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Sample records for activate human dendritic

  1. Ragweed subpollen particles of respirable size activate human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pazmandi, Kitti; Kumar, Brahma V; Szabo, Krisztina; Boldogh, Istvan; Szoor, Arpad; Vereb, Gyorgy; Veres, Agota; Lanyi, Arpad; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Bacsi, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen grains, which are generally considered too large to reach the lower respiratory tract, release subpollen particles (SPPs) of respirable size upon hydration. These SPPs contain allergenic proteins and functional NAD(P)H oxidases. In this study, we examined whether exposure to SPPs initiates the activation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). We found that treatment with freshly isolated ragweed SPPs increased the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in moDCs. Phagocytosis of SPPs by moDCs, as demonstrated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy, led to an up-regulation of the cell surface expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DQ and an increase in the production of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10. Furthermore, SPP-treated moDCs had an increased capacity to stimulate the proliferation of naïve T cells. Co-culture of SPP-treated moDCs with allogeneic CD3(+) pan-T cells resulted in increased secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 by T cells of both allergic and non-allergic subjects, but induced the production of IL-4 exclusively from the T cells of allergic individuals. Addition of exogenous NADPH further increased, while heat-inactivation or pre-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, strongly diminished, the ability of SPPs to induce phenotypic and functional changes in moDCs, indicating that these processes were mediated, at least partly, by the intrinsic NAD(P)H oxidase activity of SPPs. Collectively, our data suggest that inhaled ragweed SPPs are fully capable of activating dendritic cells (DCs) in the airways and SPPs' NAD(P)H oxidase activity is involved in initiation of adaptive immune responses against innocuous pollen proteins. PMID:23251688

  2. Diesel-Enriched Particulate Matter Functionally Activates Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Michael; Karp, Matthew; Killedar, Smruti; Bauer, Stephen M.; Guo, Jia; Williams, D'Ann; Breysse, Patrick; Georas, Steve N.; Williams, Marc A.

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have associated exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) with exacerbations of asthma. It is unknown how different sources of PM affect innate immunity. We sought to determine how car- and diesel exhaust–derived PM affects dendritic cell (DC) activation. DC development was modeled using CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors. Airborne PM was collected from exhaust plenums of Fort McHenry Tunnel providing car-enriched particles (CEP) and diesel-enriched particles (DEP). DC were stimulated for 48 hours with CEP, DEP, CD40-ligand, or lipopolysaccharide. DC activation was assessed by flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and standard culture techniques. DEP increased uptake of fluorescein isothiocyanate–dextran (a model antigen) by DC. Diesel particles enhanced cell-surface expression of co-stimulatory molecules (e.g., CD40 [P < 0.01] and MHC class II [P < 0.01]). By contrast, CEP poorly affected antigen uptake and expression of cell surface molecules, and did not greatly affect cytokine secretion by DC. However, DEP increased production of TNF, IL-6, and IFN-γ (P < 0.01), IL-12 (P < 0.05), and vascular endothelial growth factor (P < 0.001). In co-stimulation assays of PM-exposed DC and alloreactive CD4+ T cells, both CEP and DEP directed a Th2-like pattern of cytokine production (e.g., enhanced IL-13 and IL-18 and suppressed IFN-γ production). CD4+ T cells were not functionally activated on exposure to either DEP or CEP. Car- and diesel-enriched particles exert a differential effect on DC activation. Our data support the hypothesis that DEP (and to a lesser extent CEP) regulate important functional aspects of human DC, supporting an adjuvant role for this material. PMID:17630318

  3. Immune activation by combination human lymphokine-activated killer and dendritic cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    West, E J; Scott, K J; Jennings, V A; Melcher, A A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Optimal cellular immunotherapy for cancer should ideally harness both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response. Lymphokine-activated killer cells (LAKs) can trigger early innate killing of tumour targets, whereas long-term adaptive-specific tumour control requires priming of CD8+ cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs) following acquisition of tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) by antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). As DCs stimulate both innate and adaptive effectors, combination cell therapy using LAKs and DCs has the potential to maximise anti-tumour immune priming. Methods: Reciprocal activation between human clinical grade LAKs and DCs on co-culture, and its immune consequences, was monitored by cell phenotype, cytokine release and priming of both innate and adaptive cytotoxicity against melanoma targets. Results: Co-culture of DCs and LAKs led to phenotypic activation of natural killer (NK) cells within the LAK population, which was associated with increased production of inflammatory cytokines and enhanced innate cytotoxicity against tumour cell targets. The LAKs reciprocally matured DCs, and the combination of LAKs and DCs, on addition of melanoma cells, supported priming of specific anti-tumour CTLs better than DCs alone. Conclusion: Clinical-grade LAKs/DCs represents a practical, effective combination cell immunotherapy for stimulation of both innate and adaptive anti-tumour immunity in cancer patients. PMID:21847125

  4. A Quantitative Proteomic Approach for Detecting Protein Profiles of Activated Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schlatzer, Daniela M; Sugalski, Julia; Dazard, Jean-Eudes; Chance, Mark R; Anthony, Donald D.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) direct the magnitude, polarity and effector function of the adaptive immune response. DC express toll-like receptors (TLR), antigen capturing and processing machinery, and costimulatory molecules, which facilitate innate sensing and T cell activation. Once activated, DC can efficiently migrate to lymphoid tissue and prime T cell responses. Therefore, DC play an integral role as mediators of the immune response to multiple pathogens. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in DC activation is therefore central in gaining an understanding of host response to infection. Unfortunately, technical constraints have limited system-wide ‘omic’ analysis of human DC subsets collected ex vivo. Here we have applied novel proteomic approaches to human myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) purified from 100 milliliters of peripheral blood to characterize specific molecular networks of cell activation at the individual patient level, and have successfully quantified over 700 proteins from individual samples containing as little as 200,000 mDCs. The proteomic and network readouts after ex vivo stimulation of mDCs with TLR3 agonists is measured and verified using flow cytometry. PMID:21945394

  5. Residual Endotoxin Contaminations in Recombinant Proteins Are Sufficient to Activate Human CD1c+ Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Harald; Schmittner, Maria; Duschl, Albert; Horejs-Hoeck, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Many commercially available recombinant proteins are produced in Escherichia coli, and most suppliers guarantee contamination levels of less than 1 endotoxin unit (EU). When we analysed commercially available proteins for their endotoxin content, we found contamination levels in the same range as generally stated in the data sheets, but also some that were higher. To analyse whether these low levels of contamination have an effect on immune cells, we stimulated the monocytic cell line THP-1, primary human monocytes, in vitro differentiated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and primary human CD1c+ dendritic cells (DCs) with very low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; ranging from 0.002–2 ng/ml). We show that CD1c+ DCs especially can be activated by minimal amounts of LPS, equivalent to the levels of endotoxin contamination we detected in some commercially available proteins. Notably, the enhanced endotoxin sensitivity of CD1c+ DCs was closely correlated with high CD14 expression levels observed in CD1c+ DCs that had been maintained in cell culture medium for 24 hours. When working with cells that are particularly sensitive to LPS, even low endotoxin contamination may generate erroneous data. We therefore recommend that recombinant proteins be thoroughly screened for endotoxin contamination using the limulus amebocyte lysate test, fluorescence-based assays, or a luciferase based NF-κB reporter assay involving highly LPS-sensitive cells overexpressing TLR4, MD-2 and CD14. PMID:25478795

  6. Brucella β 1,2 Cyclic Glucan Is an Activator of Human and Mouse Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Anna; Pérez-Gutierrez, Camino; Banchereau, Romain; Dutartre, Hélène; Lecine, Patrick; Dullaers, Melissa; Mello, Marielle; Pinto Salcedo, Suzana; Muller, Alexandre; Leserman, Lee; Levy, Yves; Zurawski, Gerard; Zurawski, Sandy; Moreno, Edgardo; Moriyón, Ignacio; Klechevsky, Eynav; Banchereau, Jacques; Oh, SangKon; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial cyclic glucans are glucose polymers that concentrate within the periplasm of alpha-proteobacteria. These molecules are necessary to maintain the homeostasis of the cell envelope by contributing to the osmolarity of Gram negative bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans are potent activators of human and mouse dendritic cells. Dendritic cells activation by Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans requires TLR4, MyD88 and TRIF, but not CD14. The Brucella cyclic glucans showed neither toxicity nor immunogenicity compared to LPS and triggered antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in vivo. These cyclic glucans also enhanced antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses including cross-presentation by different human DC subsets. Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans increased the memory CD4+ T cell responses of blood mononuclear cells exposed to recombinant fusion proteins composed of anti-CD40 antibody and antigens from both hepatitis C virus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Thus cyclic glucans represent a new class of adjuvants, which might contribute to the development of effective antimicrobial therapies. PMID:23166489

  7. Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucan is an activator of human and mouse dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Anna; Pérez-Gutierrez, Camino; Banchereau, Romain; Dutartre, Hélène; Lecine, Patrick; Dullaers, Melissa; Mello, Marielle; Salcedo, Suzana Pinto; Muller, Alexandre; Leserman, Lee; Levy, Yves; Zurawski, Gerard; Zurawski, Sandy; Moreno, Edgardo; Moriyón, Ignacio; Klechevsky, Eynav; Banchereau, Jacques; Oh, Sangkon; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial cyclic glucans are glucose polymers that concentrate within the periplasm of alpha-proteobacteria. These molecules are necessary to maintain the homeostasis of the cell envelope by contributing to the osmolarity of Gram negative bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans are potent activators of human and mouse dendritic cells. Dendritic cells activation by Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans requires TLR4, MyD88 and TRIF, but not CD14. The Brucella cyclic glucans showed neither toxicity nor immunogenicity compared to LPS and triggered antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in vivo. These cyclic glucans also enhanced antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses including cross-presentation by different human DC subsets. Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans increased the memory CD4(+) T cell responses of blood mononuclear cells exposed to recombinant fusion proteins composed of anti-CD40 antibody and antigens from both hepatitis C virus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Thus cyclic glucans represent a new class of adjuvants, which might contribute to the development of effective antimicrobial therapies. PMID:23166489

  8. Human SOCS1 Controls Immunostimulatory Activity of Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Bangxing; Ren, Wenhong; Song, Xiao-Tong; Evel-Kabler, Kevin; Chen, Si-Yi; Huang, Xue F

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based tumor vaccines have only achieved limited clinical efficacy, underscoring the limitation of stimulatory strategies to elicit effective cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses against self tumor-associated antigens. Here we investigate the role of human suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 1, a feedback inhibitor of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway, in regulating antigen presentation by human DCs. We find that human SOCS1-silenced DCs have an enhanced stimulatory ability to prime self antigen-specific CTLs in vitro and in an SCID-hu mouse model. Human CTLs activated by SOCS1-silenced DCs, but not wild-type DCs, have an active lytic activity to natural antigen-expressing tumor cells. We further find that the capacity of human DCs to prime CTLs is likely controlled by SOCS1 restricted production and signaling of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-12. These results indicate a critical role of human SOCS1 in negatively regulating the immunostimulatory capacity of DCs and imply a translational potential of this alternative, SOCS1 silencing strategy to develop effective DC vaccines. PMID:19789342

  9. Activation of antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes by fusions of human dendritic cells and breast carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jianlin; Avigan, David; Chen, Dongshu; Wu, Zekui; Koido, Shigeo; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Kufe, Donald

    2000-01-01

    We have reported that fusions of murine dendritic cells (DCs) and murine carcinoma cells reverse unresponsiveness to tumor-associated antigens and induce the rejection of established metastases. In the present study, fusions were generated with primary human breast carcinoma cells and autologous DCs. Fusion cells coexpressed tumor-associated antigens and DC-derived costimulatory molecules. The fusion cells also retained the functional potency of DCs and stimulated autologous T cell proliferation. Significantly, the results show that autologous T cells are primed by the fusion cells to induce MHC class I-dependent lysis of autologous breast tumor cells. These findings demonstrate that fusions of human breast cancer cells and DCs activate T cell responses against autologous tumors. PMID:10688917

  10. Helicobacter pylori γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase Induces Tolerogenic Human Dendritic Cells by Activation of Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Käbisch, Romy; Semper, Raphaela P; Wüstner, Stefanie; Gerhard, Markus; Mejías-Luque, Raquel

    2016-05-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection is characterized by chronic persistence of the bacterium. Different virulence factors, including H. pylori γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (gGT), have been reported to induce tolerogenicity by reprogramming dendritic cells (DCs). gGT is present in all bacterial isolates, indicating an important role for gGT in the course of infection. In the current study, we have analyzed the effect of H. pylori gGT on human DCs and the subsequent adaptive immune response. We show that glutamate produced due to H. pylori gGT enzymatic activity tolerizes DCs by inhibiting cAMP signaling and dampening IL-6 secretion in response to the infection. Together, our results provide a novel molecular mechanism by which H. pylori manipulates the host's immune response to persist within its host. PMID:27183641

  11. Inhibition of human dendritic cell activation by hydroethanolic but not lipophilic extracts of turmeric (Curcuma longa).

    PubMed

    Krasovsky, Joseph; Chang, David H; Deng, Gary; Yeung, Simon; Lee, Mavis; Leung, Ping Chung; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Cassileth, Barrie; Dhodapkar, Madhav V

    2009-03-01

    Turmeric has been extensively utilized in Indian and Chinese medicine for its immune-modulatory properties. Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells specialized to initiate and regulate immunity. The ability of DCs to initiate immunity is linked to their activation status. The effects of turmeric on human DCs have not been studied. Here we show that hydroethanolic (HEE) but not lipophilic "supercritical" extraction (SCE) of turmeric inhibits the activation of human DCs in response to inflammatory cytokines. Treatment of DCs with HEE also inhibits the ability of DCs to stimulate the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Importantly, the lipophilic fraction does not synergize with the hydroethanolic fraction for the ability of inhibiting DC maturation. Rather, culturing of DCs with the combination of HEE and SCE leads to partial abrogation of the effects of HEE on the MLR initiated by DCs. These data provide a mechanism for the anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric. However, they suggest that these extracts are not synergistic and may contain components with mutually antagonistic effects on human DCs. Harnessing the immune effects of turmeric may benefit from specifically targeting the active fractions. PMID:19034830

  12. Pro-lymphangiogenic properties of IFN-γ-activated human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Gagliostro, Vincenzo; Seeger, Pascal; Garrafa, Emirena; Salvi, Valentina; Bresciani, Roberto; Bosisio, Daniela; Sozzani, Silvano

    2016-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in the initiation of adaptive immune responses. In addition, through the release of pro- and anti-angiogenic mediators, DCs are key regulators of blood vessel remodeling, a process that characterizes inflammation. Less information is available on the role of DCs in lymphangiogenesis. This study reports that human DCs produce VEGF-C, a cytokine with potent pro-lymphangiogenic activity when stimulated with IFN-γ. DC-derived VEGF-C was biologically active, being able to promote tube-like structure formation in cultures of human lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). DCs co-cultured with IL-15-activated NK cells produced high levels of VEGF-C, suggesting a role for NK-DC cross-talk in peripheral lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues in inflammation-associated lymphangiogenesis. Induction of VEGF-C by IFN-γ was detected also in other myeloid cells, such as blood-purified CD1c(+) DCs, CD14(+) monocytes and in monocyte-derived macrophages. In all these cell types, VEGF-C was found associated with the cell membrane by low affinity, heparan sulphate-mediated, interactions. Therefore, human DCs should be considered as new players in inflammation-associated lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26987844

  13. Protocatechuic acid inhibits human dendritic cell functional activation: role of PPARγ up-modulation.

    PubMed

    Del Cornò, Manuela; Varano, Barbara; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Filesi, Carmelina; Masella, Roberta; Gessani, Sandra

    2014-06-01

    Polyphenols have been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and immunomodulatory activities. However, the effects of anthocyanins, flavonoids of great nutritional interest, in particular of their metabolite protocatechuic acid (PCA) on the phenotypic and functional maturation of human dendritic cells (DCs) are still largely unknown. In this study, we report that PCA is efficiently taken up and accumulated in human monocyte-derived DCs (MD-DCs). PCA exposure of MD-DCs markedly impaired the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines (i.e. IL-6, IL-8 and CCL2) in response to bacterial endotoxin and leptin, and down-regulated the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced migratory response of MD-DCs to CCL19. Conversely, the phenotypic profile induced by LPS-mediated activation as well as IL-12 production was not affected. Interestingly, we found that PPARγ is a main factor in the PCA-induced effects as blocking its activity abolish PCA capacity to down-regulate IL-6 and IL-8, but not CCL2, secretion and to inhibit MD-DC migration. In keeping with this observation, cytosol to nucleus translocation and PPARγ activity were found to be directly stimulated by PCA exposure of MD-DCs. These novel findings provide new insight into the immunoregulatory effects of polyphenol metabolites in DCs opening new perspectives on their potential application in the prevention of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:24576555

  14. Human Dendritic Cells Activated by TSLP and CD40L Induce Proallergic Cytotoxic T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gilliet, Michel; Soumelis, Vassili; Watanabe, Norihiko; Hanabuchi, Shino; Antonenko, Svetlana; de Waal-Malefyt, Rene; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2003-01-01

    Human thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a novel epithelial cell–derived cytokine, which induces dendritic cell (DC)-mediated CD4+ T cell responses with a proallergic phenotype. Although the participation of CD8+ T cells in allergic inflammation is well documented, their functional properties as well as the pathways leading to their generation remain poorly understood. Here, we show that TSLP-activated CD11c+ DCs potently activate and expand naive CD8+ T cells, and induce their differentiation into interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-13–producing effectors exhibiting poor cytolytic activity. Additional CD40L triggering of TSLP-activated DCs induced CD8+ T cells with potent cytolytic activity, producing large amounts of interferon (IFN)-γ, while retaining their capacity to produce IL-5 and IL-13. These data further support the role of TSLP as initial trigger of allergic T cell responses and suggest that CD40L-expressing cells may act in combination with TSLP to amplify and sustain pro-allergic responses and cause tissue damage by promoting the generation of IFN-γ–producing cytotoxic effectors. PMID:12707303

  15. Immature human dendritic cells enhance their migration through KCa3.1 channel activation.

    PubMed

    Crottès, David; Félix, Romain; Meley, Daniel; Chadet, Stéphanie; Herr, Florence; Audiger, Cindy; Soriani, Olivier; Vandier, Christophe; Roger, Sébastien; Angoulvant, Denis; Velge-Roussel, Florence

    2016-04-01

    Migration capacity is essential for dendritic cells (DCs) to present antigen to T cells for the induction of immune response. The DC migration is supposed to be a calcium-dependent process, while not fully understood. Here, we report a role of the KCa3.1/IK1/SK4 channels in the migration capacity of both immature (iDC) and mature (mDC) human CD14(+)-derived DCs. KCa3.1 channels were shown to control the membrane potential of human DC and the Ca(2+) entry, which is directly related to migration capacities. The expression of migration marker such as CCR5 and CCR7 was modified in both types of DCs by TRAM-34 (100nM). But, only the migration of iDC was decreased by use of both TRAM-34 and KCa3.1 siRNA. Confocal analyses showed a close localization of CCR5 with KCa3.1 in the steady state of iDC. Finally, the implication of KCa3.1 seems to be limited to the migration capacities as T cell activation of DCs appeared unchanged. Altogether, these results demonstrated that KCa3.1 channels have a pro-migratory effect on iDC migration. Our findings suggest that KCa3.1 in human iDC play a major role in their migration and constitute an attractive target for the cell therapy optimization. PMID:27020659

  16. Immunosuppressive human anti-CD83 monoclonal antibody depletion of activated dendritic cells in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Seldon, T A; Pryor, R; Palkova, A; Jones, M L; Verma, N D; Findova, M; Braet, K; Sheng, Y; Fan, Y; Zhou, E Y; Marks, J D; Munro, T; Mahler, S M; Barnard, R T; Fromm, P D; Silveira, P A; Elgundi, Z; Ju, X; Clark, G J; Bradstock, K F; Munster, D J; Hart, D N J

    2016-03-01

    Current immunosuppressive/anti-inflammatory agents target the responding effector arm of the immune response and their nonspecific action increases the risk of infection and malignancy. These effects impact on their use in allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation and other forms of transplantation. Interventions that target activated dendritic cells (DCs) have the potential to suppress the induction of undesired immune responses (for example, graft versus host disease (GVHD) or transplant rejection) and to leave protective T-cell immune responses intact (for example, cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunity). We developed a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb), 3C12, specific for CD83, which is expressed on activated but not resting DC. The 3C12 mAb and an affinity improved version, 3C12C, depleted CD83(+) cells by CD16(+) NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and inhibited allogeneic T-cell proliferation in vitro. A single dose of 3C12C prevented human peripheral blood mononuclear cell-induced acute GVHD in SCID mouse recipients. The mAb 3C12C depleted CMRF-44(+)CD83(bright) activated DC but spared CD83(dim/-) DC in vivo. It reduced human T-cell activation in vivo and maintained the proportion of CD4(+) FoxP3(+) CD25(+) Treg cells and also viral-specific CD8(+) T cells. The anti-CD83 mAb, 3C12C, merits further evaluation as a new immunosuppressive agent in transplantation. PMID:26286117

  17. Oral bacteria induce a differential activation of human immunodeficiency virus-1 promoter in T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C. B.; Emerson, K. A.; Gonzalez, O. A.; Ebersole, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can integrate into T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells resulting in a latent infection. Reports have also demonstrated that various microbial and host cell factors can trigger HIV reactivation leading to HIV recrudescence, potentially undermining highly active antiretroviral therapies. Methods This study evaluated the capacity of oral bacteria associated with chronic periodontal infections to stimulate HIV promoter activation in various cell models of HIV latency. Results T cells (1G5) challenged with oral bacteria demonstrated a dose–response of HIV promoter activation with a subset of the bacteria, as well as kinetics that were generally similar irrespective of the stimuli. Direct bacterial challenge of the T cells resulted in increased activation of approximately 1.5- to 7-fold over controls. Challenge of macrophages (BF24) indicated different kinetics for individual bacteria and resulted in consistent increases in promoter activation of five fold to six fold over basal levels for all bacteria except Streptococcus mutans. Dendritic cells showed increases in HIV reactivation of 7- to 34-fold specific for individual species of bacteria. Conclusion These results suggested that oral bacteria have the capability to reactivate HIV from latently infected cells, showing a relationship of mature dendritic cells > immature dendritic cells > macrophages ≥ T cells. Expression of various pattern recognition receptors on these various cell types may provide insight into the primary receptors/signaling pathways used for reactivation by the bacteria. PMID:19702954

  18. Incomplete activation of peripheral blood dendritic cells during healthy human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Della Bella, S; Giannelli, S; Cozzi, V; Signorelli, V; Cappelletti, M; Cetin, I; Villa, M L

    2011-05-01

    Successful pregnancy relies on the adaptation of immune responses that allow the fetus to grow and develop in the uterus despite being recognized by maternal immune cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are central to the control of immune tolerance, and their state of activation at the maternal-decidual interface is critical to the feto-maternal immunological equilibrium. So far, the involvement of circulating DCs has been investigated poorly. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether, during healthy human pregnancy, peripheral blood DCs (PBDCs) undergo changes that may be relevant to the adaptation of maternal immune responses that allow fetal tolerance. In a cross-sectional study, we analysed PBDCs by six-colour flow cytometry on whole blood samples from 47 women during healthy pregnancy progression and 24 non-pregnant controls. We demonstrated that both myeloid and plasmacytoid PBDCs undergo a state of incomplete activation, more evident in the third trimester, characterized by increased expression of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokine production but lacking human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR up-regulation. To investigate the contribution of soluble circulating factors to this phenomenon, we also performed culture experiments showing that sera from pregnant women added to control DCs conditioned a similar incomplete activation that was associated with reduced DC allostimulatory capacity, supporting the in vivo relevance of our findings. We also obtained evidence that the glycoprotein hormone activin-A may contribute to DC incomplete activation. We suggest that the changes of PBDCs occurring during late pregnancy may aid the comprehension of the immune mechanisms operated by the maternal immune system to maintain fetal tolerance. PMID:21352205

  19. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Stefania; Grange, Cristina; Tapparo, Marta; Pasquino, Chiara; Romagnoli, Renato; Dametto, Ennia; Amoroso, Antonio; Tetta, Ciro; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Human liver stem cells (HLSCs) are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs), and dendritic cells (DCs) in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response. PMID:27127520

  20. Saccharomyces boulardii inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of human dendritic cells and T cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, S; Przesdzing, I; Metzke, D; Schmitz, J; Radbruch, A; Baumgart, D C

    2009-01-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb) is a probiotic yeast preparation that has demonstrated efficacy in inflammatory and infectious disorders of the gastrointestinal tract in controlled clinical trials. Although patients clearly benefit from treatment with Sb, little is known on how Sb unfolds its anti-inflammatory properties in humans. Dendritic cells (DC) balance tolerance and immunity and are involved critically in the control of T cell activation. Thus, they are believed to have a pivotal role in the initiation and perpetuation of chronic inflammatory disorders, not only in the gut. We therefore decided to investigate if Sb modulates DC function. Culture of primary (native, non-monocyte-derived) human myeloid CD1c+CD11c+CD123– DC (mDC) in the presence of Sb culture supernatant (active component molecular weight < 3 kDa, as evaluated by membrane partition chromatography) reduced significantly expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD40 and CD80 (P < 0·01) and the DC mobilization marker CC-chemokine receptor CCR7 (CD197) (P < 0·001) induced by the prototypical microbial antigen lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Moreover, secretion of key proinflammatory cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-6 were notably reduced, while the secretion of anti-inflammatory IL-10 increased. Finally, Sb supernatant inhibited the proliferation of naive T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction with mDC. In summary, our data suggest that Sb may exhibit part of its anti-inflammatory potential through modulation of DC phenotype, function and migration by inhibition of their immune response to bacterial microbial surrogate antigens such as LPS. PMID:19161443

  1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activators affect the maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Gosset, P; Charbonnier, A S; Delerive, P; Fontaine, J; Staels, B; Pestel, J; Tonnel, A B; Trottein, F

    2001-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma ), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, has recently been described as a modulator of macrophage functions and as an inhibitor of T cell proliferation. Here, we investigated the role of PPARgamma in dendritic cells (DC), the most potent antigen-presenting cells. We showed that PPARgamma is highly expressed in immature human monocyte-derived DC (MDDC) and that it may affect the immunostimulatory function of MDDC stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or via CD40 ligand (CD40L). We found that the synthetic PPARgamma agonist rosiglitazone (as well as pioglitazone and troglitazone) significantly increases on LPS- and CD40L-activated MDDC, the surface expression of CD36 (by 184% and 104%, respectively) and CD86 (by 54% and 48%), whereas it reduces the synthesis of CD80 (by 42% and 42%). Moreover, activation of PPARgamma resulted in a dramatic decreased secretion of the Th1-promoting factor IL-12 in LPS- and CD40L-stimulated cells (by 47% and 62%), while the production of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10 was unaffected. Finally, PPARgamma ligands down-modulate the synthesis of IFN-gamma -inducible protein-10 (recently termed as CXCL10) and RANTES (CCL5), both chemokines involved in the recruitment of Th1 lymphocytes (by 49% and 30%), but not the levels of the Th2 cell-attracting chemokines,macrophage-derived chemokine (CCL22) and thymus and activation regulated chemokine (CCL17), in mature MDDC. Taken together, our data suggest that activation of PPARgamma in human DC may have an impact in the orientation of primary and secondary immune responses by favoring type 2 responses. PMID:11592060

  2. Human intestinal dendritic cells decrease cytokine release against Salmonella infection in the presence of Lactobacillus paracasei upon TLR activation.

    PubMed

    Bermudez-Brito, Miriam; Muñoz-Quezada, Sergio; Gomez-Llorente, Carolina; Matencio, Esther; Bernal, María J; Romero, Fernando; Gil, Angel

    2012-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria have been shown to modulate immune responses and could have therapeutic effects in allergic and inflammatory disorders. However, little is known about the signalling pathways that are engaged by probiotics. Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells that are involved in immunity and tolerance. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) and murine DCs are different from human gut DCs; therefore, in this study, we used human DCs generated from CD34+ progenitor cells (hematopoietic stem cells) harvested from umbilical cord blood; those DCs exhibited surface antigens of dendritic Langerhans cells, similar to the lamina propria DCs in the gut. We report that both a novel probiotic strain isolated from faeces of exclusively breast-fed newborn infants, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, and its cell-free culture supernatant (CFS) decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human intestinal DCs challenged with Salmonella. Interestingly, the supernatant was as effective as the bacteria in reducing pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. In contrast, the bacterium was a potent inducer of TGF-β2 secretion, whereas the supernatant increased the secretion of TGF-β1 in response to Salmonella. We also showed that both the bacteria and its supernatant enhanced innate immunity through the activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling. These treatments strongly induced the transcription of the TLR9 gene. In addition, upregulation of the CASP8 and TOLLIP genes was observed. This work demonstrates that L. paracasei CNCM I-4034 enhanced innate immune responses, as evidenced by the activation of TLR signalling and the downregulation of a broad array of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The use of supernatants like the one described in this paper could be an effective and safe alternative to using live bacteria in functional foods. PMID:22905233

  3. Distinct activation of primary human BDCA1(+) dendritic cells upon interaction with stressed or infected β cells.

    PubMed

    Schulte, B M; Kers-Rebel, E D; Bottino, R; Piganelli, J D; Galama, J M D; Engelse, M A; de Koning, E J P; Adema, G J

    2016-06-01

    Derailment of immune responses can lead to autoimmune type 1 diabetes, and this can be accelerated or even induced by local stress caused by inflammation or infection. Dendritic cells (DCs) shape both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we report on the responses of naturally occurring human myeloid BDCA1(+) DCs towards differentially stressed pancreatic β cells. Our data show that BDCA1(+) DCs in human pancreas-draining lymph node (pdLN) suspensions and blood-derived BDCA1(+) DCs both effectively engulf β cells, thus mimicking physiological conditions. Upon uptake of enterovirus-infected, but not mock-infected cells, BDCA1(+) DCs induced interferon (IFN)-α/β responses, co-stimulatory molecules and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Notably, induction of stress in β cells by ultraviolet irradiation, culture in serum-free medium or cytokine-induced stress did not provoke strong DC activation, despite efficient phagocytosis. DC activation correlated with the amount of virus used to infect β cells and required RNA within virally infected cells. DCs encountering enterovirus-infected β cells, but not those incubated with mock-infected or stressed β cells, suppressed T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines and variably induced IFN-γ in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Thus, stressed β cells have little effect on human BDCA1(+) DC activation and function, while enterovirus-infected β cells impact these cells significantly, which could help to explain their role in development of autoimmune diabetes in individuals at risk. PMID:26888163

  4. Selective activation of human dendritic cells by OM-85 through a NF-kB and MAPK dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Parola, Carmen; Salogni, Laura; Vaira, Xenia; Scutera, Sara; Somma, Paolo; Salvi, Valentina; Musso, Tiziana; Tabbia, Giuseppe; Bardessono, Marco; Pasquali, Christian; Mantovani, Alberto; Sozzani, Silvano; Bosisio, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    OM-85 (Broncho-Vaxom®, Broncho-Munal®, Ommunal®, Paxoral®, Vaxoral®), a product made of the water soluble fractions of 21 inactivated bacterial strain patterns responsible for respiratory tract infections, is used for the prevention of recurrent upper respiratory tract infections and acute exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. OM-85 is able to potentiate both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for OM-85 activation are still largely unknown. Purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of OM-85 stimulation on human dendritic cell functions. We show that OM-85 selectively induced NF-kB and MAPK activation in human DC with no detectable action on the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) pathway. As a consequence, chemokines (i.e. CXCL8, CXCL6, CCL3, CCL20, CCL22) and B-cell activating cytokines (i.e. IL-6, BAFF and IL-10) were strongly upregulated. OM-85 also synergized with the action of classical pro-inflammatory stimuli used at suboptimal concentrations. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with COPD, a pathological condition often associated with altered PRR expression pattern, fully retained the capability to respond to OM-85. These results provide new insights on the molecular mechanisms of OM-85 activation of the immune response and strengthen the rational for its use in clinical settings. PMID:24386121

  5. Selective Activation of Human Dendritic Cells by OM-85 through a NF-kB and MAPK Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Scutera, Sara; Somma, Paolo; Salvi, Valentina; Musso, Tiziana; Tabbia, Giuseppe; Bardessono, Marco; Pasquali, Christian; Mantovani, Alberto; Sozzani, Silvano; Bosisio, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    OM-85 (Broncho-Vaxom®, Broncho-Munal®, Ommunal®, Paxoral®, Vaxoral®), a product made of the water soluble fractions of 21 inactivated bacterial strain patterns responsible for respiratory tract infections, is used for the prevention of recurrent upper respiratory tract infections and acute exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. OM-85 is able to potentiate both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for OM-85 activation are still largely unknown. Purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of OM-85 stimulation on human dendritic cell functions. We show that OM-85 selectively induced NF-kB and MAPK activation in human DC with no detectable action on the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) pathway. As a consequence, chemokines (i.e. CXCL8, CXCL6, CCL3, CCL20, CCL22) and B-cell activating cytokines (i.e. IL-6, BAFF and IL-10) were strongly upregulated. OM-85 also synergized with the action of classical pro-inflammatory stimuli used at suboptimal concentrations. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with COPD, a pathological condition often associated with altered PRR expression pattern, fully retained the capability to respond to OM-85. These results provide new insights on the molecular mechanisms of OM-85 activation of the immune response and strengthen the rational for its use in clinical settings. PMID:24386121

  6. Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin-Activated Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Induce the Generation of FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells in Human Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Hanabuchi, Shino; Ito, Tomoki; Park, Woon-Ryon; Watanabe, Norihiko; Shaw, Joanne L.; Roman, Eulogia; Arima, Kazuhiko; Wang, Yui-Hsi; Voo, Kui Shin; Cao, Wei; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Human thymus contains major dendritic cell (DC) subsets, myeloid DCs (mDCs), and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). We previously showed that mDCs, educated by thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) produced by the epithelial cells of the Hassall’s corpuscles, induced differentiation of CD4+CD25− thymocytes into Forkhead Box P3+ (FOXP3+) regulatory T cells (TR) within the medulla of human thymus. In this study, we show that pDCs expressed the TSLP receptor and IL-7 receptor a complexes upon activation and became responsive to TSLP. TSLP-activated human pDCs secrete macrophage-derived chemokine CCL-22 and thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine CCL-17 but not Th1- or Th2-polarizing cytokines. TSLP-activated pDCs induced the generation of FOXP3+ TR from CD4+CD8−CD25− thymocytes, which could be strongly inhibited by Th1-polarizing cytokine IL-12 or Th2-polarizing cytokine IL-4. Interestingly, the FOXP3+ TR induced by the TSLP-pDCs expressed more IL-10 but less TGF-b than that induced by the TSLP-mDCs. These data suggest that TSLP expressed by thymic epithelial cells can activate mDCs and pDCs to positively select the FOXP3+ TR with different cytokine production potential in human thymus. The inability of TSLP to induce DC maturation without producing Th1- or Th2-polarizing cytokines may provide a thymic niche for TR development. PMID:20173030

  7. Toll-like receptor activation enhances cell-mediated immunity induced by an antibody vaccine targeting human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Venky; Vasilakos, John P; Tario, Joseph D; Berger, Marc A; Wallace, Paul K; Keler, Tibor

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we have successfully targeted the mannose receptor (MR) expressed on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) using a fully human MR-specific antibody, B11, as a vehicle to deliver whole protein tumor antigens such as the human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (hCGβ). Since MRs play a role in bridging innate immunity with adaptive immunity we have explored several toll-like receptor (TLR)-specific ligands that may synergize with MR targeting and be applicable as adjuvants in the clinic. We demonstrate that antigen-specific helper and cytolytic T cells from both healthy donors and cancer patients were effectively primed with B11-hCGβ-treated autologous DCs when a combination of one or several TLR ligands is used. Specifically, concomitant signaling of DCs via TLR3 with dsRNA (poly I:C) and DC TLR 7/8 with Resiquimod (R-848), respectively, elicited efficient antigen presentation-mediated by MR-targeting. We demonstrate that MR and TLRs contribute towards maturation and activation of DCs by a mechanism that may be driven by a combination of adjuvant and antibody vaccines that specifically deliver antigenic targets to DCs. PMID:17254349

  8. MicroRNA-155 modulates the interleukin-1 signaling pathway in activated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ceppi, Maurizio; Pereira, Patricia M.; Dunand-Sauthier, Isabelle; Barras, Emmanuèle; Reith, Walter; Santos, Manuel A.; Pierre, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    In response to inflammatory stimulation, dendritic cells (DCs) have a remarkable pattern of differentiation (maturation) that exhibits specific mechanisms to control immunity. Here, we show that in response to Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), several microRNAs (miRNAs) are regulated in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Among these miRNAs, miR-155 is highly up-regulated during maturation. Using LNA silencing combined to microarray technology, we have identified the Toll-like receptor/interleukin-1 (TLR/IL-1) inflammatory pathway as a general target of miR-155. We further demonstrate that miR-155 directly controls the level of TAB2, an important signal transduction molecule. Our observations suggest, therefore, that in mature human DCs, miR-155 is part of a negative feedback loop, which down-modulates inflammatory cytokine production in response to microbial stimuli. PMID:19193853

  9. Human endogenous retrovirus envelope proteins target dendritic cells to suppress T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Jonas; Kämmerer, Ulrike; Müller, Nora; Avota, Elita; Schneider-Schaulies, Sibylle

    2015-06-01

    Though mostly defective, human endogenous retroviruses (HERV) can retain open reading frames, which are especially expressed in the placenta. There, the envelope (env) proteins of HERV-W (Syncytin-1), HERV-FRD (Syncytin-2), and HERV-K (HML-2) were implicated in tolerance against the semi-allogenic fetus. Here, we show that the known HERV env-binding receptors ASCT-1 and -2 and MFSD2 are expressed by DCs and T-cells. When used as effectors in coculture systems, CHO cells transfected to express Syncytin-1, -2, or HML-2 did not affect T-cell expansion or overall LPS-driven phenotypic DC maturation, however, promoted release of IL-12 and TNF-α rather than IL-10. In contrast, HERV env expressing choriocarcinoma cell lines suppressed T-cell proliferation and LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-12 release, however, promoted IL-10 accumulation, indicating that these effects might not rely on HERV env interactions. However, DCs conditioned by choriocarcinoma, but also transgenic CHO cells failed to promote allogenic T-cell expansion. This was associated with a loss of DC/T-cell conjugate frequencies, impaired Ca(2+) mobilization, and aberrant patterning of f-actin and tyrosine phosphorylated proteins in T-cells. Altogether, these findings suggest that HERV env proteins target T-cell activation indirectly by modulating the stimulatory activity of DCs. PMID:25752285

  10. Nocardia farcinica Activates Human Dendritic Cells and Induces Secretion of Interleukin-23 (IL-23) Rather than IL-12p70

    PubMed Central

    Eisenblätter, Martin; Buchal, Ariane; Gayum, Hermine; Jasny, Edith; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Ulrichs, Timo; Schneider, Thomas; Schumann, Ralf R.; Zweigner, Janine

    2012-01-01

    Studying the interaction of dendritic cells (DCs) with bacteria controlled by T-cell-mediated immune responses may reveal novel adjuvants for the induction of cellular immunity. Murine studies and the observation that nocardias infect predominantly immunosuppressed patients have suggested that these bacteria may possess an adjuvant potential. Moreover, adjuvants on the basis of the nocardial cell wall have been applied in clinical studies. Since the handling of adjuvants by DCs may determine the type of immune responses induced by a vaccine, the present study aimed at investigating the interaction of immature human monocyte-derived DCs with live or inactivated Nocardia farcinica in vitro and determining the cellular phenotypic changes as well as alterations in characteristic functions, such as phagocytosis, induction of T-cell proliferation, and cytokine secretion. Human DCs ingested N. farcinica and eradicated the bacterium intracellularly. DCs exposed to inactivated N. farcinica were activated, i.e., they developed a mature phenotype, downregulated their phagocytic capacity, and stimulated allogeneic T cells in mixed leukocyte reactions. Soluble factors were not involved in this process. To elucidate the potential adjuvant effect of N. farcinica on the induction of T-cell-mediated immune responses, we characterized the cytokines produced by nocardia-exposed DCs and detected substantial amounts of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-12 p40 (IL-12p40). However, nocardia-treated DCs secreted only small amounts of IL-12p70, which were significantly smaller than the amounts of IL-23. Thus, N. farcinica activates DCs, but adjuvants based on this bacterium may have only a limited capacity to induce Th1 immune responses. PMID:22988018

  11. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma leads to upregulation of ESE-3 expression in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Sprater, F; Azeem, W; Appel, S

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor ESE-3 has been suggested to be involved in regulating the immunogenicity of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). While ESE-3 is not expressed in monocytes, it is upregulated during the differentiation of monocytes into dendritic cells (DCs) and highly expressed in immunogenic DCs while downregulated in tolerogenic DCs. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) during DC development has been shown to result in a rather tolerogenic cell population. In this study, we identified eight PPAR-γ binding sites upstream of the ESE-3 gene. Activation of the PPAR-γ pathway with synthetic PPAR-γ ligands during moDC generation resulted in upregulation of ESE-3b expression on mRNA and protein level, phenotypic alterations and reduced capacity of the cells to stimulate allogeneic T cells. This could be inhibited by blocking the PPAR-γ pathway with specific antagonists. Our results suggest PPAR-γ to be involved in the regulation of ESE-3b expression during moDC development and that ESE-3 expression is not correlated with the immunogenicity of DCs. PMID:24219556

  12. Alarmin human α defensin HNP1 activates plasmacytoid dendritic cells by triggering NF-κB and IRF1 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Qiao, Linan; Lv, Xing; Trivett, Anna; Yang, Rui; Oppenheim, Joost J; Yang, De; Zhang, Ning

    2016-07-01

    Human neutrophil peptide 1 (HNP1), a predominant α defensin in the azurophilic granules of human neutrophils, is an alarmin capable of inducing the migration and maturation of human myeloid/conventional dendritic cells. However, it is not determined whether it can activate plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Herein, we found that both human pDCs and CAL-1 cells, a pDC-like cell line, produced IFNα upon treatment with HNP1. Additionally, HNP1 could promote CpG ODN-induced pDC production of proinflammatory cytokines including IFNα. HNP1 triggered activation of NF-κB and nuclear translocation of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) in CAL-1 cells. HNP1 upregulation of cytokine expression in pDCs was inhibited by blockade of NF-κB activation or knockdown of IRF1, demonstrating the importance of these two signaling events in HNP1-induced pDC activation. Using a human pDC-nude mouse model, HNP1 was shown to induce IFNα production by human pDCs in vivo. Thus, HNP1 can activate human pDCs using NF-κB and IRF signaling pathways, and HNP-induced IFN production may participate in the inflammatory pathogenesis in certain authoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27031443

  13. Low Thymic Activity and Dendritic Cell Numbers Are Associated with the Immune Response to Primary Viral Infection in Elderly Humans.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Axel Ronald; Mälzer, Julia Nora; Domingo, Cristina; Jürchott, Karsten; Grützkau, Andreas; Babel, Nina; Nienen, Mikalai; Jelinek, Tomas; Niedrig, Matthias; Thiel, Andreas

    2015-11-15

    Immunological competence declines progressively with age, resulting in increased susceptibility of the elderly to infection and impaired responses to vaccines. Underlying mechanisms remain largely obscure as they have been related to complex, individual systemic immune properties that are challenging to investigate. In this study, we explored age-related changes in human immunity during a primary virus infection experimentally induced by immunization with live-attenuated yellow fever (YF) vaccine. Applying detailed serology, advanced FACS analysis, and systems biology, we discovered that aged subjects developed fewer neutralizing Abs, mounted diminished YF-specific CD8(+) T cell responses, and showed quantitatively and qualitatively altered YF-specific CD4(+) T cell immunity. Among numerous immune signatures, low in vivo numbers of naive CD4(+) recent thymic emigrants and peripheral dendritic cells correlated well with reduced acute responsiveness and altered long-term persistence of human cellular immunity to YF vaccination. Hence, we reveal in this article that essential elements of immune responses such as recent thymic emigrants and dendritic cells strongly relate to productive immunity in the elderly, providing a conceivable explanation for diminished responsiveness to vaccination with neoantigens and infection with de novo pathogens in the aged population. PMID:26459351

  14. Manipulation of dendritic cell functions by human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, John

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the mammalian immune system and are central to the initiation and maintenance of the adaptive immune response. They are crucial for the presentation of antigen to T cells and B cells, as well as the induction of chemokines and proinflammatory cytokines, which orchestrate the balance of the cell-mediated (Th1) and antibody (Th2) response. This ability of dendritic cells to present antigen and release chemokines and cytokines also bridges the innate and adaptive immune responses by driving T cell activation. These cells thus possess key immunological functions that make them the front line of defence for the targeting and clearance of any invading pathogen and, as such, they underpin the host immune response to infection. For efficient infection, invading pathogens often need to overcome these sentinel immune functions. It is therefore not surprising that pathogens have evolved numerous mechanisms to target dendritic cell functions directly or indirectly during infection, and at least one herpesvirus--human cytomegalovirus--has evolved a life cycle that hijacks dendritic cells for its long-term persistence in the infected host. PMID:19025715

  15. The effect of stable macromolecular complexes of ionic polyphosphazene on HIV Gag antigen and on activation of human dendritic cells and presentation to T-cells.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christine D; Ninković, Jana; Prokopowicz, Zofia M; Mancuso, Christy J; Marin, Alexander; Andrianov, Alexander K; Dowling, David J; Levy, Ofer

    2014-10-01

    Neonates and infants are susceptible to infection due to distinct immune responses in early life. Therefore, development of vaccine formulation and delivery systems capable of activating human newborn leukocytes is of global health importance. Poly[di(carboxylatophenoxy)phosphazene] (PCPP) belongs to a family of ionic synthetic polyphosphazene polyelectrolyte compounds that can form non-covalent interactions with protein antigens and demonstrate adjuvant activity in animals and in human clinical trials. However, little is known about their ability to activate human immune cells. In this study, we characterized the effects of PCPP alone or in combination with a model antigen (recombinant HIV-Gag (Gag)), on the maturation, activation and antigen presentation by human adult and newborn dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro. PCPP treatment induced DC activation as assessed by upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokine production. Studies benchmarking PCPP to Alum, the most commonly used vaccine adjuvant, demonstrated that both triggered cell death and release of danger signals in adult and newborn DCs. When complexed with Gag antigen, PCPP maintained its immunostimulatory characteristics while permitting internalization and presentation of Gag by DCs to HIV-Gag-specific CD4(+) T cell clones. The PCPP vaccine formulation outlined here has intrinsic adjuvant activity, can facilitate effective delivery of antigen to DCs, and may be advantageous for induction of beneficial T cell-mediated immunity. Moreover, polyphosphazenes can further reduce cost of vaccine production and distribution through their dose-sparing and antigen-stabilizing properties, thus potentially eliminating the need for cold chain distribution. PMID:25023392

  16. Dendritic NMDA receptors activate axonal calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Jason M.; Jahr, Craig E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation can alter synaptic strength by regulating transmitter release from a variety of neurons in the CNS. As NMDARs are permeable to Ca2+ and monovalent cations, they could alter release directly by increasing presynaptic Ca2+ or indirectly by axonal depolarization sufficient to activate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs). Using two-photon microscopy to measure Ca2+ excursions, we found that somatic depolarization or focal activation of dendritic NMDARs elicited small Ca2+ transients in axon varicosities of cerebellar stellate cell interneurons. These axonal transients resulted from Ca2+ entry through VSCCs that were opened by the electrotonic spread of the NMDAR-mediated depolarization elicited in the dendrites. In contrast, we were unable to detect direct activation of NMDARs on axons indicating an exclusive somatodendritic expression of functional NMDARs. In cerebellar stellate cells, dendritic NMDAR activation masquerades as a presynaptic phenomenon and may influence Ca2+-dependent forms of presynaptic plasticity and release. PMID:18957221

  17. Random positions of dendritic spines in human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Morales, Juan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Dar, Mor; Fernaud, Isabel; Rodríguez, Angel; Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-07-23

    Dendritic spines establish most excitatory synapses in the brain and are located in Purkinje cell's dendrites along helical paths, perhaps maximizing the probability to contact different axons. To test whether spine helixes also occur in neocortex, we reconstructed >500 dendritic segments from adult human cortex obtained from autopsies. With Fourier analysis and spatial statistics, we analyzed spine position along apical and basal dendrites of layer 3 pyramidal neurons from frontal, temporal, and cingulate cortex. Although we occasionally detected helical positioning, for the great majority of dendrites we could not reject the null hypothesis of spatial randomness in spine locations, either in apical or basal dendrites, in neurons of different cortical areas or among spines of different volumes and lengths. We conclude that in adult human neocortex spine positions are mostly random. We discuss the relevance of these results for spine formation and plasticity and their functional impact for cortical circuits. PMID:25057209

  18. Random Positions of Dendritic Spines in Human Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Juan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Dar, Mor; Fernaud, Isabel; Rodríguez, Angel; Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines establish most excitatory synapses in the brain and are located in Purkinje cell's dendrites along helical paths, perhaps maximizing the probability to contact different axons. To test whether spine helixes also occur in neocortex, we reconstructed >500 dendritic segments from adult human cortex obtained from autopsies. With Fourier analysis and spatial statistics, we analyzed spine position along apical and basal dendrites of layer 3 pyramidal neurons from frontal, temporal, and cingulate cortex. Although we occasionally detected helical positioning, for the great majority of dendrites we could not reject the null hypothesis of spatial randomness in spine locations, either in apical or basal dendrites, in neurons of different cortical areas or among spines of different volumes and lengths. We conclude that in adult human neocortex spine positions are mostly random. We discuss the relevance of these results for spine formation and plasticity and their functional impact for cortical circuits. PMID:25057209

  19. The Attenuated Brucella abortus Strain 19 Invades, Persists in, and Activates Human Dendritic Cells, and Induces the Secretion of IL-12p70 but Not IL-23

    PubMed Central

    Weinhold, Mario; Eisenblätter, Martin; Jasny, Edith; Fehlings, Michael; Finke, Antje; Gayum, Hermine; Rüschendorf, Ursula; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Moos, Verena; Allers, Kristina; Schneider, Thomas; Schaible, Ulrich E.; Schumann, Ralf R.; Mielke, Martin E.; Ignatius, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial vectors have been proposed as novel vaccine strategies to induce strong cellular immunity. Attenuated strains of Brucella abortus comprise promising vector candidates since they have the potential to induce strong CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell mediated immune responses in the absence of excessive inflammation as observed with other Gram-negative bacteria. However, some Brucella strains interfere with the maturation of dendritic cells (DCs), which is essential for antigen-specific T-cell priming. In the present study, we investigated the interaction of human monocyte-derived DCs with the smooth attenuated B. abortus strain (S) 19, which has previously been employed successfully to vaccinate cattle. Methodology/Principal findings We first looked into the potential of S19 to hamper the cytokine-induced maturation of DCs; however, infected cells expressed CD25, CD40, CD80, and CD86 to a comparable extent as uninfected, cytokine-matured DCs. Furthermore, S19 activated DCs in the absence of exogeneous stimuli, enhanced the expression of HLA-ABC and HLA-DR, and was able to persist intracellularly without causing cytotoxicity. Thus, DCs provide a cellular niche for persisting brucellae in vivo as a permanent source of antigen. S19-infected DCs produced IL-12/23p40, IL-12p70, and IL-10, but not IL-23. While heat-killed bacteria also activated DCs, soluble mediators were not involved in S19-induced activation of human DCs. HEK 293 transfectants revealed cellular activation by S19 primarily through engagement of Toll-like receptor (TLR)2. Conclusions/Significance Thus, as an immunological prerequisite for vaccine efficacy, B. abortus S19 potently infects and potently activates (most likely via TLR2) human DCs to produce Th1-promoting cytokines. PMID:23805193

  20. Measles Virus Induces Functional TRAIL Production by Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Azocar, Olga; Lamouille, Barbara; Astier, Anne; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Servet-Delprat, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Measles virus infection induces a profound immunosuppression that can lead to serious secondary infections. Here we demonstrate that measles virus induces tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) mRNA and protein expression in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Moreover, measles virus-infected dendritic cells are shown to be cytotoxic via the TRAIL pathway. PMID:10590149

  1. IL-6 down-regulates HLA class II expression and IL-12 production of human dendritic cells to impair activation of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yosuke; Kitamura, Hidemitsu; Takahashi, Norihiko; Ohtake, Junya; Kaneumi, Shun; Sumida, Kentaro; Homma, Shigenori; Kawamura, Hideki; Minagawa, Nozomi; Shibasaki, Susumu; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-02-01

    Immunosuppression in tumor microenvironments critically affects the success of cancer immunotherapy. Here, we focused on the role of interleukin (IL)-6/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3) signaling cascade in immune regulation by human dendritic cells (DCs). IL-6-conditioned monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) impaired the presenting ability of cancer-related antigens. Interferon (IFN)-γ production attenuated by CD4(+) T cells co-cultured with IL-6-conditioned MoDCs corresponded with decreased DC IL-12p70 production. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR and CD86 expression was significantly reduced in CD11b(+)CD11c(+) cells obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of healthy donors by IL-6 treatment and was STAT3 dependent. Arginase-1 (ARG1), lysosomal protease, cathepsin L (CTSL), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) were involved in the reduction of surface HLA-DR expression. Gene expressions of ARG1, CTSL, COX2, and IL6 were higher in tumor-infiltrating CD11b(+)CD11c(+) cells compared with PBMCs isolated from colorectal cancer patients. Expression of surface HLA-DR and CD86 on CD11b(+)CD11c(+) cells was down-regulated, and T cell-stimulating ability was attenuated compared with PBMCs, suggesting that an immunosuppressive phenotype might be induced by IL-6, ARG1, CTSL, and COX2 in tumor sites of colorectal cancer patients. There was a relationship between HLA-DR expression levels in tumor tissues and the size of CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cell compartments. Our findings indicate that IL-6 causes a dysfunction in human DCs that activates cancer antigen-specific Th cells, suggesting that blocking the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway might be a promising strategy to improve cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26759006

  2. Dextromethorphan inhibits activations and functions in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Song, Pei-Shan; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Chu, Ching-Liang; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Lin, Sheng-Hao; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, DCs have been regarded as a major target for the development of immunomodulators. In this study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan (DXM), a common cough suppressant with a high safety profile, on the activation and function of DCs. In the presence of DXM, the LPS-induced expression of the costimulatory molecules in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was significantly suppressed. In addition, DXM treatment reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in maturing BMDCs that were activated by LPS. Therefore, DXM abrogated the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce Ag-specific T-cell activation, as determined by their decreased proliferation and IFN- γ secretion in mixed leukocyte cultures. Moreover, the inhibition of LPS-induced MAPK activation and NF- κ B translocation may contribute to the suppressive effect of DXM on BMDCs. Remarkably, DXM decreased the LPS-induced surface expression of CD80, CD83, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). These findings provide a new insight into the impact of DXM treatment on DCs and suggest that DXM has the potential to be used in treating DC-related acute and chronic diseases. PMID:23781253

  3. Dextromethorphan Inhibits Activations and Functions in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Song, Pei-Shan; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Chu, Ching-Liang; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Lin, Sheng-Hao; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, DCs have been regarded as a major target for the development of immunomodulators. In this study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan (DXM), a common cough suppressant with a high safety profile, on the activation and function of DCs. In the presence of DXM, the LPS-induced expression of the costimulatory molecules in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was significantly suppressed. In addition, DXM treatment reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in maturing BMDCs that were activated by LPS. Therefore, DXM abrogated the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce Ag-specific T-cell activation, as determined by their decreased proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in mixed leukocyte cultures. Moreover, the inhibition of LPS-induced MAPK activation and NF-κB translocation may contribute to the suppressive effect of DXM on BMDCs. Remarkably, DXM decreased the LPS-induced surface expression of CD80, CD83, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). These findings provide a new insight into the impact of DXM treatment on DCs and suggest that DXM has the potential to be used in treating DC-related acute and chronic diseases. PMID:23781253

  4. Bacillus anthracis capsule activates caspase-1 and induces interleukin-1beta release from differentiated THP-1 and human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min-Hee; Ahn, Hae-Jeong; Ha, Hyun-Joon; Park, Jungchan; Chun, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Bong-Su; Oh, Hee-Bok; Rhie, Gi-Eun

    2010-01-01

    The poly-gamma-d-glutamic acid (PGA) capsule is one of the major virulence factors of Bacillus anthracis, which causes a highly lethal infection. The antiphagocytic PGA capsule disguises the bacilli from immune surveillance and allows unimpeded growth of bacilli in the host. Recently, efforts have been made to include PGA as a component of anthrax vaccine; however, the innate immune response of PGA itself has been poorly investigated. In this study, we characterized the innate immune response elicited by PGA in the human monocytic cell line THP-1, which was differentiated into macrophages with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (hMoDCs). PGA capsules were isolated from the culture supernatant of either the pXO1-cured strain of B. anthracis H9401 or B. licheniformis ATCC 9945a. PGA treatment of differentiated THP-1 cells and hMoDCs led to the specific extracellular release of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) in a dose-dependent manner. Evaluation of IL-1beta processing by Western blotting revealed that cleaved IL-1beta increased in THP-1 cells and hMoDCs after PGA treatment. Enhanced processing of IL-1beta directly correlated with increased activation of its upstream regulator, caspase-1, also known as IL-1beta-converting enzyme (ICE). The extracellular release of IL-1beta in response to PGA was ICE dependent, since the administration of an ICE inhibitor prior to PGA treatment blocked induction of IL-1beta. These results demonstrate that B. anthracis PGA elicits IL-1beta production through activation of ICE in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells and hMoDCs, suggesting the potential for PGA as a therapeutic target for anthrax. PMID:19737897

  5. Exogenous Thyropin from p41 Invariant Chain Diminishes Cysteine Protease Activity and Affects IL-12 Secretion during Maturation of Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zavašnik-Bergant, Tina; Bergant Marušič, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal role as antigen presenting cells (APC) and their maturation is crucial for effectively eliciting an antigen-specific immune response. The p41 splice variant of MHC class II-associated chaperone, called invariant chain p41 Ii, contains an amino acid sequence, the p41 fragment, which is a thyropin-type inhibitor of proteolytic enzymes. The effects of exogenous p41 fragment and related thyropin inhibitors acting on human immune cells have not been reported yet. In this study we demonstrate that exogenous p41 fragment can enter the endocytic pathway of targeted human immature DC. Internalized p41 fragment has contributed to the total amount of the immunogold labelled p41 Ii-specific epitope, as quantified by transmission electron microscopy, in particular in late endocytic compartments with multivesicular morphology where antigen processing and binding to MHC II take place. In cell lysates of treated immature DC, diminished enzymatic activity of cysteine proteases has been confirmed. Internalized exogenous p41 fragment did not affect the perinuclear clustering of acidic cathepsin S-positive vesicles typical of mature DC. p41 fragment is shown to interfere with the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 subunit in LPS-stimulated DC. p41 fragment is also shown to reduce the secretion of interleukin-12 (IL-12/p70) during the subsequent maturation of treated DC. The inhibition of proteolytic activity of lysosomal cysteine proteases in immature DC and the diminished capability of DC to produce IL-12 upon their subsequent maturation support the immunomodulatory potential of the examined thyropin from p41 Ii. PMID:26960148

  6. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Activation and IFN-α Production Are Prominent Features of Murine Autoimmune Pancreatitis and Human IgG4-Related Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Kouhei; Kuriyama, Katsutoshi; Shiokawa, Masahiro; Kodama, Yuzo; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Mizugishi, Kiyomi; Uchida, Kazushige; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Kudo, Masatoshi; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Strober, Warren; Chiba, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Tomohiro

    2015-10-01

    The abnormal immune response accompanying IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is presently unclear. In this study, we examined the role of plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) activation and IFN-α production in this disease as well as in a murine model of AIP (MRL/Mp mice treated with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid). We found that the development of AIP in treated MRL/Mp mice occurred in parallel with pancreatic accumulation of pDCs producing IFN-α, and with pDC depletion and IFN-α-blocking studies, we showed that such accumulation was necessary for AIP induction. In addition, we found that the pancreas of treated MRL/Mp mice contained neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) shown previously to stimulate pDCs to produce IFN-α. Consistent with these findings, we found that patients with IgG4-related AIP also exhibited pancreatic tissue localization of IFN-α-expressing pDCs and had significantly higher serum IFN-α levels than healthy controls. In addition, the inflamed pancreas of these patients but not controls also contained NETs that were shown to be capable of pDC activation. More importantly, patient pDCs cultured in the presence of NETs produced greatly increased levels of IFN-α and induced control B cells to produce IgG4 (but not IgG1) as compared with control pDCs. These data suggest that pDC activation and production of IFN-α is a major cause of murine AIP; in addition, the increased pDC production of IFN-α and its relation to IgG4 production observed in IgG4-related AIP suggest that this mechanism also plays a role in the human disease. PMID:26297761

  7. Interleukin-1 and Interferon-γ Orchestrate β-Glucan-Activated Human Dendritic Cell Programming via IκB-ζ Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Cardone, Marco; Dzutsev, Amiran K.; Li, Hongchuan; Riteau, Nicolas; Gerosa, Franca; Shenderov, Kevin; Winkler-Pickett, Robin; Provezza, Lisa; Riboldi, Elena; Leighty, Robert M.; Orr, Selinda J.; Steinhagen, Folkert; Wewers, Mark D.; Sher, Alan; Anderson, Stephen K.; Goldszmid, Romina; McVicar, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of microbial components via innate receptors including the C-type lectin receptor Dectin-1, together with the inflammatory environment, programs dendritic cells (DCs) to orchestrate the magnitude and type of adaptive immune responses. The exposure to β-glucan, a known Dectin-1 agonist and component of fungi, yeasts, and certain immune support supplements, activates DCs to induce T helper (Th)17 cells that are essential against fungal pathogens and extracellular bacteria but may trigger inflammatory pathology or autoimmune diseases. However, the exact mechanisms of DC programming by β-glucan have not yet been fully elucidated. Using a gene expression/perturbation approach, we demonstrate that in human DCs β-glucan transcriptionally activates via an interleukin (IL)-1- and inflammasome-mediated positive feedback late-induced genes that bridge innate and adaptive immunity. We report that in addition to its known ability to directly prime T cells toward the Th17 lineage, IL-1 by promoting the transcriptional cofactor inhibitor of κB-ζ (IκB-ζ) also programs β-glucan-exposed DCs to express cell adhesion and migration mediators, antimicrobial molecules, and Th17-polarizing factors. Interferon (IFN)-γ interferes with the IL-1/IκB-ζ axis in β-glucan-activated DCs and promotes T cell-mediated immune responses with increased release of IFN-γ and IL-22, and diminished production of IL-17. Thus, our results identify IL-1 and IFN-γ as regulators of DC programming by β-glucan. These molecular networks provide new insights into the regulation of the Th17 response as well as new targets for the modulation of immune responses to β-glucan-containing microorganisms. PMID:25474109

  8. Exposure to Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Impairs the Differentiation of Human Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells and their Capacity for T cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Castaneda, Julie T.; Kiertscher, Sylvia M.

    2015-01-01

    The capacity for human monocytes to differentiate into antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DC) can be influenced by a number of immune modulating signals. Monocytes express intracellular cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) receptors and we demonstrate that exposure to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) inhibits the forskolin-induced generation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate in a CB2-specific manner. In order to examine the potential impact of cannabinoids on the generation of monocyte-derived DC, monocytes were cultured in vitro with differentiation medium alone [containing granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and Interleukin-4 (IL-4)] or in combination with THC. The presence of THC (0.25–1.0 μg/ml) altered key features of DC differentiation, producing a concentration-dependent decrease in surface expression of CD11c, HLA-DR and costimulatory molecules (CD40 and CD86), less effective antigen uptake, and signs of functional skewing with decreased production of IL-12 but normal levels of IL-10. When examined in a mixed leukocyte reaction, DC that had been generated in the presence of THC were poor T cell activators as evidenced by their inability to generate effector/memory T cells or to stimulate robust IFN-γ responses. Some of these effects were partially restored by exposure to exogenous IL-7 and bacterial superantigen (S. aureus Cowans strain). These studies demonstrate that human monocytes express functional cannabinoid receptors and suggest that exposure to THC can alter their differentiation into functional antigen presenting cells; an effect that may be counter-balanced by the presence of other immunoregulatory factors. The impact of cannabinoids on adaptive immune responses in individuals with frequent drug exposure remains to be determined. PMID:25614186

  9. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  10. Dendritic Cell Activity Driven by Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Producing Human IL-18, in Healthy BCG Vaccinated Adults

    PubMed Central

    Szpakowski, Piotr; Biet, Franck; Locht, Camille; Paszkiewicz, Małgorzata; Rudnicka, Wiesława; Druszczyńska, Magdalena; Allain, Fabrice; Fol, Marek; Pestel, Joël; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains an enormous global burden, despite wide vaccination coverage with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the only vaccine available against this disease, indicating that BCG-driven immunity is insufficient to protect the human population against tuberculosis. In this study we constructed recombinant BCG producing human IL-18 (rBCGhIL-18) and investigated whether human IL-18 produced by rBCGhIL-18 modulates DC functions and enhances Th1 responses to mycobacterial antigens in humans. We found that the costimulatory CD86 and CD80 molecules were significantly upregulated on rBCGhIL-18-infected DCs, whereas the stimulation of DCs with nonrecombinant BCG was less effective. In contrast, both BCG strains decreased the DC-SIGN expression on human DCs. The rBCGhIL-18 increased IL-23, IL-10, and IP-10 production by DCs to a greater extent than nonrecombinant BCG. In a coculture system of CD4+ T cells and loaded DCs, rBCGhIL-18 favoured strong IFN-γ but also IL-10 production by naive T cells but not by memory T cells. This was much less the case for nonrecombinant BCG. Thus the expression of IL-18 by recombinant BCG increases IL-23, IP-10, and IL-10 expression by human DCs and enhances their ability to induce IFN-γ and IL-10 expression by naive T cells, without affecting the maturation phenotype of the DCs. PMID:26339658

  11. Infection of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells by ANDES Hantavirus enhances pro-inflammatory state, the secretion of active MMP-9 and indirectly enhances endothelial permeability

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Andes virus (ANDV), a rodent-borne Hantavirus, is the major etiological agent of Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in South America, which is mainly characterized by a vascular leakage with high rate of fatal outcomes for infected patients. Currently, neither specific therapy nor vaccines are available against this pathogen. ANDV infects both dendritic and epithelial cells, but in despite that the severity of the disease directly correlates with the viral RNA load, considerable evidence suggests that immune mechanisms rather than direct viral cytopathology are responsible for plasma leakage in HCPS. Here, we assessed the possible effect of soluble factors, induced in viral-activated DCs, on endothelial permeability. Activated immune cells, including DC, secrete gelatinolytic matrix metalloproteases (gMMP-2 and -9) that modulate the vascular permeability for their trafficking. Methods A clinical ANDES isolate was used to infect DC derived from primary PBMC. Maturation and pro-inflammatory phenotypes of ANDES-infected DC were assessed by studying the expression of receptors, cytokines and active gMMP-9, as well as some of their functional status. The ANDES-infected DC supernatants were assessed for their capacity to enhance a monolayer endothelial permeability using primary human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). Results Here, we show that in vitro primary DCs infected by a clinical isolate of ANDV shed virus RNA and proteins, suggesting a competent viral replication in these cells. Moreover, this infection induces an enhanced expression of soluble pro-inflammatory factors, including TNF-α and the active gMMP-9, as well as a decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10 and TGF-β. These viral activated cells are less sensitive to apoptosis. Moreover, supernatants from ANDV-infected DCs were able to indirectly enhance the permeability of a monolayer of primary HUVEC. Conclusions Primary human DCs, that are primarily

  12. Human dendritic cell DC-SIGN and TLR-2 mediate complementary immune regulatory activities in response to Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1.

