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Sample records for actinomucor elegans var

  1. Maxillary Sinusitis Caused by Actinomucor elegans

    PubMed Central

    Davel, Graciela; Featherston, Patricia; Fernández, Anibal; Abrantes, Ruben; Canteros, Cristina; Rodero, Laura; Sztern, Carlos; Perrotta, Diego

    2001-01-01

    We report the first case of maxillary sinusitis caused by Actinomucor elegans in an 11-year-old patient. Histopathological and mycological examinations of surgical maxillary sinuses samples showed coenocytic hyphae characteristic of mucoraceous fungi. The fungi recovered had stolons and rhizoids, nonapophyseal and globose sporangia, and whorled branched sporangiophores and was identified as A. elegans. After surgical cleaning and chemotherapy with amphotericin B administered intravenously and by irrigation, the patient became asymptomatic and the mycological study results were negative. PMID:11158140

  2. Enhanced Glucosamine Production with Actinomucor elegans Based on Stimulating Factor of Methanol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Li, Piwu; Su, Jing; Liang, Rongrong; Wu, Xiangkun

    2014-12-01

    Glucosamine (GlcN) is a major and valuable component in the cell wall of fungi. In this study, the cell wall was treated via a two-stage alkali and acid process, and chitin and chitosan were fully deacetylated, partially depolymerized, and converted to GlcN oligosaccharides. Then, the oligosaccharides were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The influences of Actinomucor elegans on GlcN production in a flask culture were investigated to achieve an optimum yield of GlcN. The experimental result showed that cultivation in condition of pH 6.0, 100 mL working volume (500 mL flask), 10 % (v/v) inoculum concentration, at 28 °C and 200 rpm for 6 days yielded highest dry cell weight (DCW) which was 23.43 g L(-1), with a GlcN concentration of 5.12 g L(-1). Methanol as stimulating factor was found to exert the best effect in concentration of 1.5 % (v/v). With addition of methanol into medium, the DCW increased from 23.69 to 32.42 g L(-1), leading to maximum GlcN concentration of 6.85 g L(-1) obtained. Here, the methanol addition may be useful for industrial production of GlcN, and may also be meaningful for the production of other fine chemicals by filamentous fungi. PMID:25320446

  3. Antioxidant activity and protective effect of Turnera ulmifolia Linn. var. elegans against carbon tetrachloride-induced oxidative damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Brito, Naira J N; López, Jorge A; do Nascimento, Maria Aparecida; Macêdo, José B M; Silva, Gabriel Araujo; Oliveira, Cláudia N; de Rezende, Adriana Augusto; Brandão-Neto, José; Schwarz, Aline; Almeida, Maria das Graças

    2012-12-01

    The present study aimed to determine whether the leaves of Turnera ulmifolia Linn. var. elegans extract exert significant antioxidant activity. The antioxidant activity of its hydroethanolic extract (HEETU) was evaluated by assessing (a) its radical scavenging ability in vitro, and (b) its in vivo effect on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme activities. The in vitro antioxidant assay (DPPH) clearly supported HEETU free radical scavenging potential. Moreover, glutathione content and antioxidant enzyme activities (glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase) were significantly enhanced in CCl(4)-treated rats due to oral HEETU-treatment (500 mg/kgb.w.) over 7 and 21 days. In addition, an improvement was observed in lipid peroxidation and serum biochemical parameters (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase), indicating a protective effect against CCl(4)-induced liver injuries, confirmed by histopathological studies. The HEETU effect was comparable to the standard drug Legalon® (50 mg/kgb.w.) under the same experimental condition. Quantitative analysis of the HPLC extract revealed the presence of flavonoids, wich mediate the effects of antioxidant and oxidative stress. In conclusion, extract components exhibit antioxidant and hepatoprotective activities in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22940430

  4. C. elegans TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Rui; Xu, X.Z. Shawn

    2010-01-01

    TRP (transient receptor potential) channels represent a superfamily of cation channels found in all eukaryotes. The C. elegans genome encodes seventeen TRP channels covering all of the seven TRP subfamilies. Genetic analyses in C. elegans have implicated TRP channels in a wide spectrum of behavioral and physiological processes, ranging from sensory transduction (e.g. chemosensation, touch sensation, proprioception and osmosensation) to fertilization, drug dependence, organelle biogenesis, apoptosis, gene expression, and neurotransmitter/hormone release. Many C. elegans TRP channels share similar activation and regulatory mechanisms with their vertebrate counterparts. Studies in C. elegans have also revealed some previously unrecognized functions and regulatory mechanisms of TRP channels. C. elegans represents an excellent genetic model organism for the study of function and regulation of TRP channels in vivo. PMID:21290304

  5. Transgenesis in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Praitis, Vida; Maduro, Morris F

    2011-01-01

    The ability to manipulate the genome of organisms at will is perhaps the single most useful ability for the study of biological systems. Techniques for the generation of transgenics in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans became available in the late 1980s. Since then, improvements to the original approach have been made to address specific limitations with transgene expression, expand on the repertoire of the types of biological information that transgenes can provide, and begin to develop methods to target transgenes to defined chromosomal locations. Many recent, detailed protocols have been published, and hence in this chapter, we will review various approaches to making C. elegans transgenics, discuss their applications, and consider their relative advantages and disadvantages. Comments will also be made on anticipated future developments and on the application of these methods to other nematodes. PMID:22118277

  6. Laser Microsurgery in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Fang-Yen, Christopher; Gabel, Christopher V.; Samuel, Aravinthan D. T.; Bargmann, Cornelia I.; Avery, Leon

    2013-01-01

    Laser killing of cell nuclei has long been a powerful means of examining the roles of individual cells in C. elegans. Advances in genetics, laser technology, and imaging have further expanded the capabilities and usefulness of laser surgery. Here, we review the implementation and application of currently used methods for target edoptical disruption in C. elegans. PMID:22226524

  7. Neuropeptide GPCRs in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Frooninckx, Lotte; Van Rompay, Liesbeth; Temmerman, Liesbet; Van Sinay, Elien; Beets, Isabel; Janssen, Tom; Husson, Steven J.; Schoofs, Liliane

    2012-01-01

    Like most organisms, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans relies heavily on neuropeptidergic signaling. This tiny animal represents a suitable model system to study neuropeptidergic signaling networks with single cell resolution due to the availability of powerful molecular and genetic tools. The availability of the worm’s complete genome sequence allows researchers to browse through it, uncovering putative neuropeptides and their cognate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Many predictions have been made about the number of C. elegans neuropeptide GPCRs. In this review, we report the state of the art of both verified as well as predicted C. elegans neuropeptide GPCRs. The predicted neuropeptide GPCRs are incorporated into the receptor classification system based on their resemblance to orthologous GPCRs in insects and vertebrates. Appointing the natural ligand(s) to each predicted neuropeptide GPCR (receptor deorphanization) is a crucial step during characterization. The development of deorphanization strategies resulted in a significant increase in the knowledge of neuropeptidergic signaling in C. elegans. Complementary localization and functional studies demonstrate that neuropeptides and their GPCRs represent a rich potential source of behavioral variability in C. elegans. Here, we review all neuropeptidergic signaling pathways that so far have been functionally characterized in C. elegans. PMID:23267347

  8. PLURIANNUEL UNIVERSIT DU SUD TOULON-VAR

    E-print Network

    Chamroukhi, Faicel

    CONTRAT PLURIANNUEL 2012-2017 UNIVERSITÉ DU SUD TOULON-VAR MINISTÈRE DE L'ENSEIGNEMENT SUPÉRIEUR ET DE LA RECHERCHE #12;#12;Contrat pluriannuel - 2012-2017 ­ Université du Sud Toulon-Var 1 CONTRAT PLURIANNUEL 2012-2017 UNIVERSITE DU SUD TOULON-VAR PREAMBULE 2

  9. Proteomic analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteomic studies of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have recently received great attention because this animal is a useful model platform for the in vivo study of various biological problems relevant to human disease. In general, proteomic analysis is performed in order to address a...

  10. Electrophysiological Methods for C. elegans Neurobiology

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Miriam B.; Lindsay, Theodore H.; Lockery, Shawn R.; Richmond, Janet E.

    2014-01-01

    Patch-clamp electrophysiology is the technique of choice for the biophysical analysis of the function of nerve, muscle, and synapse in C. elegans nematodes. Considerable technical progress has been made in C. elegans electrophysiology in the decade since the initial publication of this technique. Today, most, if not all electrophysiological studies that can be done in larger animal preparations can also be done in C. elegans. This chapter has two main goals. The first is to present to a broad audience the many techniques available for patch-clamp analysis of neurons, muscles, and synapses in C. elegans. The second is to provide a methodological introduction to the techniques for patch-clamping C. elegans neurons and body-wall muscles in vivo, including emerging methods for optogenetic stimulation coupled with post-synaptic recording. We also present samples of the cell-intrinsic and post-synaptic ionic currents that can be measured in C. elegans nerve and muscle. PMID:22226532

  11. Zygomycosis caused by Apophysomyces elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Wieden, M A; Steinbronn, K K; Padhye, A A; Ajello, L; Chandler, F W

    1985-01-01

    A case of zygomycosis caused by Apophysomyces elegans in a diabetic, obese female is described. The fungus gained entry into the body through injury to the skin, penetrating the keratin, epidermis, and dermis. Hyphal angioinvasion was observed. Fungal elements invaded the subcutaneous fat, skeletal muscle fibers, nerves, and large blood vessels, resulting in the spread of the infection. The rapidity with which A. elegans invaded the blood vessels left no choice except amputation of the leg to stop the spread of the infection. This zygomycetous fungus closely resembles Absidia corymbifera. It is distinguished by its prominent campanulate apophyses. In its gross colony characteristics and failure to sporulate on routinely used media it resembles Saksenaea vasiformis. Images PMID:4077963

  12. Sensory Transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Austin L.; Ramot, Daniel; Goodman, Miriam B.

    The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans has a well-defined and comparatively simple repertoire of sensory-guided behaviors, all of which rely on its ability to detect chemical, mechanical or thermal stimuli. In this chapter, we review what is known about the ion channels that mediate sensation in this remarkable model organism. Genetic screens for mutants defective in sensory-guided behaviors have identified genes encoding channel proteins, which are likely transducers of chemical, thermal, and mechanical stimuli. Such classical genetic approaches are now being coupled with molecular genetics and in vivo cellular physiology to elucidate how these channels are activated in specific sensory neurons. The ion channel superfamilies implicated in sensory transduction in C. elegans - CNG, TRP, and DEG/ENaC - are conserved across phyla and also appear to contribute to sensory transduction in other organisms, including vertebrates. What we learn about the role of these ion channels in C. elegans sensation is likely to illuminate analogous processes in other animals, including humans.

  13. Caenorhabditis elegans swimming in a saturated particulate system Sunghwan Jung

    E-print Network

    Jung, Sunghwan "Sunny"

    Caenorhabditis elegans swimming in a saturated particulate system Sunghwan Jung Department Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) is a nematode that often swims in saturated soil in nature. We investigated the locomotive behavior of C. elegans swimming in a fluid with particles of various sizes and found

  14. Regulation of body fat in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Supriya

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, studies conducted in Caenorhabditis elegans have helped to uncover the ancient and complex origins of body fat regulation. This review highlights the powerful combination of genetics, pharmacology, and biochemistry used to study energy balance and the regulation of cellular fat metabolism in C. elegans. The complete wiring diagram of the C. elegans nervous system has been exploited to understand how the sensory nervous system regulates body fat and how food perception is coupled with the production of energy via fat metabolism. As a model organism, C. elegans also offers a unique opportunity to discover neuroendocrine factors that mediate direct communication between the nervous system and the metabolic tissues. The coming years are expected to reveal a wealth of information on the neuroendocrine control of body fat in C. elegans. PMID:25340962

  15. Measurement of the [ital CP]-violation parameter Re([var epsilon][prime]/[var epsilon])

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, L.K.; Barker, A.R.; Briere, R.A.; Makoff, G.; Papadimitriou, V.; Patterson, J.R.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Somalwar, S.V.; Wah, Y.W.; Winstein, B.; Winston, R.; Woods, M.; Yamamoto, H. ); Swallow, E.C. The Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 ); Bock, G.J.; Coleman, R.; Enagonio, J.; Hsiung, Y.B.; Ramberg, E.; Stanfield, K.; Tschirhart, R.; Yamanaka, T. ); Gollin, G.D.; Karlsson, M.; Okamitsu, J.K. ); Debu, P.; Peyaud, B.; Turlay, R.; Vallage, B. (Departement de Physique des Particules Elementaires, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvet

    1993-03-01

    A measurement of the [ital CP]-violation parameter Re([var epsilon][prime]/[var epsilon]) has been made using the full E731 data set. We find Re([var epsilon][prime]/[var epsilon])=(7.4[plus minus]5.2[plus minus]2.9)[times]10[sup [minus]4] where the first error is statistical and the second systematic.

  16. Using C. elegans for aging research

    PubMed Central

    Tissenbaum, Heidi A.

    2015-01-01

    Over a century ago, the zoologist Emile Maupas first identified the nematode, Rhabditis elegans, in the soil in Algiers. Subsequent work and phylogenic studies renamed the species Caenorhabditis elegans or more commonly referred to as C. elegans; (Caeno meaning recent; rhabditis meaning rod; elegans meaning nice). However, it was not until 1963, when Sydney Brenner, already successful from his work on DNA, RNA, and the genetic code, suggested the future of biological research lay in model organisms. Brenner believed that biological research required a model system that could grow in vast quantities in the lab, were cheap to maintain and had a simple body plan, and he chose the nematode C. elegans to fulfill such a role. Since that time, C. elegans has emerged as one of the premiere model systems for aging research. This paper reviews some initial identification of mutants with altered lifespan with a focus on genetics and then discusses advantages and disadvantages for using C. elegans as a model system to understand human aging. This review focuses on molecular genetics aspects of this model organism. PMID:26136622

  17. The genome of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Waterston, R; Sulston, J

    1995-01-01

    The physical map of the 100-Mb Caenorhabditis elegans genome consists of 17,500 cosmids and 3500 yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs). A total of 22.5 Mb has been sequenced, with the remainder expected by 1998. A further 15.5 Mb of unfinished sequence is freely available online: because the areas sequenced so far are relatively gene rich, about half the 13,000 genes can now be scanned. More than a quarter of the genes are represented by expressed sequence tags (ESTs). All information pertaining to the genome is publicly available in the ACeDB data base. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7479894

  18. Gait synchronization in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jinzhou; Raizen, David M.; Bau, Haim H.

    2014-01-01

    Collective motion is observed in swarms of swimmers of various sizes, ranging from self-propelled nanoparticles to fish. The mechanisms that govern interactions among individuals are debated, and vary from one species to another. Although the interactions among relatively large animals, such as fish, are controlled by their nervous systems, the interactions among microorganisms, which lack nervous systems, are controlled through physical and chemical pathways. Little is known, however, regarding the mechanism of collective movements in microscopic organisms with nervous systems. To attempt to remedy this, we studied collective swimming behavior in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a microorganism with a compact nervous system. We evaluated the contributions of hydrodynamic forces, contact forces, and mechanosensory input to the interactions among individuals. We devised an experiment to examine pair interactions as a function of the distance between the animals and observed that gait synchronization occurred only when the animals were in close proximity, independent of genes required for mechanosensation. Our measurements and simulations indicate that steric hindrance is the dominant factor responsible for motion synchronization in C. elegans, and that hydrodynamic interactions and genotype do not play a significant role. We infer that a similar mechanism may apply to other microscopic swimming organisms and self-propelled particles. PMID:24778261

  19. Locomotion of C. elegans in Structured Environments

    E-print Network

    Majmudar, Trushant S; Shelley, Mike; Zhang, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Undulatory locomotion of microorganisms like soil-dwelling worms and spermatozoa, in structured environments, is ubiquitous in nature. They navigate complex environments consisting of fluids and obstacles, negotiating hydrodynamic effects and geometrical constraints. Here, we show fluid dynamics videos of experiments and simulations of {\\textit {C. elegans}} moving in an array of micro-pillars. In addition, we show a video of transition from swimming to crawling in drop of {\\textit {C. elegans}}, where the fluid is wicking into agar.

  20. Biomechanical profiling of Caenorhabditis elegans motility.

    PubMed

    Krajacic, Predrag; Shen, Xiaoning; Purohit, Prashant K; Arratia, Paulo; Lamitina, Todd

    2012-07-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans locomotion is a stereotyped behavior that is ideal for genetic analysis. We integrated video microscopy, image analysis algorithms, and fluid mechanics principles to describe the C. elegans swim gait. Quantification of body shapes and external hydrodynamics and model-based estimates of biomechanics reveal that mutants affecting similar biological processes exhibit related patterns of biomechanical differences. Therefore, biomechanical profiling could be useful for predicting the function of previously unstudied motility genes. PMID:22554893

  1. Forward and reverse mutagenesis in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kutscher, Lena M.; Shaham, Shai

    2014-01-01

    Mutagenesis drives natural selection. In the lab, mutations allow gene function to be deciphered. C. elegans is highly amendable to functional genetics because of its short generation time, ease of use, and wealth of available gene-alteration techniques. Here we provide an overview of historical and contemporary methods for mutagenesis in C. elegans, and discuss principles and strategies for forward (genome-wide mutagenesis) and reverse (target-selected and gene-specific mutagenesis) genetic studies in this animal. PMID:24449699

  2. Large-scale transgenesis and nerve regeneration in C. elegans

    E-print Network

    Gilleland, Cody Lee

    2014-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) is a widely studied model organism due to their fully mapped neural network of 302 neurons and amenable genetics. Their small size and short life cycle allows for rapid studies to be ...

  3. Variable cosmological term \\varLambda(t)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, J.; D'oleire, M.; Pimentel, Luis O.

    2015-11-01

    We present the case of time-varying cosmological term \\varLambda(t). The main idea arises by proposing that as in the cosmological constant case, the scalar potential is identified as V(?)=2\\varLambda, with \\varLambda a constant, this identification should be kept even when the cosmological term has a temporal dependence, i.e., V(?(t))=2\\varLambda(t). We use the Lagrangian formalism for a scalar field ? with standard kinetic energy and arbitrary potential V(?) and apply this model to the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology. Exact solutions of the field equations are obtained by a special ansatz to solve the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equation and a particular potential for the scalar field and barotropic perfect fluid. We present the evolution on this cosmological term with different scenarios.

  4. Is Caenorhabditis elegans the Magic Bullet for Anthelminthic Drug Discovery?

    PubMed

    Keiser, Jennifer

    2015-10-01

    Recent advances in handling and readout have facilitated high-throughput screens with Caenorhabditis elegans. A new study demonstrates that C. elegans is a useful tool in high-throughput anthelminthic drug discovery. Despite challenges, drug discovery using C. elegans offers opportunities that might lead the way to novel anthelminthic drugs. PMID:26422771

  5. Counting Mutagenized Genomes and Optimizing Genetic Screens in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Shaham, Shai

    Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we review general principles of genetic screens in C. elegans, and use a modified algorithm for optimizing genetic screens in this organism. Here we examine such an optimization approach. WeCounting Mutagenized Genomes and Optimizing Genetic Screens in Caenorhabditis elegans Shai Shaham

  6. Prospects & Overviews The mystery of C. elegans aging

    E-print Network

    Gems, David

    assumption: that a fundamental cause of aging is accumulation of molecular damage. Could fat dysho- meostasisProspects & Overviews The mystery of C. elegans aging: An emerging role for fat Distant parallels between C. elegans aging and metabolic syndrome? Daniel Ackerman and David Gemsà New C. elegans studies

  7. 4D-Var Developement at GMAO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelc, Joanna S.; Todling, Ricardo; Akkraoui, Amal El

    2014-01-01

    The Global Modeling and Assimilation Offce (GMAO) is currently using an IAU-based 3D-Var data assimilation system. GMAO has been experimenting with a 3D-Var-hybrid version of its data assimilation system (DAS) for over a year now, which will soon become operational and it will rapidly progress toward a 4D-EnVar. Concurrently, the machinery to exercise traditional 4DVar is in place and it is desirable to have a comparison of the traditional 4D approach with the other available options, and evaluate their performance in the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) DAS. This work will also explore the possibility for constructing a reduced order model (ROM) to make traditional 4D-Var computationally attractive for increasing model resolutions. Part of the research on ROM will be to search for a suitably acceptable space to carry on the corresponding reduction. This poster illustrates how the IAU-based 4D-Var assimilation compares with our currently used IAU-based 3D-Var.

  8. Chemically defined medium and Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; Kozak, Elena; Conley, Catharine A.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C. elegans has been established as a powerful genetic system. Use of a chemically defined medium (C. elegans Maintenance Medium (CeMM)) now allows standardization and systematic manipulation of the nutrients that animals receive. Liquid cultivation allows automated culturing and experimentation and should be of use in large-scale growth and screening of animals. RESULTS: We find that CeMM is versatile and culturing is simple. CeMM can be used in a solid or liquid state, it can be stored unused for at least a year, unattended actively growing cultures may be maintained longer than with standard techniques, and standard C. elegans protocols work well with animals grown in defined medium. We also find that there are caveats to using defined medium. Animals in defined medium grow more slowly than on standard medium, appear to display adaptation to the defined medium, and display altered growth rates as they change the composition of the defined medium. CONCLUSIONS: As was suggested with the introduction of C. elegans as a potential genetic system, use of defined medium with C. elegans should prove a powerful tool.

  9. Host-Microbe Interactions in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Aixin

    2013-01-01

    A good understanding of how microbes interact with hosts has a direct bearing on our capability of fighting infectious microbial pathogens and making good use of beneficial ones. Among the model organisms used to study reciprocal actions among microbes and hosts, C. elegans may be the most advantageous in the context of its unique attributes such as the short life cycle, easiness of laboratory maintenance, and the availability of different genetic mutants. This review summarizes the recent advances in understanding host-microbe interactions in C. elegans. Although these investigations have greatly enhanced our understanding of C. elegans-microbe relationships, all but one of them involve only one or few microbial species. We argue here that more research is needed for exploring the evolution and establishment of a complex microbial community in the worm's intestine and its interaction with the host. PMID:23984180

  10. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Nectogale elegans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ting; Yan, Chaochao; Tan, Zheng; Tu, Feiyun; Yue, Bisong; Zhang, Xiuyue

    2014-08-01

    The elegant water shrew (Nectogale elegans) belongs to the family Soricidae, and distributes in northern South Asia, central and southern China and northern Southeast Asia. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of N. elegans was sequenced. It was determined to be 17,460 bases, and included 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 tRNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and one non-coding region, which is similar to other mammalian mitochondrial genomes. Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood methods were used to construct phylogenetic trees based on 12 heavy-strand concatenated PCGs. Phylogenetic analyses further confirmed that Crocidurinae diverged prior to Soricinae, and Sorex unguiculatus differentiated earlier than N. elegans. PMID:23795853

  11. Optogenetic mutagenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Noma, Kentaro; Jin, Yishi

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can modify and damage DNA. Here we report an optogenetic mutagenesis approach that is free of toxic chemicals and easy to perform by taking advantage of a genetically encoded ROS generator. This method relies on the potency of ROS generation by His-mSOG, the mini singlet oxygen generator, miniSOG, fused to a histone. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing His-mSOG in the germline behave and reproduce normally, without photoinduction. Following exposure to blue light, the His-mSOG animals produce progeny with a wide range of heritable phenotypes. We show that optogenetic mutagenesis by His-mSOG induces a broad spectrum of mutations including single-nucleotide variants (SNVs), chromosomal deletions, as well as integration of extrachromosomal transgenes, which complements those derived from traditional chemical or radiation mutagenesis. The optogenetic mutagenesis expands the toolbox for forward genetic screening and also provides direct evidence that nuclear ROS can induce heritable and specific genetic mutations. PMID:26632265

  12. Optogenetic mutagenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Noma, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can modify and damage DNA. Taking advantage of a genetically encoded ROS generator, here we report an optogenetic mutagenesis approach that is free of toxic chemicals and easy to perform. This method relies on the potency of ROS generation by His-mSOG, the mini singlet oxygen generator, miniSOG, fused to a histone. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing His-mSOG in the germline behave and reproduce normally, without photoinduction. Following exposure to blue light, the His-mSOG animals produce progeny with a wide range of heritable phenotypes. We show that optogenetic mutagenesis by His-mSOG induces a broad spectrum of mutations including single-nucleotide variants (SNVs), chromosomal deletions, as well as integration of extrachromosomal transgenes, which complements those derived from traditional chemical or radiation mutagenesis. The optogenetic mutagenesis expands the toolbox for forward genetic screening and also provides direct evidence that nuclear ROS can induce heritable and specific genetic mutations. PMID:26632265

  13. LIN-12/Notch signaling in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Iva

    2005-01-01

    Receptors of the LIN-12/Notch family mediate cell-cell interactions during animal development, and aberrations in LIN-12/Notch signaling have been implicated in human disease. Studies in C. elegans have been instrumental in defining the basic features of the LIN-12/Notch pathway, the role of LIN-12/Notch proteins as receptors for intercellular signals, the mechanism of signal transduction, and the regulation of LIN-12/Notch signaling during cell fate decisions. This chapter is focused on detailing how the "awesome power of C. elegans genetics" has identified many core components and modulators of LIN-12/Notch activity. PMID:18050403

  14. Xenobiotic detoxification in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lindblom, Tim H; Dodd, Allyn K

    2006-09-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an important model organism for the study of such diverse aspects of animal physiology and behavior as embryonic development, chemoreception, and the genetic control of lifespan. Yet, even though the entire genome sequence of this organism was deposited into public databases several years ago, little is known about xenobiotic metabolism in C. elegans. In part, the paucity of detoxification information may be due to the plush life enjoyed by nematodes raised in the laboratory. In the wild, however, these animals experience a much greater array of chemical assaults. Living in the interstitial water of the soil, populations of C. elegans exhibit a boom and bust lifestyle characterized by prodigious predation of soil microbes punctuated by periods of dispersal as a non-developing alternative larval stage. During the booming periods of population expansion, these animals almost indiscriminately consume everything in their environment including any number of compounds from other animals, microorganisms, plants, and xenobiotics. Several recent studies have identified many genes encoding sensors and enzymes these nematodes may use in their xeno-coping strategies. Here, we will discuss these recent advances, as well as the efforts by our lab and others to utilize the genomic resources of the C. elegans system to elucidate this nematode's molecular defenses against toxins. PMID:16902959

  15. Comparative Toxicology of Mercurials in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    McElwee, Matthew K.; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2011-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic metal that can exist in multiple chemical species. Humans are commonly exposed to methylmercury and mercury vapor, which is converted to mercuric mercury in the body. Despite years of research, there is a paucity of information on the similarity and differences in the mechanisms of mercury toxicity. The relative toxicity of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) and methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl) in C. elegans was determined using assays that measured growth, feeding, reproduction, and locomotion. The effect of HgCl2 and MeHgCl on the expression of several archetypal stress-response genes was also determined. There was no significant difference between the EC50s of the two mercurials on C. elegans growth. However, MeHgCl was more toxic to C. elegans than HgCl2 when assessing feeding, movement and reproduction, all of which require proper neuromuscular activity. Methylmercury chloride exposure resulted in increased steady-state levels of the stress response genes at lower concentrations than HgCl2. In general, MeHgCl was more toxic to C. elegans than HgCl2, particularly when assaying behaviors that require neuromuscular function. PMID:21692103

  16. Burn wound zygomycosis caused by Apophysomyces elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Cooter, R D; Lim, I S; Ellis, D H; Leitch, I O

    1990-01-01

    A case of zygomycosis caused by Apophysomyces elegans in a patient having 25% full-thickness burns is described. Amputation of the leg was necessary to control rapid tissue invasion. The fungus was isolated from soil in the burn environment. Images PMID:2229400

  17. A Polymorphism in npr-1 Is a Behavioral Determinant of Pathogen Susceptibility in C. elegans

    E-print Network

    Reddy, Kirthi C.

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans responds to pathogenic bacteria with conserved innate immune responses and pathogen avoidance behaviors. We investigated natural variation in C. elegans resistance to pathogen infection. ...

  18. Hormetic effect of methylmercury on Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Helmcke, Kirsten J.; Aschner, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Research has demonstrated the toxic effects of methylmercury (MeHg), yet molecular mechanisms underlying its toxicity are not completely understood. Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) offers a unique biological model to explore mechanisms of MeHg toxicity given many advantages associated with its ease of use and genetic power. Since our previous work indicated neurotoxic resistance of C. elegans to MeHg, the present study was designed to examine molecular mechanisms associated with this resistance. We hypothesized MeHg would induce expression of gst, hsp or mtl in vivo since glutathione (GSH), heat shock proteins (HSPs), and metallothioneins (MTs) have shown involvement in MeHg toxicity. Our studies demonstrated a modest, but significant increase in fluorescence in gst-4::GFP and mtl-1::GFP strains at an acute, low L1 MeHg exposure, whereas chronic L4 MeHg exposure induced expression of gst-4::GFP and hsp-4::GFP. Knockout gst-4 animals showed no alterations in lethality sensitivity compared to wildtype animals whereas mtl knockouts displayed increased sensitivity to MeHg exposure. GSH levels were increased by acute MeHg treatment and depleted with chronic exposure. We also demonstrate that MeHg induces hormesis, a phenotype whereby a sublethal exposure to MeHg rendered C. elegans resistant to subsequent exposure to the organometal. The involvement of gst-4, hsp-4, mtl-1, and mtl-2 in hormesis was examined. An increase in gst-4::GFP expression after a low-dose acute exposure to MeHg indicated that gst-4 may be involved in this response. Our results implicate GSH, HSPs, and MTs in protecting C. elegans from MeHg toxicity and show a potential role of gst-4 in MeHg-induced hormesis. PMID:20691719

  19. Hormetic effect of methylmercury on Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Helmcke, Kirsten J. Aschner, Michael

    2010-10-15

    Research has demonstrated the toxic effects of methylmercury (MeHg), yet molecular mechanisms underlying its toxicity are not completely understood. Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) offers a unique biological model to explore mechanisms of MeHg toxicity given many advantages associated with its ease of use and genetic power. Since our previous work indicated neurotoxic resistance of C. elegans to MeHg, the present study was designed to examine molecular mechanisms associated with this resistance. We hypothesized MeHg would induce expression of gst, hsp or mtl in vivo since glutathione (GSH), heat shock proteins (HSPs), and metallothioneins (MTs) have shown involvement in MeHg toxicity. Our studies demonstrated a modest, but significant increase in fluorescence in gst-4::GFP and mtl-1::GFP strains at an acute, low L1 MeHg exposure, whereas chronic L4 MeHg exposure induced expression of gst-4::GFP and hsp-4::GFP. Knockout gst-4 animals showed no alterations in lethality sensitivity compared to wildtype animals whereas mtl knockouts displayed increased sensitivity to MeHg exposure. GSH levels were increased by acute MeHg treatment and depleted with chronic exposure. We also demonstrate that MeHg induces hormesis, a phenotype whereby a sublethal exposure to MeHg rendered C. elegans resistant to subsequent exposure to the organometal. The involvement of gst-4, hsp-4, mtl-1, and mtl-2 in hormesis was examined. An increase in gst-4::GFP expression after a low-dose acute exposure to MeHg indicated that gst-4 may be involved in this response. Our results implicate GSH, HSPs, and MTs in protecting C. elegans from MeHg toxicity and show a potential role of gst-4 in MeHg-induced hormesis.

  20. Lignans from Syringa pinnatifolia Hemsl. Var. alashanensis.

    PubMed

    Ao, Wu-Li-Ji; Bao, Xiao-Hua; Wu, Xiao-Lan; Wang, Qing-Hu

    2012-01-01

    Two new lignans, syripinnalignans A and B (1 and 2), together with two known lignans, were isolated from the stem of Syringa pinnatifolia Hemsl. Var. alashanensis. The structures of 1 and 2 were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, including extensive 1D and 2D NMR techniques. PMID:22375878

  1. Bacteria and the Aging and Longevity of Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Kim, Dennis H.

    The molecular genetic analysis of longevity of Caenorhabditis elegans has yielded fundamental insights into evolutionarily conserved pathways and processes governing the physiology of aging. Recent studies suggest that ...

  2. VAR Support from Distributed Wind Energy Resources: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Romanowitz, H.; Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Yinger, R.

    2004-07-01

    As the size and quantity of wind farms and other distributed generation facilities increase, especially in relation to local grids, the importance of a reactive power compensator or VAR support from these facilities becomes more significant. Poorly done, it can result in cycling or inadequate VAR support, and the local grid could experience excessive voltage regulation and, ultimately, instability. Improved wind turbine and distributed generation power control technologies are creating VAR support capabilities that can be used to enhance the voltage regulation and stability of local grids. Locating VAR support near the point of consumption, reducing step size, and making the control active all improve the performance of the grid. This paper presents and discusses alternatives for improving the integration of VAR support from distributed generation facilities such as wind farms. We also examine the relative effectiveness of distributed VAR support on the local grid and how it can b e integrated with the VAR support of the grid operator.

  3. The laboratory domestication of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sterken, Mark G; Snoek, L Basten; Kammenga, Jan E; Andersen, Erik C

    2015-05-01

    Model organisms are of great importance to our understanding of basic biology and to making advances in biomedical research. However, the influence of laboratory cultivation on these organisms is underappreciated, and especially how that environment can affect research outcomes. Recent experiments led to insights into how the widely used laboratory reference strain of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans compares with natural strains. Here we describe potential selective pressures that led to the fixation of laboratory-derived alleles for the genes npr-1, glb-5, and nath-10. These alleles influence a large number of traits, resulting in behaviors that affect experimental interpretations. Furthermore, strong phenotypic effects caused by these laboratory-derived alleles hinder the discovery of natural alleles. We highlight strategies to reduce the influence of laboratory-derived alleles and to harness the full power of C. elegans. PMID:25804345

  4. Measurements of behavioral quiescence in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Stanislav; Raizen, David M.; Biron, David

    2014-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans, a long time work horse for behavioral genetic studies of locomotion, has recently been studied for quiescent behavior. Methods previously established for the study of C. elegans locomotion are not well-suited for the study of quiescent behavior. We describe in detail two computer vision approaches to distinguish quiescent from movement bouts focusing on the behavioral quiescence that occurs during fourth larval stage lethargus, a transition stage between the larva and the adult. The first is the frame subtraction method, which consists of subtraction of temporally adjacent images as a sensitive way to detect motion. The second, which is more computationally intensive, is the posture analysis method, which consists of analysis of the rate of local angle change of the animal’s body. Quiescence measurements should be done continuously while minimizing sensory perturbation of the animal. PMID:24642199

  5. Metal-induced neurodegeneration in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pan; Martinez-Finley, Ebany J.; Bornhorst, Julia; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Aschner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The model species, Caenorhabditis elegans, has been used as a tool to probe for mechanisms underlying numerous neurodegenerative diseases. This use has been exploited to study neurodegeneration induced by metals. The allure of the nematode comes from the ease of genetic manipulation, the ability to fluorescently label neuronal subtypes, and the relative simplicity of the nervous system. Notably, C. elegans have approximately 60–80% of human genes and contain genes involved in metal homeostasis and transport, allowing for the study of metal-induced degeneration in the nematode. This review discusses methods to assess degeneration as well as outlines techniques for genetic manipulation and presents a comprehensive survey of the existing literature on metal-induced degeneration studies in the worm. PMID:23730287

  6. Measurements of behavioral quiescence in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Stanislav; Raizen, David M; Biron, David

    2014-08-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans, a long time work horse for behavioral genetic studies of locomotion, has recently been studied for quiescent behavior. Methods previously established for the study of C. elegans locomotion are not well-suited for the study of quiescent behavior. We describe in detail two computer vision approaches to distinguish quiescent from movement bouts focusing on the behavioral quiescence that occurs during fourth larval stage lethargus, a transition stage between the larva and the adult. The first is the frame subtraction method, which consists of subtraction of temporally adjacent images as a sensitive way to detect motion. The second, which is more computationally intensive, is the posture analysis method, which consists of analysis of the rate of local angle change of the animal's body. Quiescence measurements should be done continuously while minimizing sensory perturbation of the animal. PMID:24642199

  7. RNASeq in C. elegans following manganese exposure

    PubMed Central

    Parmalee, Nancy L.; Maqbool, Shahina B.; Ye, Bin; Calder, Brent; Bowman, Aaron B.; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Manganese is a metal that is required for optimal biological functioning of organisms. Absorption, cellular import and export, and excretion of manganese are all tightly regulated. While some genes involved in regulation, such as DMT-1 and ferroportin are known, it is presumed that many more are involved and as yet unknown. Excessive exposure to manganese, usually in industrial settings, such as mining or welding, can lead to neurotoxicity and a condition known as manganism that closely resembles Parkinson's disease. Elucidating transcriptional changes following manganese exposure could lead to the development of biomarkers for exposure. This unit presents a protocol for RNA sequencing in the worm Caenorhabditis elegans to assay for transcriptional changes following exposure to manganese. This protocol is adaptable to any environmental exposure in C. elegans. The protocol results in counts of gene transcripts in control versus exposed conditions, and a ranked list of differentially expressed genes for further study. PMID:26250396

  8. RNASeq in C. elegans Following Manganese Exposure.

    PubMed

    Parmalee, Nancy L; Maqbool, Shahina B; Ye, Bin; Calder, Brent; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Manganese is a metal that is required for optimal biological functioning of organisms. Absorption, cellular import and export, and excretion of manganese are all tightly regulated. While some genes involved in regulation, such as DMT-1 and ferroportin, are known, it is presumed that many more are involved and as yet unknown. Excessive exposure to manganese, usually in industrial settings such as mining or welding, can lead to neurotoxicity and a condition known as manganism that closely resembles Parkinson's disease. Elucidating transcriptional changes following manganese exposure could lead to the development of biomarkers for exposure. This unit presents a protocol for RNA sequencing in the worm Caenorhabditis elegans to assay for transcriptional changes following exposure to manganese. This protocol is adaptable to any environmental exposure in C. elegans. The protocol results in counts of gene transcripts in control versus exposed conditions and a ranked list of differentially expressed genes for further study. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26250396

  9. A database of C. elegans behavioral phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Yemini, Eviatar; Jucikas, Tadas; Grundy, Laura J.; Brown, André E.X.; Schafer, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Using low-cost automated tracking microscopes, we have generated a behavioral database for 305 C. elegans strains, including 76 mutants with no previously described phenotype. The database consists of 9,203 short videos segmented to extract behavior and morphology features that are available online for further analysis. The database also includes summary statistics for 702 measures with statistical comparisons to wild-type controls so that phenotypes can be identified and understood by users. PMID:23852451

  10. Caenorhabditis Elegans—Applications to Nematode Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, John

    2003-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was published 4 years ago. Since then, we have seen great strides in technologies that seek to exploit this data. Here we describe the application of some of these techniques and other advances that are helping us to understand about not only the biology of this important model organism but also the entire phylum Nematoda. PMID:18629128

  11. Control of Neuronal Network in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Badhwar, Rahul; Bagler, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans, a soil dwelling nematode, is evolutionarily rudimentary and contains only ? 300 neurons which are connected to each other via chemical synapses and gap junctions. This structural connectivity can be perceived as nodes and edges of a graph. Controlling complex networked systems (such as nervous system) has been an area of excitement for mankind. Various methods have been developed to identify specific brain regions, which when controlled by external input can lead to achievement of control over the state of the system. But in case of neuronal connectivity network the properties of neurons identified as driver nodes is of much importance because nervous system can produce a variety of states (behaviour of the animal). Hence to gain insight on the type of control achieved in nervous system we implemented the notion of structural control from graph theory to C. elegans neuronal network. We identified ‘driver neurons’ which can provide full control over the network. We studied phenotypic properties of these neurons which are referred to as ‘phenoframe’ as well as the ‘genoframe’ which represents their genetic correlates. We find that the driver neurons are primarily motor neurons located in the ventral nerve cord and contribute to biological reproduction of the animal. Identification of driver neurons and its characterization adds a new dimension in controllability of C. elegans neuronal network. This study suggests the importance of driver neurons and their utility to control the behaviour of the organism. PMID:26413834

  12. Acute carbon dioxide avoidance in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Hallem, Elissa A; Sternberg, Paul W

    2008-06-10

    Carbon dioxide is produced as a by-product of cellular respiration by all aerobic organisms and thus serves for many animals as an important indicator of food, mates, and predators. However, whether free-living terrestrial nematodes such as Caenorhabditis elegans respond to CO2 was unclear. We have demonstrated that adult C. elegans display an acute avoidance response upon exposure to CO2 that is characterized by the cessation of forward movement and the rapid initiation of backward movement. This response is mediated by a cGMP signaling pathway that includes the cGMP-gated heteromeric channel TAX-2/TAX-4. CO2 avoidance is modulated by multiple signaling molecules, including the neuropeptide Y receptor NPR-1 and the calcineurin subunits TAX-6 and CNB-1. Nutritional status also modulates CO2 responsiveness via the insulin and TGFbeta signaling pathways. CO2 response is mediated by a neural circuit that includes the BAG neurons, a pair of sensory neurons of previously unknown function. TAX-2/TAX-4 function in the BAG neurons to mediate acute CO2 avoidance. Our results demonstrate that C. elegans senses and responds to CO2 using multiple signaling pathways and a neural network that includes the BAG neurons and that this response is modulated by the physiological state of the worm. PMID:18524955

  13. Chemical mating cues in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Chute, Christopher D; Srinivasan, Jagan

    2014-09-01

    In the natural environment it is vital that organisms are capable of locating mates to reproduce and, consequently, increase the diversity of their gene pool. Many species make use of audio and visual communication for mate location. However, the more ancient form of chemical communication is used by all forms of life, from bacteria to mammals. In the past decade, much information has been discovered regarding pheromones in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In this review, chemical signals that govern mating behavior in C. elegans will be discussed, from the existence and identification of mating cues, to the neurons involved in the behavioral response. Specifically, mate attraction is dictated by specific glycosides and side chains of the dideoxysugar ascarylose, a class of molecules known as ascarosides. Intriguingly, modifications of the ascarosides can dictate different behaviors such as male attraction, hermaphrodite attraction, and dauer formation. In general, interactions between core sensory neurons such as ASK and sex-specific neurons like CEM are critical for detecting these small molecules. These data reveal the existence of a complex, synergistic, chemical mating cue system between males and hermaphrodites in C. elegans, thereby highlighting the importance of mate attraction in a primarily hermaphroditic population. PMID:24977334

  14. Laser killing of blastomeres in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Walston, Timothy; Hardin, Jeff

    2010-12-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans embryo is particularly amenable to microscopy and embryological studies because of its short developmental time, transparent shell, and nonpigmented cells. Within the embryo, contacts between cells often establish the polarization of neighboring cells. Blastomere isolation and recombination experiments have led to a wealth of understanding of the events in the four-cell C. elegans embryo. However, identifying individual blastomeres after isolation at stages past the four-cell stage is limited. In addition, removal of blastomeres from their native surroundings can interfere with many cell contacts besides the contacts of interest. An alternative approach for studying cell interactions within the C. elegans embryo is to use laser ablation of individual cells. Laser ablation can be used to kill one of two cells in contact with each other to understand what happens when a cell no longer signals to its neighbor. Additionally, killing a cell that is between two cells that will eventually contact each other can result in the corpse of the cell forming a steric barrier between the cells, preventing the contact. This protocol describes laser ablation of embryos mounted on an agar mount. PMID:21123430

  15. Toxicological Effects of Fullerenes on Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomaker, Justin; Snook, Renee; Howell, Carina

    2014-03-01

    The nematode species Caenorhabditis elegans is a useful genetic model organism due to its simplicity and the substantial molecular, genetic, and developmental knowledge about the species. In this study, this species was used to test the toxicological effects of C60 fullerene nanoparticles. In previous studies using rats, a solution of C60 fullerenes in olive oil proved to extend the life of the subjects. The purpose of this experiment was to subject C. elegans to varying concentrations of C60 fullerenes and observe their toxicological effects. Initial findings indicate a link between fullerene exposure and enlargement of the vulva as well as the formation of a small nodule at the base of the tail in some individuals. While the fullerenes are not lethally toxic in C. elegans, results will be presented that pertain to changes in life span and progeny of the nematodes exposed to varying concentrations of fullerenes as well as the mechanisms of toxicity. High magnification imaging via SEM and/or AFM will be used to characterize the fullerene nanoparticles. Testing the toxicity of fullerenes in a wide variety of organisms will lead to a more complete understanding of the effects of fullerenes on living organisms to ultimately understand their effects in humans. This work was supported by National Science Foundation grants DUE-1058829, DMR-0923047, DUE-0806660 and Lock Haven FPDC grants.

  16. Alkaloids from Lupinus argenteus var. stenophyllus.

    PubMed

    Keller, W J; Zelenski, S G

    1978-03-01

    TLC and GLC of an alkaloid extract of the aboveground portions of Lupinus argenteus Pursh. var. stenophyllus (Rydb.) Davis (Leguminosae) suggested the presence of sparteine, beta-isosparteine, delta5-dehydrolupanine, alpha-isolupanine, lupanine, thermopsine, and anagyrine. GLC-mass spectrometry confirmed these preliminary findings. Preparative TLC was used to isolate sparteine, and this alkaloid was further characterized by IR spectral analysis and derivatization. PMID:641742

  17. Withanolides from Jaborosa caulescens var. bipinnatifida

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huaping; Cao, Cong-Mei; Gallagher, Robert J.; Day, Victor W.; Montenegro, Gloria; Timmermann, Barbara N.

    2013-01-01

    Two new withanolides 2,3-dihydrotrechonolide A (1) and 2,3-dihydro-21-hydroxytrechonolide A (2) were isolated along with two known withanolides trechonolide A (3) and jaborosalactone 39 (4) from Jaborosa caulescens var. bipinnatifida (Solanaceae). The structures of 1-2 were elucidated through 2D NMR and other spectroscopic techniques. In addition, the structure of withanolide 1 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. PMID:24314746

  18. Antifungal Chemical Compounds Identified Using a C. elegans Pathogenicity Assay

    E-print Network

    Ausubel, Frederick M.

    of the main obstacles in current antifungal discovery. We show that Candida albicans, as well as other Candida. elegans intestinal track. Importantly, key components of Candida pathogenesis in mammals, such as filament formation, are also involved in nematode killing. We devised a Candida-mediated C. elegans assay that allows

  19. Caenorhabditis elegans chemical biology: lessons from small molecules

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    How can we complement Caenorhabditis elegans genomics and proteomics with a comprehensive structural and functional annotation of its metabolome? Several lines of evidence indicate that small molecules of largely undetermined structure play important roles in C. elegans biology, including key pathw...

  20. Katz model prediction of Caenorhabditis elegans mutagenesis on STS-42

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Katz, Robert; Badhwar, Gautam D.

    1992-01-01

    Response parameters that describe the production of recessive lethal mutations in C. elegans from ionizing radiation are obtained with the Katz track structure model. The authors used models of the space radiation environment and radiation transport to predict and discuss mutation rates for C. elegans on the IML-1 experiment aboard STS-42.

  1. Deciphering the Neural and Molecular Mechanisms of C. elegans Behavior

    E-print Network

    Schafer, William R.

    and classical genetic manipulation. Many robust behavioral assays have been developed for C. elegans, making of its small and well-characterized nervous system and amenability to genetic manipulation, the nematode critical roles in nervous system function and development were first identified genetically in C. elegans

  2. INHIBITION OF STEROL METABOLISM IN CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS BY AY-9944

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Caenorhabditis elegans and some other nematodes are capable of attaching a methyl group to the nucleus of sterols at the C-4 position. In C. elegans, 4-methylcholest-8(14)-enol is the most abundant 4-methylsterol produced, and smaller quantities of 4-methylcholest-7-enol also occur. The purpose of...

  3. Caenorhabditis elegans swimming in a saturated particulate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunghwan

    2010-03-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) is a nematode that often swims in saturated soil in nature. We investigated the locomotive behavior of C. elegans swimming in a fluid with particles of various sizes and found that the nematode swims a greater distance per undulation than it does in a fluid without particles. The Strouhal number (a ratio of lateral to forward velocity) of C. elegans significantly decreases in a saturated particulate medium (0.50±0.13) in comparison to a fluid without particles (1.6±0.27). This result was unexpected due to the generally low performance of a body moving in a high drag medium. In our model, a saturated granular system is approximated as a porous medium where only the hydrodynamic forces on the body are considered. Combining these assumptions with resistive force theory, we find that a porous medium provides more asymmetric drag on a slender body, and consequently that C. elegans locomotes with a greater distance per undulation.

  4. The development of RAPD and microsatellite markers in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var.

    E-print Network

    Macdonald, Ellen

    The development of RAPD and microsatellite markers in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) have been developed. We detected 52 decameric oligonucleotides polymorphism, RAPD, microsatellite, SSR, Pinus contorta var. latifolia. Résumé : Deux types de marqueurs

  5. Characterization of the effects of methylmercury on Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Helmcke, Kirsten J.; Syversen, Tore; Miller, David M.; Aschner, Michael

    2009-10-15

    The rising prevalence of methylmercury (MeHg) in seafood and in the global environment provides an impetus for delineating the mechanism of the toxicity of MeHg. Deleterious effects of MeHg have been widely observed in humans and in other mammals, the most striking of which occur in the nervous system. Here we test the model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), for MeHg toxicity. The simple, well-defined anatomy of the C. elegans nervous system and its ready visualization with green fluorescent protein (GFP) markers facilitated our study of the effects of methylmercuric chloride (MeHgCl) on neural development. Although MeHgCl was lethal to C. elegans, induced a developmental delay, and decreased pharyngeal pumping, other traits including lifespan, brood size, swimming rate, and nervous system morphology were not obviously perturbed in animals that survived MeHgCl exposure. Despite the limited effects of MeHgCl on C. elegans development and behavior, intracellular mercury (Hg) concentrations ({<=} 3 ng Hg/mg protein) in MeHgCl-treated nematodes approached levels that are highly toxic to mammals. If MeHgCl reaches these concentrations throughout the animal, this finding indicates that C. elegans cells, particularly neurons, may be less sensitive to MeHgCl toxicity than mammalian cells. We propose, therefore, that C. elegans should be a useful model for discovering intrinsic mechanisms that confer resistance to MeHgCl exposure.

  6. C. elegans locomotion: small circuits, complex functions.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Mei; Samuel, Aravinthan D T

    2015-08-01

    With 302 neurons in the adult Caenorhabditis elegans nervous system, it should be possible to build models of complex behaviors spanning sensory input to motor output. The logic of the motor circuit is an essential component of such models. Advances in physiological, anatomical, and neurogenetic analysis are revealing a surprisingly complex signaling network in the worm's small motor circuit. We are progressing towards a systems level dissection of the network of premotor interneurons, motor neurons, and muscle cells that move the animal forward and backward in its environment. PMID:25845627

  7. Microsporidia Are Natural Intracellular Parasites of the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Troemel, Emily R; Félix, Marie-Anne; Whiteman, Noah K; Barrière, Antoine; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2008-01-01

    For decades the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been an important model system for biology, but little is known about its natural ecology. Recently, C. elegans has become the focus of studies of innate immunity and several pathogens have been shown to cause lethal intestinal infections in C. elegans. However none of these pathogens has been shown to invade nematode intestinal cells, and no pathogen has been isolated from wild-caught C. elegans. Here we describe an intracellular pathogen isolated from wild-caught C. elegans that we show is a new species of microsporidia. Microsporidia comprise a large class of eukaryotic intracellular parasites that are medically and agriculturally important, but poorly understood. We show that microsporidian infection of the C. elegans intestine proceeds through distinct stages and is transmitted horizontally. Disruption of a conserved cytoskeletal structure in the intestine called the terminal web correlates with the release of microsporidian spores from infected cells, and appears to be part of a novel mechanism by which intracellular pathogens exit from infected cells. Unlike in bacterial intestinal infections, the p38 MAPK and insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathways do not appear to play substantial roles in resistance to microsporidian infection in C. elegans. We found microsporidia in multiple wild-caught isolates of Caenorhabditis nematodes from diverse geographic locations. These results indicate that microsporidia are common parasites of C. elegans in the wild. In addition, the interaction between C. elegans and its natural microsporidian parasites provides a system in which to dissect intracellular intestinal infection in vivo and insight into the diversity of pathogenic mechanisms used by intracellular microbes. PMID:19071962

  8. C. elegans: social interactions in a "nonsocial" animal.

    PubMed

    Ardiel, Evan L; Rankin, Catharine H

    2009-01-01

    As self-fertilizing nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans do not normally come to mind when one thinks of social animals. However, their reproductive mode is optimized for rapid population growth, and although they do not form structured societies, conspecifics are an important source of sensory input. A pheromone signal underlies multiple complex behaviors, including diapause, male-mating, and aggregation. The use of C. elegans in sociogenetics research allows for the analysis of social interactions at the level of genes, circuits, and behaviors. This chapter describes natural polymorphisms in mab-23, plg-1, npr-1, and glb-5 as they relate to two C. elegans social behaviors: male-mating and aggregation. PMID:20109657

  9. Imaging embryonic development in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Mohler, William A; Isaacson, Ariel B

    2010-03-01

    Embryos are remarkable for their combination of pluripotency, three-dimensionality, and swiftness of subcellular and developmental rearrangements. Embryogenesis in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is uniquely suited among model systems to high-resolution dynamic imaging. Within a single high-magnification, high-numerical aperture (NA) microscope field, at submicrometer resolution, it is possible to observe several entire animals taking form. The full approximately 14-h course of embryonic cleavage and morphogenesis of this transparent, free-living worm is essentially invariant. Observing specific fluorescently labeled components during embryonic development promises to reveal the roles of organelles and molecules in an extremely diverse and reproducible set of contexts. The C. elegans community has created a growing collection of hundreds of transgenic strains expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled versions of distinct endogenously expressed genes. The task of correlating the resulting expression and localization patterns in space and time is simultaneously alluring and technically demanding. This article describes the use of four-dimensional (4D) laser-scanning microscopy and subsequent data processing to record, portray, analyze, and compare the expression of fluorescently tagged gene products during development of the nematode embryo. PMID:20194475

  10. C. elegans Tracking and Behavioral Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Likitlersuang, Jirapat; Stephens, Greg; Palanski, Konstantine; Ryu, William S.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed instrumentation, image processing, and data analysis techniques to quantify the locomotory behavior of C. elegans as it crawls on the surface of an agar plate. For the study of the genetic, biochemical, and neuronal basis of behavior, C. elegans is an ideal organism because it is genetically tractable, amenable to microscopy, and shows a number of complex behaviors, including taxis, learning, and social interaction1,2. Behavioral analysis based on tracking the movements of worms as they crawl on agar plates have been particularly useful in the study of sensory behavior3, locomotion4, and general mutational phenotyping5. Our system works by moving the camera and illumination system as the worms crawls on a stationary agar plate, which ensures no mechanical stimulus is transmitted to the worm. Our tracking system is easy to use and includes a semi-automatic calibration feature. A challenge of all video tracking systems is that it generates an enormous amount of data that is intrinsically high dimensional. Our image processing and data analysis programs deal with this challenge by reducing the worms shape into a set of independent components, which comprehensively reconstruct the worms behavior as a function of only 3-4 dimensions6,7. As an example of the process we show that the worm enters and exits its reversal state in a phase specific manner. PMID:23183548

  11. Morphogenesis of the C. elegans vulva

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Adam J

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how cells move, change shape, and alter cellular behaviors to form organs, a process termed morphogenesis, is one of the great challenges of developmental biology. Formation of the C. elegans vulva is a powerful, simple, and experimentally accessible model for elucidating how morphogenetic processes produce an organ. In the first step of vulval development, three epithelial precursor cells divide and differentiate to generate 22 cells of seven different vulval subtypes. The 22 vulval cells then rearrange from a linear array into a tube, with each of the seven cell types undergoing characteristic morphogenetic behaviours that construct the vulva. Vulval morphogenesis entails many of the same cellular activities that underlie organogenesis and tissue formation across species, including invagination, lumen formation, oriented cell divisions, cell-cell adhesion, cell migration, cell fusion, extracellular matrix remodelling and cell invasion. Studies of vulval development have led to pioneering discoveries in a number of these processes and are beginning to bridge the gap between the pathways that specify cells and their connections to morphogenetic behaviors. The simplicity of the vulva and the experimental tools available in C. elegans will continue to make vulval morphogenesis a powerful paradigm to further our understanding of the largely mysterious mechanisms that build tissues and organs. PMID:23418408

  12. Alcohol Disinhibition of Behaviors in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Topper, Stephen M.; Aguilar, Sara C.; Topper, Viktoria Y.; Elbel, Erin; Pierce-Shimomura, Jonathan T.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol has a wide variety of effects on physiology and behavior. One of the most well-recognized behavioral effects is disinhibition, where behaviors that are normally suppressed are displayed following intoxication. A large body of evidence has shown that alcohol-induced disinhibition in humans affects attention, verbal, sexual, and locomotor behaviors. Similar behavioral disinhibition is also seen in many animal models of ethanol response, from invertebrates to mammals and primates. Here we describe several examples of disinhibition in the nematode C. elegans. The nematode displays distinct behavioral states associated with locomotion (crawling on land and swimming in water) that are mediated by dopamine. On land, animals crawl and feed freely, but these behaviors are inhibited in water. We found that additional behaviors, including a variety of escape responses are also inhibited in water. Whereas alcohol non-specifically impaired locomotion, feeding, and escape responses in worms on land, alcohol specifically disinhibited these behaviors in worms immersed in water. Loss of dopamine signaling relieved disinhibition of feeding behavior, while loss of the D1-like dopamine receptor DOP-4 impaired the ethanol-induced disinhibition of crawling. The powerful genetics and simple nervous system of C. elegans may help uncover conserved molecular mechanisms that underlie alcohol-induced disinhibition of behaviors in higher animals. PMID:24681782

  13. Caenorhabditis elegans: an emerging model in biomedical and environmental toxicology.

    PubMed

    Leung, Maxwell C K; Williams, Phillip L; Benedetto, Alexandre; Au, Catherine; Helmcke, Kirsten J; Aschner, Michael; Meyer, Joel N

    2008-11-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as an important animal model in various fields including neurobiology, developmental biology, and genetics. Characteristics of this animal model that have contributed to its success include its genetic manipulability, invariant and fully described developmental program, well-characterized genome, ease of maintenance, short and prolific life cycle, and small body size. These same features have led to an increasing use of C. elegans in toxicology, both for mechanistic studies and high-throughput screening approaches. We describe some of the research that has been carried out in the areas of neurotoxicology, genetic toxicology, and environmental toxicology, as well as high-throughput experiments with C. elegans including genome-wide screening for molecular targets of toxicity and rapid toxicity assessment for new chemicals. We argue for an increased role for C. elegans in complementing other model systems in toxicological research. PMID:18566021

  14. Genetic analysis of innate immunity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Redding, Bethany Joy

    2007-01-01

    Pathogen resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans is a model for studying innate immunity. Several conserved activators in the p38 PMK-1 pathway have been identified and are required for pathogen resistance to the bacterium ...

