Sample records for activated carbon production

  1. Production and characterization of granular activated carbon from activated sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. Al-Qodah; R. Shawabkah

    2009-01-01

    In this study, activated sludge was used as a precursor to prepare activated carbon using sulfuric acid as a chemical activation agent. The effect of preparation conditions on the produced activated carbon characteristics as an adsorbent was investigated. The results indicate that the produced activated carbon has a highly porous structure and a specific surface area of 580 m 2

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

    2003-09-30

    The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, the principal objective of this work was to characterize and utilize the unburned carbon in fly ash for the production of activated carbons. The unburned carbon samples were collected from different combustion systems, including pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. LOI (loss-on-ignition), proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses were conducted, and the surface areas of the samples were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The LOIs of the unburned carbon samples varied between 21.79-84.52%. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt %), while the volatile matter contents varied between 0.45 to 24.82 wt%. The elemental analyses show that all the unburned carbon samples consist mainly of carbon with very little hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen In addition, the potential use of unburned carbon as precursor for activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Activated carbons with specific surface area up to 1075m{sup 2}/g were produced from the unburned carbon. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was related to the properties of the unburned carbon feedstock and the activation conditions used. It was found that not all the unburned carbon samples are equally suited for activation, and furthermore, their potential as activated carbons precursors could be inferred from their physical and chemical properties. The developed porosity of the activated carbon was a function of the oxygen content, porosity and H/C ratio of the parent unburned carbon feedstock. It was observed that extended activation times and high activation temperatures increased the porosity of the produced activated carbon at the expense of the solid yield. The development of activated carbon from unburned carbon in fly ash has been proven to be a success by this study in terms of the higher surface areas of the resultant activated carbons, which are comparable with commercial activated carbons. However, unburned carbon samples obtained from coal-fired power plants as by-product have high ash content, which is unwanted for the production of activated carbons. Therefore, the separation of unburned carbon from the fly ash is expected to be beneficial for the utilization of unburned carbon to produce activated carbons with low ash content.

  3. JV Task 90 - Activated Carbon Production from North Dakota Lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Benson; Charlene Crocker; Rokan Zaman; Mark Musich; Edwin Olson

    2008-03-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has pursued a research program for producing activated carbon from North Dakota lignite that can be competitive with commercial-grade activated carbon. As part of this effort, small-scale production of activated carbon was produced from Fort Union lignite. A conceptual design of a commercial activated carbon production plant was drawn, and a market assessment was performed to determine likely revenue streams for the produced carbon. Activated carbon was produced from lignite coal in both laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactors and in a small pilot-scale rotary kiln. The EERC was successfully able to upgrade the laboratory-scale activated carbon production system to a pilot-scale rotary kiln system. The activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite was superior to commercial grade DARCO{reg_sign} FGD and Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product with respect to iodine number. The iodine number of North Dakota lignite-derived activated carbon was between 600 and 800 mg I{sub 2}/g, whereas the iodine number of DARCO FGD was between 500 and 600 mg I{sub 2}/g, and the iodine number of Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product was around 275 mg I{sub 2}/g. The EERC performed both bench-scale and pilot-scale mercury capture tests using the activated carbon made under various optimization process conditions. For comparison, the mercury capture capability of commercial DARCO FGD was also tested. The lab-scale apparatus is a thin fixed-bed mercury-screening system, which has been used by the EERC for many mercury capture screen tests. The pilot-scale systems included two combustion units, both equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Activated carbons were also tested in a slipstream baghouse at a Texas power plant. The results indicated that the activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite coal is capable of removing mercury from flue gas. The tests showed that activated carbon with the greatest iodine number was superior to commercial DARCO FGD for mercury capture. The results of the activated carbon market assessment indicate an existing market for water treatment and an emerging application for mercury control. That market will involve both existing and new coal-fired plants. It is expected that 20% of the existing coal-fired plants will implement activated carbon injection by 2015, representing about 200,000 tons of annual demand. The potential annual demand by new plants is even greater. In the mercury control market, two characteristics are going to dominate the customer's buying habit-performance and price. As continued demonstration testing of activated carbon injection at the various coal-fired power plants progresses, the importance of fuel type and plant configuration on the type of activated carbon best suited is being identified.

  4. Production Scale-Up or Activated Carbons for Ultracapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Steven D. Dietz

    2007-01-10

    Transportation use accounts for 67% of the petroleum consumption in the US. Electric and hybrid vehicles are promising technologies for decreasing our dependence on petroleum, and this is the objective of the FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Inexpensive and efficient energy storage devices are needed for electric and hybrid vehicle to be economically viable, and ultracapacitors are a leading energy storage technology being investigated by the FreedomCAR program. The most important parameter in determining the power and energy density of a carbon-based ultracapacitor is the amount of surface area accessible to the electrolyte, which is primarily determined by the pore size distribution. The major problems with current carbons are that their pore size distribution is not optimized for liquid electrolytes and the best carbons are very expensive. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) has developed methods to prepare porous carbons with tunable pore size distributions from inexpensive carbohydrate based precursors. The use of low-cost feedstocks and processing steps greatly lowers the production costs. During this project with the assistance of Maxwell Technologies, we found that an impurity was limiting the performance of our carbon and the major impurity found was sulfur. A new carbon with low sulfur content was made and found that the performance of the carbon was greatly improved. We also scaled-up the process to pre-production levels and we are currently able to produce 0.25 tons/year of activated carbon. We could easily double this amount by purchasing a second rotary kiln. More importantly, we are working with MeadWestvaco on a Joint Development Agreement to scale-up the process to produce hundreds of tons of high quality, inexpensive carbon per year based on our processes.

  5. The production of activated silica with carbon dioxide gas

    E-print Network

    Hayes, William Bell

    1956-01-01

    LIBRARY A A M COLLEGE OF TEXAS THE PRODIICTION OF ACTIVAT!D SILICA )TITH CARBON DIOXIDE GAS A Thesis Killi, am Bell Hayes III Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechani cal ColleSe of Texas in parti. al fulfillment... of the reciuire . ents for the dedree of iliASTER OF SCIENCE Janus', 1956 Major Subject: Chemi. cal Engineering TH PRODUCTION OP ACTIVATED SILICA 7iIITH CARBON DIOXIDE GAS A Thesis William Bell Hayes III Approved as to style and content by: Chairmen...

  6. Production of charcoal and activated carbon at elevated pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiangfeng; Norberg, N.; Antal, M.J. Jr. [Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    With its wide range of properties, charcoal finds many commercial applications for domestic cooking, refining of metals (steel, copper, bronze, nickel, aluminum and electro-manganese), production of chemicals (carbon disulfide, calcium carbide, silicon carbide, sodium cyanide, carbon black, fireworks, gaseous chemicals, absorbents, soil conditioners and pharmaceuticals), as well as production of activated carbon and synthesis gas. In 1991, the world production of charcoal was 22.8 million cubic meters (3.8 million metric tons) as shown in Table 1. Brazil is the world`s largest charcoal producer --- 5.9 million cubic meters or one million metric tons was produced in 1991, most of which is used in steel and iron industry. African countries produced 45% of the world total amount of charcoal, where 86% of the wood-based energy is for domestic use, most of which is inefficiently used. Charcoal is produced commercially in kilns with a 25% to 30% yield by mass on a 7 to 12 day operating cycle. Until recently, the highest yield of good quality charcoal reported in the literature was 38%. In this paper, and ASME code rated experimental system is presented for producing charcoal and activated carbon from biomass.

  7. Converting poultry litter to activated carbon: optimal carbonization conditions and product sorption for benzene.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingxin; Song, Weiping

    2011-12-01

    To promote utilization of poultry litter as a source material for manufacturing low-cost activated carbon (AC) that can be used in wastewater treatment, this study investigated optimal production conditions and water-borne organic sorption potential of poultry litter-based AC. Pelletized broiler litter was carbonized at different temperatures for varied time periods and activated with steam at a range of flow rate and time. The AC products were examined for quality characteristics using standard methods and for organic sorption potentials using batch benzene sorption techniques. The study shows that the yield and quality of litter AC varied with production conditions. The optimal production conditions for poultry litter-based AC were carbonization at 700 degrees C for 45 min followed by activation with 2.5 ml min(-1) steam for another 45 min. The resulting AC possessed an iodine number of 454 mg g(-1) and a specific surface area of 403 m2 g(-1). It sorbed benzene in water following sigmoidal kinetic and isothermal patterns. The sorption capacity for benzene was 23.70 mg g(-1), lower than that of top-class commercial AC. The results, together with other reported research findings, suggest that poultry litter is a reasonable feedstock for low-cost AC applicable to pre-treat wastewater contaminated by organic pollutants and heavy metals. PMID:22439566

  8. Experimental investigation of factors controlling the calcium carbonate ion activity product of shallow water carbonate-rich sediments

    E-print Network

    Bernstein, Lawrence Douglas

    1983-01-01

    sediment samples with sea- water to gain an equilibrium solubility product for calcium carbonate. He failed to recognize that this would represent a metastable equilibrium due to the complex nature of the sediments. Dynamic processes...EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF FACTORS CONTROLLING THE CALCIUM CARBONATE ION ACTIVITY PRODUCT OF SHALLOW WATER CARBONATE-RICH SEDIMENTS A Thesis by LAWRENCE DOUGLAS BERNSTEIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University...

  9. Application of thermal analysis techniques in activated carbon production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnals, G.L.; DeBarr, J.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.; Brady, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal analysis techniques have been used at the ISGS as an aid in the development and characterization of carbon adsorbents. Promising adsorbents from fly ash, tires, and Illinois coals have been produced for various applications. Process conditions determined in the preparation of gram quantities of carbons were used as guides in the preparation of larger samples. TG techniques developed to characterize the carbon adsorbents included the measurement of the kinetics of SO2 adsorption, the performance of rapid proximate analyses, and the determination of equilibrium methane adsorption capacities. Thermal regeneration of carbons was assessed by TG to predict the life cycle of carbon adsorbents in different applications. TPD was used to determine the nature of surface functional groups and their effect on a carbon's adsorption properties.

  10. Brazilian natural fiber (jute) as raw material for activated carbon production.

    PubMed

    Rombaldo, Carla F S; Lisboa, Antonio C L; Mendez, Manoel O A; Coutinho, Aparecido R

    2014-12-01

    Jute fiber is the second most common natural cellulose fiber worldwide, especially in recent years, due to its excellent physical, chemical and structural properties. The objective of this paper was to investigate: the thermal degradation of in natura jute fiber, and the production and characterization of the generated activated carbon. The production consisted of carbonization of the jute fiber and activation with steam. During the activation step the amorphous carbon produced in the initial carbonization step reacted with oxidizing gas, forming new pores and opening closed pores, which enhanced the adsorptive capacity of the activated carbon. N2 gas adsorption at 77K was used in order to evaluate the effect of the carbonization and activation steps. The results of the adsorption indicate the possibility of producing a porous material with a combination of microporous and mesoporous structure, depending on the parameters used in the processes, with resulting specific surface area around 470 m2.g-1. The thermal analysis indicates that above 600°C there is no significant mass loss. PMID:25590747

  11. Production of activated carbon and its catalytic application for oxidation of hydrogen sulphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azargohar, Ramin

    Hydrogen sulphide is an environmentally hazardous gas which is present in many gas streams associated with oil and gas industry. Oxidation of H 2S to sulphur in air produces no bulky or waste material and requires no further purification. Activated carbon is known as a catalyst for this reaction. In this research, a coal-based precursor (luscar char) and a biomass-based precursor (biochar) were used for production of activated carbons by two common methods of activation: physical and chemical activation in which steam and potassium hydroxide (KOH), respectively, were used. Experiments were designed by the statistical central composite design method. Two models were developed for the BET surface area and reaction yield of each activation process. These models showed the effects of operating conditions, such as activation temperature, mass ratio of activating agent to precursor, activation time, and nitrogen flowrate on the BET surface area and reaction yield for each activation method for each precursor. The optimum operating conditions were calculated using these models to produce activated carbons with relatively large BET surface area (> 500 m2/g) and high reaction yield (> 50 wt %). The BET surface area and reaction yield for activated carbons produced at optimum operating conditions showed maximum 7 and 7.4% difference, respectively, comparing to the values predicted by models. The activated carbons produced at optimum operating conditions were used as the base catalysts for the direct oxidation of 1 mol % hydrogen sulphide in nitrogen to sulphur at the temperature range of 160-205°C and pressure of 700 kPa. Originally activated carbons showed a good potential for oxidation of hydrogen sulphide by their selectivity for sulphur product and low amount of sulphur dioxide production. To improve the performance of steam-activated carbons, the catalysts were modified by acid-treatment followed by thermal desorption. This method increased the break-through times for coal-based and biomass-based catalysts to 115 and 141 minutes, respectively. The average amounts of sulphur dioxide produced during the reaction time were 0.14 and 0.03% (as % of hydrogen sulphide fed to the reactor) for modified activated carbons prepared from biochar and luscar char, respectively. The effects of porous structure, surface chemistry, and ash content on the performances of these activated carbon catalysts were investigated for the direct oxidation reaction of hydrogen sulphide. The acid-treatment followed by thermal desorption of activated carbons developed the porosity which produced more surface area for active sites and in addition, provided more space for sulphur product storage resulting in higher life time for catalyst. Boehm titration and temperature program desorption showed that the modification method increased basic character of carbon surface after thermal desorption in comparison to acid-treated sample. In addition, the effects of impregnating agents (potassium iodide and manganese nitrate) and two solvents for impregnation process were studied on the performance of the activated carbon catalysts for the direct oxidation of H2S to sulphur. Sulphur L-edge X-ray near edge structure (XANES) showed that the elemental sulphur was the dominant sulphur species in the product. The kinetic study for oxidation reaction of H2S over LusAC-O-D(650) was performed for temperature range of 160-190°C, oxygen to hydrogen sulphide molar ratio of 1-3, and H2S concentration of 6000-10000 ppm at 200 kPa. The values of activation energy were 26.6 and 29.3 kJ.gmol-1 for Eley-Rideal and Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanisms, respectively.

  12. EFFECTS OF SODIUM AND CALCIUM IN LIGNITE ON THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin S. Olson; Kurt E. Eylands; Daniel J. Stepan

    2001-12-01

    Powdered activated carbon (PAC) has traditionally been used by the water treatment industry for the removal of compounds contributing to taste and odor problems. PAC also has the potential to remove naturally occurring organic matter (NOM) from raw waters prior to disinfection, thus controlling the formation of regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs). Many small water systems are currently using PAC for taste and odor control and have the potential to use PAC for controlling DBPs. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has been working on the development of a PAC product to remove NOM from surface water supplies to prevent the formation of carcinogenic DBPs during chlorination. During previous studies, the sodium and calcium content of the lignites showed a significant effect on the sorption capacity of the activated carbon product. As much as a 130% increase in the humic acid sorption capacity of a PAC produced from a high-sodium-content lignite was observed. During this study, activated carbons were prepared from three coals representing high-sodium, low-sodium--low-calcium, and high-calcium compositions in two steps, an initial char formation followed by mild activation with steam to avoid excessive burnout. This set of carbons was characterized with respect to physical and chemical properties. The BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) nitrogen adsorption isotherms gave relatively low surface areas (ranging from 245 to 370 m{sup 2}/g). The lowest-BET area was obtained for the high-sodium carbon, which can be attributed to enlargement of micropores as a result of sodium-catalyzed gasification reaction of the carbon structure. This hypothesis is consistent with the scanning electron microscopy microprobe analyses, which show that in both the coal and the activated carbon from this coal, the sodium is distributed over both the carbon structure and the mineral particles. Thus it is initially associated with carboxylate groups on the coal and then as sodium oxide or other active form in close proximity to the carbon and is, therefore, readily available for catalysis of gasification. Humate adsorption isotherms for the high-sodium carbon gave superior results as defined by very high intercepts in modified Freundlich plots. Thus the high-sodium carbon will be considerably more effective in reducing the humate concentration for a given carbon dosage. Analysis of adsorption isotherms indicated the results were consistent with the hypothesis that only the larger pores are effective for binding the large humate molecules, and that the larger pores developed during activation of the high-sodium char give the appropriate macropore structure for humate binding. Toluene adsorption isotherms indicated that the high-calcium carbon and the low-calcium, low-sodium carbon were superior to the high-sodium carbon for small molecules in aqueous solution, but not as effective as a Calgon F-400 commercial activated carbon. This is consistent with the low-BET surface areas observed for the lignite-derived carbons, and thus there are a lower number of sites for binding the smaller toluene molecule in these carbons.

  13. Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production

    E-print Network

    Narasayya, Vivek

    #12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

  14. EFFECTS OF SODIUM AND CALCIUM IN LIGNITE ON THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin S. Olson; Kurt E. Eylands; Daniel J. Stepan

    2001-12-01

    New federal drinking water regulations have been promulgated to restrict the levels of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in finished public water supplies. DBPs are suspected carcinogens and are formed when organic material is partially oxidized by disinfectants commonly used in the water treatment industry. Additional federal mandates are expected in the near future that will also affect public water suppliers with respect to DBPs. These new federal drinking water regulations may require public water suppliers to adjust treatment practices or incorporate additional treatment operations into their existing treatment trains. Many options have been identified, including membrane processes, granular activated carbon, powered activated carbon (PAC), enhanced coagulation and/or softening, and alternative disinfectants (e.g., chlorine dioxide, ozone, and chloramines). Of the processes being considered, PAC appears to offer an attractive benefit-to-cost advantage for many water treatment plants, particularly small systems (those serving fewer than 10,000 customers). PAC has traditionally been used by the water treatment industry for the removal of compounds contributing to taste and odor problems. PAC also has the potential to remove naturally occurring organic matter (NOM) from raw waters prior to disinfection, thus controlling the formation of regulated DBPs. Many small water systems are currently using PAC for taste and odor control and have the potential to use PAC for controlling DBPs. Activated carbons can be produced from a variety of raw materials, including wood, peat, coconut husks, and numerous types of coal. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been working on the development of a PAC product to remove NOM from surface water supplies to prevent the formation of carcinogenic DBPs during chlorination. During that study, the sodium and calcium content of the lignites showed a significant effect on the sorption capacity of the activated carbon product. As much as a 130% increase in the humic acid sorption capacity of a PAC produced from a high-sodium-content lignite was observed. We hypothesize that the sodium and calcium content of the coal plays a significant role in the development of pore structures and pore-size distribution, ultimately producing activated carbon products that have greater sorption capacity for specific contaminants, depending on molecular size.

  15. Microbial production, enzyme activity, and carbon turnover in surface sediments of the Hudson River estuary.

    PubMed

    Sinsabaugh, R L; Findlay, S

    1995-09-01

    The detrital food web is a major nexus of energy flow in nearly all aquatic ecosystems. Energy enters this nexus by microbial assimilation of detrital carbon. To link microbiological variables with ecosystem process, it is necessary to understand the regulatory hierarchy that controls the distribution of microbial biomass and activity. Toward that goal, we investigated variability in microbial abundance and activities within the tidal freshwater estuary of the Hudson River. Surface sediments were collected from four contrasting sites: a mid-channel shoal, two types of wetlands, and a tributary confluence. These samples, collected in June to August 1992, were sorted into two to four size fractions, depending on the particle size distribution at each site. Each fraction was analyzed for bacterial biomass (by acridine orange direct counting), bacterial production (by (3)H-thymidine incorporation into DNA), fungal biomass (by ergosterol extraction), fungal production (by biomass accrual), and the potential activities of seven extracellular enzymes involved in the degradation of detrital structural molecules. Decomposition rates for particulate organic carbon (POC) were estimated from a statistical model relating mass loss rates to endocellulase activity. Within samples, bacterial biomass and productivity were negatively correlated with particle size: Standing stocks and rates in the <63-?m class were roughly twofold greater than in the >4-mm class. Conversely, fungal biomass was positively correlated with particle size, with standing stocks in the largest size class more than 1OX greater than in the smallest. Extracellular enzyme activities also differed significantly among size classes, with high carbohydrase activities associated with the largest particles, while oxidative activities predominated in the smallest size classes. Among sites, the mid-channel sediments had the lowest POC standing stock (2% of sediment dry mass) and longest turnover time (approximately 1.7 years), with bacterial productivity approximately equal to fungal (56 vs. 46 ?g C per gram POC per day, respectively). In the Typha wetland, POC standing stock was high (10%); turnover time was about 0.3 years; and 90% of the microbial productivity was fungal (670 vs. 84 ?g C per gram POC per day). The other two sites, a Trapa wetland and a tributary confluence, showed intermediate values for microbial productivity and POC turnover. Differences among sites were described by regression models that related the distribution of microbial biomass (r (2) = 0.98) and productivity (r (2) = 0.81) to particle size and carbon quality. These factors also determined POC decomposition rates. Net microbial production efficiency (production rate/decomposition rate) averaged 10.6%, suggesting that the sediments were exporting large quantities of unassimilated dissolved organic carbon into the water column. Our results suggest that studies of carbon processing in large systems, like the Hudson River estuary, can be facilitated by regression models that relate microbial dynamics to more readily measured parameters. PMID:24185480

  16. Treatment of olive mill waste water with activated carbons from agricultural by-products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Polymnia Galiatsatou; Michail Metaxas; Dimitrios Arapoglou; Vasilia Kasselouri-Rigopoulou

    2002-01-01

    A series of activated carbons prepared by a two-step steam activation of olive stone and solvent extracted olive pulp (SEOP) have been used in an attempt to investigate the total phenol removal and chemical oxygen demand (COD) decrease in olive mill waste water (OMWW). The temperature of carbonization and activation were kept constant at 850 and 800 °C, respectively. One of

  17. GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON INSTALLATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a compilation and summary of design criteria, performance, and cost data from 22 operating municipal and industrial granular activated carbon (GAC) installations that treat water and wastewater or process food and beverage products. Guidance for using this inf...

  18. Production of Carbon Dioxide

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Science House

    2014-01-28

    In this chemistry activity, learners use common chemicals to produce carbon dioxide and observe its properties. This resource includes brief questions for learners to answer after the experiment. Use this activity to introduce learners to carbon dioxide and its use as a fire extinguisher. Note: this activity involves an open flame.

  19. Production of energy and activated carbon from agri-residue: sunflower seed example.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Adam A; Kadakia, Parag; Gupta, Murlidhar; Zhang, Zisheng

    2012-09-01

    In this work, a biomass processing facility is designed and simulated for the annual conversion of 77 ktons of sunflower residue into electricity and activated carbon. The residue is initially pyrolized to produce low hydrocarbon gases (35 wt%), bio-oils (30 wt%), and char (35 wt%). The gases and bio-oils are separated and combusted to generate high pressure steam, electricity, and steam for conversion of char into activated carbon. Assuming 35% of the char's mass is lost during activation, the proposed process produces 15.6 ktons activated carbon and 5.5 ktons ash annually, while generating 10.2 MW of electricity. Economic analysis of the proposed facility yielded capital costs of $31.64 million, annual operating costs of $31.58 million, and a yearly gross revenue of $38.9 million. A discounted payback period of 6.1 years was determined for the current design, extending to 10 years if the facility were operated at 75% capacity. While the proposed process appears to be economically viable, profitability is highly sensitive to the selling price of electricity and activated carbon, highlighting the need for additional research into the pyrolysis reactor design, char/ash separation techniques, and the quality of activated carbon obtained using char from sunflower residue pyrolysis. PMID:21938425

  20. PROCESS DESCRIPTION AND PRODUCT COST TO MANUFACTURE SUGARCANE BAGASSE-BASED GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Process flow diagrams and manufacturing costs were developed to convert sugarcane bagasse to granular activated carbon. Unit operations in the conversion process consisted of milling, pelletization, pyrolysis/activation, washing with acid and water, and drying/screening/collecting of the final prod...

  1. ACTIVATED CARBON FROM BROILER LITTER: PROCESS DESCRIPTION AND COST OF PRODUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure continues to represent a significantly large and problematic portion of the U.S. agricultural waste generated yearly. Granular activated carbons made from pelletized poultry litter have been shown to adsorb various positively charged metal ions from laboratory prepared solutions. Bas...

  2. Microbial production, enzyme activity, and carbon turnover in surface sediments of the Hudson River estuary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Sinsabaugh; S. Findlay

    1995-01-01

    The detrital food web is a major nexus of energy flow in nearly all aquatic ecosystems. Energy enters this nexus by microbial assimilation of detrital carbon. To link microbiological variables with ecosystem process, it is necessary to understand the regulatory hierarchy that controls the distribution of microbial biomass and activity. Toward that goal, we investigated variability in microbial abundance and

  3. Activated carbons from end-products of tree nut and tree fruit production as sorbents for removing methyl bromide in ventilation effluent following postharvest chamber fumigation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Wiley A; Bellamy, David E; Walse, Spencer S

    2015-04-01

    End-products of tree nuts and tree fruits grown in California, USA were evaluated for the ability to remove methyl bromide (MB) from ventilation effluent following postharvest chamber fumigation. Activated carbon sorbents from walnut and almond shells as well as peach and prune pits were prepared using different methods of pyrolysis, activation, and quenching. Each source and preparation was evaluated for yield from starting material (%, m/m) and performance on tests where MB-containing airstreams were directed through a columnar bed of the activated carbon in an experimental apparatus, termed a parallel adsorbent column tester, which was constructed as a scaled-down model of a chamber ventilation system. We report the number of doses needed to first observe the breakthrough of MB downstream of the bed and the capacity of the activated carbon for MB (%, m/m) based on a fractional percentage of MB mass sorbed at breakthrough relative to mass of the bed prior to testing. Results were based on a novel application of solid-phase microextraction with time-weighted averaging sampling of MB concentration in airstreams, which was quantitative across the range of fumigation-relevant conditions and statistically unaffected by relative humidity. Activated carbons from prune pits, prepared either by steam activation or carbon dioxide activation coupled to water quenching, received the greatest number of doses prior to breakthrough and had the highest capacity, approximately 12-14%, outperforming a commercially marketed activated carbon derived from coconut shells. Experimental evidence is presented that links discrepancy in performance to the relative potential for activated carbons to preferentially sorb water vapor relative to MB. PMID:25758836

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF CARBON FIBER EMISSIONS FROM CURRENT AND PROJECTED ACTIVITIES FOR THE MANUFACTURE AND DISPOSAL OF CARBON FIBER PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Composite materials formed by impregnating a carbon or graphite fiber mat with plastic binders are being used increasingly in military, aerospace, sports and automotive applications. Carbon fibers are formed primarily from synthetic fibers carbonized in the absence of oxygen. Pos...

  5. Enhancement of nuclease P1 production by Penicillium citrinum YL104 immobilized on activated carbon filter sponge.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Nan; Ren, Hengfei; Li, Zhenjian; Zhao, Ting; Shi, Xinchi; Cheng, Hao; Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Yong; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-02-01

    The efficiency of current methods for industrial production of the enzyme nuclease P1 is limited. In this study, we sought to improve fermentation methods for the production of nuclease P1. An immobilized fermentation system using an activated carbon filter sponge as a carrier was used for the production of nuclease P1. In an airlift internal loop reactor (ALR), the fermentation performance of three different fermentation modes, including free-cell fermentation, repeated-batch fermentation, and semi-continuous immobilized fermentation, were compared. The fermentation kinetics in the fermentation broth of the three fermentation modes, including dissolved oxygen (DO), pH value, cell concentration, residual sugar concentration, and enzyme activity, were tested. The productivity of semi-continuous immobilized fermentation reached 8.76 U/mL/h, which was 33.3 and 80.2% higher than that of repeated-batch fermentation and free-cell fermentation, respectively. The sugar consumption of free-cell, repeated-batch, and semi-continuous immobilized fermentations was 41.2, 30.8, and 25.9 g/L, respectively. These results showed that immobilized-cell fermentation by using Penicillium citrinum with activated carbon filter sponge in an ALR was advantageous for nuclease P1 production, especially in the semi-continuous immobilized fermentation mode. In spite of the significant improvement in nuclease P1 production in semi-continuous immobilized fermentation mode, the specific activity of nuclease P1 was almost equal among the three fermentation modes. PMID:25472432

  6. PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotubes activate neutrophils to increase production of hypochlorous acid, the oxidant capable of degrading nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasova, Irina I., E-mail: irina.vlasova@yahoo.com [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine, Federal Medico-Biological Agency, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vakhrusheva, Tatyana V. [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine, Federal Medico-Biological Agency, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine, Federal Medico-Biological Agency, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sokolov, Alexey V.; Kostevich, Valeria A. [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine, Federal Medico-Biological Agency, Moscow (Russian Federation) [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine, Federal Medico-Biological Agency, Moscow (Russian Federation); Research Institute for Experimental Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical Science, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Gusev, Alexandr A.; Gusev, Sergey A. [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine, Federal Medico-Biological Agency, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine, Federal Medico-Biological Agency, Moscow (Russian Federation); Melnikova, Viktoriya I. [Institute of Developmental Biology, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Developmental Biology, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lobach, Anatolii S. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Science, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Science, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-01

    Perspectives for the use of carbon nanotubes in biomedical applications depend largely on their ability to degrade in the body into products that can be easily cleared out. Carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWCNTs) were shown to be degraded by oxidants generated by peroxidases in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In the present study we demonstrated that conjugation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to c-SWCNTs does not interfere with their degradation by peroxidase/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system or by hypochlorite. Comparison of different heme-containing proteins for their ability to degrade PEG-SWCNTs has led us to conclude that the myeloperoxidase (MPO) product hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is the major oxidant that may be responsible for biodegradation of PEG-SWCNTs in vivo. MPO is secreted mainly by neutrophils upon activation. We hypothesize that SWCNTs may enhance neutrophil activation and therefore stimulate their own biodegradation due to MPO-generated HOCl. PEG-SWCNTs at concentrations similar to those commonly used in in vivo studies were found to activate isolated human neutrophils to produce HOCl. Both PEG-SWCNTs and c-SWCNTs enhanced HOCl generation from isolated neutrophils upon serum-opsonized zymosan stimulation. Both types of nanotubes were also found to activate neutrophils in whole blood samples. Intraperitoneal injection of a low dose of PEG-SWCNTs into mice induced an increase in percentage of circulating neutrophils and activation of neutrophils and macrophages in the peritoneal cavity, suggesting the evolution of an inflammatory response. Activated neutrophils can produce high local concentrations of HOCl, thereby creating the conditions favorable for degradation of the nanotubes. -- Highlights: ? Myeloperoxidase (MPO) product hypochlorous acid is able to degrade CNTs. ? PEGylated SWCNTs stimulate isolated neutrophils to produce hypochlorous acid. ? SWCNTs are capable of activating neutrophils in blood samples. ? Activation of neutrophils in blood causes an increase in plasma MPO concentration. ? Intraperitoneal injection of PEG-SWCNTs in mice induces an inflammatory response.

  7. Production of activated carbon from bagasse and rice husk by a single-stage chemical activation method at low retention times.

    PubMed

    Kalderis, Dimitrios; Bethanis, Sophia; Paraskeva, Panagiota; Diamadopoulos, Evan

    2008-10-01

    The production of activated carbon from bagasse and rice husk by a single-stage chemical activation method in short retention times (30-60min) was examined in this study. The raw materials were subjected to a chemical pretreatment and were fed to the reactor in the form of a paste (75% moisture). Chemicals examined were ZnCl2, NaOH and H3PO4, for temperatures of 600, 700 and 800 degrees C. Of the three chemical reagents under evaluation only ZnCl2 produced activated carbons with high surface areas. BET surface areas for rice husk were up to 750m2/g for 1:1 ZnCl2:rice husk ratio. BET surface areas for bagasse were up to 674m2/g for 0.75:1 ZnCl2:bagasse ratio. Results were compared to regular two-stage physical activation methods. PMID:18364254

  8. Production of granular activated carbon from food-processing wastes (walnut shells and jujube seeds) and its adsorptive properties.

    PubMed

    Bae, Wookeun; Kim, Jongho; Chung, Jinwook

    2014-08-01

    Commercial activated carbon is a highly effective absorbent that can be used to remove micropollutants from water. As a result, the demand for activated carbon is increasing. In this study, we investigated the optimum manufacturing conditions for producing activated carbon from ligneous wastes generated from food processing. Jujube seeds and walnut shells were selected as raw materials. Carbonization and steam activation were performed in a fixed-bed laboratory electric furnace. To obtain the highest iodine number, the optimum conditions for producing activated carbon from jujube seeds and walnut shells were 2 hr and 1.5 hr (carbonization at 700 degrees C) followed by 1 hr and 0.5 hr (activation at 1000 degrees C), respectively. The surface area and iodine number of activated carbon made from jujube seeds and walnut shells were 1,477 and 1,184 m2/g and 1,450 and 1,200 mg/g, respectively. A pore-distribution analysis revealed that most pores had a pore diameter within or around 30-40 angstroms, and adsorption capacity for surfactants was about 2 times larger than the commercial activated carbon, indicating that waste-based activated carbon can be used as alternative. Implications: Wastes discharged from agricultural and food industries results in a serious environmental problem. A method is proposed to convert food-processing wastes such as jujube seeds and walnut shells into high-grade granular activated carbon. Especially, the performance of jujube seeds as activated carbon is worthy of close attention. There is little research about the application ofjujube seeds. Also, when compared to two commercial carbons (Samchully and Calgon samples), the results show that it is possible to produce high-quality carbon, particularly from jujube seed, using a one-stage, 1,000 degrees C, steam pyrolysis. The preparation of activated carbon from food-processing wastes could increase economic return and reduce pollution. PMID:25185390

  9. Carbon Black Nanoparticles Promote Endothelial Activation and Lipid Accumulation in Macrophages Independently of Intracellular ROS Production

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yi; Roursgaard, Martin; Danielsen, Pernille Høgh; Møller, Peter; Loft, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to nanoparticles (NPs) may cause vascular effects including endothelial dysfunction and foam cell formation, with oxidative stress and inflammation as supposed central mechanisms. We investigated oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and lipid accumulation caused by nano-sized carbon black (CB) exposure in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), THP-1 (monocytes) and THP-1 derived macrophages (THP-1a). The proliferation of HUVECs or co-cultures of HUVECs and THP-1 cells were unaffected by CB exposure, whereas there was increased cytotoxicity, assessed by the LDH and WST-1 assays, especially in THP-1 and THP-1a cells. The CB exposure decreased the glutathione (GSH) content in THP-1 and THP-1a cells, whereas GSH was increased in HUVECs. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was increased in all cell types after CB exposure. A reduction of the intracellular GSH concentration by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) pre-treatment further increased the CB-induced ROS production in THP-1 cells and HUVECs. The expression of adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, but not adhesion of THP-1 to HUVECs or culture dishes, was elevated by CB exposure, whereas these effects were unaffected by BSO pre-treatment. qRT-PCR showed increased VCAM1 expression, but no change in GCLM and HMOX1 expression in CB-exposed HUVECs. Pre-exposure to CB induced lipid accumulation in THP-1a cells, which was not affected by the presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. In addition, the concentrations of CB to induce lipid accumulation were lower than the concentrations to promote intracellular ROS production in THP-1a cells. In conclusion, exposure to nano-sized CB induced endothelial dysfunction and foam cell formation, which was not dependent on intracellular ROS production. PMID:25184212

  10. GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM AGRICULTURAL BY-PRODUCTS: POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS IN DRINKING WATER AND MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENTS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activated carbons are used routinely in the drinking water and wastewater treatment industries to remove principally organic contaminants. While coconut shell-based carbons are used in these applications, nutshell-based carbons from tree nuts originating from domestic or U.S. sources have not been ...

  11. Powdered Activated Carbon Adsorption

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yung-Tse Hung; Howard H. Lo; Lawrence K. Wang; Jerry R. Taricska; Kathleen Hung Li

    \\u000a Historically, the use of activated carbon has been limited to treatment applications for drinking water. In the past two decades,\\u000a more attention has been given to the potential use of activated carbons for wastewater treatment. The interest in such a process\\u000a has stemmed from the growing concern over the quality of rain water from which we get our potable water.

  12. Activated Carbon Catalysts for the Production of Hydrogen for the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Harry W. Rollins; Kyle C Burch; Cristina Deiana; Hugo S. Silva; Maria F. Sardella; Dolly Granados

    2009-05-01

    Seven activated carbon catalysts obtained from a variety of raw material sources and preparation methods were examined for their catalytic activity to decompose hydroiodic acid (HI) to produce hydrogen; a key reaction in the sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical water splitting cycle. Activity was examined under a temperature ramp from 473 to 773 K. Within the group of ligno-cellulosic steam-activated carbon catalysts, activity increased with surface area. However, both a mineral-based steam-activated carbon and a ligno-cellulosic chemically-activated carbon displayed activities lower than expected based on their higher surface areas. In general, ash content was detrimental to catalytic activity while total acid sites, as determined by Bohem’s titrations, seemed to favor higher catalytic activity within the group of steam-activated carbons. These results suggest, one more time, that activated carbon raw materials and preparation methods may have played a significant role in the development of surface characteristics that eventually dictated catalyst activity and stability as well.

  13. Effect of Carbon, Nitrogen Sources and Water Activity on Growth and Ochratoxin Production of Aspergillus carbonarius (Bainier) Thom

    PubMed Central

    Hashem, Abeer; Fathi Abd-Allah, Elsayed; Sultan Al-Obeed, Rashid; Abdullah Alqarawi, Abdulaziz; Alwathnani, Hend Awad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a toxic secondary metabolite produced by fungi belonging to Aspergillus and Penicillium genera. The production of OTA is influenced by environmental conditions and nutritional requirements. The postharvest application of bunches of table grape fruit (TGF), with water activity of 0.8 aw, was highly effective for controlling OTA contamination in vitro and in vivo (table grape). Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the influence of environmental conditions and nutritional requirements on growth and OTA production by Aspergillus carbonarius, as well as, the impact of water activity on OTA production and growth characters of A. carbonarius. Furthermore, we also examined the influence of the application of different levels of water activity (aw 0.8) on the preservation of the general appearance of TGF and control of their contamination with OTA. Materials and Methods: The growth and OTA production by A. carbonarius were studied using glucose-ammonium nitrate salt broth medium. Effect of water activity was studied using glycerol (0.80, 0.85, 0.90, and 0.98 aw). The bunches of table grape fruits were immersed in glycerol solution (equivalent to 0.80 aw) and placed as a double layer in cardboard boxes (25 × 35 × 10 cm). The boxes were stored at 20°C for 15 days to simulate local market conditions. Results: The maximum OTA production by A. carbonarius was observed on broth medium after eight days of incubation at 20°C, with pH 4, and fructose and ammonium nitrate supplementation as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. The water activity (0.9, 0.85 aw) caused significant decrease in OTA production by A. carbonarius. The postharvest application of water activity (0.8 aw) was highly effective for maintenance of the table grape quality, which was expressed as weight loss, firmness and decay, while it also controlled OTA contamination of fruits under concept of local market conditions. Conclusions: Our results reported that deterioration of TGF by A. carbonarius could be minimized by application of aw. Our experiments were performed under conditions of local markets, which support the economy of many thousands of families in Egypt, especially in the poor rural areas. In future adequate research is required to use these technologies commercially.

  14. Anionic group 6B metal carbonyls as homogeneous catalysts for carbon dioxide\\/hydrogen activation: the production of alkyl formates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald J. Darensbourg; Cesar Ovalles

    1984-01-01

    The production of alkyl formates from the hydrocondensation of carbon dioxide in alcohols utilizing anionic group 6B carbonyl hydrides as catalysts is herein reported. HM(CO)â⁻ (M = Cr, W; derived from ..mu..-H(Mâ(CO)ââ)⁻) and their products of carbon dioxide insertion, HCOâM(CO)â⁻, have been found to be effective catalysts for the hydrogenation of COâ in alcohols under rather mild conditions (loading pressures

  15. Production of biodiesel fuel from canola oil with dimethyl carbonate using an active sodium methoxide catalyst prepared by crystallization.

    PubMed

    Kai, Takami; Mak, Goon Lum; Wada, Shohei; Nakazato, Tsutomu; Takanashi, Hirokazu; Uemura, Yoshimitsu

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a novel method for the production of biodiesel under mild conditions using fine particles of sodium methoxide formed in dimethyl carbonate (DMC) is proposed. Biodiesel is generally produced from vegetable oils by the transesterification of triglycerides with methanol. However, this reaction produces glycerol as a byproduct, and raw materials are not effectively utilized. Transesterification with DMC has recently been studied because glycerol is not formed in the process. Although solid-state sodium methoxide has been reported to be inactive for this reaction, the catalytic activity dramatically increased with the preparation of fine catalyst powders by crystallization. The transesterification of canola oil with DMC was studied using this catalyst for the preparation of biodiesel. A conversion greater than 96% was obtained at 65°C for 2h with a 3:1M ratio of DMC and oil and 2.0 wt% catalyst. PMID:24813567

  16. Ozone-biological activated carbon integrated treatment for removal of precursors of halogenated nitrogenous disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wenhai; Gao, Naiyun; Yin, Daqiang; Deng, Yang; Templeton, Michael R

    2012-03-01

    Pilot-scale tests were performed to reduce the formation of several nitrogenous and carbonaceous disinfection by-products (DBPs) with an integrated ozone and biological activated carbon (O(3)-BAC) treatment process following conventional water treatment processes (coagulation-sedimentation-filtration). Relative to the conventional processes alone, O(3)-BAC significantly improved the removal of turbidity, dissolved organic carbon, UV(254), NH(4)(+) and dissolved organic nitrogen from 98-99%, 58-72%, 31-53%, 16-93% and 35-74%, respectively, and enhanced the removal efficiency of the precursors for the measured DBPs. The conventional process was almost ineffective in removing the precursors of trichloronitromethane (TCNM) and dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm). Ozonation could not substantially reduce the formation of DCAcAm, and actually increased the formation potential of TCNM; it chemically altered the molecular structures of the precursors and increased the biodegradability of N-containing organic compounds. Consequently, the subsequent BAC filtration substantially reduced the formation of the both TCNM and DCAcAm, thus highlighting a synergistic effect of O(3) and BAC. Additionally, O(3)-BAC was effective at controlling the formation of the total organic halogen, which can be considered as an indicator of the formation of unidentified DBPs. PMID:22205050

  17. Carbon, nitrogen and pH regulate the production and activity of a polygalacturonase isozyme produced by Penicillium expansum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of carbon, nitrogen and pH on polygalacturonase activity produced by Penicillium expansum were investigated. P. expansum mycelial growth was greatest on lyophilized fruit tissue and the highest PG activity occurred in apple pectin medium. Nitrogen source influenced PG activity and was ...

  18. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION BY ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTANTS AND REMOVAL BY GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of the use of the alternative disinfectants on the formation of halogenated disinfection by-products (DBPS) including total organic halide, trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacentonitriles, haloketones, chloral hydrate, and chloropicrin, were examined along with ...

  19. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION BY ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTANTS AND REMOVAL BY GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of the use of the alternative disinfectants on the formation of halogenated disinfection by–products (DBPs) including total organic halide, trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, haloketones, chloral hydrate, and chloropicrin, were examined along ...

  20. Production and characterization of activated carbon prepared from safflower seed cake biochar and its ability to absorb reactive dyestuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang?n, Dilek; Köse, T. Ennil; Selengil, U?ur

    2013-09-01

    The use of activated carbon obtained from biochar for the removal of reactive dyestuff from aqueous solutions at various contact times, pHs and temperatures was investigated. The biochar was chemically modified with potassium hydroxide. The surface area and micropore volume of activated carbon was 1277 m2/g and 0.4952 cm3/g, respectively. The surface characterization of both biochar and activated carbon was undertaken using by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The experimental data indicated that the adsorption isotherms are well described by the Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR) isotherm equation. The adsorption kinetics of reactive dyestuff obeys the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic parameters such as ?G?, ?H? and ?S? were calculated to estimate the nature of adsorption. The activation energy of the system was calculated as 1.12 kJ/mol. According to these results, prepared activated carbon could be used as a low-cost adsorbent to compare with the commercial activated carbon for the removal reactive dyestuff from wastewater.

  1. Activated Carbon Derived from Fast Pyrolysis Liquids Production of Agricultural Residues and Energy Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fast pyrolysis is a thermochemical method that can be used for processing energy crops such as switchgrass, alfalfa, soybean straw, corn stover as well as agricultural residuals (broiler litter) for bio-oil production. Researchers with the Agriculture Research Service (ARS) of the USDA developed a 2...

  2. Powdered activated carbon coupled with enhanced coagulation for natural organic matter removal and disinfection by-product control: Application in a Western Australian water treatment plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ina Kristiana; Cynthia Joll; Anna Heitz

    2011-01-01

    The removal of organic precursors of disinfection by-products (DBPs), i.e. natural organic matter (NOM), prior to disinfection and distribution is considered as the most effective approach to minimise the formation of DBPs. This study investigated the impact of the addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to an enhanced coagulation treatment process at an existing water treatment plant on the efficiency

  3. Reducing carbon dioxide to products

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Emily Barton; Sivasankar, Narayanappa; Parajuli, Rishi; Keets, Kate A

    2014-09-30

    A method reducing carbon dioxide to one or more products may include steps (A) to (C). Step (A) may bubble said carbon dioxide into a solution of an electrolyte and a catalyst in a divided electrochemical cell. The divided electrochemical cell may include an anode in a first cell compartment and a cathode in a second cell compartment. The cathode may reduce said carbon dioxide into said products. Step (B) may adjust one or more of (a) a cathode material, (b) a surface morphology of said cathode, (c) said electrolyte, (d) a manner in which said carbon dioxide is bubbled, (e), a pH level of said solution, and (f) an electrical potential of said divided electrochemical cell, to vary at least one of (i) which of said products is produced and (ii) a faradaic yield of said products. Step (C) may separate said products from said solution.

  4. Carbon Dioxide Production at Home

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    In this problem set, learners will consider the "Carbon Footprint" of a family of four in a given context, as well as the US and global averages, and compare that with their own to answer a series of questions. They will use an online Carbon Footprint calculator to determine their own per-capita carbon production. Answer key is provided. This problem is part of Earth Math: A Brief Mathematical Guide to Earth Science and Climate Change.

