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Sample records for activation inhibits rapamycin

  1. Vascular tumors have increased p70 S6-kinase activation and are inhibited by topical rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Du, Wa; Gerald, Damien; Perruzzi, Carole A; Rodriguez-Waitkus, Paul; Enayati, Ladan; Krishnan, Bhuvaneswari; Edmonds, Joseph; Hochman, Marcelo L; Lev, Dina C; Phung, Thuy L

    2013-10-01

    Vascular tumors are endothelial cell neoplasms whose cellular and molecular mechanisms, leading to tumor formation, are poorly understood, and current therapies have limited efficacy with significant side effects. We have investigated mechanistic (mammalian) target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in benign and malignant vascular tumors, and the effects of mTOR kinase inhibitor as a potential therapy for these lesions. Human vascular tumors (infantile hemangioma and angiosarcoma) were analyzed by immunohistochemical stains and western blot for the phosphorylation of p70 S6-kinase (S6K) and S6 ribosomal protein (S6), which are activated downstream of mTOR complex-1 (mTORC1). To assess the function of S6K, tumor cells with genetic knockdown of S6K were analyzed for cell proliferation and migration. The effects of topical rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, on mTORC1 and mTOR complex-2 (mTORC2) activities, as well as on tumor growth and migration, were determined. Vascular tumors showed increased activation of S6K and S6. Genetic knockdown of S6K resulted in reduced tumor cell proliferation and migration. Rapamycin fully inhibited mTORC1 and partially inhibited mTORC2 activities, including the phosphorylation of Akt (serine 473) and PKCα, in vascular tumor cells. Rapamycin significantly reduced vascular tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. As a potential localized therapy for cutaneous vascular tumors, topically applied rapamycin effectively reduced tumor growth with limited systemic drug absorption. These findings reveal the importance of mTOR signaling pathways in benign and malignant vascular tumors. The mTOR pathway is an important therapeutic target in vascular tumors, and topical mTOR inhibitors may provide an alternative and well-tolerated therapy for the treatment of cutaneous vascular lesions. PMID:23938603

  2. Inhibition of Target of Rapamycin Signaling and Stress Activate Autophagy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1[W

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Florencio, Francisco J.; Crespo, José L.

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic membrane-trafficking process whereby cells recycle cytosolic proteins and organelles under stress conditions or during development. This degradative process is mediated by autophagy-related (ATG) proteins that have been described in yeast, animals, and more recently in plants. In this study, we report the molecular characterization of autophagy in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that the ATG8 protein from Chlamydomonas (CrATG8) is functionally conserved and may be used as a molecular autophagy marker. Like yeast ATG8, CrATG8 is cleaved at the carboxyl-terminal conserved glycine and is associated with membranes in Chlamydomonas. Cell aging or different stresses such as nutrient limitation, oxidative stress, or the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum caused an increase in CrATG8 abundance as well as the detection of modified forms of this protein, both landmarks of autophagy activation. Furthermore, rapamycin-mediated inhibition of the Target of Rapamycin signaling pathway, a major regulator of autophagy in eukaryotes, results in identical effects on CrATG8 and a relocalization of this protein in Chlamydomonas cells similar to the one observed upon nutrient limitation. Thus, our findings indicate that Chlamydomonas cells may respond to stress conditions by inducing autophagy via Target of Rapamycin signaling modulation. PMID:20107021

  3. Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin activation in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex attenuates pain-related aversion in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bo; Jiang, Jingyan; Sun, Jianliang; Xiao, Chun; Meng, Bo; Zheng, Jinwei; Li, Xiaoyu; Wang, Ruichun; Wu, Guorong; Chen, Junping

    2016-09-01

    Pain is a complex experience that comprises both sensory and affective dimensions. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays an important role in the modulation of neuronal plasticity associated with the pathogenesis of pain sensation. However, the role of mTOR in pain affect is unclear. Using a formalin-induced conditioned place avoidance (F-CPA) test, the current study investigated the effects of the mTOR specific inhibitor rapamycin on noxious stimulation induced aversion in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC). Intraplantar injection of 5% formalin was associated with significant activation of mTOR, as well as p70 ribosomal S6 protein (p70S6K), its downstream effector, in the rACC. The inhibition of mTOR activation with rapamycin disrupted pain-related aversion; however, this inhibition did not affect formalin-induced spontaneous nociceptive behaviors in rats. These findings demonstrated for the first time that mTOR and its downstream pathway in the rACC contribute to the induction of pain-related negative emotion. PMID:27163752

  4. Rapamycin inhibits poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in intact cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrer, Joerg; Wagner, Silvia; Buerkle, Alexander; Koenigsrainer, Alfred

    2009-08-14

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity inducing changes in cell proliferation. Synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is an immediate cellular response to genotoxic stress catalyzed mostly by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), which is also controlled by signaling pathways. Therefore, we investigated whether rapamycin affects PAR production. Strikingly, rapamycin inhibited PAR synthesis in living fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as monitored by immunofluorescence. PARP-1 activity was then assayed in vitro, revealing that down-regulation of cellular PAR production by rapamycin was apparently not due to competitive PARP-1 inhibition. Further studies showed that rapamycin did not influence the cellular NAD pool and the activation of PARP-1 in extracts of pretreated fibroblasts. Collectively, our data suggest that inhibition of cellular PAR synthesis by rapamycin is mediated by formation of a detergent-sensitive complex in living cells, and that rapamycin may have a potential as therapeutic PARP inhibitor.

  5. Rapamycin inhibits the growth of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Arcella, Antonietta; Biagioni, Francesca; Antonietta Oliva, Maria; Bucci, Domenico; Frati, Alessandro; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Giampaolo; Giangaspero, Felice; Fornai, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    The molecular target of rapamycin (mTOR) is up-regulated in glioblastoma (GBM) and this is associated with the rate of cell growth, stem cell proliferation and disease relapse. Rapamycin is a powerful mTOR inhibitor and strong autophagy inducer. Previous studies analyzed the effects of rapamycin in GBM cell lines. However, to our knowledge, no experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of rapamycin neither in primary cells derived from GBM patients nor in vivo in brain GBM xenograft. These data are critical to get a deeper insight into the effects of such adjuvant therapy in GBM patients. In the present study, various doses of rapamycin were tested in primary cell cultures from GBM patients. These effects were compared with that obtained by the same doses of rapamycin in GBM cell lines (U87Mg). The effects of rapamycin were also evaluated in vivo, in brain tumors developed from mouse xenografts. Rapamycin, starting at the dose of 10nm inhibited cell growth both in U87Mg cell line and primary cell cultures derived from various GBM patients. When administered in vivo to brain xenografts in nude mice rapamycin almost doubled the survival time of mice and inhibited by more than 95% of tumor volume. PMID:23261661

  6. Dual inhibition of Akt/mTOR pathway by nab-rapamycin and perifosine induces anti-tumor activity in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Cirstea, Diana; Hideshima, Teru; Rodig, Scott; Santo, Loredana; Pozzi, Samantha; Vallet, Sonia; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Perrone, Giulia; Patel, Kishan; Desai, Neil; Sportelli, Peter; Kapoor, Shweta; Vali, Shireen; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Raje, Noopur

    2011-01-01

    The PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway mediates multiple myeloma (MM) cell proliferation, survival, and development of drug resistance, underscoring the role of mTOR inhibitors such as rapamycin with potential anti-MM activity. However, recent data demonstrate a positive feedback loop from mTOR/S6K1 to Akt, whereby Akt activation confers resistance to mTOR inhibitors. We confirmed that suppression of mTOR signaling in MM cells by rapamycin was associated with upregulation of Akt phosphorylation. We hypothesized that inhibiting this positive feedback by a potent Akt inhibitor perifosine would augment rapamycin-induced cytotoxicity in MM cells. Perifosine inhibited rapamycin-induced p-Akt, resulting in enhanced cytotoxicity in MM.1S cells even in the presence of IL-6, IGF-1 or bone marrow stromal cells. Moreover, rapamycin induced autophagy in MM.1S MM cells as evidenced by electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry, was augmented by perifosine. Combination therapy increased apoptosis detected by Annexin/PI analysis and caspase/PARP cleavage. Importantly, in vivo antitumor activity and prolongation of survival in a MM mouse xenograft model after treatment was enhanced with combination of nab-rapamycin and perifosine. Utilizing the in silico predictive analysis we confirmed our experimental findings of this drug combination on PI3K, Akt, mTOR kinases, and the caspases. Our data suggests that mutual suppression of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway by rapamycin and perifosine combination induces synergistic MM cell cytotoxicity, providing the rationale for clinical trials in patients with relapsed / refractory MM. PMID:20371718

  7. Fission yeast TORC1 regulates phosphorylation of ribosomal S6 proteins in response to nutrients and its activity is inhibited by rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Akio; Sato, Tatsuhiro; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko

    2010-01-01

    Cellular activities are regulated by environmental stimuli through protein phosphorylation. Target of rapamycin (TOR), a serine/threonine kinase, plays pivotal roles in cell proliferation and cell growth in response to nutrient status. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, TORC1, which contains Tor2, plays crucial roles in nutrient response. Here we find a nitrogen-regulated phosphoprotein, p27, in S. pombe using the phospho-Akt substrate antibody. Response of p27 phosphorylation to nitrogen availability is mediated by TORC1 and the TSC-Rhb1 signaling, but not by TORC2 or other nutrient stress-related pathways. Database and biochemical analyses indicate that p27 is identical to ribosomal protein S6 (Rps6). Ser235 and Ser236 in Rps6 are necessary for Rps6 phosphorylation by TORC1. These Rps6 phosphorylations are dispensable for cell viability. Rps6 phosphorylation by TORC1 also responds to availability of glucose and is inhibited by osmotic and oxidative stresses. Rapamycin inhibits the ability of TORC1 to phosphorylate Rps6, owing to interaction of the rapamycin-FKBP12 complex with the FRB domain in Tor2. Rapamycin also leads to a decrease in cell size in a TORC1-dependent manner. Our findings demonstrate that the nutrient-responsive and rapamycin-sensitive TORC1-S6 signaling exists in S. pombe, and that this pathway plays a role in cell size control. PMID:20144990

  8. Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) - Rapamycin and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Lamming, Dudley W.

    2016-01-01

    Rapamycin is an FDA-approved immunosuppressant and anti-cancer agent discovered in the soil of Easter Island in the early 1970s. Rapamycin is a potent and selective inhibitor of the mTOR (mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin) protein kinase, which acts as a central integrator of nutrient signaling pathways. During the last decade, genetic and pharmaceutical inhibition of mTOR pathway signaling has been found to promote longevity in yeast, worms, flies and mice. In this chapter, we will discuss the molecular biology underlying the effects of rapamycin and its physiological effects; evidence for rapamycin as an anti-aging compound; mechanisms by which rapamycin may extend lifespan; and the potential limitations of rapamycin as an anti-aging molecule. Finally, we will discuss possible strategies that may allow us to inhibit mTOR signaling safely while minimizing side effects, and reap the health, social and economic benefits from slowing the aging process. PMID:27048303

  9. Inhibition of the Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin (mTOR)-Rapamycin and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Lamming, Dudley W

    2016-01-01

    Rapamycin is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved immunosuppressant and anticancer agent discovered in the soil of Easter Island in the early 1970s. Rapamycin is a potent and selective inhibitor of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein kinase, which acts as a central integrator of nutrient signaling pathways. During the last decade, genetic and pharmaceutical inhibition of mTOR pathway signaling has been found to promote longevity in yeast, worms, flies, and mice. In this article, we will discuss the molecular biology underlying the effects of rapamycin and its physiological effects, evidence for rapamycin as an antiaging compound, mechanisms by which rapamycin may extend life span, and the potential limitations of rapamycin as an antiaging molecule. Finally, we will discuss possible strategies that may allow us to inhibit mTOR signaling safely while minimizing side effects, and reap the health, social, and economic benefits from slowing the aging process. PMID:27048303

  10. A Burkholderia pseudomallei Macrophage Infectivity Potentiator-Like Protein Has Rapamycin-Inhibitable Peptidylprolyl Isomerase Activity and Pleiotropic Effects on Virulence ▿

    PubMed Central

    Norville, Isobel H.; Harmer, Nicholas J.; Harding, Sarah V.; Fischer, Gunter; Keith, Karen E.; Brown, Katherine A.; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Titball, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    Macrophage infectivity potentiators (Mips) are a group of virulence factors encoded by pathogenic bacteria such as Legionella, Chlamydia, and Neisseria species. Mips are part of the FK506-binding protein (FKBP) family, whose members typically exhibit peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) activity which is inhibitable by the immunosuppressants FK506 and rapamycin. Here we describe the identification and characterization of BPSS1823, a Mip-like protein in the intracellular pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei. Recombinant BPSS1823 protein has rapamycin-inhibitable PPIase activity, indicating that it is a functional FKBP. A mutant strain generated by deletion of BPSS1823 in B. pseudomallei exhibited a reduced ability to survive within cells and significant attenuation in vivo, suggesting that BPSS1823 is important for B. pseudomallei virulence. In addition, pleiotropic effects were observed with a reduction in virulence mechanisms, including resistance to host killing mechanisms, swarming motility, and protease production. PMID:21859853

  11. Rapamycin inhibited the function of lung CSCs via SOX2.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li-Xia; Sun, Feng-Feng; He, Bin-Feng; Zhan, Xiao-Feng; Song, Juan; Chen, Sheng-Song; Yu, Shi-Cang; Ye, Xiao-Qun

    2016-04-01

    The presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is the source of occurrence, aggravation, and recurrence of lung cancer. Accordingly, targeting killing the lung CSCs has been suggested to be an effective approach for lung cancer treatment. In this study, we showed that rapamycin inhibited the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signal transduction in A549 cells and improved the sensitivity to cisplatin (DDP). The mechanisms involve inhibition of the SOX2 expression, cell proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype, and sphere formation. Interestingly, knocked down SOX2 was a similar effect with rapamycin in A549 sphere. Furthermore, we showed that ectopic expression of Sox2 in A549 cells was sufficient to render them more resistant to rapamycin treatment in vitro. These data suggested that rapamycin inhibited the function of lung CSCs via SOX2. It will be of great interest to further explore the therapeutic strategies of lung cancer. PMID:26526583

  12. Acute rapamycin treatment improved glucose tolerance through inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Dai, Weiwei; Panserat, Stéphane; Terrier, Frédéric; Seiliez, Iban; Skiba-Cassy, Sandrine

    2014-11-15

    Our aim was to investigate the potential role of TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling pathway in the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism in rainbow trout. Fasted fish were first treated with a single intraperitoneal injection of rapamycin or vehicle and then submitted to a second intraperitoneal administration of glucose 4 h later. Our results revealed that intraperitoneal administration of glucose induced hyperglycemia for both vehicle and rapamycin treatments, which peaked at 2 h. Plasma glucose level in vehicle-treated fish was significantly higher than in rapamycin-treated fish at 8 and 17 h, whereas it remained at the basal level in rapamycin-treated fish. Glucose administration significantly enhanced the phosphorylation of Akt and ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1) in vehicle-treated fish, while rapamycin completely abolished the activation of S6K1 in rapamycin-treated fish, without inhibiting the phosphorylation of Akt on Thr-308 or Ser-473. Despite the lack of significant variation in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA abundance, mRNA abundance for glucokinase (GK), glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase) I and II, and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) was reduced by rapamycin 17 h after glucose administration. The inhibition effect of rapamycin on GK and FBPase was further substantiated at the activity level. The suppression of GK gene expression and activity by rapamycin provided the first in vivo evidence in fish that glucose regulates hepatic GK gene expression and activity through a TORC1-dependent manner. Unlike in mammals, we observed that acute rapamycin treatment improved glucose tolerance through the inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis in rainbow trout. PMID:25163922

  13. Autophagy Induction by Endothelial-Monocyte Activating Polypeptide II Contributes to the Inhibition of Malignant Biological Behaviors by the Combination of EMAP II with Rapamycin in Human Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Meng, Fanjie; Li, Shuai; Liu, Libo; Zhao, Lini; Liu, Yunhui; Hu, Yi; Li, Zhen; Yao, Yilong; Xi, Zhuo; Teng, Hao; Xue, Yixue

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of endothelial-monocyte activating polypeptide II (EMAP II) on human glioblastoma (GBM) cells and glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) as well as its possible mechanisms. In this study, EMAP II inhibited the cell viability and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in human GBM cells and GSCs, and autophagy inhibitor 3-methyl adenine (3-MA) blocked these effects. Autophagic vacuoles were formed in these cells after EMAP II treatment and this phenomenon was blocked by 3-MA. In addition, the up-regulation of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3 (LC3)-II and the down-regulation of autophagic degraded substrate p62/SQSTM1 caused by EMAP II were observed. Cells treated with EMAP-II inhibited the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway, and PI3K/Akt agonist insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) blocked the effect of EMAP II on the expression of LC3-II and p62/SQSTM1. Cells exposed to EMAP-II experienced mitophagy and ER stress. Furthermore, the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion of GBM cells and GSCs were more remarkable by the combination of EMAP II and rapamycin than either agent alone in vitro and in vivo. The current study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of EMAP II in human GBM cells and GSCs was induced by autophagy, accompanied by the inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway, mitophagy and ER stress. The combination of EMAP II with rapamycin demonstrated the inhibitory effect on the malignant biological behaviors of human GBM cells and GSCs in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26648842

  14. Characterization of the cloned full-length and a truncated human target of rapamycin: Activity, specificity, and enzyme inhibition as studied by a high capacity assay

    SciTech Connect

    Toral-Barza, Lourdes; Zhang Weiguo; Lamison, Craig; LaRocque, James; Gibbons, James; Yu, Ker . E-mail: yuk@wyeth.com

    2005-06-24

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR/TOR) is implicated in cancer and other human disorders and thus an important target for therapeutic intervention. To study human TOR in vitro, we have produced in large scale both the full-length TOR (289 kDa) and a truncated TOR (132 kDa) from HEK293 cells. Both enzymes demonstrated a robust and specific catalytic activity towards the physiological substrate proteins, p70 S6 ribosomal protein kinase 1 (p70S6K1) and eIF4E binding protein 1 (4EBP1), as measured by phosphor-specific antibodies in Western blotting. We developed a high capacity dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay (DELFIA) for analysis of kinetic parameters. The Michaelis constant (K {sub m}) values of TOR for ATP and the His6-S6K substrate were shown to be 50 and 0.8 {mu}M, respectively. Dose-response and inhibition mechanisms of several known inhibitors, the rapamycin-FKBP12 complex, wortmannin and LY294002, were also studied in DELFIA. Our data indicate that TOR exhibits kinetic features of those shared by traditional serine/threonine kinases and demonstrate the feasibility for TOR enzyme screen in searching for new inhibitors.

  15. Quercetin Inhibits Fibroblast Activation and Kidney Fibrosis Involving the Suppression of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin and β-catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jiafa; Li, Jianzhong; Liu, Xin; Feng, Ye; Gui, Yuan; Yang, Junwei; He, Weichun; Dai, Chunsun

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid found in a wide variety of plants and presented in human diet, displays promising potential in preventing kidney fibroblast activation. However, whether quercetin can ameliorate kidney fibrosis in mice with obstructive nephropathy and the underlying mechanisms remain to be further elucidated. In this study, we found that administration of quercetin could largely ameliorate kidney interstitial fibrosis and macrophage accumulation in the kidneys with obstructive nephropathy. MTORC1, mTORC2, β-catenin as well as Smad signaling were activated in the obstructive kidneys, whereas quercetin could markedly reduce their abundance except Smad3 phosphorylation. In cultured NRK-49F cells, quercetin could inhibit α-SMA and fibronectin (FN) expression induced by TGFβ1 treatment. MTORC1, mTORC2, β-catenin and Smad signaling pathways were stimulated by TGFβ1 at a time dependent manner. Similar to those findings in the obstructive kidneys, mTORC1, mTORC2 and β-catenin, but not Smad signaling pathways were remarkably blocked by quercetin treatment. Together, these results suggest that quercetin inhibits fibroblast activation and kidney fibrosis involving a combined inhibition of mTOR and β-catenin signaling transduction, which may act as a therapeutic candidate for patients with chronic kidney diseases. PMID:27052477

  16. Mammalian target of rapamycin signaling inhibition ameliorates vascular calcification via Klotho upregulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Zhao, Ming-Ming; Cai, Yan; Zheng, Ming-Fei; Sun, Wei-Liang; Zhang, Song-Yang; Kong, Wei; Gu, Jun; Wang, Xian; Xu, Ming-Jiang

    2015-10-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular mortality in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients, but the pathogenesis remains partially unknown and effective therapeutic targets should be urgently explored. Here we pursued the therapeutic role of rapamycin in CRF-related VC. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signal was activated in the aortic wall of CRF rats. As expected, oral rapamycin administration significantly reduced VC by inhibiting mTOR in rats with CRF. Further in vitro results showed that activation of mTOR by both pharmacological agent and genetic method promoted, while inhibition of mTOR reduced, inorganic phosphate-induced vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification and chondrogenic/osteogenic gene expression, which were independent of autophagy and apoptosis. Interestingly, the expression of Klotho, an antiaging gene that suppresses VC, was reduced in calcified vasculature, whereas rapamycin reversed membrane and secreted Klotho decline through mTOR inhibition. When mTOR signaling was enhanced by either mTOR overexpression or deletion of tuberous sclerosis 1, Klotho mRNA was further decreased in phosphate-treated VSMCs, suggesting a vital association between mTOR signaling and Klotho expression. More importantly, rapamycin failed to reduce VC in the absence of Klotho by using either siRNA knockdown of Klotho or Klotho knockout mice. Thus, Klotho has a critical role in mediating the observed decrease in calcification by rapamycin in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26061549

  17. Sustained delivery by a cyclodextrin material-based nanocarrier potentiates antiatherosclerotic activity of rapamycin via selectively inhibiting mTORC1 in mice.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yin; Guo, Jiawei; Chen, Yue; Han, Songling; Xu, Xiaoqiu; Shi, Qing; Jia, Yi; Liu, Ya; Deng, Youcai; Wang, Ruibing; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianxiang

    2016-08-10

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated special advantages of the nanomedicinal approach for the management of cardiovascular disease. We hypothesize that sustained delivery of rapamycin (RAP) may provide more desirable therapeutic effects than traditional oral administration by selectively inhibiting mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. To evidence this assumption and develop an effective, safe, and translational nanotherapy for atherosclerosis, this study was designed to examine antiatherosclerotic efficacy of a RAP nanotherapy based on an acetalated β-cyclodextrin (Ac-bCD) material in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice. First, biodegradable and biocompatible materials of Ac-bCDs were synthesized by kinetically controlled acetalation, giving rise to carrier materials that may not generate acidic byproducts after hydrolysis. Then RAP-loaded nanoparticles base on various Ac-bCDs were prepared by a nanoemulsion technique, which can sustain drug release for different periods of time, depending on the composition of Ac-bCDs. For a RAP/Ac-bCD180-derived nanotherapy (RAP-NP) that may continue RAP release for up to 20days in vitro, it afforded constant drug levels in both the blood and aortic tissue after subcutaneous injection, while orally administered free RAP showed typical peak-valley profiles with remarkably high peak concentrations. Therapeutic studies conducted in an experimental model of atherosclerosis established in ApoE(-/-) mice revealed that RAP-NP significantly reduced the formation of atherosclerotic lesions and dramatically enhanced the stability of plaques, which was more efficacious than orally delivered free RAP. Moreover, rupture-prone proinflammatory factors in both serum and aortas were significantly decreased after treatment. Whereas oral administration of RAP simultaneously inhibited mTORC1 and mTORC2 in the aorta, sustained delivery by RAP-NP selectively suppressed mTORC1, agreeing with in vitro results in smooth

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway and has a protective effect in a rat model of status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    San, Yong-Zhi; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Yu; Shi, Ping-Ping; Zhu, Yu-Lan

    2015-08-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) has a protective role in several neurological diseases. The present study investigated the effect of the PPAR-γ agonist, pioglitazone, on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in a rat model of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced status epilepticus (SE). The investigation proceeded in two stages. First, the course of activation of the mTOR signaling pathway in PTZ-induced SE was examined to determine the time-point of peak activity, as reflected by phopshorylated (p)-mTOR/mTOR and p-S6/S6 ratios. Subsequently, pioglitazone was administrated intragastrically to investigate its effect on the mTOR signaling pathway, through western blot and immunochemical analyses. The levels of the interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 inflammatory cytokines were detected using ELISA, and neuronal loss was observed via Nissl staining. In the first stage of experimentation, the mTOR signaling pathway was activated, and the p-mTOR/mTOR and p-S6/S6 ratios peaked on the third day. Compared with the vehicle treated-SE group, pretreatment with pioglitazone was associated with the loss of fewer neurons, lower levels of IL-1β and IL-6, and inhibition of the activation of the mTOR signaling pathway. Therefore, the mTOR signaling pathway was activated in the PTZ-induced SE rat model, and the PPAR-γ agonist, pioglitazone, had a neuroprotective effect, by inhibiting activation of the mTOR pathway and preventing the increase in the levels of IL-1β and IL-6. PMID:25891824

  19. Growth of Steptomyces hygroscopicus in rotating-wall bioreactor under simulated microgravity inhibits rapamycin production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, A.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Demain, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Growth of Streptomyces hygroscopicus under conditions of simulated microgravity in a rotating-wall bioreactor resulted in a pellet form of growth, lowered dry cell weight, and inhibition of rapamycin production. With the addition of Teflon beads to the bioreactor, growth became much less pelleted, dry cell weight increased but rapamycin production was still markedly inhibited. Growth under simulated microgravity favored extracellular production of rapamycin, in contrast to a greater percentage of cell-bound rapamycin observed under normal gravity conditions.

  20. Growth of Streptomyces Hygroscopicus in Rotating-Wall Bioreactor Under Simulated Microgravity Inhibits Rapamycin Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, A.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Demain, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Growth of Streptomyces hygroscopicus under conditions of simulated microgravity in a rotating-wall bioreactor resulted in a pellet form of growth, lowered dry cell weight, and inhibition of rapamycin production. With the addition of Teflon beads to the bioreactor, growth became much less pelleted, dry cell weight increased but rapamycin production was still markedly inhibited. Growth under simulated microgravity favored extracellular production of rapamycin in contrast to a greater percentage of cell-bound rapamycin observed under normal gravity conditions.

  1. Rapamycin attenuates visible light-induced injury in retinal photoreceptor cells via inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang-Yu; Fan, Bin; Jiao, Ying-Ying

    2014-05-14

    An extended exposure of the retina to visible light may lead to photochemical damage in retinal photoreceptor cells. The exact mechanism of retinal light damage remains unknown, and an effective therapy is still unavailable. Here, we demonstrated that rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), markedly protected 661W photoreceptor cells from visible light exposure-induced damage at the nanomolar level. We also observed by transmission electron microscopy that light exposure led to severe endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in 661W cells as well as abnormal endomembranes and ER membranes. In addition, obvious upregulated ER stress markers were monitored by western blot at the protein level and by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) at the mRNA level. Interestingly, rapamycin pretreatment significantly suppressed light-induced ER stress and all three major branches of the unfolded protein response (UPR), including the RNA-dependent protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK), inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1), and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) pathways both at the protein and mRNA levels. Additionally, the inhibition of ER stress by rapamycin was further confirmed with a dithiothreitol (DTT; a classical ER stress inducer)-damaged 661W cell model. Meanwhile, our results also revealed that rapamycin was able to remarkably inhibit the activation of mTOR and its downstream factors eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1), p-4EBP1, p70, p-p70, and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p-S6K) in the light-injured 661W cells. Thus, these data indicate that visible light induces ER stress in 661W cells; whereas the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, effectively protects 661W cells from light injury through suppressing the ER stress pathway. PMID:24607296

  2. Rapamycin attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction via activation of mitophagy in experimental ischemic stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qiang; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Jixian; Zhang, Zhijun; Zhai, Yu; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Sun, Xiaojiang

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Rapamycin enhances mitophagy via increasing p62 translocation to the mitochondria. • Rapamycin attenuates brain ischemic damage and improves mitochondrial function. • The protection of rapamycin to mitochondrial is linked to enhanced mitophagy. - Abstract: Rapamycin has been demonstrated to exhibit neuroprotective functions via the activation of autophagy in a cerebral ischemia model. However, the involvement of mitophagy in this process and its contribution to the protection of mitochondrial function remains unknown. The present study explored the characteristics of mitophagy after cerebral ischemia and the effect of rapamycin on mitochondrial function. Male Sprague–Dawley rats underwent transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Neurological deficits scores; infarct volumes; mitophagy morphology; and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and mitochondrial membrane potentials (Δψm) were examined. The expression of LC3, Beclin-1 and p62 in the mitochondrial fraction combined with transmission electronic microscopy were used to explore mitophagic activity after ischemia. We also blocked autophagosome formation using 3-methyladenine (3-MA) to check the linkage between the mitochondrial protective effect of rapamycin and enhanced mitophagy. We observed that rapamycin significantly enhanced mitophagy, as evidenced by the increase in LC3-II and Beclin-1 expression in the mitochondria and p62 translocation to the mitochondria. Rapamycin reduced infarct volume, improved neurological outcomes and inhibited mitochondrial dysfunction compared with the control animals (p < 0.05). However, these protective effects were reversed by 3-methyladenine treatment after rapamycin. The present study indicates that rapamycin treatment attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction following cerebral ischemia, which is linked to enhanced mitophagy.

  3. Rapamycin, a mTOR inhibitor, induced growth inhibition in retinoblastoma Y79 cell via down-regulation of Bmi-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Dong; Su, Yong-Jing; Li, Jian-Ying; Yao, Xiang-Chao; Liang, Guang-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Rapamycin is useful in the treatment of certain cancers by inhibiting mTOR(mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. Here, anticancer activity and its acting mechanisms of rapamycin were investigated in human retinoblastoma Y79 cells. CCK-8 assay showed that the IC50 value of rapamycin against human retinoblastoma Y79 cells was 0.122±0.026 μmol/L. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that rapamycin induced G1 cell cycle arrest. Western blot assay demonstrated that the mTOR pathway in Y79 cells was blocked by rapamycin. Western blot and RT-PCR assay showed that Bmi-1 was downregulated in protein and mRNA level by rapamycin treatment. Further Western blot and RNA interference assays showed that rapamycin-mediated downregulation of Bmi-1 induced decreases of cyclin E1, which accounted for rapamycin-mediated G1 cell cycle arrest in human retinoblastoma cells. Together, all these results illustrated that rapamycin induced growth inhibition of human retinoblastoma cells, and inactive of mTOR pathway and downregulation of Bmi-1 was involved in its action mechanism. PMID:26191215

  4. Rapamycin, a mTOR inhibitor, induced growth inhibition in retinoblastoma Y79 cell via down-regulation of Bmi-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Dong; Su, Yong-Jing; Li, Jian-Ying; Yao, Xiang-Chao; Liang, Guang-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Rapamycin is useful in the treatment of certain cancers by inhibiting mTOR(mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. Here, anticancer activity and its acting mechanisms of rapamycin were investigated in human retinoblastoma Y79 cells. CCK-8 assay showed that the IC50 value of rapamycin against human retinoblastoma Y79 cells was 0.122 ± 0.026 μmol/L. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that rapamycin induced G1 cell cycle arrest. Western blot assay demonstrated that the mTOR pathway in Y79 cells was blocked by rapamycin. Western blot and RT-PCR assay showed that Bmi-1 was downregulated in protein and mRNA level by rapamycin treatment. Further Western blot and RNA interference assays showed that rapamycin-mediated downregulation of Bmi-1 induced decreases of cyclin E1, which accounted for rapamycin-mediated G1 cell cycle arrest in human retinoblastoma cells. Together, all these results illustrated that rapamycin induced growth inhibition of human retinoblastoma cells, and inactive of mTOR pathway and downregulation of Bmi-1 was involved in its action mechanism. PMID:26191215

  5. The ketogenic diet inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Sharon S.; Rensing, Nicholas R.; Thio, Liu Lin; Yamada, Kelvin A.; Wong, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Summary The ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective treatment for epilepsy, but its mechanisms of action are poorly understood. We investigated the hypothesis that KD inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway signaling. The expression of pS6 and pAkt, markers of mTOR pathway activation, was reduced in hippocampus and liver of rats fed KD. In the kainate model of epilepsy, KD blocked the hippocampal pS6 elevation that occurs after status epilepticus. As mTOR signaling has been implicated in epileptogenesis, these results suggest that the KD may have anticonvulsant or antiepileptogenic actions via mTOR pathway inhibition. PMID:21371020

  6. Rapamycin requires AMPK activity and p27 expression for promoting autophagy-dependent Tsc2-null cell survival.

    PubMed

    Campos, Tania; Ziehe, Javiera; Fuentes-Villalobos, Francisco; Riquelme, Orlando; Peña, Daniela; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Lavandero, Sergio; Morin, Violeta; Pincheira, Roxana; Castro, Ariel F

    2016-06-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) disease results from inactivation of the TSC1 or TSC2 gene, and is characterized by benign tumors in several organs. Because TSC tumorigenesis correlates with hyperactivation of mTORC1, current therapies focus on mTORC1 inhibition with rapamycin or its analogs. Rapamycin-induced tumor shrinkage has been reported, but tumor recurrence occurs on withdrawal from rapamycin. Autophagy has been associated with development of TSC tumors and with tumor cell survival during rapamycin treatment. mTORC1 and AMPK directly inhibit and activate autophagy, respectively. AMPK is hyperactivated in TSC cells and tumors, and drives cytoplasmic sequestration of the cell-cycle inhibitor p27KIP (p27). Whether AMPK and p27 are involved in rapamycin-induced autophagy and survival of TSC cells remain unexplored. Here, we show that inhibition of AMPK by compound C or by shRNA-mediated depletion of LKB1 reduces activation of autophagy by rapamycin in Tsc2-null cells. Similarly, shRNA-mediated depletion of p27 inhibited rapamycin-induced autophagy. In support of p27 lying downstream of AMPK on the activation of autophagy in Tsc2-null cells, a p27 mutant that preferentially localizes in the cytosol recovered the effect of rapamycin on autophagy in both p27- and LKB1-depleted cells, but a nuclear p27 mutant was inactive. Finally, we show that p27-dependent activation of autophagy is involved in Tsc2-null cell survival under rapamycin treatment. These results indicate that an AMPK/p27 axis is promoting a survival mechanism that could explain in part the relapse of TSC tumors treated with rapamycin, exposing new avenues for designing more efficient treatments for TSC patients. PMID:26975583

  7. Oral rapamycin inhibits growth of atherosclerotic plaque in apoE knock-out mice

    SciTech Connect

    Waksman, Ron; Pakala, Rajbabu; Burnett, Mary S.; Gulick, Cindy P.; Leborgne, Laurent; Fournadjiev, Jana; Wolfram, Roswitha; Hellinga, David

    2003-03-01

    Introduction: Inflammatory and immunological responses of vascular cells are known to play significant roles in atherosclerotic plaque development. Rapamycin with antiinflammatory, immunosuppressive and antiproliferative properties has been shown to reduce neointima formation when coated on stents. This study is designed to test the potential of oral rapamycin to inhibit atherosclerotic plaque development. Methods: Eight-week-old apoE knock-out mice were fed with 0.25% cholesterol supplemented diet (control diet), control diet containing 50 {mu}g/kg rapamycin (low-dose rapamycin) or 100 {mu}g/kg rapamycin (high-dose rapamycin) for 4 or 8 weeks. Subsets of mice from each group (n=10) were weighed and euthanized. Whole blood rapamycin levels were determined using HPLC-MS/MS, and histological analyses of atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic root were performed. Results: Mice fed with high-dose rapamycin did not gain weight (18.5{+-}1.5 vs. 20.6{+-}0.9 g, P=.01). Blood levels of rapamycin 117{+-}7 pg/ml were detected in the blood of mice fed with high-dose rapamycin for 8 weeks. The plaque area in mice fed with high dose oral rapamycin is significantly less as compared to control (0.168{+-}0.008 vs. 0.326{+-}0.013 mm{sup 2}, P=.001 at 4 weeks; 0.234{+-}0.013 vs. 0.447{+-}0.011 mm{sup 2}, P=.001 at 8 weeks). Lumen area was inversely proportional to the plaque area. Conclusions: The results indicate that oral rapamycin is effective in attenuating the progression of atherosclerotic plaque in the mice.

  8. Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin attenuates early brain injury through modulating microglial polarization after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    You, Wanchun; Wang, Zhong; Li, Haiying; Shen, Haitao; Xu, Xiang; Jia, Genlai; Chen, Gang

    2016-08-15

    Here, we aimed to study the role and underlying mechanism of mTOR in early brain injury (EBI) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Experiment 1, the time course of mTOR activation in the cortex following SAH. Experiment 2, the role of mTOR in SAH-induced EBI. Adult SD rats were divided into four groups: sham group (n=18), SAH+vehicle group (n=18), SAH+rapamycin group (n=18), SAH+AZD8055 group (n=18). Experiment 3, we incubated enriched microglia with OxyHb. Rapamycin and AZD8055 were also used to demonstrate the mTOR's role on microglial polarization in vitro. The phosphorylation levels of mTOR and its substrates were significantly increased and peaked at 24h after SAH. Rapamycin or AZD8055 markedly decreased the phosphorylation levels of mTOR and its substrates and the activation of microglia in vivo, and promoted the microglial polarization from M1 phenotype to M2 phenotype. In addition, administration of rapamycin and AZD8055 following SAH significantly ameliorated EBI, including neuronal apoptosis, neuronal necrosis, brain edema and blood-brain barrier permeability. Our findings suggested that the rapamycin and AZD8055 could attenuate the development of EBI in this SAH model, possibly through inhibiting the activation of microglia by mTOR pathway. PMID:27423593

  9. Muscle Wasting in Fasting Requires Activation of NF-κB and Inhibition of AKT/Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) by the Protein Acetylase, GCN5.

    PubMed

    Lee, Donghoon; Goldberg, Alfred L

    2015-12-18

    NF-κB is best known for its pro-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic actions, but in skeletal muscle, NF-κB activation is important for atrophy upon denervation or cancer. Here, we show that also upon fasting, NF-κB becomes activated in muscle and is critical for the subsequent atrophy. Following food deprivation, the expression and acetylation of the p65 of NF-κB on lysine 310 increase markedly in muscles. NF-κB inhibition in mouse muscles by overexpression of the IκBα superrepressor (IκBα-SR) or of p65 mutated at Lys-310 prevented atrophy. Knockdown of GCN5 with shRNA or a dominant-negative GCN5 or overexpression of SIRT1 decreased p65K310 acetylation and muscle wasting upon starvation. In addition to reducing atrogene expression, surprisingly inhibiting NF-κB with IκBα-SR or by GCN5 knockdown in these muscles also enhanced AKT and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) activities, which also contributed to the reduction in atrophy. These new roles of NF-κB and GCN5 in regulating muscle proteolysis and AKT/mTOR signaling suggest novel approaches to combat muscle wasting. PMID:26515065

  10. TORC1 Inhibition by Rapamycin Promotes Antioxidant Defences in a Drosophila Model of Friedreich’s Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Calap-Quintana, Pablo; Soriano, Sirena; Llorens, José Vicente; Al-Ramahi, Ismael; Botas, Juan; Moltó, María Dolores; Martínez-Sebastián, María José

    2015-01-01

    Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA), the most common inherited ataxia in the Caucasian population, is a multisystemic disease caused by a significant decrease in the frataxin level. To identify genes capable of modifying the severity of the symptoms of frataxin depletion, we performed a candidate genetic screen in a Drosophila RNAi-based model of FRDA. We found that genetic reduction in TOR Complex 1 (TORC1) signalling improves the impaired motor performance phenotype of FRDA model flies. Pharmacologic inhibition of TORC1 signalling by rapamycin also restored this phenotype and increased the lifespan and ATP levels. Furthermore, rapamycin reduced the altered levels of malondialdehyde + 4-hydroxyalkenals and total glutathione of the model flies. The rapamycin-mediated protection against oxidative stress is due in part to an increase in the transcription of antioxidant genes mediated by cap-n-collar (Drosophila ortholog of Nrf2). Our results suggest that autophagy is indeed necessary for the protective effect of rapamycin in hyperoxia. Rapamycin increased the survival and aconitase activity of model flies subjected to high oxidative insult, and this improvement was abolished by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. These results point to the TORC1 pathway as a new potential therapeutic target for FRDA and as a guide to finding new promising molecules for disease treatment. PMID:26158631

  11. Rapamycin Inhibits Cardiac Hypertrophy by Promoting Autophagy via the MEK/ERK/Beclin-1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jun; Hu, Wei; Song, Zhi-Ping; Chen, Yue-Guang; Zhang, Da-Dong; Wang, Chang-Qian

    2016-01-01

    Rapamycin, also known as sirolimus, is an antifungal agent and immunosuppressant drug used to prevent organ rejection in transplantation. However, little is known about the role of rapamycin in cardiac hypertrophy and the signaling pathways involved. Here, the effect of rapamycin was examined using phenylephrine (PE) induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro and in a rat model of aortic banding (AB) - induced hypertrophy in vivo. Inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling reversed the effect of rapamycin on the up-regulation of LC3-II, Beclin-1 and Noxa, and the down-regulation of Mcl-1 and p62. Silencing of Noxa or Beclin-1 suppressed rapamycin-induced autophagy, and co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that Noxa abolishes the inhibitory effect of Mcl-1 on Beclin-1, promoting autophagy. In vivo experiments showed that rapamycin decreased AB-induced cardiac hypertrophy in a MEK/ERK dependent manner. Taken together, our results indicate that rapamycin attenuates cardiac hypertrophy by promoting autophagy through a mechanism involving the modulation of Noxa and Beclin-1 expression by the MEK/ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27047390

  12. Enhanced antitumor activity of 3-bromopyruvate in combination with rapamycin in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Pan, Jing; Lubet, Ronald A; Komas, Steven M; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Wang, Yian; You, Ming

    2015-04-01

    3-Bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) is an alkylating agent and a well-known inhibitor of energy metabolism. Rapamycin is an inhibitor of the serine/threonine protein kinase mTOR. Both 3-BrPA and rapamycin show chemopreventive efficacy in mouse models of lung cancer. Aerosol delivery of therapeutic drugs for lung cancer has been reported to be an effective route of delivery with little systemic distribution in humans. In this study, 3-BrPA and rapamycin were evaluated in combination for their preventive effects against lung cancer in mice by aerosol treatment, revealing a synergistic ability as measured by tumor multiplicity and tumor load compared treatment with either single-agent alone. No evidence of liver toxicity was detected by monitoring serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) enzymes. To understand the mechanism in vitro experiments were performed using human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. 3-BrPA and rapamycin also synergistically inhibited cell proliferation. Rapamycin alone blocked the mTOR signaling pathway, whereas 3-BrPA did not potentiate this effect. Given the known role of 3-BrPA as an inhibitor of glycolysis, we investigated mitochondrial bioenergetics changes in vitro in 3-BrPA-treated NSCLC cells. 3-BrPA significantly decreased glycolytic activity, which may be due to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion and decreased expression of GAPDH. Our results demonstrate that rapamycin enhanced the antitumor efficacy of 3-BrPA, and that dual inhibition of mTOR signaling and glycolysis may be an effective therapeutic strategy for lung cancer chemoprevention. PMID:25644152

  13. Inhibition of akt enhances the chemopreventive effects of topical rapamycin in mouse skin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickinson, Sally E; Janda, Jaroslav; Criswell, Jane; Blohm-Mangone, Karen; Olson, Erik R.; Liu, Zhonglin; Barber, Christie; Rusche, Jadrian J.; Petricoin, Emmanuel, III; Calvert, Valerie; Einspahr, Janine G.; Dickinson, Jesse; Stratton, Steven P.; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Saboda, Kathylynn; Hu, Chengcheng; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang; Alberts, David S.; Bowden, G. Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The PI3Kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway has important roles in cancer development for multiple tumor types, including UV-induced non-melanoma skin cancer. Immunosuppressed populations are at increased risk of aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Individuals who are treated with rapamycin, (sirolimus, a classical mTOR inhibitor) have significantly decreased rates of developing new cutaneous SCCs compared to those that receive traditional immunosuppression. However, systemic rapamycin use can lead to significant adverse events. Here we explored the use of topical rapamycin as a chemopreventive agent in the context of solar simulated light (SSL)-induced skin carcinogenesis. In SKH-1 mice, topical rapamycin treatment decreased tumor yields when applied after completion of 15 weeks of SSL exposure compared to controls. However, applying rapamycin during SSL exposure for 15 weeks, and continuing for 10 weeks after UV treatment, increased tumor yields. We also examined whether a combinatorial approach might result in more significant tumor suppression by rapamycin. We validated that rapamycin causes increased Akt (S473) phosphorylation in the epidermis after SSL, and show for the first time that this dysregulation can be inhibited in vivo by a selective PDK1/Akt inhibitor, PHT-427. Combining rapamycin with PHT-427 on tumor prone skin additively caused a significant reduction of tumor multiplicity compared to vehicle controls. Our findings indicate that patients taking rapamycin should avoid sun exposure, and that combining topical mTOR inhibitors and Akt inhibitors may be a viable chemoprevention option for individuals at high risk for cutaneous SCC.

