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Sample records for acrylonitrile

  1. Acrylonitrile

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylonitrile ; CASRN 107 - 13 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  2. Health Assessment Document for Acrylonitrile (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute acrylonitrile intoxication in humans, like many volatile organic compounds, results in irritation of the eyes and nose, weakness, labored breathing, dizziness, impaired judgement, cyanosis, nausea, and convulsions. Unlike many of these other organics, acrylonitrile causes s...

  3. ACRYLONITRILE PLANT AIR POLLUTION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Based on available literature, the report identifies and ranks (in terms of efficiency, cost, and energy requirements) air pollution control technologies for each of four major air pollutant emission sources in acrylonitrile plants. The sources are: (1) absorber vent gas streams,...

  4. 21 CFR 180.22 - Acrylonitrile copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD OR IN CONTACT WITH FOOD ON AN INTERIM BASIS PENDING ADDITIONAL STUDY Specific Requirements for Certain Food Additives § 180.22 Acrylonitrile copolymers. Acrylonitrile copolymers may be... uses subject to the denial are thereafter unapproved food additives and consequently unlawful. (3)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.505 - Halogenated acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.505 Halogenated acrylonitrile. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated acrylonitrile, (PMN P-90-299)...

  6. 40 CFR 721.505 - Halogenated acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.505 Halogenated acrylonitrile. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated acrylonitrile, (PMN P-90-299)...

  7. Ion-Molecule Association in Acrylonitrile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Paul F.; Milligan, Daniel B.; McEwan, Murray J.

    1997-01-01

    Acrylonitrile (propernenitrile or vinyl cyanide) polymerizes readily via a radical mechanism in solution at room temparature. The propensity to polymerize is sufficiently strong that it is usual to add a radical scavenger to the solution to prevent polymerization when oxygen (an inhibitor) is removed. Polymerization of acrylonitrile is also know to occur via nucleophilic addition of an anion by a michael-type reaction.

  8. HEALTH ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT FOR ACRYLONITRILE (REVISED DRAFT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acrylonitrile is readily absorbed in animals following ingestion or inhalation, while dermal absorption is poor (1%) compared to that of the lungs. Acrylonitrile is metabolized to cyanide, which is transformed to thiocyanic acid and by cyanoethylation of sulfhydryl groups to S-(2...

  9. Lowest Vibrational States of Acrylonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiel, Zbigniew; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Pirali, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies of the broadband rotational spectrum of acrylonitrile, H_2C=CHC≡N, revealed the presence of multiple resonances between rotational levels in different vibrational states. The resonances affect even the ground state transitions and their analysis allowed determination of vibrational term values for the first three excited states above the ground state and of vibrational energy differences in several polyads above these states. At that time there was no infrared data of sufficient resolution to assess the reliability of the resonance based vibrational energy determinations. We presently report results based on a 40-700 cm-1 high-resolution spectrum of acrylonitrile recorded at the AILES beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron. This spectrum was reduced by using the AABS packagea, and allowed assignment of vibration-rotation transitions in four fundamentals, five hot bands, and one overtone band. The infrared data and previous measurements made with microwave techniques have been combined into a single global fit encompassing over 31000 measured transitions. Precise vibrational term values have been determined for the eight lowest excited vibrational states. The new results validate the previous estimates from rotational perturbations and are also compared with results of ab~initio anharmonic force field calculations. Z. Kisiel, et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 280 134 (2012). A. López, et al., Astron. & Astrophys. 572, A44 Z. Kisiel, et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 233 231 (2005).

  10. HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS PROFILE FOR ACRYLONITRILE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Health and Environmental Effects Profile for acrylonitrile was prepared by the Office of Health and Environmental Assessment, Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office, Cincinnati, OH for the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response to support listings of hazardous con...

  11. IRIS Toxicological Review of Acrylonitrile (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    [UPDATE] New Schedule for IRIS Acrylonitrile Assessment

    In May 2012, EPA developed a new schedule for completing the IRIS acrylonitrile assessment. Acrylonitrile is primarily used in the manufacture of acrylic and modacrylic fibers, plastics, and nitrile rubbers. It ...

  12. 29 CFR 1915.1045 - Acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylonitrile. 1915.1045 Section 1915.1045 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Toxic and Hazardous...

  13. 40 CFR 721.505 - Halogenated acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated acrylonitrile, (PMN P-90-299) is... specified in § 721.125 (a) through (h). (2) Limitations or revocation of certain notification requirements... Section 721.505 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC...

  14. 40 CFR 721.505 - Halogenated acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated acrylonitrile, (PMN P-90-299) is... specified in § 721.125 (a) through (h). (2) Limitations or revocation of certain notification requirements... Section 721.505 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC...

  15. Denitrification with acrylonitrile as a substrate using pure bacteria cultures isolated from acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, C C; Lee, C M

    2001-04-01

    This study attempted to isolate and identify the denitrifying bacteria that utilize acrylonitrile as a substrate from acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) resin wastewater. The performance of the denitrifying bacteria for treating different initial acrylonitrile concentrations was also investigated under anoxic conditions. The results showed that seven strains of denitrifying bacteria that can use acrylonitrile or acrylic acid as a substrate were isolated from the denitrification tank of a wastewater treatment plant in a ABS resin manufacturing plant and a lab-scale anoxic granular activated carbon-fluidized bed. The bacteria strains Acidovorax facilis B and Pseudomonas nautica could utilize acrylonitrile up to 279 mg/l as a substrate for denitrification. For complete nitrate removal, an adequate supply of acrylonitrile was necessary. Under the assumption that the acrylic acid would be completely removed, the removal of 1 mg/l nitrate by A. facilis B or P. nautica, about 0.64-0.74 mg/l acrylonitrile or 0.87-1 mg/l acrylic acid was needed. Because strains A. facilis B and P. nautica could utilize acrylonitrile for denitrification, they are expected to play an important role in the treatment of acrylonitrile in the wastewater treatment plant (denitrification and nitrification processes) and lab-scale granular activated carbon-fluidized bed. PMID:11341291

  16. 21 CFR 181.32 - Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins. 181.32 Section 181.32 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PRIOR-SANCTIONED FOOD INGREDIENTS Specific Prior-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.32 Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins. (a)...

  17. ABSORPTION OF CO2 IN HIGH ACRYLONITRILE CONTENT COPOLYMERS: DEPENDENCE ON ACRYLONITRILE CONTENT. (R829555)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In continuation of our goal to determine the ability of CO2 to plasticize acrylonitrile (AN) copolymers and facilitate melt processing at temperatures below the onset of thermal degradation, a systematic study has been performed to determine the influence of AN cont...

  18. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177... Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1020 Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile... by weight of a matrix polymer containing 73 to 78 parts by weight of acrylonitrile and 22 to 27...

  19. [Migrants from disposable gloves and residual acrylonitrile].

    PubMed

    Wakui, C; Kawamura, Y; Maitani, T

    2001-10-01

    Disposable gloves made from polyvinyl chloride with and without di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (PVC-DEHP, PVC-NP), polyethylene (PE), natural rubber (NR) and nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) were investigated with respect to evaporation residue, migrated metals, migrants and residual acrylonitrile. The evaporation residue found in n-heptane was 870-1,300 ppm from PVC-DEHP and PVC-NP, which was due to the plasticizers. Most of the PE gloves had low evaporation residue levels and migrants, except for the glove designated as antibacterial, which released copper and zinc into 4% acetic acid. For the NR and NBR gloves, the evaporation residue found in 4% acetic acid was 29-180 ppm. They also released over 10 ppm of calcium and 6 ppm of zinc into 4% acetic acid, and 1.68-8.37 ppm of zinc di-ethyldithiocarbamate and zinc di-n-butyldithiocarbamate used as vulcanization accelerators into n-heptane. The acrylonitrile content was 0.40-0.94 ppm in NBR gloves. PMID:11775358

  20. Gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation of acrylonitrile.

    PubMed

    Krichevskaya, Marina; Jõks, Svetlana; Kachina, Anna; Preis, Sergei

    2009-05-01

    Photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) of acrylonitrile (AN) on titanium dioxide in the gaseous phase was studied. AN readily undergoes photocatalytic degradation in a gas-solid system by using TiO(2) Degussa P25. The AN PCO volatile products, visible in the infrared spectra, included nitrogen dioxide, nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, water, hydrogen cyanide and carbon monoxide. Longer contact time resulted in deeper oxidation of AN with decreasing hydrogen cyanide and increasing nitrogen dioxide content. The effect of temperature increasing from 60 to 130 degrees C was observed to be slightly negative in terms of AN degradation rate. However, the effect of increased temperature was noticeable in terms of the character and yields of the PCO products: HCN peaks diminished with growing peaks of NO(2). PMID:19424531

  1. Acrylonitrile characterization and high energetic photochemistry at Titan temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumi, A.; Piétri, N.; Chiavassa, T.; Couturier-Tamburelli, I.

    2016-05-01

    Laboratory infrared spectra of amorphous and crystalline acrylonitrile (C2H3CN) ices were recorded between 4000 and 650 cm-1. Heating up the acrylonitrile sample to 160 K shows details on the transition between amorphous and crystalline ice at ∼94 K. This molecule can be used as an indicator of the surface temperature of Titan since it is known also to be ∼94 K. The desorption energy of acrylonitrile was determined using two methods (IRTF and mass spectrometries) to be around 35 kJ mol-1. Solid phase acrylonitrile was irradiated with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light at low temperatures (20, 70, 95 and 130 K) using a microwave-discharge hydrogen flow lamp. Isoacrylonitrile, cyanoacetylene (HC3N), isocyanoacetylene (HC2NC), acetylene (C2H2) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) were identified as photoproducts by using FTIR spectroscopy. The branching ratio of each pathway has been calculated for the different temperatures. We have estimated the acrylonitrile, HCN and HC3N νCtbnd N stretching band strengths to be respectively A = 3.98 ×10-18 , A = 1.38 ×10-18 and A = 2.92 ×10-18cmmolecule-1 .

  2. 21 CFR 177.1040 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... temperature for 2 h.1 Minimum 10 pct solution viscosity at 25 °C (77 °F) is 10cP. 1 3. Acrylonitrile/styrene... average molecular weight, and solution viscosity, titled: “Determination of Residual Acrylonitrile and... Weights of Acrylonitrile/Styrene Copolymers,” and “Analytical Method for 10% Solution Viscosity of...

  3. Radiation grafting of styrene and acrylonitrile to cellulose and polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanpour, S.

    1999-06-01

    Radiation induced graft polymerization is one of the best methods for obtaining material with new properties. In this work, radiation grafting of styrene, mixture of styrene and acrylonitrile to cellulose and polyethylene in the presence of methanol as a solvent by mutual method is discussed. At a low dose rate, high grafting yields were obtained from the two systems used, due to lesser termination of free radicals with the polymer growing radicals and recombination of primary radicals, resulting in a longer chain length of the grafted copolymer. In the system of styrene and acrylonitrile, comonomer technique was used and the styrene controlled the homopolymer formation during graft polymerization. Water uptake of cellulose decreased by increasing the grafting yields. Grafted cellulose can be molded to some extent and in a high percent of grafting, a new transparent material was obtained. By radiation grafting of styrene-acrylonitrile to low density polyethylene a high degree of crosslinking was observed.

  4. 21 CFR 181.32 - Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins. 181.32 Section 181.32 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) PRIOR-SANCTIONED FOOD INGREDIENTS Specific Prior-Sanctioned...

  5. 21 CFR 181.32 - Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Acrylonitrile/butadiene copolymer blended with vinyl chloride-vinyl acetate (optional at level up to 5 percent by weight of the vinyl chloride resin) resin—for use only in contact with oleomargarine. (iv... with polyvinyl chloride resins—for use only on paper and paperboard in contact with meats and lard....

  6. IRIS Toxicological Review of Acrylonitrile (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On June 30, 2011, the draft Toxicological Review of Acrylonitrile and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and White House...

  7. 21 CFR 181.32 - Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins. 181.32 Section 181.32 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) PRIOR-SANCTIONED FOOD INGREDIENTS Specific Prior-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.32...

  8. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A TEST METHOD FOR ACRYLONITRILE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acrylonitrile (AN) has been identified as a suspected carcinogen and may be regulated in the future as a hazardous air pollutant under Section 112 of the Clean Air Act. A method was validated that utilizes a midget impinger containing methanol for trapping AN vapors followed by a...

  9. Testosterone in sera of workers exposed to acrylonitrile.

    PubMed

    Ivănescu, M; Berinde, M; Simionescu, L

    1990-01-01

    Testosterone was measured through three consecutive years in sera from young and adult male subjects working in a chemical factory exposed to some complex chemical noxae, the major exposure being acrylonitrile (vinylcyanid). In the first yr, (group A), the blood was collected on May 1975 (no 39), the II-nd yr (group B) on March (no 109) and the III-rd yr (group C) on May (no 149). The exposure time varied in each group between 6 mos and 7-10 yrs. For comparison, blood samples were collected from 145 men of comparable age grouped in nonexposed: blood donors (no 37) (group a), new workers (no 23) (group b) and exposed to other chemical noxae in the same factory: Na cyanid (group c, no 23), cyan derivatives (group d, no 22) and pyrolysis (group no 39). The seasonal testosterone variations being considered, the Student's 't' test applied to the hormonal levels in acrylonitrile groups A, B and C showed non significant differences. However, the comparison of the testosterone concentrations in sera of the groups A, B and C vs the control groups investigated during the same month of the year showed much lower levels of the hormone in the first groups (p less than 0.001). These data are suggesting that the exposure to acrylonitrile either by direct participation to the technological chain or by working in the same noxious environment may influence the testosterone synthesis and/or secretion. PMID:2103974

  10. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177.../butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene copolymer identified in this section may be... of: (1) Eighty-four to eighty-nine parts by weight of a matrix polymer containing 73 to 78 parts...

  11. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177.../butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene copolymer identified in this section may be... of: (1) Eighty-four to eighty-nine parts by weight of a matrix polymer containing 73 to 78 parts...

  12. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances.../butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene copolymer identified in this section may...

  13. 21 CFR 177.1020 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. 177... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances.../butadiene/sty-rene co-polymer. Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene copolymer identified in this section may...

  14. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of acrylonitrile binding to cytochrome c peroxidase and oxidation of acrylonitrile by cytochrome c peroxidase compound I

    SciTech Connect

    Chinchilla, Diana Kilheeney, Heather Vitello, Lidia B. Erman, James E.

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) binds acrylonitrile in a pH-independent fashion. •The spectrum of the CcP/acrylonitrile complex is that of a 6c–ls ferric heme. •The acrylonitrile/CcP complex has a K{sub D} value of 1.1 ± 0.2 M. •CcP compound I oxidizes acrylonitrile with a maximum turnover rate of 0.61 min{sup −1}. -- Abstract: Ferric heme proteins bind weakly basic ligands and the binding affinity is often pH dependent due to protonation of the ligand as well as the protein. In an effort to find a small, neutral ligand without significant acid/base properties to probe ligand binding reactions in ferric heme proteins we were led to consider the organonitriles. Although organonitriles are known to bind to transition metals, we have been unable to find any prior studies of nitrile binding to heme proteins. In this communication we report on the equilibrium and kinetic properties of acrylonitrile binding to cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) as well as the oxidation of acrylonitrile by CcP compound I. Acrylonitrile binding to CcP is independent of pH between pH 4 and 8. The association and dissociation rate constants are 0.32 ± 0.16 M{sup −1} s{sup −1} and 0.34 ± 0.15 s{sup −1}, respectively, and the independently measured equilibrium dissociation constant for the complex is 1.1 ± 0.2 M. We have demonstrated for the first time that acrylonitrile can bind to a ferric heme protein. The binding mechanism appears to be a simple, one-step association of the ligand with the heme iron. We have also demonstrated that CcP can catalyze the oxidation of acrylonitrile, most likely to 2-cyanoethylene oxide in a “peroxygenase”-type reaction, with rates that are similar to rat liver microsomal cytochrome P450-catalyzed oxidation of acrylonitrile in the monooxygenase reaction. CcP compound I oxidizes acrylonitrile with a maximum turnover number of 0.61 min{sup −1} at pH 6.0.

  15. Vibrations of acrylonitrile in N 1s excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilakovac, V.; Carniato, S.; Gallet, J.-J.; Kukk, E.; Horvatić, D.; Ilakovac, A.

    2008-01-01

    The N 1s near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of acrylonitrile gas are accurately reproduced by a complete ab initio multidimensional vibrational analysis. The role of π∗ -orbital localization and hybridization on vibrations accompanying core excitation is discussed. Transition to the π⊥∗(C=C-C≡N) delocalized orbital excites mostly stretching vibrations of the whole spinal column of the molecule. Promoting a core electron to the localized π∥∗(C≡N) produces C≡N stretching vibration combined with two strong bending modes of the C-C≡N end of the molecule, related to the change of carbon hybridization.

  16. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of acrylonitrile binding to cytochrome c peroxidase and oxidation of acrylonitrile by cytochrome c peroxidase compound I.

    PubMed

    Chinchilla, Diana; Kilheeney, Heather; Vitello, Lidia B; Erman, James E

    2014-01-01

    Ferric heme proteins bind weakly basic ligands and the binding affinity is often pH dependent due to protonation of the ligand as well as the protein. In an effort to find a small, neutral ligand without significant acid/base properties to probe ligand binding reactions in ferric heme proteins we were led to consider the organonitriles. Although organonitriles are known to bind to transition metals, we have been unable to find any prior studies of nitrile binding to heme proteins. In this communication we report on the equilibrium and kinetic properties of acrylonitrile binding to cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) as well as the oxidation of acrylonitrile by CcP compound I. Acrylonitrile binding to CcP is independent of pH between pH 4 and 8. The association and dissociation rate constants are 0.32±0.16 M(-1) s(-1) and 0.34±0.15 s(-1), respectively, and the independently measured equilibrium dissociation constant for the complex is 1.1±0.2 M. We have demonstrated for the first time that acrylonitrile can bind to a ferric heme protein. The binding mechanism appears to be a simple, one-step association of the ligand with the heme iron. We have also demonstrated that CcP can catalyze the oxidation of acrylonitrile, most likely to 2-cyanoethylene oxide in a "peroxygenase"-type reaction, with rates that are similar to rat liver microsomal cytochrome P450-catalyzed oxidation of acrylonitrile in the monooxygenase reaction. CcP compound I oxidizes acrylonitrile with a maximum turnover number of 0.61 min(-1) at pH 6.0. PMID:24291498

  17. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of acrylonitrile binding to cytochrome c peroxidase and oxidation of acrylonitrile by cytochrome c peroxidase compound I

    PubMed Central

    Chinchilla, Diana; Kilheeney, Heather; Vitello, Lidia B.; Erman, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Ferric heme proteins bind weakly basic ligands and the binding affinity is often pH dependent due to protonation of the ligand as well as the protein. In an effort to find a small, neutral ligand without significant acid/base properties to probe ligand binding reactions in ferric heme proteins we were led to consider the organonitriles. Although organonitriles are known to bind to transition metals, we have been unable to find any prior studies of nitrile binding to heme proteins. In this communication we report on the equilibrium and kinetic properties of acrylonitrile binding to cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) as well as the oxidation of acrylonitrile by CcP compound I. Acrylonitrile binding to CcP is independent of pH between pH 4 and 8. The association and dissociation rate constants are 0.32 ± 0.16 M−1s−1 and 0.34 ± 0.15 s−1, respectively, and the independently measured equilibrium dissociation constant for the complex is 1.1 ± 0.2 M. We have demonstrated for the first time that acrylonitrile can bind to a ferric heme protein. The binding mechanism appears to be a simple, one-step association of the ligand with the heme iron. We have also demonstrated that CcP can catalyze the oxidation of acrylonitrile, most likely to 2-cyanoethylene oxide in a “peroxygenase”-type reaction, with rates that are similar to rat liver microsomal cytochrome P450-catalyzed oxidation of acrylonitrile in the monooxygenase reaction. CcP compound I oxidizes acrylonitrile with a maximum turnover number of 0.61 min−1 at pH 6.0. PMID:24291498

  18. Radical-initiated controlled synthesis of homo- and copolymers based on acrylonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishin, D. F.; Grishin, I. D.

    2015-07-01

    Data on the controlled synthesis of polyacrylonitrile and acrylonitrile copolymers with other (meth)acrylic and vinyl monomers upon radical initiation and metal complex catalysis are analyzed. Primary attention is given to the use of metal complexes for the synthesis of acrylonitrile-based (co)polymers with defined molecular weight and polydispersity in living mode by atom transfer radical polymerization. The prospects for using known methods of controlled synthesis of macromolecules for the preparation of acrylonitrile homo- and copolymers as carbon fibre precursors are estimated. The major array of published data analyzed in the review refers to the last decade. The bibliography includes 175 references.

  19. Hydrolyzed Poly(acrylonitrile) Electrospun Ion-Exchange Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Jassal, Manisha; Bhowmick, Sankha; Sengupta, Sukalyan; Patra, Prabir K.; Walker, Douglas I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A potential ion-exchange material was developed from poly(acrylonitrile) fibers that were prepared by electrospinning followed by alkaline hydrolysis (to convert the nitrile group to the carboxylate functional group). Characterization studies performed on this material using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-Transform infra-red spectroscopy, and ion chromatography confirmed the presence of ion-exchange functional group (carboxylate). Optimum hydrolysis conditions resulted in an ion-exchange capacity of 2.39 meq/g. Ion-exchange fibers were used in a packed-bed column to selectively remove heavy-metal cation from the background of a benign, competing cation at a much higher concentration. The material can be efficiently regenerated and used for multiple cycles of exhaustion and regeneration. PMID:24963270

  20. Photolysis of astrophysically relevant acrylonitrile: a matrix experimental study.

    PubMed

    Toumi, A; Couturier-Tamburelli, I; Chiavassa, T; Piétri, N

    2014-04-01

    This report documents the photochemical study of H2C ═ C(H)CN (acrylonitrile) trapped in low-temperature argon matrices and irradiated with a microwave-discharge hydrogen-flow lamp (λ > 120 nm). We succeeded in identifying H2C ═ C(H)NC (isoacrylonitrile) as a photoproduct. HC3N (cyanoacetylene), C2H2:HCN (acetylene:hydrogen cyanide), and C2H2:HNC (acetylene:hydrogen isocyanide) complexes, which are molecules detected in molecular clouds or in the Titan atmosphere, were also identified. No imine product was observed, but other compounds coming from the HC3N photolysis have been found. Fourier transform infrared measurements and (2)H substitution experiments coupled with density functional theory calculations (B3LYP/6-31G**) were performed to confirm the spectral assignments of the photochemical products and intermediate species. PMID:24621153

  1. The Rotational Spectrum of Acrylonitrile to 1.67 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiel, Zbigniew; Pszczółkowski, Lech; Drouin, Brian J.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Yu, Shanshan; Pearson, John C.

    2009-06-01

    Acrylonitrile (vinyl cyanide) is an astrophysical molecule of sufficient abundance for detection of its ^{13}C isotopologues. In fact this molecule has been identified as one of the 'weed' species, that will contribute a plethora of lines in broadband submillimetre spectra from the new tools of radioastronomy, such as the Herschel Space Observatory or ALMA. We presently report the first stage in extending the knowledge of the rotational spectrum of acrylonitrile well into the THz region. The spectrum was recorded with the jpl cascaded harmonic multiplication instrument in the form of several broadband segments covering 390-540, 818-930, 967-1160, and 1576-1669 GHz. The analysis of the ground state spectrum has been extended up to J=128, K_a=29, and a combined data set of over 3000 fitted lines. It is found that transitions in all measurable vibrational states, inclusive of the ground state, show evidence of perturbations with other states. Several different perturbations between the ground state and v_{11}=1 at 228 cm^{-1} were identified and have been successfully fitted, resulting in E_{11}=228.29994(3) cm^{-1}, to compare with a direct far-infrared value of 228.83(18) cm^{-1}. H.S.P.Müller et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc., 251, 319-325 (2008). B.J.Drouin, F.W.Maiwald, J.C.Pearson, Rev. Sci. Instrum., 76, 093113-1-10 (2005). A.R.H.Cole, A.A.Green, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 48, 246-253 (1973).

  2. Recycling of Chrome Tanned Leather Dust in Acrylonitrile Butadiene Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sabbagh, Salwa H.; Mohamed, Ola A.

    2010-06-01

    Concerns on environmental waste problem caused by chrome tanned leather wastes in huge amount have caused an increasing interest in developing this wastes in many composite formation. This leather dust was used as filler in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) before treatment and after treatment with ammonia solution and sod. formate. Different formulations of NBR/ leather dust (untreated-treated with ammonia solution—treated with sod. formate) composites are prepared. The formed composite exhibit a considerable improvement in some of their properties such as rheometric characteristics especially with composites loaded with treated leather dust. Tensile strength, modulus at 100% elongation, hardness and youngs modulus were improved then by further loading start to be steady or decrease. Cross linking density in toluene were increased by incorporation of leather dust treated or untreated resulting in decreases in equilibrium swelling. Distinct increase in the ageing coefficient of both treated and untreated leather with drop in NBR vulcanizates without leather dust. Addition of leather dust treated or untreated exhibit better thermal stability.

