO, and HCO+ with the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope. The Very Large Array archival data of OH at 1720 MHz were also reanalyzed. We found two molecular clouds with separate velocities, V LSR = -14 km s-1 and +5 km s-1. These clouds show rough spatial anti-correlation. Both clouds are associated with OH 1720 MHz emissions in the area overlapping with the Tornado Nebula. The spatial and velocity coincidence indicates violent interaction between the clouds and the Tornado Nebula. Modestly excited gas prefers the position of the Tornado "head" in the -14 km s-1 cloud, also suggesting the interaction. Virial analysis shows that the +5 km s-1 cloud is more tightly bound by self-gravity than the -14 km s-1 cloud. We propose a formation scenario for the Tornado Nebula; the +5 km s-1 cloud collided into the -14 km s-1 cloud, generating a high-density layer behind the shock front, which activates a putative compact object by Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion to eject a pair of bipolar jets.

  14. Flight test of a passive millimeter-wave imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Christopher A.; Manning, Will; Kolinko, Vladimir G.; Hall, Max

    2005-05-01

    A real-time passive millimeter-wave imaging system with a wide-field of view and 3K temperature sensitivity is described. The system was flown on a UH-1H helicopter in a flight test conducted by the U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD). We collected approximately eight hours of data over the course of the two-week flight test. Flight data was collected in horizontal and vertical polarizations at look down angles from 0 to 40 degrees. Speeds varied from 0 to 90 knots and altitudes varied from 0' to 1000'. Targets imaged include roads, freeways, railroads, houses, industrial buildings, power plants, people, streams, rivers, bridges, cars, trucks, trains, boats, planes, runways, treelines, shorelines, and the horizon. The imaging system withstood vibration and temperature variations, but experienced some RF interference. The flight test demonstrated the system's capabilities as an airborne navigation and surveillance aid. It also performed in a personnel recovery scenario.

  15. Studies of millimeter-wave phenomenology for helicopter brownout mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Christopher A.; Stein, E. Lee, Jr.; Samluk, Jesse; Mackrides, Daniel; Wilson, John P.; Martin, Richard D.; Dillon, Thomas E.; Prather, Dennis W.

    2009-09-01

    The unique ability of the millimeter-wave portion of the spectrum to penetrate typical visual obscurants has resulted in a wide range of possible applications for imagers in this spectrum. Of particular interest to the military community are imagers that can operate effectively in Degraded Visual Environments (DVE's) experienced by helicopter pilots when landing in dry, dusty environments, otherwise known as "brownout." One of the first steps to developing operational requirements for imagers in this spectrum is to develop a quantitative understanding of the phenomenology that governs imaging in these environments. While preliminary studies have been done in this area, quantitative, calibrated measurements of typical targets and degradation of target contrasts due to brownout conditions are not available. To this end, we will present results from calibrated, empirical measurements of typical targets of interest to helicopter pilots made in a representative desert environment. In addition, real-time measurements of target contrast reduction due to brownout conditions generated by helicopter downwash will be shown. These data were acquired using a W-band, dual-polarization radiometric scanner using optical-upconversion detectors.

  16. Near-field millimeter-wave imaging for weapon detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, D.M.; McMakin, D.L.; Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.

    1992-11-01

    Various millimeter-wave imaging systems capable of imaging through clothing for the detection of contraband metal, plastic, or ceramic weapons, have been developed at PNL. Two dimensional scanned holographic systems, developed at 35, 90, and 350 GHz, are used to obtain high resolution images of metal and plastic targets concealed by clothing. Coherent single-frequency amplitude and phase data, which is gathered over a two-dimensional scanned aperture, is reconstructed to the target plane using a holographic wavefront reconstruction technique. Practical weapon detection systems require high-speed scanning. To achieve this goal, a 35 GHz linear sequentially switched array has been built and integrated into a high speed linear scanner. This system poses special challenges on calibration / signal processing of the holographic system. Further, significant improvements in speed are required to achieve real time operation. Toward this goal, a wideband scanned system which allows for a two-dimensional image formation from a one-dimensional scanned (or array) system has been developed . Signal / image processing techniques developed and implemented for this technique are a variation on conventional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) techniques which eliminate far-field and narrow bandwidth requirements. Performance of this technique is demonstrated with imaging results obtained from a K[sub a]-band system.

  17. Near-field millimeter-wave imaging for weapon detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, D.M.; McMakin, D.L.; Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.

    1992-11-01

    Various millimeter-wave imaging systems capable of imaging through clothing for the detection of contraband metal, plastic, or ceramic weapons, have been developed at PNL. Two dimensional scanned holographic systems, developed at 35, 90, and 350 GHz, are used to obtain high resolution images of metal and plastic targets concealed by clothing. Coherent single-frequency amplitude and phase data, which is gathered over a two-dimensional scanned aperture, is reconstructed to the target plane using a holographic wavefront reconstruction technique. Practical weapon detection systems require high-speed scanning. To achieve this goal, a 35 GHz linear sequentially switched array has been built and integrated into a high speed linear scanner. This system poses special challenges on calibration / signal processing of the holographic system. Further, significant improvements in speed are required to achieve real time operation. Toward this goal, a wideband scanned system which allows for a two-dimensional image formation from a one-dimensional scanned (or array) system has been developed . Signal / image processing techniques developed and implemented for this technique are a variation on conventional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) techniques which eliminate far-field and narrow bandwidth requirements. Performance of this technique is demonstrated with imaging results obtained from a K{sub a}-band system.