  15. Caenorhabditis elegans: An Emerging Model in Biomedical and Environmental Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Maxwell C. K.; Williams, Phillip L.; Benedetto, Alexandre; Au, Catherine; Helmcke, Kirsten J.; Aschner, Michael; Meyer, Joel N.

    2008-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as an important animal model in various fields including neurobiology, developmental biology, and genetics. Characteristics of this animal model that have contributed to its success include its genetic manipulability, invariant and fully described developmental program, well-characterized genome, ease of maintenance, short and prolific life cycle, and small body size. These same features have led to an increasing use of C. elegans in toxicology, both for mechanistic studies and high-throughput screening approaches. We describe some of the research that has been carried out in the areas of neurotoxicology, genetic toxicology, and environmental toxicology, as well as high-throughput experiments with C. elegans including genome-wide screening for molecular targets of toxicity and rapid toxicity assessment for new chemicals. We argue for an increased role for C. elegans in complementing other model systems in toxicological research. PMID:18566021

  16. Bacterial attraction and quorum sensing inhibition in Caenorhabditis elegans exudates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Caenorhabditis elegans, a bacterivorous soil nematode, lives in a complex environment that requires chemical communication for mating, monitoring population density, recognition of food, avoidance of pathogenic microbes, and other essential ecological functions. Despite being one of the best-studied...

  17. Neural Regulatory Pathways of Feeding and Fat in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, George A; Ashrafi, Kaveh

    2015-11-23

    The compact nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans and its genetic tractability are features that make this organism highly suitable for investigating energy balance in an animal system. Here, we focus on molecular components and organizational principles emerging from the investigation of pathways that largely originate in the nervous system and regulate feeding behavior but also peripheral fat regulation through neuroendocrine signaling. We provide an overview of studies aimed at understanding how C. elegans integrate internal and external cues in feeding behavior. We highlight some of the similarities and differences in energy balance between C. elegans and mammals. We also provide our perspective on unresolved issues, both conceptual and technical, that we believe have hampered critical evaluation of findings relevant to fat regulation in C. elegans. PMID:26473379

  18. Tertiary siRNAs mediate paramutation in C. elegans

    E-print Network

    Sapetschnig, Alexandra; Sarkies, Peter; Lehrbach, Nicolas J.; Miska, Eric A.

    2015-03-26

    for epigenetic inheritance of acquired traits in animals. This resurrection of Larmarckism is poised to rewrite the textbook on heredity [2], but a clearer understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved is needed. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans...

  19. Transcription reactivation steps stimulated by oocyte maturation in C. elegans

    E-print Network

    Blackwell, Keith

    embryonic development then cease transcription before fertilization. Later, a distinct transcription program, a process that releases meiotic arrest and prepares for fertilization. By monitoring transcription; Oocyte maturation; Meiosis; C. elegans; Transcription; CTD; CTD phosphatase; FCP-1; Ubiquitylation

  20. Meiotic prophase regulation and achiasmate chromosome segregation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Glazier, Christina Marie

    2015-01-01

    arrested during meiosis until fertilization by a male-Meiosis I take place during fetal development in utero and fertilizationmeiosis and meiotic chromosome segregation using C. elegans. Figure 1.1 Fertilization

  1. The Perfect C. elegans Project: An Initial Report Hiroaki Kitano

    E-print Network

    Luke, Sean

    , and the initial results of the project. 1 Introduction When Sydney Brenner proposed the investigating C. elegans to the Medical Research Council, he chose it because it was the simplest of all differentiated organisms [Brenner

  2. BACTERIAL ATTRACTION AND QUORUM SENSING INHIBITION IN CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS EXUDATES

    PubMed Central

    KAPLAN, FATMA; BADRI, DAYAKAR V.; ZACHARIAH, CHERIAN; AJREDINI, RAMADAN; SANDOVAL, FRANCISCO J; ROJE, SANJA; LEVINE, LANFANG H.; ZHANG, FENGLI; ROBINETTE, STEVEN L.; ALBORN, HANS T.; ZHAO, WEI; STADLER, MICHAEL; NIMALENDRAN, RATHIKA; DOSSEY, AARON T.; BRÜSCHWEILER, RAFAEL; VIVANCO, JORGE M.; EDISON, ARTHUR S.

    2014-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans, a bacterivorous nematode, lives in complex rotting fruit, soil, and compost environments, and chemical interactions are required for mating, monitoring population density, recognition of food, avoidance of pathogenic microbes, and other essential ecological functions. Despite being one of the best-studied model organisms in biology, relatively little is known about the signals that C. elegans uses to chemically interact with its environment or as defense. C. elegans exudates were analyzed using several analytical methods and found to contain 36 common metabolites including organic acids, amino acids and sugars, all in relatively high abundance. Furthermore, the concentrations of amino acids in the exudates were dependent on developmental stage. The C. elegans exudates were tested for bacterial chemotaxis using Pseudomonas putida (KT2440), a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1), a soil bacterium pathogenic to C. elegans, and E. coli (OP50), a non-motile bacterium tested as a control. The C. elegans exudates attracted the two Psuedomonas species, but had no detectable antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa. To our surprise, the exudates of young adult and adult life stages of C. elegans exudates inhibited quorum sensing in the reporter system based on the LuxR bacterial quorum sensing (QS) system, which regulates bacterial virulence and other factors in Vibrio fischeri. We were able to fractionate the QS inhibition and bacterial chemotaxis activities, demonstrating that these activities are chemically distinct. Our results demonstrate that C. elegans can attract its bacterial food and has the potential of partially regulating the virulence of bacterial pathogens by inhibiting specific QS systems. PMID:19649780

  3. Action potentials contribute to neuronal signaling in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Mellem, Jerry E; Brockie, Penelope J; Madsen, David M; Maricq, Andres V

    2008-08-01

    Small, high-impedance neurons with short processes, similar to those found in the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, are predicted to transmit electrical signals by passive propagation. However, we have found that certain neurons in C. elegans fire regenerative action potentials. These neurons resembled Schmitt triggers, as their potential state appears to be bistable. Transitions between up and down states could be triggered by application of the neurotransmitter glutamate or brief current pulses. PMID:18587393

  4. Japanese studies on neural circuits and behavior of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sasakura, Hiroyuki; Tsukada, Yuki; Takagi, Shin; Mori, Ikue

    2013-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an ideal organism for studying neural plasticity and animal behaviors. A total of 302 neurons of a C. elegans hermaphrodite have been classified into 118 neuronal groups. This simple neural circuit provides a solid basis for understanding the mechanisms of the brains of higher animals, including humans. Recent studies that employ modern imaging and manipulation techniques enable researchers to study the dynamic properties of nervous systems with great precision. Behavioral and molecular genetic analyses of this tiny animal have contributed greatly to the advancement of neural circuit research. Here, we will review the recent studies on the neural circuits of C. elegans that have been conducted in Japan. Several laboratories have established unique and clever methods to study the underlying neuronal substrates of behavioral regulation in C. elegans. The technological advances applied to studies of C. elegans have allowed new approaches for the studies of complex neural systems. Through reviewing the studies on the neuronal circuits of C. elegans in Japan, we will analyze and discuss the directions of neural circuit studies. PMID:24348340

  5. Somatic Embryogenesis in Olive (Olea europaea L. subsp. europaea var. sativa and var. sylvestris).

    PubMed

    Rugini, Eddo; Silvestri, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Protocols for olive somatic embryogenesis from zygotic embryos and mature tissues have been described for both Olea europaea sub. europaea var. sativa and var. sylvestris. Immature zygotic embryos (no more than 75 days old), used after fruit collection or stored at 12-14 °C for 2-3 months, are the best responsive explants and very slightly genotype dependent, and one single protocol can be effective for a wide range of genotypes. On the contrary, protocols for mature zygotic embryos and for mature tissue of cultivars are often genotype specific, so that they may require many adjustments according to genotypes. The use of thidiazuron and cefotaxime seems to be an important trigger for induction phase particularly for tissues derived from cultivars. Up to now, however, the application of this technique for large-scale propagation is hampered also by the low rate of embryo germination; it proves nonetheless very useful for genetic improvement. PMID:26619870

  6. 1D-VAR Retrieval Using Superchannels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel; Larar, Allen; Smith, William L.; Schluessel, Peter; Mango, Stephen; SaintGermain, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Since modern ultra-spectral remote sensors have thousands of channels, it is difficult to include all of them in a 1D-var retrieval system. We will describe a physical inversion algorithm, which includes all available channels for the atmospheric temperature, moisture, cloud, and surface parameter retrievals. Both the forward model and the inversion algorithm compress the channel radiances into super channels. These super channels are obtained by projecting the radiance spectra onto a set of pre-calculated eigenvectors. The forward model provides both super channel properties and jacobian in EOF space directly. For ultra-spectral sensors such as Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed Interferometer (NAST), a compression ratio of more than 80 can be achieved, leading to a significant reduction in computations involved in an inversion process. Results will be shown applying the algorithm to real IASI and NAST data.

  7. Caenorhabditis elegans NPR-1–mediated behaviors are suppressed in the presence of mucoid bacteria

    E-print Network

    Reddy, Kirthi C.

    Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits a diverse range of behaviors in response to bacteria. The presence of bacterial food influences C. elegans aerotaxis, aggregation, locomotion, and pathogen avoidance behaviors through the ...

  8. Effects of sterols on the development and aging of caenorhabditis elegans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because Caenorhabditis elegans lacks several components of the de novo sterol biosynthesis pathway, it requires sterols as essential nutrients. Supplemented cholesterol undergoes extensive enzymatic modification in C. elegans to form other sterols of unknown function. Because sterol metabolism in ...

  9. Dynamic patterning of maternal mRNAs in the Early C. elegans embryo

    E-print Network

    Li, Jialing, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    Asymmetric segregation of maternally-encoded proteins is essential to cell fate determination during early cell divisions of the Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) embryo, but little is known about the patterning of ...

  10. Mainstreaming Caenorhabditis elegans in experimental evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Jeremy C.; Cutter, Asher D.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental evolution provides a powerful manipulative tool for probing evolutionary process and mechanism. As this approach to hypothesis testing has taken purchase in biology, so too has the number of experimental systems that use it, each with its own unique strengths and weaknesses. The depth of biological knowledge about Caenorhabditis nematodes, combined with their laboratory tractability, positions them well for exploiting experimental evolution in animal systems to understand deep questions in evolution and ecology, as well as in molecular genetics and systems biology. To date, Caenorhabditis elegans and related species have proved themselves in experimental evolution studies of the process of mutation, host–pathogen coevolution, mating system evolution and life-history theory. Yet these organisms are not broadly recognized for their utility for evolution experiments and remain underexploited. Here, we outline this experimental evolution work undertaken so far in Caenorhabditis, detail simple methodological tricks that can be exploited and identify research areas that are ripe for future discovery. PMID:24430852

  11. Chemotaxis of crawling and swimming Caenorhabditis Elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Amar; Bilbao, Alejandro; Padmanabhan, Venkat; Khan, Zeina; Armstrong, Andrew; Rumbaugh, Kendra; Vanapalli, Siva; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2012-11-01

    A soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis Elegans efficiently navigates through complex environments, responding to chemical signals to find food or avoid danger. According to previous studies, the nematode uses both gradual-turn and run-and-tumble strategies to move in the direction of the increasing concentration of chemical attractants. We show that both these chemotaxis strategies can be described using our kinematic model [PLoS ONE, 7: e40121 (2012)] in which harmonic-curvature modes represent elementary nematode movements. In our chemotaxis model, the statistics of mode changes is governed by the time history of the chemoattractant concentration at the position of the nematode head. We present results for both nematodes crawling without transverse slip and for swimming nematodes. This work was supported by NSF grant No. CBET 1059745.

  12. Big Data in Caenorhabditis elegans: quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Hutter, Harald; Moerman, Donald

    2015-11-01

    A clear definition of what constitutes "Big Data" is difficult to identify, but we find it most useful to define Big Data as a data collection that is complete. By this criterion, researchers on Caenorhabditis elegans have a long history of collecting Big Data, since the organism was selected with the idea of obtaining a complete biological description and understanding of development. The complete wiring diagram of the nervous system, the complete cell lineage, and the complete genome sequence provide a framework to phrase and test hypotheses. Given this history, it might be surprising that the number of "complete" data sets for this organism is actually rather small-not because of lack of effort, but because most types of biological experiments are not currently amenable to complete large-scale data collection. Many are also not inherently limited, so that it becomes difficult to even define completeness. At present, we only have partial data on mutated genes and their phenotypes, gene expression, and protein-protein interaction-important data for many biological questions. Big Data can point toward unexpected correlations, and these unexpected correlations can lead to novel investigations; however, Big Data cannot establish causation. As a result, there is much excitement about Big Data, but there is also a discussion on just what Big Data contributes to solving a biological problem. Because of its relative simplicity, C. elegans is an ideal test bed to explore this issue and at the same time determine what is necessary to build a multicellular organism from a single cell. PMID:26543198

  13. Expriences de prvisions utilisant les conditions initiales issues du 3D-VAR

    E-print Network

    All experimentsexperiments archivedarchived atat ECMWFECMWF #12;Nino 3 & Nino 4 #12;Impact on the SST drift (Blue: control: observations) #12;Impact of 3D-Var Seasonal forecasts Nino3 SST (Blue: control, red: 3D-Var) #12;Impact of 3D-Var Seasonal forecasts Nino3 SST (Blue: control, red: 3D-Var) #12;Impact of 3D-Var Seasonal forecasts Nino3 SST

  14. Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin in Caenorhabditis elegans from Loss of Fucose*

    E-print Network

    Aroian, Raffi V.

    Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin in Caenorhabditis elegans from Loss of Fucose* Received- alyzes the first step in the biosynthesis of GDP-fucose from GDP-mannose. Injection of GDP-fucose but not fucose into C. elegans intestinal cells rescues bre-1 mutant phenotypes. Thus, C. elegans lacks

  15. Light and Hydrogen Peroxide Inhibit C. elegans Feeding through Gustatory Receptor Orthologs and Pharyngeal

    E-print Network

    Horvitz, H. Robert

    Article Light and Hydrogen Peroxide Inhibit C. elegans Feeding through Gustatory Receptor Orthologs and Pharyngeal Neurons Highlights d Light and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) cause C. elegans to inhibit feeding C. elegans tastes and behaviorally responds to hydrogen peroxide. This sensing mechanism is also

  16. Role for -catenin and HOX transcription factors in Caenorhabditis elegans and mammalian host

    E-print Network

    Ausubel, Frederick M.

    infect and kill C. elegans, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus, the latter being. elegans transcriptional response to infection by the Gram-negative pathogen P. aeruginosa, and highlighted described elsewhere, we used Affymetrix whole-genome C. elegans microarrays to iden- tify 186 genes whose

  17. Killing of Caenorhabditis elegans by Cryptococcus neoformans as a model of yeast pathogenesis

    E-print Network

    Ausubel, Frederick M.

    Killing of Caenorhabditis elegans by Cryptococcus neoformans as a model of yeast pathogenesis.However,thehumanpathogenicyeastCryptococcusneoformans killed C. elegans, and the C. neoformans polysaccharide capsule as well as several C. neoformans genes previously shown to be involved in mammalian virulence were also shown to play a role in C. elegans killing

  18. C. elegans Egg-laying Detection and Behavior Study Using Image Analysis

    E-print Network

    Cosman, Pamela C.

    1 C. elegans Egg-laying Detection and Behavior Study Using Image Analysis Wei Geng Department-0349, USA. E-mail:wschafer@ucsd.edu #12;2 Egg-laying is an important phase of the life cycle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Previous studies examined egg-laying events manually. This paper presents

  19. http://C.elegans: mining the functional genomic landscape Stuart K. Kim

    E-print Network

    Kim, Stuart

    or genome-wide expression studies)3,4 . The modern field of C. elegans began with a publication by Sydney Brenner less than thirty years ago5 , and so C. elegans has a shorter research history than that of humans or Drosophila. Since Brenner's first paper, only 1877 C. elegans genes (9% of the genome) have been examined

  20. Material Properties of Caenorhabditis elegans Swimming at Low Reynolds J. Sznitman,

    E-print Network

    Purohit, Prashant

    ABSTRACT Undulatory locomotion½AQ2 , as seen in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, is a common swimmingMaterial Properties of Caenorhabditis elegans Swimming at Low Reynolds Number J. Sznitman, Prashant scarce. Here, the swimming behavior of C. elegans is inves- tigated in experiments and in a simple model

  1. Capacitor-Less VAR Compensator Based on a Matrix Converter 

    E-print Network

    Balakrishnan, Divya Rathna

    2012-02-14

    Reactive power, denoted as volt-ampere reactive (VARs), is fundamental to ac power systems and is due to the complex impedance of the loads and transmission lines. It has several undesirable consequences which include increased transmission loss...

  2. The dynamics of the thermal memory of C. elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, William; Palanski, Konstantine; Bartumeus, Frederic; Nemenman, Ilya

    2014-03-01

    C. elegans has the capacity to learn associatively. For example, C. elegans associates temperature with food and performs thermotaxis towards this temperature when placed on a spatial thermal gradient. However, very little is understood how C. elegans acquires this thermal memory. We have developed a novel droplet-based microfluidic assay to measure the dynamics of the thermal memory of C. elegans. Individual animals are placed in an array of microdroplets on a slide, and a linear temperature gradient of 0.5 deg/cm is applied to the array. By measuring the swimming motions of C. elegans in the droplets, we show that they can perform thermotaxis. By calculating an index of this taxis behavior over time, we quantify the worm's thermal memory and measure its dynamics when the animals are exposed to different conditions of feeding and starvation. Over a time scale of hours, we find that the thermal preference of wild-type worms decays and will actually become inverted and that mutations in the insulin signaling pathway perturb the dynamics. This biphasic conditional association can be explained with a reinforcement learning model with independent reinforcement and avoidance pathways with distinct time scales. Human Frontier Science Program.

  3. Chemically Defined Medium and Caenorhabditis elegans: A Powerful Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, N. J.; Kozak, E.; Conley, C. A.

    2003-01-01

    C. elegans has been established as a powerful genetic system. Growth in a chemically defined medium (C. elegans Maintenance Medium (CeMM)) now allows standardization and systematic manipulation of the nutrients that animals receive. Liquid cultivation allows automated culturing and experimentation and should be of me in large-scale growth and screening of animals. Here we present our initial results from developing culture systems with CeMM. We find that CeMM is versatile and culturing is simple. CeMM can be used in a solid or liquid state, it can be stored unused for at least a year, unattended actively growing cultures may be maintained longer than with standard techniques, and standard C. elegans protocols work well with animals grown in defined medium. We also find that there are caveats of using defined medium. Animals in defined medium grow more slowly than on standard medium, appear to display adaptation to the defined medium, and display altered growth rates as they change defined medium composition. As was suggested with the introduction of C. elegans as a potential genetic system, use of defined medium with C. elegans should prove a powerful tool.

  4. Environmental isolation of Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii and C. neoformans var. neoformans in the city of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, H; Paula, C R

    2000-10-01

    In order to determine the environmental occurrence of both varieties of Cryptococcus neoformans in the city of São Paulo, pigeon droppings and vegetable material from trees of the genus Eucalyptus were collected at typically crowded places. A total of 38 sites downtown where large heaps of pigeon droppings could be found were selected for sampling. Pigeon droppings from 10 (26.3%) of these sites were positive for C. neoformans var. neoformans in at least one sample. Twelve eucalyptus woods located within four municipal parks were also surveyed; vegetable material from Eucalyptus spp. trees were collected monthly over a 2-year period. C. neoformans var. gattii was recovered from a wood in Ibirapuera Park during the same season on two different occasions (November 1996 and November 1997); this park contained specimens of Eucalyptus camaldulensis, a natural habitat of C. n. var. gattii. C. n. var. neoformans was detected in a wood in Ibirapuera Park and Aclimação Park. The results show that both C. n. var. neoformans and C. n. var. gattii are present in the urban environment of São Paulo city at sites where large numbers of people normally gather. PMID:11092386

  5. Perilla frutescens var. frutescens in northern Laos.

    PubMed

    Ito, Michiho; Honda, Gisho; Sydara, Kongmany

    2008-04-01

    Twenty-eight samples of mericarps of Perilla frutescens var. frutescens were collected through fieldwork performed in Phongsali and Xieng Khouang provinces in northern Laos. No perilla samples were collected from Savannakhet province in the south although more than 20 sites were investigated. Perilla plants are mostly grown mixed with dry-paddy rice by slash-and-burn cultivation in Laos. The most popular local name for perilla mericarps in the area was "Ma Nga Chan". Weight of 1,000 grains and hardness of the mericarps were measured, and all mericarps were found to be large (weight of 1,000 grains around 2 g) and soft (limit load weight under 300 g), which were preferred for culinary use in Laos. The composition of the essential oils obtained from the herbaceous plants raised from the mericarps was divided into five types, perillaketone, elemicine plus myristicine, shisofuran, piperitenon, and myristicine, and GC-MS analysis of these Laotian perilla samples showed that they were similar to those of corresponding types of known Japanese perilla strains. One of the shisofuran-type perilla contained large amounts of putative alpha-naginatene, which is likely to be an intermediate of the biosynthesis of naginataketone. The farmers' indifference to the oil type of the leaf seems to leave Laotian perilla as a good genetic resource for studies of the biosynthesis of oil compounds. PMID:18404336

  6. Proprioceptive coupling within motor neurons drives C. elegans forward locomotion.

    PubMed

    Wen, Quan; Po, Michelle D; Hulme, Elizabeth; Chen, Sway; Liu, Xinyu; Kwok, Sen Wai; Gershow, Marc; Leifer, Andrew M; Butler, Victoria; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Kawano, Taizo; Schafer, William R; Whitesides, George; Wyart, Matthieu; Chklovskii, Dmitri B; Zhen, Mei; Samuel, Aravinthan D T

    2012-11-21

    Locomotion requires coordinated motor activity throughout an animal's body. In both vertebrates and invertebrates, chains of coupled central pattern generators (CPGs) are commonly evoked to explain local rhythmic behaviors. In C. elegans, we report that proprioception within the motor circuit is responsible for propagating and coordinating rhythmic undulatory waves from head to tail during forward movement. Proprioceptive coupling between adjacent body regions transduces rhythmic movement initiated near the head into bending waves driven along the body by a chain of reflexes. Using optogenetics and calcium imaging to manipulate and monitor motor circuit activity of moving C. elegans held in microfluidic devices, we found that the B-type cholinergic motor neurons transduce the proprioceptive signal. In C. elegans, a sensorimotor feedback loop operating within a specific type of motor neuron both drives and organizes body movement. PMID:23177960

  7. Metabotropic GABA signalling modulates longevity in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Lei; Gong, Jianke; Yuan, Fengling; Zhang, Bi; Liu, Hongkang; Zheng, Tianlin; Yu, Teng; Xu, X. Z. Shawn; Liu, Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system plays an important but poorly understood role in modulating longevity. GABA, a prominent inhibitory neurotransmitter, is best known to regulate nervous system function and behaviour in diverse organisms. Whether GABA signalling affects aging, however, has not been explored. Here we examined mutants lacking each of the major neurotransmitters in C. elegans, and find that deficiency in GABA signalling extends lifespan. This pro-longevity effect is mediated by the metabotropic GABAB receptor GBB-1, but not ionotropic GABAA receptors. GBB-1 regulates lifespan through G protein-PLC? signalling, which transmits longevity signals to the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO, a key regulator of lifespan. Mammalian GABAB receptors can functionally substitute for GBB-1 in lifespan control in C. elegans. Our results uncover a new role of GABA signalling in lifespan regulation in C. elegans, raising the possibility that a similar process may occur in other organisms. PMID:26537867

  8. Femtosecond laser dissection in C. elegans neural circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Aravinthan D. T.; Chung, Samuel H.; Clark, Damon A.; Gabel, Christopher V.; Chang, Chieh; Murthy, Venkatesh; Mazur, Eric

    2006-02-01

    The nematode C. elegans, a millimeter-long roundworm, is a well-established model organism for studies of neural development and behavior, however physiological methods to manipulate and monitor the activity of its neural network have lagged behind the development of powerful methods in genetics and molecular biology. The small size and transparency of C. elegans make the worm an ideal test-bed for the development of physiological methods derived from optics and microscopy. We present the development and application of a new physiological tool: femtosecond laser dissection, which allows us to selectively ablate segments of individual neural fibers within live C. elegans. Femtosecond laser dissection provides a scalpel with submicrometer resolution, and we discuss its application in studies of neural growth, regenerative growth, and the neural basis of behavior.

  9. Dissection of C. elegans behavioral genetics in 3-D environments

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Namseop; Hwang, Ara B.; You, Young-Jai; V. Lee, Seung-Jae; Ho Je, Jung

    2015-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a widely used model for genetic dissection of animal behaviors. Despite extensive technical advances in imaging methods, it remains challenging to visualize and quantify C. elegans behaviors in three-dimensional (3-D) natural environments. Here we developed an innovative 3-D imaging method that enables quantification of C. elegans behavior in 3-D environments. Furthermore, for the first time, we characterized 3-D-specific behavioral phenotypes of mutant worms that have defects in head movement or mechanosensation. This approach allowed us to reveal previously unknown functions of genes in behavioral regulation. We expect that our 3-D imaging method will facilitate new investigations into genetic basis of animal behaviors in natural 3-D environments. PMID:25955271

  10. Metabotropic GABA signalling modulates longevity in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Chun, Lei; Gong, Jianke; Yuan, Fengling; Zhang, Bi; Liu, Hongkang; Zheng, Tianlin; Yu, Teng; Xu, X Z Shawn; Liu, Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system plays an important but poorly understood role in modulating longevity. GABA, a prominent inhibitory neurotransmitter, is best known to regulate nervous system function and behaviour in diverse organisms. Whether GABA signalling affects aging, however, has not been explored. Here we examined mutants lacking each of the major neurotransmitters in C. elegans, and find that deficiency in GABA signalling extends lifespan. This pro-longevity effect is mediated by the metabotropic GABAB receptor GBB-1, but not ionotropic GABAA receptors. GBB-1 regulates lifespan through G protein-PLC? signalling, which transmits longevity signals to the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO, a key regulator of lifespan. Mammalian GABAB receptors can functionally substitute for GBB-1 in lifespan control in C. elegans. Our results uncover a new role of GABA signalling in lifespan regulation in C. elegans, raising the possibility that a similar process may occur in other organisms. PMID:26537867

  11. Measuring Food Intake and Nutrient Absorption in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Amaro, Rafael L.; Valentine, Elizabeth R.; Carretero, Maria; LeBoeuf, Sarah E.; Rangaraju, Sunitha; Broaddus, Caroline D.; Solis, Gregory M.; Williamson, James R.; Petrascheck, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as a powerful model to study the genetics of feeding, food-related behaviors, and metabolism. Despite the many advantages of C. elegans as a model organism, direct measurement of its bacterial food intake remains challenging. Here, we describe two complementary methods that measure the food intake of C. elegans. The first method is a microtiter plate-based bacterial clearing assay that measures food intake by quantifying the change in the optical density of bacteria over time. The second method, termed pulse feeding, measures the absorption of food by tracking de novo protein synthesis using a novel metabolic pulse-labeling strategy. Using the bacterial clearance assay, we compare the bacterial food intake of various C. elegans strains and show that long-lived eat mutants eat substantially more than previous estimates. To demonstrate the applicability of the pulse-feeding assay, we compare the assimilation of food for two C. elegans strains in response to serotonin. We show that serotonin-increased feeding leads to increased protein synthesis in a SER-7-dependent manner, including proteins known to promote aging. Protein content in the food has recently emerged as critical factor in determining how food composition affects aging and health. The pulse-feeding assay, by measuring de novo protein synthesis, represents an ideal method to unequivocally establish how the composition of food dictates protein synthesis. In combination, these two assays provide new and powerful tools for C. elegans research to investigate feeding and how food intake affects the proteome and thus the physiology and health of an organism. PMID:25903497

  12. Phycoerythrin extends life span and health span of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sonani, Ravi Raghav; Singh, Niraj Kumar; Awasthi, Anjali; Prasad, Birendra; Kumar, Jitendra; Madamwar, Datta

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we tested the antioxidant activity of phycoerythrin (PE, an oligomeric light harvesting protein isolated from Lyngbya sp. A09DM) to curtail aging effects in Caenorhabditis elegans. Purified PE (100 ?g/ml) dietary supplement was given to C. elegans and investigated for its anti-aging potential. PE treatment improved the mean life span of wild type (N2)-animals from 15?±?0.1 to 19.9?±?0.3 days. PE treatment also moderated the decline in aging-associated physiological functions like pharyngeal pumping and locomotion with increasing age of N2 worms. Moreover, PE treatment also enhanced the stress tolerance in 5-day-aged adults with increase in mean survival rate from 22.2?±?2.5 to 41.6?±?2.5% under thermo stress and from 30.1?±?3.2 to 63.1?±?6.4% under oxidative (hydrogen peroxide)-stress. PE treatment was also noted to moderate the heat-induced expression of human amyloid-beta(A?1-42) peptide and associated paralysis in the muscle tissues of transgenic C. elegans CL4176 (Alzheimer's disease model). Effectiveness of PE in expanding the life span of mutant C. elegans, knockout for some up (daf-2 and age-1)- and down (daf-16)-stream regulators of insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS), shows the independency of PE effect from DAF-2-AGE-1-DAF-16 signaling pathway. Moreover, the inability of PE in expanding the life span of hsf-1 knockout C. elegans(sy441) suggests the dependency of PE effect on heat shock transcription factor (HSF-1) controlling stress-induced gene expression. In conclusion, our results demonstrated a novel anti-aging activity of PE which conferred increased resistance to cellular stress resulting in improved life span and health span of C. elegans. PMID:25304463

  13. Caenorhabditis elegans vulval cell fate patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Félix, Marie-Anne

    2012-08-01

    The spatial patterning of three cell fates in a row of competent cells is exemplified by vulva development in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The intercellular signaling network that underlies fate specification is well understood, yet quantitative aspects remain to be elucidated. Quantitative models of the network allow us to test the effect of parameter variation on the cell fate pattern output. Among the parameter sets that allow us to reach the wild-type pattern, two general developmental patterning mechanisms of the three fates can be found: sequential inductions and morphogen-based induction, the former being more robust to parameter variation. Experimentally, the vulval cell fate pattern is robust to stochastic and environmental challenges, and minor variants can be detected. The exception is the fate of the anterior cell, P3.p, which is sensitive to stochastic variation and spontaneous mutation, and is also evolving the fastest. Other vulval precursor cell fates can be affected by mutation, yet little natural variation can be found, suggesting stabilizing selection. Despite this fate pattern conservation, different Caenorhabditis species respond differently to perturbations of the system. In the quantitative models, different parameter sets can reconstitute their response to perturbation, suggesting that network variation among Caenorhabditis species may be quantitative. Network rewiring likely occurred at longer evolutionary scales.

  14. Hormesis and aging in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Cypser, James R; Tedesco, Pat; Johnson, Thomas E

    2006-10-01

    Hormesis has emerged as an important manipulation for the study of aging. Although hormesis is manifested in manifold combinations of stress and model organism, the mechanisms of hormesis are only partly understood. The increased stress resistance and extended survival caused by hormesis can be manipulated to further our understanding of the roles of intrinsic and induced stress resistance in aging. Genes of the dauer/insulin/insulin-like signaling (IIS) pathway have well-established roles in aging in Caenorhabditis elegans. Here, we discuss the role of some of those genes in the induced stress resistance and induced life extension attributable to hormesis. Mutations in three genes (daf-16, daf-18, and daf-12) block hormetically induced life extension. However, of these three, only daf-18 appears to be required for a full induction of thermotolerance induced by hormesis, illustrating possible separation of the genetic requirements for stress resistance and life extension. Mutations in three other genes of this pathway (daf-3, daf-5, and age-1) do not block induced life extension or induced thermotolerance; daf-5 mutants may be unusually sensitive to hormetic conditions. PMID:17067771

  15. Developmental genetics of the Caenorhabditis elegans pharynx

    PubMed Central

    Pilon, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans pharynx is a rhythmically pumping organ composed initially of 80 cells that, through fusions, amount to 62 cells in the adult worm. During the first 100 min of development, most future pharyngeal cells are born and gather into a double-plate primordium surrounded by a basal lamina. All pharyngeal cells express the transcription factor PHA-4, of which the concentration increases throughout development, triggering a sequential activation of genes with promoters responding differentially to PHA-4 protein levels. The oblong-shaped pharyngeal primordium becomes polarized, many cells taking on wedge shapes with their narrow ends toward the center, hence forming an epithelial cyst. The primordium then elongates, and reorientations of the cells at the anterior and posterior ends form the mouth and pharyngeal-intestinal openings, respectively. The 20 pharyngeal neurons establish complex but reproducible trajectories using ‘fishing line’ and growth cone-driven mechanisms, and the gland cells also similarly develop their processes. The genetics behind many fate decisions and morphogenetic processes are being elucidated, and reveal the pharynx to be a fruitful model for developmental biologists. PMID:25262818

  16. Sperm and Oocyte Communication Mechanisms Controlling C. elegans Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sung Min; Cottee, Pauline A.; Miller, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    During sexual reproduction in many species, sperm and oocyte secrete diffusible signaling molecules to help orchestrate the biological symphony of fertilization. In the Caenorhabditis elegans gonad, bidirectional signaling between sperm and oocyte is important for guiding sperm to the fertilization site and inducing oocyte maturation. The molecular mechanisms that regulate sperm guidance and oocyte maturation are being delineated. Unexpectedly, these mechanisms are providing insight into human diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, and cancer. Here we review sperm and oocyte communication in C. elegans and discuss relationships to human disorders. PMID:20034089

  17. Pharmacological classes that extend lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Carretero, Maria; Gomez-Amaro, Rafael L.; Petrascheck, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the field of aging has resulted in ever increasing numbers of compounds that extend lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans. Lifespan extending compounds include metabolites and synthetic compounds, as well as natural products. For many of these compounds, mammalian pharmacology is known, and for some the actual targets have been experimentally identified. In this review, we explore the data available in C. elegans to provide an overview of which pharmacological classes have potential for identification of further compounds that extend lifespan. PMID:25784926

  18. Caenorhabditis elegans glp-4 Encodes a Valyl Aminoacyl tRNA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Suchita; Borgo, Ben; Pazdernik, Nanette; Fox, Paul; Mardis, Elaine R.; Kohara, Yuji; Havranek, Jim; Schedl, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Germline stem cell proliferation is necessary to populate the germline with sufficient numbers of cells for gametogenesis and for signaling the soma to control organismal properties such as aging. The Caenorhabditis elegans gene glp-4 was identified by the temperature-sensitive allele bn2 where mutants raised at the restrictive temperature produce adults that are essentially germ cell deficient, containing only a small number of stem cells arrested in the mitotic cycle but otherwise have a morphologically normal soma. We determined that glp-4 encodes a valyl aminoacyl transfer RNA synthetase (VARS-2) and that the probable null phenotype is early larval lethality. Phenotypic analysis indicates glp-4(bn2ts) is partial loss of function in the soma. Structural modeling suggests that bn2 Gly296Asp results in partial loss of function by a novel mechanism: aspartate 296 in the editing pocket induces inappropriate deacylation of correctly charged Val-tRNAval. Intragenic suppressor mutations are predicted to displace aspartate 296 so that it is less able to catalyze inappropriate deacylation. Thus glp-4(bn2ts) likely causes reduced protein translation due to decreased levels of Val-tRNAval. The germline, as a reproductive preservation mechanism during unfavorable conditions, signals the soma for organismal aging, stress and pathogen resistance. glp-4(bn2ts) mutants are widely used to generate germline deficient mutants for organismal studies, under the assumption that the soma is unaffected. As reduced translation has also been demonstrated to alter organismal properties, it is unclear whether changes in aging, stress resistance, etc. observed in glp-4(bn2ts) mutants are the result of germline deficiency or reduced translation. PMID:26464357

  19. 40 CFR 180.1243 - Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens strain FZB24; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens strain...Tolerances § 180.1243 Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens ...tolerance for residues of the Bacillus subtilis var....

  20. 40 CFR 180.1243 - Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens strain FZB24; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens strain...Tolerances § 180.1243 Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens ...tolerance for residues of the Bacillus subtilis var....

  1. 40 CFR 180.1243 - Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens strain FZB24; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens strain...Tolerances § 180.1243 Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens ...tolerance for residues of the Bacillus subtilis var....

  2. 40 CFR 180.1243 - Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens strain FZB24; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens strain...Tolerances § 180.1243 Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens ...tolerance for residues of the Bacillus subtilis var....

  3. 40 CFR 180.1243 - Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens strain FZB24; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens strain...Tolerances § 180.1243 Bacillus subtilis var. amyloliquefaciens ...tolerance for residues of the Bacillus subtilis var....

  4. A Method for Evaluating Volt-VAR Optimization Field Demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Weaver, T. F.

    2014-08-31

    In a regulated business environment a utility must be able to validate that deployed technologies provide quantifiable benefits to the end-use customers. For traditional technologies there are well established procedures for determining what benefits will be derived from the deployment. But for many emerging technologies procedures for determining benefits are less clear and completely absent in some cases. Volt-VAR Optimization is a technology that is being deployed across the nation, but there are still numerous discussions about potential benefits and how they are achieved. This paper will present a method for the evaluation, and quantification of benefits, for field deployments of Volt-VAR Optimization technologies. In addition to the basic methodology, the paper will present a summary of results, and observations, from two separate Volt-VAR Optimization field evaluations using the proposed method.

  5. An Elegant Mind: Learning and Memory in "Caenorhabditis elegans"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardiel, Evan L.; Rankin, Catharine H.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on learning and memory in the soil-dwelling nematode "Caenorhabditis elegans." Paradigms include nonassociative learning, associative learning, and imprinting, as worms have been shown to habituate to mechanical and chemical stimuli, as well as learn the smells, tastes, temperatures, and oxygen levels that…

  6. A Method for Culturing Embryonic C. elegans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sangaletti, Rachele; Bianchi, Laura

    2013-01-01

    C. elegans is a powerful model system, in which genetic and molecular techniques are easily applicable. Until recently though, techniques that require direct access to cells and isolation of specific cell types, could not be applied in C. elegans. This limitation was due to the fact that tissues are confined within a pressurized cuticle which is not easily digested by treatment with enzymes and/or detergents. Based on early pioneer work by Laird Bloom, Christensen and colleagues 1 developed a robust method for culturing C. elegans embryonic cells in large scale. Eggs are isolated from gravid adults by treatment with bleach/NaOH and subsequently treated with chitinase to remove the eggshells. Embryonic cells are then dissociated by manual pipetting and plated onto substrate-covered glass in serum-enriched media. Within 24 hr of isolation cells begin to differentiate by changing morphology and by expressing cell specific markers. C. elegans cells cultured using this method survive for up 2 weeks in vitro and have been used for electrophysiological, immunochemical, and imaging analyses as well as they have been sorted and used for microarray profiling. PMID:24084243

  7. Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a Model for Obesity Pharmacology Development.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jolene; Vasselli, Joseph R; King, Jason F; King, Michael L; We, Wenqian; Fitzpatrick, Zachary; Johnson, William D; Finley, John W; Martin, Roy J; Keenan, Michael J; Enright, Frederic M; Greenway, Frank L

    2014-05-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans model is a rapid and inexpensive method to address pharmacologic questions. We describe the use of C. elegans to explore 2 pharmacologic questions concerning candidate antiobesity drugs and illustrate its potential usefulness in pharmacologic research: (1) to determine a ratio of betahistine-olanzapine that blocks the olanzapine-induced intestinal fat deposition (IFD) as detected by Nile red staining and (2) to identify the mechanism of action of a pharmaceutical candidate AB-101 that reduces IFD. Olanzapine (53 ?g/mL) increased the IFD (12.1 ± 0.1%, P < 0.02), which was blocked by betahistine (763 ?g/mL, 39.3 ± 0.01%, P < 0.05) in wild-type C. elegans (N2). AB-101 (1.0%) reduced the IFD in N2 (P < 0.05), increased the pharyngeal pumping rate (P < 0.05), and reversed the elevated IFD induced by protease inhibitors atazanavir and ritonavir (P < 0.05). AB-101 did not affect IFD in a ACS null mutant strain acs-4(ok2872) III/hT2[bli-4(e937) let-?(q782) qIs48](I;III) suggesting an involvement of the lipid oxidation pathway and an upregulation of CPT-1. Our studies suggest that C. elegans may be used as a resource in pharmacologic research. This article is intended to stimulate a greater appreciation of its value in the development of new pharmaceutical interventions. PMID:24786852

  8. Silicon-inducible defenses of Zinnia elegans against Myzus persicae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several examples exist of silicon (Si) amendment inducing plant chemical defenses against plant pathogens, but few studies have focused on Si-induced defenses against phloem-feeding herbivores. The current study examined Si treatment of Zinnia elegans Jacq. cv. Oklahoma White (Compositae) on the pe...

  9. Concentration dependent differential activity of signalling molecules in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Caenorhabditis elegans employs specific glycosides of the dideoxysugar ascarylose (the ‘ascarosides’) for monitoring population density/ dauer formation and finding mates. A synergistic blend of three ascarosides, called ascr#2, ascr#3 and ascr#4 acts as a dauer pheromone at a high concentration na...

  10. Identification of an estrogenic hormone receptor in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Mimoto, Ai; Fujii, Madoka; Usami, Makoto; Shimamura, Maki; Hirabayashi, Naoko; Kaneko, Takako; Sasagawa, Noboru; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2007-12-28

    Changes in both behavior and gene expression occur in Caenorhabditis elegans following exposure to sex hormones such as estrogen and progesterone, and to bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogenic endocrine-disrupting compound. However, only one steroid hormone receptor has been identified. Of the 284 known nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) in C. elegans, we selected nhr-14, nhr-69, and nhr-121 for analysis as potential estrogenic hormone receptors, because they share sequence similarity with the human estrogen receptor. First, the genes were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and then the affinity of each protein for estrogen was determined using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. All three NHRs bound estrogen in a dose-dependent fashion. To evaluate the specificity of the binding, we performed a solution competition assay using an SPR biosensor. According to our results, only NHR-14 was able to interact with estrogen. Therefore, we next examined whether nhr-14 regulates estrogen signaling in vivo. To investigate whether these interactions actually control the response of C. elegans to hormones, we investigated the expression of vitellogenin, an estrogen responsive gene, in an nhr-14 mutant. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that vitellogenin expression was significantly reduced in the mutant. This suggests that NHR-14 is a C. elegans estrogenic hormone receptor and that it controls gene expression in response to estrogen.

  11. C. elegans condensin promotes mitotic chromosome architecture, centromere

    E-print Network

    Meyer, Barbara

    Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3204, USA Chromosome segregation and X-chromosome with different protein partners. To repress gene expression, MIX-1 acts in an X-chromosome complex that resemblesC. elegans condensin promotes mitotic chromosome architecture, centromere organization, and sister

  12. Tomosyn Inhibits Synaptic Vesicle Priming in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Gracheva, Elena O.; Burdina, Anna O.; Holgado, Andrea M.; Berthelot-Grosjean, Martine; Ackley, Brian D.; Hadwiger, Gayla; Nonet, Michael L.; Weimer, Robby M.; Richmond, Janet E.

    2006-07-25

    in vivo, we analyzed C. elegans tom-1 mutants. Our electrophysiological analysis indicates that evoked postsynaptic responses at tom-1 mutant synapses are prolonged leading to a two-fold increase in total charge transfer. The enhanced response in tom-1...

  13. METABOLISM OF AN INSECT NEUROPEPTIDE BY THE NEMATODE C. ELEGANS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are interested in neuropeptides in nematodes as leads to new control agents for parasitic nematodes. This includes physiological aspects of neuropeptide action and metabolic regulation of these peptides. The free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, with its mapped genome, offers unique opport...

  14. Glianeuron interactions in the nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Shaham, Shai

    of C. elegans have revealed a connection between glial ensheathment of neurons and tubulogenesis, have of vertebrate nervous systems described glia as integral components of neural tissue [1], and it was recognized that glia provide essential nutritive and growth signals for neurons [6]. Put simply, in the absence of glia

  15. Caenorhabditis elegans glia modulate neuronal activity and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Stout Jr., Randy F.; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Glial cells of Caenorhabditis elegans can modulate neuronal activity and behavior, which is the focus of this review. Initially, we provide an overview of neuroglial evolution, making a comparison between C. elegans glia and their genealogical counterparts. What follows is a brief discussion on C. elegans glia characteristics in terms of their exact numbers, germ layers origin, their necessity for proper development of sensory organs, and lack of their need for neuronal survival. The more specific roles that various glial cells have on neuron-based activity/behavior are succinctly presented. The cephalic sheath glia are important for development, maintenance and activity of central synapses, whereas the amphid glia seem to set the tone of sensory synapses; these glial cell types are ectoderm-derived. Mesoderm-derived Glial-Like cells in the nerve Ring (GLRs) appear to be a part of the circuit for production of motor movement of the worm anterior. Finally, we discuss tools and approaches utilized in studying C. elegans glia, which are assets available for this animal, making it an appealing model, not only in neurosciences, but in biology in general. PMID:24672428

  16. New antibacterial pentacyclic triterpenes from Myricaria elegans Royle. (tamariscineae).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Manzoor; Ahmad, Waqar; Khan, Salimullah; Zeeshan, Muhammad; Obaidullah; Nisar, Muhammad; Shaheen, Farzana; Ahmad, Mansoor

    2008-12-01

    Two new pentacyclic triterpenes eleganene-A (1) and eleganene-B (2), along with four known pentacyclic triterpenes betulin (3), ursolic acid (4), erythrodiol (5) and corosolic acid (6) were isolated from the aerial parts of Myricaria elegans. These compounds exhibited significant antibacterial activity. The structure of compounds 1 and 2 were deduced on the basis of their spectral analysis. PMID:18608775

  17. Phomalactone from a phytopathogenic fungus infecting Zinnia elegans (Asteraceae) leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinnia elegans plants are infected by a fungus that causes necrosis with dark red spots particularly in late spring to the middle of summer in the Mid-South part of the United States. This fungal disease when untreated causes the leaves to wilt and eventually kills the plant. The fungus was isolated...

  18. Laser Microsurgery in Caenorhabditis elegans Christopher Fang-Yen*

    E-print Network

    . Identifying Cells in C. elegans III. Laser Ablation Theory and Apparatus A. Tissue Damage by Nanosecond cells of the somatic gonad causes premature differ- entiation of the germ line, showing a role for the somatic gonad in maintenance of the germ line in an undifferentiated state (Kimble and White, 1981

  19. INTRODUCTION The worm Caenorhabditis elegans generally employs three types

    E-print Network

    Mahadevan, L.

    1554 INTRODUCTION The worm Caenorhabditis elegans generally employs three types of crawling modes reorientations. However, in the presence of attractants, worms are able to track gradients using a biased random in the absence of food, worms also exhibit a large number of small angle turns by forming higher or lower

  20. Biophysical and biological meanings of healthspan from C. elegans cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Suda, Hitoshi

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • We focus on a third factor, noise, as well as on genetic and environmental factors. • C. elegans fed a healthy food had an extended healthspan as compared to those fed a conventional diet. • An amplification of ATP noise was clearly evident from around the onset of biodemographic aging. • The extension of timing of noise amplification may contribute to effectively extending the healthspan. • The same mechanism of the mean lifespan extension in C. elegans may be realized in humans. - Abstract: Lifespan among individuals ranges widely in organisms from yeast to mammals, even in an isogenic cohort born in a nearly uniform environment. Needless to say, genetic and environmental factors are essential for aging and lifespan, but in addition, a third factor or the existence of a stochastic element must be reflected in aging and lifespan. An essential point is that lifespan or aging is an unpredictable phenomenon. The present study focuses on elucidating the biophysical and biological meanings of healthspan that latently indwells a stochastic nature. To perform this purpose, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans served as a model animal. C. elegans fed a healthy food had an extended healthspan as compared to those fed a conventional diet. Then, utilizing this phenomenon, we clarified a mechanism of healthspan extension by measuring the single-worm ATP and estimating the ATP noise (or the variability of the ATP content) among individual worms and by quantitatively analyzing biodemographic data with the lifespan equation that was derived from a fluctuation theory.

  1. Cell-specific proteomic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Schuman, Erin M.

    that permit facile detection, isolation, and visualization of labeled proteins. This strategy has been used methods are needed to enrich, identify, and quantify proteins expressed in specific cells in complex elegans phe- nylalanyl-tRNA synthetase capable of tagging proteins with the reactive noncanonical amino

  2. A pharmacological network for lifespan extension in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaolan; Linton, James M; Schork, Nicholas J; Buck, Linda B; Petrascheck, Michael

    2014-01-01

    One goal of aging research is to find drugs that delay the onset of age-associated disease. Studies in invertebrates, particularly Caenorhabditis elegans, have uncovered numerous genes involved in aging, many conserved in mammals. However, which of these encode proteins suitable for drug targeting is unknown. To investigate this question, we screened a library of compounds with known mammalian pharmacology for compounds that increase C. elegans lifespan. We identified 60 compounds that increase longevity in C. elegans, 33 of which also increased resistance to oxidative stress. Many of these compounds are drugs approved for human use. Enhanced resistance to oxidative stress was associated primarily with compounds that target receptors for biogenic amines, such as dopamine or serotonin. A pharmacological network constructed with these data reveal that lifespan extension and increased stress resistance cluster together in a few pharmacological classes, most involved in intercellular signaling. These studies identify compounds that can now be explored for beneficial effects on aging in mammals, as well as tools that can be used to further investigate the mechanisms underlying aging in C. elegans. PMID:24134630

  3. Molecular Correlates of Genes Exhibiting RNAi Phenotypes in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Good, Jeffrey M.

    . For example, the particularly low rate of evolution of genes in the sterility RNAi phenotype class suggests expect future RNAi studies to reveal phenotypic effects (i.e., false negatives in present screens of molecular evolution, to phenotypic traits for the C. elegans genome. Because proteins are the active

  4. Food sensitizes C. elegans avoidance behaviours through acute dopamine signalling

    E-print Network

    Schafer, William R.

    genetic tools exists for studying behavioural states at the molecular level. One particularly importantFood sensitizes C. elegans avoidance behaviours through acute dopamine signalling Marina Ezcurra1 at NOVUM, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden Many behavioural states are modulated by food avail

  5. BZ UMa and Var Her 04: Orphan TOADS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, A.; Howell, S.

    2005-05-01

    Both BZ UMa and Var Her 04 are cataclysmic variable stars without a home. Neither fit easily into current classification systems so may extend the population distribution of two unique CV types: UGWZ dwarf novae and intermediate polars. New outburst photometry and archival X-Ray data shed some new light on BZ UMa's high energy state and new spectral and IR observations from Spitzer of dust around the newly discovered cataclysmic variable Var Her 04 may help find it a home as well.