  3. Acrylonitrile is a multisite carcinogen in male and female B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Ghanayem, Burhan I; Nyska, Abraham; Haseman, Joseph K; Bucher, John R

    2002-07-01

    Acrylonitrile is a heavily produced unsaturated nitrile, which is used in the production of synthetic fibers, plastics, resins, and rubber. Acrylonitrile is a multisite carcinogen in rats after exposure via gavage, drinking water, or inhalation. No carcinogenicity studies of acrylonitrile in a second animal species were available. The current studies were designed to assess the carcinogenicity of acrylonitrile in B6C3F1 mice of both sexes. Acrylonitrile was administered by gavage at 0, 2.5, 10, or 20 mg/kg/day, 5 days per week, for 2 years. Urinary thiocyanate and N-acetyl-S-(2-cyanoethyl)-L-cysteine were measured as markers of exposure to acrylonitrile. In general, there were dose-related increases in urinary thiocyanate and N-acetyl-S-(2-cyanoethyl)-L-cysteine concentrations in all dosed groups of mice and at all time points. Survival was significantly (p < 0.001) reduced in the top dose (20 mg/kg) group of male and female mice relative to controls. The incidence of forestomach papillomas and carcinomas was increased in mice of both sexes in association with an increase in forestomach epithelial hyperplasia. The incidence of Harderian gland adenomas and carcinomas was also markedly increased in the acrylonitrile-dosed groups. In female mice, the incidence of benign or malignant granulosa cell tumors (combined) in the ovary in the 10 mg/kg dose group was greater than that in the vehicle control group, but because of a lack of dose response, this was considered an equivocal finding. In addition, the incidences of atrophy and cysts in the ovary of the 10 and 20 mg/kg dose groups were significantly increased. The incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar adenoma or carcinoma (combined) were significantly increased in female mice treated with acrylonitrile at 10 mg/kg/day for 2 years. This was also considered an equivocal result. In conclusion, these studies demonstrated that acrylonitrile causes multiple carcinogenic effects after gavage administration to male and female B6

  4. An experimental Raman and theoretical DFT study on the self-association of acrylonitrile.

    PubMed

    Alía, Jose M; Edwards, Howell G M; Fawcett, W Ronald; Smagala, Thomas G

    2007-02-01

    The liquid structure of acrylonitrile (propenenitrile) has been investigated using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) ab initio calculations with the 6-311++G** basis set. Two different and complementary experimental approaches were undertaken: FT-Raman spectra of 13 acrylonitrile solutions in carbon tetrachloride (concentration range=0.25-12.0 mol.L-1) were studied in detail including principal component analysis (PCA) of the CN stretching band. Furthermore, dispersive Raman spectra of neat acrylonitrile were obtained at eight different temperatures from 238 up to 343 K. The complex and asymmetric acrylonitrile Raman CN stretching band can be decomposed into two components attributed to monomeric and self-associated forms. Ab initio results fully support this assignment and suggest that the self-associated complex is a nonplanar trimer held together by dipole-dipole interactions. At ambient temperature, the composition of acrylonitrile can be expressed as a mixture of 25% monomers and 75% trimers. Close to the boiling point, trimers still represent 65% of the liquid composition. The corresponding enthalpy of association was estimated to be -22+/-2 kJ.mol-1. PMID:17266219

  5. Atmospheric chemistry of toxic contaminants. 3. Unsaturated aliphatics: Acrolein, acrylonitrile, maleic anhydride

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D. )

    1990-12-01

    Detailed mechanisms are outlined for the chemical reactions that contribute to in-situ formation and atmospheric removal of the unsaturated aliphatic contaminants acrolein, acrylonitrile, and maleic anhydride. In-situ formation of small amounts of acrolein and maleic anhydride may involve the reaction of OH (and O{sub 3}) with 1,3-dienes and the reaction of OH with aromatic hydrocarbons, respectively. There is no known pathway for in-situ formation of acrylonitrile. Rapid removal of acrolein (half-life = less than one day) and of maleic anhydride (half-life = several hours) is expected from their rapid reactions with OH (major), O{sub 3}, and NO{sub 3}. These reactions lead to formaldehyde and glyoxal from acrolein and to dicarbonyls from maleic anhydride. Acrylonitrile is removed at a slower rate (half-life = 2-7 days) by reaction with OH, leading to formaldehyde and formyl cyanide.

  6. Chrome-tanned leather shavings as a filler of butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber.

    PubMed

    Przepiórkowska, A; Chrońska, K; Zaborski, M

    2007-03-01

    The noxious wastes from the tanning industry such as chrome-tanned leather shavings were used as the only filler of rubber mixes containing carboxylated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (XNBR) or butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber (NBR), and a dispersing agent Limanol PEV (Schill & Seilacher). The best form addition of leather powder to the rubber mixes is mixed the waste protein with zinc oxide. The leather powder added to the rubber mixes improves the mechanical properties: tensile strength (T(s)), elongation at break (epsilon(b)) and increase the cross-linking density of carboxylated XNBR and NBR rubber mixes. Satisfactory results of these studies are presented in this work. PMID:16942836

  7. 21 CFR 177.1040 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... deionized water or reagent grade n-heptane at reflux temperature for 2 h.1 Minimum 10 pct solution viscosity... viscosity, titled: “Determination of Residual Acrylonitrile and Styrene Monomers-Gas Chromatographic... Copolymers,” and “Analytical Method for 10% Solution Viscosity of Tyril,” which are incorproated by...

  8. ABSORPTION OF CO2 AND SUBSEQUENT VISCOSITY REDUCTION OF AN ACRYLONITRILE COPOLYMER. (R829555)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acrylonitrile (AN) copolymers (AN content greater than about 85 mol%) are traditionally solution processed to avoid a cyclization and crosslinking reaction that takes place at temperatures where melt processing would be feasible. It is well known that carbon dioxide (CO

  9. 21 CFR 177.1030 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer. 177.1030 Section 177.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components...

  10. 21 CFR 177.1040 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer. 177.1040 Section 177.1040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use...

  11. Controlled polymerization of acrylonitrile proceeded along with the Belousov-Zhabotinsky oscillator by changing its stirring conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furue, Yuuka; Okano, Kunihiko; Banno, Taisuke; Asakura, Kouichi

    2016-02-01

    Chemical oscillations of the manganese-ion catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction system were found to be controlled by changing its stirring conditions. The oscillation stopped at a high stirring rate, while it reappeared immediately by reducing the stirring rate. It is known in the BZ reaction system, that the radical polymerization takes place along with the oscillation when acrylic monomers are added. By the addition of acrylonitrile to the system stirred at a high stirring rate, the oscillation as well as the polymerization of acrylonitrile stopped. The radical polymerization of acrylonitrile by the BZ oscillator is thus found to be made controllable by changing the mixing conditions.

  12. Development of a conductimetric biosensor using immobilised Rhodococcus ruber whole cells for the detection and quantification of acrylonitrile.

    PubMed

    Roach, P C J; Ramsden, D K; Hughes, J; Williams, P

    2003-10-30

    A conductimetric biosensor for the detection of acrylonitrile in solution was designed and characterised using whole cells of Rhodococcus ruber NCIMB 40757, which were immobilised into a disc of dimethyl silicone sponge (ImmobaSil). The biosensor described was capable of the detection and quantification of acrylonitrile in aqueous solution, having a linear response to concentrations between 2 and 50 mM (106-2650 ppm) acrylonitrile. The biosensor has been shown to be reproducible with respect to the data obtained over a number of days, and retains stability for a minimum period of at least 5 days before recalibration of the biosensor is required. PMID:14559001

  13. Preparation and characterization of zinc sulphide nanocomposites based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesan, M. T.; Nihmath, A.; Francis, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    Rubber composite based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) reinforced with nano zinc sulphide (ZnS) have been prepared via vulcanization process and characterized by several techniques. Processing characteristics such as scorch time, optimum cure time decreases with increase in concentration of nano filler in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber. Mechanical properties such as tensile and tear strength increases with increase in concentration of nano filler up to 7 phr of loading thereafter the value decreases, whereas hardness, and flame resistance increases with the dosage of fillers. These enhanced properties are due to the homogenous dispersion of nano fillers in NBR matrix, which is evidenced from the structure that evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  14. Detection of acrolein and acrylonitrile with a pulsed room temperature quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manne, J.; Jäger, W.; Tulip, J.

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the use of a pulsed, distributed feedback quantum cascade laser centered at 957 cm-1 in combination with an astigmatic Herriot cell with 250 m path length for the detection of acrolein and acrylonitrile. These molecules have been identified as hazardous air-pollutants because of their adverse health effects. The spectrometer utilizes the intra-pulse method, where a linear frequency down-chirp, that is induced when a top-hat current pulse is applied to the laser, is used for sweeping across the absorption line. Up to 450 ns long pulses were used for these measurements which resulted in a spectral window of ~2.2 cm-1. A room temperature mercury-cadmium-telluride detector was used, resulting in a completely cryogen free spectrometer. We demonstrated detection limits of ~3 ppb for acrylonitrile and ~6 ppb for acrolein with ~10 s averaging time. Laser characterization and optimization of the operational parameters for sensitivity improvement are discussed.

  15. Pathogenesis of neurotoxicity of acrylates acrylonitrile and acrylamide: from cell to organism.

    PubMed

    Tarskikh, M M; Klimatskaya, L G; Kolesnikov, S I

    2013-08-01

    The incubation of 10 mM acrylamide (in vitro) with rat brain homogenate was followed by a decrease in catalase activity by 48% as soon as 5 min after addition of acrylate to the incubation medium. Activity of this enzyme remained low 30 min after the start of the experiment. Acute poisoning with this acrylate was accompanied by LPO activation in rat brain 24 h after injection. Exposure to acrylonitrile during occupational contacts with this monomer was followed by accumulation of adducts of acrylate with erythrocytic hemoglobin in human blood. In accordance with previously observed data, modern scheme of neurotropic effects of acrylonitrile and acrylamide was proposed. This scheme explained specific features of clinical syndromes induced by acute and chronic exposure to these toxic agents. PMID:24143365

  16. Urinary excretion of the acrylonitrile metabolite 2-cyanoethylmercapturic acid is correlated with a variety of biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure and consumption

    PubMed Central

    Minet, Emmanuel; Cheung, Francis; Errington, Graham; Sterz, Katharina; Scherer, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Acrylonitrile is an IARC class 2B carcinogen present in cigarette smoke. Urinary 2-cyanoethylmercapturic acid (CEMA) is an acrylonitrile metabolite and a potential biomarker for acrylonitrile exposure. The objective of this work was to study the dose response of CEMA in urine of non-smokers and smokers of different ISO tar yield cigarettes. We observed that smokers excreted >100-fold higher amounts of urinary CEMA than non-smokers. The CEMA levels in smokers were significantly correlated with ISO tar yield, daily cigarette consumption, and urinary biomarkers of smoke exposure. In conclusion, urinary CEMA is a suitable biomarker for assessing smoking-related exposure to acrylonitrile. PMID:21108560

  17. Alteration of Acrylonitrile-Methylacrylate-Butadiene Terpolymer by Nocardia rhodochrous and Penicillium notatum†

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, A. D.; Dean, A. V.; Gilbert, S. G.

    1980-01-01

    [14C]Barex-210, a terpolymer of acrylonitrile, methylacrylate, and butadiene, was tested for bioconversion. Powdered samples of polymer, each specifically 14C labeled at different carbon atoms of the polymer, were incubated with either Nocardia rhodochrous or Penicillium notatum in an enriched growth medium for various periods of time. After 6 months of incubation, the 14C-labeled polymer was transformed from a high-molecular-weight material completely soluble in dimethyl formamide (DMF) into both a lower-molecular-weight form still soluble in DMF and a second form that was no longer soluble in DMF. The amount of 14C-labeled carbon atoms converted into DMF-insoluble material was 8% of the backbone carbon-carbon atoms and 12% of the side-chain nitrile and acrylate atoms from the acrylonitrile-methylacrylate copolymer and 60% of the elastomer (acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer) atoms. Metabolism of the polymer was not established from measurements of metabolic 14CO2. Evolution of 14CO2 amounted to only 0.3, 0.6, 1.8, and 3.3% of these four fractions, respectively. Although the transformation of high-molecular-weight polymer into DMF-insoluble material was rapid in the early stages of microbial growth, the accompanying CO2 evolution was much slower. Further evidence of polymer alteration was indicated by the infrared spectrum of the insoluble material, which showed a disappearance of the nitrile and methylacrylate peaks. PMID:16345541

  18. Characterisation of recycled acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene from waste computer equipment in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Denise; Saron, Clodoaldo

    2015-06-01

    Polymeric materials constitute a considerable fraction of waste computer equipment and polymers acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene are the main thermoplastic polymeric components found in waste computer equipment. Identification, separation and characterisation of additives present in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene are fundamental procedures to mechanical recycling of these polymers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the methods for identification of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene from waste computer equipment in Brazil, as well as their potential for mechanical recycling. The imprecise utilisation of symbols for identification of the polymers and the presence of additives containing toxic elements in determinate computer devices are some of the difficulties found for recycling of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene from waste computer equipment. However, the considerable performance of mechanical properties of the recycled acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene when compared with the virgin materials confirms the potential for mechanical recycling of these polymers. PMID:26022280

  19. Comparative studies on the removal of heavy metals ions onto cross linked chitosan-g-acrylonitrile copolymer.

    PubMed

    Shankar, P; Gomathi, Thandapani; Vijayalakshmi, K; Sudha, P N

    2014-06-01

    The graft copolymerization of acrylonitrile onto cross linked chitosan was carried out using ceric ammonium nitrate as an initiator. The prepared cross linked chitosan-g-acrylonitrile copolymer was characterized using FT-IR and XRD studies. The adsorption behavior of chromium(VI), copper(II) and nickel(II) ions from aqueous solution onto cross linked chitosan graft acrylonitrile copolymer was investigated through batch method. The efficiency of the adsorbent was identified from the varying the contact time, adsorbent dose and pH. The results evident that the adsorption of metal ions increases with the increase of shaking time and metal ion concentration. An optimum pH was found to be 5.0 for both Cr(VI) and Cu(II), whereas the optimum pH is 5.5 for the adsorption of Ni(II) onto cross linked chitosan-g-acrylonitrile copolymer. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe the isotherms and isotherm constants. Adsorption isothermal data could be well interpreted by the Freundlich model. The kinetic experimental data properly correlated with the second-order kinetic model. From the above results it was concluded that the cross linked chitosan graft acrylonitrile copolymer was found to be the efficient adsorbent for removing the heavy metals under optimum conditions. PMID:24680901

  20. Mechanism of Selective Ammoxidation of Propene to Acrylonitrile on Bismuth Molybdates from Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Pudar, Sanja; Oxgaard, Jonas; Goddard, William A

    2010-08-25

    In order to understand the mechanism for selective ammoxidation of propene to acrylonitrile by bismuth molybdates, we report quantum mechanical studies (using the B3LYP flavor of density functional theory) for the various steps involved in converting the allyl-activated intermediate to acrylonitrile over molybdenum oxide (using a Mo3O9 cluster model) under conditions adjusted to describe both high and low partial pressures of NH3 in the feed. We find that the rate-determining step in converting of allyl to acrylonitrile at all feed partial pressures is the second hydrogen abstraction from the nitrogen-bound allyl intermediate (Mo-NH-CH2-CH=CH2) to form Mo-NH=CH-CH=CH2). We find that imido groups (Mo=NH) have two roles: (1) a direct effect on H abstraction barriers, H abstraction by an imido moiety is (~8 kcal/mol) more favorable than abstraction by an oxo moiety (Mo=O), and (2) an indirect effect, the presence of spectator imido groups decreases the H abstraction barriers by an additional ~15 kcal/mol. Therefore, at higher NH3 pressures (which increases the number of Mo=NH groups), the second H abstraction barrier decreases significantly, in agreement with experimental observations that propene conversion is higher at higher partial pressures of NH3. At high NH3 pressures we find that the final hydrogen abstraction has a high barrier [ΔHfourth-ab = 31.6 kcal/mol compared to ΔHsecond-ab = 16.4 kcal/mol] due to formation of low Mo oxidation states in the final state. However, we find that reoxidizing the surface prior to the last hydrogen abstraction leads to a significant reduction of this barrier to ΔHfourth-ab = 15.9 kcal/mol, so that this step is no longer rate determining. Therefore, we conclude that reoxidation during the reaction is necessary for facile conversion of allyl to

  1. Detection of hydrogen dissolved in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Shin; Fujiwara, Hirotada

    2012-01-01

    Rubber materials, which are used for hydrogen gas seal, can dissolve hydrogen during exposure in high-pressure hydrogen gas. Dissolved hydrogen molecules were detected by solid state 1H NMR of the unfilled vulcanized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber. Two signals were observed at 4.5 ppm and 4.8 ppm, which were assignable to dissolved hydrogen, in the 1H NMR spectrum of NBR after being exposed 100 MPa hydrogen gas for 24 h at room temperature. These signals were shifted from that of gaseous hydrogen molecules. Assignment of the signals was confirmed by quantitative estimation of dissolved hydrogen and peak area of the signals.

  2. Discovery and Optimization of Sulfonyl Acrylonitriles as Selective, Covalent Inhibitors of Protein Phosphatase Methylesterase-1

    PubMed Central

    Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Zuhl, Andrea M.; Speers, Anna E.; Wolfe, Monique R.; Weerapana, Eranthie; Brown, Steven J.; Rosen, Hugh; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2011-01-01

    The serine hydrolase protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) regulates the methylesterification state of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and has been implicated in cancer and Alzheimer's disease. We recently reported a fluorescence polarization-activity-based protein profiling (fluopol-ABPP) high-throughput screen for PME-1 that uncovered a remarkably potent and selective class of aza-β-lactam (ABL) PME-1 inhibitors. Here, we describe a distinct set of sulfonyl acrylonitrile inhibitors that also emerged from this screen. The optimized compound, 28 (AMZ30), selectively inactivates PME-1 and reduces the demethylated form of PP2A in living cells. Considering that 28 is structurally unrelated to ABL inhibitors of PME-1, these agents, together, provide a valuable set of pharmacological probes to study the role of methylation in regulating PP2A function. We furthermore observed that several serine hydrolases were sensitive to analogs of 28, suggesting that more extensive structural exploration of the sulfonyl acrylonitrile chemotype may result in useful inhibitors for other members of this large enzyme class. PMID:21639134

  3. Discovery and optimization of sulfonyl acrylonitriles as selective, covalent inhibitors of protein phosphatase methylesterase-1.

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, Daniel A; Zuhl, Andrea M; Speers, Anna E; Wolfe, Monique R; Weerapana, Eranthie; Brown, Steven J; Rosen, Hugh; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2011-07-28

    The serine hydrolase protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) regulates the methylesterification state of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and has been implicated in cancer and Alzheimer's disease. We recently reported a fluorescence polarization-activity-based protein profiling (fluopol-ABPP) high-throughput screen for PME-1 that uncovered a remarkably potent and selective class of aza-β-lactam (ABL) PME-1 inhibitors. Here, we describe a distinct set of sulfonyl acrylonitrile inhibitors that also emerged from this screen. The optimized compound, 28 (AMZ30), selectively inactivates PME-1 and reduces the demethylated form of PP2A in living cells. Considering that 28 is structurally unrelated to ABL inhibitors of PME-1, these agents, together, provide a valuable set of pharmacological probes to study the role of methylation in regulating PP2A function. We furthermore observed that several serine hydrolases were sensitive to analogues of 28, suggesting that more extensive structural exploration of the sulfonyl acrylonitrile chemotype may result in useful inhibitors for other members of this large enzyme class. PMID:21639134

  4. Two-dimensional spectra of electron collisions with acrylonitrile and methacrylonitrile reveal nuclear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Regeta, K. Allan, M.

    2015-05-14

    Detailed experimental information on the motion of a nuclear packet on a complex (resonant) anion potential surface is obtained by measuring 2-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra. The cross section is plotted as a function of incident electron energy, which determines which resonant anion state is populated, i.e., along which normal coordinate the wave packet is launched, and of the electron energy loss, which reveals into which final states each specific resonant state decays. The 2D spectra are presented for acrylonitrile and methacrylonitrile, at the incident energy range 0.095-1.0 eV, where the incoming electron is temporarily captured in the lowest π{sup ∗} orbital. The 2D spectra reveal selectivity patterns with respect to which vibrations are excited in the attachment and de-excited in the detachment. Further insight is gained by recording 1D spectra measured along horizontal, vertical, and diagonal cuts of the 2D spectrum. The methyl group in methacrylonitrile increases the resonance width 7 times. This converts the sharp resonances of acrylonitrile into boomerang structures but preserves the essence of the selectivity patterns. Selectivity of vibrational excitation by higher-lying shape resonances up to 8 eV is also reported.

  5. Ultrasonic velocity and absorption study of binary mixtures of cyclohexane with acrylonitrile by interferometric method at different frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, N. R.; Chimankar, O. P.; Bhandakkar, V. D.; Padole, N. N.

    2012-12-01

    The ultrasonic velocity (u), absorption (α), density (ρ), and viscosity (η) has been measured at different frequencies (1MHz to 10MHz) in the binary mixtures of cyclohexane with acrylonitriile over the entire range of composition at temperature 303K. Vander Waal's constant (b), adiabatic compressibility (βa), acoustic impedance (Z), molar volume (V), free length (Lf), free volume, internal pressure, intermolecular radius and relative association have been also calculated. A special application for acrylonitrile is in the manufacture of carbon fibers. These are produced by paralysis of oriented poly acrylonitrile fibers and are used to reinforce composites for high-performance applications in the aircraft, defense and aerospace industries. Other applications of acrylonitrile are in the production of fatty amines, ion exchange resins and fatty amine amides used in cosmetics, adhesives, corrosion inhibitors and water-treatment resins. Cyclohexane derivatives can be used for the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, dyes, herbicides, plant growth regulator, plasticizers, rubber chemicals, nylon, cyclamens and other organic compounds. In the view of these extensive applications of acrylonitrile and cyclohexane in the engineering process, textile and pharmaceutical industries present study provides qualitative information regarding the nature and strength of interaction in the liquid mixtures through derive parameters from ultrasonic velocity and absorption measurement.

  6. 21 CFR 177.1050 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer. 177.1050 Section 177.1050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as...

  7. 21 CFR 177.1050 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer. 177.1050 Section 177.1050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as...

  8. 21 CFR 177.1050 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer. 177.1050 Section 177.1050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as...

  9. SISTER CHROMATID EXCHANGE AND CHROMOSOME ABERRATION ANALYSES IN MICE AFTER IN VIVO EXPOSURE TO ACRYLONITRILE, STYRENE, OR BUTADIENE MONOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of polymers in plastic and rubber products has generated concern that monomers potentially active in biological systems may be eluted from these substances. The authors have evaluated two such monomers, acrylonitrile and styrene, for the induction of chromosome damage in ...

  10. Synergetic effect of copper-plating wastewater as a catalyst for the destruction of acrylonitrile wastewater in supercritical water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Ho; Lee, Hong-shik; Lee, Young-Ho; Kim, Jaehoon; Kim, Jae-Duck; Lee, Youn-Woo

    2009-08-15

    A new supercritical water oxidation process for the simultaneous treatment of mixed wastewater containing wastewater from acrylonitrile manufacturing processes and copper-plating processes was investigated using a continuous tubular reactor system. Experiments were carried out at temperatures ranging from 400 to 600 degrees C and a pressure of 25 MPa. The residence time was fixed at 2s by changing the flow rates of feeds, depending on reaction temperature. The initial total organic carbon (TOC) concentration of the wastewaters and the O(2) concentration at the reactor inlet were kept constant at 0.49 and 0.74 mol/L. It was confirmed that the copper-plating wastewater accelerated the TOC conversion of acrylonitrile wastewater from 17.6% to 67.3% at a temperature of 450 degrees C. Moreover, copper and copper oxide nanoparticles were generated in the process of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of mixed wastewater. 99.8% of copper in mixed wastewater was recovered as solid copper and copper oxides at a temperature of 600 degrees C, with their average sizes ranging from 150 to 160 nm. Our study showed that SCWO provides a synergetic effect for simultaneous treatment of acrylonitrile and copper-plating wastewater. During the reaction, the oxidation rate of acrylonitrile wastewater was enhanced due to the in situ formation of nano-catalysts of copper and/or copper oxides, while the exothermic decomposition of acrylonitrile wastewater supplied enough heat for the recovery of solid copper and copper oxides from copper-plating wastewater. The synergetic effect of wastewater treatment by the newly proposed SCWO process leads to full TOC conversion, color removal, detoxification, and odor elimination, as well as full recovery of copper. PMID:19231072

  11. Preparing cellulose nanocrystal/acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene nanocomposites using the master-batch method.

    PubMed

    Ma, Libo; Zhang, Yang; Meng, Yujie; Anusonti-Inthra, Phuriwat; Wang, Siqun

    2015-07-10

    The master-batch method provides a simple way to apply cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) as reinforcement in a hydrophobic matrix. The two-stage process includes making high-CNC content (70 wt%) master batch pellets, then mixing acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and maleic anhydride grafted polyethylene with the master batch pellets to prepare the ABS/CNC nanocomposite in extruder. SEM image indicates that self-assembled CNC nanosheets disperse evenly throughout the polymer matrix. The improved mechanical properties shown in tensile and DMA tests reveal that the CNC combines well with the ABS. TGA results show that the thermal degradation temperature of CNC in the master batch increases because of the protection of the ABS coating. This approach not only improves the dispersion ability and the thermal stability of CNC, but it is also applicable to use with other hydrophobic thermoplastics in industrial scale production. PMID:25857992

  12. Gloves against mineral oils and mechanical hazards: composites of carboxylated acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber latex.

