Science.gov

Sample records for acrylonitrile stanniciv tungstate

  1. Acrylonitrile

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylonitrile ; CASRN 107 - 13 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  2. Acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR)/manganous tungstate (MnWO4) nanocomposites: Characterization, mechanical and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesan, M. T.; Abdu Raheem V., P.; Jayakrishnan, P.; Pradyumnan, P. P.

    2014-10-01

    Nanocomposites of NBR with manganous-tungstate nanoparticles were prepared through vulcanization process. The extent of interaction of nanoparticles with the polymer was studied by FTIR, SEM, XRD, TGA and AC conductivity. FTIR and XRD ascertain the interaction of NBR with MnWO4 nanoparticles. SEM analysis established that the nanopartilces were well dispersed in the macromolecular chain of NBR. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposites were studied as a function of filler loading. The nanocomposites exhibited enhanced thermal stability as seen in TGA. Conductivity and dielectric properties of nanocomposites increase with increase in concentration of MnWO4 nanoparticles (7phr) and thereafter the value decreases.

  3. Health Assessment Document for Acrylonitrile (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute acrylonitrile intoxication in humans, like many volatile organic compounds, results in irritation of the eyes and nose, weakness, labored breathing, dizziness, impaired judgement, cyanosis, nausea, and convulsions. Unlike many of these other organics, acrylonitrile causes s...

  4. ACRYLONITRILE PLANT AIR POLLUTION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Based on available literature, the report identifies and ranks (in terms of efficiency, cost, and energy requirements) air pollution control technologies for each of four major air pollutant emission sources in acrylonitrile plants. The sources are: (1) absorber vent gas streams,...

  5. HEALTH ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT FOR ACRYLONITRILE (REVISED DRAFT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acrylonitrile is readily absorbed in animals following ingestion or inhalation, while dermal absorption is poor (1%) compared to that of the lungs. Acrylonitrile is metabolized to cyanide, which is transformed to thiocyanic acid and by cyanoethylation of sulfhydryl groups to S-(2...

  6. 21 CFR 180.22 - Acrylonitrile copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD OR IN CONTACT WITH FOOD ON AN INTERIM BASIS PENDING ADDITIONAL STUDY Specific Requirements for Certain Food Additives § 180.22 Acrylonitrile copolymers. Acrylonitrile copolymers may be... uses subject to the denial are thereafter unapproved food additives and consequently unlawful. (3)...

  7. 40 CFR 721.505 - Halogenated acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.505 Halogenated acrylonitrile. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated acrylonitrile, (PMN P-90-299)...

  8. 40 CFR 721.505 - Halogenated acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.505 Halogenated acrylonitrile. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated acrylonitrile, (PMN P-90-299)...

  9. Ion-Molecule Association in Acrylonitrile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Paul F.; Milligan, Daniel B.; McEwan, Murray J.

    1997-01-01

    Acrylonitrile (propernenitrile or vinyl cyanide) polymerizes readily via a radical mechanism in solution at room temparature. The propensity to polymerize is sufficiently strong that it is usual to add a radical scavenger to the solution to prevent polymerization when oxygen (an inhibitor) is removed. Polymerization of acrylonitrile is also know to occur via nucleophilic addition of an anion by a michael-type reaction.

  10. Lowest Vibrational States of Acrylonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiel, Zbigniew; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Pirali, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies of the broadband rotational spectrum of acrylonitrile, H_2C=CHC≡N, revealed the presence of multiple resonances between rotational levels in different vibrational states. The resonances affect even the ground state transitions and their analysis allowed determination of vibrational term values for the first three excited states above the ground state and of vibrational energy differences in several polyads above these states. At that time there was no infrared data of sufficient resolution to assess the reliability of the resonance based vibrational energy determinations. We presently report results based on a 40-700 cm-1 high-resolution spectrum of acrylonitrile recorded at the AILES beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron. This spectrum was reduced by using the AABS packagea, and allowed assignment of vibration-rotation transitions in four fundamentals, five hot bands, and one overtone band. The infrared data and previous measurements made with microwave techniques have been combined into a single global fit encompassing over 31000 measured transitions. Precise vibrational term values have been determined for the eight lowest excited vibrational states. The new results validate the previous estimates from rotational perturbations and are also compared with results of ab~initio anharmonic force field calculations. Z. Kisiel, et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 280 134 (2012). A. López, et al., Astron. & Astrophys. 572, A44 Z. Kisiel, et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 233 231 (2005).

  11. Vanadate, molybdate and tungstate for orthomolecular medicine.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, J

    1994-09-01

    Recent studies indicate that oxyanions, such as vanadate (V) or vanadyl (IV), cause insulin-like effects on rats by stimulating the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. Tungstate (VI) and molybdate (VI) show the same effects on rat adipocytes and hepatocytes. Results of uncontrolled trials on volunteers accumulated in Japan also suggest that tungstate effectively regulates diabetes mellitus without detectable side effects. Since these oxyanions naturally exist in organisms, oxyanion therapy, the oral administration of vanadate, vanadyl, molybdate, or tungstate, can be considered to be orthomolecular medicine. Therefore, these oxyanions may provide a viable alternative to chemotherapy. Many diseases in addition to diabetes mellitus might also be treated since the implication of these results is that tyrosine kinases are involved in a variety of diseases. PMID:7815975

  12. Morphology Tuning of Strontium Tungstate Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, S.; George, T.; George, K. C.; Sunny, A. T.; Mathew, S.

    2007-08-22

    Strontium tungstate nanocrystals in two different morphologies are successfully synthesized by controlled precipitation in aqueous and in poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) medium. Structural characterizations are carried out by XRD and SEM. The average particle size calculated for the SrWO4 prepared in the two different solvents ranges 20-24 nm. The SEM pictures show that the surface morphologies of the SrWO4 nanoparticles in aqueous medium resemble mushroom and the SrWO4 nanoparticles in PVA medium resemble cauliflower. Investigations on the room temperature luminescent properties of the strontium tungstate nanoparticles prepared in aqueous and PVA medium shows strong emissions around 425 nm.

  13. Synthesis procedure optimization and characterization of europium (III) tungstate nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Reza Banan, Ali; Ahmadi, Farhad

    2014-09-01

    Taguchi robust design as a statistical method was applied for the optimization of process parameters in order to tunable, facile and fast synthesis of europium (III) tungstate nanoparticles. Europium (III) tungstate nanoparticles were synthesized by a chemical precipitation reaction involving direct addition of europium ion aqueous solution to the tungstate reagent solved in an aqueous medium. Effects of some synthesis procedure variables on the particle size of europium (III) tungstate nanoparticles were studied. Analysis of variance showed the importance of controlling tungstate concentration, cation feeding flow rate and temperature during preparation of europium (III) tungstate nanoparticles by the proposed chemical precipitation reaction. Finally, europium (III) tungstate nanoparticles were synthesized at the optimum conditions of the proposed method. The morphology and chemical composition of the prepared nano-material were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and fluorescence.

  14. HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS PROFILE FOR ACRYLONITRILE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Health and Environmental Effects Profile for acrylonitrile was prepared by the Office of Health and Environmental Assessment, Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office, Cincinnati, OH for the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response to support listings of hazardous con...

  15. IRIS Toxicological Review of Acrylonitrile (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    [UPDATE] New Schedule for IRIS Acrylonitrile Assessment

    In May 2012, EPA developed a new schedule for completing the IRIS acrylonitrile assessment. Acrylonitrile is primarily used in the manufacture of acrylic and modacrylic fibers, plastics, and nitrile rubbers. It ...

  16. Electrosynthesis and characterization of zinc tungstate nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh; Zahedi, Mir Mahdi

    2013-09-01

    Zinc tungstate nanoparticles with different sizes are produced through an electrolysis process including a zinc plate anode in sodium tungstate solution. The shape and size of the product was found to be controlled by varying reaction parameters such as electrolysis voltage, stirring rate of electrolyte solution and temperature. The morphological (SEM) characterization analysis was performed on the product and UV-Vis spectrophotometry and FT-IR spectroscopy was utilized to characterize the electrodeposited nanoparticles. Study of the particle size of the product versus the electrolysis voltage showed that, increasing the voltage from 4 to 8 V, led to the particle size of zinc tungstate to decrease, but further increasing the voltage from 8 to 12 V, the particle size of the produced particles increased. The size and shape of the product was also found to be dependent on the stirring rate and temperature of the electrolyte solution. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), FT-IR spectroscopy, and photoluminescence, were used to study the structure as well as composition of the nano-material prepared under optimum conditions.

  17. 29 CFR 1915.1045 - Acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylonitrile. 1915.1045 Section 1915.1045 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Toxic and Hazardous...

  18. 40 CFR 721.505 - Halogenated acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated acrylonitrile, (PMN P-90-299) is... specified in § 721.125 (a) through (h). (2) Limitations or revocation of certain notification requirements... Section 721.505 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC...

  19. 40 CFR 721.505 - Halogenated acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated acrylonitrile, (PMN P-90-299) is... specified in § 721.125 (a) through (h). (2) Limitations or revocation of certain notification requirements... Section 721.505 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC...

  20. Denitrification with acrylonitrile as a substrate using pure bacteria cultures isolated from acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, C C; Lee, C M

    2001-04-01

    This study attempted to isolate and identify the denitrifying bacteria that utilize acrylonitrile as a substrate from acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) resin wastewater. The performance of the denitrifying bacteria for treating different initial acrylonitrile concentrations was also investigated under anoxic conditions. The results showed that seven strains of denitrifying bacteria that can use acrylonitrile or acrylic acid as a substrate were isolated from the denitrification tank of a wastewater treatment plant in a ABS resin manufacturing plant and a lab-scale anoxic granular activated carbon-fluidized bed. The bacteria strains Acidovorax facilis B and Pseudomonas nautica could utilize acrylonitrile up to 279 mg/l as a substrate for denitrification. For complete nitrate removal, an adequate supply of acrylonitrile was necessary. Under the assumption that the acrylic acid would be completely removed, the removal of 1 mg/l nitrate by A. facilis B or P. nautica, about 0.64-0.74 mg/l acrylonitrile or 0.87-1 mg/l acrylic acid was needed. Because strains A. facilis B and P. nautica could utilize acrylonitrile for denitrification, they are expected to play an important role in the treatment of acrylonitrile in the wastewater treatment plant (denitrification and nitrification processes) and lab-scale granular activated carbon-fluidized bed. PMID:11341291

  1. 21 CFR 181.32 - Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins. 181.32 Section 181.32 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PRIOR-SANCTIONED FOOD INGREDIENTS Specific Prior-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.32 Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins. (a)...

  2. ABSORPTION OF CO2 IN HIGH ACRYLONITRILE CONTENT COPOLYMERS: DEPENDENCE ON ACRYLONITRILE CONTENT. (R829555)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In continuation of our goal to determine the ability of CO2 to plasticize acrylonitrile (AN) copolymers and facilitate melt processing at temperatures below the onset of thermal degradation, a systematic study has been performed to determine the influence of AN cont...

  3. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177... Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1020 Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile... by weight of a matrix polymer containing 73 to 78 parts by weight of acrylonitrile and 22 to 27...

  4. [Migrants from disposable gloves and residual acrylonitrile].

    PubMed

    Wakui, C; Kawamura, Y; Maitani, T

    2001-10-01

    Disposable gloves made from polyvinyl chloride with and without di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (PVC-DEHP, PVC-NP), polyethylene (PE), natural rubber (NR) and nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) were investigated with respect to evaporation residue, migrated metals, migrants and residual acrylonitrile. The evaporation residue found in n-heptane was 870-1,300 ppm from PVC-DEHP and PVC-NP, which was due to the plasticizers. Most of the PE gloves had low evaporation residue levels and migrants, except for the glove designated as antibacterial, which released copper and zinc into 4% acetic acid. For the NR and NBR gloves, the evaporation residue found in 4% acetic acid was 29-180 ppm. They also released over 10 ppm of calcium and 6 ppm of zinc into 4% acetic acid, and 1.68-8.37 ppm of zinc di-ethyldithiocarbamate and zinc di-n-butyldithiocarbamate used as vulcanization accelerators into n-heptane. The acrylonitrile content was 0.40-0.94 ppm in NBR gloves. PMID:11775358

  5. 40 CFR 721.9840 - Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9840 Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as tungstate...

  6. 40 CFR 721.9840 - Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9840 Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as tungstate...

  7. Tuning the architecture and properties of microstructured yttrium tungstate oxide hydroxide and lanthanum tungstate.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, Anna M; Liu, Ying-Ya; Van der Voort, Pascal; Van Deun, Rik

    2013-04-21

    In this paper, various microstructures of yttrium and lanthanum tungstates were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions, at pH 5, in a ligand-free environment, and in the presence of a dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DSS) surfactant. It was observed that the shape of the nanobuilding blocks, and therefore the architecture of the microstructures, could be tuned by controlling the reaction conditions, such as the source of the rare earth, the amount of a surfactant and the reaction time. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and N2 adsorption were employed to characterize the obtained products. The photoluminescent properties of Eu(3+) and Dy(3+) doped tungstate materials were investigated. Luminescence measurements showed an efficient charge transfer from the WO4(2-) groups to Eu(3+) and Dy(3+) ions. It was found that under UV excitation the Dy(3+) doped Y(WO3)2(OH)3 and La2(WO4)3 precursors exhibit white emission. PMID:23426044

  8. Gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation of acrylonitrile.

    PubMed

    Krichevskaya, Marina; Jõks, Svetlana; Kachina, Anna; Preis, Sergei

    2009-05-01

    Photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) of acrylonitrile (AN) on titanium dioxide in the gaseous phase was studied. AN readily undergoes photocatalytic degradation in a gas-solid system by using TiO(2) Degussa P25. The AN PCO volatile products, visible in the infrared spectra, included nitrogen dioxide, nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, water, hydrogen cyanide and carbon monoxide. Longer contact time resulted in deeper oxidation of AN with decreasing hydrogen cyanide and increasing nitrogen dioxide content. The effect of temperature increasing from 60 to 130 degrees C was observed to be slightly negative in terms of AN degradation rate. However, the effect of increased temperature was noticeable in terms of the character and yields of the PCO products: HCN peaks diminished with growing peaks of NO(2). PMID:19424531

  9. In situ growth of epitaxial cerium tungstate (100) thin films.

    PubMed

    Skála, Tomáš; Tsud, Nataliya; Orti, Miguel Ángel Niño; Menteş, Tevfik Onur; Locatelli, Andrea; Prince, Kevin Charles; Matolín, Vladimír

    2011-04-21

    The deposition of ceria on a preoxidized W(110) crystal at 870 K has been studied in situ by photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. Formation of an epitaxial layer of crystalline cerium tungstate Ce(6)WO(12)(100), with the metals in the Ce(3+) and W(6+) chemical states, has been observed. The interface between the tungsten substrate and the tungstate film consists of WO suboxide. At thicknesses above 0.89 nm, cerium dioxide grows on the surface of Ce(6)WO(12), favoured by the limited diffusion of tungsten from the substrate. PMID:21399780

  10. Synthesis of potassium tungstate micro-walls by thermal evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kunquan; Xie, Maohai; Hu, Rong; Wu, Huasheng

    2006-09-01

    We report the synthesis of potassium tungstate (K 2W 3O 10) micro-walls by a simple method of thermal evaporation. Using tungsten powder, tungsten oxide powder and potassium iodide as the source materials and tungsten plate as the substrate, K 2W 3O 10 micro-walls with thicknesses ranging from 400 nm to 2 μm, lengths up to hundreds of micrometers and heights up to tens of micrometers are obtained on a large scale. The possible mechanism for the formation of these tungstate micro-walls is discussed.

  11. Synchrotron-based far-infrared spectroscopy of nickel tungstate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinko, A.; Kuzmin, A.; Roy, P.; Evarestov, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    Monoclinic antiferromagnetic NiWO4 was studied by far-infrared (30-600 cm-1) absorption spectroscopy in the temperature range of 5-300 K using the synchrotron radiation from SOLEIL source. Two isomorphous CoWO4 and ZnWO4 tungstates were investigated for comparison. The phonon contributions in the far-infrared range of tungstates were interpreted using the first-principles spin-polarized linear combination of atomic orbital calculations. No contributions from magnetic excitations were found in NiWO4 and CoWO4 below their Neel temperatures down to 5 K.

  12. Acrylonitrile characterization and high energetic photochemistry at Titan temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumi, A.; Piétri, N.; Chiavassa, T.; Couturier-Tamburelli, I.

    2016-05-01

    Laboratory infrared spectra of amorphous and crystalline acrylonitrile (C2H3CN) ices were recorded between 4000 and 650 cm-1. Heating up the acrylonitrile sample to 160 K shows details on the transition between amorphous and crystalline ice at ∼94 K. This molecule can be used as an indicator of the surface temperature of Titan since it is known also to be ∼94 K. The desorption energy of acrylonitrile was determined using two methods (IRTF and mass spectrometries) to be around 35 kJ mol-1. Solid phase acrylonitrile was irradiated with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light at low temperatures (20, 70, 95 and 130 K) using a microwave-discharge hydrogen flow lamp. Isoacrylonitrile, cyanoacetylene (HC3N), isocyanoacetylene (HC2NC), acetylene (C2H2) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) were identified as photoproducts by using FTIR spectroscopy. The branching ratio of each pathway has been calculated for the different temperatures. We have estimated the acrylonitrile, HCN and HC3N νCtbnd N stretching band strengths to be respectively A = 3.98 ×10-18 , A = 1.38 ×10-18 and A = 2.92 ×10-18cmmolecule-1 .

  13. 21 CFR 177.1040 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... temperature for 2 h.1 Minimum 10 pct solution viscosity at 25 °C (77 °F) is 10cP. 1 3. Acrylonitrile/styrene... average molecular weight, and solution viscosity, titled: “Determination of Residual Acrylonitrile and... Weights of Acrylonitrile/Styrene Copolymers,” and “Analytical Method for 10% Solution Viscosity of...

  14. Radiation grafting of styrene and acrylonitrile to cellulose and polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanpour, S.

    1999-06-01

    Radiation induced graft polymerization is one of the best methods for obtaining material with new properties. In this work, radiation grafting of styrene, mixture of styrene and acrylonitrile to cellulose and polyethylene in the presence of methanol as a solvent by mutual method is discussed. At a low dose rate, high grafting yields were obtained from the two systems used, due to lesser termination of free radicals with the polymer growing radicals and recombination of primary radicals, resulting in a longer chain length of the grafted copolymer. In the system of styrene and acrylonitrile, comonomer technique was used and the styrene controlled the homopolymer formation during graft polymerization. Water uptake of cellulose decreased by increasing the grafting yields. Grafted cellulose can be molded to some extent and in a high percent of grafting, a new transparent material was obtained. By radiation grafting of styrene-acrylonitrile to low density polyethylene a high degree of crosslinking was observed.

  15. Growth of transition metals on cerium tungstate model catalyst layers.

    PubMed

    Skála, T; Tsud, N; Stetsovych, V; Mysliveček, J; Matolín, V

    2016-10-01

    Two model catalytic metal/oxide systems were investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. The mixed-oxide support was a cerium tungstate epitaxial thin layer grown in situ on the W(1 1 0) single crystal. Active particles consisted of palladium and platinum 3D islands deposited on the tungstate surface at 300 K. Both metals were found to interact weakly with the oxide support and the original chemical state of both support and metals was mostly preserved. Electronic and morphological changes are discussed during the metal growth and after post-annealing at temperatures up to 700 K. Partial transition-metal coalescence and self-cleaning from the CO and carbon impurities were observed. PMID:27494195

  16. Laser system with trivalent chromium doped aluminum tungstate fluorescent converter

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, G.

    1988-09-06

    This patent describes a laser system combination comprising: (a) a neodymium element; (b) a light source for pumping the neodymium laser element to produce coherent, monochromatic light; (c) a fluorescent converter element positioned in light exchange relationship with the light source for spectrally shifting at least a portion of light outside of the neodymium laser pumping band passing through the neodymium laser into light in the neodymium laser pumping band; (d) the fluorescent element including trivalent chromium doped aluminum tungstate excited by light passing through the laser which is outside of the pumping band for the laser, the tungstate covering a portion of light passing through the laser element which is outside of the pumping band into light within the pumping band; (e) the concentration of the trivalent chromium dopant lying in the range of 0.5 to 3 per mole percent (%).

  17. Structure and thermal behavior of zirconium tungstate under heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedova, E. S.; Shutilova, E. S.; Geber, R.; Gomze, L. A.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    The morphology and properties of powders ZrW2O7(OH)2·2H2O and ZrW2O8, obtained under the conditions of hydrothermal synthesis was studied. Using the high-temperature X-ray analysis, the mechanism of formation of zirconium tungstate was established. The influence of temperature on the structure and properties of materials was studied using shadow-casting method.

  18. Polyimide nanocomposites based on cubic zirconium tungstate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasubramanian Sharma, Gayathri

    2009-12-01

    In this research, cubic zirconium tungstate (ZrW2O8) was used as a filler to reduce the CTE of polyimides (PI), and the effect of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles on the bulk polymer properties was studied. Polyimides are high performance polymers with exceptional thermal stability, and there is a need for PIs with low CTEs for high temperature applications. The nanofiller, cubic ZrW2O8, is well known for its isotropic negative thermal expansion (NTE) over a wide temperature range from -272.7 to 777°C. The preparation of nanocomposites involved the synthesis of ZrW 2O8 nanofiller, engineering the polymer-filler interface using linker groups and optimization of processing strategies to prepare free-standing PI nanocomposite films. A hydrothermal method was used to synthesize ZrW 2O8 nanoparticles. Polyimide-ZrW2O8 interface interaction was enhanced by covalently bonding linker moieties to the surface of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles. Specifically, ZrW 2O8 nanoparticles were functionalized with two different linker groups: (1) a short aliphatic silane, and (2) low molecular weight PI. The surface functionalization was confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Reprecipitation blending was used to prepare the freestanding PI-ZrW2O8 nanocomposite films with up to 15 volume% filler loading. SEM images showed the improvements in polymer-filler wetting behavior achieved using interface engineering. SEM images indicated that there was better filler dispersion in the PI matrix using reprecipitation blending, compared to the filler dispersion achieved in the nanocomposites prepared using conventional blending technique. The structure-property relationships in PI-ZrW2O8 nanocomposites were investigated by studying the thermal degradation, glass transition, tensile and thermal expansion properties of the nanocomposites. The properties were studied as a function of filler loading and interface linker groups. Addition of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles did not

  19. 21 CFR 181.32 - Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins. 181.32 Section 181.32 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) PRIOR-SANCTIONED FOOD INGREDIENTS Specific Prior-Sanctioned...

  20. 21 CFR 181.32 - Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Acrylonitrile/butadiene copolymer blended with vinyl chloride-vinyl acetate (optional at level up to 5 percent by weight of the vinyl chloride resin) resin—for use only in contact with oleomargarine. (iv... with polyvinyl chloride resins—for use only on paper and paperboard in contact with meats and lard....

  1. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A TEST METHOD FOR ACRYLONITRILE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acrylonitrile (AN) has been identified as a suspected carcinogen and may be regulated in the future as a hazardous air pollutant under Section 112 of the Clean Air Act. A method was validated that utilizes a midget impinger containing methanol for trapping AN vapors followed by a...

  2. IRIS Toxicological Review of Acrylonitrile (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On June 30, 2011, the draft Toxicological Review of Acrylonitrile and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and White House...

  3. 21 CFR 181.32 - Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins. 181.32 Section 181.32 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) PRIOR-SANCTIONED FOOD INGREDIENTS Specific Prior-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.32...

  4. A functional leptin system is essential for sodium tungstate antiobesity action.

    PubMed

    Canals, Ignasi; Carmona, María C; Amigó, Marta; Barbera, Albert; Bortolozzi, Analía; Artigas, Francesc; Gomis, Ramon

    2009-02-01

    Sodium tungstate is a novel agent in the treatment of obesity. In diet-induced obese rats, it is able to reduce body weight gain by increasing energy expenditure. This study evaluated the role of leptin, a key regulator of energy homeostasis, in the tungstate antiobesity effect. Leptin receptor-deficient Zucker fa/fa rats and leptin-deficient ob/ob mice were treated with tungstate. In lean animals, tungstate administration reduced body weight gain and food intake and increased energy expenditure. However, in animals with deficiencies in the leptin system, treatment did not modify these parameters. In ob/ob mice in which leptin deficiency was restored through adipose tissue transplantation, treatment restored the tungstate-induced body weight gain and food intake reduction as well as energy expenditure increase. Furthermore, in animals in which tungstate administration increased energy expenditure, changes in the expression of key genes involved in brown adipose tissue thermogenesis were detected. Finally, the gene expression of the hypothalamic neuropeptides, Npy, Agrp, and Cart, involved in the leptin regulation of energy homeostasis, was also modified by tungstate in a leptin-dependent manner. In summary, the results indicate that the effectiveness of tungstate in reducing body weight gain is completely dependent on a functional leptin system. PMID:18845634

  5. Synthesis of europium-activated calcium tungstate phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovici, Elisabeth-Jeanne; Forgaciu, Flavia; Nemes, Miloslava; Ursu, Veronica

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish the way in which different synthesis conditions influence on the structural and luminescent characteristics of europium activated calcium tungstate powder phosphor. CaWO4:Eu3+ samples were prepared by thermal synthesis from mixtures consisting of precipitated-CaWO4, equivalent amounts of Eu2O3 and WO3 (activating system) and CaCl2 or Na2WO4 as flux. Calcination was performed at 800 - 1000 degree(s)C for 2 h, in air. The crystalline structure (XRD-patterns) and luminescent characteristics (emission and excitation spectra of phosphor samples were determined and interpreted.

  6. Tungstate as a Transition State Analog for Catalysis by Alkaline Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Peck, Ariana; Sunden, Fanny; Andrews, Logan D; Pande, Vijay S; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    The catalytic mechanisms underlying Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase's (AP) remarkable rate enhancement have been probed extensively. Past work indicated that whereas the serine nucleophile (Ser102) electrostatically repels the product phosphate, another oxyanion, tungstate, binds more strongly in the presence of Ser102. These results predict a covalent bond between the serine nucleophile and tungstate, a model that we test herein. The crystal structure of tungstate-bound alkaline phosphatase provides evidence for a covalent adduct model and further shows that the ligand adopts trigonal bipyramidal geometry, which is infrequently observed for tungstate in small molecules and other active sites but mirrors the geometry of the presumed phosphoryl transfer transition state. The AP active site is known to stabilize another oxyanion, vanadate, in trigonal bipyramidal geometry, but the extent to which binding of either ligand reproduces the energetics of the transition state cannot be deduced from structural inspection alone. To test for transition state analog behavior, we determined the relationship between catalytic activity and affinity for tungstate and vanadate for a series of 20 AP variants. Affinity and activity were highly correlated for tungstate (r(2) = 0.89) but not vanadate (r(2) = 0.23), indicating that the tungstate•AP complex may better mimic this enzyme's transition state properties. The results herein suggest that tungstate will be a valuable tool for further dissecting AP catalysis and may prove helpful in mechanistic studies of other phosphoryl transfer enzymes. PMID:27189921

  7. Toxicity of sodium tungstate to earthworm, oat, radish, and lettuce.

    PubMed

    Bamford, Josie E; Butler, Alicia D; Heim, Katherine E; Pittinger, Charles A; Lemus, Ranulfo; Staveley, Jane P; Lee, K Brian; Venezia, Carmen; Pardus, Michael J

    2011-10-01

    Due to unknown effects of the potential exposure of the terrestrial environment to tungsten substances, a series of toxicity studies of sodium tungstate (Na(2) WO(4) ) was conducted. The effect on earthworm (Eisenia fetida) survival and reproduction was examined using Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Guideline 222. No effect on either endpoint was seen at the highest concentration tested, resulting in a 56-d no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) of ≥586 mg tungsten/kg dry soil (nominal concentrations). The effect of sodium tungstate on emergence and growth of plant species was examined according to OECD Guideline 208: oat (Avena sativa), radish (Raphanus sativus), and lettuce (Lactuca sativa). No effects on emergence, shoot height, and dry shoot weight were observed in oats exposed to the highest concentration, resulting in a 21-d NOEC of ≥586 mg tungsten/kg dry soil. The NOECs for radish and lettuce were 65 and 21.7 mg tungsten/kg dry soil (nominal concentrations), respectively. Respective 21-d median effective concentration values (EC50) for radish and lettuce were >586 and 313 mg tungsten/kg dry soil (based on shoot height) (confidence level [CL] -8.5-615); EC25 values were 152 (CL 0-331) and 55 (CL 0-114) mg tungsten/kg dry soil. Results are consistent with the few other tungsten substance terrestrial toxicity studies in the literature. PMID:21805499

  8. Femtosecond laser ablation of cadmium tungstate for scintillator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, S.; Baker, M. A.; Wilson, M. D.; Lohstroh, A.; Seller, P.

    2016-08-01

    Ultrafast pulsed laser ablation has been investigated as a technique to machine CdWO4 single crystal scintillator and segment it into small blocks with the aim of fabricating a 2D high energy X-ray imaging array. Cadmium tungstate (CdWO4) is a brittle transparent scintillator used for the detection of high energy X-rays and γ-rays. A 6 W Yb:KGW Pharos-SP pulsed laser of wavelength 1028 nm was used with a tuneable pulse duration of 10 ps to 190 fs, repetition rate of up to 600 kHz and pulse energies of up to 1 mJ was employed. The effect of varying the pulse duration, pulse energy, pulse overlap and scan pattern on the laser induced damage to the crystals was investigated. A pulse duration of ≥500 fs was found to induce substantial cracking in the material. The laser induced damage was minimised using the following operating parameters: a pulse duration of 190 fs, fluence of 15.3 J cm-2 and employing a serpentine scan pattern with a normalised pulse overlap of 0.8. The surface of the ablated surfaces was studied using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ablation products were found to contain cadmium tungstate together with different cadmium and tungsten oxides. These laser ablation products could be removed using an ammonium hydroxide treatment.

  9. Testosterone in sera of workers exposed to acrylonitrile.

    PubMed

    Ivănescu, M; Berinde, M; Simionescu, L

    1990-01-01

    Testosterone was measured through three consecutive years in sera from young and adult male subjects working in a chemical factory exposed to some complex chemical noxae, the major exposure being acrylonitrile (vinylcyanid). In the first yr, (group A), the blood was collected on May 1975 (no 39), the II-nd yr (group B) on March (no 109) and the III-rd yr (group C) on May (no 149). The exposure time varied in each group between 6 mos and 7-10 yrs. For comparison, blood samples were collected from 145 men of comparable age grouped in nonexposed: blood donors (no 37) (group a), new workers (no 23) (group b) and exposed to other chemical noxae in the same factory: Na cyanid (group c, no 23), cyan derivatives (group d, no 22) and pyrolysis (group no 39). The seasonal testosterone variations being considered, the Student's 't' test applied to the hormonal levels in acrylonitrile groups A, B and C showed non significant differences. However, the comparison of the testosterone concentrations in sera of the groups A, B and C vs the control groups investigated during the same month of the year showed much lower levels of the hormone in the first groups (p less than 0.001). These data are suggesting that the exposure to acrylonitrile either by direct participation to the technological chain or by working in the same noxious environment may influence the testosterone synthesis and/or secretion. PMID:2103974

  10. Vibrational Spectroscopic Studies on Some Double Alkali Tungstates Belonging to Orthorhombic Class at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Sharaff, Usha; Bajpai, P. K.; Choudhary, R. N. P.

    2011-11-22

    Room temperature IR and Raman spectra of rubidium lithium tungstate and sodium lithium tungstates belonging to double alkali tungstate family are investigated using group theoretical methods. Observed internal and lattice modes in both systems studied are assigned. Analysis of spectral behavior reveals that the effect of site potential around tungstates ion is weak and the factor group splitting is operative. Differences in the lattice mode mixing and splitting of internal modes is influenced by the statistical ordering between two alkali ions having large and small ionic radii and is explained using size and charge effect observed earlier in scheelite type of structure. Thus, vibrational spectroscopic analysis may be a tool to understand the alkali ion ordering in double alkali systems.

  11. Comparative study of various polyols as complexing agents for the acidimetric titration of tungstate.

    PubMed

    Verchère, J F; Sauvage, J P; Rapaumbya, G R

    1990-05-01

    Most polyols (L = alditol or carbohydrate) form dinuclear tungstate complexes according to the over-all equilibrium 2WO4(2-) + 2H+ + L equal equilibrium [W2O7L]2- + H2O. When the reaction is fast and complete, it allows the acidimetric titration of tungstate. The formation constants of the complexes of a series of polyols were determined by potentiometry. Their values were higher at low ionic strengths. Opposite structural factors govern the stabilities and the formation rates of complexes: alditols of threo configuration react with tungstate faster than those of erythro configuration, but the stability order is erythro greater than threo. Of the polyols investigated, only xylitol and D-glucitol (sorbitol) allowed a fast and accurate potentiometric titration. Using 0.02 M HCl as titrand, 0.04 mmol of tungstate was determined in a volume of 100 cm3. The interference of molybdate is discussed in detail. PMID:2118740

  12. Theoretical calculations of emission of wolframite and scheelite-type tungstate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaenko, T.; Hizhnyi, Y.; Nedilko, S.

    2009-01-21

    Tungstate crystals AWO{sub 4} (A = Zn,Cd,Pb) are well-known scintillation materials for various applications in science and technology. In recent years the optical properties of these crystals were intensively studied experimentally and theoretically. However, the origin of luminescence in lead, cadmium and zinc tungstates is still the subject of discussion. According to generally accepted view, the centers of luminescence in AWO{sub 4} crystals are in some or other way related to the tungstate anionic groups. We developed a cluster approach in theoretical investigation of the electronic structure of AWO{sub 4} tungstate crystals based on the configuration interaction (CI) computation in which the lattice vibrations were taken into account.

  13. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177.../butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene copolymer identified in this section may be... of: (1) Eighty-four to eighty-nine parts by weight of a matrix polymer containing 73 to 78 parts...

  14. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177.../butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene copolymer identified in this section may be... of: (1) Eighty-four to eighty-nine parts by weight of a matrix polymer containing 73 to 78 parts...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances.../butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene copolymer identified in this section may...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances.../butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene copolymer identified in this section may...

  17. Large-scale synthesis and photoluminescence of cobalt tungstate nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cuiling; Guo, Donglin; Hu, Chenguo; Chen, Yanxue; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Hulin; Wang, Xue

    2013-01-01

    Single-crystalline wolframite-type monoclinic structure cobalt tungstate (CoWO4) nanowires were obtained by a solvothermal method at 180 °C for 24 h with a width of 20 nm and length of 200 to 400 nm. Besides the strong blue-green light emission at 10-250 K, we found much stronger and broader near-infrared emission ranging from 700-1000 nm at about 300 K under the excitation wavelength of 325 nm. The emission and the dependence of emission intensity on temperature are discussed by introducing the effect of Co vacancies. This near-infrared emission material might have potential applications in infrared detection or stealth technology.

  18. Phosphorylation events implicating p38 and PI3K mediate tungstate-effects in MIN6 beta cells

    SciTech Connect

    Piquer, Sandra; Gomis, Ramon . E-mail: rgomis@clinic.ub.es

    2007-06-29

    Oral administration of sodium tungstate is an effective treatment for diabetes in animal models. Several lines of evidence indicate the pancreatic beta cell as one of the targets of tungstate action. Here, we examined the molecular mechanism by which this compound exerts its effects on the beta cell line MIN6. Tungstate treatment induced phosphorylation and subsequent activation of p38 and PI3K which in turn are implicated in tungstate PDX-1 nuclear localization and activation. Although no effect was observed in glucose-induced insulin secretion we found that tungstate activates basal insulin release, a process driven, at least in part, by activation of p38. These results show a direct involvement of p38 and PI3K phosphorylation in the mechanism of action of tungstate in the beta cell.

  19. Effect of sodium tungstate on visual evoked potentials in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Bulut, Mehmet; Dönmez, Barış Özgür; Öztürk, Nihal; Başaranlar, Göksun; Kencebay Manas, Ceren; Derin, Narin; Özdemir, Semir

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effect of sodium tungstate on visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in diabetic rats. METHODS Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups as normal control, diabetic control and diabetic rats treated with sodium tungstate. Diabetes was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Sodium tungstate [40 mg/(kg·d)] was administered for 12wk and then VEPs were recorded. Additionally, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels were measured in brain tissues. RESULTS The latencies of P1, N1, P2, N2 and P3 waves were significantly prolonged in diabetic rats compared with control group. Diabetes mellitus caused an increase in the lipid peroxidation process that was accompanied by changes in VEPs. However, prolonged latencies of VEPs for all components returned to control levels in sodium tungstate-treated group. The treatment of sodium tungstate significantly decreased brain TBARS levels and depleted the prolonged latencies of VEP components compared with diabetic control group. CONCLUSION Sodium tungstate shows protective effects on visual pathway in diabetic rats, and it can be worthy of further study for potential use. PMID:27275420

  20. Sodium tungstate decreases sucrase and Na+/D-glucose cotransporter in the jejunum of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Miró-Queralt, Montserrat; Guinovart, Joan J; Planas, Joana M

    2008-09-01

    Sodium tungstate reduces glycemia and reverts the diabetic phenotype in several induced and genetic animal models of diabetes. Oral administration of this compound has recently emerged as an effective treatment for diabetes. Here we examined the effects of 30 days of oral administration of tungstate on disaccharidase and Na+/D-glucose cotransporter (SGLT1) activity in the jejunum of control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes increased sucrase-specific activity in the jejunal mucosa but did not affect the activity of lactase, maltase, or trehalase. The abundance and the maximal rate of transport of SGLT1 in isolated brush-border membrane vesicles also increased. Tungstate decreased sucrase activity and normalized SGLT1 expression and activity in the jejunum of diabetic rats. Furthermore, tungstate did not change the affinity of SGLT1 for d-glucose and had no effect on the diffusional component. In control animals, tungstate had no effect on disaccharidases or SGLT1 expression. Northern blot analysis showed that the amount of specific SGLT1 mRNA was the same in the jejunum from all experimental groups, thereby indicating that changes in SGLT1 abundance are due to posttranscriptional mechanisms. We conclude that the antidiabetic effect of tungstate is partly due to normalization of the activity of sucrase and SGLT1 in the brush-border membrane of enterocytes. PMID:18617558

  1. Sodium tungstate induced neurological alterations in rat brain regions and their response to antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Sherry; Pant, Satish C; Kushwaha, Pramod; Bhargava, Rakesh; Flora, Swaran J S

    2015-08-01

    Tungsten, recognized recently as an environmental contaminant, is being used in arms and ammunitions as substitute to depleted uranium. We studied the effects of sodium tungstate on oxidative stress, few selected neurological variables like acetylcholinesterase, biogenic amines in rat brain regions (cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum) and their prevention following co-administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), naringenin and quercetin. Animals were sub-chronically exposed to sodium tungstate (100 ppm in drinking water) and orally co-supplemented with different antioxidants (0.30 mM) for three months. Sodium tungstate significantly decreased the activity of acetylcholinesterase, dopamine, nor-epinephrine and 5-hydroxytryptamine levels while it increased monoamine oxidase activity in different brain regions. Tungstate exposure produced a significant increase in biochemical variables indicative of oxidative stress while, neurological alterations were more pronounced in the cerebral cortex compared to other regions. Co-administration of NAC and flavonoids with sodium tungstate significantly restored glutathione, prevented changes in the brain biogenic amines, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and TBARS levels in the different brain regions. The protection was more prominent in the animals co-administered with NAC. We can thus conclude that sodium tungstate induced brain oxidative stress and the alterations in some neurological variables can effectively be reduced by co-supplementation of NAC. PMID:25983264

  2. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of acrylonitrile binding to cytochrome c peroxidase and oxidation of acrylonitrile by cytochrome c peroxidase compound I

    SciTech Connect

    Chinchilla, Diana Kilheeney, Heather Vitello, Lidia B. Erman, James E.

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) binds acrylonitrile in a pH-independent fashion. •The spectrum of the CcP/acrylonitrile complex is that of a 6c–ls ferric heme. •The acrylonitrile/CcP complex has a K{sub D} value of 1.1 ± 0.2 M. •CcP compound I oxidizes acrylonitrile with a maximum turnover rate of 0.61 min{sup −1}. -- Abstract: Ferric heme proteins bind weakly basic ligands and the binding affinity is often pH dependent due to protonation of the ligand as well as the protein. In an effort to find a small, neutral ligand without significant acid/base properties to probe ligand binding reactions in ferric heme proteins we were led to consider the organonitriles. Although organonitriles are known to bind to transition metals, we have been unable to find any prior studies of nitrile binding to heme proteins. In this communication we report on the equilibrium and kinetic properties of acrylonitrile binding to cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) as well as the oxidation of acrylonitrile by CcP compound I. Acrylonitrile binding to CcP is independent of pH between pH 4 and 8. The association and dissociation rate constants are 0.32 ± 0.16 M{sup −1} s{sup −1} and 0.34 ± 0.15 s{sup −1}, respectively, and the independently measured equilibrium dissociation constant for the complex is 1.1 ± 0.2 M. We have demonstrated for the first time that acrylonitrile can bind to a ferric heme protein. The binding mechanism appears to be a simple, one-step association of the ligand with the heme iron. We have also demonstrated that CcP can catalyze the oxidation of acrylonitrile, most likely to 2-cyanoethylene oxide in a “peroxygenase”-type reaction, with rates that are similar to rat liver microsomal cytochrome P450-catalyzed oxidation of acrylonitrile in the monooxygenase reaction. CcP compound I oxidizes acrylonitrile with a maximum turnover number of 0.61 min{sup −1} at pH 6.0.

  3. Vibrations of acrylonitrile in N 1s excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilakovac, V.; Carniato, S.; Gallet, J.-J.; Kukk, E.; Horvatić, D.; Ilakovac, A.

    2008-01-01

    The N 1s near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of acrylonitrile gas are accurately reproduced by a complete ab initio multidimensional vibrational analysis. The role of π∗ -orbital localization and hybridization on vibrations accompanying core excitation is discussed. Transition to the π⊥∗(C=C-C≡N) delocalized orbital excites mostly stretching vibrations of the whole spinal column of the molecule. Promoting a core electron to the localized π∥∗(C≡N) produces C≡N stretching vibration combined with two strong bending modes of the C-C≡N end of the molecule, related to the change of carbon hybridization.

  4. Tungstate-targeting of BKαβ1 channels tunes ERK phosphorylation and cell proliferation in human vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Mariño, Ana Isabel; Cidad, Pilar; Zafra, Delia; Nocito, Laura; Domínguez, Jorge; Oliván-Viguera, Aida; Köhler, Ralf; López-López, José R; Pérez-García, María Teresa; Valverde, Miguel Ángel; Guinovart, Joan J; Fernández-Fernández, José M

    2015-01-01

    Despite the substantial knowledge on the antidiabetic, antiobesity and antihypertensive actions of tungstate, information on its primary target/s is scarce. Tungstate activates both the ERK1/2 pathway and the vascular voltage- and Ca2+-dependent large-conductance BKαβ1 potassium channel, which modulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and function, respectively. Here, we have assessed the possible involvement of BKαβ1 channels in the tungstate-induced ERK phosphorylation and its relevance for VSMC proliferation. Western blot analysis in HEK cell lines showed that expression of vascular BKαβ1 channels potentiates the tungstate-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a Gi/o protein-dependent manner. Tungstate activated BKαβ1 channels upstream of G proteins as channel activation was not altered by the inhibition of G proteins with GDPβS or pertussis toxin. Moreover, analysis of Gi/o protein activation measuring the FRET among heterologously expressed Gi protein subunits suggested that tungstate-targeting of BKαβ1 channels promotes G protein activation. Single channel recordings on VSMCs from wild-type and β1-knockout mice indicated that the presence of the regulatory β1 subunit was essential for the tungstate-mediated activation of BK channels in VSMCs. Moreover, the specific BK channel blocker iberiotoxin lowered tungstate-induced ERK phosphorylation by 55% and partially reverted (by 51%) the tungstate-produced reduction of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced proliferation in human VSMCs. Our observations indicate that tungstate-targeting of BKαβ1 channels promotes activation of PTX-sensitive Gi proteins to enhance the tungstate-induced phosphorylation of ERK, and inhibits PDGF-stimulated cell proliferation in human vascular smooth muscle. PMID:25659150

  5. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of acrylonitrile binding to cytochrome c peroxidase and oxidation of acrylonitrile by cytochrome c peroxidase compound I.

    PubMed

    Chinchilla, Diana; Kilheeney, Heather; Vitello, Lidia B; Erman, James E

    2014-01-01

    Ferric heme proteins bind weakly basic ligands and the binding affinity is often pH dependent due to protonation of the ligand as well as the protein. In an effort to find a small, neutral ligand without significant acid/base properties to probe ligand binding reactions in ferric heme proteins we were led to consider the organonitriles. Although organonitriles are known to bind to transition metals, we have been unable to find any prior studies of nitrile binding to heme proteins. In this communication we report on the equilibrium and kinetic properties of acrylonitrile binding to cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) as well as the oxidation of acrylonitrile by CcP compound I. Acrylonitrile binding to CcP is independent of pH between pH 4 and 8. The association and dissociation rate constants are 0.32±0.16 M(-1) s(-1) and 0.34±0.15 s(-1), respectively, and the independently measured equilibrium dissociation constant for the complex is 1.1±0.2 M. We have demonstrated for the first time that acrylonitrile can bind to a ferric heme protein. The binding mechanism appears to be a simple, one-step association of the ligand with the heme iron. We have also demonstrated that CcP can catalyze the oxidation of acrylonitrile, most likely to 2-cyanoethylene oxide in a "peroxygenase"-type reaction, with rates that are similar to rat liver microsomal cytochrome P450-catalyzed oxidation of acrylonitrile in the monooxygenase reaction. CcP compound I oxidizes acrylonitrile with a maximum turnover number of 0.61 min(-1) at pH 6.0. PMID:24291498

  6. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of acrylonitrile binding to cytochrome c peroxidase and oxidation of acrylonitrile by cytochrome c peroxidase compound I

    PubMed Central

    Chinchilla, Diana; Kilheeney, Heather; Vitello, Lidia B.; Erman, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Ferric heme proteins bind weakly basic ligands and the binding affinity is often pH dependent due to protonation of the ligand as well as the protein. In an effort to find a small, neutral ligand without significant acid/base properties to probe ligand binding reactions in ferric heme proteins we were led to consider the organonitriles. Although organonitriles are known to bind to transition metals, we have been unable to find any prior studies of nitrile binding to heme proteins. In this communication we report on the equilibrium and kinetic properties of acrylonitrile binding to cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) as well as the oxidation of acrylonitrile by CcP compound I. Acrylonitrile binding to CcP is independent of pH between pH 4 and 8. The association and dissociation rate constants are 0.32 ± 0.16 M−1s−1 and 0.34 ± 0.15 s−1, respectively, and the independently measured equilibrium dissociation constant for the complex is 1.1 ± 0.2 M. We have demonstrated for the first time that acrylonitrile can bind to a ferric heme protein. The binding mechanism appears to be a simple, one-step association of the ligand with the heme iron. We have also demonstrated that CcP can catalyze the oxidation of acrylonitrile, most likely to 2-cyanoethylene oxide in a “peroxygenase”-type reaction, with rates that are similar to rat liver microsomal cytochrome P450-catalyzed oxidation of acrylonitrile in the monooxygenase reaction. CcP compound I oxidizes acrylonitrile with a maximum turnover number of 0.61 min−1 at pH 6.0. PMID:24291498

  7. Radical-initiated controlled synthesis of homo- and copolymers based on acrylonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishin, D. F.; Grishin, I. D.

    2015-07-01

    Data on the controlled synthesis of polyacrylonitrile and acrylonitrile copolymers with other (meth)acrylic and vinyl monomers upon radical initiation and metal complex catalysis are analyzed. Primary attention is given to the use of metal complexes for the synthesis of acrylonitrile-based (co)polymers with defined molecular weight and polydispersity in living mode by atom transfer radical polymerization. The prospects for using known methods of controlled synthesis of macromolecules for the preparation of acrylonitrile homo- and copolymers as carbon fibre precursors are estimated. The major array of published data analyzed in the review refers to the last decade. The bibliography includes 175 references.

  8. Amorphous tungstate precursor route to nanostructured tungsten oxide film with electrochromic property.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ie-Rang; Kang, Joo-Hee; Paek, Seung-Min; Hwang, Seong-Ju; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2011-07-01

    Electrochromic tungsten oxide (WO3) films on ITO glass were fabricated by spin-coating with a tungsten peroxy acid solution, which was prepared by adding an equivolume mixture of hydrogen peroxide and glacial acetic acid to tungsten metal powder. The structural evolution of the tungstate precursor upon heat treatment was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses, which indicated that the as-synthesized tungstate transformed into nanocrystalline WO3 upon heating. It is, therefore, quite clear that as-synthesized tungstate can be a good precursor for electrochromic WO3 films. A series of WO3 thin films were prepared on ITO glass by spin-coating with different concentrations of tungsten peroxy acid solution and then post-annealing at various temperatures. Depending on the concentration of the tungstate coating solution (200-500 mg mL(-1)) and the annealing temperature (100-300 degrees C), the thickness and WO3 content as well as the electrochromic properties of WO3 films can be controlled. As a result, the optimum fabrication conditions were determined to be a tungstate solution concentration of 300-400 mg mL(-1) and a post-annealing temperature of 200 degrees C. Finally, an inorganic-inorganic hybrid electrochromic device (ECD) composed of optimized WO3 and Prussian Blue (PB) with desirable coloration efficiency was successfully developed. PMID:22121748

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Zirconium Tungstate Ultra-Thin Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lifeng; Howe, Jane Y; Fong, Hao; Zhang, Yan

    2009-01-01

    This study reports an innovative method of electrospinning followed by pyrolysis to synthesize zirconium tungstate (ZrW2O8), a material with negative coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), in ultra-thin fiber form. Morphologies and microstructures of the as-electrospun precursor fibers, the heat-treated intermediate fibers, and the final ZrW2O8 ultra-thin fibers were characterized by SEM, XRD, and TEM. The ZrW2O8 ultra-thin fibers had diameters in the sub-micrometer range with aspect ratios larger than 100; these fibers were polycrystalline, and consisted of single crystalline ZrW2O8 crystallites with sizes of 30-50 nm and surface roughness of several nanometers. The ZrW2O8 ultra-thin fibers are expected to outperform spherically, cylindrically, and/or irregularly shaped polycrystalline ZrW2O8 particles for the development of composites with precisely controlled CTEs. Additionally, this reported method could be utilized as a general approach to convert nano-scaled inorganic particles into fibers.

  10. Preclinical and Clinical Studies for Sodium Tungstate: Application in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Bertinat, Romina; Nualart, Francisco; Li, Xuhang; Yáñez, Alejandro J.; Gomis, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a complex metabolic disorder triggered by the deficient secretion of insulin by the pancreatic β-cell or the resistance of peripheral tissues to the action of the hormone. Chronic hyperglycemia is the major consequence of this failure, and also the main cause of diabetic problems. Indeed, several clinical trials have agreed in that tight glycemic control is the best way to stop progression of the disease. Many anti-diabetic drugs for treatment of type 2 diabetes are commercially available, but no ideal normoglycemic agent has been developed yet. Moreover, weight gain is the most common side effect of many oral anti-diabetic agents and insulin, and increased weight has been shown to worsen glycemic control and increase the risk of diabetes progression. In this sense, the inorganic salt sodium tungstate (NaW) has been studied in different animal models of metabolic syndrome and diabetes, proving to have a potent effect on normalizing blood glucose levels and reducing body weight, without any hypoglycemic action. Although the liver has been studied as the main site of NaW action, positive effects have been also addressed in muscle, pancreas, brain, adipose tissue and intestine, explaining the effective anti-diabetic action of this salt. Here, we review NaW research to date in these different target organs. We believe that NaW deserves more attention, since all available anti-diabetic treatments remain suboptimal and new therapeutics are urgently needed. PMID:25995968

  11. Hydrolyzed Poly(acrylonitrile) Electrospun Ion-Exchange Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Jassal, Manisha; Bhowmick, Sankha; Sengupta, Sukalyan; Patra, Prabir K.; Walker, Douglas I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A potential ion-exchange material was developed from poly(acrylonitrile) fibers that were prepared by electrospinning followed by alkaline hydrolysis (to convert the nitrile group to the carboxylate functional group). Characterization studies performed on this material using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-Transform infra-red spectroscopy, and ion chromatography confirmed the presence of ion-exchange functional group (carboxylate). Optimum hydrolysis conditions resulted in an ion-exchange capacity of 2.39 meq/g. Ion-exchange fibers were used in a packed-bed column to selectively remove heavy-metal cation from the background of a benign, competing cation at a much higher concentration. The material can be efficiently regenerated and used for multiple cycles of exhaustion and regeneration. PMID:24963270

  12. Photolysis of astrophysically relevant acrylonitrile: a matrix experimental study.

    PubMed

    Toumi, A; Couturier-Tamburelli, I; Chiavassa, T; Piétri, N

    2014-04-01

    This report documents the photochemical study of H2C ═ C(H)CN (acrylonitrile) trapped in low-temperature argon matrices and irradiated with a microwave-discharge hydrogen-flow lamp (λ > 120 nm). We succeeded in identifying H2C ═ C(H)NC (isoacrylonitrile) as a photoproduct. HC3N (cyanoacetylene), C2H2:HCN (acetylene:hydrogen cyanide), and C2H2:HNC (acetylene:hydrogen isocyanide) complexes, which are molecules detected in molecular clouds or in the Titan atmosphere, were also identified. No imine product was observed, but other compounds coming from the HC3N photolysis have been found. Fourier transform infrared measurements and (2)H substitution experiments coupled with density functional theory calculations (B3LYP/6-31G**) were performed to confirm the spectral assignments of the photochemical products and intermediate species. PMID:24621153

  13. The Rotational Spectrum of Acrylonitrile to 1.67 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiel, Zbigniew; Pszczółkowski, Lech; Drouin, Brian J.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Yu, Shanshan; Pearson, John C.

    2009-06-01

    Acrylonitrile (vinyl cyanide) is an astrophysical molecule of sufficient abundance for detection of its ^{13}C isotopologues. In fact this molecule has been identified as one of the 'weed' species, that will contribute a plethora of lines in broadband submillimetre spectra from the new tools of radioastronomy, such as the Herschel Space Observatory or ALMA. We presently report the first stage in extending the knowledge of the rotational spectrum of acrylonitrile well into the THz region. The spectrum was recorded with the jpl cascaded harmonic multiplication instrument in the form of several broadband segments covering 390-540, 818-930, 967-1160, and 1576-1669 GHz. The analysis of the ground state spectrum has been extended up to J=128, K_a=29, and a combined data set of over 3000 fitted lines. It is found that transitions in all measurable vibrational states, inclusive of the ground state, show evidence of perturbations with other states. Several different perturbations between the ground state and v_{11}=1 at 228 cm^{-1} were identified and have been successfully fitted, resulting in E_{11}=228.29994(3) cm^{-1}, to compare with a direct far-infrared value of 228.83(18) cm^{-1}. H.S.P.Müller et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc., 251, 319-325 (2008). B.J.Drouin, F.W.Maiwald, J.C.Pearson, Rev. Sci. Instrum., 76, 093113-1-10 (2005). A.R.H.Cole, A.A.Green, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 48, 246-253 (1973).

  14. The effects of tungstate on skin lesions caused by PPD in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hee; Cho, Hyun-Gug; Lee, Sang-Il

    2008-04-01

    P-phenylenediamine (PPD) has been used as one of the ingredients in hair dye. The purpose of this study is to investigate the skin toxicity of PPD application in a tungstate-induced xanthine oxidase (XO) deficient animal model. PPD (2.5% PPD in 2% NH4OH) was applied to rat skin (25 mg/16.5 cm2) five times every other day in rats fed a standard diet (SD) or a tungstate supplemented diet (TD). The skin structure in the SD and the TD group was intact, whereas XO activity was not detected in the TD group during experimental periods. Furthermore, there were no differences between the SD and the TD group in dermal reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzymes. In these experimental conditions, although XO activity was not detected in the applied PPD rats fed a tungstate supplemented diet (PTD) group, it showed more severe tissue damage compared with the applied PPD rats fed a standard diet (PSD) group. In addition, the PTD group showed higher increased rates of ROS scavenging enzyme activity and lipid peroxide (LPO) content, and decreased glutathione (GSH) content than in the PSD group. In conclusion, the increase of PPD dermal toxicity in tungstate-induced XO deficient animals may be due to excessive ROS via ROS imbalance during PPD skin application. PMID:18379062

  15. Zirconium tungstate hydroxide hydrate revisited: Crystallization dependence on halide and hydronium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Colin, Julie A. Camper, DeMarco V.; Gates, Stacy D.; Simon, Monty D. Witker, Karen L. Lind, Cora

    2007-12-15

    The formation of zirconium tungstate hydroxide hydrate, a precursor to the negative thermal expansion material cubic zirconium tungstate, shows a strong dependence on hydrothermal reaction conditions. It was found that not only the acid concentration, but also the acid counterion plays a significant role in the crystallization of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O. High temperatures, high acid concentrations, and the presence of chloride or bromide ions promote the formation of well-crystallized ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O. For low acid concentrations, a new zirconium tungstate hydrate polymorph is observed, which transforms to tetragonal ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O at longer reaction times. A study of crystallization kinetics in hydrochloric acid is presented. - Graphical abstract: The formation of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O shows a strong dependence on reaction conditions. Both acid concentration and acid counterion play a significant role in the crystallization. High temperatures, high acid concentrations, and the presence of chloride or bromide ions promote the formation of well-crystallized ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O. For low acid concentrations, a new zirconium tungstate hydrate polymorph is observed.