  6. Natural environmental sources of Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii.

    PubMed Central

    Sorrell, T C; Brownlee, A G; Ruma, P; Malik, R; Pfeiffer, T J; Ellis, D H

    1996-01-01

    We sought evidence for new environmental sources of Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis of isolates from 29 animals with a restricted territorial range in five Australian states. Twenty-three of the 29 isolates and 45 of 45 eucalypt isolates tested previously exhibited one RAPD profile, VGI. RAPD profile VGII was identified in 6 of 17 isolates from domesticated species but in none of 12 native species. Four VGII isolates originated from an area of Western Australia with no natural stands of known eucalypt host, indicating the existence of at least one unrecognized natural source of C. neoformans var. gattii. PMID:8727913

  7. The VarS/VarA two-component system modulates the activity of the Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing transcriptional regulator HapR.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Amy M; Liu, Zhi; Cai, Tao; Zhu, Jun

    2011-06-01

    The human pathogen Vibrio cholerae uses quorum sensing to regulate the expression of a number of phenotypes, including virulence factor production, in response to changes in cell density. It produces small molecules called autoinducers that increase in concentration as cell density increases, and these autoinducers bind to membrane sensors once they reach a certain threshold. This binding leads to signalling through a downstream phosphorelay pathway to alter the expression of the transcriptional regulator HapR. Previously, it was shown that the VarS/VarA two-component system acts on a component of the phosphorelay pathway upstream of HapR to regulate HapR expression levels. Here, we show that in addition to this mechanism of regulation, VarS and VarA also indirectly modulate HapR protein activity. This modulation is mediated by the small RNA CsrB but is independent of the known quorum-sensing system that links the autoinducers to HapR. Thus, the VarS/VarA two-component system intersects with the quorum-sensing network at two levels. In both cases, the effect of VarS and VarA on quorum sensing is dependent on the Csr small RNAs, which regulate carbon metabolism, suggesting that V. cholerae may integrate nutrient status and cell density sensory inputs to tailor its gene expression profile more precisely to surrounding conditions. PMID:21393367

  8. A gene expression fingerprint of C. elegans embryonic motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Rebecca M; Von Stetina, Stephen E; Barlow, Susan J; Shaffer, Christian; Olszewski, Kellen L; Moore, Jason H; Dupuy, Denis; Vidal, Marc; Miller, David M

    2005-01-01

    Background Differential gene expression specifies the highly diverse cell types that constitute the nervous system. With its sequenced genome and simple, well-defined neuroanatomy, the nematode C. elegans is a useful model system in which to correlate gene expression with neuron identity. The UNC-4 transcription factor is expressed in thirteen embryonic motor neurons where it specifies axonal morphology and synaptic function. These cells can be marked with an unc-4::GFP reporter transgene. Here we describe a powerful strategy, Micro-Array Profiling of C. elegans cells (MAPCeL), and confirm that this approach provides a comprehensive gene expression profile of unc-4::GFP motor neurons in vivo. Results Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) was used to isolate unc-4::GFP neurons from primary cultures of C. elegans embryonic cells. Microarray experiments detected 6,217 unique transcripts of which ~1,000 are enriched in unc-4::GFP neurons relative to the average nematode embryonic cell. The reliability of these data was validated by the detection of known cell-specific transcripts and by expression in UNC-4 motor neurons of GFP reporters derived from the enriched data set. In addition to genes involved in neurotransmitter packaging and release, the microarray data include transcripts for receptors to a remarkably wide variety of signaling molecules. The added presence of a robust array of G-protein pathway components is indicative of complex and highly integrated mechanisms for modulating motor neuron activity. Over half of the enriched genes (537) have human homologs, a finding that could reflect substantial overlap with the gene expression repertoire of mammalian motor neurons. Conclusion We have described a microarray-based method, MAPCeL, for profiling gene expression in specific C. elegans motor neurons and provide evidence that this approach can reveal candidate genes for key roles in the differentiation and function of these cells. These methods can now be applied to generate a gene expression map of the C. elegans nervous system. PMID:15780142

  9. Together or alone?: foraging strategies in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Boender, Arjen J; Roubos, Eric W; van der Velde, Gerard

    2011-11-01

    A central goal in Life Sciences is to understand how genes encode behaviour and how environmental factors influence the expression of the genes concerned. To reach this goal a combined ecological, molecular biological and physiological approach is required in combination with a suitable model organism. Such an approach allows the elucidation of all parts of the complicated chain of events that lead from induction of gene expression to behaviour, i.e. from environmental stimulus, sensory organs and extracellular and intracellular neuronal signal processing to activation of effector organs. A particularly good model species with which to take this approach is the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, as it has been described in great detail at the genomic, cellular and behavioural levels. Different strains of C. elegans display prominent behavioural variation in foraging behaviour. Some strains will form social feeding groups when subjected to certain environmental stimuli, while others do not. This variation is due to the existence of just two isoforms of the gene npr-1, namely 215F and 215V. Here, we describe these behavioural variations at the molecular and cellular levels to attempt to determine the environmental inputs that cause aggregation of these small nematodes. As many different stimuli affect aggregation either positively or negatively, aggregation behaviour seems to be displayed when it improves survival chances. However, not much is known about the ecological context in which C. elegans lives. Investigation of the habitats of different strains of C. elegans would help us to understand why and how a specific foraging strategy enhances survival. The relatively well-understood molecular pathways that direct its social feeding behaviour make C. elegans a highly suitable model organism to test ecological and behavioural hypotheses about the mechanisms that differentiate between aggregation and solitary behaviours. PMID:21314888

  10. Characterization of the arginine kinase isoforms in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Dean; Aryal, Manish; Hall, Joseph E; Rae, Evan; Snider, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Phosphagen kinases (PKs) are well-studied enzymes involved in energy homeostasis in a wide range of animal, protozoan, and even some bacterial species. Recent genome efforts have allowed comparative work on the PKs to extend beyond the biochemistry of individual proteins to the comparative cellular physiology and examining of the role of all PK family members in an organism. The sequencing of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome and availability of sophisticated genetic tools within that system affords the opportunity to conduct a detailed physiological analysis of the PKs from a well known invertebrate for comparison with the extensive work conducted on vertebrate systems. As a first step in this effort we have carried out a detailed molecular genetic and biochemical characterization of the PKs in C. elegans. Our results reveal that C. elegans has five PK genes encoding arginine kinases that range in catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM(Arg)) from (3.1±0.6)×10(4) to (9±4)×10(5) M(-1) s(-1). This range is generally within the range seen for arginine kinases from a variety of species. Our molecular genetic and phylogenetic analysis reveals that the gene family has undergone extensive intron loss and gain within the suborder Rhabditina. In addition, within C. elegans we find evidence of gene duplication and loss. The analysis described here for the C. elegans AKs represents one of the most complete biochemical and molecular genetic analysis of a PK family within a genetically tractable invertebrate system and opens up the possibility of conducting detailed physiological comparisons with vertebrate systems using the sophisticated tools available with this model invertebrate system. PMID:25981702

  11. MicroRNA binding sites in C. elegans 3' UTRs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaochun; Rennie, William A; Mallick, Bibekanand; Kanoria, Shaveta; Long, Dang; Wolenc, Adam; Carmack, C Steven; Ding, Ye

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Since the discovery of lin-4, the founding member of the miRNA family, over 360 miRNAs have been identified for Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Prediction and validation of targets are essential for elucidation of regulatory functions of these miRNAs. For C. elegans, crosslinking immunoprecipitation (CLIP) has been successfully performed for the identification of target mRNA sequences bound by Argonaute protein ALG-1. In addition, reliable annotation of the 3' untranslated regions (3' UTRs) as well as developmental stage-specific expression profiles for both miRNAs and 3' UTR isoforms are available. By utilizing these data, we developed statistical models and bioinformatics tools for both transcriptome-scale and developmental stage-specific predictions of miRNA binding sites in C. elegans 3' UTRs. In performance evaluation via cross validation on the ALG-1 CLIP data, the models were found to offer major improvements over established algorithms for predicting both seed sites and seedless sites. In particular, our top-ranked predictions have a substantially higher true positive rate, suggesting a much higher likelihood of positive experimental validation. A gene ontology analysis of stage-specific predictions suggests that miRNAs are involved in dynamic regulation of biological functions during C. elegans development. In particular, miRNAs preferentially target genes related to development, cell cycle, trafficking, and cell signaling processes. A database for both transcriptome-scale and stage-specific predictions and software for implementing the prediction models are available through the Sfold web server at http://sfold.wadsworth.org. PMID:24827614

  12. SKN-1/Nrf, stress responses, and aging in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, T Keith; Steinbaugh, Michael J; Hourihan, John M; Ewald, Collin Y; Isik, Meltem

    2015-11-01

    The mammalian Nrf/CNC proteins (Nrf1, Nrf2, Nrf3, p45 NF-E2) perform a wide range of cellular protective and maintenance functions. The most thoroughly described of these proteins, Nrf2, is best known as a regulator of antioxidant and xenobiotic defense, but more recently has been implicated in additional functions that include proteostasis and metabolic regulation. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which offers many advantages for genetic analyses, the Nrf/CNC proteins are represented by their ortholog SKN-1. Although SKN-1 has diverged in aspects of how it binds DNA, it exhibits remarkable functional conservation with Nrf/CNC proteins in other species and regulates many of the same target gene families. C. elegans may therefore have considerable predictive value as a discovery model for understanding how mammalian Nrf/CNC proteins function and are regulated in vivo. Work in C. elegans indicates that SKN-1 regulation is surprisingly complex and is influenced by numerous growth, nutrient, and metabolic signals. SKN-1 is also involved in a wide range of homeostatic functions that extend well beyond the canonical Nrf2 function in responses to acute stress. Importantly, SKN-1 plays a central role in diverse genetic and pharmacologic interventions that promote C. elegans longevity, suggesting that mechanisms regulated by SKN-1 may be of conserved importance in aging. These C. elegans studies predict that mammalian Nrf/CNC protein functions and regulation may be similarly complex and that the proteins and processes that they regulate are likely to have a major influence on mammalian life- and healthspan. PMID:26232625

  13. STATIC VAR COMPENSATOR CONTROL USING A QUANTIZED CONTROLLER FOR A TWO AREA MULTI-MACHINE SYSTEM

    E-print Network

    Wilamowski, Bogdan Maciej

    the tuning process []. Static VAR Compensators (SVC) provides rapid control of the susceptance and in turnSTATIC VAR COMPENSATOR CONTROL USING A QUANTIZED CONTROLLER FOR A TWO AREA MULTI-MACHINE SYSTEM control. This paper conduct a preliminary study on using the quantized controller in the Static VAR

  14. Optimality of 4D-Var and its relationship with the Kalman lter and Kalman smoother

    E-print Network

    Optimality of 4D-Var and its relationship with the Kalman #12;lter and Kalman smoother Zhijin Li-Var and the Kalman #12;lter as well as the #12;xed-interval Kalman smoother point to particular optimal properties irrespective of whether the model is perfect or not. Various properties of equivalence of 4D-Var to the Kalman

  15. Transcriptome analysis of antigenic variation in Plasmodium falciparum - var silencing is not dependent on antisense RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Stuart A; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Mattei, Denise; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Guigon, Ghislaine; Coppee, Jean-Yves; David, Peter H; Scherf, Artur

    2005-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most severe form of malaria, undergoes antigenic variation through successive presentation of a family of antigens on the surface of parasitized erythrocytes. These antigens, known as Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) proteins, are subject to a mutually exclusive expression system, and are encoded by the multigene var family. The mechanism whereby inactive var genes are silenced is poorly understood. To investigate transcriptional features of this mechanism, we conducted a microarray analysis of parasites that were selected to express different var genes by adhesion to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) or CD36. Results In addition to oligonucleotides for all predicted protein-coding genes, oligonucleotide probes specific to each known var gene of the FCR3 background were designed and added to the microarray, as well as tiled sense and antisense probes for a subset of var genes. In parasites selected for adhesion to CSA, one full-length var gene (var2csa) was strongly upregulated, as were sense RNA molecules emanating from the 3' end of a limited subset of other var genes. No global relationship between sense and antisense production of var genes was observed, but notably, some var genes had coincident high levels of both antisense and sense transcript. Conclusion Mutually exclusive expression of PfEMP1 proteins results from transcriptional silencing of non-expressed var genes. The distribution of steady-state sense and antisense RNA at var loci are not consistent with a silencing mechanism based on antisense silencing of inactive var genes. Silencing of var loci is also associated with altered regulation of genes distal to var loci. PMID:16277748

  16. Indolizidine, Antiinfective and Antiparasitic Compounds from Prosopis glandulosa var. glandulosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prosopilosidine, a new potent antiinfective and antiparasitic 2,3-dihydro-1H-indolizinium chloride, (1), was isolated from Prosopis glandulosa Torr. var. glandulosa. Furthermore, three additional new and one known indolizidines, prosopilosine (2), isoprosopilosine (3), isoprosopilosidine (4) and jul...

  17. A static VAR compensator using a superconducting coil

    SciTech Connect

    Boenig, H.; Cibulka, F.

    1982-10-01

    A superconducting coil has virtually no losses for a dc current. To utilize this feature in a static VAR compensator application the conventional conversion equipment between the three phase system and the coil must be modified to obtain variable ac currents with a constant coil current. In the description of a recently introduced control scheme of a bridge converter it is shown that by the method of variable free-wheeling the line currents of a converter can be made variable while the coil current remains nearly constant. In this paper the novel static VAR circuit, called SAVAR (Superconductor Application for VAR control) is analyzed, and some derived voltage and current shapes are compared with experimental results. A 40 MVA SAVAR system, including the appropriate harmonic filters, is designed and compared technically and economically with a conventional static VAR generator. It is concluded that the dynamic characteristics of the SAVAR circuit satisfy the requirements of the voltage support operation in electric utility systems. At this time the economic advantages of a SAVAR system are marginal. However, continuing improvements in thyristor ratings and expected increases in energy cost are factors which could give additional economic benefits to SAVAR in the future.

  18. [Studies on the chemical constituents of Citrus medica var. sarcodactylis].

    PubMed

    Gao, Youheng; Huang, Haibo; Xu, Honghua; Diao, Yuanming; Dong, Zheng

    2002-09-01

    Three compounds were isolated from Citrus medica L. var. sarcodactylis (Noot) Swingle. The structures were identified as limettin(I), stigmasta-5, 22-dien-3-ol(II) and palmilic acid(III) on the basis of UV, MS, IR, 1HNMR, 13CNMR and DEPT. PMID:12451974

  19. New cyclic peptides from Citrus medica var. sarcodactylis SWINGLE.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Teruki; Nishimura, Koichi; Takeya, Koichi

    2002-06-01

    Two new cyclic peptides were isolated from the fruit peels of Citrus medica var. sarcodactylis SWINGLE. Their structures were elucidated as cyclo(-Gly-Asp-Leu-Thr-Val-Tyr-Phe-) and cyclo(-Gly-Leu-Pro-Trp-Leu-Ile-Ala-Ala-) by intensive two-dimensional (2D) NMR analysis and chemical evidence. PMID:12045349

  20. Wnt and EGF pathways act together to induce C. elegans male hook development

    E-print Network

    Sternberg, Paul W.

    Comparative studies of vulva development between Caenorhabditis elegans and other nematode species have provided some insight into the evolution of patterning networks. However, molecular genetic details are available ...

  1. 4D-Var or Ensemble Kalman Filter?4D-Var or Ensemble Kalman Filter? Eugenia Kalnay, Shu-Chih Yang, Hong Li, Junjie

    E-print Network

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    4D-Var or Ensemble Kalman Filter?4D-Var or Ensemble Kalman Filter? Eugenia Kalnay, Shu-Chih Yang.atmos.umd.edu/^ekalnay #12;Outline · 4D-Var or EnKF? Lorenc (2003, 2004) · Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (Hunt et al Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (Ott et al, 2004, Hunt et al, 2004, 2007) · Model independent (black box

  2. Propulsion by sinusoidal locomotion: A motion inspired by Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Xialing

    Sinusoidal locomotion is commonly seen in snakes, fish, nematodes, or even the wings of some birds and insects. This doctoral thesis presents the study of sinusoidal locomotion of the nematode C. elegans in experiments and the application of the state-space airloads theory to the theoretical forces of sinusoidal motion. An original MATLAB program has been developed to analyze the video records of C. elegans' movement in different fluids, including Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. The experimental and numerical studies of swimming C. elegans has revealed three conclusions. First, though the amplitude and wavelength are varying with time, the motion of swimming C. elegans can still be viewed as sinusoidal locomotion with slips. The average normalized wavelength is a conserved character of the locomotion for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. Second, fluid viscosity affects the frequency but not the moving speed of C. elegans, while fluid elasticity affects the moving speed but not the frequency. Third, by the resistive force theory, for more elastic fluids the ratio of resistive coefficients becomes smaller. Inspired by the motion of C. elegans and other animals performing sinusoidal motion, we investigated the sinusoidal motion of a thin flexible wing in theory. Given the equation of the motion, we have derived the closed forms of propulsive force, lift and other generalized forces applying on the wing. We also calculated the power required to perform the motion, the power lost due to the shed vortices and the propulsive efficiency. These forces and powers are given as functions of reduced frequency k, dimensionless wavelength z, dimensionless amplitude A/b, and time. Our results show that a positive, time-averaged propulsive force is produced for all k>k0=pi/ z. At k=k0, which implies the moment when the moving speed of the wing is the same as the wave speed of its undulation, the motion reaches a steady state with all forces being zero. If there were no shed vorticity effects, the propulsive force would be zero at z = 0.569 and z = 1.3 for all k, and for a fixed k the wing would gain the optimal propulsive force when z = 0.82. With the effects of shed vorticity, the propulsive efficiency decreases from 1.0 to 0.5 as k goes to infinity, and the propulsive efficiency increases almost in a linear relationship with k0.

  3. Amanitin and phallotoxin concentration in Amanita phalloides var. alba mushroom.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Ertugrul; Yilmaz, Ismail; Sinirlioglu, Zeynep Aydin; Karahan, Selim; Bayram, Recep; Yaykasli, Kursat Oguz; Colakoglu, Serdar; Saritas, Ayhan; Severoglu, Zeki

    2013-12-15

    Although rarely seen, Amanita phalloides var. alba, a variety of A. phalloides type mushrooms, causes mushroom poisoning resulting in death. Since it is frequently confused with some edible mushrooms due to its white colored cap and macroscopic appearance, it becomes important in toxicological terms. Knowledge of the toxin amount contained in this mushroom type is invaluable in the treatment of cases involving poisoning. In this study, we examined the toxin levels of various parts of the A. phalloides var. alba mushroom growing Duzce region of Turkey. Toxin analyses were carried out for A. phalloides var. alba, which were collected from the forests Duzce region of Turkey in 2011, as a whole and also separately in its spore, pileus, gills, stipe and volva parts. The alpha amanitin, beta amanitin, gamma amanitin, phalloidin and phallacidine analyses of the mushrooms were carried out using the RP-HPLC method. A genetic analysis of the mushroom showed that it had similar genetic characteristics as A. phalloides and was a variety of it. The lowest toxins quantity was detected in spores, volva and stipe among all parts of the mushroom. The maximum amount of amatoxins was measured in the gills. The pileus also contained a high amount of amatoxins. Generally, amatoxins and phallotoxin concentrations were lower as compared to A. phalloides, but interestingly all toxins other than gamma toxin were higher in the spores of A. phalloides var. alba. The amount of toxin in all of its parts had sufficient concentrations to cause death. With this study, the amatoxin and phallotoxin concentrations in A. phalloides var. alba mushroom and in its parts have been revealed in detail for the first time. PMID:24139877

  4. Plasmodium falciparum var gene expression is modified by host immunity.

    PubMed

    Warimwe, George M; Keane, Thomas M; Fegan, Gregory; Musyoki, Jennifer N; Newton, Charles R J C; Pain, Arnab; Berriman, Matthew; Marsh, Kevin; Bull, Peter C

    2009-12-22

    Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is a potentially important family of immune targets, which play a central role in the host-parasite interaction by binding to various host molecules. They are encoded by a diverse family of genes called var, of which there are approximately 60 copies in each parasite genome. In sub-Saharan Africa, although P. falciparum infection occurs throughout life, severe malarial disease tends to occur only in childhood. This could potentially be explained if (i) PfEMP1 variants differ in their capacity to support pathogenesis of severe malaria and (ii) this capacity is linked to the likelihood of each molecule being recognized and cleared by naturally acquired antibodies. Here, in a study of 217 Kenyan children with malaria, we show that expression of a group of var genes "cys2," containing a distinct pattern of cysteine residues, is associated with low host immunity. Expression of cys2 genes was associated with parasites from young children, those with severe malaria, and those with a poorly developed antibody response to parasite-infected erythrocyte surface antigens. Cys-2 var genes form a minor component of all genomic var repertoires analyzed to date. Therefore, the results are compatible with the hypothesis that the genomic var gene repertoire is organized such that PfEMP1 molecules that confer the most virulence to the parasite tend also to be those that are most susceptible to the development of host immunity. This may help the parasite to adapt effectively to the development of host antibodies through modification of the host-parasite relationship. PMID:20018734

  5. Chemopreventive and Anticancer Activities of Allium victorialis var. platyphyllum Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Park, Min Jeong; Park, Hee-Juhn; Chung, Won-Yoon; Kim, Ki-Rim; Park, Kwang-Kyun

    2014-01-01

    Background: Allium victorialis var. platyphyllum is an edible perennial herb and has been used as a vegetable or as a Korean traditional medicine. Allium species have received much attention owing to their diverse pharmacological properties, including antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities. However, A. victorialis var. platyphyllum needs more study. Methods: The chemopreventive potential of A. victorialis var. platyphyllum methanol extracts was examined by measuring 12-O-tetra-decanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-induced superoxide anion production in the differentiated HL-60 cells, TPA-induced mouse ear edema, and Ames/Salmonella mutagenicity. The apoptosis-inducing capabilities of the extracts were evaluated by the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay, 4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining, and the DNA fragmentation assay in human colon cancer HT-29 cells. Antimetastatic activities of the extracts were also investigated in an experimental mouse lung metastasis model. Results: The methanol extracts of A. victorialis var. platyphyllum rhizome (AVP-R) and A. victorialis var. platyphyllum stem (AVP-S) dose-dependently inhibited the TPA-induced generation of superoxide anion in HL-60 cells and TPA-induced ear edema in mice, as well as 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH) -induced bacterial mutagenesis. AVP-R and AVP-S reduced cell viability in a dose-related manner and induced apoptotic morphological changes and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in HT-29 cells. In the experimental mouse lung metastasis model, the formation of tumor nodules in lung tissue was significantly inhibited by the treatment of the extracts. Conclusions: AVP-R and AVP-S possess antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic, proapoptotic, and antimetastatic activities. Therefore, these extracts can serve as a beneficial supplement for the prevention and treatment of cancer. PMID:25337587

  6. Determination of Re(. var epsilon. prime /. var epsilon. ) by the simultaneous detection of the four K sub L , S r arrow. pi. pi. decay modes

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.R.; Barker, A.; Briere, R.A.; Gibbons, L.K.; Makoff, G.; Papadimitriou, V.; Somalwar, S.; Wah, Y.W.; Winstein, B.; Winston, R.; Woods, M.; Yamamoto, H. The Department of Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 ); Swallow, E. Department of Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 ); Bock, G.J.; Coleman, R.; Enagonio, J.; Hsiung, Y.B.; Stanfield, K.; Stefanski, R.; Yamanaka, T. ); Blair, G.; Gollin, G.D.; Karlsson, M.; Okamitsu, J.K.; Tschirhart, R. ); Brisson, J.C.; Debu, P.; Peyaud, B.; Turlay, R.; Vallage, B. (Department de Physique des Particules Elementaires, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette CEDEX,

    1990-03-26

    The E731 experiment at Fermilab has searched for direct {ital CP} violation in {ital K}{sup 0}{r arrow}{pi}{pi}, which is parametrized by {var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon}. For the first time all four of the {ital K}{sub {ital L},}{ital S}{r arrow}{pi}{pi} modes were collected simultaneously, which greatly facilitated studies of systematic uncertainty. We find Re({var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon})={minus}0.0004{plus minus}0.0014(stat){plus minus}0.0006(syst). The result provides no evidence for direct {ital CP} violation.

  7. EXC-5 Controls Intracellular Trafficking in Order to Maintain the Apical Structure of the C. elegans Excretory Canal

    E-print Network

    Mattingly, Brendan Christopher

    2011-04-26

    The goal of this work is to understand how cells form and maintain tubular shapes. The protein EXC-5 is necessary for a small tubular structure in Caenorhabditis elegans to maintain its shape. C. elegans is a small, easily ...

  8. C.V. Riley’s lost aphids: Siphonophora fragariae var. immaculata and Aphis rapae var. laevigata (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The syntypes of Siphonophora fragariae var. immaculata Riley were rediscovered in the Aphidoidea collection of the United States of America National Museum of Natural History. Previously, S. fragariae immaculata was largely lost and forgotten. Through examination of the specimens, we hereby establ...

  9. Global genetic diversity and evolution of var genes associated with placental and severe childhood malaria.

    PubMed

    Trimnell, Adama R; Kraemer, Susan M; Mukherjee, Sandeep; Phippard, David J; Janes, Joel H; Flamoe, Eric; Su, Xin-zhuan; Awadalla, Philip; Smith, Joseph D

    2006-08-01

    In Plasmodium falciparum, var genes encode adhesive proteins that are transported to the surface of infected erythrocytes and act as major virulence determinants for infected erythrocyte binding and immune evasion. Var genes are highly diverse and can be classified into five major groups (UpsA, B, C, D, and E). Previous serological studies have suggested that the UpsA var group may contain common antigenic types that have important roles in severe childhood malaria. Here, our analysis found that UpsA vars are highly diverse between 22 world-wide parasite isolates, although they could be grouped into two broad clusters that may be separately recombining. By comparison, orthologs of the UpsA-linked Type 3 var and UpsE-linked var2csa were detected in nearly all parasite isolates, and a var2csa ortholog was also present in a chimpanzee malaria P. reichenowi that diverged from P. falciparum approximately 5-7 million years ago. Although the specific function of Type 3 var genes is unknown, var2csa is a leading candidate for a pregnancy associated malaria vaccine. Compared to typical var genes, var2csa is unusually conserved but still had only 54-94% amino acid identity in extracellular binding regions. However, var2csa alleles have extensive gene mosaicism within polymorphic blocks that are shared between world-wide parasite isolates and recognizable in P. rechenowi suggesting a high rate of self-self recombination and an ancient and globally-related pool of var2csa polymorphism. These studies aid our understanding of the evolutionary mechanisms that shape var diversity and will be important to the development of vaccines against pregnancy associated malaria and severe malaria. PMID:16697476

  10. Tools and methods to analyze autophagy in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Jenzer, Céline; Simionato, Elena; Legouis, Renaud

    2015-03-01

    For a long time, autophagy has been mainly studied in yeast or mammalian cell lines, and assays for analyzing autophagy in these models have been well described. More recently, the involvement of autophagy in various physiological functions has been investigated in multicellular organisms. Modification of autophagy flux is involved in developmental processes, resistance to stress conditions, aging, cell death and multiple pathologies. So, the use of animal models is essential to understand these processes in the context of different cell types and during the whole life. For ten years, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as a powerful model to analyze autophagy in physiological or pathological contexts. In this article, we present some of the established approaches and the emerging tools available to monitor and manipulate autophagy in C. elegans, and discuss their advantages and limitations. PMID:25484340

  11. Fucoxanthin increases lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lashmanova, Ekaterina; Proshkina, Ekaterina; Zhikrivetskaya, Svetlana; Shevchenko, Oksana; Marusich, Elena; Leonov, Sergey; Melerzanov, Alex; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Moskalev, Alexey

    2015-10-01

    The pharmacological activation of stress-defense mechanisms is one of the perspective ways to increase human lifespan. The goal of the present study was to study the effects on lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans of two carotenoids: ß-carotene and fucoxanthin, which are bioactive natural substances in human diet. In addition, the effects of carotenoids on the flies survival were studied under stress conditions, including starvation, thermal stress (35°C), oxidative stress (20mM paraquat), as well as locomotor activity, fecundity, and genes expression level. Our results demonstrated lifespan extension of flies by both carotenoids. However, the positive effects on the lifespan of C. elegans were revealed only for fucoxanthin. In presence of carotenoids decreased flies' fecundity, increased spontaneous locomotor activity and resistance to oxidative stress were detected. PMID:26292053

  12. C. elegans as a model for membrane traffic

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Ken; Norris, Anne; Sato, Miyuki; Grant, Barth D.

    2014-01-01

    The counterbalancing action of the endocytosis and secretory pathways maintains a dynamic equilibrium that regulates the composition of the plasma membrane, allowing it to maintain homeostasis and to change rapidly in response to changes in the extracellular environment and/or intracellular metabolism. These pathways are intimately integrated with intercellular signaling systems and play critical roles in all cells. Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have revealed diverse roles of membrane trafficking in physiology and development and have also provided molecular insight into the fundamental mechanisms that direct cargo sorting, vesicle budding, and membrane fisson and fusion. In this review, we summarize progress in understanding membrane trafficking mechanisms derived from work in C. elegans, focusing mainly on work done in non-neuronal cell-types, especially the germline, early embryo, coelomocytes, and intestine. PMID:24778088

  13. Caenorhabditis elegans ATAD-3 modulates mitochondrial iron and heme homeostasis.

    PubMed

    van den Ecker, Daniela; Hoffmann, Michael; Müting, Gesine; Maglioni, Silvia; Herebian, Diran; Mayatepek, Ertan; Ventura, Natascia; Distelmaier, Felix

    2015-11-13

    ATAD3 (ATPase family AAA domain-containing protein 3) is a mitochondrial protein, which is essential for cell viability and organismal development. ATAD3 has been implicated in several important cellular processes such as apoptosis regulation, respiratory chain function and steroid hormone biosynthesis. Moreover, altered expression of ATAD3 has been associated with several types of cancer. However, the exact mechanisms underlying ATAD3 effects on cellular metabolism remain largely unclear. Here, we demonstrate that Caenorhabditis elegans ATAD-3 is involved in mitochondrial iron and heme homeostasis. Knockdown of atad-3 caused mitochondrial iron- and heme accumulation. This was paralleled by changes in the expression levels of several iron- and heme-regulatory genes as well as an increased heme uptake. In conclusion, our data indicate a regulatory role of C. elegans ATAD-3 in mitochondrial iron and heme metabolism. PMID:26427876

  14. Sensory regulation of C. elegans male mate-searching behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Arantza; Nurrish, Stephen; Emmons, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    Summary How do animals integrate internal drives and external environmental cues to coordinate behaviours? We address this question studying mate-searching behaviour in C. elegans. C. elgans males explore their environment in search of mates (hermaphrodites) and will leave food if mating partners are absent. However, when mates and food coincide, male exploratory behaviour is suppressed and males are retained on the food source. We show that the drive to explore is stimulated by male specific neurons in the tail, the ray neurons. Periodic contact with the hermaphrodite detected through ray neurons changes the male’s behaviour during periods of no contact and prevents the male from leaving the food source. The hermaphrodite signal is conveyed by male-specific interneurons that are post-synaptic to the rays and that send processes to the major integrative center in the head. This study identifies key parts of the neural circuit that regulates a sexual appetitive behaviour in C. elegans. PMID:19062284

  15. Copyright 2002 by the Genetics Society of America Why Are There Males in the Hermaphroditic Species Caenorhabditis elegans?

    E-print Network

    Chasnov, Jeffrey R.

    -fertilize or be fertilized by males and we perform laboratory observations and experiments on both C. elegans and a related there are opposing selec- These two related species, C. remanei and C. elegans, tive forces. The problem Species Caenorhabditis elegans? J. R. Chasnov* and King L. Chow,1 *Department of Mathematics

  16. Imaging of Up-Conversion Phosphors in C. Elegans

    E-print Network

    Petta, Jason

    transfer #12;Synthesis of Nano-Phosphors Inorganic Chemistry, Vol. 41(23), p6137, 2002. Y(NO3)3 + Yb(NO3 by electron beam (10-30 kV) Chih-Kuan (2005) #12;Sample Preparation Fixed - Dehydrated - Conductive Alcohol dehydration Sputter coat with iridium C. elegansSpecimen preserved between 2 layers of Poly-L-lysine Mount

  17. Biotransformation of fluorene by the fungus Cunninghamella elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Pothuluri, J.V.; Freeman, J.P.; Evans, F.E.; Cerniglia, C.E. )

    1993-06-01

    Fluorene, a tricyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, is formed during the combustion of fossil fuels and is an important pollutant of aquatic ecosystems where it is highly toxic to fish and algae. Few studies on microbial biodegradation of fluorene have been reported. This investigation describes the metabolism of fluorene by the fungus Cunninghamella elegans ATCC 36112 and the identification of major metabolites. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Genomic Analysis of Stress Response against Arsenic in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Surasri N.; Lewis, Jada; Patel, Isha; Bozdag, Serdar; Lee, Jeong H.; Sprando, Robert; Cinar, Hediye Nese

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic, a known human carcinogen, is widely distributed around the world and found in particularly high concentrations in certain regions including Southwestern US, Eastern Europe, India, China, Taiwan and Mexico. Chronic arsenic poisoning affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with increased risk of many diseases including arthrosclerosis, diabetes and cancer. In this study, we explored genome level global responses to high and low levels of arsenic exposure in Caenorhabditis elegans using Affymetrix expression microarrays. This experimental design allows us to do microarray analysis of dose-response relationships of global gene expression patterns. High dose (0.03%) exposure caused stronger global gene expression changes in comparison with low dose (0.003%) exposure, suggesting a positive dose-response correlation. Biological processes such as oxidative stress, and iron metabolism, which were previously reported to be involved in arsenic toxicity studies using cultured cells, experimental animals, and humans, were found to be affected in C. elegans. We performed genome-wide gene expression comparisons between our microarray data and publicly available C. elegans microarray datasets of cadmium, and sediment exposure samples of German rivers Rhine and Elbe. Bioinformatics analysis of arsenic-responsive regulatory networks were done using FastMEDUSA program. FastMEDUSA analysis identified cancer-related genes, particularly genes associated with leukemia, such as dnj-11, which encodes a protein orthologous to the mammalian ZRF1/MIDA1/MPP11/DNAJC2 family of ribosome-associated molecular chaperones. We analyzed the protective functions of several of the identified genes using RNAi. Our study indicates that C. elegans could be a substitute model to study the mechanism of metal toxicity using high-throughput expression data and bioinformatics tools such as FastMEDUSA. PMID:23894281

  19. Antifungal chemical compounds identified using a C. elegans pathogenicity assay.

    PubMed

    Breger, Julia; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Aperis, George; Moy, Terence I; Ausubel, Frederick M; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2007-02-01

    There is an urgent need for the development of new antifungal agents. A facile in vivo model that evaluates libraries of chemical compounds could solve some of the main obstacles in current antifungal discovery. We show that Candida albicans, as well as other Candida species, are ingested by Caenorhabditis elegans and establish a persistent lethal infection in the C. elegans intestinal track. Importantly, key components of Candida pathogenesis in mammals, such as filament formation, are also involved in nematode killing. We devised a Candida-mediated C. elegans assay that allows high-throughput in vivo screening of chemical libraries for antifungal activities, while synchronously screening against toxic compounds. The assay is performed in liquid media using standard 96-well plate technology and allows the study of C. albicans in non-planktonic form. A screen of 1,266 compounds with known pharmaceutical activities identified 15 (approximately 1.2%) that prolonged survival of C. albicans-infected nematodes and inhibited in vivo filamentation of C. albicans. Two compounds identified in the screen, caffeic acid phenethyl ester, a major active component of honeybee propolis, and the fluoroquinolone agent enoxacin exhibited antifungal activity in a murine model of candidiasis. The whole-animal C. elegans assay may help to study the molecular basis of C. albicans pathogenesis and identify antifungal compounds that most likely would not be identified by in vitro screens that target fungal growth. Compounds identified in the screen that affect the virulence of Candida in vivo can potentially be used as "probe compounds" and may have antifungal activity against other fungi. PMID:17274686

  20. Neurotoxic effects of TDP-43 overexpression in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Ash, Peter E A; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Roberts, Christine M; Saldi, Tassa; Hutter, Harald; Buratti, Emanuele; Petrucelli, Leonard; Link, Christopher D

    2010-08-15

    RNA-binding protein TDP-43 has been associated with multiple neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar dementia. We have engineered pan-neuronal expression of human TDP-43 protein in Caenorhabditis elegans, with the goal of generating a convenient in vivo model of TDP-43 function and neurotoxicity. Transgenic worms with the neuronal expression of human TDP-43 exhibit an 'uncoordinated' phenotype and have abnormal motorneuron synapses. Caenorhabditis elegans contains a single putative ortholog of TDP-43, designated TDP-1, which we show can support alternative splicing of CFTR in a cell-based assay. Neuronal overexpression of TDP-1 also results in an uncoordinated phenotype, while genetic deletion of the tdp-1 gene does not affect movement or alter motorneuron synapses. By using the uncoordinated phenotype as a read-out of TDP-43 overexpression neurotoxicty, we have investigated the contribution of specific TDP-43 domains and subcellular localization to toxicity. Full-length (wild-type) human TDP-43 expressed in C. elegans is localized to the nucleus. Deletion of either RNA recognition domain (RRM1 or RRM2) completely blocks neurotoxicity, as does deletion of the C-terminal region. These deleted TDP-43 variants still accumulate in the nucleus, although their subnuclear distribution is altered. Interestingly, fusion of TDP-1 C-terminal sequences to TDP-43 missing its C-terminal domain restores normal subnuclear localization and toxicity in C. elegans and CFTR splicing in cell-based assays. Overexpression of wild-type, full-length TDP-43 in mammalian cells (differentiated M17 cells) can also result in cell toxicity. Our results demonstrate that in vivo TDP-43 neurotoxicity can result from nuclear activity of overexpressed full-length protein. PMID:20530643

  1. A soil bioassay using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.N.; Peredney, C.L.; Williams, P.L.

    1999-07-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a free-livings soil nematode that is commonly used as a biological model. Recently, much work has been done using the nematode as a toxicological model as well. Much of the work involving C. elegans has been performed in aquatic media, since it lives in the interstitial water of soil. However, testing in soil would be expected to more accurately reproduce the organism's normal environment and may take into consideration other factors not available in an aquatic test, i.e., toxicant availability effects due to sorption, various chemical interactions, etc. This study used a modification of a previous experimental protocol to determine 24h LC{sub 50} values for Cu in a Cecil series soil mixture, and examined the use of CuCl{sub 2} as a reference toxicant for soil toxicity testing with C. elegans. Three different methods of determining percent lethality were used, each dependent on how the number of worms missing after the recovery process was used in the lethality calculations. Only tests having {ge}80% worm recovery and {ge}90% control survival were used in determining the LC{sub 50}s, by Probit analysis. The replicate LC{sub 50} values generated a control chart for each method of calculating percent lethality. The coefficient of variation (CV) for each of the three methods was {le}14%. The control charts and the protocol outlined in this study are intended to be used to assess test organism health and monitor precision of future soil toxicity tests with C. elegans.

  2. Caenorhabditis elegans is a useful model for anthelmintic discovery

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Andrew R.; Luciani, Genna M.; Musso, Gabriel; Bagg, Rachel; Yeo, May; Zhang, Yuqian; Rajendran, Luckshika; Glavin, John; Hunter, Robert; Redman, Elizabeth; Stasiuk, Susan; Schertzberg, Michael; Angus McQuibban, G.; Caffrey, Conor R.; Cutler, Sean R.; Tyers, Mike; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Fraser, Andy G.; MacRae, Calum A.; Gilleard, John; Roy, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes infect one quarter of the world's population and impact all humans through widespread infection of crops and livestock. Resistance to current anthelmintics has prompted the search for new drugs. Traditional screens that rely on parasitic worms are costly and labour intensive and target-based approaches have failed to yield novel anthelmintics. Here, we present our screen of 67,012 compounds to identify those that kill the non-parasitic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We then rescreen our hits in two parasitic nematode species and two vertebrate models (HEK293 cells and zebrafish), and identify 30 structurally distinct anthelmintic lead molecules. Genetic screens of 19 million C. elegans mutants reveal those nematicides for which the generation of resistance is and is not likely. We identify the target of one lead with nematode specificity and nanomolar potency as complex II of the electron transport chain. This work establishes C. elegans as an effective and cost-efficient model system for anthelmintic discovery. PMID:26108372

  3. Serotonin Control of Thermotaxis Memory Behavior in Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuling; Wang, Daoyong; Li, Chaojun; Wang, Dayong

    2013-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is as an ideal model system for the study of mechanisms underlying learning and memory. In the present study, we employed C. elegans assay system of thermotaxis memory to investigate the possible role of serotonin neurotransmitter in memory control. Our data showed that both mutations of tph-1, bas-1, and cat-4 genes, required for serotonin synthesis, and mutations of mod-5 gene, encoding a serotonin reuptake transporter, resulted in deficits in thermotaxis memory behavior. Exogenous treatment with serotonin effectively recovered the deficits in thermotaxis memory of tph-1 and bas-1 mutants to the level of wild-type N2. Neuron-specific activity assay of TPH-1 suggests that serotonin might regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior by release from the ADF sensory neurons. Ablation of ADF sensory neurons by expressing a cell-death activator gene egl-1 decreased the thermotaxis memory, whereas activation of ADF neurons by expression of a constitutively active protein kinase C homologue (pkc-1(gf)) increased the thermotaxis memory and rescued the deficits in thermotaxis memory in tph-1 mutants. Moreover, serotonin released from the ADF sensory neurons might act through the G-protein-coupled serotonin receptors of SER-4 and SER-7 to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Genetic analysis implies that serotonin might further target the insulin signaling pathway to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Thus, our results suggest the possible crucial role of serotonin and ADF sensory neurons in thermotaxis memory control in C. elegans. PMID:24223727

  4. Non-dauer larval dispersal in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Simon C

    2009-05-15

    Species that exploit transient food patches must both effectively utilize such food sources and colonize new patches. The timing and rate of dispersal from existing patches and adaptations that aid dispersal are therefore crucial. Currently, no system exists in which dispersal has been investigated at both the ecological and genetic levels. The extensively studied model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is potentially such a system. Dispersal between food patches in C. elegans has been found to be related to polymorphism in the npr-1 gene, which regulates the tendency of worms to aggregate on food. Here I show that this non-dauer larval dispersal is affected by various environmental variables and that variation is not fully explained by differences in aggregation behavior. Quantitative trait loci mapping identifies candidate genomic regions, separate to npr-1, which affect variation in dispersal between two isolates. These data suggest that the ecology of C. elegans is more complex than previously thought, but indicate that it is experimentally tractable. PMID:19288538

  5. Aluminium exposure disrupts elemental homeostasis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Page, Kathryn E.; White, Keith N.; McCrohan, Catherine R.

    2013-01-01

    Aluminium (Al) is highly abundant in the environment and can elicit a variety of toxic responses in biological systems. Here we characterize the effects of Al on Caenorhabditis elegans by identifying phenotypic abnormalities and disruption in whole-body metal homeostasis (metallostasis) following Al exposure in food. Widespread changes to the elemental content of adult nematodes were observed when chronically exposed to Al from the first larval stage (L1). Specifically, we saw increased barium, chromium, copper and iron content, and a reduction in calcium levels. Lifespan was decreased in worms exposed to low levels of Al, but unexpectedly increased when the Al concentration reached higher levels (4.8 mM). This bi-phasic phenotype was only observed when Al exposure occurred during development, as lifespan was unaffected by Al exposure during adulthood. Lower levels of Al slowed C. elegans developmental progression, and reduced hermaphrodite self-fertility and adult body size. Significant developmental delay was observed even when Al exposure was restricted to embryogenesis. Similar changes in Al have been noted in association with Al toxicity in humans and other mammals, suggesting that C. elegans may be of use as a model for understanding the mechanisms of Al toxicity in mammalian systems. PMID:22534883

  6. In vivo Neuronal Calcium Imaging in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Gabel, Christopher V.

    2013-01-01

    The nematode worm C. elegans is an ideal model organism for relatively simple, low cost neuronal imaging in vivo. Its small transparent body and simple, well-characterized nervous system allows identification and fluorescence imaging of any neuron within the intact animal. Simple immobilization techniques with minimal impact on the animal's physiology allow extended time-lapse imaging. The development of genetically-encoded calcium sensitive fluorophores such as cameleon 1 and GCaMP 2 allow in vivo imaging of neuronal calcium relating both cell physiology and neuronal activity. Numerous transgenic strains expressing these fluorophores in specific neurons are readily available or can be constructed using well-established techniques. Here, we describe detailed procedures for measuring calcium dynamics within a single neuron in vivo using both GCaMP and cameleon. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of both as well as various methods of sample preparation (animal immobilization) and image analysis. Finally, we present results from two experiments: 1) Using GCaMP to measure the sensory response of a specific neuron to an external electrical field and 2) Using cameleon to measure the physiological calcium response of a neuron to traumatic laser damage. Calcium imaging techniques such as these are used extensively in C. elegans and have been extended to measurements in freely moving animals, multiple neurons simultaneously and comparison across genetic backgrounds. C. elegans presents a robust and flexible system for in vivo neuronal imaging with advantages over other model systems in technical simplicity and cost. PMID:23603812

  7. RNAi Screening to Identify Postembryonic Phenotypes in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Beifuss, Katherine K.; Gumienny, Tina L.

    2012-01-01

    C. elegans has proven to be a valuable model system for the discovery and functional characterization of many genes and gene pathways1. More sophisticated tools and resources for studies in this system are facilitating continued discovery of genes with more subtle phenotypes or roles. Here we present a generalized protocol we adapted for identifying C. elegans genes with postembryonic phenotypes of interest using RNAi2. This procedure is easily modified to assay the phenotype of choice, whether by light or fluorescence optics on a dissecting or compound microscope. This screening protocol capitalizes on the physical assets of the organism and molecular tools the C. elegans research community has produced. As an example, we demonstrate the use of an integrated transgene that expresses a fluorescent product in an RNAi screen to identify genes required for the normal localization of this product in late stage larvae and adults. First, we used a commercially available genomic RNAi library with full-length cDNA inserts. This library facilitates the rapid identification of multiple candidates by RNAi reduction of the candidate gene product. Second, we generated an integrated transgene that expresses our fluorecently tagged protein of interest in an RNAi-sensitive background. Third, by exposing hatched animals to RNAi, this screen permits identification of gene products that have a vital embryonic role that would otherwise mask a post-embryonic role in regulating the protein of interest. Lastly, this screen uses a compound microscope equipped for single cell resolution. PMID:22353760

  8. Dynamical Complexity in the C.elegans Neural Network

    E-print Network

    Chris G. Antonopoulos; Athanasios S. Fokas; Tassos C. Bountis

    2015-10-25

    We model the neuronal circuit of the C.elegans soil worm in terms of Hindmarsh-Rose systems of ordinary differential equations, dividing its circuit into six communities pointed out by the walktrap and Louvain methods. Using the numerical solution of these equations, we analyze important measures of dynamical complexity, namely synchronicity, the largest Lyapunov exponent, and the $\\Phi_{\\mbox{AR}}$ auto-regressive integrated information theory measure, which has been suggested to reflect different levels of consciousness. We show that $\\Phi_{\\mbox{AR}}$ provides a useful measure of the information contained in the C.elegans brain dynamic network. Our analysis reveals that the C.elegans brain dynamic network generates more information than the sum of its constituent parts, and that attains higher levels of integrated information for couplings for which either all its communities are highly synchronized, or there is a mixed state of highly synchronized and desynchronized communities. Both situations are characterized by relatively low chaotic behavior.

  9. Vitellogenesis of the digenean Plagiorchis elegans (Rudolphi, 1802) (Plagiorchioidea, Plagiorchiidae).

    PubMed

    Greani, Samuel; Quilichini, Yann; Foata, Joséphine; Greiman, Stephen E; Ndiaye, Papa Ibnou; Tkach, Vasyl V; Marchand, Bernard

    2014-06-01

    The ultrastructural organization of vitellogenesis of Plagiorchis elegans (Rudolphi, 1802), experimentally obtained from the golden hamster Mesocricetus auratus (Linnaeus, 1758), is described using transmission electron microscopy. This study is the first ultrastructural study of vitellogenesis in a member of the superfamily Plagiorchioidea. The four stages usually observed during vitellogenesis are described: stage I, cytoplasm of the vitellocytes mainly filled with ribosomes and few mitochondria; stage II, beginning of the synthetic activity; stage III, active synthesis of the shell globule clusters; stage IV, vitellocytes are filled with shell globule clusters and contain several lipid droplets, and glycogen granules are grouped around clusters and droplets. Vitellogenesis in P. elegans is compared with that of other Digenea. The differences among P. elegans and previously studied digeneans include, but are not limited to the occurrence of dense coiled endoplasmic reticulum saccules and the concentration of glycogen in the mesenchyme, which may be considered as a fifth stage of maturation of the vitelline glands. This peculiarity was not observed in all trematodes, which clearly indicates differences in the vitellogenesis in various digenean lineages at different stages of maturation of their vitelline cells. PMID:24569135

  10. Direct micro-mechanical measurements on C. elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backholm, Matilda; Ryu, William S.; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2013-03-01

    The millimeter-sized nematode Caenorhabditis elegans provides an excellent biophysical system for both static and dynamic biomechanical studies. The undulatory motion exhibited by this model organism as it crawls or swims through a medium is ubiquitous in nature at scales from microns to meters. A successful description of this form of locomotion requires knowledge of the material properties of the crawler, as well as its force output as it moves. Here we present an experimental technique with which the material properties and dynamics of C. elegans can be directly probed. By using the deflection of a flexible micropipette, the bending stiffness of C. elegans has been measured at all stages of its life cycle, as well as along the body of the adult worm. The mechanical properties of the worm are modelled as a viscoelastic material which provides new insights into its material properties. The forces exerted by the worm during undulatory motion are also discussed. Direct experimental characterization of this model organism provides guidance for theoretical treatments of undulatory locomotion in general.

  11. Undulatory Locomotion of Caenorhabditis elegans on Wet Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X. N.; Sznitman, J.; Krajacic, P.; Lamitina, T.; Arratia, P. E.

    2012-06-01

    The physical and bio-mechanical principles that govern undulatory movement on wet surfaces have important applications in physiology, physics, and engineering. The nematode {\\it C. elegans}, with its highly stereotypical and functionally distinct sinusoidal locomotory gaits, is an excellent system in which to dissect these properties. Measurements of the main forces governing the {\\it C. elegans} crawling gait on lubricated surfaces have been scarce, primarily due to difficulties in estimating the physical features at the nematode-gel interface. Using kinematic data and a hydrodynamic model based on lubrication theory, we calculate both the surface drag forces and the nematode's bending force while crawling on the surface of agar gels. We find that the normal and tangential surface drag force coefficients during crawling are approximately 220 and 22, respectively, and the drag coefficient ratio is approximately 10. During crawling, the calculated internal bending force is time-periodic and spatially complex, exhibiting a phase lag with respect to the nematode's body bending curvature. This phase lag is largely due to viscous drag forces, which are higher during crawling as compared to swimming in an aqueous buffer solution. The spatial patterns of bending force generated during either swimming or crawling correlate well with previously described gait-specific features of calcium signals in muscle. Further, our analysis indicates that changes in the motility gait of {\\it C. elegans} is most likely due to the nematode's adaptive response to environments characterized by different drag coefficient ratios.

  12. Genotype-dependent lifespan effects in peptone deprived Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Stastna, Jana J.; Snoek, L. Basten; Kammenga, Jan E.; Harvey, Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary restriction appears to act as a general non-genetic mechanism that can robustly prolong lifespan. There have however been reports in many systems of cases where restricted food intake either shortens, or does not affect, lifespan. Here we analyze lifespan and the effect of food restriction via deprived peptone levels on lifespan in wild isolates and introgression lines (ILs) of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. These analyses identify genetic variation in lifespan, in the effect of this variation in diet on lifespan and also in the likelihood of maternal, matricidal, hatching. Importantly, in the wild isolates and the ILs, we identify genotypes in which peptone deprivation mediated dietary restriction reduces lifespan. We also identify, in recombinant inbred lines, a locus that affects maternal hatching, a phenotype closely linked to dietary restriction in C. elegans. These results indicate that peptone deprivation mediated dietary restriction affects lifespan in C. elegans in a genotype-dependent manner, reducing lifespan in some genotypes. This may operate by a mechanism similar to dietary restriction. PMID:26539794

  13. Differential expression pattern of UBX family genes in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Seiji; Sasagawa, Yohei; Ogura, Teru . E-mail: ogura@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Yamanaka, Kunitoshi . E-mail: yamanaka@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-06-29

    UBX (ubiquitin regulatory X)-containing proteins belong to an evolutionary conserved protein family and determine the specificity of p97/VCP/Cdc48p function by binding as its adaptors. Caenorhabditis elegans was found to possess six UBX-containing proteins, named UBXN-1 to -6. However, no general or specific function of them has been revealed. During the course of understanding not only their function but also specified function of p97, we investigated spatial and temporal expression patterns of six ubxn genes in this study. Transcript analyses showed that the expression pattern of each ubxn gene was different throughout worm's development and may show potential developmental dynamics in their function, especially ubxn-5 was expressed specifically in the spermatogenic germline, suggesting a crucial role in spermatogenesis. In addition, as ubxn-4 expression was induced by ER stress, it would function as an ERAD factor in C. elegans. In vivo expression analysis by using GFP translational fusion constructs revealed that six ubxn genes show distinct expression patterns. These results altogether demonstrate that the expression of all six ubxn genes of C. elegans is differently regulated.

  14. Two-color GFP expression system for C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Miller, D M; Desai, N S; Hardin, D C; Piston, D W; Patterson, G H; Fleenor, J; Xu, S; Fire, A

    1999-05-01

    We describe the use of modified versions of the Aequora victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) to simultaneously follow the expression and distribution of two different proteins in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. A cyan-colored GFP derivative, designated CFP, contains amino acid (aa) substitutions Y66W, N146I, M153T and V163A relative to the original GFP sequence and is similar to the previously reported "W7" form. A yellow-shifted GFP derivative, designated YFP, contains aa substitutions S65G, V68A, S72A and T203Y and is similar to the previously described "I0C" variant. Coding regions for CFP and YFP were constructed in the context of a high-activity C. elegans expression system. Previously characterized promoters and localization signals have been used to express CFP and YFP in C. elegans. Filter sets designed to distinguish YFP and CFP fluorescence spectra allowed visualization of the two distinct forms of GFP in neurons and in muscle cells. A series of expression vectors carrying CFP and YFP have been constructed and are being made available to the scientific community. PMID:10337485

  15. Genotype-dependent lifespan effects in peptone deprived Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Stastna, Jana J; Snoek, L Basten; Kammenga, Jan E; Harvey, Simon C

    2015-01-01

    Dietary restriction appears to act as a general non-genetic mechanism that can robustly prolong lifespan. There have however been reports in many systems of cases where restricted food intake either shortens, or does not affect, lifespan. Here we analyze lifespan and the effect of food restriction via deprived peptone levels on lifespan in wild isolates and introgression lines (ILs) of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. These analyses identify genetic variation in lifespan, in the effect of this variation in diet on lifespan and also in the likelihood of maternal, matricidal, hatching. Importantly, in the wild isolates and the ILs, we identify genotypes in which peptone deprivation mediated dietary restriction reduces lifespan. We also identify, in recombinant inbred lines, a locus that affects maternal hatching, a phenotype closely linked to dietary restriction in C. elegans. These results indicate that peptone deprivation mediated dietary restriction affects lifespan in C. elegans in a genotype-dependent manner, reducing lifespan in some genotypes. This may operate by a mechanism similar to dietary restriction. PMID:26539794

  16. Isotopic Ratio Outlier Analysis Global Metabolomics of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Szewc, Mark A.; Garrett, Timothy; Menger, Robert F.; Yost, Richard A.; Beecher, Chris; Edison, Arthur S.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the global metabolic analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans stress responses using a mass spectrometry-based technique called Isotopic Ratio Outlier Analysis (IROA). In an IROA protocol, control and experimental samples are isotopically labeled with 95% and 5% 13C, and the two sample populations are mixed together for uniform extraction, sample preparation, and LC-MS analysis. This labeling strategy provides several advantages over conventional approaches: 1) compounds arising from biosynthesis are easily distinguished from artifacts, 2) errors from sample extraction and preparation are minimized because the control and experiment are combined into a single sample, 3) measurement of both the molecular weight and the exact number of carbon atoms in each molecule provides extremely accurate molecular formulae, and 4) relative concentrations of all metabolites are easily determined. A heat shock perturbation was conducted on C. elegans to demonstrate this approach. We identified many compounds that significantly changed upon heat shock, including several from the purine metabolism pathway, which we use to demonstrate the approach. The metabolomic response information by IROA may be interpreted in the context of a wealth of genetic and proteomic information available for C. elegans. Furthermore, the IROA protocol can be applied to any organism that can be isotopically labeled, making it a powerful new tool in a global metabolomics pipeline. PMID:24274725

  17. Fungal metabolism and detoxification of fluoranthene. [Cunninghamella elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Pothuluri, J.V.; Heflich, R.H.; Fu, P.P.; Cerniglia, C.E. )

    1992-03-01

    Five metabolites produced by Cunninghamella elegans from fluoranthene (FA) in biotransformation studies were investigated for mutagenic activity towards Salmonella typhimurium TA100 and TA104. Whereas FA displayed positive, dose-related mutagenic responses in both tester strains in the presence of a rat liver homogenate fraction, 3-FA-{beta}-glucopyranoside, 3-(8-hydroxy-FA)-{beta}-glucopyranoside, FA trans-2,3-dihydrodiol, and 8-hydroxy-FA trans-2,3-dihydrodiol were negative. 9-Hydroxy-FA trans-2,3-dihydrodiol showed a weak positive response in S. typhimurium TA100. Mutagenicity assays performed with samples extracted at 24-h intervals during incubation of C. elegans with FA for 120 h showed that mutagenic activity decreased with time. Comparative studies with rat liver microsomes indicated that FA trans-2,3-dihydrodiol, the previously identified proximal mutagenic metabolite of FA, was the major metabolite. The circular dichroism spectrum of the rat liver microsomal FA trans-2,3-dihydrodiol indicated that is was optically active. In contrast, the circular dichroism spectrum of the fungal FA trans-2,3-dihydrodiol showed no optical activity. These results indicate that C. elegans has the potential to detoxify FA and that the stereochemistry of its trans-2,3-dihydrodiol metabolite reduces its mutagenic potential.

  18. Caenorhabditis elegans is a useful model for anthelmintic discovery.

    PubMed

    Burns, Andrew R; Luciani, Genna M; Musso, Gabriel; Bagg, Rachel; Yeo, May; Zhang, Yuqian; Rajendran, Luckshika; Glavin, John; Hunter, Robert; Redman, Elizabeth; Stasiuk, Susan; Schertzberg, Michael; Angus McQuibban, G; Caffrey, Conor R; Cutler, Sean R; Tyers, Mike; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Fraser, Andy G; MacRae, Calum A; Gilleard, John; Roy, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes infect one quarter of the world's population and impact all humans through widespread infection of crops and livestock. Resistance to current anthelmintics has prompted the search for new drugs. Traditional screens that rely on parasitic worms are costly and labour intensive and target-based approaches have failed to yield novel anthelmintics. Here, we present our screen of 67,012 compounds to identify those that kill the non-parasitic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We then rescreen our hits in two parasitic nematode species and two vertebrate models (HEK293 cells and zebrafish), and identify 30 structurally distinct anthelmintic lead molecules. Genetic screens of 19 million C. elegans mutants reveal those nematicides for which the generation of resistance is and is not likely. We identify the target of one lead with nematode specificity and nanomolar potency as complex II of the electron transport chain. This work establishes C. elegans as an effective and cost-efficient model system for anthelmintic discovery. PMID:26108372

  19. Caenorhabditis elegans mutants resistant to attachment of Yersinia biofilms.

    PubMed

    Darby, Creg; Chakraborti, Amrita; Politz, Samuel M; Daniels, Calvin C; Tan, Li; Drace, Kevin

    2007-05-01

    The detailed composition and structure of the Caenorhabditis elegans surface are unknown. Previous genetic studies used antibody or lectin binding to identify srf genes that play roles in surface determination. Infection by Microbacterium nematophilum identified bus (bacterially unswollen) genes that also affect surface characteristics. We report that biofilms produced by Yersinia pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis, which bind the C. elegans surface predominantly on the head, can be used to identify additional surface-determining genes. A screen for C. elegans mutants with a biofilm absent on the head (Bah) phenotype identified three novel genes: bah-1, bah-2, and bah-3. The bah-1 and bah-2 mutants have slightly fragile cuticles but are neither Srf nor Bus, suggesting that they are specific for surface components involved in biofilm attachment. A bah-3 mutant has normal cuticle integrity, but shows a stage-specific Srf phenotype. The screen produced alleles of five known surface genes: srf-2, srf-3, bus-4, bus-12, and bus-17. For the X-linked bus-17, a paternal effect was observed in biofilm assays. PMID:17339204

  20. Effects of seven organic pollutants on soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sochová, Ivana; Hofman, Jakub; Holoubek, Ivan

    2007-08-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a free-living soil nematode that is commonly used as a model for toxicity tests. The aim of this study was to investigate the toxicity of seven organic pollutants: four azaarenes (quinoline, acridine, phenazine, and 1,10-phenanthroline), short-chain chlorinated paraffins, and two organochlorinated pesticides (toxaphene and hexachlorobenzene). The exposure to all chemicals was carried out in three test media (soil, agar, and aquatic medium), and adult mortality was evaluated after 24 and 48 h. Toxaphene was the most toxic substance with LC(50) (48 h) of 379 mg/kg in the soil and 0.2 mg/L in the aquatic medium. Quinoline was the most toxic chemical in agar test with LC(50) (48 h) of 10 mg/L. HCB showed a very low toxicity in all tests, maybe due to its very low water solubility. Longer than 24-h test duration was found necessary for getting more correct data on toxicity. In comparison with other studies, C. elegans was less sensitive than other soil invertebrates. Different response might be attributed to different exposure routes and shorter test duration. Equilibrium partitioning theory was used to calculate K(oc) from results of soil and aquatic tests but this approach was found not working. Our results suggest that the tests with nematode C. elegans should be included to the battery of tests for risk assessment of POPs in soil. PMID:17449100

  1. hecd-1 Modulates Notch Activity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yunting; Greenwald, Iva

    2014-01-01

    Notch is a receptor that mediates cell–cell interactions that specify binary cell fate decisions in development and tissue homeostasis. Inappropriate Notch signaling is associated with cancer, and mutations in Notch pathway components have been associated with developmental diseases and syndromes. In Caenorhabditis elegans, suppressors of phenotypes associated with constitutively active LIN-12/Notch have identified many conserved core components and direct or indirect modulators. Here, we molecularly identify sel(ar584), originally isolated as a suppressor of a constitutively active allele of lin-12. We show that sel(ar584) is an allele of hecd-1, the ortholog of human HECDT1, a ubiquitin ligase that has been implicated in several different mammalian developmental events. We studied interactions of hecd-1 with lin-12 in the somatic gonad and with the other C. elegans Notch gene, glp-1, in the germ line. We found that hecd-1 acts as a positive modulator of lin-12/Notch activity in a somatic gonad context—the original basis for its isolation—but acts autonomously as a negative modulator of glp-1/Notch activity in the germ line. As the yeast ortholog of HECD-1, Ufd4p, has been shown to function in quality control, and C. elegans HECD-1 has been shown to affect mitochondrial maintenance, we propose that the different genetic interactions between hecd-1 and Notch genes we observed in different cell contexts may reflect differences in quality control regulatory mechanisms or in cellular metabolism. PMID:25552605

  2. Tat-mediated protein delivery in living Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Delom, Frederic; Fessart, Delphine; Caruso, Marie-Elaine; Chevet, Eric . E-mail: eric.chevet@mcgill.ca

    2007-01-19

    The Tat protein from HIV-1 fused with heterologous proteins traverses biological membranes in a transcellular process called: protein transduction. This has already been successfully exploited in various biological models, but never in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. TAT-eGFP or GST-eGFP proteins were fed to C. elegans worms, which resulted in the specific localization of Tat-eGFP to epithelial intestinal cells. This system represents an efficient tool for transcellular transduction in C. elegans intestinal cells. Indeed, this approach avoids the use of tedious purification steps to purify the TAT fusion proteins and allows for rapid analyses of the transduced proteins. In addition, it may represent an efficient tool to functionally analyze the mechanisms of protein transduction as well as to complement RNAi/KO in the epithelial intestinal system. To sum up, the advantage of this technology is to combine the potential of bacterial expression system and the Tat-mediated transduction technique in living worm.