  5. POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON FROM NORTH DAKOTA LIGNITE: AN OPTION FOR DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT CONTROL IN WATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel J. Stepan; Thomas A. Moe; Melanie D. Hetland; Margaret L. Laumb

    2001-06-01

    New federal drinking water regulations have been promulgated to restrict the levels of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in finished public water supplies. DBPs are suspected carcinogens and are formed when organic material is partially oxidized by disinfectants commonly used in the water treatment industry. Additional federal mandates are expected in the near future that will further affect public water suppliers with respect to DBPs. Powdered activated carbon (PAC) has traditionally been used by the water treatment industry for the removal of compounds contributing to taste and odor problems. PAC also has the potential to remove naturally occurring organic matter (NOM) from raw waters prior to disinfection, thus controlling the formation of regulated DBPs. Many small water systems are currently using PAC for taste and odor control and have the potential to use PAC for controlling DBPs. This project, a cooperative effort between the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), the Grand Forks Water Treatment Plant, and the University of North Dakota Department of Civil Engineering, consists of several interrelated tasks. The objective of the research was to evaluate a cost-effective PAC produced from North Dakota lignite for removing NOM from water and reducing trihalomethane formation potential. The research approach was to develop a statistically valid testing protocol that can be used to compare dose-response relationships between North Dakota lignite-derived PAC and commercially available PAC products. A statistical analysis was performed to determine whether significant correlations exist between operating conditions, water properties, PAC properties, and dose-response behavior. Pertinent physical and chemical properties were also measured for each of the waters and each of the PACs.

  6. FREUNDLICH ADSORPTION ISOTHERMS OF AGRICULTURAL BY-PRODUCT-BASED POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBONS IN A GEOSMIN-WATER SYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study was designed to model the adsorption of geosmin from water under laboratory conditions using the Freundlich isotherm model. This model was used to compare the efficiency of sugarcane bagasse and pecan shell-based granular activated carbon (GAC) to the efficiency of a coal-based co...

  7. COMBINED USE OF ION EXCHANGE RESINS AND GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON FOR THE CONTROL OF ORGANIC MATTER AND DISINFECTION BY PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of anion exchange resin as a pretreatment step to granular activated carbon is evaluated. erformance is evaluated by DOC, SAC, TOXFP, and THMFP parameters. hio River water and Palm Beach groundwater are used. he results show that resin pretreatment is significant in exten...

  8. Commercial Activated Carbon for the Catalytic Production of Hydrogen via the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Ginosar; Lucia M. Petkovic; Kyle C. Burch

    2011-07-01

    Eight activated carbon catalysts were examined for their catalytic activity to decompose hydroiodic acid (HI) to produce hydrogen; a key reaction in the sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical water splitting cycle. Activity was examined under a temperature ramp from 473 to 773 K. No statistically significant correlation was found between catalyst sample properties and catalytic activity. Four of the eight samples were examined for one week of continuous operation at 723 K. All samples appeared to be stable over the period of examination.

  9. Dewatering Peat With Activated Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Proposed process produces enough gas and carbon to sustain itself. In proposed process peat slurry is dewatered to approximately 40 percent moisture content by mixing slurry with activated carbon and filtering with solid/liquid separation techniques.

  10. Anionic group 6B metal carbonyls as homogeneous catalysts for carbon dioxide/hydrogen activation: the production of alkyl formates

    SciTech Connect

    Darensbourg, D.J.; Ovalles, C.

    1984-06-27

    The production of alkyl formates from the hydrocondensation of carbon dioxide in alcohols utilizing anionic group 6B carbonyl hydrides as catalysts is herein reported. HM(CO)/sub 5//sup -/ (M = Cr, W; derived from ..mu..-H(M/sub 2/(CO)/sub 10/)/sup -/) and their products of carbon dioxide insertion, HCO/sub 2/M(CO)/sub 5//sup -/, have been found to be effective catalysts for the hydrogenation of CO/sub 2/ in alcohols under rather mild conditions (loading pressures of CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/, 250 psi each, and 125/sup 0/C) to provide alkyl formates. The only metal carbonyl species detected in solution via spectroscopy, both at the end of a catalytic period and during catalysis, were M(CO)/sub 6/ and HCO/sub 2/M(CO)/sub 5//sup -/. The metal hexacarbonyls were independently shown to be catalytically inactive. A catalytic cycle is proposed which initially involves release of formic acid from the metal center, either by reductive elimination of the hydrido formato ligands or ligand-assisted heterolytic splitting of dihydrogen with loss of formic acid. In a rapid subsequent process HCOOH reacts with alcohols to yield HCOOR. The addition of carbon monoxide retards alkyl formate production, strongly implying CO/sub 2/ to be the primary source of the carboxylic carbon atom in HCOOR. This was verified by carrying out reactions in the presence of HCO/sub 2/W(/sup 13/CO)/sub 5//sup -/ which provided only H/sup 12/COOR after short reaction periods. However, in the absence of hydrogen and carbon dioxide ..mu..-H(M/sub 2/(CO)/sub 10/)/sup -/ species were observed to be effective catalyst precursors for converting CO and methanol into methyl formate. 36 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling

    E-print Network

    Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling Oak Ridge National spinning, and the low mass conversion yield of precursor to carbon fiber. Alternative precursors have22725 Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy

  12. ACTIVATED CARBON FROM LIGNITE FOR WATER TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin S. Olson; Daniel J. Stepan

    2000-07-01

    High concentrations of humate in surface water result in the formation of excess amounts of chlorinated byproducts during disinfection treatment. These precursors can be removed in water treatment prior to disinfection using powdered activated carbon. In the interest of developing a more cost-effective method for removal of humates in surface water, a comparison of the activities of carbons prepared from North Dakota lignites with those of commercial carbons was conducted. Previous studies indicated that a commercial carbon prepared from Texas lignite (Darco HDB) was superior to those prepared from bituminous coals for water treatment. That the high alkali content of North Dakota lignites would result in favorable adsorptive properties for the very large humate molecules was hypothesized, owing to the formation of larger pores during activation. Since no standard humate test has been previously developed, initial adsorption testing was performed using smaller dye molecules with various types of ionic character. With the cationic dye, methylene blue, a carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite (HSKRC) adsorbed more dye than the Darco HDB. The carbon from the low-sodium lignite was much inferior. With another cationic dye, malachite green, the Darco HDB was slightly better. With anionic dyes, methyl red and azocarmine-B, the results for the HSKRC and Darco HDB were comparable. A humate test was developed using Aldrich humic acid. The HSKRC and the Darco HDB gave equally high adsorption capacities for the humate (138 mg/g), consistent with the similarities observed in earlier tests. A carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite from a different mine showed an outstanding improvement (201 mg/g). The carbons prepared from the low-sodium lignites from both mines showed poor adsorption capacities for humate. Adsorption isotherms were performed for the set of activated carbons in the humate system. These exhibited a complex behavior interpreted as resulting from two types of sorption sites. The effect of pH on adsorption was investigated using buffered solutions. The sorption capacity decreased with increasing pH. A study of the effect of activation conditions on the adsorption capacity of the resulting carbon showed that steam activation at 750 C provides the optimum activity with the high-sodium char. An attempt to scale up the carbon production to the 2-kg scale failed to produce the same high activity that was obtained in the 100-g batch unit. Although this research demonstrated that a highly active carbon for water treatment can be produced from high-sodium lignites, much further work is needed to understand what methods and equipment will be needed for large-scale production of this carbon.

  13. Activated Boron Nitride Derived from Activated Carbon

    E-print Network

    Zettl, Alex

    for catalytic processes. A wide variety of porous solids exist, including zeolites, pillared clays, porousCyNz intermediate product was collected from the bed of porous carbon. To determine appropriate experimental

  14. Optimum manufacturing conditions of activated carbon fiber absorbents. II. Effect of carbonization and activation conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ching-Iuan Su; Ching-Luh Wang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, viscose rayon-based knitted fabrics were utilized as the precursor to produce activated carbon fiber absorbents\\u000a (ACFA). The effects of carbonization and activation conditions on characteristics (ACFA) were examined. Experimental results\\u000a revealed that increasing the flow rate of environmental gas N2 and steam activator used in conjunction and decreasing the production rate of ACFA can obtain better pore

  15. Carbon Dioxide Production in the Oxidation of Organic

    E-print Network

    Steinbock, Oliver

    Carbon Dioxide Production in the Oxidation of Organic Acids by Cerium(IV) under Aerobic are oxidized to carbon dioxide. Hence, the determination of the stoichiometry between produced CO2 and reduced The study of oxidation of relatively low molecular weight carbonic acids by metal ions has been an active

  16. REACTIONS OF CHLORITE WITH ACTIVATED CARBON AND WITH VANILLIC ACID AND INDAN ADSORBED ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction between chlorite (CO2(-1)) and vanillic acid, at pH 6.0 in the presence of granular activated carbon (GAC), yielded several reaction products identifiable by GC/MS; no products were found in the absence of GAC. Indan and ClO2 or ClO2(-1) reacted in aqueous solution a...

  17. The influence of broiler activity, growth rate, and litter on carbon dioxide balances for the determination of ventilation flow rates in broiler production.

    PubMed

    Calvet, S; Estellés, F; Cambra-López, M; Torres, A G; Van den Weghe, H F A

    2011-11-01

    Carbon dioxide balances are useful in determining ventilation rates in livestock buildings. These balances need an accurate estimation of the CO(2) produced by animals and their litter to determine the ventilation flows. To estimate the daily variation in ventilation flow, it is necessary to precisely know the daily variation pattern of CO(2) production, which mainly depends on animal activity. The objective of this study was to explore the applicability of CO(2) balances for determining ventilation flows in broiler buildings. More specifically, this work aimed to quantify the amount of CO(2) produced by the litter, as well as the amount of CO(2) produced by the broilers, as a function of productive parameters, and to analyze the influence of broiler activity on CO(2) emissions. Gas concentrations and ventilation flows were simultaneously measured in 3 trials, with 1 under experimental conditions and the other 2 in a commercial broiler farm. In the experimental assay, broiler activity was also determined. At the end of the experimental trial, on the day after the removal of the broilers, the litter accounted for 20% of the total CO(2) produced, and the broilers produced 3.71 L/h of CO(2) per kg of metabolic weight. On the commercial farm, CO(2) production was the same for the 2 cycles (2.60 L/h per kg of metabolic weight, P > 0.05). However, substantial differences were found between CO(2) and broiler activity patterns after changes in light status. A regression model was used to explain these differences (R(2) = 0.52). Carbon dioxide increased with bird activity, being on average 3.02 L/h per kg of metabolic weight for inactive birds and 4.73 L/h per kg of metabolic weight when bird activity was highest. Overall, CO(2) balances are robust tools for determining the daily average ventilation flows in broiler farms. These balances could also be applied at more frequent intervals, but in this case, particular care is necessary after light status changes because of discrepancy between animal activity and CO(2) production. PMID:22010228

  18. Activated carbon from pecan shell: process description and economic analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chilton Ng; Wayne E Marshall; Ramu M Rao; Rishipal R Bansode; Jacques N Losso

    2003-01-01

    Granular activated carbons derived from pecan shells have been shown to adsorb a variety of metal and organic species in various processing wastewaters. Their effectiveness is equivalent to or exceeds comparable commercial carbons in this regard. The objectives of this study were to develop process flow diagrams for the large-scale production of pecan shell-based carbons derived from steam or phosphoric

  19. Thermal activation of copper carbonate

    E-print Network

    Z. Ding; R. L. Frost; J. T. Kloprogge

    Much interest focuses on the use of nano-scale copper and copper oxide for catalyst use [1]. The copper oxide may be used as a solid solution or as a mixture of mixed oxides [2-6]. The application of these mixed oxides is in environmental applications such as the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide and the wet oxidation of organics in aqueous systems [5,6]. These nano-scale chemicals are produced through the thermal decomposition of copper salts such as copper carbonate, copper hydroxy-carbonate either synthetic or natural (malachite) [7-9]. Many studies of the thermal treatment of these copper carbonates have been undertaken [9-16]. The use of thermogravimetry to assess the effect of mechanochemical activation by dry grinding of malachite determined the mass loss of water and carbon dioxide separately and/or together for Cu2(OH)2CO3 samples untreated and ground for different times [17,18]. Often the thermal analysis is used to determine the effectiveness of catalyst precursors [19]. Indeed copper carbonates and nitrates can form part of the basic synthesis of superconductors. Thus there is a need to understand the thermal decomposition and surface reactions during thermal

  20. Production Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    This production systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, domains and objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 30 modules on the following topics: production…

  1. Effect of Carbonation on Alkali-Activated Slag Paste

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Palaciosw; F. Puertas

    2006-01-01

    Carbonation on waterglass- and NaOH-activated slag pastes was analyzed and compared with carbonation in Portland ce- ment pastes to determine possible differences. Thermogravime- try-differential thermal analysis (TG\\/DTA), Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance were used to determine the effects on the main reaction products. According to the TG\\/DTA results, carbonate precipitation fol- lowing carbonation is much more intense in

  2. Understanding the link between aggregated industrial production and the carbon price

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    the link between aggregated industrial production and the carbon price. In The Economics of Green Energy1 Understanding the link between aggregated industrial production and the carbon price Julien to which economic activity and the carbon price are linked. Carbon price drivers can be mainly related

  3. System and method for coproduction of activated carbon and steam/electricity

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasachar, Srivats (Sturbridge, MA); Benson, Steven (Grand Forks, ND); Crocker, Charlene (Newfolden, MN); Mackenzie, Jill (Carmel, IN)

    2011-07-19

    A system and method for producing activated carbon comprising carbonizing a solid carbonaceous material in a carbonization zone of an activated carbon production apparatus (ACPA) to yield a carbonized product and carbonization product gases, the carbonization zone comprising carbonaceous material inlet, char outlet and carbonization gas outlet; activating the carbonized product via activation with steam in an activation zone of the ACPA to yield activated carbon and activation product gases, the activation zone comprising activated carbon outlet, activation gas outlet, and activation steam inlet; and utilizing process gas comprising at least a portion of the carbonization product gases or a combustion product thereof; at least a portion of the activation product gases or a combustion product thereof; or a combination thereof in a solid fuel boiler system that burns a solid fuel boiler feed with air to produce boiler-produced steam and flue gas, the boiler upstream of an air heater within a steam/electricity generation plant, said boiler comprising a combustion zone, a boiler-produced steam outlet and at least one flue gas outlet.

  4. Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation?

    E-print Network

    Berkowitz, Alan R.

    COMMENTARY Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation? Gary M. Lovett ABSTRACT Net ecosystem production (NEP), defined as the difference between gross primary production: net ecosystem production; carbon accumulation; net primary production; gross pri- mary production

  5. Solvent-regenerated activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, H. (Fluids Design Corp., Troy, NY (USA))

    1988-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of a University/Industry research project, sponsored by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and Fluids Design Corporation. The research project studied the solvent regeneration of activated carbon. Activate carbon was used to remove trace organics from aqueous streams, then regenerated by desorbing the adsorbates with organic solvents. The project included a survey of the potential applications in New York State industries, fundamental research on the adsorption/desorption phenomena, and design of a full-scale process. The economics of the full-scale process were evaluated and compared to alternate available technologies. The result of this work is a versatile process with attractive economics. A wide range of adsorbates and solvents were found to be acceptable for this process. The design methodologies are developed and the techniques for evaluating a new application are delineated. 13 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Activated carbon fibre materials for VOC removal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Navarri; D Marchal; A Ginestet

    2001-01-01

    Activated carbon material has been used for many years in air cleaning applications. Powder form activated carbon has been gradually replaced by activate carbon fibre, which allows much smaller pores - specific area of such material may reach up to 2000 m2\\/g. An experimental dynamic volatile organic compound (VOC) generation system has been developed in order to test new types

  7. PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dady Dadyburjor; Chong Chen; Elliot B. Kennel; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2006-02-23

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop technologies for carbon products from coal-derived feedstocks. Carbon products can include precursor materials such as solvent extracted carbon ore (SECO) and synthetic pitch (Synpitch). In addition, derived products include carbon composites, fibers, foams and others. Key milestones included producing hydrogenated coal in the Hydrotreating Facility for the first time. The facility is now operational, although digital controls have not yet been completely wired. In addition, ultrasound is being used to investigate enhanced dissolution of coal. Experiments have been carried out.

  8. Production of Carbon 14 by Solar Protons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. Lingenfelter; E. J. Flamm

    1964-01-01

    The rate of production of carbon 14 by interaction of solar-proton-produced neutrons with atmospheric nitrogen is calculated for the period 1956-61. A time-average production rate of 0.05 to 0.12 carbon 14 atoms cm2 sec1, less than 5 per cent of the rate of production by galactic cosmic-ray neutrons, is obtained. Solar particle radiation of the intensity observed during the last

  9. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2004-12-21

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  10. POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON FROM NORTH DAKOTA LIGNITE: AN OPTION FOR DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT CONTROL IN WATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel J. Stepan; Thomas A. Moe; Melanie D. Hetland; Margaret L. Laumb

    2001-01-01

    New federal drinking water regulations have been promulgated to restrict the levels of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in finished public water supplies. DBPs are suspected carcinogens and are formed when organic material is partially oxidized by disinfectants commonly used in the water treatment industry. Additional federal mandates are expected in the near future that will further affect public water suppliers with

  11. Activated carbon catalyzing the formation of carbon nanotubes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jinling Song; Shouai Feng; Jianghong Zhao; Jianfeng Zheng; Zhenping Zhu

    2010-01-01

    Activated carbon (AC), a common carbon material, is employed as catalyst to synthesize carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and detonation-assisted CVD methods. The results show AC can effectively catalyze CNT formation. From the microscopic observations on morphologies and structures of the formed intermediates, it is found that carbon-catalyzed CNT formation follows particle-wire-tube stepwise evolution mechanism, in which

  12. Ozonation effect on natural organic matter adsorption and biodegradation--application to a membrane bioreactor containing activated carbon for drinking water production.

    PubMed

    Treguer, Ronan; Tatin, Romuald; Couvert, Annabelle; Wolbert, Dominique; Tazi-Pain, Annie

    2010-02-01

    More stringent legislation on dissolved organic matter (DOM) urges the drinking water industry to improve in DOM removal, especially when applied to water with high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contents and low turbidity. To improve conventional processes currently used in drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs), the performances of a hybrid membrane bioreactor containing fluidized activated carbon were investigated at the DWTP of Rennes. Preliminary results showed that the residual DOC was the major part of the non-biodegradable fraction. In order to increase the global efficiency, an upstream oxidation step was added to the process. Ozone was chosen to break large molecules and increase their biodegradability. The first step consisted of carrying out lab-scale experiments in order to optimise the necessary ozone dose by measuring the process yield, in terms of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC). Secondly, activated carbon adsorption of the DOC present in ozonated water was quantified. The whole process was tested in a pilot unit under field conditions at the DWTP of Rennes (France). Lab-scale experiments confirmed that ozonation increases the BDOC fraction, reduces the aromaticity of the DOC and produces small size organic compounds. Adsorption tests led to the conclusion that activated carbon unexpectedly removes BDOC first. Finally, the pilot unit results revealed an additional BDOC removal (from 0.10 to 0.15 mg L(-1)) of dissolved organic carbon from the raw water considered. PMID:19906398

  13. Organic solvent regeneration of granular activated carbon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. H. Cross; M. T. Suidan; M. A. Roller; B. R. Kim; J. P. Gould

    1982-01-01

    The use of activated carbon for the treatment of industrial waste-streams was shown to be an effective treatment. The high costs associated with the replacement or thermal regeneration of the carbon have prohibited the economic feasibility of this process. The in situ solvent regeneration of activated carbon by means of organic solvent extraction was suggested as an economically alternative to

  14. Sonochemical production of a carbon nanotube

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Katoh; Y. Tasaka; E. Sekreta; M. Yumura; F. Ikazaki; Y. Kakudate; S. Fujiwara

    1999-01-01

    Sonochemical production of a carbon nanotube has been studied. The carbon nanotube is produced by applying ultrasound to liquid chlorobenzene with ZnCl2 particles and to o-dichlorobenzene with ZnCl2 and Zn particles. It is considered that the polymer and the disordered carbon, which are formed by cavitational collapse in homogeneous liquid, are annealed by the inter-particle collision induced by the turbulent

  15. Decolorization of Cheddar cheese whey by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Campbell, Rachel; Drake, MaryAnne; Zhong, Qixin

    2015-05-01

    Colored Cheddar whey is a source for whey protein recovery and is decolorized conventionally by bleaching, which affects whey protein quality. Two activated carbons were studied in the present work as physical means of removing annatto (norbixin) in Cheddar cheese whey. The color and residual norbixin content of Cheddar whey were reduced by a higher level of activated carbon at a higher temperature between 25 and 55°C and a longer time. Activated carbon applied at 40g/L for 2h at 30°C was more effective than bleaching by 500mg/L of hydrogen peroxide at 68°C. The lowered temperature in activated-carbon treatments had less effect on protein structure as investigated for fluorescence spectroscopy and volatile compounds, particularly oxidation products, based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Activated carbon was also reusable, removing more than 50% norbixin even after 10 times of regeneration, which showed great potential for decolorizing cheese whey. PMID:25704972

  16. Natural products that inhibit carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Sally-Ann; Davis, Rohan A

    2014-01-01

    The chemical diversity, binding specificity and propensity to interact with biological targets has inspired many researchers to utilize natural products as molecular probes. Almost all reported carbonic anhydrase inhibitors comprise a zinc binding group in their structure of which the primary sulfonamide moiety (-SO2NH2) is the foremost example and to a lesser extent the primary sulfamate (-O-SO2NH2) and sulfamide (-NH-SO2NH2) groups. Natural products that comprise these zinc binding groups in their structure are however rare and relatively few natural products have been explored as a source for novel carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. This chapter will highlight the recent and growing interest in carbonic anhydrase inhibitors sourced from nature, demonstrating that natural product chemical space presents a rich source of potential alternate chemotypes for the discovery of novel drug-like carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. PMID:24146386

  17. Terminating pre-ozonation prior to biological activated carbon filtration results in increased formation of nitrogenous disinfection by-products upon subsequent chlorination.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Changjun; Gao, Naiyun; Templeton, Michael R; Zhang, Yanshen

    2015-02-01

    Previous research demonstrated that ozone dosed before biological activated carbon (BAC) filtration reduces the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) upon subsequent chlorination. The current work aimed to evaluate the impact of terminating this pre-ozonation on the ability of the BAC to remove the precursors of N-DBPs. More N-DBP precursors passed into the post-BAC water when the pre-ozonation was terminated, resulting in greater formation of N-DBPs when the water was subsequently chlorinated, compared to a parallel BAC filter when the pre-ozonation was run continuously. Moreover, the N-DBP formation potential was significantly increased in the effluent of the BAC filter after terminating pre-ozonation, compared with the influent of the BAC filter (i.e. the effluent from the sand filter). Therefore, while selectively switching pre-ozonation on/off may have cost and other operational benefits for water suppliers, these should be weighed against the increased formation of N-DBPs and potential associated health risks. PMID:25479807

  18. Powdered activated carbon coupled with enhanced coagulation for natural organic matter removal and disinfection by-product control: application in a Western Australian water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Kristiana, Ina; Joll, Cynthia; Heitz, Anna

    2011-04-01

    The removal of organic precursors of disinfection by-products (DBPs), i.e. natural organic matter (NOM), prior to disinfection and distribution is considered as the most effective approach to minimise the formation of DBPs. This study investigated the impact of the addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to an enhanced coagulation treatment process at an existing water treatment plant on the efficiency of NOM removal, the disinfection behaviour of the treated water, and the water quality in the distribution system. This is the first comprehensive assessment of the efficacy of plant-scale application of PAC combined with enhanced coagulation on an Australian source water. As a result of the PAC addition, the removal of NOM improved by 70%, which led to a significant reduction (80-95%) in the formation of DBPs. The water quality in the distribution system also improved, indicated by lower concentrations of DBPs in the distribution system and better maintenance of disinfectant residual at the extremities of the distribution system. The efficacy of the PAC treatment for NOM removal was shown to be a function of the characteristics of the NOM and the quality of the source water, as well as the PAC dose. PAC treatment did not have the capacity to remove bromide ion, resulting in the formation of more brominated DBPs. Since brominated DBPs have been found to be more toxic than their chlorinated analogues, their preferential formation upon PAC addition must be considered, especially in source waters containing high concentrations of bromide. PMID:21353285

  19. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Despite technical advances to reduce air pollution emissions, motor vehicles still account for 30 to 70% emissions of all urban air pollutants. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require 100 cities in the United States to reduce the amount of their smog within 5 to 15 years. Hence, auto emissions, the major cause of smog, must be reduced 30 to 60% by 1998. Natural gas con be combusted with less pollutant emissions. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) uses adsorbents and operates with a low storage pressure which results in lower capital costs and maintenance. This paper describes the production of an activated carbon adsorbent produced from an Illinois coal for ANG.

  20. PRODUCTS OF ACTIVATED LYMPHOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, Clemens; Bloom, Barry R.

    1973-01-01

    General methods were developed and applied to the biosynthesis and purification of products of activated lymphocytes available in minute quantities. The activity studied here was the migration inhibitory factor (MIF) produced by purified protein derivative (PPD)- or concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated lymphocytes obtained from one guinea pig or less. The methods selected yielded results in terms of two chemical parameters characteristic of the molecules involved, namely Kd on Sephadex G-75 and isoionic point, pI, on isoelectric focusing. When supernatants were fractionated on G-75 columns, there were several areas even in control supernatants which produced migration inhibition relative to medium controls. However, in PPD- and Con A-stimulated supernatants, at least one peak of MIF activity was found solely in the stimulated cultures, with a Kd of 0.15. A double-labeling technique was used to characterize the proteins of this peak. Control, unstimulated cultures were labeled with [14C]leucine and stimulated cultures were labeled with [3H]leucine. After mixing the supernatants and G-75 filtration, a major "ratiolabeled" broad peak. i.e. one with increased 3H/14C ratio, was found. When a narrow portion of this peak about Kd 0.15, containing most of the MIF activity, was subjected to analytical isoelectric focusing, all of the label was associated with proteins of lower net charge than albumin. A unique ratiolabeled peak was found in PPD- and Con A-stimulated fractions with a pI of approx. 5.3. A micropreparative isoelectric focusing technique was developed and yielded MIF activity in the same region as the major ratiolabeled peak. Further study will be required to ascertain whether the ratiolabeled protein is MIF. By following the Kd, pI, and 3H/14C labeling ratio, at least 14 products of activated lymphocytes, synthesized either de novo or in increased amounts, could be distinguished. PMID:4688317

  1. Adsorption of herbicides using activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyan, M.; Lafferty, C.; Kimber, G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This work describes development of a series of novel activated carbon materials and their testing for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorphenolate, PCP (a common herbicide/wood preservative). Although the application of activated carbons is an established technology for the treatment of public water supplies, there is a growing need for materials with higher selectivity and adsorptive capacities as well as high abrasion resistance. The materials that will be discussed include extruded wood-derived carbons with novel pore size distributions and high hardness, as well as activated carbon fiber composites. Comparisons will be made with commercial granular water treatment carbons.

  2. Nanostructural activated carbons for hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suoding

    A series of nanostructured activated carbons have been synthesized from poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK), and its derivatives. These carbons, with surface area exceeding 3000 m2/g and with average pore diameters of ? 20 A, are proven to be superior hydrogen storage materials, with hydrogen storage capacities up to 5.5 wt% at 77 K and 45 atm. The porous texture of these carbons was controlled via optimizing three synthetic steps: thermo-oxidation of PEEK in air, pyrolysis or carbonization of the oxidized PEEK in an inert atmosphere, and activation of the pre-carbonized PEEK with metal hydroxide. Thermo-oxidation of PEEK and carbonization process were thoroughly studied. These processes have been investigated by MDSC, FTIR, TGA and Py-MS. The pyrolysis or carbonization of PEEK involves the degradation of PEEK chains in three stages. Carbon morphology, including crystallinity and porous texture, is readily controlled by adjusting carbonization temperature. Activation of PEEK carbons, using inorganic bases and other activation agents, produces microporous carbons having a very narrow pore size distribution and an average pore diameter of ? 20 A. The activation control parameters including activation agent, activation temperature, time and carbon morphology have been investigated extensively. High surface area activated carbon is obtained by activating a highly amorphous carbon with a high activation agent/carbon ratio at 800°C. Theoretical calculations show that the pores with smaller diameter, especially smaller than 7 A, favor hydrogen adsorption. The experimental results confirm this fact and show that: (1) the hydrogen adsorption capacity per unit surface area at 77 K and 1 bar is larger in the smaller pores, (2) gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity (W(H2)) is directly proportional to the ultramicropore (< 7 A) volume; and (3) the volumetric hydrogen storage capacity is directly proportional to the volume fraction of ultramicropores in carbon. Hydrogen adsorption in activated carbons synthesized from PEEK and poly(ether imide) blends, poly(phenylene oxide), polybenzimidazole and lignin show similar trends. In addition, W( H2) progressively increases as surface area increases for the carbons with similar average pore diameters. Keywords. carbon, activated carbon, poly(ether ether ketone), poly(ether imide), poly(phenylene oxide), polybenzimidazole, lignin, gas adsorption, hydrogen storage

  3. Black Carbon Production in Open Biomass Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, R.; Doerr, S. H.; Santin, C.

    2012-04-01

    Reduction in the quantity of forest fuel accumulating in regions prone to wildfires by using fuel reduction burns not only reduces damage to natural resources and habitats (when wildfires subsequently occur), but also provides a mean to generate black carbon of various particle sizes. These include sizes capable of entering the soil matrix and/or undergoing erosion and subsequent deposition in sedimentary sinks. Black carbon represents a compact form of carbon capable of offsetting an equivalent quantity of contemporary fossil carbon released as CO2. Black carbon, provided it is not consumed as a fuel, may serve this purpose for a considerable period in relation to that of our consumption of fossil fuels. Little is presently known of the extent of natural black carbon production in such biomass combustion and it is clearly beneficial to acquire such knowledge and, where possible, to adjust land management practices to enhance this production. This contribution presents the outcomes of an exploratory experiment devised to enable, insofar as possible, (i) a material balance to estimate the yield of black carbon from a small-scale burning of typical forest litter, (ii) identify the primary factors controlling yield (iii) and develop an experimental programme to provide data contributing to the objective of improved model estimates of the black carbon component in the global carbon cycle.

  4. Bacterial carbon production in Lake Erie is influenced by viruses and solar radiation

    E-print Network

    Wilhelm, Steven W.

    Bacterial carbon production in Lake Erie is influenced by viruses and solar radiation Steven W that facilitates carbon flow through aquatic food webs. Factors influencing bacterial activity therefore impact carbon flow. Although ecologists consider grazing and dis- solved organic carbon flux to be the major

  5. SORPTION OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY ACTIVATED CARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms and rate of elemental mercury (HgO) capture by activated carbons have been studied using a bench-scale apparatus. Three types of activated carbons, two of which are thermally activated (PC-100 and FGD) and one with elemental sulfur (S) impregnated in it (HGR), were...

  6. Production of bio-based phenolic resin and activated carbon from bio-oil and biochar derived from fast pyrolysis of palm kernel shells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Gyung-Goo; Oh, Seung-Jin; Lee, Soon-Jang; Kim, Joo-Sik

    2015-02-01

    A fraction of palm kernel shells (PKS) was pyrolyzed in a fluidized bed reactor. The experiments were performed in a temperature range of 479-555 °C to produce bio-oil, biochar, and gas. All the bio-oils were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively by GC-FID and GC-MS. The maximum content of phenolic compounds in the bio-oil was 24.8 wt.% at ?500 °C. The maximum phenol content in the bio-oil, as determined by the external standard method, was 8.1 wt.%. A bio-oil derived from the pyrolysis of PKS was used in the synthesis of phenolic resin, showing that the bio-oil could substitute for fossil phenol up to 25 wt.%. The biochar was activated using CO2 at a final activation temperature of 900 °C with different activation time (1-3 h) to produce activated carbon. Activated carbons produced were microporous, and the maximum surface area of the activated carbons produced was 807 m(2)/g. PMID:25227587

  7. Carbon Dioxide: Production and Sequestration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this problem set, learners will refer to a satellite image to calculate the rate of carbon sequestration in the areas of bare land and forested lawn shown to answer a series of questions. Answer key is provided. This is part of Earth Math: A Brief Mathematical Guide to Earth Science and Climate Change.

  8. PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dady Dadyburjor; Philip R. Biedler; Chong Chen; L. Mitchell Clendenin; Manoj Katakdaunde; Elliot B. Kennel; Nathan D. King; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2004-08-31

    This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed carbon products, using mildly hydrogenated solvents to extract the organic portion of coal to create synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and carbon fibers. The focus of this effort was on development of lower cost solvents, milder hydrogenation conditions and improved yield in order to enable practical production of these products. This technology is needed because of the long-term decline in production of domestic feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. Currently, carbon products represents a market of roughly 5 million tons domestically, and 19 million tons worldwide. Carbon products are mainly derived from feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. The domestic supply of petroleum pitch is declining because of the rising price of liquid fuels, which has caused US refineries to maximize liquid fuel production. As a consequence, the long term trend has a decline in production of petroleum pitch over the past 20 years. The production of coal tar pitch, as in the case of petroleum pitch, has likewise declined significantly over the past two decades. Coal tar pitch is a byproduct of metallurgical grade coke (metcoke) production. In this industry, modern metcoke facilities are recycling coal tar as fuel in order to enhance energy efficiency and minimize environmental emissions. Metcoke production itself is dependent upon the production requirements for domestic steel. Hence, several metcoke ovens have been decommissioned over the past two decades and have not been replaced. As a consequence sources of coal tar are being taken off line and are not being replaced. The long-term trend is a reduction in coal tar pitch production. Thus import of feedstocks, mainly from Eastern Europe and China, is on the rise despite the relatively large transportation cost. To reverse this trend, a new process for producing carbon products is needed. The process must be economically competitive with current processes, and yet be environmentally friendly as well. The solvent extraction process developed uses mild hydrogenation of low cost oils to create powerful solvents that can dissolve the organic portion of coal. The insoluble portion, consisting mainly of mineral matter and fixed carbon, is removed via centrifugation or filtration, leaving a liquid solution of coal chemicals and solvent. This solution can be further refined via distillation to meet specifications for products such as synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and fibers. The most economical process recycles 85% of the solvent, which itself is obtained as a low-cost byproduct from industrial processes such as coal tar or petroleum refining. Alternatively, processes have been developed that can recycle 100% of the solvent, avoiding any need for products derived from petroleum or coal tar.

  9. Selecting activated carbon for water and wastewater treatability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Chang, Q.G.; Liu, W.D.; Li, B.J.; Jiang, W.X.; Fu, L.J.; Ying, W.C. [East China University of Chemical Technology, Shanghai (China)

    2007-10-15

    A series of follow-up investigations were performed to produce data for improving the four-indicator carbon selection method that we developed to identify high-potential activated carbons effective for removing specific organic water pollutants. The carbon's pore structure and surface chemistry are dependent on the raw material and the activation process. Coconut carbons have relatively more small pores than large pores; coal and apricot nutshell/walnut shell fruit carbons have the desirable pore structures for removing adsorbates of all sizes. Chemical activation, excessive activation, and/or thermal reactivation enlarge small pores, resulting in reduced phenol number and higher tannic acid number. Activated carbon's phenol, iodine, methylene blue, and tannic acid numbers are convenient indicators of its surface area and pore volume of pore diameters < 10, 10-15, 15-28, and > 28 angstrom, respectively. The phenol number of a carbon is also a good indicator of its surface acidity of oxygen-containing organic functional groups that affect the adsorptive capacity for aromatic and other small polar organics. The tannic acid number is an indicator of carbon's capacity for large, high-molecular-weight natural organic precursors of disinfection by-products in water treatment. The experimental results for removing nitrobenzene, methyl-tert-butyl ether, 4,4-bisphenol, humic acid, and the organic constituents of a biologically treated coking-plant effluent have demonstrated the effectiveness of this capacity-indicator-based method of carbon selection.

  10. Nitric acid vapor removal by activated, impregnated carbons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wood

    1996-01-01

    Laboratory and industrial workers can be exposed to vapors of nitric acid, especially in accidents, such as spills. Nitric acid can also be a product of incineration for energy production or waste (e.g., CW agent) disposal. Activated carbons containing impregnants for enhancing vapor and gas removal have been tested for effectiveness in removing vapors of nitric acid from air. The

  11. Natural gas storage with activated carbon from a bituminous coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, J.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    Granular activated carbons ( -20 + 100 mesh; 0.149-0.84 mm) were produced by physical activation and chemical activation with KOH from an Illinois bituminous coal (IBC-106) for natural gas storage. The products were characterized by BET surface area, micropore volume, bulk density, and methane adsorption capacities. Volumetric methane adsorption capacities (Vm/Vs) of some of the granular carbons produced by physical activation are about 70 cm3/cm3 which is comparable to that of BPL, a commercial activated carbon. Vm/Vs values above 100 cm3/cm3 are obtainable by grinding the granular products to - 325 mesh (<0.044 mm). The increase in Vm/Vs is due to the increase in bulk density of the carbons. Volumetric methane adsorption capacity increases with increasing pore surface area and micropore volume when normalizing with respect to sample bulk volume. Compared with steam-activated carbons, granular carbons produced by KOH activation have higher micropore volume and higher methane adsorption capacities (g/g). Their volumetric methane adsorption capacities are lower due to their lower bulk densities. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  12. A combined process of activated carbon adsorption, ion exchange resin treatment and membrane concentration for recovery of dissolved organics in pre-hydrolysis liquor of the kraft-based dissolving pulp production process.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jing; Kaur, Ishneet; Baktash, Mir Mojtaba; He, Zhibin; Ni, Yonghao

    2013-01-01

    To recover dissolved organics in pre-hydrolysis liquor (PHL) of the kraft-based dissolving pulp production process, a new combined process concept of sequential steps of activated carbon adsorption, ion exchange resin treatment, and membrane concentration, was proposed. The removal of lignin in the PHL was achieved in the activated carbon adsorption step, which also facilitates the subsequent operations, such as the membrane filtration and ion exchange resin treatment. The ion exchange resin treatment resulted in the removal/concentration of acetic acid, which opens the door for acetic acid recovery. The membrane filtration is to recover/concentrate the dissolved sugars. The combined process resulted in the production of PHL-based concentrate with relatively high concentration of hemicellulosic sugars, i.e., 22.13%. PMID:23131623

  13. Carbon Footprint Analysis for a GRAPE Production Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirca, C.; Marras, S.; Masia, S.; Duce, P.; Zara, P.; Spano, D.

    2013-12-01

    Agriculture activities can play a double role in emitting or sequestering carbon from the atmosphere. Mitigation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in agriculture is one of the most urgent research subjects in the framework of enhancing environmental stewardship. However, little is known about the role of the agriculture in the global carbon balance, since most of the studies applied the Eddy Covariance technique in natural or semi-natural ecosystems to investigate their role in mitigate the anthropogenic carbon release. The application of the Eddy Covariance technique in agricultural systems could greatly improve our knowledge about their role on the global carbon budget and help in modeling the related processes. In addition, there is a growing request from producers, trade companies, and customers on the assessment of the environmental impact of a production process related to agricultural high quality products. In recent years, particular attention was put on the estimation of GHG emissions deriving from productive processes. In this context, a useful tool is the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), which represents a methodology to estimate GHG emissions related to the entire life cycle of a product. The Carbon Footprint (CF) analysis represents a subset of the LCA, which only considers CO2 emissions with an impact on climate change. With respect to the wine industry, most of studies focused on the CF analysis related to the wine making process in the cellar, while a few studies analyzed the GHG emissions related to the grape production. The aim of this work was to quantify the CO2 emissions due to the grape production and emphasize the double role of a vineyard as a carbon sink or source. An Eddy Covariance station was set up in a representative vineyard located in the Mediterranean Basin (Sardinia, Italy) to measure the net carbon exchange between the surface and the atmosphere. The CF analysis was also conducted to compute the carbon balance of the grape production process in terms of CO2-equivalent emissions by following the International Wine Carbon Protocol (IWCP). Additional terms (e.g. emissions due to fossil fuel combustion, fertilizers, soil tillage) were also quantified. Results showed that the vineyard is able to store net amounts of carbon both in biomass and soil. Human added inputs for the vineyard management practices (e.g. soil tillage) are responsible for the release of significant quantities of GHG in the atmosphere. Results also showed that data obtained from the EC measurements could allow for a direct quantification of part of the terms involved in the grape production process, but the assessment of the carbon sequestration capacity in agricultural sites requires to account for GHG emissions from additional anthropogenic inputs.

  14. ACTIVATED CARBON FROM LIGNITE FOR WATER TREATMENT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edwin S. Olson; Daniel J. Stepan

    2000-01-01

    High concentrations of humate in surface water result in the formation of excess amounts of chlorinated byproducts during disinfection treatment. These precursors can be removed in water treatment prior to disinfection using powdered activated carbon. In the interest of developing a more cost-effective method for removal of humates in surface water, a comparison of the activities of carbons prepared from

  15. Heating activated carbon by electromagnetic induction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Mocho; J. Ch. Bourhis; P. Le Cloirec

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study is the use of electromagnetic induction to heat activated carbon. The ultimate goal is to get an original process to regenerate adsorbants loaded with the volatile organic compounds present in air or water.The first step was to explore the possibilities of heating granular activated carbon with this technology. In order to get the best operating

  16. Copper (II) Adsorption by Activated Carbons from Pecan Shells: Effect of Oxygen Level During Activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural by-products represent a considerable quantity of harvested commodity crops. The use of by-products as precursors for the production of widely used adsorbents, such as activated carbons, may impart a value-added component of the overall biomass harvested. Our objective in this paper is...

  17. Metal Ion Adsorption by Activated Carbons Made from Pecan Shells: Effect of Oxygen Level During Activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural by-products represent a considerable quantity of harvested commodity crops. The use of by-products as precursors for the production of widely used adsorbents, such as activated carbons, may impart a value-added component of the overall biomass harvested. Our objective in this presenta...

  18. Ris-R-Report Emerging product carbon footprint standards and

    E-print Network

    carbon footprinting? 7 3 Methodological issues in product carbon footprinting 9 3.1 Life Cycle AnalysisRisø-R-Report Emerging product carbon footprint standards and schemes and their possible trade Bolwig and Peter Gibbon Title: Emerging product carbon footprint standards and schemes and their possible

  19. Activated carbon from leather shaving wastes and its application in removal of toxic materials.

    PubMed

    Kantarli, Ismail Cem; Yanik, Jale

    2010-07-15

    In this study, utilization of a solid waste as raw material for activated carbon production was investigated. For this purpose, activated carbons were produced from chromium and vegetable tanned leather shaving wastes by physical and chemical activation methods. A detailed analysis of the surface properties of the activated carbons including acidity, total surface area, extent of microporosity and mesoporosity was presented. The activated carbon produced from vegetable tanned leather shaving waste produced has a higher surface area and micropore volume than the activated carbon produced from chromium tanned leather shaving waste. The potential application of activated carbons obtained from vegetable tanned shavings as adsorbent for removal of water pollutants have been checked for phenol, methylene blue, and Cr(VI). Adsorption capacities of activated carbons were found to be comparable to that of activated carbons derived from biomass. PMID:20382474

  20. Catalytic Growth of Macroscopic Carbon Nanofibers Bodies with Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, N.; Muhammad, I. S.; Hamid, S. B. Abd. [NANOCEN, Block A, Level 3, Institute of Postgraduate Studies, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Rinaldi, A. [NANOCEN, Block A, Level 3, Institute of Postgraduate Studies, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Inorganic Chemistry Department, Fritz-Haber Institute der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Su, D. S.; Schlogl, R. [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Fritz-Haber Institute der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-06-01

    Carbon-carbon composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofibers have been synthesized by growing Carbon nanofiber (CNF) on Palm shell-based Activated carbon (AC) with Ni catalyst. The composites are in an agglomerated shape due to the entanglement of the defective CNF between the AC particles forming a macroscopic body. The macroscopic size will allow the composite to be used as a stabile catalyst support and liquid adsorbent. The preparation of CNT/AC nanocarbon was initiated by pre-treating the activated carbon with nitric acid, followed by impregnation of 1 wt% loading of nickel (II) nitrate solutions in acetone. The catalyst precursor was calcined and reduced at 300 deg. C for an hour in each step. The catalytic growth of nanocarbon in C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/H{sub 2} was carried out at temperature of 550 deg. C for 2 hrs with different rotating angle in the fluidization system. SEM and N{sub 2} isotherms show the level of agglomeration which is a function of growth density and fluidization of the system. The effect of fluidization by rotating the reactor during growth with different speed give a significant impact on the agglomeration of the final CNF/AC composite and thus the amount of CNFs produced. The macrostructure body produced in this work of CNF/AC composite will have advantages in the adsorbent and catalyst support application, due to the mechanical and chemical properties of the material.