    PubMed

    Konieczna, Patrycja; Schiavi, Elisa; Ziegler, Mario; Groeger, David; Healy, Selena; Grant, Ray; O'Mahony, Liam

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota is required for optimal host development and ongoing immune homeostasis. Lactobacilli are common inhabitants of the mammalian large intestine and immunoregulatory effects have been described for certain, but not all, strains. The mechanisms underpinning these protective effects are beginning to be elucidated. One such protective organism is Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1 (Lb. rhamnosus JB-1). Lb. murinus has no such anti-inflammatory protective effects and was used as a comparator organism. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) were co-incubated with bacteria and analysed over time for bacterial adhesion and intracellular processing, costimulatory molecule expression, cytokine secretion and induction of lymphocyte polarization. Neutralising antibodies were utilized to identify the responsible MDDC receptors. Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 adhered to MDDCs, but internalization and intracellular processing was significantly delayed, compared to Lb. murinus which was rapidly internalized and processed. Lb. murinus induced CD80 and CD86 expression, accompanied by high levels of cytokine secretion, while Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 was a poor inducer of costimulatory molecule expression and cytokine secretion. Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 primed MDDCs induced Foxp3 expression in autologous lymphocytes, while Lb. murinus primed MDDCs induced Foxp3, T-bet and Ror-γt expression. DC-SIGN was required for Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 adhesion and influenced IL-12 secretion, while TLR-2 influenced IL-10 and IL-12 secretion. Here we demonstrate that the delayed kinetics of bacterial processing by MDDCs correlates with MDDC activation and stimulation of lymphocytes. Thus, inhibition or delay of intracellular processing may be a novel strategy by which certain commensals may avoid the induction of proinflammatory responses. PMID:25816321

  13. Enterovirus-71 Virus-Like Particles Induce the Activation and Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells through TLR4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Li; Hu, Yu-Chen; Liang, Cheng-Chao; Lin, Shih-Yeh; Liang, Yu-Chih; Yuan, Hui-Ping; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes seasonal epidemics of hand-foot-and-mouth disease and has a high mortality rate among young children. We recently demonstrated potent induction of the humoral and cell-mediated immune response in monkeys immunized with EV71 virus-like particles (VLPs), with a morphology resembling that of infectious EV71 virions but not containing a viral genome, which could potentially be safe as a vaccine for EV71. To elucidate the mechanisms through which EV71 VLPs induce cell-mediated immunity, we studied the immunomodulatory effects of EV71 VLPs on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), which bind to and incorporate EV71 VLPs. DC treatment with EV71 VLPs enhanced the expression of CD80, CD86, CD83, CD40, CD54, and HLA-DR on the cell surface; increased the production of interleukin (IL)-12 p40, IL-12 p70, and IL-10 by DCs; and suppressed the capacity of DCs for endocytosis. Treatment with EV71 VLPs also enhanced the ability of DCs to stimulate naïve T cells and induced secretion of interferon (IFN)-γ by T cells and Th1 cell responses. Neutralization with antibodies against Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 suppressed the capacity of EV71 VLPs to induce the production of IL-12 p40, IL-12 p70, and IL-10 by DCs and inhibited EV71 VLPs binding to DCs. Our study findings clarified the important role for TLR4 signaling in DCs in response to EV71 VLPs and showed that EV71 VLPs induced inhibitor of kappaB alpha (IκBα) degradation and nuclear factor of kappaB (NF-κB) activation. PMID:25360749

  14. Human Dendritic Cell DC-SIGN and TLR-2 Mediate Complementary Immune Regulatory Activities in Response to Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1

    PubMed Central

    Konieczna, Patrycja; Schiavi, Elisa; Ziegler, Mario; Groeger, David; Healy, Selena; Grant, Ray; O’Mahony, Liam

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota is required for optimal host development and ongoing immune homeostasis. Lactobacilli are common inhabitants of the mammalian large intestine and immunoregulatory effects have been described for certain, but not all, strains. The mechanisms underpinning these protective effects are beginning to be elucidated. One such protective organism is Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1 (Lb. rhamnosus JB-1). Lb. murinus has no such anti-inflammatory protective effects and was used as a comparator organism. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) were co-incubated with bacteria and analysed over time for bacterial adhesion and intracellular processing, costimulatory molecule expression, cytokine secretion and induction of lymphocyte polarization. Neutralising antibodies were utilized to identify the responsible MDDC receptors. Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 adhered to MDDCs, but internalization and intracellular processing was significantly delayed, compared to Lb. murinus which was rapidly internalized and processed. Lb. murinus induced CD80 and CD86 expression, accompanied by high levels of cytokine secretion, while Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 was a poor inducer of costimulatory molecule expression and cytokine secretion. Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 primed MDDCs induced Foxp3 expression in autologous lymphocytes, while Lb. murinus primed MDDCs induced Foxp3, T-bet and Ror-γt expression. DC-SIGN was required for Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 adhesion and influenced IL-12 secretion, while TLR-2 influenced IL-10 and IL-12 secretion. Here we demonstrate that the delayed kinetics of bacterial processing by MDDCs correlates with MDDC activation and stimulation of lymphocytes. Thus, inhibition or delay of intracellular processing may be a novel strategy by which certain commensals may avoid the induction of proinflammatory responses. PMID:25816321

  15. Resident and “inflammatory” dendritic cells in human skin

    PubMed Central

    Zaba, Lisa C.; Krueger, James G; Lowes, Michelle A.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a heterogeneous group of antigen-presenting leukocytes that play an important role in activation of both the innate and acquired arms of the immune system. While there are several different DC populations in the body, DCs are globally defined by their capacity for potent antigen presentation and naive T cell activation. In non-inflamed human skin during steady-state, there are three main cutaneous DC populations: epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs), dermal myeloid DCs, and dermal plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). In psoriasis, a model for cutaneous inflammation, there is an additional population of myeloid dermal DCs – “inflammatory DCs” – which appear to be critical for disease pathogenesis. PMID:18685620

  16. A strategy of tumor treatment in mice with doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide combination based on dendritic cell activation by human double-stranded DNA preparation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Immunization of mice with tumor homogenate after combined treatment with cyclophosphamide (CP) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) preparation is effective at inhibition of growth of tumor challenged after the treatment. It was assumed that this inhibition might be due to activation of the antigen-presenting cells. The purpose was to develop improved antitumor strategy using mice. We studied the combined action of cytostatics doxorubicin (Dox) plus CP with subsequent dsDNA preparation on tumor growth. Methods Three-month old CBA/Lac mice were used in the experiments. Mice were injected with CP and human dsDNA preparation. The percentage of mature dendritic cells (DCs) was estimated by staining of mononuclear cells isolated from spleen and bone marrow 3, 6, and 9 days later with monoclonal antibodies CD34, CD80, and CD86. In the next set of experiments, mice were given intramuscularly injections of 1-3 × 105 tumor cells. Four days later, they were injected intravenously with 6-6.7 mg/kg Dox and intraperitoneally with 100-200 mg/kg CP; 200 mkg human DNA was injected intraperitoneally after CP administration. Differences in tumor size between groups were analyzed for statistical significance by Student's t-test. The MTT-test was done to determine the cytotoxic index of mouse leucocytes from treated groups. Results The conducted experiments showed that combined treatment with CP and dsDNA preparation produce an increase in the total amount of mature DCs in vivo. Treatment of tumor bearers with preparation of fragmented dsDNA on the background of pretreatment with Dox plus CP demonstrated a strong suppression of tumor growth in two models. RLS, a weakly immunogenic, resistant to alkalyting cytostatics tumor, grew 3.4-fold slower when compared with the control (p < 0.001). In experiment with Krebs-2 tumor, only 2 of the 10 mice in the Dox+CP+DNA group had a palpable tumor on day 16. The cytotoxic index of leucocytes was 86.5% in the Dox+CP+DNA group, but it was 0

  17. Gallic Acid Is the Major Active Component of Cortex Moutan in Inhibiting Immune Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ben Chung Lap; Li, Long Fei; Hu, Shui Qing; Wat, Elaine; Wong, Eric Chun Wai; Zhang, Vanilla Xin; Lau, Clara Bik San; Wong, Chun Kwok; Hon, Kam Lun Ellis; Hui, Patrick Chi Leung; Leung, Ping Chung

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a widely prevalent and chronically relapsing inflammatory skin disease. Penta Herbs Formula (PHF) is efficacious in improving the quality of life and reducing topical corticosteroid used in children with AD and one of the active herbs it contains is Cortex Moutan. Recent studies showed that altered functions of dendritic cells (DC) were observed in atopic individuals, suggesting that DC might play a major role in the generation and maintenance of inflammation by their production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Hence, the aims of the present study were to identify the major active component(s) of Cortex Moutan, which might inhibit DC functions and to investigate their possible interactions with conventional corticosteroid on inhibiting the development of DC from monocytes. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC) culture model coupled with the high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC), high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LCMS) analyses were used. Gallic acid was the major active component from Cortex Moutan which could dose dependently inhibit interleukin (IL)-12 p40 and the functional cluster of differentiation (CD) surface markers CD40, CD80, CD83 and CD86 expression from cytokine cocktail-activated moDC. Gallic acid could also lower the concentration of hydrocortisone required to inhibit the activation of DC. PMID:26378505

  18. Replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in primary dendritic cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Langhoff, E; Terwilliger, E F; Bos, H J; Kalland, K H; Poznansky, M C; Bacon, O M; Haseltine, W A

    1991-01-01

    The ability of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to replicate in primary blood dendritic cells was investigated. Dendritic cells compose less than 1% of the circulating leukocytes and are nondividing cells. Highly purified preparations of dendritic cells were obtained using recent advances in cell fractionation. The results of these experiments show that dendritic cells, in contrast to monocytes and T cells, support the active replication of all strains of HIV-1 tested, including T-cell tropic and monocyte/macrophage tropic isolates. The dendritic cell cultures supported much more virus production than did cultures of primary unseparated T cells, CD4+ T cells, and adherent as well as nonadherent monocytes. Replication of HIV-1 in dendritic cells produces no noticeable cytopathic effect nor does it decrease total cell number. The ability of the nonreplicating dendritic cells to support high levels of replication of HIV-1 suggests that this antigen-presenting cell population, which is also capable of supporting clonal T-cell growth, may play a central role in HIV pathogenesis, serving as a source of continued infection of CD4+ T cells and as a reservoir of virus infection. Images PMID:1910172

  19. Bordetella pertussis Commits Human Dendritic Cells to Promote a Th1/Th17 Response through the Activity of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin and MAPK-Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Palazzo, Raffaella; Nasso, Maria; Cheung, Gordon Yiu Chong; Coote, John Graham; Ausiello, Clara Maria

    2010-01-01

    The complex pathology of B. pertussis infection is due to multiple virulence factors having disparate effects on different cell types. We focused our investigation on the ability of B. pertussis to modulate host immunity, in particular on the role played by adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA), an important virulence factor of B. pertussis. As a tool, we used human monocyte derived dendritic cells (MDDC), an ex vivo model useful for the evaluation of the regulatory potential of DC on T cell immune responses. The work compared MDDC functions after encounter with wild-type B. pertussis (BpWT) or a mutant lacking CyaA (BpCyaA−), or the BpCyaA− strain supplemented with either the fully functional CyaA or a derivative, CyaA*, lacking adenylate cyclase activity. As a first step, MDDC maturation, cytokine production, and modulation of T helper cell polarization were evaluated. As a second step, engagement of Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and TLR4 by B. pertussis and the signaling events connected to this were analyzed. These approaches allowed us to demonstrate that CyaA expressed by B. pertussis strongly interferes with DC functions, by reducing the expression of phenotypic markers and immunomodulatory cytokines, and blocking IL-12p70 production. B. pertussis-treated MDDC promoted a mixed Th1/Th17 polarization, and the activity of CyaA altered the Th1/Th17 balance, enhancing Th17 and limiting Th1 expansion. We also demonstrated that Th1 effectors are induced by B. pertussis-MDDC in the absence of IL-12p70 through an ERK1/2 dependent mechanism, and that p38 MAPK is essential for MDDC-driven Th17 expansion. The data suggest that CyaA mediates an escape strategy for the bacterium, since it reduces Th1 immunity and increases Th17 responses thought to be responsible, when the response is exacerbated, for enhanced lung inflammation and injury. PMID:20090944

  20. DOWN-REGULATION OF SIGNAL TRANSDUCER AND ACTIVATOR OF TRANSCRIPTION 3 IMPROVES HUMAN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA-DERIVED DENDRITIC CELL FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Michael T.; Miller, Austin; Sait, Sheila N.; Ford, Laurie A.; Minderman, Hans; Wang, Eunice S.; Lee, Kelvin P.; Baumann, Heinz; Wetzler, Meir

    2013-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 inhibits dendritic cell (DC) differentiation and is constitutively activated in blasts of approximately half of AML patients. We investigated the correlation between STAT3 activity, DC maturation and the ability to stimulate T-cells in primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-derived DCs. STAT3 knock-down by shRNAmir increased the ability of AML-DCs to stimulate T-cells. Treatment of AML-DC with arsenic trioxide, but not AG490, JSI-124 or NSC-74859, led to a more mature phenotype and enhanced T-cell stimulation, while having minimal effect on normal DC. We conclude that AML-DCs have improved immunogenicity after reducing STAT3. PMID:23628554

  1. Dengue Virus Activates Membrane TRAIL Relocalization and IFN-α Production by Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gandini, Mariana; Gras, Christophe; Azeredo, Elzinandes Leal; Pinto, Luzia Maria de Oliveira; Smith, Nikaïa; Despres, Philippe; da Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio; de Souza, Luiz José

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue displays a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations that may vary from asymptomatic to severe and even fatal features. Plasma leakage/hemorrhages can be caused by a cytokine storm induced by monocytes and dendritic cells during dengue virus (DENV) replication. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are innate immune cells and in response to virus exposure secrete IFN-α and express membrane TRAIL (mTRAIL). We aimed to characterize pDC activation in dengue patients and their function under DENV-2 stimulation in vitro. Methods & Findings Flow cytometry analysis (FCA) revealed that pDCs of mild dengue patients exhibit significantly higher frequencies of mTRAIL compared to severe cases or healthy controls. Plasma levels of IFN-α and soluble TRAIL are increased in mild compared to severe dengue patients, positively correlating with pDC activation. FCA experiments showed that in vitro exposure to DENV-2 induced mTRAIL expression on pDC. Furthermore, three dimension microscopy highlighted that TRAIL was relocalized from intracellular compartment to plasma membrane. Chloroquine treatment inhibited DENV-2-induced mTRAIL relocalization and IFN-α production by pDC. Endosomal viral degradation blockade by chloroquine allowed viral antigens detection inside pDCs. All those data are in favor of endocytosis pathway activation by DENV-2 in pDC. Coculture of pDC/DENV-2-infected monocytes revealed a dramatic decrease of antigen detection by FCA. This viral antigens reduction in monocytes was also observed after exogenous IFN-α treatment. Thus, pDC effect on viral load reduction was mainly dependent on IFN-α production Conclusions This investigation characterizes, during DENV-2 infection, activation of pDCs in vivo and their antiviral role in vitro. Thus, we propose TRAIL-expressing pDCs may have an important role in the outcome of disease. PMID:23755314

  2. Ion efflux and influenza infection trigger NLRP3 inflammasome signaling in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Melissa Victoria; Miller, Elizabeth; Krammer, Florian; Gopal, Ramya; Greenbaum, Benjamin D; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2016-05-01

    The nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor protein 3 inflammasome, a multiprotein complex, is an essential intracellular mediator of antiviral immunity. In murine dendritic cells, this complex responds to a wide array of signals, including ion efflux and influenza A virus infection, to activate caspase-1-mediated proteolysis of IL-1β and IL-18 into biologically active cytokines. However, the presence and function of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor protein 3 inflammasome in human dendritic cells, in response to various triggers, including viral infection, has not been defined clearly. Here, we delineate the contribution of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor protein 3 inflammasome to the secretion of IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-1α by human dendritic cells (monocyte-derived and primary conventional dendritic cells). Activation of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor protein 3 inflammasome in human dendritic cells by various synthetic activators resulted in the secretion of bioactive IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-1α and induction of pyroptotic cell death. Cellular IL-1β release depended on potassium efflux and the activity of proteins nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor protein 3 and caspase-1. Likewise, influenza A virus infection of dendritic cells resulted in priming and activation of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor protein 3 inflammasome and secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 in an M2- and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor protein 3-dependent manner. The magnitude of priming by influenza A virus varied among different strains and inversely corresponded to type I IFN production. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the existence and function of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor protein 3 inflammasome in human dendritic cells and the ability of influenza A virus to prime and

  3. Somato-dendritic Synaptic Plasticity and Error-backpropagation in Active Dendrites.

    PubMed

    Schiess, Mathieu; Urbanczik, Robert; Senn, Walter

    2016-02-01

    In the last decade dendrites of cortical neurons have been shown to nonlinearly combine synaptic inputs by evoking local dendritic spikes. It has been suggested that these nonlinearities raise the computational power of a single neuron, making it comparable to a 2-layer network of point neurons. But how these nonlinearities can be incorporated into the synaptic plasticity to optimally support learning remains unclear. We present a theoretically derived synaptic plasticity rule for supervised and reinforcement learning that depends on the timing of the presynaptic, the dendritic and the postsynaptic spikes. For supervised learning, the rule can be seen as a biological version of the classical error-backpropagation algorithm applied to the dendritic case. When modulated by a delayed reward signal, the same plasticity is shown to maximize the expected reward in reinforcement learning for various coding scenarios. Our framework makes specific experimental predictions and highlights the unique advantage of active dendrites for implementing powerful synaptic plasticity rules that have access to downstream information via backpropagation of action potentials. PMID:26841235

  4. Somato-dendritic Synaptic Plasticity and Error-backpropagation in Active Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Schiess, Mathieu; Urbanczik, Robert; Senn, Walter

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade dendrites of cortical neurons have been shown to nonlinearly combine synaptic inputs by evoking local dendritic spikes. It has been suggested that these nonlinearities raise the computational power of a single neuron, making it comparable to a 2-layer network of point neurons. But how these nonlinearities can be incorporated into the synaptic plasticity to optimally support learning remains unclear. We present a theoretically derived synaptic plasticity rule for supervised and reinforcement learning that depends on the timing of the presynaptic, the dendritic and the postsynaptic spikes. For supervised learning, the rule can be seen as a biological version of the classical error-backpropagation algorithm applied to the dendritic case. When modulated by a delayed reward signal, the same plasticity is shown to maximize the expected reward in reinforcement learning for various coding scenarios. Our framework makes specific experimental predictions and highlights the unique advantage of active dendrites for implementing powerful synaptic plasticity rules that have access to downstream information via backpropagation of action potentials. PMID:26841235

  5. Strategies to reduce dendritic cell activation through functional biomaterial design

    PubMed Central

    Hume, Patrick S.; He, Jing; Haskins, Kathryn; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells play a key role in determining adaptive immunity, and there is growing interest in characterizing and manipulating the interactions between dendritic cells and biomaterial surfaces. Contact with several common biomaterials can induce the maturation of immature dendritic cells, but substrates that reduce dendritic cell maturation are of particular interest within the field of cell-based therapeutics where the goal is to reduce the immune response to cell-laden material carriers. In this study, we use a materials-based strategy to functionalize poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with immobilized immunosuppressive factors (TGF-β1 and IL-10) to reduce the maturation of immature dendritic cells. TGF-β1 and IL-10 are commonly employed as soluble factors to program dendritic cells in vitro, and we demonstrate that these proteins retain bioactivity towards dendritic cells when immobilized on hydrogel surfaces. Following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or cytokines, a dendritic cell line interacting with the surfaces of immunosuppressive hydrogels expressed reduced markers of maturation, including IL-12 and MHCII. The bioactivity of these immunomodulatory hydrogels was further confirmed with primary bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDCs) isolated from non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, as quantified by a decrease in activation markers and a significantly reduced capacity to activate T cells. Furthermore, by introducing a second signal to promote BMDC-material interactions combined with the presentation of tolerizing signals, the mulitfunctional PEG hydrogels were found to further increase signaling towards BMDCs, as evidenced by greater reductions in maturation markers. PMID:22361099

  6. Increased expression with differential subcellular location of cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G in human CD4(+) T-cell activation and dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Harold; Pacheco, Rodrigo; Martinez-Navio, José M; Rodríguez-García, Marta; Naranjo-Gómez, Mar; Climent, Núria; Prado, Carolina; Gil, Cristina; Plana, Montserrat; García, Felipe; Miró, José M; Franco, Rafael; Borras, Francesc E; Navaratnam, Naveenan; Gatell, José M; Gallart, Teresa

    2016-08-01

    APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G; A3G) is an innate defense protein showing activity against retroviruses and retrotransposons. Activated CD4(+) T cells are highly permissive for HIV-1 replication, whereas resting CD4(+) T cells are refractory. Dendritic cells (DCs), especially mature DCs, are also refractory. We investigated whether these differences could be related to a differential A3G expression and/or subcellular distribution. We found that A3G mRNA and protein expression is very low in resting CD4(+) T cells and immature DCs, but increases strongly following T-cell activation and DC maturation. The Apo-7 anti-A3G monoclonal antibody (mAb), which was specifically developed, confirmed these differences at the protein level and disclosed that A3G is mainly cytoplasmic in resting CD4(+) T cells and immature DCs. Nevertheless, A3G translocates to the nucleus in activated-proliferating CD4(+) T cells, yet remaining cytoplasmic in matured DCs, a finding confirmed by immunoblotting analysis of cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. Apo-7 mAb was able to immunoprecipitate endogenous A3G allowing to detect complexes with numerous proteins in activated-proliferating but not in resting CD4(+) T cells. The results show for the first time the nuclear translocation of A3G in activated-proliferating CD4(+) T cells. PMID:26987686

  7. Distal gap junctions and active dendrites can tune network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saraga, Fernanda; Ng, Leo; Skinner, Frances K

    2006-03-01

    Gap junctions allow direct electrical communication between CNS neurons. From theoretical and modeling studies, it is well known that although gap junctions can act to synchronize network output, they can also give rise to many other dynamic patterns including antiphase and other phase-locked states. The particular network pattern that arises depends on cellular, intrinsic properties that affect firing frequencies as well as the strength and location of the gap junctions. Interneurons or GABAergic neurons in hippocampus are diverse in their cellular characteristics and have been shown to have active dendrites. Furthermore, parvalbumin-positive GABAergic neurons, also known as basket cells, can contact one another via gap junctions on their distal dendrites. Using two-cell network models, we explore how distal electrical connections affect network output. We build multi-compartment models of hippocampal basket cells using NEURON and endow them with varying amounts of active dendrites. Two-cell networks of these model cells as well as reduced versions are explored. The relationship between intrinsic frequency and the level of active dendrites allows us to define three regions based on what sort of network dynamics occur with distal gap junction coupling. Weak coupling theory is used to predict the delineation of these regions as well as examination of phase response curves and distal dendritic polarization levels. We find that a nonmonotonic dependence of network dynamic characteristics (phase lags) on gap junction conductance occurs. This suggests that distal electrical coupling and active dendrite levels can control how sensitive network dynamics are to gap junction modulation. With the extended geometry, gap junctions located at more distal locations must have larger conductances for pure synchrony to occur. Furthermore, based on simulations with heterogeneous networks, it may be that one requires active dendrites if phase-locking is to occur in networks formed

  8. Differential regulation of apical-basolateral dendrite outgrowth by activity in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yang; Seong, Eunju; Yuan, Li; Singh, Dipika; Arikkath, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons have characteristic dendrite asymmetry, characterized by structurally and functionally distinct apical and basolateral dendrites. The ability of the neuron to generate and maintain dendrite asymmetry is vital, since synaptic inputs received are critically dependent on dendrite architecture. Little is known about the role of neuronal activity in guiding maintenance of dendrite asymmetry. Our data indicate that dendrite asymmetry is established and maintained early during development. Further, our results indicate that cell intrinsic and global alterations of neuronal activity have differential effects on net extension of apical and basolateral dendrites. Thus, apical and basolateral dendrite extension may be independently regulated by cell intrinsic and network neuronal activity during development, suggesting that individual dendrites may have autonomous control over net extension. We propose that regulated individual dendrite extension in response to cell intrinsic and neuronal network activity may allow temporal control of synapse specificity in the developing hippocampus. PMID:26321915

  9. Biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory response of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Agrawal, Anshu; Said, Hamid M

    2016-09-01

    The water-soluble biotin (vitamin B7) is indispensable for normal human health. The vitamin acts as a cofactor for five carboxylases that are critical for fatty acid, glucose, and amino acid metabolism. Biotin deficiency is associated with various diseases, and mice deficient in this vitamin display enhanced inflammation. Previous studies have shown that biotin affects the functions of adaptive immune T and NK cells, but its effect(s) on innate immune cells is not known. Because of that and because vitamins such as vitamins A and D have a profound effect on dendritic cell (DC) function, we investigated the effect of biotin levels on the functions of human monocyte-derived DCs. Culture of DCs in a biotin-deficient medium (BDM) and subsequent activation with LPS resulted in enhanced secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-12p40, IL-23, and IL-1β compared with LPS-activated DCs cultured in biotin-sufficient (control) and biotin-oversupplemented media. Furthermore, LPS-activated DCs cultured in BDM displayed a significantly higher induction of IFN-γ and IL-17 indicating Th1/Th17 bias in T cells compared with cells maintained in biotin control or biotin-oversupplemented media. Investigations into the mechanisms suggested that impaired activation of AMP kinase in DCs cultured in BDM may be responsible for the observed increase in inflammatory responses. In summary, these results demonstrate for the first time that biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory responses of DCs. This may therefore be one of the mechanism(s) that mediates the observed inflammation that occurs in biotin deficiency. PMID:27413170

  10. Modification of TLR-induced activation of human dendritic cells by type I IFN: synergistic interaction with TLR4 but not TLR3 agonists.

    PubMed

    Walker, Josef; Tough, David F

    2006-07-01

    Upon detection of direct and indirect signs of infection, dendritic cells (DC) undergo functional changes that modify their ability to elicit immune responses. Type I interferon (IFN-alpha/beta), which includes a large family of closely related infection-inducible cytokines, represents one indirect signal that can act as a DC stimulus. We have investigated the ability of IFN-alpha/beta subtypes to affect DC function and to influence DC responses to Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists (i.e., direct infection-associated signals). Subtle differences were observed among 15 subtypes of IFN-alpha/beta in the ability to stimulate expression of maturation markers and chemokines by human monocyte-derived DC, with IFN-omega being the most unique in its effects. Pre-treatment with IFN-alpha/beta did not alter the ability of DC to mature in response to subsequent contact with TLR agonists, but did modulate their secretion of chemokines. Conversely, IFN-alpha/beta was shown to act synergistically with TLR4 but not TLR3 agonists for the induction of maturation and chemokine production when DC were exposed to IFN-alpha/beta and TLR ligands simultaneously. Taken together, these results indicate a complex role for IFN-alpha/beta in regulating DC function during the course an infection, which varies according to IFN-alpha/beta subtype and the timing of exposure to other stimuli. PMID:16783851

  11. Ternary dendritic nanowires as highly active and stable multifunctional electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yoojin; Jin, Haneul; Kim, Ho Young; Yoon, Jisun; Park, Jongsik; Baik, Hionsuck; Joo, Sang Hoon; Lee, Kwangyeol

    2016-08-18

    Multimetallic nanocatalysts with a controlled structure can provide enhanced catalytic activity and durability by exploiting electronic, geometric, and strain effects. Herein, we report the synthesis of a novel ternary nanocatalyst based on Mo doped PtNi dendritic nanowires (Mo-PtNi DNW) and its bifunctional application in the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) at the anode and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode for direct methanol fuel cells. An unprecedented Mo-PtNi DNW structure can combine multiple structural attributes of the 1D nanowire morphology and dendritic surfaces. In the MOR, Mo-PtNi DNW exhibits superior activity to Pt/C and Mo doped Pt dendritic nanowires (Mo-Pt DNW), and excellent durability. Furthermore, Mo-PtNi DNW demonstrates excellent activity and durability for the ORR. This work highlights the important role of compositional and structural control in nanocatalysts for boosting catalytic performances. PMID:27507777

  12. Nanostructured lipid carriers loaded with resveratrol modulate human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, João P; Neves, Ana R; Silva, Andreia M; Barbosa, Mário A; Reis, M Salette; Santos, Susana G

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are promising targets for drug delivery, as they can induce immunity or tolerance. The current study aims to examine the potential of using nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) as delivery systems for human DC by evaluating nanoparticle internalization, cell labeling, and drug activity. NLC were formulated incorporating the fluorochrome fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-NLC) or the natural anti-inflammatory molecule resveratrol (rsv-NLC). Primary human DCs were differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes, and the innovative imaging flow cytometry technique was used to examine FITC-NLC internalization. The capacity of rsv-NLC to inhibit DC activation in response to proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF- α) was investigated by conventional flow cytometry. A combination of imaging and conventional flow cytometry was used to assess NLC cytotoxicity. The results obtained indicate that both NLC formulations were stable over time, with mean diameter <200 nm and highly negative zeta potential (about −30 mV). When DCs were placed in contact with NLC, imaging flow cytometry clearly showed that DCs efficiently internalized FITC-NLC, with nearly 100% of cells internalizing nanoparticles upon 1 hour of incubation. Both immature and mature DCs internalized NLC to high and comparable levels, and without cytotoxicity. Stimulating DC with TNF-α in the presence of rsv-NLC revealed that, using these nanoparticles, very small concentrations of rsv were sufficient to significantly decrease surface expression of activation marker CD83 (5 µM) and major histocompatibility complex-class II molecule human leukocyte antigen – antigen D related (10 µM), both upregulated in response to TNF-α stimulation. Rsv-NLC were compared with free rsv; at 5 µM, rsv-NLC were able to inhibit nuclear factor κ beta phosphorylation and significantly decrease the level of interleukin-12/23, both upregulated in response to TNF-α, while 10 µM free rsv were

  13. Nanostructured lipid carriers loaded with resveratrol modulate human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, João P; Neves, Ana R; Silva, Andreia M; Barbosa, Mário A; Reis, M Salette; Santos, Susana G

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are promising targets for drug delivery, as they can induce immunity or tolerance. The current study aims to examine the potential of using nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) as delivery systems for human DC by evaluating nanoparticle internalization, cell labeling, and drug activity. NLC were formulated incorporating the fluorochrome fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-NLC) or the natural anti-inflammatory molecule resveratrol (rsv-NLC). Primary human DCs were differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes, and the innovative imaging flow cytometry technique was used to examine FITC-NLC internalization. The capacity of rsv-NLC to inhibit DC activation in response to proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF- α) was investigated by conventional flow cytometry. A combination of imaging and conventional flow cytometry was used to assess NLC cytotoxicity. The results obtained indicate that both NLC formulations were stable over time, with mean diameter <200 nm and highly negative zeta potential (about -30 mV). When DCs were placed in contact with NLC, imaging flow cytometry clearly showed that DCs efficiently internalized FITC-NLC, with nearly 100% of cells internalizing nanoparticles upon 1 hour of incubation. Both immature and mature DCs internalized NLC to high and comparable levels, and without cytotoxicity. Stimulating DC with TNF-α in the presence of rsv-NLC revealed that, using these nanoparticles, very small concentrations of rsv were sufficient to significantly decrease surface expression of activation marker CD83 (5 µM) and major histocompatibility complex-class II molecule human leukocyte antigen - antigen D related (10 µM), both upregulated in response to TNF-α stimulation. Rsv-NLC were compared with free rsv; at 5 µM, rsv-NLC were able to inhibit nuclear factor κ beta phosphorylation and significantly decrease the level of interleukin-12/23, both upregulated in response to TNF-α, while 10 µM free rsv were needed

  14. Immunity to Pathogens Taught by Specialized Human Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Geginat, Jens; Nizzoli, Giulia; Paroni, Moira; Maglie, Stefano; Larghi, Paola; Pascolo, Steve; Abrignani, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that have a key role in immune responses because they bridge the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. They mature upon recognition of pathogens and upregulate MHC molecules and costimulatory receptors to activate antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. It is now well established that DCs are not a homogeneous population but are composed of different subsets with specialized functions in immune responses to specific pathogens. Upon viral infections, plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) rapidly produce large amounts of IFN-α, which has potent antiviral functions and activates several other immune cells. However, pDCs are not particularly potent APCs and induce the tolerogenic cytokine IL-10 in CD4+ T cells. In contrast, myeloid DCs (mDCs) are very potent APCs and possess the unique capacity to prime naive T cells and consequently to initiate a primary adaptive immune response. Different subsets of mDCs with specialized functions have been identified. In mice, CD8α+ mDCs capture antigenic material from necrotic cells, secrete high levels of IL-12, and prime Th1 and cytotoxic T-cell responses to control intracellular pathogens. Conversely, CD8α− mDCs preferentially prime CD4+ T cells and promote Th2 or Th17 differentiation. BDCA-3+ mDC2 are the human homologue of CD8α+ mDCs, since they share the expression of several key molecules, the capacity to cross-present antigens to CD8+ T-cells and to produce IFN-λ. However, although several features of the DC network are conserved between humans and mice, the expression of several toll-like receptors as well as the production of cytokines that regulate T-cell differentiation are different. Intriguingly, recent data suggest specific roles for human DC subsets in immune responses against individual pathogens. The biology of human DC subsets holds the promise to be exploitable in translational medicine, in particular for the development of vaccines against

  15. Immunity to Pathogens Taught by Specialized Human Dendritic Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Geginat, Jens; Nizzoli, Giulia; Paroni, Moira; Maglie, Stefano; Larghi, Paola; Pascolo, Steve; Abrignani, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that have a key role in immune responses because they bridge the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. They mature upon recognition of pathogens and upregulate MHC molecules and costimulatory receptors to activate antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. It is now well established that DCs are not a homogeneous population but are composed of different subsets with specialized functions in immune responses to specific pathogens. Upon viral infections, plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) rapidly produce large amounts of IFN-α, which has potent antiviral functions and activates several other immune cells. However, pDCs are not particularly potent APCs and induce the tolerogenic cytokine IL-10 in CD4(+) T cells. In contrast, myeloid DCs (mDCs) are very potent APCs and possess the unique capacity to prime naive T cells and consequently to initiate a primary adaptive immune response. Different subsets of mDCs with specialized functions have been identified. In mice, CD8α(+) mDCs capture antigenic material from necrotic cells, secrete high levels of IL-12, and prime Th1 and cytotoxic T-cell responses to control intracellular pathogens. Conversely, CD8α(-) mDCs preferentially prime CD4(+) T cells and promote Th2 or Th17 differentiation. BDCA-3(+) mDC2 are the human homologue of CD8α(+) mDCs, since they share the expression of several key molecules, the capacity to cross-present antigens to CD8(+) T-cells and to produce IFN-λ. However, although several features of the DC network are conserved between humans and mice, the expression of several toll-like receptors as well as the production of cytokines that regulate T-cell differentiation are different. Intriguingly, recent data suggest specific roles for human DC subsets in immune responses against individual pathogens. The biology of human DC subsets holds the promise to be exploitable in translational medicine, in particular for the development of

  16. Presence and regulation of the endocannabinoid system in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Matias, Isabel; Pochard, Pierre; Orlando, Pierangelo; Salzet, Michel; Pestel, Joel; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2002-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands, the endocannabinoids, have been detected in several blood immune cells, including monocytes/macrophages, basophils and lymphocytes. However, their presence in dendritic cells, which play a key role in the initiation and development of the immune response, has never been investigated. Here we have analyzed human dendritic cells for the presence of the endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, and one of the enzymes mostly responsible for endocannabinoid hydrolysis, the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). By using a very sensitive liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometric (LC-APCI-MS) method, lipids extracted from immature dendritic cells were shown to contain 2-AG, anandamide and the anti-inflammatory anandamide congener, N-palmitoylethanolamine (PalEtn) (2.1 +/- 1.0, 0.14 +/- 0.02 and 8.2 +/- 3.9 pmol x 10(-7) cells, respectively). The amounts of 2-AG, but not anandamide or PalEtn, were significantly increased following cell maturation induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the allergen Der p 1 (2.8- and 1.9-fold, respectively). By using both RT-PCR and Western immunoblotting, dendritic cells were also found to express measurable amounts of CB1 and CB2 receptors and of FAAH. Cell maturation did not consistently modify the expression of these proteins, although in some cell preparations a decrease of the levels of both CB1 and CB2 mRNA transcripts was observed after LPS stimulation. These findings demonstrate for the first time that the endogenous cannabinoid system is present in human dendritic cells and can be regulated by cell activation. PMID:12153574

  17. Curcumin prevents human dendritic cell response to immune stimulants

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, Shawna A.; Montpetit, Alison J.; Lockey, R.F.; Mohapatra, Shyam S.

    2008-09-26

    Curcumin, a compound found in the Indian spice turmeric, has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, though the mechanism remains unclear. Dendritic cells (DCs) are important to generating an immune response and the effect of curcumin on human DCs has not been explored. The role curcumin in the DC response to bacterial and viral infection was investigated in vitro using LPS and Poly I:C as models of infection. CD14{sup +} monocytes, isolated from human peripheral blood, were cultured in GM-CSF- and IL-4-supplemented medium to generate immature DCs. Cultures were incubated with curcumin, stimulated with LPS or Poly I:C and functional assays were performed. Curcumin prevents DCs from responding to immunostimulants and inducing CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation by blocking maturation marker, cytokine and chemokine expression and reducing both migration and endocytosis. These data suggest a therapeutic role for curcumin as an immune suppressant.

  18. Dendritic cells in humans--from fetus to adult.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Naomi; Chan, Jerry K Y; Ginhoux, Florent

    2015-02-01

    The human immune system evolves continuously during development from the embryo into the adult, reflecting the ever-changing environment and demands of our body. This ability of our immune system to sense external cues and adapt as we develop is just as important in the early tolerogenic environment of the fetus, as it is in the constantly pathogen-challenged adult. Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen-sensing and antigen-presenting components of the immune system, play a crucial role in this process where they act as sentinels, both initiating and regulating immune responses. Here, we provide an overview of the human immune system in the developing fetus and the adult, with a focus on DC ontogeny and function during these discrete but intimately linked life stages. PMID:25323843

  19. Curcumin prevents human dendritic cell response to immune stimulants

    PubMed Central

    Shirley, Shawna A.; Montpetit, Alison J.; Lockey, R.F.; Mohapatra, Shyam S.

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin, a compound found in the Indian spice turmeric, has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, though the mechanism remains unclear. Dendritic cells (DCs) are important to generating an immune response and the effect of curcumin on human DCs has not been explored. The role curcumin in the DC response to bacterial and viral infection was investigated in vitro using LPS and Poly I:C as models of infection. CD14+ monocytes, isolated from human peripheral blood, were cultured in GM-CSF- and IL-4-supplemented medium to generate immature DCs. Cultures were incubated with curcumin, stimulated with LPS or Poly I:C and functional assays were performed. Curcumin prevents DCs from responding to immunostimulants and inducing naïve CD4+ T cell proliferation by blocking maturation marker, cytokine and chemokine expression and reducing both migration and endocytosis. These data suggest a therapeutic role for curcumin as an immune suppressant. PMID:18639521

  20. Induction of maturation and activation of human dendritic cells: A mechanism underlying the beneficial effect of Viscum album as complimentary therapy in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elluru, Sri Ramulu; van Huyen, Jean-Paul Duong; Delignat, Sandrine; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Friboulet, Alain; Kaveri, Srini V; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2008-01-01

    Background Viscum album (VA) preparations have been used as a complimentary therapy in cancer. In addition to their cytotoxic properties, they have also been shown to have immunostimulatory properties. In the present study, we examine the hypothesis that the VA preparations induce activation of human DC that facilitates effective tumor regression. Methods Four day old monocyte-derived immature DCs were treated with VA Qu Spez at 5, 10 and 15 μg/ml for 48 hrs. The expression of surface molecules was analyzed by flow cytometry. The ability of Qu Spez-educated DC to stimulate T cells was analyzed by allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction and activation of Melan-A/MART-1-specific M77-80 CD8+T cells. Cytokines in cell free culture supernatant was analyzed by cytokine bead array assay. Results VA Qu Spez stimulated DCs presented with increased expression of antigen presenting molecule HLA-DR and of co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86. The VA Qu Spez also induced the secretion of inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. Further, Qu Spez-educated DC stimulated CD4+T cells in a allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction and activated melanoma antigen Melan-A/MART-1-specific M77-80 CD8+T cells as evidenced by increased secretion of TNF-α and IFNγ. Conclusion The VA preparations stimulate the maturation and activation of human DCs, which may facilitate anti-tumoral immune responses. These results should assist in understanding the immunostimulatory properties of VA preparations and improving the therapeutic strategies. PMID:18533025

  1. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells turn into foamy dendritic cells with IL-17A.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Giulia; Bernoud-Hubac, Nathalie; Bissay, Nathalie; Debard, Cyrille; Daira, Patricia; Meugnier, Emmanuelle; Proamer, Fabienne; Hanau, Daniel; Vidal, Hubert; Aricò, Maurizio; Delprat, Christine; Mahtouk, Karène

    2015-06-01

    Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases. In the field of immunometabolism, we have studied the impact of IL-17A on the lipid metabolism of human in vitro-generated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Microarrays and lipidomic analysis revealed an intense remodeling of lipid metabolism induced by IL-17A in DCs. IL-17A increased 2-12 times the amounts of phospholipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, and cholesteryl esters in DCs. Palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), and oleic (18:ln-9c) acid were the main fatty acid chains present in DCs. They were strongly increased in response to IL-17A while their relative proportion remained unchanged. Capture of extracellular lipids was the major mechanism of lipid droplet accumulation, visualized by electron microscopy and Oil Red O staining. Besides this foamy phenotype, IL-17A induced a mixed macrophage-DC phenotype and expression of the nuclear receptor NR1H3/liver X receptor-α, previously identified in the context of atherosclerosis as the master regulator of cholesterol homeostasis in macrophages. These IL-17A-treated DCs were as competent as untreated DCs to stimulate allogeneic naive T-cell proliferation. Following this first characterization of lipid-rich DCs, we propose to call these IL-17A-dependent cells "foamy DCs" and discuss the possible existence of foamy DCs in atherosclerosis, a metabolic and inflammatory disorder involving IL-17A. PMID:25833686

  2. HIV-1 Tat Protein Induces Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines by Human Dendritic Cells and Monocytes/Macrophages through Engagement of TLR4-MD2-CD14 Complex and Activation of NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Leghmari, Kaoutar; Serrero, Manutea; Delobel, Pierre; Izopet, Jacques; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Bahraoui, Elmostafa

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) Tat protein induced the expression of programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) on dendritic cells (DCs) through a TLR4 pathway. However, the underlying mechanisms by which HIV-1 Tat protein induces the abnormal hyper-activation of the immune system seen in HIV-1 infected patients remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, we report that HIV-1 Tat protein induced the production of significant amounts of the pro-inflammatory IL-6 and IL-8 cytokines by DCs and monocytes from both healthy and HIV-1 infected patients. Such production was abrogated in the presence of anti-TLR4 blocking antibodies or soluble recombinant TLR4-MD2 as a decoy receptor, suggesting TLR4 was recruited by Tat protein. Tat-induced murine IL-6 and CXCL1/KC a functional homologue of human IL-8 was abolished in peritoneal macrophages derived from TLR4 KO but not from Wt mice, confirming the involvement of the TLR4 pathway. Furthermore, the recruitment of TLR4-MD2-CD14 complex by Tat protein was demonstrated by the activation of TLR4 downstream pathways including NF-κB and SOCS-1 and by down-modulation of cell surface TLR4 by endocytosis in dynamin and lipid-raft-dependent manners. Collectively, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that HIV-1 Tat interacts with TLR4-MD2-CD14 complex and activates the NF-κB pathway, leading to overproduction of IL-6 and IL-8 pro-inflammatory cytokines by myeloid cells from both healthy and HIV-1 infected patients. This study reveals a novel mechanism by which HIV-1, via its early expressed Tat protein, hijacks the TLR4 pathway, hence establishing abnormal hyper-activation of the immune system. PMID:26090662

  3. Vaccine activation of the nutrient sensor GCN2 in dendritic cells enhances antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Rajesh; Khan, Nooruddin; Nakaya, Helder I; Li, Shuzhao; Loebbermann, Jens; Maddur, Mohan S; Park, Youngja; Jones, Dean P; Chappert, Pascal; Davoust, Jean; Weiss, David S; Virgin, Herbert W; Ron, David; Pulendran, Bali

    2014-01-17

    The yellow fever vaccine YF-17D is one of the most successful vaccines ever developed in humans. Despite its efficacy and widespread use in more than 600 million people, the mechanisms by which it stimulates protective immunity remain poorly understood. Recent studies using systems biology approaches in humans have revealed that YF-17D-induced early expression of general control nonderepressible 2 kinase (GCN2) in the blood strongly correlates with the magnitude of the later CD8(+) T cell response. We demonstrate a key role for virus-induced GCN2 activation in programming dendritic cells to initiate autophagy and enhanced antigen presentation to both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. These results reveal an unappreciated link between virus-induced integrated stress response in dendritic cells and the adaptive immune response. PMID:24310610

  4. HIV-1-derived lentiviral vectors directly activate plasmacytoid dendritic cells, which in turn induce the maturation of myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Maura; Gregori, Silvia; Hauben, Ehud; Brown, Brian D; Sergi, Lucia Sergi; Naldini, Luigi; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2011-02-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LV) can induce type I interferon (IFN I) production from murine plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), but not myeloid (my)DC. Here, we investigated whether this mechanism is conserved in human DC. MyDC and pDC were isolated from peripheral blood and transduced with increasing vector concentrations. Compared with in vitro differentiated monocyte-derived DC, the transduction efficiency of peripheral blood DC was low (ranging from <1% to 45%), with pDC showing the lowest susceptibility to LV transduction. Phenotype and function of myDC were not directly modified by LV transduction; by contrast, pDC produced significant levels of IFN-α and tumor necrosis factor-α. pDC activation was dependent on functional vector particles and was mediated by Toll-like receptor 7/9 triggering. Coculture of myDC with pDC in the presence of LV resulted in myDC activation, with CD86 up-regulation and interleukin-6 secretion. These findings demonstrate that the induction of transgene-specific immunity is triggered by an innate immune response with pDC activation and consequent myDC maturation, a response that closely resembles the one induced by functional viruses. This information is important to design strategies aimed at using LV in humans for gene therapy, where adverse immune responses must be avoided, or for cancer immunotherapy, where inducing immunity is the goal. PMID:20825284

  5. Retinoic acid-primed human dendritic cells inhibit Th9 cells and induce Th1/Th17 cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rampal, Ritika; Awasthi, Amit; Ahuja, Vineet

    2016-07-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid plays a central role in mucosal immunity, where it promotes its synthesis by up-regulating CD103 expression on dendritic cells, induces gut tropic (α4β7(+) and CCR9(+)) T cells, and inhibits Th1/Th17 differentiation. Recently, murine studies have highlighted the proinflammatory role of retinoic acid in maintaining inflammation under a variety of pathologic conditions. However, as a result of limited human data, we investigated the effect of retinoic acid on human dendritic cells and CD4(+) T cell responses in the presence of polarizing (Th1/Th9/Th17) and inflammatory (LPS-induced dendritic cells) conditions. We report a novel role of retinoic acid in an inflammatory setup, where retinoic acid-primed dendritic cells (retinoic acid-monocyte-derived dendritic cells) up-regulated CCR9(+)T cells, which were observed to express high levels of IFN-γ in the presence of Th1/Th17 conditions. Retinoic acid-monocyte-derived dendritic cells, under Th17 conditions, also favored the induction of IL-17(+) T cells. Furthermore, in the presence of TGF-β1 and IL-4, retinoic acid-monocyte-derived dendritic cells inhibited IL-9 and induced IFN-γ expression on T cells. Experiments with naïve CD4(+) T cells, activated in the presence of Th1/Th17 conditions and absence of DCs, indicated that retinoic acid inhibited IFN-γ and IL-17 expression on T cells. These data revealed that in the face of inflammatory conditions, retinoic acid, in contrast from its anti-inflammatory role, could maintain or aggravate the intestinal inflammation. PMID:26980802

  6. Aminopeptidase N (CD13) Is Involved in Phagocytic Processes in Human Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Villaseñor-Cardoso, Mónica I.; Frausto-Del-Río, Dulce A.

    2013-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN or CD13) is a membrane ectopeptidase expressed by many cell types, including myelomonocytic lineage cells: monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. CD13 is known to regulate the biological activity of various peptides by proteolysis, and it has been proposed that CD13 also participates in several functions such as angiogenesis, cell adhesion, metastasis, and tumor invasion. We had previously reported that, in human monocytes and macrophages, CD13 modulates the phagocytosis mediated by receptors for the Fc portion of IgG antibodies (FcγRs). In this work, we analyzed the possible interaction of CD13 with other phagocytic receptors. We found out that the cross-linking of CD13 positively modulates the phagocytosis mediated by receptors of the innate immune system, since a significant increase in the phagocytosis of zymosan particles or heat-killed E. coli was observed when CD13 was cross-linked using anti-CD13 antibodies, in both macrophages and dendritic cells. Also, we observed that, during the phagocytosis of zymosan, CD13 redistributes and is internalized into the phagosome. These findings suggest that, besides its known functions, CD13 participates in phagocytic processes in dendritic cells and macrophages. PMID:24063007

  7. Chrysin suppresses human CD14(+) monocyte-derived dendritic cells and ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Ge, Zhenzhen; Xue, Zhenyi; Huang, Wenjing; Mei, Mei; Zhang, Qi; Li, Yan; Li, Wen; Zhang, Zhihui; Zhang, Zimu; Zhang, Lijuan; Wang, Huafeng; Cai, Jinzhen; Yao, Zhi; Zhang, Rongxin; Da, Yurong

    2015-11-15

    Chrysin, a naturally flavonoid of plant, has various biological activities. However, the effects of chrysin on dendritic cells (DCs) and multiple sclerosis (MS) remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that chrysin inhibited human DC differentiation, maturation, function and the expression of the Th1 cells polarizing cytokines IFN-γ and IL-12p35 form DCs. In addition, chrysin ameliorated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS, by reducing CNS inflammation and demyelination. Furthermore, chrysin suppressed DCs and Th1 cells in the EAE mice. Taken together, chrysin exerts anti-inflammatory and immune suppressive effects, and suggests a possible therapeutic application of chrysin in MS. PMID:26531689

  8. Human Decidua Contains Potent Immunostimulatory CD83+ Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kämmerer, Ulrike; Schoppet, Michael; McLellan, Alexander D.; Kapp, Michaela; Huppertz, Hans-Iko; Kämpgen, Eckhart; Dietl, Johannes

    2000-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are sentinel cells of the immune system important in initiating antigen-specific T-cell responses to microbial and transplantation antigens. DCs are particularly found in surface tissues such as skin and mucosa, where the organism is threatened by infectious agents. The human decidua, despite its proposed immunosuppressive function, hosts a variety of immunocompetent CD45 cells such as natural killer cells, macrophages, and T cells. Here we describe the detection, isolation, and characterization of CD45+, CD40+, HLA-DR++, and CD83+ cells from human early pregnancy decidua with typical DC morphology. CD83+ as well as CD1a+ cells were found in close vicinity to endometrial glands, with preference to the basal layer of the decidua. In vitro, decidual CD83+ cells could be enriched to ∼30%, with the remainder of cells encompassing DC-bound CD3+ T cells. Stimulation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed leukocyte reaction by the decidual cell fraction enriched for CD83+ cells, was similar to that obtained with blood monocyte-derived DCs, demonstrating the potent immunostimulatory capacity of these cells. Decidual DCs with morphological, phenotypic, and functional characteristics of immunostimulatory DCs might be important mediators in the regulation of immunological balance between maternal and fetal tissue, leading to successful pregnancy. PMID:10880386

  9. Defining human dendritic cell progenitors by multiparametric flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Breton, Gaëlle; Lee, Jaeyop; Liu, Kang; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2015-09-01

    Human dendritic cells (DCs) develop from progressively restricted bone marrow (BM) progenitors: these progenitor cells include granulocyte, monocyte and DC progenitor (GMDP) cells; monocyte and DC progenitor (MDP) cells; and common DC progenitor (CDP) and DC precursor (pre-DC) cells. These four DC progenitors can be defined on the basis of the expression of surface markers such as CD34 and hematopoietin receptors. In this protocol, we describe five multiparametric flow cytometry panels that can be used as a tool (i) to simultaneously detect or phenotype the four DC progenitors, (ii) to isolate DC progenitors to enable in vitro differentiation or (iii) to assess the in vitro differentiation and proliferation of DC progenitors. The entire procedure from isolation of cells to flow cytometry can be completed in 3-7 h. This protocol provides optimized antibody panels, as well as gating strategies, for immunostaining of BM and cord blood specimens to study human DC hematopoiesis in health, disease and vaccine settings. PMID:26292072

  10. Defining human dendritic cell progenitors by multiparametric flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Gaëlle; Lee, Jaeyop; Liu, Kang; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2015-01-01

    Human dendritic cells (DCs) develop from progressively restricted bone marrow (BM) progenitors: these progenitor cells include granulocyte, monocyte and DC progenitor (GMDP) cells; monocyte and DC progenitor (MDP) cells; and common DC progenitor (CDP) and DC precursor (pre-DC) cells. These four DC progenitors can be defined on the basis of the expression of surface markers such as CD34 and hematopoietin receptors. In this protocol, we describe five multiparametric flow cytometry panels that can be used as a tool (i) to simultaneously detect or phenotype the four DC progenitors, (ii) to isolate DC progenitors to enable in vitro differentiation or (iii) to assess the in vitro differentiation and proliferation of DC progenitors. The entire procedure from isolation of cells to flow cytometry can be completed in 3–7 h. This protocol provides optimized antibody panels, as well as gating strategies, for immunostaining of BM and cord blood specimens to study human DC hematopoiesis in health, disease and vaccine settings. PMID:26292072

  11. Human cytomegalovirus tropism for mucosal myeloid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, Laura

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human CMV infections are a serious source of morbidity and mortality for immunocompromised patients and for the developing fetus. Because of this, the development of new strategies to prevent CMV acquisition and transmission is a top priority. Myeloid dendritic cells (DC) residing in the oral and nasal mucosae are among the first immune cells to encounter CMV during entry, and greatly contribute to virus dissemination, reactivation from latency, and horizontal spread. Albeit affected by the immunoevasive tactics of CMV, mucosal DC remain potent inducers of cellular and humoral immune responses against this virus. Their natural functions could thus be exploited to generate long-lasting protective immunity against CMV by vaccination via the oro-nasal mucosae. Although related, epithelial Langerhans-type DC (LC) and dermal monocyte-derived DC (MDDC) interact with CMV in dramatically different ways. While immature MDDC are fully permissive to infection, for instance, immature LC are completely resistant. Understanding these differences is essential to design innovative vaccines and new antiviral compounds to protect these cells from CMV infection in vivo. PMID:24888709

  12. CD83 and GRASP55 interact in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Stein, Marcello F; Blume, Katja; Heilingloh, Christiane S; Kummer, Mirko; Biesinger, Brigitte; Sticht, Heinrich; Steinkasserer, Alexander

    2015-03-27

    CD83 is one of the best known surface markers for mature human dendritic cells (DCs). The full-length 45 kDa type-I membrane-bound form (mbCD83) is strongly glycosylated upon DCs maturation. As co-stimulatory properties of CD83 are attributed to mbCD83 surface expression is required for efficient T-cell stimulation by mature DCs. By yeast two-hybrid screening, we were able to identify GRASP55 as interaction partner of CD83. DCs maturation induces endogenous CD83 protein expression with simultaneous regulation of CD83 glycosylation, interaction and co-localization with GRASP55 and CD83 surface exposure. GRASP55 is especially known for its role in maintaining Golgi architecture, but also plays a role in Golgi transport of specific cargo proteins bearing a C-terminal valine residue. Here we additionally demonstrate that binding of CD83 and GRASP55 rely on the C-terminal TELV-motif of CD83. Mutation of this TELV-motif not only disrupted binding to GRASP55, but also altered the glycosylation pattern of CD83 and reduced its membrane expression. Here we show for the first time that GRASP55 interacts with CD83 shortly after induction of DC maturation and that this interaction plays a role in CD83 glycosylation as well as in surface expression of CD83 on DCs. PMID:25701785

  13. Costimulatory Molecules on Immunogenic Versus Tolerogenic Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hubo, Mario; Trinschek, Bettina; Kryczanowsky, Fanny; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Steinbrink, Kerstin; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are sentinels of immunity, essential for homeostasis of T cell-dependent immune responses. Both functions of DC, initiation of antigen-specific T cell immunity and maintenance of tissue-specific tolerance originate from distinct stages of differentiation, immunogenic versus tolerogenic. Dependent on local micro milieu and inflammatory stimuli, tissue resident immature DC with functional plasticity differentiate into tolerogenic or immunogenic DC with stable phenotypes. They efficiently link innate and adaptive immunity and are ideally positioned to modify T cell-mediated immune responses. Since the T cell stimulatory properties of DC are significantly influenced by their expression of signal II ligands, it is critical to understand the impact of distinct costimulatory pathways on DC function. This review gives an overview of functional different human DC subsets with unique profiles of costimulatory molecules and outlines how different costimulatory pathways together with the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 bias immunogenic versus tolerogenic DC functions. Furthermore, we exemplarily describe protocols for the generation of two well-defined monocyte-derived DC subsets for their clinical use, immunogenic versus tolerogenic. PMID:23565116

  14. Thrombin regulates the function of human blood dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagita, Manabu; Kobayashi, Ryohei; Kashiwagi, Yoichiro; Shimabukuro, Yoshio; Murakami, Shinya E-mail: ipshinya@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2007-12-14

    Thrombin is the key enzyme in the coagulation cascade and activates endothelial cells, neutrophils and monocytes via protease-activated receptors (PARs). At the inflammatory site, immune cells have an opportunity to encounter thrombin. However little is known about the effect of thrombin for dendritic cells (DC), which are efficient antigen-presenting cells and play important roles in initiating and regulating immune responses. The present study revealed that thrombin has the ability to stimulate blood DC. Plasmacytoid DC (PDC) and myeloid DC (MDC) isolated from PBMC expressed PAR-1 and released MCP-1, IL-10, and IL-12 after thrombin stimulation. Unlike blood DC, monocyte-derived DC (MoDC), differentiated in vitro did not express PAR-1 and were unresponsive to thrombin. Effects of thrombin on blood DC were significantly diminished by the addition of anti-PAR-1 Ab or hirudin, serine protease inhibitor. Moreover, thrombin induced HLA-DR and CD86 expression on DC and the thrombin-treated DC induced allogenic T cell proliferation. These findings indicate that thrombin plays a role in the regulation of blood DC functions.

  15. Prostaglandin E{sub 2} regulates melanocyte dendrite formation through activation of PKC{zeta}

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Glynis Fricke, Alex; Fender, Anne; McClelland, Lindy; Jacobs, Stacey

    2007-11-01

    Prostaglandins are lipid signaling intermediates released by keratinocytes in response to ultraviolet irradiation (UVR) in the skin. The main prostaglandin released following UVR is PGE{sub 2}, a ligand for 4 related G-protein-coupled receptors (EP{sub 1}, EP{sub 2}, EP{sub 3} and EP{sub 4}). Our previous work established that PGE{sub 2} stimulates melanocyte dendrite formation through activation of the EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} receptors. The purpose of the present report is to define the signaling intermediates involved in EP{sub 1}- and EP{sub 3}-dependent dendrite formation in human melanocytes. We recently showed that activation of the atypical PKC{zeta} isoform stimulates melanocyte dendricity in response to treatment with lysophosphatidylcholine. We therefore examined the potential contribution of PKC{zeta} activation on EP{sub 1}- and EP{sub 3}-dependent dendrite formation in melanocytes. Stimulation of the EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} receptors by selective agonists activated PKC{zeta}, and inhibition of PKC{zeta} activation abrogated EP{sub 1}- and EP{sub 3}-receptor-mediated melanocyte dendricity. Because of the importance of Rho-GTP binding proteins in the regulation of melanocyte dendricity, we also examined the effect of EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} receptor activation on Rac and Rho activity. Neither Rac nor Rho was activated upon treatment with EP{sub 1,3}-receptor agonists. We show that melanocytes express only the EP{sub 3A1} isoform, but not the EP{sub 3B} receptor isoform, previously associated with Rho activation, consistent with a lack of Rho stimulation by EP{sub 3} agonists. Our data suggest that PKC{zeta} activation plays a predominant role in regulation of PGE{sub 2}-dependent melanocyte dendricity.

  16. Specific activation of dendritic cells enhances clearance of Bacillus anthracis following infection.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Iain J T; Mann, Elizabeth R; Stokes, Margaret G; English, Nicholas R; Knight, Stella C; Williamson, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells are potent activators of the immune system and have a key role in linking innate and adaptive immune responses. In the current study we have used ex vivo pulsed bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDC) in a novel adoptive transfer strategy to protect against challenge with Bacillus anthracis, in a murine model. Pre-pulsing murine BMDC with either recombinant Protective Antigen (PA) or CpG significantly upregulated expression of the activation markers CD40, CD80, CD86 and MHC-II. Passive transfusion of mice with pulsed BMDC, concurrently with active immunisation with rPA in alum, significantly enhanced (p<0.001) PA-specific splenocyte responses seven days post-immunisation. Parallel studies using ex vivo DCs expanded from human peripheral blood and activated under the same conditions as the murine DC, demonstrated that human DCs had a PA dose-related significant increase in the markers CD40, CD80 and CCR7 and that the increases in CD40 and CD80 were maintained when the other activating components, CpG and HK B. anthracis were added to the rPA in culture. Mice vaccinated on a single occasion intra-muscularly with rPA and alum and concurrently transfused intra-dermally with pulsed BMDC, demonstrated 100% survival following lethal B. anthracis challenge and had significantly enhanced (p<0.05) bacterial clearance within 2 days, compared with mice vaccinated with rPA and alum alone. PMID:25380285

  17. Blue light irradiation suppresses dendritic cells activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael R; Abel, Manuela; Lopez Kostka, Susanna; Rudolph, Berenice; Becker, Detlef; von Stebut, Esther

    2013-08-01

    Blue light is a UV-free irradiation suitable for treating chronic skin inflammation, for example, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and hand- and foot eczema. However, a better understanding of the mode of action is still missing. For this reason, we investigated whether dendritic cells (DC) are directly affected by blue light irradiation in vitro. Here, we report that irradiation neither induced apoptosis nor maturation of monocyte-derived and myeloid DC. However, subsequent DC maturation upon LPS/IFNγ stimulation was impaired in a dose-dependent manner as assessed by maturation markers and cytokine release. Moreover, the potential of this DC to induce cytokine secretion from allogeneic CD4 T cells was reduced. In conclusion, unlike UV irradiation, blue light irradiation at high and low doses only resulted in impaired DC maturation upon activation and a reduced subsequent stimulatory capacity in allogeneic MLRs with strongest effects at higher doses. PMID:23879817

  18. Statins decrease dendritic arborization in rat sympathetic neurons by blocking RhoA activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo-Yang; Gonsiorek, Eugene A.; Barnhart, Chris; Davare, Monika A.; Engebose, Abby J.; Lauridsen, Holly; Bruun, Donald; Lesiak, Adam; Wayman, Gary; Bucelli, Robert; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence suggest that statins decrease sympathetic activity, but whether peripheral mechanisms involving direct actions on post-ganglionic sympathetic neurons contribute to this effect is not known. Because tonic activity of these neurons is directly correlated with the size of their dendritic arbor, we tested the hypothesis that statins decrease dendritic arborization in sympathetic neurons. Oral administration of atorvastatin (20 mg/kg/day for 7 days) significantly reduced dendritic arborization in vivo in sympathetic ganglia of adult male rats. In cultured sympathetic neurons, statins caused dendrite retraction and reversibly blocked bone morphogenetic protein-induced dendritic growth without altering cell survival or axonal growth. Supplementation with mevalonate or isoprenoids, but not cholesterol, attenuated the inhibitory effects of statins on dendritic growth, whereas specific inhibition of isoprenoid synthesis mimicked these statin effects. Statins blocked RhoA translocation to the membrane, an event that requires isoprenylation, and constitutively active RhoA reversed statin effects on dendrites. These observations that statins decrease dendritic arborization in sympathetic neurons by blocking RhoA activation suggest a novel mechanism by which statins decrease sympathetic activity and protect against cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. PMID:19209406

  19. Dendritic Polyglycerol Sulfate Inhibits Microglial Activation and Reduces Hippocampal CA1 Dendritic Spine Morphology Deficits.

    PubMed

    Maysinger, Dusica; Gröger, Dominic; Lake, Andrew; Licha, Kai; Weinhart, Marie; Chang, Philip K-Y; Mulvey, Rose; Haag, Rainer; McKinney, R Anne

    2015-09-14

    Hyperactivity of microglia and loss of functional circuitry is a common feature of many neurological disorders including those induced or exacerbated by inflammation. Herein, we investigate the response of microglia and changes in hippocampal dendritic postsynaptic spines by dendritic polyglycerol sulfate (dPGS) treatment. Mouse microglia and organotypic hippocampal slices were exposed to dPGS and an inflammogen (lipopolysaccharides). Measurements of intracellular fluorescence and confocal microscopic analyses revealed that dPGS is avidly internalized by microglia but not CA1 pyramidal neurons. Concentration and time-dependent response studies consistently showed no obvious toxicity of dPGS. The adverse effects induced by proinflammogen LPS exposure were reduced and dendritic spine morphology was normalized with the addition of dPGS. This was accompanied by a significant reduction in nitrite and proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) from hyperactive microglia suggesting normalized circuitry function with dPGS treatment. Collectively, these results suggest that dPGS acts anti-inflammatory, inhibits inflammation-induced degenerative changes in microglia phenotype and rescues dendritic spine morphology. PMID:26218295

  20. Inhibition of the Differentiation of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells by Human Gingival Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Séguier, Sylvie; Tartour, Eric; Guérin, Coralie; Couty, Ludovic; Lemitre, Mathilde; Lallement, Laetitia; Folliguet, Marysette; Naderi, Samah El; Terme, Magali; Badoual, Cécile; Lafont, Antoine; Coulomb, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether gingival fibroblasts (GFs) can modulate the differentiation and/or maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and analyzed soluble factors that may be involved in this immune modulation. Experiments were performed using human monocytes in co-culture with human GFs in Transwell® chambers or using monocyte cultures treated with conditioned media (CM) from GFs of four donors. The four CM and supernatants from cell culture were assayed by ELISA for cytokines involved in the differentiation of dendritic cells, such as IL-6, VEGF, TGFβ1, IL-13 and IL-10. The maturation of monocyte-derived DCs induced by LPS in presence of CM was also studied. Cell surface phenotype markers were analyzed by flow cytometry. In co-cultures, GFs inhibited the differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs and the strength of this blockade correlated with the GF/monocyte ratio. Conditioned media from GFs showed similar effects, suggesting the involvement of soluble factors produced by GFs. This inhibition was associated with a lower stimulatory activity in MLR of DCs generated with GFs or its CM. Neutralizing antibodies against IL-6 and VEGF significantly (P<0.05) inhibited the inhibitory effect of CM on the differentiation of monocytes-derived DCs and in a dose dependent manner. Our data suggest that IL-6 is the main factor responsible for the inhibition of DCs differentiation mediated by GFs but that VEGF is also involved and constitutes an additional mechanism. PMID:23936476

  1. Immunomodulation of phloretin by impairing dendritic cell activation and function.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Chen; Chu, Ching-Liang; Ng, Chin-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yen; Chen, Der-Yuan; Pan, I-Hong; Huang, Kao-Jean

    2014-05-01

    Dietary compounds in fruits and vegetables have been shown to exert many biological activities. In addition to antioxidant effects, a number of flavonoids are able to modulate inflammatory responses. Here, we demonstrated that phloretin (PT), a natural dihydrochalcone found in many fruits, suppressed the activation and function of mouse dendritic cells (DCs). Phloretin disturbed the multiple intracellular signaling pathways in DCs induced by the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS), including ROS, MAPKs (ERK, JNK, p38 MAPK), and NF-κB, and thereby reducing the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Phloretin also effectively suppressed the activation of DCs treated with different dosages of LPS or various TLR agonists. The LPS-induced DC maturation was attenuated by phloretin because the expression levels of the MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecules were down-regulated, which then inhibited the LPS-stimulating DCs and the subsequent naïve T cell activation in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. Moreover, in vivo administration of phloretin suppressed the phenotypic maturation of the LPS-challenged splenic DCs and decreased the IFN-γ production from the activated CD4 T cells. Thus, we suggest that phloretin may potentially be an immunomodulator by impairing the activation and function of DCs and phloretin-contained fruits may be helpful in the improvement of inflammation and autoimmune diseases. PMID:24651121

  2. Electrical activity in cerebellar cultures determines Purkinje cell dendritic growth patterns.

    PubMed

    Schilling, K; Dickinson, M H; Connor, J A; Morgan, J I

    1991-12-01

    In primary dissociated cultures of mouse cerebellum a number of Purkinje cell-specific marker proteins and characteristic ionic currents appear at the appropriate developmental time. During the first week after plating, Purkinje cell dendrites elongate, but as electrical activity emerges the dendrites stop growing and branch. If endogenous electrical activity is inhibited by chronic tetrodotoxin or high magnesium treatment, dendrites continue to elongate, as if they were still immature. At the time that branching begins, intracellular calcium levels become sensitive to tetrodotoxin, suggesting that this cation may be involved in dendrite growth. Even apparently mature Purkinje cells alter their dendritic growth in response to changes in activity, suggesting long-term plasticity. PMID:1684902

  3. Hierarchical Pd-Sn Alloy Nanosheet Dendrites: An Economical and Highly Active Catalyst for Ethanol Electrooxidation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Liang-Xin; Wang, An-Liang; Ou, Yan-Nan; Li, Qi; Guo, Rui; Zhao, Wen-Xia; Tong, Ye-Xiang; Li, Gao-Ren

    2013-01-01

    Hierarchical alloy nanosheet dendrites (ANSDs) are highly favorable for superior catalytic performance and efficient utilization of catalyst because of the special characteristics of alloys, nanosheets, and dendritic nanostructures. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time a facile and efficient electrodeposition approach for the controllable synthesis of Pd-Sn ANSDs with high surface area. These synthesized Pd-Sn ANSDs exhibit high electrocatalytic activity and superior long-term cycle stability toward ethanol oxidation in alkaline media. The enhanced electrocataytic activity of Pd-Sn ANSDs may be attributed to Pd-Sn alloys, nanosheet dendrite induced promotional effect, large number of active sites on dendrite surface, large surface area, and good electrical contact with the base electrode. Because of the simple implement and high flexibility, the proposed approach can be considered as a general and powerful strategy to synthesize the alloy electrocatalysts with high surface areas and open dendritic nanostructures. PMID:23383368

  4. Age-Based Comparison of Human Dendritic Spine Structure Using Complete Three-Dimensional Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; Robles, Victor; Yuste, Rafael; DeFelipe, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons are targets of most excitatory synapses in the cerebral cortex. Recent evidence suggests that the morphology of the dendritic spine could determine its synaptic strength and learning rules. However, unfortunately, there are scant data available regarding the detailed morphology of these structures for the human cerebral cortex. In the present study, we analyzed over 8900 individual dendritic spines that were completely 3D reconstructed along the length of apical and basal dendrites of layer III pyramidal neurons in the cingulate cortex of 2 male humans (aged 40 and 85 years old), using intracellular injections of Lucifer Yellow in fixed tissue. We assembled a large, quantitative database, which revealed a major reduction in spine densities in the aged case. Specifically, small and short spines of basal dendrites and long spines of apical dendrites were lost, regardless of the distance from the soma. Given the age difference between the cases, our results suggest selective alterations in spines with aging in humans and indicate that the spine volume and length are regulated by different biological mechanisms. PMID:22710613

  5. CD5 monoclonal antibodies react with human peripheral blood dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, G. S.; Freudenthal, P. S.

    1992-01-01

    CD5 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) define a 67,000 kd monomeric glycoprotein expressed predominantly by thymocytes, mature T cells and a subpopulation of B cells. CD5 is believed to be an alternative signaling molecules capable of increasing the supply of second messengers and thereby altering the cellular response threshold to other activation stimuli. Human peripheral blood dendritic cells (PBDC) are a circulating component of the immune dendritic cell family, which also includes Langerhans' cells in epithelia and interdigitating cells in the T-cell domains of lymphoid tissues. PBDC comprise less than 1% of the peripheral blood mononuclear cell fraction. They are morphologically, immunophenotypically, and functionally distinct from monocytes. In this study, we report that at least a subpopulation of PBDC react with the anti-CD5 MAbs Leu-1 and UCHT2, which define the two major non-crossblocking CD5 epitopes. In contrast, Langerhans' cells, interdigitating cells, monocytes, and macrophages were uniformly CD5-. These findings suggest that PBDC can express the CD5 molecule. Furthermore, they define an additional feature of many enriched PBDC that distinguishes them from monocytes and certain other mononuclear leukocytes, and may provide insights into their activation pathways. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 3 PMID:1384337

  6. Intense and specialized dendritic localization of the fragile X mental retardation protein in binaural brainstem neurons: a comparative study in the alligator, chicken, gerbil, and human.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Sakano, Hitomi; Beebe, Karisa; Brown, Maile R; de Laat, Rian; Bothwell, Mark; Kulesza, Randy J; Rubel, Edwin W

    2014-06-15

    Neuronal dendrites are structurally and functionally dynamic in response to changes in afferent activity. The fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an mRNA binding protein that regulates activity-dependent protein synthesis and morphological dynamics of dendrites. Loss and abnormal expression of FMRP occur in fragile X syndrome (FXS) and some forms of autism spectrum disorders. To provide further understanding of how FMRP signaling regulates dendritic dynamics, we examined dendritic expression and localization of FMRP in the reptilian and avian nucleus laminaris (NL) and its mammalian analogue, the medial superior olive (MSO), in rodents and humans. NL/MSO neurons are specialized for temporal processing of low-frequency sounds for binaural hearing, which is impaired in FXS. Protein BLAST analyses first demonstrate that the FMRP amino acid sequences in the alligator and chicken are highly similar to human FMRP with identical mRNA-binding and phosphorylation sites, suggesting that FMRP functions similarly across vertebrates. Immunocytochemistry further reveals that NL/MSO neurons have very high levels of dendritic FMRP in low-frequency hearing vertebrates including alligator, chicken, gerbil, and human. Remarkably, dendritic FMRP in NL/MSO neurons often accumulates at branch points and enlarged distal tips, loci known to be critical for branch-specific dendritic arbor dynamics. These observations support an important role for FMRP in regulating dendritic properties of binaural neurons that are essential for low-frequency sound localization and auditory scene segregation, and support the relevance of studying this regulation in nonhuman vertebrates that use low frequencies in order to further understand human auditory processing disorders. PMID:24318628

  7. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal-placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN(+)CD14(+)CD1a(-) phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal-fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  8. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal–placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN+CD14+CD1a− phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal–fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  9. Dendritic Cell Activation by Glucan Isolated from Umbilicaria Esculenta

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Sook; Kim, Jee Youn; Lee, Hong Kyung; Kim, Moo Sung; Lee, Sang Rin; Kang, Jong Soon; Kim, Hwan Mook; Lee, Kyung-Ae; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2010-01-01

    Background Lichen-derived glucans have been known to stimulate the functions of immune cells. However, immunostimulatory activity of glucan obtained from edible lichen, Umbilicaria esculenta, has not been reported. Thus we evaluated the phenotype and functional maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) following treatment of extracted glucan (PUE). Methods The phenotypic and functional maturation of PUE-treated DCs was assessed by flow cytometric analysis and cytokine production, respectively. PUE-treated DCs was also used for mixed leukocyte reaction to evaluate T cell-priming capacity. Finally we detected the activation of MAPK and NF-κB by immunoblot. Results Phenotypic maturation of DCs was shown by the elevated expressions of CD40, CD80, CD86, and MHC class I/II molecules. Functional activation of DCs was proved by increased cytokine production of IL-12, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-α/β, decreased endocytosis, and enhanced proliferation of allogenic T cells. Polymyxin B, specific inhibitor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), did not affect PUE activity, which suggested that PUE was free of LPS contamination. As a mechanism of action, PUE increased phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPKs, and enhanced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p50/p65 in DCs. Conclusion These results indicate that PUE induced DC maturation via MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:21286379

  10. Antihelminthic niclosamide modulates dendritic cells activation and function.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chieh-Shan; Li, Yi-Rong; Chen, Jeremy J W; Chen, Ying-Che; Chu, Chiang-Liang; Pan, I-Hong; Wu, Yu-Shan; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) link the sensing of the environment by the innate immune system to the initiation of adaptive immune responses. Accordingly, DCs are considered to be a major target in the development of immunomodulating compounds. In this study, the effect of niclosamide, a Food and Drug Administration-approved antihelminthic drug, on the activation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine bone marrow-derived DCs was examined. Our experimental results show that niclosamide reduced the pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression of LPS-activated DCs. In addition, niclosamide also affected the expression of MHC and costimulatory molecules and influenced the ability of the cells to take up antigens. Therefore, in mixed cell cultures composed of syngeneic OVA-specific T cells and DCs, niclosamide-treated DCs showed a decreased ability to stimulate T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production. Furthermore, intravenous injection of niclosamide also attenuated contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in mice during sensitization with 2,4-dinitro-1-fluorobenzene. Blocking the LPS-induced activation of MAPK-ERK, JNK and NF-κB may contribute to the inhibitory effect of niclosamide on DC activation. Collectively, our findings suggest that niclosamide can manipulate the function of DCs. These results provide new insight into the immunopharmacological role of niclosamide and suggest that it may be useful for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders or DC-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:24561310

  11. Restricted dendritic cell and monocyte progenitors in human cord blood and bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaeyop; Breton, Gaëlle; Oliveira, Thiago Yukio Kikuchi; Zhou, Yu Jerry; Aljoufi, Arafat; Puhr, Sarah; Cameron, Mark J.; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    In mice, two restricted dendritic cell (DC) progenitors, macrophage/dendritic progenitors (MDPs) and common dendritic progenitors (CDPs), demonstrate increasing commitment to the DC lineage, as they sequentially lose granulocyte and monocyte potential, respectively. Identifying these progenitors has enabled us to understand the role of DCs and monocytes in immunity and tolerance in mice. In humans, however, restricted monocyte and DC progenitors remain unknown. Progress in studying human DC development has been hampered by lack of an in vitro culture system that recapitulates in vivo DC hematopoiesis. Here we report a culture system that supports development of CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell progenitors into the three major human DC subsets, monocytes, granulocytes, and NK and B cells. Using this culture system, we defined the pathway for human DC development and revealed the sequential origin of human DCs from increasingly restricted progenitors: a human granulocyte-monocyte-DC progenitor (hGMDP) that develops into a human monocyte-dendritic progenitor (hMDP), which in turn develops into monocytes, and a human CDP (hCDP) that is restricted to produce the three major DC subsets. The phenotype of the DC progenitors partially overlaps with granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (GMPs). These progenitors reside in human cord blood and bone marrow but not in the blood or lymphoid tissues. PMID:25687283

  12. Human islets and dendritic cells generate post-translationally modified islet autoantigens.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, R J; de Haan, A; Zaldumbide, A; de Koning, E J; de Ru, A H; van Veelen, P A; van Lummel, M; Roep, B O

    2016-08-01

    The initiation of type 1 diabetes (T1D) requires a break in peripheral tolerance. New insights into neoepitope formation indicate that post-translational modification of islet autoantigens, for example via deamidation, may be an important component of disease initiation or exacerbation. Indeed, deamidation of islet autoantigens increases their binding affinity to the T1D highest-risk human leucocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes HLA-DR3/DQ2 and -DR4/DQ8, increasing the chance that T cells reactive to deamidated autoantigens can be activated upon T cell receptor ligation. Here we investigated human pancreatic islets and inflammatory and tolerogenic human dendritic cells (DC and tolDC) as potential sources of deamidated islet autoantigens and examined whether deamidation is altered in an inflammatory environment. Islets, DC and tolDC contained tissue transglutaminase, the key enzyme responsible for peptide deamidation, and enzyme activity increased following an inflammatory insult. Islets treated with inflammatory cytokines were found to contain deamidated insulin C-peptide. DC, heterozygous for the T1D highest-risk DQ2/8, pulsed with native islet autoantigens could present naturally processed deamidated neoepitopes. HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 homozygous DC did not present deamidated islet peptides. This study identifies both human islets and DC as sources of deamidated islet autoantigens and implicates inflammatory activation of tissue transglutaminase as a potential mechanism for islet and DC deamidation. PMID:26861694

  13. Dendritic and Axonal Architecture of Individual Pyramidal Neurons across Layers of Adult Human Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Hemanth; Verhoog, Matthijs B.; Doreswamy, Keerthi K.; Eyal, Guy; Aardse, Romy; Lodder, Brendan N.; Goriounova, Natalia A.; Asamoah, Boateng; B. Brakspear, A.B. Clementine; Groot, Colin; van der Sluis, Sophie; Testa-Silva, Guilherme; Obermayer, Joshua; Boudewijns, Zimbo S.R.M.; Narayanan, Rajeevan T.; Baayen, Johannes C.; Segev, Idan; Mansvelder, Huibert D.; de Kock, Christiaan P.J.

    2015-01-01

    The size and shape of dendrites and axons are strong determinants of neuronal information processing. Our knowledge on neuronal structure and function is primarily based on brains of laboratory animals. Whether it translates to human is not known since quantitative data on “full” human neuronal morphologies are lacking. Here, we obtained human brain tissue during resection surgery and reconstructed basal and apical dendrites and axons of individual neurons across all cortical layers in temporal cortex (Brodmann area 21). Importantly, morphologies did not correlate to etiology, disease severity, or disease duration. Next, we show that human L(ayer) 2 and L3 pyramidal neurons have 3-fold larger dendritic length and increased branch complexity with longer segments compared with temporal cortex neurons from macaque and mouse. Unsupervised cluster analysis classified 88% of human L2 and L3 neurons into human-specific clusters distinct from mouse and macaque neurons. Computational modeling of passive electrical properties to assess the functional impact of large dendrites indicates stronger signal attenuation of electrical inputs compared with mouse. We thus provide a quantitative analysis of “full” human neuron morphologies and present direct evidence that human neurons are not “scaled-up” versions of rodent or macaque neurons, but have unique structural and functional properties. PMID:26318661

  14. The role of human dendritic cells in HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zahra; Kawamura, Tatsuyoshi; Shimada, Shinji; Piguet, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and their subsets have multifaceted roles in the early stages of HIV-1 transmission and infection. DC studies have led to remarkable discoveries, including identification of restriction factors, cellular structures promoting viral transmission including the infectious synapse or the interplay of the C-type lectins, Langerin on Langerhans cells (LCs), and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin on other DC subsets, limiting or facilitating HIV transmission to CD4(+) T cells, respectively. LCs/DCs are also exposed to encountering HIV-1 and other sexually transmitted infections (herpes simplex virus-2, bacteria, fungi), which reprogram HIV-1 interaction with these cells. This review will summarize advances in the role of DCs during HIV-1 infection and discuss their potential involvement in the development of preventive strategies against HIV-1 and other sexually transmitted infections. PMID:25407434

  15. In vitro interaction of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia with human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Roscetto, Emanuela; Vitiello, Laura; Muoio, Rosa; Soriano, Amata A.; Iula, Vita D.; Vollaro, Antonio; Gregorio, Eliana De; Catania, Maria R.