  16. Role of sodium tungstate as a potential antiplatelet agent

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ruiz, Rebeca; Pino, Marc; Hurtado, Begoña; García de Frutos, Pablo; Caballo, Carolina; Escolar, Ginés; Gomis, Ramón; Diaz-Ricart, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Platelet inhibition is a key strategy in the management of atherothrombosis. However, the large variability in response to current strategies leads to the search for alternative inhibitors. The antiplatelet effect of the inorganic salt sodium tungstate (Na2O4W), a protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitor, has been investigated in this study. Methods Wild-type (WT) and PTP1B knockout (PTP1B−/−) mice were treated for 1 week with Na2O4W to study platelet function with the platelet function analyzer PFA-100, a cone-and-plate analyzer, a flat perfusion chamber, and thrombus formation in vivo. Human blood aliquots were incubated with Na2O4W for 1 hour to measure platelet function using the PFA-100 and the annular perfusion chamber. Aggregometry and thromboelastometry were also performed. Results In WT mice, Na2O4W treatment prolonged closure times in the PFA-100 and decreased the surface covered (%SC) by platelets on collagen. Thrombi formed in a thrombosis mice model were smaller in animals treated with Na2O4W (4.6±0.7 mg vs 8.9±0.7 mg; P<0.001). Results with Na2O4W were similar to those in untreated PTP1B−/− mice (5.0±0.3 mg). Treatment of the PTP1B−/− mice with Na2O4W modified only slightly this response. In human blood, a dose-dependent effect was observed. At 200 μM, closure times in the PFA-100 were prolonged. On denuded vessels, %SC and thrombi formation (%T) decreased with Na2O4W. Neither the aggregating response nor the viscoelastic clot properties were affected. Conclusion Na2O4W decreases consistently the hemostatic capacity of platelets, inhibiting their adhesive and cohesive properties under flow conditions in mice and in human blood, resulting in smaller thrombi. Although Na2O4W may be acting on platelet PTP1B, other potential targets should not be disregarded. PMID:26060394

  17. New family of tungstate-responsive transcriptional regulators in sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kazakov, Alexey E; Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric G; Zane, Grant M; Siddartha, Kavya; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Dubchak, Inna; Arkin, Adam P; Wall, Judy D; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Novichkov, Pavel S

    2013-10-01

    The trace elements molybdenum and tungsten are essential components of cofactors of many metalloenzymes. However, in sulfate-reducing bacteria, high concentrations of molybdate and tungstate oxyanions inhibit growth, thus requiring the tight regulation of their homeostasis. By a combination of bioinformatic and experimental techniques, we identified a novel regulator family, tungstate-responsive regulator (TunR), controlling the homeostasis of tungstate and molybdate in sulfate-reducing deltaproteobacteria. The effector-sensing domains of these regulators are similar to those of the known molybdate-responsive regulator ModE, while their DNA-binding domains are homologous to XerC/XerD site-specific recombinases. Using a comparative genomics approach, we identified DNA motifs and reconstructed regulons for 40 TunR family members. Positional analysis of TunR sites and putative promoters allowed us to classify most TunR proteins into two groups: (i) activators of modABC genes encoding a high-affinity molybdenum and tungsten transporting system and (ii) repressors of genes for toluene sulfonate uptake (TSUP) family transporters. The activation of modA and modBC genes by TunR in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was confirmed in vivo, and we discovered that the activation was diminished in the presence of tungstate. A predicted 30-bp TunR-binding motif was confirmed by in vitro binding assays. A novel TunR family of bacterial transcriptional factors controls tungstate and molybdate homeostasis in sulfate-reducing deltaproteobacteria. We proposed that TunR proteins participate in protection of the cells from the inhibition by these oxyanions. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of a family of bacterial transcriptional factors evolved from site-specific recombinases. PMID:23913324

  18. Recycling of Chrome Tanned Leather Dust in Acrylonitrile Butadiene Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sabbagh, Salwa H.; Mohamed, Ola A.

    2010-06-01

    Concerns on environmental waste problem caused by chrome tanned leather wastes in huge amount have caused an increasing interest in developing this wastes in many composite formation. This leather dust was used as filler in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) before treatment and after treatment with ammonia solution and sod. formate. Different formulations of NBR/ leather dust (untreated-treated with ammonia solution—treated with sod. formate) composites are prepared. The formed composite exhibit a considerable improvement in some of their properties such as rheometric characteristics especially with composites loaded with treated leather dust. Tensile strength, modulus at 100% elongation, hardness and youngs modulus were improved then by further loading start to be steady or decrease. Cross linking density in toluene were increased by incorporation of leather dust treated or untreated resulting in decreases in equilibrium swelling. Distinct increase in the ageing coefficient of both treated and untreated leather with drop in NBR vulcanizates without leather dust. Addition of leather dust treated or untreated exhibit better thermal stability.

  19. Acrylonitrile is a multisite carcinogen in male and female B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Ghanayem, Burhan I; Nyska, Abraham; Haseman, Joseph K; Bucher, John R

    2002-07-01

    Acrylonitrile is a heavily produced unsaturated nitrile, which is used in the production of synthetic fibers, plastics, resins, and rubber. Acrylonitrile is a multisite carcinogen in rats after exposure via gavage, drinking water, or inhalation. No carcinogenicity studies of acrylonitrile in a second animal species were available. The current studies were designed to assess the carcinogenicity of acrylonitrile in B6C3F1 mice of both sexes. Acrylonitrile was administered by gavage at 0, 2.5, 10, or 20 mg/kg/day, 5 days per week, for 2 years. Urinary thiocyanate and N-acetyl-S-(2-cyanoethyl)-L-cysteine were measured as markers of exposure to acrylonitrile. In general, there were dose-related increases in urinary thiocyanate and N-acetyl-S-(2-cyanoethyl)-L-cysteine concentrations in all dosed groups of mice and at all time points. Survival was significantly (p < 0.001) reduced in the top dose (20 mg/kg) group of male and female mice relative to controls. The incidence of forestomach papillomas and carcinomas was increased in mice of both sexes in association with an increase in forestomach epithelial hyperplasia. The incidence of Harderian gland adenomas and carcinomas was also markedly increased in the acrylonitrile-dosed groups. In female mice, the incidence of benign or malignant granulosa cell tumors (combined) in the ovary in the 10 mg/kg dose group was greater than that in the vehicle control group, but because of a lack of dose response, this was considered an equivocal finding. In addition, the incidences of atrophy and cysts in the ovary of the 10 and 20 mg/kg dose groups were significantly increased. The incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar adenoma or carcinoma (combined) were significantly increased in female mice treated with acrylonitrile at 10 mg/kg/day for 2 years. This was also considered an equivocal result. In conclusion, these studies demonstrated that acrylonitrile causes multiple carcinogenic effects after gavage administration to male and female B6

  20. An experimental Raman and theoretical DFT study on the self-association of acrylonitrile.

    PubMed

    Alía, Jose M; Edwards, Howell G M; Fawcett, W Ronald; Smagala, Thomas G

    2007-02-01

    The liquid structure of acrylonitrile (propenenitrile) has been investigated using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) ab initio calculations with the 6-311++G** basis set. Two different and complementary experimental approaches were undertaken: FT-Raman spectra of 13 acrylonitrile solutions in carbon tetrachloride (concentration range=0.25-12.0 mol.L-1) were studied in detail including principal component analysis (PCA) of the CN stretching band. Furthermore, dispersive Raman spectra of neat acrylonitrile were obtained at eight different temperatures from 238 up to 343 K. The complex and asymmetric acrylonitrile Raman CN stretching band can be decomposed into two components attributed to monomeric and self-associated forms. Ab initio results fully support this assignment and suggest that the self-associated complex is a nonplanar trimer held together by dipole-dipole interactions. At ambient temperature, the composition of acrylonitrile can be expressed as a mixture of 25% monomers and 75% trimers. Close to the boiling point, trimers still represent 65% of the liquid composition. The corresponding enthalpy of association was estimated to be -22+/-2 kJ.mol-1. PMID:17266219

  1. Time- and energy-efficient solution combustion synthesis of binary metal tungstate nanoparticles with enhanced photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Abegayl; Janáky, Csaba; Samu, Gergely F; Huda, Muhammad N; Sarker, Pranab; Liu, J Ping; van Nguyen, Vuong; Wang, Evelyn H; Schug, Kevin A; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2015-05-22

    In the search for stable and efficient photocatalysts beyond TiO2 , the tungsten-based oxide semiconductors silver tungstate (Ag2 WO4 ), copper tungstate (CuWO4 ), and zinc tungstate (ZnWO4 ) were prepared using solution combustion synthesis (SCS). The tungsten precursor's influence on the product was of particular relevance to this study, and the most significant effects are highlighted. Each sample's photocatalytic activity towards methyl orange degradation was studied and benchmarked against their respective commercial oxide sample obtained by solid-state ceramic synthesis. Based on the results herein, we conclude that SCS is a time- and energy-efficient method to synthesize crystalline binary tungstate nanomaterials even without additional excessive heat treatment. As many of these photocatalysts possess excellent photocatalytic activity, the discussed synthetic strategy may open sustainable materials chemistry avenues to solar energy conversion and environmental remediation. PMID:26018624

  2. Atmospheric chemistry of toxic contaminants. 3. Unsaturated aliphatics: Acrolein, acrylonitrile, maleic anhydride

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D. )

    1990-12-01

    Detailed mechanisms are outlined for the chemical reactions that contribute to in-situ formation and atmospheric removal of the unsaturated aliphatic contaminants acrolein, acrylonitrile, and maleic anhydride. In-situ formation of small amounts of acrolein and maleic anhydride may involve the reaction of OH (and O{sub 3}) with 1,3-dienes and the reaction of OH with aromatic hydrocarbons, respectively. There is no known pathway for in-situ formation of acrylonitrile. Rapid removal of acrolein (half-life = less than one day) and of maleic anhydride (half-life = several hours) is expected from their rapid reactions with OH (major), O{sub 3}, and NO{sub 3}. These reactions lead to formaldehyde and glyoxal from acrolein and to dicarbonyls from maleic anhydride. Acrylonitrile is removed at a slower rate (half-life = 2-7 days) by reaction with OH, leading to formaldehyde and formyl cyanide.

  3. Chrome-tanned leather shavings as a filler of butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber.

    PubMed

    Przepiórkowska, A; Chrońska, K; Zaborski, M

    2007-03-01

    The noxious wastes from the tanning industry such as chrome-tanned leather shavings were used as the only filler of rubber mixes containing carboxylated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (XNBR) or butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (NBR), and a dispersing agent Limanol PEV (Schill & Seilacher). The best form addition of leather powder to the rubber mixes is mixed the waste protein with zinc oxide. The leather powder added to the rubber mixes improves the mechanical properties: tensile strength (T(s)), elongation at break (epsilon(b)) and increase the cross-linking density of carboxylated XNBR and NBR rubber mixes. Satisfactory results of these studies are presented in this work. PMID:16942836

  4. Oral tungstate (Na2WO4) exposure reduces adaptive immune responses in mice after challenge.

    PubMed

    Osterburg, Andrew R; Robinson, Chad T; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Stockelman, Michael; Schwemberger, Sandy J; Chapman, Gail; Babcock, George F

    2014-01-01

    Tungstate (WO²⁻₄) has been identified as a ground water contaminant at military firing ranges and can be absorbed by ingestion. In this study, C57BL6 mice were exposed to sodium tungstate (Na2WO4·2H2O) (0, 2, 62.5, 125, and 200 mg/kg/day) in their drinking water for an initial 28-day screen and in a one-generation (one-gen) model. Twenty-four hours prior to euthanasia, mice were intraperitoneally injected with Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) (20 μg/mouse) or saline as controls. After euthanasia, splenocytes and blood were collected and stained with lymphocyte and/or myeloid immunophenotyping panels and analyzed by flow cytometry. In the 28-day and one-gen exposure, statistically significant reductions were observed in the quantities of activated cytotoxic T-cells (TCTL; CD3(+)CD8(+)CD71(+)) and helper T-cells (TH; CD3(+)CD4(+)CD71(+)) from spleens of SEB-treated mice. In the 28-day exposures, CD71(+) TCTL cells were 12.87 ± 2.05% (SE) in the 0 tungstate (control) group compared to 4.44 ± 1.42% in the 200 mg/kg/day (p < 0.001) group. TH cells were 4.85 ± 1.23% in controls and 2.76 ± 0.51% in the 200 mg/kg/day (p < 0.003) group. In the one-gen exposures, TCTL cells were 7.98 ± 0.49% and 6.33 ± 0.49% for P and F1 mice after 0 mg/kg/day tungstate vs 1.58 ± 0.23% and 2.52 ± 0.25% after 200 mg/kg/day of tungstate (p < 0.001). Similarly, TH cells were reduced to 6.21 ± 0.39% and 7.20 ± 0.76%, respectively, for the 0 mg/kg/day P and F1 mice, and 2.28 ± 0.41% and 2.85 ± 0.53%, respectively, for the 200 mg/kg/day tungstate P and F1 groups (p < 0.001). In delayed-type hypersensitivity Type IV experiments, tungstate exposure prior to primary and secondary antigen challenge significantly reduced footpad swelling at 20 and 200 mg/kg/day. These data indicate that exposure to tungstate can result in immune suppression that may, in turn, reduce host defense against

  5. High power tungstate-crystal Raman laser operating in the strong thermal lensing regime.

    PubMed

    McKay, Aaron; Kitzler, Ondrej; Mildren, Richard P

    2014-01-13

    We report an investigation into a double metal tungstate Raman laser when pumped at elevated average powers. Potassium gadolinium tungstate (KGW) was placed in an external cavity configured for second-Stokes output and pumped at pulse repetition rate of 38 kHz with up to 46 W of average power. For output powers above 3 W, we observe preferential excitation of Hermite-Gaussian transverse modes whose order in the X(1)(') principal direction of the thermal expansion tensor scales linearly with Raman power. We deduce that strong astigmatic thermal lensing is induced in the Raman crystal with a negative component in the X(1)(') direction. At maximum pump power, 8.3 W of output power was obtained at a conversion efficiency of 18%. PMID:24515030

  6. Distribution of tungstate in pregnant mice and effects on embryonic cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Wide, M.; Danielsson, B.R.G.; Dencker, L.

    1986-08-01

    Whole-body autoradiography and impulse counting experiments were used to study the distribution and retention of radioactivity in the pregnant mouse after administration of (/sup 185/W)tungstate. A rapid uptake was found in a number of tissues - skeleton, red pulp of the spleen, adrenal, liver, thyroid, pituitary, and ovary - and in the intestine and kidneys, through which it was rapidly excreted. /sup 185/W was also readily transported from mother to fetus, although more in late than in early gestation. The largest metal retention was found in the maternal skeleton, kidneys, and spleen and in visceral yolk sac epithelium and the skeleton of the fetus. Furthermore, in vitro cytotoxicity experiments showed inhibition by tungstate of cartilage production in limb bud mesenchymal cultures at concentrations similar to those found in vivo.

  7. Separation of Molybdenum from Tungstate Solution—Scavenging Thiomolybdate by Copper Compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhongwei; Gao, Lili; Cao, Caifang; Li, Jiangtao; Chen, Xingyu; Chen, Ailiang; Liu, Xuheng; Sun, Peimei; Huo, Guangsheng; Li, Yunjiao; Li, Honggui

    2012-12-01

    Molybdenum is frequently associated with tungsten in mineral deposits, and their chemical properties are quite similar. Therefore, for many years, removal of impurity molybdenum from tungsten has been a worldwide technical problem. In this work, a separation process was investigated with the use of copper-bearing materials as the scavenging agents. Various conditions involved in the effects of different copper-bearing materials, dosage of scavenging agents, reaction time, and temperature were studied in detail. It was found that thiomolybdate can be selectively precipitated from tungstate solution by all the scavenging agents, especially when using nascent copper sulfide. Removal of thiomlybdate can reach 99.45 pct under optimum condition. Nascent CuS is an economic and efficient reagent for removing Mo from tungstate solution.

  8. Crucibleless crystal growth and Radioluminescence study of calcium tungstate single crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, M. S.; Jesus, L. M.; Barbosa, L. B.; Ardila, D. R.; Andreeta, J. P.; Silva, R. S.

    2014-11-01

    In this article, single phase and high optical quality scheelite calcium tungstate single crystal fibers were grown by using the crucibleless laser heated pedestal growth technique. The as-synthesized calcium tungstate powders used for shaping seed and feed rods were investigated by X-ray diffraction technique. As-grown crystals were studied by Raman spectroscopy and Radioluminescence measurements. The results indicate that in both two cases, calcined powder and single crystal fiber, only the expected scheelite CaWO4 phase was observed. It was verified large homogeneity in the crystal composition, without the presence of secondary phases. The Radioluminescence spectra of the as-grown single crystal fibers are in agreement with that present in Literature for bulk single crystals, presented a single emission band centered at 420 nm when irradiated with β-rays.

  9. MOF-Derived Tungstated Zirconia as Strong Solid Acids toward High Catalytic Performance for Acetalization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Feng, Jian; Zhao, Yupei; Wang, Shaobin; Liu, Jian

    2016-09-14

    A strong solid acid, tungstated zirconia (WZ), has been prepared first using tungstate immobilized UiO-66 as precursors through a "double-solvent" impregnation method under mild calcination temperature. With moderate W contents, the as-synthesized WZ catalysts possess a high density of acid sites, and the proper heat treatment also has facilely led to a bunch of oligomeric tungsten clusters on stabilized tetragonal ZrO2. The resultant solid acids show an improved catalytic performance toward the benzaldehyde's acetalization in comparison with traditional zirconium hydroxide-prepared WZ. Notably, due to large surface area and additionally introduced strong acid sites, the MOF-derived WZ catalysts afforded conversion up to 86.0%. The facile method endows the WZ catalysts with superior catalytic activities and excellent recyclability, thus opening a new avenue for preparation of metal oxide-based solid superacids and superbases. PMID:27557351

  10. One-step synthesis and luminescence properties of tetragonal double tungstates nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z J; Zhang, Y L; Zhong, J P; Yao, H H; Wang, J; Wu, M M; Meijerink, A

    2016-08-25

    A versatile one-step thermolysis protocol is demonstrated to produce a uniform dispersion of tetragonal double tungstates NaRE(WO4)2 (RE = rare earth) nanocrystals (NCs). Oriented attachment in the [001] direction occurred. Doping with luminescent RE(3+) ions resulted in highly luminescent NCs showing characteristic line emission of the dopant as well as a blue emission assigned to surface adsorbed organic species. PMID:27524472

  11. A photon calorimeter using lead tungstate crystals for the CEBAF HAll A Compton polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    D. Neyret; T. Pussieux; T. Auger; M. Baylac; E. Burtin; C. Cavata; R. Chipaux; S. Escoffier; N. Falletto; J. Jardillier; S. Kerhoas; D. Lhuillier; F. Marie; C. Veyssiere; J. Ahrens; R. Beck; M. Lang

    2000-05-01

    A new Compton polarimeter is built on the CEBAF Hall A electron beam line. Performances of 10% resolution and 1% calibration are required for the photon calorimeter of this polarimeter. This calorimeter is built with lead tungstate scintillators coming from the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter R&D. Beam tests of this detector have been made using the tagged photon beam line at MAMI, Mainz, and a resolution of 1.76%+2.75%/v+0.41%/E has been measured.

  12. Tungstate decreases weight gain and adiposity in obese rats through increased thermogenesis and lipid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Claret, Marc; Corominola, Helena; Canals, Ignasi; Saura, Josep; Barcelo-Batllori, Silvia; Guinovart, Joan J; Gomis, Ramon

    2005-10-01

    The increasing worldwide incidence of obesity and the limitations of current treatments raise the need for finding novel therapeutic approaches to treat this disease. The purpose of the current study was first to investigate the effects of tungstate on body weight and insulin sensitivity in a rat model of diet-induced obesity. Second, we aimed to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying its action. Oral administration of tungstate significantly decreased body weight gain and adiposity without modifying caloric intake, intestinal fat absorption, or growth rate in obese rats. Moreover, the treatment ameliorated dislipemia and insulin resistance of obese rats. These effects were mediated by an increase in whole-body energy dissipation and by changes in the expression of genes involved in the oxidation of fatty acids and mitochondrial uncoupling in adipose tissue. Furthermore, treatment increased the number of small adipocytes with a concomitant induction of apoptosis. Our results indicate that tungstate treatment may provide the basis for a promising novel therapy for obesity. PMID:16002523

  13. Tungstate, a Molybdate Analog Inactivating Nitrate Reductase, Deregulates the Expression of the Nitrate Reductase Structural Gene

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Mingde; Moureaux, Thérèse; Caboche, Michel

    1989-01-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.6.6.1) from higher plants is a homodimeric enzyme carrying a molybdenum cofactor at the catalytic site. Tungsten can be substituted for molybdenum in the cofactor structure, resulting in an inactive enzyme. When nitratefed Nicotiana tabacum plants were grown on a nutrient solution in which tungstate was substituted for molybdate, NR activity in the leaves decreased to a very low level within 24 hours while NR protein accumulated progressively to a level severalfold higher than the control after 6 days. NR mRNA level in molybdate-grown plants exhibited a considerable day-night fluctuation. However, when plants were treated with tungstate, NR mRNA level remained very high. NR activity and protein increased over a 24-hour period when nitrate was added back to N-starved molybdate-grown plants. NR mRNA level increased markedly during the first 2 hours and then decreased. In the presence of tungstate, however, the induction of NR activity by nitrate was totally abolished while high levels of NR protein and mRNA were both induced, and the high level of NR mRNA was maintained over a 10-hour period. These results suggest that the substitution of tungsten for molybdenum in NR complex leads to an overexpression of the NR structural gene. Possible mechanisms involved in this deregulation are discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:16667015

  14. THE EFFECT OF TUNGSTATE NANOPARTICLES ON REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES AND CYTOTOXICITY IN RAW 264.7 MOUSE MONOCYTE MACROPHAGE CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Dunnick, Katherine M.; Badding, Melissa A.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Patete, Jonathan M.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Leonard, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their unique size, surface area, and chemical characteristics, nanoparticles’ use in consumer products has increased. However, the toxicity of nanoparticle (NP) exposure during the manufacturing process has not been fully assessed. Tungstate NP are used in numerous products, including but not limited to scintillator detectors and fluorescent lighting. As with many NP, no apparent toxicity studies have been completed with tungstate NP. The hypothesis that tungstate NP in vitro exposure results in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and cytotoxicity was examined. Differences in toxicity based on tungstate NP size, shape (sphere vs. wire), and chemical characteristics were determined. RAW 264.7 mouse monocyte macrophages were exposed to tungstate NP, and ROS formation was assessed via electron spin resonance (ESR), and several assays including hydrogen peroxide, intracellular ROS, and Comet. Results showed ROS production induced by tungstate nanowire exposure, but this exposure did not result in oxidative DNA damage. Nanospheres showed neither ROS nor DNA damage following cellular exposure. Cells were exposed over 72 h to assess cytotoxicity using an MTT (tetrazolium compound) assay. Results showed that differences in cell death between wires and spheres occurred at 24 h but were minimal at both 48 and 72 h. The present results indicate that tungstate nanowires are more reactive and produce cell death within 24 h of exposure, whereas nanospheres are less reactive and did not produce cell death. Results suggest that differences in shape may affect reactivity. However, regardless of the differences in reactivity, in general both shapes produced mild ROS and resulted in minimal cell death at 48 and 72 h in RAW 264.7 cells. PMID:25208664

  15. 21 CFR 177.1030 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer. 177.1030 Section 177.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1040 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... deionized water or reagent grade n-heptane at reflux temperature for 2 h.1 Minimum 10 pct solution viscosity... viscosity, titled: “Determination of Residual Acrylonitrile and Styrene Monomers-Gas Chromatographic... Copolymers,” and “Analytical Method for 10% Solution Viscosity of Tyril,” which are incorproated by...

  17. ABSORPTION OF CO2 AND SUBSEQUENT VISCOSITY REDUCTION OF AN ACRYLONITRILE COPOLYMER. (R829555)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acrylonitrile (AN) copolymers (AN content greater than about 85 mol%) are traditionally solution processed to avoid a cyclization and crosslinking reaction that takes place at temperatures where melt processing would be feasible. It is well known that carbon dioxide (CO

  18. 21 CFR 177.1040 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer. 177.1040 Section 177.1040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use...

  19. Development of a conductimetric biosensor using immobilised Rhodococcus ruber whole cells for the detection and quantification of acrylonitrile.

    PubMed

    Roach, P C J; Ramsden, D K; Hughes, J; Williams, P

    2003-10-30

    A conductimetric biosensor for the detection of acrylonitrile in solution was designed and characterised using whole cells of Rhodococcus ruber NCIMB 40757, which were immobilised into a disc of dimethyl silicone sponge (ImmobaSil). The biosensor described was capable of the detection and quantification of acrylonitrile in aqueous solution, having a linear response to concentrations between 2 and 50 mM (106-2650 ppm) acrylonitrile. The biosensor has been shown to be reproducible with respect to the data obtained over a number of days, and retains stability for a minimum period of at least 5 days before recalibration of the biosensor is required. PMID:14559001

  20. Controlled polymerization of acrylonitrile proceeded along with the Belousov-Zhabotinsky oscillator by changing its stirring conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furue, Yuuka; Okano, Kunihiko; Banno, Taisuke; Asakura, Kouichi

    2016-02-01

    Chemical oscillations of the manganese-ion catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction system were found to be controlled by changing its stirring conditions. The oscillation stopped at a high stirring rate, while it reappeared immediately by reducing the stirring rate. It is known in the BZ reaction system, that the radical polymerization takes place along with the oscillation when acrylic monomers are added. By the addition of acrylonitrile to the system stirred at a high stirring rate, the oscillation as well as the polymerization of acrylonitrile stopped. The radical polymerization of acrylonitrile by the BZ oscillator is thus found to be made controllable by changing the mixing conditions.

  1. A quantitative study of sodium tungstate protective effect on pancreatic beta cells in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Zahra; Mahmoudzadeh-Sagheb, Hamidreza; Moudi, Bita

    2008-12-01

    Diabetes is a major public health problem. Development of new therapies that are able to improve glycemia management, cure diabetes, and can even protect from it, are of great interest. This study investigated the protective effect of sodium tungstate against STZ-induced beta-cell damages by means of stereological methods. Sixty rats were divided into six groups: control (C), tungstate-treated control (TC), STZ-induced diabetic (D), STZ-induced diabetic rats were treated by sodium tungstate from 1 week before STZ injection (TDB), food-restricted diabetic (FRD), and diabetic rats treated with sodium tungstate 1 week after STZ administration (TDA). Stereological estimation of pancreas volume, islets volume density, volume-weighted mean islets volume and mass of beta cells, islets, and pancreas and total number of islets were done. Islets volume density, volume-weighted mean islets volume, and mass of beta cells, islets, and pancreas of TDB group was significantly higher than D, FRD and TDA groups (P<0.001) and was comparable to controls (C and TC groups). Total number of islets, pancreas wet weight and volume did not show any significant changes between these groups (P>0.05). Results suggested that sodium tungstate preserves pancreatic beta cells from STZ-induced damages and diabetes induction in rats. PMID:18400503

  2. Efficacy of some antioxidants supplementation in reducing oxidative stress post sodium tungstate exposure in male wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, S; Flora, S J S

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the protective efficacy of some antioxidants against sodium tungstate induced oxidative stress in male wistar rats. Animals were sub-chronically exposed to sodium tungstate (100ppm in drinking water) for three months except for control group. In the same time, many rats were supplemented orally with different antioxidants (alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), n-acetylcysteine (NAC), quercetin or naringenin (0.30mM)) for five consecutive days a week for the same mentioned period before. Exposure to sodium tungstate significantly (P<0.05) inhibit blood δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity, liver and blood reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and an increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) levels in tissues. ALA acid and NAC supplementation post sodium tungstate exposure increased GSH and also, was beneficial in the recovery of altered superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, besides, significantly reducing blood and tissue reactive oxygen species and TBARS levels. The results suggest a more pronounced efficacy of ALA acid and NAC supplementation than quercetin or naringenin supplementation post sodium tungstate exposure in preventing induced oxidative stress in rats. PMID:24613855

  3. Precision machining, polishing and measurement of mechanical and toxicological properties of lead tungstate crystals for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, C.R.; Fuchs, B.A.; Shi, X.

    1995-08-01

    We have developed new machining and polishing techniques that have previously been applied to large scintillating crystal arrays for high energy physics experiments such as the Barium Fluoride Electromagnetic Calorimeter for the GEM Detector at SSCL, the LCsI Electromagnetic Calorimeter for the BaBar Detector at PEP-II B Factory at SLAC and the 110,000 crystal CMS Lead Tungstate Electromagnetic Calorimeter at LHC at CERN. We discuss earlier results achieved with diamond machining and polishing methods and present new results on diamond machining of lead tungstate crystals. Additionally we present new results on mechanical properties of lead tungstate including toxicological data important for the safe handling and processing of this material.

  4. TupA: A Tungstate Binding Protein in the Periplasm of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    PubMed Central

    Otrelo-Cardoso, Ana Rita; Nair, Rashmi R.; Correia, Márcia A. S.; Rivas, Maria G.; Santos-Silva, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The TupABC system is involved in the cellular uptake of tungsten and belongs to the ABC (ATP binding cassette)-type transporter systems. The TupA component is a periplasmic protein that binds tungstate anions, which are then transported through the membrane by the TupB component using ATP hydrolysis as the energy source (the reaction catalyzed by the ModC component). We report the heterologous expression, purification, determination of affinity binding constants and crystallization of the Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 TupA. The tupA gene (locus tag Dde_0234) was cloned in the pET46 Enterokinase/Ligation-Independent Cloning (LIC) expression vector, and the construct was used to transform BL21 (DE3) cells. TupA expression and purification were optimized to a final yield of 10 mg of soluble pure protein per liter of culture medium. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was carried out showing that TupA binds both tungstate and molybdate ions and has no significant interaction with sulfate, phosphate or perchlorate. Quantitative analysis of metal binding by isothermal titration calorimetry was in agreement with these results, but in addition, shows that TupA has higher affinity to tungstate than molybdate. The protein crystallizes in the presence of 30% (w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 using the hanging-drop vapor diffusion method. The crystals diffract X-rays beyond 1.4 Å resolution and belong to the P21 space group, with cell parameters a = 52.25 Å, b = 42.50 Å, c = 54.71 Å, β = 95.43°. A molecular replacement solution was found, and the structure is currently under refinement. PMID:24992597

  5. Effect of thermal annealing on the phase evolution of silver tungstate in Ag/WO₃ films.

    PubMed

    Bose, R Jolly; Sreedharan, R Sreeja; Krishnan, R Resmi; Reddy, V R; Gupta, Mukul; Ganesan, V; Sudheer, S K; Pillai, V P Mahadevan

    2015-06-15

    Silver/tungsten oxide multi-layer films are deposited over quartz substrates by RF magnetron sputtering technique and the films are annealed at temperatures 200, 400 and 600°C. The effect of thermal annealing on the phase evolution of silver tungstate phase in Ag/WO3 films is studied extensively using techniques like X-ray diffraction, micro-Raman analysis, atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence studies. The XRD pattern of the as-deposited film shows only the peaks of cubic phase of silver. The film annealed at 200°C shows the presence of XRD peaks corresponding to orthorhombic phase of Ag2WO4 and peaks corresponding to cubic phase of silver with reduced intensity. It is found that, as annealing temperature increases, the volume fraction of Ag decreases and that of Ag2WO4 phase increases and becomes highest at a temperature of 400°C. When the temperature increases beyond 400°C, the volume fraction of Ag2WO4 decreases, due to its decomposition into silver and oxygen deficient phase Ag2W4O13. The micro-Raman spectra of the annealed films show the characteristic bands of tungstate phase which is in agreement with XRD analysis. The surface morphology of the films studied by atomic force microscopy reveals that the particle size and r.m.s roughness are highest for the sample annealed at 400°C. In the photoluminescence study, the films with silver tungstate phase show an emission peak in blue region centered around the wavelength 441 nm (excitation wavelength 256 nm). PMID:25791880

  6. Detection of acrolein and acrylonitrile with a pulsed room temperature quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manne, J.; Jäger, W.; Tulip, J.

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the use of a pulsed, distributed feedback quantum cascade laser centered at 957 cm-1 in combination with an astigmatic Herriot cell with 250 m path length for the detection of acrolein and acrylonitrile. These molecules have been identified as hazardous air-pollutants because of their adverse health effects. The spectrometer utilizes the intra-pulse method, where a linear frequency down-chirp, that is induced when a top-hat current pulse is applied to the laser, is used for sweeping across the absorption line. Up to 450 ns long pulses were used for these measurements which resulted in a spectral window of ~2.2 cm-1. A room temperature mercury-cadmium-telluride detector was used, resulting in a completely cryogen free spectrometer. We demonstrated detection limits of ~3 ppb for acrylonitrile and ~6 ppb for acrolein with ~10 s averaging time. Laser characterization and optimization of the operational parameters for sensitivity improvement are discussed.

  7. Pathogenesis of neurotoxicity of acrylates acrylonitrile and acrylamide: from cell to organism.

    PubMed

    Tarskikh, M M; Klimatskaya, L G; Kolesnikov, S I

    2013-08-01

    The incubation of 10 mM acrylamide (in vitro) with rat brain homogenate was followed by a decrease in catalase activity by 48% as soon as 5 min after addition of acrylate to the incubation medium. Activity of this enzyme remained low 30 min after the start of the experiment. Acute poisoning with this acrylate was accompanied by LPO activation in rat brain 24 h after injection. Exposure to acrylonitrile during occupational contacts with this monomer was followed by accumulation of adducts of acrylate with erythrocytic hemoglobin in human blood. In accordance with previously observed data, modern scheme of neurotropic effects of acrylonitrile and acrylamide was proposed. This scheme explained specific features of clinical syndromes induced by acute and chronic exposure to these toxic agents. PMID:24143365

  8. Preparation and characterization of zinc sulphide nanocomposites based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesan, M. T.; Nihmath, A.; Francis, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    Rubber composite based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) reinforced with nano zinc sulphide (ZnS) have been prepared via vulcanization process and characterized by several techniques. Processing characteristics such as scorch time, optimum cure time decreases with increase in concentration of nano filler in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber. Mechanical properties such as tensile and tear strength increases with increase in concentration of nano filler up to 7 phr of loading thereafter the value decreases, whereas hardness, and flame resistance increases with the dosage of fillers. These enhanced properties are due to the homogenous dispersion of nano fillers in NBR matrix, which is evidenced from the structure that evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  9. Urinary excretion of the acrylonitrile metabolite 2-cyanoethylmercapturic acid is correlated with a variety of biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure and consumption

    PubMed Central

    Minet, Emmanuel; Cheung, Francis; Errington, Graham; Sterz, Katharina; Scherer, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Acrylonitrile is an IARC class 2B carcinogen present in cigarette smoke. Urinary 2-cyanoethylmercapturic acid (CEMA) is an acrylonitrile metabolite and a potential biomarker for acrylonitrile exposure. The objective of this work was to study the dose response of CEMA in urine of non-smokers and smokers of different ISO tar yield cigarettes. We observed that smokers excreted >100-fold higher amounts of urinary CEMA than non-smokers. The CEMA levels in smokers were significantly correlated with ISO tar yield, daily cigarette consumption, and urinary biomarkers of smoke exposure. In conclusion, urinary CEMA is a suitable biomarker for assessing smoking-related exposure to acrylonitrile. PMID:21108560

  10. Alteration of Acrylonitrile-Methylacrylate-Butadiene Terpolymer by Nocardia rhodochrous and Penicillium notatum†

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, A. D.; Dean, A. V.; Gilbert, S. G.

    1980-01-01

    [14C]Barex-210, a terpolymer of acrylonitrile, methylacrylate, and butadiene, was tested for bioconversion. Powdered samples of polymer, each specifically 14C labeled at different carbon atoms of the polymer, were incubated with either Nocardia rhodochrous or Penicillium notatum in an enriched growth medium for various periods of time. After 6 months of incubation, the 14C-labeled polymer was transformed from a high-molecular-weight material completely soluble in dimethyl formamide (DMF) into both a lower-molecular-weight form still soluble in DMF and a second form that was no longer soluble in DMF. The amount of 14C-labeled carbon atoms converted into DMF-insoluble material was 8% of the backbone carbon-carbon atoms and 12% of the side-chain nitrile and acrylate atoms from the acrylonitrile-methylacrylate copolymer and 60% of the elastomer (acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer) atoms. Metabolism of the polymer was not established from measurements of metabolic 14CO2. Evolution of 14CO2 amounted to only 0.3, 0.6, 1.8, and 3.3% of these four fractions, respectively. Although the transformation of high-molecular-weight polymer into DMF-insoluble material was rapid in the early stages of microbial growth, the accompanying CO2 evolution was much slower. Further evidence of polymer alteration was indicated by the infrared spectrum of the insoluble material, which showed a disappearance of the nitrile and methylacrylate peaks. PMID:16345541

  11. Deposition of Highly Luminescent Zinc Tungstate Thin Films on Various Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrakhan, Rashad

    Zinc tungstate films have promising applications in small form factor backscatter electron detectors. We are developing a multistep technology for synthesis of these films. Zinc and tungsten were co-sputtered onto substrates through the process of magnetron sputtering. The metallic films were oxidized in a vacuum sealed tube furnace in controlled flow of argon and oxygen at 800 °C. The chemical composition of the film was characterized by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The structure of the film was investigated by Raman Spectroscopy. The photoluminescence quantum efficiency of the films was found to be 60%. Process parameters for obtaining the desired 1-1 ratio of zinc to tungsten in the film is explored through varying factors such as: the composition of the target used in the sputtering, the power and or voltage used in the sputtering process. Our experiments show that zinc tungstate thin films can be deposited on various substrates with good adhesion and mechanical integrity, and still be efficient light emitters.

  12. Double aberration-corrected TEM/STEM of tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Shiju, N. R.; Brown, D. R.; Boyes, E. D.; Gai, P. L.

    2010-07-01

    We report highly active tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol by Beckmann rearrangement of 4-hydroxyacetophenone oxime. Double aberration-corrected (2AC)-TEM/STEM studies were performed in a JEOL 2200FS FEG TEM/STEM at the 1 Angstrom (1 Å = 0.1 nanometer) level. Observations at close to zero defocus were carried out using the AC-TEM as well as AC-STEM including high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, from the same areas of the catalyst crystallites. The studies from the same areas have revealed the location and the nanostructure of the polytungstate species (clusters) and the nanograins of zirconia. The AC (S)TEM was crucial to observe the nanostructure and location of polytungstate clusters on the zirconia grains. Polytungstate clusters as small as 0.5 nm have been identified using the HAADF-STEM. The nanostructures of the catalyst and the W surface density have been correlated with paracetamol reaction studies. The results demonstrate the nature of active sites and high activity of the tungstated zirconia nanocatalyst, which is an environmentally clean alternative to the current homogeneous process.

  13. Two-Dimensional Iron Tungstate: A Ternary Oxide Layer With Honeycomb Geometry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The exceptional physical properties of graphene have sparked tremendous interests toward two-dimensional (2D) materials with honeycomb structure. We report here the successful fabrication of 2D iron tungstate (FeWOx) layers with honeycomb geometry on a Pt(111) surface, using the solid-state reaction of (WO3)3 clusters with a FeO(111) monolayer on Pt(111). The formation process and the atomic structure of two commensurate FeWOx phases, with (2 × 2) and (6 × 6) periodicities, have been characterized experimentally by combination of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and understood theoretically by density functional theory (DFT) modeling. The thermodynamically most stable (2 × 2) phase has a formal FeWO3 stoichiometry and corresponds to a buckled Fe2+/W4+ layer arranged in a honeycomb lattice, terminated by oxygen atoms in Fe–W bridging positions. This 2D FeWO3 layer has a novel structure and stoichiometry and has no analogues to known bulk iron tungstate phases. It is theoretically predicted to exhibit a ferromagnetic electronic ground state with a Curie temperature of 95 K, as opposed to the antiferromagnetic behavior of bulk FeWO4 materials. PMID:27110319

  14. Compton profiles and electronic structure of monoclinic zinc and cadmium tungstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena, B. S.; Heda, N. L.; Mund, H. S.; Ahuja, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    We report the first ever Compton scattering study of ZnWO4 and CdWO4 using 20 Ci 137Cs Compton spectrometer at momentum resolution of 0.34 a.u. To compare the experimental Compton profiles, we have also deduced the momentum densities using density functional theory (DFT) within linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) methods. It is seen that the experimental Compton profiles of both the tungstates give a better agreement with LCAO-DFT calculations within generalized gradient approximation (GGA) employing Perdew-Becke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange and correlation energies than other approximations included in the present work. Further, energy bands, density of states (DOS) and band gaps have also been calculated using LCAO-DFT-GGA-PBE scheme and full potential linearized augmented plane wave method. Both the computational schemes show a semiconducting nature of both the tungstates, with a direct band gap at Y point of Brillouin zone. Further, a relative nature of bonding on equal-valence-electron-density scale shows more covalent character in ZnWO4 than CdWO4 which reconciles with the conclusions drawn using integrated DOS and Mulliken's population data.

  15. Simultaneous speciation analysis of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate in welding fume alkaline extracts by HPLC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Ščančar, Janez; Berlinger, Balázs; Thomassen, Yngvar; Milačič, Radmila

    2015-09-01

    A novel analytical procedure was developed for the simultaneous speciation analysis of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate by anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). Linear gradient elution from 100% water to 100% 0.7 M NaCl was applied for chromatographic separation of metal species. In standard aqueous solution at neutral pH molybdate, tungstate and vanadate exist in several aqueous species, while chromate is present as a single CrO4(2-) species. Consequently, only chromate can be separated from this solution in a sharp chromatographic peak. For obtaining sharp chromatographic peaks for molybdate, tungstate and vanadate, the pH of aqueous standard solutions was raised to 12. At highly alkaline conditions single CrO4(2-), MoO4(2-) and WO4(2-) are present and were eluted in sharp chromatographic peaks, while VO4(3-) species, which predominates at pH 12 was eluted in slightly broaden peak. In a mixture of aqueous standard solutions (pH 12) chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate were eluted at retention times from 380 to 420 s, 320 to 370 s, 300 to 350 s and 240 to 360 s, respectively. Eluted species were simultaneously detected on-line by ICP-MS recording m/z 52, 95, 182 and 51. The developed procedure was successfully applied to the analysis of leachable concentrations of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate in alkaline extracts (2% NaOH+3% Na2CO3) of manual metal arc (MMA) welding fumes loaded on filters. Good repeatability and reproducibility of measurement (RSD±3.0%) for the investigated species were obtained in both aqueous standard solutions (pH 12) and in alkaline extracts of welding fumes. Low limits of detection (LODs) were found for chromate (0.02 ng Cr mL(-1)), molybdate (0.1 ng Mo mL(-1)), tungstate (0.1 ng W mL(-1)) and vanadate (0.2 ng V mL(-1)). The accuracy of analytical procedure for the determination of chromate was checked by analysis of

  16. Comparative studies on the removal of heavy metals ions onto cross linked chitosan-g-acrylonitrile copolymer.

    PubMed

    Shankar, P; Gomathi, Thandapani; Vijayalakshmi, K; Sudha, P N

    2014-06-01

    The graft copolymerization of acrylonitrile onto cross linked chitosan was carried out using ceric ammonium nitrate as an initiator. The prepared cross linked chitosan-g-acrylonitrile copolymer was characterized using FT-IR and XRD studies. The adsorption behavior of chromium(VI), copper(II) and nickel(II) ions from aqueous solution onto cross linked chitosan graft acrylonitrile copolymer was investigated through batch method. The efficiency of the adsorbent was identified from the varying the contact time, adsorbent dose and pH. The results evident that the adsorption of metal ions increases with the increase of shaking time and metal ion concentration. An optimum pH was found to be 5.0 for both Cr(VI) and Cu(II), whereas the optimum pH is 5.5 for the adsorption of Ni(II) onto cross linked chitosan-g-acrylonitrile copolymer. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe the isotherms and isotherm constants. Adsorption isothermal data could be well interpreted by the Freundlich model. The kinetic experimental data properly correlated with the second-order kinetic model. From the above results it was concluded that the cross linked chitosan graft acrylonitrile copolymer was found to be the efficient adsorbent for removing the heavy metals under optimum conditions. PMID:24680901

  17. Characterisation of recycled acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene from waste computer equipment in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Denise; Saron, Clodoaldo

    2015-06-01

    Polymeric materials constitute a considerable fraction of waste computer equipment and polymers acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene are the main thermoplastic polymeric components found in waste computer equipment. Identification, separation and characterisation of additives present in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene are fundamental procedures to mechanical recycling of these polymers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the methods for identification of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene from waste computer equipment in Brazil, as well as their potential for mechanical recycling. The imprecise utilisation of symbols for identification of the polymers and the presence of additives containing toxic elements in determinate computer devices are some of the difficulties found for recycling of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene from waste computer equipment. However, the considerable performance of mechanical properties of the recycled acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene when compared with the virgin materials confirms the potential for mechanical recycling of these polymers. PMID:26022280

  18. BK channel activation by tungstate requires the β1 subunit extracellular loop residues essential to modulate voltage sensor function and channel gating.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Mariño, Ana I; Valverde, Miguel A; Fernández-Fernández, José M

    2014-07-01

    Tungstate, a compound with antidiabetic, antiobesity, and antihypertensive properties, activates the large-conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) (BK) channel containing either β1 or β4 subunits. The BK activation by tungstate is Mg(2+)-dependent and promotes arterial vasodilation, but only in precontracted mouse arteries expressing β1. In this study, we further explored how the β1 subunit participates in tungstate activation of BK channels. Activation of heterologously expressed human BKαβ1 channels in inside-out patches is fully dependent on the Mg(2+) sensitivity of the BK α channel subunit even at high (10 μM) cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. Alanine mutagenesis of β1 extracellular residues Y74 or S104, which destabilize the active voltage sensor, greatly decreased the tungstate-induced left-shift of the BKαβ1 G-V curves in either the absence or presence of physiologically relevant cytosolic Ca(2+) levels (10 μM). The weakened tungstate activation of the BKαβ1Y74A and BKαβ1S104A mutant channels was not related to decreased Mg(2+) sensitivity. These results, together with previously published reports, support the idea that the putative binding site for tungstate-mediated BK channel activation is located in the pore-forming α channel subunit, around the Mg(2+) binding site. The role of β1 in tungstate-induced channel activation seems to rely on its interaction with the BK α subunit to modulate channel activity. Loop residues that are essential for the regulation of voltage sensor activation and gating of the BK channel are also relevant for BK activation by tungstate. PMID:24158430

  19. Scintillation of lead tungstate crystal studied with single-electron beam from KUFEL

    SciTech Connect

    Rizwan, Mohamad Uozumi, Yusuke; Matsuo, Kazuki; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Kii, Toshiteru; Zen, Heishun; Tsamalaidze, Zviadi; Evtoukhovitch, Petr; Valentin, Samoilov

    2015-04-29

    Lead tungstate (PWO) crystal has a very fast response, high atomic density and high radiation hardness. Therefore, they are suitable to be used for high-energy nuclear data measurements under high-background circumstances. Although a good electron-ion separation with a pulse shape analysis technique is essential, scintillation pulse shapes have not been observed with electron beams of a wide energy range. A single-electron beam technique has been developed at Kyoto University Free Electron Laser (KUFEL), and electron beams of 4-38 MeV are available. During the experiments, single electron beams bombarded a PWO crystal. By using oscilloscope we observed scintillation pulses of a PWO crystal coupled with a photomultiplier tube. Measured spectra were compared with the simulation code of EGS5 to analyze scattering effects. As the result, the pulse amplitudes show good linearity and the pulse shapes are almost constant in the observed energy range.

  20. Lead Tungstate Crystals for the Cms Electromagnetic Calorimeter at the Lhc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dafinei, Ioan

    2002-11-01

    With its over 80,000 scintillating lead tungstate PbWO4 (PWO) crystals the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) will be the largest one ever constructed. It was designed to work in the demanding LHC environment and give a resolution of 0.5% for photon energies above 50 GeV/c. An important R & D effort was necessary in order to guarantee the production of PWO crystals able to satisfy such challenging constraints. The performance of the pre-production crystal batches (about 6000 barrel crystals) is consistent with the very strict quality parameters defined by the ECAL Collaboration. The meaning of quality controls as well as the main characteristics of these crystals are discussed. More, recent developments in the PWO crystal growth technology may speedup the crystal supplying for the ECAL construction.

  1. Scintillation of lead tungstate crystal studied with single-electron beam from KUFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizwan, Mohamad; Uozumi, Yusuke; Matsuo, Kazuki; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Kii, Toshiteru; Zen, Heishun; Tsamalaidze, Zviadi; Evtoukhovitch, Petr; Valentin, Samoilov

    2015-04-01

    Lead tungstate (PWO) crystal has a very fast response, high atomic density and high radiation hardness. Therefore, they are suitable to be used for high-energy nuclear data measurements under high-background circumstances. Although a good electron-ion separation with a pulse shape analysis technique is essential, scintillation pulse shapes have not been observed with electron beams of a wide energy range. A single-electron beam technique has been developed at Kyoto University Free Electron Laser (KUFEL), and electron beams of 4-38 MeV are available. During the experiments, single electron beams bombarded a PWO crystal. By using oscilloscope we observed scintillation pulses of a PWO crystal coupled with a photomultiplier tube. Measured spectra were compared with the simulation code of EGS5 to analyze scattering effects. As the result, the pulse amplitudes show good linearity and the pulse shapes are almost constant in the observed energy range.

  2. Fast synthesis and morphology control of lead tungstate microcrystals via a microwave-assisted method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Guizhen; Hao Chuncheng

    2009-02-04

    Lead tungstate (PbWO{sub 4}) microcrystals with different morphologies, such as tetragonal flowerlike, amygdaloidal, and multiple-lamellar, have been successfully synthesized via a simple microwave-assisted method. Various factors, such as the pH value and the concentration of the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), play an important role in the morphological control of PbWO{sub 4} microcrystals. The products were characterized by the techniques of powder X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The possible formation mechanisms of PbWO{sub 4} samples of various morphologies were discussed. The luminescence properties of the final products were investigated and the as-prepared PbWO{sub 4} microcrystals showed special room-temperature photoluminescence intensity compared to the solid structures.

  3. Lasing properties of new Nd 3+-doped tungstate, molybdate, and fluoride materials under selective optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šulc, Jan; Jelínkova, Helena; Basiev, Tolstoban T.; Doroschenko, Maxim E.; Ivleva, Ludmila I.; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.; Zverev, Peter G.

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the relative efficiencies of new Nd 3+-doped laser active/Raman - tungstate, molybdate, and fluoride - materials (SrWO 4, PbWO 4, BaWO 4, SrMoO 4, PbMoO 4, SrF II, and LaF 3) under selective longitudinal optical pumping by the alexandrite (~750nm), or diode (~800nm) laser. Crystals with various length, orientations and active ions concentrations were tested. To optimize the output of the tested lasers a set of input dichroic and output dielectric mirrors with different reflectivities were used. For realized lasers operating at pulsed free-running regime, threshold energy, slope efficiency, emission wavelength, and radiation polarization were determined. For each crystal, fluorescence lifetime and absorption coefficient under given pumping were established. The slope efficiency in case of Nd 3+:PbMoO 4 laser at wavelength 1054nm was measured to be 54.3% with total efficiency of 46% which is the best result obtained for all new tested crystals. For Nd 3+ doped SrWO 4, PbWO 4, and BaWO 4 crystals simultaneous laser and self-Raman emission were demonstrated in Q-switched regime. Thus newly proposed laser Raman crystals demonstrate high efficiency for Nd 3+ laser oscillations comparable with well known and widely used Nd:KGW crystal. Further improvement in the quality of tungstate and molybdate type crystals should result in further increase in lasing efficiency at 1.06μm wavelength. Self Raman frequency conversion of Nd 3+-laser oscillations in these crystals should result in high efficient pulse shortening, high peak power and new wavelengths in 1.2-1.5μm wavelength region.

  4. Diode-pumped ytterbium-doped phosphate and tungstate regenerative amplifiers and ancillary investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hsiao-Hua

    This thesis focuses on the development of directly diode- pumped solid-state regenerative laser amplifiers. Our purpose is to build a compact, simple, reliable, and economical subpicosecond laser system by employing a direct diode-pumping scheme for real-world applications such as medical surgeries and micromachining. Ytterbium- doped phosphate glass (QX/Yb) and ytterbium-doped tungstate crystals (Yb:KYW and Yb:KGW) are used as the amplifier gain media, and their laser properties are discussed and compared with other ytterbium-doped materials. The same oscillator, stretcher, and compressor are used with each amplifier presented. Both end- and side-pumping configurations are implemented and compared wherever possible. Typically, an end-pumped laser has a higher efficiency, whereas a side-pumped laser has a simpler, and thus more compact setup. To improve the efficiency of a side-pumped laser, we have proposed and demonstrated a novel pumping scheme with the QX/Yb, amplifier. To match the elliptical beam from the pump diodes, we have designed and built cavities with an elliptical fundamental mode by using cylindrical optics. Millijoule, subpicosecond pulses have been produced from our QX/Yb regenerative amplifier using the proposed pumping scheme and an elliptic-mode cavity. The diode- pumped ytterbium-doped tungstate regenerative amplifiers in this thesis produced subpicosecond pulses with at least tens of microjoules of pulse energy at a kHz repetition rate, also using a cavity with an elliptical fundamental mode. A self-starting Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb:KYW oscillator directly pumped by diodes and a low- repetition-rate Yb:KGW regenerative amplifier pumped by a flashlamp-pumped Ti:sapphire laser are also presented as ancillary studies.

  5. Mechanism of Selective Ammoxidation of Propene to Acrylonitrile on Bismuth Molybdates from Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Pudar, Sanja; Oxgaard, Jonas; Goddard, William A

    2010-08-25

    In order to understand the mechanism for selective ammoxidation of propene to acrylonitrile by bismuth molybdates, we report quantum mechanical studies (using the B3LYP flavor of density functional theory) for the various steps involved in converting the allyl-activated intermediate to acrylonitrile over molybdenum oxide (using a Mo3O9 cluster model) under conditions adjusted to describe both high and low partial pressures of NH3 in the feed. We find that the rate-determining step in converting of allyl to acrylonitrile at all feed partial pressures is the second hydrogen abstraction from the nitrogen-bound allyl intermediate (Mo-NH-CH2-CH=CH2) to form Mo-NH=CH-CH=CH2). We find that imido groups (Mo=NH) have two roles: (1) a direct effect on H abstraction barriers, H abstraction by an imido moiety is (~8 kcal/mol) more favorable than abstraction by an oxo moiety (Mo=O), and (2) an indirect effect, the presence of spectator imido groups decreases the H abstraction barriers by an additional ~15 kcal/mol. Therefore, at higher NH3 pressures (which increases the number of Mo=NH groups), the second H abstraction barrier decreases significantly, in agreement with experimental observations that propene conversion is higher at higher partial pressures of NH3. At high NH3 pressures we find that the final hydrogen abstraction has a high barrier [ΔHfourth-ab = 31.6 kcal/mol compared to ΔHsecond-ab = 16.4 kcal/mol] due to formation of low Mo oxidation states in the final state. However, we find that reoxidizing the surface prior to the last hydrogen abstraction leads to a significant reduction of this barrier to ΔHfourth-ab = 15.9 kcal/mol, so that this step is no longer rate determining. Therefore, we conclude that reoxidation during the reaction is necessary for facile conversion of allyl to

  6. Detection of hydrogen dissolved in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Shin; Fujiwara, Hirotada

    2012-01-01

    Rubber materials, which are used for hydrogen gas seal, can dissolve hydrogen during exposure in high-pressure hydrogen gas. Dissolved hydrogen molecules were detected by solid state 1H NMR of the unfilled vulcanized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber. Two signals were observed at 4.5 ppm and 4.8 ppm, which were assignable to dissolved hydrogen, in the 1H NMR spectrum of NBR after being exposed 100 MPa hydrogen gas for 24 h at room temperature. These signals were shifted from that of gaseous hydrogen molecules. Assignment of the signals was confirmed by quantitative estimation of dissolved hydrogen and peak area of the signals.

