Science.gov

Sample records for acrylonitrile butadiene styrene

  1. 21 CFR 177.1050 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer. 177.1050 Section 177.1050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as...

  2. 21 CFR 177.1030 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer. 177.1030 Section 177.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components...

  3. Denitrification with acrylonitrile as a substrate using pure bacteria cultures isolated from acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, C C; Lee, C M

    2001-04-01

    This study attempted to isolate and identify the denitrifying bacteria that utilize acrylonitrile as a substrate from acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) resin wastewater. The performance of the denitrifying bacteria for treating different initial acrylonitrile concentrations was also investigated under anoxic conditions. The results showed that seven strains of denitrifying bacteria that can use acrylonitrile or acrylic acid as a substrate were isolated from the denitrification tank of a wastewater treatment plant in a ABS resin manufacturing plant and a lab-scale anoxic granular activated carbon-fluidized bed. The bacteria strains Acidovorax facilis B and Pseudomonas nautica could utilize acrylonitrile up to 279 mg/l as a substrate for denitrification. For complete nitrate removal, an adequate supply of acrylonitrile was necessary. Under the assumption that the acrylic acid would be completely removed, the removal of 1 mg/l nitrate by A. facilis B or P. nautica, about 0.64-0.74 mg/l acrylonitrile or 0.87-1 mg/l acrylic acid was needed. Because strains A. facilis B and P. nautica could utilize acrylonitrile for denitrification, they are expected to play an important role in the treatment of acrylonitrile in the wastewater treatment plant (denitrification and nitrification processes) and lab-scale granular activated carbon-fluidized bed. PMID:11341291

  4. Toxicity of the components of styrene polymers: polystyrene, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and styrene-butadiene-rubber (SBR). Reactants and additives.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, L

    1984-01-01

    The toxicity of the components of styrene polymers, e.g., polystyrene, ABS and SBR, were reviewed with primary focus on the reactive monomers (except styrene) (e.g., acrylonitrile, butadiene) as well as on impurities and solvents such as benzene, hexane and methylethyl ketone, and additives such as phenyl-2-naphthylamine, di-n-butyl phthalate, and a number of peroxide initiators and flame retardants (e.g., 2,3-dibromopropanol, decadibromodiphenyl oxide and antimony trioxide). It is stressed that toxicity data are generally lacking for the majority of additives employed in the production of styrene polymers. Information is also lacking as to the numbers of individuals at potential risk and the extent of their exposure to the large number of additives employed. PMID:6371825

  5. Characterisation of recycled acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene from waste computer equipment in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Denise; Saron, Clodoaldo

    2015-06-01

    Polymeric materials constitute a considerable fraction of waste computer equipment and polymers acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene are the main thermoplastic polymeric components found in waste computer equipment. Identification, separation and characterisation of additives present in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene are fundamental procedures to mechanical recycling of these polymers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the methods for identification of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene from waste computer equipment in Brazil, as well as their potential for mechanical recycling. The imprecise utilisation of symbols for identification of the polymers and the presence of additives containing toxic elements in determinate computer devices are some of the difficulties found for recycling of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene from waste computer equipment. However, the considerable performance of mechanical properties of the recycled acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene when compared with the virgin materials confirms the potential for mechanical recycling of these polymers. PMID:26022280

  6. Preparing cellulose nanocrystal/acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene nanocomposites using the master-batch method.

    PubMed

    Ma, Libo; Zhang, Yang; Meng, Yujie; Anusonti-Inthra, Phuriwat; Wang, Siqun

    2015-07-10

    The master-batch method provides a simple way to apply cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) as reinforcement in a hydrophobic matrix. The two-stage process includes making high-CNC content (70 wt%) master batch pellets, then mixing acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and maleic anhydride grafted polyethylene with the master batch pellets to prepare the ABS/CNC nanocomposite in extruder. SEM image indicates that self-assembled CNC nanosheets disperse evenly throughout the polymer matrix. The improved mechanical properties shown in tensile and DMA tests reveal that the CNC combines well with the ABS. TGA results show that the thermal degradation temperature of CNC in the master batch increases because of the protection of the ABS coating. This approach not only improves the dispersion ability and the thermal stability of CNC, but it is also applicable to use with other hydrophobic thermoplastics in industrial scale production. PMID:25857992

  7. Design and testing of digitally manufactured paraffin Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene hybrid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulley, Jonathan M.

    This research investigates the application of additive manufacturing techniques for fabricating hybrid rocket fuel grains composed of porous Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene impregnated with paraffin wax. The digitally manufactured ABS substrate provides mechanical support for the paraffin fuel material and serves as an additional fuel component. The embedded paraffin provides an enhanced fuel regression rate while having no detrimental effect on the thermodynamic burn properties of the fuel grain. Multiple fuel grains with various ABS-to-Paraffin mass ratios were fabricated and burned with nitrous oxide. Analytical predictions for end-to-end motor performance and fuel regression are compared against static test results. Baseline fuel grain regression calculations use an enthalpy balance energy analysis with the material and thermodynamic properties based on the mean paraffin/ABS mass fractions within the fuel grain. In support of these analytical comparisons, a novel method for propagating the fuel port burn surface was developed. In this modeling approach the fuel cross section grid is modeled as an image with white pixels representing the fuel and black pixels representing empty or burned grid cells.

  8. Method for the separation of high impact polystyrene (HIPS) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastics

    DOEpatents

    Jody, Bassam J.; Arman, Bayram; Karvelas, Dimitrios E.; Pomykala, Jr., Joseph A.; Daniels, Edward J.

    1997-01-01

    An improved method is provided for separating acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and high impact polystyrene (HIPS) plastics from each other. The ABS and HIPS plastics are shredded to provide a selected particle size. The shredded particles of the ABS and HIPS plastics are applied to a solution having a solution density in a predefined range between 1.055 gm/cm.sup.3 and 1.07 gm/cm.sup.3, a predefined surface tension in a range between 22 dynes/cm to 40 dynes/cm and a pH in the range of 1.77 and 2.05. In accordance with a feature of the invention, the novel method is provided for separating ABS and HIPS, two solid thermoplastics which have similar densities by selectively modifying the effective density of the HIPS using a binary solution with the appropriate properties, such as pH, density and surface tension, such as a solution of acetic acid and water or a quaternary solution having the appropriate density, surface tension, and pH.

  9. 21 CFR 177.1050 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (3) Residual acrylonitrile monomer content of the modified copolymer articles is not more than 11 ppm as determined by a gas chromatographic method titled “Determination of Residual Acrylonitrile and Styrene Monomers-Gas Chromatographic Internal Standard Method,” which is incorporated by reference....

  10. Environmentally benign electroless nickel plating using supercritical carbon-dioxide on hydrophilically modified acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tengsuwan, Siwach; Ohshima, Masahiro

    2014-08-01

    Electroless Ni-P plating using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) in conjunction with copolymer-based hydrophilic modification was applied to an acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) substrate. The surface of ABS substrate was hydrophilically modified by blending with a multi-block copolymer, poly(ether-ester-amide)s (PEEA), in injection molding process. The substrate was then impregnated with Pd(II)-hexafluoroacetylacetonate, Pd(hfa)2, using scCO2, followed by the electroless plating reaction. ABS/PEEA substrates with different PEEA to ABS blend ratios and different volume ratios of butadiene to the styrene-acrylonitrile copolymer (SAN) matrix were prepared to investigate how the dispersed PEEA and butadiene domains affected the blend morphology and the adhesive strength of the plating metal-to-polymer contact. Increasing the PEEA copolymer to ABS blend ratio increased the mass transfer rate of the plating solution in the ABS substrate. Consequently, the metal-polymer composite layer became thicker, which increased the adhesive strength of the metal-to-polymer contact because of the anchoring effect. The butadiene domains appeared to attract the Pd catalyst precursor, and thus, the proportion of butadiene in the ABS matrix also affected the adhesive strength of the contact between the metal layer and the substrate. The ABS substrate was successfully plated with a Ni-P metal layer with an average adhesive strength of 9.1 ± 0.5 N cm-1 by choosing appropriate ABS/PEEA blend ratios and a Pd(hfa)2 concentration.

  11. Fabrication of Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene Nanostructures with Anodic Alumina Oxide Templates, Characterization and Biofilm Development Test for Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Desrousseaux, Camille; Cueff, Régis; Aumeran, Claire; Garrait, Ghislain; Mailhot-Jensen, Bénédicte; Traoré, Ousmane; Sautou, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Medical devices can be contaminated by microbial biofilm which causes nosocomial infections. One of the strategies for the prevention of such microbial adhesion is to modify the biomaterials by creating micro or nanofeatures on their surface. This study aimed (1) to nanostructure acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS), a polymer composing connectors in perfusion devices, using Anodic Alumina Oxide templates, and to control the reproducibility of this process; (2) to characterize the physico-chemical properties of the nanostructured surfaces such as wettability using captive-bubble contact angle measurement technique; (3) to test the impact of nanostructures on Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm development. Fabrication of Anodic Alumina Oxide molds was realized by double anodization in oxalic acid. This process was reproducible. The obtained molds present hexagonally arranged 50 nm diameter pores, with a 100 nm interpore distance and a length of 100 nm. Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene nanostructures were successfully prepared using a polymer solution and two melt wetting methods. For all methods, the nanopicots were obtained but inside each sample their length was different. One method was selected essentially for industrial purposes and for better reproducibility results. The flat ABS surface presents a slightly hydrophilic character, which remains roughly unchanged after nanostructuration, the increasing apparent wettability observed in that case being explained by roughness effects. Also, the nanostructuration of the polymer surface does not induce any significant effect on Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion. PMID:26284922

  12. Surface discharge and tracking phenomena induced on acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene polymer dielectric material by acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Yoshimura, N.

    1999-05-01

    The discharge and tracking phenomena induced on the polymer dielectric materials by acid rain are investigated by the accelerated aging of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer in artificial rainwater in this article. Based on the investigation of acid rain, the artificial rainwater is chosen to agree well with the actual ingredients of precipitation. The influence of hydrophobicity degradation on the surface discharge and tracking is studied. The relations among the surface discharge, tracking, hydrophobicity, and microchemical structure and physical morphology of material are furthermore discussed. Experimental results show that the polymer dielectric materials suffer a large attack and degradation from acid rain. The dielectric surface degrades and becomes rough, and the hydrophobicity decreases so that the surface discharge and tracking may occur on them.

  13. Effect of reactive compatibilization on the morphology and physical properties of bisphenol-A-polycarbonate/acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildes, Gregg Stephen

    1998-11-01

    An amine functional styrene-acrylonitrile (SAN-amine) polymer is proposed as a reactive compatibilizer for bisphenol-A-polycarbonate/acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (PC/ABS) blends. This polymer is miscible with the styrene/acrylonitrile (SAN) copolymer matrix of ABS materials, and the pendant secondary amine groups react with PC at the carbonate linkage to form a SAN-g-PC copolymer. The graft copolymer molecules reside at the PC/ABS interface and provide improved morphological stability at elevated temperatures by suppressing phase coalescence. The synthesis of this reactive compatibilizer and its reaction with carbonate moieties is described. Characterization of this reaction was done by NMR and GPC using model secondary amine and carbonate containing compounds. A technique was developed for the quantitative measurement of the kinetics of dispersed phase particle coalescence in these blends; the morphology was examined using TEM. While uncompatibilized PC/SAN blends showed an increase in particle size from approximately 1 mum to 2 mum (depending on PC viscosity) in less than five minutes at 270spC; compatibilized blends containing as little as 1% SAN-amine exhibited no change in morphology after 20 minutes. The effects of dispersed phase concentration, viscosity ratio and interfacial compatibilization using the SAN-amine compatibilizer on the process induced morphology of PC/SAN blends were also examined. Dispersed phase particle size increased significantly with SAN concentration and, although the morphology of uncompatibilized PC/SAN blends mixed in a Brabender mixer, single and twin screw extruders were quite similar, the twin screw extruder produced significantly finer morphologies in blends containing SAN-amine. The average particle size for blends compatibilized with the SAN-amine polymer was approximately half that of uncompatibilized blends and was relatively independent of viscosity ratio and dispersed phase composition. The fracture of thin (3.18 mm) and thick (6.35 mm) specimens of PC, ABS and PC/ABS blends with both standard and sharp notches was examined by standard Izod and single edge notch three point bend (SEN3PB) instrumented drop tower tests. Load-deflection data were analyzed as a function of ligament length and fracture parameters were calculated using the theoretical framework of the essential work of fracture concept. The effects of blend composition, temperature, rubber concentration and reactive compatibilization on the fracture properties of these materials were examined.

  14. Analysis of acrylonitrile, 1,3-butadiene, and related compounds in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymers for kitchen utensils and children's toys by headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hiroyuki; Kawamura, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    A headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method was developed for the simultaneous determination of the residual levels of acrylonitrile (AN), 1,3-butadiene (1,3-BD), and their related compounds containing propionitrile (PN) and 4-vinyl-1-cyclohexene (4-VC) in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) copolymers for kitchen utensils and children's toys. A sample was cut into small pieces, then N,N-dimethylacetamide and an internal standard were added in a sealed headspace vial. The vial was incubated for 1 h at 90 degrees C and the headspace gas was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The recovery rates of the analytes were 93.3-101.8% and the coefficients of variation were 0.3-6.5%. In ABS copolymers, the levels were 0.3-50.4 microg/g for AN, ND-4.5 microg/g for PN, 0.06-1.58 microg/g for 1,3-BD, and 1.1-295 microg/g for 4-VC. The highest level was found for 4-VC, which is a dimer of 1,3-BD, and the next highest was for AN, which is one of the monomers of the ABS copolymer. Furthermore, the method was also applied to acrylonitrile-styrene (AS) copolymers and polystyrenes (PS) for kitchen utensils, and nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) gloves. In AS copolymers, AN and PN were detected at 16.8-54.5 and 0.8-6.9 microg/g, respectively. On the other hand, the levels in PS and NBR samples were all low. PMID:21313827

  15. 21 CFR 177.1050 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... room temperature. A sample of the extracting solvent is then withdrawn and analyzed for acrylonitrile.... (e) Accelerated extraction end test. The modified copolymer shall yield acrylonitrile monomer not in... Acrylonitrile Monomer in Acrylonitrile-Containing Polymers and Food Simulating Solvents,” which is...

  16. Separation of polycarbonate and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene waste plastics by froth flotation combined with ammonia pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-Qing; Wang, Hui; Liu, Qun; Fu, Jian-Gang; Liu, You-Nian

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this research is flotation separation of polycarbonate (PC) and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) waste plastics combined with ammonia pretreatment. The PC and ABS plastics show similar hydrophobicity, and ammonia treatment changes selectively floatability of PC plastic while ABS is insensitive to ammonia treatment. The contact angle measurement indicates the dropping of flotation recovery of PC is ascribed to a decline of contact angle. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates reactions occur on PC surface, which makes PC surface more hydrophilic. Separation of PC and ABS waste plastics was conducted based on the flotation behavior of single plastic. At different temperatures, PC and ABS mixtures were separated efficiently through froth flotation with ammonia pretreatment for different time (13 min at 23 °C, 18 min at 18 °C and 30 min at 23 °C). For both PC and ABS, the purity and recovery is more than 95.31% and 95.35%, respectively; the purity of PC and ABS is up to 99.72% and 99.23%, respectively. PC and ABS mixtures with different particle sizes were separated effectively, implying that ammonia treatment possesses superior applicability. PMID:25266156

  17. 21 CFR 177.1030 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intended for use with food identified in table 1 of § 176.170(c) of this chapter as Type I, II, III, IVA.../styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer consists of: (1) 73 to 79 parts by weight of a matrix polymer... 28 parts by weight of styrene and (ii) 5 to 10 parts by weight of a graft polymer having the...

  18. 21 CFR 177.1030 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... intended for use with food identified in table 1 of § 176.170(c) of this chapter as Type I, II, III, IVA.../styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer consists of: (1) 73 to 79 parts by weight of a matrix polymer... 28 parts by weight of styrene and (ii) 5 to 10 parts by weight of a graft polymer having the...

  19. 21 CFR 177.1030 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... intended for use with food identified in table 1 of § 176.170(c) of this chapter as Type I, II, III, IVA.../styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer consists of: (1) 73 to 79 parts by weight of a matrix polymer... 28 parts by weight of styrene and (ii) 5 to 10 parts by weight of a graft polymer having the...

  20. SISTER CHROMATID EXCHANGE AND CHROMOSOME ABERRATION ANALYSES IN MICE AFTER IN VIVO EXPOSURE TO ACRYLONITRILE, STYRENE, OR BUTADIENE MONOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of polymers in plastic and rubber products has generated concern that monomers potentially active in biological systems may be eluted from these substances. The authors have evaluated two such monomers, acrylonitrile and styrene, for the induction of chromosome damage in ...

  1. Bacterial colonization and endotoxin content of a new renal dialysis water system composed of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene.

    PubMed Central

    du Moulin, G C; Coleman, E C; Hedley-Whyte, J

    1987-01-01

    We measured endotoxin and bacterial levels in tap water, in water purified by reverse osmosis, and in dialysate samples over a 4-month period in a new 10-bed renal dialysis unit. Water treated by reverse osmosis is conducted to the 10 stations through 111 m of piping composed of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). All determinations were made prior to the opening of the unit and after the system was purged for 35 h with all bedside station taps open. Formaldehyde disinfection of the piping system was attempted with a recommended protocol after 11 weeks by feeding 2.5 liters of 37% formaldehyde (0.85%, vol/vol) into the delivery system. Prior to water purging, 24 ng of endotoxin per ml was detected. This level decreased to 2.0 ng of endotoxin after the purging. Levels of endotoxin remained below 1.0 ng of endotoxin per ml throughout the duration of the study. In contrast, the level of viable microorganisms recovered from the treated water was approximately 3.5 X 10(4) CFU/100 ml. Even after disinfection of the system, there was no significant decrease in culturable bacteria from the water even though endotoxin levels were lower. Species isolated from the renal dialysis system were predominately pseudomonads, whereas species isolated from the tap water were Bacillus and Flavobacterium species. ABS provides a surface suitable for long-term colonization and growth of bacteria. Currently recommended decontamination protocols are ineffective in removing potentially pathogenic bacteria from ABS pipes and thus constitute an increased risk to patients undergoing dialysis. Images PMID:3606109

  2. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177.1020 Section 177.1020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN.../butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene copolymer identified in this section may...

  3. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177.1020 Section 177.1020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN.../butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene copolymer identified in this section may...

  4. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances.../butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene copolymer identified in this section may...

  5. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances.../butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene copolymer identified in this section may...

  6. Three-dimensional Printed Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene Framework Coated with Cu-BTC Metal-organic Frameworks for the Removal of Methylene Blue

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zongyuan; Wang, Jiajun; Li, Minyue; Sun, Kaihang; Liu, Chang-jun

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing was applied for the fabrication of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) framework. Functionalization of the ABS framework was then performed by coating of porous Cu-BTC (BTC = benzene tricarboxylic acid) metal-organic frameworks on it using a step-by-step in-situ growth. The size of the Cu-BTC particles on ABS was ranged from 200 nm to 900 nm. The Cu-BTC/ABS framework can take up most of the space of the tubular reactor that makes the adsorption effective with no need of stirring. Methylene blue (MB) can be readily removed from aqueous solution by this Cu-BTC/ABS framework. The MB removal efficiency for solutions with concentrations of 10 and 5 mg/L was 93.3% and 98.3%, respectively, within 10 min. After MB adsorption, the Cu-BTC/ABS composite can easily be recovered without the need for centrifugation or filtration and the composite is reusable. In addition the ABS framework can be recovered for subsequent reuse. A significant advantage of 3D-printed frameworks is that different frameworks can be easily fabricated to meet the needs of different applications. This is a promising strategy to synthesize new frameworks using MOFs and polymers to develop materials for applications beyond adsorption. PMID:25089616

  7. Three-dimensional printed acrylonitrile butadiene styrene framework coated with Cu-BTC metal-organic frameworks for the removal of methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zongyuan; Wang, Jiajun; Li, Minyue; Sun, Kaihang; Liu, Chang-jun

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing was applied for the fabrication of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) framework. Functionalization of the ABS framework was then performed by coating of porous Cu-BTC (BTC = benzene tricarboxylic acid) metal-organic frameworks on it using a step-by-step in-situ growth. The size of the Cu-BTC particles on ABS was ranged from 200 nm to 900 nm. The Cu-BTC/ABS framework can take up most of the space of the tubular reactor that makes the adsorption effective with no need of stirring. Methylene blue (MB) can be readily removed from aqueous solution by this Cu-BTC/ABS framework. The MB removal efficiency for solutions with concentrations of 10 and 5 mg/L was 93.3% and 98.3%, respectively, within 10 min. After MB adsorption, the Cu-BTC/ABS composite can easily be recovered without the need for centrifugation or filtration and the composite is reusable. In addition the ABS framework can be recovered for subsequent reuse. A significant advantage of 3D-printed frameworks is that different frameworks can be easily fabricated to meet the needs of different applications. This is a promising strategy to synthesize new frameworks using MOFs and polymers to develop materials for applications beyond adsorption. PMID:25089616

  8. Three-dimensional Printed Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene Framework Coated with Cu-BTC Metal-organic Frameworks for the Removal of Methylene Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zongyuan; Wang, Jiajun; Li, Minyue; Sun, Kaihang; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing was applied for the fabrication of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) framework. Functionalization of the ABS framework was then performed by coating of porous Cu-BTC (BTC = benzene tricarboxylic acid) metal-organic frameworks on it using a step-by-step in-situ growth. The size of the Cu-BTC particles on ABS was ranged from 200 nm to 900 nm. The Cu-BTC/ABS framework can take up most of the space of the tubular reactor that makes the adsorption effective with no need of stirring. Methylene blue (MB) can be readily removed from aqueous solution by this Cu-BTC/ABS framework. The MB removal efficiency for solutions with concentrations of 10 and 5 mg/L was 93.3% and 98.3%, respectively, within 10 min. After MB adsorption, the Cu-BTC/ABS composite can easily be recovered without the need for centrifugation or filtration and the composite is reusable. In addition the ABS framework can be recovered for subsequent reuse. A significant advantage of 3D-printed frameworks is that different frameworks can be easily fabricated to meet the needs of different applications. This is a promising strategy to synthesize new frameworks using MOFs and polymers to develop materials for applications beyond adsorption.

  9. Ultrasonic degradation of butadiene, styrene and their copolymers.

    PubMed

    Sathiskumar, P S; Madras, Giridhar

    2012-05-01

    Ultrasonic degradation of commercially important polymers, styrene-butadiene (SBR) rubber, acrylonitrile-butadiene (NBR) rubber, styrene-acrylonitrile (SAN), polybutadiene rubber and polystyrene were investigated. The molecular weight distributions were measured using gel permeation chromatography (GPC). A model based on continuous distribution kinetics approach was used to study the time evolution of molecular weight distribution for these polymers during degradation. The effect of solvent properties and ultrasound intensity on the degradation of SBR rubber was investigated using different pure solvents and mixed solvents of varying volatility and different ultrasonic intensities. PMID:21986515

  10. Laser transmission welding of Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene (ABS) using a tailored high power diode-laser optical fiber coupled system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Vidal, E.; Quintana, I.; Etxarri, J.; Otaduy, D.; González, F.; Moreno, F.

    2012-06-01

    Laser transmission welding (LTW) of polymers is a direct bonding technique which is already used in different industrial applications sectors such as automobile, microfluidic, electronic and biomedicine. This technique offers several advantages over conventional methods, especially when a local deposition of energy and minimum thermal distortions are required. In LTW one of the polymeric materials needs to be transparent to the laser wavelength and the second part needs to be designed to be absorbed in IR spectrum. This report presents a study of laser weldability of ABS (acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene) filled with two different concentrations of carbon nanotubes (0.01% and 0.05% CNTs). These additives are used as infrared absorbing components in the laser welding process, affecting the thermal and optical properties of the material and, hence, the final quality of the weld seam. A tailored laser system has been designed to obtain high quality weld seams with widths between 0.4 and 1.0mm. It consists of two diode laser bars (50W per bar) coupled into an optical fiber using a non-imaging solution: equalization of the beam quality factor (M2) in the slow and fast axes by a pair of micro step-mirrors. The beam quality factor has been analyzed at different laser powers with the aim to guarantee a coupling efficiency to the multimode optical fiber. The power scaling is carried out by means of multiplexing polarization technique. The analysis of energy balance and beam quality is performed in two linked steps: first by means ray tracing simulations (ZEMAX®) and second, by validation. Quality of the weld seams is analyzed in terms of the process parameters (welding speed, laser power and clamping pressure) by visual and optical microscope inspections. The optimum laser power range for three different welding speeds is determinate meanwhile the clamping pressure is held constant. Additionally, the corresponding mechanical shear tests were carried out to analyze the mechanical properties of the weld seams. This work provides a detailed study concerning the effect of the material microstructure and laser beam quality on the final weld formation and surface integrity.

  11. Comparison of sodium naphthenate and air-ionization corona discharge as surface treatments for the ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene polymer (ETFE) to improve adhesion between ETFE and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene polymer (ABS) in the presence of a cyanoacrylate adhesive (CAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucía Johanning-Solís, Ana; Stradi-Granados, Benito A.

    2014-09-01

    This study compares two ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) surface activation treatments, namely chemical attack with a solution of sodium naphthenate and plasma erosion via air-ionization corona discharge in order to improve the adhesive properties of the ETFE. An experimental design was prepared for both treatments in order to assess the effect of the treatment characteristics on the tensile load needed to break the bond between the ETFE and the acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene polymer (ABS) formed with a cyanoacrylate adhesive (CAA) applied between them. The reason for the selection of this problem is that both polymers are frequently used in the biomedical industry for their properties, and they need to be joined firmly in biomedical devices, and the cyanoacrylate adhesive is the adhesive traditionally used for fluoropolymers, in this case the ETFE, and the same CAA has also shown good adhesion with ABS. However, the strength of the bond for the triplet ETFE-CAA-ABS has not been reported and the improvement of the strength of the bond with surface treatments is not found in scholarly journals for modern medical devices such as stents and snares. Both treatments were compared based on the aforementioned design of experiments. The case where ETFE receives no surface treatment serves as the reference. The results indicated that the three factors evaluated (initial drying of the material, temperature of the chemical bath, and immersion time), and their interactions have no significant effect over the tensile load at failure (tensile strength) of the adhesive bond being evaluated. For the air-ionization corona discharge treatment, two factors were evaluated: discharge exposition time and air pressure. The results obtained from this experimental design indicate that there is no significant difference between the levels of the factors evaluated. These results were unexpected as the ranges used were representative of the maximum ranges permissible in manufacturing operations. As for the comparison of the treatments, it was determined that the treatments have statistically significant differences. It was also determined that there is a significant statistical difference between the processes where a surface treatment is performed and the process where no surface treatment is applied to the ETFE. The chemical treatment results in a higher tensile load at failure (tensile strength) of 276.6 N on average, the air ionization treatment has an average of 248.4 N, and the process with no treatment has the lower ultimate tensile strength average of 53 N. This comparison has demonstrated that the best treatment is the chemical treatment with sodium naphthenate under the conditions tested.

  12. 21 CFR 177.1040 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... temperature for 2 h.1 Minimum 10 pct solution viscosity at 25 °C (77 °F) is 10cP. 1 3. Acrylonitrile/styrene... average molecular weight, and solution viscosity, titled: “Determination of Residual Acrylonitrile and... Weights of Acrylonitrile/Styrene Copolymers,” and “Analytical Method for 10% Solution Viscosity of...

  13. 21 CFR 177.1040 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... temperature for 2 h.1 Minimum 10 pct solution viscosity at 25 °C (77 °F) is 10cP. 1 3. Acrylonitrile/styrene... average molecular weight, and solution viscosity, titled: “Determination of Residual Acrylonitrile and... Weights of Acrylonitrile/Styrene Copolymers,” and “Analytical Method for 10% Solution Viscosity of...

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF SOY PROTEIN ISOLATE/STYRENE-BUTADIENE RUBBER COMPOSITES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of renewable soy protein aggregates as a reinforcement network in Styrene-butadiene rubber composites is investigated by a dynamic mechanical method. The rigid nature of dry protein has a high shear elastic modulus of ~2 GPa and, therefore, is suitable as a reinforcement phase in rubber com...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... method titled “Determination of Residual Acrylonitrile and Styrene Monomers-Gas Chromatographic Internal... titled “Analysis of Cycopac Resin for Residual β-(2-Hydroxyethylmercapto) propionitrile,” which is... percent as determined by Micro-Kjeldahl analysis. (2) Residual acrylonitrile monomer content of...

  16. Recycling of Chrome Tanned Leather Dust in Acrylonitrile Butadiene Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sabbagh, Salwa H.; Mohamed, Ola A.

    2010-06-01

    Concerns on environmental waste problem caused by chrome tanned leather wastes in huge amount have caused an increasing interest in developing this wastes in many composite formation. This leather dust was used as filler in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) before treatment and after treatment with ammonia solution and sod. formate. Different formulations of NBR/ leather dust (untreated-treated with ammonia solution—treated with sod. formate) composites are prepared. The formed composite exhibit a considerable improvement in some of their properties such as rheometric characteristics especially with composites loaded with treated leather dust. Tensile strength, modulus at 100% elongation, hardness and youngs modulus were improved then by further loading start to be steady or decrease. Cross linking density in toluene were increased by incorporation of leather dust treated or untreated resulting in decreases in equilibrium swelling. Distinct increase in the ageing coefficient of both treated and untreated leather with drop in NBR vulcanizates without leather dust. Addition of leather dust treated or untreated exhibit better thermal stability.

  17. Development of Polythiophene/Acrylonitrile-Butadiene Rubbers for Artificial Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thipdech, Pacharavalee; Sirivat, Anuvat

    2007-03-01

    Electroactive polymers (EAPs) can respond to the applied electrical field by an extension or a retraction. In this work, we are interested in using an elastomeric blend for electroactive applications, acrylonitirle-butadiene rubber (NBR) containing a conductive polymer (Poly(3-thiopheneacetic acid, PTAA); the latter can be synthesized via oxidative polymerization. FT-IR, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), ^1H-NMR, UV-visible spectroscopy, and SEM are used to characterize the conductive polymer. Electrorheological properties are measured and investigated in terms of acrylonitrile content, blending ratio, doping level, and temperature. Experiments are carried out under oscillatory shear mode and with applied electric field strength varying from 0 to 2 kV/mm. Dielectric properties, conductivities are measured and correlated with the storage modulus responses. The storage modulus sensitivity, δG'G'0of the pure rubbers increases with increasing electric field strength. They attain the maximum values of about 30% and become constant at electric strength at and above 1000 V/mm.

  18. Chrome-tanned leather shavings as a filler of butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber.

    PubMed

    Przepiórkowska, A; Chrońska, K; Zaborski, M

    2007-03-01

    The noxious wastes from the tanning industry such as chrome-tanned leather shavings were used as the only filler of rubber mixes containing carboxylated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (XNBR) or butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (NBR), and a dispersing agent Limanol PEV (Schill & Seilacher). The best form addition of leather powder to the rubber mixes is mixed the waste protein with zinc oxide. The leather powder added to the rubber mixes improves the mechanical properties: tensile strength (T(s)), elongation at break (epsilon(b)) and increase the cross-linking density of carboxylated XNBR and NBR rubber mixes. Satisfactory results of these studies are presented in this work. PMID:16942836

  19. Study on the thermal stability of styrene butadiene rubber nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeb, M. R.; Chenari, T. N.; Parast, O. Yazdan; Jafari, B.; Asadi, H.; Safari, M. Arfavi; Holisaz, H.

    2012-07-01

    This study aims to investigate the thermal stability of the styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) nanocomposites containig surface modified calcium carbonate (MCC). All nanocomposites were produced at various nanofiller contents, utilizing a laboratory scale two-roll mill. The thermal stability parameters including initial decomposing temperature, temperature at maximum rate of weight loss, and char content of the MCC/SBR nanocomposites were then compared. It was found that by increasing the filler content, the decomposition temperature of MCC/SBR nanocomposites increases. Furthermore, the char content at high temperatures rises by increasing nanofiller content.

  20. Preparation and characterization of zinc sulphide nanocomposites based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesan, M. T.; Nihmath, A.; Francis, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    Rubber composite based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) reinforced with nano zinc sulphide (ZnS) have been prepared via vulcanization process and characterized by several techniques. Processing characteristics such as scorch time, optimum cure time decreases with increase in concentration of nano filler in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber. Mechanical properties such as tensile and tear strength increases with increase in concentration of nano filler up to 7 phr of loading thereafter the value decreases, whereas hardness, and flame resistance increases with the dosage of fillers. These enhanced properties are due to the homogenous dispersion of nano fillers in NBR matrix, which is evidenced from the structure that evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  1. Durability of styrene-butadiene latex modified concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Shaker, F.A.; El-Dieb, A.S.; Reda, M.M.

    1997-05-01

    The durability of reinforced concrete structures represents a major concern to many investigators. The use of latex modified concrete (LMC) in construction has urged researchers to review and investigate its different properties. This study is part of a comprehensive investigation carried on the use of polymers in concrete. The main objective of this study to investigate and evaluate the main durability aspects of Styrene-Butadiene latex modified concrete (LMC) compared to those of conventional concrete. Also, the main microstructural characteristics of LMC were studied using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The SEM investigation of the LMC showed major differences in its microstructure compared to that of the conventional concrete. The LMC proved to be superior in its durability compared to the durability of conventional concrete especially its water tightness (measured by water penetration, absorption, and sorptivity tests), abrasion, corrosion, and sulphate resistance.

  2. Ferromagnetic resonance investigations on styrene-butadiene-styrene barium ferrite nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    All, N; Chipara, M; Balascuta, S; Skomski, R; Sellmyer, D J

    2009-07-01

    FMR measurements on barium ferrite nanoparticles (with an average length of about 13 nm) dispersed within a block copolymer (styrene-butadiene-styrene) are reported. Resonance spectra have been successfully simulated by a convolution of a Dysonian line and a Lorentzian line. The temperature dependence of FMR spectra in the so called in-the-plane and out-of the-plane configurations is reported. The angular dependence of FMR spectra at room temperature is analyzed in detail and simulated within simple thermodynamic model that takes into account the competition between shape and magnetocrystalline anisotropies. FMR data revealed that the local magnetic field acting on uncoupled electronic spin is dominated by the magnetocrystalline contribution, which eventually includes surface effects. The strong connection between FMR spectra and hysteresis loop is demonstrated. PMID:19916470

  3. Diamino Telechelic Polybutadienes for Solventless Styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) Triblock Copolymer Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Shengxiang; Hoye, Thomas R.; Macosko, Christopher W.

    2008-01-01

    High molecular weight, high functionality diamino telechelic polybutadienes (TPBs) were synthesized by ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) of 1,5-cyclooctadiene (COD) in the presence of a chain transfer agent, 1,8-dicyano-4-octene, followed by lithium aluminum hydride reduction. Melt coupling of diamino TPB with anhydride-terminated polystyrene (PS-anh) resulted in the formation of styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) triblock copolymers; ca. 80% maximum conversion of PS-anh was achieved within 30 seconds. The results from SAXS, TEM, and rheological measurements of the coupling products confirmed the formation of SBS triblock copolymers having lamellar morphology. A fluororesent-labeled PS-anh was used to study the coupling kinetics by diluting the reactants by the addition of non-functional PS. PMID:19907636

  4. Effects of Soy Protein Nanoparticle Aggregate Size on the Viscoelastic Properties of Styrene-Butadiene Composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein nanoparticle aggregates were prepared by alkaline hydrolysis of soy protein isolate (SPI). Light scattering measurements indicated a narrow size distribution of SPI aggregates. Nanocomposites were formed by mixing hydrolyzed SPI (HSPI) nanoparticle aggregates with styrene-butadiene (SB...

  5. Determination of styrene-butadiene rubber composition by attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. S.; Kiselev, S. A.; Kiseleva, E. A.; Budeeva, A. V.; Mashukov, V. I.

    2013-03-01

    A rapid method for determining the composition of styrene-butadiene rubber using attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy was proposed. PMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy and infrared transmission spectroscopy were used as absolute techniques for determining the compositions of calibration samples. It was shown that the method was applicable to a wide range of styrene-butadiene rubbers, did not require additional sample preparation, and was easily reproducible.

  6. Alteration of Acrylonitrile-Methylacrylate-Butadiene Terpolymer by Nocardia rhodochrous and Penicillium notatum†

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, A. D.; Dean, A. V.; Gilbert, S. G.

    1980-01-01

    [14C]Barex-210, a terpolymer of acrylonitrile, methylacrylate, and butadiene, was tested for bioconversion. Powdered samples of polymer, each specifically 14C labeled at different carbon atoms of the polymer, were incubated with either Nocardia rhodochrous or Penicillium notatum in an enriched growth medium for various periods of time. After 6 months of incubation, the 14C-labeled polymer was transformed from a high-molecular-weight material completely soluble in dimethyl formamide (DMF) into both a lower-molecular-weight form still soluble in DMF and a second form that was no longer soluble in DMF. The amount of 14C-labeled carbon atoms converted into DMF-insoluble material was 8% of the backbone carbon-carbon atoms and 12% of the side-chain nitrile and acrylate atoms from the acrylonitrile-methylacrylate copolymer and 60% of the elastomer (acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer) atoms. Metabolism of the polymer was not established from measurements of metabolic 14CO2. Evolution of 14CO2 amounted to only 0.3, 0.6, 1.8, and 3.3% of these four fractions, respectively. Although the transformation of high-molecular-weight polymer into DMF-insoluble material was rapid in the early stages of microbial growth, the accompanying CO2 evolution was much slower. Further evidence of polymer alteration was indicated by the infrared spectrum of the insoluble material, which showed a disappearance of the nitrile and methylacrylate peaks. PMID:16345541

  7. 21 CFR 177.1040 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... deionized water or reagent grade n-heptane at reflux temperature for 2 h.1 Minimum 10 pct solution viscosity... viscosity, titled: “Determination of Residual Acrylonitrile and Styrene Monomers-Gas Chromatographic... Copolymers,” and “Analytical Method for 10% Solution Viscosity of Tyril,” which are incorproated by...

  8. Radiation chemical modification of rubbers on the basis of ethylene-propylene terpolymer and butadiene-styrene thermoelastoplastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikaev, A. K.; Shemenkova, L. V.; Timofeeva, V. F.; Glazunov, P. Ya.

    With the purpose of improving the operating characteristics of rubbers on the basis of ethylene-propylene terpolymer and butadiene-styrene thermoelastoplastic their modification by radiation graft polymerization of acrylic monomers (acrylonitrile, acrylic acid, glycidyl methacrylate, cyanoethyl methacrylate etc.) was carried out. The investigations performed made it possible to select monomers, whose grafting onto rubbers improves the adhesion properties and increases oil resistance of the latter. A continuous grafting process by the method of impregnation of rubber with monomer using a pilot plant with an electron accelerator was developed. The output of the pilot plant at a dose rate of 2.2 kGy/s is 4.2 t/year.

  9. Detection of hydrogen dissolved in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Shin; Fujiwara, Hirotada

    2012-01-01

    Rubber materials, which are used for hydrogen gas seal, can dissolve hydrogen during exposure in high-pressure hydrogen gas. Dissolved hydrogen molecules were detected by solid state 1H NMR of the unfilled vulcanized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber. Two signals were observed at 4.5 ppm and 4.8 ppm, which were assignable to dissolved hydrogen, in the 1H NMR spectrum of NBR after being exposed 100 MPa hydrogen gas for 24 h at room temperature. These signals were shifted from that of gaseous hydrogen molecules. Assignment of the signals was confirmed by quantitative estimation of dissolved hydrogen and peak area of the signals.

  10. Chemical characterization of CTBN (carboxyl-terminated butadiene/acrylonitrile) and its epoxy adduct

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the analysis of carbonxyl-terminated butadiene (CTB), carboxyl-terminated butadiene/acrylonitrile (CTBN), and a CTBN adduct prepared by reaction with Epon 828. Data from gel permeation chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography, and ion chromatography are presented and discussed. Quantitative methods based on carbon-13 and proton NMR for analyzing CTBN are described. Proton NMR was found to be useful in identifying lots that have an abnormal amount of CTBN protons. One such lot exhibited a phase separation of a polybutadiene impurity. Carbon-13 NMR was found to be capable of determining nitrile content directly. Carbon-13 NMR had a relative standard deviation of 8.3% and a proton NMR of 3.9%. Proton NMR was found to be useful in identifying lots that have 5% more CTBN protons than other lots. 3 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Acrylonitrile-Butadiene Rubber (NBR) Prepared via Living/Controlled Radical Polymerization (RAFT).

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Andreas; Brandau, Sven; Klimpel, Michael; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2010-09-15

    In the current work we present results on the controlled/living radical copolymerization of acrylonitrile (AN) and 1,3-butadiene (BD) via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization techniques. For the first time, a solution polymerization process for the synthesis of nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) via the use of dithioacetate and trithiocarbonate RAFT agents is described. It is demonstrated that the number average molar mass, $\\overline M _{\\rm n} $, of the NBR can be varied between a few thousand and 60 000 g · mol(-1) with polydispersities between 1.2 and 2.0 (depending on the monomer to polymer conversion). Excellent agreement between the experimentally observed and the theoretically expected molar masses is found. Detailed information on the structure of the synthesized polymers is obtained by variable analytical techniques such as infrared spectroscopy (IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). PMID:21567572

  12. Application of Lignin as Antioxidant in Styrene Butadiene Rubber Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shusheng; Cheng, Xiansu

    2010-11-01

    Lignin isolated from enzymatic hydrolyzed cornstalks (EHL) is a renewable natural polymer, and rubber is one of the most important polymer materials. The application of EHL in rubber industry is of great significance. The influence of EHL and antioxidant RD on the vulcanizing characteristics, thermal oxidative aging stability under free condition, and water extraction resistance of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) were investigated. The effect of EHL/antioxidant D composite antioxidant on the thermal oxidative ageing of SBR was also evaluated. Results showed that the protection of SBR from thermal oxidative aging by EHL/antioxidant D composite antioxidant was superior to that of antioxidant D. This is because EHL molecules have hindered phenol group and have excellent auxiliary antioxidant role with antioxidant D. Moreover, the influence of EHL on the vulcanizing characteristics of SBR compounds was better than that of antioxidant RD, and EHL can reduce the cure rate and increase the optimum cure time. It is because that the EHL molecules have hindered phenol group and methoxy group, which can form a special structure to capture free radical and terminate the chain reaction. The retained tensile strength of SBR compounds with EHL was similar to that of the samples with antioxidant RD, while the retained elongation at break of SBR compounds with EHL was higher than that of the samples with antioxidant RD. In addition, the SBR compounds with EHL have a good water extraction resistance property, which was similar to the samples with antioxidant RD. This is because EHL have large molecular weight, good stability and low solubility in water. In conclusion, due to the low price, abundant resources, non-toxic and pollution-free, etc., EHL will have broad application prospect.

  13. Recycling cycle of materials applied to acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene/policarbonate blends with styrene-butadiene-styrene copolymer addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cândido, L. H. A.; Ferreira, D. B.; Júnior, W. Kindlein; Demori, R.; Mauler, R. S.

    2014-05-01

    The scope of this research is the recycling of polymers from mobile phones hulls discarded and the performance evaluation when they are submitted to the Recycling Cycle of Materials (RCM). The studied material was the ABS/PC blend in a 70/30 proportion. Different compositions were evaluated adding virgin material, recycled material and using the copolymer SBS as impact modifier. In order to evaluate the properties of material's composition, the samples were characterized by TGA, FTIR, SEM, IZOD impact strength and tensile strength tests. At the first stage, the presented results suggest the composition containing 25% of recycled material and 5% of SBS combines good mechanical performance to the higher content of recycled material and lower content of impact modifier providing major benefits to recycling plans. Five cycles (RCM) were applied in the second stage; they evidenced a decrease trend considering the impact strength. At first and second cycle the impact strength was higher than reference material (ABS/PC blend) and from the fourth cycle it was lower. The superiority impact strength in the first and second cycles can be attributed to impact modifier effect. The thermal tests and the spectrometry didn't show the presence of degradation process in the material and the TGA curves demonstrated the process stability. The impact surface of each sample was observed at SEM. The microstructures are not homogeneous presenting voids and lamellar appearance, although the outer surface presents no defects, demonstrating good moldability. The present work aims to assess the life cycle of the material from the successive recycling processes.

  14. Barrierity of hydrogenated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber and butyl rubber after exposure to organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Krzemińska, Sylwia; Rzymski, Władysław M

    2011-01-01

    Resistance of antichemical clothing primarily depends on the type of material it is made from, in particular on the type of polymer used for coating the fabric carrier. This paper reports on systematic investigations on the influence of the cross-linking density of an elastomer and the composition of a cross-linked elastomer on its resistance to permeation of selected organic solvents. Tests of barrier material samples made from nonpolar butyl rubber (IIR) and polar hydrogenated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (HNBR) showed that (a) in rubber-solvent systems with medium thermodynamic affinity, cross-linking density influenced resistance to permeation and (b) the polarity of the system had a significant influence on barrierity. PMID:21375953

  15. Experimental study on behaviors of dielectric elastomer based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Kuangjun; Chuc, Nguyen Huu; Kwon, Hyeok Yong; Phuc, Vuong Hong; Koo, Jachoon; Lee, Youngkwan; Nam, Jaedo; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol

    2010-04-01

    Previously, the dielectric elastomer based on Acrylonitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR), called synthetic elastomer has been reported by our group. It has the advantages that its characteristics can be modified according to the requirements of performances, and thus, it is applicable to a wide variety of applications. In this paper, we address the effects of additives and vulcanization conditions on the overall performance of synthetic elastomer. In the present work, factors to have effects on the performances are extracted, e.g additives such as dioctyl phthalate (DOP), barium titanium dioxide (BaTiO3) and vulcanization conditions such as dicumyl peroxide (DCP), cross-linking times. Also, it is described how the performances can be optimized by using DOE (Design of Experiments) technique and experimental results are analyzed by ANOVA (Analysis of variance).

  16. Birchwood biochar as partial carbon black replacement in styrene-butadiene rubber composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Birchwood feedstock was used to make slow pyrolysis biochar that contained 89% carbon and < 2% ash. This biochar was blended with carbon black as filler for styrene-butadiene rubber. Composites made from blended fillers of 25/75 biochar/carbon black were equivalent to or superior to their 100% carbo...

  17. Morphology and Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Diglycidyl Ether of Bisphenol-A Toughened with Carboxyl-Terminated Butadiene-Acrylonitrile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. D.; Chung, S. Y.; Fedors, R. F.; Moacanin, J.; Gupta, A.

    1984-01-01

    The fracture toughness of an incorporation of a carboxyl-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile (CTBN) elastomer in diglycidyl ether bisphenol A (DGEBA) resin was investigated. Measurements of dynamic mechanical properties, scanning electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering were carried out to characterize the state of cure, morphology and particle size and size distribution of the neat resins and their graphite fiber reinforced composites.

  18. Estimation of the Surface Properties of Styrene-Acrylonitrile Random Copolymers from Contact Angle Measurements.

    PubMed

    Adão; Saramago; Fernandes

    1999-09-01

    The surface free energy per unit area of a solid, gamma(S), is a fundamental property of materials and determines their surface and interfacial behavior in processes like wetting and adhesion. In this study the gamma(S) of a series of styrene-acrylonitrile random copolymers is evaluated. Three different approaches are used to determine the components in which the surface free energy can be decomposed. Using the geometric and the harmonic mean approach, the dispersive, gamma(d), and polar, gamma(p), components of the solid surface free energy were determined and compared to the Lifshitz-van der Waals, gamma(LW), and acid-base, gamma(AB), components using the approach developed by C. J. van Oss et al. (1987, Adv. Colloid Interface Sci. 28, 35). The acid-base approach was also used to evaluate the work of adhesion of the test liquids: water, glycerol, and thiodiglycol. It was found that the contact angles of these liquids follow closely the predictions of Cassie equation. The evaluation of the surface free energy components on one hand and the relative magnitude of the work of adhesion components on the other hand, suggest that below 50% of acrylonitrile the polystyrene repeating units are preferentially at the surface. Above 50% of acrylonitrile the segregation of the low-energy homopolymer at the surface decreases. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10441415

  19. The physical and degradation properties of starch-graft-acrylonitrile/carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber latex films.

    PubMed

    Misman, M A; Azura, A R; Hamid, Z A A

    2015-09-01

    Starch-graft-acrylonitrile (ANS) is compounded with carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber (XNBR) latex. The control XNBR and the ANS/XNBR latex films were prepared through a coagulant dipping process. The films were subjected to ageing and soil burial procedures. For the biodegradation experiment, the surface of the film was assessed after the 2nd, 4th and 8th week of soil burial. The ANS, XNBR, and ANS/XNBR colloidal stability were determined with a Malvern Zetasizer. For the dipped latex films, the mechanical, morphological and thermal properties were analyzed. The addition of ANS into the XNBR latex increased the stability of the colloidal dispersions, decreased the latex film tensile strength, but increased the elongation at break due to the bipolar interaction of the ANS and XNBR particles. The ANS/XNBR latex films aged faster than the control films while the morphological analysis showed the existence of a starch crystal region and the formation of microbial colonies on the surfaces of the films. Based on the TGA-DTA curves, a higher ΔT was observed for the ANS/XNBR latex films signifying high thermal energy needed for the film to thermally degrade. PMID:26005134

  20. Barrier properties of hydrogenated acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber composites containing modified layered aluminosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzemińska, S.; Rzymski, W. M.

    2011-12-01

    The resistance to permeation by the selected solvents of flat membranes made of cured hydrogenated acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (HNBR) materials without any fillers and containing 5 phr of layered aluminosilicate nanofiller (bentonite), modified with various types of ammonium salts or N330 type carbon black, was investigated. The barrier properties were assessed on the basis of the breakthrough time of a liquid with low (cyclohexane) or average (butyl acetate) thermodynamic affinity to HNBR, determined according to EN 6529:2001, through a cured elastomer sample. The addition of bentonite, irrespectively of the method of modification of its particles, was found to increase the cured HNBR breakthrough time by 20 - 35 % in the case of slowly permeating non-polar cyclohexane, and by 50 - 130 % in the case of polar butyl acetate permeating more rapidly, in comparison with the barrier material containing no filler. The layered aluminosilicate nanofillers increased the breakthrough time of the material sample for both the tested solvents. In particular, the breakthrough time for polar butyl acetate was even longer than for conventional carbon black. Additionally, the increase of the breakthrough time was observed to depend on the modifier of bentonite particle surface.

  1. An investigation on chloroprene-compatibilized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene blends.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Khalil

    2015-11-01

    Blends of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene (NBR/HDPE) compatibilized by Chloroprene rubber (CR) were prepared. A fixed quantity of industrial waste such as marble waste (MW, 40 phr) was also included. The effect of the blend ratio and CR on cure characteristics, mechanical and swelling properties of MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends was investigated. The results showed that the MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends revealed an increase in tensile strength, tear, modulus, hardness and cross-link density for increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The minimum torque (M L) and maximum torque (M H) of blends increased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE while scorch time (ts2) cure time (tc90), compression set and abrasion loss of blends decreased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The blends also showed a continuous reduction in elongation at break as well as swelling coefficient with increasing HDPE amount in blends. MW filled blends based on CR provided the most encouraging balance values of overall properties. PMID:26644917

  2. An investigation on chloroprene-compatibilized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene blends

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Blends of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene (NBR/HDPE) compatibilized by Chloroprene rubber (CR) were prepared. A fixed quantity of industrial waste such as marble waste (MW, 40 phr) was also included. The effect of the blend ratio and CR on cure characteristics, mechanical and swelling properties of MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends was investigated. The results showed that the MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends revealed an increase in tensile strength, tear, modulus, hardness and cross-link density for increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The minimum torque (ML) and maximum torque (MH) of blends increased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE while scorch time (ts2) cure time (tc90), compression set and abrasion loss of blends decreased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The blends also showed a continuous reduction in elongation at break as well as swelling coefficient with increasing HDPE amount in blends. MW filled blends based on CR provided the most encouraging balance values of overall properties. PMID:26644917

  3. Nanocomposites prepared from acrylonitrile butadiene rubber and organically modified montmorillonite with vinyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mijeong; Kim, Hoonjung; Kim, Eunkyoung

    2006-01-01

    Nanocomposites were prepared from acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR), vinyl groups containing organically modified montmorillonite and additives, such as zinc oxide, stearic acid, and sulfur. The organically modified montmorillonites used in these nanocomposites were prepared by ion exchange reactions of N,N'-dimethylalkyl-(p-vinylbenzyl)-ammonium chlorides (DAVBAs, alkyl = octyl, dodecyl, and octadecyl) with sodium montmorillonite (Na+-MMT). NBR nanocomposites were obtained by controlling both the mixing and vulcanization conditions, by using a Brabender mixer and hot-press process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that, depending on the amount of montmorillonite that is added, both exfoliated and intercalated nanocomposite structures are formed. The NBR/DAVBA-MMT nanocomposites exhibit much higher mechanical properties (e.g., tensile strength, Young's modulus, 300% modulus, and hardness) as well as gas barrier properties as compared to NBR Na+-MMT or NBR composites generated from modified montmorillonites without vinyl groups. Consistent with the results of XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the intercalation and exfoliation structures of the nanocomposites coexist and that the DAVBA-MMT layers are well dispersed in NBR.

  4. Rheology of the Miscible Polymer Blend Poly(methyl methacrylate) and Poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, J. A.; Colby, R. H.; Stadler, R.

    1997-03-01

    The viscoelasticity of a miscible blend of poly(methyl methacrylate) and a random copolymer of styrene and acrylonitrile has been investigated by means of oscillatory shear, and compared to the pure components. The blend components are characterized by closely-matched glass transition temperatures (110 and 130 ^oC for SAN and PMMA respectively). The Flory interaction parameter for this blend \\chi = -0.01. The blend contained 20 wt% SAN. We find that the empirical time-temperature superposition principle holds for the pure SAN and the blend between Tg and Tg+55K, and between Tg+20K and Tg+55K for the pure PMMA. Literature neutron scattering data indicate significant concentration fluctuations in this blend system, but the fluctuations do not cause thermorheological complexity because all compositions have nearly identical glass transition temperatures.

  5. Perinatal Toxicity and Carcinogenicity Studies of StyreneAcrylonitrile Trimer, A Ground Water Contaminant

    PubMed Central

    Behl, Mamta; Elmore, Susan A.; Malarkey, David E.; Hejtmancik, Milton R.; Gerken, Diane K.; Chhabra, Rajendra S.

    2015-01-01

    Styrene Acrylonitrile (SAN) Trimer is a by-product in the production of acrylonitrile styrene plastics. Following a report of a childhood cancer cluster in the Toms River section of Dover Township, New Jersey, SAN Trimer was identified as one of the groundwater contaminants at Reich Farm Superfund site in the township. The contaminants from the Reich Farm site’s ground water plume impacted two wells at the Parkway well field. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) studied the toxicity and carcinogenicity of SAN Trimer in rats exposed during their perinatal developmental period and adulthood. The chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity studies in F344/N rats were preceded by 7- and 18-week perinatal toxicity studies to determine the exposure concentrations for the 2-year studies. Subsequently, Fisher 344 pregnant dams were exposed to SAN Trimer containing diet at 400, 800, or 1600 ppm concentrations during gestation, nursing and weaning periods of offspring followed by two year of adult exposures to both male and female pups. There was no statistically significant evidence of carcinogenic activity following SAN-Trimer exposure; however, rare neoplasms in the brain and spinal cord were observed in males and to lesser extent in female rats. These incidences were considered within the range of historical background in the animal model used in the current studies. Therefore, the presence of a few rarely occurring CNS tumors in the treated groups were not judged to be associated with the SAN Trimer exposure. The major finding was a dose-related peripheral neuropathy associated with the sciatic nerves in females and spinal nerve roots in males and females thereby suggesting that SAN trimer is potentially a nervous system toxicant. PMID:24060431

  6. Acrylonitrile

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylonitrile ; CASRN 107 - 13 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  7. Electrical Conductivity in the Nonconjugated Polymer Styrene-Butadiene-Rubber (SBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, Jitto; Khatavkar, Sanchit; Thakur, Mrinal

    2003-03-01

    Electrical conductivity as a function of doping with iodine has been measured in a nonconjugated polymer, styrene-butadiene-rubber (SBR) which is a copolymer of styrene and butadiene, used extensively in automobile tires. The conductivity reaches a value of about 0.01 S/cm upon doping with iodine. The color of the rubber film changes from colorless to black upon doping. FTIR studies of the polymer show that the intensity of the =CH bending mode decreases with doping - indicating that the dopant interacts with the double bond and leads to a charge-transfer from the double bond to the dopant. The absorption spectrum after doping at a low level has two peaks - one at 4.13 eV and the other at 3.18 eV. The first peak is due to the cation radical formed upon doping and the second one is due to the charge-transfer complex formed with the dopant. The polystyrene segments of the copolymer seem to have less interaction with the dopant since polystyrene is glassy. The radical cation peak of another nonconjugated conductive polymer, polyalloocimene having a higher number-fraction of double bonds in the repeat, is slightly red-shifted compared to that of SBR.