  14. Inhibition of Akt Enhances the Chemopreventive Effects of Topical Rapamycin in Mouse Skin.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Sally E; Janda, Jaroslav; Criswell, Jane; Blohm-Mangone, Karen; Olson, Erik R; Liu, Zhonglin; Barber, Christy; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Calvert, Valerie S; Einspahr, Janine; Dickinson, Jesse E; Stratton, Steven P; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Saboda, Kathylynn; Hu, Chengcheng; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang; Alberts, David S; Timothy Bowden, G

    2016-03-01

    The PI3Kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway has important roles in cancer development for multiple tumor types, including UV-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer. Immunosuppressed populations are at increased risk of aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Individuals who are treated with rapamycin (sirolimus, a classical mTOR inhibitor) have significantly decreased rates of developing new cutaneous SCCs compared with those that receive traditional immunosuppression. However, systemic rapamycin use can lead to significant adverse events. Here, we explored the use of topical rapamycin as a chemopreventive agent in the context of solar-simulated light (SSL)-induced skin carcinogenesis. In SKH-1 mice, topical rapamycin treatment decreased tumor yields when applied after completion of 15 weeks of SSL exposure compared with controls. However, applying rapamycin during SSL exposure for 15 weeks, and continuing for 10 weeks after UV treatment, increased tumor yields. We also examined whether a combinatorial approach might result in more significant tumor suppression by rapamycin. We validated that rapamycin causes increased Akt (S473) phosphorylation in the epidermis after SSL, and show for the first time that this dysregulation can be inhibited in vivo by a selective PDK1/Akt inhibitor, PHT-427. Combining rapamycin with PHT-427 on tumor prone skin additively caused a significant reduction of tumor multiplicity compared with vehicle controls. Our findings indicate that patients taking rapamycin should avoid sun exposure, and that combining topical mTOR inhibitors and Akt inhibitors may be a viable chemoprevention option for individuals at high risk for cutaneous SCC. PMID:26801880

  15. Metformin inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin-dependent translation initiation in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Ryan J O; Zakikhani, Mahvash; Fantus, I George; Pollak, Michael; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2007-11-15

    Metformin is used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes because of its ability to lower blood glucose. The effects of metformin are explained by the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which regulates cellular energy metabolism. Recently, we showed that metformin inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells through the activation of AMPK. Here, we show that metformin inhibits translation initiation. In MCF-7 breast cancer cells, metformin treatment led to a 30% decrease in global protein synthesis. Metformin caused a dose-dependent specific decrease in cap-dependent translation, with a maximal inhibition of 40%. Polysome profile analysis showed an inhibition of translation initiation as metformin treatment of MCF-7 cells led to a shift of mRNAs from heavy to light polysomes and a concomitant increase in the amount of 80S ribosomes. The decrease in translation caused by metformin was associated with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition, and a decrease in the phosphorylation of S6 kinase, ribosomal protein S6, and eIF4E-binding protein 1. The effects of metformin on translation were mediated by AMPK, as treatment of cells with the AMPK inhibitor compound C prevented the inhibition of translation. Furthermore, translation in MDA-MB-231 cells, which lack the AMPK kinase LKB1, and in tuberous sclerosis complex 2 null (TSC2(-/-)) mouse embryonic fibroblasts was unaffected by metformin, indicating that LKB1 and TSC2 are involved in the mechanism of action of metformin. These results show that metformin-mediated AMPK activation leads to inhibition of mTOR and a reduction in translation initiation, thus providing a possible mechanism of action of metformin in the inhibition of cancer cell growth. PMID:18006825

  16. Rapamycin Inhibits Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Uptake in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells via mTOR/NF-κB/LOX-1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Hua; Cao, Yong-Jun; Liu, Chun-Feng; Zhang, Yan-Lin; Xie, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein-1 (LOX-1) is the major receptor for oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) uptake in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Previously, we found that rapamycin inhibited ox-LDL accumulation in HUVECs, and this effect was related to its role in increasing the activity of autophagy-lysosome pathway. In this study, we determined whether rapamycin could also reduce ox-LDL uptake in HUVECs and investigated the underlying signaling mechanisms. Results Flow cytometry and live cell imaging showed that rapamycin reduced Dil-ox-LDL accumulation in HUVECs. Furthermore, rapamycin reduced the ox-LDL-induced increase in LOX-1 mRNA and protein levels. Western blotting showed that rapamycin inhibited mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), p70s6k and IκBα phosphorylation triggered by ox-LDL. Flow cytometry implied that mTOR, NF-κB knockdown and NF-κB inhibitors significantly reduced Dil-ox-LDL uptake. Moreover, immunofluorescent staining showed that rapamycin reduced the accumulation of p65 in the nucleus after ox-LDL treatment for 30 h. mTOR knockdown decreased LOX-1 protein production and IκBα phosphorylation induced by ox-LDL. NF-κB knockdown and NF-κB inhibitors reduced LOX-1 protein production, but did not inhibit mTOR phosphorylation stimulated by ox-LDL. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that rapamycin reduce mTOR phosphorylation and subsequently inhibit NF-κB activation and suppresses LOX-1, resulting in a reduction in ox-LDL uptake in HUVECs. PMID:26752047

  17. mTOR inhibition by rapamycin increases ceramide synthesis by promoting transforming growth factor-β1/Smad signaling in the skin.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Takumi; Muramatsu, Aimi; Yoshino, Sawako; Matsui, Sho; Shimura, Mari; Tsujii, Yoshimasa; Iwatsuki, Ken; Kobayashi-Hattori, Kazuo; Oishi, Yuichi

    2016-04-01

    Although mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) mediates a wide variety of biological functions, little information is available on the effect of mTOR on the functions of skin cells. In this study, we investigated effects of mTOR inhibition by rapamycin on ceramide synthesis in the skin of rats and human keratinocytes and its regulatory mechanisms. The phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase, which indicates mTOR activation, was induced in the skin of rats fed a high-fat diet, but this abnormality was reversed by supplementation with rapamycin. Ceramide levels and the mRNA levels of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 were suppressed in the skin of rats fed high-fat diets, but this abnormality was reversed by supplementation with rapamycin. TGF-β1-induced SPT mRNA expression was blocked by SB525334, an inhibitor of TGF-β1-induced Smad2/3 nuclear localization, in human keratinocytes. Rapamycin-induced SPT mRNA expression was blocked by an anti-TGF-β1 antibody or SB525334 in human keratinocytes. These results show that mTOR inhibition by rapamycin increases ceramide synthesis by promoting TGF-β1/Smad signaling in the skin. PMID:27239444

  18. Rapamycin ameliorates cadmium-induced activation of MAPK pathway and neuronal apoptosis by preventing mitochondrial ROS inactivation of PP2A.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chong; Wang, Xiaoxue; Zhu, Yu; Dong, Xiaoqing; Liu, Chunxiao; Zhang, Hai; Liu, Lei; Huang, Shile; Chen, Long

    2016-06-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a highly toxic metal that affects the central nervous system. Recently we have demonstrated that inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin rescues neuronal cells from Cd-poisoning. Here we show that rapamycin inhibited Cd-induced mitochondrial ROS-dependent neuronal apoptosis. Intriguingly, rapamycin remarkably blocked phosphorylation of JNK, Erk1/2 and p38 in neuronal cells induced by Cd, which was strengthened by co-treatment with Mito-TEMPO. Inhibition of JNK and Erk1/2 by SP600125 and U0126, respectively, potentiated rapamycin's prevention from Cd-induced apoptosis. Consistently, over-expression of dominant negative c-Jun or MKK1 also potently improved the inhibitory effect of rapamycin on Cd neurotoxicity. Furthermore, pretreatment with SP600125 or U0126, or expression of dominant negative c-Jun or MKK1 enhanced the inhibitory effects of rapamycin or Mito-TEMPO on Cd-induced ROS. Further investigation found that co-treatment with Mito-TEMPO/rapamycin more effectively rescued cells by preventing Cd inactivation of PP2A than treatment with rapamycin or Mito-TEMPO alone. Over-expression of wild-type PP2A reinforced rapamycin or Mito-TEMPO suppression of activated JNK and Erk1/2 pathways, as well as ROS production and apoptosis in neuronal cells in response to Cd. The findings indicate that rapamycin ameliorates Cd-evoked neuronal apoptosis by preventing mitochondrial ROS inactivation of PP2A, thereby suppressing activation of JNK and Erk1/2 pathways. Our results underline that rapamycin may have a potential in preventing Cd-induced oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26805420

  19. Tumor Progression Locus 2 (Tpl2) Activates the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Pathway, Inhibits Forkhead Box P3 (FoxP3) Expression, and Limits Regulatory T Cell (Treg) Immunosuppressive Functions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Acuff, Nicole V; Peeks, Angela R; Kirkland, Rebecca; Wyatt, Kara D; Nagy, Tamas; Watford, Wendy T

    2016-08-01

    The serine/threonine kinase tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl2, also known as Map3k8/Cot) is a potent inflammatory mediator that drives the production of TNFα, IL-1β, and IFNγ. We previously demonstrated that Tpl2 regulates T cell receptor (TCR) signaling and modulates T helper cell differentiation. However, very little is known about how Tpl2 modulates the development of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs are a specialized subset of T cells that express FoxP3 and possess immunosuppressive properties to limit excess inflammation. Because of the documented role of Tpl2 in promoting inflammation, we hypothesized that Tpl2 antagonizes Treg development and immunosuppressive function. Here we demonstrate that Tpl2 constrains the development of inducible Tregs. Tpl2(-/-) naïve CD4(+) T cells preferentially develop into FoxP3(+) inducible Tregs in vitro as well as in vivo in a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced systemic tolerance. Treg biasing of Tpl2(-/-) T cells depended on TCR signal strength and corresponded with reduced activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Importantly, Tpl2(-/-) Tregs have basally increased expression of FoxP3 and immunosuppressive molecules, IL-10 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4). Furthermore, they were more immunosuppressive in vivo in a T cell transfer model of colitis, as evidenced by reduced effector T cell accumulation, systemic production of inflammatory cytokines, and colonic inflammation. These results demonstrate that Tpl2 promotes inflammation in part by constraining FoxP3 expression and Treg immunosuppressive functions. Overall, these findings suggest that Tpl2 inhibition could be used to preferentially drive Treg induction and thereby limit inflammation in a variety of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27261457

  20. TORC1 signaling inhibition by rapamycin and caffeine affect lifespan, global gene expression, and cell proliferation of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Rallis, Charalampos; Codlin, Sandra; Bähler, Jürg

    2013-08-01

    Target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is implicated in growth control and aging from yeast to humans. Fission yeast is emerging as a popular model organism to study TOR signaling, although rapamycin has been thought to not affect cell growth in this organism. Here, we analyzed the effects of rapamycin and caffeine, singly and combined, on multiple cellular processes in fission yeast. The two drugs led to diverse and specific phenotypes that depended on TORC1 inhibition, including prolonged chronological lifespan, inhibition of global translation, inhibition of cell growth and division, and reprograming of global gene expression mimicking nitrogen starvation. Rapamycin and caffeine differentially affected these various TORC1-dependent processes. Combined drug treatment augmented most phenotypes and effectively blocked cell growth. Rapamycin showed a much more subtle effect on global translation than did caffeine, while both drugs were effective in prolonging chronological lifespan. Rapamycin and caffeine did not affect the lifespan via the pH of the growth media. Rapamycin prolonged the lifespan of nongrowing cells only when applied during the growth phase but not when applied after cells had stopped proliferation. The doses of rapamycin and caffeine strongly correlated with growth inhibition and with lifespan extension. This comprehensive analysis will inform future studies into TORC1 function and cellular aging in fission yeast and beyond. PMID:23551936

  1. Rapamycin downregulates thymidylate synthase and potentiates the activity of pemetrexed in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsurutani, Junji; Shiga, Hideaki; Arwood, Matthew L.; Komiya, Takefumi; Gills, Joell J.; Memmott, Regan M.; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for 80–85% of lung cancer cases, and almost half of newly diagnosed patients have metastatic disease. Pemetrexed is a widely used drug for NSCLC and inhibits several folate-dependent enzymes including thymidylate synthase (TS). Increased expression of TS confers resistance to pemetrexed in vitro and predicts poor response to pemetrexed. Rapamycin is an mTOR inhibitor and suppresses cap-dependent synthesis of specific mRNA species. Here, we show that the combination of rapamycin and pemetrexed synergistically inhibits proliferation of NSCLC cells. Although pemetrexed as a single agent induced TS, pretreatment with rapamycin suppressed pemetrexed-induced TS expression. In vivo, the combination of rapamycin and pemetrexed inhibited growth of NSCLC xenografts, which correlated with decreased mTOR activity and suppression of pemetrexed-induced TS expression. The ability of rapamycin to enhance the efficacy of pemetrexed and prevent TS expression has implications for the design of Phase I and/or Phase II NSCLC clinical trials with mTOR inhibitors in combination with pemetrexed. PMID:24658085

  2. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition in polycystic kidney disease: From bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Edelstein, Charles L

    2012-09-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common life-threatening hereditary disease in the USA resulting in chronic kidney disease and the need for dialysis and transplantation. Approximately 85% of cases of ADPKD are caused by a mutation in the Pkd1 gene that encodes polycystin-1, a large membrane receptor. The Pkd1 gene mutation results in abnormal proliferation in tubular epithelial cells, which plays a crucial role in cyst development and/or growth in PKD. Activation of the proliferative mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway has been demonstrated in polycystic kidneys from rodents and humans. mTOR inhibition with sirolimus or everolimus decreases cysts in most animal models of PKD including Pkd1 and Pkd2 gene deficient orthologous models of human disease. On the basis of animal studies, human studies were undertaken. Two large randomized clinical trials published in the New England Journal of Medicine of everolimus or sirolimus in ADPKD patients were very unimpressive and associated with a high side-effect profile. Possible reasons for the unimpressive nature of the human studies include their short duration, the high drop-out rate, suboptimal dosing, lack of randomization of "fast" and "slow progressors" and the lack of correlation between kidney size and kidney function in ADPKD. The future of mTOR inhibition in ADPKD is discussed. PMID:26894018

  3. Activation of mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Perl, Andras

    2016-03-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR, also known as mammalian target of rapamycin) is a ubiquitous serine/threonine kinase that regulates cell growth, proliferation and survival. These effects are cell-type-specific, and are elicited in response to stimulation by growth factors, hormones and cytokines, as well as to internal and external metabolic cues. Rapamycin was initially developed as an inhibitor of T-cell proliferation and allograft rejection in the organ transplant setting. Subsequently, its molecular target (mTOR) was identified as a component of two interacting complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, that regulate T-cell lineage specification and macrophage differentiation. mTORC1 drives the proinflammatory expansion of T helper (TH) type 1, TH17, and CD4(-)CD8(-) (double-negative, DN) T cells. Both mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibit the development of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) T regulatory (TREG) cells and, indirectly, mTORC2 favours the expansion of T follicular helper (TFH) cells which, similarly to DN T cells, promote B-cell activation and autoantibody production. In contrast to this proinflammatory effect of mTORC2, mTORC1 favours, to some extent, an anti-inflammatory macrophage polarization that is protective against infections and tissue inflammation. Outside the immune system, mTORC1 controls fibroblast proliferation and chondrocyte survival, with implications for tissue fibrosis and osteoarthritis, respectively. Rapamycin (which primarily inhibits mTORC1), ATP-competitive, dual mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitors and upstream regulators of the mTOR pathway are being developed to treat autoimmune, hyperproliferative and degenerative diseases. In this regard, mTOR blockade promises to increase life expectancy through treatment and prevention of rheumatic diseases. PMID:26698023

  4. Rapamycin inhibits clonal expansion and adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, W C; Bierer, B E; McKnight, S L

    1995-01-01

    Differentiating 3T3-L1 cells express an immunophilin early during the adipocyte conversion program as described in this issue [Yeh, W.-C., Li, T.-K., Bierer, B. E. & McKnight, S. L. (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 11081-11085]. The temporal expression profile of this protein, designated FK506-binding protein (FKBP) 51, is concordant with the clonal-expansion period undertaken by 3T3-L1 cells after exposure to adipogenic hormones. Having observed FKBP51 synthesis early during adipogenesis, we tested the effects of three immunosuppressive drugs--cyclosporin A, FK506, and rapamycin--on the terminal-differentiation process. Adipocyte conversion was not affected by either cyclosporin A or FK506 and yet was significantly reduced by rapamycin at drug concentrations as low as 10 nM. Clonal expansion was impeded in drug-treated cultures, as was the accumulation of cytoplasmic lipid droplets normally seen late during differentiation. Rapamycin treatment likewise inhibited the expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha, a transcription factor required for 3T3-L1 cell differentiation. All three of these effects were reversed by high FK506 concentrations, indicating that the operative inhibitory event was mediated by an immunophilin-rapamycin complex. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7479942

  5. Rapamycin attenuates acute lung injury induced by LPS through inhibition of Th17 cell proliferation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhao; Xiaoyu, Zhang; Zhixin, Song; Di, Qi; Xinyu, Deng; Jing, Xia; Jing, He; Wang, Deng; Xi, Zhong; Chunrong, Zhang; Daoxin, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Th17 cells have been confirmed to increase neutrophils through cytokine secretions. ALI/ARDS are characterized as neutrophil infiltration in inflammation cases; however, there is conflicting information concerning the role of Th17 cells in ALI/ARDS, as well as their potential treatment value. We measured Th17-linear cytokines in the plasma of patients with sepsis-related ARDS. The consistently high levels of IL-17 and IL-22 in the nonsurvivors suggested that overreaction of the Th17-mediated immune response may be a risk factor for poor outcomes. Th17 linear cytokines were also increased in an LPS-induced murine model of acute lung injury, along with neutrophil accumulation. The mice that completely lacked IL-17 failed to accumulate and activate neutrophils. Lung inflammation was obviously attenuated in the IL-17−/− mice. Meanwhile, the neutrophil count was markedly increased in the healthy WT mice challenged with recombinant IL-22 and IL-17. Rapamycin attenuated lung injury by inhibiting the differentiation of Th17 cells through RORγt and STAT3 dysfunction. Furthermore, we demonstrated that SOCS3 and Gfi1, which were responsible for the molecular suppression of RORγt and STAT3, were up-regulated by rapamycin. These results point toward a pivotal view to treatment of ALI through weakening the proliferation of Th17 cells with rapamycin. PMID:26888095

  6. Pharmaceutical inhibition of mTOR in the common marmoset: effect of rapamycin on regulators of proteostasis in a non-human primate

    PubMed Central

    Lelegren, Matthew; Liu, Yuhong; Ross, Corinna; Tardif, Suzette; Salmon, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Inhibition of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) has emerged as a viable means to lengthen lifespan and healthspan in mice, although it is still unclear whether these benefits will extend to other mammalian species. We previously reported results from a pilot experiment wherein common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were treated orally with rapamycin to reduce mTOR signaling in vivo in line with previous reports in mice and humans. Further, long-term treatment did not significantly alter body weight, daily activity, blood lipid concentrations, or glucose metabolism in this cohort. Methods In this study, we report on the molecular consequences of rapamycin treatment in marmosets on mechanisms that regulate protein homeostasis (proteostasis) in vivo. There is growing appreciation for the role of proteostasis in longevity and for the role that mTOR plays in regulating this process. Tissue samples of liver and skeletal muscle from marmosets in our pilot cohort were assessed for expression and activity of components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, macroautophagy, and protein chaperones. Results Rapamycin treatment was associated with increased expression of PSMB5, a core subunit of the 20S proteasome, but not PSMB8 which is involved in the formation of the immunoproteasome, in the skeletal muscle and liver. Surprisingly, proteasome activity measured in these tissues was not affected by rapamycin. Rapamycin treatment was associated with an increased expression of mitochondria-targeted protein chaperones in skeletal muscle, but not liver. Finally, autophagy was increased in skeletal muscle and adipose, but not liver, from rapamycin-treated marmosets. Conclusions Overall, these data show tissue-specific upregulation of some, but not all, components of the proteostasis network in common marmosets treated with a pharmaceutical inhibitor of mTOR. PMID:27341957

  7. Intrathecal administration of rapamycin inhibits the phosphorylation of DRG Nav1.8 and attenuates STZ-induced painful diabetic neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    He, Wan-You; Zhang, Bin; Xiong, Qing-Ming; Yang, Cheng-Xiang; Zhao, Wei-Cheng; He, Jian; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Han-Bing

    2016-04-21

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of mRNA translation and protein synthesis, and it is specifically inhibited by rapamycin. In chronic pain conditions, mTOR-mediated local protein synthesis is crucial for neuronal hyperexcitability and synaptic plasticity. The tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channel Nav1.8 plays a major role in action potential initiation and propagation and cellular excitability in DRG (dorsal root ganglion) neurons. In this study, we investigated if mTOR modulates the phosphorylation of Nav1.8 that is associated with neuronal hyperexcitability and behavioral hypersensitivity in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by intraperitoneal injection with streptozotocin (STZ) at 60mg/kg. After the onset of PDN, the rats received daily intrathecal administrations of rapamycin (1μg, 3μg, or 10μg/day) for 7 days; other diabetic rats received the same volumes of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Herein, we demonstrate a marked increase in protein expression of total mTOR and phospho-mTOR (p-mTOR) together with the up-regulation of phosphor-Nav1.8 (p-Nav1.8) prior to the mechanical withdrawal threshold reaching a significant reduction in dorsal root ganglions (DRGs). Furthermore, the intrathecal administration of rapamycin, inhibiting the activity of mTOR, suppressed the phosphorylation of DRG Nav1.8, reduced the TTX-R current density, heightened the voltage threshold for activation and lowered the voltage threshold for inactivation and relieved mechanical hypersensitivity in diabetic rats. An intrathecal injection (i.t.) of rapamycin inhibited the phosphorylation and enhanced the functional availability of DRG Nav1.8 attenuated STZ-induced hyperalgesia. These results suggest that rapamycin is a potential therapeutic intervention for clinical PDN. PMID:26946108

  8. Interferon alpha and rapamycin inhibit the growth of carcinoid and medullary thyroid cancer in vitro.

    PubMed

    Motylewska, Ewelina; Lawnicka, Hanna; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Sicinska, Paulina; Niedziela, Agata; Melen-Mucha, Gabriela; Stepien, Henryk

    2014-08-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are highly vascularized neoplasms characterized by rising incidence. Moreover, the neuroendocrine cells were shown to express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptors. Therefore, angiomodulators could be potentially a new group of drugs enhancing still unsatisfactory effectiveness of NET therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the direct influence of angiomodulators: VEGF and five endogenous and exogenous antiangiogenic compounds (endostatin, interferon alpha [IFNα], rapamycin, JV1-36, semaxinib [SU5416]) on the growth of two NET cell lines: lung carcinoid H727 cell line and medullary thyroid cancer TT cell line in vitro. IFNα and rapamycin induced the inhibitory effect on H727 and TT cell viability and proliferation, increasing apoptosis and arresting the cell cycle. Also semaxinib (10(-5)M) inhibited proliferation of both cell lines. VEGF and endostatin did not influence the growth of H727 and TT cells. The inhibitory effect of IFNα, rapamycin and semaxinib on carcinoid and medullary thyroid cancer growth was revealed in our in vitro study, although some other antiangiogenic agents did not directly influence H727 and TT cell growth. Thus, IFNα and mTOR inhibitors as multidirectionally acting drugs with antiangiogenic effect could be potentially efficient in treatment of neuroendocrine tumors and are worth further studies. PMID:24948064

  9. Rapamycin protects neurons from brain contusion-induced inflammatory reaction via modulation of microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    SONG, QI; XIE, DUJIANG; PAN, SHIYONG; XU, WEIJUN

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory reaction is important in secondary injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Rapamycin has been demonstrated as a neuroprotective agent in a mouse model of TBI, however, there is a lack of data regarding the effects of rapamycin on the inflammatory reaction following TBI. Therefore, the present study was designed to assess the effects of treatment with rapamycin on inflammatory reactions and examine the possible involvement of microglial activation following TBI. Male imprinting control region mice were randomly divided into four groups: Sham group (n=23), TBI group (n=23), TBI + dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) group (n=31) and TBI + rapamycin group (n=31). Rapamycin was dissolved in DMSO (50 mg/ml) and injected 30 min after TBI (2 mg/Kg; intraperitoneally). A weight-drop model of TBI was induced, and the brain tissues were harvested 24 h after TBI. The findings indicated that the administration of rapamycin following TBI was associated with decreased levels of activated microglia and neuron degeneration at the peri-injury site, reduced levels of proinflammatory cytokines and increased neurobehavioral function, possibly mediated by inactivation of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. The results of the present study offer novel insight into the mechanisms responsible for the anti-neuroinflammatory effects of rapamycin, possibly involving the modulation of microglial activation. PMID:26458361

  10. mTOR Ser-2481 autophosphorylation monitors mTORC-specific catalytic activity and clarifies rapamycin mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ghada A; Acosta-Jaquez, Hugo A; Dunlop, Elaine A; Ekim, Bilgen; Maj, Nicole E; Tee, Andrew R; Fingar, Diane C

    2010-03-12

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) Ser/Thr kinase signals in at least two multiprotein complexes distinguished by their different partners and sensitivities to rapamycin. Acute rapamycin inhibits signaling by mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) but not mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), which both promote cell growth, proliferation, and survival. Although mTORC2 regulation remains poorly defined, diverse cellular mitogens activate mTORC1 signaling in a manner that requires sufficient levels of amino acids and cellular energy. Before the identification of distinct mTOR complexes, mTOR was reported to autophosphorylate on Ser-2481 in vivo in a rapamycin- and amino acid-insensitive manner. These results suggested that modulation of mTOR intrinsic catalytic activity does not universally underlie mTOR regulation. Here we re-examine the regulation of mTOR Ser-2481 autophosphorylation (Ser(P)-2481) in vivo by studying mTORC-specific Ser(P)-2481 in mTORC1 and mTORC2, with a primary focus on mTORC1. In contrast to previous work, we find that acute rapamycin and amino acid withdrawal markedly attenuate mTORC1-associated mTOR Ser(P)-2481 in cycling cells. Although insulin stimulates both mTORC1- and mTORC2-associated mTOR Ser(P)-2481 in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent manner, rapamycin acutely inhibits insulin-stimulated mTOR Ser(P)-2481 in mTORC1 but not mTORC2. By interrogating diverse mTORC1 regulatory input, we find that without exception mTORC1-activating signals promote, whereas mTORC1-inhibitory signals decrease mTORC1-associated mTOR Ser(P)-2481. These data suggest that mTORC1- and likely mTORC2-associated mTOR Ser-2481 autophosphorylation directly monitors intrinsic mTORC-specific catalytic activity and reveal that rapamycin inhibits mTORC1 signaling in vivo by reducing mTORC1 catalytic activity. PMID:20022946

  11. Chronic rapamycin restores brain vascular integrity and function through NO synthase activation and improves memory in symptomatic mice modeling Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Zheng, Wei; Halloran, Jonathan J; Burbank, Raquel R; Hussong, Stacy A; Hart, Matthew J; Javors, Martin; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Muir, Eric; Solano Fonseca, Rene; Strong, Randy; Richardson, Arlan G; Lechleiter, James D; Fox, Peter T; Galvan, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Vascular pathology is a major feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias. We recently showed that chronic administration of the target-of-rapamycin (TOR) inhibitor rapamycin, which extends lifespan and delays aging, halts the progression of AD-like disease in transgenic human (h)APP mice modeling AD when administered before disease onset. Here we demonstrate that chronic reduction of TOR activity by rapamycin treatment started after disease onset restored cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain vascular density, reduced cerebral amyloid angiopathy and microhemorrhages, decreased amyloid burden, and improved cognitive function in symptomatic hAPP (AD) mice. Like acetylcholine (ACh), a potent vasodilator, acute rapamycin treatment induced the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) and NO release in brain endothelium. Administration of the NOS inhibitor L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester reversed vasodilation as well as the protective effects of rapamycin on CBF and vasculature integrity, indicating that rapamycin preserves vascular density and CBF in AD mouse brains through NOS activation. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic reduction of TOR activity by rapamycin blocked the progression of AD-like cognitive and histopathological deficits by preserving brain vascular integrity and function. Drugs that inhibit the TOR pathway may have promise as a therapy for AD and possibly for vascular dementias. PMID:23801246

  12. Rapamycin induces apoptosis when autophagy is inhibited in T-47D mammary cells and both processes are regulated by Phlda1.

    PubMed

    Moad, Ahmed Ismail Hassan; Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul Tengku; Oon, Chern Ein; Tan, Mei Lan

    2013-07-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation pathway and plays a critical role in the homeostatic process of recycling proteins and organelles. Functional relationships have been described between apoptosis and autophagy. Perturbations in the apoptotic machinery have been reported to induce autophagic cell deaths. Inhibition of autophagy in cancer cells has resulted in cell deaths that manifested hallmarks of apoptosis. However, the molecular relationships and the circumstances of which molecular pathways dictate the choice between apoptosis and autophagy are currently unknown. This study aims to identify specific gene expression of rapamycin-induced autophagy and the effects of rapamycin when the autophagy process is inhibited. In this study, we have demonstrated that rapamycin is capable of inducing autophagy in T-47D breast carcinoma cells. However, when the autophagy process was inhibited by 3-MA, the effects of rapamycin became apoptotic. The Phlda1 gene was found to be up-regulated in both autophagy and apoptosis and silencing this gene was found to reduce both activities, strongly suggests that Phlda1 mediates and positively regulates both autophagy and apoptosis pathways. PMID:23300026

  13. Inhibition of mTOR Pathway by Rapamycin Reduces Brain Damage in Rats Subjected to Transient Forebrain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao; Hei, Changhun; Liu, Ping; Song, Yaozu; Thomas, Taylor; Tshimanga, Sylvie; Wang, Feng; Niu, Jianguo; Sun, Tao; Li, P. Andy

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study are to clarify the role of mTOR in mediating cerebral ischemic brain damage and the effects of rapamycin on ischemic outcomes. Ten minutes of forebrain ischemia was induced in rats, and their brains were sampled after 3 h, 16 h, and 7 days reperfusion for histology, immunohistochemistry and biochemical analysis. Our data demonstrated that cerebral ischemia resulted in both apoptotic and necrotic neuronal death; cerebral ischemia and reperfusion led to significant increases of mRNA and protein levels of p-mTOR and its downstream p-P70S6K and p-S6; elevation of LC3-II, and release of cytochrome c into the cytoplasm in both the cortex and hippocampus. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin markedly reduced ischemia-induced damage; suppressed p-Akt, p-mTOR, p-P70S6K and p-S6 protein levels; decreased LC3-II and Beclin-1; and prevented cytochrome c release in the two structures. All together, these data provide evidence that cerebral ischemia activates mTOR and autophagy pathways. Inhibition of mTOR deactivates the mTOR pathway, suppresses autophagy, prevents cytochrome c release and reduces ischemic brain damage. PMID:26681922

  14. Chronic rapamycin treatment or lack of S6K1 does not reduce ribosome activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Garelick, Michael G; MacKay, Vivian L; Yanagida, Aya; Academia, Emmeline C; Schreiber, Katherine H; Ladiges, Warren C; Kennedy, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    Reducing activity of the mTORC1/S6K1 pathway has been shown to extend lifespan in both vertebrate and invertebrate models. For instance, both pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 with the drug rapamycin or S6K1 knockout extends lifespan in mice. Since studies with invertebrate models suggest that reducing translational activity can increase lifespan, we reasoned that the benefits of decreased mTORC1 or S6K1 activity might be due, at least in part, to a reduction of general translational activity. Here, we report that mice given a single dose of rapamycin have reduced translational activity, while mice receiving multiple injections of rapamycin over 4 weeks show no difference in translational activity compared with vehicle-injected controls. Furthermore, mice lacking S6K1 have no difference in global translational activity compared with wild-type littermates as measured by the percentage of ribosomes that are active in multiple tissues. Translational activity is reduced in S6K1-knockout mice following single injection of rapamycin, demonstrating that rapamycin’s effects on translation can occur independently of S6K1. Taken together, these data suggest that benefits of chronic rapamycin treatment or lack of S6K1 are dissociable from potential benefits of reduced translational activity, instead pointing to a model whereby changes in translation of specific subsets of mRNAs and/or translation-independent effects of reduced mTOR signaling underlie the longevity benefits. PMID:23839034

  15. Differential effects of rapamycin treatment on tonic and phasic GABAergic inhibition in dentate granule cells after focal brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Butler, Corwin R; Boychuk, Jeffery A; Smith, Bret N

    2016-06-01

    The cascade of events leading to post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains unclear. Altered inhibition in the hippocampal formation and dentate gyrus is a hallmark of several neurological disorders, including TBI and PTE. Inhibitory synaptic signaling in the hippocampus is predominately driven by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission, and is prominently mediated by postsynaptic type A GABA receptors (GABAAR's). Subsets of these receptors involved in tonic inhibition of neuronal membranes serve a fundamental role in maintenance of inhibitory state, and GABAAR-mediated tonic inhibition is altered functionally in animal models of both TBI and epilepsy. In this study, we assessed the effect of mTOR inhibition on hippocampal hilar inhibitory interneuron loss and synaptic and tonic GABAergic inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells (DGCs) after controlled cortical impact (CCI) to determine if mTOR activation after TBI modulates GABAAR function. Hilar inhibitory interneuron density was significantly reduced 72h after CCI injury in the dorsal two-thirds of the hemisphere ipsilateral to injury compared with the contralateral hemisphere and sham controls. Rapamycin treatment did not alter this reduction in cell density. Synaptic and tonic current measurements made in DGCs at both 1-2 and 8-13weeks post-injury indicated reduced synaptic inhibition and THIP-induced tonic current density in DGCs ipsilateral to CCI injury at both time points post-injury, with no change in resting tonic GABAAR-mediated currents. Rapamycin treatment did not alter the reduced synaptic inhibition observed in ipsilateral DGCs 1-2weeks post-CCI injury, but further reduced synaptic inhibition of ipsilateral DGCs at 8-13weeks post-injury. The reduction in THIP-induced tonic current after injury, however, was prevented by rapamycin treatment at both time points. Rapamycin treatment thus differentially modifies CCI-induced changes in synaptic and tonic GABAAR

  16. Rapamycin Attenuates Mouse Liver Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury by Inhibiting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Hua, X; Li, D; Zhang, J; Xia, Q

    2015-01-01

    The roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in liver ischemia and reperfusion injury (IRI) have been well recognized. However, the impact of rapamycin (Rapa), a broadly used immunosuppressive agent in human liver transplantation, on ER stress during IRI remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the roles of Rapa in the regulation of ER stress in vivo and in vitro. In a mouse liver partial warm ischemia and reperfusion mode, we demonstrated that Rapa markedly protected livers from IRI, as evidenced by serum alanine aminotransferase (sALT) levels and liver histology. Then we also confirmed the protection of Rapa from thapsigargin (Tg)-induced cell death in primary hepatocytes. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments showed that the ER stress markers were markedly up-regulated by IRI and Tg treatment, whereas they were down-regulated by Rapa pretreatment, as monitored by Western blot at the protein levels and by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) at the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels. In addition, it was also revealed that Rapa was able to remarkably inhibit the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and enhance autophagy both in IR-stressed livers and Tg-treated primary hepatocytes. Thus, these results suggest that Rapa protects livers from IRI through inhibiting the ER stress pathway. PMID:26293028

  17. Target of rapamycin activation predicts lifespan in fruit flies

    PubMed Central

    Scialò, Filippo; Sriram, Ashwin; Naudí, Alba; Ayala, Victoria; Jové, Mariona; Pamplona, Reinald; Sanz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Aging and age-related diseases are one of the most important health issues that the world will confront during the 21st century. Only by understanding the proximal causes will we be able to find treatments to reduce or delay the onset of degenerative diseases associated with aging. Currently, the prevalent paradigm in the field is the accumulation of damage. However, a new theory that proposes an alternative explanation is gaining momentum. The hyperfunction theory proposes that aging is not a consequence of a wear and tear process, but a result of the continuation of developmental programs during adulthood. Here we use Drosophila melanogaster, where evidence supporting both paradigms has been reported, to identify which parameters that have been previously related with lifespan best predict the rate of aging in wild type flies cultured at different temperatures. We find that mitochondrial function and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation correlates with metabolic rate, but not with the rate of aging. Importantly, we find that activation of nutrient sensing pathways (i.e. insulin-PI3K/Target of rapamycin (Tor) pathway) correlates with lifespan, but not with metabolic rate. Our results, dissociate metabolic rate and lifespan in wild type flies and instead link nutrient sensing signaling with longevity as predicted by the hyperfunction theory. PMID:26259964

  18. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition reduces cerebral vasospasm following a subarachnoid hemorrhage injury in canines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiguang; Khatibi, Nikan H; Yamaguchi-Okada, Mitsuo; Yan, Junhao; Chen, Chunhua; Hu, Qin; Meng, Haiwei; Han, Hongbin; Liu, Shuwei; Zhou, Changman

    2012-02-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a vital role in regulating growth, proliferation, survival, and protein synthesis among cells. In the present study, we investigated the role of the mTOR pathway following subarachnoid hemorrhage brain injury--specifically investigating its ability to mediate the activation of cerebral vasospasm. Additionally, we investigated whether key signaling pathway molecules such as the mTOR, P70S6K1, and 4E-BP1 play a role in the process. Thirty dogs were randomly divided into 5 groups: sham, SAH (subarachnoid hemorrhage), SAH+DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide), SAH+Rapamycin and SAH+AZD8055. An established canine double-hemorrhage model of SAH was used by injecting autologous arterial blood into the cisterna magna on days 0 and 2. Angiography was performed at days 0 and 7. Clinical behavior, histology, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot of mTOR, P70S6K1, 4E-BP1 and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) in the basilar arteries were examined. In the SAH and SAH+DMSO groups, severe angiographic vasospasm was obtained (34.3±19.8%, 38.4±10.3) compared with that in Sham (93.9±5.0%) respectively. mTOR, P70S6K1, 4E-BP1 and PCNA increased in the sample of spastic basilar arteries (p<0.05). In the SAH+RAPA and SAH+AZD8055 groups, Rapamycin and AZD8055 attenuated angiographic vasospasm (62.3±15.9% and 65.2±10.3%) while improving appetite and activity scores (p<0.05) on days 5 through 7. Rapamycin and AZD8055 significantly reduced the level and expression of mTOR, P70S6K1, 4E-BP1 and PCNA (p<0.05). In conclusion, our study suggests that the mTOR molecular signaling pathway plays a significant role in cerebral vasospasm following SAH, and that inhibition of the mTOR pathway has the potential to become an attractive strategy to treat vasospasm following SAH. PMID:22177999

  19. The effect of Bortezomib and Rapamycin on Telomerase Activity in Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Uziel, Orit; Cohen, Olga; Beery, Einat; Nordenberg, Jardena; Lahav, Meir

    2014-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a hematological malignancy with unfavorable prognosis. Novel therapeutic approaches for treating the disease are aimed at the mechanisms regulating growth signals, cellular proliferation, and survival pathways of the malignant clones. Bortezomib (Brt), a proteasome inhibitor with pleiotropic activities was shown to be active in MCL and is currently implemented in therapeutic combinations for this disease. Telomerase activity is essential for survival of malignant cells and as such is considered a valid therapeutic target. This study evaluated the effects of bortezomib on telomerase activity and its regulation in MCL cells in vitro and ex vivo. Our study shows that bortezomib exerts a cytotoxic effect in a dose dependent manner in two MCL cell lines, with differential sensitivity. While the IC50 for HBL-2 cells ranged between 2.5 ng/ml to 1.5 ng/ml during 24-72 h respectively, the IC50 for the NCEB cells was twice. Bortezomib differentially inhibited telomerase activity (TA): in HBL-2 cells there was a decline of 20%-55% during 24-72 h respectively. However in NCEB cells the decline was much smaller, and did not exceed 25%. Inhibition of telomerase activity is shown to be operated by two separate mechanisms: reduction of the hTERT mRNA expression (controlled by the binding of transcription factors) and reduction in phosphorylation of the catalytic subunit of hTERT by its kinases, AKT and PKCα. A decrease in telomerase activity was demonstrated also in mononuclear cells, isolated from three MCL patients following incubation of the cells in the presence of bortezomib for 24-72 h. In one patient the decrease in TA ranged between 17%-37% respectively, in the second patient between 63%-76% and in the third patient between 70-100% for 24-72 h respectively. The current study indicates that a combination of bortezomib and rapamycin, (an m-Tor pathway inhibitor used in MCL treatment) induced synergistic inhibition of telomerase activity. In HBL

  20. Direct inhibition of the signaling functions of the mammalian target of rapamycin by the phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors, wortmannin and LY294002.

    PubMed Central

    Brunn, G J; Williams, J; Sabers, C; Wiederrecht, G; Lawrence, J C; Abraham, R T

    1996-01-01

    The immunosuppressant, rapamycin, inhibits cell growth by interfering with the function of a novel kinase, termed mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). The putative catalytic domain of mTOR is similar to those of mammalian and yeast phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinases. This study demonstrates that mTOR is a component of a cytokine-triggered protein kinase cascade leading to the phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor-4E (eIF-4E) binding protein, PHAS-1, in activated T lymphocytes. This event promotes G1 phase progression by stimulating eIF-4E-dependent translation initiation. A mutant YAC-1 T lymphoma cell line, which was selected for resistance to the growth-inhibitory action of rapamycin, was correspondingly resistant to the suppressive effect of this drug on PHAS-1 phosphorylation. In contrast, the PI 3-kinase inhibitor, wortmannin, reduced the phosphorylation of PHAS-1 in both rapamycin-sensitive and -resistant T cells. At similar drug concentrations (0.1-1 microM), wortmannin irreversibly inhibited the serine-specific autokinase activity of mTOR. The autokinase activity of mTOR was also sensitive to the structurally distinct PI 3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002, at concentrations (1-30 microM) nearly identical to those required for inhibition of the lipid kinase activity of the mammalian p85-p110 heterodimer. These studies indicate that the signaling functions of mTOR, and potentially those of other high molecular weight PI 3-kinase homologs, are directly affected by cellular treatment with wortmannin or LY294002. Images PMID:8895571

  1. AKT inhibition overcomes rapamycin resistance by enhancing the repressive function of PRAS40 on mTORC1/4E-BP1 axis

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Wenting; Ye, Qing; Liu, Side; She, Qing-Bai

    2015-01-01

    The mTORC1 inhibitors, rapamycin and its analogs, are known to show only modest antitumor activity in clinic, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely elusive. Here, we found that activated AKT signaling is associated with rapamycin resistance in breast and colon cancers by sustained phosphorylation of the translational repressor 4E-BP1. Treatment of tumor cells with rapamycin or the AKT inhibitor MK2206 showed a limited activity in inhibiting 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, cap-dependent translation, cell growth and motility. However, treatment with both drugs resulted in profound effects in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic investigation demonstrated that the combination treatment was required to effectively inhibit PRAS40 phosphorylation on both Ser183 and Thr246 mediated by mTORC1 and AKT respectively, and with the combined treatment, dephosphorylated PRAS40 binding to the raptor/mTOR complex was enhanced, leading to dramatic repression of mTORC1-regulated 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and translation. Knockdown of PRAS40 or 4E-BP1 expression markedly reduced the dependence of tumor cells on AKT/mTORC1 signaling for translation and survival. Together, these findings reveal a critical role of PRAS40 as an integrator of mTORC1 and AKT signaling for 4E-BP1-mediated translational regulation of tumor cell growth and motility, and highlight PRAS40 phosphorylation as a potential biomarker to evaluate the therapeutic response to mTOR/AKT inhibitors. PMID:25961827

  2. Rapamycin Protects from Type-I Peritoneal Membrane Failure Inhibiting the Angiogenesis, Lymphangiogenesis, and Endo-MT

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Anna Rita; Loureiro, Jesús; Abensur, Hugo; Sandoval, Pilar; Sánchez-Tomero, José Antonio; del Peso, Gloria; Jiménez-Heffernan, José Antonio; Ruiz-Carpio, Vicente; Selgas, Rafael; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Aguilera, Abelardo; Liappas, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Preservation of peritoneal membrane (PM) is essential for long-term survival in peritoneal dialysis (PD). Continuous presence of PD fluids (PDF) in the peritoneal cavity generates chronic inflammation and promotes changes of the PM, such as fibrosis, angiogenesis, and lymphangiogenesis. Mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT) and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (Endo-MT) seem to play a central role in this pathogenesis. We speculated that Rapamycin, a potent immunosuppressor, could be beneficial by regulating blood and lymphatic vessels proliferation. We demonstrate that mice undergoing a combined PD and Rapamycin treatment (PDF + Rapa group) presented a reduced PM thickness and lower number of submesothelial blood and lymphatic vessels, as well as decreased MMT and Endo-MT, comparing with their counterparts exposed to PD alone (PDF group). Peritoneal water transport in the PDF + Rapa group remained at control level, whereas PD effluent levels of VEGF, TGF-β, and TNF-α were lower than in the PDF group. Moreover, the treatment of mesothelial cells with Rapamycin in vitro significantly decreased VEGF synthesis and selectively inhibited the VEGF-C and VEGF-D release when compared with control cells. Thus, Rapamycin has a protective effect on PM in PD through an antifibrotic and antiproliferative effect on blood and lymphatic vessels. Moreover, it inhibits Endo-MT and, at least partially, MMT. PMID:26688823

  3. [Significance of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) activity in human lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Márk, Ágnes

    2014-06-01

    Neoplastic processes, tumor growth, and tumor cell proliferation and survival are often due to the altered activation of different signaling pathways. The increased activity of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling has been shown to be an important regulator of tumor growth in several solid tumors and in mantle cell lymphomas. The active form of mTOR kinase (mammalian target of rapamycin) is a key signaling molecule, and it exists in two different complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. In the present work, mTOR activity was investigated in different lymphoma types, in parallel with clinical data. We also examined in Hodgkin lymphomas (HL) the role of mTOR activity in survival mechanisms such as antiapoptotic protein expression and alterations in the microenvironment. We determined which lymphoma types display characteristic high mTOR activity in our TMA (tissue microarray) study. We observed that mTOR activity is increased in mitotic lymphoid cells compared to interphasic cells. The number of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and HL cases was extended in a further set of TMA. We observed significantly higher mTOR activity in the non-centrum germinativum derived subtype of DLBCL than in the centrum germinativum derived subtype, which was a prognostic marker; 63% of mTOR active cases showed Rictor overexpression, indicating mTORC2 activity. High mTOR activity was also established in 92% of HL cases, which was linked to mTORC1. This finding was not a prognostic marker, however, it can be useful in targeted therapy. We observed the overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein BCL-xL and NFκB-p50 in the majority of mTOR active HLs. HLs showed high numbers of regulatory T cells in the microenvironment and high expression of galectin-1 in tumor cells and in the extracellular matrix, when compared to reactive lymph nodes. We confirmed that mTOR inhibition had significant antiproliferative and antiapoptotic effects in lymphoma cell lines and in lymphoma xenografts (HL, DLBCL, Burkitt lymphoma

  4. Participation of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 in Toll-Like Receptor 2– and 4–Induced Neutrophil Activation and Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lorne, Emmanuel; Zhao, Xia; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W.; Liu, Gang; Park, Young-Jun; Tsuruta, Yuko; Abraham, Edward

    2009-01-01

    mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) plays a central role in cell growth and cellular responses to metabolic stress. Although mTORC1 has been shown to be activated after Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 engagement, there is little information concerning the role that mTORC1 may play in modulating neutrophil function and neutrophil-dependent inflammatory events, such as acute lung injury. To examine these issues, we determined the effects of rapamycin-induced inhibition of mTORC1 on TLR2- and TLR4-induced neutrophil activation. mTORC1 was dose- and time-dependently activated in murine bone marrow neutrophils cultured with the TLR4 ligand, LPS, or the TLR2 ligand, Pam3 Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 (PAM). Incubation of PAM- or LPS-stimulated neutrophils with rapamycin inhibited expression of TNF-α and IL-6, but not IκB-α degradation or nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Exposure of PAM or LPS-stimulated neutrophils to rapamycin inhibited phosphorylation of serine 276 in the NF-κB p65 subunit, a phosphorylation event required for optimal transcriptional activity of NF-κB. Rapamycin pretreatment inhibited PAM- or LPS-induced mTORC1 activation in the lungs. Administration of rapamycin also decreased the severity of lung injury after intratracheal LPS or PAM administration, as determined by diminished neutrophil accumulation in the lungs, reduced interstitial pulmonary edema, and diminished levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. These results indicate that mTORC1 activation is essential in TLR2- and TLR4-induced neutrophil activation, as well as in the development and severity of acute lung injury. PMID:19131641

  5. cAMP-dependent activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in thyroid cells. Implication in mitogenesis and activation of CDK4.