  7. On the nature of defect states in tungstate nanoflake arrays as promising photoanodes in solar fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Aya M; Amer, Ahmad W; AlQaradawi, Siham Y; Allam, Nageh K

    2016-08-10

    An electrochemical method is presented to study the nature of the defect states in sub-stoichiometric tungsten oxide nanoflake photoanodes used in water splitting. First, stoichiometric/sub-stoichiometric tungstate nanoflake arrays were deliberately developed via annealing under different atmospheres (air, O2, and H2) in different sequences. UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra and Tauc analysis indicated the presence of oxygen vacancies, which was also confirmed via XRD and Raman analysis, with samples annealed in an air/O2 sequence resulting in the most stoichiometric monoclinic structures. A defect sensitivity factor was proposed to explain the nature of defects whether they are deep or shallow. Mott-Schottky analysis was used to confirm the expected defect donor densities, as well as to confirm the nature of the developed oxygen vacancy defect states. The tungstate photoanodes were tested in photoelectrochemical water splitting cells and their photoconversion efficiency was demonstrated and discussed in detail. PMID:27453354

  8. Toward a mid-infrared femtosecond laser system with suspended-core tungstate-tellurite glass fibers.

    PubMed

    Anashkina, E A; Andrianov, A V; Dorofeev, V V; Kim, A V

    2016-06-10

    A simple design of a fiber laser system for generating high-quality pulses with a duration of order 100 fs with ultrabroad wavelength tunability in the 2-5 μm range is discussed. This design incorporates conventional fs near-IR lasers and specially developed tungstate-tellurite fibers with two zero-dispersion wavelengths (ZDW) and relies on nonlinear wavelength conversion via either soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) or red-shifted dispersive wave (DW) generation. The fiber parameters needed for such optical conversion have been scanned numerically and showed a possibility of SSFS beyond 4 μm and of DW generation beyond 5 μm. We have also studied and prepared tungstate-tellurite glasses and preforms that are highly stable against crystallization, exhibit extremely low level of hydroxyl groups absorption, and from which the suspended-core two-ZDW fibers can be manufactured. PMID:27409007

  9. Discovery and optimization of sulfonyl acrylonitriles as selective, covalent inhibitors of protein phosphatase methylesterase-1.

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, Daniel A; Zuhl, Andrea M; Speers, Anna E; Wolfe, Monique R; Weerapana, Eranthie; Brown, Steven J; Rosen, Hugh; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2011-07-28

    The serine hydrolase protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) regulates the methylesterification state of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and has been implicated in cancer and Alzheimer's disease. We recently reported a fluorescence polarization-activity-based protein profiling (fluopol-ABPP) high-throughput screen for PME-1 that uncovered a remarkably potent and selective class of aza-β-lactam (ABL) PME-1 inhibitors. Here, we describe a distinct set of sulfonyl acrylonitrile inhibitors that also emerged from this screen. The optimized compound, 28 (AMZ30), selectively inactivates PME-1 and reduces the demethylated form of PP2A in living cells. Considering that 28 is structurally unrelated to ABL inhibitors of PME-1, these agents, together, provide a valuable set of pharmacological probes to study the role of methylation in regulating PP2A function. We furthermore observed that several serine hydrolases were sensitive to analogues of 28, suggesting that more extensive structural exploration of the sulfonyl acrylonitrile chemotype may result in useful inhibitors for other members of this large enzyme class. PMID:21639134

  10. Discovery and Optimization of Sulfonyl Acrylonitriles as Selective, Covalent Inhibitors of Protein Phosphatase Methylesterase-1

    PubMed Central

    Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Zuhl, Andrea M.; Speers, Anna E.; Wolfe, Monique R.; Weerapana, Eranthie; Brown, Steven J.; Rosen, Hugh; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2011-01-01

    The serine hydrolase protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) regulates the methylesterification state of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and has been implicated in cancer and Alzheimer's disease. We recently reported a fluorescence polarization-activity-based protein profiling (fluopol-ABPP) high-throughput screen for PME-1 that uncovered a remarkably potent and selective class of aza-β-lactam (ABL) PME-1 inhibitors. Here, we describe a distinct set of sulfonyl acrylonitrile inhibitors that also emerged from this screen. The optimized compound, 28 (AMZ30), selectively inactivates PME-1 and reduces the demethylated form of PP2A in living cells. Considering that 28 is structurally unrelated to ABL inhibitors of PME-1, these agents, together, provide a valuable set of pharmacological probes to study the role of methylation in regulating PP2A function. We furthermore observed that several serine hydrolases were sensitive to analogs of 28, suggesting that more extensive structural exploration of the sulfonyl acrylonitrile chemotype may result in useful inhibitors for other members of this large enzyme class. PMID:21639134

  11. Two-dimensional spectra of electron collisions with acrylonitrile and methacrylonitrile reveal nuclear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Regeta, K. Allan, M.

    2015-05-14

    Detailed experimental information on the motion of a nuclear packet on a complex (resonant) anion potential surface is obtained by measuring 2-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra. The cross section is plotted as a function of incident electron energy, which determines which resonant anion state is populated, i.e., along which normal coordinate the wave packet is launched, and of the electron energy loss, which reveals into which final states each specific resonant state decays. The 2D spectra are presented for acrylonitrile and methacrylonitrile, at the incident energy range 0.095-1.0 eV, where the incoming electron is temporarily captured in the lowest π{sup ∗} orbital. The 2D spectra reveal selectivity patterns with respect to which vibrations are excited in the attachment and de-excited in the detachment. Further insight is gained by recording 1D spectra measured along horizontal, vertical, and diagonal cuts of the 2D spectrum. The methyl group in methacrylonitrile increases the resonance width 7 times. This converts the sharp resonances of acrylonitrile into boomerang structures but preserves the essence of the selectivity patterns. Selectivity of vibrational excitation by higher-lying shape resonances up to 8 eV is also reported.

  12. Assessing the performance under ionising radiation of lead tungstate scintillators for EM calorimetry in the CLAS12 Forward Tagger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fegan, S.; Auffray, E.; Battaglieri, M.; Buchanan, E.; Caiffi, B.; Celentano, A.; Colaneri, L.; D`Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; Dormenev, V.; Fanchini, E.; Lanza, L.; Novotny, R. W.; Parodi, F.; Rizzo, A.; Sokhan, D.; Tarasov, I.; Zonta, I.

    2015-07-01

    The well-established technology of electromagnetic calorimetry using Lead Tungstate crystals has recently seen an upheaval, with the closure of one of the most experienced large-scale suppliers of such crystals, the Bogoroditsk Technical Chemical Plant (BTCP), which was instrumental in the development of mass production procedures for PWO-II, the current benchmark for this scintillator. Obtaining alternative supplies of Lead Tungstate crystals matching the demanding specifications of contemporary calorimeter devices now presents a significant challenge to detector research and development programmes. In this paper we describe a programme of assessment carried out for the selection, based upon the performance under irradiation, of Lead Tungstate crystals for use in the Forward Tagger device, part of the CLAS12 detector in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The crystals tested were acquired from SICCAS, the Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The tests performed are intended to maximise the performance of the detector within the practicalities of the crystal manufacturing process. Results of light transmission, before and after gamma ray irradiation, are presented and used to calculate dk, the induced radiation absorption coefficient, at 420 nm, the peak of the Lead Tungstate emission spectrum. Results for the SICCAS crystals are compared with identical measurements carried out on Bogoroditsk samples, which were acquired for the Forward Tagger development program before the closure of the facility. Also presented are a series of tests performed to determine the feasibility of recovering radiation damage to the crystals using illumination from an LED, with such illumination available in the Forward Tagger from a light monitoring system integral to the detector.

  13. Steady-state Raman gain coefficients of potassium-gadolinium tungstate at the wavelength of 532 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulkov, R.; Markevich, V.; Orlovich, V.; El-Desouki, M.

    2015-12-01

    Stokes generation has been considered under the Fourier-limited nanosecond pulse excitation to find Raman gain coefficients in potassium-gadolinium tungstate. Data of numerical simulation under spontaneous Stokes initiation, light diffraction, and optical feedback have been compared with experimental results to reveal coefficient values of 14 ± 3 and 11 ± 3 cm/GW for the p[mm]p and p[gg]p sample orientations, respectively, at 532 nm wavelength.

  14. 21 CFR 177.1050 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer. 177.1050 Section 177.1050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1050 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer. 177.1050 Section 177.1050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1050 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer. 177.1050 Section 177.1050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as...

  17. SISTER CHROMATID EXCHANGE AND CHROMOSOME ABERRATION ANALYSES IN MICE AFTER IN VIVO EXPOSURE TO ACRYLONITRILE, STYRENE, OR BUTADIENE MONOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of polymers in plastic and rubber products has generated concern that monomers potentially active in biological systems may be eluted from these substances. The authors have evaluated two such monomers, acrylonitrile and styrene, for the induction of chromosome damage in ...

  18. Ultrasonic velocity and absorption study of binary mixtures of cyclohexane with acrylonitrile by interferometric method at different frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, N. R.; Chimankar, O. P.; Bhandakkar, V. D.; Padole, N. N.

    2012-12-01

    The ultrasonic velocity (u), absorption (α), density (ρ), and viscosity (η) has been measured at different frequencies (1MHz to 10MHz) in the binary mixtures of cyclohexane with acrylonitriile over the entire range of composition at temperature 303K. Vander Waal's constant (b), adiabatic compressibility (βa), acoustic impedance (Z), molar volume (V), free length (Lf), free volume, internal pressure, intermolecular radius and relative association have been also calculated. A special application for acrylonitrile is in the manufacture of carbon fibers. These are produced by paralysis of oriented poly acrylonitrile fibers and are used to reinforce composites for high-performance applications in the aircraft, defense and aerospace industries. Other applications of acrylonitrile are in the production of fatty amines, ion exchange resins and fatty amine amides used in cosmetics, adhesives, corrosion inhibitors and water-treatment resins. Cyclohexane derivatives can be used for the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, dyes, herbicides, plant growth regulator, plasticizers, rubber chemicals, nylon, cyclamens and other organic compounds. In the view of these extensive applications of acrylonitrile and cyclohexane in the engineering process, textile and pharmaceutical industries present study provides qualitative information regarding the nature and strength of interaction in the liquid mixtures through derive parameters from ultrasonic velocity and absorption measurement.

  19. Synergetic effect of copper-plating wastewater as a catalyst for the destruction of acrylonitrile wastewater in supercritical water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Ho; Lee, Hong-shik; Lee, Young-Ho; Kim, Jaehoon; Kim, Jae-Duck; Lee, Youn-Woo

    2009-08-15

    A new supercritical water oxidation process for the simultaneous treatment of mixed wastewater containing wastewater from acrylonitrile manufacturing processes and copper-plating processes was investigated using a continuous tubular reactor system. Experiments were carried out at temperatures ranging from 400 to 600 degrees C and a pressure of 25 MPa. The residence time was fixed at 2s by changing the flow rates of feeds, depending on reaction temperature. The initial total organic carbon (TOC) concentration of the wastewaters and the O(2) concentration at the reactor inlet were kept constant at 0.49 and 0.74 mol/L. It was confirmed that the copper-plating wastewater accelerated the TOC conversion of acrylonitrile wastewater from 17.6% to 67.3% at a temperature of 450 degrees C. Moreover, copper and copper oxide nanoparticles were generated in the process of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of mixed wastewater. 99.8% of copper in mixed wastewater was recovered as solid copper and copper oxides at a temperature of 600 degrees C, with their average sizes ranging from 150 to 160 nm. Our study showed that SCWO provides a synergetic effect for simultaneous treatment of acrylonitrile and copper-plating wastewater. During the reaction, the oxidation rate of acrylonitrile wastewater was enhanced due to the in situ formation of nano-catalysts of copper and/or copper oxides, while the exothermic decomposition of acrylonitrile wastewater supplied enough heat for the recovery of solid copper and copper oxides from copper-plating wastewater. The synergetic effect of wastewater treatment by the newly proposed SCWO process leads to full TOC conversion, color removal, detoxification, and odor elimination, as well as full recovery of copper. PMID:19231072

  20. Investigation of oxygen vacancy and photoluminescence in calcium tungstate nanophosphors with different particle sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yezhou; Wang, Zhaofeng; Sun, Luyi; Wang, Zhilong; Wang, Shiqin; Liu, Xiong; Wang, Yuhua

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • CaWO{sub 4} nanophosphors with different particle sizes were prepared by hydrothermal processes through controlling the concentration of surfactant. • Green emission band of oxygen vacancy in CaWO{sub 4} nanophosphor was clearly observed upon the irradiation of 350 nm excitation. • The concentration of oxygen vacancy in CaWO{sub 4} nanophosphor could be increased by reducing its size. - Abstract: Calcium tungstate (CaWO{sub 4}) nanophosphors with the particle sizes from 35 to 90 nm were synthesized by a hydrothermal process through exactly controlling the pre-treated conditions. The influence of particle size on oxygen vacancy and photoluminescence properties in CaWO{sub 4} nanophosphors was investigated and discussed. The crystal structure of the CaWO{sub 4} nanophosphors presented a certain level of distortion due to the high concentration of oxygen vacancy. Under 350 nm excitation, a clear green emission aroused by oxygen vacancy was observed. The possible luminescence processes for the matrix and oxygen vacancy were proposed. The luminescence spectra of the nanophosphors revealed that the emission and absorption intensity aroused by oxygen vacancy were both enhanced when the size is decreased. On the basis of the above results, the essential relationship between particle size and oxygen vacancy in CaWO{sub 4} nanophosphors was concluded that the concentration of oxygen vacancy could be increased by reducing its size, which was further confirmed by decay lifetimes.

  1. Zirconium tungstate/epoxy nanocomposites: effect of nanoparticle morphology and negative thermal expansivity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongchao; Rogalski, Mark; Kessler, Michael R

    2013-10-01

    The ability to tailor the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of a polymer is essential for mitigating thermal residual stress and reducing microcracks caused by CTE mismatch of different components in electronic applications. This work studies the effect of morphology and thermal expansivity of zirconium tungstate nanoparticles on the rheological, thermo-mechanical, dynamic-mechanical, and dielectric properties of ZrW2O8/epoxy nanocomposites. Three types of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles were synthesized under different hydrothermal conditions and their distinct properties were characterized, including morphology, particle size, aspect ratio, surface area, and CTE. Nanoparticles with a smaller particle size and larger surface area led to a more significant reduction in gel-time and glass transition temperature of the epoxy nanocomposites, while a higher initial viscosity and significant shear thinning behavior was found in prepolymer suspensions containing ZrW2O8 with larger particle sizes and aspect ratios. The thermo- and dynamic-mechanical properties of epoxy-based nanocomposites improved with increasing loadings of the three types of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles. In addition, the introduced ZrW2O8 nanoparticles did not negatively affect the dielectric constant or the breakdown strength of the epoxy resin, suggesting potential applications of ZrW2O8/epoxy nanocomposites in the microelectronic insulation industry. PMID:24070222

  2. Effect of tri- and tetravalent metal doping on the electrochemical properties of lanthanum tungstate proton conductors.

    PubMed

    Porras-Vázquez, J M; dos Santos-Gómez, L; Marrero-López, D; Slater, P R; Masó, N; Magrasó, A; Losilla, Enrique R

    2016-02-21

    Rare-earth tungstates (La(28-y)W(4+y)O(54+δ)□(2-δ)) have attracted attention recently because of their relatively high proton-electron conductivity and high stability in a CO2 environment. Since doping on the tungsten-site may increase the conductivity, a new series of compounds with composition La(5.5)W(1-x)M(x)O(11.25-δ) (M = Al, Ti and Zr; x = 0, 0.05 and 0.10) have been investigated. The crystal structure of these materials has been studied using X-ray and time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction by Rietveld analysis. The concentration of oxygen vacancies for hydration in the structure has been indirectly determined by thermogravimetric analysis, and the total conductivity in several pO2, pH2O and pD2O atmospheres has been studied by impedance spectroscopy. An increase in the conductivity is observed, ranging from 4.1 mS cm(-1) for the undoped sample to 9.2 mS cm(-1) for La(5.5)W(0.9)Ti(0.1)O(11.25-δ), in wet N2 at 800 °C. PMID:26776842

  3. ROLE OF TUNGSTEN IN THE AQUEOUS PHASE HYDRODEOXYGENATION OF ETHYLENE GLYCOL ON TUNGSTATED ZIRCONIA SUPPORTED PALLADIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Marin-Flores, Oscar G.; Karim, Ayman M.; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-15

    The focus of the present work was specifically on the elucidation of the role played by tungsten on the catalytic activity and selectivity of tungstated zirconia supported palladium (Pd-mWZ) for the aqueous phase hydrodeoxygenation (APHDO) of ethylene glycol (EG). Zirconia supported palladium (Pd-mZ) was used as reference. The catalysts were prepared via incipient wet impregnation and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), CO pulse chemisorption, CO-DRIFTS, ammonia temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) and pyridine adsorption. The presence of W results in larger Pd particles on supported Pd catalysts, i.e., 0.9 and 6.1 nm Pd particles are for Pd-mZ and Pd-mWZ, respectively. For comparison purposes, the activity of the catalytic materials used in this work was obtained using a well-defined set of operating conditions. The catalytic activity measurements show that the overall intrinsic activity of Pd particles on mWZ is 1.9 times higher than on mZ. APHDO process appears to be highly favored on Pd-mWZ whereas Pd-mZ exhibits a higher selectivity for reforming. This difference in terms of selectivity seems to be related to the high concentration of Brønsted acid sites and electron-deficient Pd species present on Pd-mWZ.

  4. Biodiesel synthesis catalyzed by transition metal oxides: ferric-manganese doped tungstated/molybdena nanoparticle catalyst.

    PubMed

    Alhassan, Fatah Hamid; Rashid, Umer; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2015-01-01

    The solid acid Ferric-manganese doped tungstated/molybdena nananoparticle catalyst was prepared via impregnation reaction followed by calcination at 600°C for 3 h. The characterization was done using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), temperature programmed desorption of NH3 (TPD-NH3), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Brunner-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement (BET). Moreover, dependence of biodiesel yield on the reaction variables such as the reaction temperature, catalyst loading, as well as molar ratio of methanol/oil and reusability were also appraised. The catalyst was reused six times without any loss in activity with maximum yield of 92.3% ±1.12 achieved in the optimized conditions of reaction temperature of 200°C; stirring speed of 600 rpm, 1:25 molar ratio of oil to alcohol, 6 % w/w catalyst loading as well as 8 h as time of the reaction. The fuel properties of WCOME's were evaluated, including the density, kinematic viscosity, pour point, cloud point and flash point whereas all properties were compared with the limits in the ASTM D6751 standard. PMID:25492234

  5. Studying radiation hardness of a cadmium tungstate crystal based radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtein, M. M.; Smekalin, L. F.; Stepanov, S. A.; Zatonov, I. A.; Tkacheva, T. V.; Usachev, E. Yu

    2016-06-01

    The given article considers radiation hardness of an X-ray detector used in production of non-destructive testing instruments and inspection systems. In the course of research, experiments were carried out to estimate radiation hardness of a detector based on cadmium tungstate crystal and its structural components individually. The article describes a layout of an experimental facility that was used for measurements of radiation hardness. The radiation dose dependence of the photodiode current is presented, when it is excited by a light flux of a scintillator or by an external light source. Experiments were carried out to estimate radiation hardness of two types of optical glue used in detector production; they are based on silicon rubber and epoxy. With the help of a spectrophotometer and cobalt gun, each of the glue samples was measured for a relative light transmission factor with different wavelengths, depending on the radiation dose. The obtained data are presented in a comprehensive analysis of the results. It was determined, which of the glue samples is most suitable for production of detectors working under exposure to strong radiation.

  6. Numerical simulation of photonic-crystal tellurite-tungstate glass fibres used in parametric fibre devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, V O; Plotnichenko, V G; Nazaryants, V O; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2006-01-31

    Using the MIT Photonic-Bands Package to calculate fully vectorial definite-mode eigenmodes of Maxwell's equations with periodic boundary conditions in a plane-wave basis, light propagation is simulated in fibres formed by point defects in two-dimensional periodic lattices of cylindrical holes in a glass or of glass tubes. The holes and gaps between tubes are assumed filled with air. Single-site hexagonal and square lattices are considered, which were most often studied both theoretically and experimentally and are used to fabricate silica photonic-crystal fibres. As a defect, a single vacancy is studied - the absent lattice site (one hole in a glass or one of the tubes are filled with the same glass) and a similar vacancy with nearest neighbours representing holes of a larger diameter. The obtained solutions are analysed by the method of effective mode area. The dependences of the effective refractive index and dispersion of the fundamental mode on the geometrical parameters of a fibre are found. The calculations are performed for tellurite-tungstate 80TeO{sub 2}-20WO{sub 3} glass fibres taking into account the frequency dispersion of the refractive index. (optical fibres)

  7. Compton profiles and Mulliken's populations of cobalt, nickel and copper tungstates: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena, B. S.; Heda, N. L.; Kumar, Kishor; Bhatt, Samir; Mund, H. S.; Ahuja, B. L.

    2016-03-01

    We present the first ever studies on Compton profiles of AWO4 (A=Co, Ni and Cu) using 661.65 keV γ-rays emitted by 137Cs source. The experimental momentum densities have been employed to validate exchange and correlation potentials within linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. Density functional theory (DFT) with local density approximation and generalized gradient approximation and also the hybridization of Hartree-Fock and DFT (B3LYP and PBE0) have been considered under LCAO scheme. The LCAO-B3LYP scheme is found to be in better agreement with the experimental data than other approximations considered in this work, suggesting applicability of B3LYP approach in predicting the electronic properties of these tungstates. The Mulliken's population (MP) data show charge transfer from Co/Ni/Cu and W to O atoms. The experimental profiles when normalized to same area show almost similar localization of 3d electrons (in real space) of Ni and Cu which is lower than that of Co in their AWO4 environment.

  8. Two-photon interband absorption coefficients in tungstate and molybdate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukanin, V. I.; Karasik, A. Ya.

    2015-02-01

    Two-photon absorption (TPA) coefficients were measured in tungstate and molybdate crystals - BaWO4, KGW, CaMoO4, BaMoO4, CaWO4, PbWO4 and ZnWO4 upon different orientations of excitation polarization with respect to the crystallographic axes. Trains of 25 ps pulses with variable radiation intensities of third (349 nm) harmonics of passively mode-locked 1047 nm Nd:YLF laser were used for interband two-photon excitation of the crystals. It was suggested that in the case, when 349 nm radiation pumping energy exceeds the bandgap width (hν>Eg), the nonlinear excitation process can be considered as two-step absorption. The interband two-photon absorption in all the studied crystals induces the following one-photon absorption from the exited states, which affects the nonlinear process dynamics and leads to a hysteresis in the dependence of the transmission on the excitation intensity. This fact was taken into account under analysis of the experimental dependences of the reciprocal transmission on the excitation intensity. Laser excitation in the transparency region of the crystals caused stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) not for all the crystals studied. The measured nonlinear coefficients allowed us to explain the suppression of SRS in crystals as a result of competition between the SRS and TPA.

  9. Studies of plastic crystal gel polymer electrolytes based on poly(vinylidene chloride-co-acrylonitrile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambali, D.; Zainuddin, Z.; Supa'at, I.; Osman, Z.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we have prepared systems of poly(vinylidene chloride-co-acrylonitrile) (PVdC-co-AN) based gel polymer electrolytes (GPEs) which are single plasticized-GPEs and double plasticized-GPEs. Both systems comprised plastic crystal succinonitrile SN to form plastic crystal gel polymer electrolyte (PGPE) films. The ionic conductivity of the PGPE films were analysed by means of a.c. impedance spectroscopy at room temperature as well as at the temperature range of 303 K to 353 K. The temperature dependence ionic conductivity was found to obey the VTF rule. To study the interactions among the constituents in the PGPEs, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was carried out and hence, the complexation between them has also been confirmed.

  10. Dielectric Relaxation Behavior of Poly(acrylonitrile-co-methacrylonitrile) Microcapsules Dispersed in a Silicone Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Taigyoo; OBrien, Emmett; Lizotte, Jeremy R.; Glass, Thomas E.; Ward, Thomas C.; Long, Timothy E.; Leo, Donald J.

    2006-01-01

    The dielectric relaxation behavior of poly(acrylonitrile-co-methacrylonitrile) dispersed in a cured polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) matrix as microcapsules was investigated over multiple thermal cycles and at varying concentrations. The copolymer microcapsules contained an isopentane core. In the PDMS matrix this copolymer displayed a pronounced relaxation signal at temperatures above the glass transition of the copolymers due to Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars (MWS) relaxation. The mechanism of MWS relaxation interpreted by the Havriliak-Negami and Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts relaxation functions was found to be very similar to previous studies of neat polyacrylonitrile and its copolymer. The activation energy of the relaxation decreased over successive thermal cycling coincident with a decreasing strength of the relaxation. These observations were attributed to the decreasing concentration of nitrile groups due to intramolecular cyclizations.

  11. Preparing cellulose nanocrystal/acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene nanocomposites using the master-batch method.

    PubMed

    Ma, Libo; Zhang, Yang; Meng, Yujie; Anusonti-Inthra, Phuriwat; Wang, Siqun

    2015-07-10

    The master-batch method provides a simple way to apply cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) as reinforcement in a hydrophobic matrix. The two-stage process includes making high-CNC content (70 wt%) master batch pellets, then mixing acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and maleic anhydride grafted polyethylene with the master batch pellets to prepare the ABS/CNC nanocomposite in extruder. SEM image indicates that self-assembled CNC nanosheets disperse evenly throughout the polymer matrix. The improved mechanical properties shown in tensile and DMA tests reveal that the CNC combines well with the ABS. TGA results show that the thermal degradation temperature of CNC in the master batch increases because of the protection of the ABS coating. This approach not only improves the dispersion ability and the thermal stability of CNC, but it is also applicable to use with other hydrophobic thermoplastics in industrial scale production. PMID:25857992

  12. Gloves against mineral oils and mechanical hazards: composites of carboxylated acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber latex.

    PubMed

    Krzemińska, Sylwia; Rzymski, Władysław M; Malesa, Monika; Borkowska, Urszula; Oleksy, Mariusz

    2016-09-01

    Resistance to permeation of noxious chemical substances should be accompanied by resistance to mechanical factors because the glove material may be torn, cut or punctured in the workplace. This study reports on glove materials, protecting against mineral oils and mechanical hazards, made of carboxylated acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (XNBR) latex. The obtained materials were characterized by a very high resistance of the produced materials to oil permeation (breakthrough time > 480 min). The mechanical properties, and especially tear resistance, of the studied materials were improved after the addition of modified bentonite (nanofiller) to the XNBR latex mixture. The nanocomposite meets the requirements in terms of parameters characterizing tear, abrasion, cut and puncture resistance. Therefore, the developed material may be used for the production of multifunctional protective gloves. PMID:26757889

  13. (E)-3-Anilino-2-benzoyl-3-(methyl­sulfan­yl)acrylonitrile

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A.; Ghabbour, Hazem A.; Chantrapromma, Suchada; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2012-01-01

    In the title acrylonitrile derivative, C17H14N2OS, the central amino­acryl­aldehyde O=C—C=C—NH unit, wherein an intra­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bond generates an S(6) ring motif, is approximately planar, with an r.m.s. deviation of 0.0234 (2) Å for the five non-H atoms. This plane makes dihedral angles of 41.04 (9) and 84.86 (10)° with the two phenyl rings. The dihedral angle between the two phenyl rings is 54.82 (10)°. An intra­molecular C—H⋯N hydrogen bond is also present. In the crystal, weak C—H⋯π and π–π inter­actions, with a centroid–centroid distance of 3.8526 (14) Å, are observed. PMID:22606198

  14. Synthesis and flocculation properties of gum ghatti and poly(acrylamide-co-acrylonitrile) based biodegradable hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Hemant; Jindal, Rajeev; Kaith, Balbir Singh; Maity, Arjun; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2014-12-19

    This article reports the development of biodegradable flocculants based on graft co-polymers of gum ghatti (Gg) and a mixture of acrylamide and acrylonitrile co-monomers (AAm-co-AN). The hydrogel polymer exhibited an excellent swelling capacity of 921% in neutral medium at 60°C. The polymer was used to remove saline water from various petroleum fraction-saline water emulsions. The flocculation characteristics of the hydrogel polymer were studied in turbid kaolin solution as a function of the amount of polymer and the solution temperature and pH. Biodegradation studies of hydrogel polymer were conducted using the soil composting method, and the degradation process was constantly monitored using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The results demonstrated an 89.47% degradation of the polymer after 60 days. Finally, the hydrogel polymer adsorbed 98% of cationic dyes from the aqueous solutions. PMID:25263897

  15. Chemical characterization of CTBN (carboxyl-terminated butadiene/acrylonitrile) and its epoxy adduct

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the analysis of carbonxyl-terminated butadiene (CTB), carboxyl-terminated butadiene/acrylonitrile (CTBN), and a CTBN adduct prepared by reaction with Epon 828. Data from gel permeation chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography, and ion chromatography are presented and discussed. Quantitative methods based on carbon-13 and proton NMR for analyzing CTBN are described. Proton NMR was found to be useful in identifying lots that have an abnormal amount of CTBN protons. One such lot exhibited a phase separation of a polybutadiene impurity. Carbon-13 NMR was found to be capable of determining nitrile content directly. Carbon-13 NMR had a relative standard deviation of 8.3% and a proton NMR of 3.9%. Proton NMR was found to be useful in identifying lots that have 5% more CTBN protons than other lots. 3 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Experimental study on behaviors of dielectric elastomer based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Kuangjun; Chuc, Nguyen Huu; Kwon, Hyeok Yong; Phuc, Vuong Hong; Koo, Jachoon; Lee, Youngkwan; Nam, Jaedo; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol

    2010-04-01

    Previously, the dielectric elastomer based on Acrylonitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR), called synthetic elastomer has been reported by our group. It has the advantages that its characteristics can be modified according to the requirements of performances, and thus, it is applicable to a wide variety of applications. In this paper, we address the effects of additives and vulcanization conditions on the overall performance of synthetic elastomer. In the present work, factors to have effects on the performances are extracted, e.g additives such as dioctyl phthalate (DOP), barium titanium dioxide (BaTiO3) and vulcanization conditions such as dicumyl peroxide (DCP), cross-linking times. Also, it is described how the performances can be optimized by using DOE (Design of Experiments) technique and experimental results are analyzed by ANOVA (Analysis of variance).

  17. Direct pyrolysis mass spectrometry of acrylonitrile-cellulose graft copolymer prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization in presence of styrene as homopolymer suppressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, Sayed M.; Dessouki, Ahmad M.; Nizam El-Din, Horia M.

    2001-05-01

    Graft polymerization of acrylonitrile onto cellulosic filter paper competing with the homopolymerization by mutual irradiation technique was studied in the presence of homopolymer suppressors. Addition of FeCl 3 decreased both homopolymerization and graft polymerization, whereas inclusion of a low ratio of styrene monomer with acrylonitrile leads to successful grafting of acrylonitrile with little homopolymer formation. Chemical structure and thermal behavior of the produced graft copolymers were investigated by gradual heating in the solid probe of a mass spectrometer equipped with a GCMS data system. The resulting total ion current (TIC) showed that the degradation of graft copolymers follows two-step pyrolysis. The presence of a low ratio of styrene comonomer increased thermal stability of the prepared acrylonitrile-cellulose graft copolymer. The pyrolysis products have mass spectra characteristic of the copolymer composition; they contain the repeating unit of the oligomers. Total ion current and spectrum subtractions were used to separate and measure spectra of graft copolymers at distinctly different temperatures.

  18. Perinatal Toxicity and Carcinogenicity Studies of Styrene –Acrylonitrile Trimer, A Ground Water Contaminant

    PubMed Central

    Behl, Mamta; Elmore, Susan A.; Malarkey, David E.; Hejtmancik, Milton R.; Gerken, Diane K.; Chhabra, Rajendra S.

    2015-01-01

    Styrene Acrylonitrile (SAN) Trimer is a by-product in the production of acrylonitrile styrene plastics. Following a report of a childhood cancer cluster in the Toms River section of Dover Township, New Jersey, SAN Trimer was identified as one of the groundwater contaminants at Reich Farm Superfund site in the township. The contaminants from the Reich Farm site’s ground water plume impacted two wells at the Parkway well field. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) studied the toxicity and carcinogenicity of SAN Trimer in rats exposed during their perinatal developmental period and adulthood. The chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity studies in F344/N rats were preceded by 7- and 18-week perinatal toxicity studies to determine the exposure concentrations for the 2-year studies. Subsequently, Fisher 344 pregnant dams were exposed to SAN Trimer containing diet at 400, 800, or 1600 ppm concentrations during gestation, nursing and weaning periods of offspring followed by two year of adult exposures to both male and female pups. There was no statistically significant evidence of carcinogenic activity following SAN-Trimer exposure; however, rare neoplasms in the brain and spinal cord were observed in males and to lesser extent in female rats. These incidences were considered within the range of historical background in the animal model used in the current studies. Therefore, the presence of a few rarely occurring CNS tumors in the treated groups were not judged to be associated with the SAN Trimer exposure. The major finding was a dose-related peripheral neuropathy associated with the sciatic nerves in females and spinal nerve roots in males and females thereby suggesting that SAN trimer is potentially a nervous system toxicant. PMID:24060431

  19. Photoinitiated decomposition of substituted ethylenes: The photodissociation of vinyl chloride and acrylonitrile at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, D.A.; Suits, A.G.; Lee, Y.T.

    1997-04-01

    Ethylene and its substituted analogues (H{sub 2}CCHX) are important molecules in hydrogen combustion. As the simplest {pi}-bonded hydrocarbons these molecules serve as prototypical systems for understanding the decomposition of this important class of compounds. The authors have used the technique of photofragment translational spectroscopy at beamline 9.0.2.1 to investigate the dissociation of vinyl chloride (X=Cl) and acrylonitrile (X=CN) following absorption at 193 nm. The technique uses a molecular beam of the reactant seeded in helium which is crossed at 90 degrees with the output of an excimer laser operating on the ArF transition, 193.3 nm. The neutral photoproducts which recoil out of the molecular beam travel 15.1 cm where they are photoionized by the VUV undulator radiation, mass selected, and counted as a function of time. The molecular beam source is rotatable about the axis of the dissociation laser. The authors have directly observed all four of the following dissociation channels for both systems: (1) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} H + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}X; (2) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} X + C{sub 2}H{sub 3}; (3) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} H{sub 2} + C{sub 2}HX; and (4) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} HX + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. They measured translational energy distributions for all of the observed channels and measured the photoionization onset for many of the photoproducts which provided information about their chemical identity and internal energy content. In the case of acrylonitrile, selective product photoionization provided the ability to discriminate between channels 2 and 4 which result in the same product mass combination.

  20. Covalent immobilization of glucose oxidase onto new modified acrylonitrile copolymer/silica gel hybrid supports.

    PubMed

    Godjevargova, Tzonka; Nenkova, Ruska; Dimova, Nedyalka

    2005-08-12

    New polymer/silica gel hybrid supports were prepared by coating high surface area of silica gel with modified acrylonitrile copolymer. The concentrations of the modifying agent (NaOH) and the modified polymer were varied. GOD was covalently immobilized on these hybrid supports and the relative activity and the amount of bound protein were determined. The highest relative activity and sufficient amount of bound protein of the immobilized GOD were achieved in 10% NaOH and 2% solution of modified acrylonitrile copolymer. The influence of glutaraldehyde concentration and the storage time on enzyme efficiency were examined. Glutaraldehyde concentration of 0.5% is optimal for the immobilized GOD. It was shown that the covalently bound enzyme (using 0.5% glutaraldehyde) had higher relative activity than the activity of the adsorbed enzyme. Covalently immobilized GOD with 0.5% glutaraldehyde was more stable for four months in comparison with the one immobilized on pure silica gel, hybrid support with 10% glutaraldehyde and the free enzyme. The effect of the pore size on the enzyme efficiency was studied on four types of silica gel with different pore size. Silica with large pores (CPC-Silica carrier, 375 A) presented higher relative activity than those with smaller pore size (Silica gel with 4, 40 and 100 A). The amount of bound protein was also reduced with decreasing the pore size. The effect of particle size was studied and it was found out that the smaller the particle size was, the greater the activity and the amount of immobilized enzyme were. The obtained results proved that these new polymer/silica gel hybrid supports were suitable for GOD immobilization. PMID:16080168

  1. Structural and optical characterization of metal tungstates (MWO4; M=Ni, Ba, Bi) synthesized by a sucrose-templated method

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metal tungstates have attracted much attention due to their interesting structural and photoluminescence properties. Depending on the size of the bivalent cation present, the metal tungstates will adopt structures with different phases. In this work, three different phases of metal tungstates MWO4 (M= Ba, Ni and Bi) were synthesized via the sucrose templated method. Results The powders of BaWO4 (tetragonal), NiWO4 (monoclinic) and Bi2WO6 (orthorhombic) formed after calcination temperatures of 750, 650 and 600°C for 4 h respectively are found to be crystalline and exist in their pure phase. Based on Scherrer estimation, their crystallite size are of nanosized. BET results showed NiWO4 has the highest surface area. BaWO4 exhibited less Raman vibrations than the NiWO4 because of the increased lattice symmetry but Bi2WO6 showed almost the same Raman vibrations as BaWO4. From the UV-vis spectra, the band gap transition of the metal tungstates are of the order of BaWO4 > Bi2WO6 > NiWO4. Broad blue-green emission peaks were detected in photoluminescence spectra and the results showed the great dependence on morphology, crystallinity and size of the metal tungstates. Conclusion Three different phases of metal tungstates of BaWO4 (scheelite), NiWO4 (wolframite) and Bi2WO6 (perovskite layer) in their pure phase were successfully prepared by the simple and economical sucrose-templated method. The highest surface area is exhibited by NiWO4 while largest band gap is shown by BaWO4. These materials showed promising optical properties. PMID:23634962

  2. Enhanced photorefractive performance in CdSe quantum-dot-dispersed poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiangping; Embden, Joel van; Chon, James W. M.; Gu Min; Evans, Richard A.

    2010-06-21

    This paper reports on the enhanced photorefractive behavior of a CdSe quantum-dot-dispersed less expensive polymer of poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile). The capability of CdSe quantum dots used as photosensitizers and the associated photorefractive performance are characterized through a photocurrent experiment and a two-beam coupling experiment, respectively. An enhanced two-beam coupling gain coefficient of 12.2 cm{sup -1} at 46 V/mum was observed owning to the reduced potential barrier. The photorefractive performance per CdSe quantum dot is three orders of magnitude higher than that in the sample sensitized by trinitrofluorenone in poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile), and almost ten times higher than that in the CdSe quantum-dot-sensitized poly(N-vinylcarbazole) polymers.

  3. Antibacterial activity of poly(vinyl alcohol)-b-poly(acrylonitrile) based micelles loaded with silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bryaskova, Rayna; Pencheva, Daniela; Kyulavska, Mariya; Bozukova, Dimitriya; Debuigne, Antoine; Detrembleur, Christophe

    2010-04-15

    A new amphiphilic poly(vinyl alcohol)-b-poly(acrylonitrile) (PVOH-b-PAN) copolymer obtained by selective hydrolysis of well-defined poly(vinyl acetate)-b-poly(acrylonitrile) copolymer synthesized by cobalt mediated radical polymerization was used for the preparation of PVOH-b-PAN based micelles with embedded silver nanoparticles. The successful formation of silver loaded micelles has been confirmed by UV-vis, DLS and TEM analysis and their antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and spore solution of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) has been studied. PVOH-b-PAN based micelles with embedded silver nanoparticles showed a strong bactericidal effect against E. coli, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa and the minimum bactericidal concentration for each system (MBC) has been determined. PMID:20074742

  4. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase interactions with decaniobate, decavanadate, vanadate, tungstate and molybdate.

    PubMed

    Fraqueza, Gil; Ohlin, C André; Casey, William H; Aureliano, Manuel

    2012-02-01

    Over the last few decades there has been increasing interest in oxometalate and polyoxometalate applications to medicine and pharmacology. This interest arose, at least in part, due to the properties of these classes of compounds as anti-cancer, anti-diabetic agents, and also for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, among others. However, our understanding of the mechanism of action would be improved if biological models could be used to clarify potential toxicological effects in main cellular processes. Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles, containing a large amount of Ca(2+)-ATPase, an enzyme that accumulates calcium by active transport using ATP, have been suggested as a useful model to study the effects of oxometalates on calcium homeostasis. In the present article, it is shown that decavanadate, decaniobate, vanadate, tungstate and molybdate, all inhibited SR Ca(2+)-ATPase, with the following IC(50) values: 15, 35, 50, 400 μM and 45 mM, respectively. Decaniobate (Nb(10)), is the strongest P-type enzyme inhibitor, after decavanadate (V(10)). Atomic-absorption spectroscopy (AAS) analysis, indicates that decavanadate binds to the protein with a 1:1 decavanadate:Ca(2+)-ATPase stoichiometry. Furthermore, V(10) binds with similar extension to all the protein conformations, which occur during calcium translocation by active transport, namely E1, E1P, E2 and E2P, as analysed by AAS. In contrast, it was confirmed that the binding of monomeric vanadate (H(2)VO(4)(2-); V(1)) to the calcium pump is favoured only for the E2 and E2P conformations of the ATPase, whereas no significant amount of vanadate is bound to the E1 and E1P conformations. Scatchard plot analysis, confirmed a 1:1 ratio for decavanadate-Ca(2+)-ATPase, with a dissociation constant, k(d) of 1 μM(-1). The interaction of decavanadate V(10)O(28)(6-) (V(10)) with Ca(2+)-ATPase is prevented by the isostructural and isoelectronic decaniobate Nb(10)O(28)(6-) (Nb(10)), whereas no significant effects were

  5. Cation–cation interactions and cation exchange in a series of isostructural framework uranyl tungstates

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C.

    2014-05-01

    treatments. The framework of these compounds is robust to cation exchange and heat. (yellow polyhedra=uranium pentagonal bipyramids; blue polyhedra=tungsten octahedral, purple balls=K; yellow balls=Na; grey balls=Tl). - Highlights: • Five isostructural uranyl tungstates compounds were synthesized hydrothermally. • The structures consist of a chains of uranium and tungstate polyhedral. • Chains are connected into a framework by cation–cation interactions. • Cation exchange does not alter the structural integrity of the compounds. • Cation exchange was successful at room temperature and mild hydrothermal conditions.

  6. Morphology and Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Diglycidyl Ether of Bisphenol-A Toughened with Carboxyl-Terminated Butadiene-Acrylonitrile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. D.; Chung, S. Y.; Fedors, R. F.; Moacanin, J.; Gupta, A.

    1984-01-01

    The fracture toughness of an incorporation of a carboxyl-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile (CTBN) elastomer in diglycidyl ether bisphenol A (DGEBA) resin was investigated. Measurements of dynamic mechanical properties, scanning electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering were carried out to characterize the state of cure, morphology and particle size and size distribution of the neat resins and their graphite fiber reinforced composites.

  7. Enantioselective cyclopropanation of (Z)-3-substituted-2-(4-pyridyl)-acrylonitriles catalyzed by Cinchona ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Del Fiandra, Claudia; Moccia, Maria; Adamo, Mauro F A

    2016-03-21

    Cyclopropane esters holding two quaternary centres were prepared in high yields, complete diastereoselection and up to 83% ee. The reaction described herein entailed reacting (Z)-3-substituted-2-(4-pyridyl)-acrylonitrile, a reactive class of Michael acceptor, with 2-bromomalonate esters in the presence of Cinchona derived phase-transfer catalysts. The reaction allowed multi-gram preparation of the desired products. PMID:26906250

  8. Structural, microstructural and vibrational analyses of the monoclinic tungstate BiLuWO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Ait Ahsaine, H.; Taoufyq, A.; Patout, L.; Ezahri, M.; Benlhachemi, A.; Bakiz, B.; Villain, S.; Guinneton, F.; Gavarri, J.-R.

    2014-10-15

    The bismuth lutetium tungstate phase BiLuWO{sub 6} has been prepared using a solid state route with stoichiometric mixtures of oxide precursors. The obtained polycrystalline phase has been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy. In the first step, the crystal structure has been refined using Rietveld method: the crystal cell was resolved using monoclinic system (parameters a, b, c, β) with space group A2/m. SEM images showed the presence of large crystallites with a constant local nominal composition (BiLuW). TEM analyses showed that the actual local structure could be better represented by a superlattice (a, 2b, c, β) associated with space groups P2 or P2/m. The Raman spectroscopy showed the presence of vibrational bands similar to those observed in the compounds BiREWO{sub 6} with RE=Y, Gd, Nd. However, these vibrational bands were characterized by large full width at half maximum, probably resulting from the long range Bi/Lu disorder and local WO{sub 6} octahedron distortions in the structure. - Graphical abstract: The average structure of BiLuWO{sub 6} determined from X-ray diffraction data can be represented by A2/m space group. Experimental Electron Diffraction patterns along the [0vw] zone axes of the monoclinic structure and associated simulated patterns show the existence of a monoclinic superstructure with space group P2 or P2/m. - Highlights: • A new monoclinic BiLuWO{sub 6} phase has been elaborated from solid-state reaction. • The space group of the monoclinic disordered average structure should be A2/m. • Transmission electron microscopy leads to a superlattice with P2/m space group. • Raman spectroscopy suggests existence of local disorder.

  9. In-situ growth of zinc tungstate nanorods on graphene for enhanced photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Lei; Xu, Junling; Ao, Yanhui; Wang, Peifang

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Graphene/ZnWO{sub 4} (G–ZnWO{sub 4}) nanorod composite photocatalysts were prepared by a simple one-step method. Namely, the reduction of graphene oxide and the growth of ZnWO{sub 4} nanorod occurred simultaneously in one single process. An enhancement in the photocatalytic activities were observed in G–ZnWO{sub 4} composites compared with pure ZnWO{sub 4} under UV light irradiation. - Highlights: • Graphene–ZnWO{sub 4} composite photocatalyst was prepared for the first time. • The as-prepared composite photocatalysts show high activity for dye degradation. • Effect of graphene amount on the photocatalytic activity was investigated. - Abstract: Graphene–zinc tungstate (G–ZnWO{sub 4}) hybrid photocatalysts were prepared by an in-situ growth method in which the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) and the growth of ZnWO{sub 4} crystals occurred simultaneously. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity was investigated by the degradation of dye methylene blue (MB). An enhancement in the photocatalytic activity was observed for G–ZnWO{sub 4} hybrids compared with pure ZnWO{sub 4} under UV light. This improvement was attributed to the following two reasons: increased migration efficiency of photo-induced electrons and increased adsorption activity for dye molecules. The effect of the amount of graphene on the photocatalytic activity was also investigated. Results showed that there was an optimum amount of 2%.

  10. In-situ non-ambient X-ray diffraction studies of indium tungstate

    SciTech Connect

    Baiz, Tamam I.; Heinrich, Christophe P.; Banek, Nathan A.; Vivekens, Boris L.; Lind, Cora

    2012-03-15

    In situ variable temperature and high pressure X-ray diffraction studies were carried out on indium tungstate (In{sub 2}W{sub 3}O{sub 12}). This material displays positive volume expansion in both its low temperature monoclinic and high temperature orthorhombic phases, with negative thermal expansion along the a axis and positive thermal expansion along the b and c axes. Upon hydrostatic compression in a diamond anvil cell, one crystalline to crystalline phase transition is observed in the range 1.9 to 2.7 GPa, and progressive irreversible amorphization occurs at pressures above 4.3 GPa. The crystalline high pressure phase appears to be isostructural to previously observed high pressure phases in other A{sub 2}M{sub 3}O{sub 12} compounds. - Graphical abstract: Variable pressure X-ray diffraction patterns of In{sub 2}W{sub 3}O{sub 12} collected in a diamond anvil cell. A phase transition is clearly observed between 2.2 and 2.7 GPa, followed by irreversible amorphization. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure of In{sub 2}W{sub 3}O{sub 12} was studied as a function of temperature and pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uniaxial negative thermal expansion was observed above 250 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A pressure-induced phase transition occurred between 2.2 and 2.7 GPa. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pressure-induced irreversible amorphization was observed above 4.3 GPa.

  11. redox reactions of uranium in the presence of potassium 2-phospho-17-tungstate

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, L.P.; Rykov, A.G.; Sirotinkina, L.V.

    1986-07-01

    The redox reactions of uranium in the presence of potassium 2-phospho-17-tungstate (17W2P) - K/sub 10/P/sub 2/W/sub 17/O/sub 61/ - were studied by the methods of spectrophotometry and potentiometry. It was established that in the presence of 17W2P the UO /SUP 2/2/ /sup +/ ion is reduced by iron(II) to uranium(IV) as a result of the binding of U(IV) into a strong complex with composition (U(p/sub 2/W/sub 17/O/sub 61/)/sub 2/)/sup 16 -/. The peculiarities of the coordination of uranium(IV) by voluminous 17W2P ligands are the cause of the different nature of its interaction with various types of oxidizing agents. It was established that under the action of oxidizing agents (K/sub 2/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7/, KMnO/sub 4/), the reduced form of which is a complex with 17W2P, there is a conversion of the complex of uranium(IV) to the corresponding complex of uranium(V), evidently with conservation of a structure analogous to that for uranium(IV). It was also shown that uranium(IV) in complex with 17W2P is practically not oxidized in the cold by persulfate ions which react according to a radical mechanism, whereas weaker oxidizing agents, for example, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, oxidize it to the UO /SUP 2/2/ /sup +/ ion. Hypotheses are advanced on the possible mechanisms of the occurrence of the corresponding reactions.

  12. Selection and preliminary evaluation of three structures as potential solid conductors of alkali ions: Two hollandites, a titanate, and a tungstate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, J.; Kautz, H. E.; Fielder, W. L.; Fordyce, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    Utilization of crystal-chemical criteria has suggested three structure types in which alkali ions may be mobile: (1)hollandites K(x)Mg(x/2)Ti(8-x/2)O16 and K(x)Al(x)Ti(8-x)O16 for 1.6 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 2.0 tungstate K2W4013; and (3) sodium hexatitante Na2Ti6O13. Each is a tunnel structure. An electrical screening procedure, previously tested on beta-alumina, has indicated high K(+) ion mobility in the hollandites and in the tungstate, but not in the hexatitanate. Specimens were polycrystalline disks near 90 percent of theoretical density. The ac conductivity calculated from dielectric and capacitance measurements has been attributed to ion mobility. This ac conductivity was up to 0.01/ohm-cm for hollandites and about 0.0001/ohm-cm for the tungstate, with approximate activation energies of 21 to 25 and 16 kJ/mole (5 to 6 and 4 kcal/mole), respectively. Electronic conduction and chemical reactivity have eliminated the tungstate from further consideration. The hollandites have been considered worthy of further development and evaluation.

  13. Novel Inducers of the Envelope Stress Response BaeSR in Salmonella Typhimurium: BaeR Is Critically Required for Tungstate Waste Disposal

    PubMed Central

    Appia-Ayme, Corinne; Patrick, Elaine; J. Sullivan, Matthew; Alston, Mark J.; Field, Sarah J.; AbuOun, Manal; Anjum, Muna F.; Rowley, Gary

    2011-01-01

    The RpoE and CpxR regulated envelope stress responses are extremely important for SalmonellaTyphimurium to cause infection in a range of hosts. Until now the role for BaeSR in both the Salmonella Typhimurium response to stress and its contribution to infection have not been fully elucidated. Here we demonstrate stationary phase growth, iron and sodium tungstate as novel inducers of the BaeRregulon, with BaeR critically required for Salmonella resistance to sodium tungstate. We show that functional overlap between the resistance nodulation-cell division (RND) multidrug transporters, MdtA, AcrD and AcrB exists for the waste disposal of tungstate from the cell. We also point to a role for enterobactinsiderophores in the protection of enteric organisms from tungstate, akin to the scenario in nitrogen fixing bacteria. Surprisingly, BaeR is the first envelope stress response pathway investigated in S. Typhimurium that is not required for murine typhoid in either ityS or ityR mouse backgrounds. BaeR is therefore either required for survival in larger mammals such as pigs or calves, an avian host such as chickens, or survival out with the host altogether where Salmonella and related enterics must survive in soil and water. PMID:21886814

  14. Nanostructured Synthetic Carbons Obtained by Pyrolysis of Spherical Acrylonitrile/Divinylbenzene Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Danish J.; Trochimczuk, Andrzej W.; Ronka, Sylwia

    2012-01-01

    Novel carbon materials have been prepared by the carbonization of acrylonitrile (AN)/divinylbenzene (DVB) suspension porous copolymers having nominal crosslinking degrees in the range of 30–70% and obtained in the presence of various amounts of porogens. The carbons were obtained by pre-oxidation of AN/DVB copolymers at 250−350°C in air followed by pyrolysis at 850°C in an N2 atmosphere. Both processes were carried out in one furnace and the resulting material needed no further activation. Resulting materials were characterized by XPS and low temperature nitrogen adsorption/desorption. It was found that maximum pyrolysis yield was ca. 50% depending on the oxidation conditions but almost independent of the crosslinking degree of the polymers. Porous structure of the carbons was characterized for the presence of micropores and macropores, when obtained from highly crosslinked polymers or polymers oxidized at 350°C and meso- and macropores in all other cases. The latter pores are prevailing in the structure of carbons obtained from less porous AN/DVB resins. Specific surface area (BET) of polymer derived carbons can vary between 440 m2/g and 250 m2/g depending on the amount of porogen used in the synthesis of the AN/DVB polymeric precursors. PMID:22916245

  15. Method for the separation of high impact polystyrene (HIPS) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastics

    DOEpatents

    Jody, Bassam J.; Arman, Bayram; Karvelas, Dimitrios E.; Pomykala, Jr., Joseph A.; Daniels, Edward J.

    1997-01-01

    An improved method is provided for separating acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and high impact polystyrene (HIPS) plastics from each other. The ABS and HIPS plastics are shredded to provide a selected particle size. The shredded particles of the ABS and HIPS plastics are applied to a solution having a solution density in a predefined range between 1.055 gm/cm.sup.3 and 1.07 gm/cm.sup.3, a predefined surface tension in a range between 22 dynes/cm to 40 dynes/cm and a pH in the range of 1.77 and 2.05. In accordance with a feature of the invention, the novel method is provided for separating ABS and HIPS, two solid thermoplastics which have similar densities by selectively modifying the effective density of the HIPS using a binary solution with the appropriate properties, such as pH, density and surface tension, such as a solution of acetic acid and water or a quaternary solution having the appropriate density, surface tension, and pH.

  16. Optical properties of polycarbonate/styrene-co-acrylonitrile blends: effects of molecular weight of the matrix.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ping; Xiong, Ying; Guo, Shaoyun

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the effects of the molecular weight of a polycarbonate (PC) matrix on the phase morphology and optical properties of a PC/styrene-co-acrylonitrile (SAN) blend were investigated. A scanning electron microscope is used to analyze the phase morphology of the blends, and Mie scattering theory is used to analyze the changing laws of the optical properties of PC/SAN blends with the increasing of PC molecular weight. Results show that the average particle diameter is not strongly changed with different PC molecular weight because the values of the viscosity ratios are very close to each other. But it is obvious that the number of large particles gradually reduced while small particles (especially d<2  μm) significantly increased with the increasing of PC molecular weight. And the increase in small particles will result in an increase in backward scattering so the transmittance of PC/SAN blends decreases with the increase of PC molecular weight. However, the balance of the scattering coefficients and the number concentration of particles eventually lead to the haze of the blends being very close, despite having different PC molecular weights. Meanwhile, the photographs of scattering patterns indicate that the PC/SAN blends whose component weight ratios are fixed at 70:30 have excellent antiglare properties, despite the changes in molecular weight of the PC matrix. PMID:26836652

  17. High-Energy-Density Poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Fei; Xu, Zhuo; Xia, Weimin; Ye, Hongjun; Wei, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Zhicheng

    2013-12-01

    The dielectric response of poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) (PSAN) thin films fabricated by a solution casting process was investigated in this work. Linear dielectric behavior was obtained in PSAN films under an electric field at frequencies from 100 Hz to 1 MHz and temperature of -50°C to 100°C. The polymer films exhibited an intermediate dielectric permittivity of 4 and low dielectric loss (tan δ) of 0.027. Under 400 MV/m, the energy density of the PSAN films was 6.8 J/cm3, which is three times higher than that of biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) (about 1.6 J/cm3). However, their charge-discharge efficiency (about 90%) was rather close to that of BOPP. The calculated effective dielectric permittivity of the PSAN films under high electric field was as high as 9, which may be attributed to the improved displacement of the cyanide groups (-CN) polarized at high electric fields. These high-performance features make PSAN attractive for high-energy-density capacitor applications.

  18. Design and testing of digitally manufactured paraffin Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene hybrid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulley, Jonathan M.

    This research investigates the application of additive manufacturing techniques for fabricating hybrid rocket fuel grains composed of porous Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene impregnated with paraffin wax. The digitally manufactured ABS substrate provides mechanical support for the paraffin fuel material and serves as an additional fuel component. The embedded paraffin provides an enhanced fuel regression rate while having no detrimental effect on the thermodynamic burn properties of the fuel grain. Multiple fuel grains with various ABS-to-Paraffin mass ratios were fabricated and burned with nitrous oxide. Analytical predictions for end-to-end motor performance and fuel regression are compared against static test results. Baseline fuel grain regression calculations use an enthalpy balance energy analysis with the material and thermodynamic properties based on the mean paraffin/ABS mass fractions within the fuel grain. In support of these analytical comparisons, a novel method for propagating the fuel port burn surface was developed. In this modeling approach the fuel cross section grid is modeled as an image with white pixels representing the fuel and black pixels representing empty or burned grid cells.