  3. HES-Mediated Repression of Pten in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Chou, Han Ting; Vazquez, Raymarie Gomez; Wang, Kun; Campbell, Richard; Milledge, Gaolin Zheng; Walthall, Walter W; Johnson, Casonya M

    2015-01-01

    The hairy/enhancer-of-split (HES) group of transcription factors controls embryonic development, often by acting downstream of the Notch signaling pathway; however, little is known about postembryonic roles of these proteins. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the six proteins that make up the REF-1 family are considered to be HES orthologs that act in both Notch-dependent and Notch-independent pathways to regulate embryonic events. To further our understanding of how the REF-1 family works to coordinate postembryonic cellular events, we performed a functional characterization of the REF-1 family member, HLH-25. We show that, after embryogenesis, hlh-25 expression persists throughout every developmental stage, including dauer, into adulthood. Like animals that carry loss-of-function alleles in genes required for normal cell-cycle progression, the phenotypes of hlh-25 animals include reduced brood size, unfertilized oocytes, and abnormal gonad morphology. Using gene expression microarray, we show that the HLH-25 transcriptional network correlates with the phenotypes of hlh-25 animals and that the C. elegans Pten ortholog, daf-18, is one major hub in the network. Finally, we show that HLH-25 regulates C. elegans lifespan and dauer recovery, which correlates with a role in the transcriptional repression of daf-18 activity. Collectively, these data provide the first genetic evidence that HLH-25 may be a functional ortholog of mammalian HES1, which represses PTEN activity in mice and human cells. PMID:26438299

  4. HES-Mediated Repression of Pten in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Han Ting; Vazquez, Raymarie Gomez; Wang, Kun; Campbell, Richard; Milledge, Gaolin Zheng; Walthall, Walter W.; Johnson, Casonya M.

    2015-01-01

    The hairy/enhancer-of-split (HES) group of transcription factors controls embryonic development, often by acting downstream of the Notch signaling pathway; however, little is known about postembryonic roles of these proteins. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the six proteins that make up the REF-1 family are considered to be HES orthologs that act in both Notch-dependent and Notch-independent pathways to regulate embryonic events. To further our understanding of how the REF-1 family works to coordinate postembryonic cellular events, we performed a functional characterization of the REF-1 family member, HLH-25. We show that, after embryogenesis, hlh-25 expression persists throughout every developmental stage, including dauer, into adulthood. Like animals that carry loss-of-function alleles in genes required for normal cell-cycle progression, the phenotypes of hlh-25 animals include reduced brood size, unfertilized oocytes, and abnormal gonad morphology. Using gene expression microarray, we show that the HLH-25 transcriptional network correlates with the phenotypes of hlh-25 animals and that the C. elegans Pten ortholog, daf-18, is one major hub in the network. Finally, we show that HLH-25 regulates C. elegans lifespan and dauer recovery, which correlates with a role in the transcriptional repression of daf-18 activity. Collectively, these data provide the first genetic evidence that HLH-25 may be a functional ortholog of mammalian HES1, which represses PTEN activity in mice and human cells. PMID:26438299

  5. Caenorhabditis elegans: A Genetic Guide to Parasitic Nematode Biology

    PubMed Central

    Bird, D. McK.; Opperman, C. H.

    1998-01-01

    The advent of parasite genome sequencing projects, as well as an increase in biology-directed gene discovery, promises to reveal genes encoding many of the key molecules required for nematode-host interactions. However, distinguishing parasitism genes from those merely required for nematode viability remains a substantial challenge. Although this will ultimately require a functional test in the host or parasite, the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans can be exploited as a heterologous system to determine function of candidate parasitism genes. Studies of C. elegans also have revealed genetic networks, such as the dauer pathway, that may also be important adaptations for parasitism. As a more directed means of identifying parasitism traits, we developed classical genetics for Heterodera glycines and have used this approach to map genes conferring host resistance-breaking phenotypes. It is likely that the C. elegans and H. glycines genomes will be at least partially syntenic, thus permitting predictive physical mapping of H. glycines genes of interest. PMID:19274223

  6. Biomechanical analysis of gait adaptation in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Fang-Yen, Christopher; Wyart, Matthieu; Xie, Julie; Kawai, Risa; Kodger, Tom; Chen, Sway; Wen, Quan; Samuel, Aravinthan D T

    2010-11-23

    To navigate different environments, an animal must be able to adapt its locomotory gait to its physical surroundings. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, between swimming in water and crawling on surfaces, adapts its locomotory gait to surroundings that impose approximately 10,000-fold differences in mechanical resistance. Here we investigate this feat by studying the undulatory movements of C. elegans in Newtonian fluids spanning nearly five orders of magnitude in viscosity. In these fluids, the worm undulatory gait varies continuously with changes in external load: As load increases, both wavelength and frequency of undulation decrease. We also quantify the internal viscoelastic properties of the worm's body and their role in locomotory dynamics. We incorporate muscle activity, internal load, and external load into a biomechanical model of locomotion and show that (i) muscle power is nearly constant across changes in locomotory gait, and (ii) the onset of gait adaptation occurs as external load becomes comparable to internal load. During the swimming gait, which is evoked by small external loads, muscle power is primarily devoted to bending the worm's elastic body. During the crawling gait, evoked by large external loads, comparable muscle power is used to drive the external load and the elastic body. Our results suggest that C. elegans locomotory gait continuously adapts to external mechanical load in order to maintain propulsive thrust. PMID:21048086

  7. Caenorhabditis elegans, a Biological Model for Research in Toxicology.

    PubMed

    Tejeda-Benitez, Lesly; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a nematode widely used as a toxicological model. The transparency of its body, short lifespan, ability to self-fertilize and ease of culture are advantages that make it ideal as a model in toxicology. Due to the fact that some of its biochemical pathways are similar to those of humans, it has been employed in research in several fields. Its use in environmental toxicological assessments allows the determination of multiple endpoints such as lethality, growth, reproduction, and locomotion. Other endpoints use reporter genes, such as GFP, driven by regulatory sequences from genes modulated by different toxicity pathways, such as heat shock responses, oxidative stress, xenobiotic metabolism, and metallothioneins production, among others. C. elegans has allowed the evaluation of neurotoxic effects for heavy metals and pesticides, among those more frequently studied, as the nematode has a very well defined nervous system. More recently, nanoparticles are emergent pollutants whose toxicity can be explored using this nematode. Overall, almost every type of known toxicant has been tested with this animal model. In the near future, the available knowledge on the life cycle of C. elegans should allow more studies on reproduction and transgenerational toxicity for newly developed chemicals and materials, as a powerful tool to protect human health. PMID:26613986

  8. The C. elegans cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase EGL-4 Regulates Nociceptive Behavioral Sensitivity

    E-print Network

    Ferkey, Denise

    Michelle C. Krzyzanowski1 , Chantal Brueggemann2. , Meredith J. Ezak1. , Jordan F. Wood1. , Kerry L. Citation: Krzyzanowski MC, Brueggemann C, Ezak MJ, Wood JF, Michaels KL, et al. (2013) The C. elegans c behavioral responses. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the pair of polymodal nociceptive head sensory

  9. Influence of Silicon on Resistance of Zinnia Elegans to Myzus Persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were conducted to examine the effect of treating Zinnia elegans Jacq. with soluble silicon on the performance of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer). Zinnia elegans plants were irrigated every 2 days throughout the duration of the experiment with a nutrient solution amended with ...

  10. Mapping a Mutation in "Caenorhabditis elegans" Using a Polymerase Chain Reaction-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Edith M.

    2014-01-01

    Many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified within the "Caenorhabditis elegans" genome. SNPs present in the genomes of two isogenic "C. elegans" strains have been routinely used as a tool in forward genetics to map a mutation to a particular chromosome. This article describes a laboratory exercise in which…

  11. A potential biochemical mechanism underlying the influence of sterol deprivation stress on Caenorhabditis elegans longevity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the biochemical mechanism for sterol-mediated alteration in aging in Caenorhabditis elegans, we established sterol depletion conditions by treating worms with azacoprostane, which reduced mean lifespan of adult C. elegans by 35%. Proteomic analyses of egg proteins from treated and un...

  12. Fish oil changes the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans via lipid peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Soko; Honma, Taro; Ito, Junya; Kijima, Ryo; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we administered fish oil containing eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) to senescence-accelerated mice P8 (SAMP8), in order to investigate the effects on lifespan. Surprisingly, the lifespan of SAMP8 that were fed fish oil was shortened significantly, through a mechanism that likely involved lipid peroxidation. In this study, we investigated this phenomenon in further detail. To examine whether this phenomenon occurs only in SAMP8, we investigated the effect of fish oil on the lifespan of another organism species, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). C. elegans fed fish oil were cultured and the lifespan monitored. As a consequence of the provision of large amounts of fish oil the lifespan of C. elegans was shortened significantly, whereas an appropriate amount of fish oil extended their lifespan significantly. Lipid peroxide levels in C. elegans that were fed fish oil increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. However, lipid peroxide levels in C. elegans were inhibited by the addition of fish oil and an antioxidant, ?-tocopherol, and completely abrogated the changes in the lifespan. To further confirm whether the oxidation of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid in fish oil would change the lifespan of C. elegans, the effect of oxidized DHA was examined. Large amounts of oxidized DHA were found to shorten their lifespan significantly. Thus, fish oil changes the lifespan of C. elegans through lipid peroxidation. PMID:23526170

  13. Caenorhabditis elegans Aurora A kinase AIR-1 Is Required for Postembryonic Cell Divisions and Germline

    E-print Network

    Baillie, David

    LETTER Caenorhabditis elegans Aurora A kinase AIR-1 Is Required for Postembryonic Cell Divisions the eukaryotic cell cycle. The Aurora kinases comprise a highly conserved family of serine/threonine kinases a sterile Caenorhabditis elegans mutant in which the majority of the locus encoding the Aurora A kinase air

  14. Ancestral roles of glia suggested by the nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Shaham, Shai

    Ancestral roles of glia suggested by the nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans maxwell g. heiman and shai shaham The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has a simple nervous system with glia restricted some glial activities may be fundamentally required for nervous system function. A priori, one might

  15. Selenite Enhances Immune Response against Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 via SKN-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chi-Wei; Wei, Chia-Cheng; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Background Selenium (Se) is an important nutrient that carries out many biological processes including maintaining optimal immune function. Here, inorganic selenite (Se(IV)) was evaluated for its pathogen resistance and potential-associated factors in Caenorhabditis elegans. The immune effects of Se(IV) were investigated by examining the responses of C. elegans to Pseudomonas aerugonisa PA14 strain. Principal Findings Se(IV)-treated C. elegans showed increased survival under PA14 infection compared with untreated controls. The significant pathogen resistance of Se(IV) on C. elegans might not be attributed to the effects of Se(IV) on PA14 as Se(IV) showed no effect on bacterial quorum-sensing and virulence factors of PA14. This study showed that Se(IV) enhanced the expression of a gene pivotal for the innate immunity in C. elegans. The study found that the pathogen-resistant phenotypes contributed by Se(IV) was absent from the skn-1 mutant worms. Moreover, Se(IV) influenced the subcellular distribution of SKN-1/Nrf in C. elegans upon PA14 infection. Furthermore, Se(IV) increased mRNA levels of SKN-1 target genes (gst-4 and gcs-1). Conclusions This study found evidence of Se(IV) protecting C. elegans against P. aeruginosa PA14 infection by exerting effects on the innate immunity of C. elegans that is likely mediated via regulation of a SKN-1-dependent signaling pathway. PMID:25147937

  16. Neuronal regulation of ascaroside response during mate response behavior in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small-molecule signaling plays an important role in the biology of Caenorhabditis elegans. We have previously shown that ascarosides, glycosides of the dideoxysugar ascarylose regulate both development and behavior in C. elegans The mating signal consists of a synergistic blend of three dauer-induc...

  17. Dynamic Encoding of Perception, Memory, and Movement in a C. elegans Chemotaxis Circuit

    E-print Network

    Neuron Article Dynamic Encoding of Perception, Memory, and Movement in a C. elegans Chemotaxis flexible chemotaxis in C. elegans, where the animal navigates up or down NaCl gradients (positive or negative chemotaxis) to reach the salt concentration of previous growth (the set point). The ASER sensory

  18. FMRFamide related peptide ligands activate the Caenorhabditis elegans orphan GPCR Y59H11AL.1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are ancient molecules that sense environmental and physiological signals. Currently, the majority of the predicted Caenorhabditis elegans GPCRs are orphan. Here, we describe the characterization of such an orphan C. elegans GPCR, which is categorized in the tachyk...

  19. FMRFamide neuropeptides and acetylcholine synergistically inhibit egg-laying by C. elegans

    E-print Network

    Horvitz, H. Robert

    FMRFamide neuropeptides and acetylcholine synergistically inhibit egg-laying by C. elegans Niels Ringstad & H Robert Horvitz Egg-laying behavior of the Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite is regulated by G protein signaling pathways. Here we show that the egg laying­defective mutant egl-6(n592) carries

  20. On-Demand Isolation and Manipulation of C. elegans by In Vitro Maskless Photopatterning.

    PubMed

    Oliver, C Ryan; Gourgou, Eleni; Bazopoulou, Daphne; Chronis, Nikos; Hart, A John

    2016-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) is a model organism for understanding aging and studying animal behavior. Microfluidic assay techniques have brought widespread advances in C. elegans research; however, traditional microfluidic assays such as those based on soft lithography require time-consuming design and fabrication cycles and offer limited flexibility in changing the geometric environment during experimentation. We present a technique for maskless photopatterning of a biocompatible hydrogel on an NGM (Agar) substrate, enabling dynamic manipulation of the C. elegans culture environment in vitro. Maskless photopatterning is performed using a projector-based microscope system largely built from off-the-shelf components. We demonstrate the capabilities of this technique by building micropillar arrays during C. elegans observation, by fabricating free-floating mechanisms that can be actuated by C. elegans motion, by using freehand drawing to isolate individual C. elegans in real time, and by patterning arrays of mazes for isolation and fitness testing of C. elegans populations. In vitro photopatterning enables rapid and flexible design of experiment geometry as well as real-time interaction between the researcher and the assay such as by sequential isolation of individual organisms. Future adoption of image analysis and machine learning techniques could be used to acquire large datasets and automatically adapt the assay geometry. PMID:26730604

  1. Aversive Olfactory Learning and Associative Long-Term Memory in "Caenorhabditis elegans"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amano, Hisayuki; Maruyama, Ichiro N.

    2011-01-01

    The nematode "Caenorhabditis elegans" ("C. elegans") adult hermaphrodite has 302 invariant neurons and is suited for cellular and molecular studies on complex behaviors including learning and memory. Here, we have developed protocols for classical conditioning of worms with 1-propanol, as a conditioned stimulus (CS), and hydrochloride (HCl) (pH…

  2. Using RNAi in C. "elegans" to Demonstrate Gene Knockdown Phenotypes in the Undergraduate Biology Lab Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Nicole M.

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful technology used to knock down genes in basic research and medicine. In 2006 RNAi technology using "Caenorhabditis elegans" ("C. elegans") was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine and thus students graduating in the biological sciences should have experience with this technology. However,…

  3. LETTER TO THE EDITOR Oligonucleotide-based targeted gene editing in C. elegans

    E-print Network

    Xue, Ding

    LETTER TO THE EDITOR Oligonucleotide-based targeted gene editing in C. elegans via the CRISPR/Cas9 Repeats (CRISPR)/ CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has emerged as a new powerful tool for genome [6], C. elegans [7-12], and plants [13]. In the widely used CRISPR/Cas9 system [2-4], the Cas9

  4. Balanced Trade-Offs between Alternative Strategies Shape the Response of C. elegans Reproduction to

    E-print Network

    Ruvinsky, Ilya

    laying, and thus protecting the reproductive system, is negated by the cost associated with implementing-offs as a dynamic response of the C. elegans reproductive system to stress and an adaptation to life in variableBalanced Trade-Offs between Alternative Strategies Shape the Response of C. elegans Reproduction

  5. A Chemosensory Adaptation Module for the Physiology Laboratory from Student-Directed "C. elegans" Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindblom, Tim

    2006-01-01

    The model organism, "Caenorhabditis elegans," in addition to being well suited to genetics and cell biology teaching applications, can also be useful in the physiology laboratory. In this article, the author describes how students in a junior level college Comparative Physiology course have made use of "C. elegans" in semester-long,…

  6. Swimming C. elegans in a wet granular medium Sunghwan Jung,1

    E-print Network

    Jung, Sunghwan "Sunny"

    , to characterize the surrogate efficiency of locomotion. Swimming motion in a granular medium, which more closelySwimming C. elegans in a wet granular medium Sunghwan Jung,1 Stella Lee,2 and Aravinthan Samuel2 1 per- form experiments on wild-type C. elegans swimming in a granular medium composed of 98 m glass

  7. Dopamine Mediates Context-Dependent Modulation of Sensory Plasticity in C. elegans

    E-print Network

    Schafer, William R.

    Neuron Article Dopamine Mediates Context-Dependent Modulation of Sensory Plasticity in C. elegans: wschafer@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk DOI 10.1016/j.neuron.2007.07.023 SUMMARY Dopamine has been implicated of neural circuits to modify behavior. In the nematode C. elegans, dopamine modu- lates habituation

  8. NCBI Handout Series | ClinVar | Last Updated on September 15, 2015 Contact: info@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov ClinVar: Clinically Relevant Sequence Variations

    E-print Network

    Levin, Judith G.

    , and the ClinVar data can be incorporated into their daily workflow. ClinVar is also avail- able to individual descriptions of both variant and phenotype, by providing HGVS expressions at the genomic, cDNA, and protein page. The minimal data required for submission is submitter information, type of study, a valid variant

  9. The Future of Data Assimilation:The Future of Data Assimilation: 4D-Var or Ensemble Kalman Filter?4D-Var or Ensemble Kalman Filter?

    E-print Network

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    The Future of Data Assimilation:The Future of Data Assimilation: 4D-Var or Ensemble Kalman Filter?4D-Var or Ensemble Kalman Filter? Eugenia Kalnay Department of Meteorology and Chaos Group University.atmos.umd.edu/~ekalnay) Ott, Hunt, Szunyogh, Zimin, Kostelich, Corazza, Kalnay, Patil, Yorke, 2004: Local Ensemble Kalman

  10. New clerodane diterpenes from Tinospora sagittata var. yunnanensis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhi-Yong; Li, Wen-Juan; Jiao, Li-Xiang; Guo, Jun-Ming; Tian, Kai; Yang, Chun-Tao; Huang, Xiang-Zhong

    2014-03-01

    Four new clerodane diterpenes, namely sagittatayunnanosides A-D (1-4), were isolated from the roots of Tinospora sagittata var. yunnanensis, together with two known compounds, tinospinoside C (5) and tinospinoside E (6). The structures of the four new compounds were well elucidated by extensive analyses of the MS, IR, and 1D and 2D?NMR data. The cytotoxic and antifouling activities of compounds 1-6 were evaluated. PMID:24634023

  11. Caenorhabditis elegans as a Model for Toxic Effects of Nanoparticles: Lethality, Growth, and Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Laura L; Ryde, Ian T; Yang, Xinyu; Meyer, Joel N

    2015-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is extensively utilized in toxicity studies. C. elegans offers a high degree of homology with higher organisms, and its ease of use and relatively inexpensive maintenance have made it an attractive complement to mammalian and ecotoxicological models. C. elegans provides multiple benefits, including the opportunity to perform relatively high-throughput assays on whole organisms, a wide range of genetic tools permitting investigation of mechanisms and genetic sensitivity, and transparent bodies that facilitate toxicokinetic studies. This unit describes protocols for three nanotoxicity assays in C. elegans: lethality, growth, and reproduction. This unit focuses on how to use these well-established assays with nanoparticles, which are being produced in ever-increasing volume and exhibit physicochemical properties that require alteration of standard toxicity assays. These assays permit a broad phenotypic assessment of nanotoxicity in C. elegans, and, when used in combination with genetic tools and other assays, also permit mechanistic insight. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26523472

  12. Complete mitochondrial genome of Xingguo red carp (Cyprinus carpio var. singuonensis) and purse red carp (Cyprinus carpio var. wuyuanensis).

    PubMed

    Hu, Guang-Fu; Liu, Xiang-Jiang; Li, Zhong; Liang, Hong-Wei; Hu, Shao-Na; Zou, Gui-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genomes of Xingguo red carp (Cyprinus carpio var. singuonensis) and purse red carp (Cyprinus carpio var. wuyuanensis) were sequenced. Comparison of these two mitochondrial genomes revealed that the mtDNAs of these two common carp varieties were remarkably similar in genome length, gene order and content, and AT content. However, size variation between these two mitochondrial genomes presented here showed 39 site differences in overall length. About 2 site differences were located in rRNAs, 3 in tRNAs, 3 in the control region, 31 in protein-coding genes. Thirty-one variable bases in the protein-coding regions between the two varieties mitochondrial sequences led to three variable amino acids, which were mainly located in the protein ND5 and ND4. PMID:24521498

  13. A microfluidic device for the continuous culture and analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans in a toxic aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jaehoon; Nakajima, Masahiro; Tajima, Hirotaka; Huang, Qiang; Fukuda, Toshio

    2013-08-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) receives attention as a bioindicator, and the C. elegans condition has been recently analyzed using microfluidic devices equipped with an imaging system. To establish a method without an imaging system, we have proposed a novel microfluidic device with which to analyze the condition of C. elegans from the capacitance change using a pair of micro-electrodes. The device was designed to culture C. elegans, to expose C. elegans to an external stimulus, such as a chemical or toxicant, and to measure the capacitance change which indicates the condition of C. elegans. In this study, to demonstrate the capability of our device in a toxic aqueous environment, the device was applied to examine the effect of cadmium on C. elegans. Thirty L4 larval stage C. elegans were divided into three groups. One group was a control group and the other groups were exposed to cadmium solutions with concentrations of 5% and 10% LC50 for 24 h. The capacitance change and the body volume of C. elegans as a reference were measured four times and we confirmed the correlation between them. It shows that our device can analyze the condition of C. elegans without an imaging system.

  14. VT-1161 Protects Immunosuppressed Mice from Rhizopus arrhizus var. arrhizus Infection.

    PubMed

    Gebremariam, Teclegiorgis; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Fothergill, Annette W; Garvey, Edward P; Hoekstra, William J; Schotzinger, Robert J; Patterson, Thomas F; Filler, Scott G; Ibrahim, Ashraf S

    2015-12-01

    We studied the efficacy of the investigational drug VT-1161 against mucormycosis. VT-1161 had more potent in vitro activity against Rhizopus arrhizus var. arrhizus than against R. arrhizus var. delemar. VT-1161 treatment demonstrated dose-dependent plasma drug levels with prolonged survival time and lowered tissue fungal burden in immunosuppressed mice infected with R. arrhizus var. arrhizus and was as effective as high-dose liposomal amphotericin B treatment. These results support further development of VT-1161 against mucormycosis. PMID:26369977

  15. Drug Absorption Efficiency in Caenorhbditis elegans Delivered by Different Methods

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shan-Qing; Ding, Ai-Jun; Li, Guo-Ping; Wu, Gui-Sheng; Luo, Huai-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Background Caenorhbditis elegans has being vigorously used as a model organism in many research fields and often accompanied by administrating with various drugs. The methods of delivering drugs to worms are varied from one study to another, which make difficult in comparing results between studies. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated the drug absorption efficiency in C. elegans using five frequently used methods with resveratrol with low aqueous solubility and water-soluble 5-Fluoro-2?-deoxyuridine (FUDR) as positive compounds. The drugs were either applied to the LB medium with bacteria OP50, before spreading onto Nematode Growth Medium (NGM) plates (LB medium method), or to the NGM with live (NGM live method) or dead bacteria (NGM dead method), or spotting the drug solution to the surface of plates directly (spot dead method), or growing the worms in liquid medium (liquid growing method). The concentration of resveratrol and FUDR increased gradually within C. elegans and reached the highest during 12 hours to one day and then decreased slowly. At the same time point, the higher the drug concentration, the higher the metabolism rate. The drug concentrations in worms fed with dead bacteria were higher than with live bacteria at the same time point. Consistently, the drug concentration in medium with live bacteria decreased much faster than in medium with dead bacteria, reach to about half of the original concentration within 12 hours. Conclusion Resveratrol with low aqueous solubility and water-soluble FUDR have the same absorption and metabolism pattern. The drug metabolism rate in worms was both dosage and time dependent. NGM dead method and liquid growing method achieved the best absorption efficiency in worms. The drug concentration within worms was comparable with that in mice, providing a bridge for dose translation from worms to mammals. PMID:23451103

  16. Polyamine-independent Expression of Caenorhabditis elegans Antizyme.

    PubMed

    Stegehake, Dirk; Kurosinski, Marc-André; Schürmann, Sabine; Daniel, Jens; Lüersen, Kai; Liebau, Eva

    2015-07-17

    Degradation of ornithine decarboxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme of polyamine biosynthesis, is promoted by the protein antizyme. Expression of antizyme is positively regulated by rising polyamine concentrations that induce a +1 translational frameshift required for production of the full-length protein. Antizyme itself is negatively regulated by the antizyme inhibitor. In our study, the regulation of Caenorhabditis elegans antizyme was investigated, and the antizyme inhibitor was identified. By applying a novel GFP-based method to monitor antizyme frameshifting in vivo, we show that the induction of translational frameshifting also occurs under stressful conditions. Interestingly, during starvation, the initiation of frameshifting was independent of polyamine concentrations. Because frameshifting was also prevalent in a polyamine auxotroph double mutant, a polyamine-independent regulation of antizyme frameshifting is suggested. Polyamine-independent induction of antizyme expression was found to be negatively regulated by the peptide transporter PEPT-1, as well as the target of rapamycin, but not by the daf-2 insulin signaling pathway. Stress-dependent expression of C. elegans antizyme occurred morely slowly than expression in response to increased polyamine levels, pointing to a more general reaction to unfavorable conditions and a diversion away from proliferation and reproduction toward conservation of energy. Interestingly, antizyme expression was found to drastically increase in aging individuals in a postreproductive manner. Although knockdown of antizyme did not affect the lifespan of C. elegans, knockdown of the antizyme inhibitor led to a significant reduction in lifespan. This is most likely caused by an increase in antizyme-mediated degradation of ornithine decarboxylase-1 and a resulting reduction in cellular polyamine levels. PMID:26032421

  17. The transcription start site landscape of C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Saito, Taro Leo; Hashimoto, Shin-ichi; Gu, Sam Guoping; Morton, J Jason; Stadler, Michael; Blumenthal, Thomas; Fire, Andrew; Morishita, Shinichi

    2013-08-01

    More than half of Caenorhabditis elegans pre-mRNAs lose their original 5' ends in a process termed "trans-splicing" in which the RNA extending from the transcription start site (TSS) to the site of trans-splicing of the primary transcript, termed the "outron," is replaced with a 22-nt spliced leader. This complicates the mapping of TSSs, leading to a lack of available TSS mapping data for these genes. We used growth at low temperature and nuclear isolation to enrich for transcripts still containing outrons, applying a modified SAGE capture procedure and high-throughput sequencing to characterize 5' termini in this transcript population. We report from this data both a landscape of 5'-end utilization for C. elegans and a representative collection of TSSs for 7351 trans-spliced genes. TSS distributions for individual genes were often dispersed, with a greater average number of TSSs for trans-spliced genes, suggesting that trans-splicing may remove selective pressure for a single TSS. Upstream of newly defined TSSs, we observed well-known motifs (including TATAA-box and SP1) as well as novel motifs. Several of these motifs showed association with tissue-specific expression and/or conservation among six worm species. Comparing TSS features between trans-spliced and non-trans-spliced genes, we found stronger signals among outron TSSs for preferentially positioning of flanking nucleosomes and for downstream Pol II enrichment. Our data provide an enabling resource for both experimental and theoretical analysis of gene structure and function in C. elegans. PMID:23636945

  18. Phospholipase C-? Regulates Epidermal Morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Manrique, Rafael P.; Nagy, Anikó I.; Legg, James C.; Bales, Olivia A. M.; Ly, Sung; Baylis, Howard A.

    2008-01-01

    Migration of cells within epithelial sheets is an important feature of embryogenesis and other biological processes. Previous work has demonstrated a role for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-mediated calcium signalling in the rearrangement of epidermal cells (also known as hypodermal cells) during embryonic morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans. However the mechanism by which IP3 production is stimulated is unknown. IP3 is produced by the action of phospholipase C (PLC). We therefore surveyed the PLC family of C. elegans using RNAi and mutant strains, and found that depletion of PLC-1/PLC-? produced substantial embryonic lethality. We used the epithelial cell marker ajm-1::gfp to follow the behaviour of epidermal cells and found that 96% of the arrested embryos have morphogenetic defects. These defects include defective ventral enclosure and aberrant dorsal intercalation. Using time-lapse confocal microscopy we show that the migration of the ventral epidermal cells, especially of the leading cells, is slower and often fails in plc-1(tm753) embryos. As a consequence plc-1 loss of function results in ruptured embryos with a Gex phenotype (gut on exterior) and lumpy larvae. Thus PLC-1 is involved in the regulation of morphogenesis. Genetic studies using gain- and loss-of-function alleles of itr-1, the gene encoding the IP3 receptor in C. elegans, demonstrate that PLC-1 acts through ITR-1. Using RNAi and double mutants to deplete the other PLCs in a plc-1 background, we show that PLC-3/PLC-? and EGL-8/PLC-? can compensate for reduced PLC-1 activity. Our work places PLC-? into a pathway controlling epidermal cell migration, thus establishing a novel role for PLC-?. PMID:18369461

  19. Characterizing temporal patterns in the swimming activity of Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yeontaek; Jeon, Wonju; Kang, Seung-Ho; Lee, Sang-Hee; Chon, Tae-Soo

    2012-06-01

    The locomotion behavior of Caenorhabditis elegans has been studied extensively to understand the respective roles of neural control and biomechanics as well as the interaction between them. In the present study, we suggest a new approach to characterize the temporal patterns in the swimming behavior of the organism. The approach is based on the branching length similarity (BLS) entropy defined on a simple branching network consisting of a single node and branches. The organism's swimming activity is recorded using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera for 3 h at a rate of 4 frames per second. In each frame, we place 13 points as nodes, those points being distributed at equal intervals along the organism's length. Thus, the organism is represented by 13 nodes and 12 edges between nodes. By using the nodes and edges, we construct two simple networks. One is formed by connecting the center point to all other points, and the other is generated from the angles between edges. The BLS entropy values are calculated as S L for the former network and S ? for the latter. We investigate the distributions of the S L and the S ? values in the phase space of S L — S ? and compare those with the values obtained from a simulated C. elegans generated by using randomly-moving chained particles along a certain angle. The comparison revealed distinctive features of the movement patterns of C. elegans during swimming activity. In addition, we briefly discuss the application of our method to bio-monitoring systems to capture behavioral changes of test organisms before and after chemical treatment at low concentrations.

  20. Mechanism underlying prolongevity induced by bifidobacteria in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Komura, Tomomi; Ikeda, Takanori; Yasui, Chikako; Saeki, Shigeru; Nishikawa, Yoshikazu

    2013-02-01

    Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria are probiotic bacteria that modify host defense systems and have the ability to extend the lifespan of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Here, we attempted to elucidate the mechanism by which bifidobacteria prolong the lifespan of C. elegans. When the nematode was fed Bifidobacterium infantis (BI) mixed at various ratios with the standard food bacterium Escherichia coli strain OP50 (OP), the mean lifespan of worms was extended in a dose-dependent manner. Worms fed BI displayed higher locomotion and produced more offspring than control worms. The growth curves of nematodes were similar regardless of the amount of BI mixed with OP, suggesting that BI did not induce prolongevity effects through caloric restriction. Notably, feeding worms the cell wall fraction of BI alone was sufficient to promote prolongevity. The accumulation of protein carbonyls and lipofuscin, a biochemical marker of aging, was also lower in worms fed BI; however, the worms displayed similar susceptibility to heat, hydrogen peroxide, and paraquat, an inducer of free radicals, as the control worms. As a result of BI feeding, loss-of-function mutants of daf-16, jnk-1, aak-2, tol-1, and tir-1 exhibited a longer lifespan than OP-fed control worms, but BI failed to extend the lifespan of pmk-1, skn-1, and vhp-1 mutants. As skn-1 induces phase 2 detoxification enzymes, our findings suggest that cell wall components of bifidobacteria increase the average lifespan of C. elegans via activation of skn-1, regulated by the p38 MAPK pathway, but not by general activation of the host defense system via DAF-16. PMID:23291976

  1. Caenorhabditis elegans-based Model Systems for Antifungal Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G.; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2013-01-01

    The substantial morbidity and mortality associated with invasive fungal infections constitute undisputed tokens of their severity. The continued expansion of susceptible population groups (such as immunocompromised individuals, patients undergoing extensive surgery, and those hospitalized with serious underlying diseases especially in the intensive care unit) and the limitations of current antifungal agents due to toxicity issues or to the development of resistance, mandate the development of novel antifungal drugs. Currently, drug discovery is transitioning from the traditional in vitro large-scale screens of chemical libraries to more complex bioassays, including in vivo studies on whole animals; invertebrates, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, are thus gaining momentum as screening tools. Key pathogenesis features of fungal infections, including filament formation, are expressed in certain invertebrate and mammalian hosts; among the various potential hosts, C. elegans provides an attractive platform both for the study of host-pathogen interactions and the identification of new antifungal agents. Advantages of compound screening in this facile, relatively inexpensive and not as ethically challenged whole-animal context, include the simultaneous assessment of antifungal efficacy and toxicity that could result in the identification of compounds with distinct mechanisms of action, for example by promoting host immune responses or by impeding fungal virulence factors. With the recent advent of using predictive models to screen for compounds with improved chances of bioavailability in the nematode a priori, high-throughput screening of chemical libraries using the C. elegans-c. albicans antifungal discovery assay holds even greater promise for the identification of novel antifungal agents in the near future. PMID:21470110

  2. Undulatory locomotion of finite filaments: lessons from Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, R. S.; Kenneth, O.; Sznitman, J.; Leshansky, A. M.

    2013-07-01

    Undulatory swimming is a widespread propulsion strategy adopted by many small-scale organisms including various single-cell eukaryotes and nematodes. In this work, we report a comprehensive study of undulatory locomotion of a finite filament using (i) approximate resistive force theory (RFT) assuming a local nature of hydrodynamic interaction between the filament and the surrounding viscous liquid and (ii) particle-based numerical computations taking into account the intra-filament hydrodynamic interaction. Using the ubiquitous model of a propagating sinusoidal waveform, we identify the limit of applicability of the RFT and determine the optimal propulsion gait in terms of (i) swimming distance per period of undulation and (ii) hydrodynamic propulsion efficiency. The occurrence of the optimal swimming gait maximizing hydrodynamic efficiency at finite wavelength in particle-based computations diverges from the prediction of the RFT. To compare the model swimmer powered by sine wave undulations to biological undulatory swimmers, we apply the particle-based approach to study locomotion of the model organism nematode Caenorhabditis elegans using the swimming gait extracted from experiments. The analysis reveals that even though the amplitude and the wavenumber of undulations are similar to those determined for the best performing sinusoidal swimmer, C. elegans overperforms the latter in terms of both displacement and hydrodynamic efficiency. Further comparison with other undulatory microorganisms reveals that many adopt waveforms with characteristics similar to the optimal model swimmer, yet real swimmers still manage to beat the best performing sine-wave swimmer in terms of distance covered per period. Overall our results underline the importance of further waveform optimization, as periodic undulations adopted by C. elegans and other organisms deviate considerably from a simple sine wave.

  3. Elucidating the Mechanism of Weissella-dependent Lifespan Extension in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyun; Kwon, Gayeung; Lim, Young-Hee

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism whereby lactic acid bacteria extend the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans has previously been elucidated. However, the role of Weissella species has yet not been studied. We show that Weissella koreensis and Weissella cibaria significantly (p?elegans compared with Escherichia coli OP50 and induce the expression of several genes related to lifespan extension (daf-16, aak-2, jnk-1, sod-3 and hif-1). Oral administration of Weissella altered reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and lowered the accumulation of lipofuscin and increased locomotor activity (which translates to a delay in ageing). Moreover, Weissella-fed C. elegans had decreased body sizes, brood sizes, ATP levels and pharyngeal pumping rates compared with E. coli OP50-fed worms. Furthermore, mutations in sod-3, hif-1 or skn-1 did not alter lifespan extension compared with wild-type C. elegans. However, C. elegans failed to display lifespan extension in loss-of-function mutants of daf-16, aak-2 and jnk-1, which highlights the potential role of these genes in Weissella-induced longevity in C. elegans. Weissella species extend C. elegans lifespan by activating DAF-16 via the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway, which is related to stress response, and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-pathway that is activated by dietary restriction. PMID:26601690

  4. Elucidating the Mechanism of Weissella-dependent Lifespan Extension in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiyun; Kwon, Gayeung; Lim, Young-Hee

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism whereby lactic acid bacteria extend the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans has previously been elucidated. However, the role of Weissella species has yet not been studied. We show that Weissella koreensis and Weissella cibaria significantly (p?elegans compared with Escherichia coli OP50 and induce the expression of several genes related to lifespan extension (daf-16, aak-2, jnk-1, sod-3 and hif-1). Oral administration of Weissella altered reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and lowered the accumulation of lipofuscin and increased locomotor activity (which translates to a delay in ageing). Moreover, Weissella-fed C. elegans had decreased body sizes, brood sizes, ATP levels and pharyngeal pumping rates compared with E. coli OP50-fed worms. Furthermore, mutations in sod-3, hif-1 or skn-1 did not alter lifespan extension compared with wild-type C. elegans. However, C. elegans failed to display lifespan extension in loss-of-function mutants of daf-16, aak-2 and jnk-1, which highlights the potential role of these genes in Weissella-induced longevity in C. elegans. Weissella species extend C. elegans lifespan by activating DAF-16 via the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway, which is related to stress response, and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-pathway that is activated by dietary restriction. PMID:26601690

  5. ICeE an interface for C. elegans experiments.

    PubMed

    Montañana, Frédéric; Julien, Renaud A; Vaglio, Philippe; Matthews, Lisa R; Tichit, Laurent; Ewbank, Jonathan J

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of laboratories are using the COPAS Biosort™ to implement high-throughput approaches to tackle diverse biological problems. While providing a powerful tool for generating quantitative data, the utility of the Biosort is currently limited by the absence of resources for data management. We describe a simple electronic database designed to allow easy storage and retrieval of Biosort data for C. elegans, but that has a wide potential application for organizing electronic files and data sets. ICeE is an Open Source application. The code and accompanying documentation are freely available via the web at http://www.ciml.univ-mrs.fr/EWBANK_jonathan/software.html. PMID:26430546

  6. Folate status of gut microbiome affects Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Theresa P T; Clarke, Catherine F

    2012-01-01

    In a paper in BMC Biology Virk et al. show that Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan is extended in response to a diet of folate-deficient Escherichia coli. The deficiencies in folate biosynthesis were due to an aroD mutation, or treatment of E. coli with sulfa drugs, which are mimics of the folate precursor para-aminobenzoic acid. This study suggests that pharmacological manipulation of the gut microbiome folate status may be a viable approach to slow animal aging, and raises questions about folate supplementation. PMID:22849295

  7. Google matrix analysis of C.elegans neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandiah, V.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2014-05-01

    We study the structural properties of the neural network of the C.elegans (worm) from a directed graph point of view. The Google matrix analysis is used to characterize the neuron connectivity structure and node classifications are discussed and compared with physiological properties of the cells. Our results are obtained by a proper definition of neural directed network and subsequent eigenvector analysis which recovers some results of previous studies. Our analysis highlights particular sets of important neurons constituting the core of the neural system. The applications of PageRank, CheiRank and ImpactRank to characterization of interdependency of neurons are discussed.

  8. Caenorhabditis elegans - A model system for space biology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Thomas E.; Nelson, Gregory A.

    1991-01-01

    The utility of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans in studies spanning aspects of development, aging, and radiobiology is reviewed. These topics are interrelated via cellular and DNA repair processes especially in the context of oxidative stress and free-radical metabolism. The relevance of these research topics to problems in space biology is discussed and properties of the space environment are outlined. Exposure to the space-flight environment can induce rapid changes in living systems that are similar to changes occurring during aging; manipulation of these environmental parameters may represent an experimental strategy for studies of development and senescence. The current and future opportunities for such space-flight experimentation are presented.

  9. IP3 signalling regulates exogenous RNAi in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Marie; Christov, Christo P; Sequedo, María Dolores; Herzog, Mareike; Herlihy, Anna E; Bodak, Maxime; Gatsi, Roxani; Baylis, Howard A.

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a widespread and widely exploited phenomenon. Here we show that changing inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) signalling alters RNAi sensitivity in C. elegans. Reducing IP3 signalling enhances sensitivity to RNAi in a broad range of genes and tissues. Conversely up-regulating IP3 signalling decreases sensitivity. Tissue specific rescue experiments suggest IP3 functions in the intestine. We also exploit IP3 signalling mutants to further enhance the sensitivity of RNAi hypersensitive strains. These results demonstrate that a conserved cell signalling pathways can modify RNAi responses, implying that RNAi responses may be influenced by an animal’s physiology or environment. PMID:25608529

  10. Koumine, Humantenine, and Yohimbane Alkaloids from Gelsemium elegans.

    PubMed

    Xu, You-Kai; Yang, Lin; Liao, Shang-Gao; Cao, Pei; Wu, Bin; Hu, Hua-Bin; Guo, Juan; Zhang, Ping

    2015-07-24

    Nine new alkaloids of the koumine (1-4), humantenine (5-7), and yohimbane (8, 9) types as well as 12 known analogues were isolated from the leaves and vine stems of Gelsemium elegans. Compound 1 is the first N-4-demethyl alkaloid of the koumine type, compound 7 is the first nor-humantenine alkaloid, and compounds 8 and 9 are the first N-1-oxide and the first seco-E-ring alkaloids, respectively, of the yohimbane type. Compounds 1 and 7 exhibited moderate cytotoxicity against five human tumor cell lines with IC50 values in the range 4.6-9.3 ?M. PMID:26103517

  11. ICeE an interface for C. elegans experiments

    PubMed Central

    Montañana, Frédéric; Julien, Renaud A; Vaglio, Philippe; Matthews, Lisa R; Tichit, Laurent; Ewbank, Jonathan J

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of laboratories are using the COPAS Biosort™ to implement high-throughput approaches to tackle diverse biological problems. While providing a powerful tool for generating quantitative data, the utility of the Biosort is currently limited by the absence of resources for data management. We describe a simple electronic database designed to allow easy storage and retrieval of Biosort data for C. elegans, but that has a wide potential application for organizing electronic files and data sets. ICeE is an Open Source application. The code and accompanying documentation are freely available via the web at http://www.ciml.univ-mrs.fr/EWBANK_jonathan/software.html. PMID:26430546

  12. Google matrix analysis of C.elegans neural network

    E-print Network

    Kandiah, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    We study the structural properties of the neural network of the C.elegans (worm) from a directed graph point of view. The Google matrix analysis is used to characterize the neuron connectivity structure and node classifications are discussed and compared with physiological properties of the cells. Our results are obtained by a proper definition of neural directed network and subsequent eigenvector analysis which recovers some results of previous studies. Our analysis highlights particular sets of important neurons constituting the core of the neural system. The applications of PageRank, CheiRank and ImpactRank to characterization of interdependency of neurons are discussed.

  13. Molecular epidemiology of Italian clinical Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii isolates.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Massimo; Zamfirova, Ralika R; Tortorano, Anna Maria; Viviani, Maria Anna

    2013-07-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans variety grubii is the major etiological agent of cryptococcal meningitis in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. The current PCR-based molecular methods are not sufficient to discriminate among the different populations of this yeast. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the genotypes of the Italian clinical C. neoformans var. grubii isolates by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A total of 53 isolates, each representative of a single case, were studied. Genotyping was performed using the ISHAM Cryptococcus MLST consensus scheme and the results were compared to the publically available global C. neoformans var. grubii MLST dataset. A total of 16 genotypes were identified; 14 were new genotypes, one was identical to sequence type (ST) ST81, which had been previously reported from Thailand, and one to ST23 already identified in Uganda, the USA and Korea. Sequence type ST61 was the most numerous, including 16 isolates. Network phylogenetic analysis showed that the Italian isolates could be divided into at least three clusters with similarities with those recovered in Africa, Asia and Americas. Distribution of the STs among the isolates could not be correlated to the hospital in which they were recovered or to the HIV status of the patients. The majority of the isolates belonged to the molecular type VNI; three belonged to the rare molecular type VNII and one to the VNB group, which until now had not been described in Europe. The results reveal that the Italian C. neoformans var. grubii population presents a distinct variability, displaying a high number of new genotypes, and probably recombines sexually. PMID:23286351

  14. Nematodes feel a craving--using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model to study alcohol addiction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Geng; Zhang, Fen; Li, Wei

    2014-08-01

    Alcohol is the most frequently-used addictive drug. However, the mechanism by which its consumption leads to addiction remains largely elusive. Given the conservation of behavioral reactions to alcohol, Caenorhabitis elegans (C. elegans) has been effectively used as a model system to investigate the relevant molecular targets and pathways mediating these responses. In this article, we review the roles of BK channels (also called SLO-1), the lipid microenvironment, receptors, the synaptic machinery, and neurotransmitters in both the acute and chronic effects of alcohol. We provide an overview of the genes and mechanisms involved in alcoholismrelated behaviors in C. elegans. PMID:25008572

  15. Insights from the worm: The C. elegans model for innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ermolaeva, Maria A.; Schumacher, Björn

    2014-01-01

    The nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans comprises an ancestral immune system. C. elegans recognizes and responds to viral, bacterial, and fungal infections. Components of the RNA interference machinery respond to viral infection, while highly conserved MAPK signaling pathways activate the innate immune response to bacterial infection. C. elegans has been particularly important for exploring the role of innate immunity in organismal stress resistance and the regulation of longevity. Also functions of neuronal sensing of infectious bacteria have recently been uncovered. Studies on nematode immunity can be instructive in exploring innate immune signaling in the absence of specialized immune cells and adaptive immunity. PMID:24856329

  16. Constituents of the root wood of Austroplenckia populnea var. ovata.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, José R; Silva, Grácia D F; Miyakoshi, Tetsuo; Chen, Chen-Loung

    2006-08-01

    The root wood of Austroplenckia populnea var. ovata was extracted successively with chloroform and methanol. Lapachol and dehydro-beta-lapachone were isolated from the chloroform extract, and euonine, alatusinine, wilfordine, 2-O-deacetyleuonine (1), 7-O-deacetyleuonine (2), and austronine (3) from the methanol extract. The structures of the new compounds 1-3 were elucidated by spectroscopic data interpretation. Lapachol, dehydro-beta-lapachone, euonine, alatusinine, and wilfordine are known compounds that are newly identified from root wood of Austroplenckia populnea. PMID:16933883

  17. Triterpenoid saponins from Polycarpaea corymbosa Lamk. var. eriantha Hochst.

    PubMed

    Manase, Mahenina Jaovita; Mitaine-Offer, Anne-Claire; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Tanaka, Chiaki; Delemasure, Stéphanie; Dutartre, Patrick; Lacaille-Dubois, Marie-Aleth

    2014-04-01

    Four triterpenoid saponins (1-4) were isolated from Polycarpaea corymbosa Lamk. var. eriantha Hochst along with the known apoanagallosaponin IV (5). Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic data analysis. Among the compounds 1, 3-5 which were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against three tumor cell lines (SW480, DU145 and EMT6), compound 1 exhibited cytotoxicity with IC50 values ranging from 4.61 to 22.61 ?M, which was greater than that of etoposide. Compound 2 was tested only against SW480 and a cardiomyoblast cell line (H9c2), and was inactive. PMID:24507482

  18. Computer-Assisted Transgenesis of Caenorhabditis elegans for Deep Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Gilleland, Cody L.; Falls, Adam T.; Noraky, James; Heiman, Maxwell G.; Yanik, Mehmet F.

    2015-01-01

    A major goal in the study of human diseases is to assign functions to genes or genetic variants. The model organism Caenorhabditis elegans provides a powerful tool because homologs of many human genes are identifiable, and large collections of genetic vectors and mutant strains are available. However, the delivery of such vector libraries into mutant strains remains a long-standing experimental bottleneck for phenotypic analysis. Here, we present a computer-assisted microinjection platform to streamline the production of transgenic C. elegans with multiple vectors for deep phenotyping. Briefly, animals are immobilized in a temperature-sensitive hydrogel using a standard multiwell platform. Microinjections are then performed under control of an automated microscope using precision robotics driven by customized computer vision algorithms. We demonstrate utility by phenotyping the morphology of 12 neuronal classes in six mutant backgrounds using combinations of neuron-type-specific fluorescent reporters. This technology can industrialize the assignment of in vivo gene function by enabling large-scale transgenic engineering. PMID:26163188

  19. Computer-Assisted Transgenesis of Caenorhabditis elegans for Deep Phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Gilleland, Cody L; Falls, Adam T; Noraky, James; Heiman, Maxwell G; Yanik, Mehmet F

    2015-09-01

    A major goal in the study of human diseases is to assign functions to genes or genetic variants. The model organism Caenorhabditis elegans provides a powerful tool because homologs of many human genes are identifiable, and large collections of genetic vectors and mutant strains are available. However, the delivery of such vector libraries into mutant strains remains a long-standing experimental bottleneck for phenotypic analysis. Here, we present a computer-assisted microinjection platform to streamline the production of transgenic C. elegans with multiple vectors for deep phenotyping. Briefly, animals are immobilized in a temperature-sensitive hydrogel using a standard multiwell platform. Microinjections are then performed under control of an automated microscope using precision robotics driven by customized computer vision algorithms. We demonstrate utility by phenotyping the morphology of 12 neuronal classes in six mutant backgrounds using combinations of neuron-type-specific fluorescent reporters. This technology can industrialize the assignment of in vivo gene function by enabling large-scale transgenic engineering. PMID:26163188

  20. The genetics of caloric restriction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lakowski, Bernard; Hekimi, Siegfried

    1998-01-01

    Low caloric intake (caloric restriction) can lengthen the life span of a wide range of animals and possibly even of humans. To understand better how caloric restriction lengthens life span, we used genetic methods and criteria to investigate its mechanism of action in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Mutations in many genes (eat genes) result in partial starvation of the worm by disrupting the function of the pharynx, the feeding organ. We found that most eat mutations significantly lengthen life span (by up to 50%). In C. elegans, mutations in a number of other genes that can extend life span have been found. Two genetically distinct mechanisms of life span extension are known: a mechanism involving genes that regulate dauer formation (age-1, daf-2, daf-16, and daf-28) and a mechanism involving genes that affect the rate of development and behavior (clk-1, clk-2, clk-3, and gro-1). We find that the long life of eat-2 mutants does not require the activity of DAF-16 and that eat-2; daf-2 double mutants live even longer than extremely long-lived daf-2 mutants. These findings demonstrate that food restriction lengthens life span by a mechanism distinct from that of dauer-formation mutants. In contrast, we find that food restriction does not further increase the life span of long-lived clk-1 mutants, suggesting that clk-1 and caloric restriction affect similar processes. PMID:9789046

  1. Characterization of mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase from C. elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, Brian M.; Hondal, Robert J. . E-mail: Robert.Hondal@uvm.edu

    2006-08-04

    Thioredoxin reductase catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of the catalytic disulfide bond of thioredoxin. In mammals and other higher eukaryotes, thioredoxin reductases contain the rare amino acid selenocysteine at the active site. The mitochondrial enzyme from Caenorhabditis elegans, however, contains a cysteine residue in place of selenocysteine. The mitochondrial C. elegans thioredoxin reductase was cloned from an expressed sequence tag and then produced in Escherichia coli as an intein-fusion protein. The purified recombinant enzyme has a k {sub cat} of 610 min{sup -1} and a K {sub m} of 610 {mu}M using E. coli thioredoxin as substrate. The reported k {sub cat} is 25% of the k {sub cat} of the mammalian enzyme and is 43-fold higher than a cysteine mutant of mammalian thioredoxin reductase. The enzyme would reduce selenocysteine, but not hydrogen peroxide or insulin. The flanking glycine residues of the GCCG motif were mutated to serine. The mutants improved substrate binding, but decreased the catalytic rate.

  2. From Modes to Movement in the Behavior of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Greg J.; Johnson-Kerner, Bethany; Bialek, William; Ryu, William S.

    2010-01-01

    Organisms move through the world by changing their shape, and here we explore the mapping from shape space to movements in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as it crawls on an agar plate. We characterize the statistics of the trajectories through the correlation functions of the orientation angular velocity, orientation angle and the mean-squared displacement, and we find that the loss of orientational memory has significant contributions from both abrupt, large amplitude turning events and the continuous dynamics between these events. Further, we discover long-time persistence of orientational memory in the intervals between abrupt turns. Building on recent work demonstrating that C. elegans movements are restricted to a low-dimensional shape space, we construct a map from the dynamics in this shape space to the trajectory of the worm along the agar. We use this connection to illustrate that changes in the continuous dynamics reveal subtle differences in movement strategy that occur among mutants defective in two classes of dopamine receptors. PMID:21103370

  3. Evidence for biogenic pyromorphite formation by the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Jackson, B P; Williams, P L; Lanzirotti, A; Bertsch, P M

    2005-08-01

    The determination of chemical speciation and spatial distribution is a prerequisite for a mechanistic understanding of contaminant bioavailability and toxicity to an organism. We have employed synchrotron X-ray techniques to study Cu and Pb speciation and spatial distribution in the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Nematodes were exposed to each metal ion singly or simultaneously in solution for 24 h and were then rinsed thoroughly and preserved in formalin for transportation to the National Synchrotron Light Source. Experiments were conducted at the microprobe beamline X26A employing a focused beam of approximately 10 microm in diameter. Nematodes were mounted in agar gel on Kapton tape. Two-dimensional elemental maps for Cu- and Pb-exposed nematodes were collected in fluorescence mode. Copper was homogeneously distributed throughout the body of the nematode, but Pb exhibited a high degree of localization in the nematode, exclusively in the anterior pharynx region. Detectable localized concentrations of Pb in C. elegans occurred at aqueous exposure concentrations of 2.4 microM. Micro X-ray diffraction of these Pb hotspots gave a diffraction pattern indicating a crystalline Pb solid that was consistent with the Pb phosphate, pyromorphite. Biogenic inorganic phosphate granule formation is relatively common in soil invertebrates; however, these phosphates are typically amorphous, and we believe that this is the first report of crystalline pyromorphite formed internally in an organism. PMID:16124295

  4. A distributed chemosensory circuit for oxygen preference in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Andy J; Chronis, Nikolas; Karow, David S; Marletta, Michael A; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2006-09-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has complex, naturally variable behavioral responses to environmental oxygen, food, and other animals. C. elegans detects oxygen through soluble guanylate cyclase homologs (sGCs) and responds to it differently depending on the activity of the neuropeptide receptor NPR-1: npr-1(lf) and naturally isolated npr-1(215F) animals avoid high oxygen and aggregate in the presence of food; npr-1(215V) animals do not. We show here that hyperoxia avoidance integrates food with npr-1 activity through neuromodulation of a distributed oxygen-sensing network. Hyperoxia avoidance is stimulated by sGC-expressing oxygen-sensing neurons, nociceptive neurons, and ADF sensory neurons. In npr-1(215V) animals, the switch from weak aerotaxis on food to strong aerotaxis in its absence requires close regulation of the neurotransmitter serotonin in the ADF neurons; high levels of ADF serotonin promote hyperoxia avoidance. In npr-1(lf) animals, food regulation is masked by increased activity of the oxygen-sensing neurons. Hyperoxia avoidance is also regulated by the neuronal TGF-beta homolog DAF-7, a secreted mediator of crowding and stress responses. DAF-7 inhibits serotonin synthesis in ADF, suggesting that ADF serotonin is a convergence point for regulation of hyperoxia avoidance. Coalitions of neurons that promote and repress hyperoxia avoidance generate a subtle and flexible response to environmental oxygen. PMID:16903785

  5. A sexually conditioned switch of chemosensory behavior in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Naoko; Iwata, Ryo; Yokoi, Saori; Butcher, Rebecca A; Clardy, Jon; Tomioka, Masahiro; Iino, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    In sexually reproducing animals, mating is essential for transmitting genetic information to the next generation and therefore animals have evolved mechanisms for optimizing the chance of successful mate location. In the soil nematode C. elegans, males approach hermaphrodites via the ascaroside pheromones, recognize hermaphrodites when their tails contact the hermaphrodites' body, and eventually mate with them. These processes are mediated by sensory signals specialized for sexual communication, but other mechanisms may also be used to optimize mate location. Here we describe associative learning whereby males use sodium chloride as a cue for hermaphrodite location. Both males and hermaphrodites normally avoid sodium chloride after associative conditioning with salt and starvation. However, we found that males become attracted to sodium chloride after conditioning with salt and starvation if hermaphrodites are present during conditioning. For this conditioning, which we call sexual conditioning, hermaphrodites are detected by males through pheromonal signaling and additional cue(s). Sex transformation experiments suggest that neuronal sex of males is essential for sexual conditioning. Altogether, these results suggest that C. elegans males integrate environmental, internal and social signals to determine the optimal strategy for mate location. PMID:23861933

  6. Mitoflash frequency in early adulthood predicts lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, En-Zhi; Song, Chun-Qing; Lin, Yuan; Zhang, Wen-Hong; Su, Pei-Fang; Liu, Wen-Yuan; Zhang, Pan; Xu, Jiejia; Lin, Na; Zhan, Cheng; Wang, Xianhua; Shyr, Yu; Cheng, Heping; Dong, Meng-Qiu

    2014-04-01

    It has been theorized for decades that mitochondria act as the biological clock of ageing, but the evidence is incomplete. Here we show a strong coupling between mitochondrial function and ageing by in vivo visualization of the mitochondrial flash (mitoflash), a frequency-coded optical readout reflecting free-radical production and energy metabolism at the single-mitochondrion level. Mitoflash activity in Caenorhabditis elegans pharyngeal muscles peaked on adult day 3 during active reproduction and on day 9 when animals started to die off. A plethora of genetic mutations and environmental factors inversely modified the lifespan and the day-3 mitoflash frequency. Even within an isogenic population, the day-3 mitoflash frequency was negatively correlated with the lifespan of individual animals. Furthermore, enhanced activity of the glyoxylate cycle contributed to the decreased day-3 mitoflash frequency and the longevity of daf-2 mutant animals. These results demonstrate that the day-3 mitoflash frequency is a powerful predictor of C. elegans lifespan across genetic, environmental and stochastic factors. They also support the notion that the rate of ageing, although adjustable in later life, has been set to a considerable degree before reproduction ceases.