    PubMed

    Blancquaert, Sara; Wang, Lifu; Paternot, Sabine; Coulonval, Katia; Dumont, Jacques E; Harris, Thurl E; Roger, Pierre P

    2010-07-01

    How cAMP-dependent protein kinases [protein kinase A (PKA)] transduce the mitogenic stimulus elicited by TSH in thyroid cells to late activation of cyclin D3-cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) remains enigmatic. Here we show in PC Cl3 rat thyroid cells that TSH/cAMP, like insulin, activates the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-raptor complex (mTORC1) leading to phosphorylation of S6K1 and 4E-BP1. mTORC1-dependent S6K1 phosphorylation in response to both insulin and cAMP required amino acids, whereas inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinase and glycogen synthase kinase 3 enhanced insulin but not cAMP effects. Unlike insulin, TSH/cAMP did not activate protein kinase B or induce tuberous sclerosis complex 2 phosphorylation at T1462 and Y1571. However, like insulin, TSH/cAMP produced a stable increase in mTORC1 kinase activity that was associated with augmented 4E-BP1 binding to raptor. This could be caused in part by T246 phosphorylation of PRAS40, which was found as an in vitro substrate of PKA. Both in PC Cl3 cells and primary dog thyrocytes, rapamycin inhibited DNA synthesis and retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation induced by TSH and insulin. Although rapamycin reduced cyclin D3 accumulation, the abundance of cyclin D3-CDK4 complexes was not affected. However, rapamycin inhibited the activity of these complexes by decreasing the TSH and insulin-mediated stimulation of activating T172 phosphorylation of CDK4. We propose that mTORC1 activation by TSH, at least in part through PKA-dependent phosphorylation of PRAS40, crucially contributes to mediate cAMP-dependent mitogenesis by regulating CDK4 T172-phosphorylation. PMID:20484410

  6. Rapamycin Inhibits Multiple Stages of c-Neu/ErbB2-induced Tumor Progression in a Transgenic Mouse Model of HER2 Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mosley, Jonathan D.; Poirier, John T.; Seachrist, Darcie D.; Landis, Melissa D.; Keri, Ruth A.

    2008-01-01

    Amplification of the HER2 (ErbB2, c-Neu) proto-oncogene in breast cancer is associated with poor prognosis and high relapse rates. HER2/ErbB2, in conjunction with ErbB3, signals through the Akt/PI3-K pathway and leads to the activation of mTOR, a critical mRNA translation regulator that controls cell growth. Gene expression analysis of mammary tumors collected from MMTV-c-Neu transgenic mice revealed that mRNA levels of several mTOR pathway members were either up-regulated (p85/PI3-K and p70S6K) or down-regulated (eIF4E-BP1) in a manner expected to enhance signaling through this pathway. Treatment of MMTV-c-Neu transgenic mice with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin caused growth arrest and regression of primary tumors with no evidence of weight loss or generalized toxicity. The treatment effects were due to decreased proliferation, associated with reduced cyclin D1 expression, and increased cell death in primary tumors. While many of the dead epithelial cells had the histopathologic characteristics of ischemic necrosis, rapamycin treatment was not associated with changes in microvascular density or apoptosis. Rapamycin also inhibited cellular proliferation in lung metastases. In summary, data from this preclinical model of ErbB2/Neu-induced breast cancer demonstrate that inhibition of the mTOR pathway with rapamycin blocks multiple stages of ErbB2/Neu-induced tumorigenic progression. PMID:17699716

  7. Resveratrol Inhibits Inflammatory Responses via the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling Pathway in Cultured LPS-Stimulated Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia-Zhi; Zhang, Wei; He, Ying; Song, Rui; Wang, Wen-Min; Xiao, Chun-Jie; Lu, Di

    2012-01-01

    Background Resveratrol have been known to possess many pharmacological properties including antioxidant, cardioprotective and anticancer effects. Although current studies indicate that resveratrol produces neuroprotection against neurological disorders, the precise mechanisms for its beneficial effects are still not fully understood. We investigate the effect of anti-inflammatory and mechamisms of resveratrol by using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine microglial BV-2 cells. Methodology/Principal Findings BV-2 cells were treated with resveratrol (25, 50, and 100 µM) and/or LPS (1 µg/ml). Nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were measured by Griess reagent and ELISA. The mRNA and protein levels of proinflammatory proteins and cytokines were analysed by RT-PCR and double immunofluorescence labeling, respectively. Phosphorylation levels of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10), Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) cascades, inhibitor κB-α (IκB-α) and cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) were measured by western blot. Resveratrol significantly attenuated the LPS-induced expression of NO, PGE2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in BV-2 cells. Resveratrol increased PTEN, Akt and mTOR phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner or a time-dependent manner. Rapamycin (10 nM), a specific mTOR inhibitor, blocked the effects of resveratrol on LPS-induced microglial activation. In addition, mTOR inhibition partially abolished the inhibitory effect of resveratrol on the phosphorylation of IκB-α, CREB, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). Conclusion and Implications This study indicates that resveratrol inhibited LPS-induced proinflammatory

  8. Glucocorticoids inhibited hypothalamic target of rapamycin in high fat diet-fed chicks.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Wang, X; Jiao, H; Zhao, J; Lin, H

    2015-09-01

    The present study was conducted with broiler chicks exposed to dexamethasone (DEX) to explore its effects on hypothalamic target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling and regulating appetite in diets containing different energy levels. At 5 d age, 48 chicks were divided into one of 4 groups: high-fat diet (HFD) or low-fat diet (LFD) and intracerebroventricular (ICV) injected with either dexamethasone (DEX; 4 μg/2 μL) or saline at 10 d age. The results showed that DEX significantly inhibited gene expression of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcripts (CART), melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R), and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), and inhibited the protein level of the phospho-TOR compared with the control in HFD-fed chicks (P<0.05) but not in LFD-fed chicks (P>0.05). After DEX treatment, hypothalamic agouti-related peptide levels were decreased significantly in HFD-fed chicks (P<0.05) but not in LFD-fed chicks (P>0.05). Compared to the control, DEX-treated chicks did not present any significant changes in neuropeptide Y gene expression with either HFD or LFD (P>0.05), but pro-opiomelanocortin levels were depressed by ICV DEX treatment with both diets (P<0.05). In conclusion, glucocorticoids (GC) downregulated hypothalamic gene expression of CART, CRH, and MC4R in HFD-fed chicks, suggesting that the regulatory network formed by these genes is associated with the appetite control during stress. The TOR pathway may be involved in the regulation of GC on appetite-related genes. PMID:26188033

  9. Active mechanistic target of rapamycin plays an ancillary rather than essential role in zebrafish CNS axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Diekmann, Heike; Kalbhen, Pascal; Fischer, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    The developmental decrease of the intrinsic regenerative ability of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is associated with reduced activity of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) in mature neurons such as retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). While mTOR activity is further decreased upon axonal injury, maintenance of its pre-injury level, for instance by genetic deletion of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), markedly promotes axon regeneration in mammals. The current study now addressed the question whether active mTOR might generally play a central role in axon regeneration by analyzing its requirement in regeneration-competent zebrafish. Remarkably, regulation of mTOR activity after optic nerve injury in zebrafish is fundamentally different compared to mammals. Hardly any activity was detected in naïve RGCs, whereas it was markedly increased upon axotomy in vivo as well as in dissociated cell cultures. After a short burst, mTOR activity was quickly attenuated, which is contrary to the requirements for axon regeneration in mammals. Surprisingly, mTOR activity was not essential for axonal growth per se, but correlated with cytokine- and PTEN inhibitor-induced neurite extension in vitro. Moreover, inhibition of mTOR using rapamycin significantly reduced axon regeneration in vivo and compromised functional recovery after optic nerve injury. Therefore, axotomy-induced mTOR activity is involved in CNS axon regeneration in zebrafish similar to mammals, although it plays an ancillary rather than essential role in this regeneration-competent species. PMID:26217179

  10. Targeting notch pathway enhances rapamycin antitumor activity in pancreas cancers through PTEN phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pancreas cancer is one of most aggressive human cancers with the survival rate for patients with metastatic pancreas cancer at 5-6 months. The poor survival demonstrates a clear need for better target identification, drug development and new therapeutic strategies. Recent discoveries have shown that the role for Notch pathway is important in both development and cancer. Its contribution to oncogenesis also involves crosstalks with other growth factor pathways, such as Akt and its modulator, PTEN. The mounting evidence supporting a role for Notch in cancer promotion and survival suggests that targeting this pathway alone or in combination with other therapeutics represents a promising therapeutic strategy. Results Using a pancreas cancer tissue microarray, we noted that Jagged1, Notch3 and Notch4 are overexpressed in pancreas tumors (26%, 84% and 31% respectively), whereas Notch1 is expressed in blood vessels. While there was no correlation between Notch receptor expression and survival, stage or tumor grade, Notch3 was associated with Jagged1 and EGFR expression, suggesting a unique relationship between Notch3 and Jagged1. Inhibition of the Notch pathway genetically and with gamma-secretase inhibitor (GSI) resulted in tumor suppression and enhanced cell death. The observed anti-tumor activity appeared to be through Akt and modulation of PTEN phosphorylation. We discovered that transcriptional regulation of RhoA by Notch is important for PTEN phosphorylation. Finally, the mTOR inhibitor Rapamycin enhanced the effect of GSI on RhoA expression, resulting in down regulation of phospho-Akt and increased in vitro tumor cytotoxity. Conclusions Notch pathway plays an important role in maintaining pancreas tumor phenotype. Targeting this pathway represents a reasonable strategy for the treatment of pancreas cancers. Notch modulates the Akt pathway through regulation of PTEN phosphorylation, an observation that has not been made previously. Furthermore, we

  11. Plumbagin induces G2-M arrest and autophagy by inhibiting the AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Po-Lin; Hsu, Ya-Ling; Cho, Chien-Yu

    2006-12-01

    This study is the first to investigate the anticancer effect of plumbagin in human breast cancer cells. Plumbagin exhibited cell proliferation inhibition by inducing cells to undergo G2-M arrest and autophagic cell death. Blockade of the cell cycle was associated with increased p21/WAF1 expression and Chk2 activation, and reduced amounts of cyclin B1, cyclin A, Cdc2, and Cdc25C. Plumbagin also reduced Cdc2 function by increasing the association of p21/WAF1/Cdc2 complex and the levels of inactivated phospho-Cdc2 and phospho-Cdc25C by Chk2 activation. Plumbagin triggered autophagic cell death but not predominantly apoptosis. Pretreatment of cells with autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin suppressed plumbagin-mediated cell death. We also found that plumbagin inhibited survival signaling through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway by blocking the activation of AKT and downstream targets, including the mammalian target of rapamycin, forkhead transcription factors, and glycogen synthase kinase 3beta. Phosphorylation of both of mammalian target of rapamycin downstream targets, p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase and 4E-BP1, was also diminished. Overexpression of AKT by AKT cDNA transfection decreased plumbagin-mediated autophagic cell death, whereas reduction of AKT expression by small interfering RNA potentiated the effect of plumbagin, supporting the inhibition of AKT being beneficial to autophagy. Furthermore, suppression of AKT by plumbagin enhanced the activation of Chk2, resulting in increased inactive phosphorylation of Cdc25C and Cdc2. Further investigation revealed that plumbagin inhibition of cell growth was also evident in a nude mouse model. Taken together, these results imply a critical role for AKT inhibition in plumbagin-induced G2-M arrest and autophagy of human breast cancer cells. PMID:17172425

  12. Tuberous sclerosis complex-1 and -2 gene products function together to inhibit mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Tee, Andrew R; Fingar, Diane C; Manning, Brendan D; Kwiatkowski, David J; Cantley, Lewis C; Blenis, John

    2002-10-15

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder that occurs upon mutation of either the TSC1 or TSC2 genes, which encode the protein products hamartin and tuberin, respectively. Here, we show that hamartin and tuberin function together to inhibit mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated signaling to eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1). First, coexpression of hamartin and tuberin repressed phosphorylation of 4E-BP1, resulting in increased association of 4E-BP1 with eIF4E; importantly, a mutant of TSC2 derived from TSC patients was defective in repressing phosphorylation of 4E-BP1. Second, the activity of S6K1 was repressed by coexpression of hamartin and tuberin, but the activity of rapamycin-resistant mutants of S6K1 were not affected, implicating mTOR in the TSC-mediated inhibitory effect on S6K1. Third, hamartin and tuberin blocked the ability of amino acids to activate S6K1 within nutrient-deprived cells, a process that is dependent on mTOR. These findings strongly implicate the tuberin-hamartin tumor suppressor complex as an inhibitor of mTOR and suggest that the formation of tumors within TSC patients may result from aberrantly high levels of mTOR-mediated signaling to downstream targets. PMID:12271141

  13. The Prolyl Peptidases PRCP/PREP Regulate IRS-1 Stability Critical for Rapamycin-induced Feedback Activation of PI3K and AKT*

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Lei; Ying, Guoguang; Danzer, Brian; Perez, Ricardo E.; Shariat-Madar, Zia; Levenson, Victor V.; Maki, Carl G.

    2014-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (PKB/AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway conveys signals from receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) to regulate cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, and motility. Previously we found that prolylcarboxypeptidase (PRCP) regulate proliferation and survival in breast cancer cells. In this study, we found that PRCP and the related family member prolylendopeptidase (PREP) are essential for proliferation and survival of pancreatic cancer cells. Depletion/inhibition of PRCP and PREP-induced serine phosphorylation and degradation of IRS-1, leading to inactivation of the cellular PI3K and AKT. Notably, depletion/inhibition of PRCP/PREP destabilized IRS-1 in the cells treated with rapamycin, blocking the feedback activation PI3K/AKT. Consequently, inhibition of PRCP/PREP enhanced rapamycin-induced cytotoxicity. Thus, we have identified PRCP and PREP as a stabilizer of IRS-1 which is critical for PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:24936056

  14. Loss of ypk1 function causes rapamycin sensitivity, inhibition of translation initiation and synthetic lethality in 14-3-3-deficient yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Gelperin, Daniel; Horton, Lynn; DeChant, Anne; Hensold, Jack; Lemmon, Sandra K

    2002-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins bind to phosphorylated proteins and regulate a variety of cellular activities as effectors of serine/threonine phosphorylation. To define processes requiring 14-3-3 function in yeast, mutants with increased sensitivity to reduced 14-3-3 protein levels were identified by synthetic lethal screening. One mutation was found to be allelic to YPK1, which encodes a Ser/Thr protein kinase. Loss of Ypk function causes hypersensitivity to rapamycin, similar to 14-3-3 mutations and other mutations affecting the TOR signaling pathway in yeast. Similar to treatment with rapamycin, loss of Ypk function disrupted translation, at least in part by causing depletion of eIF4G, a central adaptor protein required for cap-dependent mRNA translation initiation. In addition, Ypk1 as well as eIF4G protein levels were rapidly depleted upon nitrogen starvation, but not during glucose starvation, even though both conditions inhibit translation initiation. These results suggest that Ypk regulates translation initiation in response to nutrient signals, either through the TOR pathway or in a functionally related pathway parallel to TOR. PMID:12196392

  15. Rapamycin extends life span of Rb1+/− mice by inhibiting neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Livi, Carolina B.; Hardman, Rulon L.; Christy, Barbara A.; Dodds, Sherry G.; Jones, Diane; Williams, Charnae; Strong, Randy; Bokov, Alex; Javors, Martin A.; Ikeno, Yuji; Hubbard, Gene; Hasty, Paul; Sharp, Zelton Dave

    2013-01-01

    Chronic treatment of mice with an enterically released formulation of rapamycin (eRapa) extends median and maximum life span, partly by attenuating cancer. The mechanistic basis of this response is not known. To gain a better understanding of these in vivo effects, we used a defined preclinical model of neuroendocrine cancer, Rb1+/− mice. Previous results showed that diet restriction (DR) had minimal or no effect on the lifespan of Rb1+/− mice, suggesting that the beneficial response to DR is dependent on pRb1. Since long-term eRapa treatment may at least partially mimic chronic DR in lifespan extension, we predicted that it would have a minimal effect in Rb1+/− mice. Beginning at 9 weeks of age until death, we fed Rb1+/− mice a diet without or with eRapa at 14 mg/kg food, which results in an approximate dose of 2.24 mg/kg body weight per day, and yielded rapamycin blood levels of about 4 ng/ml. Surprisingly, we found that eRapa dramatically extended life span of both female and male Rb1+/− mice, and slowed the appearance and growth of pituitary and decreased the incidence of thyroid tumors commonly observed in these mice. In this model, eRapa appears to act differently than DR, suggesting diverse mechanisms of action on survival and anti-tumor effects. In particular the beneficial effects of rapamycin did not depend on the dose of Rb1. PMID:23454836

  16. Functionally conserved effects of rapamycin exposure on zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Sucularli, Ceren; Shehwana, Huma; Kuscu, Cem; Dungul, Dilay Ciglidag; Ozdag, Hilal; Konu, Ozlen

    2016-05-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a conserved serine/threonine kinase important in cell proliferation, growth and protein translation. Rapamycin, a well‑known anti‑cancer agent and immunosuppressant drug, inhibits mTOR activity in different taxa including zebrafish. In the present study, the effect of rapamycin exposure on the transcriptome of a zebrafish fibroblast cell line, ZF4, was investigated. Microarray analysis demonstrated that rapamycin treatment modulated a large set of genes with varying functions including protein synthesis, assembly of mitochondrial and proteasomal machinery, cell cycle, metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation in ZF4 cells. A mild however, coordinated reduction in the expression of proteasomal and mitochondrial ribosomal subunits was detected, while the expression of numerous ribosomal subunits increased. Meta‑analysis of heterogeneous mouse rapamycin microarray datasets enabled the comparison of zebrafish and mouse pathways modulated by rapamycin, using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and Gene Ontology pathway analysis. The analyses demonstrated a high degree of functional conservation between zebrafish and mice in response to rapamycin. In addition, rapamycin treatment resulted in a marked dose‑dependent reduction in body size and pigmentation in zebrafish embryos. The present study is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to evaluate the conservation of rapamycin‑modulated functional pathways between zebrafish and mice, in addition to the dose‑dependent growth curves of zebrafish embryos upon rapamycin exposure. PMID:27035657

  17. Inhibition of mTOR by Rapamycin Abolishes Cognitive Deficits and Reduces Amyloid-β Levels in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Spilman, Patricia; Podlutskaya, Natalia; Hart, Matthew J.; Debnath, Jayanta; Gorostiza, Olivia; Bredesen, Dale; Richardson, Arlan; Strong, Randy; Galvan, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    Background Reduced TOR signaling has been shown to significantly increase lifespan in a variety of organisms [1], [2], [3], [4]. It was recently demonstrated that long-term treatment with rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mTOR pathway[5], or ablation of the mTOR target p70S6K[6] extends lifespan in mice, possibly by delaying aging. Whether inhibition of the mTOR pathway would delay or prevent age-associated disease such as AD remained to be determined. Methodology/Principal Findings We used rapamycin administration and behavioral tools in a mouse model of AD as well as standard biochemical and immunohistochemical measures in brain tissue to provide answers for this question. Here we show that long-term inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin prevented AD-like cognitive deficits and lowered levels of Aβ42, a major toxic species in AD[7], in the PDAPP transgenic mouse model. These data indicate that inhibition of the mTOR pathway can reduce Aβ42 levels in vivo and block or delay AD in mice. As expected from the inhibition of mTOR, autophagy was increased in neurons of rapamycin-treated transgenic, but not in non-transgenic, PDAPP mice, suggesting that the reduction in Aβ and the improvement in cognitive function are due in part to increased autophagy, possibly as a response to high levels of Aβ. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggest that inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin, an intervention that extends lifespan in mice, can slow or block AD progression in a transgenic mouse model of the disease. Rapamycin, already used in clinical settings, may be a potentially effective therapeutic agent for the treatment of AD. PMID:20376313

  18. GSK3β, But Not GSK3α, Inhibits the Neuronal Differentiation of Neural Progenitor Cells As a Downstream Target of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex1

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jyhyun; Jang, Jiwon; Choi, Jinyong; Lee, Junsub; Oh, Seo-Ho; Lee, Junghun; Yoon, Keejung

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) acts as an important regulator during the proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs), but the roles of the isoforms of this molecule (GSK3α and GSK3β) have not been clearly defined. In this study, we investigated the functions of GSK3α and GSK3β in the context of neuronal differentiation of murine NPCs. Treatment of primary NPCs with a GSK3 inhibitor (SB216763) resulted in an increase in the percentage of TuJ1-positive immature neurons, suggesting an inhibitory role of GSK3 in embryonic neurogenesis. Downregulation of GSK3β expression increased the percentage of TuJ1-positive cells, while knock-down of GSK3α seemed to have no effect. When primary NPCs were engineered to stably express either isoform of GSK3 using retroviral vectors, GSK3β, but not GSK3α, inhibited neuronal differentiation and helped the cells to maintain the characteristics of NPCs. Mutant GSK3β (Y216F) failed to suppress neuronal differentiation, indicating that the kinase activity of GSK3β is important for this regulatory function. Similar results were obtained in vivo when a retroviral vector expressing GSK3β was delivered to E9.5 mouse brains using the ultrasound image-guided gene delivery technique. In addition, SB216763 was found to block the rapamycin-mediated inhibition of neuronal differentiation of NPCs. Taken together, our results demonstrate that GSK3β, but not GSK3α, negatively controls the neuronal differentiation of progenitor cells and that GSK3β may act downstream of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex1 signaling pathway. PMID:24397546

  19. Metformin and rapamycin have distinct effects on the AKT pathway and proliferation in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zakikhani, Mahvash; Blouin, Marie-José; Piura, Esther; Pollak, Michael N

    2010-08-01

    Rapamycin and its analogues inhibit mTOR, which leads to decreased protein synthesis and decreased cancer cell proliferation in many experimental systems. Adenosine 5'- monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators such as metformin have similar actions, in keeping with the TSC2/1 pathway linking activation of AMPK to inhibition of mTOR. As mTOR inhibition by rapamycin is associated with attenuation of negative feedback to IRS-1, rapamycin is known to increase activation of AKT, which may reduce its anti-neoplastic activity. We observed that metformin exposure decreases AKT activation, an action opposite to that of rapamycin. We show that metformin (but not rapamycin) exposure leads to increased phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Ser(789), a site previously reported to inhibit downstream signaling and to be an AMPK substrate phosphorylated under conditions of cellular energy depletion. siRNA methods confirmed that reduction of AMPK levels attenuates both the IRS-1 Ser(789) phosphorylation and the inhibition of AKT activation associated with metformin exposure. Although both rapamycin and metformin inhibit mTOR (the former directly and the latter through AMPK signaling), our results demonstrate previously unrecognized differences between these agents. The data are consistent with the observation that maximal induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation are greater for metformin than rapamycin. PMID:20135346

  20. Rapamycin enhances eIF4E phosphorylation by activating MAP kinase-interacting kinase 2a (Mnk2a).

    PubMed

    Stead, Rebecca L; Proud, Christopher G

    2013-08-19

    Eukaryotic initiation factor eIF4E and its phosphorylation play key roles in cell transformation and tumorigenesis. eIF4E is phosphorylated by the Mnks (MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase-interacting kinases). Rapamycin increases eIF4E phosphorylation in cancer cells, potentially limiting their anti-cancer effects. Here we show that the rapamycin-induced increase in eIF4E phosphorylation reflects increased activity of Mnk2 but not Mnk1. This activation requires a novel phosphorylation site in Mnk2a, Ser437. Our findings have potentially important implications for the use of rapamycin and its analogues in cancer therapy, suggesting that inhibitors of mTOR and Mnk (or Mnk2) may be more efficacious than rapalogs alone. PMID:23831578

  1. Long-term effects of rapamycin treatment on insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt/PKB and glycogen synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, Shailly; Shrivastav, Anuraag; Changela, Sheena; Khandelwal, Ramji L.

    2008-04-01

    Protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) is a Ser/Thr kinase that is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation/survival through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the regulation of glycogen metabolism through glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) and glycogen synthase (GS). Rapamycin is an inhibitor of mTOR. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of rapamycin pretreatment on the insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt/PKB phosphorylation and GS activity in parental HepG2 and HepG2 cells with overexpression of constitutively active Akt1/PKB-{alpha} (HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB). Rapamycin pretreatment resulted in a decrease (20-30%) in the insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 (Ser 473) in parental HepG2 cells but showed an upregulation of phosphorylation in HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells. Rictor levels were decreased (20-50%) in parental HepG2 cells but were not significantly altered in the HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells. Furthermore, rictor knockdown decreased the phosphorylation of Akt (Ser 473) by 40-60% upon rapamycin pretreatment. GS activity followed similar trends as that of phosphorylated Akt and so with rictor levels in these cells pretreated with rapamycin; parental HepG2 cells showed a decrease in GS activity, whereas as HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells showed an increase in GS activity. The changes in the levels of phosphorylated Akt/PKB (Ser 473) correlated with GS and protein phoshatase-1 activity.

  2. Rapamycin inhibits re-endothelialization after percutaneous coronary intervention by impeding the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells and inducing apoptosis of endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Tao; Li, Fei; Wang, Wen-Yong; Li, Xiao-Jing; Liu, Yi-Meng; Wang, Rui-An; Guo, Wen-Yi; Wang, Hai-Chang

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial-cell function is important in the healing of damaged endothelium after percutaneous coronary artery damage. In 3 different animal models, we sought to determine whether rapamycin (sirolimus) affects the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells. First, after we implanted stents in dogs, we found that re-endothelialization was impeded more by drug-eluting stents than by bare-metal stents, 30 days after percutaneous coronary intervention. Second, in vitro in rats, we found that 1-100 ng/mL of rapamycin time- and dose-dependently inhibited proliferation over 72 hr (with effects evident as early as 24 hr) and also dose-dependently induced endothelial progenitor-cell apoptosis. Finally, in vivo in rats, we observed that vascular endothelial growth factor expression was decreased after 5 days of rapamycin treatment. We conclude that rapamycin impedes re-endothelialization after drug-eluting stent implantation by inhibiting the proliferation and migration of coronary endothelial cells, inducing endothelial progenitor-cell apoptosis, and decreasing vascular endothelial growth factor expression in the circulation. PMID:20401293

  3. Rapamycin protects livers from ischemia and reperfusion Injury via both autophagy induction and mTORC2-Akt activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianjun; Lu, Tianfei; Yue, Shi; Shen, Xiuda; Gao, Feng; Busuttil, Ronald W.; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W.; Xia, Qiang; Zhai, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Background Although Rapamycin (RPM) have been studied extensively in ischemia models, its functional mechanisms remains to be defined. Methods We determined how RPM impacted the pathogenesis of ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) in a murine liver partial warm ischemia model, with emphasis on its regulation of hepatocyte death. Results RPM protected livers from IRI in the presence of fully developed liver inflammatory immune response. RPM enhanced liver autophagy induction at the reperfusion stage. Dual mTOR1/2 inhibitor Torin 1, despite its ability to induced autophagy, failed to protect livers from IRI. The treatment with RPM, but not Torin 1, resulted in the enhanced activation of the mTORC2-Akt signaling pathway activation in livers post reperfusion. Inactivation of Akt by Triciribine abolished liver protective effect of RPM. The differential cytoprotective effect of RPM and Torin 1 was confirmed in vitro in hepatocyte cultures. RPM, but not Trin 1, protected hepatocytes from stress and TNF-α induced cell death; and inhibition of either autophagy by chloroquine or Akt by Triciribine abolished RPM-mediated cytoprotection. Conclusion RPM protected livers from IRI via both autophagy and mTORC2-Akt activation mechanisms. PMID:25340604

  4. The novel orally bioavailable inhibitor of phosphoinositol-3-kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin, NVP-BEZ235, inhibits growth and proliferation in multiple myeloma

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Philipp Mandl-Weber, Sonja; Oduncu, Fuat; Schmidmaier, Ralf

    2009-02-01

    NVP-BEZ235 is a new inhibitor of phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3 kinase) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) whose efficacy in advanced solid tumours is currently being evaluated in a phase I/II clinical trial. Here we show that NVP-BEZ235 inhibits growth in common myeloma cell lines as well as primary myeloma cells at nanomolar concentrations in a time and dose dependent fashion. Further experiments revealed induction of apoptosis in three of four cell lines. Inhibition of cell growth was mainly due to inhibition of myeloma cell proliferation, as shown by the BrdU assay. Cell cycle analysis revealed induction of cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase, which was due to downregulation of cyclin D1, pRb and cdc25a. NVP-BEZ235 inhibited phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt), P70S6k and 4E-BP-1. Furthermore we show that the stimulatory effect of CD40-ligand (CD40L), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and conditioned medium of HS-5 stromal cells on myeloma cell growth is completely abrogated by NVP-BEZ235. In addition, synergism studies revealed synergistic and additive activity of NVP-BEZ235 together with melphalan, doxorubicin and bortezomib. Taken together, inhibition of PI3 kinase/mTOR by NVP-BEZ235 is highly effective and NVP-BEZ235 represents a potential new candidate for targeted therapy in multiple myeloma.

  5. The Enigma of Rapamycin Dosage.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Suman; Frias, Maria A; Chatterjee, Amrita; Yellen, Paige; Foster, David A

    2016-03-01

    The mTOR pathway is a critical regulator of cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, and survival. Dysregulation of mTOR signaling has been observed in most cancers and, thus, the mTOR pathway has been extensively studied for therapeutic intervention. Rapamycin is a natural product that inhibits mTOR with high specificity. However, its efficacy varies by dose in several contexts. First, different doses of rapamycin are needed to suppress mTOR in different cell lines; second, different doses of rapamycin are needed to suppress the phosphorylation of different mTOR substrates; and third, there is a differential sensitivity of the two mTOR complexes mTORC1 and mTORC2 to rapamycin. Intriguingly, the enigmatic properties of rapamycin dosage can be explained in large part by the competition between rapamycin and phosphatidic acid (PA) for mTOR. Rapamycin and PA have opposite effects on mTOR whereby rapamycin destabilizes and PA stabilizes both mTOR complexes. In this review, we discuss the properties of rapamycin dosage in the context of anticancer therapeutics. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(3); 347-53. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26916116

  6. Rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, induced apoptosis via independent mitochondrial and death receptor pathway in retinoblastoma Y79 cell

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Dong; Su, Yong-Jing; Li, Jian-Ying; Yao, Xiang-Chao; Liang, Guang-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Rapamycin is helpful in the treatment of certain cancers by inhibiting mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. Here, rapamycin mediated apoptosis were investigated in human retinoblastoma Y79 cells. The MTT assay showed that the IC50 value of rapamycin against Y79 cells was 0.136 ± 0.032 μmol/L. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that the percentage of apoptotic cells was increased from 2.16 ± 0.41% to 12.24 ± 3.10%, 20.16 ± 4.22%, and 31.32 ± 5.78% after 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 μmol/L rapamycin or without rapamycin treatment for 48 hours. Flow cytometry analysis showed that rapamycin induced mitochondrial membrane potential (∆Ψm) collapse in Y79 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Western blot assay showed that rapamycin led to release of cytochrome c from mitochondrial membranes to cytosol. Further Western blot assays showed that rapamycin induced activation of caspase-9 and caspase-8 and the cleavage of caspase-3. Rapamycin induced cleavages of caspase-3 and apoptosis was inhibited by both Z-LETD-FMK and Z-IETD-FMK treatment. Together, all these results illustrated that rapamycin induced apoptosis in human retinoblastoma Y79 cells involvement of both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. PMID:26379864

  7. Chronic mTOR inhibition in mice with rapamycin alters T, B, myeloid, and innate lymphoid cells and gut flora and prolongs life of immune-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Hurez, Vincent; Dao, Vinh; Liu, Aijie; Pandeswara, Srilakshmi; Gelfond, Jonathan; Sun, Lishi; Bergman, Molly; Orihuela, Carlos J; Galvan, Veronica; Padrón, Álvaro; Drerup, Justin; Liu, Yang; Hasty, Paul; Sharp, Zelton Dave; Curiel, Tyler J

    2015-12-01

    The mammalian (mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates critical immune processes that remain incompletely defined. Interest in mTOR inhibitor drugs is heightened by recent demonstrations that the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin extends lifespan and healthspan in mice. Rapamycin or related analogues (rapalogues) also mitigate age-related debilities including increasing antigen-specific immunity, improving vaccine responses in elderly humans, and treating cancers and autoimmunity, suggesting important new clinical applications. Nonetheless, immune toxicity concerns for long-term mTOR inhibition, particularly immunosuppression, persist. Although mTOR is pivotal to fundamental, important immune pathways, little is reported on immune effects of mTOR inhibition in lifespan or healthspan extension, or with chronic mTOR inhibitor use. We comprehensively analyzed immune effects of rapamycin as used in lifespan extension studies. Gene expression profiling found many and novel changes in genes affecting differentiation, function, homeostasis, exhaustion, cell death, and inflammation in distinct T- and B-lymphocyte and myeloid cell subpopulations. Immune functions relevant to aging and inflammation, and to cancer and infections, and innate lymphoid cell effects were validated in vitro and in vivo. Rapamycin markedly prolonged lifespan and healthspan in cancer- and infection-prone mice supporting disease mitigation as a mechanism for mTOR suppression-mediated longevity extension. It modestly altered gut metagenomes, and some metagenomic effects were linked to immune outcomes. Our data show novel mTOR inhibitor immune effects meriting further studies in relation to longevity and healthspan extension. PMID:26315673

  8. Device-based local delivery of siRNA against mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a murine subcutaneous implant model to inhibit fibrous encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hironobu; Wang, Yuwei; Grainger, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Fibrous encapsulation of surgically implant devices is associated with elevated proliferation and activation of fibroblasts in tissues surrounding these implants, frequently causing foreign body complications. Here we test the hypothesis that inhibition of the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in fibroblasts can mitigate the soft tissue implant foreign body response by suppressing fibrotic responses around implants. In this study, mTOR was knocked down using small interfering RNA conjugated with branched cationic polyethylenimine (bPEI) in fibroblastic lineage cells in serum-based cell culture as shown by both gene and protein analysis. This mTOR knockdown led to an inhibition in fibroblast proliferation by 70% and simultaneous down-regulation in the expression of type I collagen in fibroblasts in vitro. These siRNA/bPEI complexes were released from poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel coatings surrounding model polymer implants in a subcutaneous rodent model in vivo. No significant reduction in fibrous capsule thickness and mTOR expression in the foreign body capsules was observed. Observed siRNA inefficacy in this in vivo implant model was attributed to siRNA dosing limitations in the gel delivery system, and lack of targeting ability of the siRNA complex specifically to fibroblasts. While in vitro data supported mTOR knock-down in fibroblast cultures, in vivo siRNA delivery must be further improved to produce clinically relevant effects on fibrotic encapsulation around implants. PMID:20727922

  9. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Inhibition as a Potential Antiepileptogenic Therapy: From Tuberous Sclerosis to Common Acquired Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michael

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Most current treatments for epilepsy are symptomatic therapies that suppress seizures but do not affect the underlying course or prognosis of epilepsy. The need for disease-modifying or “antiepileptogenic” treatments for epilepsy is widely recognized, but no such preventative therapies have yet been established for clinical use. A rational strategy for preventing epilepsy is to target primary signaling pathways that initially trigger the numerous downstream mechanisms mediating epileptogenesis. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway represents a logical candidate, because mTOR regulates multiple cellular functions that may contribute to epileptogenesis, including protein synthesis, cell growth and proliferation, and synaptic plasticity. The importance of the mTOR pathway in epileptogenesis is best illustrated by Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC), one of the most common genetic causes of epilepsy. In mouse models of TSC, mTOR inhibitors prevent the development of epilepsy and underlying brain abnormalities associated with epileptogenesis. Accumulating evidence suggests that mTOR also participates in epileptogenesis due to a variety of other causes, including focal cortical dysplasia and acquired brain injuries, such as in animal models following status epilepticus or traumatic brain injury. Thus, mTOR inhibition may represent a potential antiepileptogenic therapy for diverse types of epilepsy, including both genetic and acquired epilepsies. PMID:19817806

  10. Sorafenib enhances the therapeutic efficacy of rapamycin in colorectal cancers harboring oncogenic KRAS and PIK3CA

    PubMed Central

    Evers, B. Mark

    2012-01-01

    Activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling is associated with tumorigenesis and metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC). The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase, a downstream effector of PI3K/Akt signaling, regulates tumorigenesis and metastasis of CRCs, indicating that mTOR inhibition may have therapeutic potential. Notwithstanding, many cancers, including CRC, demonstrate resistance to the antitumorigenic effects of rapamycin. In this study, we show that inhibition of mTORC1 with rapamycin leads to feedback activation of PI3K/Akt and Ras-MAPK signaling, resulting in cell survival and possible contribution to rapamycin resistance. Combination with the multikinase inhibitor, sorafenib, abrogates rapamycin-induced activation of PI3K/Akt and Ras-MAPK signaling pathways. Combination of rapamycin with sorafenib synergistically inhibits proliferation of CRC cells. CRCs harboring coexistent KRAS and PIK3CA mutations are partially sensitive to either rapamycin or sorafenib monotherapy, but highly sensitive to combination treatment with rapamycin and sorafenib. Combination with sorafenib enhances therapeutic efficacy of rapamycin on induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell-cycle progression, migration and invasion of CRCs. We demonstrate efficacy and safety of concomitant treatment with rapamycin and sorafenib at inhibiting growth of xenografts from CRC cells with coexistent mutations in KRAS and PIK3CA. The efficacy and tolerability of combined treatment with rapamycin and sorafenib provides rationale for use in treating CRC patients, particularly those with tumors harboring coexistent KRAS and PIK3CA mutations. Abbreviations:CIcombination indexCRCcolorectal cancerIHCimmunohistochemistryMAPKmitogen activated protein kinasemTORmammalian target of rapamycinPI3Kphosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. PMID:22696593

  11. Decrease in transient receptor potential melastatin 6 mRNA stability caused by rapamycin in renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ikari, Akira; Sanada, Ayumi; Sawada, Hayato; Okude, Chiaki; Tonegawa, Chie; Sugatani, Junko

    2011-06-01

    Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is used in treatments for transplantation and cancer. Rapamycin causes hypomagnesemia, although precisely how has not been examined. Here, we investigated the effect of rapamycin on the expression of transient receptor potential melastatin 6 (TRPM6), a Mg2+ channel. Rapamycin and LY-294002, an inhibitor of phosphatidilinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) located upstream of mTOR, inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced expression of the TRPM6 protein without affecting TRPM7 expression in rat renal NRK-52E epithelial cells. Both rapamycin and LY-294002 decreased EGF-induced Mg2+ influx. U0126, a MEK inhibitor, inhibited EGF-induced increases in c-Fos, p-ERK, and TRPM6 levels. In contrast, neither rapamycin nor LY-294002 inhibited EGF-induced increases in p-ERK and c-Fos levels. EGF increased p-Akt level, an effect inhibited by LY-294002 and 1L-6-hydroxymethyl-chiro-inositol2-[(R)-2-O-methyl-3-O-octadecylcarbonate] (Akt inhibitor). Akt inhibitor decreased TRPM6 level similar to rapamycin and LY-294002. These results suggest that a PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is involved in the regulation of TRPM6 expression. Rapamycin inhibited the EGF-induced increase in TRPM6 mRNA but did not inhibit human TRPM6 promoter activity. In the presence of actinomycin D, a transcriptional inhibitor, rapamycin accelerated the decrease in TRPM6 mRNA. Rapamycin decreased the expression and activity of a luciferase linked with the 3'-untranslated region of human TRPM6 mRNA. These results suggest that TRPM6 expression is up-regulated by a PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and rapamycin reduces TRPM6 mRNA stability, resulting in a decrease in the reabsorption of Mg2+. PMID:21073857

  12. A domain in the transcription activator Gln3 specifically required for rapamycin responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rajendra; Tate, Jennifer J; Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Howe, Martha M; Cooper, Terrance G

    2014-07-01

    Nitrogen-responsive control of Gln3 localization is implemented through TorC1-dependent (rapamycin-responsive) and TorC1-independent (nitrogen catabolite repression-sensitive and methionine sulfoximine (Msx)-responsive) regulatory pathways. We previously demonstrated amino acid substitutions in a putative Gln3 α-helix(656-666), which are required for a two-hybrid Gln3-Tor1 interaction, also abolished rapamycin responsiveness of Gln3 localization and partially abrogated cytoplasmic Gln3 sequestration in cells cultured under nitrogen-repressive conditions. Here, we demonstrate these three characteristics are not inextricably linked together. A second distinct Gln3 region (Gln3(510-589)) is specifically required for rapamycin responsiveness of Gln3 localization, but not for cytoplasmic Gln3 sequestration under repressive growth conditions or relocation to the nucleus following Msx addition. Aspartate or alanine substitution mutations throughout this region uniformly abolish rapamycin responsiveness. Contained within this region is a sequence with a predicted propensity to form an α-helix(583-591), one side of which consists of three hydrophobic amino acids flanked by serine residues. Substitution of aspartate for even one of these serines abolishes rapamycin responsiveness and increases rapamycin resistance without affecting either of the other two Gln3 localization responses. In contrast, alanine substitutions decrease rapamycin resistance. Together, these data suggest that targets in the C-terminal portion of Gln3 required for the Gln3-Tor1 interaction, cytoplasmic Gln3 sequestration, and Gln3 responsiveness to Msx addition and growth in poor nitrogen sources are distinct from those needed for rapamycin responsiveness. PMID:24847055

  13. Activation of Mammalian target of rapamycin in canine mammary carcinomas: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Delgado, L; Gärtner, F; Dias Pereira, P

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine-threonine kinase involved in cell growth, proliferation and survival. Activation of mTOR has been reported in various tumour types, including human breast cancer; however, the expression of mTOR in canine mammary tumours has not been examined. In the present study, expression of the activated form of mTOR (phospho-mTOR [p-mTOR]) was examined immunohistochemically in five normal canine mammary glands, 45 canine mammary carcinomas and their corresponding metastatic lesions (n = 15). Phospho-mTOR was not expressed in normal canine mammary tissue, but cytoplasmic labelling was observed in 78% of canine mammary carcinomas. Two carcinomas had both cytoplasmic and nuclear labelling. No significant relationship was found between p-mTOR cytoplasmic expression and histological type or grading of carcinomas, degree of tubular formation, anisokaryosis, mitotic activity or lymph node metastasis. In all except one case, the expression pattern of p-mTOR in lymph node metastases was similar or decreased when compared with the primary lesion. The findings suggest that p-mTOR is involved in mammary carcinogenesis in dogs. However, p-mTOR cytoplasmic expression does not appear to be a prognostic indicator in canine mammary carcinomas, which may be related to its subcellular location in the neoplastic cells. Canine mammary tumours may provide a model for the development of innovative medical strategies involving mTOR inhibitors in human breast cancer. PMID:25670666

  14. Autophagy inhibition enhances colorectal cancer apoptosis induced by dual phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor NVP-BEZ235

    PubMed Central

    YANG, XIAOYU; NIU, BINGXUAN; WANG, LIBO; CHEN, MEILING; KANG, XIAOCHUN; WANG, LUONAN; JI, YINGHUA; ZHONG, JIATENG

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway performs a central role in tumorigenesis and is constitutively activated in many malignancies. As a novel dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor currently undergoing evaluation in a phase I/II clinical trial, NVP-BEZ235 indicates a significant antitumor efficacy in diverse solid tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC). Autophagy is a catabolic process that maintains cellular homeostasis and reduces diverse stresses through lysosomal recycling of the unnecessary and damaged cell components. This process is also observed to antagonize the antitumor efficacy of PI3K/mTOR inhibitor agents such as NVP-BEZ235, via apoptosis inhibition. In the present study, we investigated anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing ability of NVP-BEZ235 in SW480 cells and the crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis in SW480 cells treated with NVP-BEZ235 in combination with an autophagy inhibitor. The results revealed that, NVP-BEZ235 effectively inhibit the growth of SW480 cells by targeting the PI3K/mTOR signaling pathway and induced apoptosis. The inhibition of autophagy with 3-methyladenine or chloroquine inhibitors in combination with NVP-BEZ235 in SW480 cells enhanced the apoptotic rate as componets to NVP-BEZ235 alone. In conclusion, the findings provide a rationale for chemotherapy targeting the PI3K/mTOR signaling pathway presenting a potential therapeutic strategy to enhance the efficacy of dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 in combination with an autophagy inhibitor in CRC treatment and treatment of other tumors. PMID:27347108

  15. Altered APP Processing in Insulin-Resistant Conditions Is Mediated by Autophagosome Accumulation via the Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Son, Sung Min; Song, Hyundong; Byun, Jayoung; Park, Kyong Soo; Jang, Hak Chul; Park, Young Joo; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance, one of the major components of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is a known risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), which is characterized by an abnormal accumulation of intra- and extracellular amyloid β peptide (Aβ). Insulin resistance is known to increase Aβ generation, but the underlying mechanism that links insulin resistance to increased Aβ generation is unknown. In this study, we examined the effect of high-fat diet–induced insulin resistance on amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing in mouse brains. We found that the induced insulin resistance promoted Aβ generation in the brain via altered insulin signal transduction, increased β- and γ-secretase activities, and accumulation of autophagosomes. These findings were confirmed in diabetic db/db mice brains. Furthermore, in vitro experiments in insulin-resistant SH-SY5Y cells and primary cortical neurons confirmed the alteration of APP processing by insulin resistance–induced autophagosome accumulation. Defects in insulin signal transduction affect autophagic flux by inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, resulting in altered APP processing in these cell culture systems. Thus, the insulin resistance that underlies the pathogenesis of T2DM might also trigger accumulation of autophagosomes, leading to increased Aβ generation, which might be involved in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:22829447

  16. Fucoidan inhibits the migration and proliferation of HT-29 human colon cancer cells via the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin pathways

    PubMed Central

    HAN, YONG-SEOK; LEE, JUN HEE; LEE, SANG HUN

    2015-01-01

    Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide, has a variety of biological activities, including anti-cancer, anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the underlying mechanisms of fucoidan as an anti-cancer agent remain to be elucidated. The present study examined the anti-cancer effect of fucoidan on HT-29 human colon cancer cells. The cell growth of HT29 cells was significantly decreased following treatment with fucoidan (200 μg/ml). In addition, fucoidan inhibited the migration of HT-29 cells by decreasing the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in a dose-dependent manner (0–200 μg/ml). The underlying mechanism of these inhibitory effects included the downregulation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) by treatment with fucoidan. Furthermore, fucoidan increased the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and decreased cancer sphere formation. The present study suggested that fucoidan exerts an anti-cancer effect on HT-29 human colon cancer cells by downregulating the PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling pathway. Therefore, fucoidan may be a potential therapeutic reagent against the growth of human colon cancer cells. PMID:25998232

  17. Targeting the mammalian target of Rapamycin to inhibit VEGF and cytokines for the treatment of primary effusion lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gasperini, Paola; Tosato, Giovanna

    2009-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a fatal malignancy, which typically presents as a lymphomatous effusion that later disseminates. Rapamycin (Rapa), which targets mTOR (mammalian target of Rapa), is currently evaluated as a treatment for PEL, but the recent development of PEL in Rapa-treated post-transplant recipients questions the drug's use in PEL. Here, we used a murine model of PEL effusion that mimics the human disease to investigate the anti-PEL activity of Rapa. We found that Rapa reduces ascites accumulation and extends mouse survival. Initially, Rapa reduced PEL load compared to control mice, but most mice rapidly showed PEL progression. Levels of VEGF, which promotes vascular permeability contributing to effusion formation, were significantly reduced in ascites of Rapa-treated mice compared to controls. Expression of IL-10, the principal autocrine growth factor for PEL, was initially reduced in PEL from Rapa-treated mice but rapidly increased despite treatment. We found that the hypoxic environment of ascites and Rapa cooperate in stimulating IL-10 expression in PEL, which likely contributes to the emergence of drug resistance. These results identify Rapa an effective drug to reduce PEL effusions but illustrate the rapid development of drug resistance, which likely limits the efficacy of Rapa in PEL. PMID:19554030

  18. Cardiac Energy Dependence on Glucose Increases Metabolites Related to Glutathione and Activates Metabolic Genes Controlled by Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Schisler, Jonathan C.; Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Pascual, Florencia; Cooper, Daniel E.; Ellis, Jessica M.; Paul, David S.; Willis, Monte S.; Patterson, Cam; Jia, Wei; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Long chain acyl‐CoA synthetases (ACSL) catalyze long‐chain fatty acids (FA) conversion to acyl‐CoAs. Temporal ACSL1 inactivation in mouse hearts (Acsl1H−/−) impaired FA oxidation and dramatically increased glucose uptake, glucose oxidation, and mTOR activation, resulting in cardiac hypertrophy. We used unbiased metabolomics and gene expression analyses to elucidate the cardiac cellular response to increased glucose use in a genetic model of inactivated FA oxidation. Methods and Results Metabolomics analysis identified 60 metabolites altered in Acsl1H−/− hearts, including 6 related to glucose metabolism and 11 to cysteine and glutathione pathways. Concurrently, global cardiac transcriptional analysis revealed differential expression of 568 genes in Acsl1H−/− hearts, a subset of which we hypothesized were targets of mTOR; subsequently, we measured the transcriptional response of several genes after chronic mTOR inhibition via rapamycin treatment during the period in which cardiac hypertrophy develops. Hearts from Acsl1H−/− mice increased expression of several Hif1α‐responsive glycolytic genes regulated by mTOR; additionally, expression of Scl7a5, Gsta1/2, Gdf15, and amino acid‐responsive genes, Fgf21, Asns, Trib3, Mthfd2, were strikingly increased by mTOR activation. Conclusions The switch from FA to glucose use causes mTOR‐dependent alterations in cardiac metabolism. We identified cardiac mTOR‐regulated genes not previously identified in other cellular models, suggesting heart‐specific mTOR signaling. Increased glucose use also changed glutathione‐related pathways and compensation by mTOR. The hypertrophy, oxidative stress, and metabolic changes that occur within the heart when glucose supplants FA as a major energy source suggest that substrate switching to glucose is not entirely benign. PMID:25713290

  19. Alternative rapamycin treatment regimens mitigate the impact of rapamycin on glucose homeostasis and the immune system.