  19. Hg(II) adsorption using amidoximated porous acrylonitrile/itaconic copolymers prepared by suspended emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chunnuan; Qu, Rongjun; Chen, Hou; Liu, Xiguang; Sun, Changmei; Ma, Caixia

    2016-01-01

    Initially, porous acrylonitrile/itaconic acid copolymers (AN/IA) were prepared by suspended emulsion polymerization. Successively, the cyano groups in AN/IA copolymers were converted to amidoxime (AO) groups by the reaction with hydroxylamine hydrochloride. The structures of the AN/IA and amidoximated AN/IA (AO AN/IA) were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and porous structural analysis. The adsorption properties of AO AN/IA for Hg(II) were investigated. The results show that AO AN/IA has mesopores and macropores, and surface area of 11.71 m(2) g(-1). It was found that AO AN/IA has higher affinity for Hg(II), with the maximum adsorption capacity of 84.25 mg g(-1). The AO AN/IA also can effectively remove Hg(II) from different binary metal ion mixture systems. Furthermore, the adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics were studied in detail. The adsorption equilibrium can quickly be achieved in 4 h determined by an adsorption kinetics study. The adsorption process is found to belong to the second-order model, and can be described by the Freundlich model. PMID:27054744

  20. The physical and degradation properties of starch-graft-acrylonitrile/carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber latex films.

    PubMed

    Misman, M A; Azura, A R; Hamid, Z A A

    2015-09-01

    Starch-graft-acrylonitrile (ANS) is compounded with carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber (XNBR) latex. The control XNBR and the ANS/XNBR latex films were prepared through a coagulant dipping process. The films were subjected to ageing and soil burial procedures. For the biodegradation experiment, the surface of the film was assessed after the 2nd, 4th and 8th week of soil burial. The ANS, XNBR, and ANS/XNBR colloidal stability were determined with a Malvern Zetasizer. For the dipped latex films, the mechanical, morphological and thermal properties were analyzed. The addition of ANS into the XNBR latex increased the stability of the colloidal dispersions, decreased the latex film tensile strength, but increased the elongation at break due to the bipolar interaction of the ANS and XNBR particles. The ANS/XNBR latex films aged faster than the control films while the morphological analysis showed the existence of a starch crystal region and the formation of microbial colonies on the surfaces of the films. Based on the TGA-DTA curves, a higher ΔT was observed for the ANS/XNBR latex films signifying high thermal energy needed for the film to thermally degrade. PMID:26005134

  1. Differential response to acrylonitrile toxicity in rat primary astrocytes and microglia

    PubMed Central

    Caito, Samuel; Yu, Yingchun; Aschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) is a widely used chemical in the production of plastics, resins, nitriles, acrylic fibers, synthetic rubber and acrylamide. While acute high level exposures to ACN are known to be lethal, chronic low dose exposures causes glial cell tumors in rats. Recently, these glial tumors have been characterized as microglial in origin. While effects of ACN on astrocytes, the more numerous glial cell, have been investigated, the effects on microglia are unknown. This study was conducted to compare the responses of astrocytes and microglia to ACN treatment in vitro to address differential sensitivities and adaptive responses to this toxic chemical. Cell viability, ACN uptake, lipid peroxidation byproducts (F2-isoprostanes), glutathione (GSH) levels and expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) were evaluated in primary rat microglia and astrocytes following ACN treatment. Results indicate that microglia are more sensitive to ACN than astrocytes, accumulating less ACN while demonstrating higher F2-isoprostane levels. GSH levels were up-regulated in both cell types, as a protective mechanism against ACN-induced oxidative stress, while Nrf2 levels were only induced in microglia. Our data suggest that microglia and astrocytes exhibit different sensitivities and responses to ACN, which are linked to the intracellular thiol status inherent to each of these cell types. PMID:23628792

  2. Nanocomposites prepared from acrylonitrile butadiene rubber and organically modified montmorillonite with vinyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mijeong; Kim, Hoonjung; Kim, Eunkyoung

    2006-01-01

    Nanocomposites were prepared from acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR), vinyl groups containing organically modified montmorillonite and additives, such as zinc oxide, stearic acid, and sulfur. The organically modified montmorillonites used in these nanocomposites were prepared by ion exchange reactions of N,N'-dimethylalkyl-(p-vinylbenzyl)-ammonium chlorides (DAVBAs, alkyl = octyl, dodecyl, and octadecyl) with sodium montmorillonite (Na+-MMT). NBR nanocomposites were obtained by controlling both the mixing and vulcanization conditions, by using a Brabender mixer and hot-press process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that, depending on the amount of montmorillonite that is added, both exfoliated and intercalated nanocomposite structures are formed. The NBR/DAVBA-MMT nanocomposites exhibit much higher mechanical properties (e.g., tensile strength, Young's modulus, 300% modulus, and hardness) as well as gas barrier properties as compared to NBR Na+-MMT or NBR composites generated from modified montmorillonites without vinyl groups. Consistent with the results of XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the intercalation and exfoliation structures of the nanocomposites coexist and that the DAVBA-MMT layers are well dispersed in NBR.

  3. An investigation on chloroprene-compatibilized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene blends.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Khalil

    2015-11-01

    Blends of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene (NBR/HDPE) compatibilized by Chloroprene rubber (CR) were prepared. A fixed quantity of industrial waste such as marble waste (MW, 40 phr) was also included. The effect of the blend ratio and CR on cure characteristics, mechanical and swelling properties of MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends was investigated. The results showed that the MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends revealed an increase in tensile strength, tear, modulus, hardness and cross-link density for increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The minimum torque (M L) and maximum torque (M H) of blends increased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE while scorch time (ts2) cure time (tc90), compression set and abrasion loss of blends decreased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The blends also showed a continuous reduction in elongation at break as well as swelling coefficient with increasing HDPE amount in blends. MW filled blends based on CR provided the most encouraging balance values of overall properties. PMID:26644917

  4. Carbon nanotube buckypaper reinforced acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene composites for electronic applications.

    PubMed

    Díez-Pascual, Ana M; Gascón, David

    2013-11-27

    Novel acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) nanocomposites reinforced with pristine or functionalized single- or multiwalled carbon nanotube buckypaper (BP) sheets were manufactured via hot-compression and vacuum infiltration. Their morphology, thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties were comparatively investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis showed that the infiltration process leads to better BP impregnation than the hot-press technique. BPs made from functionalized or short nanotubes form compact networks that hamper the penetration of the matrix chains, whereas those composed of pristine tubes possess large pores that facilitate the polymer flow, resulting in composites with low degree of porosity and improved mechanical performance. Enhanced thermal and electrical properties are found for samples incorporating functionalized BPs since dense networks lead to more conductive pathways, and a stronger barrier effect to the diffusion of degradation products, thus better thermal stability. According to dynamic mechanical analysis these composites exhibit the highest glass transition temperatures, suggesting enhanced filler-matrix interactions as corroborated by the Raman spectra. The results presented herein demonstrate that the composite performance can be tailored by controlling the BP architecture and offer useful insights into the structure-property relationships of these materials to be used in electronic applications, particularly for EMI shielding and packaging of integrated circuits. PMID:24171494

  5. Phenomena affecting morphology of microporous poly(acrylonitrile) prepared via phase separation from solution

    SciTech Connect

    Legasse, R.R.; Weagley, R.J.; Leslie, P.K.; Schneider, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is concerned with controlling the morphology of microporous polymers prepared via thermal demixing of solutions. 2 wt % solutions of poly(acrylonitrile) in maleic anhydride, a poor solvent, are first cooled to produce separated polymer-rich and solvent-rich phases. Removing the solvent by freeze drying then produces a microporous material having a density of 33 mg/cm{sup 3}, a void fraction of 97%, and a pore size of about 10 {mu}m. We find that the morphology cannot be explained by existing models, which focus on phase diagrams and kinetics of phase transformations during cooling of the solution. In conflict with those models, we find that two radically different morphologies can be produced even when the polymer concentration and cooling path are held strictly constant. A hypothesis that polymer degradation causes the different morphologies is not supported by GPC, {sup 13}C NMR, and FTIR experiments. Instead, we offer evidence that the different microporous morphologies are caused by different polymer conformations in solutions having the same concentration and temperature. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  6. An investigation on chloroprene-compatibilized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene blends

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Blends of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene (NBR/HDPE) compatibilized by Chloroprene rubber (CR) were prepared. A fixed quantity of industrial waste such as marble waste (MW, 40 phr) was also included. The effect of the blend ratio and CR on cure characteristics, mechanical and swelling properties of MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends was investigated. The results showed that the MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends revealed an increase in tensile strength, tear, modulus, hardness and cross-link density for increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The minimum torque (ML) and maximum torque (MH) of blends increased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE while scorch time (ts2) cure time (tc90), compression set and abrasion loss of blends decreased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The blends also showed a continuous reduction in elongation at break as well as swelling coefficient with increasing HDPE amount in blends. MW filled blends based on CR provided the most encouraging balance values of overall properties. PMID:26644917

  7. Analysis of acrylonitrile, 1,3-butadiene, and related compounds in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymers for kitchen utensils and children's toys by headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hiroyuki; Kawamura, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    A headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method was developed for the simultaneous determination of the residual levels of acrylonitrile (AN), 1,3-butadiene (1,3-BD), and their related compounds containing propionitrile (PN) and 4-vinyl-1-cyclohexene (4-VC) in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) copolymers for kitchen utensils and children's toys. A sample was cut into small pieces, then N,N-dimethylacetamide and an internal standard were added in a sealed headspace vial. The vial was incubated for 1 h at 90 degrees C and the headspace gas was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The recovery rates of the analytes were 93.3-101.8% and the coefficients of variation were 0.3-6.5%. In ABS copolymers, the levels were 0.3-50.4 microg/g for AN, ND-4.5 microg/g for PN, 0.06-1.58 microg/g for 1,3-BD, and 1.1-295 microg/g for 4-VC. The highest level was found for 4-VC, which is a dimer of 1,3-BD, and the next highest was for AN, which is one of the monomers of the ABS copolymer. Furthermore, the method was also applied to acrylonitrile-styrene (AS) copolymers and polystyrenes (PS) for kitchen utensils, and nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) gloves. In AS copolymers, AN and PN were detected at 16.8-54.5 and 0.8-6.9 microg/g, respectively. On the other hand, the levels in PS and NBR samples were all low. PMID:21313827

  8. Biospeciation of tungsten in the serum of diabetic and healthy rats treated with the antidiabetic agent sodium tungstate.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gómez, M Milagros; Rodríguez-Fariñas, Nuria; Cañas-Montalvo, Benito; Domínguez, Jorge; Guinovart, Joan; Cámara-Rica, Carmen

    2011-05-30

    It is known that oral administration of sodium tungstate preserves the pancreatic beta cell function in diabetic rats. Healthy and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were treated with sodium tungstate for one, three or six weeks, after which the species of W in serum, were analysed. An increase in serum W with treatment time was observed. After six weeks, the serum W concentration in diabetic rats (70 mg L(-1)) was about 4.6 times higher than in healthy specimens. This different behaviour was also observed for Cu accumulation, while the Zn pattern follows the contrary. The patterns observed in the retention of Cu and Zn may be attributable to a normalization of glycaemia. The speciation analysis of W was performed using 2D separations, including an immunoaffinity packing and a SEC (Size Exclusion Chromatography) column coupled to an ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry) for elemental detection. Ultrafiltration data together with SEC-ICP-MS results proved that around 80% of serum W was bound to proteins, the diabetic rats registering a higher W content than their healthy counterparts. Most of the protein-bound W was due to a complex with albumin. An unknown protein with a molecular weight higher than 100 kDa was also found to bind a small amount of W (about 2%). MALDI-TOF (Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight) analysis of the desalted and concentrated chromatographic fractions confirmed albumin as the main protein bound to tungstate in rat serum, while no binding to transferrin (Tf) was detected. The interaction between glutathione and W was also evaluated using standard solutions; however, the formation of complexes was not observed. The stability of the complexes between W and proteins when subjected to more stringent procedures, like those used in proteomic methodologies (denaturing with urea or SDS, boiling, sonication, acid media, reduction with β-mercaptoethanol (BME) or DTT (dithiotreitol) and alkylation with

  9. Chitosan-tethered poly(acrylonitrile-co-maleic acid) hollow fiber membrane for lipase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Ye, Peng; Xu, Zhi-Kang; Che, Ai-Fu; Wu, Jian; Seta, Patrick

    2005-11-01

    A protocol was used to prepare a dual-layer biomimetic membrane as support for enzyme immobilization by tethering chitosan on the surface of poly(acrylonitrile-co-maleic acid) (PANCMA) ultrafiltration hollow fiber membrane in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC)/N-hydroxylsuccin-imide (NHS). The chemical change of the chitosan-modified PANCMA membrane surface was confirmed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Lipase from Candida rugosa was immobilized on this dual-layer biomimetic membrane using glutaraldehyde (GA), and on the nascent PANCMA membrane using EDC/NHS as coupling agent. The properties of the immobilized enzymes were assayed and compared with those of the free one. It was found that both the activity retention of the immobilized lipase and the amount of bound protein on the dual-layer biomimetic membrane (44.5% and 66.5 mg/m2) were higher than those on the nascent PANCMA membrane (33.9% and 53.7 mg/m2). The kinetic parameters of the free and immobilized lipases, Km and Vmax, were also assayed. The Km values were similar for the immobilized lipases, while the Vmax value of the immobilized lipase on the dual-layer biomimetic membrane was higher than that on the nascent PANCMA membrane. Results indicated that the pH and thermal stabilities of lipase increased upon immobilization. The residual activity of the immobilized lipase after 10 uses was 53% on the dual-layer biomimetic membrane and 62% on the nascent PANCMA membrane. PMID:15919112

  10. Nanofibrous poly(acrylonitrile-co-maleic acid) membranes functionalized with gelatin and chitosan for lipase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Ye, Peng; Xu, Zhi-Kang; Wu, Jian; Innocent, Christophe; Seta, Patrick

    2006-08-01

    Nanofibrous membranes with an average diameter of 100 and 180 nm were fabricated from poly(acrylonitrile-co-maleic acid) (PANCMA) by the electrospinning process. These nanofibrous membranes contain reactive groups which can be used to covalently immobilize biomacromolecules. Two natural macromolecules, chitosan and gelatin, were tethered on these nanofibrous membranes to fabricate dual-layer biomimetic supports for enzyme immobilization in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(dimethyl-aminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC)/N-hydroxyl succinimide (NHS). Lipase from Candida rugosa was then immobilized on these dual-layer biomimetic supports using glutaraldehyde (GA), and on the nascent PANCMA fibrous membrane using EDC/NHS as coupling agent, respectively. The properties of the immobilized lipases were assayed. It was found that there is an increase of the activity retention of the immobilized lipase on the chitosan-modified nanofibrous membrane (45.6+/-1.8%) and on the gelatin-modified one (49.7+/-1.8%), compared to that on the nascent one (37.6+/-1.8%). The kinetic parameters of the free and immobilized lipases, K(m) and V(max), were also assayed. In comparison with the immobilized lipase on the nascent nanofibrous membrane, there is an increase of the V(max) value for the immobilized lipases on the chitosan- and gelatin-modified nanofibrous membranes. Results also indicate that the pH and thermal stabilities of lipases increase upon immobilization. The residual activities of the immobilized lipases are 55% on the chitosan-modified nanofibrous membrane and 60% on the gelatin-modified one, after 10 uses. PMID:16584770

  11. Modeling contaminant transport and remediation at an acrylonitrile spill site in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şengör, S. Sevinç; Ünlü, Kahraman

    2013-07-01

    The August 1999 earthquake in Turkey damaged three acrylonitrile (AN) storage tanks at a plant producing synthetic fiber by polymerization. A numerical modeling study was carried out to analyze the groundwater flow and contaminant (AN) transport at the spill site. This study presents the application of a numerical groundwater model to determine the hydrogeological parameters of the site, where such data were not available during the field surveys prior to the simulation studies. The two- and three-dimensional transient flow and transport models were first calibrated using the first 266 days of observed head and concentration data and then verified using the remaining 540-day observed data set. Off-site migration of the contaminant plume was kept under control within the site boundaries owing to the favorable geology of the site, the characteristics of the local groundwater flow regime and the pumping operations. As expected, the applied pump-and-treat system was effective at high-permeability zones, but not fully effective at low-permeability zones. The results of long-term simulations for unconfined aquifer showed that the size of the plume in the high permeability zone shrank significantly due to the dilution by natural recharge. However, in the low permeability zone, it was not significantly affected. The study showed that accurate and sufficient data regarding the source characteristics, concentration and groundwater level measurements, groundwater pumping rates and their durations at each of the extraction points involved in the pump-and-treat system along with the hydrogeological site characterization are the key parameters for successful flow and transport model calibrations.

  12. Modification of fiber properties through grafting of acrylonitrile to rayon by chemical and radiation methods

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Inderjeet; Sharma, Neelam; Kumari, Vandna

    2013-01-01

    Fibrous properties of rayon has been modified through synthesis of graft copolymers of rayon with acrylonitrile (AN) by chemical method using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN/HNO3) as a redox initiator and gamma radiation mutual method. Percentage of grafting (Pg) was determined as a function of initiator concentration, monomer concentration, irradiation dose, temperature, time of reaction and the amount of water. Maximum percentage of grafting (160.01%) using CAN/HNO3 was obtained at [CAN] = 22.80 × 10−3 mol/L, [HNO3] = 112.68 × 10−2 mol/L and [AN] = 114.49 × 10−2 mol/L in 20 mL of water at 45 °C within 120 min while in case of gamma radiation method, maximum Pg (90.24%) was obtained at an optimum concentration of AN of 76.32 × 10−2 mol/L using 10 mL of water at room temperature with total dose exposure of 3.456 kGy/h. The grafted fiber was characterized by FTIR, SEM, TGA and XRD studies. Swelling behavior of grafted rayon in different solvents such as water, methanol, ethanol, DMF and acetone was studied and compared with the unmodified rayon. Dyeing behavior of the grafted fiber was also investigated. PMID:25685464

  13. Modification of fiber properties through grafting of acrylonitrile to rayon by chemical and radiation methods.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Inderjeet; Sharma, Neelam; Kumari, Vandna

    2013-11-01

    Fibrous properties of rayon has been modified through synthesis of graft copolymers of rayon with acrylonitrile (AN) by chemical method using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN/HNO3) as a redox initiator and gamma radiation mutual method. Percentage of grafting (Pg) was determined as a function of initiator concentration, monomer concentration, irradiation dose, temperature, time of reaction and the amount of water. Maximum percentage of grafting (160.01%) using CAN/HNO3 was obtained at [CAN] = 22.80 × 10(-3) mol/L, [HNO3] = 112.68 × 10(-2) mol/L and [AN] = 114.49 × 10(-2) mol/L in 20 mL of water at 45 °C within 120 min while in case of gamma radiation method, maximum Pg (90.24%) was obtained at an optimum concentration of AN of 76.32 × 10(-2) mol/L using 10 mL of water at room temperature with total dose exposure of 3.456 kGy/h. The grafted fiber was characterized by FTIR, SEM, TGA and XRD studies. Swelling behavior of grafted rayon in different solvents such as water, methanol, ethanol, DMF and acetone was studied and compared with the unmodified rayon. Dyeing behavior of the grafted fiber was also investigated. PMID:25685464

  14. Design of poly(acrylonitrile)-based gel electrolytes for high-performance lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Hong; Kuo, Ping-Lin; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Teng, Hsisheng

    2014-11-12

    The use of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) as a host for gel polymer electrolytes (GPEs) commonly produces a strong dipole-dipole interaction with the polymer. This study presents a strategy for the application of PAN in GPEs for the production of high performance lithium ion batteries. The resulting gel electrolyte GPE-AVM comprises a poly(acrylonitrile-co-vinyl acetate) copolymer blending poly(methyl methacrylate) as a host, which is swelled using a liquid electrolyte (LE) of 1 M LiPF6 in carbonate solvent. Vinyl acetate and methacrylate groups segregate the PAN chains in the GPE, which produces high ionic conductivity (3.5 × 10 (-3) S cm(-1) at 30 °C) and a wide electrochemical voltage range (>6.5 V) as well as an excellent Li(+) transference number of 0.6. This study includes GPE-AVM in a full-cell battery comprising a LiFePO4 cathode and graphite anode to promote ion motion, which reduced resistance in the battery by 39% and increased the specific power by 110%, relative to the performance of batteries based on LE. The proposed GPE-based battery has a capacity of 140 mAh g(-1) at a discharge rate of 0.1 C and is able to deliver 67 mAh g(-1) of electricity at 17 C. The proposed GPE-AVM provides a robust interface with the electrodes in full-cell batteries, resulting in 93% capacity retention after 100 charge-discharge cycles at 17 C and 63% retention after 1000 cycles. PMID:25361495

  15. The role of acrylonitrile in controlling the structure and properties of nanostructured ionomer films.

    PubMed

    Tungchaiwattana, Somjit; Musa, Muhamad Sharan; Yan, Junfeng; Lovell, Peter A; Shaw, Peter; Saunders, Brian R

    2014-07-14

    Ionomers are polymers which contain ionic groups that are covalently bound to the main chain. The presence of a small percentage of ionic groups strongly affects the polymer's mechanical properties. Here, we examine a new family of nanostructured ionomer films prepared from core-shell polymer nanoparticles containing acrylonitrile (AN), 1,3-butadiene (Bd) and methacrylic acid (MAA). Three new AN-containing dispersions were investigated in this study. The core-shell nanoparticles contained a PBd core. The shells contained copolymerised Bd, AN and MAA, i.e., PBd-AN-MAA. Three types of crosslinking were present in these films: covalent crosslinks (from Bd); strong physical crosslinks (involving ionic bonding of RCOO(-) and Zn(2+)) and weaker physical crosslinks (from AN). We examined and compared the roles of AN and ionic crosslinking (from added Zn(2+)) on the structure and mechanical properties of the films. The FTIR spectroscopy data showed evidence for RCOOH-nitrile hydrogen bonding with tetrahedral geometry. DMTA studies showed that AN copolymerised within the PBd-AN-MAA phase uniformly. Tensile stress-strain data showed that inclusion of AN increased elasticity and toughness. Analysis showed that about 33 AN groups were required to provide an elastically-effective chain. However, only 1.5 to 2 ionically bonded RCOO(-) groups were required to generate an elastically-effective chain. By contrast to ionic bonding, AN inclusion increased the modulus without compromising ductility. Our results show that AN is an attractive, versatile, monomer for increasing the toughness of nanostructured ionomers and this should also be the case for other nanostructured polymer elastomers. PMID:24852137

  16. A correlation study applied to biomarkers of internal and effective dose for acrylonitrile and 4-aminobiphenyl in smokers

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Gerhard; Newland, Kirk; Papadopoulou, Ermioni

    2014-01-01

    The urinary metabolites 2-cyanoethylmercapturic acid and 4-aminobiphenyl have been correlated with tobacco smoke exposure. Similarly, 2-cyanoethylvaline and 4-aminobiphenyl haemoglobin adducts have been used as biomarkers of effective dose for the exposure to acrylonitrile and 4-aminobiphenyl, respectively. Each pair of biomarkers is derived from the same parent chemical; however, the correlation between the urinary and the haemoglobin biomarkers has not been investigated. Using clinical study samples, we report a weak correlation between urinary and haemoglobin biomarkers due to different accumulation and elimination rates. Time course analysis showed that a reduction in exposure was paralleled by a delayed reduction in haemoglobin adducts. PMID:24754403

  17. Specific recognition of guanines in non-duplex regions of nucleic acids with potassium tungstate and hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Wuxiang; Xu, Xiaowei; He, Huan; Huang, Rong; Chen, Xi; Xiao, Heng; Yu, Zhenduo; Liu, Yi; Zhou, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Structural features of nucleic acids have become an integral part of current biomedical research. Highly selective and readily performed methods with little toxicity that target guanosines in non-duplex nucleic acids are needed, which led us to search for an effective agent for guanosine sequencing. Treatment of DNA or RNA with potassium tungstate and hydrogen peroxide produced damaged guanosines in DNA or RNA sequences. The damaged guanosines in non-duplex DNA could be cleaved by hot piperidine. Similarly, damaged guanosines in non-duplex RNA could be cleaved by aniline acetate. We could identify structural features of nucleic acid using this strategy instead of dimethyl sulphate and Ribonuclease T1. PMID:25355517

  18. Fabrication of Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene Nanostructures with Anodic Alumina Oxide Templates, Characterization and Biofilm Development Test for Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Desrousseaux, Camille; Cueff, Régis; Aumeran, Claire; Garrait, Ghislain; Mailhot-Jensen, Bénédicte; Traoré, Ousmane; Sautou, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Medical devices can be contaminated by microbial biofilm which causes nosocomial infections. One of the strategies for the prevention of such microbial adhesion is to modify the biomaterials by creating micro or nanofeatures on their surface. This study aimed (1) to nanostructure acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS), a polymer composing connectors in perfusion devices, using Anodic Alumina Oxide templates, and to control the reproducibility of this process; (2) to characterize the physico-chemical properties of the nanostructured surfaces such as wettability using captive-bubble contact angle measurement technique; (3) to test the impact of nanostructures on Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm development. Fabrication of Anodic Alumina Oxide molds was realized by double anodization in oxalic acid. This process was reproducible. The obtained molds present hexagonally arranged 50 nm diameter pores, with a 100 nm interpore distance and a length of 100 nm. Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene nanostructures were successfully prepared using a polymer solution and two melt wetting methods. For all methods, the nanopicots were obtained but inside each sample their length was different. One method was selected essentially for industrial purposes and for better reproducibility results. The flat ABS surface presents a slightly hydrophilic character, which remains roughly unchanged after nanostructuration, the increasing apparent wettability observed in that case being explained by roughness effects. Also, the nanostructuration of the polymer surface does not induce any significant effect on Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion. PMID:26284922

  19. Simulations of the Interaction of Small Molecules with Styrene-Butadiene and Styrene-Butadiene-Acrylonitrile Polymer Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Upendra; Mattice, Wayne

    1997-03-01

    We have simulated atomistically the structure and energetics of Styrene-Butadiene(SB) and Styrene-Butadiene-Acrylonitrile(SBA) random copolymer thin films. The films attain bulk density in their interior region. The surface layer is about 5 ÅThe orientation of the backbone bonds is random in the interior region of the films, while orienting preferentially in the direction of the plane of the film at the surface. The surface energy for the SBA films is significantly higher than for the SB films and the reason was found to be the preferential location of Acrylonitrile groups on the surface. The comparison of density and surface energy with experimental data is very good. We studied the interaction of toluene, water and hexadecane with SB and SBA films. At small concentrations, toluene is found to wet the films and spread uniformly with random structural orientation. Hexadecane also wets the surface, its chains showing an extended conformation. The water molecules are seen to form drops and do not prefer the SB and SBA surfaces. We will present results of wetting and non-wetting interaction energies, surface coverage, and conformational characteristics of these molecules and low molecular weight surfactants at different concentrations of these molecules on the films.

  20. Acrylonitrile potentiates hearing loss and cochlear damage induced by moderate noise exposure in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pouyatos, BenoIt . E-mail: benoit.pouyatos@med.va.gov; Gearhart, Caroline A.; Fechter, Laurence D.

    2005-04-01

    The diversity of chemical and drugs that can potentiate noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) has impeded efforts to predict such interactions. We have hypothesized that chemical contaminants that disrupt intrinsic antioxidant defenses hold significant risk for potentiating NIHL. If this is true, then acrylonitrile (ACN) would be expected to potentiate NIHL. ACN, one of the 50 most commonly used chemicals in the United States, is metabolized via two pathways that are likely to disrupt intrinsic reactive oxygen species (ROS) buffering systems: (1) it conjugates glutathione, depleting this important antioxidant rapidly; (2) a second pathway involves the formation of cyanide, which can inhibit superoxide dismutase. We hypothesized that moderate noise exposure, that does not produce permanent hearing loss by itself, could initiate oxidative stress and that ACN could render the inner ear more sensitive to noise by disrupting intrinsic antioxidant defenses. Temporary and persistent effects of ACN alone (50 mg/kg, sc 5 days), noise alone (95 or 97 dB octave band noise, 4 h/day for 5 days), or ACN in combination with noise were determined using distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) and compound action potential (CAP) amplitudes. Histopathological damage to hair cells resulting from these treatments was also investigated using surface preparations of the organ of Corti. Individually, neither ACN nor noise exposures caused any permanent hearing or hair cell loss; only a reversible temporary threshold shift was measured in noise-exposed animals. However, when given in combination, ACN and noise induced permanent threshold shifts (13-16 dB between 7 and 40 kHz) and a decrease in DPOAE amplitudes (up to 25 dB at 19 kHz), as well as significant outer hair cell (OHC) loss (up to 20% in the first row between 13 and 47 kHz). This investigation demonstrates that ACN can potentiate NIHL at noise levels that are realistic in terms of human exposure, and that the OHCs are the

  1. Local pharmacological effects of tungstate on the color-pattern determination of butterfly wings: a possible relationship between the eyespot and parafocal element.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, Bidur; Otaki, Joji M

    2009-11-01

    Butterfly wing color patterns can be changed by the application of a temperature shock or pharmacological agents such as tungstate, producing a distinctive type of elemental modification called the TS (temperature shock) type. Heterochronic uncoupling between the signaling and reception steps during the color-pattern determination process has been proposed as a mechanism for TS-type changes. As an extension of this hypothesis, both the parafocal element (PFE) and the eyespot in the same wing compartment are considered to be determined by morphogenic signal(s) emitted from the same eyespot focus. However, these models need to be examined with additional experimental data. Furthermore, there is controversy as to whether the action of tungstate on wing color patterns is direct or Indirect. Using a species of nymphalid butterfly (Junonia orithya), we have devised a simple method for the local application of pharmacological agents directly on developing wings of pupae. Local tungstate application resulted in reduced eyespots and circular dislocated PFEs in the eyespot-less compartments only on the treated wing, demonstrating that tungstate directly induces color-pattern changes on wings. We further examined the eyespot-PFE relationship in normal and cold-shocked Individuals, showing that an eyespot can be superimposed on a PFE and vice versa, probably depending on the timing of their fate determination. Taken together, we propose a two-morphogen model for the normal color-pattern determination, in which the morphogenic signals for the eyespot and PFE are different from each other despite their Identical origin. This two-morphogen model is compatible with the heterochronic uncoupling model for TS-type changes. PMID:19877835

  2. Development and validation of personal monitoring methods for low levels of acrylonitrile in workplace atmosphere. II. Thermal desorption and field validation

    SciTech Connect

    Borders, R.A.; Gluck, S.J.; Sowle, W.F.; Melcher, R.G.

    1986-03-01

    Thermal desorption is a more sensitive alternative to solvent desorption for the determination of acrylonitrile in air. A dual-bed collection tube (Tenax GC and Carbosieve B) was developed for collecting and concentrating low levels of acrylonitrile. Two thermal desorption techniques were evaluated for the recovery of acrylonitrile collected on the dual-bed tubes over a concentration range from 0.05 to 5 ppm. A commercially-available system, the Century Programmable Thermal Desorption Unit, was easy to operate, allowed for multiple injections of the sample and had a recovery of 82 +/- 12% (RSD). Sampled were stored for up to two months without affecting the recovery and there was not an observable effect from humidity or from the presence of other organic compounds. This system was found to have limitations at acrylonitrile concentrations above 1 ppm. A field validation study tested the sampling and analytical methods developed for monitoring low levels of acrylonitrile in the workplace. Three methods employing Pittsburgh Coconut-Base activated charcoal, Ambersorb XE-348 and Tenax-GC and Carbosieve B sampling mediums were validated for concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 5 ppm and confirmed in the field from 0.02 to 3 ppm in tests conducted at plant sites. These field studies were run over varying humidity and temperature conditions. The overall absolute recoveries and relative standard deviations found for these methods found during the field trials are 90 +/- 18% for charcoal; 85 +/- 11% for Ambersorb XE-348; and 90 +/- 19% for the Century dual-bed sorbent. These values were in quite good agreement with the 91 +/- 10%, 88 +/- 8%, and 82 +/- 12% determined in laboratory studies.

  3. Surface discharge and tracking phenomena induced on acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene polymer dielectric material by acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Yoshimura, N.

    1999-05-01

    The discharge and tracking phenomena induced on the polymer dielectric materials by acid rain are investigated by the accelerated aging of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer in artificial rainwater in this article. Based on the investigation of acid rain, the artificial rainwater is chosen to agree well with the actual ingredients of precipitation. The influence of hydrophobicity degradation on the surface discharge and tracking is studied. The relations among the surface discharge, tracking, hydrophobicity, and microchemical structure and physical morphology of material are furthermore discussed. Experimental results show that the polymer dielectric materials suffer a large attack and degradation from acid rain. The dielectric surface degrades and becomes rough, and the hydrophobicity decreases so that the surface discharge and tracking may occur on them.

  4. A role for tungsten in the biology of Campylobacter jejuni: tungstate stimulates formate dehydrogenase activity and is transported via an ultra-high affinity ABC system distinct from the molybdate transporter.

    PubMed

    Smart, Jonathan P; Cliff, Matthew J; Kelly, David J

    2009-11-01

    The food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni possesses no known tungstoenzymes, yet encodes two ABC transporters (Cj0300-0303 and Cj1538-1540) homologous to bacterial molybdate (ModABC) uptake systems and the tungstate transporter (TupABC) of Eubacterium acidaminophilum respectively. The actual substrates and physiological role of these transporters were investigated. Tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry of the purified periplasmic binding proteins of each system revealed that while Cj0303 is unable to discriminate between molybdate and tungstate (K(D) values for both ligands of 4-8 nM), Cj1540 binds tungstate with a K(D) of 1.0 +/- 0.2 pM; 50 000-fold more tightly than molybdate. Induction-coupled plasma mass spectroscopy of single and double mutants showed that this large difference in affinity is reflected in a lower cellular tungsten content in a cj1540 (tupA) mutant compared with a cj0303c (modA) mutant. Surprisingly, formate dehydrogenase (FDH) activity was decreased approximately 50% in the tupA strain, and supplementation of the growth medium with tungstate significantly increased FDH activity in the wild type, while inhibiting known molybdoenzymes. Our data suggest that C. jejuni possesses a specific, ultra-high affinity tungstate transporter that supplies tungsten for incorporation into FDH. Furthermore, possession of two MoeA paralogues may explain the formation of both molybdopterin and tungstopterin in this bacterium. PMID:19818021

  5. Environmentally benign electroless nickel plating using supercritical carbon-dioxide on hydrophilically modified acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tengsuwan, Siwach; Ohshima, Masahiro

    2014-08-01

    Electroless Ni-P plating using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) in conjunction with copolymer-based hydrophilic modification was applied to an acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) substrate. The surface of ABS substrate was hydrophilically modified by blending with a multi-block copolymer, poly(ether-ester-amide)s (PEEA), in injection molding process. The substrate was then impregnated with Pd(II)-hexafluoroacetylacetonate, Pd(hfa)2, using scCO2, followed by the electroless plating reaction. ABS/PEEA substrates with different PEEA to ABS blend ratios and different volume ratios of butadiene to the styrene-acrylonitrile copolymer (SAN) matrix were prepared to investigate how the dispersed PEEA and butadiene domains affected the blend morphology and the adhesive strength of the plating metal-to-polymer contact. Increasing the PEEA copolymer to ABS blend ratio increased the mass transfer rate of the plating solution in the ABS substrate. Consequently, the metal-polymer composite layer became thicker, which increased the adhesive strength of the metal-to-polymer contact because of the anchoring effect. The butadiene domains appeared to attract the Pd catalyst precursor, and thus, the proportion of butadiene in the ABS matrix also affected the adhesive strength of the contact between the metal layer and the substrate. The ABS substrate was successfully plated with a Ni-P metal layer with an average adhesive strength of 9.1 ± 0.5 N cm-1 by choosing appropriate ABS/PEEA blend ratios and a Pd(hfa)2 concentration.

  6. Spectroscopy and structural characteristics of Eu3+-activated perovskite tungstate Ba2La2ZnW2O12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Huang, Yanlin; Cheng, Han; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2015-11-01

    Eu3+-doped tungstate Ba2La2ZnW2O12 was prepared by the high-temperature solid-state reaction method. The x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) patterns indicate that the matrix has a perovskite structure. The samples were characterized by the scanning electron microscope (SEM), by optical diffuse reflection, photoluminescence (PL) spectra and by their decay curves. Eu3+-activated Ba2La2ZnW2O12 shows red luminescence under the excitation of near-ultraviolet and blue light. Laser site-selective excitation and emission spectroscopy technology was applied to investigate the spectroscopic and microstructural properties. The excitation spectra were tested by monitoring the emission from 5D0  →  7F0-4 transitions. Accordingly the emission spectra and decay curves (lifetime) were measured by the excitation in the 5D0  →  7F0 wavelength region using a pulsed, tunable, and narrow-band dye laser. We have detected two Eu3+ sites in Ba2La2ZnW2O12 with the temperature region ranging from 10 K to below 300 K. On the spectra data of the site-selective emission and decay, the Stark energy levels of Eu3+ at two different sites were determined. The lifetimes of Eu3+ ions at the two sites were compared. The energy transfer and crystallographic assignments for the Eu3+ sites were discussed.

  7. Lasing properties of selectively pumped Raman-active Nd{sup 3+}-doped molybdate and tungstate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Basiev, Tasoltan T; Doroshenko, Maxim E; Ivleva, Lyudmila I; Osiko, Vyacheslav V; Kosmyna, M B; Komar', V K; Sulc, J; Jelinkova, H

    2006-08-31

    The lasing efficiency of Nd{sup 3+} ions is studied in laser materials capable of self-Raman frequency conversion. The lasing properties of tungstate and molybdate crystals with the scheelite structure (SrWO{sub 4}, BaWO{sub 4}, PbWO{sub 4}, SrMoO{sub 4}, PbMoO{sub 4}) activated with neodymium ions are investigated upon longitudinal pumping by a 750-nm alexandrite laser or a 800-nm diode laser. The slope lasing efficiency obtained for a Nd{sup 3+}:PbMoO{sub 4} laser emitting at 1054 nm is 54.3% for the total lasing efficiency of 46%, which is the best result for all the crystals with the scheelite structure studied so far. The simultaneous Q-switched lasing and self-Raman frequency conversion were demonstrated in neodymium-doped SrWO{sub 4}, PbWO{sub 4}, and BaWO{sub 4} crystals. (papers devoted to the 90th anniversary of a.m.prokhorov)

  8. Theoretical and experimental investigations of the 2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-{[5-(2-cyano-2-phenylethenyl)]furan-2-yl}acrylonitrile molecule as a potential acceptor in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazici, Mehmet; Bozar, Sinem; Aydin Yuksel, Sureyya; Ongul, Fatih; Gokce, Halil; Gunes, Serap; Yorur Goreci, Cigdem

    2016-06-01

    A novel soluble asymmetric acrylonitrile derivative, 2-(4-Chlorophenyl)-3-{[5-(2-cyano-2-phenylethenyl)]furan-2-yl}acrylonitrile (CPCPFA, 3) was synthesized in three steps by Knoevenagel condensation. The structure of the CPCPFA was characterized using UV–vis, FTIR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and LC-MS. CPCPFA was evaluated as an electron acceptor in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. Its optical and electronic properties as well as photovoltaic performance were investigated.

  9. Theoretical and experimental investigations of the 2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-{[5-(2-cyano-2-phenylethenyl)]furan-2-yl}acrylonitrile molecule as a potential acceptor in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kazici, Mehmet; Bozar, Sinem; Yuksel, Sureyya Aydin; Ongul, Fatih; Gokce, Halil; Gunes, Serap; Goreci, Cigdem Yorur

    2016-06-10

    A novel soluble asymmetric acrylonitrile derivative, 2-(4-Chlorophenyl)-3-{[5-(2-cyano-2-phenylethenyl)]furan-2-yl}acrylonitrile (CPCPFA, 3) was synthesized in three steps by Knoevenagel condensation. The structure of the CPCPFA was characterized using UV-vis, FTIR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and LC-MS. CPCPFA was evaluated as an electron acceptor in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. Its optical and electronic properties as well as photovoltaic performance were investigated. PMID:27145976

  10. Infrared spectra and structure of the cyano and methoxycarbonyl derivatives of 3,3-bis(dimethylamino)acrylonitrile: an ab initio force field treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binev, Ivan G.; Binev, Yuri I.

    1997-12-01

    The structure of 2-cyano-3,3-bis(dimethylamino)acrylonitrile and 2-methoxycarbonyl-3,3-bis(dimethylamino)acrylonitrile has been studied on the basis of both infrared spectra and ab initio force field calculations. The 3012-376 cm -1 region bands have been assigned; a good agreement has been found between the theoretical and experimental spectroscopic characteristics. According to both infrared data and bond parameters, the CC bond in the molecules studied is strongly polarized. The ground-state charge transfer between the electropositive and electronegative fragments of the molecules is more than 0.5 e -, so the species studied have a dual character, both molecular and zwitterionic.

  11. Immunotoxic effects of sodium tungstate dihydrate on female B6C3F1/N mice when administered in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Frawley, Rachel P; Smith, Matthew J; White, Kimber L; Elmore, Susan A; Herbert, Ron; Moore, Rebecca; Staska, Lauren M; Behl, Mamta; Hooth, Michelle J; Kissling, Grace E; Germolec, Dori R

    2016-09-01

    Tungsten is a naturally occurring, high-tensile strength element that has been used in a number of consumer products. Tungsten has been detected in soil, waterways, groundwater, and human tissue and body fluids. Elevated levels of tungsten in urine were reported for populations exposed to tungstate in drinking water in areas where natural tungsten formations were prevalent. Published reports indicated that sodium tungstate may modulate hematopoiesis, immune cell populations, and immune responses in rodent models. The objective of this study was to assess potential immunotoxicity of sodium tungstate dihydrate (STD), a drinking water contaminant. Female B6C3F1/N mice received 0-2000 mg STD/L in their drinking water for 28 d, and were evaluated for effects on immune cell populations in spleen and bone marrow, and humoral-mediated, cell-mediated, and innate immunity. Three different parameters of cell-mediated immunity were similarly affected at 1000 mg STD/L. T-cell proliferative responses against allogeneic leukocytes and anti-CD3 were decreased 32%, and 21%, respectively. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity was decreased at all effector:target cell ratios examined. At 2000 mg STD/L, the absolute numbers of CD3(+) T-cell progenitor cells in bone marrow were increased 86%, but the alterations in B-lymphocyte and other progenitor cells were not significant. There were no effects on bone marrow DNA synthesis or colony forming capabilities. STD-induced effects on humoral-mediated immunity, innate immunity, and splenocyte sub-populations were limited. Enhanced histopathology did not detect treatment-related lesions in any of the immune tissues. These data suggest exposure to STD in drinking water may adversely affect cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27223060

  12. Photocatalytic decomposition of acrylonitrile with N-F codoped TiO2/SiO2 under simulant solar light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Pang, Dandan; Qiu, Lu; Wang, Yunteng; Zhu, Rongshu; Ouyang, Feng

    2015-07-01

    The solid acid catalyst, N-F codoped TiO2/SiO2 composite oxide was prepared by a sol-gel method using NH4F as nitrogen and fluorine source. The prepared materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-Visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis), ammonia adsorption and temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD), in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and N2 physical adsorption isotherm. The photocatalytic activity of the catalyst for acrylonitrile degradation was investigated under simulant solar irradiation. The results showed that strong Lewis and Brønsted acid sites appear on the surface of the sample after N-F doping. Systematic investigation showed that the highest photocatalytic activity for acrylonitrile degradation was obtained for samples calcined at 450°C with molar ratio (NH4F to Ti) of 0.8. The degradation ratio of 71.5% was achieved with the prepared catalyst after 6-min irradiation, demonstrating the effectiveness of photocatalytic degradation of acrylonitrile with N-F codoped TiO2/SiO2 composite oxide. The photocatalyst is promising for application under solar light irradiation. Moreover, the intermediates generated after irradiation were verified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis and UV-Vis spectroscopy to be simple organic acids with lower toxicity, and the degradation pathway was also proposed for acrylonitrile degradation with the prepared catalyst. PMID:26141890

  13. Kinetic approach to evaluate the energy and entropy of activation for the exchange of alkaline earth metal ions on tin(IV) tungstate cation exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Khan, A.A.; Varshney, K.; Agrawal, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new approach based on the Nernst-Planck equations has been applied to study the reaction kinetics on the surface of tin(IV) tungstate for the Mg(II)-H(I), Ca(II)-H(I), Sr(II)-H(I) and Ba(II)-H(I) exchanges under the conditions favouring a particle diffusion phenomenon. On the basis of these studies the various physical parameters such as the effective diffusion coefficients, activation energies and entropies of activation have been evaluated which give some informations regarding the mechanism of ion-exchange on the surface of inorganic materials. 25 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  14. Decavanadate, decaniobate, tungstate and molybdate interactions with sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase: quercetin prevents cysteine oxidation by vanadate but does not reverse ATPase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fraqueza, Gil; Batista de Carvalho, Luís A E; Marques, M Paula M; Maia, Luisa; Ohlin, C André; Casey, William H; Aureliano, Manuel

    2012-11-01

    Recently we demonstrated that the decavanadate (V(10)) ion is a stronger Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor than other oxometalates, such as the isoelectronic and isostructural decaniobate ion, and the tungstate and molybdate monomer ions, and that it binds to this protein with a 1 : 1 stoichiometry. The V(10) interaction is not affected by any of the protein conformations that occur during the process of calcium translocation (i.e. E1, E1P, E2 and E2P) (Fraqueza et al., J. Inorg. Biochem., 2012). In the present study, we further explore this subject, and we can now show that the decaniobate ion, [Nb(10) = Nb(10)O(28)](6-), is a useful tool in deducing the interaction and the non-competitive Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibition by the decavanadate ion [V(10) = V(10)O(28)](6-). Moreover, decavanadate and vanadate induce protein cysteine oxidation whereas no effects were detected for the decaniobate, tungstate or molybdate ions. The presence of the antioxidant quercetin prevents cysteine oxidation, but not ATPase inhibition, by vanadate or decavanadate. Definitive V(IV) EPR spectra were observed for decavanadate in the presence of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase, indicating a vanadate reduction at some stage of the protein interaction. Raman spectroscopy clearly shows that the protein conformation changes that are induced by V(10), Nb(10) and vanadate are different from the ones induced by molybdate and tungstate monomer ions. Here, Mo and W cause changes similar to those by phosphate, yielding changes similar to the E1P protein conformation. The putative reduction of vanadium(V) to vanadium(IV) and the non-competitive binding of the V(10) and Nb(10) decametalates may explain the differences in the Raman spectra compared to those seen in the presence of molybdate or tungstate. Putting it all together, we suggest that the ability of V(10) to inhibit the Ca(2+)-ATPase may be at least in part due to the process of vanadate reduction and associated protein cysteine oxidation. These

  15. Development of radiopure cadmium tungstate crystal scintillators from enriched {sup 106}Cd and {sup 116}Cd to search for double beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Danevich, F. A.; Boiko, R. S.; Chernyak, D. M.; Kobychev, V. V.; Kropivyansky, B. N.; Mokina, V. M.; Nikolaiko, A. S.; Poda, D. V.; Podviyanuk, R. B.; Tretyak, V. I.; Barabash, A. S.; Konovalov, S. I.; Umatov, V. I.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; D'Angelo, S.; Brudanin, V. B.; Cappella, F.; Incicchitti, A.; Caracciolo, V.; and others

    2013-08-08

    Cadmium tungstate crystal scintillators enriched in {sup 106}Cd up to 66% ({sup 106}CdWO{sub 4}) and in {sup 116}Cd up to 82% ({sup 116}CdWO{sub 4}) have been developed. The low radioactive contamination of the crystals measured on the level of ≤ 1.5 mBq/kg ({sup 40}K), ≤ 0.005 - 0.012 mBq/kg ({sup 226}Ra), 0.04 - 0.07 mBq/kg ({sup 228}Th) allows to carry out high sensitivity experiments to search for double beta processes in {sup 106}Cd and {sup 116}Cd.

  16. Development and validation of personal monitoring methods for low levels of acrylonitrile in workplace atmosphere. I. Test atmosphere generation and solvent desorption methods

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, R.G.; Borders, R.A.; Coyne, L.B.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize monitoring methods and to investigate new technology for the determination of low levels of acrylonitrile (0.05 to 5 ppm) in workplace atmospheres. In the first phase of the study, a dynamic atmosphere generation system was developed to produce low levels of acrylonitrile in simulated workplace atmospheres. Various potential sorbents were investigated in the second phase, and the candidate methods were compared in a laboratory validation study over a concentration range from 0.05 to 5 ppm acrylonitrile in the presence of potential interferences and under relative humidity conditions from 30% to 95% RH. A collection tube containing 600 mg Pittsburgh coconut base charcoal was found to be the optimum tube for sampling for a full 8 -hr shift. No breakthrough was observed over the concentrations and humidities tested. The recovery was 91.3% with a total relative precision of +/-21% over the test range, and the recovery was not affected by storage for up to five weeks.

  17. A Roughness Study of Ytterbium-Doped Potassium Yttrium Tungstate (YB: KYW) Thin-Disk Femtosecond Ablated Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Hu; Ge, Wenqi; Wang, Yongbo; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Lü, Peijun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological changes and quantitatively assess the roughness of dentin after the ablation with a Ytterbium-Doped Potassium Yttrium Tungstate (YB: KYW) thin-disk femtosecond pulsed laser of different fluences, scanning speeds and scanning distances. Method: Twelve extracted human premolars were sectioned into crowns and roots along the cementum-enamel junction, and then the crowns were cut longitudinally into sheets about 1.5 mm thick with a cutting machine. The dentin samples were fixed on a stage at focus plane. The laser beam was irradiated onto the samples through a galvanometric scanning system, so rectangular movement could be achieved. After ablation, the samples were examined with a scanning electron microscope and laser three-dimensional profile measurement microscope for morphology and roughness study.With increasing laser fluence, dentin samples exhibited more melting and resolidification of dentin as well as debris-like structure and occluded parts of dentinal tubules. Results: When at the scanning speed of 2400mm/s and scanning distance of 24μm, the surface roughness of dentin ablated with femtosecond pulsed laser decreased significantly and varied between values of dentin surface roughness grinded with two kinds of diamond burs with different grits. When at the scanning speed of 1200mm/s and scanning distance of 12μm, the surface roughness decreased slightly, and the surface roughness of dentin ablated with femtosecond pulsed laser was almost equal to that grinded with a low grit diamond bur. Conclusion: This study showed that increased laser influence may lead to more collateral damage and lower dentin surface roughness, while scanning speed and scanning distance were also negatively correlated with surface roughness. Adequate parameters should be chosen to achieve therapeutic benefits, and different parameters can result in diverse ablation results. PMID:25606337

  18. The potential reproductive, neurobehavioral and systemic effects of soluble sodium tungstate exposure in Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect

    McInturf, S.M.; Bekkedal, M.Y.V.; Wilfong, E.; Arfsten, D.; Chapman, G.; Gunasekar, P.G.

    2011-07-15

    The debate on tungsten (W) is fostered by its continuous usage in military munitions. Reports demonstrate W solubilizes in soil and can migrate into drinking water supplies and, therefore, is a potential health risk to humans. This study evaluated the reproductive, systemic and neurobehavioral effects of sodium tungstate (NaW) in rats following 70 days of daily pre-and postnatal exposure via oral gavage to 5, 62.5 and 125 mg/kg/day of NaW through mating, gestation and weaning (PND 0-20). Daily administration of NaW produced no overt evidence of toxicity and had no apparent effect on mating success or offspring physical development. Distress vocalizations were elevated in F{sub 1} offspring from the high dose group, whereas righting reflex showed unexpected sex differences where males demonstrated faster righting than females; however, the effects were not dose-dependent. Locomotor activity was affected in both low and high-dose groups of F{sub 1} females. Low-dose group showed increased distance traveled, more time in ambulatory movements and less time in stereotypic behavior than controls or high dose animals. The high-dose group had more time in stereotypical movements than controls, and less time resting than controls and the lowest exposure group. Maternal retrieval was not affected by NaW exposure. Tungsten analysis showed a systemic distribution of NaW in both parents and offspring, with preferential uptake within the immune organs, including the femur, spleen and thymus. Histopathological evidence suggested no severe chronic injury or loss of function in these organs. However, the heart showed histological lesions, histiocytic inflammation from minimal to mild with cardiomyocyte degeneration and necrosis in several P{sub 0} animals of 125 mg NaW dose group. The result of this study suggests that pre and postnatal exposure to NaW may produce subtle neurobehavioral effects in offspring related to motor activity and emotionality.

  19. Crystal structures of deuterated sodium molybdate dihydrate and sodium tungstate dihydrate from time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Fortes, A Dominic

    2015-07-01

    Time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data have been measured from ∼90 mol% deuterated isotopologues of Na2MoO4·2H2O and Na2WO4·2H2O at 295 K to a resolution of sin (θ)/λ = 0.77 Å(-1). The use of neutrons has allowed refinement of structural parameters with a precision that varies by a factor of two from the heaviest to the lightest atoms; this contrasts with the X-ray based refinements where precision may be > 20× poorer for O atoms in the presence of atoms such as Mo and W. The accuracy and precision of inter-atomic distances and angles are in excellent agreement with recent X-ray single-crystal structure refinements whilst also completing our view of the hydrogen-bond geometry to the same degree of statistical certainty. The two structures are isotypic, space-group Pbca, with all atoms occupying general positions, being comprised of edge- and corner-sharing NaO5 and NaO6 polyhedra that form layers parallel with (010) inter-leaved with planes of XO4 (X = Mo, W) tetra-hedra that are linked by chains of water mol-ecules along [100] and [001]. The complete structure is identical with the previously described molybdate [Capitelli et al. (2006 ▸). Asian J. Chem. 18, 2856-2860] but shows that the purported three-centred inter-action involving one of the water mol-ecules in the tungstate [Farrugia (2007 ▸). Acta Cryst. E63, i142] is in fact an ordinary two-centred 'linear' hydrogen bond. PMID:26279871

  20. Crystal structures of deuterated sodium molybdate dihydrate and sodium tungstate dihydrate from time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, A. Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data have been measured from ∼90 mol% deuterated isotopologues of Na2MoO4·2H2O and Na2WO4·2H2O at 295 K to a resolution of sin (θ)/λ = 0.77 Å−1. The use of neutrons has allowed refinement of structural parameters with a precision that varies by a factor of two from the heaviest to the lightest atoms; this contrasts with the X-ray based refinements where precision may be > 20× poorer for O atoms in the presence of atoms such as Mo and W. The accuracy and precision of inter­atomic distances and angles are in excellent agreement with recent X-ray single-crystal structure refinements whilst also completing our view of the hydrogen-bond geometry to the same degree of statistical certainty. The two structures are isotypic, space-group Pbca, with all atoms occupying general positions, being comprised of edge- and corner-sharing NaO5 and NaO6 polyhedra that form layers parallel with (010) inter­leaved with planes of XO4 (X = Mo, W) tetra­hedra that are linked by chains of water mol­ecules along [100] and [001]. The complete structure is identical with the previously described molybdate [Capitelli et al. (2006 ▸). Asian J. Chem. 18, 2856–2860] but shows that the purported three-centred inter­action involving one of the water mol­ecules in the tungstate [Farrugia (2007 ▸). Acta Cryst. E63, i142] is in fact an ordinary two-centred ‘linear’ hydrogen bond. PMID:26279871

  1. Radiolytic preparation and characterization of hydrophilic poly(acrylonitrile-co-vinylsulfonate)-grafted porous poly(tetrafluoroethylene) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byeong-Hee; Sohn, Joon-Yong; Shin, Junhwa

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a hydrophilic copolymer of acrylonitrile (AN) and sodium vinylsulfonate (SVS) was grafted into a highly hydrophobic porous poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) substrate using a gamma-ray irradiation method and the grafted substrate was used as a substrate for impregnating a hydrophilic ionomer, Nafion. The results of FT-IR and TGA analysis of the prepared substrate showed that the SVS/AN monomers were successfully grafted into the porous PTFE film. The results of degree of grafting, elemental analyzer, and contact angle analysis showed that the hydrophilicity of the prepared PTFE-g-P(AN-co-VS) substrate was increased with an increase in the amount of SVS/AN graft copolymers. Also, the results of FE-SEM and Gurley number measurement showed that the pores in the substrate were reduced as the amount of SVS/AN copolymers grafted into the substrate increased. The prepared porous PTFE-g-P(AN-co-VS) substrate at an irradiation dose of 70 kGy was found to impregnate Nafion ionomer effectively compared to the original porous PTFE substrate. These results suggest that the prepared PTFE-g-P(AN-co-VS) substrate can be effectively used for the impregnation of polymer electrolyte (Nafion) to prepare a reinforced composite membrane.

  2. Electron Beam Damage in Poly(Vinyl Chloride) and Poly(Acrylonitrile) as Observed by Auger Electron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, Alan S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Baer, Donald R.

    2003-03-07

    AES spectra of spun-cast films of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) were collected over a period of time to determine specimen damage during exposure to a 10kV electron beam. For the PVC, loss of chlorine was observed over a period of 203 minutes to the extent that the final chlorine concentration was only 20% of its original value. PAN exhibited a loss in nitrogen content over a period of 120 minutes, but the rate of damage to the polymer was significantly less than PVC. Figure 1 shows the atomic concentration in the PVC film as a function of dose (time). It takes a dose of approximately 7.0x10-5 Ccm-5 for the chlorine concentration to fall from its original value by 10% (one definition of critical dose). Figure 2 shows a similar drop in nitrogen concentration in the PAN film as a function of dose. For this polymer, it takes a dose of 1.3x10-3 Ccm-2 for the nitrogen concentration to fall by 10%.