  1. New PHA products using unrelated carbon sources

    PubMed Central

    Matias, Fernanda; de Andrade Rodrigues, Maria Filomena

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are natural polyesters stored by a wide range of bacteria as carbon source reserve. Due to its chemical characteristics and biodegradability PHA can be used in chemical, medical and pharmaceutical industry for many human purposes. Over the past years, few Burkholderia species have become known for production of PHA. Aside from that, these bacteria seem to be interesting for discovering new PHA compositions which is important to different industrial applications. In this paper, we introduce two new strains which belong either to Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) or genomovar-type, Burkholderia cepacia SA3J and Burkholderia contaminans I29B, both PHA producers from unrelated carbon sources. The classification was based on 16S rDNA and recA partial sequence genes and cell wall fatty acids composition. These two strains were capable to produce different types of PHA monomers or precursors. Unrelated carbon sources were used for growth and PHA accumulation. The amount of carbon source evaluated, or mixtures of them, was increased with every new experiment until it reaches eighteen carbon sources. As first bioprospection experiments staining methods were used with colony fluorescent dye Nile Red and the cell fluorescent dye Nile Blue A. Gas chromatography analysis coupled to mass spectrometry was used to evaluate the PHA composition on each strain cultivated on different carbon sources. The synthesized polymers were composed by short chain length-PHA (scl-PHA), especially polyhydroxybutyrate, and medium chain length-PHA (mcl-PHA) depending on the carbon source used. PMID:24031764

  2. New PHA products using unrelated carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Matias, Fernanda; de Andrade Rodrigues, Maria Filomena

    2011-10-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are natural polyesters stored by a wide range of bacteria as carbon source reserve. Due to its chemical characteristics and biodegradability PHA can be used in chemical, medical and pharmaceutical industry for many human purposes. Over the past years, few Burkholderia species have become known for production of PHA. Aside from that, these bacteria seem to be interesting for discovering new PHA compositions which is important to different industrial applications. In this paper, we introduce two new strains which belong either to Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) or genomovar-type, Burkholderia cepacia SA3J and Burkholderia contaminans I29B, both PHA producers from unrelated carbon sources. The classification was based on 16S rDNA and recA partial sequence genes and cell wall fatty acids composition. These two strains were capable to produce different types of PHA monomers or precursors. Unrelated carbon sources were used for growth and PHA accumulation. The amount of carbon source evaluated, or mixtures of them, was increased with every new experiment until it reaches eighteen carbon sources. As first bioprospection experiments staining methods were used with colony fluorescent dye Nile Red and the cell fluorescent dye Nile Blue A. Gas chromatography analysis coupled to mass spectrometry was used to evaluate the PHA composition on each strain cultivated on different carbon sources. The synthesized polymers were composed by short chain length-PHA (scl-PHA), especially polyhydroxybutyrate, and medium chain length-PHA (mcl-PHA) depending on the carbon source used. PMID:24031764

  3. Create a Consortium and Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Rusinko; John Andresen; Jennifer E. Hill; Harold H. Schobert; Bruce G. Miller

    2006-01-01

    The objective of these projects was to investigate alternative technologies for non-fuel uses of coal. Special emphasis was placed on developing premium carbon products from coal-derived feedstocks. A total of 14 projects, which are the 2003 Research Projects, are reported herein. These projects were categorized into three overall objectives. They are: (1) To explore new applications for the use of anthracite in order to improve its marketability; (2) To effectively minimize environmental damage caused by mercury emissions, CO{sub 2} emissions, and coal impounds; and (3) To continue to increase our understanding of coal properties and establish coal usage in non-fuel industries. Research was completed in laboratories throughout the United States. Most research was performed on a bench-scale level with the intent of scaling up if preliminary tests proved successful. These projects resulted in many potential applications for coal-derived feedstocks. These include: (1) Use of anthracite as a sorbent to capture CO{sub 2} emissions; (2) Use of anthracite-based carbon as a catalyst; (3) Use of processed anthracite in carbon electrodes and carbon black; (4) Use of raw coal refuse for producing activated carbon; (5) Reusable PACs to recycle captured mercury; (6) Use of combustion and gasification chars to capture mercury from coal-fired power plants; (7) Development of a synthetic coal tar enamel; (8) Use of alternative binder pitches in aluminum anodes; (9) Use of Solvent Extracted Carbon Ore (SECO) to fuel a carbon fuel cell; (10) Production of a low cost coal-derived turbostratic carbon powder for structural applications; (11) Production of high-value carbon fibers and foams via the co-processing of a low-cost coal extract pitch with well-dispersed carbon nanotubes; (12) Use of carbon from fly ash as metallurgical carbon; (13) Production of bulk carbon fiber for concrete reinforcement; and (14) Characterizing coal solvent extraction processes. Although some of the projects funded did not meet their original goals, the overall objectives of the CPCPC were completed as many new applications for coal-derived feedstocks have been researched. Future research in many of these areas is necessary before implementation into industry.

  4. The carbon footprints of food crop production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan Hillier; Cathy Hawes; Geoff Squire; Alex Hilton; Stuart Wale; Pete Smith

    2009-01-01

    The agriculture sector contributes significantly to global carbon emissions from diverse sources such as product and machinery manufacture, transport of materials and direct and indirect soil greenhouse gas emissions. In this article, we use farm survey data from the east of Scotland combined with published estimates of emissions for individual farm operations to quantify the relative contribution of a range

  5. Integrating Steel Production with Mineral Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Klaus Lackner; Paul Doby; Tuncel Yegulalp; Samuel Krevor; Christopher Graves

    2008-05-01

    The objectives of the project were (i) to develop a combination iron oxide production and carbon sequestration plant that will use serpentine ores as the source of iron and the extraction tailings as the storage element for CO2 disposal, (ii) the identification of locations within the US where this process may be implemented and (iii) to create a standardized process to characterize the serpentine deposits in terms of carbon disposal capacity and iron and steel production capacity. The first objective was not accomplished. The research failed to identify a technique to accelerate direct aqueous mineral carbonation, the limiting step in the integration of steel production and carbon sequestration. Objective (ii) was accomplished. It was found that the sequestration potential of the ultramafic resource surfaces in the US and Puerto Rico is approximately 4,647 Gt of CO2 or over 500 years of current US production of CO2. Lastly, a computer model was developed to investigate the impact of various system parameters (recoveries and efficiencies and capacities of different system components) and serpentinite quality as well as incorporation of CO2 from sources outside the steel industry.

  6. Quality of poultry litter-derived granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guannan; Guo, Mingxin

    2010-01-01

    Utilization of poultry litter as a source material for generating activated carbon is a value-added and environmentally beneficial approach to recycling organic waste. In this study, the overall quality of poultry litter-derived granular activated carbon was systematically evaluated based on its various physical and chemical properties. Granular activated carbon generated from pelletized poultry litter following a typical steam-activation procedure possessed numerous micropores in the matrix. The product exhibited a mean particle diameter of 2.59 mm, an apparent density of 0.45 g cm(-3), a ball-pan hardness of 91.0, an iodine number of 454 mg g(-1), and a BET surface area of 403 m(2) g(-1). It contained high ash, nitrogen, phosphorus contents and the trace elements Cu, Zn, and As. Most of the nutrients and toxic elements were solidified and solution-unextractable. In general, poultry litter-based activated carbon demonstrated overall quality comparable to that of low-grade commercial activated carbon derived from coconut shell and bituminous coal. It is promising to use poultry litter as a feedstock to manufacture activated carbon for wastewater treatment. PMID:19703765

  7. Production of precipitated calcium carbonate from calcium silicates and carbon dioxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sebastian Teir; Sanni Eloneva; Ron Zevenhoven

    2005-01-01

    The possibilities for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the pulp and paper industry by calcium carbonation are presented. The current precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) production uses mined, crushed calcium carbonate as raw materials. If calcium silicates were used instead, carbon dioxide emissions from the calcination of carbonates would be eliminated. In Finland, there could, thus, be a potential for eliminating

  8. 78 FR 13894 - Certain Activated Carbon From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ...731-TA-1103 (Review)] Certain Activated Carbon From China Determination On...antidumping duty order on certain activated carbon from China would be likely to...February 2013), entitled Certain Activated Carbon from China: Investigation...

  9. Flax shive as a source of activated carbon for metals remediaton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flax shive constitutes about 70% of the flax stem and has limited use. Because shive is a lignocellulosic by-product, it can potentially be pyroylzed and activated to produce an activated carbon. The objective of this study was to create an activated carbon from flax shive by chemical activation t...

  10. REGIONAL REACTIVATION OF GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major portion of the cost of using Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) as a water treatment unit process is associated with spent carbon replacement or reactivation. Regional reactivation or sharing a reactivation furnace among several users, has been proposed as a means of minimiz...

  11. Thermocatalytic process for CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Muradov, Nazim Z. (Melbourne, FL)

    2011-08-23

    A novel process and apparatus are disclosed for sustainable CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon by thermocatalytic decomposition (dissociation, pyrolysis, cracking) of hydrocarbon fuels over carbon-based catalysts in the absence of air and/or water. The apparatus and thermocatalytic process improve the activity and stability of carbon catalysts during the thermocatalytic process and produce both high purity hydrogen (at least, 99.0 volume %) and carbon, from any hydrocarbon fuel, including sulfurous fuels. In a preferred embodiment, production of hydrogen and carbon is achieved by both internal and external activation of carbon catalysts. Internal activation of carbon catalyst is accomplished by recycling of hydrogen-depleted gas containing unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons back to the reactor. External activation of the catalyst can be achieved via surface gasification with hot combustion gases during catalyst heating. The process and apparatus can be conveniently integrated with any type of fuel cell to generate electricity.

  12. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330...CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330...of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  13. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330...CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330...of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  14. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330...CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330...of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  15. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330...CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330...of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  16. Adsorption of herbicides using activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyen, M.; Lafferty, C.; Kimber, G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the results of research in which novel activated carbons have been examined for their efficacy in water treatment and, specifically, for the adsorption of a common herbicide and wood preservative, sodium pentachlorophenolate. To place this work in context, the introduction will discuss first some of the considerations of using activated carbons for water treatment, and then certain aspects of the authors research that has led to this particular topic.

  17. Activated Carbons From Grape Seeds By Chemical Activation With Potassium Carbonate And Potassium Hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okman, Irem; Karagöz, Selhan; Tay, Turgay; Erdem, Murat

    2014-02-01

    Activated carbons were produced from grape seed using either potassium carbonate (K2CO3) or potassium hydroxide (KOH). The carbonization experiments were accomplished at 600 and 800 °C. The effects of the experimental conditions (i.e., type of activation reagents, reagent concentrations, and carbonization temperatures) on the yields and the properties of these activated carbons were analyzed under identical conditions. An increase in the temperature at the same concentrations for both K2CO3 and KOH led to a decrease in the yields of the activated carbons. The lowest activated carbon yields were obtained at 800 °C at the highest reagent concentration (100 wt%) for both K2CO3 and KOH. The activated carbon with the highest surface area of 1238 m2g-1 was obtained at 800 °C in K2CO3 concentration of 50 wt% while KOH produced the activated carbon with the highest surface area of 1222 m2g-1 in a concentration of 25wt% at 800 °C. The obtained activated carbons were mainly microporous.

  18. Properties and degradability of hydrothermal carbonization products.

    PubMed

    Eibisch, Nina; Helfrich, Mirjam; Don, Axel; Mikutta, Robert; Kruse, Andrea; Ellerbrock, Ruth; Flessa, Heinz

    2013-09-01

    Biomass carbonized via hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) yields a liquid and a carbon (C)-rich solid called hydrochar. In soil, hydrochars may act as fertilizers and promote C sequestration. We assumed that the chemical composition of the raw material (woodchips, straw, grass cuttings, or digestate) determines the properties of the liquid and solid HTC products, including their degradability. Additionally, we investigated whether easily mineralizable organic components adsorbed on the hydrochar surface influence the degradability of the hydrochars and could be removed by repetitive washing. Carbon mineralization was measured as CO production over 30 d in aerobic incubation experiments with loamy sand. Chemical analysis revealed that most nutrients were preferably enriched in the liquid phase. The C mineralization of hydrochars from woodchips (2% of total C added), straw (3%), grass (6%), and digestate (14%) were dependent on the raw material carbonized and were significantly lower (by 60-92%; < 0.05) than the mineralization of the corresponding raw materials. Washing of the hydrochars significantly decreased mineralization of digestate-hydrochar (up to 40%) but had no effect on mineralization rates of the other three hydrochars. Variations in C mineralization between different hydrochars could be explained by multiple factors, including differences in the O/C-H/C ratios, C/N ratios, lignin content, amount of oxygen-containing functional groups, and pH. In contrast to the solids, the liquid products were highly degradable, with 61 to 89% of their dissolved organic C being mineralized within 30 d. The liquids may be treated aerobically (e.g., for nutrient recovery). PMID:24216434

  19. Effect of activated carbon on fouling of activated sludge filtration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Herbert H. P. Fang; Xinlong Shi; Tong Zhang

    2006-01-01

    The effect of adding activated carbon on the fouling of activated sludge filtration was investigated using a complete-mix cell with a flat-sheet cellulosic membrane at a constant pressure gradient of 70 kN\\/m2. Four sludge samples were tested in parallel: a sludge without additive served as control, plus three sludge samples dosed with individual additives, including inert diatomaceous earth, activated carbon

  20. Commercial Product Activation Using RFID

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Radio-frequency identification (RFID) would be used for commercial product activation, according to a proposal. What is new here is the concept of combining RFID with activation - more specifically, using RFID for activating commercial products (principally, electronic ones) and for performing such ancillary functions as tracking individual product units on production lines, tracking shipments, and updating inventories. According to the proposal, an RFID chip would be embedded in each product. The information encoded in the chip would include a unique number for identifying the product. An RFID reader at the point of sale would record the number of the product and would write digital information to the RFID chip for either immediate activation of the product or for later interrogation and processing. To be practical, an RFID product-activation system should satisfy a number of key requirements: the system should be designed to be integrable into the inventory-tracking and the data-processing and -communication infrastructures of businesses along the entire supply chain from manufacture to retail; the system should be resistant to sophisticated hacking; activation codes should be made sufficiently complexity to minimize the probability of activating stolen products; RFID activation equipment at points of sale must be capable to two-way RF communication for the purposes of reading information from, and writing information to, embedded RFID chips; the equipment at points of sale should be easily operable by sales clerks with little or no training; the point-of-sale equipment should verify activation and provide visible and/or audible signals indicating verification or lack thereof; and, the system should be able to handle millions of products per year with minimal human intervention, among other requirements.

  1. Organic solvent regeneration of granular activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, W. H.; Suidan, M. T.; Roller, M. A.; Kim, B. R.; Gould, J. P.

    1982-09-01

    The use of activated carbon for the treatment of industrial waste-streams was shown to be an effective treatment. The high costs associated with the replacement or thermal regeneration of the carbon have prohibited the economic feasibility of this process. The in situ solvent regeneration of activated carbon by means of organic solvent extraction was suggested as an economically alternative to thermal regeneration. The important aspects of the solvent regeneration process include: the physical and chemical characteristics of the adsorbent, the pore size distribution and energy of adsorption associated with the activated carbon; the degree of solubility of the adsorbate in the organic solvent; the miscibility of the organic solvent in water; and the temperature at which the generation is performed.

  2. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Mennati, Afsaneh; Jafari, Samira; Khezri, Khadejeh; Adibkia, Khosro

    2015-01-01

    Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)) and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery. PMID:25789215

  3. Antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Mennati, Afsaneh; Jafari, Samira; Khezri, Khadejeh; Adibkia, Khosro

    2015-03-01

    Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)) and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery. PMID:25789215

  4. Stereoselective heterocycle synthesis through oxidative carbon-hydrogen bond activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Floreancig, Paul E

    2010-01-01

    Heterocycles are ubiquitous structures in both drugs and natural products, and efficient methods for their construction are being pursued constantly. Carbon-hydrogen bond activation offers numerous advantages for the synthesis of heterocycles with respect to minimizing the length of synthetic routes and reducing waste. As interest in chiral medicinal leads increases, stereoselective methods for heterocycle synthesis must be developed. The use of carbon-hydrogen bond activation reactions for stereoselective heterocycle synthesis has produced a range of creative transformations that provide a wide array of structural motifs, selected examples of which are described in this review. PMID:21061234

  5. Black Carbon in the Soil Carbon Cycle: Is it an Oxidation Resistant End-Product?

    E-print Network

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Black Carbon in the Soil Carbon Cycle: Is it an Oxidation Resistant End-Product? Simone;1 Introduction Soils represent a large carbon pool in the global carbon cycle. Estimates suggest that this pool is twice as large as the atmospheric pool. But its role in the global carbon cycle remains unclear

  6. Gold complexes and activated carbon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gloria J. McDougall; Robert D. Hancock

    1981-01-01

    Exciting new developments are taking place in the extractive metallurgy of gold, which are based upon the adsorption of the\\u000a metal or its complexes on carbon and subsequent elution. Despite the efforts of investigators over a period of almost 70 years,\\u000a however, the mechanisms of the adsorption and elution processes have not yet been established unequivocally. The literature\\u000a relating to

  7. Converting Poultry Litter into Activated Carbon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disposal of animal manure is one of the biggest problems facing agriculture today. Now new technology has been designed to covert manure into environmentally friendly and highly valued activated carbon. When pelletized and activated under specific conditions, the litter becomes a highly porous mat...

  8. Carbon dioxide-activated carbons from almond tree pruning: Preparation and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gañán, J.; González, J. F.; González-García, C. M.; Ramiro, A.; Sabio, E.; Román, S.

    2006-06-01

    Activated carbons were prepared from almond tree pruning by non-catalytic and catalytic gasification with carbon dioxide and their surface characteristics were investigated. In both series a two-stage activation procedure (pyrolysis at 800 °C in nitrogen atmosphere, followed by carbon dioxide activation) was used for the production of activated samples. In non-catalytic gasification, the effect of the temperature (650-800 °C for 1 h) and the reaction time (1-12 h at 650 °C) on the surface characteristics of the prepared samples was investigated. Carbons were characterized by means of nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77 K. The textural parameters of the carbons present a linear relation with the conversion degree until a value of approximately 40%, when they come independent from both parameters studied. The highest surface area obtained for this series was 840 m 2 g -1. In the catalytic gasification the effect of the addition of one catalyst (K and Co) and the gasification time (2-4 h) on the surface and porosity development of the carbons was also studied. At the same conditions, Co leads to higher conversion values than K but this last gives a better porosity development.

  9. Comparison of Toluene Adsorption Among Granular Activated Carbon and Different Types of Activated Carbon Fibers (ACFs)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jo Anne G. Balanay; Shaun A. Crawford; Claudiu T. Lungu

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbon fiber (ACF) has been demonstrated to be a good adsorbent for the removal of organic vapors in air. Some ACF has a comparable or larger surface area and higher adsorption capacity when compared with granular activated carbon (GAC) commonly used in respiratory protection devices. ACF is an attractive alternative adsorbent to GAC because of its ease of handling,

  10. Catalysts for Efficient Production of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Ted X.; Dong, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Several metal alloys have shown promise as improved catalysts for catalytic thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon gases to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Heretofore almost every experiment on the production of carbon nanotubes by this method has involved the use of iron, nickel, or cobalt as the catalyst. However, the catalytic-conversion efficiencies of these metals have been observed to be limited. The identification of better catalysts is part of a continuing program to develop means of mass production of high-quality carbon nanotubes at costs lower than those achieved thus far (as much as $100/g for purified multi-wall CNTs or $1,000/g for single-wall CNTs in year 2002). The main effort thus far in this program has been the design and implementation of a process tailored specifically for high-throughput screening of alloys for catalyzing the growth of CNTs. The process includes an integral combination of (1) formulation of libraries of catalysts, (2) synthesis of CNTs from decomposition of ethylene on powders of the alloys in a pyrolytic chemical-vapor-decomposition reactor, and (3) scanning- electron-microscope screening of the CNTs thus synthesized to evaluate the catalytic efficiencies of the alloys. Information gained in this process is put into a database and analyzed to identify promising alloy compositions, which are to be subjected to further evaluation in a subsequent round of testing. Some of these alloys have been found to catalyze the formation of carbon nano tubes from ethylene at temperatures as low as 350 to 400 C. In contrast, the temperatures typically required for prior catalysts range from 550 to 750 C.

  11. Optimal Production Policy under the Carbon Emission Market

    E-print Network

    Touzi, Nizar

    Optimal Production Policy under the Carbon Emission Market Redouane Belaouar Arash Fahim Nizar Scheme (EU ETS) which provides a way to control the emission of CO2 within carbon polluters through carbon emission. Within ETS, certain industrial installations with intensive carbon pollution are given

  12. A novel activated carbon for supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Haijie [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Liu, Enhui, E-mail: liuenhui99@sina.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Xiang, Xiaoxia; Huang, Zhengzheng; Tian, Yingying; Wu, Yuhu; Wu, Zhilian; Xie, Hui [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel activated carbon was prepared from phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbon has large surface area with microporous, and high heteroatom content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heteroatom-containing functional groups can improve the pseudo-capacitance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and chemical properties lead to the good electrochemical properties. -- Abstract: A novel activated carbon has been prepared by simple carbonization and activation of phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin which is synthesized by the condensation polymerization method. The morphology, thermal stability, surface area, elemental composition and surface chemical composition of samples have been investigated by scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurement, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Electrochemical properties have been studied by cyclic voltammograms, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements in 6 mol L{sup -1} potassium hydroxide. The activated carbon shows good capacitive behavior and the specific capacitance is up to 210 F g{sup -1}, which indicates that it may be a promising candidate for supercapacitors.

  13. DISPLAYING DYNAMIC CARBON FOOTPRINTS OF PRODUCTS ON MOBILE PHONES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali Dada; Felix von Reischach; Thorsten Staake

    Several brand owners are calculating the carbon footprint of sample products and intend to make the information available to their consumers as a label on the product. A physical label on the items or on the retail shelf will not be flexible enough to show the carbon footprint because of the dynamic nature of carbon emissions and the potential difference

  14. Universal Product Design: Transforming User Activity Into Product Function

    E-print Network

    Kostovich, Vincent

    2010-07-14

    is to develop a universal product method by understanding how user activity closely resembles product function. The research results include a twenty product pair study in which a universal and typical product were compared. An activity diagram and functional...

  15. Fabrication of activated carbon fibers/carbon aerogels composites by gelation and supercritical drying

    E-print Network

    Liu, Jie

    Fabrication of activated carbon fibers/carbon aerogels composites by gelation and supercritical August 2003) Activated carbon fiber/carbon aerogel (ACF/CA) composites were fabricated by gelling. The ACFs can reinforce the related carbon aerogels when they originally have low mass density and are weak

  16. Hydrogen storage on chemically activated carbons and carbon nanomaterials at high pressures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Jordá-Beneyto; F. Suárez-García; D. Lozano-Castelló; D. Cazorla-Amorós; A. Linares-Solano

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen adsorption measurements have been carried out at different temperatures (298K and 77K) and high pressure on a series of chemically activated carbons with a wide range of porosities and also on other types of carbon materials, such as activated carbon fibers, carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers. This paper provides a useful interpretation of hydrogen adsorption data according to the

  17. Modeling the selectivity of activated carbons for efficient separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide

    E-print Network

    Wu, Jianzhong

    the separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide via adsorption in activated carbons. In the simulations, both hydrogen and carbon dioxide molecules are modeled as Lennard-Jones spheres, and the activated carbons essentially no preference over the two gases and the selectivity of carbon dioxide relative to hydrogen falls

  18. Special steel production on common carbon steel production line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Huachun; Han, Jingtao; Hu, Haiping; Bian, Ruisheng; Kang, Jianjun; Xu, Manlin

    2004-06-01

    The equipment and technology of small bar tandem rolling line of Shijiazhuang Iron & Steel Co. in China has reached the 90's international advanced level in the 20th century, but products on the line are mostly of common carbon steel. Currently there are few steel plants in China to produce 45 steel bars for cold drawing, which is a kind of shortage product. Development of 45 steel for cold drawing has a wide market outlook in China. In this paper, continuous cooling transformation (CCT) curve of 45 steel for cold drawing used for rolling was set out first. According to the CCT curve, we determined some key temperature points such as Ac3 temperature and Ac1 temperature during the cooling procedure and discussed the precipitation microstructure at different cooling rate. Then by studying thermal treatment process of 45 steel bars for cold drawing, the influence of cooling time on microstructure was analyzed and the optimum cooling speed has been found. All results concluded from the above studies are the basis of regulating controlled cooling process of 45 steel bars for cold drawing. Finally, the feasible production process of 45 steel bars for cold drawing on common carbon steel production line combined with the field condition was recommended.

  19. Waste management activities and carbon emissions in Africa.

    PubMed

    Couth, R; Trois, C

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes research into waste management activities and carbon emissions from territories in sub-Saharan Africa with the main objective of quantifying emission reductions (ERs) that can be gained through viable improvements to waste management in Africa. It demonstrates that data on waste and carbon emissions is poor and generally inadequate for prediction models. The paper shows that the amount of waste produced and its composition are linked to national Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Waste production per person is around half that in developed countries with a mean around 230 kg/hd/yr. Sub-Saharan territories produce waste with a biogenic carbon content of around 56% (+/-25%), which is approximately 40% greater than developed countries. This waste is disposed in uncontrolled dumps that produce large amounts of methane gas. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from waste will rise with increasing urbanization and can only be controlled through funding mechanisms from developed countries. PMID:20832276

  20. Waste management activities and carbon emissions in Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Couth, R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Trois, C., E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa)

    2011-01-15

    This paper summarizes research into waste management activities and carbon emissions from territories in sub-Saharan Africa with the main objective of quantifying emission reductions (ERs) that can be gained through viable improvements to waste management in Africa. It demonstrates that data on waste and carbon emissions is poor and generally inadequate for prediction models. The paper shows that the amount of waste produced and its composition are linked to national Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Waste production per person is around half that in developed countries with a mean around 230 kg/hd/yr. Sub-Saharan territories produce waste with a biogenic carbon content of around 56% (+/-25%), which is approximately 40% greater than developed countries. This waste is disposed in uncontrolled dumps that produce large amounts of methane gas. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from waste will rise with increasing urbanization and can only be controlled through funding mechanisms from developed countries.

  1. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from demineralized tyre char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Prasad, Guddu R.; Joshi, Parth.; Zala, Ranjitsingh S.; Gokhale, Siddharth S.; Manocha, L. M.

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon is the most adsorbing material for industrial waste water treatment. For wider applications, the main consideration is to manufacture activated carbon from low cost precursors, which are easily available and cost effective. One such source is scrap tyres. Recently much effort has been devoted to the thermal degradation of tyres into gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons and solid char residue, all of which have the potential to be processed into valuable products. As for solid residue, char can be used either as low-grade reinforcing filler or as activated carbon. The product recovered by a typical pyrolysis of tyres are usually, 33-38 wt% pyrolytic char, 38-55 wt% oil and 10-30 wt% solid fractions. In the present work activated carbon was prepared from pyrolyzed tyre char (PC). Demineralization involves the dissolution of metal into acids i.e. HCl, HNO3 and H2SO4 and in base i.e. NaOH. Different concentration of acid and base were used. Sodium hydroxide showed maximum amount of metal oxide removal. Further the concentration of sodium hydroxide was varied from 1N to 6N. As the concentration of acid are increased demineralization increases. 6N Sodium hydroxide is found to be more effective demineralising agent of tyre char.

  2. Natural Product Polyamines That Inhibit Human Carbonic Anhydrases

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Rohan A.; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T.

    2014-01-01

    Natural product compound collections have proven an effective way to access chemical diversity and recent findings have identified phenolic, coumarin, and polyamine natural products as atypical chemotypes that inhibit carbonic anhydrases (CAs). CA enzymes are implicated as targets of variable drug therapeutic classes and the discovery of selective, drug-like CA inhibitors is essential. Just two natural product polyamines, spermine and spermidine, have until now been investigated as CA inhibitors. In this study, five more complex natural product polyamines 1–5, derived from either marine sponge or fungi, were considered for inhibition of six different human CA isozymes of interest in therapeutic drug development. All compounds share a simple polyamine core fragment, either spermine or spermidine, yet display substantially different structure activity relationships for CA inhibition. Notably, polyamines 1–5 were submicromolar inhibitors of the cancer drug target CA IX, this is more potent than either spermine or spermidine. PMID:25162012

  3. Carbon Monoxide Production From Overheated Thermal Insulation Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlos J. Hilado; Patricia A. Huttlinger

    1980-01-01

    Carbon monoxide production in the off-gases was determined for selected thermal insulation materials. The highest yields of carbon monoxide were observed with phenol ic rigid foam and with hardboard containing phenol-formaldehyde binder.

  4. Preparation of activated carbons from cherry stones by activation with potassium hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares-Marín, M.; Fernández-González, C.; Macías-García, A.; Gómez-Serrano, V.

    2006-06-01

    Using cherry stones, the preparation of activated carbon has been undertaken in the present study by chemical activation with potassium hydroxide. A series of KOH-activated products was prepared by varying the carbonisation temperature in the 400 900 °C range. Such products were characterised texturally by gas adsorption (N2, -196 °C), mercury porosimetry, and helium and mercury density measurements. FT-IR spectroscopy was also applied. The carbons prepared as a rule are microporous and macroporous solids. The degree of development of surface area and porosity increases with increasing carbonisation temperature. For the carbon heated at 900 °C the specific surface area (BET) is 1624 m2 g-1, the micropore volume is 0.67 cm3 g-1, the mesopore volume is 0.28 cm3 g-1, and the macropore volume is 1.84 cm3 g-1.

  5. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

    2003-03-01

    The program efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction, commercial design development, and prototype system field trials. The program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size field test to the commercial design. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) is in the later stage of the multiyear program for development and verification of carbonate fuel cell based power plants supported by DOE/NETL with additional funding from DOD/DARPA and the FuelCell Energy team. FCE has scaled up the technology to full-size and developed DFC{reg_sign} stack and balance-of-plant (BOP) equipment technology to meet product requirements, and acquired high rate manufacturing capabilities to reduce cost. FCE has designed submegawatt (DFC300A) and megawatt (DFC1500 and DFC3000) class fuel cell products for commercialization of its DFC{reg_sign} technology. A significant progress was made during the reporting period. The reforming unit design was optimized using a three-dimensional stack simulation model. Thermal and flow uniformities of the oxidant-In flow in the stack module were improved using computational fluid dynamics based flow simulation model. The manufacturing capacity was increased. The submegawatt stack module overall cost was reduced by {approx}30% on a per kW basis. An integrated deoxidizer-prereformer design was tested successfully at submegawatt scale using fuels simulating digester gas, coal bed methane gas and peak shave (natural) gas.

  6. Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Product Design Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This annual report provides results of Energy Research Corporation`s technical approach to performing the program `Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) Product Design Improvement` covered under the DOE-ERC Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-95MC31184. This work is supported by DOE/METC and DOD/DARPA as well as ERC Team funds. The objective of the DOE-sponsored program is to advance the direct carbonate fuel cell technology to a level suitable for commercial entry for civilian applications. The overall objective of the DOD/DARPA initiative is to adapt the civilian 2 MW-Class fuel cell power plant for dual fuel DOD applications. This program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from the power plant demonstration status to the commercial entry early production unit design stage. The specific objectives which will allow attainment of these overall program goals are: (1) Provide environmental information to support DOE evaluation with respect to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), (2) Define market-responsive power plant requirements and specifications, (3) Establish design for multifuel, low-cost, modular, market-responsive power plant, (4) Resolve power plant manufacturing issues and define the design for the commercial manufacturing facility, (5) Acquire capabilities to support developmental testing of 0370 stacks and BOP equipment as required to prepare for commercial design, and (6) Resolve stack and BOP equipment technology issues and design, build, and field test a modular commercial prototype power plant to demonstrate readiness of the power plant for commercial entry.

  7. Preparation of activated carbon from cherry stones by chemical activation with ZnCl 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares-Marín, M.; Fernández-González, C.; Macías-García, A.; Gómez-Serrano, V.

    2006-06-01

    Cherry stones (CS), an industrial product generated abundantly in the Valle del Jerte (Cáceres province, Spain), were used as precursor in the preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation with ZnCl 2. The influence of process variables such as the carbonisation temperature and the ZnCl 2:CS ratio (impregnation ratio) on textural and chemical-surface properties of the products obtained was studied. Such products were characterised texturally by adsorption of N 2 at -196 °C, mercury porosimetry and density measurements. Information on the surface functional groups and structures of the carbons was provided by FT-IR spectroscopy. Activated carbon with a high development of surface area and porosity is prepared. When using the 4:1 impregnation ratio, the specific surface area (BET) of the resultant carbon is as high as 1971 m 2 g -1. The effect of the increase in the impregnation ratio on the porous structure of activated carbon is stronger than that of the rise in the carbonisation temperature, whereas the opposite applies to the effect on the surface functional groups and structures.

  8. Characteristics of activated carbon and carbon nanotubes as adsorbents to remove annatto (norbixin) in cheese whey.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Pan, Kang; Zhong, Qixin

    2013-09-25

    Removing annatto from cheese whey without bleaching has potential to improve whey protein quality. In this work, the potential of two activated carbon products and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNT) was studied for extracting annatto (norbixin) in aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption experiments were studied for the effects of solution pH, adsorbent mass, contact duration, and ionic strength. The equilibrium adsorption data were observed to fit both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The thermodynamic parameters estimated from adsorption isotherms demonstrated that the adsorption of norbixin on three adsorbents is exothermic, and the entropic contribution differs with adsorbent structure. The adsorption kinetics, with CNT showing a higher rate than activated carbon, followed the pseudo first order and second order rate expressions and demonstrated the significance of intraparticle diffusion. Electrostatic interactions were observed to be significant in the adsorption. The established adsorption parameters may be used in the dairy industry to decolorize cheese whey without applying bleaching agents. PMID:23978061

  9. APPLICATION OF ACTIVATED CARBON IN REACTOR CONTAINMENT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Prigge

    1962-01-01

    An activated-carbon bed, or filter, was designed to remove 99.9+% of the ; radioactive halogen vapor that could be released as the result of a containable ; accident of a watermoderated-and-cooled reactor. The filter was intended for ; installation in the exhaust of the ventilation system of the reactor building and ; was designed on the basis of results from

  10. Drinking Water Treatment: Activated Carbon Filtration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Divorak, Bruce I.

    This site, presented by the University of Nebraska - Lincoln Extension, discusses the principles, processes and requirements of activated carbon filtration systems for the domestic (household) user. The site addresses contaminants removed, those not removed, water testing, principals of treatment and the equipment used in this treatment.

  11. USING POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON: A CRITICAL REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for uses other than taste and odor control is poorly documented, the purpose of this article is to critically review uses that have been reported and to analyze means of employing PAC more efficiently. The extent of adsor...

  12. USING POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON: A CRITICAL REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for uses other than taste and odor control is poorly documented, the purpose of this article is to critically review uses that have been reported (i.e., pesticides and herbicides, synthetic organic chemicals, and trihalom...

  13. MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

  14. ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT OF KRAFT BLEACHING EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of color and organic contaminants by adsorption on activated carbon from the effluent of a kraft pulp bleaching plant was investigated in a pilot plant. The caustic bleach effluent, which contains 80% of the color from pulp bleaching, was decolorized successfully when...

  15. Carbon sequestration from boreal wildfires via Pyrogenic Carbon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santin, Cristina; Doerr, Stefan; Preston, Caroline

    2014-05-01

    Fire releases important quantities of carbon (C) to the atmosphere. Every year, an average of 460 Million ha burn around the globe, generating C emissions equivalent to a third of the current annual contribution from fossil fuel combustion. Over the longer-term wildfires are widely considered as 'net zero C emission events', because C emissions from fires, excluding those associated with deforestation and peatland fires, are balanced by C uptake by regenerating vegetation. This 'zero C emission' scenario, however, may be flawed, as it does not consider the production of pyrogenic C (PyC). During fire, part of the biomass C burnt is emitted to the atmosphere but part is transformed into PyC (i.e. charcoal). The enhanced resistance of PyC to environmental degradation compared to unburnt biomass gives it the potential to sequester C over the medium/long term. Therefore, after complete regeneration of the vegetation, the PyC generated may represent an additional C pool and, hence, recurring fire-regrowth cycles could represent net sinks of atmospheric C. To estimate the quantitative importance of PyC production, accurate data on PyC generation with respect to the fuel combusted are needed. Unfortunately, detailed quantification of fuel prior to fire is normally only available for prescribed and experimental fires, which are usually of low-intensity and therefore not representative of higher-intensity wildfires. Furthermore, what little data is available is usually based on only a specific fraction of the PyC present following burning rather than the whole range of PyC products and pools (i.e. PyC in soil, ash, downed wood and standing vegetation). To address this research gap, we utilized the globally unique FireSmart experimental forest fires in Northwest Canada. They are aimed to reproduce wildfire conditions typical for boreal forest and, at the same time, allow pre-fire fuel assessment, fire behaviour monitoring and immediate post-fire fuel and PyC inventory. This allowed, for the first time, quantifying the whole range of PyC components found in-situ immediately after a typical boreal forest fire. The fire examined had a fireline intensity of ~8000 kw/m, which is typical of boreal fires in NW Canada and we found that more than 18% of the fuel consumed was converted to PyC. This rate by far exceeds previous estimates (1-3%) and suggests that PyC production has indeed been substantially underestimated. As boreal forests are the world's largest terrestrial biome and contain half of the forest ecosystem C with a third its net primary productivity being consumed by fire every year, our findings could imply that PyC production from wildfires is a potential carbon sequestration mechanism of sufficient magnitude that warrants inclusion in boreal and perhaps global C budget estimations.

  16. Photobiological hydrogen production and carbon dioxide sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berberoglu, Halil

    Photobiological hydrogen production is an alternative to thermochemical and electrolytic technologies with the advantage of carbon dioxide sequestration. However, it suffers from low solar to hydrogen energy conversion efficiency due to limited light transfer, mass transfer, and nutrient medium composition. The present study aims at addressing these limitations and can be divided in three parts: (1) experimental measurements of the radiation characteristics of hydrogen producing and carbon dioxide consuming microorganisms, (2) solar radiation transfer modeling and simulation in photobioreactors, and (3) parametric experiments of photobiological hydrogen production and carbon dioxide sequestration. First, solar radiation transfer in photobioreactors containing microorganisms and bubbles was modeled using the radiative transport equation (RTE) and solved using the modified method of characteristics. The study concluded that Beer-Lambert's law gives inaccurate results and anisotropic scattering must be accounted for to predict the local irradiance inside a photobioreactor. The need for accurate measurement of the complete set of radiation characteristics of microorganisms was established. Then, experimental setup and analysis methods for measuring the complete set of radiation characteristics of microorganisms have been developed and successfully validated experimentally. A database of the radiation characteristics of representative microorganisms have been created including the cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis, the purple non-sulfur bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides and the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii along with its three genetically engineered strains. This enabled, for the first time, quantitative assessment of the effect of genetic engineering on the radiation characteristics of microorganisms. In addition, a parametric experimental study has been performed to model the growth, CO2 consumption, and H 2 production of Anabaena variabilis as functions of irradiance and CO2 concentration. Kinetic models were successfully developed based on the Monod model and on a novel scaling analysis employing the CO2 consumption half-time as the time scale. Finally, the growth and hydrogen production of Anabaena variabilis have been compared in a flat panel photobioreactor using three different nutrient media under otherwise similar conditions. Light to hydrogen energy conversion efficiency for Allen-Arnon medium was superior by a factor of 5.5 to both BG-11 and BG-11o media. This was attributed to the presence of vanadium and larger heterocyst frequency observed in the Allen-Arnon medium.

  17. Making Activated Carbon for Storing Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Serio, Michael A.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2005-01-01

    Solid disks of microporous activated carbon, produced by a method that enables optimization of pore structure, have been investigated as means of storing gas (especially hydrogen for use as a fuel) at relatively low pressure through adsorption on pore surfaces. For hydrogen and other gases of practical interest, a narrow distribution of pore sizes <2 nm is preferable. The present method is a variant of a previously patented method of cyclic chemisorption and desorption in which a piece of carbon is alternately (1) heated to the lower of two elevated temperatures in air or other oxidizing gas, causing the formation of stable carbon/oxygen surface complexes; then (2) heated to the higher of the two elevated temperatures in flowing helium or other inert gas, causing the desorption of the surface complexes in the form of carbon monoxide. In the present method, pore structure is optimized partly by heating to a temperature of 1,100 C during carbonization. Another aspect of the method exploits the finding that for each gas-storage pressure, gas-storage capacity can be maximized by burning off a specific proportion (typically between 10 and 20 weight percent) of the carbon during the cyclic chemisorption/desorption process.

  18. Preparation of functionalized and metal-impregnated activated carbon by a single-step activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dastgheib, Seyed A.; Ren, Jianli; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud; Chang, Ramsay

    2014-01-01

    A rapid method to prepare functionalized and metal-impregnated activated carbon from coal is described in this paper. A mixture of ferric chloride and a sub-bituminous coal was used to demonstrate simultaneous coal activation, chlorine functionalization, and iron/iron oxides impregnation in the resulting porous carbon products. The FeCl3 concentration in the mixture, the method to prepare the FeCl3-coal mixture (solid mixing or liquid impregnation), and activation atmosphere and temperature impacted the surface area and porosity development, Cl functionalization, and iron species impregnation and dispersion in the carbon products. Samples activated in nitrogen or a simulated flue gas at 600 or 1000 °C for 1-2 min had surface areas up to ?800 m2/g, bulk iron contents up to 18 wt%, and surface chlorine contents up to 27 wt%. Potential catalytic and adsorption application of the carbon materials was explored in catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol and adsorption of ionic mercury from aqueous solutions. Results indicated that impregnated activated carbons outperformed their non-impregnated counterparts in both the CWAO and adsorption tests.

  19. The biomass derived activated carbon for supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, S. T.; Selvan, R. Kalai; Melo, J. S.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, the activated carbon was prepared from biowaste of Eichhornia crassipes by chemical activation method using KOH as the activating agent at various carbonization temperatures (600 °C, 700 °C and 800 °C). The disordered nature, morphology and surface functional groups of ACs were examined by XRD, SEM and FT-IR. The electrochemical properties of AC electrodes were studied in 1M H2SO4 in the potential range of -0.2 to 0.8 V using cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques in a three electrode system. Subsequently, the fabricated supercapacitor using AC electrode delivered the higher specific capacitance and energy density of 509 F/g at current density of 1 mA/cm2 and 17 Wh/kg at power density of 0.416 W/g.

  20. Thermal regeneration of activated carbon saturated with p-nitrophenol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E Sabio; E González; J. F González; C. M González-Garc??a; A Ramiro; J Gañan

    2004-01-01

    Water contamination by organic compounds is an important environmental problem. Activated carbon filters are widely used to eliminate these contaminants. After exhaustion, activated carbon must be regenerated or replaced by fresh carbon. In this study thermal regeneration of saturated carbon with p-nitrophenol has been analysed. Three thermal regeneration methods have been tested: (1) pyrolysis, (2) pyrolyis-gasification and (3) direct gasification,

  1. A new antacid drug from activated carbon modified with calcium carbonate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlos F. Linares; José Quintero; Lesbia Martínez; Gema González

    2007-01-01

    Activated carbons were previously modified with different sodium carbonate solutions and then, they were soaked in a calcium nitrate solution. This procedure allowed to precipitate calcium carbonate on the microporous carbons. Then, these solids were washed with abundant distillated water. These modified carbons were characterized by means of XRD, SEM, HRTEM and BET surface area measurements. XRD confirmed the presence

  2. Studying the effectiveness of activated carbon R95 respirators in reducing the inhalation of combustion by-products in Hanoi, Vietnam: a demonstration study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Urban air pollution is an increasing health problem, particularly in Asia, where the combustion of fossil fuels has increased rapidly as a result of industrialization and socio-economic development. The adverse health impacts of urban air pollution are well established, but less is known about effective intervention strategies. In this demonstration study we set out to establish methods to assess whether wearing an R95 activated carbon respirator could reduce intake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in street workers in Hanoi, Vietnam. Methods In this demonstration study we performed a cross-over study in which non-smoking participants that worked at least 4 hours per day on the street in Hanoi were randomly allocated to specific respirator wearing sequences for a duration of 2 weeks. Urines were collected after each period, i.e. twice per week, at the end of the working day to measure hydroxy PAHs (OH-PAH) using gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry. The primary endpoint was the urinary concentration of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP). Results Forty-four participants (54.5% male, median age 40 years) were enrolled with the majority being motorbike taxi drivers (38.6%) or street vendors (34.1%). The baseline creatinine corrected urinary level for 1-OHP was much higher than other international comparisons: 1020 ng/g creatinine (IQR: 604–1551). Wearing a R95 mask had no significant effect on 1-OHP levels: estimated multiplicative effect 1.0 (95% CI: 0.92-1.09) or other OH-PAHs, except 1-hydroxynaphthalene (1-OHN): 0.86 (95% CI: 0.11-0.96). Conclusions High levels of urine OH-PAHs were found in Hanoi street workers. No effect was seen on urine OH-PAH levels by wearing R95 particulate respirators in an area of high urban air pollution, except for 1-OHN. A lack of effect may be de to gaseous phase PAHs that were not filtered efficiently by the respirator. The high levels of urinary OH-PAHs found, urges for effective interventions. Trial registration ISRCTN74390617 (date of assignation: 04/08/2009). PMID:23013369

  3. APPRAISAL OF POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON PROCESSES FOR MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Powdered activated carbon has been the subject of several developmental efforts directed towards producing improved methods for treating municipal wastewaters. Granular activated carbon has proven itself as an effective means of reducing dissolved organic contaminant levels, but ...

  4. Enhancing capacitive deionization performance of electrospun activated carbon nanofibers by coupling with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qiang; Wang, Gang; Wu, Tingting; Peng, Senpei; Qiu, Jieshan

    2015-05-15

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is an alternative, effective and environmentally friendly technology for desalination of brackish water. The performance of the CDI device is highly determined by the electrode materials. In this paper, a composite of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded in activated carbon nanofiber (ACF) was prepared by a direct co-electrospinning way and subsequent CO2 activation. The introduction of CNTs can greatly improve the conductivity while the CO2-mediated activation can render the final product with high porosity. As such, the hybrid structure can provide an excellent storage space and pathways for ion adsorption and conduction. When evaluated as electrode materials for CDI, the as-prepared CNT/ACF composites with higher electrical conductivity and mesopore ratios exhibited higher electrosorption capacity and good regeneration performance in comparison with the pure ACF. PMID:25595622

  5. Product Carbon Footprints and Their Uncertainties in Comparative Decision Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Dao, Hai M.; Phan, Lam T.; de Snoo, Geert R.

    2015-01-01

    In response to growing awareness of climate change, requests to establish product carbon footprints have been increasing. Product carbon footprints are life cycle assessments restricted to just one impact category, global warming. Product carbon footprint studies generate life cycle inventory results, listing the environmental emissions of greenhouse gases from a product’s lifecycle, and characterize these by their global warming potentials, producing product carbon footprints that are commonly communicated as point values. In the present research we show that the uncertainties surrounding these point values necessitate more sophisticated ways of communicating product carbon footprints, using different sizes of catfish (Pangasius spp.) farms in Vietnam as a case study. As most product carbon footprint studies only have a comparative meaning, we used dependent sampling to produce relative results in order to increase the power for identifying environmentally superior products. We therefore argue that product carbon footprints, supported by quantitative uncertainty estimates, should be used to test hypotheses, rather than to provide point value estimates or plain confidence intervals of products’ environmental performance. PMID:25781175

  6. BREAKPOINT CHLORINATION/ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT: EFFECT ON VOLATILE HALOGENATED ORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The production and removal of six volatile halogenated organic compounds during treatment of tertiary clarified and filtered wastewater by breakpoint chlorination and activated carbon was examined in a continuous flow pilot plant. Short contact time breakpoint chlorination of fil...