    PubMed

    Arriola Apelo, Sebastian I; Neuman, Joshua C; Baar, Emma L; Syed, Faizan A; Cummings, Nicole E; Brar, Harpreet K; Pumper, Cassidy P; Kimple, Michelle E; Lamming, Dudley W

    2016-02-01

    Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway by the FDA-approved drug rapamycin has been shown to promote lifespan and delay age-related diseases in model organisms including mice. Unfortunately, rapamycin has potentially serious side effects in humans, including glucose intolerance and immunosuppression, which may preclude the long-term prophylactic use of rapamycin as a therapy for age-related diseases. While the beneficial effects of rapamycin are largely mediated by the inhibition of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), which is acutely sensitive to rapamycin, many of the negative side effects are mediated by the inhibition of a second mTOR-containing complex, mTORC2, which is much less sensitive to rapamycin. We hypothesized that different rapamycin dosing schedules or the use of FDA-approved rapamycin analogs with different pharmacokinetics might expand the therapeutic window of rapamycin by more specifically targeting mTORC1. Here, we identified an intermittent rapamycin dosing schedule with minimal effects on glucose tolerance, and we find that this schedule has a reduced impact on pyruvate tolerance, fasting glucose and insulin levels, beta cell function, and the immune system compared to daily rapamycin treatment. Further, we find that the FDA-approved rapamycin analogs everolimus and temsirolimus efficiently inhibit mTORC1 while having a reduced impact on glucose and pyruvate tolerance. Our results suggest that many of the negative side effects of rapamycin treatment can be mitigated through intermittent dosing or the use of rapamycin analogs. PMID:26463117

  20. Rapamycin inhibits FBXW7 loss-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell-like characteristics in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuli; Liu, Yueyong; Lu, Jing; Zhang, Pengju; Wang, Yunshan; Xu, Yangyang; Wang, Zeran; Mao, Jian-Hua; Wei, Guangwei

    2013-01-01

    Increased cell migration and invasion lead to cancer metastasis and are crucial to cancer prognosis. In this study, we explore whether FBXW7 plays any role in metastatic process. We show that depletion of FBXW7 induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human colon cancer cells along with the increase in cell migration and invasion. Moreover, FBXW7 deficiency promotes the generation of colon cancer stem-like cells in tumor-sphere culture. mTOR inhibition by rapamycin suppresses FBXW7 loss-driven EMT, invasion and stemness. Our results define the FBXW7/mTOR axis as a novel EMT pathway that mediates cancer invasion. PMID:23558291

  1. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition is associated with rapamycin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Ashley M.; Akcakanat, Argun; Adkins, Farrell; Evans, Kurt; Chen, Huiqin; Wei, Caimiao; Milton, Denai R.; Li, Yisheng; Do, Kim-Anh; Janku, Filip; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2015-01-01

    Rapamycin analogues have antitumor efficacy in several tumor types, however few patients demonstrate tumor regression. Thus, there is a pressing need for markers of intrinsic response/resistance and rational combination therapies. We hypothesized that epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) confers rapamycin resistance. We found that the epithelial marker E-cadherin protein is higher in rapamycin sensitive (RS) cells and mesenchymal breast cancer cell lines selected by transcriptional EMT signatures are less sensitive to rapamycin. MCF7 cells, transfected with constitutively active mutant Snail, had increased rapamycin resistance (RR) compared to cells transfected with wild-type Snail. Conversely, we transfected two RR mesenchymal cell lines—ACHN and MDA-MB-231—with miR-200b/c or ZEB1 siRNA to promote mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. This induced E-cadherin expression in both cell lines, and ACHN demonstrated a significant increase in RS. Treatment of ACHN and MDA-MB-231 with trametinib modulated EMT in ACHN cells in vitro. Treatment of MDA-MB-231 and ACHN xenografts with trametinib in combination with rapamycin resulted in significant growth inhibition in both but without an apparent effect on EMT. Future studies are needed to determine whether EMT status is predictive of sensitivity to rapalogs and to determine whether combination therapy with EMT modulating agents can enhance antitumor effects of PI3K/mTOR inhibitors. PMID:25944619

  2. Rapamycin Protects Mice from Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B-Induced Toxic Shock and Blocks Cytokine Release In Vitro and In Vivo▿

    PubMed Central

    Krakauer, Teresa; Buckley, Marilyn; Issaq, Haleem J.; Fox, Stephen D.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins are potent activators for human T cells and cause lethal toxic shock. Rapamycin, an immunosuppressant, was tested for its ability to inhibit staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-induced activation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro and toxin-mediated shock in mice. Stimulation of PMBC by SEB was effectively blocked by rapamycin as evidenced by the inhibition of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-2, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α), MIP-1β, and T-cell proliferation. In vivo, rapamycin protected 100% of mice from lethal shock, even when administered 24 h after intranasal SEB challenge. The serum levels of MCP-1 and IL-6, after intranasal exposure to SEB, were significantly reduced in mice given rapamycin versus controls. Additionally, rapamycin diminished the weight loss and temperature fluctuations elicited by SEB. PMID:20086156

  3. Rapamycin protects mice from staphylococcal enterotoxin B-induced toxic shock and blocks cytokine release in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Krakauer, Teresa; Buckley, Marilyn; Issaq, Haleem J; Fox, Stephen D

    2010-03-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins are potent activators for human T cells and cause lethal toxic shock. Rapamycin, an immunosuppressant, was tested for its ability to inhibit staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-induced activation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro and toxin-mediated shock in mice. Stimulation of PMBC by SEB was effectively blocked by rapamycin as evidenced by the inhibition of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, IL-2, gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha (MIP-1alpha), MIP-1beta, and T-cell proliferation. In vivo, rapamycin protected 100% of mice from lethal shock, even when administered 24 h after intranasal SEB challenge. The serum levels of MCP-1 and IL-6, after intranasal exposure to SEB, were significantly reduced in mice given rapamycin versus controls. Additionally, rapamycin diminished the weight loss and temperature fluctuations elicited by SEB. PMID:20086156

  4. Structure-Activity Analysis of Niclosamide Reveals Potential Role for Cytoplasmic pH in Control of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Bruno D.; Diering, Graham H.; Bidinosti, Michael A.; Dalal, Kush; Alain, Tommy; Balgi, Aruna D.; Forestieri, Roberto; Nodwell, Matt; Rajadurai, Charles V.; Gunaratnam, Cynthia; Tee, Andrew R.; Duong, Franck; Andersen, Raymond J.; Orlowski, John; Numata, Masayuki; Sonenberg, Nahum; Roberge, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling is frequently dysregulated in cancer. Inhibition of mTORC1 is thus regarded as a promising strategy in the treatment of tumors with elevated mTORC1 activity. We have recently identified niclosamide (a Food and Drug Administration-approved antihelminthic drug) as an inhibitor of mTORC1 signaling. In the present study, we explored possible mechanisms by which niclosamide may inhibit mTORC1 signaling. We tested whether niclosamide interferes with signaling cascades upstream of mTORC1, the catalytic activity of mTOR, or mTORC1 assembly. We found that niclosamide does not impair PI3K/Akt signaling, nor does it inhibit mTORC1 kinase activity. We also found that niclosamide does not interfere with mTORC1 assembly. Previous studies in helminths suggest that niclosamide disrupts pH homeostasis of the parasite. This prompted us to investigate whether niclosamide affects the pH balance of cancer cells. Experiments in both breast cancer cells and cell-free systems demonstrated that niclosamide possesses protonophoric activity in cells and in vitro. In cells, niclosamide dissipated protons (down their concentration gradient) from lysosomes to the cytosol, effectively lowering cytoplasmic pH. Notably, analysis of five niclosamide analogs revealed that the structural features of niclosamide required for protonophoric activity are also essential for mTORC1 inhibition. Furthermore, lowering cytoplasmic pH by means other than niclosamide treatment (e.g. incubation with propionic acid or bicarbonate withdrawal) recapitulated the inhibitory effects of niclosamide on mTORC1 signaling, lending support to a possible role for cytoplasmic pH in the control of mTORC1. Our data illustrate a potential mechanism for chemical inhibition of mTORC1 signaling involving modulation of cytoplasmic pH. PMID:22474287

  5. Structure-activity analysis of niclosamide reveals potential role for cytoplasmic pH in control of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Bruno D; Diering, Graham H; Bidinosti, Michael A; Dalal, Kush; Alain, Tommy; Balgi, Aruna D; Forestieri, Roberto; Nodwell, Matt; Rajadurai, Charles V; Gunaratnam, Cynthia; Tee, Andrew R; Duong, Franck; Andersen, Raymond J; Orlowski, John; Numata, Masayuki; Sonenberg, Nahum; Roberge, Michel

    2012-05-18

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling is frequently dysregulated in cancer. Inhibition of mTORC1 is thus regarded as a promising strategy in the treatment of tumors with elevated mTORC1 activity. We have recently identified niclosamide (a Food and Drug Administration-approved antihelminthic drug) as an inhibitor of mTORC1 signaling. In the present study, we explored possible mechanisms by which niclosamide may inhibit mTORC1 signaling. We tested whether niclosamide interferes with signaling cascades upstream of mTORC1, the catalytic activity of mTOR, or mTORC1 assembly. We found that niclosamide does not impair PI3K/Akt signaling, nor does it inhibit mTORC1 kinase activity. We also found that niclosamide does not interfere with mTORC1 assembly. Previous studies in helminths suggest that niclosamide disrupts pH homeostasis of the parasite. This prompted us to investigate whether niclosamide affects the pH balance of cancer cells. Experiments in both breast cancer cells and cell-free systems demonstrated that niclosamide possesses protonophoric activity in cells and in vitro. In cells, niclosamide dissipated protons (down their concentration gradient) from lysosomes to the cytosol, effectively lowering cytoplasmic pH. Notably, analysis of five niclosamide analogs revealed that the structural features of niclosamide required for protonophoric activity are also essential for mTORC1 inhibition. Furthermore, lowering cytoplasmic pH by means other than niclosamide treatment (e.g. incubation with propionic acid or bicarbonate withdrawal) recapitulated the inhibitory effects of niclosamide on mTORC1 signaling, lending support to a possible role for cytoplasmic pH in the control of mTORC1. Our data illustrate a potential mechanism for chemical inhibition of mTORC1 signaling involving modulation of cytoplasmic pH. PMID:22474287

  6. Activation of Autophagic Flux against Xenoestrogen Bisphenol-A-induced Hippocampal Neurodegeneration via AMP kinase (AMPK)/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Swati; Tiwari, Shashi Kant; Seth, Brashket; Yadav, Anuradha; Singh, Anshuman; Mudawal, Anubha; Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh; Gupta, Shailendra Kumar; Choubey, Vinay; Tripathi, Anurag; Kumar, Amit; Ray, Ratan Singh; Shukla, Shubha; Parmar, Devendra; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The human health hazards related to persisting use of bisphenol-A (BPA) are well documented. BPA-induced neurotoxicity occurs with the generation of oxidative stress, neurodegeneration, and cognitive dysfunctions. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) of the effects of BPA on autophagy and association with oxidative stress and apoptosis are still elusive. We observed that BPA exposure during the early postnatal period enhanced the expression and the levels of autophagy genes/proteins. BPA treatment in the presence of bafilomycin A1 increased the levels of LC3-II and SQSTM1 and also potentiated GFP-LC3 puncta index in GFP-LC3-transfected hippocampal neural stem cell-derived neurons. BPA-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis were mitigated by a pharmacological activator of autophagy (rapamycin). Pharmacological (wortmannin and bafilomycin A1) and genetic (beclin siRNA) inhibition of autophagy aggravated BPA neurotoxicity. Activation of autophagy against BPA resulted in intracellular energy sensor AMP kinase (AMPK) activation, increased phosphorylation of raptor and acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and decreased phosphorylation of ULK1 (Ser-757), and silencing of AMPK exacerbated BPA neurotoxicity. Conversely, BPA exposure down-regulated the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway by phosphorylation of raptor as a transient cell's compensatory mechanism to preserve cellular energy pool. Moreover, silencing of mTOR enhanced autophagy, which further alleviated BPA-induced reactive oxygen species generation and apoptosis. BPA-mediated neurotoxicity also resulted in mitochondrial loss, bioenergetic deficits, and increased PARKIN mitochondrial translocation, suggesting enhanced mitophagy. These results suggest implication of autophagy against BPA-mediated neurodegeneration through involvement of AMPK and mTOR pathways. Hence, autophagy, which arbitrates cell survival and demise during stress conditions, requires further assessment to be

  7. Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Downregulates ELOVL1 Gene Expression and Fatty Acid Synthesis in Goat Fetal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weipeng; He, Qiburi; Guo, Zhixin; Yang, Limin; Bao, Lili; Bao, Wenlei; Zheng, Xu; Wang, Yanfeng; Wang, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Elongation of very-long-chain fatty acids 1 (ELOVL1) is a ubiquitously expressed gene that belongs to the ELOVL family and regulates the synthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) and sphingolipids, from yeast to mammals. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a central regulator of cell metabolism and is associated with fatty acids synthesis. In this study, we cloned the cDNA that encodes Cashmere goat (Capra hircus) ELOVL1 (GenBank Accession number KF549985) and investigated its expression in 10 tissues. ELOVL1 cDNA was 840 bp, encoding a deduced protein of 279 amino acids, and ELOVL1 mRNA was expressed in a wide range of tissues. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin decreased ELOVL1 expression and fatty acids synthesis in Cashmere goat fetal fibroblasts. These data show that ELOVL1 expression is regulated by mTORC1 and that mTORC1 has significant function in fatty acids synthesis in Cashmere goat. PMID:26204830

  8. Autophagy regulates the apoptosis of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells under hypoxic condition via AMP-activated protein kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Yang, Ming; Wang, Yabin; Wang, Le; Jin, Zhitao; Ding, Liping; Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Lina; Jiang, Wei; Gao, Guojie; Yang, Junke; Lu, Bingwei; Cao, Feng; Hu, Taohong

    2016-06-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have been demonstrated as an ideal autologous stem cells source for cell-based therapy for myocardial infarction (MI). However, poor viability of donor stem cells after transplantation limits their therapeutic efficiency, whereas the underlying mechanism is still poorly understood. Autophagy, a highly conserved process of cellular degradation, is required for maintaining homeostasis and normal function. Here, we investigated the potential role of autophagy on apoptosis in BM-MSCs induced by hypoxic injury. BM-MSCs, isolated from male C57BL/6 mice, were subjected to hypoxia and serum deprivation (H/SD) injury for 6, 12, and 24 h, respectively. The autophagy state was regulated by 3-methyladenine (3MA) and rapamycin administration. Furthermore, compound C was administrated to inhibit AMPK. The apoptosis induced by H/SD was determined by TUNEL assays. Meanwhile, autophagy was measured by GFP-LC3 plasmids transfection and transmission electron microscope. Moreover, protein expressions were evaluated by Western blot assay. In the present study, we found that hypoxic stress increased autophagy and apoptosis in BM-MSCs time dependently. Meanwhile, hypoxia increased the activity of AMPK/mTOR signal pathway. Moreover, increased apoptosis in BM-MSCs under hypoxia was abolished by 3-MA, whereas was aggravated by rapamycin. Furthermore, the increased autophagy and apoptosis in BM-MSCs induced by hypoxia were abolished by AMPK inhibitor compound C. These data provide evidence that hypoxia induced AMPK/mTOR signal pathway activation which regulated the apoptosis and autophagy in BM-MSCs. Furthermore, the apoptosis of BM-MSCs under hypoxic condition was regulated by autophagy via AMPK/mTOR pathway. PMID:27005844

  9. Antimyeloma activity of the orally bioavailable dual phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor NVP-BEZ235.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Douglas W; Ooi, Melissa; Delmore, Jake; Negri, Joseph; Hayden, Patrick; Mitsiades, Nicolas; Jakubikova, Jana; Maira, Sauveur-Michel; Garcia-Echeverria, Carlos; Schlossman, Robert; Munshi, Nikhil C; Richardson, Paul G; Anderson, Kenneth C; Mitsiades, Constantine S

    2009-07-15

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway mediates proliferation, survival, and drug resistance in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Here, we tested the anti-MM activity of NVP-BEZ235 (BEZ235), which inhibits PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling at the levels of PI3K and mTOR. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric survival assays showed that MM cell lines exhibited dose- and time-dependent decreased viability after exposure to BEZ235 (IC(50), 25-800 nmol/L for 48 hours). MM cells highly sensitive (IC(50), <25 nmol/L) to BEZ235 (e.g., MM.1S, MM.1R, Dox40, and KMS-12-PE) included both lines sensitive and resistant to conventional (dexamethasone, cytotoxic chemotherapeutics) agents. Pharmacologically relevant BEZ235 concentrations (25-400 nmol/L) induced rapid commitment to and induction of MM.1S and OPM-2 cell death. Furthermore, normal donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells were less sensitive (IC(50), >800 nmol/L) than the majority of MM cell lines tested, suggesting a favorable therapeutic index. In addition, BEZ235 was able to target MM cells in the presence of exogenous interleukin-6, insulin-like growth factor-1, stromal cells, or osteoclasts, which are known to protect against various anti-MM agents. Molecular profiling revealed that BEZ235 treatment decreased the amplitude of transcriptional signatures previously associated with myc, ribosome, and proteasome function, as well as high-risk MM and undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells. In vivo xenograft studies revealed significant reduction in tumor burden (P = 0.011) and survival (P = 0.028) in BEZ235-treated human MM tumor-bearing mice. Combinations of BEZ235 with conventional (e.g., dexamethasone and doxorubicin) or novel (e.g., bortezomib) anti-MM agents showed lack of antagonism. These results indicate that BEZ235 merits clinical testing, alone and in combination with other agents, in MM. PMID:19584292

  10. Rapamycin and dietary restriction induce metabolically distinctive changes in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhen; Wang, Rong; Fok, Wilson C; Coles, Alexander; Salmon, Adam B; Pérez, Viviana I

    2015-04-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) is the gold standard intervention used to delay aging, and much recent research has focused on the identification of possible DR mimetics. Energy sensing pathways, including insulin/IGF1 signaling, sirtuins, and mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR), have been proposed as pathways involved in the antiaging actions of DR, and compounds that affect these pathways have been suggested to act as DR mimetics, including metformin (insulin/IGF1 signaling), resveratrol (sirtuins), and rapamycin (mTOR). Rapamycin is a promising DR mimetic because it significantly increases both health span and life span in mice. Unfortunately, rapamycin also leads to some negative effects, foremost among which is the induction of insulin resistance, potentially limiting its translation into humans. To begin clarifying the mechanism(s) involved in insulin resistance induced by rapamycin, we compared several aspects of liver metabolism in mice treated with DR or rapamycin for 6 months. Our data suggest that although both DR and rapamycin inhibit lipogenesis, activate lipolysis, and increased serum levels of nonesterified fatty acids, only DR further activates β-oxidation of the fatty acids leading to the production of ketone bodies. PMID:24755936

  11. Rapamycin delays salivary gland atrophy following ductal ligation

    PubMed Central

    Bozorgi, S S; Proctor, G B; Carpenter, G H

    2014-01-01

    Salivary gland atrophy is a frequent consequence of head and neck cancer irradiation therapy but can potentially be regulated through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Excretory duct ligation of the mouse submandibular gland provokes severe glandular atrophy causing activation of mTOR. This study aims to discover the effects of blocking mTOR signaling in ligation-induced atrophic salivary glands. Following 1 week of unilateral submandibular excretory duct ligation: gland weights were significantly reduced, 4E-BP1 and S6rp were activated, and tissue morphology revealed typical signs of atrophy. However, 3 days following ligation with rapamycin treatment, a selective mTOR inhibitor, gland weights were maintained, 4E-BP1 and S6rp phosphorylation was inhibited, and there were morphological signs of recovery from atrophy. However, following 5 and 7 days of ligation and rapamycin treatment, glands expressed active mTOR and showed signs of considerable atrophy. This evidence suggests that inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin delays ligation-induced atrophy of salivary glands. PMID:24675464

  12. Protease-activated receptor 1 and 4 signal inhibition reduces preterm neonatal hemorrhagic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Lekic, Tim; Klebe, Damon; McBride, Devin W; Manaenko, Anatol; Rolland, William B.; Flores, Jerry J.; Altay, Orhan; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study examines the role of thrombin’s protease-activated receptors (PAR)-1,-4 in mediating cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) following germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH). Methods GMH was induced by intraparenchymal infusion of bacterial collagenase into the right ganglionic eminence of P7 rat pups. Animals were treated with either PAR-1, -4, COX-2, or mTOR inhibitors by 1 hour, and up to five days. Results We found increased thrombin activity 6–24 hrs after GMH, and PAR-1, -4, inhibition normalized COX-2 and mTOR by 72 hrs. Early treatment with NS398 or rapamycin substantially improved long-term outcomes in juvenile animals. Conclusions Suppressing early PAR signal transduction, and postnatal NS398 or rapamycin treatment, may help reduce GMH severity in susceptible preterm infants. PMID:25931468

  13. Rapamycin preserves gut homeostasis during Drosophila aging.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaolan; Liang, Qing; Lian, Ting; Wu, Qi; Gaur, Uma; Li, Diyan; Yang, Deying; Mao, Xueping; Jin, Zhihua; Li, Ying; Yang, Mingyao

    2015-11-01

    Gut homeostasis plays an important role in maintaining the overall body health during aging. Rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTOR, exerts prolongevity effects in evolutionarily diverse species. However, its impact on the intestinal homeostasis remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that rapamycin can slow down the proliferation rate of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) in the aging guts and induce autophagy in the intestinal epithelium in Drosophila. Rapamycin can also significantly affect the FOXO associated genes in intestine and up-regulate the negative regulators of IMD/Rel pathway, consequently delaying the microbial expansion in the aging guts. Collectively, these findings reveal that rapamycin can delay the intestinal aging by inhibiting mTOR and thus keeping stem cell proliferation in check. These results will further explain the mechanism of healthspan and lifespan extension by rapamycin in Drosophila. PMID:26431326

  14. Rapamycin preserves gut homeostasis during Drosophila aging

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Ting; Wu, Qi; Gaur, Uma; Li, Diyan; Yang, Deying; Mao, Xueping; Jin, Zhihua; Li, Ying; Yang, Mingyao

    2015-01-01

    Gut homeostasis plays an important role in maintaining the overall body health during aging. Rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTOR, exerts prolongevity effects in evolutionarily diverse species. However, its impact on the intestinal homeostasis remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that rapamycin can slow down the proliferation rate of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) in the aging guts and induce autophagy in the intestinal epithelium in Drosophila. Rapamycin can also significantly affect the FOXO associated genes in intestine and up-regulate the negative regulators of IMD/Rel pathway, consequently delaying the microbial expansion in the aging guts. Collectively, these findings reveal that rapamycin can delay the intestinal aging by inhibiting mTOR and thus keeping stem cell proliferation in check. These results will further explain the mechanism of healthspan and lifespan extension by rapamycin in Drosophila. PMID:26431326

  15. Novel role of the small GTPase Rheb: its implication in endocytic pathway independent of the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kota; Araki, Yasuhiro; Kontani, Kenji; Nishina, Hiroshi; Katada, Toshiaki

    2005-03-01

    The Ras-homologous GTPase Rheb that is conserved from yeast to human appears to be involved not only in cell growth but also in nutrient uptake. Recent biochemical analysis revealed that tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a GTPase-activating protein (GAP), deactivates Rheb and that phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3k)-Akt/PKB kinase pathway activates Rheb through inhibition of the GAP-mediated deactivation. Although mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is implicated in the downstream target of Rheb, the direct effector(s) and exact functions of Rheb have not been fully elucidated. Here we identified that Rheb expression in cultured cells induces the formation of large cytoplasmic vacuoles, which are characterized as late endocytic (late endosome- and lysosome-like) components. The vacuole formation required the GTP form of Rheb, but not the activation of the downstream mTOR kinase. These results suggest that Rheb regulates endocytic trafficking pathway independent of the previously identified mTOR pathway. The physiological roles of the two Rheb-dependent signaling pathways are discussed in terms of nutrient uptake and cell growth or cell cycle progression. PMID:15809346

  16. Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in triple negative feline mammary carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) in humans is defined by the absence of oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2 overexpression. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is overexpressed in TNBC and it represents a potential target for the treatment of this aggressive tumour. Feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) is considered to be a model for hormone-independent human breast cancer. This study investigated mTOR and p-mTOR expression in FMC in relation to triple negative (TN) phenotype. Results The expression of mTOR, p-mTOR, ERα, PR and HER2 was evaluated in 58 FMCs by immunohistochemistry and in six FMC cell lines by Western blot analysis. 53.5% of FMC analyzed were ER, PR, HER2 negative (TN-FMC) while 56.9% and 55.2% of cases expressed mTOR and p-mTOR respectively. In this study we found that m-TOR and p-mTOR were more frequently detected in TN-FMC and in HER2 negative samples. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrate that there is also a FMC subset defined as TN FMC, which is characterised by a statistically significant association with m-TOR and p-mTOR expression as demonstrated in human breast cancer. PMID:23587222

  17. Prevention of irradiation-induced salivary hypofunction by rapamycin in swine parotid glands.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhao; Pang, Baoxing; Iglesias-Bartolome, Ramiro; Wu, Xiaoshan; Hu, Lei; Zhang, Chunmei; Wang, Jinsong; Gutkind, J Silvio; Wang, Songlin

    2016-04-12

    Radiotherapy is commonly used in patients with oral cavity and pharyngeal cancers, usually resulting in irreversible salivary hypofunction. Currently management of radiation damage to salivary glands still remains a great challenge. Recent studies show that activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) occurs in salivary gland lesions, making it possible to apply mTOR inhibitor for treatment. Our results indicate inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin significantly alleviated irradiation-induced salivary hypofunction by restoring 46% salivary flow rate and protecting histological structures in swine. Furthermore, rapamycin protected human submandibular gland cell line (HSG) from irradiation-induced cell depletion and loss of cell proliferation capacity. These findings lay the foundation for a new clinical application of rapamycin to prevent irradiation-induced salivary hypofunction. PMID:26958808

  18. Prevention of irradiation-induced salivary hypofunction by rapamycin in swine parotid glands

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhao; Pang, Baoxing; Iglesias-Bartolome, Ramiro; Wu, Xiaoshan; Hu, Lei; Zhang, Chunmei; Wang, Jinsong; Silvio Gutkind, J; Wang, Songlin

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is commonly used in patients with oral cavity and pharyngeal cancers, usually resulting in irreversible salivary hypofunction. Currently management of radiation damage to salivary glands still remains a great challenge. Recent studies show that activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) occurs in salivary gland lesions, making it possible to apply mTOR inhibitor for treatment. Our results indicate inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin significantly alleviated irradiation-induced salivary hypofunction by restoring 46% salivary flow rate and protecting histological structures in swine. Furthermore, rapamycin protected human submandibular gland cell line (HSG) from irradiation-induced cell depletion and loss of cell proliferation capacity. These findings lay the foundation for a new clinical application of rapamycin to prevent irradiation-induced salivary hypofunction. PMID:26958808

  19. Rapamycin interacts synergistically with idarubicin to induce T-leukemia cell apoptosis in vitro and in a mesenchymal stem cell simulated drug-resistant microenvironment via Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin and extracellular signal-related kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kang-Ni; Zhao, Yan-Min; He, Ying; Wang, Bin-Sheng; Du, Kai-Li; Fu, Shan; Hu, Kai-Min; Zhang, Li-Fei; Liu, Li-Zhen; Hu, Yong-Xian; Wang, Ying-Jia; Huang, He

    2014-03-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs) are clonal lymphoid malignancies with a poor prognosis, and still a lack of effective treatment. Here we examined the interactions between the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin and idarubicin (IDA) in a series of human T-ALL cell lines Molt-4, Jurkat, CCRF-CEM and CEM/C1. Co-exposure of cells to rapamycin and IDA synergistically induced T-ALL cell growth inhibition and apoptosis mediated by caspase activation via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway and extrinsic pathway. Combined treatment with rapamycin and IDA down-regulated Bcl-2 and Mcl-1, and inhibited the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/mTOR and extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK). They also played synergistic pro-apoptotic roles in the drug-resistant microenvironment simulated by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a feeder layer. In addition, MSCs protected T-ALL cells from IDA cytotoxicity by up-regulating ERK phosphorylation, while rapamycin efficiently reversed this protective effect. Taken together, we confirm the synergistic antitumor effects of rapamycin and IDA, and provide an insight into the potential future clinical applications of combined rapamycin-IDA regimens for treating T-cell malignancies. PMID:23741975

  20. Redox Regulates Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Activity by Modulating the TSC1/TSC2-Rheb GTPase Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Sei; Hong, Sungki; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Nada, Shigeyuki; Mannan, Aristotle M.; Wang, Junying; Okada, Masato; Guan, Kun-Liang; Inoki, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a kinase that plays a key role in a wide array of cellular processes and exists in two distinct functional complexes, mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2). Although mTORC2 is primarily activated by growth factors, mTORC1 is regulated by numerous extracellular and intracellular signals such as nutrients, growth factors, and cellular redox. Previous study has shown that cysteine oxidants sufficiently activate mTORC1 activity under amino acid-depleted conditions and that a reducing agent effectively suppresses amino acid-induced mTORC1 activity, thereby raising the possibility that redox-sensitive mechanisms underlie amino acid-dependent mTORC1 regulation. However, the molecular mechanism by which redox regulates mTORC1 activity is not well understood. In this study, we show that the redox-sensitive regulation of mTORC1 occurs via Rheb but not the Rag small GTPase. Enhancing cellular redox potential with cysteine oxidants significantly increases Rheb GTP levels. Importantly, modulation of the cellular redox potential with a cysteine oxidant or reducing agent failed to alter mTORC1 activity in TSC1−/− or TSC2−/− mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Furthermore, a cysteine oxidant has little effect on mTOR localization but sufficiently activates mTORC1 activity in both p18−/− and control mouse embryonic fibroblast cells, suggesting that the redox-sensitive regulation of mTORC1 occurs independent of the Ragulator·Rag complex. Taken together, our results suggest that the TSC complex plays an important role in redox-sensitive mTORC1 regulation and argues for the activation of mTORC1 in places other than the lysosome upon inhibition of the TSC complex. PMID:21784859

  1. Activation of extracellular regulated kinase and mechanistic target of rapamycin pathway in focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Patil, Vinit V; Guzman, Miguel; Carter, Angela N; Rathore, Geetanjali; Yoshor, Daniel; Curry, Daniel; Wilfong, Angus; Agadi, Satish; Swann, John W; Adesina, Adekunle M; Bhattacharjee, Meenakshi B; Anderson, Anne E

    2016-04-01

    Neuropathology of resected brain tissue has revealed an association of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) with drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE). Recent studies have shown that the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is hyperactivated in FCD as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of the ribosomal protein S6 (S6) at serine 240/244 (S(240/244) ), a downstream target of mTOR. Moreover, extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) has been shown to phosphorylate S6 at serine 235/236 (S(235/236) ) and tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) at serine 664 (S(664) ) leading to hyperactive mTOR signaling. We evaluated ERK phosphorylation of S6 and TSC2 in two types of FCD (FCD I and FCD II) as a candidate mechanism contributing to mTOR pathway dysregulation. Tissue samples from patients with tuberous sclerosis (TS) served as a positive control. Immunostaining for phospho-S6 (pS6(240/244) and pS6(235/236) ), phospho-ERK (pERK), and phospho-TSC2 (pTSC2) was performed on resected brain tissue with FCD and TS. We found increased pS6(240/244) and pS6(235/236) staining in FCD I, FCD II and TS compared to normal-appearing tissue, while pERK and pTSC2 staining was increased only in FCD IIb and TS tissue. Our results suggest that both the ERK and mTOR pathways are dysregulated in FCD and TS; however, the signaling alterations are different for FCD I as compared to FCD II and TS. PMID:26381727

  2. Effects of combined treatment with rapamycin and cotylenin A, a novel differentiation-inducing agent, on human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells and xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Kasukabe, Takashi; Okabe-Kado, Junko; Kato, Nobuo; Sassa, Takeshi; Honma, Yoshio

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Rapamycin, an inhibitor of the serine/threonine kinase target of rapamycin, induces G1 arrest and/or apoptosis. Although rapamycin and its analogues are attractive candidates for cancer therapy, their sensitivities with respect to growth inhibition differ markedly among various cancer cells. Using human breast carcinoma cell line MCF-7 as an experimental model system, we examined the growth-inhibitory effects of combinations of various agents and rapamycin to find the agent that most potently enhances the growth-inhibitory effect of rapamycin. Method We evaluated the growth-inhibitory effect of rapamycin plus various agents, including cotylenin A (a novel inducer of differentiation of myeloid leukaemia cells) to MCF-7 cells, using either MTT assay or trypan blue dye exclusion test. The cell cycle was analyzed using propidium iodide-stained nuclei. Expressions of several genes in MCF-7 cells with rapamycin plus cotylenin A were studied using cDNA microarray analysis and RT-PCR. The in vitro results of MCF-7 cells treated with rapamycin plus cotylenin A were further confirmed in vivo in a mouse xenograft model. Results We found that the sensitivity of rapamycin to MCF-7 cells was markedly affected by cotylenin A. This treatment induced growth arrest of the cells at the G1 phase, rather than apoptosis, and induced senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. We examined the gene expression profiles associated with exposure to rapamycin and cotylenin A using cDNA microarrays. We found that expressions of cyclin G2, transforming growth factor-β-induced 68 kDa protein, BCL2-interacting killer, and growth factor receptor-bound 7 were markedly induced in MCF-7 cells treated with rapamycin plus cotylenin A. Furthermore, combined treatment with rapamycin and cotylenin A significantly inhibited the growth of MCF-7 cells as xenografts, without apparent adverse effects. Conclusion Rapamycin and cotylenin A cooperatively induced growth arrest in breast

  3. Convergence of Ubiquitylation and Phosphorylation Signaling in Rapamycin-treated Yeast Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Weinert, Brian T.; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2014-01-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase senses the availability of nutrients and coordinates cellular growth and proliferation with nutrient abundance. Inhibition of TOR mimics nutrient starvation and leads to the reorganization of many cellular processes, including autophagy, protein translation, and vesicle trafficking. TOR regulates cellular physiology by modulating phosphorylation and ubiquitylation signaling networks; however, the global scope of such regulation is not fully known. Here, we used a mass-spectrometry-based proteomics approach for the parallel quantification of ubiquitylation, phosphorylation, and proteome changes in rapamycin-treated yeast cells. Our data constitute a detailed proteomic analysis of rapamycin-treated yeast with 3590 proteins, 8961 phosphorylation sites, and 2299 di-Gly modified lysines (putative ubiquitylation sites) quantified. The phosphoproteome was extensively modulated by rapamycin treatment, with more than 900 up-regulated sites one hour after rapamycin treatment. Dynamically regulated phosphoproteins were involved in diverse cellular processes, prominently including transcription, membrane organization, vesicle-mediated transport, and autophagy. Several hundred ubiquitylation sites were increased after rapamycin treatment, and about half as many decreased in abundance. We found that proteome, phosphorylation, and ubiquitylation changes converged on the Rsp5-ubiquitin ligase, Rsp5 adaptor proteins, and Rsp5 targets. Putative Rsp5 targets were biased for increased ubiquitylation, suggesting activation of Rsp5 by rapamycin. Rsp5 adaptor proteins, which recruit target proteins for Rsp5-dependent ubiquitylation, were biased for increased phosphorylation. Furthermore, we found that permeases and transporters, which are often ubiquitylated by Rsp5, were biased for reduced ubiquitylation and reduced protein abundance. The convergence of multiple proteome-level changes on the Rsp5 system indicates a key role of this pathway in the

  4. p53 and rapamycin are additive

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Judith; Huang, Jing; Jones, Diane; Dodds, Sherry G.; Williams, Charnae; Hubbard, Gene; Livi, Carolina B.; Gao, Xiaoli; Weintraub, Susan; Curiel, Tyler; Sharp, Z. Dave; Hasty, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a kinase found in a complex (mTORC1) that enables macromolecular synthesis and cell growth and is implicated in cancer etiology. The rapamycin-FK506 binding protein 12 (FKBP12) complex allosterically inhibits mTORC1. In response to stress, p53 inhibits mTORC1 through a separate pathway involving cell signaling and amino acid sensing. Thus, these different mechanisms could be additive. Here we show that p53 improved the ability of rapamycin to: 1) extend mouse life span, 2) suppress ionizing radiation (IR)-induced senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) and 3) increase the levels of amino acids and citric acid in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. This additive effect could have implications for cancer treatment since rapamycin and p53 are anti-oncogenic. PMID:26158292

  5. Inhibition of insulin-like growth factor receptor/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin axis targets colorectal cancer stem cells by attenuating mevalonate-isoprenoid pathway in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sharon, Chetna; Baranwal, Somesh; Patel, Nirmita J.; Rodriguez-Agudo, Daniel; Pandak, William M.; Majumdar, Adhip PN; Krystal, Geoffrey; Patel, Bhaumik B.