  3. Acrylonitrile-contamination induced enhancement of formic acid electro-oxidation at platinum nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nagar, Gumaa A.; Mohammad, Ahmad M.; El-Deab, Mohamed S.; Ohsaka, Takeo; El-Anadouli, Bahgat E.

    2014-11-01

    Minute amount (∼1 ppm) of acrylonitrile (AcN), a possible contaminant, shows an unexpected enhancement for the direct electro-oxidation of formic acid (FAO) at Pt nanoparticles modified GC (nano-Pt/GC) electrodes. This is reflected by a remarkable increase of the current intensity of the direct oxidation peak (Ipd, at ca. 0.3 V) in the presence of AcN, concurrently with a significant decrease of the second (indirect) oxidation current (Ipind, at ca. 0.7 V), compared to that observed in the absence of AcN (i.e., at the unpoisoned Pt electrode). The extent of enhancement depends on the surface coverage (θ) of AcN at the surface of Pt nanoparticles. AcN is thought to favor the direct FAO by disturbing the contiguity of the Pt sites, which is necessary for CO adsorption. Furthermore, XPS measurements revealed a change in the electronic structure of Pt in presence of AcN, which has a favorable positive impact on the charge transfer during the direct FAO.

  4. Separation of polycarbonate and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene waste plastics by froth flotation combined with ammonia pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-Qing; Wang, Hui; Liu, Qun; Fu, Jian-Gang; Liu, You-Nian

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this research is flotation separation of polycarbonate (PC) and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) waste plastics combined with ammonia pretreatment. The PC and ABS plastics show similar hydrophobicity, and ammonia treatment changes selectively floatability of PC plastic while ABS is insensitive to ammonia treatment. The contact angle measurement indicates the dropping of flotation recovery of PC is ascribed to a decline of contact angle. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates reactions occur on PC surface, which makes PC surface more hydrophilic. Separation of PC and ABS waste plastics was conducted based on the flotation behavior of single plastic. At different temperatures, PC and ABS mixtures were separated efficiently through froth flotation with ammonia pretreatment for different time (13 min at 23 °C, 18 min at 18 °C and 30 min at 23 °C). For both PC and ABS, the purity and recovery is more than 95.31% and 95.35%, respectively; the purity of PC and ABS is up to 99.72% and 99.23%, respectively. PC and ABS mixtures with different particle sizes were separated effectively, implying that ammonia treatment possesses superior applicability. PMID:25266156

  5. Isolation of the epsilon-caprolactam denitrifying bacteria from a wastewater treatment system manufactured with acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene resin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Lee, Chi-Mei

    2007-06-25

    epsilon-Caprolactam has high COD and toxicity, so its discharge to natural water and soil systems may lead to an adverse environmental effect on water quality, endangering public health and welfare. This investigation attempts to isolate epsilon-caprolactam denitrifying bacteria from a wastewater treatment system manufactured with acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) resin. The goal is to elucidate the effectiveness of isolated pure strain and ABS mixed strains in treating epsilon-caprolactam from synthetic wastewater. The results reveal that Paracoccus versutus MDC-3 was isolated from the wastewater treatment system manufactured with ABS resin. The ABS mixed strains and P. versutus MDC-3 can consume up to 1539mg/l epsilon-caprolactam to denitrify from synthetic wastewater. Complete epsilon-caprolactam removal depended on the supply of sufficient electron acceptors (nitrate). Strain P. versutus MDC-3, Hyphomicrobium sp. HM, Methylosinus pucelana and Magnetospirillum sp. CC-26 are related closely, according to the phylogenetic analyses of 16S rDNA sequences. PMID:17161908

  6. The effect of trichloroethylene and acrylonitrile on RNA and ribosome synthesis and ribosome content in Saccharomyces cells.

    PubMed

    Lochmann, E R; Ehrlich, W; Mangir, M

    1984-04-01

    The effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) and acrylonitrile (ACN) on growth, RNA synthesis, ribosome synthesis, and ribosome content were tested in yeast cells. TCE causes a delay of the growth of a cell culture (prolongation of the lag phase), but does not cause inhibition. Cells exposed to increasing concentrations of ACN show increasing damage, so that, at a certain point of the growth curve, cell division stops altogether. Similar results were obtained when RNA synthesis was investigated: After treatment with TCE, the maximum RNA synthesis of the cell culture was retarded, but subsequently reached the same level as the untreated control cells. In the presence of ACN, however, the rate of RNA synthesis was lowered with increasing ACN concentrations. The same effect was observed upon investigation of ribosome synthesis: Whereas TCE produces only a slight effect, treatment with increasing concentrations of ACN leads to a substantial decrease in ribosome synthesis, and finally to total inhibition. Parallel to this, the content of free and membrane-bound ribosomes is diminished. Obviously, the decrease in ribosome content is caused not only by an inhibition of ribosome synthesis, but also by a degradation of existing ribosomes, as well as by induction of a ribosome-associated RNase. PMID:6714140

  7. Reclamation of post-consumer plastics for development of polycarbonate and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene based nanocomposites with nanoclay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zicans, Janis; Meri, Remo Merijs; Ivanova, Tatjana; Berzina, Rita; Saldabola, Ruuta; Maksimov, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Suitability of recycled acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (R-ABS) and recycled polycarbonate (R-PC) for the development of polymer matrix nanocomposites with organically modified nanoclay (OMMT) is evaluated in comparison to virgin polymers (V-ABS and V-PC) based systems. The influence of OMMT content on the structure as well as calorimetric, mechanical and thermal properties of virgin and recycled polymers containing systems is revealed. Increase in stiffness and strength of virgin and recycled polymers based systems is observed along with rising nanoclay content. However, it is observed that reinforcing efficiency of clays on the R-ABS containing systems is reduced to certain extent in comparison to those, based on virgin polymers. It is shown, that in the presence of OMMT approximation of glass transition temperatures of both polymeric components is observed, which can testify about certain improvement of compatibility between PC and ABS. Increment of the modulus of elasticity and yield strength of the nanocomposites is associated with anisodiametric shape of OMMT, as well as with intercalation of polymer within the interlaminar space of the clay nanoparticles. It is also demonstrated that addition of nanoclay improves thermogravimetric behavior of the investigated compositions. Consequently, it is suggested that nanoclays can be used as promising functional additives and replace halogenated flame-retardants, without reducing mechanical properties of the composites.

  8. Species difference in the disposition of acrylonitrile: quantitative whole-body autoradiographic study in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sam; Ahmed, Ahmed E

    2004-06-01

    Previous studies from this and other laboratories have indicated the role of species difference in acrylonitrile (VCN) toxicity and its metabolism to cyanide. Our recent studies also indicated a more pronounced elimination of VCN following oral as compared to i.v. administration. To further characterize the mechanism of these differences on the distribution of VCN, quantitative whole-body autoradiographic distribution and elimination studies were conducted at various time points (0.08, 8, 24, 48 h) following the administration of an equivalent i.v. dose of 2-[14C]-VCN to male Fischer rats and male CD-1 mice. Whole-body autoradiographs obtained from freeze-dried and acid-extracted sections of rats and mice demonstrated a rapid uptake of 14C in liver, lungs, spleen and bone marrow at early time intervals. Quantitatively, the uptake, retention and covalent interaction of 14C were higher in organs of rats as compared to mice, over 48 h. Mice eliminated 74% of the total administered dose of 2-[14C]-VCN (expired air 4%, urine 16% and feces 54%), while rats eliminated only 26% of the dose (expired air 2%, urine 4% and feces 20%). Species differences in VCN toxicity seem to be correlated with its rate of elimination. The distribution and elimination data demonstrated that mice divest VCN more rapidly than rats. The study also demonstrated that administration of VCN in rats resulted in covalent interactions and retention of 2-[14C]-VCN/metabolites in the tissues thus exerting more chronic toxicity to rats than to mice. PMID:15807404

  9. Preconditioning of endoplasmic reticulum stress protects against acrylonitrile-induced cytotoxicity in primary rat astrocytes: The role of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bai; Wenjun, Zhao; Changsheng, Yin; Yuntao, Fang; Jing, Ma; Ben, Li; Hai, Qian; Guangwei, Xing; Suhua, Wang; Fang, Li; Aschner, Michael; Rongzhu, Lu

    2016-07-01

    This study explored the protective effects of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress preconditioning induced by 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) or oxidized dithiothreitol (DTTox) on acrylonitrile (AN)-induced cytotocity in primary rat astrocytes. Cells were pretreated with 2-DG or DTTox for different times at various concentration. Next, astrocytes were treated with 2.5mM AN for an additional 12h. Cell viability and cytotoxicity were assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) were determined. Expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), phosphorylated-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (p-eIF2α), microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3), P62, and Beclin1 were used to assess autophagy. In addition, 3-methyadenine (3-MA), an autophagy-specific inhibitor, was used to assess the role of autophagy in ER stress preconditioning-induced protection against AN cytotoxicity. The results showed that AN alone significantly decreased astrocytic viability and enhanced cytotoxicity. Compared to the AN-alone group, preconditioning with 2-DG or DTTox significantly increased cell viability and reduced cytotoxicity to indistinguishable levels. Decreased ROS generation and increased ΔΨm were also inherent to ER stress preconditioning with these compounds. Furthermore, autophagy was activated by both 2-DG and DTTox. Blockage of autophagy attenuated the protection afforded by 2-DG or DTTox preconditioning in AN-treated astrocytes. These results establish that ER stress preconditioning affords cellular protection against AN, and that activation of autophagy mediates the cytoprotection. Modulation of ER stress and resultant activation of autophagy may be a novel target for to ameliorate AN toxicity. PMID:27260289

  10. Morphological evolution and visible light-induced degradation of Rhodamine 6G by nanocrystalline bismuth tungstate prepared using a template-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Raissa Mendes; Batista Barbosa, Diego Augusto; de Jesus Silva Mendonça, Caritas; de Oliveira Lima, José Renato; Silva, Fernando Carvalho; Longo, Elson; Maciel, Adeilton Pereira; de Araujo Paschoal, Carlos William; Almeida, Marcio Aurélio Pinheiro

    2016-09-01

    The cleaning of water contaminated with organic dyes is a crucial problem nowadays. The search for good catalysts is intense, and bismuth tungstates have attracted a lot of attention because of their catalytic properties which are related to their crystal structure and morphology. In this study, we show that Bi2WO6 (BWO) crystals synthesized by the surfactant-assisted hydrothermal method create a different morphology than non-assisted crystals. With the assistance of the PVP surfactant, even the BWO crystalline structure could change, crystallizing into a high-symmetry metastable phase. These changes in morphology imply a decrease in BWO catalytic activity, which shows that insightful control of BWO synthesis is necessary to improve the BWO properties.

  11. PAPERS DEVOTED TO THE 90TH ANNIVERSARY OF A.M.PROKHOROV: Lasing properties of selectively pumped Raman-active Nd3+-doped molybdate and tungstate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiev, Tasoltan T.; Doroshenko, Maxim E.; Ivleva, Lyudmila I.; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.; Kosmyna, M. B.; Komar', V. K.; Sulc, J.; Jelinkova, H.

    2006-08-01

    The lasing efficiency of Nd3+ ions is studied in laser materials capable of self-Raman frequency conversion. The lasing properties of tungstate and molybdate crystals with the scheelite structure (SrWO4, BaWO4, PbWO4, SrMoO4, PbMoO4) activated with neodymium ions are investigated upon longitudinal pumping by a 750-nm alexandrite laser or a 800-nm diode laser. The slope lasing efficiency obtained for a Nd3+:PbMoO4 laser emitting at 1054 nm is 54.3% for the total lasing efficiency of 46%, which is the best result for all the crystals with the scheelite structure studied so far. The simultaneous Q-switched lasing and self-Raman frequency conversion were demonstrated in neodymium-doped SrWO4, PbWO4, and BaWO4 crystals.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of a novel hybrid nano composite cation exchanger poly-o-toluidine Sn(IV) tungstate: Its analytical applications as ion-selective electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Asif Ali; Shaheen, Shakeeba

    2013-02-01

    A novel organic-inorganic nano composite cation exchanger poly-o-toluidine Sn(IV) tungstate has been synthesized by incorporation of a polymer material into inorganic precipitate. The material is a class of hybrid ion-exchanger with good ion-exchange properties, reproducibility, stability and good selectivity for heavy metals. The physico-chemical properties of this nano composite material were characterized by using XRD, TGA, FTIR, SEM and TEM. The ion-exchange capacity, pH titrations, elution behavior and chemical stability were also carried out to study ion-exchange properties of the material. Distribution studies for various metal ions revealed that the nano composite is highly selective for Cd(II). An ion-selective membrane electrode was fabricated using this material for the determination of Cd(II) ions in solutions. The analytical utility of this electrode was established by employing it as an indicator electrode in electrometric titrations.

  13. Synthesis, structural and vibrational studies on mixed alkali metal gadolinium double tungstate, K1-xNaxGd(WO4)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durairajan, A.; Thangaraju, D.; Moorthy Babu, S.

    2013-02-01

    Mixed alkali double tungstates K1-xNaxGd(WO4)2 (KNGW) (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 1) were synthesized by solid state reaction using sodium doped monoclinic KGd(WO4)2 (KGW). Synthesized KNGW powders were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman analysis. DTA analysis confirms that the melting point of the KGW matrix increases from 1063 °C to 1255 °C with increasing sodium content. The Powder XRD analyses reveal that mixed phases were observed up to 40 wt.% of Na in the KGW matrix above that percentage there is domination of scheelite structure in the synthesized powder. Polyhedral type, bi-pyramidal shape and spheroid shape morphology was observed for KGW, NKGW and NGW powders respectively. The Raman analysis was carried out to understand the vibrational characteristic changes with mixing of sodium ions in the KGW matrix.

  14. Removal of As(V), Cr(III) and Cr(VI) from aqueous environments by poly(acrylonitril-co-acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride)-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Dudu, Tuba Ersen; Sahiner, Mehtap; Alpaslan, Duygu; Demirci, Sahin; Aktas, Nahit

    2015-09-15

    Cationic poly(Acrylonitril-co-Acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl Ammonium Chloride) (p(AN-co-APTMACl)) hydrogels in bulk were synthesized by using acrylonitrile (AN) and 3-acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride (APTMACl) as monomers. The prepared hydrogels were exposed to amidoximation reaction to replace hydrophobic nitrile groups with hydrophilic amidoxime groups that have metal ion binding ability. Those replacements were increased the hydrogels absorption capacity for As(V) and Cr(VI). Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms equations were utilized to obtain the best-fitted isotherm model for the absorption of the ions at different metal ion concentrations. The absorption data of As(V) ion were fitted well to Freundlich isotherm while those of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) ions were fitted well to Langmuir isotherm. The maximum absorption of poly(3-acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride (p(APTMACl)) and amid-p(AN-co-APTMACl) macro gels were 22.39 mg and 21.83 mg for As(V), and 30.65 mg and 18.16 mg for Cr(VI) ion per unit gram dried gel, respectively. Kinetically, the absorption behaviors of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ions were fitted well to a pseudo 2nd-order kinetic model and those of As(V) ions were fitted well to a pseudo 1st order kinetic model. PMID:26188989

  15. Acrylonitrile has Distinct Hormetic Effects on Acetyl-Cholinesterase Activity in Mouse Brain and Blood that are Modulated by Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Yuanqing, He; Suhua, Wang; Guangwei, Xing; Chunlan, Ren; Hai, Qian; Wenrong, Xu; Rongzhu, Lu; Aschner, Michael; Milatovic, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    Acrylonitrile(AN) is a neurotoxin both in animals and humans, but its effects on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity remain controversial. This study aimed to determine the dose-response effects of AN on AChE activity and the modulatory role of ethanol pre-treatment. A total of 144 Kunming mice were randomly divided into 18 groups: nine groups received 5% ethanol in their drinking water, and the remaining nine groups received regular tap water. One week later, both the ethanol and tap water only groups were given an intraperitoneal injection of AN at the following doses: 0 (control), 0.156, 0.3125, 0.625, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10 or 20 mg AN/kg body weight. AChE activity was determined on whole blood and brain 24 h later. Blood AChE activity was higher in AN-injected mice than in controls at all doses. AChE activity in blood increased in a dose-dependent manner, peaking at 0.156 mg/kg, after which a gradual decrease ensued, displaying a β-typed dose-response relationship. In contrast, brain AChE activity, following a single AN injection, was consistently lower than in control mice, and continued to fall up to a dose of 0.313 mg/kg, and thereafter increased gradually with higher doses. Mice receiving a 20 mg/kg dose of AN exhibited AChE brain activity indistinguishable from that of control mice, demonstrating a typical U-typed dose-response relationship. The activity of AChE in the blood and brain of the AN + ethanol-treated groups displayed a shift to the right, and the magnitude of the decrease in AChE activity induced by AN was attenuated relative to the AN-only group. These results suggest that AN affects AChE activity in both mouse blood and brain in a hormetic manner. Pretreatment with ethanol modifies the effect of AN on AChE, indicating that parent AN has a more prominent role than its metabolites in modulating enzyme activity. PMID:23550232

  16. Acrylonitrile grafted to PVDF

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jin; Eitouni, Hany Basam

    2015-03-31

    PVDF-g-PAN has been synthesized by grafting polyacrylonitrile onto polyvinylidene fluoride using an ATRP/AGET method. The novel polymer is ionically conducive and has much more flexibility than PVDF alone, making it especially useful either as a binder in battery cell electrodes or as a polymer electrolyte in a battery cell.

  17. Infrared thermochromic behaviour of a composite Sm0.65Ca0.35MnO3-poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammar, M. R.; Napierala, C.; Laffez, P.

    2009-05-01

    Samarium calcium perovskite manganite Sm0.65Ca0.35MnO3 was dispersed homogeneously in a solution of poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile). A thin film was deposited on (100) oriented silicon substrate by spin-coating and the optical thermochromic behaviour in the infrared range was studied. In the wavelength range 8-14 µm, the optical transmittance of the thermochromic composite coating exhibited a large variation between 173 and 343 K due to a semiconductor-metal first-order transition at Tc = 250 K. The thermochromic behaviour of the composite coatings was optimized. The contrast in the transmittance first increased with pigment content, then reached a maximum value.

  18. The influence of nano silica particles on gamma-irradiation ageing of elastomers based on chlorosulphonated polyethylene and acrylonitrile butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, G.; Marinović-Cincović, M.; Tanasić, Lj.; Jovanović, V.; Samaržija-Jovanović, S.; Vukić, N.; Budinski-Simendić, J.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this work was to study gamma irradiation ageing of rubber blends based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) and chlorosulphonated polyethylene rubber (CSM) reinforced by silica nano particles. The NBR/CSM compounds (50: 50, w/w) filled with different content of filler (0-100 phr) were crosslinked by sulfur. The vulcanization characteristics were assessed using the rheometer with an oscillating disk. The vulcanizates were prepared in a hydraulic press. The obtained materials were exposed to the different irradiation doses (100, 200, 300 and 400 kGy). The mechanical properties (hardness, modulus at 100% elongation, tensile strength and elongation at break) and swelling numbers were assessed before and after gamma irradiation ageing.

  19. Modification on liquid retention property of cassava starch by radiation grafting with acrylonitrile. I. Effect of γ-irradiation on grafting parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiatkamjornwong, S.; Chvajarernpun, J.; Nakason, C.

    1993-07-01

    Radiation modification on liquid retention properties of native cassava starch, gelatinized at 85°C, by graft copolymerization with acrylonitrile was carried out by mutual irradiation to gamma-rays. A thin aluminum foil was used to cover the inner wall of the reaction vessel, so that the homopolymer concentration was reduced to be less than 1.0% with a distilled water retention value of 665 g/g of the dry weight of the saponified grafted product. Confirmation of graft copolymerization and saponification reactions was made by the infrared spectrophotometric technique. The combined effect of radiation parameters in terms of an irradiation time and a dose rate to the total dose on the extent of the grafting reaction expressed in terms of grafting parameters which directly influenced liquid retention values was evaluated in conjunction with statistical analysis.

  20. Effect of Substrate Temperature on the Properties of Sprayed WO3 Thin Films Using Peroxotungstic Acid and Ammonium Tungstate: A Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbavle, V. V.; Kim, J. H.; Rajpure, K. Y.

    2015-03-01

    A comparative study on the physicochemical properties of tungsten oxide (WO3) thin films synthesized using peroxotungstic acid (PTA) and ammonium tungstate (AT) by simple spray pyrolysis technique is reported. X-ray diffraction patterns show that the films deposited using both the precursors are polycrystalline with monoclinic crystal structure. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies confirm that the films are sub-stoichiometric with O/W ratios of 2.93 and 2.87, respectively, for typical PTA and AT films. Tungsten (W) exists in two chemical states, 5+ and 6+. Scanning electron microscopy images show the uniform and dense network of wires in PTA films, while the films deposited using AT possess a porous structure with small grains. Electrical and dielectric studies show that films are highly resistive and possess high dielectric constant. The near ultra-violet, blue, green and weak red emissions due to defects were observed in the photoluminescence studies. Properties of the WO3 thin films reported here are suitable for gas sensor applications. Films deposited using PTA are more functional than those deposited using AT.

  1. Tunable quasi-cw two-micron lasing in diode-pumped crystals of mixed Tm{sup 3+}-doped sodium - lanthanum - gadolinium molybdates and tungstates

    SciTech Connect

    Bol'shchikov, F A; Ryabochkina, P A; Zharikov, Evgeny V; Lis, Denis A; Subbotin, Kirill A; Zakharov, N G; Antipov, Oleg L

    2010-12-09

    Two-micron lasing is obtained for the first time on the {sup 3}F{sub 4} {yields} {sup 3}H{sub 6} transition of Tm{sup 3+} ions in diode-pumped crystals of mixed sodium - lanthanum - gadolinium tungstate Tm:NaLa{sub 1/2}Gd{sub 1/2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} (C{sub Tm} = 3.6 at %) (3.6Tm : NLGW) and molybdate Tm:NaLa{sub 1/3}Gd{sub 2/3}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} (C{sub Tm} = 4.8 at %) (4.8Tm : NLGM). For the 3.6Tm : NLGW crystal, the quasi-cw laser output power exceeded 200 mW and the slope efficiency (with respect to absorbed pump power) for the {pi}- and {sigma}-polarisations at wavelengths of 1908 and 1918 nm was 34% and 30%, respectively. The laser wavelength of this crystal was continuously tuned within the spectral range of 1860 - 1935 nm. For the 4.8Tm : NLGM crystal, the slope efficiency for the {pi}- and {sigma}-polarisations at wavelengths of 1910 and 1918 nm was 27% and 23%, respectively, and the laser wavelength was tunable within the spectral range of 1870 - 1950 nm. (lasers)

  2. Molecular structures of n-type semiconducting material 2,5-difluoro-1,4-phenylene-3,3‧-bis{2-[(4-trifluoromethyl)phenyl]acrylonitrile} and its photo dimerization product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriguchi, Tetsuji; Kitou, Naoya; Jalli, Venkataprasad; Yoza, Kenji; Nagamatsu, Shuichi; Okauchi, Tatsuo; Tsuge, Akihiko; Takashima, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    The absolute molecular structure of air stable n-type semiconducting material 2,5-difluoro-1,4-phenylene-3,3‧-bis{2-[(4-trifluoromethyl)phenyl]acrylonitrile} was determined by using twin crystal treatment X-ray diffraction analysis. The compound was readily dimerized in solution via irradiating of UV or Sun light. The exact molecular structure of the dimer also determined by X-ray analysis.

  3. Inelastic neutron scattering studies of phonon spectra, and simulations of pressure-induced amorphization in tungstates A W O4 (A =Ba ,Sr ,Ca , and Pb )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Prabhatasree; Gupta, M. K.; Mittal, R.; Rols, S.; Achary, S. N.; Tyagi, A. K.; Chaplot, S. L.

    2015-03-01

    Lattice dynamics and high-pressure phase transitions in A W O4 (A =Ba ,Sr ,Ca , and Pb ) have been investigated using inelastic neutron scattering experiments, ab initio density functional theory calculations, and extensive molecular dynamics simulations. The vibrational modes that are internal to W O4 tetrahedra occur at the highest energies consistent with the relative stability of W O4 tetrahedra. The neutron data and the ab initio calculations are found to be in excellent agreement. The neutron and structural data are used to develop and validate an interatomic potential model. The model is used for classical molecular dynamics simulations to study their response to high pressure. We have calculated the enthalpies of the scheelite and fergusonite phases as a function of pressure, which confirms that the scheelite to fergusonite transition is second order in nature. With increase in pressure, there is a gradual change in the A O8 polyhedra, while there is no apparent change in the W O4 tetrahedra. We found that all the four tungstates amorphize at high pressure. This is in good agreement with available experimental observations which show amorphization at around 45 GPa in BaW O4 and 40 GPa in CaW O4 . Further molecular dynamics simulations at high pressure and high temperature indicate that application of pressure at higher temperature hastens the process of amorphization. On amorphization, there is an abrupt increase in the coordination of the W atom while the bisdisphenoids around the A atom are considerably distorted. The pair-correlation functions of the various atom pairs corroborate these observations. Our observations aid in predicting the pressure of amorphization in SrW O4 and PbW O4 .

  4. Successful startup of a full-scale acrylonitrile wastewater biological treatment plant (ACN-WWTP) by eliminating the inhibitory effects of toxic compounds on nitrification.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuanyuan; Jin, Xibiao; Wang, Feng; Liu, Yongdi; Chen, Xiurong

    2014-01-01

    During the startup of a full-scale anoxic/aerobic (A/O) biological treatment plant for acrylonitrile wastewater, the removal efficiencies of NH(3)-N and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) were 1.29 and 0.83% on day 30, respectively. The nitrification process was almost totally inhibited, which was mainly caused by the inhibitory effects of toxic compounds. To eliminate the inhibition, cultivating the bacteria that degrade toxic compounds with patience was applied into the second startup of the biological treatment plant. After 75 days of startup, the inhibitory effects of the toxic compounds on nitrification were eliminated. The treatment plant has been operated stably for more than 3 years. During the last 100 days, the influent concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (COD), NH(3)-N, TKN and total cyanide (TCN) were 831-2,164, 188-516, 306-542 and 1.17-9.57 mg L(-1) respectively, and the effluent concentrations were 257 ± 30.9, 3.30 ± 1.10, 31.6 ± 4.49 and 0.40 ± 0.10 mg L(-1) (n = 100), respectively. Four strains of cyanide-degrading bacteria which were able to grow with cyanide as the sole carbon and nitrogen source were isolated from the full-scale biological treatment plant. They were short and rod-shaped under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and were identified as Brevundimonas sp., Rhizobium sp., Dietzia natronolimnaea and Microbacterium sp., respectively. PMID:24552727

  5. Covalent immobilization of redox enzyme on electrospun nonwoven poly(acrylonitrile-co-acrylic acid) nanofiber mesh filled with carbon nanotubes: a comprehensive study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Gang; Ke, Bei-Bei; Xu, Zhi-Kang

    2007-07-01

    In this work, novel conductive composite nanofiber mesh possessing reactive groups was electrospun from solutions containing poly(acrylonitrile-co-acrylic acid) (PANCAA) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for redoxase immobilization, assuming that the incorporated MWCNTs could behave as electrons transferor during enzyme catalysis. The covalent immobilization of catalase from bovine liver on the neat PANCAA nanofiber mesh or the composite one was processed in the presence of EDC/NHS. Results indicated that both the amount and activity retention of bound catalase on the composite nanofiber mesh were higher than those on the neat PANCAA nanofiber mesh, and the activity increased up to 42%. Kinetic parameters, K(m) and V(max), for the catalases immobilized on the composite nanofiber mesh were lower and higher than those on the neat one, respectively. This enhanced activity might be ascribed to either promoted electron transfer through charge-transfer complexes and the pi system of carbon nanotubes or rendered biocompatibility by modified MWCNTs. Furthermore, the immobilized catalases revealed much more stability after MWCNTs were incorporated into the polymer nanofiber mesh. However, there was no significant difference in optimum pH value and temperature, thermal stability and operational stability between these two immobilized preparations, while the two ones appeared more advantageous than the free in these properties. The effect of MWCNTs incorporation on another redox enzyme, peroxidase, was also studied and it was found that the activity increased by 68% in comparison of composite one with neat preparation. PMID:17171660

  6. Study of poly(acrylonitrile-methyl methacrylate) as binder for graphite anode and LiMn 2O 4 cathode of Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. S.; Jow, T. R.

    We evaluated poly(acrylonitrile-methyl methacrylate) (AMMA, AN/MMA=94:6) as a binder for the graphite anode and the LiMn 2O 4 cathode of Li-ion batteries by studying the cycling performance of lithium half-cells. The results showed that, using AMMA binder, both graphite and LiMn 2O 4 could be cycled well in 1 m LiPF 6 3:3:4 (weight) PC/EC/EMC electrolyte with less capacity fading. AMMA is chemically more stable than poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) against the lithiated graphite. More importantly, AMMA can help graphite to form a stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) film. An impedance study showed that the SEI film formed with AMMA is more stable than the one formed with PVDF. Therefore, self-delithiation of the lithiated graphite can be reduced by use of AMMA instead of PVDF, which improves the storage performance of Li-ion batteries.

  7. A poly(acrylonitrile)-functionalized porous aromatic framework synthesized by atom-transfer radical polymerization for the extraction of uranium from seawater

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Yanfeng; Zhang, Chenxi; Tang, Qing; Mayes, Richard T.; Liao, Wei -Po; Liao, Chen; Tsouris, Costas; Stankovich, Joseph J.; Chen, Jihua; Hensley, Dale K.; et al

    2015-10-30

    In order to ensure a sustainable reserve of fuel for nuclear power generation, tremendous research efforts have been devoted to developing advanced sorbent materials for extracting uranium from seawater. In this work, a porous aromatic framework (PAF) was surface-functionalized with poly(acrylonitrile) through atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Batches of this adsorbent were conditioned with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at room temperature or 80 °C prior to contact with a uranium-spiked seawater simulant, with minimal differences in uptake observed as a function of conditioning temperature. A maximum capacity of 4.81 g-U/kg-ads was obtained following 42 days contact with uranium-spiked filtered environmental seawater, whichmore » demonstrates a comparable adsorption rate. A kinetic investigation revealed extremely rapid uranyl uptake, with more than 80% saturation reached within 14 days. Furthermore, relying on the semiordered structure of the PAF adsorbent, density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal cooperative interactions between multiple adsorbent groups yield a strong driving force for uranium binding.« less

  8. A poly(acrylonitrile)-functionalized porous aromatic framework synthesized by atom-transfer radical polymerization for the extraction of uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Yanfeng; Zhang, Chenxi; Tang, Qing; Mayes, Richard T.; Liao, Wei -Po; Liao, Chen; Tsouris, Costas; Stankovich, Joseph J.; Chen, Jihua; Hensley, Dale K.; Abney, Carter W.; Jiang, De-en; Brown, Suree; Dai, Sheng

    2015-10-30

    In order to ensure a sustainable reserve of fuel for nuclear power generation, tremendous research efforts have been devoted to developing advanced sorbent materials for extracting uranium from seawater. In this work, a porous aromatic framework (PAF) was surface-functionalized with poly(acrylonitrile) through atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Batches of this adsorbent were conditioned with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at room temperature or 80 °C prior to contact with a uranium-spiked seawater simulant, with minimal differences in uptake observed as a function of conditioning temperature. A maximum capacity of 4.81 g-U/kg-ads was obtained following 42 days contact with uranium-spiked filtered environmental seawater, which demonstrates a comparable adsorption rate. A kinetic investigation revealed extremely rapid uranyl uptake, with more than 80% saturation reached within 14 days. Furthermore, relying on the semiordered structure of the PAF adsorbent, density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal cooperative interactions between multiple adsorbent groups yield a strong driving force for uranium binding.

  9. Study on ion conductivity and crystallinity of composite polymer electrolytes based on poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(acrylonitrile) containing nano-sized Al2O3 fillers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mingyeong; Lee, Lyungyu; Jung, Yongju; Kim, Seok

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, composite polymer electrolytes were prepared by a blend of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) as a polymer matrix, ethylene carbonate as a plasticizer, LiClO4 as a salt, and by containing a different content of nano-sized Al2O3. The composite films were prepared by using the solution casting method. The crystallinity and ionic conductivity of the polymer electrolytes was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and AC impedance method, respectively. The morphology of composite polymer electrolyte film was analyzed by SEM method. From the experimental results, by increasing the Al2O3 content, the crystallinity of PEO was reduced, and the ionic conductivity was increased. In particular, by a doping of 15 wt.% Al2O3 in PEO/PAN polymer blend, the CPEs showed the superior ionic conductivity. However, when Al2O3 content exceeds 15 wt.%, the ionic conductivity was decreased. From the surface morphology, it was concluded that the ionic conductivity was decreased because the CPEs showed a heterogenous morphology due to immiscibility or aggregation of the ceramic filler within the polymer matrix. PMID:24266154

  10. Effect of thermally reduced graphene sheets on the phase behavior, morphology, and electrical conductivity in poly[(α-methyl styrene)-co-(acrylonitrile)/poly(methyl-methacrylate) blends.

    PubMed

    Vleminckx, Giovanni; Bose, Suryasarathi; Leys, Jan; Vermant, Jan; Wübbenhorst, Michael; Abdala, Ahmed A; Macosko, Chris; Moldenaers, Paula

    2011-08-01

    The effects of thermally reduced graphene sheets (TRG) on the phase separation in poly[(α-methyl styrene)-co-(acrylonitrile)]/poly(methyl-methacrylate) blends were monitored using melt rheology, conductivity spectroscopy, and electron microscopic techniques. The TRG were incorporated in the single-phase material by solution mixing. The composite samples were then allowed to phase separate in situ. The thermodynamics of phase separation have been investigated by monitoring the evolution of the storage modulus (G') as a function of temperature as the system passes through the binodal and the spinodal lines of the phase diagram. The phase separation kinetics were probed by monitoring the evolution of G' as a function of time at a quench depth well in the spinodal region. It was observed that TRG significantly influenced the phase separation temperature, the shape of the phase diagram and the rate of phase separation. The state of dispersion of TRG in the blends was assessed using electron microscopy and conductivity spectroscopy measurements. Interestingly, the composite samples (monophasic) were virtually insulators at room temperature, whereas highly conducting materials were obtained as a result of phase separation in the biphasic materials. PMID:21749102

  11. Effects of aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APS) on tensile properties and morphology of polypropylene (PP), recycle acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBRr) and sugarcane bagasse (SCB) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiagoo, Ragunathan; Omar, Latifah; Zainal, Mustaffa; Ting, Sam Sung; Ismail, Hanafi

    2015-07-01

    The performance of sugarcane baggase (SCB) treated with γ-APS filled polypropylene (PP)/recycled acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBRr) biocomposites were investigated. The composites with different filler loading ranging from 5 to 30 wt % were prepared using heated two roll mill by melt mixing at temperature of 180 °C. Tensile properties of the PP/NBRr/SCB composites which is tensile strength, Young Modulus and elongation at break were investigated. Increasing of treated SCB filler loading in PP/NBRr/SCB composites have increased the Young modulus however decreased the tensile strength and elongation at break of the PP/NBRr/SCB composites. From the results, γ-APS treated SCB composites shown higher tensile strength and Young Modulus but lower elongation at break when compared to the untreated SCB composites. This is due to the stronger bonding between γ-APS treated SCB with PP/NBRr matrices. These findings was supported by micrograph pictures from morphological study. SCB filler treated with γ-APS has improved the adhesion as well as gave strong interfacial bonding between SCB filler and PP/NBRr matrices which results in good tensile strength of PP/NBRr/SCB composites.

  12. Microwave absorption properties of lightweight absorber based on Fe50Ni50-coated poly(acrylonitrile) microspheres and reduced graphene oxide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Junpeng; Huo, Siqi; Zhang, Bin; Tang, Yushan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we proposed a facile method to obtain the lightweight composites consisting of surface modified Fe50Ni50-coated poly(acrylonitrile) microspheres (PANS@SMF), reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and epoxy resin. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and vector network analyzer (VNA). Impedance matching condition and electromagnetic wave attenuation characteristic were used for the reflection loss (RL) performance of the composites. Compared with pure PANS@SMF and RGO composites, the -10 dB absorption bandwidth and the minimum RL of the hybrid composites were enhanced. The bandwidth less than -10 dB was almost 4.5 GHz in the range of 10 GHz to 14.5 GHz, with a matching thickness of 2.5 mm. The density of the hybrid composites was in the range of 0.25-0.34 g/cm3. Therefore, the hybrid composite can be considered as a potential lightweight microwave absorber.

  13. Three-dimensional Printed Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene Framework Coated with Cu-BTC Metal-organic Frameworks for the Removal of Methylene Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zongyuan; Wang, Jiajun; Li, Minyue; Sun, Kaihang; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing was applied for the fabrication of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) framework. Functionalization of the ABS framework was then performed by coating of porous Cu-BTC (BTC = benzene tricarboxylic acid) metal-organic frameworks on it using a step-by-step in-situ growth. The size of the Cu-BTC particles on ABS was ranged from 200 nm to 900 nm. The Cu-BTC/ABS framework can take up most of the space of the tubular reactor that makes the adsorption effective with no need of stirring. Methylene blue (MB) can be readily removed from aqueous solution by this Cu-BTC/ABS framework. The MB removal efficiency for solutions with concentrations of 10 and 5 mg/L was 93.3% and 98.3%, respectively, within 10 min. After MB adsorption, the Cu-BTC/ABS composite can easily be recovered without the need for centrifugation or filtration and the composite is reusable. In addition the ABS framework can be recovered for subsequent reuse. A significant advantage of 3D-printed frameworks is that different frameworks can be easily fabricated to meet the needs of different applications. This is a promising strategy to synthesize new frameworks using MOFs and polymers to develop materials for applications beyond adsorption.

  14. Heat shrinkable behavior, physico-mechanical and structure properties of electron beam cross-linked blends of high-density polyethylene with acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinholds, Ingars; Kalkis, Valdis; Merijs-Meri, Remo; Zicans, Janis; Grigalovica, Agnese

    2016-03-01

    In this study, heat-shrinkable composites of electron beam irradiated high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites with acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) were investigated. HDPE/NBR blends at a ratio of components 100/0, 90/10, 80/20, 50/50 and 20/80 wt% were prepared using a two-roll mill. The compression molded films were irradiated high-energy (5 MeV) accelerated electrons up to irradiation absorbed doses of 100-300 kGy. The effect of electron beam induced cross-linking was evaluated by the changes of mechanical properties, gel content and by the differences of thermal properties, detected by differential scanning calorimetry. The thermo-shrinkage forces were determined as the kinetics of thermorelaxation and the residual shrinkage stresses of previously oriented (stretched up to 100% at above melting temperature of HDPE and followed by cooling to room temperature) specimens of irradiated HDPE/NBR blends under isometric heating-cooling mode. The compatibility between the both components was enhanced due to the formation of cross-linked sites at amorphous interphase. The results showed increase of mechanical stiffness of composites with increase of irradiation dose. The values of gel fraction compared to thermorelaxation stresses increased with the growth of irradiation dose level, as a result of formation cross-linked sites in amorphous PP/NBR interphase.

  15. Co-recycling of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene waste plastic and nonmetal particles from waste printed circuit boards to manufacture reproduction composites.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhixing; Shen, Zhigang; Zhang, Xiaojing; Ma, Shulin

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) waste plastic and nonmetal particles from waste printed circuit boards (WPCB) to manufacture reproduction composites (RC), with the aim of co-recycling these two waste resources. The composites were prepared in a twin-crew extruder and investigated by means of mechanical testing, in situ flexural observation, thermogravimatric analysis, and dimensional stability evaluation. The results showed that the presence of nonmetal particles significantly improved the mechanical properties and the physical performance of the RC. A loading of 30 wt% nonmetal particles could achieve a flexural strength of 72.6 MPa, a flexural modulus of 3.57 GPa, and an impact strength of 15.5 kJ/m2. Moreover, it was found that the application of maleic anhydride-grafted ABS as compatilizer could effectively promote the interfacial adhesion between the ABS plastic and the nonmetal particles. This research provides a novel method to reuse waste ABS and WPCB nonmetals for manufacturing high value-added product, which represents a promising way for waste recycling and resolving the environmental problem. PMID:25413110

  16. Three-dimensional Printed Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene Framework Coated with Cu-BTC Metal-organic Frameworks for the Removal of Methylene Blue

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zongyuan; Wang, Jiajun; Li, Minyue; Sun, Kaihang; Liu, Chang-jun

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing was applied for the fabrication of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) framework. Functionalization of the ABS framework was then performed by coating of porous Cu-BTC (BTC = benzene tricarboxylic acid) metal-organic frameworks on it using a step-by-step in-situ growth. The size of the Cu-BTC particles on ABS was ranged from 200 nm to 900 nm. The Cu-BTC/ABS framework can take up most of the space of the tubular reactor that makes the adsorption effective with no need of stirring. Methylene blue (MB) can be readily removed from aqueous solution by this Cu-BTC/ABS framework. The MB removal efficiency for solutions with concentrations of 10 and 5 mg/L was 93.3% and 98.3%, respectively, within 10 min. After MB adsorption, the Cu-BTC/ABS composite can easily be recovered without the need for centrifugation or filtration and the composite is reusable. In addition the ABS framework can be recovered for subsequent reuse. A significant advantage of 3D-printed frameworks is that different frameworks can be easily fabricated to meet the needs of different applications. This is a promising strategy to synthesize new frameworks using MOFs and polymers to develop materials for applications beyond adsorption. PMID:25089616

  17. Synchrotron X-Ray Topography Study of Structural Defects and Strain in Epitaxial Structures of Yb- and Tm-Doped Potassium Rare-Earth Double Tungstates and Their Influence on Laser Performance.

    SciTech Connect

    Raghothamachar, B.; Carvajal, J; Pujol, M; Mateos, X; Sole, R; Aguilo, M; Diaz, F; Dudley, M

    2010-01-01

    Monoclinic potassium rare-earth double tungstates [KRE(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}, RE = Y, Lu, Yb; KREW] are well suited as hosts for active lanthanide ion (Ln{sup 3+}) dopants for diode-pumped solid-state lasers, with particular interest in thin-disk laser configurations when they are grown as thin films. Using synchrotron white-beam x-ray topography, we have imaged defects and strain in top-seeded solution-grown (TSSG) bulk substrates of different rare-earth tungstates as well as within Yb{sup 3+}- and Tm{sup 3+}-doped epitaxies for thin-disk laser applications grown on these substrates by liquid-phase epitaxy. Higher structural stress in Yb:KYW/KYW epitaxies compared with Yb:KLuW/KLuW epitaxies is found to lower efficiency in laser operation. The quality of Tm:KLuW/KLuW epitaxial films is sensitive to doping level, film thickness, and growth rate. Inhomogeneous stresses within the layers are dominated by lattice-mismatch effects rather than by crystallographic anisotropy.

  18. Kinetics of generation, relaxation, and accumulation of electronic excitations under two-photon interband picosecond absorption in tungstate and molibdate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lukanin, V. I.; Karasik, A. Ya.

    2013-08-15

    Under two-photon 523.5 nm interband picosecond laser excitation, we measured the kinetics of induced absorption in PbWO{sub 4}, ZnWO{sub 4}, and PbMoO{sub 4} crystals with 532 to 633 nm continuous probe radiation. We obtained real-time information about the dynamics of the generation, relaxation, and accumulations of electronic excitations over a wide time range (from picoseconds to hundreds of seconds) and the 77-300 K temperature range. For the studied crystals, exponential temperature-independent growth of the induced absorption (IA) with 60 ns rise time reflects the dynamics of the generation of electronic excitation. The kinetics of the IA exponential growth with temperature-dependent 3.5-11 {mu}s time constants reflect the dynamics of energy migration between neighboring tungstate (molibdate) ions to traps for the studied crystals. The multiexponential relaxation absorption kinetics strongly depend on temperature, and the relaxation decay time of induced absorption increased from tens to hundreds of milliseconds to seconds under crystal cooling from 300 to 77 K. We found that the increase in the laser pump repetition rate (0-10 Hz) leads to the accumulation of electronic excitations. Control of the repetition rate and the number of excitations allowed us to change the relaxation time of the induced absorption by more than two orders of magnitude. Due to accumulation of excitations at 77 K, the absorption relaxation time can exceed 100 s for PbWO{sub 4} and PbMoO{sub 4} crystals. In the initially transparent crystals, two-photon interband absorption (2PA) leads to crystals opacity at the 523 and 633 nm wavelengths. (An inverse optical transmission of the crystals exceeds 50-55 at a 50-100 GW/cm{sup 2} pump intensity.) Measured at {approx}1 mW probe radiation of 532 and 633 nm wavelengths, the induced absorption values are comparable with those obtained under two-photon absorption at {approx}5 kW pump power. An optical 2PA shutter for the visible spectral range

  19. Zinc oxide nanorod assisted rapid single-step process for the conversion of electrospun poly(acrylonitrile) nanofibers to carbon nanofibers with a high graphitic content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nain, Ratyakshi; Singh, Dhirendra; Jassal, Manjeet; Agrawal, Ashwini K.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of incorporation of rigid zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures on carbonization behavior of electrospun special acrylic fiber grade poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN-SAF) nanofibers was investigated. ZnO nanorods with high aspect ratios were incorporated into a PAN-N,N-dimethylformamide system and the composite nanofibers reinforced with aligned ZnO rods up to 50 wt% were successfully electrospun, and subsequently, carbonized. The morphology and the structural analysis of the resultant carbon nanofibers revealed that the rigid ZnO nanorods, present inside the nanofibers, possibly acted as scaffolds (temporary support structures) for immobilization of polymer chains and assisted in uniform heat distribution. This facilitated rapid and efficient conversion of the polymer structure to the ladder, and subsequently, the graphitized structure. At the end of the process, the ZnO nanorods were found to completely separate from the carbonized fibers yielding pure carbon nanofibers with a high graphitic content and surface area. The approach could be used to eliminate the slow, energy intensive stabilization step and achieve fast conversion of randomly laid carbon nanofiber webs in a single step to carbon nanofibers without the application of external tension or internal templates usually employed to achieve a high graphitic content in such systems.The effect of incorporation of rigid zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures on carbonization behavior of electrospun special acrylic fiber grade poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN-SAF) nanofibers was investigated. ZnO nanorods with high aspect ratios were incorporated into a PAN-N,N-dimethylformamide system and the composite nanofibers reinforced with aligned ZnO rods up to 50 wt% were successfully electrospun, and subsequently, carbonized. The morphology and the structural analysis of the resultant carbon nanofibers revealed that the rigid ZnO nanorods, present inside the nanofibers, possibly acted as scaffolds (temporary support structures) for

  20. Cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol)-poly(acrylonitrile-co-2-dimethylamino ethylmethacrylate) based anion-exchange membranes in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mahendra; Singh, Shalini; Shahi, Vinod K

    2010-01-14

    Hydroxide anion conducting polymer membranes also termed as anion exchange membranes (AEMs) are recently becoming important materials for electrochemical technology, alkaline fuel cells, and electrolyzers. In this work, the preparation procedure for AEMs based on poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and copolymer of poly(acrylonitrile (PAN)-dimethylamino ethylmethacrylate) (DMAEMA) with strongly basic quaternary ammonium in aqueous media has been reported. This simplified procedure avoids the use of chloromethyl methyl ether (CME), a carcinogen that is harmful to human health, generally used for chloromethylation during AEM preparation. Developed AEMs were extensively characterized by studying physicochemical and electrochemical properties, to assess their suitability for electrodialytic ion separation. These membranes were designed to possess all the required properties of a highly anion conductive membrane such as reasonable water uptake, good ion-exchange capacity (1.18 mequiv g(-1)), high permselectivity (0.90), along with reasonable conductivity (3.45 mS cm(-1)) due to quaternary ammonium group functionality. The membrane conductivity values in conjunction with solution conductivity have been used for the estimation of the isoconductivity point, considering the membrane as a combination of the gel phase and integral phase. Electroosmotic studies revealed quite low mass drag and equivalent pore radius (2.7-4.0 A) of the membrane, which are also desirable properties of an AEM. The excellent electrotransport property of AEM-70 for practical anion separation was concluded from i-v studies. Electrodialytic performance of the AEM-70 membrane revealed its suitability for applications in electromembrane processes. PMID:19938844

  1. Hemoglobin adducts from acrylonitrile and ethylene oxide in cigarette smokers: effects of glutathione S-transferase T1-null and M1-null genotypes.

    PubMed

    Fennell, T R; MacNeela, J P; Morris, R W; Watson, M; Thompson, C L; Bell, D A

    2000-07-01

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) is used to manufacture plastics and fibers. It is carcinogenic in rats and is found in cigarette smoke. Ethylene oxide (EO) is a metabolite of ethylene, also found in cigarette smoke, and is carcinogenic in rodents. Both ACN and EO undergo conjugation with glutathione. The objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between cigarette smoking and hemoglobin adducts derived from ACN and EO and to investigate whether null genotypes for glutathione transferase (GSTM1 and GSTT1) alter the internal dose of these agents. The hemoglobin adducts N-(2-cyanoethyl)valine (CEVal), which is formed from ACN, and N-(2-hydroxyethyl)valine (HEVal), which is formed from EO, and GST genotypes were determined in blood samples obtained from 16 nonsmokers and 32 smokers (one to two packs/day). Smoking information was obtained by questionnaire, and plasma cotinine levels were determined by immunoassay. Glutathione transferase null genotypes (GSTM1 and GSTT1) were determined by PCR. Both CEVal and HEVal levels increased with increased cigarette smoking dose (both self-reported and cotinine-based). CEVal and HEVal levels were also correlated. GSTM1 and GSTT1 genotypes had little effect on CEVal concentrations. GSTM1 null genotypes had no significant impact on HEVal. However, HEVal levels were significantly elevated in GSTT1-null individuals when normalized to smoking status or cotinine levels. The ratio of HEVal:CEVal was also elevated in GSTT1-null smokers (1.50 +/- 0.57 versus 0.88 +/- 0.24; P = 0.0002). The lack of a functional GSTT1 is estimated to increase the internal dose of EO derived from cigarette smoke by 50-70%. PMID:10919741

  2. Copper-catalyzed retro-aldol reaction of β-hydroxy ketones or nitriles with aldehydes: chemo- and stereoselective access to (E)-enones and (E)-acrylonitriles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song-Lin; Deng, Zhu-Qin

    2016-07-26

    A copper-catalyzed transfer aldol type reaction of β-hydroxy ketones or nitriles with aldehydes is reported, which enables chemo- and stereoselective access to (E)-α,β-unsaturated ketones and (E)-acrylonitriles. A key step of the in situ copper(i)-promoted retro-aldol reaction of β-hydroxy ketones or nitriles is proposed to generate a reactive Cu(i) enolate or cyanomethyl intermediate, which undergoes ensuing aldol condensation with aldehydes to deliver the products. This reaction uses 1.2 mol% Cu(IPr)Cl (IPr denotes 1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene) as the catalyst in the presence of 6.0 mol% NaOtBu cocatalyst at room temperature or 70 °C. A range of aryl and heteroaryl aldehydes as well as acrylaldehydes are compatible with many useful functional groups being tolerated. Under the mild and weakly basic conditions, competitive Cannizzaro-type reaction of benzaldehydes and side reactions of base-sensitive functional groups can be effectively suppressed, which show synthetic advantages of this reaction compared to classic aldol reactions. The synthetic potential of this reaction is further demonstrated by the one-step synthesis of biologically active quinolines and 1,8-naphthyridine in excellent yields (up to 91%). Finally, a full catalytic cycle for this reaction has been constructed using DFT computational studies in the context of a retro-aldol/aldol two-stage mechanism. A rather flat reaction energy profile is found indicating that both stages are kinetically facile, which is consistent with the mild reaction conditions. PMID:27397647

  3. Towards alpha- or beta-D-C-glycosyl compounds by tin-catalyzed addition of glycosyl radicals to acrylonitrile and vinylphosphonate, and flexible reduction of tetra-O-acetyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl bromide with cyanoborohydride.

    PubMed

    Praly, Jean-Pierre; Ardakani, Azin Salek; Bruyère, Isabelle; Marie-Luce, Chrystelle; Bing Qin, Bing

    2002-10-01

    Photo-induced radical addition of acetylated alpha-D-glucopyranosyl bromide (1). to acrylonitrile or diethyl vinylphosphonate, in the presence of catalytic amounts of tri-n-butyltin chloride and sodium (or tetra-n-butylammonium) cyanoborohydride in excess, allowed efficient preparations of alpha-configurated nonononitrile and 2-(alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-ethylphosphonate (79, 70% yields, respectively). These conditions led to 2-(alpha-D-manno-, and galactopyranosyl)-ethylphosphonates in 68 and 76% yields. Similarly, radical addition of acetylated 1-bromo-beta-D-glucopyranosyl chloride (2). to acrylonitrile or diethyl vinylphosphonate afforded mainly intermediate chlorides which, upon radical reduction with excess tri-n-butyltin hydride, afforded the corresponding beta anomers (40 and 38%, respectively) by sequential C-C and C-H bond formation. Stereocontrol relies on the alpha-stereoselective quenching of D-glycopyranos-1-yl radicals. We found also that UV light irradiation of 1 with excess NaBH(3)CN in tert-butanol afforded either 1,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-2-deoxy-alpha-D-arabino-hexopyranose (65% after crystallization) or, when 10% mol thiophenol was added, 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-1,5-anhydro-D-glucitol (79%). These are simple, tin-free, and easily controlled conditions, which compare well with known preparations of these reduced sugars. PMID:12423963

  4. Between Ni(mnt)2 and Ni(tfd)2 dithiolene complexes: the unsymmetrical 2-(trifluoromethyl)acrylonitrile-1,2-dithiolate and its nickel complexes.

    PubMed

    Jeannin, Olivier; Delaunay, Jacques; Barrière, Frédéric; Fourmigué, Marc

    2005-12-26

    A novel 1,2-dithiolate ligand, that is, the 2-(trifluoromethyl)acrylonitrile-1,2-dithiolate, abbreviated here as tfadt, is prepared from the corresponding cyclic dithiocarbonate. This ligand, substituted with both a CN and a CF(3) group, is compared with the well-known maleonitrile- and bis(trifluoromethyl)ethane-1,2-dithiolates. The preparation, electrochemical properties, and X-ray crystal structures of the square-planar nickel complexes, in both their dianionic diamagnetic [Ni(tfadt)(2)](2)(-) and their monoanionic paramagnetic [Ni(tfadt)(2)](*)(-) forms, are reported, as n-Bu(4)N(+), PPh(4)(+), and (18-crown-6)Na(+) salts, respectively. In the [(18-crown-6)Na](2)[Ni(tfadt)(2)] salt, each CN moiety of the [Ni(tfadt)(2)](2)(-) dianion is coordinated to a (18-crown-6)Na(+) cation through a CN...Na interaction [N...Na = 2.481(3) A], affording an "axle with wheels" model where two MeOH molecules act as axle caps. On the other hand, in [(18-crown-6)Na][Ni(tfadt)(2)], each (18-crown-6)Na(+) cation is coordinated on both sides by the CN groups of two monoanionic [Ni(tfadt)(2)](*)(-) complexes with N...Na(+) distances at 2.434(5) and 2.485(4) A, giving rise to heterobimetallic chains with alternating (18-crown-6)Na(+) and [Ni(tfadt)(2)](*)(-) ions. These two examples demonstrate the attractive ability of the CN moieties in the [Ni(tfadt)(2)](2)(-)(,)(*)(-) complexes to coordinate metallic cationic centers. The paramagnetic salts of the anionic [Ni(tfadt)(2)](*)(-) complex follow Curie-type law in the 2-300 K temperature range, indicating the absence of intermolecular magnetic interactions in the solid state. The complexes are found in their trans form in all crystal structures, while density functional theory calculations establish that both forms have essentially the same energy. A cis-trans interconversion process is observed by variable-temperature NMR on the dianionic [Ni(tfadt)(2)](2)(-) complex with a coalescence temperature T(c) of 260 K and a free energy of

  5. Laser transmission welding of Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene (ABS) using a tailored high power diode-laser optical fiber coupled system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Vidal, E.; Quintana, I.; Etxarri, J.; Otaduy, D.; González, F.; Moreno, F.