  7. Adsorption of Nonylphenol onto Granular Activated Carbon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tom Tanghe; Willy Verstraete

    2001-01-01

    The applicability of granular activated carbon (GAC)filtration for the removal of the xeno-estrogenicmicropollutant nonylphenol (NP) is evaluated using batchadsorption data. From the obtained adsorption data, it wasapparent that with contact times of 4 d and 24 hr and GACdosages of 1 and 0.1 g L-1 no saturationof the GAC could be obtained with NP total contaminantloadings up to 10 000

  8. Product carbon footprints and their uncertainties in comparative decision contexts.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Patrik J G; Heijungs, Reinout; Dao, Hai M; Phan, Lam T; de Snoo, Geert R; Guinée, Jeroen B

    2015-01-01

    In response to growing awareness of climate change, requests to establish product carbon footprints have been increasing. Product carbon footprints are life cycle assessments restricted to just one impact category, global warming. Product carbon footprint studies generate life cycle inventory results, listing the environmental emissions of greenhouse gases from a product's lifecycle, and characterize these by their global warming potentials, producing product carbon footprints that are commonly communicated as point values. In the present research we show that the uncertainties surrounding these point values necessitate more sophisticated ways of communicating product carbon footprints, using different sizes of catfish (Pangasius spp.) farms in Vietnam as a case study. As most product carbon footprint studies only have a comparative meaning, we used dependent sampling to produce relative results in order to increase the power for identifying environmentally superior products. We therefore argue that product carbon footprints, supported by quantitative uncertainty estimates, should be used to test hypotheses, rather than to provide point value estimates or plain confidence intervals of products' environmental performance. PMID:25781175

  9. REMOVAL OF DYE BY IMMOBILISED PHOTOCATALYST LOADED ACTIVATED CARBON

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zulkarnain Zainal; Chang Sook Keng; Abdul Halim Abdullah

    The ability of activated carbon to adsorb and titanium dioxide to photodegrade organic impurities from water bodies is well accepted. Combination of the two is expected to enhance the removal efficiency due to the synergistic effect. This has enabled activated carbon to adsorb more and at the same time the lifespan of activated carbon is prolonged as the workload of

  10. Less-costly activated carbon for sewage treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, J. D.; Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    Lignite-aided sewage treatment is based on absorption of dissolved pollutants by activated carbon. Settling sludge is removed and dried into cakes that are pyrolyzed with lignites to yield activated carbon. Lignite is less expensive than activated carbon previously used to supplement pyrolysis yield.

  11. PRODUCTION OF CARBON 14 BY COSMIC-RAY NEUTRONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. Lingenfelter

    1963-01-01

    The rate of production of carbon-14 by cosmic neutrons is calculated by ; multigroup diffusion theory as a function of altitude, latitude, and time, and it ; is normalized to absolute cosmic neutron flux measurements. The global average ; production rate over the last ten solar cycles is found to be 2.50 plus or minus ; 0.50 carbon-14 atoms per

  12. Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary M. Lovett; Jonathan J. Cole; Michael L. Pace

    2006-01-01

    Net ecosystem production (NEP), defined as the difference between gross primary production and total ecosystem respiration,\\u000a represents the total amount of organic carbon in an ecosystem available for storage, export as organic carbon, or nonbiological\\u000a oxidation to carbon dioxide through fire or ultraviolet oxidation. In some of the recent literature, especially that on terrestrial\\u000a ecosystems, NEP has been redefined as

  13. Characteristics of activated carbon produced from biosludge and its use in wastewater post-treatment.

    PubMed

    Pikkov, L; Kallas, J; Rüütmann, T; Rikmann, E

    2001-02-01

    Experimental research into the bench-scale production of activated carbon from waste-activated sludge from water purification, sawdust, peat, and their mixtures, by carbonisation and activation was undertaken. The research work was carried out to determine possible methods of production of cheap activated carbon from local raw materials and to use it in water purification technology. Along with the samples produced, several commercial activated carbons (namely RB-1, F 100, CA (adsorbent from military gas masks), BAY (product of the USSR)) were tested to compare adsorption properties in the adsorption of phenols, xylidines, amines, methylene blue and molasses. It has been found that the activated carbon produced from waste biosludge was of higher quality than that produced from either sawdust or peat, and performed similarly to RB-1 and F100 in adsorption tests. It was also determined that the activated carbon produced from biosludge could possibly be used in the post-treatment of wastewater. Residual sludge from the biological treatment of the wastewater from the purification of oil-shale in the chemical processing industry could cover up to 80% of the need for activated carbon. Some of this activated carbon could be used in the post-treatment of the same water, adsorbing polyalcaline phenols from the initial content of 4 mg l-1 to the demanded level of 1 mg l-1. PMID:11349382

  14. Preparation of high surface area activated carbon from corn by chemical activation using potassium hydroxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Narges Bagheri; Jalal Abedi

    2009-01-01

    Activated carbons were prepared through chemical activation of corn cob precursor, using potassium hydroxide as the chemical agent. The effect of different parameters, such as particle size, method of mixing, chemical\\/corn ratio, activation time and activation temperature, on weight loss and BET surface area of the produced activated carbons were discussed. The porosity of the activated carbons was evaluated through

  15. Beneficial Use of Carbon Dioxide in Precast Concrete Production

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yixin

    2014-03-31

    The feasibility of using carbon dioxide as feedstock in precast concrete production is studied. Carbon dioxide reacts with calcium compounds in concrete, producing solid calcium carbonates in binding matrix. Two typical precast products are examined for their capacity to store carbon dioxide during the production. They are concrete blocks and fiber?cement panels. The two products are currently mass produced and cured by steam. Carbon dioxide can be used to replace steam in curing process to accelerate early strength, improve the long?term durability and reduce energy and emission. For a reaction within a 24?hour process window, the theoretical maximum possible carbon uptake in concrete is found to be 29% based on cement mass in the product. To reach the maximum uptake, a special process is developed to promote the reaction efficiency to 60?80% in 4?hour carbon dioxide curing and improve the resistance to freeze?thaw cycling and sulfate ion attack. The process is also optimized to meet the project target of $10/tCO{sub 2} in carbon utilization. By the use of self?concentrating absorption technology, high purity CO{sub 2} can be produced at a price below $40/t. With low cost CO{sub 2} capture and utilization technologies, it is feasible to establish a network for carbon capture and utilization at the vicinity of carbon sources. If all block produces and panel producers in United States could adopt carbon dioxide process in their production in place of steam, carbon utilization in these two markets alone could consume more than 2 Mt CO{sub 2}/year. This capture and utilization process can be extended to more precast products and will continue for years to come.

  16. Sustainable production of green feed from carbon dioxide and hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Landau, Miron V; Vidruk, Roxana; Herskowitz, Moti

    2014-03-01

    Carbon dioxide hydrogenation to form hydrocarbons was conducted on two iron-based catalysts, prepared according to procedures described in the literature, and on a new iron spinel catalyst. The CO2 conversion measured in a packed-bed reactor was limited to about 60% because of excessive amounts of water produced in this process. Switching to a system of three packed-bed reactors in series with interim removal of water and condensed hydrocarbons increased CO2 conversion to as much as 89%. The pure spinel catalyst displayed a significantly higher activity and selectivity than those of the other iron catalysts. This process produces a product called green feed, which is similar in composition to the product of a high-temperature, iron-based Fischer–Tropsch process from syngas. The green feed can be readily converted into renewable fuels by well-established technologies. PMID:24678062

  17. Carbon Cycle in the Lab: Carbon Products and the Processes That Link Them

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lab teaches students about the nature of carbon, the different types of compounds it exists in (e.g. charcoal, glucose, carbon dioxide), the biochemical reactions it takes part in (photosynthesis and respiration), the range of processes that carbon and carbon compounds are involved in on Earth, and how these link together form the carbon cycle. They will get a feel for how the whole carbon cycle works by turning the laboratory into a model of the carbon cycle and seeing how the different things that are produced in the cycle (the products) fit together with the way those products are made (the processes). The site contains teacher notes, a list of required materials, student instructions and questions, and a diagram of the carbon cycle.

  18. Inhibitory effect of sorbitol on acetaminophen adsorption by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takeo; Oida, Yoshihito; Matsumoto, Kazuoki; Kawasaki, Naohito; Tanada, Seiki

    2002-01-01

    The effective use of activated carbon as oral adsorbent in the primary treatment of acute acetaminophen poisoning was studied. The adsorption characteristics of acetaminophen onto activated carbons in presence of sorbitol were investigated in vitro. Both the equilibrium amount adsorbed and the removal rate of acetaminophen onto activated carbon were decreased with the increase of sorbitol concentration in solutions. The sorbitol concentration independency of the inhibition to the acetaminophen adsorption was recognized. It was concluded that the addition of sorbitol to the suspension of activated carbon inhibited the acetaminophen adsorption by activated carbon. PMID:12049124

  19. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

    2004-08-01

    The ongoing program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size proof-of-concept field test to the commercial design. DOE has been funding Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) development at FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) for stationary power plant applications. The program efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction, leading to commercial design development and prototype system field trials. FCE, Danbury, CT, is a world-recognized leader for the development and commercialization of high efficiency fuel cells that can generate clean electricity at power stations, or at distributed locations near the customers such as hospitals, schools, universities, hotels and other commercial and industrial applications. FCE has designed three different fuel cell power plant models (DFC300A, DFC1500 and DFC3000). FCE's power plants are based on its patented DFC{reg_sign} technology, where the fuel is directly fed to the fuel cell and hydrogen is generated internally. These power plants offer significant advantages compared to the existing power generation technologies--higher fuel efficiency, significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, flexible siting and permitting requirements, scalability and potentially lower operating costs. Also, the exhaust heat by-product can be used for cogeneration applications such as high-pressure steam, district heating and air conditioning. Several FCE sub-megawatt power plants are currently operating in Europe, Japan and the US. Because hydrogen is generated directly within the fuel cell module from readily available fuels such as natural gas and waste water treatment gas, DFC power plants are ready today and do not require the creation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Product improvement progress made during the reporting period in the areas of technology, manufacturing processes, cost reduction and balance of plant equipment designs is discussed in this report.

  20. Characteristics and humidity control capacity of activated carbon from bamboo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshihide Horikawa; Yoshiyuki Kitakaze; Tomoki Sekida; Jun’ichi Hayashi; Masahiro Katoh

    2010-01-01

    Activated carbons were prepared from bamboo by chemical activation with K2CO3 or physical activation with CO2. The structural and surface chemical characteristics of the activated carbons were determined by N2 adsorption–desorption and Boehm titration, respectively. The water vapor adsorption properties of the activated carbons with various pore structures (preparation conditions) were examined. The relationship between water vapor adsorption capacity and

  1. Investigation kinetics mechanisms of adsorption malachite green onto activated carbon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Önal; C. Akmil-Ba?ar; Ç. Sar?c?-Özdemir

    2007-01-01

    Lignite was used to prepare activated carbon (T3K618) by chemical activation with KOH. Pore properties of the activated carbon such as BET surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and pore diameter were characterized by t-plot based on N2 adsorption isotherm. BET surface area of activated carbon is determined as 1000m2\\/g. Adsorption capacity of malachite green (MG) onto T3K618 activated

  2. Photorespiration and Carbon Limitation Determine Productivity in Temperate Seagrasses

    PubMed Central

    Buapet, Pimchanok; Rasmusson, Lina M.; Gullström, Martin; Björk, Mats

    2013-01-01

    The gross primary productivity of two seagrasses, Zostera marina and Ruppia maritima, and one green macroalga, Ulva intestinalis, was assessed in laboratory and field experiments to determine whether the photorespiratory pathway operates at a substantial level in these macrophytes and to what extent it is enhanced by naturally occurring shifts in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and O2 in dense vegetation. To achieve these conditions in laboratory experiments, seawater was incubated with U. intestinalis in light to obtain a range of higher pH and O2 levels and lower DIC levels. Gross photosynthetic O2 evolution was then measured in this pretreated seawater (pH, 7.8–9.8; high to low DIC:O2 ratio) at both natural and low O2 concentrations (adjusted by N2 bubbling). The presence of photorespiration was indicated by a lower gross O2 evolution rate under natural O2 conditions than when O2 was reduced. In all three macrophytes, gross photosynthetic rates were negatively affected by higher pH and lower DIC. However, while both seagrasses exhibited significant photorespiratory activity at increasing pH values, the macroalga U. intestinalis exhibited no such activity. Rates of seagrass photosynthesis were then assessed in seawater collected from the natural habitats (i.e., shallow bays characterized by high macrophyte cover and by low DIC and high pH during daytime) and compared with open baymouth water conditions (where seawater DIC is in equilibrium with air, normal DIC, and pH). The gross photosynthetic rates of both seagrasses were significantly higher when incubated in the baymouth water, indicating that these grasses can be significantly carbon limited in shallow bays. Photorespiration was also detected in both seagrasses under shallow bay water conditions. Our findings indicate that natural carbon limitations caused by high community photosynthesis can enhance photorespiration and cause a significant decline in seagrass primary production in shallow waters. PMID:24376754

  3. PRODUCTION AND SCREENING OF CARBON PRODUCTS PRECURSORS FROM COAL

    SciTech Connect

    Caulton L. Irwin

    2001-05-31

    The authors have examined effects of blending a raw coal extract (EXT) with an extracted coal-tar pitch (ECTP). Previous reports were concerned with the addition of 15 wt% EXT, or less, on the physical characteristics of the blend and on the development of optical texture following carbonization. Two additional blends of ECTP and EXT were prepared at the 30 and 50 wt% EXT content using a procedure already described. The characteristics of the blends are presented. The density for these blended materials is not much different than the density for the blends reported earlier. The softening point temperature for the 30 wt% EXT increased to over 200 C while the softening point temperature for the 50 wt% EXT blend was too high to be determined by the Mettler method. Coke yields approximately follow the law of mixtures. The optical texture of the green cokes for the 30 and 50 wt% EXT blends is shown. Though the optical texture of the green cokes was not significantly affected where the level of EXT is 15 wt% or less, larger proportions of EXT exert a marked reduction in anisotropy. The co-processing of coal with petroleum residues or other heavy hydrocarbons at elevated temperature and pressure has received considerable attention in the research community as a means to upgrade simultaneously coal and byproducts. Heavy hydrocarbons can function as sources of hydrogen, as well as performing as a medium for dissolution and dispersion of coal fragments. However, the focus of much of the prior research has been on developing fuels, distillable liquids, or synthetic crudes. Comparatively little effort has been deliberately directed toward the production of heavier, non-distillable materials which could perform as binder and extender pitches, impregnants, or feedstocks for cokes and other carbons.

  4. Communications to the Editor Aliphatic Carbon-Fluorine Bond Activation Using

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    Communications to the Editor Aliphatic Carbon-Fluorine Bond Activation Using (C5Me5)2ZrH2 Bradley M Rochester, New York 14627 ReceiVed March 21, 2000 Carbon-fluorine bonds are among the strongest and most with many types of fluorinated substrates to give hydrogenated organic products and Cp*2ZrHF. Reaction of Cp

  5. Impact of backwashing on nitrification in the biological activated carbon filters used in drinking water treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Laurent; A. Kihn; A. Andersson; P. Servais

    2003-01-01

    Nitrification during biological filtration is currently used in drinking water production to remove ammonia, which is the source of several water quality problems during treatment and distribution. We evaluated here the impact of backwashing on nitrification efficiency in filters used for drinking water treatment. Two different granular activated carbon (one open and one closed carbon superstructure) were tested. Ammonia removal

  6. Food security and climate change: On the potential to adapt global crop production by active selection to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural production is under increasing pressure by global anthropogenic changes, including rising population, diversion of cereals to biofuels, increased protein demands, and climatic extremes. Because of the immediate and dynamic nature of these changes, adaptation measures are urgently need...

  7. Preparation of steam activated carbon from rubberwood sawdust (Hevea brasiliensis) and its adsorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Prakash Kumar, B G; Shivakamy, K; Miranda, Lima Rose; Velan, M

    2006-08-25

    Activated carbon was produced from a biowaste product, rubberwood sawdust (RWSD) using steam in a high temperature fluidized bed reactor. Experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of various process parameters such as activation time, activation temperature, particle size and fluidising velocity on the quality of the activated carbon. The activated carbon was characterized based on its iodine number, methylene blue number, Brauner Emmet Teller (BET) surface area and surface area obtained using the ethylene glycol mono ethyl ether (EGME) retention method. The best quality activated carbon was obtained at an activation time and temperature of 1h and 750 degrees C for an average particle size of 0.46 mm. The adsorption kinetics shows that pseudo-second-order rate fitted the adsorption kinetics better than pseudo-first-order rate equation. The adsorption capacity of carbon produced from RWSD was found to be 1250 mg g(-1) for the Bismark Brown dye. The rate constant and diffusion coefficient for intraparticle transport were determined for steam activated carbon. The characteristic of the prepared activated carbon was found comparable to the commercial activated carbon. PMID:16510239

  8. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    H. C. Maru; M. Farooque

    2003-12-19

    The ongoing program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size proof-of-concept field test to the commercial design. DOE has been funding Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) development at FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) for stationary power plant applications. The program efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction leading to commercial design development and prototype system field trials. FCE, Danbury, CT, is a world-recognized leader for the development and commercialization of high efficiency fuel cells that can generate clean electricity at power stations or in distributed locations near the customer, including hospitals, schools, universities, hotels and other commercial and industrial applications. FuelCell Energy has designed three different fuel cell power plant models (DFC300, DFC1500 and DFC3000). FCE's power plants are based on its patented Direct FuelCell technology, where the fuel is directly fed to fuel cell and hydrogen is generated internally. These power plants offer significant advantages compared to existing power generation technologies--higher fuel efficiency, significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, flexible siting and permitting requirements, scalability and potentially lower operating costs. Also, the exhaust heat by-product can be used for cogeneration applications such as high-pressure steam, district heating, and air conditioning. Several FCE sub-megawatt power plants are currently operating in Europe, Japan and the US. Because hydrogen is generated directly within the fuel cell module from readily available fuels such as natural gas and waste water treatment gas, DFC power plants are ready today and do not require the creation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Product improvement progress made during the reporting period in the areas of technology, manufacturing processes, cost reduction and balance of plant equipment designs is discussed in this report. FCE's DFC products development has been carried out under a joint public-private effort with DOE being the major contributor. Current funding is primarily under a Cooperative Agreement with DOE.

  9. The regeneration of polluted activated carbon by radiation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minghong, Wu; Borong, Bao; Ruimin, Zhou; Jinliang, Zhu; Longxin, Hu

    1998-10-01

    In this paper, the regeneration of used activated carbon from monosodium glutamate factory was experimented using radiation and acid-alkali chemical cleaning method. Results showed that the activated carbon saturated with pollutants can be wash away easily by flushing with chemical solution prior irradiation. DSC was used to monitor the change of carbon adsorption

  10. ENTRAINED-FLOW ADSORPTION OF MERCURY USING ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench-scale experiments were conducted in a flow reactor to simulate entrained-flow capture of elemental mercury (Hg) by activated carbon. Adsorption of Hg by several commercial activated carbons was examined at different carbon-to-mercury (C:Hg) ratios (by weight) (600:1 - 29000...

  11. BACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON PARTICLES IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sampling protocol was developed to examine particles released from granular activated carbon filter beds. A gauze filter/Swinnex procedure was used to collect carbon fines from 201 granular activated carbon-treated drinking water samples over 12 months. Application of a homogen...

  12. Improvement of Ansamitocin P-3 Production by Actinosynnema mirum with Fructose as the Sole Carbon Source.

    PubMed

    Li, Tinglan; Fan, Yuxiang; Nambou, Komi; Hu, Fengxian; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Wei, Liujing; Hua, Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Ansamitocin P-3 (AP-3) is an active and potent anti-tumor maytansinoid, which is usually produced by Actinosynnema spp. In this study, the effects of different carbon sources on biomass and AP-3 production by Actinosynnema mirum were investigated. The results showed great biomass production behavior of A. mirum in glucose medium comparatively to other carbon sources. Interestingly, when fructose was used as the sole carbon source, the highest yield of AP-3 was obtained, which was about fourfold than that of strain cultured in glucose after 168 h. Further analysis conducted in regard to better understanding of such observations in glucose and fructose defined media showed that fructose improves AP-3 production through the stimulation of the key genes of the secondary metabolism pathways. It was concluded that fructose could be a potential carbon source for cost-effective production of AP-3 from an industrial point of view. PMID:25564203

  13. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...true Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415...CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.300 Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory....

  14. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...false Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415...CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.300 Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory....

  15. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...true Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415...CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.300 Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory....

  16. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...true Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415...CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.300 Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory....

  17. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...true Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415...CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.300 Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory....

  18. 40 CFR 415.450 - Applicability; description of the lithium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...true Applicability; description of the lithium carbonate production subcategory. 415...CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Lithium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.450 Applicability; description of the lithium carbonate production subcategory....

  19. 40 CFR 415.450 - Applicability; description of the lithium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...true Applicability; description of the lithium carbonate production subcategory. 415...CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Lithium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.450 Applicability; description of the lithium carbonate production subcategory....

  20. 40 CFR 415.450 - Applicability; description of the lithium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...true Applicability; description of the lithium carbonate production subcategory. 415...CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Lithium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.450 Applicability; description of the lithium carbonate production subcategory....

  1. 40 CFR 415.450 - Applicability; description of the lithium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...false Applicability; description of the lithium carbonate production subcategory. 415...CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Lithium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.450 Applicability; description of the lithium carbonate production subcategory....

  2. 40 CFR 415.450 - Applicability; description of the lithium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...true Applicability; description of the lithium carbonate production subcategory. 415...CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Lithium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.450 Applicability; description of the lithium carbonate production subcategory....

  3. Charcoal and activated carbon at elevated pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Dai, Xiangfeng; Norberg, N. [Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    High quality charcoal has been produced with very high yields of 50% to 60% from macadamia nut and kukui nut shells and of 44% to 47% from Eucalyptus and Leucaena wood in a bench scale unit at elevated pressure on a 2 to 3 hour cycle, compared to commercial practice of 25% to 30% yield on a 7 to 12 day operating cycle. Neither air pollution nor tar is produced by the process. The effects of feedstock pretreatments with metal additives on charcoal yield are evaluated in this paper. Also, the influences of steam and air partial pressure and total pressure on yields of activated carbon from high yield charcoal are presented.

  4. Carbonate and carbon fluctuations in the Eastern Arabian Sea over 140 ka: Implications on productivity changes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guptha, M. V. S.; Naidu, P. Divakar; Haake, Birgit Gaye; Schiebel, Ralf

    2005-07-01

    Biological productivity in the western Arabian Sea was higher during interglacial than glacial times. In the eastern Arabian Sea productivity was higher during the glacials compared to interglacials, which is in sharp contrast to the southwest monsoon intensity variations. To examine temporal changes in productivity in the eastern Arabian Sea over the last 140 ka, oxygen isotopes, calcium carbonate and organic carbon on three cores (SL-1 & 4 and SK 129-CR05) were analyzed. Oxygen isotope records display distinct glacial and interglacial transitions. In the northeastern (Core SL-1) and eastern Arabian Sea (Core SL-4) both calcium carbonate and organic carbon variations show no significant systematic relationship with glacial and interglacials periods. In the southeastern Arabian Sea (Core SK-129-CR05) calcium carbonate shows high and low values during interglacial and glacials, respectively, and temporal changes in organic carbon concentration are significant only during MIS 5. Differential variation of calcium carbonate and organic carbon concentration at the northeastern and southeastern Arabian Sea, and between glacials and interglacials, are attributed to regional differences in sedimentation rates, dilution and preservation, which modify the signal of carbonate and carbon production.

  5. The production of carbon materials by hydrothermal carbonization of cellulose

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Sevilla; A. B. Fuertes

    2009-01-01

    Highly functionalized carbonaceous materials were produced by means of the hydrothermal carbonization of cellulose at temperatures in the 220–250°C range. The formation of this material follows essentially the path of a dehydration process, similar to that previously observed for the hydrothermal transformation of saccharides such as glucose, sucrose or starch. The materials so formed are composed of agglomerates of carbonaceous

  6. REPEATED REDUCTIVE AND OXIDATIVE TREATMENTS ON GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton oxidation and Fenton oxidation preceded by reduction solutions were applied to granular activated carbon (GAC) to chemically regenerate the adsorbent. No adsorbate was present on the GAC so physicochemical effects from chemically aggressive regeneration of the carbon coul...

  7. Unburnt carbon from coal fly ashes as a precursor of activated carbon for nitric oxide removal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Begoña Rubio; M. Teresa Izquierdo; M. Carmen Mayoral; M. Teresa Bona; Jose M. Andres

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the characteristics of an activated carbon obtained from unburnt carbon in coal fly ashes to be used in the removal of NO. Carbon-rich fraction was obtained by mechanical sieving of fly ashes. The mineral matter was removed by conventional HCl and HF demineralization procedure. Activation was carried out with steam at 900°C

  8. Plant diversity increases soil microbial activity and soil carbon storage.

    PubMed

    Lange, Markus; Eisenhauer, Nico; Sierra, Carlos A; Bessler, Holger; Engels, Christoph; Griffiths, Robert I; Mellado-Vázquez, Perla G; Malik, Ashish A; Roy, Jacques; Scheu, Stefan; Steinbeiss, Sibylle; Thomson, Bruce C; Trumbore, Susan E; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Plant diversity strongly influences ecosystem functions and services, such as soil carbon storage. However, the mechanisms underlying the positive plant diversity effects on soil carbon storage are poorly understood. We explored this relationship using long-term data from a grassland biodiversity experiment (The Jena Experiment) and radiocarbon ((14)C) modelling. Here we show that higher plant diversity increases rhizosphere carbon inputs into the microbial community resulting in both increased microbial activity and carbon storage. Increases in soil carbon were related to the enhanced accumulation of recently fixed carbon in high-diversity plots, while plant diversity had less pronounced effects on the decomposition rate of existing carbon. The present study shows that elevated carbon storage at high plant diversity is a direct function of the soil microbial community, indicating that the increase in carbon storage is mainly limited by the integration of new carbon into soil and less by the decomposition of existing soil carbon. PMID:25848862

  9. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

    2005-03-01

    The program was designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size proof-of-concept field test to the commercial design. DOE has been funding Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) development at FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE, formerly Energy Research Corporation) from an early state of development for stationary power plant applications. The current program efforts were focused on technology and system development, and cost reduction, leading to commercial design development and prototype system field trials. FCE, in Danbury, CT, is a world-recognized leader for the development and commercialization of high efficiency fuel cells that can generate clean electricity at power stations, or at distributed locations near the customers such as hospitals, schools, universities, hotels and other commercial and industrial applications. FCE has designed three different fuel cell power plant models (DFC300A, DFC1500 and DFC3000). FCE's power plants are based on its patented DFC{reg_sign} technology, where a hydrocarbon fuel is directly fed to the fuel cell and hydrogen is generated internally. These power plants offer significant advantages compared to the existing power generation technologies--higher fuel efficiency, significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, flexible siting and permitting requirements, scalability and potentially lower operating costs. Also, the exhaust heat by-product can be used for cogeneration applications such as high-pressure steam, district heating and air conditioning. Several sub-MW power plants based on the DFC design are currently operating in Europe, Japan and the US. Several one-megawatt power plant design was verified by operation on natural gas at FCE. This plant is currently installed at a customer site in King County, WA under another US government program and is currently in operation. Because hydrogen is generated directly within the fuel cell module from readily available fuels such as natural gas and waste water treatment gas, DFC power plants are ready today and do not require the creation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Product improvement progress made during the program period in the areas of technology, manufacturing processes, cost reduction and balance-of-plant equipment designs is discussed in this report.

  10. Carbon nano structures: Production and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beig Agha, Rosa

    L'objectif de ce memoire est de preparer et de caracteriser des nanostructures de carbone (CNS -- Carbon Nanostructures, en licence a l'Institut de recherche sur l'hydrogene, Quebec, Canada), un carbone avec un plus grand degre de graphitisation et une meilleure porosite. Le Chapitre 1 est une description generale des PEMFCs (PEMFC -- Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell) et plus particulierement des CNS comme support de catalyseurs, leur synthese et purification. Le Chapitre 2 decrit plus en details la methode de synthese et la purification des CNS, la theorie de formation des nanostructures et les differentes techniques de caracterisation que nous avons utilises telles que la diffraction aux rayons-X (XRD -- X-ray diffraction), la microscopie electronique a transmission (TEM -- transmission electron microscope ), la spectroscopie Raman, les isothermes d'adsorption d'azote a 77 K (analyse BET, t-plot, DFT), l'intrusion au mercure, et l'analyse thermogravimetrique (TGA -- thermogravimetric analysis). Le Chapitre 3 presente les resultats obtenus a chaque etape de la synthese des CNS et avec des echantillons produits a l'aide d'un broyeur de type SPEXRTM (SPEX/CertiPrep 8000D) et d'un broyeur de type planetaire (Fritsch Pulverisette 5). La difference essentielle entre ces deux types de broyeur est la facon avec laquelle les materiaux sont broyes. Le broyeur de type SPEX secoue le creuset contenant les materiaux et des billes d'acier selon 3 axes produisant ainsi des impacts de tres grande energie. Le broyeur planetaire quant a lui fait tourner et deplace le creuset contenant les materiaux et des billes d'acier selon 2 axes (plan). Les materiaux sont donc broyes differemment et l'objectif est de voir si les CNS produits ont les memes structures et proprietes. Lors de nos travaux nous avons ete confrontes a un probleme majeur. Nous n'arrivions pas a reproduire les CNS dont la methode de synthese a originellement ete developpee dans les laboratoires de l'Institut de recherche sur l'hydrogene (IRH). Nos echantillons presentaient toujours une grande quantite de carbure de fer au detriment de la formation de nanostructures de carbone. Apres plusieurs mois de recherche nous avons constate que les metaux de base, soit le fer et le cobalt, etaient contamines. Neanmoins, ces recherches nous ont enseigne beaucoup et les resultats sont presentes aux Appendices I a III. Le carbone de depart est du charbon active commercial (CNS201) qui a ete prealablement chauffe a 1,000°C sous vide pendant 90 minutes pour se debarrasser de toute humidite et autres impuretes. En premiere etape, dans un creuset d'acier durci du CNS201 pretraite fut melange a une certaine quantite de Fe et de Co (99.9 % purs). Des proportions typiques sont 50 pd. %, 44 pd. %, et 6 pd. % pour le C, le Fe, et le Co respectivement. Pour les echantillons prepares avec le broyeur SPEX, trois a six billes en acier durci furent utilisees pour le broyage, de masse relative echantillon/poudre de 35 a 1. Pour les echantillons prepares avec le broyeur planetaire, trente-six billes en acier durci furent utilisees pour le broyage, de masse relative echantillon/poudre de 10 a 1. L'hydrogene fut alors introduit dans le creuset pour les deux types de broyeur a une pression de 1.4 MPa, et l'echantillon fut broye pendant 12 h pour le SPEX et 24 h pour le planetaire. Le broyeur SPEX a un rendement de transfert d'energie mecanique plus grand qu'un broyeur planetaire, mais il a le desavantage de contaminer davantage l'echantillon en Fe par attrition. Cependant, ceci peut etre neglige vu que le Fe etait un des catalyseurs metalliques ajoutes au creuset. En deuxieme etape, l'echantillon broye est transfere sous gaz inerte (argon) dans un tube en quartz, qui est alors chauffe a 700°C pendant 90 minutes. Des mesures de patrons de diffraction a rayons-X sur poudre furent faites pour caracteriser les changements structurels des CNS lors des etapes de synthese. Ces mesures furent prises avec un diffractometre Bruker D8 FOCUS utilisant le rayonnement Cu Ka (lambda = 1.54054 A) et une geometrie T

  11. Effects of globalisation on carbon footprints of products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. T. Herrmann; M. Z. Hauschild

    2009-01-01

    Outsourcing of production from the industrialised countries to the newly industrialised economies holds the potential to increase wealth in both places, but what are the environmental costs of the globalised manufacturing systems? This paper looks into the changes in carbon footprint of manufactured products when production is moved from United Kingdom or Denmark to China and uses environmental input–output analysis

  12. Center for By-Products Utilization CARBONATION: AN EFFICIENT

    E-print Network

    Saldin, Dilano

    and water Calcium silicate hydrate Calcite, silica gel, and water Calcium aluminate hydrate Calcite, alumina Products of Portland Cement Hydrates Cement Hydration Carbonation Products Calcium hydroxide Calcite and calcium monosulfoaluminate Gypsum, alumina gel, and water #12;Center for By-Products Utilization

  13. Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation?

    E-print Network

    Pace, Michael L.

    COMMENTARY Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation? Gary M. Lovett,* Jonathan J. Cole, and Michael L. Pace Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York 12545, USA ABSTRACT Net ecosystem production (NEP), defined as the difference between gross primary production

  14. Qualitative determination of carbon black in food products.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Bermudez, E; Belai, N; Harp, B Petigara; Yakes, B J; Barrows, J N

    2012-01-01

    Carbon black (C.I. 77266) is an insoluble pigment produced by the partial combustion of hydrocarbons. The pigment is known by several synonyms, including vegetable carbon, lamp black and carbon ash, that correspond to the raw materials and methods used for its production. Vegetable carbon (E153) is permitted for use in colouring food in the European Union. The US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) has not approved the use of any type of carbon black for colouring food, although the agency batch certifies the pigment as D&C Black No. 2 for use in colouring certain cosmetics. Since carbon black (as vegetable carbon) may be present in food products offered for import into the United States, the USFDA's district laboratories need a qualitative analytical method for determining its presence. We have developed an extraction method for this purpose. A sample is broken down and dissolved with nitric acid. The resulting solution is filtered and treated with hydrochloric acid to dissolve any black iron oxide also present as a colour additive. A black residue remaining on the filter paper indicates the presence of carbon black in the food. We confirmed the presence of carbon black in residues from several standards and food products using Raman spectroscopy. The limit of detection for this method is 0.0001%. PMID:22035229

  15. Carbon monoxide affects electrical and contractile activity of rat myocardium

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Carbon monoxide (CO) is a toxic gas, which also acts in the organism as a neurotransmitter. It is generated as a by-product of heme breakdown catalyzed by heme oxygenase. We have investigated changes in electrical and contractile activity of isolated rat atrial and ventricular myocardium preparations under the influence of CO. Methods Standard microelectrode technique was used for intracellular registration of electrical activity in isolated preparations of atrial and ventricular myocardium. Contractions of atrial myocardial stripes were registered via force transducer. Results CO (10-4 - 10-3 M) caused prominent decrease of action potential duration (APD) in working atrial myocardium as well as significant acceleration of sinus rhythm. In addition CO reduced force of contractions and other parameters of contractile activity. Inhibitor of heme oxygenase zinc protoporphyrin IX exerts opposite effects: prolongation of action potential, reduction of sinus rhythm rate and enhancement of contractile function. Therefore, endogenous CO, which may be generated in the heart due to the presence of active heme oxygenase, is likely to exert the same effects as exogenous CO applied to the perfusing medium. In ventricular myocardium preparations exogenous CO also induced shortening of action potential, while zinc protoporphyrin IX produced the opposite effect. Conclusions Thus, endogenous or exogenous carbon monoxide may act as an important regulator of electrical and contractile cardiac activity. PMID:21676214

  16. Production and dissolution rates of earthworm-secreted calcium carbonate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. C. Lambkin; K. H. Gwilliam; C. Layton; M. G. Canti; T. G. Piearce; M. E. Hodson

    Earthworms secrete granules of calcium carbonate. These are potentially important in soil biogeochemical cycles and are routinely recorded in archaeological studies of Quaternary soils. Production rates of calcium carbonate granules by the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris L. were determined over 27days in a range of soils with differing chemical properties (pH, organic matter content, water holding capacity, bulk composition, cation exchange

  17. Carbonate thermochemical cycle for the production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Jack L (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Dole, Leslie R (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Ferrada, Juan J (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Forsberg, Charles W (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Haire, Marvin J (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Hunt, Rodney D (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Lewis Jr., Benjamin E (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Wymer, Raymond G (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-02-23

    The present invention is directed to a thermochemical method for the production of hydrogen from water. The method includes reacting a multi-valent metal oxide, water and a carbonate to produce an alkali metal-multi-valent metal oxide compound, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen.

  18. Accounting for forest carbon pool dynamics in product carbon footprints: Challenges and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, Joshua P., E-mail: jpnewell@umich.edu [School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States); Vos, Robert O., E-mail: vos@usc.edu [Spatial Sciences Institute, University of Southern California (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Modification and loss of forests due to natural and anthropogenic disturbance contribute an estimated 20% of annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide. Although forest carbon pool modeling rarely suggests a 'carbon neutral' flux profile, the life cycle assessment community and associated product carbon footprint protocols have struggled to account for the GHG emissions associated with forestry, specifically, and land use generally. Principally, this is due to underdeveloped linkages between life cycle inventory (LCI) modeling for wood and forest carbon modeling for a full range of forest types and harvest practices, as well as a lack of transparency in globalized forest supply chains. In this paper, through a comparative study of U.S. and Chinese coated freesheet paper, we develop the initial foundations for a methodology that rescales IPCC methods from the national to the product level, with reference to the approaches in three international product carbon footprint protocols. Due to differences in geographic origin of the wood fiber, the results for two scenarios are highly divergent. This suggests that both wood LCI models and the protocols need further development to capture the range of spatial and temporal dimensions for supply chains (and the associated land use change and modification) for specific product systems. The paper concludes by outlining opportunities to measure and reduce uncertainty in accounting for net emissions of biogenic carbon from forestland, where timber is harvested for consumer products. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Typical life cycle assessment practice for consumer products often excludes significant land use change emissions when estimating carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The article provides a methodology to rescale IPCC guidelines for product-level carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life cycle inventories and product carbon footprint protocols need more comprehensive land use-related accounting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interdisciplinary collaboration linking the LCA and forest carbon modeling communities is necessary.

  19. The preparation of active carbons from coal by chemical and physical activation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Ahmadpour; D. D. Do

    1996-01-01

    A series of activated carbons was prepared from bituminous coal by chemical activation with potassium hydroxide and zinc chloride and also by physical activation with carbon dioxide. The effect of process variables such as carbonization time, temperature, particle size, chemical agents, method of mixing and impregnation ratio in the chemical activation process was studied in order to optimize those preparation

  20. Investigations about the quantitative changes of carbon dioxide production in humans. Report 2: Carbon dioxide production during fever and its relationship with heat production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebermeister, C.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations are cited and explained for carbon dioxide production during fever and its relationship with heat production. The general topics of discussion are: (1) carbon dioxide production for alternating fever attacks; (2) heat balance during the perspiration phase; (3) heat balance during the chill phase; (4) the theory of fever; and (5) chill phase for other fever attacks.

  1. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

    2002-02-01

    The carbonate fuel cell promises highly efficient, cost-effective and environmentally superior power generation from pipeline natural gas, coal gas, biogas, and other gaseous and liquid fuels. FuelCell Energy, Inc. has been engaged in the development of this unique technology, focusing on the development of the Direct Fuel Cell (DFC{reg_sign}). The DFC{reg_sign} design incorporates the unique internal reforming feature which allows utilization of a hydrocarbon fuel directly in the fuel cell without requiring any external reforming reactor and associated heat exchange equipment. This approach upgrades waste heat to chemical energy and thereby contributes to a higher overall conversion efficiency of fuel energy to electricity with low levels of environmental emissions. Among the internal reforming options, FuelCell Energy has selected the Indirect Internal Reforming (IIR)--Direct Internal Reforming (DIR) combination as its baseline design. The IIR-DIR combination allows reforming control (and thus cooling) over the entire cell area. This results in uniform cell temperature. In the IIR-DIR stack, a reforming unit (RU) is placed in between a group of fuel cells. The hydrocarbon fuel is first fed into the RU where it is reformed partially to hydrogen and carbon monoxide fuel using heat produced by the fuel cell electrochemical reactions. The reformed gases are then fed to the DIR chamber, where the residual fuel is reformed simultaneously with the electrochemical fuel cell reactions. FuelCell Energy plans to offer commercial DFC power plants in various sizes, focusing on the subMW as well as the MW-scale units. The plan is to offer standardized, packaged DFC power plants operating on natural gas or other hydrocarbon-containing fuels for commercial sale. The power plant design will include a diesel fuel processing option to allow dual fuel applications. These power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed power generation, industrial cogeneration, marine applications and uninterrupted power for military bases. FuelCell Energy operated a 1.8 MW plant at a utility site in 1996-97, the largest fuel cell power plant ever operated in North America. This proof-of-concept power plant demonstrated high efficiency, low emissions, reactive power control, and unattended operation capabilities. Drawing on the manufacture, field test, and post-test experience of the full-size power plant; FuelCell Energy launched the Product Design Improvement (PDI) program sponsored by government and the private-sector cost-share. The PDI efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction, commercial design development, and prototype system field trials. The program was initiated in December 1994. Year 2000 program accomplishments are discussed in this report.

  2. Metal salen catalyzed production of polytrimethylene carbonate

    E-print Network

    Ganguly, Poulomi

    2009-06-02

    polycarbonate derived from trimethylene carbonate, (TMC, 1, 3-dioxan-2-one), has been studied extensively for its potential use as a biodegradable polymer in biomedical and pharmaceutical systems. Its important applications include sutures, drug delivery systems...

  3. Characteristic and mercury adsorption of activated carbon produced by CO2 of chicken waste.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yaji; Jin, Baosheng; Zhong, Zhaoping; Zhong, Wenqi; Xiao, Rui

    2008-01-01

    Preparation of activated carbon from chicken waste is a promising way to produce a useful adsorbent for Hg removal. A three-stage activation process (drying at 200 degrees C, pyrolysis in N2 atmosphere, followed by CO2 activation) was used for the production of activated samples. The effects of carbonization temperature (400-600 degrees C), activation temperature (700-900 degrees C), and activation time (1-2.5 h) on the physicochemical properties (weight-loss and BET surface) of the prepared carbon were investigated. Adsorptive removal of mercury from real flue gas onto activated carbon has been studied. The activated carbon from chicken waste has the same mercury capacity as commercial activated carbon (Darco LH) (Hg(v): 38.7% vs. 53.5%, Hg(0): 50.5% vs. 68.8%), although its surface area is around 10 times smaller, 89.5 m2/g vs. 862 m2/g. The low cost activated carbon can be produced from chicken waste, and the procedure is suitable. PMID:18595395

  4. Nitrogen doping of activated carbon loading Fe 2 O 3 and activity in carbon-nitric oxide reaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xian-kai Wan; Xue-quan Zou; Hui-xiang Shi; Da-hui Wang

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen doping of activated carbon loading Fe2O3 was performed by annealing in ammonia, and the activity of the modified carbon for NO reduction was studied in the presence\\u000a of oxygen. Results show that Fe2O3 enhances the amount of surface oxygen complexes and facilitates nitrogen incorporation in the carbon, especially in the form\\u000a of pyridinic nitrogen. The modified carbon shows excellent

  5. Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide on Activated Carbons Impregnated with Sodium Hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Viviane [ORNL; Baskova, Svetlana [ORNL; Armstrong, Timothy R. [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Two activated carbons of different origin were impregnated with the solution of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) of various concentrations up to 10 wt %, and the effect of impregnation on the catalytic performance of the carbons was evaluated. The catalytic activity was analyzed in terms of the capacity of carbons for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) conversion and removal from hydrogen-rich fuel streams and the emission times of H2S and the products of its oxidation [e.g., sulfur dioxide (SO2) and carbonyl sulfide (COS)]. The results of impregnation showed a significant improvement in the catalytic activity of both carbons proportional to the amount of NaOH introduced. NaOH introduces hydroxyl groups (OH-) on the surface of the activated carbon that increase its surface reactivity and its interaction with sulfur-containing compounds.

  6. Oxidative degradation of trichloroethylene adsorbed on active carbons: Use of microwave energy

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, R.; Nandi, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds (CHCl), such as chlorinated alkanes/alkenes, benzene and biphenyl etc, represent an important fraction of the industrial hazardous wastes produced. Trichloroethylene (TCE) can be removed from waste streams by adsorption on active carbons. The primary objective of the present work was to study the detoxification in air-stream of TCE adsorbed on different types of active carbons using in situ microwave heating. A secondary objective was to examine the regeneration of used carbons from the effects of repeated cyclic operations (adsorption- detoxification). The experimental study has shown that trichloroethylene adsorbed on active carbon can be oxidatively degradated in presence of microwave radiation. Energy can be transferred efficiently to the reaction sites without losing heat to the surrounding vessel. One of the decomposition product of trichloroethylene is free chlorine which is held very strongly on active carbon. Hydrochloric acid on the other hand seems to be less strongly held and appears in large concentration in the exit gas. Production of free chlorine can be avoided by using chlorohydrocarbon mixed with sufficient internal hydrogen. This is also expected to minimize the problem of carbon regeneration encountered in this study. The results obtained from studies on the oxidative degradation of TCE under microwave radiation are promising in a number of respects: (1) the detoxification of TCE adsorbed on active carbon can be conducted at moderate (<400{degree}C) temperatures, and (2) the used carbon bed can be regenerated. A patent on the process has been issued. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. CRADA Carbon Sequestration in Soils and Commercial Products

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, G.K.

    2002-01-31

    ORNL, through The Consortium for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE), collaborated with The Village Botanica, Inc. (VB) on a project investigating carbon sequestration in soils and commercial products from a new sustainable crop developed from perennial Hibiscus spp. Over 500 pre-treated samples were analyzed for soil carbon content. ORNL helped design a sampling scheme for soils during the planting phase of the project. Samples were collected and prepared by VB and analyzed for carbon content by ORNL. The project did not progress to a Phase II proposal because VB declined to prepare the required proposal.

  8. CYANIDE REMOVAL FROM REFINERY WASTEWATER USING POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the removal of low level cyanide in petroleum refinery wastewater by the addition of powdered activated carbon and cupric chloride to an activated sludge unit. The activated carbon and cupric chloride act as a catalyst in the oxidatio...

  9. Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Zondlo, J.; Stiller, A.