    PubMed

    Krzemińska, Sylwia; Rzymski, Władysław M; Malesa, Monika; Borkowska, Urszula; Oleksy, Mariusz

    2016-09-01

    Resistance to permeation of noxious chemical substances should be accompanied by resistance to mechanical factors because the glove material may be torn, cut or punctured in the workplace. This study reports on glove materials, protecting against mineral oils and mechanical hazards, made of carboxylated acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (XNBR) latex. The obtained materials were characterized by a very high resistance of the produced materials to oil permeation (breakthrough time > 480 min). The mechanical properties, and especially tear resistance, of the studied materials were improved after the addition of modified bentonite (nanofiller) to the XNBR latex mixture. The nanocomposite meets the requirements in terms of parameters characterizing tear, abrasion, cut and puncture resistance. Therefore, the developed material may be used for the production of multifunctional protective gloves. PMID:26757889

  13. (E)-3-Anilino-2-benzoyl-3-(methyl­sulfan­yl)acrylonitrile

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A.; Ghabbour, Hazem A.; Chantrapromma, Suchada; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2012-01-01

    In the title acrylonitrile derivative, C17H14N2OS, the central amino­acryl­aldehyde O=C—C=C—NH unit, wherein an intra­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bond generates an S(6) ring motif, is approximately planar, with an r.m.s. deviation of 0.0234 (2) Å for the five non-H atoms. This plane makes dihedral angles of 41.04 (9) and 84.86 (10)° with the two phenyl rings. The dihedral angle between the two phenyl rings is 54.82 (10)°. An intra­molecular C—H⋯N hydrogen bond is also present. In the crystal, weak C—H⋯π and π–π inter­actions, with a centroid–centroid distance of 3.8526 (14) Å, are observed. PMID:22606198

  14. Synthesis and flocculation properties of gum ghatti and poly(acrylamide-co-acrylonitrile) based biodegradable hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Hemant; Jindal, Rajeev; Kaith, Balbir Singh; Maity, Arjun; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2014-12-19

    This article reports the development of biodegradable flocculants based on graft co-polymers of gum ghatti (Gg) and a mixture of acrylamide and acrylonitrile co-monomers (AAm-co-AN). The hydrogel polymer exhibited an excellent swelling capacity of 921% in neutral medium at 60°C. The polymer was used to remove saline water from various petroleum fraction-saline water emulsions. The flocculation characteristics of the hydrogel polymer were studied in turbid kaolin solution as a function of the amount of polymer and the solution temperature and pH. Biodegradation studies of hydrogel polymer were conducted using the soil composting method, and the degradation process was constantly monitored using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The results demonstrated an 89.47% degradation of the polymer after 60 days. Finally, the hydrogel polymer adsorbed 98% of cationic dyes from the aqueous solutions. PMID:25263897

  15. Experimental study on behaviors of dielectric elastomer based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Kuangjun; Chuc, Nguyen Huu; Kwon, Hyeok Yong; Phuc, Vuong Hong; Koo, Jachoon; Lee, Youngkwan; Nam, Jaedo; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol

    2010-04-01

    Previously, the dielectric elastomer based on Acrylonitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR), called synthetic elastomer has been reported by our group. It has the advantages that its characteristics can be modified according to the requirements of performances, and thus, it is applicable to a wide variety of applications. In this paper, we address the effects of additives and vulcanization conditions on the overall performance of synthetic elastomer. In the present work, factors to have effects on the performances are extracted, e.g additives such as dioctyl phthalate (DOP), barium titanium dioxide (BaTiO3) and vulcanization conditions such as dicumyl peroxide (DCP), cross-linking times. Also, it is described how the performances can be optimized by using DOE (Design of Experiments) technique and experimental results are analyzed by ANOVA (Analysis of variance).

  16. Studies of plastic crystal gel polymer electrolytes based on poly(vinylidene chloride-co-acrylonitrile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambali, D.; Zainuddin, Z.; Supa'at, I.; Osman, Z.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we have prepared systems of poly(vinylidene chloride-co-acrylonitrile) (PVdC-co-AN) based gel polymer electrolytes (GPEs) which are single plasticized-GPEs and double plasticized-GPEs. Both systems comprised plastic crystal succinonitrile SN to form plastic crystal gel polymer electrolyte (PGPE) films. The ionic conductivity of the PGPE films were analysed by means of a.c. impedance spectroscopy at room temperature as well as at the temperature range of 303 K to 353 K. The temperature dependence ionic conductivity was found to obey the VTF rule. To study the interactions among the constituents in the PGPEs, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was carried out and hence, the complexation between them has also been confirmed.

  17. Dielectric Relaxation Behavior of Poly(acrylonitrile-co-methacrylonitrile) Microcapsules Dispersed in a Silicone Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Taigyoo; OBrien, Emmett; Lizotte, Jeremy R.; Glass, Thomas E.; Ward, Thomas C.; Long, Timothy E.; Leo, Donald J.

    2006-01-01

    The dielectric relaxation behavior of poly(acrylonitrile-co-methacrylonitrile) dispersed in a cured polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) matrix as microcapsules was investigated over multiple thermal cycles and at varying concentrations. The copolymer microcapsules contained an isopentane core. In the PDMS matrix this copolymer displayed a pronounced relaxation signal at temperatures above the glass transition of the copolymers due to Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars (MWS) relaxation. The mechanism of MWS relaxation interpreted by the Havriliak-Negami and Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts relaxation functions was found to be very similar to previous studies of neat polyacrylonitrile and its copolymer. The activation energy of the relaxation decreased over successive thermal cycling coincident with a decreasing strength of the relaxation. These observations were attributed to the decreasing concentration of nitrile groups due to intramolecular cyclizations.

  18. Chemical characterization of CTBN (carboxyl-terminated butadiene/acrylonitrile) and its epoxy adduct

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the analysis of carbonxyl-terminated butadiene (CTB), carboxyl-terminated butadiene/acrylonitrile (CTBN), and a CTBN adduct prepared by reaction with Epon 828. Data from gel permeation chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography, and ion chromatography are presented and discussed. Quantitative methods based on carbon-13 and proton NMR for analyzing CTBN are described. Proton NMR was found to be useful in identifying lots that have an abnormal amount of CTBN protons. One such lot exhibited a phase separation of a polybutadiene impurity. Carbon-13 NMR was found to be capable of determining nitrile content directly. Carbon-13 NMR had a relative standard deviation of 8.3% and a proton NMR of 3.9%. Proton NMR was found to be useful in identifying lots that have 5% more CTBN protons than other lots. 3 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Direct pyrolysis mass spectrometry of acrylonitrile-cellulose graft copolymer prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization in presence of styrene as homopolymer suppressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, Sayed M.; Dessouki, Ahmad M.; Nizam El-Din, Horia M.

    2001-05-01

    Graft polymerization of acrylonitrile onto cellulosic filter paper competing with the homopolymerization by mutual irradiation technique was studied in the presence of homopolymer suppressors. Addition of FeCl 3 decreased both homopolymerization and graft polymerization, whereas inclusion of a low ratio of styrene monomer with acrylonitrile leads to successful grafting of acrylonitrile with little homopolymer formation. Chemical structure and thermal behavior of the produced graft copolymers were investigated by gradual heating in the solid probe of a mass spectrometer equipped with a GCMS data system. The resulting total ion current (TIC) showed that the degradation of graft copolymers follows two-step pyrolysis. The presence of a low ratio of styrene comonomer increased thermal stability of the prepared acrylonitrile-cellulose graft copolymer. The pyrolysis products have mass spectra characteristic of the copolymer composition; they contain the repeating unit of the oligomers. Total ion current and spectrum subtractions were used to separate and measure spectra of graft copolymers at distinctly different temperatures.

  20. Covalent immobilization of glucose oxidase onto new modified acrylonitrile copolymer/silica gel hybrid supports.

    PubMed

    Godjevargova, Tzonka; Nenkova, Ruska; Dimova, Nedyalka

    2005-08-12

    New polymer/silica gel hybrid supports were prepared by coating high surface area of silica gel with modified acrylonitrile copolymer. The concentrations of the modifying agent (NaOH) and the modified polymer were varied. GOD was covalently immobilized on these hybrid supports and the relative activity and the amount of bound protein were determined. The highest relative activity and sufficient amount of bound protein of the immobilized GOD were achieved in 10% NaOH and 2% solution of modified acrylonitrile copolymer. The influence of glutaraldehyde concentration and the storage time on enzyme efficiency were examined. Glutaraldehyde concentration of 0.5% is optimal for the immobilized GOD. It was shown that the covalently bound enzyme (using 0.5% glutaraldehyde) had higher relative activity than the activity of the adsorbed enzyme. Covalently immobilized GOD with 0.5% glutaraldehyde was more stable for four months in comparison with the one immobilized on pure silica gel, hybrid support with 10% glutaraldehyde and the free enzyme. The effect of the pore size on the enzyme efficiency was studied on four types of silica gel with different pore size. Silica with large pores (CPC-Silica carrier, 375 A) presented higher relative activity than those with smaller pore size (Silica gel with 4, 40 and 100 A). The amount of bound protein was also reduced with decreasing the pore size. The effect of particle size was studied and it was found out that the smaller the particle size was, the greater the activity and the amount of immobilized enzyme were. The obtained results proved that these new polymer/silica gel hybrid supports were suitable for GOD immobilization. PMID:16080168

  1. Perinatal Toxicity and Carcinogenicity Studies of Styrene –Acrylonitrile Trimer, A Ground Water Contaminant

    PubMed Central

    Behl, Mamta; Elmore, Susan A.; Malarkey, David E.; Hejtmancik, Milton R.; Gerken, Diane K.; Chhabra, Rajendra S.

    2015-01-01

    Styrene Acrylonitrile (SAN) Trimer is a by-product in the production of acrylonitrile styrene plastics. Following a report of a childhood cancer cluster in the Toms River section of Dover Township, New Jersey, SAN Trimer was identified as one of the groundwater contaminants at Reich Farm Superfund site in the township. The contaminants from the Reich Farm site’s ground water plume impacted two wells at the Parkway well field. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) studied the toxicity and carcinogenicity of SAN Trimer in rats exposed during their perinatal developmental period and adulthood. The chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity studies in F344/N rats were preceded by 7- and 18-week perinatal toxicity studies to determine the exposure concentrations for the 2-year studies. Subsequently, Fisher 344 pregnant dams were exposed to SAN Trimer containing diet at 400, 800, or 1600 ppm concentrations during gestation, nursing and weaning periods of offspring followed by two year of adult exposures to both male and female pups. There was no statistically significant evidence of carcinogenic activity following SAN-Trimer exposure; however, rare neoplasms in the brain and spinal cord were observed in males and to lesser extent in female rats. These incidences were considered within the range of historical background in the animal model used in the current studies. Therefore, the presence of a few rarely occurring CNS tumors in the treated groups were not judged to be associated with the SAN Trimer exposure. The major finding was a dose-related peripheral neuropathy associated with the sciatic nerves in females and spinal nerve roots in males and females thereby suggesting that SAN trimer is potentially a nervous system toxicant. PMID:24060431

  2. Photoinitiated decomposition of substituted ethylenes: The photodissociation of vinyl chloride and acrylonitrile at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, D.A.; Suits, A.G.; Lee, Y.T.

    1997-04-01

    Ethylene and its substituted analogues (H{sub 2}CCHX) are important molecules in hydrogen combustion. As the simplest {pi}-bonded hydrocarbons these molecules serve as prototypical systems for understanding the decomposition of this important class of compounds. The authors have used the technique of photofragment translational spectroscopy at beamline 9.0.2.1 to investigate the dissociation of vinyl chloride (X=Cl) and acrylonitrile (X=CN) following absorption at 193 nm. The technique uses a molecular beam of the reactant seeded in helium which is crossed at 90 degrees with the output of an excimer laser operating on the ArF transition, 193.3 nm. The neutral photoproducts which recoil out of the molecular beam travel 15.1 cm where they are photoionized by the VUV undulator radiation, mass selected, and counted as a function of time. The molecular beam source is rotatable about the axis of the dissociation laser. The authors have directly observed all four of the following dissociation channels for both systems: (1) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} H + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}X; (2) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} X + C{sub 2}H{sub 3}; (3) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} H{sub 2} + C{sub 2}HX; and (4) H{sub 2}CCHX {r_arrow} HX + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. They measured translational energy distributions for all of the observed channels and measured the photoionization onset for many of the photoproducts which provided information about their chemical identity and internal energy content. In the case of acrylonitrile, selective product photoionization provided the ability to discriminate between channels 2 and 4 which result in the same product mass combination.

  3. Antibacterial activity of poly(vinyl alcohol)-b-poly(acrylonitrile) based micelles loaded with silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bryaskova, Rayna; Pencheva, Daniela; Kyulavska, Mariya; Bozukova, Dimitriya; Debuigne, Antoine; Detrembleur, Christophe

    2010-04-15

    A new amphiphilic poly(vinyl alcohol)-b-poly(acrylonitrile) (PVOH-b-PAN) copolymer obtained by selective hydrolysis of well-defined poly(vinyl acetate)-b-poly(acrylonitrile) copolymer synthesized by cobalt mediated radical polymerization was used for the preparation of PVOH-b-PAN based micelles with embedded silver nanoparticles. The successful formation of silver loaded micelles has been confirmed by UV-vis, DLS and TEM analysis and their antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and spore solution of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) has been studied. PVOH-b-PAN based micelles with embedded silver nanoparticles showed a strong bactericidal effect against E. coli, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa and the minimum bactericidal concentration for each system (MBC) has been determined. PMID:20074742

  4. Enhanced photorefractive performance in CdSe quantum-dot-dispersed poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiangping; Embden, Joel van; Chon, James W. M.; Gu Min; Evans, Richard A.

    2010-06-21

    This paper reports on the enhanced photorefractive behavior of a CdSe quantum-dot-dispersed less expensive polymer of poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile). The capability of CdSe quantum dots used as photosensitizers and the associated photorefractive performance are characterized through a photocurrent experiment and a two-beam coupling experiment, respectively. An enhanced two-beam coupling gain coefficient of 12.2 cm{sup -1} at 46 V/mum was observed owning to the reduced potential barrier. The photorefractive performance per CdSe quantum dot is three orders of magnitude higher than that in the sample sensitized by trinitrofluorenone in poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile), and almost ten times higher than that in the CdSe quantum-dot-sensitized poly(N-vinylcarbazole) polymers.

  5. Morphology and Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Diglycidyl Ether of Bisphenol-A Toughened with Carboxyl-Terminated Butadiene-Acrylonitrile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. D.; Chung, S. Y.; Fedors, R. F.; Moacanin, J.; Gupta, A.

    1984-01-01

    The fracture toughness of an incorporation of a carboxyl-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile (CTBN) elastomer in diglycidyl ether bisphenol A (DGEBA) resin was investigated. Measurements of dynamic mechanical properties, scanning electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering were carried out to characterize the state of cure, morphology and particle size and size distribution of the neat resins and their graphite fiber reinforced composites.

  6. Enantioselective cyclopropanation of (Z)-3-substituted-2-(4-pyridyl)-acrylonitriles catalyzed by Cinchona ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Del Fiandra, Claudia; Moccia, Maria; Adamo, Mauro F A

    2016-03-21

    Cyclopropane esters holding two quaternary centres were prepared in high yields, complete diastereoselection and up to 83% ee. The reaction described herein entailed reacting (Z)-3-substituted-2-(4-pyridyl)-acrylonitrile, a reactive class of Michael acceptor, with 2-bromomalonate esters in the presence of Cinchona derived phase-transfer catalysts. The reaction allowed multi-gram preparation of the desired products. PMID:26906250

  7. Phenomena affecting morphology of microporous poly(acrylonitrile) prepared via phase separation from solution

    SciTech Connect

    Legasse, R.R.; Weagley, R.J.; Leslie, P.K.; Schneider, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is concerned with controlling the morphology of microporous polymers prepared via thermal demixing of solutions. 2 wt % solutions of poly(acrylonitrile) in maleic anhydride, a poor solvent, are first cooled to produce separated polymer-rich and solvent-rich phases. Removing the solvent by freeze drying then produces a microporous material having a density of 33 mg/cm{sup 3}, a void fraction of 97%, and a pore size of about 10 {mu}m. We find that the morphology cannot be explained by existing models, which focus on phase diagrams and kinetics of phase transformations during cooling of the solution. In conflict with those models, we find that two radically different morphologies can be produced even when the polymer concentration and cooling path are held strictly constant. A hypothesis that polymer degradation causes the different morphologies is not supported by GPC, {sup 13}C NMR, and FTIR experiments. Instead, we offer evidence that the different microporous morphologies are caused by different polymer conformations in solutions having the same concentration and temperature. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Hg(II) adsorption using amidoximated porous acrylonitrile/itaconic copolymers prepared by suspended emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chunnuan; Qu, Rongjun; Chen, Hou; Liu, Xiguang; Sun, Changmei; Ma, Caixia

    2016-01-01

    Initially, porous acrylonitrile/itaconic acid copolymers (AN/IA) were prepared by suspended emulsion polymerization. Successively, the cyano groups in AN/IA copolymers were converted to amidoxime (AO) groups by the reaction with hydroxylamine hydrochloride. The structures of the AN/IA and amidoximated AN/IA (AO AN/IA) were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and porous structural analysis. The adsorption properties of AO AN/IA for Hg(II) were investigated. The results show that AO AN/IA has mesopores and macropores, and surface area of 11.71 m(2) g(-1). It was found that AO AN/IA has higher affinity for Hg(II), with the maximum adsorption capacity of 84.25 mg g(-1). The AO AN/IA also can effectively remove Hg(II) from different binary metal ion mixture systems. Furthermore, the adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics were studied in detail. The adsorption equilibrium can quickly be achieved in 4 h determined by an adsorption kinetics study. The adsorption process is found to belong to the second-order model, and can be described by the Freundlich model. PMID:27054744

  9. The physical and degradation properties of starch-graft-acrylonitrile/carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber latex films.

    PubMed

    Misman, M A; Azura, A R; Hamid, Z A A

    2015-09-01

    Starch-graft-acrylonitrile (ANS) is compounded with carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber (XNBR) latex. The control XNBR and the ANS/XNBR latex films were prepared through a coagulant dipping process. The films were subjected to ageing and soil burial procedures. For the biodegradation experiment, the surface of the film was assessed after the 2nd, 4th and 8th week of soil burial. The ANS, XNBR, and ANS/XNBR colloidal stability were determined with a Malvern Zetasizer. For the dipped latex films, the mechanical, morphological and thermal properties were analyzed. The addition of ANS into the XNBR latex increased the stability of the colloidal dispersions, decreased the latex film tensile strength, but increased the elongation at break due to the bipolar interaction of the ANS and XNBR particles. The ANS/XNBR latex films aged faster than the control films while the morphological analysis showed the existence of a starch crystal region and the formation of microbial colonies on the surfaces of the films. Based on the TGA-DTA curves, a higher ΔT was observed for the ANS/XNBR latex films signifying high thermal energy needed for the film to thermally degrade. PMID:26005134

  10. Differential response to acrylonitrile toxicity in rat primary astrocytes and microglia

    PubMed Central

    Caito, Samuel; Yu, Yingchun; Aschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) is a widely used chemical in the production of plastics, resins, nitriles, acrylic fibers, synthetic rubber and acrylamide. While acute high level exposures to ACN are known to be lethal, chronic low dose exposures causes glial cell tumors in rats. Recently, these glial tumors have been characterized as microglial in origin. While effects of ACN on astrocytes, the more numerous glial cell, have been investigated, the effects on microglia are unknown. This study was conducted to compare the responses of astrocytes and microglia to ACN treatment in vitro to address differential sensitivities and adaptive responses to this toxic chemical. Cell viability, ACN uptake, lipid peroxidation byproducts (F2-isoprostanes), glutathione (GSH) levels and expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) were evaluated in primary rat microglia and astrocytes following ACN treatment. Results indicate that microglia are more sensitive to ACN than astrocytes, accumulating less ACN while demonstrating higher F2-isoprostane levels. GSH levels were up-regulated in both cell types, as a protective mechanism against ACN-induced oxidative stress, while Nrf2 levels were only induced in microglia. Our data suggest that microglia and astrocytes exhibit different sensitivities and responses to ACN, which are linked to the intracellular thiol status inherent to each of these cell types. PMID:23628792

  11. Nanocomposites prepared from acrylonitrile butadiene rubber and organically modified montmorillonite with vinyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mijeong; Kim, Hoonjung; Kim, Eunkyoung

    2006-01-01

    Nanocomposites were prepared from acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR), vinyl groups containing organically modified montmorillonite and additives, such as zinc oxide, stearic acid, and sulfur. The organically modified montmorillonites used in these nanocomposites were prepared by ion exchange reactions of N,N'-dimethylalkyl-(p-vinylbenzyl)-ammonium chlorides (DAVBAs, alkyl = octyl, dodecyl, and octadecyl) with sodium montmorillonite (Na+-MMT). NBR nanocomposites were obtained by controlling both the mixing and vulcanization conditions, by using a Brabender mixer and hot-press process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that, depending on the amount of montmorillonite that is added, both exfoliated and intercalated nanocomposite structures are formed. The NBR/DAVBA-MMT nanocomposites exhibit much higher mechanical properties (e.g., tensile strength, Young's modulus, 300% modulus, and hardness) as well as gas barrier properties as compared to NBR Na+-MMT or NBR composites generated from modified montmorillonites without vinyl groups. Consistent with the results of XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the intercalation and exfoliation structures of the nanocomposites coexist and that the DAVBA-MMT layers are well dispersed in NBR.

  12. An investigation on chloroprene-compatibilized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene blends

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Blends of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene (NBR/HDPE) compatibilized by Chloroprene rubber (CR) were prepared. A fixed quantity of industrial waste such as marble waste (MW, 40 phr) was also included. The effect of the blend ratio and CR on cure characteristics, mechanical and swelling properties of MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends was investigated. The results showed that the MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends revealed an increase in tensile strength, tear, modulus, hardness and cross-link density for increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The minimum torque (ML) and maximum torque (MH) of blends increased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE while scorch time (ts2) cure time (tc90), compression set and abrasion loss of blends decreased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The blends also showed a continuous reduction in elongation at break as well as swelling coefficient with increasing HDPE amount in blends. MW filled blends based on CR provided the most encouraging balance values of overall properties. PMID:26644917

  13. Nanostructured Synthetic Carbons Obtained by Pyrolysis of Spherical Acrylonitrile/Divinylbenzene Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Danish J.; Trochimczuk, Andrzej W.; Ronka, Sylwia

    2012-01-01

    Novel carbon materials have been prepared by the carbonization of acrylonitrile (AN)/divinylbenzene (DVB) suspension porous copolymers having nominal crosslinking degrees in the range of 30–70% and obtained in the presence of various amounts of porogens. The carbons were obtained by pre-oxidation of AN/DVB copolymers at 250−350°C in air followed by pyrolysis at 850°C in an N2 atmosphere. Both processes were carried out in one furnace and the resulting material needed no further activation. Resulting materials were characterized by XPS and low temperature nitrogen adsorption/desorption. It was found that maximum pyrolysis yield was ca. 50% depending on the oxidation conditions but almost independent of the crosslinking degree of the polymers. Porous structure of the carbons was characterized for the presence of micropores and macropores, when obtained from highly crosslinked polymers or polymers oxidized at 350°C and meso- and macropores in all other cases. The latter pores are prevailing in the structure of carbons obtained from less porous AN/DVB resins. Specific surface area (BET) of polymer derived carbons can vary between 440 m2/g and 250 m2/g depending on the amount of porogen used in the synthesis of the AN/DVB polymeric precursors. PMID:22916245

  14. Method for the separation of high impact polystyrene (HIPS) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastics

    DOEpatents

    Jody, Bassam J.; Arman, Bayram; Karvelas, Dimitrios E.; Pomykala, Jr., Joseph A.; Daniels, Edward J.

    1997-01-01

    An improved method is provided for separating acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and high impact polystyrene (HIPS) plastics from each other. The ABS and HIPS plastics are shredded to provide a selected particle size. The shredded particles of the ABS and HIPS plastics are applied to a solution having a solution density in a predefined range between 1.055 gm/cm.sup.3 and 1.07 gm/cm.sup.3, a predefined surface tension in a range between 22 dynes/cm to 40 dynes/cm and a pH in the range of 1.77 and 2.05. In accordance with a feature of the invention, the novel method is provided for separating ABS and HIPS, two solid thermoplastics which have similar densities by selectively modifying the effective density of the HIPS using a binary solution with the appropriate properties, such as pH, density and surface tension, such as a solution of acetic acid and water or a quaternary solution having the appropriate density, surface tension, and pH.

  15. Optical properties of polycarbonate/styrene-co-acrylonitrile blends: effects of molecular weight of the matrix.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ping; Xiong, Ying; Guo, Shaoyun

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the effects of the molecular weight of a polycarbonate (PC) matrix on the phase morphology and optical properties of a PC/styrene-co-acrylonitrile (SAN) blend were investigated. A scanning electron microscope is used to analyze the phase morphology of the blends, and Mie scattering theory is used to analyze the changing laws of the optical properties of PC/SAN blends with the increasing of PC molecular weight. Results show that the average particle diameter is not strongly changed with different PC molecular weight because the values of the viscosity ratios are very close to each other. But it is obvious that the number of large particles gradually reduced while small particles (especially d<2  μm) significantly increased with the increasing of PC molecular weight. And the increase in small particles will result in an increase in backward scattering so the transmittance of PC/SAN blends decreases with the increase of PC molecular weight. However, the balance of the scattering coefficients and the number concentration of particles eventually lead to the haze of the blends being very close, despite having different PC molecular weights. Meanwhile, the photographs of scattering patterns indicate that the PC/SAN blends whose component weight ratios are fixed at 70:30 have excellent antiglare properties, despite the changes in molecular weight of the PC matrix. PMID:26836652

  16. High-Energy-Density Poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Fei; Xu, Zhuo; Xia, Weimin; Ye, Hongjun; Wei, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Zhicheng

    2013-12-01

    The dielectric response of poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) (PSAN) thin films fabricated by a solution casting process was investigated in this work. Linear dielectric behavior was obtained in PSAN films under an electric field at frequencies from 100 Hz to 1 MHz and temperature of -50°C to 100°C. The polymer films exhibited an intermediate dielectric permittivity of 4 and low dielectric loss (tan δ) of 0.027. Under 400 MV/m, the energy density of the PSAN films was 6.8 J/cm3, which is three times higher than that of biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) (about 1.6 J/cm3). However, their charge-discharge efficiency (about 90%) was rather close to that of BOPP. The calculated effective dielectric permittivity of the PSAN films under high electric field was as high as 9, which may be attributed to the improved displacement of the cyanide groups (-CN) polarized at high electric fields. These high-performance features make PSAN attractive for high-energy-density capacitor applications.

  17. Design and testing of digitally manufactured paraffin Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene hybrid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulley, Jonathan M.