    2012-06-01

    Laser transmission welding (LTW) of polymers is a direct bonding technique which is already used in different industrial applications sectors such as automobile, microfluidic, electronic and biomedicine. This technique offers several advantages over conventional methods, especially when a local deposition of energy and minimum thermal distortions are required. In LTW one of the polymeric materials needs to be transparent to the laser wavelength and the second part needs to be designed to be absorbed in IR spectrum. This report presents a study of laser weldability of ABS (acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene) filled with two different concentrations of carbon nanotubes (0.01% and 0.05% CNTs). These additives are used as infrared absorbing components in the laser welding process, affecting the thermal and optical properties of the material and, hence, the final quality of the weld seam. A tailored laser system has been designed to obtain high quality weld seams with widths between 0.4 and 1.0mm. It consists of two diode laser bars (50W per bar) coupled into an optical fiber using a non-imaging solution: equalization of the beam quality factor (M2) in the slow and fast axes by a pair of micro step-mirrors. The beam quality factor has been analyzed at different laser powers with the aim to guarantee a coupling efficiency to the multimode optical fiber. The power scaling is carried out by means of multiplexing polarization technique. The analysis of energy balance and beam quality is performed in two linked steps: first by means ray tracing simulations (ZEMAX®) and second, by validation. Quality of the weld seams is analyzed in terms of the process parameters (welding speed, laser power and clamping pressure) by visual and optical microscope inspections. The optimum laser power range for three different welding speeds is determinate meanwhile the clamping pressure is held constant. Additionally, the corresponding mechanical shear tests were carried out to analyze the

  6. Comparative metabolism of methacrylonitrile and acrylonitrile to cyanide using cytochrome P4502E1 and microsomal epoxide hydrolase-null mice

    SciTech Connect

    El Hadri, L.; Chanas, B.; Ghanayem, B.I. . E-mail: ghanayem@niehs.nih.gov

    2005-06-01

    Methacrylonitrile (MAN) and acrylonitrile (AN) are metabolized via glutathione (GSH) conjugation or epoxide formation. We have recently shown that CYP2E1 is essential for AN epoxidation and subsequent cyanide liberation. Current studies were designed to compare the enzymatic basis of MAN vs. AN metabolism to cyanide using wild-type (WT), CYP2E1-, and mEH-null mice. Mice received a single gavage dose of 0.047, 0.095, 0.19, or 0.38 mmol/kg of MAN or AN, and blood cyanide was measured at 1 or 3 h later. Blood cyanide levels in WT mice treated with AN or MAN were dose and time dependent. At equimolar doses, significantly higher levels of cyanide were detected in the blood of MAN- vs. AN-treated mice. Further, while significant reduction in blood cyanide levels occurred in MAN-treated CYP2E1-null vs. WT mice, AN metabolism to cyanide was largely abolished in CYP2E1-null mice. Pretreatment of mice with 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT, CYP inhibitor) demonstrated that CYPs other than CYP2E1 also contribute to MAN metabolism to cyanide. Blood cyanide levels in mEH-null mice treated with aliphatic nitriles are generally lower than levels in similarly treated WT mice. Western blot analysis showed that expression of sEH was greater in male vs. female mice. The role of various epoxide hydrolases (EHs) in the production of cyanide from aliphatic nitriles is apparently structure and dose dependent. Regardless of genotype, significantly higher levels of cyanide were measured in the blood of male vs. female mice treated with MAN or AN. In conclusion, these data showed that (1) at equimolar doses, higher blood cyanide levels were detected in mice treated with MAN vs. AN; (2) while CYP2E1 is the only enzyme responsible for AN metabolism to cyanide, other CYPs also contribute to MAN metabolism; and (3) significantly higher levels of cyanide were measured in the blood of male vs. female treated with either nitrile. Higher blood cyanide levels in male vs. female mice and in MAN- vs. AN

  7. HEALTH EFFECTS ASSESSMENT FOR ACRYLONITRILE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes and evaluates information relevant to a preliminary interim assessment of adverse health effects associated with specific chemicals or compounds. The Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (Superfund) uses these documents in preparing cost-benefit analyse...

  8. Experimental (FT-IR, NMR and UV) and theoretical (M06-2X and DFT) investigation, and frequency estimation analyses on (E)-3-(4-bromo-5-methylthiophen-2-yl)acrylonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sert, Yusuf; Balakit, Asim A.; Öztürk, Nuri; Ucun, Fatih; El-Hiti, Gamal A.

    2014-10-01

    The spectroscopic properties of (E)-3-(4-bromo-5-methylthiophen-2-yl)acrylonitrile have been investigated by FT-IR, UV, 1H and 13C NMR techniques. The theoretical vibrational frequencies and optimized geometric parameters (bond lengths and angles) have been calculated using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP: Becke, 3-parameter, Lee-Yang-Parr) and DFT/M06-2X (the highly parameterized, empirical exchange correlation function) quantum chemical methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set by Gaussian 03 software, for the first time. The assignments of the vibrational frequencies have been carried out by potential energy distribution (PED) analysis by using VEDA 4 software. The theoretical optimized geometric parameters and vibrational frequencies were in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data, and with the results in the literature. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strength wavelengths were performed by B3LYP methods. In addition, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies and the other related molecular energy values have been calculated and depicted.

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Facilitated Transport Membranes Composed of Chitosan-Styrene and Chitosan-Acrylonitrile Copolymers Modified by Methylimidazolium Based Ionic Liquids for CO2 Separation from CH4 and N2

    PubMed Central

    Otvagina, Ksenia V.; Mochalova, Alla E.; Sazanova, Tatyana S.; Petukhov, Anton N.; Moskvichev, Alexandr A.; Vorotyntsev, Andrey V.; Afonso, Carlos A. M.; Vorotyntsev, Ilya V.

    2016-01-01

    CO2 separation was found to be facilitated by transport membranes based on novel chitosan (CS)–poly(styrene) (PS) and chitosan (CS)–poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) copolymer matrices doped with methylimidazolium based ionic liquids: [bmim][BF4], [bmim][PF6], and [bmim][Tf2N] (IL). CS plays the role of biodegradable film former and selectivity promoter. Copolymers were prepared implementing the latest achievements in radical copolymerization with chosen monomers, which enabled the achievement of outstanding mechanical strength values for the CS-based membranes (75–104 MPa for CS-PAN and 69–75 MPa for CS-PS). Ionic liquid (IL) doping affected the surface and mechanical properties of the membranes as well as the gas separation properties. The highest CO2 permeability 400 Barrers belongs to CS-b-PS/[bmim][BF4]. The highest selectivity α (CO2/N2) = 15.5 was achieved for CS-b-PAN/[bmim][BF4]. The operational temperature of the membranes is under 220 °C. PMID:27294964

  10. Morphology, mechanical, cross-linking, thermal, and tribological properties of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composites prepared by melt compounding: The effect of acrylonitrile content and hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likozar, Blaž; Major, Zoltan

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to prepare nanocomposites by mixing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile elastomers (NBR and HNBR). Utilization of transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques (SAXS and WAXS) for advanced morphology observation of conducting filler-reinforced nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber composites is reported. Principal results were increases in hardness (maximally 97 Shore, type A), elastic modulus (maximally 981 MPa), tensile strength (maximally 27.7 MPa), elongation at break (maximally 216%), cross-link density (maximally 7.94 × 1028 m-3), density (maximally 1.16 g cm-3), and tear strength (11.2 kN m-1), which were clearly visible at particular acrylonitrile contents both for unhydrogenated and hydrogenated polymers due to enhanced distribution of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and their aggregated particles in the applied rubber matrix. Conclusion was that multi-walled carbon nanotubes improved the performance of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber nanocomposites prepared by melt compounding.

  11. Evaluation of the detoxication efficiencies for acrylonitrile wastewater treated by a combined anaerobic oxic-aerobic biological fluidized tank (A/O-ABFT) process: Acute toxicity and zebrafish embryo toxicity.

    PubMed

    Na, Chunhong; Zhang, Ying; Deng, Minjie; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo; Zhang, Yaobin

    2016-07-01

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) wastewater generated during ACN production has been reported to be toxic to many aquatic organisms. However, few studies have evaluated toxicity removal of ACN wastewater during and after the treatment process. In this study, the detoxication ability of an ACN wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was evaluated using Daphnia magna, Danio rerio and zebrafish embryo. This ACN WWTP has a combined anaerobic oxic-aerobic biological fluidized tank (A/O-ABFT) process upgraded from the traditional anaerobic oxic (A/O) process. Moreover, the potential toxicants of the ACN wastewaters were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The raw ACN wastewater showed high acute and embryo toxicity. 3-Cyanopyridine, succinonitrile and a series of nitriles were detected as the toxic contributors of ACN wastewater. The A/O process was effective for the acute and embryo toxicity removal, as well as the organic toxicants. However, the A/O effluent still showed acute and embryo toxicity which was attributed by the undegraded and the newly generated toxicants during the A/O process. The residual acute and embryo toxicity as well as the organic toxicants in the A/O effluent were further reduced after going through the downstream ABFT process system. The final effluent displayed no significant acute and embryo toxicity, and less organic toxicants were detected in the final effluent. The upgrade of this ACN WWTP results in the improved removal efficiencies for acute and embryo toxicity, as well as the organic toxicants. PMID:27037768

  12. Preparation and Characterization of Facilitated Transport Membranes Composed of Chitosan-Styrene and Chitosan-Acrylonitrile Copolymers Modified by Methylimidazolium Based Ionic Liquids for CO₂ Separation from CH₄ and N₂.

    PubMed

    Otvagina, Ksenia V; Mochalova, Alla E; Sazanova, Tatyana S; Petukhov, Anton N; Moskvichev, Alexandr A; Vorotyntsev, Andrey V; Afonso, Carlos A M; Vorotyntsev, Ilya V

    2016-01-01

    CO₂ separation was found to be facilitated by transport membranes based on novel chitosan (CS)-poly(styrene) (PS) and chitosan (CS)-poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) copolymer matrices doped with methylimidazolium based ionic liquids: [bmim][BF₄], [bmim][PF₆], and [bmim][Tf₂N] (IL). CS plays the role of biodegradable film former and selectivity promoter. Copolymers were prepared implementing the latest achievements in radical copolymerization with chosen monomers, which enabled the achievement of outstanding mechanical strength values for the CS-based membranes (75-104 MPa for CS-PAN and 69-75 MPa for CS-PS). Ionic liquid (IL) doping affected the surface and mechanical properties of the membranes as well as the gas separation properties. The highest CO₂ permeability 400 Barrers belongs to CS-b-PS/[bmim][BF₄]. The highest selectivity α (CO₂/N₂) = 15.5 was achieved for CS-b-PAN/[bmim][BF₄]. The operational temperature of the membranes is under 220 °C. PMID:27294964

  13. Comparison of sodium naphthenate and air-ionization corona discharge as surface treatments for the ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene polymer (ETFE) to improve adhesion between ETFE and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene polymer (ABS) in the presence of a cyanoacrylate adhesive (CAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucía Johanning-Solís, Ana; Stradi-Granados, Benito A.

    2014-09-01

    This study compares two ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) surface activation treatments, namely chemical attack with a solution of sodium naphthenate and plasma erosion via air-ionization corona discharge in order to improve the adhesive properties of the ETFE. An experimental design was prepared for both treatments in order to assess the effect of the treatment characteristics on the tensile load needed to break the bond between the ETFE and the acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene polymer (ABS) formed with a cyanoacrylate adhesive (CAA) applied between them. The reason for the selection of this problem is that both polymers are frequently used in the biomedical industry for their properties, and they need to be joined firmly in biomedical devices, and the cyanoacrylate adhesive is the adhesive traditionally used for fluoropolymers, in this case the ETFE, and the same CAA has also shown good adhesion with ABS. However, the strength of the bond for the triplet ETFE-CAA-ABS has not been reported and the improvement of the strength of the bond with surface treatments is not found in scholarly journals for modern medical devices such as stents and snares. Both treatments were compared based on the aforementioned design of experiments. The case where ETFE receives no surface treatment serves as the reference. The results indicated that the three factors evaluated (initial drying of the material, temperature of the chemical bath, and immersion time), and their interactions have no significant effect over the tensile load at failure (tensile strength) of the adhesive bond being evaluated. For the air-ionization corona discharge treatment, two factors were evaluated: discharge exposition time and air pressure. The results obtained from this experimental design indicate that there is no significant difference between the levels of the factors evaluated. These results were unexpected as the ranges used were representative of the maximum ranges permissible in manufacturing

  14. Synthesis, molecular conformation, vibrational and electronic transition, isometric chemical shift, polarizability and hyperpolarizability analysis of 3-(4-Methoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-nitro-phenyl)-acrylonitrile: A combined experimental and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiri, Abdullah Mohamed; Karabacak, Mehmet; Kurt, Mustafa; Alamry, Khalid A.

    2011-11-01

    This work presents the synthesis and characterization of a novel compound, 3-(4-Methoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-nitro-phenyl)-acrylonitrile (abbreviated as 3-(4MP)-2-(4-NP)-AN, C 16H 12N 2O 3). The spectroscopic properties of the compound were examined by FT-IR, UV-vis and NMR ( 1H and 13C) techniques. FT-IR spectrum in solid state was observed in the region 4000-400 cm -1. The UV-vis absorption spectrum of the compound which dissolved in chloroform was recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded in CDCl 3 solution. To determine lowest-energy molecular conformation of the title molecule, the selected torsion angle is varied every 10° and molecular energy profile is calculated from 0° to 360°. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) basis set. The dipole moment, linear polarizability and first hyperpolarizability values were also computed using the same basis set. A study on the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The HOMO and LUMO analysis were used to elucidate information regarding charge transfer within the molecule. The vibrational wavenumbers were calculated and scaled values were compared with experimental FT-IR spectrum. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the experimental results and total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. Isotropic chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Comparison of the calculated frequencies, NMR chemical shifts, absorption wavelengths with the experimental values revealed that DFT and TD-DFT method produce good results. The linear polarizabilities and first hyperpolarizabilities of the studied molecule indicate that the title compound can be used as a good nonlinear optical material

  15. Synthesis, molecular conformation, vibrational and electronic transition, isometric chemical shift, polarizability and hyperpolarizability analysis of 3-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-nitro-phenyl)-acrylonitrile: a combined experimental and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Asiri, Abdullah Mohamed; Karabacak, Mehmet; Kurt, Mustafa; Alamry, Khalid A

    2011-11-01

    This work presents the synthesis and characterization of a novel compound, 3-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-nitro-phenyl)-acrylonitrile (abbreviated as 3-(4MP)-2-(4-NP)-AN, C(16)H(12)N(2)O(3)). The spectroscopic properties of the compound were examined by FT-IR, UV-vis and NMR ((1)H and (13)C) techniques. FT-IR spectrum in solid state was observed in the region 4000-400 cm(-1). The UV-vis absorption spectrum of the compound which dissolved in chloroform was recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were recorded in CDCl(3) solution. To determine lowest-energy molecular conformation of the title molecule, the selected torsion angle is varied every 10° and molecular energy profile is calculated from 0° to 360°. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) basis set. The dipole moment, linear polarizability and first hyperpolarizability values were also computed using the same basis set. A study on the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The HOMO and LUMO analysis were used to elucidate information regarding charge transfer within the molecule. The vibrational wavenumbers were calculated and scaled values were compared with experimental FT-IR spectrum. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the experimental results and total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. Isotropic chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Comparison of the calculated frequencies, NMR chemical shifts, absorption wavelengths with the experimental values revealed that DFT and TD-DFT method produce good results. The linear polarizabilities and first hyperpolarizabilities of the studied molecule indicate that the title compound can be used as a good nonlinear

  16. 29 CFR 1910.1045 - Acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... provide to employees, the appropriate respirators specified in paragraph (d)(3)(i)(A) of 29 CFR 1910.134...) of this section, the facilities required by 29 CFR 1910.141, including clean change rooms and shower... Secretary in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020 (a) through (e) and (q) through (i). Records required...

  17. 29 CFR 1910.1045 - Acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... provide to employees, the appropriate respirators specified in paragraph (d)(3)(i)(A) of 29 CFR 1910.134...) of this section, the facilities required by 29 CFR 1910.141, including clean change rooms and shower... Secretary in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020 (a) through (e) and (q) through (i). Records required...

  18. 29 CFR 1910.1045 - Acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provide to employees, the appropriate respirators specified in paragraph (d)(3)(i)(A) of 29 CFR 1910.134...) of this section, the facilities required by 29 CFR 1910.141, including clean change rooms and shower... Secretary in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020 (a) through (e) and (q) through (i). Records required...

  19. 29 CFR 1910.1045 - Acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... provide to employees, the appropriate respirators specified in paragraph (d)(3)(i)(A) of 29 CFR 1910.134...) of this section, the facilities required by 29 CFR 1910.141, including clean change rooms and shower... Secretary in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020 (a) through (e) and (q) through (i). Records required...

  20. 29 CFR 1910.1045 - Acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... provide to employees, the appropriate respirators specified in paragraph (d)(3)(i)(A) of 29 CFR 1910.134...) of this section, the facilities required by 29 CFR 1910.141, including clean change rooms and shower... Secretary in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020 (a) through (e) and (q) through (i). Records required...

  1. 21 CFR 180.22 - Acrylonitrile copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD OR IN CONTACT WITH FOOD ON AN INTERIM BASIS PENDING ADDITIONAL STUDY Specific Requirements for Certain Food Additives § 180.22... accordance with this paragraph. Those uses are thereafter unapproved food additives and consequently...

  2. 21 CFR 180.22 - Acrylonitrile copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD OR IN CONTACT WITH FOOD ON AN INTERIM BASIS PENDING ADDITIONAL STUDY Specific Requirements for Certain Food Additives § 180.22... accordance with this paragraph. Those uses are thereafter unapproved food additives and consequently...

  3. 21 CFR 180.22 - Acrylonitrile copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD OR IN CONTACT WITH FOOD ON AN INTERIM BASIS PENDING ADDITIONAL STUDY Specific Requirements for Certain Food Additives § 180.22... accordance with this paragraph. Those uses are thereafter unapproved food additives and consequently...

  4. 21 CFR 180.22 - Acrylonitrile copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD OR IN CONTACT WITH FOOD ON AN INTERIM BASIS PENDING ADDITIONAL STUDY Specific Requirements for Certain Food Additives § 180.22... accordance with this paragraph. Those uses are thereafter unapproved food additives and consequently...

  5. Enzymatic surface modification of acrylonitrile fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battistel, Ezio; Morra, Marco; Marinetti, Massimo

    2001-06-01

    The surface of polyacrylonitrile polymer (containing 10% acetate groups) as fibers and finely ground powder have been modified by enzymatic treatment. The enzyme used was a nitrile hydratase, member of the class of nitrile converting enzymes, present in the microorganisms Brevibacterium imperiale and Corynebacterium nitrilophilus. The pendant nitrile groups were selectively converted into the corresponding amides as assessed by XPS analysis. As indicated by the increase of the O/C atomic ratio, the fiber surface showed a significant increase in hydrophilicity. The newly formed amide groups were then able to react with the acid dyes typically used to stain natural fibers, conferring the coloring properties to the otherwise inert polymer surface.

  6. Buffing dust as a filler of carboxylated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber and butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber.

    PubMed

    Chronska, K; Przepiorkowska, A

    2008-03-01

    Buffing dust from chrome tanned leather is one of the difficult tannery wastes to manage. It is also hazardous to both human health and the environment. The scientific literature rarely reports studies on dust management, especially on its utilization as a filler for elastomers. In this connection we have made an attempt to use this leather waste as a filler for rubbers such as XNBR and NBR. The addition of the buffing dust to rubber mixes brought improvement in mechanical properties, and increase in resistance to thermal ageing as well as in electric conductivity and crosslink density of vulcalizates. PMID:17629616

  7. Synthesis of Compositionally Defined Single-Crystalline Eu 3+ -Activated Molybdate–Tungstate Solid-Solution Composite Nanowires and Observation of Charge Transfer in a Novel Class of 1D CaMoO 4 –CaWO 4 :Eu 3+ –0D CdS/CdSe QD Nanoscale Heterostructures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Han, Jinkyu; McBean, Coray; Wang, Lei; Jaye, Cherno; Liu, Haiqing; Fischer, Daniel A.; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2015-02-10

    As a first step, we have synthesized and optically characterized a systematic series of one-dimensional (1D) single-crystalline Eu³⁺-activated alkaline-earth metal tungstate/molybdate solid solution composite CaW₁₋xMoxO₄ (0 ≤ ‘x’ ≤ 1) nanowires of controllable chemical composition using a modified template-directed methodology under ambient room-temperature conditions. Extensive characterization of the resulting nanowires has been performed using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and optical spectroscopy. The crystallite size and single crystallinity of as-prepared 1D CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ (0 ≤ ‘x’ ≤ 1) solid solution composite nanowires increase with increasing Mo component (‘x’). We note a clear dependence of luminescence output upon nanowire chemical composition withmore » our 1D CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ (0 ≤ ‘x’ ≤ 1) evincing the highest photoluminescence (PL) output at ‘x’ = 0.8, amongst samples tested. Subsequently, coupled with either zero-dimensional (0D) CdS or CdSe quantum dots (QDs), we successfully synthesized and observed charge transfer processes in 1D CaW1-xMoxO4: Eu3+ (‘x’ = 0.8) – 0D QD composite nanoscale heterostructures. Our results show that CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ (‘x’ = 0.8) nanowires give rise to PL quenching when CdSe QDs and CdS QDs are anchored onto the surfaces of 1D CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ nanowires. The observed PL quenching is especially pronounced in CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ (‘x’ = 0.8) – 0D CdSe QD heterostructures. Conversely, the PL output and lifetimes of CdSe and CdS QDs within these heterostructures are not noticeably altered as compared with unbound CdSe and CdS QDs. The difference in optical behavior between 1D Eu³⁺ activated tungstate and molybdate solid solution nanowires and the semiconducting 0D QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. We propose that

  8. Synthesis of Compositionally Defined Single-Crystalline Eu 3+ -Activated Molybdate–Tungstate Solid-Solution Composite Nanowires and Observation of Charge Transfer in a Novel Class of 1D CaMoO 4 –CaWO 4 :Eu 3+ –0D CdS/CdSe QD Nanoscale Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jinkyu; McBean, Coray; Wang, Lei; Jaye, Cherno; Liu, Haiqing; Fischer, Daniel A.; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2015-02-10

    As a first step, we have synthesized and optically characterized a systematic series of one-dimensional (1D) single-crystalline Eu³⁺-activated alkaline-earth metal tungstate/molybdate solid solution composite CaW₁₋xMoxO₄ (0 ≤ ‘x’ ≤ 1) nanowires of controllable chemical composition using a modified template-directed methodology under ambient room-temperature conditions. Extensive characterization of the resulting nanowires has been performed using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and optical spectroscopy. The crystallite size and single crystallinity of as-prepared 1D CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ (0 ≤ ‘x’ ≤ 1) solid solution composite nanowires increase with increasing Mo component (‘x’). We note a clear dependence of luminescence output upon nanowire chemical composition with our 1D CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ (0 ≤ ‘x’ ≤ 1) evincing the highest photoluminescence (PL) output at ‘x’ = 0.8, amongst samples tested. Subsequently, coupled with either zero-dimensional (0D) CdS or CdSe quantum dots (QDs), we successfully synthesized and observed charge transfer processes in 1D CaW1-xMoxO4: Eu3+ (‘x’ = 0.8) – 0D QD composite nanoscale heterostructures. Our results show that CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ (‘x’ = 0.8) nanowires give rise to PL quenching when CdSe QDs and CdS QDs are anchored onto the surfaces of 1D CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ nanowires. The observed PL quenching is especially pronounced in CaW₁₋xMoxO₄: Eu³⁺ (‘x’ = 0.8) – 0D CdSe QD heterostructures. Conversely, the PL output and lifetimes of CdSe and CdS QDs within these heterostructures are not noticeably altered as compared with unbound CdSe and CdS QDs. The difference in optical behavior between 1D Eu³⁺ activated tungstate and molybdate solid solution nanowires and the semiconducting 0D QDs within our

  9. Thermodynamic Properties of the Gaseous Gallium Molybdates and Tungstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopatin, S. I.; Shugurov, S. M.; Gunina, A. O.

    2009-10-01

    A number of gaseous oxyacid salts have been identified by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry by vaporizing Ga2O3 from molybdenum and tungsten cells. The stability of gaseous molecules Ga2MoO4, Ga2WO4, Ga2Mo2O7, and Ga2W2O7 was deduced from the measurements. The structures and molecular parameters of all salts investigated were obtained using quantum chemical calculations. On the basis of equilibrium constants measured for gas-phase reactions, the standard formation enthalpies were determined to be -827 ± 26, -843 ± 26, -1578 ± 32, and -1525 ± 34 kJ·mol-1 for Ga2MoO4, Ga2WO4, Ga2Mo2O7, and Ga2W2O7, respectively.

  10. The improved scintillation crystal lead tungstate scintillation for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Youbao; WU, Rurong; Xiao, Linrong; Zhang, Jianxin; Yang, Peizhi; Yan, Hui

    2009-07-01

    As a valuable material for the detecting of γ-ray, PbWO4 and BaF2:PbWO4 crystals were grown by a novel multi-crucible temperature gradient system developed by ourselves. Utilizing a topical partial heating method, this system can form a topical partial high temperature in its hearth. Thus this system could melt raw materials in step by step as requirement. The advantage of this method is that there would be solid obstruct left on the melt in the procedure of the crystal growing up. The left obstruct could prevent the volatilization of the component in the melt. Hence it is helpful for the composition homogenization in the crystal. The system also offers a sustaining device for multi-crucibles and thus it can grow many crystals simultaneity. The optical properties and scintillation properties of the crystals were studied. The results reveal that the ions doping improves the scintillation properties of the crystal. The transmittance spectra show that the transmittance of BaF2:PbWO4 crystals are better than that of PbWO4 crystals. For the PbWO4 crystals, their absorption edge is at 325nm, and their maximum transmittance is 68%. For the BaF2:PbWO4 crystals, their absorption edge is at 325nm and their maximum transmittance is upto76%. The X-ray excited luminescence spectra shows that the luminescence peak is at 420nm for the samples of PbWO4 crystal while the peak is at 430nm for the samples of BaF2:PbWO4 crystal respectively. The luminescence intensity of the samples of BaF2:PbWO4 crystal is about two times than that of PbWO4 crystal. And their peak shape is different for the two kind of crystal. The light yield of BaF2:PbWO4 crystals is about 2.9 times than that of PbWO4 crystal Analyzing these scintillation properties, we find that the VPb 3+ and VO- defects do harm for the optical properties of the crystal. Ions doping method could reduce the defect concentration and improving its illumination performance of the crystal. Specially, the doped F- ions in O2- site can induce the aberrance of the [WO4]2- tetrahedron and form [WO3F]- tetrahedron which has more active blue light yield, thus improve the light yield of the crystal. The improved light yield of BaF2:PbWO4 crystals is valuable for the medical diagnosing instrument PET and CT with high resolving power

  11. Tin Tungstate Nanoparticles: A Photosensitizer for Photodynamic Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Carmen; Ungelenk, Jan; Zittel, Eva; Bergfeldt, Thomas; Sleeman, Jonathan P; Schepers, Ute; Feldmann, Claus

    2016-03-22

    The nanoparticulate inorganic photosensitizer β-SnWO4 is suggested for photodynamic therapy (PDT) of near-surface tumors via reiterated 5 min blue-light LED illumination. β-SnWO4 nanoparticles are obtained via water-based synthesis and comprise excellent colloidal stability under physiological conditions and high biocompatibility at low material complexity. Antitumor and antimetastatic effects were investigated with a spontaneously metastasizing (4T1 cells) orthotopic breast cancer BALB/c mouse model. Besides protamine-functionalized β-SnWO4 (23 mg/kg of body weight, in PBS buffer), chemotherapeutic doxorubicin was used as positive control (2.5 mg/kg of body weight, in PBS buffer) and physiological saline (DPBS) as a negative control. After 21 days, treatment with β-SnWO4 resulted in a clearly inhibited growth of the primary tumor (all tumor volumes below 3 cm(3)) as compared to the doxorubicin and DPBS control groups (volumes up to 6 cm(3)). Histological evaluations of lymph nodes and lungs as well as the volume of ipsilateral lymph nodes show a remarkable antimetastatic effect being similar to chemotherapeutic doxorubicin but-according to blood counts-at significantly reduced side effects. On the basis of low material complexity, high cytotoxicity under blue-light LED illumination at low dark and long-term toxicity, β-SnWO4 can be an interesting addition to PDT and the treatment of near-surface tumors, including skin cancer, esophageal/gastric/colon tumors as well as certain types of breast cancer. PMID:26894966

  12. Photoluminescence and photocatalytic activity of zinc tungstate powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigorjeva, Larisa; Millers, Donats; Grabis, Jānis; Jankoviča, Dzidra

    2011-04-01

    ZnWO4 powders with grain size in range 20 nm-10 µm have been synthesized by a simple combustion method and subsequent calcinations. The photocatalytic activities of powders were tested by degradation of methylene blue solution under UV light. The luminescence spectra and luminescence decay kinetics were studied and luminescence decay time dependence on average powder-grain size was obtained. The correlation between self-trapped exciton luminescence decay time and photocatalytic activity of ZnWO4 powders was shown. A model explaining the excitonic luminescence decay time correlation with photocatalytic activity was proposed.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, and properties of reduced europium molybdates and tungstates

    SciTech Connect

    Abeysinghe, Dileka; Gerke, Birgit; Morrison, Gregory; Hsieh, Chun H.; Smith, Mark D.; Pöttgen, Rainer; Makris, Thomas M.; Loye, Hans-Conrad zur

    2015-09-15

    Single crystals of K{sub 0.094}Eu{sub 0.906}MoO{sub 4}, K{sub 0.097}Eu{sub 0.903}WO{sub 4}, EuWO{sub 4}, and EuMoO{sub 4} were grown from molten chloride fluxes contained in vacuum-sealed fused silica and structurally characterized via single crystal X-ray diffraction. The in situ reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} was carried out using Mo, W, and Zn as metal reducing agents. All four compounds crystallize in the tetragonal space group of I4{sub 1}/a and adopt the scheelite (CaWO{sub 4}) structure type. The magnetic susceptibility of the reported compounds shows paramagnetic behavior down to 2 K. {sup 151}Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to analyze the relative Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} content of the samples. All the compounds were further characterized by EPR, and UV-vis spectroscopy. - Graphical abstract: TOC Caption Two new reduced europium containing quaternary oxides, K{sub 0.094}Eu{sub 0.906}MoO{sub 4} and K{sub 0.097}Eu{sub 0.903}WO{sub 4}, and two previously reported ternary reduced oxides, EuWO{sub 4} and EuMoO{sub 4}, were synthesized via an in situ reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} under flux method using Mo, W, and Zn as metal reducing agents. {sup 151}Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to analyze the relative Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} content of the samples. - Highlights: • K{sub 0.094}Eu{sub 0.906}MoO{sub 4}, K{sub 0.097}Eu{sub 0.903}WO{sub 4}, EuWO{sub 4}, and EuMoO{sub 4} have been synthesized and characterized. • The in situ reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} was carried out using Mo, W, and Zn as metal reducing agents. • Magnetic susceptibility data were collected. • {sup 151}Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to analyze Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} content.

  14. Surface crystallography and electronic structure of potassium yttrium tungstate

    SciTech Connect

    Atuchin, V. V.; Pokrovsky, L. D.; Khyzhun, O. Yu.; Sinelnichenko, A. K.; Ramana, C. V.

    2008-08-01

    Structural and electronic characteristics of KY(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} (KYW) (010) crystal surfaces have been studied using reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that the crystal structure and chemical composition of the mechanically polished pristine surface is stoichiometrically well maintained as expected for KYW crystals. Combined measurements of RHEED and XPS as a function of 1.5 keV Ar{sup +} ion irradiation of the KYW (010) surfaces indicate amorphization, partial loss of potassium atoms, and partial transformation of chemical valence state of tungsten from W{sup 6+} to a lower valence state, W{sup 0} state predominantly, which induces electronic states at the top of valence band.

  15. Hydroflux synthesis and crystal structure of new lanthanide tungstate oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latshaw, Allison M.; Smith, Mark D.; Chance, W. Michael; zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2015-04-01

    Single crystals of Na5Ln(OH)6WO4 where Ln = Er, Tm, and Yb were grown out of a NaOH hydroflux. The crystals were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and were found to crystallize in the monoclinic space group I2/a. The lattice parameter ranges for the three structures are a = 11.2024(7) Å-11.2412(6) Å, b = 16.1850(10) Å-16.2220(10) Å, and c = 11.9913(7) Å-12.0323(7) Å while the β angle range is 101.999(2)°-102.025(2)°.

  16. 21 CFR 181.32 - Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... square inch of food-contact surface—0.003 milligram/square inch when extracted to equilibrium at 120 °F... to equilibrium at 120 °F with food-simulating solvents appropriate to the intended conditions of...

  17. Evaluation of lanthanum tungstates as electrolytes for proton conductors Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayas-Rey, M. J.; dos Santos-Gómez, L.; Porras-Vázquez, J. M.; Losilla, E. R.; Marrero-López, D.

    2015-10-01

    La27W4NbO55-δ (LWNO) has been tested as electrolyte for proton conductor Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (PC-SOFCs). For this purpose, different electrodes and composite electrodes are considered, including: La0.8Sr0.2MnO3-δ, La0.6Sr0.4Co1-xFexO3-δ, La0.75Sr0.25Cr0.5Mn0.5O3-δ, SrFe0.75Nb0.25O3-δ and NiO. Chemical compatibility between the cell components is investigated by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Furthermore, area specific resistance (ASR) for the different electrodes is determined in symmetrical cells by impedance spectroscopy. XRPD and EDS analysis does not reveal significant bulk reactivity between most of these electrodes and LWNO electrolyte in the typical operating temperature range of an SOFC (600-900 °C). However, minor interdiffusion of elements at the electrolyte/electrode interface has negative effects on both the ohmic losses and electrode polarization of the cells. ASR values are significantly improved by using a porous buffer layer of Ce0.8Gd0.2O1.9 (CGO), deposited between the electrolyte and electrode materials, to prevent reactivity. A single cell with a 350 μm-thick electrolyte, NiO-CGO and La0.6Sr0.4Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ-CGO composite as anode and cathode, respectively, generates maximum power densities of 140 and 18 mWcm-2 at 900 and 650 °C, respectively.

  18. Synthesis of zirconium tungstate-zirconia core-shell composite particles

    SciTech Connect

    Khazeni, Nasser; Mavis, Bora; Guenduez, Guengoer; Colak, Uner

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8}-ZrO{sub 2} core-shell particles to offer solutions for sintering problems. {yields} Core synthesis by a precursor based on tungstic acid and zirconium acetate. {yields} Shell phase by urea hydrolysis in the presence of zirconium ions. {yields} [Urea]/[ZrOCl{sub 2}] ratio controls the rate of shell precursor precipitation. -- Abstract: In this work, ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8}-ZrO{sub 2} core-shell composite particles were synthesized. ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} that was used in the core is a material with negative coefficient of thermal expansion, and it was synthesized from a high-pH precursor based on use of tungstic acid and zirconium acetate. Shell layer was composed of ZrO{sub 2} nanocrystallites and precipitated from an aqueous solution by urea hydrolysis. While volume of the shell was effectively controlled by the initial zirconium ion concentration in the solutions, the rate of precipitation was a function of the ratio of initial concentrations of urea to zirconium ions. It is hypothesized that isolation of the ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} within a layer of ZrO{sub 2}, will be a key element in solving problems associated with reactivity of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} towards other components in sintering of ceramic-ceramic composites with tuned or zero thermal expansion coefficient.

  19. Cation-cation interactions and cation exchange in a series of isostructural framework uranyl tungstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C.

    2014-05-01

    The isotypical compounds (UO2)3(WO6)(H2O)5 (1), Ag(UO2)3(WO6)(OH)(H2O)3 (2), K(UO2)3(WO6)OH(H2O)4 (3), Rb(UO2)3(WO6)(OH)(H2O)3.5 (4), and Cs(UO2)3(WO6)OH(H2O)3 (5) were synthesized, characterized, and their structures determined. Each crystallizes in space group Cc. (1): a=12.979 (3), b=10.238 (2), c=11.302 (2), β=102.044 (2); (2): a=13.148 (2), b=9.520 (1), c=11.083 (2), β=101.568 (2); (3): a=13.111 (8), b=9.930 (6), c=11.242 (7), β=101.024 (7); (4): a=12.940 (2), b=10.231 (2), c=11.259(2), β=102.205 (2); (5): a=12.983 (3), b=10.191 (3), c=11.263 (4), β=101.661 (4). Compounds 1-5 are a framework of uranyl and tungsten polyhedra containing cation-cation interactions. The framework has three symmetrically distinct U(VI) cations, one tungsten, sixteen to eighteen oxygen atoms, and in 2-5, one monovalent cation. Each atom occupies a general position. Each U(VI) cation is present as a typical (UO2)2+ uranyl ion in an overall pentagonal bipyramidal coordination environment. Each pentagonal bipyramid shares two equatorial edges with two other pentagonal bipyramids, forming a trimer. Trimers are connected into chains by edge-sharing with WO6 octahedra. Chains are linked through cation-cation interactions between two symmetrically independent uranyl ions. This yields a remarkably complex system of intersecting channels that extend along [0 0 1] and [-1 1 0]. The cation exchange properties of 2 and 3 were characterized at room temperature and at 140 °C.

  20. Polishing procedure and surface characterization lead tungstate crystal scintillator Road No. 723 and No. 754

    SciTech Connect

    Kellam, M

    1996-05-01

    Step by step procedures are given for polishing the scintillator rods. A Strasbaugh spindle polishing machine was used along with visual inspection and hand polishing. Extensive data is given on pre-polish surface characterization, profilometry, microphotography, and interferometry.

  1. Polypyrrole-encapsulated iron tungstate nanocomposites: a versatile platform for multimodal tumor imaging and photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhiyin; Peng, Chen; Jiang, Xiaohong; Peng, Yuxuan; Huang, Xiaojuan; Guan, Guoqiang; Zhang, Wenlong; Liu, Xiaoming; Qin, Zongyi; Hu, Junqing

    2016-06-01

    A versatile nanoplatform of FeWO4@Polypyrrole (PPy) core/shell nanocomposites, which was facilely fabricated by first hydrothermal synthesis of FeWO4 nanoparticles and subsequent surface-coating of polypyrrole shell, was developed as an effective nanotheranostic agent of cancer. The as-prepared nanocomposites demonstrated excellent dispersion in saline, long-term colloidal storage, outstanding photo-stability and high photothermal efficiency in solution. In particular, FeWO4@PPy exhibited efficient performance for hyperthermia-killing of cancer cells under the irradiation of an 808 nm laser, accompanied with multimodal contrast capabilities for magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray computed tomography and infrared thermal imaging in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the nanocomposites presented impactful tumor growth inhibition and good biocompability in animal experiments. Blood circulation and biodistribution of the nanocomposites were also investigated to understand their in vivo behaviours. Our results verified the platform of FeWO4@PPy nanocomposites as a promising photothermal agent for imaging-guided cancer theranostics.A versatile nanoplatform of FeWO4@Polypyrrole (PPy) core/shell nanocomposites, which was facilely fabricated by first hydrothermal synthesis of FeWO4 nanoparticles and subsequent surface-coating of polypyrrole shell, was developed as an effective nanotheranostic agent of cancer. The as-prepared nanocomposites demonstrated excellent dispersion in saline, long-term colloidal storage, outstanding photo-stability and high photothermal efficiency in solution. In particular, FeWO4@PPy exhibited efficient performance for hyperthermia-killing of cancer cells under the irradiation of an 808 nm laser, accompanied with multimodal contrast capabilities for magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray computed tomography and infrared thermal imaging in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the nanocomposites presented impactful tumor growth inhibition and good biocompability in animal experiments. Blood circulation and biodistribution of the nanocomposites were also investigated to understand their in vivo behaviours. Our results verified the platform of FeWO4@PPy nanocomposites as a promising photothermal agent for imaging-guided cancer theranostics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03336a

  2. Polypyrrole-encapsulated iron tungstate nanocomposites: a versatile platform for multimodal tumor imaging and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiyin; Peng, Chen; Jiang, Xiaohong; Peng, Yuxuan; Huang, Xiaojuan; Guan, Guoqiang; Zhang, Wenlong; Liu, Xiaoming; Qin, Zongyi; Hu, Junqing

    2016-07-14

    A versatile nanoplatform of FeWO4@Polypyrrole (PPy) core/shell nanocomposites, which was facilely fabricated by first hydrothermal synthesis of FeWO4 nanoparticles and subsequent surface-coating of polypyrrole shell, was developed as an effective nanotheranostic agent of cancer. The as-prepared nanocomposites demonstrated excellent dispersion in saline, long-term colloidal storage, outstanding photo-stability and high photothermal efficiency in solution. In particular, FeWO4@PPy exhibited efficient performance for hyperthermia-killing of cancer cells under the irradiation of an 808 nm laser, accompanied with multimodal contrast capabilities for magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray computed tomography and infrared thermal imaging in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the nanocomposites presented impactful tumor growth inhibition and good biocompability in animal experiments. Blood circulation and biodistribution of the nanocomposites were also investigated to understand their in vivo behaviours. Our results verified the platform of FeWO4@PPy nanocomposites as a promising photothermal agent for imaging-guided cancer theranostics. PMID:27303912

  3. Random lasing in Nd{sup 3+} doped potassium gadolinium tungstate crystal powder

    SciTech Connect

    Moura, André L.; Fewo, Serge I.; Carvalho, Mariana T.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Araújo, Cid B. de; Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2015-02-28

    Random laser (RL) emission in Nd{sup 3+} doped potassium gadolinium tungstate—KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Nd{sup 3+}—crystal powder is demonstrated. The powder was excited at 813 nm in resonance with the Nd{sup 3+} transition {sup 4}I{sub 9/2}→{sup 4}F{sub 5/2}. RL emission at 1067 nm due to the {sup 4}F{sub 3/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 11/2} transition was observed and characterized. An intensity threshold dependent on the laser spot area and bandwidth narrowing from ≈2.20 nm to ≈0.40 nm were observed and measured. For a beam spot area of 0.4 mm{sup 2}, a RL threshold of 6.5 mJ/mm{sup 2} (90 MW/cm{sup 2}) was determined. For excitation intensity smaller than the RL threshold, only spontaneous emission from level {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} with decay time in the tens microsecond range was observed, but for excitation above the RL threshold, significant shortening of excited level lifetime, characteristic of a stimulated process was found. The overall characteristics measured show that KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Nd{sup 3+} is an efficient material for operation of solid state RLs in the near-infrared.

  4. Characterization of Lead Tungstate for Neutral Particle Spectrometer at 12 GeV JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runyon, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Precision measurements of the deeply-virtual Compton scattering cross section at different beam energies to extract the real part of the Compton form factor, measurements to push the energy scale of real Compton scattering, and measurements of the basic semi-inclusive neutral-pion cross section in a kinematical region where the QCD factorization scheme is expected to hold all have something in common: the need for detecting neutral particles with high precision and high luminosity. The Neutral Particle Spectrometer (NPS) is a crystal electromagnetic calorimeter preceded by a sweeping magnet to sweep away charged particles. In this presentation I will show the results of PbWO4 crystal quality studies for the NPS. PbWO4 is optimal for the NPS due to its small Moliere radius and radiation hardness. The critical aspect for crystal quality, and thus resolution/precision, is the combination of high light output and radiation hardness, which depend strongly on the manufacturing process. We have tested the performance of PbWO4 crystals, and in particular, measured their light yield, optical transmission, and uniformity and radiation hardness. The homogeneity of the crystal was investigated based on the variation of the transverse optical transmission. Supported in part by NSF-PHY-1306227.

  5. Simulation study of negative thermal expansion in yttrium tungstate Y2W3O12.

    PubMed

    Rimmer, Leila H N; Dove, Martin T

    2015-05-13

    A simulation study of negative thermal expansion in Y2W3O12 was carried out using calculations of phonon dispersion curves through the application of density functional perturbation theory. The mode eigenvectors were mapped onto flexibility models and results compared with calculations of the mode Grüneisen parameters. It was found that many lower-frequency phonons contribute to negative thermal expansion in Y2W3O12, all of which can be described in terms of rotations of effectively rigid WO4 tetrahedra and Y-O rods. The results are strikingly different from previous phonon studies of higher-symmetry materials that show negative thermal expansion. PMID:25880236

  6. Random lasing in Nd3+ doped potassium gadolinium tungstate crystal powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, André L.; Fewo, Serge I.; Carvalho, Mariana T.; Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Prasad, Paras N.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; de Araújo, Cid B.

    2015-02-01

    Random laser (RL) emission in Nd3+ doped potassium gadolinium tungstate—KGd(WO4)2:Nd3+—crystal powder is demonstrated. The powder was excited at 813 nm in resonance with the Nd3+ transition 4I9/2→4F5/2. RL emission at 1067 nm due to the 4F3/2→4I11/2 transition was observed and characterized. An intensity threshold dependent on the laser spot area and bandwidth narrowing from ≈2.20 nm to ≈0.40 nm were observed and measured. For a beam spot area of 0.4 mm2, a RL threshold of 6.5 mJ/mm2 (90 MW/cm2) was determined. For excitation intensity smaller than the RL threshold, only spontaneous emission from level 4F3/2 with decay time in the tens microsecond range was observed, but for excitation above the RL threshold, significant shortening of excited level lifetime, characteristic of a stimulated process was found. The overall characteristics measured show that KGd(WO4)2:Nd3+ is an efficient material for operation of solid state RLs in the near-infrared.

  7. Lead Tungstate and Silicon Photomultipliers for Transmission Z-spectroscopy in Cargo Inspection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Janecek, Martin

    The bremsstrahlung X-ray spectrum in high-energy, high-intensity X-ray cargo inspection systems is attenuated and modified by cargo materials depending on the cargo atomic number (Z). Spectroscopy of transmitted x rays is thus useful to measure the approximate Z of the cargo. Due to the broad features of the energy spectrum, excellent energy resolution is not required. Such "Z-Spectroscopy" (Z-SPEC) is possible at low enough count rates. A statistical approach, Z-SCAN (Z-determination by Statistical Count-rate ANalysis), can also be used, complementing Z-SPEC at high count rates. Both approaches require fast X-ray detectors and fast digitizers. Z-SPEC, in particular, benefits from very fast scintillators, in order to avoid signal pile-up.Preferentially, Z-SPEC, Z-SCAN and cargo imaging are implemented in a single detector array to reduce system cost, weight, and complexity. To preserve good spatial resolution of the imaging subsystem, dense scintillators are required. Previously, we studied ZnO, BaF2 and PbWO4, as well as suitable photo-detectors, read-out electronics and digitizers. ZnO is not suitable because it self-absorbs its scintillation light. BaF2 emits in the UV, either requiring fast wavelength shifters or UV-sensitive solid state read-out devices, and it also has a long decay time component. PbWO4 is currently the most attractive choice because it does not have these problems, but it is significantly slower and has low light output. There is thus a need for alternative fast high-density scintillators that emit visible light. Alternatively, there is a need for a fast solid-state read-out device that is sensitive to UV light for use with BaF2, or other UV-emitting scintillators. Here, we present results of tests performed with PbWO4 crystals, reflector materials and silicon photomultipliers.

  8. Novel perovskite-related barium tungstate Ba 11W 4O 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seung-Tae

    2007-11-01

    Ba 11W 4O 23 was synthesized at 1300 °C, followed by quenching with liquid nitrogen. The crystal structure, which was known to be cryolite-related but has remained unclear, was initially determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction for the isostructural Ru-substituted compound Ba 11(W 3.1Ru 0.9)O 22.5, which was discovered during exploratory synthesis in the Ba-Ru-O system. The structure of Ba 11W 4O 23 was refined by a combined powder X-ray and neutron Rietveld method ( Fd-3 m, a=17.1823(1) Å, Z=8, Rp=3.09%, Rwp=4.25%, χ2=2.8, 23 °C). The structure is an example of A-site vacancy-ordered 4×4×4 superstructure of a simple perovskite ABO 3, and it may be written as (Ba 1.75□ 0.25)BaWO 5.75□ 0.25, emphasizing vacancies on both metal and anion sites. The local structure of one of two asymmetric tungsten ions is the WO 6 octahedron, typical of perovskite. The other tungsten, however, is surrounded by oxygen and anionic vacancies statistically distributed over three divided sites to form 18 partially occupied oxygen atoms (˜30% on average), represented as WO 18/3. The A-site cation-vacancies are ordered at the 8a ( {1}/{8}, {1}/{8}, {1}/{8}) site in between adjoining WO 18/3 polyhedra which form 1-D arrangements along [110] and equivalent directions. In situ high-temperature XRD data have shown that the quenched Ba 11W 4O 23 at room temperature is isostructural to the high-temperature phase at 1100 °C.

  9. Structural and optical studies of cerium doped lead tungstate nano phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawde, Dharmendra V.

    The rapidly expanding oil sands of western Canada, the third largest reserves in the world, are creating serious challenges, such as ecological harm, labour shortages, and extensive natural gas consumption. This thesis develops three practical real options models to evaluate the feasibility of oil sands projects and to estimate the optimal rate of oil sands expansion, while accounting for the stated concerns. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  10. 21 CFR 177.1040 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... exposed to distilled water and 3 pct acetic acid for 10 d at 66 °C (150 °F)The extracted copolymer shall not exceed 0.001 mg/in 2 surface area of the food contact article when exposed to distilled water and... 2 surface area of the food contact article when exposed to distilled water and 3 pct acetic acid...

  11. Quantitative analysis of (styrene/acrylonitrile/methyl methacrylate) co-polymer systems by infrared resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalbout, Abraham F.; Jiang, Tao; Fengqi, Liu; Ding, C.; Darwish, Abdalla M.

    2002-02-01

    A detailed careful analysis of the infrared resonance (IR) spectra of polystyrene (PSt), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and their co-mixtures were performed. Through this study the absorption peak area to weight ratios as well as working curves were obtained to test for their reliability as well as their suitability. Satisfactory results were achieved and these working curves were then used to measure the polymerized components of binary and ternary co-polymers. By investigating the acquired data we conclude that the monomer preferential polymeric sequence is St>MMA>AN. A quantitative method to measure P (St/AN/MMA) concentrations by IR spectroscopy is proposed in this work.

  12. 21 CFR 177.1030 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .../styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer consists of: (1) 73 to 79 parts by weight of a matrix polymer... weight of methyl methacrylate; and (2) 21 to 27 parts by weight of a grafted rubber consisting of (i) 16... 28 parts by weight of styrene and (ii) 5 to 10 parts by weight of a graft polymer having the...

  13. 21 CFR 177.1030 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .../styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer consists of: (1) 73 to 79 parts by weight of a matrix polymer... weight of methyl methacrylate; and (2) 21 to 27 parts by weight of a grafted rubber consisting of (i) 16... 28 parts by weight of styrene and (ii) 5 to 10 parts by weight of a graft polymer having the...

  14. 21 CFR 177.1030 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... consists of: (1) 73 to 79 parts by weight of a matrix polymer containing 64 to 69 parts by weight of... to 27 parts by weight of a grafted rubber consisting of (i) 16 to 20 parts of butadiene/styrene...) 5 to 10 parts by weight of a graft polymer having the same composition range as the matrix...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1030 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .../styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer consists of: (1) 73 to 79 parts by weight of a matrix polymer... weight of methyl methacrylate; and (2) 21 to 27 parts by weight of a grafted rubber consisting of (i) 16... 28 parts by weight of styrene and (ii) 5 to 10 parts by weight of a graft polymer having the...

  16. A comparison of the characteristics of excimer and femtosecond laser ablation of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Tian Long; Liu, Zhu; Li, Lin; Zhong, Xiang Li

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the ablation characteristics of excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 15 ns) and femtosecond laser (λ = 800 nm, τ = 100 fs) on ABS polymer sheets. The laser-material interaction parameters (ablation threshold, optical penetration depth and incubation factor) and the changes in material chemical properties were evaluated and compared between the two lasers. The work shows that the ablation threshold and effective optical penetration depth values are dependent on the wavelength of laser beam (photon energy) and the pulse width. The ablation threshold value is lower for the excimer laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 0.087 J/cm2) than that for the femtosecond laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 1.576 J/cm2), demonstrating a more dominating role of laser wavelength than the pulse width in influencing the ablation threshold. The ablation depth versus the logarithmic scale of laser fluence shows two linear regions for the fs laser ablation, not previously known for polymers. The effective optical penetration depth value is lower for excimer laser ablation (α-1 = 223 nm) than that for femtosecond laser ablation (α-1 = 2917 nm). The ablation threshold decreases with increasing number of pulses (NOP) due to the chain scission process that shortens the polymeric chains, resulting in a weaker polymeric configuration and the dependency is governed by the incubation factor. Excimer laser treatment of ABS eliminates the Cdbnd C bond completely through the chain scission process whereas Cdbnd C bond is partially eliminated through the femtosecond laser treatment due to the difference in photon energy of the two laser beams. A reduction in the Cdbnd C bond through the chain scission process creates free radical carbons which then form crosslinks with each other or react with oxygen, nitrogen and water in air producing oxygen-rich (Csbnd O and Cdbnd O bond) and nitrogen-rich (Csbnd N) functional groups.

  17. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Extractives limitations. The following extractive limitations are determined by an infrared spectrophotometric method titled, “Infrared Spectrophotometric Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210...

  18. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Extractives limitations. The following extractive limitations are determined by an infrared spectrophotometric method titled, “Infrared Spectrophotometric Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210...

  19. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Extractives limitations. The following extractive limitations are determined by an infrared spectrophotometric method titled, “Infrared Spectrophotometric Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210...

  20. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Extractives limitations. The following extractive limitations are determined by an infrared spectrophotometric method titled, “Infrared Spectrophotometric Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210...

  1. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... content is in the range 16.5-19 percent as determined by Kjeldahl analysis. (ii) Intrinsic viscosity in... Test Method for Dilute Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated...

  2. 76 FR 54228 - Draft Toxicological Review of Acrylonitrile: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... (76 FR 38387) for the external review draft human health assessment titled, ``Toxicological Review of...- dissemination peer review under applicable information quality guidelines. This draft assessment has not been... for independent external peer review of this draft assessment. The public comment period and...

  3. 2-[(4-Benzhydrylpipérazin-1-yl)méthyl]acrylonitrile

    PubMed Central

    Ben Amor, Fatma; Ould M’hamed, Mohamed; Mrabet, Hédi; Driss, Ahmed; Efrit, Mohamed Lotfi

    2008-01-01

    In the title compound, 2-[(4-benz­hydryl­piperazin-1-yl)­methyl]­acrylo­nitrile, C21H23N3, the substituted piperazine ring adopts a chair conformation and the dihedral angle between the mean planes of the aromatic rings is 71.61 (8)°. PMID:21201087

  4. Structure and activity of tellurium/molybdenum oxide acrylonitrile catalysts. [Ammoxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Bart, J.C.J.; Giordano, N.

    1980-08-01

    The tellurium/molybdenum mixed oxides ((TeMo)O) catalyst system was investigated as part of the development of an industrial cerium/tellurium/molybdenum mixed oxides catalyst for propylene ammoxidation Catalysts containing 25% active phase on silica were prepared, characterized by BET surface area measurement, mercury porosimetry, X-ray diffraction, and optical microscopy, and tested for the ammoxidation of propylene at 400/sup 0/-460/sup 0/C in a flow reactor. The results suggested that Te/sub 2/MoO/sub 7/ is the active phase. The mechanism probably involves activation of propylene on a tellurium site and oxygen insertion at isolated and highly distorted MoO/sub 6/ octahedral sites. The addition of cerium to the binary catalyst prevents the reductive degradation of (TeMo)O which occurs under reactor flow conditions by a phase-separation process.

  5. Coconut shell powder as cost effective filler in copolymer of acrylonitrile and butadiene rubber.

    PubMed

    Keerthika, B; Umayavalli, M; Jeyalalitha, T; Krishnaveni, N

    2016-08-01

    Filler is one of the major additives in rubber compounds to enhance the physical properties. Even though numerous benefits obtained from agricultural by products like coconut shell, rice husk etc., still they constitute a large source of environmental pollution. In this investigation, one of the agricultural bye product coconut shell powder (CSP) is used as filler in the compounding KNB rubber. It shows the positive and satisfied result was achieved only by the use of filler Fast Extrusion Furnace (FEF) and coconut shell powder (CSP) which was used 50% in each. The effect of these fillers on the mechanical properties of a rubber material at various loading raging from 0 to 60PHP was studied. Mercaptodibanzothiazole disulphide (MBTS) was used as an accelerator. The result shows that presence of 25% and 50% of the composites has better mechanical properties like Hardness, Tensile strength, Elongation at break and Specific gravity when compared with other two combinations. Even though both 25% and 50% of composites shows good mechanical properties, 50% of CSP have more efficient than 25% of CSP. PMID:27060197

  6. 76 FR 38387 - Draft Toxicological Review of Acrylonitrile: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... the meeting, attendees must have photo identification with them and must register at the guard's desk in the lobby. The guard will retain your photo identification and will provide you with a visitor's... the guard and you will receive your photo identification. A teleconference line will also be...

  7. 76 FR 77267 - Acrylonitrile Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3506 et seq.) and Secretary of Labor's Order No. 4-2010 (75 FR 55355). Signed... the Federal eRulemaking Portal. Follow the instructions online for submitting comments. Facsimile: If... , which is the Federal eRulemaking Portal; (2) by facsimile (fax); or (3) by hard copy. All...

  8. The photodissociation mechanisms of acrylonitrile: Ab initio calculations on reaction channels and surface intersections

    SciTech Connect

    Du Weina; Luo Cheng; Li Zesheng

    2008-11-07

    The dissociations of CH{sub 2}CHCN into CH{sub 2}CH+CN and CH{sub 2}C+HCN in the S{sub 0}, T{sub 1}, and {sup 1}{pi}{sub 2}{pi}{sub C{identical_to}}{sub N}* (definitions of {pi} orbitals can refer to computational details) states, have been explored at the complete active space self-consistent field level of theory employing the Dunning correlation consistent triple-zeta basis set. The lowest energy points of the surface crossing seams have been searched. Two conical intersections, from {sup 1}{pi}{sub C{identical_to}}{sub N}{pi}{sub 1}* to {sup 1}{pi}{sub 2}{pi}{sub 1}* (CI{sub 1}) and from {sup 1}{pi}{sub 2}{pi}{sub 1}* to S{sub 0} (CI{sub 2}), and one intersystem crossing point (T{sub 1}/S{sub 0}) have been located. The energies of all critical points have been recomputed with the multiconfigurational second-order perturbation method. At each conical intersection, derivative coupling and unscaled gradient difference vectors have been analyzed to determine the relaxation channels that the molecule may evolve in after nonradiative decay. Once the molecule is photoexcited to the {sup 1}{pi}{sub 2}{pi}{sub 1}* or {sup 1}{pi}{sub C{identical_to}}{sub N}{pi}{sub 1}* state, it would relax along the similar pathway: funneling through CI{sub 1} and then CI{sub 2}, and finally populate the ground state. Our results show that upon 193 nm photoexcitation, the most probable reaction channel is the ground-state HCN elimination following radiationless decays from excited states through surface crossings, which consists with experimental results J. Chem. Phys. 108, 5784 (1998). The investigated dissociation channels on the {sup 1}{pi}{sub 2}{pi}{sub C{identical_to}}{sub N}* surface, which are inaccessible upon 193 nm photoexcitation, may provide information for reactions induced by higher energy excitations.