  18. Near millimeter wave imaging/multi-beam integrated antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yngvesson, K. Sigfrid; Schaubert, Daniel H.; Stephan, Karl D.; Pozar, David M.; Sollner, T. C. L. Gerhard; Parrish, Peter T.

    1986-01-01

    Some preliminary results on a mixer design which is suitable for integration with tapered slot antennas have been obtained and published. This mixer design was tested both in a 4 to 10 GHz model, and (slightly modified) at 94 GHz. The latter utilized the same Hewlett-Packard beam-lead diodes which were used as detector diodes in the linearly tapered slot antennas (LTSA) arrays. These diodes are the most rugged to be found, and generally survive well on the flexible Kapton substrates. The 4 to 10 GHz version of this mixer has less than 6 dB conversion loss over an octave bandwidth. It uses a slot ring in a balanced configuration, and requires the LO to be fed through a separate port. A different design for a mixer which may be integrated with an LTSA antenna element is discussed. This mixer was tested at 38 GHz with the same HP beam-lead diodes, and has less than 10 dB conversion loss. Further work on mixers has emphasized theoretical modeling, using a computer program, which takes into account the effect of excess noise of Schottky-barrier diodes for the first time. Calculated results agree quantitatively with measured results on millimeter wave mixers.

  19. Low-Intensity Electromagnetic Millimeter Waves for Pain Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Usichenko, Taras I.; Edinger, Hardy; Gizhko, Vasyl V.; Lehmann, Christian; Wendt, Michael; Feyerherd, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Millimeter wave therapy (MWT), a non-invasive complementary therapeutic technique is claimed to possess analgesic properties. We reviewed the clinical studies describing the pain-relief effect of MWT. Medline-based search according to review criteria and evaluation of methodological quality of the retrieved studies was performed. Of 13 studies, 9 of them were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), only three studies yielded more than 3 points on the Oxford scale of methodological quality of RCTs. MWT was reported to be effective in the treatment of headache, arthritic, neuropathic and acute postoperative pain. The rapid onset of pain relief during MWT lasting hours to days after, remote to the site of exposure (acupuncture points), was the most characteristic feature in MWT application for pain relief. The most commonly used parameters of MWT were the MW frequencies between 30 and 70 GHz and power density up to 10 mW cm−2. The promising results from pilot case series studies and small-size RCTs for analgesic/hypoalgesic effects of MWT should be verified in large-scale RCTs on the effectiveness of this treatment method. PMID:16786049

  20. Millimeter waves as a source of selective heating of skin.

    PubMed

    Zhadobov, Maxim; Alekseev, Stanislav I; Le Dréan, Yves; Sauleau, Ronan; Fesenko, Evgeny E

    2015-09-01

    This study demonstrates that 20-100 GHz range can be used for spatially-accurate focusing of heating inside the skin achieved by varying frequency and exposure beam size, as well as by enforcing air convection. The latter is also used to reduce overheating of skin surface. Heating at different skin depths depending on these parameters is investigated in detail using the hybrid bio-heat equation. In particular, it is shown that decreasing frequency and/or increasing exposure beam size at forced airflow result in elevation of heating of deeper layers of tissue and decrease of skin surface temperature. Changes of water content within 15%, which exceed those due to aging and presence of tumors, only slightly affect heating. Exposure intensity necessary to reach a target temperature significantly increases in different areas of body with elevated blood flow. Dependence on exposure intensity and hyperthermia treatment duration is also investigated and discussed. Results of this study suggest that the lower part of the millimeter-wave range is an attractive alternative for non-invasive thermal treatment of skin cancer with a high spatial resolution. PMID:26179286

  1. Investigation of gigawatt millimeter wave source applications. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bruder, J.A.; Belcher, M.L.

    1991-09-01

    The Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) investigated potential applications of millimeter wave (MMW) sources with peak powers on the order of a gigawatt. This power level is representative of MMW devices such as the free electron laser (FEL) and the cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM) that are under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In addition to determining the technical requirements for these applications, the investigation considered potential users and how a high power MMW system would expand their current capabilities. Two of the more promising applications were examined in detail to include trade-off evaluations system parameters. The trade-off evaluations included overall system configuration, frequency and coherence, component availability, and performance estimates. Brainstorming sessions were held to try and uncover additional applications for a gigawatt MMW source. In setting up guidelines for the session, the need to attempt to predict applications for the years 2000 to 2030 was stressed. Also, possible non-DoD applications needed to be considered. While some of these applications could not in themselves justify the costs involved in the development of the radar system, they could be considered potential secondary applications of the system. As a result of the sessions, a number of interesting potential applications evolved including: space object identification; low angle tracking; illuminator for space-based radar; radio astronomy; space vehicle navigation; space debris location; atmospheric research; wind shear detection; electronic countermeasures; low observable detection; and long range detection via ducting.