  8. Optical properties of polycarbonate/styrene-co-acrylonitrile blends: effects of molecular weight of the matrix.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ping; Xiong, Ying; Guo, Shaoyun

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the effects of the molecular weight of a polycarbonate (PC) matrix on the phase morphology and optical properties of a PC/styrene-co-acrylonitrile (SAN) blend were investigated. A scanning electron microscope is used to analyze the phase morphology of the blends, and Mie scattering theory is used to analyze the changing laws of the optical properties of PC/SAN blends with the increasing of PC molecular weight. Results show that the average particle diameter is not strongly changed with different PC molecular weight because the values of the viscosity ratios are very close to each other. But it is obvious that the number of large particles gradually reduced while small particles (especially d<2  μm) significantly increased with the increasing of PC molecular weight. And the increase in small particles will result in an increase in backward scattering so the transmittance of PC/SAN blends decreases with the increase of PC molecular weight. However, the balance of the scattering coefficients and the number concentration of particles eventually lead to the haze of the blends being very close, despite having different PC molecular weights. Meanwhile, the photographs of scattering patterns indicate that the PC/SAN blends whose component weight ratios are fixed at 70:30 have excellent antiglare properties, despite the changes in molecular weight of the PC matrix. PMID:26836652

  9. Effect of Wheat Flour Pre-cooking on the Composite Modulus of Wheat Flour and Carboxylated Styrene-Butadiene Latex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercial wheat flours with two different concentrations of insoluble protein were used as fillers to reinforce styrene-butadiene latex composites and their viscoelastic properties were examined. Both wheat flours were also cooked at 55, 70, or 95 deg C for one hour in an aqueous dispersion prior ...

  10. EFFECT OF PH ON THE COMPOSITE MODULUS OF SOY PROTEIN AGGREGATES AND CARBOXYLATED STYRENE-BUTADIENE LATEX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein isolate (SPI) has been reported to have a significant reinforcement effect in styrene-butadiene composites prepared under alkaline condition. SPI is a soy product that remains after soybean oil and soy carbohydrates (both soluble and insoluble) are removed from soybean flakes. SPI is a...

  11. On the form of the strain energy function for a family of SBR materials. [Styrene-Butadiene Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenz, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Styrene-butadiene materials with varying crosslink densities are analyzed through use of a strain energy function of the type introduced by Valanis and Landel (1967). A form of the strain energy function derived from strip biaxial tests proves to be accurate when checked against uniaxial and other biaxial test results.

  12. Evaluating corn starch and corn stover biochar as renewable filler in carboxylated styrene-butadiene rubber composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn starch, corn flour, and corn stover biochar were evaluated as potential renewable substitutes for carbon black as filler in rubber composites using carboxylated styrene-butadiene as the rubber matrix. Previous work has shown that starch-based fillers have very good reinforcement properties at t...

  13. DYNAMIC MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF STYRENE-BUTADIENE COMPOSITES REINFORCED BY DEFATTED SOY FLOUR AND CARBON BLACK CO-FILLER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carboxylated styrene-butadiene (SB) composites reinforced by a mixture of defatted soy flour (DSF) and carbon black (CB) were investigated in terms of their dynamic mechanical properties. DSF is an abundant renewable commodity and has a lower cost than CB. DSF contains soy protein, soy carbohydrat...

  14. Effect of strain rate on mechanical properties of melt-processed soy flour composite filler and styrene-butadiene blends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymer composites were prepared by melt-mixing polymer and soy flour composite fillers in an internal mixer. Soy flour composite fillers were prepared by blending aqueous dispersion of soy flour with styrene-butadiene rubber latex, dried, and cryogenically ground into powders. Upon crosslinking, th...

  15. Effect of concentration of polyfunctional monomers on physical properties of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber under electron-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Tariq; Ahmed, Shamshad; Ahmed, Munir; Yoshii, Fumio

    2005-06-01

    An investigation has been undertaken to find out the effect of concentration of different polyfunctional monomers (PFMs) on the physical properties of the acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) crosslinked by electron beam (EB). The PFMs used were diethylene glycol dimethacrylate, trimethylol propane trimethacrylate and trimethylol propane triacrylate. The physical properties of EB-irradiated NBR sheets were evaluated by measuring the tensile strength, elongation percent at break, hardness and gel fraction. The results showed a remarkable increase in tensile strength, hardness and gel fraction as the concentration of PFMs was increased from 1 part per hundred (phr) to 5 phr in the NBR samples whereas elongation percent decreased in a steady manner. The improvement in physical properties of radiation crosslinked NBR in the presence of PFMs may be attributed to its increased crosslinking density as observed by the corresponding increase in gel content.

  16. Radiation crosslinking of styrene-butadiene rubber containing waste tire rubber and polyfunctional monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Tariq; Khan, Sara; Shafiq, Muhammad; Gill, Rohama

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of polyfunctional monomers (PFMs) and absorbed dose on the final characteristics of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) mixed with waste tire rubber (WTR). A series of SBR/WTR blends were prepared by varying the ratios of WTR in the presence of PFMs, namely trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) and crosslinked using gamma rays. The physicochemical characteristics of the prepared blends were investigated. It was observed that tensile strength, hardness and gel content of the blends increased with absorbed dose while the blends containing TMPTA showed higher tensile strength, gel content and thermal stability as compared to the blends containing TMPTMA. Higher thermal stability was observed in the blends which were crosslinked by radiation as compared to the blends crosslinked by sulfur. These blends exhibited higher rate of swelling in organic solvents, whereas negligible swelling was observed in acidic and basic environment.

  17. Fast and robust method for the determination of microstructure and composition in butadiene, styrene-butadiene, and isoprene rubber by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vilmin, Franck; Dussap, Claude; Coste, Nathalie

    2006-06-01

    In the tire industry, synthetic styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), butadiene rubber (BR), and isoprene rubber (IR) elastomers are essential for conferring to the product its properties of grip and rolling resistance. Their physical properties depend on their chemical composition, i. e., their microstructure and styrene content, which must be accurately controlled. This paper describes a fast, robust, and highly reproducible near-infrared analytical method for the quantitative determination of the microstructure and styrene content. The quantitative models are calculated with the help of pure spectral profiles estimated from a partial least squares (PLS) regression, using (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as the reference method. This versatile approach allows the models to be applied over a large range of compositions, from a single BR to an SBR-IR blend. The resulting quantitative predictions are independent of the sample path length. As a consequence, the sample preparation is solvent free and simplified with a very fast (five minutes) hot filming step of a bulk polymer piece. No precise thickness control is required. Thus, the operator effect becomes negligible and the method is easily transferable. The root mean square error of prediction, depending on the rubber composition, is between 0.7% and 1.3%. The reproducibility standard error is less than 0.2% in every case. PMID:16808863

  18. Screening-Level Risk Assessment for Styrene-Acrylonitrile (SAN) Trimer Detected in Soil and Groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Kirman, C. R.; Gargas, M. L.; Collins, J. J.; Rowlands, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    A screening-level risk assessment was conducted for styrene-acrylonitrile (SAN) Trimer detected at the Reich Farm Superfund site in Toms River, NJ. Consistent with a screening-level approach, on-site and off-site exposure scenarios were evaluated using assumptions that are expected to overestimate actual exposures and hazards at the site. Environmental sampling data collected for soil and groundwater were used to estimate exposure point concentrations. Several exposure scenarios were evaluated to assess potential on-site and off-site exposures, using parameter values for exposures to soil (oral, inhalation of particulates, and dermal contact) and groundwater (oral, dermal contact) to reflect central tendency exposure (CTE) and reasonable maximum exposure (RME) conditions. Three reference dose (RfD) values were derived for SAN Trimer for short-term, subchronic, and chronic exposures, based upon its effects on the liver in exposed rats. Benchmark (BMD) methods were used to assess the relationship between exposure and response, and to characterize appropriate points of departure (POD) for each RfD. An uncertainty factor of 300 was applied to each POD to yield RfD values of 0.1, 0.04, and 0.03 mg/kg-d for short-term, subchronic, and chronic exposures, respectively. Because a chronic cancer bioassay for SAN Trimer in rats (NTP 2011a) does not provide evidence of carcinogenicity, a cancer risk assessment is not appropriate for this chemical. Potential health hazards to human health were assessed using a hazard index (HI) approach, which considers the ratio of exposure dose (i.e., average daily dose, mg/kg-d) to toxicity dose (RfD, mg/kg-d) for each scenario. All CTE and RME HI values are well below 1 (where the average daily dose is equivalent to the RfD), indicating that there is no concern for potential noncancer effects in exposed populations even under the conservative assumptions of this screening-level assessment. PMID:23030654

  19. Performance of Styrene Butadiene Rubber as a Concrete Repair Material in tropical climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Prakash, V. Syam; Thampan, C. K.; Varma, Prasad

    2012-11-01

    Deterioration of Concrete due to variety of reasons like corrosion of steel, inferior quality of materials as well as workmanship and exposure to aggressive environment like thermal cycling affect the performance or damage a number of Reinforced cement concrete structures. In order to repair these structures for enhancing the service life, number of methods and materials are available. But the degree of success of any repair in concrete depends mainly on the correct choice and the method of application of repair materials. This paper discusses the details of an experimental investigation on the performance of Styrene ñ Butadiene Rubber (SBR) as a concrete repair material in tropical climatic conditions. Resistance to water penetration and tensile cracking are two important performance criteria for any repair material. Cement mortar cubes of mix proportion 1:3 with SBR added at the rate of 20% of the weight of cement, and control specimens without SBR were made. Compressive strength and sorptivity values of the cubes were determined. Shear Bond strength (by slant shear test) and splitting tensile strength of the repaired cylinder specimens of standard dimensions, in which SBR used as a bonding agent were determined. These values were compared with the values obtained for the similar specimens, in which the bonding agent applied was conventional cement slurry. The influence of thermal cycling on the properties of repaired concrete specimens were also studied. A comparison has also been made with the values required to meet the standard specifications of a repair material.

  20. Application of Composite Powders Recycled from Graphite Tailings in Styrene-Butadiene Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Yun; Liao, Libing; Lv, Guocheng; Qin, Faxiang; Mei, Lefu; Wei, Yaozu

    2015-11-01

    With styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) as matrix and composite powders recycled from graphite tailings as fillers, the influence of the particle size and content of the composite powders on the tensile strength and electrical conductivity of the composite powder-filled SBR were studied. The results showed that composite powder recycled from graphite tailings could reinforce SBR, whose tensile strength was significantly increased with reducing the particle size of the composite powder, but it had little effect on the conductivity of the system. With composite powders as fillers in conjunction with conductive carbon black, the tensile strength and electrical conductivity of the system were greatly improved. The maximum tensile strength of the SBR filled with composite powder and conductive carbon black increased by 47% compared to that of the single composite powder-filled SBR. When the filling content of conductive carbon black was 10 phr and that of composite powder was above 30 phr, the volume resistivity of SBR showed a sharp decline, reaching a minimum about 106 Ω cm at 40 phr. All the results indicated that composite powder recycled from graphite tailings can be applied effectively as filler in SBR. It has great economic and environmental benefits.

  1. A comparison of the characteristics of excimer and femtosecond laser ablation of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Tian Long; Liu, Zhu; Li, Lin; Zhong, Xiang Li

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the ablation characteristics of excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 15 ns) and femtosecond laser (λ = 800 nm, τ = 100 fs) on ABS polymer sheets. The laser-material interaction parameters (ablation threshold, optical penetration depth and incubation factor) and the changes in material chemical properties were evaluated and compared between the two lasers. The work shows that the ablation threshold and effective optical penetration depth values are dependent on the wavelength of laser beam (photon energy) and the pulse width. The ablation threshold value is lower for the excimer laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 0.087 J/cm2) than that for the femtosecond laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 1.576 J/cm2), demonstrating a more dominating role of laser wavelength than the pulse width in influencing the ablation threshold. The ablation depth versus the logarithmic scale of laser fluence shows two linear regions for the fs laser ablation, not previously known for polymers. The effective optical penetration depth value is lower for excimer laser ablation (α-1 = 223 nm) than that for femtosecond laser ablation (α-1 = 2917 nm). The ablation threshold decreases with increasing number of pulses (NOP) due to the chain scission process that shortens the polymeric chains, resulting in a weaker polymeric configuration and the dependency is governed by the incubation factor. Excimer laser treatment of ABS eliminates the Cdbnd C bond completely through the chain scission process whereas Cdbnd C bond is partially eliminated through the femtosecond laser treatment due to the difference in photon energy of the two laser beams. A reduction in the Cdbnd C bond through the chain scission process creates free radical carbons which then form crosslinks with each other or react with oxygen, nitrogen and water in air producing oxygen-rich (Csbnd O and Cdbnd O bond) and nitrogen-rich (Csbnd N) functional groups.

  2. 21 CFR 177.1030 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... table 1 of § 176.170(c) of this chapter as Type I, II, III, IVA, IVB, V, VIB, (except bottles intended... consists of: (1) 73 to 79 parts by weight of a matrix polymer containing 64 to 69 parts by weight of...) 5 to 10 parts by weight of a graft polymer having the same composition range as the matrix...

  3. The effect of crosslinking and copolymer composition on the peel adhesion between chlorinated polyethylene and acrylonitrile-butadiene elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Kenneth Allen

    The adhesion between chlorinated polyethylene (CM) and acrylonitrile-butadiene (NBR) elastomers was evaluated using a T-peel adhesion test. Peel measurements were conducted under a wide range of temperatures and peel rates. Joint strength between vulcanized elastomers was found to be highly temperature sensitive, varying over three orders of magnitude between 25 and 125°C. As peeling temperatures increased, joint strength generally decreased. The purpose of this research was to determine why vulcanized CM and NBR joints are so weak at elevated temperatures. During the course of the investigation, the effect of crosslinking on both the adhesive and cohesive strength of each adherend was investigated as a function of peel rate and temperature. In addition, the dependence of peel strength on interphase thickness was investigated by altering the thermodynamic miscibility of the adherends. Curative migration was found to be responsible for the weak bonding between conventionally crosslinked CM and NBR adherends. The dimercaptothiadiazole cure system used in the CM composition is inhibited by zinc, which was shown to diffuse from the ZnO-accelerated NBR adherend into the surface of the CM adherend. As a result, covulcanizates of CM and NBR are held together primarily by polymer entanglements, rather than covalent bonds. Crosslinking of the chains removed from the entangled interphase weakened the apparent joint strength by reducing inelastic energy dissipation in the bulk of each adherend. Normal crosslinking of each polymer was found to take place in the interphase when a peroxide cure system was substituted into the NBR recipe. In this case, an optimum degree of crosslinking was identified where adhesion is maximized. This optimum took place very early in the crosslinking process, near the point of incipient gelation. At higher levels of crosslinking bond strength decreased, exhibiting a dependence of Mc0.66 +/- 0.02 at elevated test temperatures.

  4. 21 CFR 177.1050 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... chapter as Type VI-B under conditions for use E, F, or G described in table 2 of § 176.170(c) of this...-mercaptopropionitrile in NR-16 Polymer,” which is incorporated by reference. Copies are available from the Center for... Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210 Resin Pellets,” which is incorporated by reference....

  5. 21 CFR 177.1050 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... chapter as Type VI-B under conditions for use E, F, or G described in table 2 of § 176.170(c) of this...-mercaptopropionitrile in NR-16 Polymer,” which is incorporated by reference. Copies are available from the Center for... Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210 Resin Pellets,” which is incorporated by reference....

  6. Characteristics of styrene-butadiene rubber/silica/Nanoprene compounds for application in tire tread.

    PubMed

    Seo, Byeongho; Kang, Jonghyub; Jang, Sukhee; Kang, Yonggu; Kim, Wonho

    2013-03-01

    Nanoprene is made from chemically cross-linked rubber particles, and has many hydroxyl groups on the surface of the particles. It is speculated that the Nanoprene could reduce the silica-silica network formation by introducing hydrogen bonding between the silanol group of silica and the hydroxyl group of Nanoprene. In this study, the styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR)/silica compounds with two types of the Nanoprene (BM75OH, BM15OH) were evaluated and it could be well explained by the concept of the volume fraction of filler or the volume fraction of rubber. If the Nanoprene applied to the compound is considered as a kind of filler, the minimum torque values and bound rubber contents of the un-vulcanized compounds, the swelling ratio and the stress-strain relationship of the vulcanized compounds could be well explained by the volume fraction of filler (phi(F)). If Nanoprene is considered as a kind of rubber such as SBR, the properties such as peak tan delta, Payne effect, tan delta at 0 degrees C and 60 degrees C, and abrasion resistance could be well explained by the volume fraction of rubber (phi'(R)). However, the improvement of silica dispersion by addition of the Nanoprene particles in the compounds was not significant. The application of BM75OH as a polymer to the tread compound will be suitable for winter tires. In addition, the compound with BM15OH as an additive will be suitable as a tread compound for summer tires. PMID:23755663

  7. Glass Transition and Molecular Mobility in Styrene-Butadiene Rubber Modified Asphalt.

    PubMed

    Khabaz, Fardin; Khare, Rajesh

    2015-11-01

    Asphalt, a soft matter consisting of more than a thousand chemical species, is of vital importance for the transportation infrastructure, yet it poses significant challenges for microscopic theory and modeling approaches due to its multicomponent nature. Polymeric additives can potentially enhance the thermo-mechanical properties of asphalt, thus helping reduce the road repair costs; rational design of such systems requires knowledge of the molecular structure and dynamics of these systems. We have used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the volumetric, structural, and dynamic properties of the neat asphalt as well as styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) modified asphalt systems. The volume-temperature behavior of the asphalt systems exhibited a glass transition phenomenon, akin to that observed in experiments. The glass transition temperature, room temperature density, and coefficient of volume thermal expansion of the neat asphalt systems so evaluated were in agreement with experimental data when the effect of the high cooling rate used in simulations was accounted for. While the volumetric properties of SBR modified asphalt were found to be insensitive to the presence of the SBR additive, the addition of SBR led to an increase in the aggregation of asphaltene molecules. Furthermore, addition of SBR caused a reduction in the mobility of the constituent molecules of asphalt, with the reduction being more significant for the larger constituent molecules. Similar to other glass forming liquids, the reciprocal of the diffusion coefficient of the selected molecules was observed to follow the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) behavior as a function of temperature. These results suggest the potential for using polymeric additives for enhancing the dynamic mechanical properties of asphalt without affecting its volumetric properties. PMID:26451630

  8. Analysis of recycled poly (styrene-co-butadiene) sulfonation: a new approach in solid catalysts for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Garnica, Efrén; Paredes-Casillas, Mario; Herrera-Larrasilla, Tito E; Rodríguez-Palomera, Felicia; Ramírez-Arreola, Daniel E

    2013-01-01

    The disposal of solid waste is a serious problem worldwide that is made worse in developing countries due to inadequate planning and unsustainable solid waste management. In Mexico, only 2% of total urban solid waste is recycled. One non-recyclable material is poly (styrene-co-butadiene), which is commonly used in consumer products (like components of appliances and toys), in the automotive industry (in instrument panels) and in food services (e.g. hot and cold drinking cups and glasses). In this paper, a lab-scale strategy is proposed for recycling poly (styrene-co-butadiene) waste by sulfonation with fuming sulfuric acid. Tests of the sulfonation strategy were carried out at various reaction conditions. The results show that 75°C and 2.5 h are the operating conditions that maximize the sulfonation level expressed as number of acid sites. The modified resin is tested as a heterogeneous catalyst in the first step (known as esterification) of biodiesel production from a mixture containing tallow fat and canola oil with 59% of free fatty acids. The preliminary results show that esterification can reach 91% conversion in the presence of the sulfonated polymeric catalyst compared with 67% conversion when the reaction is performed without catalyst. PMID:24098857

  9. The effect of multifunctional monomers/oligomers Additives on electron beam radiation crosslinking of poly (styrene-block-isoprene/butadiene-block-styrene) (SIBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinping; Soucek, Mark D.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of multifunctional monomers or oligomers (MFM/O) additives on electron beam (E-beam) radiation induced crosslinking of poly (styrene-block-isoprene/butadiene-block-styrene) (SIBS) was studied. Ten types of MFM/O were investigated, including trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA), trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA), triallyl cyanurate (TAC), polybutadiene diacrylate (PB-diacrylate), ethylene glycol dimethylacrylate (EGDMA), butylene glycol dimethacrylate (BGDMA), 1,2-polybutadiene. The effects of MFM/O concentration and E-beam radiation dose on properties of SIBS were studied including tensile strength, elongation-at-break, modulus, gel content, equilibrium swelling and crosslink density. TMPTA significantly improved the tensile modulus and crosslink density of SIBS. SIBS with TMPTMA and TMTPMA with inhibitor showed a 50% increase in tensile strength. The solubility of MFM/O in SIBS was also investigated by a selective swelling method. The MFM/O were found to be soluble in both phases of SIBS. The viscosity of SIBS with methacrylate type MFM/O was stable at 200 °C.

  10. Innovative neutron shielding materials composed of natural rubber-styrene butadiene rubber blends, boron oxide and iron(III) oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumpee, C.; Wongsawaeng, D.

    2015-05-01

    Optimized flexible and lightweight neutron shielding materials were designed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. Thicknesses of 10 mm and 100 mm were tested for neutron shielding performances. Simulation results indicated that the 10 mm shielding material of natural rubber (NR) and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) blend (1:1) with 60 part per hundred rubber (phr) boron oxide (B2O3) and 100 mm shielding material with four alternating layers of NR with 100 phr iron (III) oxide (Fe2O3) and of NR and SBR blend (1:1) with 10 phr B2O3 were most suitable for thermal neutron shielding and all-energy neutron shielding, respectively. Experimental results verified the shielding efficiency of these optimal designs and ease of fabrication.

  11. Prediction of Flexural Strength of Concretes Containing Silica Fume and Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR) with an Empirical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafieyzadeh, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the flexural test, the theoretical maximum tensile stress at the bottom fiber of a test beam is known as the modulus of rupture or flexural strength. This work deals with the effects of Silica Fume and Styrene-Butadiene Latex (SBR) on flexural strength of concrete. An extensive experimentation was carried out to determine the effects of silica fume and SBR on flexural strength of concrete. Two water-binder ratios and several percentages of silica fume and SBR were considered. Abrams' Law, which was originally formulated for conventional concrete containing cement as the only cementations material, is used for prediction of flexural strength of these concretes. The aim of this work is to construct an empirical model to predict the flexural strength of silica fume-SBR concretes using concrete ingredients and time of curing in water. Also, the obtained results for flexural strength tests have been compared with predicted results.

  12. Use of Ultra Small Angle X-Ray Scattering to Measure Grain Size of Styrene-Butadiene Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Robert E.; Myers, Randall T.; Bellare, Anuj

    1998-03-01

    Simultaneous determination of the lamellar morphological length scale and the grain size of several commercial heterogeneous styrene - butadiene block copolymers was accomplished through the use of ultra small angle x-ray scattering measurements. NIST's X23A3 ultra SAXS beamline at the Brookhaven National Laboratory provided a range of scattering vector q from 0.0004 to 0.1 ÅThe grain dimension was determined by analysis of both the Bragg peaks and the Porod region coupled with the invarient assosciated with the scattering intensities at very low values of q. Grain size was controlled in a given block copolymer by the choice of evaporation solvent and temperature as well as annealing time and temperature. Conventional 2-dimensional SAXS and transmission electron microscopy corroborated the ultra SAXS analysis.

  13. The influence of nano silica particles on gamma-irradiation ageing of elastomers based on chlorosulphonated polyethylene and acrylonitrile butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, G.; Marinović-Cincović, M.; Tanasić, Lj.; Jovanović, V.; Samaržija-Jovanović, S.; Vukić, N.; Budinski-Simendić, J.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this work was to study gamma irradiation ageing of rubber blends based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) and chlorosulphonated polyethylene rubber (CSM) reinforced by silica nano particles. The NBR/CSM compounds (50: 50, w/w) filled with different content of filler (0-100 phr) were crosslinked by sulfur. The vulcanization characteristics were assessed using the rheometer with an oscillating disk. The vulcanizates were prepared in a hydraulic press. The obtained materials were exposed to the different irradiation doses (100, 200, 300 and 400 kGy). The mechanical properties (hardness, modulus at 100% elongation, tensile strength and elongation at break) and swelling numbers were assessed before and after gamma irradiation ageing.

  14. Polymer composites prepared from heat-treated starch and styrene-butadiene latex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermoplastic starch/latex polymer composites were prepared using styrene–butadiene (SB) latex and heat-treated cornstarch. The composites were prepared in a compression mold at 130 °C, with starch content 20%. An amylose-free cornstarch, waxy maize, was used for this research and the heat treatment...

  15. Synthesis and electrical conductivity studies of metal chloro and nitroxide group containing styrene butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anilkumar, T.; Ramesan, M. T.

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of different functional group in SBR was done by a simple reaction between sodium nitrite and mercuric chloride in the presence of phase transfer catalyst. The attachment of chlorine and NO2 functional group in the double bond of the butadiene was monitored by FTIR and UV spectroscopy. The structure and morphology of chloro nitro SBR was studied by SEM and XRD. Flame retardency studies revealed that the chemical modification imparts better flame resistance to chemically modified SBR. AC conductivity and dielectric properties of chloro- nitro SBR was higher than that of SBR and conductivity increases with the level of chemical modification.

  16. Survey of volatile substances in kitchen utensils made from acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene and acrylonitrile–styrene resin in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Yutaka; Yamaguchi, Miku; Mutsuga, Motoh; Kawamura, Yoko; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Residual levels of 14 volatile substances, including 1,3-butadiene, acrylonitrile, benzene, ethylbenzene, and styrene, in 30 kitchen utensils made from acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene resin (ABS) and acrylonitrile–styrene resin (AS) such as slicers, picks, cups, and lunch boxes in Japan were simultaneously determined using headspace gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (HS-GC/MS). The maximum residual levels in the ABS and AS samples were found to be 2000 and 2800 μg/g of styrene, respectively. The residual levels of 1,3-butadiene ranged from 0.06 to 1.7 μg/g in ABS, and three of 15 ABS samples exceeded the regulatory limit for this compound as established by the European Union (EU). The residual levels of acrylonitrile ranged from 0.15 to 20 μg/g in ABS and from 19 to 180 μg/g in AS. The levels of this substance in seven ABS and six AS samples exceeded the limit set by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Furthermore, the levels of acrylonitrile in three AS samples exceeded the voluntary standard established by Japanese industries. These results clearly indicate that the residual levels of some volatile compounds are still high in ABS and AS kitchen utensils and further observations are needed. PMID:24936293

  17. Rheological properties of styrene-butadiene rubber filled with electron beam modified surface treated dual phase fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugharaj, A. M.; Bhowmick, Anil K.

    2004-01-01

    The rheological properties of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) loaded with dual phase filler were measured using Monsanto Processability Tester (MPT) at three different temperatures (100°C, 110°C and 130°C) and four different shear rates (61.3, 306.3, 613, and 1004.5 s -1). The effect of electron beam modification of dual phase filler in absence and presence of trimethylol propane triacrylate (TMPTA) or triethoxysilylpropyltetrasulphide (Si-69) on melt flow properties of SBR was also studied. The viscosity of all the systems decreases with shear rate indicating their pseudoplastic or shear thinning nature. The higher shear viscosity for the SBR loaded with the electron beam modified filler is explained in terms of variation in structure of the filler upon electron beam irradiation. Die swell of the modified filler loaded SBR is slightly higher than that of the unmodified filler loaded rubber, which is explained by calculating normal stress difference for the systems. Activation energy of the modified filler loaded SBR systems is also slightly higher than that of the control filler loaded SBR system.

  18. The filler-rubber interface in styrene butadiene nanocomposites with anisotropic silica particles: morphology and dynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Tadiello, L; D'Arienzo, M; Di Credico, B; Hanel, T; Matejka, L; Mauri, M; Morazzoni, F; Simonutti, R; Spirkova, M; Scotti, R

    2015-05-28

    Silica-styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) nanocomposites were prepared by using shape-controlled spherical and rod-like silica nanoparticles (NPs) with different aspect ratios (AR = 1-5), obtained by a sol-gel route assisted by a structure directing agent. The nanocomposites were used as models to study the influence of the particle shape on the formation of nanoscale immobilized rubber at the silica-rubber interface and its effect on the dynamic-mechanical behavior. TEM and AFM tapping mode analyses of nanocomposites demonstrated that the silica particles are surrounded by a rubber layer immobilized at the particle surface. The spherical filler showed small contact zones between neighboring particles in contact with thin rubber layers, while anisotropic particles (AR > 2) formed domains of rods preferentially aligned along the main axis. A detailed analysis of the polymer chain mobility by different time domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR) techniques evidenced a population of rigid rubber chains surrounding particles, whose amount increases with the particle anisotropy, even in the absence of significant differences in terms of chemical crosslinking. Dynamic measurements demonstrate that rod-like particles induce stronger reinforcement of rubber, increasing with the AR. This was related to the self-alignment of the anisotropic silica particles in domains able to immobilize rubber. PMID:25899456

  19. Surface modification of halloysite nanotubes by vulcanization accelerator and properties of styrene-butadiene rubber nanocomposites with modified halloysite nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Bangchao; Jia, Zhixin; Hu, Dechao; Luo, Yuanfang; Guo, Baochun; Jia, Demin

    2016-03-01

    Vulcanization accelerant N-cyclohexyl-2-benzothiazole sulfenamide (CZ) was used as a surface modifier and chemically grafted on the surface of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) to obtain CZ-functionalized HNTs (HNTs-s-CZ). It was found that HNTs-s-CZ could be homogeneously dispersed into styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). The grafted CZ molecules, exactly located at the filler-rubber interface, reduced the activation energy of vulcanization of SBR/HNTs-s-CZ compounds. Besides, the density of chain segments introduced by the interfacial phase of SBR/HNTs-s-CZ nanocomposites was higher than the other nanocomposites with silane-modified HNTs (m-HNTs) or pristine HNTs, manifesting an indication of enhanced filler-rubber interfacial interaction in SBR/HNTs-s-CZ nanocomposites. Consequently, SBR/HNTs-s-CZ nanocomposites showed excellent mechanical properties. The tensile strength could be enhanced by as much as 38.6% and 102.5% compared to those of SBR/m-HNTs and SBR/HNTs nanocomposites, respectively, though containing equivalent accelerant component. The value of this work lies in the fact that apparent properties improvement of elastomer composites has been achieved by the incorporation of vulcanization accelerant-functionalized HNTs, which may be fruitful for the rational design of filler surface treatment and offer new scientific and technological opportunities for the preparation of high performance elastomer composites.

  20. Characterization on the phase separation behavior of styrene-butadiene rubber/polyisoprene/organoclay ternary blends under oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianggui; Dong, Xia; Liu, Wei; Xing, Qian; Zou, Fasheng; Han, Charles C.; Wang, Dujin; Liang, Aimin; Li, Chuanqing; Xie, Ximing

    2015-09-01

    The present work investigated the influence of organoclay (organo-montmorillonite, OMMT) on the phase separation behavior and morphology evolution of solution polymerized styrene-butadiene rubber (SSBR)/low vinyl content polyisoprene (LPI) blends with rheological methodology. It was found that the incorporation of OMMT not only reduced the droplet size of the dispersion phase, slowed down the phase separation kinetics, also enlarged the processing miscibility window of the blends. The determination on the wetting parameters indicated that due to the oscillatory shear effect, the OMMT sheets might localize at the interface between the two phases and act as compatibilizer or rigid barrier to prevent domain coarsening, resulting in slow phase separation kinetics, small droplet size, and stable morphology. The analysis of rheological data by the Palierne model provided further confirmation that the addition of OMMT can decrease the interfacial tension and restrict the relaxation of melt droplets. Therefore, a vivid "sea-fish-net" model was proposed to describe the effect of OMMT on the phase separation behavior of SSBR/LPI blends, in which the OMMT sheets acted as the barrier (net) to slow down the domain coarsening/coalescence in phase separation process of SSBR/LPI blends.

  1. Characterization on the phase separation behavior of styrene-butadiene rubber/polyisoprene/organoclay ternary blends under oscillatory shear.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianggui; Dong, Xia; Liu, Wei; Xing, Qian; Zou, Fasheng; Han, Charles C; Wang, Dujin; Liang, Aimin; Li, Chuanqing; Xie, Ximing

    2015-09-21

    The present work investigated the influence of organoclay (organo-montmorillonite, OMMT) on the phase separation behavior and morphology evolution of solution polymerized styrene-butadiene rubber (SSBR)/low vinyl content polyisoprene (LPI) blends with rheological methodology. It was found that the incorporation of OMMT not only reduced the droplet size of the dispersion phase, slowed down the phase separation kinetics, also enlarged the processing miscibility window of the blends. The determination on the wetting parameters indicated that due to the oscillatory shear effect, the OMMT sheets might localize at the interface between the two phases and act as compatibilizer or rigid barrier to prevent domain coarsening, resulting in slow phase separation kinetics, small droplet size, and stable morphology. The analysis of rheological data by the Palierne model provided further confirmation that the addition of OMMT can decrease the interfacial tension and restrict the relaxation of melt droplets. Therefore, a vivid "sea-fish-net" model was proposed to describe the effect of OMMT on the phase separation behavior of SSBR/LPI blends, in which the OMMT sheets acted as the barrier (net) to slow down the domain coarsening/coalescence in phase separation process of SSBR/LPI blends. PMID:26395734

  2. Effects of aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APS) on tensile properties and morphology of polypropylene (PP), recycle acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBRr) and sugarcane bagasse (SCB) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiagoo, Ragunathan; Omar, Latifah; Zainal, Mustaffa; Ting, Sam Sung; Ismail, Hanafi

    2015-07-01

    The performance of sugarcane baggase (SCB) treated with γ-APS filled polypropylene (PP)/recycled acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBRr) biocomposites were investigated. The composites with different filler loading ranging from 5 to 30 wt % were prepared using heated two roll mill by melt mixing at temperature of 180 °C. Tensile properties of the PP/NBRr/SCB composites which is tensile strength, Young Modulus and elongation at break were investigated. Increasing of treated SCB filler loading in PP/NBRr/SCB composites have increased the Young modulus however decreased the tensile strength and elongation at break of the PP/NBRr/SCB composites. From the results, γ-APS treated SCB composites shown higher tensile strength and Young Modulus but lower elongation at break when compared to the untreated SCB composites. This is due to the stronger bonding between γ-APS treated SCB with PP/NBRr matrices. These findings was supported by micrograph pictures from morphological study. SCB filler treated with γ-APS has improved the adhesion as well as gave strong interfacial bonding between SCB filler and PP/NBRr matrices which results in good tensile strength of PP/NBRr/SCB composites.

  3. Heat shrinkable behavior, physico-mechanical and structure properties of electron beam cross-linked blends of high-density polyethylene with acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinholds, Ingars; Kalkis, Valdis; Merijs-Meri, Remo; Zicans, Janis; Grigalovica, Agnese

    2016-03-01

    In this study, heat-shrinkable composites of electron beam irradiated high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites with acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) were investigated. HDPE/NBR blends at a ratio of components 100/0, 90/10, 80/20, 50/50 and 20/80 wt% were prepared using a two-roll mill. The compression molded films were irradiated high-energy (5 MeV) accelerated electrons up to irradiation absorbed doses of 100-300 kGy. The effect of electron beam induced cross-linking was evaluated by the changes of mechanical properties, gel content and by the differences of thermal properties, detected by differential scanning calorimetry. The thermo-shrinkage forces were determined as the kinetics of thermorelaxation and the residual shrinkage stresses of previously oriented (stretched up to 100% at above melting temperature of HDPE and followed by cooling to room temperature) specimens of irradiated HDPE/NBR blends under isometric heating-cooling mode. The compatibility between the both components was enhanced due to the formation of cross-linked sites at amorphous interphase. The results showed increase of mechanical stiffness of composites with increase of irradiation dose. The values of gel fraction compared to thermorelaxation stresses increased with the growth of irradiation dose level, as a result of formation cross-linked sites in amorphous PP/NBR interphase.

  4. Biomonitoring of 1,3-butadiene and related compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Osterman-Golkar, S.; Bond, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments list several volatile organic chemicals as hazardous air pollutants, including ethylene oxide, butadiene, styrene, and acrylonitrile. The toxicology of many of these compounds shares several common elements such as carcinogenicity in laboratory animals, genotoxicity of the epoxide intermediates, involvement of cytochrome P450 for metabolic activation (except ethylene oxide), and involvement of at least two enzymes for detoxication of the epoxides (e.g., hydrolysis or conjugation with glutathione). These similarities facilitate research strategies for identifying and developing biomarkers of exposure. This article reviews the current knowledge about biomarkers of butadiene. Butadiene is carcinogenic in mice and rats, which raises concern for potential carcinogenicity in humans. 85 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. Infrared thermochromic behaviour of a composite Sm0.65Ca0.35MnO3-poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammar, M. R.; Napierala, C.; Laffez, P.

    2009-05-01

    Samarium calcium perovskite manganite Sm0.65Ca0.35MnO3 was dispersed homogeneously in a solution of poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile). A thin film was deposited on (100) oriented silicon substrate by spin-coating and the optical thermochromic behaviour in the infrared range was studied. In the wavelength range 8-14 µm, the optical transmittance of the thermochromic composite coating exhibited a large variation between 173 and 343 K due to a semiconductor-metal first-order transition at Tc = 250 K. The thermochromic behaviour of the composite coatings was optimized. The contrast in the transmittance first increased with pigment content, then reached a maximum value.

  6. Water-responsive mechanically adaptive nanocomposites based on styrene-butadiene rubber and cellulose nanocrystals--processing matters.

    PubMed

    Annamalai, Pratheep K; Dagnon, Koffi L; Monemian, Seyedali; Foster, E Johan; Rowan, Stuart J; Weder, Christoph

    2014-01-22

    Biomimetic, stimuli-responsive polymer nanocomposites based on a hydrophobic styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) matrix and rigid, rod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) isolated from cotton were prepared by three different approaches, and their properties were studied and related to the composition, processing history, and exposure to water as a stimulus. The first processing approach involved mixing an aqueous SBR latex with aqueous CNC dispersions, and films were subsequently formed by solution-casting. The second method utilized the first protocol, but films were additionally compression-molded. The third method involved the formation of a CNC organogel via a solvent exchange with acetone, followed by infusing this gel, in which the CNCs form a percolating network with solutions of SBR in tetrahydrofuran. The thermomechanical properties of the materials were established by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). In the dry state, all nanocomposites show much higher tensile storage moduli, E', than the neat SBR or the SBR latex. E' increases with the CNC content and depends strongly on the processing method, which appears to influence the morphology of the SBR nanocomposites produced. The highest E' values were observed for the solution cast samples involving an SBR latex, where E' increased from 3 MPa for the neat SBR to ca. 740 MPa for the nanocomposite containing 20% v/v CNCs. Upon submersion in deionized water, a dramatic reduction of E' was observed, for example from 740 to 5 MPa for the solution-cast nanocomposite containing 20% v/v CNCs. This change is interpreted as a disengagement of the percolating CNC network, on account of modest aqueous swelling and competitive hydrogen bonding of water molecules with the CNCs. It is shown that the method of preparation also influenced the swelling behavior and kinetics of modulus switching, consistent with different arrangements of the CNCs, which serve as channels for water absorption and transport within the hydrophobic SBR matrix. PMID:24354282

  7. Styrene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Styrene ; CASRN 100 - 42 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  8. Quadratic Electro-Optic Effect in the Nonconjugated Conductive Co-polymer Iodine-doped Styrene-Butadiene-Rubber Measured at 633 nm and 1550 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telang, Gurudutt; Thakur, Mrinal

    2012-02-01

    The quadratic electro-optic effect in the nonconjugated conductive co-polymer film of styrene-butadiene-rubber (SBR) has been measured using field-induced birefringence method. Thin films of styrene-butadiene-rubber have been prepared on various substrates from a chloroform solution and characterized using optical absorption spectroscopy, FTIR and DSC before and after doping with iodine. The optical absorption spectrum at low doping shows two peaks: one at 4.27 eV and the other at 3.2 eV corresponding to the radical cation and charge-transfer transition. FTIR data indicate =C-H vibration bands (964 cm-1 and 910 cm-1) of polybutadiene decrease upon doping due to transformation of the double bonds into radical cations. The Kerr coefficients as measured at 633 nm and at 1550 nm are 3.1x10-10 m/V^2 and 1.3x10-10 m/V^2 respectively. These exceptionally large values have been attributed to the subnanometer metallic domains formed upon doping and charge-transfer involving isolated double-bonds.

  9. 1,3-Butadiene, styrene and lymphohematopoietic cancer among male synthetic rubber industry workers--Preliminary exposure-response analyses.

    PubMed

    Sathiakumar, Nalini; Brill, Ilene; Leader, Mark; Delzell, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    We updated the mortality experience of North American synthetic rubber industry workers to include follow-up from 1944 through 2009, adding 11 years of mortality data to previous investigations. The present analysis used Cox regression to examine the exposure-response relationship between 1,3-butadiene (BD) and styrene (STY) parts per million (ppm)-years and leukemia (N = 114 deaths), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (N = 89) and multiple myeloma (MM) (N = 48). A pattern of largely monotonically increasing rate ratios across deciles of BD ppm-years and a positive, statistically significant exposure-response trend were observed for BD ppm-years and leukemia. Using continuous, untransformed BD ppm-years the regression coefficient (β) adjusted only for age was 2.6 × 10(-4) (p < 0.01); the regression coefficient adjusted for age, year of birth, race and plant was 2.9 × 10(-4) (p < 0.01). STY ppm-years also displayed a positive exposure-response association with leukemia. STY and BD were strongly correlated, and the separate effects of these two agents could not be estimated. For NHL, a pattern of approximately monotonically increasing rate ratios across deciles of exposure was seen for STY but not for BD; the test of trend was statistically significant in one of five models that used different STY exposure metrics and adjusted for age and other covariates. BD ppm-years and STY ppm-years were not associated with MM. The present analyses indicated a positive exposure-response relationship between BD cumulative exposure and leukemia. This result along with other research and biological information support an interpretation that BD causes leukemia in humans. STY exposure also was positively associated with leukemia, but its independent effect could not be delineated because of its strong correlation with BD, and there is no external support for a STY-leukemia association. STY, but not BD, was associated positively with NHL. The interpretation of this result is uncertain because the exposure-response data were statistically imprecise and because consistent support for causality from other studies is lacking. The current study provides no support for an association between BD or STY and MM. PMID:26343807

  10. Effect of thermally reduced graphene sheets on the phase behavior, morphology, and electrical conductivity in poly[(α-methyl styrene)-co-(acrylonitrile)/poly(methyl-methacrylate) blends.

    PubMed

    Vleminckx, Giovanni; Bose, Suryasarathi; Leys, Jan; Vermant, Jan; Wübbenhorst, Michael; Abdala, Ahmed A; Macosko, Chris; Moldenaers, Paula

    2011-08-01

    The effects of thermally reduced graphene sheets (TRG) on the phase separation in poly[(α-methyl styrene)-co-(acrylonitrile)]/poly(methyl-methacrylate) blends were monitored using melt rheology, conductivity spectroscopy, and electron microscopic techniques. The TRG were incorporated in the single-phase material by solution mixing. The composite samples were then allowed to phase separate in situ. The thermodynamics of phase separation have been investigated by monitoring the evolution of the storage modulus (G') as a function of temperature as the system passes through the binodal and the spinodal lines of the phase diagram. The phase separation kinetics were probed by monitoring the evolution of G' as a function of time at a quench depth well in the spinodal region. It was observed that TRG significantly influenced the phase separation temperature, the shape of the phase diagram and the rate of phase separation. The state of dispersion of TRG in the blends was assessed using electron microscopy and conductivity spectroscopy measurements. Interestingly, the composite samples (monophasic) were virtually insulators at room temperature, whereas highly conducting materials were obtained as a result of phase separation in the biphasic materials. PMID:21749102

  11. Two-dimensional chromatography applied to the study of the thermo-oxidative degradation of poly(styrene-b-butadiene) star block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Moyses, Stephan

    2012-07-01

    Two-dimensional chromatography with gradient polymer elution chromatography in the first dimension and gel permeation chromatography in the second dimension was used to characterize a poly(styrene-b-butadiene) star block copolymer. The data evidence several populations that are clues left by the different steps in the sequential reaction employed to make the polymer. The sample was subjected to thermo-oxidative degradation at 180C and was analyzed at different times during the process. After a relatively long induction period, the two-dimensional chromatograms show how the different populations are progressively degraded via random chain scission of the polybutadiene block to leave essentially polystyrene as the only soluble component. With longer thermal aging times, the polystyrene also degrades via chain scission. PMID:22807356

  12. Contribution made by multivariate curve resolution applied to gel permeation chromatography-Fourier transform infrared data for an in-depth characterization of styrene-butadiene rubber blends.

    PubMed

    Ruckebusch, C; Vilmin, F; Coste, N; Huvenne, J P

    2008-07-01

    We evaluate the contribution made by multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) for resolving gel permeation chromatography-Fourier transform infrared (GPC-FT-IR) data collected on butadiene rubber (BR) and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) blends in order to access in-depth knowledge of polymers along the molecular weight distribution (MWD). In the BR-SBR case, individual polymers differ in chemical composition but share almost the same MWD. Principal component analysis (PCA) gives a general overview of the data structure and attests to the feasibility of modeling blends as a binary system. MCR-ALS is then performed. It allows resolving the chromatographic coelution and validates the chosen methodology. For SBR-SBR blends, the problem is more challenging since the individual elastomers present the same chemical composition. Rank deficiency is detected from the PCA data structure analysis. MCR-ALS is thus performed on column-wise augmented matrices. It brings very useful insight into the composition of the analyzed blends. In particular, a weak change in the composition of individual SBR in the MWD's lowest mass region is revealed. PMID:18935830

  13. Investigation of mechanisms of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) initiated from the thermal degradation of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) in N2 atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eilhann; Castaldi, Marco J

    2008-03-15

    This study has been carried out to characterize the thermal decomposition of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled to online GC/MS, and to investigate the formation and ultimate fate of chemical species produced during gasification of SBR. A preliminary mechanistic understanding has been developed to explain the formation and relationship of light hydrocarbons (C1-C4), substituted aromatics, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during the decomposition of SBR in a N2 atmosphere. Identification and absolute concentrations of over 50 major and minor species (from hydrogen to benzo[ghi]perylene) have been established, and the measurements have been carried out between 300 and 500 at 10 degrees C/min heating rate in a N2 atmosphere. The concentration of styrene reached 120 PPMV and the concentration of other substituted aromatics, such as toluene and ethyl benzene reached 20 and 5 PPMV, respectively. These measurements indicate PAH formation at a relatively lower temperature as compared to conventional fuel, such as coal and diesel. The PAH sequence is not simply the constructing of larger PAHs from smaller ones to achieve the complex polymer structures. It is possible to generate large PAH molecules while circumventing the typical construction pathway. PMID:18409655

  14. Comparative study of the effect of untreated, silanized and grafted alumina nanoparticles on thermal and dynamic mechanical properties of the styrene-butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushko, Rymma; Baller, Joerg; Filimon, Marlena; Sanctuary, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Elastomers filled with hard nanoparticles are of great technical importance for the rubber industry. In general, fillers improve mechanical properties of polymer materials, e.g. elastic moduli, tensile strength etc. The smaller the size of the particles the larger is the interface where interactions between polymer molecules and fillers can generate new properties. Using Temperature Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimetry (TMDSC) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA), we investigated the properties of the pure styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), SBR/ alumina nanoparticles, SBR/silanized alumina and SBR/alumina grafted to polymer chains. Beside a general reinforcement effect seen in the complex elastic moduli, the studies revealed that: i) small concentrations of nanoparticles (of 1.5-2 wt%) lead to a minimum in the glass transition temperature as a function of nanoparticle content; ii) for the grafted nanocomposites increasing the nanoparticle concentration beyond 4 wt% yields an increase of Tg by 4 K; iii) DMA mastercurves showed that in case of untreated and silanized alumina mechanical behaviour of the composite systems is rather near to the one of the SBR matrix, but the grafting of elastomer molecules to the silanized fillers induces a quasi-solid like response of the system in the low frequency regime.

  15. Water soluble styrene butadiene rubber and sodium carboxyl methyl cellulose binder for ZnFe2O4 anode electrodes in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongyu; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Dong; Qiu, Hailong; Fu, Qiang; Na, Hui; Guo, Zhendong; Du, Fei; Chen, Gang; Wei, Yingjin

    2015-07-01

    ZnFe2O4 nano particles as an anode material for lithium ion batteries are prepared by the glycine-nitrate combustion method. The mixture of styrene butadiene rubber and sodium carboxyl methyl cellulose (SBR/CMC) with the weight ratio of 1:1 is used as the binder for ZnFe2O4 electrode. Compared with the conventional polyvinylidene-fluoride (PVDF) binder, the SBR/CMC binder is much cheaper and environment benign. More significantly, this water soluble binder significantly improves the rate capability and cycle stability of ZnFe2O4. A discharge capacity of 873.8 mAh g-1 is obtained after 100 cycles at the 0.1C rate, with a very little capacity fading rate of 0.06% per cycle. Studies show that the SBR/CMC binder enhances the adhesion of the electrode film to the current collector, and constructs an effective three-dimensional network for electrons transport. In addition, the SBR/CMC binder helps to form a uniform SEI film thus prohibiting the formation of lithium dendrite. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy shows that the SBR/CMC binder lowers the ohmic resistance of the electrode, depresses the formation of SEI film and facilitates the charge transfer reactions at the electrode/electrolyte interface. These advantages highlight the potential applications of SBR/CMC binder in lithium ion batteries.

  16. Utilizing carbon dioxide as a reaction medium to mitigate production of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the thermal decomposition of styrene butadiene rubber.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Yi, Haakrho; Castaldi, Marco J

    2012-10-01

    The CO(2) cofeed impact on the pyrolysis of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) was investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled to online gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). The direct comparison of the chemical species evolved from the thermal degradation of SBR in N(2) and CO(2) led to a preliminary mechanistic understanding of the formation and relationship of light hydrocarbons (C(1-4)), aromatic derivatives, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), clarifying the role of CO(2) in the thermal degradation of SBR. The identification and quantification of over 50 major and minor chemical species from hydrogen and benzo[ghi]perylene were carried out experimentally in the temperature regime between 300 and 500 °C in N(2) and CO(2). The significant amounts of benzene derivatives from the direct bond dissociation of the backbone of SBR, induced by thermal degradation, provided favorable conditions for PAHs by the gas-phase addition reaction at a relatively low temperature compared to that with conventional fuels such as coal and petroleum-derived fuels. However, the formation of PAHs in a CO(2) atmosphere was decreased considerably (i.e., ∼50%) by the enhanced thermal cracking behavior, and the ultimate fates of these species were determined by different pathways in CO(2) and N(2) atmospheres. Consequently, this work has provided a new approach to mitigate PAHs by utilizing CO(2) as a reaction medium in thermochemical processes. PMID:22950720

  17. HEALTH ASSESSMENT OF 1,3-BUTADIENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This assessment was conducted to review the new information that has become available since EPA's 1985 health assessment of 1,3-butadiene.

    1,3-Butadiene is a gas used commercially in the production of styrene-butadiene rubber, plastics, and thermoplastic resins. The major...

  18. Transport characteristics of organic solvents through carbon nanotube filled styrene butadiene rubber nanocomposites: the influence of rubber-filler interaction, the degree of reinforcement and morphology.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Jiji; Maria, Hanna J; George, Soney C; Kalarikkal, Nandakumar; Thomas, Sabu

    2015-05-01

    The transport behaviour of some aromatic and aliphatic solvents through carbon nanotube filled styrene butadiene rubber composites has been investigated. The aim of the present work is to investigate the role of the sorption technique in analysing the compatibility and the reinforcing effect of MWCNTs as a filler in the SBR matrix. It also focuses on the investigation of the relationship between the dispersion of CNTs in the SBR matrix and its transport behaviour. The diffusion and transport of organic solvents through the membranes have been investigated in detail as a function of CNT content, nature of solvent and temperature in the range of 28-60 °C. Solvent uptake, diffusion, sorption and permeation constants were investigated and were found to decrease with the increase of CNT loading. Transport properties could be related to the morphology of the nanocomposites. At high concentration CNT particles form a local filler-filler network in the rubber matrix. As a result, the transport of solvent molecules through the polymer is hindered. The rubber-solvent interaction parameter, enthalpy and entropy of sorption have also been estimated from the transport data. The values of rubber-solvent interaction parameters obtained from the diffusion experiments have been used to calculate the molecular mass between the crosslinks of the network polymer. The better reinforcement at higher filler loading was confirmed from the cross-link density values. The extent of reinforcement was evaluated using Kraus and Cunneen and Russel equations. The Affine and Phantom models for chemical crosslinks were used to predict the mobility of the crosslinks. The Phantom model gave better fitting indicating that the chains can move freely through one another, i.e. the junction points fluctuate over time around their mean position without any hindrance from the neighbouring molecule. The diffusivity datas of the systems have shown dependence on the temperature and microstructure of the nanocomposite. Finally, the diffusion data have been compared with theoretical predictions. PMID:25829168

  19. CASE-COHORT STUDY OF STYRENE EXPOSURE AND ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE INVESTIGATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigators examined workers exposed to styrene while working in styrene-butadiene polymer manufacturing plants between 1943 and 1982. Workers who had died from ischemic heart disease were compared to a subgroup of all men employed in two styrene-butadiene polymer manufac...

  20. A comparison between the effects of gamma radiation and sulfur cure system on the microstructure and crosslink network of (styrene butadiene rubber/ethylene propylene diene monomer) blends in presence of nanoclay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoushtari Zadeh Naseri, Aida; Jalali-Arani, Azam

    2015-10-01

    Rubber blends based on (styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR)/ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM)) with and without organoclay (OC) were prepared through a melt mixing process. The concentration ratio of the rubber phases (EPDM/SBR; 50/50 wt%) and the amount of the OC were kept constant. The samples were then vulcanized by means of gamma radiation using a Co-60 gamma source as well as sulfur cure system. The effect of absorbed dose on the formation of the crosslinks was confirmed by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The effects of absorbed dose, sulfur cure system and OC on the gel content, and crosslink density were evaluated by the chemical tests. Applying the Charlesby-Pinner equation to estimate the radiation chemical yield, revealed that the use of OC in the blend caused 20% reduction in the degradation/crosslinking ratio. Employing the swelling test data, some thermodynamic parameters were determined. Using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) to investigate microstructure of the samples revealed a more homogeneous structure and also an increase in compatibility of the blend components in the sample cured by the irradiation in comparison to that cured by the sulfur curing system.

  1. 21 CFR 181.32 - Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... blended with vinyl chloride-vinyl acetate (optional at level up to 5 percent by weight of the vinyl... restrictions. (2) Coatings. (i) Acrylonitrile/butadiene copolymer blended with polyvinyl chloride resins—for use only on paper and paperboard in contact with meats and lard. (ii) Polyvinyl chloride resin...

  2. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS OF BUTADIENE AT A SYNTHETIC RUBBER PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Butadiene emission samples were collected from the process vent stream of a plant manufacturing synthetic rubber from styrene and butadiene. Samples were collected by modification of the evacuated container sampling procedure, outlined in Section 7.1.1 of EPA Method 18. On-site a...

  3. Buffing dust as a filler of carboxylated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber and butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber.

    PubMed

    Chronska, K; Przepiorkowska, A

    2008-03-01

    Buffing dust from chrome tanned leather is one of the difficult tannery wastes to manage. It is also hazardous to both human health and the environment. The scientific literature rarely reports studies on dust management, especially on its utilization as a filler for elastomers. In this connection we have made an attempt to use this leather waste as a filler for rubbers such as XNBR and NBR. The addition of the buffing dust to rubber mixes brought improvement in mechanical properties, and increase in resistance to thermal ageing as well as in electric conductivity and crosslink density of vulcalizates. PMID:17629616

  4. Polybenzoxazole-filled nitrile butadiene rubber compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajiwala, Himansu M. (Inventor); Guillot, David G. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An insulation composition that comprises at least one nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) having an acrylonitrile content that ranges from approximately 26% by weight to approximately 35% by weight and polybenzoxazole (PBO) fibers. The NBR may be a copolymer of acrylonitrile and butadiene and may be present in the insulation composition in a range of from approximately 45% by weight to approximately 56% by weight of a total weight of the insulation composition. The PBO fibers may be present in a range of from approximately 3% by weight to approximately 10% by weight of a total weight of the insulation composition. A rocket motor including the insulation composition and a method of insulating a rocket motor are also disclosed.

  5. Preparation of candidate reference materials for the determination of phosphorus containing flame retardants in styrene-based polymers.

    PubMed

    Roth, Thomas; Urpi Bertran, Raquel; Latza, Andreas; Andörfer-Lang, Katrin; Hügelschäffer, Claudia; Pöhlein, Manfred; Puchta, Ralph; Placht, Christian; Maid, Harald; Bauer, Walter; van Eldik, Rudi

    2015-04-01

    Candidate reference materials (RM) for the analysis of phosphorus-based flame retardants in styrene-based polymers were prepared using a self-made mini-extruder. Due to legal requirements of the current restriction for the use of certain hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment, focus now is placed on phosphorus-based flame retardants instead of the brominated kind. Newly developed analytical methods for the first-mentioned substances also require RMs similar to industrial samples for validation and verification purposes. Hence, the prepared candidate RMs contained resorcinol-bis-(diphenyl phosphate), bisphenol A bis(diphenyl phosphate), triphenyl phosphate and triphenyl phosphine oxide as phosphorus-based flame retardants. Blends of polycarbonate and acrylonitrile-co-butadiene-co-styrene as well as blends of high-impact polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide were chosen as carrier polymers. Homogeneity and thermal stability of the candidate RMs were investigated. Results showed that the candidate RMs were comparable to the available industrial materials. Measurements by ICP/OES, FTIR and NMR confirmed the expected concentrations of the flame retardants and proved that analyte loss and degradation, respectively, was below the uncertainty of measurement during the extrusion process. Thus, the candidate RMs were found to be suitable for laboratory use. PMID:25410641

  6. Carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, R L; Shackelford, C C; Huff, J

    1993-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene, a high-production volume chemical used largely in the manufacture of synthetic rubber, is a multiple organ carcinogen in rats and mice. In inhalation studies conducted in mice by the National Toxicology Program, high rates of early lethal lymphomas occurring at exposure levels of 625 ppm or higher reduced the development and expression of later developing tumors at other sites. Use of survival-adjusted tumor rates to account for competing risk factors provided a clearer indication of the dose responses for 1,3-butadiene-induced neoplasms. An increase in lung tumors in female mice was observed at exposure concentrations as low as 6.25 ppm, the lowest concentration ever used in a long-term carcinogenicity study of this gas. Human exposures to 1,3-butadiene by workers employed at facilities that produce this chemical and at facilities that produce styrene-butadiene rubber have been measured at levels higher than those that cause cancer in animals. Furthermore, epidemiology studies have consistently revealed associations between occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene and excess mortality due to lymphatic and hematopoietic cancers. In response to the carcinogenicity findings for 1,3-butadiene in animals and in humans, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has proposed lowering the occupational exposure standard for this chemical from 1000 ppm to 2 ppm. Future work is needed to understand the mechanisms of tumor induction by 1,3-butadiene; however, the pursuit of this research should not delay the reduction of human exposure to this chemical. PMID:8354171

  7. [Migrants from disposable gloves and residual acrylonitrile].