    This research investigates the application of additive manufacturing techniques for fabricating hybrid rocket fuel grains composed of porous Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene impregnated with paraffin wax. The digitally manufactured ABS substrate provides mechanical support for the paraffin fuel material and serves as an additional fuel component. The embedded paraffin provides an enhanced fuel regression rate while having no detrimental effect on the thermodynamic burn properties of the fuel grain. Multiple fuel grains with various ABS-to-Paraffin mass ratios were fabricated and burned with nitrous oxide. Analytical predictions for end-to-end motor performance and fuel regression are compared against static test results. Baseline fuel grain regression calculations use an enthalpy balance energy analysis with the material and thermodynamic properties based on the mean paraffin/ABS mass fractions within the fuel grain. In support of these analytical comparisons, a novel method for propagating the fuel port burn surface was developed. In this modeling approach the fuel cross section grid is modeled as an image with white pixels representing the fuel and black pixels representing empty or burned grid cells.

  18. Carbon nanotube buckypaper reinforced acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene composites for electronic applications.

    PubMed

    Díez-Pascual, Ana M; Gascón, David

    2013-11-27

    Novel acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) nanocomposites reinforced with pristine or functionalized single- or multiwalled carbon nanotube buckypaper (BP) sheets were manufactured via hot-compression and vacuum infiltration. Their morphology, thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties were comparatively investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis showed that the infiltration process leads to better BP impregnation than the hot-press technique. BPs made from functionalized or short nanotubes form compact networks that hamper the penetration of the matrix chains, whereas those composed of pristine tubes possess large pores that facilitate the polymer flow, resulting in composites with low degree of porosity and improved mechanical performance. Enhanced thermal and electrical properties are found for samples incorporating functionalized BPs since dense networks lead to more conductive pathways, and a stronger barrier effect to the diffusion of degradation products, thus better thermal stability. According to dynamic mechanical analysis these composites exhibit the highest glass transition temperatures, suggesting enhanced filler-matrix interactions as corroborated by the Raman spectra. The results presented herein demonstrate that the composite performance can be tailored by controlling the BP architecture and offer useful insights into the structure-property relationships of these materials to be used in electronic applications, particularly for EMI shielding and packaging of integrated circuits. PMID:24171494

  19. An investigation on chloroprene-compatibilized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene blends.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Khalil

    2015-11-01

    Blends of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene (NBR/HDPE) compatibilized by Chloroprene rubber (CR) were prepared. A fixed quantity of industrial waste such as marble waste (MW, 40 phr) was also included. The effect of the blend ratio and CR on cure characteristics, mechanical and swelling properties of MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends was investigated. The results showed that the MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends revealed an increase in tensile strength, tear, modulus, hardness and cross-link density for increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The minimum torque (M L) and maximum torque (M H) of blends increased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE while scorch time (ts2) cure time (tc90), compression set and abrasion loss of blends decreased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The blends also showed a continuous reduction in elongation at break as well as swelling coefficient with increasing HDPE amount in blends. MW filled blends based on CR provided the most encouraging balance values of overall properties. PMID:26644917

  20. Analysis of acrylonitrile, 1,3-butadiene, and related compounds in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymers for kitchen utensils and children's toys by headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hiroyuki; Kawamura, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    A headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method was developed for the simultaneous determination of the residual levels of acrylonitrile (AN), 1,3-butadiene (1,3-BD), and their related compounds containing propionitrile (PN) and 4-vinyl-1-cyclohexene (4-VC) in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) copolymers for kitchen utensils and children's toys. A sample was cut into small pieces, then N,N-dimethylacetamide and an internal standard were added in a sealed headspace vial. The vial was incubated for 1 h at 90 degrees C and the headspace gas was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The recovery rates of the analytes were 93.3-101.8% and the coefficients of variation were 0.3-6.5%. In ABS copolymers, the levels were 0.3-50.4 microg/g for AN, ND-4.5 microg/g for PN, 0.06-1.58 microg/g for 1,3-BD, and 1.1-295 microg/g for 4-VC. The highest level was found for 4-VC, which is a dimer of 1,3-BD, and the next highest was for AN, which is one of the monomers of the ABS copolymer. Furthermore, the method was also applied to acrylonitrile-styrene (AS) copolymers and polystyrenes (PS) for kitchen utensils, and nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) gloves. In AS copolymers, AN and PN were detected at 16.8-54.5 and 0.8-6.9 microg/g, respectively. On the other hand, the levels in PS and NBR samples were all low. PMID:21313827

  1. Modification of fiber properties through grafting of acrylonitrile to rayon by chemical and radiation methods.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Inderjeet; Sharma, Neelam; Kumari, Vandna

    2013-11-01

    Fibrous properties of rayon has been modified through synthesis of graft copolymers of rayon with acrylonitrile (AN) by chemical method using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN/HNO3) as a redox initiator and gamma radiation mutual method. Percentage of grafting (Pg) was determined as a function of initiator concentration, monomer concentration, irradiation dose, temperature, time of reaction and the amount of water. Maximum percentage of grafting (160.01%) using CAN/HNO3 was obtained at [CAN] = 22.80 × 10(-3) mol/L, [HNO3] = 112.68 × 10(-2) mol/L and [AN] = 114.49 × 10(-2) mol/L in 20 mL of water at 45 °C within 120 min while in case of gamma radiation method, maximum Pg (90.24%) was obtained at an optimum concentration of AN of 76.32 × 10(-2) mol/L using 10 mL of water at room temperature with total dose exposure of 3.456 kGy/h. The grafted fiber was characterized by FTIR, SEM, TGA and XRD studies. Swelling behavior of grafted rayon in different solvents such as water, methanol, ethanol, DMF and acetone was studied and compared with the unmodified rayon. Dyeing behavior of the grafted fiber was also investigated. PMID:25685464

  2. Chitosan-tethered poly(acrylonitrile-co-maleic acid) hollow fiber membrane for lipase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Ye, Peng; Xu, Zhi-Kang; Che, Ai-Fu; Wu, Jian; Seta, Patrick

    2005-11-01

    A protocol was used to prepare a dual-layer biomimetic membrane as support for enzyme immobilization by tethering chitosan on the surface of poly(acrylonitrile-co-maleic acid) (PANCMA) ultrafiltration hollow fiber membrane in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC)/N-hydroxylsuccin-imide (NHS). The chemical change of the chitosan-modified PANCMA membrane surface was confirmed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Lipase from Candida rugosa was immobilized on this dual-layer biomimetic membrane using glutaraldehyde (GA), and on the nascent PANCMA membrane using EDC/NHS as coupling agent. The properties of the immobilized enzymes were assayed and compared with those of the free one. It was found that both the activity retention of the immobilized lipase and the amount of bound protein on the dual-layer biomimetic membrane (44.5% and 66.5 mg/m2) were higher than those on the nascent PANCMA membrane (33.9% and 53.7 mg/m2). The kinetic parameters of the free and immobilized lipases, Km and Vmax, were also assayed. The Km values were similar for the immobilized lipases, while the Vmax value of the immobilized lipase on the dual-layer biomimetic membrane was higher than that on the nascent PANCMA membrane. Results indicated that the pH and thermal stabilities of lipase increased upon immobilization. The residual activity of the immobilized lipase after 10 uses was 53% on the dual-layer biomimetic membrane and 62% on the nascent PANCMA membrane. PMID:15919112

  3. Nanofibrous poly(acrylonitrile-co-maleic acid) membranes functionalized with gelatin and chitosan for lipase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Ye, Peng; Xu, Zhi-Kang; Wu, Jian; Innocent, Christophe; Seta, Patrick

    2006-08-01

    Nanofibrous membranes with an average diameter of 100 and 180 nm were fabricated from poly(acrylonitrile-co-maleic acid) (PANCMA) by the electrospinning process. These nanofibrous membranes contain reactive groups which can be used to covalently immobilize biomacromolecules. Two natural macromolecules, chitosan and gelatin, were tethered on these nanofibrous membranes to fabricate dual-layer biomimetic supports for enzyme immobilization in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(dimethyl-aminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC)/N-hydroxyl succinimide (NHS). Lipase from Candida rugosa was then immobilized on these dual-layer biomimetic supports using glutaraldehyde (GA), and on the nascent PANCMA fibrous membrane using EDC/NHS as coupling agent, respectively. The properties of the immobilized lipases were assayed. It was found that there is an increase of the activity retention of the immobilized lipase on the chitosan-modified nanofibrous membrane (45.6+/-1.8%) and on the gelatin-modified one (49.7+/-1.8%), compared to that on the nascent one (37.6+/-1.8%). The kinetic parameters of the free and immobilized lipases, K(m) and V(max), were also assayed. In comparison with the immobilized lipase on the nascent nanofibrous membrane, there is an increase of the V(max) value for the immobilized lipases on the chitosan- and gelatin-modified nanofibrous membranes. Results also indicate that the pH and thermal stabilities of lipases increase upon immobilization. The residual activities of the immobilized lipases are 55% on the chitosan-modified nanofibrous membrane and 60% on the gelatin-modified one, after 10 uses. PMID:16584770

  4. Modification of fiber properties through grafting of acrylonitrile to rayon by chemical and radiation methods

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Inderjeet; Sharma, Neelam; Kumari, Vandna

    2013-01-01

    Fibrous properties of rayon has been modified through synthesis of graft copolymers of rayon with acrylonitrile (AN) by chemical method using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN/HNO3) as a redox initiator and gamma radiation mutual method. Percentage of grafting (Pg) was determined as a function of initiator concentration, monomer concentration, irradiation dose, temperature, time of reaction and the amount of water. Maximum percentage of grafting (160.01%) using CAN/HNO3 was obtained at [CAN] = 22.80 × 10−3 mol/L, [HNO3] = 112.68 × 10−2 mol/L and [AN] = 114.49 × 10−2 mol/L in 20 mL of water at 45 °C within 120 min while in case of gamma radiation method, maximum Pg (90.24%) was obtained at an optimum concentration of AN of 76.32 × 10−2 mol/L using 10 mL of water at room temperature with total dose exposure of 3.456 kGy/h. The grafted fiber was characterized by FTIR, SEM, TGA and XRD studies. Swelling behavior of grafted rayon in different solvents such as water, methanol, ethanol, DMF and acetone was studied and compared with the unmodified rayon. Dyeing behavior of the grafted fiber was also investigated. PMID:25685464

  5. Design of poly(acrylonitrile)-based gel electrolytes for high-performance lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Hong; Kuo, Ping-Lin; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Teng, Hsisheng

    2014-11-12

    The use of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) as a host for gel polymer electrolytes (GPEs) commonly produces a strong dipole-dipole interaction with the polymer. This study presents a strategy for the application of PAN in GPEs for the production of high performance lithium ion batteries. The resulting gel electrolyte GPE-AVM comprises a poly(acrylonitrile-co-vinyl acetate) copolymer blending poly(methyl methacrylate) as a host, which is swelled using a liquid electrolyte (LE) of 1 M LiPF6 in carbonate solvent. Vinyl acetate and methacrylate groups segregate the PAN chains in the GPE, which produces high ionic conductivity (3.5 × 10 (-3) S cm(-1) at 30 °C) and a wide electrochemical voltage range (>6.5 V) as well as an excellent Li(+) transference number of 0.6. This study includes GPE-AVM in a full-cell battery comprising a LiFePO4 cathode and graphite anode to promote ion motion, which reduced resistance in the battery by 39% and increased the specific power by 110%, relative to the performance of batteries based on LE. The proposed GPE-based battery has a capacity of 140 mAh g(-1) at a discharge rate of 0.1 C and is able to deliver 67 mAh g(-1) of electricity at 17 C. The proposed GPE-AVM provides a robust interface with the electrodes in full-cell batteries, resulting in 93% capacity retention after 100 charge-discharge cycles at 17 C and 63% retention after 1000 cycles. PMID:25361495

  6. The role of acrylonitrile in controlling the structure and properties of nanostructured ionomer films.

    PubMed

    Tungchaiwattana, Somjit; Musa, Muhamad Sharan; Yan, Junfeng; Lovell, Peter A; Shaw, Peter; Saunders, Brian R

    2014-07-14

    Ionomers are polymers which contain ionic groups that are covalently bound to the main chain. The presence of a small percentage of ionic groups strongly affects the polymer's mechanical properties. Here, we examine a new family of nanostructured ionomer films prepared from core-shell polymer nanoparticles containing acrylonitrile (AN), 1,3-butadiene (Bd) and methacrylic acid (MAA). Three new AN-containing dispersions were investigated in this study. The core-shell nanoparticles contained a PBd core. The shells contained copolymerised Bd, AN and MAA, i.e., PBd-AN-MAA. Three types of crosslinking were present in these films: covalent crosslinks (from Bd); strong physical crosslinks (involving ionic bonding of RCOO(-) and Zn(2+)) and weaker physical crosslinks (from AN). We examined and compared the roles of AN and ionic crosslinking (from added Zn(2+)) on the structure and mechanical properties of the films. The FTIR spectroscopy data showed evidence for RCOOH-nitrile hydrogen bonding with tetrahedral geometry. DMTA studies showed that AN copolymerised within the PBd-AN-MAA phase uniformly. Tensile stress-strain data showed that inclusion of AN increased elasticity and toughness. Analysis showed that about 33 AN groups were required to provide an elastically-effective chain. However, only 1.5 to 2 ionically bonded RCOO(-) groups were required to generate an elastically-effective chain. By contrast to ionic bonding, AN inclusion increased the modulus without compromising ductility. Our results show that AN is an attractive, versatile, monomer for increasing the toughness of nanostructured ionomers and this should also be the case for other nanostructured polymer elastomers. PMID:24852137

  7. Modeling contaminant transport and remediation at an acrylonitrile spill site in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şengör, S. Sevinç; Ünlü, Kahraman

    2013-07-01

    The August 1999 earthquake in Turkey damaged three acrylonitrile (AN) storage tanks at a plant producing synthetic fiber by polymerization. A numerical modeling study was carried out to analyze the groundwater flow and contaminant (AN) transport at the spill site. This study presents the application of a numerical groundwater model to determine the hydrogeological parameters of the site, where such data were not available during the field surveys prior to the simulation studies. The two- and three-dimensional transient flow and transport models were first calibrated using the first 266 days of observed head and concentration data and then verified using the remaining 540-day observed data set. Off-site migration of the contaminant plume was kept under control within the site boundaries owing to the favorable geology of the site, the characteristics of the local groundwater flow regime and the pumping operations. As expected, the applied pump-and-treat system was effective at high-permeability zones, but not fully effective at low-permeability zones. The results of long-term simulations for unconfined aquifer showed that the size of the plume in the high permeability zone shrank significantly due to the dilution by natural recharge. However, in the low permeability zone, it was not significantly affected. The study showed that accurate and sufficient data regarding the source characteristics, concentration and groundwater level measurements, groundwater pumping rates and their durations at each of the extraction points involved in the pump-and-treat system along with the hydrogeological site characterization are the key parameters for successful flow and transport model calibrations.

  8. A correlation study applied to biomarkers of internal and effective dose for acrylonitrile and 4-aminobiphenyl in smokers

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Gerhard; Newland, Kirk; Papadopoulou, Ermioni

    2014-01-01

    The urinary metabolites 2-cyanoethylmercapturic acid and 4-aminobiphenyl have been correlated with tobacco smoke exposure. Similarly, 2-cyanoethylvaline and 4-aminobiphenyl haemoglobin adducts have been used as biomarkers of effective dose for the exposure to acrylonitrile and 4-aminobiphenyl, respectively. Each pair of biomarkers is derived from the same parent chemical; however, the correlation between the urinary and the haemoglobin biomarkers has not been investigated. Using clinical study samples, we report a weak correlation between urinary and haemoglobin biomarkers due to different accumulation and elimination rates. Time course analysis showed that a reduction in exposure was paralleled by a delayed reduction in haemoglobin adducts. PMID:24754403

  9. Fabrication of Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene Nanostructures with Anodic Alumina Oxide Templates, Characterization and Biofilm Development Test for Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Desrousseaux, Camille; Cueff, Régis; Aumeran, Claire; Garrait, Ghislain; Mailhot-Jensen, Bénédicte; Traoré, Ousmane; Sautou, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Medical devices can be contaminated by microbial biofilm which causes nosocomial infections. One of the strategies for the prevention of such microbial adhesion is to modify the biomaterials by creating micro or nanofeatures on their surface. This study aimed (1) to nanostructure acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS), a polymer composing connectors in perfusion devices, using Anodic Alumina Oxide templates, and to control the reproducibility of this process; (2) to characterize the physico-chemical properties of the nanostructured surfaces such as wettability using captive-bubble contact angle measurement technique; (3) to test the impact of nanostructures on Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm development. Fabrication of Anodic Alumina Oxide molds was realized by double anodization in oxalic acid. This process was reproducible. The obtained molds present hexagonally arranged 50 nm diameter pores, with a 100 nm interpore distance and a length of 100 nm. Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene nanostructures were successfully prepared using a polymer solution and two melt wetting methods. For all methods, the nanopicots were obtained but inside each sample their length was different. One method was selected essentially for industrial purposes and for better reproducibility results. The flat ABS surface presents a slightly hydrophilic character, which remains roughly unchanged after nanostructuration, the increasing apparent wettability observed in that case being explained by roughness effects. Also, the nanostructuration of the polymer surface does not induce any significant effect on Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion. PMID:26284922

  10. Simulations of the Interaction of Small Molecules with Styrene-Butadiene and Styrene-Butadiene-Acrylonitrile Polymer Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Upendra; Mattice, Wayne

    1997-03-01

    We have simulated atomistically the structure and energetics of Styrene-Butadiene(SB) and Styrene-Butadiene-Acrylonitrile(SBA) random copolymer thin films. The films attain bulk density in their interior region. The surface layer is about 5 ÅThe orientation of the backbone bonds is random in the interior region of the films, while orienting preferentially in the direction of the plane of the film at the surface. The surface energy for the SBA films is significantly higher than for the SB films and the reason was found to be the preferential location of Acrylonitrile groups on the surface. The comparison of density and surface energy with experimental data is very good. We studied the interaction of toluene, water and hexadecane with SB and SBA films. At small concentrations, toluene is found to wet the films and spread uniformly with random structural orientation. Hexadecane also wets the surface, its chains showing an extended conformation. The water molecules are seen to form drops and do not prefer the SB and SBA surfaces. We will present results of wetting and non-wetting interaction energies, surface coverage, and conformational characteristics of these molecules and low molecular weight surfactants at different concentrations of these molecules on the films.

  11. Acrylonitrile potentiates hearing loss and cochlear damage induced by moderate noise exposure in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pouyatos, BenoIt . E-mail: benoit.pouyatos@med.va.gov; Gearhart, Caroline A.; Fechter, Laurence D.

    2005-04-01

    The diversity of chemical and drugs that can potentiate noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) has impeded efforts to predict such interactions. We have hypothesized that chemical contaminants that disrupt intrinsic antioxidant defenses hold significant risk for potentiating NIHL. If this is true, then acrylonitrile (ACN) would be expected to potentiate NIHL. ACN, one of the 50 most commonly used chemicals in the United States, is metabolized via two pathways that are likely to disrupt intrinsic reactive oxygen species (ROS) buffering systems: (1) it conjugates glutathione, depleting this important antioxidant rapidly; (2) a second pathway involves the formation of cyanide, which can inhibit superoxide dismutase. We hypothesized that moderate noise exposure, that does not produce permanent hearing loss by itself, could initiate oxidative stress and that ACN could render the inner ear more sensitive to noise by disrupting intrinsic antioxidant defenses. Temporary and persistent effects of ACN alone (50 mg/kg, sc 5 days), noise alone (95 or 97 dB octave band noise, 4 h/day for 5 days), or ACN in combination with noise were determined using distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) and compound action potential (CAP) amplitudes. Histopathological damage to hair cells resulting from these treatments was also investigated using surface preparations of the organ of Corti. Individually, neither ACN nor noise exposures caused any permanent hearing or hair cell loss; only a reversible temporary threshold shift was measured in noise-exposed animals. However, when given in combination, ACN and noise induced permanent threshold shifts (13-16 dB between 7 and 40 kHz) and a decrease in DPOAE amplitudes (up to 25 dB at 19 kHz), as well as significant outer hair cell (OHC) loss (up to 20% in the first row between 13 and 47 kHz). This investigation demonstrates that ACN can potentiate NIHL at noise levels that are realistic in terms of human exposure, and that the OHCs are the

  12. Development and validation of personal monitoring methods for low levels of acrylonitrile in workplace atmosphere. II. Thermal desorption and field validation

    SciTech Connect

    Borders, R.A.; Gluck, S.J.; Sowle, W.F.; Melcher, R.G.

    1986-03-01

    Thermal desorption is a more sensitive alternative to solvent desorption for the determination of acrylonitrile in air. A dual-bed collection tube (Tenax GC and Carbosieve B) was developed for collecting and concentrating low levels of acrylonitrile. Two thermal desorption techniques were evaluated for the recovery of acrylonitrile collected on the dual-bed tubes over a concentration range from 0.05 to 5 ppm. A commercially-available system, the Century Programmable Thermal Desorption Unit, was easy to operate, allowed for multiple injections of the sample and had a recovery of 82 +/- 12% (RSD). Sampled were stored for up to two months without affecting the recovery and there was not an observable effect from humidity or from the presence of other organic compounds. This system was found to have limitations at acrylonitrile concentrations above 1 ppm. A field validation study tested the sampling and analytical methods developed for monitoring low levels of acrylonitrile in the workplace. Three methods employing Pittsburgh Coconut-Base activated charcoal, Ambersorb XE-348 and Tenax-GC and Carbosieve B sampling mediums were validated for concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 5 ppm and confirmed in the field from 0.02 to 3 ppm in tests conducted at plant sites. These field studies were run over varying humidity and temperature conditions. The overall absolute recoveries and relative standard deviations found for these methods found during the field trials are 90 +/- 18% for charcoal; 85 +/- 11% for Ambersorb XE-348; and 90 +/- 19% for the Century dual-bed sorbent. These values were in quite good agreement with the 91 +/- 10%, 88 +/- 8%, and 82 +/- 12% determined in laboratory studies.

  13. Surface discharge and tracking phenomena induced on acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene polymer dielectric material by acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Yoshimura, N.

    1999-05-01

    The discharge and tracking phenomena induced on the polymer dielectric materials by acid rain are investigated by the accelerated aging of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer in artificial rainwater in this article. Based on the investigation of acid rain, the artificial rainwater is chosen to agree well with the actual ingredients of precipitation. The influence of hydrophobicity degradation on the surface discharge and tracking is studied. The relations among the surface discharge, tracking, hydrophobicity, and microchemical structure and physical morphology of material are furthermore discussed. Experimental results show that the polymer dielectric materials suffer a large attack and degradation from acid rain. The dielectric surface degrades and becomes rough, and the hydrophobicity decreases so that the surface discharge and tracking may occur on them.

  14. Environmentally benign electroless nickel plating using supercritical carbon-dioxide on hydrophilically modified acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tengsuwan, Siwach; Ohshima, Masahiro

    2014-08-01

    Electroless Ni-P plating using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) in conjunction with copolymer-based hydrophilic modification was applied to an acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) substrate. The surface of ABS substrate was hydrophilically modified by blending with a multi-block copolymer, poly(ether-ester-amide)s (PEEA), in injection molding process. The substrate was then impregnated with Pd(II)-hexafluoroacetylacetonate, Pd(hfa)2, using scCO2, followed by the electroless plating reaction. ABS/PEEA substrates with different PEEA to ABS blend ratios and different volume ratios of butadiene to the styrene-acrylonitrile copolymer (SAN) matrix were prepared to investigate how the dispersed PEEA and butadiene domains affected the blend morphology and the adhesive strength of the plating metal-to-polymer contact. Increasing the PEEA copolymer to ABS blend ratio increased the mass transfer rate of the plating solution in the ABS substrate. Consequently, the metal-polymer composite layer became thicker, which increased the adhesive strength of the metal-to-polymer contact because of the anchoring effect. The butadiene domains appeared to attract the Pd catalyst precursor, and thus, the proportion of butadiene in the ABS matrix also affected the adhesive strength of the contact between the metal layer and the substrate. The ABS substrate was successfully plated with a Ni-P metal layer with an average adhesive strength of 9.1 ± 0.5 N cm-1 by choosing appropriate ABS/PEEA blend ratios and a Pd(hfa)2 concentration.

  15. Theoretical and experimental investigations of the 2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-{[5-(2-cyano-2-phenylethenyl)]furan-2-yl}acrylonitrile molecule as a potential acceptor in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazici, Mehmet; Bozar, Sinem; Aydin Yuksel, Sureyya; Ongul, Fatih; Gokce, Halil; Gunes, Serap; Yorur Goreci, Cigdem

    2016-06-01

    A novel soluble asymmetric acrylonitrile derivative, 2-(4-Chlorophenyl)-3-{[5-(2-cyano-2-phenylethenyl)]furan-2-yl}acrylonitrile (CPCPFA, 3) was synthesized in three steps by Knoevenagel condensation. The structure of the CPCPFA was characterized using UV–vis, FTIR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and LC-MS. CPCPFA was evaluated as an electron acceptor in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. Its optical and electronic properties as well as photovoltaic performance were investigated.

  16. Theoretical and experimental investigations of the 2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-{[5-(2-cyano-2-phenylethenyl)]furan-2-yl}acrylonitrile molecule as a potential acceptor in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kazici, Mehmet; Bozar, Sinem; Yuksel, Sureyya Aydin; Ongul, Fatih; Gokce, Halil; Gunes, Serap; Goreci, Cigdem Yorur

    2016-06-10

    A novel soluble asymmetric acrylonitrile derivative, 2-(4-Chlorophenyl)-3-{[5-(2-cyano-2-phenylethenyl)]furan-2-yl}acrylonitrile (CPCPFA, 3) was synthesized in three steps by Knoevenagel condensation. The structure of the CPCPFA was characterized using UV-vis, FTIR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and LC-MS. CPCPFA was evaluated as an electron acceptor in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. Its optical and electronic properties as well as photovoltaic performance were investigated. PMID:27145976

  17. Infrared spectra and structure of the cyano and methoxycarbonyl derivatives of 3,3-bis(dimethylamino)acrylonitrile: an ab initio force field treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binev, Ivan G.; Binev, Yuri I.