  2. Microwave and millimeter-wave systems for wall penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, David D., Jr.; Currie, Nicholas C.

    1998-07-01

    The need for through-the-wall surveillance sensors has existed for many years. Recent advances in microwave and millimeter-wave (MMW) technologies provide new applications for law enforcement use. These applications include the potential to conduct surveillance through walls and the ability to detect the presence of living persons behind doors or other barriers. Covert surveillance and personnel detection are of high interest to both the Department of Defense in support of Small Unit Operations and the Justice Department for civilian law enforcement applications. Microwave sensors are under development that can detect the presence of persons (and even weapons) behind walls and track moving persons behind walls. MMW sensors are under development which can provide pseudo-images of persons behind the walls including radiometric sensors at 95 GHz, active 95 GHz real aperture radars, and heartbeat detection radars. Radiometric sensors include 2D FPA systems, 1D FPA, scanned systems, and single element scanned sensors. Active FPA radars include illuminated radiometric systems and coherent radar systems. Real aperture MMW radar systems include raster scanned and non-scanned (hand-held) sensors.

  3. Cylindrical millimeter-wave imaging technique and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2006-05-01

    The wideband microwave or millimeter-wave cylindrical imaging technique has been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for several applications including concealed weapon detection and automated body measurement for apparel fitting. This technique forms a fully-focused, diffraction-limited, three-dimensional image of the person or imaging target by scanning an inward-directed vertical array around the person or imaging target. The array is switched electronically to sequence across the array at high-speed, so that a full 360 degree mechanical scan over the cylindrical aperture can occur in 2-10 seconds. Wideband, coherent reflection data from each antenna position are recorded in a computer and subsequently reconstructed using an FFT-based image reconstruction algorithm developed at PNNL. The cylindrical scanning configuration is designed to optimize the illumination of the target and minimize non-returns due to specular reflection of the illumination away from the array. In this paper, simulated modeling data are used to explore imaging issues that affect the cylindrical imaging technique. Physical optics scattering simulations are used to model realistic returns from curved surfaces to determine the extent to which specular reflection affects the signal return and subsequent image reconstruction from these surfaces. This is a particularly important issue for the body measurement application. Also, an artifact in the imaging technique, referred to as "circular convolution aliasing" is discussed including methods to reduce or eliminate it. Numerous simulated and laboratory measured imaging results are presented.

  4. Millimeter wave sensor requirements for maritime small craft identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krapels, Keith; Driggers, Ronald G.; Garcia, Jose; Boettcher, Evelyn; Prather, Dennis; Schuetz, Chrisopher; Samluk, Jesse; Stein, Lee; Kiser, William; Visnansky, Andrew; Grata, Jeremy; Wikner, David; Harris, Russ

    2009-09-01

    Passive millimeter wave (mmW) imagers have improved in terms of resolution sensitivity and frame rate. Currently, the Office of Naval Research (ONR), along with the US Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, Communications Electronics Research Development and Engineering Center (RDECOM CERDEC) Night Vision and Electronic Sensor Directorate (NVESD), are investigating the current state-of-the-art of mmW imaging systems. The focus of this study was the performance of mmW imaging systems for the task of small watercraft / boat identification field performance. First mmW signatures were collected. This consisted of a set of eight small watercrafts; at 5 different aspects, during the daylight hours over a 48 hour period in the spring of 2008. Target characteristics were measured and characteristic dimension, signatures, and Root Sum Squared of Target's Temperature (RRSΔT) tabulated. Then an eight-alternative, forced choice (8AFC) human perception experiment was developed and conducted at NVESD. The ability of observers to discriminate between small watercraft was quantified. Next, the task difficulty criterion, V50, was quantified by applying this data to NVESD's target acquisition models using the Targeting Task Performance (TTP) metric. These parameters can be used to evaluate sensor field performance for Anti-Terrorism / Force Protection (AT/FP) and navigation tasks for the U.S. Navy, as well as for design and evaluation of imaging passive mmW sensors for both the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard.

  5. Millimeter Wave Synthetic Aperture Imaging System with a Unique Rotary Scanning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghasr, M. T.; Case, J. T.; McClanahan, A. D.; Abou-Khousa, M.; Guinn, K.; Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.; Afaki-Beni, A.; DePaulis, F.; Pommerenke, D.

    2008-01-01

    This is the video that accompanies the "Millimeter Wave Synthetic Aperture Imaging System with a Unique Rotary Scanning System" presentation. It shows the operation of the scanning system, and reviews the results of the scanning of a sample.