    PubMed

    Wakui, C; Kawamura, Y; Maitani, T

    2001-10-01

    Disposable gloves made from polyvinyl chloride with and without di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (PVC-DEHP, PVC-NP), polyethylene (PE), natural rubber (NR) and nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) were investigated with respect to evaporation residue, migrated metals, migrants and residual acrylonitrile. The evaporation residue found in n-heptane was 870-1,300 ppm from PVC-DEHP and PVC-NP, which was due to the plasticizers. Most of the PE gloves had low evaporation residue levels and migrants, except for the glove designated as antibacterial, which released copper and zinc into 4% acetic acid. For the NR and NBR gloves, the evaporation residue found in 4% acetic acid was 29-180 ppm. They also released over 10 ppm of calcium and 6 ppm of zinc into 4% acetic acid, and 1.68-8.37 ppm of zinc di-ethyldithiocarbamate and zinc di-n-butyldithiocarbamate used as vulcanization accelerators into n-heptane. The acrylonitrile content was 0.40-0.94 ppm in NBR gloves. PMID:11775358

  8. Melt processing and property testing of a model system of plastics contained in waste from electrical and electronic equipment.

    PubMed

    Triantou, Marianna I; Tarantili, Petroula A; Andreopoulos, Andreas G

    2015-05-01

    In the present research, blending of polymers used in electrical and electronic equipment, i.e. acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer, polycarbonate and polypropylene, was performed in a twin-screw extruder, in order to explore the effect process parameters on the mixture properties, in an attempt to determine some characteristics of a fast and economical procedure for waste management. The addition of polycarbonate in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer seemed to increase its thermal stability. Also, the addition of polypropylene in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer facilitates its melt processing, whereas the addition of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer in polypropylene improves its mechanical performance. Moreover, the upgrading of the above blends by incorporating 2 phr organically modified montmorillonite was investigated. The prepared nanocomposites exhibit greater tensile strength, elastic modulus and storage modulus, as well as higher melt viscosity, compared with the unreinforced blends. The incorporation of montmorillonite nanoplatelets in polycarbonate-rich acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer/polycarbonate blends turns the thermal degradation mechanism into a two-stage process. Alternatively to mechanical recycling, the energy recovery from the combustion of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer/polycarbonate and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer/polypropylene blends was recorded by measuring the gross calorific value. Comparing the investigated polymers, polypropylene presents the higher gross calorific value, followed by acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer and then polycarbonate. The above study allows a rough comparative evaluation of various methodologies for treating plastics from waste from electrical and electronic equipment. PMID:25750055

  9. Health Assessment Document for Acrylonitrile (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute acrylonitrile intoxication in humans, like many volatile organic compounds, results in irritation of the eyes and nose, weakness, labored breathing, dizziness, impaired judgement, cyanosis, nausea, and convulsions. Unlike many of these other organics, acrylonitrile causes s...

  10. 40 CFR 721.505 - Halogenated acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Halogenated acrylonitrile. 721.505... Substances § 721.505 Halogenated acrylonitrile. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated acrylonitrile, (PMN P-90-299)...

  11. 40 CFR 721.505 - Halogenated acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogenated acrylonitrile. 721.505... Substances § 721.505 Halogenated acrylonitrile. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated acrylonitrile, (PMN P-90-299)...

  12. Mutagenicity of acrylonitrile in mouse.

    PubMed

    Leonard, A; Garny, V; Poncelet, F; Mercier, M

    1981-02-01

    The capacity of acrylonitrile (ACN) to produce chromosome aberrations in mammals was studied in somatic and germ cells of male NMRI mice. Induction of chromosome aberrations was followed in bone marrow cells 6, 18, 24, 48 and 72 h after an i.p. injection of 20 or 30 mg/kg acrylonitrile, and polychromatic erythrocytes were examined for the presence of micronuclei 24, 30 and 48 h after injection. The dominant lethal test served to detect chromosome aberrations in meiotic and postmeiotic male germ cells. All the tests utilized yielded negative results, so that it may be concluded that acute treatment with acrylonitrile has no clastogenic effects on male mouse cells in vivo. PMID:7222109

  13. 1,3-Butadiene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,3 - Butadiene ; CASRN 106 - 99 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  14. ACRYLONITRILE PLANT AIR POLLUTION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Based on available literature, the report identifies and ranks (in terms of efficiency, cost, and energy requirements) air pollution control technologies for each of four major air pollutant emission sources in acrylonitrile plants. The sources are: (1) absorber vent gas streams,...

  15. Charcoal byproducts as potential styrene-butadiene rubber composte filler

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon black, a byproduct of the petroleum industry, is the world's most predominant filler for rubber composites. In this study, various renewable charcoals in the form of pyrolyzed agricultural byproducts were evaluted as potential carbon-based filler for rubber composites made with carboxylated s...

  16. 29 CFR 1926.1145 - Acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylonitrile. 1926.1145 Section 1926.1145 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Acrylonitrile. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  17. 29 CFR 1915.1045 - Acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acrylonitrile. 1915.1045 Section 1915.1045 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1045 Acrylonitrile. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.1145 - Acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acrylonitrile. 1926.1145 Section 1926.1145 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Acrylonitrile. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  19. HEALTH ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT FOR ACRYLONITRILE (REVISED DRAFT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acrylonitrile is readily absorbed in animals following ingestion or inhalation, while dermal absorption is poor (1%) compared to that of the lungs. Acrylonitrile is metabolized to cyanide, which is transformed to thiocyanic acid and by cyanoethylation of sulfhydryl groups to S-(2...

  20. 21 CFR 180.22 - Acrylonitrile copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD OR IN CONTACT WITH FOOD ON AN INTERIM BASIS PENDING ADDITIONAL STUDY Specific Requirements for Certain Food Additives § 180.22 Acrylonitrile copolymers. Acrylonitrile copolymers may be... uses subject to the denial are thereafter unapproved food additives and consequently unlawful. (3)...

  1. Ion-Molecule Association in Acrylonitrile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Paul F.; Milligan, Daniel B.; McEwan, Murray J.

    1997-01-01

    Acrylonitrile (propernenitrile or vinyl cyanide) polymerizes readily via a radical mechanism in solution at room temparature. The propensity to polymerize is sufficiently strong that it is usual to add a radical scavenger to the solution to prevent polymerization when oxygen (an inhibitor) is removed. Polymerization of acrylonitrile is also know to occur via nucleophilic addition of an anion by a michael-type reaction.

  2. [Biological effect of exposure to butadiene].

    PubMed

    Dobrzy?ska, M M; Gajewski, A K

    1999-01-01

    People can be exposed to 1,3-butadiene in work place (rubber industry) as well as in natural environment (car exhausts fumes, cigarette smoke). Butadien on its own is not genotoxic, but is metabolized to mutagenic and carcinogenic epoxydes, 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane and 3,4-epoxybutene in the organism of mammals and human. 1,3-butadiene has been shown to be a potent carcinogen in animals and human. Laboratory investigations showed also toxic and mutagenic abilities of butadiene and its metabolities. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to butadiene are caused by differences in metabolic transformations of butadiene in different species. PMID:10474288

  3. [Identification of migrants from nitrile-butadiene rubber gloves].

    PubMed

    Mutsuga, Motoh; Kawamura, Yoko; Wakui, Chiseko; Maitani, Tamio

    2003-04-01

    Polyvinyl chloride gloves containing di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate are restricted for food contact use. In their place, disposable gloves made from nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) are used in contact with foodstuffs. Some unknown substances were found to migrate into n-heptane from NBR gloves. By GC/MS, HR-MS and NMR, their chemical structures were confirmed to be 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate (used as a plasticizer), 4,4'-butylidenedi(6-tert-butyl-m-cresol), a mixture of styrenated phenols consisting of 2-(alpha-methylbenzyl)phenol, 4-(alpha-methylbenzyl)phenol, 2,6-di(alpha-methylbenzyl)phenol, 2,4-di(alpha-methylbenzyl)phenol and 2,4,6-tri(alpha-methylbenzyl)phenol (used as antioxidants), and 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol, which seems to a degradation product of antioxidant. Migration levels of these compounds were 1.68 micrograms/cm2 of 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol, 2.80 micrograms/cm2 of 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate, 46.08 micrograms/cm2 of styrenated phenols and 4.22 micrograms/cm2 of 4,4'-butylidenedi(6-tert-butyl-m-cresol) into n-heptane, respectively. The content of total styrenated phenols was 6,900 micrograms/g in NBR gloves. PMID:12846157

  4. HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS PROFILE FOR ACRYLONITRILE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Health and Environmental Effects Profile for acrylonitrile was prepared by the Office of Health and Environmental Assessment, Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office, Cincinnati, OH for the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response to support listings of hazardous con...

  5. 40 CFR 721.8965 - 1H-Pyrole-2, 5-dione, 1-(2,4,6-tribromophenyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... dewatering step during polymerization of acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene), and (g)(5). (iii) Industrial... apply to releases of the PMN substance during the dewatering step of the polymerization reactions...

  6. 40 CFR 721.8965 - 1H-Pyrole-2, 5-dione, 1-(2,4,6-tribromophenyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dewatering step during polymerization of acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene), and (g)(5). (iii) Industrial... apply to releases of the PMN substance during the dewatering step of the polymerization reactions...

  7. 40 CFR 721.8965 - 1H-Pyrole-2, 5-dione, 1-(2,4,6-tribromophenyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dewatering step during polymerization of acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene), and (g)(5). (iii) Industrial... apply to releases of the PMN substance during the dewatering step of the polymerization reactions...

  8. 40 CFR 721.8965 - 1H-Pyrole-2, 5-dione, 1-(2,4,6-tribromophenyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... dewatering step during polymerization of acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene), and (g)(5). (iii) Industrial... apply to releases of the PMN substance during the dewatering step of the polymerization reactions...

  9. 40 CFR 721.8965 - 1H-Pyrole-2, 5-dione, 1-(2,4,6-tribromophenyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dewatering step during polymerization of acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene), and (g)(5). (iii) Industrial... apply to releases of the PMN substance during the dewatering step of the polymerization reactions...

  10. Recycling of engineering plastics from waste electrical and electronic equipments: influence of virgin polycarbonate and impact modifier on the final performance of blends.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, V; Biswal, Manoranjan; Mohanty, Smita; Nayak, Sanjay K

    2014-05-01

    This study is focused on the recovery and recycling of plastics waste, primarily polycarbonate, poly(acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene) and high impact polystyrene, from end-of-life waste electrical and electronic equipments. Recycling of used polycarbonate, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene, polycarbonate/acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene/high impact polystrene material was carried out using material recycling through a melt blending process. An optimized blend composition was formulated to achieve desired properties from different plastics present in the waste electrical and electronic equipments. The toughness of blended plastics was improved with the addition of 10 wt% of virgin polycarbonate and impact modifier (ethylene-acrylic ester-glycidyl methacrylate). The mechanical, thermal, dynamic-mechanical and morphological properties of recycled blend were investigated. Improved properties of blended plastics indicate better miscibility in the presence of a compatibilizer suitable for high-end application. PMID:24695435

  11. 1,3-Butadiene: toxicity and carcinogenicity in laboratory animals and in humans.

    PubMed

    Melnick, R L; Huff, J

    1992-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene is a high production volume chemical used largely in the manufacture of synthetic rubber. The production and use of 1,3-butadiene increased dramatically during World War II with the development of the synthetic rubber industry. Before the 1980s, 1,3-butadiene was not considered to be particularly hazardous to human health; therefore, OSHA established a permissible limit of 1,000 ppm for occupational exposure to this chemical. Results of recent inhalation carcinogenicity studies have demonstrated clearly that 1,3-butadiene is a multiple-organ carcinogen in Sprague-Dawley rats and in B6C3F1 mice. Particularly noteworthy in mice were the early occurrences and extensive development of lymphomas, the induction of uncommon hemangiosarcomas of the heart, and the development of malignant lung tumors at exposure concentrations as low as 6.25 ppm. Because 6.25 ppm was the lowest concentration ever used in a long-term carcinogenicity of this gas, it is likely that lower exposure levels would also cause cancers in laboratory animals. In addition, multiple organ site neoplasia was induced in mice after only 13 weeks of exposure. Two reactive epoxides, 1,2-epoxy-3-butene and diepoxybutane, have been identified as intermediates in the biotransformation of 1,3-butadiene in rats and mice. Metabolism is probably an important factor in the carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene, because in vitro mutagenicity of 1,3-butadiene requires metabolic activation, whereas these epoxide intermediates are direct acting mutagens in bacteria and are carcinogens in rats and mice. The metabolism of 1,3-butadiene in rats and mice is linear up to concentrations of at least 1000 ppm. Pharmacokinetic studies on 1,3-butadiene and on 1,2-epoxy-3-butene have revealed certain quantitative differences in metabolic rates between Sprague-Dawley rats and B6C3F1 mice; however, these differences were not of sufficient magnitude to account for the reported different target site carcinogenic responses in these two strains of animals. Thus, additional factors must be involved in distinguishing site specificity in the carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene between species. In addition to its carcinogenic effects, 1,3-butadiene is a potent in vivo genotoxic agent to mouse bone marrow cells. Hematologic changes indicative of a partially regenerative anemia were induced in mice at 62.5 and higher concentrations. 1,3-Butadiene is also a reproductive and developmental toxicant. Epidemiology studies of workers employed in the production of 1,3-butadiene or of styrene-butadiene rubber have consistently revealed associations between occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene and excess mortality due to lymphatic and hematopoietic cancers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1732994

  12. IRIS Toxicological Review of Acrylonitrile (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    [UPDATE] New Schedule for IRIS Acrylonitrile Assessment

    In May 2012, EPA developed a new schedule for completing the IRIS acrylonitrile assessment. Acrylonitrile is primarily used in the manufacture of acrylic and modacrylic fibers, plastics, and nitrile rubbers. It ...

  13. Species differences in metabolism of 1,3-butadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, R.F.

    1995-02-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is a 4-carbon gaseous compound with two double bonds. Used in high tonnage to make styrene-butadiene polymers in the rubber industry. Because of large amounts in use, BD was tested for toxicity in 2-year inhalation exposures of both Sprague-Dawley rats and B6C3F{sub 1} mice. The results of the two-species studies were dramatically different. In the initial study in mice, BD was shown to be a potent multiple-site carcinogen at exposure levels of 625 and 1250 ppM. There were increased incidences of neoplasia in the heart, lung, mammary gland, and ovary; malignant lymphomas resulted in early deaths of the mice so that the planned 2-year study was stopped after only 61 weeks of exposure. The second study in mice was conducted at much lower exposure concentrations (6.25, 20, 62.5, 200, and 625 ppM) and lasted 104 weeks. Increased incidences of hemangiosarcomas of the heart and lung neoplasia were observed in males exposed to 62.5 ppM BD, while females had increased lung neoplasia even at the 6.25 ppM exposure level. Early deaths from lymphomas were again observed at the high exposure concentration (625 ppm). A noncancer toxicity observed in mice was a macrocytic, megaloblastic anemia.

  14. Critical assessment of epidemiologic studies on the human carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed Central

    Landrigan, P J

    1990-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene, a major ingredient of synthetic rubber, has been shown to be carcinogenic in two animal species. To assess the possible human carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene, a critical review was undertaken of the epidemiologic literature. An early retrospective study of 8017 males employed in tire manufacturing found excess mortality for lymphatic and hematopoietic neoplasms in production workers (standardized mortality ratio, SMR = 560); these workers were exposed to 1,3-butadiene as well as to styrene and possibly to benzene. A recently updated epidemiologic study of 2568 workers at a butadiene manufacturing plant in Texas reported low mortality overall (SMR = 84) but found excess deaths for lymphosarcoma and reticulum cell sarcoma (SMR = 229). A retrospective study of workers employed at two synthetic rubber plants in Texas found excess mortality for lymphatic and hematopoietic malignancies in the older of these facilities; the excesses for lymphosarcoma (SMR = 224) and leukemia (SMR = 278) were most significant in wartime workers. A large, recently updated retrospective study of 12,113 workers employed in eight synthetic rubber manufacturing plants in the United States and Canada found excess mortality for lymphatic and hematopoietic cancer in production workers; the SMR for other lymphatic cancers in white production workers was 230, and the SMR for all lymphatic malignancies in black production workers was 507. These updated epidemiologic results strongly suggest an etiologic association between occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene and human cancer. It is reasonable, therefore, to conclude that there now exists at least limited evidence for the human carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene. PMID:2205484

  15. Coconut shell powder as cost effective filler in copolymer of acrylonitrile and butadiene rubber.

    PubMed

    Keerthika, B; Umayavalli, M; Jeyalalitha, T; Krishnaveni, N

    2016-08-01

    Filler is one of the major additives in rubber compounds to enhance the physical properties. Even though numerous benefits obtained from agricultural by products like coconut shell, rice husk etc., still they constitute a large source of environmental pollution. In this investigation, one of the agricultural bye product coconut shell powder (CSP) is used as filler in the compounding KNB rubber. It shows the positive and satisfied result was achieved only by the use of filler Fast Extrusion Furnace (FEF) and coconut shell powder (CSP) which was used 50% in each. The effect of these fillers on the mechanical properties of a rubber material at various loading raging from 0 to 60PHP was studied. Mercaptodibanzothiazole disulphide (MBTS) was used as an accelerator. The result shows that presence of 25% and 50% of the composites has better mechanical properties like Hardness, Tensile strength, Elongation at break and Specific gravity when compared with other two combinations. Even though both 25% and 50% of composites shows good mechanical properties, 50% of CSP have more efficient than 25% of CSP. PMID:27060197

  16. 29 CFR 1915.1045 - Acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylonitrile. 1915.1045 Section 1915.1045 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Toxic and Hazardous...

  17. Organic chemistry. A rhodium catalyst for single-step styrene production from benzene and ethylene.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Benjamin A; Webster-Gardiner, Michael S; Cundari, Thomas R; Gunnoe, T Brent

    2015-04-24

    Rising global demand for fossil resources has prompted a renewed interest in catalyst technologies that increase the efficiency of conversion of hydrocarbons from petroleum and natural gas to higher-value materials. Styrene is currently produced from benzene and ethylene through the intermediacy of ethylbenzene, which must be dehydrogenated in a separate step. The direct oxidative conversion of benzene and ethylene to styrene could provide a more efficient route, but achieving high selectivity and yield for this reaction has been challenging. Here, we report that the Rh catalyst ((Fl)DAB)Rh(TFA)(η(2)-C2H4) [(Fl)DAB is N,N'-bis(pentafluorophenyl)-2,3-dimethyl-1,4-diaza-1,3-butadiene; TFA is trifluoroacetate] converts benzene, ethylene, and Cu(II) acetate to styrene, Cu(I) acetate, and acetic acid with 100% selectivity and yields ≥95%. Turnover numbers >800 have been demonstrated, with catalyst stability up to 96 hours. PMID:25908817

  18. New modified hydrocarbon resins; An alternative to styrenated terpene resins in hot melts

    SciTech Connect

    Carper, J.D. )

    1990-06-01

    This paper reports on the development of two hydrocarbon-based resin formulations that could be used with different thermoplastic block copolymers to formulate pressure-sensitive adhesives. Results are examined with one of these resins in formulations with styrene-isoprene-styrene (SIS) and styrene-butadiene (SB) compounds. The new modified hydrocarbon resin, with a softening point of 98{degrees} C, matches the adhesive performance of a terpene resin with a softening point of 105{degrees} C. The resin performs as well as the modified terpene in SIS-, SB-, and EVA-based adhesives. The new hydrocarbon resin is especially well suited for hot-melt adhesives. It exhibits low volatility, good color stability, and excellent melt viscosity stability. Since the new resin is based on petroleum hydrocarbon feedstocks, it should be available at moderate, stable prices. The other hydrocarbon resin, with a softening point of 85{degrees} C, produced comparable results.

  19. ABSORPTION OF CO2 IN HIGH ACRYLONITRILE CONTENT COPOLYMERS: DEPENDENCE ON ACRYLONITRILE CONTENT. (R829555)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In continuation of our goal to determine the ability of CO2 to plasticize acrylonitrile (AN) copolymers and facilitate melt processing at temperatures below the onset of thermal degradation, a systematic study has been performed to determine the influence of AN cont...

  20. 21 CFR 177.1040 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Maximum carbon dioxide permeability at 23 °C (73 °F) for the finished article is 0.04 barrer. 3 1 Use... Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA... Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go...

  1. 21 CFR 177.1040 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Maximum carbon dioxide permeability at 23 °C (73 °F) for the finished article is 0.04 barrer. 3 1 Use... Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA... Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go...

  2. Styrene exposure and risk of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huff, James; Infante, Peter F.

    2011-01-01

    Styrene is widely used in the manufacture of synthetic rubber, resins, polyesters and plastics. Styrene and the primary metabolite styrene-7,8-oxide are genotoxic and carcinogenic. Long-term chemical carcinogenesis bioassays showed that styrene caused lung cancers in several strains of mice and mammary cancers in rats and styrene-7,8-oxide caused tumours of the forestomach in rats and mice and of the liver in mice. Subsequent epidemiologic studies found styrene workers had increased mortality or incidences of lymphohematopoietic cancers (leukaemia or lymphoma or all), with suggestive evidence for pancreatic and esophageal tumours. No adequate human studies are available for styrene-7,8-oxide although this is the primary and active epoxide metabolite of styrene. Both are genotoxic and form DNA adducts in humans. PMID:21724974

  3. A numerical investigation on mechanical property improvement of styrene butadine rubber by static straight blade indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiyana, B.; Ismail, R.; Jamari, J.; Schipper, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical property improvement of rubber is widely carried out by adding carbon black or silica as a filler in rubber. In general, this improvement aims on the increase of stiffness and abrasion resistance. By means of the static straight blade indentation technique, this paper studies the mechanical properties of Unfilled Styrene Butadiene Rubber (SBR-0) and Filled Styrene Butadiene Rubber that is compounded with carbon black (SBR-25). The numerical method applied was Finite Element Analysis (FEA) in which the rubber was modeled as a hyper-elastic material and indented by a blade indenter with various wedge angles i.e. 30, 45 and 60 degrees. At the same depth of indentation, the results showed that there was an increase in both rubber stiffness and maximum stress if the rubber was compounded. However, it is found that the rubber stiffness showed a regular slight increase, while the maximum stress experienced an irregularly significant increase. Especially for the 30 degree wedge angle, the maximum stress extremely increased at a certain depth of indentation.

  4. Effect of soy protein and carbohydrate ratio on the viscoelastic properties of styrene-butadiene composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When soy products including soy protein isolate (SPI), defatted soy flour, soy protein concentrate, and soy spent flakes (SSF) were incorporated into rubber latex to form composites, they showed substantial reinforcement effects as measured by rheological and mechanical methods. It was observed tha...

  5. Reinforcement effect of soy protein/carbohydrate ratio in styrene-butadiene polymer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein and carbohydrate at different ratios were blended with latex to form composites. The variation of protein to carbohydrate ratio has a sifnificant effect on the composite properties and the results from dynamic mechanical method showed a substantial reinforcement effect. The composites ...

  6. EFFECT OF SOY PROTEIN AND CARBOHYDRATE RATIO ON THE VISCOELASTIC PROPERTIES OF STYRENE-BUTADIENE COMPOSITES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When soy products including soy protein isolate, defatted soy flour, soy protein concentrate, and soy spent flakes were incorporated into rubber latex to form composites, they showed substantial reinforcement effects as measured by rheological and mechanical methods. It was observed that different ...

  7. Reinforcement Effect of Alkali Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten and Starch in Carboxylated Styrene-Butadiene Composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat gluten (WG) and wheat starch (WS) are the protein and carbohydrate obtained from wheat flours. Wheat gluten is not water soluble or dispersible due to its hydrophobic nature. To prepare wheat gluten dispersions, an alkali hydrolysis reaction was carried out to produce a stable aqueous disper...

  8. Morphology and vulcanizate properties of ethylene-propylene-diene rubber/ styrene-butadiene rubber blends.

    PubMed

    Park, Gayoung; Kim, Yun Hee; Kim, Dong Soo; Ko, Young Chun

    2010-05-01

    Morphology and vulcanizate properties of EPDM/SBR blends were investigated. AAHR (a mixture of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon resins) was used as a compatibilizer and bis(3-triethoxysilylpropyl)tetrasulfide (TESPT) was used as a coupling agent. The vulcanizate properties and the morphological studies revealed that EPDM and SBR were incompatible, and the addition of AAHR was very effective to enhance the compatibility between EPDM and SBR. The weight percent of bound rubbers was increased with increasing SBR contents. The addition of an AAHR increased the amounts of bound rubbers, and hence the vulcanizate properties such as tear strength and fatigue resistance of the EPDM/SBR blends were improved. The dynamic mechanical analysis and the morphological studies revealed that the addition of TESPT increased the weight of bound rubbers and provided better dispersion of carbon black, resulting in good mechanical properties such as tear strength and fatigue resistance of the vulcanized EPDM/SBR blends. The smaller particle of zinc oxide (i.e., 50 nm > 100 nm > 1000 nm) yielded to the better blending properties of the polymer blend. PMID:20359035

  9. Assessment of 1,3-butadiene exposure in polymer production workers using HPRT mutations in lymphocytes as a biomarker.

    PubMed Central

    Ammenheuser, M M; Bechtold, W E; Abdel-Rahman, S Z; Rosenblatt, J I; Hastings-Smith, D A; Ward, J B

    2001-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD), which is used to make styrene-butadiene rubber, is a potent carcinogen in mice and a probable carcinogen, associated with leukemia, in humans. We have previously used HPRT mutation as a biomarker to evaluate exposures to BD in a monomer production plant. We now report on a study of 49 workers in a styrene-butadiene rubber plant in which we used the concentration of the BD metabolite 1,2-dihydroxy-4-(N-acetylcysteinyl-S)-butane (M1) in urine as a biomarker of exposure and the frequency of HPRT variant (mutant) lymphocytes (Vf) as a biomarker of effect. Workers were assigned to high- and low-exposure groups based on historical information about work areas and jobs. Personal exposure to BD for one work shift was measured using a passive badge dosimeter. Each participant provided a urine specimen and blood sample at the end of the work shift and completed a questionnaire providing information on lifestyle, health, and work activities. The average BD exposures in the high- and low-exposure groups were significantly different, even after excluding two extreme values, (high 1.48 ppm; low 0.15 ppm, p < 0.002). This study was done in 1994 and 1995 before the establishment, in 1996, of the new permissible exposure limit of 1 ppm. Both the mean M1 and the HPRT Vf were more than three times greater in the high-exposure group than in the low-exposure group (p < 0.0005). The three end points correlated with each other, with sample correlation coefficients between 0.4 and 0.6. The correlations among BD exposure and the biomarkers of internal exposure and genotoxicity suggest that occupational exposure to BD, in the range of 1-3 ppm, may be associated with adverse biological effects. PMID:11748032

  10. Acrylonitrile characterization and high energetic photochemistry at Titan temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumi, A.; Piétri, N.; Chiavassa, T.; Couturier-Tamburelli, I.

    2016-05-01

    Laboratory infrared spectra of amorphous and crystalline acrylonitrile (C2H3CN) ices were recorded between 4000 and 650 cm-1. Heating up the acrylonitrile sample to 160 K shows details on the transition between amorphous and crystalline ice at ∼94 K. This molecule can be used as an indicator of the surface temperature of Titan since it is known also to be ∼94 K. The desorption energy of acrylonitrile was determined using two methods (IRTF and mass spectrometries) to be around 35 kJ mol-1. Solid phase acrylonitrile was irradiated with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light at low temperatures (20, 70, 95 and 130 K) using a microwave-discharge hydrogen flow lamp. Isoacrylonitrile, cyanoacetylene (HC3N), isocyanoacetylene (HC2NC), acetylene (C2H2) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) were identified as photoproducts by using FTIR spectroscopy. The branching ratio of each pathway has been calculated for the different temperatures. We have estimated the acrylonitrile, HCN and HC3N νCtbnd N stretching band strengths to be respectively A = 3.98 ×10-18 , A = 1.38 ×10-18 and A = 2.92 ×10-18cmmolecule-1 .

  11. 76 FR 38387 - Draft Toxicological Review of Acrylonitrile: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Acrylonitrile: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated... Review of Acrylonitrile: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System... draft assessment for acrylonitrile will be held on August 10, 2011, beginning at 9 a.m. and ending at...

  12. Styrene metabolism in Exophiala jeanselmei and involvement of a cytochrome P-450-dependent styrene monooxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, H H; Faber, B W; Van Heiningen, W N; Radhoe, H; Doddema, H J; Harder, W

    1996-01-01

    The yeast-like fungus Exophiala jeanselmei degrades styrene via initial oxidation of the vinyl side chain to phenylacetic acid, which is subsequently hydroxylated to homogentisic acid. The initial reactions are catalyzed by a NADPH- and flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent styrene monooxygenase, a styrene oxide isomerase, and a NAD(+)-dependent phenylacetaldehyde dehydrogenase. The reduced CO-difference spectrum of microsomal preparations of styrene-grown cells shows a characteristic absorption maximum at 450 nm, which strongly suggests the involvement of a cytochrome P-450-dependent styrene monooxygenase. Inhibition of styrene monooxygenase activity in cell extracts by cytochrome P-450 inhibitors SKF-525-A, metyrapone, and CO confirms this assumption. PMID:8919815

  13. Acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR)/manganous tungstate (MnWO4) nanocomposites: Characterization, mechanical and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesan, M. T.; Abdu Raheem V., P.; Jayakrishnan, P.; Pradyumnan, P. P.

    2014-10-01

    Nanocomposites of NBR with manganous-tungstate nanoparticles were prepared through vulcanization process. The extent of interaction of nanoparticles with the polymer was studied by FTIR, SEM, XRD, TGA and AC conductivity. FTIR and XRD ascertain the interaction of NBR with MnWO4 nanoparticles. SEM analysis established that the nanopartilces were well dispersed in the macromolecular chain of NBR. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposites were studied as a function of filler loading. The nanocomposites exhibited enhanced thermal stability as seen in TGA. Conductivity and dielectric properties of nanocomposites increase with increase in concentration of MnWO4 nanoparticles (7phr) and thereafter the value decreases.

  14. Thermodynamics of coil-hyperbranched poly(styrene-b-acrylated epoxidized soybean oil) block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fang-Yi; Hohmann, Austin; Hernández, Nacú; Cochran, Eric

    Here we present the phase behavior of a new type of coil-hyperbranched diblock copolymer: poly(styrene- b-acrylated epoxidized soybean oil), or PS-PAESO. PS-PAESO is an example of a biorenewable thermoplastic elastomer (bio-TPE). To date, we have shown that bio-TPEs can be economical commercial substitutes for their petrochemically derived analogues--such as poly(styrene- b-butadiene- b-styrene) (SBS)--in a range of applications including pressure sensitive adhesives and bitumen modification. From a polymer physics perspective, PS-PAESO is an interesting material in that it couples a linear coil-like block with a highly branched block. Thus in contrast to the past five decades of studies on linear AB diblock copolymers, coil-hyperbranched block copolymers are relatively unknown to the community and can be expected to deviate substantially from the standard ``universal'' phase behavior in the AB systems. To explore these new materials, we have constructed a library of PS-PAESO materials spanning a range of molecular weight and composition values. The phase transition behavior and the morphology information will be interpreted by isochronal temperature scanning in dynamic shear rheology, small angle X-ray scattering and the corresponding transmission electron microscopy.

  15. Styrene toxicity: an ecotoxicological assessment.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, B F; Mulligan, C N

    1997-12-01

    Although other aromatic compounds (e.g., benzene, toluene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), etc.) have been thoroughly studied over the years, styrene has been given little attention probably due to its lower rate of industrial use. In addition, it is less toxic than benzene and PAH, proven carcinogens. However, it is classified as a mutagen and thus potentially carcinogenic. Its main use is in the production of the polymer polystyrene and in the production of plastics, rubber, resins, and insulators. Entry into the environment is mainly through industrial and municipal discharges. In this review, the toxicological effects of styrene on humans, animals, and plants are discussed. Its mode of entry and methods of monitoring its presence are examined. Although its effects on humans and aquatic life have been studied, the data on short- or long-term exposures to plants, birds, and land animals are insufficient to be conclusive. Since exposure to workers can result in memory loss, difficulties in concentration and learning, brain and liver damage, and cancer, development of accurate methods to monitor its exposure is essential. In addition, the review outlines the present state of styrene in the environment and suggests ways to deal with its presence. It might appear that the quantities are not sufficient to harm humans, but more data are necessary to evaluate its effect, especially on workers who are regularly exposed to it. PMID:9469867

  16. The role of acrylonitrile in controlling the structure and properties of nanostructured ionomer films.

    PubMed

    Tungchaiwattana, Somjit; Musa, Muhamad Sharan; Yan, Junfeng; Lovell, Peter A; Shaw, Peter; Saunders, Brian R

    2014-07-14

    Ionomers are polymers which contain ionic groups that are covalently bound to the main chain. The presence of a small percentage of ionic groups strongly affects the polymer's mechanical properties. Here, we examine a new family of nanostructured ionomer films prepared from core-shell polymer nanoparticles containing acrylonitrile (AN), 1,3-butadiene (Bd) and methacrylic acid (MAA). Three new AN-containing dispersions were investigated in this study. The core-shell nanoparticles contained a PBd core. The shells contained copolymerised Bd, AN and MAA, i.e., PBd-AN-MAA. Three types of crosslinking were present in these films: covalent crosslinks (from Bd); strong physical crosslinks (involving ionic bonding of RCOO(-) and Zn(2+)) and weaker physical crosslinks (from AN). We examined and compared the roles of AN and ionic crosslinking (from added Zn(2+)) on the structure and mechanical properties of the films. The FTIR spectroscopy data showed evidence for RCOOH-nitrile hydrogen bonding with tetrahedral geometry. DMTA studies showed that AN copolymerised within the PBd-AN-MAA phase uniformly. Tensile stress-strain data showed that inclusion of AN increased elasticity and toughness. Analysis showed that about 33 AN groups were required to provide an elastically-effective chain. However, only 1.5 to 2 ionically bonded RCOO(-) groups were required to generate an elastically-effective chain. By contrast to ionic bonding, AN inclusion increased the modulus without compromising ductility. Our results show that AN is an attractive, versatile, monomer for increasing the toughness of nanostructured ionomers and this should also be the case for other nanostructured polymer elastomers. PMID:24852137

  17. IRIS Toxicological Review of Acrylonitrile (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On June 30, 2011, the draft Toxicological Review of Acrylonitrile and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and White House...

  18. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A TEST METHOD FOR ACRYLONITRILE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acrylonitrile (AN) has been identified as a suspected carcinogen and may be regulated in the future as a hazardous air pollutant under Section 112 of the Clean Air Act. A method was validated that utilizes a midget impinger containing methanol for trapping AN vapors followed by a...

  19. MUTAGENICITY AND CARCINOGENICITY ASSESSMENT OF 1,3-BUTADIENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    1,3-Butadiene has been shown to be an indirect mutage in bacteria. Two of its potential metabolites, 3,4- epoxybutene and diepoxybutane, are genotoxic in prokaryote as well as eukaryote test systems. Exposure of rodents to 1,3-butadiene results in ovarian tumors in mice and testi...

  20. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS OF BUTADIENE AT A NEOPRENE PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document details a field study to validate a method for the sampling and analysis of butadiene emissions from a plant manufacturing neoprene from butadiene/chlorine mixtures. aseous samples were collected from the process vent of one such plant using a modification of the ev...

  1. Gas Phase Raman Spectra of Butadiene and BUTADIENE-d_{6} and the Internal Rotation Potential Energy Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boopalachandran, Praveenkumar; Laane, Jaan; Craig, Norman C.

    2009-06-01

    The Raman spectrum of butadiene has been previously reported by Carreira and by Engeln and co-workers. Both studies reported a series of bands corresponding to double quantum jumps of ν_{13}, the internal rotation vibration, of the trans rotamer. Both studies also reported weaker bands assigned to the higher energy conformer. Carriera assigned these to the cis form while Engeln assigned them to the gauche form. Recent high level calculations by Feller and Craig also assign the higher energy form as gauche. In the present study we report the gas phase Raman spectrum of butadiene and its d_{6} isotopomer at both 25^°C and 260^°C. Several new spectral features in the 330 to 210 cm^{-1} region were observed and the effect of heating on the band intensities was studied. In addition, combination bands were observed in the 630 to 690 cm^{-1} (ν_{12} + ν_{13}) and 1130 to 1180 cm^{-1} (ν_{10} + ν_{13}) regions. A periodic potential energy function with V_{1}, V_{2}, V_{3}, V_{4}, and V_{6} terms was utilized to fit the data. This function was compared to the results from previous work and to the theoretical calculation. L. Carreira, J. Phys. Chem. 62, 3851 (1975). R. Engeln, D. Consalvo, and J. Reuss, J. Chem. Phys. 160, 427 (1992). D. Feller and N. C. Craig, J. Phys. Chem. 113, 1601 (2009).

  2. Metabolism of styrene oxide and 2-phenylethanol in the styrene-degrading Xanthobacter strain 124X

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmans, S.; Smits, J.P.; Van Der Werf, M.J.; Volkering, F.; De Bont, J.A.M. )

    1989-11-01

    Styrene oxide and 2-phenylethanol metabolism in the styrene-degrading Xanthobacter sp. strain 124X was shown to proceed via phenylacetaldehyde and phenylacetic acid. In cell extracts 2-phenylethanol was oxidized by a phenazine methosulfate-dependent enzyme, probably a pyrroloquinoline quinone enzyme. Xanthobacter sp. strain 124X also contains a novel enzymatic activity designated as styrene oxide isomerase. Styrene oxide isomerase catalyzes the isomerization of styrene oxide to phenylacetaldehyde. The enzyme was partially purified and shown to have a very high substrate specificity. Of the epoxides tested, styrene oxide was the only substrate transformed. The initial step in styrene metabolism in Xanthobacter sp. strain 124X is oxygen dependent and probably involves oxidation of the aromatic nucleus.

  3. REDUCING STYRENE EMISSIONS FROM SPRAYED FILLED RESINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Styrene emissions are coming under increasing study as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) develops maximum achievable control technology standards. During the manufacture of fiber-reinforced plastics/composites products, styrene, a volatile organic compound and a haz...

  4. Reaction of monosubstituted aromatic hydrocarbons with styrene

    SciTech Connect

    Grushin, A.I.; Grigor'ev, V.V.; Prokof'ev, K.V.; Kozlova, N.M.

    1986-03-20

    1,1-Phenylarylethanes were obtained by the reaction of styrene with some monosubstituted aromatic hydrocarbons in the presence of titanium tetrachloride. It was established that electron-donating substituents have an effect on the yield of the arylalkylation products.

  5. Laser transmission welding of ABS: Effect of CNTs concentration and process parameters on material integrity and weld formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Vidal, E.; Quintana, I.; Gadea, C.

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports a study of the laser transmission welding of polymeric joints composed by two ABS (acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene) sheets, one transparent (natural ABS) and the other absorbent (filled by different percentages of carbon nanotubes (CNTs)). The objective of this work is to analyze the effect of process parameters and CNTs concentrations on weld formation and mechanical resistance of the weld joints.

  6. New dual-phase polymer electrolytes prepared from NBR/SBR lattices. [polyacryloNitrile-Butadiene Rubber/poly(Styrene-Butadiene) copolymer Rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Morihiko; Ichino, Toshihiro; Rutt, J.S.; Nishi, Shiro . NTT Interdisciplinary Research Lab.)

    1993-10-01

    A new type of Li[sup +] ion conducting polymer electrolytes consisting of two phases, one of which is a highly polar region (impregnated with lithium salt solution), forming ion-conductive channels, while the other is a nonpolar region, forming supporting polymer matrices have been prepared from NBR/SBR lattices. TEM measurement and EDX analysis show evidence that dual-phase structure is constructed in the electrolyte. Ionic conductivity of the electrolyte increases with increase of lithium salt solution content. Maximum ionic conductivity of 2.2 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] S/cm is obtained at the lithium salt solution content of 60.5% (w/w). The electrolyte retains rubber-like film with good mechanical strength despite the presence of the solution.

  7. 76 FR 77267 - Acrylonitrile Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3506 et seq.) and Secretary of Labor's Order No. 4-2010 (75 FR 55355). Signed... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Acrylonitrile Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and... the information collection requirements specified by the Acrylonitrile Standard (29 CFR...

  8. Cooxidation of styrene by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and 4-methylphenol

    SciTech Connect

    Grab, L.A.; Ortiz, P.R.

    1987-05-01

    Styrene is cooxidized to styrene oxide in a system containing HRP/H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and 4-methylphenol. Styrene oxide is not formed in the absence of any of these components, or if the reaction is run under anaerobic conditions. Styrene oxide formation is inhibited by ascorbic acid and catalase but not mannitol or superoxide dismutase. Incubation with /sup 18/O/sub 2/ resulted in more than 90% incorporation of label into styrene oxide. The epoxidation of trans-(1-/sup 2/H)styrene occurred with partial loss of stereochemistry. The products expected from addition of the phenoxy radical to styrene were synthesized and shown not to be formed. Finally, EPR evidence was obtained for formation of 4-methyl catechol in the presence, but not absence, of styrene. The results imply that a peroxy radical is formed by addition of oxygen to the HRP-generated 4-methylphenoxy radical, and that this peroxy radical then cooxidizes styrene.

  9. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of acrylonitrile binding to cytochrome c peroxidase and oxidation of acrylonitrile by cytochrome c peroxidase compound I

    SciTech Connect

    Chinchilla, Diana Kilheeney, Heather Vitello, Lidia B. Erman, James E.

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) binds acrylonitrile in a pH-independent fashion. •The spectrum of the CcP/acrylonitrile complex is that of a 6c–ls ferric heme. •The acrylonitrile/CcP complex has a K{sub D} value of 1.1 ± 0.2 M. •CcP compound I oxidizes acrylonitrile with a maximum turnover rate of 0.61 min{sup −1}. -- Abstract: Ferric heme proteins bind weakly basic ligands and the binding affinity is often pH dependent due to protonation of the ligand as well as the protein. In an effort to find a small, neutral ligand without significant acid/base properties to probe ligand binding reactions in ferric heme proteins we were led to consider the organonitriles. Although organonitriles are known to bind to transition metals, we have been unable to find any prior studies of nitrile binding to heme proteins. In this communication we report on the equilibrium and kinetic properties of acrylonitrile binding to cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) as well as the oxidation of acrylonitrile by CcP compound I. Acrylonitrile binding to CcP is independent of pH between pH 4 and 8. The association and dissociation rate constants are 0.32 ± 0.16 M{sup −1} s{sup −1} and 0.34 ± 0.15 s{sup −1}, respectively, and the independently measured equilibrium dissociation constant for the complex is 1.1 ± 0.2 M. We have demonstrated for the first time that acrylonitrile can bind to a ferric heme protein. The binding mechanism appears to be a simple, one-step association of the ligand with the heme iron. We have also demonstrated that CcP can catalyze the oxidation of acrylonitrile, most likely to 2-cyanoethylene oxide in a “peroxygenase”-type reaction, with rates that are similar to rat liver microsomal cytochrome P450-catalyzed oxidation of acrylonitrile in the monooxygenase reaction. CcP compound I oxidizes acrylonitrile with a maximum turnover number of 0.61 min{sup −1} at pH 6.0.

  10. Aspects of the synthesis of poly(styrene-b-isobutylene-b-styrene) block copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Storey, R.F.; Chisholm, B.J.

    1993-12-31

    Poly(styrene-b-isobutylene-b-styrene) block copolymers were synthesized by the addition of a solution of styrene to living polyisobutylene chains produced from a dicumyl chloride/TiCl{sub 4}/pyridine initiating system. The effect of the time of the styrene addition was investigated with respect to product polymer composition. Styrene addition at an isobutylene reaction time far exceeding the time necessary for complete isobutylene consumption was found to result in a very rapid polymerization of styrene, some of which was blocked properly and some of which was not. Conversely, premature addition of styrene (at intermediate isobutylene conversion) resulted in retardation of the polymerization and possible creation of a transitional random copolymer block. The appropriate time for styrene addition seems to be at an isobutylene conversion which corresponds to the point of departure from linearity of a plot of {minus}ln1{minus}(DP{sub n}[I]{sub o}/[M]{sub o}) vs time. Linearity of this plot ensures the absence of chain transfer and termination, and for the isobutylene polymerization system under investigation, the point of departure from linearity has been determined to be an approximately 90% conversion.

  11. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart U of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Elastomer Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... = Ethylene Propylene Rubber. HYP = HypalonTM. NEO = Neoprene. NBL = Nitrile Butadiene Latex. NBR = Nitrile... Rubber. SBL = Styrene Butadiene Latex. SBRE = Styrene Butadiene Rubber by Emulsion....

  12. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart U of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Elastomer Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... = Ethylene Propylene Rubber. HYP = HypalonTM. NEO = Neoprene. NBL = Nitrile Butadiene Latex. NBR = Nitrile... Rubber. SBL = Styrene Butadiene Latex. SBRE = Styrene Butadiene Rubber by Emulsion....

  13. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart U of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Elastomer Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... = Ethylene Propylene Rubber. HYP = HypalonTM. NEO = Neoprene. NBL = Nitrile Butadiene Latex. NBR = Nitrile... Rubber. SBL = Styrene Butadiene Latex. SBRE = Styrene Butadiene Rubber by Emulsion....

  14. Vibrations of acrylonitrile in N 1s excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilakovac, V.; Carniato, S.; Gallet, J.-J.; Kukk, E.; Horvati?, D.; Ilakovac, A.

    2008-01-01

    The N 1s near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of acrylonitrile gas are accurately reproduced by a complete ab initio multidimensional vibrational analysis. The role of ?? -orbital localization and hybridization on vibrations accompanying core excitation is discussed. Transition to the ???(C=C-C?N) delocalized orbital excites mostly stretching vibrations of the whole spinal column of the molecule. Promoting a core electron to the localized ???(C?N) produces C?N stretching vibration combined with two strong bending modes of the C-C?N end of the molecule, related to the change of carbon hybridization.

  15. Occupational exposure of workers to 1,3-butadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Fajen, J.M.; Roberts, D.R.; Ungers, L.J.; Krishnan, E.R. )

    1990-06-01

    Researchers from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted an extent-of-exposure study of the 1,3-butadiene monomer, polymer, and end-user industries to determine the size of the exposed workforce, evaluate control technologies and personal protective equipment programs, and assess occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene. A new analytical method was developed for 1,3-butadiene that increased the sensitivity and selectivity of the previous NIOSH method. The new method is sensitive to 0.2 microgram per 1,3-butadiene sample. Walk-through surveys were conducted in 11 monomer, 17 polymer, and 2 end-user plants. In-depth industrial hygiene surveys were conducted at 4 monomer, 5 polymer, and 2 end-user plants. Airborne exposure concentrations of 1,3-butadiene were determined using personal sampling for each job category. A total of 692 full shift and short-term personnel and 259 area air samples were examined for the presence of 1,3-butadiene. Sample results indicated that all worker exposures were well below the current OSHA PEL of 1000 ppm. Exposures ranged from less than 0.006 ppm to 374 ppm. The average exposure for all samples was less than 2 ppm. The present American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value for 1,3-butadiene is 10 ppm. To reduce the potential for occupational exposure, it is recommended that quality control sampling be conducted using a closed loop system. Also all process pumps should be retrofitted with dual mechanical seals, magnetic gauges should be used in loading and unloading rail cars, and engineering controls should be designed for safely voiding quality control cylinders.

  16. Occupational exposure of workers to 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed

    Fajen, J M; Roberts, D R; Ungers, L J; Krishnan, E R

    1990-06-01

    Researchers from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted an extent-of-exposure study of the 1,3-butadiene monomer, polymer, and end-user industries to determine the size of the exposed workforce, evaluate control technologies and personal protective equipment programs, and assess occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene. A new analytical method was developed for 1,3-butadiene that increased the sensitivity and selectivity of the previous NIOSH method. The new method is sensitive to 0.2 microgram per 1,3-butadiene sample. Walk-through surveys were conducted in 11 monomer, 17 polymer, and 2 end-user plants. In-depth industrial hygiene surveys were conducted at 4 monomer, 5 polymer, and 2 end-user plants. Airborne exposure concentrations of 1,3-butadiene were determined using personal sampling for each job category. A total of 692 full shift and short-term personnel and 259 area air samples were examined for the presence of 1,3-butadiene. Sample results indicated that all worker exposures were well below the current OSHA PEL of 1000 ppm. Exposures ranged from less than 0.006 ppm to 374 ppm. The average exposure for all samples was less than 2 ppm. The present American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value for 1,3-butadiene is 10 ppm. To reduce the potential for occupational exposure, it is recommended that quality control sampling be conducted using a closed loop system. Also all process pumps should be retrofitted with dual mechanical seals, magnetic gauges should be used in loading and unloading rail cars, and engineering controls should be designed for safely voiding quality control cylinders. PMID:2401251

  17. Effects of Styrene-metabolizing Enzyme Polymorphisms and Lifestyle Behaviors on Blood Styrene and Urinary Metabolite Levels in Workers Chronically Exposed to Styrene

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether genetic polymorphisms of CYP2E1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 and lifestyle habits (smoking, drinking, and exercise) modulate the levels of urinary styrene metabolites such as mandelic acid (MA) and phenylglyoxylic acid (PGA) after occupational exposure to styrene. We recruited 79 male workers who had received chronic exposure in styrene fiberglass-reinforced plastic manufacturing factories. We found that serum albumin was significantly correlated with blood styrene/ambient styrene (BS/AS), urinary styrene (US)/AS, and US/BS ratios as well as urinary metabolites, that total protein correlated with US/MA and US/PGA ratios, and that low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol significantly correlated with US/BS, US/MA, and US/PGA ratios. Multiple logistic regression analyses using styrene-metabolizing enzyme genotypes and lifestyle habits as dependent variables and blood and urine styrene concentrations and urine styrene metabolite levels as independent variables revealed that CYP2E1*5 was associated with the MA/US ratio and GSTM1 with US/BS, that a smoking habit was associated with US/AS and MA/US ratios and MA and PGA levels, and that regular exercise was correlated with PGA/US. In conclusion, the results suggested that genetic polymorphisms of styrene-metabolizing enzymes, lifestyle behaviors, and albumin and LDL-cholesterol serving as homeostasis factors together are involved in styrene metabolism. PMID:26877838

  18. Effects of Styrene-metabolizing Enzyme Polymorphisms and Lifestyle Behaviors on Blood Styrene and Urinary Metabolite Levels in Workers Chronically Exposed to Styrene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Woong

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether genetic polymorphisms of CYP2E1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 and lifestyle habits (smoking, drinking, and exercise) modulate the levels of urinary styrene metabolites such as mandelic acid (MA) and phenylglyoxylic acid (PGA) after occupational exposure to styrene. We recruited 79 male workers who had received chronic exposure in styrene fiberglass-reinforced plastic manufacturing factories. We found that serum albumin was significantly correlated with blood styrene/ambient styrene (BS/AS), urinary styrene (US)/AS, and US/BS ratios as well as urinary metabolites, that total protein correlated with US/MA and US/PGA ratios, and that low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol significantly correlated with US/BS, US/MA, and US/PGA ratios. Multiple logistic regression analyses using styrene-metabolizing enzyme genotypes and lifestyle habits as dependent variables and blood and urine styrene concentrations and urine styrene metabolite levels as independent variables revealed that CYP2E1*5 was associated with the MA/US ratio and GSTM1 with US/BS, that a smoking habit was associated with US/AS and MA/US ratios and MA and PGA levels, and that regular exercise was correlated with PGA/US. In conclusion, the results suggested that genetic polymorphisms of styrene-metabolizing enzymes, lifestyle behaviors, and albumin and LDL-cholesterol serving as homeostasis factors together are involved in styrene metabolism. PMID:26877838

  19. Reaction of ethylene and 1,3-Butadiene with a titanium-magnesium catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Lubnin, A.V.; Bresler, L.S.; Genkin, A.N.; Moiseeva, V.G.

    1985-11-01

    The authors examine the reaction of butadiene with titanium-magnesium catalyst (TMC), and ethylene with TMC. The reaction of butadiene shows that it is not possible to determine the surface of the catalyst chromatographically. In contrast to saturated hydrocarbons, ethylene and butadiene are irreversibly absorbed in carbon packed with a freshly prepared TMC washed with toluene. There are active sites on the surface of the catalyst capable of binding butadiene, but there are no sites for oligomerization of ethylene.

  20. 46 CFR 154.1750 - Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. 154... and Operating Requirements § 154.1750 Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. A refrigeration system for butadiene or vinyl chloride must not use vapor compression unless it: (a) Avoids...

  1. 46 CFR 154.1750 - Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. 154... and Operating Requirements § 154.1750 Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. A refrigeration system for butadiene or vinyl chloride must not use vapor compression unless it: (a) Avoids...

  2. 46 CFR 154.1750 - Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. 154... and Operating Requirements § 154.1750 Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. A refrigeration system for butadiene or vinyl chloride must not use vapor compression unless it: (a) Avoids...

  3. 46 CFR 154.1750 - Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. 154... and Operating Requirements § 154.1750 Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. A refrigeration system for butadiene or vinyl chloride must not use vapor compression unless it: (a) Avoids...

  4. 46 CFR 154.1750 - Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. 154... and Operating Requirements § 154.1750 Butadiene or vinyl chloride: Refrigeration system. A refrigeration system for butadiene or vinyl chloride must not use vapor compression unless it: (a) Avoids...

  5. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of acrylonitrile binding to cytochrome c peroxidase and oxidation of acrylonitrile by cytochrome c peroxidase compound I

    PubMed Central

    Chinchilla, Diana; Kilheeney, Heather; Vitello, Lidia B.; Erman, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Ferric heme proteins bind weakly basic ligands and the binding affinity is often pH dependent due to protonation of the ligand as well as the protein. In an effort to find a small, neutral ligand without significant acid/base properties to probe ligand binding reactions in ferric heme proteins we were led to consider the organonitriles. Although organonitriles are known to bind to transition metals, we have been unable to find any prior studies of nitrile binding to heme proteins. In this communication we report on the equilibrium and kinetic properties of acrylonitrile binding to cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) as well as the oxidation of acrylonitrile by CcP compound I. Acrylonitrile binding to CcP is independent of pH between pH 4 and 8. The association and dissociation rate constants are 0.32 ± 0.16 M−1s−1 and 0.34 ± 0.15 s−1, respectively, and the independently measured equilibrium dissociation constant for the complex is 1.1 ± 0.2 M. We have demonstrated for the first time that acrylonitrile can bind to a ferric heme protein. The binding mechanism appears to be a simple, one-step association of the ligand with the heme iron. We have also demonstrated that CcP can catalyze the oxidation of acrylonitrile, most likely to 2-cyanoethylene oxide in a “peroxygenase”-type reaction, with rates that are similar to rat liver microsomal cytochrome P450-catalyzed oxidation of acrylonitrile in the monooxygenase reaction. CcP compound I oxidizes acrylonitrile with a maximum turnover number of 0.61 min−1 at pH 6.0. PMID:24291498

  6. The Iodochlorination of Styrene: An Experiment that Makes a Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amiet, R. Gary; Urban, Sylvia

    2008-01-01

    The iodochlorination of styrene, involving the addition of iodine monochloride to styrene, followed by the sodium methoxide-initiated dehydrohalogenation of the product results in a variable mixture of substituted styrenes by way of various substitution and elimination reaction mechanisms. As a result individual results are obtained for each…

  7. Radical-initiated controlled synthesis of homo- and copolymers based on acrylonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishin, D. F.; Grishin, I. D.

    2015-07-01

    Data on the controlled synthesis of polyacrylonitrile and acrylonitrile copolymers with other (meth)acrylic and vinyl monomers upon radical initiation and metal complex catalysis are analyzed. Primary attention is given to the use of metal complexes for the synthesis of acrylonitrile-based (co)polymers with defined molecular weight and polydispersity in living mode by atom transfer radical polymerization. The prospects for using known methods of controlled synthesis of macromolecules for the preparation of acrylonitrile homo- and copolymers as carbon fibre precursors are estimated. The major array of published data analyzed in the review refers to the last decade. The bibliography includes 175 references.