    1997-12-01

    The structure of 2-cyano-3,3-bis(dimethylamino)acrylonitrile and 2-methoxycarbonyl-3,3-bis(dimethylamino)acrylonitrile has been studied on the basis of both infrared spectra and ab initio force field calculations. The 3012-376 cm -1 region bands have been assigned; a good agreement has been found between the theoretical and experimental spectroscopic characteristics. According to both infrared data and bond parameters, the CC bond in the molecules studied is strongly polarized. The ground-state charge transfer between the electropositive and electronegative fragments of the molecules is more than 0.5 e -, so the species studied have a dual character, both molecular and zwitterionic.

  18. Photocatalytic decomposition of acrylonitrile with N-F codoped TiO2/SiO2 under simulant solar light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Pang, Dandan; Qiu, Lu; Wang, Yunteng; Zhu, Rongshu; Ouyang, Feng

    2015-07-01

    The solid acid catalyst, N-F codoped TiO2/SiO2 composite oxide was prepared by a sol-gel method using NH4F as nitrogen and fluorine source. The prepared materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-Visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis), ammonia adsorption and temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD), in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and N2 physical adsorption isotherm. The photocatalytic activity of the catalyst for acrylonitrile degradation was investigated under simulant solar irradiation. The results showed that strong Lewis and Brønsted acid sites appear on the surface of the sample after N-F doping. Systematic investigation showed that the highest photocatalytic activity for acrylonitrile degradation was obtained for samples calcined at 450°C with molar ratio (NH4F to Ti) of 0.8. The degradation ratio of 71.5% was achieved with the prepared catalyst after 6-min irradiation, demonstrating the effectiveness of photocatalytic degradation of acrylonitrile with N-F codoped TiO2/SiO2 composite oxide. The photocatalyst is promising for application under solar light irradiation. Moreover, the intermediates generated after irradiation were verified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis and UV-Vis spectroscopy to be simple organic acids with lower toxicity, and the degradation pathway was also proposed for acrylonitrile degradation with the prepared catalyst. PMID:26141890

  19. Development and validation of personal monitoring methods for low levels of acrylonitrile in workplace atmosphere. I. Test atmosphere generation and solvent desorption methods

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, R.G.; Borders, R.A.; Coyne, L.B.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize monitoring methods and to investigate new technology for the determination of low levels of acrylonitrile (0.05 to 5 ppm) in workplace atmospheres. In the first phase of the study, a dynamic atmosphere generation system was developed to produce low levels of acrylonitrile in simulated workplace atmospheres. Various potential sorbents were investigated in the second phase, and the candidate methods were compared in a laboratory validation study over a concentration range from 0.05 to 5 ppm acrylonitrile in the presence of potential interferences and under relative humidity conditions from 30% to 95% RH. A collection tube containing 600 mg Pittsburgh coconut base charcoal was found to be the optimum tube for sampling for a full 8 -hr shift. No breakthrough was observed over the concentrations and humidities tested. The recovery was 91.3% with a total relative precision of +/-21% over the test range, and the recovery was not affected by storage for up to five weeks.

  20. Isolation of the epsilon-caprolactam denitrifying bacteria from a wastewater treatment system manufactured with acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene resin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Lee, Chi-Mei

    2007-06-25

    epsilon-Caprolactam has high COD and toxicity, so its discharge to natural water and soil systems may lead to an adverse environmental effect on water quality, endangering public health and welfare. This investigation attempts to isolate epsilon-caprolactam denitrifying bacteria from a wastewater treatment system manufactured with acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) resin. The goal is to elucidate the effectiveness of isolated pure strain and ABS mixed strains in treating epsilon-caprolactam from synthetic wastewater. The results reveal that Paracoccus versutus MDC-3 was isolated from the wastewater treatment system manufactured with ABS resin. The ABS mixed strains and P. versutus MDC-3 can consume up to 1539mg/l epsilon-caprolactam to denitrify from synthetic wastewater. Complete epsilon-caprolactam removal depended on the supply of sufficient electron acceptors (nitrate). Strain P. versutus MDC-3, Hyphomicrobium sp. HM, Methylosinus pucelana and Magnetospirillum sp. CC-26 are related closely, according to the phylogenetic analyses of 16S rDNA sequences. PMID:17161908

  1. The effect of trichloroethylene and acrylonitrile on RNA and ribosome synthesis and ribosome content in Saccharomyces cells.

    PubMed

    Lochmann, E R; Ehrlich, W; Mangir, M

    1984-04-01

    The effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) and acrylonitrile (ACN) on growth, RNA synthesis, ribosome synthesis, and ribosome content were tested in yeast cells. TCE causes a delay of the growth of a cell culture (prolongation of the lag phase), but does not cause inhibition. Cells exposed to increasing concentrations of ACN show increasing damage, so that, at a certain point of the growth curve, cell division stops altogether. Similar results were obtained when RNA synthesis was investigated: After treatment with TCE, the maximum RNA synthesis of the cell culture was retarded, but subsequently reached the same level as the untreated control cells. In the presence of ACN, however, the rate of RNA synthesis was lowered with increasing ACN concentrations. The same effect was observed upon investigation of ribosome synthesis: Whereas TCE produces only a slight effect, treatment with increasing concentrations of ACN leads to a substantial decrease in ribosome synthesis, and finally to total inhibition. Parallel to this, the content of free and membrane-bound ribosomes is diminished. Obviously, the decrease in ribosome content is caused not only by an inhibition of ribosome synthesis, but also by a degradation of existing ribosomes, as well as by induction of a ribosome-associated RNase. PMID:6714140

  2. Radiolytic preparation and characterization of hydrophilic poly(acrylonitrile-co-vinylsulfonate)-grafted porous poly(tetrafluoroethylene) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byeong-Hee; Sohn, Joon-Yong; Shin, Junhwa

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a hydrophilic copolymer of acrylonitrile (AN) and sodium vinylsulfonate (SVS) was grafted into a highly hydrophobic porous poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) substrate using a gamma-ray irradiation method and the grafted substrate was used as a substrate for impregnating a hydrophilic ionomer, Nafion. The results of FT-IR and TGA analysis of the prepared substrate showed that the SVS/AN monomers were successfully grafted into the porous PTFE film. The results of degree of grafting, elemental analyzer, and contact angle analysis showed that the hydrophilicity of the prepared PTFE-g-P(AN-co-VS) substrate was increased with an increase in the amount of SVS/AN graft copolymers. Also, the results of FE-SEM and Gurley number measurement showed that the pores in the substrate were reduced as the amount of SVS/AN copolymers grafted into the substrate increased. The prepared porous PTFE-g-P(AN-co-VS) substrate at an irradiation dose of 70 kGy was found to impregnate Nafion ionomer effectively compared to the original porous PTFE substrate. These results suggest that the prepared PTFE-g-P(AN-co-VS) substrate can be effectively used for the impregnation of polymer electrolyte (Nafion) to prepare a reinforced composite membrane.

  3. Electron Beam Damage in Poly(Vinyl Chloride) and Poly(Acrylonitrile) as Observed by Auger Electron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, Alan S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Baer, Donald R.

    2003-03-07

    AES spectra of spun-cast films of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) were collected over a period of time to determine specimen damage during exposure to a 10kV electron beam. For the PVC, loss of chlorine was observed over a period of 203 minutes to the extent that the final chlorine concentration was only 20% of its original value. PAN exhibited a loss in nitrogen content over a period of 120 minutes, but the rate of damage to the polymer was significantly less than PVC. Figure 1 shows the atomic concentration in the PVC film as a function of dose (time). It takes a dose of approximately 7.0x10-5 Ccm-5 for the chlorine concentration to fall from its original value by 10% (one definition of critical dose). Figure 2 shows a similar drop in nitrogen concentration in the PAN film as a function of dose. For this polymer, it takes a dose of 1.3x10-3 Ccm-2 for the nitrogen concentration to fall by 10%.

  4. Acrylonitrile-contamination induced enhancement of formic acid electro-oxidation at platinum nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nagar, Gumaa A.; Mohammad, Ahmad M.; El-Deab, Mohamed S.; Ohsaka, Takeo; El-Anadouli, Bahgat E.

    2014-11-01

    Minute amount (∼1 ppm) of acrylonitrile (AcN), a possible contaminant, shows an unexpected enhancement for the direct electro-oxidation of formic acid (FAO) at Pt nanoparticles modified GC (nano-Pt/GC) electrodes. This is reflected by a remarkable increase of the current intensity of the direct oxidation peak (Ipd, at ca. 0.3 V) in the presence of AcN, concurrently with a significant decrease of the second (indirect) oxidation current (Ipind, at ca. 0.7 V), compared to that observed in the absence of AcN (i.e., at the unpoisoned Pt electrode). The extent of enhancement depends on the surface coverage (θ) of AcN at the surface of Pt nanoparticles. AcN is thought to favor the direct FAO by disturbing the contiguity of the Pt sites, which is necessary for CO adsorption. Furthermore, XPS measurements revealed a change in the electronic structure of Pt in presence of AcN, which has a favorable positive impact on the charge transfer during the direct FAO.

  5. Separation of polycarbonate and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene waste plastics by froth flotation combined with ammonia pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-Qing; Wang, Hui; Liu, Qun; Fu, Jian-Gang; Liu, You-Nian

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this research is flotation separation of polycarbonate (PC) and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) waste plastics combined with ammonia pretreatment. The PC and ABS plastics show similar hydrophobicity, and ammonia treatment changes selectively floatability of PC plastic while ABS is insensitive to ammonia treatment. The contact angle measurement indicates the dropping of flotation recovery of PC is ascribed to a decline of contact angle. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates reactions occur on PC surface, which makes PC surface more hydrophilic. Separation of PC and ABS waste plastics was conducted based on the flotation behavior of single plastic. At different temperatures, PC and ABS mixtures were separated efficiently through froth flotation with ammonia pretreatment for different time (13 min at 23 °C, 18 min at 18 °C and 30 min at 23 °C). For both PC and ABS, the purity and recovery is more than 95.31% and 95.35%, respectively; the purity of PC and ABS is up to 99.72% and 99.23%, respectively. PC and ABS mixtures with different particle sizes were separated effectively, implying that ammonia treatment possesses superior applicability. PMID:25266156

  6. Reclamation of post-consumer plastics for development of polycarbonate and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene based nanocomposites with nanoclay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zicans, Janis; Meri, Remo Merijs; Ivanova, Tatjana; Berzina, Rita; Saldabola, Ruuta; Maksimov, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Suitability of recycled acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (R-ABS) and recycled polycarbonate (R-PC) for the development of polymer matrix nanocomposites with organically modified nanoclay (OMMT) is evaluated in comparison to virgin polymers (V-ABS and V-PC) based systems. The influence of OMMT content on the structure as well as calorimetric, mechanical and thermal properties of virgin and recycled polymers containing systems is revealed. Increase in stiffness and strength of virgin and recycled polymers based systems is observed along with rising nanoclay content. However, it is observed that reinforcing efficiency of clays on the R-ABS containing systems is reduced to certain extent in comparison to those, based on virgin polymers. It is shown, that in the presence of OMMT approximation of glass transition temperatures of both polymeric components is observed, which can testify about certain improvement of compatibility between PC and ABS. Increment of the modulus of elasticity and yield strength of the nanocomposites is associated with anisodiametric shape of OMMT, as well as with intercalation of polymer within the interlaminar space of the clay nanoparticles. It is also demonstrated that addition of nanoclay improves thermogravimetric behavior of the investigated compositions. Consequently, it is suggested that nanoclays can be used as promising functional additives and replace halogenated flame-retardants, without reducing mechanical properties of the composites.

  7. Preconditioning of endoplasmic reticulum stress protects against acrylonitrile-induced cytotoxicity in primary rat astrocytes: The role of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bai; Wenjun, Zhao; Changsheng, Yin; Yuntao, Fang; Jing, Ma; Ben, Li; Hai, Qian; Guangwei, Xing; Suhua, Wang; Fang, Li; Aschner, Michael; Rongzhu, Lu

    2016-07-01

    This study explored the protective effects of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress preconditioning induced by 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) or oxidized dithiothreitol (DTTox) on acrylonitrile (AN)-induced cytotocity in primary rat astrocytes. Cells were pretreated with 2-DG or DTTox for different times at various concentration. Next, astrocytes were treated with 2.5mM AN for an additional 12h. Cell viability and cytotoxicity were assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) were determined. Expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), phosphorylated-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (p-eIF2α), microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3), P62, and Beclin1 were used to assess autophagy. In addition, 3-methyadenine (3-MA), an autophagy-specific inhibitor, was used to assess the role of autophagy in ER stress preconditioning-induced protection against AN cytotoxicity. The results showed that AN alone significantly decreased astrocytic viability and enhanced cytotoxicity. Compared to the AN-alone group, preconditioning with 2-DG or DTTox significantly increased cell viability and reduced cytotoxicity to indistinguishable levels. Decreased ROS generation and increased ΔΨm were also inherent to ER stress preconditioning with these compounds. Furthermore, autophagy was activated by both 2-DG and DTTox. Blockage of autophagy attenuated the protection afforded by 2-DG or DTTox preconditioning in AN-treated astrocytes. These results establish that ER stress preconditioning affords cellular protection against AN, and that activation of autophagy mediates the cytoprotection. Modulation of ER stress and resultant activation of autophagy may be a novel target for to ameliorate AN toxicity. PMID:27260289

  8. Species difference in the disposition of acrylonitrile: quantitative whole-body autoradiographic study in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sam; Ahmed, Ahmed E

    2004-06-01

    Previous studies from this and other laboratories have indicated the role of species difference in acrylonitrile (VCN) toxicity and its metabolism to cyanide. Our recent studies also indicated a more pronounced elimination of VCN following oral as compared to i.v. administration. To further characterize the mechanism of these differences on the distribution of VCN, quantitative whole-body autoradiographic distribution and elimination studies were conducted at various time points (0.08, 8, 24, 48 h) following the administration of an equivalent i.v. dose of 2-[14C]-VCN to male Fischer rats and male CD-1 mice. Whole-body autoradiographs obtained from freeze-dried and acid-extracted sections of rats and mice demonstrated a rapid uptake of 14C in liver, lungs, spleen and bone marrow at early time intervals. Quantitatively, the uptake, retention and covalent interaction of 14C were higher in organs of rats as compared to mice, over 48 h. Mice eliminated 74% of the total administered dose of 2-[14C]-VCN (expired air 4%, urine 16% and feces 54%), while rats eliminated only 26% of the dose (expired air 2%, urine 4% and feces 20%). Species differences in VCN toxicity seem to be correlated with its rate of elimination. The distribution and elimination data demonstrated that mice divest VCN more rapidly than rats. The study also demonstrated that administration of VCN in rats resulted in covalent interactions and retention of 2-[14C]-VCN/metabolites in the tissues thus exerting more chronic toxicity to rats than to mice. PMID:15807404

  9. Removal of As(V), Cr(III) and Cr(VI) from aqueous environments by poly(acrylonitril-co-acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride)-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Dudu, Tuba Ersen; Sahiner, Mehtap; Alpaslan, Duygu; Demirci, Sahin; Aktas, Nahit

    2015-09-15

    Cationic poly(Acrylonitril-co-Acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl Ammonium Chloride) (p(AN-co-APTMACl)) hydrogels in bulk were synthesized by using acrylonitrile (AN) and 3-acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride (APTMACl) as monomers. The prepared hydrogels were exposed to amidoximation reaction to replace hydrophobic nitrile groups with hydrophilic amidoxime groups that have metal ion binding ability. Those replacements were increased the hydrogels absorption capacity for As(V) and Cr(VI). Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms equations were utilized to obtain the best-fitted isotherm model for the absorption of the ions at different metal ion concentrations. The absorption data of As(V) ion were fitted well to Freundlich isotherm while those of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) ions were fitted well to Langmuir isotherm. The maximum absorption of poly(3-acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride (p(APTMACl)) and amid-p(AN-co-APTMACl) macro gels were 22.39 mg and 21.83 mg for As(V), and 30.65 mg and 18.16 mg for Cr(VI) ion per unit gram dried gel, respectively. Kinetically, the absorption behaviors of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ions were fitted well to a pseudo 2nd-order kinetic model and those of As(V) ions were fitted well to a pseudo 1st order kinetic model. PMID:26188989

  10. Acrylonitrile has Distinct Hormetic Effects on Acetyl-Cholinesterase Activity in Mouse Brain and Blood that are Modulated by Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Yuanqing, He; Suhua, Wang; Guangwei, Xing; Chunlan, Ren; Hai, Qian; Wenrong, Xu; Rongzhu, Lu; Aschner, Michael; Milatovic, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    Acrylonitrile(AN) is a neurotoxin both in animals and humans, but its effects on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity remain controversial. This study aimed to determine the dose-response effects of AN on AChE activity and the modulatory role of ethanol pre-treatment. A total of 144 Kunming mice were randomly divided into 18 groups: nine groups received 5% ethanol in their drinking water, and the remaining nine groups received regular tap water. One week later, both the ethanol and tap water only groups were given an intraperitoneal injection of AN at the following doses: 0 (control), 0.156, 0.3125, 0.625, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10 or 20 mg AN/kg body weight. AChE activity was determined on whole blood and brain 24 h later. Blood AChE activity was higher in AN-injected mice than in controls at all doses. AChE activity in blood increased in a dose-dependent manner, peaking at 0.156 mg/kg, after which a gradual decrease ensued, displaying a β-typed dose-response relationship. In contrast, brain AChE activity, following a single AN injection, was consistently lower than in control mice, and continued to fall up to a dose of 0.313 mg/kg, and thereafter increased gradually with higher doses. Mice receiving a 20 mg/kg dose of AN exhibited AChE brain activity indistinguishable from that of control mice, demonstrating a typical U-typed dose-response relationship. The activity of AChE in the blood and brain of the AN + ethanol-treated groups displayed a shift to the right, and the magnitude of the decrease in AChE activity induced by AN was attenuated relative to the AN-only group. These results suggest that AN affects AChE activity in both mouse blood and brain in a hormetic manner. Pretreatment with ethanol modifies the effect of AN on AChE, indicating that parent AN has a more prominent role than its metabolites in modulating enzyme activity. PMID:23550232

  11. Acrylonitrile grafted to PVDF

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jin; Eitouni, Hany Basam

    2015-03-31

    PVDF-g-PAN has been synthesized by grafting polyacrylonitrile onto polyvinylidene fluoride using an ATRP/AGET method. The novel polymer is ionically conducive and has much more flexibility than PVDF alone, making it especially useful either as a binder in battery cell electrodes or as a polymer electrolyte in a battery cell.

  12. The influence of nano silica particles on gamma-irradiation ageing of elastomers based on chlorosulphonated polyethylene and acrylonitrile butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, G.; Marinović-Cincović, M.; Tanasić, Lj.; Jovanović, V.; Samaržija-Jovanović, S.; Vukić, N.; Budinski-Simendić, J.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this work was to study gamma irradiation ageing of rubber blends based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) and chlorosulphonated polyethylene rubber (CSM) reinforced by silica nano particles. The NBR/CSM compounds (50: 50, w/w) filled with different content of filler (0-100 phr) were crosslinked by sulfur. The vulcanization characteristics were assessed using the rheometer with an oscillating disk. The vulcanizates were prepared in a hydraulic press. The obtained materials were exposed to the different irradiation doses (100, 200, 300 and 400 kGy). The mechanical properties (hardness, modulus at 100% elongation, tensile strength and elongation at break) and swelling numbers were assessed before and after gamma irradiation ageing.

  13. Infrared thermochromic behaviour of a composite Sm0.65Ca0.35MnO3-poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammar, M. R.; Napierala, C.; Laffez, P.

    2009-05-01

    Samarium calcium perovskite manganite Sm0.65Ca0.35MnO3 was dispersed homogeneously in a solution of poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile). A thin film was deposited on (100) oriented silicon substrate by spin-coating and the optical thermochromic behaviour in the infrared range was studied. In the wavelength range 8-14 µm, the optical transmittance of the thermochromic composite coating exhibited a large variation between 173 and 343 K due to a semiconductor-metal first-order transition at Tc = 250 K. The thermochromic behaviour of the composite coatings was optimized. The contrast in the transmittance first increased with pigment content, then reached a maximum value.

  14. Modification on liquid retention property of cassava starch by radiation grafting with acrylonitrile. I. Effect of γ-irradiation on grafting parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiatkamjornwong, S.; Chvajarernpun, J.; Nakason, C.

    1993-07-01

    Radiation modification on liquid retention properties of native cassava starch, gelatinized at 85°C, by graft copolymerization with acrylonitrile was carried out by mutual irradiation to gamma-rays. A thin aluminum foil was used to cover the inner wall of the reaction vessel, so that the homopolymer concentration was reduced to be less than 1.0% with a distilled water retention value of 665 g/g of the dry weight of the saponified grafted product. Confirmation of graft copolymerization and saponification reactions was made by the infrared spectrophotometric technique. The combined effect of radiation parameters in terms of an irradiation time and a dose rate to the total dose on the extent of the grafting reaction expressed in terms of grafting parameters which directly influenced liquid retention values was evaluated in conjunction with statistical analysis.

  15. Molecular structures of n-type semiconducting material 2,5-difluoro-1,4-phenylene-3,3‧-bis{2-[(4-trifluoromethyl)phenyl]acrylonitrile} and its photo dimerization product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriguchi, Tetsuji; Kitou, Naoya; Jalli, Venkataprasad; Yoza, Kenji; Nagamatsu, Shuichi; Okauchi, Tatsuo; Tsuge, Akihiko; Takashima, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    The absolute molecular structure of air stable n-type semiconducting material 2,5-difluoro-1,4-phenylene-3,3‧-bis{2-[(4-trifluoromethyl)phenyl]acrylonitrile} was determined by using twin crystal treatment X-ray diffraction analysis. The compound was readily dimerized in solution via irradiating of UV or Sun light. The exact molecular structure of the dimer also determined by X-ray analysis.

  16. Effect of thermally reduced graphene sheets on the phase behavior, morphology, and electrical conductivity in poly[(α-methyl styrene)-co-(acrylonitrile)/poly(methyl-methacrylate) blends.

    PubMed

    Vleminckx, Giovanni; Bose, Suryasarathi; Leys, Jan; Vermant, Jan; Wübbenhorst, Michael; Abdala, Ahmed A; Macosko, Chris; Moldenaers, Paula

    2011-08-01

    The effects of thermally reduced graphene sheets (TRG) on the phase separation in poly[(α-methyl styrene)-co-(acrylonitrile)]/poly(methyl-methacrylate) blends were monitored using melt rheology, conductivity spectroscopy, and electron microscopic techniques. The TRG were incorporated in the single-phase material by solution mixing. The composite samples were then allowed to phase separate in situ. The thermodynamics of phase separation have been investigated by monitoring the evolution of the storage modulus (G') as a function of temperature as the system passes through the binodal and the spinodal lines of the phase diagram. The phase separation kinetics were probed by monitoring the evolution of G' as a function of time at a quench depth well in the spinodal region. It was observed that TRG significantly influenced the phase separation temperature, the shape of the phase diagram and the rate of phase separation. The state of dispersion of TRG in the blends was assessed using electron microscopy and conductivity spectroscopy measurements. Interestingly, the composite samples (monophasic) were virtually insulators at room temperature, whereas highly conducting materials were obtained as a result of phase separation in the biphasic materials. PMID:21749102

  17. Effects of aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APS) on tensile properties and morphology of polypropylene (PP), recycle acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBRr) and sugarcane bagasse (SCB) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiagoo, Ragunathan; Omar, Latifah; Zainal, Mustaffa; Ting, Sam Sung; Ismail, Hanafi

    2015-07-01

    The performance of sugarcane baggase (SCB) treated with γ-APS filled polypropylene (PP)/recycled acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBRr) biocomposites were investigated. The composites with different filler loading ranging from 5 to 30 wt % were prepared using heated two roll mill by melt mixing at temperature of 180 °C. Tensile properties of the PP/NBRr/SCB composites which is tensile strength, Young Modulus and elongation at break were investigated. Increasing of treated SCB filler loading in PP/NBRr/SCB composites have increased the Young modulus however decreased the tensile strength and elongation at break of the PP/NBRr/SCB composites. From the results, γ-APS treated SCB composites shown higher tensile strength and Young Modulus but lower elongation at break when compared to the untreated SCB composites. This is due to the stronger bonding between γ-APS treated SCB with PP/NBRr matrices. These findings was supported by micrograph pictures from morphological study. SCB filler treated with γ-APS has improved the adhesion as well as gave strong interfacial bonding between SCB filler and PP/NBRr matrices which results in good tensile strength of PP/NBRr/SCB composites.

  18. Microwave absorption properties of lightweight absorber based on Fe50Ni50-coated poly(acrylonitrile) microspheres and reduced graphene oxide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Junpeng; Huo, Siqi; Zhang, Bin; Tang, Yushan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we proposed a facile method to obtain the lightweight composites consisting of surface modified Fe50Ni50-coated poly(acrylonitrile) microspheres (PANS@SMF), reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and epoxy resin. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and vector network analyzer (VNA). Impedance matching condition and electromagnetic wave attenuation characteristic were used for the reflection loss (RL) performance of the composites. Compared with pure PANS@SMF and RGO composites, the -10 dB absorption bandwidth and the minimum RL of the hybrid composites were enhanced. The bandwidth less than -10 dB was almost 4.5 GHz in the range of 10 GHz to 14.5 GHz, with a matching thickness of 2.5 mm. The density of the hybrid composites was in the range of 0.25-0.34 g/cm3. Therefore, the hybrid composite can be considered as a potential lightweight microwave absorber.