  6. Silicon micromachined waveguides for millimeter-wave and submillimeter-wave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrath, William R.; Walker, Christopher; Yap, Markus; Tai, Yu-Chong

    1993-01-01

    Rectangular waveguide is commonly used up to high millimeter-wave frequencies. However, conventional machining techniques for waveguides operating above a few hundred GHz are complicated and costly. The development of silicon micro-machining techniques to create silicon-based waveguide circuits, which can operate up to high submillimeter-wave frequencies, is reported. As a first step, WR-10 waveguide has been fabricated from (110) silicon wafers. Insertion loss measurements of gold plated silicon waveguide show performance comparable to standard metal waveguides. It is suggested that active devices and planar circuits can be integrated with the waveguides, solving the traditional mounting problems.

  7. Analytical model and optical design of distributed aperture optical system for millimeter-wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Caihua; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Martin, Richard D.; Samluk, Jesse; Stein, E. Lee, Jr.; MacKrides, Daniel G.; Mirotznik, Mark; Prather, Dennis W.

    2008-10-01

    Millimeter-wave imaging is very interesting due to its unique transmission properties through a broad range of atmospheric obscurants such as cloud, dust, fog, sandstorms, and smoke, which thereby enables all-weather passive imaging. Unfortunately, the usefulness of millimeter-wave imagers is often limited by the large aperture sizes required to obtain images of sufficient resolution, as governed by the diffraction limit. To this end, we previously proposed a distributed aperture system for direct non-scan millimeter-wave imaging using an optical upconversion technique. In this proposed approach, an antenna array is employed to sample image signals in the millimeter-wave domain. The sampled millimeter-wave signals are then upconverted to the optical domain using electro-optic modulation techniques. These optical signals are mapped into a similar array on the entrance pupil of the following optical system for direct imaging. Although distributed aperture imaging is not new in both radio astronomy and conventional optical inteferometric imaging, the proposed approach is different in that it physically samples image in the millimeter-wave domain and directly forms the image in the optical domain. Therefore, specific analysis and evaluation techniques are required for the design and optimization of the proposed system. In this paper, we will address these issues, develop techniques to evaluate and enhance the system imaging performance and present methods to optimize the geometric configuration.

  8. Efficient millimeter wave 1140 GHz/ diode for harmonic power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Epitaxial gallium arsenide diode junction formed in a crossed waveguide structure operates as a variable reactance harmonic generator. This varactor diode can generate power efficiently in the low-millimeter wavelength.

  9. Millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, D.; Oka, T.; Tanaka, K.; Matsumura, S.; Miura, K.; Takekawa, S.

    2014-08-10

    We report the results of millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado Nebula (G357.7-0.1), which is a bright radio source behind the Galactic center region. A 15' × 15' area was mapped in the J = 1-0 lines of CO, {sup 13}CO, and HCO{sup +} with the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope. The Very Large Array archival data of OH at 1720 MHz were also reanalyzed. We found two molecular clouds with separate velocities, V{sub LSR} = –14 km s{sup –1} and +5 km s{sup –1}. These clouds show rough spatial anti-correlation. Both clouds are associated with OH 1720 MHz emissions in the area overlapping with the Tornado Nebula. The spatial and velocity coincidence indicates violent interaction between the clouds and the Tornado Nebula. Modestly excited gas prefers the position of the Tornado 'head' in the –14 km s{sup –1} cloud, also suggesting the interaction. Virial analysis shows that the +5 km s{sup –1} cloud is more tightly bound by self-gravity than the –14 km s{sup –1} cloud. We propose a formation scenario for the Tornado Nebula; the +5 km s{sup –1} cloud collided into the –14 km s{sup –1} cloud, generating a high-density layer behind the shock front, which activates a putative compact object by Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion to eject a pair of bipolar jets.

  10. Millimeter-wave nondestructive evaluation of pavement conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vines-Cavanau, David; Busuioc, Dan; Birken, Ralf; Wang, Ming

    2012-04-01

    The United States is suffering from an aging civil infrastructure crisis. Key to recovery are rapid inspection technologies like that being investigated by the VOTERS project (Versatile Onboard Traffic Embedded Roaming Sensors), which aims to outfit ordinary road vehicles with compact low-cost hardware that enables them to rapidly assess and report the condition of roadways and bridge decks free of driver interaction. A key piece of hardware, and the focus of this paper, is a 24 GHz millimeter-wave radar system that measures the reflectivity of pavement surfaces. To account for the variability of real-world driving, such as changes in height, angle, speed, and temperature, a sensor fusion approach is used that corrects MWR measurements based on data from four additional sensors. The corrected MWR measurements are expected to be useful for various characterization applications, including: material type; deterioration such as cracks and potholes; and surface coverage conditions such as dry, wet, oil, water, and ice. Success at each of these applications is an important step towards achieving the VOTERS objective, however, this paper focuses on surface coverage, as whatever covers the driving surface will be most apparent to the MWR sensor and if not accounted for could significantly limit the accuracy of other applications. Contributions of the paper include findings from static lab tests, which validate the approach and show the effects of height and angle. Further contributions come from lab and in-field dynamic tests, which show the effects of speed and demonstrate that the MWR approach is accurate under city driving conditions.