  9. 21 CFR 177.1040 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... exposed to distilled water and 3 pct acetic acid for 10 d at 66 °C (150 °F)The extracted copolymer shall not exceed 0.001 mg/in 2 surface area of the food contact article when exposed to distilled water and... 2 surface area of the food contact article when exposed to distilled water and 3 pct acetic acid...

  10. High index contrast potassium double tungstate waveguides towards efficient rare-earth ion amplification on-chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefunc, Mustafa Akin; Segerink, Frans; Garcia-Blanco, Sonia

    2015-02-01

    Rare-earth ion doped KY(WO4)2 amplifiers are proposed to be a good candidate for many future applications by benefiting from the excellent gain characteristics of rare-earth ions, namely high bit rate amplification (

  11. In Situ Formation of Efficient Cobalt-Based Water Oxidation Catalysts from Co(2+)-Containing Tungstate and Molybdate Solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Biaobiao; Wu, Xiujuan; Li, Fei; Yu, Fengshou; Wang, Yong; Sun, Licheng

    2015-10-01

    Replacing rare and expensive noble-metal catalysts with inexpensive and earth-abundant ones is of great importance to split water either electrochemically or photoelectrochemically. In this study, two amorphous cobalt oxide catalysts (Co-W film and Co-Mo film) with high activity for electrocatalytic water oxidation were prepared by fast, simple electrodeposition from aqueous solutions of Na2WO4 and Na2MoO4 containing Co(2+). In solutions of Na2WO4 and Na2MoO4, sustained anodic current densities up to 1.45 and 0.95 mA cm(-2) were obtained for Co-W film at 1.87 V versus a reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) and Co-Mo film on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates at 1.85 V versus RHE. For the Co-W film, a much higher current density of 4.5 mA cm(-2) was acquired by using a stainless-steel mesh as the electrode substrate. Significantly, in long-term electrolysis for 13 h, the Co-W film exhibited improved stability in cobalt-free buffer solution in comparison with the previously reported Co-Pi film. PMID:25827641

  12. Structural, thermal, optical properties and simulation of white light of titanium-tungstate-tellurite glasses doped with dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Jyothi, L.; Upender, G.; Kuladeep, R.; Rao, D. Narayana

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: CIE coordinate diagram of different concentrations of the Dy{sup 3+}-doped TTWD glasses with coordinates in the white light region. - Highlights: • Radiative lifetime of {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} level of Dy{sup 3+} ions is longer in the tellurite glass. • Quantum efficiency is found to be high. • These glasses are suitable materials for generating white light. - Abstract: Structural, thermal, optical properties and simulation of white light of Dy{sup 3+}-doped tellurite glasses of composition TTWD: (75 − x)TeO{sub 2} − 10TiO{sub 2} − 15WO{sub 3} − xDy{sub 2}O{sub 3} (x = 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mol%) were investigated. Raman spectra revealed that the glass contains TeO{sub 4}, TeO{sub 3}, WO{sub 4} and WO{sub 6} units. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements were carried out to measure the glass transition temperature of all the glasses. From the optical absorption spectra, luminescence spectra and using the Judd–Ofelt (JO) analysis, we estimated the radiative transition probabilities, emission cross-sections, branching ratios and radiative lifetimes. The decay curves at lower concentrations are exponential while they show a non-exponential behavior at higher concentrations (≥0.5 mol%) due to energy transfer processes. The effective lifetime for the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} level decreases with increase in Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration for the glasses under investigation. The non-exponential decay curves could fit well to the Inokuti–Hirayama (IH) model with S = 6, indicating that the nature of interaction responsible for energy transfer is of dipole–dipole type. Simulation of white light is examined with varying concentration and the results indicate that these glasses are suitable for white light emitting diode applications.

  13. 21 CFR 177.1050 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... rubber consisting of (i) 8-12 parts of butadiene/styrene elastomer containing 77-82 parts by weight of... by the method titled, “Determination of β-Dodecyl-mercaptopropionitrile in NR-16 Polymer,” which is... infrared spectro-photo-metric method titled “Infrared Spectro-photo-metric Determination of...

  14. 21 CFR 177.1050 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... parts by weight of a grafted rubber consisting of (i) 8-12 parts of butadiene/styrene elastomer...-mercaptopropionitrile in NR-16 Polymer,” which is incorporated by reference. Copies are available from the Center for... Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210 Resin Pellets,” which is incorporated by reference....

  15. Recycling cycle of materials applied to acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene/policarbonate blends with styrene-butadiene-styrene copolymer addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cândido, L. H. A.; Ferreira, D. B.; Júnior, W. Kindlein; Demori, R.; Mauler, R. S.

    2014-05-01

    The scope of this research is the recycling of polymers from mobile phones hulls discarded and the performance evaluation when they are submitted to the Recycling Cycle of Materials (RCM). The studied material was the ABS/PC blend in a 70/30 proportion. Different compositions were evaluated adding virgin material, recycled material and using the copolymer SBS as impact modifier. In order to evaluate the properties of material's composition, the samples were characterized by TGA, FTIR, SEM, IZOD impact strength and tensile strength tests. At the first stage, the presented results suggest the composition containing 25% of recycled material and 5% of SBS combines good mechanical performance to the higher content of recycled material and lower content of impact modifier providing major benefits to recycling plans. Five cycles (RCM) were applied in the second stage; they evidenced a decrease trend considering the impact strength. At first and second cycle the impact strength was higher than reference material (ABS/PC blend) and from the fourth cycle it was lower. The superiority impact strength in the first and second cycles can be attributed to impact modifier effect. The thermal tests and the spectrometry didn't show the presence of degradation process in the material and the TGA curves demonstrated the process stability. The impact surface of each sample was observed at SEM. The microstructures are not homogeneous presenting voids and lamellar appearance, although the outer surface presents no defects, demonstrating good moldability. The present work aims to assess the life cycle of the material from the successive recycling processes.

  16. Conformational and Molecular Structures of α,β-Unsaturated Acrylonitrile Derivatives: Photophysical Properties and Their Frontier Orbitals.

    PubMed

    Percino, María Judith; Cerón, Margarita; Rodríguez, Oscar; Soriano-Moro, Guillermo; Castro, María Eugenia; Chapela, Víctor M; Siegler, Maxime A; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    We report single crystal X-ray diffraction (hereafter, SCXRD) analyses of derivatives featuring the electron-donor N-ethylcarbazole or the (4-diphenylamino)phenyl moieties associated with a -CN group attached to a double bond. The compounds are (2Z)-3-(4-(diphenylamino)-phenyl)-2-(pyridin-3-yl)prop-2-enenitrile (I), (2Z)-3-(4-(diphenylamino)phenyl)-2-(pyridin-4-yl)-prop-2-enenitrile (II) and (2Z)-3-(9-ethyl-9H-carbazol-3-yl)-2-(pyridin-2-yl)enenitrile (III). SCXRD analyses reveal that I and III crystallize in the monoclinic space groups P2/c with Z' = 2 and C2/c with Z' = 1, respectively. Compound II crystallized in the orthorhombic space group Pbcn with Z' = 1. The molecular packing analysis was conducted to examine the pyridine core effect, depending on the ortho, meta- and para-positions of the nitrogen atom, with respect to the optical properties and number of independent molecules (Z'). It is found that the double bond bearing a diphenylamino moiety introduced properties to exhibit a strong π-π-interaction in the solid state. The compounds were examined to evaluate the effects of solvent polarity, the role of the molecular structure, and the molecular interactions on their self-assembly behaviors. Compound I crystallized with a cell with two conformers, anti and syn, due to interaction with solvent. DFT calculations indicated the anti and syn structures of I are energetically stable (less than 1 eV). Also electrochemical and photophysical properties of the compounds were investigated, as well as the determination of optimization calculations in gas and different solvent (chloroform, cyclohexane, methanol, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran, dichloromethane and dimethyl sulfoxide) in the Gaussian09 program. The effect of solvent by PCM method was also investigated. The frontier HOMO and LUMO energies and gap energies are reported. PMID:27043499

  17. Effect of winding layer and speed on kenaf/glass fiber hybrid reinforced acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoni, Norizzahthul Ainaa Abdul; Sharifah Shahnaz S., B.; Ghazali, Che Mohd Ruzaidi

    2016-07-01

    The usage of natural fiber is becoming significant in composite industries due to their good performance. Single and continuous natural fibers have relatively high mechanical properties; especially their young modulus can be as high as glass fibers. Filament winding is a method to produce technically aligned composites which have high fibers content. The properties of filament winding can be tailored to meet the end product requirements. This research studied the compression properties of kenaf/glass fibers hybrid reinforced composites. Kenaf/glass fibers hybrid composite samples were fabricated by filament winding technique and their properties were compared with the properties of neat kenaf fiber and glass fibers composites. The kenaf/glass fiber hybrid composites exhibited higher strength compared to the neat glass fibers composites. Composites of helical pattern, which produced at low winding speed showed better compression resistance than hoop pattern winding, which produced at high winding speed. As predicted, kenaf composite showed highest water absorption; followed by kenaf/glass fiber hybrid composites while neat glass fiber has lowest water absorption capability.

  18. The effect of embedded carbon nanotubes on the morphological evolution during the carbonization of poly(acrylonitrile) nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, Sabina; Zussman, Eyal; Cohen, Yachin

    2008-04-23

    Hybrid nanofibers with different concentrations of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) were fabricated using the electrospinning technique and subsequently carbonized. The morphology of the fabricated carbon nanofibers (CNFs) at different stages of the carbonization process was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The polycrystalline nature of the CNFs was shown, with increasing content of ordered crystalline regions having enhanced orientation with increasing content of MWCNTs. The results indicate that embedded MWCNTs in the PAN nanofibers nucleate the growth of carbon crystals during PAN carbonization. PMID:21825647

  19. Preparation and dielectric analysis of microphase-separated poly(acrylonitrile-co-acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, D.Shiaw-Guang; Lin, Yow-Shi

    1993-12-31

    The acidic hydrolysis of polyacrylonitrile was carried out to yield a variety of terpolymers made up of nitriles, amides and acids. The formation of block structure was shown to follow a ripper mechanism occurring to acrylamide groups, that is more pronounced for a certain range of acrylamide content, evidenced by the composition analysis using {sup 1}H-NMR and base titration. The rates of formation of acrylamide fraction and acid fraction in the consecutive mode are approximately the same, yielding the content of ionic groups from 0.8 to 2.2. mole percent, dependent on the time of hydrolysis. The dielectric relaxation measurement on swollen gels shows three relaxation transitions, {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, over -150{degrees}C to 0{degrees}C, as influenced by the chemical composition and water absorption. The {beta} and {gamma} are associated with the polymer-water interaction and short-range motion of polymers and water.

  20. High-resolution measurement and mapping of tungstate in waters, soils and sediments using the low-disturbance DGT sampling technique.

    PubMed

    Guan, Dong-Xing; Williams, Paul N; Xu, Hua-Cheng; Li, Gang; Luo, Jun; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-10-01

    Increasing tungsten (W) use for industrial and military applications has resulted in greater W discharge into natural waters, soils and sediments. Risk modeling of W transport and fate in the environment relies on measurement of the release/mobilization flux of W in the bulk media and the interfaces between matrix compartments. Diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) is a promising passive sampling technique to acquire such information. DGT devices equipped with the newly developed high-resolution binding gels (precipitated zirconia, PZ, or ferrihydrite, PF, gels) or classic/conventional ferrihydrite slurry gel were comprehensively assessed for measuring W in waters. (Ferrihydrite)DGT can measure W at various ionic strengths (0.001-0.5molL(-1) NaNO3) and pH (4-8), while (PZ)DGT can operate across slightly wider environmental conditions. The three DGT configurations gave comparable results for soil W measurement, showing that typically W resupply is relatively poorly sustained. 1D and 2D high-resolution W profiling across sediment-water and hotspot-bulk media interfaces from Lake Taihu were obtained using (PZ)DGT coupled with laser ablation ICP-MS measurement, and the apparent diffusion fluxes across the interfaces were calculated using a numerical model. PMID:27209520

  1. Copper(ii) tungstate nanoflake array films: sacrificial template synthesis, hydrogen treatment, and their application as photoanodes in solar water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dianyi; Diao, Peng; Xu, Di; Xia, Mengyang; Gu, Yue; Wu, Qingyong; Li, Chao; Yang, Shubin

    2016-03-01

    We report the preparation of CuWO4 nanoflake (NF) array films by using a solid phase reaction method in which WO3 NFs were employed as sacrificial templates. The SEM, TEM and XRD results demonstrated that the obtained CuWO4 films possessed a network structure that was composed of single crystalline NFs intersected with each other. The CuWO4 NF films showed superior photoelectrochemical (PEC) activity to other CuWO4 photoanodes reported recently for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). We attributed the high activity to the unique morphological and crystalline structure of the CuWO4 film, which enhanced the photoactivity by providing a large specific area, a short hole transport distance from the inside of CuWO4 to the CuWO4/solution interface, and a low grain boundary density. Hydrogen treatment by annealing the CuWO4 NF film in mixed gases of H2 and Ar could further enhance the photoactivity, as hydrogen treatment significantly increased the electron density of CuWO4 by generating oxygen vacancy in the lattice. The photocurrent density for OER obtained on the hydrogen-treated (H-treated) CuWO4 NF film is the largest ever reported on CuWO4 photoanodes in the literature. Moreover, the CuWO4 photoanodes exhibit good stability in weak alkaline solution, while the H-treated CuWO4 photoanodes exhibit acceptable stability. This work not only reveals the potential of CuWO4 as a photoanode material for solar water splitting but also shows that the construction of nanostructured CuWO4 photoanodes is a promising method to achieve high PEC activity toward OER.We report the preparation of CuWO4 nanoflake (NF) array films by using a solid phase reaction method in which WO3 NFs were employed as sacrificial templates. The SEM, TEM and XRD results demonstrated that the obtained CuWO4 films possessed a network structure that was composed of single crystalline NFs intersected with each other. The CuWO4 NF films showed superior photoelectrochemical (PEC) activity to other CuWO4 photoanodes reported recently for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). We attributed the high activity to the unique morphological and crystalline structure of the CuWO4 film, which enhanced the photoactivity by providing a large specific area, a short hole transport distance from the inside of CuWO4 to the CuWO4/solution interface, and a low grain boundary density. Hydrogen treatment by annealing the CuWO4 NF film in mixed gases of H2 and Ar could further enhance the photoactivity, as hydrogen treatment significantly increased the electron density of CuWO4 by generating oxygen vacancy in the lattice. The photocurrent density for OER obtained on the hydrogen-treated (H-treated) CuWO4 NF film is the largest ever reported on CuWO4 photoanodes in the literature. Moreover, the CuWO4 photoanodes exhibit good stability in weak alkaline solution, while the H-treated CuWO4 photoanodes exhibit acceptable stability. This work not only reveals the potential of CuWO4 as a photoanode material for solar water splitting but also shows that the construction of nanostructured CuWO4 photoanodes is a promising method to achieve high PEC activity toward OER. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr09210h

  2. Copper(II) tungstate nanoflake array films: sacrificial template synthesis, hydrogen treatment, and their application as photoanodes in solar water splitting.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dianyi; Diao, Peng; Xu, Di; Xia, Mengyang; Gu, Yue; Wu, Qingyong; Li, Chao; Yang, Shubin

    2016-03-21

    We report the preparation of CuWO4 nanoflake (NF) array films by using a solid phase reaction method in which WO3 NFs were employed as sacrificial templates. The SEM, TEM and XRD results demonstrated that the obtained CuWO4 films possessed a network structure that was composed of single crystalline NFs intersected with each other. The CuWO4 NF films showed superior photoelectrochemical (PEC) activity to other CuWO4 photoanodes reported recently for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). We attributed the high activity to the unique morphological and crystalline structure of the CuWO4 film, which enhanced the photoactivity by providing a large specific area, a short hole transport distance from the inside of CuWO4 to the CuWO4/solution interface, and a low grain boundary density. Hydrogen treatment by annealing the CuWO4 NF film in mixed gases of H2 and Ar could further enhance the photoactivity, as hydrogen treatment significantly increased the electron density of CuWO4 by generating oxygen vacancy in the lattice. The photocurrent density for OER obtained on the hydrogen-treated (H-treated) CuWO4 NF film is the largest ever reported on CuWO4 photoanodes in the literature. Moreover, the CuWO4 photoanodes exhibit good stability in weak alkaline solution, while the H-treated CuWO4 photoanodes exhibit acceptable stability. This work not only reveals the potential of CuWO4 as a photoanode material for solar water splitting but also shows that the construction of nanostructured CuWO4 photoanodes is a promising method to achieve high PEC activity toward OER. PMID:26912373

  3. Poly (vinylidene fluoride) / Poly (acrylonitrile)–based Superior Hydrophobic Piezoelectric Solid Derived by Aligned Carbon Nanotube in Electrospinning: Fabrication, the Phase Conversion and Surface Energy

    PubMed Central

    Aqeel, Salem M.; Than, Lisa; Sreenivasulu, Gollapudi

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional materials have attracted many interests from both fundamental and practical aspects, such as field–effect transistor, electric protection, transducers and biosensor. Here we demonstrated the first superior hydrophobic piezoelectric surface based on the polymer blend of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)–polyacrilonitrile (PAN) assisted with functionalized multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs), by a modified electrospinning method. Typically the β–phase polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) was considered as the excellent piezoelectric and pyroelectric materials. However, polar β–phase of PVDF exhibited a natural high hydrophilicity. As a well–known fact, the wettability of the surface is dominated by two major factors: surface composition and surface roughness. The significant conversions derived by the incorporation of MWNTs, from nonpolar α–phase to highly polar β–phase of PVDF, were confirmed by FTIR. Meanwhile, the effects of MWNTs on the improvement of the roughness and the hydrophobicity of polymer blend were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle (CA). Molar free energy of wetting of the polymer nanocomposite decreases with increasing the wt.% of MWNTs. All molar free energy of wetting of PVDF–PAN/MWNTs were negative, which means the non–wettability of film. The combination of surface roughness and low–surface–energy modification in nanostructured composites leads to high hydrophobicity. Particularly, fabrication of superior hydrophobic surfaces not only has fundamental interest but also various possible functional applications in micro– and nano–materials and devices. PMID:26989486

  4. Study of two tungstates Ca0.5 Cd0.5 WO4 and Ca0.2 Cd0.8 WO4 by transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Taoufyq, A; Patout, L; Guinneton, F; Benlhachemi, A; Bakiz, B; Villain, S; Lyoussi, A; Nolibe, G; Gavarri, J-R

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the role of crystal structures and local disorder in the photonic properties of the system (1 - x)CaWO4  - xCdWO4 with 0 < x < 1, two specific phases with compositions x = 0.5 (scheelite phase) and 0.8 (wolframite phase) have been studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. High-resolution electron microscopy images and image simulations, associated with X-ray diffraction data, allowed confirming the lattices and space groups I41 /a and P2/c of the two scheelite and wolframite phases, at the local scale. The electron microscopy data show the existence of a high degree of crystallization associated with statistical distribution of Ca or Cd atoms on a Ca1- x Cdx site in each lattice. PMID:26372831

  5. Time course and distribution of tungsten-laden macrophages in the hilar lymph nodes of the dog lung after experimental instillation of calcium tungstate into the left apical bronchus.

    PubMed

    Grande, N R; de Sá, C M; Aguas, A P; Carvalho, E; Soares, M

    1990-12-01

    We sprayed a tungsten powder (CaWO4) into the airway of a single lobe (left apical) of the dog lung in order to study: (a) the kinetics of particle translocation from the bronchoalveolar lining to hilar lymph nodes, and (b) the sorting in lung lymph nodes of inhaled microcrystals. We found that the transport of the tungsten particles to the regional lymph node takes at least 24 hours and reaches its peak at day 7. In situ detection of tungsten by elemental particle analysis of lymph node sections by scanning electron microscopy allowed precise mapping of the marker in the node; the method was complemented by light microscopy and thin-section electron microscopy of the same nodes. Virtually all of the lymph node tungsten was located inside macrophages. The first tungsten-positive macrophages seen in the regional lymph nodes (day 1 to day 3) were restricted to the subcapsular space. This was followed by massive filling of the same sinus and of the narrow interfollicular areas by the particle-laden macrophages (day 3 to day 7). The even distribution of the tungsten-bearing phagocytes found in these anatomical regions of the node indicated that the subcapsular area in the dog was a continuous domain rather than the segmented region observed in nodes of common laboratory animals such as the rat. By day 7 after tungsten instillation, a moderate number of tungsten-positive macrophages was also detected in the paracortical region of the node. Finally, the presence of tungsten-bearing macrophages was extended to the outer lymph node medulla (day 7 to day 14); here, the macrophages were located in association with cords of plasmacytes and showed interdigitations with these lymphocytes. Only minimal amounts of tungsten were detected inside lymphoid follicles in association with dendritic cells. Some of the tungsten initially deposited in the airway of the apical left lung lobe was detected in contralateral hilar lymph nodes. We conclude that: (i) particle translocation from the alveolus to regional lymph nodes is a slow process that is mediated by pulmonary macrophages, in agreement with the findings of Harmsen et al Science 230:1277, 1985); (ii) in the lymph node, particle-bearing macrophages are sorted through narrow interfollicular sinuses into the outer medulla where they interact extensively with plasma cells; (iii) the migrating macrophages cannot penetrate the follicular domains of the node; minute quantities of exogenous particles may, nevertheless, be transferred from macrophages to follicular dendritic cells; and (iv) contralateral drainage may be a feature of the lymphatic system in the lung. PMID:2077298

  6. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 192 - Listed Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-(aminothioxymethyl)-) Acrolein (2-Propenal) Acrylamide (2-Propenamide) Acrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile) Aflatoxins..., mercury(2+) salt) Methacrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl-) Methapyrilene (1,2-Ethanediamine,...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 192 - Listed Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-(aminothioxymethyl)-) Acrolein (2-Propenal) Acrylamide (2-Propenamide) Acrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile) Aflatoxins..., mercury(2+) salt) Methacrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl-) Methapyrilene (1,2-Ethanediamine,...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 192 - Listed Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-(aminothioxymethyl)-) Acrolein (2-Propenal) Acrylamide (2-Propenamide) Acrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile) Aflatoxins..., mercury(2+) salt) Methacrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl-) Methapyrilene (1,2-Ethanediamine,...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 192 - Listed Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-(aminothioxymethyl)-) Acrolein (2-Propenal) Acrylamide (2-Propenamide) Acrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile) Aflatoxins..., mercury(2+) salt) Methacrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl-) Methapyrilene (1,2-Ethanediamine,...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 192 - Listed Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-(aminothioxymethyl)-) Acrolein (2-Propenal) Acrylamide (2-Propenamide) Acrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile) Aflatoxins..., mercury(2+) salt) Methacrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl-) Methapyrilene (1,2-Ethanediamine,...

  11. 21 CFR 176.170 - Components of paper and paperboard in contact with aqueous and fatty foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Hydrocarbon Solvents,” which are incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part... kilograms (1 ton) of dry paper and paperboard fibers. Acrylonitrile polymer, reaction product with.... Acrylonitrile polymer with styrene, reaction product with ethylenediamine acetate, having a nitrogen content...

  12. 21 CFR 176.170 - Components of paper and paperboard in contact with aqueous and fatty foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Hydrocarbon Solvents,” which are incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part... kilograms (1 ton) of dry paper and paperboard fibers. Acrylonitrile polymer, reaction product with.... Acrylonitrile polymer with styrene, reaction product with ethylenediamine acetate, having a nitrogen content...

  13. Melt processing and property testing of a model system of plastics contained in waste from electrical and electronic equipment.

    PubMed

    Triantou, Marianna I; Tarantili, Petroula A; Andreopoulos, Andreas G

    2015-05-01

    In the present research, blending of polymers used in electrical and electronic equipment, i.e. acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer, polycarbonate and polypropylene, was performed in a twin-screw extruder, in order to explore the effect process parameters on the mixture properties, in an attempt to determine some characteristics of a fast and economical procedure for waste management. The addition of polycarbonate in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer seemed to increase its thermal stability. Also, the addition of polypropylene in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer facilitates its melt processing, whereas the addition of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer in polypropylene improves its mechanical performance. Moreover, the upgrading of the above blends by incorporating 2 phr organically modified montmorillonite was investigated. The prepared nanocomposites exhibit greater tensile strength, elastic modulus and storage modulus, as well as higher melt viscosity, compared with the unreinforced blends. The incorporation of montmorillonite nanoplatelets in polycarbonate-rich acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer/polycarbonate blends turns the thermal degradation mechanism into a two-stage process. Alternatively to mechanical recycling, the energy recovery from the combustion of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer/polycarbonate and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer/polypropylene blends was recorded by measuring the gross calorific value. Comparing the investigated polymers, polypropylene presents the higher gross calorific value, followed by acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer and then polycarbonate. The above study allows a rough comparative evaluation of various methodologies for treating plastics from waste from electrical and electronic equipment. PMID:25750055

  14. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Thermoplastic Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... terephthalic acid high viscosity multiple end finisher process ✔ ✔ ✔ Polystyrene resin using a batch process ✔ Polystyrene resin using a continuous process ✔ SAN using a batch process ✔ ✔ SAN using a continuous process... = Acrylonitrile styrene resin/alpha methyl styrene acrylonitrile resin. EPS = expandable polystyrene resin....

  15. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Thermoplastic Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... acid high viscosity multiple end finisher process ✔ ✔ ✔ Polystyrene resin using a batch process ✔ Polystyrene resin using a continuous process ✔ SAN using a batch process ✔ ✔ SAN using a continuous process... = Acrylonitrile styrene resin/alpha methyl styrene acrylonitrile resin. EPS = expandable polystyrene resin....

  16. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Thermoplastic Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... acid high viscosity multiple end finisher process ✔ ✔ ✔ Polystyrene resin using a batch process ✔ Polystyrene resin using a continuous process ✔ SAN using a batch process ✔ ✔ SAN using a continuous process... = Acrylonitrile styrene resin/alpha methyl styrene acrylonitrile resin. EPS = expandable polystyrene resin....

  17. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Thermoplastic Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... terephthalic acid high viscosity multiple end finisher process ✔ ✔ ✔ Polystyrene resin using a batch process ✔ Polystyrene resin using a continuous process ✔ SAN using a batch process ✔ ✔ SAN using a continuous process... = Acrylonitrile styrene resin/alpha methyl styrene acrylonitrile resin. EPS = expandable polystyrene resin....

  18. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Thermoplastic Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... acid high viscosity multiple end finisher process ✔ ✔ ✔ Polystyrene resin using a batch process ✔ Polystyrene resin using a continuous process ✔ SAN using a batch process ✔ ✔ SAN using a continuous process... = Acrylonitrile styrene resin/alpha methyl styrene acrylonitrile resin. EPS = expandable polystyrene resin....

  19. Glove permeation by shale oil and coal tar extract

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, G.O.; Carlson, G.J.; Buerer, A.L.

    1980-02-14

    The vapor penetration of shale oil and coal tar extract through protective gloves composed of either polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, vinyl, latex, neoprene, Buna-N, acrylonitrile, natural rubber, or nitrile rubber was tested and measured. We used flame ionization techniques to determine the permeation characteristics of the gloves. Neoprene, Buna-N, acrylonitrile and nitrile gloves offered the best protection against the vapors tested.

  20. Green and blue emitting 3D structured Tb:Ce2(WO4)3 and Tb:Ce10W22O81 micromaterials.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, Anna M; Ndagsi, Dorine; Van Driessche, Isabel; Van Hecke, Kristof; Van Deun, Rik

    2015-06-14

    In this paper, various microstructures of Ce2(WO4)3 and Ce10W22O81 were prepared by applying a hydrothermal synthesis, in a ligand-free environment, and in the presence of a dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DSS) surfactant, after which the materials were heat treated at a temperature of 900 °C. Depending on the ratio of cerium ions to sodium tungstate, as well as the reaction pH, two different cerium tungstate materials were obtained. The source of cerium, and the presence or absence of the surfactant had a significant influence on the morphology of the final product. The photoluminescence properties of Tb(3+) doped cerium tungstate materials were investigated. Luminescence measurements showed an efficient charge transfer from the tungstate groups to the Tb(3+) ions. All the materials emitted blue or green light under UV excitation. PMID:25955974

  1. UV-VUV synchrotron radiation spectroscopy of NiWO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, A.; Pankratov, V.; Kalinko, A.; Kotlov, A.; Shirmane, L.; Popov, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    Photoluminescence and excitation spectra of microcrystalline and nanocrystalline nickel tungstate (NiWO4) were measured using UV-VUV synchrotron radiation source. The origin of the bands is interpreted using comparative analysis with isostructural ZnWO4 tungstate and based on the results of recent first-principles band structure calculations. The influence of the local atomic structure relaxation and of Ni2+ intra-ion d-d transitions on the photoluminescence band intensity are discussed.

  2. Ethyl­enedi­ammonium sodium tetra­kis­[bis­(ethyl­enedi­amine-κ2 N,N′)(oxalato-κ2 O 1,O 2)cobalt(III)] [penta­hydrogen di(phosphato­octa­deca­tungstate)] tetra­deca­hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuzhuo; Wang, Jing; Xu, Yun

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, Na(C2H10N2)[Co(C2O4)(C2H8N2)2]4[H5(P2W18O62)2]·14H2O, prepared under hydro­thermal conditions, consists of two Dawson-type [P2W18O62]6− anions, four isolated [Co(en)2(ox)]+ cations (en = ethyl­enedi­amine and ox = oxalate), one Na+ cation, one [H2en]2+ cation, and a number of ordered (14) and disordered solvent water mol­ecules. The [P2W18O62]6− polyoxidometalate anion has site symmetry 1 and contains two structurally distinct types of W atoms: viz. six W atoms on vertical pseudo-mirror planes grouped in two sets of three, and 12 equatorial W atoms that do not lie in the pseudo-mirror planes grouped in two sets of six. In each [Co(en)2(ox)]+ cation, the CoIII ion is coordinated by four N atoms from two en ligands and two O atoms from the ox ligands, completing a distorted octa­hedral structure. The sodium cation lies on an inversion centre and additionally links the complex cations and anions. In the crystal, the various units are linked by N—H⋯O and O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, which together with C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds form a three-dimensional structure. The contribution of a region of disordered electron density, possibly highly disordered solvent water mol­ecules, to the scattering was removed with the SQUEEZE option of PLATON [Spek (2009 ▶). Acta Cryst. D65, 148–155]. To equilibrate the charges five H+ ions have been added to the polyoxidometalate. These H+ ions and the disordered solvent contribution were not included in the reported mol­ecular weight and density. PMID:24454036

  3. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1996-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  4. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1995-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  5. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1994-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene disphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  6. 21 CFR 173.5 - Acrylate-acrylamide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... produced by the polymerization of acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide... polyacrylate-acrylamide resin is produced by the polymerization and subsequent hydrolysis of acrylonitrile in...

  7. 21 CFR 173.5 - Acrylate-acrylamide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... produced by the polymerization of acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide... polyacrylate-acrylamide resin is produced by the polymerization and subsequent hydrolysis of acrylonitrile in...

  8. 21 CFR 173.5 - Acrylate-acrylamide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... produced by the polymerization of acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide... polyacrylate-acrylamide resin is produced by the polymerization and subsequent hydrolysis of acrylonitrile in...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 258 - List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin 309-00-2 1,4:5,8-Dimethanonaphthalene, 1,2,3,4,10...-decachlorooctahydro- Lead (Total) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile,...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 264 - Ground-Water Monitoring List

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Acetamide, N-9H-fluoren-2-yl- Acrolein 107-02-8 2-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin...) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl- Methapyrilene...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 264 - Ground-Water Monitoring List

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Acetamide, N-9H-fluoren-2-yl- Acrolein 107-02-8 2-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin...) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl- Methapyrilene...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 264 - Ground-Water Monitoring List

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Acetamide, N-9H-fluoren-2-yl- Acrolein 107-02-8 2-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin...) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl- Methapyrilene...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 258 - List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin 309-00-2 1,4:5,8-Dimethanonaphthalene, 1,2,3,4,10...-decachlorooctahydro- Lead (Total) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile,...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 258 - List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin 309-00-2 1,4:5,8-Dimethanonaphthalene, 1,2,3,4,10...-decachlorooctahydro- Lead (Total) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile,...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 264 - Ground-Water Monitoring List

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Acetamide, N-9H-fluoren-2-yl- Acrolein 107-02-8 2-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin...) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl- Methapyrilene...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 258 - List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin 309-00-2 1,4:5,8-Dimethanonaphthalene, 1,2,3,4,10...-decachlorooctahydro- Lead (Total) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile,...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 264 - Ground-Water Monitoring List

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Acetamide, N-9H-fluoren-2-yl- Acrolein 107-02-8 2-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin...) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl- Methapyrilene...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 258 - List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin 309-00-2 1,4:5,8-Dimethanonaphthalene, 1,2,3,4,10...-decachlorooctahydro- Lead (Total) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile,...

  19. Recycling of engineering plastics from waste electrical and electronic equipments: influence of virgin polycarbonate and impact modifier on the final performance of blends.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, V; Biswal, Manoranjan; Mohanty, Smita; Nayak, Sanjay K

    2014-05-01

    This study is focused on the recovery and recycling of plastics waste, primarily polycarbonate, poly(acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene) and high impact polystyrene, from end-of-life waste electrical and electronic equipments. Recycling of used polycarbonate, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene, polycarbonate/acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene/high impact polystrene material was carried out using material recycling through a melt blending process. An optimized blend composition was formulated to achieve desired properties from different plastics present in the waste electrical and electronic equipments. The toughness of blended plastics was improved with the addition of 10 wt% of virgin polycarbonate and impact modifier (ethylene-acrylic ester-glycidyl methacrylate). The mechanical, thermal, dynamic-mechanical and morphological properties of recycled blend were investigated. Improved properties of blended plastics indicate better miscibility in the presence of a compatibilizer suitable for high-end application. PMID:24695435

  20. 40 CFR 721.8965 - 1H-Pyrole-2, 5-dione, 1-(2,4,6-tribromophenyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dewatering step during polymerization of acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene), and (g)(5). (iii) Industrial... apply to releases of the PMN substance during the dewatering step of the polymerization reactions...

  1. 40 CFR 721.8965 - 1H-Pyrole-2, 5-dione, 1-(2,4,6-tribromophenyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... dewatering step during polymerization of acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene), and (g)(5). (iii) Industrial... apply to releases of the PMN substance during the dewatering step of the polymerization reactions...

  2. 40 CFR 721.8965 - 1H-Pyrole-2, 5-dione, 1-(2,4,6-tribromophenyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dewatering step during polymerization of acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene), and (g)(5). (iii) Industrial... apply to releases of the PMN substance during the dewatering step of the polymerization reactions...

  3. 21 CFR 177.1630 - Polyethylene phthalate polymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... Acrylonitrile. Methacrylonitrile. Vinyl chloride. Itaconic acid. Styrene-maleic anhydride resin, partial 2... terephthalate or terephthalic acid with ethylene glycol, modified with one or more of the following: Azelaic acid, dimethyl azelate, dimethyl sebacate, sebacic acid. Ethylene terephthalate copolymers: Prepared...

  4. 16 CFR 1500.86 - Exemptions from classification as a banned toy or other banned article for use by children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene), nylon, and high-impact polystyrene) that are injection-molded and possess high..., or high-impact polystyrene) though exempt from the requirements that there be no internal voids,...

  5. 16 CFR 1500.86 - Exemptions from classification as a banned toy or other banned article for use by children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... materials other than those materials (such as ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene), nylon, and high-impact... characteristics (such as injection-molded balls made of ABS, nylon, or high-impact polystyrene) though exempt...

  6. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1994-01-25

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 9 figures.

  7. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1995-09-12

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  8. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1996-07-23

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  9. Uniformly microsized luminescent materials obtained through a solid state reaction of WO{sub 3} with Ln{sup 3+}-exchanged zeolite L at 700 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yige; Fang, Yi; Zhang, Wenjun; Zhang, Li; Chen, Yuhuan; Yu, Xiaoyan

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: We have reported the modification of Ln3+/ZL microcrystals by the tungstate-oxygen species via a solid state reaction of WO{sub 3} and Ln{sup 3+}-exchanged zeolite L at 700 °C. Highlights: ► Luminescent materials were obtained from zeolite L crystals. ► The materials show characteristic luminescence of Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions. ► The framework of zeolite L crystals has been kept during the annealing process. ► Energy transfer from tungstate-oxygen species to lanthanide was confirmed. - Abstract: In this work, we report the uniformly microsized luminescent materials prepared by a solid state reaction of WO{sub 3} and Ln{sup 3+}-exchanged zeolite L at 700 °C. The obtained materials were investigated by SEM, XRD and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The influence of tungstate-oxygen species on the morphology and luminescence of the materials were discussed in detail. Energy transfer from the tungstate-oxygen species to Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions have been demonstrated by the photoluminescence spectra, implying the loading of tungstate-oxygen species into the nanochannels of the crystals and the close proximity of which to Eu{sup 3+} ions.

  10. The determination of tungsten, molybdenum, and phosphorus oxyanions by high performance liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometery.

    PubMed

    Bednar, A J; Mirecki, J E; Inouye, L S; Winfield, L E; Larson, S L; Ringelberg, D B

    2007-07-31

    The toxic properties of tungsten compounds have recently been brought to the forefront with clusters of human cancer cases, such as in Fallon, NV. Such instances have made the determination of tungsten in natural water supplies vitally important. Tungsten exists in most environmental matrices as the soluble and mobile tungstate anion, although it can polymerize with itself and other anions, such as molybdate and phosphate. Because the geochemical and toxicological properties of these polymer species will vary from the monomeric tungstate parent, determination of tungstate speciation is as critical as determination of total dissolved tungsten concentration. Use of chromatographic separations, followed by element-specific detection is a proven technology for elemental speciation. In the present work, anion exchange chromatography has been coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine tungstate, molybdate, and phosphate species at the sub-microg l(-1) and microg l(-1) levels. The method provides quantitative determination of these species in about 10 min with the capability to simultaneously determine other oxyanion species. The method has been applied to groundwater and extracts of soils amended with tungsten powder. The water soluble tungsten in 1-h deionized water extracts after six months of soil aging was >15 mg l(-1), however, only approximately 50% of the tungsten was present as monomeric tungstate. PMID:19071839

  11. Anthocyanins facilitate tungsten accumulation in Brassica

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, K.L.

    2002-11-01

    Accumulation of molybdenum in Brassica was recently found to be correlated with anthocyanin content, involving the formation of a blue complex. Here the role of anthocyanins in tungsten sequestration was investigated using three species of Brassica: B. rapa (cv. Fast plants), B. juncea (Indian mustard) and B. oleracea (red cabbage). Seedlings of B. rapa and B. juncea turned blue when supplied with colourless tungstate. The blue compound co-localized with anthocyanins in the peripheral cell layers, and the degree of blueness was correlated with anthocyanin content. The direct involvement of anthocyanins in the blue coloration was evident when purified anthocyanins showed a colour change from pink to blue in vitro upon addition of tungstate, over a wide pH range. Anthocyanin production was upregulated 3-fold by W in B. juncea, possibly reflecting a function for anthocyanins in W tolerance or sequestration. The presence of anthocyanins facilitated W accumulation in B. rapa: anthocyanin-containing seedlings accumulated 3-fold more W than an anthocyaninless mutant. There was no correlation between anthocyanin content and W tolerance under these conditions. The nature of the interaction between anthocyanins and tungstate was investigated. X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed no change in the local chemical environment of Wupon uptake of tungstate by the plant; HPLC analysis of purified anthocyanin with or without tungstate showed no peak shift after metal treatment.

  12. Electronic band structures and photovoltaic properties of MWO{sub 4} (M=Zn, Mg, Ca, Sr) compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong Wook; Cho, In-Sun; Shin, Seong Sik; Lee, Sangwook; Noh, Tae Hoon; Kim, Dong Hoe; Jung, Hyun Suk; Hong, Kug Sun

    2011-08-15

    Divalent metal tungstates, MWO{sub 4}, with wolframite (M=Zn and Mg) and scheelite (M=Ca and Sr) structures were prepared using a conventional solid state reaction method. Their electronic band structures were investigated by a combination of electronic band structure calculations and electrochemical measurements. From these investigations, it was found that the band structures (i.e. band positions and band gaps) of the divalent metal tungstates were significantly influenced by their crystal structural environments, such as the W-O bond length. Their photovoltaic properties were evaluated by applying to the working electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells. The dye-sensitized solar cells employing the wolframite-structured metal tungstates (ZnWO{sub 4} and MgWO{sub 4}) exhibited better performance than those using the scheelite-structured metal tungstates (CaWO{sub 4} and SrWO{sub 4}), which was attributed to their enhanced electron transfer resulting from their appropriate band positions. - Graphical abstract: The electronic band structures of divalent metal tungstates are described from the combination of experimental results and theoretical calculations, and their electronic structure-dependent photovoltaic performances are also studied. Highlights: > MWO{sub 4} compounds with wolframite (M=Zn and Mg) and scheelite structure (M=Ca and Sr) were prepared. > Their electronic band structures were investigated by the calculations and the measurements. > Their photovoltaic properties were determined by the crystal and electronic structures.

  13. Classification of a Haemophilus influenzae ABC Transporter HI1470/71 through Its Cognate Molybdate Periplasmic Binding Protein, MolA

    SciTech Connect

    Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Lee, Allen; Rees, Douglas C.; Pinkett, Heather W.

    2014-10-02

    molA (HI1472) from H. influenzae encodes a periplasmic binding protein (PBP) that delivers substrate to the ABC transporter MolB{sub 2}C{sub 2} (formerly HI1470/71). The structures of MolA with molybdate and tungstate in the binding pocket were solved to 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The MolA-binding protein binds molybdate and tungstate, but not other oxyanions such as sulfate and phosphate, making it the first class III molybdate-binding protein structurally solved. The {approx}100 {mu}M binding affinity for tungstate and molybdate is significantly lower than observed for the class II ModA molybdate-binding proteins that have nanomolar to low micromolar affinity for molybdate. The presence of two molybdate loci in H. influenzae suggests multiple transport systems for one substrate, with molABC constituting a low-affinity molybdate locus.

  14. Development of a new electrolyte matrix for MCFC

    SciTech Connect

    Nagashima, I.; Higaki, K.; Terada, S.; Suemitsu, T.

    1996-12-31

    To prolong the life of cell is one of the most important issues for MCFC to be brought into actual application. In this respect, investigators have been proposing the addition of tungstate salt such as K2WO4 into MCFC electrolyte, which is supposed effectively to reduce the sintering of anode probably by precipitates formed through the reduction of tungstate with dissolved hydrogen near the anode surface. In this research, such effect upon sintering of anode was quantitatively examined by out-of-cell tests and the validity of above assumption for the mechanism was confirmed. Also other effects of tungstate salt addition into electrolyte, such upon corrosion of separator, solubility of cathode, stability of matrix substrates (LiAlO{sub 2}) were investigated.

  15. Classification of a Haemophilus influenzae ABC transporter HI1470/71 through its cognate molybdate periplasmic binding protein, MolA.

    PubMed

    Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Lee, Allen; Rees, Douglas C; Pinkett, Heather W

    2011-11-01

    molA (HI1472) from H. influenzae encodes a periplasmic binding protein (PBP) that delivers substrate to the ABC transporter MolB(2)C(2) (formerly HI1470/71). The structures of MolA with molybdate and tungstate in the binding pocket were solved to 1.6 and 1.7 Å resolution, respectively. The MolA-binding protein binds molybdate and tungstate, but not other oxyanions such as sulfate and phosphate, making it the first class III molybdate-binding protein structurally solved. The ∼100 μM binding affinity for tungstate and molybdate is significantly lower than observed for the class II ModA molybdate-binding proteins that have nanomolar to low micromolar affinity for molybdate. The presence of two molybdate loci in H. influenzae suggests multiple transport systems for one substrate, with molABC constituting a low-affinity molybdate locus. PMID:22078568

  16. Research study for gel precursors as glass and ceramic starting materials for space processing applications research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, R. L.; Miller, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    The development of techniques for the preparation of glass and ceramic starting materials that will result in homogeneous glasses or ceramic products when melted and cooled in a containerless environment is described. Metal-organic starting materials were used to make compounds or mixtures which were then decomposed by hydrolysis reactions to the corresponding oxides. The sodium tungstate system was chosen as a model for a glass with a relatively low melting temperature. The alkoxide tungstates also have interesting optical properties. For all the compositions studied, comparison samples were prepared from inorganic starting materials and submitted to the same analyses.

  17. The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Paramatti, Riccardo

    2005-10-12

    The electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment at LHC will consist of about 76000 Lead Tungstate crystals. Its main purpose is the very precise energy measurement of electrons and photons produced at 14 TeV centre-of-mass energy. A review of its performances and its construction status is given. Then the calibration strategy is described in details.

  18. An Inexpensive Device for Studying Electrochromism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; Puente-Caballero, Rodrigo; Torres-Perez, Jonatan; Bustos, Daniel; Carmona-Orbezo, Aranzazu; Sevilla, Fortunato B., III

    2012-01-01

    A novel procedure for the preparation of electrochromic WO[subscript 3] films from readily available materials is presented. It is based on the electrochemical preparation of potassium tungstate from tungsten filaments of incandescent light bulbs in a potassium hydroxide solution. Tungstic acid is then produced by proton exchange using a…

  19. Effect of heating rate on toxicity of pyrolysis gases from some elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Kosola, K. L.; Solis, A. N.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of heating rate on the toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from six elastomers was investigated, using a screening test method. The elastomers were polyisoprene (natural rubber), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM), acrylonitrile rubber, chlorosulfonated polyethylene rubber, and polychloroprene. The rising temperature and fixed temperature programs produced exactly the same rank order of materials based on time to death. Acrylonitrile rubber exhibited the greatest toxicity under these test conditions, and carbon monoxide was not found in sufficient concentrations to be the primary cause of death.

  20. Electrically Conducting Polymer-Copper Sulphide Composite Films, Preparation by Treatment of Polymer-Copper (2) Acetate Composites with Hydrogen Sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, Takakazu; Kamigaki, Takahira; Kubota, Etsuo

    1988-01-01

    Polymer copper sulfide composite films were prepared by treatment of polymer poly(vinyl chloride), poly(acrylonitrile), copolymer of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate (90:10), and ABS resin copper (2) acetate composites with hydrogen sulfide. The films showed electrical conductivity higher than 0.015 S/cm when they contained more than 20 wt percent of copper sulfide. A poly(acrylonitrile)-copper sulfide composite film containing 40 to 50 wt percent of copper sulfide showed electrical conductivity of 10 to 150.0 S/cm and had relatively high mechanical strength to be used in practical purposes.

  1. Low pour crude oil compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Motz, K.L.; Latham, R.A.; Statz, R.J.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes and improvement in the process of transporting waxy crude oils through a pipeline. It comprises: incorporating into the crude oil an effective pour point depressant amount of an additive comprising a polymer selected from the group consisting of copolymers of ethylene and acrylonitrile, and terpolymers of ethylene, acrylonitrile and a third monomer selected from the group consisting of vinyl acetate, carbon monoxide, alkyl acrylates, alkyl methacrylates, alkyl vinyl ethers, vinyl chloride, vinyl fluoride, acrylic acid, and methacrylic acid, wherein the amount of third monomer in the terpolymer ranges from about 0.1 to about 10.0 percent by weight.

  2. Morphology of a silver/polyacrylonitrile nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, M. A.; Mashin, A. I.; Tyurin, A. S.; Fedosov, A. E.; Chidichimo, G.; De Filpo, G.

    2011-01-01

    Silver/polyacrylonitrile (Ag/PAN) nanocomposites are synthesized at the stage of simultaneous acrylonitrile polymerization and the reduction of silver ions from a mixture of silver nitrate AgNO3, acrylonitrile, and a photoinitiator. The synthesized films are transparent in the visible region and are characterized by a uniform dispersion of silver nanoparticles in a PAN matrix without any macroscopic agglomeration. The effects of the metal salt and photoinitiator concentrations on the size and density of metal nanoparticles in a composite are revealed.

  3. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Jjj of... - Group 1 Storage Vessels at New Affected Sources Producing the Listed Thermoplastics

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Vessel capacity(cubic meters) Vapor pressure b (kilopascals) ASA/AMSAN c Styrene/ acrylonitrile mixture... indicated. b Maximum true vapor pressure of total organic HAP at storage temperature. c The applicability....43 ≥ 0.078 All other chemicals ≥ 38 and < 45.43 ≥ 13.1 ≥ 45.43 ≥ 0.53 a Vessel capacity and...

  4. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Jjj of... - Group 1 Storage Vessels at New Affected Sources Producing the Listed Thermoplastics

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Chemical a Vessel capacity(cubic meters) Vapor pressure b (kilopascals) ASA/AMSAN c Styrene/ acrylonitrile... indicated. b Maximum true vapor pressure of total organic HAP at storage temperature. c The applicability....43 ≥ 0.078 All other chemicals ≥ 38 and < 45.43 ≥ 13.1 ≥ 45.43 ≥ 0.53 a Vessel capacity and...

  5. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Jjj of... - Group 1 Storage Vessels at New Affected Sources Producing the Listed Thermoplastics

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Vessel capacity(cubic meters) Vapor pressure b (kilopascals) ASA/AMSAN c Styrene/ acrylonitrile mixture... indicated. b Maximum true vapor pressure of total organic HAP at storage temperature. c The applicability....43 ≥ 0.078 All other chemicals ≥ 38 and < 45.43 ≥ 13.1 ≥ 45.43 ≥ 0.53 a Vessel capacity and...

  6. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Vvvvvv... - Partially Soluble HAP

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Vinyl acetate 108054 57. Vinyl chloride 75014 58. Xylene (m) 108383 59. Xylene (o) 95476 60. Xylene (p...-Dichloroethylene (vinylidene chloride) 75354 5. 1,2-Dibromoethane 106934 6. 1,2-Dichloroethane (ethylene dichloride.... Acrolein 107028 15. Acrylonitrile 107131 16. Allyl chloride 107051 17. Benzene 71432 18. Benzyl...

  7. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Vvvvvv... - Partially Soluble HAP

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Vinyl acetate 108054 57. Vinyl chloride 75014 58. Xylene (m) 108383 59. Xylene (o) 95476 60. Xylene (p...-Dichloroethylene (vinylidene chloride) 75354 5. 1,2-Dibromoethane 106934 6. 1,2-Dichloroethane (ethylene dichloride.... Acrolein 107028 15. Acrylonitrile 107131 16. Allyl chloride 107051 17. Benzene 71432 18. Benzyl...

  8. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Vvvvvv... - Partially Soluble HAP

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... Vinyl acetate 108054 57. Vinyl chloride 75014 58. Xylene (m) 108383 59. Xylene (o) 95476 60. Xylene (p...-Dichloroethylene (vinylidene chloride) 75354 5. 1,2-Dibromoethane 106934 6. 1,2-Dichloroethane (ethylene dichloride.... Acrolein 107028 15. Acrylonitrile 107131 16. Allyl chloride 107051 17. Benzene 71432 18. Benzyl...

  9. Vapor-liquid equilibria of copolymer + solvent and homopolymer + solvent binaries: New experimental data and their correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.B.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1995-07-01

    Sixty-four isothermal data sets for vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) for polymer + solvent binaries have been obtained using a gravimetric sorption technique, in the range of 23.5--80 C. Solvents studied were acetone, acetonitrile, 1-butanol, 1,2-dichloroethane, chloroform, cyclohexane, hexane, methanol, octane, pentane, and toluene. Copolymers studied were poly(acrylonitrile-co-butadiene), poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile), poly(styrene-co-butadiene), poly(styrene-co-butyl methacrylate), poly(vinyl acetate-co-ethylene), and poly(vinyl acetate-co-vinyl chloride). All copolymers were random copolymers. Some homopolymers were also studied: polyacrylonitrile, polybutadiene, poly(butyl methacrylate), poly(ethylene oxide), polystyrene, and poly(vinyl acetate). The composition of the copolymer may have a surprising effect on VLE. Normally, deviation from ideal behavior lies between those of the constituent homopolymers, according to the copolymer composition, as observed for cyclohexane + poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) and chloroform + poly(styrene-co-butyl methacrylate). However, the strong nonideal behavior observed for systems containing hydrocarbons and poly(butadiene-co-acrylonitrile) shows that the effect of acrylonitrile is in excess of that expected form the copolymer composition. The perturbed hard-sphere chain (PHSC) equation of state was used to represent VLE of the copolymer solutions studied here.

  10. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Vvvvvv... - Partially Soluble HAP

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Vinyl acetate 108054 57. Vinyl chloride 75014 58. Xylene (m) 108383 59. Xylene (o) 95476 60. Xylene (p...-Dichloroethylene (vinylidene chloride) 75354 5. 1,2-Dibromoethane 106934 6. 1,2-Dichloroethane (ethylene dichloride.... Acrolein 107028 15. Acrylonitrile 107131 16. Allyl chloride 107051 17. Benzene 71432 18. Benzyl...

  11. DETERMINATION OF HEMOGLOBIN ADDUCTS IN HUMANS OCCUPATIONALLY EXPOSED TO ACRYLAMIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hemoglobin (Hb) adduct determinations were used to monitor occupational exposure to acrylamide (AA) and acrylonitrile (AN). orth-one workers in a factory in the People's Republic of China who were involved in the synthesis of a AA by catalytic hydration of AN and the manufacturin...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 423 - 126 Priority Pollutants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true 126 Priority Pollutants A Appendix A to Part 423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND... Priority Pollutants 001Acenaphthene 002Acrolein 003Acrylonitrile 004Benzene 005Benzidine...

  13. 40 CFR 261.33 - Discarded commercial chemical products, off-specification species, container residues, and spill...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-Propenenitrile U152 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl- (I,T) U008 79-10-7 2-Propenoic acid (I) U113 140-88-5 2...-10-7 2-Propenoic acid (I) U009 107-13-1 Acrylonitrile U009 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile U010...

  14. 40 CFR 261.33 - Discarded commercial chemical products, off-specification species, container residues, and spill...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-Propenenitrile U152 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl- (I,T) U008 79-10-7 2-Propenoic acid (I) U113 140-88-5 2... Acrylonitrile U009 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile U010 50-07-7 Azirino pyrrolo indole-4,7-dione, 6-amino-8-...

  15. 40 CFR 261.33 - Discarded commercial chemical products, off-specification species, container residues, and spill...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-Propenenitrile U152 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl- (I,T) U008 79-10-7 2-Propenoic acid (I) U113 140-88-5 2...-10-7 2-Propenoic acid (I) U009 107-13-1 Acrylonitrile U009 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile U010...

  16. 40 CFR 261.33 - Discarded commercial chemical products, off-specification species, container residues, and spill...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-Propenenitrile U152 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl- (I,T) U008 79-10-7 2-Propenoic acid (I) U113 140-88-5 2...-10-7 2-Propenoic acid (I) U009 107-13-1 Acrylonitrile U009 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile U010...

  17. 40 CFR 261.33 - Discarded commercial chemical products, off-specification species, container residues, and spill...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-Propenenitrile U152 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl- (I,T) U008 79-10-7 2-Propenoic acid (I) U113 140-88-5 2...-10-7 2-Propenoic acid (I) U009 107-13-1 Acrylonitrile U009 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile U010...

  18. 40 CFR 180.960 - Polymers; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... specified for defining a low-risk polymer in 40 CFR 723.250, as an inert ingredient in a pesticide chemical... weight (in amu), 1,200 None Acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer conforming to 21 CFR 180.22, minimum... 25086-29-7 Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 180.960, see the List of...

  19. 40 CFR 180.960 - Polymers; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... specified for defining a low-risk polymer in 40 CFR 723.250, as an inert ingredient in a pesticide chemical... Acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer conforming to 21 CFR 180.22, minimum average molecular weight (in amu), 1,000... Federal Register citations affecting § 180.960, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears...

  20. 21 CFR 176.170 - Components of paper and paperboard in contact with aqueous and fatty foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Hydrocarbon Solvents,” which are incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part...) of dry paper and paperboard fibers. Acrylonitrile polymer, reaction product with ethylenediamine... polymer with styrene, reaction product with ethylenediamine acetate, having a nitrogen content of...

  1. 40 CFR 180.960 - Polymers; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... specified for defining a low-risk polymer in 40 CFR 723.250, as an inert ingredient in a pesticide chemical... weight (in amu), 1,200 None Acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer conforming to 21 CFR 180.22, minimum... Federal Register citations affecting § 180.960, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears...