  19. Three-dimensional Printed Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene Framework Coated with Cu-BTC Metal-organic Frameworks for the Removal of Methylene Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zongyuan; Wang, Jiajun; Li, Minyue; Sun, Kaihang; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing was applied for the fabrication of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) framework. Functionalization of the ABS framework was then performed by coating of porous Cu-BTC (BTC = benzene tricarboxylic acid) metal-organic frameworks on it using a step-by-step in-situ growth. The size of the Cu-BTC particles on ABS was ranged from 200 nm to 900 nm. The Cu-BTC/ABS framework can take up most of the space of the tubular reactor that makes the adsorption effective with no need of stirring. Methylene blue (MB) can be readily removed from aqueous solution by this Cu-BTC/ABS framework. The MB removal efficiency for solutions with concentrations of 10 and 5 mg/L was 93.3% and 98.3%, respectively, within 10 min. After MB adsorption, the Cu-BTC/ABS composite can easily be recovered without the need for centrifugation or filtration and the composite is reusable. In addition the ABS framework can be recovered for subsequent reuse. A significant advantage of 3D-printed frameworks is that different frameworks can be easily fabricated to meet the needs of different applications. This is a promising strategy to synthesize new frameworks using MOFs and polymers to develop materials for applications beyond adsorption.

  20. Co-recycling of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene waste plastic and nonmetal particles from waste printed circuit boards to manufacture reproduction composites.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhixing; Shen, Zhigang; Zhang, Xiaojing; Ma, Shulin

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) waste plastic and nonmetal particles from waste printed circuit boards (WPCB) to manufacture reproduction composites (RC), with the aim of co-recycling these two waste resources. The composites were prepared in a twin-crew extruder and investigated by means of mechanical testing, in situ flexural observation, thermogravimatric analysis, and dimensional stability evaluation. The results showed that the presence of nonmetal particles significantly improved the mechanical properties and the physical performance of the RC. A loading of 30 wt% nonmetal particles could achieve a flexural strength of 72.6 MPa, a flexural modulus of 3.57 GPa, and an impact strength of 15.5 kJ/m2. Moreover, it was found that the application of maleic anhydride-grafted ABS as compatilizer could effectively promote the interfacial adhesion between the ABS plastic and the nonmetal particles. This research provides a novel method to reuse waste ABS and WPCB nonmetals for manufacturing high value-added product, which represents a promising way for waste recycling and resolving the environmental problem. PMID:25413110

  1. Successful startup of a full-scale acrylonitrile wastewater biological treatment plant (ACN-WWTP) by eliminating the inhibitory effects of toxic compounds on nitrification.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuanyuan; Jin, Xibiao; Wang, Feng; Liu, Yongdi; Chen, Xiurong

    2014-01-01

    During the startup of a full-scale anoxic/aerobic (A/O) biological treatment plant for acrylonitrile wastewater, the removal efficiencies of NH(3)-N and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) were 1.29 and 0.83% on day 30, respectively. The nitrification process was almost totally inhibited, which was mainly caused by the inhibitory effects of toxic compounds. To eliminate the inhibition, cultivating the bacteria that degrade toxic compounds with patience was applied into the second startup of the biological treatment plant. After 75 days of startup, the inhibitory effects of the toxic compounds on nitrification were eliminated. The treatment plant has been operated stably for more than 3 years. During the last 100 days, the influent concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (COD), NH(3)-N, TKN and total cyanide (TCN) were 831-2,164, 188-516, 306-542 and 1.17-9.57 mg L(-1) respectively, and the effluent concentrations were 257 ± 30.9, 3.30 ± 1.10, 31.6 ± 4.49 and 0.40 ± 0.10 mg L(-1) (n = 100), respectively. Four strains of cyanide-degrading bacteria which were able to grow with cyanide as the sole carbon and nitrogen source were isolated from the full-scale biological treatment plant. They were short and rod-shaped under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and were identified as Brevundimonas sp., Rhizobium sp., Dietzia natronolimnaea and Microbacterium sp., respectively. PMID:24552727

  2. Covalent immobilization of redox enzyme on electrospun nonwoven poly(acrylonitrile-co-acrylic acid) nanofiber mesh filled with carbon nanotubes: a comprehensive study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Gang; Ke, Bei-Bei; Xu, Zhi-Kang

    2007-07-01

    In this work, novel conductive composite nanofiber mesh possessing reactive groups was electrospun from solutions containing poly(acrylonitrile-co-acrylic acid) (PANCAA) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for redoxase immobilization, assuming that the incorporated MWCNTs could behave as electrons transferor during enzyme catalysis. The covalent immobilization of catalase from bovine liver on the neat PANCAA nanofiber mesh or the composite one was processed in the presence of EDC/NHS. Results indicated that both the amount and activity retention of bound catalase on the composite nanofiber mesh were higher than those on the neat PANCAA nanofiber mesh, and the activity increased up to 42%. Kinetic parameters, K(m) and V(max), for the catalases immobilized on the composite nanofiber mesh were lower and higher than those on the neat one, respectively. This enhanced activity might be ascribed to either promoted electron transfer through charge-transfer complexes and the pi system of carbon nanotubes or rendered biocompatibility by modified MWCNTs. Furthermore, the immobilized catalases revealed much more stability after MWCNTs were incorporated into the polymer nanofiber mesh. However, there was no significant difference in optimum pH value and temperature, thermal stability and operational stability between these two immobilized preparations, while the two ones appeared more advantageous than the free in these properties. The effect of MWCNTs incorporation on another redox enzyme, peroxidase, was also studied and it was found that the activity increased by 68% in comparison of composite one with neat preparation. PMID:17171660

  3. Study of poly(acrylonitrile-methyl methacrylate) as binder for graphite anode and LiMn 2O 4 cathode of Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. S.; Jow, T. R.

    We evaluated poly(acrylonitrile-methyl methacrylate) (AMMA, AN/MMA=94:6) as a binder for the graphite anode and the LiMn 2O 4 cathode of Li-ion batteries by studying the cycling performance of lithium half-cells. The results showed that, using AMMA binder, both graphite and LiMn 2O 4 could be cycled well in 1 m LiPF 6 3:3:4 (weight) PC/EC/EMC electrolyte with less capacity fading. AMMA is chemically more stable than poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) against the lithiated graphite. More importantly, AMMA can help graphite to form a stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) film. An impedance study showed that the SEI film formed with AMMA is more stable than the one formed with PVDF. Therefore, self-delithiation of the lithiated graphite can be reduced by use of AMMA instead of PVDF, which improves the storage performance of Li-ion batteries.

  4. A poly(acrylonitrile)-functionalized porous aromatic framework synthesized by atom-transfer radical polymerization for the extraction of uranium from seawater

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Yanfeng; Zhang, Chenxi; Tang, Qing; Mayes, Richard T.; Liao, Wei -Po; Liao, Chen; Tsouris, Costas; Stankovich, Joseph J.; Chen, Jihua; Hensley, Dale K.; et al

    2015-10-30

    In order to ensure a sustainable reserve of fuel for nuclear power generation, tremendous research efforts have been devoted to developing advanced sorbent materials for extracting uranium from seawater. In this work, a porous aromatic framework (PAF) was surface-functionalized with poly(acrylonitrile) through atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Batches of this adsorbent were conditioned with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at room temperature or 80 °C prior to contact with a uranium-spiked seawater simulant, with minimal differences in uptake observed as a function of conditioning temperature. A maximum capacity of 4.81 g-U/kg-ads was obtained following 42 days contact with uranium-spiked filtered environmental seawater, whichmore » demonstrates a comparable adsorption rate. A kinetic investigation revealed extremely rapid uranyl uptake, with more than 80% saturation reached within 14 days. Furthermore, relying on the semiordered structure of the PAF adsorbent, density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal cooperative interactions between multiple adsorbent groups yield a strong driving force for uranium binding.« less

  5. A poly(acrylonitrile)-functionalized porous aromatic framework synthesized by atom-transfer radical polymerization for the extraction of uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Yanfeng; Zhang, Chenxi; Tang, Qing; Mayes, Richard T.; Liao, Wei -Po; Liao, Chen; Tsouris, Costas; Stankovich, Joseph J.; Chen, Jihua; Hensley, Dale K.; Abney, Carter W.; Jiang, De-en; Brown, Suree; Dai, Sheng

    2015-10-30

    In order to ensure a sustainable reserve of fuel for nuclear power generation, tremendous research efforts have been devoted to developing advanced sorbent materials for extracting uranium from seawater. In this work, a porous aromatic framework (PAF) was surface-functionalized with poly(acrylonitrile) through atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Batches of this adsorbent were conditioned with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at room temperature or 80 °C prior to contact with a uranium-spiked seawater simulant, with minimal differences in uptake observed as a function of conditioning temperature. A maximum capacity of 4.81 g-U/kg-ads was obtained following 42 days contact with uranium-spiked filtered environmental seawater, which demonstrates a comparable adsorption rate. A kinetic investigation revealed extremely rapid uranyl uptake, with more than 80% saturation reached within 14 days. Furthermore, relying on the semiordered structure of the PAF adsorbent, density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal cooperative interactions between multiple adsorbent groups yield a strong driving force for uranium binding.

  6. Study on ion conductivity and crystallinity of composite polymer electrolytes based on poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(acrylonitrile) containing nano-sized Al2O3 fillers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mingyeong; Lee, Lyungyu; Jung, Yongju; Kim, Seok

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, composite polymer electrolytes were prepared by a blend of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) as a polymer matrix, ethylene carbonate as a plasticizer, LiClO4 as a salt, and by containing a different content of nano-sized Al2O3. The composite films were prepared by using the solution casting method. The crystallinity and ionic conductivity of the polymer electrolytes was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and AC impedance method, respectively. The morphology of composite polymer electrolyte film was analyzed by SEM method. From the experimental results, by increasing the Al2O3 content, the crystallinity of PEO was reduced, and the ionic conductivity was increased. In particular, by a doping of 15 wt.% Al2O3 in PEO/PAN polymer blend, the CPEs showed the superior ionic conductivity. However, when Al2O3 content exceeds 15 wt.%, the ionic conductivity was decreased. From the surface morphology, it was concluded that the ionic conductivity was decreased because the CPEs showed a heterogenous morphology due to immiscibility or aggregation of the ceramic filler within the polymer matrix. PMID:24266154

  7. Heat shrinkable behavior, physico-mechanical and structure properties of electron beam cross-linked blends of high-density polyethylene with acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinholds, Ingars; Kalkis, Valdis; Merijs-Meri, Remo; Zicans, Janis; Grigalovica, Agnese

    2016-03-01

    In this study, heat-shrinkable composites of electron beam irradiated high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites with acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) were investigated. HDPE/NBR blends at a ratio of components 100/0, 90/10, 80/20, 50/50 and 20/80 wt% were prepared using a two-roll mill. The compression molded films were irradiated high-energy (5 MeV) accelerated electrons up to irradiation absorbed doses of 100-300 kGy. The effect of electron beam induced cross-linking was evaluated by the changes of mechanical properties, gel content and by the differences of thermal properties, detected by differential scanning calorimetry. The thermo-shrinkage forces were determined as the kinetics of thermorelaxation and the residual shrinkage stresses of previously oriented (stretched up to 100% at above melting temperature of HDPE and followed by cooling to room temperature) specimens of irradiated HDPE/NBR blends under isometric heating-cooling mode. The compatibility between the both components was enhanced due to the formation of cross-linked sites at amorphous interphase. The results showed increase of mechanical stiffness of composites with increase of irradiation dose. The values of gel fraction compared to thermorelaxation stresses increased with the growth of irradiation dose level, as a result of formation cross-linked sites in amorphous PP/NBR interphase.

  8. Three-dimensional Printed Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene Framework Coated with Cu-BTC Metal-organic Frameworks for the Removal of Methylene Blue

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zongyuan; Wang, Jiajun; Li, Minyue; Sun, Kaihang; Liu, Chang-jun

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing was applied for the fabrication of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) framework. Functionalization of the ABS framework was then performed by coating of porous Cu-BTC (BTC = benzene tricarboxylic acid) metal-organic frameworks on it using a step-by-step in-situ growth. The size of the Cu-BTC particles on ABS was ranged from 200 nm to 900 nm. The Cu-BTC/ABS framework can take up most of the space of the tubular reactor that makes the adsorption effective with no need of stirring. Methylene blue (MB) can be readily removed from aqueous solution by this Cu-BTC/ABS framework. The MB removal efficiency for solutions with concentrations of 10 and 5 mg/L was 93.3% and 98.3%, respectively, within 10 min. After MB adsorption, the Cu-BTC/ABS composite can easily be recovered without the need for centrifugation or filtration and the composite is reusable. In addition the ABS framework can be recovered for subsequent reuse. A significant advantage of 3D-printed frameworks is that different frameworks can be easily fabricated to meet the needs of different applications. This is a promising strategy to synthesize new frameworks using MOFs and polymers to develop materials for applications beyond adsorption. PMID:25089616

  9. Zinc oxide nanorod assisted rapid single-step process for the conversion of electrospun poly(acrylonitrile) nanofibers to carbon nanofibers with a high graphitic content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nain, Ratyakshi; Singh, Dhirendra; Jassal, Manjeet; Agrawal, Ashwini K.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of incorporation of rigid zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures on carbonization behavior of electrospun special acrylic fiber grade poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN-SAF) nanofibers was investigated. ZnO nanorods with high aspect ratios were incorporated into a PAN-N,N-dimethylformamide system and the composite nanofibers reinforced with aligned ZnO rods up to 50 wt% were successfully electrospun, and subsequently, carbonized. The morphology and the structural analysis of the resultant carbon nanofibers revealed that the rigid ZnO nanorods, present inside the nanofibers, possibly acted as scaffolds (temporary support structures) for immobilization of polymer chains and assisted in uniform heat distribution. This facilitated rapid and efficient conversion of the polymer structure to the ladder, and subsequently, the graphitized structure. At the end of the process, the ZnO nanorods were found to completely separate from the carbonized fibers yielding pure carbon nanofibers with a high graphitic content and surface area. The approach could be used to eliminate the slow, energy intensive stabilization step and achieve fast conversion of randomly laid carbon nanofiber webs in a single step to carbon nanofibers without the application of external tension or internal templates usually employed to achieve a high graphitic content in such systems.The effect of incorporation of rigid zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures on carbonization behavior of electrospun special acrylic fiber grade poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN-SAF) nanofibers was investigated. ZnO nanorods with high aspect ratios were incorporated into a PAN-N,N-dimethylformamide system and the composite nanofibers reinforced with aligned ZnO rods up to 50 wt% were successfully electrospun, and subsequently, carbonized. The morphology and the structural analysis of the resultant carbon nanofibers revealed that the rigid ZnO nanorods, present inside the nanofibers, possibly acted as scaffolds (temporary support structures) for

  10. Hemoglobin adducts from acrylonitrile and ethylene oxide in cigarette smokers: effects of glutathione S-transferase T1-null and M1-null genotypes.

    PubMed

    Fennell, T R; MacNeela, J P; Morris, R W; Watson, M; Thompson, C L; Bell, D A

    2000-07-01

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) is used to manufacture plastics and fibers. It is carcinogenic in rats and is found in cigarette smoke. Ethylene oxide (EO) is a metabolite of ethylene, also found in cigarette smoke, and is carcinogenic in rodents. Both ACN and EO undergo conjugation with glutathione. The objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between cigarette smoking and hemoglobin adducts derived from ACN and EO and to investigate whether null genotypes for glutathione transferase (GSTM1 and GSTT1) alter the internal dose of these agents. The hemoglobin adducts N-(2-cyanoethyl)valine (CEVal), which is formed from ACN, and N-(2-hydroxyethyl)valine (HEVal), which is formed from EO, and GST genotypes were determined in blood samples obtained from 16 nonsmokers and 32 smokers (one to two packs/day). Smoking information was obtained by questionnaire, and plasma cotinine levels were determined by immunoassay. Glutathione transferase null genotypes (GSTM1 and GSTT1) were determined by PCR. Both CEVal and HEVal levels increased with increased cigarette smoking dose (both self-reported and cotinine-based). CEVal and HEVal levels were also correlated. GSTM1 and GSTT1 genotypes had little effect on CEVal concentrations. GSTM1 null genotypes had no significant impact on HEVal. However, HEVal levels were significantly elevated in GSTT1-null individuals when normalized to smoking status or cotinine levels. The ratio of HEVal:CEVal was also elevated in GSTT1-null smokers (1.50 +/- 0.57 versus 0.88 +/- 0.24; P = 0.0002). The lack of a functional GSTT1 is estimated to increase the internal dose of EO derived from cigarette smoke by 50-70%. PMID:10919741

  11. Cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol)-poly(acrylonitrile-co-2-dimethylamino ethylmethacrylate) based anion-exchange membranes in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mahendra; Singh, Shalini; Shahi, Vinod K

    2010-01-14

    Hydroxide anion conducting polymer membranes also termed as anion exchange membranes (AEMs) are recently becoming important materials for electrochemical technology, alkaline fuel cells, and electrolyzers. In this work, the preparation procedure for AEMs based on poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and copolymer of poly(acrylonitrile (PAN)-dimethylamino ethylmethacrylate) (DMAEMA) with strongly basic quaternary ammonium in aqueous media has been reported. This simplified procedure avoids the use of chloromethyl methyl ether (CME), a carcinogen that is harmful to human health, generally used for chloromethylation during AEM preparation. Developed AEMs were extensively characterized by studying physicochemical and electrochemical properties, to assess their suitability for electrodialytic ion separation. These membranes were designed to possess all the required properties of a highly anion conductive membrane such as reasonable water uptake, good ion-exchange capacity (1.18 mequiv g(-1)), high permselectivity (0.90), along with reasonable conductivity (3.45 mS cm(-1)) due to quaternary ammonium group functionality. The membrane conductivity values in conjunction with solution conductivity have been used for the estimation of the isoconductivity point, considering the membrane as a combination of the gel phase and integral phase. Electroosmotic studies revealed quite low mass drag and equivalent pore radius (2.7-4.0 A) of the membrane, which are also desirable properties of an AEM. The excellent electrotransport property of AEM-70 for practical anion separation was concluded from i-v studies. Electrodialytic performance of the AEM-70 membrane revealed its suitability for applications in electromembrane processes. PMID:19938844

  12. Copper-catalyzed retro-aldol reaction of β-hydroxy ketones or nitriles with aldehydes: chemo- and stereoselective access to (E)-enones and (E)-acrylonitriles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song-Lin; Deng, Zhu-Qin

    2016-07-26

    A copper-catalyzed transfer aldol type reaction of β-hydroxy ketones or nitriles with aldehydes is reported, which enables chemo- and stereoselective access to (E)-α,β-unsaturated ketones and (E)-acrylonitriles. A key step of the in situ copper(i)-promoted retro-aldol reaction of β-hydroxy ketones or nitriles is proposed to generate a reactive Cu(i) enolate or cyanomethyl intermediate, which undergoes ensuing aldol condensation with aldehydes to deliver the products. This reaction uses 1.2 mol% Cu(IPr)Cl (IPr denotes 1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene) as the catalyst in the presence of 6.0 mol% NaOtBu cocatalyst at room temperature or 70 °C. A range of aryl and heteroaryl aldehydes as well as acrylaldehydes are compatible with many useful functional groups being tolerated. Under the mild and weakly basic conditions, competitive Cannizzaro-type reaction of benzaldehydes and side reactions of base-sensitive functional groups can be effectively suppressed, which show synthetic advantages of this reaction compared to classic aldol reactions. The synthetic potential of this reaction is further demonstrated by the one-step synthesis of biologically active quinolines and 1,8-naphthyridine in excellent yields (up to 91%). Finally, a full catalytic cycle for this reaction has been constructed using DFT computational studies in the context of a retro-aldol/aldol two-stage mechanism. A rather flat reaction energy profile is found indicating that both stages are kinetically facile, which is consistent with the mild reaction conditions. PMID:27397647

  13. Towards alpha- or beta-D-C-glycosyl compounds by tin-catalyzed addition of glycosyl radicals to acrylonitrile and vinylphosphonate, and flexible reduction of tetra-O-acetyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl bromide with cyanoborohydride.

    PubMed

    Praly, Jean-Pierre; Ardakani, Azin Salek; Bruyère, Isabelle; Marie-Luce, Chrystelle; Bing Qin, Bing

    2002-10-01

    Photo-induced radical addition of acetylated alpha-D-glucopyranosyl bromide (1). to acrylonitrile or diethyl vinylphosphonate, in the presence of catalytic amounts of tri-n-butyltin chloride and sodium (or tetra-n-butylammonium) cyanoborohydride in excess, allowed efficient preparations of alpha-configurated nonononitrile and 2-(alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-ethylphosphonate (79, 70% yields, respectively). These conditions led to 2-(alpha-D-manno-, and galactopyranosyl)-ethylphosphonates in 68 and 76% yields. Similarly, radical addition of acetylated 1-bromo-beta-D-glucopyranosyl chloride (2). to acrylonitrile or diethyl vinylphosphonate afforded mainly intermediate chlorides which, upon radical reduction with excess tri-n-butyltin hydride, afforded the corresponding beta anomers (40 and 38%, respectively) by sequential C-C and C-H bond formation. Stereocontrol relies on the alpha-stereoselective quenching of D-glycopyranos-1-yl radicals. We found also that UV light irradiation of 1 with excess NaBH(3)CN in tert-butanol afforded either 1,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-2-deoxy-alpha-D-arabino-hexopyranose (65% after crystallization) or, when 10% mol thiophenol was added, 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-1,5-anhydro-D-glucitol (79%). These are simple, tin-free, and easily controlled conditions, which compare well with known preparations of these reduced sugars. PMID:12423963

  14. Between Ni(mnt)2 and Ni(tfd)2 dithiolene complexes: the unsymmetrical 2-(trifluoromethyl)acrylonitrile-1,2-dithiolate and its nickel complexes.

    PubMed

    Jeannin, Olivier; Delaunay, Jacques; Barrière, Frédéric; Fourmigué, Marc

    2005-12-26

    A novel 1,2-dithiolate ligand, that is, the 2-(trifluoromethyl)acrylonitrile-1,2-dithiolate, abbreviated here as tfadt, is prepared from the corresponding cyclic dithiocarbonate. This ligand, substituted with both a CN and a CF(3) group, is compared with the well-known maleonitrile- and bis(trifluoromethyl)ethane-1,2-dithiolates. The preparation, electrochemical properties, and X-ray crystal structures of the square-planar nickel complexes, in both their dianionic diamagnetic [Ni(tfadt)(2)](2)(-) and their monoanionic paramagnetic [Ni(tfadt)(2)](*)(-) forms, are reported, as n-Bu(4)N(+), PPh(4)(+), and (18-crown-6)Na(+) salts, respectively. In the [(18-crown-6)Na](2)[Ni(tfadt)(2)] salt, each CN moiety of the [Ni(tfadt)(2)](2)(-) dianion is coordinated to a (18-crown-6)Na(+) cation through a CN...Na interaction [N...Na = 2.481(3) A], affording an "axle with wheels" model where two MeOH molecules act as axle caps. On the other hand, in [(18-crown-6)Na][Ni(tfadt)(2)], each (18-crown-6)Na(+) cation is coordinated on both sides by the CN groups of two monoanionic [Ni(tfadt)(2)](*)(-) complexes with N...Na(+) distances at 2.434(5) and 2.485(4) A, giving rise to heterobimetallic chains with alternating (18-crown-6)Na(+) and [Ni(tfadt)(2)](*)(-) ions. These two examples demonstrate the attractive ability of the CN moieties in the [Ni(tfadt)(2)](2)(-)(,)(*)(-) complexes to coordinate metallic cationic centers. The paramagnetic salts of the anionic [Ni(tfadt)(2)](*)(-) complex follow Curie-type law in the 2-300 K temperature range, indicating the absence of intermolecular magnetic interactions in the solid state. The complexes are found in their trans form in all crystal structures, while density functional theory calculations establish that both forms have essentially the same energy. A cis-trans interconversion process is observed by variable-temperature NMR on the dianionic [Ni(tfadt)(2)](2)(-) complex with a coalescence temperature T(c) of 260 K and a free energy of

  15. Laser transmission welding of Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene (ABS) using a tailored high power diode-laser optical fiber coupled system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Vidal, E.; Quintana, I.; Etxarri, J.; Otaduy, D.; González, F.; Moreno, F.

    2012-06-01

    Laser transmission welding (LTW) of polymers is a direct bonding technique which is already used in different industrial applications sectors such as automobile, microfluidic, electronic and biomedicine. This technique offers several advantages over conventional methods, especially when a local deposition of energy and minimum thermal distortions are required. In LTW one of the polymeric materials needs to be transparent to the laser wavelength and the second part needs to be designed to be absorbed in IR spectrum. This report presents a study of laser weldability of ABS (acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene) filled with two different concentrations of carbon nanotubes (0.01% and 0.05% CNTs). These additives are used as infrared absorbing components in the laser welding process, affecting the thermal and optical properties of the material and, hence, the final quality of the weld seam. A tailored laser system has been designed to obtain high quality weld seams with widths between 0.4 and 1.0mm. It consists of two diode laser bars (50W per bar) coupled into an optical fiber using a non-imaging solution: equalization of the beam quality factor (M2) in the slow and fast axes by a pair of micro step-mirrors. The beam quality factor has been analyzed at different laser powers with the aim to guarantee a coupling efficiency to the multimode optical fiber. The power scaling is carried out by means of multiplexing polarization technique. The analysis of energy balance and beam quality is performed in two linked steps: first by means ray tracing simulations (ZEMAX®) and second, by validation. Quality of the weld seams is analyzed in terms of the process parameters (welding speed, laser power and clamping pressure) by visual and optical microscope inspections. The optimum laser power range for three different welding speeds is determinate meanwhile the clamping pressure is held constant. Additionally, the corresponding mechanical shear tests were carried out to analyze the

  16. Comparative metabolism of methacrylonitrile and acrylonitrile to cyanide using cytochrome P4502E1 and microsomal epoxide hydrolase-null mice

    SciTech Connect

    El Hadri, L.; Chanas, B.; Ghanayem, B.I. . E-mail: ghanayem@niehs.nih.gov

    2005-06-01

    Methacrylonitrile (MAN) and acrylonitrile (AN) are metabolized via glutathione (GSH) conjugation or epoxide formation. We have recently shown that CYP2E1 is essential for AN epoxidation and subsequent cyanide liberation. Current studies were designed to compare the enzymatic basis of MAN vs. AN metabolism to cyanide using wild-type (WT), CYP2E1-, and mEH-null mice. Mice received a single gavage dose of 0.047, 0.095, 0.19, or 0.38 mmol/kg of MAN or AN, and blood cyanide was measured at 1 or 3 h later. Blood cyanide levels in WT mice treated with AN or MAN were dose and time dependent. At equimolar doses, significantly higher levels of cyanide were detected in the blood of MAN- vs. AN-treated mice. Further, while significant reduction in blood cyanide levels occurred in MAN-treated CYP2E1-null vs. WT mice, AN metabolism to cyanide was largely abolished in CYP2E1-null mice. Pretreatment of mice with 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT, CYP inhibitor) demonstrated that CYPs other than CYP2E1 also contribute to MAN metabolism to cyanide. Blood cyanide levels in mEH-null mice treated with aliphatic nitriles are generally lower than levels in similarly treated WT mice. Western blot analysis showed that expression of sEH was greater in male vs. female mice. The role of various epoxide hydrolases (EHs) in the production of cyanide from aliphatic nitriles is apparently structure and dose dependent. Regardless of genotype, significantly higher levels of cyanide were measured in the blood of male vs. female mice treated with MAN or AN. In conclusion, these data showed that (1) at equimolar doses, higher blood cyanide levels were detected in mice treated with MAN vs. AN; (2) while CYP2E1 is the only enzyme responsible for AN metabolism to cyanide, other CYPs also contribute to MAN metabolism; and (3) significantly higher levels of cyanide were measured in the blood of male vs. female treated with either nitrile. Higher blood cyanide levels in male vs. female mice and in MAN- vs. AN

  17. HEALTH EFFECTS ASSESSMENT FOR ACRYLONITRILE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes and evaluates information relevant to a preliminary interim assessment of adverse health effects associated with specific chemicals or compounds. The Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (Superfund) uses these documents in preparing cost-benefit analyse...