  11. The Detectability of Millimeter-wave Molecular Rotational Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liszt, Harvey S.; Pety, Jerome

    2016-06-01

    Elaborating on a formalism that was first expressed some 40 years ago, we consider the brightness of low-lying millimeter-wave rotational lines of strongly polar molecules at the threshold of detectability. We derive a simple expression relating the brightness to the line-of-sight integral of the product of the total gas and molecular number densities and a suitably defined temperature-dependent excitation rate into the upper level of the transition. Detectability of a line is contingent only on the ability of a molecule to channel enough of the ambient thermal energy into the line, and the excitation can be computed in bulk by summing over rates without solving the multi-level rate equations, or computing optical depths and excitation temperatures. Results for {{HCO}}+, HNC, and CS are compared with escape-probability solutions of the rate equations using closed-form expressions for the expected range of validity of our ansatz, with the result that gas number densities as high as {10}4 {{{cm}}}-3 or optical depths as high as 100 can be accommodated in some cases. For densities below a well-defined upper bound, the range of validity of the discussion can be cast as an upper bound on the line brightness which is 0.3 K for the J = 1–0 lines and 0.8–1.7 K for the J = 2–1 lines of these species. The discussion casts new light on the interpretation of line brightnesses under conditions of weak excitation, simplifies derivation of physical parameters, and eliminates the need to construct grids of numerical solutions of the rate equations.

  12. REMOTE DETECTION OF RADIOACTIVE PLUMES USING MILLIMETER WAVE TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Barnowski, R.; Chien; H.; Gopalsami, N.

    2009-01-01

    The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, a common method for manufacturing weapons-grade special nuclear materials, is accompanied by the release of fi ssion products trapped within the fuel. One of these fi ssion products is a radioactive isotope of Krypton (Kr-85); a pure β- emitter with a half-life of 10.72 years. Due to its chemical neutrality and relatively long half life, nearly all of the Kr-85 is released into the surrounding air during reprocessing, resulting in a concentration of Kr-85 near the source that is several orders of magnitude higher than the typical background (atmospheric) concentrations. This high concentration of Kr-85 is accompanied by a proportionately high increase in air ionization due to the release of beta radiation from Kr-85 decay. Millimeter wave (MMW) sensing technology can be used to detect the presence of Kr-85 induced plumes since a high concentration of ions in the air increases the radar cross section due to a combination of atmospheric phenomena. Possible applications for this technology include the remote sensing of reprocessing activities across national borders bolstering global anti-proliferation initiatives. The feasibility of using MMW radar technology to uniquely detect the presence of Kr-85 can be tested using commercial ion generators or sealed radioactive sources in the laboratory. In this paper we describe our work to derive an ion dispersion model that will describe the spatial distribution of ions from Kr-85 and other common lab sources. The types and energies of radiation emitted by isotopes Co-60 and Cs-137 were researched, and these parameters were incorporated into these dispersion models. Our results can be compared with the results of MMW detection experiments in order to quantify the relationship between radar cross section and air ionization as well as to further calibrate the MMW detection equipment.

  13. Millimeter-wave Driven Shock Wave for a Pulsed Detonation Microwave Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komatsu, Reiji; Fukunari, Masafumi; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Oda, Yasuhisa; Kajiwara, Ken; Takahashi, Koji; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2011-11-01

    A shock wave driven by millimeter wave ionization can be applied into a pulsed detonation engine as a Microwave Rocket. A high pressure induced inside the thruster generates the thrust, thus the shock wave propagation driven by the plasma is important. In this study, to obtain a different propagating structure, the beam profile was transformed from a Gaussian into a Ring and a Flat-top profile by using a pair of phase correcting mirrors. As a result, the shape of the propagating plasma was changed into a no-center shape in case of the Ring beam, and it was changed to a wider shape in case of the Flat-top beam. The propagating velocity of the ionization front of the Flat-top beam was much lower than that of the Gaussian due to the lower peak power density, and a higher plateau pressure and higher thrust impulse were generated by the Flat-top beam.

  14. Millimeter-Wave Imaging Technology Advancements for Plasma Diagnostics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangyu

    To realize fusion plant, the very first step is to understand the fundamental physics of materials under fusion conditions, i.e. to understand fusion plasmas. Our research group, Plasma Diagnostics Group, focuses on developing advanced tools for physicists to extract as much information as possible from fusion plasmas at millions degrees. The Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostics is a very useful tool invented in this group to study fusion plasma electron temperature and it fluctuations. This dissertation presents millimeter wave imaging technology advances recently developed in this group to improve the ECEI system. New technologies made it more powerful to image and visualize magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) activities and micro-turbulence in fusion plasmas. Topics of particular emphasis start from development of miniaturized elliptical substrate lens array. This novel substrate lens array replaces the previous generation substrate lens, hyper-hemispherical substrate lens, in terms of geometry. From the optical performance perspective, this substitution not only significantly simplifies the optical system with improved optical coupling, but also enhances the RF/LO coupling efficiency. By the benefit of the mini lens focusing properties, a wideband dual-dipole antenna array is carefully designed and developed. The new antenna array is optimized simultaneously for receiving both RF and LO, with sharp radiation patterns, low side-lobe levels, and less crosstalk between adjacent antennas. In addition, a high frequency antenna is also developed, which extends the frequency limit from 145 GHz to 220 GHz. This type of antenna will be used on high field operation tokamaks with toroidal fields in excess of 3 Tesla. Another important technology advance is so-called extended bandwidth double down-conversion electronics. This new electronics extends the instantaneous IF coverage from 2 to 9.2 GHz to 2 to 16.4 GHz. From the plasma point of view, it means that the