    2015-01-01

    We observed a co-upregulation of the insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) [InAT] axis and the mevalonate-isoprenoid biosynthesis (MIB) pathways in colorectal cancer stem cells (CSCs) in an unbiased approach. Hence, we hypothesized that the InAT axis might regulate the MIB pathway to govern colorectal CSCs growth. Stimulation (IGF-1) or inhibition (IGF-1R depletion and pharmacological inhibition of IGF-1R/mTOR) of the InAT axis produced induction or attenuation of CSC growth as well as expression of CSC markers and self-renewal factors respectively. Intriguingly, activation of the InAT axis (IGF-1) caused significant upregulation of the MIB pathway genes (both mRNA and protein); while its inhibition produced the opposite effects in colonospheres. More importantly, supplementation with dimethylallyl- and farnesyl-PP, MIB metabolites downstream of isopentenyl-diphosphate delta isomerase (IDI), but not mevalonate and isopentenyl-pp that are upstream of IDI, resulted in a near-complete reversal of the suppressive effect of the InAT axis inhibitors on CSCs growth. The latter findings suggest a specific regulation of the MIB pathway by the InAT axis distal to the target of statins that inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR). Effects of IGF-1R inhibition on colonic CSCs proliferation and the MIB pathway were confirmed in an ‘in vivo’ HCT-116 xenograft model. These observations establish a novel mechanistic link between the InAT axis that is commonly deregulated in colorectal cancer and the MIB pathway in regulation of colonic CSCs growth. Hence, the InAT-MIB corridor is a novel target for developing paradigm shifting optimum anti-CSCs therapies for colorectal cancer. PMID:25895029

  6. Erythroid induction of K562 cells treated with mithramycin is associated with inhibition of raptor gene transcription and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) functions

    PubMed Central

    Finotti, Alessia; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Fabbri, Enrica; Borgatti, Monica; Breveglieri, Giulia; Gasparello, Jessica; Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR activity, is a potent inducer of erythroid differentiation and fetal hemoglobin production in β-thalassemic patients. Mithramycin (MTH) was studied to see if this inducer of K562 differentiation also operates through inhibition of mTOR. We can conclude from the study that the mTOR pathway is among the major transcript classes affected by mithramycin-treatment in K562 cells and a sharp decrease of raptor protein production and p70S6 kinase is detectable in mithramycin treated K562 cells. The promoter sequence of the raptor gene contains several Sp1 binding sites which may explain its mechanism of action. We hypothesize that the G + C-selective DNA-binding drug mithramycin is able to interact with these sequences and to inhibit the binding of Sp1 to the raptor promoter due to the following results: (a) MTH strongly inhibits the interactions between Sp1 and Sp1-binding sites of the raptor promoter (studied by electrophoretic mobility shift assays, EMSA); (b) MTH strongly reduces the recruitment of Sp1 transcription factor to the raptor promoter in intact K562 cells (studied by chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, ChIP); (c) Sp1 decoy oligonucleotides are able to specifically inhibit raptor mRNA accumulation in K562 cells. In conclusion, raptor gene expression is involved in mithramycin-mediated induction of erythroid differentiation of K562 cells and one of its mechanism of action is the inhibition of Sp1 binding to the raptor promoter. PMID:25478892

  7. Rapamycin Influences the Efficiency of In vitro Fertilization and Development in the Mouse: A Role for Autophagic Activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Geun-Kyung; Shin, Hyejin; Lim, Hyunjung Jade

    2016-08-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates cellular processes such as cell growth, metabolism, transcription, translation, and autophagy. Rapamycin is a selective inhibitor of mTOR, and induces autophagy in various systems. Autophagy contributes to clearance and recycling of macromolecules and organelles in response to stress. We previously reported that vitrified-warmed mouse oocytes show acute increases in autophagy during warming, and suggested that it is a natural response to cold stress. In this follow-up study, we examined whether the modulation of autophagy influences survival, fertilization, and developmental rates of vitrified-warmed mouse oocytes. We used rapamycin to enhance autophagy in metaphase II (MII) oocytes before and after vitrification. The oocytes were then subjected to in vitro fertilization (IVF). The fertilization and developmental rates of vitrified-warmed oocytes after rapamycin treatment were significantly lower than those for control groups. Modulation of autophagy with rapamycin treatment shows that rapamycin-induced autophagy exerts a negative influence on fertilization and development of vitrified-warmed oocytes. PMID:26954158

  8. Rapamycin activates autophagy in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: implications for normal aging and age-dependent neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Graziotto, John J; Cao, Kan; Collins, Francis S; Krainc, Dimitri

    2012-01-01

    While rapamycin has been in use for years in transplant patients as an antirejection drug, more recently it has shown promise in treating diseases of aging, such as neurodegenerative disorders and atherosclerosis. We recently reported that rapamycin reverses the cellular phenotype of fibroblasts from children with the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). We found that the causative aberrant protein, progerin, was cleared through autophagic mechanisms when the cells were treated with rapamycin, suggesting a new potential treatment for HGPS. Recent evidence shows that progerin is also present in aged tissues of healthy individuals, suggesting that progerin may contribute to physiological aging. While it is intriguing to speculate that rapamycin may affect normal aging in humans, as it does in lower organisms, it will be important to identify safer analogues of rapamycin for chronic treatments in humans in order to minimize toxicity. In addition to its role in HGPS and normal aging, we discuss the potential of rapamycin for the treatment of age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22170152

  9. Synergy between rapamycin and FLT3 ligand enhances plasmacytoid dendritic cell–dependent induction of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Moanaro; Sarkar, Debalina; Kumar, Sandeep R. P.; Nayak, Sushrusha; Rogers, Geoffrey L.; Markusic, David M.; Liao, Gongxian; Terhorst, Cox

    2015-01-01

    CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) are critical elements for maintaining immune tolerance, for instance to exogenous antigens that are introduced during therapeutic interventions such as cell/organ transplant or gene/protein replacement therapy. Coadministration of antigen with rapamycin simultaneously promotes deletion of conventional CD4+ T cells and induction of Treg. Here, we report that the cytokine FMS-like receptor tyrosine kinase ligand (Flt3L) enhances the in vivo effect of rapamycin. This occurs via selective expansion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), which further augments the number of Treg. Whereas in conventional DCs, rapamycin effectively blocks mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) 1 signaling induced by Flt3L, increased mTOR1 activity renders pDCs more resistant to inhibition by rapamycin. Consequently, Flt3L and rapamycin synergistically promote induction of antigen-specific Treg via selective expansion of pDCs. This concept is supported by the finding that Treg induction is abrogated upon pDC depletion. The combination with pDCs and rapamycin is requisite for Flt3L/antigen-induced Treg induction because Flt3L/antigen by itself fails to induce Treg. As coadministering Flt3L, rapamycin, and antigen blocked CD8+ T-cell and antibody responses in models of gene and protein therapy, we conclude that the differential effect of rapamycin on DC subsets can be exploited for improved tolerance induction. PMID:25833958

  10. Combinatorial Antitumor Effect of Rapamycin and β-Elemene in Follicular Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; He, Li-Li; Ding, Xiao-Fei; Yuan, Qiu-Qi; Zhang, Jian-Xin; Liu, Shuang-Chun; Chen, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background. mTOR signaling would be a promising target for thyroid cancer therapy. However, in clinical trials, objective response rate with mTOR inhibitor monotherapy in most cancer types was modest. A new focus on development of combinatorial strategies with rapalogs is increasing. Objective. Investigating the combinatorial antitumor effect of rapamycin and β-elemene in follicular thyroid cancer cells. Methods. MTT assay was used to determine the FTC-133 cell proliferation after culturing with rapamycin and/or β-elemene. To analyze their combinatorial effect, immunoblotting was performed to analyze the activation status of AKT. Moreover, β-elemene attenuated rapamycin-induced immunosuppression was tested in mice. Results. Combination of rapamycin and β-elemene exerted significant synergistic antiproliferative effects in FTC-133 cell lines in vitro, based on inhibiting the AKT feedback activation induced by rapamycin. In vivo, the β-elemene could attenuate rapamycin-induced immunosuppression via reversing imbalance of Treg/Th17, with the underlying mechanism needed to be declared. Conclusions. We demonstrate that the novel combination of mTOR inhibitor with β-elemene synergistically attenuates tumor cell growth in follicular thyroid cancer, which requires additional preclinical validation. PMID:27274989

  11. Rapamycin increases neuronal survival, reduces inflammation and astrocyte proliferation after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Goldshmit, Yona; Kanner, Sivan; Zacs, Maria; Frisca, Frisca; Pinto, Alexander R; Currie, Peter D; Pinkas-Kramarski, Ronit

    2015-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) frequently leads to a permanent functional impairment as a result of the initial injury followed by secondary injury mechanism, which is characterised by increased inflammation, glial scarring and neuronal cell death. Finding drugs that may reduce inflammatory cell invasion and activation to reduce glial scarring and increase neuronal survival is of major importance for improving the outcome after SCI. In the present study, we examined the effect of rapamycin, an mTORC1 inhibitor and an inducer of autophagy, on recovery from spinal cord injury. Autophagy, a process that facilitates the degradation of cytoplasmic proteins, is also important for maintenance of neuronal homeostasis and plays a major role in neurodegeneration after neurotrauma. We examined rapamycin effects on the inflammatory response, glial scar formation, neuronal survival and regeneration in vivo using spinal cord hemisection model in mice, and in vitro using primary cortical neurons and human astrocytes. We show that a single injection of rapamycin, inhibited p62/SQSTM1, a marker of autophagy, inhibited mTORC1 downstream effector p70S6K, reduced macrophage/neutrophil infiltration into the lesion site, microglia activation and secretion of TNFα. Rapamycin inhibited astrocyte proliferation and reduced the number of GFAP expressing cells at the lesion site. Finally, it increased neuronal survival and axonogenesis towards the lesion site. Our study shows that rapamycin treatment increased significantly p-Akt levels at the lesion site following SCI. Similarly, rapamycin treatment of neurons and astrocytes induced p-Akt elevation under stress conditions. Together, these findings indicate that rapamycin is a promising candidate for treatment of acute SCI condition and may be a useful therapeutic agent. PMID:25936601

  12. mTORC1 activity as a determinant of cancer risk--rationalizing the cancer-preventive effects of adiponectin, metformin, rapamycin, and low-protein vegan diets.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2011-10-01

    Increased plasma levels of adiponectin, metformin therapy of diabetes, rapamycin administration in transplant patients, and lifelong consumption of low-protein plant-based diets have all been linked to decreased risk for various cancers. These benefits may be mediated, at least in part, by down-regulated activity of the mTORC1 complex, a key regulator of protein translation. By boosting the effective availability of the translation initiator eIF4E, mTORC1 activity promotes the translation of a number of "weak" mRNAs that code for proteins, often up-regulated in cancer, that promote cellular proliferation, invasiveness, and angiogenesis, and that abet cancer promotion and chemoresistance by opposing apoptosis. Measures which inhibit eIF4E activity, either directly or indirectly, may have utility not only for cancer prevention, but also for the treatment of many cancers in which eIF4E drives malignancy. Since eIF4E is overexpressed in many cancers, strategies which target eIF4E directly--some of which are now being assessed clinically--may have the broadest efficacy in this regard. Many of the "weak" mRNAs coding for proteins that promote malignant behavior or chemoresistance are regulated transcriptionally by NF-kappaB and/or Stat3, which are active in a high proportion of cancers; thus, regimens concurrently targeting eIF4E, NF-kappaB, and Stat3 may suppress these proteins at both the transcriptional and translational levels, potentially achieving a very marked reduction in their expression. PMID:21862237

  13. Target of Rapamycin Is a Key Player for Auxin Signaling Transduction in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kexuan; Yu, Lihua; Zheng, Xianzhe; Zhang, Kang; Wang, Wanjing; Dong, Pan; Zhang, Jiankui; Ren, Maozhi

    2016-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR), a master sensor for growth factors and nutrition availability in eukaryotic species, is a specific target protein of rapamycin. Rapamycin inhibits TOR kinase activity viaFK506 binding protein 12 kDa (FKBP12) in all examined heterotrophic eukaryotic organisms. In Arabidopsis, several independent studies have shown that AtFKBP12 is non-functional under aerobic condition, but one study suggests that AtFKBP12 is functional during anaerobic growth. However, the functions of AtFKBP12 have never been examined in parallel under aerobic and anaerobic growth conditions so far. To this end, we cloned the FKBP12 gene of humans, yeast, and Arabidopsis, respectively. Transgenic plants were generated, and pharmacological examinations were performed in parallel with Arabidopsis under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. ScFKBP12 conferred plants with the strongest sensitivity to rapamycin, followed by HsFKBP12, whereas AtFKBP12 failed to generate rapamycin sensitivity under aerobic condition. Upon submergence, yeast and human FKBP12 can significantly block cotyledon greening while Arabidopsis FKBP12 only retards plant growth in the presence of rapamycin, suggesting that hypoxia stress could partially restore the functions of AtFKBP12 to bridge the interaction between rapamycin and TOR. To further determine if communication between TOR and auxin signaling exists in plants, yeast FKBP12 was introduced into DR5::GUS homozygous plants. The transgenic plants DR5/BP12 were then treated with rapamycin or KU63794 (a new inhibitor of TOR). GUS staining showed that the auxin content of root tips decreased compared to the control. DR5/BP12 plants lost sensitivity to auxin after treatment with rapamycin. Auxin-defective phenotypes, including short primary roots, fewer lateral roots, and loss of gravitropism, occurred in DR5/BP12 plants when seedlings were treated with rapamycin+KU63794. This indicated that the combination of rapamycin and KU63794 can significantly

  14. Target of Rapamycin Is a Key Player for Auxin Signaling Transduction in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Kexuan; Yu, Lihua; Zheng, Xianzhe; Zhang, Kang; Wang, Wanjing; Dong, Pan; Zhang, Jiankui; Ren, Maozhi

    2016-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR), a master sensor for growth factors and nutrition availability in eukaryotic species, is a specific target protein of rapamycin. Rapamycin inhibits TOR kinase activity viaFK506 binding protein 12 kDa (FKBP12) in all examined heterotrophic eukaryotic organisms. In Arabidopsis, several independent studies have shown that AtFKBP12 is non-functional under aerobic condition, but one study suggests that AtFKBP12 is functional during anaerobic growth. However, the functions of AtFKBP12 have never been examined in parallel under aerobic and anaerobic growth conditions so far. To this end, we cloned the FKBP12 gene of humans, yeast, and Arabidopsis, respectively. Transgenic plants were generated, and pharmacological examinations were performed in parallel with Arabidopsis under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. ScFKBP12 conferred plants with the strongest sensitivity to rapamycin, followed by HsFKBP12, whereas AtFKBP12 failed to generate rapamycin sensitivity under aerobic condition. Upon submergence, yeast and human FKBP12 can significantly block cotyledon greening while Arabidopsis FKBP12 only retards plant growth in the presence of rapamycin, suggesting that hypoxia stress could partially restore the functions of AtFKBP12 to bridge the interaction between rapamycin and TOR. To further determine if communication between TOR and auxin signaling exists in plants, yeast FKBP12 was introduced into DR5::GUS homozygous plants. The transgenic plants DR5/BP12 were then treated with rapamycin or KU63794 (a new inhibitor of TOR). GUS staining showed that the auxin content of root tips decreased compared to the control. DR5/BP12 plants lost sensitivity to auxin after treatment with rapamycin. Auxin-defective phenotypes, including short primary roots, fewer lateral roots, and loss of gravitropism, occurred in DR5/BP12 plants when seedlings were treated with rapamycin+KU63794. This indicated that the combination of rapamycin and KU63794 can significantly

  15. Rapamycin sensitivity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is mediated by a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase related to human FK506-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Koltin, Y; Faucette, L; Bergsma, D J; Levy, M A; Cafferkey, R; Koser, P L; Johnson, R K; Livi, G P

    1991-01-01

    Rapamycin is a macrolide antifungal agent with structural similarity to FK506. It exhibits potent immunosuppressive properties analogous to those of both FK506 and cyclosporin A (CsA). Unlike FK506 and CsA, however, rapamycin does not inhibit the transcription of early T-cell activation genes, including interleukin-2, but instead appears to block downstream events leading to T-cell activation. FK506 and CsA receptor proteins (FKBP and cyclophilin, respectively) have been identified and shown to be distinct members of a class of enzymes that possess peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) activity. Despite the apparent differences in their mode of action, rapamycin and FK506 act as reciprocal antagonists in vivo and compete for binding to FKBP. As a means of rapidly identifying a target protein for rapamycin in vivo, we selected and genetically characterized rapamycin-resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and isolated a yeast genomic fragment that confers drug sensitivity. We demonstrate that the resonse to rapamycin in yeast cells is mediated by a gene encoding a 114-amino-acid, approximately 13-kDa protein which has a high degree of sequence homology with human FKBP; we designated this gene RBP1 (for rapamycin-binding protein). The RBP1 protein (RBP) was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and shown to catalyze peptidyl-prolyl isomerization of a synthetic peptide substrate. PPIase activity was completely inhibited by rapamycin and FK506 but not by CsA, indicating that both macrolides bind to the recombinant protein. Expression of human FKBP in rapamycin-resistant mutants restored rapamycin sensitivity, indicating a functional equivalence between the yeast and human enzymes. Images PMID:1996117

  16. Fibrous Papule of the Face, Similar to Tuberous Sclerosis Complex-Associated Angiofibroma, Shows Activation of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Pathway: Evidence for a Novel Therapeutic Strategy?

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jung-Yi Lisa; Wang, Kuo-Hsien; Fang, Chia-Lang; Chen, Wei-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Fibrous papules of the face are hamartomas characterized by stellate-shaped stromal cells, multinucleated giant cells, and proliferative blood vessels in the dermis. The pathogenesis of fibrous papules remains unclear. There is a striking microscopic resemblance between fibrous papules and tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC)-associated angiofibromas. A germline mutation of the TSC1 or TSC2 gene, leading to activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, accounts for the pathogenesis of TSC-associated angiofibromas. Activated mTOR subsequently activates p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) and ribosomal protein S6 (S6) by phosphorylation. Rapamycin, a mTOR inhibitor, is effective in treating TSC-associated angiofibromas. The aim of this study was to understand whether the mTOR pathway is activated in fibrous papules. We studied immunoexpressions of phosphorylated (p-) mTOR effectors in fibrous papules, TSC-associated angiofibromas, and normal skin controls. P-mTOR, p-p70S6K and p-S6 were highly expressed in dermal stromal cells and epidermal keratinocytes in fibrous papules and TSC-associated angiofibromas but not in fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes of normal skin controls (p<0.001). The results suggest topical rapamycin may be a novel treatment option for fibrous papules. PMID:24558502

  17. Rapamycin Impairs Antitumor CD8+ T-cell Responses and Vaccine-Induced Tumor Eradication.

    PubMed

    Chaoul, Nada; Fayolle, Catherine; Desrues, Belinda; Oberkampf, Marine; Tang, Alexandre; Ladant, Daniel; Leclerc, Claude

    2015-08-15

    The metabolic sensor mTOR broadly regulates cell growth and division in cancer cells, leading to a significant focus on studies of rapamycin and its analogues as candidate anticancer drugs. However, mTOR inhibitors have failed to produce useful clinical efficacy, potentially because mTOR is also critical in T cells implicated in immunosurveillance. Indeed, recent studies using rapamycin have demonstrated the important role of mTOR in differentiation and induction of the CD8+ memory in T-cell responses associated with antitumor properties. In this study, we demonstrate that rapamycin harms antitumor immune responses mediated by T cells in the setting of cancer vaccine therapy. Specifically, we analyzed how rapamycin affects the antitumor efficacy of a human papilloma virus E7 peptide vaccine (CyaA-E7) capable of eradicating tumors in the TC-1 mouse model of cervical cancer. In animals vaccinated with CyaA-E7, rapamycin administration completely abolished recruitment of CD8+ T cells into TC-1 tumors along with the ability of the vaccine to reduce infiltration of T regulatory cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Moreover, rapamycin completely abolished vaccine-induced cytotoxic T-cell responses and therapeutic activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate the powerful effects of mTOR inhibition in abolishing T-cell-mediated antitumor immune responses essential for the therapeutic efficacy of cancer vaccines. PMID:26122844

  18. Rapamycin improves TIE2-mutated venous malformation in murine model and human subjects.

    PubMed

    Boscolo, Elisa; Limaye, Nisha; Huang, Lan; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Soblet, Julie; Uebelhoer, Melanie; Mendola, Antonella; Natynki, Marjut; Seront, Emmanuel; Dupont, Sophie; Hammer, Jennifer; Legrand, Catherine; Brugnara, Carlo; Eklund, Lauri; Vikkula, Miikka; Bischoff, Joyce; Boon, Laurence M

    2015-09-01

    Venous malformations (VMs) are composed of ectatic veins with scarce smooth muscle cell coverage. Activating mutations in the endothelial cell tyrosine kinase receptor TIE2 are a common cause of these lesions. VMs cause deformity, pain, and local intravascular coagulopathy, and they expand with time. Targeted pharmacological therapies are not available for this condition. Here, we generated a model of VMs by injecting HUVECs expressing the most frequent VM-causing TIE2 mutation, TIE2-L914F, into immune-deficient mice. TIE2-L914F-expressing HUVECs formed VMs with ectatic blood-filled channels that enlarged over time. We tested both rapamycin and a TIE2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TIE2-TKI) for their effects on murine VM expansion and for their ability to inhibit mutant TIE2 signaling. Rapamycin prevented VM growth, while TIE2-TKI had no effect. In cultured TIE2-L914F-expressing HUVECs, rapamycin effectively reduced mutant TIE2-induced AKT signaling and, though TIE2-TKI did target the WT receptor, it only weakly suppressed mutant-induced AKT signaling. In a prospective clinical pilot study, we analyzed the effects of rapamycin in 6 patients with difficult-to-treat venous anomalies. Rapamycin reduced pain, bleeding, lesion size, functional and esthetic impairment, and intravascular coagulopathy. This study provides a VM model that allows evaluation of potential therapeutic strategies and demonstrates that rapamycin provides clinical improvement in patients with venous malformation. PMID:26258417

  19. Rapamycin improves TIE2-mutated venous malformation in murine model and human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Boscolo, Elisa; Limaye, Nisha; Huang, Lan; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Soblet, Julie; Uebelhoer, Melanie; Mendola, Antonella; Natynki, Marjut; Seront, Emmanuel; Dupont, Sophie; Hammer, Jennifer; Legrand, Catherine; Brugnara, Carlo; Eklund, Lauri; Vikkula, Miikka; Bischoff, Joyce; Boon, Laurence M.

    2015-01-01

    Venous malformations (VMs) are composed of ectatic veins with scarce smooth muscle cell coverage. Activating mutations in the endothelial cell tyrosine kinase receptor TIE2 are a common cause of these lesions. VMs cause deformity, pain, and local intravascular coagulopathy, and they expand with time. Targeted pharmacological therapies are not available for this condition. Here, we generated a model of VMs by injecting HUVECs expressing the most frequent VM-causing TIE2 mutation, TIE2-L914F, into immune-deficient mice. TIE2-L914F–expressing HUVECs formed VMs with ectatic blood-filled channels that enlarged over time. We tested both rapamycin and a TIE2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TIE2-TKI) for their effects on murine VM expansion and for their ability to inhibit mutant TIE2 signaling. Rapamycin prevented VM growth, while TIE2-TKI had no effect. In cultured TIE2-L914F–expressing HUVECs, rapamycin effectively reduced mutant TIE2-induced AKT signaling and, though TIE2-TKI did target the WT receptor, it only weakly suppressed mutant-induced AKT signaling. In a prospective clinical pilot study, we analyzed the effects of rapamycin in 6 patients with difficult–to-treat venous anomalies. Rapamycin reduced pain, bleeding, lesion size, functional and esthetic impairment, and intravascular coagulopathy. This study provides a VM model that allows evaluation of potential therapeutic strategies and demonstrates that rapamycin provides clinical improvement in patients with venous malformation. PMID:26258417

  20. 17ß-Estradiol Regulates mTORC2 Sensitivity to Rapamycin in Adaptive Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kusch, Angelika; Schmidt, Maria; Gürgen, Dennis; Postpieszala, Daniel; Catar, Rusan; Hegner, Björn; Davidson, Merci M.; Mahmoodzadeh, Shokoufeh; Dragun, Duska

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive cardiac remodeling is characterized by enhanced signaling of mTORC2 downstream kinase Akt. In females, 17ß-estradiol (E2), as well as Akt contribute essentially to sex-related premenopausal cardioprotection. Pharmacologic mTOR targeting with rapamycin is increasingly used for various clinical indications, yet burdened with clinical heterogeneity in therapy responses. The drug inhibits mTORC1 and less-so mTORC2. In male rodents, rapamycin decreases maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy whereas it leads to detrimental dilative cardiomyopathy in females. We hypothesized that mTOR inhibition could interfere with 17β-estradiol (E2)-mediated sexual dimorphism and adaptive cell growth and tested responses in murine female hearts and cultured female cardiomyocytes. Under physiological in vivo conditions, rapamycin compromised mTORC2 function only in female, but not in male murine hearts. In cultured female cardiomyocytes, rapamycin impaired simultaneously IGF-1 induced activation of both mTOR signaling branches, mTORC1 and mTORC2 only in presence of E2. Use of specific estrogen receptor (ER)α- and ERβ-agonists indicated involvement of both estrogen receptors (ER) in rapamycin effects on mTORC1 and mTORC2. Classical feedback mechanisms common in tumour cells with upregulation of PI3K signaling were not involved. E2 effect on Akt-pS473 downregulation by rapamycin was independent of ERK as shown by sequential mTOR and MEK-inhibition. Furthermore, regulatory mTORC2 complex defining component rictor phosphorylation at Ser1235, known to interfere with Akt-substrate binding to mTORC2, was not altered. Functionally, rapamycin significantly reduced trophic effect of E2 on cell size. In addition, cardiomyocytes with reduced Akt-pS473 under rapamycin treatment displayed decreased SERCA2A mRNA and protein expression suggesting negative functional consequences on cardiomyocyte contractility. Rictor silencing confirmed regulation of SERCA2A expression by mTORC2 in E2-cultured

  1. TOR (target of rapamycin) is a key regulator of triacylglycerol accumulation in microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Sousuke; Kawase, Yasuko; Kobayashi, Ikki; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most microalgae abundantly accumulate lipid droplets (LDs) containing triacylglycerols (TAGs) under several stress conditions, but the underlying molecular mechanism of this accumulation remains unclear. In a recent study, we found that inhibition of TOR (target of rapamycin), a highly conserved protein kinase of eukaryotes, by rapamycin resulted in TAG accumulation in microalgae, indicating that TOR negatively regulates TAG accumulation. Here, we show that formation of intracellular LDs and TAG accumulation were also induced in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii after exposure to Torin1 or AZD8055, which are novel TOR inhibitors that inhibit TOR activity in a manner different from rapamycin. These results supported quite well our previous conclusion that TOR is a central regulator of TAG accumulation in microalgae. PMID:26855321

  2. Rapamycin blocks hepatoblastoma growth in vitro and in vivo implicating new treatment options in high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ferdinand; Henningsen, Bente; Lederer, Christine; Eichenmüller, Melanie; Gödeke, Jan; Müller-Höcker, Josef; von Schweinitz, Dietrich; Kappler, Roland

    2012-10-01

    Activation of the protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway plays a central role in the formation of hepatoblastoma (HB), the most common liver cancer in childhood. Blocking this pathway with specific mTOR inhibitors such as the immunosuppressant rapamycin is being currently tested for a variety of cancers. Here, we report that rapamycin treatment induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability and promoted apoptosis in HB cells in vitro. Moreover, rapamycin inhibited AKT/mTOR signalling by dephosphorylation of the downstream target p70S6 kinase (p70S6K). Most importantly, treating subcutaneous HUH6 xenograft tumour bearing mice orally with 5mg/kg/day rapamycin for three weeks resulted in a striking reduction of tumour growth, as evidenced by reduced volume and weight, and moderately lowered tumour-specific alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) serum levels. The anti-tumourigenic effect was primarily ascribed to a significantly reduced proliferation rate upon p70S6K dephosphorylation, as microvascular density of rapamycin-treated compared to vehicle-treated tumours stayed grossly unchanged. Of uttermost clinical importance, we found no evidence for a feedback-loop activation of AKT in vivo. In conclusion, we demonstrate that rapamycin effectively inhibits HB growth both in vitro and in vivo by blocking AKT/mTOR signalling at the level of p70S6K and that rapamycin should be considered to treat HB patients especially those to be indicated for liver transplantation to benefit from its anti-tumourigenic and immunosuppressive properties. PMID:22285179

  3. Olanzapine Activates Hepatic Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: New Mechanistic Insight into Metabolic Dysregulation with Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Robin H.; Jokinen, Jenny D.; Massey, Veronica L.; Falkner, K. Cameron; Shi, Xue; Yin, Xinmin; Zhang, Xiang; Beier, Juliane I.

    2013-01-01

    Olanzapine (OLZ), an effective treatment of schizophrenia and other disorders, causes weight gain and metabolic syndrome. Most studies to date have focused on the potential effects of OLZ on the central nervous system’s mediation of weight; however, peripheral changes in liver or other key metabolic organs may also play a role in the systemic effects of OLZ. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of OLZ on hepatic metabolism in a mouse model of OLZ exposure. Female C57Bl/6J mice were administered OLZ (8 mg/kg per day) or vehicle subcutaneously by osmotic minipumps for 28 days. Liver and plasma were taken at sacrifice for biochemical analyses and for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry metabolomics analysis. OLZ increased body weight, fat pad mass, and liver-to-body weight ratio without commensurate increase in food consumption, indicating that OLZ altered energy expenditure. Expression and biochemical analyses indicated that OLZ induced anaerobic glycolysis and caused a pseudo-fasted state, which depleted hepatic glycogen reserves. OLZ caused similar effects in cultured HepG2 cells, as determined by Seahorse analysis. Metabolomic analysis indicated that OLZ increased hepatic concentrations of amino acids that can alter metabolism via the mTOR pathway; indeed, hepatic mTOR signaling was robustly increased by OLZ. Interestingly, OLZ concomitantly activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling. Taken together, these data suggest that disturbances in glucose and lipid metabolism caused by OLZ in liver may be mediated, at least in part, via simultaneous activation of both catabolic (AMPK) and anabolic (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathways, which yields new insight into the metabolic side effects of this drug. PMID:23926289

  4. Activation of pp70/85 S6 kinases in interleukin-2-responsive lymphoid cells is mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and inhibited by cyclic AMP.

    PubMed Central

    Monfar, M; Lemon, K P; Grammer, T C; Cheatham, L; Chung, J; Vlahos, C J; Blenis, J

    1995-01-01

    Activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and activation of the 70/85-kDa S6 protein kinases (alpha II and alpha I isoforms, referred to collectively as pp70S6k) have been independently linked to the regulation of cell proliferation. We demonstrate that these kinases lie on the same signalling pathway and that PI3K mediates the activation of pp70 by the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2). We also show that the activation of pp70S6k can be blocked at different points along the signalling pathway by using specific inhibitors of T-cell proliferation. Inhibition of PI3K activity with structurally unrelated but highly specific PI3K inhibitors (wortmannin or LY294002) results in inhibition of IL-2-dependent but not phorbol ester (conventional protein kinase C [cPKC])-dependent pp70S6k activation. The T-cell immunosuppressant rapamycin potently antagonizes IL-2-(PI3K)- and phorbol ester (cPKC)-mediated activation of pp70S6k. Thus, wortmannin and rapamycin antagonize IL-2-mediated activation of pp70S6k at distinct points along the PI3K-regulated signalling pathway, or rapamycin antagonizes another pathway required for pp70S6k activity. Agents that raise the concentration of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) and activate cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) also inhibit IL-2-dependent activation of pp70S6k. In this case, inhibition appears to occur at least two points in this signalling path. Like rapamycin, PKA appears to act downstream of cPKC-mediated pp70S6k activation, and like wortmannin, PKA antagonizes IL-2-dependent activation of PI3K. The results with rapamycin and wortmannin are of added interest since the yeast and mammalian rapamycin targets resemble PI3K in the catalytic domain. PMID:7528328

  5. Rapamycin restores p14, p15 and p57 expression and inhibits the mTOR/p70S6K pathway in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Huibo; Kong, Xiaolin; Cui, Gang; Ren, Cuicui; Fan, Shengjin; Sun, Lili; Zhang, Yingjie; Cao, Rongyi; Li, Yinghua; Zhou, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of rapamycin and its underlying mechanisms on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. We found that the p14, p15, and p57 genes were not expressed in ALL cell lines (Molt-4 and Nalm-6) and adult ALL patients, whereas mTOR, 4E-BP1, and p70S6K were highly expressed. In Molt-4 and Nalm-6 cells exposed to rapamycin, cell viability decreased and the cell cycle was arrested at the G1/S phase. Rapamycin restored p14, p15, and p57 gene expression through demethylation of the promoters of these genes. As expected, rapamycin also increased p14 and p15 protein expression in both Molt-4 and Nalm-6 cells, as well as p57 protein expression in Nalm-6 cells. Rapamycin additionally decreased mTOR and p70S6K mRNA levels, as well as p70S6K and p-p70S6K protein levels. However, depletion of mTOR by siRNA did not alter the expression and promoter methylation states of p14, p15, and p57. These results indicate that the inhibitory effect of rapamycin may be due mainly to increased p14, p15, and p57 expression via promoter demethylation and decreased mTOR and p70S6K expression in ALL cell lines. These results suggest a potential role for rapamycin in the treatment of adult ALL. PMID:26362858

  6. Metformin attenuates graft-versus-host disease via restricting mammalian target of rapamycin/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and promoting adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase-autophagy for the balance between T helper 17 and Tregs.

    PubMed

    Park, Min-Jung; Lee, Seon-Yeong; Moon, Su-Jin; Son, Hye-Jin; Lee, Sung-Hee; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Byun, Jae-Kyeong; Shin, Dong Yun; Park, Sung-Hwan; Yang, Chul-Woo; Cho, Mi-La

    2016-07-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), caused by donor T cell-mediated injury to host tissues, is a problem in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. The transition from naïve to effector T cells is accompanied by shift in metabolism main pathway; from glucose oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine kinase that is a metabolic sensor that helps maintain cellular energy homeostasis. Although AMPK activation can exert anti-inflammatory properties by negatively regulating pro-inflammatory mediators, its role as a therapeutic potential of graft-versus-host disease development remains unclear. In this study, we found that the intraperitoneal administration of metformin, which activates AMPK signaling significantly, ameliorated the clinical severity of aGHVD and lethality. This was associated with reductions in type I T helper (Th1) and Th17 and rises in Th2 and regulatory T (Treg) cell. The enhanced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation noted during the development of aGVHD was reduced by metformin treatment. Furthermore, metformin-treated Th17 cells became converted into Treg cells via enhanced autophagy. The reduction in mortality associated with metformin treatment was associated with inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway. These results suggest that metformin might be of significant use in the treatment of patients with aGVHD. PMID:27126953

  7. Metformin potentiates rapamycin and cisplatin in gastric cancer in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yunshu; Jiao, Xiaodong; Huang, Suyun; Wang, Jiejun; Li, Zhaosheng; Xie, Keping

    2015-01-01

    Here we showed that pAMPKα and PTEN were down-regulated and p-mTOR, p-S6, p-4EBP1, MMP7, and DCN1 were up-regulated in human gastric cancer tissue samples as compared to that in the noncancerous tissues. Metformin inhibited tumor growth in mice. Also it enhanced cisplatin- or rapamycin-induced reduction of tumor growth as compared with treatment of either drug alone. In addition to activation of AMPK and suppression of the mTOR pathway, a series of increased and decreased genes expression were induced by metformin, including PTEN, MMP7, and FN1. We suggest that metformin could potentially be used for the treatment of gastric cancer especially in combination with cisplatin or rapamycin. PMID:25909163

  8. Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2 as Key Signaling Intermediates in Mesenchymal Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Walker, Natalie M; Belloli, Elizabeth A; Stuckey, Linda; Chan, Kevin M; Lin, Jules; Lynch, William; Chang, Andrew; Mazzoni, Serina M; Fingar, Diane C; Lama, Vibha N

    2016-03-18

    Fibrotic diseases display mesenchymal cell (MC) activation with pathologic deposition of matrix proteins such as collagen. Here we investigate the role of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2 in regulating MC collagen expression, a hallmark of fibrotic disease. Relative to normal MCs (non-Fib MCs), MCs derived from fibrotic human lung allografts (Fib-MCs) demonstrated increased phosphoinositide-3kinase (PI3K) dependent activation of both mTORC1 and mTORC2, as measured by increased phosphorylation of S6K1 and 4E-BP1 (mTORC1 substrates) and AKT (an mTORC2 substrate). Dual ATP-competitive TORC1/2 inhibitor AZD8055, in contrast to allosteric mTORC1-specific inhibitor rapamycin, strongly inhibited 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and collagen I expression in Fib-MCs. In non-Fib MCs, increased mTORC1 signaling was shown to augment collagen I expression. mTORC1/4E-BP1 pathway was identified as an important driver of collagen I expression in Fib-MCs in experiments utilizing raptor gene silencing and overexpression of dominant-inhibitory 4E-BP1. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of rictor, an mTORC2 partner protein, reduced mTORC1 substrate phosphorylation and collagen expression in Fib-, but not non-Fib MCs, revealing a dependence of mTORC1 signaling on mTORC2 function in activated MCs. Together these studies suggest a novel paradigm where fibrotic activation in MCs increases PI3K dependent mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling and leads to increased collagen I expression via the mTORC1-dependent 4E-BP1/eIF4E pathway. These data provide rationale for targeting specific components of mTORC pathways in fibrotic states and underscore the need to further delineate mTORC2 signaling in activated cell states. PMID:26755732

  9. SR4 Uncouples Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation, Modulates AMP-dependent Kinase (AMPK)-Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling, and Inhibits Proliferation of HepG2 Hepatocarcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Figarola, James L; Singhal, Jyotsana; Tompkins, Joshua D; Rogers, George W; Warden, Charles; Horne, David; Riggs, Arthur D; Awasthi, Sanjay; Singhal, Sharad S

    2015-12-18

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation produces most of the energy in aerobic cells by coupling respiration to the production of ATP. Mitochondrial uncouplers, which reduce the proton gradient across the mitochondrial inner membrane, create a futile cycle of nutrient oxidation without generating ATP. Regulation of mitochondrial dysfunction and associated cellular bioenergetics has been recently identified as a promising target for anticancer therapy. Here, we show that SR4 is a novel mitochondrial uncoupler that causes dose-dependent increase in mitochondrial respiration and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells. These effects were reversed by the recoupling agent 6-ketocholestanol but not cyclosporin A and were nonexistent in mitochondrial DNA-depleted HepG2 cells. In isolated mouse liver mitochondria, SR4 similarly increased oxygen consumption independent of adenine nucleotide translocase and uncoupling proteins, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and promoted swelling of valinomycin-treated mitochondria in potassium acetate medium. Mitochondrial uncoupling in HepG2 cells by SR4 results in the reduction of cellular ATP production, increased ROS production, activation of the energy-sensing enzyme AMPK, and inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathways, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Global analysis of SR4-associated differential gene expression confirms these observations, including significant induction of apoptotic genes and down-regulation of cell cycle, mitochondrial, and oxidative phosphorylation pathway transcripts at 24 h post-treatment. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that the previously reported indirect activation of AMPK and in vitro anticancer properties of SR4 as well as its beneficial effects in both animal xenograft and obese mice models could be a direct consequence of its mitochondrial uncoupling activity. PMID:26534958

  10. Dual inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin using NVP-BEZ235 as a novel therapeutic approach for mucinous adenocarcinoma of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Kudoh, Akiko; Oishi, Tetsuro; Itamochi, Hiroaki; Sato, Seiya; Naniwa, Jun; Sato, Shinya; Shimada, Muneaki; Kigawa, Junzo; Harada, Tasuku

    2014-03-01

    Ovarian mucinous adenocarcinoma (MAC) resists standard chemotherapy and is associated with poor prognosis. A more effective treatment is needed urgently. The present study assessed the possibility of molecular-targeted therapy with a novel dual inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), NVP-BEZ235 (BEZ235) to treat of MAC. Seven human MAC cell lines were used in this study. The sensitivity of the cells to BEZ235, temsirolimus, and anticancer agents was determined with the WST-8 assay. Cell cycle distribution was assessed by flow cytometry, and the expression of proteins in apoptotic pathways and molecules of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways was determined by Western blot analysis. We also examined the effects of BEZ235 on tumor growth in nude mice xenograft models. The cell lines showed half-maximal inhibitory concentration values of BEZ235 from 13 to 328 nmol/L. Low half-maximal inhibitory concentration values to BEZ235 were observed in MCAS and OMC-1 cells; these 2 lines have an activating mutation in the PIK3CA gene. NVP-BEZ235 down-regulated the protein expression of phosphorylated (p-) Akt, p-p70S6K, and p-4E-BP1, suppressed cell cycle progression, up-regulated the expression of cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase 9, and increased apoptotic cells. Synergistic effects were observed on more than 5 cell lines when BEZ235 was combined with paclitaxel or cisplatin. The treatment of mice bearing OMC-1 or RMUG-S with BEZ235 significantly suppressed tumor growth in MAC xenograft models without severe weight loss. We conclude that the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is a potential therapeutic target and that BEZ235 should be explored as a therapeutic agent for MAC. PMID:24552895

  11. Inhibition of Autophagy as a Strategy to Augment Radiosensitization by the Dual Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitor NVP-BEZ235S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Cerniglia, George J.; Karar, Jayashree; Tyagi, Sonia; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Rengan, Ramesh; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effect of 2-methyl-2-{4-[3-methyl-2-oxo-8-(quinolin-3-yl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]quinolin-1-yl]phenyl} propanenitrile (NVP-BEZ235) (Novartis, Basel Switzerland), a dual phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor currently being tested in phase I clinical trials, in radiosensitization. NVP-BEZ235 radiosensitized a variety of cancer cell lines, including SQ20B head and neck carcinoma cells and U251 glioblastoma cells. NVP-BEZ235 also increased in vivo radiation response in SQ20B xenografts. Knockdown of Akt1, p110α, or mTOR resulted in radiosensitization, but not to the same degree as with NVP-BEZ235. NVP-BEZ235 interfered with DNA damage repair after radiation as measured by the CometAssay and resolution of phosphorylated H2A histone family member X foci. NVP-BEZ235 abrogated the radiation-induced phosphorylation of both DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated. Knockdown of either p110α or mTOR failed to decrease the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs, suggesting that the effect of the drug was direct rather than mediated via p110α or mTOR. The treatment of cells with NVP-BEZ235 also promoted autophagy. To assess the importance of this process in radiosensitization, we used the autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine and found that either drug increased cell killing after NVP-BEZ235 treatment and radiation. Knocking down the essential autophagy proteins autophagy related 5 (ATG5) and beclin1 increased NVP-BEZ235-mediated radiosensitization. Furthermore, NVP-BEZ235 radiosensitized autophagy-deficient ATG5(−/−) fibroblasts to a greater extent than ATG5(+/+) cells. We conclude that NVP-BEZ235 radiosensitizes cells and induces autophagy by apparently distinct mechanisms. Inhibiting autophagy via pharmacologic or genetic means increases radiation killing after NVP-BEZ235 treatment; hence, autophagy seems to be cytoprotective in this

  12. Effects of Rapamycin Treatment on Neurogenesis and Synaptic Reorganization in the Dentate Gyrus after Controlled Cortical Impact Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Corwin R.; Boychuk, Jeffery A.; Smith, Bret N.