    2015-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is increasingly identified as an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised, cancer and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Knowledge on innate immune responses to S. maltophilia and its potential modulation is poor. The present work investigated the ability of 12 clinical S. maltophilia strains (five from CF patients, seven from non-CF patients) and one environmental strain to survive inside human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). The effects of the bacteria on maturation of and cytokine secretion by DCs were also measured. S. maltophilia strains presented a high degree of heterogeneity in internalization and intracellular replication efficiencies as well as in the ability of S. maltophilia to interfere with normal DCs maturation. By contrast, all S. maltophilia strains were able to activate DCs, as measured by increase in the expression of surface maturation markers and proinflammatory cytokines secretion. PMID:26236302

  16. Plastic downregulation of the transcriptional repressor BCL6 during maturation of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pantano, Serafino . E-mail: serafino.pantano@unil.ch; Jarrossay, David; Saccani, Simona; Bosisio, Daniela; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2006-05-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation links peripheral events initiated by the encounter with pathogens to the activation and expansion of antigen-specific T lymphocytes in secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we describe an as yet unrecognized modulator of human DC maturation, the transcriptional repressor BCL6. We found that both myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs constitutively express BCL6, which is rapidly downregulated following maturation triggered by selected stimuli. Both in unstimulated and maturing DCs, control of BCL6 protein levels reflects the convergence of several mechanisms regulating BCL6 stability, mRNA transcription and nuclear export. By regulating the induction of several genes implicated in the immune response, including inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and survival genes, BCL6 may represent a pivotal modulator of the afferent branch of the immune response.

  17. Regulation of activity-dependent dendritic vasopressin release from rat supraoptic neurones.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Mike; Bull, Philip M; Tobin, Vicky A; Sabatier, Nancy; Landgraf, Rainer; Dayanithi, Govindan; Leng, Gareth

    2005-04-15

    Magnocellular neurones of the hypothalamus release vasopressin and oxytocin from their dendrites and soma. Using a combination of electrophysiology, microdialysis, in vitro explants, and radioimmunoassay we assessed the involvement of intracellular Ca(2+) stores in the regulation of dendritic vasopressin release. Thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid, which mobilize Ca(2+) from intracellular stores of the endoplasmic reticulum, evoked vasopressin release from dendrites and somata of magnocellular neurones in the supraoptic nucleus. Thapsigargin also produced a dramatic potentiation of dendritic vasopressin release evoked by osmotic or high potassium stimulation. This effect is long lasting, time dependent, and specific to thapsigargin as caffeine and ryanodine had no effect. Furthermore, antidromic activation of electrical activity in the cell bodies released vasopressin from dendrites only after thapsigargin pretreatment. Thus, exposure to Ca(2+) mobilizers such as thapsigargin or cyclopiazonic acid primes the releasable pool of vasopressin in the dendrites, so that release can subsequently be evoked by electrical and depolarization-dependent activation. Vasopressin itself is effective in inducing dendritic vasopressin release, but it is ineffective in producing priming. PMID:15731188

  18. Enhancing dendritic cell activation and HIV vaccine effectiveness through nanoparticle vaccination.

    PubMed

    Glass, Joshua J; Kent, Stephen J; De Rose, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Novel vaccination approaches are needed to prevent and control human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. A growing body of literature demonstrates the potential of nanotechnology to modulate the human immune system and generate targeted, controlled immune responses. In this Review, we summarize important advances in how 'nanovaccinology' can be used to develop safe and effective vaccines for HIV. We highlight the central role of dendritic cells in the immune response to vaccination and describe how nanotechnology can be used to enhance delivery to and activation of these important antigen-presenting cells. Strategies employed to improve biodistribution are discussed, including improved lymph node delivery and mucosal penetration concepts, before detailing methods to enhance the humoral and/or cellular immune response to vaccines. We conclude with a commentary on the current state of nanovaccinology. PMID:26783186

  19. Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin itself does not trigger anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 production by human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Villarino Romero, Rodrigo; Hasan, Shakir; Faé, Kellen; Holubova, Jana; Geurtsen, Jeroen; Schwarzer, Martin; Wiertsema, Selma; Osicka, Radim; Poolman, Jan; Sebo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) is an important adhesin of the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis and is contained in most acellular pertussis vaccines. Recently, FHA was proposed to exert an immunomodulatory activity through induction of tolerogenic IL-10 secretion from dendritic cells. We have re-evaluated the cytokine-inducing activity of FHA, placing specific emphasis on the role of the residual endotoxin contamination of FHA preparations. We show that endotoxin depletion did not affect the capacity of FHA to bind primary human monocyte-derived dendritic cells, while it abrogated the capacity of FHA to elicit TNF-α and IL-10 secretion and strongly reduced its capacity to trigger IL-6 production. The levels of cytokines induced by the different FHA preparations correlated with their residual contents of B. pertussis endotoxin. Moreover, FHA failed to trigger cytokine secretion in the presence of antibodies that block TLR2 and/or TLR4 signaling. The TLR2 signaling capacity appeared to be linked to the presence of endotoxin-associated components in FHA preparations and not to the FHA protein itself. These results show that the endotoxin-depleted FHA protein does not induce cytokine release from human dendritic cells. PMID:26699834

  20. Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells Exhibit Increased Levels of Lysosomal Proteolysis as Compared to Other Human Dendritic Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    McCurley, Nathanael; Mellman, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Background Fine control of lysosomal degradation for limited processing of internalized antigens is a hallmark of professional antigen presenting cells. Previous work in mice has shown that dendritic cells (DCs) contain lysosomes with remarkably low protease content. Combined with the ability to modulate lysosomal pH during phagocytosis and maturation, murine DCs enhance their production of class II MHC-peptide complexes for presentation to T cells. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we extend these findings to human DCs and distinguish between different subsets of DCs based on their ability to preserve internalized antigen. Whereas DCs derived in vitro from CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells or isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors are protease poor, DCs derived in vitro from monocytes (MDDCs) are more similar to macrophages (MΦs) in protease content. Unlike other DCs, MDDCs also fail to reduce their intralysosomal pH in response to maturation stimuli. Indeed, functional characterization of lysosomal proteolysis indicates that MDDCs are comparable to MΦs in the rapid degradation of antigen while other human DC subtypes are attenuated in this capacity. Conclusions/Significance Human DCs are comparable to murine DCs in exhibiting a markedly reduced level of lysosomal proteolysis. However, as an important exception to this, human MDDCs stand apart from all other DCs by a heightened capacity for proteolysis that resembles that of MΦs. Thus, caution should be exercised when using human MDDCs as a model for DC function and cell biology. PMID:20689855

  1. Controlled synthesis of m-BiVO4 dendrites for enhanced photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di; Shi, Weidong; Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-08-01

    Well-defined m-BiVO4 dendrites have been synthesized using a simple hydrothermal method without adding organic surfactant. A series of time-dependent experiments were conducted to investigate the shape formation mechanism of the m-BiVO4 dendrites. Furthermore, the corresponding growth mechanism which involved the Ostwald ripening process has been discussed. The m-BiVO4 dendrites showed great enhanced activity in the visible-light photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) solution which might be attributed to the special morphology.

  2. Calmodulin kinase II regulates the maturation and antigen presentation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Tara L; Morita, Craig T; Lee, Kelvin; Kusner, David J

    2005-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells, which activate the adaptive immune system. Upon receiving a danger signal, they undergo a maturation process, which increases their antigen presentation capacity, but the responsible regulatory mechanisms remain incompletely understood. A Ca2+-calmodulin (Cam)-Cam kinase II (CamK II) pathway regulates phagosome maturation in macrophages, and this pathway is inhibited by pathogenic microbes. Our hypothesis is that signal transduction events which control phagosome maturation also regulate antigen presentation. Stimulation of primary human DC or the human DC line KG-1, with particulate antigen, resulted in the activation of CamK II and its localization to the phagosome and plasma membrane. Two mechanistically distinct inhibitors of CamK II significantly reduced DC maturation, as determined by up-regulation of surface costimulatory and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and secretion of cytokines. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that the CamK II inhibitors blocked the antigen-induced increase in total cellular MHC class molecules as well as their trafficking to the plasma membrane. Inhibition of CamK II was associated with decreased presentation of particulate and soluble MHC class II-restricted antigen, with a greater effect on the former. These data support a model in which CamK II regulates critical stages of the maturation and antigen presentation capacity of human DC, particularly in response to stimulation via phagocytosis. PMID:16204647

  3. Hypoxia attenuates anti-Aspergillus fumigatus immune responses initiated by human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Fliesser, Mirjam; Wallstein, Marion; Kurzai, Oliver; Einsele, Hermann; Löffler, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic mould that causes invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA), a life-threatening infection in immunocompromised patients. During the course of IPA, localised areas of tissue hypoxia occur. Bacterial infection models revealed that hypoxic microenvironments modulate the function of host immune cells. However, the influence of hypoxia on anti-fungal immunity has been largely unknown. We evaluated the impact of hypoxia on the human anti-A. fumigatus immune response. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) were stimulated in vitro with germ tubes of A. fumigatus under normoxia or hypoxia (1% O2 ), followed by analysis of DC viability, maturation and cytokine release. While DC viability was unaffected, hypoxia attenuated cytokine release from DCs and maturation of DCs upon stimulation with A. fumigatus. These data suggest that hypoxia at the site of A. fumigatus infection inhibits full activation and function of human DCs. Thereby, this study identified hypoxia as a crucial immune-modulating factor in the human anti-fungal immune response that might influence the course and outcome of IPA in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27005862

  4. Dengue virus NS1 enhances viral replication and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Alayli, Farah; Scholle, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Dengue virus (DV) has become the most prevalent arthropod borne virus due to globalization and climate change. It targets dendritic cells during infection and leads to production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Several DV non-structural proteins (NS) modulate activation of human dendritic cells. We investigated the effect of DV NS1 on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mo-DCs) during dengue infection. NS1 is secreted into the serum of infected individuals where it interacts with various immune mediators and cell types. We purified secreted DV1 NS1 from supernatants of 293T cells that over-express the protein. Upon incubation with mo-DCs, we observed NS1 uptake and enhancement of early DV1 replication. As a consequence, mo-DCs that were pre-exposed to NS1 produced more pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to subsequent DV infection compared to DCs exposed to heat-inactivated NS1 (HNS1). Therefore the presence of exogenous NS1 is able to modulate dengue infection in mo-DCs. PMID:27348054

  5. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase in beryllium-induced dendritic cell activation.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Huang, Z; Gillespie, M; Mroz, P M; Maier, L A

    2014-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a role in the regulation of immune responses to haptens, which in turn impact DC maturation. Whether beryllium (Be) is able to induce DC maturation and if this occurs via the MAPK pathway is not known. Primary monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) models were generated from Be non-exposed healthy volunteers as a non-sensitized cell model, while PBMCs from BeS (Be sensitized) and CBD (chronic beryllium disease) were used as disease models. The response of these cells to Be was evaluated. The expression of CD40 was increased significantly (p<0.05) on HLA-DP Glu69+ moDCs after 100 μM BeSO₄-stimulation. BeSO₄ induced p38MAPK phosphorylation, while IκB-α was degraded in Be-stimulated moDCs. The p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 blocked Be-induced NF-κB activation in moDCs, suggesting that p38MAPK and NF-κB are dependently activated by BeSO₄. Furthermore, in BeS and CBD subjects, SB203580 downregulated Be-stimulated proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, and decreased Be-stimulated TNF-α and IFNγ cytokine production. Taken together, this study suggests that Be-induces non-sensitized Glu69+ DCs maturation, and that p38MAPK signaling is important in the Be-stimulated DCs activation as well as subsequent T cell proliferation and cytokine production in BeS and CBD. In total, the MAPK pathway may serve as a potential therapeutic target for human granulomatous lung diseases. PMID:25454621

  6. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase in beryllium-induced dendritic cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, L.; Huang, Z.; Gillespie, M.; Mroz, P.M.; Maier, L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a role in the regulation of immune responses to haptens, which in turn impact DC maturation. Whether beryllium (Be) is able to induce DC maturation and if this occurs via the MAPK pathway is not known. Primary monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) models were generated from Be non-exposed healthy volunteers as a non-sensitized cell model, while PBMCs from BeS (Be sensitized) and CBD (chronic beryllium disease) were used as disease models. The response of these cells to Be was evaluated. The expression of CD40 was increased significantly (p<0.05) on HLA-DP Glu69+ moDCs after 100 μM BeSO4-stimulation. BeSO4 induced p38MAPK phosphorylation, while IκB-α was degraded in Be-stimulated moDCs. The p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 blocked Be-induced NF-κB activation in moDCs, suggesting that p38MAPK and NF-κB are dependently activated by BeSO4. Furthermore, in BeS and CBD subjects, SB203580 downregulated Be-stimulated proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, and decreased Be-stimulated TNF-α and IFNγ cytokine production. Taken together, this study suggests that Be-induces non-sensitized Glu69+ DCs maturation, and that p38MAPK signaling is important in the Be-stimulated DCs activation as well as subsequent T cell proliferation and cytokine production in BeS and CBD. In total, the MAPK pathway may serve as a potential therapeutic target for human granulomatous lung diseases. PMID:25454621

  7. High mitochondrial respiration and glycolytic capacity represent a metabolic phenotype of human tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Malinarich, Frano; Duan, Kaibo; Hamid, Raudhah Abdull; Bijin, Au; Lin, Wu Xue; Poidinger, Michael; Fairhurst, Anna-Marie; Connolly, John E

    2015-06-01

    Human dendritic cells (DCs) regulate the balance between immunity and tolerance through selective activation by environmental and pathogen-derived triggers. To characterize the rapid changes that occur during this process, we analyzed the underlying metabolic activity across a spectrum of functional DC activation states, from immunogenic to tolerogenic. We found that in contrast to the pronounced proinflammatory program of mature DCs, tolerogenic DCs displayed a markedly augmented catabolic pathway, related to oxidative phosphorylation, fatty acid metabolism, and glycolysis. Functionally, tolerogenic DCs demonstrated the highest mitochondrial oxidative activity, production of reactive oxygen species, superoxide, and increased spare respiratory capacity. Furthermore, assembled, electron transport chain complexes were significantly more abundant in tolerogenic DCs. At the level of glycolysis, tolerogenic and mature DCs showed similar glycolytic rates, but glycolytic capacity and reserve were more pronounced in tolerogenic DCs. The enhanced glycolytic reserve and respiratory capacity observed in these DCs were reflected in a higher metabolic plasticity to maintain intracellular ATP content. Interestingly, tolerogenic and mature DCs manifested substantially different expression of proteins involved in the fatty acid oxidation (FAO) pathway, and FAO activity was significantly higher in tolerogenic DCs. Inhibition of FAO prevented the function of tolerogenic DCs and partially restored T cell stimulatory capacity, demonstrating their dependence on this pathway. Overall, tolerogenic DCs show metabolic signatures of increased oxidative phosphorylation programing, a shift in redox state, and high plasticity for metabolic adaptation. These observations point to a mechanism for rapid genome-wide reprograming by modulation of underlying cellular metabolism during DC differentiation. PMID:25917094

  8. Bacterial infection remodels the DNA methylation landscape of human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Pacis, Alain; Tailleux, Ludovic; Morin, Alexander M.; Lambourne, John; MacIsaac, Julia L.; Yotova, Vania; Dumaine, Anne; Danckaert, Anne; Luca, Francesca; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; Hansen, Kasper D.; Gicquel, Brigitte; Yu, Miao; Pai, Athma; He, Chuan; Tung, Jenny; Pastinen, Tomi; Kobor, Michael S.; Pique-Regi, Roger; Gilad, Yoav; Barreiro, Luis B.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mark thought to be robust to environmental perturbations on a short time scale. Here, we challenge that view by demonstrating that the infection of human dendritic cells (DCs) with a live pathogenic bacteria is associated with rapid and active demethylation at thousands of loci, independent of cell division. We performed an integrated analysis of data on genome-wide DNA methylation, histone mark patterns, chromatin accessibility, and gene expression, before and after infection. We found that infection-induced demethylation rarely occurs at promoter regions and instead localizes to distal enhancer elements, including those that regulate the activation of key immune transcription factors. Active demethylation is associated with extensive epigenetic remodeling, including the gain of histone activation marks and increased chromatin accessibility, and is strongly predictive of changes in the expression levels of nearby genes. Collectively, our observations show that active, rapid changes in DNA methylation in enhancers play a previously unappreciated role in regulating the transcriptional response to infection, even in nonproliferating cells. PMID:26392366

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection induces non-apoptotic cell death of human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) connect innate and adaptive immunity, and are necessary for an efficient CD4+ and CD8+ T cell response after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We previously described the macrophage cell death response to Mtb infection. To investigate the effect of Mtb infection on human DC viability, we infected these phagocytes with different strains of Mtb and assessed viability, as well as DNA fragmentation and caspase activity. In parallel studies, we assessed the impact of infection on DC maturation, cytokine production and bacillary survival. Results Infection of DCs with live Mtb (H37Ra or H37Rv) led to cell death. This cell death proceeded in a caspase-independent manner, and without nuclear fragmentation. In fact, substrate assays demonstrated that Mtb H37Ra-induced cell death progressed without the activation of the executioner caspases, 3/7. Although the death pathway was triggered after infection, the DCs successfully underwent maturation and produced a host-protective cytokine profile. Finally, dying infected DCs were permissive for Mtb H37Ra growth. Conclusions Human DCs undergo cell death after infection with live Mtb, in a manner that does not involve executioner caspases, and results in no mycobactericidal effect. Nonetheless, the DC maturation and cytokine profile observed suggests that the infected cells can still contribute to TB immunity. PMID:22024399

  10. Granzyme B produced by human plasmacytoid dendritic cells suppresses T-cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Vollmer, Angelika; Blackwell, Sue E.; Maier, Julia; Sontheimer, Kai; Beyer, Thamara; Mandel, Birgit; Lunov, Oleg; Tron, Kyrylo; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich; Simmet, Thomas; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Weiner, George J.

    2010-01-01

    Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are crucially involved in the modulation of adaptive T-cell responses in the course of neoplastic, viral, and autoimmune disorders. In several of these diseases elevated extracellular levels of the serine protease granzyme B (GrB) are observed. Here we demonstrate that human pDCs can be an abundant source of GrB and that such GrB+ pDCs potently suppress T-cell proliferation in a GrB-dependent, perforin-independent manner, a process reminiscent of regulatory T cells. Moreover, we show that GrB expression is strictly regulated on a transcriptional level involving Janus kinase 1 (JAK1), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and STAT5 and that interleukin-3 (IL-3), a cytokine secreted by activated T cells, plays a central role for GrB induction. Moreover, we find that the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 enhances, while Toll-like receptor agonists and CD40 ligand strongly inhibit, GrB secretion by pDCs. GrB-secreting pDCs may play a regulatory role for immune evasion of tumors, antiviral immune responses, and autoimmune processes. Our results provide novel information about the complex network of pDC–T-cell interactions and may contribute to an improvement of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccinations. PMID:19965634

  11. β2-Agonist clenbuterol hinders human monocyte differentiation into dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Luciana; Cuzziol, Noemi; Del Pinto, Tamara; Sanchez, Massimo; Maccari, Sonia; Massimi, Alessia; Pietraforte, Donatella; Viora, Marina

    2015-12-10

    Clenbuterol (CLB) is a beta2-adrenergic agonist commonly used in asthma therapy, but is also a non-steroidal anabolic drug often abused in sport doping practices. Here we evaluated the in vitro impact of CLB on the physiology and function of human monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs), instrumental in the development of immune responses. We demonstrate that CLB inhibits the differentiation of monocytes into DCs and this effect is specific and dependent on β2-adrenergic receptor (AR) activation. We found that CLB treatment reduced the percentage of CD1a(+) immature DCs, while increasing the frequency of monocytes retaining CD14 surface expression. Moreover, CLB inhibited tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) enhanced IL-(interleukin)-10 and IL-6 production. In contrast, CLB did not modulate the phenotypic and functional properties of monocytes and DCs, such as the surface expression of HLA-DR, CD83, CD80 and CD86 molecules, cytokine production, immunostimulatory activity and phagocytic activity. Moreover, we found that CLB did not modulate the activation of NF-kB in DCs. Moreover, we found that the differentiation of monocytes into DCs was associated with a significant decrease of β2-ARs mRNA expression. These results provide new insights on the effect of CLB on monocyte differentiation into DCs. Considering the frequent illegal use of CLB in doping, our work suggests that this drug is potentially harmful to immune responses decreasing the supply of DCs, thus subverting immune surveillance. PMID:26524508

  12. Effects of heat shock protein gp96 on human dendritic cell maturation and CTL expansion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxia; Zan, Yanlu; Shan, Ming; Liu, Changmei; Shi, Ming; Li, Wei; Zhang, Zhixin; Liu, Na; Wang, Fusheng; Zhong, Weidong; Liao, Fulian; Gao, George F; Tien, Po

    2006-06-01

    We reported previously that heat shock protein gp96 and its N-terminal fragment were able to stimulate CTL expansion specific for a HBV peptide (SYVNTNMGL) in BALB/c mice. Here we characterized the adjuvant effects of gp96 on human HLA-A2 restricted T cells. Full-length gp96 isolated from healthy human liver and recombinant fragments both from prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells were analyzed for their ability to stimulate maturation of human dendritic cells. It was found that in vitro these proteins were capable of maturating human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC) isolated from healthy donors as well as from HBV-positive, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In HLA-A2.1/Kb transgenic mice, gp96 and the recombinant fragments were found to augment CTL response specific for the HBcAg(18-27) FLPSDFFPSV peptide of hepatitis B virus. PMID:16630554

  13. Activation of inflammasomes in dendritic cells and macrophages by Mycoplasma salivarium.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, M; Saeki, A; Hasebe, A; Kamesaki, R; Yoshida, Y; Kitagawa, Y; Suzuki, T; Shibata, K

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) plays crucial roles in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. It is produced after the processing of pro-IL-1β by caspase-1, which is activated by the inflammasome-a multiprotein complex comprising nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat-containing receptor (NLR), the adaptor protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain (ASC), and procaspase-1. Mycoplasma salivarium preferentially inhabits the gingival sulcus and the incidence and number of organisms in the oral cavity increase significantly with the progression of periodontal disease. To initially clarify the association of this organism with periodontal diseases, this study determined whether it induces IL-1β production by innate immune cells such as dendritic cells or macrophages by using Mycoplasma pneumoniae as a positive control. Both live and heat-killed M. salivarium and M. pneumoniae cells induced IL-1β production by XS106 murine dendritic cells as well as pyroptosis. The activities were significantly downregulated by silencing of caspase-1. Bone-marrow-derived macrophage (BMMs) from wild-type and NLR-containing protein 3 (NLRP3)-, ASC-, and caspase-1-deficient mice were examined for IL-1β production in response to these mycoplasmas. Live M. salivarium and M. pneumoniae cells almost completely lost the ability to induce IL-1β production by BMMs from ASC- and caspase-1-deficient mice. Their activities toward BMMs from NLRP3-deficient mice were significantly but not completely attenuated. These results suggest that live M. salivarium and M. pneumoniae cells can activate several types of inflammasomes including the NLRP3 inflammasome. Both M. salivarium and M. pneumoniae cells can activate THP-1 human monocytic cells to induce IL-1β production. Hence, the present finding that M. salivarium induces IL-1β production by dendritic cells and macrophages may suggest the association of this organism with periodontal diseases

  14. Temporal coherency between receptor expression, neural activity and AP-1-dependent transcription regulates Drosophila motoneuron dendrite development

    PubMed Central

    Vonhoff, Fernando; Kuehn, Claudia; Blumenstock, Sonja; Sanyal, Subhabrata; Duch, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Neural activity has profound effects on the development of dendritic structure. Mechanisms that link neural activity to nuclear gene expression include activity-regulated factors, such as CREB, Crest or Mef2, as well as activity-regulated immediate-early genes, such as fos and jun. This study investigates the role of the transcriptional regulator AP-1, a Fos-Jun heterodimer, in activity-dependent dendritic structure development. We combine genetic manipulation, imaging and quantitative dendritic architecture analysis in a Drosophila single neuron model, the individually identified motoneuron MN5. First, Dα7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and AP-1 are required for normal MN5 dendritic growth. Second, AP-1 functions downstream of activity during MN5 dendritic growth. Third, using a newly engineered AP-1 reporter we demonstrate that AP-1 transcriptional activity is downstream of Dα7 nAChRs and Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling. Fourth, AP-1 can have opposite effects on dendritic development, depending on the timing of activation. Enhancing excitability or AP-1 activity after MN5 cholinergic synapses and primary dendrites have formed causes dendritic branching, whereas premature AP-1 expression or induced activity prior to excitatory synapse formation disrupts dendritic growth. Finally, AP-1 transcriptional activity and dendritic growth are affected by MN5 firing only during development but not in the adult. Our results highlight the importance of timing in the growth and plasticity of neuronal dendrites by defining a developmental period of activity-dependent AP-1 induction that is temporally locked to cholinergic synapse formation and dendritic refinement, thus significantly refining prior models derived from chronic expression studies. PMID:23293292

  15. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits interferon production by a human plasmacytoid dendritic cell line and dysregulates interferon regulatory factor-7 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Stone, Amy E L; Mitchell, Angela; Brownell, Jessica; Miklin, Daniel J; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Polyak, Stephen J; Gale, Michael J; Rosen, Hugo R

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs) represent a key immune cell population in the defense against viruses. pDCs detect viral pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) through pattern recognition receptors (PRR). PRR/PAMP interactions trigger signaling events that induce interferon (IFN) production to initiate local and systemic responses. pDCs produce Type I and Type III (IFNL) IFNs in response to HCV RNA. Extracellular HCV core protein (Core) is found in the circulation in chronic infection. This study defined how Core modulates PRR signaling in pDCs. Type I and III IFN expression and production following exposure to recombinant Core or β-galactosiade was assessed in human GEN2.2 cells, a pDC cell line. Core suppressed type I and III IFN production in response to TLR agonists and the HCV PAMP agonist of RIG-I. Core suppression of IFN induction was linked with decreased IRF-7 protein levels and increased non-phosphorylated STAT1 protein. Circulating Core protein interferes with PRR signaling by pDCs to suppress IFN production. Strategies to define and target Core effects on pDCs may serve to enhance IFN production and antiviral actions against HCV. PMID:24788809

  16. Induction of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase in human dendritic cells by a cholera toxin B subunit-proinsulin vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mbongue, Jacques C; Nicholas, Dequina A; Zhang, Kangling; Kim, Nan-Sun; Hamilton, Brittany N; Larios, Marco; Zhang, Guangyu; Umezawa, Kazuo; Firek, Anthony F; Langridge, William H R

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) interact with naïve T cells to regulate the delicate balance between immunity and tolerance required to maintain immunological homeostasis. In this study, immature human dendritic cells (iDC) were inoculated with a chimeric fusion protein vaccine containing the pancreatic β-cell auto-antigen proinsulin linked to a mucosal adjuvant the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB-INS). Proteomic analysis of vaccine inoculated DCs revealed strong up-regulation of the tryptophan catabolic enzyme indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO1). Increased biosynthesis of the immunosuppressive enzyme was detected in DCs inoculated with the CTB-INS fusion protein but not in DCs inoculated with proinsulin, CTB, or an unlinked combination of the two proteins. Immunoblot and PCR analyses of vaccine treated DCs detected IDO1mRNA by 3 hours and IDO1 protein synthesis by 6 hours after vaccine inoculation. Determination of IDO1 activity in vaccinated DCs by measurement of tryptophan degradation products (kynurenines) showed increased tryptophan cleavage into N-formyl kynurenine. Vaccination did not interfere with monocytes differentiation into DC, suggesting the vaccine can function safely in the human immune system. Treatment of vaccinated DCs with pharmacological NF-κB inhibitors ACHP or DHMEQ significantly inhibited IDO1 biosynthesis, suggesting a role for NF-κB signaling in vaccine up-regulation of dendritic cell IDO1. Heat map analysis of the proteomic data revealed an overall down-regulation of vaccinated DC functions, suggesting vaccine suppression of DC maturation. Together, our experimental data indicate that CTB-INS vaccine induction of IDO1 biosynthesis in human DCs may result in the inhibition of DC maturation generating a durable state of immunological tolerance. Understanding how CTB-INS modulates IDO1 activity in human DCs will facilitate vaccine efficacy and safety, moving this immunosuppressive strategy closer to clinical applications for prevention of type 1

  17. Induction of Indoleamine 2, 3-Dioxygenase in Human Dendritic Cells by a Cholera Toxin B Subunit—Proinsulin Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Mbongue, Jacques C.; Nicholas, Dequina A.; Zhang, Kangling; Kim, Nan-Sun; Hamilton, Brittany N.; Larios, Marco; Zhang, Guangyu; Umezawa, Kazuo; Firek, Anthony F.; Langridge, William H. R.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) interact with naïve T cells to regulate the delicate balance between immunity and tolerance required to maintain immunological homeostasis. In this study, immature human dendritic cells (iDC) were inoculated with a chimeric fusion protein vaccine containing the pancreatic β-cell auto-antigen proinsulin linked to a mucosal adjuvant the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB-INS). Proteomic analysis of vaccine inoculated DCs revealed strong up-regulation of the tryptophan catabolic enzyme indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO1). Increased biosynthesis of the immunosuppressive enzyme was detected in DCs inoculated with the CTB-INS fusion protein but not in DCs inoculated with proinsulin, CTB, or an unlinked combination of the two proteins. Immunoblot and PCR analyses of vaccine treated DCs detected IDO1mRNA by 3 hours and IDO1 protein synthesis by 6 hours after vaccine inoculation. Determination of IDO1 activity in vaccinated DCs by measurement of tryptophan degradation products (kynurenines) showed increased tryptophan cleavage into N-formyl kynurenine. Vaccination did not interfere with monocytes differentiation into DC, suggesting the vaccine can function safely in the human immune system. Treatment of vaccinated DCs with pharmacological NF-κB inhibitors ACHP or DHMEQ significantly inhibited IDO1 biosynthesis, suggesting a role for NF-κB signaling in vaccine up-regulation of dendritic cell IDO1. Heat map analysis of the proteomic data revealed an overall down-regulation of vaccinated DC functions, suggesting vaccine suppression of DC maturation. Together, our experimental data indicate that CTB-INS vaccine induction of IDO1 biosynthesis in human DCs may result in the inhibition of DC maturation generating a durable state of immunological tolerance. Understanding how CTB-INS modulates IDO1 activity in human DCs will facilitate vaccine efficacy and safety, moving this immunosuppressive strategy closer to clinical applications for prevention of type 1

  18. Spherical Lactic Acid Bacteria Activate Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Immunomodulatory Function via TLR9-Dependent Crosstalk with Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jounai, Kenta; Ikado, Kumiko; Sugimura, Tetsu; Ano, Yasuhisa; Braun, Jonathan; Fujiwara, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) are a specialized sensor of viral and bacterial nucleic acids and a major producer of IFN-α that promotes host defense by priming both innate and acquired immune responses. Although synthetic Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, pathogenic bacteria and viruses activate pDC, there is limited investigation of non-pathogenic microbiota that are in wide industrial dietary use, such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In this study, we screened for LAB strains, which induce pDC activation and IFN-α production using murine bone marrow (BM)-derived Flt-3L induced dendritic cell culture. Microbial strains with such activity on pDC were absent in a diversity of bacillary strains, but were observed in certain spherical species (Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Streptococcus and Pediococcus), which was correlated with their capacity for uptake by pDC. Detailed study of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis JCM5805 and JCM20101 revealed that the major type I and type III interferons were induced (IFN-α, -β, and λ). IFN-α induction was TLR9 and MyD88-dependent; a slight impairment was also observed in TLR4-/- cells. While these responses occurred with purified pDC, IFN-α production was synergistic upon co-culture with myeloid dendritic cells (mDC), an interaction that required direct mDC-pDC contact. L. lactis strains also stimulated expression of immunoregulatory receptors on pDC (ICOS-L and PD-L1), and accordingly augmented pDC induction of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg compared to the Lactobacillus strain. Oral administration of L. lactis JCM5805 induced significant activation of pDC resident in the intestinal draining mesenteric lymph nodes, but not in a remote lymphoid site (spleen). Taken together, certain non-pathogenic spherical LAB in wide dietary use has potent and diverse immunomodulatory effects on pDC potentially relevant to anti-viral immunity and chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:22505996

  19. Active dendrites regulate the impact of gliotransmission on rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ashhad, Sufyan; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2016-06-01

    An important consequence of gliotransmission, a signaling mechanism that involves glial release of active transmitter molecules, is its manifestation as N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent slow inward currents in neurons. However, the intraneuronal spatial dynamics of these events or the role of active dendrites in regulating their amplitude and spatial spread have remained unexplored. Here, we used somatic and/or dendritic recordings from rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons and demonstrate that a majority of NMDAR-dependent spontaneous slow excitatory potentials (SEP) originate at dendritic locations and are significantly attenuated through their propagation across the neuronal arbor. We substantiated the astrocytic origin of SEPs through paired neuron-astrocyte recordings, where we found that specific infusion of inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) into either distal or proximal astrocytes enhanced the amplitude and frequency of neuronal SEPs. Importantly, SEPs recorded after InsP3 infusion into distal astrocytes exhibited significantly slower kinetics compared with those recorded after proximal infusion. Furthermore, using neuron-specific infusion of pharmacological agents and morphologically realistic conductance-based computational models, we demonstrate that dendritically expressed hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated (HCN) and transient potassium channels play critical roles in regulating the strength, kinetics, and compartmentalization of neuronal SEPs. Finally, through the application of subtype-specific receptor blockers during paired neuron-astrocyte recordings, we provide evidence that GluN2B- and GluN2D-containing NMDARs predominantly mediate perisomatic and dendritic SEPs, respectively. Our results unveil an important role for active dendrites in regulating the impact of gliotransmission on neurons and suggest astrocytes as a source of dendritic plateau potentials that have been implicated in localized plasticity and place cell

  20. Natural antibodies sustain differentiation and maturation of human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Donkova-Petrini, Vladimira; Carbonneil, Cédric; Misra, Namita; Lepelletier, Yves; Delignat, Sandrine; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Oksenhendler, Eric; Lévy, Yves; Debré, Marianne; Kazatchkine, Michel D.; Hermine, Olivier; Kaveri, Srini V.

    2004-01-01

    The differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) is governed by various signals in the microenvironment. Monocytes and DCs circulate in peripheral blood, which contains high levels of natural antibodies (NAbs). NAbs are germ-line-encoded and occur in the absence of deliberate immunization or microbial aggression. To assess the importance of NAbs in the milieu on DC development, we examined the status of DCs in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia, a disease characterized by paucity of B cells and circulating antibodies. We demonstrate that the in vitro differentiation of DCs is severely impaired in these patients, at least in part because of low levels of circulating NAbs. We identified NAbs reactive with the CD40 molecule as an important component that participates in the development of DCs. CD40-reactive NAbs restored normal phenotypes of DCs in patients. The maturation process induced by CD40-reactive NAbs was accompanied by an increased IL-10 and decreased IL-12 production. The transcription factor analysis revealed distinct signaling pathways operated by CD40-reactive NAbs compared to those by CD40 ligand. These results suggest that B cells promote bystander DC development through NAbs and the interaction between NAbs and DCs may play a role in steady-state migration of DCs. PMID:15381781

  1. Thimerosal compromises human dendritic cell maturation, IL-12 production, chemokine release, and T-helper polarization

    PubMed Central

    Loison, Emily; Gougeon, Marie-Lise

    2014-01-01

    Thimerosal is a preservative used in multidose vials of vaccine formulations to prevent bacterial and fungal contamination. We recently reported that nanomolar concentrations of thimerosal induce cell cycle arrest of human T cells activated via the TCR and inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine production, thus interfering with T-cell functions. Given the essential role of dendritic cells (DCs) in T-cell polarization and vaccine immunity, we studied the influence of non-toxic concentrations of thimerosal on DC maturation and functions. Ex-vivo exposure of human monocyte-derived DCs to nanomolar concentrations of thimerosal prevented LPS-induced DC maturation, as evidenced by the inhibition of morphological changes and a decreased expression of the maturation markers CD86 and HLA-DR. In addition thimerosal dampened their proinflammatory response, in particular the production of the Th1 polarizing cytokine IL-12, as well as TNF-α and IL-6. DC-dependent T helper polarization was altered, leading to a decreased production of IFN-γ IP10 and GM-CSF and increased levels of IL-8, IL-9, and MIP-1α. Although multi-dose vials of vaccines containing thimerosal remain important for vaccine delivery, our results alert about the ex-vivo immunomodulatory effects of thimerosal on DCs, a key player for the induction of an adaptive response PMID:25424939

  2. Communication between Human Dendritic Cell Subsets in Tuberculosis: Requirements for Naive CD4+ T Cell Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lozza, Laura; Farinacci, Maura; Bechtle, Marina; Stäber, Manuela; Zedler, Ulrike; Baiocchini, Andrea; del Nonno, Franca; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    2014-01-01

    Human primary dendritic cells (DCs) are heterogeneous by phenotype, function, and tissue localization and distinct from inflammatory monocyte-derived DCs. Current information regarding the susceptibility and functional role of primary human DC subsets to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is limited. Here, we dissect the response of different primary DC subsets to Mtb infection. Myeloid CD11c+ cells and pDCs (C-type lectin 4C+ cells) were located in human lymph nodes (LNs) of tuberculosis (TB) patients by histochemistry. Rare CD141hi DCs (C-type lectin 9A+ cells) were also identified. Infection with live Mtb revealed a higher responsiveness of myeloid CD1c+ DCs compared to CD141hi DCs and pDCs. CD1c+ DCs produced interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor α, and IL-1β but not IL-12p70, a cytokine important for Th1 activation and host defenses against Mtb. Yet, CD1c+ DCs were able to activate autologous naïve CD4+ T cells. By combining cell purification with fluorescence-activated cell sorting and gene expression profiling on rare cell populations, we detected in responding CD4+ T cells, genes related to effector-cytolytic functions and transcription factors associated with Th1, Th17, and Treg polarization, suggesting multifunctional properties in our experimental conditions. Finally, immunohistologic analyses revealed contact between CD11c+ cells and pDCs in LNs of TB patients and in vitro data suggest that cooperation between Mtb-infected CD1c+ DCs and pDCs favors stimulation of CD4+ T cells. PMID:25071784

  3. Herbal medicine IMOD suppresses LPS-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines in human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaee, Saeedeh; Drewniak, Agata; Sarrami-Forooshani, Ramin; Kaptein, Tanja M.; Gharibdoost, Farhad; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional medicines that stimulate or modulate the immune system can be used as innovative approaches to treat immunological diseases. The herbal medicine IMOD has been shown to strongly modulate immune responses in several animal studies as well as in clinical trials. However, little is known about the mechanisms of IMOD to modulate immunity. Here we have investigated whether IMOD modulates the immunological function of human dendritic cells (DCs). IMOD alone did not induce DC maturation nor production of cytokines. Notably, IMOD decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-12 p70, and TNFα by LPS-activated DCs at both mRNA and protein levels in a dose dependent manner. In contrast, treatment with IMOD did not affect LPS induced-production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Furthermore, IMOD inhibited T cell activation/proliferation by LPS-treated DCs and skewed T-cells responses toward the T helper type 2 polarization. These data strongly indicate that IMOD has a potent immunomodulatory ability that affects TLR signaling and thereby modulates DC function. Insight into the immunomodulatory effect of herbal medicine IMOD may provide innovative strategies to affect the immune system and to help combat various diseases. PMID:25870561

  4. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTPRS Is an Inhibitory Receptor on Human and Murine Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Bunin, Anna; Sisirak, Vanja; Ghosh, Hiyaa S; Grajkowska, Lucja T; Hou, Z Esther; Miron, Michelle; Yang, Cliff; Ceribelli, Michele; Uetani, Noriko; Chaperot, Laurence; Plumas, Joel; Hendriks, Wiljan; Tremblay, Michel L; Häcker, Hans; Staudt, Louis M; Green, Peter H; Bhagat, Govind; Reizis, Boris

    2015-08-18

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are primary producers of type I interferon (IFN) in response to viruses. The IFN-producing capacity of pDCs is regulated by specific inhibitory receptors, yet none of the known receptors are conserved in evolution. We report that within the human immune system, receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma (PTPRS) is expressed specifically on pDCs. Surface PTPRS was rapidly downregulated after pDC activation, and only PTPRS(-) pDCs produced IFN-α. Antibody-mediated PTPRS crosslinking inhibited pDC activation, whereas PTPRS knockdown enhanced IFN response in a pDC cell line. Similarly, murine Ptprs and the homologous receptor phosphatase Ptprf were specifically co-expressed in murine pDCs. Haplodeficiency or DC-specific deletion of Ptprs on Ptprf-deficient background were associated with enhanced IFN response of pDCs, leukocyte infiltration in the intestine and mild colitis. Thus, PTPRS represents an evolutionarily conserved pDC-specific inhibitory receptor, and is required to prevent spontaneous IFN production and immune-mediated intestinal inflammation. PMID:26231120

  5. Interaction of Rotavirus with Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Narváez, Carlos F.; Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A.

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown that very few rotavirus (RV)-specific T cells that secrete gamma interferon circulate in recently infected and seropositive adults and children. Here, we have studied the interaction of RV with myeloid immature (IDC) and mature dendritic cells (MDC) in vitro. RV did not induce cell death of IDC or MDC and induced maturation of between 12 and 48% of IDC. Nonetheless, RV did not inhibit the maturation of IDC or change the expression of maturation markers on MDC. After treatment with RV, few IDC expressed the nonstructural viral protein NSP4. In contrast, a discrete productive viral infection was shown in MDC of a subset of volunteers, and between 3 and 46% of these cells expressed NSP4. RV-treated IDC secreted interleukin 6 (IL-6) (but not IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor alpha, or transforming growth factor beta), and MDC released IL-6 and small amounts of IL-10 and IL-12p70. The patterns of cytokines secreted by T cells stimulated by staphylococcal enterotoxin B presented by MDC infected with RV or uninfected were comparable. The frequencies and patterns of cytokines secreted by memory RV-specific T cells evidenced after stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with RV were similar to those evidenced after stimulation of PBMC with RV-infected MDC. Finally, IDC treated with RV strongly stimulated naive allogeneic CD4+ T cells to secrete Th1 cytokines. Thus, although RV does not seem to be a strong maturing stimulus for DC, it promotes their capacity to prime Th1 cells. PMID:16282452

  6. Active colonization dynamics and diversity patterns are influenced by dendritic network connectivity and species interactions

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Mathew; Altermatt, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Habitat network connectivity influences colonization dynamics, species invasions, and biodiversity patterns. Recent theoretical work suggests dendritic networks, such as those found in rivers, alter expectations regarding colonization and dispersal dynamics compared with other network types. As many native and non-native species are spreading along river networks, this may have important ecological implications. However, experimental studies testing the effects of network structure on colonization and diversity patterns are scarce. Up to now, experimental studies have only considered networks where sites are connected with small corridors, or dispersal was experimentally controlled, which eliminates possible effects of species interactions on colonization dynamics. Here, we tested the effect of network connectivity and species interactions on colonization dynamics using continuous linear and dendritic (i.e., river-like) networks, which allow for active dispersal. We used a set of six protist species and one rotifer species in linear and dendritic microcosm networks. At the start of the experiment, we introduced species, either singularly or as a community within the networks. Species subsequently actively colonized the networks. We periodically measured densities of species throughout the networks over 2 weeks to track community dynamics, colonization, and diversity patterns. We found that colonization of dendritic networks was faster compared with colonization of linear networks, which resulted in higher local mean species richness in dendritic networks. Initially, community similarity was also greater in dendritic networks compared with linear networks, but this effect vanished over time. The presence of species interactions increased community evenness over time, compared with extrapolations from single-species setups. Our experimental findings confirm previous theoretical work and show that network connectivity, species-specific dispersal ability, and species

  7. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor serves as adjuvant by activating dendritic cells through stimulation of TLR4.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Heung; Kim, Young Seob; Kim, Seokho; Yang, Benjamin; Lee, Je-Jung; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Jaemin; Jung, In Duk; Han, Hee Dong; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Koh, Sang Seok; Wu, T-C; Park, Yeong-Min

    2015-09-29

    Dendritic cell (DC) based cancer vaccines represent a promising immunotherapeutic strategy against cancer. To enhance the modest immunogenicity of DC vaccines, various adjuvants are often incorporated. Particularly, most of the common adjuvants are derived from bacteria. In the current study, we evaluate the use of a human pancreatic cancer derived protein, pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), as a novel DC vaccine adjuvant. We show that PAUF can induce activation and maturation of DCs and activate NFkB by stimulating the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. Furthermore, vaccination with PAUF treated DCs pulsed with E7 or OVA peptides leads to generation of E7 or OVA-specific CD8+ T cells and memory T cells, which correlate with long term tumor protection and antitumor effects against TC-1 and EG.7 tumors in mice. Finally, we demonstrated that PAUF mediated DC activation and immune stimulation are dependent on TLR4. Our data provides evidence supporting PAUF as a promising adjuvant for DC based therapies, which can be applied in conjunction with other cancer therapies. Most importantly, our results serve as a reference for future investigation of human based adjuvants. PMID:26336989

  8. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor serves as adjuvant by activating dendritic cells through stimulation of TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Benjamin; Lee, Je-Jung; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Jaemin; Jung, In Duk; Han, Hee Dong; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Koh, Sang Seok; Wu, T.-C.; Park, Yeong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) based cancer vaccines represent a promising immunotherapeutic strategy against cancer. To enhance the modest immunogenicity of DC vaccines, various adjuvants are often incorporated. Particularly, most of the common adjuvants are derived from bacteria. In the current study, we evaluate the use of a human pancreatic cancer derived protein, pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), as a novel DC vaccine adjuvant. We show that PAUF can induce activation and maturation of DCs and activate NFkB by stimulating the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. Furthermore, vaccination with PAUF treated DCs pulsed with E7 or OVA peptides leads to generation of E7 or OVA-specific CD8+ T cells and memory T cells, which correlate with long term tumor protection and antitumor effects against TC-1 and EG.7 tumors in mice. Finally, we demonstrated that PAUF mediated DC activation and immune stimulation are dependent on TLR4. Our data provides evidence supporting PAUF as a promising adjuvant for DC based therapies, which can be applied in conjunction with other cancer therapies. Most importantly, our results serve as a reference for future investigation of human based adjuvants. PMID:26336989

  9. Enhancing anti-melanoma immunity by electrochemotherapy and in vivo dendritic-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Gerlini, Gianni; Di Gennaro, Paola; Borgognoni, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Combining electrochemotherapy with dendritic cell-based immunotherapy is a promising strategy against human metastatic melanoma that deserves to be clinically assessed. While electrochemotherapy induces a rapid regression of metastases, immunotherapy generates systemic anticancer immunity, contributes to eradicate the tumor and maintains an immunological memory to control relapse. PMID:23264927

  10. Responsiveness of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells to thimerosal and mercury derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Migdal, C.; Tailhardat, M.; Courtellemont, P.; Haftek, M.; Serres, M.

    2010-07-15

    Several cases of skin sensitization have been reported following the application of thimerosal, which is composed of ethyl mercury and thiosalicylic acid (TSA). However, few in vitro studies have been carried out on human dendritic cells (DCs) which play an essential role in the initiation of allergic contact dermatitis. The aim of the present study was to identify the effect of thimerosal and other mercury compounds on human DCs. To address this purpose, DCs derived from monocytes (mono-DCs) were used. Data show that thimerosal and mercury derivatives induced DC activation, as monitored by CD86 and HLA-DR overexpression associated with the secretion of tumor necrosis factor {alpha} and interleukin 8, similarly to lipopolysaccharide and the sensitizers, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB) and nickel sulfate, which were used as positive controls. In contrast, TSA, the non-mercury part of thimerosal, as well as dichloronitrobenzene, a DNCB negative control, and the irritant, sodium dodecyl sulfate, had no effect. Moreover, oxidative stress, monitored by ROS induction and depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, was induced by thimerosal and mercury compounds, as well as DNCB, in comparison with hydrogen peroxide, used as a positive control. The role of thiol oxidation in the initiation of mono-DC activation was confirmed by a pre-treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine which strongly decreased chemical-induced CD86 overexpression. These data are in agreement with several clinical observations of the high relevance of thimerosal in patch-test reactions and prove that human mono-DCs are useful in vitro tools for determining the allergenic potency of chemicals.

  11. Phenotypic and functional activation of hyporesponsive KIRnegNKG2Aneg human NK-cell precursors requires IL12p70 provided by Poly(I:C)-matured monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Curran, Shane A; Romano, Emanuela; Kennedy, Michael G; Hsu, Katharine C; Young, James W

    2014-10-01

    A functionally responsive natural killer (NK)-cell repertoire requires the acquisition of inhibitory NKG2A and killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) through pathways that remain undefined. Functional donor NK cells expressing KIRs for non-self class I MHC ligands contribute to a positive outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) by targeting HLA-matched recipient leukemic cells. Insofar as circulating donor conventional dendritic cells (DC) reconstitute with comparable kinetics with donor NK cells after alloHSCT, we used hyporesponsive KIRnegNKG2Aneg precursor cells to evaluate how specific DC subtypes generate a functionally active NK-cell repertoire. Both monocyte-derived DCs (moDC) and Langerhans-type DCs (LC) induce KIRnegNKG2Aneg precursor cells to express the inhibitory receptors NKG2A and KIR, without requiring cell proliferation. Poly(I:C)-matured moDCs significantly augmented the expression of NKG2A, but not KIR, in an IL12p70-dependent manner. Although all DC-stimulated KIRnegNKG2Aneg cells were able to acquire cytolytic activity against class I MHC-negative targets, the ability to secrete IFNγ was restricted to cells that were stimulated by IL12p70-producing, poly(I:C)-matured moDCs. This critical ability of poly(I:C)-matured moDCs to provide IL12p70 to developing KIRnegNKG2Aneg precursors results in a dom4inant, multifunctional, NKG2Apos NK-cell population that is capable of both cytolysis and IFNγ production. Poly(I:C)-matured moDCs are, therefore, the most effective conventional DC subtype for generating a functionally competent NK-cell repertoire by an IL12p70-dependent mechanism. PMID:25023628

  12. Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 2 Vector Induces Dendritic Cell Maturation Without Viral RNA Replication/Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Kenichiro; Fukumura, Masayuki; Ohtsuka, Junpei; Kawano, Mitsuo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The dendritic cell (DC), a most potent antigen-presenting cell, plays a key role in vaccine therapy against infectious diseases and malignant tumors. Although advantages of viral vectors for vaccine therapy have been reported, potential risks for adverse effects prevent them from being licensed for clinical use. Human parainfluenza virus type 2 (hPIV2), one of the members of the Paramyxoviridae family, is a nonsegmented and negative-stranded RNA virus. We have developed a reverse genetics system for the production of infectious hPIV2 lacking the F gene (hPIV2ΔF), wherein various advantages for vaccine therapy exist, such as cytoplasmic replication/transcription, nontransmissible infectivity, and extremely high transduction efficacy in various types of target cells. Here we demonstrate that hPIV2ΔF shows high transduction efficiency in human DCs, while not so high in mouse DCs. In addition, hPIV2ΔF sufficiently induces maturation of both human and murine DCs, and the maturation state of both human and murine DCs is almost equivalent to that induced by lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, alkylating agent β-propiolactone-inactivated hPIV2ΔF (BPL-hPIV2ΔF) elicits DC maturation without viral replication/transcription. These results suggest that hPIV2ΔF may be a useful tool for vaccine therapy as a novel type of paramyxoviral vector, which is single-round infectious vector and has potential adjuvant activity. PMID:23790317

  13. Bordetella pertussis Naturally Occurring Isolates with Altered Lipooligosaccharide Structure Fail To Fully Mature Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brummelman, Jolanda; Veerman, Rosanne E.; Hamstra, Hendrik Jan; Deuss, Anna J. M.; Schuijt, Tim J.; Sloots, Arjen; Kuipers, Betsy; van Els, Cécile A. C. M.; van der Ley, Peter; Mooi, Frits R.; Han, Wanda G. H.

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis is a Gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of whooping cough. Despite high vaccination coverage, outbreaks are being increasingly reported worldwide. Possible explanations include adaptation of this pathogen, which may interfere with recognition by the innate immune system. Here, we describe innate immune recognition and responses to different B. pertussis clinical isolates. By using HEK-Blue cells transfected with different pattern recognition receptors, we found that 3 out of 19 clinical isolates failed to activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). These findings were confirmed by using the monocytic MM6 cell line. Although incubation with high concentrations of these 3 strains resulted in significant activation of the MM6 cells, it was found to occur mainly through interaction with TLR2 and not through TLR4. When using live bacteria, these 3 strains also failed to activate TLR4 on HEK-Blue cells, and activation of MM6 cells or human monocyte-derived dendritic cells was significantly lower than activation induced by the other 16 strains. Mass spectrum analysis of the lipid A moieties from these 3 strains indicated an altered structure of this molecule. Gene sequence analysis revealed mutations in genes involved in lipid A synthesis. Findings from this study indicate that B. pertussis isolates that do not activate TLR4 occur naturally and that this phenotype may give this bacterium an advantage in tempering the innate immune response and establishing infection. Knowledge on the strategies used by this pathogen in evading the host immune response is essential for the improvement of current vaccines or for the development of new ones. PMID:25348634

  14. Bexarotene-Activated Retinoid X Receptors Regulate Neuronal Differentiation and Dendritic Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Mounier, Anais; Georgiev, Danko; Nam, Kyong Nyon; Fitz, Nicholas F.; Castranio, Emilie L.; Wolfe, Cody M.; Cronican, Andrea A.; Schug, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Bexarotene-activated retinoid X receptors (RXRs) ameliorate memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease mouse models, including mice expressing human apolipoprotein E (APOE) isoforms. The goal of this study was to gain further insight into molecular mechanisms whereby ligand-activated RXR can affect or restore cognitive functions. We used an unbiased approach to discover genome-wide changes in RXR cistrome (ChIP-Seq) and gene expression profile (RNA-Seq) in response to bexarotene in the cortex of APOE4 mice. Functional categories enriched in both datasets revealed that bexarotene-liganded RXR affected signaling pathways associated with neurogenesis and neuron projection development. To further validate the significance of RXR for these functions, we used mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, primary neurons, and APOE3 and APOE4 mice treated with bexarotene. In vitro data from ES cells confirmed that bexarotene-activated RXR affected neuronal development at different levels, including proliferation of neural progenitors and neuronal differentiation, and stimulated neurite outgrowth. This effect was validated in vivo by demonstrating an increased number of neuronal progenitors after bexarotene treatment in the dentate gyrus of APOE3 and APOE4 mice. In primary neurons, bexarotene enhanced the dendritic complexity characterized by increased branching, intersections, and bifurcations. This effect was confirmed by in vivo studies demonstrating that bexarotene significantly improved the compromised dendritic structure in the hippocampus of APOE4 mice. We conclude that bexarotene-activated RXRs promote genetic programs involved in the neurogenesis and development of neuronal projections and these results have significance for the improvement of cognitive deficits. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Bexarotene-activated retinoid X receptors (RXRs) ameliorate memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease mouse models, including mice expressing human apolipoprotein E (APOE) isoforms. The goal of this

  15. DOCK8 is a Cdc42 activator critical for interstitial dendritic cell migration during immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Yosuke; Tanaka, Yoshihiko; Terasawa, Masao; Pieczyk, Markus; Habiro, Katsuyoshi; Katakai, Tomoya; Hanawa-Suetsugu, Kyoko; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Nishizaki, Tomoko; Shirouzu, Mikako; Duan, Xuefeng; Uruno, Takehito; Nishikimi, Akihiko; Sanematsu, Fumiyuki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Stein, Jens V.; Kinashi, Tatsuo

    2012-01-01

    To migrate efficiently through the interstitium, dendritic cells (DCs) constantly adapt their shape to the given structure of the extracellular matrix and follow the path of least resistance. It is known that this amoeboid migration of DCs requires Cdc42, yet the upstream regulators critical for localization and activation of Cdc42 remain to be determined. Mutations of DOCK8, a member of the atypical guanine nucleotide exchange factor family, causes combined immunodeficiency in humans. In the present study, we show that DOCK8 is a Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor that is critical for interstitial DC migration. By generating the knockout mice, we found that in the absence of DOCK8, DCs failed to accumulate in the lymph node parenchyma for T-cell priming. Although DOCK8-deficient DCs migrated normally on 2-dimensional surfaces, DOCK8 was required for DCs to crawl within 3-dimensional fibrillar networks and to transmigrate through the subcapsular sinus floor. This function of DOCK8 depended on the DHR-2 domain mediating Cdc42 activation. DOCK8 deficiency did not affect global Cdc42 activity. However, Cdc42 activation at the leading edge membrane was impaired in DOCK8-deficient DCs, resulting in a severe defect in amoeboid polarization and migration. Therefore, DOCK8 regulates interstitial DC migration by controlling Cdc42 activity spatially. PMID:22461490

  16. Rem2 Is an Activity-Dependent Negative Regulator of Dendritic Complexity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ghiretti, Amy E.; Moore, Anna R.; Brenner, Rebecca G.; Chen, Liang-Fu; West, Anne E.; Lau, Nelson C.; Van Hooser, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    A key feature of the CNS is structural plasticity, the ability of neurons to alter their morphology and connectivity in response to sensory experience and other changes in the environment. How this structural plasticity is achieved at the molecular level is not well understood. We provide evidence that changes in sensory experience simultaneously trigger multiple signaling pathways that either promote or restrict growth of the dendritic arbor; structural plasticity is achieved through a balance of these opposing signals. Specifically, we have uncovered a novel, activity-dependent signaling pathway that restricts dendritic arborization. We demonstrate that the GTPase Rem2 is regulated at the transcriptional level by calcium influx through L-VGCCs and inhibits dendritic arborization in cultured rat cortical neurons and in the Xenopus laevis tadpole visual system. Thus, our results demonstrate that changes in neuronal activity initiate competing signaling pathways that positively and negatively regulate the growth of the dendritic arbor. It is the balance of these opposing signals that leads to proper dendritic morphology. PMID:24403140

  17. Licensed human natural killer cells aid dendritic cell maturation via TNFSF14/LIGHT

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Tim D.; Wilson, Erica B.; Black, Emma V. I.; Benest, Andrew V.; Vaz, Candida; Tan, Betty; Tanavde, Vivek M.; Cook, Graham P.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DCs) aid DC maturation and promote T-cell responses. Here, we have analyzed the response of human NK cells to tumor cells, and we identify a pathway by which NK–DC interactions occur. Gene expression profiling of tumor-responsive NK cells identified the very rapid induction of TNF superfamily member 14 [TNFSF14; also known as homologous to lymphotoxins, exhibits inducible expression, and competes with HSV glycoprotein D for HVEM, a receptor expressed by T lymphocytes (LIGHT)], a cytokine implicated in the enhancement of antitumor responses. TNFSF14 protein expression was induced by three primary mechanisms of NK cell activation, namely, via the engagement of CD16, by the synergistic activity of multiple target cell-sensing NK-cell activation receptors, and by the cytokines IL-2 and IL-15. For antitumor responses, TNFSF14 was preferentially produced by the licensed NK-cell population, defined by the expression of inhibitory receptors specific for self-MHC class I molecules. In contrast, IL-2 and IL-15 treatment induced TNFSF14 production by both licensed and unlicensed NK cells, reflecting the ability of proinflammatory conditions to override the licensing mechanism. Importantly, both tumor- and cytokine-activated NK cells induced DC maturation in a TNFSF14-dependent manner. The coupling of TNFSF14 production to tumor-sensing NK-cell activation receptors links the tumor immune surveillance function of NK cells to DC maturation and adaptive immunity. Furthermore, regulation by NK cell licensing helps to safeguard against TNFSF14 production in response to healthy tissues. PMID:25512551

  18. Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Inhibits Dendritic Cell Activation and Attenuates Nephritis in a Mouse Model of Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Elshikha, Ahmed S.; Lu, Yuanqing; Chen, Mong-Jen; Akbar, Mohammad; Zeumer, Leilani; Ritter, Andrea; Elghamry, Hanaa; Mahdi, Mahmoud A.; Morel, Laurence; Song, Sihong

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder with a worldwide distribution and considerable mortality and morbidity. Although the pathogenesis of this disease remains elusive, over-reactive dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the disease development. It has been shown that human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT) has protective effects in type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis mouse models. In the present study, we tested the effect of AAT on DC differentiation and functions, as well as its protective effect in a lupus-prone mouse model. We showed that hAAT treatment significantly inhibited LPS (TLR4 agonist) and CpG (TLR9 agonist) -induced bone-marrow (BM)-derived conventional and plasmacytoid DC (cDC and pDC) activation and reduced the production of inflammatory cytokines including IFN-I, TNF-α and IL-1β. In MRL/lpr mice, hAAT treatment significantly reduced BM-derived DC differentiation, serum autoantibody levels, and importantly attenuated renal pathology. Our results for the first time demonstrate that hAAT inhibits DC activation and function, and it also attenuates autoimmunity and renal damage in the MRL/lpr lupus model. These results imply that hAAT has a therapeutic potential for the treatment of SLE in humans. PMID:27232337

  19. Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Inhibits Dendritic Cell Activation and Attenuates Nephritis in a Mouse Model of Lupus.

    PubMed

    Elshikha, Ahmed S; Lu, Yuanqing; Chen, Mong-Jen; Akbar, Mohammad; Zeumer, Leilani; Ritter, Andrea; Elghamry, Hanaa; Mahdi, Mahmoud A; Morel, Laurence; Song, Sihong

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder with a worldwide distribution and considerable mortality and morbidity. Although the pathogenesis of this disease remains elusive, over-reactive dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the disease development. It has been shown that human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT) has protective effects in type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis mouse models. In the present study, we tested the effect of AAT on DC differentiation and functions, as well as its protective effect in a lupus-prone mouse model. We showed that hAAT treatment significantly inhibited LPS (TLR4 agonist) and CpG (TLR9 agonist) -induced bone-marrow (BM)-derived conventional and plasmacytoid DC (cDC and pDC) activation and reduced the production of inflammatory cytokines including IFN-I, TNF-α and IL-1β. In MRL/lpr mice, hAAT treatment significantly reduced BM-derived DC differentiation, serum autoantibody levels, and importantly attenuated renal pathology. Our results for the first time demonstrate that hAAT inhibits DC activation and function, and it also attenuates autoimmunity and renal damage in the MRL/lpr lupus model. These results imply that hAAT has a therapeutic potential for the treatment of SLE in humans. PMID:27232337

  20. The intimate relationship between human cytomegalovirus and the dendritic cell lineage

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, John; Reeves, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Primary infection of healthy individuals with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is normally asymptomatic but results in the establishment of a lifelong infection of the host. One important cellular reservoir of HCMV latency is the CD34+ haematopoietic progenitor cells resident in the bone marrow. Viral gene expression is highly restricted in these cells with an absence of viral progeny production. However, cellular differentiation into mature myeloid cells is concomitant with the induction of a full lytic transcription program, DNA replication and, ultimately, the production of infectious viral progeny. Such reactivation of HCMV is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in a number of immune-suppressed patient populations. Our current understanding of HCMV carriage and reactivation is that cellular differentiation of the CD34+ progenitor cells through the myeloid lineage, resulting in terminal differentiation to either a macrophage or dendritic cell (DC) phenotype, is crucial for the reactivation event. In this mini-review, we focus on the interaction of HCMV with DCs, with a particular emphasis on their role in reactivation, and discuss how the critical regulation of viral major immediate-early gene expression appears to be delicately entwined with the activation of cellular pathways in differentiating DCs. Furthermore, we also explore the possible immune consequences associated with reactivation in a professional antigen presenting cell and potential countermeasures HCMV employs to abrogate these. PMID:25147545

  1. The effect of human immunodeficiency virus-1 on monocyte-derived dendritic cell maturation and function

    PubMed Central

    Fairman, P; Angel, J B

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are mediators of the adaptive immune response responsible for antigen presentation to naive T cells in secondary lymph organs. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) has been reported to inhibit the maturation of DC, but a clear link between maturation and function has not been elucidated. To understand further the effects of HIV-1 on DC maturation and function, we expanded upon previous investigations and assessed the effects of HIV-1 infection on the expression of surface molecules, carbohydrate endocytosis, antigen presentation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responsiveness over the course of maturation. In vitro infection with HIV-1 resulted in an increase in the expression of DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) as well as decreases in maturation-induced CCR7 and major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-II expression. Retention of endocytosis that normally occurs with DC maturation as well as inhibition of antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells was also observed. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) responsiveness to LPS as measured by phosphorylation of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 was not affected by HIV-1 infection. In summary, in-vitro HIV-1 impairs DC maturation, as defined by cell surface protein expression, with selective alterations in mature DC function. Understanding the mechanisms of DC dysfunction in HIV infection will provide further insight into HIV immune pathogenesis. PMID:22943206

  2. Impact of Mycobacterium tuberculosis RD1-locus on human primary dendritic cell immune functions.

    PubMed

    Etna, Marilena P; Giacomini, Elena; Pardini, Manuela; Severa, Martina; Bottai, Daria; Cruciani, Melania; Rizzo, Fabiana; Calogero, Raffaele; Brosch, Roland; Coccia, Eliana M

    2015-01-01

    Modern strategies to develop vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) aim to improve the current Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine or to attenuate the virulence of Mtb vaccine candidates. In the present study, the impact of wild type or mutated region of difference 1 (RD1) variants on the immunogenicity of Mtb and BCG recombinants was investigated in human primary dendritic cells (DC). A comparative analysis of transcriptome, signalling pathway activation, maturation, apoptosis, cytokine production and capacity to promote Th1 responses demonstrated that DC sense quantitative and qualitative differences in the expression of RD1-encoded factors--ESAT6 and CFP10--within BCG or Mtb backgrounds. Expansion of IFN-γ producing T cells was promoted by BCG::RD1-challenged DC, as compared to their BCG-infected counterparts. Although Mtb recombinants acted as a strong Th-1 promoting stimulus, even with RD1 deletion, the attenuated Mtb strain carrying a C-terminus truncated ESAT-6 elicited a robust Th1 promoting phenotype in DC. Collectively, these studies indicate a necessary but not sufficient role for the RD1 locus in promoting DC immune-regulatory functions. Additional mycobacterial factors are likely required to endow DC with a high Th1 polarizing capacity, a desirable attribute for a successful control of Mtb infection. PMID:26602835

  3. Impact of Mycobacterium tuberculosis RD1-locus on human primary dendritic cell immune functions

    PubMed Central

    Etna, Marilena P.; Giacomini, Elena; Pardini, Manuela; Severa, Martina; Bottai, Daria; Cruciani, Melania; Rizzo, Fabiana; Calogero, Raffaele; Brosch, Roland; Coccia, Eliana M.

    2015-01-01

    Modern strategies to develop vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) aim to improve the current Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine or to attenuate the virulence of Mtb vaccine candidates. In the present study, the impact of wild type or mutated region of difference 1 (RD1) variants on the immunogenicity of Mtb and BCG recombinants was investigated in human primary dendritic cells (DC). A comparative analysis of transcriptome, signalling pathway activation, maturation, apoptosis, cytokine production and capacity to promote Th1 responses demonstrated that DC sense quantitative and qualitative differences in the expression of RD1-encoded factors—ESAT6 and CFP10—within BCG or Mtb backgrounds. Expansion of IFN-γ producing T cells was promoted by BCG::RD1-challenged DC, as compared to their BCG-infected counterparts. Although Mtb recombinants acted as a strong Th-1 promoting stimulus, even with RD1 deletion, the attenuated Mtb strain carrying a C-terminus truncated ESAT-6 elicited a robust Th1 promoting phenotype in DC. Collectively, these studies indicate a necessary but not sufficient role for the RD1 locus in promoting DC immune-regulatory functions. Additional mycobacterial factors are likely required to endow DC with a high Th1 polarizing capacity, a desirable attribute for a successful control of Mtb infection. PMID:26602835

  4. Midostaurin (PKC412) modulates differentiation and maturation of human myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Chuen; Shieh, Hui-Ru; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2010-09-01

    Midostaurin, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been shown efficacy against acute myeloid leukemia and various other malignancies in clinical trials. Prior studies indicate midostaurin affects the function of immune cells such as lymphocytes and macrophages. To understand the effect of midostaurin on human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), we conducted an ex vivo study using immature DCs differentiated from CD14(+) monocytes and further maturated using lipopolysaccharide. Addition of midostaurin to a culture of starting CD14(+) monocytes markedly and dose-dependently reduced DC recovery. Mature DCs differentiating in the presence of midostaurin had fewer, shorter cell projections than those differentiating in the absence of midostaurin. Changes in morphological features characteristic of apoptotic cells were also evident. Moreover, midostaurin affected DC differentiation and maturation patterns; CD83 expression levels decreased, whereas CD14 and CD80 expressions increased. Additionally, DCs derived in the presence of midostaurin possessed a lower endocytotic capacity and less allostimulatory activity on naive CD4(+)CD45(+)RA(+) T cell proliferation than those derived in its absence, suggesting that midostaurin redirects DC differentiation toward a less mature stage and that this effect is not solely due to its cytotoxicity. Whether this effect underlies immune suppression or tolerance to disease treatments with unwanted immune reactions needs further evaluation. PMID:20685248

  5. Necroptosis of Dendritic Cells Promotes Activation of γδ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Collins, Cheryl C; Bashant, Kathleen; Erikson, Cuixia; Thwe, Phyu Myat; Fortner, Karen A; Wang, Hong; Morita, Craig T; Budd, Ralph C

    2016-01-01

    γδ T cells function at the interface between innate and adaptive immunity and have well-demonstrated roles in response to infection, autoimmunity and tumors. A common characteristic of these seemingly disparate conditions may be cellular stress or death. However, the conditions under which ligands for γδ T cells are induced or exposed remain largely undefined. We observed that induction of necroptosis of murine or human dendritic cells (DC) by inhibition of caspase activity paradoxically augments their ability to activate γδ T cells. Furthermore, upregulation of the stabilizer of caspase-8 activity, c-FLIP, by IL-4, not only greatly reduced the susceptibility of DC to necroptosis, but also considerably decreased their ability to activate γδ T cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that the induction of necroptosis in DC upregulates or exposes the expression of γδ T cell ligands, and they support the view that γδ T cells function in the immune surveillance of cell stress. PMID:27431410

  6. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells turn into foamy dendritic cells with IL-17A1[S

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Giulia; Bernoud-Hubac, Nathalie; Bissay, Nathalie; Debard, Cyrille; Daira, Patricia; Meugnier, Emmanuelle; Proamer, Fabienne; Hanau, Daniel; Vidal, Hubert; Aricò, Maurizio; Delprat, Christine; Mahtouk, Karène

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases. In the field of immunometabolism, we have studied the impact of IL-17A on the lipid metabolism of human in vitro-generated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Microarrays and lipidomic analysis revealed an intense remodeling of lipid metabolism induced by IL-17A in DCs. IL-17A increased 2–12 times the amounts of phospholipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, and cholesteryl esters in DCs. Palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), and oleic (18:ln-9c) acid were the main fatty acid chains present in DCs. They were strongly increased in response to IL-17A while their relative proportion remained unchanged. Capture of extracellular lipids was the major mechanism of lipid droplet accumulation, visualized by electron microscopy and Oil Red O staining. Besides this foamy phenotype, IL-17A induced a mixed macrophage-DC phenotype and expression of the nuclear receptor NR1H3/liver X receptor-α, previously identified in the context of atherosclerosis as the master regulator of cholesterol homeostasis in macrophages. These IL-17A-treated DCs were as competent as untreated DCs to stimulate allogeneic naive T-cell proliferation. Following this first characterization of lipid-rich DCs, we propose to call these IL-17A-dependent cells “foamy DCs” and discuss the possible existence of foamy DCs in atherosclerosis, a metabolic and inflammatory disorder involving IL-17A. PMID:25833686

  7. Activation of B cells by antigens on follicular dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin M.; El Sayed, Rania M.; Sukumar, Selvakumar; Szakal, Andras K.; Tew, John G.

    2010-01-01

    A need for antigen-processing and presentation to B cells is not widely appreciated. However, cross-linking of multiple B cell receptors (BCRs) by T-independent antigens delivers a potent signal that induces antibody responses. Such BCR cross-linking also occurs in germinal centers where follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) present multimerized antigens as periodically arranged antigen-antibody complexes (ICs). Unlike T cells that recognize antigens as peptide-MHC complexes, optimal B cell-responses are induced by multimerized FDC-ICs that simultaneously engage multiple BCRs. FDC-FcγRIIB mediates IC-periodicity and FDC-BAFF, -IL-6 and -C4bBP are co-stimulators. Remarkably, specific antibody responses can be induced by FDC-ICs in the absence of T cells, opening up the exciting possibility that people with T cell insufficiencies may be immunized with T-dependent vaccines via FDC-ICs. PMID:20418164

  8. Facile synthesis of dendritic gold nanostructures with hyperbranched architectures and their electrocatalytic activity toward ethanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianshe; Han, Xinyi; Wang, Dawei; Liu, Dong; You, Tianyan

    2013-09-25

    Gold dendritic nanostructures with hyperbranched architectures were synthesized by the galvanic replacement reaction between nickel wire and HAuCl4 in aqueous solution. The study revealed that the morphology of the obtained nanostructures strongly depended on experimental parameters such as the HAuCl4 solution concentration, reaction temperature, and time, as well as stirring or not. According to the investigation of the growth process, it was proposed that gold nanoparticles with rough surfaces were first deposited on the nickel substrate and that subsequent growth preferentially occurred on the preformed gold nanoparticles, finally leading to the formation of hyperbranched gold dendrites via a self-organization process under nonequilibrium conditions. The electrochemical experiment results demonstrated that the as-obtained gold dendrites exhibited high catalytic activity toward ethanol electrooxidation in alkaline solution, indicating that this nanomaterial may be a potential catalyst for direct ethanol fuel cells. PMID:23972030

  9. Exceptional methanol electro-oxidation activity by bimetallic concave and dendritic Pt-Cu nanocrystals catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying-Xia; Zhou, Hui-Jing; Sun, Ping-Chuan; Chen, Tie-Hong

    2014-01-01

    PtCux (x = 1, 2 and 3) bimetallic nanocrystals with concave surface and dendritic morphology were prepared and used as electrocatalysts in methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The bimetallic nanocrystals were synthesized via one-pot co-reduction of H2PtCl6 and Cu(acac)2 by oleylamine and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) in an autoclave at 180 °C. The concave dendritic bimetallic nanostructure consisted of a core rich in Cu and nanodendrites rich in Pt, which was formed via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pt. It was found that PVP played an important role in initiating, facilitating, and directing the replacement reaction. The electrochemical properties of the PtCux were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA). The concave dendritic PtCu2/C nanocrystals exhibited exceptionally high activity and strong poisoning resistance in MOR. At 0.75 V (vs. reversible hydrogen electrode, RHE) the mass activity and specific activity of PtCu2/C were 3.3 and 4.1 times higher than those of the commercial Pt/C catalysts, respectively. The enhanced catalytic activity could be attributed to the unique concave dendritic morphology of the bimetallic nanocrystals.

  10. Synaptogenesis and development of pyramidal neuron dendritic morphology in the chimpanzee neocortex resembles humans

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Serena; Duka, Tetyana; Larsen, Michael D.; Janssen, William G. M.; Collins, Zachary; Bauernfeind, Amy L.; Schapiro, Steven J.; Baze, Wallace B.; McArthur, Mark J.; Hopkins, William D.; Wildman, Derek E.; Lipovich, Leonard; Kuzawa, Christopher W.; Jacobs, Bob; Hof, Patrick R.; Sherwood, Chet C.