  8. In vivo comet assay of acrylonitrile, 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride monohydrate and ethanol in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yuzuki; Toyoizumi, Tomoyasu; Sui, Hajime; Ohta, Ryo; Kumagai, Fumiaki; Usumi, Kenji; Saito, Yoshiaki; Yamakage, Kohji

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiative international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay, we examined the ability of acrylonitrile, 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride monohydrate (9-AA), and ethanol to induce DNA damage in the liver and glandular stomach of male rats. Acrylonitrile is a genotoxic carcinogen, 9-AA is a genotoxic non-carcinogen, and ethanol is a non-genotoxic carcinogen. Positive results were obtained in the liver cells of male rats treated with known genotoxic compounds, acrylonitrile and 9-AA. PMID:26212299

  9. Gender differences in the metabolism of 1,3-butadiene to butadiene diepoxide in Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton-Manning, J.R.; Dahl, A.R.; Bechtold, W.E.

    1995-12-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD), a gaseous compound used in the production of rubber, is a potent carcinogen in mice and a weak carcinogen in rats. The mechanism of BD-induced carcinogenicity is thought to involve genotoxic effects of its reactive epoxide metabolites butadiene monoepoxide (BDO) and butadiene diepoxide (BDO{sub 2}). Studies in our laboratory have shown that levels of the epoxides, particularly BDO{sub 2}, are greater in mice-the more sensitive species-than rats. While both epoxides are genotoxic in a number of assays, BDO{sub 2} is mutagenic in TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells at concentrations approximately 100-fold lower than BDO. Species differences in carcinogenicity of BD have posed a dilemma to investigators deciding which animal model is most appropriate for BD risk assessment.

  10. Photolysis of astrophysically relevant acrylonitrile: a matrix experimental study.

    PubMed

    Toumi, A; Couturier-Tamburelli, I; Chiavassa, T; Piétri, N

    2014-04-01

    This report documents the photochemical study of H2C ═ C(H)CN (acrylonitrile) trapped in low-temperature argon matrices and irradiated with a microwave-discharge hydrogen-flow lamp (λ > 120 nm). We succeeded in identifying H2C ═ C(H)NC (isoacrylonitrile) as a photoproduct. HC3N (cyanoacetylene), C2H2:HCN (acetylene:hydrogen cyanide), and C2H2:HNC (acetylene:hydrogen isocyanide) complexes, which are molecules detected in molecular clouds or in the Titan atmosphere, were also identified. No imine product was observed, but other compounds coming from the HC3N photolysis have been found. Fourier transform infrared measurements and (2)H substitution experiments coupled with density functional theory calculations (B3LYP/6-31G**) were performed to confirm the spectral assignments of the photochemical products and intermediate species. PMID:24621153

  11. Hydrolyzed Poly(acrylonitrile) Electrospun Ion-Exchange Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Jassal, Manisha; Bhowmick, Sankha; Sengupta, Sukalyan; Patra, Prabir K.; Walker, Douglas I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A potential ion-exchange material was developed from poly(acrylonitrile) fibers that were prepared by electrospinning followed by alkaline hydrolysis (to convert the nitrile group to the carboxylate functional group). Characterization studies performed on this material using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-Transform infra-red spectroscopy, and ion chromatography confirmed the presence of ion-exchange functional group (carboxylate). Optimum hydrolysis conditions resulted in an ion-exchange capacity of 2.39 meq/g. Ion-exchange fibers were used in a packed-bed column to selectively remove heavy-metal cation from the background of a benign, competing cation at a much higher concentration. The material can be efficiently regenerated and used for multiple cycles of exhaustion and regeneration. PMID:24963270

  12. Polystyrene cups and containers: styrene migration.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, M S; Huyghebaert, A

    1998-07-01

    The level of styrene migration from polystyrene cups was monitored in different food systems including: water, milk (0.5, 1.55 and 3.6% fat), cold beverages (apple juice, orange juice, carbonated water, cola, beer and chocolate drink), hot beverages (tea, coffee, chocolate and soup (0.0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 3.6% fat), take away foods (yogurt, jelly, pudding and ice-cream), as well as aqueous food simulants (3% acetic acid, 15, 50, and 100% ethanol) and olive oil. Styrene migration was found to be strongly dependent upon the fat content and storage temperature. Drinking water gave migration values considerably lower than all of the fatty foods. Ethanol at 15% showed a migration level equivalent to milk or soup containing 3.6% fat. Maximum observed migration for cold or hot beverages and take-away foods was 0.025% of the total styrene in the cup. Food simulants were responsible for higher migration (0.37% in 100% ethanol). A total of 60 food samples (yogurt, rice with milk, fromage, biogardes, and cheese) packed in polystyrene containers were collected from retail markets in Belgium, Germany, and the Netherlands. The level of styrene detected in the foods was always fat dependent. PMID:9829045

  13. ENGINEERING THE BIOSYNTHESIS OF STYRENE IN YEAST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The strategy pursued was to insert genes for phenylalanine ammonia lysase (pal) and phenolic acid decarboxylase (pad) into the yeast that would convert phenylalanine to styrene through a cinnamic acid intermediate.

    Reaction of disubstituted aromatic compounds with styrene

    SciTech Connect

    Grushin, A.I.; Grigor'ev, V.V.; Prokof'ev, K.V.; Kozlova, N.M.

    1988-03-20

    Hydrocarbons of the 1,1-diphenylethane type were obtained by the reaction of styrene with various disubstituted derivatives of benzene in the presence of titanium tetrachloride. It was found that the yield of the desired compound depends on the strength of the electron-donating substituents and on steric factors in the aromatic ring.

  14. The Rotational Spectrum of Acrylonitrile to 1.67 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiel, Zbigniew; Pszczółkowski, Lech; Drouin, Brian J.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Yu, Shanshan; Pearson, John C.

    2009-06-01

    Acrylonitrile (vinyl cyanide) is an astrophysical molecule of sufficient abundance for detection of its ^{13}C isotopologues. In fact this molecule has been identified as one of the 'weed' species, that will contribute a plethora of lines in broadband submillimetre spectra from the new tools of radioastronomy, such as the Herschel Space Observatory or ALMA. We presently report the first stage in extending the knowledge of the rotational spectrum of acrylonitrile well into the THz region. The spectrum was recorded with the jpl cascaded harmonic multiplication instrument in the form of several broadband segments covering 390-540, 818-930, 967-1160, and 1576-1669 GHz. The analysis of the ground state spectrum has been extended up to J=128, K_a=29, and a combined data set of over 3000 fitted lines. It is found that transitions in all measurable vibrational states, inclusive of the ground state, show evidence of perturbations with other states. Several different perturbations between the ground state and v_{11}=1 at 228 cm^{-1} were identified and have been successfully fitted, resulting in E_{11}=228.29994(3) cm^{-1}, to compare with a direct far-infrared value of 228.83(18) cm^{-1}. H.S.P.Müller et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc., 251, 319-325 (2008). B.J.Drouin, F.W.Maiwald, J.C.Pearson, Rev. Sci. Instrum., 76, 093113-1-10 (2005). A.R.H.Cole, A.A.Green, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 48, 246-253 (1973).

  15. Vapor-liquid equilibria of copolymer + solvent and homopolymer + solvent binaries: New experimental data and their correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.B.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1995-07-01

    Sixty-four isothermal data sets for vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) for polymer + solvent binaries have been obtained using a gravimetric sorption technique, in the range of 23.5--80 C. Solvents studied were acetone, acetonitrile, 1-butanol, 1,2-dichloroethane, chloroform, cyclohexane, hexane, methanol, octane, pentane, and toluene. Copolymers studied were poly(acrylonitrile-co-butadiene), poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile), poly(styrene-co-butadiene), poly(styrene-co-butyl methacrylate), poly(vinyl acetate-co-ethylene), and poly(vinyl acetate-co-vinyl chloride). All copolymers were random copolymers. Some homopolymers were also studied: polyacrylonitrile, polybutadiene, poly(butyl methacrylate), poly(ethylene oxide), polystyrene, and poly(vinyl acetate). The composition of the copolymer may have a surprising effect on VLE. Normally, deviation from ideal behavior lies between those of the constituent homopolymers, according to the copolymer composition, as observed for cyclohexane + poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) and chloroform + poly(styrene-co-butyl methacrylate). However, the strong nonideal behavior observed for systems containing hydrocarbons and poly(butadiene-co-acrylonitrile) shows that the effect of acrylonitrile is in excess of that expected form the copolymer composition. The perturbed hard-sphere chain (PHSC) equation of state was used to represent VLE of the copolymer solutions studied here.

  16. Mechanical properties of melt-processed polymer blend of amorphous corn flour composite filler and styrene-butadiene rubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The corn flour composite fillers were prepared by blending corn flour with rubber latex, dried, and cryogenically ground into powders, which were then melt-blended with rubber polymers in an internal mixer to form composites with enhanced mechanical properties. The composites prepared with melt-blen...

  17. Reinforcement Effect of Alkali-Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten and Shear-Degraded Wheat Starch in Carboxylated Styrene-Butadiene Composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat gluten (WG) and wheat starch (WS) are the protein and carbohydrate obtained from wheat flours. Wheat gluten is not water soluble or dispersible due to its hydrophobic nature. To prepare wheat gluten dispersions, an alkali hydrolysis reaction was carried out to produce a stable aqueous disper...

  18. 40 CFR 63.500 - Back-end process provisions-carbon disulfide limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... or 1A of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, as required, shall be used for selection of the sampling sites. (ii) The gas volumetric flow rate shall be determined using Method 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D of 40 CFR part 60... paragraph (a) of this section, the owner or operator shall use Method 18 or Method 25A of 40 CFR part...

  19. 40 CFR 63.500 - Back-end process provisions-carbon disulfide limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or 1A of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, as required, shall be used for selection of the sampling sites. (ii) The gas volumetric flow rate shall be determined using Method 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D of 40 CFR part 60... paragraph (a) of this section, the owner or operator shall use Method 18 or Method 25A of 40 CFR part...

  1. Aggregate structure and effect of phthalic anhydride modified soy protein on the mechanical properties of styrene-butadiene copolymer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aggregate structure of phthalic anhydride (PA) modified soy protein isolate (SPI) was investigated by estimating its fractal dimension from the equilibrated dynamic strain sweep experiments. The estimated fractal dimensions of the filler aggregates were less than 2, indicating that these partic...

  2. 40 CFR 63.500 - Back-end process provisions-carbon disulfide limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... or 1A of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, as required, shall be used for selection of the sampling sites. (ii) The gas volumetric flow rate shall be determined using Method 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D of 40 CFR part 60... paragraph (a) of this section, the owner or operator shall use Method 18 or Method 25A of 40 CFR part...

  3. Mechanical properties of heterophase polymer blends of cryogenically fractured soy flour composite filler and poly(styrene-butadiene)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reinforcement effect of cryogenically fractured soy Flour composite filler in soft polymer was investigated in this study. Polymer composites were prepared by melt-mixing polymer and soy flour composite fillers in an internal mixer. Soy flour composite fillers were prepared by blending aqueous dis...

  4. Effects of interfacial interaction on the properties of poly(vinyl chloride)/styrene-butadiene rubber blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shuihan

    PVC/SBR blends---new thermoplastic elastomer material---were developed. They have potential applications due to low costs and low-temperature elasticity. A unique compatibilization method was employed to enhance the mechanical properties of the materials a compatibilizer miscible with one of the blend components can react chemically with the other component(s). Improvements in tensile and impact behavior were observed as a result of the compatibilization. A novel characterization technique to study the interface of PVC/SBR blends was developed. This technique involves the observation of the unstained sample under electron beam irradiation by a transmission electron microscope (TEM). An enrichment of rubber at the interface between PVC and SBR was detected in the compatiblized PVC/SBR blends. Magnetic relaxation measurements show that the rubber concentration in the proximity of PVC increases with the degree of covulcanization between NBR and SBR. The interface development and the rheological effect during processing were investigated. The interfacial concentration profile and the interfacial thickness were obtained by grayscale measurements on TEM micrographs, evaluation of SIMS images, and measurements of micromechanical properties.

  5. 40 CFR 63.500 - Back-end process provisions-carbon disulfide limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or 1A of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, as required, shall be used for selection of the sampling sites. (ii) The gas volumetric flow rate shall be determined using Method 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D of 40 CFR part 60... paragraph (a) of this section, the owner or operator shall use Method 18 or Method 25A of 40 CFR part...

  6. 40 CFR 63.500 - Back-end process provisions-carbon disulfide limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... or 1A of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, as required, shall be used for selection of the sampling sites. (ii) The gas volumetric flow rate shall be determined using Method 2, 2A, 2C, or 2D of 40 CFR part 60... paragraph (a) of this section, the owner or operator shall use Method 18 or Method 25A of 40 CFR part...

  7. CARBOXYLATED STYRENE-BUTADIENE RUBBER COMPOSITES REINFORCED BY DEFATTED SOY FLOUR AND CARBON BLACK CO-FILLER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rubber composites reinforced by a mixture of defatted soy flour (DSF) and carbon black (CB) are investigated in terms of their dynamic shear modulus. DSF is an inexpensive and plentiful renewable material from soybean after soybean oil is removed. DSF contains soy protein and soy carbohydrate....

  8. Styrene exposure during the manufacturing of reinforced fiberglass pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    Considering the large number of employees exposed to airborne styrene during the manufacturing of reinforced fiberglass pipe and the absence of appropriate information to define airborne styrene exposure and the resulting levels of urinary mandelic acid, it was necessary that these parameters be evaluated in an actual industrial setting in order to appropriately monitor and control health hazards in the work place. Styrene measurements were collected at eight work stations over a 5-year period at the world's largest manufacturer of styrenated reinforced fiberglass pipe. Pre- and post-shift urinary mandelic acid was measured for 16 employees for 3-consecutive days. The data obtained were statistically analyzed to determine the mean styrene exposure at each work station and the relationship between airborne styrene and pre-and post-shift urinary mandelic acid. The results of this study indicated that both the pre- and post-shift urinary mandelic acid measurements can be utilized to confirm human exposure to styrene. Post-shift measurements are more reflective of daily variations in styrene exposure, whereas pre-shift urinary mandelic acid was found to correlate best to the long-term airborne styrene concentrations (r = 0.787). The prediction equations of NIOSH and ACGIH for the arithmetic mean airborne styrene concentration from post-shift mandelic acid were not valid for the low levels of styrene exposure and urinary mandelic acid concentrations found in this study. Significant changes in the post-shift to pre-shift urinary mandelic acid concentrations were observed.

  9. KINETIC MODELING OF COUNTERFLOW DIFFUSION FLAMES OF BUTADIENE. (R828193)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive, semi-detailed kinetic scheme was used to simulate the chemical structures of counterflow diffusion and fuel-rich premixed 1,3-butadiene flames, to better understand the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The results showed that model predicti...

  10. Chemocatalytic conversion of ethanol into butadiene and other bulk chemicals.

    PubMed

    Angelici, Carlo; Weckhuysen, Bert M; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A

    2013-09-01

    The development of new and improved processes for the synthesis of bio-based chemicals is one of the scientific challenges of our time. These new discoveries are not only important from an environmental point of view, but also represent an important economic opportunity, provided that the developed processes are selective and efficient. Bioethanol is currently produced from renewable resources in large amounts and, in addition to its use as biofuel, holds considerable promise as a building block for the chemical industry. Indeed, further improvements in production, both in terms of efficiency and feedstock selection, will guarantee availability at competitive prices. The conversion of bioethanol into commodity chemicals, in particular direct 'drop-in' replacements is, therefore, becoming increasingly attractive, provided that the appropriate (catalytic) technology is in place. The production of green and renewable 1,3-butadiene is a clear example of this approach. The Lebedev process for the one-step catalytic conversion of ethanol to butadiene has been known since the 1930s and has been applied on an industrial scale to produce synthetic rubber. Later, the availability of low-cost oil made it more convenient to obtain butadiene from petrochemical sources. The desire to produce bulk chemicals in a sustainable way and the availability of low-cost bioethanol in large volumes has, however, resulted in a renaissance of this old butadiene production process. This paper reviews the catalytic aspects associated with the synthesis of butadiene via the Lebedev process, as well as the production of other, mechanistically related bulk chemicals that can be obtained from (bio)ethanol. PMID:23703747

  11. Quantitative risk assessment of exposures to butadiene in EU occupational settings based on the University of Alabama at Birmingham epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Sielken, Robert L; Valdez-Flores, Ciriaco

    2013-03-01

    The excess risks due to 1,3-butadiene (BD) inhalation in EU occupational settings are quantified for leukemia, AML, CLL, CML, lymphoid neoplasms, and myeloid neoplasms. The most recent data from the University of Alabama at Birmingham epidemiological study of North American workers in the styrene-butadiene rubber industry are modeled. The number of high-intensity tasks (HITs) and other exposure covariates may be more important predictors than cumulative BD ppm-years alone. For example, all of the 71 leukemia decedents in the UAB study who were exposed to BD had some BD HITs. None of the 1192 exposed workers without BD HITs had leukemia mortalities. The authors' best estimate (consolidated over all endpoints) of the average occupational BD exposure concentration for 45 years of exposure starting at age 20 corresponding to an added risk of 1/10,000 by age 70 is 7.2 ppm. Cumulative BD ppm-years is not statistically significantly associated with CML, AML, or myeloid neoplasms or (after any one of eight exposure covariates is included in the modeling) leukemia. The statistical significance of the slopes for leukemia, CLL, and lymphoid neoplasms unadjusted for covariate effects disappears when modeling is restricted to person years with less than 200 cumulative BD ppm-years. PMID:23261476

  12. Simple replica micromolding of biocompatible styrenic elastomers.

    PubMed

    Borysiak, Mark D; Bielawski, Kevin S; Sniadecki, Nathan J; Jenkel, Colin F; Vogt, Bryan D; Posner, Jonathan D

    2013-07-21

    In this work, we introduce a simple solvent-assisted micromolding technique for the fabrication of high-fidelity styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) microfluidic devices with high polystyrene (PS) content (42 wt% PS, SEBS42). SEBS triblock copolymers are styrenic thermoplastic elastomers that exhibit both glassy thermoplastic and elastomeric properties resulting from their respective hard PS and rubbery ethylene/butylene segments. The PS fraction gives SEBS microdevices many of the appealing properties of pure PS devices, while the elastomeric properties simplify fabrication of the devices, similar to PDMS. SEBS42 devices have wettable, stable surfaces (both contact angle and zeta potential) that support cell attachment and proliferation consistent with tissue culture dish substrates, do not adsorb hydrophobic molecules, and have high bond strength to wide range of substrates (glass, PS, SEBS). Furthermore, SEBS42 devices are mechanically robust, thermally stable, as well as exhibit low auto-fluorescence and high transmissivity. We characterize SEBS42 surface properties by contact angle measurements, cell culture studies, zeta potential measurements, and the adsorption of hydrophobic molecules. The PS surface composition of SEBS microdevices cast on different substrates is determined by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The attractive SEBS42 material properties, coupled with the simple fabrication method, make SEBS42 a quality substrate for microfluidic applications where the properties of PS are desired but the ease of PDMS micromolding is favoured. PMID:23670166

  13. Simple Replica Micromolding of Biocompatible Styrenic Elastomers†

    PubMed Central

    Bielawski, Kevin S.; Sniadecki, Nathan J.; Jenkel, Colin F.; Vogt, Bryan D.; Posner, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we introduce a simple solvent-assisted micromolding technique for the fabrication of high-fidelity styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) microfluidic devices with high polystyrene (PS) content (42 wt% PS). SEBS triblock copolymers are styrenic thermoplastic elastomers that exhibit both glassy thermoplastic and elastomeric properties resulting from their respective hard PS and rubbery ethylene/butylene fractions. The PS fraction gives SEBS microdevices many of the appealing properties of pure PS devices, while the elastomeric fraction simplifies fabrication of the devices, similar to PDMS. SEBS42 devices have wettable, stable surfaces (both contact angle and zeta potential) that support cell attachment and proliferation consistent with tissue culture dish substrates, do not adsorb hydrophobic molecules, and have high bond strength to wide range of substrates (glass, PS, SEBS). Furthermore, SEBS42 devices are mechanically robust, thermally stable, as well as exhibit low auto-fluorescence and high transmissivity. We characterize SEBS42 surface properties by contact angle measurements, cell culture studies, zeta potential measurements, and the adsorption of hydrophobic molecules. The PS surface composition of SEBS microdevices cast on different substrates is determined by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The attractive SEBS42 material properties, coupled with the simple fabrication method, make SEBS42 a quality substrate for microfluidic applications where the properties of PS are desired but the ease of PDMS micromolding is favoured. PMID:23670166

  14. Evaluation of possible genotoxic mechanisms for acrylonitrile tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Whysner, J; Ross, P M; Conaway, C C; Verna, L K; Williams, G M

    1998-06-01

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) exposure is associated with tumors in rat brain, Zymbal gland, and mammary gland. Adducts affecting base pairing were formed in isolated DNA exposed in vitro to the ACN metabolite cyanoethylene oxide (CNEO). DNA from liver, which is not a cancer target organ in ACN-exposed rats, contained low levels of 7-(2-oxoethyl)guanine, and adduct believed not to interfere with base pairing. No adducts have been detected in brain DNA from ACN-exposed rats, suggesting that brain tumors may have arisen by mechanisms other than ACN-DNA reactivity. Genotoxicity assays of ACN have indicated no particular carcinogenic mechanism. Positive reverse mutagenesis in Salmonella typhimurium HisG46 base substitution tester strains by ACN is attributable to CNEO. Other in vitro genotoxicity test assays of ACN have yielded mixed results, without consistent effect of metabolic activation. Some positive genotoxicity data for ACN appear to result from artifacts or from non-DNA-reactive mechanisms. In vivo micronucleus, chromosome aberration, and autoradiographic unscheduled DNA synthesis assays were negative for ACN. The comparative genotoxicity of vinyl chloride and ACN indicates that despite other similarities, they cause rodent tumors by different mechanisms. Also, they absence of ACN-DNA adduct formation in the rat brain suggests the operation of epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:9693074

  15. Coagulation pretreatment of highly concentrated acrylonitrile wastewater from petrochemical plants.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dongju; Qin, Lin; Wang, Tao; Ren, Xiaojing; Zhang, Zhongguo; Li, Jiding

    2014-01-01

    Acrylonitrile (AN) wastewater is a heavily polluted and a likely hazardous liquid that is generated during the production of AN. Several chemical methods for the pretreatment of AN wastewater are available in laboratory scale. However, the harsh reaction conditions and high operational cost make these methods undesirable. Until now, four-effect evaporation is the only pretreatment method used for AN wastewater in industry despite its huge energy consumption and high cost. It is difficult to find an energy-saving pretreatment technique from the perspective of industrial application. In this study, a safe and low-cost coagulation technique was developed for the pretreatment of AN wastewater. Three types of inorganic coagulant and three types of polymer coagulant were investigated for the coagulation treatment of highly concentrated AN wastewater from petrochemical plants. The effects of coagulant type, dosage, and coagulation conditions on the pretreatment efficiency of AN wastewater were investigated. The results show that a combination of inorganic and polymer coagulants is effective for the pretreatment of AN wastewater. PMID:25051483

  16. Cell sealant

    SciTech Connect

    Markin, C.; Book, R.J.; James, D.A.

    1988-04-26

    An electrochemical cell is described comprising an anode, a cathode and an electrolyte disposed within an open ended cylindrical metallic cell container, with an insulative cell top member being positioned within the open end of a sealant at the interface between the cell top member and the metallic cell container. The sealant is a mixture of a Type 2 BUR asphalt and an elastomeric material selected from the group consisting of (cis-1,4-polyisoprene), styrene-butadiene copolymer (SBR), cis-1,4-polybutadiene and styrene butadiene styrene (SBS), styrene isoprene styrene (SIS), neoprene (poly-chloprene), acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer (NBR), ethylene-propylene elastomers (EPR), butyl rubber (copolymers of isobutylene), urethane, nitrile (polymers of butadiene and acrylonitrile), polysulfide, polyacrylate, silicone, chlorosulfonated polyethylene, and EPDM (terpolymers of ethylene, propylene and diene monomers), and mixtures thereof, and wherein the elastomeric material is substantially inert to the electrolyte and is present in an amount between 0.5% to 10% by weight of the asphalt.

  17. Toxicokinetics of inhaled 1,3-butadiene in monkeys: Comparison to toxicokinetics in rats and mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, A.R.; Sun, J.D.; Birnbaum, L.S.; Bond, J.A.; Griffith, W.C. Jr.; Mauderly, J.L.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Sabourin, P.J.; Henderson, R.F. )

    1991-08-01

    1,3-Butadiene is a potent carcinogen in mice and a weaker carcinogen in rats. People are exposed to butadiene through its industrial use--largely in rubber production (over 3 billion pounds of butadiene were produced in 1989)--and because it is common in the environment, occurring in cigarette smoke, gasoline vapor and in the effluents from fossil fuel incineration. Epidemiological studies have provided some evidence for butadiene carcinogenicity in people. Differences in the uptake and metabolism of inhaled butadiene between rodents and primates, including people, might be reflected in differences in its toxicity. In order to compare uptake and metabolism in primates to that in rodents--for which data were already available--the authors exposed cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) to 14C-labeled butadiene at concentrations of 10.1, 310 or 7760 ppm for 2 hr. Exhaled air and excreta were collected during exposure and for 96 hr after exposure. The uptake of butadiene as a result of metabolism was much lower in monkeys than in rodents. For equivalent inhalation exposures, the concentrations of total butadiene metabolites in the blood were 5-50 times lower in monkey than in the mouse, the more sensitive rodent species, and 4-14 times lower than in the rat. If the toxicokinetics of butadiene in people is more like that of the monkey than that of rodents, then our data suggest that people will receive lower doses of butadiene and its metabolites than rodents following equivalent inhalation exposures to butadiene. This has important implications for assessing the risk to humans of butadiene exposure based on animal studies.

  18. Scintillation of thin tetraphenyl butadiene films under alpha particle excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollmann, Tina; Boulay, Mark; Kuźniak, Marcin

    2011-04-01

    The alpha induced scintillation of the wavelength shifter 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene (TPB) was studied to improve the understanding of possible surface alpha backgrounds in the DEAP dark matter search experiment. We found that vacuum deposited thin TPB films emit 882±210 photons per MeV under alpha particle excitation. The scintillation pulse shape consists of a double exponential decay with lifetimes of 11±5 and 275±10 ns.

  19. Reaction between CH2 and HCCN: a theoretical approach to acrylonitrile formation in the interstellar medium.

    PubMed

    Shivani; Misra, Alka; Tandon, Poonam

    2014-04-01

    Acrylonitrile (CH2CHCN) was first detected in dense molecular cloud SgrB2. The synthesis of this interstellar molecule is reported to be quite difficult. Therefore, in the present work an attempt has been made to explore the possibility of formation of acrylonitrile from some simple molecules and radicals detected in interstellar space by radical-radical interaction scheme, both in the gas phase and in the icy grains. All calculations are performed using quantum chemical methods with density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) level and Møller-Plesset perturbation theory at the MP2/6-311G (d,p) level. In the discussed chemical pathway, the reaction is found to be totally exothermic and barrier less giving rise to a high probability of acrylonitrile formation in Interstellar space. PMID:25416678

  20. 1,3-butadiene in urban and industrial areas and its role in photochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czader, Beata; Rappenglück, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    1,3-butadiene is an important pollutant in terms of public health and important driver for photochemical processes influencing ozone formation in the area of Houston. Ambient levels of 1,3-butadiene were simulated with the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) including the SAPRC99-extended mechanism and the results were compared to spatially and temporally resolved observations of 1,3-butadiene for an episodic period during Summer 2006. Relative contributions of different type of emissions and chemical reactions to 1,3-butadiene concentrations were examined, the highest contribution was found to be from industrial emission sources. 1,3-butadiene mixing ratios in the urban area were found to be lower than in the industrial area. Although emissions of 1,3-butadiene peak during daytime its mixing ratios are lower during daytimes as compared to nighttime. 1,3-butadiene is removed from the surface through vertical upward transport (~90%) and chemical reactions (~10%). During daytime 1,3-butadiene reacts mainly with the OH radical (90%), during nighttime this reaction pathway is still significant in the industrial area (57% of all reaction pathways). Reaction with NO3 during nighttime contributes 33% in industrial and 56% in urban areas, where high NOx emissions occur. Reaction with ozone contributes 10% and 13% in industrial and urban areas, respectively. Analysis of measured data revealed that episodically very high emissions spikes of 1,3-butadiene occur. CMAQ often underpredicts 1,3-butadiene mixing ratios when sites are exposed to sporadic releases from industrial facilities. These releases are not accounted for in the emission inventory. It also appears that emissions of 1,3-butadiene from point sources have much more variability than those listed in the emission inventory.

  1. Modeling of 1,3-butadiene in urban and industrial areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czader, Beata H.; Rappenglck, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    1,3-butadiene is an important pollutant in terms of public health and important driver for photochemical processes influencing ozone formation in the area of Houston. Ambient levels of 1,3-butadiene were simulated with the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) including the SAPRC99-extended mechanism and the results were compared to spatially and temporally resolved observations of 1,3-butadiene for an episodic period during Summer 2006. Relative contributions of different type of emissions and chemical reactions to 1,3-butadiene concentrations were examined, the highest contribution was found to be from industrial emission sources. 1,3-butadiene mixing ratios in the urban area were found to be lower than in the industrial area. Although emissions of 1,3-butadiene peak during daytime its mixing ratios are lower during daytimes as compared to nighttime. 1,3-butadiene is removed from the surface through vertical upward transport (?90%) and chemical reactions (?10%). During daytime 1,3-butadiene reacts mainly with the OH radical (90%), during nighttime this reaction pathway is still significant in the industrial area (57% of all reaction pathways). Reaction with NO3 during nighttime contributes 33% in industrial and 56% in urban areas, where high NOx emissions occur. Reaction with ozone contributes 10% and 13% in industrial and urban areas, respectively. Analysis of measured data revealed that episodically very high emissions spikes of 1,3-butadiene occur. CMAQ often underpredicts 1,3-butadiene mixing ratios when sites are exposed to sporadic releases from industrial facilities. These releases are not accounted for in the emission inventory. It also appears that emissions of 1,3-butadiene from point sources have much more variability than those listed in the emission inventory.

  2. 40 CFR 721.10151 - Modified styrene, divinylbenzene polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... polymer (generic). 721.10151 Section 721.10151 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10151 Modified styrene, divinylbenzene polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified styrene, divinylbenzene polymer (PMN P-07-642) is subject to reporting under this...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10151 - Modified styrene, divinylbenzene polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... polymer (generic). 721.10151 Section 721.10151 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10151 Modified styrene, divinylbenzene polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified styrene, divinylbenzene polymer (PMN P-07-642) is subject to reporting under this...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10151 - Modified styrene, divinylbenzene polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polymer (generic). 721.10151 Section 721.10151 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10151 Modified styrene, divinylbenzene polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified styrene, divinylbenzene polymer (PMN P-07-642) is subject to reporting under this...

  5. STYRENE IMPAIRS SERIAL SPATIAL REVERSAL LEARNING IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Occupational exposure to styrene monomer has been implicated in the etiology of solvent-induced cognitive dysfunction. o evaluate the effects of styrene exposure on learning, rats were trained on a series of reversals of a spatial discrimination, permitting repeated evaluation of...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10151 - Modified styrene, divinylbenzene polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... polymer (generic). 721.10151 Section 721.10151 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10151 Modified styrene, divinylbenzene polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified styrene, divinylbenzene polymer (PMN P-07-642) is subject to reporting under this...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10151 - Modified styrene, divinylbenzene polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... polymer (generic). 721.10151 Section 721.10151 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10151 Modified styrene, divinylbenzene polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified styrene, divinylbenzene polymer (PMN P-07-642) is subject to reporting under this...

  8. Natural formation of styrene by cinnamon mold flora.

    PubMed

    Lafeuille, J-L; Buniak, M-L; Vioujas, M-C; Lefevre, S

    2009-08-01

    Tests on 106 dried pure cinnamon samples of diverse origins showed that some samples were naturally contaminated with high levels of styrene, up to 524 microg/g. Styrene taint can be associated with high water activity levels and thus with microorganism growth. The mold flora of a Korintji cinnamon sample in which styrene had been found at a 50 microg/g concentration was analyzed and 5 species of mold were isolated. An investigation into the ability of the 5 species of mold to produce styrene showed that 3 of them--namely, Penicillium citrinum, Penicillium oxalicum, Aspergillus niger--produced styrene in vitro in buffered peptone water at 25 degrees C within 5 d in the presence of several natural cinnamon volatile constituents containing the styrene structure. The conversion of these compounds into styrene by these 3 cinnamon fungal species has never been previously reported. A standardized inoculation with the 3 mold species was carried out on 10 g cinnamon samples of various origins followed by a 10-d incubation and highlighting styrene production except for Sri Lanka origin. PMID:19723212

  9. 40 CFR 80.55 - Measurement methods for benzene and 1,3-butadiene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Measurement methods for benzene and 1,3-butadiene. (a) Sampling for benzene and 1,3-butadiene must be accomplished by bag sampling as used for total hydrocarbons determination. This procedure is detailed in 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Measurement methods for benzene and...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10280 - Benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, brominated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10280 Benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, brominated. (a... benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, brominated (PMN P-10-476; CAS No. 1195978-93-8)) is...

  11. 40 CFR 80.55 - Measurement methods for benzene and 1,3-butadiene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Measurement methods for benzene and 1,3-butadiene. (a) Sampling for benzene and 1,3-butadiene must be accomplished by bag sampling as used for total hydrocarbons determination. This procedure is detailed in 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Measurement methods for benzene and...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10280 - Benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, brominated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10280 Benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, brominated. (a... benzene ethenyl-, polymer with 1,3-butadiene, brominated (PMN P-10-476; CAS No. 1195978-93-8)) is...

  13. BIOMARKERS IN CZECH WORKERS EXPOSED TO 1,3-BUTADIENE: A TRANSITIONAL EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    All the biomarkers of exposure were correlated with the measurements of butadiene recorded by the air samplers. Although the correlation between hemoglobin adducts and exposure levels was strongest, urinary metabolites were also found to be very useful measures of butadiene...

  14. SOME INSIGHTS INTO THE MODE OF ACTION OF BUTADIENE BY EXAMINING THE GENOTOXICITY OF ITS METABOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    1,3-Butadiene (BTD) is an important commodity chemical and air pollutant that has been shown to be a potent carcinogen in mice, and to a lesser extent, a carcinogen in rats. To better assess butadiene's carcinogenic risk to humans, it is important to understand its mode of action...

  15. 76 FR 54228 - Draft Toxicological Review of Acrylonitrile: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... (76 FR 38387) for the external review draft human health assessment titled, ``Toxicological Review of... INFORMATION section of the previous Federal Register Notice (76 FR 38387). Additional Information: For... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Acrylonitrile: In Support of Summary Information on the...

  16. GRAFT POLYMERIZATION OF ACRYLONITRILE ONTO STARCH-COATED POLYETHYLENE FILM SURFACES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When starch-coated polyethylene (PE) films were allowed to react with acrylonitrile in the presence of ceric ammonium nitrate initiator, graft polymerization occurred to produce starch-polyacrylonitrile (PAN) coatings that contained about 25% grafted PAN, by weight. The graft copolymer coatings adh...

  17. ABSORPTION OF CO2 AND SUBSEQUENT VISCOSITY REDUCTION OF AN ACRYLONITRILE COPOLYMER. (R829555)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acrylonitrile (AN) copolymers (AN content greater than about 85 mol%) are traditionally solution processed to avoid a cyclization and crosslinking reaction that takes place at temperatures where melt processing would be feasible. It is well known that carbon dioxide (CO

  18. Biocompatibility and characterization of polylactic acid/styrene-ethylene-butylene-styrene composites.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Chi-Hui; Kao, Bo-Jyue; Yang, Ming-Chien; Suen, Maw-Cherng; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Chen, Jui-Chin; Yao, Wei-Hua; Lin, Shang-Ming; Tsou, Chih-Yuan; Huang, Shu-Hsien; De Guzman, Manuel; Hung, Wei-Song

    2015-01-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA)/styrene-ethylene-butylene-styrene (SEBS) composites were prepared by melt blending. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and wide angle X-ray diffraction (WXRD) were used to characterize PLA and PLA/SEBS composites in terms of their melting behavior and crystallization. Curves from thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) illustrated that thermostability increased with SEBS content. Further morphological analysis of PLA/SEBS composites revealed that SEBS molecules were not miscible with PLA molecules in PLA/SEBS composites. The tensile testing for PLA and PLA/SEBS composites showed that the elongation at the break was enhanced, but tensile strength decreased with increasing SEBS content. L929 fibroblast cells were chosen to assess the cytocompatibility; the cell growth of PLA was found to decrease with increasing SEBS content. This study proposes possible reasons for these properties of PLA/SEBS composites. PMID:26405910

  19. CYP2E1 Metabolism of Styrene Involves Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Jessica H.; Boysen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    We are the first to report allosterism during styrene oxidation by recombinant CYP2E1 and human liver microsomes. At low styrene concentrations, oxidation is inefficient because of weak binding to CYP2E1 (Ks = 830 μM). A second styrene molecule then binds CYP2E1 with higher affinity (Kss = 110 μM) and significantly improves oxidation to achieve a kcat of 6.3 nmol · min−1 · nmol CYP2E1−1. The transition between these metabolic cycles coincides with reported styrene concentrations in blood from exposed workers; thus, this CYP2E1 mechanism may be relevant in vivo. Scaled modeling of the in vitro-positive allosteric mechanism for styrene metabolism to its in vivo clearance led to significant deviations from the traditional model based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Low styrene levels were notably much less toxic than generally assumed. We interrogated the allosteric mechanism using the CYP2E1-specific inhibitor and drug 4-methylpyrazole, which we have shown binds two CYP2E1 sites. From the current studies, styrene was a positive allosteric effector on 4-methylpyrazole binding, based on a 10-fold increase in 4-methylpyrazole binding affinity from Ki 0.51 to Ksi 0.043 μM. The inhibitor was a negative allosteric effector on styrene oxidation, because kcat decreased 6-fold to 0.98 nmol · min−1 · nmol CYP2E1−1. Consequently, mixtures of styrene and other molecules can induce allosteric effects on binding and metabolism by CYP2E1 and thus mitigate the efficiency of their metabolism and corresponding effects on human health. Taken together, our elucidation of mechanisms for these allosteric reactions provides a powerful tool for further investigating the complexities of CYP2E1 metabolism of drugs and pollutants. PMID:22807108

  20. Development of a conductimetric biosensor using immobilised Rhodococcus ruber whole cells for the detection and quantification of acrylonitrile.

    PubMed

    Roach, P C J; Ramsden, D K; Hughes, J; Williams, P

    2003-10-30

    A conductimetric biosensor for the detection of acrylonitrile in solution was designed and characterised using whole cells of Rhodococcus ruber NCIMB 40757, which were immobilised into a disc of dimethyl silicone sponge (ImmobaSil). The biosensor described was capable of the detection and quantification of acrylonitrile in aqueous solution, having a linear response to concentrations between 2 and 50 mM (106-2650 ppm) acrylonitrile. The biosensor has been shown to be reproducible with respect to the data obtained over a number of days, and retains stability for a minimum period of at least 5 days before recalibration of the biosensor is required. PMID:14559001

  1. Controlled polymerization of acrylonitrile proceeded along with the Belousov-Zhabotinsky oscillator by changing its stirring conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furue, Yuuka; Okano, Kunihiko; Banno, Taisuke; Asakura, Kouichi

    2016-02-01

    Chemical oscillations of the manganese-ion catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction system were found to be controlled by changing its stirring conditions. The oscillation stopped at a high stirring rate, while it reappeared immediately by reducing the stirring rate. It is known in the BZ reaction system, that the radical polymerization takes place along with the oscillation when acrylic monomers are added. By the addition of acrylonitrile to the system stirred at a high stirring rate, the oscillation as well as the polymerization of acrylonitrile stopped. The radical polymerization of acrylonitrile by the BZ oscillator is thus found to be made controllable by changing the mixing conditions.

  2. Effect of shutdown on styrene removal in a biofilter inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. SR-5.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jong Hee; Hirai, Mitsuyo; Shoda, Makoto

    2006-02-28

    Styrene gas removal was carried out in a biofilter inoculated with a styrene-degrading Pseudomonas sp. SR-5 using a mixed packing material of peat and ceramic under the non-sterile condition. More than 86% removal efficiency was obtained at styrene load of 5-93 g m(-3) h(-1) for 62 days operation period and 78% carbon of removed styrene was converted to CO2. Thereafter, three kinds of styrene shutdown experiments were conducted: (i) air and mineral medium were supplied for 4 days, (ii) complete shutdown, namely no styrene, air and moisture supply was conducted for 3 days, and (iii) only air was supplied for 11 days. When styrene gas was re-supplied after (i) and (iii) shutdown experiments, styrene removal efficiency rapidly recovered, but after (ii) shutdown, recovery of styrene removal was significantly delayed. Supply of air during shutdown period was found to be enough to resume microbial activity to degrade styrene. PMID:16202514

  3. Clinical studies of styrene workers: initial findings.

    PubMed Central

    Lorimer, W V; Lilis, R; Nicholson, W J; Anderson, H; Fischbein, A; Daum, S; Rom, W; Rice, C; Selikoff, I J

    1976-01-01

    Styrene monomer is a high volume chemical used chiefly in production of polystyrene. A clinical survey of 493 production workers was undertaken at the oldest and largest monomer production, polymerization, and extrusion facility in the U.S. Relative exposure durations and levels were obtained from occupational histories. Significant differences between the high and low exposure groups were found with regard to history of acute prenarcotic symptoms, acute lower respiratory symptoms, prevalence of FEV 1/FV less than 75 per cent, and elevated GCTP. Other liver function tests, chest x-ray, FVC less than 80 per cent, and hematological parameters showed no distinct pattern. A concomitant mortality study has been mounted and is in progress. PMID:1026403

  4. Protein adducts as dosimeters of human exposure to styrene, styrene-7,8-oxide, and benzene.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, S M; Yeowell-O'Connell, K

    1999-09-01

    Cysteinyl adducts of hemoglobin (Hb) and albumin (Alb) formed via reactions with reactive species were measured in 48 subjects exposed to styrene (0.24-55.2 ppm) and to styrene-7,8-oxide (SO) (2.65-107 ppb) in a factory producing boats in the USA. Hb and Alb adducts were also investigated among 88 workers exposed to benzene (0-138 ppm) in several Chinese factories. The particular adducts were S-(2-hydroxy-1-phenylethyl) cysteine, from reactions of SO with Alb (designated SO-Alb), and S-phenylcysteine, from reactions of the CYP450 benzene metabolite, benzene oxide (BO), with Hb and Alb (designated BO-Hb and BO-Alb, respectively). The relationships between adduct levels and exposures were investigated in both studies. The estimated slopes varied considerably among the particular combinations of adduct and agent to which the workers were exposed, ranging from 0.815 pmol BO-Hb/g Hb per ppm benzene to 24400 pmol SO-Alb/g Alb per ppm SO. We used these estimated slopes, along with kinetic constants, to predict the systemic doses of SO and BO in humans per mg of styrene, SO or benzene per kg body weight, under certain assumptions. Using RX to signify the particular electrophile (SO or BO) the doses of RX to the blood per unit of dose varied between 2.21 and 4110 nM RX-h/mg agent per kg b.w. The dose of RX to the blood arising from inhalation of SO was almost 2000 times that of styrene (i.e. 4110 vs. 2.21 nM RX/mg agent per kg b.w.) and 430-781 times that of benzene (i.e. 4110 vs. 5.26-9.55 nM RX/mg agent per kg b.w.), depending upon the study. Comparable estimates of the blood dose of BO were obtained from adducts of Hb and Alb and two independent studies of BO-Alb yielded similar dose estimates. These results point to the utility of protein adducts as dosimeters of reactive electrophilic species in occupational studies. Finally, significant levels of background adducts of SO and BO with Hb and Alb were observed among workers, among control subjects and in commercial human proteins. Levels of these background adducts were too great to have arisen from non-occupational exposures to styrene or benzene or from cigarette smoking. PMID:10511253

  5. High throughput HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS methodology for mercapturic acid metabolites of 1,3-butadiene: Biomarkers of exposure and bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Kotapati, Srikanth; Esades, Amanda; Matter, Brock; Le, Chap; Tretyakova, Natalia

    2015-11-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is an important industrial and environmental carcinogen present in cigarette smoke, automobile exhaust, and urban air. The major urinary metabolites of BD in humans are 2-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1-hydroxybut-3-ene/1-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-2-hydroxybut-3-ene (MHBMA), 4-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1,2-dihydroxybutane (DHBMA), and 4-(N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)-1,2,3-trihydroxybutyl mercapturic acid (THBMA), which are formed from the electrophilic metabolites of BD, 3,4-epoxy-1-butene (EB), hydroxymethyl vinyl ketone (HMVK), and 3,4-epoxy-1,2-diol (EBD), respectively. In the present work, a sensitive high-throughput HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS method was developed for simultaneous quantification of MHBMA and DHBMA in small volumes of human urine (200 μl). The method employs a 96 well Oasis HLB SPE enrichment step, followed by isotope dilution HPLC-ESI(-)-MS/MS analysis on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The validated method was used to quantify MHBMA and DHBMA in urine of workers from a BD monomer and styrene-butadiene rubber production facility (40 controls and 32 occupationally exposed to BD). Urinary THBMA concentrations were also determined in the same samples. The concentrations of all three BD-mercapturic acids and the metabolic ratio (MHBMA/(MHBMA+DHBMA+THBMA)) were significantly higher in the occupationally exposed group as compared to controls and correlated with BD exposure, with each other, and with BD-hemoglobin biomarkers. This improved high throughput methodology for MHBMA and DHBMA will be useful for future epidemiological studies in smokers and occupationally exposed workers. PMID:25727266

  6. Reliable passive-sampling method for determining outdoor 1,3-butadiene concentrations in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Kenji; Miyake, Yuichi; Amagai, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a simple and reliable passive-sampling method for determining outdoor 1,3-butadiene concentrations in air. In this method, 1,3-butadiene is adsorbed on Carboxen 1000 uniformly packed in a porous polytetrafluoroethylene tube and then analyzed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The amounts of 1,3-butadiene adsorbed on Carboxen 1000 were 2.8 times as high as those adsorbed on activated carbon. Much greater amounts of 1,3-butadiene were collected with the passive sampler than with an active sampler even though ozone, which reacts rapidly with 1,3-butadiene, could penetrate the passive-sampling tube. These results demonstrate that our method sensitively and reliably determines outdoor 1,3-butadiene concentrations in air, that ambient ozone slowly react with 1,3-butadiene adsorbed by the passive sampler, and that the KI ozone scrubber in an active-sampling system does not completely remove ozone from the system.

  7. Substituent effects in surface-initiated ATRP of substituted styrenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sampa; Baker, Gregory L.

    2015-12-01

    Surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of substituted styrenes leads to rapid synthesis of uniform and thick substituted polystyrene brushes (>100 nm in 1 h) from gold surface. High growth rates were observed for styrenes substituted with electron withdrawing groups in meta/para positions. The effects seen in surface and solution polymerizations are similar for styrenes with electron withdrawing groups, and for electron donors in ortho and para positions. However, electron donors at meta sites have surprisingly fast growth rates, which may be due to steric inhibition of termination. The overall surface polymerization rates for substituted styrenes was analyzed and found to follow the Hammett relation with ρ = 0.51. The ratio of kp to kt, is as an indicator of the likelihood that a reaction will reach high degrees of polymerization before termination.

  8. 21 CFR 177.1830 - Styrene-methyl methacrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... copolymers contain more than 50 weight percent of polymer units derived from styrene. (b) The finished plastic food-contact article, when extracted with the solvent or solvents characterizing the type of...

  9. 21 CFR 177.1830 - Styrene-methyl methacrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... copolymers contain more than 50 weight percent of polymer units derived from styrene. (b) The finished plastic food-contact article, when extracted with the solvent or solvents characterizing the type of...

  10. 21 CFR 177.1810 - Styrene block polymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... this section are as follows and are applicable to the finished polymer. (1) Molecular weight. Molecular.... For block polymers of low styrene content or for simple block polymers, the polymer may be...

  11. 21 CFR 177.1830 - Styrene-methyl methacrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... weight percent of polymer units derived from styrene. (b) The finished plastic food-contact article, when extracted with the solvent or solvents characterizing the type of food and under the conditions of time...

  12. 21 CFR 177.1830 - Styrene-methyl methacrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... copolymers contain more than 50 weight percent of polymer units derived from styrene. (b) The finished plastic food-contact article, when extracted with the solvent or solvents characterizing the type of...

  13. Toxicity of Pyrolysis Gases from Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, Carlos J.; Kosola, Kay L.; Solis, Alida N.; Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Parker, John A.

    1977-01-01

    The toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from six elastomers was investigated. The elastomers were polyisoprene (natural rubber), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM), acrylonitrile rubber, chlorosulfonated polyethylene rubber, and polychloroprene. The rising temperature and fixed temperature programs produced exactly the same rank order of materials based on time to death. Acryltonitrile rubber exhibited the greatest toxicity under these test conditions; carbon monoxide was not found in sufficient concentrations to be the primary cause of death.

  14. The relative fire resistance of select thermoplastic materials. [for aircraft interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The relative thermal stability, flammability, and related thermochemical properties of some thermoplastic materials currently used in aircraft interiors as well as of some candidate thermoplastics were investigated. Currently used materials that were evaluated include acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, bisphenol A polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide, and polyvinyl fluoride. Candidate thermoplastic materials evaluated include: 9,9-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)fluorene polycarbonate-poly(dimethylsiloxane) block polymer, chlorinated polyvinylchloride homopolymer, phenolphthalein polycarbonate, polyethersulfone, polyphenylene sulfide, polyarylsulfone, and polyvinylidene fluoride.

  15. Synaptic contacts impaired by styrene-7,8-oxide toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Corsi, P. D'Aprile, A.; Nico, B.; Costa, G.L.; Assennato, G.

    2007-10-01

    Styrene-7,8-oxide (SO), a chemical compound widely used in industrial applications, is a potential hazard for humans, particularly in occupational settings. Neurobehavioral changes are consistently observed in occupationally exposed individuals and alterations of neurotransmitters associated with neuronal loss have been reported in animal models. Although the toxic effects of styrene have been extensively documented, the molecular mechanisms responsible for SO-induced neurotoxicity are still unclear. A possible dopamine-mediated effect of styrene neurotoxicity has been previously demonstrated, since styrene oxide alters dopamine neurotransmission in the brain. Thus, the present study hypothesizes that styrene neurotoxicity may involve synaptic contacts. Primary striatal neurons were exposed to styrene oxide at different concentrations (0.1-1 mM) for different time periods (8, 16, and 24 h) to evaluate the dose able to induce synaptic impairments. The expression of proteins crucial for synaptic transmission such as Synapsin, Synaptophysin, and RAC-1 were considered. The levels of Synaptophysin and RAC-1 decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, morphological alterations, observed at the ultrastructural level, primarily involved the pre-synaptic compartment. In SO-exposed cultures, the biochemical cascade of caspases was activated affecting the cytoskeleton components as their target. Thus the impairments in synaptic contacts observed in SO-exposed cultures might reflect a primarily morphological alteration of neuronal cytoskeleton. In addition, our data support the hypothesis developed by previous authors of reactive oxygen species (ROS) initiating events of SO cytotoxicity.

  16. Ordered, microphase-separated, noncharged-charged diblock copolymers via the sequential ATRP of styrene and styrenic imidazolium monomers

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, ZX; Newell, BS; Bailey, TS; Gin, DL

    2014-12-15

    A series of imidazolium-based noncharged-charged diblock copolymers (1) was synthesized by the direct, sequential ATRP of styrene and styrenic imidazolium bis(trifluoromethyl)sulfonamide monomers with methyl, n-butyl, and n-decyl side-chains. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies on initial examples of 1 with a total of 50 repeat units and styrene:imidazolium-styrene repeat unit ratios of 25:25, 20:30, and 15:35 showed that their ability to form ordered nanostructures (i.e., sphere and cylinder phases) in their neat states depends on both the block ratio and the length of the alkyl side-chain on the imidazolium monomer. To our knowledge, the synthesis of imidazolium-based BCPs that form ordered, phase-separated nanostructures via direct ATRP of immiscible co-monomers is unprecedented. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of heating rate on toxicity of pyrolysis gases from some elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Kosola, K. L.; Solis, A. N.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of heating rate on the toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from six elastomers was investigated, using a screening test method. The elastomers were polyisoprene (natural rubber), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM), acrylonitrile rubber, chlorosulfonated polyethylene rubber, and polychloroprene. The rising temperature and fixed temperature programs produced exactly the same rank order of materials based on time to death. Acrylonitrile rubber exhibited the greatest toxicity under these test conditions, and carbon monoxide was not found in sufficient concentrations to be the primary cause of death.

  18. Influence of genetic polymorphisms of styrene-metabolizing enzymes on the levels of urinary biomarkers of styrene exposure.

    PubMed

    Carbonari, Damiano; Mansi, Antonella; Proietto, Anna Rita; Paci, Enrico; Bonanni, Rossana Claudia; Gherardi, Monica; Gatto, Maria Pia; Sisto, Renata; Tranfo, Giovanna

    2015-03-01

    Styrene exposure is still present in different occupational settings including manufacture of synthetic rubber, resins, polyesters and plastic. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of polymorphic genes CYP2E1, EPHX1, GSTT1, and GSTM1 on the urinary concentrations of the styrene metabolites mandelic acid (MA), phenylglyoxylic acid (PGA) and on the concentration ratios between (MA+PGA) and urinary styrene (U-Sty) and airborne styrene (A-Sty), in 30 workers from two fiberglass-reinforced plastic manufacturing plants and 26 unexposed controls. Personal air sampling and biological monitoring results revealed that sometimes exposure levels exceeded both the threshold limit value (TLV) and the biological exposure index (BEI) suggested by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. A significantly reduced excretion of styrene metabolites (MA+PGA) in individuals carrying the CYP2E1*5B and CYP2E1*6 heterozygote alleles, with respect to the homozygote wild type, was observed only in the exposed group. A reduction was also detected, in the same group, in subjects carrying the slow allele EPHX1 (codon 113), through the lowering of (MA+PGA)/urinary styrene concentration ratio. In addition, the ratio between MA+PGA and the personal airborne styrene concentration appeared to be modulated by the predicted mEH activity, in the exposed group, as evidenced by univariate linear regression analysis. Our results confirm some previous hypotheses about the role of the polymorphism of genes coding for enzymes involved in the styrene detoxification pathway: this may significantly reduce the levels of excreted metabolites and therefore it must be taken into account in the interpretation of the biological monitoring results for occupational exposure. PMID:25562543

  19. Optimization of injection molding parameters for poly(styrene-isobutylene-styrene) block copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fittipaldi, Mauro; Garcia, Carla; Rodriguez, Luis A.; Grace, Landon R.

    2016-03-01

    Poly(styrene-isobutylene-styrene) (SIBS) is a widely used thermoplastic elastomer in bioimplantable devices due to its inherent stability in vivo. However, the properties of the material are highly dependent on the fabrication conditions, molecular weight, and styrene content. An optimization method for injection molding is herein proposed which can be applied to varying SIBS formulations in order to maximize ultimate tensile strength, which is critical to certain load-bearing implantable applications. The number of injection molded samples required to ascertain the optimum conditions for maximum ultimate tensile strength is limited in order to minimize experimental time and effort. Injection molding parameters including nozzle temperature (three levels: 218, 246, and 274 °C), mold temperature (three levels: 50, 85, and 120 °C), injection speed (three levels: slow, medium and fast) and holding pressure time (three levels: 2, 6, and 10 seconds) were varied to fabricate dumbbell specimens for tensile testing. A three-level L9 Taguchi method utilizing orthogonal arrays was used in order to rank the importance of the different injection molding parameters and to find an optimal parameter setting to maximize the ultimate tensile strength of the thermoplastic elastomer. Based on the Taguchi design results, a Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was applied in order to build a model to predict the tensile strength of the material at different injection parameters. Finally, the model was optimized to find the injection molding parameters providing maximum ultimate tensile strength. Subsequently, the theoretically-optimum injection molding parameters were used to fabricate additional dumbbell specimens. The experimentally-determined ultimate tensile strength of these samples was found to be in close agreement (1.2%) with the theoretical results, successfully demonstrating the suitability of the Taguchi Method and RSM for optimizing injection molding parameters of SIBS.

  20. Photodegradation mechanisms of tetraphenyl butadiene coatings for liquid argon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B. J. P.; VanGemert, J. K.; Conrad, J. M.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on studies of degradation mechanisms of tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings of the type used in neutrino and dark matter liquid argon experiments. Using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry we have detected the ultraviolet-blocking impurity benzophenone. We monitored the drop in performance and increase of benzophenone concentration in TPB plates with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, and demonstrate the correlation between these two variables. Based on the presence and initially exponential increase in the concentration of benzophenone observed, we propose that TPB degradation is a free radical-mediated photooxidation reaction, which is subsequently confirmed by displaying delayed degradation using a free radical inhibitor. Finally we show that the performance of wavelength-shifting coatings of the type envisioned for the LBNE experiment can be improved by 10-20%, with significantly delayed UV degradation, by using a 20% admixture of 4-tert-Butylcatechol.

  1. Aging studies on thin tetra-phenyl butadiene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acciarri, R.; Canci, N.; Cavanna, F.; Segreto, E.; Szelc, A. M.