    1996-10-25

    This quarterly report covers activities during the period from July 1, 1996 through September 30, 1996 on the development of carbon products precursor materials from coal. The first year of the project ended in February, 1996; however, the WVU research effort continued through August 14, 1997 on a no-cost extension of the original contract. PETC chose to exercise the option for continuation of the projects and $100,000 became available on August 9, 1996. The objective for year two is to focus on development of those carbon products from coal-based solvent extract precursors which have the greatest possibility for commercial success.

  10. Role of activated carbon pellets in carbon dioxide removal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. C Sarkar; A Bose

    1997-01-01

    The removal of carbon dioxide from gas\\/air streams is more often becoming necessary in many industries for different purposes. In cryogenic air separation plant, air has to be free from carbon dioxide before its liquefaction otherwise blockage due to freezing of heat exchange equipment would result. Enrichment of methane in biogas to have fuel of higher calorific value can be

  11. Influence of Algal Photosynthesis on Biofilm Bacterial Production and Associated Glucosidase and Xylosidase Activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. M. Espeland; S. N. Francoeur; R. G. Wetzel

    2001-01-01

    Natural photosynthetic biofilms were incubated under light (100 mmol m?2 s?1) and dark conditions to elucidate the impact of photosynthesis on bacterial production, abundance, biovolume, biomass, and enzyme activities over 24 h. Use of organic carbon-free media limited carbon sources to algal photosynthesis and possibly the polysaccharides of the biofilm matrix. Bacterial production of biofilm communities was significantly higher in

  12. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Frederick S [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    Coal-derived synthesis gas is a potential major source of hydrogen for fuel cells. Oxygen-blown coal gasification is an efficient approach to achieving the goal of producing hydrogen from coal, but a cost-effective means of enriching O2 concentration in air is required. A key objective of this project is to assess the utility of a system that exploits porous carbon materials and electrical swing adsorption to produce an O2-enriched air stream for coal gasification. As a complement to O2 and N2 adsorption measurements, CO2 was used as a more sensitive probe molecule for the characterization of molecular sieving effects. To further enhance the potential of activated carbon composite materials for air separation, work was implemented on incorporating a novel twist into the system; namely the addition of a magnetic field to influence O2 adsorption, which is accompanied by a transition between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic states. The preliminary findings in this respect are discussed.

  13. Active Carbon and Oxygen Shell Burning Hydrodynamics

    E-print Network

    Casey Meakin; David Arnett

    2006-01-16

    We have simulated 2.5$\\times10^3$ s of the late evolution of a $23 \\rm M_\\odot$ star with full hydrodynamic behavior. We present the first simulations of a multiple-shell burning epoch, including the concurrent evolution and interaction of an oxygen and carbon burning shell. In addition, we have evolved a 3D model of the oxygen burning shell to sufficiently long times (300 s) to begin to assess the adequacy of the 2D approximation. We summarize striking new results: (1) strong interactions occur between active carbon and oxygen burning shells, (2) hydrodynamic wave motions in nonconvective regions, generated at the convective-radiative boundaries, are energetically important in both 2D and 3D with important consequences for compositional mixing, and (3) a spectrum of mixed p- and g-modes are unambiguously identified with corresponding adiabatic waves in these computational domains. We find that 2D convective motions are exaggerated relative to 3D because of vortex instability in 3D. We discuss the implications for supernova progenitor evolution and symmetry breaking in core collapse.

  14. 75 FR 48644 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Partial Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ...Huaiyushan Activated Carbon Group; Huatai Activated Carbon; Huaxin Active Carbon Plant; Huzhou Zhonglin Activated Carbon; Inner Mongolia Taixi Coal Chemical Industry Limited Company; Itigi Corp. Ltd.; J&D Activated Carbon Filter Co., Ltd.; Jiangle...

  15. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330...Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330...monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The...

  16. Properties of activated carbon controlling 2-Methylisoborneol adsorption

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Pendleton; S. H. Wong; R. Schumann; G. Levay; R. Denoyel; J. Rouquero

    1997-01-01

    2-Methylisoborneol (MIB) is one of the most common taste and odour molecules found in water supplies. The use of activated carbons is known to be effective in removing MIB from water. In this work, it was found that the selection of an appropriate carbon for removing MIB from water depends on the carbon surface hydrophilicity, which can be determined via

  17. Optically active single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiaobin; Komatsu, Naoki; Bhattacharya, Sumanta; Shimawaki, Takanori; Aonuma, Shuji; Kimura, Takahide; Osuka, Atsuhiro

    2007-06-01

    The optical, electrical and mechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are largely determined by their structures, and bulk availability of uniform materials is vital for extending their technological applications. Since they were first prepared, much effort has been directed toward selective synthesis and separation of SWNTs with specific structures. As-prepared samples of chiral SWNTs contain equal amounts of left- and right-handed helical structures, but little attention has been paid to the separation of these non-superimposable mirror image forms, known as optical isomers. Here, we show that optically active SWNT samples can be obtained by preferentially extracting either right- or left-handed SWNTs from a commercial sample. Chiral `gable-type' diporphyrin molecules bind with different affinities to the left- and right-handed helical nanotube isomers to form complexes with unequal stabilities that can be readily separated. Significantly, the diporphyrins can be liberated from the complexes afterwards, to provide optically enriched SWNTs.

  18. Thermal conversion of municipal solid waste via hydrothermal carbonization: Comparison of carbonization products to products from current waste management techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Xiaowei; Jordan, Beth [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Berge, Nicole D., E-mail: berge@cec.sc.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HTC converts wastes into value-added resources. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization integrates majority of carbon into solid-phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization results in a hydrochar with high energy density. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using hydrochar as an energy source may be beneficial. - Abstract: Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process that may be a viable means for managing solid waste streams while minimizing greenhouse gas production and producing residual material with intrinsic value. HTC is a wet, relatively low temperature (180-350 Degree-Sign C) thermal conversion process that has been shown to convert biomass to a carbonaceous residue referred to as hydrochar. Results from batch experiments indicate HTC of representative waste materials is feasible, and results in the majority of carbon (45-75% of the initially present carbon) remaining within the hydrochar. Gas production during the batch experiments suggests that longer reaction periods may be desirable to maximize the production of energy-favorable products. If using the hydrochar for applications in which the carbon will remain stored, results suggest that the gaseous products from HTC result in fewer g CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions than the gases associated with landfilling, composting, and incineration. When considering the use of hydrochar as a solid fuel, more energy can be derived from the hydrochar than from the gases resulting from waste degradation during landfilling and anaerobic digestion, and from incineration of food waste. Carbon emissions resulting from the use of the hydrochar as a fuel source are smaller than those associated with incineration, suggesting HTC may serve as an environmentally beneficial alternative to incineration. The type and extent of environmental benefits derived from HTC will be dependent on hydrochar use/the purpose for HTC (e.g., energy generation or carbon storage).

  19. Competitive Carbon-Sulfur vs Carbon-Carbon Bond Activation of 2-Cyanothiophene with [Ni(dippe)H]2

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    Competitive Carbon-Sulfur vs Carbon-Carbon Bond Activation of 2-Cyanothiophene with [Ni(dippe)H]2: The processes of C-C and C-S bond cleavage have been studied with the homogeneous organometallic compound [Ni(dippe)H]2 (1). When 1 is reacted with 2-cyanothiophene at room temperature, cleavage of the nitrile

  20. Oil Palm Biomass as a Precursor of Activated Carbons-A Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohd Rafatullah; Tanweer Ahmad; Arniza Ghazali; Othman Sulaiman; Mohammed Danish; Rokiah Hashim

    2012-01-01

    Commercial activated carbon has been a preferred adsorbent for the removal of various pollutants, its widespread use is restricted due to its relatively high costs which led to the researches on the possible alternative non-conventional and low cost adsorbents. The use of agricultural products and by-products for instance, has been widely investigated as a replacement for the current costly methods

  1. Carbon13 and Carbon14 Abundances in Alaskan Aquatic Organisms: Delayed Production from Peat in Arctic Food Webs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald M. Schell

    1983-01-01

    Inputs of terrestrial peat carbon to the nearshore Alaskan Beaufort Sea from erosion and fluvial transport are of the same magnitude as in situ primary production within 10 kilometers of shore. Nevertheless, carbon-13\\/carbon-12 ratios and carbon-14 abundances in marine organisms show that only small amounts of the terrestrial carbon are transferred beyond the microbial level. Freshwater organisms, however, are heavily

  2. Active carbon filter health condition detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jingjing Bao; Victor Giurgiutiu; Glenn O. Rubel; Gregory W. Peterson; Thomas M. Ball

    2011-01-01

    The impregnated active carbon used in air purification systems degrades over time due to exposure to contamination and mechanical effects (packing, settling, flow channeling, etc.). A novel approach is proposed to detect contamination in active carbon filters by combining the electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (ECIS). ECIS is currently being used to evaluate active carbon filtration material;

  3. Production of single-walled carbon nanotube grids

    DOEpatents

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-12-03

    A method of forming a nanotube grid includes placing a plurality of catalyst nanoparticles on a grid framework, contacting the catalyst nanoparticles with a gas mixture that includes hydrogen and a carbon source in a reaction chamber, forming an activated gas from the gas mixture, heating the grid framework and activated gas, and controlling a growth time to generate a single-wall carbon nanotube array radially about the grid framework. A filter membrane may be produced by this method.

  4. Towards Carbon-free Metals Production by Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    E-print Network

    Sadoway, Donald Robert

    Towards Carbon-free Metals Production by Molten Oxide Electrolysis Deepak Khetpal, Andrew Ducret by-products problems with electrolytic technologies: Al electrolysis makes CO2 (½ kg C / kg Al) Mg electrolysis makes Cl2 C & F react to make CF4 & C2F6 C & Cl in presence of O dioxins? furans? #12;Sadoway, MIT

  5. In situ Diagnostics During Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    1999-01-01

    The preliminary results of spectral analysis of the reaction zone during the carbon nanotube production by laser ablation method indicate synergetic dependence on dual laser setup. The emission spectra recorded from different regions of the laser ablated plume at different delay times from the laser pulses are used to map the temperatures of C2 and C3. These are compared with Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) spectra also obtained during production to model the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes. Experiments conducted to correlate the spectral features with nanotube yields as a function of different production parameters will be discussed.

  6. [Effects of different fertilizer application on soil active organic carbon].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Gui-Long; Ji, Yan-Yan; Li, Gang; Chang, Hong; Yang, Dian-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The variation characteristics of the content and components of soil active organic carbon under different fertilizer application were investigated in samples of calcareous fluvo-aquic soil from a field experiment growing winter wheat and summer maize in rotation in the North China Plain. The results showed that RF (recommended fertilization), CF (conventional fertilization) and NPK (mineral fertilizer alone) significantly increased the content of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon by 24.92-38.63 mg x kg(-1) and 0.94-0.58 mg x kg(-1) respectively compared to CK (unfertilized control). The soil dissolved organic carbon content under OM (organic manure) increased greater than those under NPK and single fertilization, soil easily oxidized organic carbon content under OM and NPK increased greater than that under single chemical fertilization. OM and NPK showed no significant role in promoting the soil microbial biomass carbon, but combined application of OM and NPK significantly increased the soil microbial biomass carbon content by 36.06% and 20.69%, respectively. Soil easily oxidized organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon accounted for 8.41% - 14.83%, 0.47% - 0.70% and 0.89% - 1.20% of the total organic carbon (TOC), respectively. According to the results, the fertilizer application significantly increased the proportion of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon, but there was no significant difference in the increasing extent of dissolved organic carbon. The RF and CF increased the proportion of soil easily oxidized organic carbon greater than OM or NPK, and significantly increased the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. OM or RF had no significant effect on the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. Therefore, in the field experiment, appropriate application of organic manure and chemical fertilizers played an important role for the increase of soil active organic carbon content and the effective control of its key components. PMID:23487951

  7. JPL Activated Carbon Treatment System (ACTS) for sewage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An Activated Carbon Treatment System (ACTS) was developed for sewage treatment and is being applied to a one-million gallon per day sewage treatment pilot plant in Orange County California. Activities reported include pyrolysis and activation of carbon-sewage sludge, and activated carbon treatment of sewage to meet ocean discharge standards. The ACTS Sewage treatment operations include carbon-sewage treatment, primary and secondary clarifiers, gravity (multi-media) filter, filter press dewatering, flash drying of carbon-sewage filter cake, and sludge pyrolysis and activation. Tests were conducted on a laboratory scale, 10,000 gallon per day demonstration plant and pilot test equipment. Preliminary economic studies are favorable to the ACTS process relative to activated sludge treatment for a 175,000,000 gallon per day sewage treatment plant.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Elliot B. Kennel; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Madhavi Nallani-Chakravartula; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2006-03-27

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, efforts have focused on the development of continuous processes for hydrogenation as well as continuous production of carbon foam and coke.

  9. Thermal conversion of municipal solid waste via hydrothermal carbonization: comparison of carbonization products to products from current waste management techniques.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaowei; Jordan, Beth; Berge, Nicole D

    2012-07-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process that may be a viable means for managing solid waste streams while minimizing greenhouse gas production and producing residual material with intrinsic value. HTC is a wet, relatively low temperature (180-350 °C) thermal conversion process that has been shown to convert biomass to a carbonaceous residue referred to as hydrochar. Results from batch experiments indicate HTC of representative waste materials is feasible, and results in the majority of carbon (45-75% of the initially present carbon) remaining within the hydrochar. Gas production during the batch experiments suggests that longer reaction periods may be desirable to maximize the production of energy-favorable products. If using the hydrochar for applications in which the carbon will remain stored, results suggest that the gaseous products from HTC result in fewer g CO(2)-equivalent emissions than the gases associated with landfilling, composting, and incineration. When considering the use of hydrochar as a solid fuel, more energy can be derived from the hydrochar than from the gases resulting from waste degradation during landfilling and anaerobic digestion, and from incineration of food waste. Carbon emissions resulting from the use of the hydrochar as a fuel source are smaller than those associated with incineration, suggesting HTC may serve as an environmentally beneficial alternative to incineration. The type and extent of environmental benefits derived from HTC will be dependent on hydrochar use/the purpose for HTC (e.g., energy generation or carbon storage). PMID:22516099

  10. Kinetics of phenanthrene desorption from activated carbons to water.

    PubMed

    Morelis, Simone; van Noort, Paul C M

    2008-05-01

    We determined the kinetics of phenanthrene desorption from three activated carbons to water using Tenax beads as an infinite sink for organic compounds in water. Desorption kinetic data very well fitted a biphasic kinetic model based on the presence of two different adsorption sites, viz. low-energy sites and high-energy sites. Rate constants for desorption to water from these two types of sites in the three activated carbons did not reveal a relation with activated carbon grain size. These rate constants were comparable to those for desorption of various organic compounds from hard carbon in various sediments. PMID:18321560

  11. Net carbon flux in organic and conventional olive production systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeid Mohamad, Ramez; Verrastro, Vincenzo; Bitar, Lina Al; Roma, Rocco; Moretti, Michele; Chami, Ziad Al

    2014-05-01

    Agricultural systems are considered as one of the most relevant sources of atmospheric carbon. However, agriculture has the potentiality to mitigate carbon dioxide mainly through soil carbon sequestration. Some agricultural practices, particularly fertilization and soil management, can play a dual role in the agricultural systems regarding the carbon cycle contributing to the emissions and to the sequestration process in the soil. Good soil and input managements affect positively Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) changes and consequently the carbon cycle. The present study aimed at comparing the carbon footprint of organic and conventional olive systems and to link it to the efficiency of both systems on carbon sequestration by calculating the net carbon flux. Data were collected at farm level through a specific and detailed questionnaire based on one hectare as a functional unit and a system boundary limited to olive production. Using LCA databases particularly ecoinvent one, IPCC GWP 100a impact assessment method was used to calculate carbon emissions from agricultural practices of both systems. Soil organic carbon has been measured, at 0-30 cm depth, based on soil analyses done at the IAMB laboratory and based on reference value of SOC, the annual change of SOC has been calculated. Substracting sequestrated carbon in the soil from the emitted on resulted in net carbon flux calculation. Results showed higher environmental impact of the organic system on Global Warming Potential (1.07 t CO2 eq. yr-1) comparing to 0.76 t CO2 eq. yr-1 in the conventional system due to the higher GHG emissions caused by manure fertilizers compared to the use of synthetic foliar fertilizers in the conventional system. However, manure was the main reason behind the higher SOC content and sequestration in the organic system. As a resultant, the organic system showed higher net carbon flux (-1.7 t C ha-1 yr-1 than -0.52 t C ha-1 yr-1 in the conventional system reflecting higher efficiency as a sink for atmospheric CO2 (the negative value of Net C flux indicates that a system is a net sink for atmospheric CO2). In conclusion, this study illustrates the importance of including soil carbon sequestration associated with CO2 emissions in the evaluation process between alternatives of agricultural systems. Thus, organic olive system offers an opportunity to increase carbon sequestration compared to the conventional one although it causes higher C emissions from manure fertilization. Keywords: Net carbon flux, GHG, organic, olive, soil organic carbon

  12. Evaluation of NOAA Carbon Tracker Global Carbon Dioxide Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, R. K.; Deepthi, E. N.; Dadhwal, V. K.; Rao, K. H.; Dutt, C. B. S.

    2014-11-01

    Inter-comparison between National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Carbon Tracker (NOAACT) CO2 with satellite observations were carried out in this study. The satellite observations used here are mid troposphere CO2 based on Atmosphere Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on board NASA's Aqua and lower troposphere CO2 based on Greenhouse-gas Observing Satellite (GOSAT) of Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). There exists good agreement between the seasonal cycles as estimated by NOAACT and Satellite observations. The mid troposphere CO2 exhibits distinct annual cycle in the northern hemisphere with positive detrended value during January-June and negative values during July-December. In the southern hemisphere, the annual cycle is less prominent and opposite phase with respect to the northern hemisphere. The lower tropospheric CO2 in both the hemispheres exhibits mixed signature of annual and semi-annual cycle. The amplitudes of the variability are significantly larger in the northern hemisphere than the southern hemisphere. The inter-annual variability of annual growth rates from the NOAACT is comparable with satellite observations however NOAACT could not resolved the spatial patterns of long-term growth rate as observed in the satellite observations.

  13. Heterogeneous mercury reaction chemistry on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Jennifer; Sasmaz, Erdem; Kirchofer, Abby; Lee, Sang-Sup

    2011-04-01

    Experimental and theory-based investigations have been carried out on the oxidation and adsorption mechanism of mercury (Hg) on brominated activated carbon (AC). Air containing parts per billion concentrations of Hg was passed over a packed-bed reactor with varying sorbent materials at 140 and 30 degrees C. Through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy surface characterization studies it was found that Hg adsorption is primarily associated with bromine (Br) on the surface, but that it may be possible for surface-bound oxygen (O) to play a role in determining the stability of adsorbed Hg. In addition to surface characterization experiments, the interaction of Hg with brominated AC was studied using plane-wave density functional theory. Various configurations of hydrogen, O, Br, and Hg on the zigzag edge sites of graphene were investigated, and although Hg-Br complexes were found to be stable on the surface, the most stable configurations found were those with Hg adjacent to O. The Hg-carbon (C) bond length ranged from 2.26 to 2.34 A and is approximately 0.1 A shorter when O is a nearest-neighbor atom rather than a next-nearest neighbor, resulting in increased stability of the given configuration and overall tighter Hg-C binding. Through a density of states analysis, Hg was found to gain electron density in the six p-states after adsorption and was found to donate electron density from the five s-states, thereby leading to an oxidized surface-bound Hg complex. PMID:21516937

  14. Analysis of pressure drops in pleated activated carbon cloth filters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert Subrenat; J. N. Baleo; Pierre Le Cloirec

    2000-01-01

    Activated carbon cloths show interesting properties for the treatment of air that is loaded with volatile organic compounds. The industrial implementation of these new adsorbent materials requires the design of new reactors. Cylindrical pleated filters made from activated carbon cloths and polypropylene layers are studied using a laboratory pilot unit. Experimental pressure drops are measured as a function of the

  15. Acoustical Evaluation of Carbonized and Activated Cotton Nonwovens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The process of manufacturing a carbonized and activated nonwoven made by cotton fiber was investigated in this paper. The study was focused on the acoustic application and nonwoven composites with cotton nonwoven as a base layer and glass fiber nonwoven, cotton nonwoven, and carbonized and activated...

  16. Carbon source regulation of antibiotic production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sergio Sánchez; Adán Chávez; Angela Forero; Yolanda García-Huante; Alba Romero; Mauricio Sánchez; Diana Rocha; Brenda Sánchez; Mariana Ávalos; Silvia Guzmán-Trampe; Romina Rodríguez-Sanoja; Elizabeth Langley; Beatriz Ruiz

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotics are low-molecular-mass products of secondary metabolism, nonessential for the growth of producing organisms, but very important for human health. They have unusual structures and are most often formed during the late growth phase of the producing microorganisms. Their production arises from intracellular intermediates, which are condensed into more complex structures through defined biochemical pathways. Their synthesis can be influenced

  17. FOREST HARVESTS AND WOOD PRODUCTS: SOURCES AND SINKS OF ATMOSPHERIC CARBON DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in the net carbon(c)sink-source balance related to a country's forest harvesting and use of wood products is an important component in making country-level inventories of greenhouse gas emissions,a current activity within many signatory nations to the UN Framework Convent...

  18. The adsorption of sympathomimetic agents by activated carbon hemoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Horres, C R; Hill, J B; Ellis, F W

    1976-01-01

    Sympathomimetic agents with mixed and pure alpha and beta adrenergic activity are adsorbed by coconut shell activated carbon from blood, sufficiently rapidly to markedly reduce the activity of these agents. The results of this study suggest that the site of injection of sympathomimetic agents being considered for correcting hypotension during activated carbon hemoperfusion be selected to permit systemic mixing before circulation into the adsorption device. PMID:951861

  19. The effect of carbonization heating rate on charcoal and active carbon yields

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, C.E.; Purdy, K.R.; Dubayeh, S.A.; Kerr, C.P.; Garr, T.D. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookville, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The thermal decomposition of white oak chips was investigated by pyrolyzing 1-k samples at atmospheric pressure in an electrically-heated batch reactor using five carbonization heating rates from 0.98 to 9.44{degrees}C/min, and a maximum temperature of 490{degrees}C. The resulting charcoals were then activated with steam in a second batch reactor. Iodine number was used as a measure of the sorptive capacity of the active carbon. Charcoal yields decreased as the carbonization heating rate increased, particularly for rates less than about VC/min. Active carbon yields decreased and iodine numbers increased as the severity of gasification increased. For carbonization heating rates greater than about 4{degrees}C/min, the active carbon yield for a given iodine number was essentially independent of the heating rate.

  20. Ozone Removal by Filters Containing Activated Carbon: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William; Spears, Mike; Sullivan, Douglas; Mendell, Mark

    2009-09-01

    This study evaluated the ozone removal performance of moderate-cost particle filters containing activated carbon when installed in a commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Filters containing 300 g of activated carbon per 0.09 m2 of filter face area were installed in two 'experimental' filter banks within an office building located in Sacramento, CA. The ozone removal performance of the filters was assessed through periodic measurements of ozone concentrations in the air upstream and downstream of the filters. Ozone concentrations were also measured upstream and downstream of a 'reference' filter bank containing filters without any activated carbon. The filter banks with prefilters containing activated carbon were removing 60percent to 70percent of the ozone 67 and 81 days after filter installation. In contrast, there was negligible ozone removal by the reference filter bank without activated carbon.

  1. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbons made from Illinois coals and scrap tires

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.; Lehmann, C.M.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    Activated carbons for natural gas storage were produced from Illinois bituminous coals (IBC-102 and IBC-106) and scrap tires by physical activation with steam or CO2 and by chemical activation with KOH, H3PO4, or ZnCl2. The products were characterized for N2-BET area, micropore volume, bulk density, pore size distribution, and volumetric methane storage capacity (Vm/Vs). Vm/Vs values for Illinois coal-derived carbons ranged from 54 to 83 cm3/cm3, which are 35-55% of a target value of 150 cm3/cm3. Both granular and pelletized carbons made with preoxidized Illinois coal gave higher micropore volumes and larger Vm/Vs values than those made without preoxidation. This confirmed that preoxidation is a desirable step in the production of carbons from caking materials. Pelletization of preoxidized IBC-106 coal, followed by steam activation, resulted in the highest Vm/Vs value. With roughly the same micropore volume, pelletization alone increased Vm/Vs of coal carbon by 10%. Tire-derived carbons had Vm/Vs values ranging from 44 to 53 cm3/cm3, lower than those of coal carbons due to their lower bulk densities. Pelletization of the tire carbons increased bulk density up to 160%. However, this increase was offset by a decrease in micropore volume of the pelletized materials, presumably due to the pellet binder. As a result, Vm/Vs values were about the same for granular and pelletized tire carbons. Compared with coal carbons, tire carbons had a higher percentage of mesopores and macropores.

  2. Carbon sink activity and GHG budget of managed European grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, Katja; Herfurth, Damien; Soussana, Jean-Francois; Fluxnet Grassland Pi's, European

    2013-04-01

    In agriculture, a large proportion (89%) of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission saving potential may be achieved by means of soil C sequestration. Recent demonstrations of carbon sink activities of European ecosystemes, however, often questioned the existence of C storing grasslands, as though a net sink of C was observed, uncertainty surrounding this estimate was larger than the sink itself (Janssens et al., 2003, Schulze et al., 2009. Then again, some of these estimates were based on a small number of measurements, and on models. Not surprising, there is still, a paucity of studies demonstrating the existence of grassland systems, where C sequestration would exceed (in CO2 equivalents) methane emissions from the enteric fermentation of ruminants and nitrous oxide emissions from managed soils. Grasslands are heavily relied upon for food and forage production. A key component of the carbon sink activity in grasslands is thus the impact of changes in management practices or effects of past and recent management, such as intensification as well as climate (and -variation). We analysed data (i.e. flux, ecological, management and soil organic carbon) from a network of European grassland flux observation sites (36). These sites covered different types and intensities of management, and offered the opportunity to understand grassland carbon cycling and trade-offs between C sinks and CH4 and N2O emissions. For some sites, the assessment of carbon sink activities were compared using two methods; repeated soil inventory and determination of the ecosystem C budget by continuous measurement of CO2 exchange in combination with quantification of other C imports and exports (net C storage, NCS). In general grassland, were a potential sink of C with 60±12 g C /m2.yr (median; min -456; max 645). Grazed sites had a higher NCS compared to cut sites (median 99 vs 67 g C /m2.yr), while permanent grassland sites tended to have a lower NCS compared to temporary sown grasslands (median 64 vs 125 g C /m2.yr). Including CH4 and N2O emission in the budget , revealed that for most sites, GHG emissions were compensated by NCS. The role of management impact,soil organic C and fluxes driven by interannual climate variation will be dicussed in the presentation.

  3. What Carbon Sources Support Groundwater Microbial Activity in Riparian Forests?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurwick, N. P.; Groffman, P. M.; McCorkle, D. C.; Stolt, M. H.; Kellogg, D. Q.; Gold, A. J.

    2004-05-01

    A major question in riparian research is the source of energy to support subsurface microbial denitrification activity. The supply of microbially-available carbon frequently limits microbial activity in the subsurface. Therefore, identifying the relative importance of carbon sources in the riparian subsurface helps explain the sustainability and spatial heterogeneity of denitrification rates. We have investigated the importance of buried, carbon-rich soil horizons, deep roots and dissolved organic carbon as potential carbon sources to support groundwater denitrification in riparian forests in Rhode Island. We used field observations, laboratory incubations and in-situ experiments to evaluate these sources at four sites in different geomorphic settings. In particular, we measured the 14C-DIC signature and DIC concentration of ambient groundwater and groundwater that had been degassed, re-introduced into the well, and incubated in-situ. Buried horizons appear to be an important source of carbon in the subsurface, as shown by active respiration in laboratory incubations; greater microbial biomass in buried carbon-rich soils compared to surrounding carbon-poor soils; and the presence of very old carbon (>1,000 ybp) in DIC 225 cm beneath the surface. DIC collected from shallower wells showed no clear evidence of ancient carbon. Roots also appear to be important, creating hotspots of carbon availability and denitrification in the generally carbon poor subsurface matrix. Dissolved organic carbon did not stimulate denitrification in aquifer microcosms in the laboratory, suggesting that this was not an important carbon source for denitrification in our sites. Determining which carbon source is fueling denitrification has practical implications. Where buried horizons are the key source, surface management of the riparian zone will likely have little direct influence on groundwater denitrification. Where roots are the key source, changes in the plant community are likely to influence denitrification capacity in the subsurface.

  4. The production of phytolith-occluded carbon in China's forests: implications to biogeochemical carbon sequestration.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhaoliang; Liu, Hongyan; Li, Beilei; Yang, Xiaomin

    2013-09-01

    The persistent terrestrial carbon sink regulates long-term climate change, but its size, location, and mechanisms remain uncertain. One of the most promising terrestrial biogeochemical carbon sequestration mechanisms is the occlusion of carbon within phytoliths, the silicified features that deposit within plant tissues. Using phytolith content-biogenic silica content transfer function obtained from our investigation, in combination with published silica content and aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) data of leaf litter and herb layer in China's forests, we estimated the production of phytolith-occluded carbon (PhytOC) in China's forests. The present annual phytolith carbon sink in China's forests is 1.7 ± 0.4 Tg CO2  yr(-1) , 30% of which is contributed by bamboo because the production flux of PhytOC through tree leaf litter for bamboo is 3-80 times higher than that of other forest types. As a result of national and international bamboo afforestation and reforestation, the potential of phytolith carbon sink for China's forests and world's bamboo can reach 6.8 ± 1.5 and 27.0 ± 6.1 Tg CO2  yr(-1) , respectively. Forest management practices such as bamboo afforestation and reforestation may significantly enhance the long-term terrestrial carbon sink and contribute to mitigation of global climate warming. PMID:23729188

  5. Carbon Nanotube Activities at NASA-Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2006-01-01

    Research activities on carbon nanotubes at NASA-Johnson Space Center include production, purification, characterization and their applications for human space flight. In-situ diagnostics during nanotube production by laser oven process include collection of spatial and temporal data of passive emission and laser induced fluorescence from C2, C3 and Nickel atoms in the plume. Details of the results from the "parametric study" of the pulsed laser ablation process indicate the effect of production parameters including temperature, buffer gas, flow rate, pressure, and laser fluence. Improvement of the purity by a variety of steps in the purification process is monitored by characterization techniques including SEM, TEM, Raman, UV-VIS-NIR and TGA. A recently established NASA-JSC protocol for SWCNT characterization is undergoing revision with feedback from nanotube community. Efforts at JSC over the past five years in composites have centered on structural polymednanotube systems. Recent activities broadened this focus to multifunctional materials, supercapacitors, fuel cells, regenerable CO2 absorbers, electromagnetic shielding, radiation dosimetry and thermal management systems of interest for human space flight. Preliminary tests indicate improvement of performance in most of these applications because of the large surface area as well as high electrical and thermal conductivity exhibited by SWCNTs.

  6. Production of superconductor/carbon bicomponent fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, S. A.; Fain, C. C.; Leigh, H. D.

    1991-01-01

    Certain materials are unable to be drawn or spun into fiber form due to their improper melting characteristics or brittleness. However, fibrous samples of such materials are often necessary for the fabrication of intricate shapes and composites. In response to this problem, a unique process, referred to as the piggyback process, was developed to prepare fibrous samples of a variety of nonspinnable ceramics. In this technique, specially produced C shaped carbon fibers serve as micromolds to hold the desired materials prior to sintering. Depending on the sintering atmosphere used, bicomponent or single component fibers result. While much has been shown worldwide concerning the YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductor, fabrication into unique forms has proven quite difficult. However, a variety of intricate shapes are necessary for rapid commercialization of the superconducting materials. The potential for producing fibrous samples of the YBa2Cu3O(7-x) compound by the piggyback process is being studied. Various organic and acrylic materials were studied to determine suspending ability, reactivity with the YBa2Cu3O(7-x) compound during long term storage, and burn out characteristics. While many questions were answered with respect to the interfacial reactions between YBa2Cu3O(7-x) and carbon, much work is still necessary to improve the quality of the sintered material if the fibers produced are to be incorporated into useful composite or cables.

  7. Studies relevant to the catalytic activation of carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, P.C.

    1992-06-04

    Research activity during the 1991--1992 funding period has been concerned with the following topics relevant to carbon monoxide activation. (1) Exploratory studies of water gas shift catalysts heterogenized on polystyrene based polymers. (2) Mechanistic investigation of the nucleophilic activation of CO in metal carbonyl clusters. (3) Application of fast reaction techniques to prepare and to investigate reactive organometallic intermediates relevant to the activation of hydrocarbons toward carbonylation and to the formation of carbon-carbon bonds via the migratory insertion of CO into metal alkyl bonds.

  8. Optically active single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaobin; Komatsu, Naoki; Bhattacharya, Sumanta; Shimawaki, Takanori; Aonuma, Shuji; Kimura, Takahide; Osuka, Atsuhiro

    2007-06-01

    The optical, electrical and mechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are largely determined by their structures, and bulk availability of uniform materials is vital for extending their technological applications. Since they were first prepared, much effort has been directed toward selective synthesis and separation of SWNTs with specific structures. As-prepared samples of chiral SWNTs contain equal amounts of left- and right-handed helical structures, but little attention has been paid to the separation of these non-superimposable mirror image forms, known as optical isomers. Here, we show that optically active SWNT samples can be obtained by preferentially extracting either right- or left-handed SWNTs from a commercial sample. Chiral 'gable-type' diporphyrin molecules bind with different affinities to the left- and right-handed helical nanotube isomers to form complexes with unequal stabilities that can be readily separated. Significantly, the diporphyrins can be liberated from the complexes afterwards, to provide optically enriched SWNTs. PMID:18654308

  9. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry

    2004-10-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds or bioreactors to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  10. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry

    2001-07-01

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  11. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2001-12-15

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  12. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2001-09-10

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  13. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2002-12-15

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  14. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHAPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V. J.Fabry

    2004-01-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  15. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V. J. Fabry

    2003-10-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds or bioreactors to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  16. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2003-07-15

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  17. Calcium Carbonate Production by Coccolithophorid Algae in Long Term, Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry

    2005-04-29

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  18. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2002-09-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  19. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2002-07-09

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  20. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry

    2004-04-26

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  1. Calcium Carbonate Production by Coccolithophorid Alge in Long Term Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    V. J. Fabry

    2006-09-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  2. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2003-04-15

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  3. Calcium Carbonate Production by Coccolithophorid Algae in Long Term, Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    V. J. Fabry

    2006-06-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  4. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V. J. Fabry

    2005-01-24

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids ? single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate ? to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  5. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2002-04-05

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  6. Clinical and radiographic study of activated carbon workers.

    PubMed Central

    Uragoda, C G

    1989-01-01

    Activated carbon is made in Sri Lanka by passing steam through charcoal made from coconut shells. The carbon does not contain free silica. Sixty six men who had worked in a factory making activated carbon for an average of 7.2 years had no more respiratory symptoms than a control group, and none showed radiological evidence of pneumoconiosis. There was no evidence that people exposed to charcoal and pure carbon for up to 11 years are at risk of developing pneumoconiosis. PMID:2763231

  7. Labile carbon concentrations are strongly linked to plant production in Arctic tussock tundra soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrouzet-Nardi, A.; Weintraub, M. N.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Steltzer, H.; Sullivan, P.

    2013-12-01

    The exchange of carbon and nutrients between plants and microbes is a key determinant of carbon balance in Arctic soils. Microbes rely on labile plant carbon for the energy they need to produce enzymes that can release nutrients and less energetically favorable carbon from soil organic matter. One of the main mechanisms of carbon transfer is rhizodeposition, the exudation of labile plant carbon such as sugars from roots into the rhizosphere. Despite the importance of this flow of energy and materials from plants to microbes, there have been few attempts to quantify labile carbon pools or fluxes in Arctic soils. To improve our knowledge of labile carbon dynamics in Arctic soils, we address two basic questions: (1) What are the seasonal patterns of labile carbon concentrations? and (2) How do seasonal patterns in labile carbon correlate with plant production, microbial biomass, and soil nutrients? We measured concentrations of total reducing sugars (TRS) in the soil solution of moist acidic tussock tundra on 28 dates during the 2012 growing season in 20 plots of an early snowmelt × warming experiment. We evaluated these total reducing sugar concentrations in the context of eddy flux carbon exchange data, plant NDVI, total dissolved carbon in soils, microbial biomass, and soil nutrients. Though we did not see treatment effects of the snowmelt × warming experiment, we did observe a clear seasonal pattern in TRS concentrations in which they started low at the time of thaw, then built to a maximum value around the time of peak plant physiology in July, followed by a decline as plants senesced. We observed a clear correlation between TRS and gross primary production (GPP). NDVI values also increased with TRS concentrations during the first half of the season and then leveled off as TRS began its decline. These relationships were in contrast to labile N concentrations, which remained at low concentrations all season. Our data suggest that rhizodeposition of labile carbon compounds in Arctic tundra ecosystems has a strong seasonal pattern that closely tracks plant production. This connection suggests that if plant production increases in a warmer Arctic, plants may ease carbon limitation to summer microbial activity.

  8. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, A. J.; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E.

    2012-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of ?-electron energy to investigate the role of ?-? electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects appear to be more pronounced with activated carbon materials, perhaps due to smaller pore sizes or larger adsorption surface areas in small pores.

  9. Morphogenesis and production of enzymes by Penicillium echinulatum in response to different carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Willian Daniel Hahn; dos Reis, Laísa; Camassola, Marli; Dillon, Aldo José Pinheiro

    2014-01-01

    The effect of different carbon sources on morphology and cellulase and xylanase production of Penicillium echinulatum was evaluated in this work. Among the six carbon sources studied, cellulose and sugar cane bagasse were the most suitable for the production of filter paper activity, endoglucanases, xylanases, and ?-glucosidases. However, sucrose and glucose showed ? -glucosidase activities similar to those obtained with the insoluble sources. The polyacrylamide gels proved the enzymatic activity, since different standards bands were detected in the media mentioned above. Regarding morphology, it was observed that the mycelium in a dispersed form provided the greatest enzymatic activity, possibly due to greater interaction between the substrate and hyphae. These data are important in understanding the physiology of fungi and could contribute to obtaining enzyme with potential application in the technology of second generation ethanol. PMID:24877074

  10. Morphogenesis and Production of Enzymes by Penicillium echinulatum in Response to Different Carbon Sources

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Willian Daniel Hahn; dos Reis, Laísa; Dillon, Aldo José Pinheiro

    2014-01-01

    The effect of different carbon sources on morphology and cellulase and xylanase production of Penicillium echinulatum was evaluated in this work. Among the six carbon sources studied, cellulose and sugar cane bagasse were the most suitable for the production of filter paper activity, endoglucanases, xylanases, and ?-glucosidases. However, sucrose and glucose showed ?-glucosidase activities similar to those obtained with the insoluble sources. The polyacrylamide gels proved the enzymatic activity, since different standards bands were detected in the media mentioned above. Regarding morphology, it was observed that the mycelium in a dispersed form provided the greatest enzymatic activity, possibly due to greater interaction between the substrate and hyphae. These data are important in understanding the physiology of fungi and could contribute to obtaining enzyme with potential application in the technology of second generation ethanol. PMID:24877074

  11. Thermoascus aurantiacus CBHI/Cel7A Production in Trichoderma reesei on Alternative Carbon Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benk?, Zsuzsa; Drahos, Eszter; Szengyel, Zsolt; Puranen, Terhi; Vehmaanperä, Jari; Réczey, Kati

    To develop functional enzymes in cellulose hydrolysis at or above 70°C the cellobiohydrolase (CBHI/Cel7A) of Thermoascus aurantiacus was cloned and expressed in Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30 under the strong cbh1 promoter. Cellulase production of the parental strain and the novel strain (RF6026) was examined in submerged fermentation experiments using various carbon sources, which were lactose, Solka Floc 200 cellulose powder, and steam pretreated corn stover. An industrially feasible production medium was used containing only distiller's spent grain, KH2PO4, and (NH4)2SO4. Enzyme production was followed by measurements of protein concentration, total cellulase enzyme activity (filter paper activity), ?-glucosidase activity, CBHI activity, and endogenase I (EGI) activity. The Thermoascus CBHI/Cel7A activity was taken as an indication of the heterologous gene expression under the cbh1 promoter.

  12. Preparation of activated carbon monolith by application of phenolic resins as carbon precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajad, Mehran; Kazemzad, Mahmood; Hosseinnia, Azarmidokht

    2014-04-01

    In the current work, activated carbon monoliths have been prepared by application of different phenolic hydrocarbons namely catechol and resorcinol as carbon precursors. For synthesis of carbon monolith, the precursors have been mixed with Genapol PF-10 as template and then polymerized in the presence of lysine as catalyst. Then the polymerized monolith carbonized in inert atmosphere at 700°C and activated by water steam at 550°C. It was found that resorcinol polymerization is easier than catechol and occurred at 90°C while for polymerization of catechol elevated temperature of 120°C at hydrothermal condition is necessary. The prepared activated carbon samples have been characterized by various analysis methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface area measurement, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The adsorptions of three different aromatic hydrocarbons by the prepared activated carbon samples have also been investigated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. It was found that carbon monolith prepared by catechol as carbon precursor has higher adsorpability and strength in comparison with the other sample. The higher performance of carbon monolith prepared by catechol can be associated with its higher active sites in comparison with resorcinol.

  13. Improvements in Production of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balzano, Leandro; Resasco, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development has been directed toward improvement of a prior batch process in which single-walled carbon nanotubes are formed by catalytic disproportionation of carbon monoxide in a fluidized-bed reactor. The overall effect of the improvements has been to make progress toward converting the process from a batch mode to a continuous mode and to scaling of production to larger quantities. Efforts have also been made to optimize associated purification and dispersion post processes to make them effective at large scales and to investigate means of incorporating the purified products into composite materials. The ultimate purpose of the program is to enable the production of high-quality single-walled carbon nanotubes in quantities large enough and at costs low enough to foster the further development of practical applications. The fluidized bed used in this process contains mixed-metal catalyst particles. The choice of the catalyst and the operating conditions is such that the yield of single-walled carbon nanotubes, relative to all forms of carbon (including carbon fibers, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and graphite) produced in the disproportionation reaction is more than 90 weight percent. After the reaction, the nanotubes are dispersed in various solvents in preparation for end use, which typically involves blending into a plastic, ceramic, or other matrix to form a composite material. Notwithstanding the batch nature of the unmodified prior fluidized-bed process, the fluidized-bed reactor operates in a continuous mode during the process. The operation is almost entirely automated, utilizing mass flow controllers, a control computer running software specific to the process, and other equipment. Moreover, an important inherent advantage of fluidized- bed reactors in general is that solid particles can be added to and removed from fluidized beds during operation. For these reasons, the process and equipment were amenable to modification for conversion from batch to continuous production.

  14. Production of superconductor/carbon bicomponent fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, S. A.; Fain, C. C.; Leigh, H. D.; Sherrill, M.

    1990-01-01

    Certain materials are unable to be drawn or spun into fiber form due to their improper melting characteristics or brittleness. However, fibrous samples of such materials are often necessary for the fabrication of intricate shapes and composites. In response to this problem, a unique process, referred to as the piggyback process, was developed to prepare fibrous samples of a variety of nonspinnable ceramics. In this technique, specially produced C-shaped carbon fibers serve as micromolds to hold the desired materials prior to sintering. Depending on the sintering atmosphere used, bicomponent or single component fibers result. While much has been demonstrated worldwide concerning the YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductor, fabrication into unique forms has proven quite difficult. However, a variety of intricate shapes are necessary for rapid commercialization of the superconducting materials. The potential for producing fibrous samples of the YBa2Cu3O(7-x) compound by the piggyback process is being investigated. Various organic and acrylic materials were investigated to determine suspending ability, reactivity with the YBa2Cu3O(7-x) compound during long term storage, and burn out characteristics. While many questions were answered with respect to the interfacial reactions between YBa2Cu3O(7-x) and carbon, much work is still necessary to improve the quality of the sintered material if the fibers produced are to be incorporated into useful composites or cables. Additional research is necessary to evaluate quality of the barrier layer during long soakings at the peak temperature; adjust the firing schedule to avoid microcracking and improve densification; and increase the solids loading in the superconductive suspension to decrease porosity.

  15. Production of carbon isotopes by laser separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vladimir Y. Baranov; A. P. Dyad'kin; D. D. Maluta; V. A. Kuzmenko; S. V. Pigulskiy; Vladimir S. Mezhevov; Vladilen S. Letokhov; V. B. Laptev; E. A. Ryabov; I. V. Yarovoi; V. B. Zarin; A. S. Podoryashy

    2000-01-01

    Since the advent of lasers, these unique sources of highly intense and monochromatic radiation have been proposed as excellent tools to induce or catalyze chemical reactions. Due to the great interest to the problem of isotope production, investigation and application, the laser method of isotope separation has received the most attention worldwide and may be the first major commercial application

  16. Carbon footprint of dairy production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and their potential impact on global warming has become an important national and international concern. Dairy production systems along with all other types of animal agriculture are recognized as a source of GHG. Although little information exists on the net GHG emiss...

  17. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation: process mineralogy of feed and products

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Rush, G.E.; Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Collins, W. Keith

    2001-01-01

    Direct mineral carbonation has been investigated as a process to convert gaseous CO2 into a geologically stable final form. The process utilizes a slurry of water, with bicarbonate and salt additions, mixed with a mineral reactant, such as olivine (Mg2SiO4) or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. Carbon dioxide is dissolved into this slurry, resulting in dissolution of the mineral and precipitation of magnesium carbonate (MgCO3). Optimum results have been achieved using heat pretreated serpentine feed material and high partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2). Specific conditions include: 155?C; PCO2=185 atm; 15% solids. Under these conditions, 78% conversion of the silicate to the carbonate was achieved in 30 minutes. Process mineralogy has been utilized to characterize the feed and process products, and interpret the mineral dissolution and carbonate precipitation reaction paths.