    2013-01-01

    Neocortical development in humans is characterized by an extended period of synaptic proliferation that peaks in mid-childhood, with subsequent pruning through early adulthood, as well as relatively delayed maturation of neuronal arborization in the prefrontal cortex compared with sensorimotor areas. In macaque monkeys, cortical synaptogenesis peaks during early infancy and developmental changes in synapse density and dendritic spines occur synchronously across cortical regions. Thus, relatively prolonged synapse and neuronal maturation in humans might contribute to enhancement of social learning during development and transmission of cultural practices, including language. However, because macaques, which share a last common ancestor with humans ∼25 million years ago, have served as the predominant comparative primate model in neurodevelopmental research, the paucity of data from more closely related great apes leaves unresolved when these evolutionary changes in the timing of cortical development became established in the human lineage. To address this question, we used immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and Golgi staining to characterize synaptic density and dendritic morphology of pyramidal neurons in primary somatosensory (area 3b), primary motor (area 4), prestriate visual (area 18), and prefrontal (area 10) cortices of developing chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). We found that synaptogenesis occurs synchronously across cortical areas, with a peak of synapse density during the juvenile period (3–5 y). Moreover, similar to findings in humans, dendrites of prefrontal pyramidal neurons developed later than sensorimotor areas. These results suggest that evolutionary changes to neocortical development promoting greater neuronal plasticity early in postnatal life preceded the divergence of the human and chimpanzee lineages. PMID:23754422

  11. Human breast cancer-derived soluble factors facilitate CCL19-induced chemotaxis of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyundoo; Shin, Changsik; Park, Juhee; Kang, Enoch; Choi, Bongseo; Han, Jae-A; Do, Yoonkyung; Ryu, Seongho; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer remains as a challenging disease with high mortality in women. Increasing evidence points the importance of understanding a crosstalk between breast cancers and immune cells, but little is known about the effect of breast cancer-derived factors on the migratory properties of dendritic cells (DCs) and their consequent capability in inducing T cell immune responses. Utilizing a unique 3D microfluidic device, we here showed that breast cancers (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-436 and SK-BR-3)-derived soluble factors increase the migration of DCs toward CCL19. The enhanced migration of DCs was mainly mediated via the highly activated JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway, increasing their directional persistence, while the velocity of DCs was not influenced, particularly when they were co-cultured with triple negative breast cancer cells (TNBCs or MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-436). The DCs up-regulated inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6 and induced T cells more proliferative and resistant against activation-induced cell death (AICD), which secret high levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and IFN-γ. This study demonstrated new possible evasion strategy of TNBCs utilizing their soluble factors that exploit the directionality of DCs toward chemokine responses, leading to the building of inflammatory milieu which may support their own growth. PMID:27451948

  12. Human breast cancer-derived soluble factors facilitate CCL19-induced chemotaxis of human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyundoo; Shin, Changsik; Park, Juhee; Kang, Enoch; Choi, Bongseo; Han, Jae-A; Do, Yoonkyung; Ryu, Seongho; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer remains as a challenging disease with high mortality in women. Increasing evidence points the importance of understanding a crosstalk between breast cancers and immune cells, but little is known about the effect of breast cancer-derived factors on the migratory properties of dendritic cells (DCs) and their consequent capability in inducing T cell immune responses. Utilizing a unique 3D microfluidic device, we here showed that breast cancers (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-436 and SK-BR-3)-derived soluble factors increase the migration of DCs toward CCL19. The enhanced migration of DCs was mainly mediated via the highly activated JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway, increasing their directional persistence, while the velocity of DCs was not influenced, particularly when they were co-cultured with triple negative breast cancer cells (TNBCs or MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-436). The DCs up-regulated inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6 and induced T cells more proliferative and resistant against activation-induced cell death (AICD), which secret high levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and IFN-γ. This study demonstrated new possible evasion strategy of TNBCs utilizing their soluble factors that exploit the directionality of DCs toward chemokine responses, leading to the building of inflammatory milieu which may support their own growth. PMID:27451948

  13. A Dap12-Mediated Pathway Regulates Expression of Cc Chemokine Receptor 7 and Maturation of Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bouchon, Axel; Hernández-Munain, Cristina; Cella, Marina; Colonna, Marco

    2001-01-01

    Gene targeting of the adaptor molecule DAP12 in mice caused abnormal distribution and impaired antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). However, the DAP12-associated receptors expressed on DCs and their functions have not been identified yet. Here we show that the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM-2) is a cell surface receptor on human monocyte-derived DCs, which is associated with DAP12. TREM-2/DAP12 promotes upregulation of CC chemokine receptor 7, partial DC maturation, and DC survival through activation of protein tyrosine kinases and extracellular signal–regulated kinase. In contrast to Toll-like receptor-mediated signaling, TREM2/DAP12 stimulation is independent of nuclear factor-κB and p38 stress-activated protein kinase. This novel DC activation pathway may regulate DC homeostasis and amplify DC responses to pathogens, explaining the phenotype observed in DAP12-deficient mice. PMID:11602640

  14. Small rho GTPases mediate tumor-induced inhibition of endocytic activity of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Tourkova, Irina L; Shurin, Galina V; Wei, Sheng; Shurin, Michael R

    2007-06-15

    The generation, maturation, and function of dendritic cells (DC) have been shown to be markedly compromised in the tumor microenvironment in animals and humans. However, the molecular mechanisms and intracellular pathways involved in the regulation of the DC system in cancer are not yet fully understood. Recently, we have reported on the role of the small Rho GTPase family members Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA in regulating DC adherence, motility, and Ag presentation. To investigate involvement of small Rho GTPases in dysregulation of DC function by tumors, we next evaluated how Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA regulated endocytic activity of DC in the tumor microenvironment. We revealed a decreased uptake of dextran 40 and polystyrene beads by DC generated in the presence of different tumor cell lines, including RM1 prostate, MC38 colon, 3LL lung, and B7E3 oral squamous cell carcinomas in vitro and by DC prepared from tumor-bearing mice ex vivo. Impaired endocytic activity of DC cocultured with tumor cells was associated with decreased levels of active Cdc42 and Rac1. Transduction of DC with the dominant negative Cdc42 and Rac1 genes also led to reduced phagocytosis and receptor-mediated endocytosis. Furthermore, transduction of DC with the constitutively active Cdc42 and Rac1 genes restored endocytic activity of DC that was inhibited by the tumors. Thus, our results suggest that tumor-induced dysregulation of endocytic activity of DC is mediated by reduced activity of several members of the small Rho GTPase family, which might serve as new targets for improving the efficacy of DC vaccines. PMID:17548616

  15. Dendritic cells treated with resveratrol during differentiation from monocytes gain substantial tolerogenic properties upon activation

    PubMed Central

    Švajger, Urban; Obermajer, Nataša; Jeras, Matjaž

    2010-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol that acts on multiple molecular targets important for cell differentiation and activation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are a functionally diverse cell type and represent the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the immune system. In this study, we investigated resveratrol-induced effects on DCs during their differentiation and maturation. Our results show that resveratrol induces DC-associated tolerance, particularly when applied during DC differentiation. Costimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86 were down-regulated, as was the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. Surface expression of inhibitory immunoglobulin-like transcript 3 (ILT3) and ILT4 molecules was induced, while human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G expression was not affected. Resveratrol-treated DCs lost the ability to produce interleukin (IL)-12p70 after activation, but had an increased ability to produce IL-10. Such DCs were poor stimulators of allogeneic T cells and had lowered ability to induce CD4+ T-cell migration. Furthermore, treated cells were able to generate allogeneic IL-10-secreting T cells, but were not competent in inducing FoxP3 expression These tolerogenic effects are probably associated with the effect of resveratrol on multiple molecular targets through which it interferes with DC differentiation and nuclear factor (NF)-κB translocation. Our data provide new insights into the molecular and functional mechanisms of the tolerogenic effects that resveratrol exerts on DCs. PMID:20002210

  16. GSK3 and KIF5 regulate activity-dependent sorting of gephyrin between axons and dendrites.

    PubMed

    Rathgeber, Louisa; Gromova, Kira V; Schaefer, Irina; Breiden, Petra; Lohr, Christian; Kneussel, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The kinesin KIF5 transports neuronal cargoes into axons and dendrites. Isolated KIF5 motor domains preferentially move into axons, however KIF5 binding to GRIP1 or gephyrin drives the motor into dendrites, to deliver AMPA receptors (AMPARs) or glycine receptors (GlyRs), respectively. At postsynaptic sites, gephyrin forms a multimeric scaffold to anchor GlyRs and GABAA receptors (GABAARs) in apposition to inhibitory presynaptic terminals. Here, we report the unexpected observation that increased intracellular calcium through chronic activation of AMPARs, steers a newly synthesized gephyrin fusion protein (tomato-gephyrin) to axons and interferes with its normal delivery into dendrites of cultured neurons. Axonal gephyrin clusters were not apposed to presynaptic terminals, but colocalized with GlyRs and neuroligin-2 (NLG2). Notably, functional blockade of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) and KIF5 normalized gephyrin missorting into the axonal compartment. In contrast, mutagenesis of gephyrin S270, a GSK3 target, did not contribute to axo-dendritic sorting. Our data are consistent with previous observations, which report regulation of kinesin motility through GSK3 activity. They suggest that GSK3 regulates the sorting of GlyR/gephyrin and NLG2 complexes in a KIF5-dependent manner. PMID:25701174

  17. Modulation of Dendritic Cell Activation and Subsequent Th1 Cell Polarization by Lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young-Tae; Na, Hyeongjin; Ryu, Heeju; Chung, Yeonseok

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells play an essential role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity by recognizing cellular stress including pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns and by shaping the types of antigen-specific T cell immunity. Although lidocaine is widely used in clinical settings that trigger cellular stress, it remains unclear whether such treatment impacts the activation of innate immune cells and subsequent differentiation of T cells. Here we showed that lidocaine inhibited the production of IL-6, TNFα and IL-12 from dendritic cells in response to toll-like receptor ligands including lipopolysaccharide, poly(I:C) and R837 in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, the differentiation of Th1 cells was significantly suppressed by the addition of lidocaine while the same treatment had little effect on the differentiation of Th17, Th2 and regulatory T cells in vitro. Moreover, lidocaine suppressed the ovalbumin-specific Th1 cell responses in vivo induced by the adoptive transfer of ovalbumin-pulsed dendritic cells. These results demonstrate that lidocaine inhibits the activation of dendritic cells in response to toll-like receptor signals and subsequently suppresses the differentiation of Th1 cell responses. PMID:26445366

  18. Human β-defensin-3 alters, but does not inhibit, the binding of Porphyromonas gingivalis haemagglutinin B to the surface of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Van Hemert, Jonathan R; Recker, Erica N; Dietrich, Deborah; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Kurago, Zoya B; Walters, Katherine S; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; Brogden, Kim A

    2012-07-01

    Human β-defensin-3 (HBD3) is a small, cationic, host defence peptide with broad antimicrobial activities and diverse innate immune functions. HBD3 binds to many microbial antigens and, in this study, we hypothesised that the known binding of HBD3 to Porphyromonas gingivalis recombinant haemagglutinin B (rHagB) alters, but does not inhibit, the binding of rHagB to human dendritic cells. To test this, human myeloid dendritic cells were incubated for 5 min with rHagB, HBD3 + rHagB (10:1 molar ratio), HBD3 or 0.1 M phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (pH 7.2) and were then rapidly fixed and processed for confocal microscopy and ultramicrotomy. rHagB and HBD3 could be detected with primary monoclonal mouse antibody to rHagB (MoAb 1858) or polyclonal rabbit antibody to HBD3 (P241) and secondary fluorescent-labelled anti-mouse or anti-rabbit antibodies (confocal microscopy) or protein A-colloidal gold (immunoelectron microscopy). In cells incubated with rHagB only, fluorescence and protein A-colloidal gold were seen at the cell surface and throughout the cytoplasm. In cells incubated with HBD3+rHagB, fluorescence was observed only at the cell surface in a 'string of pearls' configuration. Overall, these results suggest that HBD3 binding to rHagB alters, but does not inhibit, the binding of rHagB to human myeloid dendritic cells. PMID:22578747

  19. Local postsynaptic voltage-gated sodium channel activation in dendritic spines of olfactory bulb granule cells.

    PubMed

    Bywalez, Wolfgang G; Patirniche, Dinu; Rupprecht, Vanessa; Stemmler, Martin; Herz, Andreas V M; Pálfi, Dénes; Rózsa, Balázs; Egger, Veronica

    2015-02-01

    Neuronal dendritic spines have been speculated to function as independent computational units, yet evidence for active electrical computation in spines is scarce. Here we show that strictly local voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) activation can occur during excitatory postsynaptic potentials in the spines of olfactory bulb granule cells, which we mimic and detect via combined two-photon uncaging of glutamate and calcium imaging in conjunction with whole-cell recordings. We find that local Nav activation boosts calcium entry into spines through high-voltage-activated calcium channels and accelerates postsynaptic somatic depolarization, without affecting NMDA receptor-mediated signaling. Hence, Nav-mediated boosting promotes rapid output from the reciprocal granule cell spine onto the lateral mitral cell dendrite and thus can speed up recurrent inhibition. This striking example of electrical compartmentalization both adds to the understanding of olfactory network processing and broadens the general view of spine function. PMID:25619656

  20. A subset of human plasmacytoid dendritic cells expresses CD8α upon exposure to herpes simplex virus type 1

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Philipp; Thomann, Sabrina; Werner, Maren; Vollmer, Jörg; Schmidt, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Classical and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DC) play important roles in the defense against murine and human infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV). So far, CD8α expression has only been reported for murine DC. CD8α+ DC have prominent cross-presenting activities, which are enhanced by murine CD8α+ PDC. The human orthologue of murine CD8α+ DC, the CD141 (BDCA3)+ DC, mainly cross-present after TLR3 ligation. We report here the serendipitous finding that a subset of human PDC upregulates CD8α upon HSV-1 stimulation, as shown by gene array and flow cytometry analyses. CD8α, not CD8ß, was expressed upon exposure. Markers of activation, migration, and costimulation were upregulated on CD8α-expressing human PDC. In these cells, increased cytokine and chemokine levels were detected that enhance development and function of T, B, and NK cells, and recruit immature DC, monocytes, and Th1 cells, respectively. Altogether, human CD8α+ PDC exhibit a highly activated phenotype and appear to recruit other immune cells to the site of inflammation. Further studies will show whether CD8α-expressing PDC contribute to antigen cross-presentation, which may be important for immune defenses against HSV infections in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26082771

  1. IRF5 and IRF8 modulate the CAL-1 human plasmacytoid dendritic cell line response following TLR9 ligation.

    PubMed

    Steinhagen, Folkert; Rodriguez, Luis G; Tross, Debra; Tewary, Poonam; Bode, Christian; Klinman, Dennis M

    2016-03-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides (ODNs) containing CpG motifs stimulate human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) to produce type-1 interferons (IFNs) and proinflammatory cytokines. Previous studies demonstrated that interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) play a central role in mediating CpG-induced pDC activation. This work explores the inverse effects of IRF5 and IRF8 (also known as IFN consensus sequence-binding protein) on CpG-dependent gene expression in the human CAL-1 pDC cell line. This cell line shares many of the phenotypic and functional properties of freshly isolated human pDCs. Results from RNA interference and microarray studies indicate that IRF5 upregulates TLR9-driven gene expression whereas IRF8 downregulates the same genes. Several findings support the conclusion that IRF8 inhibits TLR9-dependent gene expression by directly blocking the activity of IRF5. First, the inhibitory activity of IRF8 is only observed when IRF5 is present. Second, proximity ligation analysis shows that IRF8 and IRF5 colocalize within the cytoplasm of resting human pDCs and cotranslocate to the nucleus after CpG stimulation. Taken together, these findings suggest that IRF5 and IRF8, two transcription factors with opposing functions, control TLR9 signaling in human pDCs. PMID:26613957

  2. Delineation of a novel dendritic-like subset in human spleen

    PubMed Central

    Petvises, Sawang; Talaulikar, Dipti; O'Neill, Helen C

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and monocyte subpopulations present in the human spleen were analyzed by flow cytometry in an attempt to identify the presence of a novel dendritic-like cell subset described previously in mice and named L-DCs. In this study, an equivalent of this novel murine subset was characterized in the human spleen, thus increasing our knowledge of the antigen-presenting cell types present in the human spleen. Human L-DCs were identified as a hCD11c+hCD11b+HLA-DR−hCD86+ subset in the spleen, along with the previously described subsets of hCD1c+ DCs, hCD123+ plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), hCD16+ DCs and hCD141+ DCs. Three subsets of monocytes were also characterized. DC and monocyte subsets in human spleen had phenotypes similar to those of subsets in human blood. In line with murine studies, the presence of L-DC progenitors within the spleen was also investigated. When human splenocytes depleted of T and B cells were cocultured with the murine stromal line 5G3, hematopoiesis ensued and hCD11c+HLA-DR+ and hCD11c+HLA-DR− cells were produced. The latter resemble L-DCs, which are also produced in murine spleen cocultures. Both subsets expressed hCD80 and hCD86, which identifies them as antigen-presenting cells, particularly DCs, and were highly endocytic. It is noteworthy that murine splenic stroma can serve as a support matrix for human hematopoiesis and DC production. These results support the hypothesis that 5G3 must express both cell-associated and soluble factors that can signal hematopoiesis in human and murine progenitors. PMID:25891217

  3. Delineation of a novel dendritic-like subset in human spleen.

    PubMed

    Petvises, Sawang; Talaulikar, Dipti; O'Neill, Helen C

    2016-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and monocyte subpopulations present in the human spleen were analyzed by flow cytometry in an attempt to identify the presence of a novel dendritic-like cell subset described previously in mice and named L-DCs. In this study, an equivalent of this novel murine subset was characterized in the human spleen, thus increasing our knowledge of the antigen-presenting cell types present in the human spleen. Human L-DCs were identified as a hCD11c(+)hCD11b(+)HLA-DR(-)hCD86(+) subset in the spleen, along with the previously described subsets of hCD1c(+) DCs, hCD123(+) plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), hCD16(+) DCs and hCD141(+) DCs. Three subsets of monocytes were also characterized. DC and monocyte subsets in human spleen had phenotypes similar to those of subsets in human blood. In line with murine studies, the presence of L-DC progenitors within the spleen was also investigated. When human splenocytes depleted of T and B cells were cocultured with the murine stromal line 5G3, hematopoiesis ensued and hCD11c(+)HLA-DR(+) and hCD11c(+)HLA-DR(-) cells were produced. The latter resemble L-DCs, which are also produced in murine spleen cocultures. Both subsets expressed hCD80 and hCD86, which identifies them as antigen-presenting cells, particularly DCs, and were highly endocytic. It is noteworthy that murine splenic stroma can serve as a support matrix for human hematopoiesis and DC production. These results support the hypothesis that 5G3 must express both cell-associated and soluble factors that can signal hematopoiesis in human and murine progenitors. PMID:25891217

  4. Activation of natural killer cells and dendritic cells upon recognition of a novel CD99-like ligand by paired immunoglobulin-like type 2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, Ikuo; Ogasawara, Kouetsu; Saito, Takashi; Lanier, Lewis L; Arase, Hisashi

    2004-02-16

    Paired receptors that consist of highly related activating and inhibitory receptors are widely involved in the regulation of the immune system. Here, we report a mouse orthologue of the human activating paired immunoglobulin-like type 2 receptor (PILR) beta, which was cloned from a cDNA library of natural killer (NK) cells based on its ability to associate with the DAP12 signaling adaptor protein. The activating PILRbeta was expressed not only on NK cells but also on dendritic cells and macrophages. Furthermore, we have identified a novel CD99-like molecule as a ligand for the activating PILRbeta and inhibitory PILRalpha receptors. Transcripts of PILR ligand are present in many tissues, including some T cell lines. Cells expressing the PILR ligand specifically activated NK cells and dendritic cells that express the activating PILRbeta. Our findings reveal a new regulatory mechanism of innate immunity by PILR and its CD99-like ligand. PMID:14970179

  5. Differential Activity-Dependent Secretion of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor from Axon and Dendrite

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Naoto; Lu, Hui; Fukata, Yuko; Noritake, Jun; Gao, Hongfeng; Mukherjee, Sujay; Nemoto, Tomomi; Fukata, Masaki

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for neuronal survival and differentiation during development and for synaptic function and plasticity in the mature brain. BDNF-containing vesicles are widely distributed and bidirectionally transported in neurons, and secreted BDNF can act on both presynaptic and postsynaptic cells. Activity-dependent BDNF secretion from neuronal cultures has been reported, but it remains unknown where the primary site of BDNF secretion is and whether neuronal activity can trigger BDNF secretion from axons and dendrites with equal efficacy. Using BDNF fused with pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein to visualize BDNF secretion, we found that BDNF-containing vesicles exhibited markedly different properties of activity-dependent exocytic fusion at the axon and dendrite of cultured hippocampal neurons. Brief spiking activity triggered a transient fusion pore opening, followed by immediate retrieval of vesicles without dilation of the fusion pore, resulting in very little BDNF secretion at the axon. On the contrary, the same brief spiking activity induced “full-collapse” vesicle fusion and substantial BDNF secretion at the dendrite. However, full vesicular fusion with BDNF secretion could occur at the axon when the neuron was stimulated by prolonged high-frequency activity, a condition neurons may encounter during epileptic discharge. Thus, activity-dependent axonal secretion of BDNF is highly restricted as a result of incomplete fusion of BDNF-containing vesicles, and normal neural activity induces BDNF secretion from dendrites, consistent with the BDNF function as a retrograde factor. Our study also revealed a novel mechanism by which differential exocytosis of BDNF-containing vesicles may regulate BDNF–TrkB signaling between connected neurons. PMID:19906967

  6. Dendritic Kv3.3 potassium channels in cerebellar purkinje cells regulate generation and spatial dynamics of dendritic Ca2+ spikes.

    PubMed

    Zagha, Edward; Manita, Satoshi; Ross, William N; Rudy, Bernardo

    2010-06-01

    Purkinje cell dendrites are excitable structures with intrinsic and synaptic conductances contributing to the generation and propagation of electrical activity. Voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed in the distal dendrites of Purkinje cells. However, the functional relevance of this dendritic distribution is not understood. Moreover, mutations in Kv3.3 cause movement disorders in mice and cerebellar atrophy and ataxia in humans, emphasizing the importance of understanding the role of these channels. In this study, we explore functional implications of this dendritic channel expression and compare Purkinje cell dendritic excitability in wild-type and Kv3.3 knockout mice. We demonstrate enhanced excitability of Purkinje cell dendrites in Kv3.3 knockout mice, despite normal resting membrane properties. Combined data from local application pharmacology, voltage clamp analysis of ionic currents, and assessment of dendritic Ca(2+) spike threshold in Purkinje cells suggest a role for Kv3.3 channels in opposing Ca(2+) spike initiation. To study the physiological relevance of altered dendritic excitability, we measured [Ca(2+)](i) changes throughout the dendritic tree in response to climbing fiber activation. Ca(2+) signals were specifically enhanced in distal dendrites of Kv3.3 knockout Purkinje cells, suggesting a role for dendritic Kv3.3 channels in regulating propagation of electrical activity and Ca(2+) influx in distal dendrites. These findings characterize unique roles of Kv3.3 channels in dendrites, with implications for synaptic integration, plasticity, and human disease. PMID:20357073

  7. Clonal analysis of human dendritic cell progenitor using a stromal cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaeyop; Breton, Gaëlle; Aljoufi, Arafat; Zhou, Yu Jerry; Puhr, Sarah; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Liu, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Different dendritic cell (DC) subsets co-exist in humans and coordinate the immune response. Having a short life, DCs must be constantly replenished from their progenitors in the bone marrow through hematopoiesis. Identification of a DC-restricted progenitor in mouse has improved our understanding of how DC lineage diverges from myeloid and lymphoid lineages. However, identification of the DC-restricted progenitor in humans has not been possible because a system that simultaneously nurtures differentiation of human DCs, myeloid and lymphoid cells, is lacking. Here we report a cytokine and stromal cell culture that allows evaluation of CD34+ progenitor potential to all three DC subsets as well as other myeloid and lymphoid cells, at a single cell level. Using this system, we show that human granulocyte–macrophage progenitors are heterogeneous and contain restricted progenitors to DCs. PMID:26056939

  8. NMDA receptor activation and calpain contribute to disruption of dendritic spines by the stress neuropeptide CRH.

    PubMed

    Andres, Adrienne L; Regev, Limor; Phi, Lucas; Seese, Ronald R; Chen, Yuncai; Gall, Christine M; Baram, Tallie Z

    2013-10-23

    The complex effects of stress on learning and memory are mediated, in part, by stress-induced changes in the composition and structure of excitatory synapses. In the hippocampus, the effects of stress involve several factors including glucocorticoids and the stress-released neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which influence the integrity of dendritic spines and the structure and function of the excitatory synapses they carry. CRH, at nanomolar, presumed-stress levels, rapidly abolishes short-term synaptic plasticity and destroys dendritic spines, yet the mechanisms for these effects are not fully understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that glutamate receptor-mediated processes, which shape synaptic structure and function, are engaged by CRH and contribute to spine destabilization. In cultured rat hippocampal neurons, CRH application reduced dendritic spine density in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and this action depended on the CRH receptor type 1. CRH-mediated spine loss required network activity and the activation of NMDA, but not of AMPA receptors; indeed GluR1-containing dendritic spines were resistant to CRH. Downstream of NMDA receptors, the calcium-dependent enzyme, calpain, was recruited, resulting in the breakdown of spine actin-interacting proteins including spectrin. Pharmacological approaches demonstrated that calpain recruitment contributed critically to CRH-induced spine loss. In conclusion, the stress hormone CRH co-opts mechanisms that contribute to the plasticity and integrity of excitatory synapses, leading to selective loss of dendritic spines. This spine loss might function as an adaptive mechanism preventing the consequences of adverse memories associated with severe stress. PMID:24155300

  9. NMDA Receptor Activation and Calpain Contribute to Disruption of Dendritic Spines by the Stress Neuropeptide CRH

    PubMed Central

    Andres, Adrienne L.; Regev, Limor; Phi, Lucas; Seese, Ronald R.; Chen, Yuncai; Gall, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    The complex effects of stress on learning and memory are mediated, in part, by stress-induced changes in the composition and structure of excitatory synapses. In the hippocampus, the effects of stress involve several factors including glucocorticoids and the stress-released neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which influence the integrity of dendritic spines and the structure and function of the excitatory synapses they carry. CRH, at nanomolar, presumed-stress levels, rapidly abolishes short-term synaptic plasticity and destroys dendritic spines, yet the mechanisms for these effects are not fully understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that glutamate receptor-mediated processes, which shape synaptic structure and function, are engaged by CRH and contribute to spine destabilization. In cultured rat hippocampal neurons, CRH application reduced dendritic spine density in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and this action depended on the CRH receptor type 1. CRH-mediated spine loss required network activity and the activation of NMDA, but not of AMPA receptors; indeed GluR1-containing dendritic spines were resistant to CRH. Downstream of NMDA receptors, the calcium-dependent enzyme, calpain, was recruited, resulting in the breakdown of spine actin-interacting proteins including spectrin. Pharmacological approaches demonstrated that calpain recruitment contributed critically to CRH-induced spine loss. In conclusion, the stress hormone CRH co-opts mechanisms that contribute to the plasticity and integrity of excitatory synapses, leading to selective loss of dendritic spines. This spine loss might function as an adaptive mechanism preventing the consequences of adverse memories associated with severe stress. PMID:24155300

  10. Highly efficient transduction of human plasmacytoid dendritic cells without phenotypic and functional maturation

    PubMed Central

    Veron, Philippe; Boutin, Sylvie; Martin, Samia; Chaperot, Laurence; Plumas, Joel; Davoust, Jean; Masurier, Carole

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene modified dendritic cells (DC) are able to modulate DC functions and induce therapeutic immunity or tolerance in an antigen-specific manner. Among the different DC subsets, plasmacytoid DC (pDC) are well known for their ability to recognize and respond to a variety of viruses by secreting high levels of type I interferon. Methods We analyzed here, the transduction efficiency of a pDC cell line, GEN2.2, and of pDC derived from CD34+ progenitors, using lentiviral vectors (LV) pseudotyped with different envelope glycoproteins such as the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope (VSVG), the gibbon ape leukaemia virus envelope (GaLV) or the feline endogenous virus envelope (RD114). At the same time, we evaluated transgene expression (E-GFP reporter gene) under the control of different promoters. Results We found that efficient gene transfer into pDC can be achieved with VSVG-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors (LV) under the control of phoshoglycerate kinase (PGK) and elongation factor-1 (EF1α) promoters (28% to 90% of E-GFP+ cells, respectively) in the absence of phenotypic and functional maturation. Surprisingly, promoters (desmin or synthetic C5–12) described as muscle-specific and which drive gene expression in single strand AAV vectors in gene therapy protocols were very highly active in pDC using VSVG-LV. Conclusion Taken together, our results indicate that LV vectors can serve to design pDC-based vaccines in humans, and they are also useful in vitro to evaluate the immunogenicity of the vector preparations, and the specificity and safety of given promoters used in gene therapy protocols. PMID:19173717

  11. Induction of maturation of human blood dendritic cell precursors by measles virus is associated with immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Schnorr, J J; Xanthakos, S; Keikavoussi, P; Kämpgen, E; ter Meulen, V; Schneider-Schaulies, S

    1997-05-13

    As well as inducing a protective immune response against reinfection, acute measles is associated with a marked suppression of immune functions against superinfecting agents and recall antigens, and this association is the major cause of the current high morbidity and mortality rate associated with measles virus (MV) infections. Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells crucially involved in the initiation of primary and secondary immune responses, so we set out to define the interaction of MV with these cells. We found that both mature and precursor human DCs generated from peripheral blood monocytic cells express the major MV protein receptor CD46 and are highly susceptible to infection with both MV vaccine (ED) and wild-type (WTF) strains, albeit with different kinetics. Except for the down-regulation of CD46, the expression pattern of functionally important surface antigens on mature DCs was not markedly altered after MV infection. However, precursor DCs up-regulated HLA-DR, CD83, and CD86 within 24 h of WTF infection and 72 h after ED infection, indicating their functional maturation. In addition, interleukin 12 synthesis was markedly enhanced after both ED and WTF infection in DCs. On the other hand, MV-infected DCs strongly interfered with mitogen-dependent proliferation of freshly isolated peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. These data indicate that the differentiation of effector functions of DCs is not impaired but rather is stimulated by MV infection. Yet, mature, activated DCs expressing MV surface antigens do give a negative signal to inhibit lymphocyte proliferation and thus contribute to MV-induced immunosuppression. PMID:9144236

  12. AIRE is not essential for the induction of human tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Crossland, Katherine L; Abinun, Mario; Arkwright, Peter D; Cheetham, Timothy D; Pearce, Simon H; Hilkens, Catharien M U; Lilic, Desa

    2016-06-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of the Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) gene results in organ-specific autoimmunity and disease Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy type 1 (APS1)/Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy Candidiasis Ectodermal Dystrophy (APECED). The AIRE protein is crucial in the induction of central tolerance, promoting ectopic expression of tissue-specific antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells and enabling removal of self-reactive T-cells. AIRE expression has recently been detected in myeloid dendritic cells (DC), suggesting AIRE may have a significant role in peripheral tolerance. DC stimulation of T-cells is critical in determining the initiation or lack of an immune response, depending on the pattern of costimulation and cytokine production by DCs, defining immunogenic/inflammatory (inflDC) and tolerogenic (tolDC) DC. In AIRE-deficient patients and healthy controls, we validated the role of AIRE in the generation and function of monocyte-derived inflDC and tolDCs by determining mRNA and protein expression of AIRE and comparing activation markers (HLA-DR/DP/DQ,CD83,CD86,CD274(PDL-1),TLR-2), cytokine production (IL-12p70,IL-10,IL-6,TNF-α,IFN-γ) and T-cell stimulatory capacity (mixed lymphocyte reaction) of AIRE+ and AIRE- DCs. We show for the first time that: (1) tolDCs from healthy individuals express AIRE; (2) AIRE expression is not significantly higher in tolDC compared to inflDC; (3) tolDC can be generated from APECED patient monocytes and (4) tolDCs lacking AIRE retain the same phenotype and reduced T-cell stimulatory function. Our findings suggest that AIRE does not have a role in the induction and function of monocyte-derived tolerogenic DC in humans, but these findings do not exclude a role for AIRE in peripheral tolerance mediated by other cell types. PMID:26912174

  13. Selective silencing of individual dendritic branches by an mGlu2-activated potassium conductance in dentate gyrus granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, János; Ster, Jeanne; Van-Weert, Susan; Andrási, Tibor; Neubrandt, Máté; Corti, Corrado; Corsi, Mauro; Ferraguti, Francesco; Gerber, Urs; Szabadics, János

    2013-01-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu-IIs) modulate hippocampal information processing through several presynaptic actions. We describe a novel postsynaptic inhibitory mechanism mediated by the mGlu2 subtype that activates an inwardly-rectifying potassium conductance in the dendrites of dentate gyrus granule cells (GCs) of rats and mice. Data from glutamate uncaging experiments and simulations indicate that the mGlu2-activated potassium conductance uniformly reduces the peak amplitude of synaptic inputs arriving in the distal two-thirds of dendrites with only minor effects on proximal inputs. This unique shunting profile is consistent with a peak expression of the mGlu2-activated conductance at the transition between the proximal and middle third of the dendrites. Further simulations under various physiologically relevant conditions show that when a shunting conductance is activated in the proximal third of a single dendrite it effectively modulates input to this specific branch while leaving inputs in neighboring dendrites relatively unaffected. Thus, the restricted expression of the mGlu2-activated potassium conductance in the proximal third of GC dendrites represents an optimal localization for achieving the opposing biophysical requirements for uniform yet selective modulation of individual dendritic branches. PMID:23616537

  14. Activated Murine B Lymphocytes and Dendritic Cells Produce a Novel CC Chemokine which Acts Selectively on Activated T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schaniel, Christoph; Pardali, Evangelia; Sallusto, Federica; Speletas, Mattheos; Ruedl, Christiane; Shimizu, Takeyuki; Seidl, Thomas; Andersson, Jan; Melchers, Fritz; Rolink, Antonius G.; Sideras, Paschalis

    1998-01-01

    Genes were isolated using the suppression subtractive hybridization method by stimulation of pro/pre B cells with anti-CD40 and interleukin (IL)-4 to mature Sμ-Sε–switched cells. One of the strongly upregulated genes encodes a novel murine CC chemokine we have named ABCD-1. The ABCD-1 gene has three exons separated by 1.2- and 2.7-kb introns. It gives rise to a 2.2-kb transcript containing an open reading frame of 276 nucleotides. Two polyadenylation sites are used, giving rise to cDNAs with either 1550 or 1850 bp of 3′ untranslated regions. The open reading frame encodes a 24 amino acid–long leader peptide and a 68 amino acid–long mature protein with a predicted molecular mass of 7.8 kD. ABCD-1 mRNA is found in highest quantities in activated splenic B lymphocytes and dendritic cells. Little chemokine mRNA is present in lung, in unstimulated splenic cells, in thymocytes, and in lymph node cells. No ABCD-1 mRNA is detected in bone marrow, liver, kidney, or brain, in peritoneal exudate cells as well as in the majority of all unstimulated B lineage cells tested. It is also undetectable in Concanavalin A–activated/IL-2–restimulated splenic T cells, and in bone marrow–derived IL-2–induced natural killer cells and IL-3–activated macrophages. Recombinant ABCD-1 revealed a concentration-dependent and specific migration of activated splenic T lymphoblasts in chemotaxis assays. FACS® analyses of migrated cells showed no preferential difference in migration of CD4+ versus CD8+ T cell blasts. Murine as well as human T cells responded to ABCD-1. Freshly isolated cells from bone marrow, thymus, spleen, and lymph node, IL-2–activated NK cells, and LPS-stimulated splenic cells, all did not show any chemotactic response. Thus, ABCD-1 is the first chemokine produced in large amounts by activated B cells and acting selectively on activated T lymphocytes. Therefore, ABCD-1 is expected to play an important role in the collaboration of dendritic cells and B

  15. Non-Ionotropic NMDA Receptor Signaling Drives Activity-Induced Dendritic Spine Shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Ivar S.; Gray, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The elimination of dendritic spine synapses is a critical step in the refinement of neuronal circuits during development of the cerebral cortex. Several studies have shown that activity-induced shrinkage and retraction of dendritic spines depend on activation of the NMDA-type glutamate receptor (NMDAR), which leads to influx of extracellular calcium ions and activation of calcium-dependent phosphatases that modify regulators of the spine cytoskeleton, suggesting that influx of extracellular calcium ions drives spine shrinkage. Intriguingly, a recent report revealed a novel non-ionotropic function of the NMDAR in the regulation of synaptic strength, which relies on glutamate binding but is independent of ion flux through the receptor (Nabavi et al., 2013). Here, we tested whether non-ionotropic NMDAR signaling could also play a role in driving structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Using two-photon glutamate uncaging and time-lapse imaging of rat hippocampal CA1 neurons, we show that low-frequency glutamatergic stimulation results in shrinkage of dendritic spines even in the presence of the NMDAR d-serine/glycine binding site antagonist 7-chlorokynurenic acid (7CK), which fully blocks NMDAR-mediated currents and Ca2+ transients. Notably, application of 7CK or MK-801 also converts spine enlargement resulting from a high-frequency uncaging stimulus into spine shrinkage, demonstrating that strong Ca2+ influx through the NMDAR normally overcomes a non-ionotropic shrinkage signal to drive spine growth. Our results support a model in which NMDAR signaling, independent of ion flux, drives structural shrinkage at spiny synapses. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dendritic spine elimination is vital for the refinement of neural circuits during development and has been linked to improvements in behavioral performance in the adult. Spine shrinkage and elimination have been widely accepted to depend on Ca2+ influx through NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) in conjunction with long

  16. Identification of TTP mRNA targets in human dendritic cells reveals TTP as a critical regulator of dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Emmons, Jillian; Townley-Tilson, W H Davin; Deleault, Kristen M; Skinner, Stephen J; Gross, Robert H; Whitfield, Michael L; Brooks, Seth A

    2008-05-01

    Dendritic cells provide a critical link between innate and adaptive immunity and are essential to prime a naive T-cell response. The transition from immature dendritic cells to mature dendritic cells involves numerous changes in gene expression; however, the role of post-transcriptional changes in this process has been largely ignored. Tristetraprolin is an AU-rich element mRNA-binding protein that has been shown to regulate the stability of a number of cytokines and chemokines of mRNAs. Using TTP immunoprecipitations and Affymetrix GeneChips, we identified 393 messages as putative TTP mRNA targets in human dendritic cells. Gene ontology analysis revealed that approximately 25% of the identified mRNAs are associated with protein synthesis. We also identified six MHC Class I alleles, five MHC Class II alleles, seven chemokine and chemokine receptor genes, indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase, and CD86 as putative TTP ligands. Real-time PCR was used to validate the GeneChip data for 15 putative target genes and functional studies performed for six target genes. These data establish that TTP regulates the expression of DUSP1, IDO, SOD2, CD86, and MHC Class I-B and F via the 3'-untranslated region of each gene. A novel finding is the demonstration that TTP can interact with and regulate the expression of non-AU-rich element-containing messages. The data implicate TTP as having a broader role in regulating and limiting the immune response than previously suspected. PMID:18367721

  17. Zymosan and PMA activate the immune responses of Mutz3-derived dendritic cells synergistically.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae Sung; Kim, Young-Jun; Han, Kyu Ung; Yoon, Byung Dae; Kim, Jae Wha

    2015-09-01

    Beta-glucan (β-glucan) including zymosan has been known as a super food because of its multifunctional activities, such as the enhancement of immune responses. To study the functional mechanism of β-glucan in immune stimulation, the effect of zymosan on dendritic cell (DC) was investigated by monitoring the production of TNF-α, a pro-inflammatory cytokine. DC was differentiated from Mutz-3, a human acute myeloid leukemia cell line, by cytokine treatment and characterized. DC-specific cell surface markers were increased during the differentiation. Especially, Dectin-1, a β-glucan receptor, was upregulated during DC differentiation, and mediated zymosan-induced TNF-α production, which was inhibited by silencing of dectin-1. Zymosan exhibited synergistic effect with other immune stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a well-known PKC activator. Simultaneous treatment of zymosan and PMA enhanced the nuclear translocation of NF-κB subunits, p50 and p65, mediating the increase of TNF-α production. Bay 11-7082, an NF-κB inhibitor, blocked morphological changes and TNF-α production induced by zymosan and/or PMA treatment. Western blot analysis has showed zymosan-Dectin-1 pathway mediated destructive phosphorylation of inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB) kinase α subunit (IKKα) in IKK complexes, while PMA-PKC pathway regulated selective phosphorylation and degradation of IKKβ. Simultaneous phosphorylation of separate IKK subunits by co-treatment of zymosan and PMA resulted in cooperative activation of NF-κB and TNF-α production. PMID:26183538

  18. Human dendritic cells and macrophages. In situ immunophenotypic definition of subsets that exhibit specific morphologic and microenvironmental characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, G. S.; Turner, R. R.; Shiurba, R. A.; Eng, L.; Warnke, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Using a panel of monoclonal antibodies and antisera in situ, the authors have defined subsets of human dendritic cells and macrophages that exhibit specific morphologic and microenvironmental characteristics. All subsets contained cells that reacted with antibodies directed against HLA-A,B,C, HLA-Dr, leukocyte common, Leu-M3, and Leu-3(T4) antigens. R4/23 and anti-S100 defined three major subsets. R4/23+, S100- cells constituted the B-cell-related follicular dendritic cells, which were identified only within the germinal center/mantle microenvironment of lymphoid follicles. R4/23-, S100+ cells constituted the T-cell-related dendritic cell subset. Anti-Leu-6(T6) further subdivided this group into Leu-6(T6)- interdigitating cells within the T-cell microenvironments of lymphoid organs and Leu-6(T6)+ Langerhans cells found predominantly in epithelial microenvironments, especially the skin. R4/23-, S100- cells constituted the nondendritic tissue macrophage subset which was widely distributed, primarily outside of dendritic-cell microenvironments. These data indicate that although dendritic cells and macrophages share several common antigenic features, morphologically and microenvironmentally distinct subsets express distinct immunologic phenotypes. Such data may provide insight into the ontogeny and function of these subsets and constitute a basis for the comparison of normal dendritic cells and macrophages to various histiocytic proliferative disorders. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 p78-c Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3985124

  19. Comparative analysis of signature genes in PRRSV-infected porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells at differential activation statuses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activation statuses of monocytic cells including monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are critically important for antiviral immunity. In particular, some devastating viruses, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), are capable of directly infecting these c...

  20. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Valerie T.; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2016-01-01

    Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7), an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) clustering in neurites and activates Gαo signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gαo subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation. PMID:26881110

  1. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Valerie T; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7), an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) clustering in neurites and activates Gα(o) signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gα(o) subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation. PMID:26881110

  2. Synaptic activation of ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation occurs locally in activated dendritic domains.

    PubMed

    Pirbhoy, Patricia Salgado; Farris, Shannon; Steward, Oswald

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) induces phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) in postsynaptic neurons, but the functional significance of rpS6 phosphorylation is poorly understood. Here, we show that synaptic stimulation that induces perforant path LTP triggers phosphorylation of rpS6 (p-rpS6) locally near active synapses. Using antibodies specific for phosphorylation at different sites (ser235/236 versus ser240/244), we show that strong synaptic activation led to dramatic increases in immunostaining throughout postsynaptic neurons with selectively higher staining for p-ser235/236 in the activated dendritic lamina. Following LTP induction, phosphorylation at ser235/236 was detectable by 5 min, peaked at 30 min, and was maintained for hours. Phosphorylation at both sites was completely blocked by local infusion of the NMDA receptor antagonist, APV. Despite robust induction of p-rpS6 following high frequency stimulation, assessment of protein synthesis by autoradiography revealed no detectable increases. Exploration of a novel environment led to increases in the number of p-rpS6-positive neurons throughout the forebrain in a pattern reminiscent of immediate early gene induction and many individual neurons that were p-rpS6-positive coexpressed Arc protein. Our results constrain hypotheses about the possible role of rpS6 phosphorylation in regulating postsynaptic protein synthesis during induction of synaptic plasticity. PMID:27194793

  3. High Secretion of Interferons by Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells upon Recognition of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Scheuplein, Vivian A.; Seifried, Janna; Malczyk, Anna H.; Miller, Lilija; Höcker, Lena; Vergara-Alert, Júlia; Dolnik, Olga; Zielecki, Florian; Becker, Björn; Spreitzer, Ingo; König, Renate; Becker, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) emerged in 2012 as the causative agent of a severe respiratory disease with a fatality rate of approximately 30%. The high virulence and mortality rate prompted us to analyze aspects of MERS-CoV pathogenesis, especially its interaction with innate immune cells such as antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Particularly, we analyzed secretion of type I and type III interferons (IFNs) by APCs, i.e., B cells, macrophages, monocyte-derived/myeloid dendritic cells (MDDCs/mDCs), and by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) of human and murine origin after inoculation with MERS-CoV. Production of large amounts of type I and III IFNs was induced exclusively in human pDCs, which were significantly higher than IFN induction by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV. Of note, IFNs were secreted in the absence of productive replication. However, receptor binding, endosomal uptake, and probably signaling via Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) were critical for sensing of MERS-CoV by pDCs. Furthermore, active transcription of MERS-CoV N RNA and subsequent N protein expression were evident in infected pDCs, indicating abortive infection. Taken together, our results point toward dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4)-dependent endosomal uptake and subsequent infection of human pDCs by MERS-CoV. However, the replication cycle is stopped after early gene expression. In parallel, human pDCs are potent IFN-producing cells upon MERS-CoV infection. Knowledge of such IFN responses supports our understanding of MERS-CoV pathogenesis and is critical for the choice of treatment options. IMPORTANCE MERS-CoV causes a severe respiratory disease with high fatality rates in human patients. Recently, confirmed human cases have increased dramatically in both number and geographic distribution. Understanding the pathogenesis of this highly pathogenic CoV is crucial for developing successful treatment strategies. This study elucidates the

  4. A Comparative Study of the T Cell Stimulatory and Polarizing Capacity of Human Primary Blood Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Simone P.; Bakdash, Ghaith; Weiden, Jorieke; Sköld, Annette E.; Tel, Jurjen; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are central players of immune responses; they become activated upon infection or inflammation and migrate to lymph nodes, where they can initiate an antigen-specific immune response by activating naive T cells. Two major types of naturally occurring DCs circulate in peripheral blood, namely, myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). Myeloid DCs (mDCs) can be subdivided based on the expression of either CD1c or CD141. These human DC subsets differ in surface marker expression, Toll-like receptor (TLR) repertoire, and transcriptional profile, suggesting functional differences between them. Here, we directly compared the capacity of human blood mDCs and pDCs to activate and polarize CD4+ T cells. CD141+ mDCs show an overall more mature phenotype over CD1c+ mDC and pDCs; they produce less IL-10 and more IL-12 than CD1c+ mDCs. Despite these differences, all subsets can induce the production of IFN-γ in naive CD4+ T cells. CD1c+ and CD141+ mDCs especially induce a strong T helper 1 profile. Importantly, naive CD4+ T cells are not polarized towards regulatory T cells by any subset. These findings further establish all three human blood DCs—despite their differences—as promising candidates for immunostimulatory effectors in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27057096

  5. Influenza virus-infected dendritic cells stimulate strong proliferative and cytolytic responses from human CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, N; Bender, A; Gonzalez, N; Bui, L K; Garrett, M C; Steinman, R M

    1994-01-01

    Antigen-specific, CD8+, cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs) could potentially provide resistance to several infectious and malignant diseases. However, the cellular requirements for the generation of specific CTLs in human lymphocyte cultures are not well defined, and repetitive stimulation with antigen is often required. We find that strong CD8+ CTL responses to influenza virus can be generated from freshly isolated blood T cells, as long as dendritic cells are used as antigen presenting cells (APCs). Small numbers of dendritic cells (APC:T cell ratio of 1:50-1:100) induce these CTL responses from most donors in 7 d of culture, but monocytes are weak or inactive. Whereas both dendritic cells and monocytes are infected with influenza virus, the former serve as effective APCs for the induction of CD8+ T cells while the latter act as targets for the CTLs that are induced. The strong CD8+ response to influenza virus-infected dendritic cells is accompanied by extensive proliferation of the CD8+ T cells, but the response can develop in the apparent absence of CD4+ helpers or exogenous lymphokines. CD4+ influenza virus-specific CTLs can also be induced by dendritic cells, but the cultures initially must be depleted of CD8+ cells. These findings should make it possible to use dendritic cells to generate human, antigen-specific, CD8+ CTLs to other targets. The results illustrate the principle that efficient T cell-mediated responses develop in two stages: an afferent limb in which dendritic cells are specialized APCs and an efferent limb in which the primed T cells carry out an immune response to many types of presenting cells. Images PMID:8040335

  6. Defective Dendrite Elongation but Normal Fertility in Mice Lacking the Rho-Like GTPase Activator Dbl

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Emilio; Pozzato, Michela; Vercelli, Alessandro; Barberis, Laura; Azzolino, Ornella; Russo, Chiara; Vanni, Cristina; Silengo, Lorenzo; Eva, Alessandra; Altruda, Fiorella

    2002-01-01

    Dbl is the prototype of a large family of GDP-GTP exchange factors for small GTPases of the Rho family. In vitro, Dbl is known to activate Rho and Cdc42 and to induce a transformed phenotype. Dbl is specifically expressed in brain and gonads, but its in vivo functions are largely unknown. To assess its role in neurogenesis and gametogenesis, targeted deletion of the murine Dbl gene was accomplished in embryonic stem cells. Dbl-null mice are viable and did not show either decreased reproductive performances or obvious neurological defects. Histological analysis of mutant testis showed normal morphology and unaltered proliferation and survival of spermatogonia. Dbl-null brains indicated a correct disposition of the major neural structures. Analysis of cortical stratification indicated that Dbl is not crucial for neuronal migration. However, in distinct populations of Dbl-null cortical pyramidal neurons, the length of dendrites was significantly reduced, suggesting a role for Dbl in dendrite elongation. PMID:11940671

  7. Norwalk Virus Does Not Replicate in Human Macrophages or Dendritic Cells Derived from the Peripheral Blood of Susceptible Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Margarita K.; Atmar, Robert L.; Guix, Susana; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; He, Hong; Neill, Frederick H.; Sastry, Jagannadha K.; Yao, Qizhi; Estes, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    Human noroviruses are difficult to study due to the lack of an efficient in vitro cell culture system or small animal model. Murine norovirus replicates in murine macrophages (MΦ) and dendritic cells (DCs), raising the possibility that human NoVs might replicate in such human cell types. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated DCs and MΦ derived from monocyte subsets and CD11c+ DCs isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of individuals susceptible to Norwalk virus (NV) infection. These cells were exposed to NV and replication was evaluated by immunofluorescence and by quantitative RT-PCR. A few PBMC-derived DCs expressed NV proteins. However, NV RNA did not increase in any of the cells tested. These results demonstrate that NV does not replicate in human CD11c+ DCs, monocyte-derived DCs and MΦ, but abortive infection may occur in a few DCs. These results suggest that NV tropism is distinct from that of murine noroviruses. PMID:20667573

  8. Tenascin‐C Aggravates Autoimmune Myocarditis via Dendritic Cell Activation and Th17 Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Machino‐Ohtsuka, Tomoko; Tajiri, Kazuko; Kimura, Taizo; Sakai, Satoshi; Sato, Akira; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Hiroe, Michiaki; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Imanaka‐Yoshida, Kyoko

    2014-01-01

    Background Tenascin‐C (TN‐C), an extracellular matrix glycoprotein, appears at several important steps of cardiac development in the embryo, but is sparse in the normal adult heart. TN‐C re‐expresses under pathological conditions including myocarditis, and is closely associated with tissue injury and inflammation in both experimental and clinical settings. However, the pathophysiological role of TN‐C in the development of myocarditis is not clear. We examined how TN‐C affects the initiation of experimental autoimmune myocarditis, immunologically. Methods and Results A model of experimental autoimmune myocarditis was established in BALB/c mice by immunization with murine α‐myosin heavy chains. We found that TN‐C knockout mice were protected from severe myocarditis compared to wild‐type mice. TN‐C induced synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)‐6, in dendritic cells via activation of a Toll‐like receptor 4, which led to T‐helper (Th)17 cell differentiation and exacerbated the myocardial inflammation. In the transfer experiment, dendritic cells loaded with cardiac myosin peptide acquired the functional capacity to induce myocarditis when stimulated with TN‐C; however, TN‐C‐stimulated dendritic cells generated from Toll‐like receptor 4 knockout mice did not induce myocarditis in recipients. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that TN‐C aggravates autoimmune myocarditis by driving the dendritic cell activation and Th17 differentiation via Toll‐like receptor 4. The blockade of Toll‐like receptor 4‐mediated signaling to inhibit the proinflammatory effects of TN‐C could be a promising therapeutic strategy against autoimmune myocarditis. PMID:25376187

  9. Human B cells induce dendritic cell maturation and favour Th2 polarization by inducing OX-40 ligand

    PubMed Central

    Maddur, Mohan S.; Sharma, Meenu; Hegde, Pushpa; Stephen-Victor, Emmanuel; Pulendran, Bali; Kaveri, Srini V.; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in immune homeostasis by regulating the functions of various immune cells, including T and B cells. Notably, DCs also undergo education on reciprocal signalling by these immune cells and environmental factors. Various reports demonstrated that B cells have profound regulatory functions, although only few reports have explored the regulation of human DCs by B cells. Here we demonstrate that activated but not resting B cells induce maturation of DCs with distinct features to polarize Th2 cells that secrete interleukin (IL)-5, IL-4 and IL-13. B-cell-induced maturation of DCs is contact dependent and implicates signalling of B-cell activation molecules CD69, B-cell-activating factor receptor, and transmembrane activator and calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand interactor. Mechanistically, differentiation of Th2 cells by B-cell-matured DCs is dependent on OX-40 ligand. Collectively, our results suggest that B cells have the ability to control their own effector functions by enhancing the ability of human DCs to mediate Th2 differentiation. PMID:24910129

  10. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Function and Dendritic Cell Differentiation Are Affected by Bisphenol-A Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ariemma, Fabiana; Cimmino, Ilaria; Bruzzese, Dario; Scerbo, Roberta; Picascia, Stefania; D’Esposito, Vittoria; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollutants, including endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), interfere on human health, leading to hormonal, immune and metabolic perturbations. Bisphenol-A (BPA), a main component of polycarbonate plastics, has been receiving increased attention due to its worldwide distribution with a large exposure. In humans, BPA, for its estrogenic activity, may have a role in autoimmunity, inflammatory and allergic diseases. To this aim, we assessed the effect of low BPA doses on functionality of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and on in vitro differentiation of dendritic cells from monocytes (mDCs). Fresh peripheral blood samples were obtained from 12 healthy adult volunteers. PBMCs were left unstimulated or were activated with the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or the anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies and incubated in presence or absence of BPA at 0.1 and 1nM concentrations. The immune-modulatory effect of BPA was assessed by evaluating the cell proliferation and the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) secreted by PBMCs. mDCs were differentiated with IL-4 and GC-CSF with or without BPA and the expression of differentiation/maturation markers (CD11c, CD1a, CD86, HLA-DR) was evaluated by flow cytometry; furthermore, a panel of 27 different cytokines, growth factors and chemokines were assayed in the mDC culture supernatants. PBMCs proliferation significantly increased upon BPA exposure compared to BPA untreated cells. In addition, a significant decrease in IL-10 secretion was observed in PBMCs incubated with BPA, either in unstimulated or mitogen-stimulated cells, and at both 0.1 and 1nM BPA concentrations. Similarly, IL-13 was reduced, mainly in cells activated by antiCD3/CD28. By contrast, no significant changes in IFN-γ and IL-4 production were found in any condition assayed. Finally, BPA at 1nM increased the density of dendritic cells expressing CD1a and concomitantly

  11. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Function and Dendritic Cell Differentiation Are Affected by Bisphenol-A Exposure.

    PubMed

    Camarca, Alessandra; Gianfrani, Carmen; Ariemma, Fabiana; Cimmino, Ilaria; Bruzzese, Dario; Scerbo, Roberta; Picascia, Stefania; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro; Valentino, Rossella

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollutants, including endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), interfere on human health, leading to hormonal, immune and metabolic perturbations. Bisphenol-A (BPA), a main component of polycarbonate plastics, has been receiving increased attention due to its worldwide distribution with a large exposure. In humans, BPA, for its estrogenic activity, may have a role in autoimmunity, inflammatory and allergic diseases. To this aim, we assessed the effect of low BPA doses on functionality of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and on in vitro differentiation of dendritic cells from monocytes (mDCs). Fresh peripheral blood samples were obtained from 12 healthy adult volunteers. PBMCs were left unstimulated or were activated with the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or the anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies and incubated in presence or absence of BPA at 0.1 and 1nM concentrations. The immune-modulatory effect of BPA was assessed by evaluating the cell proliferation and the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) secreted by PBMCs. mDCs were differentiated with IL-4 and GC-CSF with or without BPA and the expression of differentiation/maturation markers (CD11c, CD1a, CD86, HLA-DR) was evaluated by flow cytometry; furthermore, a panel of 27 different cytokines, growth factors and chemokines were assayed in the mDC culture supernatants. PBMCs proliferation significantly increased upon BPA exposure compared to BPA untreated cells. In addition, a significant decrease in IL-10 secretion was observed in PBMCs incubated with BPA, either in unstimulated or mitogen-stimulated cells, and at both 0.1 and 1nM BPA concentrations. Similarly, IL-13 was reduced, mainly in cells activated by antiCD3/CD28. By contrast, no significant changes in IFN-γ and IL-4 production were found in any condition assayed. Finally, BPA at 1nM increased the density of dendritic cells expressing CD1a and concomitantly

  12. Dendritic cells from human mesenteric lymph nodes in inflammatory and non-inflammatory bowel diseases: subsets and function of plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hostmann, Arwed; Kapp, Kerstin; Beutner, Marianne; Ritz, Jörg-Peter; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Ignatius, Ralf; Duchmann, Rainer; Daum, Severin; Gröne, Jörn; Hotz, Hubert; Buhr, Heinz-Johannes; Zeitz, Martin; Ullrich, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) may be important regulators of both inflammatory and non-inflammatory mucosal immune responses but human studies are rare. Here we compare pDC from human MLN and peripheral blood (PB) by phenotype and function. MLN from patients with or without inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) undergoing colon surgery and PB from patients with IBD and from controls were used to isolate mononuclear cells. The pDC were analysed by flow cytometry for the expression of CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CCR6, CCR7, CX3CR1, CD103 and HLA-DR. Purified pDC from MLN and PB were stimulated with staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB), CpG-A, interleukin-3 (IL-3), SEB + IL-3, CpG-A + IL-3 or left unstimulated, and cultured alone or with purified allogeneic CD4+ CD45RA+ HLA-DR- T cells. Subsequently, concentrations of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-17, interferon-α (IFN-α), IFN-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in culture supernatants were determined by multiplex bead array. The PB pDC from IBD patients exhibited an activated and matured phenotype whereas MLN pDC and control PB pDC were less activated. CpG-A and CpG-A + IL-3-stimulated MLN pDC secreted less IL-6 and TNF-α compared with PB pDC from controls. Compared with co-cultures of naive CD4 T cells with PB pDC, co-cultures with MLN pDC contained more IL-2, IL-10 and IFN-γ when stimulated with SEB and SEB + IL-3, and less IFN-α when stimulated with CpG-A. MLN pDC differ phenotypically from PB pDC and their pattern of cytokine secretion and may contribute to specific outcomes of mucosal immune reactions. PMID:23278129

  13. S1PR4 Signaling Attenuates ILT 7 Internalization To Limit IFN-α Production by Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Dillmann, Christina; Ringel, Christian; Ringleb, Julia; Mora, Javier; Olesch, Catherine; Fink, Annika F; Roberts, Edward; Brüne, Bernhard; Weigert, Andreas

    2016-02-15

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) produce large amounts of type I IFN in response to TLR7/9 ligands. This conveys antiviral effects, activates other immune cells (NK cells, conventional DCs, B, and T cells), and causes the induction and expansion of a strong inflammatory response. pDCs are key players in various type I IFN-driven autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus or psoriasis, but pDCs are also involved in (anti-)tumor immunity. The sphingolipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signals through five G-protein-coupled receptors (S1PR1-5) to regulate, among other activities, immune cell migration and activation. The present study shows that S1P stimulation of human, primary pDCs substantially decreases IFN-α production after TLR7/9 activation with different types of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides or tick-borne encephalitis vaccine, which occurred in an S1PR4-dependent manner. Mechanistically, S1PR4 activation preserves the surface expression of the human pDC-specific inhibitory receptor Ig-like transcript 7. We provide novel information that Ig-like transcript 7 is rapidly internalized upon receptor-mediated endocytosis of TLR7/9 ligands to allow high IFN-α production. This is antagonized by S1PR4 signaling, thus decreasing TLR-induced IFN-α secretion. At a functional level, attenuated IFN-α production failed to alter Ag-driven T cell proliferation in pDC-dependent T cell activation assays, but shifted cytokine production of T cells from a Th1 (IFN-γ) to a regulatory (IL-10) profile. In conclusion, S1PR4 agonists block human pDC activation and may therefore be a promising tool to restrict pathogenic IFN-α production. PMID:26783340

  14. Natural IgM Switches the Function of Lipopolysaccharide-Activated Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Dendritic Cells to a Regulatory Dendritic Cell That Suppresses Innate Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Peter I; Schlegel, Kailo H; Bajwa, Amandeep; Huang, Liping; Kurmaeva, Elvira; Wang, Binru; Ye, Hong; Tedder, Thomas F; Kinsey, Gilbert R; Okusa, Mark D

    2015-12-01

    We have previously shown that polyclonal natural IgM protects mice from renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) by inhibiting the reperfusion inflammatory response. We hypothesized that a potential mechanism involved IgM modulation of dendritic cells (DC), as we observed high IgM binding to splenic DC. To test this hypothesis, we pretreated bone marrow-derived DC (BMDC) with polyclonal murine or human IgM prior to LPS activation and demonstrated that 0.5 × 10(6) IgM/LPS-pretreated BMDC, when injected into wild-type C57BL/6 mice 24 h before renal ischemia, protect mice from developing renal IRI. We show that this switching of LPS-activated BMDC to a regulatory phenotype requires modulation of BMDC function that is mediated by IgM binding to nonapoptotic BMDC receptors. Regulatory BMDC require IL-10 and programmed death 1 as well as downregulation of CD40 and p65 NF-κB phosphorylation to protect in renal IRI. Blocking the programmed death ligand 1 binding site just before i.v. injection of IgM/LPS-pretreated BMDC or using IL-10 knockout BMDC fails to induce protection. Similarly, IgM/LPS-pretreated BMDC are rendered nonprotective by increasing CD40 expression and phosphorylation of p65 NF-κB. How IgM/LPS regulatory BMDC suppress in vivo ischemia-induced innate inflammation remains to be determined. However, we show that suppression is dependent on other in vivo regulatory mechanisms in the host, that is, CD25(+) T cells, B cells, IL-10, and circulating IgM. There was no increase in Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in the spleen either before or after renal IRI. Collectively, these findings show that natural IgM anti-leukocyte Abs can switch BMDC to a regulatory phenotype despite the presence of LPS that ordinarily induces BMDC maturation. PMID:26519533

  15. Critical Role of MDA5 in the Interferon Response Induced by Human Metapneumovirus Infection in Dendritic Cells and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Baños-Lara, M. Del Rocío; Ghosh, Arpita

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a respiratory paramyxovirus of global clinical relevance. Despite the substantial knowledge generated during the last 10 years about hMPV infection, information regarding the activation of the immune response against this virus remains largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that the helicase melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) is essential to induce the interferon response after hMPV infection in human and mouse dendritic cells as well as in an experimental mouse model of infection. Our findings in vitro and in vivo showed that MDA5 is required for the expression and activation of interferon (IFN) regulatory factors (IRFs). hMPV infection induces activation of IRF-3, and it regulates the expression of IRF-7. However, both IRF-3 and IRF-7 are critical for the production of type I and type III IFNs. In addition, our in vivo studies in hMPV-infected mice indicated that MDA5 alters viral clearance, enhances disease severity and pulmonary inflammation, and regulates the production of cytokines and chemokines in response to hMPV. These findings are relevant for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of hMPV infection. PMID:23152520

  16. Complement Opsonization Promotes Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Infection of Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ellegård, Rada; Nyström, Sofia; Rondahl, Elin; Serrander, Lena; Bergström, Tomas; Sjöwall, Christopher; Eriksson, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections globally, with a very high prevalence in many countries. During HSV-2 infection, viral particles become coated with complement proteins and antibodies, both present in genital fluids, which could influence the activation of immune responses. In genital mucosa, the primary target cells for HSV-2 infection are epithelial cells, but resident immune cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs), are also infected. DCs are the activators of the ensuing immune responses directed against HSV-2, and the aim of this study was to examine the effects opsonization of HSV-2, either with complement alone or with complement and antibodies, had on the infection of immature DCs and their ability to mount inflammatory and antiviral responses. Complement opsonization of HSV-2 enhanced both the direct infection of immature DCs and their production of new infectious viral particles. The enhanced infection required activation of the complement cascade and functional complement receptor 3. Furthermore, HSV-2 infection of DCs required endocytosis of viral particles and their delivery into an acid endosomal compartment. The presence of complement in combination with HSV-1- or HSV-2-specific antibodies more or less abolished HSV-2 infection of DCs. Our results clearly demonstrate the importance of studying HSV-2 infection under conditions that ensue in vivo, i.e., conditions under which the virions are covered in complement fragments and complement fragments and antibodies, as these shape the infection and the subsequent immune response and need to be further elucidated. IMPORTANCE During HSV-2 infection, viral particles should become coated with complement proteins and antibodies, both present in genital fluids, which could influence the activation of the immune responses. The dendritic cells are activators of the immune responses directed against HSV-2, and the aim of this study was to examine the

  17. Circulating precursors of human CD1c+ and CD141+ dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Gaëlle; Lee, Jaeyop; Zhou, Yu Jerry; Schreiber, Joseph J.; Keler, Tibor; Puhr, Sarah; Anandasabapathy, Niroshana; Schlesinger, Sarah; Caskey, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Two subsets of conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) with distinct cell surface markers and functions exist in mouse and human. The two subsets of cDCs are specialized antigen-presenting cells that initiate T cell immunity and tolerance. In the mouse, a migratory cDC precursor (pre-CDC) originates from defined progenitors in the bone marrow (BM). Small numbers of short-lived pre-CDCs travel through the blood and replace cDCs in the peripheral organs, maintaining homeostasis of the highly dynamic cDC pool. However, the identity and distribution of the immediate precursor to human cDCs has not been defined. Using a tissue culture system that supports the development of human DCs, we identify a migratory precursor (hpre-CDC) that exists in human cord blood, BM, blood, and peripheral lymphoid organs. hpre-CDCs differ from premonocytes that are restricted to the BM. In contrast to earlier progenitors with greater developmental potential, the hpre-CDC is restricted to producing CD1c+ and CD141+ Clec9a+ cDCs. Studies in human volunteers demonstrate that hpre-CDCs are a dynamic population that increases in response to levels of circulating Flt3L. PMID:25687281

  18. Control of Ca2+ Influx and Calmodulin Activation by SK-Channels in Dendritic Spines

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Thom; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    The key trigger for Hebbian synaptic plasticity is influx of Ca2+ into postsynaptic dendritic spines. The magnitude of [Ca2+] increase caused by NMDA-receptor (NMDAR) and voltage-gated Ca2+ -channel (VGCC) activation is thought to determine both the amplitude and direction of synaptic plasticity by differential activation of Ca2+ -sensitive enzymes such as calmodulin. Ca2+ influx is negatively regulated by Ca2+ -activated K+ channels (SK-channels) which are in turn inhibited by neuromodulators such as acetylcholine. However, the precise mechanisms by which SK-channels control the induction of synaptic plasticity remain unclear. Using a 3-dimensional model of Ca2+ and calmodulin dynamics within an idealised, but biophysically-plausible, dendritic spine, we show that SK-channels regulate calmodulin activation specifically during neuron-firing patterns associated with induction of spike timing-dependent plasticity. SK-channel activation and the subsequent reduction in Ca2+ influx through NMDARs and L-type VGCCs results in an order of magnitude decrease in calmodulin (CaM) activation, providing a mechanism for the effective gating of synaptic plasticity induction. This provides a common mechanism for the regulation of synaptic plasticity by neuromodulators. PMID:27232631

  19. Allergy-Protective Arabinogalactan Modulates Human Dendritic Cells via C-Type Lectins and Inhibition of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Peters, Marcus; Guidato, Patrick M; Peters, Karin; Megger, Dominik A; Sitek, Barbara; Classen, Birgit; Heise, Esther M; Bufe, Albrecht

    2016-02-15

    Arabinogalactan (AG) isolated from dust of a traditional farm prevents disease in murine models of allergy. However, it is unclear whether this polysaccharide has immune regulatory properties in humans. The aim of this study was to test the influence of AG on the immune-stimulating properties of human dendritic cells (DCs). Moreover, we sought to identify the receptor to which AG binds. AG was produced from plant callus tissue under sterile conditions to avoid the influence of pathogen-associated molecular patterns in subsequent experiments. The influence of AG on the human immune system was investigated by analyzing its impact on monocyte-derived DCs. To analyze whether the T cell stimulatory capacity of AG-stimulated DCs is altered, an MLR with naive Th cells was performed. We revealed that AG reduced T cell proliferation in a human MLR. In the search for a molecular mechanism, we found that AG binds to the immune modulatory receptors DC-specific ICAM-3 -: grabbing non integrin (DC-SIGN) and macrophage mannose receptor 1 (MMR-1). Stimulation of these receptors with AG simultaneously with TLR4 stimulation with LPS increased the expression of the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase tripartite motif -: containing protein 21 and decreased the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 in DCs. This led to a reduced activation profile with reduced costimulatory molecules and proinflammatory cytokine production. Blocking of MMR-1 or DC-SIGN with neutralizing Abs partially inhibits this effect. We conclude that AG dampens the activation of human DCs by LPS via binding to DC-SIGN and MMR-1, leading to attenuated TLR signaling. This results in a reduced T cell activation capacity of DCs. PMID:26746190

  20. Activation-Induced Cell Death of Dendritic Cells Is Dependent on Sphingosine Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Schwiebs, Anja; Friesen, Olga; Katzy, Elisabeth; Ferreirós, Nerea; Pfeilschifter, Josef M.; Radeke, Heinfried H.

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is an immune modulatory lipid mediator and has been implicated in numerous pathophysiological processes. S1P is produced by sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1) and Sphk2. Dendritic cells (DCs) are central for the direction of immune responses and crucially involved in autoimmunity and cancerogenesis. In this study we examined the function and survival of bone marrow-derived DCs under long-term inflammatory stimulation. We observed that differentiated cells undergo activation-induced cell death (AICD) upon LPS stimulation with an increased metabolic activity shortly after stimulation, followed by a rapid activation of caspase 3 and subsequent augmented apoptosis. Importantly, we highlight a profound role of Sphk1 in secretion of inflammatory cytokines and survival of dendritic cells that might be mediated by a change in sphingolipid levels as well as by a change in STAT3 expression. Cell growth during differentiation of Sphk1-deficient cells treated with the functional S1P receptor antagonist FTYP was reduced. Importantly, in dendritic cells we did not observe a compensatory regulation of Sphk2 mRNA in Sphk1-deficient cells. Instead, we discovered a massive increase in Sphk1 mRNA concentration upon long-term stimulation with LPS in wild type cells that might function as an attempt to rescue from inflammation-caused cell death. Taken together, in this investigation we describe details of a crucial involvement of sphingolipids and Sphk1 in AICD during long-term immunogenic activity of DCs that might play an important role in autoimmunity and might explain the differences in immune response observed in in vivo studies of Sphk1 modulation. PMID:27148053

  1. STAT2 Is Required for TLR-Induced Murine Dendritic Cell Activation and Cross-Presentation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Lee, Michael H; Chakhtoura, Marita; Green, Benjamin L; Kotredes, Kevin P; Chain, Robert W; Sriram, Uma; Gamero, Ana M; Gallucci, Stefania

    2016-07-01

    TLR-stimulated cross-presentation by conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) is important in host defense and antitumor immunity. We recently reported that cDCs lacking the type I IFN signaling molecule STAT2 are impaired in cross-presenting tumor Ags to CD8(+) T cells. To investigate how STAT2 affects cross-presentation, we determined its requirements for dendritic cell activation. In this study, we report that STAT2 is essential for the activation of murine female cDCs upon TLR3, -4, -7, and -9 stimulation. In response to various TLR ligands, Stat2(-/-) cDCs displayed reduced expression of costimulatory molecules and type I IFN-stimulated genes. The cDC responses to exogenous IFN-α that we evaluated required STAT2 activation, indicating that the canonical STAT1-STAT2 heterodimers are the primary signaling transducers of type I IFNs in cDCs. Interestingly, LPS-induced production of IL-12 was STAT2 and type I IFN receptor (IFNAR) dependent, whereas LPS-induced production of TNF-α and IL-6 was STAT2 and IFNAR independent, suggesting a specific role of the IFNAR-STAT2 axis in the stimulation of proinflammatory cytokines by LPS in cDCs. In contrast, R848- and CpG-induced cytokine production was less influenced by the IFNAR-STAT2 axis. Short kinetics and IFNAR blockade studies showed that STAT2 main function is to transduce signals triggered by autocrine type I IFNs. Importantly, Stat2(-/-) cDCs were deficient in cross-presenting to CD8(+) T cells in vitro upon IFN-α, CpG, and LPS stimulation, and also in cross-priming and licensing cytotoxic T cell killers in vivo. We conclude that STAT2 plays a critical role in TLR-induced dendritic cell activation and cross-presentation, and thus is vital in host defense. PMID:27233962

  2. Effects of RAMEA-complexed polyunsaturated fatty acids on the response of human dendritic cells to inflammatory signals

    PubMed Central

    Rajnavölgyi, Éva; Laczik, Renáta; Kun, Viktor; Szente, Lajos

    2014-01-01

    Summary The n−3 fatty acids are not produced by mammals, although they are essential for hormone synthesis and maintenance of cell membrane structure and integrity. They have recently been shown to inhibit inflammatory reactions and also emerged as potential treatment options for inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma and inflammatory bowel diseases. Dendritic cells (DC) play a central role in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity and upon inflammatory signals they produce various soluble factors among them cytokines and chemokines that act as inflammatory or regulatory mediators. In this study we monitored the effects of α-linoleic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid solubilized in a dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/ethanol 1:1 mixture or as complexed by randomly methylated α-cyclodextrin (RAMEA) on the inflammatory response of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC). The use of RAMEA for enhancing aqueous solubility of n−3 fatty acids has the unambiguous advantage over applying RAMEB (the β-cyclodextrin analog), since there is no interaction with cell membrane cholesterol. In vitro differentiated moDC were left untreated or were stimulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, mimicking bacterial and viral infections, respectively. The response of unstimulated and activated moDC to n−3 fatty acid treatment was tested by measuring the cell surface expression of CD1a used as a phenotypic and CD83 as an activation marker of inflammatory moDC differentiation and activation by using flow cytometry. Monocyte-derived DC activation was also monitored by the secretion level of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-12, respectively. We found that RAMEA-complexed n−3 fatty acids reduced the expression of CD1a protein in both LPS and Poly(I:C) stimulated moDC significantly, but most efficiently by eicosapentaenic acid, while no significant change

  3. FOXO1 Regulates Dendritic Cell Activity Through ICAM-1 and CCR7

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guangyu; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Wen-Mei; Pujado, Sandra Pacios; Xu, Fanxing; Tian, Chen; Xiao, E; Choi, Yongwon; Graves, Dana T.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor FOXO1 regulates cell function and is expressed in dendritic cells (DC). We investigated the role of FOXO1 in activating DCs to stimulate a lymphocyte response to bacteria. We show that bacteria induce FOXO1 nuclear localization through the MAP kinase pathway and identify for the first time that FOXO1 is needed for dendritic cell activation of lymphocytes in vivo. This occurs through FOXO1 regulation of DC phagocytosis, chemotaxis, and DC-lymphocyte binding. FOXO1 induces DC activity by regulating ICAM-1 and CCR7. FOXO1 binds to the CCR7 and ICAM-1 promoters, stimulates CCR7 and ICAM-1 transcriptional activity and regulates their expression. This is functionally important since transfection of DC from FOXO1 deleted CD11c.Cre+FOXO1L/L mice with an ICAM-1 expressing plasmid rescues the negative effect of FOXO1 deletion on DC bacterial phagocytosis and chemotaxis. Rescue with both CCR7 and ICAM-1 reverses impaired DC homing to lymph nodes in vivo when FOXO1 is deleted. Moreover, antibody production following injection of bacteria is significantly reduced with lineage specific FOXO1 ablation. Thus FOXO1 coordinates up-regulation of DC activity through key downstream target genes that are needed for DC to stimulate T and B lymphocytes and generate an antibody defense to bacteria. PMID:25786691

  4. The capabilities and limitations of conductance-based compartmental neuron models with reduced branched or unbranched morphologies and active dendrites.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Eric B; Edgerton, Jeremy R; Jaeger, Dieter

    2011-04-01

    Conductance-based neuron models are frequently employed to study the dynamics of biological neural networks. For speed and ease of use, these models are often reduced in morphological complexity. Simplified dendritic branching structures may process inputs differently than full branching structures, however, and could thereby fail to reproduce important aspects of biological neural processing. It is not yet well understood which processing capabilities require detailed branching structures. Therefore, we analyzed the processing capabilities of full or partially branched reduced models. These models were created by collapsing the dendritic tree of a full morphological model of a globus pallidus (GP) neuron while preserving its total surface area and electrotonic length, as well as its passive and active parameters. Dendritic trees were either collapsed into single cables (unbranched models) or the full complement of branch points was preserved (branched models). Both reduction strategies allowed us to compare dynamics between all models using the same channel density settings. Full model responses to somatic inputs were generally preserved by both types of reduced model while dendritic input responses could be more closely preserved by branched than unbranched reduced models. However, features strongly influenced by local dendritic input resistance, such as active dendritic sodium spike generation and propagation, could not be accurately reproduced by any reduced model. Based on our analyses, we suggest that there are intrinsic differences in processing capabilities between unbranched and branched models. We also indicate suitable applications for different levels of reduction, including fast searches of full model parameter space. PMID:20623167

  5. The SOCS3-independent expression of IDO2 supports the homeostatic generation of T regulatory cells by human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Trabanelli, Sara; Očadlíková, Darina; Ciciarello, Marilena; Salvestrini, Valentina; Lecciso, Mariangela; Jandus, Camilla; Metz, Richard; Evangelisti, Cecilia; Laury-Kleintop, Lisa; Romero, Pedro; Prendergast, George C; Curti, Antonio; Lemoli, Roberto M

    2014-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional APCs that have a role in the initiation of adaptive immune responses and tolerance. Among the tolerogenic mechanisms, the expression of the enzyme IDO1 represents an effective tool to generate T regulatory cells. In humans, different DC subsets express IDO1, but less is known about the IDO1-related enzyme IDO2. In this study, we found a different pattern of expression and regulation between IDO1 and IDO2 in human circulating DCs. At the protein level, IDO1 is expressed only in circulating myeloid DCs (mDCs) and is modulated by PGE2, whereas IDO2 is expressed in both mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs and is not modulated by PGE2. In healthy subjects, IDO1 expression requires the presence of PGE2 and needs continuous transcription and translation, whereas IDO2 expression is constitutive, independent from suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 activity. Conversely, in patients suffering from inflammatory arthritis, circulating DCs express both IDO1 and IDO2. At the functional level, both mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs generate T regulatory cells through an IDO1/IDO2-dependent mechanism. We conclude that, in humans, whereas IDO1 provides an additional mechanism of tolerance induced by proinflammatory mediators, IDO2 is stably expressed in steady-state conditions and may contribute to the homeostatic tolerogenic capacity of DCs. PMID:24391212

  6. Chimeric Vaccine Stimulation of Human Dendritic Cell Indoleamine 2, 3-Dioxygenase Occurs via the Non-Canonical NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nan-Sun; Mbongue, Jacques C; Nicholas, Dequina A; Esebanmen, Grace E; Unternaehrer, Juli J; Firek, Anthony F; Langridge, William H R

    2016-01-01

    A chimeric protein vaccine composed of the cholera toxin B subunit fused to proinsulin (CTB-INS) was shown to suppress type 1 diabetes onset in NOD mice and upregulate biosynthesis of the tryptophan catabolic enzyme indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO1) in human dendritic cells (DCs). Here we demonstrate siRNA inhibition of the NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) suppresses vaccine-induced IDO1 biosynthesis as well as IKKα phosphorylation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis of CTB-INS inoculated DCs showed that RelB bound to NF-κB consensus sequences in the IDO1 promoter, suggesting vaccine stimulation of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway activates IDO1 expression in vivo. The addition of Tumor Necrosis Factor Associated Factors (TRAF) TRAF 2, 3 and TRAF6 blocking peptides to vaccine inoculated DCs was shown to inhibit IDO1 biosynthesis. This experimental outcome suggests vaccine activation of the TNFR super-family receptor pathway leads to upregulation of IDO1 biosynthesis in CTB-INS inoculated dendritic cells. Together, our experimental data suggest the CTB-INS vaccine uses a TNFR-dependent signaling pathway of the non-canonical NF-κB signaling pathway resulting in suppression of dendritic cell mediated type 1 diabetes autoimmunity. PMID:26881431

  7. Chimeric Vaccine Stimulation of Human Dendritic Cell Indoleamine 2, 3-Dioxygenase Occurs via the Non-Canonical NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nan-Sun; Mbongue, Jacques C.; Nicholas, Dequina A.; Esebanmen, Grace E.; Unternaehrer, Juli J.; Firek, Anthony F.; Langridge, William H. R.