    2013-10-01

    Tetra-Phenyl Butadiene (TPB) is the most commonly used compound to wave-shift the 128 nm scintillation light of liquid Argon down to the visible spectrum. We present a study on the loss of conversion efficiency of thin TPB films evaporated on reflective foils when exposed to light and atmosphere. The efficiency of the films is measured and monitored with a dedicated set-up that uses gaseous Argon excited by alpha particles to produce 128 nm photons and working at room temperature. In particular we performed a two years long exposure of the samples to lab diffuse light and atmosphere. We also performed more controlled aging tests to investigate the effect of storing samples in a inert atmosphere.

  2. Bioconversion of acrylonitrile to acrylamide using polyacrylamide entrapped cells of Rhodococcus rhodochrous PA-34.

    PubMed

    Raj, J; Prasad, S; Sharma, N N; Bhalla, T C

    2010-09-01

    The nitrile hydratase (NHase) of Rhodococcus rhodochrous PA-34 catalyzed the conversion of acrylonitrile to acrylamide. The resting cells (having NHase activity) (8 %; 1 mL corresponds to 22 mg dry cell mass, DCM) were immobilized in polyacrylamide gel containing 12.5 % acrylamide, 0.6 % bisacrylamide, 0.2 % diammonium persulfate and 0.4 % TEMED. The polyacrylamide entrapped cells (1.12 mg DCM/mL) completely converted acrylonitrile in 3 h at 10 °C, using 0.1 mol/L potassium phosphate buffer. In a partitioned fed batch reactor, 432 g/L acrylamide was accumulated after 1 d. The polyacrylamide discs were recycled up to 3×; 405, 210 and 170 g/L acrylamide was produced in 1st, 2nd and 3rd recycling reactions. In four cycles, a total of 1217 g acrylamide was produced by recycling the same mass of entrapped cells. PMID:20941578

  3. Detection of acrolein and acrylonitrile with a pulsed room temperature quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manne, J.; Jäger, W.; Tulip, J.

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the use of a pulsed, distributed feedback quantum cascade laser centered at 957 cm-1 in combination with an astigmatic Herriot cell with 250 m path length for the detection of acrolein and acrylonitrile. These molecules have been identified as hazardous air-pollutants because of their adverse health effects. The spectrometer utilizes the intra-pulse method, where a linear frequency down-chirp, that is induced when a top-hat current pulse is applied to the laser, is used for sweeping across the absorption line. Up to 450 ns long pulses were used for these measurements which resulted in a spectral window of ~2.2 cm-1. A room temperature mercury-cadmium-telluride detector was used, resulting in a completely cryogen free spectrometer. We demonstrated detection limits of ~3 ppb for acrylonitrile and ~6 ppb for acrolein with ~10 s averaging time. Laser characterization and optimization of the operational parameters for sensitivity improvement are discussed.

  4. Sequence of reactions in thermooxidative degradation of polyacrylonitrile and of acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Grebenkin, A.N.; Romanova, E.P.; Kol'tsov, A.I.; Firsov, E.I.

    1986-02-10

    Despite the considerable number of studies of thermooxidative degradation of polyacrylonitrile (PAN), the question of the sequence of reactions involved is not completely clear. The mechanism of action of comonomer units on the course of degradation in acrylonitrile copolymers has been studied very little, apart from initiation of degradation by comonomer units of the carboxylic acid type. The question of participation of comonomer units of the acrylate, methyl acrylate, etc., types remains open. Since most commercially available PAN fibers contain units of this type, study of the thermal stability of acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate (AN/MA) copolymer is of considerable practical importance. Accordingly, the purpose of the present work was to establish the sequence of thermooxidative degradation reactions and to elucidate the influence of comonomer units of the ester type on the course of these reactions.

  5. 40 CFR 80.55 - Measurement methods for benzene and 1,3-butadiene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... accomplished by bag sampling as used for total hydrocarbons determination. This procedure is detailed in 40 CFR 86.109. (b) Benzene and 1,3-butadiene must be analyzed by gas chromatography. Expected values...

  6. 40 CFR 80.55 - Measurement methods for benzene and 1,3-butadiene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... accomplished by bag sampling as used for total hydrocarbons determination. This procedure is detailed in 40 CFR 86.109. (b) Benzene and 1,3-butadiene must be analyzed by gas chromatography. Expected values...

  7. 40 CFR 80.55 - Measurement methods for benzene and 1,3-butadiene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... accomplished by bag sampling as used for total hydrocarbons determination. This procedure is detailed in 40 CFR 86.109. (b) Benzene and 1,3-butadiene must be analyzed by gas chromatography. Expected values...

  8. Three-generation reproduction study of rats receiving acrylonitrile in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M A; Beliles, R P

    2002-06-24

    Acrylonitrile, a high volume organic chemical, was tested for reproductive effects in a three generation drinking water study with two matings per generation. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to acrylonitrile in drinking water at 0, 100, or 500 ppm. This corresponds to 0, 11+/-5 and 37+/-10 mg/kg, respectively, for males and 0, 20+/-3 and 40+/-8 mg/kg per day for the females, respectively. Water consumption was reduced in F0 rats in the 100 and 500 ppm groups. At 500 ppm, acrylonitrile reduced body weight gain and food intake of the first generation parental rats (F0). These parameters were not investigated at subsequent generations. The pup survival (both viability and lactation indices) was reduced at the 500 ppm treatment level in both matings of all three generations. Fostering the 500 ppm pups onto untreated mothers following the second mating lessened mortality, suggesting a maternal effect consistent with decreased water consumption. There was no remarkable change in the reproductive capacity in any of matings in rats at the 100 ppm concentration. In contrast, in all three generations, the body weights of the pups of the 500 ppm treatment level were reduced on Day 21 at both matings. No adverse findings were observed in the tissues of a limited number of third generation weanlings (F3b) upon gross and microscopic evaluation. No effect on the sciatic nerve was evident among the adult female rats held for 20 weeks after weaning of the second litter. There was a dose-related effect of acrylonitrile on gross masses in female rats at each parental generation held 20 weeks after the weaning of the second litter. Histopathological evaluation of these dams showed an increase in astrocytomas and zymbal gland tumors. PMID:12044706

  9. [Styrene migration into wine contained in polyester resin tanks].

    PubMed

    Giffone, M; Brun, S

    1978-01-01

    The use of polyester resins in wine tanks manufacture or coating has widely spread during the past five years; this type of material has been and is still the source of organoleptic damage due to non polymerized sytrene migration into urine. Sytrene is a solvant often used in resin polymerization: it act as a reticulation agent of insaturated linear polyester. Polymerization at room temperature is allowed gy additives but has to be completed in warm air or in steam. An excess of styrene is often used for a polymerisation as complete as possible and remains on a free form. Then it migrates from the tank walls into the wine. For a better understanding of the styrene migration mechanism studies were performed on two levels: from small containers (4 l) kept in the laboratory and from tanks (30 hl) set up in an I.N.R.A. wine estate in all conditions usually realized in practice. Influence of time, temperature and alcohol content were studied. Styrene migration was interpreted as a diffusion phenomenom and styrene diffusion coefficients were calculated for several temperatures. Knowledge of these coefficients and of styrene content of the tank walls allow the prediction of a tank behaviour in time. Other substances that styrene were detected in wine and in tank walls, they are impurities either from resins like ethylbenzene, or from the catalyst like mesityl oxide. The lattest has never been mentioned in the litterature. From the results obtained it is possible to give some advices to manufacturers and users of polyester resin tanks, about the quality of raw materials, resins and additives along with the conditions carried and for their use and about the control of monomer styrene content in the walls of just manufactured tank. PMID:754602

  10. Neuropharmacological and cochleotoxic effects of styrene. Consequences on noise exposures.

    PubMed

    Campo, Pierre; Venet, Thomas; Thomas, Aurélie; Cour, Chantal; Brochard, Céline; Cosnier, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Occupational noise exposure can damage workers' hearing, particularly when combined with exposure to cochleotoxic chemicals such as styrene. Although styrene-induced cochlear impairments only become apparent after a long incubation period, the pharmacological impact of styrene on the central nervous system (CNS) can be rapidly measured by determining the threshold of the middle-ear acoustic reflex (MER) trigger. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a noise (both continuous and impulse), and a low concentration of styrene [300ppm<(threshold limit value×10) safety factor] on the peripheral auditory receptor, and on the CNS in rats. The impact of the different conditions on hearing loss was assessed using distortion product oto-acoustic emissions, and histological analysis of cochleae. Although the LEX,8h (8-hour time-weighted average exposure) of the impulse noise was lower (80dB SPL sound pressure level) than that of the continuous noise (85dB SPL), it appeared more detrimental to the peripheral auditory receptors. A co-exposure to styrene and continuous noise was less damaging than exposure to continuous noise alone. In contrast, the traumatic effects of impulse noise on the organ of Corti were enhanced by co-exposure to styrene. The pharmacological effects of the solvent on the CNS were discussed to put forward a plausible explanation of these surprising results. We hypothesize that CNS effects of styrene may account for this apparent paradox. Based on the present results, the temporal structure of the noise should be reintroduced as a key parameter in hearing conservation regulations. PMID:24929234

  11. The use of poly(styrene-block-isobutylene-block-styrene) as a microshunt to treat glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Leonard; Riss, Isabelle; Batlle, Juan F; Kato, Yasushi P; Martin, John B; Arrieta, Esdras; Palmberg, Paul; Parrish, Richard K; Weber, Bruce A; Kwon, Yongmoon; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-06-01

    The InnFocus MicroShunt® is a minimally invasive glaucoma drainage microtube used to shunt aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of the eye to a flap formed under the conjunctiva and Tenon's capsule. The safety and clinical performance of this device approaches that of trabeculectomy with mitomycin C, the current 'gold standard' treatment for advanced glaucoma. The invention of a new biomaterial called poly(styrene-block-isobutylene-block-styrene) or 'SIBS' is the enabling factor which led to the success of this product. SIBS is ultrastable with virtually no foreign body reaction in the body, which manifests as clinically insignificant inflammation and capsule formation in the eye. The lack of capsule formation enables unobstructed flow through the 70 µm lumen tube and the achievement of controlled low intraocular pressure, which is important for the management of glaucoma. This article summarizes the integration of SIBS into a glaucoma drainage device and confirms its functionality with clinical success over a 2-year period. PMID:27047682

  12. The use of poly(styrene-block-isobutylene-block-styrene) as a microshunt to treat glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Pinchuk, Leonard; Riss, Isabelle; Batlle, Juan F.; Kato, Yasushi P.; Martin, John B.; Arrieta, Esdras; Palmberg, Paul; Parrish, Richard K.; Weber, Bruce A.; Kwon, Yongmoon; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The InnFocus MicroShunt® is a minimally invasive glaucoma drainage microtube used to shunt aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of the eye to a flap formed under the conjunctiva and Tenon’s capsule. The safety and clinical performance of this device approaches that of trabeculectomy with mitomycin C, the current ‘gold standard’ treatment for advanced glaucoma. The invention of a new biomaterial called poly(styrene-block-isobutylene-block-styrene) or ‘SIBS’ is the enabling factor which led to the success of this product. SIBS is ultrastable with virtually no foreign body reaction in the body, which manifests as clinically insignificant inflammation and capsule formation in the eye. The lack of capsule formation enables unobstructed flow through the 70 µm lumen tube and the achievement of controlled low intraocular pressure, which is important for the management of glaucoma. This article summarizes the integration of SIBS into a glaucoma drainage device and confirms its functionality with clinical success over a 2-year period. PMID:27047682

  13. Air-structured optical fibre drawn from a 3D-printed preform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Kevin; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Canning, John; Reid, Zane; Hossain, Md. Arafat; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2015-09-01

    We report the first optical fibre drawn from a 3D-printed preform. An air-structured polymer preform is printed using a modified butadiene plastic called Bendlay as opposed to the more-common Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS). The preform is subsequently drawn to fibre form at a relatively low temperature of 160 °C and maintains its air-structured cladding holes. Such ability to freely-design and 3D-print complex preform structures, such as photonic bandgap and photonic crystal structures, opens up an exciting new front in optical fibre fabrication.

  14. Review of old chemistry and new catalytic advances in the on-purpose synthesis of butadiene.

    PubMed

    Makshina, Ekaterina V; Dusselier, Michiel; Janssens, Wout; Degrève, Jan; Jacobs, Pierre A; Sels, Bert F

    2014-11-21

    Increasing demand for renewable feedstock-based chemicals is driving the interest of both academic and industrial research to substitute petrochemicals with renewable chemicals from biomass-derived resources. The search towards novel platform chemicals is challenging and rewarding, but the main research activities are concentrated on finding efficient pathways to produce familiar drop-in chemicals and polymer building blocks. A diversity of industrially important monomers like alkenes, conjugated dienes, unsaturated carboxylic acids and aromatic compounds are thus targeted from renewable feedstock. In this context, on-purpose production of 1,3-butadiene from biomass-derived feedstock is an interesting example as its production is under pressure by uncertainty of the conventional fossil feedstock. Ethanol, obtained via fermentation or (biomass-generated) syngas, can be converted to butadiene, although there is no large commercial activity today. Though practised on a large scale in the beginning of the 20th century, there is a growing worldwide renewed interest in the butadiene-from-ethanol route. An alternative route to produce butadiene from biomass is through direct carbohydrate and gas fermentation or indirectly via the dehydration of butanediols. This review starts with a brief discussion on the different feedstock possibilities to produce butadiene, followed by a comprehensive summary of the current state of knowledge regarding advances and achievements in the field of the chemocatalytic conversion of ethanol and butanediols to butadiene, including thermodynamics and kinetic aspects of the reactions with discussions on the reaction pathways and the type of catalysts developed. PMID:24993100

  15. Morphological and physical characterization of poly(styrene-isobutylene-styrene) block copolymers and ionomers thereof

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baugh, Daniel Webster, III

    Poly(styrene-isobutylene-styrene) block copolymers made by living cationic polymerization using a difunctional initiator and the sequential monomer addition technique were analyzed using curve-resolution software in conjunction with high-resolution GPC. Fractional precipitation and selective solvent extraction were applied to a representative sample in order to confirm the identity of contaminating species. The latter were found to be low molecular weight polystyrene homopolymer, diblock copolymer, and higher molecular weight segmented block copolymers formed by intermolecular electrophilic aromatic substitution linking reactions occurring late in the polymerization of the styrene outer blocks. Solvent-cast films of poly(styrene-isobutylene-styrene) (PS-PIB-PS) block copolymers and block ionomers were analyzed using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Four block copolymer samples with center block molecular weights of 52,000 g/mol and PS volume fractions (o sbPS) ranging from 0.17 to 0.31 were studied. All samples exhibited hexagonally packed cylinders of PS within the PIB matrix. Cylinder spacing was in the range 32 to 36 nm for most samples, while cylinder diameters varied from 14 to 21 nm. Porod analysis of the scattering data indicated the presence of isolated phase mixing and sharp phase boundaries. PS-PIB-PS block copolymers and ionomers therefrom were analyzed using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and tensile testing. The study encompassed five block copolymer samples with similar PIB center blocks with molecular weights of approx52,000 g/mol and PS weight fractions ranging from 0.127 to 0.337. Ionomers were prepared from two of these materials by lightly sulfonating the PS outer blocks. Sulfonation levels varied from 1.7 to 4.7 mol % and the sodium and potassium neutralized forms were compared to the parent block copolymers. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) of the block copolymer films indicated the existence of a third phase attributed to PIB chains near the PS domain interface which experience reduced mobility due to their firm attachment to the hard PS domain. The relative amount of this phase decreased in samples with larger PS blocks, while the temperature of the associated transition increased. Tensile testing showed increased tensile strength but decreased elongation at break with larger PS blocks. DMA of the ionomers indicated improved dynamic modulus at temperatures above 100spcirc$C. Tensile testing of the ionomers indicated slight improvements in tensile strength with little loss in elongation at break. PS-PIB-PS block copolymer ionomer (BCP01, center block molecular weight = 53,000 g/mole; 25.5 wt % polystyrene, 4.7% sulfonation of phenyl units, 100% neutralized with KOH) was compounded with various organic and inorganic acid salts of 2-ethylhexyl-p-dimethyl aminobenzoate (ODAB) to explore the efficacy of these compounds as ionic plasticizers. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  16. The effect of nutrient limitation on styrene metabolism in Pseudomonas putida CA-3.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, K; Duetz, W; Wind, B; Dobson, A D

    1996-10-01

    Styrene degradation in Pseudomonas putida CA-3 has previously been shown to be subject to catabolite repression in batch culture. We report here on the catabolite-repressing effects of succinate and glutamate and the effects of a limiting inorganic-nutrient concentration on the styrene degradation pathway of P. putida CA-3 in a chemostat culture at low growth rates (0.05 h-1). Oxidation of styrene and the presence of styrene oxide isomerase and phenylacetaldehyde dehydrogenase activities were used as a measure of the expression of the styrene degradation pathway. Both glutamate and succinate failed to repress the styrene degradation ability under growth conditions of carbon and energy limitation. Lower levels of enzyme activities of the styrene degradation pathway were seen in cells grown on styrene or phenylacetic acid (PAA) under conditions of both ammonia and sulfate limitation than were seen under carbon and energy limitation. Cells grown on PAA under continuous culture oxidize styrene and styrene oxide and possess styrene oxide isomerase and NAD(+)-dependent phenylacetaldehyde dehydrogenase activities. Catabolite repression of styrene metabolism was observed in cells grown on styrene or PAA in the presence of growth-saturating (nonlimiting) concentrations of succinate or glutamate under sulfate limitation. PMID:8967774

  17. Styrene biosynthesis from glucose by engineered E. coli.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Rebekah; Nielsen, David R

    2011-09-01

    Styrene is a large volume, commodity petrochemical with diverse commercial applications, including as a monomer building-block for the synthesis of many useful polymers. Here we demonstrate how, through the de novo design and development of a novel metabolic pathway, styrene can alternatively be synthesized from renewable substrates such as glucose. The conversion of endogenously synthesized l-phenylalanine to styrene was achieved by the co-expression of phenylalanine ammonia lyase and trans-cinnamate decarboxylase. Candidate isoenzymes for each step were screened from bacterial, yeast, and plant genetic sources. Finally, over-expression of PAL2 from Arabidopsis thaliana and FDC1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (originally classified as ferulate decarboxylase) in an l-phenylalanine over-producing Escherichia coli host led to the accumulation of up to 260 mg/L in shake flask cultures. Achievable titers already approach the styrene toxicity threshold (determined as ~300 mg/L). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of microbial styrene production from sustainable feedstocks. PMID:21722749

  18. Evaluation of a liquid chemical scrubber system for styrene removal

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, L.; Merritt, R.; Williamson, A.

    1994-12-01

    The report gives results of a study of the styrene removal efficiency of a pilot-scale version of the QUAD Chemtact scrubber, quantified by continuously measuring the total hydrocarbon (THC) content of spray booth exhaust air entering and exiting the device with THC analyzers and, for some tests, by collecting EPA Method 18 samples (adsorption tube procedure) at the inlet and exit of the device. Average styrene removal efficiencies approached but were never >55%. The test was carried out at a facility (Eljer Plumbingware in Wilson, NC) that manufactures polyester bathtubs and shower stalls by spraying styrene-based resins onto molds in vented, open spray booths. A side stream of air, exhausted from one of the spray booths in the gel coating part of the process, was used for the test.

  19. Radiation grafting of styrene on starch with high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh, N.; Akhavan, A.; Ataeivarjovi, E.

    2013-04-01

    Wheat starch grafted with polystyrene (PS-g-starch) was synthesized via polymerization grafting of styrene on starch by gamma-ray. The effects of starch/styrene weight ratio, and amount of applied doses (5-40 kGy) on the percentage of grafting, G (%), were investigated. The results showed that G (%) increased with increasing starch content. The optimum condition, starch/styrene weight ratio 1/3 and the applied dose 10 kGy, led to 252.9% of grafting. The obtained graft copolymer was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. FTIR spectroscopy as well as the XRD analysis exhibited the changes in chemical and crystalline structure of starch after grafting reaction. TGA demonstrated the changes in thermal stability of PS-g-starch copolymer. SEM micrographs indicated porous patches of PS adhering on the starch.

  20. Phenaceturic acid, a new urinary metabolite of styrene in the rat.

    PubMed

    Delbressine, L P; Ketelaars, H C; Seutter-Berlage, F; Smeets, F L

    1980-05-01

    1. After administration of styrene to rat, phenaceturic acid, a new metabolite, was isolated. After administration of d8-styrene to rat, deuterium-labelled phenaceturic acid was excreted in the urine. 2. Two metabolic pathways are proposed, based on mass spectra of the deuterium-labelled phenaceturic acid. 3. After a single dose of styrene (250 mg/kg), the excreted phenaceturic acid originating from styrene in the urine amounted to 1.4% dose. PMID:7415215

  1. New styrene-b-isobutylene-b-styrene (SIBS) glaucoma drainage implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco, Marcia A.; Acosta, Ana C.; Espana, Edgar M.; Pinchuk, Leonard; Weber, Bruce; Davis, Stewart; Arrieta, Esdras; Dubovy, Sander; Fantes, Francisco; Aly, Mohamed; Zhou, Yonghua; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To design and test the Miami-InnFocus Drainage Implant (MiDi) as a glaucoma shunt that is biocompatible, flexible, and significantly smaller than existing commercial implants in order to prevent postoperative hypotony, inflammation, scarring, erosion, and extrusion. Methods: A new biomaterial composed of styrene-b-isobutylene-b-styrene (SIBS) was used in a novel design for a glaucoma drainage implant. The implant consists of a tube 11mm long with an inner diameter of 70, 100, and 150 μm and outer diameter of 250 μm with a 1mm2 tab located 4.5mm from the proximal tip to prevent migration. The device was implanted in 15 New Zealand White rabbits for biocompatibility and efficacy testing. A similarly designed implant made of polydimethylsiloxane was implanted in 6 other animals as a pseudo-control. Typical GDI implantation technique was modified for this device. The proximal end of the new SIBS implant was inserted 2mm into the anterior chamber and the distal end placed in a subconjunctival space created by the surgeon. Biocompatibility of the device was studied by slit-lamp follow-up and intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements recorded periodically. Results: Biocompatibility of the MiDi was excellent. A low and diffuse bleb was observed with these devices. All SIBS tubes were patent 9 months after insertion. Immunostaining demonstrated non-continuous deposition of collagen with virtually no encapsulation. No macrophages or myofibroblast were visible around the SIBS polymer which was found more bioinert than the control PDMS. Conclusion: This newly designed glaucoma implant is clinically biocompatible in the rabbit model and maintained 100% patency at 9 months.

  2. Photoacoustic FTIR detection of external lubricants in styrenic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, T.; Yock, K. E.

    1989-12-01

    A simple Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) method using Photoacoustic (PA) detection is used to detect external lubricants directly on the surface of styrenic resin pellets. This technique is non-destructive, requires no sample preparation and rapidly determines the lubricant chemical class. This rapid qualitative procedure significantly reduces the subsequent quantitative analysis time of unknown samples. The application of PA-FTIR and the advantages of applying spectral subtraction in identifying fatty acid and substituted fatty amide external lubricants on some styrenic resins will be presented.

  3. Behavioral technology for reducing occupational exposures to styrene.

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, B L; Conard, R J; Dangel, R F; Fitch, H G; Smith, M J; Anger, W K

    1986-01-01

    We conducted a test of the usefulness of behavioral methods to control occupational health problems by reducing workers' exposures to toxic chemicals. Four plastics workers were trained in nine behaviors selected for potential to reduce their exposures to styrene, a common chemical with multiple toxic effects. Behavioral measures indicated that the workers quickly came to emit most of the behaviors. Measures of air samples indicated that large decreases in exposures to styrene accompanied the changes in behaviors for the three workers who had been selected because they most needed relief from their exposures and because they had opportunities to control their exposures by the ways they behaved. PMID:3710946

  4. POTENTIAL FOR REDUCING STYRENE EXPOSURES FROM COPIED PAPER THROUGH USE OF LOW-EMITTING TONERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports results of tests, conducted using 53-L chambers to determine styrene emission rates from freshly copied paper produced on a single photocopier using two toners manufactured for the copier having different styrene contents. Copied-paper styrene emissions with bot...

  5. 40 CFR 721.9492 - Polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl methacrylate and substituted methacrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9492 Polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl methacrylate... generically as polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl methacrylate and substituted methacrylate (PMNs...

  6. 40 CFR 721.9492 - Polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl methacrylate and substituted methacrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9492 Polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl methacrylate...) The chemical substances identified generically as polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl methacrylate...

  7. 40 CFR 721.9492 - Polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl methacrylate and substituted methacrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9492 Polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl methacrylate...) The chemical substances identified generically as polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl methacrylate...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9492 - Polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl methacrylate and substituted methacrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9492 Polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl methacrylate...) The chemical substances identified generically as polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl methacrylate...

  9. 40 CFR 721.9492 - Polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl methacrylate and substituted methacrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9492 Polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl methacrylate...) The chemical substances identified generically as polymers of styrene, cyclohexyl methacrylate...

  10. 40 CFR 721.3800 - Formaldehyde, condensated polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3800 Section 721.3800... Formaldehyde, condensated polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. (a... generically as formaldehyde, condensated polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol,...

  11. 40 CFR 721.3800 - Formaldehyde, condensated polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3800 Section 721.3800... Formaldehyde, condensated polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. (a... generically as formaldehyde, condensated polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol,...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3800 - Formaldehyde, condensated polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3800 Section 721.3800... Formaldehyde, condensated polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. (a... generically as formaldehyde, condensated polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol,...

  13. 40 CFR 721.3800 - Formaldehyde, condensated polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3800 Section 721.3800... Formaldehyde, condensated polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. (a... generically as formaldehyde, condensated polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol,...

  14. 40 CFR 721.3800 - Formaldehyde, condensated polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3800 Section 721.3800... Formaldehyde, condensated polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. (a... generically as formaldehyde, condensated polyoxyethylene fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol,...

  15. The high-pressure chemistry of butadiene crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citroni, Margherita; Ceppatelli, Matteo; Bini, Roberto; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2003-01-01

    FTIR spectroscopy was applied to the study of the high-pressure reactivity of solid butadiene. The chemical transformation from the ordered phase I was observed to occur only above 270 K. The existence of a threshold temperature for the reaction reveals the central role of the lattice phonons in the activation of the transformation. Below 4.0 GPa only dimerization to 4-vinylcyclohexene occurs, while above this pressure an increasing amount of polymer forms with rising pressure. Room temperature kinetic studies have been performed at different pressures, from 2.1 up to 6.6 GPa, and the sign of the activation volume for the dimerization has been obtained. The dimerization reaction is found to follow a first-order mechanism. A reaction pathway for this process is proposed where the internal rearrangement of a diradical intermediate specie is identified as the rate limiting step. An acceleration of the dimerization process is observed above 4.0 GPa and is ascribed to the simultaneous polymer formation. This effect causes the laser assisted reaction, where a large amount of polymer is produced at any pressure, to be not as selective on polymerization as it is in the liquid phase, since also the dimerization rate is enhanced.

  16. Ring-puckering potential function for butadiene sulphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Juan C.; Lister, David G.; Villamañán, Rosa M.; Alonso, José L.

    1990-06-01

    The ring puckering in butadiene sulphone has been investigated using microwave spectroscopy and ab initio computations. Microwave spectra of the ground and first eight excited states of the ring-puckering vibration have been observed. A two state analysis of the vibration-rotation interaction for the v=0 and v=1 states gives an energy separation between these states of 4.97 (3) cm-1. This separation and the vibrational dependence of the rotational constants have been used to derive the reduced potential function V(X)=4.7(X4-6.5X2) for the ring-puckering vibration. This potential function gives a barrier to ring inversion of 50 (11) cm-1 and an equilibrium dihedral angle of ≊20°. Ab initio computations using STO 3-21G* orbitals and full geometry optimization give a barrier height of 88 cm-1 and an equilibrium dihedral angle of 19.2°. The ab initio computations predict structural relaxation including a rocking of the sulphone group during the ring-puckering motion. This is supported by calculations of the vibration-rotation interaction parameter (δμac/δQ). The μa component of the electric dipole moment has been determined as 4.6 (1) D from Stark effect measurements. The ab initio computations and Stark effect measurements indicate that the transition moment <0‖μc‖1> is 1-2 D.

  17. Bioaccumulation factors for chlorinated benzenes, chlorinated butadienes and hexachloroethane

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhard, L.P.; Sheedy, B.R.; McCauley, D.J.; DeGraeve, G.M.

    1997-08-01

    A field study was performed that measured bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for chlorinated benzenes, chlorinated butadienes, and hexachloroethane in four species, Fundulus heteroclitus (mummichog), Callinectes sapidus (blue crabs), Brevoortia patronus (gulf menhaden), and Micropoganias undulatus (Atlantic croaker). The measured BAFs were not significantly different among the fishes. The measured BAFs for the C. sapidus were in good agreement with those measured for the fishes except for hexachloroethane (HCE), E- and Z-1,1,2,3,4-pentachlorobuta-1,3-diene (E-and Z-PeCBD), and hexachlorobuta-1,3-diene (HCBD). Their measured BAFs were approximately an order of magnitude smaller than those measured for the fishes. The measured BAFs were also in good agreement with BAFs reported/derived from the literature and to BAFs predicted using two methods of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) except for HCE, E- and Z-PeCBD, and HCBD in the C. sapidus. These BAFs were much smaller than the reported/derived and predicted BAFs. The smaller BAFs for HCE, E- and Z-PeCBD, and HCBD were consistent with the metabolism abilities for the C. sapidus, and metabolism processes are believed to be the cause for the smaller BAFs. The predicted BAFs were within a factor of five of the measured BAFs for 90% (n = 48) and 94% (n = 32) using the two methods of the EPA.

  18. High performance light-colored nitrile-butadiene rubber nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yanda; Guo, Baochun; Chen, Feng; Zhu, Lixin; Zhou, Wenyou; Jia, Demin

    2011-12-01

    High mechanical performance nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) with light color was fabricated by the method of in situ formation of zinc disorbate (ZDS) or magnesium disorbate (MDS). The in situ formed ZDS and its polymerization via internal mixing was confirmed by X-ray diffaraction. The mechanical properties, ageing resistance, morphology and the dynamic mechanical analysis were fully studied. It was found that with increasing loading of metallic disorbate both the curing rate and the ionic crosslink density was largely increased. The modulus, tensile strength and tear strength were largely increased. With a comparison between internal mixing and opening mixing, the mechanical performance for the former one was obviously better than the latter one. The high performance was ascribed to the finely dispersion nano domains with irregular shape and obscure interfacial structures. Except for the NBR vulcanizate with a high loading of MDS, the others' ageing resistance with incorporation of these two metallic disorbate was found to be good. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) showed that, with increasing loading of metallic disorbate, the highly increased storage modulus above -20 degrees C, the up-shifted glass transition temperature (Tg) and the reduced mechanical loss were ascribed to strengthened interfacial interactions. PMID:22408977

  19. An estimation of photon scattering length in tetraphenyl-butadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolp, D.; Dalager, O.; Dhaliwal, N.; Godfrey, B.; Irving, M.; Kazkaz, K.; Manalaysay, A.; Neher, C.; Stephenson, S.; Tripathi, M.

    2016-03-01

    Tetraphenyl-butadiene (TPB) is a wavelength shifting material that can absorb ultraviolet photons and emit blue photons. It is used in the detection of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons, for which typical photo-sensors, such as most photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and silicon photomultipliers (SiPM), do not have any quantum efficiency. The secondary blue light is emitted isotropically, however, due to scattering within the material, its angular distribution upon exiting the material can not be easily predicted. Here we describe a procedure for estimating the scattering length of blue light in TPB, by measuring and modeling the angular distribution as a function of layer thickness. The experiment consists of shining 254nm light at various thicknesses of TPB deposited on fused silica, and measuring the intensity of blue light using SiPMs on either side of the sample. We simulate light propagation within the sample to estimate the light yield and compare that to the data, which allows us to estimate mean scattering length for photons in TPB to be in the range 2-3 μm, with some preference for a central value of 2.75 μm.

  20. Assessment of the potential risk to workers from exposure to 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, D; Rodricks, J V; Brett, S M

    1990-01-01

    The available epidemiologic data provide equivocal evidence that 1,3-butadiene is carcinogenic in humans; some available studies suggest that the lymphopoietic system is a target, but there are inconsistencies among studies in the types of tumors associated with 1,3-butadiene exposure, and there is no evidence of a relationship between length of exposure and cancer risk, as one might expect if there was a true causal relationship between 1,3-butadiene exposure and cancer risk. The available chronic animal studies, however, show an increase in tumor incidence associated with exposure to high concentrations of 1,3-butadiene. In addition to the general uncertainty of the relevance of animal data to humans, there are several additional reasons why the National Toxicology Program's mouse study may not be appropriate for assessing possible human risks. These include: a) the possible involvement of a species-specific tumor virus (MuLV) in the response in mice; b) apparent differences between mice and humans in the rate of metabolism of 1,3-butadiene to reactive epoxides that may be proximate carcinogens; c) use of high dose levels that caused excess early mortality; and d) exposure of animals to 1,3-butadiene for only about half their lifetime. While recognizing the uncertainty in using the available animal data for risk assessment, we have performed low-dose extrapolation of the data to examine the implications of the data if humans were as sensitive as rats or mice to 1,3-butadiene, and to examine how the predictions of the animal data compare to that observed in the epidemiologic studies. With the mouse data, because the study was of less than lifetime duration, we have used the Hartley-Sielken time-to-tumor model to permit estimation of lifetime risk from the less than lifetime exposure of the study. With the rat data, we have used three plausible models for assessing low-dose risk: the multistage model, the Weibull model, and the Mantel-Bryan probit model. With both the rat and mouse data, we used information on how much 1,3-butadiene is retained by animals exposed to various concentrations of the chemical. This improves the accuracy of the low-dose extrapolation. When extrapolated to low-dose levels, mice appear to be at greater risk (by a factor of 5-fold to 40-fold) than rats. Some of this difference (a factor 3-fold to 5-fold) may be due to the faster rate of metabolism of 1,3-butadiene to, and higher blood levels of, epoxide derivatives in mice than in rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2205486

  1. Sequential shape-selective adsorption and photocatalytic transformation of acrylonitrile production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yunrong; Song, Yonghui; Tu, Xiang; Jiang, Yanpeng; Yuan, Yu

    2015-11-15

    Acrylonitrile production wastewater has been widely recognized as one type of refractory organic wastewater because of its complicated composition and low bioavailability. It usually contains plenty of micromolecular nitrile and pyridine, resulting in high chemical oxygen demand (CODCr), total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations. In this study, a novel microporous zeolite, CS-Z1, was developed as an adsorbent for rapidly shape-selective adsorption of the micromolecular pollutants from the acrylonitrile production wastewater, and a visible light-driven Ti-β-Bi2O3 photocatalysis was introduced to sequentially treat the residual macromolecular pollutants for complete purification. The adsorption processes by CS-Z1 were mostly achieved within the first 5 min, and the equilibrium was reached quickly after 30 min, where the CODCr, TOC and TN removal efficiencies of the wastewater were as high as 93.5%, 92.2% and 96.8%, respectively, much higher than those by other adsorbents. Furthermore, the adsorption efficiencies of CS-Z1 were barely affected by the variation of pH value and temperature, which was mainly attributed to the shape-selective adsorption mechanism of the CS-Z1 zeolite. The Ti-β-Bi2O3 photocatalysis could remove more than 95% of the residual macromolecular pollutants in the wastewater, where a synergistic mechanism of reduction-oxidation/polymerization was proposed. In a 108 h of CS-Z1 adsorption and Ti-β-Bi2O3 photocatalysis sequential process, the CODCr, TOC and TN concentrations was reduced to below 20, 7 and 5 mg L(-1), respectively, demonstrating the excellent practical potential of the sequential treatment system for acrylonitrile production wastewater. PMID:26331895

  2. Exploiting Framework Flexibility of a Metal-Organic Framework for Selective Adsorption of Styrene over Ethylbenzene.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumya; Joarder, Biplab; Desai, Aamod V; Manna, Biplab; Krishna, Rajamani; Ghosh, Sujit K

    2015-05-01

    The separation of styrene and ethylbenzene mixtures is industrially important and is currently performed in highly energy-intensive vacuum distillation columns. The primary objective of our investigation is to offer an energy-efficient alternative for selective adsorption of styrene by a flexible metal-organic framework, DynaMOF-100. The structural transformation of DynaMOF-100 is specifically triggered on inclusion of styrene within the framework; this structural transformation is reversible. The styrene/ethylbenzene adsorption selectivity, originated as an outcome of the framework flexibility, is found to be much superior to the only two MOFs yet reported, serving styrene/ethylbenzene separation purpose. PMID:25875678

  3. 21 CFR 177.1830 - Styrene-methyl methacrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Styrene-methyl methacrylate copolymers. 177.1830 Section 177.1830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components of Single and...

  4. 21 CFR 177.1810 - Styrene block polymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... hr on a 0.071 cm (0.028 in) thick sample. (Optionally, maximum net residue soluble in chloroform... in chloroform shall not exceed 0.00040 mg/cm2 (0.0025 mg/in2) of surface.) 3. (i) Styrene block... in distilled water and 50 percent ethanol and the maximum net residue solubles in chloroform....

  5. 21 CFR 177.1810 - Styrene block polymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... hr on a 0.071 cm (0.028 in) thick sample. (Optionally, maximum net residue soluble in chloroform... in chloroform shall not exceed 0.00040 mg/cm2 (0.0025 mg/in2) of surface.) 3. (i) Styrene block... in distilled water and 50 percent ethanol and the maximum net residue solubles in chloroform....

  6. EVALUATION OF A LIQUID CHEMICAL SCRUBBER SYSTEM FOR STYRENE REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of the styrene removal efficiency o a pilot-scale version of the QUAD Chemtact scrubber, quantified by continuously measuring the total hydrocarbon (THC) content of spray both exhaust air entering and exiting the device with THC analyzers and, ...

  7. PRODUCTS OF THE GAS-PHASE REACTIONS OF 1,3-BUTADIENE WITH OH AND NO3 RADICALS. (R825252)

    EPA Science Inventory

    1,3-Butadiene is emitted into the atmosphere from a number of sources
    including combustion sources and is listed in the United States as a hazardous
    air pollutant. In the atmosphere, 1,3-butadiene reacts with OH radicals,
    NO3 radicals, and O3 ...

  8. REPRODUCTIVE EFFECTS ASSESSMENT GROUP'S REPORT ON THE MUTAGENICITY OF 1.3-BUTADIENE AND ITS REACTIVE METABOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major data gap for assessing heritable risk from exposure to 1,3-butadiene is the lack of mammalian mutagenicity data. The data base on the mutagenic potential of 1,3-butadiene is limited to three bacterial studies from the same laboratory. Two of these studies were positive on...

  9. [Carcinogenicity of acrylonitrile and evaluation of approaches to pathogenetic correction of acrylate toxicity and antitumorigenic anthracycline doxorubicin toxicity during chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Tarskikh, M M; Shumbasov, M A; Kolesnikov, S I

    2013-01-01

    Statistical analysis within the 20-year period showed that approximately 49% of workers who were exposed to widespread industrial poison acrylonitrile subsequently died from malignancy of different localization. The conducted experimental investigations demonstrated that acrylonitrile with the subacute intoxication of animals, the anti-tumor antibiotic doxorubicin, their combination, interwoven tumor and tumor developed against the background the introduction of acrylate and subsequent treatment doxorubicin led to onset of free-radical reactions. These reactions by themselves might stimulate development of malignancy. This fact confirms the need for antioxidant tracking of chemotherapy of tumors in the similar clinical cases. PMID:23819331

  10. [Occupational risk after repeated skin exposure to styrene].

    PubMed

    Burkova, T; Ba?nova, A; Kapurdov, V

    1982-01-01

    The use of styrene in the production and processing of polymers, varnishes and paints is a prerequisite for a broad skin contact with the solvent, hence conditions for occupational effect on the workers, manifested with frequent contact toxic dermatitis. That determined the scope of this work, aiming at the specifying of the occupational risk in case of repeated dermal contact with styrene. The experiment was carried out in the course of 28 days on 70 albino male rats, treated daily, dermally with 4 ml/kg and 8 ml/kg from the substance and on groups with a following 14--day rehabilitation. The following methods were used in the investigation: histological (H.E.), histochemical (Sudan III, Sudan schwartz and PAS-reactions under the control of alpha-amilase), enzyme-histochemical (activity of alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatases, ATP, SDH, LDH and G16PDH) and electron microscopic. The repeated skin application of styrene was established to induce changes in the organism of the experimental animals, localized mainly in the liver and carrying the character of fatty dystrophia. The latter is directly proportional to the dose applied and the exposure duration. After a 14-day rehabilitation period, the dystrophia abates and the processes of proliferation and regeneration predominate in the organ, regardless of the enzyme disorders established in the oxidation-reduction processes of liver, with the higher styrene dose (8 ml/kg). The authors presume that the dynamic follow up of the adaptation mechanisms in liver, in case of repeated dermal contact with styrene, determines reversible tissue deviations in organism of the experimental animals, being dose-effect dependent. The authors are in the opinion that the occupational risk in production and processing of polystyrene is minimum when observing the sanitary instructions for safe contact. PMID:7178069

  11. Mutagenicity of 1,3-butadiene inhalation in somatic and germinal cells of mice.

    PubMed

    Adler, I D; Cao, J; Filser, J G; Gassner, P; Kessler, W; Kliesch, U; Neuhäuser-Klaus, A; Nüsse, M

    1994-09-01

    Inhalation exposure of mice to 50, 200, 500 or 1300 ppm of 1,3-butadiene for 6 h per day for 5 consecutive days caused micronuclei in mouse bone marrow and peripheral blood erythrocytes. The dose response was non-linear. The slope of the curve flattened with increasing exposure concentration. Coat color spots were found in the mouse spot test after exposure of pregnant females on pregnancy days 8-12 to 500 ppm of 1,3-butadiene. Dominant lethal mutations were induced in spermatozoa and late spermatids after exposure of male mice to 1300 ppm with the 5-day exposure regimen. Thus, in the mouse 1,3-butadiene is a somatic and germ cell mutagen. PMID:7520990

  12. Design of a metal-promoted oxide catalyst for the selective synthesis of butadiene from ethanol.

    PubMed

    Sushkevich, Vitaly L; Ivanova, Irina I; Ordomsky, Vitaly V; Taarning, Esben

    2014-09-01

    The synthesis of buta-1,3-diene from ethanol has been studied over metal-containing (M=Ag, Cu, Ni) oxide catalysts (MO(x)=MgO, ZrO2, Nb2O5, TiO2, Al2O3) supported on silica. Kinetic study of a wide range of ethanol conversions (2-90%) allowed the main reaction pathways leading to butadiene and byproducts to be determined. The key reaction steps of butadiene synthesis were found to involve ethanol dehydrogenation, acetaldehyde condensation, and the reduction of crotonaldehyde with ethanol into crotyl alcohol. Catalyst design included the selection of active components for each key reaction step and merging of these components into multifunctional catalysts and adjusting the catalyst functions to achieve the highest selectivity. The best catalytic performance was achieved over the Ag/ZrO2/SiO2 catalyst, which showed the highest selectivity towards butadiene (74 mol%). PMID:25123990

  13. Significance of 1,3-butadiene to the US air toxics regulatory effort.

    PubMed

    Morrow, N L

    2001-06-01

    Because of its prevalence, particularly as a combustion by-product, 1,3-butadiene is a particularly important air toxic. It plays a significant role in all air toxics regulatory efforts in the US. The various requirements of the Federal Clean Air Act (CAA) dealing with air toxics are reviewed and the significance of 1,3-butadiene in each area is discussed in light of what is known about its emissions and health effects. The impacts of the changes in the understanding of 1,3-butadiene cancer potency over the past 15 years demonstrates the possible impact of such benchmarks and the importance of using the best science in understanding public health risks. PMID:11397386

  14. Toxicology of 1,3-butadiene, chloroprene, and isoprene.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Harrell E

    2007-01-01

    The diene monomers, 1,3-butadiene, chloroprene, and isoprene, respectively, differ only in substitution of a hydrogen, a chlorine, or a methyl group at the second of the four unsaturated carbon atoms in these linear molecules. Literature reviewed in the preceding sections indicates that these chemicals have important uses in synthesis of polymers, which offer significant benefits within modern society. Additionally, studies document that these monomers can increase the tumor formation rate in various organs of rats and mice during chronic cancer bioassays. The extent of tumor formation versus animal exposure to these monomers varies significantly across species, as well among strains within species. These studies approach, but do not resolve, important questions of human risk from inhalation exposure. Each of these diene monomers can be activated to electrophilic epoxide metabolites through microsomal oxidation reactions in mammals. These epoxide metabolites are genotoxic through reactions with nucleic acids. Some of these reactions cause mutations and subsequent cancers, as noted in animal experiments. Significant differences exist among the compounds, particularly in the extent of formation of highly mutagenic diepoxide metabolites, when animals are exposed. These metabolites are detoxified through hydrolysis by epoxide hydrolase enzymes and through conjugation with glutathione with the aid of glutathione S-transferase. Different strains and species perform these reactions with varying efficacy. Mice produce these electrophilic epoxides more rapidly and appear to have less adequate detoxification mechanisms than rats or humans. The weight of evidence from many studies suggests that the balance of activation versus detoxification offers explanation of differing sensitivities of animals to these carcinogenic actions. Other aspects, including molecular biology of the many processes that lead through specific mutations to cancer, are yet to be understood. Melnick and Sills (2001) compared the carcinogenic potentials of these three dienes, along with that of ethylene oxide, which also acts through an epoxide intermediate. From the number of tissue sites where experimental animal tumors were detected, butadiene offers greatest potential for carcinogenicity of these dienes. Chloroprene and then isoprene appear to follow in this order. Comparisons among these chemicals based on responses to external exposures are complicated by differences among studies and of species and tissue susceptibilities. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models offer promise to overcome these impediments to interpretation. Mechanistic studies at the molecular level offer promise for understanding the relationships among electrophilic metabolites and vital genetic components. Significant improvements in minimization of industrial worker exposures to carcinogenic chemicals have been accomplished after realization that vinyl chloride caused hepatic angiosarcoma in polymer production workers (Creech and Johnson 1974; Falk et al. 1974). Efforts continue to minimize disease, particularly cancer, from exposures to chemicals such as these dienes. Industry has responded to significant challenges that affect the health of workers through efforts that minimize plant exposures and by sponsorship of research, including animal and epidemiological studies. Governmental agencies provide oversight and have developed facilities that accomplish studies of continuing scientific excellence. These entities grapple with differences in perspective, objectives, and interpretation as synthesis of knowledge develops through mutual work. A major challenge remains, however, in assessment of significance of environmental human exposures to these dienes. Such exposure levels are orders of magnitude less than exposures studied in experimental or epidemiological settings, but exposures may persist much longer and may involve unknown but potentially significant sensitivities in the general population. New paradigms likely will be needed for toxicological evaluation of these human exposures, which are ongoing but as yet are not interpreted. PMID:17193739

  15. Preparation of a series of model poly(n-alkyl styrene)s and their viscoelasticity and glass transition temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Satoru; Takano, Atsushi; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Matsushita, Yushu

    Viscoelasticity and glass transition temperatures for linear polymers of many species have been investigated so far, and it is well-known that the melt viscosity for the linear polymers varies with molecular weight in essentially the same manner such as packing length theory. It is important to understand the relationship between the viscosity and the molecular structure of various kinds of linear polymers. To investigate the relationship deeply, viscoelastic measurements using linear polymer analogues which the molecular structure is systematically varied should be useful. For example, poly(n-alkyl-substituted polymers) such as poly(n-alkyl methacrylate)s are one of the good candidate. In this study, a series of poly(n-alkyl styrene)s with the different number of carbon atoms(n) in the side alkyl groups (n =1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12) were carefully synthesized by an anionic polymerization technique, and the viscoelasticity and the glass transition temperatures of the poly(n-alkyl styrene)s with high molecular weight (Mw >=4Me) and narrow molecular weight distribution (Mw/Mn <=1.1) were discussed.

  16. 75 FR 9438 - Americas Styrenics, LLC-Marietta Plant a Subsidiary of Americas Styrenics, LLLC Formerly Known as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... was published in the Federal Register on January 25, 2010 (75 FR 3937). At the request of the State... engaged in the production of styrene monomer and polystyrene pellets. Information shows that Americas... and polystyrene pellets. The amended notice applicable to TA-W-70,380 is hereby issued as follows:...

  17. Block copolymerization of isoprene and butadiene under the effect of a catalyst based on neodymium trichloride

    SciTech Connect

    Bodrova, V.S.; Piskareva, E.P.; Kormer, V.A.

    1987-09-01

    The authors assess the catalytic activity of neodymium trichloride in the block copolymerization of isoprene and butadiene by using a monomer catalyst ratio of 500-1000 in solvents of hexane and benzene. Molecular weight measurements and gel permeation chromatography were used to monitor the kinetics as well as the yields of the reactions. Two variants of the experiments were conducted. Either butadiene was added to the system after termination of isoprene polymerization or vice versa. The first variant was found to be more conducive to a quantitative estimation of the catalyst efficiency and is therefore used in the mathematical formulation of the process.

  18. Sensitive detection of acrolein and acrylonitrile with a pulsed quantum-cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manne, J.; Lim, A.; Tulip, J.; Jäger, W.

    2012-05-01

    We report on spectroscopic measurements of acrolein and acrylonitrile at atmospheric pressure using a pulsed distributed feedback quantum-cascade laser in combination with intra- and inter-pulse techniques and compare the results. The measurements were done in the frequency region around 957 cm-1. In the inter-pulse technique, the laser is excited with short current pulses (5-10 ns), and the pulse amplitude is modulated with an external current ramp resulting in a ˜2.3 cm-1 frequency scan. In the intra-pulse technique, a linear frequency down-chirp during the pulse is used for sweeping across the absorption line. Long current pulses up to 500 ns were used for these measurements which resulted in a spectral window of ˜2.2 cm-1 during the down-chirp. These comparatively wide spectral windows facilitated the measurements of the relatively broad absorption lines (˜1 cm-1) of acrolein and acrylonitrile. The use of a room-temperature mercury-cadmium-telluride detector resulted in a completely cryogen-free spectrometer. We demonstrate ppb level detection limits within a data acquisition time of ˜10 s with these methodologies.

  19. Two-dimensional spectra of electron collisions with acrylonitrile and methacrylonitrile reveal nuclear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Regeta, K. Allan, M.

    2015-05-14

    Detailed experimental information on the motion of a nuclear packet on a complex (resonant) anion potential surface is obtained by measuring 2-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra. The cross section is plotted as a function of incident electron energy, which determines which resonant anion state is populated, i.e., along which normal coordinate the wave packet is launched, and of the electron energy loss, which reveals into which final states each specific resonant state decays. The 2D spectra are presented for acrylonitrile and methacrylonitrile, at the incident energy range 0.095-1.0 eV, where the incoming electron is temporarily captured in the lowest π{sup ∗} orbital. The 2D spectra reveal selectivity patterns with respect to which vibrations are excited in the attachment and de-excited in the detachment. Further insight is gained by recording 1D spectra measured along horizontal, vertical, and diagonal cuts of the 2D spectrum. The methyl group in methacrylonitrile increases the resonance width 7 times. This converts the sharp resonances of acrylonitrile into boomerang structures but preserves the essence of the selectivity patterns. Selectivity of vibrational excitation by higher-lying shape resonances up to 8 eV is also reported.

  20. The migration of styrene butadiene latex during the drying of coating suspensions: when and how does migration of colloidal particles occur?

    PubMed

    Zang, Yong-Hua; Du, Juan; Du, Yanfen; Wu, Zhenjuan; Cheng, Shaoling; Liu, Yuping

    2010-12-01

    Surface elemental compositions of model latex clay coatings on an impervious substrate consolidated under various conditions were measured using the XPS technique, in order to clarify when and how colloidal latex particles migrate to the surface during drying. Under similar drying conditions, surface carbon content decreased with the addition of a water-soluble polymer to the coating colors, while remaining virtually unchanged for coatings of different coat weights made with a given color, indicating that surface carbon content variation is mainly caused by migration of latex rather than of water-soluble polymer. The results also showed that for coatings made with a given suspension, surface carbon content decreased with increasing delay time between coating and heating. For coatings frozen during consolidation and dried by sublimation, surface carbon content increased with increasing drying time before freezing. These results suggest that for the model coatings studied, latex migration mainly occurs after coating application before capillary formation during the initial drying stage when coatings are in the liquid phase, contradicting both the conventional capillary transport and boundary wall migration mechanisms. An alternative mechanism which attributes latex migration to surface trapping effect and to higher Brownian mobility of the smaller latex particles compared with pigment appears to provide a systematically consistent explanation to those phenomena. The new particle migration mechanism implies that segregation of colloidal particles is a ubiquitous phenomenon that would occur not only during the drying of paper coatings but also during consolidation of colloidal films containing particles of different sizes. This is of great importance in the control of surface compositions of nanocomposite coatings. PMID:21043465

  1. EFFECT OF STARCH SWELLING ON THE COMPOSITE MODULUS OF LOW- AND HIGH-GLUTEN WHEAT FLOURS AND CARBOXYLATED STYRENE-BUTADIENE LATEX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat flour is a plentiful renewable resource. The dry flour is rigid and can be used as a potential reinforcement material for soft rubber matrices. Wheat flours with two different gluten contents were investigated and the initial cook temperature of the aqueous wheat flour dispersions was varied...

  2. Modulation of different stress pathways after styrene and styrene-7,8-oxide exposure in HepG2 cell line and normal human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Diodovich, Cristina; Urani, Chiara; Maurici, Daniela; Malerba, Ilaria; Melchioretto, Pasquale; Orlandi, Marco; Zoia, Luca; Campi, Valentina; Carfi', Maria; Pellizzer, Cristian; Gribaldo, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Styrene is one of the most important monomers produced worldwide. IARC classified styrene as a possible carcinogen to humans (group 2B). Styrene-7,8-oxide (SO) is the main reactive metabolite of styrene, and it is found to be genotoxic in several in vitro test systems. Styrene and styrene-7,8-oxide (SO) toxicity to HepG2 cells was investigated by evaluating end-points such as heat shock proteins (Hsps), metallothioneins (MT), apoptosis-related proteins, accumulation of styrene within the cells and expression of two isoforms of cytochrome P450. The potential activity of styrene and styrene-7,8-oxide in modulating gene expression was also investigated. The results showed induction of Hsp70, metallothioneins, BclX(S/L) and c-myc expression and a decrease in Bax expression in HepG2 after treatments, confirming that these compounds activated protective mechanisms. Moreover, up-regulation of TGFbeta2 and TGFbetaRIII in HepG2 cells was found after exposure to styrene, while in human primary hepatocytes these genes were down-regulated after both treatments. Finally, it was found that styrene and SO treatments did not induce CYP1A2 and CYP2E1 protein expression. In conclusion, both compounds caused toxic stress in HepG2 cells, with SO being more toxic; in the meantime, a different effect of the two compounds in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes was observed regarding their activity in gene modulation. PMID:16705669

  3. Ultrasonic velocity and absorption study of binary mixtures of cyclohexane with acrylonitrile by interferometric method at different frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, N. R.; Chimankar, O. P.; Bhandakkar, V. D.; Padole, N. N.

    2012-12-01

    The ultrasonic velocity (u), absorption (α), density (ρ), and viscosity (η) has been measured at different frequencies (1MHz to 10MHz) in the binary mixtures of cyclohexane with acrylonitriile over the entire range of composition at temperature 303K. Vander Waal's constant (b), adiabatic compressibility (βa), acoustic impedance (Z), molar volume (V), free length (Lf), free volume, internal pressure, intermolecular radius and relative association have been also calculated. A special application for acrylonitrile is in the manufacture of carbon fibers. These are produced by paralysis of oriented poly acrylonitrile fibers and are used to reinforce composites for high-performance applications in the aircraft, defense and aerospace industries. Other applications of acrylonitrile are in the production of fatty amines, ion exchange resins and fatty amine amides used in cosmetics, adhesives, corrosion inhibitors and water-treatment resins. Cyclohexane derivatives can be used for the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, dyes, herbicides, plant growth regulator, plasticizers, rubber chemicals, nylon, cyclamens and other organic compounds. In the view of these extensive applications of acrylonitrile and cyclohexane in the engineering process, textile and pharmaceutical industries present study provides qualitative information regarding the nature and strength of interaction in the liquid mixtures through derive parameters from ultrasonic velocity and absorption measurement.