  2. 40 CFR 180.960 - Polymers; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... specified for defining a low-risk polymer in 40 CFR 723.250, as an inert ingredient in a pesticide chemical... weight (in amu), 1,200 None Acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer conforming to 21 CFR 180.22, minimum... Federal Register citations affecting § 180.960, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears...

  3. Industrial hygiene walk-through survey report of the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, Houston Chemical Plant, Houston, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Fajen, J.M.; Ungers, L.J.

    1986-04-01

    A walk-through survey was conducted at Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, Houston, Texas in November, 1985. The purpose of the survey was to obtain information on production processes for styrene/butadiene rubber, styrene/butadiene latex and acrylonitrile/butadiene rubber, and to evaluate the potential for 1,3-butadiene exposure.

  4. 40 CFR 63.11395 - What are the standards and compliance requirements for existing sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Standard for Volatile Organic Liquids (40 CFR part 60, subpart Kb) for vessels that store acrylonitrile. The provisions in 40 CFR 60.114b do not apply to this subpart. (e) You must operate continuous... operate a monomer recovery process that removes AN prior to spinning, you must comply with...

  5. NUCLEOPHILIC ADDITION TO ACTIVATED DOUBLE BONDS: PREDICTION OF REACTIVITY FROM THE LAPLACIAN OF CHARGE DENSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reactivities of a series of molecules in a Michael addition reaction are analyzed on the basis of properties expressed in the Laplacian of the charge density distribution. he charge densities of structurally optimized acrylic acid (AA), methacrylic acid (MAA), acrylonitrile (...

  6. Polymeric Additives For Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Nir, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experimental studies of properties of several graphite/epoxy composites containing polymeric additives as flexibilizing or toughening agents. Emphasizes effects of brominated polymeric additives (BPA's) with or without carboxy-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber. Reviews effects of individual and combined additives on fracture toughnesses, environmental stabilities, hot/wet strengths, thermomechanical behaviors, and other mechanical properties of composites.

  7. 40 CFR 63.11397 - What General Provisions apply to this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... apply to this subpart? (a) You must meet the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 63... requirements of 40 CFR part 60, subpart Kb for each tank that stores acrylonitrile.” (4) This certification of... malfunction plan in accordance with the requirements of 40 CFR 63.6(e)(3).” (c) If you own or operate a...

  8. 40 CFR 63.11397 - What General Provisions apply to this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... apply to this subpart? (a) You must meet the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 63... requirements of 40 CFR part 60, subpart Kb for each tank that stores acrylonitrile.” (4) This certification of... malfunction plan in accordance with the requirements of 40 CFR 63.6(e)(3).” (c) If you own or operate a...

  9. 40 CFR 63.11397 - What General Provisions apply to this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... apply to this subpart? (a) You must meet the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 63... requirements of 40 CFR part 60, subpart Kb for each tank that stores acrylonitrile.” (4) This certification of... malfunction plan in accordance with the requirements of 40 CFR 63.6(e)(3).” (c) If you own or operate a...

  10. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart F of... - Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Acetonitrile 75058 Acetophenone 98862 Acrolein 107028 Acrylamide 79061 Acrylic acid 79107 Acrylonitrile 107131... tetrachloride 56235 Chloroacetic acid 79118 Chloroacetophenone (2-) 532274 Chlorobenzene 108907 2-Chloro-,1,3... cresylic acids (mixed) 1319773 Cresol and cresylic acid (o-) 95487 Cresol and cresylic acid (m-)...

  11. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart F of... - Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Acetonitrile 75058 Acetophenone 98862 Acrolein 107028 Acrylamide 79061 Acrylic acid 79107 Acrylonitrile 107131... tetrachloride 56235 Chloroacetic acid 79118 Chloroacetophenone (2-) 532274 Chlorobenzene 108907 2-Chloro-,1,3... cresylic acids (mixed) 1319773 Cresol and cresylic acid (o-) 95487 Cresol and cresylic acid (m-)...

  12. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart F of... - Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Acetonitrile 75058 Acetophenone 98862 Acrolein 107028 Acrylamide 79061 Acrylic acid 79107 Acrylonitrile 107131... tetrachloride 56235 Chloroacetic acid 79118 Chloroacetophenone (2-) 532274 Chlorobenzene 108907 2-Chloro-,1,3... cresylic acids (mixed) 1319773 Cresol and cresylic acid (o-) 95487 Cresol and cresylic acid (m-)...

  13. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart F of... - Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Acetonitrile 75058 Acetophenone 98862 Acrolein 107028 Acrylamide 79061 Acrylic acid 79107 Acrylonitrile 107131... tetrachloride 56235 Chloroacetic acid 79118 Chloroacetophenone (2-) 532274 Chlorobenzene 108907 2-Chloro-,1,3... cresylic acids (mixed) 1319773 Cresol and cresylic acid (o-) 95487 Cresol and cresylic acid (m-)...

  14. MW-assisted synthesis of carboxymethyl tamarind kernel polysaccharide-g-polyacrylonitrile: optimization and characterization.

    PubMed

    Meenkashi; Ahuja, Munish; Verma, Purnima

    2014-11-26

    Microwave-assisted synthesis of graft copolymer of carboxymethyl tamarind seed polysaccharide and polyacrylonitrile was carried out. The effect of formulation and process variables on grafting efficiency of carboxymethyl tamarind kernel polysaccharide-g-poly(acrylonitrile) was studied using response surface methodology. The results revealed that the significant factors affecting grafting efficiency were concentrations of ammonium persulphate, acrylonitrile and interaction effects of ammonium persulphate and acrylonitrile concentrations. The optimal calculated parameters were found to be microwave exposure time-99.48 s, microwave exposure power-160 W, concentration of acrylonitrile-0.10% (w/v), concentration of ammonium persulphate--40 mmol/l, which provided graft copolymer with grafting efficiency of 96%. The formation of graft copolymer was confirmed by FT-IR studies and validated by scanning electron micrographs. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated higher thermal stability of graft copolymer and X-ray diffraction study revealed increase in crystallinity on graft polymerization. Further, the graft copolymer showed pH dependant swelling. PMID:25256516

  15. 40 CFR 721.8965 - 1H-Pyrole-2, 5-dione, 1-(2,4,6-tribromophenyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...), (g)(2)(iii), (g)(2)(iv)( use chemical goggles), (g)(3)(ii), (g)(4)(i), (g)(4)(iii) (except the dewatering step during polymerization of acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene), and (g)(5). (iii) Industrial... § 721.185 apply to this significant new use rule. (3) Determining whether a specific use is subject...

  16. 40 CFR 63.11397 - What General Provisions apply to this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... apply to this subpart? (a) You must meet the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 63... requirements of 40 CFR part 60, subpart Kb for each tank that stores acrylonitrile.” (4) This certification of... malfunction plan in accordance with the requirements of 40 CFR 63.6(e)(3).” (c) If you own or operate a...

  17. 40 CFR 63.11397 - What General Provisions apply to this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... apply to this subpart? (a) You must meet the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 63... requirements of 40 CFR part 60, subpart Kb for each tank that stores acrylonitrile.” (4) This certification of... malfunction plan in accordance with the requirements of 40 CFR 63.6(e)(3).” (c) If you own or operate a...

  18. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN BIOMARKERS OF EXPOSURE AND NEUROLOGICAL EFFECTS IN A GROUP OF WORKERS EXPOSED TO ACRYLAMIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was performed among 41 workers heavily exposed to a mixture of acrylamide and acrylonitrile in Henan province of China. The workers underwent a complete medical and neurological examination and gave blood and urine for the determination of several biomarkers of exposure. ...

  19. 40 CFR 63.11395 - What are the standards and compliance requirements for existing sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Standard for Volatile Organic Liquids (40 CFR part 60, subpart Kb) for vessels that store acrylonitrile. The provisions in 40 CFR 60.114b do not apply to this subpart. (e) You must operate continuous... SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Acrylic...

  20. 40 CFR 63.11395 - What are the standards and compliance requirements for existing sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Standard for Volatile Organic Liquids (40 CFR part 60, subpart Kb) for vessels that store acrylonitrile. The provisions in 40 CFR 60.114b do not apply to this subpart. (e) You must operate continuous... SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Acrylic...

  1. 40 CFR 63.11395 - What are the standards and compliance requirements for existing sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Standard for Volatile Organic Liquids (40 CFR part 60, subpart Kb) for vessels that store acrylonitrile. The provisions in 40 CFR 60.114b do not apply to this subpart. (e) You must operate continuous... SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Acrylic...

  2. 40 CFR 63.11395 - What are the standards and compliance requirements for existing sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Standard for Volatile Organic Liquids (40 CFR part 60, subpart Kb) for vessels that store acrylonitrile. The provisions in 40 CFR 60.114b do not apply to this subpart. (e) You must operate continuous... SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Acrylic...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 68 - Table of Toxic Endpoints

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Table of Toxic Endpoints A Appendix A to Part 68 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Endpoints CAS No. Chemical name Toxic endpoint (mg/L) 107-02-8 Acrolein 0.0011 107-13-1 Acrylonitrile...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 68 - Table of Toxic Endpoints

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Table of Toxic Endpoints A Appendix A to Part 68 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Endpoints CAS No. Chemical name Toxic endpoint (mg/L) 107-02-8 Acrolein 0.0011 107-13-1 Acrylonitrile...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 68 - Table of Toxic Endpoints

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Table of Toxic Endpoints A Appendix A to Part 68 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Endpoints CAS No. Chemical name Toxic endpoint (mg/L) 107-02-8 Acrolein 0.0011 107-13-1 Acrylonitrile...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 68 - Table of Toxic Endpoints

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Table of Toxic Endpoints A Appendix A to Part 68 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Endpoints CAS No. Chemical name Toxic endpoint (mg/L) 107-02-8 Acrolein 0.0011 107-13-1 Acrylonitrile...

  7. Industrial Organic Electrosynthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagenknecht, John H.

    1983-01-01

    Four examples of industrial electrochemical synthesis of organic compounds are described. These include acrylonitrile dimerization, tetramethyl lead, electrochemical fluorination, and production of diacetone-2-keto-L-gulonic acid. Additional examples are also cited, including the production of several compounds by the BASF company of Germany. (JN)

  8. Preparation and photoelectrocatalytic activity of a nano-structured WO{sub 3} platelet film

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Masayuki Maruyama, Syou; Sone, Koji; Nagai, Keiji; Norimatsu, Takayoshi

    2008-01-15

    A tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) film was prepared by calcination from a precursor paste including suspended ammonium tungstate and polyethylene glycol (PEG). The ammonium tungstate suspension was yielded by an acid-base reaction of tungstic acid and an ammonium solution followed by deposition with ethanol addition. Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis showed that the TG profile of PEG is significantly influenced by deposited ammonium tungstate, suggesting that PEG is interacting strongly with deposited ammonium tungstate in the suspension paste. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data indicated that the WO{sub 3} film is crystallized by sintering over 400 deg. C. The scanning electron microscopic (SEM) measurement showed that the film is composed of the nano-structured WO{sub 3} platelets. The semiconductor properties of the film were examined by Mott-Schottky analysis to give flat band potential E{sub FB}=0.30 V vs. saturated calomel reference electrode (SCE) and donor carrier density N{sub D}=2.5x10{sup 22} cm{sup -3}, latter of which is higher than previous WO{sub 3} films by two orders of magnitude. The higher N{sub D} was explained by the large interfacial heterojunction area caused by the nano-platelet structure, which apparently increases capacitance per a unit electrode area. The WO{sub 3} film sintered at 550 deg. C produced 3.7 mA cm{sup -2} of a photoanodic current at 1.2 V vs. SCE under illumination with a 500 W xenon lamp due to catalytic water oxidation. This photocurrent was 4.5-12.8 times higher than those for the other control WO{sub 3} films prepared by similar but different procedures. The high catalytic activity could be explained by the nano-platelet structure. The photocurrent was generated on illumination of UV and visible light below 470 nm, and the maximum incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) was 47% at 320 nm at 1.2 V. Technically important procedures for preparation of nano-structured platelets were discussed. - Graphical abstract: A

  9. Advanced selective non-invasive ketone body detection sensors based on new ionophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyapalan, A.; Sarswat, P. K.; Zhu, Y.; Free, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    New molecules and methods were examined that can be used to detect trace level ketone bodies. Diseases such as type 1 diabetes, childhood hypo-glycaemia-growth hormone deficiency, toxic inhalation, and body metabolism changes are linked with ketone bodies concentration. Here we introduce, selective ketone body detection sensors based on small, environmentally friendly organic molecules with Lewis acid additives. Density functional theory (DFT) simulation of the sensor molecules (Bromo-acetonaphthone tungstate (BANT) and acetonaphthophenyl ether propiono hydroxyl tungstate (APPHT)), indicated a fully relaxed geometry without symmetry attributes and specific coordination which enhances ketone bodies sensitivity. A portable sensing unit was made in which detection media containing ketone bodies at low concentration and new molecules show color change in visible light as well as unique irradiance during UV illumination. RGB analysis, electrochemical tests, SEM characterization, FTIR, absorbance and emission spectroscopy were also performed in order to validate the ketone sensitivity of these new molecules.

  10. A comparative evaluation of rare-earth screen-film systems. System speed, contrast, sensitometry, RMS noise, square-wave response function, and contrast-dose-detail analysis.

    PubMed

    Fearon, T; Vucich, J; Hoe, J; McSweeney, W J; Potter, B M

    1986-08-01

    We evaluated the physical characteristics and contrast-dose-detail performance of 11 rare-earth and three calcium tungstate screen-film systems. Measurements included system speed, contrast, sensitometry, RMS noise, square-wave response function, and contrast-dose-detail analysis. The major differences in physical characteristics among systems were system speed and RMS noise. Square-wave response differences were more subtle. For contrast-dose-detail analysis, the rare-earth screen-film systems and the calcium tungstate system responses were significant over a limited subject contrast range as a function of detail diameter. Relative dose efficiency in the noise-limited region is a function of the properties of the screen only and is independent of the film. PMID:3744739

  11. Precipitation Synthesis, Characterization, Morphological Control, and Photocatalyst Application of ZnWO4 Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpour-Mashkani, S. Mostafa; Maddahfar, Mahnaz; Sobhani-Nasab, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Zinc tungstate nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by a precipitation method in the presence of different polymeric surfactants. This study aimed to investigate the effect of different solvents and polymeric surfactants such as carboxymethyl cellulose, polyethylene glycol, and polyvinyl alcohol on the morphology, particle size, and crystal structure of the final product. The as-synthesized products were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy techniques. Furthermore, the hysteresis loop of the zinc tungstate nanoparticles at room temperature revealed paramagnetic behavior. Photocatalysis results revealed that maximum methyl orange decolorization of 85% was achieved with ZnWO4 nanoparticles in 240 min under visible-light irradiation. The saturation magnetization, remanent magnetization, and coercivity of the ZnWO4 nanoparticles were 0.003 emu/g, 0.0005 emu/g, and 110 Oe, respectively.

  12. Precipitation Synthesis, Characterization, Morphological Control, and Photocatalyst Application of ZnWO4 Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpour-Mashkani, S. Mostafa; Maddahfar, Mahnaz; Sobhani-Nasab, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Zinc tungstate nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by a precipitation method in the presence of different polymeric surfactants. This study aimed to investigate the effect of different solvents and polymeric surfactants such as carboxymethyl cellulose, polyethylene glycol, and polyvinyl alcohol on the morphology, particle size, and crystal structure of the final product. The as-synthesized products were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy techniques. Furthermore, the hysteresis loop of the zinc tungstate nanoparticles at room temperature revealed paramagnetic behavior. Photocatalysis results revealed that maximum methyl orange decolorization of 85% was achieved with ZnWO4 nanoparticles in 240 min under visible-light irradiation. The saturation magnetization, remanent magnetization, and coercivity of the ZnWO4 nanoparticles were 0.003 emu/g, 0.0005 emu/g, and 110 Oe, respectively.

  13. The textural properties and microstructure of konjac glucomannan - tungsten gels induced by DC electric fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixia; Zhuang, Yuanhong; Li, Jingliang; Pang, Jie; Liu, Xiangyang

    2016-12-01

    Konjac glucomannan - tungsten (KGM-T) gels were successfully prepared under DC electric fields, in the presence of sodium tungstate. The textural properties and microstructure of the gels were investigated by Texture Analyzer, Rheometer and SEM. Based on the response surface methodology (RSM) results, the optimum conditions for KGM-T gel springiness is 0.32% sodium tungstate concentration, 0.54% KGM concentration, 24.66V voltage and 12.37min treatment time. Under these conditions, the maximum springiness value of KGM-T gel is 1.21mm. Steady flow measurement indicated that KGM-T gel showed characteristic non-Newtonian pseudoplastic behaviour, with low flow behaviour indexes in the shear thinning region. SEM demonstrated the porosity of the freeze-dried samples. These findings may pave the way to use DC electric fields for the design and development of KGM gels and to apply KGM gels for practical applications. PMID:27374531

  14. Catalytic conversion of cellulosic biomass to ethylene glycol: Effects of inorganic impurities in biomass.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jifeng; Zheng, Mingyuan; Sun, Ruiyan; Song, Lei; Wang, Aiqin; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The effects of typical inorganic impurities on the catalytic conversion of cellulose to ethylene glycol (EG) were investigated, and the mechanism of catalyst deactivation by certain impurities were clarified. It was found that most impurities did not affect the EG yield, but some non-neutral impurities or Ca and Fe ions greatly decreased the EG yield. Conditional experiments and catalyst characterization showed that some impurities changed the pH of the reaction solution and affected the cellulose hydrolysis rate; Ca and Fe cations reacted with tungstate ions and suppressed the retro-aldol condensation. To obtain a high EG yield, the pH of the reaction solution and the concentration of tungstate ions should be respectively adjusted to 5.0-6.0 and higher than 187ppm. For raw biomass conversion, negative effects were eliminated by suitable pretreatments, and high EG yields comparable to those from pure cellulose were obtained. PMID:25459851

  15. Diode-pumped Yb:KYW femtosecond laser frequency comb with stabilized carrier-envelope offset frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, S. A.; Squier, J. A.; Diddams, S. A.

    2008-06-01

    We describe the detection and stabilization of the carrier envelope offset (CEO) frequency of a diode-pumped Yb:KYW (ytterbium-doped potassium yttrium tungstate) femtosecond oscillator that is spectrally centered at 1033 nm. The system consists of a diode-pumped, passively mode-locked femtosecond laser that produces 290 fs pulses at a repetition rate of 160 MHz. These pulses are first amplified, spectrally broadened and temporally compressed to 80 fs, and then launched into microstructured fiber to produce an octave-spanning spectrum. An f-2f nonlinear interferometer is employed with the broadened spectrum to detect and stabilize the CEO frequency through feedback to the pump laser current. These results demonstrate that such a Yb-doped tungstate laser can provide an efficient, compact, high-repetition-rate optical frequency comb with coverage from 650-1450 nm.

  16. Fabrication and morphology control of BaWO 4 thin films by microwave assisted chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Chen; Zeng, Jia; Li, KunWei; Wang, Hao

    2009-04-01

    Highly crystallized barium tungstate (BaWO 4) thin films with dumbbell-like, kernel-like, bowknot-like and cauliflower-like microstructure were synthesized from an aqueous solution containing barium nitrate, ethylenediamine tetraacetate acid disodium and sodium tungstate, via mild microwave assisted chemical bath deposition process. The resulting BaWO 4 films with different morphologies were characterized by X-ray diffraction spectrum, scanning electron microscope, Raman and photoluminescence spectra. The results indicate that the morphologies of final products significantly depend on the reaction conditions including the reaction time, the initial concentration of precursor reagent and the physicochemical characteristics of the substrates. Furthermore, the oriented aggregation mechanism is proposed as a possible formation mechanism of the films with specific morphologies.

  17. Radiation damage of PbWO 4 crystals due to irradiation by 60Co gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozma, Peter; Bajgar, Robert; Kozma, Petr

    2002-09-01

    Radiation resistivity of large tungstate crystals PbWO 4 from three suppliers has been studied for doses 10 4 Gy (10 6 rad) and 10 5 Gy (10 7 rad). Radiation resistivity was examined by the measurement of optical transmission through tungstate crystals before and after 60Co gamma-ray irradiations. The absolute degradation of transmission for 10 4 and 10 5 Gy doses at 480 nm wavelength of the peak emission of PbWO 4 doped with La 2+, was found to be lower than 12.3% and 14.2%, respectively. The results have been also compared with radiation hardness measurements for a large volume CeF 3 scintillation crystal. Complete recovery of radiation damage was observed between 10 and 15 days after irradiations.

  18. Polymerized Complex Sol-Gel Synthesis, Structural and Optical Properties of Monoclinic Eu3+ Doped KGd(WO4)2 Crystalline Red Phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thangaraju, D.; Durairajan, A.; Babu, S. Moorthy; Hayakawa, Y.

    2011-10-01

    1% Eu3+ doped KGd(WO4)2 (KGW) was synthesized through Pechini sol-gel process and crystallized by subsequent annealing at high temperature. Potassium nitrate, gadolinium nitrate and ammonium para tungstate precursors were mixed with citric acid and ethylene glycol to synthesis the polymerizable complex gel. The gel was heated to 250 °C for decomposition of polymer, which after the brownish white powder was used to synthesis the pure form of 1% Eu:KGW. The pre-fired powder was further heated at high temperature/s (550, 600, 650 and 700 °C) for calcination. The properties of heat treated samples were characterized by powder XRD, FT-IR, Raman, FESEM and fluorescence analysis to understand the crystallinity, organic liberation, tungstate ribbon formation, surface morphology and emission nature, respectively. Phase evaluation from the amorphous pre-fired sample to well crystalline KGW powder formation was confirmed with powder XRD analysis. Powders calcined at 600 °C show the appearance of monoclinic phase of KGW. Crystalline peaks without intermediate compound peaks were observed for samples calcined at 700 °C. Gel degradation and formation of double tungstate was clearly seen in the FT-IR spectrum. FT-IR spectrum of synthesized gel also, confirms the citrate formation and etherification. FESEM analysis reveals the size and morphology of the powder. Double tungstate formation from the amorphous powder was analyzed using laser Raman spectral analysis. The emission property of the europium doped KGW was analyzed using fluorescence. Changes in emission intensity was observed for samples calcined at different temperatures.

  19. Enantioselective Sulfoxidation Catalyzed by a Bisguanidinium Diphosphatobisperoxotungstate Ion Pair.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xinyi; Moeljadi, Adhitya Mangala Putra; Chin, Kek Foo; Hirao, Hajime; Zong, Lili; Tan, Choon-Hong

    2016-06-13

    The first enantioselective tungstate-catalyzed oxidation reaction is presented. High enantioselectivities were achieved for a variety of drug-like phenyl and heterocyclic sulfides under mild conditions with H2 O2 , a cheap and environmentally friendly oxidant. Synthetic utility was demonstrated through the preparation of (S)-Lansoprazole, a commercial proton-pump inhibitor. The active ion-pair catalyst was identified to be bisguanidinium diphosphatobisperoxotungstate using Raman spectroscopy and computational studies. PMID:27150978

  20. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    F.X. Girod

    2007-12-17

    The beam spin asymmetries of the reaction ep -> epg in the Bjorken regime were measured over a wide kinematical domain using the CLAS detector and a new lead-tungstate calorimeter. Through the interference of the Bethe-Heitler process with Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering, those asymmetries provide constraints for the nucleon Generalized Parton Distributions models. The observed shapes are in agreement with twist-2 dominance predictions.

  1. CMS electromagnetic calorimeter readout

    SciTech Connect

    Denes, P.; Wixted, R.

    1997-12-31

    The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter will consist of 109,008 crystals of Lead Tungstate (PbWO{sub 4}) arranged in a barrel (92880 crystals) and 2 endcaps (8064 crystals each). The crystals will be 25 radiation lengths long and cut in tapered shapes to make a hermetic calorimeter. The scintillation light from the crystals is captured by a photodetector, amplified and digitized. The properties of PbWO4, which is a new crystal still very much under development.

  2. Differential Light Induction of Nitrate Reductases in Greening and Photobleached Soybean Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Kakefuda, Genichi; Duke, Stanley H.; Duke, Stephen O.

    1983-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) seeds were imbibed and germinated with or without NO3−, tungstate, and norflurazon (San 9789). Norflurazon is a herbicide which causes photobleaching of chlorophyll by inhibiting carotenoid synthesis and which impairs normal chloroplast development. After 3 days in the dark, seedlings were placed in white light to induce extractable nitrate reductase activity. The induction of maximal nitrate reductase activity in greening cotyledons did not require NO3− and was not inhibited by tungstate. Induction of nitrate reductase activity in norflurazon-treated cotyledons had an absolute requirement for NO3− and was completely inhibited by tungstate. Nitrate was not detected in seeds or seedlings which had not been treated with NO3−. The optimum pH for cotyledon nitrate reductase activity from norflurazon-treated seedlings was at pH 7.5, and near that for root nitrate reductase activity, whereas the optimum pH for nitrate reductase activity from greening cotyledons was pH 6.5. Induction of root nitrate reductase activity was also inhibited by tungstate and was dependent on the presence of NO3−, further indicating that the isoform of nitrate reductase induced in norflurazon-treated cotyledons is the same or similar to that found in roots. Nitrate reductases with and without a NO3− requirement for light induction appear to be present in developing leaves. In vivo kinetics (light induction and dark decay rates) and in vitro kinetics (Arrhenius energies of activation and NADH:NADPH specificities) of nitrate reductases with and without a NO3− requirement for induction were quite different. Km values for NO3− were identical for both nitrate reductases. PMID:16663185

  3. Trichoderma harzianum Produces a New Thermally Stable Acid Phosphatase, with Potential for Biotechnological Application

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Amanda Araújo; Leitão, Vanessa Oliveira; Ramada, Marcelo Henrique; Mehdad, Azadeh; Georg, Raphaela de Castro; Ulhôa, Cirano José; de Freitas, Sonia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Acid phosphatases (ACPases) are produced by a variety of fungi and have gained attention due their biotechnological potential in industrial, diagnosis and bioremediation processes. These enzymes play a specific role in scavenging, mobilization and acquisition of phosphate, enhancing soil fertility and plant growth. In this study, a new ACPase from Trichoderma harzianum, named ACPase II, was purified and characterized as a glycoprotein belonging to the acid phosphatase family. ACPase II presents an optimum pH and temperature of 3.8 and 65°C, respectively, and is stable at 55°C for 120 min, retaining 60% of its activity. The enzyme did not require metal divalent ions, but was inhibited by inorganic phosphate and tungstate. Affinity for several phosphate substrates was observed, including phytate, which is the major component of phosphorus in plant foods. The inhibition of ACPase II by tungstate and phosphate at different pH values is consistent with the inability of the substrate to occupy its active site due to electrostatic contacts that promote conformational changes, as indicated by fluorescence spectroscopy. A higher affinity for tungstate rather than phosphate at pH 4.0was observed, in accordance with its highest inhibitory effect. Results indicate considerable biotechnological potential of the ACPase II in soil environments. PMID:26938873

  4. Rheological properties and formation mechanism of DC electric fields induced konjac glucomannan-tungsten gels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixia; Jiang, Yaoping; Lin, Youhui; Pang, Jie; Liu, Xiang Yang

    2016-05-20

    Konjac glucomannan-tungsten (KGM-T) hydrogel of electrochemical reversibility was successfully produced under DC electric fields in the presence of sodium tungstate. The structure and the effects of sodium tungstate concentration, KGM concentration, voltage and electric processing time on the rheological properties of the gels were investigated. pH experiments showed that KGM sol containing Na2WO4·2H2O in the vicinity of the positive electrode became acidic and the negative electrode basic after the application of DC electric fields. Under acid conditions, WO4(2-) ions transformed into isopoly-tungstic acid ions. FTIR and Raman studies indicated that isopoly-tungstic acid ions absorbed on KGM molecular chain and cross-linked with -OH groups at C-6 position on sugar units of KGM. Frequency sweep data showed with increasing sodium tungstate concentration, voltage, and electric processing time, the viscoelastic moduli, i.e., the storage and the loss moduli of the gel increased, whereas an increase in KGM concentration led to a decrease in gel viscoelastic moduli. The temperature sweep measurements indicated the obtained gel exhibited high thermal stability. Finally, the mechanism of gel formation was proposed. Our work may pave the way to use DC electric fields for the design and development of KGM gels as well as polysaccharide gels. PMID:26917402

  5. Controlled Growth of WO3Nanostructures with Three Different Morphologies and Their Structural, Optical, and Photodecomposition Studies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) nanostructures were synthesized by hydrothermal method using sodium tungstate (Na2WO4·2H2O) alone as starting material, and sodium tungstate in presence of ferrous ammonium sulfate [(NH4)2Fe(SO4)2·6H2O] or cobalt chloride (CoCl2·6H2O) as structure-directing agents. Orthorhombic WO3having a rectangular slab-like morphology was obtained when Na2WO4·2H2O was used alone. When ferrous ammonium sulfate and cobalt chloride were added to sodium tungstate, hexagonal WO3nanowire clusters and hexagonal WO3nanorods were obtained, respectively. The crystal structure and orientation of the synthesized products were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and their chemical composition was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The optical properties of the synthesized products were verified by UV–Vis and photoluminescence studies. A photodegradation study on Procion Red MX 5B was also carried out, showing that the hexagonal WO3nanowire clusters had the highest photodegradation efficiency. PMID:20628456

  6. Aerobic Hydrogen Production via Nitrogenase in Azotobacter vinelandii CA6

    PubMed Central

    Noar, Jesse; Loveless, Telisa; Navarro-Herrero, José Luis; Olson, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    The diazotroph Azotobacter vinelandii possesses three distinct nitrogenase isoenzymes, all of which produce molecular hydrogen as a by-product. In batch cultures, A. vinelandii strain CA6, a mutant of strain CA, displays multiple phenotypes distinct from its parent: tolerance to tungstate, impaired growth and molybdate transport, and increased hydrogen evolution. Determining and comparing the genomic sequences of strains CA and CA6 revealed a large deletion in CA6's genome, encompassing genes related to molybdate and iron transport and hydrogen reoxidation. A series of iron uptake analyses and chemostat culture experiments confirmed iron transport impairment and showed that the addition of fixed nitrogen (ammonia) resulted in cessation of hydrogen production. Additional chemostat experiments compared the hydrogen-producing parameters of different strains: in iron-sufficient, tungstate-free conditions, strain CA6's yields were identical to those of a strain lacking only a single hydrogenase gene. However, in the presence of tungstate, CA6 produced several times more hydrogen. A. vinelandii may hold promise for developing a novel strategy for production of hydrogen as an energy compound. PMID:25911479

  7. Anion binding in biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  8. Tungsten toxicity, bioaccumulation, and compartmentalization into organisms representing two trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Alan J; Johnson, David R; Seiter, Jennifer M; Lindsay, James H; Boyd, Robert E; Bednar, Anthony J; Allison, Paul G

    2012-09-01

    Metallic tungsten has civil and military applications and was considered a green alternative to lead. Recent reports of contamination in drinking water and soil have raised scrutiny and suspended some applications. This investigation employed the cabbage Brassica oleracae and snail Otala lactea as models to determine the toxicological implications of sodium tungstate and an aged tungsten powder-spiked soil containing monomeric and polymeric tungstates. Aged soil bioassays indicated cabbage growth was impaired at 436 mg of W/kg, while snail survival was not impacted up to 3793 mg of W/kg. In a dermal exposure, sodium tungstate was more toxic to the snail, with a lethal median concentration of 859 mg of W/kg. While the snail significantly bioaccumulated tungsten, predominately in the hepatopancreas, cabbage leaves bioaccumulated much higher concentrations. Synchrotron-based mapping indicated the highest levels of W were in the veins of cabbage leaves. Our results suggest snails consuming contaminated cabbage accumulated higher tungsten concentrations relative to the concentrations directly bioaccumulated from soil, indicating the importance of robust trophic transfer investigations. Finally, synchrotron mapping provided evidence of tungsten in the inner layer of the snail shell, suggesting potential use of snail shells as a biomonitoring tool for metal contamination. PMID:22873780

  9. Evaluating vacuum phototriodes designed for the PANDA electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makónyi, K.; Marcks von Würtemberg, K.; Tegnér, P.-E.; Hansen, K.; Isaksson, L.; Lundin, M.; Schröder, B.; Balkeståhl, L.; Fransson, K.; Johansson, T.; Rosenbaum, C.; Wolke, M.; Erni, W.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krushe, B.

    2014-11-01

    In this work properties of a vacuum phototriode (VPT) and preamplifier unit designed for the electromagnetic calorimeter of the PANDA experiment being built at FAIR are investigated. With the use of lead tungstate and lanthanium bromide scintillators the VPT properties are studied at low photon energies, from tens of keV in the lanthanium bromide measurements and between 10 MeV and 60 MeV in the lead tungstate measurements. At these energies the noise of the VPT unit can be expected to influence its performance significantly. It is shown that the noise contribution to the measured energy resolution, under optimal conditions, is consistent with a fluctuation of (one standard deviation) approximately 200 electrons at the VPT anode. For a lead tungstate crystal this is equivalent to a noise of 1.2 MeV. For lanthanium bromide this makes it possible to use VPTs for gamma ray spectroscopy above a few hundreds of keV without noticeable effects on the energy resolution compared to measurements with a standard photomultiplier.

  10. Trichoderma harzianum Produces a New Thermally Stable Acid Phosphatase, with Potential for Biotechnological Application.

    PubMed

    Souza, Amanda Araújo; Leitão, Vanessa Oliveira; Ramada, Marcelo Henrique; Mehdad, Azadeh; Georg, Raphaela de Castro; Ulhôa, Cirano José; de Freitas, Sonia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Acid phosphatases (ACPases) are produced by a variety of fungi and have gained attention due their biotechnological potential in industrial, diagnosis and bioremediation processes. These enzymes play a specific role in scavenging, mobilization and acquisition of phosphate, enhancing soil fertility and plant growth. In this study, a new ACPase from Trichoderma harzianum, named ACPase II, was purified and characterized as a glycoprotein belonging to the acid phosphatase family. ACPase II presents an optimum pH and temperature of 3.8 and 65 °C, respectively, and is stable at 55 °C for 120 min, retaining 60% of its activity. The enzyme did not require metal divalent ions, but was inhibited by inorganic phosphate and tungstate. Affinity for several phosphate substrates was observed, including phytate, which is the major component of phosphorus in plant foods. The inhibition of ACPase II by tungstate and phosphate at different pH values is consistent with the inability of the substrate to occupy its active site due to electrostatic contacts that promote conformational changes, as indicated by fluorescence spectroscopy. A higher affinity for tungstate rather than phosphate at pH 4.0 was observed, in accordance with its highest inhibitory effect. Results indicate considerable biotechnological potential of the ACPase II in soil environments. PMID:26938873

  11. Thin film scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Warren; McKinney, George; Tzolov, Marian

    2015-03-01

    Scintillating materials convert energy flux (particles or electromagnetic waves) into light with spectral characteristic matching a subsequent light detector. Commercial scintillators such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) are commonly used. These are inefficient at lower energies due to the conductive coating present on their top surface, which is needed to avoid charging. We hypothesize that nano-structured thin film scintillators will outperform the commercial scintillators at low electron energies. We have developed alternative thin film scintillators, zinc tungstate and zinc oxide, which show promise for higher sensitivity to lower energy electrons since they are inherently conductive. Zinc tungstate films exhibit photoluminescence quantum efficiency of 74%. Cathodoluminescence spectroscopy was applied in transmission and reflection geometries. The comparison between the thin films and the YAG and YAP commercial scintillators shows much higher light output from the zinc tungstate and zinc oxide at electron energies less than 5 keV. Our films were integrated in a backscattered electron detector. This detector delivers better images than an identical detector with commercial YAG scintillator at low electron energies. Dr. Nicholas Barbi from PulseTor LLC, Dr. Anura Goonewardene, NSF Grants: #0806660, #1058829, #0923047.

  12. Novel pseudo-morphotactic synthesis and characterization of tungsten nitride nanoplates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Deliang; Wen Hejing; Li Tao; Yin Li; Fan Bingbing; Wang Hailong; Zhang Rui; Li Xinjian; Xu Hongliang; Lu Hongxia; Yang Daoyuan; Sun Jing; Gao Lian

    2011-02-15

    A novel pseudo-morphotactic transformation route was developed to synthesize polycrystalline {beta}-W{sub 2}N nanoplates by thermally treating tungstate-based inorganic-organic hybrid nanobelts with a lamellar microstructure in an NH{sub 3} flow. The tungstate-based hybrid nanobelts were formed in a water-in-oil-microemulsion-like 'commercial H{sub 2}WO{sub 4} powders/n-octylamine/heptane' reaction system. The as-obtained hybrid nanobelts were thermally treated in an NH{sub 3} atmosphere at 650-800 {sup o}C for 2 h to form cubic {beta}-W{sub 2}N nanoplates. XRD, SEM, TEM, FT-IR and TG-DTA were used to characterize the precursors and their final products. The polycrystalline {beta}-W{sub 2}N nanoplates derived from hybrid nanobelts, with side lengths of several hundred nanometers, consist of small nanocrystals with an average grain size of 3.2 nm. The formation of {beta}-W{sub 2}N nanoplates involved two steps: decomposing tungstate-based hybrid nanobelts into WO{sub y} and W species and then nitridizing the active W-containing species to {beta}-W{sub 2}N nanocrystals in an NH{sub 3} flow. The platelike morphology of the {beta}-W{sub 2}N nanocrystals was inherited from the precursor of tungstate-based inorganic-organic hybrid nanobelts. -- A novel pseudo-morphotactic transformation route was developed to synthesize {beta}-W{sub 2}N nanoplates by thermally treating tungstate-based inorganic-organic hybrid nanobelts, the morphology of which was inherited to the {beta}-W{sub 2}N nanocrystals. Research highlights: {yields} We synthesize {beta}-W{sub 2}N nanoplates using inorganic-organic hybrid nanobelts as precursors. {yields} {beta}-W{sub 2}N nanoplates are formed at 650-800 {sup o}C for 2 h in an NH{sub 3} flow. {yields} {beta}-W{sub 2}N nanoplates consist of small nanocrystals. {yields} The plate-like morphology of {beta}-W{sub 2}N is inherited from its hybrid precursor. {yields} The pseudo-morphotactic transformation route is suitable for large-scale synthesis.

  13. Processing of polymer surfaces by laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutz, E. W.; Frerichs, H.; Stricker, J.; Wesner, D. A.

    1995-11-01

    The processing of polymer surfaces by laser radiation is investigated as a function of laser parameters (fluence, mode of operation) and processing variables (repetition rate, pulse number). Polymers under investigation are polyamide, polymethylmethacrylate, polypropylene, polystyrene, polycarbonate, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer, styrene-acrylonitrile copolymer, polybutadiene terephtalate, and polyoxymethylene, which are studied in air within different processing regimes such as modification of surface properties for subsequent metallization and removal of material for structuring of surface geometry. The metallization of polymers, which are pretreated by laser irradiation, wet chemical etching or plasma etching, is performed via electroplating and physical vapour deposition as a function of surface properties. The removal of polymers including non-thermal and thermal processes is done by direct processing techniques in the demagnification mode within one processing step. The diagnosis and the modelling of physical processes involved in tailoring the surface properties of polymers with laser radiation have to be implied to improve any application of these materials.

  14. Renal cancer risk and occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and plastics

    PubMed Central

    Karami, Sara; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Stewart, Patricia A.; Zaridze, David; Matveev, Vsevolod; Janout, Vladimir; Kollarova, Helena; Bencko, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Mates, Dana; Gromiec, Jan P.; Sobotka, Roman; Chow, Wong-Ho; Rothman, Nathaniel; Moore, Lee E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and certain plastic monomers increased renal cell carcinomas (RCC) risk. Methods Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate RCC risk in relation to exposure. Results No association between RCC risk and having ever been occupationally exposed to any polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or plastics was observed. Duration of exposure and average exposure also showed no association with risk. Suggestive positive associations between RCC risk and cumulative exposure to styrene (P-trend = 0.02) and acrylonitrile (P-trend = 0.06) were found. Cumulative exposure to petroleum/gasoline engine emissions was inversely associated with risk (P-trend = 0.02). Conclusions Results indicate a possible association between occupational styrene and acrylonitrile exposure and RCC risk. Additional studies are needed to replicate findings, as this is the first time these associations have been reported and they may be due to chance. PMID:21270648

  15. Nitrile bioconversion by Microbacterium imperiale CBS 498-74 resting cells in batch and ultrafiltration membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Cantarella, M; Cantarella, L; Gallifuoco, A; Spera, A

    2006-03-01

    The biohydration of acrylonitrile, propionitrile and benzonitrile catalysed by the NHase activity contained in resting cells of Microbacterium imperiale CBS 498-74 was operated at 5, 10 and 20 degrees C in laboratory-scale batch and membrane bioreactors. The bioreactions were conducted in buffered medium (50 mM Na(2)HPO(4)/NaH(2)PO(4), pH 7.0) in the presence of distilled water or tap-water, to simulate a possible end-pipe biotreatment process. The integral bioreactor performances were studied with a cell loading (dry cell weight; DCW) varying from 0.1 mg(DCW) per reactor to 16 mg(DCW) per reactor, in order to realize near 100% bioconversion of acrylonitrile, propionitrile and benzonitrile without consistent loss of NHase activity. PMID:15739103

  16. Novel nanosized water soluble fluorescent micelles with embedded perylene diimide fluorophores for potential biomedical applications: cell permeability, localization and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bryaskova, Rayna; Georgiev, Nikolai I; Dimov, Stefan M; Tzoneva, Rumiana; Detrembleur, Christophe; Asiri, Abdullah M; Alamry, Khalid A; Bojinov, Vladimir B

    2015-06-01

    Novel biocompatible water-soluble fluorescent micelles with embedded perylene diimides (PDI) for intracellular applications have been prepared by self assembling of amphiphilic poly(vinyl alcohol)-b-poly(acrylonitrile) (PVA-b-PAN) copolymers in the presence of synthesized fluorophores. Amphiphilic PVA-b-PAN copolymers were obtained by selective hydrolysis of well-defined poly(vinyl acetate)-b-poly(acrylonitrile) (PVAc-b-PAN) copolymer. The preparation of the novel fluorescence micelles consisting of PVA hydrophilic shell and PAN hydrophobic core with incorporated PDI fluorophores has been confirmed by DLS and TEM analysis. The cytotoxicity of the water-soluble fluorophores and their internalization into living cells depending on the micellar concentration have been tested. It was shown that they could successfully enter in living cells without destroying their morphology. The results obtained indicate that the novel water-soluble fluorescent micelles with embedded PDI fluorophores would be suitable for potential intracellular biomedical applications. PMID:25842102

  17. Polybenzoxazole-filled nitrile butadiene rubber compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajiwala, Himansu M. (Inventor); Guillot, David G. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An insulation composition that comprises at least one nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) having an acrylonitrile content that ranges from approximately 26% by weight to approximately 35% by weight and polybenzoxazole (PBO) fibers. The NBR may be a copolymer of acrylonitrile and butadiene and may be present in the insulation composition in a range of from approximately 45% by weight to approximately 56% by weight of a total weight of the insulation composition. The PBO fibers may be present in a range of from approximately 3% by weight to approximately 10% by weight of a total weight of the insulation composition. A rocket motor including the insulation composition and a method of insulating a rocket motor are also disclosed.

  18. Enzymatic degradation of aliphatic nitriles by Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2, a versatile nitrile-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shumei; An, Xuejiao; Liu, Hongyuan; Cheng, Yi; Hou, Ning; Feng, Lu; Huang, Xinning; Li, Chunyan

    2015-06-01

    Nitriles are common environmental pollutants, and their removal has attracted increasing attention. Microbial degradation is considered to be the most acceptable method for removal. In this work, we investigated the biodegradation of three aliphatic nitriles (acetonitrile, acrylonitrile and crotononitrile) by Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2 and the expression of their corresponding metabolic enzymes. This organism can utilize all three aliphatic nitriles as sole carbon and nitrogen sources, resulting in the complete degradation of these compounds. The degradation kinetics were described using a first-order model. The degradation efficiency was ranked according to t1/2 as follows: acetonitrile>trans-crotononitrile>acrylonitrile>cis-crotononitrile. Only ammonia accumulated following the three nitriles degradation, while amides and carboxylic acids were transient and disappeared by the end of the assay. mRNA expression and enzyme activity indicated that the tested aliphatic nitriles were degraded via both the inducible NHase/amidase and the constitutive nitrilase pathways, with the former most likely preferred. PMID:25746475

  19. The polymer-like organic material in the Orgueil meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandurski, E. L.; Nagy, B.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for analysis of polymeric organic material contained in powder from the Orgueil chondrite, using a stepwise high-vacuum pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique. Pyrolysis products obtained include a series of alkanes and alkenes to C8, an extensive series of alkylbenzene isomers, thiophene, alkylthiophenes, benzothiophene, acetonitrile, acrylonitrile, benzonitrile, acetone, and phenol. Most of these products are shown to be similar both qualitatively and quantitatively to those previously obtained from solvent-extracted Allende powder, indicating a basically aromatic and heteroaromatic polymer matrix with short aliphatic bridges or side chains. The production of acrylonitrile, acetonitrile, and benzonitrile (common breakdown products of amino acids) from the insoluble organic material is taken to suggest that amino acids exist in an insoluble form, perhaps as peptides, in the meteorite's polymeric component. Similarities between the structure of the Orgueil polymeric material and terrestrial kerogen are discussed which raise the possibility that both might have been produced in part by similar reactions.

  20. Positron annihilation lifetime study of interfaces in ternary polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meghala, D.; Ramya, P.; Pasang, T.; Raj, J. M.; Ranganathaiah, C.; Williams, J. F.

    2013-06-01

    A new method based on positron lifetime spectroscopy is developed to characterize individual interfaces in ternary polymer blends and hence determine the composition dependent miscibility level. The method owes its origin to the Kirkwood-Risemann-Zimm (KRZ) model for the evaluation of the hydrodynamic interaction parameters (αij) which was used successfully for a binary blend with a single interface. The model was revised for the present work for ternary polymer blends to account for three interfaces. The efficacy of this method is shown for two ternary blends namely poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile)/poly (ethylene-co-vinylacetate)/poly(vinyl chloride) (SAN/EVA/PVC) and polycaprolactone /poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile)/poly(vinyl chloride) (PCL/SAN/PVC) at different compositions. An effective hydrodynamic interaction parameter, αeff, was introduced to predict the overall miscibility of ternary blends.

  1. Toxicity of Pyrolysis Gases from Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, Carlos J.; Kosola, Kay L.; Solis, Alida N.; Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Parker, John A.

    1977-01-01

    The toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from six elastomers was investigated. The elastomers were polyisoprene (natural rubber), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM), acrylonitrile rubber, chlorosulfonated polyethylene rubber, and polychloroprene. The rising temperature and fixed temperature programs produced exactly the same rank order of materials based on time to death. Acryltonitrile rubber exhibited the greatest toxicity under these test conditions; carbon monoxide was not found in sufficient concentrations to be the primary cause of death.

  2. 40 CFR Table 37 to Subpart G of... - Default Biorates for List 1 Compounds

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Biorates for List 1 Compounds.... 63, Subpt. G, Table 37 Table 37 to Subpart G of Part 63—Default Biorates for List 1 Compounds Compound name Biorate, K1L/g MLVSS-hr Acetonitrile 0.100 Acetophenone 0.538 Acrylonitrile 0.750 Biphenyl...

  3. 40 CFR Table 37 to Subpart G of... - Default Biorates for List 1 Compounds

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Biorates for List 1 Compounds.... 63, Subpt. G, Table 37 Table 37 to Subpart G of Part 63—Default Biorates for List 1 Compounds Compound name Biorate, K1L/g MLVSS-hr Acetonitrile 0.100 Acetophenone 0.538 Acrylonitrile 0.750 Biphenyl...

  4. 40 CFR Table 37 to Subpart G of... - Default Biorates for List 1 Compounds

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Default Biorates for List 1 Compounds.... 63, Subpt. G, Table 37 Table 37 to Subpart G of Part 63—Default Biorates for List 1 Compounds Compound name Biorate, K1L/g MLVSS-hr Acetonitrile 0.100 Acetophenone 0.538 Acrylonitrile 0.750 Biphenyl...

  5. 40 CFR Table 37 to Subpart G of... - Default Biorates for List 1 Compounds

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Default Biorates for List 1 Compounds.... 63, Subpt. G, Table 37 Table 37 to Subpart G of Part 63—Default Biorates for List 1 Compounds Compound name Biorate, K1L/g MLVSS-hr Acetonitrile 0.100 Acetophenone 0.538 Acrylonitrile 0.750 Biphenyl...

  6. 40 CFR Table 37 to Subpart G of... - Default Biorates for List 1 Compounds

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Default Biorates for List 1 Compounds.... 63, Subpt. G, Table 37 Table 37 to Subpart G of Part 63—Default Biorates for List 1 Compounds Compound name Biorate, K1L/g MLVSS-hr Acetonitrile 0.100 Acetophenone 0.538 Acrylonitrile 0.750 Biphenyl...

  7. Study on some new water-soluble copolymers and polymer blends used for exploitation of oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.; He, Q.; Zhuo, Q.; Mao, W.

    1982-01-01

    Some water-soluble polymers used for oil recovery were prepared by copolymerizing acrylamide and acrylonitrile using ammonium persulfate as initiator. The properties of the mixed aqueous solution of carboxymethly cellulose and partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide were modified by ultrasonic technique. In addition, the gel characteristics of several etherified polyvinyl alcohols and their blends were studied and some new applications of polyvinyl were exploited. 6 refs.

  8. On the Development of Thermally Stable Semi-IPNs of PVA and PAN using IR, DSC and XRD Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Deepti S.; Bajpai, R.; Bajpai, A. K.

    2011-07-01

    A novel biopolymer based Semi-IPN of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polycrylonitrile (PAN) were synthesized in various proportions by redox polymerization and analyzed thermally by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSC thermograms shows good thermal stability, as a result of incorporation of acrylonitrile as the second network. The structural and morphological study of these semi-IPNs by FTIR and XRD technique, respectively, were correlated. The approach seems to be beneficial for various biomedical applications.

  9. The relative fire resistance of select thermoplastic materials. [for aircraft interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The relative thermal stability, flammability, and related thermochemical properties of some thermoplastic materials currently used in aircraft interiors as well as of some candidate thermoplastics were investigated. Currently used materials that were evaluated include acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, bisphenol A polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide, and polyvinyl fluoride. Candidate thermoplastic materials evaluated include: 9,9-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)fluorene polycarbonate-poly(dimethylsiloxane) block polymer, chlorinated polyvinylchloride homopolymer, phenolphthalein polycarbonate, polyethersulfone, polyphenylene sulfide, polyarylsulfone, and polyvinylidene fluoride.

  10. Vapor-liquid equilibria for copolymer+solvent systems: Effect of intramolecular repulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.B.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1995-03-01

    Role of intramolecular interactions in blend miscibility is well documented for polymer+copolymer mixtures. Some copolymer+polymer mixtures are miscible although their corresponding homopolymers are not miscible; for example, over a range of acrylonitrile content, styrene/acrylonitrile copolymers are miscible with poly(methyl methacrylate) but neither polystyrene nor polyacrylonitrile is miscible with poly(methyl methacrylate). Similarly, over a composition range, butadiene/acrylonitrile copolymers are miscible with poly(vinyl chloride) while none of the binary combinations of the homopolymers [polybutadiene, polyacrylonitrile, and poly(vinyl chloride)] are miscible. This behavior has been attributed to ``intramolecular repulsion`` between unlike copolymer segments. We have observed similar behavior in vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) of copolymer+solvent systems. We find that acrylonitrile/butadiene copolymers have higher affinity for acetonitrile solvent than do polyacrylonitrile or polybutadiene. We attribute this non-intuitive behavior to ``intramolecular repulsion`` between unlike segments of the copolymer. This repulsive interaction is weakened when acetonitrile molecules are in the vicinity of unlike copolymer segments, favoring copolymer+solvent miscibility. We find similar behavior when acetonitrile is replaced by methyl ethyl ketone. To best knowledge, this effect has not been reported previously for VLE. We have obtained VLE data for mixtures containing a solvent and a copolymer as a function of copolymer composition. It appears that, at a given solvent partial pressure, there may be copolymer composition that yields maximum absorption of the solvent. This highly non-ideal VLE phase behavior may be useful for optimum design of a membrane for a separation process.

  11. 40 CFR 60.667 - Chemicals affected by subpart NNN.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 107-89-1 Acetic acid 64-19-7 Acetic anhydride 108-24-7 Acetone 67-64-1 Acetone cyanohydrin 75-86-5 Acetylene 74-86-2 Acrylic acid 79-10-7 Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 Adipic acid 124-04-9 Adiponitrile 111-69-3...-9 Amylenes, mixed Aniline 62-53-3 Benzene 71-43-2 Benzenesulfonic acid 98-11-3 Benzenesulfonic...

  12. 40 CFR 60.707 - Chemicals affected by subpart RRR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....707 Chemicals affected by subpart RRR. Chemical CAS No. 1 Acetaldehyde 75-07-0 Acetic acid 64-19-7 Acetic anhydride 108-24-7 Acetone 67-64-1 Acetone cyanohydrin 75-86-5 Acetylene 74-86-2 Acrylic acid 79-10-7 Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 Adipic acid 124-04-9 Adiponitrile 111-69-3 Alcohols, C-11 or...

  13. 40 CFR 60.707 - Chemicals affected by subpart RRR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....707 Chemicals affected by subpart RRR. Chemical CAS No. 1 Acetaldehyde 75-07-0 Acetic acid 64-19-7 Acetic anhydride 108-24-7 Acetone 67-64-1 Acetone cyanohydrin 75-86-5 Acetylene 74-86-2 Acrylic acid 79-10-7 Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 Adipic acid 124-04-9 Adiponitrile 111-69-3 Alcohols, C-11 or...

  14. 40 CFR 60.667 - Chemicals affected by subpart NNN.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 107-89-1 Acetic acid 64-19-7 Acetic anhydride 108-24-7 Acetone 67-64-1 Acetone cyanohydrin 75-86-5 Acetylene 74-86-2 Acrylic acid 79-10-7 Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 Adipic acid 124-04-9 Adiponitrile 111-69-3...-9 Amylenes, mixed Aniline 62-53-3 Benzene 71-43-2 Benzenesulfonic acid 98-11-3 Benzenesulfonic...

  15. 40 CFR 60.707 - Chemicals affected by subpart RRR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....707 Chemicals affected by subpart RRR. Chemical CAS No. 1 Acetaldehyde 75-07-0 Acetic acid 64-19-7 Acetic anhydride 108-24-7 Acetone 67-64-1 Acetone cyanohydrin 75-86-5 Acetylene 74-86-2 Acrylic acid 79-10-7 Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 Adipic acid 124-04-9 Adiponitrile 111-69-3 Alcohols, C-11 or...

  16. 40 CFR 60.667 - Chemicals affected by subpart NNN.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 107-89-1 Acetic acid 64-19-7 Acetic anhydride 108-24-7 Acetone 67-64-1 Acetone cyanohydrin 75-86-5 Acetylene 74-86-2 Acrylic acid 79-10-7 Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 Adipic acid 124-04-9 Adiponitrile 111-69-3...-9 Amylenes, mixed Aniline 62-53-3 Benzene 71-43-2 Benzenesulfonic acid 98-11-3 Benzenesulfonic...

  17. 40 CFR 60.667 - Chemicals affected by subpart NNN.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 107-89-1 Acetic acid 64-19-7 Acetic anhydride 108-24-7 Acetone 67-64-1 Acetone cyanohydrin 75-86-5 Acetylene 74-86-2 Acrylic acid 79-10-7 Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 Adipic acid 124-04-9 Adiponitrile 111-69-3...-9 Amylenes, mixed Aniline 62-53-3 Benzene 71-43-2 Benzenesulfonic acid 98-11-3 Benzenesulfonic...

  18. 40 CFR 60.707 - Chemicals affected by subpart RRR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....707 Chemicals affected by subpart RRR. Chemical CAS No. 1 Acetaldehyde 75-07-0 Acetic acid 64-19-7 Acetic anhydride 108-24-7 Acetone 67-64-1 Acetone cyanohydrin 75-86-5 Acetylene 74-86-2 Acrylic acid 79-10-7 Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 Adipic acid 124-04-9 Adiponitrile 111-69-3 Alcohols, C-11 or...

  19. 40 CFR 60.707 - Chemicals affected by subpart RRR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....707 Chemicals affected by subpart RRR. Chemical CAS No. 1 Acetaldehyde 75-07-0 Acetic acid 64-19-7 Acetic anhydride 108-24-7 Acetone 67-64-1 Acetone cyanohydrin 75-86-5 Acetylene 74-86-2 Acrylic acid 79-10-7 Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 Adipic acid 124-04-9 Adiponitrile 111-69-3 Alcohols, C-11 or...

  20. 40 CFR 60.667 - Chemicals affected by subpart NNN.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 107-89-1 Acetic acid 64-19-7 Acetic anhydride 108-24-7 Acetone 67-64-1 Acetone cyanohydrin 75-86-5 Acetylene 74-86-2 Acrylic acid 79-10-7 Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 Adipic acid 124-04-9 Adiponitrile 111-69-3...-9 Amylenes, mixed Aniline 62-53-3 Benzene 71-43-2 Benzenesulfonic acid 98-11-3 Benzenesulfonic...