  18. A Carbon Arc Apparatus For Production Of Nanotubes In Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    Although many methods are available for production of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), the conventional carbon arc process remains the most popular due to its simplicity and large production rate. However, high temperatures inside the carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection, and it is hypothesized that the non-uniform environment created by this flow will have large effects on the growth and morphology of SWNTs produced by the arc process. Indeed, using normal gravity experiments, Marin et al. have demonstrated that changes in the buoyant convection plume produced by altering the arc electrode orientation can be used to change the diameter distribution of the SWNTs produced; an effect they attribute to changes in the temperature of the local nanotube growth environment. While these experiments present convincing evidence that buoyant convection has a strong effect on nanotube growth, normal gravity experiments are severely limited in scope. The ideal way to study the effect of buoyancy on SWNT production is to remove it completely. Toward this goal, a microgravity carbon arc reactor has been designed for use in the NASA Glenn 2.2 and 5 second drop towers. Although simple in principle, conventional carbon arc machines, which generally employ large reaction chambers and require heavy duty welding power supplies capable of supplying kilowatts of power, are not suitable for microgravity experiments. Here we describe a miniature carbon arc machine for SWNT production that fits into a conventional drop rig for use on the NASA Glenn 2.2 and 5 second drop towers, but that has a performance (production rate) that is better than most large ground-based machines.

  19. Photochemically induced carbon dioxide production as a mechanism for carbon loss from plant litter in arid ecosystems

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Photochemically induced carbon dioxide production as a mechanism for carbon loss from plant litter for abiotic mineralization to carbon dioxide (CO2) via photodegradation to account for carbon (C) loss from chemistry or sterilization. We also exposed litter to natural solar radiation outdoors on clear, sunny days

  20. Catalytic oxidation ofS(IV) on activated carbon in aqueous suspension: kinetics and mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Brodzinsky, R.

    1981-02-01

    Activated carbon and combustion produced soot particles have been studied for their catalytic effect on the oxidation of aqueous sulfur(IV) species. Detailed kinetic studies of the reaction were performed on three different activated carbons and on a soot collected in a highway tunnel. Combustion produced soots were tested for their catalytic behavior and found to be similar to the activated carbons. The reaction rate was found to be linearly dependent on the concentration of carbon particles in the solution. The rate was found to follow a Langmuir adsorption isotherm for its dependence on oxygen and the product of two adsorption isotherms for S(IV). The reaction is independent of the pH of the solution when the pH is below 7.6. The reaction does not occur when the pH is above 7.6. The three aqueous S(IV) species are catalyzed in their oxidation by the carbon particles in a similar manner. Activation energies for the reactions on the different carbons are all about 8.5 kcal/mole. A possible four-step reaction mechanism is proposed. It consists of the adsorption of a dissolved oxygen molecule onto the carbon surface, followed by the adsorption of two S(IV) molecules or ions. These are oxidized on the surface to sulfate, which desorbs from the surface, regenerating the catalytically active site.

  1. Lithium Methyl Carbonate as a Reaction Product of Metallic Lithiumand Dimethyl Carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Guorong V.; Yang, Hui; Ross Jr., Philip N.; Xu, Kang; Jow, T. Richard

    2005-10-16

    To improve the understanding of passive film formation on metallic lithium in organic electrolyte, we synthesized and characterized lithium methyl carbonate (LiOCO{sub 2}CH{sub 3}), a prototypical component of the film. The chemical structure of this compound was characterized with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and its thermal stability and decomposition pathway was studied by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). The FTIR spectrum of chemically synthesized compound enabled us to resolve multiple products in the passive film on lithium in dimethyl carbonate (DMC). Lithium methyl carbonate is only one of the components, the others being lithium oxalate and lithium methoxide.

  2. Resistance of alkali-activated slag concrete to carbonation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T Bakharev; J. G Sanjayan; Y.-B Cheng

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation into durability of alkali-activated slag (AAS) concrete exposed to carbonation. Two tests were used which simulated exposure of AAS concrete to carbonated solution and to atmosphere high in carbon dioxide. These tests involved immersion of the concrete in 0.352 M sodium bicarbonate solution, and exposure to atmosphere with 10–20% of CO2 at 70% relative humidity.

  3. 40 CFR 62.15275 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? 62.15275 Section 62.15275 ...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or...

  4. 40 CFR 60.1820 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? 60.1820 Section 60.1820 Protection...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or...

  5. 40 CFR 62.15275 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? 62.15275 Section 62.15275 ...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or...

  6. 40 CFR 62.15275 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? 62.15275 Section 62.15275 ...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or...

  7. 40 CFR 60.1330 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? 60.1330 Section 60.1330 Protection...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or...

  8. 40 CFR 60.1820 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? 60.1820 Section 60.1820 Protection...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or...

  9. 40 CFR 60.1330 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? 60.1330 Section 60.1330 Protection...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or...

  10. 40 CFR 60.1820 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? 60.1820 Section 60.1820 Protection...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or...

  11. 40 CFR 60.1330 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? 60.1330 Section 60.1330 Protection...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or...

  12. 40 CFR 60.1820 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? 60.1820 Section 60.1820 Protection...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or...

  13. 40 CFR 62.15275 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? 62.15275 Section 62.15275 ...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or...

  14. 40 CFR 60.1330 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? 60.1330 Section 60.1330 Protection...monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or...

  15. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S

    2013-02-19

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  16. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S.

    2010-06-01

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  17. Nomex-derived activated carbon fibers as electrode materials in carbon based supercapacitors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Leitner; A. Lerf; M. Winter; J. O. Besenhard; S. Villar-Rodil; F. Suárez-García; A. Martínez-Alonso; J. M. D. Tascón

    2006-01-01

    Electrochemical characterization has been carried out for electrodes prepared of several activated carbon fiber samples derived from poly (m-phenylene isophthalamide) (Nomex) in an aqueous solution. Depending on the burn-off due to activation the BET surface area of the carbons was in the order of 1300–2800m2g?1, providing an extensive network of micropores. Their capability as active material for supercapacitors was evaluated

  18. Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

    2012-12-18

    In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

  19. Carbon dioxide concentration, photosynthesis, and dry matter production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul J. Kramer

    1981-01-01

    It has been suggested the increase in atmospheric COâ produced by the burning of fossil fuels will be to some extent counteracted by an increase in carbon fixation by photosynthesis. This hypothesis is based on the assumption that the rate of photosynthesis is limited chiefly by COâ concentration. The effects on photosynthesis and dry matter production by increased levels of

  20. ccsd00001984, Selective production of metallic carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    ccsd­00001984, version 1 ­ 18 Oct 2004 Selective production of metallic carbon nanotubes Yasushi- type nanotubes (metallic character) evaluated using the previous Huckel-Poisson method can be applied at the tip of a nanotube in a realistic system. Setting the cross-section of a nanotube and the external #12

  1. Laser-Induced Production of Large Carbon-Based Toriods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on the production of large carbon-based toroids (CBTs) from fullerencs. The process involves two step laser irradiation of a mixed fullcrene target (76% C-60, 22% C-70). Transmission electron microscopy (11M) clearly identifies toroidal-shaped structures as well as Q-shaped constructs. ...

  2. Electrocatalytic production of hydrogen on reticulated vitreous carbon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. S El-Deab; Mahmoud M Saleh

    2003-01-01

    Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) was used as a porous cathode for the production of hydrogen gas from flowing alkaline solution. Polarization curves were measured to evaluate the overall performance of the RVC electrode. By an aid of a mathematical model, the kinetic parameters for HER at different conditions were estimated by fitting the experimental data with the model predictions. Black

  3. Silver Nanoparticle Impregnated Bio-Based Activated Carbon with Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvakumar, R.; Suriyaraj, S. P.; Jayavignesh, V.; Swaminathan, K.

    2013-08-01

    The present study involves the production of silver nanoparticles using a novel yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae BU-MBT CY-1 isolated from coconut cell sap. The biological reduction of silver nitrate by the isolate was deducted at various time intervals. The yeast cells after biological silver reduction were harvested and subjected to carbonization at 400°C for 1 h and its properties were analyzed using Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope attached with energy dispersive spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The average size of the silver nanoparticles present on the surface of the carbonized silver containing yeast cells (CSY) was 19 ± 9 nm. The carbonized control yeast cells (CCY) did not contain any particles on its surface. The carbonized silver nanoparticles containing yeast cells (CSY) were made into bioactive emulsion and tested for its efficacy against various pathogenic Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The antimicrobial activity studies indicated that CSY bioactive nanoemulsion was effective against Gram negative organisms than Gram positive organism.

  4. Molten carbonate fuel cell product design improvement

    SciTech Connect

    P. Voyentzie; T. Leo; A. Kush; L. Christner; G. Carlson; C. Yuh

    1998-12-20

    Drawing on the manufacture, field test, and post-test experience of the sixteen Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) stacks, ERC is finalizing the next generation commercial entry product design. The second generation cells are 50% larger in area, 40% lighter on equal geometric area basis, and 30% thinner than the earlier design. These improvements have resulted in doubling of the full-height stack power. A low-cost and high-strength matrix has also been developed for improving product ruggedness. The low-cost advanced cell design incorporating these improvements has been refined through six short stack tests. Power production per cell of two times the SCDP maximum power operation, over ten thermal cycles, and overall operating flexibility with respect to load and thermal changes have been demonstrated in these short stack tests. An internally insulated stack enclosure has been designed and fabricated to eliminate the need for an inert gas environment during operation. ERC has acquired the capability for testing 400kW full-height direct fuel ceil (DFC) stack and balance-of-plant equipment. With the readiness of the power plant test facility, the cell package design, and the stack module, full-height stack testing has begun. The first full- height stack incorporating the post-SCDP second generation design was completed. The stack reached a power level of 253 kW, setting a world record for the highest power production from the advanced fuel cell system. Excellent performance uniformity at this power level affirmed manufacturing reproducibility of the components at the factory. This unoptimized small size test has achieved pipeline natural gas to DC electricity conversion efficiency of 47% (based on lower heating value - LHV) including the parasitic power consumed by the BOP equipment; that should translate to more than 50% efficiency in commercial operation, before employing cogeneration. The power plant system also operated smoothly. With the success of this test confirming the full-height stack basic design and with the completion of SCDP stacks post-test feedback, manufacture of the full-height stack representing the commercial prototype design has been completed and system demonstration is planned to start in the first quarter of 1999. These developments as well as manufacturing advances are discussed in this report.

  5. ACTIVATED CARBON PROCESS FOR TREATMENT OF WASTEWATERS CONTAINING HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), from dilute aqueous solution by an activated carbon process has been investigated. Two removal mechanisms were observed; hexavalent chromium species were removed by adsorption onto the interior carbon surface and/or through reduction to...

  6. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A MOBILE ACTIVATED CARBON REGENERATOR SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activated carbon adsorption has become a standard procedure for the cleanup of contaminated water streams. To facilitate such cleanup at hazardous waste and spill sites, mobile carbon adsorption units have been constructed and are now in use. Their primary drawback is the logisti...

  7. HARDWOOD-BASED GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON FOR METALS REMEDIATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Granular activated carbon is usually the adsorbent of choice for removing organic pollutants from air and water waste streams. Its ability to remove metal ions from aqueous media is considered secondary to its ability to remove organics. Only recently was a coal-based, commercial carbon (Minotaur, C...

  8. HARDWOOD-BASED GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON FOR METALS REMEDIATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Granular activated carbon is usually the adsorbent of choice for removing organic pollutants from air and water waste streams. Its ability to remove metal ions from aqueous media is considered secondary to its ability to remove organics. Only recently was a coal-based, commercial carbon (Minotaur) m...

  9. Carbon Nanotubes and Semiconductor Nanowires for Active Matrix Backplanes.

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Carbon Nanotubes and Semiconductor Nanowires for Active Matrix Backplanes. D. Pribat, C. S and P. Legagneux Thales Research & Technology, 91767 Palaiseau, France ABSTRACT Carbon nanotubes (CNTs nanotubes (CNTs) and semiconductor nanowires (essentially Si and Ge). We will also emphasise the possible

  10. HARDWOOD-BASED GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON FOR METALS REMEDIATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Granular activated carbon is usually the adsorbent of choice for removing organic pollutants from air and water waste streams. Its ability to remove metal ions from aqueous media is considered secondary to its ability to remove organics. Only recently was a coal-based, commerical carbon (Minotaur,...

  11. ELEMENTAL MERCURY CAPTURE BY ACTIVATED CARBON IN A FLOW REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of bench-scale experiments in a flow reactor to simulate the entrained-flow capture of elemental mercury (Hgo) using solid sorbents. Adsorption of Hgo by a lignite-based activated carbon (Calgon FGD) was examined at different carbon/mercury (C/Hg) rat...

  12. Physicochemical and porosity characteristics of thermally regenerated activated carbon polluted with biological activated carbon process.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lihua; Liu, Wenjun; Jiang, Renfu; Wang, Zhansheng

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of thermally regenerated activated carbon (AC) polluted with biological activated carbon (BAC) process were investigated. The results showed that the true micropore and sub-micropore volume, pH value, bulk density, and hardness of regenerated AC decreased compared to the virgin AC, but the total pore volume increased. XPS analysis displayed that the ash contents of Al, Si, and Ca in the regenerated AC respectively increased by 3.83%, 2.62% and 1.8%. FTIR spectrum showed that the surface functional groups of virgin and regenerated AC did not change significantly. Pore size distributions indicated that the AC regeneration process resulted in the decrease of micropore and macropore (D>10 ?m) volume and the increase of mesopore and macropore (0.1 ?m

  13. IMPROVING THE COMPLETENESS OF PRODUCT CARBON FOOTPRINTS USING A GLOBAL LINK INPUT–OUTPUT MODEL: THE CASE OF JAPAN

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keisuke Nansai; Shigemi Kagawa; Yasushi Kondo; Sangwon Suh; Rokuta Inaba; Kenichi Nakajima

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the main activities of Japan's ‘Disclosure of CO2 emissions’ programme, aimed at illustrating the CO2 emissions associated with consumer products as a ‘carbon footprint’ (CF). Although the current, provisional guidelines for calculating product carbon footprints specify that only the bottom-up approach is to be used for this purpose, this paper presents useful applications of input–output

  14. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on activated carbon impregnated with metal halide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hajime Tamon; Kenji Kitamura; Morio Okazaki

    1996-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) removal is important in the purification of ammonia-synthesis gas produced by the partial oxidation of hydrocarbons, the water-gas reaction, or the steam reforming of hydrocarbons. A coke-oven gas, a blast-furnace gas, and a converter gas also contain 8--89% CO. Activated carbon was impregnated with a metal halide, and adsorption and desorption characteristics of CO on the carbon

  15. Methodology for calculation of carbon balances for biofuel crops production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlfand, I.; Hamilton, S. K.; Snapp, S. S.; Robertson, G. P.

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the carbon balance implications for different biofuel crop production systems is important for the development of decision making tools and policies. We present here a detailed methodology for assessing carbon balances in agricultural and natural ecosystems. We use 20 years of data from Long-term Ecological Research (LTER) experiments at the Kellogg Biological Station (KBS), combined with models to produce farm level CO2 balances for different management practices. We compared four grain and one forage systems in the U.S. Midwest: corn (Zea mays) - soybean (Glycine max) - wheat (Triticum aestivum) rotations managed with (1) conventional tillage, (2) no till, (3) low chemical input, and (4) biologically-based (organic) practices; and (5) continuous alfalfa (Medicago sativa). In addition we use an abandoned agricultural field (successionnal ecosystem) as reference system. Measurements include fluxes of N2O and CH4, soil organic carbon change, agricultural yields, and agricultural inputs (e.g. fertilization and farm fuel use). In addition to measurements, we model carbon offsets associated with the use of bioenergy from agriculturally produced crops. Our analysis shows the importance of establishing appropriate system boundaries for carbon balance calculations. We explore how different assumptions regarding production methods and emission factors affect overall conclusions on carbon balances of different agricultural systems. Our results show management practices that have major the most important effects on carbon balances. Overall, agricultural management with conventional tillage was found to be a net CO2 source to the atmosphere, while agricultural management under reduced tillage, low input, or organic management sequestered carbon at rates of 93, -23, -51, and -14 g CO2e m-2 yr-1, respectively for conventionally tilled, no-till, low-input, and organically managed ecosystems. Perennial systems (alfalfa and the successionnal fields) showed net carbon sequestration of -44 and -382 g CO2e m-2 yr-1, respectively. When studied systems were assumed to be used for bioenergy production, all system exhibited carbon sequestration -- between -149 and -841 g CO2e m-2 yr-1, for conventionally tilled and successionnal ecosystems, respectively.

  16. TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ABSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    BYRNES ME

    2010-09-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs) will load heavily onto activated carbon and should be removed from groundwater upstream of the activated carbon pre-treatment system. Unless removed upstream, the adsorbed loadings of these organic constituents could exceed the land disposal criteria for carbon.

  17. Effect of silicate modulus and metakaolin incorporation on the carbonation of alkali silicate-activated slags

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, Susan A., E-mail: susana.bernal@gmail.co [Materials Engineering Department, Composite Materials Group, CENM, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Mejia de Gutierrez, Ruby [Materials Engineering Department, Composite Materials Group, CENM, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Provis, John L., E-mail: jprovis@unimelb.edu.a [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Rose, Volker [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Accelerated carbonation is induced in pastes and mortars produced from alkali silicate-activated granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS)-metakaolin (MK) blends, by exposure to CO{sub 2}-rich gas atmospheres. Uncarbonated specimens show compressive strengths of up to 63 MPa after 28 days of curing when GBFS is used as the sole binder, and this decreases by 40-50% upon complete carbonation. The final strength of carbonated samples is largely independent of the extent of metakaolin incorporation up to 20%. Increasing the metakaolin content of the binder leads to a reduction in mechanical strength, more rapid carbonation, and an increase in capillary sorptivity. A higher susceptibility to carbonation is identified when activation is carried out with a lower solution modulus (SiO{sub 2}/Na{sub 2}O ratio) in metakaolin-free samples, but this trend is reversed when metakaolin is added due to the formation of secondary aluminosilicate phases. High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffractometry of uncarbonated paste samples shows that the main reaction products in alkali-activated GBFS/MK blends are C-S-H gels, and aluminosilicates with a zeolitic (gismondine) structure. The main crystalline carbonation products are calcite in all samples and trona only in samples containing no metakaolin, with carbonation taking place in the C-S-H gels of all samples, and involving the free Na{sup +} present in the pore solution of the metakaolin-free samples. Samples containing metakaolin do not appear to have the same availability of Na{sup +} for carbonation, indicating that this is more effectively bound in the presence of a secondary aluminosilicate gel phase. It is clear that claims of exceptional carbonation resistance in alkali-activated binders are not universally true, but by developing a fuller mechanistic understanding of this process, it will certainly be possible to improve performance in this area.

  18. Selection and preparation of activated carbon for fuel gas storage

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, James A. (Fayetteville, NY); Noh, Joong S. (Syracuse, NY); Agarwal, Rajiv K. (Las Vegas, NV)

    1990-10-02

    Increasing the surface acidity of active carbons can lead to an increase in capacity for hydrogen adsorption. Increasing the surface basicity can facilitate methane adsorption. The treatment of carbons is most effective when the carbon source material is selected to have a low ash content i.e., below about 3%, and where the ash consists predominantly of alkali metals alkali earth, with only minimal amounts of transition metals and silicon. The carbon is washed in water or acid and then oxidized, e.g. in a stream of oxygen and an inert gas at an elevated temperature.

  19. GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION AND INFRARED REACTIVATION: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study evaluated the effectiveness and cost of removing trace organic contaminants and surrogates from drinking water by granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption. The effect of multiple reactivations of spent GAC was also evaluated. Results indicated that reactivated GAC eff...

  20. Mechanistic Investigation of Catalytic Carbon-Carbon Bond Activation and Formation by Platinum and Palladium Phosphine

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    )3 or 1 converts biphenylene to tetraphenylene. The intermediates in the catalytic cycle have beenMechanistic Investigation of Catalytic Carbon-Carbon Bond Activation and Formation by Platinum(IV) intermediate. 2 reductively eliminates tetraphenylene at 115 °C. At 120 °C the reaction is catalytic; Pt(PEt3

  1. Biofilm processes in biologically active carbon water purification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David R. Simpson

    2008-01-01

    This review paper serves to describe the composition and activity of a biologically active carbon (BAC) biofilm used in water purification. An analysis of several physical–chemical, biochemical and microbiological methods (indicators) used to characterize the BAC biofilm's composition and activity is provided. As well, the ability of the biofilm to remove and biodegrade waterborne organic substances and pollutants will be

  2. Preparation and characterisation of demineralised tyre derived activated carbon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. S. Chan; W. H. Cheung; G. McKay

    2011-01-01

    The effect of demineralisation and activation conditions on the physical and chemical properties of activated carbon adsorbents produced from waste tyre char has been investigated. Experimental data showed that hydrochloric acid treatment prior to the activation is able to remove certain mineral contents such as zinc, calcium, sodium and others from the tyre char. The removal of some of the

  3. Mechanisms of Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Smalley, Richard E.; Nocholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We will present possible mechanisms for nanotube production by laser oven process. Spectral emission of excited species during laser ablation of a composite graphite target is compared with that of laser irradiated C60 vapor. The similarities in the transient and spectral data suggest that fullerenes are intermediate precursors for nanotube formation. The confinement of the ablation products by means of a 25-mm diameter tube placed upstream of the target seems to improve the production and purity of nanotubes. Repeated laser pulses vaporize the amorphous/graphitic carbon and possibly catalyst particles, and dissociate fullerenes yielding additional feedstock for SWNT growth.

  4. Characterization of activated carbons using liquid phase adsorption

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Ismadji; S. K. Bhatia

    2001-01-01

    A modification of the Dubinin–Radushkevich pore filling model by incorporation of the repulsive contribution to the pore potential, and of bulk non-ideality, is proposed in this paper for characterization of activated carbon using liquid phase adsorption. For this purpose experiments have been performed using ethyl propionate, ethyl butyrate, and ethyl isovalerate as adsorbates and the microporous–mesoporous activated carbons Filtrasorb 400,

  5. Characterization of activated carbon prepared from chicken waste and coal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yan Zhang; Hong Cui; Riko Ozao; Yan Cao; Bobby I.-T. Chen; Chia-Wei Wang; Wei-Ping Pan

    2007-01-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from chicken waste (CW) and coal (E-coal) blended at the ratios of 100:0, 80:20, 50:50, 20:80, and 0:100. The process included carbonization in flowing gaseous nitrogen (300 mL min¹) at ca. 430{sup o}C for 60 min and successive steam activation (0.1 mL min¹ water injection with a flow of N at 100 mL min¹) at

  6. Caustic-impregnated activated carbons for removal of hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Truk, A.

    1991-06-18

    This paper describes improvement in a process for removing hydrogen sulfide from an oxygen-containing gas stream by passing the gas stream through caustic-impregnated activated carbon, the stream containing from about 5 ppm to about 10,000 ppm by volume of hydrogen sulfide. The improvement comprises: the breakthrough capacity of the caustic-impregnated activated carbon for hydrogen sulfide is extended by the addition of ammonia to the gas stream about the time of breakthrough.

  7. Caustic-impregnated activated carbons for removal of hydrogen sulfide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Truk

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes improvement in a process for removing hydrogen sulfide from an oxygen-containing gas stream by passing the gas stream through caustic-impregnated activated carbon, the stream containing from about 5 ppm to about 10,000 ppm by volume of hydrogen sulfide. The improvement comprises: the breakthrough capacity of the caustic-impregnated activated carbon for hydrogen sulfide is extended by the addition

  8. Adsorption of dissolved natural organic matter by modified activated carbons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei Cheng; Seyed A. Dastgheib; Tanju Karanfil

    2005-01-01

    Adsorption of dissolved natural organic matter (DOM) by virgin and modified granular activated carbons (GACs) was studied. DOM samples were obtained from two water treatment plants before (i.e., raw water) and after coagulation\\/flocculation\\/sedimentation processes (i.e., treated water). A granular activated carbon (GAC) was modified by high temperature helium or ammonia treatment, or iron impregnation followed by high temperature ammonia treatment.

  9. Hydrogen storage on activated carbon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, J.A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    1994-11-01

    The project studied factors that influence the ability of carbon to store hydrogen and developed techniques to enhance that ability in naturally occurring and factory-produced commercial carbon materials. During testing of enhanced materials, levels of hydrogen storage were achieved that compare well with conventional forms of energy storage, including lead-acid batteries, gasoline, and diesel fuel. Using the best materials, an electric car with a modern fuel cell to convert the hydrogen directly to electricity would have a range of over 1,000 miles. This assumes that the total allowable weight of the fuel cell and carbon/hydrogen storage system is no greater than the present weight of batteries in an existing electric vehicle. By comparison, gasoline cars generally are limited to about a 450-mile range, and battery-electric cars to 40 to 60 miles. The project also developed a new class of carbon materials, based on polymers and other organic compounds, in which the best hydrogen-storing factors discovered earlier were {open_quotes}molecularly engineered{close_quotes} into the new materials. It is believed that these new molecularly engineered materials are likely to exceed the performance of the naturally occurring and manufactured carbons seen earlier with respect to hydrogen storage.

  10. Activated Carbons from Flax Shive and Cotton Gin Waste as Environmental Adsorbents for the Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Trichloroethylene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural by-products represent a considerable quantity of harvested commodity crops. The use of by-products as a starting material for the production of widely used adsorbents, such as activated carbons, may impart a value-added component of the overall biomass harvested. Our objective in this...

  11. Ion coordination significantly enhances the photocatalytic activity of graphitic-phase carbon nitride.

    PubMed

    Gao, Honglin; Yan, Shicheng; Wang, Jiajia; Zou, Zhigang

    2014-06-14

    Here we report a facile surface modification route, metal ion coordination, to improve the photoactivity of carbon nitride. The metal ions coordinating into the plane of g-C3N4 significantly contribute to a drastic increase of the photocatalytic activity in solar hydrogen production as well as in the photodegradation of organic pollutants. PMID:24781099

  12. ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTANTS AND GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON EFFECTS ON TRACE ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of alternative disinfectants on drinking water quality were examined along with the ability of granular activated carbon (GAC) to remove disinfection by-products and organic contaminants from lower Mississippi River source water. In addition, the study obtained bacter...

  13. Decolorization/Deodorization of Zein via Activated Carbons and Molecular Sieves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of commercial activated carbons generated from different media and selective microporous zeolites with different pore sizes were used in a batch system to sequester the low molecular weight odor and color contaminants in commercial zein products. Because the adsorbents can also adsorb prot...

  14. PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dady Dadyburjor; Chong Chen; Elliot B. Kennel; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2005-12-12

    High melting temperature synthetic pitches (Synpitches) were created using coal derivatives produced from a solvent extraction technique. Solvent extraction is used to separate hydrocarbons from mineral matter as well as other insolubles. Mild hydrogenation can be used to chemically modify resultant material to produce a true pitch. There are three main techniques which can be used to tailor the softening point of the Synpitch. First, the softening point can be controlled by varying the conditions of hydrogenation, chiefly the temperature, pressure and residence time in a hydrogen overpressure. Second, by selectively distilling light hydrocarbons, the softening point of the remaining pitch can be raised. Third, the Synpitch can be blended with another mutually soluble pitch or hydrocarbon liquid. Through such techniques, spinnable isotropic Synpitches have been created from coal feedstocks. Characteristics of Synpitches include high cross-linking reactivity and high molecular weight, resulting in carbon fibers with excellent mechanical properties. To date, mechanical properties have been achieved which are comparable to the state of the art achievable with conventional coal tar pitch or petroleum pitch.

  15. Production of biodiesel from carbon sources of macroalgae, Laminaria japonica.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xu; Kim, Ji Young; Oh, Yu Ri; Park, Jong Moon

    2014-10-01

    As aquatic biomass which is called "the third generation biomass", Laminaria japonica (also known as Saccharina japonica) consists of mannitol and alginate which are the main polysaccharides of algal carbohydrates. In this study, oleaginous yeast (Cryptococcus curvatus) was used to produce lipid from carbon sources derived from Laminaria japonica. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were produced by fermentation of alginate extracted from L. japonica. Thereafter, mannitol was mixed with VFAs to culture the oleaginous yeast. The highest lipid content was 48.30%. The composition of the fatty acids was similar to vegetable oils. This is the first confirmation of the feasibility of using macroalgae as a carbon source for biodiesel production. PMID:25084043

  16. Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Heben, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Kelley, R. D.; Kini, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    Carbon SWNTs are attractive materials for supporting electrocatalysts. The properties of SWNTs are highly tunable and controlled by the nanotube's circumferential periodicity and their surface chemistry. These unique characteristics suggest that architectures constructed from these types of carbon support materials would exhibit interesting and useful properties. Here, we expect that the structure of the carbon nanotube support will play a major role in stabilizing metal electrocatalysts under extreme operating conditions and suppress both catalyst and support degradation. Furthermore, the chemical modification of the carbon nanotube surfaces can be expected to alter the interface between the catalyst and support, thus, enhancing the activity and utilization of the electrocatalysts. We plan to incorporate discrete reaction sites into the carbon nanotube lattice to create intimate electrical contacts with the catalyst particles to increase the metal catalyst activity and utilization. The work involves materials synthesis, design of electrode architectures on the nanoscale, control of the electronic, ionic, and mass fluxes, and use of advanced optical spectroscopy techniques.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Elliot B. Kennel; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2005-08-11

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, efforts have focused on the facility modifications for continuous hydrotreating, as well as developing improved protocols for producing synthetic pitches.

  18. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Chilcoat, Bill R. (Knoxville, TN); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

    2001-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  19. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Chilcoat, Bill R. (Knoxville, TN); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

    2000-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  20. Analysis of structure and properties of active carbons and their copolymeric precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobiesiak, M.; Gawdzik, B.; Puziy, A. M.; Poddubnaya, O. I.

    2010-06-01

    The relations between chemical structures of BM-DVB copolymers obtained with various monomer molar ratios and their carbonization products were studied. Three porous copolymers 1:4, 1:1, and 4:1 of BM to DVB were the starting materials for preparation of active carbons. Two activation agents were employed: air and phosphoric acid. The carbonization process was performed in the same way in these two cases. To characterize the obtained materials FTIR spectroscopy, thermal and elemental analyses were applied. Porous structure parameters were obtained by means of nitrogen sorption. The results proved that differences in the molar ratio of monomers used in the syntheses of polymeric precursor play a key role for structure and properties of copolymers but have rather small influence on properties of the obtained carbons. Preliminary treatment is more effective during the activation process. The carbons obtained by activation with phosphoric acid are microporous and have well developed porous structures. The air activated carbons are mesoporous with specific surface areas similar to those of polymeric precursors.

  1. Catalytic ozonation of p-chlorobenzoic acid by activated carbon and nickel supported activated carbon prepared from petroleum coke.

    PubMed

    Li, Xukai; Zhang, Qiuyun; Tang, Lili; Lu, Ping; Sun, Fengqiang; Li, Laisheng

    2009-04-15

    The aim of this research was to investigate catalytic activity of petroleum coke, activated carbon (AC) prepared from this material, Ni supported catalyst on activated carbon (Ni/AC) in the ozonation of aqueous phase p-chlorobenzoic acid (p-CBA). Activated carbon and Ni/AC catalyst were characterized by XRD and SEM. The presence of petroleum coke did not improve the degradation of p-CBA compared to ozonation alone, but it was advantageous for p-CBA mineralization (total organic carbon, TOC, reduction), indicating the generation of highly oxidant species (*OH) in the medium. The presence of either activated carbon or Ni/AC considerably improves TOC removal during p-CBA ozonation. Ni/AC catalyst shows the better catalytic activity and stability based on five repeated tests during p-CBA ozonation. During the ozonation (50 mg/h ozone flow rate) of a 10 mg/L p-CBA (pH 4.31), it can be more mineralized in the presence of Ni/AC catalyst (5.0 g/L), TOC removal rate is over 60% in 60 min, 43% using activated carbon as catalyst, only 30% with ozonation alone. PMID:18667273

  2. Solar thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide for the production of catalytic filamentous carbon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Meier; V. A. Kirillov; G. G. Kuvshinov; Yu. I. Mogilnykh; A. Reller; A. Steinfeld; A. Weidenkaff

    1999-01-01

    Concentrated solar radiation is used as the clean source of process heat for the production of catalytic filamentous carbon (CFC) by thermal decomposition of gaseous hydrocarbons (CH4 and C4H10) and by CO disproportionation in the presence of small metal catalyst particles. Depending on the catalyst, two different types of CFC, namely nanotubes and nanofibers, are obtained in solar experiments. Nanotubes

  3. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Zeikus, J.G.; Jain, M.K.

    1992-01-01

    This reporting period, progress is reported on the following: metabolic pathway of solvent production in B. methylotrophicum; the biochemical mechanism for metabolic regulation of the succinate fermentation; models to understand the physiobiochemical function of formate metabolism in anaerobes and; models for understanding the influence of low pH on one carbon metabolism. (CBS)

  4. Detection of low concentration oxygen containing functional groups on activated carbon fiber surfaces through fluorescent labeling

    E-print Network

    Borguet, Eric

    carbon, activated carbon fibers and carbon nano- tubes, are based on the presence of oxygen containingDetection of low concentration oxygen containing functional groups on activated carbon fiber of surface functional groups (OH, COOH and CHO) on activated carbon fiber surfaces. The chromophores were

  5. 76 FR 58246 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Partial Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ...Chemical Co., Ltd.; Huaiyushan Activated Carbon Group; Huatai Activated Carbon; Huzhou Zhonglin Activated Carbon; Inner Mongolia Taixi Coal Chemical Industry Limited Company; Itigi Corp. Ltd.; J&D Activated Carbon Filter Co. Ltd.; Jiangle...

  6. Production and accumulation of calcium carbonate in the ocean: Budget of a nonsteady state

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John D. Milliman

    1993-01-01

    The calcium carbonate budget in the ocean has become of great interest to geochemists, sedimentologists and paleoceanographers. The carbonate system represents only a small part of the global carbon cycle, but it is intimately related to atmospheric carbon dioxide. This paper discusses calcium carbonate production and accumulations in the present-day marine environment and over the past 25,000 years. The new

  7. A sustainable route for the preparation of activated carbon and silica from rice husk ash.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Guo, Yupeng; Zhu, Yanchao; An, Dongmin; Gao, Wei; Wang, Zhuo; Ma, Yuejia; Wang, Zichen

    2011-02-28

    An environmentally friendly and economically effective process to produce silica and activated carbon form rice husk ask simultaneously has been developed in this study. An extraction yield of silica of 72-98% was obtained and the particle size was 40-50 nm. The microstructures of the as-obtained silica powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared spectra (IR). The surface area, iodine number and capacitance value of activated carbon could achieve 570 m(2)/g, 1708 mg/g, 180 F/g, respectively. In the whole synthetic procedure, the wastewater and the carbon dioxide were collected and reutilized. The recovery rate of sodium carbonate was achieved 92.25%. The process is inexpensive, sustainable, environmentally friendly and suitable for large-scale production. PMID:21194835

  8. Oxygen production and carbon sequestration in an upwelling coastal Burke Hales,1

    E-print Network

    Pierce, Stephen

    Oxygen production and carbon sequestration in an upwelling coastal margin Burke Hales,1 Lee Karp), Oxygen production and carbon sequestration in an upwelling coastal margin, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 20

  9. 78 FR 35603 - Foreign-Trade Zone 83-Huntsville, Alabama; Application for Production Authority; Toray Carbon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ...Foreign-Trade Zone 83--Huntsville, Alabama; Application for Production Authority; Toray Carbon Fibers America, Inc.; (Polyacrylonitrile Fiber/Carbon Fiber Production), Decatur, Alabama An application has been submitted to the...

  10. Electroadsorption of Arsenic from natural water in granular activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beralus, Jean-Mackson; Ruiz Rosas, Ramiro; Cazorla-Amoros, Diego; Morallon, Emilia

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption and electroadsorption of arsenic from a natural water has been studied in a filter-press electrochemical cell using a commercial granular activated carbon as adsorbent and Pt/Ti and graphite as electrodes. A significant reduction of the arsenic concentration is achieved when current is imposed between the electrodes, especially when the activated carbon was located in the vicinity of the anode. This enhancement can be explained in terms of the presence of electrostatic interactions between the polarized carbon surface and the arsenic ions, and changes in the distribution of most stable species of arsenic in solution due to As(III) to As(V) oxidation. In summary, electrochemical adsorption on a filter press cell can be used for enhancement the arsenic remediation with activated carbon in the treatment of a real groundwater.

  11. Environmental Remediation and Conversion of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) into Useful Green Products by Accelerated Carbonation Technology

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mihee; Han, Gi-Chun; Ahn, Ji-Whan; You, Kwang-Suk

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of carbonation technology to the environmental industry as a way of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2), a green house gas, including the presentation of related projects of our research group. An alternative technology to very slow natural carbonation is the co-called ‘accelerated carbonation’, which completes its fast reaction within few hours by using pure CO2. Carbonation technology is widely applied to solidify or stabilize solid combustion residues from municipal solid wastes, paper mill wastes, etc. and contaminated soils, and to manufacture precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC). Carbonated products can be utilized as aggregates in the concrete industry and as alkaline fillers in the paper (or recycled paper) making industry. The quantity of captured CO2 in carbonated products can be evaluated by measuring mass loss of heated samples by thermo-gravimetric (TG) analysis. The industrial carbonation technology could contribute to both reduction of CO2 emissions and environmental remediation. PMID:20195442

  12. Comparison of toluene adsorption among granular activated carbon and different types of activated carbon fibers (ACFs).

    PubMed

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Crawford, Shaun A; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2011-10-01

    Activated carbon fiber (ACF) has been demonstrated to be a good adsorbent for the removal of organic vapors in air. Some ACF has a comparable or larger surface area and higher adsorption capacity when compared with granular activated carbon (GAC) commonly used in respiratory protection devices. ACF is an attractive alternative adsorbent to GAC because of its ease of handling, light weight, and decreasing cost. ACF may offer the potential for short-term respiratory protection for first responders and emergency personnel. This study compares the critical bed depths and adsorption capacities for toluene among GAC and ACF of different forms and surface areas. GAC and ACF in cloth (ACFC) and felt (ACFF) forms were challenged in stainless steel chambers with a constant concentration of 500 ppm toluene via conditioned air at 25°C, 50% RH, and constant airflow (7 L/min). Breakthrough data were obtained for each adsorbent using gas chromatography with flame ionization detector. Surface areas of each adsorbent were determined using a physisorption analyzer. Results showed that the critical bed depth of GAC is 275% higher than the average of ACFC but is 55% lower than the average of ACFF. Adsorption capacity of GAC (with a nominal surface area of 1800 m(2)/g) at 50% breakthrough is 25% higher than the average of ACF with surface area of 1000 m(2)/g, while the rest of ACF with surface area of 1500 m(2)/g and higher have 40% higher adsorption capacities than GAC. ACFC with higher surface area has the smallest critical bed depth and highest adsorption capacity, which makes it a good adsorbent for thinner and lighter respirators. We concluded that ACF has great potential for application in respiratory protection considering its higher adsorption capacity and lower critical bed depth in addition to its advantages over GAC, particularly for ACF with higher surface area. PMID:21936696

  13. Influence of the precursor metamorphism degree on preparation of nitrogen-enriched activated carbons by ammoxidation and chemical activation of coals

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Nowicki; Robert Pietrzak; Helena Wachowska [Adam Mickiewicz University, Pozna (Poland). Laboratory of Coal Chemistry and Technology

    2009-04-15

    The paper presents results of a study on obtaining N-enriched active carbons from four hard coals with different degree of metamorphism. The starting materials were carbonized, activated with KOH, and ammoxidized by a mixture of ammonia and air at the ratio 1:3 at 300 and 350{sup o}C, at each stage of the active carbon production. The efficiency of ammoxidation was found to depend on the degree of metamorphism of the precursor, the stage of processing at which ammoxidation is performed, and the temperature of this process. Ammoxidation of the active carbon led to a decrease in their surface area and pore volume, whereas that performed both at the stage of the precursor and the carbonizate brought improvement of textural parameters of the active carbons obtained. The sequence of the carbonization, activation, and ammoxidation processes had a significant effect on the acid-base character of the active carbon samples obtained. The majority of the active carbons modified at the stage of precursor and carbonizate showed considerable prevalence of surface acidic groups, whereas the samples ammoxidized after activation showed an intermediate acidic-basic character of the surface. 25 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. Free nitrous acid pretreatment of wasted activated sludge to exploit internal carbon source for enhanced denitrification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bin; Peng, Yongzhen; Wei, Yan; Li, Baikun; Bao, Peng; Wang, Yayi

    2015-03-01

    Using internal carbon source contained in waste activated sludge (WAS) is beneficial for nitrogen removal from wastewater with low carbon/nitrogen ratio, but it is usually limited by sludge disintegration. This study presented a novel strategy based on free nitrous acid (FNA) pretreatment to intensify the release of organic matters from WAS for enhanced denitrification. During FNA pretreatment, soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) production kept increasing when FNA increased from 0 to 2.04mg HNO2-N/L. Compared with untreated WAS, the internal carbon source production increased by 50% in a simultaneous fermentation and denitrification reactor fed with WAS pretreated by FNA for 24h at 2.04mg HNO2-N/L. This also increased denitrification efficiency by 76% and sludge reduction by 87.5%. More importantly, greenhouse gas nitrous oxide production in denitrification was alleviated since more electrons could be provided by FNA pretreated WAS. PMID:25514398

  15. FENTON-DRIVEN REGENERATION OF GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON: A TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Fenton-driven mechanism for regenerating spent granular activated carbon (GAC) involves the combined, synergistic use of two reliable and well established treatment technologies - adsorption onto activated carbon and Fenton oxidation. During carbon adsorption treatment, enviro...

  16. Characterisation and applications of activated carbon produced from Moringa oleifera seed husks by single-step steam pyrolysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Michael Warhurst; Gordon L. McConnachie; Simon J. T. Pollard

    1997-01-01

    The seed husks of the multipurpose tree Moringa oleifera are potentially a waste product that may be available in large quantities, and previous work has demonstrated that a microporous activated carbon can be produced from them by carbonisation under nitrogen followed by activation in steam. This research examines the efficacy of a simpler and cheaper activation process, single-step steam pyrolysis

  17. 77 FR 14501 - Certain Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-12

    ...Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from...Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from...no longer necessary to offset dumping. A request for...otherwise necessary to offset dumping...Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products...

  18. CREAT A CONSORTIUM AND DEVELOP PREMIUM CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL

    SciTech Connect

    John M. Andresen

    2003-08-01

    The Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory and matching funds from industry and academic institutions continued to excel in developing innovative technologies to use coal and coal-derived feedstocks to produce premium carbon product. During Budget Period 5, eleven projects were supported and sub-contracted were awarded to seven organizations. The CPCPC held two meetings and one tutorial at various locations during the year. Budget Period 5 was a time of growth for CPCPC in terms of number of proposals and funding requested from members, projects funded and participation during meetings. Although the membership was stable during the first part of Budget Period 5 an increase in new members was registered during the last months of the performance period.

  19. The Effects of Moisture and Organic Matter Lability on Carbon Dioxide and Methane Production in an

    E-print Network

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    The Effects of Moisture and Organic Matter Lability on Carbon Dioxide and Methane Production as organic matter lability, on the production of both carbon dioxide and methane gas. Gas flux was measured and the production of carbon dioxide and methane gases. An increase in water table yielded a decrease in the net

  20. 78 FR 15376 - Determinations: Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ...Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea On the basis of the record...corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from Germany and Korea would not be likely to lead...Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from Germany and Korea: Investigation Nos....

  1. TOXIC SUBSTANCE REMOVAL IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE AND PAC (POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON) TREATMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effectiveness of adding powdered activated carbon to activated sludge systems was evaluated for enhanced removal of specific toxic organic compounds. Nine organic compounds encompassing a range of solubility, volatility, biodegradability, and adsorptive properties were studie...

  2. Suomi NPP VIIRS active fire product status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellicott, E. A.; Csiszar, I. A.; Schroeder, W.; Giglio, L.; Wind, B.; Justice, C. O.

    2012-12-01

    We provide an overview of the evaluation and development of the Active Fires product derived from the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite during the first year of on-orbit data. Results from the initial evaluation of the standard SNPP Active Fires product, generated by the SNPP Interface Data Processing System (IDPS), supported the stabilization of the VIIRS Sensor Data Record (SDR) product. This activity focused in particular on the processing of the dual-gain 4 micron VIIRS M13 radiometric measurements into 750m aggregated data, which are fundamental for active fire detection. Following the VIIRS SDR product's Beta maturity status in April 2012, correlative analysis between VIIRS and near-simultaneous fire detections from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the NASA Earth Observing System Aqua satellite confirmed the expected relative detection rates driven primarily by sensor differences. The VIIRS Active Fires Product Development and Validation Team also developed a science code that is based on the latest MODIS Collection 6 algorithm and provides a full spatially explicit fire mask to replace the sparse array output of fire locations from a MODIS Collection 4 equivalent algorithm in the current IDPS product. The Algorithm Development Library (ADL) was used to support the planning for the transition of the science code into IDPS operations in the future. Product evaluation and user outreach was facilitated by a product website that provided end user access to fire data in user-friendly format over North America as well as examples of VIIRS-MODIS comparisons. The VIIRS fire team also developed an experimental product based on 375m VIIRS Imagery band measurements and provided high quality imagery of major fire events in US. By August 2012 the IDPS product achieved Beta maturity, with some known and documented shortfalls related to the processing of incorrect SDR input data and to apparent algorithm deficiencies in select observing and environmental conditions.