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) is one consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI). A prominent cell signaling pathway activated in animal models of both TBI and epilepsy is the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin has shown promise as a potential modulator of epileptogenesis in several animal models of epilepsy, but cellular mechanisms linking mTOR expression and epileptogenesis are unclear. In this study, the role of mTOR in modifying functional hippocampal circuit reorganization after focal TBI induced by controlled cortical impact (CCI) was investigated. Rapamycin (3 or 10 mg/kg), an inhibitor of mTOR signaling, was administered by intraperitoneal injection beginning on the day of injury and continued daily until tissue collection. Relative to controls, rapamycin treatment reduced dentate granule cell area in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the injury two weeks post-injury. Brain injury resulted in a significant increase in doublecortin immunolabeling in the dentate gyrus ipsilateral to the injury, indicating increased neurogenesis shortly after TBI. Rapamycin treatment prevented the increase in doublecortin labeling, with no overall effect on Fluoro-Jade B staining in the ipsilateral hemisphere, suggesting that rapamycin treatment reduced posttraumatic neurogenesis but did not prevent cell loss after injury. At later times post-injury (8–13 weeks), evidence of mossy fiber sprouting and increased recurrent excitation of dentate granule cells was detected, which were attenuated by rapamycin treatment. Rapamycin treatment also diminished seizure prevalence relative to vehicle-treated controls after TBI. Collectively, these results support a role for adult neurogenesis in PTE development and suggest that suppression of epileptogenesis by mTOR inhibition includes effects on post-injury neurogenesis. PMID:26640431

  13. The target of rapamycin (TOR) proteins

    PubMed Central

    Raught, Brian; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2001-01-01

    Rapamycin potently inhibits downstream signaling from the target of rapamycin (TOR) proteins. These evolutionarily conserved protein kinases coordinate the balance between protein synthesis and protein degradation in response to nutrient quality and quantity. The TOR proteins regulate (i) the initiation and elongation phases of translation, (ii) ribosome biosynthesis, (iii) amino acid import, (iv) the transcription of numerous enzymes involved in multiple metabolic pathways, and (v) autophagy. Intriguingly, recent studies have also suggested that TOR signaling plays a critical role in brain development, learning, and memory formation. PMID:11416184

  14. Impact of rapamycin on status epilepticus induced hippocampal pathology and weight gain.

    PubMed

    Hester, Michael S; Hosford, Bethany E; Santos, Victor R; Singh, Shatrunjai P; Rolle, Isaiah J; LaSarge, Candi L; Liska, John P; Garcia-Cairasco, Norberto; Danzer, Steve C

    2016-06-01

    Growing evidence implicates the dentate gyrus in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Dentate granule cells limit the amount of excitatory signaling through the hippocampus and exhibit striking neuroplastic changes that may impair this function during epileptogenesis. Furthermore, aberrant integration of newly-generated granule cells underlies the majority of dentate restructuring. Recently, attention has focused on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway as a potential mediator of epileptogenic change. Systemic administration of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin has promising therapeutic potential, as it has been shown to reduce seizure frequency and seizure severity in rodent models. Here, we tested whether mTOR signaling facilitates abnormal development of granule cells during epileptogenesis. We also examined dentate inflammation and mossy cell death in the dentate hilus. To determine if mTOR activation is necessary for abnormal granule cell development, transgenic mice that harbored fluorescently-labeled adult-born granule cells were treated with rapamycin following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. Systemic rapamycin effectively blocked phosphorylation of S6 protein (a readout of mTOR activity) and reduced granule cell mossy fiber axon sprouting. However, the accumulation of ectopic granule cells and granule cells with aberrant basal dendrites was not significantly reduced. Mossy cell death and reactive astrocytosis were also unaffected. These data suggest that anti-epileptogenic effects of mTOR inhibition may be mediated by mechanisms other than inhibition of these common dentate pathologies. Consistent with this conclusion, rapamycin prevented pathological weight gain in epileptic mice, suggesting that rapamycin might act on central circuits or even peripheral tissues controlling weight gain in epilepsy. PMID:26995324

  15. Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1/S6 Kinase 1 Signals Influence T Cell Activation Independently of Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Salmond, Robert J.; Brownlie, Rebecca J.; Meyuhas, Oded

    2015-01-01

    Ag-dependent activation of naive T cells induces dramatic changes in cellular metabolism that are essential for cell growth, division, and differentiation. In recent years, the serine/threonine kinase mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) has emerged as a key integrator of signaling pathways that regulate these metabolic processes. However, the role of specific downstream effectors of mTOR function in T cells is poorly understood. Ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) is an essential component of the ribosome and is inducibly phosphorylated following mTOR activation in eukaryotic cells. In the current work, we addressed the role of phosphorylation of rpS6 as an effector of mTOR function in T cell development, growth, proliferation, and differentiation using knockin and TCR transgenic mice. Surprisingly, we demonstrate that rpS6 phosphorylation is not required for any of these processes either in vitro or in vivo. Indeed, rpS6 knockin mice are completely sensitive to the inhibitory effects of rapamycin and an S6 kinase 1 (S6K1)–specific inhibitor on T cell activation and proliferation. These results place the mTOR complex 1-S6K1 axis as a crucial determinant of T cell activation independently of its ability to regulate rpS6 phosphorylation. PMID:26453749

  16. EFFECTS OF RAPAMYCIN ON CEREBRAL OXYGEN SUPPLY AND CONSUMPTION DURING REPERFUSION AFTER CEREBRAL ISCHEMIA

    PubMed Central

    CHI, O. Z.; BARSOUM, S.; VEGA-COTTO, N. M.; JACINTO, E.; LIU, X.; MELLENDER, S. J.; WEISS, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract—Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) leads to cell growth and survival. We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mTOR would increase infarct size and decrease microregional O2 supply/consumption balance after cerebral ischemia–reperfusion. This was tested in isoflurane-anesthetized rats with middle cerebral artery blockade for 1 h and reperfusion for 2 h with and without rapamycin (20 mg/kg once daily for two days prior to ischemia). Regional cerebral blood flow was determined using a C14-iodoantipyrine autoradiographic technique. Regional small-vessel arterial and venous oxygen saturations were determined microspectrophotometrically. The control ischemic-reperfused cortex had a similar blood flow and O2 consumption to the contralateral cortex. However, microregional O2 supply/consumption balance was significantly reduced in the ischemic-reperfused cortex. Rapamycin significantly increased cerebral O2 consumption and further reduced O2 supply/consumption balance in the reperfused area. This was associated with an increased cortical infarct size (13.5 ± 0.8% control vs. 21.5 ± 0.9% rapamycin). We also found that ischemia–reperfusion increased AKT and S6K1 phosphorylation, while rapamycin decreased this phosphorylation in both the control and ischemic-reperfused cortex. This suggests that mTOR is important for not only cell survival, but also for the control of oxygen balance after cerebral ischemia–reperfusion. PMID:26742793

  17. Effects of rapamycin on cerebral oxygen supply and consumption during reperfusion after cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chi, O Z; Barsoum, S; Vega-Cotto, N M; Jacinto, E; Liu, X; Mellender, S J; Weiss, H R

    2016-03-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) leads to cell growth and survival. We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mTOR would increase infarct size and decrease microregional O2 supply/consumption balance after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. This was tested in isoflurane-anesthetized rats with middle cerebral artery blockade for 1h and reperfusion for 2h with and without rapamycin (20mg/kg once daily for two days prior to ischemia). Regional cerebral blood flow was determined using a C(14)-iodoantipyrine autoradiographic technique. Regional small-vessel arterial and venous oxygen saturations were determined microspectrophotometrically. The control ischemic-reperfused cortex had a similar blood flow and O2 consumption to the contralateral cortex. However, microregional O2 supply/consumption balance was significantly reduced in the ischemic-reperfused cortex. Rapamycin significantly increased cerebral O2 consumption and further reduced O2 supply/consumption balance in the reperfused area. This was associated with an increased cortical infarct size (13.5±0.8% control vs. 21.5±0.9% rapamycin). We also found that ischemia-reperfusion increased AKT and S6K1 phosphorylation, while rapamycin decreased this phosphorylation in both the control and ischemic-reperfused cortex. This suggests that mTOR is important for not only cell survival, but also for the control of oxygen balance after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:26742793

  18. Rapamycin: An InhibiTOR of Aging Emerges From the Soil of Easter Island.

    PubMed

    Arriola Apelo, Sebastian I; Lamming, Dudley W

    2016-07-01

    Rapamycin (sirolimus) is a macrolide immunosuppressant that inhibits the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein kinase and extends lifespan in model organisms including mice. Although rapamycin is an FDA-approved drug for select indications, a diverse set of negative side effects may preclude its wide-scale deployment as an antiaging therapy. mTOR forms two different protein complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2; the former is acutely sensitive to rapamycin whereas the latter is only chronically sensitive to rapamycin in vivo. Over the past decade, it has become clear that although genetic and pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 extends lifespan and delays aging, inhibition of mTORC2 has negative effects on mammalian health and longevity and is responsible for many of the negative side effects of rapamycin. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the molecular and physiological effects of rapamycin treatment, and we discuss how the use of alternative rapamycin treatment regimens or rapamycin analogs has the potential to mitigate the deleterious side effects of rapamycin treatment by more specifically targeting mTORC1. Although the side effects of rapamycin are still of significant concern, rapid progress is being made in realizing the revolutionary potential of rapamycin-based therapies for the treatment of diseases of aging. PMID:27208895

  19. Transcriptome profiling of CTLs regulated by rapamycin using RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Mattson, Elliot; Xu, Lingyang; Li, Lei; Liu, George E; Xiao, Zhengguo

    2014-11-01

    Memory programming of cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) by inflammatory cytokines can be regulated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). We have shown that inhibition of mTOR during CTL activation leads to the enhancement of memory, but the molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Using high-throughput RNA-Seq, we identified genes and functions in mouse CTLs affected by mTOR inhibition through rapamycin. Of the 43,221 identified transcripts, 184 transcripts were differentially expressed after rapamycin treatment, corresponding to 128 annotated genes. Of these genes, 114 were downregulated and only 14 were upregulated. Most importantly, 50 of them are directly related to cell death and survival. In addition, several genes such as CD62L are related to migration. Furthermore, we predicted downregulation of transcriptional regulators based on the total differentially expressed genes, as well as the subset of apoptosis-related genes. Quantitative PCR confirmed the differential expressions detected in RNA-Seq. We conclude that the regulatory function of rapamycin may work through inhibition of multiple genes related to apoptosis and migration, which enhance CTL survival into memory. PMID:25113844

  20. Rheb, an activator of target of rapamycin, in the blackback land crab, Gecarcinus lateralis: cloning and effects of molting and unweighting on expression in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    MacLea, Kyle S; Abuhagr, Ali M; Pitts, Natalie L; Covi, Joseph A; Bader, Brandon D; Chang, Ernest S; Mykles, Donald L

    2012-02-15

    Molt-induced claw muscle atrophy in decapod crustaceans facilitates exuviation and is coordinated by ecdysteroid hormones. There is a 4-fold reduction in mass accompanied by remodeling of the contractile apparatus, which is associated with an 11-fold increase in myofibrillar protein synthesis by the end of the premolt period. Loss of a walking limb or claw causes a loss of mass in the associated thoracic musculature; this unweighting atrophy occurs in intermolt and is ecdysteroid independent. Myostatin (Mstn) is a negative regulator of muscle growth in mammals; it suppresses protein synthesis, in part, by inhibiting the insulin/metazoan target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Signaling via mTOR activates translation by phosphorylating ribosomal S6 kinase (s6k) and 4E-binding protein 1. Rheb (Ras homolog enriched in brain), a GTP-binding protein, is a key activator of mTOR and is inhibited by Rheb-GTPase-activating protein (GAP). Akt protein kinase inactivates Rheb-GAP, thus slowing Rheb-GTPase activity and maintaining mTOR in the active state. We hypothesized that the large increase in global protein synthesis in claw muscle was due to regulation of mTOR activity by ecdysteroids, caused either directly or indirectly via Mstn. In the blackback land crab, Gecarcinus lateralis, a Mstn-like gene (Gl-Mstn) is downregulated as much as 17-fold in claw muscle during premolt and upregulated 3-fold in unweighted thoracic muscle during intermolt. Gl-Mstn expression in claw muscle is negatively correlated with hemolymph ecdysteroid level. Full-length cDNAs encoding Rheb orthologs from three crustacean species (G. lateralis, Carcinus maenas and Homarus americanus), as well as partial cDNAs encoding Akt (Gl-Akt), mTOR (Gl-mTOR) and s6k (Gl-s6k) from G. lateralis, were cloned. The effects of molting on insulin/mTOR signaling components were quantified in claw closer, weighted thoracic and unweighted thoracic muscles using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Gl-Rheb m

  1. Anorexic response to rapamycin does not appear to involve a central mechanism.

    PubMed

    Toklu, Hale Z; Bruce, Erin B; Sakarya, Yasemin; Carter, Christy S; Morgan, Drake; Matheny, Michael K; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Scarpace, Philip J; Tümer, Nihal

    2016-09-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated that a low and intermittent peripheral dose of rapamycin (1 mg/kg three times/week) to rats inhibited mTORC1 signalling, but avoided the hyperlipidemia and diabetes-like syndrome associated with higher doses of rapamycin. The dosing regimen reduced food intake, body weight, adiposity, serum leptin and triglycerides. mTORC1 signalling was inhibited in both liver and hypothalamus, suggesting some of the actions, in particular the decrease in food intake, may be the results of a central mechanism. To test this hypothesis, rapamycin (30 μg/day for 4 weeks) was infused into 23-25-month-old F344xBN rats by intracerebroventricular (icv) mini pumps. Our results demonstrated that central infusion did not alter food intake or body weight, although there was a tendency for a decrease in body weight towards the end of the study. mTORC1 signalling, evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of S6 protein at end of 4 weeks, was not activated in liver, hypothalamus or hindbrain. Fat and lean mass, sum of white adipose tissues, brown adipose tissue, serum glucose, insulin and leptin levels remained unchanged. Thus, these data suggest that the anorexic and body weight responses evident with peripheral rapamycin are not the result of direct central action. The tendency for decreased body weight towards the end of study, suggests that there is either a slow transport of centrally administered rapamycin into the periphery, or that there is delayed action of rapamycin at sites in the brain. PMID:27232670

  2. Loss of the repressor REST in uterine fibroids promotes aberrant G protein-coupled receptor 10 expression and activates mammalian target of rapamycin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Binny V.; Koohestani, Faezeh; McWilliams, Michelle; Colvin, Arlene; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Kinsey, William H.; Nowak, Romana A.; Nothnick, Warren B.; Chennathukuzhi, Vargheese M.

    2013-01-01

    Uterine fibroids (leiomyomas) are the most common tumors of the female reproductive tract, occurring in up to 77% of reproductive-aged women, yet molecular pathogenesis remains poorly understood. A role for atypically activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in the pathogenesis of uterine fibroids has been suggested in several studies. We identified that G protein-coupled receptor 10 [GPR10, a putative signaling protein upstream of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase–protein kinase B/AKT–mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT–mTOR) pathway] is aberrantly expressed in uterine fibroids. The activation of GPR10 by its cognate ligand, prolactin releasing peptide, promotes PI3K–AKT–mTOR pathways and cell proliferation specifically in cultured primary leiomyoma cells. Additionally, we report that RE1 suppressing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor (REST/NRSF), a known tumor suppressor, transcriptionally represses GPR10 in the normal myometrium, and that the loss of REST in fibroids permits GPR10 expression. Importantly, mice overexpressing human GPR10 in the myometrium develop myometrial hyperplasia with excessive extracellular matrix deposition, a hallmark of uterine fibroids. We demonstrate previously unrecognized roles for GPR10 and its upstream regulator REST in the pathogenesis of uterine fibroids. Importantly, we report a unique genetically modified mouse model for a gene that is misexpressed in uterine fibroids. PMID:23284171

  3. The effect of rapamycin on biodiesel-producing protist Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Mukaida, Shiho; Ogawa, Takumi; Ohishi, Kazuko; Tanizawa, Yasuhiro; Ohta, Daisaku; Arita, Masanori

    2016-06-01

    Rapamycin induces autophagy with lipid remodeling in yeast and mammalian cells. To investigate the lipid biosynthesis of Euglena gracilis, rapamycin was supplemented in comparison with two model algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Cyanidioschyzon merolae. In Euglena, rapamycin induced the reduction of chlorophylls and the accumulation of neutral lipids without deterring its cell proliferation. Its lipidomic profile revealed that the fatty acid composition did not alter by supplementing rapamycin. In Chlamydomonas, however, rapamycin induced serious growth inhibition as reported elsewhere. With a lower concentration of rapamycin, the alga accumulated neutral lipids without reducing chlorophylls. In Cyanidioschyzon, rapamycin did not increase neutral lipids but reduced its chlorophyll content. We also tested fatty acid elongase inhibitors such as pyroxasulfone or flufenacet in Euglena with no significant change in its neutral lipid contents. In summary, controlled supplementation of rapamycin can increase the yield of neutral lipids while the scheme is not always applicable for other algal species. PMID:26872547

  4. Nitrogen source activates TOR (target of rapamycin) complex 1 via glutamine and independently of Gtr/Rag proteins.

    PubMed

    Stracka, Daniele; Jozefczuk, Szymon; Rudroff, Florian; Sauer, Uwe; Hall, Michael N

    2014-09-01

    The evolutionary conserved TOR complex 1 (TORC1) activates cell growth in response to nutrients. In yeast, TORC1 responds to the nitrogen source via a poorly understood mechanism. Leucine, and perhaps other amino acids, activates TORC1 via the small GTPases Gtr1 and Gtr2, orthologs of the mammalian Rag GTPases. Here we investigate the activation of TORC1 by the nitrogen source and how this might be related to TORC1 activation by Gtr/Rag. The quality of the nitrogen source, as defined by its ability to promote growth and glutamine accumulation, directly correlates with its ability to activate TORC1 as measured by Sch9 phosphorylation. Preferred nitrogen sources stimulate rapid, sustained Sch9 phosphorylation and glutamine accumulation. Inhibition of glutamine synthesis reduces TORC1 activity and growth. Poor nitrogen sources stimulate rapid but transient Sch9 phosphorylation. A Gtr1 deficiency prevents the transient stimulation of TORC1 but does not affect the sustained TORC1 activity in response to good nitrogen sources. These findings suggest that the nitrogen source must be converted to glutamine, the preferred nitrogen source in yeast, to sustain TORC1 activity. Furthermore, sustained TORC1 activity is independent of Gtr/Rag. Thus, the nitrogen source and Gtr/Rag activate TORC1 via different mechanisms. PMID:25063813

  5. Huntingtin inhibits caspase-3 activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Leavitt, Blair R; van Raamsdonk, Jeremy M; Dragatsis, Ioannis; Goldowitz, Dan; MacDonald, Marcy E; Hayden, Michael R; Friedlander, Robert M

    2006-01-01

    Huntington's disease results from a mutation in the HD gene encoding for the protein huntingtin. The function of huntingtin, although beginning to be elucidated, remains largely unclear. To probe the prosurvival function of huntingtin, we modulate levels of wild-type huntingtin in a number of cellular and in vivo models. Huntingtin depletion resulted in caspase-3 activation, and overexpression of huntingtin resulted in caspase-3 inhibition. Additionally, we demonstrate that huntingtin physically interacts with active caspase-3. Interestingly, mutant huntingtin binds active caspase-3 with a lower affinity and lower inhibitory effect on active caspase-3 than does wild-type huntingtin. Although reduction of huntingtin levels resulted in caspase-3 activation in all conditions examined, the cellular response was cell-type specific. Depletion of huntingtin resulted in either overt cell death, or in increased vulnerability to cell death. These data demonstrate that huntingtin inhibits caspase-3 activity, suggesting a mechanism whereby caspase-mediated huntingtin depletion results in a detrimental amplification cascade leading to further caspase-3 activation, resulting in cell dysfunction and cell death. PMID:17124493

  6. Different in vitro proliferation and cytokine-production inhibition of memory T-cell subsets after calcineurin and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors treatment.

    PubMed

    Merino, David; San Segundo, David; Medina, Juan M; Rodrigo, Emilio; Asensio, Esther; Irure, Juan; Fernández-Fresnedo, Gema; Arias, Manuel A; López-Hoyos, Marcos

    2016-06-01

    Calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi) are the main immunosuppressants used for long-term maintenance therapy in transplant recipients to avoid acute rejection episodes. Both groups of immunosuppressants have wide effects and are focused against the T cells, although different impacts on specific T-cell subsets, such as regulatory T cells, have been demonstrated. A greater knowledge of the impact of immunosuppression on the cellular components involved in allograft rejection could facilitate decisions for individualized immunosuppression when an acute rejection event is suspected. Memory T cells have recently gained focus because they might induce a more potent response compared with naive cells. The impact of immunosuppressants on different memory T-cell subsets remains unclear. In the present study, we have studied the specific impact of CNI (tacrolimus) and mTORi (rapamycin and everolimus) over memory and naive CD4(+) T cells. To do so, we have analysed the proliferation, phenotypic changes and cytokine synthesis in vitro in the presence of these immunosuppressants. The present work shows a more potent effect of CNI on proliferation and cytokine production in naive and memory T cells. However, the mTORi permit the differentiation of naive T cells to the memory phenotype and allow the production of interleukin-2. Taken together, our data show evidence to support the combined use of CNI and mTORi in transplant immunosuppression. PMID:26931075

  7. Rapamycin can restore the negative regulatory function of transforming growth factor beta 1 in high grade lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Sebestyén, Anna; Márk, Ágnes; Hajdu, Melinda; Nagy, Noémi; Molnár, Anna; Végső, Gyula; Barna, Gábor; Kopper, László

    2015-06-01

    TGF-β1 (transforming growth factor beta 1) is a negative regulator of lymphocytes, inhibiting proliferation and switching on the apoptotic program in normal lymphoid cells. Lymphoma cells often lose their sensitivity to proapoptotic/anti-proliferative regulators such as TGF-β1. Rapamycin can influence both mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and TGF-β signaling, and through these pathways it is able to enhance TGF-β induced anti-proliferative and apoptotic responses. In the present work we investigated the effect of rapamycin and TGF-β1 combination on cell growth and on TGF-β and mTOR signalling events in lymphoma cells. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1 (mTOR complex 1) did not elicit apoptosis in lymphoma cells; however, the combination of rapamycin with exogenous TGF-β1 induced apoptosis and restored TGF-β1 dependent apoptotic machinery in several lymphoma cell lines with reduced TGF-β sensitivity in vitro. In parallel, the phosphorylation of p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K) and ribosomal S6 protein, targets of mTORC1, was completely eliminated. Knockdown of Smad signalling by Smad4 siRNA had no influence on apoptosis induced by the rapamycin+TGF-β1, suggesting that this effect is independent of Smad signalling. However, apoptosis induction was dependent on early protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity, and in part on caspases. Rapamycin+TGF-β1 induced apoptosis was not completely eliminated by a caspase inhibitor. These results suggest that high mTOR activity contributes to TGF-β resistance and lowering mTORC1 kinase activity may provide a tool in high grade B-cell lymphoma therapy by restoring the sensitivity to normally available regulators such as TGF-β1. PMID:25794661

  8. Renin inhibition activity by chitooligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Park, Pyo-Jam; Ahn, Chang-Bum; Jeon, You-Jin; Je, Jae-Young

    2008-04-01

    Six kinds of chitooligosaccharides (COSs) with different molecular weight (MW) and degree of deacetylation (DD) were prepared using ultrafiltration membrane reactor, and their renin inhibition modes were evaluated. All the COSs showed the renin-inhibitory activities with dose-dependent manner, and 90-COSs had the potent renin-inhibitory activity than that of 50-COSs. Among them, 90-MMWCOS (1000-5000Da) exhibits the highest activity with IC(50) value of 0.51mg/mL and acts as competitive inhibitor with K(i) value of 0.28mg/mL by Lineweaver-Burk and Dixon plots. These results indicated that DD value and MW of COSs are important factors affecting renin-inhibitory activity. PMID:18313296

  9. FOXO3a reactivation mediates the synergistic cytotoxic effects of rapamycin and cisplatin in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Liang; Wang Huiming; Zhou Lin; Yu Da

    2011-02-15

    FOXO3a, a well-known transcriptional regulator, controls a wide spectrum of biological processes. The Phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway inactivates FOXO3a via phosphorylation-induced nuclear exclusion and degradation. A loss or gain of FOXO3a activity has been correlated with efficiency of chemotherapies in various cancers including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Therefore, in the current study, we have investigated the FOXO3a activity modulating and antitumor effects of rapamycin and cisplatin in OSCC cells. Cisplatin inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent way in OSCC Tca8113 cells. Rapamycin alone had no effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis. Rapamycin downregulated the expression of S-phase kinase associated protein-2 (Skp2) and increased the FOXO3a protein stability but induced the upregulation of feedback Akt activation-mediated FOXO3a phosphorylation. Cisplatin decreased the phosphorylation of FOXO3a via Akt inhibition. Rapamycin combined with cisplatin as its feedback Akt activation inhibitor revealed the most dramatic FOXO3a nuclear localization and reactivation with the prevention of its feedback loop and exposed significant synergistic effects of decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in vitro and decreased tumor size in vivo. Furthermore, the downstream effects of FOXO3a reactivation were found to be accumulation of p27 and Bim. In conclusion, rapamycin/cisplatin combination therapy boosts synergistic antitumor effects through the significant FOXO3a reactivation in OSCC cells. These results may represent a novel mechanism by which rapamycin/cisplatin combination therapy proves to be a potent molecular-targeted strategy for OSCC.

  10. Effect of rapamycin on hepatic osteodystrophy in rats with portasystemic shunting

    PubMed Central

    van der Merwe, Schalk W; Conradie, Maria M; Bond, Robert; Olivier, Brenda J; Fritz, Elongo; Nieuwoudt, Martin; Delport, Rhena; Slavik, Tomas; Engelbrecht, Gert; Kahn, Del; Shephard, Enid G; Kotze, Maritha J; de Villiers, Nico P; Hough, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study if T-cell activation related to portasystemic shunting causes osteoclast-mediated bone loss through RANKL-dependent pathways. We also investigated if T-cell inhibition using rapamycin would protect against bone loss in rats. METHODS: Portasystemic shunting was performed in male Sprague-Dawley rats and rapamycin 0.1 mg/kg was administered for 15 wk by gavage. Rats received powderized chow and supplemental feeds to prevent the effects of malnutrition on bone composition. Weight gain and growth was restored after surgery in shunted animals. At termination, biochemical parameters of bone turnover and quantitative bone histology were assessed. Markers of T-cell activation, inflammatory cytokine production, and RANKL-dependent pathways were measured. In addition, the roles of IGF-1 and hypogonadism were investigated. RESULTS: Portasystemic shunting caused low turnover osteoporosis that was RANKL independent. Bone resorbing cytokine levels, including IL-1, IL-6 and TNFα, were not increased in serum and TNFα and RANKL expression were not upregulated in PBMC. Portasystemic shunting increased the circulating CD8+ T-cell population. Rapamycin decreased the circulating CD8+ T-cell population, increased CD8+ CD25+ T-regulatory cell population and improved all parameters of bone turnover. CONCLUSION: Osteoporosis caused by portasystemic shunting may be partially ameliorated by rapamycin in the rat model of hepatic osteodystrophy. PMID:16874862

  11. Ciclopirox olamine inhibits mTORC1 signaling by activation of AMPK.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongyu; Shang, Chaowei; Wang, Min; Shen, Tao; Kong, Lingmei; Yu, Chunlei; Ye, Zhennan; Luo, Yan; Liu, Lei; Li, Yan; Huang, Shile

    2016-09-15

    Ciclopirox olamine (CPX), an off-patent antifungal agent, has recently been identified as a potential anticancer agent. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central controller of cell growth, proliferation and survival. Little is known about whether and how CPX executes its anticancer action by inhibiting mTOR. Here we show that CPX inhibited the phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), two downstream effector molecules of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), in a spectrum of human tumor cells, indicating that CPX inhibits mTORC1 signaling. Using rhabdomyosarcoma cells as an experimental model, we found that expression of constitutively active mTOR (E2419K) conferred resistance to CPX inhibition of cell proliferation, suggesting that CPX inhibition of mTORC1 contributed to its anticancer effect. In line with this, treatment with CPX inhibited tumor growth and concurrently suppressed mTORC1 signaling in RD xenografts. Mechanistically, CPX inhibition of mTORC1 was neither via inhibition of IGF-I receptor or phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), nor by activation of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). Instead, CPX inhibition of mTORC1 was attributed to activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-tuberous sclerosis complexes (TSC)/raptor pathways. This is supported by the findings that CPX activated AMPK; inhibition of AMPK with Compound C or ectopic expression of dominant negative AMPKα partially prevented CPX from inhibiting mTORC1; silencing TSC2 attenuated CPX inhibition of mTORC1; and CPX also increased AMPK-mediated phosphorylation of raptor (S792). Therefore, the results indicate that CPX exerts the anticancer effect by activating AMPK, resulting in inhibition of mTORC1 signaling. PMID:27396756

  12. Downregulation of p70S6K Enhances Cell Sensitivity to Rapamycin in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhaoming; Peng, Kezheng; Wang, Ning; Liu, Hong-Min; Hou, Guiqin

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that mTOR/p70S6K pathway was abnormally activated in many cancers and rapamycin and its analogs can restrain tumor growth through inhibiting this pathway, but some tumors including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) appear to be insensitive to rapamycin in recent studies. In the present study, we explored the measures to improve the sensitivity of ESCC cells to rapamycin and identified the clinical significance of the expression of phosphorylated p70S6K (p-p70S6K). The results showed that, after downregulating the expression of p70S6K and p-p70S6K by p70S6K siRNA, the inhibitory effects of rapamycin on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and tumor growth were significantly enhanced in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, p-p70S6K had strong positive expression in ESCC tissues and its expression was closely related to lymph node metastasis and the TNM staging. These results indicated that p-p70S6K may participate in the invasion and metastasis in the development of ESCC and downregulation of the expression of p-p70S6K could improve the sensitivity of cells to rapamycin in ESCC. PMID:27595116

  13. Downregulation of p70S6K Enhances Cell Sensitivity to Rapamycin in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhaoming; Peng, Kezheng; Wang, Ning; Liu, Hong-Min

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that mTOR/p70S6K pathway was abnormally activated in many cancers and rapamycin and its analogs can restrain tumor growth through inhibiting this pathway, but some tumors including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) appear to be insensitive to rapamycin in recent studies. In the present study, we explored the measures to improve the sensitivity of ESCC cells to rapamycin and identified the clinical significance of the expression of phosphorylated p70S6K (p-p70S6K). The results showed that, after downregulating the expression of p70S6K and p-p70S6K by p70S6K siRNA, the inhibitory effects of rapamycin on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and tumor growth were significantly enhanced in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, p-p70S6K had strong positive expression in ESCC tissues and its expression was closely related to lymph node metastasis and the TNM staging. These results indicated that p-p70S6K may participate in the invasion and metastasis in the development of ESCC and downregulation of the expression of p-p70S6K could improve the sensitivity of cells to rapamycin in ESCC. PMID:27595116

  14. mTOR inhibition decreases SOX2-SOX9 mediated glioma stem cell activity and temozolomide resistance

    PubMed Central

    Garros-Regulez, Laura; Aldaz, Paula; Arrizabalaga, Olatz; Moncho-Amor, Veronica; Carrasco-Garcia, Estefania; Manterola, Lorea; Moreno-Cugnon, Leire; Barrena, Cristina; Villanua, Jorge; Ruiz, Irune; Pollard, Steven; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Sampron, Nicolas; Garcia, Idoia; Matheu, Ander

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: SOX2 and SOX9 are commonly overexpressed in glioblastoma, and regulate the activity of glioma stem cells (GSCs). Their specific and overlapping roles in GSCs and glioma treatment remain unclear. Methods: SOX2 and SOX9 levels were examined in human biopsies. Gain and loss of function determined the impact of altering SOX2 and SOX9 on cell proliferation, senescence, stem cell activity, tumorigenesis and chemoresistance. Results: SOX2 and SOX9 expression correlates positively in glioma cells and glioblastoma biopsies. High levels of SOX2 bypass cellular senescence and promote resistance to temozolomide. Mechanistic investigations revealed that SOX2 acts upstream of SOX9. mTOR genetic and pharmacologic (rapamycin) inhibition decreased SOX2 and SOX9 expression, and reversed chemoresistance. Conclusions: Our findings reveal SOX2-SOX9 as an oncogenic axis that regulates stem cell properties and chemoresistance. We identify that rapamycin abrogate SOX protein expression and provide evidence that a combination of rapamycin and temozolomide inhibits tumor growth in cells with high SOX2/SOX9. PMID:26878385

  15. Transcriptome Profiling of CTLs Regulated by Rapamycin Using RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Elliot; Xu, Lingyang; Li, Lei; Liu, George E.; Xiao, Zhengguo

    2014-01-01

    Memory programming of CTLs by inflammatory cytokines can be regulated by mTOR. We have shown that inhibition of mTOR during CTL activation leads to the enhancement of memory, but the molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Using high-throughput RNA-Seq, we identified genes and functions in mouse CTLs affected by mTOR inhibition through rapamycin. Of the 43,221 identified transcripts, 184 transcripts were differentially expressed after rapamycin treatment, corresponding to 128 annotated genes. Of these genes, 114 were downregulated and only 14 were upregulated. Most importantly, 50 of them are directly related to cell death and survival. In addition, several genes such as CD62L are related to migration. Furthermore, we predicted downregulation of transcriptional regulators based on the total differentially expressed genes, as well as the subset of apoptosis related genes. Quantitative PCR confirmed the differential expressions detected in RNA-Seq. We conclude that the regulatory function of rapamycin may work through inhibition of multiple genes related to apoptosis and migration, which enhance CTL survival into memory. PMID:25113844

  16. Combinatorial Effects of Lapatinib and Rapamycin in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tongrui; Yacoub, Rami; Taliaferro-Smith, LaTonia D.; Sun, Shi-Yong; Graham, Tisheeka R.; Dolan, Ryan; Lobo, Christine; Tighiouart, Mourad; Yang, Lily; Adams, Amy; O'Regan, Ruth M.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers, which lack estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2/neu overexpression, account for approximately 15% of breast cancers, but occur more commonly in African Americans. The poor survival outcomes seen with triple-negative breast cancers patients are, in part, due to a lack of therapeutic targets. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in 50% of triple-negative breast cancers, but EGFR inhibitors have not been effective in patients with metastatic breast cancers. However, mTOR inhibition has been shown to reverse resistance to EGFR inhibitors. We examined the combination effects of mTOR inhibition with EGFR inhibition in triple-negative breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. The combination of EGFR inhibition by using lapatinib and mTOR inhibition with rapamycin resulted in significantly greater cytotoxicity than the single agents alone and these effects were synergistic in vitro. The combination of rapamycin and lapatinib significantly decreased growth of triple-negative breast cancers in vivo compared with either agent alone. EGFR inhibition abrogated the expression of rapamycin-induced activated Akt in triple-negative breast cancer cells in vitro. The combination of EGFR and mTOR inhibition resulted in increased apoptosis in some, but not all, triple-negative cell lines, and these apoptotic effects correlated with a decrease in activated eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF4E). These results suggest that mTOR inhibitors could sensitize a subset of triple-negative breast cancers to EGFR inhibitors. Given the paucity of effective targeted agents in triple-negative breast cancers, these results warrant further evaluation. PMID:21690228

  17. Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin contributes to pain nociception induced in rats by BmK I, a sodium channel-specific modulator.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Hua, Li-Ming; Jiao, Yun-Lu; Ye, Pin; Fu, Jin; Cheng, Zhi-Jun; Ding, Gang; Ji, Yong-Hua

    2014-02-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is essential for maintenance of the sensitivity of certain adult sensory neurons. Here, we investigated whether the mTOR cascade is involved in scorpion envenomation-induced pain hypersensitivity in rats. The results showed that intraplantar injection of a neurotoxin from Buthus martensii Karsch, BmK I (10 μg), induced the activation of mTOR, as well as its downstream molecules p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase (p70 S6K) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), in lumbar 5-6 dorsal root ganglia neurons on both sides in rats. The activation peaked at 2 h and recovered 1 day after injection. Compared with the control group, the ratios of p-mTOR/p-p70 S6K/p-4EBP1 in three types of neurons changed significantly. The cell typology of p-mTOR/p-p70 S6K/p-4E-BP1 immuno-reactive neurons also changed. Intrathecal administration of deforolimus, a specific inhibitor of mTOR, attenuated BmK I-induced pain responses (spontaneous flinching, paroxysmal pain-like behavior, and mechanical hypersensitivity). Together, these results imply that the mTOR signaling pathway is mobilized by and contributes to experimental scorpion sting-induced pain. PMID:24132796

  18. A combination therapy for KRAS-driven lung adenocarcinomas using lipophilic bisphosphonates and rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yifeng; Liu, Yi-Liang; Xie, Yonghua; Zhu, Wei; Guerra, Francisco; Shen, Shen; Yeddula, Narayana; Fischer, Wolfgang; Low, William; Zhou, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yonghui; Oldfield, Eric; Verma, Inder M.

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common human malignancy and leads to about one-third of all cancer-related deaths. Lung adenocarcinomas harboring KRAS mutations, in contrast to those with EGFR and EML4-ALK mutations, have not yet been successfully targeted. Here, we describe a combination therapy for treating these malignancies using two agents: a lipophilic bisphosphonate and rapamycin. This drug combination is much more effective than either agent acting alone in the KRAS G12D induced mouse lung model. Lipophilic bisphosphonates inhibit both farnesyl and geranylgeranyldiphosphate synthases, effectively blocking prenylation of the KRAS and other small G-proteins critical for tumor growth and cell survival. Bisphosphonate treatment of cells initiated autophagy but was ultimately unsuccessful and led to p62 accumulation and concomitant NF-κB activation, resulting in dampened efficacy in vivo. However, we found that rapamycin, in addition to inhibiting the mTOR pathway, facilitated autophagy and prevented p62 accumulation-induced NF-κB activation and tumor cell proliferation. Overall, these results suggest that using lipophilic bisphosphonates in combination with rapamycin may provide an effective strategy for targeting lung adenocarcinomas harboring KRAS mutations. PMID:25411474

  19. p21WAF1/CIP1 Expression is Differentially Regulated by Metformin and Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Zoltan; Millward, Ann B.; Tse, Wai; Demaine, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway plays an important role in the development of diabetic nephropathy and other age-related diseases. One of the features of DN is the elevated expression of p21WAF1/CIP1. However, the importance of the mTOR signalling pathway in p21 regulation is poorly understood. Here we investigated the effect of metformin and rapamycin on mTOR-related phenotypes in cell lines of epithelial origin. This study reports that metformin inhibits high glucose-induced p21 expression. High glucose opposed metformin in regulating cell size, proliferation, and protein synthesis. These effects were associated with reduced AMPK activation, affecting downstream mTOR signalling. However, the inhibition of the mTOR pathway by rapamycin did not have a negative effect on p21 expression, suggesting that metformin regulates p21 upstream of mTOR. These findings provide support for the hypothesis that AMPK activation may regulate p21 expression, which may have implications for diabetic nephropathy and other age-related pathologies. PMID:26464852

  20. The role of diacylglycerol kinase ζ and phosphatidic acid in the mechanical activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    You, Jae-Sung; Lincoln, Hannah C; Kim, Chan-Ran; Frey, John W; Goodman, Craig A; Zhong, Xiao-Ping; Hornberger, Troy A

    2014-01-17

    The activation of mTOR signaling is essential for mechanically induced changes in skeletal muscle mass, and previous studies have suggested that mechanical stimuli activate mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling through a phospholipase D (PLD)-dependent increase in the concentration of phosphatidic acid (PA). Consistent with this conclusion, we obtained evidence which further suggests that mechanical stimuli utilize PA as a direct upstream activator of mTOR signaling. Unexpectedly though, we found that the activation of PLD is not necessary for the mechanically induced increases in PA or mTOR signaling. Motivated by this observation, we performed experiments that were aimed at identifying the enzyme(s) that promotes the increase in PA. These experiments revealed that mechanical stimulation increases the concentration of diacylglycerol (DAG) and the activity of DAG kinases (DGKs) in membranous structures. Furthermore, using knock-out mice, we determined that the ζ isoform of DGK (DGKζ) is necessary for the mechanically induced increase in PA. We also determined that DGKζ significantly contributes to the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling, and this is likely driven by an enhanced binding of PA to mTOR. Last, we found that the overexpression of DGKζ is sufficient to induce muscle fiber hypertrophy through an mTOR-dependent mechanism, and this event requires DGKζ kinase activity (i.e. the synthesis of PA). Combined, these results indicate that DGKζ, but not PLD, plays an important role in mechanically induced increases in PA and mTOR signaling. Furthermore, this study suggests that DGKζ could be a fundamental component of the mechanism(s) through which mechanical stimuli regulate skeletal muscle mass. PMID:24302719

  1. Rapamycin Treatment of Healthy Pigs Subjected to Acute Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Attenuates Cardiac Functions and Increases Myocardial Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lassaletta, Antonio D; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y; Zanetti, Arthus V D; Feng, Jun; Anduaga, Javier; Gohh, Reginald Y.; Sellke, Frank W; Bianchi, Cesario

    2013-01-01

    Background The Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a major regulator of cell immunity and metabolism. mTOR is a well-known suppressor of tissue rejection in organ transplants, however, it has other non-immune functions including in the cardiovascular system, where it is a regulator of heart hypertrophy and locally, in coated vascular stents, inhibits vascular wall cell growth and hence neointimal formation/restenosis. Because the mTOR pathway plays major roles in normal cell growth, metabolism and survival, we hypothesized that inhibiting it with rapamycin, prior to an acute myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), would confer cardioprotection by virtue of slowing down cardiac function and metabolism. Methods Yorkshire pigs received orally either placebo or 4 mg/day rapamycin for 7 days before the IRI. All animals underwent median sternotomy and the mid-left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded for 60 min followed by 120 min of reperfusion. Left ventricular pressure-volume data was collected throughout the operation. The ischemic and infarcted areas were determined by monastral blue and triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining, respectively and plasma cardiac troponin I concentration. mTOR kinase activities were monitored in remote cardiac tissue by western blotting with specific antibodies against specific substrates phosphorylating sites. Results Rapamycin pre-treatement impaired endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation, attenuated cardiac function during IRI, and increased myocardial necrosis. Western blotting confirmed effective inhibition of myocardial mTOR kinase activities. Conclusions Pre-treatment of healthy pigs with rapamycin prior to acute myocardial IRI is associated with decreased cardiac function and higher myocardial necrosis. PMID:24266948

  2. Tetra-O-Methyl Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Broadly Suppresses Cancer Metabolism and Synergistically Induces Strong Anticancer Activity in Combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin and UCN-01

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Kotohiko; Huang, Ru Chih C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Tetra-O-methyl nordihydroguaiaretic acid (M4N) to induce rapid cell death in combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin, or UCN-01 was examined in LNCaP cells, both in cell culture and animal experiments. Mice treated with M4N drug combinations with either Etoposide or Rapamycin showed no evidence of tumor and had a 100% survival rate 100 days after tumor implantation. By comparison all other vehicles or single drug treated mice failed to survive longer than 30 days after implantation. This synergistic improvement of anticancer effect was also confirmed in more than 20 cancer cell lines. In LNCaP cells, M4N was found to reduce cellular ATP content, and suppress NDUFS1 expression while inducing hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. M4N-treated cells lacked autophagy with reduced expression of BNIP3 and ATG5. To understand the mechanisms of this anticancer activity of M4N, the effect of this drug on three cancer cell lines (LNCaP, AsPC-1, and L428 cells) was further examined via transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. Metabolomic results showed that there were reductions of 26 metabolites essential for energy generation and/or production of cellular components in common with these three cell lines following 8 hours of M4N treatment. Deep RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that there were sixteen genes whose expressions were found to be modulated following 6 hours of M4N treatment similarly in these three cell lines. Six out of these 16 genes were functionally related to the 26 metabolites described above. One of these up-regulated genes encodes for CHAC1, a key enzyme affecting the stress pathways through its degradation of glutathione. In fact M4N was found to suppress glutathione content and induce reactive oxygen species production. The data overall indicate that M4N has profound specific negative impacts on a wide range of cancer metabolisms supporting the use of M4N combination for cancer treatments. PMID:26886430

  3. Tetra-O-Methyl Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Broadly Suppresses Cancer Metabolism and Synergistically Induces Strong Anticancer Activity in Combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin and UCN-01.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kotohiko; Huang, Ru Chih C

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Tetra-O-methyl nordihydroguaiaretic acid (M4N) to induce rapid cell death in combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin, or UCN-01 was examined in LNCaP cells, both in cell culture and animal experiments. Mice treated with M4N drug combinations with either Etoposide or Rapamycin showed no evidence of tumor and had a 100% survival rate 100 days after tumor implantation. By comparison all other vehicles or single drug treated mice failed to survive longer than 30 days after implantation. This synergistic improvement of anticancer effect was also confirmed in more than 20 cancer cell lines. In LNCaP cells, M4N was found to reduce cellular ATP content, and suppress NDUFS1 expression while inducing hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. M4N-treated cells lacked autophagy with reduced expression of BNIP3 and ATG5. To understand the mechanisms of this anticancer activity of M4N, the effect of this drug on three cancer cell lines (LNCaP, AsPC-1, and L428 cells) was further examined via transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. Metabolomic results showed that there were reductions of 26 metabolites essential for energy generation and/or production of cellular components in common with these three cell lines following 8 hours of M4N treatment. Deep RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that there were sixteen genes whose expressions were found to be modulated following 6 hours of M4N treatment similarly in these three cell lines. Six out of these 16 genes were functionally related to the 26 metabolites described above. One of these up-regulated genes encodes for CHAC1, a key enzyme affecting the stress pathways through its degradation of glutathione. In fact M4N was found to suppress glutathione content and induce reactive oxygen species production. The data overall indicate that M4N has profound specific negative impacts on a wide range of cancer metabolisms supporting the use of M4N combination for cancer treatments. PMID:26886430

  4. Compound 13, an α1-selective small molecule activator of AMPK, potently inhibits melanoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xueqing; Jiang, Fangzhen; Bao, Qi; Qian, Huan; Fang, Quan; Shao, Zheren

    2016-01-01

    It is vital to develop new therapeutic agents for the treatment of melanoma. In the current study, we studied the potential effect of Compound 13 (C13), a novel α1-selective AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, in melanoma cells. We showed that C13 exerted mainly cytostatic, but not cytotoxic activities in melanoma cells. C13 potently inhibited proliferation in melanoma cell lines (A375, OCM-1 and B16), but not in B10BR melanocytes. Meanwhile, the AMPK activator inhibited melanoma cell cycle progression by inducing G1-S arrest. Significantly, we failed to detect significant melanoma cell death or apoptosis after the C13 treatment. For the mechanism study, we showed that C13 activated AMPK and inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling in melanoma cells through interaction with the α1 subunit. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of AMPKα1 not only blocked C13-mediated AMPK activation but also abolished its antiproliferative activity against melanoma cells. Together, these results show that C13 inhibits melanoma cell proliferation through activating AMPK signaling. Our data suggest that C13 along with other small molecular AMPK activators may be beneficial for patients with melanoma. PMID:26271666

  5. Pranlukast inhibits renal epithelial cyst progression via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Pathomthongtaweechai, Nutthapoom; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2014-02-01

    Cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLT1 receptor) antagonists were found to inhibit chloride secretion in human airway epithelial cells. Since chloride secretion in renal epithelial cells, which shares common mechanisms with airway epithelial cells, plays important roles in renal cyst progression in polycystic kidney disease (PKD), this study was aimed to investigate effects of drugs acting as CysLT1 receptor antagonists on renal cyst progression and its underlying mechanisms. Effects of CysLT1 receptor antagonists on renal cyst growth and formation were determined using Madine Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cyst models. Mechanisms of actions of CysLT1 receptor antagonists were determined using short-circuit current measurement, assays of cell viability and cell proliferation, and immunoblot analysis of signaling proteins. Of the three drugs acting as CysLT1 receptor antagonists (montelukast, pranlukast and zafirlukast) tested, pranlukast was the most promising drug that inhibited MDCK cyst growth and formation without affecting cell viability. Its effect was independent of the inhibition of CysLT1 receptors. Instead, it reduced cAMP-activated chloride secretion and proliferation of MDCK cells in an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent manner and had no effect on CFTR protein expression. Interestingly, pranlukast enhanced AMPK activation via calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase beta (CaMKKβ) with consequent activation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. These results indicate that pranlukast retards renal epithelial cyst progression by inhibiting cAMP-activated chloride secretion and cell proliferation via CaMKKβ-AMPK-mTOR pathway. Therefore, pranlukast represents a class of known drugs that may have potential utility in PKD treatment. PMID:24360935

  6. Delayed Correlation of mRNA and Protein Expression in Rapamycin-treated Cells and a Role for Ggc1 in Cellular Sensitivity to Rapamycin*

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Marjorie L.; Paulson, Ariel; Pavelka, Norman; Mosley, Amber L.; Gaudenz, Karin; Bradford, William D.; Glynn, Earl; Li, Hua; Sardiu, Mihaela E.; Fleharty, Brian; Seidel, Christopher; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    To identify new molecular targets of rapamycin, an anticancer and immunosuppressive drug, we analyzed temporal changes in yeast over 6 h in response to rapamycin at the transcriptome and proteome levels and integrated the expression patterns with functional profiling. We show that the integration of transcriptomics, proteomics, and functional data sets provides novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of rapamycin action. We first observed a temporal delay in the correlation of mRNA and protein expression where mRNA expression at 1 and 2 h correlated best with protein expression changes after 6 h of rapamycin treatment. This was especially the case for the inhibition of ribosome biogenesis and induction of heat shock and autophagy essential to promote the cellular sensitivity to rapamycin. However, increased levels of vacuolar protease could enhance resistance to rapamycin. Of the 85 proteins identified as statistically significantly changing in abundance, most of the proteins that decreased in abundance were correlated with a decrease in mRNA expression. However, of the 56 proteins increasing in abundance, 26 were not correlated with an increase in mRNA expression. These protein changes were correlated with unchanged or down-regulated mRNA expression. These proteins, involved in mitochondrial genome maintenance, endocytosis, or drug export, represent new candidates effecting rapamycin action whose expression might be post-transcriptionally or post-translationally regulated. We identified GGC1, a mitochondrial GTP/GDP carrier, as a new component of the rapamycin/target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway. We determined that the protein product of GGC1 was stabilized in the presence of rapamycin, and the deletion of the GGC1 enhanced growth fitness in the presence of rapamycin. A dynamic mRNA expression analysis of Δggc1 and wild-type cells treated with rapamycin revealed a key role for Ggc1p in the regulation of ribosome biogenesis and cell cycle progression

  7. Metabolic Effects of Acute Thiamine Depletion Are Reversed by Rapamycin in Breast and Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuqian; Miriyala, Sumitra; Keaton, Mignon A.; Jordan, Craig T.; Wiedl, Christina; Clair, Daret K. St.; Moscow, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Thiamine-dependent enzymes (TDEs) control metabolic pathways that are frequently altered in cancer and therefore present cancer-relevant targets. We have previously shown that the recombinant enzyme thiaminase cleaves and depletes intracellular thiamine, has growth inhibitory activity against leukemia and breast cancer cell lines, and that its growth inhibitory effects were reversed in leukemia cell lines by rapamycin. Now, we first show further evidence of thiaminase therapeutic potential by demonstrating its activity against breast and leukemia xenografts, and against a primary leukemia xenograft. We therefore further explored the metabolic effects of thiaminase in combination with rapamycin in leukemia and breast cell lines. Thiaminase decreased oxygen consumption rate and increased extracellular acidification rate, consistent with the inhibitory effect of acute thiamine depletion on the activity of the TDEs pyruvate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes; these effects were reversed by rapamycin. Metabolomic studies demonstrated intracellular thiamine depletion and the presence of the thiazole cleavage product in thiaminase-treated cells, providing validation of the experimental procedures. Accumulation of ribose and ribulose in both cell lines support the thiaminase-mediated suppression of the TDE transketolase. Interestingly, thiaminase suppression of another TDE, branched chain amino ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH), showed very different patterns in the two cell lines: in RS4 leukemia cells it led to an increase in BCKDH substrates, and in MCF-7 breast cancer cells it led to a decrease in BCKDH products. Immunoblot analyses showed corresponding differences in expression of BCKDH pathway enzymes, and partial protection of thiaminase growth inhibition by gabapentin indicated that BCKDH inhibition may be a mechanism of thiaminase-mediated toxicity. Surprisingly, most of thiaminase-mediated metabolomic effects were also reversed by rapamycin