  4. Production of biorenewable styrene: utilization of biomass-derived sugars and insights into toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jieni; McKenna, Rebekah; Rover, Marjorie R; Nielsen, David R; Wen, Zhiyou; Jarboe, Laura R

    2016-05-01

    Fermentative production of styrene from glucose has been previously demonstrated in Escherichia coli. Here, we demonstrate the production of styrene from the sugars derived from lignocellulosic biomass depolymerized by fast pyrolysis. A previously engineered styrene-producing strain was further engineered for utilization of the anhydrosugar levoglucosan via expression of levoglucosan kinase. The resulting strain produced 240 ± 3 mg L(-1) styrene from pure levoglucosan, similar to the 251 ± 3 mg L(-1) produced from glucose. When provided at a concentration of 5 g L(-1), pyrolytic sugars supported styrene production at titers similar to those from pure sugars, demonstrating the feasibility of producing this important industrial chemical from biomass-derived sugars. However, the toxicity of contaminant compounds in the biomass-derived sugars and styrene itself limit further gains in production. Styrene toxicity is generally believed to be due to membrane damage. Contrary to this prevailing wisdom, our quantitative assessment during challenge with up to 200 mg L(-1) of exogenously provided styrene showed little change in membrane integrity; membrane disruption was observed only during styrene production. Membrane fluidity was also quantified during styrene production, but no changes were observed relative to the non-producing control strain. This observation that styrene production is much more damaging to the membrane integrity than challenge with exogenously supplied styrene provides insight into the mechanism of styrene toxicity and emphasizes the importance of verifying proposed toxicity mechanisms during production instead of relying upon results obtained during exogenous challenge. PMID:26803503

  5. Alkyltransferase-mediated Toxicity of 1,3-Butadiene Diepoxide

    PubMed Central

    Kalapila, Aley G.; Loktionova, Natalia A.; Pegg, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    Human O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (hAGT) expression increases mutations and cytotoxicity following exposure to 1,3-butadiene diepoxide (BDO) and hAGT-DNA cross-links are formed in the presence of BDO. We have used hAGT mutants to investigate the mechanism of cross-link formation and genotoxicity. Formation of a hAGT-DNA conjugate in vitro was observed with C145S and C145A mutant proteins but was considerably diminished with the C145A/C150S double mutant confirming that cross-linking primarily involves either of these two cysteine residues, which are located in the active site pocket of the protein. Cross-link formation by BDO occurred both via (a) an initial reaction of BDO with hAGT followed by attack of the reactive hAGT complex on DNA, and (b) the initial reaction of BDO with DNA followed by a reaction between hAGT and the DNA adduct. These results differ from those with 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE) where Cys145 is the only site of attachment and pathway (b) does not occur. The complex formed between hAGT at Cys145 and BDO was very unstable in aqueous solution. However, the BDO-hAGT complex at Cys150 exhibited stability for more than 1 h. The effect of hAGT and mutants on BDO-induced genotoxicity was studied in E. coli using the forward assay to rifampicin resistance. Both mutations and cell killing were greatly increased by wild type hAGT and there was a smaller but significant effect with the C145A mutant. The R128A mutant and R128A/C145A and C145A/C150S double mutants were ineffective supporting the hypothesis that the formation of hAGT-DNA cross-links is responsible for the enhanced genotoxicity detected in this biological system. In the absence of hAGT, there were equal proportions of G:C to A:T transitions, G:C to T:A transversions and A:T to T:A transversions. Wild type hAGT expression yielded significantly greater G:C to A:T and A:T to G:C transitions, whereas C145A mutant expression resulted in more transitions and transversions at A:T base-pairs. PMID:18712882

  6. Quantitation of DNA Adducts Induced by 1,3-Butadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangaraju, Dewakar; Villalta, Peter W.; Wickramaratne, Susith; Swenberg, James; Tretyakova, Natalia

    2014-07-01

    Human exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD) present in automobile exhaust, cigarette smoke, and forest fires is of great concern because of its potent carcinogenicity. The adverse health effects of BD are mediated by its epoxide metabolites such as 3,4-epoxy-1-butene (EB), which covalently modify genomic DNA to form promutagenic nucleobase adducts. Because of their direct role in cancer, BD-DNA adducts can be used as mechanism-based biomarkers of BD exposure. In the present work, a mass spectrometry-based methodology was developed for accurate, sensitive, and precise quantification of EB-induced N-7-(1-hydroxy-3-buten-2-yl) guanine (EB-GII) DNA adducts in vivo. In our approach, EB-GII adducts are selectively released from DNA backbone by neutral thermal hydrolysis, followed by ultrafiltration, offline HPLC purification, and isotope dilution nanoLC/ESI+-HRMS3 analysis on an Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer. Following method validation, EB-GII lesions were quantified in human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cells treated with micromolar concentrations of EB and in liver tissues of rats exposed to sub-ppm concentrations of BD (0.5-1.5 ppm). EB-GII concentrations increased linearly from 1.15 ± 0.23 to 10.11 ± 0.45 adducts per 106 nucleotides in HT1080 cells treated with 0.5-10 μM DEB. EB-GII concentrations in DNA of laboratory rats exposed to 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 ppm BD were 0.17 ± 0.05, 0.33 ± 0.08, and 0.50 ± 0.04 adducts per 106 nucleotides, respectively. We also used the new method to determine the in vivo half-life of EB-GII adducts in rat liver DNA (2.20 ± 0.12 d) and to detect EB-GII in human blood DNA. To our knowledge, this is the first application of nanoLC/ESI+-HRMS3 Orbitrap methodology to quantitative analysis of DNA adducts in vivo.

  7. Effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on emulsion polymerization of styrene.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, Daichi; Horie, Takafumi; Hongo, Chizuru; Ohmura, Naoto

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of pretreatment of ultrasonic irradiation on emulsion polymerization of styrene to propose a process intensification method which gives high conversion, high reaction rate, and high energy efficiency. The solution containing styrene monomer was irradiated by a horn mounted on the ultrasonic transducer with the diameter of 5mm diameter and the frequency of 28kHz before starting polymerization. The pretreatment of ultrasound irradiation as short as 1min drastically improved monomer dispersion and increased reaction rate even under the agitation condition with low rotational speed of impeller. Furthermore, the ultrasonic pretreatment resulted in higher monomer concentration in polymer particles and produced larger polymer particles than conventional polymerization without ultrasonic pretreatment. PMID:26964957

  8. EFFECTS OF 1,3-BUTADIENE, ISOPRENE, AND THEIR PHOTOCHEMICAL DEGRADATION PRODUCTS ON HUMAN LUNG CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of potential exposure both in the workplace and from ambient air, the known carcinogen 1,3-butadiene (BD) is considered a priority hazardous air pollutant. BD and its 2-methyl analog, isoprene (ISO), are chemically similar but have very different toxicities, with ISO show...

  9. THE OZONE REACTION WITH BUTADIENE: FORMATION OF TOXIC PRODUCTS. (R826236)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The formation yields of acrolein, 1,2-epoxy-3-butene and OH radicals have been measured from reaction of ozone with 1,3-butadiene at room temperature and atmosphere pressure. 1,3,5-Trimethyl benzene was added to scavenge OH radicals in measurements of product ...

  10. HYDROXYL RADICAL AND OZONE INITIATED PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS OF 1,3-BUTADIENE. (R826247)

    EPA Science Inventory

    1,3-Butadiene, classified as hazardous in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, is an important ambient air pollutant. Understanding its atmospheric transformation is useful for its own sake, and is also helpful for eliciting isoprene's fate in the atmosphere (isoprene dominates ...

  11. Heritable translocations induced by inhalation exposure of male mice to 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed

    Adler, I D; Filser, J G; Gassner, P; Kessler, W; Schöneich, J; Schriever-Schwemmer, G

    1995-08-01

    Previously, we reported that dominant lethal mutations were induced in spermatids after inhalation exposure of male (102/El x C3H/El)F1 mice to 1300 ppm of 1,3-butadiene on 5 days for 6 h per day (exposure dose 39,000 ppm h). The same inhalation exposure was given to male C3H/El inbred mice which were mated to inbred line 102/El females 8-14 d after the end of exposure. Male and female F1 hybrid progeny were tested for the presence of heritable translocations by observation of litter sizes and by cytogenetic analyses in meiotic and somatic cells. 1,3-Butadiene induced heritable translocations in late spermatids. The translocation frequency after 1,3-butadiene exposure to 39,000 ppm h was 2.7% (16 translocation heterozygotes among 559 F1 offspring). This frequency is 54 times higher than the historical control frequency (0.05%; 5 translocation heterozygotes among 9500 F1 offspring). Thus, 1,3-butadiene causes heritable germ cell effects in mice. PMID:7565902

  12. Review of risk assessments on 1,3-butadiene (1985-1991).

    PubMed

    Cagen, S Z; MacDonald, R L; Van Gelder, G

    1996-10-28

    During the past decade, several assessments have estimated the carcinogenic risk of inhaled 1,3-butadiene (BD) to the general population as well as for occupational exposures. Although most of the risk assessments have been based on inhalation bioassays in mice, some of the assessments have included the 2-year inhalation bioassay in rats. Because of the marked species differences in the carcinogenic response to butadiene, estimates of risk vary over nine orders of magnitude going from the most sensitive target organ in female mice to less sensitive male rats. An important tool in determining which estimate is most relevant for extrapolation to humans is to ascertain consistency with human experience. Estimated workplace cancer risks which are based on the assumption that humans are as responsive as the mouse suggest added risks of 200 or more out of 1000 workers (1 in 5) exposed to 2 ppm butadiene (assume 40 years of exposure). This estimate is clearly inconsistent with what has been seen and this would not have been missed in epidemiology studies. Risk assessments based on the growing understanding of the mechanisms of toxicity and the importance of various tissues ability to produce and maintain reactive epoxide metabolites demonstrate why rats are much less susceptible than the mouse. By developing a mechanistic understanding of humans, it is possible to refine the traditional approach to risk assessment, whereby better risk assessments can be made. This paper presents a summary of eight risk assessments that have been developed to date for butadiene. PMID:8901900

  13. Ternary Ag/MgO-SiO2 catalysts for the conversion of ethanol into butadiene.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Wout; Makshina, Ekaterina V; Vanelderen, Pieter; De Clippel, Filip; Houthoofd, Kristof; Kerkhofs, Stef; Martens, Johan A; Jacobs, Pierre A; Sels, Bert F

    2015-03-01

    Ternary Ag/Magnesia-silica catalysts were tested in the direct synthesis of 1,3-butadiene from ethanol. The influence of the silver content and the type of silica source on catalytic performance has been studied. Prepared catalysts were characterized by (29) Si NMR, N2 sorption, small-angle X-ray scattering measurements, XRD, environmental scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (ESEM/EDX), FTIR spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine and CO2 , temperature-programmed desorption of CO2 and UV/Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Based on these characterization results, the catalytic performance of the catalysts in the 1,3-butadiene formation process was interpreted and a tentative model explaining the role of the different catalytically active sites was elaborated. The balance of the active sites is crucial to obtain an active and selective catalyst to form 1,3-butadiene from ethanol. The optimal silver loading is 1-2 wt% on a MgO-silica support with a molar Mg/Si ratio of 2. The silver species and basic sites (Mg?O pairs and basic OH groups) are of prime importance in the 1,3-butadiene production, catalyzing mainly the ethanol dehydrogenation and the aldol condensation, respectively. PMID:25410420

  14. Selectivity of the carbonylation of styrene by cationic palladium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, C.; Mezzetti, A.; Consiglio, G.

    1992-01-01

    [Pd(CH{sub 3}CN){sub 4}][BF{sub 4}]{sub 2} modified with different nitrogen and mono- or bidentate phosphorus ligands catalyzes the formation of (E)-1,5-diphenylpent-1-en-3-one from styrene and carbon monoxide; the use of hybrid ligands, particularly phosphine thioethers, switches the regioselectivity to bring about a largely selective formation of (E)-1,4-diphenylpent-1-en-3-one. 15 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Emission of 1,3-butadiene from petrol-driven motor vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Y.; Galbally, I. E.; Weeks, I. A.

    This study reports the measurement of 1,3-butadiene emissions from 30 petrol-driven vehicles from the Australian car fleet using the Australian Design Rule 37/00 vehicle test procedure. Six of the cars tested were not equipped with catalytic converters and used leaded petrol as fuel. The remaining 24 cars were fitted with catalytic converters and used unleaded petrol. 1,3-Butadiene in exhaust samples was found to degrade rapidly in SUMMA treated stainless steel canisters and the degradation followed first-order kinetics. The rate coefficient of the decay can be represented by a linear dependence on the concentration of nitrogen oxides in the exhaust ( r2 = 0.79, n = 43), and the gas-phase reaction of NO 2 and 1,3-butadiene may have a major role in this loss. The 1,3-butadiene concentrations used to estimate vehicle emissions were corrected for this loss using the decay rate constant either observed from replicate analyses or from the NO x concentrations in the samples. The measurements showed that 1,3-butadiene was emitted at a rate of 20.7 ± 9.2 mg km -1 from 6 non-catalyst vehicles. There was considerable scatter in the observations from catalyst equipped vehicles and we infer that this was due to the malfunction of the emission control devices on some vehicles. The 19 vehicles that appeared to have functioning catalyst emission control devices had an average emission rate of 2.1 ± 1.5 mg km -1. These emission rates are consistent with atmospheric observations and are much higher than those reported previously. We calculate that more than 90% of the 1,3-butadiene in engine exhaust comes from the common alkane and aromatic constituents of the fuel. A comparison of emissions in the different phases of the drive cycle indicates that current emission controls remove more than 90% of the 1,3-butadiene from the initial exhaust mixture.

  16. Subclinical impairment of colour vision among workers exposed to styrene.

    PubMed

    Fallas, C; Fallas, J; Maslard, P; Dally, S

    1992-10-01

    The effects of exposure to styrene were studied among 60 men aged 20 to 56 (mean 29.5) employed in shipbuilding. Exposure was due to the handling of glass reinforced polyester materials. The study was cross sectional and the workers were compared with a control group matched for age, social and occupational state, and ethnic origin. During the study, the mean atmospheric exposure to styrene was 24.3 ppm. Mean urinary elimination was 230 mg/g creatinine for mandelic acid and 57.4 mg/g creatinine for phenylglyoxylic acid. The Farnsworth 100 hue test showed no significant differences between the exposed and control groups for error scores. A significant difference was found, however, for the number of subjects with errors axis in the red-green, or blue-yellow ranges, or both, which was larger among the exposed workers (32/60 v 20/60 for the controls (p < 0.05)). Psychometric tests were also conducted, using the World Health Organisation (WHO) neurobehavioural core test battery. Of the seven tests it included, anomalies were only found for the aiming test. These results suggest that exposure to moderate styrene concentrations of the order of 25 ppm can lead to impairment of colour vision. PMID:1419854

  17. Subclinical impairment of colour vision among workers exposed to styrene.

    PubMed Central

    Fallas, C; Fallas, J; Maslard, P; Dally, S

    1992-01-01

    The effects of exposure to styrene were studied among 60 men aged 20 to 56 (mean 29.5) employed in shipbuilding. Exposure was due to the handling of glass reinforced polyester materials. The study was cross sectional and the workers were compared with a control group matched for age, social and occupational state, and ethnic origin. During the study, the mean atmospheric exposure to styrene was 24.3 ppm. Mean urinary elimination was 230 mg/g creatinine for mandelic acid and 57.4 mg/g creatinine for phenylglyoxylic acid. The Farnsworth 100 hue test showed no significant differences between the exposed and control groups for error scores. A significant difference was found, however, for the number of subjects with errors axis in the red-green, or blue-yellow ranges, or both, which was larger among the exposed workers (32/60 v 20/60 for the controls (p < 0.05)). Psychometric tests were also conducted, using the World Health Organisation (WHO) neurobehavioural core test battery. Of the seven tests it included, anomalies were only found for the aiming test. These results suggest that exposure to moderate styrene concentrations of the order of 25 ppm can lead to impairment of colour vision. PMID:1419854

  18. [Mental health deterioration in workers exposed to styrene].

    PubMed

    Sassine, M P; Mergler, D; Larribe, F; Bélanger, S

    1996-01-01

    Emotional instability which might be an early symptom of more severe disorders, is one of the first manifestations of chronic exposure to organic solvents. The present study measures the association between exposure to styrene and mood states of active workers. A total of 128 workers (85% of the total population) from 3 factories where styrene is used, participated on a voluntary basis. They filled out the following self-administered questionnaires: Profile of Mood States (POMS), Psychiatric Symptom Index and Well-being Index. The results indicate a significant relationship between post work-shift urinary mandelic acid (biological indicator of styrene exposure) and the scores obtained on the POMS scales of tension-anxiety (Spearman's rank correlation rho = 0.30; p < 0.01), anger-hostility (rho = 0.29; p < 0.01), fatigue-inertie (rho = 0.34; p < 0.01), and confusion-bewilderment (rho = 0.23; p = 0.04), as well as the Psychological Distress Index (rho = 0.30; p < 0.01). All scores were adjusted for the effects of 4 potentially confounding variables: age, schooling, alcohol and cigarette consumption. These indicators of mood states do not constitute a diagnosis of mental disease but reveal progressive deterioration of well being associated with neurotoxic exposure in the workplace. PMID:8851939

  19. Combustion products of 1,3-butadiene are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Catallo, W J; Kennedy, C H; Henk, W; Barker, S A; Grace, S C; Penn, A

    2001-09-01

    Adverse health effects of airborne toxicants, especially small respirable particles and their associated adsorbed chemicals, are of growing concern to health professionals, governmental agencies, and the general public. Areas rich in petrochemical processing facilities (e.g., eastern Texas and southern California) chronically have poor air quality. Atmospheric releases of products of incomplete combustion (e.g., soot) from these facilities are not subject to rigorous regulatory enforcement. Although soot can include respirable particles and carcinogens, the toxicologic and epidemiologic consequences of exposure to environmentally relevant complex soots have not been well investigated. Here we continue our physico-chemical analysis of butadiene soot and report effects of exposure to this soot on putative targets, normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells. We examined organic extracts of butadiene soot by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), probe distillation MS, and liquid chromatography (LC)-MS-MS. Hundreds of aromatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with molecular mass as high as 1,000 atomic mass units were detected, including known and suspected human carcinogens (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene). Butadiene soot particles also had strong, solid-state free-radical character in electron spin resonance analysis. Spin-trapping studies indicated that fresh butadiene soot in a buffered aqueous solution containing dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) oxidized the DMSO, leading to CH(3)* radical formation. Butadiene soot DMSO extract (BSDE)-exposed NHBE cells displayed extranuclear fluorescence within 4 hr of exposure. BSDE was cytotoxic to > 20% of the cells at 72 hr. Morphologic alterations, including cell swelling and membrane blebbing, were apparent within 24 hr of exposure. These alterations are characteristic of oncosis, an ischemia-induced form of cell death. BSDE treatment also produced significant genotoxicity, as indicated by binucleated cell formation. The combination of moderate cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, as occurred here, can be pro-carcinogenic. PMID:11673128

  20. Combustion products of 1,3-butadiene are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Catallo, W J; Kennedy, C H; Henk, W; Barker, S A; Grace, S C; Penn, A

    2001-01-01

    Adverse health effects of airborne toxicants, especially small respirable particles and their associated adsorbed chemicals, are of growing concern to health professionals, governmental agencies, and the general public. Areas rich in petrochemical processing facilities (e.g., eastern Texas and southern California) chronically have poor air quality. Atmospheric releases of products of incomplete combustion (e.g., soot) from these facilities are not subject to rigorous regulatory enforcement. Although soot can include respirable particles and carcinogens, the toxicologic and epidemiologic consequences of exposure to environmentally relevant complex soots have not been well investigated. Here we continue our physico-chemical analysis of butadiene soot and report effects of exposure to this soot on putative targets, normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells. We examined organic extracts of butadiene soot by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), probe distillation MS, and liquid chromatography (LC)-MS-MS. Hundreds of aromatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with molecular mass as high as 1,000 atomic mass units were detected, including known and suspected human carcinogens (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene). Butadiene soot particles also had strong, solid-state free-radical character in electron spin resonance analysis. Spin-trapping studies indicated that fresh butadiene soot in a buffered aqueous solution containing dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) oxidized the DMSO, leading to CH(3)* radical formation. Butadiene soot DMSO extract (BSDE)-exposed NHBE cells displayed extranuclear fluorescence within 4 hr of exposure. BSDE was cytotoxic to > 20% of the cells at 72 hr. Morphologic alterations, including cell swelling and membrane blebbing, were apparent within 24 hr of exposure. These alterations are characteristic of oncosis, an ischemia-induced form of cell death. BSDE treatment also produced significant genotoxicity, as indicated by binucleated cell formation. The combination of moderate cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, as occurred here, can be pro-carcinogenic. PMID:11673128

  1. Poly(styrene-b-dimethylsiloxane-b-styrene) Membranes in Pervaporation for In Situ Product Recovery during Fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Chaeyoung; Baer, Zachary; Ozcam, Ali Evren; Clark, Douglas; Balsara, Nitash

    2014-03-01

    In situ product recovery was investigated in fermentation experiments to enable the development of a continuous fermentation process. Our pervaporation membranes are based on poly(styrene-b-dimethylsiloxane-b-styrene) (SDS) block copolymers. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is the best known organophilic pervaporation membrane material and was utilized as the transporting phase for selective permeation of organic molecules. The polystyrene (PS) block added structural integrity to the membrane due to the high modulus of PS. SDS membranes were found to have both the enhanced robustness as well as comparable pervaporation performance to that of cross-linked PDMS membranes. The permeabilities of water and organic components through SDS membranes were studied to elucidate the sorption and transport phenomena in this system. Furthermore, experiments combining fermentation with pervaporation were performed, and continuous fermentation by using pervaporation as the sole means of removing products was successfully demonstrated for the first time.

  2. Stabilization of polypropylene, polypropylene blends with poly (styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene) under irradiation: A comparative investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Shifang; Yang, Huawei; Shi, Hengchong; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Jianwei; Yin, Jinghua

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the stabilization of polypropylene in the poly (styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene) (SEBS)/polypropylene (PP) blends under irradiation with respect to PP. The PP films, SEBS/PP films were subjected to electron beam irradiation and characterized by wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). It demonstrated that upon irradiation, the molecular weight of PP had a pronounced decrease due to the major chain scission, and the minor chain cross-linking or chain branching occurred at the higher irradiation dose. Stabilization of PP was improved in the presence of SEBS, exhibiting an enhanced irradiation resistance.

  3. Regioselectivity of styrene carbonylation in the presence of palladium(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapidus, A. L.; Eliseev, O. L.; Zvyagintsev, N. V.; Kondrat'ev, L. T.

    2011-05-01

    The influence of a catalyst on regioselectivity of styrene carbonylation in ionic liquids catalyzed by palladium(II) complexes was studied. The mechanism of the migration insertion of styrene at the palladium-hydrogen bond determining the regioselectrivity of the whole reaction, which is treated as electrophilic addition to the multiple bond of styrene, was studied. A study of the structure of intermediate complexes formed at this stage was performed using the B3LYP method of density functional theory.

  4. A preliminary regional PBPK model of lung metabolism for improving species dependent descriptions of 1,3-butadiene and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jerry; Van Landingham, Cynthia; Crowell, Susan; Gentry, Robinan; Kaden, Debra; Fiebelkorn, Stacy; Loccisano, Anne; Clewell, Harvey

    2015-08-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD), a volatile organic chemical (VOC), is used in synthetic rubber production and other industrial processes. It is detectable at low levels in ambient air as well as in tobacco smoke and gasoline vapors. Inhalation exposures to high concentrations of BD have been associated with lung cancer in both humans and experimental animals, although differences in species sensitivity have been observed. Metabolically active lung cells such as Pulmonary Type I and Type II epithelial cells and club cells (Clara cells)(1) are potential targets of BD metabolite-induced toxicity. Metabolic capacities of these cells, their regional densities, and distributions vary throughout the respiratory tract as well as between species and cell types. Here we present a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for BD that includes a regional model of lung metabolism, based on a previous model for styrene, to provide species-dependent descriptions of BD metabolism in the mouse, rat, and human. Since there are no in vivo data on BD pharmacokinetics in the human, the rat and mouse models were parameterized to the extent possible on the basis of in vitro metabolic data. Where it was necessary to use in vivo data, extrapolation from rat to mouse was performed to evaluate the level of uncertainty in the human model. A kidney compartment and description of downstream metabolism were also included in the model to allow for eventual use of available urinary and blood biomarker data in animals and humans to calibrate the model for estimation of BD exposures and internal metabolite levels. Results from simulated inhalation exposures to BD indicate that incorporation of differential lung region metabolism is important in describing species differences in pulmonary response and that these differences may have implications for risk assessments of human exposures to BD. PMID:26079054

  5. A preliminary regional PBPK model of lung metabolism for improving species dependent descriptions of 1,3-butadiene and its metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Jerry; Van Landingham, Cynthia; Crowell, Susan; Gentry, Robinan; Kaden, Debra; Fiebelkorn, Stacy; Loccisano, Anne; Clewell, Harvey

    2015-06-12

    1,3-Butadiene (BD), a volatile organic chemical (VOC), is used in synthetic rubber production and other industrial processes. It is detectable at low levels in ambient air as well as in tobacco smoke and gasoline vapors. Inhalation exposures to high concentrations of BD have been associated with lung cancer in both humans and experimental animals, although differences in species sensitivity have been observed. Metabolically active lung cells such as Pulmonary Type I and Type II epithelial cells and club cells (Clara cells)1 are potential targets of BD metabolite-induced toxicity. Metabolic capacities of these cells, their regional densities, and distributions vary throughout the respiratory tract as well as between species and cell types. Here we present a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for BD that includes a regional model of lung metabolism, based on a previous model for styrene, to provide species-dependent descriptions of BD metabolism in the mouse, rat, and human. Since there are no in vivo data on BD pharmacokinetics in the human, the rat and mouse models were parameterized to the extent possible on the basis of in vitro metabolic data. Where it was necessary to use in vivo data, extrapolation from rat to mouse was performed to evaluate the level of uncertainty in the human model. A kidney compartment and description of downstream metabolism were also included in the model to allow for eventual use of available urinary and blood biomarker data in animals and humans to calibrate the model for estimation of BD exposures and internal metabolite levels. Results from simulated inhalation exposures to BD indicate that incorporation of differential lung region metabolism is important in describing species differences in pulmonary response and that these differences may have implications for risk assessments of human exposures to BD.

  6. A preliminary regional PBPK model of lung metabolism for improving species dependent descriptions of 1,3-butadiene and its metabolites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Campbell, Jerry; Van Landingham, Cynthia; Crowell, Susan; Gentry, Robinan; Kaden, Debra; Fiebelkorn, Stacy; Loccisano, Anne; Clewell, Harvey

    2015-06-12

    1,3-Butadiene (BD), a volatile organic chemical (VOC), is used in synthetic rubber production and other industrial processes. It is detectable at low levels in ambient air as well as in tobacco smoke and gasoline vapors. Inhalation exposures to high concentrations of BD have been associated with lung cancer in both humans and experimental animals, although differences in species sensitivity have been observed. Metabolically active lung cells such as Pulmonary Type I and Type II epithelial cells and club cells (Clara cells)1 are potential targets of BD metabolite-induced toxicity. Metabolic capacities of these cells, their regional densities, and distributions vary throughoutmore » the respiratory tract as well as between species and cell types. Here we present a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for BD that includes a regional model of lung metabolism, based on a previous model for styrene, to provide species-dependent descriptions of BD metabolism in the mouse, rat, and human. Since there are no in vivo data on BD pharmacokinetics in the human, the rat and mouse models were parameterized to the extent possible on the basis of in vitro metabolic data. Where it was necessary to use in vivo data, extrapolation from rat to mouse was performed to evaluate the level of uncertainty in the human model. A kidney compartment and description of downstream metabolism were also included in the model to allow for eventual use of available urinary and blood biomarker data in animals and humans to calibrate the model for estimation of BD exposures and internal metabolite levels. Results from simulated inhalation exposures to BD indicate that incorporation of differential lung region metabolism is important in describing species differences in pulmonary response and that these differences may have implications for risk assessments of human exposures to BD.« less

  7. Studies of plastic crystal gel polymer electrolytes based on poly(vinylidene chloride-co-acrylonitrile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambali, D.; Zainuddin, Z.; Supa'at, I.; Osman, Z.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we have prepared systems of poly(vinylidene chloride-co-acrylonitrile) (PVdC-co-AN) based gel polymer electrolytes (GPEs) which are single plasticized-GPEs and double plasticized-GPEs. Both systems comprised plastic crystal succinonitrile SN to form plastic crystal gel polymer electrolyte (PGPE) films. The ionic conductivity of the PGPE films were analysed by means of a.c. impedance spectroscopy at room temperature as well as at the temperature range of 303 K to 353 K. The temperature dependence ionic conductivity was found to obey the VTF rule. To study the interactions among the constituents in the PGPEs, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was carried out and hence, the complexation between them has also been confirmed.

  8. Dielectric Relaxation Behavior of Poly(acrylonitrile-co-methacrylonitrile) Microcapsules Dispersed in a Silicone Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Taigyoo; OBrien, Emmett; Lizotte, Jeremy R.; Glass, Thomas E.; Ward, Thomas C.; Long, Timothy E.; Leo, Donald J.

    2006-01-01

    The dielectric relaxation behavior of poly(acrylonitrile-co-methacrylonitrile) dispersed in a cured polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) matrix as microcapsules was investigated over multiple thermal cycles and at varying concentrations. The copolymer microcapsules contained an isopentane core. In the PDMS matrix this copolymer displayed a pronounced relaxation signal at temperatures above the glass transition of the copolymers due to Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars (MWS) relaxation. The mechanism of MWS relaxation interpreted by the Havriliak-Negami and Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts relaxation functions was found to be very similar to previous studies of neat polyacrylonitrile and its copolymer. The activation energy of the relaxation decreased over successive thermal cycling coincident with a decreasing strength of the relaxation. These observations were attributed to the decreasing concentration of nitrile groups due to intramolecular cyclizations.

  9. Synthesis and flocculation properties of gum ghatti and poly(acrylamide-co-acrylonitrile) based biodegradable hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Hemant; Jindal, Rajeev; Kaith, Balbir Singh; Maity, Arjun; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2014-12-19

    This article reports the development of biodegradable flocculants based on graft co-polymers of gum ghatti (Gg) and a mixture of acrylamide and acrylonitrile co-monomers (AAm-co-AN). The hydrogel polymer exhibited an excellent swelling capacity of 921% in neutral medium at 60°C. The polymer was used to remove saline water from various petroleum fraction-saline water emulsions. The flocculation characteristics of the hydrogel polymer were studied in turbid kaolin solution as a function of the amount of polymer and the solution temperature and pH. Biodegradation studies of hydrogel polymer were conducted using the soil composting method, and the degradation process was constantly monitored using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The results demonstrated an 89.47% degradation of the polymer after 60 days. Finally, the hydrogel polymer adsorbed 98% of cationic dyes from the aqueous solutions. PMID:25263897

  10. (E)-3-Anilino-2-benzoyl-3-(methyl­sulfan­yl)acrylonitrile

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A.; Ghabbour, Hazem A.; Chantrapromma, Suchada; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2012-01-01

    In the title acrylonitrile derivative, C17H14N2OS, the central amino­acryl­aldehyde O=C—C=C—NH unit, wherein an intra­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bond generates an S(6) ring motif, is approximately planar, with an r.m.s. deviation of 0.0234 (2) Å for the five non-H atoms. This plane makes dihedral angles of 41.04 (9) and 84.86 (10)° with the two phenyl rings. The dihedral angle between the two phenyl rings is 54.82 (10)°. An intra­molecular C—H⋯N hydrogen bond is also present. In the crystal, weak C—H⋯π and π–π inter­actions, with a centroid–centroid distance of 3.8526 (14) Å, are observed. PMID:22606198

  11. [Study of amount of evaporation residue in extracts from plastic kitchen utensils into four food-simulating solvents].

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Masako; Kawamura, Yoko

    2011-01-01

    The amount of evaporation residue was investigated as an index of total amount of non-volatile substances that migrated from plastic kitchen utensils into four food-simulating solvents (water, 4% acetic acid, 20% ethanol and heptane). The samples were 71 products made of 12 types of plastics for food contact use. The amount was determined in accordance with the Japanese testing method. The quantitation limit was 5 µg/mL. In the cases of polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, acrylonitrile styrene resin, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene resin, polyvinyl chloride, polyvinylidene chloride, polymethylpentene, polymethylmethacrylate and polyethylene terephthalate samples, the amount was highest for heptane and very low for the other solvents. On the other hand, in the cases of melamine resin and polyamide samples, the amount was highest for 4% acetic acid or 20% ethanol and lowest for heptane. These results enabled the selection of the most suitable solvent, and the rapid and efficient determination of evaporation residue. PMID:21383537

  12. Photoinitiated decomposition of substituted ethylenes: The photodissociation of vinyl chloride and acrylonitrile at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, D.A.; Suits, A.G.; Lee, Y.T.

    1997-04-01

    Ethylene and its substituted analogues (H{sub 2}CCHX) are important molecules in hydrogen combustion. As the simplest {pi}-bonded hydrocarbons these molecules serve as prototypical systems for understanding the decomposition of this important class of compounds. The authors have used the technique of photofragment translational spectroscopy at beamline 9.0.2.1 to investigate the dissociation of vinyl chloride (X=Cl) and acrylonitrile (X=CN) following absorption at 193 nm. The technique uses a molecular beam of the reactant seeded in helium which is crossed at 90 degrees with the output of an excimer laser operating on the ArF transition, 193.3 nm. The neutral photoproducts which recoil out of the molecular beam travel 15.1 cm where they are photoionized by the VUV undulator radiation, mass selected, and counted as a function of time. The molecular beam source is rotatable about the axis of the dissociation laser. The authors have directly observed all four of the following dissociation channels for both systems: (1) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} H + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}X; (2) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} X + C{sub 2}H{sub 3}; (3) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} H{sub 2} + C{sub 2}HX; and (4) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} HX + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. They measured translational energy distributions for all of the observed channels and measured the photoionization onset for many of the photoproducts which provided information about their chemical identity and internal energy content. In the case of acrylonitrile, selective product photoionization provided the ability to discriminate between channels 2 and 4 which result in the same product mass combination.

  13. Covalent immobilization of glucose oxidase onto new modified acrylonitrile copolymer/silica gel hybrid supports.

    PubMed

    Godjevargova, Tzonka; Nenkova, Ruska; Dimova, Nedyalka

    2005-08-12

    New polymer/silica gel hybrid supports were prepared by coating high surface area of silica gel with modified acrylonitrile copolymer. The concentrations of the modifying agent (NaOH) and the modified polymer were varied. GOD was covalently immobilized on these hybrid supports and the relative activity and the amount of bound protein were determined. The highest relative activity and sufficient amount of bound protein of the immobilized GOD were achieved in 10% NaOH and 2% solution of modified acrylonitrile copolymer. The influence of glutaraldehyde concentration and the storage time on enzyme efficiency were examined. Glutaraldehyde concentration of 0.5% is optimal for the immobilized GOD. It was shown that the covalently bound enzyme (using 0.5% glutaraldehyde) had higher relative activity than the activity of the adsorbed enzyme. Covalently immobilized GOD with 0.5% glutaraldehyde was more stable for four months in comparison with the one immobilized on pure silica gel, hybrid support with 10% glutaraldehyde and the free enzyme. The effect of the pore size on the enzyme efficiency was studied on four types of silica gel with different pore size. Silica with large pores (CPC-Silica carrier, 375 A) presented higher relative activity than those with smaller pore size (Silica gel with 4, 40 and 100 A). The amount of bound protein was also reduced with decreasing the pore size. The effect of particle size was studied and it was found out that the smaller the particle size was, the greater the activity and the amount of immobilized enzyme were. The obtained results proved that these new polymer/silica gel hybrid supports were suitable for GOD immobilization. PMID:16080168

  14. Influence of temperature on styrene emission from a vinyl ester resin thermoset composite material.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Shaun; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2011-08-15

    Composite materials made with vinyl ester resins are lighter, stronger and corrosion resistant compared to most metals, and are increasingly being used as building materials and in public transportation. Styrene monomer is used as both a diluent and strengthener in the production of vinyl ester resin (VER) composites. Some researchers contend that free styrene in VER composites is available to diffuse out of the material into air, perhaps leading to adverse health effects via inhalation exposures in humans, yet there is no known data on styrene emissions from these materials in the literature. In this study, a typical VER composite made with resin containing 38% by weight styrene, reinforced with E-glass fiber and formed using a vacuum assisted resin transfer method was characterized for styrene emissions by environmental test chamber (ETC) methodology. Styrene concentrations in the ETC were measured over a temperature range of 10 to 50 °C. Initial evaporative styrene emissions increase with increasing temperature. There is a nearly linear relationship in the total mass of styrene emitted and emission factor as emissions increase with increasing temperature. Styrene emission factors appear to vary for different materials, which could indicate more complex processes or the influence of material physical properties on emission rates. These results can be used to validate and improve mass transfer emission models for the prediction of volatile organic compound concentrations in indoor environments. PMID:21689842

  15. Evaluation of long-term occupational exposure to styrene vapor on olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Pamela; Lees, Peter S J; Gould, Michele; Dilks, Daniel; Stefaniak, Aleksandr; Bader, Michael; Ihrig, Andreas; Triebig, Gerhard

    2007-10-01

    The primary sensory neurons of the olfactory system are chronically exposed to the ambient environment and may therefore be susceptible to damage from occupational exposure to many volatile chemicals. To investigate whether occupational exposure to styrene was associated with olfactory impairment, we examined olfactory function in 2 groups: workers in a German reinforced-plastics boat-manufacturing facility having a minimum of 2 years of styrene exposure (15-25 ppm as calculated from urinary metabolite concentrations, with historical exposures up to 85 ppm) and a group of age-matched workers from the same facility with lower styrene exposures. The results were also compared with normative data previously collected from healthy, unexposed individuals. Multiple measures of olfactory function were evaluated using a standardized battery of clinical assessments from the Monell-Jefferson Chemosensory Clinical Research Center that included tests of threshold sensitivity for phenylethyl alcohol (PEA) and odor identification ability. Thresholds for styrene were also obtained as a measure of occupational olfactory adaptation. Styrene exposure history was calculated through the use of past biological monitoring results for urinary metabolites of styrene (mandelic acid [MA], phenylglyoxylic acid [PGA]); current exposure was determined for each individual using passive air sampling for styrene and biological monitoring for styrene urinary metabolites. Current mean effective styrene exposure during the day of olfactory testing for the group of workers who worked directly with styrene resins was 18 ppm styrene (standard deviation [SD] = 14), 371 g/g creatinine MA + PGA (SD = 289) and that of the group of workers with lower exposures was 4.8 ppm (SD = 5.2), 93 g/g creatinine MA+PGA (SD = 100). Historic annual average exposures for all workers were greater by a factor of up to 6x. No differences unequivocally attributable to exposure status were observed between the Exposed and Comparison groups or between performance of either group and normative population values on thresholds for PEA or odor identification. Although odor identification performance was lower among workers with higher ongoing exposures, performance on this test is not a pure measure of olfactory ability and is influenced by familiarity with the stimuli and their sources. Consistent with exposure-induced sensory adaptation, however, elevated styrene thresholds were significantly associated with higher occupational exposures to styrene. In summary, the present study found no evidence among a cross-section of reinforced-plastics workers that current or historical exposure to styrene was associated with a general impairment of olfactory function. When taken together with prior studies of styrene-exposed workers, these results suggest that styrene is not a significant olfactory toxicant in humans at current exposure levels. PMID:17602142

  16. Antibacterial activity of poly(vinyl alcohol)-b-poly(acrylonitrile) based micelles loaded with silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bryaskova, Rayna; Pencheva, Daniela; Kyulavska, Mariya; Bozukova, Dimitriya; Debuigne, Antoine; Detrembleur, Christophe

    2010-04-15

    A new amphiphilic poly(vinyl alcohol)-b-poly(acrylonitrile) (PVOH-b-PAN) copolymer obtained by selective hydrolysis of well-defined poly(vinyl acetate)-b-poly(acrylonitrile) copolymer synthesized by cobalt mediated radical polymerization was used for the preparation of PVOH-b-PAN based micelles with embedded silver nanoparticles. The successful formation of silver loaded micelles has been confirmed by UV-vis, DLS and TEM analysis and their antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and spore solution of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) has been studied. PVOH-b-PAN based micelles with embedded silver nanoparticles showed a strong bactericidal effect against E. coli, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa and the minimum bactericidal concentration for each system (MBC) has been determined. PMID:20074742

  17. An evaluation of concentrations of styrene-7,8-oxide in rats and humans resulting from exposure to styrene or styrene-7,8-oxide and potential genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Filser, Johannes Georg; Gelbke, Heinz-Peter

    2016-04-15

    There is potential for oral exposure of humans to styrene (ST) such as from migration of residual levels in polystyrene food containers. After absorption, ST is metabolised to styrene-7,8-oxide (SO), an alkylating epoxide. Hence, a comparison of blood burdens of SO resulting from oral exposures to ST was made with SO burdens possibly warranting genotoxic concern. A validated physiological toxicokinetic model was used for the assessment. Model calculations predicted for exposures to ST that maximum concentrations of SO in venous blood of rats and humans should not exceed 0.33μg/ml and 0.036μg/ml, respectively, because of saturation of the SO formation from ST. The daily area under the concentration-time curve of SO in venous blood (AUCSO) was directly proportional to the dose of ST (mg/kg body weight; BW), independent of the exposure route (inhalation or oral exposure). In resting humans, the daily AUCSO was about half that in rats at the same amount of ST/kg BW (calculated up to 100mg ST/kg BW in humans). Taking into account the results of cytogenetic studies in ST-exposed rats, it was deduced that no genotoxic effects of SO are to be expected in ST-exposed humans, at least up to a daily amount of 100mg ST/kg BW, which is equivalent to 100 times the amount originating from the Overall Migration Limit in the EU for ST migrating from food contact plastics. Therefore, no potential genotoxic concern is predicted for ST uptake from food packaging, based on the reported combined measured and modelled data. PMID:26851640

  18. Genetic and reproductive toxicity of butadiene and isoprene.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D

    2001-06-01

    Butadiene (BD) and its 2-methyl analogue, isoprene, have been extensively studied in animals and BD in population studies. Both chemicals are metabolised by liver cytochrome P450 dependent monogenases to monoepoxide and diepoxide intermediates. The diepoxide intermediates of both compounds were mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium. However, unlike the monoepoxide of BD, the monoepoxides of isoprene were not mutagenic. It appears that they have no alkylating capacity. BD did not induce somatic cell mutation and recombination or sex-linked recessive lethal mutation in Drosophila melanogaster and isoprene produced no increase in chromosomal aberrations in CHO cells in vitro. Comparative concentrations of haemoglobin adducts in the blood of mice and rats after exposure to BD indicated that reaction with blood may decrease the levels of reactive intermediates available to tissues in rats, but not in mice contributing to greater potency of BD in the mouse. For isoprene, the adducts reach approximately the same concentrations in both species. DNA adducts have also been detected in testicular and lung cells of mice after BD exposure. The level of epoxybutene haemoglobin adducts was significantly elevated in BD-exposed workers, but lower than in rats and mice. In conjunction with the toxicology and carcinogenesis studies for BD and isoprene, additional mice were included for the evaluation of cytogenetic effects. Both chemicals produced increases in sister chromatid exchanges in bone marrow cells and in the frequency of micronuclei in normochromatic and polychromatic erythrocytes, but only BD produced an increase in the percent of bone marrow cells with chromosomal aberrations. At similar doses, the effects with BD were 2-3 times larger than with isoprene. There were also increased hprt mutation frequencies in rats and mice after BD exposure. Biomonitoring studies with hprt mutations in lymphocytes showed conflicting results, with both positive and negative findings. BD has been shown to be positive in one human cytogenetic biomonitoring study and not in three others, but chromosomal aberrations were increased in BD-exposed workers after challenge with gamma rays. Re-analysis of GSTTI null individuals showed positive results. There was an increase in spermatid micronuclei in mice by BD and its metabolites and in rats only by its metabolites. The cytotoxic response of germ cells in mice is greater than in rats. Dominant lethal mutations have been induced by BD and diepoxybutane, but not by epoxybutene. There was some evidence of congenital malformations in mice after BD exposure and there was a linear concentration-related induction of heritable translocations in mice. There was no induction of dominant lethal mutations or congenital malformations in rats. Using the heritable translocation data in mice, it has been determined that if a worker is continually exposed over 5 or 6 weeks to 20-25 ppm of BD, the risk of producing a child with a balanced reciprocal translocation is twice as high as the background risk. Since genetic damage cannot be measured directly in human germ cells, risk to such cells can also be estimated from germ cells and somatic cells of the mouse and human somatic cells using the parallelogram approach. Using doubling doses, the fourth corner of the parallelogram was calculated as a doubling dose for human germ cells of 4390 ppm/h. However, it is still questioned if man is more like rat than mouse in terms of sensitivity to exposure. Similar germ cell data do not exist for isoprene. In conventional developmental studies, where rats and mice were exposed to BD, maternal toxicity was shown in rats but there was no evidence of developmental toxicity or teratogenic effects and there was a small effect on sperm morphology. After exposure to isoprene, there was no adverse effect on rat dams or other reproductive indices. In mice, there was reduced foetal body weight and decreased maternal weight gain and isoprene also affected ovarian follicles. There was a reduction in testicular function parameters such as testicular weight and sperm motility. PMID:11397382

  19. Enantioselective cyclopropanation of (Z)-3-substituted-2-(4-pyridyl)-acrylonitriles catalyzed by Cinchona ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Del Fiandra, Claudia; Moccia, Maria; Adamo, Mauro F A

    2016-03-21

    Cyclopropane esters holding two quaternary centres were prepared in high yields, complete diastereoselection and up to 83% ee. The reaction described herein entailed reacting (Z)-3-substituted-2-(4-pyridyl)-acrylonitrile, a reactive class of Michael acceptor, with 2-bromomalonate esters in the presence of Cinchona derived phase-transfer catalysts. The reaction allowed multi-gram preparation of the desired products. PMID:26906250

  20. Cooxidation of styrene by horseradish peroxidase and phenols. A biochemical model for protein-mediated cooxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.; Grab, L.A.

    1987-08-25

    Styrene is oxidized to styrene oxide and benzaldehyde when incubated with horseradish peroxidase, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, and 4-methylphenol. Styrene oxide is not formed in the absence of any of these reaction components or of molecular oxygen. The coupling products 2-(4-methylphenoxy)-1-phenylethane, 2-(4-methylphenoxy)-1-phenylethan-1-ol, and 2-(4-methylphenoxy)-2-phenylethan-1-ol are not formed, but the ortho-linked dimer of 4-methylphenol is a major product. The epoxide oxygen is labeled in the presence of /sup 18/O/sub 2/ but not H/sub 2/ /sup 18/O/sub 2/. Styrene oxide formation is not inhibited by mannitol or superoxide dismutase. The stereochemistry of trans-(1-/sup 2/H)styrene is partially scrambled in the epoxide product. EPR signals attributable to the 2,4-dihydroxyl-5-methylphenoxy radical, a product of the oxidation of 4-methylcatechol, are observed if Zn/sup 2 +/ is added to stabilize the radical. This radical is only detected in the presence of styrene. The results imply that styrene is epoxidized by the hydroperoxy radical generated by addition of molecular oxygen to the 4-methylphenoxy radical. The epoxidation mimics the chemistry proposed to occur in the protein-mediated cooxidation of styrene by hemoglobin and myoglobin.

  1. POTENTIAL FOR REDUCING INDOOR STYRENE EXPOSURE FROM COPIED PAPER THROUGH USE OF LOW-EMITTING TONERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tests were conducted, using 53-L dynamic chambers, to determine airborne styrene emission rates over time from freshly copied paper. Copies were produced on a single photocopier, using two toners manufactured for this copier but having different styrene contents. The resulting em...

  2. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  3. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  4. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  5. Letter to the Editor: Styrene-producing microbes in food-stuff

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An article was published in Journal of Food Science, August 2009 (Vol. 74, Nr 6) entitled “Natural formation of styrene by cinnamon mold flora”. In the article, the authors reported on the production of styrene from several fungi typically found on cinnamon, and used cinnamic acid and similar analog...

  6. Initiation precursors and initiators in laser-induced copolymerization of styrene and maleic anhydride in acetone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, Gilda A.; Meador, Willard E.; Chang, C. Ken

    1990-01-01

    The initiation step of photopolymerized styrene/maleic anhydride copolymer was investigated at 365 nm. UV absorption measurements provide decisive evidence that the styrene/maleic anhydride charge transfer complex is the sole absorbing species; however, key laser experiments suggest intermediate reactions lead to a monoradical initiating species. A mechanism for the photoinitiation step of the copolymer is proposed.

  7. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  8. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  9. Ultrathin CuO nanorods: controllable synthesis and superior catalytic properties in styrene epoxidation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Wei; Liu, Yuxi; Hu, Pengfei; Yu, Rong; Wang, Yu; Ma, Lei; Wang, Dingsheng; Li, Yadong

    2015-05-25

    Ultrathin copper oxide (CuO) nanorods with diameters of ∼3.6 nm were obtained in one step using oleylamine (OAm) as both the solvent and the surface controller. The oriented attachment is responsible for the formation of the ultrathin CuO nanorods. Furthermore, this ultrathin nanostructure catalyst exhibited excellent activity and high styrene oxide yields in styrene epoxidation. PMID:25920405

  10. EVALUATION OF TRICKLE-BED AIR BIOFILTER PERFORMANCE FOR STYRENE REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot-scale trickle-bed air biofilter (TBAB) was evaluated for the removal of styrene from a waste gas stream. Six-millimeter (6 mm) Celite pellets (R-635) were used as the biological attachment medium. The operating parameters considered in the study included the styrene vol...

  11. Physiological Analysis of the Expression of the Styrene Degradation Gene Cluster in Pseudomonas fluorescens ST

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Pedro Miguel; Blatny, Janet Martha; Di Bartolo, Ilaria; Valla, Svein; Zennaro, Elisabetta

    2000-01-01

    The effects of different carbon sources on expression of the styrene catabolism genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens ST were analyzed by using a promoter probe vector, pPR9TT, which contains transcription terminators upstream and downstream of the β-galactosidase reporter system. Expression of the promoter of the stySR operon, which codes for the styrene two-component regulatory system, was found to be constitutive and not subject to catabolite repression. This was confirmed by the results of an analysis of the stySR transcript in P. fluorescens ST cells grown on different carbon sources. The promoter of the operon of the upper pathway, designated PstyA, was induced by styrene and repressed to different extents by organic acids or carbohydrates. In particular, cells grown on succinate or lactate in the presence of styrene started to exhibit β-galactosidase activity during the mid-exponential growth phase, before the preferred carbon sources were depleted, indicating that there is a threshold succinate and lactate concentration which allows induction of styrene catabolic genes. In contrast, cells grown on glucose, acetate, or glutamate and styrene exhibited a diauxic growth curve, and β-galactosidase activity was detected only after the end of the exponential growth phase. In each experiment the reliability of the reporter system constructed was verified by comparing the β-galactosidase activity and the activity of the styrene monooxygenase encoded by the first gene of the styrene catabolic operon. PMID:10742204

  12. EVALUATION OF STYRENE EMISSIONS FROM A SHOWER STALL/BATHTUB MANUFACTURING FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of emissions measurements carried out at a representative facility (Eljer Plumbingware in Wilson, NC) that manufactures polyester-resin-reinforced shower stalls and bathtubs by spraying styrene-based resins onto molds in vented, open, spray booths. Styren...

  13. 40 CFR 721.3700 - Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3700 Section 721.3700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3700 Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol... chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

  14. 40 CFR 721.3700 - Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3700 Section 721.3700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3700 Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol... chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

  15. 40 CFR 721.3700 - Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3700 Section 721.3700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3700 Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol... chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

  16. 40 CFR 721.3700 - Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3700 Section 721.3700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3700 Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol... chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

  17. 40 CFR 721.3700 - Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3700 Section 721.3700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3700 Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol... chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene...

  18. ADDENDUM TO ASSESSMENT OF STYRENE EMISSION CONTROLS FOR FRP/C AND BOAT BUILDING INDUSTRIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is an addendum to a 1996 report, Assessment of Styrene Emission Controls for FRP/C and Boat Building Industries. It presents additional evaluation of the biological treatment of styrene emissions, Dow Chemical Company's Sorbathene solvent vapor recovery system, Occupa...

  19. AN EMPIRICAL MODEL TO PREDICT STYRENE EMISSIONS FROM FIBER-REINFORCED PLASTICS FABRICATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Styrene is a designated hazardous air pollutant, per the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. It is also a tropospheric ozone precursor. Fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP) fabrication is the primary source of anthropogenic styrene emissions in the United States. This paper describes an em...

  20. Acid-catalyzed ortho-alkylation of anilines with styrenes: an improved route to chiral anilines with bulky substituents.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Anna E; Domski, Gregory J; Rose, Jeffrey M; Lobkovsky, Emil B; Coates, Geoffrey W

    2005-11-10

    [reaction: see text] Reaction of para-substituted anilines with styrene derivatives at elevated temperatures, when catalyzed by CF3SO3H, results in highly chemoselective ortho-alkylation of the aniline. When R = H, dialkylation can be achieved by varying the ratio of styrene to aniline. Several different substituted anilines and styrenes were examined, and good yields (42-87%) were obtained, except in the case where electron-withdrawing substituents are present on the styrene. PMID:16268521

  1. Palladium-Catalyzed Telomerization of Butadiene with Polyols: From Mono to Polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouquillon, Sandrine; Muzart, Jacques; Pinel, Catherine; Rataboul, Franck

    The telomerization of butadiene with alcohols is an elegant way to synthesize ethers with minimal environmental impact since this reaction is 100% atom efficient. Besides telomerization of butadiene with methanol and water that is industrially developed, the modification of polyols is still under development. Recently, a series of new substrates has been involved in this reaction, including diols, pure or crude glycerol, protected or unprotected monosaccharides, as well as polysaccharides. This opens up the formation of new products having specific physicochemical properties. We will describe recent advances in this field, focusing on the reaction of renewable products and more specifically on saccharides. The efficient catalytic systems as well as the optimized reaction conditions will be described and some physicochemical properties of the products will be reported.

  2. 3-Aryl-2-[1H-benzotriazol-1-yl]acrylonitriles: a novel class of potent tubulin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Carta, Antonio; Briguglio, Irene; Piras, Sandra; Boatto, Giampiero; La Colla, Paolo; Loddo, Roberta; Tolomeo, Manlio; Grimaudo, Stefania; Di Cristina, Antonietta; Pipitone, Rosaria Maria; Laurini, Erik; Paneni, Maria Silvia; Posocco, Paola; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Pricl, Sabrina

    2011-09-01

    During a screening for compounds that could act against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a series of new cellular antiproliferative agents was identified. The most cytotoxic molecules were evaluated against a panel of human cell lines derived from hematological and solid human tumors. In particular, (E)-2-(1H-benzo[d] [1,2,3]triazol-1-yl)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)acrylonitrile (1) was found to be of a potency comparable to etoposide and greater than 6-mercaptopurine in all cell lines tested. Accordingly, a synthesis of a new series of (E)-2-(5,6-dichloro-1H-benzo[d] [1,2,3]triazol-1-yl)-3-(4-R-phenyl)acrylonitriles was conducted in order to extend the studies of structure-activity relationship (SAR) for this class of molecules. With the aim to evaluate if 3-aryl-2-[1H-benzotriazol-1-yl]acrylonitriles were able to act like tubulin binding agents, the effects on cell cycle distribution of the most active compounds (1, 2a, 3 and 4) were analyzed in K562 cells. A detailed molecular modeling study of the putative binding mode of this series of compounds on tubulin is also reported. PMID:21741130

  3. Acrylonitrile Quenching of Trp Phosphorescence in Proteins: A Probe of the Internal Flexibility of the Globular Fold

    PubMed Central

    Strambini, Giovanni B.; Gonnelli, Margherita

    2010-01-01

    Quenching of Trp phosphorescence in proteins by diffusion of solutes of various molecular sizes unveils the frequency-amplitude of structural fluctuations. To cover the sizes gap between O2 and acrylamide, we examined the potential of acrylonitrile to probe conformational flexibility of proteins. The distance dependence of the through-space acrylonitrile quenching rate was determined in a glass at 77 K, with the indole analog 2-(3-indoyl) ethyl phenyl ketone. Intensity and decay kinetics data were fitted to a rate, k(r) = k0 exp[−(r − r0)/re], with an attenuation length re = 0.03 nm and a contact rate k0 = 3.6 × 1010 s−1. At ambient temperature, the bimolecular quenching rate constant (kq) was determined for a series of proteins, appositely selected to test the importance of factors such as the degree of Trp burial and structural rigidity. Relative to kq = 1.9 × 109 M−1s−1 for free Trp in water, in proteins kq ranged from 6.5 × 106 M−1s−1 for superficial sites to 1.3 × 102 M−1s−1 for deep cores. The short-range nature of the interaction and the direct correlation between kq and structural flexibility attest that in the microsecond-second timescale of phosphorescence acrylonitrile readily penetrates even compact protein cores and exhibits significant sensitivity to variations in dynamical structure of the globular fold. PMID:20682273

  4. Chemical recycling of waste polystyrene into styrene over solid acids and bases

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Hirose, Tamaki; Nishio, Suehiro; Morioka, Yoshio; Azuma, Naoto; Ueno, Akifumi; Ohkita, Hironobu; Okada, Mitsunori

    1995-12-01

    Catalytic degradation of waste polystyrene into styrene was studied using solid acids and bases as catalysts. Partially because of the high yield of distillates from polystyrene and partially because of the high selectivity into styrene in the distillates, solid bases were emphasized to be effective catalysts for the chemical recycling of waste polystyrene. Since there were significant differences in the compositions of distillates yielded on solid acids and bases, degradation mechanisms to styrene and other products on these materials were also briefly discussed. Finally, in order to make a design for disassembly of waste polystyrene into styrene, barium oxide powders, the most effective catalyst for the chemical recycling of waste polystyrene, were dispersed into polystyrene pieces when molded into thin films. Thermal degradation of these films in styrene was successfully carried out without the assistance of any other catalytic compounds.