  3. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristian I Contescu; Frederick S Baker; Costas Tsouris; Joanna McFarlane

    2008-01-01

    In continuation of the development of composite materials for air separation based on molecular sieving properties and magnetic fields effects, several molecular sieve materials were tested in a flow system, and the effects of temperature, flow conditions, and magnetic fields were investigated. New carbon materials adsorbents, with and without pre-loaded super-paramagnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized; all materials were packed

  4. Production of carbonate sediments by a unicellular green alga

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KIMBERLY K. YATES; LISA L. ROBBINS

    1998-01-01

    This study investigates the ability of the unicellular green alga Nannochloris atomusto precipitate CaCO3, quantifies mineral precipitation rates, estimates sediment production in a N. atomus bloom, and discusses the implications of microbial calcification for carbonate sediment deposition. A series of N. atomus cultures, isolated from Lake Reeve, Australia, were incubated at various pH and calcium concentrations to determine environmental pa-

  5. Porous texture evolution in Nomex-derived activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Villar-Rodil, S; Denoyel, R; Rouquerol, J; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2002-08-01

    In the present work, the textural evolution of a series of activated carbon fibers with increasing burn-off degree, prepared by the pyrolysis and steam activation of Nomex aramid fibers, is followed by measurements of physical adsorption of N(2) (77 K) and CO(2) (273 K) and immersion calorimetry into different liquids (dichloromethane, benzene, cyclohexane). The immersion calorimetry results are discussed in depth, paying special attention to the choice of the reference material. The activated carbon fibers studied possess an essentially homogeneous microporous texture, which suggests that these materials may be applied in gas separation, either directly or with additional CVD treatment. PMID:16290775

  6. Oxidation of activated carbon: application to vinegar decolorization.

    PubMed

    López, Francisco; Medina, Francisco; Prodanov, Marin; Güell, Carme

    2003-01-15

    This article reports studies on the feasibility of increasing the decoloring capacity of a granular activated carbon (GAC) by using oxidation with air at 350 degrees C to modify its surface activity and porosity. The GAC, obtained from olive stones, had a maximum decolorization capacity of 92% for doses of 20 g/l, while the maximum decolorization capacity of the modified granular activated carbon (MGAC) was about 96% at a dose of 10 g/l. The increase in decoloring capacity is thought to be due to an increase in mesopore area (from 129 to 340 m2/g) in the MGAC. The maximum decoloring values and the doses needed to attain them are very close to values obtained in previous studies using coconut shell powder-activated carbon (94 and 98% for red and white vinegar for a dose of 10 g/l, respectively). PMID:16256469

  7. Adsorption Capacity of Activated Carbon for n-Alkane VOCs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhibin Zhang; Gang Nong; C. Y. Shaw; Ling Gao

    The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the indoor air come from many sources including building materials, furnishings, occupant activities and in some cases, the ventilation air. Granular activated carbons (GAC) have been increasingly used to remove these contaminants, particularly for small commercial buildings and those located in urban centers or near industrial plants where the quality of outdoor air may

  8. Bioindication Potential of Carbonic Anhydrase Activity in Anemones

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    Bioindication Potential of Carbonic Anhydrase Activity in Anemones and Corals AUBREY L. GILBERT describing coral CA activity for potential application in bioindication. Published by Elsevier Sci- ence Ltd bioindication. While oysters and many other bivalves are predisposed to accumulate heavy metal pollutants

  9. Porous Texture Evolution in Nomex-Derived Activated Carbon Fibers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Villar-Rodil; R. Denoyel; J. Rouquerol; A. Mart??nez-Alonso; J. M. D. Tascón

    2002-01-01

    In the present work, the textural evolution of a series of activated carbon fibers with increasing burn-off degree, prepared by the pyrolysis and steam activation of Nomex aramid fibers, is followed by measurements of physical adsorption of N2 (77 K) and CO2 (273 K) and immersion calorimetry into different liquids (dichloromethane, benzene, cyclohexane). The immersion calorimetry results are discussed in

  10. India's cement industry: Productivity, energy efficiency and carbon emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Katja; Sathaye, Jayant

    1999-07-01

    Historical estimates of productivity growth in India's cement sector vary from indicating an improvement to a decline in the sector's productivity. The variance may be traced to the time period of study, source of data for analysis, and type of indices and econometric specifications used for reporting productivity growth. Analysis shows that in the twenty year period, 1973 to 1993, productivity in the aluminum sector increased by 0.8% per annum. An econometric analysis reveals that technical progress in India's cement sector has been biased towards the use of energy and capital, while it has been material and labor saving. The increase in productivity was mainly driven by a period of progress between 1983 and 1991 following partial decontrol of the cement sector in 1982. The authors examine the current changes in structure and energy efficiency in the sector. Their analysis shows that the Indian cement sector is moving towards world-best technology, which will result in fewer carbon emissions and more efficient energy use. However, substantial further energy savings and carbon reduction potentials still exist.

  11. Ratio of Pion Kaon Production in Proton Carbon Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Andrey V.; /Harvard U.

    2007-05-01

    The ratio of pion-kaon production by 120 GeV/c protons incident on carbon target is presented. The data was recorded with the Main Injector Particle Production experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Production ratios of K{sup +}/{pi}{sup +}, K{sup -}/{pi}{sup -}, K{sup -}/K{sup +}, and {pi}{sup -}/{pi}{sup +} are measured in 24 bins in longitudinal momentum from 20 to 90 GeV/c and transverse momentum up to 2 GeV/c. The measurement is compared to existing data sets, particle production Monte Carlo results from FLUKA-06, parametrization of proton-beryllium data at 400/450 GeV/c, and ratios measured by the MINOS experiment on the NuMI target.

  12. The Nanotech Academy Activity E: Consumer Products

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson plan from the Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge (NACK) Center provides an activity which will illustrate how nanotechnology is impacting the consumer products market. The activity is intended to help students understand the practical applications of nanotechnology while actively participating in the classroom.The exercise should take about 45 minutes of classroom time. This and all other resources from the NACK Center require a fast, easy, free log-in.

  13. Helical graphitic carbon nitrides with photocatalytic and optical activities.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun; Lin, Lihua; Ye, Xiangju; Guo, Fangsong; Wang, Xinchen

    2014-10-27

    Graphitic carbon nitride can be imprinted with a twisted hexagonal rod-like morphology by a nanocasting technique using chiral silicon dioxides as templates. The helical nanoarchitectures promote charge separation and mass transfer of carbon nitride semiconductors, enabling it to act as a more efficient photocatalyst for water splitting and CO2 reduction than the pristine carbon nitride polymer. This is to our knowledge a unique example of chiral graphitic carbon nitride that features both left- and right-handed helical nanostructures and exhibits unique optical activity to circularly polarized light at the semiconductor absorption edge as well as photoredox activity for solar-to-chemical conversion. Such helical nanostructured polymeric semiconductors are envisaged to hold great promise for a range of applications that rely on such semiconductor properties as well as chirality for photocatalysis, asymmetric catalysis, chiral recognition, nanotechnology, and chemical sensing. PMID:25220601

  14. [Comparison study on adsorption of middle molecular substances with multiwalled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Li, Guifeng; Wan, Jianxin; Huang, Xiangqian; Zeng, Qiao; Tang, Jing

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCTs) are very favorable to the adsorption of middle molecular substances in the hemoperfusion because of their multiporous structure, large surface area and high reactivity, which are beneficial to the excellent absorption properties. The purpose of this study was to study the MWCTs on the adsorption capacity of the middle molecular substances. Vitamin B12 (VB12) was selected as a model of the middle molecular substances. The morphologies of MWCTs and activated carbon from commercial "carbon kidney" were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The adsorption behavior of VB12 was compared to each other with UV-visible absorption spectra. The MWCTs formed a sophistaicate gap structure, and compared to the activated carbon, MWCTs had a larger surface area. By Langmuir equation and Freundlich equation fitting analysis, VB12 adsorption on MWCTs is fit for multi-molecular layer adsorption, and the adsorption type of activated carbon is more inclined to the model corresponding to Langmuir monolayer adsorption. The adsorption rate of MWCTs is faster than that of the activated carbon and the adsorption capacity is greater, which could be expected to become the new adsorbent in the hemoperfusion. PMID:21936376

  15. Bacteria associated with granular activated carbon particles in drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Camper, A K; LeChevallier, M W; Broadaway, S C; McFeters, G A

    1986-01-01

    A sampling protocol was developed to examine particles released from granular activated carbon filter beds. A gauze filter/Swinnex procedure was used to collect carbon fines from 201 granular activated carbon-treated drinking water samples over 12 months. Application of a homogenization procedure (developed previously) indicated that 41.4% of the water samples had heterotrophic plate count bacteria attached to carbon particles. With the enumeration procedures described, heterotrophic plate count bacteria were recovered at an average rate of 8.6 times higher than by conventional analyses. Over 17% of the samples contained carbon particles colonized with coliform bacteria as enumerated with modified most-probable-number and membrane filter techniques. In some instances coliform recoveries were 122 to 1,194 times higher than by standard procedures. Nearly 28% of the coliforms attached to these particles in drinking water exhibited the fecal biotype. Scanning electron micrographs of carbon fines from treated drinking water showed microcolonies of bacteria on particle surfaces. These data indicate that bacteria attached to carbon fines may be an important mechanism by which microorganisms penetrate treatment barriers and enter potable water supplies. PMID:3767356

  16. Breakthrough behavior of diethyl sulphide vapor on active carbon systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beer Singh; G. K. Prasad; T. H. Mahato; K. Sekhar

    2007-01-01

    Breakthrough behavior of diethyl sulphide vapors on carbon systems such as active carbon, NaOH\\/CrO3\\/C, NaOH\\/CrO3\\/EDA\\/C and RuCl3\\/C has been studied by using modified Wheeler equation and the same was used to calculate the pseudo-first-order rate constant (kv) and kinetic saturation of capacity (We) values. Effects of various parameters such as bed height, air flow rate, concentration and temperature on the

  17. Carbonation process of alkali-activated slag mortars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Puertas; M. Palacios; T. Vázquez

    2006-01-01

    This study analyzes the behaviour of waterglass- or NaOH-activated slag mortars after carbonation. The effect of a superplasticizer\\u000a based on vinyl copolymer and shrinkage reducing polypropylenglycol derivative admixtures on that process was also examined.\\u000a The same tests were run on cement mortars for reference purposes. The mortars were carbonated in a chamber ensuring CO2 saturation for four and eight months,

  18. Analysis of carbon soil content by using tagged neutron activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obhodas, Jasmina; Sudac, Davorin; Matjacic, Lidija; Valkovic, Vladivoj

    2012-06-01

    Here we describe a prototype for non-destructive, in-situ, accurate and cost-effectively measurement procedure of carbon in soil based on neutron activation analysis using 14 MeV tagged neutron beam. This technology can be used for carbon baseline assessment on regional scale and for monitoring of its surface and depth storage due to the changes in agricultural practices undertaken in order to mitigate global climate change.

  19. Apparatus for hydrogen and carbon production via carbon aerosol-catalyzed dissociation of hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muradov, Nazim Z. (Inventor); Smith, Franklyn (Inventor); Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A novel process and apparatus is disclosed for sustainable, continuous production of hydrogen and carbon by catalytic dissociation or decomposition of hydrocarbons at elevated temperatures using in-situ generated carbon particles. Carbon particles are produced by decomposition of carbonaceous materials in response to an energy input. The energy input can be provided by at least one of a non-oxidative and oxidative means. The non-oxidative means of the energy input includes a high temperature source, or different types of plasma, such as, thermal, non-thermal, microwave, corona discharge, glow discharge, dielectric barrier discharge, or radiation sources, such as, electron beam, gamma, ultraviolet (UV). The oxidative means of the energy input includes oxygen, air, ozone, nitrous oxide (NO.sub.2) and other oxidizing agents. The method, apparatus and process of the present invention is applicable to any gaseous or liquid hydrocarbon fuel and it produces no or significantly less CO.sub.2 emissions compared to conventional processes.

  20. Gel nanostructure in alkali-activated binders based on slag and fly ash, and effects of accelerated carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, Susan A., E-mail: s.bernal@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Provis, John L., E-mail: j.provis@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Walkley, Brant; San Nicolas, Rackel [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)] [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Gehman, John D. [School of Chemistry and Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)] [School of Chemistry and Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Brice, David G.; Kilcullen, Adam R. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia) [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Zeobond Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 23450, Docklands, Victoria 8012 (Australia); Duxson, Peter [Zeobond Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 23450, Docklands, Victoria 8012 (Australia)] [Zeobond Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 23450, Docklands, Victoria 8012 (Australia); Deventer, Jannie S.J. van [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Zeobond Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 23450, Docklands, Victoria 8012 (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    Binders formed through alkali-activation of slags and fly ashes, including ‘fly ash geopolymers’, provide appealing properties as binders for low-emissions concrete production. However, the changes in pH and pore solution chemistry induced during accelerated carbonation testing provide unrealistically low predictions of in-service carbonation resistance. The aluminosilicate gel remaining in an alkali-activated slag system after accelerated carbonation is highly polymerised, consistent with a decalcification mechanism, while fly ash-based binders mainly carbonate through precipitation of alkali salts (bicarbonates at elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations, or carbonates under natural exposure) from the pore solution, with little change in the binder gel identifiable by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In activated fly ash/slag blends, two distinct gels (C–A–S–H and N–A–S–H) are formed; under accelerated carbonation, the N–A–S–H gel behaves comparably to fly ash-based systems, while the C–A–S–H gel is decalcified similarly to alkali-activated slag. This provides new scope for durability optimisation, and for developing appropriate testing methodologies. -- Highlights: •C-A-S-H gel in alkali-activated slag decalcifies during accelerated carbonation. •Alkali-activated fly ash gel changes much less under CO{sub 2} exposure. •Blended slag-fly ash binder contains two coexisting gel types. •These two gels respond differently to carbonation. •Understanding of carbonation mechanisms is essential in developing test methods.

  1. A comparison of the electrochemical behavior of carbon aerogels and activated carbon fiber cloths

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T.D.; Alviso, C.T.; Hulsey, S.S.; Nielsen, J.K.; Pekala, R.W.

    1996-05-10

    Electrochemical capacitative behavior of carbon aerogels and commercial carbon fiber cloths was studied in 5M KOH, 3M sulfuric acid, and 0.5M tetrethylammonium tetrafluoroborate/propylene carbonate electrolytes. The resorcinol-formaldehyde based carbon aerogels with a range of denisty (0.2-0.85 g/cc) have open-cell structures with ultrafine pore sizes (5-50 nm), high surface area (400-700 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected particles or fibers with characteristic diameters of 10 nm. The commercial fiber cloths in the density range 0.2-04g/cc have high surface areas (1000-2500 m{sup 2}/g). The volumetric capacitances of high-density aerogels are shown to be comparable to or exceeding those from activated carbon fibers. Electrochemical behavior of these materials in various electrolytes is compared and related to their physical properties.

  2. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Baker, Frederick S [ORNL; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL

    2008-03-01

    In continuation of the development of composite materials for air separation based on molecular sieving properties and magnetic fields effects, several molecular sieve materials were tested in a flow system, and the effects of temperature, flow conditions, and magnetic fields were investigated. New carbon materials adsorbents, with and without pre-loaded super-paramagnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized; all materials were packed in chromatographic type columns which were placed between the poles of a high intensity, water-cooled, magnet (1.5 Tesla). In order to verify the existence of magnetodesorption effect, separation tests were conducted by injecting controlled volumes of air in a flow of inert gas, while the magnetic field was switched on and off. Gas composition downstream the column was analyzed by gas chromatography and by mass spectrometry. Under the conditions employed, the tests confirmed that N2 - O2 separation occurred at various degrees, depending on material's intrinsic properties, temperature and flow rate. The effect of magnetic fields, reported previously for static conditions, was not confirmed in the flow system. The best separation was obtained for zeolite 13X at sub-ambient temperatures. Future directions for the project include evaluation of a combined system, comprising carbon and zeolite molecular sieves, and testing the effect of stronger magnetic fields produced by cryogenic magnets.

  3. Alternating Authigenic and Carbonate Factory Production within a Cool-water Carbonate Sequence Stratigraphic Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, N. K.; Reid, C.; Bassett, K. N.

    2012-12-01

    Glaucony and phosphate production is characteristic of low sedimentation rates within low energy, oxygen-depleted environments, and is often associated with condensed sections and unconformities. Glaucony- and phosphate-rich rocks are often interpreted to be associated with sea-level highstands and maximum flooding surfaces, especially in siliciclastic systems. In contrast, our research shows that in the cool-water carbonate realm glaucony and, to an extent, phosphate are connected to lowstands and transgressions, requiring a reversal in the way they are interpreted within a sequence stratigraphic context. The Mid-Tertiary rocks of the Waitaki Basin, South Island, New Zealand, contain a cool-water carbonate and greensand succession formed on the eastern passive margin of the Zealandia continental fragment, and include two major sequence boundaries within a broad regional transgression. The palaeobasin contained an eastern outer shelf volcanic-induced high that acted like a platform rim, from where the basin deepened towards the west. The basal sequence contains a bryozoan grainstone facies that formed a shoal on the eastern volcanic seamount. This grades westward to a quartzose impure wackestone containing terrigenous material derived from low-lying islands of Zealandia far to the west. The overlying sequence boundary forms a karst surface associated with the high in the east, and a firmground in the west, and developed as a result of sea-level fall and lowstand conditions. During these lowstand conditions the terrigenous supply of silt and clay material was moved closer to the Waitaki Basin and this was then available for glauconitisation. Calcareous glaucony- and phosphate-rich greensands accumulated during the subsequent transgression, with the glaucony and phosphate content decreasing through this second sequence to form pure packstones during highstand and early regression. The second sequence boundary overlying these packstones shows similar karst and firmground distribution to the first, and has a similar greensand transgressive sequence deposited above it. In this cool-water setting, where the carbonate factory is located on an offshore volcanic-induced high, authigenic mineral production occurs at lowstand settings. During lowstand, mud-sized terrigenous clay minerals are introduced to the basin from the west, smothering the carbonate factory and supplying the building blocks for glaucony production. Through the transgressive phase this terrigenous clay supply is progressively shut down and the system returns to carbonate production at highstand. Sea-level rise in such an environment encourages the development of the cool-water carbonate factory, and thus a decrease in production from the 'authigenic factory'.

  4. Simulating the effects of light intensity and carbonate system composition on particulate organic and inorganic carbon production in Emiliania huxleyi.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Lena-Maria; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter; Thoms, Silke

    2015-05-01

    Coccolithophores play an important role in the marine carbon cycle. Variations in light intensity and external carbonate system composition alter intracellular carbon fluxes and therewith the production rates of particulate organic and inorganic carbon. Aiming to find a mechanistic explanation for the interrelation between dissolved inorganic carbon fluxes and particulate carbon production rates, we develop a numerical cell model for Emiliania huxleyi, one of the most abundant coccolithophore species. The model consists of four cellular compartments, for each of which the carbonate system is resolved dynamically. The compartments are connected to each other and to the external medium via substrate fluxes across the compartment-confining membranes. By means of the model we are able to explain several pattern observed in particulate organic and inorganic carbon production rates for different strains and under different acclimation conditions. Particulate organic and inorganic carbon production rates for instance decrease at very low external CO2 concentrations. Our model suggests that this effect is caused mainly by reduced HCO3(-) uptake rates, not by CO2 limitation. The often observed decrease in particulate inorganic carbon production rates under Ocean Acidification is explained by a downregulation of cellular HCO3(-) uptake. PMID:25747776

  5. Mechanochemical activation of high-carbon fly ash for enhanced carbon reburning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Osvalda Senneca; Piero Salatino; Riccardo Chirone; Luciano Cortese; Roberto Solimene

    2011-01-01

    The focus of the present study is the reduction of the residual unburnt carbon contained in fly ash from PC-fired boilers by reburning and\\/or beneficiation. More specifically, the study addresses the potential of enhancing oxyreactivity of the residual carbon contained in fly ash by mechanochemical activation in order to improve the effectiveness of ash reburning.The concept is tested with reference

  6. Hydrophobisation of activated carbon fiber and the influence on the adsorption selectivity towards carbon disulfide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zunyuan Xie; Feng Wang; Ning Zhao; Wei Wei; Yuhan Sun

    2011-01-01

    The hydrophobisation of commercial viscose-based activated carbon fiber (ACF) was obtained by grafting vinyltrimethoxysilane (vtmos) on the ACF surface, to improve ACF's adsorption selectivity towards carbon disulfide (CS2) under highly humid condition. The characterizations, including FTIR, 29Si NMR, adsorption\\/desorption of nitrogen, thermal analysis and elemental analysis, revealed that the vtmos was successfully grafted onto the ACF surface, even though the

  7. Enhancement of electrosorption capacity of activated carbon fibers by grafting with carbon nanofibers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yankun Zhan; Chunyang Nie; Haibo Li; Likun Pan; Zhuo Sun

    2011-01-01

    The composite films of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are prepared via chemical vapor deposition of CNFs onto ACFs in different times from 0.5 to 2h and their electrosorption behaviors in NaCl solution are investigated. The morphology, structure, porous and electrochemical properties are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, N2 adsorption at 77K,

  8. A General Methodology for Evaluation of Carbon Sequestration Activities and Carbon Credits

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, KT

    2002-12-23

    A general methodology was developed for evaluation of carbon sequestration technologies. In this document, we provide a method that is quantitative, but is structured to give qualitative comparisons despite changes in detailed method parameters, i.e., it does not matter what ''grade'' a sequestration technology gets but a ''better'' technology should receive a better grade. To meet these objectives, we developed and elaborate on the following concepts: (1) All resources used in a sequestration activity should be reviewed by estimating the amount of greenhouse gas emissions for which they historically are responsible. We have done this by introducing a quantifier we term Full-Cycle Carbon Emissions, which is tied to the resource. (2) The future fate of sequestered carbon should be included in technology evaluations. We have addressed this by introducing a variable called Time-adjusted Value of Carbon Sequestration to weigh potential future releases of carbon, escaping the sequestered form. (3) The Figure of Merit of a sequestration technology should address the entire life-cycle of an activity. The figures of merit we have developed relate the investment made (carbon release during the construction phase) to the life-time sequestration capacity of the activity. To account for carbon flows that occur during different times of an activity we incorporate the Time Value of Carbon Flows. The methodology we have developed can be expanded to include financial, social, and long-term environmental aspects of a sequestration technology implementation. It does not rely on global atmospheric modeling efforts but is consistent with these efforts and could be combined with them.

  9. Activated Carbon and Carbon Black Catalyzed Transformation of Aqueous Ozone into OH-Radicals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Urs Jans; Jürg Hoigné

    1998-01-01

    In an ozone-containing water a suspension of a few milligrams per liter of activated carbon (AQ or carbon black (CB) initiates a radical-type chain reaction that then proceeds in the aqueous phase and accelerates the transformation of O3 into secondary radicals, such as hydroxyl radicals (°OH). This results in an Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) that is similar to an O3-based

  10. Modified Activated Carbon to be Used in Clinical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, M. S.; de Silva, W. R. M.; de Silva, K. M. N.

    2014-11-01

    In this study a novel nano composite of hydroxyapatite nano particles impregnated activated carbon (C-HAp), which was synthesized in our own method, was used in iron adsorption studies. The study was conducted in order to investigate the potential of using C-HAp nanocomposite to be used in clinical detoxifications such as acute iron toxicity where the use of Activated carbon (GAC) is not very effective. Adsorption studies were conducted for synthetic solutions of Fe2+, Fe3+ and iron syrup using GAC, C-HAp and neat HAp as adsorbents. According to the results C-HAp nano composite showed improved properties than GAC in adsorbing Fe2+, Fe3+ and also Fe ions in iron syrup solutions. Thus the results of the in-vitro studies of iron adsorption studies indicated the potential of using C-HAp as an alternative to activated carbon in such clinical applications.

  11. Chars pyrolyzed from oil palm wastes for activated carbon preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Lua, A.C.; Guo, J. [Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore (Singapore)] [Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore (Singapore)

    1999-01-01

    Chars pyrolyzed from extracted oil palm fibers for the preparation of activated carbons were studied. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and hold time on density, porosity, yield, BET and micropore surface areas, total pore volume, and pore size distributions of chars were investigated. The optimum conditions for pyrolysis were found to be at a pyrolysis temperature of 850 C for a hold time of 3.5 h. Scanning electron micrographs of the char surfaces verified the presence of porosities. The experimental results showed that it was feasible to produce chars with high BET and micropore surface areas from extracted oil palm fibers. The resulting chars will be subjected to steam or carbon dioxide activation to prepare activated carbons for use as gas adsorbents for air pollution control.

  12. Towards efficient solar hydrogen production by intercalated carbon nitride photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Gao, Honglin; Yan, Shicheng; Wang, Jiajia; Huang, Yu An; Wang, Peng; Li, Zhaosheng; Zou, Zhigang

    2013-11-01

    The development of efficient photocatalytic material for converting solar energy to hydrogen energy as viable alternatives to fossil-fuel technologies is expected to revolutionize energy shortage and environment issues. However, to date, the low quantum yield for solar hydrogen production over photocatalysts has hindered advances in the practical applications of photocatalysis. Here, we show that a carbon nitride intercalation compound (CNIC) synthesized by a simple molten salt route is an efficient polymer photocatalyst with a high quantum yield. We found that coordinating the alkali metals into the C-N plane of carbon nitride will induce the un-uniform spatial charge distribution. The electrons are confined in the intercalated region while the holes are in the far intercalated region, which promoted efficient separation of photogenerated carriers. The donor-type alkali metal ions coordinating into the nitrogen pots of carbon nitrides increase the free carrier concentration and lead to the formation of novel nonradiative paths. This should favor improved transport of the photogenerated electron and hole and decrease the electron-hole recombination rate. As a result, the CNIC exhibits a quantum yield as high as 21.2% under 420 nm light irradiation for solar hydrogen production. Such high quantum yield opens up new opportunities for using cheap semiconducting polymers as energy transducers. PMID:24061109

  13. Modeling and preparation of activated carbon for methane storage II. Neural network modeling and experimental studies of the activated carbon preparation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mahnaz Namvar-Asl; Mohammad Soltanieh; Alimorad Rashidi

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the activated carbon (AC) preparation for methane storage. Due to the need for the introduction of a model, correlating the effective preparation parameters with the characteristic parameters of the activated carbon, a model was developed by neural networks. In a previous study [Namvar-Asl M, Soltanieh M, Rashidi A, Irandoukht A. Modeling and preparation of activated carbon for

  14. Carbon Monoxide Activates Autophagy via Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon-Jin; Ryter, Stefan W.; Xu, Jin-Fu; Nakahira, Kiichi; Kim, Hong Pyo; Kim, Young Sam

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy, an autodigestive process that degrades cellular organelles and protein, plays an important role in maintaining cellular homeostasis during environmental stress. Carbon monoxide (CO), a toxic gas and candidate therapeutic molecule, confers cytoprotection in animal models of acute lung injury. The mechanisms underlying CO-dependent lung cell protection and the role of autophagy in this process remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CO exposure time-dependently increased the expression and activation of the autophagic protein, microtubule-associated protein–1 light chain-3B (LC3B) in mouse lung, and in cultured human alveolar (A549) or human bronchial epithelial cells. Furthermore, CO increased autophagosome formation in epithelial cells by electron microscopy and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-LC3 puncta assays. Recent studies indicate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the activation of autophagy. CO up-regulated mitochondria-dependent generation of ROS in epithelial cells, as assayed by MitoSOX fluorescence. Furthermore, CO-dependent induction of LC3B expression was inhibited by N-acetyl-L-cysteine and the mitochondria-targeting antioxidant, Mito-TEMPO. These data suggest that CO promotes the autophagic process through mitochondrial ROS generation. We investigated the relationships between autophagic proteins and CO-dependent cytoprotection using a model of hyperoxic stress. CO protected against hyperoxia-induced cell death, and inhibited hyperoxia-associated ROS production. The ability of CO to protect against hyperoxia-induced cell death and caspase-3 activation was compromised in epithelial cells infected with LC3B-small interfering (si)RNA, indicating a role for autophagic proteins. These studies uncover a new mechanism for the protective action of CO, in support of potential therapeutic application of this gas. PMID:21441382

  15. Active cycling of organic carbon in the central Arctic Ocean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia A. Wheeler; Michel Gosselin; Evelyn Sherr; Delphine Thibaultc; David L. Kirchman; Ronald Benner; Terry E. Whitledge

    1996-01-01

    THE notion of a barren central Arctic Ocean has been accepted since English's pioneering work1 on drifting ice-islands. The year-round presence of ice, a short photosynthetic season and low temperatures were thought to severely limit biological production1,2, although the paucity of data was often noted. Because primary production appeared to be low1,2, subsequent studies assumed that most organic carbon was

  16. Adsorption of aromatic organic contaminants by graphene nanosheets: comparison with carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Apul, Onur Guven; Wang, Qiliang; Zhou, Yang; Karanfil, Tanju

    2013-03-15

    Adsorption of two synthetic organic compounds (SOCs; phenanthrene and biphenyl) by two pristine graphene nanosheets (GNS) and one graphene oxide (GO) was examined and compared with those of a coal base activated carbon (HD4000), a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), and a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) in distilled and deionized water and in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM). Graphenes exhibited comparable or better adsorption capacities than carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and granular activated carbon (GAC) in the presence of NOM. The presence of NOM reduced the SOC uptake of all adsorbents. However, the impact of NOM on the SOC adsorption was smaller on graphenes than CNTs and activated carbons. Furthermore, the SOC with its flexible molecular structure was less impacted from NOM preloading than the SOC with planar and rigid molecular structure. The results indicated that graphenes can serve as alternative adsorbents for removing SOCs from water. However, they will also, if released to environment, adsorb organic contaminants influencing their fate and impact in the environment. PMID:23313232

  17. Influence of preparation conditions in the textural and chemical properties of activated carbons from a novel biomass precursor: The coffee endocarp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    João Valente Nabais; Peter Carrott; M. M. L. Ribeiro Carrott; Vânia Luz; Angel L. Ortiz

    2008-01-01

    In this work a novel biomass precursor for the production of activated carbons (AC) was studied. The lignocellulosic material used as precursor is the coffee bean endocarp, which constitutes an industrial residue from the Portuguese coffee industry. Activation by carbon dioxide and potassium hydroxide produces activated carbons with small external areas and pore volumes up to 0.22 and 0.43cm3g?1, respectively,

  18. Comparisons of pore properties and adsorption performance of KOH-activated and steam-activated carbons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Feng-Chin Wu; Ru-Ling Tseng; Chi-Chang Hu

    2005-01-01

    Carbonaceous adsorbents with controllable pore sizes derived from carbonized pistachio shells (i.e., char) were prepared by the KOH activation and steam activation methods in this work. The pore properties including the BET surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and pore diameter of these activated carbons were characterized by the t-plot method based on N2 adsorption isotherms. Through varying the

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Elliot B. Kennel; Quentin C. Berg; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Jason C. Hissam; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Abha Saddawi; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2006-03-07

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. The largest applications are those which support metals smelting, such as anodes for aluminum smelting and electrodes for arc furnaces. Other carbon products include materials used in creating fuels for the Direct Carbon Fuel Cell, metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, efforts have focused on the development of carbon electrodes for Direct Carbon Fuel Cells (DCFC), and on carbon foam composites used in ballistic armor, as well as the hydrotreatment of solvents used in the basic solvent extraction process. A major goal is the production of 1500 pounds of binder pitch, corresponding to about 3000 pounds of hydrotreated solvent.

  20. Equation calculates activated carbon's capacity for adsorbing pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Yaws, C.L.; Bu, L.; Nijhawan, S. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

    1995-02-13

    Adsorption on activated carbon is an effective method for removing volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminants from gases. A new, simple equation has been developed for calculating activated carbon's adsorption capacity as a function of the VOC concentration in the gas. The correlation shows good agreement with experimental results. Results from the equation are applicable for conditions commonly encountered in air pollution control techniques (25 C, 1 atm). The only input parameters needed are VOC concentrations and a table of correlation coefficients for 292 C[sub 8]-C[sub 14] compounds. The table is suitable for rapid engineering usage with a personal computer or hand calculator.

  1. Pore structure of the activated coconut shell charcoal carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi, E.; Nasbey, H.; Yuniarti, B. D. P.; Nurmayatri, Y.; Fahdiana, J.; Budi, A. S.

    2014-09-01

    The development of activated carbon from coconut shell charcoal has been investigated by using physical method to determine the influence of activation parameters in term of temperature, argon gas pressure and time period on the pore structure of the activated carbon. The coconut shell charcoal was produced by pyrolisis process at temperature of about 75 - 150 °C for 6 hours. The charcoal was activated at various temperature (532, 700 and 868 °C), argon gas pressure (6.59, 15 and 23.4 kgf/cm2) and time period of (10, 60 and 120 minutes). The results showed that the pores size were reduced and distributed uniformly as the activation parameters are increased.

  2. One-carbon substrate-based biohydrogen production: microbes, mechanism, and productivity.

    PubMed

    Rittmann, Simon K-M R; Lee, Hyun Sook; Lim, Jae Kyu; Kim, Tae Wan; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Kang, Sung Gyun

    2015-01-01

    Among four basic mechanisms for biological hydrogen (H2) production, dark fermentation has been considered to show the highest hydrogen evolution rate (HER). H2 production from one-carbon (C1) compounds such as formate and carbon monoxide (CO) is promising because formate is an efficient H2 carrier, and the utilization of CO-containing syngas or industrial waste gas may render the industrial biohydrogen production process cost-effective. A variety of microbes with the formate hydrogen lyase (FHL) system have been identified from phylogenetically diverse groups of archaea and bacteria, and numerous efforts have been undertaken to improve the HER for formate through strain optimization and bioprocess development. CO-dependent H2 production has been investigated to enhance the H2 productivity of various carboxydotrophs via an increase in CO gas-liquid mass transfer rates and the construction of genetically modified strains. Hydrogenogenic CO-conversion has been applied to syngas and by-product gas of the steel-mill process, and this low-cost feedstock has shown to be promising in the production of biomass and H2. Here, we focus on recent advances in the isolation of novel phylogenetic groups utilizing formate or CO, the remarkable genetic engineering that enhances H2 productivity, and the practical implementation of H2 production from C1 substrates. PMID:25461503

  3. Removal of benzocaine from water by filtration with activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howe, G.E.; Bills, T.D.; Marking, L.L.

    1990-01-01

    Benzocaine is a promising candidate for registration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use as an anesthetic in fish culture, management, and research. A method for the removal of benzocaine from hatchery effluents could speed registration of this drug by eliminating requirements for data on its residues, tolerances, detoxification, and environmental hazards. Carbon filtration effectively removes many organic compounds from water. This study tested the effectiveness of three types of activated carbon for removing benzocaine from water by column filtration under controlled laboratory conditions. An adsorptive capacity was calculated for each type of activated carbon. Filtrasorb 400 (12 x 40 mesh; U.S. standard sieve series) showed the greatest capacity for benzocaine adsorption (76.12 mg benzocaine/g carbon); Filtrasorb 300 (8 x 30 mesh) ranked next (31.93 mg/g); and Filtrasorb 816 (8 x 16 mesh) absorbed the least (1.0 mg/g). Increased adsorptive capacity was associated with smaller carbon particle size; however, smaller particle size also impeded column flow. Carbon filtration is a practical means for removing benzocaine from treated water.

  4. Hydrodenitrogenation activity and selectivity of well-dispersed transition metal sulfides of the second row on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Ledoux, M.J.; Djellouli, B. (Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France))

    1989-02-01

    The study of the second row of transition metal sulfided catalysts well-dispersed on activated carbon and of a conventional NiMo/alumina sulfided catalyst shows that these sulfides can be classified into three families following their pyridine hydrodenitrogenation activity: the very poor catalysts (order 1) such as MiMo, Zr, Ag, and Nb; the active catalysts (order 10) such as Mo, Rh, and Pd; and the very active catalyst Ru. The selectivity of products differs greatly from one catalyst to another: the higher the concentration in saturated C{sub 5} hydrocarbons, the higher the activity; the higher the concentration in cracked hydrocarbons (C{sub 4}, C{sub 3}, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 1}) the lower the activity. In addition, there is no simple correlation between the concentrations of the different intermediate amines (piperidine and pentylamines mainly) and activity, which excludes any simple kinetical explanation.

  5. Dynamic adsorption on activated carbons of SO 2 traces in air

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Martin; A. Perrard; J. P. Joly; F. Gaillard; V. Delecroix

    2002-01-01

    Sulphur dioxide is an atmospheric pollutant which, among numerous others, has to be eliminated by habitacle filters. Breakthrough curves of low concentration SO2 streams through beds of activated carbons have been obtained. Two carbons were studied, an activated PAN fiber (CF) and a granulated activated carbon (CN) under SO2 concentrations lower than 100 ppm. Carbon CN used ‘as received’ is

  6. Characteristics of activated carbon for controlling gasoline vapor emissions: laboratory evaluation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Manos; W. C. Kelly; M. Samfield

    1977-01-01

    The application of activated carbon for control of gasoline vapor emissions resulting from service station operations was investigated under laboratory conditions. Cyclic tests were conducted on five activated carbon materials at various combinations of temperature, humidity, fuel volatility and container shape to determine working capacity characteristics. Regeneration of the carbon was effected by air purging and vacuum stripping. Activated carbon

  7. Extracellular matrix production and calcium carbonate precipitation by coral cells in vitro

    E-print Network

    Extracellular matrix production and calcium carbonate precipitation by coral cells in vitro Yael), which facilitates controlled deposition of a calcium carbonate skeleton; and (iii) the calcium carbonate to nematocysts, mucous glands, and sensory or nerve cells (2, 3). Many corals also precipitate calcium carbonate

  8. Estimates of carbon stored in harvested wood products from United States Forest Service's

    E-print Network

    , 2014 #12;2 Abstract Global forests capture and store significant amounts of carbon throughEstimates of carbon stored in harvested wood products from United States Forest Service's Sierra photosynthesis. When carbon is removed from forests through harvest, a portion of the harvested carbon is stored

  9. Effects of organic carbon sequestration strategies on soil enzymatic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, E.; Suciu, N.; Botteri, L.; Ferrari, T.; Coppolecchia, D.; Trevisan, M.; Piccolo, A.

    2009-04-01

    Greenhouse gases emissions can be counterbalanced with proper agronomical strategies aimed at sequestering carbon in soils. These strategies must be tested not only for their ability in reducing carbon dioxide emissions, but also for their impact on soil quality: enzymatic activities are related to main soil ecological quality, and can be used as early and sensitive indicators of alteration events. Three different strategies for soil carbon sequestration were studied: minimum tillage, protection of biodegradable organic fraction by compost amendment and oxidative polimerization of soil organic matter catalyzed by biometic porfirins. All strategies were compared with a traditional agricultural management based on tillage and mineral fertilization. Experiments were carried out in three Italian soils from different pedo-climatic regions located respectively in Piacenza, Turin and Naples and cultivated with maize or wheat. Soil samples were taken for three consecutive years after harvest and analyzed for their content in phosphates, ß-glucosidase, urease and invertase. An alteration index based on these enzymatic activities levels was applied as well. The biomimetic porfirin application didn't cause changes in enzymatic activities compared to the control at any treatment or location. Enzymatic activities were generally higher in the minimum tillage and compost treatment, while differences between location and date of samplings were limited. Application of the soil alteration index based on enzymatic activities showed that soils treated with compost or subjected to minimum tillage generally have a higher biological quality. The work confirms the environmental sustainability of the carbon sequestering agronomical practices studied.

  10. Production of carbonate sediments by a unicellular green alga

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, K.K.; Robbins, L.L.

    1998-01-01

    This study investigates the ability of the unicellular green alga Natmochloris atoimis to precipitate CaCO3, quantifies mineral precipitation rates, estimates sediment production in a N. atomiis bloom, and discusses the implications of microbial calcification for carbonate sediment deposition. A series of N. atomus cultures, isolated from Lake Reeve, Australia, were incubated at various pH and calcium concentrations to determine environmental parameters for calcification. Rates of calcification were calculated from initial and postincubation alkalinity, pH, and calcium measurements. Replicate experiments and controls consisting of non-calcifying cultures, uninoculated media, and dead cell cultures were performed using environmental culture parameters determined in series cultures. Average calcification rates from replicate experiments were used to predict daily sediment production rates in a small bloom of N. atomus. N. atomus precipitates 0.138 g/L of calcite in approximately 4 h when incubated at pH 8.5, 14.24 mM calcium concentration, 33 ??C, 100 ??E/m2/s light intensity, and a cell population density of 107 cells/mL. Assuming continuous precipitation, this corresponds to a maximum estimated sediment production rate of 1.6 ?? 106 kg of CaCO3, per 12 h day in a single bloom of 3.2 ?? 109 L. Our results suggest that microbial calcification contributes significantly to the carbonate sediment budget.

  11. Concomitant Production of High Purity Hydrogen and Sequestration Ready Carbon Dioxide From Coal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kanchan Mondal; Krzysztof Piotrowski; Tomasz Wiltowski

    A novel process on the production of a high purity stream of hydrogen from gasification products with concomitant generation of sequestration-ready carbon dioxide stream is presented. The central theme of the process lies in the sequential use of a) an oxygen transfer compound (OTC) to oxidize carbon monoxide present in syngas and b) capture of CO2 using an appropriate carbon

  12. Phenol oxidation on the surface of granular activated carbon under water-treatment conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, L.S.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical activity of granular activated carbon (GAC) toward adsorbed phenol were investigated in a fixed bed column. After adsorption from aqueous solution, phenol was oxidized to carbon-carbon (C-C) and carbon-oxygen (C-0) bonded dimers as well as an oxidized compound of uncertain structure (molecular weight 276) as major products. This phenol coupling oxidation was observed on several types of commercial GAC. Various experimental parameters were tested to further characterize the coupling reaction of phenol on F400 GAC. Total product yields (based on adsorbed phenol) were determined based on the amount of phenol removed by GAC, not the initial concentration of input phenol. The ratio of C-C dimer to C-0 dimer increased with the increase of the amount of phenol adsorbed. Also, total product yield was dependent on reaction pH which influenced phenol adsorption onto GAC from aqueous solution. Phenol oxidations on GAC surfaces were also studied in a series of experiments under conditions similar to those commonly met in water treatment. The presence of humic substances from soil or groundwater inhibited phenol oxidation and favored the formation of the C-0 dimer relative to the C-C dimer. The lower total product yield was partially due to the competitive adsorption on active sit and partially to the free radical quenching activity of humic substances. The mechanism of the inhibition of humic substance h been discussed according to the results from syringic acid as a model compound of humic substances and ascorbic acid as a hydrophilic free radical scavenger, which were applied along with phenol onto GAC separately. Free chlorine-oxidized GAC showed less capacity for phenol adsorption than virgin GAC. The lower degree of phenol uptake resulted in lower formation of phenol coupling products on the GAC.

  13. Carbon–carbon bond activation of cyclobutenones enabled by the addition of chiral organocatalyst to ketone

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bao-Sheng; Wang, Yuhuang; Jin, Zhichao; Zheng, Pengcheng; Ganguly, Rakesh; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2015-01-01

    The activation of carbon–carbon (C–C) bonds is an effective strategy in building functional molecules. The C–C bond activation is typically accomplished via metal catalysis, with which high levels of enantioselectivity are difficult to achieve due to high reactivity of metal catalysts and the metal-bound intermediates. It remains largely unexplored to use organocatalysis for C–C bond activation. Here we describe an organocatalytic activation of C–C bonds through the addition of an NHC to a ketone moiety that initiates a C–C single bond cleavage as a key step to generate an NHC-bound intermediate for chemo- and stereo-selective reactions. This reaction constitutes an asymmetric functionalization of cyclobutenones using organocatalysts via a C–C bond activation process. Structurally diverse and multicyclic compounds could be obtained with high optical purities via an atom and redox economic process. PMID:25652912

  14. Sulfurized activated carbon for high energy density supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yunxia; Candelaria, Stephanie L.; Li, Yanwei; Li, Zhimin; Tian, Jianjun; Zhang, Lili; Cao, Guozhong

    2014-04-01

    Sulfurized activated carbon (SAC), made by coating the pore surface with thiophenic sulfur functional groups from the pyrolysis of sulfur flakes, were characterized and tested for supercapacitor applications. From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the sulfur content in the SAC was found to be 2.7 at%. Electrochemical properties from potentiostatic and galvanostatic measurements, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to evaluate the effect of sulfur on porous carbon electrodes. The SAC electrode exhibits better conductivity, and an obvious increase in specific capacitance that is almost 40% higher than plain activated carbons (ACs) electrode at a high current density of 1.4 A g-1. The proposed mechanism for improved conductivity and capacitive performance due to the sulfur functional groups on ACs will be discussed.

  15. Combined effect of adsorption and biodegradation of biological activated carbon on H2S biotrickling filtration.

    PubMed

    Duan, Huiqi; Yan, Rong; Koe, Lawrence Choon Chiaw; Wang, Xiaoling

    2007-01-01

    In order to evaluate the combined effect of adsorption and biodegradation of H(2)S on activated carbon surface in biotrickling filtration, four laboratory-scale biofiltration columns were operated simultaneously for 120h to investigate the mechanisms involved in treating synthetic H(2)S streams using biological activated carbon (BAC). The first three columns (A, B, C) contained a mixture of activated carbon and glass beads, with the carbons (BAC or virgin activated carbon (VAC)) and conditions (with or without liquid medium recirculation) differentiated. The last column (D) used 100% glass beads with liquid medium recirculation. Air streams containing 45ppmv H(2)S were passed through the columns at 4s of gas retention time (GRT) and liquid flow rate was set at 0.71mlmin(-1). Column D got its breakthrough in 3min of operation, indicating a negligible contribution of glass beads to the adsorption of H(2)S. The removal efficiency (RE) of Columns B and C using VAC dropped quickly to 30% within the first 8h, and afterwards continued to drop further but slowly. Column A using BAC stayed at 25% of RE throughout the operation time. A thorough investigation of the H(2)S oxidation products, i.e., various S species in both aqueous (recirculation media) and solid phases (BAC and VAC), was conducted using ICP-OES, IC, XRF, and CHNS elemental analyzer. BAC demonstrated a better performance than columns with adsorption only. Water film was found to enhance H(2)S removal. The percentage of sulphate in the total sulphur of the BAC system improved to twice of that of VAC system, indicating sulphate is the main product of H(2)S biofiltration. The observed pH drop in BAC system double confirmed that the presence of biodegradation in the biofilm over carbon surface did profound effect on the oxidation of H(2)S, compare to the systems with adsorption only. PMID:16930670

  16. Harnessing the Biological Activity of Natural Products

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have been intrigued by the potent and beneficial biological activity shown by some natural products and are testing ways to incorporate them into standard and experimental cancer treatment regimens, both to enhance the anticancer effects of therapy and reduce side effects.