  7. Manganese disturbs metal and protein homeostasis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Suzanne; Barhydt, Tracy; Jacobs, Ross; Killilea, David W; Lithgow, Gordon J; Andersen, Julie K

    2014-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating motor and cognitive neurodegenerative disorder for which there is no cure. While aging is the major risk factor for developing PD, clear environmental risks have also been identified. Environmental exposure to the manganese (Mn) metal is a prominent risk factor for developing PD and occupational exposure to high levels of Mn can cause a syndrome known as manganism, which has symptoms that closely resemble PD. In this study, we developed a model of manganism in the environmentally tractable nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. We find that, in addition to previously described modes of Mn toxicity, which primarily include mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, Mn exposure also significantly antagonizes protein homeostasis, another key pathological feature associated with PD and many age-related neurodegenerative diseases. Mn treatment activates the ER unfolded protein response, severely exacerbates toxicity in a disease model of protein misfolding, and alters aggregate solubility. Further, aged animals, which have previously been shown to exhibit decreased protein homeostasis, are particularly susceptible to Mn toxicity when compared to young animals, indicating that the aging process sensitizes animals to metal toxicity. Mn exposure also significantly alters iron (Fe) and calcium (Ca) homeostasis, which is important for mitochondrial and ER health and which may further compound toxicity. These findings indicate that modeling manganism in C. elegans can provide a useful platform for identifying therapeutic interventions for ER stress, proteotoxicity, and age-dependent susceptibilities, key pathological features of PD and other related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25057947

  8. Starvation-induced collective behavior in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Artyukhin, Alexander B.; Yim, Joshua J.; Cheong Cheong, Mi; Avery, Leon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new type of collective behavior in C. elegans nematodes, aggregation of starved L1 larvae. Shortly after hatching in the absence of food, L1 larvae arrest their development and disperse in search for food. In contrast, after two or more days without food, the worms change their behavior—they start to aggregate. The aggregation requires a small amount of ethanol or acetate in the environment. In the case of ethanol, it has to be metabolized, which requires functional alcohol dehydrogenase sodh-1. The resulting acetate is used in de novo fatty acid synthesis, and some of the newly made fatty acids are then derivatized to glycerophosphoethanolamides and released into the surrounding medium. We examined several other Caenorhabditis species and found an apparent correlation between propensity of starved L1s to aggregate and density dependence of their survival in starvation. Aggregation locally concentrates worms and may help the larvae to survive long starvation. This work demonstrates how presence of ethanol or acetate, relatively abundant small molecules in the environment, induces collective behavior in C. elegans associated with different survival strategies. PMID:26013573

  9. Alteration in cellular acetylcholine influences dauer formation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeeyong; Kim, Kwang-Youl; Paik, Young-Ki

    2014-01-01

    Altered acetylcholine (Ach) homeostasis is associated with loss of viability in flies, developmental defects in mice, and cognitive deficits in human. Here, we assessed the importance of Ach in Caenorhabditis elegans development, focusing on the role of Ach during dauer formation. We found that dauer formation was disturbed in choline acetyltransferase (cha-1) and acetylcholinesterase (ace) mutants defective in Ach biosynthesis and degradation, respectively. When examined the potential role of G-proteins in dauer formation, goa-1 and egl-30 mutant worms, expressing mutated versions of mammalian Go and Gq homolog, respectively, showed some abnormalities in dauer formation. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we also found that dauer larvae had lower Ach content than did reproductively grown larvae. In addition, a proteomic analysis of acetylcholinesterase mutant worms, which have excessive levels of Ach, showed differential expression of metabolic genes. Collectively, these results indicate that alterations in Ach release may influence dauer formation in C. elegans. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(2): 80-85] PMID:24219868

  10. Crossover heterogeneity in the absence of hotspots in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Taniya; Rockman, Matthew V

    2014-01-01

    Crossovers play mechanical roles in meiotic chromosome segregation, generate genetic diversity by producing new allelic combinations, and facilitate evolution by decoupling linked alleles. In almost every species studied to date, crossover distributions are dramatically nonuniform, differing among sexes and across genomes, with spatial variation in crossover rates on scales from whole chromosomes to subkilobase hotspots. To understand the regulatory forces dictating these heterogeneous distributions a crucial first step is the fine-scale characterization of crossover distributions. Here we define the wild-type distribution of crossovers along a region of the C. elegans chromosome II at unprecedented resolution, using recombinant chromosomes of 243 hermaphrodites and 226 males. We find that well-characterized large-scale domains, with little fine-scale rate heterogeneity, dominate this region's crossover landscape. Using the Gini coefficient as a summary statistic, we find that this region of the C. elegans genome has the least heterogeneous fine-scale crossover distribution yet observed among model organisms, and we show by simulation that the data are incompatible with a mammalian-type hotspot-rich landscape. The large-scale structural domains-the low-recombination center and the high-recombination arm-have a discrete boundary that we localize to a small region. This boundary coincides with the arm-center boundary defined both by nuclear-envelope attachment of DNA in somatic cells and GC content, consistent with proposals that these features of chromosome organization may be mechanical causes and evolutionary consequences of crossover recombination. PMID:24172135

  11. Caenorhabditis elegans num-1 Negatively Regulates Endocytic Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Lars; Conradt, Barbara; Ruaud, Anne-Françoise; Chen, Carlos Chih-Hsiung; Hatzold, Julia; Bessereau, Jean-Louis; Grant, Barth D.; Tuck, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Much of the material taken into cells by endocytosis is rapidly returned to the plasma membrane by the endocytic recycling pathway. Although recycling is vital for the correct localization of cell membrane receptors and lipids, the molecular mechanisms that regulate recycling are only partially understood. Here we show that in Caenorhabditis elegans endocytic recycling is inhibited by NUM-1A, the nematode Numb homolog. NUM-1A?GFP fusion protein is localized to the baso-lateral surfaces of many polarized epithelial cells, including the hypodermis and the intestine. We show that increased NUM-1A levels cause morphological defects in these cells similar to those caused by loss-of-function mutations in rme-1, a positive regulator of recycling in both C. elegans and mammals. We describe the isolation of worms lacking num-1A activity and show that, consistent with a model in which NUM-1A negatively regulates recycling in the intestine, loss of num-1A function bypasses the requirement for RME-1. Genetic epistasis analysis with rab-10, which is required at an early part of the recycling pathway, suggests that loss of num-1A function does not affect the uptake of material by endocytosis but rather inhibits baso-lateral recycling downstream of rab-10. PMID:18493060

  12. Electron microscopy of the early Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    PubMed

    Müller-Reichert, T; Mäntler, J; Srayko, M; O'Toole, E

    2008-05-01

    The early Caenorhabditis elegans embryo is currently a popular model system to study centrosome assembly, kinetochore organization, spindle formation, and cellular polarization. Here, we present and review methods for routine electron microscopy and 3D analysis of the early C. elegans embryo. The first method uses laser-induced chemical fixation to preserve the fine structure of isolated embryos. This approach takes advantage of time-resolved fixation to arrest development at specific stages. The second method uses high-pressure freezing of whole worms followed by freeze-substitution (HPF-FS) for ultrastructural analysis. This technique allows staging of developing early embryos within the worm uterus, and has the advantage of superior sample preservation required for high-resolution 3D reconstruction. The third method uses a correlative approach to stage isolated, single embryos by light microscopy followed by HPF-FS and electron tomography. This procedure combines the advantages of time-resolved fixation and superior ultrastructural preservation by high-pressure freezing and allows a higher throughput electron microscopic analysis. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods for different applications are discussed. PMID:18445160

  13. Bacopa monnieri promotes longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans under stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Phulara, Suresh C.; Shukla, Virendra; Tiwari, Sudeep; Pandey, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacopa monnieri (L.) Pennell, commonly known as Brahmi is an important medicinal plant traditionally used as memory enhancer and antiepileptic agent. Objective: The present study investigated antioxidant and stress resistance potentials of B. monnieri aqueous extract (BMW) using Caenorhabditis elegans animal model system. Materials and Methods: The antioxidant activity of the BMW was measured using in vitro (DPPH, reducing power and total polyphenol content) and in vivo (DCF-DA assay) assays. The antistress potential of BMW (0.1, 0.01, and 0.001 mg/ml) was evaluated through thermal stress (37°C) and oxidative stress (10 mM paraquat) using C. elegans. Quantification of the HSP-16.2 level was done using CL2070 transgenic worms. Results: Present study reveals that BMW possess in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities. BMW significantly enhanced stress tolerance and increased the mean lifespan of worms during thermal and oxidative stress, although it did not extend lifespan at 20°C and attenuated age dependent decline in physiological behaviors. Moreover, it was shown that BMW was able to up-regulate expression of stress associated gene hsp-16.2, which significantly (P < 0.001) extends the mean lifespan of worms under stress conditions. Conclusion: The study strongly suggests that BMW acts as an antistressor and potent reactive oxygen species scavenger which enhances the survival of the worms in different stress conditions. PMID:25829783

  14. Autophagy protects C. elegans against necrosis during Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Cheng-Gang; Ma, Yi-Cheng; Dai, Li-Li; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy, a conserved pathway that delivers intracellular materials into lysosomes for degradation, is involved in development, aging, and a variety of diseases. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that autophagy plays a protective role against infectious diseases by diminishing intracellular pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, and parasites. However, the mechanism by which autophagy regulates innate immunity remains largely unknown. Here, we show that autophagy is involved in host defense against a pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the metazoan Caenorhabditis elegans. P. aeruginosa infection induces autophagy via a conserved extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Intriguingly, impairment of autophagy does not influence the intestinal accumulation of P. aeruginosa, but instead induces intestinal necrosis. Inhibition of necrosis results in the survival of autophagy-deficient worms after P. aeruginosa infection. These findings reveal a previously unidentified role for autophagy in protection against necrosis triggered by pathogenic bacteria in C. elegans and implicate that such a function of autophagy may be conserved through the inflammatory response in diverse organisms. PMID:25114220

  15. A Distributed Chemosensory Circuit for Oxygen Preference in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Andy J; Chronis, Nikolas; Karow, David S; Marletta, Michael A; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2006-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has complex, naturally variable behavioral responses to environmental oxygen, food, and other animals. C. elegans detects oxygen through soluble guanylate cyclase homologs (sGCs) and responds to it differently depending on the activity of the neuropeptide receptor NPR-1: npr-1(lf) and naturally isolated npr-1(215F) animals avoid high oxygen and aggregate in the presence of food; npr-1(215V) animals do not. We show here that hyperoxia avoidance integrates food with npr-1 activity through neuromodulation of a distributed oxygen-sensing network. Hyperoxia avoidance is stimulated by sGC-expressing oxygen-sensing neurons, nociceptive neurons, and ADF sensory neurons. In npr-1(215V) animals, the switch from weak aerotaxis on food to strong aerotaxis in its absence requires close regulation of the neurotransmitter serotonin in the ADF neurons; high levels of ADF serotonin promote hyperoxia avoidance. In npr-1(lf) animals, food regulation is masked by increased activity of the oxygen-sensing neurons. Hyperoxia avoidance is also regulated by the neuronal TGF-? homolog DAF-7, a secreted mediator of crowding and stress responses. DAF-7 inhibits serotonin synthesis in ADF, suggesting that ADF serotonin is a convergence point for regulation of hyperoxia avoidance. Coalitions of neurons that promote and repress hyperoxia avoidance generate a subtle and flexible response to environmental oxygen. PMID:16903785

  16. Do proximate, C. elegans swimmers synchronize their gait?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinzhou; Raizen, David; Bau, Haim

    2012-11-01

    We imaged two C. elegans swimming, one after the other, in a tapered conduit. The conduit was subjected to a DC electric field, with the negative pole at the narrow end and applied flow directed from the narrow end. As a result of their attraction to the negative pole (electrotaxis), both animals swam upstream. As the conduit narrowed, the average adverse flow velocity increased and the swimming speed of the leading animal decreased faster than that of the trailing animal, allowing the latter to catch up with the former. We quantified synchronization by measuring the phase lag between the gait of one animal and the extended wave pattern of the other as a function of the distance between the two animals. Only when the distance between the two animals' body centers was nearly equal to or smaller than one body length were the animals' motions synchronized. When the nematodes were parallel to one another, synchronization was essential to prevent the animals from colliding. Direct numerical simulations indicate that when the trailing animal's head is immediately downstream of the leading animal's tail, the animals derive just a slight hydrodynamic advantage from their proximity compared to a single swimmer. We thank Kun He Lee from the University of Pennsylvania for preparing C. elegans.

  17. Distribution and movement of Caenorhabditis elegans on a thermal gradient.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yohko; Ohshima, Yasumi

    2003-08-01

    To analyze thermal responses of Caenorhabditis elegans in detail, distribution of a worm population and movement of individual worms were examined on a linear, reproducible and broad temperature gradient. Assay methods were improved compared with those reported previously to ensure good motility and dispersion of worms. Well-fed, wild-type worms distributed over a wide temperature range of up to 10 degrees C, and, within this range, worms migrated in both directions of the gradient at similar frequencies without any specific response to the growth temperature in most cases. By contrast, worms migrated down the gradient if put in a region warmer than the warm boundary of distribution. The distribution range changed depending on the growth temperature and starvation, but active avoidance of a starvation temperature was not detected. These findings contradict previous hypotheses of taxis or migration to the growth temperature in association with food and instead indicate avoidance of a warm temperature. Our results favor a model for thermal response of C. elegans that postulates a single drive based on warm sensation rather than downward and upward drives in the physiological temperature range. Mutants in ttx-3, tax-2, tax-4 or egl-4 genes showed abnormal thermal responses, suggesting that these genes are involved in warm avoidance. Laser ablation and gene expression studies suggest that AFD neurons are not important, and tax-4 expression in neurons other than AFD is required, for warm avoidance. PMID:12819265

  18. Characterization of 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci of Pityopsis graminifolia var. latifolia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pityopsis graminifolia (Michx.) Small var. latifolia (Fern.) Semple is an herbaceous perennial that grows in close proximity to the federally endangered species P. ruthii (Small) Small. Twelve polymorphic microsatellite loci were identified from 87 samples of P. graminifolia var. latifolia and addit...

  19. Generation of Antigenic Diversity in Plasmodium falciparum by Structured Rearrangement of Var Genes During Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Kekre, Mihir; Otto, Thomas D.; Faizullabhoy, Adnan; Rayner, Julian C.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    The most polymorphic gene family in P. falciparum is the ?60 var genes distributed across parasite chromosomes, both in the subtelomeres and in internal regions. They encode hypervariable surface proteins known as P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) that are critical for pathogenesis and immune evasion in Plasmodium falciparum. How var gene sequence diversity is generated is not currently completely understood. To address this, we constructed large clone trees and performed whole genome sequence analysis to study the generation of novel var gene sequences in asexually replicating parasites. While single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were scattered across the genome, structural variants (deletions, duplications, translocations) were focused in and around var genes, with considerable variation in frequency between strains. Analysis of more than 100 recombination events involving var exon 1 revealed that the average nucleotide sequence identity of two recombining exons was only 63% (range: 52.7–72.4%) yet the crossovers were error-free and occurred in such a way that the resulting sequence was in frame and domain architecture was preserved. Var exon 1, which encodes the immunologically exposed part of the protein, recombined in up to 0.2% of infected erythrocytes in vitro per life cycle. The high rate of var exon 1 recombination indicates that millions of new antigenic structures could potentially be generated each day in a single infected individual. We propose a model whereby var gene sequence polymorphism is mainly generated during the asexual part of the life cycle. PMID:25521112

  20. Adaptive observation experiments with 3D-Var and Ensemble Kalman Filtering

    E-print Network

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    Adaptive observation experiments with 3D-Var and Ensemble Kalman Filtering: Implications the University of Maryland we developed the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF) (Ott et al, 2004, Hunt and better than 4D-Var #12;Local Ensemble Transform Kalman FilterLocal Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter

  1. Optimal Allocation of Shunt Dynamic Var Source SVC and STATCOM: A Survey

    E-print Network

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    1 Optimal Allocation of Shunt Dynamic Var Source SVC and STATCOM: A Survey Abstract-- Optimal categorizes the literature relevant to optimal allocation of shunt dynamic Var source SVC and STATCOM, based allocation, voltage stability analysis, CPF, modal analysis, OPF, SVC, STATCOM I. INTRODUCTION Recently

  2. Use of incremental analysis updates in 4D-Var data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Banglin; Tallapragada, Vijay; Weng, Fuzhong; Sippel, Jason; Ma, Zaizhong

    2015-12-01

    The four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation systems used in most operational and research centers use initial condition increments as control variables and adjust initial increments to find optimal analysis solutions. This approach may sometimes create discontinuities in analysis fields and produce undesirable spin ups and spin downs. This study explores using incremental analysis updates (IAU) in 4D-Var to reduce the analysis discontinuities. IAU-based 4D-Var has almost the same mathematical formula as conventional 4D-Var if the initial condition increments are replaced with time-integrated increments as control variables. The IAU technique was implemented in the NASA/GSFC 4D-Var prototype and compared against a control run without IAU. The results showed that the initial precipitation spikes were removed and that other discontinuities were also reduced, especially for the analysis of surface temperature.

  3. Empirical analysis on future-cash arbitrage risk with portfolio VaR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rongda; Li, Cong; Wang, Weijin; Wang, Ze

    2014-03-01

    This paper constructs the positive arbitrage position by alternating the spot index with Chinese Exchange Traded Fund (ETF) portfolio and estimating the arbitrage-free interval of futures with the latest trade data. Then, an improved Delta-normal method was used, which replaces the simple linear correlation coefficient with tail dependence correlation coefficient, to measure VaR (Value-at-risk) of the arbitrage position. Analysis of VaR implies that the risk of future-cash arbitrage is less than that of investing completely in either futures or spot market. Then according to the compositional VaR and the marginal VaR, we should increase the futures position and decrease the spot position appropriately to minimize the VaR, which can minimize risk subject to certain revenues.

  4. Copyright01985 by the Genetics Society of America MUTAGENESIS IN CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS. 11. A

    E-print Network

    Baillie, David

    . ONIZING radiation (X or y ray) is commonly used in the nematode Caenor- I habditis elegans to produce (GREENWALDand HORVITZ1980; HERMAN,MADLand KARI1979; MENEELYand WOOD1984; ROSE,BAILLIEand CURRAN1984).Since

  5. Whole-organism integrative expressome for C. elegans enables in silico study of developmental regulation

    E-print Network

    Hutchison, Luke A. D. (Luke Alexander Daysh), 1976-

    2011-01-01

    The C. elegans nematode has been extensively studied as a model organism since the 1970s, and is the only organism for which the complete cell division tree and the genome are both available. These two datasets were ...

  6. Ligand-Gated Chloride Channels Are Receptors for Biogenic Amines in C. elegans

    E-print Network

    Ringstad, Niels

    Biogenic amines such as serotonin and dopamine are intercellular signaling molecules that function widely as neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. We have identified in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans three ligand-gated ...

  7. An image analysis toolbox for high-throughput C. elegans assays

    E-print Network

    Kamentsky, Lee

    We present a toolbox for high-throughput screening of image-based Caenorhabditis elegans phenotypes. The image analysis algorithms measure morphological phenotypes in individual worms and are effective for a variety of ...

  8. The RHO-1 RhoGTPase Modulates Fertility and Multiple Behaviors in Adult C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    McMullan, Rachel; Nurrish, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    The Rho family of small GTPases are essential during early embryonic development making it difficult to study their functions in adult animals. Using inducible transgenes expressing either a constitutively active version of the single C. elegans Rho ortholog, RHO-1, or an inhibitor of endogenous Rho (C3 transferase), we demonstrate multiple defects caused by altering Rho signaling in adult C. elegans. Changes in RHO-1 signaling in cholinergic neurons affected locomotion, pharyngeal pumping and fecundity. Changes in RHO-1 signaling outside the cholinergic neurons resulted in defective defecation, ovulation, and changes in C. elegans body morphology. Finally both increased and decreased RHO-1 signaling in adults resulted in death within hours. The multiple post-developmental roles for Rho in C. elegans demonstrate that RhoA signaling pathways continue to be used post-developmentally and the resulting phenotypes provide an opportunity to further study post-developmental Rho signaling pathways using genetic screens. PMID:21387015

  9. Dopamine Signaling Is Essential for Precise Rates of Locomotion by C. elegans

    E-print Network

    Omura, Daniel T.

    Dopamine is an important neuromodulator in both vertebrates and invertebrates. We have found that reduced dopamine signaling can cause a distinct abnormality in the behavior of the nematode C. elegans, which has only eight ...

  10. A Neuronal Acetylcholine Receptor Regulates the Balance of Muscle Excitation and Inhibition in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Jospin, Maelle

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, cholinergic motor neurons stimulate muscle contraction as well as activate GABAergic motor neurons that inhibit contraction of the contralateral muscles. Here, we describe the ...

  11. A Decline in p38 MAPK Signaling Underlies Immunosenescence in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Youngman, Matthew J.

    The decline in immune function with aging, known as immunosenescence, has been implicated in evolutionarily diverse species, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not understood. During aging in Caenorhabditis elegans, ...

  12. Analysis of the swimming-to-crawling transition of Caenorhabditis elegans in viscous fluid

    E-print Network

    Kawai, Risa

    2008-01-01

    The locomotory behavior of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is often characterized by two distinct gaits - swimming when in fluids and crawling when on surfaces. Swimming is characterized by about a twice greater ...

  13. Studying host-pathogen interactions and innate immunity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Kim, Dennis H.

    The genetic analysis of mechanisms of pathogen resistance in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has revealed a role for evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways that are required for innate immunity in a wide range of ...

  14. Identification of Potential Therapeutic Drugs for Huntington's Disease using Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Stockwell, Brent R.

    Identification of Potential Therapeutic Drugs for Huntington's Disease using Caenorhabditis elegans, Massachusetts, United States of America Background. The prolonged time course of Huntington's disease (HD, Stockwell BR, et al (2007) Identification of Potential Therapeutic Drugs for Huntington's Disease using

  15. Cloning and characterization of exc-9, a Caenorhabditis elegans CRIP homologue that regulates tubular structure

    E-print Network

    Tong, Xiangyan

    2007-10-12

    Forming and maintaining tubular structure is fundamental to organismal development. The excretory canal cell of C.elegans forms a single-cell epithelial tubule, which provides a simple model for tubular structure study. The EXC proteins regulate...

  16. AUTOMATED NUCLEI TRACKING IN C. ELEGANS BASED ON SPHERICAL MODEL FITTING WITH MULTIPLE TARGET TRACKING

    E-print Network

    Cosman, Pamela C.

    , describing the fates of cells to the adult stage [1][2]. This trait makes C. elegans suitable for studies on cell differentiation and related subjects. Rapid advances in microscopy technology enable high

  17. Receptors and Other Signaling Proteins Required for Serotonin Control of Locomotion in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Gustafson, Megan A.

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of signaling by the neurotransmitter serotonin is required to assess the hypothesis that defects in serotonin signaling underlie depression in humans. Caenorhabditis elegans ...

  18. Communication between oocytes and somatic cells regulates volatile pheromone production in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Leighton, Daniel H. W.; Choe, Andrea; Wu, Shannon Y; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Males of the androdioecious species Caenorhabditis elegans are more likely to attempt to mate with and successfully inseminate C. elegans hermaphrodites that do not concurrently harbor sperm. Although a small number of genes have been implicated in this effect, the mechanism by which it arises remains unknown. In the context of the battle of the sexes, it is also unknown whether this effect is to the benefit of the male, the hermaphrodite, or both. We report that successful contact between mature sperm and oocyte in the C. elegans gonad at the start of fertilization causes the oocyte to release a signal that is transmitted to somatic cells in its mother, with the ultimate effect of reducing her attractiveness to males. Changes in hermaphrodite attractiveness are tied to the production of a volatile pheromone, the first such pheromone described in C. elegans. PMID:25453110

  19. Single molecule fluorescent in situ hybridization (smFISH) of C. elegans worms and embryos

    E-print Network

    Ji, Ni

    In C. elegans, the expression pattern of a gene provides important clues to understanding its biological function. To accurately depict endogenous transcriptional activity, a highly sensitive method is required to measure ...

  20. Evaluation of the influence of fullerenol on aging and stress resistance using Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Cong, Wenshu; Wang, Peng; Qu, Ying; Tang, Jinglong; Bai, Ru; Zhao, Yuliang; Chunying Chen; Bi, Xiaolin

    2015-02-01

    Fullerene derivatives have attracted extensive attention in biomedical fields and polyhydroxyl fullerene (fullerenol), a water-soluble fullerene derivative, is demonstrated as a powerful antioxidant. To further assess their anti-aging and anti-stress potential, we employed Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) as a model organism to evaluate the effects of fullerenol on the growth, development, behavior and anti-stress ability in vivo. The data show that fullerenol has no obviously toxic effect on nematodes and can delay C. elegans aging progress under normal condition. Further studies demonstrate that fullerenol attenuates endogenous levels of reactive oxygen species and provides protection to C. elegans under stress conditions by up-regulating stress-related genes in a DAF-16 depend manner and improving lifespan. In summary, our data suggest that fullerenol might be a safe and reasonable anti-aging candidate with great potential in vivo. PMID:25542795

  1. The broad-spectrum antibiotic, zeamine, kills the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Hellberg, Josephine E. E. U.; Matilla, Miguel A.; Salmond, George P. C.

    2015-02-26

    (PKSs) or non-ribosomal peptide synthases (NRPSs). The plant-associated Gram-negative bacterium, Serratia plymuthica A153, produces several secondary metabolites and is capable of killing the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans; a commonly used model...

  2. Alpha-Synuclein Disrupted Dopamine Homeostasis Leads to Dopaminergic Neuron Degeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Cao, Pengxiu; Yuan, Yiyuan; Pehek, Elizabeth A.; Moise, Alexander R.; Huang, Ying; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Feng, Zhaoyang

    2010-02-19

    Disruption of dopamine homeostasis may lead to dopaminergic neuron degeneration, a proposed explanation for the specific vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. While expression of human ?-synuclein in C. elegans results...

  3. Insulin signaling genes modulate nicotine-induced behavioral responses in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wescott, Seth A; Ronan, Elizabeth A; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2016-02-01

    Insulin signaling has been suggested to modulate nicotine dependence, but the underlying genetic evidence has been lacking. Here, we used the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, to investigate whether genetic alterations in the insulin signaling pathway affect behavioral responses to nicotine. For this, we challenged drug-naive C. elegans with an acute dose of nicotine (100??mol/l) while recording changes in their locomotion speed. Although nicotine treatment stimulated locomotion speed in wild-type C. elegans, the same treatment reduced locomotion speed in mutants defective in insulin signaling. This phenotype could be suppressed by mutations in daf-16, a gene encoding a FOXO transcription factor that acts downstream of insulin signaling. Our data suggest that insulin signaling genes, daf-2, age-1, pdk-1, akt-1, and akt-2, modulate behavioral responses to nicotine in C. elegans, indicating a genetic link between nicotine behavior and insulin signaling. PMID:26317299

  4. Biochemical and High Throughput Microscopic Assessment of Fat Mass in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    E-print Network

    Pino, Elizabeth C.

    The nematode C. elegans has emerged as an important model for the study of conserved genetic pathways regulating fat metabolism as it relates to human obesity and its associated pathologies. Several previous methodologies ...

  5. The neural circuits and sensory channels mediating harsh touch sensation in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Kang, Lijun; Piggott, Beverly J.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Shawn Xu, X. Z.

    2011-01-01

    Most animals can distinguish two distinct types of touch stimuli: gentle (innocuous) and harsh (noxious/painful) touch, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. C. elegans is a highly successful model for the study of gentle touch sensation. However, little is known about harsh touch sensation in this organism. Here we characterize harsh touch sensation in C. elegans. We show that C. elegans exhibits differential behavioral responses to harsh touch and gentle touch. Laser ablations identify distinct sets of sensory neurons and interneurons required for harsh touch sensation at different body segments. Optogenetic stimulation of the circuitry can drive behavior. Patch-clamp recordings reveal that TRP family and amiloride-sensitive Na+ channels mediate touch-evoked currents in different sensory neurons. Our work identifies the neural circuits and characterizes the sensory channels mediating harsh touch sensation in C. elegans, establishing it as a genetic model for studying this sensory modality. PMID:21587232

  6. Receptor-type guanylate cyclase is required for carbon dioxide sensation by Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Hallem, Elissa A.

    CO2 [CO subscript 2] is both a critical regulator of animal physiology and an important sensory cue for many animals for host detection, food location, and mate finding. The free-living soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans ...

  7. Abl Kinase Inhibits the Engulfment of Apoptotic [corrected] Cells in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Hurwitz, Michael Eliezer

    The engulfment of apoptotic cells is required for normal metazoan development and tissue remodeling. In Caenorhabditis elegans, two parallel and partially redundant conserved pathways act in cell-corpse engulfment. One ...

  8. The regulation of programmed and pathological cell death in C. elegans

    E-print Network

    Galvin, Brendan D. (Brendan Daniel)

    2007-01-01

    Programmed cell death, or apoptosis, is important in the development and homeostasis of metazoans. In the nematode C. elegans, four genes, egl-1, ced-9, ced-4, and ced-3, constitute the core pathway acting in all somatic ...

  9. C. elegans integrates food, stress, and hunger signals to coordinate motor activity

    E-print Network

    Omura, Daniel Togo

    2008-01-01

    In the presence of a bacterial food source, the small nematode C. elegans greatly reduces its rate of locomotion. While mechanical agitation greatly stimulates the locomotion of well-fed animals on bacteria, it does not ...

  10. Phytologia (February 2013) 95(1)94 Taxonomy of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) infraspecific taxa: vars. menziesii, glauca and

    E-print Network

    Adams, Robert P.

    taxa: vars. menziesii, glauca and oaxacana: nrDNA, cpDNA sequences and leaf essential oils Robert P (Debreczy and Racz, 1995). The leaf essential oils of P. menziesii have been exhaustively studied by von differences in oil composition between coastal (var. menziesii) and inland (var. glauca) varieties. A second

  11. Critical review of Ayurvedic Var?ya herbs and their tyrosinase inhibition effect

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Khemchand; Joshi, Namrata; Goyal, Chinky

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aspiration for light skin (fair complexion) is becoming pronounced in a greater number of people in the present times with natural products being more in demand than their synthetic counterparts. Research in the area of skin-lightening agents is an expanding field with the knowledge being updated regularly. In Ayurveda, var?ya, raktapras?dana, tvacya are few terms specifying skin lightening with respect to its modern counterpart i.e., Tyrosinase inhibition, the most commonly reported method of skin lightening. Aim: The present review is undertaken for screening twenty herbs from Var?ya Mah?ka??ya, Lodhr?di var?ya ga?a, El?di var?a pras?dana ga?a and few var?ya formulations to evaluate their probable modes of action through which the skin lightening is effected as per both Ayurveda and biomedical concepts. Materials and Methods: Critical review of herbs to show var?ya property is compiled from various Ayurvedic texts as well as from multiple articles on the internet to justify their skin lightening property on the basis of data collected. Result and Conclusion: All the twenty herbs reviewed are found to act as var?ya directly (citation as var?ya) or indirectly (alleviation of pitta and rakta) as per Ayurveda and to interfere in melanogenesis pathway through tyrosinase inhibition as per biomedicine. This shows their potential to act as good skin whitening agents. ?u??hi being a part of many var?ya formulations, is the only herb among all reviewed in the present study found to exhibit tyrosinase inhibition without any Ayurvedic citation of var?ya property. PMID:26600663

  12. Dense aggregations of Pygospio elegans (Claparède): effect on macrofaunal community structure and sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolam, Stefan G.; Fernandes, Teresa F.

    2003-05-01

    Epibenthic biogenic structures such as polychaete tubes are conspicuous features of many marine soft-bottom habitats. This paper compares the benthic macrofauna in patches with high and low densities of the tube-dweller Pygospio elegans on intertidal sandflats in eastern Scotland (UK). The main aim of this study was to determine potential differences in the macrofaunal community structure, the size distribution of individual species and sediment properties. Multivariate data analyses revealed that the macrofaunal community composition (excluding P. elegans) within patches was always significantly different from outside patches, mainly due to variability in the abundances of Cerastoderma edule and Corophium volutator. In addition to P. elegans, 5 taxa were sufficiently abundant for univariate analyses, 4 of these ( Capitella capitata, C. edule, Macoma balthica and C. volutator) being significantly more abundant within P. elegans patches than in surrounding, non-patch sediments. The size distribution of P. elegans was significantly different between patches (bimodal distribution) and non-patches (skewed distribution). Similarly, there was a greater proportion of larger C. capitata individuals within patches compared to non-patch sediments. Sediment organic content and silt/clay fraction were always significantly higher in patch sediments while redox profiles showed no differences except at the end of the study period when the top 2 cm within patches were more positive and more negative at 4 cm. These results imply that even relatively small (1-1.5 m 2) P. elegans patches can have large effects on the spatial variability of macrofaunal community structure on intertidal sandflats. Towards the end of the study there were marked visual changes in the P. elegans patches, such as wave-ripple marks on the surface, which signified their demise. This coincided with dramatic changes in the invertebrate community structure within patches. Along with the decline in P. elegans numbers, dramatic increases in the densities of the 2 bivalve species C. edule and M. balthica occurred, while remaining comparatively stable outside patches. This suggested that the conditions within P. elegans patches were particularly favourable to successful bivalve spat settlement. We postulate that P. elegans patches have limited longevity and propose that enhanced bivalve competition within them leads to rapid decreases in P. elegans numbers.

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide Is an Endogenous Regulator of Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Qabazard, Bedoor; Li, Ling; Gruber, Jan; Peh, Meng Teng; Ng, Li Fang; Kumar, Srinivasan Dinesh; Rose, Peter; Tan, Choon-Hong; Dymock, Brian W.; Wei, Feng; Swain, Suresh C.; Halliwell, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: To investigate the role of endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the control of aging and healthspan of Caenorhabditis elegans. Results: We show that the model organism, C. elegans, synthesizes H2S. Three H2S-synthesizing enzymes are present in C. elegans, namely cystathionine ? lyase (CSE), cystathionine ? synthetase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate transferase (MPST or 3-MST). Genetic deficiency of mpst-1 (3-MST orthologue 1), but not cth-2 (CSE orthologue), reduced the lifespan of C. elegans. This effect was reversed by a pharmacological H2S donor (GYY4137). GYY4137 also reduced detrimental age-dependent changes in a range of physiological indices, including pharyngeal contraction and defecation. Treatment of C. elegans with GYY4137 increased the expression of several age-related, stress response, and antioxidant genes, whereas MitoSOX Red fluorescence, indicative of reactive oxygen species generation, was increased in mpst-1 knockouts and decreased by GYY4137 treatment. GYY4137 additionally increased the lifespan in short-lived mev-1 mutants with elevated oxidative stress and protected wild-type C. elegans against paraquat poisoning. The lifespan-prolonging and health-promoting effects of H2S in C. elegans are likely due to the antioxidant action of this highly cell-permeable gas. Innovation: The possibility that novel pharmacological agents based on the principle of H2S donation may be able to retard the onset of age-related disease by slowing the aging process warrants further study. Conclusion: Our results show that H2S is an endogenous regulator of oxidative damage, metabolism, and aging in C. elegans and provide new insight into the mechanisms, which control aging in this model organism. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2621–2630. PMID:24093496

  14. A conserved checkpoint monitors meiotic chromosome synapsis inCaenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Bhalla, Needhi; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-07-14

    We report the discovery of a checkpoint that monitorssynapsis between homologous chromosomes to ensure accurate meioticsegregation. Oocytes containing unsynapsed chromosomes selectivelyundergo apoptosis even if agermline DNA damage checkpoint is inactivated.This culling mechanism isspecifically activated by unsynapsed pairingcenters, cis-acting chromosomesites that are also required to promotesynapsis in Caenorhabditis elegans. Apoptosis due to synaptic failurealso requires the C. elegans homolog of PCH2,a budding yeast pachytenecheckpoint gene, which suggests that this surveillance mechanism iswidely conserved.

  15. Variability of chemical composition and antioxidant activity of essential oils between Myrtus communis var. Leucocarpa DC and var. Melanocarpa DC.

    PubMed

    Petretto, Giacomo Luigi; Maldini, Mariateresa; Addis, Roberta; Chessa, Mario; Foddai, Marzia; Rourke, Jonathan P; Pintore, Giorgio

    2016-04-15

    Essential oils (EOs) from several individuals of Myrtus communis L. (M. communis) growing in different habitats in Sardinia have been studied. The analyses were focused on four groups of samples, namely cultivated and wild M. communis var. melanocarpa DC, characterized by red/purple berries, and cultivated and wild M. communis var. leucocarpa DC, characterized by white berries. Qualitative and quantitative analyses demonstrated different EO fingerprints among the studied samples: cultivated and wild leucocarpa variety differs mainly from the melanocarpa variety by a high amount of myrtenyl acetate (>200mg/mL and 0.4mg/mL in leucocarpa and melanocarpa varieties respectively). Conversely, the wild group is characterized by a higher amount, compared with the cultivated species, of linalool (about 110mg/mL and 20mg/mL respectively), linalyl acetate (about 24mg/mL and about 6mg/mL respectively) whereas EOs of the cultivated plants were rich in pinocarveol-cis compared with wild plants (about 2mg/mL and about 0.5mg/mL respectively). Principal component analysis applied to the chromatographic data confirm a differentiation and classification of EOs from the four groups of M. communis plants. Finally, antioxidant activity of the studied EOs shows differences between the various categories of samples. PMID:26616932

  16. The lifespan-extending effects of Nymphaea hybrid root extract in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Ziheng; Lv, Ting; Li, Min; Zhang, Yusi; Xue, Ting; Yang, Linsong; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Weiming

    2014-12-01

    Nymphaea hybrid, a water lily from the Nymphaeaceae family, has been found to exhibit some in vivo beneficial effects. In the present study we investigated the lifespan-extending effects of Nymphaea hybrid root extract in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that Nymphaea hybrid root extract significantly extended the lifespan of C.elegans and improved its locomotion during aging. Moreover, Nymphaea hybrid root extract increased the resistance of C.elegans to both heat stress and oxidative stress. We found that the ability of Nymphaea hybrid root extract to increase lifespan was independent of its antimicrobial effects and was probably associated with its effects on the reproduction of C.elegans. In addition, the lifespan-extending effects of Nymphaea hybrid root extract were found to be dependent on the insulin/IGF signaling pathway. We also found that total flavones of Nymphaea hybrid could increase survival of C.elegans in both normal and adverse conditions, indicating that total flavones comprise the major fractions with lifespan-extending effects. Therefore, Nymphaea hybrid root extract has lifespan-extending effects in C.elegans and could be developed as a functional food. PMID:25367047

  17. Anti-aging effect of polysaccharide from Bletilla striata on nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yusi; Lv, Ting; Li, Min; Xue, Ting; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Weiming; Ding, Xiaoyu; Zhuang, Ziheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polysaccharide isolated from Bletilla striata, a well-known traditional Chinese medicine (Bletilla striata polysaccharide [BSP]) has been found to play important roles in endothelial cells proliferation, inducible nitric oxide stimulation, wound healing acceleration and other processes. Recent studies found that B. striata has anti-oxidative properties, however, potential anti-aging effects of BSP in whole organisms has not been characterized. Objective: To investigate whether BSP has anti-aging effects on Caenorhabditis elegans. Materials and Methods: After treatment with BSP, the lifespan, locomotion ability, and stress resistance of C. elegans was determined. To provide insight into the underlying mechanism for the anti-aging effect of BSP, we measured its effect on bacterial growth, brood size of C. elegans, and the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway. Results: After BSP treatment, the lifespan of C. elegans was extended, and its locomotion ability and stress resistance were increased. BSP was found to have no effect on bacterial growth or on reproduction of C. elegans, However, mRNA levels of age-1 and hcf-1 were reduced after BSP treatment. Additionally, we observed that BSP did not extend the lifespan of daf-16 mutant animals. Conclusion: BSP produces an anti-aging effect on C. elegans through the insulin/IGF signaling pathway and holds promise for future development as a functional food. PMID:26246718

  18. Effect of nanoparticles on the biochemical and behavioral aging phenotype of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Andrea; Piechulek, Annette; von Mikecz, Anna

    2013-12-23

    Invertebrate animal models such as the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) are increasingly used in nanotechnological applications. Research in this area covers a wide range from remote control of worm behavior by nanoparticles (NPs) to evaluation of organismal nanomaterial safety. Despite of the broad spectrum of investigated NP-bio interactions, little is known about the role of nanomaterials with respect to aging processes in C. elegans. We trace NPs in single cells of adult C. elegans and correlate particle distribution with the worm's metabolism and organ function. By confocal microscopy analysis of fluorescently labeled NPs in living worms, we identify two entry portals for the uptake of nanomaterials via the pharynx to the intestinal system and via the vulva to the reproductive system. NPs are localized throughout the cytoplasm and the cell nucleus in single intestinal, and vulval B and D cells. Silica NPs induce an untimely accumulation of insoluble ubiquitinated proteins, nuclear amyloid and reduction of pharyngeal pumping that taken together constitute a premature aging phenotype of C. elegans on the molecular and behavioral level, respectively. Screening of different nanomaterials for their effects on protein solubility shows that polystyrene or silver NPs do not induce accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins suggesting that alteration of protein homeostasis is a unique property of silica NPs. The nematode C. elegans represents an excellent model to investigate the effect of different types of nanomaterials on aging at the molecule, cell, and whole organism level. PMID:24256469

  19. Ultrastructure of the spermatozoon of the digenean Plagiorchis elegans (Rudolphi, 1802) (Plagiorchioidea, Plagiorchiidae).

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, Papa Ibnou; Quilichini, Yann; Tkach, Vasyl V; Greiman, Stephen E; Bâ, Cheikh Tidiane; Marchand, Bernard

    2013-09-01

    The ultrastructure of the mature spermatozoon of the type genus of the Plagiorchiidae Plagiorchis elegans (Rudolphi, 1802), a parasite of the Golden hamster, Mesocricetus auratus is described. This study is the first ultrastructural study of the spermatozoon of a Plagiorchis, the second of a plagiorchiid species and only the third in the Plagiorchioidea. Previously data on spermatozoon ultrastructure existed only for the plagiorchiid Enodiotrema reductum and the omphalometrid Rubenstrema exasperatum. The mature spermatozoon of P. elegans exhibited the general pattern described in most digenean species, namely two axonemes of the 9 +?"1" Trepaxonemata pattern, nucleus, mitochondria, external ornamentation of the plasma membrane, spine-like bodies, and glycogen granules. However, the rather typical expansion of the plasma membrane is not found in P. elegans. Another peculiarity of the spermatozoon of P. elegans is the presence of a structure called thin cytoplasm termination. Spermatozoon ultrastructure of P. elegans is compared with that of E. reductum and R. exasperatum. Spermatozoon of P. elegans conforms to the general pattern described in E. reductum. Thus, this study further expands our knowledge on the spermatozoon ultrastructure among the members of the Plagiorchioidea, one of the most phylogenetically derived groups of the digenea. PMID:23630154

  20. Excessive folate synthesis limits lifespan in the C. elegans: E. coli aging model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gut microbes influence animal health and thus, are potential targets for interventions that slow aging. Live E. coli provides the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans with vital micronutrients, such as folates that cannot be synthesized by animals. However, the microbe also limits C. elegans lifespan. Understanding these interactions may shed light on how intestinal microbes influence mammalian aging. Results Serendipitously, we isolated an E. coli mutant that slows C. elegans aging. We identified the disrupted gene to be aroD, which is required to synthesize aromatic compounds in the microbe. Adding back aromatic compounds to the media revealed that the increased C. elegans lifespan was caused by decreased availability of para-aminobenzoic acid, a precursor to folate. Consistent with this result, inhibition of folate synthesis by sulfamethoxazole, a sulfonamide, led to a dose-dependent increase in C. elegans lifespan. As expected, these treatments caused a decrease in bacterial and worm folate levels, as measured by mass spectrometry of intact folates. The folate cycle is essential for cellular biosynthesis. However, bacterial proliferation and C. elegans growth and reproduction were unaffected under the conditions that increased lifespan. Conclusions In this animal:microbe system, folates are in excess of that required for biosynthesis. This study suggests that microbial folate synthesis is a pharmacologically accessible target to slow animal aging without detrimental effects. PMID:22849329

  1. E. coli OxyS non-coding RNA does not trigger RNAi in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Akay, Alper; Sarkies, Peter; Miska, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) in C. elegans has had a major impact on scientific research, led to the rapid development of RNAi tools and has inspired RNA-based therapeutics. Astonishingly, nematodes, planaria and many insects take up double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) from their environment to elicit RNAi; the biological function of this mechanism is unclear. Recently, the E. coli OxyS non-coding RNA was shown to regulate gene expression in C. elegans when E. coli is offered as food. This was surprising given that C. elegans is unlikely to encounter E. coli in nature. To directly test the hypothesis that the E. coli OxyS non-coding RNA triggers the C. elegans RNAi pathway, we sequenced small RNAs from C. elegans after feeding with bacteria. We clearly demonstrate that the OxyS non-coding RNA does not trigger an RNAi response in C. elegans. We conclude that the biology of environmental RNAi remains to be discovered. PMID:25873159

  2. E. coli OxyS non-coding RNA does not trigger RNAi in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Akay, Alper; Sarkies, Peter; Miska, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) in C. elegans has had a major impact on scientific research, led to the rapid development of RNAi tools and has inspired RNA-based therapeutics. Astonishingly, nematodes, planaria and many insects take up double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) from their environment to elicit RNAi; the biological function of this mechanism is unclear. Recently, the E. coli OxyS non-coding RNA was shown to regulate gene expression in C. elegans when E. coli is offered as food. This was surprising given that C. elegans is unlikely to encounter E. coli in nature. To directly test the hypothesis that the E. coli OxyS non-coding RNA triggers the C. elegans RNAi pathway, we sequenced small RNAs from C. elegans after feeding with bacteria. We clearly demonstrate that the OxyS non-coding RNA does not trigger an RNAi response in C. elegans. We conclude that the biology of environmental RNAi remains to be discovered. PMID:25873159

  3. Solution structure of CEH-37 homeodomain of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Sunjin; Lee, Yong Woo; Kim, Woo Taek; Lee, Weontae

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •We have determined solution structures of CEH-37 homedomain. •CEH-37 HD has a compact ?-helical structure with HTH DNA binding motif. •Solution structure of CEH-37 HD shares its molecular topology with that of the homeodomain proteins. •Residues in the N-terminal region and HTH motif are important in binding to Caenorhabditis elegans telomeric DNA. •CEH-37 could play an important role in telomere function via DNA binding. -- Abstract: The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans protein CEH-37 belongs to the paired OTD/OTX family of homeobox-containing homeodomain proteins. CEH-37 shares sequence similarity with homeodomain proteins, although it specifically binds to double-stranded C. elegans telomeric DNA, which is unusual to homeodomain proteins. Here, we report the solution structure of CEH-37 homeodomain and molecular interaction with double-stranded C. elegans telomeric DNA using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NMR structure shows that CEH-37 homeodomain is composed of a flexible N-terminal region and three ?-helices with a helix-turn-helix (HTH) DNA binding motif. Data from size-exclusion chromatography and fluorescence spectroscopy reveal that CEH-37 homeodomain interacts strongly with double-stranded C. elegans telomeric DNA. NMR titration experiments identified residues responsible for specific binding to nematode double-stranded telomeric DNA. These results suggest that C. elegans homeodomain protein, CEH-37 could play an important role in telomere function via DNA binding.

  4. Chromatin and transcriptional regulators act in a cascade to establish a bilateral asymmetry of the C. elegans nervous system

    E-print Network

    Nakano, Shunji, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Neuroanatomical bilateral asymmetry is a widespread feature in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Although mostly bilaterally symmetric, the nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans displays bilateral asymmetry. Bilateral ...

  5. Tissue-Specific Activities of SARM-ASK1-MKK3 Signaling Coordinate Immunity and Behavior to Pathogenic and Nutritional Bacteria in C. elegans

    E-print Network

    Kim, Dennis H.

    Microbes represent both an essential source of nutrition and a potential source of lethal infection to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Immunity in C. elegans requires a signaling module comprised of orthologs of the ...

  6. Six and Eya promote apoptosis through direct transcriptional activation of the proapoptotic BH3-only gene egl-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Hirose, Takashi

    The decision of a cell to undergo programmed cell death is tightly regulated during animal development and tissue homeostasis. Here, we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans Six family homeodomain protein C. elegans homeobox ...

  7. Anti-adipogenic effects of extracts of Ficus deltoidea var. deltoidea and var. angustifolia on 3T3-L1 adipocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Woon, Shiau Mei; Seng, Yew Wei; Ling, Anna Pick Kiong; Chye, Soi Moi; Koh, Rhun Yian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the anti-adipogenic effects of extracts of Ficus deltoidea var. deltoidia and var. angustifolia, a natural slimming aid, on 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Methods: Methanol and water extracts of leaves of the F. deltoidea varieties were analyzed to determine their total flavonoid content (TFC) and total phenolic content (TPC), respectively. The study was initiated by determining the maximum non-toxic dose (MNTD) of the methanol and water extracts for 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Possible anti-adipogenic effects were then examined by treating 2-d post confluent 3T3-L1 preadipocytes with either methanol extract or water extract at MNTD and half MNTD (½MNTD), after which the preadipocytces were induced to form mature adipocytes. Visualisation and quantification of lipid content in mature adipocytes were carried out through oil red O staining and measurement of optical density (OD) at 520 nm, respectively. Results: The TFCs of the methanol extracts were 1.36 and 1.97 g quercetin equivalents (QE)/100 g dry weight (DW), while the TPCs of the water extracts were 5.61 and 2.73 g gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/100 g DW for var. deltoidea and var. angustilofia, respectively. The MNTDs determined for methanol and water extracts were (300.0±28.3) and (225.0±21.2) ?g/ml, respectively, for var. deltoidea, while much lower MNTDs [(60.0±2.0) ?g/ml for methanol extracts and (8.0±1.0) ?g/ml for water extracts] were recorded for var. angustifolia. Studies revealed that the methanol extracts of both varieties and the water extracts of var. angustifolia at either MNTD or ½MNTD significantly inhibited the maturation of preadipocytes. Conclusions: The inhibition of the formation of mature adipocytes indicated that leaf extracts of F. deltoidea could have potential anti-obesity effects. PMID:24599694

  8. Neural and genetic degeneracy underlies Caenorhabditis elegans feeding behavior

    PubMed Central

    Trojanowski, Nicholas F.; Padovan-Merhar, Olivia; Fang-Yen, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Degenerate networks, in which structurally distinct elements can perform the same function or yield the same output, are ubiquitous in biology. Degeneracy contributes to the robustness and adaptability of networks in varied environmental and evolutionary contexts. However, how degenerate neural networks regulate behavior in vivo is poorly understood, especially at the genetic level. Here, we identify degenerate neural and genetic mechanisms that underlie excitation of the pharynx (feeding organ) in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans using cell-specific optogenetic excitation and inhibition. We show that the pharyngeal neurons MC, M2, M4, and I1 form multiple direct and indirect excitatory pathways in a robust network for control of pharyngeal pumping. I1 excites pumping via MC and M2 in a state-dependent manner. We identify nicotinic and muscarinic receptors through which the pharyngeal network regulates feeding rate. These results identify two different mechanisms by which degeneracy is manifest in a neural circuit in vivo. PMID:24872529

  9. A Caenorhabditis elegans model system for amylopathy study.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhibing; Sesti, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Amylopathy is a term that describes abnormal synthesis and accumulation of amyloid beta (A?) in tissues with time. A? is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is found in Lewy body dementia, inclusion body myositis and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (1-4). Amylopathies progressively develop with time. For this reason simple organisms with short lifespans may help to elucidate molecular aspects of these conditions. Here, we describe experimental protocols to study A?-mediated neurodegeneration using the worm Caenorhabditis elegans. Thus, we construct transgenic worms by injecting DNA encoding human A?42 into the syncytial gonads of adult hermaphrodites. Transformant lines are stabilized by a mutagenesis-induced integration. Nematodes are age synchronized by collecting and seeding their eggs. The function of neurons expressing A?42 is tested in opportune behavioral assays (chemotaxis assays). Primary neuronal cultures obtained from embryos are used to complement behavioral data and to test the neuroprotective effects of anti-apoptotic compounds. PMID:23711592

  10. An Engineering Approach to Extending Lifespan in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sagi, Dror; Kim, Stuart K.

    2012-01-01

    We have taken an engineering approach to extending the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. Aging stands out as a complex trait, because events that occur in old animals are not under strong natural selection. As a result, lifespan can be lengthened rationally using bioengineering to modulate gene expression or to add exogenous components. Here, we engineered longer lifespan by expressing genes from zebrafish encoding molecular functions not normally present in worms. Additionally, we extended lifespan by increasing the activity of four endogenous worm aging pathways. Next, we used a modular approach to extend lifespan by combining components. Finally, we used cell- and worm-based assays to analyze changes in cell physiology and as a rapid means to evaluate whether multi-component transgenic lines were likely to have extended longevity. Using engineering to add novel functions and to tune endogenous functions provides a new framework for lifespan extension that goes beyond the constraints of the worm genome. PMID:22737090

  11. Iron promotes protein insolubility and aging in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Klang, Ida M.; Schilling, Birgit; Sorensen, Dylan J.; Sahu, Alexandria K.; Kapahi, Pankaj; Andersen, Julie K.; Swoboda, Peter; Killilea, David W.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Lithgow, Gordon J.

    2014-01-01

    Many late-onset proteotoxic diseases are accompanied by a disruption in homeostasis of metals (metallostasis) including iron, copper and zinc. Although aging is the most prominent risk factor for these disorders, the impact of aging on metallostasis and its role in proteotoxic disease remain poorly understood. Moreover, it is not clear whether a loss of metallostasis influences normal aging. We have investigated the role of metallostasis in longevity of Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that calcium, copper, iron, and manganese levels increase as a function of age, while potassium and phosphorus levels tend to decrease. Increased dietary iron significantly accelerated the age-related accumulation of insoluble protein, a molecular pathology of aging. Proteomic analysis revealed widespread effects of dietary iron in multiple organelles and tissues. Pharmacological interventions to block accumulation of specific metals attenuated many models of proteotoxicity and extended normal lifespan. Collectively, these results suggest that a loss of metallostasis with aging contributes to age-related protein aggregation. PMID:25554795

  12. In vitro biological screening of the stem of Desmodium elegans

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arshad; Usman, Rabia; Rauf, Abdur; Wang, Ming-Liang; Muhammad, Naveed; Aman, Akhatar; Tahir, Taha Hussein Musa

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the medicinal importance of the stem of Desmodium elegans, methanolic extract, and its different solvent fractions were evaluated for brine shrimp lethality, insecticidal and phytotoxicity, antifungal, and antibacterial activities. Methods The methanolic extract and its solvent fractions were tested for cytotoxic, phytotoxic, insecticidal, antifungal, and antibacterial effects using our previous published protocols. Results The methanolic, DCM, ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions exhibited insecticidal effect against Callosobruchus analis and Rhyzopertha dominic. The methanolic extract, n-hexane, DCM ethyl acetate and n-butanol showed 75, 85, 85, 65 and 5% phytotoxicity at the tested concentration of 500 µg/mL respectively. The solvent fractions (DCM and ethyl acetate) were effective against F. solani (10% and 20% inhibition respectively). All the tested samples were devoid of cytotoxic and antibacterial effects. Conclusion It was concluded that this plant can be practiced for control of weeds and insects. PMID:23998011

  13. Mesoscopic organization reveals the constraints governing C. elegans nervous system

    E-print Network

    Pan, Raj Kumar; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2009-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in biology is to understand how activity at the cellular level of neurons, as a result of their mutual interactions, leads to the observed behavior of an organism responding to a variety of environmental stimuli. Investigating the intermediate or mesoscopic level of organization in the nervous system is a vital step towards understanding how the integration of micro-level dynamics results in macro-level functioning. In this paper, we have considered the somatic nervous system of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, for which the entire neuronal connectivity diagram is known. We focus on the organization of the system into modules, i.e., neuronal groups having relatively higher connection density compared to that of the overall network. We show that this mesoscopic feature cannot be explained exclusively in terms of considerations, such as optimizing for resource constraints (viz., total wiring cost) and communication efficiency (i.e., network path length). Comparison with other c...