  5. Thermal annealing effects on the physical properties of styrenic pentablock ionomers and their electromechanical responses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang-Woo; Lee, Jin Hong; Kim, Minho; Hong, Soon Man; Koo, Chong Min

    2013-05-01

    Thermal annealing effect on the physical properties of two ionic (poly((t-butyl-styrene)-b-(ethylene-r-propylene)-b-(styrene-r-styrene sulfonate)-b-(ethylene-r-propylene)-b-(t-butyl-styrene (SSPB) pentablock copolymers with different ion exchange capacities (IEC; 1.5 and 2.0 meq/g) and their electromechanical responses in ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) devices have been investigated. The ionic SSPB formed the microphase-separated morphology on the several tens nanometer scale and the selectively sulfonated styrene middle blocks formed the ionic channels through which ions can pass in the membrane. The thermal annealing at a high temperature led to the well developed interconnectivity between adjacent ionic channels, and thus enhanced the ion conductivity and mechanical strength of membranes, resulting in an actuation enhancement of the SSPB-based ionic actuator. PMID:23858912

  6. Proton exchange membranes prepared by grafting of styrene/divinylbenzene into crosslinked PTFE membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingye; Ichizuri, Shogo; Asano, Saneto; Mutou, Fumihiro; Ikeda, Shigetoshi; Iida, Minoru; Miura, Takaharu; Oshima, Akihiro; Tabata, Yoneho; Washio, Masakazu

    2005-07-01

    Thin PTFE membranes were prepared by coating the PTFE dispersion onto the aluminum films. Thus the thin crosslinked PTFE (RX-PTFE) membranes were obtained by means of electron beam irradiation above the melting temperature of PTFE under oxygen-free atmosphere. The RX-PTFE membranes were pre-irradiated and grafted by styrene with or without divinylbenzene (DVB) in liquid phase. The existence of DVB accelerated the initial grafting rate. The styrene grafted RX-PTFE membranes are white colored, on the other hand, the styrene/DVB grafted RX-PTFE membranes are colorless. The proton exchange membranes (PEMs) were obtained by sulfonating the grafted membranes using chlorosulfonic acid. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) values of the PEMs ranging from 1.5 to 2.8 meq/g were obtained. The PEMs made from the styrene/DVB grafted membranes showed higher chemical stability than those of the styrene grafted membranes under oxidative circumstance.

  7. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of 1,3-butadiene in mice: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, P.L.; Sikov, M.R.; Mast, T.J.; Brown, M.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Clark, M.L.; Decker, J.R.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Rowe, S.E.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1987-11-01

    Maternal toxicity, reproductive performance and developmental toxicology were evaluated in CD-1 mice following whole-body, inhalation exposures to 0, 40, 200 and 1000 ppM of 1,3-butadiene. The female mice, which had mated with unexposed males were exposed to the chemical for 6 hours/day on 6 through 15 dg and sacrificed on 18 dg. Maternal animals were weighed prior to mating and on 0, 6, 11 and 18 dg; the mice were observed for mortality, morbidity and signs of toxicity during exposure and examined for gross tissue abnormalities at necropsy. Live fetuses were weighed and subjected to external, visceral and skeletal examinations to detect growth retardation and morphologic anomalies. Significant concentration-related decreases were detected in a number of maternal body weight measures. There was a significant concentration-related depression of fetal body weights and placental weights. Body weights of male fetuses of all exposed groups were significantly lower than values for control fetuses; weights of female fetuses were significantly depressed in the mice exposed to 200 and 1000 ppM. In the 200- and 1000-ppM exposure groups, weights of placentas of male fetuses were significantly decreased, but placental weights of female fetuses were significantly affected only in litters exposed to the highest 1,3-butadiene concentration. This exposure regimen produced significant signs of maternal toxicity at concentrations of 200 and 1000 ppM 1,3-butadiene.

  8. Inhalation toxicity and carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, P E; Glaister, J R

    1990-01-01

    A 2-year inhalation study was conducted in Sprague-Dawley rats with 1,3-butadiene. Groups of 110 male and 110 female rats inhaled 1,3-butadiene at 0, 1000, or 8000 ppm for 6hr/day, 5 days/week. Interim clinical pathology, neuromuscular, and histopathology investigations were carried out. The study terminated at 20 to 25% survival (105 weeks for females, 111 weeks for males). Following exposure to 1,3-butadiene there were no effects on hematology, blood chemistry, urine analysis, and neuromuscular function that definitely could be associated with treatment. Treatment was associated with changes in clinical condition, suppression of body weight gain, reduced survival, and increases in certain organ weights and in both common and uncommon tumor types. Although the biological interpretation of the significance of some of the tumor types is equivocal, the evidence suggests that the test article is an oncogen to the rat under the conditions of exposure used in this study, and the mechanism is more likely to be an indirect effect through the endocrine system, rather than a direct effect through the production of reactive metabolites. PMID:2401255

  9. Synthesis and Mutagenesis of the Butadiene-derived N3 2′-deoxyuridine adducts

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Priscilla H.; Hackfeld, Linda C.; Kozekov, Ivan D.; Hodge, Richard P.; Lloyd, R. Stephen

    2008-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene is a known carcinogen and mutagen that acts through a variety of metabolic intermediates that react with DNA, forming stable and unstable lesions on dG, dA, dC and dT. The N3 2′-deoxyuridine adducts are a highly stable, stereoisomeric mixture of adducts derived from the reaction of cytosine with the monoepoxide metabolite of butadiene, followed by spontaneous deamination. In this study, the phosphoramidites and subsequent oligodeoxynucleotides containing the N3 2′-deoxyuridine adducts have been constructed and characterized. Using a single-stranded shuttle vector DNA, the mutagenic potential of these adducts has been tested following replication in mammalian cells. Replication past the N3 2′-deoxyuridine adducts was found to be highly mutagenic with an overall mutation yield of ∼ 97%. The major mutations that were observed were C to T transitions and C to A transversions. In vitro, these adducts posed a complete block to both the Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli polymerase I and polymerase ε, while these lesions were significantly blocking to polymerase δ. These data suggested a possible involvement of bypass polymerases in the in vivo replication of these lesions. Overall these findings indicate that the N3 2′-deoxyuridine adducts are highly mutagenic lesions that may contribute to butadiene-mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:16841966

  10. Evidence of delayed light emission of tetraphenyl-butadiene excited by liquid-argon scintillation light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segreto, E.

    2015-03-01

    Tetraphenyl-butadiene is the wavelength shifter most widely used in combination with liquid argon. The latter emits scintillation photons with a wavelength of 127 nm that need to be downshifted to be detected by photomultipliers with glass or quartz windows. Tetraphenyl-butadiene has been demonstrated to have an extremely high conversion efficiency, possibly higher than 100% for 127 nm photons, while there is no precise information about the time dependence of its emission. It is usually assumed to be exponentially decaying with a characteristic time of the order of one ns, as an extrapolation from measurements with exciting radiation in the near UV. This work shows that tetraphenyl-butadiene, when excited by 127 nm photons, re-emits photons not only with a very short decay time, but also with slower ones due to triplet states de-excitations. This fact can strongly contribute to clarifying the anomalies in liquid-argon scintillation light reported in the literature since the 1970s, namely, the inconsistency in the measured values of the long decay time constant and the appearance of an intermediate component. Similar effects should be also expected when the TPB is used in combination with helium and neon, which emit scintillation photons with wavelengths shorter than 127 nm.

  11. Capturing 1,3-butadiene by the highly ordered Al-containing SBA-15.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ling; Gu, Fang Na; Zhou, Yu; Yang, Jing; Wang, Ying; Zhu, Jian Hua

    2009-11-15

    This investigation examined the instantaneous adsorption of 1,3-butadiene by aluminum-modified mesoporous silica SBA-15 at ambient temperature. To efficiently trap the 1,3-butadiene pollutant in environment, alumina was incorporated in SBA-15 through various pathways such as one-pot synthesis, solid state grinding and impregnation, and the property-function relation of resulting composites were characterized with XRD, N(2) adsorption-desorption, FTIR and NH(3)-TPD techniques. Adsorption of N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) was employed for the first time to reveal the difference between the mesoporous silica with the same Al-content but prepared with different methods, providing a potential method for the delicate characterization. Modification with alumina significantly increased the capability of SBA-15 to adsorb 1,3-butadiene, and the one-pot synthesized sample exhibited a higher activity than the post-modified samples, resulting from the formation of Brønsted acidic sites and reservation of silianol groups on SBA-15 host. PMID:19577838

  12. Transition metal catalyzed polymerization of butadiene in supercritical CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowsky, S. |; Tumas, W.; Waymouth, R.M.

    1998-08-01

    A class of Ni(II) catalysts has been shown to stereoselectively catalyze the 1,4-polymerization of butadiene. The authors have been investigating the use of supercritical CO{sub 2} as an environmentally benign replacement solvent for conventional hydrocarbon and halocarbon solvents for a variety of chemical transformations. Above 31 C, CO{sub 2} enters a supercritical phase, where its physical properties are both liquid-like and gas-like. Importantly, the solvent properties such as dielectric constant for supercritical fluids can be varied by changing the pressure of the fluid. In this report, the authors present results of an investigation of the polymerization of 1,3-butadiene using [({pi}-allyl) Ni(CF{sub 3}CO{sub 2})]{sub 2} in supercritical CO{sub 2}. They conducted 1,3-butadiene polymerizations in CO{sub 2} to determine whether or not they could systematically and predictably adjust the regiochemistry/stereochemistry of the polybutadiene product by varying the solution properties at different pressures. They also mention experiments with CO catalysts that are known to give 1,2-syndiotactic polybutadiene, and with a Pd catalyst system that is known to copolymerize olefin with CO to give perfectly alternating copolymers.

  13. Mortality study of workers employed in 1,3-butadiene production units identified from a large chemical workers cohort.

    PubMed

    Ward, E M; Fajen, J M; Ruder, A M; Rinsky, R A; Halperin, W E; Fessler-Flesch, C A

    1996-10-28

    The IARC has given the designations of "sufficient evidence" of carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene in experimental animals and "limited evidence" of carcinogenicity in humans. To investigate the carcinogenic effect in humans, a cohort mortality study was conducted among 364 men who were assigned to any of three 1,3-butadiene production units located within several chemical plants in the Kanawha Valley of West Virginia, including 277 men employed in a U.S. Rubber Reserve Plant which operated during World War II. The butadiene production units included in this study were selected from an index developed by the Union Carbide Corporation which listed for each chemical production unit within their South Charleston and Institute plants all products, by-products and reactants. Departments included in the study were those where butadiene was a primary product and neither benzene nor ethylene oxide was present. A total of 185 deaths were observed; the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for all causes of death was 91, reflecting lower mortality among the study population than the U.S. population. The study found a significantly elevated standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for lymphosarcoma and reticulosarcoma based on four observed cases (SMR = 577; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 157-1480), which persisted in an analysis using county referent rates. An excess of lymphosarcoma and reticulosarcoma among all workers and among workers with routine exposure to 1,3-butadiene was also observed in the only other cohort of 1,3-butadiene production workers previously studied. A statistically non-significant excess of stomach cancer was observed in the overall cohort (five cases; SMR = 243; CI = 79-568) that was most pronounced among workers employed in the Rubber Reserve plant for 2 or more years (five cases; SMR = 657; CI = 213-1530). We conclude that the results of this study add to the weight of evidence suggesting that butadiene is carcinogenic in humans. PMID:8901895

  14. Studies of the mutagenic effects of styrene to man: conclusions for the surveillance of styrene-exposed workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothe, Roland; Schmidt, P.; Grummt, T.; Grummt, H. J.; Kersten, N.; Weigmann, Hans-Juergen

    1993-03-01

    One hundred fifty-six styrene-exposed workers had a fourfold higher rate of chromosome aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes than the control persons. The parameters of clinical chemistry (liver, kidney, and blood) remained in the normal range. Further analyses of the data of this study revealed no connections of the degree of effects in clinical chemistry and the exposure level. But a connection exists to the duration of exposure (3 - 26 years): in the comparison of the mean values (all mean values within the normal range) significant differences were found between long-term exposed workers (more than ten years) and control persons. In the higher age groups (above 45 years) also the GAP-rate differences are more pronounced. Seventy percent of the TWA-values were found to be below 85 mg/m3; the arithmetic mean of the TWA-values 72,3 mg/m3. A health surveillance program to styrene-exposed workers is to be reviewed (clinical chemistry and genetic effects). Proposals concerning both problems are presented.

  15. Genotoxicity of 1,3-butadiene and its epoxy intermediates.

    PubMed

    Walker, Vernon E; Walker, Dale M; Meng, Quanxin; McDonald, Jacob D; Scott, Bobby R; Seilkop, Steven K; Claffey, David J; Upton, Patricia B; Powley, Mark W; Swenberg, James A; Henderson, Rogene F

    2009-08-01

    Current risk assessments of 1,3-butadiene (BD*) are complicated by limited evidence of its carcinogenicity in humans. Hence, there is a critical need to identify early events and factors that account for the heightened sensitivity of mice to BD-induced carcinogenesis and to deter-mine which animal model, mouse or rat, is the more useful surrogate of potency for predicting health effects in BD-exposed humans. HEI sponsored an earlier investigation of mutagenic responses in mice and rats exposed to BD, or to the racemic mixture of 1,2-epoxy-3-butene (BDO) or of 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane (BDO2; Walker and Meng 2000). In that study, our research team demonstrated (1) that the frequency of mutations in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt) gene of splenic T cells from BD-exposed mice and rats could be correlated with the species-related differences in cancer susceptibility; (2) that mutagenic-potency and mutagenic-specificity data from mice and rats exposed to BD or its individual epoxy intermediates could provide useful information about the BD metabolites responsible for mutations in each species; and (3) that our novel approach to measuring the mutagenic potency of a given chemical exposure as the change in Hprt mutant frequencies (Mfs) over time was valuable for estimating species-specific differences in mutagenic responses to BD exposure and for predicting the effect of BD metabolites in each species. To gain additional mode-of-action information that can be used to inform studies of human responses to BD exposure, experiments in the current investigation tested a new set of five hypotheses about species-specific patterns in the mutagenic effects in rodents of exposure to BD and BD metabolites: 1. Repeated BD exposures at low levels that approach the occupational exposure limit for BD workers (set by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration) are mutagenic in female mice. 2. The differences in mutagenic responses of the Hprt gene to BD in similarly exposed rodents of a given species (reported in various earlier studies) are primarily associated with age-related thymus activity and trafficking of T cells and with sex-related differences in BD metabolism. 3. The mutagenic potency of the stereochemical forms of BD's epoxy intermediates plays a significant role in the species-related mutagenicity of BD. 4. The hydrolysis-detoxification pathway of BD through 1,2-dihydroxy-3-butene (BD-diol) is a major contributor to mutagenicity at high-level BD exposures in mice and rats. 5. Significant and informative species-specific differences in mutation spectra can be identified by examining both large- and small-scale genetic alterations in the Hprt gene of BD-exposed mice and rats. The first four hypotheses were tested by exposing mice and rats to BD, meso-BDO2, or BD-diol and measuring Hprt Mfs as the primary biomarker. For this, we used the T-cell-cloning assay of lymphocytes isolated from the spleens of exposed and control (sham-exposed) mice and rats. The first hypothesis was tested by exposing female B6C3F1 mice (4 to 5 weeks of age) by inhalation for 2 weeks (6 hours/day, 5 days/week) to 0 or 3 ppm BD. Hprt Mfs were measured at the time of peak mutagenic response after exposure for this age of mice. We then compared the resulting data to those from mutagenicity studies with mice of the same age that had been exposed in a similar protocol to higher levels of BD (Walker and Meng 2000). In mice exposed to 3 ppm BD (n = 27), there was a significant 1.6-fold increase over the mean background Hprt Mf in control animals (n = 24, P = 0.004). Calculating the efficiency of Hprt mutant induction, by dividing induced Hprt Mfs by the respective BD exposure levels, demonstrated that the mutagenic potency of 3 ppm BD was twice that of 20 ppm BD and almost 20 times that of 625 or 1250 ppm BD in exposed female mice. Sample-size calculations based on the Hprt Mf data from this experiment demonstrated the feasibility of conducting a future experiment to find out whether induced Mfs at even lower exposure levels (between 0.1 and 1.0 ppm BD) fit the supralinear exposure-response curve found with exposures between 3.0 and 62.5 ppm BD, or whether they deviate from the curve as Mf values approach the background levels found in control animals. The second hypothesis was tested by estimating mutagenic potency for female mice exposed by inhalation for 2 weeks to 0 or 1250 ppm BD at 8 weeks of age and comparing this estimate to that reported for female mice exposed to BD in a similar protocol at 4 to 5 weeks of age (Walker and Meng 2000). For these two age groups, the shapes of the mutant splenic T-cell manifestation curves were different, but the mutagenic burden was statistically the same. These results support our contention that the disparity in responses reported in earlier Hprt-mutation studies of BD-exposed rodents is related more to age-related T-cell kinetics than to age-specific differences in the metabolism of BD. The third hypothesis was tested by estimating mutagenic potency for female mice and rats (4 to 5 weeks of age) exposed by inhalation to 2 or 4 ppm meso-BDO2 and comparing these estimates to those previously obtained for female mice and rats of the same age and exposed in a similar protocol to (+/-)-BDO2 (Meng et al. 1999b; Walker and Meng 2000). These exposures to stereospecific forms of BDO2 caused equivalent mutagenic effects in each species. This suggests that the small differences in the mutagenic potency of the individual stereoisomers of BDO2 appear to be of less consequence in characterizing the sources of BD-induced mutagenicity than the much larger differences between the mutagenic potencies of BDO2 and the other two BD epoxides (BDO and 1,2-dihydroxy-3,4-epoxybutane [BDO-diol]). The fourth hypothesis was tested in several experiments. First, female and male mice and rats (4 to 5 weeks of age) were exposed by nose only for 6 hours to 0, 62.5, 200, 625, or 1250 ppm BD or to 0, 6, 18, 24, or 36 ppm BD-diol primarily to establish BD and BD-diol exposure levels that would yield similar plasma concentrations of BD-diol. Second, animals were exposed in inhalation chambers for 4 weeks to 0, 6, 18, or 36 ppm BD-diol to determine the mutagenic potency estimates for these exposure levels and to compare these estimates with those reported for BD-exposed female mice and rats (Walker and Meng 2000) in which similar blood levels of BD-diol had been achieved. Measurements of plasma concentrations of BD-diol (via a gas chromatography and mass spectrometry [GC/MS] method developed for this purpose) showed these results: First, BD-diol accumulated in a sublinear manner during a single 6-hour exposure to more than 200 ppm BD. Second, BD-diol accumulated in a linear manner during single (6-hour) or repeated (4-week) exposure to 6 or 18 ppm BD and in a sublinear manner with increasing levels of BD-diol exposure. Third, exposure of female mice and rats to 18 ppm BD-diol produced plasma concentrations equivalent to those produced by exposure to 200 ppm BD (exposure to 36 ppm BD-diol produced plasma concentrations of about 25% of those produced by exposure to 625 ppm BD). In general, 4-week exposure to 18 or 36 ppm BD-diol was significantly mutagenic in female and male mice and rats. The differences in mutagenic responses between the species and sexes were not remarkable, except that the mutagenic effects were greatest in female mice. The substantial differences in the exposure-related accumulation of BD-diol in plasma after rodents were exposed to more than 200 ppm BD compared with the relatively small differences in the mutagenic responses to direct exposures to 6, 18, or 36 ppm BD-diol in female mice provided evidence that the contribution of BD-diol-derived metabolites to the overall mutagenicity of BD has a narrow range of effect that is confined to relatively high-level BD exposures in mice and rats. This conclusion was supported by the results of parallel analyses of adducts in mice and rats concurrently exposed to BD-diol (Powley et al. 2005b), which showed that the exposure-response curves for the formation of N-(2,3,4-trihydroxybutyl)valine (THB-Val) in hemoglobin, formation of N7-(2,3,4-trihydroxybutyl)guanine (THB-Gua) in DNA, and induction of Hprt mutations in exposed rodents were remarkably similar in shape (i.e., supralinear). Combined, these data suggest that trihydroxybutyl (THB) adducts are good quantitative indicators of BD-induced mutagenicity and that BD-diol-derived BDO-diol (the major source of the adducts) might be largely responsible for mutagenicity in rodents exposed to BD-diol or to hight levels of BD. The mutagenic-potency studies of meso-BDO2 and BD-diol reported here, combined with our earlier studies of BD, (+/-) BDO, and(+/-)-BDO2 (Walker and Meng 2000), revealed important trends in species-specific mutagenic responses that distinguish the relative degree to which the epoxy intermediates contribute to mutation induction in rodents at selected levels of BD exposures. These data as a whole suggest that , in mice, BDO2 largely causes mutations at exposures less than 62.5 ppm BD and that BD-diol-derived metabolites add to these mutagenic effects at higher BD exposures. In rats, it appears that the BD-diol pathway might account for nearly all the mutagenicity at the hight-level BD exposures where significant increases in Hprt Mfs are found and cancers are induced. Additional exposure-response studies of hemoglobin and DNA adducts specifics to BDO2, BDO-diol, and other reactive intermediates are needed to determine more definitively the relative contribution of each metabolite to the DNA alkylation and mutation patterns induced by BD exposure in mice and rats. For the fifth hypothesis, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedure for the analysis of genomic DNA mutations in the Hprt gene of mice was developed. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED) PMID:20017413

  16. Cobalt-Mediated Radical Polymerization of Vinyl Acetate and Acrylonitrile in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Kermagoret, Anthony; Chau, Ngoc Do Quyen; Grignard, Bruno; Cordella, Daniela; Debuigne, Antoine; Jérôme, Christine; Detrembleur, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    Cobalt-mediated radical polymerization (CMRP) of vinyl acetate (VAc) is successfully achieved in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 ). CMRP of VAc is conducted using an alkyl-cobalt(III) adduct that is soluble in scCO2 . Kinetics studies coupled to visual observations of the polymerization medium highlight that the melt viscosity and PVAc molar mass (Mn ) are key parameters that affect the CMRP in scCO2 . It is noticed that CMRP is controlled for Mn up to 10 000 g mol(-1) , but loss of control is progressively observed for higher molar masses when PVAc precipitates in the polymerization medium. Low molar mass PVAc macroinitiator, prepared by CMRP in scCO2 , is then successfully used to initiate the acrylonitrile polymerization. PVAc-b-PAN block copolymer is collected as a free flowing powder at the end of the process although the dispersity of the copolymer increases with the reaction time. Although optimization is required to decrease the dispersity of the polymer formed, this CMRP process opens new perspectives for macromolecular engineering in scCO2 without the utilization of fluorinated comonomers or organic solvents. PMID:26787365

  17. Phenomena affecting morphology of microporous poly(acrylonitrile) prepared via phase separation from solution

    SciTech Connect

    Legasse, R.R.; Weagley, R.J.; Leslie, P.K.; Schneider, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is concerned with controlling the morphology of microporous polymers prepared via thermal demixing of solutions. 2 wt % solutions of poly(acrylonitrile) in maleic anhydride, a poor solvent, are first cooled to produce separated polymer-rich and solvent-rich phases. Removing the solvent by freeze drying then produces a microporous material having a density of 33 mg/cm{sup 3}, a void fraction of 97%, and a pore size of about 10 {mu}m. We find that the morphology cannot be explained by existing models, which focus on phase diagrams and kinetics of phase transformations during cooling of the solution. In conflict with those models, we find that two radically different morphologies can be produced even when the polymer concentration and cooling path are held strictly constant. A hypothesis that polymer degradation causes the different morphologies is not supported by GPC, {sup 13}C NMR, and FTIR experiments. Instead, we offer evidence that the different microporous morphologies are caused by different polymer conformations in solutions having the same concentration and temperature. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Pre-irradiation grafting of acrylonitrile onto chitin for adsorption of arsenic in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanh, Truong Thi; Huy, Ha Thuc; Hien, Nguyen Quoc

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced grafting is an effective technique for preparation of novel materials. In this study, partially deacetylated chitin with deacetylation degree (DDA) of about 40% was graft-copolymerized with acrylonitrile (AN) by a γ-ray pre-irradiation method. The maximal grafting degree of AN onto pre-irradiated chitin at 25±1.2 kGy was 114% for AN concentration in dimethylformamide of 40% (v/v) at 70 °C for 8 h. The mixture ratio of 0.1 N NH2OH·HCl to 0.1 N NaOH was selected to be 7:3 (v/v) for amidoxime conversion of cyano-groups on grafted chitin (Chi-g-AN). The characteristics of modified chitin were depicted by the FT-IR spectra, BET area and SEM images. Adsorption equilibrium of As(III) onto Chi-g-AN converted amidoxime (Chi-g-AN-C) fits with the Langmuir model and the maximal adsorption capacity was 19.724 mg/g. The break-through times of As(III) on Chi-g-AN-C in column adsorption experiments increased with the increase in bed depths.

  19. Design, synthesis, and anti-melanogenic effects of (E)-2-benzoyl-3-(substituted phenyl)acrylonitriles

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hwi Young; Kim, Do Hyun; Son, Sujin; Ullah, Sultan; Kim, Seong Jin; Kim, Yeon-Jeong; Yoo, Jin-Wook; Jung, Yunjin; Chun, Pusoon; Moon, Hyung Ryong

    2015-01-01

    Background Tyrosinase is the most prominent target for inhibitors of hyperpigmentation because it plays a critical role in melaninogenesis. Although many tyrosinase inhibitors have been identified, from both natural and synthetic sources, there remains a considerable demand for novel tyrosinase inhibitors that are safer and more effective. Methods (E)-2-Benzoyl-3-(substituted phenyl)acrylonitriles (BPA analogs) with a linear β-phenyl-α,β-unsaturated carbonyl scaffold were designed and synthesized as potential tyrosinase inhibitors. We evaluated their effects on cellular tyrosinase activity and melanin biosynthesis in murine B16F10 melanoma cells and their ability to inhibit mushroom tyrosinase activity. Results BPA analogs exhibited inhibitory activity against mushroom tyrosinase. In particular, BPA13 significantly suppressed melanin biosynthesis and inhibited cellular tyrosinase activity in B16F10 cells in a dose-dependent manner. A docking study revealed that BPA13 had higher binding affinity for tyrosinase than kojic acid. Conclusion BPA13, which possesses a linear β-phenyl-α,β-unsaturated carbonyl scaffold, is a potential candidate skin-whitening agent and treatment for diseases associated with hyperpigmentation. PMID:26347064

  20. Autodetachment dynamics of acrylonitrile anion revealed by two-dimensional electron impact spectra.

    PubMed

    Regeta, K; Allan, M

    2013-05-17

    Two-dimensional electron energy-loss spectra of acrylonitrile are presented in the incident energy range 0.095-0.9 eV, where the incoming electron is temporarily captured in the lowest π* orbital. The cross section is plotted as a function of the incident electron energy that determines which vibrational resonant anion state is populated, and of the electron energy loss, that shows into which final vibrational states each resonance decays. The striking result is that besides the expected horizontal (for given resonances) and vertical (for given final states) patterns of peaks, diagonal arrangements of peaks are observed. They reveal restrictive selectivity with respect to which vibrations are deexcited in the detachment process, with ν(4) (C ≡ N stretch) and ν(7) (C-H rocking) dominating. Surprisingly, all spectral features could be assigned to vibrational levels of the valence π* resonance, and none to dipole-bound vibrational Feshbach resonance, although the latter must also exist in this energy range. PMID:25167404

  1. Nanostructured Synthetic Carbons Obtained by Pyrolysis of Spherical Acrylonitrile/Divinylbenzene Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Danish J.; Trochimczuk, Andrzej W.; Ronka, Sylwia

    2012-01-01

    Novel carbon materials have been prepared by the carbonization of acrylonitrile (AN)/divinylbenzene (DVB) suspension porous copolymers having nominal crosslinking degrees in the range of 3070% and obtained in the presence of various amounts of porogens. The carbons were obtained by pre-oxidation of AN/DVB copolymers at 250?350C in air followed by pyrolysis at 850C in an N2 atmosphere. Both processes were carried out in one furnace and the resulting material needed no further activation. Resulting materials were characterized by XPS and low temperature nitrogen adsorption/desorption. It was found that maximum pyrolysis yield was ca. 50% depending on the oxidation conditions but almost independent of the crosslinking degree of the polymers. Porous structure of the carbons was characterized for the presence of micropores and macropores, when obtained from highly crosslinked polymers or polymers oxidized at 350C and meso- and macropores in all other cases. The latter pores are prevailing in the structure of carbons obtained from less porous AN/DVB resins. Specific surface area (BET) of polymer derived carbons can vary between 440 m2/g and 250 m2/g depending on the amount of porogen used in the synthesis of the AN/DVB polymeric precursors. PMID:22916245

  2. 40 CFR 63.484 - Storage vessel provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-butadiene latex; (2) Storage vessels containing latex products other than styrene-butadiene latex, located downstream of the stripping operations; (3) Storage vessels containing high conversion latex products;...

  3. 40 CFR 63.484 - Storage vessel provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-butadiene latex; (2) Storage vessels containing latex products other than styrene-butadiene latex, located downstream of the stripping operations; (3) Storage vessels containing high conversion latex products;...

  4. 40 CFR 63.484 - Storage vessel provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-butadiene latex; (2) Storage vessels containing latex products other than styrene-butadiene latex, located downstream of the stripping operations; (3) Storage vessels containing high conversion latex products;...

  5. 40 CFR 63.484 - Storage vessel provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-butadiene latex; (2) Storage vessels containing latex products other than styrene-butadiene latex, located downstream of the stripping operations; (3) Storage vessels containing high conversion latex products;...

  6. 40 CFR 63.484 - Storage vessel provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-butadiene latex; (2) Storage vessels containing latex products other than styrene-butadiene latex, located downstream of the stripping operations; (3) Storage vessels containing high conversion latex products;...

  7. Assessment of the peripheral, central, and autonomic nervous system function in styrene workers

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, K.; Araki, S.; Yokoyama, K. )

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the effects of styrene exposure on peripheral, central, and autonomic nervous system functions in man, we measured the distribution of nerve conduction velocities (DCV), short-latency somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), and variability in electrocardiographic R-R interval (CVRR) as well as conventional sensory and motor median nerve conduction velocities (SCV and MCV) in eleven styrene-exposed workers. The styrene workers' urinary phenylglyoxylic acid levels ranged from 31 to 419 (mean 169) mg/g creatinine at the end of the work shift on the examination day (estimated exposure to styrene of 22 ppm in air). Control subjects, matched to each styrene worker by sex and age, were selected from healthy adults without cardiovascular, neurologic and other potentially confounding disorders. In the styrene workers, we found that the V80 velocity of the DCV, below which 80% of active nerve fibers lie, and the SCV were both significantly slowed; the CVRR was also significantly reduced. There were no significant differences in SSEP latencies, MCV, or heart rate between the exposed workers and controls. These data, despite the small sample size, suggest that styrene affects the faster myelinated fibers of the peripheral sensory nerves, and that it also affects autonomic nervous activity.

  8. Technoeconomic evaluation of bio-based styrene production by engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Claypool, Joshua T; Raman, D Raj; Jarboe, Laura R; Nielsen, David R

    2014-08-01

    Styrene is an important commodity chemical used in polymers and resins, and is typically produced from the petrochemical feedstocks benzene and ethylene. Styrene has recently been produced biosynthetically for the first time using engineered Escherichia coli, and this bio-based route may represent a lower energy and renewable alternative to petroleum-derived styrene. However, the economics of such an approach has not yet been investigated. Using an early-stage technoeconomic evaluation tool, a preliminary economic analysis of bio-based styrene from C(6)-sugar feedstock has been conducted. Owing to styrene's limited water solubility, it was assumed that the resulting fermentation broth would spontaneously form two immiscible liquid phases that could subsequently be decanted. Assuming current C(6) sugar prices and industrially achievable biokinetic parameter values (e.g., product yield, specific growth rate), commercial-scale bio-based styrene has a minimum estimated selling price (MESP) of 1.90 USD kg(-1) which is in the range of current styrene prices. A Monte Carlo analysis revealed a potentially large (0.45 USD kg(-1)) standard deviation in the MESP, while a sensitivity analysis showed feedstock price and overall yield as primary drivers of MESP. PMID:24939174

  9. Separation of styrene and ethylbenzene on metal-organic frameworks: analogous structures with different adsorption mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michael; Vermoortele, Frederik; Alaerts, Luc; Couck, Sarah; Kirschhock, Christine E A; Denayer, Joeri F M; De Vos, Dirk E

    2010-11-01

    The metal-organic frameworks MIL-47 (V(IV)O{O(2)C-C(6)H(4)-CO(2)}) and MIL-53(Al) (Al(III)(OH)·{O(2)C-C(6)H(4)-CO(2)}) are capable of separating ethylbenzene and styrene. Both materials adsorb up to 20-24 wt % of both compounds. Despite the fact that they have identical building schemes, the reason for preferential adsorption of styrene compared to ethylbenzene is very different for the two frameworks. For MIL-47, diffraction experiments reveal that styrene is packed inside the pores in a unique, pairwise fashion, resulting in separation factors as high as 4 in favor of styrene. These separation factors are independent of the total amount of adsorbate offered. This is due to co-adsorption of ethylbenzene in the space left available between the packed styrene pairs. The separation is of a non-enthalpic nature. On MIL-53, the origin of the preferential adsorption of styrene is related to differences in enthalpy of adsorption, which are based on different degrees of framework relaxation. The proposed adsorption mechanisms are in line with the influence of temperature on the separation factors derived from pulse chromatography: separation factors are independent of temperature for MIL-47 but vary with temperature for MIL-53. Finally, MIL-53 is also capable of removing typical impurities like o-xylene or toluene from styrene-ethylbenzene mixtures. PMID:20942418

  10. Leaching of styrene and other aromatic compounds in drinking water from PS bottles.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Maqbool; Bajahlan, Ahmad S

    2007-01-01

    Bottled water may not be safer, or healthier, than tap water. The present studies have proved that styrene and some other aromatic compounds leach continuously from polystyrene (PS) bottles used locally for packaging. Water sapmles in contact with PS were extracted by a preconcentration technique called as "purge and trap" and analysed by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS). Eleven aromatic compounds were identified in these studies. Maximum concentration of styrene in PS bottles was 29.5 microg/L. Apart from styrene, ethyl benzene, toluene and benzene were also quantified but their concentrations were much less than WHO guide line values. All other compounds were in traces. Quality of plastic and storage time were the major factor in leaching of styrene. Concentration of styrene was increased to 69.53 microg/L after one-year storage. In Styrofoam and PS cups studies, hot water was found to be contaminated with styrene and other aromatic compounds. It was observed that temperature played a major role in the leaching of styrene monomer from Styrofoam cups. Paper cups were found to be safe for hot drinks. PMID:17915704

  11. Cooperativity in CYP2E1 metabolism of acetaminophen and styrene mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Jessica H; Letzig, Lynda G; Roberts, Dean W; James, Laura P; Fifer, E Kim; Miller, Grover P

    2015-10-01

    Risk assessment for exposure to mixtures of drugs and pollutants relies heavily on in vitro characterization of their bioactivation and/or metabolism individually and extrapolation to mixtures assuming no interaction. Herein, we demonstrated that in vitro CYP2E1 metabolic activation of acetaminophen and styrene mixtures could not be explained through the Michaelis-Menten mechanism or any models relying on that premise. As a baseline for mixture studies with styrene, steady-state analysis of acetaminophen oxidation revealed a biphasic kinetic profile that was best described by negative cooperativity (Hill coefficient=0.72). The best-fit mechanism for this relationship involved two binding sites with differing affinities (Ks=830μM and Kss=32mM). Introduction of styrene inhibited that reaction less than predicted by simple competition and thus provided evidence for a cooperative mechanism within the mixture. Likewise, acetaminophen acted through a mixed-type inhibition mechanism to impact styrene epoxidation. In this case, acetaminophen competed with styrene for CYP2E1 (Ki=830μM and Ksi=180μM for catalytic and effector sites, respectively) and resulted in cooperative impacts on binding and catalysis. Based on modeling of in vivo clearance, cooperative interactions between acetaminophen and styrene resulted in profoundly increased styrene activation at low styrene exposure levels and therapeutic acetaminophen levels. Current Michaelis-Menten based toxicological models for mixtures such as styrene and acetaminophen would fail to detect this concentration-dependent relationship. Hence, future studies must assess the role of alternate CYP2E1 mechanisms in bioactivation of compounds to improve the accuracy of interpretations and predictions of toxicity. PMID:26225832

  12. The Nature of the Reaction Intermediates in the FAD-Dependent Epoxidation Mechanism of Styrene Monooxygenase*

    PubMed Central

    Kantz, Auric; Gassner, George T.

    2010-01-01

    Styrene monooxygenase (SMO) is a two-component flavoenzyme composed of an NADH-specific flavin reductase (SMOB) and FAD-specific styrene epoxidase (NSMOA). NSMOA binds tightly to reduced FAD and catalyzes the stereospecific addition of one atom of molecular oxygen to the vinyl side chain of styrene in the enantioselective synthesis of S-styrene oxide. In this mechanism, molecular oxygen first reacts with NSMOA(FADred) to yield an FAD C(4a)- peroxide intermediate. This species is non-fluorescent and has an absorbance maximum of 382 nm. Styrene then reacts with the peroxide intermediate with a second order rate constant of 2.6 × 106 ± 0.1 × 106 M−1 s−1 to yield a fluorescent intermediate with an absorbance maximum of 368 nm. We compute an activation free energy of 8.7 kcal.mol∙−1 for the oxygenation step in good agreement with that expected for a peroxide-catalyzed epoxidation, and acid-quenched samples recovered at defined time points in the single-turnover reaction indicate that styrene oxide synthesis is coincident with the formation phase of the fluorescent intermediate. These findings support FAD C(4a)-peroxide as the oxygen atom donor and identity of the fluorescent intermediate as an FAD C(4a)-hydroxide product of the styrene epoxidation. Overall, four pH-dependent rate constants corresponding to peroxyflavin formation (pKa = 7.2), styrene epoxidation (pKa = 7.7), styrene oxide dissociation (pKa = 8.3), and hydroxyflavin dehydration (pKa 7.6) are needed to fit the single-turnover kinetics. PMID:21166448

  13. Levels of selected urinary metabolites of volatile organic compounds among children aged 6-11 years.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ram B

    2015-10-01

    Data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for the years 2011-2012 were used to evaluate variability in the observed levels of 20 urinary metabolites of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by age, gender, and race/ethnicity among children aged 6-11 years. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke was positively associated with the levels of selected metabolites of acrylonitrile, 1,3-butadiene, cyanide, and propylene oxide in a dose-response manner. Levels of the selected metabolites of acrolein, acrylonitrile, 1,3-butadiene, styrene, toluene, and xylene decreased with increase in age. Levels of 1-bromopropane decreased with number of rooms in the house but the reverse was true for 1,3-butadiene, carbon-disulfide, and N,N-dimethylformamide. Levels of most of the 20 metabolites did not vary with gender. Non-Hispanic white children had higher adjusted levels of N-Acetyl-S-(3,4-dihydroxybutyl)-L-cysteine (DHBMA), N-Acetyl-S-(N-methylcarbamoyl)-L-cysteine (AMCC), and phenylglyoxylic acid (PGA) than non-Hispanic black children. Non-Hispanic white children had statistically significantly higher adjusted levels of N-Acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA), trans, trans-Muconic acid (MU), and N-Acetyl-S-(N-methylcarbamoyl)-L-cysteine (AMCC) than non-Hispanic Asian children but statistically significantly lower levels of N-Acetyl-S-(n-propyl)-L-cysteine (BPMA) than non-Hispanic Asian children. Non-Hispanic Asian children had the lowest levels of 13 of the 20 metabolites among four major racial/ethnic groups but highest levels for three metabolites. For selected metabolites of acrolein, acrylamide, acrylonitrile-vinyl chloride-ethylene oxide, benzene, 1,3-butadien, crotonaldehyde, cyanide, ethylbenzene-styrene, and toluene, children had statistically significantly higher levels than nonsmoking adults. These results demonstrate how vulnerable children are to being exposed to harmful chemicals like VOCs in their own homes. PMID:26257031

  14. Interfacing microbial styrene production with a biocompatible cyclopropanation reaction.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Stephen; Balskus, Emily P

    2015-06-01

    The introduction of new reactivity into living organisms is a major challenge in synthetic biology. Despite an increasing interest in both the development of small-molecule catalysts that are compatible with aqueous media and the engineering of enzymes to perform new chemistry in vitro, the integration of non-native reactivity into metabolic pathways for small-molecule production has been underexplored. Herein we report a biocompatible iron(III) phthalocyanine catalyst capable of efficient olefin cyclopropanation in the presence of a living microorganism. By interfacing this catalyst with E. coli engineered to produce styrene, we synthesized non-natural phenyl cyclopropanes directly from D-glucose in single-vessel fermentations. This process is the first example of the combination of nonbiological carbene-transfer reactivity with cellular metabolism for small-molecule production. PMID:25925138

  15. Production of super-smooth articles

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, D.V.

    1981-05-29

    Super-smooth rounded or formed articles made of thermoplastic materials including various poly(methyl methacrylate) or acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymers are produced by immersing the articles into a bath, the composition of which is slowly changed with time. The starting composition of the bath is made up of at least one solvent for the polymer and a diluent made up of at least one nonsolvent for the polymer and optional materials which are soluble in the bath. The resulting extremely smooth articles are useful as mandrels for laser fusion and should be useful for a wide variety of other purposes, for example lenses.

  16. Production of super-smooth articles

    DOEpatents

    Duchane, David V.

    1983-01-01

    Super-smooth rounded or formed articles made of thermoplastic materials including various poly(methyl methacrylate) or acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymers are produced by immersing the articles into a bath, the composition of which is slowly changed with time. The starting composition of the bath is made up of at least one solvent for the polymer and a diluent made up of at least one nonsolvent for the polymer and optional materials which are soluble in the bath. The resulting extremely smooth articles are useful as mandrels for laser fusion and should be useful for a wide variety of other purposes, for example lenses.

  17. Development of recycled plastic composites for structural applications from CEA plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Agrim

    Plastic waste from consumer electronic appliances (CEAs) such as computer and printer parts including Polystyrene (PS), Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS), Polystyrene (PS) and PC/ABS were collected using handheld FTIR Spectrophotometer. The blends of these plastics with High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) are manufactured under special processing conditions in a single screw compounding injection molding machine. The blends are thermoplastics have high stiffness and strength, which may enhance the mechanical properties of HDPE like tensile modulus, ultimate tensile strength, tensile break and tensile yield. These composites have a potential to be used for the future application of recycled plastic lumber, thus replacing the traditional wood lumber.

  18. Process for the recovery and separation of plastics

    DOEpatents

    Jody, Bassam J.; Daniels, Edward J.; Pomykala Jr., Joseph A.

    2003-07-29

    A method of separating a portion of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) from a mixture containing ABS and for separating a portion of ABS and polycarbonate (PC) from a mixture of plastics containing ABS and PC is disclosed. The method includes shredding and/or granulating the mixture of plastics containing ABS and PC to provide a selected particle size; sequentially dispersing the shredded mixture of plastics in a series aqueous solutions having different specific gravities and separating the floating fraction until the desired separation is obtained. Surface tension and pH are also variable to be controlled.

  19. Manufacturing of microcirculation phantoms using rapid prototyping technologies.

    PubMed

    Buchoux, Anthony; Valluri, Prashant; Smith, Stewart; Stokes, Adam A; Hoskins, Peter R; Sboros, Vassilis

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we describe a method for the manufacturing of a microcirculation phantom that may be used to investigate hemodynamics using optics based methods. We made an Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) negative mold, manufactured in a Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) printer, embedded it in Polydimethysilioxane (PDMS) and dissolved it from within using acetone. We successfully made an enlarged three-dimensional (3D) network of microcirculation, and tested it using red blood cell (RBC) analogues. This phantom may be used for testing medical imaging technology. PMID:26737636

  20. Highly efficient synthesis of stereodefined multisubstituted 1,4-dicyano- and 1-cyano-1,3-butadienes and their reactions with organolithium reagents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congyang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Qifeng; Wang, Zhihui; Sun, Hui; Guo, Xiangyu; Xi, Zhenfeng

    2007-01-01

    Stereodefined multisubstituted 1-cyano- and 1,4-dicyano-1,3-butadiene derivatives were obtained in excellent yields of the isolated product from their corresponding monohalo- and dihalobutadienes and CuCN. This reaction proceeded with high stereoselectivity and retention of the stereochemistry of the starting halobutadienes. A study of the utility of the thus-obtained 1-cyano- and 1,4-dicyano-1,3-butadiene derivatives was demonstrated by their reactions with organolithium reagents. 2H-Pyrrole or iminocyclopentadiene derivatives were formed in high yields from 1-cyano-4-halo-1,3-butadienes and organolithium reagents. When 1,4-dicyano-1,3-butadienes were treated with organolithium reagents followed by trapping with electrophiles, a tandem process took place to afford 2H-pyrrolyl nitriles in excellent yields. Reduction of 1,4-dicyano-1,3-butadiene derivatives with LiAlH4 showed novel reaction patterns relative to normal nitriles. PMID:17497622

  1. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies of 1,3-butadiene in the rat: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, P.L.; Sikov, M.R.; Mast, T.J.; Brown, M.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Clark, M.L.; Decker, J.R.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Rowe, S.E.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1987-11-01

    Maternal toxicity, reproductive performance and developmental toxicology were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley-derived rats during and following 6 hours/day, whole-body, inhalation exposures to 0, 40, 200, and 1000 ppM of 1,3-butadiene. The female rats (Ns = 24 to 28), which had mated with unexposed males, were exposed to the chemical from 6 through 15 dg and sacrificed on 20 dg. Maternal animals were weighed prior to mating and on 0, 6, 11, 16 and 20 dg; the rats were observed for mortality, morbidity and signs of toxicity during exposure and examined for gross tissue abnormalities at necropsy. Live fetuses were weighed and subjected to external, visceral and skeletal examinations to detect growth retardation and morphologic anomalies. There were no significant differences among treatment groups in maternal body weights or extragestational weights of rats exposed to 1,3-butadiene concentrations of 40 or 200 ppM, but, in animals exposed to 1000 ppM, significantly depressed body weight gains were observed during the first 5 days of exposure and extragestational weight gains tended to be lower than control values. These results, and the absence of clinical signs of toxicity, were considered to indicate that there was no maternal toxicity at exposure levels of 200 ppM or lower. The percentage of pregnant animals and the number of litters with live fetuses were unaffected by treatment. Under the conditions of this exposure regimen, there was no evidence for a teratogenic response to 1,3-butadiene exposure.

  2. Atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of 1,3-butadiene for hydrophobic finishing of textile substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Kartick K.; Jassal, Manjeet; Agrawal, Ashwini K.

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma processing of textile has both ecological and economical advantages over the wet-chemical processing. However, reaction in atmospheric pressure plasma has important challenges to be overcome before it can be successfully used for finishing applications in textile. These challenges are (i) generating stable glow plasma in presence liquid/gaseous monomer, and (ii) keeping the generated radicals active in the presence of contaminants such as oxygen and air. In this study, a stable glow plasma was generated at atmospheric pressure in the mixture of gaseous reactive monomer-1,3-butadiene and He and was made to react with cellulosic textile substrate. After 12 min of plasma treatment, the hydrophilic surface of the cellulosic substrate turned into highly hydrophobic surface. The hydrophobic finish was found to be durable to soap washing. After soap washing, a water drop of 37 μl took around 250 s to get absorbed in the treated sample compared to < 1 s in the untreated samples. The plasma modified samples showed water contact angle of around 134°. Both top and bottom sides of the fabric showed similar hydrophobic results in terms of water absorbency and contact angle. The results may be attributed to chemical reaction of butadiene with the cellulosic textile substrate. The surface characterization of the plasma modified samples under SEM and AFM revealed modification of the surface under <100 nm. The results showed that atmospheric pressure plasma can be successfully used for carrying out reaction of 1,3-butadiene with cellulosic textile substrates for producing hydrophobic surface finish.

  3. Electrochemical properties of a disilene, a tetrasila-1,3-butadiene, and their germanium analogues.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Annemarie; Weidenbruch, Manfred; Müller, Thomas; Pravinkumar, Kendrekar; Becker, James Y

    2009-08-24

    The redox properties of aryl-substituted disilene (1), tetrasila-1,3-butadiene (2), digermene (3), and tetragerma-1,3-butadiene (4) (in which the aryl group is 2,4,6-triisopropylphenyl) have been studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in two different solvents. In o-dichlorobenzene, disilene 1 exhibited reversible redox couples in both oxidation and reduction processes, whereas tetrasilabutadiene 2 showed a reversible behavior only in its oxidation and an irreversible wave in its reduction. Tetragermabutadiene 4 afforded a reversible couple in its reduction and an irreversible wave in its oxidation, whereas digermene 3 showed only an irreversible oxidation wave but no reduction one. In comparison, all observed oxidation and reduction waves in THF were irreversible. In both solvents, the same trend of decreasing ease of oxidation has been observed: 2>4>3>1. The calculated vertical ionization energies (E(i)) for the 2,6-dimethylphenyl-substituted model compounds 9-12 afforded a trend of ease of oxidation that decreases in the series tetrasilabutadiene 10>tetragermabutadiene 12>disilene 9>digermene 11. This predicted trend parallels the measured oxidation potentials in the sense that the heavy butadienes are easier to oxidize than the heavy alkenes. The trend in the reduction direction has been found to be different in the two solvents studied. The computed electron affinities (E(ea)) for compounds 9-12 indicated that the ease of reduction decreased in the sequence tetragermabutadiene 12>tetrasilabutadiene 10>digermene 11>disilene 9. However, no straightforward relation between the computed electron affinities and the experimentally measured reduction potentials has been found. PMID:19575430

  4. Coexistence of 1,3-butadiene conformers in ionization energies and Dyson orbitals.

    PubMed

    Saha, Saumitra; Wang, Feng; Falzon, Chantal T; Brunger, Michael J

    2005-09-22

    The minimum-energy structures on the torsional potential-energy surface of 1,3-butadiene have been studied quantum mechanically using a range of models including ab initio Hartree-Fock and second-order Møller-Plesset theories, outer valence Green's function, and density-functional theory with a hybrid functional and statistical average orbital potential model in order to understand the binding-energy (ionization energy) spectra and orbital cross sections observed by experiments. The unique full geometry optimization process locates the s-trans-1,3-butadiene as the global minimum structure and the s-gauche-1,3-butadiene as the local minimum structure. The latter possesses the dihedral angle of the central carbon bond of 32.81 degrees in agreement with the range of 30 degrees-41 degrees obtained by other theoretical models. Ionization energies in the outer valence space of the conformer pair have been obtained using Hartree-Fock, outer valence Green's function, and density-functional (statistical average orbital potentials) models, respectively. The Hartree-Fock results indicate that electron correlation (and orbital relaxation) effects become more significant towards the inner shell. The spectroscopic pole strengths calculated in the Green's function model are in the range of 0.85-0.91, suggesting that the independent particle picture is a good approximation in the present study. The binding energies from the density-functional (statisticaly averaged orbital potential) model are in good agreement with photoelectron spectroscopy, and the simulated Dyson orbitals in momentum space approximated by the density-functional orbitals using plane-wave impulse approximation agree well with those from experimental electron momentum spectroscopy. The coexistence of the conformer pair under the experimental conditions is supported by the approximated experimental binding-energy spectra due to the split conformer orbital energies, as well as the orbital momentum distributions of the mixed conformer pair observed in the orbital cross sections of electron momentum spectroscopy. PMID:16392490

  5. Modification of fiber properties through grafting of acrylonitrile to rayon by chemical and radiation methods.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Inderjeet; Sharma, Neelam; Kumari, Vandna

    2013-11-01

    Fibrous properties of rayon has been modified through synthesis of graft copolymers of rayon with acrylonitrile (AN) by chemical method using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN/HNO3) as a redox initiator and gamma radiation mutual method. Percentage of grafting (Pg) was determined as a function of initiator concentration, monomer concentration, irradiation dose, temperature, time of reaction and the amount of water. Maximum percentage of grafting (160.01%) using CAN/HNO3 was obtained at [CAN] = 22.80 × 10(-3) mol/L, [HNO3] = 112.68 × 10(-2) mol/L and [AN] = 114.49 × 10(-2) mol/L in 20 mL of water at 45 °C within 120 min while in case of gamma radiation method, maximum Pg (90.24%) was obtained at an optimum concentration of AN of 76.32 × 10(-2) mol/L using 10 mL of water at room temperature with total dose exposure of 3.456 kGy/h. The grafted fiber was characterized by FTIR, SEM, TGA and XRD studies. Swelling behavior of grafted rayon in different solvents such as water, methanol, ethanol, DMF and acetone was studied and compared with the unmodified rayon. Dyeing behavior of the grafted fiber was also investigated. PMID:25685464

  6. Modeling contaminant transport and remediation at an acrylonitrile spill site in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sengör, S Sevinç; Unlü, Kahraman

    2013-07-01

    The August 1999 earthquake in Turkey damaged three acrylonitrile (AN) storage tanks at a plant producing synthetic fiber by polymerization. A numerical modeling study was carried out to analyze the groundwater flow and contaminant (AN) transport at the spill site. This study presents the application of a numerical groundwater model to determine the hydrogeological parameters of the site, where such data were not available during the field surveys prior to the simulation studies. The two- and three-dimensional transient flow and transport models were first calibrated using the first 266days of observed head and concentration data and then verified using the remaining 540-day observed data set. Off-site migration of the contaminant plume was kept under control within the site boundaries owing to the favorable geology of the site, the characteristics of the local groundwater flow regime and the pumping operations. As expected, the applied pump-and-treat system was effective at high-permeability zones, but not fully effective at low-permeability zones. The results of long-term simulations for unconfined aquifer showed that the size of the plume in the high permeability zone shrank significantly due to the dilution by natural recharge. However, in the low permeability zone, it was not significantly affected. The study showed that accurate and sufficient data regarding the source characteristics, concentration and groundwater level measurements, groundwater pumping rates and their durations at each of the extraction points involved in the pump-and-treat system along with the hydrogeological site characterization are the key parameters for successful flow and transport model calibrations. PMID:23680827

  7. Comparison of the dominant lethal effects of acrylonitrile and acrylamide in male Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Working, P K; Bentley, K S; Hurtt, M E; Mohr, K L

    1987-05-01

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) and acrylamide (AA), structurally similar vinyl monomers, are both animal carcinogens. ACN is weakly mutagenic in bacteria and induces sister-chromatid exchange, unscheduled DNA synthesis and cell transformation in cells in culture. AA induces chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow, blood and germ cells in vivo, and dominant lethal mutations in the germ cells of male mice and rats. In the current study, the ability of AA and ACN to induce dominant lethal mutations in the germ cells of male Fischer 344 rats was compared. Three groups of 50 males were gavaged daily for 5 days with ACN (60 mg/kg in normal saline), AA (30 mg/kg in normal saline) or vehicle only; an additional group of 20 males received a single i.p. injection of 0.2 mg/kg triethylenemelamine (TEM) on the afternoon of day 5. Starting 1 day after exposure, each male was bred to one female per week for 4 weeks (TEM-exposed group) or 10 weeks (ACN, AA and control groups). Mating rates were reduced only during week 1 in the TEM-treated group; pregnancy rates were reduced only during week 2 in the AA-exposed group and week 4 in the TEM-treated group. Females were necropsied 13 days after the end of the appropriate mating week and the amount of pre- and post-implantation loss calculated. ACN treatment of male rats induced no increases in either pre- or post-implantation loss in females in any of the 10 weeks post-exposure examined.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3325746

  8. Ionic polymer-metal composite actuators employing sulfonated poly (styrene-ethylene-butylene-styrene) as ionic-exchange membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuan-Lun; Oh, Il-Kwon; Lu, Jun; Ju, Jin-Hun; Lee, Sun-Woo

    2007-07-01

    There is growing interest in biomimetic motions by employing ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) as the candidates for the fabrication of artificial muscle. However, the membrane materials currently used in IPMC actuators have been limited to a few commercially available perfluorinated ionic polymers, such as Nafion, and they suffer from several shortcomings among which their high cost presents a major obstacle for wide application. With excellent proton conductivity and high water uptake capacity, commercially available Sulfonated poly (styrene-ethylene-butylene-styrene) (SEBS) of low cost has been investigated for many years as a fuel cell membrane. Herein, we report the preparation of a novel IPMC actuator based on the sulfonated SEBS (SSEBS) membrane. The platinum electrodes of the SEBS actuators were obtained with electroless plating procedure, and the cation exchange with lithium was performed by soaking the composite membranes into a 1.5N LiCl solution. The surface and cross-sectional morphologies of the SSEBS actuators were observed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which revealed that the platinum layer up to 8µm was deposited on the top and bottom surfaces of the SSEBS membrane. The electromechanical bending responses were investigated under alternating current excitations with various driving frequencies and voltage amplitudes, which showed high electrical strains under sinusoidal signal. The effect of the membrane thickness on the performance of the actuators was also addressed in this presentation. This kind of IPMC has great potentials for the applications in biomimetic sensors and actuators, which can be utilized to mimic the locomotion of fish and insects and can be applied to micro-robots and bio-medical devices as well.

  9. Simulation of a Hazardous and Noxious Substances (HNS) spill in the marine environment: lethal and sublethal effects of acrylonitrile to the European seabass.