  8. Alternative Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signal Activation in Sorafenib-resistant Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells Revealed by Array-based Pathway Profiling*

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Mari; Chen, Wei-Yu; Miyanaga, Akihiko; Nakamura, Yuka; Kawasaki, Kumiko; Sakuma, Tomohiro; Ono, Masaya; Chen, Chi-Long; Honda, Kazufumi; Yamada, Tesshi

    2014-01-01

    Sorafenib is a multi-kinase inhibitor that has been proven effective for the treatment of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, its precise mechanisms of action and resistance have not been well established. We have developed high-density fluorescence reverse-phase protein arrays and used them to determine the status of 180 phosphorylation sites of signaling molecules in the 120 pathways registered in the NCI-Nature curated database in 23 HCC cell lines. Among the 180 signaling nodes, we found that the level of ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylated at serine residue 235/236 (p-RPS6 S235/236) was most significantly correlated with the resistance of HCC cells to sorafenib. The high expression of p-RPS6 S235/236 was confirmed immunohistochemically in biopsy samples obtained from HCC patients who responded poorly to sorafenib. Sorafenib-resistant HCC cells showed constitutive activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, but whole-exon sequencing of kinase genes revealed no evident alteration in the pathway. p-RPS6 S235/236 is a potential biomarker that predicts unresponsiveness of HCC to sorafenib. The use of mTOR inhibitors may be considered for the treatment of such tumors. PMID:24643969

  9. A hexane fraction of guava Leaves (Psidium guajava L.) induces anticancer activity by suppressing AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin/ribosomal p70 S6 kinase in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Nae Hyung; Park, Kyung-Ran; Kim, Sung-Moo; Yun, Hyung-Mun; Nam, Dongwoo; Lee, Seok-Geun; Jang, Hyeung-Jin; Ahn, Kyoo Seok; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Shim, Bum Sang; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Mosaddik, Ashik; Cho, Somi K; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2012-03-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the anticancer effects of guava leaf extracts and its fractions. The chemical compositions of the active extracts were also determined. In the present study, we set out to determine whether the anticancer effects of guava leaves are linked with their ability to suppress constitutive AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/ribosomal p70 S6 kinase (S6K1) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation pathways in human prostate cancer cells. We found that guava leaf hexane fraction (GHF) was the most potent inducer of cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in PC-3 cells. The molecular mechanism or mechanisms of GHF apoptotic potential were correlated with the suppression of AKT/mTOR/S6K1 and MAPK signaling pathways. This effect of GHF correlated with down-regulation of various proteins that mediate cell proliferation, cell survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Analysis of GHF by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry tentatively identified 60 compounds, including β-eudesmol (11.98%), α-copaene (7.97%), phytol (7.95%), α-patchoulene (3.76%), β-caryophyllene oxide (CPO) (3.63%), caryophylla-3(15),7(14)-dien-6-ol (2.68%), (E)-methyl isoeugenol (1.90%), α-terpineol (1.76%), and octadecane (1.23%). Besides GHF, CPO, but not phytol, also inhibited the AKT/mTOR/S6K1 signaling pathway and induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. Overall, these findings suggest that guava leaves can interfere with multiple signaling cascades linked with tumorigenesis and provide a source of potential therapeutic compounds for both the prevention and treatment of cancer. PMID:22280146

  10. A Hexane Fraction of Guava Leaves (Psidium guajava L.) Induces Anticancer Activity by Suppressing AKT/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin/Ribosomal p70 S6 Kinase in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Nae Hyung; Park, Kyung-Ran; Kim, Sung-Moo; Yun, Hyung-Mun; Nam, Dongwoo; Lee, Seok-Geun; Jang, Hyeung-Jin; Ahn, Kyoo Seok; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Shim, Bum Sang; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Mosaddik, Ashik

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This study was carried out to evaluate the anticancer effects of guava leaf extracts and its fractions. The chemical compositions of the active extracts were also determined. In the present study, we set out to determine whether the anticancer effects of guava leaves are linked with their ability to suppress constitutive AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/ribosomal p70 S6 kinase (S6K1) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation pathways in human prostate cancer cells. We found that guava leaf hexane fraction (GHF) was the most potent inducer of cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in PC-3 cells. The molecular mechanism or mechanisms of GHF apoptotic potential were correlated with the suppression of AKT/mTOR/S6K1 and MAPK signaling pathways. This effect of GHF correlated with down-regulation of various proteins that mediate cell proliferation, cell survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Analysis of GHF by gas chromatography and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry tentatively identified 60 compounds, including β-eudesmol (11.98%), α-copaene (7.97%), phytol (7.95%), α-patchoulene (3.76%), β-caryophyllene oxide (CPO) (3.63%), caryophylla-3(15),7(14)-dien-6-ol (2.68%), (E)-methyl isoeugenol (1.90%), α-terpineol (1.76%), and octadecane (1.23%). Besides GHF, CPO, but not phytol, also inhibited the AKT/mTOR/S6K1 signaling pathway and induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. Overall, these findings suggest that guava leaves can interfere with multiple signaling cascades linked with tumorigenesis and provide a source of potential therapeutic compounds for both the prevention and treatment of cancer. PMID:22280146

  11. Cardamonin Inhibits Metastasis of Lewis Lung Carcinoma Cells by Decreasing mTOR Activity

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Pei-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Xuan; Shi, Dao-Hua; Liu, Ying; Chen, Yao-Yao; Deng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates the motility and invasion of cancer cells. Cardamonin is a chalcone that exhibits anti-tumor activity. The previous study had proved that the anti-tumor effect of cardamonin was associated with mTOR inhibition. In the present study, the anti-metastatic effect of cardamonin and its underlying molecule mechanisms were investigated on the highly metastatic Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. The proliferation, invasion and migration of LLC cells were measured by MTT, transwell and wound healing assays, respectively. The expression and activation of mTOR- and adhesion-related proteins were assessed by Western blotting. The in vivo effect of cardamonin on the metastasis of the LLC cells was investigated by a mouse model. Treated with cardamonin, the proliferation, invasion and migration of LLC cells were significantly inhibited. The expression of Snail was decreased by cardamonin, while that of E-cadherin was increased. In addition, cardamonin inhibited the activation of mTOR and its downstream target ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1). Furthermore, the tumor growth and its lung metastasis were inhibited by cardamonin in C57BL/6 mice. It indicated that cardamonin inhibited the invasion and metastasis of LLC cells through inhibiting mTOR. The metastasis inhibitory effect of cardamonin was correlated with down-regulation of Snail and up-regulation of E-cadherin. PMID:25996501

  12. The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor-targeting antibody, CP-751,871, suppresses tumor-derived VEGF and synergizes with rapamycin in models of childhood sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Kurmasheva, Raushan T; Dudkin, Lorina; Billups, Catherine; Debelenko, Larisa V; Morton, Christopher L; Houghton, Peter J

    2009-10-01

    Signaling through the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) occurs in many human cancers, including childhood sarcomas. As a consequence, targeting the IGF-1R has become a focus for cancer drug development. We examined the antitumor activity of CP-751,871, a human antibody that blocks IGF-1R ligand binding, alone and in combination with rapamycin against sarcoma cell lines in vitro and xenograft models in vivo. In Ewing sarcoma (EWS) cell lines, CP751,871 inhibited growth poorly (<50%), but prevented rapamycin-induced hyperphosphorylation of AKT(Ser473) and induced greater than additive apoptosis. Rapamycin treatment also increased secretion of IGF-1 resulting in phosphorylation of IGF-1R (Tyr1131) that was blocked by CP751,871. In vivo CP-751,871, rapamycin, or the combination were evaluated against EWS, osteosarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma xenografts. CP751871 induced significant growth inhibition [EFS(T/C) >2] in four models. Rapamycin induced significant growth inhibition [EFS(T/C) >2] in nine models. Although neither agent given alone caused tumor regressions, in combination, these agents had greater than additive activity against 5 of 13 xenografts and induced complete remissions in one model each of rhabdomyosarcoma and EWS, and in three of four osteosarcoma models. CP751,871 caused complete IGF-1R down-regulation, suppression of AKT phosphorylation, and dramatically suppressed tumor-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in some sarcoma xenografts. Rapamycin treatment did not markedly suppress VEGF in tumors and synergized only in tumor lines where VEGF was dramatically inhibited by CP751,871. These data suggest a model in which blockade of IGF-1R suppresses tumor-derived VEGF to a level where rapamycin can effectively suppress the response in vascular endothelial cells. PMID:19789339

  13. Rapamycin reverses the senescent phenotype and improves immuno-regulation of mesenchymal stem cells from MRL/lpr mice and systemic lupus erythematosus patients through inhibition of the mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guijian; Meng, Yan; Da, Zhanyun; Guo, Genkai; Xia, Yunfei; Zhu, Xinhang; Shi, Guixiu; Cheng, Chun

    2016-01-01

    We have shown that bone marrow (BM)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) from SLE patients exhibit senescent behavior and are involved in the pathogenesis of SLE. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of rapamycin (RAPA) on the senescences and immunoregulatory ability of MSCs of MRL/lpr mice and SLE patients and the underlying mechanisms. Cell morphology, senescence associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining, F-actin staining were used to detect the senescence of cells. BM-MSCs and purified CD4+ T cells were co-cultured indirectly. Flow cytometry was used to inspect the proportion of regulatory T (Treg) /T helper type 17 (Th17). We used small interfering RNA (siRNA) to interfere the expression of mTOR, and detect the effects by RT-PCR, WB and immunofluorescence. Finally, 1×106 of SLE BM-MSCs treated with RAPA were transplanted to cure the 8 MRL/lpr mice aged 16 weeks for 12 weeks. We demonstrated that RAPA alleviated the clinical symptoms of lupus nephritis and prolonged survival in MRL/lpr mice. RAPA reversed the senescent phenotype and improved immunoregulation of MSCs from MRL/lpr mice and SLE patients through inhibition of the mTOR signaling pathway. Marked therapeutic effects were observed in MRL/lpr mice following transplantation of BM-MSCs from SLE patients pretreated with RAPA. PMID:27048648

  14. Natural killer group 2D and CD28 receptors differentially activate mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin to alter murine effector CD8+ T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Bryan; Trace, Kelsey; Whitman, Emily; Bedsworth, Taylor; Barber, Amorette

    2016-03-01

    Memory CD8+ T cells are an essential component of anti-tumour and anti-viral immunity. Activation of the mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been implicated in regulating the differentiation of effector and memory T cells. However, the mechanisms that control mTOR activity during immunity to tumours and infections are not well known. Activation of co-stimulatory receptors, including CD28 and natural killer group 2D (NKG2D), activate phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase and subsequently may activate the mTOR pathway in CD8+ T cells. This study compared the activation of the mTOR signalling pathway after co-stimulation through CD28 or NKG2D receptors in murine effector CD8+ T cells. Compared with CD28 co-stimulation, activation through CD3 and NKG2D receptors had weaker activation of mTORc1, as shown by decreased phosphorylation of mTORc1 targets S6K1, ribosomal protein S6 and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1. NKG2D co-stimulation also showed increased gene expression of tuberous sclerosis protein 2, a negative regulator of mTORc1, whereas CD28 co-stimulation increased gene expression of Ras homologue enriched in brain, an activator of mTORc1, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor-α, pro-angiogenic factors downstream of mTORc1. Strong mTORc1 activation in CD28-co-stimulated cells also increased expression of transcription factors that support effector cell differentiation, namely T-bet, B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein (BLIMP-1), interferon regulatory factor 4, and inhibitor of DNA binding 2, whereas low levels of mTORc1 activation allowed for the expression of Eomes, B-cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6), and inhibitor of DNA binding 3 during NKG2D stimulation, and increased expression of memory markers CD62 ligand and CD127. These data show that compared with CD28, co-stimulation through the NKG2D receptor leads to the differential activation of the mTOR signalling pathway and potentially supports

  15. Rapamycin protects against dominant negative-HNF1A-induced apoptosis in INS-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Farrelly, Angela M; Kilbride, Seán M; Bonner, Caroline; Prehn, Jochen H M; Byrne, Maria M

    2011-11-01

    HNF1A-maturity onset diabetes of the young (HNF1A-MODY) is caused by mutations in Hnf1a gene encoding the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 1alpha (HNF1A). An increased rate of apoptosis has been associated with the decrease in beta-cell mass that is a hallmark of HNF1A-MODY and other forms of diabetes. In a cellular model of HNF1A-MODY, we have recently shown that signalling through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is decreased by the overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of HNF1A (DN-HNF1A). mTOR is a protein kinase which has important roles in cell metabolism and growth, but also in cell survival, where it has been shown to be both protective and detrimental. Here, we show that pharmacological inhibition of mTOR activity with rapamycin protected INS-1 cells against DN-HNF1A-induced apoptosis. Rapamycin also prevented DN-HNF1A-induced activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an intracellular energy sensor which we have previously shown to mediate DN-HNF1A-induced apoptosis. Conversely, activation of mTOR with leucine potentiated DN-HNF1A-induced apoptosis. Gene silencing of raptor (regulatory associated protein of mTOR), a subunit of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), also conferred protection on INS-1 cells against DN-HNF1A-induced apoptosis, confirming that mTORC1 mediates the protective effect. The potential relevance of this effect with regards to the clinical use of rapamycin as an immunosuppressant in diabetics post-transplantation is discussed. PMID:21874357

  16. Rapamycin induces pluripotent genes associated with avoidance of replicative senescence

    PubMed Central

    Pospelova, Tatiana V; Bykova, Tatiana V; Zubova, Svetlana G; Katolikova, Natalia V; Yartzeva, Natalia M; Pospelov, Valery A

    2013-01-01

    Primary rodent cells undergo replicative senescence, independent from telomere shortening. We have recently shown that treatment with rapamycin during passages 3–7 suppressed replicative senescence in rat embryonic fibroblasts (REFs), which otherwise occurred by 10–14 passages. Here, we further investigated rapamycin-primed cells for an extended number of passages. Rapamycin-primed cells continued to proliferate without accumulation of senescent markers. Importantly, these cells retained the ability to undergo serum starvation- and etoposide-induced cell cycle arrest. The p53/p21 pathway was functional. This indicates that rapamycin did not cause either transformation or loss of cell cycle checkpoints. We found that rapamycin activated transcription of pluripotent genes, oct-4, sox-2, nanog, as well as further upregulated telomerase (tert) gene. The rapamycin-derived cells have mostly non-rearranged, near-normal karyotype. Still, when cultivated for a higher number of passages, these cells acquired a chromosomal marker within the chromosome 3. We conclude that suppression mTORC1 activity may prevent replicative senescence without transformation of rodent cells. PMID:24296616

  17. Follicle-stimulating Hormone Activation of Hypoxia-inducible Factor-1 by the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/AKT/Ras Homolog Enriched in Brain (Rheb)/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Pathway Is Necessary for Induction of Select Protein Markers of Follicular Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Hena; Maizels, Evelyn T.; Park, Youngkyu; Ghaey, Shail; Feiger, Zachary J.; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary

    2006-01-01

    We sought to elucidate the role of AKT in follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-mediated granulosa cell (GC) differentiation. Our results define a signaling pathway in GCs whereby the inactivating phosphorylation of tuberin downstream of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase/AKT activity leads to Rheb (Ras homolog enriched in brain) and subsequent mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) activation. mTOR then stimulates translation by phosphorylating p70 S6 kinase and, consequently, the 40 S ribosomal protein S6. Activation of this pathway is required for FSH-mediated induction of several follicular differentiation markers, including luteinizing-hormone receptor (LHR), inhibin-α, microtubule-associated protein 2D, and the PKA type IIβ regulatory subunit. FSH also promotes activation of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). FSH-stimulated HIF-1 activity is inhibited by the PI 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002, the Rheb inhibitor FTI-277 (farne-syltransferase inhibitor-277), and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Finally, we find that the FSH-mediated up-regulation of reporter activities for LHR, inhibin-α, and vascular endothelial growth factor is dependent upon HIF-1 activity, because a dominant negative form of HIF-1α interferes with the up-regulation of these genes. These results show that FSH enhances HIF-1 activity downstream of the PI 3-kinase/AKT/Rheb/mTOR pathway in GCs and that HIF-1 activity is necessary for FSH to induce multiple follicular differentiation markers. PMID:14982927

  18. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Activity Dependent Phospho-Protein Expression in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

    PubMed Central

    Márk, Ágnes; Hajdu, Melinda; Kenessey, István; Sticz, Tamás; Nagy, Eszter; Barna, Gábor; Váradi, Zsófia; Kovács, Gábor; Kopper, László; Csóka, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Modern treatment strategies have improved the prognosis of childhood ALL; however, treatment still fails in 25–30% of patients. Further improvement of treatment may depend on the development of targeted therapies. mTOR kinase, a central mediator of several signaling pathways, has recently attracted remarkable attention as a potential target in pediatric ALL. However, limited data exists about the activity of mTOR. In the present study, the amount of mTOR activity dependent phospho-proteins was characterized by ELISA in human leukemia cell lines and in lymphoblasts from childhood ALL patients (n = 49). Expression was measured before and during chemotherapy and at relapses. Leukemia cell lines exhibited increased mTOR activity, indicated by phospho-S6 ribosomal protein (p-S6) and phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein (p-4EBP1). Elevated p-4EBP1 protein levels were detected in ALL samples at diagnosis; efficacy of chemotherapy was followed by the decrease of mTOR activity dependent protein phosphorylation. Optical density (OD) for p-4EBP1 (ELISA) was significantly higher in patients with poor prognosis at diagnosis, and in the samples of relapsed patients. Our results suggest that measuring mTOR activity related phospho-proteins such as p-4EBP1 by ELISA may help to identify patients with poor prognosis before treatment, and to detect early relapses. Determining mTOR activity in leukemic cells may also be a useful tool for selecting patients who may benefit from future mTOR inhibitor treatments. PMID:23573198

  19. Sann-Joong-Kuey-Jian-Tang induces autophagy in HepG2 cells via regulation of the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    CHUANG, WAN-LING; SU, CHIN-CHENG; LIN, PING-YI; LIN, CHI-CHEN; CHEN, YAO-LI

    2015-01-01

    Sann-Joong-Kuey-Jian-Tang (SJKJT), a traditional Chinese medicine, was previously reported to induce autophagy and inhibit the proliferation of the human HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cell line via an extrinsic pathway. In the present study, the effects of SJKJT-induced autophagy and the cytotoxic mechanisms mediating these effects were investigated in HepG2 cells. The cytotoxicity of SJKJT in the HepG2 cells was evaluated using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The results demonstrated that the half-maximal inhibitory concentration of SJKJT was 2.91 mg/ml at 24 h, 1.64 mg/ml at 48 h and 1.26 mg/ml at 72 h. The results of confocal fluorescence microscopy indicated that SJKJT resulted in the accumulation of green fluorescent protein-LC3 and vacuolation of the cytoplasm. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles. Furthermore, western blot analysis, used to determine the expression levels of autophagy-associated proteins, demonstrated that the HepG2 cells treated with SJKJT exhibited LC3B-I/LC3B-II conversion, increased expression levels of Beclin, Atg-3 and Atg-5 and reduced expression levels of p62 and decreased signaling of the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Taken together, these findings may assist in the development of novel chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of malignant types of liver cancer. PMID:25847489

  20. Activation of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin in the Rostral Ventromedial Medulla Contributes to the Maintenance of Nerve Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Feng, Da-Yun; Li, Zhi-Hua; Feng, Ban; Zhang, Han; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Tao; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a serine-threonine protein kinase, integrates extracellular signals, thereby modulating several physiological and pathological processes, including pain. Previous studies have suggested that rapamycin (an mTOR inhibitor) can attenuate nociceptive behaviors in many pain models, most likely at the spinal cord level. However, the mechanisms of mTOR at the supraspinal level, particularly at the level of the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM), remain unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to elucidate the role of mTOR in the RVM, a key relay region for the descending pain control pathway, under neuropathic pain conditions. Phosphorylated mTOR was mainly expressed in serotonergic spinally projecting neurons and was significantly increased in the RVM after spared nerve injury- (SNI-) induced neuropathic pain. Moreover, in SNI rat brain slices, rapamycin infusion both decreased the amplitude instead of the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents and reduced the numbers of action potentials in serotonergic neurons. Finally, intra-RVM microinjection of rapamycin effectively alleviated established mechanical allodynia but failed to affect the development of neuropathic pain. In conclusion, our data provide strong evidence for the role of mTOR in the RVM in nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain, indicating a novel mechanism of mTOR inhibitor-induced analgesia. PMID:26770837

  1. mTOR inhibition activates overall protein degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome system as well as by autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinghui; Zhai, Bo; Gygi, Steven P.; Goldberg, Alfred Lewis

    2015-01-01

    Growth factors and nutrients enhance protein synthesis and suppress overall protein degradation by activating the protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Conversely, nutrient or serum deprivation inhibits mTOR and stimulates protein breakdown by inducing autophagy, which provides the starved cells with amino acids for protein synthesis and energy production. However, it is unclear whether proteolysis by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), which catalyzes most protein degradation in mammalian cells, also increases when mTOR activity decreases. Here we show that inhibiting mTOR with rapamycin or Torin1 rapidly increases the degradation of long-lived cell proteins, but not short-lived ones, by stimulating proteolysis by proteasomes, in addition to autophagy. This enhanced proteasomal degradation required protein ubiquitination, and within 30 min after mTOR inhibition, the cellular content of K48-linked ubiquitinated proteins increased without any change in proteasome content or activity. This rapid increase in UPS-mediated proteolysis continued for many hours and resulted primarily from inhibition of mTORC1 (not mTORC2), but did not require new protein synthesis or key mTOR targets: S6Ks, 4E-BPs, or Ulks. These findings do not support the recent report that mTORC1 inhibition reduces proteolysis by suppressing proteasome expression [Zhang Y, et al. (2014) Nature 513(7518):440–443]. Several growth-related proteins were identified that were ubiquitinated and degraded more rapidly after mTOR inhibition, including HMG-CoA synthase, whose enhanced degradation probably limits cholesterol biosynthesis upon insulin deficiency. Thus, mTOR inhibition coordinately activates the UPS and autophagy, which provide essential amino acids and, together with the enhanced ubiquitination of anabolic proteins, help slow growth. PMID:26669439

  2. Rapamycin (Sirolimus) alters mechanistic target of rapamycin pathway regulation and microRNA expression in mouse meiotic spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, A; Koli, S; Reddy, K V R

    2015-09-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a signal transduction pathway that modulates translation initiation in several animals including mammals. Rapamaycin, an allosteric inhibitor of mTOR pathway, is often used as an immunosuppressive drug following kidney transplantation and causes gonadal dysfunction and defects in spermatogenesis. The molecular mechanism behind rapamycin-mediated testicular dysfunction is not known. We have therefore explored the contribution of rapamycin in mTOR regulation and microRNA (miRNA) expression in mouse spermatocytes, the intermediate stage of spermatogenesis, where meiosis takes place. In the present study, we optimized the isolation of highly pure and viable spermatocytes by flow sorting, treated them with rapamycin, and investigated the expression of mTOR and downstream effector molecules. Western blot and immunocytochemical analysis confirm that rapamycin treatment suppresses mTOR and phopsphorylated P70S6 kinase activities in spermatocytes, but not that of phosphorylated 4E-binding protein 1. Also, rapamycin treatment modulates the expression of several spermatocyte-specific miRNAs. To complement these finding an in vivo study was also performed. In silico prediction of target genes of these miRNAs and their functional pathway analysis revealed that, several of them are involved in crucial biological process, cellular process and catalytic activities. miRNA-transcription factor (TF) network analysis enlisted different TFs propelling the transcription machineries of these miRNAs. In silico prediction followed by quatitative real-time PCR revealed two of these TFs namely, PU.1 and CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) are down and upregulated, respectively, which may be the reason of the altered expression of miRNAs following rapamycin treatment. In conclusion, for the first time, the present study provides insight into how rapamycin regulates mTOR pathway and spermatocyte-specific miRNA expression which in turn, regulate expression of

  3. [mTOR, the mammalian target of rapamycin].

    PubMed

    Julien, Louis-André; Roux, Philippe P

    2010-12-01

    The discovery of rapamycin from a soil sample on Easter Island in the mid 60's marked the beginning of an exciting field of research in cell biology and medicine. While it was first used as an antifungal and as an immunosuppressive drug, more recent studies confirmed rapamycin's antiproliferative properties over a variety of solid tumors. Research aimed at identifying its mechanism of action uncovered mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin), a protein kinase that regulates mRNA translation and protein synthesis, an essential step in cell division and proliferation. Recent evidence suggests a more complex role for mTOR in the regulation of several growth factor-stimulated protein kinases, including the proto-oncogene Akt. This article reviews mTOR function and regulation, and briefly details the future challenges for anti-cancer therapies based on mTOR inhibition. PMID:21187044

  4. Leptin induces macrophage lipid body formation by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase- and mammalian target of rapamycin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M; Almeida, Patricia E; D'Avila, Heloisa; Martins, Aline S; Rezende, Ana Paula; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo; Bozza, Patricia T

    2008-01-25

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone/cytokine that links nutritional status with neuroendocrine and immune functions. Lipid bodies (lipid droplets) are emerging as dynamic organelles with roles in lipid metabolism and inflammation. Here we investigated the roles of leptin in signaling pathways involved in cytoplasmic lipid body biogenesis and leukotriene B(4) synthesis in macrophages. Our results demonstrated that leptin directly activated macrophages and induced the formation of adipose differentiation-related protein-enriched lipid bodies. Newly formed lipid bodies were sites of 5-lipoxygenase localization and correlated with an enhanced capacity of leukotriene B(4) production. We demonstrated that leptin-induced macrophage activation was dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, since the lipid body formation was inhibited by LY294002 and was absent in the PI3K knock-out mice. Leptin induces phosphorylation of p70(S6K) and 4EBP1 key downstream signaling intermediates of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in a rapamycin-sensitive mechanism. The mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, inhibited leptin-induced lipid body formation, both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, rapamycin inhibited leptin-induced adipose differentiation-related protein accumulation in macrophages and lipid body-dependent leukotriene synthesis, demonstrating a key role for mTOR in lipid body biogenesis and function. Our results establish PI3K/mTOR as an important signaling pathway for leptin-induced cytoplasmic lipid body biogenesis and adipose differentiation-related protein accumulation. Furthermore, we demonstrate a previously unrecognized link between intracellular (mTOR) and systemic (leptin) nutrient sensors in macrophage lipid metabolism. Leptin-induced increased formation of cytoplasmic lipid bodies and enhanced inflammatory mediator production in macrophages may have implications for obesity-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:18039669

  5. Comparative analysis of MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathway activation and inhibition in human and canine melanoma.

    PubMed

    Fowles, J S; Denton, C L; Gustafson, D L

    2015-09-01

    The lack of advanced animal models of human cancers is considered a barrier to developing effective therapeutics. Canine and human melanomas are histologically disparate but show similar disease progression and response to therapies. The purpose of these studies was to compare human and canine melanoma tumours and cell lines regarding MAPK and PI3K/AKT signalling dysregulation, and response to select molecularly targeted agents. Pathway activation was investigated via microarray and mutational analysis. Growth inhibition and cell cycle effects were assessed for pathway inhibitors AZD6244 (MAPK) and rapamycin (PI3K/AKT) in human and canine melanoma cells. Human and canine melanoma share similar differential gene expression patterns within the MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways. Constitutive pathway activation and similar sensitivity to AZD6244 and rapamycin was observed in human and canine cells. These results show that human and canine melanoma share activation and sensitivity to inhibition of cancer-related signalling pathways despite differences in activating mutations. PMID:23745794

  6. Beneficial metabolic effects of rapamycin are associated with enhanced regulatory cells in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Makki, Kassem; Taront, Solenne; Molendi-Coste, Olivier; Bouchaert, Emmanuel; Neve, Bernadette; Eury, Elodie; Lobbens, Stéphane; Labalette, Myriam; Duez, Hélène; Staels, Bart; Dombrowicz, David; Froguel, Philippe; Wolowczuk, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    The "mechanistic target of rapamycin" (mTOR) is a central controller of growth, proliferation and/or motility of various cell-types ranging from adipocytes to immune cells, thereby linking metabolism and immunity. mTOR signaling is overactivated in obesity, promoting inflammation and insulin resistance. Therefore, great interest exists in the development of mTOR inhibitors as therapeutic drugs for obesity or diabetes. However, despite a plethora of studies characterizing the metabolic consequences of mTOR inhibition in rodent models, its impact on immune changes associated with the obese condition has never been questioned so far. To address this, we used a mouse model of high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice with and without pharmacologic mTOR inhibition by rapamycin. Rapamycin was weekly administrated to HFD-fed C57BL/6 mice for 22 weeks. Metabolic effects were determined by glucose and insulin tolerance tests and by indirect calorimetry measures of energy expenditure. Inflammatory response and immune cell populations were characterized in blood, adipose tissue and liver. In parallel, the activities of both mTOR complexes (e. g. mTORC1 and mTORC2) were determined in adipose tissue, muscle and liver. We show that rapamycin-treated mice are leaner, have enhanced energy expenditure and are protected against insulin resistance. These beneficial metabolic effects of rapamycin were associated to significant changes of the inflammatory profiles of both adipose tissue and liver. Importantly, immune cells with regulatory functions such as regulatory T-cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) were increased in adipose tissue. These rapamycin-triggered metabolic and immune effects resulted from mTORC1 inhibition whilst mTORC2 activity was intact. Taken together, our results reinforce the notion that controlling immune regulatory cells in metabolic tissues is crucial to maintain a proper metabolic status and, more generally, comfort the need to search for novel

  7. Local delivery of rapamycin: a toxicity and efficacy study in an experimental malignant glioma model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Betty; Wadsworth, Scott; Recinos, Violette; Mehta, Vivek; Vellimana, Ananth; Li, Khan; Rosenblatt, Joel; Do, Hiep; Gallia, Gary L.; Siu, I-Mei; Wicks, Robert T.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Zhao, Ming; Brem, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Rapamycin, an anti-proliferative agent, is effective in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and recurrent breast cancers. We proposed that this potent mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor may be useful for the treatment of gliomas as well. We examined the cytotoxicity of rapamycin against a rodent glioma cell line, determined the toxicity of rapamycin when delivered intracranially, and investigated the efficacy of local delivery of rapamycin for the treatment of experimental malignant glioma in vivo. We also examined the dose-dependent efficacy of rapamycin and the effect when locally delivered rapamycin was combined with radiation therapy. Rapamycin was cytotoxic to 9L cells, causing 34% growth inhibition at a concentration of 0.01 µg/mL. No in vivo toxicity was observed when rapamycin was incorporated into biodegradable caprolactone-glycolide (35:65) polymer beads at 0.3%, 3%, and 30% loading doses and implanted intracranially. Three separate efficacy studies were performed to test the reproducibility of the effect of the rapamycin beads as well as the validity of this treatment approach. Animals treated with the highest dose of rapamycin beads tested (30%) consistently demonstrated significantly longer survival durations than the control and placebo groups. All dose-escalating rapamycin bead treatment groups (0.3%, 3% and 30%), treated both concurrently with tumor and in a delayed manner after tumor placement, experienced a significant increase in survival, compared with controls. Radiation therapy in addition to the simultaneous treatment with 30% rapamycin beads led to significantly longer survival duration than either therapy alone. These results suggest that the local delivery of rapamycin for the treatment of gliomas should be further investigated. PMID:21727209

  8. Adaptations to chronic rapamycin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dodds, Sherry G.; Livi, Carolina B.; Parihar, Manish; Hsu, Hang-Kai; Benavides, Adriana D.; Morris, Jay; Javors, Martin; Strong, Randy; Christy, Barbara; Hasty, Paul; Sharp, Zelton Dave

    2016-01-01

    Rapamycin inhibits mechanistic (or mammalian) target of rapamycin (mTOR) that promotes protein production in cells by facilitating ribosome biogenesis (RiBi) and eIF4E-mediated 5'cap mRNA translation. Chronic treatment with encapsulated rapamycin (eRapa) extended health and life span for wild-type and cancer-prone mice. Yet, the long-term consequences of chronic eRapa treatment are not known at the organ level. Here, we report our observations of chronic eRapa treatment on mTORC1 signaling and RiBi in mouse colon and visceral adipose. As expected, chronic eRapa treatment decreased detection of phosphorylated mTORC1/S6K substrate, ribosomal protein (rpS6) in colon and fat. However, in colon, contrary to expectations, there was an upregulation of 18S rRNA and some ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) suggesting increased RiBi. Among RPGs, eRapa increases rpl22l1 mRNA but not its paralog rpl22. Furthermore, there was an increase in the cap-binding protein, eIF4E relative to its repressor 4E-BP1 suggesting increased translation. By comparison, in fat, there was a decrease in the level of 18S rRNA (opposite to colon), while overall mRNAs encoding ribosomal protein genes appeared to increase, including rpl22, but not rpl22l1 (opposite to colon). In fat, there was a decrease in eIF4E relative to actin (opposite to colon) but also an increase in the eIF4E/4E-BP1 ratio likely due to reductions in 4E-BP1 at our lower eRapa dose (similar to colon). Thus, in contrast to predictions of decreased protein production seen in cell-based studies, we provide evidence that colon from chronically treated mice exhibited an adaptive ‘pseudo-anabolic’ state, which is only partially present in fat, which might relate to differing tissue levels of rapamycin, cell-type-specific responses, and/or strain differences. PMID:27237224

  9. Serendipity in splendid isolation: rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Rao, V Koneti

    2016-01-01

    In this issue of Blood, Bride et al report results of the first prospective multi-institutional trial of a long-term single-agent therapy for refractory cytopenias using rapamycin in 30 patients and show remarkable efficacy in children with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). PMID:26744433

  10. Activin inhibits telomerase activity in cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Katik, Indzi; Mackenzie-Kludas, Charley; Nicholls, Craig; Jiang, Fang-Xu; Zhou, Shufeng; Li, He; Liu, Jun-Ping

    2009-11-27

    Activin is a pleiotropic cytokine with broad tissue distributions. Recent studies demonstrate that activin-A inhibits cancer cell proliferation with unknown mechanisms. In this report, we demonstrate that recombinant activin-A induces telomerase inhibition in cancer cells. In breast and cervical cancer cells, activin-A resulted in telomerase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Significant inhibition was observed at 10 ng/ml of activin-A, with a near complete inhibition at 80 ng/ml. Consistently, activin-A induced repression of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene, with the hTERT gene to be suppressed by 60-80% within 24 h. In addition, activin-A induced a concomitant increase in Smad3 signaling and decrease of the hTERT gene promoter activity in a concentration-dependent fashion. These data suggest that activin-A triggered telomerase inhibition by down-regulating hTERT gene expression is involved in activin-A-induced inhibition of cancer cell proliferation.

  11. Intermittent Administration of Rapamycin Extends the Life Span of Female C57BL/6J Mice.

    PubMed

    Arriola Apelo, Sebastian I; Pumper, Cassidy P; Baar, Emma L; Cummings, Nicole E; Lamming, Dudley W

    2016-07-01

    Inhibition of the mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) signaling pathway by the FDA-approved drug rapamycin promotes life span in numerous model organisms and delays age-related disease in mice. However, the utilization of rapamycin as a therapy for age-related diseases will likely prove challenging due to the serious metabolic and immunological side effects of rapamycin in humans. We recently identified an intermittent rapamycin treatment regimen-2mg/kg administered every 5 days-with a reduced impact on glucose homeostasis and the immune system as compared with chronic treatment; however, the ability of this regimen to extend life span has not been determined. Here, we report for the first time that an intermittent rapamycin treatment regimen starting as late as 20 months of age can extend the life span of female C57BL/6J mice. Our work demonstrates that the anti-aging potential of rapamycin is separable from many of its negative side effects and suggests that carefully designed dosing regimens may permit the safer use of rapamycin and its analogs for the treatment of age-related diseases in humans. PMID:27091134

  12. Rapamycin Normalizes Serum Leptin by Alleviating Obesity and Reducing Leptin Synthesis in Aged Rats.

    PubMed

    Scarpace, Philip J; Matheny, Michael; Strehler, Kevin Y E; Toklu, Hale Zerrin; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Carter, Christy S; Morgan, Drake; Tümer, Nihal

    2016-07-01

    This investigation examines whether a low intermittent dose of rapamycin will avoid the hyperlipidemia and diabetes-like syndrome associated with rapamycin while still decreasing body weight and adiposity in aged obese rats. Furthermore, we examined if the rapamycin-mediated decrease in serum leptin was a reflection of decreased adiposity, diminished leptin synthesis, or both. To these ends, rapamycin (1mg/kg) was administered three times a week to 3 and 24-month old rats. Body weight, food intake, body composition, mTORC1 signaling, markers of metabolism, as well as serum leptin levels and leptin synthesis in adipose tissue were examined and compared to that following a central infusion of rapamycin. Our data suggest that the dosing schedule of rapamycin acts on peripheral targets to inhibit mTORC1 signaling, preferentially reducing adiposity and sparing lean mass in an aged model of obesity resulting in favorable outcomes on blood triglycerides, increasing lean/fat ratio, and normalizing elevated serum leptin with age. The initial mechanism underlying the rapamycin responses appears to have a peripheral action and not central. The peripheral rapamycin responses may communicate an excessive nutrients signal to the hypothalamus that triggers an anorexic response to reduce food consumption. This coupled with potential peripheral mechanism serves to decrease adiposity and synthesis of leptin. PMID:25617379

  13. Targeted therapy of colorectal neoplasia with rapamycin in peptide-labeled pegylated octadecyl lithocholate micelles.

    PubMed

    Khondee, Supang; Rabinsky, Emily F; Owens, Scott R; Joshi, Bishnu P; Qiu, Zhen; Duan, Xiyu; Zhao, Lili; Wang, Thomas D

    2015-02-10

    Many powerful drugs have limited clinical utility because of poor water solubility and high systemic toxicity. Here, we formulated a targeted nanomedicine, rapamycin encapsulated in pegylated octadecyl lithocholate micelles labeled with a new ligand for colorectal neoplasia, LTTHYKL peptide. CPC;Apc mice that spontaneously develop colonic adenomas were treated with free rapamycin, plain rapamycin micelles, and peptide-labeled rapamycin micelles via intraperitoneal injection for 35days. Endoscopy was performed to monitor adenoma regression in vivo. We observed complete adenoma regression at the end of therapy. The mean regression rate for peptide-labeled rapamycin micelles was significantly greater than that for plain rapamycin micelles, P<0.01. On immunohistochemistry, we observed a significant reduction in phospho-S6 but not β-catenin expression and reduced tumor cell proliferation, suggesting greater inhibition of downstream mTOR signaling. We observed significantly reduced renal toxicity for peptide-labeled rapamycin micelles compared to that of free drug, and no other toxicities were found on chemistries. Together, this unique targeted micelle represents a potential therapeutic for colorectal neoplasia with comparable therapeutic efficacy to rapamycin free drug and significantly less systemic toxicity. PMID:25483425

  14. Denervation atrophy is independent from Akt and mTOR activation and is not rescued by myostatin inhibition.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Elizabeth M; Andres-Mateos, Eva; Mejias, Rebeca; Simmers, Jessica L; Mi, Ruifa; Park, Jae-Sung; Ying, Stephanie; Hoke, Ahmet; Lee, Se-Jin; Cohn, Ronald D

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare two acquired muscle atrophies and the use of myostatin inhibition for their treatment. Myostatin naturally inhibits skeletal muscle growth by binding to ActRIIB, a receptor on the cell surface of myofibers. Because blocking myostatin in an adult wild-type mouse induces profound muscle hypertrophy, we applied a soluble ActRIIB receptor to models of disuse (limb immobilization) and denervation (sciatic nerve resection) atrophy. We found that treatment of immobilized mice with ActRIIB prevented the loss of muscle mass observed in placebo-treated mice. Our results suggest that this protection from disuse atrophy is regulated by serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinase (SGK) rather than by Akt. Denervation atrophy, however, was not protected by ActRIIB treatment, yet resulted in an upregulation of the pro-growth factors Akt, SGK and components of the mTOR pathway. We then treated the denervated mice with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and found that, despite a reduction in mTOR activation, there is no alteration of the atrophy phenotype. Additionally, rapamycin prevented the denervation-induced upregulation of the mTORC2 substrates Akt and SGK. Thus, our studies show that denervation atrophy is not only independent from Akt, SGK and mTOR activation but also has a different underlying pathophysiological mechanism than disuse atrophy. PMID:24504412

  15. Rapamycin Rescues the Poor Developmental Capacity of Aged Porcine Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Eun; Kim, Eun Young; Choi, Hyun Yong; Moon, Jeremiah Jiman; Park, Min Jee; Lee, Jun Beom; Jeong, Chang Jin; Park, Se Pill

    2014-01-01

    Unfertilized oocytes age inevitably after ovulation, which limits their fertilizable life span and embryonic development. Rapamycin affects mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) expression and cytoskeleton reorganization during oocyte meiotic maturation. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of rapamycin treatment on aged porcine oocytes and their in vitro development. Rapamycin treatment of aged oocytes for 24 h (68 h in vitro maturation [IVM]; 44 h+10 μM rapamycin/24 h, 47.52±5.68) or control oocytes (44 h IVM; 42.14±4.40) significantly increased the development rate and total cell number compared with untreated aged oocytes (68 h IVM, 22.04±5.68) (p<0.05). Rapamycin treatment of aged IVM oocytes for 24 h also rescued aberrant spindle organization and chromosomal misalignment, blocked the decrease in the level of phosphorylated-p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and increased the mRNA expression of cytoplasmic maturation factor genes (MOS, BMP15, GDF9, and CCNB1) compared with untreated, 24 h-aged IVM oocytes (p<0.05). Furthermore, rapamycin treatment of aged oocytes decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity and DNA fragmentation (p<0.05), and downregulated the mRNA expression of mTOR compared with control or untreated aged oocytes. By contrast, rapamycin treatment of aged oocytes increased mitochondrial localization (p<0.05) and upregulated the mRNA expression of autophagy (BECN1, ATG7, MAP1LC3B, ATG12, GABARAP, and GABARAPL1), anti-apoptosis (BCL2L1 and BIRC5; p<0.05), and development (NANOG and SOX2; p<0.05) genes, but it did not affect the mRNA expression of pro-apoptosis genes (FAS and CASP3) compared with the control. This study demonstrates that rapamycin treatment can rescue the poor developmental capacity of aged porcine oocytes. PMID:25049998

  16. Inhibition of CDK1 activity by sumoylation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuxuan; Lucas, Benjamin; Molcho, Elana; Schiff, Tania; Vigodner, Margarita

    2016-09-16

    Sumoylation (a covalent modification by Small Ubiquitin-like Modifiers or SUMO proteins) has been implicated in the regulation of various cellular events including cell cycle progression. We have recently identified CDK1, a master regulator of mitosis and meiosis, as a SUMO target both in vivo and in vitro, supporting growing evidence concerning a close cross talk between sumoylation and phosphorylation during cell cycle progression. However, any data regarding the effect of sumoylation upon CDK1 activity have been missing. In this study, we performed a series of in vitro experiments to inhibit sumoylation by three different means (ginkgolic acid, physiological levels of oxidative stress, and using an siRNA approach) and assessed the changes in CDK1 activity using specific antibodies and a kinase assay. We have also tested for an interaction between SUMO and active and/or inactive CDK1 isoforms in addition to having assessed the status of CDK1-interacting sumoylated proteins upon inhibition of sumoylation. Our data suggest that inhibition of sumoylation increases the activity of CDK1 probably through changes in sumoylated status and/or the ability of specific proteins to bind CDK1 and inhibit its activity. PMID:27520372

  17. Neurotrophic actions of nonimmunosuppressive analogues of immunosuppressive drugs FK506, rapamycin and cyclosporin A.