  14. TOR signaling couples oxygen sensing to lifespan in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Schieber, Michael; Chandel, Navdeep S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Metazoans adapt to a low oxygen environment (hypoxia) through activation of stress response pathways. Here we report that transient hypoxia exposure extends lifespan in C. elegans through mitochondrial ROS-dependent regulation of the nutrient sensing kinase TOR and its upstream activator RHEB-1. The increase in lifespan during hypoxia requires the intestinal GATA-type transcription factor, ELT-2, downstream of TOR signaling. Using RNA-Sequencing, we describe an ELT-2-dependent hypoxia response that includes an intestinal glutathione S-transferase, GSTO-1, and uncover that GSTO-1 is required for lifespan under hypoxia. These results indicate mitochondrial ROS-dependent TOR signaling integrates metabolic adaptations to confer survival under hypoxia. PMID:25284791

  15. Electrical Activity and Behavior in the Pharynx of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Raizen, David M.; Avery, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Summary The pharynx of C. elegans, a model system for neural networks and for membrane excitability, has been chiefly studied by observing its behavior in normal worms, in mutant worms, and in worms lacking pharyngeal neurons. To complement this behavioral approach, we devised a method for recording currents produced by changes in pharyngeal muscle membrane potential. The electrical records, called electropharyngeograms, contain transients caused by pharyngeal muscle action potentials and by inhibitory synaptic transmission between pharyngeal neuron M3 and the muscle. Using the electropharyngeograms, we show that ?-aminobutyric acid is not likely to be the M3 neurotransmitter, that synaptic transmission is present but abnormal in mutants lacking synaptotagmin, and that worms mutant in the eat-4 gene are defective for M3 function or transmission. PMID:8155316

  16. Radiation-induced gene expression in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Jones, Tamako A.; Chesnut, Aaron; Smith, Anna L.

    2002-01-01

    We used the nematode C. elegans to characterize the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in a simple animal model emphasizing the unique effects of charged particle radiation. Here we demonstrate by RT-PCR differential display and whole genome microarray hybridization experiments that gamma rays, accelerated protons and iron ions at the same physical dose lead to unique transcription profiles. 599 of 17871 genes analyzed (3.4%) showed differential expression 3 hrs after exposure to 3 Gy of radiation. 193 were up-regulated, 406 were down-regulated and 90% were affected only by a single species of radiation. A novel statistical clustering technique identified the regulatory relationships between the radiation-modulated genes and showed that genes affected by each radiation species were associated with unique regulatory clusters. This suggests that independent homeostatic mechanisms are activated in response to radiation exposure as a function of track structure or ionization density.

  17. Investigating the Role of RIO Protein Kinases in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Raymant, Greta; Bertram, Sonja E.; Esmaillie, Reza; Nadarajan, Saravanapriah; Breugelmans, Bert; Hofmann, Andreas; Gasser, Robin B.; Colaiácovo, Monica P.; Boag, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    RIO protein kinases (RIOKs) are a relatively conserved family of enzymes implicated in cell cycle control and ribosomal RNA processing. Despite their functional importance, they remain a poorly understood group of kinases in multicellular organisms. Here, we show that the C. elegans genome contains one member of each of the three RIOK sub-families and that each of the genes coding for them has a unique tissue expression pattern. Our analysis showed that the gene encoding RIOK-1 (riok-1) was broadly and strongly expressed. Interestingly, the intestinal expression of riok-1 was dependent upon two putative binding sites for the oxidative and xenobiotic stress response transcription factor SKN-1. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knock down of riok-1 resulted in germline defects, including defects in germ line stem cell proliferation, oocyte maturation and the production of endomitotic oocytes. Taken together, our findings indicate new functions for RIOK-1 in post mitotic tissues and in reproduction. PMID:25688864

  18. C. elegans dauer formation and the molecular basis of plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Fielenbach, Nicole; Antebi, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Because life is often unpredictable, dynamic, and complex, all animals have evolved remarkable abilities to cope with changes in their external environment and internal physiology. This regulatory plasticity leads to shifts in behavior and metabolism, as well as to changes in development, growth, and reproduction, which is thought to improve the chances of survival and reproductive success. In favorable environments, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans develops rapidly to reproductive maturity, but in adverse environments, animals arrest at the dauer diapause, a long-lived stress resistant stage. A molecular and genetic analysis of dauer formation has revealed key insights into how sensory and dietary cues are coupled to conserved endocrine pathways, including insulin/IGF, TGF-?, serotonergic, and steroid hormone signal transduction, which govern the choice between reproduction and survival. These and other pathways reveal a molecular basis for metazoan plasticity in response to extrinsic and intrinsic signals. PMID:18708575

  19. A quantifiably complete repertoire of C. elegans locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andre; Schwarz, Roland; Branicky, Robyn; Schafer, William

    2014-03-01

    Visible phenotypes have played a critical role in understanding the molecular basis of behaviour in model organisms. However, most current descriptions of behaviour are based on manually identified events or a limited set of quantitative parameters. Here we report an extension of the concept of behavioural motifs to exhaustively catalogue C. elegans locomotion and derive a repertoire that is quantifiably complete. A repertoire learned for spontaneous behaviour in wild-type worms can be used to fit data from mutants or worms in different environmental conditions and provides a sensitive measure of phenotypic similarity. Repertoire comparison can also be used to assess inter-individual variation and the compositionality of behaviour, that is, the extent to which behavioural adaptation involves the creation of novel repertoire elements or the reuse of existing elements in novel sequences. Repertoire derivation is general, so that given a representation of posture, our approach will apply to other organisms.

  20. Controlling neural activity in Caenorhabditis elegans to evoke chemotactic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocabas, Askin; Shen, Ching-Han; Guo, Zengcai V.; Ramanathan, Sharad

    2013-03-01

    Animals locate and track chemoattractive gradients in the environment to find food. With its simple nervous system, Caenorhabditis elegans is a good model system in which to understand how the dynamics of neural activity control this search behavior. To understand how the activity in its interneurons coordinate different motor programs to lead the animal to food, here we used optogenetics and new optical tools to manipulate neural activity directly in freely moving animals to evoke chemotactic behavior. By deducing the classes of activity patterns triggered during chemotaxis and exciting individual neurons with these patterns, we identified interneurons that control the essential locomotory programs for this behavior. Notably, we discovered that controlling the dynamics of activity in just one interneuron pair was sufficient to force the animal to locate, turn towards and track virtual light gradients.

  1. Regulatory analysis of the C. elegans genome with spatiotemporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Carlos L.; Kawli, Trupti; Kundaje, Anshul; Jiang, Lixia; Wu, Beijing; Vafeados, Dionne; Terrell, Robert; Weissdepp, Peter; Gevirtzman, Louis; Mace, Daniel; Niu, Wei; Boyle, Alan P.; Xie, Dan; Ma, Lijia; Murray, John I.; Reinke, Valerie; Waterston, Robert H.; Snyder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Discovering the structure and dynamics of transcriptional regulatory events in the genome with cellular and temporal resolution is crucial to understanding the regulatory underpinnings of development and disease. We determined the genomic distribution of binding sites for 92 transcription factors (TFs) and regulatory proteins across multiple stages of C. elegans development by performing 241 ChIP-seq experiments. Integrating regulatory binding and cellular-resolution expression data yielded a spatiotemporally-resolved metazoan TF binding map. Using this map, we explore developmental regulatory circuits that encode combinatorial logic at the levels of co-binding and co-expression of TFs, characterizing (1) the genomic coverage and clustering of regulatory binding, (2) the binding preferences of and biological processes regulated by TFs, (3) the global TF co-associations and genomic subdomains that suggest shared patterns of regulation, and (4) key TFs and TF co-associations for fate specification of individual lineages and cell-types. PMID:25164749

  2. Axon Regeneration Genes Identified by RNAi Screening in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Nix, Paola; Hammarlund, Marc; Hauth, Linda; Lachnit, Martina; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2014-01-01

    Axons of the mammalian CNS lose the ability to regenerate soon after development due to both an inhibitory CNS environment and the loss of cell-intrinsic factors necessary for regeneration. The complex molecular events required for robust regeneration of mature neurons are not fully understood, particularly in vivo. To identify genes affecting axon regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans, we performed both an RNAi-based screen for defective motor axon regeneration in unc-70/?-spectrin mutants and a candidate gene screen. From these screens, we identified at least 50 conserved genes with growth-promoting or growth-inhibiting functions. Through our analysis of mutants, we shed new light on certain aspects of regeneration, including the role of ?-spectrin and membrane dynamics, the antagonistic activity of MAP kinase signaling pathways, and the role of stress in promoting axon regeneration. Many gene candidates had not previously been associated with axon regeneration and implicate new pathways of interest for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24403161

  3. High-throughput behavioral analysis in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Swierczek, Nicholas A; Giles, Andrew C; Rankin, Catharine H; Kerr, Rex A

    2011-07-01

    We designed a real-time computer vision system, the Multi-Worm Tracker (MWT), which can simultaneously quantify the behavior of dozens of Caenorhabditis elegans on a Petri plate at video rates. We examined three traditional behavioral paradigms using this system: spontaneous movement on food, where the behavior changes over tens of minutes; chemotaxis, where turning events must be detected accurately to determine strategy; and habituation of response to tap, where the response is stochastic and changes over time. In each case, manual analysis or automated single-worm tracking would be tedious and time-consuming, but the MWT system allowed rapid quantification of behavior with minimal human effort. Thus, this system will enable large-scale forward and reverse genetic screens for complex behaviors. PMID:21642964

  4. Integrating -Omics: Systems Biology as Explored Through C. elegans Research.

    PubMed

    Van Assche, Roel; Broeckx, Valérie; Boonen, Kurt; Maes, Evelyne; De Haes, Wouter; Schoofs, Liliane; Temmerman, Liesbet

    2015-10-23

    -Omics data have become indispensable to systems biology, which aims to describe the full complexity of functional cells, tissues, organs and organisms. Generating vast amounts of data via such methods, researchers have invested in ways of handling and interpreting these. From the large volumes of -omics data that have been gathered over the years, it is clear that the information derived from one -ome is usually far from complete. Now, individual techniques and methods for integration are maturing to the point that researchers can focus on network-based integration rather than simply interpreting single -ome studies. This review evaluates the application of integrated -omics approaches with a focus on Caenorhabditis elegans studies, intending to direct researchers in this field to useful databases and inspiring examples. PMID:25839106

  5. A Circuit for Gradient Climbing in C. elegans Chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Larsch, Johannes; Flavell, Steven W; Liu, Qiang; Gordus, Andrew; Albrecht, Dirk R; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2015-09-22

    Animals have a remarkable ability to track dynamic sensory information. For example, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans can locate a diacetyl odor source across a 100,000-fold concentration range. Here, we relate neuronal properties, circuit implementation, and behavioral strategies underlying this robust navigation. Diacetyl responses in AWA olfactory neurons are concentration and history dependent; AWA integrates over time at low odor concentrations, but as concentrations rise, it desensitizes rapidly through a process requiring cilia transport. After desensitization, AWA retains sensitivity to small odor increases. The downstream AIA interneuron amplifies weak odor inputs and desensitizes further, resulting in a stereotyped response to odor increases over three orders of magnitude. The AWA-AIA circuit drives asymmetric behavioral responses to odor increases that facilitate gradient climbing. The adaptation-based circuit motif embodied by AWA and AIA shares computational properties with bacterial chemotaxis and the vertebrate retina, each providing a solution for maintaining sensitivity across a dynamic range. PMID:26365196

  6. How Does C. elegans Respond to Altered Gravity?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Catharine A.; Udranszky, Ingrid; Hoffman, David; Kim, Stuart K.

    2001-01-01

    All organisms on Earth have evolved at unit gravity (1xG), and thus are probably adapted to function optimally at 1xG. However, with the advent of space exploration, it has been shown that organisms are capable of surviving at much less than 1xG, as well as at greater than 1xG. Organisms subjected to increased G levels exhibit alterations in physiological processes that compensate for novel environmental stresses, such as increased weight and density-driven sedimentation. These physiological adaptations illustrate the plasticity of organisms when presented with environmental conditions in which they could not possibly have evolved. Investigating the mechanism(s) behind these adaptations may uncover biological pathways that have not previously been identified. An easily-cultured and well-studied organism, such as C. elegans, would be a desirable model system for these studies. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Dopamine Signaling Regulates Fat Content through ?-Oxidation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Alexandre Guimarães de Almeida; Bridi, Jessika Cristina; de Souza, Bruno Rezende; de Castro Júnior, Célio; de Lima Torres, Karen Cecília; Malard, Leandro; Jorio, Ado; de Miranda, Débora Marques; Ashrafi, Kaveh; Romano-Silva, Marco Aurélio

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of energy balance involves an intricate interplay between neural mechanisms that respond to internal and external cues of energy demand and food availability. Compelling data have implicated the neurotransmitter dopamine as an important part of body weight regulation. However, the precise mechanisms through which dopamine regulates energy homeostasis remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate mechanisms through which dopamine modulates energy storage. We showed that dopamine signaling regulates fat reservoirs in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that the fat reducing effects of dopamine were dependent on dopaminergic receptors and a set of fat oxidation enzymes. Our findings reveal an ancient role for dopaminergic regulation of fat and suggest that dopamine signaling elicits this outcome through cascades that ultimately mobilize peripheral fat depots. PMID:24465759

  8. [Correlation between distribution of rhizospheric microorganisms and contents of steroidal saponins of Paris polyphylla var. yunnanensis].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nong; Qi, Wen-hua; Xiao, Guo-sheng; Ding, Bo; Zhang, Hua; Guo, Dong-qin; Shen, Wei

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the varying pattern of the amount of rhizospheric microorganisms, including bacteria, actinomycetes and fungus, was observed during the cultivation of Paris polyphylla var. yunnanensis. And the correlations between number of rhizospheric microorganisms and the quality of P. polyphylla var. yunnanensis were also studied. The results showed that the rhizospheric microorganism source of P. polyphylla var. yunnanensis was rich. The distribution of rhizospheric microorganisms (soil bacteria, fungus, actinomycetes, potassium-solubilizing bacteria, inorganic phosphorus-solubilizing bacteria, organic phosphorus-solubilizing bacteria) collected from different origin places existed significant difference (P < 0.05). The varying pattern for the amount of rhizospheric microorganisms was showed as following: the amount of bacteria > the amount of actinomycetes > the amount of fungus. The medicinal quality of P. polyphylla var. yunnanensis was influenced by their habits, and the increase of cultivation years caused the obvious decrease of the quality of P. polyphylla var. yunnanensis. Therefore, the increase of cultivation years will cause the variation of the soil micro-ecology flora, and decrease the nutrient absorption and the utilization of P. polyphylla var. yunnanensis, which will make the decrease of the medical quality of P. polyphylla var. yunnanensis. PMID:26226744

  9. Isolation and culture of larval cells from C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sihui; Banerjee, Diya; Kuhn, Jeffrey R

    2011-01-01

    Cell culture is an essential tool to study cell function. In C. elegans the ability to isolate and culture cells has been limited to embryonically derived cells. However, cells or blastomeres isolated from mixed stage embryos terminally differentiate within 24 hours of culture, thus precluding post-embryonic stage cell culture. We have developed an efficient and technically simple method for large-scale isolation and primary culture of larval-stage cells. We have optimized the treatment to maximize cell number and minimize cell death for each of the four larval stages. We obtained up to 7.8×10(4) cells per microliter of packed larvae, and up to 97% of adherent cells isolated by this method were viable for at least 16 hours. Cultured larval cells showed stage-specific increases in both cell size and multinuclearity and expressed lineage- and cell type-specific reporters. The majority (81%) of larval cells isolated by our method were muscle cells that exhibited stage-specific phenotypes. L1 muscle cells developed 1 to 2 wide cytoplasmic processes, while L4 muscle cells developed 4 to 14 processes of various thicknesses. L4 muscle cells developed bands of myosin heavy chain A thick filaments at the cell center and spontaneously contracted ex vivo. Neurons constituted less than 10% of the isolated cells and the majority of neurons developed one or more long, microtubule-rich protrusions that terminated in actin-rich growth cones. In addition to cells such as muscle and neuron that are high abundance in vivo, we were also able to isolate M-lineage cells that constitute less than 0.2% of cells in vivo. Our novel method of cell isolation extends C. elegans cell culture to larval developmental stages, and allows use of the wealth of cell culture tools, such as cell sorting, electrophysiology, co-culture, and high-resolution imaging of subcellular dynamics, in investigation of post-embryonic development and physiology. PMID:21559335

  10. The Rich Club of the C. elegans Neuronal Connectome

    PubMed Central

    Vértes, Petra E.; Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Schafer, William R.; Bullmore, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing interest in topological analysis of brain networks as complex systems, with researchers often using neuroimaging to represent the large-scale organization of nervous systems without precise cellular resolution. Here we used graph theory to investigate the neuronal connectome of the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans, which is defined anatomically at a cellular scale as 2287 synaptic connections between 279 neurons. We identified a small number of highly connected neurons as a rich club (N = 11) interconnected with high efficiency and high connection distance. Rich club neurons comprise almost exclusively the interneurons of the locomotor circuits, with known functional importance for coordinated movement. The rich club neurons are connector hubs, with high betweenness centrality, and many intermodular connections to nodes in different modules. On identifying the shortest topological paths (motifs) between pairs of peripheral neurons, the motifs that are found most frequently traverse the rich club. The rich club neurons are born early in development, before visible movement of the animal and before the main phase of developmental elongation of its body. We conclude that the high wiring cost of the globally integrative rich club of neurons in the C. elegans connectome is justified by the adaptive value of coordinated movement of the animal. The economical trade-off between physical cost and behavioral value of rich club organization in a cellular connectome confirms theoretical expectations and recapitulates comparable results from human neuroimaging on much larger scale networks, suggesting that this may be a general and scale-invariant principle of brain network organization. PMID:23575836

  11. Malate and Fumarate Extend Lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Clare B.; Copes, Neil; Brito, Andres G.; Canfield, John; Bradshaw, Patrick C.

    2013-01-01

    Malate, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolite, increased lifespan and thermotolerance in the nematode C. elegans. Malate can be synthesized from fumarate by the enzyme fumarase and further oxidized to oxaloacetate by malate dehydrogenase with the accompanying reduction of NAD. Addition of fumarate also extended lifespan, but succinate addition did not, although all three intermediates activated nuclear translocation of the cytoprotective DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor and protected from paraquat-induced oxidative stress. The glyoxylate shunt, an anabolic pathway linked to lifespan extension in C. elegans, reversibly converts isocitrate and acetyl-CoA to succinate, malate, and CoA. The increased longevity provided by malate addition did not occur in fumarase (fum-1), glyoxylate shunt (gei-7), succinate dehydrogenase flavoprotein (sdha-2), or soluble fumarate reductase F48E8.3 RNAi knockdown worms. Therefore, to increase lifespan, malate must be first converted to fumarate, then fumarate must be reduced to succinate by soluble fumarate reductase and the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex II. Reduction of fumarate to succinate is coupled with the oxidation of FADH2 to FAD. Lifespan extension induced by malate depended upon the longevity regulators DAF-16 and SIR-2.1. Malate supplementation did not extend the lifespan of long-lived eat-2 mutant worms, a model of dietary restriction. Malate and fumarate addition increased oxygen consumption, but decreased ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential suggesting a mild uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. Malate also increased NADPH, NAD, and the NAD/NADH ratio. Fumarate reduction, glyoxylate shunt activity, and mild mitochondrial uncoupling likely contribute to the lifespan extension induced by malate and fumarate by increasing the amount of oxidized NAD and FAD cofactors. PMID:23472183

  12. Benzophenones from Hypericum elegans with antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory potential

    PubMed Central

    Zheleva-Dimitrova, Dimitrina; Nedialkov, Paraskev; Momekov, Georgi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hypericum elegans is used in Bulgarian folk medicine for treatment of wounds, depression, gastrointestinal and bacterial diseases. Objective: Recently, new natural benzophenones: Elegaphenone and O-glycosides: Hypericophenonoside, Neoannulatophenonoside and Elegaphenonoside as well as already known 7-Epiclusianone were isolated from the titled species. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant and acetyl cholinesterase inhibitory potential of the isolated compounds. Materials and Methods: 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2’-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) di-ammonium salt (ABTS) free radicals, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay as well as inhibition of lipid peroxidation in linoleic acid system were used for determination of antioxidant activity. Modified Ellman's colorimetric method was carried out to assess the acetyl cholinesterase inhibition potential. Hyperoside and Galantamine hydrobromide were used as positive controls. Results: Hypericophenonoside was found to possess the strongest DPPH radical scavenging activity (IC50 = 181.85 ± 6.82 ?M), while Neoannulatophenonoside showed the highest ABTS (IC50 = 0.25 ± 0.005 ?M) and lipid peroxidation inhibitor activity. FRAP activity was demonstrated only by prenylated aglycones – Elegaphenone [942.16 ± 4.03 ?M Trolox Equivalent (TE)] and 7-Epiclusianone (642.95 ± 3.95 ?M TE) and was stronger compared to the control Hyperoside (421.75 ± 9.29 ?M TE). Elegaphenone and 7-Epiclusianone were found to possess moderate acetyl cholinesterase inhibitory potential with IC50 values of 192.19 ± 3.54 ?M and 142.97 ± 4.62 ?M, respectively. Conclusion: The results obtained revealed that H. elegans is a potential natural source of bioactive compounds and benzophenones could be useful in therapy of free radical pathologies and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24143038

  13. Generation of Transgenic C. elegans by Biolistic Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Hochbaum, Daniel; Ferguson, Annabel A.; Fisher, Alfred L.

    2010-01-01

    The number of laboratories using the free living nematode C. elegans is rapidly growing. The popularity of this biological model is attributed to a rapid generation time and short life span, easy and inexpensive maintenance, fully sequenced genome, and array of RNAi resources and mutant animals. Additionally, analysis of the C. elegans genome revealed a great similarity between worms and higher vertebrates, which suggests that research in worms could be an important adjunct to studies performed in whole mice or cultured cells. A powerful and important part of worm research is the ability to use transgenic animals to study gene localization and function. Transgenic animals can be created either via microinjection of the worm germline or through the use of biolistic bombardment. Bombardment is a newer technique and is less familiar to a number of labs. Here we describe a simple protocol to generate transgenic worms by biolistic bombardment with gold particles using the Bio-Rad PDS-1000 system. Compared with DNA microinjection into hermaphrodite germline, this protocol has the advantage of not requiring special skills from the operator with regards to identifying worm anatomy or performing microinjection. Further multiple transgenic lines are usually obtained from a single bombardment. Also in contrast to microinjection, biolistic bombardment produces transgenic animals with both extrachromosomal arrays and integrated transgenes. The ability to obtain integrated transgenic lines can avoid the use of mutagenic protocols to integrate foreign DNA. In conclusion, biolistic bombardment can be an attractive method for the generation of transgenic animals, especially for investigators not interested in investing the time and effort needed to become skilled at microinjection. PMID:20811328

  14. Metabolome and proteome changes with aging in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Copes, Neil; Edwards, Clare; Chaput, Dale; Saifee, Mariam; Barjuca, Iosif; Nelson, Daniel; Paraggio, Alyssa; Saad, Patrick; Lipps, David; Stevens, Stanley M; Bradshaw, Patrick C

    2015-12-01

    To expand the understanding of aging in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, global quantification of metabolite and protein levels in young and aged nematodes was performed using mass spectrometry. With age, there was a decreased abundance of proteins functioning in transcription termination, mRNA degradation, mRNA stability, protein synthesis, and proteasomal function. Furthermore, there was altered S-adenosyl methionine metabolism as well as a decreased abundance of the S-adenosyl methionine synthetase (SAMS-1) protein. Other aging-related changes included alterations in free fatty acid levels and composition, decreased levels of ribosomal proteins, decreased levels of NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH1), a shift in the cellular redox state, an increase in sorbitol content, alterations in free amino acid levels, and indications of altered muscle function and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) homeostasis. There were also decreases in pyrimidine and purine metabolite levels, most markedly nitrogenous bases. Supplementing the culture medium with cytidine (a pyrimidine nucleoside) or hypoxanthine (a purine base) increased lifespan slightly, suggesting that aging-induced alterations in ribonucleotide metabolism affect lifespan. An age-related increase in body size, lipotoxicity from ectopic yolk lipoprotein accumulation, a decline in NAD(+) levels, and mitochondrial electron transport chain dysfunction may explain many of these changes. In addition, dietary restriction in aged worms resulting from sarcopenia of the pharyngeal pump likely decreases the abundance of SAMS-1, possibly leading to decreased phosphatidylcholine levels, larger lipid droplets, and ER and mitochondrial stress. The complementary use of proteomics and metabolomics yielded unique insights into the molecular processes altered with age in C. elegans. PMID:26390854

  15. Deterioration of expanded polystyrene caused by Aureobasidium pullulans var. melanogenum.

    PubMed

    Castiglia, Valeria C; Kuhar, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    An expanded-polystyrene factory located in northern Buenos Aires reported unusual dark spots causing esthetic damage in their production. A fungal strain forming black-olive colonies on extract malt agar medium was isolated from the damaged material and identified as Aureobasidium pullullans var. melanogenum. This fungus is particularly known for its capacity to produce hydrolytic enzymes and a biodegradable extracellular polysaccharide known as pullulan, which is used in the manufacture of packaging material for food and medicine. Laboratory tests were conducted to characterize its growth parameters. It was found that the organism was resistant to a wide range of pHs but did not survive at temperatures over 65°C. The proposed action plan includes drying of the material prior to packaging and disinfection of the machinery used in the manufacturing process and of the silos used for raw material storage. PMID:26165967

  16. Subsynchronous torsional interactions with static VAR compensators; Influence of HVDC

    SciTech Connect

    Rostamkolai, N.; Piwko, R.J.; Larsen, E.V. ); Fisher, D.A. ); Mobarak, M.A. ); Poitras, A.E. )

    1991-02-01

    Planning for installation of a static var compensator (SVC) in Chester, Maine, was initiated in 1987. The pre-specification subsynchronous torsional interaction (SSTI) studies showed the SVC might have a negative influence on stability of torsional modes of vibration of the nearby turbine-generators. In a previous paper, the parameters influencing the level of SSTI were identified with the use of a simple system. This paper extends the work to power systems containing an HVDC transmission system. The combined effect of SVC and HVDC on turbine-generator SSTI is investigated with the use of a hypothetical system. Simulation plots for the large machines of New Brunswick and Maine are included to quantify the level of interaction with the Chester SVC. Filtering as a mitigation measure is proposed to eliminate the small level of SSTI attributed to the Chester SVC.

  17. Utilization of Leek (Allium ampeloprasum var. porrum) for inulinase production.

    PubMed

    Tasar, Ozden Canli; Erdal, Serkan; Algur, Omer Faruk

    2015-08-18

    Inulinase production by Rhodotorula glutinis was carried out in this study, using leek (Allium ampeloprasum var. porrum) as an alternative carbon source due to its high inulin content and easy availability. Taguchi orthogonal array (OA) design of experiment (DOE) was used to optimize fermentation conditions. For this purpose, five influential factors (leek concentration, pH, incubation temperature, agitation speed, and fermentation time) related to inulinase production were selected at four convenient levels. The results showed that maximum inulinase activity was obtained as 30.89 U/mL, which was close to the predicted result (30.24 U/mL). To validate the obtained results, analysis of variance (ANOVA) was employed. Consequently, leek has a great potential as an effective and economical carbon source for inulinase production, and the use of Taguchi DOE enhanced enzyme activity about 2.87-fold when compared with the unoptimized condition. PMID:25036570

  18. Steroidal saponins from the flowers of Dioscorea bulbifera var. sativa.

    PubMed

    Tapondjou, Léon Azefack; Jenett-Siems, Kristina; Böttger, Stefan; Melzig, Matthias F

    2013-11-01

    Eleven steroidal saponins, dioscoreanosides A-K, along with five known congeners, were isolated from the flowers of Dioscorea bulbifera var. sativa. Their structures were established by extensive NMR experiments in conjunction with mass spectrometry. The isolated compounds were tested for cytotoxicity against urinary bladder carcinoma cells (ECV-304 cells). Our results revealed a moderate activity for spiroconazol A (15), pennogenin 3-O-?-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1?4)-?-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1?4)-[?-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1?2)]-?-d-glucopyranoside (12), and 26-O-ß-d-glucopyranosyl-(25R)-5-en-furost-3ß,17?,22?,26-tetraol-3-O-?-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1?4)-?-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1?4)-[?-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1?2)]-?-d-glucopyranoside (13). PMID:23969106

  19. Podocarpane, isopimarane, and abietane diterpenoids from Isodon lophanthoides var. graciliflorus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yaoguang; Xie, Haihui; Wu, Ping; Jiang, Yueming; Wei, Xiaoyi

    2013-02-15

    Four new diterpenoids including two podocarpanes, graciliflorins A (1) and B (2), an isopimarane acetal, graciliflorin C (3), and a rearranged abietane, graciliflorin D (4) were isolated from the aerial parts of Isodon lophanthoides var. graciliflorus (Lamiaceae) along with podocarpa-8,11,13-triene-3?,13-diol (5) and micranthin B (6). Their structures were elucidated based on the spectroscopic data. The in vitro cytotoxicity of compounds 1-4 and 6 against human carcinoma A549, MCF-7, and HeLa cell lines were evaluated using the MTT colourimetric assay. Micranthin B (6) showed moderate activity against all the cells with IC(50) values of 16.29, 18.20, and 22.25 ?M, while compounds 1-4 were inactive (IC(50)>50 ?g/ml). PMID:23194512

  20. Var gene transcription and clinical disease manifestation in African P. falciparum malaria field isolates 

    E-print Network

    Kyriacou, Helen M

    2008-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) variant surface antigens, encoded by the var gene family, play a crucial role in malaria pathogenesis through mediating immunomodulation and host cell ...

  1. ENERGY VARIATIONAL ANALYSIS EnVarA OF IONS IN WATER AND CHANNELS: FIELD THEORY FOR

    E-print Network

    to compute properties of liquid crystals, polymer fluids and electrorheological fluids containing solidVarA optimizes both the action integral functional of classical mechanics and the dissipation functional

  2. COLLARD: Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala DC, `Georgia' CONTROL OF DBM ON COLLARDS, 2004

    E-print Network

    Ma, Lena

    (E29) COLLARD: Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala DC, `Georgia' CONTROL OF DBM ON COLLARDS, 2004 P with 12 inch emitter spacing and covering with a white-face polyethylene mulch. Greenhouse-grown collard

  3. Long-Term Nicotine Adaptation in Caenorhabditis elegans Involves PKC-Dependent Changes in Nicotinic Receptor Abundance

    E-print Network

    Schafer, William R.

    Long-Term Nicotine Adaptation in Caenorhabditis elegans Involves PKC-Dependent Changes in Nicotinic to nicotine leads to long-term changes in both the abundance and activity of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, processes thought to contribute to nicotine addiction. We have found that in Caenorhabditis elegans

  4. Corticosterone and pace of life in two life-history ecotypes of the garter snake Thamnophis elegans

    E-print Network

    Bronikowski, Anne

    Corticosterone and pace of life in two life-history ecotypes of the garter snake Thamnophis elegans Maria G. Palacios ,2 , Amanda M. Sparkman 1,2 , Anne M. Bronikowski 2 Department of Ecology, Evolution of the garter snake (Thamnophis elegans) that exhibit slow and fast pace of life strategies. We subjected free

  5. Study about locomotory ability of dystrophin-defected C.elegans after spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ying; Sun, Yeqing; Lei, Huang; Xu, Dan

    2012-07-01

    Space microgravity could induce a variety of biological changes such as muscular atrophy. Recent studies show that gravisensing is a key point in muscular atrophy process, but the molecular mechanism is still unknown. Dystrophin, a muscle-related protein, plays an important role in muscle development. It is reported that mutation of human dystrophin gene could cause muscular atrophy. In this study, we focus on whether dystrophin gene acts as a gravisensing factor and observe locomotory ability of dystrophin-defected Caenorhabditis elegans (C.elegans) after spaceflight. We used wild-type (WT) and dystrophin-defected (dys-1) mutant of C.elegans, which were cultured to dauer stage and sent to space by Shenzhou 8 spacecraft (from Nov 1st to 17th, 2011). These worms were divided into three groups: space group (space radiation and microgravity conditions), space control group (space radiation and chmetcnvTCSC0NumberType1NegativeFalseHasSpaceFalseSourceValue1UnitNameg1g centrifuge force conditions) and ground control group.We already observed the progeny (generation F1 and F2) of worms which were sent to space, the movement of C. elegans is restricted to a two-dimensional sinusoidal pattern, and evaluated locomotory ability by the ratio (length/width) in crawl trace wave of C. elegans. The increased value of ratio indicates the decrease in locomotory ability of C. elegans. Our results from generation F1 showed that WT worms in space group(7.7±1.8) demonstrated the significant decrease in locomotory ability about 15%, compared with those in space control group(6.7±1.2). This finding indicates that locomotory ability of C. elegans progeny could be affected by microgravity in space environment. In comparison to the obvious difference in ratio between space group and space control group for WT worms, there is no significant difference between two space groups of generation F2 .For dys-1 mutant of C.elegans (generation F1 and F2), the results show that dystrophin deficiency results in no response to microgravity, compared with WT, suggesting that dys-1 gene plays a role in locomotory ability under ground gravity. Further, we performed all genome microarray analysis and found that expression of several muscle-related genes in dys-1 mutant groups were also changed, accompanied with changes in biological processes such as oxidation, protein modification and metabolic process. Our findings suggest that dystrophin gene could act as a gravisensing and affect locomotory ability of C. elegans progeny.

  6. A Highly Accurate Inclusive Cancer Screening Test Using Caenorhabditis elegans Scent Detection

    PubMed Central

    Uozumi, Takayuki; Shinden, Yoshiaki; Mimori, Koshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Ueda, Naoko; Hamakawa, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Early detection and treatment are of vital importance to the successful eradication of various cancers, and development of economical and non-invasive novel cancer screening systems is critical. Previous reports using canine scent detection demonstrated the existence of cancer-specific odours. However, it is difficult to introduce canine scent recognition into clinical practice because of the need to maintain accuracy. In this study, we developed a Nematode Scent Detection Test (NSDT) using Caenorhabditis elegans to provide a novel highly accurate cancer detection system that is economical, painless, rapid and convenient. We demonstrated wild-type C. elegans displayed attractive chemotaxis towards human cancer cell secretions, cancer tissues and urine from cancer patients but avoided control urine; in parallel, the response of the olfactory neurons of C. elegans to the urine from cancer patients was significantly stronger than to control urine. In contrast, G protein ? mutants and olfactory neurons-ablated animals were not attracted to cancer patient urine, suggesting that C. elegans senses odours in urine. We tested 242 samples to measure the performance of the NSDT, and found the sensitivity was 95.8%; this is markedly higher than that of other existing tumour markers. Furthermore, the specificity was 95.0%. Importantly, this test was able to diagnose various cancer types tested at the early stage (stage 0 or 1). To conclude, C. elegans scent-based analyses might provide a new strategy to detect and study disease-associated scents. PMID:25760772

  7. Natural polymorphisms in C. elegans HECW-1 E3 ligase affect pathogen avoidance behaviour.

    PubMed

    Chang, Howard C; Paek, Jennifer; Kim, Dennis H

    2011-12-22

    Heritable variation in behavioural traits generally has a complex genetic basis, and thus naturally occurring polymorphisms that influence behaviour have been defined only in rare instances. The isolation of wild strains of Caenorhabditis elegans has facilitated the study of natural genetic variation in this species and provided insights into its diverse microbial ecology. C. elegans responds to bacterial infection with conserved innate immune responses and, although lacking the immunological memory of vertebrate adaptive immunity, shows an aversive learning response to pathogenic bacteria. Here, we report the molecular characterization of naturally occurring coding polymorphisms in a C. elegans gene encoding a conserved HECT domain-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase, HECW-1. We show that two distinct polymorphisms in neighbouring residues of HECW-1 each affect C. elegans behavioural avoidance of a lawn of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Neuron-specific rescue and ablation experiments and genetic interaction analysis indicate that HECW-1 functions in a pair of sensory neurons to inhibit P. aeruginosa lawn avoidance behaviour through inhibition of the neuropeptide receptor NPR-1 (ref. 10), which we have previously shown promotes P. aeruginosa lawn avoidance behaviour. Our data establish a molecular basis for natural variation in a C. elegans behaviour that may undergo adaptive changes in response to microbial pathogens. PMID:22089131

  8. Caenorhabditis elegans NPR-1-mediated behaviors are suppressed in the presence of mucoid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Kirthi C; Hunter, Ryan C; Bhatla, Nikhil; Newman, Dianne K; Kim, Dennis H

    2011-08-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits a diverse range of behaviors in response to bacteria. The presence of bacterial food influences C. elegans aerotaxis, aggregation, locomotion, and pathogen avoidance behaviors through the activity of the NPR-1 neuropeptide receptor. Here, we show that mucoid strains of bacteria that produce an exopolysaccharide matrix do not induce NPR-1-dependent behaviors. In the presence of mucoid strains of bacteria, the C. elegans laboratory wild-type (WT) strain N2 exhibits behaviors characteristic of wild isolates and mutants with reduced NPR-1 activity. Specifically, N2 exhibits lawn bordering and roaming behavior on mucoid nonpathogenic bacteria and loss of pathogen avoidance on mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Alginate biosynthesis by laboratory and clinical isolates of mucoid P. aeruginosa is necessary and sufficient to attenuate NPR-1-mediated behavior and it suppresses C. elegans pathogen avoidance behavior. Our data suggest that the specific interaction with nonmucoid bacteria induces NPR-1-dependent behaviors of C. elegans. These observations provide an example of how exopolysaccharide matrix biosynthesis by a community of bacteria may inhibit specific host responses to microbes. PMID:21768378

  9. Caenorhabditis elegans as a platform to study the mechanism of action of synthetic antitumor lipids

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Blanco, Adolfo; Rodríguez-Matellán, Alberto G; Reis-Sobreiro, Mariana; Sáenz-Narciso, Beatriz; Cabello, Juan; Mohler, William A; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2014-01-01

    Drugs capable of specifically recognizing and killing cancer cells while sparing healthy cells are of great interest in anti-cancer therapy. An example of such a drug is edelfosine, the prototype molecule of a family of synthetic lipids collectively known as antitumor lipids (ATLs). A better understanding of the selectivity and the mechanism of action of these compounds would lead to better anticancer treatments. Using Caenorhabditis elegans, we modeled key features of the ATL selectivity against cancer cells. Edelfosine induced a selective and direct killing action on C. elegans embryos, which was dependent on cholesterol, without affecting adult worms and larvae. Distinct ATLs ranked differently in their embryonic lethal effect with edelfosine > perifosine > erucylphosphocholine >> miltefosine. Following a biased screening of 57 C. elegans mutants we found that inactivation of components of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway led to resistance against the ATL edelfosine in both C. elegans and human tumor cells. This paper shows that C. elegans can be used as a rapid platform to facilitate ATL research and to further understand the mechanism of action of edelfosine and other synthetic ATLs. PMID:25485582

  10. Highly efficient microfluidic sorting device for synchronizing developmental stages of C. elegans based on deflecting electrotaxis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xixian; Hu, Rui; Ge, Anle; Hu, Liang; Wang, Shanshan; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2015-06-01

    C. elegans as a powerful model organism has been widely used in fundamental biological studies. Many of these studies frequently need a large number of different stage-synchronized worms due to the stage-specific features of C. elegans among 4 distinct larval stages and the adult stage. In this work, we present an interesting and cost-effective microfluidic approach to realize simultaneous sorting of C. elegans of different developmental stages by deflecting electrotaxis. The microfluidic device was fabricated using PDMS consisting of symmetric sorting channels with specific angles, which was further hybridized to an agarose plate. While applying an electric field, different stages of C. elegans would crawl to the negative pore with different angles due to their deflecting electrotaxis. Thus, the worms were separated and synchronized by stages. lon-2 mutant was further used to study this electrotactic response and the results indicated that the body size plays a key role in determining the deflecting angle in matured adult worms. In addition to discriminating wild-type hermaphrodites, it could also be employed to sort mutants with abnormal development sizes and males. Therefore, our device provided a versatile and highly efficient platform for sorting C. elegans to meet the requirement of large numbers of different stage-synchronized worms. It can also be further used to investigate the neuronal basis of deflecting electrotaxis in worms. PMID:25963054

  11. Effects of Microcystin-LR Exposure on Spermiogenesis in Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunhui; Zhang, Minhui; Chen, Pan; Liu, Ran; Liang, Geyu; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the effect on spermiogenesis induced by microcystin-leucine arginine (MC-LR), even though such data are very important to better elucidate reproductive health. In the current work, with the aid of nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) as an animal model, we investigated the defects on spermiogenesis induced by MC-LR. Our results showed that MC-LR exposure induced sperm morphology abnormality and caused severe defects of sperm activation, trans-activation, sperm behavior and competition. Additionally, the expression levels of spe-15 were significantly decreased in C. elegans exposed to MC-LR lower than 16.0 ?g/L, while the expression levels of spe-10 and fer-1 could be significantly lowered in C. elegans even exposed to 1.0 ?g/L of MC-LR. Therefore, the present study reveals that MC-LR can induce adverse effects on spermiogenesis, and those defects of sperm functions may be induced by the decreases of spe-10, spe-15 and fer-1 gene expressions in C. elegans. PMID:26402677

  12. Enhanced toxicity of silver nanoparticles in transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans expressing amyloidogenic proteins.

    PubMed

    Soria, Cristina; Coccini, Teresa; De Simone, Uliana; Marchese, Loredana; Zorzoli, Irene; Giorgetti, Sofia; Raimondi, Sara; Mangione, P Patrizia; Ramat, Stefano; Bellotti, Vittorio; Manzo, Luigi; Stoppini, Monica

    2015-12-01

    The increasing number of applications of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) prompted us to assess their toxicity in vivo. We have investigated their effects on wild type and transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) strains expressing two prototypic amyloidogenic proteins: ?2-microglobulin and A? peptide3-42. The use of C. elegans allowed us to highlight AgNP toxicity in the early phase of the worm's life cycle (LC50 survival, 0.9?µg/ml). A comparative analysis of LC50 values revealed that our nematode strains were more sensitive to assess AgNP toxicity than the cell lines, classically used in toxicity tests. Movement and superoxide production in the adult population were significantly affected by exposure to AgNP; the transgenic strains were more affected than the wild type worms. Our screening approach could be applied to other types of nanomaterials that can enter the body and express any nanostructure-related bioactivities. We propose that C. elegans reproducing the molecular events associated with protein misfolding diseases, e.g. Alzheimer's disease and systemic amyloidosis, may help to investigate the specific toxicity of a range of potentially harmful molecules. Our study suggests that transgenic C. elegans may be used to predict the effect of chemicals in a "fragile population", where an underlying pathologic state may amplify their toxicity. PMID:26466638

  13. Unique C. elegans telomeric overhang structures reveal the evolutionarily conserved properties of telomeric DNA

    PubMed Central

    Školáková, Petra; Foldynová-Trantírková, Silvie; Bedná?ová, Klára; Fiala, Radovan; Vorlí?ková, Michaela; Trantírek, Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    There are two basic mechanisms that are associated with the maintenance of the telomere length, which endows cancer cells with unlimited proliferative potential. One mechanism, referred to as alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), accounts for approximately 10–15% of all human cancers. Tumours engaged in the ALT pathway are characterised by the presence of the single stranded 5?-C-rich telomeric overhang (C-overhang). This recently identified hallmark of ALT cancers distinguishes them from healthy tissues and renders the C-overhang as a clear target for anticancer therapy. We analysed structures of the 5?-C-rich and 3?-G-rich telomeric overhangs from human and Caenorhabditis elegans, the recently established multicellular in vivo model of ALT tumours. We show that the telomeric DNA from C. elegans and humans forms fundamentally different secondary structures. The unique structural characteristics of C. elegans telomeric DNA that are distinct not only from those of humans but also from those of other multicellular eukaryotes allowed us to identify evolutionarily conserved properties of telomeric DNA. Differences in structural organisation of the telomeric DNA between the C. elegans and human impose limitations on the use of the C. elegans as an ALT tumour model. PMID:25855805

  14. Working alliance inventory applied to virtual and augmented reality (WAI-VAR): psychometrics and therapeutic outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Miragall, Marta; Baños, Rosa M.; Cebolla, Ausiàs; Botella, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the psychometric properties of the Working Alliance Inventory-Short (WAI-S) adaptation to Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) therapies (WAI-VAR). The relationship between the therapeutic alliance (TA) with VR and AR and clinically significant change (CSC) is also explored. Seventy-five patients took part in this study (74.7% women, Mage = 34.41). Fear of flying and adjustment disorder patients received VR therapy, and cockroach phobia patients received AR therapy. Psychometric properties, CSC, one-way ANOVA, Spearman’s Correlations and Multiple Regression were calculated. The WAI-VAR showed a unidimensional structure, high internal consistency and adequate convergent validity. “Not changed” patients scored lower on the WAI-VAR than “improved” and “recovered” patients. Correlation between the WAI-VAR and CSC was moderate. The best fitting model for predicting CSC was a linear combination of the TA with therapist (WAI-S) and the TA with VR and AR (WAI-VAR), due to the latter variable slightly increased the percentage of variability accounted for in CSC. The WAI-VAR is the first validated instrument to measure the TA with VR and AR in research and clinical practice. This study reveals the importance of the quality of the TA with technologies in achieving positive outcomes in the therapy. PMID:26500589

  15. Working alliance inventory applied to virtual and augmented reality (WAI-VAR): psychometrics and therapeutic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Miragall, Marta; Baños, Rosa M; Cebolla, Ausiàs; Botella, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the psychometric properties of the Working Alliance Inventory-Short (WAI-S) adaptation to Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) therapies (WAI-VAR). The relationship between the therapeutic alliance (TA) with VR and AR and clinically significant change (CSC) is also explored. Seventy-five patients took part in this study (74.7% women, M age = 34.41). Fear of flying and adjustment disorder patients received VR therapy, and cockroach phobia patients received AR therapy. Psychometric properties, CSC, one-way ANOVA, Spearman's Correlations and Multiple Regression were calculated. The WAI-VAR showed a unidimensional structure, high internal consistency and adequate convergent validity. "Not changed" patients scored lower on the WAI-VAR than "improved" and "recovered" patients. Correlation between the WAI-VAR and CSC was moderate. The best fitting model for predicting CSC was a linear combination of the TA with therapist (WAI-S) and the TA with VR and AR (WAI-VAR), due to the latter variable slightly increased the percentage of variability accounted for in CSC. The WAI-VAR is the first validated instrument to measure the TA with VR and AR in research and clinical practice. This study reveals the importance of the quality of the TA with technologies in achieving positive outcomes in the therapy. PMID:26500589

  16. Semi-nonparametric VaR forecasts for hedge funds during the recent crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Brio, Esther B.; Mora-Valencia, Andrés; Perote, Javier

    2014-05-01

    The need to provide accurate value-at-risk (VaR) forecasting measures has triggered an important literature in econophysics. Although these accurate VaR models and methodologies are particularly demanded for hedge fund managers, there exist few articles specifically devoted to implement new techniques in hedge fund returns VaR forecasting. This article advances in these issues by comparing the performance of risk measures based on parametric distributions (the normal, Student’s t and skewed-t), semi-nonparametric (SNP) methodologies based on Gram-Charlier (GC) series and the extreme value theory (EVT) approach. Our results show that normal-, Student’s t- and Skewed t- based methodologies fail to forecast hedge fund VaR, whilst SNP and EVT approaches accurately success on it. We extend these results to the multivariate framework by providing an explicit formula for the GC copula and its density that encompasses the Gaussian copula and accounts for non-linear dependences. We show that the VaR obtained by the meta GC accurately captures portfolio risk and outperforms regulatory VaR estimates obtained through the meta Gaussian and Student’s t distributions.

  17. rBTI extends Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan by mimicking calorie restriction.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiao; Cui, Xiaodong; Wang, Zhuanhua; Li, Yuying

    2015-07-01

    Buckwheat trypsin inhibitor (BTI) is a low molecular weight polypeptide extracted from buckwheat. This study examined the effects of BTI on the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) and investigated the mechanism involved. Our results showed that recombinant BTI (rBTI) extended life expectancy by mimicking calorie restriction (CR) in C. elegans. rBTI promoted formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via increasing respiration, induced activities of ROS defense enzymes by activating DAF-16, and increased oxidative stress resistance and survival rates. The inhibition of ROS signal by antioxidants reduced rBTI-mediated longevity by up to 65%. Moreover, it was shown that the disruption of daf-2 abolished the extension of the lifespan and the increased ROS. Taken together, these data indicate that rBTI-mediated longevity mimics CR by down-regulating insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) pathway, implying that BTI has the potential to be a novel anti-aging drug. PMID:25959406

  18. Unraveling the mechanisms of synapse formation and axon regeneration: the awesome power of C. elegans genetics

    PubMed Central

    YiShi, JIN

    2015-01-01

    Since Caenorhabditis elegans was chosen as a model organism by Sydney Brenner in 1960’s, genetic studies in this organism have been instrumental in discovering the function of genes and in deciphering molecular signaling network. The small size of the organism and the simple nervous system enable the complete reconstruction of the first connectome. The stereotypic developmental program and the anatomical reproducibility of synaptic connections provide a blueprint to dissect the mechanisms underlying synapse formation. Recent technological innovation using laser surgery of single axons and in vivo imaging has also made C. elegans a new model for axon regeneration. Importantly, genes regulating synaptogenesis and axon regeneration are highly conserved in function across animal phyla. This mini-review will summarize the main approaches and the key findings in understanding the mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of the nervous system. The impact of such findings underscores the awesome power of C. elegans genetics. PMID:26563175

  19. Motility analysis of the nematode C. elegans on wet soft media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sznitman, Josue; Shen, Xiaoning; Arratia, Paulo

    2011-11-01

    Undulatory locomotion is widely utilized by limbless organisms such as snakes, eels and worms. When moving on top of wet soft gels (e.g. agar), undulating organisms such as the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans display a motility gait that is characterized by crawling. Until present however, a detailed understanding of how C. elegans' crawling gait generates propulsion over soft gels is lacking. Namely, how much crawling force does C. elegans generate? Here, we propose a simple model based on lubrication theory to examine the biomechanics of crawling motion. In analogy to the well-known resistive-force theory (RFT) for low Reynolds number swimming, our model provides a mechanism for the linear relation between the sliding speeds and the drag forces, and sheds light on the role of grooves created by nematodes on agar. We further examine the kinematics of locomotion experimentally and compare muscle activity patterns between crawling and swimming gaits, emphasizing the inherent differences in nematode adaptability to different environments.

  20. Latrophilin is required for toxicity of black widow spider venom in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Mee, Christopher J; Tomlinson, Simon R; Perestenko, Pavel V; De Pomerai, David; Duce, Ian R; Usherwood, Peter N R; Bell, David R

    2004-01-01

    Black widow spider venom (BWSV) kills Caenorhabditis elegans after injection owing to the presence of heat- and detergent-sensitive components, which are high-molecular-mass latrotoxins. A C. elegans homologue of latrophilin/CIRL (calcium-independent receptor for latrotoxin), B0457.1, was identified and shown to have five conserved domains. RNAi (RNA interference) of this gene rendered C. elegans resistant to BWSV, whereas RNAi for CYP37A1 or a neurexin I homologue, and a deletion mutant of the related B0286.2 gene, had no effect on BWSV toxicity. The latrophilin RNAi mutants exhibit changes in defaecation cycle and alterations in drug sensitivity. These results demonstrate that latrophilin mediates the toxicity of BWSV and provide evidence for a physiological function of this receptor. PMID:14594448

  1. The C. elegans SYS-1 protein is a bona fide ?-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Phillips, Bryan T.; Amaya, Maria F.; Kimble, Judith; Xu, Wenqing

    2008-01-01

    Summary C. elegans SYS-1 has key functional characteristics of a canonical ?-catenin, but no significant sequence similarity. Here, we report the SYS-1 crystal structure, both on its own and in a complex with POP-1, the C. elegans TCF homolog. The two structures possess signature features of canonical ?-catenin and the ?-catenin/TCF complex that could not be predicted by sequence. Most importantly, SYS-1 bears 12 armadillo repeats and the SYS-1/POP-1 interface is anchored by a conserved salt-bridge, the “charged button”. We also modeled structures for three other C. elegans ?-catenins to predict the molecular basis of their distinct binding properties. Finally, we generated a phylogenetic tree, using the region of highest structural similarity between SYS-1 and ?-catenin, and found that SYS-1 clusters robustly within the ?-catenin clade. We conclude that the SYS-1 protein belongs to the ?-catenin family and suggest that additional divergent ?-catenins await discovery. PMID:18477457

  2. A polymorphism in npr-1 is a behavioral determinant of pathogen susceptibility in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Kirthi C; Andersen, Erik C; Kruglyak, Leonid; Kim, Dennis H

    2009-01-16

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans responds to pathogenic bacteria with conserved innate immune responses and pathogen avoidance behaviors. We investigated natural variation in C. elegans resistance to pathogen infection. With the use of quantitative genetic analysis, we determined that the pathogen susceptibility difference between the laboratory wild-type strain N2 and the wild isolate CB4856 is caused by a polymorphism in the npr-1 gene, which encodes a homolog of the mammalian neuropeptide Y receptor. We show that the mechanism of NPR-1-mediated pathogen resistance is through oxygen-dependent behavioral avoidance rather than direct regulation of innate immunity. For C. elegans, bacteria represent food but also a potential source of infection. Our data underscore the importance of behavioral responses to oxygen levels in finding an optimal balance between these potentially conflicting cues. PMID:19150845

  3. Application of RNAi technology and fluorescent protein markers to study membrane traffic in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Solinger, Jachen A; Poteryaev, Dmitry; Spang, Anne

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool to study the intracellular membrane transport and membrane organelle behavior in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This model organism has gained popularity in the trafficking field because of its relative simplicity, yet being multicellular. C. elegans is fully sequenced and has an annotated genome, it is easy to maintain, and a growing number of transgenic strains bearing markers for different membrane compartments are available. C. elegans is particularly well suited for protein downregulation by RNAi because of the simple but efficient methods of dsRNA delivery. The phenomenon of systemic RNAi in the worm further facilitates this approach. In this chapter we describe methods and applications of RNAi in the field of membrane traffic. We summarize the fluorescent markers used as a readout for the effects of gene knockdown in different cells and tissues and give details for data acquisition and analysis. PMID:24947393

  4. High-Resolution Multi-Photon Imaging of Morphological Structures of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Bixel, Gabriele M; Fretham, Stephanie J B; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In this protocol, we combine two-photon excitation fluorescence with nonlinear optical measurements to reconstruct the three-dimensional architecture of the pharyngeal region and the muscular system of the anterior and mid-body region of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Femto-second laser pulses excite second-harmonic generation (SHG) and third-harmonic generation (THG) signals, which show detailed structural information regarding the organization of myofibrils that are arranged around the central pharynx region. The combination of two-photon excitation with SHG and THG imaging is a very powerful tool to study cell morphology, microarchitecture, and tissue arrangement in C. elegans. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26344221

  5. Phase transition in Caenorhabditis elegans: A classical oil-water phase separation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Christoph; Tony Hyman Collaboration; Andrés Delgadillo Collaboration; Frank Jülicher Team

    2014-03-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans droplets form before the cell divides. These droplets, also referred to as P-granules, consist of a variety of unstructured proteins and mRNA. Brangwynne et al. [Science, 2009] showed that the P-granules exhibit fluid-like behavior and that the phase separation is controlled spatially by a gradient of a component called Mex-5. It is believed that this system exhibits the same characteristics as a classical oil-water phase separation. Here we report the recent experimental investigations on the phase separation in Caenorhabditis elegans and compare our findings with a classical oil-water phase separation. Specifically, we consider the underlying coarsening mechanisms as well as the impact of temperature and species composition. Finally, we present a preliminary model incorporating the characteristics of the phase separation kinetics for Caenorhabditis elegans.

  6. Strongyloides stercoralis daf-2 encodes a divergent ortholog of Caenorhabditis elegans DAF-2?

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Holman C.; Ranjit, Najju; Stoltzfus, Jonathan D.; Lok, James B.

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesize that developmental arrest in infectious larvae of parasitic nematodes is regulated by signaling pathways homologous to Caenorhabditis elegans DAF (dauer formation) pathways. Alignment of Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss) DAF-2 with DAF-2 of C. elegans and homologs of other species shows that most structural motifs in these insulin-like receptors are conserved. However, the catalytic domain of Ss-DAF-2 contains two substitutions (Q1242 and Q1256), that would result in constitutive dauer formation in C. elegans or diabetes in vertebrate animals. Ss-daf-2 also shows two alternately spliced isoforms, the constitutively expressed Ss-daf-2a, and Ss-daf-2b, which is only expressed in stages leading to parasitism. PMID:23500073

  7. Unraveling the mechanisms of synapse formation and axon regeneration: the awesome power of C. elegans genetics.

    PubMed

    Jin, YiShi

    2015-11-01

    Since Caenorhabditis elegans was chosen as a model organism by Sydney Brenner in 1960's, genetic studies in this organism have been instrumental in discovering the function of genes and in deciphering molecular signaling network. The small size of the organism and the simple nervous system enable the complete reconstruction of the first connectome. The stereotypic developmental program and the anatomical reproducibility of synaptic connections provide a blueprint to dissect the mechanisms underlying synapse formation. Recent technological innovation using laser surgery of single axons and in vivo imaging has also made C. elegans a new model for axon regeneration. Importantly, genes regulating synaptogenesis and axon regeneration are highly conserved in function across animal phyla. This mini-review will summarize the main approaches and the key findings in understanding the mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of the nervous system. The impact of such findings underscores the awesome power of C. elegans genetics. PMID:26563175

  8. Reference toxicants for toxicity testing using Caenorhabditis elegans in aquatic media

    SciTech Connect

    Cressman, C.P. III; Williams, P.L.