    PubMed

    Neuparth, T; Capela, R; Rey-Salgueiro, L; Moreira, S M; Santos, M M; Reis-Henriques, M A

    2013-10-01

    Despite the extensive maritime transportation of Hazardous and Noxious Substances (HNS), there is a current lack of knowledge on the effects posed by HNS spills on the marine biota. Among the HNS identified as priority, acrylonitrile was selected to conduct ecotoxicological assays. We assessed the acute and subletal effects of acrylonitrile in seabass, followed by a recovery phase to simulate the conditions of a spill incident. The work aimed at testing a broad range of biological responses induced by acrylonitrile. Sublethal exposure to the highest two doses increased the fish mortality rate (8.3% and 25% mortality in 0.75 and 2 mg L(-1) acrylonitrile concentrations), whereas no mortality were observed in control and 0.15 mg L(-1) treatments. Additionally, important alterations at sub-individual level were observed. Acrylonitrile significantly induced the activities of Catalase- CAT and Glutathione S-Transferase - GST; and the levels of DNA damage were significantly increased. Conversely, Superoxide Dismutase- SOD - activity was found to be significantly inhibited and no effects were found on Lipid Peroxidation- LPO and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase - EROD - activity. Following a 7d recovery period, the levels of CAT, GST and EROD fell to levels at or below those in the control. In the 2 mg L(-1) group, SOD remained at the levels found during exposure phase. This study has gathered essential information on the acute and subletal toxicity of acrylonitrile to seabass. It also demonstrated that 7d recovery allowed a return of most endpoints to background levels. These data will be useful to assist relevant bodies in preparedness and response to HNS spills. PMID:23800594

  10. Mortality study of workers in 1,3-butadiene production units identified from a chemical workers cohort.

    PubMed

    Ward, E M; Fajen, J M; Ruder, A M; Rinsky, R A; Halperin, W E; Fessler-Flesch, C A

    1995-06-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer has given the designations of "sufficient evidence" of carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene in experimental animals and "limited evidence" of carcinogenicity in humans. To investigate the carcinogenic effect in humans, we conducted a cohort mortality study among 364 men who were assigned to any of three 1,3-butadiene production units located within several chemical plants in the Kanawha Valley of West Virginia, including 277 men employed in a U.S. Rubber Reserve Plant which operated during World War II. The butadiene production units included in this study were selected from an index developed by the Union Carbide Corporation, which listed for each chemical production unit within their South Charleston, West Virginia and Institute, West Virginia, plants all products, by-products, and reactants. Departments included in the study were those where butadiene was a primary product and neither benzene nor ethylene oxide was present. A total of 185 deaths were observed; the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for all causes of death was 91, reflecting lower mortality among the study population than the U.S. population. The study found a significantly elevated standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for lymphosarcoma and reticulosarcoma based on four observed cases (SMR = 577; 95% CI = 157-1480), which persisted in an analysis using county referent rates. An excess of lymphosarcoma and reticulosarcoma among all workers and among workers with routine exposure to 1,3-butadiene was also observed in the only other cohort of 1,3-butadiene production workers previously studied.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7556014

  11. Mortality study of workers in 1,3-butadiene production units identified from a chemical workers cohort.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, E M; Fajen, J M; Ruder, A M; Rinsky, R A; Halperin, W E; Fessler-Flesch, C A

    1995-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer has given the designations of "sufficient evidence" of carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene in experimental animals and "limited evidence" of carcinogenicity in humans. To investigate the carcinogenic effect in humans, we conducted a cohort mortality study among 364 men who were assigned to any of three 1,3-butadiene production units located within several chemical plants in the Kanawha Valley of West Virginia, including 277 men employed in a U.S. Rubber Reserve Plant which operated during World War II. The butadiene production units included in this study were selected from an index developed by the Union Carbide Corporation, which listed for each chemical production unit within their South Charleston, West Virginia and Institute, West Virginia, plants all products, by-products, and reactants. Departments included in the study were those where butadiene was a primary product and neither benzene nor ethylene oxide was present. A total of 185 deaths were observed; the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for all causes of death was 91, reflecting lower mortality among the study population than the U.S. population. The study found a significantly elevated standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for lymphosarcoma and reticulosarcoma based on four observed cases (SMR = 577; 95% CI = 157-1480), which persisted in an analysis using county referent rates. An excess of lymphosarcoma and reticulosarcoma among all workers and among workers with routine exposure to 1,3-butadiene was also observed in the only other cohort of 1,3-butadiene production workers previously studied.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7556014

  12. Thermoplastic nanoclay-modified vulcanizates based on polypropylene and nitrile-butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volfson, Svetoslav I.; Okhotina, Natalya A.; Nigmatullina, Alina I.; Panfilova, Olga A.

    2014-05-01

    Thermoplastic vulcanizates based on polypropylene and nitrile-butadiene rubber, containing modified organoclay were developed. It was shown that composites containing 1 to 5 pbw of Cloisite 15A montmorillonite added to rubber show improved physical-mechanical characteristics. Their swelling degree in AI-92 and motor oil was determined. The swelling degree of composites in petrol and motor oil decreases substantially, by 20-63%, due to the introduction of Cloisite 15A montmorillonite. Modification of thermoplastic vulcanizates using layered silicates raised the degradation onset temperature and decreases weight loss upon high temperature heating.

  13. The influence of zeolitic water on the rate of butadiene dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    Zeolites find widespread usage as catalysts for a variety of chemical transformations. Frequently, the catalytically active agent is a transition metal ion located at an exchange site in contact with the zeolitic surface. Although the extraframework cation positions and relative populations can often be determined by spectroscopic methods, the influence of cation sitting and adsorbed reactant induced migration under reaction conditions is less well understood. This note describes the role which water exerts on the activity of copper-exchanged zeolite Y for the dimerization of butadiene to 4-vinylcyclohexene (4-VCH). 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Adsorption of 2-methylpropene and 1,3-butadiene on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, M.G.; Berlier, K.; Bougard, J. . Service de Thermodynamique)

    1994-10-01

    Four adsorption isotherms at 278, 288, 293, and 303 K of 2-methylpropene and 1, 3-butadiene on activated carbon are given. The results at pressures up to 0.8P/P[sub s] are measured using an automated apparatus and correlated by the vacancy solution model of Cochran and Danner. This work aims at determining the influence of a double bond and a branched structure on the adsorption capacity. For their industrial separation by an adsorption process, it is important to have equilibrium data on the same adsorbent and at different temperatures.

  15. Pre-irradiation induced emulsion co-graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and acrylic acid onto a polyethylene nonwoven fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanzhou; Yu, Ming; Ma, Hongjuan; Wang, Ziqiang; Li, Linfan; Li, Jingye

    2014-01-01

    A pre-irradiation induced emulsion co-graft polymerization method was used to introduce acrylonitrile and acrylic acid onto a PE nonwoven fabric. The use of acrylic acid is meant to improve the hydrophilicity of the modified fabric. The kinetics of co-graft polymerization were studied. The existence of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAAc) graft chains was proven by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The existence of the nitrile groups in the graft chains indicates that they are ready for further amidoximation and adsorption of heavy metal ions.

  16. A correlation study applied to biomarkers of internal and effective dose for acrylonitrile and 4-aminobiphenyl in smokers

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Gerhard; Newland, Kirk; Papadopoulou, Ermioni

    2014-01-01

    The urinary metabolites 2-cyanoethylmercapturic acid and 4-aminobiphenyl have been correlated with tobacco smoke exposure. Similarly, 2-cyanoethylvaline and 4-aminobiphenyl haemoglobin adducts have been used as biomarkers of effective dose for the exposure to acrylonitrile and 4-aminobiphenyl, respectively. Each pair of biomarkers is derived from the same parent chemical; however, the correlation between the urinary and the haemoglobin biomarkers has not been investigated. Using clinical study samples, we report a weak correlation between urinary and haemoglobin biomarkers due to different accumulation and elimination rates. Time course analysis showed that a reduction in exposure was paralleled by a delayed reduction in haemoglobin adducts. PMID:24754403

  17. 21 CFR 173.70 - Chloromethylated aminated styrene-divinylbenzene resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... conditions: (a) The additive is an aqueous dispersion of styrene-divinylbenzene copolymers, first... resin dispersion. (c) The additive is used as a decolorizing and clarification agent for treatment...

  18. PALLADIUM-CATALYZED OXIDATION OF STYRENE AND ALKENES IN PRESENCE OF IONIC LIQUIDS (WACKER REACTION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of ionic liquids in various synthetic transformations is gaining significance due to the enhanced reaction rates, potential for recycling and compatibility with various organic compounds and organometallic catalysts. Palladium-catalyzed oxidation of styrene and other alk...

  19. Effect of Methyl Substitution on Microbial Degradation of Linear Styrene Dimers by Two Soil Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Higashimura, Toshinobu; Sawamoto, Mitsuo; Hiza, Tae; Karaiwa, Masato; Tsuchii, Akio; Suzuki, Tomoo

    1983-01-01

    The microbial degradation of 10 linear unsaturated dimers (I to IV) prepared from styrene and o-, m-, or p-methylstyrene was investigated with two soil bacteria, Alcaligenes sp. strain 559 and Pseudomonas sp. strain 419. The two strains decomposed styrene dimer I and all styrene-methylstyrene codimers II and III, but methylstyrene homodimers IV remained intact. The degradation rates of codimers II and III of o- and m-methylstyrenes were found to depend on both their structure and the strain used; i.e., Alcaligenes sp. strain 559 decomposed III faster than II, whereas the reverse order (II > III) was obtained with Pseudomonas sp. strain 419. In biodegradation by the former strain, the codimers were degraded faster in the presence of styrene dimer I than in its absence, but no such effect of dimer I was observed with the latter. PMID:16346363

  20. Reaction of pyrocatechol and resorcinol with styrene in the presence of aluminum phenolate

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlikovskii, Y.B.; Butov, S.A.; Koshchii, V.A.

    1986-08-01

    The alkylation of pyrocatechol and resorcinol with styrene in the presence of aluminum phenolate leads to a mixture of isomeric (..cap alpha..-methylbenzyl)dihydroxybenzenes, in which the ortho-alkylation products as a rule predominate.

  1. Heat of Combustion of the Product Formed by the Reaction of Diborane with 1,3-Butadiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannenbaum, Stanley; Allen, Harrison, Jr.

    1953-01-01

    The net heat of combustion of the product formed by the reaction of diborane with 1,3-butadiene was found to be 18,700+/-150 Btu per pound for the reaction of liquid fuel to gaseous carbon dioxide, gaseous water, and solid boric oxide. The measurements were made in a Parr oxygen-bomb calorimeter, and the combustion was believed to be 98 percent complete. The estimated net heat of combustion for complete combustion would therefore be 19,075+/-150 Btu per pound. Since this value is approximately the same as the heat of combustion of butadiene, it seems certain that the material is partially oxidized.

  2. Styrene-terminated polysulfone oligomers as matrix material for graphite reinforced composites: An initial study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Dana; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1987-01-01

    Styrene terminated polysulfone oligomers are part of an oligomeric class of compounds with end groups capable of thermal polymerization. These materials can be used as matrices for graphite reinforced composites. The initial evaluation of styrene terminated polysulfone oligomer based composites are summarized in terms of fabrication methods, and mechanical and environmental properties. In addition, a description and evaluation is provided of the NASA/Industry Fellowship Program for Technology Transfer.

  3. Synthesis of Biaryls via Benzylic C-C Bond Cleavage of Styrenes and Benzyl Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Shah, Bhahwal Ali

    2015-11-01

    A metal-free oxidative coupling of styrenes and benzyl alcohols with arenes has been developed for the synthesis of biaryls. The reaction features a conspicuous benzylic C-C bond cleavage of styrenes and benzyl alcohols. The reaction with both substrates proceeds through a common aldehydic intermediate formed through oxidative C-C bond cleavage of alkene and oxidation of benzyl alcohols. The reaction proceeds efficiently over a broad range of substrates with excellent functional group tolerance. PMID:26479321

  4. A comprehensive review of occupational and general population cancer risk: 1,3-Butadiene exposure-response modeling for all leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, myeloid neoplasm and lymphoid neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Sielken, Robert L; Valdez-Flores, Ciriaco

    2015-11-01

    Excess cancer risks associated with 1,3-butadiene (BD) inhalation exposures are calculated using an extensive data set developed by the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) from an epidemiology study of North American workers in the styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) industry. While the UAB study followed SBR workers, risk calculations can be adapted to estimate both occupational and general population risks. The data from the UAB SBR study offer an opportunity to quantitatively evaluate the association between cumulative exposure to BD and different types of cancer, accounting for the number of tasks involving high-intensity exposures to BD as well as confounding associated with the exposures to the multiple other chemicals in the SBR industry. Quantitative associations of BD exposure and cancer, specifically leukemia, can be further characterized by leukemia type, including potential associations with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and the groups of lymphoid and myeloid neoplasms. Collectively, these multiple evaluations lead to a comprehensive analysis that makes use of all of the available information and is consistent with the risk assessment goals of the USEPA and other regulatory agencies, and in line with the recommendations of the USEPA Science Advisory Board. While a range of cancer risk values can result from these multiple factors, a preferred case for occupational and general population risk is highlighted. Cox proportional hazards models are used to fit exposure-response models to the most recent UAB data. The slope of the model with cumulative BD ppm-years as the predictor variable is not statistically significantly greater than zero for CML, AML, or, when any one of eight exposure covariates is added to the model, for all leukemias combined. The slope for CLL is statistically significantly different from zero. The slope for myeloid neoplasms is not statistically significantly greater than zero while the slope for lymphoid neoplasms is statistically significantly greater than zero. The excess risk for the general population is largest for lymphoid neoplasms. The best estimates of the environmental concentrations (ECs) associated with an excess risk of 1/100,000 by age 70 years for lymphoid neoplasms, all leukemias, and CLL are EC(1/100,000)'s equal to 0.06, 0.16 and 0.38 ppm, respectively. The best estimates of the occupational BD exposure from 20 to 65 years of age associated with an excess risk of 1/10,000 by age 70 years for lymphoid neoplasms, all leukemias, and CLL are the EC(1/10,000)'s of 2.7, 7.3 and 15.1 ppm, respectively. PMID:26070419

  5. An assessment of styrene emission control technologies for the FRP and boat building industries

    SciTech Connect

    Bahner, M.; Kong, E.; Turner, S.; Kaplan, N.

    1996-12-31

    Styrene emissions from open molding processes in fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP) and boat building facilities are typically diluted by general ventilation to ensure that worker exposures to not exceed Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards. This practice tends to increase the costs of add-on controls, since costs are strongly dependent on air flow rate through the control system. Also, add-on styrene emission controls are currently not generally mandated by regulations. Therefore, emission controls are infrequently used in these industries at present. In order to provide technical and cost information to companies that might choose emission controls to reduce styrene emissions, Research Triangle Institute (RTI), working with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), examined several emission control technologies that have been used to treat styrene emissions in the US and abroad. Control costs for these technologies were developed and compared for three hypothetical plant sizes. The results of this cost analysis indicate that increasing styrene concentration in the exhaust streams can significantly reduce cost per ton of styrene removed for all technologies examined. Therefore, a company should evaluate methods to increases concentrations in the exhaust stream before considering any add-on control devices. This paper also presents air flow management practices and enclosure concepts that could be used to create a concentrated exhaust stream while maintaining a safe working environment. 19 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Quantum dynamics study of singlet-triplet transitions in s-trans-1,3-butadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikoobakht, Behnam; Köppel, Horst

    2016-05-01

    The intersystem crossing dynamics of s-trans-1,3-butadiene in its lowest singlet and triplet states is studied theoretically, employing a fully quantal approach for the first time. The electronic states 21Ag, 11Bu, 13Bu and 13Ag, which interact vibronically and via the spin-orbit coupling are treated in the calculation, thus covering the lowest spin-forbidden electronic transitions. Up to five nuclear degrees of freedom, including out-of-plane dihedral angles are included in our investigation. The calculation of potential energy surfaces relies on the CASPT2 method, and the evaluation of spin-orbit coupling matrix elements using the full two-electron Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian is performed by utilizing the MRCI wavefunction. The latter dependence on the nuclear coordinates is included for the first time. An electronic population transfer on the sub-picosecond time scale due to intersystem crossing is obtained, a mechanism that can contribute to the singlet-triplet transitions in the electron energy loss spectrum of s-trans-1, 3-butadiene. It is found that the dependence of the spin-orbit coupling on the out-of-plane coordinates plays a dominant role in these singlet-triplet transitions. The amount of population transfer to the 13Ag and 13Bu states is roughly of the same order of magnitude.

  7. Acrylonitrile potentiates hearing loss and cochlear damage induced by moderate noise exposure in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pouyatos, BenoIt . E-mail: benoit.pouyatos@med.va.gov; Gearhart, Caroline A.; Fechter, Laurence D.

    2005-04-01

    The diversity of chemical and drugs that can potentiate noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) has impeded efforts to predict such interactions. We have hypothesized that chemical contaminants that disrupt intrinsic antioxidant defenses hold significant risk for potentiating NIHL. If this is true, then acrylonitrile (ACN) would be expected to potentiate NIHL. ACN, one of the 50 most commonly used chemicals in the United States, is metabolized via two pathways that are likely to disrupt intrinsic reactive oxygen species (ROS) buffering systems: (1) it conjugates glutathione, depleting this important antioxidant rapidly; (2) a second pathway involves the formation of cyanide, which can inhibit superoxide dismutase. We hypothesized that moderate noise exposure, that does not produce permanent hearing loss by itself, could initiate oxidative stress and that ACN could render the inner ear more sensitive to noise by disrupting intrinsic antioxidant defenses. Temporary and persistent effects of ACN alone (50 mg/kg, sc 5 days), noise alone (95 or 97 dB octave band noise, 4 h/day for 5 days), or ACN in combination with noise were determined using distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) and compound action potential (CAP) amplitudes. Histopathological damage to hair cells resulting from these treatments was also investigated using surface preparations of the organ of Corti. Individually, neither ACN nor noise exposures caused any permanent hearing or hair cell loss; only a reversible temporary threshold shift was measured in noise-exposed animals. However, when given in combination, ACN and noise induced permanent threshold shifts (13-16 dB between 7 and 40 kHz) and a decrease in DPOAE amplitudes (up to 25 dB at 19 kHz), as well as significant outer hair cell (OHC) loss (up to 20% in the first row between 13 and 47 kHz). This investigation demonstrates that ACN can potentiate NIHL at noise levels that are realistic in terms of human exposure, and that the OHCs are the main target of toxicity. While the exact mechanism is unknown, the results are consistent with the hypothesis of ROS involvement in NIHL at moderate levels.

  8. Two-year toxicity and oncogenicity study with acrylonitrile incorporated in the drinking water of rats.

    PubMed

    Quast, John F

    2002-06-24

    Sprague-Dawley rats (80 per sex per control and 48 per sex in each treatment group) were given drinking water formulated to contain 0, 35, 100, or 300 ppm acrylonitrile (AN) for up to 2-years. An additional ten rats per sex per group were added for a 1-year interim necropsy. The equivalent doses of AN consumed were 0, 3.4, 8.5, and 21.3 mg/kg per day for males and 0, 4.4, 10.8, and 25.0 for females. Rats were closely monitored clinically with body weight, feed and water consumption measured at numerous intervals. Hematology, clinical chemistry, and urinalysis were evaluated six times. All rats were necropsied when moribund, found dead, or at scheduled termination, with extensive histopathology of all rats. Numerous adverse toxic and oncogenic effects were observed in both sexes of all AN treatment groups. Decreased water consumption, feed consumption, and concomitant body weight suppression occurred within days of study initiation and persisted throughout the study in all treatment groups. An early onset of Zymbal gland tumors in high dose male and female rats, and in the mammary gland of all treated groups of females, was detected in-life. Hematology, clinical chemistry, and urinalysis, repeatedly evaluated, were without significant biological effects, except for an increased urine specific gravity due to the rats lower water intake. Organ weights at study termination were not significantly affected. Mortality was high in all female treated groups, with no surviving male or female 300 ppm rats during the last 2 months of the study. The most significant findings in this study were detected following gross and microscopic examination of an extensive list of tissues from all rats in the study. Nontumorous and tumorous lesions were found at an increased and/or decreased rate in a number of tissues of both sexes at all treatment levels. The primary nontumorous histopathologic effects of AN exposure occurred in the forestomach and the central nervous system of rats of both sexes and involved all treatment groups. A statistically significant increased incidence of tumors in one or more dose levels of either sex occurred in the central nervous system, Zymbal gland, forestomach, tongue, small instestine, and mammary gland. A no-observed-effect level (NOEL) was not identified in this study for toxicity or oncogenicity in either sex. PMID:12044703

  9. Controlled Release of Imidacloprid from Poly Styrene-Diacetone - Nanoformulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Kun; Guo, Yanzhen; He, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Imidacloprid is a neonicotinoids insecticide, which is important for the cash crops such as tomato, rape and so on. The conventional formulation does not only increase the loss of pesticide but also leads to environmental pollution. Controlled-release formulations of pesticide are highly desirable not only for attaining the most effective utilization of the pesticide, but also for reducing environmental pollution. Pesticide imidacloprid was incorporated in poly (styrene-diacetone crylamide)-based formulation to obtain controlled release properties, and the imidacloprid nanocontrolled release formulation was characterized by infrared (IR) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). Factors related to loading efficiency, swelling and release behaviors of the formulation were investigated. It showed that the loading efficiency could reach about 40% (w/w). The values for the diffusion exponent "n" were in the range of 0.31-0.58, which indicated that the release of imidacloprid was diffusion-controlled. The time taken for 50% of the active ingredient to be released into water, T50, was also calculated for the comparison of formulations in different conditions. The results showed that the formulation with higher temperature and more diacetone crylamide had lower value of T50, which means a quicker release of the active ingredient. This study highlighted some pieces of evidence that improved pesticide incorporation and slower release were linked to potential interactions between the pesticide and the polymer.

  10. A REVIEW OF THE GENETIC AND RELATED EFFECTS OF 1,3-BUTADIENE IN RODENTS AND HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper, the metabolism and genetic toxicity of 1,3-butadiene (BD) and its oxidative metabolites in humans and rodents is reviewed with attention to newer data that have been published since the latest evaluation of BD by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IAR...

  11. MICROBIAL REDUCTIVE DECHLORINATION OF HEXACHLORO-1,3-BUTADIENE IN A METHANOGENIC ENRICHMENT CULTURE. (R825513C007)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequential reductive dechlorination of hexachloro-1,3-butadiene (HCBD) was achieved by a mixed, methanogenic culture enriched from a contaminated estuarine sediment. Both methanol and lactate served as carbon and electron sources. Methanol was stoichiometrically converted to m...

  12. 77 FR 40087 - 1,3-Butadiene Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1,3-Butadiene Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and... No. OSHA-2012-0027, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, Room N... OSHA's estimate of the information collection burden is accurate. The Occupational Safety and...

  13. THE GAS PHASE REACTION OF OZONE WITH 1,3-BUTADIENE: FORMATION YIELDS OF SOME TOXIC PRODUCTS. (R826236)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation yields of acrolein, 1,2-epoxy-3-butene and OH radicals have been measured from reaction of ozone with 1,3-butadiene at room temperature and atmosphere pressure. 1,3,5-Trimethyl benzene was added to scavenge OH radicals in measurements of product yields. In separa...

  14. Aqueous-based immobilization of initiator and surface-initiated ATRP to construct hemocompatible surface of poly (styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene) elastomer.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jianwen; Shi, Qiang; Stagnaro, Paola; Ye, Wei; Jin, Jing; Conzatti, Lucia; Yin, Jinghua

    2013-11-01

    Surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) is a versatile tool for surface functionalization in a well-controlled manner. However, surface modification of styrenic thermoplastic elastomers (STPEs) faces a great challenge because immobilization of typical ATRP initiators onto STPEs needs to be carried out in organic solvent, which dissolves and destroys the STPEs film. In this work, a simple aqueous-based route is developed to immobilize ATRP initiators, Br, onto the surface of styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene elastomer (SEBS), chosen as a model copolymer of STPEs. In such a way, functional polymer brushes of ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (OEGMA) are successfully prepared from the surface of SEBS. Kinetic investigations show an approximately linear relationship between grafting density and reaction time, indicating the growth of chains is coincident with a "controlled" process. CBr bonds directly connected to benzene rings on the SEBS-Br surfaces are demonstrated to be effective initiation sites for SI-ATRP. The even coverage of the surface by well-defined P(OEGMA) brushes enable SEBS films to exhibit excellent resistance to protein adsorption and platelet adhesion as well as low hemolysis ratio. This work not only manipulates the SEBS surface to substantially improve its biocompatibility, but paves a way to facilitate SI-ATRP on the surface of styrene-based block copolymers (SBCs). PMID:23838201

  15. PAH formation under single collision conditions: reaction of phenyl radical and 1,3-butadiene to form 1,4-dihydronaphthalene.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, R I; Parker, D S N; Zhang, F; Landera, A; Kislov, V V; Mebel, A M

    2012-05-01

    The crossed beam reactions of the phenyl radical (C(6)H(5), X(2)A(1)) with 1,3-butadiene (C(4)H(6), X(1)A(g)) and D6-1,3-butadiene (C(4)D(6), X(1)A(g)) as well as of the D5-phenyl radical (C(6)D(5), X(2)A(1)) with 2,3-D2-1,3-butadiene and 1,1,4,4-D4-1,3-butadiene were carried out under single collision conditions at collision energies of about 55 kJ mol(-1). Experimentally, the bicyclic 1,4-dihydronaphthalene molecule was identified as a major product of this reaction (58 ± 15%) with the 1-phenyl-1,3-butadiene contributing 34 ± 10%. The reaction is initiated by a barrierless addition of the phenyl radical to the terminal carbon atom of the 1,3-butadiene (C1/C4) to form a bound intermediate; the latter underwent hydrogen elimination from the terminal CH(2) group of the 1,3-butadiene molecule leading to 1-phenyl-trans-1,3-butadiene through a submerged barrier. The dominant product, 1,4-dihydronaphthalene, is formed via an isomerization of the adduct by ring closure and emission of the hydrogen atom from the phenyl moiety at the bridging carbon atom through a tight exit transition state located about 31 kJ mol(-1) above the separated products. The hydrogen atom was found to leave the decomposing complex almost parallel to the total angular momentum vector and perpendicularly to the rotation plane of the decomposing intermediate. The defacto barrierless formation of the 1,4-dihydronaphthalene molecule involving a single collision between a phenyl radical and 1,3-butadiene represents an important step in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their partially hydrogenated counterparts in combustion and interstellar chemistry. PMID:22497458

  16. Detection of Phenolic Metabolites of Styrene in Mouse Liver and Lung Microsomal IncubationsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shuijie; Zhang, Fan; Gao, Lingbo; Zeng, Su

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic activation is considered to be a critical step for styrene-induced pulmonary toxicity. Styrene-7,8-oxide is a primary oxidative metabolite generated by vinyl epoxidation of styrene. In addition, urinary 4-vinylphenol (4-VP), a phenolic metabolite formed by aromatic hydroxylation, has been detected in workers and experimental animals after exposure to styrene. In the present study, new oxidative metabolites of styrene, including 2-vinylphenol (2-VP), 3-vinylphenol (3-VP), vinyl-1,4-hydroquinone, and 2-hydroxystyrene glycol were detected in mouse liver microsomal incubations. The production rates of 2-VP, 3-VP, 4-VP, and styrene glycol were 0.0527 ± 0.0045, 0.0019 ± 0.0006, 0.0053 ± 0.0002, and 4.42 ± 0.33 nmol/(min · mg protein) in mouse liver microsomes, respectively. Both disulfiram (100 μM) and 5-phenyl-1-pentyne (5 μM) significantly inhibited the formation of the VPs and styrene glycol. 2-VP, 3-VP, and 4-VP were metabolized in mouse liver microsomes at rates of 2.50 ± 0.30, 2.63 ± 0.13, and 3.45 ± 0.11 nmol/(min · mg protein), respectively. The three VPs were further metabolized to vinylcatechols and/or vinyl-1,4-hydroquinone and the corresponding glycols. Pulmonary toxicity of 2-VP, 3-VP, and 4-VP was evaluated in CD-1 mice, and 4-VP was found to be more toxic than 2-VP and 3-VP. PMID:20724499

  17. Accurate quantification of the mercapturic acids of acrylonitrile and its genotoxic metabolite cyanoethylene-epoxide in human urine by isotope-dilution LC-ESI/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Schettgen, T; Bertram, J; Kraus, T

    2012-08-30

    Acrylonitrile is a highly important industrial chemical with a high production volume worldwide, especially in the plastics industry. It is classified as a possible human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC group 2B). During metabolism of acrylonitrile, the genotoxic metabolite cyanoethylene-epoxide is formed. The urinary mercapturic acids of acrylonitrile, namely N-acetyl-S-(2-cyanoethyl)-L-cysteine (CEMA) and cyanoethylene-epoxide, namely N-acetyl-S-(1-cyano-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (CHEMA) are specific biomarkers for the determination of individual internal exposure to acrylonitrile and its highly reactive metabolite. We have developed and validated a sensitive method for the accurate determination of CEMA and CHEMA in human urine with a multidimensional LC/MS/MS-method using deuterium-labelled analogues for both analytes as internal standards. Analytes were stripped from urinary matrix by online extraction on a restricted access material, transferred to the analytical column and determined by tandem mass spectrometry. The limit of quantification (LOQ) for CEMA and CHEMA was 1 μg/L urine and allowed to quantify the background exposure of the (smoking) general population. Precision within and between series for CHEMA ranged from 2.6 to 8.0% at four concentrations ranging from 8.3 to 86 μg/L urine, mean accuracy was between 94 and 100%. For CEMA, precision within and between series ranged from 2.4 to 14.5% at four concentrations ranging from 15.1 to 196 μg/L urine, mean accuracy was between 91 and 104%. We applied the method to spot urine samples of 83 subjects of the general population with no known occupational exposure to acrylonitrile. Median levels (range) for CEMA and CHEMA in urine samples of non-smokers (n=47) were 1.9 μg/L (<1-16.4 μg/L) and<1 μg/L (<1-3 μg/L), while in urine samples of smokers (n=36), median levels were 184 μg/L (2-907 μg/L) and 29.3 μg/L (<1-147 μg/L), respectively. Smokers showed a significantly higher excretion of both acrylonitrile metabolites (p<0.001). Due to its automation and high sensitivity, our method is well suited for application in experimental studies on acrylonitrile metabolism or occupational studies. PMID:22939149

  18. Inhalation toxicology and carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene in B6C3F1 mice following 65 weeks of exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, R L; Huff, J E; Roycroft, J H; Chou, B J; Miller, R A

    1990-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene, a large-production volume chemical used mainly in the manufacture of synthetic rubber, was found to induce multiple-organ carcinogenicity in male and female B6C3F1 mice at exposure concentrations (625 and 1250 ppm) equivalent to and below the OSHA standard of 1000 ppm. Since this study was terminated after 60 weeks of exposure because of reduced survival due to fatal tumors, and because dose-response relationships for 1,3-butadiene-induced neoplastic and nonneoplastic lesions were not clearly established, a second long-term inhalation study of 1,3-butadiene in B6C3F1 mice was conducted at lower exposure concentrations, ranging from 6.25 to 625 ppm. Both the histopathological findings from animals dying through week 65 and the results of evaluations of animals exposed for 40 and 65 weeks are presented in this report. Exposure to 1,3-butadiene caused a regenerative anemia at concentrations of 62.5 ppm and higher. Testicular atrophy was induced at 625 ppm, and ovarian atrophy was observed at 20 ppm and higher. During the first 50 weeks of the study, lymphocytic lymphoma was the major cause of death of mice exposed to 625 ppm 1,3-butadiene. Neoplasms of the heart, forestomach, lung, Harderian gland, mammary gland, ovary, and liver were frequently observed in 1,3-butadiene-exposed mice that died between week 40 and week 65 of the study. Studies in which exposure to 1,3-butadiene was stopped after limited periods were also included to assess the relationship between exposure levels and duration of exposures on the outcome of 1,3-butadiene-induced carcinogenicity. In these studies, lymphocytic lymphomas were induced in male mice exposed to 625 ppm 1,3-butadiene for only 13 weeks. The incidence of lymphocytic lymphoma in male mice exposed to 625 ppm 1,3-butadiene for 26 weeks was two times that in mice exposed to 625 ppm for 13 weeks. However, when the exposure concentration was reduced by half to 312 ppm and the exposure duration extended to 52 weeks, the incidence of lymphocytic lymphoma was reduced by 90%. Thus, the multiple of the exposure concentration times the exposure duration did not predict the incidence of lymphocytic lymphoma in mice. The early mortalities resulting from lymphocytic lymphomas in male mice exposed to 625 ppm 1,3-butadiene limited the expression of tumors at other sites. A clearer dose-response for 1,3-butadiene-induced neoplasia should be apparent from experiments in mice exposed to lower concentrations of this chemical for 2 years. PMID:2401263

  19. Non-methane exhaust composition in the sydney harbour tunnel: A focus on benzene and 1,3-butadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Bronwyn L.; Nelson, Peter F.

    The concentrations of individual hydrocarbon species in the Sydney Harbour Tunnel were measured and used to estimate the average composition of emissions from moving motor vehicles in the Sydney urban area. The mean composition of non-methane hydrocarbons in the tunnel air on a weight basis was relatively constant. The mean concentrations for benzene and 1,3-butadiene were 45 and 13 ppbv, respectively, which in turn represented ˜ 5.2% w/w and ˜ 1.0% w/w of the total non-methane C 2C 10 hydrocarbons in the tunnel air. The unit risk factor and the maximum incremental reactivity factor for 1 1,3-butadiene are approximately 30 times higher and 25 times higher, respectively, than the corresponding values for benzene. The concentration (μg m -3) of benzene, however, is only about 5 times that of 1,3-butadiene. On this basis, the relative contribution to the risk associated with exposure to fresh motor vehicle emissions in Sydney would be about 6 times higher for 1,3-butadiene than for benzene. Similarly, the contribution made by 1,3-butadiene to the total hydrocarbon reactivity of the tunnel air will be about 5 times that of benzene. Samples of three different grades of petrol (leaded, unleaded and premium unleaded) from three different brands of fuel were also analysed on two separate occasions. Compositions of leaded and standard unleaded petrol averaged across the three different brands are quite similar. The average aromatic content (% w/w) of the 3 different commercial brands were ˜ 35 and 30% for leaded and unleaded petrol, respectively. However, premium unleaded petrol has a much higher aromatic content of ˜ 47% w/w. Comparison of the petrol and tunnel compositions demonstrated that benzene is enriched relative to other aromatics in exhaust compared to its proportion in the petrol.

  20. The effect of water absorption on the viscoelastic properties of poly(styrene-block-isobutylene-block-styrene) for use in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fittipaldi, Mauro; Rodriguez, Luis A.; Grace, Landon R.

    2015-05-01

    The decrease in glass transition temperature and change in creep compliance due to water diffusion in a biocompatible thermoplastic elastomer was studied and quantified. Knowledge of the mechanical and viscoelastic performance of the styrene-isobutylene-styrene block (SIBS) copolymer is important to determine the feasibility of certain in-vivo applications. Furthermore, the deterioration in these types of properties due to the plasticizing effect of water must be well understood for long term usage. Samples were formed with an injection molding press and fully dried prior to immersion in distilled water at 37°C. Water diffusion kinetics were studied for four different SIBS copolymers of varying molecular weight and styrene content by measuring weight changes as a function of time. These gravimetric diffusion studies showed an inverse relationship between diffusivity and styrene content and molecular weight for the first thousand hours of immersion. Measurements of storage modulus, loss modulus, tangent delta, strain recovery and creep compliance were performed using a dynamic mechanical analyzer for the high molecular weight, high styrene content SIBS version at different absorbed water contents. A measurable and nearly linear decrease of the glass transition temperature and creep recovery with respect to water content was observed for the samples tested even at relatively low water content: an increase in water content of 0.27% correlated to a decrease of 4°C in glass transition temperature while a 0.16% weight increase corresponded to a 12.5% decrease in creep recovery. These quantified material properties restrict the use of SIBS in certain implantable operations that undergo cyclic strains, and in sterilization techniques that require high temperatures. As such, they are important to understand in order to determine the viability of in vivo usage of this biocompatible polymer.

  1. Development and validation of personal monitoring methods for low levels of acrylonitrile in workplace atmosphere. II. Thermal desorption and field validation

    SciTech Connect

    Borders, R.A.; Gluck, S.J.; Sowle, W.F.; Melcher, R.G.

    1986-03-01

    Thermal desorption is a more sensitive alternative to solvent desorption for the determination of acrylonitrile in air. A dual-bed collection tube (Tenax GC and Carbosieve B) was developed for collecting and concentrating low levels of acrylonitrile. Two thermal desorption techniques were evaluated for the recovery of acrylonitrile collected on the dual-bed tubes over a concentration range from 0.05 to 5 ppm. A commercially-available system, the Century Programmable Thermal Desorption Unit, was easy to operate, allowed for multiple injections of the sample and had a recovery of 82 +/- 12% (RSD). Sampled were stored for up to two months without affecting the recovery and there was not an observable effect from humidity or from the presence of other organic compounds. This system was found to have limitations at acrylonitrile concentrations above 1 ppm. A field validation study tested the sampling and analytical methods developed for monitoring low levels of acrylonitrile in the workplace. Three methods employing Pittsburgh Coconut-Base activated charcoal, Ambersorb XE-348 and Tenax-GC and Carbosieve B sampling mediums were validated for concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 5 ppm and confirmed in the field from 0.02 to 3 ppm in tests conducted at plant sites. These field studies were run over varying humidity and temperature conditions. The overall absolute recoveries and relative standard deviations found for these methods found during the field trials are 90 +/- 18% for charcoal; 85 +/- 11% for Ambersorb XE-348; and 90 +/- 19% for the Century dual-bed sorbent. These values were in quite good agreement with the 91 +/- 10%, 88 +/- 8%, and 82 +/- 12% determined in laboratory studies.

  2. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Anhydride Resins Styrene Polymeric Residue *Styrene-Acrylic Copolymer Resins *Styrene-Acrylonitrile... *Ethylene-Methacrylic Acid Copolymers *Ethylene-Vinyl Acetate Copolymers *Fatty Acid Resins *Fluorocarbon... Polyacrylic Acid *Polyamides *Polyarylamides Polybutadiene *Polybutenes Polybutenyl Succinic...

  3. Copolymers of acrylonitrile with quaternizable thiazole and triazole side-chain methacrylates as potent antimicrobial and hemocompatible systems.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Rubn; Gutirrez, Beatriz; Lpez, Daniel; Lpez-Fabal, Ftima; Gmez-Garcs, Jos L; Fernndez-Garca, Marta

    2015-10-01

    A series of six copolymeric families, P(AN-co-MTAs) with various molar fractions of acrylonitrile (fAN) and methacrylates (fMTA) based on 1,3-thiazole and 1,2,3-triazole pendant groups with several spacers of different length and nature (alkyl or succinic), have been synthesized by conventional radical polymerization. The molar fraction of acrylonitrile in the copolymers (FAN) was determined by CHNS elemental analysis. The copolymers were also characterized by ATR-FTIR and molecular weights were determined by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Due to the nucleophilic nature of the azole heterocycles the copolymers have been easily modified by N-alkylation reaction with butyl iodide leading to polyelectrolytes of diverse amphiphilic balance, P(AN-co-MTAs-BuI). The degree of quaternization (DQ) was quantitative in all instances and was determined by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements were performed in order to determine the particle size and the charge density of the systems. The antimicrobial activity of the copolymers was studied in terms of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, the Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the yeast Candida parapsilosis, as well as the cytotoxic activity toward human red blood cells (RBCs). These types of amphiphilic copolycations presented high selectivity (>300) maintaining moderate to good antimicrobial activity (MIC=4-64 ?g/mL) and being non-hemolytic even at high molar fractions of AN in the copolymers compared to PMTAs-BuI homopolymers. Moreover, two examples of acrylonitrile-enriched copolymers (FAN=0.6) presented an excellent time-killing efficiency against microorganisms with 99.9% of killing ranging from 5 to 30 min. Besides, important changes in the morphology of the cell envelop of the microorganisms after treatment with P(AN-co-MTAs) were observed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) compared to untreated samples. These results indicate that these quaternized copolymers (QUATs) behave like the corresponding PMTAs-BuI homopolymers, being microbiostatic and also highly effective microbiocidal agents. PMID:26219860

  4. Highly thermostable anatase titania-pillared clay for the photocatalytic degradation of airborne styrene.

    PubMed

    Lim, Melvin; Zhou, Yan; Wood, Barry; Wang, Lian Zhou; Rudolph, Victor; Lu, Gao Qing

    2009-01-15

    Airborne styrene is a suspected human carcinogen, and traditional ways of mitigation include the use of adsorption technologies (activated carbon or zeolites) or thermal destruction. These methods presenttheir own shortcomings, i.e., adsorbents need to be regenerated or replaced regularly, and relatively large energy inputs are required in thermal treatment. Photocatalysis offers a potentially sustainable and clean means of controlling such fugitive emissions of styrene in air. The present study demonstrates a new type of well-characterized, highly thermostable titania-pillared clay photocatalysts for airborne styrene decomposition in a custom-designed fluidized-bed photoreactor. This photocatalytic system is found to be capable of destroying up to 87% of 300 ppmV airborne styrene in the presence of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The effects of relative humidity (RH: 0 or 20%) are also studied, together with the arising physical structures (in terms of porosity and surface characteristics) of the catalysts when subjected to relatively high calcination temperatures of 1000-1200 degrees C. Such a temperature range may be encountered, e.g., in flue gas emissions (1). It is found that relative humidity levels of 20% retard the degradation efficiencies of airborne styrene when using highly porous catalysts. PMID:19238991

  5. Case study: Biofiltration of styrene and butylacetate at a dashboard manufacturer

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, M.S.; Nieuwland, J.C.; Lith, C. van

    1999-09-30

    Holzindustie Bruchsal (HIB) was required to treat moderate levels of styrene emissions from their plastic dashboard manufacturing process. After evaluating many types of control technologies, HIB decided to install a Bioton biofiltration system from Monsanto Enviro-Chem Systems Inc. (MEC). After the installation of the Bioton biofilter, HIB and MEC learned that large amounts of butylacetate were also present in the off-gas stream. The presence of butylacetate was found to have inhibitory effects on the removal of styrene. Therefore, MEC performed a series of pilot and laboratory studies to determine if a bacteria strain could be identified that would be capable of removing styrene in the presence of butylacetate. It was found that a specific bacteria strain was capable of achieving high levels of styrene removal without inhibition from butylacetate in laboratory and pilot testing. This strain was inoculated into the full scale system. After acclimation, the full scale inoculation produced a consortium of bacteria that biologically removed the styrene from the dashboard manufacturing process in the presence of butylacetate.

  6. Biofiltration of mixtures of gas-phase styrene and acetone with the fungus Sporothrix variecibatus.

    PubMed

    Rene, Eldon R; Spačková, Radka; Veiga, María C; Kennes, Christian

    2010-12-15

    The biodegradation performance of a biofilter, inoculated with the fungus Sporothrix variecibatus, to treat gas-phase styrene and acetone mixtures under steady-state and transient conditions was evaluated. Experiments were carried out by varying the gas-flow rates (0.05-0.4m(3)h(-1)), leading to empty bed residence times as low as 17.1s, and by changing the concentrations of gas-phase styrene (0.01-6.3 g m(-3)) and acetone (0.01-8.9 g m(-3)). The total elimination capacities were as high as 360 g m(-3)h(-1), with nearly 97.5% removal of styrene and 75.6% for acetone. The biodegradation of acetone was inhibited by the presence of styrene, while styrene removal was affected only slightly by the presence of acetone. During transient-state experiments, increasing the overall pollutant load by almost 3-fold, i.e., from 220 to 600 g m(-3)h(-1), resulted in a sudden drop of removal efficiency (>90-70%), but still high elimination capacities were maintained. Periodic microscopic observations revealed that the originally inoculated Sporothrix sp. remained present in the reactor and actively dominant in the biofilm. PMID:20869172

  7. Linear chains of styrene and methylstyrene molecules and their heterojunctions on silicon: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirczenow, George; Piva, Paul G.; Wolkow, Robert A.

    2005-12-01

    We report on the synthesis, scanning tunnel microscope (STM) imaging, and theoretical studies of the structure, electronic structure, and transport properties of linear chains of styrene and methylstyrene molecules and their heterojunctions on hydrogen-terminated dimerized silicon (001) surfaces. The theory presented here accounts for the essential features of the experimental STM data including the nature of the corrugation observed along the molecular chains and the pronounced changes in the contrast between the styrene and methylstyrene parts of the molecular chains that are observed as the applied bias is varied. The observed evolution with applied bias of the STM profiles near the ends of the molecular chains is also explained. Calculations are also presented of electron transport along styrene linear chains adsorbed on the silicon surface at energies in the vicinity of the molecular highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) levels. For short styrene chains this lateral transport is found to be due primarily to direct electron transmission from molecule to molecule rather than through the silicon substrate, especially in the molecular LUMO band. Differences between the calculated position dependences of the STM current around a junction of styrene and methylstyrene molecular chains under positive and negative tip bias are related to the nature of lateral electron transmission along the molecular chains and to the formation in the LUMO band of an electronic state localized around the heterojunction.

  8. The effect of spraying and rolling process factors on styrene emission during the application of unsaturated polyester resins.

    PubMed

    Säämänen, Arto; Skrifvars, Mikael

    2002-01-01

    In recent years the awareness of the problems caused by styrene emission during the processing of unsaturated polyester resins has enlarged. The spray-up application of gel coats is especially problematic, and it produces high styrene emission rates. The emission of styrene has been reduced through material changes, work practice controls, and add-on controls. However, the influence of the spray-up process factors on styrene emission has not been studied before. The aim of this study was to examine possibilities to reduce styrene emission by optimization of spray-up process factors. The following factors were studied under controlled laboratory conditions: orifice size and angle of the spray gun tip, spraying pressure, distance between spray gun and mold, and shape of the mold. The influence of the rolling pattern during lamination was also studied. Several significant factors were found. High pressure and long spraying distance increased both the unit styrene emission and the emission rate. The orifice size had two effects; a large orifice decreased the amount of styrene emitted per sprayed amount of resin but increased the emission rate of styrene. The shape of the mold did not affect the styrene emission. Styrene emission is greater if the entire mold area is rolled. To achieve lower emission is it necessary to roll an area as small as possible; this is especially important if a large mold is laminated. The results showed that emission of styrene can be reduced significantly by an optimal selection of the spray gun settings and the way of working. Optimal settings also increased the transfer efficiency resulting in decreased material loss. PMID:12486781

  9. Grafting titanium nitride surfaces with sodium styrene sulfonate thin films

    PubMed Central

    Zorn, Gilad; Migonney, Véronique; Castner, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of titanium nitride lies in its high hardness and its remarkable resistance to wear and corrosion, which has led to its use as a coating for the heads of hip prostheses, dental implants and dental surgery tools. However, the usefulness of titanium nitride coatings for biomedical applications could be significantly enhanced by modifying their surface with a bioactive polymer film. The main focus of the present work was to graft a bioactive poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) (pNaSS) thin film from titanium nitride surfaces via a two-step procedure: first modifying the surface with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and then grafting the pNaSS film from the MPS modified titanium through free radical polymerization. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used after each step to characterize success and completeness of each reaction. The surface region of the titanium nitride prior to MPS functionalization and NaSS grafting contained a mixture of titanium nitride, oxy-nitride, oxide species as well as adventitious surface contaminants. After MPS functionalization, Si was detected by XPS, and characteristic MPS fragments were detected by ToF-SIMS. After NaSS grafting, Na and S were detected by XPS and characteristic NaSS fragments were detected by ToF-SIMS. The XPS determined thicknesses of the MPS and NaSS overlayers were ∼1.5 and ∼1.7 nm, respectively. The pNaSS film density was estimated by the toluidine blue colorimetric assay to be 260 ± 70 ng/cm2. PMID:25280842

  10. Tetraphenyl-butadiene films: VUV-Vis optical characterization from room to liquid argon temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francini, R.; Montereali, R. M.; Nichelatti, E.; Vincenti, M. A.; Canci, N.; Segreto, E.; Cavanna, F.; Di Pompeo, F.; Carbonara, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Perfetto, F.

    2013-09-01

    A thin film of Tetraphenyl-butadiene (TPB) deposited onto the surface delimiting the active volume of the detector and/or onto the photosensor's optical window is the most common solution to down convert argon VUV scintillation light in current and planned liquid argon based experiments for dark matter searches and neutrino physics. Characterization of the main features of TPB coatings on different, commonly used substrates is reported, as a result of measurements at the specialized optical metrology labs of ENEA and University of Tor Vergata. Measured features include TPB emission spectra with lineshape and relative intensity variation recorded as a function of the film thickness and for the first time down to LAr temperature, as well as optical reflectance and transmittance spectra of the TPB coated substrates in the wavelength range of the TPB emission.

  11. Migration study of 1,3-butadiene in eye-drop solutions.

    PubMed

    Pistos, Constantinos; Karampela, Sevasti; Vardakou, Ioanna; Papoutsis, Ioannis; Spiliopoulou, Chara; Athanaselis, Sotiris

    2012-07-01

    The potential deleterious effects of extractables/leachables in pharmaceutical products led the USP, EP, and JP to require extractable and toxicity testing of container/closure systems. To that, a headspace gas chromatography flame ionization detection method was developed and validated for the determination of 1,3-butadiene (1,3-BD) as a potential extractable residue from a pharmaceutical container/closure system into eye-drop solutions. A migration study was further applied in eight eye-drop solutions (currently marketed products) after short- and long-term exposure of these products at various temperatures. This method allows the establishment of safety-qualification thresholds for 1,3-BD being capable of monitoring eye-drop solution products for this residue. PMID:22187982

  12. Fluorescence Efficiency and Visible Re-emission Spectrum of Tetraphenyl Butadiene Films at Extreme Ultraviolet Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehman, Victor; Seibert, Stanley; Hime, Andrew; Rielage, Keith; Sun, Yongchen; Mei, Dongming; Massen, Joel; Moore, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    There are a large number of direct dark matter and neutrino detection experiments either in construction or in planning which will use the scintillation light from noble elements as a mechanism for measuring radiation deposition. This scintillation light is emitted in extreme ultraviolet (EUV, 100--200 nm) wavelengths. There are very few photon detectors directly sensitive to this wavelength that are also capable of detecting the very small number of photons expected from signal events in such detectors. The most technically feasible solution to this problem is to surround the noble element volume with a thin film of Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB) to act as a fluor. The TPB film shifts the EUV photons to visible photons, detectable with commercial photomultiplier tubes. Here we present a study of the fluorescence efficiency of such films as well as the shape of the visible re-emission spectral shape at several input EUV wavelengths.

  13. Fluorescence efficiency and visible re-emission spectrum of tetraphenyl butadiene films at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehman, V. M.; Seibert, S. R.; Rielage, K.; Hime, A.; Sun, Y.; Mei, D.-M.; Maassen, J.; Moore, D.

    2011-10-01

    A large number of current and future experiments in neutrino and dark matter detection use the scintillation light from noble elements as a mechanism for measuring energy deposition. The scintillation light from these elements is produced in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) range, from 60 to 200 nm. Currently, the most practical technique for observing light at these wavelengths is to surround the scintillation volume with a thin film of tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) to act as a fluor. The TPB film absorbs EUV photons and re-emits visible photons, detectable with a variety of commercial photosensors. Here we present a measurement of the re-emission spectrum of TPB films when illuminated with 128, 160, 175, and 250 nm light. We also measure the fluorescence efficiency as a function of incident wavelength from 120 to 250 nm.

  14. Laser-Induced Selectivity for Dimerization Versus Polymerization of Butadiene Under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citroni, Margherita; Ceppatelli, Matteo; Bini, Roberto; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2002-03-01

    The pressure-induced chemical reaction of liquid butadiene was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell. Dimerization was found to occur above 0.7 gigapascal, giving vinylcyclohexene according to a cyclo-addiction reaction and only a trace amount of polybutadiene forms. By irradiating the high-pressure sample with a few milliwatts of the 488-nanometer argon+ laser line, the dimerization was completely inhibited, and the rapid formation of pure trans-polybutadiene was observed. The use of different excitation wavelength allows us to emphasize the selectivity of the process and to identify the active role of the 21Ag state in this pressure- and laser-induced chemical reaction.

  15. Optimization of mechanical performance of oxidative nano-particle electrode nitrile butadiene rubber conducting polymer actuator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Baek-Chul; Park, S J; Cho, M S; Lee, Y; Nam, J D; Choi, H R; Koo, J C

    2009-12-01

    Present work delivers a systematical evaluation of actuation efficiency of a nano-particle electrode conducting polymer actuator fabricated based on Nitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR). Attempts are made for maximizing mechanical functionality of the nano-particle electrode conducting polymer actuator that can be driven in the air. As the conducting polymer polypyrrole of the actuator is to be fabricated through a chemical oxidation polymerization process that may impose certain limitations on both electrical and mechanical functionality of the actuator, a coordinated study for optimization process of the actuator is necessary for maximizing its performance. In this article actuation behaviors of the nano-particle electrode polypyrrole conducting polymer is studied and an optimization process for the mechanical performance maximization is performed. PMID:19908773

  16. Prediction of the lifetime of nitrile-butadiene rubber by FT-IR.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Toshio

    2005-12-01

    A quantitative measurement method with FT-IR was proposed for a thermal degradation analysis of nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR). An NBR film was prepared as a model sample on a barium fluoride (BaF2) crystal plate, which was subjected to a heat treatment. The absorbances of various functional groups were measured directly by FT-IR after thermal degradation at high temperatures. By measuring the absorbances, it was possible to readily determine quantitatively each of the functional groups after the degradation of NBR. By assuming that the NBR lifetime was the point at which the absorbance of a carbon-carbon double bond reaches 45% of that prior to thermal treatment, a method for predicting the lifetime of NBR heated below 150 degrees C was proposed, by using an Arrhenius plot of the heating time versus heating temperature. PMID:16379389

  17. Homogeneous single-component betaine Ziegler-Natta catalysts derived from (butadiene)zirconocene precursors.

    PubMed

    Erker, G

    2001-04-01

    (Butadiene)zirconocene adds B(C(6)F(5))(3) at a terminal diene carbon atom to yield the zirconocene-(mu-hydrocarbyl)-borate betaine Cp(2)Zr[C(4)H(6)-B(C(6)F(5))(3)] (4). The dipolar complex 4 contains a distorted pi-allyl moiety and features an additional stabilizing Zr-F-C(arene) coordination. Under kinetic control, an isomeric betaine system is formed, characterized by an internal Zr(+).CH(2)[B](-) ion-pair interaction, that rearranges to 4 upon heating. A great variety of ansa-metallocene(butadiene) complexes and related systems cleanly form analogous metallocene-(mu-conjugated diene)-borate betaines upon treatment with B(C(6)F(5))(3) and related Lewis acids. Most of these systems represent very active homogeneous single-component Ziegler-Natta catalysts for alpha-olefin polymerization and copolymerization. In addition, these betaine catalysts are ideally suited for carrying out mechanistic studies in active Ziegler-Natta catalyst systems. They allow for an experimental observation of the first alkene insertion step at the active single-component catalyst. This feature has been used for studying the mechanism of transfer of the stereochemical information from the bent metallocene backbone and for an experimental characterization of the energy profile of the alkene addition/alkene insertion reaction sequence in active homogeneous Ziegler-Natta systems. The neutral dipolar single-component catalysts (e.g., 4) produce a polyolefin-modified R'-(CHR-CH(2))-C(4)H(6)-B(C(6)F(5))(3)(-) counterion at the end of the initiation period upon entering into the repetitive active catalytic cycle. PMID:11308305

  18. Effects of Surfactants on the Properties of Mortar Containing Styrene/Methacrylate Superplasticizer

    PubMed Central

    Negim, El-Sayed; Kozhamzharova, Latipa; Khatib, Jamal; Bekbayeva, Lyazzat; Williams, Craig

    2014-01-01

    The physical and mechanical properties of mortar containing synthetic cosurfactants as air entraining agent are investigated. The cosurfactants consist of a combination of 2% dodecyl benzene sodium sulfonate (DBSS) and either 1.5% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) or 1.5% polyoxyethylene glycol monomethyl ether (POE). Also these cosurfactants were used to prepare copolymers latex: styrene/butyl methacrylate (St/BuMA), styrene/methyl methacrylate (St/MMA), and styrene/glycidyl methacrylate (St/GMA), in order to study their effects on the properties of mortar. The properties of mortar examined included flow table, W/C ratio, setting time, water absorption, compressive strength, and combined water. The results indicate that the latex causes improvement in mortar properties compared with cosurfactants. Also polymer latex containing DBSS/POE is more effective than that containing DBSS/PVA. PMID:24955426

  19. Final Technical Report - Autothermal Styrene Manufacturing Process with Net Export of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Trubac, Robert , E.; Lin, Feng; Ghosh, Ruma: Greene, Marvin

    2011-11-29

    The overall objectives of the project were to: (a) develop an economically competitive processing technology for styrene monomer (SM) that would reduce process energy requirements by a minimum 25% relative to those of conventional technology while achieving a minimum 10% ROI; and (b) advance the technology towards commercial readiness. This technology is referred to as OMT (Oxymethylation of Toluene). The unique energy savings feature of the OMT technology would be replacement of the conventional benzene and ethylene feedstocks with toluene, methane in natural gas and air or oxygen, the latter of which have much lower specific energy of production values. As an oxidative technology, OMT is a net energy exporter rather than a net energy consumer like the conventional ethylbenzene/styrene (EB/SM) process. OMT plants would ultimately reduce the cost of styrene monomer which in turn will decrease the costs of polystyrene making it perhaps more cost competitive with competing polymers such as polypropylene.

  20. Selective and Stable Ethylbenzene Dehydrogenation to Styrene over Nanodiamonds under Oxygen-lean Conditions.

    PubMed

    Diao, Jiangyong; Feng, Zhenbao; Huang, Rui; Liu, Hongyang; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Su, Dang Sheng

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, significant improvement of the catalytic performance of nanodiamonds was achieved for the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene under oxygen-lean conditions. We demonstrated that the combination of direct dehydrogenation and oxidative dehydrogenation indeed occurred on the nanodiamond surface throughout the reaction system. It was found that the active sp(2) -sp(3) hybridized nanostructure was well maintained after the long-term test and the active ketonic carbonyl groups could be generated in situ. A high reactivity with 40 % ethylbenzene conversion and 92 % styrene selectivity was obtained over the nanodiamond catalyst under oxygen-lean conditions even after a 240 h test, demonstrating the potential of this procedure for application as a promising industrial process for the ethylbenzene dehydrogenation to styrene without steam protection. PMID:26871428