  15. Near field effects of millimeter-wave power transmission for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hargsoon; Song, Kyo D.; Lee, Kunik; Kim, Jaehwan; Choi, Sang H.

    2011-04-01

    An integration of micro devices system and wireless power transmission (WPT) technology offers a great potential to revolutionize current health care devices. The system integration of wireless power transmission devices with smart microsensors is crucial for replacing a power storage devices and miniaturizing wireless biomedical systems. Our research goal is to replace battery power supply with an implantable millimeter-wave rectenna. Recently, a hat system with a small millimeter-wave antenna which can feed millimeter-wave power to thin-film rectenna array embedding Schottky diodes was introduced for neural sensing and stimulation applications. In order to prove the design concept and investigate wireless power coupling efficiency under the system design, near-field wireless power transmission was studied in terms of wave frequency and distance. Also, in this paper, we will present the influence of biological objects to the wireless power transmission, simulating the experimental conditions of human objects for future medical applications.

  16. Ferromagnetic resonance of micro- and nano-sized hexagonal ferrite powders at millimeter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Konstantin A.; McCloy, John S.; Afsar, Mohammed N.

    2012-04-01

    Complex magnetic permeability and dielectric permittivity of micro- and nano-sized powdered barium (BaFe12O19) and strontium (SrFe12O19) hexaferrites have been studied in a broadband millimeter wave frequency range (30-120 GHz). Transmittance measurements have been performed using a free-space quasi-optical millimeter wave spectrometer, equipped with a set of high-power backward wave oscillators. Real and imaginary parts of dielectric permittivity for both types of micro- and nanoferrites have been calculated using analysis of recorded high-precision transmittance spectra. Frequency dependences of the magnetic permeability have been obtained from Schlömann's equation for partially magnetized ferrites. These materials show promise as tunable millimeter wave absorbers, based on their size-dependent absorption.

  17. Ferromagnetic Resonance of Micro- and Nano-sized Hexagonal Ferrite Powders at Millimeter Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Korolev, Konstantin A.; McCloy, John S.; Afsar, Mohammed N.

    2012-02-22

    Complex magnetic permeability and dielectric permittivity of micro- and nano-sized powdered barium (BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}) and strontium (SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}) hexaferrites have been studied in a broadband millimeter wave frequency range (30-120 GHz). Transmittance measurements have been performed using a free space quasi-optical millimeter wave spectrometer, equipped with a set of high power backward wave oscillators. Real and imaginary parts of dielectric permittivity for both types of micro- and nanoferrites have been calculated using analysis of recorded high precision transmittance spectra. Frequency dependences of the magnetic permeability have been obtained from Schloemann's equation for partially magnetized ferrites. These materials show promise as tunable millimeter wave absorber, based on their size-dependent absorption.

  18. Power and polarization monitor development for high power millimeter-wave

    SciTech Connect

    Makino, R. Kobayashi, K.; Kubo, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Mutoh, T.

    2014-11-15

    A new type monitor of power and polarization states of millimeter-waves has been developed to be installed at a miter-bend, which is a part of transmission lines of millimeter-waves, for electron cyclotron resonance heating on the Large Helical Device. The monitor measures amplitudes and phase difference of the electric field of the two orthogonal polarizations which are needed for calculation of the power and polarization states of waves. The power and phase differences of two orthogonal polarizations were successfully detected simultaneously.

  19. Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna Radiation Characteristics at Millimeter-Wave Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1998-01-01

    An endfire travelling wave antenna, such as, a linearly tapered slot antenna (LTSA) is a viable alternative to a patch antenna at millimeter-wave frequencies because of its simple design and ease of fabrication. This paper presents the radiation characteristics of LTSA at higher millimeter-wave frequencies. The measured radiation patterns are observed to be well behaved and symmetric with the main beam in the endfire direction. The measured gain is about 10 dB. The LTSAs have potential wireless applications at 50 GHz, 77 GHz, and 94 GHz.