    1997-09-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans aquatic toxicity assays were standardized with five common reference toxicants: CdCl{sub 2}, NaCl, KCl, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), and sodium pentachlorophenate (PCP). Aquatic toxicity testing was conducted in 3 media: a standard C. elegans medium; EPA moderately hard reconstituted water; and EPA moderately hard mineral water. Test duration in each medium was 24h without a food source, and 24h and 48h with Escherichia coli strain OP50 as a food source. Each test was replicated three times with each replicate having 6 wells per concentration, 10 worms per well. LC{sub 50} values were calculated using probit analysis. The average LC{sub 50}s for each set of replications were compared to assess sensitivity and reproducibility of the data, identifying expected variation between replicate tests. These reference toxicants increase the database for C. elegans and provide a benchmark for further application.

  9. Pharyngeal pumping continues after laser killing of the pharyngeal nervous system of C. elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, L.; Horvitz, H.R. )

    1989-10-01

    Using a laser microbeam to kill specific subsets of the pharyngeal nervous system of C. elegans, we found that feeding was accomplished by two separately controlled muscle motions, isthmus peristalsis and pumping. The single neuron M4 was necessary and sufficient for isthmus peristalsis. The MC neurons were necessary for normal stimulation of pumping in response to food, but pumping continued and was functional in MC- worms. The remaining 12 neuron types were also unnecessary for functional pumping. No operation we did, including destruction of the entire pharyngeal nervous system, abolished pumping altogether. When we killed all pharyngeal neurons except M4, the worms were viable and fertile, although retarded and starved. Since feeding is one of the few known essential actions controlled by the nervous system, we suggest that most of the C. elegans nervous system is dispensable in hermaphrodites under laboratory conditions. This may explain the ease with which nervous system mutants are isolated and handled in C. elegans.

  10. Microscopic Investigation of Protein Function in C. elegans Using Fluorescent Imaging.

    PubMed

    Luke, Cliff J; O'Reilly, Linda P

    2015-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model organism for studying human biology and disease due to its surprisingly high genetic homology to Homo sapiens. Its genetic amenability, small size, short generation time, and transparent body make it an ideal organism for multiple scientific disciplines. Fluorescent microscopy is essential for studying protein biological function. However, C. elegans, mainly due to its high motility, has been more difficult to adapt to fluorescence imaging, especially live-imaging. We present here several protocols for the study of protein location, function and dynamics in context of a whole animal. These protocols, especially when combined with existing genetic procedures, can yield a great deal of insight in the physiological roles of proteins in C. elegans, which can be directly translated into mammalian systems. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26423692

  11. Micropropagation of globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus L. var. scolymus).

    PubMed

    Iapichino, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus L. var. scolymus) is a perennial plant cultivated in the Mediterranean region and the Americas for its edible young flower heads. Although vegetative propagation by offshoots or by "ovoli" (underground dormant axillary buds) has been the primary method of propagation, the potential for the diffusion of diseases and the phenotypic variability can be very high. The propagation of this species by axillary shoot proliferation from in vitro-cultured meristems produces systemic pathogen-free plants and a higher multiplication rate as compared to that obtained by conventional agamic multiplication. Axillary shoot proliferation can be induced from excised shoot apices cultured on Murashige and Skoog agar solidified medium supplemented with various concentrations of cytokinins and auxins, depending on genotype. For the production of virus-free plants, meristems, 0.3-0.8 mm long are excised from shoot apices and surface sterilized. The transfer of artichoke microshoots to a medium lacking cytokinins or with low cytokinin concentration is critical for rooting. Adventitious roots develop within 3-5 weeks after transfer to root induction MS medium containing NAA or IAA at various concentrations. However, in vitro rooting frequency rate is dependent on the genotype and the protocol used. Acclimatization of in vitro microshoots having 3-4 roots is successfully accomplished; plantlets develop new roots in ex vitro conditions and continue to grow. PMID:23179714

  12. Abietane diterpenoids from Isodon lophanthoides var. graciliflorus and their cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenting; Xie, Haihui; Wu, Ping; Wei, Xiaoyi

    2013-01-15

    Seven new (1-7) and three known (8-10) abietane diterpenoids were isolated from the methanolic extract of the aerial parts of Isodon lophanthoides var. graciliflorus (Lamiaceae), a folk Chinese medicine and an herb for functional beverages. They were identified as 16-acetoxylsugiol (1), graciliflorin E (2), graciliflorin F (3), 15-O-methylgraciliflorin F (4), 15-hydroxy-20-deoxocarnosol (5), 3?-hydroxysempervirol (6), 15-hydroxy-1-oxosalvibretol (7), abieta-8,11,13-triene-14,19-diol (8), 6,12,15-trihydroxy-5,8,11,13-abietatetraen-7-one (9), and 3?-hinokiol (10) based on the spectroscopic data including COSY (correlated spectroscopy), HMBC (heteronuclear multiple bond correlation), and HR-ESI-MS (high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry). All the compounds except 10 were obtained from I. lophanthoides for the first time. Compounds 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, and 9 exhibited in vitro cytotoxicity against A549 (human lung adenocarcinoma), MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma), and HeLa (human cervical carcinoma) cell lines with the IC(50) values of 1.79-52.67 ?M. PMID:23122169

  13. In vitro antioxidant and anticancer effects of solvent fractions from prunella vulgaris var. lilacina

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, considerable attention has been focused on exploring the potential antioxidant properties of plant extracts or isolated products of plant origin. Prunella vulgaris var. lilacina is widely distributed in Korea, Japan, China, and Europe, and it continues to be used to treat inflammation, eye pain, headache, and dizziness. However, reports on the antioxidant activities of P. vulgaris var. lilacina are limited, particularly concerning the relationship between its phenolic content and antioxidant capacity. In this study, we investigated the antioxidant and anticancer activities of an ethanol extract from P. vulgaris var. lilacina and its fractions. Methods Dried powder of P. vulgaris var. lilacina was extracted with ethanol, and the extract was fractionated to produce the hexane fraction, butanol fraction, chloroform fraction and residual water fraction. The phenolic content was assayed using the Folin-Ciocalteu colorimetric method. Subsequently, the antioxidant activities of the ethanol extract and its fractions were analyzed employing various antioxidant assay methods including DPPH, FRAP, ABTS, SOD activity and production of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, the extract and fractions were assayed for their ability to exert cytotoxic activities on various cancer cells using the MTT assay. We also investigated the expression of genes associated with apoptotic cell death by RT-PCR. Results The total phenolic contents of the ethanol extract and water fraction of P. vulgaris var. lilacina were 303.66 and 322.80 mg GAE/g dry weight (or fractions), respectively. The results showed that the ethanol extract and the water fraction of P. vulgaris var. lilacina had higher antioxidant content than other solvent fractions, similar to their total phenolic content. Anticancer activity was also tested using the HepG2, HT29, A549, MKN45 and HeLa cancer cell lines. The results clearly demonstrated that the P. vulgaris var. lilacina ethanol extract induced significant cytotoxic effects on the various cancer cell lines, and these effects were stronger than those induced by the P. vulgaris var. lilacina solvent fractions. We also investigated the expression of genes associated with apoptotic cell death. We confirmed that the P. vulgaris var. lilacina ethanol extract and water fraction significantly increased the expression of p53, Bax and Fas. Conclusions These results suggest that the ethanol extract from P. vulgaris var. lilacina and its fractions could be applied as natural sources of antioxidants and anticancer activities in food and in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:24206840

  14. A modular library of small molecule signals regulates social behaviors in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Jagan; von Reuss, Stephan H; Bose, Neelanjan; Zaslaver, Alon; Mahanti, Parag; Ho, Margaret C; O'Doherty, Oran G; Edison, Arthur S; Sternberg, Paul W; Schroeder, Frank C

    2012-01-01

    The nematode C. elegans is an important model for the study of social behaviors. Recent investigations have shown that a family of small molecule signals, the ascarosides, controls population density sensing and mating behavior. However, despite extensive studies of C. elegans aggregation behaviors, no intraspecific signals promoting attraction or aggregation of wild-type hermaphrodites have been identified. Using comparative metabolomics, we show that the known ascarosides are accompanied by a series of derivatives featuring a tryptophan-derived indole moiety. Behavioral assays demonstrate that these indole ascarosides serve as potent intraspecific attraction and aggregation signals for hermaphrodites, in contrast to ascarosides lacking the indole group, which are repulsive. Hermaphrodite attraction to indole ascarosides depends on the ASK amphid sensory neurons. Downstream of the ASK sensory neuron, the interneuron AIA is required for mediating attraction to indole ascarosides instead of the RMG interneurons, which previous studies have shown to integrate attraction and aggregation signals from ASK and other sensory neurons. The role of the RMG interneuron in mediating aggregation and attraction is thought to depend on the neuropeptide Y-like receptor NPR-1, because solitary and social C. elegans strains are distinguished by different npr-1 variants. We show that indole ascarosides promote attraction and aggregation in both solitary and social C. elegans strains. The identification of indole ascarosides as aggregation signals reveals unexpected complexity of social signaling in C. elegans, which appears to be based on a modular library of ascarosides integrating building blocks derived from lipid ?-oxidation and amino-acid metabolism. Variation of modules results in strongly altered signaling content, as addition of a tryptophan-derived indole unit to repellent ascarosides produces strongly attractive indole ascarosides. Our findings show that the library of ascarosides represents a highly developed chemical language integrating different neurophysiological pathways to mediate social communication in C. elegans. PMID:22253572

  15. Heterologous Expression in Remodeled C. elegans: A Platform for Monoaminergic Agonist Identification and Anthelmintic Screening.

    PubMed

    Law, Wenjing; Wuescher, Leah M; Ortega, Amanda; Hapiak, Vera M; Komuniecki, Patricia R; Komuniecki, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Monoamines, such as 5-HT and tyramine (TA), paralyze both free-living and parasitic nematodes when applied exogenously and serotonergic agonists have been used to clear Haemonchus contortus infections in vivo. Since nematode cell lines are not available and animal screening options are limited, we have developed a screening platform to identify monoamine receptor agonists. Key receptors were expressed heterologously in chimeric, genetically-engineered Caenorhabditis elegans, at sites likely to yield robust phenotypes upon agonist stimulation. This approach potentially preserves the unique pharmacologies of the receptors, while including nematode-specific accessory proteins and the nematode cuticle. Importantly, the sensitivity of monoamine-dependent paralysis could be increased dramatically by hypotonic incubation or the use of bus mutants with increased cuticular permeabilities. We have demonstrated that the monoamine-dependent inhibition of key interneurons, cholinergic motor neurons or body wall muscle inhibited locomotion and caused paralysis. Specifically, 5-HT paralyzed C. elegans 5-HT receptor null animals expressing either nematode, insect or human orthologues of a key G?o-coupled 5-HT1-like receptor in the cholinergic motor neurons. Importantly, 8-OH-DPAT and PAPP, 5-HT receptor agonists, differentially paralyzed the transgenic animals, with 8-OH-DPAT paralyzing mutant animals expressing the human receptor at concentrations well below those affecting its C. elegans or insect orthologues. Similarly, 5-HT and TA paralyzed C. elegans 5-HT or TA receptor null animals, respectively, expressing either C. elegans or H. contortus 5-HT or TA-gated Cl- channels in either C. elegans cholinergic motor neurons or body wall muscles. Together, these data suggest that this heterologous, ectopic expression screening approach will be useful for the identification of agonists for key monoamine receptors from parasites and could have broad application for the identification of ligands for a host of potential anthelmintic targets. PMID:25928899

  16. Pseudomonas fluorescens NZI7 repels grazing by C. elegans, a natural predator

    PubMed Central

    Burlinson, Peter; Studholme, David; Cambray-Young, Joanna; Heavens, Darren; Rathjen, John; Hodgkin, Jonathan; Preston, Gail M

    2013-01-01

    The bacteriovorous nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been used to investigate many aspects of animal biology, including interactions with pathogenic bacteria. However, studies examining C. elegans interactions with bacteria isolated from environments in which it is found naturally are relatively scarce. C. elegans is frequently associated with cultivation of the edible mushroom Agaricus bisporus, and has been reported to increase the severity of bacterial blotch of mushrooms, a disease caused by bacteria from the Pseudomonas fluorescens complex. We observed that pseudomonads isolated from mushroom farms showed differential resistance to nematode predation. Under nutrient poor conditions, in which most pseudomonads were consumed, the mushroom pathogenic isolate P. fluorescens NZI7 was able to repel C. elegans without causing nematode death. A draft genome sequence of NZI7 showed it to be related to the biocontrol strain P. protegens Pf-5. To identify the genetic basis of nematode repellence in NZI7, we developed a grid-based screen for mutants that lacked the ability to repel C. elegans. The mutants isolated in this screen included strains with insertions in the global regulator GacS and in a previously undescribed GacS-regulated gene cluster, ‘EDB' (‘edible'). Our results suggest that the product of the EDB cluster is a poorly diffusible or cell-associated factor that acts together with other features of NZI7 to provide a novel mechanism to deter nematode grazing. As nematodes interact with NZI7 colonies before being repelled, the EDB factor may enable NZI7 to come into contact with and be disseminated by C. elegans without being subject to intensive predation. PMID:23426012

  17. A Modular Library of Small Molecule Signals Regulates Social Behaviors in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Neelanjan; Zaslaver, Alon; Mahanti, Parag; Ho, Margaret C.; O'Doherty, Oran G.; Edison, Arthur S.; Sternberg, Paul W.; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2012-01-01

    The nematode C. elegans is an important model for the study of social behaviors. Recent investigations have shown that a family of small molecule signals, the ascarosides, controls population density sensing and mating behavior. However, despite extensive studies of C. elegans aggregation behaviors, no intraspecific signals promoting attraction or aggregation of wild-type hermaphrodites have been identified. Using comparative metabolomics, we show that the known ascarosides are accompanied by a series of derivatives featuring a tryptophan-derived indole moiety. Behavioral assays demonstrate that these indole ascarosides serve as potent intraspecific attraction and aggregation signals for hermaphrodites, in contrast to ascarosides lacking the indole group, which are repulsive. Hermaphrodite attraction to indole ascarosides depends on the ASK amphid sensory neurons. Downstream of the ASK sensory neuron, the interneuron AIA is required for mediating attraction to indole ascarosides instead of the RMG interneurons, which previous studies have shown to integrate attraction and aggregation signals from ASK and other sensory neurons. The role of the RMG interneuron in mediating aggregation and attraction is thought to depend on the neuropeptide Y-like receptor NPR-1, because solitary and social C. elegans strains are distinguished by different npr-1 variants. We show that indole ascarosides promote attraction and aggregation in both solitary and social C. elegans strains. The identification of indole ascarosides as aggregation signals reveals unexpected complexity of social signaling in C. elegans, which appears to be based on a modular library of ascarosides integrating building blocks derived from lipid ?-oxidation and amino-acid metabolism. Variation of modules results in strongly altered signaling content, as addition of a tryptophan-derived indole unit to repellent ascarosides produces strongly attractive indole ascarosides. Our findings show that the library of ascarosides represents a highly developed chemical language integrating different neurophysiological pathways to mediate social communication in C. elegans. PMID:22253572

  18. Heterologous Expression in Remodeled C. elegans: A Platform for Monoaminergic Agonist Identification and Anthelmintic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Law, Wenjing; Wuescher, Leah M.; Ortega, Amanda; Hapiak, Vera M.; Komuniecki, Patricia R.; Komuniecki, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Monoamines, such as 5-HT and tyramine (TA), paralyze both free-living and parasitic nematodes when applied exogenously and serotonergic agonists have been used to clear Haemonchus contortus infections in vivo. Since nematode cell lines are not available and animal screening options are limited, we have developed a screening platform to identify monoamine receptor agonists. Key receptors were expressed heterologously in chimeric, genetically-engineered Caenorhabditis elegans, at sites likely to yield robust phenotypes upon agonist stimulation. This approach potentially preserves the unique pharmacologies of the receptors, while including nematode-specific accessory proteins and the nematode cuticle. Importantly, the sensitivity of monoamine-dependent paralysis could be increased dramatically by hypotonic incubation or the use of bus mutants with increased cuticular permeabilities. We have demonstrated that the monoamine-dependent inhibition of key interneurons, cholinergic motor neurons or body wall muscle inhibited locomotion and caused paralysis. Specifically, 5-HT paralyzed C. elegans 5-HT receptor null animals expressing either nematode, insect or human orthologues of a key G?o-coupled 5-HT1-like receptor in the cholinergic motor neurons. Importantly, 8-OH-DPAT and PAPP, 5-HT receptor agonists, differentially paralyzed the transgenic animals, with 8-OH-DPAT paralyzing mutant animals expressing the human receptor at concentrations well below those affecting its C. elegans or insect orthologues. Similarly, 5-HT and TA paralyzed C. elegans 5-HT or TA receptor null animals, respectively, expressing either C. elegans or H. contortus 5-HT or TA-gated Cl- channels in either C. elegans cholinergic motor neurons or body wall muscles. Together, these data suggest that this heterologous, ectopic expression screening approach will be useful for the identification of agonists for key monoamine receptors from parasites and could have broad application for the identification of ligands for a host of potential anthelmintic targets. PMID:25928899

  19. Precision measurement of the direct CP violation parameter. var epsilon. prime /. var epsilon. via the four K yields 2. pi. decay modes and a high sensitivity search for CP violating rare K sub L decays, Task J

    SciTech Connect

    Wah, Yau W.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the progress on the measurement of the direct CP violation parameter {var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon} and the rare KL decay. The progress has been as follows: (A) results from the complete E731 data set which was collected in the 1987/88 fixed target run; preparations for and the taking of the data for (B) E773 (CPT symmetry test) and (C) E799 (rare decay study); and finally (D) R D for a new detector to further study {var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon} and rate decays.

  20. Dynamic Range in the C.elegans Brain Network

    E-print Network

    Chris G. Antonopoulos

    2015-12-28

    We study external, electrical perturbations and their responses in the brain dynamic network of the \\textit{Caenorhabditis elegans} soil worm, given by the connectome of its large somatic nervous system. Our analysis is inspired by a realistic experiment where one stimulates externally specific parts of the brain and studies the persistent neural activity triggered in other cortical regions. In this work, we perturb groups of neurons that form communities, identified by the walktrap community detection method, by trains of stereotypical electrical Poissonian impulses and study the propagation of neural activity to other communities by measuring the corresponding dynamic ranges and Steven law exponents. We show that when one perturbs specific communities, keeping the rest unperturbed, the external stimulations are able to propagate to some of them but not to all. There are also perturbations that do not trigger any response. We found that this depends on the initially perturbed community. Finally, we relate our findings for the former cases with low neural synchronization, self-criticality and large information flow capacity, and interpret them as the ability of the brain network to respond to external perturbations when it works at criticality and its information flow capacity becomes maximal.

  1. npr-1 Regulates foraging and dispersal strategies in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Gloria-Soria, Andrea; Azevedo, Ricardo B R

    2008-11-11

    Wild isolates of Caenorhabditis elegans differ in their tendency to aggregate on food [1, 2]. Most quantitative variation in this behavior is explained by a polymorphism at a single amino acid in the G protein-coupled receptor NPR-1: gregarious strains carry the 215F allele, and solitary strains carry the 215V allele [2]. Although npr-1 regulates a behavioral syndrome with potential adaptive implications, the evolutionary causes and consequences of this natural polymorphism remain unclear. Here we show that npr-1 regulates two behaviors that can promote coexistence of the two alleles. First, gregarious and solitary worms differ in their responses to food such that they can partition a single, continuous patch of food. Second, gregarious worms disperse more readily from patch to patch than do solitary worms, which can cause partitioning of a fragmented resource. The dispersal propensity of both gregarious and solitary worms increases with density. npr-1-dependent dispersal is independent of aggregation and could be part of a food-searching strategy. The gregarious allele is favored in a fragmented relative to a continuous food environment in competition experiments. We conclude that the npr-1 polymorphism could be maintained by a trade-off between dispersal and competitive ability. PMID:18993077

  2. Neuronal and molecular substrates for optimal foraging in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Milward, Kate; Busch, Karl Emanuel; Murphy, Robin Joseph; de Bono, Mario; Olofsson, Birgitta

    2011-12-20

    Variation in food quality and abundance requires animals to decide whether to stay on a poor food patch or leave in search of better food. An important question in behavioral ecology asks when is it optimal for an animal to leave a food patch it is depleting. Although optimal foraging is central to evolutionary success, the neural and molecular mechanisms underlying it are poorly understood. Here we investigate the neuronal basis for adaptive food-leaving behavior in response to resource depletion in Caenorhabditis elegans, and identify several of the signaling pathways involved. The ASE neurons, previously implicated in salt chemoattraction, promote food-leaving behavior via a cGMP pathway as food becomes limited. High ambient O(2) promotes food-leaving via the O(2)-sensing neurons AQR, PQR, and URX. Ectopic activation of these neurons using channelrhodopsin is sufficient to induce high food-leaving behavior. In contrast, the neuropeptide receptor NPR-1, which regulates social behavior on food, acts in the ASE neurons, the nociceptive ASH neurons, and in the RMG interneuron to repress food-leaving. Finally, we show that neuroendocrine signaling by TGF-?/DAF-7 and neuronal insulin signaling are necessary for adaptive food-leaving behavior. We suggest that animals integrate information about their nutritional state with ambient oxygen and gustatory stimuli to formulate optimal foraging strategies. PMID:22135454

  3. Family of FLP Peptides in Caenorhabditis elegans and Related Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chris; Kim, Kyuhyung

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptides regulate all aspects of behavior in multicellular organisms. Because of their ability to act at long distances, neuropeptides can exert their effects beyond the conventional synaptic connections, thereby adding an intricate layer of complexity to the activity of neural networks. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a large number of neuropeptide genes that are expressed throughout the nervous system have been identified. The actions of these peptides supplement the synaptic connections of the 302 neurons, allowing for fine tuning of neural networks and increasing the ways in which behaviors can be regulated. In this review, we focus on a large family of genes encoding FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs). These genes, the flp genes, have been used as a starting point to identifying flp genes throughout Nematoda. Nematodes have the largest family of FaRPs described thus far. The challenges in the future are the elucidation of their functions and the identification of the receptors and signaling pathways through which they function. PMID:25352828

  4. Epidermal Wound Healing in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Healing of epidermal wounds is a fundamentally conserved process found in essentially all multicellular organisms. Studies of anatomically simple and genetically tractable model invertebrates can illuminate the roles of key genes and mechanisms in wound healing. Recent Advances: The nematode skin is composed of a simple epithelium, the epidermis (also known as hypodermis), and an associated extracellular cuticle. Nematodes likely have a robust capacity for epidermal repair; yet until recently, relatively few studies have directly analyzed wound healing. Here we review epidermal wound responses and repair in the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Critical Issues: Wounding the epidermis triggers a cutaneous innate immune response and wound closure. The innate immune response involves upregulation of a suite of antimicrobial peptides. Wound closure involves a Ca2+-triggered rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. These processes appear to be initiated independently, yet, their coordinated activity allows the animal to survive otherwise fatal skin wounds. Future Directions: Unanswered questions include the nature of the damage-associated molecular patterns sensed by the epidermis, the signaling pathways relaying Ca2+ to the cytoskeleton, and the mechanisms of permeability barrier repair. PMID:25945288

  5. Cuticle of Caenorhabditis elegans: its isolation and partial characterization

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The adult cuticle of the soil nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, is a proteinaceous extracellular structure elaborated by the underlying layer of hypodermal cells during the final molt in the animal's life cycle. The cuticle is composed of an outer cortical layer connected by regularly arranged struts to an inner basal layer. The cuticle can be isolated largely intact and free of all cellular material by sonication and treatment with 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Purified cuticles exhibit a negative material in the basal cuticle layer. The cuticle layers differ in their solubility in sulfhydryl reducing agents, susceptibility to various proteolytic enzymes and amino acid composition. The struts, basal layer, and internal cortical layer are composed of collagen proteins that are extensively cross-linked by disulfide bonds. The external cortical layer appears to contain primarily noncollagen proteins that are extensively cross-linked by nonreducible covalent bonds. The collagen proteins extracted from the cuticle with a reducing agent can be separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis into eight major species differing in apparent molecular weight. PMID:7251677

  6. Quantification of Nociceptive Escape Response in C.elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Kawai; Mohammadi, Aylia; Ryu, William; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    Animals cannot rank and communicate their pain consciously. Thus in pain studies on animal models, one must infer the pain level from high precision experimental characterization of behavior. This is not trivial since behaviors are very complex and multidimensional. Here we explore the feasibility of C.elegans as a model for pain transduction. The nematode has a robust neurally mediated noxious escape response, which we show to be partially decoupled from other sensory behaviors. We develop a nociceptive behavioral response assay that allows us to apply controlled levels of pain by locally heating worms with an IR laser. The worms' motions are captured by machine vision programming with high spatiotemporal resolution. The resulting behavioral quantification allows us to build a statistical model for inference of the experienced pain level from the behavioral response. Based on the measured nociceptive escape of over 400 worms, we conclude that none of the simple characteristics of the response are reliable indicators of the laser pulse strength. Nonetheless, a more reliable statistical inference of the pain stimulus level from the measured behavior is possible based on a complexity-controlled regression model that takes into account the entire worm behavioral output. This work was partially supported by NSF grant No. IOS/1208126 and HFSP grant No. RGY0084/2011.

  7. Antibody Staining in C. Elegans Using "Freeze-Cracking"

    PubMed Central

    Duerr, Janet S.

    2013-01-01

    To stain C. elegans with antibodies, the relatively impermeable cuticle must be bypassed by chemical or mechanical methods. "Freeze-cracking" is one method used to physically pull the cuticle from nematodes by compressing nematodes between two adherent slides, freezing them, and pulling the slides apart. Freeze-cracking provides a simple and rapid way to gain access to the tissues without chemical treatment and can be used with a variety of fixatives. However, it leads to the loss of many of the specimens and the required compression mechanically distorts the sample. Practice is required to maximize recovery of samples with good morphology. Freeze-cracking can be optimized for specific fixation conditions, recovery of samples, or low non-specific staining, but not for all parameters at once. For antibodies that require very hard fixation conditions and tolerate the chemical treatments needed to chemically permeabilize the cuticle, treatment of intact nematodes in solution may be preferred. If the antibody requires a lighter fix or if the optimum fixation conditions are unknown, freeze-cracking provides a very useful way to rapidly assay the antibody and can yield specific subcellular and cellular localization information for the antigen of interest. PMID:24145964

  8. Sphingolipid metabolism regulates development and lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Roy G.; Thompson, Kenneth W.; Camandola, Simonetta; Mack, Kendra T.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a highly conserved lipid component of cell membranes involved in the formation of lipid raft domains that house many of the receptors and cell-to-cell signaling factors involved in regulating cell division, maturation, and terminal differentiation. By measuring and manipulating sphingolipid metabolism using pharmacological and genetic tools in Caenorhabditis elegans, we provide evidence that the synthesis and remodeling of specific ceramides (e.g., dC18:1–C24:1), gangliosides (e.g., GM1–C24:1), and sphingomyelins (e.g., dC18:1–C18:1) influence development rate and lifespan. We found that the levels of fatty acid chain desaturation and elongation in many sphingolipid species increased during development and aging, with no such changes in developmentally-arrested dauer larvae or normal adults after food withdrawal (an anti-aging intervention). Pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNAs directed against serine palmitoyl transferase and glucosylceramide synthase acted to slow development rate, extend the reproductive period, and increase lifespan. In contrast, worms fed an egg yolk diet rich in sphingolipids exhibited accelerated development and reduced lifespan. Our findings demonstrate that sphingolipid accumulation and remodeling are critical events that determine development rate and lifespan in the nematode model, with both development rate and aging being accelerated by the synthesis of sphingomyelin, and its metabolism to ceramides and gangliosides. PMID:25437839

  9. Phosphoregulation of the C. elegans cadherin-catenin complex.

    PubMed

    Callaci, Sandhya; Morrison, Kylee; Shao, Xiangqiang; Schuh, Amber L; Wang, Yueju; Yates, John R; Hardin, Jeff; Audhya, Anjon

    2015-12-15

    Adherens junctions play key roles in mediating cell-cell contacts during tissue development. In Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, the cadherin-catenin complex (CCC), composed of the classical cadherin HMR-1 and members of three catenin families, HMP-1, HMP-2 and JAC-1, is necessary for normal blastomere adhesion, gastrulation, ventral enclosure of the epidermis and embryo elongation. Disruption of CCC assembly or function results in embryonic lethality. Previous work suggests that components of the CCC are subject to phosphorylation. However, the identity of phosphorylated residues in CCC components and their contributions to CCC stability and function in a living organism remain speculative. Using mass spectrometry, we systematically identify phosphorylated residues in the essential CCC subunits HMR-1, HMP-1 and HMP-2 in vivo. We demonstrate that HMR-1/cadherin phosphorylation occurs on three sites within its ?-catenin binding domain that each contributes to CCC assembly on lipid bilayers. In contrast, phosphorylation of HMP-2/?-catenin inhibits its association with HMR-1/cadherin in vitro, suggesting a role in CCC disassembly. Although HMP-1/?-catenin is also phosphorylated in vivo, phosphomimetic mutations do not affect its ability to associate with other CCC components or interact with actin in vitro. Collectively, our findings support a model in which distinct phosphorylation events contribute to rapid CCC assembly and disassembly, both of which are essential for morphogenetic rearrangements during development. PMID:26443865

  10. Genetic Regulation of Caenorhabditis elegans Lysosome Related Organelle Function

    PubMed Central

    Soukas, Alexander A.; Carr, Christopher E.; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles that contain acid hydrolases that degrade cellular proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and oligosaccharides, and are important for cellular maintenance and protection against age-related decline. Lysosome related organelles (LROs) are specialized lysosomes found in organisms from humans to worms, and share many of the features of classic lysosomes. Defective LROs are associated with human immune disorders and neurological disease. Caenorhabditis elegans LROs are the site of concentration of vital dyes such as Nile red as well as age-associated autofluorescence. Even though certain short-lived mutants have high LRO Nile red and high autofluorescence, and other long-lived mutants have low LRO Nile red and low autofluorescence, these two biologies are distinct. We identified a genetic pathway that modulates aging-related LRO phenotypes via serotonin signaling and the gene kat-1, which encodes a mitochondrial ketothiolase. Regulation of LRO phenotypes by serotonin and kat-1 in turn depend on the proton-coupled, transmembrane transporter SKAT-1. skat-1 loss of function mutations strongly suppress the high LRO Nile red accumulation phenotype of kat-1 mutation. Using a systems approach, we further analyzed the role of 571 genes in LRO biology. These results highlight a gene network that modulates LRO biology in a manner dependent upon the conserved protein kinase TOR complex 2. The results implicate new genetic pathways involved in LRO biology, aging related physiology, and potentially human diseases of the LRO. PMID:24204312

  11. Challenging muscle homeostasis uncovers novel chaperone interactions in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Frumkin, Anna; Dror, Shiran; Pokrzywa, Wojciech; Bar-Lavan, Yael; Karady, Ido; Hoppe, Thorsten; Ben-Zvi, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Proteome stability is central to cellular function and the lifespan of an organism. This is apparent in muscle cells, where incorrect folding and assembly of the sarcomere contributes to disease and aging. Apart from the myosin-assembly factor UNC-45, the complete network of chaperones involved in assembly and maintenance of muscle tissue is currently unknown. To identify additional factors required for sarcomere quality control, we performed genetic screens based on suppressed or synthetic motility defects in Caenorhabditis elegans. In addition to ethyl methyl sulfonate-based mutagenesis, we employed RNAi-mediated knockdown of candidate chaperones in unc-45 temperature-sensitive mutants and screened for impaired movement at permissive conditions. This approach confirmed the cooperation between UNC-45 and Hsp90. Moreover, the screens identified three novel co-chaperones, CeHop (STI-1), CeAha1 (C01G10.8) and Cep23 (ZC395.10), required for muscle integrity. The specific identification of Hsp90 and Hsp90 co-chaperones highlights the physiological role of Hsp90 in myosin folding. Our work thus provides a clear example of how a combination of mild perturbations to the proteostasis network can uncover specific quality control modules. PMID:25988162

  12. Natural Variation and Copulatory Plug Formation in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkin, J.; Doniach, T.

    1997-01-01

    Most of the available natural isolates of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have been examined and compared with the standard laboratory wild type (Bristol N2). Molecular markers, in particular transposon restriction fragment length polymorphisms, were used to assign these isolates to 22 different races, for which brood size and spontaneous male frequency were determined. Several distinctive traits were observed in some of these races. One example is mab-23, in a race from Vancouver, which leads to severe distortion of male genitalia and prevents male mating. Another is gro-1, segregating in a Californian race, which is associated with slow growth, heat resistance and longevity. Many races differ from N2 in carrying a dominant allele at the plg-1 locus, causing copulatory plug formation by males. Properties and possible advantages of the plugging trait have been investigated. The dominant plg-1 allele does not lead to increased male mating efficiency, but males from a Stanford race (CB4855), in which the plugging trait was first observed, are much more virile than N2 males. Crosses between N2 and CB4855 indicate that the higher virility is due to multiple factors. Size differences between N2 and CB4855 are associated with factors mapping to LGV and LGX. PMID:9136008

  13. Antagonistic sensory cues generate gustatory plasticity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Hukema, Renate K; Rademakers, Suzanne; Dekkers, Martijn P J; Burghoorn, Jan; Jansen, Gert

    2006-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans shows chemoattraction to 0.1–200 mM NaCl, avoidance of higher NaCl concentrations, and avoidance of otherwise attractive NaCl concentrations after prolonged exposure to NaCl (gustatory plasticity). Previous studies have shown that the ASE and ASH sensory neurons primarily mediate attraction and avoidance of NaCl, respectively. Here we show that balances between at least four sensory cell types, ASE, ASI, ASH, ADF and perhaps ADL, modulate the response to NaCl. Our results suggest that two NaCl-attraction signalling pathways exist, one of which uses Ca2+/cGMP signalling. In addition, we provide evidence that attraction to NaCl is antagonised by G-protein signalling in the ASH neurons, which is desensitised by the G-protein-coupled receptor kinase GRK-2. Finally, the response to NaCl is modulated by G-protein signalling in the ASI and ADF neurons, a second G-protein pathway in ASH and cGMP signalling in neurons exposed to the body fluid. PMID:16407969

  14. Perilipin-related protein regulates lipid metabolism in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chughtai, Ahmed Ali; Kaššák, Filip; Kostrouchová, Markéta; Novotný, Jan Philipp; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouch, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    Perilipins are lipid droplet surface proteins that contribute to fat metabolism by controlling the access of lipids to lipolytic enzymes. Perilipins have been identified in organisms as diverse as metazoa, fungi, and amoebas but strikingly not in nematodes. Here we identify the protein encoded by the W01A8.1 gene in Caenorhabditis elegans as the closest homologue and likely orthologue of metazoan perilipin. We demonstrate that nematode W01A8.1 is a cytoplasmic protein residing on lipid droplets similarly as human perilipins 1 and 2. Downregulation or elimination of W01A8.1 affects the appearance of lipid droplets resulting in the formation of large lipid droplets localized around the dividing nucleus during the early zygotic divisions. Visualization of lipid containing structures by CARS microscopy in vivo showed that lipid-containing structures become gradually enlarged during oogenesis and relocate during the first zygotic division around the dividing nucleus. In mutant embryos, the lipid containing structures show defective intracellular distribution in subsequent embryonic divisions and become gradually smaller during further development. In contrast to embryos, lipid-containing structures in enterocytes and in epidermal cells of adult animals are smaller in mutants than in wild type animals. Our results demonstrate the existence of a perilipin-related regulation of fat metabolism in nematodes and provide new possibilities for functional studies of lipid metabolism. PMID:26357594

  15. Uncoupling lifespan and healthspan in Caenorhabditis elegans longevity mutants

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ankita; Zhu, Lihua J.; Yen, Kelvin; Tissenbaum, Heidi A.

    2015-01-01

    Aging research has been very successful at identifying signaling pathways and evolutionarily conserved genes that extend lifespan with the assumption that an increase in lifespan will also increase healthspan. However, it is largely unknown whether we are extending the healthy time of life or simply prolonging a period of frailty with increased incidence of age-associated diseases. Here we use Caenorhabditis elegans, one of the premiere systems for lifespan studies, to determine whether lifespan and healthspan are intrinsically correlated. We conducted multiple cellular and organismal assays on wild type as well as four long-lived mutants (insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1, dietary restriction, protein translation, mitochondrial signaling) in a longitudinal manner to determine the health of the animals as they age. We find that some long-lived mutants performed better than wild type when measured chronologically (number of days). However, all long-lived mutants increased the proportion of time spent in a frail state. Together, these data suggest that lifespan can no longer be the sole parameter of interest and reveal the importance of evaluating multiple healthspan parameters for future studies on antiaging interventions. PMID:25561524

  16. Genetic Organization of the Unc-60 Region in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    McKim, K. S.; Heschl, MFP.; Rosenbluth, R. E.; Baillie, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    We have investigated the chromosomal region around unc-60 V, a gene affecting muscle structure, in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The region studied covers 3 map units and lies at the left end of linkage group (LG) V. Compared to the region around dpy-11 (at the center of LGV), the unc-60 region has relatively few visible genes per map unit. We found the same to be true for essential genes. By screening simultaneously for recessive lethals closely linked to either dpy-11 or unc-60, we recovered ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutations in 10 essential genes near dpy-11 but in only two genes near unc-60. Four deficiency breakpoints were mapped to the unc-60 region. Using recombination and deficiency mapping we established the following gene order: let-336, unc-34, let-326, unc-60, emb-29, let-426. Regarding unc-60 itself, we compared the effect of ten alleles (including five isolated during this study) on hermaphrodite mobility and fecundity. We used intragenic mapping to position eight of these alleles. The results show that these alleles are not distributed uniformly within the gene, but map to two groups approximately 0.012 map unit apart. PMID:8608931

  17. Alterations in Caenorhabditis elegans and Cronobacter sakazakii lipopolysaccharide during interaction.

    PubMed

    Sivamaruthi, Bhagavathi Sundaram; Prasanth, Mani Iyer; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2015-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide is one of the pathogen-associated molecular patterns of Gram-negative bacteria which are essential for its pathogenicity. Cronobacter sakazakii is an opportunistic, emergent pathogen, which infects and cause mortality in Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, modifications in host and C. sakazakii LPS during infections were evaluated. The physiological assays revealed that LPS alone is sufficient to affect the host pharyngeal pumping rate, brood size and cause lethality. FTIR spectra of LPS revealed that C. sakazakii modifies its LPS to escape from the recognition of host immune system. These results indicate that LPS plays a key role in C. sakazakii pathogenicity. qPCR studies revealed that LPS modulated the expression of selected host immune (clec-60, clec-87, lys-7, ilys-3, F08G5.6, atf-7, scl-2, cpr-2) and aging-related genes (skn-1, clk-2, bra-2, age-1, bec-1, daf-16, daf-2). Moreover, it was confirmed that p38 MAPK pathway has a major role in host immune response against LPS-mediated challenges. PMID:25416126

  18. Undulatory locomotion of finite filaments: lessons from C. elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leshansky, Alexander; Kenneth, Oded; Berman, Rotem; Sznitman, Josue

    2013-11-01

    Undulatory swimming is a widespread propulsion strategy adopted by many small-scale organisms including various single-cell eukaryotes and nematodes. In this work, we report a comprehensive study of undulatory locomotion of a finite filament using an approximate resistive force theory (RFT) and particle-based numerical computations. Using the ubiquitous model of a propagating sinusoidal waveform, we identify the limit of applicability of the RFT and determine the optimal propulsion gait in terms of (i) swimming distance covered per period of undulation and (ii) hydrodynamic propulsion efficiency. To compare the model sine swimmer to biological undulatory swimmers, we apply the particle-based approach to study locomotion of the of the model organism nematode Caenorhabditis elegans using the swimming gait extracted from experiments. The analysis reveals that the nematode overperforms the model sine swimmer in terms of both displacement and efficiency. Further comparison with common undulatory microorganisms reveals that many adopt waveforms with characteristics similar to the most efficient sine swimmer, yet real swimmers still manage to beat the latter in terms of speed. Our results emphasize the importance of the waveform optimization.

  19. The forward undulatory locomotion of Ceanorhabditis elegans in viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Amy; Ulrich, Xialing

    2013-11-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a soil dwelling roundworm that has served as model organisms for studying a multitude of biological and engineering phenomena. We study the undulatory locomotion of nematode in viscoelastic fluids with zero-shear viscosity varying from 0.03-75 Pa .s and relaxation times ranging from 0-350 s. We observe that the averaged normalized wavelength of swimming worm is essentially the same as that in Newtonian fluids. The undulatory frequency f shows the same reduction rate with respect to zero-shear viscosity in viscoelastic fluids as that found in the Newtonian fluids, meaning that the undulatory frequency is mainly controlled by the fluid viscosity. However, the moving speed Vm of the worm shows more distinct dependence on the elasticity of the fluid and exhibits a 4% drop with each 10-fold increase of the Deborah number De, a dimensionless number characterizing the elasticity of a fluid. To estimate the swimming efficiency coefficient and the ratio K =CN /CL of resistive coefficients of the worm in various viscoelastic fluids, we show that whereas it would take the worm around 7 periods to move a body length in a Newtonian fluid, it would take 27 periods to move a body length in a highly viscoelastic fluid.

  20. Genetic Linkage Map of Citrullus lanatus var. Citroides Chromosomal Segments Introgressed into the Watermelon Cultivar Crimson Sweet (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) Genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is need to develop of introgression lines, useful for genetic studies and genetic enhancement of watermelon. In this study, we used an advanced recombinant population (BC2F2) to identify and map chromosomal segments of the wild watermelon Citrullus lanatus var. citroides that were incorporate...

  1. Use of repetitive DNA probes as physical mapping strategy in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Cangiano, G; Ameer, H; Waterston, R; La Volpe, A

    1990-01-01

    A method for linking genomic sequences cloned in yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) has been tested using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model system. Yeast clones carrying YACs with repeated sequences were selected from a C. elegans genomic library, total DNA was digested with restriction enzymes, transferred to nylon membranes and probed with a variety of repetitive DNA probes. YAC clones that overlap share common bands with one or more repetitive DNA probes. In 159 YAC clones tested with one restriction enzyme and six probes 28 overlapping clones were detected. The advantages and limitations of this method for construction of YAC physical maps is discussed. Images PMID:2402436

  2. Graphite nanoplatelets and Caenorhabditis elegans: insights from an in vivo model.

    PubMed

    Zanni, Elena; De Bellis, Giovanni; Bracciale, Maria P; Broggi, Alessandra; Santarelli, Maria L; Sarto, Maria S; Palleschi, Claudio; Uccelletti, Daniela

    2012-06-13

    We evaluated the toxicity of graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. The GNPs resulted nontoxic by measuring longevity as well as reproductive capability end points. An imaging technique based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) mapping was also developed to analyze the GNPs spatial distribution inside the nematodes. Conflicting reports on the in vitro antimicrobial properties of graphene-based nanomaterials prompted us to challenge the host-pathogen system C. elegans-Pseudomonas aeruginosa to assess these findings through an in vivo model. PMID:22612766

  3. Amphotericin B Resistant Apophysomyces elegans Causing Rhino-oculo-Cerebral Mucormycosis in an Immunocompetent Host

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Debasis; Kakati, Barnali; Ahmad, Sohaib

    2015-01-01

    Mucormycosis, an angioinvasive infection is caused by the ubiquitous filamentous fungi of the order Mucorales and class Mucormycetes. Reports of this disease are on the rise over the past few decades. Rhino-oculo-Cerebral presentation associated with uncontrolled diabetes is the predominant characteristic of this entity. We report here a case of rhinooculocerebral mucormycosis (ROCM) due to Apophysomyces elegans (A. elegans) in a 45-year-old diabetic lady with background illness of hypothyroidism and polyradiculoneuropathy. Though this condition is usually managed with surgical debridement of the affected tissue and medical therapy with Amphotericin B, the isolate recovered in our case was found to be resistant to Amphotericin B. PMID:26435947

  4. Methods for the culture of C. elegans and S. cerevisiae in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahlen, Thomas; Sunga, June; Rask, Jon; Herrera, Anna; Lam, Kitty; Sing, Luke; Sato, Kevin; Ramos, Ross A.; Kirven-Brooks, Melissa; Reiss-Bubenheim, Debra

    2005-01-01

    To support the study of the effects of microgravity on biological systems, our group is developing and testing methods that allow the cultivation of C. elegans and S. cerevisiae in microgravity. Our aim is to develop the experimental means by which investigators may conduct peer reviewed biological experiments with C. elegans or S. cerevisiae in microgravity. Our protocols are aimed at enabling investigators to grow these organisms for extended periods during which samples may be sub-cultured, collected, preserved, frozen, and/or returned to earth for analysis. Data presented include characterization of the growth phenotype of these organisms in liquid medium in OptiCells(TM) (Biocrystal, LTD).

  5. Var2CSA minimal CSA binding region is located within the N-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anand; Gangnard, Stéphane; Dechavanne, Sébastien; Amirat, Farroudja; Lewit Bentley, Anita; Bentley, Graham A; Gamain, Benoît

    2011-01-01

    Var2CSA, a key molecule linked with pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM), causes sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes (PEs) in the placenta by adhesion to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA). Var2CSA possesses a 300 kDa extracellular region composed of six Duffy-binding like (DBL) domains and a cysteine-rich interdomain region (CIDRpam) module. Although initial studies implicated several individual var2CSA DBL domains as important for adhesion of PEs to CSA, new studies revealed that these individual domains lack both the affinity and specificity displayed by the full-length extracellular region. Indeed, recent evidence suggests the presence of a single CSA-binding site formed by a higher-order domain organization rather than several independent binding sites located on the different domains. Here, we search for the minimal binding region within var2CSA that maintains high affinity and specificity for CSA binding, a characteristic feature of the full-length extracellular region. Accordingly, truncated recombinant var2CSA proteins comprising different domain combinations were expressed and their binding characteristics assessed against different sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Our results indicate that the smallest region within var2CSA with similar binding properties to those of the full-length var2CSA is DBL1X-3X. We also demonstrate that inhibitory antibodies raised in rabbit against the full-length DBL1X-6? target principally DBL3X and, to a lesser extent, DBL5?. Taken together, our results indicate that efforts should focus on the DBL1X-3X region for developing vaccine and therapeutic strategies aimed at combating PAM. PMID:21625526

  6. The var3 genes of Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 strain are differentially expressed in infected erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yana; Jiang, Ning; Chang, Zhiguang; Wang, Henan; Lu, Huijun; Wahlgren, Mats; Chen, Qijun

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is an important virulence factor encoded by a family of 59 var genes, including 56 var genes plus 3 small var3 genes. The var genes are among the most diverse sequences in the P. falciparum genome, but the var3 genes are found conserved in most P. falciparum strains. Previous studies have been mainly focused on the typical var genes, while the biological characteristics of the var3 genes remain unknown. In this study, the three var3 genes, PF3D7_0100300, PF3D7_0600400, and PF3D7_0937600, were found to be transcribed in the erythrocytic stages of P. falciparum, with a peak in the transcription level at 16 h post-invasion, but terminated immediately after 16 h post-invasion. The encoded protein of PF3D7_0600400 could be detected in both the late trophozoite stage and schizont stage, while the encoded proteins of PF3D7_0100300 and PF3D7_0937600 could only be detected in the late trophozoite stage and schizont stage, respectively. Thus, the var3 genes of the P. falciparum 3D7 strain were differentially expressed during the erythrocytic development of the parasite. PMID:24759654

  7. Regulation of structure and function of sarcomeric actin filaments in striated muscle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2014-09-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been used as a valuable system to study structure and function of striated muscle. The body wall muscle of C. elegans is obliquely striated muscle with highly organized sarcomeric assembly of actin, myosin, and other accessory proteins. Genetic and molecular biological studies in C. elegans have identified a number of genes encoding structural and regulatory components for the muscle contractile apparatuses, and many of them have counterparts in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscles or striated muscles in other invertebrates. Applicability of genetics, cell biology, and biochemistry has made C. elegans an excellent system to study mechanisms of muscle contractility and assembly and maintenance of myofibrils. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms of structure and function of actin filaments in the C. elegans body wall muscle. Sarcomeric actin filaments in C. elegans muscle are associated with the troponin-tropomyosin system that regulates the actin-myosin interaction. Proteins that bind to the side and ends of actin filaments support ordered assembly of thin filaments. Furthermore, regulators of actin dynamics play important roles in initial assembly, growth, and maintenance of sarcomeres. The knowledge acquired in C. elegans can serve as bases to understand the basic mechanisms of muscle structure and function. PMID:25125169

  8. Novel picornavirus in domestic rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus var. domestica).

    PubMed

    Pankovics, Péter; Boros, Ákos; Bíró, Hunor; Horváth, Katalin Barbara; Phan, Tung Gia; Delwart, Eric; Reuter, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    Picornaviruses (family Picornaviridae) are small, non-enveloped viruses with positive sense, single-stranded RNA genomes. The numbers of the novel picornavirus species and genera are continuously increasing. Picornaviruses infect numerous vertebrate species from fish to mammals, but have not been identified in a member of the Lagomorpha order (pikas, hares and rabbits). In this study, a novel picornavirus was identified in 16 (28.6%) out of 56 faecal samples collected from clinically healthy rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus var. domestica) in two (one commercial and one family farms) of four rabbit farms in Hungary. The 8364 nucleotide (2486 amino acid) long complete genome sequence of strain Rabbit01/2013/HUN (KT325852) has typical picornavirus genome organization with type-V IRES at the 5'UTR, encodes a leader (L) and a single 2A(H-box/NC) proteins, contains a hepatitis-A-virus-like cis-acting replication element (CRE) in the 2A, but it does not contain the sequence forming a "barbell-like" secondary structure in the 3'UTR. Rabbit01/2013/HUN has 52.9%, 52% and 57.2% amino acid identity to corresponding proteins of species Aichivirus A (genus Kobuvirus): to murine Kobuvirus (JF755427) in P1, to canine Kobuvirus (JN387133) in P2 and to feline Kobuvirus (KF831027) in P3, respectively. The sequence and phylogenetic analysis indicated that Rabbit01/2013/HUN represents a novel picornavirus species possibly in genus Kobuvirus. This is the first report of detection of picornavirus in rabbit. Further study is needed to clarify whether this novel picornavirus plays a part in any diseases in domestic or wild rabbits. PMID:26588888

  9. [Diversity and community structure of endophytic fungi from Taxus chinensis var. mairei].

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    A total of 628 endophytic fungi were isolated from 480 tissue segments of needles and branches of Taxus chinensis var. mairei. According to morphological characteristics and ITS sequences, they represented 43 taxa in 28 genera, of which 10 Hyphomycetes, 20 Coelomycetes, 12 Ascomycetes and 1 unknown fungus. Phomopsis mali was confirmed as the dominant species. In accordance with relative frequency, Alternaria alternata, Aureobasidium pullulans, Colletotrichum boninense, C. gloeosporioides, Epicoccum nigrum , Fungal sp., Fusarium lateritium, Glomerella cingulata, Magnaporthales sp. , Nigrospora oryzae, Pestalotiopsis maculiformans, P. microspora, Peyronellaea glomerata and Xylaria sp. 1 were more common in T. chinensis var. mairei. T. chinensis var. mairei were severely infected by endophytic fungi. Endophytic fungi were found in 81 percent of plant tissues with a high diversity. Distribution ranges of endophytic fungi were influenced by tissue properties. The colonization rate, richness, diversity of endophytic fungi in needles were obviously lower than in branches, and kinds of endophytic fungi between branches were more similar than those in needles, thus endophytic fungi had tissue preference. In addition, tissue age influenced the community structure of endophytic fungi. The elder branch tissues were, the higher colonization rate, richness, diversity of endophytic fungi were. Systematic studying the diversity and community structure of endophytic fungi in T. chinensis var. mairei and clarifying their distribution regularity in plant tissues would offer basic data and scientific basis for their development and utilization. Discussing the presence of fungal pathogens in healthy plant tissues would be of positive significance for source protection of T. chinensis var. mairei. PMID:25345060

  10. Identification of parental genomes and genomic organization in Aster microcephalus var. ovatus.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Hideyuki; Soejima, Akiko; Hoshi, Yoshikazu

    2007-09-01

    The karyotype of diploid Aster iinumae is morphologically similar to that of diploid Aster ageratoides var. ageratoides, however, its chromosome size is apparently smaller (S-type chromosomes versus L-type chromosomes, respectively). The hybrid origin of tetraploid Aster microcephalus var. ovatus (LS-type chromosomes) has previously been suggested by cytogenetics and chloroplast DNA (cp DNA) data. The cp DNA phylogeny also implies that the S-type chromosome is apomorphic, which means that genome size reduction occurred on the evolutionary way to A. iinumae. In this study, we have demonstrated that the chromosome size difference does not depend on the intensity of chromosome condensation but on the DNA content. The simultaneous genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) results show the similarity between S-type chromosomes of A. iinumae and A. microcephalus var. ovatus, and between L-type chromosomes of A. ageratoides and A. microcephalus var. ovatus, which provide additional evidence for A. microcephalus var. ovatus being a tetraploid amphidiploid produced by hybridization between S-type chromosomes and L-type chromosomes. The distribution patterns of Ty1-copia-like retrotransposons were similar in L- and S-type chromosomes. The copies of this retrotransposon dispersed uniformly on all chromosomes, and it is not yet apparent how the Ty1-copia-like retrotransposon affects the size difference between them. PMID:17710369

  11. Designing a VAR2CSA-based vaccine to prevent placental malaria.

    PubMed

    Fried, Michal; Duffy, Patrick E

    2015-12-22

    Placental malaria (PM) due to Plasmodium falciparum is a major cause of maternal, fetal and infant mortality, but the mechanisms of pathogenesis and protective immunity are relatively well-understood for this condition, providing a path for vaccine development. P. falciparum parasites bind to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) to sequester in the placenta, and women become resistant over 1-2 pregnancies as they acquire antibodies that block adhesion to CSA. The protein VAR2CSA, a member of the PfEMP1 variant surface antigen family, mediates parasite adhesion to CSA, and is the leading target for a vaccine to prevent PM. Obstacles to PM vaccine development include the large size (?350kD), high cysteine content, and sequence variation of VAR2CSA. A number of approaches have been taken to identify the combination of VAR2CSA domains and alleles that can induce broadly active antibodies that block adhesion of heterologous parasite isolates to CSA. This review summarizes these approaches, which have examined VAR2CSA fragments for binding activity, antigenicity with naturally acquired antibodies, and immunogenicity in animals for inducing anti-adhesion or surface-reactive antibodies. Two products are expected to enter human clinical studies in the near future based on N-terminal VAR2CSA fragments that have high binding affinity for CSA, and additional proteins preferentially expressed by placental parasites are also being examined for their potential contribution to a PM vaccine. PMID:26469717

  12. Characteristic odorants from bailingu oyster mushroom (Pleurotus eryngii var. tuoliensis) and summer oyster mushroom (Pleurotus cystidiosus).