  18. Preparation and Characterization of Facilitated Transport Membranes Composed of Chitosan-Styrene and Chitosan-Acrylonitrile Copolymers Modified by Methylimidazolium Based Ionic Liquids for CO2 Separation from CH4 and N2

    PubMed Central

    Otvagina, Ksenia V.; Mochalova, Alla E.; Sazanova, Tatyana S.; Petukhov, Anton N.; Moskvichev, Alexandr A.; Vorotyntsev, Andrey V.; Afonso, Carlos A. M.; Vorotyntsev, Ilya V.

    2016-01-01

    CO2 separation was found to be facilitated by transport membranes based on novel chitosan (CS)–poly(styrene) (PS) and chitosan (CS)–poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) copolymer matrices doped with methylimidazolium based ionic liquids: [bmim][BF4], [bmim][PF6], and [bmim][Tf2N] (IL). CS plays the role of biodegradable film former and selectivity promoter. Copolymers were prepared implementing the latest achievements in radical copolymerization with chosen monomers, which enabled the achievement of outstanding mechanical strength values for the CS-based membranes (75–104 MPa for CS-PAN and 69–75 MPa for CS-PS). Ionic liquid (IL) doping affected the surface and mechanical properties of the membranes as well as the gas separation properties. The highest CO2 permeability 400 Barrers belongs to CS-b-PS/[bmim][BF4]. The highest selectivity α (CO2/N2) = 15.5 was achieved for CS-b-PAN/[bmim][BF4]. The operational temperature of the membranes is under 220 °C. PMID:27294964

  19. Experimental (FT-IR, NMR and UV) and theoretical (M06-2X and DFT) investigation, and frequency estimation analyses on (E)-3-(4-bromo-5-methylthiophen-2-yl)acrylonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sert, Yusuf; Balakit, Asim A.; Öztürk, Nuri; Ucun, Fatih; El-Hiti, Gamal A.

    2014-10-01

    The spectroscopic properties of (E)-3-(4-bromo-5-methylthiophen-2-yl)acrylonitrile have been investigated by FT-IR, UV, 1H and 13C NMR techniques. The theoretical vibrational frequencies and optimized geometric parameters (bond lengths and angles) have been calculated using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP: Becke, 3-parameter, Lee-Yang-Parr) and DFT/M06-2X (the highly parameterized, empirical exchange correlation function) quantum chemical methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set by Gaussian 03 software, for the first time. The assignments of the vibrational frequencies have been carried out by potential energy distribution (PED) analysis by using VEDA 4 software. The theoretical optimized geometric parameters and vibrational frequencies were in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data, and with the results in the literature. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strength wavelengths were performed by B3LYP methods. In addition, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies and the other related molecular energy values have been calculated and depicted.

  20. Preparation and Characterization of Facilitated Transport Membranes Composed of Chitosan-Styrene and Chitosan-Acrylonitrile Copolymers Modified by Methylimidazolium Based Ionic Liquids for CO₂ Separation from CH₄ and N₂.

    PubMed

    Otvagina, Ksenia V; Mochalova, Alla E; Sazanova, Tatyana S; Petukhov, Anton N; Moskvichev, Alexandr A; Vorotyntsev, Andrey V; Afonso, Carlos A M; Vorotyntsev, Ilya V

    2016-01-01

    CO₂ separation was found to be facilitated by transport membranes based on novel chitosan (CS)-poly(styrene) (PS) and chitosan (CS)-poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) copolymer matrices doped with methylimidazolium based ionic liquids: [bmim][BF₄], [bmim][PF₆], and [bmim][Tf₂N] (IL). CS plays the role of biodegradable film former and selectivity promoter. Copolymers were prepared implementing the latest achievements in radical copolymerization with chosen monomers, which enabled the achievement of outstanding mechanical strength values for the CS-based membranes (75-104 MPa for CS-PAN and 69-75 MPa for CS-PS). Ionic liquid (IL) doping affected the surface and mechanical properties of the membranes as well as the gas separation properties. The highest CO₂ permeability 400 Barrers belongs to CS-b-PS/[bmim][BF₄]. The highest selectivity α (CO₂/N₂) = 15.5 was achieved for CS-b-PAN/[bmim][BF₄]. The operational temperature of the membranes is under 220 °C. PMID:27294964

  1. Morphology, mechanical, cross-linking, thermal, and tribological properties of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composites prepared by melt compounding: The effect of acrylonitrile content and hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likozar, Blaž; Major, Zoltan

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to prepare nanocomposites by mixing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile elastomers (NBR and HNBR). Utilization of transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques (SAXS and WAXS) for advanced morphology observation of conducting filler-reinforced nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber composites is reported. Principal results were increases in hardness (maximally 97 Shore, type A), elastic modulus (maximally 981 MPa), tensile strength (maximally 27.7 MPa), elongation at break (maximally 216%), cross-link density (maximally 7.94 × 1028 m-3), density (maximally 1.16 g cm-3), and tear strength (11.2 kN m-1), which were clearly visible at particular acrylonitrile contents both for unhydrogenated and hydrogenated polymers due to enhanced distribution of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and their aggregated particles in the applied rubber matrix. Conclusion was that multi-walled carbon nanotubes improved the performance of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber nanocomposites prepared by melt compounding.

  2. Evaluation of the detoxication efficiencies for acrylonitrile wastewater treated by a combined anaerobic oxic-aerobic biological fluidized tank (A/O-ABFT) process: Acute toxicity and zebrafish embryo toxicity.

    PubMed

    Na, Chunhong; Zhang, Ying; Deng, Minjie; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo; Zhang, Yaobin

    2016-07-01

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) wastewater generated during ACN production has been reported to be toxic to many aquatic organisms. However, few studies have evaluated toxicity removal of ACN wastewater during and after the treatment process. In this study, the detoxication ability of an ACN wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was evaluated using Daphnia magna, Danio rerio and zebrafish embryo. This ACN WWTP has a combined anaerobic oxic-aerobic biological fluidized tank (A/O-ABFT) process upgraded from the traditional anaerobic oxic (A/O) process. Moreover, the potential toxicants of the ACN wastewaters were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The raw ACN wastewater showed high acute and embryo toxicity. 3-Cyanopyridine, succinonitrile and a series of nitriles were detected as the toxic contributors of ACN wastewater. The A/O process was effective for the acute and embryo toxicity removal, as well as the organic toxicants. However, the A/O effluent still showed acute and embryo toxicity which was attributed by the undegraded and the newly generated toxicants during the A/O process. The residual acute and embryo toxicity as well as the organic toxicants in the A/O effluent were further reduced after going through the downstream ABFT process system. The final effluent displayed no significant acute and embryo toxicity, and less organic toxicants were detected in the final effluent. The upgrade of this ACN WWTP results in the improved removal efficiencies for acute and embryo toxicity, as well as the organic toxicants. PMID:27037768

  3. Synthesis, molecular conformation, vibrational and electronic transition, isometric chemical shift, polarizability and hyperpolarizability analysis of 3-(4-Methoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-nitro-phenyl)-acrylonitrile: A combined experimental and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiri, Abdullah Mohamed; Karabacak, Mehmet; Kurt, Mustafa; Alamry, Khalid A.

    2011-11-01

    This work presents the synthesis and characterization of a novel compound, 3-(4-Methoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-nitro-phenyl)-acrylonitrile (abbreviated as 3-(4MP)-2-(4-NP)-AN, C 16H 12N 2O 3). The spectroscopic properties of the compound were examined by FT-IR, UV-vis and NMR ( 1H and 13C) techniques. FT-IR spectrum in solid state was observed in the region 4000-400 cm -1. The UV-vis absorption spectrum of the compound which dissolved in chloroform was recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded in CDCl 3 solution. To determine lowest-energy molecular conformation of the title molecule, the selected torsion angle is varied every 10° and molecular energy profile is calculated from 0° to 360°. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) basis set. The dipole moment, linear polarizability and first hyperpolarizability values were also computed using the same basis set. A study on the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The HOMO and LUMO analysis were used to elucidate information regarding charge transfer within the molecule. The vibrational wavenumbers were calculated and scaled values were compared with experimental FT-IR spectrum. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the experimental results and total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. Isotropic chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Comparison of the calculated frequencies, NMR chemical shifts, absorption wavelengths with the experimental values revealed that DFT and TD-DFT method produce good results. The linear polarizabilities and first hyperpolarizabilities of the studied molecule indicate that the title compound can be used as a good nonlinear optical material

  4. Synthesis, molecular conformation, vibrational and electronic transition, isometric chemical shift, polarizability and hyperpolarizability analysis of 3-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-nitro-phenyl)-acrylonitrile: a combined experimental and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Asiri, Abdullah Mohamed; Karabacak, Mehmet; Kurt, Mustafa; Alamry, Khalid A

    2011-11-01

    This work presents the synthesis and characterization of a novel compound, 3-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-nitro-phenyl)-acrylonitrile (abbreviated as 3-(4MP)-2-(4-NP)-AN, C(16)H(12)N(2)O(3)). The spectroscopic properties of the compound were examined by FT-IR, UV-vis and NMR ((1)H and (13)C) techniques. FT-IR spectrum in solid state was observed in the region 4000-400 cm(-1). The UV-vis absorption spectrum of the compound which dissolved in chloroform was recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were recorded in CDCl(3) solution. To determine lowest-energy molecular conformation of the title molecule, the selected torsion angle is varied every 10° and molecular energy profile is calculated from 0° to 360°. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) basis set. The dipole moment, linear polarizability and first hyperpolarizability values were also computed using the same basis set. A study on the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The HOMO and LUMO analysis were used to elucidate information regarding charge transfer within the molecule. The vibrational wavenumbers were calculated and scaled values were compared with experimental FT-IR spectrum. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the experimental results and total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. Isotropic chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Comparison of the calculated frequencies, NMR chemical shifts, absorption wavelengths with the experimental values revealed that DFT and TD-DFT method produce good results. The linear polarizabilities and first hyperpolarizabilities of the studied molecule indicate that the title compound can be used as a good nonlinear

  5. Comparison of sodium naphthenate and air-ionization corona discharge as surface treatments for the ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene polymer (ETFE) to improve adhesion between ETFE and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene polymer (ABS) in the presence of a cyanoacrylate adhesive (CAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucía Johanning-Solís, Ana; Stradi-Granados, Benito A.

    2014-09-01

    This study compares two ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) surface activation treatments, namely chemical attack with a solution of sodium naphthenate and plasma erosion via air-ionization corona discharge in order to improve the adhesive properties of the ETFE. An experimental design was prepared for both treatments in order to assess the effect of the treatment characteristics on the tensile load needed to break the bond between the ETFE and the acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene polymer (ABS) formed with a cyanoacrylate adhesive (CAA) applied between them. The reason for the selection of this problem is that both polymers are frequently used in the biomedical industry for their properties, and they need to be joined firmly in biomedical devices, and the cyanoacrylate adhesive is the adhesive traditionally used for fluoropolymers, in this case the ETFE, and the same CAA has also shown good adhesion with ABS. However, the strength of the bond for the triplet ETFE-CAA-ABS has not been reported and the improvement of the strength of the bond with surface treatments is not found in scholarly journals for modern medical devices such as stents and snares. Both treatments were compared based on the aforementioned design of experiments. The case where ETFE receives no surface treatment serves as the reference. The results indicated that the three factors evaluated (initial drying of the material, temperature of the chemical bath, and immersion time), and their interactions have no significant effect over the tensile load at failure (tensile strength) of the adhesive bond being evaluated. For the air-ionization corona discharge treatment, two factors were evaluated: discharge exposition time and air pressure. The results obtained from this experimental design indicate that there is no significant difference between the levels of the factors evaluated. These results were unexpected as the ranges used were representative of the maximum ranges permissible in manufacturing

  6. 21 CFR 180.22 - Acrylonitrile copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD OR IN CONTACT WITH FOOD ON AN INTERIM BASIS PENDING ADDITIONAL STUDY Specific Requirements for Certain Food Additives § 180.22... accordance with this paragraph. Those uses are thereafter unapproved food additives and consequently...

  7. 21 CFR 180.22 - Acrylonitrile copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD OR IN CONTACT WITH FOOD ON AN INTERIM BASIS PENDING ADDITIONAL STUDY Specific Requirements for Certain Food Additives § 180.22... accordance with this paragraph. Those uses are thereafter unapproved food additives and consequently...

  8. 21 CFR 180.22 - Acrylonitrile copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD OR IN CONTACT WITH FOOD ON AN INTERIM BASIS PENDING ADDITIONAL STUDY Specific Requirements for Certain Food Additives § 180.22... accordance with this paragraph. Those uses are thereafter unapproved food additives and consequently...

  9. 21 CFR 180.22 - Acrylonitrile copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD OR IN CONTACT WITH FOOD ON AN INTERIM BASIS PENDING ADDITIONAL STUDY Specific Requirements for Certain Food Additives § 180.22... accordance with this paragraph. Those uses are thereafter unapproved food additives and consequently...

  10. Enzymatic surface modification of acrylonitrile fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battistel, Ezio; Morra, Marco; Marinetti, Massimo

    2001-06-01

    The surface of polyacrylonitrile polymer (containing 10% acetate groups) as fibers and finely ground powder have been modified by enzymatic treatment. The enzyme used was a nitrile hydratase, member of the class of nitrile converting enzymes, present in the microorganisms Brevibacterium imperiale and Corynebacterium nitrilophilus. The pendant nitrile groups were selectively converted into the corresponding amides as assessed by XPS analysis. As indicated by the increase of the O/C atomic ratio, the fiber surface showed a significant increase in hydrophilicity. The newly formed amide groups were then able to react with the acid dyes typically used to stain natural fibers, conferring the coloring properties to the otherwise inert polymer surface.

  11. 29 CFR 1910.1045 - Acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... provide to employees, the appropriate respirators specified in paragraph (d)(3)(i)(A) of 29 CFR 1910.134...) of this section, the facilities required by 29 CFR 1910.141, including clean change rooms and shower... Secretary in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020 (a) through (e) and (q) through (i). Records required...

  12. 29 CFR 1910.1045 - Acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... provide to employees, the appropriate respirators specified in paragraph (d)(3)(i)(A) of 29 CFR 1910.134...) of this section, the facilities required by 29 CFR 1910.141, including clean change rooms and shower... Secretary in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020 (a) through (e) and (q) through (i). Records required...

  13. 29 CFR 1910.1045 - Acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provide to employees, the appropriate respirators specified in paragraph (d)(3)(i)(A) of 29 CFR 1910.134...) of this section, the facilities required by 29 CFR 1910.141, including clean change rooms and shower... Secretary in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020 (a) through (e) and (q) through (i). Records required...

  14. 29 CFR 1910.1045 - Acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... provide to employees, the appropriate respirators specified in paragraph (d)(3)(i)(A) of 29 CFR 1910.134...) of this section, the facilities required by 29 CFR 1910.141, including clean change rooms and shower... Secretary in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020 (a) through (e) and (q) through (i). Records required...

  15. 29 CFR 1910.1045 - Acrylonitrile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... provide to employees, the appropriate respirators specified in paragraph (d)(3)(i)(A) of 29 CFR 1910.134...) of this section, the facilities required by 29 CFR 1910.141, including clean change rooms and shower... Secretary in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020 (a) through (e) and (q) through (i). Records required...

  16. Buffing dust as a filler of carboxylated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber and butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber.

    PubMed

    Chronska, K; Przepiorkowska, A

    2008-03-01

    Buffing dust from chrome tanned leather is one of the difficult tannery wastes to manage. It is also hazardous to both human health and the environment. The scientific literature rarely reports studies on dust management, especially on its utilization as a filler for elastomers. In this connection we have made an attempt to use this leather waste as a filler for rubbers such as XNBR and NBR. The addition of the buffing dust to rubber mixes brought improvement in mechanical properties, and increase in resistance to thermal ageing as well as in electric conductivity and crosslink density of vulcalizates. PMID:17629616

  17. 21 CFR 181.32 - Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... square inch of food-contact surface—0.003 milligram/square inch when extracted to equilibrium at 120 °F... to equilibrium at 120 °F with food-simulating solvents appropriate to the intended conditions of...

  18. 76 FR 77267 - Acrylonitrile Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3506 et seq.) and Secretary of Labor's Order No. 4-2010 (75 FR 55355). Signed... the Federal eRulemaking Portal. Follow the instructions online for submitting comments. Facsimile: If... , which is the Federal eRulemaking Portal; (2) by facsimile (fax); or (3) by hard copy. All...

  19. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... content is in the range 16.5-19 percent as determined by Kjeldahl analysis. (ii) Intrinsic viscosity in... Test Method for Dilute Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated...

  20. 76 FR 54228 - Draft Toxicological Review of Acrylonitrile: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... (76 FR 38387) for the external review draft human health assessment titled, ``Toxicological Review of...- dissemination peer review under applicable information quality guidelines. This draft assessment has not been... for independent external peer review of this draft assessment. The public comment period and...

  1. 2-[(4-Benzhydrylpipérazin-1-yl)méthyl]acrylonitrile

    PubMed Central

    Ben Amor, Fatma; Ould M’hamed, Mohamed; Mrabet, Hédi; Driss, Ahmed; Efrit, Mohamed Lotfi

    2008-01-01

    In the title compound, 2-[(4-benz­hydryl­piperazin-1-yl)­methyl]­acrylo­nitrile, C21H23N3, the substituted piperazine ring adopts a chair conformation and the dihedral angle between the mean planes of the aromatic rings is 71.61 (8)°. PMID:21201087

  2. Structure and activity of tellurium/molybdenum oxide acrylonitrile catalysts. [Ammoxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Bart, J.C.J.; Giordano, N.

    1980-08-01

    The tellurium/molybdenum mixed oxides ((TeMo)O) catalyst system was investigated as part of the development of an industrial cerium/tellurium/molybdenum mixed oxides catalyst for propylene ammoxidation Catalysts containing 25% active phase on silica were prepared, characterized by BET surface area measurement, mercury porosimetry, X-ray diffraction, and optical microscopy, and tested for the ammoxidation of propylene at 400/sup 0/-460/sup 0/C in a flow reactor. The results suggested that Te/sub 2/MoO/sub 7/ is the active phase. The mechanism probably involves activation of propylene on a tellurium site and oxygen insertion at isolated and highly distorted MoO/sub 6/ octahedral sites. The addition of cerium to the binary catalyst prevents the reductive degradation of (TeMo)O which occurs under reactor flow conditions by a phase-separation process.

  3. Coconut shell powder as cost effective filler in copolymer of acrylonitrile and butadiene rubber.

    PubMed

    Keerthika, B; Umayavalli, M; Jeyalalitha, T; Krishnaveni, N

    2016-08-01

    Filler is one of the major additives in rubber compounds to enhance the physical properties. Even though numerous benefits obtained from agricultural by products like coconut shell, rice husk etc., still they constitute a large source of environmental pollution. In this investigation, one of the agricultural bye product coconut shell powder (CSP) is used as filler in the compounding KNB rubber. It shows the positive and satisfied result was achieved only by the use of filler Fast Extrusion Furnace (FEF) and coconut shell powder (CSP) which was used 50% in each. The effect of these fillers on the mechanical properties of a rubber material at various loading raging from 0 to 60PHP was studied. Mercaptodibanzothiazole disulphide (MBTS) was used as an accelerator. The result shows that presence of 25% and 50% of the composites has better mechanical properties like Hardness, Tensile strength, Elongation at break and Specific gravity when compared with other two combinations. Even though both 25% and 50% of composites shows good mechanical properties, 50% of CSP have more efficient than 25% of CSP. PMID:27060197

  4. The photodissociation mechanisms of acrylonitrile: Ab initio calculations on reaction channels and surface intersections

    SciTech Connect

    Du Weina; Luo Cheng; Li Zesheng

    2008-11-07

    The dissociations of CH{sub 2}CHCN into CH{sub 2}CH+CN and CH{sub 2}C+HCN in the S{sub 0}, T{sub 1}, and {sup 1}{pi}{sub 2}{pi}{sub C{identical_to}}{sub N}* (definitions of {pi} orbitals can refer to computational details) states, have been explored at the complete active space self-consistent field level of theory employing the Dunning correlation consistent triple-zeta basis set. The lowest energy points of the surface crossing seams have been searched. Two conical intersections, from {sup 1}{pi}{sub C{identical_to}}{sub N}{pi}{sub 1}* to {sup 1}{pi}{sub 2}{pi}{sub 1}* (CI{sub 1}) and from {sup 1}{pi}{sub 2}{pi}{sub 1}* to S{sub 0} (CI{sub 2}), and one intersystem crossing point (T{sub 1}/S{sub 0}) have been located. The energies of all critical points have been recomputed with the multiconfigurational second-order perturbation method. At each conical intersection, derivative coupling and unscaled gradient difference vectors have been analyzed to determine the relaxation channels that the molecule may evolve in after nonradiative decay. Once the molecule is photoexcited to the {sup 1}{pi}{sub 2}{pi}{sub 1}* or {sup 1}{pi}{sub C{identical_to}}{sub N}{pi}{sub 1}* state, it would relax along the similar pathway: funneling through CI{sub 1} and then CI{sub 2}, and finally populate the ground state. Our results show that upon 193 nm photoexcitation, the most probable reaction channel is the ground-state HCN elimination following radiationless decays from excited states through surface crossings, which consists with experimental results J. Chem. Phys. 108, 5784 (1998). The investigated dissociation channels on the {sup 1}{pi}{sub 2}{pi}{sub C{identical_to}}{sub N}* surface, which are inaccessible upon 193 nm photoexcitation, may provide information for reactions induced by higher energy excitations.

  5. 21 CFR 177.1040 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... exposed to distilled water and 3 pct acetic acid for 10 d at 66 °C (150 °F)The extracted copolymer shall not exceed 0.001 mg/in 2 surface area of the food contact article when exposed to distilled water and... 2 surface area of the food contact article when exposed to distilled water and 3 pct acetic acid...

  6. Quantitative analysis of (styrene/acrylonitrile/methyl methacrylate) co-polymer systems by infrared resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalbout, Abraham F.; Jiang, Tao; Fengqi, Liu; Ding, C.; Darwish, Abdalla M.

    2002-02-01

    A detailed careful analysis of the infrared resonance (IR) spectra of polystyrene (PSt), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and their co-mixtures were performed. Through this study the absorption peak area to weight ratios as well as working curves were obtained to test for their reliability as well as their suitability. Satisfactory results were achieved and these working curves were then used to measure the polymerized components of binary and ternary co-polymers. By investigating the acquired data we conclude that the monomer preferential polymeric sequence is St>MMA>AN. A quantitative method to measure P (St/AN/MMA) concentrations by IR spectroscopy is proposed in this work.

  7. 21 CFR 177.1030 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .../styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer consists of: (1) 73 to 79 parts by weight of a matrix polymer... weight of methyl methacrylate; and (2) 21 to 27 parts by weight of a grafted rubber consisting of (i) 16... 28 parts by weight of styrene and (ii) 5 to 10 parts by weight of a graft polymer having the...

  8. 21 CFR 177.1030 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .../styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer consists of: (1) 73 to 79 parts by weight of a matrix polymer... weight of methyl methacrylate; and (2) 21 to 27 parts by weight of a grafted rubber consisting of (i) 16... 28 parts by weight of styrene and (ii) 5 to 10 parts by weight of a graft polymer having the...

  9. 21 CFR 177.1030 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... consists of: (1) 73 to 79 parts by weight of a matrix polymer containing 64 to 69 parts by weight of... to 27 parts by weight of a grafted rubber consisting of (i) 16 to 20 parts of butadiene/styrene...) 5 to 10 parts by weight of a graft polymer having the same composition range as the matrix...

  10. 21 CFR 177.1030 - Acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .../styrene/methyl methacrylate copolymer consists of: (1) 73 to 79 parts by weight of a matrix polymer... weight of methyl methacrylate; and (2) 21 to 27 parts by weight of a grafted rubber consisting of (i) 16... 28 parts by weight of styrene and (ii) 5 to 10 parts by weight of a graft polymer having the...