    2016-01-01

    A chimeric protein vaccine composed of the cholera toxin B subunit fused to proinsulin (CTB-INS) was shown to suppress type 1 diabetes onset in NOD mice and upregulate biosynthesis of the tryptophan catabolic enzyme indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO1) in human dendritic cells (DCs). Here we demonstrate siRNA inhibition of the NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) suppresses vaccine-induced IDO1 biosynthesis as well as IKKα phosphorylation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis of CTB-INS inoculated DCs showed that RelB bound to NF-κB consensus sequences in the IDO1 promoter, suggesting vaccine stimulation of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway activates IDO1 expression in vivo. The addition of Tumor Necrosis Factor Associated Factors (TRAF) TRAF 2, 3 and TRAF6 blocking peptides to vaccine inoculated DCs was shown to inhibit IDO1 biosynthesis. This experimental outcome suggests vaccine activation of the TNFR super-family receptor pathway leads to upregulation of IDO1 biosynthesis in CTB-INS inoculated dendritic cells. Together, our experimental data suggest the CTB-INS vaccine uses a TNFR-dependent signaling pathway of the non-canonical NF-κB signaling pathway resulting in suppression of dendritic cell mediated type 1 diabetes autoimmunity. PMID:26881431

  8. Collagen Induces Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells by Signaling through Osteoclast-Associated Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Heidi S.; Nitze, Louise M.; Zeuthen, Louise H.; Keller, Pernille; Gruhler, Albrecht; Pass, Jesper; Chen, Jianhe; Guo, Li; Fleetwood, Andrew J.; Hamilton, John A.; Berchtold, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is widely expressed on human myeloid cells. Collagen types (Col)I, II, and III have been described as OSCAR ligands, and ColII peptides can induce costimulatory signaling in receptor activator for NF-κB–dependent osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we isolated collagen as an OSCAR-interacting protein from the membranes of murine osteoblasts. We have investigated a functional outcome of the OSCAR–collagen interaction in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). OSCAR engagement by ColI/II-induced activation/maturation of DCs is characterized by upregulation of cell surface markers and secretion of cytokines. These collagen-matured DCs (Col-DCs) were efficient drivers of allogeneic and autologous naive T cell proliferation. The T cells expanded by Col-DCs secreted cytokines with no clear T cell polarization pattern. Global RNA profiling revealed that multiple proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines and cytokine receptors, components of the stable immune synapse (namely CD40, CD86, CD80, and ICAM-1), as well as components of TNF and TLR signaling, are transcriptional targets of OSCAR in DCs. Our findings indicate the existence of a novel pathway by which extracellular matrix proteins locally drive maturation of DCs during inflammatory conditions, for example, within synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients, where collagens become exposed during tissue remodeling and are thus accessible for interaction with infiltrating precursors of DCs. PMID:25725106

  9. CCL-34, a synthetic toll-like receptor 4 activator, modulates differentiation and maturation of myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shu-Ling; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Liu, Sheng-Hung; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2016-03-01

    CCL-34, a synthetic α-galactosylceramide analog, has been reported as an activator of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in macrophages. TLR4 is highly expressed in dendritic cell (DC) and several TLR4 agonists are known to trigger DC maturation. We herein evaluated the effect of CCL-34 on DC maturation. Human CD14+ monocyte-derived immature DC were treated with CCL-34, its inactive structural analog CCL-44, or LPS to assess the DC maturation. CCL-34 induced DC maturation according to their characteristically dendrite-forming morphology, CD83 expression and IL-12p70 production. The allostimulatory activity of DC on proliferation of naive CD4+CD45+RA+ T cells and their secretion of interferon-γ was increased by CCL-34. Phagocytosis, an important function of immature DC, was reduced after CCL-34 treatment. All these effects related to DC maturation were evidently induced by positive control LPS but not by CCL-44 treatment. TLR4 neutralization impaired human DC maturation triggered by CCL-34. The induction of IL-12, a hallmark of DC maturation, by CCL-34 and LPS was only evident in TLR4-competent C3H/HeN, but not in TLR4-defective C3H/HeJ mice. CCL-34 could further elicit the antigen presentation capability in mice inoculated with doxorubicin-treated colorectal cancer cells. In summary, CCL-34 triggers DC maturation via a TLR4-dependent manner, which supports its potential application as an immunostimulator. PMID:26883191

  10. CCL-34, a synthetic toll-like receptor 4 activator, modulates differentiation and maturation of myeloid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shu-Ling; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Liu, Sheng-Hung; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2016-01-01

    CCL-34, a synthetic α-galactosylceramide analog, has been reported as an activator of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in macrophages. TLR4 is highly expressed in dendritic cell (DC) and several TLR4 agonists are known to trigger DC maturation. We herein evaluated the effect of CCL-34 on DC maturation. Human CD14+ monocyte-derived immature DC were treated with CCL-34, its inactive structural analog CCL-44, or LPS to assess the DC maturation. CCL-34 induced DC maturation according to their characteristically dendrite-forming morphology, CD83 expression and IL-12p70 production. The allostimulatory activity of DC on proliferation of naive CD4+CD45+RA+ T cells and their secretion of interferon-γ was increased by CCL-34. Phagocytosis, an important function of immature DC, was reduced after CCL-34 treatment. All these effects related to DC maturation were evidently induced by positive control LPS but not by CCL-44 treatment. TLR4 neutralization impaired human DC maturation triggered by CCL-34. The induction of IL-12, a hallmark of DC maturation, by CCL-34 and LPS was only evident in TLR4-competent C3H/HeN, but not in TLR4-defective C3H/HeJ mice. CCL-34 could further elicit the antigen presentation capability in mice inoculated with doxorubicin-treated colorectal cancer cells. In summary, CCL-34 triggers DC maturation via a TLR4-dependent manner, which supports its potential application as an immunostimulator. PMID:26883191

  11. Efficient internalization of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles of different sizes by primary human macrophages and dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kunzmann, Andrea; Andersson, Britta; Vogt, Carmen; Feliu, Neus; Ye Fei; Gabrielsson, Susanne; Toprak, Muhammet S.; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; Laurent, Sophie; Vahter, Marie; Krug, Harald; Muhammed, Mamoun; Scheynius, Annika; Fadeel, Bengt

    2011-06-01

    Engineered nanoparticles are being considered for a wide range of biomedical applications, from magnetic resonance imaging to 'smart' drug delivery systems. The development of novel nanomaterials for biomedical applications must be accompanied by careful scrutiny of their biocompatibility. In this regard, particular attention should be paid to the possible interactions between nanoparticles and cells of the immune system, our primary defense system against foreign invasion. On the other hand, labeling of immune cells serves as an ideal tool for visualization, diagnosis or treatment of inflammatory processes, which requires the efficient internalization of the nanoparticles into the cells of interest. Here, we compare novel monodispersed silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with commercially available dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. The silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles displayed excellent magnetic properties. Furthermore, they were non-toxic to primary human monocyte-derived macrophages at all doses tested whereas dose-dependent toxicity of the smaller silica-coated nanoparticles (30 nm and 50 nm) was observed for primary monocyte-derived dendritic cells, but not for the similarly small dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. No macrophage or dendritic cell secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines was observed upon administration of nanoparticles. The silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were taken up to a significantly higher degree when compared to the dextran-coated nanoparticles, irrespective of size. Cellular internalization of the silica-coated nanoparticles was through an active, actin cytoskeleton-dependent process. We conclude that these novel silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are promising materials for medical imaging, cell tracking and other biomedical applications.

  12. Diesel Exhaust Particle-Exposed Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Induce Dendritic Cell Maturation and Polarization via Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin

    PubMed Central

    Bleck, Bertram; Tse, Doris B.; Curotto de Lafaille, Maria A.; Zhang, Feijie

    2009-01-01

    Human exposure to air pollutants, including ambient particulate matter, has been proposed as a mechanism for the rise in allergic disorders. Diesel exhaust particles, a major component of ambient particulate matter, induce sensitization to neoallergens, but the mechanisms by which sensitization occur remain unclear. We show that diesel exhaust particles upregulate thymic stromal lymphopoietin in human bronchial epithelial cells in an oxidant-dependent manner. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin induced by diesel exhaust particles was associated with maturation of myeloid dendritic cells, which was blocked by anti-thymic stromal lymphopoietin antibodies or silencing epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin. Dendritic cells exposed to diesel exhaust particle-treated human bronchial epithelial cells induced Th2 polarization in a thymic stromal lymphopoietin-dependent manner. These findings provide new insight into the mechanisms by which diesel exhaust particles modify human lung mucosal immunity. PMID:18049884

  13. Patients with active inflammatory bowel disease lack immature peripheral blood plasmacytoid and myeloid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, D C; Metzke, D; Schmitz, J; Scheffold, A; Sturm, A; Wiedenmann, B; Dignass, A U

    2005-01-01

    Background: Breakdown of tolerance against the commensal microflora is believed to be a major factor in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Dendritic cells (DC) have been implicated in this process in various animal models, but data on human DC in IBD are very limited. Aim: To characterise plasmacytoid DC (PDC) and myeloid DC (MDC) in patients with active versus inactive IBD and healthy controls. Patients and Methods: Peripheral blood was obtained from 106 patients (Crohn’s disease (CD) n = 49, ulcerative colitis (UC) n = 57) and healthy controls (n = 19). Disease activity was scored using the modified Truelove Witts (MTWSI) for UC and the Harvey Bradshaw severity indices (HBSI) for CD. Four colour flow cytometric analysis was used to identify, enumerate, and phenotype DC. DC from patients with acute flare ups and healthy controls were cultured and stimulated with CpG ODN 2006 or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Results: IBD patients in remission (PDC UC, 0.39%; CD, 0.35%; MDC-1 UC, 0.23%; CD, 0.22% of PBMC) have slightly lower numbers of circulating DC compared with healthy controls (PDC 0.41%, MDC-1 0.25% of PBMC). In acute flare ups IBD patients experience a significant drop of DC (PDC UC, 0.04%; CD, 0.11%; MDC-1 UC, 0.11%; CD, 0.14% of PBMC) that correlates with disease activity (correlation coefficients: PDC MTWSI, 0.93; HBSI, 0.79; MDC-1 MTWSI, 0.75; HBSI, 0.81). Moreover, both express α4β7 integrin and display an immature phenotype. Freshly isolated PDC and MDC-1 from untreated flaring IBD patients express higher baseline levels of CD86 which increases further in culture and upon stimulation compared with healthy controls. Conclusion: IBD patients lack immature blood DC during flare ups which possibly migrate to the gut. An aberrant response to microbial surrogate stimuli suggests a disturbed interaction with commensals. PMID:15647187

  14. Cytotoxic activity of interferon alpha induced dendritic cells as a biomarker of glioblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishinov, S. V.; Stupak, V. V.; Tyrinova, T. V.; Leplina, O. Yu.; Ostanin, A. A.; Chernykh, E. R.

    2016-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen presenting cells that can play direct role in anti-tumor immune response as killer cells. DC tumoricidal activity can be stimulated greatly by type I IFN (IFNα and IFNβ). In the present study, we examined cytostatic and cytotoxic activity of monocyte-derived IFNα-induced DCs generated from patients with brain glioma and evaluated the potential use of these parameters in diagnostics of high-grade gliomas. Herein, we demonstrated that patient DCs do not possess the ability to inhibit the growth of tumor HEp-2 cell line but low-grade and high-grade glioma patients do not differ significantly in DC cytostatic activity. However, glioma patient DCs are characterized by reduced cytotoxic activity against HEp-2 cells. The impairment of DC cytotoxic function is observed mainly in glioblastoma patients. The cytotoxic activity of DCs against HEp-2 cells below 9% is an informative marker for glioblastomas.

  15. Expression and regulation of Schlafen (SLFN) family members in primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells

    PubMed Central

    Puck, Alexander; Aigner, Regina; Modak, Madhura; Cejka, Petra; Blaas, Dieter; Stöckl, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Schlafen (SLFN/Slfn) family members have been investigated for their involvement in fundamental cellular processes including growth regulation, differentiation and control of viral replication. However, most research has been focused on the characterization of Slfns within the murine system or in human cell lines. Since little is known about SLFNs in primary human immune cells, we set out to analyze the expression and regulation of the six human SLFN genes in monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) and T cells. Comparison of SLFN gene expression across these three cell types showed high mRNA expression of SLFN11 in monocytes and moDCs and high SLFN5 expression in T cells, indicating functional importance within these cell types. Differentiation of monocytes to moDCs leads to the gradual upregulation of SLFN12L and SLFN13 while SLFN12 levels were decreased by differentiation stimuli. Stimulation of moDCs via human rhinovirus, lipopolysaccharide, or IFN-α lead to strong upregulation of SLFN gene expression, while peptidoglycan poorly stimulated regulation of both SLFNs and the classical interferon-stimulated gene MxA. T cell activation was found to downregulate the expression of SLFN5, SLFN12 and SLFN12L, which was reversible upon addition of exogenous IFN-α. In conclusion, we demonstrate, that SLFN gene upregulation is mainly dependent on autocrine type I interferon signaling in primary human immune cells. Rapid decrease of SLFN expression levels following T cell receptor stimulation indicates a role of SLFNs in the regulation of human T cell quiescence. PMID:26623250

  16. Dendritic Cells and Their Role in Cardiovascular Diseases: A View on Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    John, Katja; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Mohr, Friedrich W.

    2016-01-01

    The antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) are key to the immunological response, with different functions ascribed ranging from cellular immune activation to induction of tolerance. Such immunological responses are involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiovascular diseases, with DCs shown to play a role in atherosclerosis, hypertension, and heart failure and most notably following heart transplantation. A better understanding of the interplay between the immune system and cardiovascular diseases will therefore be critical for developing novel therapeutic treatments as well as innovative monitoring tools for disease progression. As such, the present review will provide an overview of DCs involvement in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases and how targeting these cells may have beneficial effects for the prognosis of patients. PMID:27088098

  17. HUMAN EXPOSURE ACTIVITY PATTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activity/uptake rate data are necessary to estimate potential human exposure and intake dose to environmental pollutants and to refine human exposure models. Personal exposure monitoring studies have demonstrated the critical role that activities play in explaining and pre...

  18. Inhibition of TLR3 and TLR4 function and expression in human dendritic cells by helminth parasites

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Priyanka Goel; Leifer, Cynthia A.; Mostböck, Sven; Sabzevari, Helen; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2008-01-01

    Patent lymphatic filariasis is characterized by antigen-specific T-cell unresponsiveness with diminished IFN-γ and IL-2 production and defects in dendritic cell (DC) function. Because Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in pathogen recognition and TLR expression is diminished on B and T cells of filaria-infected individuals, we examined the effect of live microfilariae (mf) on expression and function of TLRs in human DCs. We show that mf-exposed monocyte-derived human DCs (mhDCs) demonstrate marked diminution of TLR3 and TLR4 mRNA expression compared with mf-unexposed mhDCs that translated into loss of function in response to appropriate TLR ligands. Exposure to mf significantly down-regulated production of IFN-α, MIP-1α, IL-12p70, and IL-1α following activation with poly I:C, and of IL-12p40 following activation with poly I:C or LPS. mRNA expression of MyD88, the adaptor molecule involved in TLR4 signaling, was significantly diminished in mhDCs after exposure to mf. Moreover, mf interfered with NF-κB activation (particularly p65 and p50) following stimulation with poly I:C or LPS. These data suggest that mf interfere with mhDC function by altering TLR expression and interfering with both MyD88-dependent signaling and a pathway that ultimately diminishes NF-κB activity. This down-regulated NF-κB activity impairs mhDC-produced cytokines needed for full T-cell activation. PMID:18541719

  19. Comparison between Sendai virus and adenovirus vectors to transduce HIV-1 genes into human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Noriaki; Miura, Toshiyuki; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Shioda, Tatsuo; Odawara, Takashi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kitamura, Yoshihiro; Kano, Munehide; Kato, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Nagai, Yoshiyuki; Iwamoto, Aikichi

    2008-03-01

    Immuno-genetherapy using dendritic cells (DCs) can be applied to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Sendai virus (SeV) has unique features such as cytoplasmic replication and high protein expression as a vector for genetic manipulation. In this study, we compared the efficiency of inducing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and HIV-1 gene expression in human monocyte-derived DCs between SeV and adenovirus (AdV). Human monocyte-derived DCs infected with SeV showed the maximum gene expression 24 hr after infection at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 2. Although SeV vector showed higher cytopathic effect on DCs than AdV, SeV vector induced maximum gene expression earlier and at much lower MOI. In terms of cell surface phenotype, both SeV and AdV vectors induced DC maturation. DCs infected with SeV as well as AdV elicited HIV-1 specific T-cell responses detected by interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) enzyme-linked immunospot (Elispot). Our data suggest that SeV could be one of the reliable vectors for immuno-genetherapy for HIV-1 infected patients. PMID:18205221

  20. Genomics and proteomics of immune modulatory effects of a butanol fraction of echinacea purpurea in human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chien-Yu; Staniforth, Vanisree; Chiao, Ming-Tsang; Hou, Chia-Chung; Wu, Han-Ming; Yeh, Kuo-Chen; Chen, Chun-Houh; Hwang, Pei-Ing; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Shyur, Lie-Fen; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2008-01-01

    Background Echinacea spp. extracts and the derived phytocompounds have been shown to induce specific immune cell activities and are popularly used as food supplements or nutraceuticals for immuno-modulatory functions. Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen presenting cells, play an important role in both innate and adaptive immunities. In this study, we investigated the specific and differential gene expression in human immature DCs (iDCs) in response to treatment with a butanol fraction containing defined bioactive phytocompounds extracted from stems and leaves of Echinacea purpurea, that we denoted [BF/S+L/Ep]. Results Affymetrix DNA microarray results showed significant up regulation of specific genes for cytokines (IL-8, IL-1β, and IL-18) and chemokines (CXCL 2, CCL 5, and CCL 2) within 4 h after [BF/S+L/Ep] treatment of iDCs. Bioinformatics analysis of genes expressed in [BF/S+L/Ep]-treated DCs revealed a key-signaling network involving a number of immune-modulatory molecules leading to the activation of a downstream molecule, adenylate cyclase 8. Proteomic analysis showed increased expression of antioxidant and cytoskeletal proteins after treatment with [BF/S+L/Ep] and cichoric acid. Conclusion This study provides information on candidate target molecules and molecular signaling mechanisms for future systematic research into the immune-modulatory activities of an important traditional medicinal herb and its derived phytocompounds. PMID:18847511

  1. Divergent signaling pathways regulate IL-12 production induced by different species of Lactobacilli in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Amar, Yacine; Rizzello, Valeria; Cavaliere, Riccardo; Campana, Stefania; De Pasquale, Claudia; Barberi, Chiara; Oliveri, Daniela; Pezzino, Gaetana; Costa, Gregorio; Meddah, Aicha Tirtouil; Ferlazzo, Guido; Bonaccorsi, Irene

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have indicated that different strains of Lactobacilli differ in their ability to regulate IL-12 production by dendritic cells (DCs), as some strains are stronger inducer of IL-12 while other are not and can even inhibit IL-12 production stimulated by IL-12-inducer Lactobacilli. In this report we demonstrate that Lactobacillus reuteri 5289, as previously described for other strains of L. reuteri, can inhibit DC production of IL-12 induced by Lactobacilllus acidophilus NCFM. Remarkably, L. reuteri 5289 was able to inhibit IL-12 production induced not only by Lactobacilli, as so far reported, but also by bacteria of different genera, including pathogens. We investigated in human DCs the signal transduction pathways involved in the inhibition of IL-12 production induced by L. reuteri 5289, showing that this potential anti-inflammatory activity, which is also accompanied by an elevated IL-10 production, is associated to a prolonged phosphorilation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. Improved understanding of the immune regulatory mechanisms exerted by Lactobacilli is crucial for a more precise employment of these commensal bacteria as probiotics in human immune-mediated pathologies, such as allergies or inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:25977118

  2. UV Radiation Induces the Epidermal Recruitment of Dendritic Cells that Compensate for the Depletion of Langerhans Cells in Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Achachi, Amine; Vocanson, Marc; Bastien, Philippe; Péguet-Navarro, Josette; Grande, Sophie; Goujon, Catherine; Breton, Lionel; Castiel-Higounenc, Isabelle; Nicolas, Jean-François; Gueniche, Audrey

    2015-08-01

    UVR causes skin injury and inflammation, resulting in impaired immune function and increased skin cancer risk. Langerhans cells (LCs), the immune sentinels of the epidermis, are depleted for several days following a single UVR exposure and can be reconstituted from circulating monocytes. However, the differentiation pathways leading to the recovery of a normal pool of LCs is still unclear. To study the dynamic changes in human skin with UV injury, we exposed a cohort of 29 healthy human volunteers to a clinically relevant dose of UVR and analyzed sequential epidermal biopsies for changes in leukocyte and dendritic cell (DC) subsets. UV-induced depletion of CD1a(high) LC was compensated by sequential appearance of various epidermal leukocytes. CD14(+) monocytes were recruited as early as D1 post exposure, followed by recruitment of two inflammatory DC subsets that may represent precursors of LCs. These CD1a(low) CD207(-) and the heretofore unknown CD1a(low) CD207(+) DCs appeared at day 1 and day 4 post UVR, respectively, and were endowed with T-cell-activating properties similar to those of LCs. We conclude that recruitment of monocytes and inflammatory DCs appear as a physiological response of the epidermis in order to repair UVR-induced LC depletion associated with immune suppression. PMID:25806853

  3. In Vitro Generation of Human XCR1(+) Dendritic Cells from CD34(+) Hematopoietic Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Balan, Sreekumar; Dalod, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a heterogeneous population of professional antigen-presenting cells which play a key role in orchestrating immune defenses. Most of the information gained on human DC biology was derived from studies conducted with DCs generated in vitro from peripheral blood CD14(+) monocytes (MoDCs) or from CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors. Recent advances in the field revealed that these types of in vitro-derived DCs strikingly differ from the DC subsets that are naturally present in human lymphoid organs, in terms of global gene expression, of specialization in the sensing of different types of danger signals, and of the ability to polarize T lymphocytes toward different functions. Major efforts are being made to better characterize the biology and the functions of lymphoid organ-resident DC subsets in humans, as an essential step for designing innovative DC-based vaccines against infections or cancers. However, this line of research is hampered by the low frequency of certain DC subsets in most tissues, their fragility, and the complexity of the procedures necessary for their purification. Hence, there is a need for robust procedures allowing large-scale in vitro generation of human DC subsets, under conditions allowing their genetic or pharmacological manipulation, to decipher their functions and their molecular regulation. Human CD141(+)CLEC9A(+)XCR1(+) DCs constitute a very interesting DC subset for the design of immunotherapeutic treatments against infections by intracellular pathogens or against cancer, because these cells resemble mouse professional cross-presenting CD8α(+)Clec9a(+)Xcr1(+) DCs. Human XCR1(+) DCs have indeed been reported by several teams to be more efficient than other human DC subsets for cross-presentation, in particular of cell-associated antigens but also of soluble antigens especially when delivered into late endosomes or lysosomes. However, human XCR1(+) DCs are the rarest and perhaps the most fragile of the human DC

  4. Novel Avian Influenza A (H7N9) Virus Induces Impaired Interferon Responses in Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arilahti, Veera; Mäkelä, Sanna M.; Tynell, Janne; Julkunen, Ilkka; Österlund, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    In March 2013 a new avian influenza A(H7N9) virus emerged in China and infected humans with a case fatality rate of over 30%. Like the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus, H7N9 virus is causing severe respiratory distress syndrome in most patients. Based on genetic analysis this avian influenza A virus shows to some extent adaptation to mammalian host. In the present study, we analyzed the activation of innate immune responses by this novel H7N9 influenza A virus and compared these responses to those induced by the avian H5N1 and seasonal H3N2 viruses in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). We observed that in H7N9 virus-infected cells, interferon (IFN) responses were weak although the virus replicated as well as the H5N1 and H3N2 viruses in moDCs. H7N9 virus-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines remained at a significantly lower level as compared to H5N1 virus-induced “cytokine storm” seen in human moDCs. However, the H7N9 virus was extremely sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFN-α and IFN-β in pretreated cells. Our data indicates that different highly pathogenic avian viruses may show considerable differences in their ability to induce host antiviral responses in human primary cell models such as moDCs. The unexpected appearance of the novel H7N9 virus clearly emphasizes the importance of the global influenza surveillance system. It is, however, equally important to systematically characterize in normal human cells the replication capacity of the new viruses and their ability to induce and respond to natural antiviral substances such as IFNs. PMID:24804732

  5. TRAIL-mediated killing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by plasmacytoid dendritic cell-activated natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Lelaidier, Martin; Dìaz-Rodriguez, Yildian; Cordeau, Martine; Cordeiro, Paulo; Haddad, Elie; Herblot, Sabine; Duval, Michel

    2015-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) still frequently recurs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), underscoring the need to improve the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect. Natural killer (NK) cells reconstitute in the first months following HSCT when leukemia burden is at its lowest, but ALL cells have been shown to be resistant to NK cell-mediated killing. We show here that this resistance is overcome by NK cell stimulation with TLR-9-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). NK cell priming with activated pDCs resulted in TRAIL and CD69 up-regulation on NK cells and IFN-γ production. NK cell activation was dependent on IFN-α produced by pDCs, but was not reproduced by IFN-α alone. ALL killing was further enhanced by inhibition of KIR engagement. We showed that ALL lysis was mainly mediated by TRAIL engagement, while the release of cytolytic granules was involved when ALL expressed NK cell activating receptor ligands. Finally, adoptive transfers of activated-pDCs in ALL-bearing humanized mice delayed the leukemia onset and cure 30% of mice. Our data therefore demonstrate that TLR-9 activated pDCs are a powerful tool to overcome ALL resistance to NK cell-mediated killing and to reinforce the GvL effect of HSCT. These results open new therapeutic avenues to prevent relapse in children with ALL. PMID:26320191

  6. TRAIL-mediated killing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by plasmacytoid dendritic cell-activated natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lelaidier, Martin; Dìaz-Rodriguez, Yildian; Cordeau, Martine; Cordeiro, Paulo; Haddad, Elie; Herblot, Sabine; Duval, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) still frequently recurs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), underscoring the need to improve the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect. Natural killer (NK) cells reconstitute in the first months following HSCT when leukemia burden is at its lowest, but ALL cells have been shown to be resistant to NK cell-mediated killing. We show here that this resistance is overcome by NK cell stimulation with TLR-9-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). NK cell priming with activated pDCs resulted in TRAIL and CD69 up-regulation on NK cells and IFN-γ production. NK cell activation was dependent on IFN-α produced by pDCs, but was not reproduced by IFN-α alone. ALL killing was further enhanced by inhibition of KIR engagement. We showed that ALL lysis was mainly mediated by TRAIL engagement, while the release of cytolytic granules was involved when ALL expressed NK cell activating receptor ligands. Finally, adoptive transfers of activated-pDCs in ALL-bearing humanized mice delayed the leukemia onset and cure 30% of mice. Our data therefore demonstrate that TLR-9 activated pDCs are a powerful tool to overcome ALL resistance to NK cell-mediated killing and to reinforce the GvL effect of HSCT. These results open new therapeutic avenues to prevent relapse in children with ALL. PMID:26320191

  7. Transient potassium channels augment degeneracy in hippocampal active dendritic spectral tuning.

    PubMed

    Rathour, Rahul Kumar; Malik, Ruchi; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons express an intraneuronal map of spectral tuning mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated nonspecific-cation channels. Modeling studies have predicted a critical regulatory role for A-type potassium (KA) channels towards augmenting functional robustness of this map. To test this, we performed patch-clamp recordings from soma and dendrites of rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and measured spectral tuning before and after blocking KA channels using two structurally distinct pharmacological agents. Consistent with computational predictions, we found that blocking KA channels resulted in a significant reduction in resonance frequency and significant increases in input resistance, impedance amplitude and action-potential firing frequency across the somato-apical trunk. Furthermore, across all measured locations, blocking KA channels enhanced temporal summation of postsynaptic potentials and critically altered the impedance phase profile, resulting in a significant reduction in total inductive phase. Finally, pair-wise correlations between intraneuronal percentage changes (after blocking KA channels) in different measurements were mostly weak, suggesting differential regulation of different physiological properties by KA channels. Our results unveil a pivotal role for fast transient channels in regulating theta-frequency spectral tuning and intrinsic phase response, and suggest that degeneracy with reference to several coexisting functional maps is mediated by cross-channel interactions across the active dendritic arbor. PMID:27094086

  8. Transient potassium channels augment degeneracy in hippocampal active dendritic spectral tuning

    PubMed Central

    Rathour, Rahul Kumar; Malik, Ruchi; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons express an intraneuronal map of spectral tuning mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated nonspecific-cation channels. Modeling studies have predicted a critical regulatory role for A-type potassium (KA) channels towards augmenting functional robustness of this map. To test this, we performed patch-clamp recordings from soma and dendrites of rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and measured spectral tuning before and after blocking KA channels using two structurally distinct pharmacological agents. Consistent with computational predictions, we found that blocking KA channels resulted in a significant reduction in resonance frequency and significant increases in input resistance, impedance amplitude and action-potential firing frequency across the somato-apical trunk. Furthermore, across all measured locations, blocking KA channels enhanced temporal summation of postsynaptic potentials and critically altered the impedance phase profile, resulting in a significant reduction in total inductive phase. Finally, pair-wise correlations between intraneuronal percentage changes (after blocking KA channels) in different measurements were mostly weak, suggesting differential regulation of different physiological properties by KA channels. Our results unveil a pivotal role for fast transient channels in regulating theta-frequency spectral tuning and intrinsic phase response, and suggest that degeneracy with reference to several coexisting functional maps is mediated by cross-channel interactions across the active dendritic arbor. PMID:27094086

  9. Enzymatically crosslinked dendritic polyglycerol nanogels for encapsulation of catalytically active proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changzhu; Böttcher, Christoph; Haag, Rainer

    2015-02-01

    The enormous potential of nanogel scaffolds for protein encapsulation has been widely recognized. However, constructing stable polymeric nanoscale networks in a facile, mild, and controllable fashion still remains a technical challenge. Here, we present a novel nanogel formation strategy using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed crosslinking on phenolic derivatized dendritic polyglycerol (dPG) in the presence of H2O2 in an inverse miniemulsion. This "enzymatic nanogelation" approach was efficient to produce stable 200 nm dPG nanogel particles, and was performed under physiological conditions, thus making it particularly beneficial for encapsulating biological proteins. Purification of the nanogels was easy to handle and practical because there was no need for a post-quenching step. Interestingly, the use of dPG resulted in higher HRP laden nanogels than for linear polyethylene glycol (PEG) analogs, which illustrates the benefits of dendritic backbones in nanogels for protein encapsulation. In addition, the mild immobilization contributed to the enhanced thermal stability and reusability of HRP. The nanogel preparation could be easily optimized to achieve the best HRP activity. Furthermore, a second enzyme, Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB), was successfully encapsulated and optimized for activity in dPG nanogels by the same enzymatic methodology, which shows the perspective applications of such techniques for encapsulation of diverse proteins. PMID:25519490

  10. Staphylococcus aureus forms spreading dendrites that have characteristics of active motility.

    PubMed

    Pollitt, Eric J G; Crusz, Shanika A; Diggle, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is historically regarded as a non-motile organism. More recently it has been shown that S. aureus can passively move across agar surfaces in a process called spreading. We re-analysed spreading motility using a modified assay and focused on observing the formation of dendrites: branching structures that emerge from the central colony. We discovered that S. aureus can spread across the surface of media in structures that we term 'comets', which advance outwards and precede the formation of dendrites. We observed comets in a diverse selection of S. aureus isolates and they exhibit the following behaviours: (1) They consist of phenotypically distinct cores of cells that move forward and seed other S. aureus cells behind them forming a comet 'tail'; (2) they move when other cells in the comet tail have stopped moving; (3) the comet core is held together by a matrix of slime; and (4) the comets etch trails in the agar as they move forwards. Comets are not consistent with spreading motility or other forms of passive motility. Comet behaviour does share many similarities with a form of active motility known as gliding. Our observations therefore suggest that S. aureus is actively motile under certain conditions. PMID:26680153

  11. Staphylococcus aureus forms spreading dendrites that have characteristics of active motility

    PubMed Central

    Pollitt, Eric J. G.; Crusz, Shanika A.; Diggle, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is historically regarded as a non-motile organism. More recently it has been shown that S. aureus can passively move across agar surfaces in a process called spreading. We re-analysed spreading motility using a modified assay and focused on observing the formation of dendrites: branching structures that emerge from the central colony. We discovered that S. aureus can spread across the surface of media in structures that we term ‘comets’, which advance outwards and precede the formation of dendrites. We observed comets in a diverse selection of S. aureus isolates and they exhibit the following behaviours: (1) They consist of phenotypically distinct cores of cells that move forward and seed other S. aureus cells behind them forming a comet ‘tail’; (2) they move when other cells in the comet tail have stopped moving; (3) the comet core is held together by a matrix of slime; and (4) the comets etch trails in the agar as they move forwards. Comets are not consistent with spreading motility or other forms of passive motility. Comet behaviour does share many similarities with a form of active motility known as gliding. Our observations therefore suggest that S. aureus is actively motile under certain conditions. PMID:26680153

  12. Adenovirus type 35, but not type 5, stimulates NK cell activation via plasmacytoid dendritic cells and TLR9 signaling.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Jens H W; Verhoeven, Dirk H J; Kwappenberg, Kitty M C; Vellinga, Jort; Lankester, Arjan C; van Tol, Maarten J D; Schilham, Marco W

    2012-05-01

    In hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients, disseminated adenoviral infections during the first two months after HSCT can lead to severe complications and fatal outcome. Since NK cells are usually the first lymphocytes to reconstitute after HSCT and have been implicated in the clearance of adenovirus-infected cells, it was investigated whether NK cells are activated by adenovirus in vitro. Exposure of PBMC to human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV5) or HAdV35 resulted in the up-regulation of the activation marker CD69 on NK cells and enhanced the cytolytic activity of NK cells. HAdV5-induced NK cell activation relied on the contribution of T cells as the depletion of T cells from PBMC abolished NK cell activation. In contrast, NK cell activation in response to HAdV35 occurred in the absence of T cells. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) were necessary and sufficient to mediate NK cell activation. HAdV35 induced significantly more interferon-α (IFN-α) production by pDC than HAdV5. The increased IFN-α production and NK cell activation correlated with a higher infection efficiency of viruses with the type 35 fiber. The IFN-α response of pDC was enhanced by the presence of NK cells, suggesting a reciprocal interaction between pDC and NK cells. Incubation with a TLR9 antagonist impaired the IFN-α production by pDC as well as NK cell activation, implying that TLR9 signaling is critically involved in the IFN-α response of pDC and NK cell activation after HAdV35 exposure. In conclusion, two human adenovirus serotypes from two different species differ considerably in their capacity to stimulate pDC and NK cells. PMID:22424784

  13. Yeast Modulation of Human Dendritic Cell Cytokine Secretion: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ida M.; Christensen, Jeffrey E.; Arneborg, Nils; Jespersen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The concept of individual microorganisms influencing the makeup of T cell subsets via interactions with intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) appears to constitute the foundation for immunoregulatory effects of probiotics, and several studies have reported probiotic strains resulting in reduction of intestinal inflammation through modulation of DC function. Consequent to a focus on Saccharomyces boulardii as the fundamental probiotic yeast, very little is known about hundreds of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in terms of their interaction with the human gastrointestinal immune system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate 170 yeast strains representing 75 diverse species for modulation of inflammatory cytokine secretion by human DCs in vitro, as compared to cytokine responses induced by a S. boulardii reference strain with probiotic properties documented in clinical trials. Furthermore, we investigated whether cytokine inducing interactions between yeasts and human DCs are dependent upon yeast viability or rather a product of membrane interactions regardless of yeast metabolic function. We demonstrate high diversity in yeast induced cytokine profiles and employ multivariate data analysis to reveal distinct clustering of yeasts inducing similar cytokine profiles in DCs, highlighting clear species distinction within specific yeast genera. The observed differences in induced DC cytokine profiles add to the currently very limited knowledge of the cross-talk between yeasts and human immune cells and provide a foundation for selecting yeast strains for further characterization and development toward potentially novel yeast probiotics. Additionally, we present data to support a hypothesis that the interaction between yeasts and human DCs does not solely depend on yeast viability, a concept which may suggest a need for further classifications beyond the current

  14. Yeast modulation of human dendritic cell cytokine secretion: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ida M; Christensen, Jeffrey E; Arneborg, Nils; Jespersen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The concept of individual microorganisms influencing the makeup of T cell subsets via interactions with intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) appears to constitute the foundation for immunoregulatory effects of probiotics, and several studies have reported probiotic strains resulting in reduction of intestinal inflammation through modulation of DC function. Consequent to a focus on Saccharomyces boulardii as the fundamental probiotic yeast, very little is known about hundreds of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in terms of their interaction with the human gastrointestinal immune system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate 170 yeast strains representing 75 diverse species for modulation of inflammatory cytokine secretion by human DCs in vitro, as compared to cytokine responses induced by a S. boulardii reference strain with probiotic properties documented in clinical trials. Furthermore, we investigated whether cytokine inducing interactions between yeasts and human DCs are dependent upon yeast viability or rather a product of membrane interactions regardless of yeast metabolic function. We demonstrate high diversity in yeast induced cytokine profiles and employ multivariate data analysis to reveal distinct clustering of yeasts inducing similar cytokine profiles in DCs, highlighting clear species distinction within specific yeast genera. The observed differences in induced DC cytokine profiles add to the currently very limited knowledge of the cross-talk between yeasts and human immune cells and provide a foundation for selecting yeast strains for further characterization and development toward potentially novel yeast probiotics. Additionally, we present data to support a hypothesis that the interaction between yeasts and human DCs does not solely depend on yeast viability, a concept which may suggest a need for further classifications beyond the current

  15. Deletion of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein triggers Rac2 activity and increased cross-presentation by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Marisa A P; Keszei, Marton; Oliveira, Mariana; Sunahara, Karen K S; Andersson, John; Dahlberg, Carin I M; Worth, Austen J; Liedén, Agne; Kuo, I-Chun; Wallin, Robert P A; Snapper, Scott B; Eidsmo, Liv; Scheynius, Annika; Karlsson, Mikael C I; Bouma, Gerben; Burns, Siobhan O; Forsell, Mattias N E; Thrasher, Adrian J; Nylén, Susanne; Westerberg, Lisa S

    2016-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the WASp gene. Decreased cellular responses in WASp-deficient cells have been interpreted to mean that WASp directly regulates these responses in WASp-sufficient cells. Here, we identify an exception to this concept and show that WASp-deficient dendritic cells have increased activation of Rac2 that support cross-presentation to CD8(+) T cells. Using two different skin pathology models, WASp-deficient mice show an accumulation of dendritic cells in the skin and increased expansion of IFNγ-producing CD8(+) T cells in the draining lymph node and spleen. Specific deletion of WASp in dendritic cells leads to marked expansion of CD8(+) T cells at the expense of CD4(+) T cells. WASp-deficient dendritic cells induce increased cross-presentation to CD8(+) T cells by activating Rac2 that maintains a near neutral pH of phagosomes. Our data reveals an intricate balance between activation of WASp and Rac2 signalling pathways in dendritic cells. PMID:27425374

  16. Deletion of Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein triggers Rac2 activity and increased cross-presentation by dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, Marisa A. P.; Keszei, Marton; Oliveira, Mariana; Sunahara, Karen K. S.; Andersson, John; Dahlberg, Carin I. M.; Worth, Austen J.; Liedén, Agne; Kuo, I-Chun; Wallin, Robert P. A.; Snapper, Scott B.; Eidsmo, Liv; Scheynius, Annika; Karlsson, Mikael C. I.; Bouma, Gerben; Burns, Siobhan O.; Forsell, Mattias N. E.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Nylén, Susanne; Westerberg, Lisa S.

    2016-01-01

    Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the WASp gene. Decreased cellular responses in WASp-deficient cells have been interpreted to mean that WASp directly regulates these responses in WASp-sufficient cells. Here, we identify an exception to this concept and show that WASp-deficient dendritic cells have increased activation of Rac2 that support cross-presentation to CD8+ T cells. Using two different skin pathology models, WASp-deficient mice show an accumulation of dendritic cells in the skin and increased expansion of IFNγ-producing CD8+ T cells in the draining lymph node and spleen. Specific deletion of WASp in dendritic cells leads to marked expansion of CD8+ T cells at the expense of CD4+ T cells. WASp-deficient dendritic cells induce increased cross-presentation to CD8+ T cells by activating Rac2 that maintains a near neutral pH of phagosomes. Our data reveals an intricate balance between activation of WASp and Rac2 signalling pathways in dendritic cells. PMID:27425374

  17. Inhibition of Protease-Activated Receptor 1 Does not Affect Dendritic Homeostasis of Cultured Mouse Dentate Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schuldt, Gerlind; Galanis, Christos; Strehl, Andreas; Hick, Meike; Schiener, Sabine; Lenz, Maximilian; Deller, Thomas; Maggio, Nicola; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). While a firm link between PAR1-activation and functional synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties exists, studies on the role of PAR1 in neural structural plasticity are scarce. The physiological function of PAR1 in the brain remains not well understood. We here sought to determine whether prolonged pharmacologic PAR1-inhibition affects dendritic morphologies of hippocampal neurons. To address this question we employed live-cell microscopy of mouse dentate granule cell dendrites in 3-week old entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures prepared from Thy1-GFP mice. A subset of cultures were treated with the PAR1-inhibitor SCH79797 (1 μM; up to 3 weeks). No major effects of PAR1-inhibition on static and dynamic parameters of dentate granule cell dendrites were detected under control conditions. Granule cells of PAR1-deficient slice cultures showed unaltered dendritic morphologies, dendritic spine densities and excitatory synaptic strength. Furthermore, we report that PAR1-inhibition does not prevent dendritic retraction following partial deafferentation in vitro. Consistent with this finding, no major changes in PAR1-mRNA levels were detected in the denervated dentate gyrus (DG). We conclude that neural PAR1 is not involved in regulating the steady-state dynamics or deafferentation-induced adaptive changes of cultured dentate granule cell dendrites. These results indicate that drugs targeting neural PAR1-signals may not affect the stability and structural integrity of neuronal networks in healthy brain regions. PMID:27378862

  18. Inhibition of Protease-Activated Receptor 1 Does not Affect Dendritic Homeostasis of Cultured Mouse Dentate Granule Cells.

    PubMed

    Schuldt, Gerlind; Galanis, Christos; Strehl, Andreas; Hick, Meike; Schiener, Sabine; Lenz, Maximilian; Deller, Thomas; Maggio, Nicola; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). While a firm link between PAR1-activation and functional synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties exists, studies on the role of PAR1 in neural structural plasticity are scarce. The physiological function of PAR1 in the brain remains not well understood. We here sought to determine whether prolonged pharmacologic PAR1-inhibition affects dendritic morphologies of hippocampal neurons. To address this question we employed live-cell microscopy of mouse dentate granule cell dendrites in 3-week old entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures prepared from Thy1-GFP mice. A subset of cultures were treated with the PAR1-inhibitor SCH79797 (1 μM; up to 3 weeks). No major effects of PAR1-inhibition on static and dynamic parameters of dentate granule cell dendrites were detected under control conditions. Granule cells of PAR1-deficient slice cultures showed unaltered dendritic morphologies, dendritic spine densities and excitatory synaptic strength. Furthermore, we report that PAR1-inhibition does not prevent dendritic retraction following partial deafferentation in vitro. Consistent with this finding, no major changes in PAR1-mRNA levels were detected in the denervated dentate gyrus (DG). We conclude that neural PAR1 is not involved in regulating the steady-state dynamics or deafferentation-induced adaptive changes of cultured dentate granule cell dendrites. These results indicate that drugs targeting neural PAR1-signals may not affect the stability and structural integrity of neuronal networks in healthy brain regions. PMID:27378862

  19. Human blood dendritic cell subsets exhibit discriminative pattern recognition receptor profiles

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Kristina; Rydnert, Frida; Greiff, Lennart; Lindstedt, Malin

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as the link between innate and adaptive immunity. Their expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), enables antigen recognition and mediates appropriate immune responses. Distinct subsets of human DCs have been identified; however their expression of PRRs is not fully clarified. Expressions of CLRs by DC subpopulations, in particular, remain elusive. This study aimed to identify and compare PRR expressions on human blood DC subsets, including CD1c+, CD141+ and CD16+ myeloid DCs and CD123+ plasmacytoid DCs, in order to understand their capacity to recognize different antigens as well as their responsiveness to PRR-directed targeting. Whole blood was obtained from 13 allergic and six non-allergic individuals. Mononuclear cells were purified and multi-colour flow cytometry was used to assess the expression of 10 CLRs and two TLRs on distinct DC subsets. PRR expression levels were shown to differ between DC subsets for each PRR assessed. Furthermore, principal component analysis and random forest test demonstrated that the PRR profiles were discriminative between DC subsets. Interestingly, CLEC9A was expressed at lower levels by CD141+ DCs from allergic compared with non-allergic donors. The subset-specific PRR expression profiles suggests individual responsiveness to PRR-targeting and supports functional specialization. PMID:24444310

  20. Human blood dendritic cell subsets exhibit discriminative pattern recognition receptor profiles.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Kristina; Rydnert, Frida; Greiff, Lennart; Lindstedt, Malin

    2014-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as the link between innate and adaptive immunity. Their expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), enables antigen recognition and mediates appropriate immune responses. Distinct subsets of human DCs have been identified; however their expression of PRRs is not fully clarified. Expressions of CLRs by DC subpopulations, in particular, remain elusive. This study aimed to identify and compare PRR expressions on human blood DC subsets, including CD1c(+) , CD141(+) and CD16(+) myeloid DCs and CD123(+) plasmacytoid DCs, in order to understand their capacity to recognize different antigens as well as their responsiveness to PRR-directed targeting. Whole blood was obtained from 13 allergic and six non-allergic individuals. Mononuclear cells were purified and multi-colour flow cytometry was used to assess the expression of 10 CLRs and two TLRs on distinct DC subsets. PRR expression levels were shown to differ between DC subsets for each PRR assessed. Furthermore, principal component analysis and random forest test demonstrated that the PRR profiles were discriminative between DC subsets. Interestingly, CLEC9A was expressed at lower levels by CD141(+) DCs from allergic compared with non-allergic donors. The subset-specific PRR expression profiles suggests individual responsiveness to PRR-targeting and supports functional specialization. PMID:24444310

  1. Alterations in Gene Array Patterns in Dendritic Cells from Aged Humans

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jia-ning; Agrawal, Anshu; Sharman, Edward; Jia, Zhenyu; Gupta, Sudhir

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells that play a key role in initiating and regulating innate and adaptive immune responses. DCs are critical mediators of tolerance and immunity. The functional properties of DCs decline with age. The purpose of this study was to define the age-associated molecular changes in DCs by gene array analysis using Affymatrix GeneChips. The expression levels of a total of 260 genes (1.8%) were significantly different (144 down-regulated and 116 upregulated) in monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) from aged compared to young human donors. Of the 260 differentially expressed genes, 24% were down-regulated by more than 3-fold, suggesting that a large reduction in expression occurred for a notable number of genes in the aged. Our results suggest that the genes involved in immune response to pathogens, cell migration and T cell priming display significant age-related changes. Furthermore, downregulated genes involved in cell cycle arrest and DNA replication may play a critical role in aging-associated genetic instability. These changes in gene expression provide molecular based evidence for age-associated functional abnormalities in human DCs that may be responsible for the defects in adaptive immunity observed in the elderly. PMID:25191744

  2. Optimization of human dendritic cell sample preparation for mass spectrometry-based proteomics studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Bottinelli, Dario; Lisacek, Frédérique; Luban, Jeremy; De Castillia, Caterina Strambio; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized leukocytes that orchestrate the adaptive immune response. Mass spectrometry based proteomic study of these cells presents technical challenges, especially when the DCs are human in origin due to the paucity of available biological material. Here, to maximize mass spectrometry coverage of the global human DC proteome, different cell disruption methods, lysis conditions, protein precipitation, and protein pellet solubilisation and denaturation methods were compared. Mechanical disruption of DC cell pellets under cryogenic conditions, coupled with the use of RIPA buffer, was shown to be the method of choice based on total protein extraction and on the solubilisation and identification of nuclear proteins. Precipitation by acetone was found to be more efficient than by 10% TCA/acetone, allowing greater than 28% more protein identifications. Although being an effective strategy to eliminate the detergent residue, the acetone-wash step caused a loss of protein identifications. However, this potential drawback was overcome by adding 1% sodium deoxycholate in the dissolution buffer, which enhanced both solubility of the precipitated proteins and digestion efficiency. This in turn resulted in 6-11% more distinct peptides and 14-19% more total proteins identified than using 0.5M triethylammonium bicarbonate alone with the greatest increase (34%) for hydrophobic proteins. PMID:25983236

  3. Optimization of human dendritic cell sample preparation for mass spectrometry-based proteomic studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Bottinelli, Dario; Lisacek, Frédérique; Luban, Jeremy; Strambio-De-Castillia, Caterina; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2015-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized leukocytes that orchestrate the adaptive immune response. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic study of these cells presents technical challenges, especially when the DCs are human in origin due to the paucity of available biological material. Here, to maximize MS coverage of the global human DC proteome, different cell disruption methods, lysis conditions, protein precipitation, and protein pellet solubilization and denaturation methods were compared. Mechanical disruption of DC cell pellets under cryogenic conditions, coupled with the use of RIPA (radioimmunoprecipitation assay) buffer, was shown to be the method of choice based on total protein extraction and on the solubilization and identification of nuclear proteins. Precipitation by acetone was found to be more efficient than that by 10% trichloroacetic acid (TCA)/acetone, allowing in excess of 28% more protein identifications. Although being an effective strategy to eliminate the detergent residue, the acetone wash step caused a loss of protein identifications. However, this potential drawback was overcome by adding 1% sodium deoxycholate into the dissolution buffer, which enhanced both solubility of the precipitated proteins and digestion efficiency. This in turn resulted in 6 to 11% more distinct peptides and 14 to 19% more total proteins identified than using 0.5M triethylammonium bicarbonate alone, with the greatest increase (34%) for hydrophobic proteins. PMID:25983236

  4. Analysis of proteomic profiles and functional properties of human peripheral blood myeloid dendritic cells, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and the dendritic cell-like KG-1 cells reveals distinct characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen presenting cells that play a pivotal role in bridging innate and adaptive immune responses. Given the scarcity of peripheral blood myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) investigators have used different model systems for studying DC biology. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) and KG-1 cells are routinely used as mDC models, but a thorough comparison of these cells has not yet been carried out, particularly in relation to their proteomes. We therefore sought to run a comparative study of the proteomes and functional properties of these cells. Results Despite general similarities between mDCs and the model systems, moDCs and KG-1 cells, our findings identified some significant differences in the proteomes of these cells, and the findings were confirmed by ELISA detection of a selection of proteins. This was particularly noticeable with proteins involved in cell growth and maintenance (for example, fibrinogen γ chain (FGG) and ubiquinol cytochrome c) and cell-cell interaction and integrity (for example, fascin and actin). We then examined the surface phenotype, cytokine profile, endocytic and T-cell-activation ability of these cells in support of the proteomic data, and obtained confirmatory evidence for differences in the maturation status and functional attributes between mDCs and the two DC models. Conclusion We have identified important proteomic and functional differences between mDCs and two DC model systems. These differences could have major functional implications, particularly in relation to DC-T cell interactions, the so-called immunological synapse, and, therefore, need to be considered when interpreting data obtained from model DC systems. PMID:17331236

  5. Effect of hyperthermic CO2-treated dendritic cell-derived exosomes on the human gastric cancer AGS cell line

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JINLIN; WANG, ZHIYONG; MO, YANXIA; ZENG, ZHAOHUI; WEI, PEI; LI, TAO

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the antitumor effects of hyperthermic CO2 (HT-CO2)-treated dendritic cell (DC)-derived exosomes (Dex) on human gastric cancer AGS cells. Mouse-derived DCs were incubated in HT-CO2 at 43°C for 4 h. The exosomes in the cell culture supernatant were then isolated. Cell proliferation was analyzed using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. Cell apoptosis was observed using flow cytometry, Hoechst 33258 staining and the analysis of caspase-3 activity. In addition, the proliferation of tumor cells was evaluated in xenotransplant nude mice. HT-CO2 markedly inhibited cell proliferation, as assessed by the CCK-8 assay, and also induced apoptosis in a time-dependent manner, as demonstrated by Annexin V/propidium iodide flow cytometry, caspase-3 activity and morphological analysis using Hoechst fluorescent dye. It was also revealed that HT-CO2-treated Dex decreased the expression of heat shock protein 70 and inhibited tumor growth in nude mice. In conclusion, HT-CO2 exerted an efficacious immune-enhancing effect on DCs. These findings may provide a novel strategy for the elimination of free cancer cells during laparoscopic resection. However, the potential cellular mechanisms underlying this process require further investigation. PMID:26170979

  6. Proteome Based Construction of the Lymphocyte Function-Associated Antigen 1 (LFA-1) Interactome in Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eich, Christina; Lasonder, Edwin; Cruz, Luis J.; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Cambi, Alessandra; Figdor, Carl G.; Buschow, Sonja I.

    2016-01-01

    The β2-integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) plays an important role in the migration, adhesion and intercellular communication of dendritic cells (DCs). During the differentiation of human DCs from monocyte precursors, LFA-1 ligand binding capacity is completely lost, even though its expression levels were remained constant. Yet LFA-1-mediated adhesive capacity on DCs can be regained by exposing DCs to the chemokine CCL21, suggesting a high degree of regulation of LFA-1 activity during the course of DC differentiation. The molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation of LFA-1 function in DCs, however, remain elusive. To get more insight we attempted to identify specific LFA-1 binding partners that may play a role in regulating LFA-1 activity in DCs. We used highly sensitive label free quantitative mass-spectrometry to identify proteins co-immunoprecipitated (co-IP) with LFA-1 from ex vivo generated DCs. Among the potential binding partners we identified not only established components of integrin signalling pathways and cytoskeletal proteins, but also several novel LFA-1 binding partners including CD13, galectin-3, thrombospondin-1 and CD44. Further comparison to the LFA-1 interaction partners in monocytes indicated that DC differentiation was accompanied by an overall increase in LFA-1 associated proteins, in particular cytoskeletal, signalling and plasma membrane (PM) proteins. The here presented LFA-1 interactome composed of 78 proteins thus represents a valuable resource of potential regulators of LFA-1 function during the DC lifecycle. PMID:26889827

  7. Dendritic Cells in the Context of Human Tumors: Biology and Experimental Tools.

    PubMed

    Volovitz, Ilan; Melzer, Susanne; Amar, Sarah; Bocsi, József; Bloch, Merav; Efroni, Sol; Ram, Zvi; Tárnok, Attila

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent and versatile antigen-presenting cells (APC) in the immune system. DC have an exceptional ability to comprehend the immune context of a captured antigen based on molecular signals identified from its vicinity. The analyzed information is then conveyed to other immune effector cells. Such capability enables DC to play a pivotal role in mediating either an immunogenic response or immune tolerance towards an acquired antigen. This review summarizes current knowledge on DC in the context of human tumors. It covers the basics of human DC biology, elaborating on the different markers, morphology and function of the different subsets of human DC. Human blood-borne DC are comprised of at least three subsets consisting of one plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and two to three myeloid DC (mDC) subsets. Some tissues have unique DC. Each subset has a different phenotype and function and may induce pro-tumoral or anti-tumoral effects. The review also discusses two methods fundamental to the research of DC on the single-cell level: multicolor flow cytometry (FCM) and image-based cytometry (IC). These methods, along with new genomics and proteomics tools, can provide high-resolution information on specific DC subsets and on immune and tumor cells with which they interact. The different layers of collected biological data may then be integrated using Immune-Cytomics modeling approaches. Such novel integrated approaches may help unravel the complex network of cellular interactions that DC carry out within tumors, and may help harness this complex immunological information into the development of more effective treatments for cancer. PMID:27007190

  8. Use of human antigen presenting cell gene array profiling to examine the effect of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax on primary human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Jaya; Kampani, Karan; Datta, Suman; Wigdahl, Brian; Flaig, Katherine E; Jain, Pooja

    2006-02-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is etiologically linked to adult T-cell leukemia and a progressive demyelinating disorder termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). One of the most striking features of the immune response in HAM/TSP centers on the expansion of HTLV-1-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) compartment in the peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid. More than 90% of the HTLV-1-specific CTLs are directed against the viral Tax (11-19) peptide implying that Tax is available for immune recognition by antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). DCs obtained from HAM/TSP patients have been shown to be infected with HTLV-1 and exhibit rapid maturation. Therefore, we hypothesized that presentation of Tax peptides by activated DCs to naIve CD8(+) T cells may play an important role in the induction of a Tax-specific CTL response and neurologic dysfunction. In this study, a pathway-specific antigen presenting cell gene array was used to study transcriptional changes induced by exposure of monocyte-derived DCs to extracellular HTLV-1 Tax protein. Approximately 100 genes were differentially expressed including genes encoding toll-like receptors, cell surface receptors, proteins involved in antigen uptake and presentation and adhesion molecules. The differential regulation of chemokines and cytokines characteristic of functional DC activation was also observed by the gene array analyses. Furthermore, the expression pattern of signal transduction genes was also significantly altered. These results have suggested that Tax-mediated DC gene regulation might play a critical role in cellular activation and the mechanisms resulting in HTLV-1-induced disease. PMID:16595374

  9. Porous Dendritic Platinum Nanotubes with Extremely High Activity and Stability for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaixia; Sun, Shuhui; Cai, Mei; Zhang, Yong; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the morphology of Pt nanostructures can provide opportunities to greatly increase their activity and stability. Porous dendritic Pt nanotubes were successfully synthesized by a facile, cost-effective aqueous solution method at room temperature in large scale. These unique structures are porous, hollow, hierarchical, and single crystalline, which not only gives them a large surface area with high catalyst utilization, but also improves mass transport and gas diffusion. These novel Pt structures exhibited significantly improved catalytic activity (4.4 fold) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and greatly enhanced durability (6.1 fold) over that of the state-of-the-art commercial Pt/C catalyst. This work provides a promising approach to the design of highly efficient next-generation electrocatalysts. PMID:23524665

  10. Differential MHC class II expression on human peripheral blood monocytes and dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, C F; Moore, M

    1988-01-01

    Both monocytes (MO) and dendritic cells (DC) in human peripheral blood are of a plastic-adherent nature. The expression of the MHC class II sublocus products HLA-DP, -DQ and -DR on human peripheral blood transiently adherent cells (TA) was examined by an immunocytochemical staining technique. While most TA showed strong expression of molecules of the HLA-DR subtype, only a small proportion of cells (2-6%) showed strong HLA-DP or -DQ positivity. This strong expression of the HLA-DP and HLA-DQ sublocus products by a subset of TA was seen only after short-term culture; freshly isolated cells expressed comparatively low levels of these molecules. Enrichment for Fc receptor-negative or low-density cells from TA produced populations with strong HLA-DQ and -DP expression. Such co-enrichment of the strongly HLA-DQ+ and strongly HLA-DP+ cells suggests that the same cells express high levels of both types of MHC class II molecule. Immunocytochemical analysis of TA indicated that the strongly HLA-DQ+ cells, at least, were only weakly or non-reactive with the MO-specific monoclonal antibodies OKM1, UCHM1, MO2 and EB11. In addition, strongly HLA-DQ- or -DP-positive cells were poorly phagocytic in comparison with the majority of adherent cells. The apparent FcR-negative, low-density and weakly phagocytic nature of the strongly HLA-DQ/DP+ cells, combined with their lack of reactivity with several MO-specific antibodies, suggests that they may represent the DC component of TA. Such strong HLA-DQ/DP expression by DC may aid their positive identification in human peripheral blood and may be of relevance to DC function in antigen presentation. Images Figure 1 PMID:3350576

  11. Characterization of early events involved in human dendritic cell maturation induced by sensitizers: Cross talk between MAPK signalling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Trompezinski, Sandra; Migdal, Camille; Tailhardat, Magalie; Le Varlet, Beatrice; Courtellemont, Pascal; Haftek, Marek; Serres, Mireille

    2008-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), efficient-antigen presenting cells play an important role in initiating and regulating immune responses. DC maturation following exposure to nickel or DNCB induced an up-regulation of phenotypic markers and inflammatory cytokine secretion. Early intracellular mechanisms involved in DC maturation required to be precise. To address this purpose, DCs derived from human monocytes were treated with sensitizers (nickel, DNCB or thimerosal) in comparison with an irritant (SDS). Our data confirming the up-regulation of CD86, CD54 and cytokine secretion (IL-8 and TNF{alpha}) induced by sensitizers but not by SDS, signalling transduction involved in DC maturation was investigated using these chemicals. Kinase activity measurement was assessed using two new sensitive procedures (Face{sup TM} and CBA) requiring few cells. SDS did not induce changes in signalling pathways whereas NiSO{sub 4}, DNCB and thimerosal markedly activated p38 MAPK and JNK, in contrast Erk1/2 phosphorylation was completely inhibited by DNCB or thimerosal and only activated by nickel. A pre-treatment with p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580) suppressed Erk1/2 inhibition induced by DNCB or thimerosal demonstrating a direct interaction between p38 MAPK and Erk1/2. A pre-treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) markedly reduced Erk1/2 inhibition and p38 MAPK phosphorylation induced by DNCB and thimerosal, suggesting a direct activation of p38 MAPK via an oxidative stress and a regulation of MAPK signalling pathways depending on chemicals. Because of a high sensitivity of kinase activity measurements, these procedures will be suitable for weak or moderate sensitizer screening.

  12. Activity-Dependent Dendritic Spine Shrinkage and Growth Involve Downregulation of Cofilin via Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Barbara; Saffin, Jean-Michel; Halpain, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    A current model posits that cofilin-dependent actin severing negatively impacts dendritic spine volume. Studies suggested that increased cofilin activity underlies activity-dependent spine shrinkage, and that reduced cofilin activity induces activity-dependent spine growth. We suggest instead that both types of structural plasticity correlate with decreased cofilin activity. However, the mechanism of inhibition determines the outcome for spine morphology. RNAi in rat hippocampal cultures demonstrates that cofilin is essential for normal spine maintenance. Cofilin-F-actin binding and filament barbed-end production decrease during the early phase of activity-dependent spine shrinkage; cofilin concentration also decreases. Inhibition of the cathepsin B/L family of proteases prevents both cofilin loss and spine shrinkage. Conversely, during activity-dependent spine growth, LIM kinase stimulates cofilin phosphorylation, which activates phospholipase D-1 to promote actin polymerization. These results implicate novel molecular mechanisms and prompt a revision of the current model for how cofilin functions in activity-dependent structural plasticity. PMID:24740405

  13. Galectin-1 Regulates Tissue Exit of Specific Dendritic Cell Populations*

    PubMed Central

    Thiemann, Sandra; Man, Jeanette H.; Chang, Margaret H.; Lee, Benhur; Baum, Linda G.

    2015-01-01

    During inflammation, dendritic cells emigrate from inflamed tissue across the lymphatic endothelium into the lymphatic vasculature and travel to regional lymph nodes to initiate immune responses. However, the processes that regulate dendritic cell tissue egress and migration across the lymphatic endothelium are not well defined. The mammalian lectin galectin-1 is highly expressed by vascular endothelial cells in inflamed tissue and has been shown to regulate immune cell tissue entry into inflamed tissue. Here, we show that galectin-1 is also highly expressed by human lymphatic endothelial cells, and deposition of galectin-1 in extracellular matrix selectively regulates migration of specific human dendritic cell subsets. The presence of galectin-1 inhibits migration of immunogenic dendritic cells through the extracellular matrix and across lymphatic endothelial cells, but it has no effect on migration of tolerogenic dendritic cells. The major galectin-1 counter-receptor on both dendritic cell populations is the cell surface mucin CD43; differential core 2 O-glycosylation of CD43 between immunogenic dendritic cells and tolerogenic dendritic cells appears to contribute to the differential effect of galectin-1 on migration. Binding of galectin-1 to immunogenic dendritic cells reduces phosphorylation and activity of the protein-tyrosine kinase Pyk2, an effect that may also contribute to reduced migration of this subset. In a murine lymphedema model, galectin-1−/− animals had increased numbers of migratory dendritic cells in draining lymph nodes, specifically dendritic cells with an immunogenic phenotype. These findings define a novel role for galectin-1 in inhibiting tissue emigration of immunogenic, but not tolerogenic, dendritic cells, providing an additional mechanism by which galectin-1 can dampen immune responses. PMID:26216879

  14. Dendritic Cells and Monocytes with Distinct Inflammatory Responses Reside in Lung Mucosa of Healthy Humans.

    PubMed

    Baharom, Faezzah; Thomas, Saskia; Rankin, Gregory; Lepzien, Rico; Pourazar, Jamshid; Behndig, Annelie F; Ahlm, Clas; Blomberg, Anders; Smed-Sörensen, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Every breath we take contains potentially harmful pathogens or allergens. Dendritic cells (DCs), monocytes, and macrophages are essential in maintaining a delicate balance of initiating immunity without causing collateral damage to the lungs because of an exaggerated inflammatory response. To document the diversity of lung mononuclear phagocytes at steady-state, we performed bronchoscopies on 20 healthy subjects, sampling the proximal and distal airways (bronchial wash and bronchoalveolar lavage, respectively), as well as mucosal tissue (endobronchial biopsies). In addition to a substantial population of alveolar macrophages, we identified subpopulations of monocytes, myeloid DCs (MDCs), and plasmacytoid DCs in the lung mucosa. Intermediate monocytes and MDCs were highly frequent in the airways compared with peripheral blood. Strikingly, the density of mononuclear phagocytes increased upon descending the airways. Monocytes from blood and airways produced 10-fold more proinflammatory cytokines than MDCs upon ex vivo stimulation. However, airway monocytes were less inflammatory than blood monocytes, suggesting a more tolerant nature. The findings of this study establish how to identify human lung mononuclear phagocytes and how they function in normal conditions, so that dysregulations in patients with respiratory diseases can be detected to elucidate their contribution to immunity or pathogenesis. PMID:27183618

  15. Antigenically Modified Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generate Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jieming; Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide a promising platform to produce dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. To streamline the production process, we investigated a unique antigen-loading strategy that suits this novel platform. Specifically, we stably modified hPSCs using tumour antigen genes in the form of a full-length tumour antigen gene or an artificial tumour antigen epitope-coding minigene. Such antigenically modified hPSCs were able to differentiate into tumour antigen-presenting DCs. Without conventional antigen-loading, DCs derived from the minigene-modified hPSCs were ready to prime a tumour antigen-specific T cell response and further expand these specific T cells in restimulation processes. These expanded tumour antigen-specific T cells were potent effectors with central memory or effector memory phenotype. Thus, we demonstrated that immunocompetent tumour antigen-loaded DCs can be directly generated from antigenically modified hPSCs. Using such strategy, we can completely eliminate the conventional antigen-loading step and significantly simplify the production of DC vaccine from hPSCs. PMID:26471005

  16. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis interacts with dermal dendritic cells and keratinocytes in human skin and oral mucosa lesions.