    PubMed

    Usami, Atsushi; Motooka, Ryota; Nakahashi, Hiroshi; Okuno, Yoshiharu; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the characteristic odorants of the volatile oils from Pleurotus species (P. eryngii var. tuoliensis and P. cystidiosus) were extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O), and aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). A total of 52 and 54 components (P. eryngii var. tuoliensis and P. cystidiosus, respectively) were identified, representing about 98.8% and 85.1% of the volatile oils, respectively. The main components of the P. eryngii var. tuoliensis oil were palmitic acid (82, 38.0%), oleic acid (86, 25.0%) and linoleic acid (85, 9.7%). The main components of the P. cystidiosus oil, palmitic acid (82, 25.8%), indole (54, 9.1%) and myristic acid (77, 5.3%). Regarding the aroma components, 16 and 13 components were identified in the P. eryngii var. tuoliensis and P. cystidiosus oils respectively, by the GC-O analyses. The results of the sniffing test, odor activity value (OAV) and flavor dilution (FD) factor indicate that methional, 1-octen-3-ol and nonanal are the main aroma-active components of P. eryngii var. tuoliensis oil. On the other hands, dimethyl trisulfide and 1-octen-3-ol were estimated as the main aroma-active components of the P. cystidiosus oil. PMID:24919476

  13. VarR controls colonization and virulence in the marine macroalgal pathogen Nautella italica R11

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Melissa; Fernandes, Neil D.; Nowakowski, Dennis; Raftery, Mark; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Zhong, Ling; Thomas, Torsten; Egan, Suhelen

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that macroalgae (seaweeds) are susceptible to infectious disease. However, to date, little is known about the mechanisms that facilitate the colonization and virulence of microbial seaweed pathogens. One well-described example of a seaweed disease is the bleaching of the red alga Delisea pulchra, which can be caused by the bacterium Nautella italica R11, a member of the Roseobacter clade. This pathogen contains a unique luxR-type gene, varR, which we hypothesize controls its colonization and virulence. We show here that a varR knock-out strain is deficient in its ability to cause disease in D. pulchra and is defective in biofilm formation and attachment to a common algal polysaccharide. Moreover complementation of the varR gene in trans can restore these functions to the wild type levels. Proteomic analysis of bacterial cells in planktonic and biofilm growth highlight the potential importance of nitrogen scavenging, mobilization of energy reserves, and stress resistance in the biofilm lifestyle of N. italica R11. Moreover, we show that VarR regulates the expression of a specific subset of biofilm-associated proteins. Taken together these data suggest that VarR controls colonization and persistence of N. italica R11 on the surface of a macroalgal host and that it is an important regulator of virulence. PMID:26528274

  14. Identification of DVA Interneuron Regulatory Sequences in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Puckett Robinson, Carmie; Schwarz, Erich M.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Background The identity of each neuron is determined by the expression of a distinct group of genes comprising its terminal gene battery. The regulatory sequences that control the expression of such terminal gene batteries in individual neurons is largely unknown. The existence of a complete genome sequence for C. elegans and draft genomes of other nematodes let us use comparative genomics to identify regulatory sequences directing expression in the DVA interneuron. Methodology/Principal Findings Using phylogenetic comparisons of multiple Caenorhabditis species, we identified conserved non-coding sequences in 3 of 10 genes (fax-1, nmr-1, and twk-16) that direct expression of reporter transgenes in DVA and other neurons. The conserved region and flanking sequences in an 85-bp intronic region of the twk-16 gene directs highly restricted expression in DVA. Mutagenesis of this 85 bp region shows that it has at least four regions. The central 53 bp region contains a 29 bp region that represses expression and a 24 bp region that drives broad neuronal expression. Two short flanking regions restrict expression of the twk-16 gene to DVA. A shared GA-rich motif was identified in three of these genes but had opposite effects on expression when mutated in the nmr-1 and twk-16 DVA regulatory elements. Conclusions/Significance We identified by multi-species conservation regulatory regions within three genes that direct expression in the DVA neuron. We identified four contiguous regions of sequence of the twk-16 gene enhancer with positive and negative effects on expression, which combined to restrict expression to the DVA neuron. For this neuron a single binding site may thus not achieve sufficient specificity for cell specific expression. One of the positive elements, an 8-bp sequence required for expression was identified in silico by sequence comparisons of seven nematode species, demonstrating the potential resolution of expanded multi-species phylogenetic comparisons. PMID:23383017

  15. Curcumin rescues Caenorhabditis elegans from a Burkholderia pseudomallei infection

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Su-Anne; Nathan, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    The tropical pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei requires long-term parenteral antimicrobial treatment to eradicate the pathogen from an infected patient. However, the development of antibiotic resistance is emerging as a threat to this form of treatment. To meet the need for alternative therapeutics, we proposed a screen of natural products for compounds that do not kill the pathogen, but in turn, abrogate bacterial virulence. We suggest that the use of molecules or compounds that are non-bactericidal (bacteriostatic) will reduce or abolish the development of resistance by the pathogen. In this study, we adopted the established Caenorhabditis elegans-B. pseudomallei infection model to screen a collection of natural products for any that are able to extend the survival of B. pseudomallei infected worms. Of the 42 natural products screened, only curcumin significantly improved worm survival following infection whilst not affecting bacterial growth. This suggested that curcumin promoted B. pseudomallei-infected worm survival independent of pathogen killing. To validate that the protective effect of curcumin was directed toward the pathogen, bacteria were treated with curcumin prior to infection. Worms fed with curcumin-treated bacteria survived with a significantly extended mean-time-to-death (p < 0.0001) compared to the untreated control. In in vitro assays, curcumin reduced the activity of known virulence factors (lipase and protease) and biofilm formation. To determine if other bacterial genes were also regulated in the presence of curcumin, a genome-wide transcriptome analysis was performed on curcumin-treated pathogen. A number of genes involved in iron acquisition and transport as well as genes encoding hypothetical proteins were induced in the presence of curcumin. Thus, we propose that curcumin may attenuate B. pseudomallei by modulating the expression of a number of bacterial proteins including lipase and protease as well as biofilm formation whilst concomitantly regulating iron transport and other proteins of unknown function. PMID:25914690

  16. A New Player in the Spermiogenesis Pathway of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    LaMunyon, Craig W; Nasri, Ubaydah; Sullivan, Nicholas G; Shaw, Misa A; Prajapati, Gaurav; Christensen, Matthew; Elmatari, Daniel; Clark, Jessica N

    2015-11-01

    Precise timing of sperm activation ensures the greatest likelihood of fertilization. Precision in Caenorhabditis elegans sperm activation is ensured by external signaling, which induces the spherical spermatid to reorganize and extend a pseudopod for motility. Spermatid activation, also called spermiogenesis, is prevented from occurring prematurely by the activity of SPE-6 and perhaps other proteins, termed "the brake model." Here, we identify the spe-47 gene from the hc198 mutation that causes premature spermiogenesis. The mutation was isolated in a suppressor screen of spe-27(it132ts), which normally renders worms sterile, due to defective transduction of the activation signal. In a spe-27(+) background, spe-47(hc198) causes a temperature-sensitive reduction of fertility, and in addition to premature spermiogenesis, many mutant sperm fail to activate altogether. The hc198 mutation is semidominant, inducing a more severe loss of fertility than do null alleles generated by CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) technology. The hc198 mutation affects an major sperm protein (MSP) domain, altering a conserved amino acid residue in a ?-strand that mediates MSP-MSP dimerization. Both N- and C-terminal SPE-47 reporters associate with the forming fibrous body (FB)-membranous organelle, a specialized sperm organelle that packages MSP and other components during spermatogenesis. Once the FB is fully formed, the SPE-47 reporters dissociate and disappear. SPE-47 reporter localization is not altered by either the hc198 mutation or a C-terminal truncation deleting the MSP domain. The disappearance of SPE-47 reporters prior to the formation of spermatids requires a reevaluation of the brake model for prevention of premature spermatid activation. PMID:26333688

  17. Curcumin rescues Caenorhabditis elegans from a Burkholderia pseudomallei infection.

    PubMed

    Eng, Su-Anne; Nathan, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    The tropical pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei requires long-term parenteral antimicrobial treatment to eradicate the pathogen from an infected patient. However, the development of antibiotic resistance is emerging as a threat to this form of treatment. To meet the need for alternative therapeutics, we proposed a screen of natural products for compounds that do not kill the pathogen, but in turn, abrogate bacterial virulence. We suggest that the use of molecules or compounds that are non-bactericidal (bacteriostatic) will reduce or abolish the development of resistance by the pathogen. In this study, we adopted the established Caenorhabditis elegans-B. pseudomallei infection model to screen a collection of natural products for any that are able to extend the survival of B. pseudomallei infected worms. Of the 42 natural products screened, only curcumin significantly improved worm survival following infection whilst not affecting bacterial growth. This suggested that curcumin promoted B. pseudomallei-infected worm survival independent of pathogen killing. To validate that the protective effect of curcumin was directed toward the pathogen, bacteria were treated with curcumin prior to infection. Worms fed with curcumin-treated bacteria survived with a significantly extended mean-time-to-death (p < 0.0001) compared to the untreated control. In in vitro assays, curcumin reduced the activity of known virulence factors (lipase and protease) and biofilm formation. To determine if other bacterial genes were also regulated in the presence of curcumin, a genome-wide transcriptome analysis was performed on curcumin-treated pathogen. A number of genes involved in iron acquisition and transport as well as genes encoding hypothetical proteins were induced in the presence of curcumin. Thus, we propose that curcumin may attenuate B. pseudomallei by modulating the expression of a number of bacterial proteins including lipase and protease as well as biofilm formation whilst concomitantly regulating iron transport and other proteins of unknown function. PMID:25914690

  18. Tertiary siRNAs Mediate Paramutation in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Miska, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, different small RNA-dependent gene silencing mechanisms act in the germline to initiate transgenerational gene silencing. Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) can initiate transposon and gene silencing by acting upstream of endogenous short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which engage a nuclear RNA interference (RNAi) pathway to trigger transcriptional gene silencing. Once gene silencing has been established, it can be stably maintained over multiple generations without the requirement of the initial trigger and is also referred to as RNAe or paramutation. This heritable silencing depends on the integrity of the nuclear RNAi pathway. However, the exact mechanism by which silencing is maintained across generations is not understood. Here we demonstrate that silencing of piRNA targets involves the production of two distinct classes of small RNAs with different genetic requirements. The first class, secondary siRNAs, are localized close to the direct target site for piRNAs. Nuclear import of the secondary siRNAs by the Argonaute HRDE-1 leads to the production of a distinct class of small RNAs that map throughout the transcript, which we term tertiary siRNAs. Both classes of small RNAs are necessary for full repression of the target gene and can be maintained independently of the initial piRNA trigger. Consistently, we observed a form of paramutation associated with tertiary siRNAs. Once paramutated, a tertiary siRNA generating allele confers dominant silencing in the progeny regardless of its own transmission, suggesting germline-transmitted siRNAs are sufficient for multigenerational silencing. This work uncovers a multi-step siRNA amplification pathway that promotes germline integrity via epigenetic silencing of endogenous and invading genetic elements. In addition, the same pathway can be engaged in environmentally induced heritable gene silencing and could therefore promote the inheritance of acquired traits. PMID:25811365

  19. The Meiotic Behavior of an Inversion in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zetka, M. C.; Rose, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    The rearrangement hIn1(I) was isolated as a crossover suppressor for the right end of linkage group (LG) I. By inducing genetic markers on this crossover suppressor and establishing the gene order in the homozygote, hIn1(I) was demonstrated to be the first genetically proven inversion in Caenorhabditis elegans. hIn1(I) extensively suppresses recombination in heterozygotes in the right arm of chromosome I from unc-75 to unc-54. This suppression is associated with enhancement of recombination in other regions of the chromosome. The enhancement observed maintains the normal distribution of events but does not extend to other chromosomes. The genetic distance of chromosome I in inversion heterozygotes approaches 50 map units (m.u.), approximately equal to one chiasma per meiosis. This value is maintained in hIn1(I)/szT1(I;X) heterozygotes indicating that small homologous regions can pair and recombine efficiently. hIn1(I)/hT2(I;III) heterozygotes share no uninverted homologous regions and segregate randomly, suggesting the importance of chiasma formation in proper segregation of chromosomes. The genetic distance of chromosome I in these heterozygotes is less that 1 m.u., indicating that crossing over can be suppressed along an entire chromosome. Since one of our goals was to develop an efficient balancer for the right end of LG I, the effectiveness of hIn1(I) as a balancer was tested by isolating and maintaining lethal mutations. The meiotic behaviour of hIn1(I) is consistent with other genetic and cytogenetic data suggesting the meiotic chromosomes are monocentric. Rare recombinants bearing duplications and deficiencies of chromosome I were recovered from hIn1(I) heterozygotes, leading to the proposal the inversion was paracentric. PMID:1644275

  20. Oxidative Stress in Caenorhabditis elegans: Protective Effects of Spartin

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Timothy; Karlinski, Zachary A.; O’Hara, Christopher; Cabe, Maleen; Kim, Hongkyun; Bakowska, Joanna C.

    2015-01-01

    Troyer syndrome is caused by a mutation in the SPG20 gene, which results in complete loss of expression of the protein spartin. We generated a genetic model of Troyer syndrome in worms to explore the locomotor consequences of a null mutation of the Caenorhabditis elegans SPG20 orthologue, F57B10.9, also known as spg-20. Spg-20 mutants showed decreased length, crawling speed, and thrashing frequency, and had a shorter lifespan than wild-type animals. These results suggest an age-dependent decline in motor function in mutant animals. The drug paraquat was used to induce oxidative stress for 4 days in the animals. We measured survival rate and examined locomotion by measuring crawling speed and thrashing frequency. After 4 days of paraquat exposure, 77% of wild-type animals survived, but only 38% of spg-20 mutant animals survived. Conversely, animals overexpressing spg-20 had a survival rate of 95%. We also tested lifespan after a 1 hour exposure to sodium azide. After a 24 hour recovery period, 87% of wild type animals survived, 57% of spg-20 mutant animals survived, and 82% of animals overexpressing spg-20 survived. In the behavioral assays, spg-20 mutant animals showed a significant decrease in both crawling speed and thrashing frequency compared with wild-type animals. Importantly, the locomotor phenotype for both crawling and thrashing was rescued in animals overexpressing spg-20. The animals overexpressing spg-20 had crawling speeds and thrashing frequencies similar to those of wild-type animals. These data suggest that the protein F57B10.9/SPG-20 might have a protective role against oxidative stress. PMID:26114733

  1. Autophagy and Insulin/TOR Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans pcm-1 Protein Repair Mutants

    E-print Network

    Clarke, Steven

    [Autophagy 3:4, 357-359; July/August 2007]; ©2007 Landes Bioscience Tara A. Gomez Steven G. Clarke://www.landesbioscience.com/journals/autophagy/abstract.php?id=4143 Key wordS aging, autophagy, Caenorhabditis elegans, dauer diapause, L1 arrest, daf-2, insulin that results in reduced autophagy during dauer formation and decreased L1 arrest survival. PCM-1 encodes

  2. ATP-binding cassette transporters are required for efficient RNA interference in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Timmons, Lisa; Hull, Dawn; Han, Wang; Echalier, B.; Sundaram, P.

    2006-08-01

    that facilitate RNAi have been identified, current descriptions of RNAi and interrelated mechanisms are far from complete. Here, we report that the Caenorhabditis elegans gene haf-6 is required for efficient RNAi. HAF-6 is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC...

  3. Non-Cell-Autonomous Postmortem Lignification of Tracheary Elements in Zinnia elegans[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Pesquet, Edouard; Zhang, Bo; Gorzsás, András; Puhakainen, Tuula; Serk, Henrik; Escamez, Sacha; Barbier, Odile; Gerber, Lorenz; Courtois-Moreau, Charleen; Alatalo, Edward; Paulin, Lars; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko; Sundberg, Björn; Goffner, Deborah; Tuominen, Hannele

    2013-01-01

    Postmortem lignification of xylem tracheary elements (TEs) has been debated for decades. Here, we provide evidence in Zinnia elegans TE cell cultures, using pharmacological inhibitors and in intact Z. elegans plants using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy, that TE lignification occurs postmortem (i.e., after TE programmed cell death). In situ RT-PCR verified expression of the lignin monomer biosynthetic cinnamoyl CoA reductase and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase in not only the lignifying TEs but also in the unlignified non-TE cells of Z. elegans TE cell cultures and in living, parenchymatic xylem cells that surround TEs in stems. These cells were also shown to have the capacity to synthesize and transport lignin monomers and reactive oxygen species to the cell walls of dead TEs. Differential gene expression analysis in Z. elegans TE cell cultures and concomitant functional analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in identification of several genes that were expressed in the non-TE cells and that affected lignin chemistry on the basis of pyrolysis–gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. These data suggest that living, parenchymatic xylem cells contribute to TE lignification in a non-cell-autonomous manner, thus enabling the postmortem lignification of TEs. PMID:23572543

  4. Review of the results from the International C. elegans first experiment (ICE-FIRST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adenle, A. A.; Johnsen, B.; Szewczyk, N. J.

    2009-07-01

    In an effort to speed the rate of discovery in space biology and medicine NASA introduced the now defunct model specimen program. Four nations applied this approach with Caenorhabditis elegans in the ICE-FIRST experiment. Here we review the standardized culturing as well as the investigation of muscle adaptation, space biology radiation, and gene expression in response to spaceflight. Muscle studies demonstrated that decreased expression of myogenic transcription factors underlie the decreased expression of myosin seen in flight, a response that would appear to be evolutionarily conserved. Radiation studies demonstrated that radiation damaged cells should be able to be removed via apoptosis in flight, and that C. elegans can be employed as a biological accumulating dosimeter. Lastly, ICE-FIRST gave us our first glimpse at the genomic response to spaceflight, suggesting that altered Insulin and/or TGF-beta signaling in flight may underlie many of the biological changes seen in response to spaceflight. The fact that the results obtained with C. elegans appear to have strong similarities in human beings suggests that not only will C. elegans prove an invaluable model for understanding the fundamental biological changes seen during spaceflight but that it may also be invaluable for understanding those changes associated with human health concerns in space.

  5. WAVE/SCAR promotes endocytosis and early endosome morphology in polarized C. elegans epithelia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Falshruti B; Soto, Martha C

    2013-05-15

    Cells can use the force of actin polymerization to drive intracellular transport, but the role of actin in endocytosis is not clear. Studies in single-celled yeast demonstrate the essential role of the branched actin nucleator, Arp2/3, and its activating nucleation promoting factors (NPFs) in the process of invagination from the cell surface through endocytosis. However, some mammalian studies have disputed the need for F-actin and Arp2/3 in Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis (CME) in multicellular organisms. We investigate the role of Arp2/3 during endocytosis in Caenorhabditis elegans, a multicellular organism with polarized epithelia. Arp2/3 and its NPF, WAVE/SCAR, are essential for C. elegans embryonic morphogenesis. We show that WAVE/SCAR and Arp2/3 regulate endocytosis and early endosome morphology in diverse tissues of C. elegans. Depletion of WAVE/SCAR or Arp2/3, but not of the NPF Wasp, severely disrupts the distribution of molecules proposed to be internalized via CME, and alters the subcellular enrichment of the early endosome regulator RAB-5. Loss of WAVE/SCAR or of the GEFs that regulate RAB-5 results in similar defects in endocytosis in the intestine and coelomocyte cells. This study in a multicellular organism supports an essential role for branched actin regulators in endocytosis, and identifies WAVE/SCAR as a key NPF that promotes Arp2/3 endocytic function in C. elegans. PMID:23510716

  6. Rapid epithelial-sheet sealing in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo requires cadherin-dependent filopodial priming

    E-print Network

    Hardin, Jeff

    Rapid epithelial-sheet sealing in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo requires cadherin development, epithelia with free edges must join together to create continuous tissues that seal the interior of the organism from the outside environment; failure of epithelial sealing underlies several common human birth

  7. Caenorhabditis elegans Recognizes a Bacterial Quorum-sensing Signal Molecule through the AWCON Neuron*

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Kristen M.; Perez, Lark J.; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Semmelhack, Martin F.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2014-01-01

    In a process known as quorum sensing, bacteria use chemicals called autoinducers for cell-cell communication. Population-wide detection of autoinducers enables bacteria to orchestrate collective behaviors. In the animal kingdom detection of chemicals is vital for success in locating food, finding hosts, and avoiding predators. This behavior, termed chemotaxis, is especially well studied in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we demonstrate that the Vibrio cholerae autoinducer (S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one, termed CAI-1, influences chemotaxis in C. elegans. C. elegans prefers V. cholerae that produces CAI-1 over a V. cholerae mutant defective for CAI-1 production. The position of the CAI-1 ketone moiety is the key feature driving CAI-1-directed nematode behavior. CAI-1 is detected by the C. elegans amphid sensory neuron AWCON. Laser ablation of the AWCON cell, but not other amphid sensory neurons, abolished chemoattraction to CAI-1. These analyses define the structural features of a bacterial-produced signal and the nematode chemosensory neuron that permit cross-kingdom interaction. PMID:25092291

  8. Studying Human Disease Genes in "Caenorhabditis Elegans": A Molecular Genetics Laboratory Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox-Paulson, Elisabeth A.; Grana, Theresa M.; Harris, Michelle A.; Batzli, Janet M.

    2012-01-01

    Scientists routinely integrate information from various channels to explore topics under study. We designed a 4-wk undergraduate laboratory module that used a multifaceted approach to study a question in molecular genetics. Specifically, students investigated whether "Caenorhabditis elegans" can be a useful model system for studying genes…

  9. Agarose Microchambers for Long-term Calcium Imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Turek, Michal; Besseling, Judith; Bringmann, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Behavior is controlled by the nervous system. Calcium imaging is a straightforward method in the transparent nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to measure the activity of neurons during various behaviors. To correlate neural activity with behavior, the animal should not be immobilized but should be able to move. Many behavioral changes occur during long time scales and require recording over many hours of behavior. This also makes it necessary to culture the worms in the presence of food. How can worms be cultured and their neural activity imaged over long time scales? Agarose Microchamber Imaging (AMI) was previously developed to culture and observe small larvae and has now been adapted to study all life stages from early L1 until the adult stage of C. elegans. AMI can be performed on various life stages of C. elegans. Long-term calcium imaging is achieved without immobilizing the animals by using short externally triggered exposures combined with an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera recording. Zooming out or scanning can scale up this method to image up to 40 worms in parallel. Thus, a method is described to image behavior and neural activity over long time scales in all life stages of C. elegans. PMID:26132740

  10. Prediction of C. elegans Longevity Genes by Human and Worm Longevity Networks

    E-print Network

    de Magalhães, João Pedro

    Prediction of C. elegans Longevity Genes by Human and Worm Longevity Networks Robi Tacutu1. , David Intricate and interconnected pathways modulate longevity, but screens to identify the components and fine-tuned by regulatory factors, the first-order protein-protein interactors of known longevity genes

  11. Dietary restriction in C. elegans: From rate-of-living effects to nutrient sensing pathways

    E-print Network

    Gems, David

    and lifespan. Two possible mechanisms by which DR increases lifespan are reduction of metabolic rateReview Dietary restriction in C. elegans: From rate-of-living effects to nutrient sensing pathways et al., 1993; Chapman and Partridge, 1996), to a range of mammals, including mice (Weindruch et al

  12. A RT I C L E S Caenorhabditis elegans transthyretin-like protein

    E-print Network

    Xue, Ding

    . The phagocytosis and removal of apoptotic cells is an important event in tissue remodelling, suppression of apoptotic cells by phagocytes3 . In C. elegans, phagocytosis of apoptotic cells is controlled by two partly, leading to the cytoskeleton reorganiza- tion needed for phagocytosis5­9 . In the other pathway, three

  13. Biochemical and High Throughput Microscopic Assessment of Fat Mass in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Pino, Elizabeth C.; Webster, Christopher M.; Carr, Christopher E.; Soukas, Alexander A.

    2013-01-01

    The nematode C. elegans has emerged as an important model for the study of conserved genetic pathways regulating fat metabolism as it relates to human obesity and its associated pathologies. Several previous methodologies developed for the visualization of C. elegans triglyceride-rich fat stores have proven to be erroneous, highlighting cellular compartments other than lipid droplets. Other methods require specialized equipment, are time-consuming, or yield inconsistent results. We introduce a rapid, reproducible, fixative-based Nile red staining method for the accurate and rapid detection of neutral lipid droplets in C. elegans. A short fixation step in 40% isopropanol makes animals completely permeable to Nile red, which is then used to stain animals. Spectral properties of this lipophilic dye allow it to strongly and selectively fluoresce in the yellow-green spectrum only when in a lipid-rich environment, but not in more polar environments. Thus, lipid droplets can be visualized on a fluorescent microscope equipped with simple GFP imaging capability after only a brief Nile red staining step in isopropanol. The speed, affordability, and reproducibility of this protocol make it ideally suited for high throughput screens. We also demonstrate a paired method for the biochemical determination of triglycerides and phospholipids using gas chromatography mass-spectrometry. This more rigorous protocol should be used as confirmation of results obtained from the Nile red microscopic lipid determination. We anticipate that these techniques will become new standards in the field of C. elegans metabolic research. PMID:23568026

  14. Ascaroside expression in Caenorhabditis elegans is strongly dependent on diet and developmental stage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A group of small signaling molecules called ascarosides, associated with dauer formation, male attraction and social behavior in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, are shown to be regulated by developmental stage and environmental factors. The concentration of dauer-inducing ascaroside, ascr#2, i...

  15. Programmed cell death in C. elegans: the genetic framework , Yi-Chun Wu2

    E-print Network

    Xue, Ding

    1 Programmed cell death in C. elegans: the genetic framework Ding Xue1 , Yi-Chun Wu2 , and Manisha) 492-7744 #12;2 1. Introduction Programmed cell death is an important cellular process that controls aspects of programmed cell death. These genes define a genetic pathway of programmed cell death in C

  16. Programmed cell death in C. elegans Yi-Chun Wu1

    E-print Network

    Xue, Ding

    1 Programmed cell death in C. elegans Yi-Chun Wu1 and Ding Xue2 1 Assistant professor, Ph. D that programmed cell death is a normal, genetically-determined part of development and is controlled by a number of specific genes. Genetic analyses have ordered these genes into a pathway. This cell death pathway

  17. Body size, insulin/IGF signaling and aging in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Gems, David

    2 May 2002; accepted 10 May 2002 Abstract A number of recent studies of aging in Drosophila, mice limit growth rather than promote it. Studies of Drosophila show no consistent correlation between body. Keywords: Caenorhabditis elegans; Aging; Body size; Insulin/IGF signaling; Drosophila 1. Introduction

  18. Effect of Temperature Pre-Exposure on the Locomotion and Chemotaxis of C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Parida, Lipika; Neogi, Sudarsan; Padmanabhan, Venkat

    2014-01-01

    The effect of temperature pre-exposure on locomotion and chemotaxis of the soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been extensively studied. The behavior of C. elegans was quantified using a simple harmonic curvature-based model. Animals showed increased levels of activity, compared to control worms, immediately after pre-exposure to 30°C. This high level of activity in C. elegans translated into frequent turns by making ‘complex’ shapes, higher velocity of locomotion, and higher chemotaxis index () in presence of a gradient of chemoattractant. The effect of pre-exposure was observed to be persistent for about 20 minutes after which the behavior (including velocity and ) appeared to be comparable to that of control animals (maintained at 20°C). Surprisingly, after 30 minutes of recovery, the behavior of C. elegans continued to deteriorate further below that of control worms with a drastic reduction in the curvature of the worms' body. A majority of these worms also showed negative chemotaxis index indicating a loss in their chemotaxis ability. PMID:25360667

  19. A blend of small molecules regulates both mating and development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In many organisms, population density sensing and sexual attraction rely on small molecule-based signaling systems. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, population density is monitored via specific glycosides of the dideoxysugar ascarylose that promote entry into an alternate larval stage, the no...

  20. Using Caenorhabditis elegans to probe toxicity of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride based ionic liquids

    E-print Network

    Caldwell, Guy

    Using Caenorhabditis elegans to probe toxicity of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride based ionic toxicological effects of 1-alkyl-3-methyli- midazolium chloride ionic liquids. Ionic liquids are quickly gaining to a range of concentrations of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C4mimCl), 1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium

  1. Identification of lipid droplet structure-like/resident proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Na, Huimin; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yong; Zhu, Xiaotong; Liu, Yi; Liu, Yangli; Xie, Kang; Xu, Ningyi; Yang, Fuquan; Yu, Yong; Cichello, Simon; Mak, Ho Yi; Wang, Meng C; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Pingsheng

    2015-10-01

    The lipid droplet (LD) is a cellular organelle that stores neutral lipids in cells and has been linked with metabolic disorders. Caenorhabditis elegans has many characteristics which make it an excellent animal model for studying LDs. However, unlike in mammalian cells, no LD structure-like/resident proteins have been identified in C. elegans, which has limited the utility of this model for the study of lipid storage and metabolism. Herein based on three lines of evidence, we identified that MDT-28 and DHS-3 previously identified in C. elegans LD proteome were two LD structure-like/resident proteins. First, MDT-28 and DHS-3 were found to be the two most abundant LD proteins in the worm. Second, the proteins were specifically localized to LDs and we identified the domains responsible for this targeting in both proteins. Third and most importantly, the depletion of MDT-28 induced LD clustering while DHS-3 deletion reduced triacylglycerol content (TAG). We further characterized the proteins finding that MDT-28 was ubiquitously expressed in the intestine, muscle, hypodermis, and embryos, whereas DHS-3 was expressed mainly in intestinal cells. Together, these two LD structure-like/resident proteins provide a basis for future mechanistic studies into the dynamics and functions of LDs in C. elegans. PMID:26025681

  2. Shifts in the Distribution of Mass Densities Is a Signature of Caloric Restriction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    in synchronized populations of wildtype N2 C. elegans grown under standard solid-phase culture conditions, in part, to its short generation time, ease of culture, and amenity to genetic manipulation [1 and metabolism [4,5,6,7,8,9], the importance of insulin-like signaling for regulation of fat levels and obesity

  3. COMPARISON OF ALANINE AMINOPEPTIDASE ACTIVITIES IN HETERODERA GLYCINES AND CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aminopeptidase activities in the cytosolic fraction of whole body homogenates of Caenorhabditis elegans and Heterodera glycines were examined. Activities were detected using a colorimetric assay based upon hydrolysis of aminoacyl p-nitroanilides (Xxx-pNA). Properties including substrate preference...

  4. Robust spatial navigation in a robot inspired by chemotaxis in C. elegans

    E-print Network

    Lockery, Shawn

    Robust spatial navigation in a robot inspired by chemotaxis in C. elegans T. M. Morse, T. C. Ferr Abstract We report on the design and implementation of an autonomous robot that per­ forms phototaxis under the control of a simulated neural network. The mechanical configuration of the robot and its neural network

  5. Direct micro-mechanical measurements of the material properties and motility of C. elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backholm, Matilda; Ryu, William S.; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2012-11-01

    The model organism C. elegans, a millimeter-sized nematode, provides an excellent biophysical system for both static and dynamic mechanical studies. The undulatory motion exhibited by the worm as it swims or crawls through a medium is ubiquitous in nature at scales from microns to meters, and has been the focus of intense research. However, for a successful description of this form of locomotion, a better knowledge of the material properties as well as the worm's output forces is needed. Here we present a new experimental assay, with which the material properties and dynamics of C. elegans can be directly probed. In this technique, we use the deflection of a very flexible micropipette to measure the flexural rigidity of C. elegans at all stages of its life cycle, as well as along the body of the adult worm. By modelling the worm as a viscoelastic material, we have achieved new insights into its mechanical properties. Furthermore, the forces involved during the undulatory motion of C. elegans have been studied. It is the hope that the direct experimental characterization of this model organism will provide guidance for theoretical treatments of undulatory locomotion in general.

  6. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence by medicinal plants in a Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Ausubel, Frederick M.

    Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence by medicinal plants in a Caenorhabditis elegans factors and innate antibiotic resistance enables the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa were evaluated in toxin-based and infection-based assays using P. aeruginosa strains PAO1 and PA14

  7. Ten years of life in compost: temporal and spatial variation of North German Caenorhabditis elegans populations

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Carola; Saebelfeld, Manja; Barbosa, Camilo; Pees, Barbara; Hermann, Ruben Joseph; Schalkowski, Rebecca; Strathmann, Eike Andreas; Dirksen, Philipp; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2015-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a central laboratory model system in almost all biological disciplines, yet its natural life history and population biology are largely unexplored. Such information is essential for in-depth understanding of the nematode's biology because its natural ecology provides the context, in which its traits and the underlying molecular mechanisms evolved. We characterized natural phenotypic and genetic variation among North German C. elegans isolates. We used the unique opportunity to compare samples collected 10 years apart from the same compost heap and additionally included recent samples for this and a second site, collected across a 1.5-year period. Our analysis revealed significant population genetic differentiation between locations, across the 10-year time period, but for only one location a trend across the shorter time frame. Significant variation was similarly found for phenotypic traits of likely importance in nature, such as choice behavior and population growth in the presence of pathogens or naturally associated bacteria. Phenotypic variation was significantly influenced by C. elegans genotype, time of isolation, and sampling site. The here studied C. elegans isolates may provide a valuable, genetically variable resource for future dissection of naturally relevant gene functions. PMID:26380661

  8. Gene Expression Changes of Caenorhabditis elegans Larvae during Molting and Sleep-Like Lethargus

    PubMed Central

    Turek, Michal; Bringmann, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    During their development, Caenorhabditis elegans larvae go through four developmental stages. At the end of each larval stage, nematodes molt. They synthesize a new cuticle and shed the old cuticle. During the molt, larvae display a sleep-like behavior that is called lethargus. We wanted to determine how gene expression changes during the C. elegans molting cycle. We performed transcriptional profiling of C. elegans by selecting larvae displaying either sleep-like behavior during the molt or wake behavior during the intermolt to identify genes that oscillate with the molting-cycle. We found that expression changed during the molt and we identified 520 genes that oscillated with the molting cycle. 138 of these genes were not previously reported to oscillate. The majority of genes that had oscillating expression levels appear to be involved in molting, indicating that the majority of transcriptional changes serve to resynthesize the cuticle. Identification of genes that control sleep-like behavior during lethargus is difficult but may be possible by looking at genes that are expressed in neurons. 22 of the oscillating genes were expressed in neurons. One of these genes, the dopamine transporter gene dat-1, was previously shown in mammals and in C. elegans to control sleep. Taken together, we provide a dataset of genes that oscillate with the molting and sleep-wake cycle, which will be useful to investigate molting and possibly also sleep-like behavior during lethargus. PMID:25409030

  9. gene expression at single-cell resolution. For example, the intestine of C. elegans is formed

    E-print Network

    van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    gene expression at single-cell resolution. For example, the intestine of C. elegans is formed from of the fertilized egg and gives rise to intestinal tissue only3 . The intestinal fate of the E cell's descend- ants. The elt-2 gene is expressed only in the intestine, and controls the expression of a large number of genes

  10. Growth and nutrition of two cultivars of zinnia elegans under saline conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinnia elegans, because of its economic value and the hardiness of its wild relatives, was selected for its potential as a salt-tolerant cut flower crop to grow in greenhouse systems using recycled agricultural wastewater. Using recycled wastewater for irrigation of cut flowers provides an alternat...

  11. Cadmium tolerance and removal from Cunninghamella elegans related to the polyphosphate metabolism.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Marcos A B; Franco, Luciana de O; de Souza, Patrícia M; do Nascimento, Aline E; da Silva, Carlos A A; Maia, Rita de C C; Rolim, Hercília M L; Takaki, Galba M C

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the cadmium effects on growth, ultrastructure and polyphosphate metabolism, as well as to evaluate the metal removal and accumulation by Cunninghamella elegans (IFM 46109) growing in culture medium. The presence of cadmium reduced growth, and a longer lag phase was observed. However, the phosphate uptake from the culture medium increased 15% when compared to the control. Moreover, C. elegans removed 70%-81% of the cadmium added to the culture medium during its growth. The C. elegans mycelia showed a removal efficiency of 280 mg/g at a cadmium concentration of 22.10 mg/L, and the removal velocity of cadmium was 0.107 mg/h. Additionally, it was observed that cadmium induced vacuolization, the presence of electron dense deposits in vacuoles, cytoplasm and cell membranes, as well as the distinct behavior of polyphosphate fractions. The results obtained with C. elegans suggest that precipitation, vacuolization and polyphosphate fractions were associated to cadmium tolerance, and this species demonstrated a higher potential for bioremediation of heavy metals. PMID:23538844

  12. High- and low-throughput scoring of fat mass and body fat distribution in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wählby, Carolina; Lee-Conery, Annie; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Kamentsky, Lee; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Sokolnicki, Katherine L.; Veneskey, Matthew; Michaels, Kerry; Carpenter, Anne E.; O’Rourke, Eyleen J.

    2014-01-01

    Fat accumulation is a complex phenotype affected by factors such as neuroendocrine signaling, feeding, activity, and reproductive output. Accordingly, the most informative screens for genes and compounds affecting fat accumulation would be those carried out in whole living animals. Caenorhabditis elegans is a well-established and effective model organism, especially for biological processes that involve organ systems and multicellular interactions, such as metabolism. Every cell in the transparent body of C. elegans is visible under a light microscope. Consequently, an accessible and reliable method to visualize worm lipid-droplet fat depots would make C. elegans the only metazoan in which genes affecting not only fat mass but also body fat distribution could be assessed at a genome-wide scale. Here we present a radical improvement in oil red O worm staining together with high-throughput image-based phenotyping. The three-step sample preparation method is robust, formaldehyde-free, and inexpensive, and requires only 15 minutes of hands-on time to process a 96-well plate. Together with our free and user-friendly automated image analysis package, this method enables C. elegans sample preparation and phenotype scoring at a scale that is compatible with genome-wide screens. Thus we present a feasible approach to small-scale phenotyping and large-scale screening for genetic and/or chemical perturbations that lead to alterations in fat quantity and distribution in whole animals. PMID:24784529

  13. The C. elegans Crumbs family contains a CRB3 homolog and is not essential for viability

    PubMed Central

    Waaijers, Selma; Ramalho, João Jacob; Koorman, Thijs; Kruse, Elisabeth; Boxem, Mike

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Crumbs proteins are important regulators of epithelial polarity. In C. elegans, no essential role for the two described Crumbs homologs has been uncovered. Here, we identify and characterize an additional Crumbs family member in C. elegans, which we termed CRB-3 based on its similarity in size and sequence to mammalian CRB3. We visualized CRB-3 subcellular localization by expressing a translational GFP fusion. CRB-3::GFP was expressed in several polarized tissues in the embryo and larval stages, and showed apical localization in the intestine and pharynx. To identify the function of the Crumbs family in C. elegans development, we generated a triple Crumbs deletion mutant by sequentially removing the entire coding sequence for each crumbs homolog using a CRISPR/Cas9-based approach. Remarkably, animals lacking all three Crumbs homologs are viable and show normal epithelial polarity. Thus, the three C. elegans Crumbs family members do not appear to play an essential role in epithelial polarity establishment. PMID:25661870

  14. Analysis of Ascarosides from Caenorhabditis elegans Using Mass Spectrometry and NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxing; Noguez, Jaime H.; Zhou, Yue; Butcher, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans secretes a family of water-soluble small molecules, known as the ascarosides, into its environment and uses these ascarosides in chemical communication. The ascarosides are derivatives of the 3,6-dideoxysugar ascarylose, modified with different fatty acid-derived side chains. C. elegans uses specific ascarosides, which are together known as the dauer pheromone, to trigger entry into the stress-resistant dauer larval stage. In addition, C. elegans uses specific ascarosides to control certain behaviors, including mating attraction, aggregation, and avoidance. Although in general the concentration of the ascarosides in the environment increases with population density, C. elegans can vary the types and amounts of ascarosides that it secretes depending on the culture conditions under which it has been grown and its developmental history. Here, we describe how to grow high-density worm cultures and the bacterial food for those cultures, as well as how to extract the culture medium to generate a crude pheromone extract. Then, we discuss how to analyze the types and amounts of ascarosides in that extract using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. PMID:24014355

  15. Continuous-flow C. elegans fluorescence expression analysis with real-time image processing through microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yuanjun; Boey, Daryl; Ng, Li Theng; Gruber, Jan; Bettiol, Andrew; Thakor, Nitish V; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2016-03-15

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has become an essential model organism in neuroscience research because of its stereotyped anatomy, relevance to human biology, and capacity for genetic manipulation. To solve the intrinsic challenges associated with performing manual operations on C. elegans, many automated chip designs based on immobilization-imaging-release approaches have been proposed. These designs are prone to limitations such as the exertion of physical stress on the worms and limited throughput. In this work, a continuous-flow, high-throughput, automated C. elegans analyzer based on droplet encapsulation and real-time image processing was developed to analyze fluorescence expression in worms. To demonstrate its capabilities, two strains of C. elegans nematodes with different levels of expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) were first mixed in a buffer solution. The worms were encapsulated in water-in-oil droplets to restrict random locomotion. The droplets were closely packed in a two-layer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) platform and were flowed through a narrow straight channel, in which a region of interest (ROI) was defined and continuously recorded by a frame acquisition device. Based on the number of pixels counted in the selected color range, our custom software analyzed GFP expression to differentiate between two strains with nearly 100% accuracy and a throughput of 0.5seconds/worm. PMID:26452079

  16. A Screenable In Vivo Assay for Mitochondrial Modulators Using Transgenic Bioluminescent Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lagido, Cristina; McLaggan, Debbie; Glover, L. Anne

    2015-01-01

    The multicellular model organism Caenorhabditis elegans is a small nematode of approximately 1 mm in size in adulthood that is genetically and experimentally tractable. It is economical and easy to culture and dispense in liquid medium which makes it well suited for medium-throughput screening. We have previously validated the use of transgenic luciferase expressing C. elegans strains to provide rapid in vivo assessment of the nematode’s ATP levels.1-3 Here we present the required materials and procedure to carry out bioassays with the bioluminescent C. elegans strains PE254 or PE255 (or any of their derivative strains). The protocol allows for in vivo detection of sublethal effects of drugs that may identify mitochondrial toxicity, as well as for in vivo detection of potential beneficial drug effects. Representative results are provided for the chemicals paraquat, rotenone, oxaloacetate and for four firefly luciferase inhibitory compounds. The methodology can be scaled up to provide a platform for screening drug libraries for compounds capable of modulating mitochondrial function. Pre-clinical evaluation of drug toxicity is often carried out on immortalized cancerous human cell lines which derive ATP mostly from glycolysis and are often tolerant of mitochondrial toxicants.4,5 In contrast, C. elegans depends on oxidative phosphorylation to sustain development into adulthood, drawing a parallel with humans and providing a unique opportunity for compound evaluation in the physiological context of a whole live multicellular organism. PMID:26554627

  17. Persistence of Long-Term Memory in Vitrified and Revived Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Barranco, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Can memory be retained after cryopreservation? Our research has attempted to answer this long-standing question by using the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans, a well-known model organism for biological research that has generated revolutionary findings but has not been tested for memory retention after cryopreservation. Our study's goal was to test C. elegans' memory recall after vitrification and reviving. Using a method of sensory imprinting in the young C. elegans, we establish that learning acquired through olfactory cues shapes the animal's behavior and the learning is retained at the adult stage after vitrification. Our research method included olfactory imprinting with the chemical benzaldehyde (C6H5CHO) for phase-sense olfactory imprinting at the L1 stage, the fast-cooling SafeSpeed method for vitrification at the L2 stage, reviving, and a chemotaxis assay for testing memory retention of learning at the adult stage. Our results in testing memory retention after cryopreservation show that the mechanisms that regulate the odorant imprinting (a form of long-term memory) in C. elegans have not been modified by the process of vitrification or by slow freezing. PMID:25867710

  18. Mechanosensation and mechanical load modulate the locomotory gait of swimming C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Korta, Jeremie; Clark, Damon A; Gabel, Christopher V; Mahadevan, L; Samuel, Aravinthan D T

    2007-07-01

    Animals move through their environments by selecting gaits that are adapted to the physical nature of their surroundings. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans swims through fluids or crawls on surfaces by propagating flexural waves along its slender body and offers a unique opportunity for detailed analysis of locomotory gait at multiple levels including kinematics, biomechanics and the molecular and physiological operation of sensory and motor systems. Here, we study the swimming gait of C. elegans in viscous fluids in the range 0.05-50 Pa s. We find that the spatial form of the swimming gait does not vary across this range of viscosities and that the temporal frequency of the swimming gait only decreases by about 20% with every 10-fold increase in viscosity. Thus, C. elegans swims in low gear, such that its musculature can deliver mechanical force and power nearly 1000-fold higher than it delivers when swimming in water. We find that mutations that disrupt mechanosensation, or the laser killing of specific touch receptor neurons, increase the temporal frequency of the undulating gait, revealing a novel effect of mechanosensory input in regulating the putative central pattern generator that produces locomotion. The adaptability of locomotory gait in C. elegans may be encoded in sensory and motor systems that allow the worm to respond to its own movement in different physical surroundings. PMID:17575043

  19. The DEAD Box RNA Helicase VBH-1 Is Required for Germ Cell Function in C. elegans

    E-print Network

    Blackwell, Keith

    ARTICLE The DEAD Box RNA Helicase VBH-1 Is Required for Germ Cell Function in C. elegans L. Silvia 2007 Summary: Vasa and Belle are conserved DEAD box RNA helicases required for germ cell function-Liss, Inc. Key words: germline; DEAD box RNA helicase; sperm/ oocyte switch INTRODUCTION Germ cells from

  20. Unusual DNA structures associated with germline genetic activity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Fire, Andrew; Alcazar, Rosa; Tan, Frederick

    2006-07-01

    We describe a surprising long-range periodicity that underlies a substantial fraction of C. elegans genomic sequence. Extended segments (up to several hundred nucleotides) of the C. elegans genome show a strong bias toward occurrence of AA/TT dinucleotides along one face of the helix while little or no such constraint is evident on the opposite helical face. Segments with this characteristic periodicity are highly overrepresented in intron sequences and are associated with a large fraction of genes with known germline expression in C. elegans. In addition to altering the path and flexibility of DNA in vitro, sequences of this character have been shown by others to constrain DNA::nucleosome interactions, potentially producing a structure that could resist the assembly of highly ordered (phased) nucleosome arrays that have been proposed as a precursor to heterochromatin. We propose a number of ways that the periodic occurrence of An/Tn clusters could reflect evolution and function of genes that express in the germ cell lineage of C. elegans. PMID:16648589

  1. Serotonin Mediates a Learned Increase in Attraction to High Concentrations of Benzaldehyde in Aged "C. elegans"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsui, David; van der Kooy, Derek

    2008-01-01

    We utilized olfactory-mediated chemotaxis in "Caenorhabditis elegans" to examine the effect of aging on information processing and animal behavior. Wild-type (N2) young adults (day 4) initially approach and eventually avoid a point source of benzaldehyde. Aged adult animals (day 7) showed a stronger initial approach and a delayed avoidance to…

  2. Functional asymmetry in Caenorhabditis elegans taste neurons and its computational role in chemotaxis

    E-print Network

    Schafer, William R.

    in chemotaxis Hiroshi Suzuki1 *{, Tod R. Thiele2 *, Serge Faumont2 , Marina Ezcurra3 , Shawn R. Lockery2 * & William R. Schafer1,3 { Chemotaxis in Caenorhabditis elegans, like chemotaxis in bac- teria1 , involves is computed is unknown. Laser ablations have shown that the strongest deficits in chemotaxis to salts

  3. Persistence of Long-Term Memory in Vitrified and Revived Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Vita-More, Natasha; Barranco, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Can memory be retained after cryopreservation? Our research has attempted to answer this long-standing question by using the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans, a well-known model organism for biological research that has generated revolutionary findings but has not been tested for memory retention after cryopreservation. Our study's goal was to test C. elegans' memory recall after vitrification and reviving. Using a method of sensory imprinting in the young C. elegans, we establish that learning acquired through olfactory cues shapes the animal's behavior and the learning is retained at the adult stage after vitrification. Our research method included olfactory imprinting with the chemical benzaldehyde (C6H5CHO) for phase-sense olfactory imprinting at the L1 stage, the fast-cooling SafeSpeed method for vitrification at the L2 stage, reviving, and a chemotaxis assay for testing memory retention of learning at the adult stage. Our results in testing memory retention after cryopreservation show that the mechanisms that regulate the odorant imprinting (a form of long-term memory) in C. elegans have not been modified by the process of vitrification or by slow freezing. PMID:25867710

  4. Effect of geldanamycin on hatching and motility in Caenorhabditis elegans and Heterodera glycines.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we show that the Hsp90 heat-shock chaperone inhibitor geldanamycin interferes with egg hatch and juvenile motility in both the free-living Caenorhabditis elegans and the plant-parasite Heterodera glycines. Five doses of geldanamycin ranging from 2 to 100 ug/ml were tested in microtiter wells on...

  5. Analyzing Defects in the "Caenorhabditis Elegans" Nervous System Using Organismal and Cell Biological Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guziewicz, Megan; Vitullo, Toni; Simmons, Bethany; Kohn, Rebecca Eustance

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this laboratory exercise is to increase student understanding of the impact of nervous system function at both the organismal and cellular levels. This inquiry-based exercise is designed for an undergraduate course examining principles of cell biology. After observing the movement of "Caenorhabditis elegans" with defects in their…

  6. A micropillar-based on-chip system for continuous force measurement of C. elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Ali; Nock, Volker; Johari, Shazlina; Blaikie, Richard; Chen, XiaoQi; Wang, Wenhui

    2012-09-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a well-established model organism and has been gaining interest particularly related to worm locomotion and the investigation of the relationship between muscle arms and the motion pattern of the nematode. In this paper, we report on a micropillar-based on-chip system which is capable of quantifying multi-point locomotive forces of a moving C. elegans. A Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) device was microfabricated to allow C. elegans to move in a matrix of micropillars in a channel, and an image processing method was developed to resolve the worm force from the bending pillars. The current micropillar-based system is able to measure force with a resolution of 2.07 µN for body width of 80 µm. Initial experiments have been conducted to collect a maximum force level for thirteen wild type worm samples. A maximum force level of 61.94 µN was observed from 1571 data points, based on which an average maximum force level was 32.61 µN for multi-point measurements. The demonstrated capabilities of the system can be an enabling technology that allows biologist to gain a better understanding of subtle force patterns of C. elegans and worm muscle development.

  7. Materials and methods Evolutionary classification of C. elegans proteins. For classification of C. ele-

    E-print Network

    Yu, Haiyuan

    Materials and methods Evolutionary classification of C. elegans proteins. For classification of C the ORFeome library (1) and transformed into E. coli strain DH5 in 96 well format. Up to 12 single colonies- propriate concentration. AD-ORFeome 1.0 and AD-wrmcDNA libraries. The two Gal4 activation do- main (AD

  8. A genome-wide view of Caenorhabditis elegans base-substitution mutation processes

    E-print Network

    Lynch, Michael

    A genome-wide view of Caenorhabditis elegans base-substitution mutation processes Dee R. Denvera,1 for review May 4, 2009) Knowledge of mutation processes is central to understanding virtu- ally all of standard molecular mutation detection methods have historically precluded a genome- wide understanding

  9. Effects of resveratrol on lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Gems, David

    Effects of resveratrol on lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans Timothy M in diverse organisms from yeast to mammals. In Drosophila, lifespan extension by DR is associated initiated a new study of the effects of resveratrol on Drosophila. We saw no significant effects on lifespan

  10. Regulation of Caenorhabditis elegans vitellogenesis by DAF-2/IIS through separable transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evolutionary theories of aging propose that longevity evolves as a competition between reproduction and somatic maintenance for a finite pool of resources. Reproduction is thought to shorten lifespan by depleting resources from processes promoting somatic maintenance. Maternal yolk production, vitellogenesis, represents a significant maternal cost for reproduction and is suppressed under genetic and environmental conditions that extend lifespan. However, little is known about the pathways regulating vitellogenesis in response to prolongevity cues. Results In order to identify mechanisms that suppress vitellogenesis under prolongevity conditions, we studied factors regulating vitellogenesis in C. elegans nematodes. In C. elegans, vitellogenesis is depressed in the absence of insulin-like signaling (IIS). We found that the C. elegans daf-2/IIS pathway regulates vitellogenesis through two mechanisms. vit-2 transcript levels in daf-2 mutants were indirectly regulated through a germline-dependent signal, and could be rescued by introduction of daf-2(+) sperm. However, yolk protein (YP) levels in daf-2 mutants were also regulated by germline-independent posttranscriptional mechanisms. Conclusions C. elegans vitellogenesis is regulated transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally in response to environmental and reproductive cues. The daf-2 pathway suppressed vitellogenesis through transcriptional mechanisms reflecting reproductive phenotypes, as well as distinct posttranscriptional mechanisms. This study reveals that pleiotropic effects of IIS pathway mutations can converge on a common downstream target, vitellogenesis, as a mechanism to modulate longevity. PMID:21749693

  11. Genetics of Extracellular Matrix Remodeling During Organ Growth Using the Caenorhabditis elegans Pharynx Model

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Gholamali; Burghoorn, Jan; Kawano, Takehiro; Mathew, Manoj; Mörck, Catarina; Axäng, Claes; Ailion, Michael; Thomas, James H.; Culotti, Joseph G.; Swoboda, Peter; Pilon, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The organs of animal embryos are typically covered with an extracellular matrix (ECM) that must be carefully remodeled as these organs enlarge during post-embryonic growth; otherwise, their shape and functions may be compromised. We previously described the twisting of the Caenorhabditis elegans pharynx (here called the Twp phenotype) as a quantitative mutant phenotype that worsens as that organ enlarges during growth. Mutations previously known to cause pharyngeal twist affect membrane proteins with large extracellular domains (DIG-1 and SAX-7), as well as a C. elegans septin (UNC-61). Here we show that two novel alleles of the C. elegans papilin gene, mig-6(et4) and mig-6(sa580), can also cause the Twp phenotype. We also show that overexpression of the ADAMTS protease gene mig-17 can suppress the pharyngeal twist in mig-6 mutants and identify several alleles of other ECM-related genes that can cause or influence the Twp phenotype, including alleles of fibulin (fbl-1), perlecan (unc-52), collagens (cle-1, dpy-7), laminins (lam-1, lam-3), one ADAM protease (sup-17), and one ADAMTS protease (adt-1). The Twp phenotype in C. elegans is easily monitored using light microscopy, is quantitative via measurements of the torsion angle, and reveals that ECM components, metalloproteinases, and ECM attachment molecules are important for this organ to retain its correct shape during post-embryonic growth. The Twp phenotype is therefore a promising experimental system to study ECM remodeling and diseases. PMID:20805556

  12. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels Direct Neuronal Migration in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Schafer, William R.

    at which they function in the mature animal; thus, accurately directed cell migrations are necessaryVoltage-Gated Calcium Channels Direct Neuronal Migration in Caenorhabditis elegans Tobey Tam for regulating the guidance of migrating neurons, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying this process

  13. The Caenorhabditis elegans Gene mfap-1 Encodes a Nuclear Protein That Affects Alternative Splicing

    E-print Network

    Horvitz, H. Robert

    The Caenorhabditis elegans Gene mfap-1 Encodes a Nuclear Protein That Affects Alternative Splicing regulatory mechanism for controlling eukaryotic gene expression. By generating various splice isoforms from used the endogenous gene tos-1 as a reporter for splicing and detected increased intron 1 retention

  14. Regulatory roles of RNA binding proteins in the nervous system of C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sharifnia, Panid; Jin, Yishi

    2015-01-01

    Neurons have evolved to employ many factors involved in the regulation of RNA processing due to their complex cellular compartments. RNA binding proteins (RBPs) are key regulators in transcription, translation, and RNA degradation. Increasing studies have shown that regulatory RNA processing is critical for the establishment, functionality, and maintenance of neural circuits. Recent advances in high-throughput transcriptomics have rapidly expanded our knowledge of the landscape of RNA regulation, but also raised the challenge for mechanistic dissection of the specific roles of RBPs in complex tissues such as the nervous system. The C. elegans genome encodes many RBPs conserved throughout evolution. The rich analytic tools in molecular genetics and simple neural anatomy of C. elegans offer advantages to define functions of genes in vivo at the level of a single cell. Notably, the discovery of microRNAs has had transformative effects to the understanding of neuronal development, circuit plasticity, and neurological diseases. Here we review recent studies unraveling diverse roles of RBPs in the development, function, and plasticity of C. elegans nervous system. We first summarize the general technologies for studying RBPs in C. elegans. We then focus on the roles of several RBPs that control gene- and cell-type specific production of neuronal transcripts. PMID:25628531

  15. On the Formation of Novel Genes by Duplication in the Caenorhabditis elegans Genome

    E-print Network

    Lynch, Michael

    On the Formation of Novel Genes by Duplication in the Caenorhabditis elegans Genome Vaishali Katju Mexico Gene duplication is thought to play the singular most important role in the formation of novel genes. The canonical model of gene duplication postulates that novel genes arise in a two-step fashion

  16. The Caenorhabditis elegans Iodotyrosine Deiodinase Ortholog SUP-18 Functions through a Conserved

    E-print Network

    Horvitz, H. Robert

    + channel associated with muscle membranes. We cloned sup-18 and found that it encodes the C. elegans unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source byproducts in the generation of thyroid hormones [2­6]. In humans, this deiodin- ation is catalyzed by human

  17. Functional analysis of the microRNA genes of C. elegans

    E-print Network

    Alvarez-Saavedra, Ezequiel (Ezequiel Andrès)

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) were discovered in C. elegans during studies of the control of developmental timing. MicroRNAs are a large class of short non-coding RNAs found in many viruses, plants and animals that regulate gene ...

  18. Global proteomics analysis of the response to starvation in C. elegans Mark Larance1,&

    E-print Network

    Lamond, Angus I.

    1 Global proteomics analysis of the response to starvation in C. elegans Mark Larance1. (+44)(0)1382385695; Email a.gartner@dundee.ac.uk Running Title: Proteomic Analysis of the Starvation Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/). Introduction The irregular availability of food provides

  19. Evolutionary perspectives on innate immunity from the study of Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Ausubel, Frederick M.

    TLR Toll-like receptor VHP VH-1 class dual specificity phosphatase Introduction Caenorhabditis elegans are required for pathogen resistance, including a Toll/IL-1 receptor domain adaptor protein that functions SARM Sterile alpha and HEAT/Armadillo motif TGF-b transforming growth factor-b TIR Toll/IL-1 receptor

  20. Dauer-specific dendrite arborization in C. elegans is regulated by KPC-1/furin

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Nathan E.; Androwski, Rebecca J.; Rashid, Alina; Lee, Harksun; Lee, Junho; Barr, Maureen M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Dendrites often display remarkably complex and diverse morphologies that are influenced by developmental and environmental cues. Neuroplasticity in response to adverse environmental conditions entails both hypertrophy and resorption of dendrites. How dendrites rapidly alter morphology in response to unfavorable environmental conditions is unclear. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans enters into a stress-resistant dauer larval stage in response to an adverse environment. Results Here we show that the IL2 bipolar sensory neurons undergo dendrite arborization and axon remodeling during dauer development. When dauer larvae are returned to favorable environmental conditions, animals resume reproductive development and IL2 dendritic branches retract, leaving behind remnant branches in post-dauer L4 and adult animals. The C. elegans furin homolog KPC-1 is required for dauer IL2 dendritic arborization and dauer specific nictation behavior. kpc-1 is also necessary for dendritic arborization of PVD and FLP sensory neurons. In mammals, furin is essential, ubiquitously expressed, and associated with numerous pathologies including neurodegenerative diseases. While broadly expressed in C. elegans neurons and epithelia, kpc-1 acts cell autonomously in IL2 neurons to regulate dauer-specific dendritic arborization and nictation. Conclusions Neuroplasticity of the C. elegans IL2 sensory neurons provides a paradigm to study stress-induced and reversible dendritic branching, and the role of environmental and developmental cues in this process. The newly discovered role of KPC-1 in dendrite morphogenesis provides insight into the function of proprotein convertases in nervous system development. PMID:23932402