  11. A comparison of the characteristics of excimer and femtosecond laser ablation of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Tian Long; Liu, Zhu; Li, Lin; Zhong, Xiang Li

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the ablation characteristics of excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 15 ns) and femtosecond laser (λ = 800 nm, τ = 100 fs) on ABS polymer sheets. The laser-material interaction parameters (ablation threshold, optical penetration depth and incubation factor) and the changes in material chemical properties were evaluated and compared between the two lasers. The work shows that the ablation threshold and effective optical penetration depth values are dependent on the wavelength of laser beam (photon energy) and the pulse width. The ablation threshold value is lower for the excimer laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 0.087 J/cm2) than that for the femtosecond laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 1.576 J/cm2), demonstrating a more dominating role of laser wavelength than the pulse width in influencing the ablation threshold. The ablation depth versus the logarithmic scale of laser fluence shows two linear regions for the fs laser ablation, not previously known for polymers. The effective optical penetration depth value is lower for excimer laser ablation (α-1 = 223 nm) than that for femtosecond laser ablation (α-1 = 2917 nm). The ablation threshold decreases with increasing number of pulses (NOP) due to the chain scission process that shortens the polymeric chains, resulting in a weaker polymeric configuration and the dependency is governed by the incubation factor. Excimer laser treatment of ABS eliminates the Cdbnd C bond completely through the chain scission process whereas Cdbnd C bond is partially eliminated through the femtosecond laser treatment due to the difference in photon energy of the two laser beams. A reduction in the Cdbnd C bond through the chain scission process creates free radical carbons which then form crosslinks with each other or react with oxygen, nitrogen and water in air producing oxygen-rich (Csbnd O and Cdbnd O bond) and nitrogen-rich (Csbnd N) functional groups.

  12. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Extractives limitations. The following extractive limitations are determined by an infrared spectrophotometric method titled, “Infrared Spectrophotometric Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210...

  13. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Extractives limitations. The following extractive limitations are determined by an infrared spectrophotometric method titled, “Infrared Spectrophotometric Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210...

  14. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Extractives limitations. The following extractive limitations are determined by an infrared spectrophotometric method titled, “Infrared Spectrophotometric Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1480 - Nitrile rubber modified acrylonitrile-methyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Extractives limitations. The following extractive limitations are determined by an infrared spectrophotometric method titled, “Infrared Spectrophotometric Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210...

  16. 76 FR 38387 - Draft Toxicological Review of Acrylonitrile: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... the meeting, attendees must have photo identification with them and must register at the guard's desk in the lobby. The guard will retain your photo identification and will provide you with a visitor's... the guard and you will receive your photo identification. A teleconference line will also be...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1040 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... exposed to distilled water and 3 pct acetic acid for 10 d at 66 °C (150 °F)The extracted copolymer shall not exceed 0.001 mg/in 2 surface area of the food contact article when exposed to distilled water and... 2 surface area of the food contact article when exposed to distilled water and 3 pct acetic acid...

  18. Preparation and dielectric analysis of microphase-separated poly(acrylonitrile-co-acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, D.Shiaw-Guang; Lin, Yow-Shi

    1993-12-31

    The acidic hydrolysis of polyacrylonitrile was carried out to yield a variety of terpolymers made up of nitriles, amides and acids. The formation of block structure was shown to follow a ripper mechanism occurring to acrylamide groups, that is more pronounced for a certain range of acrylamide content, evidenced by the composition analysis using {sup 1}H-NMR and base titration. The rates of formation of acrylamide fraction and acid fraction in the consecutive mode are approximately the same, yielding the content of ionic groups from 0.8 to 2.2. mole percent, dependent on the time of hydrolysis. The dielectric relaxation measurement on swollen gels shows three relaxation transitions, {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, over -150{degrees}C to 0{degrees}C, as influenced by the chemical composition and water absorption. The {beta} and {gamma} are associated with the polymer-water interaction and short-range motion of polymers and water.

  19. Effect of winding layer and speed on kenaf/glass fiber hybrid reinforced acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoni, Norizzahthul Ainaa Abdul; Sharifah Shahnaz S., B.; Ghazali, Che Mohd Ruzaidi

    2016-07-01

    The usage of natural fiber is becoming significant in composite industries due to their good performance. Single and continuous natural fibers have relatively high mechanical properties; especially their young modulus can be as high as glass fibers. Filament winding is a method to produce technically aligned composites which have high fibers content. The properties of filament winding can be tailored to meet the end product requirements. This research studied the compression properties of kenaf/glass fibers hybrid reinforced composites. Kenaf/glass fibers hybrid composite samples were fabricated by filament winding technique and their properties were compared with the properties of neat kenaf fiber and glass fibers composites. The kenaf/glass fiber hybrid composites exhibited higher strength compared to the neat glass fibers composites. Composites of helical pattern, which produced at low winding speed showed better compression resistance than hoop pattern winding, which produced at high winding speed. As predicted, kenaf composite showed highest water absorption; followed by kenaf/glass fiber hybrid composites while neat glass fiber has lowest water absorption capability.

  20. The effect of embedded carbon nanotubes on the morphological evolution during the carbonization of poly(acrylonitrile) nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, Sabina; Zussman, Eyal; Cohen, Yachin

    2008-04-23

    Hybrid nanofibers with different concentrations of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) were fabricated using the electrospinning technique and subsequently carbonized. The morphology of the fabricated carbon nanofibers (CNFs) at different stages of the carbonization process was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The polycrystalline nature of the CNFs was shown, with increasing content of ordered crystalline regions having enhanced orientation with increasing content of MWCNTs. The results indicate that embedded MWCNTs in the PAN nanofibers nucleate the growth of carbon crystals during PAN carbonization. PMID:21825647

  1. Acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR)/manganous tungstate (MnWO4) nanocomposites: Characterization, mechanical and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesan, M. T.; Abdu Raheem V., P.; Jayakrishnan, P.; Pradyumnan, P. P.

    2014-10-01

    Nanocomposites of NBR with manganous-tungstate nanoparticles were prepared through vulcanization process. The extent of interaction of nanoparticles with the polymer was studied by FTIR, SEM, XRD, TGA and AC conductivity. FTIR and XRD ascertain the interaction of NBR with MnWO4 nanoparticles. SEM analysis established that the nanopartilces were well dispersed in the macromolecular chain of NBR. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposites were studied as a function of filler loading. The nanocomposites exhibited enhanced thermal stability as seen in TGA. Conductivity and dielectric properties of nanocomposites increase with increase in concentration of MnWO4 nanoparticles (7phr) and thereafter the value decreases.

  2. 21 CFR 177.1050 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... rubber consisting of (i) 8-12 parts of butadiene/styrene elastomer containing 77-82 parts by weight of... by the method titled, “Determination of β-Dodecyl-mercaptopropionitrile in NR-16 Polymer,” which is... infrared spectro-photo-metric method titled “Infrared Spectro-photo-metric Determination of...

  3. 21 CFR 177.1050 - Acrylonitrile/styrene copoly-mer modified with butadiene/styrene elastomer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... parts by weight of a grafted rubber consisting of (i) 8-12 parts of butadiene/styrene elastomer...-mercaptopropionitrile in NR-16 Polymer,” which is incorporated by reference. Copies are available from the Center for... Determination of Polymer Extracted from Borex ® 210 Resin Pellets,” which is incorporated by reference....

  4. Recycling cycle of materials applied to acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene/policarbonate blends with styrene-butadiene-styrene copolymer addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cândido, L. H. A.; Ferreira, D. B.; Júnior, W. Kindlein; Demori, R.; Mauler, R. S.

    2014-05-01

    The scope of this research is the recycling of polymers from mobile phones hulls discarded and the performance evaluation when they are submitted to the Recycling Cycle of Materials (RCM). The studied material was the ABS/PC blend in a 70/30 proportion. Different compositions were evaluated adding virgin material, recycled material and using the copolymer SBS as impact modifier. In order to evaluate the properties of material's composition, the samples were characterized by TGA, FTIR, SEM, IZOD impact strength and tensile strength tests. At the first stage, the presented results suggest the composition containing 25% of recycled material and 5% of SBS combines good mechanical performance to the higher content of recycled material and lower content of impact modifier providing major benefits to recycling plans. Five cycles (RCM) were applied in the second stage; they evidenced a decrease trend considering the impact strength. At first and second cycle the impact strength was higher than reference material (ABS/PC blend) and from the fourth cycle it was lower. The superiority impact strength in the first and second cycles can be attributed to impact modifier effect. The thermal tests and the spectrometry didn't show the presence of degradation process in the material and the TGA curves demonstrated the process stability. The impact surface of each sample was observed at SEM. The microstructures are not homogeneous presenting voids and lamellar appearance, although the outer surface presents no defects, demonstrating good moldability. The present work aims to assess the life cycle of the material from the successive recycling processes.

  5. Conformational and Molecular Structures of α,β-Unsaturated Acrylonitrile Derivatives: Photophysical Properties and Their Frontier Orbitals.

    PubMed

    Percino, María Judith; Cerón, Margarita; Rodríguez, Oscar; Soriano-Moro, Guillermo; Castro, María Eugenia; Chapela, Víctor M; Siegler, Maxime A; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    We report single crystal X-ray diffraction (hereafter, SCXRD) analyses of derivatives featuring the electron-donor N-ethylcarbazole or the (4-diphenylamino)phenyl moieties associated with a -CN group attached to a double bond. The compounds are (2Z)-3-(4-(diphenylamino)-phenyl)-2-(pyridin-3-yl)prop-2-enenitrile (I), (2Z)-3-(4-(diphenylamino)phenyl)-2-(pyridin-4-yl)-prop-2-enenitrile (II) and (2Z)-3-(9-ethyl-9H-carbazol-3-yl)-2-(pyridin-2-yl)enenitrile (III). SCXRD analyses reveal that I and III crystallize in the monoclinic space groups P2/c with Z' = 2 and C2/c with Z' = 1, respectively. Compound II crystallized in the orthorhombic space group Pbcn with Z' = 1. The molecular packing analysis was conducted to examine the pyridine core effect, depending on the ortho, meta- and para-positions of the nitrogen atom, with respect to the optical properties and number of independent molecules (Z'). It is found that the double bond bearing a diphenylamino moiety introduced properties to exhibit a strong π-π-interaction in the solid state. The compounds were examined to evaluate the effects of solvent polarity, the role of the molecular structure, and the molecular interactions on their self-assembly behaviors. Compound I crystallized with a cell with two conformers, anti and syn, due to interaction with solvent. DFT calculations indicated the anti and syn structures of I are energetically stable (less than 1 eV). Also electrochemical and photophysical properties of the compounds were investigated, as well as the determination of optimization calculations in gas and different solvent (chloroform, cyclohexane, methanol, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran, dichloromethane and dimethyl sulfoxide) in the Gaussian09 program. The effect of solvent by PCM method was also investigated. The frontier HOMO and LUMO energies and gap energies are reported. PMID:27043499

  6. Poly (vinylidene fluoride) / Poly (acrylonitrile)–based Superior Hydrophobic Piezoelectric Solid Derived by Aligned Carbon Nanotube in Electrospinning: Fabrication, the Phase Conversion and Surface Energy

    PubMed Central

    Aqeel, Salem M.; Than, Lisa; Sreenivasulu, Gollapudi

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional materials have attracted many interests from both fundamental and practical aspects, such as field–effect transistor, electric protection, transducers and biosensor. Here we demonstrated the first superior hydrophobic piezoelectric surface based on the polymer blend of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)–polyacrilonitrile (PAN) assisted with functionalized multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs), by a modified electrospinning method. Typically the β–phase polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) was considered as the excellent piezoelectric and pyroelectric materials. However, polar β–phase of PVDF exhibited a natural high hydrophilicity. As a well–known fact, the wettability of the surface is dominated by two major factors: surface composition and surface roughness. The significant conversions derived by the incorporation of MWNTs, from nonpolar α–phase to highly polar β–phase of PVDF, were confirmed by FTIR. Meanwhile, the effects of MWNTs on the improvement of the roughness and the hydrophobicity of polymer blend were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle (CA). Molar free energy of wetting of the polymer nanocomposite decreases with increasing the wt.% of MWNTs. All molar free energy of wetting of PVDF–PAN/MWNTs were negative, which means the non–wettability of film. The combination of surface roughness and low–surface–energy modification in nanostructured composites leads to high hydrophobicity. Particularly, fabrication of superior hydrophobic surfaces not only has fundamental interest but also various possible functional applications in micro– and nano–materials and devices. PMID:26989486

  7. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 192 - Listed Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-(aminothioxymethyl)-) Acrolein (2-Propenal) Acrylamide (2-Propenamide) Acrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile) Aflatoxins..., mercury(2+) salt) Methacrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl-) Methapyrilene (1,2-Ethanediamine,...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 192 - Listed Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-(aminothioxymethyl)-) Acrolein (2-Propenal) Acrylamide (2-Propenamide) Acrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile) Aflatoxins..., mercury(2+) salt) Methacrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl-) Methapyrilene (1,2-Ethanediamine,...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 192 - Listed Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-(aminothioxymethyl)-) Acrolein (2-Propenal) Acrylamide (2-Propenamide) Acrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile) Aflatoxins..., mercury(2+) salt) Methacrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl-) Methapyrilene (1,2-Ethanediamine,...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 192 - Listed Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-(aminothioxymethyl)-) Acrolein (2-Propenal) Acrylamide (2-Propenamide) Acrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile) Aflatoxins..., mercury(2+) salt) Methacrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl-) Methapyrilene (1,2-Ethanediamine,...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 192 - Listed Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-(aminothioxymethyl)-) Acrolein (2-Propenal) Acrylamide (2-Propenamide) Acrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile) Aflatoxins..., mercury(2+) salt) Methacrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl-) Methapyrilene (1,2-Ethanediamine,...

  12. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Thermoplastic Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... terephthalic acid high viscosity multiple end finisher process ✔ ✔ ✔ Polystyrene resin using a batch process ✔ Polystyrene resin using a continuous process ✔ SAN using a batch process ✔ ✔ SAN using a continuous process... = Acrylonitrile styrene resin/alpha methyl styrene acrylonitrile resin. EPS = expandable polystyrene resin....

  13. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Thermoplastic Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... acid high viscosity multiple end finisher process ✔ ✔ ✔ Polystyrene resin using a batch process ✔ Polystyrene resin using a continuous process ✔ SAN using a batch process ✔ ✔ SAN using a continuous process... = Acrylonitrile styrene resin/alpha methyl styrene acrylonitrile resin. EPS = expandable polystyrene resin....

  14. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Thermoplastic Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... acid high viscosity multiple end finisher process ✔ ✔ ✔ Polystyrene resin using a batch process ✔ Polystyrene resin using a continuous process ✔ SAN using a batch process ✔ ✔ SAN using a continuous process... = Acrylonitrile styrene resin/alpha methyl styrene acrylonitrile resin. EPS = expandable polystyrene resin....

  15. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Thermoplastic Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... terephthalic acid high viscosity multiple end finisher process ✔ ✔ ✔ Polystyrene resin using a batch process ✔ Polystyrene resin using a continuous process ✔ SAN using a batch process ✔ ✔ SAN using a continuous process... = Acrylonitrile styrene resin/alpha methyl styrene acrylonitrile resin. EPS = expandable polystyrene resin....

  16. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Thermoplastic Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... acid high viscosity multiple end finisher process ✔ ✔ ✔ Polystyrene resin using a batch process ✔ Polystyrene resin using a continuous process ✔ SAN using a batch process ✔ ✔ SAN using a continuous process... = Acrylonitrile styrene resin/alpha methyl styrene acrylonitrile resin. EPS = expandable polystyrene resin....

  17. Melt processing and property testing of a model system of plastics contained in waste from electrical and electronic equipment.

    PubMed

    Triantou, Marianna I; Tarantili, Petroula A; Andreopoulos, Andreas G

    2015-05-01

    In the present research, blending of polymers used in electrical and electronic equipment, i.e. acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer, polycarbonate and polypropylene, was performed in a twin-screw extruder, in order to explore the effect process parameters on the mixture properties, in an attempt to determine some characteristics of a fast and economical procedure for waste management. The addition of polycarbonate in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer seemed to increase its thermal stability. Also, the addition of polypropylene in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer facilitates its melt processing, whereas the addition of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer in polypropylene improves its mechanical performance. Moreover, the upgrading of the above blends by incorporating 2 phr organically modified montmorillonite was investigated. The prepared nanocomposites exhibit greater tensile strength, elastic modulus and storage modulus, as well as higher melt viscosity, compared with the unreinforced blends. The incorporation of montmorillonite nanoplatelets in polycarbonate-rich acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer/polycarbonate blends turns the thermal degradation mechanism into a two-stage process. Alternatively to mechanical recycling, the energy recovery from the combustion of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer/polycarbonate and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer/polypropylene blends was recorded by measuring the gross calorific value. Comparing the investigated polymers, polypropylene presents the higher gross calorific value, followed by acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer and then polycarbonate. The above study allows a rough comparative evaluation of various methodologies for treating plastics from waste from electrical and electronic equipment. PMID:25750055

  18. 21 CFR 176.170 - Components of paper and paperboard in contact with aqueous and fatty foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Hydrocarbon Solvents,” which are incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part... kilograms (1 ton) of dry paper and paperboard fibers. Acrylonitrile polymer, reaction product with.... Acrylonitrile polymer with styrene, reaction product with ethylenediamine acetate, having a nitrogen content...

  19. 21 CFR 176.170 - Components of paper and paperboard in contact with aqueous and fatty foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Hydrocarbon Solvents,” which are incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part... kilograms (1 ton) of dry paper and paperboard fibers. Acrylonitrile polymer, reaction product with.... Acrylonitrile polymer with styrene, reaction product with ethylenediamine acetate, having a nitrogen content...

  20. Glove permeation by shale oil and coal tar extract

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, G.O.; Carlson, G.J.; Buerer, A.L.

    1980-02-14

    The vapor penetration of shale oil and coal tar extract through protective gloves composed of either polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, vinyl, latex, neoprene, Buna-N, acrylonitrile, natural rubber, or nitrile rubber was tested and measured. We used flame ionization techniques to determine the permeation characteristics of the gloves. Neoprene, Buna-N, acrylonitrile and nitrile gloves offered the best protection against the vapors tested.

  1. 16 CFR 1500.86 - Exemptions from classification as a banned toy or other banned article for use by children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene), nylon, and high-impact polystyrene) that are injection-molded and possess high..., or high-impact polystyrene) though exempt from the requirements that there be no internal voids,...

  2. 40 CFR 721.8965 - 1H-Pyrole-2, 5-dione, 1-(2,4,6-tribromophenyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dewatering step during polymerization of acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene), and (g)(5). (iii) Industrial... apply to releases of the PMN substance during the dewatering step of the polymerization reactions...

  3. 40 CFR 721.8965 - 1H-Pyrole-2, 5-dione, 1-(2,4,6-tribromophenyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... dewatering step during polymerization of acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene), and (g)(5). (iii) Industrial... apply to releases of the PMN substance during the dewatering step of the polymerization reactions...

  4. 40 CFR 721.8965 - 1H-Pyrole-2, 5-dione, 1-(2,4,6-tribromophenyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dewatering step during polymerization of acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene), and (g)(5). (iii) Industrial... apply to releases of the PMN substance during the dewatering step of the polymerization reactions...

  5. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1994-01-25

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 9 figures.

  6. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1995-09-12

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  7. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1996-07-23

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  8. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1996-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  9. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1995-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  10. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1994-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene disphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  11. 21 CFR 173.5 - Acrylate-acrylamide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... produced by the polymerization of acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide... polyacrylate-acrylamide resin is produced by the polymerization and subsequent hydrolysis of acrylonitrile in...

  12. 21 CFR 173.5 - Acrylate-acrylamide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... produced by the polymerization of acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide... polyacrylate-acrylamide resin is produced by the polymerization and subsequent hydrolysis of acrylonitrile in...

  13. 21 CFR 173.5 - Acrylate-acrylamide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... produced by the polymerization of acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide... polyacrylate-acrylamide resin is produced by the polymerization and subsequent hydrolysis of acrylonitrile in...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 258 - List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin 309-00-2 1,4:5,8-Dimethanonaphthalene, 1,2,3,4,10...-decachlorooctahydro- Lead (Total) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile,...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 264 - Ground-Water Monitoring List

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Acetamide, N-9H-fluoren-2-yl- Acrolein 107-02-8 2-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin...) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl- Methapyrilene...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 264 - Ground-Water Monitoring List

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Acetamide, N-9H-fluoren-2-yl- Acrolein 107-02-8 2-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin...) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl- Methapyrilene...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 264 - Ground-Water Monitoring List

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Acetamide, N-9H-fluoren-2-yl- Acrolein 107-02-8 2-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin...) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl- Methapyrilene...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 258 - List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin 309-00-2 1,4:5,8-Dimethanonaphthalene, 1,2,3,4,10...-decachlorooctahydro- Lead (Total) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile,...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 258 - List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin 309-00-2 1,4:5,8-Dimethanonaphthalene, 1,2,3,4,10...-decachlorooctahydro- Lead (Total) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile,...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 264 - Ground-Water Monitoring List

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Acetamide, N-9H-fluoren-2-yl- Acrolein 107-02-8 2-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin...) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl- Methapyrilene...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 258 - List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin 309-00-2 1,4:5,8-Dimethanonaphthalene, 1,2,3,4,10...-decachlorooctahydro- Lead (Total) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile,...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 264 - Ground-Water Monitoring List

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Acetamide, N-9H-fluoren-2-yl- Acrolein 107-02-8 2-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin...) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl- Methapyrilene...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 258 - List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-Propenal Acrylonitrile 107-13-1 2-Propenenitrile Aldrin 309-00-2 1,4:5,8-Dimethanonaphthalene, 1,2,3,4,10...-decachlorooctahydro- Lead (Total) Lead Mercury (Total) Mercury Methacrylonitrile 126-98-7 2-Propenenitrile,...

  4. Recycling of engineering plastics from waste electrical and electronic equipments: influence of virgin polycarbonate and impact modifier on the final performance of blends.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, V; Biswal, Manoranjan; Mohanty, Smita; Nayak, Sanjay K

    2014-05-01

    This study is focused on the recovery and recycling of plastics waste, primarily polycarbonate, poly(acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene) and high impact polystyrene, from end-of-life waste electrical and electronic equipments. Recycling of used polycarbonate, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene, polycarbonate/acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene/high impact polystrene material was carried out using material recycling through a melt blending process. An optimized blend composition was formulated to achieve desired properties from different plastics present in the waste electrical and electronic equipments. The toughness of blended plastics was improved with the addition of 10 wt% of virgin polycarbonate and impact modifier (ethylene-acrylic ester-glycidyl methacrylate). The mechanical, thermal, dynamic-mechanical and morphological properties of recycled blend were investigated. Improved properties of blended plastics indicate better miscibility in the presence of a compatibilizer suitable for high-end application. PMID:24695435

  5. 16 CFR 1500.86 - Exemptions from classification as a banned toy or other banned article for use by children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... materials other than those materials (such as ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene), nylon, and high-impact... characteristics (such as injection-molded balls made of ABS, nylon, or high-impact polystyrene) though exempt...

  6. 21 CFR 177.1630 - Polyethylene phthalate polymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... Acrylonitrile. Methacrylonitrile. Vinyl chloride. Itaconic acid. Styrene-maleic anhydride resin, partial 2... terephthalate or terephthalic acid with ethylene glycol, modified with one or more of the following: Azelaic acid, dimethyl azelate, dimethyl sebacate, sebacic acid. Ethylene terephthalate copolymers: Prepared...

  7. Morphology of a silver/polyacrylonitrile nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, M. A.; Mashin, A. I.; Tyurin, A. S.; Fedosov, A. E.; Chidichimo, G.; De Filpo, G.

    2011-01-01

    Silver/polyacrylonitrile (Ag/PAN) nanocomposites are synthesized at the stage of simultaneous acrylonitrile polymerization and the reduction of silver ions from a mixture of silver nitrate AgNO3, acrylonitrile, and a photoinitiator. The synthesized films are transparent in the visible region and are characterized by a uniform dispersion of silver nanoparticles in a PAN matrix without any macroscopic agglomeration. The effects of the metal salt and photoinitiator concentrations on the size and density of metal nanoparticles in a composite are revealed.

  8. Effect of heating rate on toxicity of pyrolysis gases from some elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Kosola, K. L.; Solis, A. N.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of heating rate on the toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from six elastomers was investigated, using a screening test method. The elastomers were polyisoprene (natural rubber), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM), acrylonitrile rubber, chlorosulfonated polyethylene rubber, and polychloroprene. The rising temperature and fixed temperature programs produced exactly the same rank order of materials based on time to death. Acrylonitrile rubber exhibited the greatest toxicity under these test conditions, and carbon monoxide was not found in sufficient concentrations to be the primary cause of death.

  9. Electrically Conducting Polymer-Copper Sulphide Composite Films, Preparation by Treatment of Polymer-Copper (2) Acetate Composites with Hydrogen Sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, Takakazu; Kamigaki, Takahira; Kubota, Etsuo

    1988-01-01

    Polymer copper sulfide composite films were prepared by treatment of polymer poly(vinyl chloride), poly(acrylonitrile), copolymer of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate (90:10), and ABS resin copper (2) acetate composites with hydrogen sulfide. The films showed electrical conductivity higher than 0.015 S/cm when they contained more than 20 wt percent of copper sulfide. A poly(acrylonitrile)-copper sulfide composite film containing 40 to 50 wt percent of copper sulfide showed electrical conductivity of 10 to 150.0 S/cm and had relatively high mechanical strength to be used in practical purposes.

  10. Low pour crude oil compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Motz, K.L.; Latham, R.A.; Statz, R.J.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes and improvement in the process of transporting waxy crude oils through a pipeline. It comprises: incorporating into the crude oil an effective pour point depressant amount of an additive comprising a polymer selected from the group consisting of copolymers of ethylene and acrylonitrile, and terpolymers of ethylene, acrylonitrile and a third monomer selected from the group consisting of vinyl acetate, carbon monoxide, alkyl acrylates, alkyl methacrylates, alkyl vinyl ethers, vinyl chloride, vinyl fluoride, acrylic acid, and methacrylic acid, wherein the amount of third monomer in the terpolymer ranges from about 0.1 to about 10.0 percent by weight.