    PubMed

    Ferreira da Silva, Wellington Luiz; Pagliari, Carla; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas; Sotto, Mirian N

    2016-05-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic disease caused by the fungusParacoccidioides brasiliensisandParacoccidioides lutzii In PCM the skin and oral mucosa are often affected. Dendritic cells and keratinocytes of the integument play a role in innate and adaptive immune response against pathogens, due to their function as antigen presenting cells. Aiming to verify the interaction ofP. brasiliensiswith these cell populations, we studied 52 skin and 47 oral mucosa samples taken from patients with proven diagnosis of PCM. The biopsies were subjected to immunohistochemical and/or immunofluorescence staining with anti-factor XIIIa (marker of dermal dendrocytes), anti-CD207 (marker of mature Langerhans cells), anti-pan cytokeratins (AE1-AE3) and anti-P. brasiliensisantibodies. Analyses with confocal laser microscopy were also performed for better visualization of the interaction between keratinocytes and the fungi. In sum, 42% of oral mucosa samples displayed yeast forms in Factor XIIIa dermal dendrocytes cytoplasm. Langerhans cells in skin and oral mucosa samples did not show yeast cells in their cytoplasm. In sum, 54% of skin and 60% of mucosal samples displayed yeast cells in the cytoplasm of keratinocytes. The parasitism of keratinocytes may represent a possible mechanism of evasion of the fungus to local immune mechanisms. Factor XIIIa dendrocytes and keratinocytes may be acting as antigen-presenting cells to fulfill the probably impaired function of Langerhans cells in skin and oral mucosa of human PCM. PMID:26768374

  17. Effects of human mesenchymal stem cells on the differentiation of dendritic cells from CD34+ cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Wei; Yue, Han; Han, Qin; Chen, Bin; Shi, Mingxia; Li, Jing; Li, Binzong; You, Shengguo; Shi, Yufang; Zhao, Robert Chunhua

    2007-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have profound immunomodulatory functions both in vitro and in vivo. However, their effects on the differentiation of dendritic cells (DCs) are unknown. In this study, we employed an in vitro model to investigate the effects of human MSCs on the development of DCs. CD34(+) cells isolated from cord blood were cultured under conventional DC(cDC) or plasmacytoid DC (pDC) differentiation conditions, in the presence or absence of MSCs or their conditioned medium. Here we show that both MSCs and their conditioned medium dramatically increased the numbers of cells generated under either condition. The percentage of cells with the cDC phenotype is significantly reduced in the presence of MSCs or their conditioned medium, whereas the percentage of pDC increased. The capacity of cDCs from MSCs or their conditioned medium-treated CD34(+) cells to stimulate allogeneic T cells was weakened. Furthermore, MSCs can skew the DC function from cDC to pDC, thus biasing the immune system toward Th2 and away from Th1 responses. Blocking the prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) synthesis of MSCs can reverse most of these influences of MSCs on DCs differentiation and function. Therefore, MSCs can significantly influence DC development through PGE(2) production. PMID:17999594

  18. Identification of the Common Origins of Osteoclasts, Macrophages, and Dendritic Cells in Human Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yanling; Zijl, Sebastiaan; Wang, Liqin; de Groot, Daniel C.; van Tol, Maarten J.; Lankester, Arjan C.; Borst, Jannie

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoclasts (OCs) originate from the myeloid cell lineage, but the successive steps in their lineage commitment are ill-defined, especially in humans. To clarify OC origin, we sorted cell populations from pediatric bone marrow (BM) by flow cytometry and assessed their differentiation potential in vitro. Within the CD11b−CD34+c-KIT+ BM cell population, OC-differentiation potential was restricted to FLT3+ cells and enriched in an IL3 receptor (R)αhigh subset that constituted less than 0.5% of total BM. These IL3Rαhigh cells also generated macrophages (MΦs) and dendritic cells (DCs) but lacked granulocyte (GR)-differentiation potential, as demonstrated at the clonal level. The IL3Rαlow subset was re-defined as common progenitor of GR, MΦ, OC, and DC (GMODP) and gave rise to the IL3Rαhigh subset that was identified as common progenitor of MΦ, OC, and DC (MODP). Unbiased transcriptome analysis of CD11b−CD34+c-KIT+FLT3+ IL3Rαlow and IL3Rαhigh subsets corroborated our definitions of the GMODP and MODP and their developmental relationship. PMID:26004632

  19. Expression of ESE-3 Isoforms in Immunogenic and Tolerogenic Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sprater, Florian; Hovden, Arnt-Ove; Appel, Silke

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the only hematopoietic cells expressing the epithelial specific Ets transcription factor ESE-3. Here we analyzed presence and quantity of isoforms ESE-3a, ESE-3b and ESE-3j in various immunogenic and tolerogenic human monocyte-derived DC (moDC) and blood DC populations using quantitative real time PCR and immunoblot analyses. ESE-3a and ESE-3b were detectable in all moDC populations with ESE-3b being the main transcript. ESE-3b expression was upregulated in immunogenic moDC and downregulated in tolerogenic moDC compared to immature moDC. ESE-3a had similar transcript levels in immature and immunogenic moDC and had very low levels in tolerogenic moDC. In blood DC populations only splice variant ESE-3b was detectable. ESE-3j was not detectable in any of the DC populations. These findings suggest that ESE-3b is the functionally most important ESE-3 isoform in DC. PMID:23185370

  20. Expression of ESE-3 isoforms in immunogenic and tolerogenic human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Sprater, Florian; Hovden, Arnt-Ove; Appel, Silke

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the only hematopoietic cells expressing the epithelial specific Ets transcription factor ESE-3. Here we analyzed presence and quantity of isoforms ESE-3a, ESE-3b and ESE-3j in various immunogenic and tolerogenic human monocyte-derived DC (moDC) and blood DC populations using quantitative real time PCR and immunoblot analyses. ESE-3a and ESE-3b were detectable in all moDC populations with ESE-3b being the main transcript. ESE-3b expression was upregulated in immunogenic moDC and downregulated in tolerogenic moDC compared to immature moDC. ESE-3a had similar transcript levels in immature and immunogenic moDC and had very low levels in tolerogenic moDC. In blood DC populations only splice variant ESE-3b was detectable. ESE-3j was not detectable in any of the DC populations. These findings suggest that ESE-3b is the functionally most important ESE-3 isoform in DC. PMID:23185370

  1. Identification of proteins derived from Listeria monocytogenes inducing human dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Reza; Saei, Azad; Torkashvand, Fatemeh; Azarian, Bahareh; Jalili, Ahmad; Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Vaziri, Behrouz; Hadjati, Jamshid

    2016-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that can promote antitumor immunity when pulsed with tumor antigens and then matured by stimulatory agents. Despite apparent progress in DC-based cancer immunotherapy, some discrepancies were reported in generating potent DCs. Listeria monocytogenes as an intracellular microorganism is able to effectively activate DCs through engaging pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs). This study aimed to find the most potent components derived from L. monocytogenes inducing DC maturation. The preliminary results demonstrated that the ability of protein components is higher than DNA components to promote DC maturation and activation. Protein lysate fractionation demonstrated that fraction 2 HIC (obtained by hydrophobic interaction chromatography) was able to efficiently mature DCs. F2HIC-matured DCs are able to induce allogeneic CD8(+) T cells proliferation better than LPS-matured DCs and induce IFN-γ producing CD8(+) T cells. Mass spectrometry results showed that F2HIC contains 109 proteins. Based on the bioinformatics analysis for these 109 proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) could be considered as a PRR ligand for stimulating DC maturation. PMID:26886282

  2. Doping effect of human blood on surface microstructure of cupric chloride dendrites grown from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Takashi; Takakuwa, Yuichi; Tanaka, Akemi; Iguchi, Tomiko; Kogure, Mitsuko; Ogawa, Tomoya

    1996-10-01

    Surface microstructures of cupric chloride dendrites grown in aqueous solutions without and with doping of blood obtained from healthy individuals showed remarkable differences when studied by atomic force microscopy.

  3. Podosomes of dendritic cells facilitate antigen sampling

    PubMed Central

    Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Cambi, Alessandra; Figdor, Carl G.; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells sample the environment for antigens and play an important role in establishing the link between innate and acquired immunity. Dendritic cells contain mechanosensitive adhesive structures called podosomes that consist of an actin-rich core surrounded by integrins, adaptor proteins and actin network filaments. They facilitate cell migration via localized degradation of extracellular matrix. Here we show that podosomes of human dendritic cells locate to spots of low physical resistance in the substrate (soft spots) where they can evolve into protrusive structures. Pathogen recognition receptors locate to these protrusive structures where they can trigger localized antigen uptake, processing and presentation to activate T-cells. Our data demonstrate a novel role in antigen sampling for podosomes of dendritic cells. PMID:24424029

  4. The Effects of T4 and A3/R Bacteriophages on Differentiation of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Zarzycki, Michał; Pacek, Magdalena; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Machcińska, Maja; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses of bacteria. Here we evaluated the effects of T4 and A3/R bacteriophages, as well as phage-generated bacterial lysates, on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) from monocytes. Neither of the phages significantly reduced the expression of markers associated with differentiation of DCs and their role in the activation of T cells (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD1c, CD11c, MHC II, PD-L1, PD-L2, TLR2, TLR4, and CCR7) and phagocytosis receptors (CD64 and DEC-205). By contrast, bacterial lysate of T4 phage significantly decreased the percentages of DEC-205- and CD1c-positive cells. The percentage of DEC-205-positive cells was also significantly reduced in DCs differentiated in the presence of lysate of A3/R phage. Thus while bacteriophages do not substantially affect differentiation of DCs, some products of phage-induced lysis of bacterial cells may influence the differentiation and potentially also some functions of DCs. Our results have important implications for phage therapy of bacterial infections because during infections monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation are an important source of inflammatory DCs. PMID:27582733

  5. Leishmania donovani infection drives the priming of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells during Plasmodium falciparum co-infections.

    PubMed

    van den Bogaart, E; de Bes, H M; Balraadjsing, P P S; Mens, P F; Adams, E R; Grobusch, M P; van Die, I; Schallig, H D F H

    2015-09-01

    Functional impairment of dendritic cells (DCs) is part of a survival strategy evolved by Leishmania and Plasmodium parasites to evade host immune responses. Here, the effects of co-exposing human monocyte-derived DCs to Leishmania donovani promastigotes and Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes were investigated. Co-stimulation resulted in a dual, dose-dependent effect on DC differentiation which ranged from semi-mature cells, secreting low interleukin(-12p70 levels to a complete lack of phenotypic maturation in the presence of high parasite amounts. The effect was mainly triggered by the Leishmania parasites, as illustrated by their ability to induce semi-mature, interleukin-10-producing DCs, that poorly responded to lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Conversely, P. falciparum blood-stage forms failed to activate DCs and only slightly interfered with lipopolysaccharide effects. Stimulation with high L. donovani concentrations triggered phosphatidylserine translocation, whose onset presented after initiating the maturation impairment process. When added in combination, the two parasites could co-localize in the same DCs, confirming that the leading effects of Leishmania over Plasmodium may not be due to mutual exclusion. Altogether, these results suggest that in the presence of visceral leishmaniasis-malaria co-infections, Leishmania-driven effects may overrule the more silent response elicited by P. falciparum, shaping host immunity towards a regulatory pattern and possibly delaying disease resolution. PMID:26173941

  6. Differential cytotoxicity of long-chain bases for human oral gingival epithelial keratinocytes, oral fibroblasts, and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Mehalick, Leslie A; Poulsen, Christopher; Fischer, Carol L; Lanzel, Emily A; Bates, Amber M; Walters, Katherine S; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; Guthmiller, Janet M; Johnson, Georgia K; Wertz, Philip W; Brogden, Kim A

    2015-12-01

    Long-chain bases, found in the oral cavity, have potent antimicrobial activity against oral pathogens. In an article associated with this dataset, Poulson and colleagues determined the cytotoxicities of long-chain bases (sphingosine, dihydrosphingosine, and phytosphingosine) for human oral gingival epithelial (GE) keratinocytes, oral gingival fibroblasts (GF), dendritic cells (DC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell lines [1]. Poulson and colleagues found that GE keratinocytes were more resistant to long-chain bases as compared to GF, DC, and SCC cell lines [1]. In this study, we assess the susceptibility of DC to lower concentrations of long chain bases. 0.2-10.0 µM long-chain bases and GML were not cytotoxic to DC; 40.0-80.0 µM long-chain bases, but not GML, were cytotoxic for DC; and 80.0 µM long-chain bases were cytotoxic to DC and induced cellular damage and death in less than 20 mins. Overall, the LD50 of long-chain bases for GE keratinocytes, GF, and DC were considerably higher than their minimal inhibitory concentrations for oral pathogens, a finding important to pursuing their future potential in treating periodontal and oral infections. PMID:26550599

  7. The Effects of T4 and A3/R Bacteriophages on Differentiation of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Zarzycki, Michał; Pacek, Magdalena; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Machcińska, Maja; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses of bacteria. Here we evaluated the effects of T4 and A3/R bacteriophages, as well as phage-generated bacterial lysates, on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) from monocytes. Neither of the phages significantly reduced the expression of markers associated with differentiation of DCs and their role in the activation of T cells (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD1c, CD11c, MHC II, PD-L1, PD-L2, TLR2, TLR4, and CCR7) and phagocytosis receptors (CD64 and DEC-205). By contrast, bacterial lysate of T4 phage significantly decreased the percentages of DEC-205- and CD1c-positive cells. The percentage of DEC-205-positive cells was also significantly reduced in DCs differentiated in the presence of lysate of A3/R phage. Thus while bacteriophages do not substantially affect differentiation of DCs, some products of phage-induced lysis of bacterial cells may influence the differentiation and potentially also some functions of DCs. Our results have important implications for phage therapy of bacterial infections because during infections monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation are an important source of inflammatory DCs. PMID:27582733

  8. Bifidobacterium bifidum actively changes the gene expression profile induced by Lactobacillus acidophilus in murine dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Gudrun; Rasmussen, Simon; Nielsen Fink, Lisbeth; Jarmer, Hanne; Nøhr Nielsen, Birgit; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal regulatory role in activation of both the innate as well as the adaptive immune system by responding to environmental microorganisms. We have previously shown that Lactobacillus acidophilus induces a strong production of the pro-inflammatory and Th1 polarizing cytokine IL-12 in DC, whereas bifidobacteria do not induce IL-12 but inhibit the IL-12 production induced by lactobacilli. In the present study, genome-wide microarrays were used to investigate the gene expression pattern of murine DC stimulated with Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium bifidum Z9. L. acidophilus NCFM strongly induced expression of interferon (IFN)-beta, other virus defence genes, and cytokine and chemokine genes related to the innate and the adaptive immune response. By contrast, B. bifidum Z9 up-regulated genes encoding cytokines and chemokines related to the innate immune response. Moreover, B. bifidum Z9 inhibited the expression of the Th1-promoting genes induced by L. acidophilus NCFM and had an additive effect on genes of the innate immune response and Th2 skewing genes. The gene encoding Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a transcription factor regulating the activation of JNK, was one of the few genes only induced by B. bifidum Z9. Neutralization of IFN-beta abrogated L. acidophilus NCFM-induced expression of Th1-skewing genes, and blocking of the JNK pathway completely inhibited the expression of IFN-beta. Our results indicate that B. bifidum Z9 actively inhibits the expression of genes related to the adaptive immune system in murine dendritic cells and that JPD2 via blocking of IFN-beta plays a central role in this regulatory mechanism. PMID:20548777

  9. A highly active water-soluble cross-coupling catalyst based on dendritic polyglycerol N-heterocyclic carbene palladium complexes.

    PubMed

    Meise, Markus; Haag, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    A new water-soluble polyglycerol derivative functionalized with N-heterocyclic carbene palladium complexes was prepared and applied as catalyst for Suzuki cross-coupling reactions in water. The complex displays a metal loading of around 65 metal centers per dendrimeric molecule, which is estimated to contain 130 chelating groups and thus corresponds approximately to the formation of 2:1 NHC/metal complexes. Monomeric analogues were also synthesized to validate the reactivity of the dendritic catalyst. Both types of catalysts were tested with various aryl bromides and arylboronic acids. Turnover frequencies of up to 2586 h(-1) at 80 degrees C were observed with the dendritic catalyst along with turnover numbers of up to 59 000, which are among the highest turnover numbers reported for polymer-supported catalysts in neat water. The dendritic catalyst could be used (reused) in five consecutive reactions without loss in activity. PMID:18702166

  10. β-III spectrin underpins ankyrin R function in Purkinje cell dendritic trees: protein complex critical for sodium channel activity is impaired by SCA5-associated mutations.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Yvonne L; Perkins, Emma M; Cairncross, Callum J; Lyndon, Alastair R; Skehel, Paul A; Jackson, Mandy

    2014-07-15

    Beta III spectrin is present throughout the elaborate dendritic tree of cerebellar Purkinje cells and is required for normal neuronal morphology and cell survival. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 (SCA5) and spectrin associated autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 are human neurodegenerative diseases involving progressive gait ataxia and cerebellar atrophy. Both disorders appear to result from loss of β-III spectrin function. Further elucidation of β-III spectrin function is therefore needed to understand disease mechanisms and identify potential therapeutic options. Here, we report that β-III spectrin is essential for the recruitment and maintenance of ankyrin R at the plasma membrane of Purkinje cell dendrites. Two SCA5-associated mutations of β-III spectrin both reduce ankyrin R levels at the cell membrane. Moreover, a wild-type β-III spectrin/ankyrin-R complex increases sodium channel levels and activity in cell culture, whereas mutant β-III spectrin complexes fail to enhance sodium currents. This suggests impaired ability to form stable complexes between the adaptor protein ankyrin R and its interacting partners in the Purkinje cell dendritic tree is a key mechanism by which mutant forms of β-III spectrin cause ataxia, initially by Purkinje cell dysfunction and exacerbated by subsequent cell death. PMID:24603075

  11. Porphyromonas gingivalis Evasion of Autophagy and Intracellular Killing by Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells Involves DC-SIGN-TLR2 Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    El-Awady, Ahmed R.; Miles, Brodie; Scisci, Elizabeth; Kurago, Zoya B.; Palani, Chithra D.; Arce, Roger M.; Waller, Jennifer L.; Genco, Caroline A.; Slocum, Connie; Manning, Matthew; Schoenlein, Patricia V.; Cutler, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) expressed on professional antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs), is crucial to the fate of engulfed microbes. Among the many PRRs expressed by DCs are Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectins such as DC-SIGN. DC-SIGN is targeted by several major human pathogens for immune-evasion, although its role in intracellular routing of pathogens to autophagosomes is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of DC-SIGN and TLRs in evasion of autophagy and survival of Porphyromonas gingivalis in human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs). We employed a panel of P. gingivalis isogenic fimbriae deficient strains with defined defects in Mfa-1 fimbriae, a DC-SIGN ligand, and FimA fimbriae, a TLR2 agonist. Our results show that DC-SIGN dependent uptake of Mfa1+P. gingivalis strains by MoDCs resulted in lower intracellular killing and higher intracellular content of P. gingivalis. Moreover, Mfa1+P. gingivalis was mostly contained within single membrane vesicles, where it survived intracellularly. Survival was decreased by activation of TLR2 and/or autophagy. Mfa1+P. gingivalis strain did not induce significant levels of Rab5, LC3-II, and LAMP1. In contrast, P. gingivalis uptake through a DC-SIGN independent manner was associated with early endosomal routing through Rab5, increased LC3-II and LAMP-1, as well as the formation of double membrane intracellular phagophores, a characteristic feature of autophagy. These results suggest that selective engagement of DC-SIGN by Mfa-1+P. gingivalis promotes evasion of antibacterial autophagy and lysosome fusion, resulting in intracellular persistence in myeloid DCs; however TLR2 activation can overcome autophagy evasion and pathogen persistence in DCs. PMID:25679217

  12. TLR ligands upregulate RIG-I expression in human plasmacytoid dendritic cells in a type I IFN-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Attila; Magyarics, Zoltan; Pazmandi, Kitti; Gopcsa, Laszlo; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Bacsi, Attila

    2014-09-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are professional type I interferon (IFN)-producing cells that play an essential role in antiviral immunity. In many cell types, detection of intracellular pathogens is mostly dependent on endosomal Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and cytosolic sensors, such as retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). However, the possible interplay between these two systems has not yet been elucidated. Here we aimed to study the collaboration of endosomal TLRs and RIG-I in primary human pDCs. We found that under steady-state conditions, pDCs express RIG-I at very low level, but the expression of this receptor is rapidly and dramatically upregulated upon stimulation by the TLR7 ligand imiquimod or the TLR9 ligand type A CpG. We also demonstrated that pDCs are able to sense and respond to 5'-triphosphate double-stranded RNA (5'-ppp-dsRNA) only following activation by endosomal TLRs. Experiments on primary pDCs with functionally blocked IFN-α/β receptor 1 (IFNAR1) and those on human pDC leukemia (pDC-L) cells defective in type I IFN secretion indicated that the upregulation of RIG-I expression in pDCs upon stimulation by endosomal TLR occurs in a type I IFN-independent manner. Selective phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) on tyrosine 701 could be identified as an early signaling event in this process. Our results show that in contrast to many other cell types, where RIG-I expression is induced by type I IFN, in pDCs a disparate mechanism is responsible for the upregulation of RIG-I. Our findings also indicate that along with autophagy, an additional mechanism is operating in pDCs to promote the detection of replicating viruses. PMID:24839978

  13. HPV vaccine stimulates cytotoxic activity of killer dendritic cells and natural killer cells against HPV-positive tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bergh, Johan M J; Guerti, Khadija; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Cools, Nathalie; Goossens, Herman; Vorsters, Alex; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I; Anguille, Sébastien; Van Damme, Pierre; Smits, Evelien L J M

    2014-01-01

    Cervarix™ is approved as a preventive vaccine against infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) strains 16 and 18, which are causally related to the development of cervical cancer. We are the first to investigate in vitro the effects of this HPV vaccine on interleukin (IL)-15 dendritic cells (DC) as proxy of a naturally occurring subset of blood DC, and natural killer (NK) cells, two innate immune cell types that play an important role in antitumour immunity. Our results show that exposure of IL-15 DC to the HPV vaccine results in increased expression of phenotypic maturation markers, pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cytotoxic activity against HPV-positive tumour cells. These effects are mediated by the vaccine adjuvant, partly through Toll-like receptor 4 activation. Next, we demonstrate that vaccine-exposed IL-15 DC in turn induce phenotypic activation of NK cells, resulting in a synergistic cytotoxic action against HPV-infected tumour cells. Our study thus identifies a novel mode of action of the HPV vaccine in boosting innate immunity, including killing of HPV-infected cells by DC and NK cells. PMID:24979331

  14. Triggering through NOD-2 Differentiates Bone Marrow Precursors to Dendritic Cells with Potent Bactericidal activity

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nargis; Aqdas, Mohammad; Vidyarthi, Aurobind; Negi, Shikha; Pahari, Susanta; Agnihotri, Tapan; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity by activating naïve T cells. The role of pattern recognition receptors like Toll-Like Receptors and Nod-Like Receptors expressed on DCs is well-defined in the recognition of the pathogens. However, nothing is precisely studied regarding the impact of NOD-2 signaling during the differentiation of DCs. Consequently, we explored the role of NOD-2 signaling in the differentiation of DCs and therefore their capability to activate innate and adaptive immunity. Intriguingly, we observed that NOD-2 stimulated DCs (nDCs) acquired highly activated and matured phenotype and exhibited substantially greater bactericidal activity by robust production of nitric oxide. The mechanism involved in improving the functionality of nDCs was dependent on IFN-αβ signaling, leading to the activation of STAT pathways. Furthermore, we also observed that STAT-1 and STAT-4 dependent maturation and activation of DCs was under the feedback mechanism of SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 proteins. nDCs acquired enhanced potential to activate chiefly Th1 and Th17 immunity. Taken together, these results suggest that nDCs can be exploited as an immunotherapeutic agent in bolstering host immunity and imparting protection against the pathogens. PMID:27265209

  15. Type I interferons produced by dendritic cells promote their phenotypic and functional activation.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Maria; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Mattei, Fabrizio; Gresser, Ion; Belardelli, Filippo; Borrow, Persephone; Tough, David F

    2002-05-01

    Resting dendritic cells (DCs) are resident in most tissues and can be activated by environmental stimuli to mature into potent antigen-presenting cells. One important stimulus for DC activation is infection; DCs can be triggered through receptors that recognize microbial components directly or by contact with infection-induced cytokines. We show here that murine DCs undergo phenotypic maturation upon exposure to type I interferons (type I IFNs) in vivo or in vitro. Moreover, DCs either derived from bone marrow cells in vitro or isolated from the spleens of normal animals express IFN-alpha and IFN-beta, suggesting that type I IFNs can act in an autocrine manner to activate DCs. Consistent with this idea, the ability to respond to type I IFN was required for the generation of fully activated DCs from bone marrow precursors, as DCs derived from the bone marrow of mice lacking a functional receptor for type I IFN had reduced expression of costimulatory and adhesion molecules and a diminished ability to stimulate naive T-cell proliferation compared with DCs derived from control bone marrow. Furthermore, the addition of neutralizing anti-IFN-alpha/beta antibody to purified splenic DCs in vitro partially blocked the "spontaneous" activation of these cells, inhibiting the up-regulation of costimulatory molecules, secretion of IFN-gamma, and T-cell stimulatory activity. These results show that DCs both secrete and respond to type I IFN, identifying type I interferons as autocrine DC activators. PMID:11964292

  16. Vaccines, adjuvants and dendritic cell activators – Current Status and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Obeid, Joseph M.; Hu, Yinin; Slingluff, Craig L.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer vaccines offer a low-toxicity approach to induce anticancer immune responses. They have shown promise for clinical benefit with one cancer vaccine approved in the U.S. for advanced prostate cancer. As other immune therapies are now clearly effective for treatment of advanced cancers of many histologies, there is renewed enthusiasm for optimizing cancer vaccines for use to prevent recurrence in early stage cancers and/or to combine with other immune therapies for therapy of advanced cancers. Future advancements in vaccine therapy will involve the identification and selection of effective antigen formulations, optimization of adjuvants, dendritic cell activation, and combination therapies. In this summary we present the current practice, the broad collection of challenges, and the promising future directions of vaccine therapy for cancer. PMID:26320060

  17. Regulation of protein synthesis and autophagy in activated dendritic cells: implications for antigen processing and presentation.

    PubMed

    Argüello, Rafael J; Reverendo, Marisa; Gatti, Evelina; Pierre, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Antigenic peptides presented in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules originate from the degradation of both self and non-self proteins. T cells can therefore recognize at the surface of surveyed cells, the self-peptidome produced by the cell itself (mostly inducing tolerance) or immunogenic peptides derived from exogenous origins. The initiation of adaptive immune responses by dendritic cells (DCs), through the antigenic priming of naïve T cells, is associated to microbial pattern recognition receptors engagement. Activation of DCs by microbial product or inflammatory cytokines initiates multiple processes that maximize DC capacity to present exogenous antigens and stimulate T cells by affecting major metabolic and membrane traffic pathways. These include the modulation of protein synthesis, the regulation of MHC and co-stimulatory molecules transport, as well as the regulation of autophagy, that, all together promote exogenous antigen presentation while limiting the display of self-antigens by MHC molecules. PMID:27319340

  18. Isolation of Splenic Dendritic Cells Using Fluorescence-activated Cell Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Tavernier, Simon J; Osorio, Fabiola; Janssens, Sophie; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2016-01-01

    The spleen is a vastly vasculated organ and consists of a complex organized network of innate and adaptive immune cells. This permits the specialized functions of the spleen such as antibacterial and antifungal immunity and iron metabolism among others (Mebius and Kraal, 2005). Different dendritic cell (DC) subsets reside in the spleen and can be defined by the expression of unique surface markers. These DC subsets are recognized to perform non-redundant functions in the immune system (Merad et al., 2013). In our recent study, we found that Inositol Requiring Enzyme (IRE)-1 is specifically activated in splenic CD8a+ DCs. Furthermore, loss of X-box binding protein (XBP)-1 – the transcription factor regulated by IRE-1 – resulted in defective cross-presentation of dead cell associated antigens by splenic CD8a+ DCs (Osorio et al., 2014). This protocol allows the isolation of specific DC subsets for experimental use ex-vivo. PMID:27376108

  19. slan/M-DC8+ cells constitute a distinct subset of dendritic cells in human tonsils

    PubMed Central

    Micheletti, Alessandra; Finotti, Giulia; Calzetti, Federica; Lonardi, Silvia; Zoratti, Elisa; Bugatti, Mattia; Stefini, Stefania; Vermi, William; Cassatella, Marco A.

    2016-01-01

    Human blood dendritic cells (DCs) include three main distinct subsets, namely the CD1c+ and CD141+ myeloid DCs (mDCs) and the CD303+ plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). More recently, a population of slan/M-DC8+ cells, also known as “slanDCs”, has been described in blood and detected even in inflamed secondary lymphoid organs and non-lymphoid tissues. Nevertheless, hallmarks of slan/M-DC8+ cells in tissues are poorly defined. Herein, we report a detailed characterization of the phenotype and function of slan/M-DC8+ cells present in human tonsils. We found that tonsil slan/M-DC8+ cells represent a unique DC cell population, distinct from their circulating counterpart and also from all other tonsil DC and monocyte/macrophage subsets. Phenotypically, slan/M-DC8+ cells in tonsils display a CD11c+HLA-DR+CD14+CD11bdim/negCD16dim/negCX3CR1dim/neg marker repertoire, while functionally they exhibit an efficient antigen presentation capacity and a constitutive secretion of TNFα. Notably, such DC phenotype and functions are substantially reproduced by culturing blood slan/M-DC8+ cells in tonsil-derived conditioned medium (TDCM), further supporting the hypothesis of a full DC-like differentiation program occurring within the tonsil microenvironment. Taken together, our data suggest that blood slan/M-DC8+ cells are immediate precursors of a previously unrecognizedcompetent DC subset in tonsils, and pave the way for further characterization of slan/M-DC8+ cells in other tissues. PMID:26695549

  20. Exposure to Bacillus anthracis Capsule Results in Suppression of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chabot, Donald J.; Bozue, Joel A.; Tobery, Steven A.; West, Michael W.; Moody, Krishna; Yang, De; Oppenheim, Joost J.

    2014-01-01

    The antiphagocytic capsule of Bacillus anthracis is a major virulence factor. We hypothesized that it may also mediate virulence through inhibition of the host's immune responses. During an infection, the capsule exists attached to the bacterial surface but also free in the host tissues. We sought to examine the impact of free capsule by assessing its effects on human monocytes and immature dendritic cells (iDCs). Human monocytes were differentiated into iDCs by interleukin-4 (IL-4) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) over 7 days in the presence of capsule derived from wild-type encapsulated B. anthracis Ames (WT) or a control preparation from an isogenic B. anthracis Ames strain that produces only 2% of the capsule of the WT (capA mutant). WT capsule consistently induced release of IL-8 and IL-6 while the capA mutant control preparation elicited either no response or only a minimal release of IL-8. iDCs that were differentiated in the presence of WT capsule had increased side scatter (SSC), a measure of cellular complexity, when assessed by flow cytometry. iDCs differentiated in the presence of WT capsule also matured less well in response to subsequent B. anthracis peptidoglycan (Ba PGN) exposure, with reduced upregulation of the chemokine receptor CCR7, reduced CCR7-dependent chemotaxis, and reduced release of certain cytokines. Exposure of naive differentiated control iDCs to WT capsule did not alter cell surface marker expression but did elicit IL-8. These results indicate that free capsule may contribute to the pathogenesis of anthrax by suppressing the responses of immune cells and interfering with the maturation of iDCs. PMID:24891109

  1. ERK1/2 Activation Is Necessary for BDNF to Increase Dendritic Spine Density in Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, Mariana; Medina, Jorge H.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2004-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent modulator of synaptic transmission and plasticity in the CNS, acting both pre- and postsynaptically. We demonstrated recently that BDNF/TrkB signaling increases dendritic spine density in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Here, we tested whether activation of the prominent ERK (MAPK) signaling…

  2. Immunomodulatory effects of adult Haemonchus contortus excretory/secretory products on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Z U; Knight, J S; Koolaard, J; Simpson, H V; Pernthaner, A

    2015-12-01

    The levels of expression of surface molecules and release of cytokines and chemokines of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells were determined after their exposure to adult H. contortus excretory/secretory (ES) products or a combination of ES products and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Worm products provoked a weak response and only partial maturation of the dendritic cells, consistent with the hyporesponsiveness and more tolerogenic immune environment present in parasitized animals and humans. Co-stimulation with LPS demonstrated that H. contortus secretions, like those of other helminths, contain immunomodulators capable of reducing some aspects of the strong T(H)1/T(H)2 response evoked by bacterial LPS. There were significant reductions in the release of some cytokine/chemokines by LPS-stimulated mdDCs and a trend (although not significant at P < 0.05) for reduced expression levels of CD40, CD80 and HLA-DR. A prominent feature was the variability in responses of dendritic cells from the four donors, even on different days in repeat experiments, suggesting that generalized conclusions may be difficult to make, except in genetically related animals. Such observations may therefore be applicable only to restricted populations. In addition, previous exposure to parasites in a target population for immunomodulatory therapy may be an important factor in assessing the likelihood of adverse reactions or failures in the treatment to worm therapy. PMID:26457886

  3. Dendritic cells and regulation of graft-versus-host disease and graft-versus-leukemia activity

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, Elizabeth O.; Turnquist, Hēth R.; Mapara, Markus Y.

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only curative treatment for many malignant hematologic diseases, with an often critical graft-versus-leukemia effect. Despite peritransplant prophylaxis, GVHD remains a significant cause of posthematopoietic stem cell transplantation morbidity and mortality. Traditional therapies have targeted T cells, yet immunostimulatory dendritic cells (DCs) are critical in the pathogenesis of GVHD. Furthermore, DCs also have tolerogenic properties. Monitoring of DC characteristics may be predictive of outcome, and therapies that target DCs are innovative and promising. DCs may be targeted in vivo or tolerogenic (tol) DCs may be generated in vitro and given in the peritransplant period. Other cellular therapies, notably regulatory T cells (Treg) and mesenchymal stem cells, mediate important effects through DCs and show promise for the prevention and treatment of GVHD in early human studies. Therapies are likely to be more effective if they have synergistic effects or target both DCs and T cells in vivo, such as tolDCs or Treg. Given the effectiveness of tolDCs in experimental models of GVHD and their safety in early human studies for type 1 diabetes, it is crucial that tolDCs be investigated in the prevention and treatment of human GVHD while ensuring conservation of graft-versus-leukemia effects. PMID:22403259

  4. Characteristics of human dendritic cells generated in a microgravity analog culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, C. A.; Grazziuti, M. L.; Przepiorka, D.; Tomasovic, S. P.; McIntyre, B. W.; Woodside, D. G.; Pellis, N. R.; Pierson, D. L.; Rex, J. H.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Generation of an effective immune response requires that antigens be processed and presented to T lymphocytes by antigen-presenting cells, the most efficient of which are dendritic cells (DC). Because of their influence on both the innate and the acquired arms of immunity, a defect in DC would be expected to result in a broad impairment of immune function, not unlike that observed in astronauts during or after space flight. In the study reported here, we investigated whether DC generation and function are altered in a culture environment that models microgravity, i.e., the rotary-cell culture system (RCCS). We observed that RCCS supported the generation of DC identified by morphology, phenotype (HLA-DR+ and lacking lineage-associated markers), and function (high allostimulatory activity). However, the yield of DC from RCCS was significantly lower than that from static cultures. RCCS-generated DC were less able to phagocytose Aspergillus fumigatus conidia and expressed a lower density of surface HLA-DR. The proportion of DC expressing CD80 was also significantly reduced in RCCS compared to static cultures. When exposed to fungal antigens, RCCS-generated DC produced lower levels of interleukin-12 and failed to upregulate some costimulatory/adhesion molecules involved in antigen presentation. These data suggest that DC generation, and some functions needed to mount an effective immune response to pathogens, may be disturbed in the microgravity environment of space.

  5. Human Herpesvirus 6 Infects Dendritic Cells and Suppresses Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication in Coinfected Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Asada, Hideo; Klaus-Kovtun, Vera; Golding, Hana; Katz, Stephen I.; Blauvelt, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) has been implicated as a cofactor in the progressive loss of CD4+ T cells observed in AIDS patients. Because dendritic cells (DC) play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease, we studied the infection of DC by HHV-6 and coinfection of DC by HHV-6 and HIV. Purified immature DC (derived from adherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4) could be infected with HHV-6, as determined by PCR analyses, intracellular monoclonal antibody staining, and presence of virus in culture supernatants. However, HHV-6-infected DC demonstrated neither cytopathic changes nor functional defects. Interestingly, HHV-6 markedly suppressed HIV replication and syncytium formation in coinfected DC cultures. This HHV-6-mediated anti-HIV effect was DC specific, occurred when HHV-6 was added either before or after HIV, and was not due to decreased surface expression or function of CD4, CXCR4, or CCR5. Conversely, HIV had no demonstrable effect on HHV-6 replication. These findings suggest that HHV-6 may protect DC from HIV-induced cytopathicity in AIDS patients. We also demonstrate that interactions between HIV and herpesviruses are complex and that the observable outcome of dual infection is dependent on the target cell type. PMID:10196298

  6. Flt3 permits survival during infection by rendering dendritic cells competent to activate NK cells.

    PubMed

    Eidenschenk, Céline; Crozat, Karine; Krebs, Philippe; Arens, Ramon; Popkin, Daniel; Arnold, Carrie N; Blasius, Amanda L; Benedict, Chris A; Moresco, Eva Marie Y; Xia, Yu; Beutler, Bruce

    2010-05-25

    A previously unappreciated signal necessary for dendritic cell (DC)-mediated activation of natural killer (NK) cells during viral infection was revealed by a recessive N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutation called warmflash (wmfl). Wmfl homozygotes displayed increased susceptibility to mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. In response to MCMV infection in vivo, delayed NK cell activation was observed, but no intrinsic defects in NK cell activation or function were identified. Rather, coculture experiments demonstrated that NK cells are suboptimally activated by wmfl DCs, which showed impaired cytokine production in response to MCMV or synthetic TLR7 and TLR9 ligands. The wmfl mutation was identified in the gene encoding the Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3). Flt3 ligand (Flt3L) is transiently induced in the serum upon infection or TLR activation. However, antibody blockade reveals no acute requirement for Flt3L, suggesting that the Flt3L --> Flt3 axis programs the development of DCs, making them competent to support NK effector function. In the absence of Flt3 signaling, NK cell activation is delayed and survival during MCMV infection is markedly compromised. PMID:20457904

  7. Flt3 permits survival during infection by rendering dendritic cells competent to activate NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Eidenschenk, Céline; Crozat, Karine; Krebs, Philippe; Arens, Ramon; Popkin, Daniel; Arnold, Carrie N.; Blasius, Amanda L.; Benedict, Chris A.; Moresco, Eva Marie Y.; Xia, Yu; Beutler, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    A previously unappreciated signal necessary for dendritic cell (DC)-mediated activation of natural killer (NK) cells during viral infection was revealed by a recessive N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutation called warmflash (wmfl). Wmfl homozygotes displayed increased susceptibility to mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. In response to MCMV infection in vivo, delayed NK cell activation was observed, but no intrinsic defects in NK cell activation or function were identified. Rather, coculture experiments demonstrated that NK cells are suboptimally activated by wmfl DCs, which showed impaired cytokine production in response to MCMV or synthetic TLR7 and TLR9 ligands. The wmfl mutation was identified in the gene encoding the Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3). Flt3 ligand (Flt3L) is transiently induced in the serum upon infection or TLR activation. However, antibody blockade reveals no acute requirement for Flt3L, suggesting that the Flt3L → Flt3 axis programs the development of DCs, making them competent to support NK effector function. In the absence of Flt3 signaling, NK cell activation is delayed and survival during MCMV infection is markedly compromised. PMID:20457904

  8. Dectin-1-activated dendritic cells trigger potent antitumour immunity through the induction of Th9 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yinghua; Chu, Xiao; Chen, Jintong; Wang, Ying; Gao, Sujun; Jiang, Yuxue; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Tan, Guangyun; Zhao, Wenjie; Yi, Huanfa; Xu, Honglin; Ma, Xingzhe; Lu, Yong; Yi, Qing; Wang, Siqing

    2016-01-01

    Dectin-1 signalling in dendritic cells (DCs) has an important role in triggering protective antifungal Th17 responses. However, whether dectin-1 directs DCs to prime antitumour Th9 cells remains unclear. Here, we show that DCs activated by dectin-1 agonists potently promote naive CD4(+) T cells to differentiate into Th9 cells. Abrogation of dectin-1 in DCs completely abolishes their Th9-polarizing capability in response to dectin-1 agonist curdlan. Notably, dectin-1 stimulation of DCs upregulates TNFSF15 and OX40L, which are essential for dectin-1-activated DC-induced Th9 cell priming. Mechanistically, dectin-1 activates Syk, Raf1 and NF-κB signalling pathways, resulting in increased p50 and RelB nuclear translocation and TNFSF15 and OX40L expression. Furthermore, immunization of tumour-bearing mice with dectin-1-activated DCs induces potent antitumour response that depends on Th9 cells and IL-9 induced by dectin-1-activated DCs in vivo. Our results identify dectin-1-activated DCs as a powerful inducer of Th9 cells and antitumour immunity and may have important clinical implications. PMID:27492902

  9. Dectin-1-activated dendritic cells trigger potent antitumour immunity through the induction of Th9 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yinghua; Chu, Xiao; Chen, Jintong; Wang, Ying; Gao, Sujun; Jiang, Yuxue; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Tan, Guangyun; Zhao, Wenjie; Yi, Huanfa; Xu, Honglin; Ma, Xingzhe; Lu, Yong; Yi, Qing; Wang, Siqing

    2016-01-01

    Dectin-1 signalling in dendritic cells (DCs) has an important role in triggering protective antifungal Th17 responses. However, whether dectin-1 directs DCs to prime antitumour Th9 cells remains unclear. Here, we show that DCs activated by dectin-1 agonists potently promote naive CD4+ T cells to differentiate into Th9 cells. Abrogation of dectin-1 in DCs completely abolishes their Th9-polarizing capability in response to dectin-1 agonist curdlan. Notably, dectin-1 stimulation of DCs upregulates TNFSF15 and OX40L, which are essential for dectin-1-activated DC-induced Th9 cell priming. Mechanistically, dectin-1 activates Syk, Raf1 and NF-κB signalling pathways, resulting in increased p50 and RelB nuclear translocation and TNFSF15 and OX40L expression. Furthermore, immunization of tumour-bearing mice with dectin-1-activated DCs induces potent antitumour response that depends on Th9 cells and IL-9 induced by dectin-1-activated DCs in vivo. Our results identify dectin-1-activated DCs as a powerful inducer of Th9 cells and antitumour immunity and may have important clinical implications. PMID:27492902

  10. Human herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases: a family of proteins that modulate dendritic cell function and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Glaser, Ronald; Williams, Marshall V.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded dUTPase can modulate innate immune responses through the activation of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling. However, whether this novel immune function of the dUTPase is specific for EBV or a common property of the Herpesviridae family is not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the purified viral dUTPases encoded by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), human herpesvirus-6A (HHV-6A), human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) differentially activate NF-κB through ligation of TLR2/TLR1 heterodimers. Furthermore, activation of NF-κB by the viral dUTPases was inhibited by anti-TLR2 blocking antibodies (Abs) and the over-expression of dominant-negative constructs of TLR2, lacking the TIR domain, and MyD88 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing TLR2/TLR1. In addition, treatment of human dendritic cells and PBMCs with the herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases from HSV-2, HHV-6A, HHV-8, and VZV resulted in the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, TNF-α, IL-10, and IFN-γ. Interestingly, blocking experiments revealed that the anti-TLR2 Ab significantly reduced the secretion of cytokines by the various herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases (p < 0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that a non-structural protein encoded by herpesviruses HHV-6A, HHV-8, VZV and to a lesser extent HSV-2 is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Our results reveal a novel function of the virus-encoded dUTPases, which may be important to the pathophysiology of diseases caused by these viruses. More importantly, this study demonstrates that the immunomodulatory functions of dUTPases are a common property of the Herpesviridae family and thus, the dUTPase could be a potential target for the development of novel therapeutic agents against infections caused by these herpesviruses. PMID:25309527

  11. Up-regulation of galectin-9 induces cell migration in human dendritic cells infected with dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Lin; Wang, Mei-Yi; Ho, Ling-Jun; Huang, Chuan-Yueh; Lai, Jenn-Haung

    2015-05-01

    Galectin-9 (Gal-9) exerts immunosuppressive effects by inducing apoptosis in T cells that produce interferon-γ and interleukin (IL)-17. However, Gal-9 can be pro-inflammatory in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated monocytes. Using microarray analysis, we observed that Gal-9 was up-regulated in human dendritic cells (DCs) after dengue virus (DV) infection. The investigation into the immunomodulatory effects and mechanisms of Gal-9 in DCs exposed to DV revealed that DV infection specifically increased mRNA and protein levels of Gal-9 but not those of Gal-1 or Gal-3. Blocking p38, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), inhibited DV-induced expression of Gal-9. Reduction in Gal-9 by small interference RNA treatment suppressed DV-stimulated migration of DCs towards the chemoattractants CCL19 and CCL21. In addition, DV-induced IL-12p40 production was reduced after knockdown of Gal-9 in DCs. Furthermore, Gal-9 deficiency suppressed DV-induced activation of nuclear factor-κB. Inhibition of DV-induced DC migration under conditions of Gal-9 deficiency was mediated through suppressing ERK activation but not by regulating the expression of CCR7, the receptor for CCL19 and CCL21. Both the reduction in IL-12 production and the suppression of ERK activity might account for the inhibition of DV-induced DC migration after knockdown of Gal-9. In summary, this study reveals the roles of Gal-9 in DV-induced migration of DCs. The findings indicate that Gal-9 might be a therapeutic target for preventing immunopathogenesis induced by DV infection. PMID:25754930

  12. Infection frequency of dendritic cells and CD4+ T lymphocytes in spleens of human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients.

    PubMed Central

    McIlroy, D; Autran, B; Cheynier, R; Wain-Hobson, S; Clauvel, J P; Oksenhendler, E; Debré, P; Hosmalin, A

    1995-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are specialized antigen-presenting leukocytes that are responsible for the activation of naive as well as memory T lymphocytes. If infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), DC may transfer virus to CD4+ lymphocytes. However, the question of whether DC are infected in vivo is controversial. As HIV infection is more active in secondary lymphoid organs than in blood, infection of splenic DC isolated from HIV-seropositive patients was investigated. Splenic DC were first enriched and characterized by flow cytometry from HIV- donors. After direct isolation, they were negative for monocyte and T- and B-lymphocyte markers, negative for CD1a, but positive for major histocompatibility complex class II and CD4. After in vitro maturation, major histocompatibility complex class II expression increased, while CD4 expression was lost. Extensive purification from the spleens of seven HIV+ patients was performed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The frequency of cells harboring HIV DNA in purified populations was quantified by limiting-dilution PCR. Directly isolated DC (average, 1/3,000; range, 1/720 to 1/18,000) were in each patient 10 to 100 times less infected than CD4+ T lymphocytes (average, 1/52; range, 1/17 to 1/190). On average, 1/1,450 (1/320 to 1/6,100) unseparated mononuclear splenocytes (containing 5% CD4+ lymphocytes) harbored HIV DNA. In conclusion, in these HIV+ patient spleens, DC seem to be infected, but HIV-DNA positive CD4+ T lymphocytes accounted for the vast majority of infected mononuclear splenocytes. PMID:7609039

  13. Activity-dependent control of neuronal output by local and global dendritic spike attenuation.

    PubMed

    Remy, Stefan; Csicsvari, Jozsef; Beck, Heinz

    2009-03-26

    Neurons possess elaborate dendritic arbors which receive and integrate excitatory synaptic signals. Individual dendritic subbranches exhibit local membrane potential supralinearities, termed dendritic spikes, which control transfer of local synaptic input to the soma. Here, we show that dendritic spikes in CA1 pyramidal cells are strongly regulated by specific types of prior input. While input in the linear range is without effect, supralinear input inhibits subsequent spikes, causing them to attenuate and ultimately fail due to dendritic Na(+) channel inactivation. This mechanism acts locally within the boundaries of the input branch. If an input is sufficiently strong to trigger axonal action potentials, their back-propagation into the dendritic tree causes a widespread global reduction in dendritic excitability which is prominent after firing patterns occurring in vivo. Together, these mechanisms control the capability of individual dendritic branches to trigger somatic action potential output. They are invoked at frequencies encountered during learning, and impose limits on the storage and retrieval rates of information encoded as branch excitability. PMID:19323999

  14. SATB1 OVEREXPRESSION DRIVES TUMOR-PROMOTING ACTIVITIES IN CANCER-ASSOCIATED DENDRITIC CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Tesone, Amelia J.; Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Brencicova, Eva; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Stephen, Tom L.; Allegrezza, Michael J.; Payne, Kyle K.; Nguyen, Jenny M.; Wickramasinghe, Jayamanna; Tchou, Julia; Borowsky, Mark E.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Special AT-rich sequence-binding protein-1 (Satb1) governs genome-wide transcriptional programs. Using a conditional knockout mouse, we find that Satb1 is required for normal differentiation of conventional dendritic cells (DCs). Furthermore, Satb1 governs the differentiation of inflammatory DCs by regulating MHC-II expression through Notch1 signaling. Mechanistically, Satb1 binds to the Notch1 promoter, activating Notch expression and driving RBPJ occupancy of the H2-Ab1 promoter, which activates MHC-II transcription. However, tumor-driven, unremitting expression of Satb1 in activated Zbtb46+ inflammatory DCs that infiltrate ovarian tumors results in an immunosuppressive phenotype characterized by increased secretion of tumor-promoting Galectin-1 and IL-6. In vivo silencing of Satb1 in tumor-associated DCs reverses their tumorigenic activity and boosts protective immunity. Therefore, dynamic fluctuations in Satb1 expression govern the generation and immunostimulatory activity of steady-state and inflammatory DCs, but continuous Satb1 overexpression in differentiated DCs converts them into tolerogenic/pro-inflammatory cells that contribute to malignant progression. PMID:26876172

  15. Satb1 Overexpression Drives Tumor-Promoting Activities in Cancer-Associated Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Tesone, Amelia J; Rutkowski, Melanie R; Brencicova, Eva; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Stephen, Tom L; Allegrezza, Michael J; Payne, Kyle K; Nguyen, Jenny M; Wickramasinghe, Jayamanna; Tchou, Julia; Borowsky, Mark E; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R

    2016-02-23

    Special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 1 (Satb1) governs genome-wide transcriptional programs. Using a conditional knockout mouse, we find that Satb1 is required for normal differentiation of conventional dendritic cells (DCs). Furthermore, Satb1 governs the differentiation of inflammatory DCs by regulating major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expression through Notch1 signaling. Mechanistically, Satb1 binds to the Notch1 promoter, activating Notch expression and driving RBPJ occupancy of the H2-Ab1 promoter, which activates MHC II transcription. However, tumor-driven, unremitting expression of Satb1 in activated Zbtb46(+) inflammatory DCs that infiltrate ovarian tumors results in an immunosuppressive phenotype characterized by increased secretion of tumor-promoting Galectin-1 and IL-6. In vivo silencing of Satb1 in tumor-associated DCs reverses their tumorigenic activity and boosts protective immunity. Therefore, dynamic fluctuations in Satb1 expression govern the generation and immunostimulatory activity of steady-state and inflammatory DCs, but continuous Satb1 overexpression in differentiated DCs converts them into tolerogenic/pro-inflammatory cells that contribute to malignant progression. PMID:26876172

  16. Biomimetic Protein Nanoparticles Facilitate Enhanced Dendritic Cell Activation and Cross-Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Molino, Nicholas M.; Anderson, Amanda K. L.; Nelson, Edward L.; Wang, Szu-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Many current cancer vaccine strategies suffer from the inability to mount a CD8 T cell response that is strong enough to overcome the low immunogenicity of tumors. Viruses naturally possess the sizes, geometries, and physical properties for which the immune system has evolved to recognize, and mimicking those properties with nanoparticles can produce robust platforms for vaccine design. Using the non-viral E2 core of pyruvate dehydrogenase, we have engineered a viral-mimicking vaccine platform capable of encapsulating dendritic cell (DC)-activating CpG molecules in an acid-releasable manner and displaying MHC I-restricted SIINFEKL peptide epitopes. Encapsulated CpG activated bone marrow-derived DCs at a 25- fold lower concentration in vitro when delivered with the E2 nanoparticle than with unbound CpG alone. Combining CpG and SIINFEKL within a single multifunctional particle induced ~ 3-fold greater SIINFEKL display on MHC I by DCs over unbound peptide. Importantly, combining CpG and SIINFEKL to the E2 nanoparticle for simultaneous temporal and spatial delivery to DCs showed increased and prolonged CD8 T cell activation, relative to free peptide or peptide-bound E2. By co-delivering peptide epitopes and CpG activator in a particle of optimal DC-uptake size, we demonstrate the ability of a non-infectious protein nanoparticle to mimic viral properties and facilitate enhanced DC activation and cross-presentation. PMID:24090491

  17. Human spleen contains different subsets of dendritic cells and regulatory T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Velásquez-Lopera, M M; Correa, L A; García, L F

    2008-01-01

    Most knowledge about dendritic cells (DCs) and regulatory T cells in humans has been gathered from circulating cells but little is known about their frequency and distribution in lymphoid organs. This report shows the frequency, phenotype and location of DCs and regulatory T cells in deceased organ donors' spleens. As determined by flow cytometry, conventional/myeloid DCs (cDCs) CD11chighHLA-DR+CD123−/low were 2·3 ± 0·9% and LIN- HLA-DR+CD11chigh 2·1 ± 0·3% of total spleen cells. Mature CD11chighHLA-DR+CD83+ were 1·5 ± 0·8% and 1·0 ± 1·6% immature CD11chighHLA-DR+CD83- cDC. There were 0·3 ± 0·3% plasmacytoid DCs (pDC) CD11c−/lowHLA-DR+CD123high and 0·3 ± 0·1% LIN-HLA-DR+CD123high. Cells expressing cDCs markers, BDCA-1 and BDCA-3, and pDCs markers BDCA-2 and BDCA-4 were observed in higher frequencies than DCs with other phenotypes evaluated. CD11c+, CD123+ and CD83+ cells were located in subcapsular zone, T cells areas and B-cell follicles. CD4+CD25high Tregs were 0·2 ± 0·2% and CD8+CD28- comprised 11·5 ± 8·1% of spleen lymphocytes. FOXP3+ cells were found in T- and B-cell areas. The improvement in cell separation, manipulation and expansion techniques, will facilitate the manipulation of donor spleen cells as a part of protocols for induction and maintenance of allograft tolerance or treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:18727627

  18. Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells efficiently capture HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins via CD4 for antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Sandgren, Kerrie J; Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Forsell, Mattias N; Soldemo, Martina; Adams, William C; Liang, Frank; Perbeck, Leif; Koup, Richard A; Wyatt, Richard T; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Loré, Karin

    2013-07-01

    Advances in HIV-1 vaccine clinical trials and preclinical research indicate that the virus envelope glycoproteins (Env) are likely to be an essential component of a prophylactic vaccine. Efficient Ag uptake and presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) is important for strong CD4(+) Th cell responses and the development of effective humoral immune responses. In this study, we examined the capacity of distinct primary human DC subsets to internalize and present recombinant Env to CD4(+) T cells. Consistent with their specific receptor expression, skin DCs bound and internalized Env via C-type lectin receptors, whereas blood DC subsets, including CD1c(+) myeloid DCs, CD123(+) plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs), and CD141(+) DCs exhibited a restricted repertoire of C-type lectin receptors and relied on CD4 for uptake of Env. Despite a generally poor capacity for Ag uptake compared with myeloid DCs, the high expression of CD4 on PDCs allowed them to bind and internalize Env very efficiently. CD4-mediated uptake delivered Env to EEA1(+) endosomes that progressed to Lamp1(+) and MHC class II(+) lysosomes where internalized Env was degraded rapidly. Finally, all three blood DC subsets were able to internalize an Env-CMV pp65 fusion protein via CD4 and stimulate pp65-specific CD4(+) T cells. Thus, in the in vitro systems described in this paper, CD4-mediated uptake of Env is a functional pathway leading to Ag presentation, and this may therefore be a mechanism used by blood DCs, including PDCs, for generating immune responses to Env-based vaccines. PMID:23729440

  19. Human cytomegalovirus inhibits maturation and impairs function of monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Moutaftsi, Magdalena; Mehl, Anja M; Borysiewicz, Leszek K; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2002-04-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the generation of virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses, but some viruses can render DCs inefficient in stimulating T cells. We studied whether infection of DCs with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) results in a suppression of DC function which may assist HCMV in establishing persistence. The effect of HCMV infection on the phenotype and function of monocyte-derived DCs and on their ability to mature following infection with an endothelial cell-adapted clinical HCMV isolate were studied. HCMV infection induced no maturation of DCs; instead, it efficiently down-regulated the expression of surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, CD40, and CD80 molecules. Slight down-regulation of MHC class II and CD86 molecules was also observed. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced maturation of infected DCs was strongly inhibited, as indicated by lower levels of surface expression of MHC class I, class II, costimulatory, and CD83 molecules. The down-regulation or inhibition of these surface markers occurred only in HCMV antigen-positive DCs. DCs produced no interleukin 12 (IL-12) and only low levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) upon HCMV infection. Furthermore, cytokine production upon stimulation with LPS or CD40L was significantly impaired. Inhibition of cytokine production did not depend on viral gene expression as UV-irradiated HCMV resulted in the same effect. Proliferation and cytotoxicity of T cells specific to a recall antigen presented by DCs were also reduced when DCs were HCMV infected. This study shows that HCMV inhibits DC function, revealing a powerful viral strategy to delay or prevent the generation of virus-specific cytotoxic T cells. PMID:11929782

  20. Dendritic cells in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Kabel, P J; Voorbij, H A; van der Gaag, R D; Wiersinga, W M; de Haan, M; Drexhage, H A

    1987-01-01

    Dendritic cells form a morphologically distinct class of cells characterized by shape, reniform nucleus, absent to weak acid-phosphatase activity and strong Class II MHC determinant positivity. Functionally they are the most efficient cells in antigen presentation to T-lymphocytes which indicates their role in the initiation of an immune response. Using immunehistochemical techniques we studied the presence of dendritic cells in normal Wistar rat and human thyroids, in thyroids of BBW rats developing thyroid autoimmunity and in Graves' goitres. Dendritic cells could be identified in all thyroids studied and were positioned underneath the thyrocytes in between the follicles. Skin dendritic cells travel via lymphatics to draining lymph nodes, thus forming an antigen presenting cell system. It is likely that a similar cell system exists on the level of the thyroid for dendritic cells have also been detected in thyroid draining lymph nodes. In normal thyroid tissue of both human and rat dendritic cells were relatively scarce. During the initial phases of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BBW rat (before the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) numbers of thyroid dendritic cells increased. Intrathyroidal T-helper cells, B-cells or plasma cells could not be found. The thyroid draining lymph node contained large numbers of plasma cells. During the later stages of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BB/W rat (after the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) and in Graves' goitres dendritic cells were not only present in high number, but 20-30% were seen in contact with now-present intrathyroidal T-helper lymphocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3475920

  1. Comparative DNA microarray analysis of human monocyte derived dendritic cells and MUTZ-3 cells exposed to the moderate skin sensitizer cinnamaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Python, Francois; Goebel, Carsten; Aeby, Pierre

    2009-09-15

    The number of studies involved in the development of in vitro skin sensitization tests has increased since the adoption of the EU 7th amendment to the cosmetics directive proposing to ban animal testing for cosmetic ingredients by 2013. Several studies have recently demonstrated that sensitizers induce a relevant up-regulation of activation markers such as CD86, CD54, IL-8 or IL-1{beta} in human myeloid cell lines (e.g., U937, MUTZ-3, THP-1) or in human peripheral blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (PBMDCs). The present study aimed at the identification of new dendritic cell activation markers in order to further improve the in vitro evaluation of the sensitizing potential of chemicals. We have compared the gene expression profiles of PBMDCs and the human cell line MUTZ-3 after a 24-h exposure to the moderate sensitizer cinnamaldehyde. A list of 80 genes modulated in both cell types was obtained and a set of candidate marker genes was selected for further analysis. Cells were exposed to selected sensitizers and non-sensitizers for 24 h and gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results indicated that PIR, TRIM16 and two Nrf2-regulated genes, CES1 and NQO1, are modulated by most sensitizers. Up-regulation of these genes could also be observed in our recently published DC-activation test with U937 cells. Due to their role in DC activation, these new genes may help to further refine the in vitro approaches for the screening of the sensitizing properties of a chemical.

  2. Ascophyllan functions as an adjuvant to promote anti-cancer effect by dendritic cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Okimura, Takasi; Xu, Li; Zhang, Lijun; Oda, Tatsuya; Kwak, Minseok; Yu, Qing; Jin, Jun-O

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that ascophyllan, a sulfated polysaccharide purified from brown alga, has immune-activating effects. In this study, we evaluated ascophyllan as an adjuvant for its therapeutic and preventive effect on tumor in a mouse melanoma model. Ascophyllan induced migration of DCs to spleen and tumor-draining lymph node (drLN) in a mouse B16 melanoma model. Moreover, ascophyllan induced activation of dendritic cells (DCs), and promoted IFN-γ- and TNF-α-producing Th1 immune responses in tumor-bearing mice. In addition, treatment with a combination of ascophyllan and ovalbumin (OVA) in the tumor-bearing mice promoted proliferation of OVA-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells and migration of those cells into the tumor, consequently inhibiting the tumor growth. Immunization with the combination of ascophyllan and OVA caused enhanced OVA-specific antibody production and memory T cell responses compared to OVA immunization alone, and almost completely prevented B16-OVA tumor growth upon subsequent tumor challenge. Finally, the combination of ascophyllan and OVA prevented B16-OVA tumor invasion and metastasis into the liver. Thus, these results demonstrate that ascophyllan can function as an adjuvant to induce DC activation, antigen specific CTL activation, Th1 immune response and antibody production, and hence may be useful as a therapeutic and preventive tumor vaccine. PMID:27008707

  3. Narrow-band UVB radiation promotes dendrite formation by activating Rac1 in B16 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wu-Qing; Wu, Jin-Feng; Xiao, Xiao-Qing; Xiao, Qin; Wang, Jing; Zuo, Fu-Guo

    2013-09-01

    Melanocytes are found scattered throughout the basal layer of the epidermis. Following hormone or ultraviolet (UV) light stimulation, the melanin pigments contained in melanocytes are transferred through the dendrites to the surrounding keratinocytes to protect against UV light damage or carcinogenesis. This has been considered as a morphological indicator of melanocytes and melanoma cells. Small GTPases of the Rho family have been implicated in the regulation of actin reorganization underlying dendrite formation in melanocytes and melanoma cells. It has been proven that ultraviolet light plays a pivotal role in melanocyte dendrite formation; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this process has not been fully elucidated. The effect of small GTPases, such as Rac1 and RhoA, on the morphology of B16 melanoma cells treated with narrow-band UVB radiation was investigated. The morphological changes were observed under a phase contrast microscope and the F-actin microfilament of the cytoskeleton was observed under a laser scanning confocal microscope. The pull-down assay was performed to detect the activity of the small GTPases Rac1 and RhoA. The morphological changes were evident, with globular cell bodies and increased numbers of tree branch-like dendrites. The cytoskeletal F-actin appeared disassembled following narrow-band UVB irradiation of B16 melanoma cells. Treatment of B16 melanoma cells with narrow-band UVB radiation resulted in the activation of Rac1 in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, the present study may provide a novel method through which narrow-band UVB radiation may be used to promote dendrite formation by activating the Rac1 signaling pathway, resulting in F-actin rearrangement in B16 melanoma cells. PMID:24649261

  4. The Rac1-GEF Tiam1 couples the NMDA receptor to the activity-dependent development of dendritic arbors and spines.

    PubMed

    Tolias, Kimberley F; Bikoff, Jay B; Burette, Alain; Paradis, Suzanne; Harrar, Dana; Tavazoie, Sohail; Weinberg, Richard J; Greenberg, Michael E

    2005-02-17

    NMDA-type glutamate receptors play a critical role in the activity-dependent development and structural remodeling of dendritic arbors and spines. However, the molecular mechanisms that link NMDA receptor activation to changes in dendritic morphology remain unclear. We report that the Rac1-GEF Tiam1 is present in dendrites and spines and is required for their development. Tiam1 interacts with the NMDA receptor and is phosphorylated in a calcium-dependent manner in response to NMDA receptor stimulation. Blockade of Tiam1 function with RNAi and dominant interfering mutants of Tiam1 suggests that Tiam1 mediates effects of the NMDA receptor on dendritic development by inducing Rac1-dependent actin remodeling and protein synthesis. Taken together, these findings define a molecular mechanism by which NMDA receptor signaling controls the growth and morphology of dendritic arbors and spines. PMID:15721239

  5. A Tec kinase BTK inhibitor ibrutinib promotes maturation and activation of dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Gayathri; Oghumu, Steve; Terrazas, Cesar; Varikuti, Sanjay; Byrd, John C.; Satoskar, Abhay R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ibrutinib, a BTK inhibitor, is currently used to treat various hematological malignancies. We evaluated whether ibrutinib treatment during development of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) modulates their maturation and activation. Ibrutinib treatment increased the proportion of CD11c+ DCs, upregulated the expression of MHC-II and CD80 and downregulated Ly6C expression by DCs. Additionally, ibrutinib treatment led to an increase in MHC-II+, CD80+ and CCR7+ DCs but a decrease in CD86+ DCs upon LPS stimulation. LPS/ibrutinib-treated DCs displayed increased IFNβ and IL-10 synthesis and decreased IL-6, IL-12 and NO production compared to DCs stimulated with LPS alone. Finally, LPS/ibrutinib-treated DCs promoted higher rates of CD4+ T cell proliferation and cytokine production compared to LPS only stimulated DCs. Taken together, our results indicate that ibrutinib enhances the maturation and activation of DCs to promote CD4+ T cell activation which could be exploited for the development of DC-based cancer therapies. PMID:27471620

  6. Tetherin/BST-2 promotes dendritic cell activation and function during acute retrovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sam X.; Barrett, Bradley S.; Guo, Kejun; Kassiotis, George; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Dittmer, Ulf; Gibbert, Kathrin; Santiago, Mario L.

    2016-01-01

    Tetherin/BST-2 is a host restriction factor that inhibits retrovirus release from infected cells in vitro by tethering nascent virions to the plasma membrane. However, contradictory data exists on whether Tetherin inhibits acute retrovirus infection in vivo. Previously, we reported that Tetherin-mediated inhibition of Friend retrovirus (FV) replication at 2 weeks post-infection correlated with stronger natural killer, CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses. Here, we further investigated the role of Tetherin in counteracting retrovirus replication in vivo. FV infection levels were similar between wild-type (WT) and Tetherin KO mice at 3 to 7 days post-infection despite removal of a potent restriction factor, Apobec3/Rfv3. However, during this phase of acute infection, Tetherin enhanced myeloid dendritic cell (DC) function. DCs from infected, but not uninfected, WT mice expressed significantly higher MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecule CD80 compared to Tetherin KO DCs. Tetherin-associated DC activation during acute FV infection correlated with stronger NK cell responses. Furthermore, Tetherin+ DCs from FV-infected mice more strongly stimulated FV-specific CD4+ T cells ex vivo compared to Tetherin KO DCs. The results link the antiretroviral and immunomodulatory activity of Tetherin in vivo to improved DC activation and MHC class II antigen presentation. PMID:26846717

  7. Allosteric modulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 activates IDO1-dependent, immunoregulatory signaling in dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Claudia; Mondanelli, Giada; Pallotta, Maria T.; Vacca, Carmine; Iacono, Alberta; Gargaro, Marco; Albini, Elisa; Bianchi, Roberta; Belladonna, Maria L.; Celanire, Sylvain; Mordant, Céline; Heroux, Madeleine; Royer-Urios, Isabelle; Schneider, Manfred; Vitte, Pierre-Alain; Cacquevel, Mathias; Galibert, Laurent; Poli, Sonia-Maria; Solari, Aldo; Bicciato, Silvio; Calvitti, Mario; Antognelli, Cinzia; Puccetti, Paolo; Orabona, Ciriana; Fallarino, Francesca; Grohmann, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGluR4) possesses immune modulatory properties in vivo, such that a positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of the receptor confers protection on mice with relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (RR-EAE). ADX88178 is a newly-developed, one such mGluR4 modulator with high selectivity, potency, and optimized pharmacokinetics. Here we found that application of ADX88178 in the RR-EAE model system converted disease into a form of mild—yet chronic—neuroinflammation that remained stable for over two months after discontinuing drug treatment. In vitro, ADX88178 modulated the cytokine secretion profile of dendritic cells (DCs), increasing production of tolerogenic IL-10 and TGF-β. The in vitro effects required activation of a Gi-independent, alternative signaling pathway that involved phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), Src kinase, and the signaling activity of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1). A PI3K inhibitor as well as small interfering RNA targeting Ido1—but not pertussis toxin, which affects Gi protein-dependent responses—abrogated the tolerogenic effects of ADX88178-conditioned DCs in vivo. Thus our data indicate that, in DCs, highly selective and potent mGluR4 PAMs such as ADX88178 may activate a Gi-independent, long-lived regulatory pathway that could be therapeutically exploited in chronic autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:26522434

  8. A Tec kinase BTK inhibitor ibrutinib promotes maturation and activation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Gayathri; Oghumu, Steve; Terrazas, Cesar; Varikuti, Sanjay; Byrd, John C; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2016-06-01

    Ibrutinib, a BTK inhibitor, is currently used to treat various hematological malignancies. We evaluated whether ibrutinib treatment during development of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) modulates their maturation and activation. Ibrutinib treatment increased the proportion of CD11c(+) DCs, upregulated the expression of MHC-II and CD80 and downregulated Ly6C expression by DCs. Additionally, ibrutinib treatment led to an increase in MHC-II(+), CD80(+) and CCR7(+) DCs but a decrease in CD86(+) DCs upon LPS stimulation. LPS/ibrutinib-treated DCs displayed increased IFNβ and IL-10 synthesis and decreased IL-6, IL-12 and NO production compared to DCs stimulated with LPS alone. Finally, LPS/ibrutinib-treated DCs promoted higher rates of CD4(+) T cell proliferation and cytokine production compared to LPS only stimulated DCs. Taken together, our results indicate that ibrutinib enhances the maturation and activation of DCs to promote CD4(+) T cell activation which could be exploited for the development of DC-based cancer therapies. PMID:27471620

  9. Metabolic Control of Dendritic Cell Activation and Function: Recent Advances and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Everts, Bart; Pearce, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key regulators of both immunity and tolerance by controlling activation and polarization of effector T helper cell and regulatory T cell responses. Therefore, there is a major focus on developing approaches to manipulate DC function for immunotherapy. It is well known that changes in cellular activation are coupled to profound changes in cellular metabolism. Over the past decade there is a growing appreciation that these metabolic changes also underlie the capacity of immune cells to perform particular functions. This has led to the concept that the manipulation of cellular metabolism can be used to shape innate and adaptive immune responses. While most of our understanding in this area has been gained from studies with T cells and macrophages, evidence is emerging that the activation and function of DCs are also dictated by the type of metabolism these cells commit to. We here discuss these new insights and explore whether targeting of metabolic pathways in DCs could hold promise as a novel approach to manipulate the functional properties of DCs for clinical purposes. PMID:24847328

  10. Gene expression analysis during acute hepatitis C virus infection associates dendritic cell activation with viral clearance.

    PubMed

    Zabaleta, Aintzane; Riezu-Boj, Jose-Ignacio; Larrea, Esther; Villanueva, Lorea; Lasarte, Juan Jose; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Fisicaro, Paola; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Missale, Gabriele; Ferrari, Carlo; Benjelloun, Soumaya; Prieto, Jesús; Sarobe, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Viral clearance during acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with the induction of potent antiviral T-cell responses. Since dendritic cells (DC) are essential in the activation of primary T-cell responses, gene expression was analyzed in DC from patients during acute HCV infection. By using microarrays, gene expression was compared in resting and activated peripheral blood plasmacytoid (pDC) and myeloid (mDC) DC from acute HCV resolving patients (AR) and from patients who become chronically infected (ANR), as well as in healthy individuals (CTRL) and chronically-infected patients (CHR). For pDC, a high number of upregulated genes was found in AR patients, irrespective of DC stimulation. However, for mDC, most evident differences were detected after DC stimulation, again corresponding to upregulated genes in AR patients. Divergent behavior of ANR was also observed when analyzing DC from CTRL and CHR, with ANR patients clustering again apart from these groups. These differences corresponded to metabolism-associated genes and genes belonging to pathways relevant for DC activation and cytokine responses. Thus, upregulation of relevant genes in DC during acute HCV infection may determine viral clearance, suggesting that dysfunctional DC may be responsible for the lack of efficient T-cell responses which lead to chronic HCV infection. PMID:26447929

  11. Impaired responses of leukemic dendritic cells derived from a human myeloid cell line to LPS stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Dong; Choi, Seung-Chul; Noh, Young-Woock; Kim, Jong Wan; Paik, Sang-Gi; Yang, Young; Kim, Keun; Lim, Jong-Seok

    2006-02-28

    Several myeloid leukemia-derived cells have been reported to possess the ability to differentiate into dendritic cells (DC). MUTZ-3, a myeloid leukemia cell line, responds to GM-CSF, IL-4 and TNF-alpha, and acquires a phenotype similar to immature monocyte-derived DC (MoDC). In the present study, MUTZ-3-derived DC (MuDC) showed high level expression of HLA class II molecules, CD80 and CD86, and were able to function as potent antigen presenting cells as previously reported. Interestingly, MuDC maturation was induced by CD40- mediated stimulation, but not by LPS stimulation. We analyzed CCR1, CCR7 and Toll-like receptor (TLR) expressions in MuDC, and measured IL-10 and IL-12 production after maturation stimuli. Although MuDC expressed the mRNA for TLR4, a major component of the LPS receptor system, they did not show an enhanced level of CCR7 or cytokine production after LPS stimulation. In contrast, they responded to CD40 stimulation, which resulted in increased levels of CD83, CD86 and CCR7. Moreover, while LPS- stimulated MoDC could potently stimulate NK cells in a DC-NK cell co-culture, LPS-stimulated MuDC failed to stimulate primary NK cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that, although MuDC express TLR4, unlike TNF-alpha and IL-1beta, LPS does not stimulate MuDC to acquire mature phenotypes, and they may have impaired activity to initiate innate immune response. PMID:16520555

  12. Self-assembled synthesis of SEF-active silver dendrites by galvanic displacement on copper substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jun; Zheng, Hairong

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, an effective substrate for surface-enhanced fluorescence, which consists of dendritic silver nanostructure on copper surface, was fabricated by modified galvanic displacement reaction at room temperature. It was found that the fluorescence efficiency of Rh6G probe molecules on the substrate depended on the period of the nanostructure growth. And it increased with the enrichment of fine-branches of the dendritic silver nanostructure. The experimental results indicated that the fine nanostructure with dendritic distribution can produce better fluorescence enhancement with the help of proper control over the reaction condition. It is important for studying the mechanism and the potential applications of enhanced fluorescence effect.

  13. Dendritic nonlinearities reduce network size requirements and mediate ON and OFF states of persistent activity in a PFC microcircuit model.