    PubMed

    Steiner, J P; Connolly, M A; Valentine, H L; Hamilton, G S; Dawson, T M; Hester, L; Snyder, S H

    1997-04-01

    We show that the nonimmunosuppressive analogues of the immunosuppressive drugs FK506, rapamycin and cyclosporin A promote neurite outgrowth both in PC12 cells and sensory neuronal cultures of dorsal root ganglia with potencies resembling their immunosuppressive homologues. Neurotrophic potencies of the immunophilin ligands resemble their potencies in binding to and inhibiting the rotamase activity of FKBP-12 of cyclophilin. Since nonimmunosuppressive immunophilin ligands, which are devoid of calcineurin inhibitory activity, are equally neurotrophic, inhibition of calcineurin activity is not the mediator of the neurotrophic effects. The immunophilin ligands are neurotrophic in intact animals. FK506 and L-685,818 (the C18-hydroxy, C21-ethyl derivative of FK506) treatment of rats with crushed sciatic nerves enhances both functional and morphologic recovery. The striking potency of these agents, their bioavailability and the dissociation of neurotrophic from immunosuppressant actions argue for their therapeutic relevance in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:9095176

  18. Hypoxia inhibits abdominal expiratory nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Fregosi, R F; Knuth, S L; Ward, D K; Bartlett, D

    1987-07-01

    Our purpose was to examine the influence of steady-state changes in chemical stimuli, as well as discrete peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation, on abdominal expiratory motor activity. In decerebrate, paralyzed, vagotomized, and ventilated cats that had bilateral pneumothoraces, we recorded efferent activity from a phrenic nerve and from an abdominal nerve (cranial iliohypogastric nerve, L1). All cats showed phasic expiratory abdominal nerve discharge at normocapnia [end-tidal PCO2 38 +/- 2 Torr], but small doses (2-6 mg/kg) of pentobarbital sodium markedly depressed this activity. Hyperoxic hypercapnia consistently enhanced abdominal expiratory activity and shortened the burst duration. Isocapnic hypoxia caused inhibition of abdominal nerve discharge in 11 of 13 cats. Carotid sinus nerve denervation (3 cats) exacerbated the hypoxic depression of abdominal nerve activity and depressed phrenic motor output. Stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors with NaCN increased abdominal nerve discharge in 7 of 10 cats, although 2 cats exhibited marked inhibition. Four cats with intact neuraxis, but anesthetized with ketamine, yielded qualitatively similar results. We conclude that when cats are subjected to steady-state chemical stimuli in isolation (no interference from proprioceptive inputs), hypercapnia potentiates, but hypoxia attenuates, abdominal expiratory nerve activity. Mechanisms to explain the selective inhibition of expiratory motor activity by hypoxia are proposed, and physiological implications are discussed. PMID:3624126

  19. Oncogenic mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) activate mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in mice and zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Valvezan, Alexander J.; Huang, Jian; Lengner, Christopher J.; Pack, Michael; Klein, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Truncating mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) are strongly linked to colorectal cancers. APC is a negative regulator of the Wnt pathway and constitutive Wnt activation mediated by enhanced Wnt–β-catenin target gene activation is believed to be the predominant mechanism responsible for APC mutant phenotypes. However, recent evidence suggests that additional downstream effectors contribute to APC mutant phenotypes. We previously identified a mechanism in cultured human cells by which APC, acting through glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), suppresses mTORC1, a nutrient sensor that regulates cell growth and proliferation. We hypothesized that truncating Apc mutations should activate mTORC1 in vivo and that mTORC1 plays an important role in Apc mutant phenotypes. We find that mTORC1 is strongly activated in apc mutant zebrafish and in intestinal polyps in Apc mutant mice. Furthermore, mTORC1 activation is essential downstream of APC as mTORC1 inhibition partially rescues Apc mutant phenotypes including early lethality, reduced circulation and liver hyperplasia. Importantly, combining mTORC1 and Wnt inhibition rescues defects in morphogenesis of the anterior-posterior axis that are not rescued by inhibition of either pathway alone. These data establish mTORC1 as a crucial, β-catenin independent effector of oncogenic Apc mutations and highlight the importance of mTORC1 regulation by APC during embryonic development. Our findings also suggest a new model of colorectal cancer pathogenesis in which mTORC1 is activated in parallel with Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:24092877

  20. Antineoplastic effects of mammalian target of rapamycine inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Maurizio

    2012-10-24

    Cancer after transplantation is the third cause of death and one of the more relevant comorbidities. Aim of this review is to verify the role of different pathogenetic mechanisms in cancer development in transplant patients and in general population as well. In particular has been outlined the different role exerted by two different families of drug as calcineurin inhibitor and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor. The role of mTOR pathways in cell homeostasis is complex but enough clear. As a consequence the mTOR pathway deregulation is involved in the genesis of several cancers. Hence the relevant role of mTOR inhibitors. The authors review the complex mechanism of action of mTOR inhibitors, not only for what concerns the immune system but also other cells as endothelial, smooth muscle and epithelial cells. The mechanism of action is still now not completely defined and understood. It implies the inhibition of mTOR pathway at different levels, but mainly at level of the phosphorylation of several intracellular kinases that contribute to activate mTOR complex. Many prospective and retrospective studies in transplant patients document the antineoplastic role of mTOR inhibition. More recently mTOR inhibitors proven to be effective in the treatment of some cancers also in general population. Kidney cancers, neuroendocrine tumors and liver cancers seem to be the most sensitive to these drugs. Best results are obtained with a combination treatment, targeting the mTOR pathway at different levels. PMID:24175199

  1. Platelet-derived growth factor regulates vascular smooth muscle phenotype via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Jung Min; Yun, Sung Ji; Kim, Young Whan; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Song, Sang Heon; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Bae, Sun Sik

    2015-08-14

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) regulates various cellular processes including proliferation, growth, migration and differentiation. In this study, we showed that mTORC1 regulates platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced phenotypic conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Stimulation of contractile VSMCs with PDGF significantly reduced the expression of contractile marker proteins in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, angiotensin II (AngII)-induced contraction of VSMCs was completely blocked by the stimulation of VSMCs with PDGF. PDGF-dependent suppression of VSMC marker gene expression was significantly blocked by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and mTOR whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK had no effect. In particular, inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked the PDGF-dependent phenotypic change of VSMCs whereas silencing of Rictor had no effect. In addition, loss of AngII-dependent contraction by PDGF was significantly retained by silencing of Raptor. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs. Taken together, we suggest that mTORC1 plays an essential role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic changes of VSMCs. - Graphical abstract: Regulation of VSMC phenotype by PDGF-dependent activation of mTORC1. - Highlights: • The expression of contractile marker proteins was reduced by PDGF stimulation. • PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs was blocked by inhibition of mTOR. • PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs was attenuated by inhibition of mTORC1. • mTORC1 plays a critical role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs.

  2. Effective targeting of STAT5-mediated survival in myeloproliferative neoplasms using ABT-737 combined with rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Geqiang; Miskimen, Kristy L.; Wang, Zhengqi; Xie, Xiu Yan; Tse, William; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Moriggl, Richard; Bunting, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 (STAT5) is a critical transcription factor for normal hematopoiesis and its sustained activation is associated with hematologic malignancy. A persistently active mutant of STAT5 (STAT5aS711F) associates with Grb2 associated binding protein 2 (Gab2) in myeloid leukemias and promotes growth in vitro through AKT activation. Here we have retrovirally transduced wild-type or Gab2−/− mouse bone marrow cells expressing STAT5aS711F and transplanted into irradiated recipient mice to test an in vivo myeloproliferative disease (MPD) model. To target Gab2-independent AKT/mTOR activation, wild-type mice were treated separately with rapamycin. In either case, mice lacking Gab2 or treated with rapamycin displayed attenuated myeloid hyperplasia and modestly improved survival, but the effects were not cytotoxic and were reversible. To improve upon this approach, in vitro targeting of STAT5-mediated AKT/mTOR using rapamycin was combined with inhibition of the STAT5 direct target genes bcl-2 and bcl-XL using ABT-737. Striking synergy with both drugs was observed in mouse BaF3 cells expressing STAT5aS711F, TEL-JAK2, or BCR-ABL and in the relatively single agent-resistant human BCR-ABL positive K562 cell line. Therefore, targeting distinct STAT5 mediated survival signals, e.g. bcl-2/bcl-XL and AKT/mTOR may be an effective therapeutic approach for human myeloproliferative neoplasms. PMID:20535152

  3. Once again on rapamycin-induced insulin resistance and longevity: despite of or owing to.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2012-05-01

    Calorie restriction (CR), which deactivates the nutrient-sensing mTOR pathway, slows down aging and prevents age-related diseases such as type II diabetes. Compared with CR, rapamycin more efficiently inhibits mTOR. Noteworthy, severe CR and starvation cause a reversible condition known as "starvation diabetes." As was already discussed, chronic administration of rapamycin can cause a similar condition in some animal models. A recent paper published in Science reported that chronic treatment with rapamycin causes a diabetes-like condition in mice by indirectly inhibiting mTOR complex 2. Here I introduce the notion of benevolent diabetes and discuss whether starvation-like effects of chronic high dose treatment with rapamycin are an obstacle for its use as an anti-aging drug. PMID:22683661

  4. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Mediates Kidney Injury Molecule 1-Dependent Tubule Injury in a Surrogate Model.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenqing; Naini, Said Movahedi; Chen, Guochun; Hentschel, Dirk M; Humphreys, Benjamin D; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2016-07-01

    Kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1), an epithelial phagocytic receptor, is markedly upregulated in the proximal tubule in various forms of acute and chronic kidney injury in humans and many other species. Whereas acute expression of KIM-1 has adaptive anti-inflammatory effects, chronic expression may be maladaptive in mice. Here, we characterized the zebrafish Kim family, consisting of Kim-1, Kim-3, and Kim-4. Kim-1 was markedly upregulated in kidney after gentamicin-induced injury and had conserved phagocytic activity in zebrafish. Both constitutive and tamoxifen-induced expression of Kim-1 in zebrafish kidney tubules resulted in loss of the tubule brush border, reduced GFR, pericardial edema, and increased mortality. Kim-1-induced kidney injury was associated with reduction of growth of adult fish. Kim-1 expression led to activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and inhibition of this pathway with rapamycin increased survival. mTOR pathway inhibition in KIM-1-overexpressing transgenic mice also significantly ameliorated serum creatinine level, proteinuria, tubular injury, and kidney inflammation. In conclusion, persistent Kim-1 expression results in chronic kidney damage in zebrafish through a mechanism involving mTOR. This observation predicted the role of the mTOR pathway and the therapeutic efficacy of mTOR-targeted agents in KIM-1-mediated kidney injury and fibrosis in mice, demonstrating the utility of the Kim-1 renal tubule zebrafish models. PMID:26538632

  5. Retinoblastoma cells are inhibited by aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) partially through activation of AMP-dependent kinase.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulou, Sofia; Kolovou, Paraskevi E; Morizane, Yuki; Kayama, Maki; Nicolaou, Fotini; Miller, Joan W; Gragoudas, Evangelos; Ksander, Bruce R; Vavvas, Demetrios G

    2010-08-01

    5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR), an analog of AMP, is widely used as an activator of AMP-kinase (AMPK), a protein that regulates the responses of the cell to energy change. We studied the effects of AICAR on the growth of retinoblastoma cell lines (Y79, WERI, and RB143). AICAR inhibited Rb cell growth, induced apoptosis and S-phase cell cycle arrest, and led to activation of AMPK. These effects were abolished by treatment with dypiridamole, an inhibitor that blocks entrance of AICAR into cells. Treatment with the adenosine kinase inhibitor 5-iodotubericidin to inhibit the conversion of AICAR to ZMP (the direct activator of AMPK) reversed most of the growth-inhibiting effects of AICAR, indicating that some of the antiproliferative effects of AICAR are mediated through AMPK activation. In addition, AICAR treatment was associated with inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, decreased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein-S6 and 4E-BP1, down-regulation of cyclins A and E, and decreased expression of p21. Our results indicate that AICAR-induced activation of AMPK inhibits retinoblastoma cell growth. This is one of the first descriptions of a nonchemotherapeutic drug with low toxicity that may be effective in treating Rb patients. PMID:20371623

  6. Time-dependent effects of rapamycin on consolidation of predator stress-induced hyperarousal.

    PubMed

    Fifield, Kathleen; Hebert, Mark; Williams, Kimberly; Linehan, Victoria; Whiteman, Jesse D; Mac Callum, Phillip; Blundell, Jacqueline

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated that rapamycin, a potent inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, blocks consolidation of shock-induced associative fear memories. Moreover, rapamycin's block of associative fear memories is time-dependent. It is unknown, however, if rapamycin blocks consolidation of predator stress-induced non-associative fear memories. Furthermore, the temporal pattern of mTOR activation following predator stress is unknown. Thus, the goal of the current studies was to determine if rapamycin blocks consolidation of predator stress-induced fear memories and if so, whether rapamycin's effect is time-dependent. Male rats were injected systemically with rapamycin at various time points following predator stress. Predator stress involves an acute, unprotected exposure of a rat to a cat, which causes long-lasting non-associative fear memories manifested as generalized hyperarousal and increased anxiety-like behaviour. We show that rapamycin injected immediately after predator stress blocked consolidation of stress-induced startle. However, rapamycin injected 9, 24 or 48h post predator stress potentiated stress-induced startle. Consistent with shock-induced associative fear memories, we show that mTOR signalling is essential for consolidation of predator stress-induced hyperarousal. However, unlike shock-induced fear memories, a second, persistent, late phase mTOR-dependent process following predator stress actually dampens startle. Consistent with previous findings, our data support the potential role for rapamycin in treatment of stress related disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder. However, our data suggest timing of rapamycin administration is critical. PMID:25746515

  7. Rapamycin Reduced Ischemic Brain Damage in Diabetic Animals Is Associated with Suppressions of mTOR and ERK1/2 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Yang, Xiao; Hei, Changchun; Meli, Yvonne; Niu, Jianguo; Sun, Tao; Li, P Andy

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study are to investigate the activation of mTOR and ERK1/2 signaling after cerebral ischemia in diabetic rats and to examine the neuroprotective effects of rapamycin. Ten minutes transient global cerebral ischemia was induced in straptozotocin-induced diabetic hyperglycemic rats and non-diabetic, euglycemic rats. Brain samples were harvested after 16 h of reperfusion. Rapamycin or vehicle was injected 1 month prior to the induction of ischemia. The results showed that diabetes increased ischemic neuronal cell death and associated with elevations of p-P70S6K and Ras/ERK1/2 and suppression of p-AMPKα. Rapamycin ameliorated diabetes-enhanced ischemic brain damage and suppressed phosphorylation of P70S6K and ERK1/2. It is concluded that diabetes activates mTOR and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in rats subjected to transient cerebral ischemia and inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin reduces ischemic brain damage and suppresses the mTOR and ERK1/2 signaling in diabetic settings. PMID:27489506

  8. Rapamycin Reduced Ischemic Brain Damage in Diabetic Animals Is Associated with Suppressions of mTOR and ERK1/2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Yang, Xiao; Hei, Changchun; Meli, Yvonne; Niu, Jianguo; Sun, Tao; Li, P. Andy

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study are to investigate the activation of mTOR and ERK1/2 signaling after cerebral ischemia in diabetic rats and to examine the neuroprotective effects of rapamycin. Ten minutes transient global cerebral ischemia was induced in straptozotocin-induced diabetic hyperglycemic rats and non-diabetic, euglycemic rats. Brain samples were harvested after 16 h of reperfusion. Rapamycin or vehicle was injected 1 month prior to the induction of ischemia. The results showed that diabetes increased ischemic neuronal cell death and associated with elevations of p-P70S6K and Ras/ERK1/2 and suppression of p-AMPKα. Rapamycin ameliorated diabetes-enhanced ischemic brain damage and suppressed phosphorylation of P70S6K and ERK1/2. It is concluded that diabetes activates mTOR and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in rats subjected to transient cerebral ischemia and inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin reduces ischemic brain damage and suppresses the mTOR and ERK1/2 signaling in diabetic settings. PMID:27489506

  9. Synthesis of Rapamycin Derivatives Containing the Triazole Moiety Used as Potential mTOR-Targeted Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lijun; Huang, Jie; Chen, Xiaoming; Yu, Hui; Li, Kualiang; Yang, Dan; Chen, Xiaqin; Ying, Jiayin; Pan, Fusheng; Lv, Youbing; Cheng, Yuanrong

    2016-06-01

    Rapamycin, a potent antifungal antibiotic, was approved as immunosuppressant, and lately its derivatives have been developed into mTOR targeting anticancer drugs. Structure modification was performed at the C-42 position of rapamycin, and a novel series of rapamycin triazole hybrids (4a-d, 5a-e, 8a-e, and 9a-e) was facilely synthesized via Huisgen's reaction. The anticancer activity of these compounds was evaluated against the Caski, H1299, MGC-803, and H460 human cancer cell lines. Some of the derivatives (8a-e, 9a-e) appeared to have stronger activity than that of rapamycin; however, 4a-d and 5a-e failed to show potential anticancer activity. Compound 9e with a (2,4-dichlorophenylamino)methyl moiety on the triazole ring was the most active anticancer compound, which showed IC50 values of 6.05 (Caski), 7.89 (H1299), 25.88 (MGC-803), and 8.60 μM (H460). In addition, research on the mechanism showed that 9e was able to cause cell morphological changes and to induce apoptosis in the Caski cell line. Most importantly, 9e can decrease the phosphorylation of mTOR and of its downstream key proteins, S6 and P70S6K1, indicating that 9e can effectively inhibit the mTOR signaling pathway. Thus, it may have the potential to become a new mTOR inhibitor against various cancers. PMID:27150260

  10. Effect of Chronic Administration of Low Dose Rapamycin on Development and Immunity in Young Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhenya; Liu, Furong; Chen, Linglin; Zhang, Huadan; Ding, Yuemin; Liu, Jianxiang; Wong, Michael; Zeng, Ling-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates cell growth, cell differentiation and protein synthesis. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR, has been widely used as an immunosuppressant and anti-cancer drug. Recently, mTOR inhibitors have also been reported to be a potential anti-epileptic drug, which may be effective when used in young patients with genetic epilepsy. Thus, a suitable dose of rapamycin which can maintain the normal function of mTOR and has fewer side effects ideally should be identified. In the present study, we first detected changes in marker proteins of mTOR signaling pathway during development. Then we determined the dose of rapamycin by treating rats of 2 weeks of age with different doses of rapamycin for 3 days and detected its effect on mTOR pathway. Young rats were then treated with a suitable dose of rapamycin for 4 weeks and the effect of rapamycin on mTOR, development and immunity were investigated. We found that the expression of the marker proteins of mTOR pathway was changed during development in brain hippocampus and neocortex. After 3 days of treanent, 0.03 mg/kg rapamycin had no effect on phospho-S6, whereas 0.1, 0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg rapamycin inhibited phospho-S6 in a dose-dependent manner. However, only 1.0 mg/kg and 3.0 mg/kg rapamycin inhibited phospho-S6 after 4 weeks treatment of rapamycin. Parallel to this result, rats treated with 0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg rapamycin had no obvious adverse effects, whereas rats treated with 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg rapamycin showed significant decreases in body, spleen and thymus weight. Additionally, rats treated with 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg rapamycin exhibited cognitive impairment and anxiety as evident by maze and open field experiments. Furthermore, the content of IL-1β, IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α in serum and cerebral cortex were significantly decreased in 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg rapamycin-treated rats. The expression of DCX was also significantly decreased in 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg rapamycin-treated rats. However, rats

  11. Effect of Chronic Administration of Low Dose Rapamycin on Development and Immunity in Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenya; Liu, Furong; Chen, Linglin; Zhang, Huadan; Ding, Yuemin; Liu, Jianxiang; Wong, Michael; Zeng, Ling-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates cell growth, cell differentiation and protein synthesis. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR, has been widely used as an immunosuppressant and anti-cancer drug. Recently, mTOR inhibitors have also been reported to be a potential anti-epileptic drug, which may be effective when used in young patients with genetic epilepsy. Thus, a suitable dose of rapamycin which can maintain the normal function of mTOR and has fewer side effects ideally should be identified. In the present study, we first detected changes in marker proteins of mTOR signaling pathway during development. Then we determined the dose of rapamycin by treating rats of 2 weeks of age with different doses of rapamycin for 3 days and detected its effect on mTOR pathway. Young rats were then treated with a suitable dose of rapamycin for 4 weeks and the effect of rapamycin on mTOR, development and immunity were investigated. We found that the expression of the marker proteins of mTOR pathway was changed during development in brain hippocampus and neocortex. After 3 days of treanent, 0.03 mg/kg rapamycin had no effect on phospho-S6, whereas 0.1, 0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg rapamycin inhibited phospho-S6 in a dose-dependent manner. However, only 1.0 mg/kg and 3.0 mg/kg rapamycin inhibited phospho-S6 after 4 weeks treatment of rapamycin. Parallel to this result, rats treated with 0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg rapamycin had no obvious adverse effects, whereas rats treated with 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg rapamycin showed significant decreases in body, spleen and thymus weight. Additionally, rats treated with 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg rapamycin exhibited cognitive impairment and anxiety as evident by maze and open field experiments. Furthermore, the content of IL-1β, IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α in serum and cerebral cortex were significantly decreased in 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg rapamycin-treated rats. The expression of DCX was also significantly decreased in 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg rapamycin-treated rats. However, rats

  12. Chronic rapamycin treatment on the nutrient utilization and metabolism of juvenile turbot (Psetta maxima)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingchao; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Huihui; Wang, Xuan; Mei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    High dietary protein inclusion is necessary in fish feeds and also represents a major cost in the aquaculture industry, which demands improved dietary conversion into body proteins in fish. In mammals, the target of rapamycin (TOR) is a key nutritionally responsive molecule governing postprandial anabolism. However, its physiological significance in teleosts has not been fully examined. In the present study, we examined the nutritional physiology of turbot after chronic rapamycin inhibition. Our results showed that a 6-week inhibition of TOR using dietary rapamycin inclusion (30 mg/kg diet) reduced growth performance and feed utilization. The rapamycin treatment inhibited TOR signaling and reduced expression of key enzymes in glycolysis, lipogenesis, cholesterol biosynthesis, while increasing the expression of enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis. Furthermore, rapamycin treatment increased intestinal goblet cell number in turbot, while the expressions of Notch and Hes1 were down regulated. It was possible that stimulated goblet cell differentiation by rapamycin was mediated through Notch-Hes1 pathway. Therefore, our results demonstrate the important role of TOR signaling in fish nutritional physiology. PMID:27305975

  13. Chronic rapamycin treatment on the nutrient utilization and metabolism of juvenile turbot (Psetta maxima).

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingchao; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Huihui; Wang, Xuan; Mei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    High dietary protein inclusion is necessary in fish feeds and also represents a major cost in the aquaculture industry, which demands improved dietary conversion into body proteins in fish. In mammals, the target of rapamycin (TOR) is a key nutritionally responsive molecule governing postprandial anabolism. However, its physiological significance in teleosts has not been fully examined. In the present study, we examined the nutritional physiology of turbot after chronic rapamycin inhibition. Our results showed that a 6-week inhibition of TOR using dietary rapamycin inclusion (30 mg/kg diet) reduced growth performance and feed utilization. The rapamycin treatment inhibited TOR signaling and reduced expression of key enzymes in glycolysis, lipogenesis, cholesterol biosynthesis, while increasing the expression of enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis. Furthermore, rapamycin treatment increased intestinal goblet cell number in turbot, while the expressions of Notch and Hes1 were down regulated. It was possible that stimulated goblet cell differentiation by rapamycin was mediated through Notch-Hes1 pathway. Therefore, our results demonstrate the important role of TOR signaling in fish nutritional physiology. PMID:27305975

  14. Effect of rapamycin on endometriosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    REN, XU; WANG, YIFENG; XU, GANG; DAI, LIBING

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate the impact of rapamycin (RAPA) on the endometriosis (EMS) lesions in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice, and to examine the possible mechanism involved in a novel therapy in EMS. Following the successful establishment of an EMS-SCID mouse model, the mice were randomly assigned into the RAPA, control and saline treatment groups. Subsequent to treatment for 2 weeks, the serum hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were detected using ELISA. The levels of HIF-1α and VEGF, as well as the size of EMS lesions, were compared among the three groups. In addition, the HIF-1α, VEGF and CD34 protein expression levels, and the microvessel density (MVD) of the lesions were determined by immunohistochemical analysis. Compared with the control and saline groups, the volume of EMS lesions in the RAPA-treated SCID mice was significantly reduced. Furthermore, the serum level and protein expression of VEGF, and the MVD in the lesions of the RAPA-treated group were significantly reduced when compared with the other two groups. These parameters were comparable in the control and saline groups. In conclusion, RAPA may inhibit the growth of endometriotic lesions, most possibly through the inhibition of the expression of VEGF in lesions, thereby inhibiting angiogenesis. PMID:27347023

  15. Short-term rapamycin treatment in mice has few effects on the transcriptome of white adipose tissue compared to dietary restriction.

    PubMed

    Fok, Wilson C; Livi, Carolina; Bokov, Alex; Yu, Zhen; Chen, Yidong; Richardson, Arlan; Pérez, Viviana I

    2014-09-01

    Rapamycin, a drug that has been shown to increase lifespan in mice, inhibits the target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway, a major pathway that regulates cell growth and energy status. It has been hypothesized that rapamycin and dietary restriction (DR) extend lifespan through similar mechanisms/pathways. Using microarray analysis, we compared the transcriptome of white adipose tissue from mice fed rapamycin or DR-diet for 6 months. Multidimensional scaling and heatmap analyses showed that rapamycin had essentially no effect on the transcriptome as compared to DR. For example, only six transcripts were significantly altered by rapamycin while mice fed DR showed a significant change in over 1000 transcripts. Using ingenuity pathway analysis, we found that stearate biosynthesis and circadian rhythm signaling were significantly changed by DR. Our findings showing that DR, but not rapamycin, has an effect on the transcriptome of the adipose tissue, suggesting that these two manipulations increase lifespan through different mechanisms/pathways. PMID:25075714

  16. [Effect of rapamycin on proliferation of acute myeloid leukemia cell lines HL-60 and HL-60/VCR].

    PubMed

    Liang, Rong; Xiong, Hua; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Xie-Qun

    2010-12-01

    In order to investigate the effect of rapamycin on the proliferation of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, the sensitive cells HL-60 and multidrug-resistant HL-60/VCR cells were chosen as research objects. The proliferation of cells was detected by growth curve method. The flow cytometer was used to analyze cell cycle. The expression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) was determined by Western blot. The results demonstrated that there was a significant difference of cell growth inhibition rate between control group and rapamycin group (p < 0.05). The cell growth inhibition rate was dose- and time- dependent (p < 0.05). Flow cytometry detection showed that the cell percentage of G(1) phase in rapamycin group was higher than that in group without rapamycin, and that of S phase was lower. The cell growth inhibition rate in 50 nmol/L and 100 nmol/L rapamycin plus daunorubicin (DNR) group was more than that in DNR alone group (p < 0.05), especially when DNR was added at 24 hours interval after RAP. The expression of Pgp of HL-60/VCR cells was inhibited by rapamycin. It is concluded that the rapamycin can inhibit the proliferation of sensitive HL-60 and multidrug resistant HL-60/VCR cells. It can also increase sensitivity of HL-60 and HL-60/VCR cells to DNR, which provides new strategy for the therapy of refractory AML. PMID:21176352

  17. Nanoparticles Effectively Target Rapamycin Delivery to Sites of Experimental Aortic Aneurysm in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shirasu, Takuro; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Miura, Yutaka; Hoshina, Katsuyuki; Kataoka, Kazunori; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Several drugs targeting the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysm have shown efficacy in model systems but not in clinical trials, potentially owing to the lack of targeted drug delivery. Here, we designed a novel drug delivery system using nanoparticles to target the disrupted aortic aneurysm micro-structure. We generated poly(ethylene glycol)-shelled nanoparticles incorporating rapamycin that exhibited uniform diameter and long-term stability. When injected intravenously into a rat model in which abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) had been induced by infusing elastase, labeled rapamycin nanoparticles specifically accumulated in the AAA. Microscopic analysis revealed that rapamycin nanoparticles were mainly distributed in the media and adventitia where the wall structures were damaged. Co-localization of rapamycin nanoparticles with macrophages was also noted. Rapamycin nanoparticles injected during the process of AAA formation evinced significant suppression of AAA formation and mural inflammation at 7 days after elastase infusion, as compared with rapamycin treatment alone. Correspondingly, the activities of matrix metalloproteinases and the expression of inflammatory cytokines were significantly suppressed by rapamycin nanoparticle treatment. Our findings suggest that the nanoparticle-based delivery system achieves specific delivery of rapamycin to the rat AAA and might contribute to establishing a drug therapy approach targeting aortic aneurysm. PMID:27336852

  18. Nanoparticles Effectively Target Rapamycin Delivery to Sites of Experimental Aortic Aneurysm in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shirasu, Takuro; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Miura, Yutaka; Hoshina, Katsuyuki; Kataoka, Kazunori; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Several drugs targeting the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysm have shown efficacy in model systems but not in clinical trials, potentially owing to the lack of targeted drug delivery. Here, we designed a novel drug delivery system using nanoparticles to target the disrupted aortic aneurysm micro-structure. We generated poly(ethylene glycol)-shelled nanoparticles incorporating rapamycin that exhibited uniform diameter and long-term stability. When injected intravenously into a rat model in which abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) had been induced by infusing elastase, labeled rapamycin nanoparticles specifically accumulated in the AAA. Microscopic analysis revealed that rapamycin nanoparticles were mainly distributed in the media and adventitia where the wall structures were damaged. Co-localization of rapamycin nanoparticles with macrophages was also noted. Rapamycin nanoparticles injected during the process of AAA formation evinced significant suppression of AAA formation and mural inflammation at 7 days after elastase infusion, as compared with rapamycin treatment alone. Correspondingly, the activities of matrix metalloproteinases and the expression of inflammatory cytokines were significantly suppressed by rapamycin nanoparticle treatment. Our findings suggest that the nanoparticle-based delivery system achieves specific delivery of rapamycin to the rat AAA and might contribute to establishing a drug therapy approach targeting aortic aneurysm. PMID:27336852

  19. Targeting Rapamycin to Podocytes Using a Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1)-Harnessed SAINT-Based Lipid Carrier System

    PubMed Central

    Visweswaran, Ganesh Ram R.; Gholizadeh, Shima; Ruiters, Marcel H. J.; Molema, Grietje; Kok, Robbert J.; Kamps, Jan. A. A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Together with mesangial cells, glomerular endothelial cells and the basement membrane, podocytes constitute the glomerular filtration barrier (GFB) of the kidney. Podocytes play a pivotal role in the progression of various kidney-related diseases such as glomerular sclerosis and glomerulonephritis that finally lead to chronic end-stage renal disease. During podocytopathies, the slit-diaphragm connecting the adjacent podocytes are detached leading to severe loss of proteins in the urine. The pathophysiology of podocytopathies makes podocytes a potential and challenging target for nanomedicine development, though there is a lack of known molecular targets for cell selective drug delivery. To identify VCAM-1 as a cell-surface receptor that is suitable for binding and internalization of nanomedicine carrier systems by podocytes, we investigated its expression in the immortalized podocyte cell lines AB8/13 and MPC-5, and in primary podocytes. Gene and protein expression analyses revealed that VCAM-1 expression is increased by podocytes upon TNFα-activation for up to 24 h. This was paralleled by anti-VCAM-1 antibody binding to the TNFα-activated cells, which can be employed as a ligand to facilitate the uptake of nanocarriers under inflammatory conditions. Hence, we next explored the possibilities of using VCAM-1 as a cell-surface receptor to deliver the potent immunosuppressant rapamycin to TNFα-activated podocytes using the lipid-based nanocarrier system Saint-O-Somes. Anti-VCAM-1-rapamycin-SAINT-O-Somes more effectively inhibited the cell migration of AB8/13 cells than free rapamycin and non-targeted rapamycin-SAINT-O-Somes indicating the potential of VCAM-1 targeted drug delivery to podocytes. PMID:26407295

  20. Beneficial Metabolic Effects of Rapamycin Are Associated with Enhanced Regulatory Cells in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Makki, Kassem; Taront, Solenne; Molendi-Coste, Olivier; Bouchaert, Emmanuel; Neve, Bernadette; Eury, Elodie; Lobbens, Stéphane; Labalette, Myriam; Duez, Hélène; Staels, Bart; Dombrowicz, David; Froguel, Philippe; Wolowczuk, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    The “mechanistic target of rapamycin” (mTOR) is a central controller of growth, proliferation and/or motility of various cell-types ranging from adipocytes to immune cells, thereby linking metabolism and immunity. mTOR signaling is overactivated in obesity, promoting inflammation and insulin resistance. Therefore, great interest exists in the development of mTOR inhibitors as therapeutic drugs for obesity or diabetes. However, despite a plethora of studies characterizing the metabolic consequences of mTOR inhibition in rodent models, its impact on immune changes associated with the obese condition has never been questioned so far. To address this, we used a mouse model of high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice with and without pharmacologic mTOR inhibition by rapamycin. Rapamycin was weekly administrated to HFD-fed C57BL/6 mice for 22 weeks. Metabolic effects were determined by glucose and insulin tolerance tests and by indirect calorimetry measures of energy expenditure. Inflammatory response and immune cell populations were characterized in blood, adipose tissue and liver. In parallel, the activities of both mTOR complexes (e. g. mTORC1 and mTORC2) were determined in adipose tissue, muscle and liver. We show that rapamycin-treated mice are leaner, have enhanced energy expenditure and are protected against insulin resistance. These beneficial metabolic effects of rapamycin were associated to significant changes of the inflammatory profiles of both adipose tissue and liver. Importantly, immune cells with regulatory functions such as regulatory T-cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) were increased in adipose tissue. These rapamycin-triggered metabolic and immune effects resulted from mTORC1 inhibition whilst mTORC2 activity was intact. Taken together, our results reinforce the notion that controlling immune regulatory cells in metabolic tissues is crucial to maintain a proper metabolic status and, more generally, comfort the need to search for novel

  1. Rapamycin-mediated CD36 translational suppression contributes to alleviation of hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuan; Yan, Yong; Hu, Lin; Zhao, Lei; Yang, Ping; Moorhead, John F; Varghese, Zac; Chen, Yaxi; Ruan, Xiong Z

    2014-04-25

    Rapamycin, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-specific inhibitor, has the effect of anti-lipid deposition on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), but the mechanisms with which rapamycin alleviates hepatic steatosis are not fully disclosed. CD36 is known to facilitate long-chain fatty acid uptake and contribute to NAFLD progression. Hepatic CD36 expression is closely associated with hepatic steatosis, while mTOR pathway is involved in CD36 translational control. This study was undertaken to investigate whether rapamycin alleviates hepatic steatosis via the inhibition of mTOR pathway-dependent CD36 translation. Human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells were treated with palmitate and C57BL/6J mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD) to induce hepatic steatosis. Hepatic CD36 protein expression was significantly increased with lipid accumulation in palmitate-treated HepG2 cells or HFD-fed C57BL/6J mice. Rapamycin reduced hepatic steatosis and CD36 protein expression, but it had no influence on CD36 mRNA expression. Rapamycin had no effect on CD36 protein stability, but it significantly decreased CD36 translational efficiency. We further confirmed that rapamycin inhibited the phosphorylation of mTOR and its downstream translational regulators including p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K), eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). This study demonstrates that rapamycin inhibits hepatic CD36 translational efficiency through the mTOR pathway, resulting in reduction of CD36 protein expression and alleviation of hepatic steatosis. PMID:24685479

  2. The rapamycin sensitivity of human T-cell leukaemia virus type I-induced T-cell proliferation is mediated independently of the polypyrimidine motifs in the 5' long terminal repeat.

    PubMed

    Rose, N; Lever, A

    2001-02-01

    The immunosuppressant rapamycin can regulate the translation of a subset of messenger RNAs, a phenotype which has been linked to the presence of a polypyrimidine motif [C(N)(4-14)] downstream of the mRNA cap structure. T-cell clones naturally infected with transcriptionally active human T-cell leukaemia virus, type I (HTLV-I) undergo autologous proliferation; this phenotype is inhibited by rapamycin but not FK506, which reverses the rapamycin effect. Within the R region of the HTLV-I 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) there are seven polypyrimidine motifs. We sought to determine if these were involved in the sensitivity of proliferation to the presence of rapamycin. Here we illustrate the generation of an in vitro model of this rapamycin-sensitivity and the analysis of LTR mutants which were created to determine the importance of the polypyrimidine motifs. Reporter gene assays suggest the effect is independent of the polypyrimidine motifs in the virus leader sequence. PMID:11161283

  3. The Rapamycin-Sensitive Complex of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Is Essential to Maintain Male Fertility.

    PubMed

    Schell, Christoph; Kretz, Oliver; Liang, Wei; Kiefer, Betina; Schneider, Simon; Sellung, Dominik; Bork, Tillmann; Leiber, Christian; Rüegg, Markus A; Mallidis, Con; Schlatt, Stefan; Mayerhofer, Artur; Huber, Tobias B; Grahammer, Florian

    2016-02-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibitor rapamycin and its analogs are being increasingly used in solid-organ transplantation. A commonly reported side effect is male subfertility to infertility, yet the precise mechanisms of mTOR interference with male fertility remain obscure. With the use of a conditional mouse genetic approach we demonstrate that deficiency of mTORC1 in the epithelial derivatives of the Wolffian duct is sufficient to cause male infertility. Analysis of spermatozoa from Raptor fl/fl*KspCre mice revealed an overall decreased motility pattern. Both epididymis and seminal vesicles displayed extensive organ regression with increasing age. Histologic and ultrastructural analyses demonstrated increased amounts of destroyed and absorbed spermatozoa in different segments of the epididymis. Mechanistically, genetic and pharmacologic mTORC1 inhibition was associated with an impaired cellular metabolism and a disturbed protein secretion of epididymal epithelial cells. Collectively, our data highlight the role of mTORC1 to preserve the function of the epididymis, ductus deferens, and the seminal vesicles. We thus reveal unexpected new insights into the frequently observed mTORC1 inhibitor side effect of male infertility in transplant recipients. PMID:26683665

  4. Methylsulfonylmethane inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Huijeong; Kim, Jeeyoung; Lee, Min-Jae; Kim, Young Jin; Cho, Young-Wook; Lee, Geun-Shik

    2015-02-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is an organosulfur compound and the health benefits associated with MSM include inflammation. Although MSM has been shown to have various physiological effects, no study has yet focused on inflammasome activation. The inflammasome is a multiprotein complex that serves as a platform for caspase 1-dependent proteolytic maturation and secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In this study, we tested the effect of MSM on inflammasome activation using mouse and human macrophages. In our results, MSM significantly attenuated NLRP3 inflammasome activation in lipopolysaccharide-primed macrophages, although it had no effect on NLCR4 or AIM2 inflammasome activation. Extracts of MSM-enriched vegetables presented the same inhibitory effect on NLRP3 inflammasome activation as MSM. MSM also attenuated the transcriptional expression of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and NLRP3. Taken together, these results show that MSM has anti-inflammatory characteristics, interrupts NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and inhibits pro-cytokine expression. We further confirmed the intracellular mechanism of MSM in relation to NLRP3 inflammasome activation, followed by comparison with that of DMSO. Both chemicals showed a synergic effect on anti-NLRP3 activation and attenuated production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus, MSM is a selective inhibitor of NLRP3 inflammasome activation and can be developed as a supplement to control several metabolic disorders. PMID:25461402

  5. Mitogen-stimulated and rapamycin-sensitive glucose transporter 12 targeting and functional glucose transport in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson-O'Brien, Amy L; Dehaan, Carrie L; Rogers, Suzanne

    2008-03-01

    We hypothesized that glucose transporter 12 (GLUT12) is involved in regulation of glucose flux in distal renal tubules in response to elevated glucose. We used the Madin-Darby canine kidney polarized epithelial cell model and neutralizing antibodies to analyze GLUT12 targeting and directional GLUT12-mediated glucose transport. At physiological glucose concentrations, GLUT12 was localized to a perinuclear position. High glucose and serum treatment resulted in GLUT12 localization to the apical membrane. This mitogen-stimulated targeting of GLUT12 was inhibited by rapamycin, the specific inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). The functional role of GLUT12 was also examined. We constructed a GLUT12 cDNA containing a c-Myc epitope tag in the fifth exofacial loop. Assays of glucose transport at the apical membrane were performed using Transwell filters. By comparing transport assays in the presence of neutralizing anti-c-Myc monoclonal antibody, we specifically measured GLUT12-mediated glucose transport at the apical surface. GLUT12-mediated glucose transport was mitogen dependent and rapamycin sensitive. Our results implicate mTOR signaling in a novel pathway of glucose transporter protein targeting and glucose transport. Activity of the mTOR pathway has been associated with diabetic kidney disease. Our results provide evidence for a link between GLUT12 protein trafficking, glucose transport and signaling molecules central to the control of metabolic disease processes. PMID:18039784

  6. Hirsutenone in Alnus extract inhibits akt activity and suppresses prostate cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Soouk; Kim, Jong-Eun; Li, Yan; Jung, Sung Keun; Song, Nu Ry; Thimmegowda, N R; Kim, Bo Yeon; Lee, Hyong Joo; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-11-01

    Although specific compounds found in some East Asian traditional medicines have been shown to exhibit bioactive properties, their molecular mechanisms of action remain elusive. The bark of the Alnus species has been used for the treatment of various pathological conditions including hemorrhage, alcoholism, fever, diarrhea, skin diseases, inflammation, and cancer in East Asia for centuries. In this study, we show that hirsutenone, a bioactive compound in Alnus japonica, exhibits anti-cancer effects against prostate cancer through a direct physical inhibition of Akt1/2. Hirsutenone suppressed anchorage-dependent and independent cell growth of PC3 and LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. Annexin V and Propidium iodide (PI) staining results demonstrated that hirsutenone strongly induces apoptotic cell death in both PC3 and LNCaP cells. Furthermore, treatment of hirsutenone attenuated phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a downstream substrate of Akt, without affecting Akt phosphorylation. Kinase and pull-down assay results clearly show that hirsutenone inhibits Akt1 and 2 by direct binding in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-noncompetitive manner in vitro and ex vivo. Our results show that hirsutenone suppresses human prostate cancer by targeting Akt1 and 2 as a key component to explain for anti-cancer activity of Alnus species. PMID:25213146

  7. SOX9-regulated cell plasticity in colorectal metastasis is attenuated by rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Garcia, Estefania; Lopez, Lidia; Aldaz, Paula; Arevalo, Sara; Aldaregia, Juncal; Egaña, Larraitz; Bujanda, Luis; Cheung, Martin; Sampron, Nicolas; Garcia, Idoia; Matheu, Ander

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis proposes a hierarchical organization of tumors, in which stem-like cells sustain tumors and drive metastasis. The molecular mechanisms underlying the acquisition of CSCs and metastatic traits are not well understood. SOX9 is a transcription factor linked to stem cell maintenance and commonly overexpressed in solid cancers including colorectal cancer. In this study, we show that SOX9 levels are higher in metastatic (SW620) than in primary colorectal cancer cells (SW480) derived from the same patient. This elevated expression correlated with enhanced self-renewal activity. By gain and loss-of-function studies in SW480 and SW620 cells respectively, we reveal that SOX9 levels modulate tumorsphere formation and self-renewal ability in vitro and tumor initiation in vivo. Moreover, SOX9 regulates migration and invasion and triggers the transition between epithelial and mesenchymal states. These activities are partially dependent on SOX9 post-transcriptional modifications. Importantly, treatment with rapamycin inhibits self-renewal and tumor growth in a SOX9-dependent manner. These results identify a functional role for SOX9 in regulating colorectal cancer cell plasticity and metastasis, and provide a strong rationale for a rapamycin-based therapeutic strategy. PMID:27571710

  8. SOX9-regulated cell plasticity in colorectal metastasis is attenuated by rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Garcia, Estefania; Lopez, Lidia; Aldaz, Paula; Arevalo, Sara; Aldaregia, Juncal; Egaña, Larraitz; Bujanda, Luis; Cheung, Martin; Sampron, Nicolas; Garcia, Idoia; Matheu, Ander

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis proposes a hierarchical organization of tumors, in which stem-like cells sustain tumors and drive metastasis. The molecular mechanisms underlying the acquisition of CSCs and metastatic traits are not well understood. SOX9 is a transcription factor linked to stem cell maintenance and commonly overexpressed in solid cancers including colorectal cancer. In this study, we show that SOX9 levels are higher in metastatic (SW620) than in primary colorectal cancer cells (SW480) derived from the same patient. This elevated expression correlated with enhanced self-renewal activity. By gain and loss-of-function studies in SW480 and SW620 cells respectively, we reveal that SOX9 levels modulate tumorsphere formation and self-renewal ability in vitro and tumor initiation in vivo. Moreover, SOX9 regulates migration and invasion and triggers the transition between epithelial and mesenchymal states. These activities are partially dependent on SOX9 post-transcriptional modifications. Importantly, treatment with rapamycin inhibits self-renewal and tumor growth in a SOX9-dependent manner. These results identify a functional role for SOX9 in regulating colorectal cancer cell plasticity and metastasis, and provide a strong rationale for a rapamycin-based therapeutic strategy. PMID:27571710

  9. FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK and downregulates mTOR signaling in hepatocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Susanne; Penke, Melanie; Gorski, Theresa; Gebhardt, Rolf; Weiss, Thomas S.; Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje

    2015-03-06

    Background: Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is the key enzyme of the NAD salvage pathway starting from nicotinamide. Cancer cells have an increased demand for NAD due to their high proliferation and DNA repair rate. Consequently, NAMPT is considered as a putative target for anti-cancer therapies. There is evidence that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) become dysregulated during the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we investigated the effects of NAMPT inhibition by its specific inhibitor FK866 on the viability of hepatocarcinoma cells and analyzed the effects of FK866 on the nutrient sensor AMPK and mTOR complex1 (mTORC1) signaling. Results: FK866 markedly decreased NAMPT activity and NAD content in hepatocarcinoma cells (Huh7 cells, Hep3B cells) and led to delayed ATP reduction which was associated with increased cell death. These effects could be abrogated by administration of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), the enzyme product of NAMPT. Our results demonstrated a dysregulation of the AMPK/mTOR pathway in hepatocarcinoma cells compared to non-cancerous hepatocytes with a higher expression of mTOR and a lower AMPKα activation in hepatocarcinoma cells. We found that NAMPT inhibition by FK866 significantly activated AMPKα and inhibited the activation of mTOR and its downstream targets p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 in hepatocarcinoma cells. Non-cancerous hepatocytes were less sensitive to FK866 and did not show changes in AMPK/mTOR signaling after FK866 treatment. Conclusion: Taken together, these findings reveal an important role of the NAMPT-mediated NAD salvage pathway in the energy homeostasis of hepatocarcinoma cells and suggest NAMPT inhibition as a potential treatment option for HCC. - Highlights: • FK866 increases cell death in p53-deficient hepatocarcinoma cells. • AMPK/mTOR signaling is dysregulated in hepatocarcinoma cells. • FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK

  10. Anti-osteoclastogenic activity of isoliquiritigenin via inhibition of NF-κB-dependent autophagic pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Zhu, Lingxin; Zhang, Jie; Yu, Jingjing; Cheng, Xue; Peng, Bin

    2016-04-15

    Previous studies, including those from our laboratory, have demonstrated that the natural flavonoid isoliquiritigenin (ISL) is a promising agent for bone destructive diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying its anti-osteoclastogenic effects are still far from clear. Here, we evaluated the potential alterations of autophagy and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) during anti-osteoclastogenic effects by ISL in vitro and in vivo. We observed that ISL inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis and suppressed autophagic microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-II and Beclin 1 accumulation. ISL treatment resulted in the interruption of several specific features for autophagy in osteoclast precursors, including acidic vesicular organelle formation, LC3-II accumulation, and appearance of autophagic vacuoles. The RANKL-stimulated expression levels of autophagy-related genes and proteins also diminished in ISL-treated osteoclast precursors. The reactivation of autophagy by rapamycin almost reversed the ISL-elicited anti-osteoclastogenic effects. Interestingly, ISL inhibited the RANKL-stimulated NF-κB expression and nuclear translocation, whereas the NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082 markedly suppressed the RANKL-induced autophagic activation. Consistent with the in vitro results, the administration of ISL could attenuate osteoclastogenic cathepsin K, autophagic LC3, and NF-κB expression to protect against inflammatory calvarial bone erosion in vivo. Our findings highlight the inhibition of NF-κB-dependent autophagy as an important mechanism of ISL-mediated anti-osteoclastogenic activity. PMID:26947453