  17. Force related activations in rhythmic sequence production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Pope; Alan M. Wing; Peter Praamstra; R. Chris Miall

    2005-01-01

    Brain imaging studies have implicated the basal ganglia in the scaling of movement velocity. Basal ganglia activation has also been reported for movement timing. We investigated the neural correlates of scaling of force and time in the production of rhythmic motor sequences using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the human brain. Participants (N = 13) were imaged while squeezing a rigid

  18. Active carbon filter health condition detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    E-print Network

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    due to mechanical changes. EMIS can detect impedance changes due to mechanical changes method. Some remarkable new phenomena were unveiled in the detection of carbon filter status. 1. PWAS the filtration performance. Hence, methods are sought to detect the degradation of impregnated active carbon

  19. Hydrogen and carbon monoxide production by hydrocarbon steam reforming and pressure swing adsorption purification

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, R.

    1992-03-17

    This patent describes a method for producing hydrogen and carbon monoxide from a feed mixture comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and methane. It comprises passing the feed mixture through a first pressure swing adsorption system containing an adsorption bed comprising an adsorbent having a greater affinity for carbon dioxide, methane, and carbon monoxide than for hydrogen to separate hydrogen as a pure non-adsorbed product and carbon dioxide, methane, and carbon monoxide as an adsorbed fraction; desorbing carbon monoxide from the pressure swing adsorption system to form a carbon monoxide-rich fraction; desorbing carbon dioxide and methane from the pressure swing absorption system to form a carbon dioxide-rich fraction; passing the carbon monoxide-rich fraction to a second pressure swing adsorption system containing an adsorption bed comprising an adsorbent having a greater affinity for carbon monoxide than for hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane to separate carbon monoxide as an absorbed fraction and hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane as a non-adsorbed fraction; and desorbing carbon monoxide from the pressure swing adsorption system to form a pure carbon monoxide product.

  20. 76 FR 77775 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ...Trade Administration [C-580-818] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products...review of the countervailing duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products...2009, through December 31, 2009. See Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat...

  1. 78 FR 55241 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ...Trade Administration [C-580-818] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products...countervailing duty (CVD) order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products...covered by this Order \\2\\ is certain corrosion- resistant carbon steel flat...

  2. 77 FR 13093 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ...Trade Administration [C-580-818] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products...countervailing duty (``CVD'') order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products...1\\ See Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat...

  3. INFLUENCE OF INORGANIC CONTAMINATIONS AND THERMAL TREATMENT CONDITIONS OF BIOMASS ON CHANGES IN CAPILLARY STRUCTURE OF ACTIVATED CARBONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Kielczewski; B. Mazela; R. Zakrzewski; S. Zietek; A. Swiatkowski

    The production of carbonaceous adsorption materials from biomass seems to be advantageos and promising upgrading innovation of this residues. This paper presents the result of an investigationon characteristics of activated carbons made from lignocellulosic wastes (solid bio-fuel) conaminated by Cr, Cu, B, Zn salt as well as some oils obtained from the pyrolysis ana destillation of coals. Charcoal and activated

  4. Characterizing o- and p-nitrophenols adsorption onto innovative activated carbon prepared from date pits.

    PubMed

    Altaher, Hossam; Dietrich, Andrea M

    2014-01-01

    The production and performance of activated carbon prepared from date pits was investigated. Date pits are an abundant local waste product in many countries; converting them to a commercial product would increase the sustainability of this fruit crop. The date pit activated carbon was shown to have similar characteristics of pore size and surface functional groups as other commercial carbons. Batch experiments were conducted with o- and p-nitrophenol to evaluate the performance of this carbon. Results were analyzed according to Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity of o-nitrophenol was 142.9 mg/g while that of p-nitrophenol was 108.7 mg/g. The adsorption process was physical in nature. The position of the -NO(2) group in the benzene ring has a considerable effect on the adsorption capacity and rate of uptake. The kinetic results showed that a pseudo second-order model appropriately describes the experimental data. The analysis of kinetic data revealed that the mechanism of adsorption is complex with both liquid film diffusion and intraparticle diffusion contributing to adsorption of both adsorbates. PMID:24434965

  5. Analysis of a Thin Activated Carbon Loaded Adsorption Medium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wayne T. Davis; Christopher C. Hood; Maureen Dever

    1995-01-01

    Thin adsorption media are being investigated for use in a variety of applications including protective clothing for military use and hazardous waste cleanup, as well as in indoor air quality within a variety of filtration media. The objective of this study was to evaluate the dynamics of adsorption of a chlorinated organic gas on activated carbon impregnated meltblown laminates. The

  6. ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT OF INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS: SELECTED TECHNICAL PAPERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the tremendous interest in the organic constituent removal by activated carbon, the two industrial categories displaying the most interest are the petroleum refining and petrochemical industries. EPA's Office of Research and Development has co-sponsored two technical s...

  7. EVALUATION OF PROCEDURES TO DESORB BACTERIA FROM GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physical, chemical, and enzymatic means for the desorption of micro-organisms from granular activated carbon (GAC) were assessed. Data indicate that homogenization at 16,000 rpm for 3 min at 4 C with a mixture of peptone (0.01%), Zwittergent 3-12 ( times 10 to the minus 6 power M...

  8. POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION ISOTHERMS FOR SELECTED TANNERY EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two raw untreated tanning effluents were initially tested for the removal of COD, BOD, TOC, total and specific phenols, oil and grease, and total chromium, using the following six individual powdered activated carbons (PAC): ICI-HDC, ICI-HDH, Nuchar SA-15, Amoco PX-21, Norit FQA,...

  9. MICROBIOLOGICAL ALTERATIONS IN DISTRIBUTED WATER TREATED WITH GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this project was to examine the effect of granular activated carbon (GAC) treatment on the microbiological characteristics of potable water in distribution systems. Data was collected from both field and pilot plant studies. Field monitoring studies from two water tre...

  10. GAC (GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON) TREATMENT COSTS: A SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although admittedly effective for removing organic compounds, concerns have been raised about the cost of using GAC for treating drinking water. This paper is devoted to the discussion of the cost of granular activated carbon for removing organic compounds from drinking water. Ac...

  11. TRANSITION METAL ACTIVATION AND FUNCTIONALIZATION OF CARBON-HYDROGEN BONDS

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    TRANSITION METAL ACTIVATION AND FUNCTIONALIZATION OF CARBON-HYDROGEN BONDS William D. Jones, New York 14627 FOR #12;DOE Report, 1998-2001 2 William D. Jones Overview of Research Accomplishments will extend this work to #12;DOE Report, 1998-2001 3 William D. Jones other early metal compounds during

  12. POULTRY MANURE-BASED ACTIVATED CARBONS AS MERCURY ADSORBENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased emphasis on reduction of mercury emissions from coal fired electric power plans have resulted in environmental regulations that may in the future require application of activated carbons as mercury sorbents. The sorbents could be injected into the flue gas stream where is adsorbs the merc...

  13. Short communication Improvement of activated carbons as oxygen reduction catalysts

    E-print Network

    , peat, and hardwood ACs. Cathode performance improved with all but one ammonia treated AC. a r t i c l available activated carbon (AC) powders from different precursor materials (peat, coconut shell, coal of the bituminous, peat, and hardwood ACs. The treated coal based AC cathodes had higher maximum power densities

  14. BACTERIA ATTACHED TO GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory and field studies were undertaken to answer basic questions about the influence of granular activated carbon (GAC) on the bacteriological quality of drinking water. A sampling apparatus consisting of a 47-mm Swinnex/and a 16-layer filter was developed to trap filter fi...

  15. Biodegradation of BTEX by bacteria on powdered activated carbon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. A. Mason; G. Ward; K. Abu-Salah; O. Keren; C. G. Dosoretz

    2000-01-01

    Aerobic degradation of a mixture of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and the mixed xylenes (BTEX) by a mixed bacterial population was studied in a continuously fed, completely mixed bioreactor in the presence of powdered activated carbon (PAC). Adsorption was characterized in the presence and in the absence of bacteria on PAC, and the affinity of virgin PAC to individual BTEX components

  16. REMOVAL OF MOLYBDENUM FROM ACID LEACH LIQUORS BY ACTIVATED CARBON

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. T. Hollis; H. E. Dixon

    1958-01-01

    Data are presented on the absorption of molybdenum on activated carbon. ;\\u000a The effect of retention time and linear flow on absorption, the use of sodium ;\\u000a hydroxide as an eluant, and the possibility of recovering molybdenum from the ;\\u000a caustic eluate are discussed. (auth)

  17. Removal of Carbonyl Sulfide Using Activated Carbon Adsorption

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melanie L. Sattler; Ranjith Samuel Rosenberk

    2006-01-01

    Wastewater treatment plant odors are caused by compounds such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methyl mercaptans, and carbonyl sulfide (COS). One of the most efficient odor control processes is activated carbon adsorption; however, very few studies have been conducted on COS adsorption. COS is not only an odor causing compound but is also listed in the Clean Air Act as a

  18. Ammonia removal of activated carbon fibers produced by oxyfluorination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Soo-Jin Park; Byung-Joo Kim

    2005-01-01

    In this study, activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were produced by an oxyfluorination treatment to enhance the capacity of ammonia gas removal. The introduction of polar groups, such as CF, CO, and COOH, on the ACFs was confirmed by a XPS analysis, and N2\\/77 K adsorption isotherm characteristics including specific surface area and total and micropore volumes were studied by the

  19. CONSIDERATIONS IN GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT OF COMBINED INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project was to examine the use of activated carbon in reducing the content of biologically resistant organic compounds in a combined industrial wastewater treatment system. The invvestigation was conducted in two stages: (1) characterize organic priority pol...

  20. Decolorization / deodorization of zein via activated carbons and molecular sieves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective is to evaluate a series of granular media consisting of activated carbons and molecular sieves in a batch process for the purpose of clarifying and removal of color and odor components from yellow zein dispersed in an aqueous alcohol medium. The major contributors of yellow zein is du...

  1. Acoustical Evaluation of Carbonized and Activated Cotton Nonwovens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An activated carbon fiber nonwoven (ACF) was manufactured from cotton nonowoven fabric. For the ACF acoustical application, a nonwoven composite of ACF with cotton nonwoven as a base layer was developed. Also produced were the composites of the cotton nonwoven base layer with a layer of glass fiber ...

  2. Carbonic anhydrase activity in acetate grown Methanosarcina barkeri

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marion Karrasch; Michael Bott; Rudolf K. Thauer

    1989-01-01

    Cell extracts (27000xg supernatant) of acetate grown Methanosarcina barkeri were found to have carbonic anhydrase activity (0.41 U\\/mg protein), which was lost upon heating or incubation with proteinase K. The activity was inhibited by Diamox (apparent Ki=0.5 mM), by azide (apparent Ki=1 mM), and by cyanide (apparent Ki=0.02 mM). These and other properties indicate that the archaebacterium contains the enzyme

  3. Evaluation of the genetic activity of industrially produced carbon black

    SciTech Connect

    Kirwin, C.J. (Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK); LeBlanc, J.V.; Thomas, W.C.; Haworth, S.R.; Kirby, P.E.; Thilagar, A.; Bowman, J.T.; Brusick, D.J.

    1981-06-01

    Commercially produced oil furnace carbon black has been evaluated by five different assays for genetic activity. These were the Ames Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation test, sister chromatid exchange test in CHO cells, mouse lymphoma test, cell transformation assay in C3H/10T 1/2 cells, and assay for genetic effects in Drosophila melanogaster. Limited cellular toxicity was exhibited but no significant genetic activity was noted.

  4. Managing Commercial Tree Species for Timber Production and Carbon Sequestration: Management Guidelines and Financial Returns

    SciTech Connect

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2006-09-19

    A carbon credit market is developing in the United States. Information is needed by buyers and sellers of carbon credits so that the market functions equitably and efficiently. Analyses have been conducted to determine the optimal forest management regime to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the tree species, site quality and management regimes utilized, analyses have determined how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities, discount rates, prices of carbon credits and other economic variables. The effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, the amount of carbon that can be sequestered, and the amount of timber products produced has been determined.

  5. Asphalt-derived high surface area activated porous carbons for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Jalilov, Almaz S; Ruan, Gedeng; Hwang, Chih-Chau; Schipper, Desmond E; Tour, Josiah J; Li, Yilun; Fei, Huilong; Samuel, Errol L G; Tour, James M

    2015-01-21

    Research activity toward the development of new sorbents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture have been increasing quickly. Despite the variety of existing materials with high surface areas and high CO2 uptake performances, the cost of the materials remains a dominant factor in slowing their industrial applications. Here we report preparation and CO2 uptake performance of microporous carbon materials synthesized from asphalt, a very inexpensive carbon source. Carbonization of asphalt with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at high temperatures (>600 °C) yields porous carbon materials (A-PC) with high surface areas of up to 2780 m(2) g(-1) and high CO2 uptake performance of 21 mmol g(-1) or 93 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C. Furthermore, nitrogen doping and reduction with hydrogen yields active N-doped materials (A-NPC and A-rNPC) containing up to 9.3% nitrogen, making them nucleophilic porous carbons with further increase in the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas up to 2860 m(2) g(-1) for A-NPC and CO2 uptake to 26 mmol g(-1) or 114 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C for A-rNPC. This is the highest reported CO2 uptake among the family of the activated porous carbonaceous materials. Thus, the porous carbon materials from asphalt have excellent properties for reversibly capturing CO2 at the well-head during the extraction of natural gas, a naturally occurring high pressure source of CO2. Through a pressure swing sorption process, when the asphalt-derived material is returned to 1 bar, the CO2 is released, thereby rendering a reversible capture medium that is highly efficient yet very inexpensive. PMID:25531980

  6. Activated carbons from KOH-activation of argan (Argania spinosa) seed shells as supercapacitor electrodes.

    PubMed

    Elmouwahidi, Abdelhakim; Zapata-Benabithe, Zulamita; Carrasco-Marín, Francisco; Moreno-Castilla, Carlos

    2012-05-01

    Activated carbons were prepared by KOH-activation of argan seed shells (ASS). The activated carbon with the largest surface area and most developed porosity was superficially treated to introduce oxygen and nitrogen functionalities. Activated carbons with a surface area of around 2100 m(2)/g were obtained. Electrochemical measurements were carried out with a three-electrode cell using 1M H(2)SO(4) as electrolyte and Ag/AgCl as reference electrode. The O-rich activated carbon showed the lowest capacitance (259 F/g at 125 mA/g) and the lowest capacity retention (52% at 1A/g), due to surface carboxyl groups hindering electrolyte diffusion into the pores. Conversely, the N-rich activated carbon showed the highest capacitance (355 F/g at 125 mA/g) with the highest retention (93% at 1A/g), due to its well-developed micro-mesoporosity and the pseudocapacitance effects of N functionalities. This capacitance performance was among the highest reported for other activated carbons from a large variety of biomass precursors. PMID:22370231

  7. Climate change, carbon dioxide, and global crop production: Adaptation to uncertainty

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Documented and projected changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide are likely to alter agricultural productivity in two ways: directly, by supplying additional carbon for photosynthesis and growth, and indirectly by altering climate, specifically surface temperatures and precipitation. In this overview...

  8. Lipid production for biofuels from hydrolyzate of waste activated sludge by heterotrophic Chlorella protothecoides.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qinxue; Chen, Zhiqiang; Li, Pengfei; Duan, Ran; Ren, Nanqi

    2013-09-01

    Microalga Chlorella protothecoides can accumulate high proportion of lipids during the heterotrophic growth with glucose as the carbon source. However, its commercial application is restricted due to the high cost of the carbon source. In this study, the wasted activated sludge (WAS) was hydrolyzed after ultrasonic pre-treatment and the hydrolyzate obtained was used as an alternative carbon source for algal biomass and biodiesel production. The results indicate that C. protothecoides can proliferate in the WAS hydrolyzate and accumulate biolipid. The final lipid content of the culture fed with the hydrolyzate was 21.5±1.44% (weight percent) after 156 h cultivation in flasks and the maximum biomass obtained was 0.5 g L(-1). Acetic acid and isovaleric acid were favorable carbon sources for cell growth. The soluble microbial products (SMP) presents in the hydrolyzate can also be used as a carbon source for cell growth. PMID:23856018

  9. PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE-POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON-WET AIR REGENERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The investigation summarized in this report was undertaken to evaluate the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) technology used in conjuntion with wet air regeneration (WAR) at municipal wastewater treatment plants. xcessive ash concentrations accumulated in the mixed l...

  10. PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE-POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON-WET AIR REGENERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The investigation summarized in the report was undertaken to evaluate the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) technology used in conjunction with wet air regeneration (WAR) at municipal wastewater treatment plants. Excessive ash concentrations accumulated in the mixed ...

  11. Investigating the performance of CoxOy/activated carbon catalysts for ethyl acetate catalytic combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hongmei; Zhao, Xiaoping; Zhou, Guilin; He, Xiaoling; Lan, Hai; Jiang, Zongxuan

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic properties of Co-supported activated carbon (AC) catalysts for ethyl acetate catalytic elimination in air were investigated. Results showed that air atmosphere promoted the generation of high-valence state cobalt oxides, and promote the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the Co3O4/AC catalyst. ROS crucially functioned in improving the catalytic activity of Co3O4/AC catalysts. Therefore, CoACA catalyst prepared in air exhibited higher catalytic activity than CoACN catalyst prepared in nitrogen, and CoACA catalyst led to high ethyl acetate conversion (>93%) and stability at a low reaction temperature (210 °C).

  12. Burners and combustion apparatus for carbon nanomaterial production

    DOEpatents

    Alford, J. Michael (Lakewood, CO); Diener, Michael D. (Denver, CO); Nabity, James (Arvada, CO); Karpuk, Michael (Boulder, CO)

    2007-10-09

    The invention provides improved burners, combustion apparatus, and methods for carbon nanomaterial production. The burners of the invention provide sooting flames of fuel and oxidizing gases. The condensable products of combustion produced by the burners of this invention produce carbon nanomaterials including without limitation, soot, fullerenic soot, and fullerenes. The burners of the invention do not require premixing of the fuel and oxidizing gases and are suitable for use with low vapor pressure fuels such as those containing substantial amounts of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The burners of the invention can operate with a hot (e.g., uncooled) burner surface and require little, if any, cooling or other forms of heat sinking. The burners of the invention comprise one or more refractory elements forming the outlet of the burner at which a flame can be established. The burners of the invention provide for improved flame stability, can be employed with a wider range of fuel/oxidizer (e.g., air) ratios and a wider range of gas velocities, and are generally more efficient than burners using water-cooled metal burner plates. The burners of the invention can also be operated to reduce the formation of undesirable soot deposits on the burner and on surfaces downstream of the burner.

  13. Burners and combustion apparatus for carbon nanomaterial production

    DOEpatents

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D; Nabity, James; Karpuk, Michael

    2013-02-05

    The invention provides improved burners, combustion apparatus, and methods for carbon nanomaterial production. The burners of the invention provide sooting flames of fuel and oxidizing gases. The condensable products of combustion produced by the burners of this invention produce carbon nanomaterials including without limitation, soot, fullerenic soot, and fullerenes. The burners of the invention do not require premixing of the fuel and oxidizing gases and are suitable for use with low vapor pressure fuels such as those containing substantial amounts of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The burners of the invention can operate with a hot (e.g., uncooled) burner surface and require little, if any, cooling or other forms of heat sinking. The burners of the invention comprise one or more refractory elements forming the outlet of the burner at which a flame can be established. The burners of the invention provide for improved flame stability, can be employed with a wider range of fuel/oxidizer (e.g., air) ratios and a wider range of gas velocities, and are generally more efficient than burners using water-cooled metal burner plates. The burners of the invention can also be operated to reduce the formation of undesirable soot deposits on the burner and on surfaces downstream of the burner.

  14. Carbon dynamics in a productive coastal region—The Skagerrak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjalmarsson, Sofia; Chierici, Melissa; Anderson, Leif G.

    2010-09-01

    The importance of the coastal seas as areas of CO 2 uptake from the atmosphere has gained more attention during recent years. This study utilizes dissolved inorganic carbon and hydrographic data collected in the Skagerrak for 10 months in 2006 to assess the carbon dynamics over the year. The surface water is under-saturated in CO 2 relative to the atmosphere during the first half of the year and stays close to equilibrium at least until November. Consequently primary production compensates for the increase in pCO 2 caused by the temperature increase from ˜ 2 to ˜ 10 °C in spring. Integrating the annual air-sea CO 2 flux as computed using the Wanninkhof (1992) parameterization gives a net uptake of 1.2 mol m - 2 year - 1 which, if representative for the whole Skagerrak area, equals 3.7 • 10 10 mol year - 1 or 0.45 Tg C year - 1 . Converting the nitrate consumption in the surface mixed layer from January to May to carbon units through the RKR ratio ( Redfield et al., 1963) gives a drawdown of 6 g C m - 2 . This number increases by a factor of two if primary productivity also occurs in the waters below the surface mixed layer, i.e. an increase in depth from 10 to 25 m as a seasonal average.We estimated the effect of salinity, biological processes and air-sea CO 2 exchange on the monthly DIC change. We found that salinity was one of the major drivers for the DIC change.

  15. Effect of dissolved carbon dioxide on penicillin fermentations: mycelial growth and penicillin production. [Penicillium chrysogenum

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.S.; Smith, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of dissolved carbon dioxide on the specific growth rate and the penicillin production rate of Penicillium chrysogenum was examined experimentally. The dissolved carbon dioxide was found to inhibit the specific growth rate and the penicillin production rate when the aerated submerged penicillin fermentation was exposed to influent gases of 12.6 and 20% carbon dioxide, respectively. Upon exposure to influent gases of 3 and 5% carbon dioxide, no pronounced metabolic inhibition was noted.

  16. Adsorption of Volatile Organic Compounds on Activated Carbon Fiber Preparedby Carbon Dioxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zheng-Hong Huang; Feiyu Kang; Jun-Bing Yang; Kai-Ming Liang; Aiping Huang

    2002-01-01

    Viscose rayon fabric impregnated with (NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 were carbonized in 200 cm 3 \\/min N 2 at 5°C\\/min with a residence time of 1 h at 850°C and then activated with 200 cm 3 \\/min CO 2 at 850°C for different burnoffs. The pore structure of all samples was characterized by N 2 adsorption at 77

  17. Lactose oxidation over palladium catalysts supported on active carbons and on carbon nanofibres

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anton V. Tokarev; Elena V. Murzina; Kari Eränen; Heidi Markus; Arie J. Plomp; Johannes H. Bitter; Päivi Mäki-Arvela; Dmitry Yu. Murzin

    2009-01-01

    Liquid-phase lactose oxidation was investigated over supported Pd\\/C and Pd-carbon nanofibre catalysts, which were characterized\\u000a by several methods. A complex relationship between catalyst activity and catalyst acidity was established, i.e. optimum catalyst\\u000a acidity resulted in the highest activity in lactose oxidation. In-situ catalyst potential measurements during lactose oxidation\\u000a gave information about the extent of accumulation of oxygen on the metal

  18. Estimates of increased black carbon emissions from electrostatic precipitators during powdered activated carbon injection for mercury emissions control.

    PubMed

    Clack, Herek L

    2012-07-01

    The behavior of mercury sorbents within electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) is not well-understood, despite a decade or more of full-scale testing. Recent laboratory results suggest that powdered activated carbon exhibits somewhat different collection behavior than fly ash in an ESP and particulate filters located at the outlet of ESPs have shown evidence of powdered activated carbon penetration during full-scale tests of sorbent injection for mercury emissions control. The present analysis considers a range of assumed differential ESP collection efficiencies for powdered activated carbon as compared to fly ash. Estimated emission rates of submicrometer powdered activated carbon are compared to estimated emission rates of particulate carbon on submicrometer fly ash, each corresponding to its respective collection efficiency. To the extent that any emitted powdered activated carbon exhibits size and optical characteristics similar to black carbon, such emissions could effectively constitute an increase in black carbon emissions from coal-based stationary power generation. The results reveal that even for the low injection rates associated with chemically impregnated carbons, submicrometer particulate carbon emissions can easily double if the submicrometer fraction of the native fly ash has a low carbon content. Increasing sorbent injection rates, larger collection efficiency differentials as compared to fly ash, and decreasing sorbent particle size all lead to increases in the estimated submicrometer particulate carbon emissions. PMID:22663136

  19. Effect of activated carbon on the properties of carboxymethylcellulose\\/activated carbon hybrid hydrogels synthesized by ?-radiation technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jingyi Qiu; Ling Xu; Jing Peng; Maolin Zhai; Long Zhao; Jiuqiang Li; Genshuan Wei

    2007-01-01

    Activated carbon (AC) was incorporated into carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) to form CMC\\/AC hybrid hydrogels with excellent elasticity and flexibility by radiation crosslinking. The effect of AC on the formation, properties and structure of CMC\\/AC hybrid hydrogels was discussed in terms of gel fraction, gel strength, gel swelling, TGA, FTIR spectra and SEM image. Compared with pure CMC hydrogel, the gel fraction,

  20. Modeling trapping mechanism for PCB adsorption on activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Bjørnar; Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Oterhals, A.?ge

    2012-12-01

    The levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin, polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (DL-PCB) in fishmeal and fish oil produced for use in feed for salmon is above present European legislation levels in some regions of the world and different decontamination approaches have been proposed [1]. One of these is adsorption on activated carbon. This approach appears to be efficient for adsorption of PCDD/F but less efficient for DL-PCB [2]. Activated carbon consists of slit pores with average sizes of 20 - 50 Ångstroms. One hypothesis [2] for the mechanism of trapping DL-PCB is reduced ability for intramolecular movements of the PCB molecules inside the slit pores. In order to investigate this hypothesis we have used quantum mechanics [3] to characterize two DL-PCB congeners, respectively congener 77 (3,3',4,4'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl) and congener 118 (2,3',4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl) and Triolein (18:1) [4] as a major constituent of the solvent fish oil. A model for activated carbon was constructed using a crystal structure of graphite from the American Mineralogist Crystal Structure Database [5]. The crystal structure used was originally from Wyckoff [6]. A small program had to be written to generate the desired graphite structure as it contains no less than 31232 Carbon atoms. Partial atomic charges were estimated using QM with DFT/B3LYP/6-311+g** and SM6 [7].

  1. [Removal of fluorescent whitening agent by hydrogen peroxide oxidation catalyzed by activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Long; Zhang, Zhong-Min; Zhao, Xia; Jiao, Ru-Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Degradation of fluorescent whitening agent VBL in the processes of activated carbon (AC) and activated carbon modified (ACM) adsorptions, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) oxidation, and hydrogen peroxide oxidation catalyzed by activated carbon were studied. Mechanism of the above catalytic oxidation was also investigated by adding tert-Butyl alcohol (TBA), the free radical scavenger, and detecting the released gases. The results showed that: the activated carbon modified by Fe (NO3)3 (ACM)exhibited better adsorption removal than AC. Catalytic oxidation showed efficient removal of VBL, and the catalytic removal of AC (up to 95%) was significantly higher than that of ACM (58% only). Catalytic oxidation was inhibited by TBA, which indicates that the above reaction involved *OH radicals and atom oxygen generated by hydrogen peroxide with the presence of AC. The results of H2O2 decomposition and released gases detection involved in the process showed that activated carbon enhanced the decomposition of H2O2 which released oxygen and heat. More O2 was produced and higher temperature of the reactor was achieved, which indicated that H2O2 decomposition catalyzed by ACM was significantly faster than that of AC. Combining the results of VBL removal, it could be concluded that the rate of active intermediates (*OH radicals and atom oxygen) production by ACM catalytic reaction was faster than that of AC. These intermediates consumed themselves and produced O2 instead of degrading VBL. It seemed that the improper mutual matching of the forming rate of activating intermediates and the supply rate of reactants was an important reason for the lower efficiency of ACM catalytic reaction comparing with AC. PMID:25158496

  2. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOEpatents

    Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ott, Martin A. (Los Alamos, NM); Fowler, Malcolm (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-10-28

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity Cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  3. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOEpatents

    Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ott, Martin A. (Los Alamos, NM); Fowler, Malcolm (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-12-03

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  4. Issues on the production and electrochemical separation of oxygen from carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaloupis, P.; Sridhar, K. R.

    1991-01-01

    There is considerable interest in in-situ propellant manufacturing on the moon and Mars. One of the concepts of oxygen production that is being actively pursued is the processing of atmospheric carbon dioxide on Mars to produce oxygen by means of thermal decomposition and electrochemical separation. The key component of such a production facility is the electrochemical separation cell that filters out the oxygen from the gas mixture of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and oxygen. Efficient design of the separation cell and the selection of electrolyte and electrode materials of superior performance for the cell would translate to significant reduction in the power requirement and the mass of the production facility. The objective is to develop the technology required to produce the cells in-house and test various electrolyte and electrode materials systematically until the optimal combination is found. An effective technique was developed for the fabrication of disk shaped cells. Zirconia and Ceria cells were made in-house. Complete modules of the electrochemical cell and housings were designed, fabricated, and tested.

  5. Formation of continuous activated carbon fibers for barrier fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying

    1997-08-01

    Commercial protective suits made of active carbon granules or nonwoven fabrics are heavy, have low moisture vapor transport rate, and are uncomfortable. Inherent problems due to construction of barrier fabrics lead to severe heat stress when worn for even short time in warm environments. One proposed method to eliminate these problems is to facilitate the construction of a fabric made of continuous activated carbon fibers (CACF). This study is directed toward investigating the possibility of developing CAFC from two precursors: aramid and fibrillated PAN fiber. It was shown in this study that Kevlar-29 fibers could be quickly carbonized and activated to CACF with high adsorptivity and relatively low weight loss. CACF with high surface area (>500 msp2/g) and reasonable tenacity (?1g/denier) were successfully prepared from Kevlar fibers through a three-step process: pretreatment, carbonization, and activation. X-ray diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermal analysis were conducted to understand the evolution of physical and chemical properties during pretreatment. The influence of temperature, heating rate, and pyrolysis environment on the thermal behavior was determined by DSC and TGA/DTA and used as an indicator for optimizing the pyrolysis conditions. Surface analysis by nitrogen isotherms indicated that the resultant fibers had micropores and mesopores on the surface of CACF. This was also inferred by studies on the surface morphology through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). An investigation of the surface chemical structure by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) before and after activation and elemental analysis confirmed that adsorption of Kevlar based CACF mainly arises due to the physisorption instead of chemisorption. A multistep stabilization along with carbonization and activation was used to prepare active carbon fiber from fibrillated PAN fiber. The resultant fiber retained its fibrillar structure and provided a very high surface area, up to 1400 msp2/g, but was brittle. The characterization of the thermal behavior, mechanical properties, and surface structure of the pyrolyzed fiber at each processing step was also carried out by using various techniques, such as DSC and TGA, Instron, and SEM. These studies provide directions for preparation of CACF from novel precursors.

  6. The influence of surface chemistry on activated carbon adsorption of 2-methylisoborneol from aqueous solution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Considine; Renaud Denoyel; Phillip Pendleton; Russell Schumann; Shiaw-Hui Wong

    2001-01-01

    An activated carbon with a relatively high oxygen content was heated at various temperatures in an argon atmosphere to produce a series of carbons with decreasing oxygen content. A second activated carbon with a relatively low oxygen content was treated with an ozone–oxygen mixture to produce a series of carbons with increasing oxygen content. In both cases, the pore size

  7. Kinetic aspects of reaction between tantalum and carbon material (active carbon or graphite) under solar radiation heating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jorge Cruz Fernandes; Fernando Almeida Costa Oliveira; Bernard Granier; Jean-Marie Badie; Luis Guerra Rosa; Nobumitsu Shohoji

    2006-01-01

    Reaction between tantalum (Ta) and carbon (graphite or amorphous carbon) in tap-compacted powder mixture state under solar radiation heating was investigated. Although mono-carbide TaC is the final equilibrium product at 1600°C under presence of excess carbon, formation of sub-carbide Ta2C as the interim product was detected under certain circumstances. After 30min reaction at 1600°C reached by solar radiation heating, Ta

  8. Irreversible adsorption of phenolic compounds by activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, T.M.; King, C.J.

    1988-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the reasons why phenolic sorbates can be difficult to remove and recover from activated carbons. The chemical properties of the sorbate and the adsorbent surface, and the influences of changes in the adsorption and desorption conditions were investigated. Comparison of isotherms established after different contact times or at different temperatures indicated that phenolic compounds react on carbon surfaces. The reaction rate is a strong function of temperature. Regeneration of carbons by leaching with acetone recovered at least as much phenol as did regeneration with other solvents or with displacers. The physiochemical properties of adsorbents influences irreversible uptakes. Sorbates differed markedly in their tendencies to undergo irreversible adsorption. 64 refs., 47 figs., 32 tabs.

  9. Authigenic carbonates from active methane seeps offshore southwest Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Catherine; Blanc-Valleron, Marie-Madeleine; Demange, Jérôme; Boudouma, Omar; Foucher, Jean-Paul; Pape, Thomas; Himmler, Tobias; Fekete, Noemi; Spiess, Volkhard

    2012-12-01

    The southwest African continental margin is well known for occurrences of active methane-rich fluid seeps associated with seafloor pockmarks at water depths ranging broadly from the shelf to the deep basins, as well as with high gas flares in the water column, gas hydrate accumulations, diagenetic carbonate crusts and highly diverse benthic faunal communities. During the M76/3a expedition of R/V METEOR in 2008, gravity cores recovered abundant authigenic carbonate concretions from three known pockmark sites—Hydrate Hole, Worm Hole, the Regab pockmark—and two sites newly discovered during that cruise, the so-called Deep Hole and Baboon Cluster. The carbonate concretions were commonly associated with seep-benthic macrofauna and occurred within sediments bearing shallow gas hydrates. This study presents selected results from a comprehensive analysis of the mineralogy and isotope geochemistry of diagenetic carbonates sampled at these five pockmark sites. The oxygen isotope stratigraphy obtained from three cores of 2-5 m length indicates a maximum age of about 60,000-80,000 years for these sediments. The authigenic carbonates comprise mostly magnesian calcite and aragonite, associated occasionally with dolomite. Their very low carbon isotopic compositions (-61.0 < ?13C ‰ V-PDB < -40.1) suggest anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) as the main process controlling carbonate precipitation. The oxygen isotopic signatures (+2.4 < ?18O ‰ V-PDB < +6.2) lie within the range in equilibrium under present-day/interglacial to glacial conditions of bottom seawater; alternatively, the most positive ?18O values might reflect the contribution of 18O-rich water from gas hydrate decomposition. The frequent occurrence of diagenetic gypsum crystals suggests that reduced sulphur (hydrogen sulphide, pyrite) from sub-seafloor sediments has been oxidized by oxygenated bottom water. The acidity released during this process can potentially induce the dissolution of carbonate, thereby providing enough Ca2+ ions for pore solutions to reach gypsum saturation; this is thought to be promoted by the bio-irrigation and burrowing activity of benthic fauna. The ?18O-?13C patterns identified in the authigenic carbonates are interpreted to reflect variations in the rate of AOM during the last glacial-interglacial cycle, in turn controlled by variably strong methane fluxes through the pockmarks. These results complement the conclusions of Kasten et al. in this special issue, based on authigenic barite trends at the Hydrate Hole and Worm Hole pockmarks which were interpreted to reflect spatiotemporal variations in AOM related to subsurface gas hydrate formation-decomposition.

  10. Trypanocidal Activity of Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Amy J.; Grkovic, Tanja; Sykes, Melissa L.; Avery, Vicky M.

    2013-01-01

    Marine natural products are a diverse, unique collection of compounds with immense therapeutic potential. This has resulted in these molecules being evaluated for a number of different disease indications including the neglected protozoan diseases, human African trypanosomiasis and Chagas disease, for which very few drugs are currently available. This article will review the marine natural products for which activity against the kinetoplastid parasites; Trypanosoma brucei brucei, T.b. rhodesiense and T. cruzi has been reported. As it is important to know the selectivity of a compound when evaluating its trypanocidal activity, this article will only cover molecules which have simultaneously been tested for cytotoxicity against a mammalian cell line. Compounds have been grouped according to their chemical structure and representative examples from each class were selected for detailed discussion. PMID:24152565

  11. Production of cellulase from Trichoderma reesei in fed-batch fermentation from soluble carbon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, A.L.; Mortensen, R.E.

    1981-11-01

    The use of a soluble carbon source in lieu of cellulose for the production of cellulase would allow greater control of the fermentation, since growth and enzyme production would no longer be dependent upon cellulose hydrolysis. Where carbon limitation is a requirement, fed-batch fermentation has proved successful. This article describes cellulase production from Trichoderma reesei using five different carbon sources, sophorose appearing to be a more likely candidate than cellobiose. (Refs. 22).

  12. Natural Oil Production from Microorganisms: Bioprocess and Microbe Engineering for Total Carbon Utilization in Biofuel Production

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2010-07-15

    Electrofuels Project: MIT is using carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen generated from electricity to produce natural oils that can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels. MIT has designed a 2-stage biofuel production system. In the first stage, hydrogen and CO2 are fed to a microorganism capable of converting these feedstocks to a 2-carbon compound called acetate. In the second stage, acetate is delivered to a different microorganism that can use the acetate to grow and produce oil. The oil can be removed from the reactor tank and chemically converted to various hydrocarbons. The electricity for the process could be supplied from novel means currently in development, or more proven methods such as the combustion of municipal waste, which would also generate the required CO2 and enhance the overall efficiency of MIT’s biofuel-production system.

  13. Activation and micropore structure determination of activated carbon-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1997-09-05

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. These novel monolithic adsorbents can be produced in single pieces to a given size and shape. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The carbon fiber composites are produced at the ORNL and activated at the CAER using different methods, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties. The main focus of the present work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites and produce controlled pore structures. Several environmental applications have been explored for the activated carbon fiber composites. One of these was to evaluate the activated composites for the separation of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures, and an apparatus was constructed specifically for this purpose. The composites were further evaluated in the cyclic recovery of volatile organics. The activated carbon fiber composites have also been tested for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorophenolate, PCP.

  14. Design for manufacturability production management activity report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Norihiko; Sato, T.; Honma, M.; Yoshioka, N.; Hosono, K.; Onodera, T.; Itoh, H.; Suzuki, H.; Uga, T.; Kadota, K.; Iriki, N.

    2006-05-01

    Design For Manufacturability Production Management (DFM-PM) Subcommittee has been started in succession to Reticle Management Subcommittee (RMS) in Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology Committee for Japan (SMTCJ) from 2005. Our activity focuses on the SoC (System On Chip) Business, and it pursues the improvement of communication in manufacturing technique. The first theme of activity is the investigation and examination of the new trends about production (manufacturer) technology and related information, and proposals of business solution. The second theme is the standardization activity about manufacture technology and the cooperation with related semiconductors' organizations. And the third theme is holding workshop and support for promotion and spread of the standardization technology throughout semiconductor companies. We expand a range of scope from design technology to wafer pattern reliability and we will propose the competition domain, the collaboration area and the standardization technology on DFM. Furthermore, we will be able to make up a SoC business model as the 45nm node technology beyond manufacturing platform in cooperating with the design information and the production information by utilizing EDA technology.

  15. A new understanding of carbon nanotube growth: Activation and deactivation of a catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yueling; Yu, Qing; Wang, Xidong; Tian, Yajun

    2014-04-01

    Due to the crucial role of a catalyst in growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by a chemical vapor deposition, it is important to understand the activation and deactivation of a catalyst for controlling production of CNTs. Using molecular benzene as the carbon source and Fe-Co/?-Al2O3 as catalyst, multi-CNTs were synthesized with a thermal analyzer coupled a mass spectrometer in different atmospheres of N2 and H2. Very different thermogravimetry behaviors (TG-DTG) were observed during CNT growth, indicating that CNTs experienced very different activation and deactivation processes. In a N2 atmosphere, a catalyst particle was activated jumpily, then about half of catalyst surface was covered by the produced CNTs generated on one side of a catalyst, leading to trigger deactivation immediately following activation; in a H2 atmosphere, a catalyst was activated gradually, and deactivation developed gradually, the total CNT yield in H2 was higher than in N2, suggesting H2 suppressed the deactivation development of a catalyst by cleaning the amorphous carbon over a catalyst. In combination of the mass spectral measurements, the activation and deactivation mechanism of a catalyst in an inert and reducing reaction atmospheres gas were revealed.

  16. RESEARCH ON CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL USING AN EXTRACTIVE PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo; Chong Chen; Brian Bland; David Fenton

    2002-03-31

    This report presents the results of a one-year effort directed at the exploration of the use of coal as a feedstock for a variety of industrially-relevant carbon products. The work was basically divided into three focus areas. The first area dealt with the acquisition of laboratory equipment to aid in the analysis and characterization of both the raw coal and the coal-derived feedstocks. Improvements were also made on the coal-extraction pilot plant which will now allow larger quantities of feedstock to be produced. Mass and energy balances were also performed on the pilot plant in an attempt to evaluate the scale-up potential of the process. The second focus area dealt with exploring hydrogenation conditions specifically aimed at testing several less-expensive candidate hydrogen-donor solvents. Through a process of filtration and vacuum distillation, viable pitch products were produced and evaluated. Moreover, a recycle solvent was also isolated so that the overall solvent balance in the system could be maintained. The effect of variables such as gas pressure and gas atmosphere were evaluated. The pitch product was analyzed and showed low ash content, reasonable yield, good coking value and a coke with anisotropic optical texture. A unique plot of coke yield vs. pitch softening point was discovered to be independent of reaction conditions or hydrogen-donor solvent. The third area of research centered on the investigation of alternate extraction solvents and processing conditions for the solvent extraction step. A wide variety of solvents, co-solvents and enhancement additives were tested with varying degrees of success. For the extraction of raw coal, the efficacy of the alternate solvents when compared to the benchmark solvent, N-methyl pyrrolidone, was not good. However when the same coal was partially hydrogenated prior to solvent extraction, all solvents showed excellent results even for extractions performed at room temperature. Standard analyses of the extraction products indicated that they had the requisite properties of viable carbon-product precursors.

  17. Adsorption of malachite green on groundnut shell waste based powdered activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, R. [Environmental Impact and Risk Assessment Division, National Environmental Engineering Research Institute, Nagpur 440 020, Maharashtra (India); Ramteke, D.S. [Environmental Impact and Risk Assessment Division, National Environmental Engineering Research Institute, Nagpur 440 020, Maharashtra (India)], E-mail: dsramteke@rediffmail.com; Wate, S.R. [Environmental Impact and Risk Assessment Division, National Environmental Engineering Research Institute, Nagpur 440 020, Maharashtra (India)

    2007-07-01

    In the present technologically fast changing situation related to waste management practices, it is desirable that disposal of plant waste should be done in a scientific manner by keeping in view economic and pollution considerations. This is only possible when the plant waste has the potential to be used as raw material for some useful product. In the present study, groundnut shell, an agricultural waste, was used for the preparation of an adsorbent by chemical activation using ZnCl{sub 2} under optimized conditions and its comparative characterisation was conducted with commercially available powdered activated carbon (CPAC) for its physical, chemical and adsorption properties. The groundnut shell based powdered activated carbon (GSPAC) has a higher surface area, iodine and methylene blue number compared to CPAC. Both of the carbons were used for the removal of malachite green dye from aqueous solution and the effect of various operating variables, viz. adsorbent dose (0.1-1 g l{sup -1}), contact time (5-120 min) and adsorbate concentrations (100-200 mg l{sup -1}) on the removal of dye, has been studied. The experimental results indicate that at a dose of 0.5 g l{sup -1} and initial concentration of 100 mg l{sup -1}, GSPAC showed 94.5% removal of the dye in 30 min equilibrium time, while CPAC removed 96% of the dye in 15 min. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using the linearized forms of Freundlich, Langmuir and BET equations to determine maximum adsorptive capacities. The equilibrium data fit well to the Freundlich isotherm, although the BET isotherm also showed higher correlation for both of the carbons. The results of comparative adsorption capacity of both carbons indicate that groundnut shell can be used as a low-cost alternative to commercial powdered activated carbon in aqueous solution for dye removal.

  18. 76 FR 60803 - Fourth Administrative Review of Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ...A-570-904] Fourth Administrative Review of Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Extension...initiation of an administrative review of certain activated carbon from the People's Republic of China...

  19. Hierarchical activated mesoporous phenolic-resin-based carbons for supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao; Zhou, Min; Chen, Hao; Jiang, Jingui; Guan, Shiyou

    2014-10-01

    A series of hierarchical activated mesoporous carbons (AMCs) were prepared by the activation of highly ordered, body-centered cubic mesoporous phenolic-resin-based carbon with KOH. The effect of the KOH/carbon-weight ratio on the textural properties and capacitive performance of the AMCs was investigated in detail. An AMC prepared with a KOH/carbon-weight ratio of 6:1 possessed the largest specific surface area (1118?m(2) g(-1)), with retention of the ordered mesoporous structure, and exhibited the highest specific capacitance of 260?F?g(-1) at a current density of 0.1?A?g(-1) in 1?M H2 SO4 aqueous electrolyte. This material also showed excellent rate capability (163?F?g(-1) retained at 20?A?g(-1)) and good long-term electrochemical stability. This superior capacitive performance could be attributed to a large specific surface area and an optimized micro-mesopore structure, which not only increased the effective specific surface area for charge storage but also provided a favorable pathway for efficient ion transport. PMID:25100552

  20. High-porosity activated carbons for bilirubin removal.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, V G; Sarnatskaya, V V; Sigal, V L; Klevtsov, V N; Makhorin, K E; Yushko, L A

    1991-03-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between the extent of activation of synthetic granula and fibrous carbons and the adsorption of bilirubin from protein solutions. The total pore volumes of granular carbons START, SCN and fibrous activated carbons ACFM were 0.9-2.2. cm3/g and 0.8-1.5 cm3/g, respectively. A parallel increase in volume and specific surface area of micropores lead to a 4-5-fold increase of bilirubin adsorption from a 3% HSA solution. About 3 mg of bilirubin per 1 ml of the working column volume is removed from the solution with a 18 mg/100 ml concentration, after 8 min contact with an adsorbent after 4 hours of perfusion. Removal of bilirubin from model solutions means the conformation of albumin molecules can be restored. Carbon adsorbents synthesized for the elimination of bilirubin from protein-containing solutions can also be called deliganding adsorbents, since under some experimental conditions they eliminate other protein-bound ligands, viz. phenols by 97-99%, bile acids by 90-92% and sodium caprylate by 89-95%. PMID:2045194