    PubMed

    Papoutsi, Athanasia; Sidiropoulou, Kyriaki; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2014-07-01

    Technological advances have unraveled the existence of small clusters of co-active neurons in the neocortex. The functional implications of these microcircuits are in large part unexplored. Using a heavily constrained biophysical model of a L5 PFC microcircuit, we recently showed that these structures act as tunable modules of persistent activity, the cellular correlate of working memory. Here, we investigate the mechanisms that underlie persistent activity emergence (ON) and termination (OFF) and search for the minimum network size required for expressing these states within physiological regimes. We show that (a) NMDA-mediated dendritic spikes gate the induction of persistent firing in the microcircuit. (b) The minimum network size required for persistent activity induction is inversely proportional to the synaptic drive of each excitatory neuron. (c) Relaxation of connectivity and synaptic delay constraints eliminates the gating effect of NMDA spikes, albeit at a cost of much larger networks. (d) Persistent activity termination by increased inhibition depends on the strength of the synaptic input and is negatively modulated by dADP. (e) Slow synaptic mechanisms and network activity contain predictive information regarding the ability of a given stimulus to turn ON and/or OFF persistent firing in the microcircuit model. Overall, this study zooms out from dendrites to cell assemblies and suggests a tight interaction between dendritic non-linearities and network properties (size/connectivity) that may facilitate the short-memory function of the PFC. PMID:25077940

  14. Dendritic Nonlinearities Reduce Network Size Requirements and Mediate ON and OFF States of Persistent Activity in a PFC Microcircuit Model

    PubMed Central

    Papoutsi, Athanasia; Sidiropoulou, Kyriaki; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have unraveled the existence of small clusters of co-active neurons in the neocortex. The functional implications of these microcircuits are in large part unexplored. Using a heavily constrained biophysical model of a L5 PFC microcircuit, we recently showed that these structures act as tunable modules of persistent activity, the cellular correlate of working memory. Here, we investigate the mechanisms that underlie persistent activity emergence (ON) and termination (OFF) and search for the minimum network size required for expressing these states within physiological regimes. We show that (a) NMDA-mediated dendritic spikes gate the induction of persistent firing in the microcircuit. (b) The minimum network size required for persistent activity induction is inversely proportional to the synaptic drive of each excitatory neuron. (c) Relaxation of connectivity and synaptic delay constraints eliminates the gating effect of NMDA spikes, albeit at a cost of much larger networks. (d) Persistent activity termination by increased inhibition depends on the strength of the synaptic input and is negatively modulated by dADP. (e) Slow synaptic mechanisms and network activity contain predictive information regarding the ability of a given stimulus to turn ON and/or OFF persistent firing in the microcircuit model. Overall, this study zooms out from dendrites to cell assemblies and suggests a tight interaction between dendritic non-linearities and network properties (size/connectivity) that may facilitate the short-memory function of the PFC. PMID:25077940

  15. Microbial Activation of Gut Dendritic Cells and the Control of Mucosal Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Current data support a role for gut colonization in maintaining balanced mucosal and systemic immune responses and have suggested aberrant innate immune recognition of enteric bacteria as an initiator of the adaptive immune damage associated with inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). In fact, data from human studies and experimental mouse models have implicated transformation of the gut microbiota from a beneficial symbiotic state to one of imbalance or “dysbiosis” in the pathogenesis of several autoinflammatory diseases, including allergic skin and respiratory disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, type I diabetes, and colorectal cancer. The host has evolved to co-exist and maintain a mutualistic relationship with the commensal microbes of the gut, and it is the function of the host innate immune system to initiate and maintain this homeostasis, while retaining the ability to respond appropriately to pathogenic organisms. In this review, we discuss the molecular and cellular interactions of the mucosal immune system that decide this delicate balance of mutualism. Furthermore, we will highlight the role of dendritic cells in preserving this precarious balance and how gene products of commensal microbes may play an integral role in re-establishing this balance once it has gone awry. PMID:23962004

  16. Production of lentiviral vectors with enhanced efficiency to target dendritic cells by attenuating mannosidase activity of mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting immune cells that interact with T cells and have been widely studied for vaccine applications. To achieve this, DCs can be manipulated by lentiviral vectors (LVs) to express antigens to stimulate the desired antigen-specific T cell response, which gives this approach great potential to fight diseases such as cancers, HIV, and autoimmune diseases. Previously we showed that LVs enveloped with an engineered Sindbis virus glycoprotein (SVGmu) could target DCs through a specific interaction with DC-SIGN, a surface molecule predominantly expressed by DCs. We hypothesized that SVGmu interacts with DC-SIGN in a mannose-dependent manner, and that an increase in high-mannose structures on the glycoprotein surface could result in higher targeting efficiencies of LVs towards DCs. It is known that 1-deoxymannojirimycin (DMJ) can inhibit mannosidase, which is an enzyme that removes high-mannose structures during the glycosylation process. Thus, we investigated the possibility of generating LVs with enhanced capability to modify DCs by supplying DMJ during vector production. Results Through western blot analysis and binding tests, we were able to infer that binding of SVGmu to DC-SIGN is directly related to amount of high-mannose structures on SVGmu. We also found that the titer for the LV (FUGW/SVGmu) produced with DMJ against 293T.DCSIGN, a human cell line expressing the human DC-SIGN atnibody, was over four times higher than that of vector produced without DMJ. In addition, transduction of a human DC cell line, MUTZ-3, yielded a higher transduction efficiency for the LV produced with DMJ. Conclusion We conclude that LVs produced under conditions with inhibited mannosidase activity can effectively modify cells displaying the DC-specific marker DC-SIGN. This study offers evidence to support the utilization of DMJ in producing LVs that are enhanced carriers for the development of DC-directed vaccines. PMID:21276219

  17. Mast cells and dendritic cells form synapses that facilitate antigen transfer for T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Cannon, Judy L.; te Riet, Joost; Holmes, Anna; Kawakami, Yuko; Kawakami, Toshiaki; Cambi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) produce soluble mediators such as histamine and prostaglandins that are known to influence dendritic cell (DC) function by stimulating maturation and antigen processing. Whether direct cell–cell interactions are important in modulating MC/DC function is unclear. In this paper, we show that direct contact between MCs and DCs occurs and plays an important role in modulating the immune response. Activation of MCs through FcεRI cross-linking triggers the formation of stable cell–cell interactions with immature DCs that are reminiscent of the immunological synapse. Direct cellular contact differentially regulates the secreted cytokine profile, indicating that MC modulation of DC populations is influenced by the nature of their interaction. Synapse formation requires integrin engagement and facilitates the transfer of internalized MC-specific antigen from MCs to DCs. The transferred material is ultimately processed and presented by DCs and can activate T cells. The physiological outcomes of the MC–DC synapse suggest a new role for intercellular crosstalk in defining the immune response. PMID:26304724

  18. Toso regulates differentiation and activation of inflammatory dendritic cells during persistence-prone virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Lang, P A; Meryk, A; Pandyra, A A; Brenner, D; Brüstle, A; Xu, H C; Merches, K; Lang, F; Khairnar, V; Sharma, P; Funkner, P; Recher, M; Shaabani, N; Duncan, G S; Duhan, V; Homey, B; Ohashi, P S; Häussinger, D; Knolle, P A; Honke, N; Mak, T W; Lang, K S

    2015-01-01

    During virus infection and autoimmune disease, inflammatory dendritic cells (iDCs) differentiate from blood monocytes and infiltrate infected tissue. Following acute infection with hepatotropic viruses, iDCs are essential for re-stimulating virus-specific CD8+ T cells and therefore contribute to virus control. Here we used the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model system to identify novel signals, which influence the recruitment and activation of iDCs in the liver. We observed that intrinsic expression of Toso (Faim3, FcμR) influenced the differentiation and activation of iDCs in vivo and DCs in vitro. Lack of iDCs in Toso-deficient (Toso–/–) mice reduced CD8+ T-cell function in the liver and resulted in virus persistence. Furthermore, Toso–/– DCs failed to induce autoimmune diabetes in the rat insulin promoter-glycoprotein (RIP-GP) autoimmune diabetes model. In conclusion, we found that Toso has an essential role in the differentiation and maturation of iDCs, a process that is required for the control of persistence-prone virus infection. PMID:25257173

  19. Toso regulates differentiation and activation of inflammatory dendritic cells during persistence-prone virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lang, P A; Meryk, A; Pandyra, A A; Brenner, D; Brüstle, A; Xu, H C; Merches, K; Lang, F; Khairnar, V; Sharma, P; Funkner, P; Recher, M; Shaabani, N; Duncan, G S; Duhan, V; Homey, B; Ohashi, P S; Häussinger, D; Knolle, P A; Honke, N; Mak, T W; Lang, K S

    2015-01-01

    During virus infection and autoimmune disease, inflammatory dendritic cells (iDCs) differentiate from blood monocytes and infiltrate infected tissue. Following acute infection with hepatotropic viruses, iDCs are essential for re-stimulating virus-specific CD8(+) T cells and therefore contribute to virus control. Here we used the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model system to identify novel signals, which influence the recruitment and activation of iDCs in the liver. We observed that intrinsic expression of Toso (Faim3, FcμR) influenced the differentiation and activation of iDCs in vivo and DCs in vitro. Lack of iDCs in Toso-deficient (Toso(-/-)) mice reduced CD8(+) T-cell function in the liver and resulted in virus persistence. Furthermore, Toso(-/-) DCs failed to induce autoimmune diabetes in the rat insulin promoter-glycoprotein (RIP-GP) autoimmune diabetes model. In conclusion, we found that Toso has an essential role in the differentiation and maturation of iDCs, a process that is required for the control of persistence-prone virus infection. PMID:25257173

  20. Induction of ALDH activity in intestinal dendritic cells by Lactobacillus plantarum NRIC0380.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tadashi; Enomoto, Mai; Nakayama, Sayuri; Adachi, Yu; Fujiwara, Wataru; Sugiyama, Hisashi; Shimojoh, Manabu; Okada, Sanae; Hattori, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have been reported to have various immune-regulating activities. We also found in the previous study that the oral administration of heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum NRIC0380 induced CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) cells (Treg cells). We examine in this present study the influence of NRIC0380 on the function of intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro and in vivo. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity was significantly induced in DCs obtained from the mesenteric lymph node (MLN) by culturing with NRIC0380. The oral administration of NRIC0380 also significantly increased ALDH-positive DCs in MLN. NRIC0380 significantly enhanced the production of TGF-β from MLN cells in vitro. These effects were not apparent in cells from the Peyer's patch (PP) and spleen (SPL). NRIC0380 also significantly enhanced the expression of B7-H1 on DCs of all organs in vitro. The effects of NRIC0380 on DCs, especially those located in MLN, might be involved in its function to induce Treg cells. PMID:24018660

  1. Rice bran feruloylated oligosaccharides activate dendritic cells via Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi Chen; Chen, Hua Han; Chen, Yu Kuo; Chang, Hung Chia; Lin, Ping Yi; Pan, I-Hong; Chen, Der-Yuan; Chen, Chuan Mu; Lin, Su Yi

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the effects of feruloylated oligosaccharides (FOs) of rice bran on murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) and the potential pathway through which the effects are mediated. We found that FOs induced phenotypic maturation of DCs, as shown by the increased expression of CD40, CD80/CD86 and MHC-I/II molecules. FOs efficiently induced maturation of DCs generated from C3H/HeN or C57BL/6 mice with normal toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) or TLR-2 but not DCs from mice with mutated TLR4 or TLR2. The mechanism of action of FOs may be mediated by increased phosphorylation of ERK, p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) and increased NF-kB activity, which are important signaling molecules downstream of TLR-4 and TLR-2. These data suggest that FOs induce DCs maturation through TLR-4 and/or TLR-2 and that FOs might have potential efficacy against tumor or virus infection or represent a candidate-adjuvant approach for application in immunotherapy and vaccination. PMID:24762969

  2. The Dendritic Cell Synapse: A Life Dedicated to T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Benvenuti, Federica

    2016-01-01

    T-cell activation within immunological synapses is a complex process whereby different types of signals are transmitted from antigen-presenting cells to T cells. The molecular strategies developed by T cells to interpret and integrate these signals have been systematically dissected in recent years and are now in large part understood. On the other side of the immune synapse, dendritic cells (DCs) participate actively in synapse formation and maintenance by remodeling of membrane receptors and intracellular content. However, the details of such changes have been only partially characterized. The DCs actin cytoskeleton has been one of the first systems to be identified as playing an important role in T-cell priming and some of the underlying mechanisms have been elucidated. Similarly, the DCs microtubule cytoskeleton undergoes major spatial changes during synapse formation that favor polarization of the DCs subcellular space toward the interacting T cell. Recently, we have begun to investigate the trafficking machinery that controls polarized delivery of endosomal vesicles at the DC-T immune synapse with the aim of understanding the functional relevance of polarized secretion of soluble factors during T-cell priming. Here, we will review the current knowledge of events occurring in DCs during synapse formation and discuss the open questions that still remain unanswered. PMID:27014259

  3. The Dendritic Cell Synapse: A Life Dedicated to T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Benvenuti, Federica

    2016-01-01

    T-cell activation within immunological synapses is a complex process whereby different types of signals are transmitted from antigen-presenting cells to T cells. The molecular strategies developed by T cells to interpret and integrate these signals have been systematically dissected in recent years and are now in large part understood. On the other side of the immune synapse, dendritic cells (DCs) participate actively in synapse formation and maintenance by remodeling of membrane receptors and intracellular content. However, the details of such changes have been only partially characterized. The DCs actin cytoskeleton has been one of the first systems to be identified as playing an important role in T-cell priming and some of the underlying mechanisms have been elucidated. Similarly, the DCs microtubule cytoskeleton undergoes major spatial changes during synapse formation that favor polarization of the DCs subcellular space toward the interacting T cell. Recently, we have begun to investigate the trafficking machinery that controls polarized delivery of endosomal vesicles at the DC–T immune synapse with the aim of understanding the functional relevance of polarized secretion of soluble factors during T-cell priming. Here, we will review the current knowledge of events occurring in DCs during synapse formation and discuss the open questions that still remain unanswered. PMID:27014259

  4. Leveraging electrokinetics for the active control of dendritic fullerene-1 release across a nanochannel membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Giacomo; Geninatti, Thomas; Hood, R. Lyle; Fine, Daniel; Scorrano, Giovanni; Schmulen, Jeffrey; Hosali, Sharath; Ferrari, Mauro; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    General adoption of advanced treatment protocols such as chronotherapy will hinge on progress in drug delivery technologies that provide precise temporal control of therapeutic release. Such innovation is also crucial to future medicine approaches such as telemedicine. Here we present a nanofluidic membrane technology capable of achieving active and tunable control of molecular transport through nanofluidic channels. Control was achieved through application of an electric field between two platinum electrodes positioned on either surface of a 5.7 nm nanochannel membrane designed for zero-order drug delivery. Two electrode configurations were tested: laser-cut foils and electron beam deposited thin-films, configurations capable of operating at low voltage (<=1.5 V), and power (100 nW). Temporal, reproducible tuning and interruption of dendritic fullerene 1 (DF-1) transport was demonstrated over multi-day release experiments. Conductance tests showed limiting currents in the low applied potential range, implying ionic concentration polarization (ICP) at the interface between the membrane's micro- and nanochannels, even in concentrated solutions (<=1 M NaCl). The ability of this nanotechnology platform to facilitate controlled delivery of molecules and particles has broad applicability to next-generation therapeutics for numerous pathologies, including autoimmune diseases, circadian dysfunction, pain, and stress, among others.General adoption of advanced treatment protocols such as chronotherapy will hinge on progress in drug delivery technologies that provide precise temporal control of therapeutic release. Such innovation is also crucial to future medicine approaches such as telemedicine. Here we present a nanofluidic membrane technology capable of achieving active and tunable control of molecular transport through nanofluidic channels. Control was achieved through application of an electric field between two platinum electrodes positioned on either surface of a 5

  5. Extracellular nucleotides regulate CCL20 release from human primary airway epithelial cells, monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Marcet, Brice; Horckmans, Michael; Libert, Frédérick; Hassid, Sergio; Boeynaems, Jean-Marie; Communi, Didier

    2007-06-01

    Extracellular nucleotides regulate ion transport and mucociliary clearance in human airway epithelial cells (HAECs) via the activation of P2 receptors, especially P2Y(2). Therefore, P2Y(2) receptor agonists represent potential pharmacotherapeutic agents to treat cystic fibrosis (CF). Nucleotides also modulate inflammatory properties of immune cells like dendritic cells (DCs), which play an important role in mucosal immunity. Using DNA-microarray experiments, quantitative RT-PCR and cytokine measurements, we show here that UTP up-regulated approximately 2- to 3-fold the antimicrobial chemokine CCL20 expression and release in primary HAECs cultured on permeable supports at an air-liquid interface (ALI). Both P2Y(2) (ATPgammaS, UTP, INS365) and P2Y(6) (UDP, INS48823) agonists increased CCL20 release. UTP-induced CCL20 release was insensitive to NF-kappaB pathway inhibitors but sensitive to inhibitors of ERK1/2 and p38/MAPK pathways. Furthermore, UTP had no effect on interleukin-(IL)-8 release and reduced the release of both CCL20 and IL-8 induced by TNF-alpha and LPS. Accordingly, UTP reduced the capacity of basolateral supernatants of HAECs treated with TNF-alpha or LPS to induce the chemoattraction of both CD4(+) T lymphocytes and neutrophils. In addition, we show that, in monocyte-derived DCs, ATPgammaS, and UDP but not UTP/INS365-stimulated CCL20 release. Likewise, UDP but not ATPgammaS was also able to increase CCL20 release from monocytes. Pharmacological experiments suggested an involvement of P2Y(11) or P2Y(6) receptors through NF-kappaB, ERK1/2, and p38/MAPK pathways. Altogether, our data demonstrate that nucleotides may modulate chemokine release and leukocyte recruitment in inflamed airways by acting on both epithelial and immune cells. Our results could be relevant for further clinical investigations in CF. PMID:17295217

  6. Multiplexed Dendritic Targeting of α Calcium Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II, Neurogranin, and Activity-regulated Cytoskeleton-associated Protein RNAs by the A2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuanzheng; Tatavarty, Vedakumar; Korza, George; Levin, Mikhail K.

    2008-01-01

    In neurons, many different RNAs are targeted to dendrites where local expression of the encoded proteins mediates synaptic plasticity during learning and memory. It is not known whether each RNA follows a separate trafficking pathway or whether multiple RNAs are targeted to dendrites by the same pathway. Here, we show that RNAs encoding α calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, neurogranin, and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein are coassembled into the same RNA granules and targeted to dendrites by the same cis/trans-determinants (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein [hnRNP] A2 response element and hnRNP A2) that mediate dendritic targeting of myelin basic protein RNA by the A2 pathway in oligodendrocytes. Multiplexed dendritic targeting of different RNAs by the same pathway represents a new organizing principle for coordinating gene expression at the synapse. PMID:18305102

  7. An engineered non-toxic superantigen increases cross presentation of hepatitis B virus nucleocapsids by human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Julie D; Manning, Kristy; Chokshi, Shilpa; Naoumov, Nikolai V; Fraser, John D; Dunbar, P Rod; Taylor, John A

    2014-01-01

    Virus like particles (VLPs) are potent immunogens capable of priming strong protective antibody responses due to their repetitive structural arrangement and affinity for specific B cell receptors. By contrast, T cell responses to VLPs can be weak due to inefficient uptake and processing by antigen presenting cells. We report here a novel strategy for increasing the T cell reactivity of a VLP, the nucleocapsid of hepatitis B virus, through covalent coupling of M1, an engineered form of the Streptococcal superantigen SMEZ2, that binds MHC II with high affinity but lacks its T cell mitogenic capability. M1:HBcAg conjugates bound to dendritic cells and were efficiently endocytosed into late endosomes. Human dendritic cells pulsed with M1:HBcAgs stimulated HBV-specific CD8(+) T cells more effectively than cells pulsed with native capsids indicating that the modified VLP was more effectively cross presented by APCs. Coupling of M1 was also able to induce significantly greater reactivity of human CD4(+) T cells specific for a common T-helper epitope. These studies indicate the potential of recombinant superantigens to act as flexible molecular adjuvants that can be incorporated into various subunit vaccine platforms leading to enhanced T cell reactivity in humans. PMID:24690680

  8. Generation of functional CD8+ T Cells by human dendritic cells expressing glypican-3 epitopes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glypican 3 (GPC-3) is an oncofoetal protein that is expressed in most hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). Since it is a potential target for T cell immunotherapy, we investigated the generation of functional, GPC-3 specific T cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Methods Dendritic cells (DC) were derived from adherent PBMC cultured at 37°C for 7 days in X-Vivo, 1% autologous plasma, and 800 u/ml GM-CSF plus 500 u/ml IL-4. Immature DC were transfected with 20 μg of in vitro synthesised GPC-3 mRNA by electroporation using the Easy-ject plus system (Equibio, UK) (300 V, 150 μF and 4 ms pulse time), or pulsed with peptide, and subsequently matured with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Six predicted GPC-3 peptide epitopes were synthesized using standard f-moc technology and tested for their binding affinity to HLA-A2.1 molecules using the cell line T2. Results DC transfected with GPC-3 mRNA but not control DC demonstrated strong intracellular staining for GPC-3 and in vitro generated interferon-gamma expressing T cells from autologous PBMC harvested from normal subjects. One peptide, GPC-3522-530 FLAELAYDL, fulfilled our criteria as a naturally processed, HLA-A2-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope: i) it showed high affinity binding to HLA-A2, in T2 cell binding assay; ii) it was generated by the MHC class I processing pathway in DC transfected with GPC-3 mRNA, and iii) HLA-A2 positive DC loaded with the peptide stimulated proliferation in autologous T cells and generated CTL that lysed HLA-A2 and GPC-3 positive target cells. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that electroporation of GPC-3 mRNA is an efficient method to load human monocyte-derived DC with antigen because in vitro they generated GPC-3-reactive T cells that were functional, as shown by interferon-gamma production. Furthermore, this study identified a novel naturally processed, HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitope, GPC-3522-530 FLAELAYDL, which can be used to monitor HLA-A2

  9. Understanding MHC Class I Presentation of Viral Antigens by Human Dendritic Cells as a Basis for Rational Design of Therapeutic Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    van Montfoort, Nadine; van der Aa, Evelyn; Woltman, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective viral clearance requires the induction of virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Since dendritic cells (DC) have a central role in initiating and shaping virus-specific CTL responses, it is important to understand how DC initiate virus-specific CTL responses. Some viruses can directly infect DC, which theoretically allow direct presentation of viral antigens to CTL, but many viruses target other cells than DC and thus the host depends on the cross-presentation of viral antigens by DC to activate virus-specific CTL. Research in mouse models has highly enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms underlying cross-presentation and the dendritic cells (DC) subsets involved, however, these results cannot be readily translated toward the role of human DC in MHC class I-antigen presentation of human viruses. Here, we summarize the insights gained in the past 20 years on MHC class I presentation of viral antigen by human DC and add to the current debate on the capacities of different human DC subsets herein. Furthermore, possible sources of viral antigens and essential DC characteristics for effective induction of virus-specific CTL are evaluated. We conclude that cross-presentation is not only an efficient mechanism exploited by DC to initiate immunity to viruses that do not infect DC but also to viruses that do infect DC, because cross-presentation has many conceptual advantages and bypasses direct immune modulatory effects of the virus on its infected target cells. Since knowledge on the mechanism of viral antigen presentation and the preferred DC subsets is crucial for rational vaccine design, the obtained insights are very instrumental for the development of effective anti-viral immunotherapy. PMID:24795724

  10. Antifungal Activity of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells against Cryptococcus neoformans In Vitro Requires Expression of Dectin-3 (CLEC4D) and Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Hole, Camaron R; Leopold Wager, Chrissy M; Mendiola, Andrew S; Wozniak, Karen L; Campuzano, Althea; Lin, Xin; Wormley, Floyd L

    2016-09-01

    Conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) are critical for protection against pulmonary infection with the opportunistic fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans; however, the role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) is unknown. We show for the first time that murine pDCs have direct activity against C. neoformans via reactive oxygen species (ROS), a mechanism different from that employed to control Aspergillus fumigatus infections. The anticryptococcal activity of murine pDCs is independent of opsonization but appears to require the C-type lectin receptor Dectin-3, a receptor not previously evaluated during cryptococcal infections. Human pDCs can also inhibit cryptococcal growth by a mechanism similar to that of murine pDCs. Experimental pulmonary infection of mice with a C. neoformans strain that induces protective immunity demonstrated that recruitment of pDCs to the lungs is CXCR3 dependent. Taken together, our results show that pDCs inhibit C. neoformans growth in vitro via the production of ROS and that Dectin-3 is required for optimal growth-inhibitory activity. PMID:27324480

  11. Dysfunctional epileptic neuronal circuits and dysmorphic dendritic spines are mitigated by platelet-activating factor receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Musto, Alberto E; Rosencrans, Robert F; Walker, Chelsey P; Bhattacharjee, Surjyadipta; Raulji, Chittalsinh M; Belayev, Ludmila; Fang, Zhide; Gordon, William C; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy or limbic epilepsy lacks effective therapies due to a void in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that set in motion aberrant neuronal network formations during the course of limbic epileptogenesis (LE). Here we show in in vivo rodent models of LE that the phospholipid mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF) increases in LE and that PAF receptor (PAF-r) ablation mitigates its progression. Synthetic PAF-r antagonists, when administered intraperitoneally in LE, re-establish hippocampal dendritic spine density and prevent formation of dysmorphic dendritic spines. Concomitantly, hippocampal interictal spikes, aberrant oscillations, and neuronal hyper-excitability, evaluated 15-16 weeks after LE using multi-array silicon probe electrodes implanted in the dorsal hippocampus, are reduced in PAF-r antagonist-treated mice. We suggest that over-activation of PAF-r signaling induces aberrant neuronal plasticity in LE and leads to chronic dysfunctional neuronal circuitry that mediates epilepsy. PMID:27444269

  12. Dysfunctional epileptic neuronal circuits and dysmorphic dendritic spines are mitigated by platelet-activating factor receptor antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Musto, Alberto E.; Rosencrans, Robert F.; Walker, Chelsey P.; Bhattacharjee, Surjyadipta; Raulji, Chittalsinh M.; Belayev, Ludmila; Fang, Zhide; Gordon, William C.; Bazan, Nicolas G.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy or limbic epilepsy lacks effective therapies due to a void in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that set in motion aberrant neuronal network formations during the course of limbic epileptogenesis (LE). Here we show in in vivo rodent models of LE that the phospholipid mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF) increases in LE and that PAF receptor (PAF-r) ablation mitigates its progression. Synthetic PAF-r antagonists, when administered intraperitoneally in LE, re-establish hippocampal dendritic spine density and prevent formation of dysmorphic dendritic spines. Concomitantly, hippocampal interictal spikes, aberrant oscillations, and neuronal hyper-excitability, evaluated 15–16 weeks after LE using multi-array silicon probe electrodes implanted in the dorsal hippocampus, are reduced in PAF-r antagonist-treated mice. We suggest that over-activation of PAF-r signaling induces aberrant neuronal plasticity in LE and leads to chronic dysfunctional neuronal circuitry that mediates epilepsy. PMID:27444269

  13. IL-1β-dependent activation of dendritic epidermal T cells in contact hypersensitivity1

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten M.; Lovato, Paola; MacLeod, Amanda S.; Witherden, Deborah A.; Skov, Lone; Dyring-Andersen, Beatrice; Dabelsteen, Sally; Woetmann, Anders; Ødum, Niels; Havran, Wendy L.; Geisler, Carsten; Bonefeld, Charlotte M.

    2014-01-01

    Substances that penetrate the skin surface can act as allergens and induce a T cell-mediated inflammatory skin disease called contact hypersensitivity (CHS). IL-17 is a key cytokine in CHS and was originally thought to be produced solely by CD4+ T cells. However, it is now known that several cell types including γδ T cells can produce IL-17. Here, we determine the role of γδ T cells, especially the dendritic epidermal T cells (DETC), in CHS. By use of a well-established model for CHS where dinitroflourobenzen (DNFB) is used as allergen, we found that γδ T cells are important players in CHS. Thus, an increased number of IL-17 producing DETC appear in the skin following exposure to DNFB in WT mice, and DNFB-induced ear-swelling is reduced by approximately 50% in TCRδ−/− mice compared to WT mice. In accordance, DNFB-induced ear-swelling was reduced by approximately 50% in IL-17−/− mice. We show that DNFB triggers DETC activation and IL-1β production in the skin, and that keratinocytes produce IL-1β when stimulated with DNFB. We find that DETC activated in vitro by incubation with anti-CD3 and IL-1β produce IL-17. Importantly, we demonstrate that the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra significantly reduces CHS responses as measured by decreased ear-swelling, inhibition of local DETC activation and a reduction in the number of IL-17+ γδ T cells and DETC in the draining lymph nodes. Taken together, we show that DETC become activated and produce IL-17 in an IL-1β-dependent manner during CHS suggesting a key role for DETC in CHS. PMID:24600030

  14. German cockroach proteases and protease-activated receptor-2 regulate chemokine production and dendritic cell recruitment.

    PubMed

    Day, Scottie B; Ledford, John R; Zhou, Ping; Lewkowich, Ian P; Page, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    We recently showed that serine proteases in German cockroach (GC) feces (frass) decreased experimental asthma through the activation of protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2. Since dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in the initiation of asthma, we queried the role of GC frass proteases in modulating CCL20 (chemokine C-C motif ligand 20) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production, factors that regulate pulmonary DCs. A single exposure to GC frass resulted in a rapid, but transient, increase in GM-CSF and a steady increase in CCL20 in the airways of mice. Instillation of protease-depleted GC frass or instillation of GC frass in PAR-2-deficient mice significantly decreased chemokine release. A specific PAR-2-activating peptide was also sufficient to induce CCL20 production. To directly assess the role of the GC frass protease in chemokine release, we enriched the protease from GC frass and confirmed that the protease was sufficient to induce both GM-CSF and CCL20 production in vivo. Primary airway epithelial cells produced both GM-CSF and CCL20 in a protease- and PAR-2-dependent manner. Finally, we show a decreased percentage of myeloid DCs in the lung following allergen exposure in PAR-2-deficient mice compared to wild-type mice. However, there was no difference in GC frass uptake. Our data indicate that, through the activation of PAR-2, allergen-derived proteases are sufficient to induce CCL20 and GM-CSF production in the airways. This leads to increased recruitment and/or differentiation of myeloid DC populations in the lungs and likely plays an important role in the initiation of allergic airway responses. PMID:21876326

  15. Leukemia-associated activating mutation of Flt3 expands dendritic cells and alters T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Lau, Colleen M; Nish, Simone A; Yogev, Nir; Waisman, Ari; Reiner, Steven L; Reizis, Boris

    2016-03-01

    A common genetic alteration in acute myeloid leukemia is the internal tandem duplication (ITD) in FLT3, the receptor for cytokine FLT3 ligand (FLT3L). Constitutively active FLT3-ITD promotes the expansion of transformed progenitors, but also has pleiotropic effects on hematopoiesis. We analyzed the effect of FLT3-ITD on dendritic cells (DCs), which express FLT3 and can be expanded by FLT3L administration. Pre-leukemic mice with the Flt3(ITD) knock-in allele manifested an expansion of classical DCs (cDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs. The expansion originated in DC progenitors, was cell intrinsic, and was further enhanced in Flt3(ITD/ITD) mice. The mutation caused the down-regulation of Flt3 on the surface of DCs and reduced their responsiveness to Flt3L. Both canonical Batf3-dependent CD8(+) cDCs and noncanonical CD8(+) cDCs were expanded and showed specific alterations in their expression profiles. Flt3(ITD) mice showed enhanced capacity to support T cell proliferation, including a cell-extrinsic expansion of regulatory T (T reg) cells. Accordingly, these mice restricted alloreactive T cell responses during graft-versus-host reaction, but failed to control autoimmunity without T reg cells. Thus, the FLT3-ITD mutation directly affects DC development, indirectly modulating T cell homeostasis and supporting T reg cell expansion. We hypothesize that this effect of FLT3-ITD might subvert immunosurveillance and promote leukemogenesis in a cell-extrinsic manner. PMID:26903243

  16. Cdc42-dependent actin dynamics controls maturation and secretory activity of dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Anna M.; Stutte, Susanne; Hogl, Sebastian; Luckashenak, Nancy; Dudziak, Diana; Leroy, Céline; Forné, Ignasi; Imhof, Axel; Müller, Stephan A.; Brakebusch, Cord H.; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.

    2015-01-01

    Cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42) is a member of the Rho guanosine triphosphatase family and has pivotal functions in actin organization, cell migration, and proliferation. To further study the molecular mechanisms of dendritic cell (DC) regulation by Cdc42, we used Cdc42-deficient DCs. Cdc42 deficiency renders DCs phenotypically mature as they up-regulate the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 from intracellular storages to the cell surface. Cdc42 knockout DCs also accumulate high amounts of invariant chain–major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II complexes at the cell surface, which cannot efficiently present peptide antigens (Ag’s) for priming of Ag-specific CD4 T cells. Proteome analyses showed a significant reduction in lysosomal MHC class II–processing proteins, such as cathepsins, which are lost from DCs by enhanced secretion. As these effects on DCs can be mimicked by chemical actin disruption, our results propose that Cdc42 control of actin dynamics keeps DCs in an immature state, and cessation of Cdc42 activity during DC maturation facilitates secretion as well as rapid up-regulation of intracellular molecules to the cell surface. PMID:26553928

  17. Space exploration by dendritic cells requires maintenance of myosin II activity by IP3 receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Solanes, Paola; Heuzé, Mélina L; Maurin, Mathieu; Bretou, Marine; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Launay, Pierre; Piel, Matthieu; Vargas, Pablo; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-03-12

    Dendritic cells (DCs) patrol the interstitial space of peripheral tissues. The mechanisms that regulate their migration in such constrained environment remain unknown. We here investigated the role of calcium in immature DCs migrating in confinement. We found that they displayed calcium oscillations that were independent of extracellular calcium and more frequently observed in DCs undergoing strong speed fluctuations. In these cells, calcium spikes were associated with fast motility phases. IP₃ receptors (IP₃Rs) channels, which allow calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, were identified as required for immature DCs to migrate at fast speed. The IP₃R1 isoform was further shown to specifically regulate the locomotion persistence of immature DCs, that is, their capacity to maintain directional migration. This function of IP₃R1 results from its ability to control the phosphorylation levels of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) and the back/front polarization of the motor protein. We propose that by upholding myosin II activity, constitutive calcium release from the ER through IP₃R1 maintains DC polarity during migration in confinement, facilitating the exploration of their environment. PMID:25637353

  18. Space exploration by dendritic cells requires maintenance of myosin II activity by IP3 receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Solanes, Paola; Heuzé, Mélina L; Maurin, Mathieu; Bretou, Marine; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Launay, Pierre; Piel, Matthieu; Vargas, Pablo; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) patrol the interstitial space of peripheral tissues. The mechanisms that regulate their migration in such constrained environment remain unknown. We here investigated the role of calcium in immature DCs migrating in confinement. We found that they displayed calcium oscillations that were independent of extracellular calcium and more frequently observed in DCs undergoing strong speed fluctuations. In these cells, calcium spikes were associated with fast motility phases. IP3 receptors (IP3Rs) channels, which allow calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, were identified as required for immature DCs to migrate at fast speed. The IP3R1 isoform was further shown to specifically regulate the locomotion persistence of immature DCs, that is, their capacity to maintain directional migration. This function of IP3R1 results from its ability to control the phosphorylation levels of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) and the back/front polarization of the motor protein. We propose that by upholding myosin II activity, constitutive calcium release from the ER through IP3R1 maintains DC polarity during migration in confinement, facilitating the exploration of their environment. PMID:25637353

  19. Leveraging electrokinetics for the active control of dendritic fullerene-1 release across a nanochannel membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Giacomo; Geninatti, Thomas; Hood, R. Lyle; Fine, Daniel; Scorrano, Giovanni; Schmulen, Jeffrey; Hosali, Sharath; Ferrari, Mauro; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    General adoption of advanced treatment protocols such as chronotherapy will hinge on progress in drug delivery technologies that provide precise temporal control of therapeutic release. Such innovation is also crucial to future medicine approaches such as telemedicine. Here we present a nanofluidic membrane technology capable of achieving active and tunable control of molecular transport through nanofluidic channels. Control was achieved through application of an electric field between two platinum electrodes positioned on either surface of a 5.7 nm nanochannel membrane designed for zero-order drug delivery. Two electrode configurations were tested: laser-cut foils and electron beam deposited thin-films, configurations capable of operating at low voltage (≤1.5 V), and power (100 nW). Temporal, reproducible tuning and interruption of dendritic fullerene 1 (DF-1) transport was demonstrated over multi-day release experiments. Conductance tests showed limiting currents in the low applied potential range, implying ionic concentration polarization (ICP) at the interface between the membrane’s micro- and nanochannels, even in concentrated solutions (≤ 1 M NaCl). The ability of this nanotechnology platform to facilitate controlled delivery of molecules and particles has broad applicability to next-generation therapeutics for numerous pathologies, including autoimmune diseases, circadian dysfunction, pain, and stress, among others. PMID:25707848

  20. D4 Receptor Activation Differentially Modulates Hippocampal Basal and Apical Dendritic Synapses in Freely Moving Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Bin; Du, Dan; Hasan, Mazahir T; Köhr, Georg

    2016-02-01

    Activation of D4 receptors (D4Rs) has been shown to improve cognitive performance, potentially affecting synaptic strength. We investigated the D4R agonist PD 168077 (PD) in hippocampal CA1 of freely moving mice. We electrically stimulated in stratum oriens (OR) or radiatum (RAD) and evoked local field potentials (LFPs). Intraperitoneally injected PD dose-dependently and reversibly attenuated LFPs for longer time in basal (OR) than apical (RAD) dendrites. High-frequency stimulation induced LTP that was stronger and more stable in OR than RAD. LTP lasted at least 4 h during which the paired-pulse ratio remained reduced. A PD concentration not affecting synaptic transmission was sufficient to reduce LTP in OR but not in RAD. A PD concentration reducing synaptic transmission reduced the early phase LTP in OR additionally and the late phase LTP in RAD exclusively. Furthermore, cell type-specific expression of mCherry in DATCre mice generated fluorescence in dorsal CA1 that was highest in lacunosum moleculare and similar in OR/RAD, indicating that midbrain dopaminergic fibers distribute evenly in OR/RAD. Together, the D4R-mediated modulation of hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity is stronger in OR than RAD. This could affect information processing in CA1 neurons, since signals arriving via basal and apical afferents are distinct. PMID:25270308

  1. Comparative analysis of signature genes in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-infected porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells at differential activation statuses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activation statuses of monocytic cells, e.g. monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are critically important for antiviral immunity. In particular, some devastating viruses, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), are capable of directly infecting these cell...

  2. Transcriptional specialization of human dendritic cell subsets in response to microbial vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Banchereau, Romain; Baldwin, Nicole; Cepika, Alma-Martina; Athale, Shruti; Xue, Yaming; Yu, Chun I; Metang, Patrick; Cheruku, Abhilasha; Berthier, Isabelle; Gayet, Ingrid; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ohouo, Marina; Snipes, LuAnn; Xu, Hui; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Blankenship, Derek; Oh, Sangkon; Ramilo, Octavio; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina; Pascual, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms by which microbial vaccines interact with human APCs remain elusive. Herein, we describe the transcriptional programs induced in human DCs by pathogens, innate receptor ligands and vaccines. Exposure of DCs to influenza, Salmonella enterica and Staphylococcus aureus allows us to build a modular framework containing 204 transcript clusters. We use this framework to characterize the responses of human monocytes, monocyte-derived DCs and blood DC subsets to 13 vaccines. Different vaccines induce distinct transcriptional programs based on pathogen type, adjuvant formulation and APC targeted. Fluzone, Pneumovax and Gardasil, respectively, activate monocyte-derived DCs, monocytes and CD1c+ blood DCs, highlighting APC specialization in response to vaccines. Finally, the blood signatures from individuals vaccinated with Fluzone or infected with influenza reveal a signature of adaptive immunity activation following vaccination and symptomatic infections, but not asymptomatic infections. These data, offered with a web interface, may guide the development of improved vaccines. PMID:25335753

  3. Melanoma-derived factors alter the maturation and activation of differentiated tissue-resident dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hargadon, Kristian M; Bishop, Johnathan D; Brandt, John P; Hand, Zachary C; Ararso, Yonathan T; Forrest, Osric A

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key regulators of host immunity that are capable of inducing either immune tolerance or activation. In addition to their well-characterized role in shaping immune responses to foreign pathogens, DCs are also known to be critical for the induction and maintenance of anti-tumor immune responses. Therefore, it is important to understand how tumors influence the function of DCs and the quality of immune responses they elicit. Although the majority of studies in this field to date have utilized either immortalized DC lines or DC populations that have been generated under artificial conditions from hematopoietic precursors in vitro, we wished to investigate how tumors impact the function of already differentiated, tissue-resident DCs. Therefore, we used both an ex vivo and in vivo model system to assess the influence of melanoma-derived factors on DC maturation and activation. In ex vivo studies with freshly isolated splenic DCs, we demonstrate that the extent to which DC maturation and activation are altered by these factors correlates with melanoma tumorigenicity, and we identify partial roles for tumor-derived transforming growth factor (TGF)β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A in the altered functionality of DCs. In vivo studies using a lung metastasis model of melanoma also demonstrate tumorigenicity-dependent alterations to the function of lung-resident DCs, and skewed production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by these tumor-altered cells is associated with recruitment of an immune infiltrate that may ultimately favor tumor immune escape and outgrowth. PMID:26010746

  4. The Myeloid U937 Skin Sensitization Test (U-SENS) addresses the activation of dendritic cell event in the adverse outcome pathway for skin sensitization.

    PubMed

    Piroird, Cécile; Ovigne, Jean-Marc; Rousset, Françoise; Martinozzi-Teissier, Silvia; Gomes, Charles; Cotovio, José; Alépée, Nathalie

    2015-08-01

    The U-SENS™ assay, formerly known as MUSST (Myeloid U937 Skin Sensitization Test), is an in vitro method to assess skin sensitization. Dendritic cell activation following exposure to sensitizers was modelled in the U937 human myeloid cell line by measuring the induction of the expression of CD86 by flow cytometry. The predictive performance of U-SENS™ was assessed via a comprehensive comparison analysis with the available human and LLNA data of 175 substances. U-SENS™ showed 79% specificity, 90% sensitivity and 88% accuracy. A four laboratory ring study demonstrated the transferability, reliability and reproducibility of U-SENS™, with a reproducibility of 95% within laboratories and 79% between-laboratories, showing that the U-SENS™ assay is a promising tool in a skin sensitization risk assessment testing strategy. PMID:25820135

  5. Differentiation of human monocytes and derived subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells by the HLDA10 monoclonal antibody panel

    PubMed Central

    Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Machacek, Christian; Fischer, Michael B; Stockinger, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte system, consisting of monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), has an important role in tissue homeostasis as well as in eliciting immune responses against invading pathogens. Blood monocytes have been viewed for decades as precursors of tissue macrophages. Although the newest data show that in the steady state resident macrophages of many organs are monocyte independent, blood monocytes critically contribute to tissue macrophage and DC pools upon inflammation. To better understand the relationship between these populations and their phenotype, we isolated and differentiated human blood CD14+ monocytes in vitro into immature and mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) as well as into seven different monocyte-derived macrophage subsets. We used the panel of 70 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) submitted to the 10th Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigen Workshop to determine the expression profiles of these 10 populations by flow cytometry. We now can compile subpanels of mAbs to differentiate the 10 monocyte/macrophage/MoDC subsets, providing the basis for novel diagnostic and therapeutic tools. PMID:26900469

  6. A rapid culture technique produces functional dendritic-like cells from human acute myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ning, Jian; Morgan, David; Pamphilon, Derwood

    2011-01-01

    Most anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies involving dendritic cells (DC) as vaccines rely upon the adoptive transfer of DC loaded with exogenous tumour-peptides. This study utilized human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells as progenitors from which functional dendritic-like antigen presenting cells (DLC) were generated, that constitutively express tumour antigens for recognition by CD8(+) T cells. DLC were generated from AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3 using rapid culture techniques and appropriate cytokines. DLC were evaluated for their cell-surface phenotype, antigen uptake and ability to stimulate allogeneic responder cell proliferation, and production of IFN-γ; compared with DC derived from normal human PBMC donors. KG-1 and MUTZ-3 DLC increased expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA-DR, and MUTZ-3 DLC downregulated CD14 and expressed CD1a. Importantly, both KG-1 and MUTZ-3-derived DLC promoted proliferation of allogeneic responder cells more efficiently than unmodified cells; neither cells incorporated FITC-labeled dextran, but both stimulated IFN-γ production from responding allogeneic CD8(+) T cells. Control DC produced from PBMC using the FastDC culture also expressed high levels of critical cell surface ligands and demonstrated good APC function. This paper indicates that functional DLC can be cultured from the AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3, and FastDC culture generates functional KG-1 DLC. PMID:22187520

  7. A Rapid Culture Technique Produces Functional Dendritic-Like Cells from Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Jian; Morgan, David; Pamphilon, Derwood

    2011-01-01

    Most anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies involving dendritic cells (DC) as vaccines rely upon the adoptive transfer of DC loaded with exogenous tumour-peptides. This study utilized human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells as progenitors from which functional dendritic-like antigen presenting cells (DLC) were generated, that constitutively express tumour antigens for recognition by CD8+ T cells. DLC were generated from AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3 using rapid culture techniques and appropriate cytokines. DLC were evaluated for their cell-surface phenotype, antigen uptake and ability to stimulate allogeneic responder cell proliferation, and production of IFN-γ; compared with DC derived from normal human PBMC donors. KG-1 and MUTZ-3 DLC increased expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA-DR, and MUTZ-3 DLC downregulated CD14 and expressed CD1a. Importantly, both KG-1 and MUTZ-3-derived DLC promoted proliferation of allogeneic responder cells more efficiently than unmodified cells; neither cells incorporated FITC-labeled dextran, but both stimulated IFN-γ production from responding allogeneic CD8+ T cells. Control DC produced from PBMC using the FastDC culture also expressed high levels of critical cell surface ligands and demonstrated good APC function. This paper indicates that functional DLC can be cultured from the AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3, and FastDC culture generates functional KG-1 DLC. PMID:22187520

  8. The Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) Asef2 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation via Rac Activation and Spinophilin-dependent Targeting*

    PubMed Central

    Evans, J. Corey; Robinson, Cristina M.; Shi, Mingjian; Webb, Donna J.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are actin-rich protrusions that establish excitatory synaptic contacts with surrounding neurons. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is critical for the development and plasticity of dendritic spines, which is the basis for learning and memory. Rho family GTPases are emerging as important modulators of spines and synapses, predominantly through their ability to regulate actin dynamics. Much less is known, however, about the function of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which activate these GTPases, in spine and synapse development. In this study we show that the Rho family GEF Asef2 is found at synaptic sites, where it promotes dendritic spine and synapse formation. Knockdown of endogenous Asef2 with shRNAs impairs spine and synapse formation, whereas exogenous expression of Asef2 causes an increase in spine and synapse density. This effect of Asef2 on spines and synapses is abrogated by expression of GEF activity-deficient Asef2 mutants or by knockdown of Rac, suggesting that Asef2-Rac signaling mediates spine development. Because Asef2 interacts with the F-actin-binding protein spinophilin, which localizes to spines, we investigated the role of spinophilin in Asef2-promoted spine formation. Spinophilin recruits Asef2 to spines, and knockdown of spinophilin hinders spine and synapse formation in Asef2-expressing neurons. Furthermore, inhibition of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA) activity blocks spinophilin-mediated localization of Asef2 to spines. These results collectively point to spinophilin-Asef2-Rac signaling as a novel mechanism for the development of dendritic spines and synapses. PMID:25750125

  9. Central Muscarinic Cholinergic Activation Alters Interaction between Splenic Dendritic Cell and CD4+CD25- T Cells in Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Valentin A.; Tracey, Kevin J.; Khafipour, Ehsan; Ghia, Jean-Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP) is based on vagus nerve (VN) activity that regulates macrophage and dendritic cell responses in the spleen through alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAChR) signaling. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients present dysautonomia with decreased vagus nerve activity, dendritic cell and T cell over-activation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether central activation of the CAP alters the function of dendritic cells (DCs) and sequential CD4+/CD25−T cell activation in the context of experimental colitis. Methods The dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid model of experimental colitis in C57BL/6 mice was used. Central, intracerebroventricular infusion of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist McN-A-343 was used to activate CAP and vagus nerve and/or splenic nerve transection were performed. In addition, the role of α7nAChR signaling and the NF-kB pathway was studied. Serum amyloid protein (SAP)-A, colonic tissue cytokines, IL-12p70 and IL-23 in isolated splenic DCs, and cytokines levels in DC-CD4+CD25−T cell co-culture were determined. Results McN-A-343 treatment reduced colonic inflammation associated with decreased pro-inflammatory Th1/Th17 colonic and splenic cytokine secretion. Splenic DCs cytokine release was modulated through α7nAChR and the NF-kB signaling pathways. Cholinergic activation resulted in decreased CD4+CD25−T cell priming. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of central cholinergic activation was abolished in mice with vagotomy or splenic neurectomy. Conclusions Suppression of splenic immune cell activation and altered interaction between DCs and T cells are important aspects of the beneficial effect of brain activation of the CAP in experimental colitis. These findings may lead to improved therapeutic strategies in the treatment of IBD. PMID:25295619

  10. Control of pathogenic effector T-cell activities in situ by PD-L1 expression on respiratory inflammatory dendritic cells during respiratory syncytial virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yao, S; Jiang, L; Moser, EK; Jewett, LB; Wright, J; Du, J; Zhou, B; Davis, SD; Krupp, NL; Braciale, TJ; Sun, J

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract illness in young infants, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. We demonstrate here that the co-inhibitory molecule programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is selectively upregulated on T cells within the respiratory tract during both murine and human RSV infection. Importantly, the interaction of PD-1 with its ligand PD-L1 is vital to restrict the pro-inflammatory activities of lung effector T cells in situ, thereby inhibiting the development of excessive pulmonary inflammation and injury during RSV infection. We further identify that PD-L1 expression on lung inflammatory dendritic cells is critical to suppress inflammatory T-cell activities, and an interferon–STAT1–IRF1 axis is responsible for increased PD-L1 expression on lung inflammatory dendritic cells. Our findings suggest a potentially critical role of PD-L1 and PD-1 interactions in the lung for controlling host inflammatory responses and disease progression in clinical RSV infection. PMID:25465101

  11. Human tonsil-derived follicular dendritic-like cells are refractory to human prion infection in vitro and traffic disease-associated prion protein to lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Krejciova, Zuzana; De Sousa, Paul; Manson, Jean; Ironside, James W; Head, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in human cellular susceptibility to prion infection remain poorly defined. This is due, in part, to the absence of any well characterized and relevant cultured human cells susceptible to infection with human prions, such as those involved in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. In variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, prion replication is thought to occur first in the lymphoreticular system and then spread into the brain. We have, therefore, examined the susceptibility of a human tonsil-derived follicular dendritic cell-like cell line (HK) to prion infection. HK cells were found to display a readily detectable, time-dependent increase in cell-associated abnormal prion protein (PrP(TSE)) when exposed to medium spiked with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease brain homogenate, resulting in a coarse granular perinuclear PrP(TSE) staining pattern. Despite their high level of cellular prion protein expression, HK cells failed to support infection, as judged by longer term maintenance of PrP(TSE) accumulation. Colocalization studies revealed that exposure of HK cells to brain homogenate resulted in increased numbers of detectable lysosomes and that these structures immunostained intensely for PrP(TSE) after exposure to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease brain homogenate. Our data suggest that human follicular dendritic-like cells and perhaps other human cell types are able to avoid prion infection by efficient lysosomal degradation of PrP(TSE). PMID:24183781

  12. TLR4-mediated activation of dendritic cells by the heat shock protein DnaK from Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Ashtekar, Amit R.; Zhang, Ping; Katz, Jannet; Deivanayagam, Champion C. S.; Rallabhandi, Prasad; Vogel, Stefanie N.; Michalek, Suzanne M.

    2008-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia, a severe, debilitating disease of humans and other mammals. As this microorganism is also classified as a “category-A pathogen” and a potential biowarfare agent, there is a need for an effective vaccine. Several antigens of F. tularensis, including the heat shock protein DnaK, have been proposed for use in a potential subunit vaccine. In this study, we characterized the innate immune response of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) to F. tularensis DnaK. Recombinant DnaK was produced using a bacterial expression system and purified using affinity, ion-exchange, and size-exclusion chromatography. DnaK induced the activation of MAPKs and NF-κB in DC and the production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-12 p40, as well as low levels of IL-10. DnaK induced phenotypic maturation of DC, as demonstrated by an up-regulation of costimulatory molecules CD40, CD80, and CD86. DnaK stimulated DC through TLR4 and the adapters MyD88 and Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor-inducing IFN-β (TRIF) that mediated differential responses. DnaK induced activation of MAPKs and NF-κB in a MyD88- or TRIF-dependent manner. However, the presence of MyD88- and TRIF-dependent signaling pathways was essential for an optimal, DnaK-induced cytokine response in DC. In contrast, DnaK induced DC maturation in a TRIF-dependent, MyD88-independent manner. These results provide insight about the molecular interactions between an immunodominant antigen of F. tularensis and host immune cells, which is crucial for the rational design and development of a safe and efficacious vaccine against tularemia. PMID:18708593

  13. Primary proliferative and cytotoxic T-cell responses to HIV induced in vitro by human dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Macatonia, S E; Patterson, S; Knight, S C

    1991-01-01

    In earlier studies, primary proliferative and cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses to influenza virus were produced in vitro by using mouse dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with virus or viral peptide as the stimulus for syngeneic T cells in 20-microliters hanging-drop cultures. We have now adapted this system for producing primary responses with cells from non-immune donors to produce primary proliferative and CTL responses to human immunodeficiency virus I (HIV) and to HIV peptides in vitro using cells from normal human peripheral blood. All donors in this study were laboratory personnel with no history of HIV infection. DC enriched from peripheral blood were exposed to HIV in vitro and small numbers were added to T lymphocytes in 20-microliters hanging drops. Proliferative responses to virus-infected DC were obtained after 3 days in culture. After 6 days, CTL were obtained that killed virus-infected autologous--but not allogeneic--phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated blast cells. Proliferative and CTL responses were obtained using cells from 14 random donors expressing a spectrum of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) types but the CTL, once produced, showed killing restricted by the MHC class I type. Treatment of cultures with monoclonal antibody (mAb) to CD4-positive cells at the beginning of culture blocked the development of both proliferative and CTL responses, but treatment after 5 days had no effect on the CTL activity. Treatment with MCA to CD8-positive cells at the beginning of culture did not block proliferation significantly, but treatment either before or after the 5-day culture period blocked CTL responses. Collaboration between proliferating CD4-positive cells and CD8-positive cells may thus be required to produce CTL of the CD8 phenotype. DC exposed to HIV also produced CTL that killed autologous blast cells pulsed with gp120 envelope glycoprotein. However, DC infected with whole virus did not produce CTL that lysed target cells pulsed with a synthetic

  14. Immunomodulatory Effects of Four Leishmania infantum Potentially Excreted/Secreted Proteins on Human Dendritic Cells Differentiation and Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Markikou-Ouni, Wafa; Drini, Sima; Bahi-Jaber, Narges; Chenik, Mehdi; Meddeb-Garnaoui, Amel

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania parasites and some molecules they secrete are known to modulate innate immune responses through effects on dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages. Here, we characterized four Leishmania infantum potentially excreted/secreted recombinant proteins (LipESP) identified in our laboratory: Elongation Factor 1 alpha (LiEF-1α), a proteasome regulatory ATPase (LiAAA-ATPase) and two novel proteins with unknown functions, which we termed LiP15 and LiP23, by investigating their effect on in vitro differentiation and maturation of human DCs and on cytokine production by DCs and monocytes. During DCs differentiation, LipESP led to a significant decrease in CD1a. LiP23 and LiEF-1α, induced a decrease of HLA-DR and an increase of CD86 surface expression, respectively. During maturation, an up-regulation of HLA-DR and CD80 was found in response to LiP15, LiP23 and LiAAA-ATPase, while an increase of CD40 expression was only observed in response to LiP15. All LipESP induced an over-expression of CD86 with significant differences between proteins. These proteins also induced significant IL-12p70 levels in immature DCs but not in monocytes. The LipESP-induced IL-12p70 production was significantly enhanced by a co-treatment with IFN-γ in both cell populations. TNF-α and IL-10 were induced in DCs and monocytes with higher levels observed for LiP15 and LiAAA-ATPase. However, LPS-induced cytokine production during DC maturation or in monocyte cultures was significantly down regulated by LipESP co-treatment. Our findings suggest that LipESP strongly interfere with DCs differentiation suggesting a possible involvement in mechanisms established by the parasite for its survival. These proteins also induce DCs maturation by up-regulating several costimulatory molecules and by inducing the production of proinflammatory cytokines, which is a prerequisite for T cell activation. However, the reduced ability of LipESP-stimulated DCs and monocytes to respond to lipopolysaccharide (LPS

  15. Immunomodulatory Effects of Four Leishmania infantum Potentially Excreted/Secreted Proteins on Human Dendritic Cells Differentiation and Maturation.

    PubMed

    Markikou-Ouni, Wafa; Drini, Sima; Bahi-Jaber, Narges; Chenik, Mehdi; Meddeb-Garnaoui, Amel

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania parasites and some molecules they secrete are known to modulate innate immune responses through effects on dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages. Here, we characterized four Leishmania infantum potentially excreted/secreted recombinant proteins (LipESP) identified in our laboratory: Elongation Factor 1 alpha (LiEF-1α), a proteasome regulatory ATPase (LiAAA-ATPase) and two novel proteins with unknown functions, which we termed LiP15 and LiP23, by investigating their effect on in vitro differentiation and maturation of human DCs and on cytokine production by DCs and monocytes. During DCs differentiation, LipESP led to a significant decrease in CD1a. LiP23 and LiEF-1α, induced a decrease of HLA-DR and an increase of CD86 surface expression, respectively. During maturation, an up-regulation of HLA-DR and CD80 was found in response to LiP15, LiP23 and LiAAA-ATPase, while an increase of CD40 expression was only observed in response to LiP15. All LipESP induced an over-expression of CD86 with significant differences between proteins. These proteins also induced significant IL-12p70 levels in immature DCs but not in monocytes. The LipESP-induced IL-12p70 production was significantly enhanced by a co-treatment with IFN-γ in both cell populations. TNF-α and IL-10 were induced in DCs and monocytes with higher levels observed for LiP15 and LiAAA-ATPase. However, LPS-induced cytokine production during DC maturation or in monocyte cultures was significantly down regulated by LipESP co-treatment. Our findings suggest that LipESP strongly interfere with DCs differentiation suggesting a possible involvement in mechanisms established by the parasite for its survival. These proteins also induce DCs maturation by up-regulating several costimulatory molecules and by inducing the production of proinflammatory cytokines, which is a prerequisite for T cell activation. However, the reduced ability of LipESP-stimulated DCs and monocytes to respond to lipopolysaccharide (LPS

  16. Differential type I interferon activation and susceptibility of dendritic cell populations to porcine arterivirus

    PubMed Central

    Loving, Crystal L; Brockmeier, Susan L; Sacco, Randy E

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a role in anti-viral immunity by providing early innate protection against viral replication and by presenting antigen to T cells for initiation of the adaptive immune response. Studies show the adaptive response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is ineffective for complete viral elimination. Other studies describe the kinetics of the adaptive response to PRRSV, but have not investigated the early response by DCs. We hypothesize that there is an aberrant activation of DCs early in PRRSV infection; consequently, the adaptive response is triggered inadequately. The current study characterized a subtype of porcine lung DCs (L-DCs) and investigated the ability of PRRSV to infect and replicate in L-DCs and monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs). Furthermore, the type I interferon anti-viral response to PRRSV with and without the addition of recombinant porcine IFN-α (rpIFN-α), an important cytokine that signals for anti-viral mediator activation, was analysed. Results show that PRRSV replicated in MDDCs but not L-DCs, providing evidence that these cells have followed distinct differentiation pathways. Although both cell types responded to PRRSV with an induction of IFN-β mRNA, the magnitude and duration of the response differed between cell types. The addition of rpIFN-α was protective in MDDCs, and mRNA synthesis of Mx (myxovirus resistant) and PKR (double-stranded RNA dependent protein kinase) was observed in both cell types after rpIFN-α addition. Overall, PRRSV replicated in MDDCs but not L-DCs, and rpIFN-α was required for the transcription of protective anti-viral mediators. DC response to PRRSV was limited to IFN-β transcription, which may be inadequate in triggering the adaptive immune response. PMID:17116172

  17. CTLA4-Ig immunosuppressive activity at the level of dendritic cell/T cell crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Edda; Hölzl, Markus; Ahmadi, Sarah; Dillinger, Barbara; Pilat, Nina; Fuchs, Dietmar; Wekerle, Thomas; Heitger, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Immunosuppressive cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen-4 immunoglobulin fusion proteins (CTLA4-Ig) block the CD28:CD80/86 costimulatory pathway. On a cellular level, CTLA4-Ig is understood to dampen T cell responses. As a mechanism, CTLA4-Ig has been reported to affect dendritic cell (DC) function via inducing the immunosuppressive indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) pathway and promoting a DC regulatory phenotype. We here probed cellular mechanisms of CTLA4-Ig immunoregulation in an allogeneic setting using C57BL/6 splenic or bone marrow derived DCs (BMDCs) as stimulators of allogeneic Balb/c derived T cells. To address whether CTLA4-Ig immunosuppression affected DCs, we pre-exposed C57BL/6 splenic or BMDCs to CTLA4-Ig and removed unbound CTLA4-Ig before co-culture with allogeneic T cells. CTLA4-Ig disappeared rapidly (within 4 h) from the cell membrane by combined internalization and dissociation. These CTLA4-Ig pre-exposed DCs were fully capable of stimulating allogeneic T cell proliferation, suggesting that CTLA4-Ig does not impair the DC stimulatory capacity. Only the presence of CTLA4-Ig during DC/T cell co-culture resulted in the expected inhibition of proliferation. C57BL/6 splenic or BMDCs exposed to CTLA4-Ig did not display IDO activity. We conclude that CTLA4-Ig immunosuppressive activity does not depend on a DC regulatory phenotype but on its presence during DC/T cell interaction. PMID:23434857

  18. Differential type I interferon activation and susceptibility of dendritic cell populations to porcine arterivirus.

    PubMed

    Loving, Crystal L; Brockmeier, Susan L; Sacco, Randy E

    2007-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a role in anti-viral immunity by providing early innate protection against viral replication and by presenting antigen to T cells for initiation of the adaptive immune response. Studies show the adaptive response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is ineffective for complete viral elimination. Other studies describe the kinetics of the adaptive response to PRRSV, but have not investigated the early response by DCs. We hypothesize that there is an aberrant activation of DCs early in PRRSV infection; consequently, the adaptive response is triggered inadequately. The current study characterized a subtype of porcine lung DCs (L-DCs) and investigated the ability of PRRSV to infect and replicate in L-DCs and monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs). Furthermore, the type I interferon anti-viral response to PRRSV with and without the addition of recombinant porcine IFN-alpha (rpIFN-alpha), an important cytokine that signals for anti-viral mediator activation, was analysed. Results show that PRRSV replicated in MDDCs but not L-DCs, providing evidence that these cells have followed distinct differentiation pathways. Although both cell types responded to PRRSV with an induction of IFN-beta mRNA, the magnitude and duration of the response differed between cell types. The addition of rpIFN-alpha was protective in MDDCs, and mRNA synthesis of Mx (myxovirus resistant) and PKR (double-stranded RNA dependent protein kinase) was observed in both cell types after rpIFN-alpha addition. Overall, PRRSV replicated in MDDCs but not L-DCs, and rpIFN-alpha was required for the transcription of protective anti-viral mediators. DC response to PRRSV was limited to IFN-beta transcription, which may be inadequate in triggering the adaptive immune response. PMID:17116172

  19. Impaired NK Cell Activation and Chemotaxis toward Dendritic Cells Exposed to Complement-Opsonized HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Ellegård, Rada; Crisci, Elisa; Andersson, Jonas; Shankar, Esaki M.; Nyström, Sofia; Hinkula, Jorma

    2015-01-01

    Mucosa resident dendritic cells (DCs) may represent one of the first immune cells that HIV-1 encounters during sexual transmission. The virions in body fluids can be opsonized with complement factors because of HIV-mediated triggering of the complement cascade, and this appears to influence numerous aspects of the immune defense targeting the virus. One key attribute of host defense is the ability to attract immune cells to the site of infection. In this study, we investigated whether the opsonization of HIV with complement (C-HIV) or a mixture of complement and Abs (CI-HIV) affected the cytokine and chemokine responses generated by DCs, as well as their ability to attract other immune cells. We found that the expression levels of CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL3, and CCL17 were lowered after exposure to either C-HIV or CI-HIV relative to free HIV (F-HIV). DCs exposed to F-HIV induced higher cell migration, consisting mainly of NK cells, compared with opsonized virus, and the chemotaxis of NK cells was dependent on CCL3 and CXCL10. NK cell exposure to supernatants derived from HIV-exposed DCs showed that F-HIV induced phenotypic activation (e.g., increased levels of TIM3, CD69, and CD25) and effector function (e.g., production of IFNγ and killing of target cells) in NK cells, whereas C-HIV and CI-HIV did not. The impairment of NK cell recruitment by DCs exposed to complement-opsonized HIV and the lack of NK activation may contribute to the failure of innate immune responses to control HIV at the site of initial mucosa infection. PMID:26157174

  20. Piperine impairs the migration and T cell-activating function of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Gemma; Doucette, Carolyn D; Soutar, David A; Liwski, Robert S; Hoskin, David W

    2016-02-01

    Piperine, a major alkaloid found in the fruits of black and long pepper plants, has anti-inflammatory properties; however, piperine's effect on dendritic cell (DC) migration and T cell-activating function has not been investigated. Bone marrow-derived mouse DCs that were matured in the presence of 100 μM piperine showed reduced in vitro migration in response to CCL21, as well as reduced in vivo migration to lymph nodes. In addition, piperine-treated DCs had reduced CCR7 expression and elevated CCR5 expression, as well as reduced expression of CD40 and class II major histocompatibility complex molecules and decreased nuclear accumulation of RelB. DC production of interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in response to lipopolysaccharide stimulation was also reduced following piperine treatment. Exposure to piperine during maturation therefore caused DCs to retain an immature phenotype, which was associated with a reduced capacity to promote T cell activation since co-culture of ovalbumin (OVA323-339)-specific T cells with OVA323-339-pulsed DCs that were previously matured in the presence of piperine showed reduced interferon-γ and IL-2 expression. OVA323-339-specific T cell proliferation was also reduced in vivo in the presence of piperine-treated DCs. Inhibition of DC migration and function by piperine may therefore be a useful strategy to down-regulate potentially harmful DC-driven T cell responses to self-antigens and transplantation antigens. PMID:26640239

  1. Activation of pulmonary and lymph node dendritic cells during chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Damlund, Dina Silke Malling; Christophersen, Lars; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Alhede, Morten; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2016-06-01

    The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients acquire chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, resulting in increased mortality and morbidity. The chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection is characterized by bacteria growing in biofilm surrounded by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). However, the infection is not eradicated and the inflammatory response leads to gradual degradation of the lung tissue. In CF patients, a Th2-dominated adaptive immune response with a pronounced antibody response is correlated with poorer outcome. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in bridging the innate immune system with the adaptive immune response. Once activated, the DCs deliver a set of signals to uncommitted T cells that induce development, such as expansion of regulatory T cells and polarization of Th1, Th2 or Th17 subsets. In this study, we characterized DCs in lungs and regional lymph nodes in BALB/c mice infected using intratracheal installation of P. aeruginosa embedded in seaweed alginate in the lungs. A significantly elevated concentration of DCs was detected earlier in the lungs than in the regional lymph nodes. To evaluate whether the chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection leads to activation of DCs, costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 were analyzed. During infection, the DCs showed significant elevation of CD80 and CD86 expression in both the lungs and the regional lymph nodes. Interestingly, the percentage of CD86-positive cells was significantly higher than the percentage of CD80-positive cells in the lymph nodes. In addition, cytokine production from Lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-stimulated DCs was analyzed demonstrating elevated production of IL-6, IL-10 and IL-12. However, production of IL-12 was suppressed earlier than IL-6 and IL-10. These results support that DCs are involved in skewing of the Th1/Th2 balance in CF and may be a possible treatment target. PMID:27009697

  2. Dynamic Expression of BCL6 in Murine Conventional Dendritic Cells during In Vivo Development and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting-ting; Liu, Dong; Calabro, Samuele; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C.; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Haberman, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    The transcriptional repressor BCL6 plays an essential role in the development of germinal center B cells and follicular helper T cells. However, much less is known about the expression and function of BCL6 in other cell types. Here we report that during murine dendritic cell (DC) ontogeny in vivo, BCL6 is not expressed in bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells, common DC precursors and committed precursors of conventional DCs (pre-cDCs), but is elevated in peripheral pre-cDCs. BCL6 protein levels rise as pre-cDCs differentiate into cDCs in secondary lymphoid organs. Elevated protein levels of Bcl6 are observed in all cDC subsets, with CD8α+ cDCs displaying the greatest levels. Co-staining of Ki-67 revealed BCL6hi cDCs to be more proliferative than BCL6lo cDCs. After adjuvant inoculation, BCL6 levels are significantly reduced in the CD11cint MHC class IIhi CD86hi cDCs. Activation-induced BCL6 reduction correlated with reduced proliferation. A LPS injection study further confirmed that, in response to microbial stimuli, BCL6 levels are dynamically regulated during the maturation of CD11cint MHC class IIhi splenic cDCs. This reduction of BCL6 levels in cDCs does not occur after LPS injection in MyD88−/− TRIF−/− mice. Thus, regulation of Bcl6 protein levels is dynamic in murine cDCs during development, maturation and activation in vivo. PMID:24979752

  3. Dynamic expression of BCL6 in murine conventional dendritic cells during in vivo development and activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting-ting; Liu, Dong; Calabro, Samuele; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Haberman, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    The transcriptional repressor BCL6 plays an essential role in the development of germinal center B cells and follicular helper T cells. However, much less is known about the expression and function of BCL6 in other cell types. Here we report that during murine dendritic cell (DC) ontogeny in vivo, BCL6 is not expressed in bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells, common DC precursors and committed precursors of conventional DCs (pre-cDCs), but is elevated in peripheral pre-cDCs. BCL6 protein levels rise as pre-cDCs differentiate into cDCs in secondary lymphoid organs. Elevated protein levels of Bcl6 are observed in all cDC subsets, with CD8α+ cDCs displaying the greatest levels. Co-staining of Ki-67 revealed BCL6hi cDCs to be more proliferative than BCL6lo cDCs. After adjuvant inoculation, BCL6 levels are significantly reduced in the CD11cint MHC class IIhi CD86hi cDCs. Activation-induced BCL6 reduction correlated with reduced proliferation. A LPS injection study further confirmed that, in response to microbial stimuli, BCL6 levels are dynamically regulated during the maturation of CD11cint MHC class IIhi splenic cDCs. This reduction of BCL6 levels in cDCs does not occur after LPS injection in MyD88-/- TRIF-/- mice. Thus, regulation of Bcl6 protein levels is dynamic in murine cDCs during development, maturation and activation in vivo. PMID:24979752

  4. Impaired NK Cell Activation and Chemotaxis toward Dendritic Cells Exposed to Complement-Opsonized HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Ellegård, Rada; Crisci, Elisa; Andersson, Jonas; Shankar, Esaki M; Nyström, Sofia; Hinkula, Jorma; Larsson, Marie

    2015-08-15

    Mucosa resident dendritic cells (DCs) may represent one of the first immune cells that HIV-1 encounters during sexual transmission. The virions in body fluids can be opsonized with complement factors because of HIV-mediated triggering of the complement cascade, and this appears to influence numerous aspects of the immune defense targeting the virus. One key attribute of host defense is the ability to attract immune cells to the site of infection. In this study, we investigated whether the opsonization of HIV with complement (C-HIV) or a mixture of complement and Abs (CI-HIV) affected the cytokine and chemokine responses generated by DCs, as well as their ability to attract other immune cells. We found that the expression levels of CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL3, and CCL17 were lowered after exposure to either C-HIV or CI-HIV relative to free HIV (F-HIV). DCs exposed to F-HIV induced higher cell migration, consisting mainly of NK cells, compared with opsonized virus, and the chemotaxis of NK cells was dependent on CCL3 and CXCL10. NK cell exposure to supernatants derived from HIV-exposed DCs showed that F-HIV induced phenotypic activation (e.g., increased levels of TIM3, CD69, and CD25) and effector function (e.g., production of IFNγ and killing of target cells) in NK cells, whereas C-HIV and CI-HIV did not. The impairment of NK cell recruitment by DCs exposed to complement-opsonized HIV and the lack of NK activation may contribute to the failure of innate immune responses to control HIV at the site of initial mucosa infection. PMID:26157174

  5. Mechanism of NK cell activation induced by coculture with dendritic cells derived from peripheral blood monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Amakata, Y; Fujiyama, Y; Andoh, A; Hodohara, K; Bamba, T

    2001-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have been regarded as one of the effective antigen-presenting cells, but the relationship between DCs and lymphocytes, in particular natural killer (NK) cells, remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated how DCs interact with both lymphocytes and NK cells using a coculture system. The number of lymphocytes increased significantly when cocultured with DCs (1·8-fold increase). In particular, the proliferation of NK cells was prominent. Furthermore, the coculture of DCs with lymphocytes induced a marked increase in IL-12 and IFN-γ secretion. When contact between the DCs and lymphocytes was prevented, the secretion of both IL-12 and IFN-γ was markedly reduced. IFN-γ production was completely blocked by an anti-IL-12 antibody, indicating that IFN-γ secretion was dependent on IL-12 secretion. The stimulating effect of the DCs on the proliferation of the lymphocytes was partially suppressed by anti-IL-12 antibodies, and was completely attenuated when cellular contact was prevented. Furthermore, the NK cell proliferation induced by coculture with DCs was significantly blocked by the inhibition of the interaction of either CD40–CD40L or CD28–B7 molecule. The coculture with DCs enhanced NK activity by 40%, and this was partially suppressed by anti-IL-12 antibodies and was completely blocked by the inhibition of cell-to-cell contact. These results indicate that the activation of NK cells by DCs is partially mediated by IL-12 secretion, and that direct contact between DCs and NK cells play a major role in this response. PMID:11422197

  6. Neonatal rearing conditions distinctly shape locus coeruleus neuronal activity, dendritic arborization, and sensitivity to corticotrophin-releasing factor

    PubMed Central

    Swinny, Jerome D.; O'Farrell, Eimear; Bingham, Brian C.; Piel, David A.; Valentino, Rita J.; Beck, Sheryl G.

    2010-01-01

    Early life events influence vulnerability to psychiatric illness. This has been modelled in rats and it has been demonstrated that different durations of maternal separation shape adult endocrine and behavioural stress reactivity. One system through which maternal separation may act is the locus coeruleus (LC)–norepinephrine system that regulates emotional arousal. Here we demonstrate that different durations of maternal separation have distinct effects on LC physiology and dendritic morphology. Rat pups were separated from the dam for 15 min/d (HMS-15) or 180 min/d (HMS-180) from post-natal days 2–14. Others were either undisturbed (HMS-0) or were vendor-purchased controls. LC characteristics were compared at age 22–35 d using whole-cell recordings in vitro. Cells were filled with biocytin for morphological analysis. LC neurons of HMS-180 rats were tonically activated compared to HMS-15 and control rats, with firing rates that were 2-fold higher than these groups. Corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) application did not further activate LC neurons of HMS-180 rats but increased LC firing rate in HMS-0 and control rats. LC neurons of HMS-15 rats were resistant to excitation by CRF. Maternal separation also affected LC dendritic morphology. LC dendrites of HMS-15 rats exhibited less branching and decreased total dendritic length, an effect that could decrease the probability of contacting limbic afferents that terminate in the pericoerulear region. This effect may provide a structural basis for an attenuated magnitude of emotional arousal. Together, these results demonstrate long-term consequences of early life events on the LC–norepinephrine system that may shape adult behaviour. PMID:19653930

  7. Axonal elongation and dendritic branching is enhanced by adenosine A2A receptors activation in cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Filipa F; Neves-Tomé, Raquel; Assaife-Lopes, Natália; Santos, Telma E; Silva, Rui F M; Brites, Dora; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sousa, Mónica M; Sebastião, Ana M

    2016-06-01

    Axon growth and dendrite development are key processes for the establishment of a functional neuronal network. Adenosine, which is released by neurons and glia, is a known modulator of synaptic transmission but its influence over neuronal growth has been much less investigated. We now explored the action of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) upon neurite outgrowth, discriminating actions over the axon or dendrites, and the mechanisms involved. Morphometric analysis of primary cultures of cortical neurons from E18 Sprague-Dawley rats demonstrated that an A2AR agonist, CGS 21680, enhances axonal elongation and dendritic branching, being the former prevented by inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase and phospholipase C, but not of protein kinase A. By testing the influence of a scavenger of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) over the action of the A2AR agonist and the action of a selective A2AR antagonist over the action of BDNF, we could conclude that while the action of A2ARs upon dendritic branching is dependent on the presence of endogenous BDNF, the influence of A2ARs upon axonal elongation is independent of endogenous BDNF. In consonance with the action over axonal elongation, A2AR activation promoted a decrease in microtubule stability and an increase in microtubule growth speed in axonal growth cones. In conclusion, we disclose a facilitatory action of A2ARs upon axonal elongation and microtubule dynamics, providing new insights for A2ARs regulation of neuronal differentiation and axonal regeneration. PMID:26068054

  8. Follow-on Research Activities for the Rensselaer Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (RIDGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaCombe, J. C.; Koss, M. B.; Lupulescu, A. O.; Frei, J. E.; Giummarra, C.; Glicksman, M. E.

    2001-01-01

    The RIDGE effort continues the aegis of the earlier, NASA-sponsored, Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) series of experiments through the continued analysis of microgravity data acquired during these earlier space flights. The preliminary observations presented here demonstrate that there are significant differences between SCN and the more anisotropic PVA dendrites. The side branch structure becomes amplified only further behind the tip, and the interface shape is generally wider (i.e. more hyperbolic than parabolic) in PVA than in SCN. These characteristics are seen to affect the process of heat transport. Additionally, the dendrites grown during the fourth United States Microgravity Payload (USMP-4) exhibit time-dependent growth characteristics and may not always have reached steady-state growth during the experiment.