  20. 3D rendering of passive millimeter-wave scenes using modified open source software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakowski, Maciej; Wilson, John; Murakowski, Janusz; Schneider, Garrett; Schuetz, Christopher; Prather, Dennis

    2011-05-01

    As millimeter-wave imaging technology becomes more mature, several applications are emerging for which this technology may be useful. However, effectively predicting the nuances of millimeter-wave phenomenology on the usefulness for a given application remains a challenge. To this end, an accurate millimeter-wave scene simulator would have tremendous value in predicting imager requirements for a given application. Herein, we present a passive millimeter-wave scene simulator built on the open-source 3d modeling software Blender. We describe the changes made to the Blender rendering engine to make it suitable for this purpose, including physically accurate reflections at each material interface, volumetric absorption and scattering, and tracking of both s and p polarizations. In addition, we have incorporated a mmW material database and world model that emulates the effects of cold sky profiles for varying weather conditions and frequencies of operation. The images produced by this model have been validated against calibrated experimental imagery captured by a passive scanning millimeter-wave imager for maritime, desert, and standoff detection applications.

  1. Millimeter wave case study of operational deployments: retail, airport, military, courthouse, and customs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryon, Gary V.

    2008-04-01

    In the wake of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on America, our security and defense industry was instantly tasked with delivering technologies that could be used to help prevent future terrorist activities. The general public world wide is asking for solutions that will foster a safe society and travel environment. Our best defenses rest in our talents within a free open society to prevent dangerous individuals from boarding planes, entering buildings, courthouses, transportations hubs and military bases with weapons capable of causing damage and bodily harm in the first place. Passive millimeter wave (PMMW) whole body imaging systems are based upon the principle that every physical entity emits, reflects, and/or absorbs electromagnetic energy. The term "passive" means that this approach does not bombard the test subject with energy radiation to further induce the discovery of hidden objects. PMMW whole body imaging systems focus on the human body's natural emission and reflection of millimeter wavelength energy. In physics, "millimeter waves" (MMW) are defined as extremely high-frequency (30-300 GHz) electromagnetic oscillations. On the electromagnetic spectrum these waves are just larger than infrared waves, but smaller than radio waves. The wavelength of a MMW is between 1 millimeter and 10 millimeters. That is approximately the thickness of a large paperclip up to the diameter of an "AAA" battery.

  2. Millimeter wave satellite concepts. Volume 2: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsen, N. B.; Holland, L. D.; Wallace, R. W.; Kelly, D. L.; Thomas, R. R.; Vogler, F. H.

    1979-01-01

    Identification of technologies for millimeter satellite communication systems, and assessment of the relative risks of these technologies, were accomplished through subsystem modeling and link optimization for both point-to-point and broadcast applications. The results, in terms of annual cost per channel to the user from a commercial view point, are described.

  3. Improved Grid-Array Millimeter-Wave Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, James J.; Rutledge, David B.; Smith, R. Peter; Weikle, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Improved grid-array amplifiers operating at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths developed for use in communications and radar. Feedback suppressed by making input polarizations orthogonal to output polarizations. Amplifier made to oscillate by introducing some feedback. Several grid-array amplifiers concatenated to form high-gain beam-amplifying unit.

  4. Millimeter-wave interferometric radiometry for the detection and geolocation of low-power signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowgiallo, David J.; Twarog, Elizabeth M.; Rauen, Steve; Peters, Wendy M.; Lazio, T. Joseph; McGlothlin, Norman R.; Helmboldt, Joseph F.; Gaiser, Peter W.

    2011-05-01

    Millimeter wave detection and imaging is becoming increasingly important with the proliferation of hostile, mobile millimeter wave threats from both weapons systems and communication links. Improved force protection, surveillance, and targeting will rely increasingly on the interception, detection, geo-sorting, and the identification of sources, such as point-to point communication systems, missile seekers, precision guided munitions, and fire control radar systems. This paper describes the Naval Research Laboratory's (NRL) demonstration broadband passive millimeter wave (mmW) interferometric imaging system. This Ka-band system will provide a capability for meter-precision geolocation for imaged objects. The interferometer uses a distributed array of 12 antenna elements to synthesize a large aperture. Each antenna is packaged into an individual receiver, from which a baseband signal is recorded. The correlator is software-based, utilizing signal processing techniques for visibilities, and image formation via beamforming methods. This paper presents first results from an interferometer flight campaign.

  5. Direct Conversion of Free Space Millimeter Waves to Optical Domain by Plasmonic Modulator Antenna

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A scheme for the direct conversion of millimeter and THz waves to optical signals is introduced. The compact device consists of a plasmonic phase modulator that is seamlessly cointegrated with an antenna. Neither high-speed electronics nor electronic amplification is required to drive the modulator. A built-in enhancement of the electric field by a factor of 35 000 enables the direct conversion of millimeter-wave signals to the optical domain. This high enhancement is obtained via a resonant antenna that is directly coupled to an optical field by means of a plasmonic modulator. The suggested concept provides a simple and cost-efficient alternative solution to conventional schemes where millimeter-wave signals are first converted to the electrical domain before being up-converted to the optical domain. PMID:26570995