  9. Activation of Human T Cells in Hypertension: Studies of Humanized Mice and Hypertensive Humans.

    PubMed

    Itani, Hana A; McMaster, William G; Saleh, Mohamed A; Nazarewicz, Rafal R; Mikolajczyk, Tomasz P; Kaszuba, Anna M; Konior, Anna; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Norlander, Allison E; Chen, Wei; Bonami, Rachel H; Marshall, Andrew F; Poffenberger, Greg; Weyand, Cornelia M; Madhur, Meena S; Moore, Daniel J; Harrison, David G; Guzik, Tomasz J

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence supports an important role for T cells in the genesis of hypertension. Because this work has predominantly been performed in experimental animals, we sought to determine whether human T cells are activated in hypertension. We used a humanized mouse model in which the murine immune system is replaced by the human immune system. Angiotensin II increased systolic pressure to 162 versus 116 mm Hg for sham-treated animals. Flow cytometry of thoracic lymph nodes, thoracic aorta, and kidney revealed increased infiltration of human leukocytes (CD45(+)) and T lymphocytes (CD3(+) and CD4(+)) in response to angiotensin II infusion. Interestingly, there was also an increase in the memory T cells (CD3(+)/CD45RO(+)) in the aortas and lymph nodes. Prevention of hypertension using hydralazine and hydrochlorothiazide prevented the accumulation of T cells in these tissues. Studies of isolated human T cells and monocytes indicated that angiotensin II had no direct effect on cytokine production by T cells or the ability of dendritic cells to drive T-cell proliferation. We also observed an increase in circulating interleukin-17A producing CD4(+) T cells and both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that produce interferon-γ in hypertensive compared with normotensive humans. Thus, human T cells become activated and invade critical end-organ tissues in response to hypertension in a humanized mouse model. This response likely reflects the hypertensive milieu encountered in vivo and is not a direct effect of the hormone angiotensin II. PMID:27217403

  10. Productive infection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in dendritic cells requires fusion-mediated viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Janas, Alicia M.; Dong, Chunsheng; Wang Jianhua; Wu Li

    2008-06-05

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters dendritic cells (DCs) through endocytosis and viral receptor-mediated fusion. Although endocytosis-mediated HIV-1 entry can generate productive infection in certain cell types, including human monocyte-derived macrophages, productive HIV-1 infection in DCs appears to be dependent on fusion-mediated viral entry. It remains to be defined whether endocytosed HIV-1 in DCs can initiate productive infection. Using HIV-1 infection and cellular fractionation assays to measure productive viral infection and entry, here we show that HIV-1 enters monocyte-derived DCs predominately through endocytosis; however, endocytosed HIV-1 cannot initiate productive HIV-1 infection in DCs. In contrast, productive HIV-1 infection in DCs requires fusion-mediated viral entry. Together, these results provide functional evidence in understanding HIV-1 cis-infection of DCs, suggesting that different pathways of HIV-1 entry into DCs determine the outcome of viral infection.

  11. A novel Wnt5a-Frizzled4 signaling pathway mediates activity-independent dendrite morphogenesis via the distal PDZ motif of Frizzled 4.

    PubMed

    Bian, Wen-Jie; Miao, Wan-Ying; He, Shun-Ji; Wan, Zong-Fang; Luo, Zhen-Ge; Yu, Xiang

    2015-08-01

    The morphology of the dendritic tree is critical to neuronal function and neural circuit wiring. Several Wnt family members have been demonstrated to play important roles in dendrite development. However, the Wnt receptors responsible for mediating this process remain largely elusive. Using primary hippocampal neuronal cultures as a model system, we report that Frizzled4 (Fzd4), a member of the Fzd family of Wnt receptors, specifically signals downstream of Wnt5a to promote dendrite branching and growth. Interestingly, the less conserved distal PDZ binding motif of Fzd4, and not its conserved proximal Dvl-interacting PDZ motif, is required for mediating this effect. We further showed that Dvl signaled parallel to and independent of Fzd4 in promoting dendrite growth. Unlike most previously described pathways, Wnt5a/Fzd4 signaling promoted dendrite development in an activity-independent and autocrine fashion. Together, these results provide the first identification of a Wnt receptor for regulating dendrite development in the mammalian system, and demonstrate a novel function of the distal PDZ motif of Fzd4 in dendrite morphogenesis, thereby expanding our knowledge of the complex roles of Wnt signaling in neural development. PMID:25424568

  12. Targeting breast cancer stem cells by dendritic cell vaccination in humanized mice with breast tumor: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Phuc Van; Le, Hanh Thi; Vu, Binh Thanh; Pham, Viet Quoc; Le, Phong Minh; Phan, Nhan Lu-Chinh; Trinh, Ngu Van; Nguyen, Huyen Thi-Lam; Nguyen, Sinh Truong; Nguyen, Toan Linh; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) is one of the leading cancers in women. Recent progress has enabled BC to be cured with high efficiency. However, late detection or metastatic disease often renders the disease untreatable. Additionally, relapse is the main cause of death in BC patients. Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are considered to cause the development of BC and are thought to be responsible for metastasis and relapse. This study aimed to target BCSCs using dendritic cells (DCs) to treat tumor-bearing humanized mice models. Materials and methods NOD/SCID mice were used to produce the humanized mice by transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells. Human BCSCs were injected into the mammary fat pad to produce BC humanized mice. Both hematopoietic stem cells and DCs were isolated from the human umbilical cord blood, and immature DCs were produced from cultured mononuclear cells. DCs were matured by BCSC-derived antigen incubation for 48 hours. Mature DCs were vaccinated to BC humanized mice with a dose of 106 cells/mice, and the survival percentage was monitored in both treated and untreated groups. Results The results showed that DC vaccination could target BCSCs and reduce the tumor size and prolong survival. Conclusion These results suggested that targeting BCSCs with DCs is a promising therapy for BC. PMID:27499638

  13. Activation of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in Colon-Draining Lymph Nodes during Citrobacter rodentium Infection Involves Pathogen-Sensing and Inflammatory Pathways Distinct from Conventional Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Toivonen, Raine; Kong, Lingjia; Rasool, Omid; Lund, Riikka J; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Hänninen, Arno

    2016-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) bear the main responsibility for initiation of adaptive immune responses necessary for antimicrobial immunity. In the small intestine, afferent lymphatics convey Ags and microbial signals to mesenteric lymph nodes (LNs) to induce adaptive immune responses against microbes and food Ags derived from the small intestine. Whether the large intestine is covered by the same lymphatic system or represents its own lymphoid compartment has not been studied until very recently. We identified three small mesenteric LNs, distinct from small intestinal LNs, which drain lymph specifically from the colon, and studied DC responses to the attaching and effacing pathogen Citrobacter rodentium in these. Transcriptional profiling of conventional (CD11c(high)CD103(high)) DC and plasmacytoid (plasmacytoid DC Ag-1(high)B220(+)CD11c(int)) DC (pDC) populations during steady-state conditions revealed activity of distinct sets of genes in these two DC subsets, both in small intestinal and colon-draining LNs. C. rodentium activated DC especially in colon-draining LNs, and gene expression changed in pDC more profoundly than in conventional DC. Among the genes most upregulated in pDC were C-type lectin receptor CLEC4E, IL-1Rs (IL-1R1 and -2), proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1a and IL-6), and TLR6. Our results indicate that colon immune surveillance is distinct from that of the small intestine in terms of draining LNs, and identify pDC as active sentinels of colonic inflammation and/or microbial dysbiosis. PMID:27183629

  14. Nanomaterial-dependent immunoregulation of dendritic cells and its effects on biological activities of contraceptive nanovaccines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pingping; Tang, Shuai; Jiang, Luping; Yang, Lihua; Zhang, Dinglin; Feng, Shibin; Zhao, Tingting; Dong, Yajun; He, Wei; Wang, Ruibing; Zhang, Jianxiang; Liang, Zhiqing

    2016-03-10

    Nanovehicles are promising delivery systems for various vaccines. Nevertheless, different biophysicochemical properties of nanoparticles (NPs), dominating their in vitro and in vivo performances for vaccination, remain unclear. We attempted to elucidate the effects of NPs and their pH-sensitivity on in vitro and in vivo efficacy of resulting prophylactic nanovaccines containing a contraceptive peptide (FSHR). To this end, pH-responsive and non-responsive nanovaccines were produced using acetalated β-cyclodextrin (Ac-bCD) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), respectively. Meanwhile, FSHR derived from an epitope of the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor was used as the model antigen. FSHR-containing Ac-bCD and PLGA NPs were successfully prepared by a nanoemulsion technique, leading to well-shaped nanovaccines with high loading efficiency. The pH-sensitivity of Ac-bCD and PLGA nanovaccines was examined by in vitro hydrolysis and antigen release studies. Nanovaccines could be effectively engulfed by dendritic cells (DCs) via endocytosis in both dose and time dependent manners, and their intracellular trafficking was closely related to the pH-sensitivity of the carrier materials. Furthermore, nanovaccines could induce the secretion of inflammatory cytokines by DCs and T cells co-cultured with the stimulated DCs. In vivo evaluations demonstrated that nanovaccines were more potent than that based on the complete Freund's adjuvant, with respect to inducing anti-FSHR antibody, reducing the sperm count, inhibiting the sperm motility, and increasing the teratosperm rate. Immunization of male mice with nanovaccines notably decreased the parturition incidence of the mated females. Consequently, both in vitro and in vivo activities of FSHR could be considerably augmented by NPs. More importantly, our studies indicated that the pH-responsive nanovaccine was not superior over the non-responsive counterpart for the examined peptide antigen. PMID:26826303

  15. Immature Dengue Virus Is Infectious in Human Immature Dendritic Cells via Interaction with the Receptor Molecule DC-SIGN

    PubMed Central

    Torres Pedraza, Silvia; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; van de Pol, Denise P. I.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue Virus (DENV) is the most common mosquito-borne viral infection worldwide. Important target cells during DENV infection are macrophages, monocytes, and immature dendritic cells (imDCs). DENV-infected cells are known to secrete a large number of partially immature and fully immature particles alongside mature virions. Fully immature DENV particles are considered non-infectious, but antibodies have been shown to rescue their infectious properties. This suggests that immature DENV particles only contribute to the viral load observed in patients with a heterologous DENV re-infection. Methodology/Principal findings In this study, we re-evaluated the infectious properties of fully immature particles in absence and presence of anti-DENV human serum. We show that immature DENV is infectious in cells expressing DC-SIGN. Furthermore, we demonstrate that immature dendritic cells, in contrast to macrophage-like cells, do not support antibody-dependent enhancement of immature DENV. Conclusions/Significance Our data shows that immature DENV can infect imDCs through interaction with DC-SIGN, suggesting that immature and partially immature DENV particles may contribute to dengue pathogenesis during primary infection. Furthermore, since antibodies do not further stimulate DENV infectivity on imDCs we propose that macrophages/monocytes rather than imDCs contribute to the increased viral load observed during severe heterotypic DENV re-infections. PMID:24886790

  16. pH-dependent recognition of apoptotic and necrotic cells by the human dendritic cell receptor DEC205

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Longxing; Shi, Xiangyi; Chang, Haishuang; Zhang, Qinfen; He, Yongning

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells play important roles in regulating innate and adaptive immune responses. DEC205 (CD205) is one of the major endocytotic receptors on dendritic cells and has been widely used for vaccine generation against viruses and tumors. However, little is known about its structure and functional mechanism. Here we determine the structure of the human DEC205 ectodomain by cryoelectron microscopy. The structure shows that the 12 extracellular domains form a compact double ring-shaped conformation at acidic pH and become extended at basic pH. Biochemical data indicate that the pH-dependent conformational change of DEC205 is correlated with ligand binding and release. DEC205 only binds to apoptotic and necrotic cells at acidic pH, whereas live cells cannot be recognized by DEC205 at either acidic or basic conditions. These results suggest that DEC205 is an immune receptor that recognizes apoptotic and necrotic cells specifically through a pH-dependent mechanism. PMID:26039988

  17. Activity-based anorexia has differential effects on apical dendritic branching in dorsal and ventral hippocampal CA1.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Tara G; Barbarich-Marsteller, Nicole C; Chan, Thomas E; Aoki, Chiye

    2014-11-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is an eating disorder to which adolescent females are particularly vulnerable. Like AN, activity-based anorexia (ABA), a rodent model of AN, results in elevation of stress hormones and has genetic links to anxiety disorders. The hippocampus plays a key role in the regulation of anxiety and responds with structural changes to hormones and stress, suggesting that it may play a role in AN. The hippocampus of ABA animals exhibits increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor and increased GABA receptor expression, but the structural effects of ABA have not been studied. We used Golgi staining of neurons to determine whether ABA in female rats during adolescence results in structural changes to the apical dendrites in hippocampal CA1 and contrasted to the effects of food restriction (FR) and exercise (EX), the environmental factors used to induce ABA. In the dorsal hippocampus, which preferentially mediates spatial learning and cognition, cells of ABA animals had less total dendritic length and fewer dendritic branches in stratum radiatum (SR) than in control (CON). In the ventral hippocampus, which preferentially mediates anxiety, ABA evoked more branching in SR than CON. In both dorsal and ventral regions, the main effect of exercise was localized to the SR while the main effect of food restriction occurred in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare. Taken together with data on spine density, these results indicate that ABA elicits pathway-specific changes in the hippocampus that may underlie the increased anxiety and reduced behavioral flexibility observed in ABA. PMID:23959245

  18. Multidirectional interactions are bridging human NK cells with plasmacytoid and monocyte-derived dendritic cells during innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Della Chiesa, Mariella; Romagnani, Chiara; Thiel, Andreas; Moretta, Lorenzo; Moretta, Alessandro

    2006-12-01

    During innate immune responses, natural killer (NK) cells may interact with both plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). We show that freshly isolated NK cells promote the release by pDCs of IFN-alpha, in a CpG-dependent manner, whereas they induce IL-6 production in a CpG-independent manner. In turn pDC-derived IFN-alpha up-regulates NK-mediated killing, whereas IL-6 could promote B-cell differentiation. We also show that exposure to exogenous IL-12 or coculture with maturing MDDCs up-regulates the NK-cell-dependent IFN-alpha production by pDCs. On the other hand, NK cells cocultured with pDCs acquire the ability to kill immature MDDCs, thus favoring their editing process. Finally, we show that activated NK cells are unable to lyse pDCs because these cells display an intrinsic resistance to lysis. The exposure of pDCs to IL-3 increased their susceptibility to NK-cell cytotoxicity resulting from a de novo expression of ligands for activating NK-cell receptors, such as the DNAM-1 ligand nectin-2. Thus, different cell-to-cell interactions and various cytokines appear to control a multidirectional network between NK cells, MDDCs, and pDCs that is likely to play an important role during the early phase of innate immune responses to viral infections and to tumors. PMID:16873676

  19. Effects of polarization induced by non-weak electric fields on the excitability of elongated neurons with active dendrites.

    PubMed

    Reznik, Robert I; Barreto, Ernest; Sander, Evelyn; So, Paul

    2016-02-01

    An externally-applied electric field can polarize a neuron, especially a neuron with elongated dendrites, and thus modify its excitability. Here we use a computational model to examine, predict, and explain these effects. We use a two-compartment Pinsky-Rinzel model neuron polarized by an electric potential difference imposed between its compartments, and we apply an injected ramp current. We vary three model parameters: the magnitude of the applied potential difference, the extracellular potassium concentration, and the rate of current injection. A study of the Time-To-First-Spike (TTFS) as a function of polarization leads to the identification of three regions of polarization strength that have different effects. In the weak region, the TTFS increases linearly with polarization. In the intermediate region, the TTFS increases either sub- or super-linearly, depending on the current injection rate and the extracellular potassium concentration. In the strong region, the TTFS decreases. Our results in the weak and strong region are consistent with experimental observations, and in the intermediate region, we predict novel effects that depend on experimentally-accessible parameters. We find that active channels in the dendrite play a key role in these effects. Our qualitative results were found to be robust over a wide range of inter-compartment conductances and the ratio of somatic to dendritic membrane areas. In addition, we discuss preliminary results where synaptic inputs replace the ramp injection protocol. The insights and conclusions were found to extend from our polarized PR model to a polarized PR model with I h dendritic currents. Finally, we discuss the degree to which our results may be generalized. PMID:26560333

  20. Dendritic Growth Investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Representatives of NASA materials science experiments supported the NASA exhibit at the Rernselaer Polytechnic Institute's Space Week activities, April 5 through 11, 1999. From left to right are: Angie Jackman, project manager at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for dendritic growth experiments; Dr. Martin Glicksman of Rennselaer Polytechnic Instutute, Troy, NY, principal investigator on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) that flew three times on the Space Shuttle; and Dr. Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA, a co-investigator on the IDGE and now principal investigator on the Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment being developed for the International Space Station (ISS). The image at far left is a dendrite grown in Glicksman's IDGE tests aboard the Shuttle. Glicksman is also principal investigator for the Evolution of Local Microstructures: Spatial Instabilities of Coarsening Clusters.

  1. Helicobacter pylori inhibits dendritic cell maturation via interleukin-10-mediated activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Rizzuti, David; Ang, Michelle; Sokollik, Christiane; Wu, Ted; Abdullah, Majd; Greenfield, Laura; Fattouh, Ramzi; Reardon, Colin; Tang, Michael; Diao, Jun; Schindler, Christian; Cattral, Mark; Jones, Nicola L

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects the human gastric mucosa causing a chronic infection that is the primary risk factor for gastric cancer development. Recent studies demonstrate that H. pylori promotes tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) development indicating that this bacterium evades the host immune response. However, the signaling pathways involved in modulating DC activation during infection remain unclear. Here, we report that H. pylori infection activated the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway in murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) and splenic DCs isolated ex vivo. Isogenic cagA-, cagE-, vacA- and urease-mutants exhibited levels of phosphoSTAT3 that were comparable to in the wild-type (WT) parent strain. H. pylori-infected BMDCs produced increased immunosuppressive IL-10, which activated STAT3 in an autocrine/paracrine fashion. Neutralization of IL-10 prevented H. pylori-mediated STAT3 activation in both BMDCs and splenic DCs. In addition, anti-IL-10 treatment of infected H. pylori-BMDCs was associated with increased CD86 and MHC II expression and enhanced proinflammatory IL-1β cytokine secretion. Finally, increased CD86 and MHC II expression was detected in H. pylori-infected STAT3 knockout DCs when compared to WT controls. Together, these results demonstrate that H. pylori infection induces IL-10 secretion in DCs, which activates STAT3, thereby modulating DC maturation and reducing IL-1β secretion. These findings identify a host molecular mechanism by which H. pylori can manipulate the innate immune response to potentially favor chronic infection and promote carcinogenesis. PMID:25412627

  2. Dendrimer-like alpha-d-glucan nanoparticles activate dendritic cells and are effective vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fangjia; Mencia, Alejandra; Bi, Lin; Taylor, Aaron; Yao, Yuan; HogenEsch, Harm

    2015-04-28

    The use of nanoparticles for delivery of vaccine antigens and as vaccine adjuvants is appealing because their size allows efficient uptake by dendritic cells and their biological properties can be tailored to the desired function. Here, we report the effect of chemically modified phytoglycogen, a dendrimer-like α-d-glucan nanoparticle, on dendritic cells in vitro, and the utility of this type of nanoparticle as a vaccine adjuvant in vivo. The modified phytoglycogen nanoparticle, termed Nano-11, has a positive surface charge which enabled electrostatic adsorption of negatively charged protein antigens. The Nano-11-antigen complexes were efficiently phagocytized by dendritic cells. Nano-11 induced increased expression of costimulatory molecules and the secretion of IL-1β and IL-12p40 by dendritic cells. Intramuscular injection of Nano-11-antigen formulations induced a significantly enhanced immune response to two different protein antigens. Examination of the injection site revealed numerous monocytes and relatively few neutrophils at one day after injection. The inflammation had nearly completely disappeared by 2 weeks after injection. These studies indicate that Nano-11 is an effective vaccine delivery vehicle that significantly enhances the immune response. This type of plant based nanoparticle is considered highly cost-effective compared with fully synthetic nanoparticles and appears to have an excellent safety profile making them an attractive adjuvant candidate for prophylactic vaccines. PMID:25747143

  3. Characterization of human DNGR-1+ BDCA3+ leukocytes as putative equivalents of mouse CD8alpha+ dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Lionel Franz; Salio, Mariolina; Griessinger, Emmanuel; Anjos-Afonso, Fernando; Craciun, Ligia; Chen, Ji-Li; Keller, Anna M; Joffre, Olivier; Zelenay, Santiago; Nye, Emma; Le Moine, Alain; Faure, Florence; Donckier, Vincent; Sancho, David; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Bonnet, Dominique; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2010-06-01

    In mouse, a subset of dendritic cells (DCs) known as CD8alpha+ DCs has emerged as an important player in the regulation of T cell responses and a promising target in vaccination strategies. However, translation into clinical protocols has been hampered by the failure to identify CD8alpha+ DCs in humans. Here, we characterize a population of human DCs that expresses DNGR-1 (CLEC9A) and high levels of BDCA3 and resembles mouse CD8alpha+ DCs in phenotype and function. We describe the presence of such cells in the spleens of humans and humanized mice and report on a protocol to generate them in vitro. Like mouse CD8alpha+ DCs, human DNGR-1+ BDCA3hi DCs express Necl2, CD207, BATF3, IRF8, and TLR3, but not CD11b, IRF4, TLR7, or (unlike CD8alpha+ DCs) TLR9. DNGR-1+ BDCA3hi DCs respond to poly I:C and agonists of TLR8, but not of TLR7, and produce interleukin (IL)-12 when given innate and T cell-derived signals. Notably, DNGR-1+ BDCA3+ DCs from in vitro cultures efficiently internalize material from dead cells and can cross-present exogenous antigens to CD8+ T cells upon treatment with poly I:C. The characterization of human DNGR-1+ BDCA3hi DCs and the ability to grow them in vitro opens the door for exploiting this subset in immunotherapy. PMID:20479117

  4. Modular expression analysis reveals functional conservation between human Langerhans cells and mouse cross-priming dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Artyomov, Maxim N.; Munk, Adiel; Gorvel, Laurent; Korenfeld, Daniel; Cella, Marina; Tung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of functionally distinct dendritic cell (DC) subsets in mice has fueled interest in whether analogous counterparts exist in humans. Transcriptional modules of coordinately expressed genes were used for defining shared functions between the species. Comparing modules derived from four human skin DC subsets and modules derived from the Immunological Genome Project database for all mouse DC subsets revealed that human Langerhans cells (LCs) and the mouse XCR1+CD8α+CD103+ DCs shared the class I–mediated antigen processing and cross-presentation transcriptional modules that were not seen in mouse LCs. Furthermore, human LCs were enriched in a transcriptional signature specific to the blood cross-presenting CD141/BDCA-3+ DCs, the proposed equivalent to mouse CD8α+ DCs. Consistent with our analysis, LCs were highly adept at inducing primary CTL responses. Thus, our study suggests that the function of LCs may not be conserved between mouse and human and supports human LCs as an especially relevant therapeutic target. PMID:25918340

  5. Helminth Excreted/Secreted Antigens Repress Expression of LPS-Induced Let-7i but Not miR-146a and miR-155 in Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Terrazas, Luis I.; Sánchez-Muñoz, Fausto; Pérez-Miranda, Magaly; Mejía-Domínguez, Ana M.; Ledesma-Soto, Yadira; Bojalil, Rafael; Gómez-García, Lorena

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as key regulators of immune responses. They influence immune cells' function and probably the outcome of several infections. Currently, it is largely unknown if helminth parasites and their antigens modify host microRNAs expression. The aim of this study was to explore if excreted/secreted antigens of Taenia crassiceps regulate LPS-induced miRNAs expression in human Dendritic Cells. We found that these antigens repressed LPS-let-7i induction but not mir-146a or mir-155 and this correlates with a diminished inflammatory response. This let-7i downregulation in Dendritic Cells constitutes a novel feature of the modulatory activity that helminth-derived antigens exert on their host. PMID:23509825

  6. Downregulation of endogenous STAT3 augments tumoricidal activity of interleukin 15 activated dendritic cell against lymphoma and leukemia via TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Hira, Sumit Kumar; Mondal, Indrani; Bhattacharya, Debasis; Manna, Partha Pratim

    2014-10-01

    Effector functions in tumor resistance by dendritic cells (DCs) are less well characterized. In this study, we describe that the murine DCs upon stimulation with recombinant IL-15 in vitro or in vivo, expresses TNF superfamily member TRAIL which mediates cytotoxicity and growth inhibition against a murine lymphoma called Dalton lymphoma (DL) via apoptosis. Presence of tumor lysate or intact tumor cells significantly reduces the DC mediated tumoricidal effect, possibly via masking and down-regulating TRAIL in DCs. The antitumor effect of DC derived TRAIL was further augmented by deactivation of STAT3 in tumor cells by cucurbitacin I, which makes it more susceptible to DC derived TRAIL Treatment of tumor cells with cucurbitacin I upregulates TRAIL receptor expression in addition to activation of caspases. Compared to naïve DCs, DCs from tumor bearing mice are significantly impaired in TRAIL expression and consequent antitumor functions against DL which was partially restored by activation with IL-15 or LPS. Priming with recombinant IL-15 prolongs the survival of tumor bearing mice treated with cucurbitacin I. Naïve peripheral blood DCs derived from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients have significant impairment in expression of TRAIL and consequent tumoricidal properties against TRAIL sensitive lymphoma cell lines and primary tumor cells compared to normal control. PMID:25139620

  7. Dendritic morphology, synaptic transmission, and activity of mature granule cells born following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fei; Song, Xueying; Zhu, Dexiao; Wang, Xiaochen; Hao, Aijun; Nadler, J. Victor; Zhan, Ren-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    To understand the potential role of enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) in the development of epilepsy, we quantitatively analyzed the geometry of apical dendrites, synaptic transmission, and activation levels of normotopically distributed mature newborn granule cells in the rat. SE in male Sprague-Dawley rats (between 6 and 7 weeks old) lasting for more than 2 h was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of pilocarpine. The complexity, spine density, miniature post-synaptic currents, and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) expression of granule cells born 5 days after SE were studied between 10 and 17 weeks after CAG-GFP retroviral vector-mediated labeling. Mature granule cells born after SE had dendritic complexity similar to that of granule cells born naturally, but with denser mushroom-like spines in dendritic segments located in the outer molecular layer. Miniature inhibitory post-synaptic currents (mIPSCs) were similar between the controls and rats subjected to SE; however, smaller miniature excitatory post-synaptic current (mEPSC) amplitude with a trend toward less frequent was found in mature granule cells born after SE. After maturation, granule cells born after SE did not show denser Arc expression in the resting condition or 2 h after being activated by pentylenetetrazol-induced transient seizure activity than vicinal GFP-unlabeled granule cells. Thus our results suggest that normotopic granule cells born after pilocarpine-induced SE are no more active when mature than age-matched, naturally born granule cells. PMID:26500490

  8. Lactobacillus crispatus strain SJ-3C-US induces human dendritic cells (DCs) maturation and confers an anti-inflammatory phenotype to DCs.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Solat; Hadjati, Jamshid; Motevaseli, Elahe; Mirzaei, Reza; Farashi Bonab, Samad; Ansaripour, Bita; Khoramizadeh, Mohammad Reza

    2016-08-01

    Lactobacillus crispatus is one of the most predominant species in the healthy vagina microbiota. Nevertheless, the interactions between this commensal bacterium and the immune system are largely unknown. Given the importance of the dendritic cells (DCs) in the regulation of the immunity, this study was performed to elucidate the influence of vaginal isolated L. crispatus SJ-3C-US from healthy Iranian women on DCs, either directly by exposure of DCs to ultraviolet-inactivated (UVI) and heat-killed (HK) L. crispatus SJ-3C-US or indirectly to its cell-free supernatant (CFS), and the outcomes of immune response. In this work we showed that L. crispatus SJ-3C-US induced strong dose-dependent activation of dendritic cells and production of high levels of IL-10, whereas IL-12p70 production was induced at low level in an inverse dose-dependent manner. This stimulation skewed T cells polarization toward CD4(+) CD25(+) FOXP3(+) Treg cells and production of IL-10 in a dose-dependent manner in mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR) test. The mode of bacterial inactivation did not affect the DCs activation pattern, upon encounter with L. crispatus SJ-3C-US. Moreover, while DCs stimulated with CFS showed moderate phenotypic maturation and IL-10 production, it failed to skew T cells polarization toward CD4(+) CD25(+) FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) and production of IL-10. This study showed that L. crispatus SJ-3C-US confers an anti-inflammatory phenotype to DCs through up-regulation of anti-inflammatory/regulatory IL-10 cytokine production and induction of CD4(+) CD25(+) FOXP3(+) T cells at optimal dosage. Our findings suggest that L. crispatus SJ-3C-US could be a potent candidate as protective probiotic against human immune-mediated pathologies, such as chronic inflammation, vaginitis or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). PMID:27245496

  9. Local plasticity of dendritic excitability can be autonomous of synaptic plasticity and regulated by activity-based phosphorylation of Kv4.2.

    PubMed

    Labno, Anna; Warrier, Ajithkumar; Wang, Sheng; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    While plasticity is typically associated with persistent modifications of synaptic strengths, recent studies indicated that modulations of dendritic excitability may form the other part of the engram and dynamically affect computational processing and output of neuronal circuits. However it remains unknown whether modulation of dendritic excitability is controlled by synaptic changes or whether it can be distinct from them. Here we report the first observation of the induction of a persistent plastic decrease in dendritic excitability decoupled from synaptic stimulation, which is localized and purely activity-based. In rats this local plasticity decrease is conferred by CamKII mediated phosphorylation of A-type potassium channels upon interaction of a back propagating action potential (bAP) with dendritic depolarization. PMID:24404150

  10. TLR2 and TLR4 as Potential Biomarkers of Environmental Particulate Matter Exposed Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Marc A.; Cheadle, Chris; Watkins, Tonya; Tailor, Anitaben; Killedar, Smruti; Breysse, Patrick; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Georas, Steve N.

    2007-01-01

    In many subjects who are genetically susceptible to asthma, exposure to environmental stimuli may exacerbate their condition. However, it is unknown how the expression and function of a family of pattern-recognition receptors called toll-like receptors (TLR) are affected by exposure to particulate pollution. TLRs serve a critical function in alerting the immune system of tissue damage or infection—the so-called “danger signals”. We are interested in the role that TLRs play in directing appropriate responses by innate immunity, particularly dendritic cells (DC), after exposing them to particulate pollution. Dendritic cells serve a pivotal role in directing host immunity. Thus, we hypothesized that alterations in TLR expression could be further explored as potential biomarkers of effect related to DC exposure to particulate pollution. We show some preliminary data that indicates that inhaled particulate pollution acts directly on DC by down-regulating TLR expression and altering the activation state of DC. While further studies are warranted, we suggest that alterations in TLR2 and TLR4 expression should be explored as potential biomarkers of DC exposure to environmental particulate pollution. PMID:19662206

  11. Nanoencapsulated budesonide in self-stratified polyurethane-polyurea nanoparticles is highly effective in inducing human tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Flórez-Grau, Georgina; Rocas, Pau; Cabezón, Raquel; España, Carolina; Panés, Julián; Rocas, Josep; Albericio, Fernando; Benítez-Ribas, Daniel

    2016-09-25

    The design of innovative strategies to selectively target cells, such antigen-presenting cells and dendritic cells, in vivo to induce immune tolerance is gaining interest and relevance for the treatment of immune-mediated diseases. A novel loaded-nanosystem strategy to generate tolerogenic dendritic cells (tol-DCs) was evaluated. Hence budesonide (BDS) was encapsulated in multiwalled polyurethane-polyurea nanoparticles (PUUa NPs-BDS) based on self-stratified polymers by hydrophobic interactions at the oil-water interface. DCs treated with encapsulated BDS presented a prominent downregulation of costimulatory molecules (CD80, CD83 and MHCII) and upregulation of inhibitory receptors. Moreover, DCs treated with these PUUa NPs-BDS also secreted large amounts of IL-10, a crucial anti-inflammatory cytokine to induce tolerance, and inhibited T lymphocyte activation in a specific manner compared to those cells generated with free BDS. These results demonstrate that PUUa NPs-BDS are a highly specific and efficient system through which to induce DCs with a tolerogenic profile. Given the capacity of PUUa NPs-BDS, this delivery system has a clear advantage for translation to in vivo studies. PMID:27477102

  12. CD4 Binding Affinity Determines Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Induced Alpha Interferon Production in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells ▿

    PubMed Central

    Haupt, Sabrina; Donhauser, Norbert; Chaipan, Chawaree; Schuster, Philipp; Puffer, Bridget; Daniels, Rod S.; Greenough, Thomas C.; Kirchhoff, Frank; Schmidt, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC) are major producers of type I interferons (IFN) in response to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. To better define the underlying mechanisms, we studied the magnitude of alpha IFN (IFN-α) induction by recombinant viruses containing changes in the Env protein that impair or disrupt CD4 binding or expressing primary env alleles with differential coreceptor tropism. We found that the CD4 binding affinity but not the viral coreceptor usage is critical for the attachment of autofluorescing HIV-1 to PDC and for subsequent IFN-α induction. Our results illustrate the importance of the gp120-CD4 interaction in determining HIV-1-induced immune stimulation via IFN-α production. PMID:18579609

  13. In situ induction of dendritic cell–based T cell tolerance in humanized mice and nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Jeon, Yoon Kyung; Ban, Young Larn; Min, Hye Sook; Kim, Eun Ji; Kim, Ju Hyun; Kang, Byung Hyun; Bae, Youngmee; Yoon, Il-Hee; Kim, Yong-Hee; Lee, Jae-Il; Kim, Jung-Sik; Shin, Jun-Seop; Yang, Jaeseok; Kim, Sung Joo; Rostlund, Emily; Muller, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Induction of antigen-specific T cell tolerance would aid treatment of diverse immunological disorders and help prevent allograft rejection and graft versus host disease. In this study, we establish a method of inducing antigen-specific T cell tolerance in situ in diabetic humanized mice and Rhesus monkeys receiving porcine islet xenografts. Antigen-specific T cell tolerance is induced by administration of an antibody ligating a particular epitope on ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1). Antibody-mediated ligation of ICAM-1 on dendritic cells (DCs) led to the arrest of DCs in a semimature stage in vitro and in vivo. Ablation of DCs from mice completely abrogated anti–ICAM-1–induced antigen-specific T cell tolerance. T cell responses to unrelated antigens remained unaffected. In situ induction of DC-mediated T cell tolerance using this method may represent a potent therapeutic tool for preventing graft rejection. PMID:22025302

  14. Human Papillomavirus Clearance Among Males Is Associated With HIV Acquisition and Increased Dendritic Cell Density in the Foreskin

    PubMed Central

    Tobian, Aaron A. R.; Grabowski, Mary K.; Kigozi, Godfrey; Redd, Andrew D.; Eaton, Kevin P.; Serwadda, David; Cornish, Toby C.; Nalugoda, Fred; Watya, Stephen; Buwembo, Denis; Nkale, James; Wawer, Maria J.; Quinn, Thomas C.; Gray, Ronald H.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroconversion is unclear, and the genital cellular immunology has not been evaluated. Methods. A case-control analysis nested within a male circumcision trial was conducted. Cases consisted of 44 male HIV seroconverters, and controls were 787 males who were persistently negative for HIV. The Roche HPV Linear Array Genotype Test detected high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) and low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) genotypes. Generalized estimating equations logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) of HIV seroconversion. In addition, densities of CD1a+ dendritic cells, CD4+ T cells, and CD8+ T cells were measured using immunohistochemistry analysis in foreskins of 79 males randomly selected from participants in the circumcision trial. Results. HR-HPV or LR-HPV acquisition was not significantly associated with HIV seroconversion, after adjustment for sexual behaviors. However, HR-HPV and LR-HPV clearance was significantly associated with HIV seroconversion (aOR, 3.25 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.11–9.55] and 3.18 [95% CI, 1.14–8.90], respectively). The odds of HIV seroconversion increased with increasing number of HPV genotypes cleared (P < .001, by the test for trend). The median CD1a+ dendritic cell density in the foreskin epidermis was significantly higher among males who cleared HPV (72.0 cells/mm2 [interquartile range {IQR}, 29.4–138.3 cells/mm2]), compared with males who were persistently negative for HPV (32.1 cells/mm2 [IQR, 3.1–96.2 cells/mm2]; P = .047), and increased progressively with the number of HPV genotypes cleared (P = .05). Conclusions. HPV clearance was associated with subsequent HIV seroconversion and also with increased epidermal dendritic cell density, which potentially mediates HIV seroconversion. PMID:23345339

  15. Epileptiform activity induces distance-dependent alterations of the Ca2+ extrusion mechanism in the apical dendrites of subicular pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Kalyan V; Sikdar, Sujit K

    2008-12-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie acquired changes in Ca(2+) dynamics of different neuronal compartments are important in the induction and maintenance of epileptiform activity. Simultaneous electrophysiology and Ca(2+) imaging techniques were used to understand the basic properties of dendritic Ca(2+) signaling in rat subicular pyramidal neurons during epileptiform activity. Distance-dependent changes in the Ca(2+) decay kinetics locked to spontaneous epileptiform discharges and back-propagating action potentials were observed in the apical dendrites. A decrement in the mean tau value of Ca(2+) decay was observed in distal parts (95-110 mum) of the apical dendrites compared with proximal segments (30-45 mum) in in-vitro epileptic conditions but not in control. Pharmacological agents that block Ca(2+) transporters, i.e. Na(+)/ Ca(2+) exchangers (Benzamil), plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase pumps (Calmidazolium) and smooth endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase pumps (Thapsigargin), were applied locally to the proximal and distal part of the apical dendrites in both experimental conditions to understand the molecular aspects of the Ca(2+) extrusion mechanisms. The relative contribution of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers in Ca(2+) extrusion was higher in the distal apical dendrites in the in-vitro epileptic condition and this property modulated the excitability of the neuron in simulation. The Ca(2+) homeostatic mechanisms that restore normal Ca(2+) levels could play a major neuroprotective role in the distal dendrites that receive synaptic inputs. PMID:19046366

  16. Dual Activation of a Sex Pheromone-Dependent Ion Channel from Insect Olfactory Dendrites by Protein Kinase C Activators and Cyclic GMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zufall, Frank; Hatt, Hanns

    1991-10-01

    Olfactory transduction is thought to take place in the outer dendritic membrane of insect olfactory receptor neurons. Here we show that the outer dendritic plasma membrane of silkmoth olfactory receptor neurons seems to be exclusively equipped with a specific ion channel activated by low concentrations of the species-specific sex pheromone component. This so-called AC_1 channel has a conductance of 56 pS and is nonselectively permeable to cations. The AC_1 channel can be activated from the intracellular side by protein kinase C activators such as diacylglycerol and phorbolester and by cGMP but not by Ca2+, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, or cAMP. Our results imply that phosphorylation of this ion channel by protein kinase C could be the crucial step in channel opening by sex pheromones.

  17. Human Gastric Epithelial Cells Contribute to Gastric Immune Regulation by Providing Retinoic Acid to Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bimczok, Diane; Kao, John Y.; Zhang, Min; Cochrun, Steven; Mannon, Peter; Peter, Shajan; Wilcox, Charles M.; Mönkemüller, Klaus E.; Harris, Paul R.; Grams, Jayleen M.; Stahl, Richard D.; Smith, Phillip D.; Smythies, Lesley E.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of chronic gastritis caused by H. pylori, the gastric mucosa has received little investigative attention as a unique immune environment. Here, we analyzed whether retinoic acid (RA), an important homeostatic factor in the small intestinal mucosa, also contributes to gastric immune regulation. We report that human gastric tissue contains high levels of the RA precursor molecule, retinol, and that gastric epithelial cells express both RA biosynthesis genes and RA response genes, indicative of active RA biosynthesis. Moreover, primary gastric epithelial cells cultured in the presence of retinol synthesized RA in vitro and induced RA biosynthesis in co-cultured monocytes through an RA-dependent mechanism, suggesting that gastric epithelial cells may also confer the ability to generate RA on gastric DCs. Indeed, DCs purified from gastric mucosa had similar levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and RA biosynthesis gene expression as small intestinal DCs, although gastric DCs lacked CD103. In H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa, gastric RA biosynthesis gene expression was severely disrupted, which may lead to reduced RA signaling and thus contribute to disease progression. Collectively, our results support a critical role for RA in human gastric immune regulation. PMID:25249167

  18. The Dark Side of Dendritic Cells: Development and Exploitation of Tolerogenic Activity That Favor Tumor Outgrowth and Immune Escape

    PubMed Central

    Seliger, Barbara; Massa, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a central role in the regulation of the immune responses by providing the information needed to decide between tolerance, ignorance, or active responses. For this reason different therapies aim at manipulating DC to obtain the desired response, such as enhanced cell-mediated toxicity against tumor and infected cells or the induction of tolerance in autoimmunity and transplantation. In the last decade studies performed in these settings have started to identify (some) molecules/factors involved in the acquisition of a tolerogenic DC phenotype as well as the underlying mechanisms of their regulatory function on different immune cell populations. PMID:24348482

  19. Low dose daily rhGM-CSF application activates monocytes and dendritic cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Demir, Gokhan; Klein, Hans Otto; Tuzuner, Nukhet

    2003-12-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a powerful cytokine with multiple actions. We investigated the effects of low dose daily rhGM-CSF application on monocytes and peripheral circulating dendritic cells (DC) in malignant melanoma patients in vivo. Twenty patients were included; rhGM-CSF was given as daily subcutaneous injections for 14 days. A significant increase was noted in monocytes and granulocytes, starting on the 5th day. Expression of CD95 (Apo-1/Fas) and CD45RO on monocytes increased significantly on the 5th day, and CD4 expression on monocytes increased significantly on the 14th day. Peripheral circulating dendritic cells which were 0.94% in the beginning, increased to 1.35% (P<0.04) and to 1.96% (P<0.001) on days 5 and 14, respectively. PMID:12921948

  20. Human dendritic cells process and present Listeria antigens for in vitro priming of autologous CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Eppler, Elisabeth; Walch, Michael; Latinovic-Golic, Sonja; Dumrese, Claudia; Filgueira, Luis; Groscurth, Peter

    2005-02-01

    The role of human dendritic cells (DC) in the immune response toward intracellularly growing Listeria was analyzed under in vitro conditions using several morphological and functional methods. DC incubated with Listeria innocua and L. monocytogenes, respectively, readily phagocytosed the bacteria. Listeria did not impair viability and immunogenic potential of human DC. Listerial antigens were found to be processed within the lysosomal compartment of DC and colocalized with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, as shown by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. DC challenged with apathogenic L. innocua were highly effective in priming autologous naive T cells (mainly CD4+) in vitro. The T cells strongly proliferated in the presence of DC incubated with L. innocua, which could be significantly inhibited by anti-MHC II mAb. L. innocua-primed T cells were also successfully stimulated by DC harboring the pathogenic L. monocytogenes, either the wild-type strain EGD or the p60 reduced mutant strain RIII. From our results, we conclude that human DC infected with nonpathogenic intracellular bacteria are able to efficiently prime naive T cells, which are then suitable for recognition of antigens derived from related virulent bacterial species. This in vitro human model provides an interesting tool for basic research in infectious immunology and possibly for a new immunotherapy. PMID:15812647

  1. The indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase pathway is essential for human plasmacytoid dendritic cell-induced adaptive T regulatory cell generation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Liang, Xueqing; Peterson, Amanda J; Munn, David H; Blazar, Bruce R

    2008-10-15

    Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs) can drive naive, allogeneic CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells to differentiate into CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). However, the intracellular mechanism or mechanisms underlying PDC-induced Treg generation are unknown. In this study, we show that human PDCs express high levels of IDO, an intracellular enzyme that catabolizes tryptophan degradation. Triggering of TLR 9 with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides activates PDCs to up-regulate surface expression of B7 ligands and HLA-DR Ag, but also significantly increases the expression of IDO and results in the generation of inducible Tregs from CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells with potent suppressor cell function. Blocking IDO activity with the pharmacologic inhibitor 1-methyl-D-tryptophan significantly abrogates PDC-driven inducible Treg generation and suppressor cell function. Adding kynurenine, the immediate downstream metabolite of tryptophan, bypasses the 1-methyl-D-tryptophan effect and restores PDC-driven Treg generation. Our results demonstrate that the IDO pathway is essential for PDC-driven Treg generation from CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells and implicate the generation of kynurenine pathway metabolites as the critical mediator of this process. PMID:18832696

  2. Activity-Dependent Gating of Calcium Spikes by A-type K+ Channels Controls Climbing Fiber Signaling in Purkinje Cell Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Otsu, Yo; Marcaggi, Païkan; Feltz, Anne; Isope, Philippe; Kollo, Mihaly; Nusser, Zoltan; Mathieu, Benjamin; Kano, Masanobu; Tsujita, Mika; Sakimura, Kenji; Dieudonné, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Summary In cerebellar Purkinje cell dendrites, heterosynaptic calcium signaling induced by the proximal climbing fiber (CF) input controls plasticity at distal parallel fiber (PF) synapses. The substrate and regulation of this long-range dendritic calcium signaling are poorly understood. Using high-speed calcium imaging, we examine the role of active dendritic conductances. Under basal conditions, CF stimulation evokes T-type calcium signaling displaying sharp proximodistal decrement. Combined mGluR1 receptor activation and depolarization, two activity-dependent signals, unlock P/Q calcium spikes initiation and propagation, mediating efficient CF signaling at distal sites. These spikes are initiated in proximal smooth dendrites, independently from somatic sodium action potentials, and evoke high-frequency bursts of all-or-none fast-rising calcium transients in PF spines. Gradual calcium spike burst unlocking arises from increasing inactivation of mGluR1-modulated low-threshold A-type potassium channels located in distal dendrites. Evidence for graded activity-dependent CF calcium signaling at PF synapses refines current views on cerebellar supervised learning rules. PMID:25220810

  3. Activity-dependent gating of calcium spikes by A-type K+ channels controls climbing fiber signaling in Purkinje cell dendrites.

    PubMed

    Otsu, Yo; Marcaggi, Païkan; Feltz, Anne; Isope, Philippe; Kollo, Mihaly; Nusser, Zoltan; Mathieu, Benjamin; Kano, Masanobu; Tsujita, Mika; Sakimura, Kenji; Dieudonné, Stéphane

    2014-10-01

    In cerebellar Purkinje cell dendrites, heterosynaptic calcium signaling induced by the proximal climbing fiber (CF) input controls plasticity at distal parallel fiber (PF) synapses. The substrate and regulation of this long-range dendritic calcium signaling are poorly understood. Using high-speed calcium imaging, we examine the role of active dendritic conductances. Under basal conditions, CF stimulation evokes T-type calcium signaling displaying sharp proximodistal decrement. Combined mGluR1 receptor activation and depolarization, two activity-dependent signals, unlock P/Q calcium spikes initiation and propagation, mediating efficient CF signaling at distal sites. These spikes are initiated in proximal smooth dendrites, independently from somatic sodium action potentials, and evoke high-frequency bursts of all-or-none fast-rising calcium transients in PF spines. Gradual calcium spike burst unlocking arises from increasing inactivation of mGluR1-modulated low-threshold A-type potassium channels located in distal dendrites. Evidence for graded activity-dependent CF calcium signaling at PF synapses refines current views on cerebellar supervised learning rules. PMID:25220810

  4. Interleukin 10 and dendritic cells are the main suppression mediators of regulatory T cells in human neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Arce-Sillas, A; Álvarez-Luquín, D D; Cárdenas, G; Casanova-Hernández, D; Fragoso, G; Hernández, M; Proaño Narváez, J V; García-Vázquez, F; Fleury, A; Sciutto, E; Adalid-Peralta, L

    2016-02-01

    Neurocysticercosis is caused by the establishment of Taenia solium cysticerci in the central nervous system. It is considered that, during co-evolution, the parasite developed strategies to modulate the host's immune response. The action mechanisms of regulatory T cells in controlling the immune response in neurocysticercosis are studied in this work. Higher blood levels of regulatory T cells with CD4(+) CD45RO(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)(high) and CD4(+) CD25(high) FoxP3(+) CD95(high) phenotype and of non-regulatory CD4(+) CD45RO(+) FoxP3(med) T cells were found in neurocysticercosis patients with respect to controls. Interestingly, regulatory T cells express higher levels of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4), lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG-3), programmed death 1 (PD-1) and glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor (GITR), suggesting a cell-to-cell contact mechanism with dendritic cells. Furthermore, higher IL-10 and regulatory T cell type 1 (Tr1) levels were found in neurocysticercosis patients' peripheral blood, suggesting that the action mechanism of regulatory T cells involves the release of immunomodulatory cytokines. No evidence was found of the regulatory T cell role in inhibiting the proliferative response. Suppressive regulatory T cells from neurocysticercosis patients correlated negatively with late activated lymphocytes (CD4(+) CD38(+) ). Our results suggest that, during neurocysticercosis, regulatory T cells could control the immune response, probably by a cell-to-cell contact with dendritic cells and interleukin (IL)-10 release by Tr1, to create an immunomodulatory environment that may favour the development of T. solium cysticerci and their permanence in the central nervous system. PMID:26391104

  5. Allergenic Can f 1 and its human homologue Lcn-1 direct dendritic cells to induce divergent immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Posch, Beate; Irsara, Christian; Gamper, Fabian S; Herrmann, Martin; Bindreither, Daniel; Fuchs, Dietmar; Reider, Norbert; Redl, Bernhard; Heufler, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Why and when the immune system skews to Th2 mediated allergic immune responses is still poorly characterized. With two homologous lipocalins, the major respiratory dog allergen Can f 1 and the human endogenous, non-allergenic Lipocalin-1, we investigated their impact on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). The two lipocalins had differential effects on DC according to their allergenic potential. Compared to Lipocalin-1, Can f 1 persistently induced lower levels of the Th1 skewing maturation marker expression, tryptophan breakdown and interleukin (IL)-12 production in DC. As a consequence, T cells stimulated by DC treated with Can f 1 produced more of the Th2 signature cytokine IL-13 and lower levels of the Th1 signature cytokine interferon-γ than T cells stimulated by Lipocalin-1 treated DC. These data were partially verified by a second pair of homologous lipocalins, the cat allergen Fel d 4 and its putative human homologue major urinary protein. Our data indicate that the crosstalk of DC with lipocalins alone has the potential to direct the type of immune response to these particular antigens. A global gene expression analysis further supported these results and indicated significant differences in intracellular trafficking, sorting and antigen presentation pathways when comparing Can f 1 and Lipocalin-1 stimulated DC. With this study we contribute to a better understanding of the induction phase of a Th2 immune response. PMID:26218644

  6. Early exposure of interferon-γ inhibits signal transducer and activator of transcription-6 signalling and nuclear factor κB activation in a short-term monocyte-derived dendritic cell culture promoting ‘FAST’ regulatory dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Canales, D; Krishnan, R; Jessup, C F; Coates, P T

    2012-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-γ is a cytokine with immunomodulatory properties, which has been shown previously to enhance the generation of tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC) when administered early ex vivo in 7-day monocyte-derived DC culture. To generate tolerogenic DC rapidly within 48 h, human monocytes were cultured for 24 h with interleukin (IL)-4 and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the presence (IFN-γ-DC) or absence of IFN-γ (500 U/ml) (UT-DC). DC were matured for 24 h with TNF-α and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). DC phenotype, signal transducer and activator of transcription-6 (STAT-6) phosphorylation and promotion of CD4+CD25+CD127neg/lowforkhead box P3 (FoxP3)hi T cells were analysed by flow cytometry. DC nuclear factor (NF)-κB transcription factor reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homologue B (RELB) and IL-12p70 protein expression were also determined. Phenotypically, IFN-γ-DC displayed reduced DC maturation marker CD83 by 62% and co-stimulation molecules CD80 (26%) and CD86 (8%). IFN-γ treatment of monocytes inhibited intracellular STAT6, RELB nuclear translocation and IL-12p70 production. IFN-γ-DC increased the proportion of CD4+CD25+CD127neg/lowfoxp3hi T cells compared to UT-DC from 12 to 23%. IFN-γ-DC primed T cells inhibited antigen-specific, autologous naive T cell proliferation by 70% at a 1:1 naive T cells to IFN-γ-DC primed T cell ratio in suppression assays. In addition, we examined the reported paradoxical proinflammatory effects of IFN-γ and confirmed in this system that late IFN-γ exposure does not inhibit DC maturation marker expression. Early IFN-γ exposure is critical in promoting the generation of regulatory DC. Early IFN-γ modulated DC generated in 48 h are maturation arrested and promote the generation of antigen-specific regulatory T cells, which may be clinically applicable as a novel cellular therapy for allograft rejection. PMID:22288588

  7. Human Dendritic Cells Derived From Embryonic Stem Cells Stably Modified With CD1d Efficiently Stimulate Antitumor Invariant Natural Killer T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a unique lymphocyte subpopulation that mediates antitumor activities upon activation. A current strategy to harness iNKT cells for cancer treatment is endogenous iNKT cell activation using patient-derived dendritic cells (DCs). However, the limited number and functional defects of patient DCs are still the major challenges for this therapeutic approach. In this study, we investigated whether human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) with an ectopically expressed CD1d gene could be exploited to address this issue. Using a lentivector carrying an optimized expression cassette, we generated stably modified hESC lines that consistently overexpressed CD1d. These modified hESC lines were able to differentiate into DCs as efficiently as the parental line. Most importantly, more than 50% of such derived DCs were CD1d+. These CD1d-overexpressing DCs were more efficient in inducing iNKT cell response than those without modification, and their ability was comparable to that of DCs generated from monocytes of healthy donors. The iNKT cells expanded by the CD1d-overexpressing DCs were functional, as demonstrated by their ability to lyse iNKT cell-sensitive glioma cells. Therefore, hESCs stably modified with the CD1d gene may serve as a convenient, unlimited, and competent DC source for iNKT cell-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24292792

  8. Human dendritic cells acquire a semimature phenotype and lymph node homing potential through interaction with CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Triebel, Frédéric; Kaveri, Srini V; Tough, David F

    2007-04-01

    Interactions between dendritic cells (DC) and T cells are known to involve the delivery of signals in both directions. We sought to characterize the effects on human DC of contact with different subsets of activated CD4+ T cells. The results showed that interaction with CD25(high)CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) caused DC to take on very different properties than contact with naive or memory phenotype T cells. Whereas non-Tregs stimulated DC maturation, culture with Tregs produced DC with a mixed phenotype. By many criteria, Tregs inhibited DC maturation, inducing down-regulation of costimulatory molecules and T cell stimulatory activity. However, DC exposed to Tregs also showed some changes typically associated with DC maturation, namely, increased expression of CCR7 and MHC class II molecules, and gained the ability to migrate in response to the CCR7 ligand CCL19. Both soluble factors and cell-associated molecules were shown to be involved in Treg modulation of DC, with lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) playing a predominant role in driving maturation-associated changes. The data show that Tregs induce the generation of semimature DC with the potential to migrate into lymphoid organs, suggesting a possible mechanism by which Tregs down-modulate immune responses. PMID:17371975

  9. Modulation of HIV Binding to Epithelial Cells and HIV Transfer from Immature Dendritic Cells to CD4 T Lymphocytes by Human Lactoferrin and its Major Exposed LF-33 Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Carthagena, Laetitia; Becquart, Pierre; Hocini, Hakim; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Bouhlal, Hicham; Belec, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Lactoferrin (LF), a multifunctional molecule present in human secretions, has potent inhibitory activities against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The aim of the study was to evaluate whether human LF (hLF) and its exposed domain LF-33 represented by the peptide (LF-33-GRRRRSVQWCAVSQPEATKCFQWQRNMRKVRGP) involved in LF-HIV gag binding and endotoxines neutralization, may inhibit early steps of HIV mucosal transmission. Human LF and the peptide LF-33 inhibited the attachment of primary X4-tropic HIV-1NDK and R5-tropic HIV-1JR-CSF strains to human endometrial (HEC-1) and colorectal (HT-29) CD4-negative epithelial cells, the purified hLF being more potent (up to 80%) than the LF-33 peptide. In addition, the hLF, but not the LF-33 peptide, inhibited up to 40% the transfer in trans of HIV-1JR-CSF and HIV-1NDK, from immature dendritic cells to CD4 T lymphocytes, likely in a DC-SIGN-dependent manner. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that hLF can interfere with HIV-1 mucosal transmission by blocking virus attachment to epithelial cells and by inhibiting virus transfer from dendritic cells to CD4 T cells, two crucial steps of HIV dissemination from mucosae to lymphoid tissue. PMID:21660187

  10. Distinct dendritic spine and nuclear phases of calcineurin activation after exposure to amyloid-β revealed by a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai-Yan; Hudry, Eloise; Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Uemura, Kengo; Fan, Zhan-Yun; Berezovska, Oksana; Grosskreutz, Cynthia L; Bacskai, Brian J; Hyman, Bradley T

    2012-04-11

    Calcineurin (CaN) activation is critically involved in the regulation of spine morphology in response to oligomeric amyloid-β (Aβ) as well as in synaptic plasticity in normal memory, but no existing techniques can monitor the spatiotemporal pattern of CaN activity. Here, we use a spectral fluorescence resonance energy transfer approach to monitor CaN activation dynamics in real time with subcellular resolution. When oligomeric Aβ derived from Tg2576 murine transgenic neurons or human AD brains were applied to wild-type murine primary cortical neurons, we observe a dynamic progression of CaN activation within minutes, first in dendritic spines, and then in the cytoplasm and, in hours, in the nucleus. CaN activation in spines leads to rapid but reversible morphological changes in spines and in postsynaptic proteins; longer exposure leads to NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells) translocation to the nucleus and frank spine loss. These results provide a framework for understanding the role of calcineurin in synaptic alterations associated with AD pathogenesis. PMID:22496575

  11. The 40-year history of modeling active dendrites in cerebellar Purkinje cells: emergence of the first single cell “community model”

    PubMed Central

    Bower, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the effects of the active properties of the Purkinje cell dendrite on neuronal function has been an active subject of study for more than 40 years. Somewhat unusually, some of these investigations, from the outset have involved an interacting combination of experimental and model-based techniques. This article recounts that 40-year history, and the view of the functional significance of the active properties of the Purkinje cell dendrite that has emerged. It specifically considers the emergence from these efforts of what is arguably the first single cell “community” model in neuroscience. The article also considers the implications of the development of this model for future studies of the complex properties of neuronal dendrites. PMID:26539104

  12. Postoperative dendritic cell vaccine plus activated T-cell transfer improves the survival of patients with invasive hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Koichi; Kotera, Yoshihito; Aruga, Atsushi; Takeshita, Nobuhiro; Katagiri, Satoshi; Ariizumi, Shun-ichi; Takahashi, Yutaka; Yoshitoshi, Kenji; Takasaki, Ken; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    The recurrence rate after surgery in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is very high, while prognosis is quite poor. However, there is no standard treatment to prevent recurrence of HCC after a curative operation. In this study, we investigated the clinical utilization of an autologous tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell vaccine plus ex vivo activated T cell transfer (ATVAC) in an adjuvant setting for postoperative HCC as a non-randomized controlled trial. Ninety-four patients with invasive HCC received informed consent information regarding the study, and 42 opted to have the ATVAC after surgery. Their recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were measured after 5 years and compared with those of 52 patients who selected to have the curative operation alone. The median RFS and OS were 24.5 months and 97.7 months in the patients receiving adjuvant ATVAC and 12.6 months and 41.0 months in the group receiving surgery alone (P = 0.011 and 0.029). In the treated group, patients with positive delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) had a better prognosis (RFS P = 0.019, OS P = 0.025). No adverse events of grade 3 or more were observed. A postoperative dendritic cell vaccine plus activated T cell transfer would be a feasible and effective treatment for preventing recurrence in HCC patients and achieving long-term survival especially in DTH positive patients. PMID:24419174

  13. Application of Microneedles to Skin Induces Activation of Epidermal Langerhans Cells and Dermal Dendritic Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Asuka; Nomoto, Yusuke; Watanabe, Mai; Kimura, Soichiro; Morimoto, Yasunori; Ueda, Hideo

    2016-08-01

    An adequate immune response to percutaneous vaccine application is generated by delivery of sufficient amounts of antigen to skin and by administration of toxin adjuvants or invasive skin abrasion that leads to an adjuvant effect. Microneedles penetrate the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin, and enable direct delivery of vaccines from the surface into the skin, where immunocompetent dendritic cells are densely distributed. However, whether the application of microneedles to the skin activates antigen-presenting cells (APCs) has not been demonstrated. Here we aimed to demonstrate that microneedles may act as a potent physical adjuvant for successful transcutaneous immunization (TCI). We prepared samples of isolated epidermal and dermal cells and analyzed the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and costimulatory molecules on Langerhans or dermal dendritic cells in the prepared samples using flow cytometry. The expression of MHC class II and costimulatory molecules demonstrated an upward trend in APCs in the skin after the application of 500- and 300-µm microneedles. In addition, in the epidermal cells, application of microneedles induced more effective activation of Langerhans cells than did an invasive tape-stripping (positive control). In conclusion, the use of microneedles is likely to have a positive effect not only as an antigen delivery system but also as a physical technique inducing an adjuvant-like effect for TCI. PMID:27251665

  14. Regulation of the IL-10/IL-12 axis in human dendritic cells with probiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gad, Monika; Ravn, Peter; Søborg, Ditte A; Lund-Jensen, Karina; Ouwehand, Arthur C; Jensen, Simon S

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we have used monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to design a screening model for the selection of microorganisms with the ability to suppress DC-secreted IL-12p70, a critical cytokine for the induction of T-helper cell type 1 immune responses under inflammatory conditions. By the treatment of DCs with cocktails containing TLR agonists and proinflammatory cytokines, the cells increased the secretion of the Th1-promoting cytokine IL-12p70. Clinically used probiotics were tested for their IL-10- and IL-12p70-stimulating properties in immature DCs, and showed a dose-dependent change in the IL-10/IL-12p70 balance. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM(™) and the probiotic mixture VSL#3 showed a strong induction of IL-12p70, whereas Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33 and Bifidobacterium infantis 35624 preferentially induced IL-10. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 induced both IL-10 and IL-12p70, whereas the probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii induced low levels of cytokines. When combining these microorganisms with the Th1-promoting cocktails, E. coli Nissle 1917 and B. infantis 35624 were potent suppressors of IL-12p70 secretion in an IL-10-independent manner, indicating a suppressive effect on Th1-inducing antigen-presenting cells. The present model, using cocktail-stimulated DCs with potent IL-12p70-stimulating capacity, may be used as an efficient tool to assess the anti-inflammatory properties of microorganisms for potential clinical use. PMID:21707779

  15. Immunogenic Properties of a BCG Adjuvanted Chitosan Nanoparticle-Based Dengue Vaccine in Human Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Hunsawong, Taweewun; Sunintaboon, Panya; Warit, Saradee; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Jarman, Richard G; Yoon, In-Kyu; Ubol, Sukathida; Fernandez, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) are among the most rapidly and efficiently spreading arboviruses. WHO recently estimated that about half of the world's population is now at risk for DENV infection. There is no specific treatment or vaccine available to treat or prevent DENV infections. Here, we report the development of a novel dengue nanovaccine (DNV) composed of UV-inactivated DENV-2 (UVI-DENV) and Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin cell wall components (BCG-CWCs) loaded into chitosan nanoparticles (CS-NPs). CS-NPs were prepared by an emulsion polymerization method prior to loading of the BCG-CWCs and UVI-DENV components. Using a scanning electron microscope and a zetasizer, DNV was determined to be of spherical shape with a diameter of 372.0 ± 11.2 nm in average and cationic surface properties. The loading efficacies of BCG-CWCs and UVI-DENV into the CS-NPs and BCG-CS-NPs were up to 97.2 and 98.4%, respectively. THP-1 cellular uptake of UVI-DENV present in the DNV was higher than soluble UVI-DENV alone. DNV stimulation of immature dendritic cells (iDCs) resulted in a significantly higher expression of DCs maturation markers (CD80, CD86 and HLA-DR) and induction of various cytokine and chemokine productions than in UVI-DENV-treated iDCs, suggesting a potential use of BCG- CS-NPs as adjuvant and delivery system for dengue vaccines. PMID:26394138

  16. A Common Polymorphism in the Caspase Recruitment Domain of RIG-I Modifies the Innate Immune Response of Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianzhong; Nistal-Villán, Estanislao; Voho, Anu; Ganee, Arnold; Kumar, Madhu; Ding, Yaomei; Garciá-Sastre, Adolfo; Wetmur, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Infection of human dendritic cells (DCs) by negative-strand RNA viruses, such as Newcastle disease virus, leads to the induction of the IFNβ gene, IFNB1, through the activation of the RNA helicase RIG-I, which is encoded by DDX58. Expression levels of IFNB1 and DDX58 in infected DCs showed positive correlations at the population and the single-cell levels. DDX58 has a common and potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphism, rs10813831 (A/G), encoding an Arg7Cys amino acid change in the RIG-I protein caspase recruitment domain (CARD). Quantitative RT-PCR analysis on Newcastle disease virus-infected primary DCs from 130 individuals revealed a significant association of the Arg7Cys single nucleotide polymorphism with increased IFNB1 and DDX58 transcription. Allelic imbalance analysis ruled out allele-specific DDX58 message levels and suggested that the observed association between Arg7Cys and IFNB1 and DDX58 transcription originated from a functional change in RIG-I due to the amino acid substitution in the CARD. DDX58 transfection experiments in 293T cells confirmed a biological functional difference between RIG-I 7Cys and the more common RIG-I 7Arg. Taken together, these data indicate that the innate immune response to viral infection of human cells is modified by a functional polymorphism in the RIG-I CARD. PMID:20511549

  17. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus shows poor replication but significant induction of antiviral responses in human monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Tynell, Janne; Westenius, Veera; Rönkkö, Esa; Munster, Vincent J; Melén, Krister; Österlund, Pamela; Julkunen, Ilkka

    2016-02-01

    In this study we assessed the ability of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) to replicate and induce innate immunity in human monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells (MDDCs), and compared it with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Assessments of viral protein and RNA levels in infected cells showed that both viruses were impaired in their ability to replicate in these cells. Some induction of IFN-λ1, CXCL10 and MxA mRNAs in both macrophages and MDDCs was seen in response to MERS-CoV infection, but almost no such induction was observed in response to SARS-CoV infection. ELISA and Western blot assays showed clear production of CXCL10 and MxA in MERS-CoV-infected macrophages and MDDCs. Our data suggest that SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV replicate poorly in human macrophages and MDDCs, but MERS-CoV is nonetheless capable of inducing a readily detectable host innate immune response. Our results highlight a clear difference between the viruses in activating host innate immune responses in macrophages and MDDCs, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of infection. PMID:26602089

  18. Supernatant from Bifidobacterium Differentially Modulates Transduction Signaling Pathways for Biological Functions of Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoarau, Cyrille; Martin, Laurence; Faugaret, Delphine; Baron, Christophe; Dauba, Audrey; Aubert-Jacquin, Cécile; Velge-Roussel, Florence; Lebranchu, Yvon

    2008-01-01

    Background Probiotic bacteria have been shown to modulate immune responses and could have therapeutic effects in allergic and inflammatory disorders. However, the signaling pathways engaged by probiotics are poorly understood. We have previously reported that a fermentation product from Bifidobacterium breve C50 (BbC50sn) could induce maturation, high IL-10 production and prolonged survival of DCs via a TLR2 pathway. We therefore studied the roles of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways on biological functions of human monocyte-derived DCs treated with BbC50sn. Methodology/Principal Findings DCs were differentiated from human monocytes with IL-4 and GM-CSF for 5 days and cultured with BbC50sn, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or Zymosan, with or without specific inhibitors of p38MAPK (SB203580), ERK (PD98059), PI3K (LY294002) and GSK3 (SB216763). We found that 1) the PI3K pathway was positively involved in the prolonged DC survival induced by BbC50sn, LPS and Zymosan in contrast to p38MAPK and GSK3 which negatively regulated DC survival; 2) p38MAPK and PI3K were positively involved in DC maturation, in contrast to ERK and GSK3 which negatively regulated DC maturation; 3) ERK and PI3K were positively involved in DC-IL-10 production, in contrast to GSK3 that was positively involved in DC-IL-12 production whereas p38MAPK was positively involved in both; 4) BbC50sn induced a PI3K/Akt phosphorylation similar to Zymosan and a p38MAPK phosphorylation similar to LPS. Conclusion/Significance We report for the first time that a fermentation product of a bifidobacteria can differentially activate MAPK, GSK3 and PI3K in order to modulate DC biological functions. These results give new insights on the fine-tuned balance between the maintenance of normal mucosal homeostasis to commensal and probiotic bacteria and the specific inflammatory immune responses to pathogen bacteria. PMID:18648505

  19. Novel insights into the relationships between dendritic cell subsets in human and mouse revealed by genome-wide expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Scott H; Walzer, Thierry; Dembélé, Doulaye; Thibault, Christelle; Defays, Axel; Bessou, Gilles; Xu, Huichun; Vivier, Eric; Sellars, MacLean; Pierre, Philippe; Sharp, Franck R; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe; Dalod, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) are a complex group of cells that play a critical role in vertebrate immunity. Lymph-node resident DCs (LN-DCs) are subdivided into conventional DC (cDC) subsets (CD11b and CD8α in mouse; BDCA1 and BDCA3 in human) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). It is currently unclear if these various DC populations belong to a unique hematopoietic lineage and if the subsets identified in the mouse and human systems are evolutionary homologs. To gain novel insights into these questions, we sought conserved genetic signatures for LN-DCs and in vitro derived granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) DCs through the analysis of a compendium of genome-wide expression profiles of mouse or human leukocytes. Results We show through clustering analysis that all LN-DC subsets form a distinct branch within the leukocyte family tree, and reveal a transcriptomal signature evolutionarily conserved in all LN-DC subsets. Moreover, we identify a large gene expression program shared between mouse and human pDCs, and smaller conserved profiles shared between mouse and human LN-cDC subsets. Importantly, most of these genes have not been previously associated with DC function and many have unknown functions. Finally, we use compendium analysis to re-evaluate the classification of interferon-producing killer DCs, lin-CD16+HLA-DR+ cells and in vitro derived GM-CSF DCs, and show that these cells are more closely linked to natural killer and myeloid cells, respectively. Conclusion Our study provides a unique database resource for future investigation of the evolutionarily conserved molecular pathways governing the ontogeny and functions of leukocyte subsets, especially DCs. PMID:18218067

  20. Familiar Taste Induces Higher Dendritic Levels of Activity-Regulated Cytoskeleton-Associated Protein in the Insular Cortex than a Novel One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, Jean-Pascal; Quiroz, Cesar; Mendoza-Viveros, Lucia; Ramirez-Amaya, Victor; Bermudez-Rattoni, Federico

    2011-01-01

    The immediate early gene (IEG) "Arc" is known to play an important role in synaptic plasticity; its protein is locally translated in the dendrites where it has been involved in several types of plasticity mechanisms. Because of its tight coupling with neuronal activity, "Arc" has been widely used as a tool to tag behaviorally activated networks.…

  1. Immunomodulatory effects of human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells on differentiation, maturation and endocytosis of monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Saeidi, Mohsen; Masoud, Ahmad; Shakiba, Yadollah; Hadjati, Jamshid; Mohyeddin Bonab, Mandana; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein; Latifpour, Mostafa; Nikbin, Behrooz

    2013-03-01

    The Wharton's jelly of the umbilical cord is believed to be a source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) which can be therapeutically applied in degenerative diseases.In this study, we investigated the immunomodulatory effect of umbilical cord derived-mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) and bone marrow-derived-mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) on differentiation, maturation, and endocytosis of monocyte-derived dendritic cells in a transwell culture system under laboratory conditions. Monocytes were differentiated into immature dendritic cells (iDCs) in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 for 6 days and then differentiated into mature dendritic cells (mDCs) in the presence of TNF-α for 2 days. In every stage of differentiation, immature and mature dendritic cells were separately co-cultured with UC-MSCs and BM-MSCs. The findings showed that UC-MSCs and BM-MSCs inhibited strongly differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells at higher dilution ratios (1:1). The BM-MSCs and UC-MSCs showed more inhibitory effect on CD1a, CD83, CD86 expression, and dendritic cell endocytic activity, respectively. On the other hand, these cells severely up-regulated CD14 marker expression. We concluded that UC-MSCs and BM-MSCs could inhibit differentiation, maturation and endocytosis in monocyte-derived DCs through the secreted factors and free of any cell-cell contacts under laboratory conditions. As DCs are believed to be the main antigen presenting cells for naïve T cells in triggering immune responses, it would be logical that their inhibitory effect on differentiation, maturation and function can decrease or modulate immune and inflammatory responses. PMID:23454777

  2. Vector-encoded Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein promotes maturation of dendritic cells with Th1 polarization and improved migration.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Mohanraj; Jin, Chuan; Yu, Di; Eriksson, Fredrik; Essand, Magnus

    2014-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is a major virulence factor involved in H. pylori infection. Both HP-NAP protein and oncolytic viruses encoding HP-NAP have been suggested as immunotherapeutic anticancer agents and adjuvants for vaccination but with little known about its mode of action to activate adaptive immunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key players in bridging innate and adaptive immune responses, and in this study we aim to evaluate the effect of HP-NAP on DC maturation, migration, and induction of adaptive immune response. Maturation markers CD83, CD80, CD86, HLA-DR, CD40, and CCR7 were upregulated on human DCs after treatment with supernatants from HP-NAP adenovirus-infected cells. HP-NAP-activated DCs had a Th1 cytokine secretion profile, with high IL-12 and relatively low IL-10 secretion, and migrated toward CCL19. Ag-specific T cells were efficiently expanded by Ag-presenting HP-NAP-activated DCs, which is an important property of functionally mature DCs. Furthermore, intradermal injections of HP-NAP-encoding adenovirus in C57BL/6 mice enhanced resident DC migration to draining lymph nodes, which was verified by imaging lymph nodes by two-photon microscopy and by phenotyping migrating cells by flow cytometry. In conclusion, therapeutic effects of HP-NAP are mediated by maturation of DCs and subsequent activation of Ag-specific T cells in addition to provoking innate immunity. PMID:25049358

  3. Cestode Antigens Induce a Tolerogenic-Like Phenotype and Inhibit LPS Inflammatory Responses in Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Terrazas, César A.; Sánchez-Muñoz, Fausto; Mejía-Domínguez, Ana M.; Amezcua-Guerra, Luis M.; Terrazas, Luis I.; Bojalil, Rafael; Gómez-García, Lorena

    2011-01-01

    Pathogens have developed strategies to modify Dendritic Cells (DCs) phenotypes and impair their functions in order to create a safer environment for their survival. DCs responses to helminths and their derivatives vary among different studies. Here we show that excretory/secretory products of the cestode Taenia crassiceps (TcES) do not induce the maturation of human DCs judged by a lack of increment in the expression of CD83, HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86 molecules but enhanced the production of IL-10 and positively modulated the expression of the C-type lectin receptor MGL and negatively modulated the expression of DC-SIGN. Additionally, these antigens were capable of down-modulating the inflammatory response induced by LPS in these cells by reducing the expression of the maturation markers and the production of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF, IL-12 and IL-6. The effects of TcES upon the DCs responses to LPS were stronger if cells were exposed during their differentiation to the helminth antigens. All together, these findings suggest the ability of TcES to induce the differentiation of human DCs into a tolerogenic-like phenotype and to inhibit the effects of inflammatory stimuli. PMID:22110390

  4. Protection of human myeloid dendritic cell subsets against influenza A virus infection is differentially regulated upon TLR stimulation.

    PubMed

    Baharom, Faezzah; Thomas, Saskia; Bieder, Andrea; Hellmér, Maria; Volz, Julia; Sandgren, Kerrie J; McInerney, Gerald M; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Mellman, Ira; Smed-Sörensen, Anna

    2015-05-01

    The proinflammatory microenvironment in the respiratory airway induces maturation of both resident and infiltrating dendritic cells (DCs) upon influenza A virus (IAV) infection. This results in upregulation of antiviral pathways as well as modulation of endocytic processes, which affect the susceptibility of DCs to IAV infection. Therefore, it is highly relevant to understand how IAV interacts with and infects mature DCs. To investigate how different subsets of human myeloid DCs (MDCs) involved in tissue inflammation are affected by inflammatory stimulation during IAV infection, we stimulated primary blood MDCs and inflammatory monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) with TLR ligands, resulting in maturation. Interestingly, MDDCs but not MDCs were protected against IAV infection after LPS (TLR4) stimulation. In contrast, stimulation with TLR