  6. Direct Conversion of Free Space Millimeter Waves to Optical Domain by Plasmonic Modulator Antenna.

    PubMed

    Salamin, Yannick; Heni, Wolfgang; Haffner, Christian; Fedoryshyn, Yuriy; Hoessbacher, Claudia; Bonjour, Romain; Zahner, Marco; Hillerkuss, David; Leuchtmann, Pascal; Elder, Delwin L; Dalton, Larry R; Hafner, Christian; Leuthold, Juerg

    2015-12-01

    A scheme for the direct conversion of millimeter and THz waves to optical signals is introduced. The compact device consists of a plasmonic phase modulator that is seamlessly cointegrated with an antenna. Neither high-speed electronics nor electronic amplification is required to drive the modulator. A built-in enhancement of the electric field by a factor of 35,000 enables the direct conversion of millimeter-wave signals to the optical domain. This high enhancement is obtained via a resonant antenna that is directly coupled to an optical field by means of a plasmonic modulator. The suggested concept provides a simple and cost-efficient alternative solution to conventional schemes where millimeter-wave signals are first converted to the electrical domain before being up-converted to the optical domain. PMID:26570995

  7. Millimeter wave-induced changes in membrane properties of leech Retzius neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikov, Victor; Siegel, Peter H.

    2011-03-01

    This study evaluated a novel method for modulation of neuronal excitability using non-invasive delivery of millimeter waves. Millimeter waves at 60 GHz and incident power density of 100-600 μW/cm2 were applied to three intact segmental ganglia of the adult leach, and intracellular neuronal activity was recorded from the Retzius neurons using intracellular glass electrode. Transient dosedependent increase in the plasma membrane permeability was observed. In addition, in one of the examined neurons, a decrease in the neuronal firing rate was also evident. The results provide strong evidence for the feasibility of modulating neuronal excitability using non-invasive delivery of millimeter waves, and will be explored further for applications in basic neuroscience and treatment of neurological disorders.

  8. Millimeter And Submillimeter-Wave Integrated Circuits On Quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, Imran; Mazed, Mohammad; Siegel, Peter; Smith, R. Peter

    1995-01-01

    Proposed Quartz substrate Upside-down Integrated Device (QUID) relies on UV-curable adhesive to bond semiconductor with quartz. Integrated circuits including planar GaAs Schottky diodes and passive circuit elements (such as bandpass filters) fabricated on quartz substrates. Circuits designed to operate as mixers in waveguide circuit at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. Integrated circuits mechanically more robust, larger, and easier to handle than planar Schottky diode chips. Quartz substrate more suitable for waveguide circuits than GaAs substrate.

  9. ACRF Archive User Meeting Summary

    SciTech Connect

    SA Edgerton; RA McCord; DP Kaiser

    2007-10-30

    On October 30, 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sponsored an all-day workshop to assess the status of the ACRF Archive. Focus areas included usability of current functions, plans for revised functions, proposals for new functions, and an overarching discussion of new ideas. Although 13 scientists familiar with ACRF and the ARM Program were invited to the workshop, only 10 scientists were available to attend the workshop. ACRF consists of the infrastructure that was developed to support the ARM Program and includes the ACRF Archive (previously called the ARM Archive). The scientists who participated in the meeting ranged from those who used the Archive frequently to those who seldom or never had accessed the Archive. The group was spread across disciplines, i.e. modelers, conservationists, and others from universities and government laboratories. A few of the participants were funded by the ARM Program, but most were not funded currently by ARM. During the past year, several improvements were made to the ACRF Archive to link it with the ARM/ACRF web pages, add a shopping cart feature, and expand on search parameters. Additional modifications have been proposed and prototypes of these proposals were made available for the participants. The participants were given several exercises to do before the meeting, and their feedback was requested to help identify potential problems and shortcomings with the existing structure and to recommend improvements.

  10. Combined illumination cylindrical millimeter-wave imaging technique for concealed weapon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2000-07-01

    A novel millimeter-wave imaging technique has been developed for personnel surveillance applications, including the detection of concealed weapons, explosives, drugs, and other contraband material. Millimeter-waves are high-frequency radio waves in the frequency band of 30 - 300 GHz, and pose no health threat to humans at moderate power levels. These waves readily penetrate common clothing materials, and are reflected by the human body and by concealed items. The combined illumination cylindrical imaging concept consists of a vertical, high-resolution, millimeter-wave array of antennas which is scanned in a cylindrical manner about the person under surveillance. Using a computer, the data from this scan is mathematically reconstructed into a series of focused 3D images of the person. After reconstruction, the images are combined into a single high-resolution 3D image of the person under surveillance. This combined image is then rendered using 3D computer graphics techniques. The combined cylindrical illumination is critical as it allows the display of information from all angles. This is necessary because millimeter-waves do not penetrate the body. Ultimately, the images displayed to the operate will be icon-based to protect the privacy of the person being screened. Novel aspects of this technique include the cylindrical scanning concept and the image reconstruction algorithm, which was developed specifically for this imaging system. An engineering prototype based on this cylindrical imaging technique has been fabricated and tested. This work has been sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration.