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Sample records for activation quantum tunneling

  1. Results of Resonant Activation and Macroscopic Quantum Tunneling Experiments in Magnesium Diboride Thin Film Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Roberto; Carabello, Steve; Lambert, Joseph; Mlack, Jerome; Dai, Wenqing; Shen, Yi.; Li, Qi; Cunnane, Daniel; Zhuang, C. G.; Chen, Ke; Xi, X. X.

    2012-02-01

    The Josephson junction is an experimental testbed widely used to study resonant activation and macroscopic quantum tunneling. These phenomena have been observed in junctions based on conventional low-temperature superconductors such as Nb and Al, and even in high-Tc, intrinsic superconductors. We report results of superconducting-to normal state switching experiments below 1 K using MgB2-based Josephson heterojunctions with Pb and Nb counter-electrodes. Measurements were made with and without RF excitation. With microwaves, we see evidence of a resonant peak, in addition to the primary escape (from ground state) peak -- consistent with resonant activation. We also observe features suggestive of macroscopic quantum tunneling including peaks in the escape rate enhancements and an ``elbow'' in the graph of calculated escape temperatures Tesc versus sample temperature.

  2. Computational multiqubit tunnelling in programmable quantum annealers.

    PubMed

    Boixo, Sergio; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N; Shabani, Alireza; Isakov, Sergei V; Dykman, Mark; Denchev, Vasil S; Amin, Mohammad H; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Mohseni, Masoud; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers higher than the energy of the state itself. Quantum tunnelling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization in quantum annealing. However, computational multiqubit tunnelling has not yet been observed, and a theory of co-tunnelling under high- and low-frequency noises is lacking. Here we show that 8-qubit tunnelling plays a computational role in a currently available programmable quantum annealer. We devise a probe for tunnelling, a computational primitive where classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In support of the design of quantum annealers we develop a nonperturbative theory of open quantum dynamics under realistic noise characteristics. This theory accurately predicts the rate of many-body dissipative quantum tunnelling subject to the polaron effect. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that quantum tunnelling outperforms thermal hopping along classical paths for problems with up to 200 qubits containing the computational primitive. PMID:26739797

  3. Computational multiqubit tunnelling in programmable quantum annealers

    PubMed Central

    Boixo, Sergio; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Shabani, Alireza; Isakov, Sergei V.; Dykman, Mark; Denchev, Vasil S.; Amin, Mohammad H.; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Mohseni, Masoud; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers higher than the energy of the state itself. Quantum tunnelling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization in quantum annealing. However, computational multiqubit tunnelling has not yet been observed, and a theory of co-tunnelling under high- and low-frequency noises is lacking. Here we show that 8-qubit tunnelling plays a computational role in a currently available programmable quantum annealer. We devise a probe for tunnelling, a computational primitive where classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In support of the design of quantum annealers we develop a nonperturbative theory of open quantum dynamics under realistic noise characteristics. This theory accurately predicts the rate of many-body dissipative quantum tunnelling subject to the polaron effect. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that quantum tunnelling outperforms thermal hopping along classical paths for problems with up to 200 qubits containing the computational primitive. PMID:26739797

  4. Quantum tunneling through graphene nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Z. Z.; Chang, Kai; Peeters, F. M.

    2010-05-01

    We investigate theoretically quantum transport through graphene nanorings in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. Our theoretical results demonstrate that the graphene nanorings behave like a resonant tunneling device, contrary to the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations found in conventional semiconductor rings. The resonant tunneling can be tuned by the Fermi energy, the size of the central part of the graphene nanorings and the external magnetic field.

  5. Quantum tunneling through graphene nanorings.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Z Z; Chang, Kai; Peeters, F M

    2010-05-01

    We investigate theoretically quantum transport through graphene nanorings in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. Our theoretical results demonstrate that the graphene nanorings behave like a resonant tunneling device, contrary to the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations found in conventional semiconductor rings. The resonant tunneling can be tuned by the Fermi energy, the size of the central part of the graphene nanorings and the external magnetic field. PMID:20388970

  6. Thermally activated tunneling in porous silicon nanowires with embedded Si quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezvani, S. J.; Pinto, N.; Enrico, E.; D'Ortenzi, L.; Chiodoni, A.; Boarino, L.

    2016-03-01

    Electronic transport properties of porous Si nanowires either with embedded Si quantum dots or with a percolative crystalline path are studied as a function of the temperature for the first time. We show that unlike bulk porous Si, the predesigned structure of the wires results in a single distinct conduction mechanism such as tunneling in the former case and variable range hopping in the latter case. We demonstrate that the geometry of the systems with a large internal surface area and high density of the Si quantum dots have a significant conduction enhancement compared to bulk porous silicon. These results can also improve the understanding of the basis of the different electronic transport mechanisms reported in bulk porous silicon.

  7. Quantum Tunneling Affects Engine Performance.

    PubMed

    Som, Sibendu; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Dingyu D Y; Magnotti, Gina M; Sivaramakrishnan, Raghu; Longman, Douglas E; Skodje, Rex T; Davis, Michael J

    2013-06-20

    We study the role of individual reaction rates on engine performance, with an emphasis on the contribution of quantum tunneling. It is demonstrated that the effect of quantum tunneling corrections for the reaction HO2 + HO2 = H2O2 + O2 can have a noticeable impact on the performance of a high-fidelity model of a compression-ignition (e.g., diesel) engine, and that an accurate prediction of ignition delay time for the engine model requires an accurate estimation of the tunneling correction for this reaction. The three-dimensional model includes detailed descriptions of the chemistry of a surrogate for a biodiesel fuel, as well as all the features of the engine, such as the liquid fuel spray and turbulence. This study is part of a larger investigation of how the features of the dynamics and potential energy surfaces of key reactions, as well as their reaction rate uncertainties, affect engine performance, and results in these directions are also presented here. PMID:26283246

  8. Quantum tunneling beyond semiclassical approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Ranjan Majhi, Bibhas

    2008-06-01

    Hawking radiation as tunneling by Hamilton-Jacobi method beyond semiclassical approximation is analysed. We compute all quantum corrections in the single particle action revealing that these are proportional to the usual semiclassical contribution. We show that a simple choice of the proportionality constants reproduces the one loop back reaction effect in the spacetime, found by conformal field theory methods, which modifies the Hawking temperature of the black hole. Using the law of black hole mechanics we give the corrections to the Bekenstein-Hawking area law following from the modified Hawking temperature. Some examples are explicitly worked out.

  9. Virtual Processes and Quantum Tunnelling as Fictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Richard T. W.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper it is argued that virtual processes are dispensable fictions. The argument proceeds by a comparison with the phenomenon of quantum tunnelling. Building on an analysis of Levy-Leblond and Balibar, it is argued that, although the phenomenon known as quantum tunnelling certainly occurs and is at the basis of many paradigmatic quantum…

  10. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-04-01

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q {approx} 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement.

  11. Quantum tunneling with global charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. )

    1994-10-15

    We investigate quantum tunneling in the theory of a complex scalar field with a global U(1) symmetry when the charge density of the initial configuration does not vanish. We discuss the possible final configurations and set up the Euclidean path integral formalism to find the bubble nucleation and to study the bubble evolution. For the stationary path, or the bounce solution, in the Euclidean time, the phase variable becomes pure imaginary so that the charge density remains real. We apply this formalism to examples when the initial charge density is small. While the phase transition considered here occurs in zero temperature, the bubble dynamics is richly complicated, involving conserved charge, the sound wave, and the supersonic bubble wall.

  12. Quantum temporal probabilities in tunneling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anastopoulos, Charis Savvidou, Ntina

    2013-09-15

    We study the temporal aspects of quantum tunneling as manifested in time-of-arrival experiments in which the detected particle tunnels through a potential barrier. In particular, we present a general method for constructing temporal probabilities in tunneling systems that (i) defines ‘classical’ time observables for quantum systems and (ii) applies to relativistic particles interacting through quantum fields. We show that the relevant probabilities are defined in terms of specific correlation functions of the quantum field associated with tunneling particles. We construct a probability distribution with respect to the time of particle detection that contains all information about the temporal aspects of the tunneling process. In specific cases, this probability distribution leads to the definition of a delay time that, for parity-symmetric potentials, reduces to the phase time of Bohm and Wigner. We apply our results to piecewise constant potentials, by deriving the appropriate junction conditions on the points of discontinuity. For the double square potential, in particular, we demonstrate the existence of (at least) two physically relevant time parameters, the delay time and a decay rate that describes the escape of particles trapped in the inter-barrier region. Finally, we propose a resolution to the paradox of apparent superluminal velocities for tunneling particles. We demonstrate that the idea of faster-than-light speeds in tunneling follows from an inadmissible use of classical reasoning in the description of quantum systems. -- Highlights: •Present a general methodology for deriving temporal probabilities in tunneling systems. •Treatment applies to relativistic particles interacting through quantum fields. •Derive a new expression for tunneling time. •Identify new time parameters relevant to tunneling. •Propose a resolution of the superluminality paradox in tunneling.

  13. Tunneling through a quantum dot in a quantum waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsen'ev, A. A.

    2010-07-01

    The problem is considered of scattering in a system consisting of a quantum waveguide and a quantum dot weakly coupled to the waveguide. It is assumed that the quantum waveguide is described by the Pauli equations, and the Rashba spin-orbit interaction is taken into account. The possibility of tunneling through the quantum dot is proved.

  14. Quantum Monte Carlo simulations of tunneling in quantum adiabatic optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Lucas T.; van Dam, Wim

    2016-03-01

    We explore to what extent path-integral quantum Monte Carlo methods can efficiently simulate quantum adiabatic optimization algorithms during a quantum tunneling process. Specifically we look at symmetric cost functions defined over n bits with a single potential barrier that a successful quantum adiabatic optimization algorithm will have to tunnel through. The height and width of this barrier depend on n , and by tuning these dependencies, we can make the optimization algorithm succeed or fail in polynomial time. In this article we compare the strength of quantum adiabatic tunneling with that of path-integral quantum Monte Carlo methods. We find numerical evidence that quantum Monte Carlo algorithms will succeed in the same regimes where quantum adiabatic optimization succeeds.

  15. Quantum temporal probabilities in tunneling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastopoulos, Charis; Savvidou, Ntina

    2013-09-01

    We study the temporal aspects of quantum tunneling as manifested in time-of-arrival experiments in which the detected particle tunnels through a potential barrier. In particular, we present a general method for constructing temporal probabilities in tunneling systems that (i) defines 'classical' time observables for quantum systems and (ii) applies to relativistic particles interacting through quantum fields. We show that the relevant probabilities are defined in terms of specific correlation functions of the quantum field associated with tunneling particles. We construct a probability distribution with respect to the time of particle detection that contains all information about the temporal aspects of the tunneling process. In specific cases, this probability distribution leads to the definition of a delay time that, for parity-symmetric potentials, reduces to the phase time of Bohm and Wigner. We apply our results to piecewise constant potentials, by deriving the appropriate junction conditions on the points of discontinuity. For the double square potential, in particular, we demonstrate the existence of (at least) two physically relevant time parameters, the delay time and a decay rate that describes the escape of particles trapped in the inter-barrier region. Finally, we propose a resolution to the paradox of apparent superluminal velocities for tunneling particles. We demonstrate that the idea of faster-than-light speeds in tunneling follows from an inadmissible use of classical reasoning in the description of quantum systems.

  16. Understanding Quantum Tunneling through Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boixo, Sergio; Isakov, Sergei; Mazzola, Guglielmo; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Jiang, Zhang; Neven, Hartmut; Troyer, Matthias

    The tunneling between the two ground states of an Ising ferromagnet is a typical example of many-body tunneling processes between two local minima, as they occur during quantum annealing. Performing quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations we find that the QMC tunneling rate displays the same scaling (in the exponent) with system size, as the rate of incoherent tunneling. The scaling in both cases is O (Δ2) , where Δ is the tunneling splitting. An important consequence is that QMC simulations can be used to predict the performance of a quantum annealer for tunneling through a barrier. Furthermore, by using open instead of periodic boundary conditions in imaginary time, equivalent to a projector QMC algorithm, we obtain a quadratic speedup for QMC, and achieve linear scaling in Δ. We provide a physical understanding of these results and their range of applicability based on an instanton picture.

  17. Tunneling rate in double quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filikhin, Igor; Matinyan, Sergei; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2014-03-01

    We study spectral properties of electron tunneling in double quantum dots (DQDs) (and double quantum wells (DQWs)) and their relation to the geometry. In particular we compare the tunneling in DQW with chaotic and regular geometry, taking into account recent evidence about regularization of the tunneling rate when the QW geometry is chaotic. Our calculations do not support this assumption. We confirm high influence of the QW geometry boundaries on the rate fluctuation along the spectrum. The factors of the effective mass anisotropy and violation of the symmetry of DQD and DQW are also considered. Generally, we found that the small violation of the symmetry drastically affects tunneling. This work is supported by the NSF (HRD-0833184) and NASA (NNX09AV07A).

  18. Dissipative macroscopic quantum tunneling in type-I superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzuela, R.; Tejada, J.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2011-11-01

    We study macroscopic quantum tunneling of interfaces separating normal and superconducting regions in type-I superconductors. A mathematical model is developed that describes dissipative quantum escape of a two-dimensional manifold from a planar potential well. It corresponds to, e.g., a current-driven quantum depinning of the interface from a grain boundary or from an artificially manufactured pinning layer. Effective action is derived and instantons of the equations of motion are investigated. The crossover between thermal activation and quantum tunneling is studied and the crossover temperature is computed. Our results, together with recent observation of nonthermal low-temperature magnetic relaxation in lead, suggest the possibility of a controlled measurement of quantum depinning of the interface in a type-I superconductor.

  19. The Quantum Hydrodynamic Description of Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, Brian K.

    2012-06-15

    The quantum hydrodynamic approach is based on the de Broglie-Bohm formulation of quantum mechanics. The resulting fluid-like equations of motion describe the flow of probability and an accurate solution to these equations is equivalent to solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. Furthermore, the hydrodynamic approach provides new insight into the mechanisms as well as an alternative computational approach for treating tunneling phenomena. New concepts include well-defined 'quantum trajectories', 'quantum potential', and 'quantum force' all of which have classical analogues. The quantum potential and its associated force give rise to all quantum mechanical effects such as zero point energy, tunneling, and interference. A new numerical approach called the Iterative Finite Difference Method (IFDM) will be discussed. The IFDM is used to solve the set of non-linear coupled hydrodynamic equations. It is 2nd-order accurate in both space and time and exhibits exponential convergence with respect to the iteration count. The stability and computational efficiency of the IFDM is significantly improved by using a 'smart' Eulerian grid which has the same computational advantages as a Lagrangian or Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) grid. The IFDM is also capable of treating anharmonic potentials. Example calculations using the IFDM will be presented which include: a one-dimensional Gaussian wave packet tunneling through an Eckart barrier, a one-dimensional bound-state Morse oscillator, and a two-dimensional (2D) model collinear reaction using an anharmonic potential energy surface. Approximate treatments of the quantum hydrodynamic equations will also be discussed which could allow scaling of the calculations to hundreds of degrees of freedom which is important for treating tunneling phenomena in condensed phase systems.

  20. Boundary conditions in tunneling via quantum hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nassar, Antonio B.

    1993-01-01

    Via the hydrodynamical formulation of quantum mechanics, an approach to the problem of tunneling through sharp-edged potential barriers is developed. Above all, it is shown how more general boundary conditions follow from the continuity of mass, momentum, and energy.

  1. Optimization of the configuration of a symmetric three-barrier resonant-tunneling structure as an active element of a quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect

    Tkach, N. V. Seti, Ju. A.

    2011-03-15

    On the basis of a model of rectangular potentials and different electron effective masses in wells and barriers of an open resonant-tunneling structure with identical outer barriers, a theory has been developed and the dynamic conductance caused by the interaction of the electromagnetic field with electrons passing through the structure has been calculated. Using the example of the three-barrier resonant-tunneling structure with In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As wells and In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As barriers, it is shown that, independently of the geometrical sizes of potential wells and barriers, there exist three geometrical configurations (positions of the inner barrier with respect to outer ones) at which the nanosystem, as an active element, provides optimum operating conditions of the quantum cascade detector.

  2. Comment on ``Quantum tunneling time''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahne, G. E.

    2005-02-01

    In this Comment on the paper by Wanget al., Phys. Rev. A692004052108], it is pointed out that (i) a group-theoretical argument advanced in the first part of their derivation is both flawed and not needed in what follows, (ii) they then assert a formula that leads to a physically incorrect phase (as distinguished from group) delay time in the motion of a free particle, and (iii) their subsequent derivation contains a mathematical error, such that the outcome is a new formula for the tunneling time that avoids the second problem, but such that the result is unfounded and is therefore of unknown physical content.

  3. Quantum tunneling dynamics using hydrodynamic trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Eric R.

    2000-06-01

    In this paper we compute quantum trajectories arising from Bohm's causal description of quantum mechanics. Our computational methodology is based upon a finite-element moving least-squares method (MWLS) presented recently by Wyatt and co-workers [Lopreore and Wyatt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 5190 (1999)]. This method treats the "particles" in the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation as Lagrangian fluid elements that carry the phase, S, and density, ρ, required to reconstruct the quantum wave function. Here, we compare results obtained via the MWLS procedure to exact results obtained either analytically or by numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Two systems are considered: first, dynamics in a harmonic well and second, tunneling dynamics in a double well potential. In the case of tunneling in the double well potential, the quantum potential acts to lower the barrier, separating the right- and left-hand sides of the well, permitting trajectories to pass from one side to another. However, as probability density passes from one side to the other, the effective barrier begins to rise and eventually will segregate trajectories in one side from the other. We note that the MWLS trajectories exhibited long time stability in the purely harmonic cases. However, this stability was not evident in the barrier crossing dynamics. Comparisons to exact trajectories obtained via wave packet calculations indicate that the MWLS trajectories tend to underestimate the effects of constructive and destructive interference effects.

  4. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian; GNS theory group Team

    In between 2 metallic nanopads, adding identical and independent electron transfer paths in parallel increases the electronic effective coupling between the 2 nanopads through the quantum circuit defined by those paths. Measuring this increase of effective coupling using the tunnelling current intensity can lead for example for 2 paths in parallel to the now standard G =G1 +G2 + 2√{G1 .G2 } conductance superposition law (1). This is only valid for the tunnelling regime (2). For large electronic coupling to the nanopads (or at resonance), G can saturate and even decay as a function of the number of parallel paths added in the quantum circuit (3). We provide here the explanation of this phenomenon: the measurement of the effective Rabi oscillation frequency using the current intensity is constrained by the normalization principle of quantum mechanics. This limits the quantum conductance G for example to go when there is only one channel per metallic nanopads. This ef fect has important consequences for the design of Boolean logic gates at the atomic scale using atomic scale or intramolecular circuits. References: This has the financial support by European PAMS project.

  5. Macroscopic quantum tunnelling in spin filter ferromagnetic Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Massarotti, D; Pal, A; Rotoli, G; Longobardi, L; Blamire, M G; Tafuri, F

    2015-01-01

    The interfacial coupling of two materials with different ordered phases, such as a superconductor (S) and a ferromagnet (F), is driving new fundamental physics and innovative applications. For example, the creation of spin-filter Josephson junctions and the demonstration of triplet supercurrents have suggested the potential of a dissipationless version of spintronics based on unconventional superconductivity. Here we demonstrate evidence for active quantum applications of S-F-S junctions, through the observation of macroscopic quantum tunnelling in Josephson junctions with GdN ferromagnetic insulator barriers. We show a clear transition from thermal to quantum regime at a crossover temperature of about 100 mK at zero magnetic field in junctions, which present clear signatures of unconventional superconductivity. Following previous demonstration of passive S-F-S phase shifters in a phase qubit, our result paves the way to the active use of spin filter Josephson systems in quantum hybrid circuits. PMID:26054495

  6. Macroscopic quantum tunnelling in spin filter ferromagnetic Josephson junctions

    PubMed Central

    Massarotti, D.; Pal, A.; Rotoli, G.; Longobardi, L.; Blamire, M. G.; Tafuri, F.

    2015-01-01

    The interfacial coupling of two materials with different ordered phases, such as a superconductor (S) and a ferromagnet (F), is driving new fundamental physics and innovative applications. For example, the creation of spin-filter Josephson junctions and the demonstration of triplet supercurrents have suggested the potential of a dissipationless version of spintronics based on unconventional superconductivity. Here we demonstrate evidence for active quantum applications of S-F-S junctions, through the observation of macroscopic quantum tunnelling in Josephson junctions with GdN ferromagnetic insulator barriers. We show a clear transition from thermal to quantum regime at a crossover temperature of about 100 mK at zero magnetic field in junctions, which present clear signatures of unconventional superconductivity. Following previous demonstration of passive S-F-S phase shifters in a phase qubit, our result paves the way to the active use of spin filter Josephson systems in quantum hybrid circuits. PMID:26054495

  7. Resonant tunnelling in a quantum oxide superlattice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Choi, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang A.; You, Jeong Ho; Lee, Suyoun; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2015-06-24

    Resonant tunneling is a quantum mechanical process that has long been attracting both scientific and technological attention owing to its intriguing underlying physics and unique applications for high-speed electronics. The materials system exhibiting resonant tunneling, however, has been largely limited to the conventional semiconductors, partially due to their excellent crystalline quality. Here we show that a deliberately designed transition metal oxide superlattice exhibits a resonant tunneling behaviour with a clear negative differential resistance. The tunneling occurred through an atomically thin, lanthanum δ- doped SrTiO3 layer, and the negative differential resistance was realized on top of the bi-polar resistance switching typicallymore » observed for perovskite oxide junctions. This combined process resulted in an extremely large resistance ratio (~105) between the high and low resistance states. Lastly, the unprecedentedly large control found in atomically thin δ-doped oxide superlattices can open a door to novel oxide-based high-frequency logic devices.« less

  8. Resonant tunnelling in a quantum oxide superlattice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang A.; You, Jeong Ho; Lee, Suyoun; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2015-06-24

    Resonant tunneling is a quantum mechanical process that has long been attracting both scientific and technological attention owing to its intriguing underlying physics and unique applications for high-speed electronics. The materials system exhibiting resonant tunneling, however, has been largely limited to the conventional semiconductors, partially due to their excellent crystalline quality. Here we show that a deliberately designed transition metal oxide superlattice exhibits a resonant tunneling behaviour with a clear negative differential resistance. The tunneling occurred through an atomically thin, lanthanum δ- doped SrTiO3 layer, and the negative differential resistance was realized on top of the bi-polar resistance switching typically observed for perovskite oxide junctions. This combined process resulted in an extremely large resistance ratio (~105) between the high and low resistance states. Lastly, the unprecedentedly large control found in atomically thin δ-doped oxide superlattices can open a door to novel oxide-based high-frequency logic devices.

  9. Quantum Tunneling Current in Nanoscale Plasmonic Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2014-10-01

    Recently, electron tunneling between plasmonic resonators is found to support quantum plasmon resonances, which may introduce new regimes in nano-optoelectronics and nonlinear optics. This revelation is of substantial interest to the fundamental problem of electron transport in nano-scale, for example, in a metal-insulator-metal junction (MIM), which has been continuously studied for decades. Here, we present a self-consistent model of electron transport in a nano-scale MIM, by solving the coupled Schrödinger and Poisson equations. The effects of space charge, exchange-correlation, anode emission, and material properties of the electrodes and insulator are examined in detail. The self-consistent calculations are compared with the widely used Simmons formula. Transition from the direct tunneling regime to the space-charge-limited regime is demonstrated. This work was supported by AFOSR.

  10. Macroscopic quantum tunneling and thermal activation in a small mesa structured Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy intrinsic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitano, H.; Ota, K.; Hamada, K.; Takemura, R.; Ohmaki, M.; Maeda, A.; Suzuki, M.

    2009-03-01

    A nanometer-thick small mesa consiting of only two or three Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) is studied through the switching current distribution measurements down to 0.4 K. Experimental results clearly show that the first switching events from the zero-voltage state for 1 K < T < 4 K are successfully described by a conventional thermal activation (TA) theory for a single Josephson junction, and that they become independent of temperature below T* ~ 0.7 K. We observe the microwave-induced peak in the switching distribution at 0.4 K, which is induced by the microwave irradiation at 55 GHz. These results strongly suggest that the system crossovers to macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) regime below T*, which is as high as the previously reported value for a stacked IJJs with several tens of junctions, in contrast to the recent result on a similar mesa-structured surface IJJ.

  11. Quantum-Sequencing: Biophysics of quantum tunneling through nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    Tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy has extensively been used in physical surface sciences to study quantum tunneling to measure electronic local density of states of nanomaterials and to characterize adsorbed species. Quantum-Sequencing (Q-Seq) is a new method based on tunneling microscopy for electronic sequencing of single molecule of nucleic acids. A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the unique ``electronic fingerprints'' for all nucleotides on DNA and RNA using Q-Seq along their intrinsic biophysical parameters. We have analyzed tunneling spectra for the nucleotides at different pH conditions and analyzed the HOMO, LUMO and energy gap for all of them. In addition we show a number of biophysical parameters to further characterize all nucleobases (electron and hole transition voltage and energy barriers). These results highlight the robustness of Q-Seq as a technique for next-generation sequencing.

  12. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction.

    PubMed

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N(2) power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N). PMID:27453262

  13. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N2 power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N).

  14. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction

    PubMed Central

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N2 power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N). PMID:27453262

  15. Mesoscopic quantum tunneling of the magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbara, B.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Sampaio, L. C.; Park, J. G.; Paulsen, C.; Novak, M. A.; Ferré, R.; Mailly, D.; Sessoli, R.; Caneschi, A.; Hasselbach, K.; Benoit, A.; Thomas, L.

    1995-02-01

    Magnetic relaxation plateaux observed at low temperature in complex systems, are generally attributed to Quantum Tunneling of the Magnetization (QTM). If the experiments are not performed down to low enough temperatures, alternative interpretations can be given in terms of powerlaw distributions resulting from either switching field distributions or/and coupling between switching blocks leading to self-organized criticality. Besides, the first low-temperature/time-dependent magnetization experiments, performed on single sub-micronic particles and on arrays nanoparticles in molecular crystals, are described.

  16. Virtual Processes and Quantum Tunnelling as Fictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Richard T. W.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper it is argued that virtual processes are dispensable fictions. The argument proceeds by a comparison with the phenomenon of quantum tunnelling. Building on an analysis of Lévy-Leblond and Balibar, it is argued that, although the phenomenon known as quantum tunnelling certainly occurs and is at the basis of many paradigmatic quantum effects, the implied conceptualization of it as a free particle burrowing through a potential barrier is flawed. An alpha particle, for example, does not exist as a free particle inside a uranium nucleus and then "burrow through" the massive potential barrier of the repulsive Coulomb potential: rather, it can be interpreted as existing in a bound state which gives it a corresponding (absolutely tiny, but) finite probability of appearing on the other side of the barrier. If the part of the state function representing the transmission through the barrier is conceived as representing a particle trajectory, the particle will have imaginary momentum and negative kinetic energy. A similar analysis then applies to virtual processes. For example, if (as in Hawking's conception of black hole radiation) one imagines a pair of particles created at the Schwarzschild radius, one of which drops into the black hole, at its creation that particle will have imaginary momentum and negative kinetic energy; so will the pion that is imagined as mediating the nuclear exchange force on the standard model. In each case, it is argued, the phenomenon can be understood in terms of a finite probability of transmission predicted by quantum theory, without appealing to particle trajectories. The idea that a particle "penetrates" a barrier that it does not have the energy to surmount, or that a pair of particles is "virtually" produced one on either side of the Schwarzschild radius, in defiance of energy conservation, should be discarded as unphysical.

  17. Quasilinearization method applied to multidimensional quantum tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavy, M.; Cote, Vincent J.

    1994-04-01

    We apply the quasilinearization method of Bellman and Kalaba [Quasilinearization and Nonlinear Boundary-Value Problems (Elsevier, New York, 1965)] to find approximate solutions for the multidimensional quantum tunneling for separable as well as nonseparable wave equations. By introducing the idea of the complex ``semiclassical trajectory'' which is valid for the motion over and under the barrier, and which, in the proper limit, reduces to the real classical trajectory in the allowed region, we obtain an eigenvalue equation for the characteristic wave numbers. This eigenvalue equation is similar to the corresponding equation obtained from the WKB approximation and yields complex eigenvalues with negative imaginary parts. When the barrier changes very rapidly as a function of the radial distance, we can replace the concept of the semiclassical trajectory, which may not be applicable in this case, by the concept of a complex ``quantum trajectory.'' The trajectory defined either way depends on a constant of integration, and by minimizing the action with respect to this constant we can obtain the minimum escape path. The case of two-dimensional tunneling is discussed as an example of this method.

  18. Josephson inplane and tunneling currents in bilayer quantum Hall system

    SciTech Connect

    Ezawa, Z. F.; Tsitsishvili, G.; Sawada, A.

    2013-12-04

    A Bose-Einstein condensation is formed by composite bosons in the quantum Hall state. A composite boson carries the fundamental charge (–e). We investigate Josephson tunneling of such charges in the bilayer quantum Hall system at the total filling ν = 1. We show the existence of the critical current for the tunneling current to be coherent and dissipationless in tunneling experiments with various geometries.

  19. Invisibility of quantum systems to tunneling of matter waves

    SciTech Connect

    Cordero, Sergio; Garcia-Calderon, Gaston

    2009-05-15

    We show that an appropriate choice of the potential parameters in one-dimensional quantum systems allows for unity transmission of the tunneling particle at all incident tunneling energies, except at controllable exceedingly small incident energies. The corresponding dwell time and the transmission amplitude are indistinguishable from those of a free particle in the unity-transmission regime. This implies the possibility of designing quantum systems that are invisible to tunneling by a passing wave packet.

  20. Concrete quantum tunneling spectrum of Schwarzschild black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Si-Na; Zhang, Jing-Yi

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a canonical ensemble model for black hole quantum tunneling radiation is introduced. We find that the probability distribution function is the same as the emission rate of a spherical shell in the Parikh-Wilczek tunneling framework. With this model, the probability distribution function corresponding to the emission shell system is calculated. Therefore, the concrete quantum tunneling spectrum of the Schwarzschild black hole is obtained. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11273009 and 11303006).

  1. Distribution of tunnelling times for quantum electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudge, Samuel L.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-03-01

    In electron transport, the tunnelling time is the time taken for an electron to tunnel out of a system after it has tunnelled in. We define the tunnelling time distribution for quantum processes in a dissipative environment and develop a practical approach for calculating it, where the environment is described by the general Markovian master equation. We illustrate the theory by using the rate equation to compute the tunnelling time distribution for electron transport through a molecular junction. The tunnelling time distribution is exponential, which indicates that Markovian quantum tunnelling is a Poissonian statistical process. The tunnelling time distribution is used not only to study the quantum statistics of tunnelling along the average electric current but also to analyse extreme quantum events where an electron jumps against the applied voltage bias. The average tunnelling time shows distinctly different temperature dependence for p- and n-type molecular junctions and therefore provides a sensitive tool to probe the alignment of molecular orbitals relative to the electrode Fermi energy.

  2. Distribution of tunnelling times for quantum electron transport.

    PubMed

    Rudge, Samuel L; Kosov, Daniel S

    2016-03-28

    In electron transport, the tunnelling time is the time taken for an electron to tunnel out of a system after it has tunnelled in. We define the tunnelling time distribution for quantum processes in a dissipative environment and develop a practical approach for calculating it, where the environment is described by the general Markovian master equation. We illustrate the theory by using the rate equation to compute the tunnelling time distribution for electron transport through a molecular junction. The tunnelling time distribution is exponential, which indicates that Markovian quantum tunnelling is a Poissonian statistical process. The tunnelling time distribution is used not only to study the quantum statistics of tunnelling along the average electric current but also to analyse extreme quantum events where an electron jumps against the applied voltage bias. The average tunnelling time shows distinctly different temperature dependence for p- and n-type molecular junctions and therefore provides a sensitive tool to probe the alignment of molecular orbitals relative to the electrode Fermi energy. PMID:27036425

  3. Optically Modulated Bistability in Quantum Dot Resonant Tunneling Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Qian-Chun; An, Zheng-Hua; Hou, Ying; Zhu, Zi-Qiang

    2013-04-01

    InAs quantum dots are introduced into resonant tunneling diodes to study the electronic transport behavior, and a wide bistability (ΔV ~ 0.8 V) is observed in the negative differential resistance region. Based on an analytic model, we attribute the observed distinct bistability of a resonant tunneling diodes with quantum dots to the feedback dependence of energy of the electron-storing quantum dots on the tunneling current density. Meanwhile, we find that this wide bistable region can be modulated sensitively by light illumination and becomes narrower with increasing light intensity. Our results suggest that the present devices can be potentially used as sensitive photodetectors in optoelectronic fields.

  4. Quantum Adiabatic Algorithms and Large Spin Tunnelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulatov, A.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.

    2003-01-01

    We provide a theoretical study of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm with different evolution paths proposed in this paper. The algorithm is applied to a random binary optimization problem (a version of the 3-Satisfiability problem) where the n-bit cost function is symmetric with respect to the permutation of individual bits. The evolution paths are produced, using the generic control Hamiltonians H (r) that preserve the bit symmetry of the underlying optimization problem. In the case where the ground state of H(0) coincides with the totally-symmetric state of an n-qubit system the algorithm dynamics is completely described in terms of the motion of a spin-n/2. We show that different control Hamiltonians can be parameterized by a set of independent parameters that are expansion coefficients of H (r) in a certain universal set of operators. Only one of these operators can be responsible for avoiding the tunnelling in the spin-n/2 system during the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We show that it is possible to select a coefficient for this operator that guarantees a polynomial complexity of the algorithm for all problem instances. We show that a successful evolution path of the algorithm always corresponds to the trajectory of a classical spin-n/2 and provide a complete characterization of such paths.

  5. Quantum tunneling from scalar fields in rotating black strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohar, H.; Saifullah, K.

    2013-08-01

    Using the Hamilton-Jacobi method of quantum tunneling and complex path integration, we study Hawking radiation of scalar particles from rotating black strings. We discuss tunneling of both charged and uncharged scalar particles from the event horizons. For this purpose, we use the Klein-Gordon equation and find the tunneling probability of outgoing scalar particles. The procedure gives Hawking temperature for rotating charged black strings as well.

  6. Quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process in Lorentzian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Woo-Pyo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2014-08-15

    The quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process between a positive ion and a neutral atom collision is investigated in nonthermal generalized Lorentzian plasmas. The result shows that the nonthermal effect enhances the resonant electron transfer cross section in Lorentzian plasmas. It is found that the nonthermal effect on the classical resonant electron transfer cross section is more significant than that on the quantum tunneling resonant charge transfer cross section. It is shown that the nonthermal effect on the resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with an increase of the Debye length. In addition, the nonthermal effect on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with increasing collision energy. The variation of nonthermal and plasma shielding effects on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process is also discussed.

  7. Single electron tunneling in double and triple quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filikhin, I.; Karoui, A.; Vlahovic, B.

    2016-03-01

    Electron localization and tunneling in laterally distributed double quantum well (DQW) and triple quantum well (TQW) are studied. Triangular configuration for the TQWs as well as various quantum well (QW) shapes and asymmetry are considered. The effect of adding a third well to a DQW is investigated as a weakly coupled system. InAs/GaAs DQWs and TQWs were modeled using single subband effective mass approach with effective potential simulating the strain effect. Electron localization dynamics in DQW and TQW over the whole spectrum is studied by varying the inter-dot distances. The electron tunneling appeared highly sensitive to small violations of the DQW mirror symmetry. We show that the presence of a third dot increases the tunneling in the DQW. The dependence of the tunneling in quantum dot (QD) arrays on inter-dot distances is also discussed.

  8. Macroscopic quantum tunneling of polarization in the hydrogenbonded chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomchuk, P. M.; Krasnoholovets, V. V.

    1997-10-01

    The probability of macroscopic quantum tunneling of polarization in a finite H-bonded chain is treated theoretically with regard to the influence of chain anisotropy. It is shown that the anisotropy stipulated by different microscopical effects plays a major role in the tunneling rate of polarization.

  9. Quantum Tunnelling to the Origin and Evolution of Life

    PubMed Central

    Trixler, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon which becomes relevant at the nanoscale and below. It is a paradox from the classical point of view as it enables elementary particles and atoms to permeate an energetic barrier without the need for sufficient energy to overcome it. Tunnelling might seem to be an exotic process only important for special physical effects and applications such as the Tunnel Diode, Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (electron tunnelling) or Near-field Optical Microscopy operating in photon tunnelling mode. However, this review demonstrates that tunnelling can do far more, being of vital importance for life: physical and chemical processes which are crucial in theories about the origin and evolution of life can be traced directly back to the effects of quantum tunnelling. These processes include the chemical evolution in stellar interiors and within the cold interstellar medium, prebiotic chemistry in the atmosphere and subsurface of planetary bodies, planetary habitability via insolation and geothermal heat as well as the function of biomolecular nanomachines. This review shows that quantum tunnelling has many highly important implications to the field of molecular and biological evolution, prebiotic chemistry and astrobiology. PMID:24039543

  10. Quantum Tunnelling to the Origin and Evolution of Life.

    PubMed

    Trixler, Frank

    2013-08-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon which becomes relevant at the nanoscale and below. It is a paradox from the classical point of view as it enables elementary particles and atoms to permeate an energetic barrier without the need for sufficient energy to overcome it. Tunnelling might seem to be an exotic process only important for special physical effects and applications such as the Tunnel Diode, Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (electron tunnelling) or Near-field Optical Microscopy operating in photon tunnelling mode. However, this review demonstrates that tunnelling can do far more, being of vital importance for life: physical and chemical processes which are crucial in theories about the origin and evolution of life can be traced directly back to the effects of quantum tunnelling. These processes include the chemical evolution in stellar interiors and within the cold interstellar medium, prebiotic chemistry in the atmosphere and subsurface of planetary bodies, planetary habitability via insolation and geothermal heat as well as the function of biomolecular nanomachines. This review shows that quantum tunnelling has many highly important implications to the field of molecular and biological evolution, prebiotic chemistry and astrobiology. PMID:24039543

  11. Multielectron dynamics in the tunneling ionization of correlated quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollstein, Maximilian; Pfannkuche, Daniela

    2015-11-01

    The importance of multielectron dynamics during the tunneling ionization of a correlated quantum system is investigated. By comparison of the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation with the time-dependent configuration-interaction singles approach, we demonstrate the importance of a multielectron description of the tunneling ionization process especially for weakly confined quantum systems. Within this context, we observe that adiabatic driving by an intense light field can even enhance the correlations between still trapped electrons.

  12. Dynamical symmetries in Kondo tunneling through complex quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, T; Kikoin, K; Avishai, Y

    2002-10-01

    Kondo tunneling reveals hidden SO(n) dynamical symmetries of evenly occupied quantum dots. As is exemplified for an experimentally realizable triple quantum dot in parallel geometry, the possible values n=3,4,5,7 can be easily tuned by gate voltages. Following construction of the corresponding o(n) algebras, scaling equations are derived and Kondo temperatures are calculated. The symmetry group for a magnetic field induced anisotropic Kondo tunneling is SU(2) or SO(4). PMID:12366008

  13. Electron Tunneling, a Quantum Probe for the Quantum World of Nanotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipps, K. W.; Scudiero, L.

    2005-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical probe is essential to study the quantum world, which is provided by electron tunneling. A spectroscopic mapping to image the electron-transport pathways on a sub-molecular scale is used.

  14. Effects of the generalised uncertainty principle on quantum tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blado, Gardo; Prescott, Trevor; Jennings, James; Ceyanes, Joshuah; Sepulveda, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    In a previous paper (Blado et al 2014 Eur. J. Phys. 35 065011), we showed that quantum gravity effects can be discussed with only a background in non-relativistic quantum mechanics at the undergraduate level by looking at the effect of the generalised uncertainty principle (GUP) on the finite and infinite square wells. In this paper, we derive the GUP corrections to the tunnelling probability of simple quantum mechanical systems which are accessible to undergraduates (alpha decay, simple models of quantum cosmogenesis and gravitational tunnelling radiation) and which employ the WKB approximation, a topic discussed in undergraduate quantum mechanics classes. It is shown that the GUP correction increases the tunnelling probability in each of the examples discussed.

  15. Quantum tunneling switch in a planar four-well system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gengbiao; Hai, Wenhua

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the tunneling dynamics of a single atom in a planar four-well potential driven by a high-frequency ac field. The quasienergy spectrum exhibits anticrossing and crossing, which are related to selective coherent destruction of tunneling (CDT) with several selectable directions. By using the CDTs of different directions, the switchlike effect is shown for the six tunneling pathways among the four wells. Applying the present results, we suggest a scheme for designing a single-atom quantum motor with the driving field as a quantum starter.

  16. Quantum tunneling switch in a planar four-well system

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Gengbiao; Hai Wenhua

    2011-05-15

    We investigate the tunneling dynamics of a single atom in a planar four-well potential driven by a high-frequency ac field. The quasienergy spectrum exhibits anticrossing and crossing, which are related to selective coherent destruction of tunneling (CDT) with several selectable directions. By using the CDTs of different directions, the switchlike effect is shown for the six tunneling pathways among the four wells. Applying the present results, we suggest a scheme for designing a single-atom quantum motor with the driving field as a quantum starter.

  17. Single to quadruple quantum dots with tunable tunnel couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Takakura, T.; Noiri, A.; Obata, T.; Yoneda, J.; Yoshida, K.; Otsuka, T.; Tarucha, S.

    2014-03-17

    We prepare a gate-defined quadruple quantum dot to study the gate-tunability of single to quadruple quantum dots with finite inter-dot tunnel couplings. The measured charging energies of various double dots suggest that the dot size is governed by the gate geometry. For the triple and quadruple dots, we study the gate-tunable inter-dot tunnel couplings. For the triple dot, we find that the effective tunnel coupling between side dots significantly depends on the alignment of the center dot potential. These results imply that the present quadruple dot has a gate performance relevant for implementing spin-based four-qubits with controllable exchange couplings.

  18. Quantum dot resonant tunneling FET on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, Hakimeh

    2016-07-01

    At this paper a field effect transistor based on graphene nanoribbon (GNR) is modeled. Like in most GNR-FETs the GNR is chosen to be semiconductor with a gap, through which the current passes at on state of the device. The regions at the two ends of GNR are highly n-type doped and play the role of metallic reservoirs so called source and drain contacts. Two dielectric layers are placed on top and bottom of the GNR and a metallic gate is located on its top above the channel region. At this paper it is assumed that the gate length is less than the channel length so that the two ends of the channel region are un-gated. As a result of this geometry, the two un-gated regions of channel act as quantum barriers between channel and the contacts. By applying gate voltage, discrete energy levels are generated in channel and resonant tunneling transport occurs via these levels. By solving the NEGF and 3D Poisson equations self consistently, we have obtained electron density, potential profile and current. The current variations with the gate voltage give rise to negative transconductance.

  19. Ultrafast hole tunneling in asymmetric double quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Mark F.; Ten, Sergey Y.; McGinnis, Brian P.; Hayduk, Michael J.; Khitrova, Galina; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    1995-04-01

    We present the results of an experimental study of tunneling in Asymmetric Double Quantum Well (ADQW) structures for which holes were found to tunnel from the narrow well to the wide well on sub-picosecond time-scales. These times are as fast, or faster than electron tunneling times despite the absence of resonances between hole states. Valence band structure calculations for our ADQW structures indicate that ultrafast hole tunneling can be attributed spin-dependent delocalization of the hole wavefunctions with a concomitant singularity (in principle) in the density of final wide well states.

  20. Tunneling and Speedup in Permutation-Invariant Quantum Optimization Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albash, Tameem

    Tunneling is often claimed to be the key mechanism underlying possible speedups in quantum optimization via the quantum adiabatic algorithm. Restricting ourselves to qubit-permutation invariant problems, we show that tunneling in these problems can be understood using the semi-classical potential derived from the spin-coherent path integral formalism. Using this, we show that the class of problems that fall under Reichardt's bound (1), i.e., have a constant gap and hence can be efficiently solved using the quantum adiabatic algorithm, do not exhibit tunneling in the large system-size limit. We proceed to construct problems that do not fall under Reichardt's bound but numerically have a constant gap and do exhibit tunneling. However, perhaps counter-intuitively, tunneling does not provide the most efficient mechanism for finding the solution to these problems. Instead, an evolution involving a sequence of diabatic transitions through many avoided level-crossings, involving no tunneling, is optimal and outperforms tunneling in the adiabatic regime. In yet another twist, we show that in this case, classical spin-vector dynamics is as efficient as the diabatic quantum evolution (2).

  1. Classical oscillators in the control of quantum tunneling: Numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Susmita; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of a classical anharmonic oscillator is exploited to control the tunneling dynamics of a quantum particle to which the classical oscillator is coupled. The mixed quantum classical problem is investigated at a mean-field like level. The anharmonic strength (λ) , particle mass (Mc) and harmonic stiffness (ωc) of the classical controller are explored as possible control parameters for the tunneling dynamics. The strength, the type of coupling between the quantum system and classical controller and the effective frequency of the controller emerge as crucial factors in shaping the nature and extent of the control. A whole spectrum of possibilities starting from enhancement, suppression to complete destruction of tunneling emerge depending on values assigned to the control parameters, the type of coupling and the control configuration used. When classical controller is replaced by a quantum controller, the control landscape becomes much simpler.

  2. Quantum Monte Carlo Simulation of Tunneling Devices Using Bohm Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriols, X.; García-García, J. J.; Martín, F.; Suñé, J.; González, T.; Mateos, J.; Pardo, D.

    1997-11-01

    A generalization of the classical Monte Carlo (MC) device simulation technique is proposed to simultaneously deal with quantum-mechanical phase-coherence effects and scattering interactions in tunneling devices. The proposed method restricts the quantum treatment of transport to the regions of the device where the potential profile significantly changes in distances of the order of the de Broglie wavelength of the carriers (the quantum window). Bohm trajectories associated to time-dependent Gaussian wavepackets are used to simulate the electron transport in the quantum window. Outside this window, the classical ensemble simulation technique is used. Classical and quantum trajectories are smoothly matched at the boundaries of the quantum window according to a criterium of total energy conservation. A simple one-dimensional simulator for resonant tunneling diodes is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of our proposal.

  3. Instantons in Quantum Annealing: Thermally Assisted Tunneling Vs Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Zhang; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Boixo, Sergio; Isakov, Sergei V.; Neven, Hartmut; Mazzola, Guglielmo; Troyer, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Recent numerical result (arXiv:1512.02206) from Google suggested that the D-Wave quantum annealer may have an asymptotic speed-up than simulated annealing, however, the asymptotic advantage disappears when it is compared to quantum Monte Carlo (a classical algorithm despite its name). We show analytically that the asymptotic scaling of quantum tunneling is exactly the same as the escape rate in quantum Monte Carlo for a class of problems. Thus, the Google result might be explained in our framework. We also found that the transition state in quantum Monte Carlo corresponds to the instanton solution in quantum tunneling problems, which is observed in numerical simulations.

  4. Active quantum plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    Marinica, Dana Codruta; Zapata, Mario; Nordlander, Peter; Kazansky, Andrey K.; M. Echenique, Pedro; Aizpurua, Javier; Borisov, Andrei G.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of localized surface plasmons to squeeze light and engineer nanoscale electromagnetic fields through electron-photon coupling at dimensions below the wavelength has turned plasmonics into a driving tool in a variety of technological applications, targeting novel and more efficient optoelectronic processes. In this context, the development of active control of plasmon excitations is a major fundamental and practical challenge. We propose a mechanism for fast and active control of the optical response of metallic nanostructures based on exploiting quantum effects in subnanometric plasmonic gaps. By applying an external dc bias across a narrow gap, a substantial change in the tunneling conductance across the junction can be induced at optical frequencies, which modifies the plasmonic resonances of the system in a reversible manner. We demonstrate the feasibility of the concept using time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Thus, along with two-dimensional structures, metal nanoparticle plasmonics can benefit from the reversibility, fast response time, and versatility of an active control strategy based on applied bias. The proposed electrical manipulation of light using quantum plasmonics establishes a new platform for many practical applications in optoelectronics. PMID:26824066

  5. Active quantum plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Marinica, Dana Codruta; Zapata, Mario; Nordlander, Peter; Kazansky, Andrey K; M Echenique, Pedro; Aizpurua, Javier; Borisov, Andrei G

    2015-12-01

    The ability of localized surface plasmons to squeeze light and engineer nanoscale electromagnetic fields through electron-photon coupling at dimensions below the wavelength has turned plasmonics into a driving tool in a variety of technological applications, targeting novel and more efficient optoelectronic processes. In this context, the development of active control of plasmon excitations is a major fundamental and practical challenge. We propose a mechanism for fast and active control of the optical response of metallic nanostructures based on exploiting quantum effects in subnanometric plasmonic gaps. By applying an external dc bias across a narrow gap, a substantial change in the tunneling conductance across the junction can be induced at optical frequencies, which modifies the plasmonic resonances of the system in a reversible manner. We demonstrate the feasibility of the concept using time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Thus, along with two-dimensional structures, metal nanoparticle plasmonics can benefit from the reversibility, fast response time, and versatility of an active control strategy based on applied bias. The proposed electrical manipulation of light using quantum plasmonics establishes a new platform for many practical applications in optoelectronics. PMID:26824066

  6. Quantum revivals and magnetization tunneling in effective spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizanac, M.; Altwein, D.; Vedmedenko, E. Y.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum mechanical objects or nano-objects have been proposed as bits for information storage. While time-averaged properties of magnetic, quantum-mechanical particles have been extensively studied experimentally and theoretically, experimental investigations of the real time evolution of magnetization in the quantum regime were not possible until recent developments in pump-probe techniques. Here we investigate the quantum dynamics of effective spin systems by means of analytical and numerical treatments. Particular attention is paid to the quantum revival time and its relation to the magnetization tunneling. The quantum revival time has been initially defined as the recurrence time of a total wave-function. Here we show that the quantum revivals of wave-functions and expectation values in spin systems may be quite different which gives rise to a more sophisticated definition of the quantum revival within the realm of experimental research. Particularly, the revival times for integer spins coincide which is not the case for half-integer spins. Furthermore, the quantum revival is found to be shortest for integer ratios between the on-site anisotropy and an external magnetic field paving the way to novel methods of anisotropy measurements. We show that the quantum tunneling of magnetization at avoided level crossing is coherent to the quantum revival time of expectation values, leading to a connection between these two fundamental properties of quantum mechanical spins.

  7. Tunneling into microstate geometries: quantum effects stop gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Mayerson, Daniel R.; Puhm, Andrea; Vercnocke, Bert

    2016-07-01

    Collapsing shells form horizons, and when the curvature is small classical general relativity is believed to describe this process arbitrarily well. On the other hand, quantum information theory based (fuzzball/firewall) arguments suggest the existence of some structure at the black hole horizon. This structure can only form if classical general relativity stops being the correct description of the collapsing shell before it reaches the horizon size. We present strong evidence that classical general relativity can indeed break down prematurely, by explicitly computing the quantum tunneling amplitude of a collapsing shell of branes into smooth horizonless microstate geometries. We show that the amplitude for tunneling into microstate geometries with a large number of topologically non-trivial cycles is parametrically larger than e - S BH , which indicates that the shell can tunnel into a horizonless configuration long before the horizon has any chance to form. We also use this technology to investigate the tunneling of M2 branes into LLM bubbling geometries.

  8. Quantum tunneling of the non-stationary BTZ black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan; Yang, Shu Zheng

    2009-07-01

    The semi-classical tunneling method is extended to study the Hawking tunneling radiation from the non-stationary BTZ black hole via general tortoise coordination transformation and WKB approximation. In this paper, we simplify the spin-0 scalar field equation and the spin-1/2 Dirac equation at the event horizon of this black hole, and then the quantum tunneling probability and Hawking temperature are obtained. Finally, the correctional tunneling rate is researched, and the results show that after considering the changed background space-time of the non-stationary BTZ black hole, the tunneling rate depends not only on the entropy change but also on the integral about {\\dot r}_H .

  9. Computational modeling of electrophotonics nanomaterials: Tunneling in double quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Vlahovic, Branislav Filikhin, Igor

    2014-10-06

    Single electron localization and tunneling in double quantum dots (DQD) and rings (DQR) and in particular the localized-delocalized states and their spectral distributions are considered in dependence on the geometry of the DQDs (DQRs). The effect of violation of symmetry of DQDs geometry on the tunneling is studied in details. The cases of regular and chaotic geometries are considered. It will be shown that a small violation of symmetry drastically affects localization of electron and that anti-crossing of the levels is the mechanism of tunneling between the localized and delocalized states in DQRs.

  10. Quantum tunneling between Chern states in a Topological Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minhao; Wang, Wudi; Richardella, Anthony R.; Kandala, Abhinav; Li, Jian; Yazdani, Ali; Samarth, Nitin; Ong, N. P.

    The tunneling of a macroscopic object through a barrier is a quintessentially quantum phenomenon important in field theory, low-temperature physics and quantum computing. Progress has been achieved in experiments on Josephson junctions, molecular magnets, and domain wall dynamics. However, a key feature - rapid expansion of the true vacuum triggered by a tunneling event is virtually unexplored. Here we report the detection of large jumps in the Hall resistance Ryx in a magnetized topological insulator which result from tunneling out of a metastable topological state. In the TI, the conducting electrons are confined to surface Dirac states. When magnetized, the TI enters the quantum anomalous Hall insulator state in which Ryx is strictly quantized. If the magnetic field is reversed, the sample is trapped in a metastable state. We find that, below 145 mK, Ryx exhibits abrupt jumps as large as one quantum unit on time-scales under 1 ms. If the temperature is raised, the escape rate is suppressed consistent with tunneling in the presence of dissipation. The jumps involve expansion of the thermodynamically stable state bubble over macroscopic lengths, but dissipation limits the final size. The results uncover novel effects of dissipation on macroscopic tunneling. We acknowledge support from DARPA SPAWAR (N66001-11-1-4110) and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundations (GBMF4539).

  11. Quantum Gravity Corrections to the Tunneling Radiation of Scalar Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Haitang; Ying, Shuxuan

    2016-05-01

    The original derivation of Hawking radiation shows the complete evaporation of black holes. However, theories of quantum gravity predict the existence of the minimal observable length. In this paper, we investigate the tunneling radiation of the scalar particles by introducing the quantum gravity effects influenced by the generalized uncertainty principle. The Hawking temperatures are not only determined by the properties of the black holes, but also affected by the quantum numbers of the emitted particles. The quantum gravity corrections slow down the increase of the temperatures. The remnants are found during the evaporation.

  12. Aharonov-Bohm effect in the tunnelling of a quantum rotor in a linear Paul trap.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Atsushi; Shikano, Yutaka; Toyoda, Kenji; Urabe, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a common fundamental quantum mechanical phenomenon that originates from the wave-like characteristics of quantum particles. Although the quantum tunnelling effect was first observed 85 years ago, some questions regarding the dynamics of quantum tunnelling remain unresolved. Here we realize a quantum tunnelling system using two-dimensional ionic structures in a linear Paul trap. We demonstrate that the charged particles in this quantum tunnelling system are coupled to the vector potential of a magnetic field throughout the entire process, even during quantum tunnelling, as indicated by the manifestation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in this system. The tunnelling rate of the structures periodically depends on the strength of the magnetic field, whose period is the same as the magnetic flux quantum φ0 through the rotor [(0.99 ± 0.07) × φ0]. PMID:24820051

  13. Nonvolatile Quantum Dot Gate Memory (NVQDM): Tunneling Rate from Quantum Well Channel to Quantum Dot Gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasaneen, El-Sayed; Heller, Evan; Bansal, Rajeev; Jain, Faquir

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we compute the tunneling of electrons in a nonvolatile quantum dot memory (NVQDM) cell during the WRITE operation. The transition rate of electrons from a quantum well channel to the quantum dots forming the floating gate is calculated using a recently reported method by Chuang et al.[1]. Tunneling current is computed based on transport of electrons from the channel to the floating quantum dots. The maximum number of electrons on a dot is calculated using surface electric field and break down voltage of the tunneling dielectric material. Comparison of tunneling for silicon oxide and high-k dielectric gate insulators is also described. Capacitance-Voltage characteristics of a NVQDM device are calculated by solving the Schrodinger and Poisson equations self-consistently. In addition, the READ operation of the memory has been investigated analytically. Results for 70 nm channel length Si NVQDMs are presented. Threshold voltage is calculated including the effect of the charge on nanocrystal quantum dots. Current-voltage characteristics are obtained using BSIM3v3 model [2-3]. This work is supported by Office of Navel Research (N00014210883, Dr. D. Purdy, Program Monitor), Connecticut Innovations Inc./TranSwitch (CII # 00Y17), and National Science Foundation (CCR-0210428) grants. [1] S. L. Chuang and N. Holonyak, Appl. Phys. Lett., 80, pp. 1270, 2002. [2] Y. Chen et. al., BSIM3v3 Manual, Elect. Eng. and Comp. Dept., U. California, Berkeley, CA, 1996. [3] W. Liu, MOSFET Models for SPICE Simulation, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2001.

  14. Quantum tunneling observed without its characteristic large kinetic isotope effects

    PubMed Central

    Hama, Tetsuya; Ueta, Hirokazu; Kouchi, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Classical transition-state theory is fundamental to describing chemical kinetics; however, quantum tunneling is also important in explaining the unexpectedly large reaction efficiencies observed in many chemical systems. Tunneling is often indicated by anomalously large kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), because a particle’s ability to tunnel decreases significantly with its increasing mass. Here we experimentally demonstrate that cold hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) atoms can add to solid benzene by tunneling; however, the observed H/D KIE was very small (1–1.5) despite the large intrinsic H/D KIE of tunneling (≳100). This strong reduction is due to the chemical kinetics being controlled not by tunneling but by the surface diffusion of the H/D atoms, a process not greatly affected by the isotope type. Because tunneling need not be accompanied by a large KIE in surface and interfacial chemical systems, it might be overlooked in other systems such as aerosols or enzymes. Our results suggest that surface tunneling reactions on interstellar dust may contribute to the deuteration of interstellar aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, which could represent a major source of the deuterium enrichment observed in carbonaceous meteorites and interplanetary dust particles. These findings could improve our understanding of interstellar physicochemical processes, including those during the formation of the solar system. PMID:26034285

  15. Decoding DNA, RNA and peptides with quantum tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Ventra, Massimiliano; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2016-02-01

    Drugs and treatments could be precisely tailored to an individual patient by extracting their cellular- and molecular-level information. For this approach to be feasible on a global scale, however, information on complete genomes (DNA), transcriptomes (RNA) and proteomes (all proteins) needs to be obtained quickly and at low cost. Quantum mechanical phenomena could potentially be of value here, because the biological information needs to be decoded at an atomic level and quantum tunnelling has recently been shown to be able to differentiate single nucleobases and amino acids in short sequences. Here, we review the different approaches to using quantum tunnelling for sequencing, highlighting the theoretical background to the method and the experimental capabilities demonstrated to date. We also explore the potential advantages of the approach and the technical challenges that must be addressed to deliver practical quantum sequencing devices.

  16. Decoding DNA, RNA and peptides with quantum tunnelling.

    PubMed

    Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2016-02-01

    Drugs and treatments could be precisely tailored to an individual patient by extracting their cellular- and molecular-level information. For this approach to be feasible on a global scale, however, information on complete genomes (DNA), transcriptomes (RNA) and proteomes (all proteins) needs to be obtained quickly and at low cost. Quantum mechanical phenomena could potentially be of value here, because the biological information needs to be decoded at an atomic level and quantum tunnelling has recently been shown to be able to differentiate single nucleobases and amino acids in short sequences. Here, we review the different approaches to using quantum tunnelling for sequencing, highlighting the theoretical background to the method and the experimental capabilities demonstrated to date. We also explore the potential advantages of the approach and the technical challenges that must be addressed to deliver practical quantum sequencing devices. PMID:26839257

  17. Room-temperature resonant quantum tunneling transport of macroscopic systems.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhengwei; Wang, Xuemin; Yan, Dawei; Wu, Weidong; Peng, Liping; Li, Weihua; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xinmin; An, Xinyou; Xiao, Tingting; Zhan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Zhuo; Chen, Xiangrong

    2014-11-21

    A self-assembled quantum dots array (QDA) is a low dimensional electron system applied to various quantum devices. This QDA, if embedded in a single crystal matrix, could be advantageous for quantum information science and technology. However, the quantum tunneling effect has been difficult to observe around room temperature thus far, because it occurs in a microcosmic and low temperature condition. Herein, we show a designed a quasi-periodic Ni QDA embedded in a single crystal BaTiO3 matrix and demonstrate novel quantum resonant tunneling transport properties around room-temperature according to theoretical calculation and experiments. The quantum tunneling process could be effectively modulated by changing the Ni QDA concentration. The major reason was that an applied weak electric field (∼10(2) V cm(-1)) could be enhanced by three orders of magnitude (∼10(5) V cm(-1)) between the Ni QDA because of the higher permittivity of BaTiO3 and the 'hot spots' of the Ni QDA. Compared with the pure BaTiO3 films, the samples with embedded Ni QDA displayed a stepped conductivity and temperature (σ-T curves) construction. PMID:25307500

  18. Coupling quantum tunneling with cavity photons.

    PubMed

    Cristofolini, Peter; Christmann, Gabriel; Tsintzos, Simeon I; Deligeorgis, George; Konstantinidis, George; Hatzopoulos, Zacharias; Savvidis, Pavlos G; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2012-05-11

    Tunneling of electrons through a potential barrier is fundamental to chemical reactions, electronic transport in semiconductors and superconductors, magnetism, and devices such as terahertz oscillators. Whereas tunneling is typically controlled by electric fields, a completely different approach is to bind electrons into bosonic quasiparticles with a photonic component. Quasiparticles made of such light-matter microcavity polaritons have recently been demonstrated to Bose-condense into superfluids, whereas spatially separated Coulomb-bound electrons and holes possess strong dipole interactions. We use tunneling polaritons to connect these two realms, producing bosonic quasiparticles with static dipole moments. Our resulting three-state system yields dark polaritons analogous to those in atomic systems or optical waveguides, thereby offering new possibilities for electromagnetically induced transparency, room-temperature condensation, and adiabatic photon-to-electron transfer. PMID:22491095

  19. Giant fifth-order nonlinearity via tunneling induced quantum interference in triple quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Si-Cong Tong, Cun-Zhu Ning, Yong-Qiang; Wan, Ren-Gang

    2015-02-15

    Schemes for giant fifth-order nonlinearity via tunneling in both linear and triangular triple quantum dots are proposed. In both configurations, the real part of the fifth-order nonlinearity can be greatly enhanced, and simultaneously the absorption is suppressed. The analytical expression and the dressed states of the system show that the two tunnelings between the neighboring quantum dots can induce quantum interference, resulting in the giant higher-order nonlinearity. The scheme proposed here may have important applications in quantum information processing at low light level.

  20. Giant fifth-order nonlinearity via tunneling induced quantum interference in triple quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Wan, Ren-Gang; Tong, Cun-Zhu; Ning, Yong-Qiang

    2015-02-01

    Schemes for giant fifth-order nonlinearity via tunneling in both linear and triangular triple quantum dots are proposed. In both configurations, the real part of the fifth-order nonlinearity can be greatly enhanced, and simultaneously the absorption is suppressed. The analytical expression and the dressed states of the system show that the two tunnelings between the neighboring quantum dots can induce quantum interference, resulting in the giant higher-order nonlinearity. The scheme proposed here may have important applications in quantum information processing at low light level.

  1. Asymptotic Formula for Quantum Harmonic Oscillator Tunneling Probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadczyk, Arkadiusz

    2015-10-01

    Using simple methods of asymptotic analysis it is shown that for a quantum harmonic oscillator in n-th energy eigenstate the probability of tunneling into the classically forbidden region obeys an unexpected but simple asymptotic formula: the leading term is inversely proportional to the cube root of n.

  2. Tunnel-injection GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Jai; Kandaswamy, Prem Kumar; Protasenko, Vladimir; Verma, Amit; Grace Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-01-28

    We demonstrate a GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diode that uses tunnel injection of carriers through AlN barriers into the active region. The quantum dot heterostructure is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN templates. The large lattice mismatch between GaN and AlN favors the formation of GaN quantum dots in the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. Carrier injection by tunneling can mitigate losses incurred in hot-carrier injection in light emitting heterostructures. To achieve tunnel injection, relatively low composition AlGaN is used for n- and p-type layers to simultaneously take advantage of effective band alignment and efficient doping. The small height of the quantum dots results in short-wavelength emission and are simultaneously an effective tool to fight the reduction of oscillator strength from quantum-confined Stark effect due to polarization fields. The strong quantum confinement results in room-temperature electroluminescence peaks at 261 and 340 nm, well above the 365 nm bandgap of bulk GaN. The demonstration opens the doorway to exploit many varied features of quantum dot physics to realize high-efficiency short-wavelength light sources.

  3. Neuroreceptor Activation by Vibration-Assisted Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Hoehn, Ross D.; Nichols, David; Neven, Hartmut; Kais, Sabre

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of receptor proteins that sense molecular signals on the exterior of a cell and activate signal transduction pathways within the cell. Modeling how an agonist activates such a receptor is fundamental for an understanding of a wide variety of physiological processes and it is of tremendous value for pharmacology and drug design. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) has been proposed as a model for the mechanism by which olfactory GPCRs are activated by a bound agonist. We apply this hyothesis to GPCRs within the mammalian nervous system using quantum chemical modeling. We found that non-endogenous agonists of the serotonin receptor share a particular IET spectral aspect both amongst each other and with the serotonin molecule: a peak whose intensity scales with the known agonist potencies. We propose an experiential validation of this model by utilizing lysergic acid dimethylamide (DAM-57), an ergot derivative, and its deuterated isotopologues; we also provide theoretical predictions for comparison to experiment. If validated our theory may provide new avenues for guided drug design and elevate methods of in silico potency/activity prediction. PMID:25909758

  4. Neuroreceptor activation by vibration-assisted tunneling.

    PubMed

    Hoehn, Ross D; Nichols, David; Neven, Hartmut; Kais, Sabre

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of receptor proteins that sense molecular signals on the exterior of a cell and activate signal transduction pathways within the cell. Modeling how an agonist activates such a receptor is fundamental for an understanding of a wide variety of physiological processes and it is of tremendous value for pharmacology and drug design. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) has been proposed as a model for the mechanism by which olfactory GPCRs are activated by a bound agonist. We apply this hyothesis to GPCRs within the mammalian nervous system using quantum chemical modeling. We found that non-endogenous agonists of the serotonin receptor share a particular IET spectral aspect both amongst each other and with the serotonin molecule: a peak whose intensity scales with the known agonist potencies. We propose an experiential validation of this model by utilizing lysergic acid dimethylamide (DAM-57), an ergot derivative, and its deuterated isotopologues; we also provide theoretical predictions for comparison to experiment. If validated our theory may provide new avenues for guided drug design and elevate methods of in silico potency/activity prediction. PMID:25909758

  5. Quantum tunneling radiation from self-dual black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C. A. S.; Brito, F. A.

    2013-10-01

    Black holes are considered as objects that can reveal quantum aspects of spacetime. Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG) is a theory that propose a way to model the quantum spacetime behavior revealed by a black hole. One recent prediction of this theory is the existence of sub-Planckian black holes, which have the interesting property of self-duality. This property removes the black hole singularity and replaces it with another asymptotically flat region. In this work, we obtain the thermodynamical properties of this kind of black holes, called self-dual black holes, using the Hamilton-Jacobi version of the tunneling formalism. Moreover, using the tools of the tunneling approach, we investigate the emission spectrum of self-dual black holes, and investigate if some information about the black hole initial state can be recovered during the evaporation process. Back-reaction effects are included.

  6. Evolution of Plasmonic Metamolecule Modes in the Quantum Tunneling Regime.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Jonathan A; Garcia-Etxarri, Aitzol; Aguirregabiria, Garikoitz; Esteban, Ruben; Narayan, Tarun C; Koh, Ai Leen; Aizpurua, Javier; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2016-01-26

    Plasmonic multinanoparticle systems exhibit collective electric and magnetic resonances that are fundamental for the development of state-of-the-art optical nanoantennas, metamaterials, and surface-enhanced spectroscopy substrates. While electric dipolar modes have been investigated in both the classical and quantum realm, little attention has been given to magnetic and other "dark" modes at the smallest dimensions. Here, we study the collective electric, magnetic, and dark modes of colloidally synthesized silver nanosphere trimers with varying interparticle separation using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). This technique enables direct visualization and spatially selective excitation of individual trimers, as well as manipulation of the interparticle distance into the subnanometer regime with the electron beam. Our experiments reveal that bonding electric and magnetic modes are significantly impacted by quantum effects, exhibiting a relative blueshift and reduced EELS amplitude compared to classical predictions. In contrast, the trimer's electric dark mode is not affected by quantum tunneling for even Ångström-scale interparticle separations. We employ a quantum-corrected model to simulate the effect of electron tunneling in the trimer which shows excellent agreement with experimental results. This understanding of classical and quantum-influenced hybridized modes may impact the development of future quantum plasmonic materials and devices, including Fano-like molecular sensors and quantum metamaterials. PMID:26639023

  7. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in small Josephson junctions in a magnetic field.

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, Yu. N.; Barone, A.; Varlamov, A. A.; Materials Science Division; Max-Planck Inst. for Physics of Complex Systems; Landau Inst. Theoretical Physics; Univ. di Napoli Federico II; Coherentia-INFM, CNR

    2007-01-01

    We study the phenomenon of macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) in small Josephson junctions (JJ) with an externally applied magnetic field. The latter results in the appearance of the Fraunhofer type modulation of the current density along the barrier. The problem of MQT for a pointlike JJ is reduced to the motion of the quantum particle in the washboard potential. In the case of a finite size JJ under consideration, this problem corresponds to a MQT in a potential which itself, besides the phase, depends on space variables. The general expression for the crossover temperature To between thermally activated and macroscopic quantum tunneling regimes and the escaping time {tau}{sub esc} have been calculated.

  8. Quantum tunneling between bent semiconductor nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, A. A.; Chaves, Andrey Farias, G. A.; Pereira, T. A. S.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-11-07

    We theoretically investigate the electronic transport properties of two closely spaced L-shaped semiconductor quantum wires, for different configurations of the output channel widths as well as the distance between the wires. Within the effective-mass approximation, we solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using the split-operator technique that allows us to calculate the transmission probability, the total probability current, the conductance, and the wave function scattering between the energy subbands. We determine the maximum distance between the quantum wires below which a relevant non-zero transmission is still found. The transmission probability and the conductance show a strong dependence on the width of the output channel for small distances between the wires.

  9. Coulomb drag and tunneling studies in quantum Hall bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Debaleena

    The bilayer quantum Hall state at total filling factor νT=1, where the total electron density matches the degeneracy of the lowest Landau level, is a prominent example of Bose-Einstein condensation of excitons. A macroscopically ordered state is realized where an electron in one layer is tightly bound to a "hole" in the other layer. If exciton transport were the only bulk transportmechanism, a current driven in one layer would spontaneously generate a current of equal magnitude and opposite sign in the other layer. The Corbino Coulomb drag measurements presented in this thesis demonstrate precisely this phenomenon. Excitonic superfluidity has been long sought in the νT=1 state. The tunneling between the two electron gas layers exihibit a dc Josephson-like effect. A simple model of an over-damped voltage biased Josephson junction is in reasonable agreement with the observed tunneling I -- V. At small tunneling biases, it exhibits a tunneling "supercurrent". The dissipation is carefully studied in this tunneling "supercurrent" and found to remain small but finite.

  10. Instanton and noninstanton tunneling in periodically perturbed barriers: semiclassical and quantum interpretations.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kin'ya; Ikeda, Kensuke S

    2012-11-01

    In multidimensional barrier tunneling, there exist two different types of tunneling mechanisms, instanton-type tunneling and noninstanton tunneling. In this paper we investigate transitions between the two tunneling mechanisms from the semiclassical and quantum viewpoints taking two simple models: a periodically perturbed Eckart barrier for the semiclassical analysis and a periodically perturbed rectangular barrier for the quantum analysis. As a result, similar transitions are observed with change of the perturbation frequency ω for both systems, and we obtain a comprehensive scenario from both semiclassical and quantum viewpoints for them. In the middle range of ω, in which the plateau spectrum is observed, noninstanton tunneling dominates the tunneling process, and the tunneling amplitude takes the maximum value. Noninstanton tunneling explained by stable-unstable manifold guided tunneling (SUMGT) from the semiclassical viewpoint is interpreted as multiphoton-assisted tunneling from the quantum viewpoint. However, in the limit ω→0, instanton-type tunneling takes the place of noninstanton tunneling, and the tunneling amplitude converges on a constant value depending on the perturbation strength. The spectrum localized around the input energy is observed, and there is a scaling law with respect to the width of the spectrum envelope, i.e., the width ∝ℏω. In the limit ω→∞, the tunneling amplitude converges on that of the unperturbed system, i.e., the instanton of the unperturbed system. PMID:23214856

  11. Coherent tunnelling across a quantum point contact in the quantum Hall regime.

    PubMed

    Martins, F; Faniel, S; Rosenow, B; Sellier, H; Huant, S; Pala, M G; Desplanque, L; Wallart, X; Bayot, V; Hackens, B

    2013-01-01

    The unique properties of quantum hall devices arise from the ideal one-dimensional edge states that form in a two-dimensional electron system at high magnetic field. Tunnelling between edge states across a quantum point contact (QPC) has already revealed rich physics, like fractionally charged excitations, or chiral Luttinger liquid. Thanks to scanning gate microscopy, we show that a single QPC can turn into an interferometer for specific potential landscapes. Spectroscopy, magnetic field and temperature dependences of electron transport reveal a quantitatively consistent interferometric behavior of the studied QPC. To explain this unexpected behavior, we put forward a new model which relies on the presence of a quantum Hall island at the centre of the constriction as well as on different tunnelling paths surrounding the island, thereby creating a new type of interferometer. This work sets the ground for new device concepts based on coherent tunnelling. PMID:23475303

  12. Coherent tunnelling across a quantum point contact in the quantum Hall regime

    PubMed Central

    Martins, F.; Faniel, S.; Rosenow, B.; Sellier, H.; Huant, S.; Pala, M. G.; Desplanque, L.; Wallart, X.; Bayot, V.; Hackens, B.

    2013-01-01

    The unique properties of quantum hall devices arise from the ideal one-dimensional edge states that form in a two-dimensional electron system at high magnetic field. Tunnelling between edge states across a quantum point contact (QPC) has already revealed rich physics, like fractionally charged excitations, or chiral Luttinger liquid. Thanks to scanning gate microscopy, we show that a single QPC can turn into an interferometer for specific potential landscapes. Spectroscopy, magnetic field and temperature dependences of electron transport reveal a quantitatively consistent interferometric behavior of the studied QPC. To explain this unexpected behavior, we put forward a new model which relies on the presence of a quantum Hall island at the centre of the constriction as well as on different tunnelling paths surrounding the island, thereby creating a new type of interferometer. This work sets the ground for new device concepts based on coherent tunnelling. PMID:23475303

  13. Tunneling control of cavity linewidth narrowing via quantum interference in triangular quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Wan, Ren-Gang; Xing, En-Bo; Tong, Cun-Zhu; Ning, Yong-Qiang

    2014-10-01

    A scheme for tunneling control of cavity linewidth narrowing by quantum interference in triangular-type triple quantum dots (TQDs) is proposed. In such system, quantum interference induced by tunneling between the TQDs can result in the appearance of two transparency windows and a steep dispersion. Furthermore, when the sample is embedded in a ring cavity, an ultranarrow transmission peak is obtained within the narrowed transparency windows. And by varying the tunneling, the linewidth and the position of the ultranarrow transmission peak can be engineered. Because no coupling laser is required, the scheme proposed here is more convenient for future experiments and applications in optics, and may be useful in designing novel optoelectronic devices.

  14. Comment on 'Realism and quantum flux tunneling'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leggett, A. J.; Garg, Anupam

    1987-01-01

    A reply is presented to Ballentine's (1987) critique of the Legett and Garg (1985) experiment to discriminate between the experimental predictions of quantum mechanics (QM) and those of a class of macrorealistic theories. Legett and Garg uphold their earlier conclusions on the basis of the fact that the present critique refers to an experiment which was not in fact proposed. It is stressed that the original work involved an analysis according to macrorealism, while the calculations of Ballentine only demonstrate the internal consistency of the formalism of QM when applied to three consecutive actually performed experiments.

  15. Tunneling induced dark states and the controllable resonance fluorescence spectrum in quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Wan, Ren-Gang; Tong, Cun-Zhu; Ning, Yong-Qiang; Qin, Li; Liu, Yun

    2014-08-01

    Optical spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing and manipulating quantum dots (QDs), has been used to investigate the resonance fluorescence spectrum from linear triple quantum dot molecules controlled by tunneling, using atomic physics methods. Interesting features such as quenching and narrowing of the fluorescence are observed. In such molecules the tunneling between the quantum dots can also induce a dark state. The results are explained by the transition properties of the dressed states generated by the coupling of the laser and the tunneling. Unlike the atomic system, in such quantum dot molecules quantum coherence can be induced using tunneling, requiring no coupling lasers, which will allow tunneling controllable quantum dot molecules to be applied to quantum optics and photonics.

  16. Study and manipulation of electron tunneling through quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadrachalam, Pradeep Krishna

    Fermi-Dirac distribution is the fundamental property which governs the electron energy distribution in solids. At finite temperatures, Fermi-Dirac thermal smearing of electron energies limits the operation of many electronic, opto-electronic and spintronic devices. Examples include single electron transistors, quantum dot resonant tunnel diodes for single photon detection, and single electron turnstile devices. To overcome this intrinsic limitation of Fermi-Dirac thermal smearing, these devices have typically been operated at cryogenic temperatures. Room temperature operation of these devices could be realized, however, if the thermal smearing of electron energies could be suppressed. Until now, studies in the fields of electron-tunneling refrigerators and double quantum dot devices have demonstrated limited manipulation/suppression of electron energy distribution, but those have been carried out at cryogenic temperatures. Using a double barrier tunneling junction structure as a model system this research has accomplished the following: * Demonstrated suppression of thermal smearing of electrons at room temperature, without any physical cooling of the system * Demonstrated that cold electrons whose effective temperature as low as ˜45 K can be created at room temperature without any physical cooling * Systematically investigated the phenomenon responsible for suppression in thermal smearing of electron energies * Systematically investigated the cold electron transport in the double barrier tunnel junction structure One of the key achievements of this research was demonstration of effective electron temperature of ˜45K at room temperature without any physical cooling of the system. This was realized by filtering out the thermally excited electrons in a double barrier tunneling junction structure. A discrete energy state of a quantum well, created by band bending of Cr2O3 conduction band, acted as an electron energy filter, effectively suppressing energy

  17. Using Mathematics to Inform Conceptual Reasoning about Quantum Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jeffrey T.; Wittmann, M. C.

    2006-12-01

    Previously, we have reported on work at the University of Maine investigating how undergraduate physics students reason about the phenomenon of quantum mechanical tunneling.(1) The majority of our interview sessions involved a series of qualitative questions regarding a square-barrier tunneling scenario. For a select group of students, we began second interview sessions by asking them to solve the time-independent Schrodinger equation prior to answering a series of conceptual questions. All were able to produce reasonably correct solutions, which could be used throughout the interview to reason about the answers to many of our questions. However, in several instances students either failed to refer to the mathematics when responding, or seemed to struggle with understanding their equations and how the mathematics informed the correct responses, suggesting a discontinuity between their mathematical reasoning and their physical reasoning. 1. M. C. Wittman, J. T. Morgan, and L. Bao. Addressing student models of energy loss in quantum tunneling. Eur. J. Phys. 26, 939-950 (2005).

  18. Quantum Adiabatic Pumping by Modulating Tunnel Phase in Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Masahiko; Nakajima, Satoshi; Kubo, Toshihiro; Tokura, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    In a mesoscopic system, under zero bias voltage, a finite charge is transferred by quantum adiabatic pumping by adiabatically and periodically changing two or more control parameters. We obtained expressions for the pumped charge for a ring of three quantum dots (QDs) by choosing the magnetic flux penetrating the ring as one of the control parameters. We found that the pumped charge shows a steplike behavior with respect to the variance of the flux. The value of the step heights is not universal but depends on the trajectory of the control parameters. We discuss the physical origin of this behavior on the basis of the Fano resonant condition of the ring.

  19. Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of resonant tunneling diodes based on the Wigner distribution function formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-García, J.; Martín, F.; Oriols, X.; Suñé, J.

    1998-12-01

    A tool for the simulation of resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) has been developed. This is based on the solution of the quantum Liouville equation in the active region of the device and the Boltzman transport equation in the regions adjacent to the contacts by means of a Monte Carlo algorithm. By accurately coupling both approaches to current transport, we have developed a quantum simulation tool that allows the use of simulation domains much larger and realistic than those previously considered, without a significant increase in computational burden. The main characteristics expected for the considered devices are clearly obtained, thus supporting the validity of our tool for the simulation of RTDs.

  20. Interlayer tunneling in double-layer quantum hall pseudoferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Balents, L; Radzihovsky, L

    2001-02-26

    We show that the interlayer tunneling I-V in double-layer quantum Hall states displays a rich behavior which depends on the relative magnitude of sample size, voltage length scale, current screening, disorder, and thermal lengths. For weak tunneling, we predict a negative differential conductance of a power-law shape crossing over to a sharp zero-bias peak. An in-plane magnetic field splits this zero-bias peak, leading instead to a "derivative" feature at V(B)(B(parallel)) = 2 pi Planck's over 2 pi upsilon B(parallel)d/e phi(0), which gives a direct measurement of the dispersion of the Goldstone mode corresponding to the spontaneous symmetry breaking of the double-layer Hall state. PMID:11290258

  1. Quantum Tunneling and Spectroscopy of Noncommutative Inspired Kerr Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yan-Gang; Xue, Zhao; Zhang, Shao-Jun

    We discuss the thermodynamics of the noncommutative inspired Kerr black hole by means of a reformulated Hamilton-Jacobi method and a dimensional reduction technique. In order to investigate the effect of the angular momentum of the tunneling particle, we calculate the wave function to the first order of the WKB ansatz. Then, using a density matrix technique we derive the radiation spectrum from which the radiation temperature can be read out. Our results show that the radiation of this noncommutative inspired black hole corresponds to a modified temperature which involves the effect of noncommutativity. However, the angular momentum of the tunneling particle has no influence on the radiation temperature. Moreover, we analyze the entropy spectrum and verify that its quantization is modified neither by the noncommutativity of spacetime nor by the quantum correction of wave functions.

  2. Quantum Tunneling Sb-Heterostructures for Millimeter Wave Radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Joel N.

    2003-03-01

    Imaging in the millimeter wavelength range has been making rapid progress as high speed electronics increase in frequency. Applications include viewing through adverse visibility conditions (fog, smoke, dust, precipitation) and also the relative transparency of clothing (concealed-weapons-detection) and some building materials (through-the-wall-detection). Atmospheric radiometry (climate assessment and weather prediction) already depend heavily on this wavelength range. Astronomical applications include incorporation in instruments for cosmic microwave background detection. An important ingredient is a diode that "rectifies" in a special way. It must convert input power, i.e., voltage squared, into a DC voltage output -- a "square-law" detector. We have recently found that quantum tunneling through an InAs/AlSb/GaAlSb heterostructure system provides the ideal physical mechanism for this purpose.1,2 We will present our results to date, demonstrating how a close coupling of semiconductor quantum tunneling theory with electrical engineering know-how have brought an "exotic" quantum phenomon to practical and economic application. 1. "Sb-heterostructure interband backward diodes" J.N. Schulman and D.H. Chow. IEEE Electron Device Letters 21, 353-355 (2000). 2. "High-Performance Antimonide-Based Heterostructure Backward Diodes for Millimeter-wave Detection" P. Fay, J. N. Schulman, S. Thomas III, D. H. Chow, Y. K. Boegeman, and K. S. Holabird, IEEE Electron Device Letters 23, 585-587 (2002).

  3. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots having tunneling barrier embedded in organic matrix

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.

    2008-08-19

    A plurality of quantum dots each have a shell. The quantum dots are embedded in an organic matrix. At least the quantum dots and the organic matrix are photoconductive semiconductors. The shell of each quantum dot is arranged as a tunneling barrier to require a charge carrier (an electron or a hole) at a base of the tunneling barrier in the organic matrix to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the respective quantum dot. A first quantum state in each quantum dot is between a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the organic matrix. Wave functions of the first quantum state of the plurality of quantum dots may overlap to form an intermediate band.

  4. The pilot-wave perspective on quantum scattering and tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norsen, Travis

    2013-04-01

    The de Broglie-Bohm "pilot-wave" theory replaces the paradoxical wave-particle duality of ordinary quantum theory with a more mundane and literal kind of duality: each individual photon or electron comprises a quantum wave (evolving in accordance with the usual quantum mechanical wave equation) and a particle that, under the influence of the wave, traces out a definite trajectory. The definite particle trajectory allows the theory to account for the results of experiments without the usual recourse to additional dynamical axioms about measurements. Instead, one need simply assume that particle detectors click when particles arrive at them. This alternative understanding of quantum phenomena is illustrated here for two elementary textbook examples of one-dimensional scattering and tunneling. We introduce a novel approach to reconcile standard textbook calculations (made using unphysical plane-wave states) with the need to treat such phenomena in terms of normalizable wave packets. This approach allows for a simple but illuminating analysis of the pilot-wave theory's particle trajectories and an explicit demonstration of the equivalence of the pilot-wave theory predictions with those of ordinary quantum theory.

  5. Creation of wormholes by quantum tunnelling in modified gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battarra, Lorenzo; Lavrelashvili, George; Lehners, Jean-Luc

    2014-12-01

    We study the process of quantum tunnelling in scalar-tensor theories in which the scalar field is nonminimally coupled to gravity. In these theories gravitational instantons can deviate substantially from sphericity and can in fact develop a neck—a feature prohibited in theories with minimal coupling. Such instantons with necks lead to the materialization of bubble geometries containing a wormhole region. We clarify the relationship of neck geometries to violations of the null energy condition, and also derive a bound on the size of the neck relative to that of the instanton.

  6. Quantum tunneling photoacoustic spectroscopy for the characterization of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Rudy, Anna M.; Mandal, Swarnasri; Nowak, Charissa A.; Viator, John A.; Hunt, Heather K.

    2015-03-01

    Thin films continue to show great promise for improving a wide variety of devices in applications such as medical instrumentation, material processing, and astronomical instrumentation. While ellipsometry and reflectometry are standard characterization techniques for determining thickness and refractive index, these techniques tend to require highly reflective or polished films and rely on empirical equations. We have created Quantum Tunneling Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (QTPAS) that uses light induced ultrasound to obtain thickness and refractive index estimates of transparent films. We present QTPAS to be used for the estimation of properties of single layer films as an alternative to ellipsometry and give qualitative sample measurements of the technique's estimated parameters.

  7. Quantum control of molecular tunneling ionization in the spatiotemporal domain

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmura, Hideki; Saito, Naoaki; Morishita, Toru

    2011-06-15

    We report on a method that can control molecular photoionization in both space and time domains. The directionally asymmetric molecular tunneling ionization induced by intense (5.0 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}) phase-controlled two-color laser pulses consisting of fundamental and second-harmonic light achieves the selective ionization of asymmetric molecules in the space domain, and manipulates the birth time and direction of photoelectron emission on an attosecond time scale. This method provides a powerful tool for tracking the quantum dynamics of photoelectrons by using phase-dependent oriented molecules as a phase reference in simultaneous ion-electron detection.

  8. Quantum tunneling of massive spin-1 particles from non-stationary metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.; Övgün, A.

    2016-01-01

    We focus on the HR of massive vector (spin-1) particles tunneling from Schwarzschild BH expressed in the Kruskal-Szekeres and dynamic Lemaitre coordinates. Using the Proca equation together with the Hamilton-Jacobi and the WKB methods, we show that the tunneling rate, and its consequence Hawking temperature are well recovered by the quantum tunneling of the massive vector particles.

  9. Quantum tunneling of the magnetic moment in the S/F/S Josephson φ0 junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovsky, Eugene M.

    2016-04-01

    We show that the S/F/S Josephson φ0 junction permits detection of macroscopic quantum tunneling and quantum oscillation of the magnetic moment by measuring the ac voltage across the junction. Exact expression for the tunnel splitting renormalized by the interaction with the superconducting order parameter is obtained. It is demonstrated that magnetic tunneling may become frozen at a sufficiently large φ0. The quality factor of quantum oscillations of the magnetic moment due to finite ohmic resistance of the junction is computed. It is shown that magnetic tunneling rate in the φ0 junction can be controlled by the bias current, with no need for the magnetic field.

  10. Quantum tunneling of vortices in two-dimensional condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, Assa; Arovas, Daniel P.; Ghosh, Sankalpa

    2006-08-01

    The tunneling rate t{sub v}/({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) of a vortex between two pinning sites (of strength V separated by d) is computed using the Bogoliubov expansion of vortex wave-functions overlap. For BCS vortices, tunneling is suppressed beyond a few Fermi wavelengths. For Bose condensates, t{sub v}=V exp(-{pi}n{sub s}d{sup 2}/2), where n{sub s} is the boson density. The analogy between vortex hopping in a superconducting film and two-dimensional electrons in a perpendicular magnetic field is exploited. We derive the variable range hopping temperature, below which vortex tunneling contributes to magnetoresistance. Using the 'quantum Hall insulator' analogy we argue that the Hall conductivity (rather than the inverse Hall resistivity) measures the effective carrier density in domains of mobile vortices. Details of vortex wave functions and overlap calculations, and a general derivation of the Magnus coefficient for any wave function on the sphere, are provided in appendixes.

  11. Quantum tunneling and vibrational dynamics of ultra-confined water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Ehlers, Georg; Mamontov, Eugene; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Prisk, Timothy R.; Seel, Andrew; Reiter, George F.

    2015-03-01

    Vibrational dynamics of ultra-confined water in single crystals beryl, the structure of which contains ~ 5 Å diameter channels along the c-axis was studied with inelastic (INS), quasi-elastic (QENS) and deep inelastic (DINS) neutron scattering. The results reveal significantly anisotropic dynamical behavior of confined water, and show that effective potential experienced by water perpendicular to the channels is significantly softer than along them. The observed 7 peaks in the INS spectra (at energies 0.25 to 15 meV), based on their temperature and momentum transfer dependences, are explained by transitions between the split ground states of water in beryl due to water quantum tunneling between the 6-fold equivalent positions across the channels. DINS study of beryl at T=4.3 K shows narrow, anisotropic water proton momentum distribution with corresponding kinetic energy, EK=95 meV, which is much less than was previously observed in bulk water (~150 meV). We believe that the exceptionally small EK in beryl is a result of water quantum tunneling ∖ delocalization in the nanometer size confinement and weak water-cage interaction. The neutron experiment at ORNL was sponsored by the Sci. User Facilities Div., BES, U.S. DOE. This research was sponsored by the Div. Chemical Sci, Geosciences, and Biosciences, BES, U.S. DOE. The STFC RAL is thanked for access to ISIS neutron facilities.

  12. The Concrete Quantum Tunneling Spectrum of Reissner-Nordstrom Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sina; Zhang, Jingyi

    2016-03-01

    A canonical ensemble model for a R-N black hole quantum tunneling radiation is introduced in this paper. We discover that the probability distribution function is equal to the emission rate of a spherical shell in the Parikh-Wilczek tunneling framework. Taking the generalized uncertainty principle into account, the probability distribution function corresponding to the emission shell system can be calculated with this model. As a result the concrete quantum tunneling spectrum for a R-N black hole is obtained.

  13. Giant Kerr nonlinearity via tunneling induced double dark resonances in triangular quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Wan, Ren-Gang; Tong, Cun-Zhu; Fu, Xi-Hong; Cao, Jun-Sheng; Ning, Yong-Qiang

    2015-12-01

    A scheme for giant Kerr nonlinearity via tunneling in triangular triple quantum dot molecules is proposed. In such a system, the linear absorption and the Kerr nonlinearity depend critically on the energy splitting of the excited states and the tunneling intensity. With proper parameters, giant Kerr nonlinearity accompanied by vanishing absorption can be realized. The enhancement of Kerr nonlinearity is attributed to the interacting double dark resonances induced by the tunneling between the quantum dots, requiring no extra coupling laser fields.

  14. Controllable optical bistability in triple quantum dot nanostructure via double tunnel coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarzadeh, Hossein

    2014-08-01

    The behavior of optical bistability in triple quantum dot nanostructure using double tunnel coupling inside a unidirectional ring cavity is investigated. Also, the linear and nonlinear absorption of the system are investigated. The double tunneling between the quantum dots can change the absorption of the system. The threshold of OB can be controlled by the intensity of the double tunneling and the detuning of probe field. This may be employed for the development of new types of nanoelectronic devices for realizing switching process.

  15. Macroscopic quantum tunneling and quantum - classical phase transitions of the escape rate in large spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owerre, S. A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review on the theoretical and the experimental developments on macroscopic quantum tunneling and quantum-classical phase transitions of the escape rate in large spin systems. A substantial amount of research work has been done in this area of research over the years, so this article does not cover all the research areas that have been studied, for instance the effect of dissipation is not discussed and can be found in other review articles. We present the basic ideas with simplified calculations so that it is readable to both specialists and nonspecialists in this area of research. A brief derivation of the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics in its original form using the orthonormal position and momentum basis is reviewed. For tunneling of a particle into the classically forbidden region, the imaginary time (Euclidean) formulation of path integral is useful, we review this formulation and apply it to the problem of tunneling in a double well potential. For spin systems such as single molecule magnets, the formulation of path integral requires the use of non-orthonormal spin coherent states in (2 s + 1) dimensional Hilbert space, the coordinate independent and the coordinate dependent form of the spin coherent state path integral are derived. These two (equivalent) forms of spin coherent state path integral are applied to the tunneling of single molecule magnets through a magnetic anisotropy barrier. Most experimental and numerical results are presented. The suppression of tunneling for half-odd integer spin (spin-parity effect) at zero magnetic field is derived using both forms of spin coherent state path integral, which shows that this result (spin-parity effect) is independent of the choice of coordinate. At nonzero magnetic field we present both the experimental and the theoretical results of the oscillation of tunneling splitting as a function of the applied magnetic field applied along the spin hard anisotropy axis

  16. Quantum mechanical tunneling of composite particle systems: Linkage to sub-barrier nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Shotter, A. C.; Shotter, M. D.

    2011-05-15

    A variety of physical phenomena have at their foundation the quantum tunneling of particles through potential barriers. Many of these phenomena can be associated with the tunneling of single inert particles. The tunneling of composite systems is more complex than for single particles due to the coupling of the tunneling coordinate with the internal degrees of freedom of the tunneling system. Reported here are the results of a study for the tunneling of a two-component projectile incident on a potential energy system which differs for the two components. A specific linkage is made to sub-Coulomb nuclear reactions.

  17. Subpicosecond hole tunneling by nonresonant delocalization in asymmetric double quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, M. F.; Ten, S.; McGinnis, B. P.; Hayduk, M. J.; Khitrova, G.; Peyghambarian, N.

    1995-11-01

    We present experimental evidence for subpicosecond hole tunneling in asymmetric double-quantum-well structures. A single tunneling time is observed at low carrier densities indicating that hole tunneling times are at least as fast as electron tunneling times despite the absence of resonances between hole states. We have conducted band-structure and tunneling-time calculations suggesting that nonresonant delocalization of hole wave functions combined with alloy scattering provides an efficient mechanism for fast hole transfer from the narrow well (NW) to the wide well (WW) at finite in-plane momenta. We suggest that holes tunnel to the WW before reaching the bottom of the lowest subband in the NW.

  18. Quantum interference effect in electron tunneling through a quantum-dot-ring spin valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jing-Min; Zhao, Jia; Zhang, Kai-Cheng; Peng, Ya-Jing; Chi, Feng

    2011-12-01

    Spin-dependent transport through a quantum-dot (QD) ring coupled to ferromagnetic leads with noncollinear magnetizations is studied theoretically. Tunneling current, current spin polarization and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) as functions of the bias voltage and the direct coupling strength between the two leads are analyzed by the nonequilibrium Green's function technique. It is shown that the magnitudes of these quantities are sensitive to the relative angle between the leads' magnetic moments and the quantum interference effect originated from the inter-lead coupling. We pay particular attention on the Coulomb blockade regime and find the relative current magnitudes of different magnetization angles can be reversed by tuning the inter-lead coupling strength, resulting in sign change of the TMR. For large enough inter-lead coupling strength, the current spin polarizations for parallel and antiparallel magnetic configurations will approach to unit and zero, respectively. PACS numbers:

  19. Quantum tunneling and scattering of a composite object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahsan, Naureen

    Reaction physics involving composite objects with internal degrees of freedom is an important subject since it is encountered in the context of nuclear processes like fusion, fission, particle decay, as well as many other branches of science. Quantum tunneling and scattering of a composite object are explored in this work. A few model Hamiltonians are chosen as examples where a two-particle system interacts, in one dimension, with a target that poses a delta-potential or an infinite wall potential. It is assumed that only one of the two components interacts with the target. The study includes the harmonic oscillator and the infinite square well as examples of intrinsic Hamiltonians that do not allow the projectile to break up, and a finite square well and a delta-well as examples of Hamiltonians that do. The Projection Method and the Variable Phase Method are applied with the aim of an exact solution to the relevant scattering problems. These methods are discussed in the context of the pertinent convergence issues related thereto, and of their applicability. Virtual excitations of the projectile into the classically forbidden energy-domain are found to play a dominant and non-perturbative role in shaping reaction observables, giving rise to enhanced or reduced tunneling in various situations. Cusps and discontinuities are found to appear in observables as manifestations of unitarity and redistribution of flux at the thresholds. The intrinsic structure gives rise to resonancelike behavior in tunneling probabilities. It is also shown that there is charge asymmetry in the scattering of a composite object, unlike in the case of a structureless particle.

  20. S-matrix and quantum tunneling in gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciafaloni, M.; Colferai, D.

    2008-11-01

    Using the recently introduced ACV reduced-action approach to transplanckian scattering of light particles, we show that the S-matrix in the region of classical gravitational collapse is related to a tunneling amplitude in an effective field space. We understand in this way the role of both real and complex field solutions, the choice of the physical ones, the absorption of the elastic channel associated to inelastic multigraviton production and the occurrence of extra absorption below the critical impact parameter. We are also able to compute a class of quantum corrections to the original semiclassical S-matrix that we argue to be qualitatively sensible and which, generally speaking, tend to smooth out the semiclassical results.

  1. Transient gain-absorption of the probe field in triple quantum dots coupled by double tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Wan, Ren-Gang; Zhao, Shuai; Wu, Hao; Shu, Shi-Li; Wang, Li-Jie; Tong, Cun-Zhu

    2016-06-01

    The transient gain-absorption property of the probe field in a linear triple quantum dots coupled by double tunneling is investigated. It is found that the additional tunneling can dramatically affect the transient behaviors under the transparency condition. The dependence of transient behaviors on other parameters, such as probe detuning, the pure dephasing decay rate of the quantum dots and the initial conditions of the population, are also discussed. The results can be explained by the properties of the dressed states generated by the additional tunneling. The scheme may have important application in quantum information network and communication.

  2. A Planar Quantum Transistor Based on 2D-2D Tunneling in Double Quantum Well Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, W.E.; Blount, M.A.; Hafich, M.J.; Lyo, S.K.; Moon, J.S.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1998-12-14

    We report on our work on the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT), based on the gate-control of two-dimensional -- two-dimensional (2D-2D) tunneling in a double quantum well heterostructure. While previous quantum transistors have typically required tiny laterally-defined features, by contrast the DELTT is entirely planar and can be reliably fabricated in large numbers. We use a novel epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) flip-chip process, whereby submicron gating on opposite sides of semiconductor epitaxial layers as thin as 0.24 microns can be achieved. Because both electron layers in the DELTT are 2D, the resonant tunneling features are unusually sharp, and can be easily modulated with one or more surface gates. We demonstrate DELTTs with peak-to-valley ratios in the source-drain I-V curve of order 20:1 below 1 K. Both the height and position of the resonant current peak can be controlled by gate voltage over a wide range. DELTTs with larger subband energy offsets ({approximately} 21 meV) exhibit characteristics that are nearly as good at 77 K, in good agreement with our theoretical calculations. Using these devices, we also demonstrate bistable memories operating at 77 K. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for room temperature operation, increases in gain, and high-speed.

  3. Electrically tunable spin filtering for electron tunneling between spin-resolved quantum Hall edge states and a quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyama, H. Fujita, T.; Teraoka, S.; Oiwa, A.; Tarucha, S.

    2014-06-30

    Spin filtering with electrically tunable efficiency is achieved for electron tunneling between a quantum dot and spin-resolved quantum Hall edge states by locally gating the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) leads near the tunnel junction to the dot. The local gating can change the potential gradient in the 2DEG and consequently the edge state separation. We use this technique to electrically control the ratio of the dot–edge state tunnel coupling between opposite spins and finally increase spin filtering efficiency up to 91%, the highest ever reported, by optimizing the local gating.

  4. Resonant tunneling and quantum fluctuation in a driven triple-well system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei-Tao; Wang, Shun-Jin; Zhang, Hua

    2010-02-01

    The influence of parameters such as the strength and frequency of a periodic driving force on the tunneling dynamics is investigated in a symmetric triple-well potential. It is shown that for some special values of the parameters, tunneling could be enhanced considerably or suppressed completely. Quantum fluctuation during the tunneling is discussed as well and the numerical results are presented and analysed by virtue of Floquet formalism.

  5. Quantum Tunneling of Water in Beryl: A New State of the Water Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Reiter, George F.; Choudhury, Narayani; Prisk, Timothy R.; Mamontov, Eugene; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Ehlers, George; Seel, Andrew G.; Wesolowski, David J.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.

    2016-04-01

    Using neutron scattering and ab initio simulations, we document the discovery of a new "quantum tunneling state" of the water molecule confined in 5 Å channels in the mineral beryl, characterized by extended proton and electron delocalization. We observed a number of peaks in the inelastic neutron scattering spectra that were uniquely assigned to water quantum tunneling. In addition, the water proton momentum distribution was measured with deep inelastic neutron scattering, which directly revealed coherent delocalization of the protons in the ground state.

  6. Elastic tunneling charge transport mechanisms in silicon quantum dots / Si O 2 thin films and superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illera, S.; Prades, J. D.; Cirera, A.

    2015-05-01

    The role of different charge transport mechanisms in Si / Si O 2 structures has been studied. A theoretical model based on the Transfer Hamiltonian Formalism has been developed to explain experimental current trends in terms of three different elastic tunneling processes: (1) trap assisted tunneling; (2) transport through an intermediate quantum dot; and (3) direct tunneling between leads. In general, at low fields carrier transport is dominated by the quantum dots whereas, for moderate and high fields, transport through deep traps inherent to the SiO2 is the most relevant process. Besides, current trends in Si / Si O 2 superlattice structure have been properly reproduced.

  7. Driven quantum tunneling and pair creation with graphene Landau levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Denis; Fillion-Gourdeau, François; Dumont, Joey; Lefebvre, Catherine; MacLean, Steve

    2016-05-01

    Driven tunneling between graphene Landau levels is theoretically linked to the process of pair creation from vacuum, a prediction of quantum electrodynamics (QED). Landau levels are created by the presence of a strong, constant, quantizing magnetic field perpendicular to a graphene monolayer. Following the formal analogy between QED and the description of low-energy excitations in graphene, solutions of the fully interacting Dirac equation are used to compute electron-hole pair creation driven by a circularly or linearly polarized field. This is achieved via the coupled channel method, a numerical scheme for the solution of the time-dependent Dirac equation in the presence of bound states. The case of a monochromatic driving field is first considered, followed by the more realistic case of a pulsed excitation. We show that the pulse duration yields an experimental control parameter over the maximal pair yield. Orders of magnitude of the pair yield are given for experimentally achievable magnetic fields and laser intensities weak enough to preserve the Landau level structure.

  8. Tunable Josephson effect in hybrid parallel coupled double quantum dot-superconductor tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajput, Gagan; Kumar, Rajendra; Ajay

    2014-09-01

    Using non-equilibrium Green's function approach, we study electronic transport through a parallel double quantum dot (DQD) system symmetrically coupled to conventional superconducting leads. Andreev bound states (ABS) and corresponding resonant Cooper pair electron transmission through such a DQD-superconductor tunnel junction around the Fermi energy, a manifestation of Josephson effect, occur due to proximity effect as a result of superconducting order parameter. Interdot tunnel coupling in parallel coupled DQD system and Coulomb interactions regulate the Josephson effect in a very significant manner. Further, it is also found that interdot tunnel coupling has reverse effect on ABS and Cooper pair tunneling in the presence and absence of Coulomb interactions.

  9. Wide bandgap, strain-balanced quantum well tunnel junctions on InP substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, M. P.; Yakes, M. K.; González, M.; Bennett, M. F.; Schmieder, K. J.; Affouda, C. A.; Herrera, M.; Delgado, F. J.; Molina, S. I.; Walters, R. J.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the electrical performance of strain-balanced quantum well tunnel junctions with varying designs is presented. Strain-balanced quantum well tunnel junctions comprising compressively strained InAlAs wells and tensile-strained InAlAs barriers were grown on InP substrates using solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. The use of InAlAs enables InP-based tunnel junction devices to be produced using wide bandgap layers, enabling high electrical performance with low absorption. The impact of well and barrier thickness on the electrical performance was investigated, in addition to the impact of Si and Be doping concentration. Finally, the impact of an InGaAs quantum well at the junction interface is presented, enabling a peak tunnel current density of 47.6 A/cm2 to be realized.

  10. Quantum Gravity Effects on the Tunneling Radiation of the Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tianhu; Ren, Ruyi; Chen, Deyou; Liu, Zixiang; Li, Guopin

    2016-07-01

    Taking into account effects of quantum gravity, we investigate the evaporation of an Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion black hole. The corrected Hawking temperature is gotten respectively by the scalar particle's and the fermion's tunneling across the horizon. This temperature is lower than the original one derived by Hawking, which means quantum gravity effects slow down the rise of the temperature.

  11. Negative tunneling magneto-resistance in quantum wires with strong spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seungju; Serra, Llorenç; Choi, Mahn-Soo

    2015-06-01

    We consider a two-dimensional magnetic tunnel junction of the FM/I/QW(FM+SO)/I/N structure, where FM, I and QW(FM+SO) stand for a ferromagnet, an insulator and a quantum wire with both magnetic ordering and Rashba spin-orbit (SOC), respectively. The tunneling magneto-resistance (TMR) exhibits strong anisotropy and switches sign as the polarization direction varies relative to the quantum-wire axis, due to interplay among the one-dimensionality, the magnetic ordering, and the strong SOC of the quantum wire.

  12. Accurate numerical verification of the instanton method for macroscopic quantum tunneling: Dynamics of phase slips

    SciTech Connect

    Danshita, Ippei; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2010-09-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of supercurrents of one-dimensional Bose gases in a ring optical lattice to verify instanton methods applied to coherent macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT). We directly simulate the real-time quantum dynamics of supercurrents, where a coherent oscillation between two macroscopically distinct current states occurs due to MQT. The tunneling rate extracted from the coherent oscillation is compared with that given by the instanton method. We find that the instanton method is quantitatively accurate when the effective Planck's constant is sufficiently small. We also find phase slips associated with the oscillations.

  13. Quantitative description of Josephson-like tunneling in {nu}{sub T}=1 quantum Hall bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Hyart, Timo; Rosenow, Bernd

    2011-04-15

    At total filling factor {nu}{sub T}=1, interlayer phase coherence in quantum Hall bilayers can result in a tunneling anomaly resembling the Josephson effect in the presence of strong fluctuations. The most robust experimental signature of this effect is a strong enhancement of the tunneling conductance at small voltages. The height and width of the conductance peak depend strongly on the area and tunneling amplitude of the samples, applied parallel magnetic field, and temperature. We find that the tunneling experiments are in quantitative agreement with a theory that treats fluctuations due to meron excitations phenomenologically and takes tunneling into account perturbatively. We also discuss the qualitative changes caused by larger tunneling amplitudes, and provide a possible explanation for recently observed critical currents in counterflow geometry.

  14. Quantum tunneling splittings from path-integral molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mátyus, Edit; Wales, David J; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2016-03-21

    We illustrate how path-integral molecular dynamics can be used to calculate ground-state tunnelling splittings in molecules or clusters. The method obtains the splittings from ratios of density matrix elements between the degenerate wells connected by the tunnelling. We propose a simple thermodynamic integration scheme for evaluating these elements. Numerical tests on fully dimensional malonaldehyde yield tunnelling splittings in good overall agreement with the results of diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. PMID:27004863

  15. Size dependence in tunneling spectra of PbSe quantum-dot arrays.

    PubMed

    Ou, Y C; Cheng, S F; Jian, W B

    2009-07-15

    Interdot Coulomb interactions and collective Coulomb blockade were theoretically argued to be a newly important topic, and experimentally identified in semiconductor quantum dots, formed in the gate confined two-dimensional electron gas system. Developments of cluster science and colloidal synthesis accelerated the studies of electron transport in colloidal nanocrystal or quantum-dot solids. To study the interdot coupling, various sizes of two-dimensional arrays of colloidal PbSe quantum dots are self-assembled on flat gold surfaces for scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements at both room and liquid-nitrogen temperatures. The tip-to-array, array-to-substrate, and interdot capacitances are evaluated and the tunneling spectra of quantum-dot arrays are analyzed by the theory of collective Coulomb blockade. The current-voltage of PbSe quantum-dot arrays conforms properly to a scaling power law function. In this study, the dependence of tunneling spectra on the sizes (numbers of quantum dots) of arrays is reported and the capacitive coupling between quantum dots in the arrays is explored. PMID:19546498

  16. Quantum susceptance and its effects on the high-frequency response of superconducting tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q.; Mears, C.A.; Richards, P.L. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA ); Lloyd, F.L. )

    1990-12-01

    We have made the first direct measurement of the quantum susceptance that arises from the nondissipative part of quasiparticle tunneling in a superconductor-insulator-superconductor tunnel junction. The junction is coupled to an antenna and a superconducting microstrip stub to form a resonator; the resonant frequency is determined from the response of the junction to broadband radiation from a Fourier-transform spectrometer. A 19% shift of the resonant frequency, from 73 to 87 GHz, is observed, which arises from the change of the quantum susceptance of the junction with dc bias voltage. This shift is in excellent agreement with calculations based on the Werthamer-Tucker theory, which includes the quantum susceptance. We also demonstrate that it is essential to include the quantum susceptance in our theoretical computation to explain the photon-assisted-tunneling steps, which have negative dynamic conductance. Such steps are observed when the junction is pumped at slightly below the resonant frequency of the capacitor and the stub. The quantum susceptance should exist in all tunnel devices whose nonlinear {ital I}-{ital V} characteristics are due to elastic tunneling.

  17. Exchange interaction and the tunneling induced transparency in coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Halyne; Alcalde, Augusto; Ulloa, Sergio

    2014-03-01

    Stacked semiconductor quantum dots coupled by tunneling are unique ``quantum molecule'' where it is possible to create a multilevel structure of excitonic states. This structure allows the investigation of quantum interference processes and their control via electric external fields. In this work, we investigate the optical response of a quantum molecule coherently driven by a polarized laser, considering the splitting in excitonic levels caused by isotropic and anisotropic exchange interactions. In our model we consider interdot transitions mediated by the the hole tunneling between states with the same total spin and, between bright and dark exciton states. Using realistic experimental parameters, we demonstrate that the excitonic states coupled by tunneling exhibit an enriched and controllable optical response. Our results show that through the appropriate control of the external electric field and light polarization, the tunneling coupling establishes an efficient destructive quantum interference path that creates a transparency window in the absorption spectra, whenever states of appropriate symmetry are mixed by the hole tunneling. We explore the relevant parameters space that would allows with the experiments. CAPES, INCT-IQ and MWN/CIAM-NSF.

  18. Control of optical bistability and third-order nonlinearity via tunneling induced quantum interference in triangular quantum dot molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Si-Cong Tong, Cun-Zhu Zhang, Jin-Long; Shan, Xiao-Nan; Fu, Xi-Hong; Zeng, Yu-Gang; Qin, Li; Ning, Yong-Qiang; Wan, Ren-Gang

    2015-06-15

    The optical bistability of a triangular quantum dot molecules embedded inside a unidirectional ring cavity is studied. The type, the threshold and the hysteresis loop of the optical bistability curves can be modified by the tunneling parameters, as well as the probe laser field. The linear and nonlinear susceptibilities of the medium are also studied to interpret the corresponding results. The physical interpretation is that the tunneling can induce the quantum interference, which modifies the linear and the nonlinear response of the medium. As a consequence, the characteristics of the optical bistability are changed. The scheme proposed here can be utilized for optimizing and controlling the optical switching process.

  19. Investigating Quantum Mechanical Tunneling at the Nanoscale via Analogy: Development and Assessment of a Teaching Tool for Upper-Division Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muniz, Marc N.; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2014-01-01

    We report a novel educational activity designed to teach quantum mechanical tunneling to upper-division undergraduate students in the context of nanochemistry. The activity is based on a theoretical framework for analogy and is split into three parts that are linked pedagogically through the framework: classical ball-and-ramp system, tunneling…

  20. Quantum dot single-photon switches of resonant tunneling current for discriminating-photon-number detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Qianchun; An, Zhenghua; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Pingping; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Zhu, Ziqiang; Lu, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Low-noise single-photon detectors that can resolve photon numbers are used to monitor the operation of quantum gates in linear-optical quantum computation. Exactly 0, 1 or 2 photons registered in a detector should be distinguished especially in long-distance quantum communication and quantum computation. Here we demonstrate a photon-number-resolving detector based on quantum dot coupled resonant tunneling diodes (QD-cRTD). Individual quantum-dots (QDs) coupled closely with adjacent quantum well (QW) of resonant tunneling diode operate as photon-gated switches- which turn on (off) the RTD tunneling current when they trap photon-generated holes (recombine with injected electrons). Proposed electron-injecting operation fills electrons into coupled QDs which turn ``photon-switches'' to ``OFF'' state and make the detector ready for multiple-photons detection. With proper decision regions defined, 1-photon and 2-photon states are resolved in 4.2 K with excellent propabilities of accuracy of 90% and 98% respectively. Further, by identifying step-like photon responses, the photon-number-resolving capability is sustained to 77 K, making the detector a promising candidate for advanced quantum information applications where photon-number-states should be accurately distinguished.

  1. Quantum dot single-photon switches of resonant tunneling current for discriminating-photon-number detection

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Qianchun; An, Zhenghua; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Pingping; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Zhu, Ziqiang; Lu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Low-noise single-photon detectors that can resolve photon numbers are used to monitor the operation of quantum gates in linear-optical quantum computation. Exactly 0, 1 or 2 photons registered in a detector should be distinguished especially in long-distance quantum communication and quantum computation. Here we demonstrate a photon-number-resolving detector based on quantum dot coupled resonant tunneling diodes (QD-cRTD). Individual quantum-dots (QDs) coupled closely with adjacent quantum well (QW) of resonant tunneling diode operate as photon-gated switches- which turn on (off) the RTD tunneling current when they trap photon-generated holes (recombine with injected electrons). Proposed electron-injecting operation fills electrons into coupled QDs which turn “photon-switches” to “OFF” state and make the detector ready for multiple-photons detection. With proper decision regions defined, 1-photon and 2-photon states are resolved in 4.2 K with excellent propabilities of accuracy of 90% and 98% respectively. Further, by identifying step-like photon responses, the photon-number-resolving capability is sustained to 77 K, making the detector a promising candidate for advanced quantum information applications where photon-number-states should be accurately distinguished. PMID:25797442

  2. Quantum dot single-photon switches of resonant tunneling current for discriminating-photon-number detection.

    PubMed

    Weng, Qianchun; An, Zhenghua; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Pingping; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Zhu, Ziqiang; Lu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Low-noise single-photon detectors that can resolve photon numbers are used to monitor the operation of quantum gates in linear-optical quantum computation. Exactly 0, 1 or 2 photons registered in a detector should be distinguished especially in long-distance quantum communication and quantum computation. Here we demonstrate a photon-number-resolving detector based on quantum dot coupled resonant tunneling diodes (QD-cRTD). Individual quantum-dots (QDs) coupled closely with adjacent quantum well (QW) of resonant tunneling diode operate as photon-gated switches- which turn on (off) the RTD tunneling current when they trap photon-generated holes (recombine with injected electrons). Proposed electron-injecting operation fills electrons into coupled QDs which turn "photon-switches" to "OFF" state and make the detector ready for multiple-photons detection. With proper decision regions defined, 1-photon and 2-photon states are resolved in 4.2 K with excellent propabilities of accuracy of 90% and 98% respectively. Further, by identifying step-like photon responses, the photon-number-resolving capability is sustained to 77 K, making the detector a promising candidate for advanced quantum information applications where photon-number-states should be accurately distinguished. PMID:25797442

  3. Quantum spin models with long-range interactions and tunnelings: a quantum Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maik, Michał; Hauke, Philipp; Dutta, Omjyoti; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2012-11-01

    We use a quantum Monte Carlo method to investigate various classes of two-dimensional spin models with long-range interactions at low temperatures. In particular, we study a dipolar XXZ model with U(1) symmetry that appears as a hard-core boson limit of an extended Hubbard model describing polarized dipolar atoms or molecules in an optical lattice. Tunneling, in such a model, is short-range, whereas density-density couplings decay with distance following a cubic power law. We also investigate an XXZ model with long-range couplings of all three spin components—such a model describes a system of ultracold ions in a lattice of microtraps. We describe an approximate phase diagram for such systems at zero and at finite temperature, and compare their properties. In particular, we compare the extent of crystalline, superfluid and supersolid phases. Our predictions apply directly to current experiments with mesoscopic numbers of polar molecules and trapped ions.

  4. Tunneling in quantum field theory and semiclassical gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohns, Dan Funch

    In this dissertation we discuss aspects of the transitions between metastable vacua in scalar field theories. These transitions are caused by nucleation of bubbles of one vacuum in a background of another vacuum, and may have relevance in cosmology. Such processes are typically exponentially suppressed in the height and width of the barriers between the vacua. We demonstrate several scenarios where this intuition fails. We use a functional Schrodinger approach to show that tunneling of a scalar field through two barriers can be exponentially faster than tunneling through a single barrier. We determine the conditions that the effective potential must satisfy for a large enhancement in the tunneling rate to be possible. Both the tunneling rate to nearby vacua and to distant vacua in field space can be enhanced by this process. It may be possible to test this phenomenon using superfluid Helium-3. Nucleation of the B phase in samples of the supercooled A phase of superfluid Helium-3 is observed in seconds or minutes, while the characteristic decay time is calculated to be longer than the age of the universe. We propose a resolution to this discrepancy using resonant tunneling. This explanation makes the distinctive prediction that there exist multiple peaks in the nucleation probability as a function of temperature, pressure, and magnetic field. Next we investigate in detail Coleman-de Luccia tunneling. We show that there are four types of tunneling, depending on the importance of thermal and horizon effects. We estimate corrections to the Hawking-Moss tunneling rate, which can be large. Finally, the tunneling rate for a scalar field described by the Dirac-Born-Infeld action is calculated in the Hawking-Moss limit using a stochastic approach.

  5. Quantum tunneling from rotating black holes with scalar hair in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.; Gursel, H.

    2016-06-01

    We study the Hawking radiation of scalar and Dirac particles (fermions) emitted from a rotating scalar hair black hole (RSHBH) within the context of three dimensional (3 D) Einstein gravity using non-minimally coupled scalar field theory. Amalgamating the quantum tunneling approach with the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation, we obtain the tunneling rates of the outgoing particles across the event horizon. Inserting the resultant tunneling rates into the Boltzmann formula, we then obtain the Hawking temperature (T_H) of the 3 D RSHBH.

  6. Theory of High-Energy Features in the Tunneling Spectra of Quantum-Hall Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, A. H.

    2010-11-01

    We show that the low-temperature sash features in lowest Landau-level (LLL) tunneling spectra recently discovered by Dial and Ashoori are intimately related to the discrete Haldane-pseudopotential interaction energy scales that govern fractional quantum-Hall physics. Our analysis is based on expressions for the tunneling density of states which become exact at filling factors close to ν=0 and ν=1, where the sash structure is most prominent. We comment on other aspects of LLL correlation physics that can be revealed by accurate temperature-dependent tunneling data.

  7. Theory of high-energy features in the tunneling spectra of quantum-Hall systems.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, A H

    2010-11-12

    We show that the low-temperature sash features in lowest Landau-level (LLL) tunneling spectra recently discovered by Dial and Ashoori are intimately related to the discrete Haldane-pseudopotential interaction energy scales that govern fractional quantum-Hall physics. Our analysis is based on expressions for the tunneling density of states which become exact at filling factors close to ν=0 and ν=1, where the sash structure is most prominent. We comment on other aspects of LLL correlation physics that can be revealed by accurate temperature-dependent tunneling data. PMID:21231254

  8. Quantum Tunneling of Magnetization in Ultrasmall Half-Metallic V3O4 Quantum Dots: Displaying Quantum Superparamagnetic State

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chong; Zhang, Jiajia; Xu, Jie; Tong, Wei; Cao, Boxiao; Li, Kun; Pan, Bicai; Su, Haibin; Xie, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTMs), stemming from their importance for understanding materials with unconventional properties, has continued to attract widespread theoretical and experimental attention. However, the observation of QTMs in the most promising candidates of molecular magnets and few iron-based compounds is limited to very low temperature. Herein, we first highlight a simple system, ultrasmall half-metallic V3O4 quantum dots, as a promising candidate for the investigation of QTMs at high temperature. The quantum superparamagnetic state (QSP) as a high temperature signature of QTMs is observed at 16 K, which is beyond absolute zero temperature and much higher than that of conventional iron-based compounds due to the stronger spin-orbital coupling of V3+ ions bringing high anisotropy energy. It is undoubtedly that this ultrasmall quantum dots, V3O4, offers not only a promising candidate for theoretical understanding of QTMs but also a very exciting possibility for computers using mesoscopic magnets. PMID:23091695

  9. Macroscopic quantum tunneling of a Bose-Einstein condensate through double Gaussian barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Kenji; Urban, Gregor; Weidemüller, Matthias; Carr, Lincoln D.

    2015-05-01

    Macroscopic quantum tunneling is one of the great manifestations of quantum physics, not only showing passage through a potential barrier but also emerging in a many-body wave function. We study a quasi-1D Bose-Einstein condensate of Lithium, confined by two Gaussian barriers, and show that in an experimentally realistic potential tens of thousands of atoms tunnel on time scales of 10 to 100 ms. Using a combination of variational and WKB approximations based on the Gross-Pitaevskii or nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we show that many unusual tunneling features appear due to the nonlinearity, including the number of trapped atoms exhibiting non-exponential decay, severe distortion of the barriers by the mean field, and even formation of a triple barrier in certain regimes. In the first 10ms, nonlinear many-body effects make the tunneling rates significantly larger than background loss rates, from 10 to 70 Hz. Thus we conclude that macroscopic quantum tunneling can be observed on experimental time scales. Funded by NSF, AFOSR, the Alexander von Humboldt foundation, and the Heidelberg Center for Quantum Dynamics.

  10. Quantum Tunneling of Water in Beryl. A New State of the Water Molecule

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Reiter, George F.; Choudhury, Narayani; Prisk, Timothy R.; Mamontov, Eugene; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Ehlers, George; Seel, Andrew G.; Wesolowski, David J.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.

    2016-04-22

    When using neutron scattering and ab initio simulations, we document the discovery of a new “quantum tunneling state” of the water molecule confined in 5 Å channels in the mineral beryl, characterized by extended proton and electron delocalization. We observed a number of peaks in the inelastic neutron scattering spectra that were uniquely assigned to water quantum tunneling. Additionally, the water proton momentum distribution was measured with deep inelastic neutron scattering, which directly revealed coherent delocalization of the protons in the ground state.

  11. Quantum Tunneling of Water in Beryl: A New State of the Water Molecule.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Reiter, George F; Choudhury, Narayani; Prisk, Timothy R; Mamontov, Eugene; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Ehlers, George; Seel, Andrew G; Wesolowski, David J; Anovitz, Lawrence M

    2016-04-22

    Using neutron scattering and ab initio simulations, we document the discovery of a new "quantum tunneling state" of the water molecule confined in 5 Å channels in the mineral beryl, characterized by extended proton and electron delocalization. We observed a number of peaks in the inelastic neutron scattering spectra that were uniquely assigned to water quantum tunneling. In addition, the water proton momentum distribution was measured with deep inelastic neutron scattering, which directly revealed coherent delocalization of the protons in the ground state. PMID:27152824

  12. The Stokes phenomenon and quantum tunneling for de Sitter radiation in nonstationary coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2010-09-01

    We study quantum tunneling for the de Sitter radiation in the planar coordinates and global coordinates, which are nonstationary coordinates and describe the expanding geometry. Using the phase-integral approximation for the Hamilton-Jacobi action in the complex plane of time, we obtain the particle-production rate in both coordinates and derive the additional sinusoidal factor depending on the dimensionality of spacetime and the quantum number for spherical harmonics in the global coordinates. This approach resolves the factor of two problem in the tunneling method.

  13. Quantum Mechanical Investigation of Mode-Specific Tunneling upon Fundamental Excitation in Malonaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng

    2016-06-01

    We present a quantum mechanical study of mode-specific tunneling upon fundamental excitation in malonaldehyde with a multidimensional theory that utilizes the saddle-point normal coordinates. We find that a ring-deformation normal mode is as essential as the well-known imaginary-frequency normal mode in the multidimensional investigation. The changes in tunneling splittings upon fundamental excitation are calculated. The results are competitive with those from a recently developed mixed classical-quantum method. Moreover, the results are qualitatively consistent with experiment for about half of all the modes. PMID:27192182

  14. Cavity linewidth narrowing by tunneling induced double dark resonances in triple quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Wan, Ren-Gang; Li, Lian-He; Tong, Cun-Zhu; Ning, Yong-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    A scheme for obtaining a tunable ultranarrow cavity transmission controlled by two tunneling in triple quantum dots system is proposed. In such system, the tunneling can induce double dark resonances, resulting in the appearance of two transparency windows. With the steep dispersion within the narrowed transparency windows, an ultranarrow transmission peak can be obtained, compared with that of double quantum dots system. Furthermore, by varying the energy splitting, the linewidth and the position of the ultranarrow transmission peak can be engineered. Because no coupling laser is required, the scheme proposed here is more convenient for future experiments and applications in optics, and may be useful in designing novel optoelectronic devices.

  15. Significant Quantum Effects in Hydrogen Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kyriakou, Georgios; Davidson, Erlend R.; Peng, Guowen; Roling, Luke T.; Singh, Suyash; Boucher, Matthew B.; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2014-03-31

    Dissociation of molecular hydrogen is an important step in a wide variety of chemical, biological, and physical processes. Due to the light mass of hydrogen, it is recognized that quantum effects are often important to its reactivity. However, understanding how quantum effects impact the reactivity of hydrogen is still in its infancy. Here, we examine this issue using a well-defined Pd/Cu(111) alloy that allows the activation of hydrogen and deuterium molecules to be examined at individual Pd atom surface sites over a wide range of temperatures. Experiments comparing the uptake of hydrogen and deuterium as a function of temperature reveal completely different behavior of the two species. The rate of hydrogen activation increases at lower sample temperature, whereas deuterium activation slows as the temperature is lowered. Density functional theory simulations in which quantum nuclear effects are accounted for reveal that tunneling through the dissociation barrier is prevalent for H2 up to 190 K and for D2 up to 140 K. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the effective barrier to H2 dissociation is so low that hydrogen uptake on the surface is limited merely by thermodynamics, whereas the D2 dissociation process is controlled by kinetics. These data illustrate the complexity and inherent quantum nature of this ubiquitous and seemingly simple chemical process. Examining these effects in other systems with a similar range of approaches may uncover temperature regimes where quantum effects can be harnessed, yielding greater control of bond-breaking processes at surfaces and uncovering useful chemistries such as selective bond activation or isotope separation.

  16. Significant Quantum Effects in Hydrogen Activation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Dissociation of molecular hydrogen is an important step in a wide variety of chemical, biological, and physical processes. Due to the light mass of hydrogen, it is recognized that quantum effects are often important to its reactivity. However, understanding how quantum effects impact the reactivity of hydrogen is still in its infancy. Here, we examine this issue using a well-defined Pd/Cu(111) alloy that allows the activation of hydrogen and deuterium molecules to be examined at individual Pd atom surface sites over a wide range of temperatures. Experiments comparing the uptake of hydrogen and deuterium as a function of temperature reveal completely different behavior of the two species. The rate of hydrogen activation increases at lower sample temperature, whereas deuterium activation slows as the temperature is lowered. Density functional theory simulations in which quantum nuclear effects are accounted for reveal that tunneling through the dissociation barrier is prevalent for H2 up to ∼190 K and for D2 up to ∼140 K. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the effective barrier to H2 dissociation is so low that hydrogen uptake on the surface is limited merely by thermodynamics, whereas the D2 dissociation process is controlled by kinetics. These data illustrate the complexity and inherent quantum nature of this ubiquitous and seemingly simple chemical process. Examining these effects in other systems with a similar range of approaches may uncover temperature regimes where quantum effects can be harnessed, yielding greater control of bond-breaking processes at surfaces and uncovering useful chemistries such as selective bond activation or isotope separation. PMID:24684530

  17. Active Control of Wind Tunnel Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Patrick (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    The need for an adaptive active control system was realized, since a wind tunnel is subjected to variations in air velocity, temperature, air turbulence, and some other factors such as nonlinearity. Among many adaptive algorithms, the Least Mean Squares (LMS) algorithm, which is the simplest one, has been used in an Active Noise Control (ANC) system by some researchers. However, Eriksson's results, Eriksson (1985), showed instability in the ANC system with an ER filter for random noise input. The Restricted Least Squares (RLS) algorithm, although computationally more complex than the LMS algorithm, has better convergence and stability properties. The ANC system in the present work was simulated by using an FIR filter with an RLS algorithm for different inputs and for a number of plant models. Simulation results for the ANC system with acoustic feedback showed better robustness when used with the RLS algorithm than with the LMS algorithm for all types of inputs. Overall attenuation in the frequency domain was better in the case of the RLS adaptive algorithm. Simulation results with a more realistic plant model and an RLS adaptive algorithm showed a slower convergence rate than the case with an acoustic plant as a delay plant. However, the attenuation properties were satisfactory for the simulated system with the modified plant. The effect of filter length on the rate of convergence and attenuation was studied. It was found that the rate of convergence decreases with increase in filter length, whereas the attenuation increases with increase in filter length. The final design of the ANC system was simulated and found to have a reasonable convergence rate and good attenuation properties for an input containing discrete frequencies and random noise.

  18. Optically active quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, Valerie; Govan, Joseph; Loudon, Alexander; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun'ko, Yurii K.

    2015-10-01

    The main goal of our research is to develop new types of technologically important optically active quantum dot (QD) based materials, study their properties and explore their biological applications. For the first time chiral II-VI QDs have been prepared by us using microwave induced heating with the racemic (Rac), D- and L-enantiomeric forms of penicillamine as stabilisers. Circular dichroism (CD) studies of these QDs have shown that D- and L-penicillamine stabilised particles produced mirror image CD spectra, while the particles prepared with a Rac mixture showed only a weak signal. It was also demonstrated that these QDs show very broad emission bands between 400 and 700 nm due to defects or trap states on the surfaces of the nanocrystals. These QDs have demonstrated highly specific chiral recognition of various biological species including aminoacids. The utilisation of chiral stabilisers also allowed the preparation of new water soluble white emitting CdS nano-tetrapods, which demonstrated circular dichroism in the band-edge region of the spectrum. Biological testing of chiral CdS nanotetrapods displayed a chiral bias for an uptake of the D- penicillamine stabilised nano-tetrapods by cancer cells. It is expected that this research will open new horizons in the chemistry of chiral nanomaterials and their application in nanobiotechnology, medicine and optical chemo- and bio-sensing.

  19. Construction monitoring activities in the ESF starter tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Pott, J.; Carlisle, S.

    1994-05-01

    In situ design verification activities am being conducted in the North Ramp Starter Tunnel of the Yucca Mountain Project Exploratory Studies Facility. These activities include: monitoring the peak particle velocities and evaluating the damage to the rock mass associated with construction blasting, assessing the rock mass quality surrounding the tunnel, monitoring the performance of the installed ground support, and monitoring the stability of the tunnel. In this paper, examples of the data that have been collected and preliminary conclusions from the data are presented.

  20. Charged Fermions Tunnel from the Kerr-Newman Black Hole Influenced by Quantum Gravity Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Ruyi; Chen, Deyou; Pu, Jin

    2016-03-01

    Taking into account quantum gravity effects, we investigate the tunnelling radiation of charged fermions in the Kerr-Newman black hole. The result shows that the corrected Hawking temperature is determined not only by the parameters of the black hole, but also by the energy, angular momentum and mass of the emitted fermion. Meanwhile, an interesting found is that the temperature is affected by the angle 𝜃. The quantum gravity correction slows down the evaporation.

  1. Strongly confined tunnel-coupled one-dimensional electron systems from an asymmetric double quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, S. S.; Fischer, S. F.; Kunze, U.; Schuh, D.; Abstreiter, G.

    2008-03-01

    Vertically stacked quantum point contacts (QPCs) are prepared by atomic force microscope (AFM) lithography from an asymmetric GaAs/AlGaAs double quantum well (DQW) heterostructure. Top- and back-gate voltages are used to tune the tunnel-coupled QPCs, and back-gate bias cooling is employed to investigate coupled and decoupled one-dimensional (1D) modes. Parity dependent mode coupling is invoked by the particular asymmetry in the vertical DQW confinement.

  2. Tunneling dynamics with a mixed quantum-classical method: Quantum corrected propagator combined with frozen Gaussian wave packets

    SciTech Connect

    Gelman, David; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2008-07-14

    The recently developed mixed quantum-classical propagation method is extended to treat tunneling effects in multidimensional systems. Formulated for systems consisting of a quantum primary part and a classical bath of heavier particles, the method employs a frozen Gaussian description for the bath degrees of freedom, while the dynamics of the quantum subsystem is governed by a corrected propagator. The corrections are defined in terms of matrix elements of zeroth-order propagators. The method is applied to a model system of a double-well potential bilinearly coupled to a harmonic oscillator. The extension of the method, which includes nondiagonal elements of the correction propagator, enables an accurate treatment of tunneling in an antisymmetric double-well potential.

  3. Quantum chaotic tunneling in graphene systems with electron-electron interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Lei; Wang, Guanglei; Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-12-01

    An outstanding and fundamental problem in contemporary physics is to include and probe the many-body effect in the study of relativistic quantum manifestations of classical chaos. We address this problem using graphene systems described by the Hubbard Hamiltonian in the setting of resonant tunneling. Such a system consists of two symmetric potential wells separated by a potential barrier, and the geometric shape of the whole domain can be chosen to generate integrable or chaotic dynamics in the classical limit. Employing a standard mean-field approach to calculating a large number of eigenenergies and eigenstates, we uncover a class of localized states with near-zero tunneling in the integrable systems. These states are not the edge states typically seen in graphene systems, and as such they are the consequence of many-body interactions. The physical origin of the non-edge-state type of localized states can be understood by the one-dimensional relativistic quantum tunneling dynamics through the solutions of the Dirac equation with appropriate boundary conditions. We demonstrate that, when the geometry of the system is modified to one with chaos, the localized states are effectively removed, implying that in realistic situations where many-body interactions are present, classical chaos is capable of facilitating greatly quantum tunneling. This result, besides its fundamental importance, can be useful for the development of nanoscale devices such as graphene-based resonant-tunneling diodes.

  4. Tunneling and Speedup in Quantum Optimization for Permutation-Symmetric Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukrishnan, Siddharth; Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2016-07-01

    Tunneling is often claimed to be the key mechanism underlying possible speedups in quantum optimization via quantum annealing (QA), especially for problems featuring a cost function with tall and thin barriers. We present and analyze several counterexamples from the class of perturbed Hamming weight optimization problems with qubit permutation symmetry. We first show that, for these problems, the adiabatic dynamics that make tunneling possible should be understood not in terms of the cost function but rather the semiclassical potential arising from the spin-coherent path-integral formalism. We then provide an example where the shape of the barrier in the final cost function is short and wide, which might suggest no quantum advantage for QA, yet where tunneling renders QA superior to simulated annealing in the adiabatic regime. However, the adiabatic dynamics turn out not be optimal. Instead, an evolution involving a sequence of diabatic transitions through many avoided-level crossings, involving no tunneling, is optimal and outperforms adiabatic QA. We show that this phenomenon of speedup by diabatic transitions is not unique to this example, and we provide an example where it provides an exponential speedup over adiabatic QA. In yet another twist, we show that a classical algorithm, spin-vector dynamics, is at least as efficient as diabatic QA. Finally, in a different example with a convex cost function, the diabatic transitions result in a speedup relative to both adiabatic QA with tunneling and classical spin-vector dynamics.

  5. Effects of the interfacial polarization on tunneling in surface coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virk, Kuljit S.; Reichman, David R.; Hybertsen, Mark S.

    2012-10-01

    Polarization effects are included exactly in a model for a quantum dot in close proximity to a planar interface. Efficient incorporation of this potential into the Schrödinger equation is utilized to map out the influence of the image potential effects on carrier tunneling in such heterostructures. In particular, the interplay between carrier mass and the dielectric constants of a quantum dot, its surrounding matrix, and the electrode is studied. We find that the polarizability of the planar electrode structure can significantly increase the tunneling rates for heavier carriers, potentially resulting in a qualitative change in the dependence of tunneling rate on mass. Our method for treating polarization can be generalized to the screening of two-particle interactions and can thus be applied to calculations such as exciton dissociation and the Coulomb blockade. In contrast to tunneling via intermediate surface localized states of the quantum dot, our work identifies the parameter space over which volume states undergo significant modification in their tunneling characteristics.

  6. Photon-assisted tunneling in an asymmetrically coupled triple quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bao-Chuan; Cao, Gang; Chen, Bao-Bao; Yu, Guo-Dong; Li, Hai-Ou; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2016-08-01

    The gate-defined quantum dot is regarded as one of the basic structures required for scalable semiconductor quantum processors. Here, we demonstrate a structure that contains three quantum dots scaled in series. The electron number of each dot and the tunnel coupling between them can be tuned conveniently using splitting gates. We tune the quantum dot array asymmetrically such that the tunnel coupling between the right dot and the central dot is much larger than that between the left dot and the central dot. When driven by microwaves, the sidebands of the photon-assisted tunneling process appear not only in the left-to-central dot transition region but also in the left-to-right dot transition region. These sidebands are both attributed to the left-to-central transition for asymmetric coupling. Our result shows that there is a region of a triple quantum dot structure that remains indistinct when studied with a normal two-dimensional charge stability diagram; this will be helpful in future studies of the scalability of quantum dot systems.

  7. Scaling for quantum tunneling current in nano- and subnano-scale plasmonic junctions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    When two conductors are separated by a sufficiently thin insulator, electrical current can flow between them by quantum tunneling. This paper presents a self-consistent model of tunneling current in a nano- and subnano-meter metal-insulator-metal plasmonic junction, by including the effects of space charge and exchange correlation potential. It is found that the J-V curve of the junction may be divided into three regimes: direct tunneling, field emission, and space-charge-limited regime. In general, the space charge inside the insulator reduces current transfer across the junction, whereas the exchange-correlation potential promotes current transfer. It is shown that these effects may modify the current density by orders of magnitude from the widely used Simmons’ formula, which is only accurate for a limited parameter space (insulator thickness > 1 nm and barrier height > 3 eV) in the direct tunneling regime. The proposed self-consistent model may provide a more accurate evaluation of the tunneling current in the other regimes. The effects of anode emission and material properties (i.e. work function of the electrodes, electron affinity and permittivity of the insulator) are examined in detail in various regimes. Our simple model and the general scaling for tunneling current may provide insights to new regimes of quantum plasmonics. PMID:25988951

  8. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, C.A.

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus_minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker`s theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

  9. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, C.A.

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker's theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

  10. GaN-based vertical-cavity laser performance improvements using tunnel-junction-cascaded active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Piprek, Joachim

    2014-07-07

    This Letter investigates the output power enhancement achieved by tunnel junction insertion into the InGaN multi-quantum well (MQW) active region of a 410 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser which enables the repeated use of carriers for light generation (carrier recycling). While the number of quantum wells remains unchanged, the tunnel junction eliminates absorption caused by the non-uniform MQW carrier distribution. The thermal resistance drops and the excess bias lead to a surprisingly small rise in self-heating.

  11. Quantum dots as active material for quantum cascade lasers: comparison to quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Stephan; Chow, Weng W.; Schneider, Hans Christian

    2016-03-01

    We review a microscopic laser theory for quantum dots as active material for quantum cascade lasers, in which carrier collisions are treated at the level of quantum kinetic equations. The computed characteristics of such a quantum-dot active material are compared to a state-of-the-art quantum-well quantum cascade laser. We find that the current requirement to achieve a comparable gain-length product is reduced compared to that of the quantum-well quantum cascade laser.

  12. Deeper Look at Student Learning of Quantum Mechanics: The Case of Tunneling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKagan, S. B.; Perkins, K. K.; Wieman, C. E.

    2008-01-01

    We report on a large-scale study of student learning of quantum tunneling in four traditional and four transformed modern physics courses. In the transformed courses, which were designed to address student difficulties found in previous research, students still struggle with many of the same issues found in other courses. However, the reasons for…

  13. Overspinning a nearly extreme charged black hole via a quantum tunneling process.

    PubMed

    Matsas, George E A; da Silva, André R R

    2007-11-01

    We examine a nearly extreme macroscopic Reissner-Nördstrom black hole in the context of semiclassical gravity. The absorption rate associated with the quantum tunneling process of scalar particles whereby this black hole can acquire enough angular momentum to violate the weak cosmic-censorship conjecture is shown to be nonzero. PMID:17995395

  14. Optical Blocking of Electron Tunneling into a Single Self-Assembled Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzmann, A.; Merkel, B.; Labud, P. A.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.; Lorke, A.; Geller, M.

    2016-07-01

    Time-resolved resonance fluorescence (RF) is used to analyze electron tunneling between a single self-assembled quantum dot (QD) and an electron reservoir. In equilibrium, the RF intensity reflects the average electron occupation of the QD and exhibits a gate voltage dependence that is given by the Fermi distribution in the reservoir. In the time-resolved signal, however, we find that the relaxation rate for electron tunneling is, surprisingly, independent of the occupation in the charge reservoir—in contrast to results from all-electrical transport measurements. Using a master equation approach, which includes both the electron tunneling and the optical excitation or recombination, we are able to explain the experimental data by optical blocking, which also reduces the electron tunneling rate when the QD is occupied by an exciton.

  15. Quantum Tunneling Enabled Self-Assembly of Hydrogen Atoms on Cu(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Jewell, April D.; Peng, Guowen; Mattera, Michael F.; Lewis, Emily A.; Murphy, Colin J.; Kyriakou, Georgios; Mavrikakis, Manos; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2012-11-27

    Atomic and molecular self-assembly are key phenomena that underpin many important technologies. Typically, thermally enabled diffusion allows a system to sample many areas of configurational space, and ordered assemblies evolve that optimize interactions between species. Herein we describe a system in which the diffusion is quantum tunneling in nature and report the self-assembly of H atoms on a Cu(111) surface into complex arrays based on local clustering followed by larger scale islanding of these clusters. By scanning tunneling microscope tip-induced scrambling of H atom assemblies, we are able to watch the atomic scale details of H atom self-assembly in real time. The ordered arrangements we observe are complex and very different from those formed by H on other metals that occur in much simpler geometries. We contrast the diffusion and assembly of H with D, which has a much slower tunneling rate and is not able to form the large islands observed with H over equivalent time scales. Using density functional theory, we examine the interaction of H atoms on Cu(111) by calculating the differential binding energy as a function of H coverage. At the temperature of the experiments (5 K), H(D) diffusion by quantum tunneling dominates. The quantum-tunneling-enabled H and D diffusion is studied using a semiclassically corrected transition state theory coupled with density functional theory. This system constitutes the first example of quantum-tunneling-enabled self-assembly, while simultaneously demonstrating the complex ordering of H on Cu(111), a catalytically relevant surface.

  16. Quantum tunneling of two coupled single-molecular magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jianming; Chen, Zhide; Shen, Shunqing

    2003-03-01

    Jian-Ming Hu, Zhi-De Chen and Shun-Qing Shen Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong December 02, 2002 Very recently a supramolecular dimer of two single-molecule magnets (SMM) was reported to be synthesized successfully. Two single-molecule magnets are coupled antiferromagnetically to form a supramolecule dimer. We study the coupling effect and tunneling process by the numerical exact diagonalization method. The sweeping rate effect in the derivatives of hysteresis loops has been quantitatively investigated using the modified Landau-Zener model. In addiction we find that exchange coupling between the two SMMs provides a biased field to expel the tunneling between SMMs to two new resonant points via an intermediate state, and direct tunneling is prohibited. The model parameters are calculated for the dimer based on the tunneling process. The outcome indicates that the coupling effect will not change the parameters of each SMM too much at all. This work is supported by a CRCG grant of The University of Hong Kong.

  17. Time delay of wave packets during their tunnelling through a quantum diode

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, N A; Skalozub, V V

    2014-04-28

    A modified saddle-point method is used to investigate the process of propagation of a wave packet through a quantum diode. A scattering matrix is constructed for the structure in question. The case of tunnelling of a packet with a Gaussian envelope through the diode is considered in detail. The time delay and the shape of the wave packet transmitted are calculated. The dependence of the delay time on the characteristics of the input packet and the internal characteristics of the quantum diode is studied. Possible applications of the results obtained are discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  18. Phonon-Assisted Resonant Tunnelling through a Triple-Quantum-Dot: a Phonon-Signal Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiao-Yun; Dong, Bing; Lei, Xiao-lin

    2008-02-01

    We study the effect of electron-phonon interaction on current and zero-frequency shot noise in resonant tunnelling through a series triple-quantum-dot coupling to a local phonon mode by means of a nonperturbative mapping technique along with the Green function formulation. By fixing the energy difference between the first two quantum dots to be equal to phonon frequency and sweeping the level of the third quantum dot, we find a largely enhanced current spectrum due to phonon effect, and in particular we predict current peaks corresponding to phonon-absorption and phonon-emission assisted resonant tunnelling processes, which show that this system can be acted as a sensitive phonon-signal detector or as a cascade phonon generator.

  19. Nuclear quantum effects of hydrogen bonds probed by tip-enhanced inelastic electron tunneling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Lü, Jing-Tao; Feng, Yexin; Chen, Ji; Peng, Jinbo; Lin, Zeren; Meng, Xiangzhi; Wang, Zhichang; Li, Xin-Zheng; Wang, En-Ge; Jiang, Ying

    2016-04-15

    We report the quantitative assessment of nuclear quantum effects on the strength of a single hydrogen bond formed at a water-salt interface, using tip-enhanced inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy based on a scanning tunneling microscope. The inelastic scattering cross section was resonantly enhanced by "gating" the frontier orbitals of water via a chlorine-terminated tip, so the hydrogen-bonding strength can be determined with high accuracy from the red shift in the oxygen-hydrogen stretching frequency of water. Isotopic substitution experiments combined with quantum simulations reveal that the anharmonic quantum fluctuations of hydrogen nuclei weaken the weak hydrogen bonds and strengthen the relatively strong ones. However, this trend can be completely reversed when a hydrogen bond is strongly coupled to the polar atomic sites of the surface. PMID:27081066

  20. Time-dependent quantum transport through an interacting quantum dot beyond sequential tunneling: second-order quantum rate equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, B.; Ding, G. H.; Lei, X. L.

    2015-05-01

    A general theoretical formulation for the effect of a strong on-site Coulomb interaction on the time-dependent electron transport through a quantum dot under the influence of arbitrary time-varying bias voltages and/or external fields is presented, based on slave bosons and the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function (GF) techniques. To avoid the difficulties of computing double-time GFs, we generalize the propagation scheme recently developed by Croy and Saalmann to combine the auxiliary-mode expansion with the celebrated Lacroix's decoupling approximation in dealing with the second-order correlated GFs and then establish a closed set of coupled equations of motion, called second-order quantum rate equations (SOQREs), for an exact description of transient dynamics of electron correlated tunneling. We verify that the stationary solution of our SOQREs is able to correctly describe the Kondo effect on a qualitative level. Moreover, a comparison with other methods, such as the second-order von Neumann approach and Hubbard-I approximation, is performed. As illustrations, we investigate the transient current behaviors in response to a step voltage pulse and a harmonic driving voltage, and linear admittance as well, in the cotunneling regime.

  1. Extracting inter-dot tunnel couplings between few donor quantum dots in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, S. K.; Broome, M. A.; Keizer, J. G.; Watson, T. F.; Hile, S. J.; Baker, W. J.; Simmons, M. Y.

    2016-05-01

    The long term scaling prospects for solid-state quantum computing architectures relies heavily on the ability to simply and reliably measure and control the coherent electron interaction strength, known as the tunnel coupling, t c. Here, we describe a method to extract the t c between two quantum dots (QDs) utilising their different tunnel rates to a reservoir. We demonstrate the technique on a few donor triple QD tunnel coupled to a nearby single-electron transistor (SET) in silicon. The device was patterned using scanning tunneling microscopy-hydrogen lithography allowing for a direct measurement of the tunnel coupling for a given inter-dot distance. We extract {t}{{c}}=5.5+/- 1.8 {{GHz}} and {t}{{c}}=2.2+/- 1.3 {{GHz}} between each of the nearest-neighbour QDs which are separated by 14.5 nm and 14.0 nm, respectively. The technique allows for an accurate measurement of t c for nanoscale devices even when it is smaller than the electron temperature and is an ideal characterisation tool for multi-dot systems with a charge sensor.

  2. Transport through an impurity tunnel coupled to a Si/SiGe quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, Ryan H. Ward, Daniel R.; Thorgrimsson, Brandur; Savage, D. E.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.; Prance, J. R.; Gamble, John King; Nielsen, Erik; Saraiva, A. L.

    2015-09-07

    Achieving controllable coupling of dopants in silicon is crucial for operating donor-based qubit devices, but it is difficult because of the small size of donor-bound electron wavefunctions. Here, we report the characterization of a quantum dot coupled to a localized electronic state and present evidence of controllable coupling between the quantum dot and the localized state. A set of measurements of transport through the device enable the determination that the most likely location of the localized state is consistent with a location in the quantum well near the edge of the quantum dot. Our results are consistent with a gate-voltage controllable tunnel coupling, which is an important building block for hybrid donor and gate-defined quantum dot devices.

  3. Resonant tunneling spectroscopy of valley eigenstates on a donor-quantum dot coupled system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; van der Heijden, J.; House, M. G.; Hile, S. J.; Asshoff, P.; Gonzalez-Zalba, M. F.; Vinet, M.; Simmons, M. Y.; Rogge, S.

    2016-04-01

    We report on electronic transport measurements through a silicon double quantum dot consisting of a donor and a quantum dot. Transport spectra show resonant tunneling peaks involving different valley states, which illustrate the valley splitting in a quantum dot on a Si/SiO2 interface. The detailed gate bias dependence of double dot transport allows a first direct observation of the valley splitting in the quantum dot, which is controllable between 160 and 240 μeV with an electric field dependence 1.2 ± 0.2 meV/(MV/m). A large valley splitting is an essential requirement for implementing a physical electron spin qubit in a silicon quantum dot.

  4. Transport through an impurity tunnel coupled to a Si/SiGe quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, Ryan H.; Ward, Daniel R.; Prance, J. R.; Gamble, John King; Nielsen, Erik; Thorgrimsson, Brandur; Savage, D. E.; Saraiva, A. L.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    Achieving controllable coupling of dopants in silicon is crucial for operating donor-based qubit devices, but it is difficult because of the small size of donor-bound electron wavefunctions. Here, we report the characterization of a quantum dot coupled to a localized electronic state and present evidence of controllable coupling between the quantum dot and the localized state. A set of measurements of transport through the device enable the determination that the most likely location of the localized state is consistent with a location in the quantum well near the edge of the quantum dot. Our results are consistent with a gate-voltage controllable tunnel coupling, which is an important building block for hybrid donor and gate-defined quantum dot devices.

  5. Macroscopic quantum tunneling and phase diffusion in a La2-xSrxCuO4 intrinsic Josephson junction stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Yuimaru; Sboychakov, A. O.; Nori, Franco; Takahide, Y.; Ueda, S.; Tanaka, I.; Islam, A. T. M. N.; Takano, Y.

    2012-10-01

    We performed measurements of switching current distribution in a submicrometer La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) intrinsic Josephson junction (IJJ) stack in a wide temperature range. The escape rate saturates below approximately 2 K, indicating that the escape event is dominated by a macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) process with a crossover temperature T*≈2K. We applied the theory of MQT for IJJ stacks, taking into account dissipation and the phase retrapping effect in the LSCO IJJ stack. The theory is in good agreement with the experiment both in the MQT and in the thermal activation regimes.

  6. Ultrafast spin tunneling and injection in coupled nanostructures of InGaAs quantum dots and quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiao-Jie Kiba, Takayuki; Yamamura, Takafumi; Takayama, Junichi; Subagyo, Agus; Sueoka, Kazuhisa; Murayama, Akihiro

    2014-01-06

    We investigate the electron-spin injection dynamics via tunneling from an In{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}As quantum well (QW) to In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As quantum dots (QDs) in coupled QW-QDs nanostructures. These coupled nanostructures demonstrate ultrafast (5 to 20 ps) spin injection into the QDs. The degree of spin polarization up to 45% is obtained in the QDs after the injection, essentially depending on the injection time. The spin injection and conservation are enhanced with thinner barriers due to the stronger electronic coupling between the QW and QDs.

  7. Quantum heat engine based on photon-assisted Cooper pair tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Patrick P.; Souquet, J.-R.; Clerk, A. Â. A.

    2016-01-01

    We propose and analyze a simple mesoscopic quantum heat engine that exhibits both high power and high efficiency. The system consists of a biased Josephson junction coupled to two microwave cavities, with each cavity coupled to a thermal bath. Resonant Cooper pair tunneling occurs with the exchange of photons between cavities, and a temperature difference between the baths can naturally lead to a current against the voltage, and hence work. As a consequence of the unique properties of Cooper-pair tunneling, the heat current is completely separated from the charge current. This combined with the strong energy selectivity of the process leads to an extremely high efficiency.

  8. Luminescence of Quantum Dots by Coupling with Nonradiative Surface Plasmon Modes in a Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, M. J.; van de Lagemaat, J.

    2009-01-01

    The electronic coupling between quantum dots (QDs) and surface plasmons (SPs) is investigated by a luminescence spectroscopy based on scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We show that tunneling luminescence from the dot is excited by coupling with the nonradiative plasmon mode oscillating at the metallic tunneling gap formed during the STM operation. This approach to the SP excitation reveals aspects of the SP-QD coupling not accessible to the more conventional optical excitation of SPs. In the STM, luminescence from the dot is observed when and only when the SP is in resonance with the fundamental transition of the dot. The tunneling luminescence spectrum also suggests that excited SP-QD hybrid states can participate in the excitation of QD luminescence. Not only the SP excitation regulates the QD luminescence but the presence of the dot at the tunneling gap imposes restrictions to the SP that can be excited in the STM, in which the SP cannot exceed the energy of the fundamental transition of the dot. The superior SP-QD coupling observed in the STM is due to the tunneling gap acting as a tunable plasmonic resonator in which the dot is fully immersed.

  9. Quantum Tunneling in Testosterone 6β-Hydroxylation by Cytochrome P450: Reaction Dynamics Calculations Employing Multiconfiguration Molecular-Mechanical Potential Energy Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Lin, Hai

    2009-05-01

    Testosterone hydroxylation is a prototypical reaction of human cytochrome P450 3A4, which metabolizes about 50% of oral drugs on the market. Reaction dynamics calculations were carried out for the testosterone 6β-hydrogen abstraction and the 6β-d1-testosterone 6β-duterium abstraction employing a model that consists of the substrate and the active oxidant compound I. The calculations were performed at the level of canonical variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling and were based on a semiglobal full-dimensional potential energy surface generated by the multiconfiguration molecular mechanics technique. The tunneling coefficients were found to be around 3, indicating substantial contributions by quantum tunneling. However, the tunneling made only modest contributions to the kinetic isotope effects. The kinetic isotope effects were computed to be about 2 in the doublet spin state and about 5 in the quartet spin state.

  10. Quantum tunneling in testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation by cytochrome P450: reaction dynamics calculations employing multiconfiguration molecular-mechanical potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Lin, Hai

    2009-10-29

    Testosterone hydroxylation is a prototypical reaction of human cytochrome P450 3A4, which metabolizes about 50% of oral drugs on the market. Reaction dynamics calculations were carried out for the testosterone 6beta-hydrogen abstraction and the 6beta-d(1)-testosterone 6beta-duterium abstraction employing a model that consists of the substrate and the active oxidant compound I. The calculations were performed at the level of canonical variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling and were based on a semiglobal full-dimensional potential energy surface generated by the multiconfiguration molecular mechanics technique. The tunneling coefficients were found to be around 3, indicating substantial contributions by quantum tunneling. However, the tunneling made only modest contributions to the kinetic isotope effects. The kinetic isotope effects were computed to be about 2 in the doublet spin state and about 5 in the quartet spin state. PMID:19480428

  11. The impact of disorder on charge transport in three dimensional quantum dot resonant tunneling structures

    SciTech Connect

    Puthen-Veettil, B. Patterson, R.; König, D.; Conibeer, G.; Green, M. A.

    2014-10-28

    Efficient iso-entropic energy filtering of electronic waves can be realized through nanostructures with three dimensional confinement, such as quantum dot resonant tunneling structures. Large-area deployment of such structures is useful for energy selective contacts but such configuration is susceptible to structural disorders. In this work, the transport properties of quantum-dot-based wide-area resonant tunneling structures, subject to realistic disorder mechanisms, are studied. Positional variations of the quantum dots are shown to reduce the resonant transmission peaks while size variations in the device are shown to reduce as well as broaden the peaks. Increased quantum dot size distribution also results in a peak shift to lower energy which is attributed to large dots dominating transmission. A decrease in barrier thickness reduces the relative peak height while the overall transmission increases dramatically due to lower “series resistance.” While any shift away from ideality can be intuitively expected to reduce the resonance peak, quantification allows better understanding of the tolerances required for fabricating structures based on resonant tunneling phenomena/.

  12. Bounces and the calculation of quantum tunneling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiu-Qing; Müller-Kirsten, H. J. W.

    1992-04-01

    The imaginary part of the energy of the metastable ground state for the inverted double-well potential is calculated by using the path-integral method. The tunneling process is dominated by bounces. It is shown that the evaluation of the determinant of the second variation of the action at the bounce can be avoided, and that the imaginary part of the energy results directly from characteristic properties of the bounce itself, namely, the antisymmetry of its first time derivative under time reversal. The imaginary part of the result is in exact agreement with that of the well-known WKB calculation of Bender and Wu.

  13. Quasiparticle Tunneling in the Fractional Quantum Hall effect at filling fraction ν=5/2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radu, Iuliana P.

    2009-03-01

    In a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), in the fractional quantum Hall regime, the quasiparticles are predicted to have fractional charge and statistics, as well as modified Coulomb interactions. The state at filling fraction ν=5/2 is predicted by some theories to have non-abelian statistics, a property that might be exploited for topological quantum computing. However, alternative models with abelian properties have been proposed as well. Weak quasiparticle tunneling between counter-propagating edges is one of the methods that can be used to learn about the properties of the state and potentially distinguish between models describing it. We employ an electrostatically defined quantum point contact (QPC) fabricated on a high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEG to create a constriction where quasiparticles can tunnel between counter-propagating edges. We study the temperature and dc bias dependence of the tunneling conductance, while preserving the same filling fraction in the constriction and the bulk of the sample. The data show scaling of the bias-dependent tunneling over a range of temperatures, in agreement with the theory of weak quasiparticle tunneling, and we extract values for the effective charge and interaction parameter of the quasiparticles. The ranges of values obtained are consistent with those predicted by certain models describing the 5/2 state, indicating as more probable a non-abelian state. This work was done in collaboration with J. B. Miller, C. M. Marcus, M. A. Kastner, L. N. Pfeiffer and K. W. West. This work was supported in part by the Army Research Office (W911NF-05-1-0062), the Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center program of NSF (PHY-0117795), NSF (DMR-0701386), the Center for Materials Science and Engineering program of NSF (DMR-0213282) at MIT, the Microsoft Corporation Project Q, and the Center for Nanoscale Systems at Harvard University.

  14. Manipulation of tunneling induced transparency windows and optical switching features in fivefold quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedi, H. R.; Reza Mehmannavaz, Mohammad

    2015-09-01

    Transient and steady-state behavior of the probe absorption in a multiple quantum dot (QD) molecule composed of five quantum dots molecules (with a center dot and four satellite dots) is explored with application in all-optical switching. We find that the absorption spectra of the light pulse can be efficiently modified via the effect of inter-dot tunnel couplings of QDs and incoherent pumping field. Results show that depending on the values of system parameters, at least one and at most four tunneling induced transparency (TIT) windows can be established in the multiple QD medium. We then investigate the dynamical behavior of the probe absorption-amplification as well as the optical switching in pulsed regime. By adjusting the incoherent pumping rate, the required switching time for changing the gain to the absorption or vice versa is then estimated approximately to be 20.7 nanosecond (ns), that is an appropriate time for such a QDM-based switch.

  15. Confined acoustic and optical plasmons in double-layered quantum-wire arrays with strong tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethlefsen, A. F.; Heyn, Ch.; Heitmann, D.; Schüller, C.

    2006-05-01

    We investigate electronic excitations in GaAs-AlxGa1-xAs double-layered quantum wire arrays with strong tunneling coupling by resonant inelastic light scattering. By applying an external electric field, we can change the one-dimensional (1D) electron density and the symmetry of the double quantum-well (DQW) structure at the same time. We identify confined optical 1D intersubband plasmons (COP) and confined acoustic 1D intersubband plasmons (CAP). Due to the tunneling coupling, the energies of the CAP exhibit a minimum for a symmetric DQW potential, whereas the energies of the COP are dominated by the total carrier density, and are nearly insensitive to the symmetry of the potential.

  16. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of lead sulfide quantum wells fabricated by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W. J.; Dasgupta, N. P.; Jung, H. J.; Lee, J. R.; Sinclair, R.; Prinz, F. B.

    2010-11-10

    We report the use of scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) to investigate one-dimensional quantum confinement effects in lead sulfide (PbS) thin films. Specifically, quantum confinement effects on the band gap of PbS quantum wells were explored by controlling the PbS film thickness and potential barrier height. PbS quantum well structures with a thickness range of 1–20 nm were fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Two barrier materials were selected based on barrier height: aluminum oxide as a high barrier material and zinc oxide as a low barrier material. Band gap measurements were carried out by STS, and an effective mass theory was developed to compare the experimental results. Our results show that the band gap of PbS thin films increased as the film thickness decreased, and the barrier height increased from 0.45 to 2.19 eV.

  17. Quantum-gravity effects outside the horizon spark black to white hole tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggard, Hal M.; Rovelli, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    We show that there is a classical metric satisfying the Einstein equations outside a finite spacetime region where matter collapses into a black hole and then emerges from a white hole. We compute this metric explicitly. We show how quantum theory determines the (long) time for the process to happen. A black hole can thus quantum tunnel into a white hole. For this to happen, quantum gravity should affect the metric also in a small region outside the horizon; we show that, contrary to what is commonly assumed, this is not forbidden by causality or by the semiclassical approximation, because quantum effects can pile up over a long time. This scenario alters radically the discussion on the black hole information puzzle.

  18. Macroscopic Quantum Tunneling in a Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ Single Crystalline Whisker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Yuimaru; Takahide, Yamaguchi; Ueda, Shinya; Takano, Yoshihiko; Ootuka, Youiti

    2010-06-01

    Macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) has been observed in an intrinsic Josephson junction (IJJ) stack of a Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (BSCCO) single crystalline whisker with high precision using a home made setup. The cross-over temperature between thermal activation and MQT was about 260 mK, and the Josephson plasma frequency was estimated to be 86 GHz. Both the thermal escape theory and the MQT theory are consistent with the experiments. These facts strongly suggest that single crystalline BSCCO whiskers are high enough quality to be used as intrinsic Josephson quantum devices such as intrinsic Josephson phase qubits. This is the first demonstration of MQT in BSCCO single crystalline whiskers.

  19. Interaction of Single Electron Tunneling and Collective Modes in Quantum Dot Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopa, Michael

    1996-03-01

    We consider arrays of N^d quantum dots in d dimensions coupled by tunnel junctions and we define the limit of N arrow ∞ as ``quantum dot matter'' (QDM). For d=1 QDM we determine the dispersion relation for collective oscillations of the junction charges by ascribing a capacitance to ground and two small internal inductances to each dot. We consider the influence of this electromagnetic environment on single electron tunneling (SET). This differs from the standard treatment (G. -L. Ingold and Yu. V. Nazarov in Single Charge Tunneling), edited by H. Grabert and M. H. Devoret, NATO ASI, Ser. B (Plenum Press, New York, 1992), Chap. 2 where electrons in an array are assumed to be isolated from the environment by the presence of other junctions and tunneling is assumed to be between equilibrium charge states. We compute the junction charge fluctuation <δ Q_k^2> and show that, as in the single junction case, charging effects are suppressed by the environment. Finally, we consider modifications to the ``global rule'' from the finite speed of electromagnetic waves in QDM.

  20. Fundamental quantum noise mapping with tunnelling microscopes tested at surface structures of subatomic lateral size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herz, Markus; Bouvron, Samuel; Ćavar, Elizabeta; Fonin, Mikhail; Belzig, Wolfgang; Scheer, Elke

    2013-09-01

    We present a measurement scheme that enables quantitative detection of the shot noise in a scanning tunnelling microscope while scanning the sample. As test objects we study defect structures produced on an iridium single crystal at low temperatures. The defect structures appear in the constant current images as protrusions with curvature radii well below the atomic diameter. The measured power spectral density of the noise is very near to the quantum limit with Fano factor F = 1. While the constant current images show detailed structures expected for tunnelling involving d-atomic orbitals of Ir, we find the current noise to be without pronounced spatial variation as expected for shot noise arising from statistically independent events.We present a measurement scheme that enables quantitative detection of the shot noise in a scanning tunnelling microscope while scanning the sample. As test objects we study defect structures produced on an iridium single crystal at low temperatures. The defect structures appear in the constant current images as protrusions with curvature radii well below the atomic diameter. The measured power spectral density of the noise is very near to the quantum limit with Fano factor F = 1. While the constant current images show detailed structures expected for tunnelling involving d-atomic orbitals of Ir, we find the current noise to be without pronounced spatial variation as expected for shot noise arising from statistically independent events. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02216a

  1. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in a stack of capacitively-coupled intrinsic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Tomio; Machida, Masahiko

    2008-04-01

    A macroscopic quantum theory for the phase dynamics in capacitively-coupled intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ's) is constructed. We quantize the capacitively-coupled IJJ model in terms of the canonical quantization method. The multi-junction effect for the macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) to the first resistive branch is clarified. It is shown that the escape rate is greatly enhanced by the capacitive coupling between junctions. We also discuss the origin of the N2 -enhancement in the escape rate observed in the uniformly switching in Bi-2212 IJJ's.

  2. Optical bistability in triple quantum dot molecules in weak tunneling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the optical bistability of a triple quantum dot molecule under coherent excitation and considering the spontaneous exciton decay and pure dephasing as two decoherence channels. By manipulating the laser detuning, electric field, and tunneling coupling, the threshold value and the hysteresis cycle width of OB can easily be controlled. Our scheme opens the possibility to control OB with electric gates, which are very useful in building all-optical switches and logic-gate devices for optical computing and quantum information processing.

  3. Multi-Dimensional Quantum Tunneling and Transport Using the Density-Gradient Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegel, Bryan A.; Yu, Zhi-Ping; Ancona, Mario; Rafferty, Conor; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We show that quantum effects are likely to significantly degrade the performance of MOSFETs (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) as these devices are scaled below 100 nm channel length and 2 nm oxide thickness over the next decade. A general and computationally efficient electronic device model including quantum effects would allow us to monitor and mitigate these effects. Full quantum models are too expensive in multi-dimensions. Using a general but efficient PDE solver called PROPHET, we implemented the density-gradient (DG) quantum correction to the industry-dominant classical drift-diffusion (DD) model. The DG model efficiently includes quantum carrier profile smoothing and tunneling in multi-dimensions and for any electronic device structure. We show that the DG model reduces DD model error from as much as 50% down to a few percent in comparison to thin oxide MOS capacitance measurements. We also show the first DG simulations of gate oxide tunneling and transverse current flow in ultra-scaled MOSFETs. The advantages of rapid model implementation using the PDE solver approach will be demonstrated, as well as the applicability of the DG model to any electronic device structure.

  4. Quantum tunnelling of the magnetization in a monolayer of oriented single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Mannini, M; Pineider, F; Danieli, C; Totti, F; Sorace, L; Sainctavit, Ph; Arrio, M-A; Otero, E; Joly, L; Cezar, J C; Cornia, A; Sessoli, R

    2010-11-18

    A fundamental step towards atomic- or molecular-scale spintronic devices has recently been made by demonstrating that the spin of an individual atom deposited on a surface, or of a small paramagnetic molecule embedded in a nanojunction, can be externally controlled. An appealing next step is the extension of such a capability to the field of information storage, by taking advantage of the magnetic bistability and rich quantum behaviour of single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Recently, a proof of concept that the magnetic memory effect is retained when SMMs are chemically anchored to a metallic surface was provided. However, control of the nanoscale organization of these complex systems is required for SMMs to be integrated into molecular spintronic devices. Here we show that a preferential orientation of Fe(4) complexes on a gold surface can be achieved by chemical tailoring. As a result, the most striking quantum feature of SMMs-their stepped hysteresis loop, which results from resonant quantum tunnelling of the magnetization-can be clearly detected using synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques. With the aid of multiple theoretical approaches, we relate the angular dependence of the quantum tunnelling resonances to the adsorption geometry, and demonstrate that molecules predominantly lie with their easy axes close to the surface normal. Our findings prove that the quantum spin dynamics can be observed in SMMs chemically grafted to surfaces, and offer a tool to reveal the organization of matter at the nanoscale. PMID:20981008

  5. Computational relativistic quantum dynamics and its application to relativistic tunneling and Kapitza-Dirac scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauke, Heiko; Klaiber, Michael; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.; Ahrens, Sven; Müller, Carsten; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2013-05-01

    Computational methods are indispensable to study the quantum dynamics of relativistic light-matter interactions in parameter regimes where analytical methods become inapplicable. We present numerical methods for solving the time-dependent Dirac equation and the time-dependent Klein-Gordon equation and their implementation on high performance graphics cards. These methods allow us to study tunneling from hydrogen-like highly charged ions in strong laser fields and Kapitza-Dirac scattering in the relativistic regime.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of low loss and high inductance Josephson tunnel junction chains for quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabon, Nicholas; Solovyeva, Natalya; Nguyen, Long; Lin, Yen-Hsiang; Manucharyan, Vladimir

    Linear chains of tightly packed Josephson junctions can realize a very high kinetic inductance circuit element, superinductance, with minimal losses. Superinductance is used in a conventional fluxonium qubit, but it has also been put forward as a key element of a fault-tolerant quantum circuits toolbox. We report fabrication and microwave characterization of linear Al/AlOx/Al Josephson tunnel junction chains and discuss their advantages and limitations as superinductors

  7. Quantum dynamics of tunneling dominated reactions at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Jisha; Balakrishnan, N.

    2015-05-01

    We report a quantum dynamics study of the Li + HF → LiF + H reaction at low temperatures of interest to cooling and trapping experiments. Contributions from non-zero partial waves are analyzed and results show narrow resonances in the energy dependence of the cross section that survive partial wave summation. The computations are performed using the ABC code and a simple modification of the ABC code that enables separate energy cutoffs for the reactant and product rovibrational energy levels is found to dramatically reduce the basis set size and computational expense. Results obtained using two ab initio electronic potential energy surfaces for the LiHF system show strong sensitivity to the choice of the potential. In particular, small differences in the barrier heights of the two potential surfaces are found to dramatically influence the reaction cross sections at low energies. Comparison with recent measurements of the reaction cross section (Bobbenkamp et al 2011 J. Chem. Phys. 135 204306) shows similar energy dependence in the threshold regime and an overall good agreement with experimental data compared to previous theoretical results. Also, usefulness of a recently introduced method for ultracold reactions that employ the quantum close-coupling method at short-range and the multichannel quantum defect theory at long-range, is demonstrated in accurately evaluating product state-resolved cross sections for D + H2 and H + D2 reactions.

  8. Electron tunneling characteristics of a cubic quantum dot, (PbS){sub 32}

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sanjeev K. E-mail: haiying.he@valpo.edu; Banyai, Douglas; Pandey, Ravindra; He, Haiying E-mail: haiying.he@valpo.edu; Kandalam, Anil K.

    2013-12-28

    The electron transport properties of the cubic quantum dot, (PbS){sub 32}, are investigated. The stability of the quantum dot has been established by recent scanning tunneling microscope experiments [B. Kiran, A. K. Kandalam, R. Rallabandi, P. Koirala, X. Li, X. Tang, Y. Wang, H. Fairbrother, G. Gantefoer, and K. Bowen, J. Chem. Phys. 136(2), 024317 (2012)]. In spite of the noticeable energy band gap (∼2 eV), a relatively high tunneling current for (PbS){sub 32} is predicted affirming the observed bright images for (PbS){sub 32}. The calculated I-V characteristics of (PbS){sub 32} are predicted to be substrate-dependent; (PbS){sub 32} on the Au (001) exhibits the molecular diode-like behavior and the unusual negative differential resistance effect, though this is not the case with (PbS){sub 32} on the Au (110). Appearance of the conduction channels associated with the hybridized states of quantum dot and substrate together with their asymmetric distribution at the Fermi level seem to determine the tunneling characteristics of the system.

  9. Electron tunneling characteristics of a cubic quantum dot, (PbS)32.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjeev K; He, Haiying; Banyai, Douglas; Kandalam, Anil K; Pandey, Ravindra

    2013-12-28

    The electron transport properties of the cubic quantum dot, (PbS)32, are investigated. The stability of the quantum dot has been established by recent scanning tunneling microscope experiments [B. Kiran, A. K. Kandalam, R. Rallabandi, P. Koirala, X. Li, X. Tang, Y. Wang, H. Fairbrother, G. Gantefoer, and K. Bowen, J. Chem. Phys. 136(2), 024317 (2012)]. In spite of the noticeable energy band gap (~2 eV), a relatively high tunneling current for (PbS)32 is predicted affirming the observed bright images for (PbS)32. The calculated I-V characteristics of (PbS)32 are predicted to be substrate-dependent; (PbS)32 on the Au (001) exhibits the molecular diode-like behavior and the unusual negative differential resistance effect, though this is not the case with (PbS)32 on the Au (110). Appearance of the conduction channels associated with the hybridized states of quantum dot and substrate together with their asymmetric distribution at the Fermi level seem to determine the tunneling characteristics of the system. PMID:24387370

  10. Electron tunneling characteristics of a cubic quantum dot, (PbS)32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K.; He, Haiying; Banyai, Douglas; Kandalam, Anil K.; Pandey, Ravindra

    2013-12-01

    The electron transport properties of the cubic quantum dot, (PbS)32, are investigated. The stability of the quantum dot has been established by recent scanning tunneling microscope experiments [B. Kiran, A. K. Kandalam, R. Rallabandi, P. Koirala, X. Li, X. Tang, Y. Wang, H. Fairbrother, G. Gantefoer, and K. Bowen, J. Chem. Phys. 136(2), 024317 (2012)]. In spite of the noticeable energy band gap (˜2 eV), a relatively high tunneling current for (PbS)32 is predicted affirming the observed bright images for (PbS)32. The calculated I-V characteristics of (PbS)32 are predicted to be substrate-dependent; (PbS)32 on the Au (001) exhibits the molecular diode-like behavior and the unusual negative differential resistance effect, though this is not the case with (PbS)32 on the Au (110). Appearance of the conduction channels associated with the hybridized states of quantum dot and substrate together with their asymmetric distribution at the Fermi level seem to determine the tunneling characteristics of the system.

  11. Importance of quantum correction for the quantitative simulation of photoexcited scanning tunneling spectra of semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnedler, M.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Ebert, Ph.

    2016-05-01

    Photoexcited scanning tunneling spectroscopy is a promising technique for the determination of carrier concentrations, surface photovoltages, and potentials of semiconductors with atomic spatial resolution. However, extraction of the desired quantities requires computation of the electrostatic potential induced by the proximity of the tip and the tunnel current. This calculation is based on an accurate solution of the Poisson as well as the continuity equations for the tip-vacuum-semiconductor system. For this purpose, the carrier current densities are modeled by classical drift and diffusion equations. However, for small tip radii and highly doped materials, the drift and diffusion transport model significantly overestimates a semiconductor's carrier concentration near the surface, making the quantification of physical properties impossible. In this paper, we apply quantum correction to the drift and diffusion model, in order to account for the so-called quantum compressibility, i.e., reduced compressibility of the carrier gas due to the Pauli principle, in the region of the tip-induced band bending. We compare carrier concentrations, potentials, and tunnel currents derived with and without quantum correction for GaN (10 1 ¯0 ) and GaAs(110) surfaces to demonstrate its necessity.

  12. Light-induced negative differential resistance in graphene/Si-quantum-dot tunneling diodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong Won; Jang, Chan Wook; Shin, Dong Hee; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Soo Seok; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Sung; Choi, Suk-Ho; Hwang, Euyheon

    2016-01-01

    One of the interesing tunneling phenomena is negative differential resistance (NDR), the basic principle of resonant-tunneling diodes. NDR has been utilized in various semiconductor devices such as frequency multipliers, oscillators, relfection amplifiers, logic switches, and memories. The NDR in graphene has been also reported theoretically as well as experimentally, but should be further studied to fully understand its mechanism, useful for practical device applications. Especially, there has been no observation about light-induced NDR (LNDR) in graphene-related structures despite very few reports on the LNDR in GaAs-based heterostructures. Here, we report first observation of LNDR in graphene/Si quantum dots-embedded SiO2 (SQDs:SiO2) multilayers (MLs) tunneling diodes. The LNDR strongly depends on temperature (T) as well as on SQD size, and the T dependence is consistent with photocurrent (PC)-decay behaviors. With increasing light power, the PC-voltage curves are more structured with peak-to-valley ratios over 2 at room temperature. The physical mechanism of the LNDR, governed by resonant tunneling of charge carriers through the minibands formed across the graphene/SQDs:SiO2 MLs and by their nonresonant phonon-assisted tunneling, is discussed based on theoretical considerations. PMID:27465107

  13. Light-induced negative differential resistance in graphene/Si-quantum-dot tunneling diodes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyeong Won; Jang, Chan Wook; Shin, Dong Hee; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Soo Seok; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Sung; Choi, Suk-Ho; Hwang, Euyheon

    2016-01-01

    One of the interesing tunneling phenomena is negative differential resistance (NDR), the basic principle of resonant-tunneling diodes. NDR has been utilized in various semiconductor devices such as frequency multipliers, oscillators, relfection amplifiers, logic switches, and memories. The NDR in graphene has been also reported theoretically as well as experimentally, but should be further studied to fully understand its mechanism, useful for practical device applications. Especially, there has been no observation about light-induced NDR (LNDR) in graphene-related structures despite very few reports on the LNDR in GaAs-based heterostructures. Here, we report first observation of LNDR in graphene/Si quantum dots-embedded SiO2 (SQDs:SiO2) multilayers (MLs) tunneling diodes. The LNDR strongly depends on temperature (T) as well as on SQD size, and the T dependence is consistent with photocurrent (PC)-decay behaviors. With increasing light power, the PC-voltage curves are more structured with peak-to-valley ratios over 2 at room temperature. The physical mechanism of the LNDR, governed by resonant tunneling of charge carriers through the minibands formed across the graphene/SQDs:SiO2 MLs and by their nonresonant phonon-assisted tunneling, is discussed based on theoretical considerations. PMID:27465107

  14. Light-induced negative differential resistance in graphene/Si-quantum-dot tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyeong Won; Jang, Chan Wook; Shin, Dong Hee; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Soo Seok; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Sung; Choi, Suk-Ho; Hwang, Euyheon

    2016-07-01

    One of the interesing tunneling phenomena is negative differential resistance (NDR), the basic principle of resonant-tunneling diodes. NDR has been utilized in various semiconductor devices such as frequency multipliers, oscillators, relfection amplifiers, logic switches, and memories. The NDR in graphene has been also reported theoretically as well as experimentally, but should be further studied to fully understand its mechanism, useful for practical device applications. Especially, there has been no observation about light-induced NDR (LNDR) in graphene-related structures despite very few reports on the LNDR in GaAs-based heterostructures. Here, we report first observation of LNDR in graphene/Si quantum dots-embedded SiO2 (SQDs:SiO2) multilayers (MLs) tunneling diodes. The LNDR strongly depends on temperature (T) as well as on SQD size, and the T dependence is consistent with photocurrent (PC)-decay behaviors. With increasing light power, the PC-voltage curves are more structured with peak-to-valley ratios over 2 at room temperature. The physical mechanism of the LNDR, governed by resonant tunneling of charge carriers through the minibands formed across the graphene/SQDs:SiO2 MLs and by their nonresonant phonon-assisted tunneling, is discussed based on theoretical considerations.

  15. Characterization of Deep Tunneling Activity through Remote-Sensing Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    R. G. Best, P. J. Etzler, and J. D. Bloom

    1997-10-01

    This work is a case study demonstrating the uses of multispectral and multi-temporal imagery to characterize deep tunneling activity. A drainage tunnel excavation in Quincy, MA is the case locality. Data used are aerial photographs (digitized) and Daedalus 3600 MSS image data that were collected in July and October of 1994. Analysis of the data includes thermal characterization, spectral characterization, multi-temporal analysis, and volume estimation using digital DEM generation. The results demonstrate the type of information that could be generated by multispectral, multi-temporal data if the study locality were a clandestine excavation site with restricted surface access.

  16. Elastic tunneling charge transport mechanisms in silicon quantum dots /SiO{sub 2} thin films and superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Illera, S. Prades, J. D.; Cirera, A.

    2015-05-07

    The role of different charge transport mechanisms in Si/SiO{sub 2} structures has been studied. A theoretical model based on the Transfer Hamiltonian Formalism has been developed to explain experimental current trends in terms of three different elastic tunneling processes: (1) trap assisted tunneling; (2) transport through an intermediate quantum dot; and (3) direct tunneling between leads. In general, at low fields carrier transport is dominated by the quantum dots whereas, for moderate and high fields, transport through deep traps inherent to the SiO{sub 2} is the most relevant process. Besides, current trends in Si/SiO{sub 2} superlattice structure have been properly reproduced.

  17. Quantum-Like Tunnelling and Levels of Arbitrage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haven, Emmanuel; Khrennikov, Andrei

    2013-11-01

    We apply methods of wave mechanics to financial modelling. We proceed by assigning a financial interpretation to wave numbers. This paper makes a plea for the use of the concept of ‘tunnelling’ (in the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics) in the modelling of financial arbitrage. Financial arbitrage is a delicate concept to model in social science (i.e. in this case economics and finance) as its presence affects the precision of benchmark financial asset prices. In this paper, we attempt to show how ‘tunnelling’ can be used to positive effect in the modelling of arbitrage in a financial asset pricing context.

  18. Zeeman effects on the tunneling spectra of a ferromagnetic d-wave superconductor in contact with a quantum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emamipour, Hamidreza; Mehrabzad, Narges

    2016-07-01

    We study tunneling conductance in a quantum wire-insulator-ferromagnetic d-wave superconductor junction. The results show that exchange field of superconductor has a strong impact on tunneling spectra depending on the junction parameters. We have found a gap like structure in the tunneling limit when we have an interface normal to the (100) axis of superconductor. In the case of (110) axis of superconductor, there is not any zero- bias conductance peaks in tunneling spectra. For a metallic junction the dips disappear.

  19. Quantum Tunneling of Charge-Density Waves in Quasi One-Dimensional Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John Harris, Jr.

    The charge-density wave (CDW) dynamics of the linear chain compound orthorhombic TaS(,3) is characterized by extensive measurements of dc conductivity, ac admittance, direct mixing, harmonic mixing, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation as functions of dc bias voltage, applied frequencies, and, in some cases, the amplitude of an additional ac signal. Measurements of the direct and harmonic mixing responses of NbSe(,3) are also reported. The results are analyzed in terms of an extension of the tunneling theory of CDW depinning, proposed by John Bardeen, coupled to the theory of photon-assisted tunneling (PAT). Where possible, the results are also compared with predictions of the classical overdamped oscillator model of CDW transport. The tunneling model is shown to provide a complete and semiquantitative interpretation of the entire small -signal ac dynamics at megahertz frequencies, using only the measured dc I-V curve and an experimentally inferred frequency-voltage scaling parameter, and also accounts for much of the large-signal behavior studied thus far. The observation of both an induced ac harmonic mixing current and a third harmonic generation current whose amplitudes peak at output frequencies far below the measured "cross -over frequency" for ac conductivity agrees with the phenomenological tunneling model, but is in serious disagreement with the classical overdamped oscillator model of CDW motion. Furthermore, the absence of any observed quadrature component in the harmonic mixing response, even though the measured linear response at the applied frequencies has substantial frequency -dependent in-phase and quadrature components, is probably impossible to reconcile with any classical theory. The results reported here thus provide compelling evidence in favor of collective, coherent quantum tunneling as the mechanism of charge-density wave depinning, and indicate that macroscopic quantum effects are observed in the megahertz frequency

  20. Influence of device geometry on tunneling in the ν=(5)/(2) quantum Hall liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Feldman, D. E.

    2013-08-01

    Two recent experiments [Radu , ScienceSCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1157560 320, 899 (2008); Lin , Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.85.165321 85, 165321 (2012)] measured the temperature and voltage dependence of the quasiparticle tunneling through a quantum point contact in the ν=5/2 quantum Hall liquid. The results led to conflicting conclusions about the nature of the quantum Hall state. In this paper, we show that the conflict can be resolved by recognizing different geometries of the devices in the experiments. We argue that in some of those geometries there is significant unscreened electrostatic interaction between the segments of the quantum Hall edge on the opposite sides of the point contact. Coulomb interaction affects the tunneling current. We compare experimental results with theoretical predictions for the Pfaffian, SU(2)2, 331, and K=8 states and their particle-hole conjugates. After Coulomb corrections are taken into account, measurements in all geometries agree with the spin-polarized and spin-unpolarized Halperin 331 states.

  1. CoFe alloy as middle layer for strong spin dependent quantum well resonant tunneling in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, R. S.; Yang, See-Hun; Jiang, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Rice, Philip M.; Canali, Carlo M.; Parkin, S. S. P.

    2013-01-01

    We report the spin-dependent quantum well resonant tunneling effect in CoFe/MgO/CoFe/MgO/CoFeB (CoFe) double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions. The dI/dV spectra reveal clear resonant peaks for the parallel magnetization configurations, which can be matched to quantum well resonances obtained from calculation. The differential TMR exhibits an oscillatory behavior with a sign change due to the formation of the spin-dependent QW states in the middle CoFe layer. Also, we observe pronounced TMR enhancement at resonant voltages at room temperature, suggesting that it is very promising to achieve high TMR using the spin-dependent QW resonant tunneling effect.

  2. Real-time Feynman path integral with Picard–Lefschetz theory and its applications to quantum tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Tanizaki, Yuya; Koike, Takayuki

    2014-12-15

    Picard–Lefschetz theory is applied to path integrals of quantum mechanics, in order to compute real-time dynamics directly. After discussing basic properties of real-time path integrals on Lefschetz thimbles, we demonstrate its computational method in a concrete way by solving three simple examples of quantum mechanics. It is applied to quantum mechanics of a double-well potential, and quantum tunneling is discussed. We identify all of the complex saddle points of the classical action, and their properties are discussed in detail. However a big theoretical difficulty turns out to appear in rewriting the original path integral into a sum of path integrals on Lefschetz thimbles. We discuss generality of that problem and mention its importance. Real-time tunneling processes are shown to be described by those complex saddle points, and thus semi-classical description of real-time quantum tunneling becomes possible on solid ground if we could solve that problem. - Highlights: • Real-time path integral is studied based on Picard–Lefschetz theory. • Lucid demonstration is given through simple examples of quantum mechanics. • This technique is applied to quantum mechanics of the double-well potential. • Difficulty for practical applications is revealed, and we discuss its generality. • Quantum tunneling is shown to be closely related to complex classical solutions.

  3. High performance tunnel injection quantum dot comb laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.-S.; Guo Wei; Basu, Debashish; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2010-03-08

    A high-speed multiwavelength quantum dot comb laser, grown by molecular beam epitaxy, is demonstrated. The device is characterized with a 75.9 nm (full width at half maximum) and a 91.4 nm (DELTA{sub -15dB}) wide lasing spectrum. There are 105 and 185 simultaneously emitted longitudinal modes with a maximum channel intensity nonuniformity of less than 3 dB in the spectral range of 1231-1252 nm and 1274-1311 nm, respectively, for a laser with 1040 mum cavity length. The channel spacing can be tuned with cavity length and remains invariant in the temperature range of 300-323 K. The small signal modulation bandwidth is 7.5 GHz.

  4. Magnetoresistance of One-Dimensional Subbands in Tunnel-Coupled Double Quantum Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, J.S.; Blount, M.A.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.; Lyo, S.K.; Reno, J.L.

    1999-08-04

    The authors study the low-temperature in-plane magnetoresistance of tunnel-coupled quasi-one-dimensional quantum wires. The wires are defined by two pairs of mutually aligned split gates on opposite sides of a {le} 1 micron thick AlGaAs/GaAs double quantum well heterostructure, allowing independent control of the width of each quantum well. In the ballistic regime, when both wires are defined and the field is perpendicular to the current, a large resistance peak at {approximately}6 Tesla is observed with a strong gate voltage dependence. The data is consistent with a counting model whereby the number of subbands crossing the Fermi level changes with field due to the formation of an anticrossing in each pair of 1D subbands.

  5. Visualizing hybridized quantum plasmons in coupled nanowires: From classical to tunneling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Kirsten; Jensen, Kristian L.; Mortensen, N. Asger; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2013-06-01

    We present full quantum-mechanical calculations of the hybridized plasmon modes of two nanowires at small separation, providing real-space visualization of the modes in the transition from the classical to the quantum tunneling regime. The plasmon modes are obtained as certain eigenfunctions of the dynamical dielectric function, which is computed using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). For freestanding wires, the energy of both surface and bulk plasmon modes deviate from the classical result for low wire radii and high momentum transfer due to effects of electron spill-out, nonlocal response, and coupling to single-particle transitions. For the wire dimer, the shape of the hybridized plasmon modes are continuously altered with decreasing separation, and below 6 Å, the energy dispersion of the modes deviate from classical results due to the onset of weak tunneling. Below 2-3 Å separation, this mode is replaced by a charge-transfer plasmon, which blue shifts with decreasing separation in agreement with experiment and marks the onset of the strong tunneling regime.

  6. Spin Dynamics and Quantum Tunneling in Fe8 Nanomagnet and in AFM Rings by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Seung-Ho-Baek

    2004-12-19

    In this thesis, our main interest has been to investigate the spin dynamics and quantum tunneling in single molecule magnets (SMMs), For this we have selected two different classes of SMMs: a ferrimagnetic total high spin S = 10 cluster Fe8 and antiferromagnetic (AFM) ring-type clusters. For Fe8, our efforts have been devoted to the investigation of the quantum tunneling of magnetization in the very low temperature region. The most remarkable experimental finding in Fe8 is that the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T{sub l}) at low temperatures takes place via strong collision mechanism, and thus it allows to measure directly the tunneling rate vs T and H for the first time. For AFM rings, we have shown that 1/T{sub l} probes the thermal fluctuations of the magnetization in the intermediate temperature range. We find that the fluctuations are dominated by a single characteristic frequency which has a power law T-dependence indicative of fluctuations due to electron-acoustic phonon interactions.

  7. Suppression of quantum tunneling for all spins for easy-axis systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Avinash; Paranjape, M. B.

    2011-05-01

    The semiclassical limit of quantum spin systems corresponds to a dynamical Lagrangian which contains the usual kinetic energy, the couplings and interactions of the spins, and an additional, first-order kinematical term which corresponds to the Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten (WZNW) term for the spin degree of freedom. It was shown that in the case of the kinetic dynamics determined only by the WZNW term, half-odd integer spin systems show a lack of tunneling phenomena, whereas integer spin systems are subject to it in the case of potentials with easy-plane easy-axis symmetry. Here we prove for the theory with a normal quadratic kinetic term of arbitrary strength or the first-order theory with azimuthal symmetry (which is equivalently the so-called easy-axis situation), that the tunneling is in fact suppressed for all nonzero values of spin. This model exemplifies the concept that in the presence of complex Euclidean action, it is necessary to use the ensuing complex critical points in order to define the quantum (perturbation) theory. In the present example, if we do not do so, exactly the opposite, erroneous conclusion that the tunneling is unsuppressed for all spins, is reached.

  8. Observation of spin-dependent quantum well resonant tunneling in textured CoFeB layers

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, J. M. Costa, J. D.; Ventura, J.; Sousa, J. B.; Wisniowski, P.; Freitas, P. P.

    2014-03-17

    We report the observation of spin-dependent quantum well (QW) resonant tunneling in textured CoFeB free layers of single MgO magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). The inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy spectra clearly show the presence of resonant oscillations in the parallel configuration, which are related with the appearance of majority-spin Δ{sub 1} QW states in the CoFeB free layer. To gain a quantitative understanding, we calculated QW state positions in the voltage-thickness plane using the so-called phase accumulation model (PAM) and compared the PAM solutions with the experimental resonant voltages observed for a set of MTJs with different CoFeB free layer thicknesses (t{sub fl} = 1.55, 1.65, 1.95, and 3.0 nm). An overall good agreement between experiment and theory was obtained. An enhancement of the tunnel magnetoresistance with bias is observed in a bias voltage region corresponding to the resonant oscillations.

  9. Analysis of Hydrogen Tunneling in an Enzyme Active Site using von Neumann Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S.

    2010-01-01

    We build on our earlier quantum wavepacket study of hydrogen transfer in the biological enzyme, soybean lipoxygenase-1, by using von Neumann quantum measurement theory to gain qualitative insights into the transfer event. We treat the enzyme active site as a measurement device which acts on the tunneling hydrogen nucleus via the potential it exerts at each configuration. A series of changing active site geometries during the tunneling process effects a sequential projection of the initial, reactant state onto the final, product state. We study this process using several different kinds of von Neumann measurements and show how a discrete sequence of such measurements not only progressively increases the projection of the hydrogen nuclear wavepacket onto the product side but also favors proton over deuteron transfer. Several qualitative features of the hydrogen tunneling problem found in wavepacket dynamics studies are also recovered here. These include the shift in the “transition state” towards the reactant as a result of nuclear quantization, greater participation of excited states in the case of deuterium, and presence of critical points along the reaction coordinate that facilitate hydrogen and deuterium transfer and coincide with surface crossings. To further “tailor” the dynamics, we construct a perturbation to the sequence of measurements, that is a perturbation to the dynamical sequence of active site geometry evolution, which leads us to insight on the existence of sensitive regions of the reaction profile where subtle changes to the dynamics of the active site can have an effect on the hydrogen and deuterium transfer process. PMID:22933858

  10. Resonant and Inelastic Andreev Tunneling Observed on a Carbon Nanotube Quantum Dot.

    PubMed

    Gramich, J; Baumgartner, A; Schönenberger, C

    2015-11-20

    We report the observation of two fundamental subgap transport processes through a quantum dot (QD) with a superconducting contact. The device consists of a carbon nanotube contacted by a Nb superconducting and a normal metal contact. First, we find a single resonance with position, shape, and amplitude consistent with the theoretically predicted resonant Andreev tunneling (AT) through a single QD level. Second, we observe a series of discrete replicas of resonant AT at a separation of ~145 μeV, with a gate, bias, and temperature dependence characteristic for boson-assisted, inelastic AT, in which energy is exchanged between a bosonic bath and the electrons. The magnetic field dependence of the replica's amplitudes and energies suggest that two different bosons couple to the tunnel process. PMID:26636862

  11. Can a man-made universe be achieved by quantum tunneling without an initial singularity?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guth, Alan H.; Haller, K. (Editor); Caldi, D. B. (Editor); Islam, M. M. (Editor); Mallett, R. L. (Editor); Mannheim, P. D. (Editor); Swanson, M. S. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Essentially all modern particle theories suggest the possible existence of a false vacuum state; a metastable state with an energy density that cannot be lowered except by means of a very slow phase transition. Inflationary cosmology makes use of such a state to drive the expansion of the big bang, allowing the entire observed universe to evolve from a very small initial mass. A sphere of false vacuum in the present universe, if larger than a certain critical mass, could inflate to form a new universe which would rapidly detach from its parent. A false vacuum bubble of this size, however, cannot be produced classically unless an initial singularity is present from the outset. The possibility is explored that a bubble of subcritical size, which classically would evolve to a maximum size and collapse, might instead tunnel through a barrier to produce a new universe. The tunneling rate using semiclassical quantum gravity is estimated, and some interesting ambiguities in the formulas are discovered.

  12. Fundamental quantum noise mapping with tunnelling microscopes tested at surface structures of subatomic lateral size.

    PubMed

    Herz, Markus; Bouvron, Samuel; Ćavar, Elizabeta; Fonin, Mikhail; Belzig, Wolfgang; Scheer, Elke

    2013-10-21

    We present a measurement scheme that enables quantitative detection of the shot noise in a scanning tunnelling microscope while scanning the sample. As test objects we study defect structures produced on an iridium single crystal at low temperatures. The defect structures appear in the constant current images as protrusions with curvature radii well below the atomic diameter. The measured power spectral density of the noise is very near to the quantum limit with Fano factor F = 1. While the constant current images show detailed structures expected for tunnelling involving d-atomic orbitals of Ir, we find the current noise to be without pronounced spatial variation as expected for shot noise arising from statistically independent events. PMID:23989889

  13. Tunnel magnetoresistance and linear conductance of double quantum dots strongly coupled to ferromagnetic leads

    SciTech Connect

    Weymann, Ireneusz

    2015-05-07

    We analyze the spin-dependent linear-response transport properties of double quantum dots strongly coupled to external ferromagnetic leads. By using the numerical renormalization group method, we determine the dependence of the linear conductance and tunnel magnetoresistance on the degree of spin polarization of the leads and the position of the double dot levels. We focus on the transport regime where the system exhibits the SU(4) Kondo effect. It is shown that the presence of ferromagnets generally leads the suppression of the linear conductance due to the presence of an exchange field. Moreover, the exchange field gives rise to a transition from the SU(4) to the orbital SU(2) Kondo effect. We also analyze the dependence of the tunnel magnetoresistance on the double dot levels' positions and show that it exhibits a very nontrivial behavior.

  14. Inter-dot tunneling control of optical bistability in triple quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reza Hamedi, Hamid

    2014-09-01

    The behavior of optical bistability (OB) and optical multistability (OM) in a triple coupled quantum dot (QD) system is theoretically explored. It is found that the tunneling coupling between electronic levels has major effect on controlling the threshold and the hysteresis cycle shape of the optical bistability. The impact of incoherent pump field on the OB and OM behavior of such medium is then discussed. We realize that the threshold intensity reduces remarkably through increasing the rate of incoherent pumping. It is also demonstrated that the switch between OB and OM can be obtained just through proper adjusting the frequency detuning of probe field. It should be pointed that in this QD system we used tunneling instead of coupling lasers. These presented results may be applicable in real experiments for realizing an all-optical bistate switching or coding element in a solid-state platform.

  15. Differential Quantum Tunneling Contributions in Nitroalkane Oxidase Catalyzed and the Uncatalyzed Proton Transfer Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Major , D.; Heroux , A; Orville , A; Valley , M; Fitzpatrick , P; Gao , J

    2009-01-01

    The proton transfer reaction between the substrate nitroethane and Asp-402 catalyzed by nitroalkane oxidase and the uncatalyzed process in water have been investigated using a path-integral free-energy perturbation method. Although the dominating effect in rate acceleration by the enzyme is the lowering of the quasiclassical free energy barrier, nuclear quantum effects also contribute to catalysis in nitroalkane oxidase. In particular, the overall nuclear quantum effects have greater contributions to lowering the classical barrier in the enzyme, and there is a larger difference in quantum effects between proton and deuteron transfer for the enzymatic reaction than that in water. Both experiment and computation show that primary KIEs are enhanced in the enzyme, and the computed Swain-Schaad exponent for the enzymatic reaction is exacerbated relative to that in the absence of the enzyme. In addition, the computed tunneling transmission coefficient is approximately three times greater for the enzyme reaction than the uncatalyzed reaction, and the origin of the difference may be attributed to a narrowing effect in the effective potentials for tunneling in the enzyme than that in aqueous solution.

  16. Differential quantum tunneling contributions in nitroalkane oxidase catalyzed and the uncatalyzed proton transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Major, Dan T; Heroux, Annie; Orville, Allen M; Valley, Michael P; Fitzpatrick, Paul F; Gao, Jiali

    2009-12-01

    The proton transfer reaction between the substrate nitroethane and Asp-402 catalyzed by nitroalkane oxidase and the uncatalyzed process in water have been investigated using a path-integral free-energy perturbation method. Although the dominating effect in rate acceleration by the enzyme is the lowering of the quasiclassical free energy barrier, nuclear quantum effects also contribute to catalysis in nitroalkane oxidase. In particular, the overall nuclear quantum effects have greater contributions to lowering the classical barrier in the enzyme, and there is a larger difference in quantum effects between proton and deuteron transfer for the enzymatic reaction than that in water. Both experiment and computation show that primary KIEs are enhanced in the enzyme, and the computed Swain-Schaad exponent for the enzymatic reaction is exacerbated relative to that in the absence of the enzyme. In addition, the computed tunneling transmission coefficient is approximately three times greater for the enzyme reaction than the uncatalyzed reaction, and the origin of the difference may be attributed to a narrowing effect in the effective potentials for tunneling in the enzyme than that in aqueous solution. PMID:19926855

  17. Wind Tunnel Test of the SMART Active Flap Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, Friedrich K.; Anand, Vaidyanthan R.; Birchette, Terrence S.; Lau, Benton H.

    2009-01-01

    Boeing and a team from Air Force, NASA, Army, DARPA, MIT, UCLA, and U. of Maryland have successfully completed a wind-tunnel test of the smart material actuated rotor technology (SMART) rotor in the 40- by 80-foot wind-tunnel of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center. The Boeing SMART rotor is a full-scale, five-bladed bearingless MD 900 helicopter rotor modified with a piezoelectric-actuated trailing edge flap on each blade. The eleven-week test program evaluated the forward flight characteristics of the active-flap rotor at speeds up to 155 knots, gathered data to validate state-of-the-art codes for rotor aero-acoustic analysis, and quantified the effects of open and closed loop active flap control on rotor loads, noise, and performance. The test demonstrated on-blade smart material control of flaps on a full-scale rotor for the first time in a wind tunnel. The effectiveness of the active flap control on noise and vibration was conclusively demonstrated. Results showed significant reductions up to 6dB in blade-vortex-interaction and in-plane noise, as well as reductions in vibratory hub loads up to 80%. Trailing-edge flap deflections were controlled within 0.1 degrees of the commanded value. The impact of the active flap on control power, rotor smoothing, and performance was also demonstrated. Finally, the reliability of the flap actuation system was successfully proven in more than 60 hours of wind-tunnel testing.

  18. Quantum Mechanical Change Control and Time-Dependent Tunneling Phenomena in Heterostructures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Irfan Abdulqayyum

    1990-01-01

    Charge transfer and tunneling of electrons through heterostructures has been investigated using a self-consistent solution of Schrodinger and Poisson equations. The generalized solver developed can determine the charge distribution and the energy band edge for any number-of-heterojunctions and material compositions. The solver takes into consideration the position dependent effective mass and dielectric constant. The limitations and computational aspects of the solver are discussed. The solver is used to examine charge control in multi-channel modulation doped field effect transistors (MODFET's). Characteristics of fabricated multi-channel MODFET's have been analyzed. The deviation of the total sheet charge density in multi-channel MODFET's from the single-channel superposition value is explained. The influence of the gate potential to modulate the channel charge is examined. The role of the channel potential in creating parallel conduction is explored via a pseudo two-dimensional approach. Present methods for time dependent tunneling analysis are critically examined. A time dependent approach to solve the time-dependent Schrodinger equation is presented. It also examines the tunneling transient response. The formation of the initial wavefunction (superposition state) and the sensitivity of the time dependent solution to initial conditions has been explored. Two structures are proposed and analyzed based on the understanding acquired. The first one is a double quantum well tunneling resonator. The oscillation modes, tuning the frequency of oscillations, and potential applications have been analyzed in details. The conversion of this oscillator into a three terminal device and the effect of the third terminal are also examined using the time-dependent solver. The second device structure is a memory cell, where the charge is stored behind a tunnel barrier in the storage well. The device consists of two quantum wells separated by thin potential barrier. The upper well

  19. The active flexible wing aeroservoelastic wind-tunnel test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas; Perry, Boyd

    1989-01-01

    For a specific application of aeroservoelastic technology, Rockwell International Corporation developed a concept known as the Active Flexible Wing (AFW). The concept incorporates multiple active leading-and trailing-edge control surfaces with a very flexible wing such that wing shape is varied in an optimum manner resulting in improved performance and reduced weight. As a result of a cooperative program between the AFWAL's Flight Dynamics Laboratory, Rockwell, and NASA LaRC, a scaled aeroelastic wind-tunnel model of an advanced fighter was designed, fabricated, and tested in the NASA LaRC Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) to validate the AFW concept. Besides conducting the wind-tunnel tests NASA provided a design of an Active Roll Control (ARC) System that was implemented and evaluated during the tests. The ARC system used a concept referred to as Control Law Parameterization which involves maintaining constant performance, robustness, and stability while using different combinations of multiple control surface displacements. Since the ARC system used measured control surface stability derivatives during the design, the predicted performance and stability results correlated very well with test measurements.

  20. Assessment of field-induced quantum confinement in heterogate germanium electron–hole bilayer tunnel field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, J. L. Alper, C.; Ionescu, A. M.; Gámiz, F.

    2014-08-25

    The analysis of quantum mechanical confinement in recent germanium electron–hole bilayer tunnel field-effect transistors has been shown to substantially affect the band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) mechanism between electron and hole inversion layers that constitutes the operating principle of these devices. The vertical electric field that appears across the intrinsic semiconductor to give rise to the bilayer configuration makes the formerly continuous conduction and valence bands become a discrete set of energy subbands, therefore increasing the effective bandgap close to the gates and reducing the BTBT probabilities. In this letter, we present a simulation approach that shows how the inclusion of quantum confinement and the subsequent modification of the band profile results in the appearance of lateral tunneling to the underlap regions that greatly degrades the subthreshold swing of these devices. To overcome this drawback imposed by confinement, we propose an heterogate configuration that proves to suppress this parasitic tunneling and enhances the device performance.

  1. Adsorbate-induced quantum Hall system probed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy combined with transport measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Masutomi, Ryuichi Okamoto, Tohru

    2015-06-22

    An adsorbate-induced quantum Hall system at the cleaved InSb surfaces is investigated in magnetic fields up to 14 T using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy combined with transport measurements. We show that an enhanced Zeeman splitting in the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations is explained by an exchange enhancement of spin splitting and potential disorder, both of which are obtained from the spatially averaged density of states (DOS). Moreover, the Altshuler–Aronov correlation gap is observed in the spatially averaged DOS at 0 T.

  2. Long wavelength quantum-dot lasers selectively populated using tunnel injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, A. A.; Smowton, P. M.; Mi, Z.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2007-05-01

    Using measured amplified spontaneous emission data, we have derived and analysed the carrier distribution of a five-layer tunnelling injection quantum-dot structure at temperatures of 300 K and 350 K. The results are consistent with the direct injection of electrons from the injector well into a subset of lower energy dot states. The carrier distribution spectra contain features which suggest that dots of a particular size within the ensemble are preferentially populated leading to a reduced spectral broadening of the emission.

  3. Electronic-state-controlled reset operation in quantum dot resonant-tunneling single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Q. C.; Zhu, Z. Q.; An, Z. H.; Song, J. D.; Choi, W. J.

    2014-02-03

    The authors present a systematic study of an introduced reset operation on quantum dot (QD) single photon detectors operating at 77 K. The detectors are based on an AlAs/GaAs/AlAs double-barrier resonant tunneling diode with an adjacent layer of self-assembled InAs QDs. Sensitive single-photon detection in high (dI)/(dV) region with suppressed current fluctuations is achieved. The dynamic detection range is extended up to at least 10{sup 4} photons/s for sensitive imaging applications by keeping the device far from saturation by employing an appropriate reset frequency.

  4. Trap-assisted tunneling in InGaN/GaN single-quantum-well light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Auf der Maur, M. Di Carlo, A.; Galler, B.; Pietzonka, I.; Strassburg, M.; Lugauer, H.

    2014-09-29

    Based on numerical simulation and comparison with measured current characteristics, we show that the current in InGaN/GaN single-quantum-well light-emitting diodes at low forward bias can be accurately described by a standard trap-assisted tunneling model. The qualitative and quantitative differences in the current characteristics of devices with different emission wavelengths are demonstrated to be correlated in a physically consistent way with the tunneling model parameters.

  5. Harmonic oscillator wave functions of a self-assembled InAs quantum dot measured by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, Karen; Wenderoth, Martin; Prüser, Henning; Pierz, Klaus; Schumacher, Hans W; Ulbrich, Rainer G

    2013-08-14

    InAs quantum dots embedded in an AlAs matrix inside a double barrier resonant tunneling diode are investigated by cross-sectional scanning tunneling spectroscopy. The wave functions of the bound quantum dot states are spatially and energetically resolved. These bound states are known to be responsible for resonant tunneling phenomena in such quantum dot diodes. The wave functions reveal a textbook-like one-dimensional harmonic oscillator behavior showing up to five equidistant energy levels of 80 meV spacing. The derived effective oscillator mass of m* = 0.24m0 is 1 order of magnitude higher than the effective electron mass of bulk InAs that we attribute to the influence of the surrounding AlAs matrix. This underlines the importance of the matrix material for tailored QD devices with well-defined properties. PMID:23777509

  6. Quantum Brownian motion on potential surfaces coupled via tunneling in an external electric field[-2mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrapsaniotis, E. G.

    2001-07-01

    The present paper deals with the motion of a Brownian particle on two identical but shifted potential surfaces, coupled via a tunneling matrix element in an external electric field. Dissipation is induced by a heat bath represented by an infinite set of harmonic oscillators with a continuum range of frequencies. We derive a perturbative solution for the quantum coherence term of the particle system after performing a small-polaron-like transformation. This is subsequently necessary for the extraction of an equation that describes the reduced dynamics and the minimal action path of the Brownian particle. Finally we extract expressions for the population relaxation rate and the pure quantum-dephasing rate of the two-level system.

  7. Room-temperature resonant tunneling of electrons in carbon nanotube junction quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Sujit K.; Schowalter, Leo J.; Jung, Yung Joon; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Vajtai, Robert

    2005-05-01

    Resonant tunneling structures [M. Bockrath, W. Liang, D. Bozovic, J. H. Hafner, C. B. Lieber, M. Tinkham, and H. Park, Science 291, 283 (2001)], formed between the junction of two single walled nanotubes and the conductive atomic force microscopy tip contact were investigated using current sensing atomic force microscopy. Oscillations in the current voltage characteristics were measured at several positions of the investigated nanotube. The oscillatory behavior is shown to follow a simple quantum mechanical model, dependent on the energy separation in the quantum well formed within the two junctions. Our model shows that these observations seen over several hundreds of nanometers, are possible only if the scattering cross section at defects is small resulting in long phase coherence length, and if the effective mass of the carrier electrons is small. We have calculated the approximate mass of the conduction electrons to be 0.003me.

  8. Magnetoresistance of One-Dimensional Subbands in Tunnel-Coupled Double Quantum Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Blount, M.A.; Lyo, S.K.; Moon, J.S.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1999-04-27

    We study the low-temperature in-plane magnetoresistance of tunnel-coupled quasi-one-dimensional quantum wires. The wires are defined by two pairs of mutually aligned split gates on opposite sides of a < 1 micron thick AlGaAs/GaAs double quantum well heterostructure, allowing independent control of their widths. In the ballistic regime, when both wires are defined and the field is perpendicular to the current, a large resistance peak at ~6 Tesla is observed with a strong gate voltage dependence. The data is consistent with a counting model whereby the number of subbands crossing the Fermi level changes with field due to the formation of an anticrossing in each pair of 1D subbands.

  9. Multistate transitions and quantum oscillations of optical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Celia; Hochberg, David

    2012-02-01

    We consider the effects of multistate transitions on the tunneling racemization of chiral molecules. This requires going beyond simple two-state models of enantiomers and to include transitions within a multiple-level quantum-mechanical system. We derive an effective two-level description which accounts for transitions from the enantiomers to an arbitrary number of excited states as an application of the Weisskopf-Wigner approximation scheme. Modifications to the optical activity from these additional states are considered in general terms under the assumption of CPT invariance and then under T invariance. Some formal dynamical analogies between enantiomers and the neutral K-meson system are discussed.

  10. Enhanced Macroscopic Quantum Tunneling in Capacitively Coupled BiPb2201 Single-Layered Intrinsic Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yoshiki; Mizuno, Takaaki; Kambara, Hitoshi; Nakagawa, Yuya; Kakeya, Itsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) in an intrinsic Josephson junction (IJJ) stack of Bi1.9Pb0.1Sr1.39La0.63CuO6+δ (BiPb2201) has been investigated. For the first switch, from superconducting to the first resistive branch in current-voltage characteristics, the crossover between MQT and thermal activation (TA) takes place at 0.6 K. On the other hand, for the second switch, the MQT-TA crossover temperature is increased to 2.0 K. This result is interpreted as follows: the MQT rate of the second switch is enhanced by the charge coupling between adjacent IJJs as well as in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ. We consider that the enhancement of the MQT rate is a common feature among bismuth-cuprates with single and double CuO2 layers in their crystal structures.

  11. Indeterminate form 0/0 and tunneling in double quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filikhin, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2015-03-01

    We study single electron tunneling between localized and delocalized states in double InAs/GaAs quantum wells (DQWs). Spectral distribution of localized (or delocalized) states demonstrates high sensitivity on inter-dot distance. The tunneling goes consecutively from the higher energy levels to the ground state when the inter-dot distance decreases. The spectrum is presented by set of quasi-doublets and may be described by three parts: localized states, delocalized states, and states with different probability for localization in each QW of DQW. For the last states, the ratio W/ ΔE of the wave functions overlapping integral W and the electron energy difference ΔE of isolated left and right QWs is a weight coefficient in the expansion of wave function on the basis of the wave functions of isolated QWs. In case of weakly coupled QWs in DQW the indeterminate form 0/0 takes a place for the electron wave function. It is found that a small violation of the DQW shape symmetry drastically affects tunneling. This effect also appears as a numerical instability calculations for small variations of input parameters of numerical procedure. This work is supported by the NSF (HRD-1345219) and NASA (NNX09AV07A).

  12. Terahertz time domain interferometry of a SIS tunnel junction and a quantum point contact

    SciTech Connect

    Karadi, C

    1995-09-01

    The author has applied the Terahertz Time Domain Interferometric (THz-TDI) technique to probe the ultrafast dynamic response of a Superconducting-Insulating-Superconducting (SIS) tunnel junction and a Quantum Point Contact (QPC). The THz-TDI technique involves monitoring changes in the dc current induced by interfering two picosecond electrical pulses on the junction as a function of time delay between them. Measurements of the response of the Nb/AlO{sub x}/Nb SIS tunnel junction from 75--200 GHz are in full agreement with the linear theory for photon-assisted tunneling. Likewise, measurements of the induced current in a QPC as a function of source-drain voltage, gate voltage, frequency, and magnetic field also show strong evidence for photon-assisted transport. These experiments together demonstrate the general applicability of the THz-TDI technique to the characterization of the dynamic response of any micron or nanometer scale device that exhibits a non-linear I-V characteristic. 133 refs., 49 figs.

  13. Modeling direct band-to-band tunneling: From bulk to quantum-confined semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Ziegler, A.; Luisier, M.; Schenk, A.

    2015-06-21

    A rigorous framework to study direct band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in homo- and hetero-junction semiconductor nanodevices is introduced. An interaction Hamiltonian coupling conduction and valence bands (CVBs) is derived using a multiband envelope method. A general form of the BTBT probability is then obtained from the linear response to the “CVBs interaction” that drives the system out of equilibrium. Simple expressions in terms of the one-electron spectral function are developed to compute the BTBT current in two- and three-dimensional semiconductor structures. Additionally, a two-band envelope equation based on the Flietner model of imaginary dispersion is proposed for the same purpose. In order to characterize their accuracy and differences, both approaches are compared with full-band, atomistic quantum transport simulations of Ge, InAs, and InAs-Si Esaki diodes. As another numerical application, the BTBT current in InAs-Si nanowire tunnel field-effect transistors is computed. It is found that both approaches agree with high accuracy. The first one is considerably easier to conceive and could be implemented straightforwardly in existing quantum transport tools based on the effective mass approximation to account for BTBT in nanodevices.

  14. Rabi oscillations at different tunnel couplings for an ac-gated quantum dot qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorgrimsson, Brandur; Kim, Dohun; Simmons, C. B.; Ward, Daniel R.; Foote, Ryan H.; Savage, D. E.; Lagally, M. G.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    One way to create a qubit is to use two distinct positions of a single electron as qubit states. Such a system can be achieved by using the left and right positions in a gated double quantum dot. In this system the qubit is strongly coupled to electric fields and has potential for high-speed operations. By tuning specific gate voltages, the tunnel coupling between the left and right quantum dots can be changed. Here, by using resonant ac microwave driving and gate tuning, we explore variations of T2* and the Rabi frequency on the tunnel coupling and microwave drive power, and we study strong driving effects such as generation of second harmonics. This work was supported in part by ARO (W911NF-12-0607) and NSF (DMR-1206915 and PHY-1104660). Development and maintenance of the growth facilities used for fabricating samples is sup- ported by DOE (DE-FG02-03ER46028). This research utilized NSF-supported shared facilities at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  15. Methyl quantum tunneling and nitrogen-14 NQR NMR studies using a SQUID magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.E. |

    1993-07-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques have been very successful in obtaining molecular conformation and dynamics information. Unfortunately, standard NMR and NQR spectrometers are unable to adequately detect resonances below a few megahertz due to the frequency dependent sensitivity of their Faraday coil detectors. For this reason a new spectrometer with a dc SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) detector, which has no such frequency dependence, has been developed. Previously, this spectrometer was used to observe {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al NQR resonances. The scope of this study was increased to include {sup 23}Na, {sup 51}V, and {sup 55}Mn NQR transitions. Also, a technique was presented to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances through cross relaxation of the nitrogen polarization to adjacent proton spins. When the proton Zeeman splitting matches one nitrogen quadrupoler transition the remaining two {sup 14}N transitions can be detected by sweeping a saturating rf field through resonance. Additionally, simultaneous excitation of two nitrogen resonances provides signal enhancement which helps to connect transitions from the same site. In this way, nitrogen-14 resonances were observed in several amino acids and polypeptides. This spectrometer has also been useful in the direct detection of methyl quantum tunneling splittings at 4.2 K. Tunneling, frequencies of a homologous series of carboxylic acids were measured and for solids with equivalent crystal structures, an exponential correlation between the tunneling frequency and the enthalpy of fusion is observed. This correlation provides information about the contribution of intermolecular interactions to the energy barrier for methyl rotation.

  16. Normal-state conductance used to probe superconducting tunnel junctions for quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaparro, Carlos; Bavier, Richard; Kim, Yong-Seung; Kim, Eunyoung; Kline, Jeffrey S.; Pappas, David P.; Oh, Seongshik

    2010-04-01

    Here we report normal-state conductance measurements of three different types of superconducting tunnel junctions that are being used or proposed for quantum computing applications: p-Al/a-AlO/p-Al, e-Re/e-AlO/p-Al, and e-V/e-MgO/p-V, where p stands for polycrystalline, e for epitaxial, and a for amorphous. All three junctions exhibited significant deviations from the parabolic behavior predicted by the WKB approximation models. In the p-Al/a-AlO/p-Al junction, we observed enhancement of tunneling conductances at voltages matching harmonics of Al-O stretching modes. On the other hand, such Al-O vibration modes were missing in the epitaxial e-Re/e-AlO/p-Al junction. This suggests that absence or existence of the Al-O stretching mode might be related to the crystallinity of the AlO tunnel barrier and the interface between the electrode and the barrier. In the e-V/e-MgO/p-V junction, which is one of the candidate systems for future superconducting qubits, we observed suppression of the density of states at zero bias. This implies that the interface is electronically disordered, presumably due to oxidation of the vanadium surface underneath the MgO barrier, even if the interface was structurally well ordered, suggesting that the e-V/e-MgO/p-V junction will not be suitable for qubit applications in its present form. This also demonstrates that the normal-state conductance measurement can be effectively used to screen out low quality samples in the search for better superconducting tunnel junctions.

  17. Three-mode entanglement via tunneling-induced interference in a coupled triple-semiconductor quantum-well structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lue Xinyou; Wu Jing

    2010-07-15

    A simple scheme is proposed to achieve three-mode continuous-variable (CV) entanglement in a coupled triple-semiconductor quantum-well (TSQW) structure via tunneling-induced interference. In the present scheme, the TSQW structure is trapped into a triply resonant cavity, and the tunneling-induced interference effects considered here are the key to realizing entanglement. By numerically simulating the dynamics of the system, we show that the strength of tunneling-induced interference can effectively influence the period of entanglement, and the generation of entanglement does not depend intensively on the initial condition of the cavity field in our scheme. As a result, the present research provides an efficient approach to achieve three-mode CV entanglement in a semiconductor nanostructure, which may have an impact on the progress of solid-state quantum-information theory.

  18. Photon assisted tunneling through three quantum dots with spin-orbit-coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Han-Zhao; An, Xing-Tao; Wang, Ai-Kun; Liu, Jian-Jun

    2014-08-14

    The effect of an ac electric field on quantum transport properties in a system of three quantum dots, two of which are connected in parallel, while the third is coupled to one of the other two, is investigated theoretically. Based on the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function method, the spin-dependent current, occupation number, and spin accumulation can be obtained in our model. An external magnetic flux, Rashba spin-orbit-coupling (SOC), and intradot Coulomb interactions are considered. The magnitude of the spin-dependent average current and the positions of the photon assisted tunneling (PAT) peaks can be accurately controlled and manipulated by simply varying the strength of the coupling and the frequency of the ac field. A particularly interesting result is the observation of a new kind of PAT peak and a multiple-PAT effect that can be generated and controlled by the coupling between the quantum dots. In addition, the spin occupation number and spin accumulation can be well controlled by the Rashba SOC and the magnetic flux.

  19. Resonant enhancement of macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson junctions: Influence of coherent two-level systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fistul, M. V.

    2015-07-01

    We report a theoretical study of the macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) in small Josephson junctions containing randomly distributed two-level systems. We focus on a Josephson phase escape for switching from the superconducting (the zero-voltage) state to a resistive one. Above the crossover temperature Tc r the thermal fluctuations of the Josephson phase induce such a switching, and as T quantum). We explain this effect quantitatively by a strong resonant suppression of the potential barrier for the Josephson phase escape that is due to the coherent quantum Rabi oscillations in two-level systems present in the junction.

  20. Quantum mechanical solver for confined heterostructure tunnel field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Verreck, Devin Groeseneken, Guido; Van de Put, Maarten; Sorée, Bart; Magnus, Wim; Verhulst, Anne S.; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron; Vandenberghe, William G.

    2014-02-07

    Heterostructure tunnel field-effect transistors (HTFET) are promising candidates for low-power applications in future technology nodes, as they are predicted to offer high on-currents, combined with a sub-60 mV/dec subthreshold swing. However, the effects of important quantum mechanical phenomena like size confinement at the heterojunction are not well understood, due to the theoretical and computational difficulties in modeling realistic heterostructures. We therefore present a ballistic quantum transport formalism, combining a novel envelope function approach for semiconductor heterostructures with the multiband quantum transmitting boundary method, which we extend to 2D potentials. We demonstrate an implementation of a 2-band version of the formalism and apply it to study confinement in realistic heterostructure diodes and p-n-i-n HTFETs. For the diodes, both transmission probabilities and current densities are found to decrease with stronger confinement. For the p-n-i-n HTFETs, the improved gate control is found to counteract the deterioration due to confinement.

  1. Transport through an impurity tunnel coupled to a Si/SiGe quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, Ryan H.; Ward, Daniel R.; Prance, J. R.; Gamble, John King; Nielsen, Erik; Thorgrimsson, Brandur; Savage, D. E.; Saraiva, A. L.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.

    Here we present measurements of transport through a gate-defined quantum dot formed in a Si/SiGe heterostructure, demonstrating controllable tunnel coupling between the quantum dot and a localized electronic state.1 Combining experimental stability diagram measurements with 3D capacitive modeling based on the expected electron density profiles, we determine the most likely location of the localized state in the quantum well. This work is supported in part by NSF (DMR-1206915, IIA-1132804), ARO (W911NF-12-1-0607) and the William F. Vilas Estate Trust. Development and maintenance of the growth facilities used for fabricating samples supported by DOE (DE-FG02-03ER46028). This research utilized facilities supported by the NSF (DMR-0832760, DMR-1121288). The work of J.K.G. and E.N. was supported in part by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 1Ryan H. Foote et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 107, 103112 (2015)

  2. Quantum phase transition and Coulomb blockade effect in triangular quantum dots with interdot capacitive and tunnel couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yong-Chen; Wang, Wei-Zhong; Yang, Jun-Tao; Huang, Hai-Ming

    2015-02-01

    The quantum phase transition and the electronic transport in a triangular quantum dot system are investigated using the numerical renormalization group method. We concentrate on the interplay between the interdot capacitive coupling V and the interdot tunnel coupling t. For small t, three dots form a local spin doublet. As t increases, due to the competition between V and t, there exist two first-order transitions with phase sequence spin-doublet-magnetic frustration phase-orbital spin singlet. When t is absent, the evolutions of the total charge on the dots and the linear conductance are of the typical Coulomb-blockade features with increasing gate voltage. While for sufficient t, the antiferromagnetic spin correlation between dots is enhanced, and the conductance is strongly suppressed for the bonding state is almost doubly occupied. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 10874132 and 11174228) and the Doctoral Scientific Research Foundation of HUAT (Grant No. BK201407). One of the authors (Huang Hai-Ming) supported by the Scientific Research Items Foundation of Educational Committee of Hubei Province, China (Grant No. Q20131805).

  3. Construction monitoring activities in the Yucca Mountain ESF Starter Tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Pott, J.; Costin, L.S.; Brechtel, C.E

    1993-12-31

    An underground test facility known as the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) is planned as part of the characterization of a site for a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, NV. The first part of the ESF that will be constructed is the North Ramp Starter Tunnel (NRST), which will provide a facility for launching the tunnel-boring machine to be used in the construction of the ESF. Geotechnical monitoring activities are planned for the NRST to provide for the collection of data to confirm design concepts and to enhance safety during construction. This paper describes the activities to be conducted and their objectives. The construction monitoring activities are part of a study defined in the In Situ Design Verification Study Plan. The objectives of this study are to (1) monitor and observe the long-term behavior of openings in a range of ground conditions in the repository host rock, and (2) to observe and evaluate the construction of the ESF with respect to implications for repository construction and performance. Initiating geotechnical monitoring activities in the NRST will allow geotechnical data required to confirm adequate design, construction and long term performance to be collected from the very beginning of underground construction. In addition, the planned monitoring is consistent with standard practice for assuring quality and safety during similar rock excavation for civil construction. The geotechnical monitoring activities addressed by this experiment plan are grouped into three tasks: (1) evaluation of mining methods, (2) monitoring of ground support systems and (3) monitoring drift stability. A general description of each of the tasks is presented below.

  4. Photon-assisted tunneling and charge dephasing in a carbon nanotube double quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavalankar, A.; Pei, T.; Gauger, E. M.; Warner, J. H.; Briggs, G. A. D.; Laird, E. A.

    2016-06-01

    We report microwave-driven photon-assisted tunneling in a suspended carbon nanotube double quantum dot. From the resonant linewidth at a temperature of 13 mK, the charge-dephasing time is determined to be 280 ±30 ps. The linewidth is independent of driving frequency, but increases with increasing temperature. The moderate temperature dependence is inconsistent with expectations from electron-phonon coupling alone, but consistent with charge noise arising in the device. The extracted level of charge noise is comparable with that expected from previous measurements of a valley-spin qubit, where it was hypothesized to be the main cause of qubit decoherence. Our results suggest a possible route towards improved valley-spin qubits.

  5. Spin texture of Bi2Se3 thin films in the quantum tunneling limit.

    PubMed

    Landolt, Gabriel; Schreyeck, Steffen; Eremeev, Sergey V; Slomski, Bartosz; Muff, Stefan; Osterwalder, Jürg; Chulkov, Evgueni V; Gould, Charles; Karczewski, Grzegorz; Brunner, Karl; Buhmann, Hartmut; Molenkamp, Laurens W; Dil, J Hugo

    2014-02-01

    By means of spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy we studied the spin structure of thin films of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 grown on InP(111). For thicknesses below six quintuple layers the spin-polarized metallic topological surface states interact with each other via quantum tunneling and a gap opens. Our measurements show that the resulting surface states can be described by massive Dirac cones which are split in a Rashba-like manner due to the substrate induced inversion asymmetry. The inner and the outer Rashba branches have distinct localization in the top and the bottom part of the film, whereas the band apices are delocalized throughout the entire film. Supported by calculations, our observations help in the understanding of the evolution of the surface states at the topological phase transition and provide the groundwork for the realization of two-dimensional spintronic devices based on topological semiconductors. PMID:24580629

  6. Concerted hydrogen-bond breaking by quantum tunneling in the water hexamer prism.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jeremy O; Pérez, Cristóbal; Lobsiger, Simon; Reid, Adam A; Temelso, Berhane; Shields, George C; Kisiel, Zbigniew; Wales, David J; Pate, Brooks H; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2016-03-18

    The nature of the intermolecular forces between water molecules is the same in small hydrogen-bonded clusters as in the bulk. The rotational spectra of the clusters therefore give insight into the intermolecular forces present in liquid water and ice. The water hexamer is the smallest water cluster to support low-energy structures with branched three-dimensional hydrogen-bond networks, rather than cyclic two-dimensional topologies. Here we report measurements of splitting patterns in rotational transitions of the water hexamer prism, and we used quantum simulations to show that they result from geared and antigeared rotations of a pair of water molecules. Unlike previously reported tunneling motions in water clusters, the geared motion involves the concerted breaking of two hydrogen bonds. Similar types of motion may be feasible in interfacial and confined water. PMID:26989250

  7. Tunneling escape time from a semiconductor quantum well in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkin, I. A.; Ujevic, Sebastian; Avrutin, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    We calculate the tunneling escape times of quasibound states in a quantum well under applied electric field. We refine the quasiclassical Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation for a multilayer heterostructure and find a simple analytical expression for the lifetime, which takes into account different effective masses and different dielectric constants inside the heterostructure layers. We compare the quasiclassical lifetime formula with exact numerical solutions of the (complex) Schrödinger equation. For the underbarrier action Sab≥ℏ /3, good agreement between the two approaches is demonstrated. Also, by analytical expansion of the Schrödinger equation we prove the quasiclassical formula for lifetime as an asymptotic limit of the exact solution.

  8. Quantum phases of Bose gases on a lattice with pair-tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue-Ming; Liang, Jiu-Qing

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the strongly interacting lattice Bose gases on a lattice with two-body interaction of nearest neighbors characterized by pair tunneling. The excitation spectrum and the depletion of the condensate of lattice Bose gases are investigated using the Bogoliubov transformation method and the results show that there is a pair condensate as well as a single particle condensate. The various possible quantum phases, such as the Mott-insulator phase (MI), the superfluid phase (SF) of an individual atom, the charge density wave phase (CDW), the supersolid phase (SS), the pair-superfluid (PSF) phase, and the pair-supersolid phase (PSS) are discussed in different parametric regions within our extended Bose-Hubbard model using perturbation theory.

  9. Atomic-Scale Visualization of Quantum Interference on a Weyl Semimetal Surface by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao; Xu, Su-Yang; Bian, Guang; Guo, Cheng; Chang, Guoqing; Sanchez, Daniel S; Belopolski, Ilya; Lee, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shin-Ming; Zhang, Xiao; Sankar, Raman; Alidoust, Nasser; Chang, Tay-Rong; Wu, Fan; Neupert, Titus; Chou, Fangcheng; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Yao, Nan; Bansil, Arun; Jia, Shuang; Lin, Hsin; Hasan, M Zahid

    2016-01-26

    Weyl semimetals may open a new era in condensed matter physics, materials science, and nanotechnology after graphene and topological insulators. We report the first atomic scale view of the surface states of a Weyl semimetal (NbP) using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy. We observe coherent quantum interference patterns that arise from the scattering of quasiparticles near point defects on the surface. The measurements reveal the surface electronic structure both below and above the chemical potential in both real and reciprocal spaces. Moreover, the interference maps uncover the scattering processes of NbP's exotic surface states. Through comparison between experimental data and theoretical calculations, we further discover that the orbital and/or spin texture of the surface bands may suppress certain scattering channels on NbP. These results provide a comprehensive understanding of electronic properties on Weyl semimetal surfaces. PMID:26743693

  10. InGaAs tunnel diodes for the calibration of semi-classical and quantum mechanical band-to-band tunneling models

    SciTech Connect

    Smets, Quentin; Verreck, Devin; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Groeseneken, Guido; Heyns, Marc M.; Verhulst, Anne S.; Rooyackers, Rita; Merckling, Clément; Simoen, Eddy; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Voon Y.; Van De Put, Maarten; Sorée, Bart

    2014-05-14

    Promising predictions are made for III-V tunnel-field-effect transistor (FET), but there is still uncertainty on the parameters used in the band-to-band tunneling models. Therefore, two simulators are calibrated in this paper; the first one uses a semi-classical tunneling model based on Kane's formalism, and the second one is a quantum mechanical simulator implemented with an envelope function formalism. The calibration is done for In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As using several p+/intrinsic/n+ diodes with different intrinsic region thicknesses. The dopant profile is determined by SIMS and capacitance-voltage measurements. Error bars are used based on statistical and systematic uncertainties in the measurement techniques. The obtained parameters are in close agreement with theoretically predicted values and validate the semi-classical and quantum mechanical models. Finally, the models are applied to predict the input characteristics of In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As n- and p-lineTFET, with the n-lineTFET showing competitive performance compared to MOSFET.

  11. The hydrogen tunneling splitting in malonaldehyde: A full-dimensional time-independent quantum mechanical method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Ren, Yinghui; Bian, Wensheng

    2016-08-21

    The accurate time-independent quantum dynamics calculations on the ground-state tunneling splitting of malonaldehyde in full dimensionality are reported for the first time. This is achieved with an efficient method developed by us. In our method, the basis functions are customized for the hydrogen transfer process which has the effect of greatly reducing the size of the final Hamiltonian matrix, and the Lanczos method and parallel strategy are used to further overcome the memory and central processing unit time bottlenecks. The obtained ground-state tunneling splitting of 24.5 cm(-1) is in excellent agreement with the benchmark value of 23.8 cm(-1) computed with the full-dimensional, multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach on the same potential energy surface, and we estimate that our reported value has an uncertainty of less than 0.5 cm(-1). Moreover, the role of various vibrational modes strongly coupled to the hydrogen transfer process is revealed. PMID:27544107

  12. Macroscopic quantum many-body tunneling of attractive Bose-Einstein condensate in anharmonic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, Sudip Kumar; Debnath, Pankaj Kumar; Chakrabarti, Barnali

    2013-09-01

    We study the stability of attractive atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and the macroscopic quantum many-body tunneling (MQT) in the anharmonic trap. We utilize correlated two-body basis function which keeps all possible two-body correlations. The anharmonic parameter ( λ) is slowly tuned from harmonic to anharmonic. For each choice of λ the many-body equation is solved adiabatically. The use of the van der Waals interaction gives realistic picture which substantially differs from the mean-field results. For weak anharmonicity, we observe that the attractive condensate gains stability with larger number of bosons compared to that in the pure harmonic trap. The transition from resonances to bound states with weak anharmonicity also differs significantly from the earlier study of [N. Moiseyev, L.D. Carr, B.A. Malomed, Y.B. Band, J. Phys. B 37, L193 (2004)]. We also study the tunneling of the metastable condensate very close to the critical number N cr of collapse and observe that near collapse the MQT is the dominant decay mechanism compared to the two-body and three-body loss rate. We also observe the power law behavior in MQT near the critical point. The results for pure harmonic trap are in agreement with mean-field results. However, we fail to retrieve the power law behavior in anharmonic trap although MQT is still the dominant decay mechanism.

  13. Investigation of quantum confinement within the tunneling-percolation transition for ultrathin bismuth films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oller, Declan; Fernandes, Gustavo E.; Kim, Jin Ho; Xu, Jimmy

    2015-10-01

    We investigate conduction phenomena in ultrathin bismuth (Bi) films that are thermally evaporated onto flat quartz. Critical points in the conductance as a function of deposition time are identified and used to scale the data from time dependence to coverage dependence. The resulting nonlinear coverage scaling equation is verified independently via analysis done on transmission electron microscope images of the evaporated films. The scaled data yields critical exponents in very good agreement with classical percolation theory, and clearly shows the transition from the tunneling regime into percolation. Surprisingly, no noticeable signatures of size-quantization effects in the nucleation sites as a function of deposition time is observed in either regime. We discuss our findings in light of Boltzmann transport modeling of 1D conduction as an approximation to the narrow percolative paths that form at the onset of percolation. Our results suggest that lack of a preferred crystallite orientation in the nucleation process may indeed cause quantum-confinement to be too smeared out to be observable in the tunneling to percolation transition.

  14. Detection of single photons by a resonant tunneling heterostructure with a quantum dot layer

    SciTech Connect

    Khanin, Yu. N. Vdovin, E. E.

    2010-08-15

    Light absorption by GaAs/AlAs heterostructures with a layer of self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs) at resonant tunneling through an energy-selected QD has been investigated. A high sensitivity of the current through this selected tunneling channel to the absorption of single photons with a wavelength {lambda} {<=} 860 nm up to a temperature of 50 K is demonstrated; this sensitivity is caused by the Coulomb effect of the photoexcited holes captured by surrounding QDs on the resonance conditions. It is shown that single-photon absorption can discretely change the current through the system under study by a factor of more than 50. The captured-hole lifetimes have been measured, and a model has been developed to qualitatively describe the experimental data. It is also demonstrated that the InAs monolayer can effectively absorb photons. The properties of the heterostructure studied can be used not only to detect photons but also to design logical valves and optical memory devices.

  15. Experimental determination of quantum-well lifetime effect on large-signal resonant tunneling diode switching time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Growden, Tyler A.; Brown, E. R.; Zhang, Weidong; Droopad, Ravi; Berger, Paul R.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental determination is presented of the effect the quantum-well lifetime has on a large-signal resonant tunneling diode (RTD) switching time. Traditional vertical In0.53Ga0.47As/AlAs RTDs were grown, fabricated, and characterized. The switching time was measured with a high-speed oscilloscope and found to be close to the sum of the calculated RC-limited 10%-90% switching time and the quantum-well quasibound-state lifetime. This method displays experimental evidence that the two intrinsic resonant-tunneling characteristic times act independently, and that the quasibound-state lifetime then serves as a quantum-limit on the large-signal speed of RTDs.

  16. Experimental determination of quantum-well lifetime effect on large-signal resonant tunneling diode switching time

    SciTech Connect

    Growden, Tyler A.; Berger, Paul R.; Brown, E. R.; Zhang, Weidong; Droopad, Ravi

    2015-10-12

    An experimental determination is presented of the effect the quantum-well lifetime has on a large-signal resonant tunneling diode (RTD) switching time. Traditional vertical In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/AlAs RTDs were grown, fabricated, and characterized. The switching time was measured with a high-speed oscilloscope and found to be close to the sum of the calculated RC-limited 10%–90% switching time and the quantum-well quasibound-state lifetime. This method displays experimental evidence that the two intrinsic resonant-tunneling characteristic times act independently, and that the quasibound-state lifetime then serves as a quantum-limit on the large-signal speed of RTDs.

  17. Large-amplitude dynamics in vinyl radical: The role of quantum tunneling as an isomerization mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Amit R.; Bowman, Joel M.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2012-01-01

    We report tunneling splittings associated with the large amplitude 1,2 H-atom migration to the global minima in the vinyl radical. These are obtained using a recent full-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface (PES) [A. R. Sharma, B. J. Braams, S. Carter, B. C. Shepler, and J. M. Bowman, J. Chem. Phys. 130(17), 174301 (2009)] and independently, directly calculated "reaction paths." The PES is a multidimensional fit to coupled cluster single and double and perturbative treatment of triple excitations coupled-cluster single double triple (CCSD(T)) with the augmented correlation consistent triple zeta basis set (aug-cc-pVTZ). The reaction path potentials are obtained from a series of CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVnTZ calculations extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Approximate 1D calculations of the tunneling splitting for these 1,2-H atom migrations are obtained using each of these potentials as well as quite different 1D Hamiltonians. The splittings are calculated over a large energy ranges, with results from the two sets of calculations in excellent agreement. Though negligibly slow (>1 s) for the vibrational ground state, this work predicts tunneling-promoted 1,2 hydride shift dynamics in vinyl to exhibit exponential growth with internal vibrational excitation, specifically achieving rates on the sub-μs time scale at energies above E ≈ 7500 cm-1. Most importantly, these results begin to elucidate the possible role of quantum isomerization through barriers without dissociation, in competition with the more conventional picture of classical roaming permitted over a much narrower window of energies immediately below the bond dissociation limit. Furthermore, when integrated over a Boltzmann distribution of thermal energies, these microcanonical tunneling rates are consistent with sub-μs time scales for 1,2 hydride shift dynamics at T > 1400 K. These results have potential relevance for combustion modeling of low-pressure flames, as well as recent observations

  18. Large-amplitude dynamics in vinyl radical: the role of quantum tunneling as an isomerization mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amit R; Bowman, Joel M; Nesbitt, David J

    2012-01-21

    We report tunneling splittings associated with the large amplitude 1,2 H-atom migration to the global minima in the vinyl radical. These are obtained using a recent full-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface (PES) [A. R. Sharma, B. J. Braams, S. Carter, B. C. Shepler, and J. M. Bowman, J. Chem. Phys. 130(17), 174301 (2009)] and independently, directly calculated "reaction paths." The PES is a multidimensional fit to coupled cluster single and double and perturbative treatment of triple excitations coupled-cluster single double triple (CCSD(T)) with the augmented correlation consistent triple zeta basis set (aug-cc-pVTZ). The reaction path potentials are obtained from a series of CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVnTZ calculations extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Approximate 1D calculations of the tunneling splitting for these 1,2-H atom migrations are obtained using each of these potentials as well as quite different 1D Hamiltonians. The splittings are calculated over a large energy ranges, with results from the two sets of calculations in excellent agreement. Though negligibly slow (>1 s) for the vibrational ground state, this work predicts tunneling-promoted 1,2 hydride shift dynamics in vinyl to exhibit exponential growth with internal vibrational excitation, specifically achieving rates on the sub-μs time scale at energies above E ≈ 7500 cm(-1). Most importantly, these results begin to elucidate the possible role of quantum isomerization through barriers without dissociation, in competition with the more conventional picture of classical roaming permitted over a much narrower window of energies immediately below the bond dissociation limit. Furthermore, when integrated over a Boltzmann distribution of thermal energies, these microcanonical tunneling rates are consistent with sub-μs time scales for 1,2 hydride shift dynamics at T > 1400 K. These results have potential relevance for combustion modeling of low-pressure flames, as well as recent

  19. Scanning tunnelling microscope fabrication of arrays of phosphorus atom qubits for a silicon quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, J. L.; Schofield, S. R.; Simmons, M. Y.; Clark, R. G.; Dzurak, A. S.; Curson, N. J.; Kane, B. E.; McAlpine, N. S.; Hawley, M. E.; Brown, G. W.

    2002-10-01

    Recognition of the potentially massive computational power of a quantum computer has driven a considerable experimental effort to build such a device. Of the various possible physical implementations, silicon-based architectures are attractive for the long spin relaxation times involved, their scalability, and ease of integration with existing silicon technology. However, their fabrication requires construction at the atomic scale - an immense technological challenge. Here we outline a detailed strategy for the construction of a phosphorus in silicon quantum computer and demonstrate the first significant step towards this goal - the fabrication of atomically precise arrays of single phosphorus bearing molecules on a silicon surface. After using a monolayer hydrogen resist to passivate a silicon surface we apply pulsed voltages to a scanning tunnelling microscope tip to selectively desorb individual hydrogen atoms with atomic resolution. Exposure of this surface to the phosphorus precursor phosphine results in precise placement of single phosphorus atoms on the surface. We also describe preliminary studies into a process to incorporate these surface phosphorus atoms into the silicon crystal at the array sites.

  20. Arrhenius-kinetics evidence for quantum tunneling in microbial “social” decision rates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    . Nonlinear Arrhenius kinetics in ciliate decision making suggest transitions from one signaling strategy to another result from a computational analogue of quantum tunneling in social information processing. PMID:21331234

  1. Arrhenius-kinetics evidence for quantum tunneling in microbial "social" decision rates.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin B

    2010-11-01

    . Nonlinear Arrhenius kinetics in ciliate decision making suggest transitions from one signaling strategy to another result from a computational analogue of quantum tunneling in social information processing. PMID:21331234

  2. Correction: Charge-tunnelling and self-trapping: common origins for blinking, grey-state emission and photoluminescence enhancement in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, M. A.; Fisher, A. A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Correction for `Charge-tunnelling and self-trapping: common origins for blinking, grey-state emission and photoluminescence enhancement in semiconductor quantum dots' by M. A. Osborne, et al., Nanoscale, 2016, 8, 9272-9283.

  3. Quantum Tunneling of the Non-stationary Kerr-Newman Black Hole via a New Type of General Tortoise Coordinate Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhong-Wen; Deng, Juan; Li, Guo-Ping; Yang, Shu-Zheng

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, the quantum tunneling of the non-stationary Kerr-Newman black hole is investigated via Hamilton-Jacobi equation and two types of general tortoise coordinate transformations. The tunneling rates, the Hawking temperatures and radiation spectrums are derived respectively. Our result shows that the new type of general tortoise coordinate transformation is more reasonable.

  4. Tuning inter-dot tunnel coupling of an etched graphene double quantum dot by adjacent metal gates

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Da; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Luo, Gang; Zheng, Zhi-Xiong; Tu, Tao; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Hong-Wen; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Graphene double quantum dots (DQDs) open to use charge or spin degrees of freedom for storing and manipulating quantum information in this new electronic material. However, impurities and edge disorders in etched graphene nano-structures hinder the ability to control the inter-dot tunnel coupling, tC, the most important property of the artificial molecule. Here we report measurements of tC in an all-metal-side-gated graphene DQD. We find that tC can be controlled continuously about a factor of four by employing a single gate. Furthermore, tC, can be changed monotonically about another factor of four as electrons are gate-pumped into the dot one by one. The results suggest that the strength of tunnel coupling in etched graphene DQDs can be varied in a rather broad range and in a controllable manner, which improves the outlook to use graphene as a base material for qubit applications. PMID:24213723

  5. Fermions Tunnelling from Black String and Kerr AdS Black Hole with Consideration of Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong-hua; Zhang, Li-mei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, using the Hamilton-Jacobi Ansatz, we discuss the tunnelling of fermions when effects of quantum gravity are taken into account. We investigate two cases, black string and Kerr AdS black hole. For black string, the uncharged and un-rotating case, we find that the correction of Hawking temperature is only affected by the mass of emitted fermions and the quantum gravitational corrections slow down the increases of the temperature, which naturally leads to remnants left in the evaporation. For another case, the Kerr AdS black hole, we find that the quantum gravitational corrections are not only determined by the mass of the emitted fermions but also affected by the rotating properties of the AdS black hole. So with consideration of the quantum gravity corrections, an offset around the standard temperature always exists.

  6. Reproducing Deep Tunneling Splittings, Resonances, and Quantum Frequencies in Vibrational Spectra From a Handful of Direct Ab Initio Semiclassical Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Conte, Riccardo; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Ceotto, Michele

    2013-10-17

    A time-dependent semiclassical approach for vibrational spectra calculations is shown to describe deep tunneling splittings, resonances, and quantum frequencies in multidimensional multiwell systems, by propagating a very limited number of classical trajectories. The approach is tested on ammonia by evolving eight trajectories on a full-dimensional PES. Quantum effects are reproduced, and results are in good agreement with time-independent quantum calculations. All the features are maintained when ab initio "on-the-fly" dynamics is adopted, thus demonstrating that precomputation of the PES can be avoided. The approach overcomes the typical scaling issues of quantum mechanical techniques without introducing any simplifications nor reductions of dimensionality of the problem. The proposed methodology is promising for further applications to systems of major complexity. PMID:26705583

  7. Conductance and Transmittance of waves through a chaotic cavity (or, equivalently, quantum dot) results in regularization of tunneling rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecora, Louis; Wu, Dong Ho; Kim, Christopher

    Tunneling rates in closed, double well quantum or wave systems in two dimensions or higher are radically different between wells with classically regular or chaotic behavior. Wells with regular dynamics have tunneling rates that fluctuate by several orders of magnitude as a function of energy or frequency. Wells with chaotic dynamics have fluctuations smaller than one order of magnitude (a regularization of the fluctuations). We examine a more realistic experimental system, a single well with two channels with tunneling barriers at their junctions with the wells. Former theories for conductance in quantum dots will not apply here. We developed a theory, which uses proper boundary conditions at the barriers and yields the scattering matrix. Results show that the transmission rates fluctuate by orders of magnitude in the regular-shaped well, but are greatly reduced (regularized) for the chaotic-shaped well. We will show experimental results that test these theoretical findings for microwave transmission through a chaotic-shaped cavity, which is made of copper and has two ports with tunneling barriers.

  8. Tunneling spectroscopy of a single quantum dot coupled to a superconductor: From Kondo ridge to Andreev bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillet, J.-D.; Joyez, P.; Žitko, Rok; Goffman, M. F.

    2013-07-01

    We performed tunneling spectroscopy of a carbon nanotube quantum dot (QD) coupled to a metallic reservoir either in the normal or in the superconducting state. We explore how the Kondo resonance, observed when the QD's occupancy is odd and the reservoir is normal, evolves towards Andreev bound states (ABS) in the superconducting state. Within this regime, the ABS spectrum observed is consistent with a quantum phase transition from a singlet to a degenerate magnetic doublet ground state, in quantitative agreement with a single-level Anderson model with superconducting leads.

  9. The ground state tunneling splitting and the zero point energy of malonaldehyde: A quantum Monte Carlo determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viel, Alexandra; Coutinho-Neto, Maurício D.; Manthe, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Quantum dynamics calculations of the ground state tunneling splitting and of the zero point energy of malonaldehyde on the full dimensional potential energy surface proposed by Yagi et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 1154, 10647 (2001)] are reported. The exact diffusion Monte Carlo and the projection operator imaginary time spectral evolution methods are used to compute accurate benchmark results for this 21-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface. A tunneling splitting of 25.7±0.3cm-1 is obtained, and the vibrational ground state energy is found to be 15122±4cm-1. Isotopic substitution of the tunneling hydrogen modifies the tunneling splitting down to 3.21±0.09cm-1 and the vibrational ground state energy to 14385±2cm-1. The computed tunneling splittings are slightly higher than the experimental values as expected from the potential energy surface which slightly underestimates the barrier height, and they are slightly lower than the results from the instanton theory obtained using the same potential energy surface.

  10. The ground state tunneling splitting and the zero point energy of malonaldehyde: a quantum Monte Carlo determination.

    PubMed

    Viel, Alexandra; Coutinho-Neto, Maurício D; Manthe, Uwe

    2007-01-14

    Quantum dynamics calculations of the ground state tunneling splitting and of the zero point energy of malonaldehyde on the full dimensional potential energy surface proposed by Yagi et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 1154, 10647 (2001)] are reported. The exact diffusion Monte Carlo and the projection operator imaginary time spectral evolution methods are used to compute accurate benchmark results for this 21-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface. A tunneling splitting of 25.7+/-0.3 cm-1 is obtained, and the vibrational ground state energy is found to be 15 122+/-4 cm-1. Isotopic substitution of the tunneling hydrogen modifies the tunneling splitting down to 3.21+/-0.09 cm-1 and the vibrational ground state energy to 14 385+/-2 cm-1. The computed tunneling splittings are slightly higher than the experimental values as expected from the potential energy surface which slightly underestimates the barrier height, and they are slightly lower than the results from the instanton theory obtained using the same potential energy surface. PMID:17228955

  11. Modeling the Benchmark Active Control Technology Wind-Tunnel Model for Active Control Design Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the formulation of a model of the dynamic behavior of the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) wind tunnel model for active control design and analysis applications. The model is formed by combining the equations of motion for the BACT wind tunnel model with actuator models and a model of wind tunnel turbulence. The primary focus of this report is the development of the equations of motion from first principles by using Lagrange's equations and the principle of virtual work. A numerical form of the model is generated by making use of parameters obtained from both experiment and analysis. Comparisons between experimental and analytical data obtained from the numerical model show excellent agreement and suggest that simple coefficient-based aerodynamics are sufficient to accurately characterize the aeroelastic response of the BACT wind tunnel model. The equations of motion developed herein have been used to aid in the design and analysis of a number of flutter suppression controllers that have been successfully implemented.

  12. ITO@Cu2S tunnel junction nanowire arrays as efficient counter electrode for quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Zhang, Xing; Ge, Qian-Qing; Yu, Bin-Bin; Zou, Yu-Gang; Jiang, Wen-Jie; Song, Wei-Guo; Wan, Li-Jun; Hu, Jin-Song

    2014-01-01

    Quantum-dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) has been considered as an alternative to new generation photovoltaics, but it still presents very low power conversion efficiency. Besides the continuous effort on improving photoanodes and electrolytes, the focused investigation on charge transfer at interfaces and the rational design for counter electrodes (CEs) are recently receiving much attention. Herein, core-shell nanowire arrays with tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanowire core and Cu2S nanocrystal shell (ITO@Cu2S) were dedicatedly designed and fabricated as new efficient CEs for QDSSCs in order to improve charge collection and transport and to avoid the intrinsic issue of copper dissolution in popular and most efficient Cu/Cu2S CEs. The high-quality tunnel junctions formed between n-type ITO nanowires and p-type Cu2S nanocrystals led to the considerable decrease in sheet resistance and charge transfer resistance and thus facilitated the electron transport during the operation of QDSSCs. The three-dimensional structure of nanowire arrays provided high surface area for more active catalytic sites and easy accessibility for an electrolyte. As a result, the power conversion efficiency of QDSSCs with the designed ITO@Cu2S CEs increased by 84.5 and 33.5% compared to that with planar Au and Cu2S CEs, respectively. PMID:24350879

  13. Tunneling behavior of ultracold atoms in optical traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Binglu; Ma, Yanhua; Shen, Man; Li, Hong

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the tunneling of ultracold atoms in optical traps by using the path-integral method. We obtain the decay rate for tunneling out of a single-well and discuss how the rate is affected by the level splitting caused by the presence of a second adjacent well. Our calculations show that the transition through the potential barrier can be divided into three regions: the quantum tunneling region, the thermally assisted region and the thermal activation region. The tunneling process is found to be a second-order transition. We also show that level splitting due to tunneling can increase the tunneling rate.

  14. A complete description of tunnelling using direct quantum dynamics simulation: Salicylaldimine proton transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Polyak, Iakov; Allan, Charlotte S. M.; Worth, Graham A.

    2015-08-28

    We demonstrate here conclusively that the variational multiconfiguration Gaussian (vMCG) method converges to the grid based full quantum dynamics multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree result for a tunnelling problem in many dimensions, using the intramolecular proton transfer in salicylaldimine as a model system. The 13-dimensional model potential energy surface was obtained from Hartree Fock energies with the 6-31G* basis set and the expectation value of the flux operator along the transition mode was used as a benchmark characteristic. As well as showing excellent convergence of the vMCG method on the model surface using a local harmonic approximation and a moderate number of basis functions, we show that the direct dynamics version of the vMCG also performs very well, usually needs the same number of Gaussians to converge, and converges to exact results if those are obtained on an accurately fitted surface. Finally, we make an important observation that the width of the Gaussian basis functions must be chosen very carefully to obtain accurate results with the use of the frozen-width approximation.

  15. Quantum effects and the dissipation by quasiparticle tunneling in arrays of Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Kampf, A.; Schoen, G.

    1987-09-01

    We investigate the influence of dissipative quasiparticle tunneling currents on quantum effects and phase transitions in d-dimensional arrays of Josephson junctions. We show how the dissipative phase transition, which is known from single junctions at zero temperature, is modified due to the multidimensional coupling. The transition depends on the strength of the dissipation but also on the ratio of Josephson coupling energy to the capacitive charging energy e/sup 2//2C. It separates an ordered (superconducting) regime from a disordered (resistive) regime where fluctuations prevent phase coherence. In arrays with small capacitance junctions and weak dissipation, the disordered phase persists down to zero temperature. Finite temperatures modify the phase diagram significantly. A reentrant transition between a resistive and a superconducting state is found for weak dissipation. We also make contact with the familiar phase transitions of d-dimensional XY models and show how the charging energy and dissipation in Josephson-junction arrays influence these transitions. The results are of relevance for granular superconductors.

  16. The effect of current-induced spin switching in the presence of quantum tunneling of magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiorny, Maciej; Barnaś, Józef

    2013-03-01

    Knowledge of transport properties of individual large-spin (S > 1 / 2) atoms/molecules exhibiting magnetic anisotropy is of key importance from the point of view of information processing technologies. The ultimate aim is to incorporate such objects as functional elements of spintronic devices, with the objective of employing spin-polarized currents to control the magnetic state of the system. In particular, for an atom/molecule with the predominant `easy-axis' uniaxial magnetic anisotropy this allows for switching the system's spin between two metastable states. However, the uniaxial component of magnetic anisotropy, underlying the magnetic bistability, is frequently accompanied by the transverse one, whose presence manifests, e.g., as quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM). Here, we show that not only does QTM induce an effective energy barrier for the spin switching, but also its effect on the transport reveals as an additional signal in transport characteristics. Furthermore, we propose how to experimentally investigate QTM by means of the STM inelastic transport spectroscopy. also at Adam Mickiewicz University

  17. Photoconduction in tunnel-coupled Ge/Si quantum dot arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Stepina, N. P. Yakimov, A. I.; Nenashev, A. V.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.; Sobolev, N. A.; Leitao, J. P.; Kirienko, V. V.; Nikiforov, A. I.; Koptev, E. S.; Pereira, L.; Carmo, M. C.

    2006-08-15

    The photoconduction in a tunnel-coupled Ge/Si quantum dot (QD) array has been studied. The photoconductance (PC) sign can be either positive or negative, depending on the initial filling of QDs with holes. The PC kinetics has a long-term character (10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} s at T = 4.2 K) and is accompanied by persistent photoconduction (PPC), whereby the PC value is not restored on the initial level even after relaxation for several hours. These phenomena are observed upon illumination by light with photon energies both greater and smaller than the silicon bandgap. A threshold light wavelength corresponding to a long-term PC kinetics depends on the QD filling with holes. A model describing the observed PC kinetics is proposed, according to which the main contribution to the PC is related to the degree of QD filling with holes. By applying the proposed model to the analysis of PC kinetics at various excitation levels, it is possible to determine the dependence of the hopping conductance on the number of holes per QD. The rate of the charge carrier density relaxation exponentially depends on the carrier density.

  18. Switching current distributions and macroscopic quantum tunneling in over-doped BSCCO mesas with nanometer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakeya, I.; Hamada, K.; Tachiki, T.; Watanabe, T.; Suzuki, M.

    2009-11-01

    The current-voltage characteristics and switching dynamics are studied in over-doped (Pb,Bi)2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (PbBi2212) and Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10+δ (Bi2223) mesa structures containing a few atomic-scale intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ) along the c axis. The cleave-in-vacuum method enables us to avoid the contact problems that are always accompanied by mesa structures. The highest critical current density of the zero-voltage state as Jc1 = 3.2 kA cm-2 among our micron-scale mesa structures of BSCCO cuprates are achieved. Narrowing of the switching probability distribution (SPD) due to suppression of the thermal fluctuation tends to saturate at 5 K, which is regarded as a symptom of macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT). The crossover temperature between the MQT and the thermal escape regions is estimated as 2.2 K for the sample with the highest Jc1. In the high temperature region, another narrowing in SPD is observed that was attributed to the phase retrapping.

  19. Temperature- and carrier-density-dependent electron tunneling kinetics in (Ga,In)As/(Al,In)As asymmetric double quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten, S.; Krol, M. F.; McGinnis, B. P.; Hayduk, M. J.; Khitrova, G.; Peyghambarian, N.

    1996-02-01

    We present a detailed investigation of electron tunneling in (Ga,In)As/(Al,In)As asymmetric double quantum wells as a function of different excitation and temperature conditions. We show that tunneling dynamics depend strongly on the initial carrier temperature and momentum. For example, electron and hole tunneling out of the narrow well is complete at low temperature. However at room temperature carriers do not exhibit any tunneling kinetics. We propose a simple kinetic model which describes the observed population dynamics at different carrier densities, temperatures, and excitation conditions.

  20. Phase transitions in two tunnel-coupled HgTe quantum wells: Bilayer graphene analogy and beyond.

    PubMed

    Krishtopenko, S S; Knap, W; Teppe, F

    2016-01-01

    HgTe quantum wells possess remarkable physical properties as for instance the quantum spin Hall state and the "single-valley" analog of graphene, depending on their layer thicknesses and barrier composition. However, double HgTe quantum wells yet contain more fascinating and still unrevealed features. Here we report on the study of the quantum phase transitions in tunnel-coupled HgTe layers separated by CdTe barrier. We demonstrate that this system has a 3/2 pseudo spin degree of freedom, which features a number of particular properties associated with the spin-dependent coupling between HgTe layers. We discover a specific metal phase arising in a wide range of HgTe and CdTe layer thicknesses, in which a gapless bulk and a pair of helical edge states coexist. This phase holds some properties of bilayer graphene such as an unconventional quantum Hall effect and an electrically-tunable band gap. In this "bilayer graphene" phase, electric field opens the band gap and drives the system into the quantum spin Hall state. Furthermore, we discover a new type of quantum phase transition arising from a mutual inversion between second electron- and hole-like subbands. This work paves the way towards novel materials based on multi-layered topological insulators. PMID:27476745

  1. Phase transitions in two tunnel-coupled HgTe quantum wells: Bilayer graphene analogy and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Krishtopenko, S. S.; Knap, W.; Teppe, F.

    2016-01-01

    HgTe quantum wells possess remarkable physical properties as for instance the quantum spin Hall state and the “single-valley” analog of graphene, depending on their layer thicknesses and barrier composition. However, double HgTe quantum wells yet contain more fascinating and still unrevealed features. Here we report on the study of the quantum phase transitions in tunnel-coupled HgTe layers separated by CdTe barrier. We demonstrate that this system has a 3/2 pseudo spin degree of freedom, which features a number of particular properties associated with the spin-dependent coupling between HgTe layers. We discover a specific metal phase arising in a wide range of HgTe and CdTe layer thicknesses, in which a gapless bulk and a pair of helical edge states coexist. This phase holds some properties of bilayer graphene such as an unconventional quantum Hall effect and an electrically-tunable band gap. In this “bilayer graphene” phase, electric field opens the band gap and drives the system into the quantum spin Hall state. Furthermore, we discover a new type of quantum phase transition arising from a mutual inversion between second electron- and hole-like subbands. This work paves the way towards novel materials based on multi-layered topological insulators. PMID:27476745

  2. Phase transitions in two tunnel-coupled HgTe quantum wells: Bilayer graphene analogy and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishtopenko, S. S.; Knap, W.; Teppe, F.

    2016-08-01

    HgTe quantum wells possess remarkable physical properties as for instance the quantum spin Hall state and the “single-valley” analog of graphene, depending on their layer thicknesses and barrier composition. However, double HgTe quantum wells yet contain more fascinating and still unrevealed features. Here we report on the study of the quantum phase transitions in tunnel-coupled HgTe layers separated by CdTe barrier. We demonstrate that this system has a 3/2 pseudo spin degree of freedom, which features a number of particular properties associated with the spin-dependent coupling between HgTe layers. We discover a specific metal phase arising in a wide range of HgTe and CdTe layer thicknesses, in which a gapless bulk and a pair of helical edge states coexist. This phase holds some properties of bilayer graphene such as an unconventional quantum Hall effect and an electrically-tunable band gap. In this “bilayer graphene” phase, electric field opens the band gap and drives the system into the quantum spin Hall state. Furthermore, we discover a new type of quantum phase transition arising from a mutual inversion between second electron- and hole-like subbands. This work paves the way towards novel materials based on multi-layered topological insulators.

  3. Radio frequency measurements of tunnel couplings and singlet-triplet spin states in Si:P quantum dots.

    PubMed

    House, M G; Kobayashi, T; Weber, B; Hile, S J; Watson, T F; van der Heijden, J; Rogge, S; Simmons, M Y

    2015-01-01

    Spin states of the electrons and nuclei of phosphorus donors in silicon are strong candidates for quantum information processing applications given their excellent coherence times. Designing a scalable donor-based quantum computer will require both knowledge of the relationship between device geometry and electron tunnel couplings, and a spin readout strategy that uses minimal physical space in the device. Here we use radio frequency reflectometry to measure singlet-triplet states of a few-donor Si:P double quantum dot and demonstrate that the exchange energy can be tuned by at least two orders of magnitude, from 20 μeV to 8 meV. We measure dot-lead tunnel rates by analysis of the reflected signal and show that they change from 100 MHz to 22 GHz as the number of electrons on a quantum dot is increased from 1 to 4. These techniques present an approach for characterizing, operating and engineering scalable qubit devices based on donors in silicon. PMID:26548556

  4. Radio frequency measurements of tunnel couplings and singlet-triplet spin states in Si:P quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, M. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Weber, B.; Hile, S. J.; Watson, T. F.; van der Heijden, J.; Rogge, S.; Simmons, M. Y.

    2015-11-01

    Spin states of the electrons and nuclei of phosphorus donors in silicon are strong candidates for quantum information processing applications given their excellent coherence times. Designing a scalable donor-based quantum computer will require both knowledge of the relationship between device geometry and electron tunnel couplings, and a spin readout strategy that uses minimal physical space in the device. Here we use radio frequency reflectometry to measure singlet-triplet states of a few-donor Si:P double quantum dot and demonstrate that the exchange energy can be tuned by at least two orders of magnitude, from 20 μeV to 8 meV. We measure dot-lead tunnel rates by analysis of the reflected signal and show that they change from 100 MHz to 22 GHz as the number of electrons on a quantum dot is increased from 1 to 4. These techniques present an approach for characterizing, operating and engineering scalable qubit devices based on donors in silicon.

  5. A classical treatment of optical tunneling in plasmonic gaps: extending the quantum corrected model to practical situations.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Rubén; Zugarramurdi, Asier; Zhang, Pu; Nordlander, Peter; García-Vidal, Francisco J; Borisov, Andrei G; Aizpurua, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The optical response of plasmonic nanogaps is challenging to address when the separation between the two nanoparticles forming the gap is reduced to a few nanometers or even subnanometer distances. We have compared results of the plasmon response within different levels of approximation, and identified a classical local regime, a nonlocal regime and a quantum regime of interaction. For separations of a few Ångstroms, in the quantum regime, optical tunneling can occur, strongly modifying the optics of the nanogap. We have considered a classical effective model, so called Quantum Corrected Model (QCM), that has been introduced to correctly describe the main features of optical transport in plasmonic nanogaps. The basics of this model are explained in detail, and its implementation is extended to include nonlocal effects and address practical situations involving different materials and temperatures of operation. PMID:25739465

  6. Imaging of subbands in InAs/GaSb double quantum wells by low-temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K.; Kanisawa, K.; Perraud, S.; Ueki, M.; Takashina, K.; Hirayama, Y.

    2007-04-01

    The spatial distribution of the electron local density of states (LDOS) in InAs/GaSb double quantum wells (DQWs) was investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy on cleaved surfaces. For DQW with a thick central barrier, clear standing wave patterns corresponding to subbands confined to each InAs single quantum well appeared in the spatial variation of LDOS spectra. In contrast, for the DQW with a thin central barrier, the standing wave patterns extended over both quantum wells. The deviation of the pattern arising from the asymmetry due to a slight difference of the well thickness appeared clearly. The observed spectra are well explained by the calculated LDOS taken to be the sum of LDOS contributed from all energetically accessible subbands.

  7. Influence of InGaN sub-quantum-well on performance of InAlN/GaN/InAlN resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haoran; Yang, Lin'an; Hao, Yue

    2014-08-01

    The resonant tunneling mechanism of the GaN based resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with an InGaN sub-quantum-well has been investigated by means of numerical simulation. At resonant-state, Electrons in the InGaN/InAlN/GaN/InAlN RTD tunnel from the emitter region through the aligned discrete energy levels in the InGaN sub-quantum-well and GaN main-quantum-well into the collector region. The implantation of the InGaN sub-quantum-well alters the dominant transport mechanism, increase the transmission coefficient and give rise to the peak current and peak-to-valley current ratio. We also demonstrate that the most pronounced negative-differential-resistance characteristic can be achieved by choosing appropriately the In composition of InxGa1-xN at around x = 0.06.

  8. Influence of InGaN sub-quantum-well on performance of InAlN/GaN/InAlN resonant tunneling diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Haoran; Yang, Lin'an Hao, Yue

    2014-08-21

    The resonant tunneling mechanism of the GaN based resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with an InGaN sub-quantum-well has been investigated by means of numerical simulation. At resonant-state, Electrons in the InGaN/InAlN/GaN/InAlN RTD tunnel from the emitter region through the aligned discrete energy levels in the InGaN sub-quantum-well and GaN main-quantum-well into the collector region. The implantation of the InGaN sub-quantum-well alters the dominant transport mechanism, increase the transmission coefficient and give rise to the peak current and peak-to-valley current ratio. We also demonstrate that the most pronounced negative-differential-resistance characteristic can be achieved by choosing appropriately the In composition of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N at around x = 0.06.

  9. Pressure effects on enzyme-catalyzed quantum tunneling events arise from protein-specific structural and dynamic changes.

    PubMed

    Hay, Sam; Johannissen, Linus O; Hothi, Parvinder; Sutcliffe, Michael J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2012-06-13

    The rate and kinetic isotope effect (KIE) on proton transfer during the aromatic amine dehydrogenase-catalyzed reaction with phenylethylamine shows complex pressure and temperature dependences. We are able to rationalize these effects within an environmentally coupled tunneling model based on constant pressure molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. As pressure appears to act anisotropically on the enzyme, perturbation of the reaction coordinate (donor-acceptor compression) is, in this case, marginal. Therefore, while we have previously demonstrated that pressure and temperature dependences can be used to infer H-tunneling and the involvement of promoting vibrations, these effects should not be used in the absence of atomistic insight, as they can vary greatly for different enzymes. We show that a pressure-dependent KIE is not a definitive hallmark of quantum mechanical H-tunneling during an enzyme-catalyzed reaction and that pressure-independent KIEs cannot be used to exclude tunneling contributions or a role for promoting vibrations in the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. We conclude that coupling of MD calculations with experimental rate and KIE studies is required to provide atomistic understanding of pressure effects in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. PMID:22632111

  10. Tunnel-field-effect-transistor based gas-sensor: Introducing gas detection with a quantum-mechanical transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Deblina; Gossner, Harald; Hansch, Walter; Banerjee, Kaustav

    2013-01-01

    A gas-sensor based on tunnel-field-effect-transistor (TFET) is proposed that leverages the unique current injection mechanism in the form of quantum-mechanical band-to-band tunneling to achieve substantially improved performance compared to conventional metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MOSFETs) for detection of gas species under ambient conditions. While nonlocal phonon-assisted tunneling model is used for detailed device simulations, in order to provide better physical insights, analytical formula for sensitivity is derived for both metal as well as organic conducting polymer based sensing elements. Analytical derivations are also presented for capturing the effects of temperature on sensor performance. Combining the developed analytical and numerical models, intricate properties of the sensor such as gate bias dependence of sensitivity, relationship between the required work-function modulation and subthreshold swing, counter-intuitive increase in threshold voltage for MOSFETs and reduction in tunneling probability for TFETs with temperature are explained. It is shown that TFET gas-sensors can not only lead to more than 10 000× increase in sensitivity but also provide design flexibility and immunity against screening of work-function modulation through non-specific gases as well as ensure stable operation under temperature variations.

  11. Instantons and scaling of the transitions rates in Quantum Monte Carlo simulations of thermally-assisted quantum tunneling in spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Jiang, Zhang; Boixo, Sergio; Issakov, Sergei; Mazzola, Guglielmo; Troyer, Matthias; Neven, Hartmut

    We study analytically and numerically the dynamics of the quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) algorithm to simulate thermally-assisted tunneling in mean-field spin models without conservation of total spin. We use Kramers escape rate theory to calculate the scaling of the QMC time with the problem size to simulate the tunneling transitions. We develop path-integral instanton approach in coherent state and Suzuki-Trotter representations to calculate the escape rate and most probable escape path in QMC dynamics. Analtytical results are in a good agreement with numerical studies. We identify the class of models where the exponent in the scaling of the QMC time is the same as that in physical tunneling but the pre-factor depends very significantly on the QMC path representation. We propose the classes of problems where QMC can fail to simulate tunneling efficiently. The work of GM and MT has been supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation through the National Competence Center in Research QSIT and by ODNI, IARPA via MIT Lincoln Laboratory Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002.

  12. Spin polarization of carriers in resonant tunneling devices containing InAs self-assembled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobrega, J. Araújo e.; Gordo, V. Orsi; Galeti, H. V. A.; Gobato, Y. Galvão; Brasil, M. J. S. P.; Taylor, D.; Orlita, M.; Henini, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we have investigated transport and optical properties of n-i-n resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) containing a layer of InAs self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) grown on a (311)B oriented GaAs substrate. Polarization-resolved photoluminescence (PL) and magneto-transport measurements were performed under applied voltage and magnetic fields up to 15 T at 2 K under linearly polarized laser excitation. It was observed that the QD circular polarization degree depends strongly on the applied voltage. Its voltage dependence is explained by the formation of excitonic complexes such as positively (X+) and negatively (X-) charged excitons in the QDs. Our results demonstrate an effective electrical control of an ensemble of InAs QD properties by tuning the applied voltage across a RTD device into the resonant tunneling condition.

  13. An efficient atomistic quantum mechanical simulation on InAs band-to-band tunneling field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhi; Jiang, Xiang-Wei; Li, Shu-Shen; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2014-03-24

    We have presented a fully atomistic quantum mechanical simulation method on band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) field-effect transistors (FETs). Our simulation approach is based on the linear combination of bulk band method with empirical pseudopotentials, which is an atomist method beyond the effective-mass approximation or k.p perturbation method, and can be used to simulate real-size devices (∼10{sup 5} atoms) efficiently (∼5 h on a few computational cores). Using this approach, we studied the InAs dual-gate BTBT FETs. The I-V characteristics from our approach agree very well with the tight-binding non-equilibrium Green's function results, yet our method costs much less computationally. In addition, we have studied ways to increase the tunneling current and analyzed the effects of different mechanisms for that purpose.

  14. Impact of field-induced quantum confinement on the onset of tunneling field-effect transistors: Experimental verification

    SciTech Connect

    Smets, Quentin Verreck, Devin; Heyns, Marc M.; Verhulst, Anne S.; Martens, Koen; Lin, Han Chung; Kazzi, Salim El; Simoen, Eddy; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron; Raskin, Jean-Pierre

    2014-11-17

    The Tunneling Field-Effect Transistor (TFET) is a promising device for future low-power logic. Its performance is often predicted using semiclassical simulations, but there is usually a large discrepancy with experimental results. An important reason is that Field-Induced Quantum Confinement (FIQC) is neglected. Quantum mechanical simulations show FIQC delays the onset of Band-To-Band Tunneling (BTBT) with hundreds of millivolts in the promising line-TFET configuration. In this letter, we provide experimental verification of this delayed onset. We accomplish this by developing a method where line-TFET are modeled using highly doped MOS capacitors (MOS-CAP). Using capacitance-voltage measurements, we demonstrate AC inversion by BTBT, which was so far unobserved in MOS-CAP. Good agreement is shown between the experimentally obtained BTBT onset and quantum mechanical predictions, proving the need to include FIQC in all TFET simulations. Finally, we show that highly doped MOS-CAP is promising for characterization of traps deep into the conduction band.

  15. Wind tunnel productivity status and improvement activities at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, Lawrence E.

    1996-01-01

    Over the last three years, a major effort has been underway to re-engineering the way wind tunnel testing is accomplished at the NASA Langley Research Center. This effort began with the reorganization of the LaRC and the consolidation of the management of the wind tunnels in the Aerodynamics Division under one operations branch. This paper provides an overview of the re-engineering activities and gives the status of the improvements in the wind tunnel productivity and customer satisfaction that have resulted from the new ways of working.

  16. LCS/CINDER`90 accelerator tunnel activation calculations for the APT 1700-MeV accelerator tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Court, J.D.; Snow, E.C.; Wilson, W.B.; Pitcher, E.R.

    1998-09-01

    Calculations have been done to determine the amount of activation in the linac components and tunnel air for the Accelerator Production of Tritium 1700-MeV superconducting linac. Proton transport is accomplished through the use of the LAHET Code System. Particle production and depletion from proton and high-energy neutron reactions, calculated in LAHET, as well as low-energy neutron fluxes calculated by MCNP, are passed to the radionuclide production code CINDER`90 to determine the source terms at various times after irradiation. The upper limit on total air activation based on conservative assumptions, for the entire tunnel air volume, was found to be 4.77 Ci after a nine-month irradiation. This is reduced to 0.09 Ci after a 10-hour cooling off period. The total activation for the full 1-km of beamline components was found to be less than 4 kCi, with the half-lives of the highest contributors ranging from 12 years to 2 minutes. This beamline component activation calculation was done for an irradiation time of 40 years, which is the anticipated lifetime of the superconducting linac.

  17. Tunneling Ionization Time Resolved by Backpropagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Hongcheng; Saalmann, Ulf; Rost, Jan-Michael

    2016-07-01

    We determine the ionization time in tunneling ionization by an elliptically polarized light pulse relative to its maximum. This is achieved by a full quantum propagation of the electron wave function forward in time, followed by a classical backpropagation to identify tunneling parameters, in particular, the fraction of electrons that has tunneled out. We find that the ionization time is close to zero for single active electrons in helium and in hydrogen if the fraction of tunneled electrons is large. We expect our analysis to be essential to quantify ionization times for correlated electron motion.

  18. Tunneling Ionization Time Resolved by Backpropagation.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hongcheng; Saalmann, Ulf; Rost, Jan-Michael

    2016-07-01

    We determine the ionization time in tunneling ionization by an elliptically polarized light pulse relative to its maximum. This is achieved by a full quantum propagation of the electron wave function forward in time, followed by a classical backpropagation to identify tunneling parameters, in particular, the fraction of electrons that has tunneled out. We find that the ionization time is close to zero for single active electrons in helium and in hydrogen if the fraction of tunneled electrons is large. We expect our analysis to be essential to quantify ionization times for correlated electron motion. PMID:27447504

  19. Tunneling ionization time-resolved by backpropagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Hongcheng; Saalmann, Ulf; Rost, Jan M.; Max-Planck-Institut für Physik komplexer Systeme Team

    2016-05-01

    We determine the ionization time in tunneling ionization by an elliptically polarized light pulse relative to its maximum. This is achieved by a full quantum propagation of the electron wave function forward in time, followed by a classical backpropagation to identify tunneling parameters, in particular the fraction of electrons that has tunneled out. We find, that the ionization time is close to zero for single active electrons in helium and in hydrogen if the fraction of tunneled electrons is large. We expect our analysis to be essential to quantify ionization times for correlated electron motion. This work was supported by Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  20. Tunneling current noise in the fractional quantum Hall effect: When the effective charge is not what it appears to be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snizhko, Kyrylo

    2016-01-01

    Fractional quantum Hall quasiparticles are famous for having fractional electric charge. Recent experiments report that the quasiparticle's effective electric charge determined through tunneling current noise measurements can depend on the system parameters such as temperature or bias voltage. Several works proposed to understand this as a signature for edge theory properties changing with energy scale. I consider two of such experiments and show that in one of them the apparent dependence of the electric charge on a system parameter is likely to be an artefact of experimental data analysis. Conversely, in the second experiment the dependence cannot be explained in such a way.

  1. Tunnel-injection quantum dot deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with polarization-induced doping in III-nitride heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Jai Islam, S. M.; Protasenko, Vladimir; Kumar Kandaswamy, Prem; Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep

    2014-01-13

    Efficient semiconductor optical emitters in the deep-ultraviolet spectral window are encountering some of the most deep rooted problems of semiconductor physics. In III-Nitride heterostructures, obtaining short-wavelength photon emission requires the use of wide bandgap high Al composition AlGaN active regions. High conductivity electron (n-) and hole (p-) injection layers of even higher bandgaps are necessary for electrical carrier injection. This approach requires the activation of very deep dopants in very wide bandgap semiconductors, which is a difficult task. In this work, an approach is proposed and experimentally demonstrated to counter the challenges. The active region of the heterostructure light emitting diode uses ultrasmall epitaxially grown GaN quantum dots. Remarkably, the optical emission energy from GaN is pushed from 365 nm (3.4 eV, the bulk bandgap) to below 240 nm (>5.2 eV) because of extreme quantum confinement in the dots. This is possible because of the peculiar bandstructure and band alignments in the GaN/AlN system. This active region design crucially enables two further innovations for efficient carrier injection: Tunnel injection of carriers and polarization-induced p-type doping. The combination of these three advances results in major boosts in electroluminescence in deep-ultraviolet light emitting diodes and lays the groundwork for electrically pumped short-wavelength lasers.

  2. Enhancing efficiency and power of quantum-dots resonant tunneling thermoelectrics in three-terminal geometry by cooperative effects

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jian-Hua

    2014-11-21

    We propose a scheme of multilayer thermoelectric engine where one electric current is coupled to two temperature gradients in three-terminal geometry. This is realized by resonant tunneling through quantum dots embedded in two thermal and electrical resisting polymer matrix layers between highly conducting semiconductor layers. There are two thermoelectric effects, one of which is pertaining to inelastic transport processes (if energies of quantum dots in the two layers are different), while the other exists also for elastic transport processes. These two correspond to the transverse and longitudinal thermoelectric effects, respectively, and are associated with different temperature gradients. We show that cooperation between the two thermoelectric effects leads to markedly improved figure of merit and power factor, which is confirmed by numerical calculation using material parameters. Such enhancement is robust against phonon heat conduction and energy level broadening. Therefore, we demonstrated cooperative effect as an additional way to effectively improve performance of thermoelectrics in three-terminal geometry.

  3. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) with Double Tunnel Junction Contact and Quantum Dot Barrier Infrared Detector (QD-BIRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.-Y; Soibel, Alexander; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Keo, Sam A.; Nguyen, Jean; Hoglund, Linda; Mumolo, Jason M.; Liu, John K.; Rafol, Sir B.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    The InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice based complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) has already demonstrated very good performance in long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) detection. In this work, we describe results on a modified CBIRD device that incorporates a double tunnel junction contact designed for robust device and focal plane array processing. The new device also exhibited reduced turn-on voltage. We also report results on the quantum dot barrier infrared detector (QD-BIRD). By incorporating self-assembled InSb quantum dots into the InAsSb absorber of the standard nBn detector structure, the QD-BIRD extend the detector cutoff wavelength from approximately 4.2 micrometers to 6 micrometers, allowing the coverage of the mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) transmission window. The device has been observed to show infrared response at 225 K.

  4. Long-distance coherent tunneling effect on the charge and heat currents in serially coupled triple quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, David M. T.; Chang, Yia-chung

    2014-03-01

    The effect of long-distance coherent tunneling (LDCT) on the charge and heat currents in serially coupled triple quantum dots (TQDs) connected to electrodes is illustrated by using a combination of the extended Hurbbard and Anderson models. The charge and heat currents are calculated with a closed-form Landauer expression for the transmission coefficient suitable for the Coulomb blockade regime. The physical parameters including bias-dependent quantum dot energy levels, electron Coulomb interactions, and electron hopping strengths are calculated in the framework of effective mass theory for semiconductor TQDs. We demonstrate that the effect of LDCT on the charge and heat currents can be robust. In addition, it is shown that prominent heat rectification behavior can exist in the TQD system with asymmetrical energy levels.

  5. Power-dependent spin amplification in (In, Ga)As/GaAs quantum well via Pauli blocking by tunnel-coupled quantum dot ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. L.; Kiba, T.; Yang, X. J.; Takayama, J.; Murayama, A.

    2016-04-01

    Power-dependent time-resolved optical spin orientation measurements were performed on In0.1Ga0.9As quantum well (QW) and In0.5Ga0.5As quantum dot (QD) tunnel-coupled structures with an 8-nm-thick GaAs barrier. A fast transient increase of electron spin polarization was observed at the QW ground state after circular-polarized pulse excitation. The temporal maximum of polarization increased with increasing pumping fluence owing to enhanced spin blocking in the QDs, yielding a highest amplification of 174% with respect to the initial spin polarization. Further elevation of the laser power gradually quenched the polarization dynamics, which was induced by saturated spin filling of both the QDs and the QW phase spaces.

  6. Signatures of Quantum-Tunneling Diffusion of Hydrogen Atoms on Water Ice at 10 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahata, K.; Hama, T.; Kouchi, A.; Watanabe, N.

    2015-09-01

    Reported here is the first observation of the tunneling surface diffusion of a hydrogen (H) atom on water ice. Photostimulated desorption and resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization methods were used to determine the diffusion rates at 10 K on amorphous solid water and polycrystalline ice. H-atom diffusion on polycrystalline ice was 2 orders of magnitude faster than that of deuterium atoms, indicating the occurrence of tunneling diffusion. Whether diffusion is by tunneling or thermal hopping also depends on the diffusion length of the atoms and the morphology of the surface. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of elementary physicochemical processes of hydrogen on cosmic ice dust.

  7. Signatures of Quantum-Tunneling Diffusion of Hydrogen Atoms on Water Ice at 10 K.

    PubMed

    Kuwahata, K; Hama, T; Kouchi, A; Watanabe, N

    2015-09-25

    Reported here is the first observation of the tunneling surface diffusion of a hydrogen (H) atom on water ice. Photostimulated desorption and resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization methods were used to determine the diffusion rates at 10 K on amorphous solid water and polycrystalline ice. H-atom diffusion on polycrystalline ice was 2 orders of magnitude faster than that of deuterium atoms, indicating the occurrence of tunneling diffusion. Whether diffusion is by tunneling or thermal hopping also depends on the diffusion length of the atoms and the morphology of the surface. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of elementary physicochemical processes of hydrogen on cosmic ice dust. PMID:26451552

  8. Interaction-dependent photon-assisted tunneling in optical lattices: a quantum simulator of strongly-correlated electrons and dynamical Gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, Alejandro; Porras, Diego

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a scheme that combines photon-assisted tunneling (PAT) by a moving optical lattice with strong Hubbard interactions, and allows for the quantum simulation of paradigmatic quantum many-body models. We show that, in a certain regime, this quantum simulator yields an effective Hubbard Hamiltonian with tunable bond-charge interactions, a model studied in the context of strongly-correlated electrons. In a different regime, we show how to exploit a correlated destruction of tunneling to explore Nagaoka ferromagnetism at finite Hubbard repulsion. By changing the photon-assisted tunneling parameters, we can also obtain a t-J model with independently controllable tunneling t, super-exchange interaction J, and even a Heisenberg-Ising anisotropy. Hence, the full phase diagram of this paradigmatic model becomes accessible to cold-atom experiments, departing from the region t\\gg J allowed by standard single-band Hubbard Hamiltonians in the strong-repulsion limit. We finally show that, by generalizing the PAT scheme, the quantum simulator yields models of dynamical Gauge fields, where atoms of a given electronic state dress the tunneling of the atoms with a different internal state, leading to Peierls phases that mimic a dynamical magnetic field.

  9. Activation of nonlocal quantum resources.

    PubMed

    Navascués, Miguel; Vértesi, Tamás

    2011-02-11

    We find two two-qubit bipartite states ρ1, ρ2 such that arbitrarily many copies of one or the other cannot exhibit nonlocal correlations in a two-setting-two-outcome Bell scenario. However, the bipartite state ρ1 ⊗ ρ2 violates the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) Bell inequality [J. F. Clauser, M. A. Horne, A. Shimony, and R. A. Holt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 23, 880 (1969).] by an amount of 2.023. We also identify a CHSH-local state ρ such that ρ⊗2 is CHSH inequality-violating. The tools employed can be easily adapted to find instances of nonlocality activation in arbitrary Bell scenarios. PMID:21405447

  10. Hot-bench simulation of the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buttrill, Carey S.; Houck, Jacob A.

    1990-01-01

    Two simulations, one batch and one real-time, of an aeroelastically-scaled wind-tunnel model were developed. The wind-tunnel model was a full-span, free-to-roll model of an advanced fighter concept. The batch simulation was used to generate and verify the real-time simulation and to test candidate control laws prior to implementation. The real-time simulation supported hot-bench testing of a digital controller, which was developed to actively control the elastic deformation of the wind-tunnel model. Time scaling was required for hot-bench testing. The wind-tunnel model, the mathematical models for the simulations, the techniques employed to reduce the hot-bench time-scale factors, and the verification procedures are described.

  11. Revealing energy level structure of individual quantum dots by tunneling rate measured by single-electron sensitive electrostatic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Roy-Gobeil, Antoine; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grutter, Peter

    2015-04-01

    We present theoretical and experimental studies of the effect of the density of states of a quantum dot (QD) on the rate of single-electron tunneling that can be directly measured by electrostatic force microscopy (e-EFM) experiments. In e-EFM, the motion of a biased atomic force microscope cantilever tip modulates the charge state of a QD in the Coulomb blockade regime. The charge dynamics of the dot, which is detected through its back-action on the capacitavely coupled cantilever, depends on the tunneling rate of the QD to a back-electrode. The density of states of the QD can therefore be measured through its effect on the energy dependence of tunneling rate. We present experimental data on individual 5 nm colloidal gold nanoparticles that exhibit a near continuous density of state at 77 K. In contrast, our analysis of already published data on self-assembled InAs QDs at 4 K clearly reveals discrete degenerate energy levels. PMID:25761141

  12. Over-bias Light Emission due to Higher Order Quantum Noise of a Tunnel Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belzig, Wolfgang; Xu, Fei; Holmqvist, Cecilia

    Understanding tunneling from an atomically sharp tip to a metallic surface requires to account for interactions on a nanoscopic scale. Inelastic tunneling of electrons generates emission of photons, whose energies intuitively should be limited by the applied bias voltage. However, experiments indicate that more complex processes involving the interaction of electrons with plasmon polaritons lead to photon emission characterized by over-bias energies. We propose a model of this observation in analogy to the dynamical Coulomb blockade, originally developed for treating the electronic environment in mesoscopic circuits. We explain the experimental finding quantitatively by the correlated tunneling of two electrons interacting with an LRC circuit modeling the local plasmon-polariton mode. To explain the over-bias emission, the non-Gaussian statistics of the tunneling dynamics of the electrons is essential.

  13. Overbias light emission due to higher-order quantum noise in a tunnel junction.

    PubMed

    Xu, F; Holmqvist, C; Belzig, W

    2014-08-01

    Understanding tunneling from an atomically sharp tip to a metallic surface requires us to account for interactions on a nanoscopic scale. Inelastic tunneling of electrons generates emission of photons, whose energies intuitively should be limited by the applied bias voltage. However, experiments [G. Schull et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 057401 (2009) indicate that more complex processes involving the interaction of electrons with plasmon polaritons lead to photon emission characterized by overbias energies. We propose a model of this observation in analogy to the dynamical Coulomb blockade, originally developed for treating the electronic environment in mesoscopic circuits. We explain the experimental finding quantitatively by the correlated tunneling of two electrons interacting with a LRC circuit modeling the local plasmon-polariton mode. To explain the overbias emission, the non-Gaussian statistics of the tunneling dynamics of the electrons is essential. PMID:25148342

  14. Resonant tunneling device with two-dimensional quantum well emitter and base layers

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, J.A.; Sherwin, M.E.; Drummond, T.J.; Weckwerth, M.V.

    1998-10-20

    A double electron layer tunneling device is presented. Electrons tunnel from a two dimensional emitter layer to a two dimensional tunneling layer and continue traveling to a collector at a lower voltage. The emitter layer is interrupted by an isolation etch, a depletion gate, or an ion implant to prevent electrons from traveling from the source along the emitter to the drain. The collector is similarly interrupted by a backgate, an isolation etch, or an ion implant. When the device is used as a transistor, a control gate is added to control the allowed energy states of the emitter layer. The tunnel gate may be recessed to change the operating range of the device and allow for integrated complementary devices. Methods of forming the device are also set forth, utilizing epoxy-bond and stop etch (EBASE), pre-growth implantation of the backgate or post-growth implantation. 43 figs.

  15. Enhanced cross-Kerr effect for probing tunnelling in coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yandong; Yang, Aihong; Chen, Bing; Zhang, Shaomei; Liu, Shande; Wang, Xueshui

    2016-02-01

    An efficient scheme for probing electron tunnelling is proposed based on the enhanced cross-Kerr nonlinearity in a double-dot system. Due to resonant tunnelling, the cross-Kerr nonlinearity arises in a transparency window. Its intensity is nearly two orders of magnitude greater than that of the self-Kerr effect under any given conditions, where residual absorption is suppressed due to the competition of nonlinear gain and absorption. The enhanced cross-Kerr effect is sensitive to the tunnelling, so the probe spectrum can detect subtle tunnelling changes. The simulation results show that the probe sensitivity of the nonlinear phase shift is about 0.28 rad/μeV.

  16. Resonant tunneling device with two-dimensional quantum well emitter and base layers

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Jerry A.; Sherwin, Marc E.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Weckwerth, Mark V.

    1998-01-01

    A double electron layer tunneling device is presented. Electrons tunnel from a two dimensional emitter layer to a two dimensional tunneling layer and continue traveling to a collector at a lower voltage. The emitter layer is interrupted by an isolation etch, a depletion gate, or an ion implant to prevent electrons from traveling from the source along the emitter to the drain. The collector is similarly interrupted by a backgate, an isolation etch, or an ion implant. When the device is used as a transistor, a control gate is added to control the allowed energy states of the emitter layer. The tunnel gate may be recessed to change the operating range of the device and allow for integrated complementary devices. Methods of forming the device are also set forth, utilizing epoxy-bond and stop etch (EBASE), pre-growth implantation of the backgate or post-growth implantation.

  17. Overbias Light Emission due to Higher-Order Quantum Noise in a Tunnel Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, F.; Holmqvist, C.; Belzig, W.

    2014-08-01

    Understanding tunneling from an atomically sharp tip to a metallic surface requires us to account for interactions on a nanoscopic scale. Inelastic tunneling of electrons generates emission of photons, whose energies intuitively should be limited by the applied bias voltage. However, experiments [G. Schull et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 057401 (2009)] indicate that more complex processes involving the interaction of electrons with plasmon polaritons lead to photon emission characterized by overbias energies. We propose a model of this observation in analogy to the dynamical Coulomb blockade, originally developed for treating the electronic environment in mesoscopic circuits. We explain the experimental finding quantitatively by the correlated tunneling of two electrons interacting with a LRC circuit modeling the local plasmon-polariton mode. To explain the overbias emission, the non-Gaussian statistics of the tunneling dynamics of the electrons is essential.

  18. Quantum entanglement and informational activities of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shargi, Hanan; Berkovich, Simon

    2009-03-01

    Our model of holographic Universe [1] explains the surprising property of quantum entanglement and reveals its biological implications. The suggested holographic mechanism handles 2D slices of the physical world as a whole. Fitting this simple holistic process in the Procrustean bed of individual particles interactions leads to intricacies of quantum theory with an unintelligible protrusion of distant correlations. Holographic medium imposes dependence of quantum effects on absolute positioning. Testing this prediction for a non-exponential radioactive decay could resolutely point to outside ``memory.'' The essence of Life is in the sophistication of macromolecules. Distinctions in biological information processing of nucleotides in DNA and amino acids in proteins are related to entropies of their structures. Randomness of genetic configurations as exposed by their maximal entropy is characteristic of passive identification rather than active storage functionality. Structural redundancy of proteins shows their operability, of which different foldings of prions is most indicative. Folding of one prion can reshape another prion without a direct contact appearing like ``quantum entanglement,'' or ``teleportation.'' Testing the surmised influence of absolute orientation on the prion reshaping can uncover the latency effects in the ``mad cow'' disease. 1. Simon Berkovich, TR-GWU-CS-07-006, http://www.cs.gwu.edu/research/reports.php

  19. Enhanced macroscopic quantum tunneling in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 + delta intrinsic Josephson-junction stacks.

    PubMed

    Jin, X Y; Lisenfeld, J; Koval, Y; Lukashenko, A; Ustinov, A V; Müller, P

    2006-05-01

    We have investigated macroscopic quantum tunneling in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8 + delta) intrinsic Josephson junctions at millikelvin temperatures using microwave irradiation. Measurements show that the escape rate for uniformly switching stacks of Nu junctions is about Nu(2) times higher than that of a single junction having the same plasma frequency. We argue that this gigantic enhancement of the macroscopic quantum tunneling rate in stacks is boosted by current fluctuations which occur in the series array of junctions loaded by the impedance of the environment. PMID:16712327

  20. Piezoelectric polarization and quantum size effects on the vertical transport in AlGaN/GaN resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H, Dakhlaoui; S, Almansour

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the electronic properties of resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) based on GaN-Al x Ga(1‑x)N double barriers are investigated by using the non-equilibrium Green functions formalism (NEG). These materials each present a wide conduction band discontinuity and a strong internal piezoelectric field, which greatly affect the electronic transport properties. The electronic density, the transmission coefficient, and the current–voltage characteristics are computed with considering the spontaneous and piezoelectric polarizations. The influence of the quantum size on the transmission coefficient is analyzed by varying GaN quantum well thickness, Al x Ga(1‑x)N width, and the aluminum concentration x Al. The results show that the transmission coefficient more strongly depends on the thickness of the quantum well than the barrier; it exhibits a series of resonant peaks and valleys as the quantum well width increases. In addition, it is found that the negative differential resistance (NDR) in the current–voltage (I–V) characteristic strongly depends on aluminum concentration x Al. It is shown that the peak-to-valley ratio (PVR) increases with x Al value decreasing. These findings open the door for developing vertical transport nitrides-based ISB devices such as THz lasers and detectors. Project supported by the Deanship of Scientific Research of University of Dammam (Grant No. 2014137).

  1. Testing for Quantum Criticality in the (Nd,La)NiO3 phase space by Inelastic Tunneling Electron Spectroscopy (IETS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klevitch, Andrew; Disa, Ankit; Walker, Fred; Adam, Gina; Allen, James; Ahn, Charles; Hauser, Adam

    Continuous (2nd order) T =0K Mott transitions are highly sought after because they are predicted to produce interesting quantum critical phenomena at higher temperatures such as quantum spin liquid states and marginal Fermi behavior. The rare earth nickelate system has generated significant interest for understanding charge and spin ordering phenomena in correlated materials and for potential application in novel switching devices. We will present Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy (IETS) measurements from a series of films across the (Nd,La)NiO3 compositional system, yielding the single particle density of states at and across the quantum phase transition. Previous work has shown that pure NdNiO3 thin films have a characteristic bandgap, and pure LaNiO3 films have a characteristic pseudo-gap, satisfying a major requirement for a quantum critical transition point. Accordingly, our films undergo a metal-to-insulator transition upon cooling for high Nd content, while remaining metallic at all temperatures for high La content.

  2. Solvent as a probe of active site motion and chemistry during the hydrogen tunnelling reaction in morphinone reductase.

    PubMed

    Hay, Sam; Pudney, Christopher R; Sutcliffe, Michael J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2008-09-15

    The reductive half-reaction of morphinone reductase involves a hydride transfer from enzyme-bound beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) to a flavin mononucleotide (FMN). We have previously demonstrated that this step proceeds via a quantum mechanical tunnelling mechanism. Herein, we probe the effect of the solvent on the active site chemistry. The pK(a) of the reduced FMN N1 is 7.4+/-0.7, based on the pH-dependence of the FMN midpoint potential. We rule out that protonation of the reduced FMN N1 is coupled to the preceding H-transfer as both the rate and temperature-dependence of the reaction are insensitive to changes in solution pH above and below this pK(a). Further, the solvent kinetic isotope effect is approximately 1.0 and both the 1 degrees and 2 degrees KIEs are insensitive to solution pH. The effect of the solvent's dielectric constant is investigated and the rate of H-transfer is found to be unaffected by changes in the dielectric constant between approximately 60 and 80. We suggest that, while there is crystallographic evidence for some water in the active site, the putative promoting motion involved in the H-tunnelling reaction is insensitive to such changes. PMID:18668493

  3. Quantum Speedup for Active Learning Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparo, Giuseppe Davide; Dunjko, Vedran; Makmal, Adi; Martin-Delgado, Miguel Angel; Briegel, Hans J.

    2014-07-01

    Can quantum mechanics help us build intelligent learning agents? A defining signature of intelligent behavior is the capacity to learn from experience. However, a major bottleneck for agents to learn in real-life situations is the size and complexity of the corresponding task environment. Even in a moderately realistic environment, it may simply take too long to rationally respond to a given situation. If the environment is impatient, allowing only a certain time for a response, an agent may then be unable to cope with the situation and to learn at all. Here, we show that quantum physics can help and provide a quadratic speedup for active learning as a genuine problem of artificial intelligence. This result will be particularly relevant for applications involving complex task environments.

  4. Mixed quantum classical calculation of proton transfer reaction rates: From deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Weiwei; Xu, Yang; Zhu, Lili; Shi, Qiang

    2014-05-07

    We present mixed quantum classical calculations of the proton transfer (PT) reaction rates represented by a double well system coupled to a dissipative bath. The rate constants are calculated within the so called nontraditional view of the PT reaction, where the proton motion is quantized and the solvent polarization is used as the reaction coordinate. Quantization of the proton degree of freedom results in a problem of non-adiabatic dynamics. By employing the reactive flux formulation of the rate constant, the initial sampling starts from the transition state defined using the collective reaction coordinate. Dynamics of the collective reaction coordinate is treated classically as over damped diffusive motion, for which the equation of motion can be derived using the path integral, or the mixed quantum classical Liouville equation methods. The calculated mixed quantum classical rate constants agree well with the results from the numerically exact hierarchical equation of motion approach for a broad range of model parameters. Moreover, we are able to obtain contributions from each vibrational state to the total reaction rate, which helps to understand the reaction mechanism from the deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes. The numerical results are also compared with those from existing approximate theories based on calculations of the non-adiabatic transmission coefficients. It is found that the two-surface Landau-Zener formula works well in calculating the transmission coefficients in the deep tunneling regime, where the crossing point between the two lowest vibrational states dominates the total reaction rate. When multiple vibrational levels are involved, including additional crossing points on the free energy surfaces is important to obtain the correct reaction rate using the Landau-Zener formula.

  5. Mixed quantum classical calculation of proton transfer reaction rates: from deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weiwei; Xu, Yang; Zhu, Lili; Shi, Qiang

    2014-05-01

    We present mixed quantum classical calculations of the proton transfer (PT) reaction rates represented by a double well system coupled to a dissipative bath. The rate constants are calculated within the so called nontraditional view of the PT reaction, where the proton motion is quantized and the solvent polarization is used as the reaction coordinate. Quantization of the proton degree of freedom results in a problem of non-adiabatic dynamics. By employing the reactive flux formulation of the rate constant, the initial sampling starts from the transition state defined using the collective reaction coordinate. Dynamics of the collective reaction coordinate is treated classically as over damped diffusive motion, for which the equation of motion can be derived using the path integral, or the mixed quantum classical Liouville equation methods. The calculated mixed quantum classical rate constants agree well with the results from the numerically exact hierarchical equation of motion approach for a broad range of model parameters. Moreover, we are able to obtain contributions from each vibrational state to the total reaction rate, which helps to understand the reaction mechanism from the deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes. The numerical results are also compared with those from existing approximate theories based on calculations of the non-adiabatic transmission coefficients. It is found that the two-surface Landau-Zener formula works well in calculating the transmission coefficients in the deep tunneling regime, where the crossing point between the two lowest vibrational states dominates the total reaction rate. When multiple vibrational levels are involved, including additional crossing points on the free energy surfaces is important to obtain the correct reaction rate using the Landau-Zener formula. PMID:24811623

  6. Cryogenic wind tunnel activities at the University of Southampton. [flow visusalization technique for low speed wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    The characteristics and behavior of a 0.3m transonic cryogenic wind tunnel are discussed. The wide band of usable Reynolds numbers is analyzed along with a flow visualization technique using propane. The combination of magnetic suspension with the cryogenic wind tunnel is described. An outline of the circuit showing the locations of the magnet system and the features of the tunnel are presented.

  7. Quantum-confinement effect in individual Ge1-xSnx quantum dots on Si(111) substrates covered with ultrathin SiO2 films using scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yoshiaki; Masada, Akiko; Ichikawa, Masakazu

    2007-07-01

    The authors observed a quantum-confinement effect in individual Ge1-xSnx quantum dots (QDs) on Si (111) substrates covered with ultrathin SiO2 films using scanning tunneling spectroscopy at room temperature. The quantum-confinement effect was featured by an increase in the energy band gap of ˜1.5eV with a decrease in QD diameter from 35to4nm. The peaks for quantum levels of QDs became broader with a decrease in the height-diameter aspect ratio of QDs, demonstrating the gradual emergence of two dimensionality in density of states of quasi zero-dimensional QDs with the QD flattening.

  8. Modeling the Benchmark Active Control Technology Wind-Tunnel Model for Application to Flutter Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the formulation of a model of the dynamic behavior of the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) wind-tunnel model for application to design and analysis of flutter suppression controllers. The model is formed by combining the equations of motion for the BACT wind-tunnel model with actuator models and a model of wind-tunnel turbulence. The primary focus of this paper is the development of the equations of motion from first principles using Lagrange's equations and the principle of virtual work. A numerical form of the model is generated using values for parameters obtained from both experiment and analysis. A unique aspect of the BACT wind-tunnel model is that it has upper- and lower-surface spoilers for active control. Comparisons with experimental frequency responses and other data show excellent agreement and suggest that simple coefficient-based aerodynamics are sufficient to accurately characterize the aeroelastic response of the BACT wind-tunnel model. The equations of motion developed herein have been used to assist the design and analysis of a number of flutter suppression controllers that have been successfully implemented.

  9. Macroscopic quantum tunneling and qubit design parameters of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ surface intrinsic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, D. J.; Yu, H. F.; Peng, Z. H.; Cao, W. H.; Zhu, X. B.; Tian, Ye; Chen, G. H.; Lin, D. H.; Gu, C. Z.; Zheng, D. N.; Jing, X. N.; Lu, Li; Zhao, S. P.

    2008-12-01

    Macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) has been demonstrated recently in a Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ surface intrinsic Josephson junction (SIJJ) with its critical current density Jc below 100 A cm-2 and its size below 1 µm. In this work, we present a study of the switching current distributions of SIJJs fabricated on the same crystal, with Jc>500 A cm-2 and size of 0.8 and 1.6 µm. MQT is clearly observed, and the crossover from MQT to thermal activation (TA) is seen. Our analysis shows that the data agree well with the theoretical predictions of MQT and TA for different-sized SIJJs when parameters that roughly scale with the SIJJ size are used. In the crossover regime, the data are found to be better fitted by considering quantum corrections to TA. We discuss the realistic design of phase- and flux-type qubits using the experimentally attainable SIJJ parameters, which shows that the SIJJs, with their controllable Jc and size (or junction capacitance), are feasible for qubit applications in the future.

  10. Softening of the tunneling gap in modulation-doped GaAs/AlGaAs asymmetric coupled double quantum wells in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Y. H.; Park, Y. H.; Perry, C. H.; Simmons, J. A.; Takamasu, T.; Kim, Yongmin

    2009-08-01

    Magnetophotoluminescence emissions were measured from modulation doped GaAs/AlGaAs asymmetric double quantum wells, wherein a thin barrier (25 Å) was sandwiched between a single quantum well (SQW) and a single heterojuction (SHJ). In the SQW, Landau level mixing is observed at the quantum Hall states. At ν <2, the lowest Landau level transition undergoes an exciton transition. For the SHJ region, the free carrier transitions become excitonic at the crossing point of the GaAs free exciton and the tunneling band gap shows a marked softening. An exciton-exciton interaction is shown to be responsible for the behavior of the subband energy levels in magnetic fields.

  11. Quantum-tunneling dynamics of a spin-polarized Fermi gas in a double-well potential

    SciTech Connect

    Salasnich, L.; Mazzarella, G.; Toigo, F.; Salerno, M.

    2010-02-15

    We study the exact dynamics of a one-dimensional spin-polarized gas of fermions in a double-well potential at zero and finite temperature. Despite the system being made of noninteracting fermions, its dynamics can be quite complex, showing strongly aperiodic spatio-temporal patterns during the tunneling. The extension of these results to the case of mixtures of spin-polarized fermions interacting with self-trapped Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) at zero temperature is considered as well. In this case we show that the fermionic dynamics remains qualitatively similar to that observed in the absence of BEC but with the Rabi frequencies of fermionic excited states explicitly depending on the number of bosons and on the boson-fermion interaction strength. From this, the possibility of controlling quantum fermionic dynamics by means of Feshbach resonances is suggested.

  12. Quantum Size and Doping Concentration Effects on the Current-Voltage Characteristics in GaN Resonant Tunneling Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassen, Dakhlaoui

    2013-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the effects of quantum size and doping concentration on the current-voltage characteristics of GaN resonant tunneling diodes. The results show a marked dependence of the peak current density on the emitter and collector spacers, and the existence of some thickness in the emitter, for which the electric current density reaches its maximum with a large peak-to-valley ratio. We also study the effect of the doping concentration in the emitter and collector layers. It is found that the doping concentration can greatly affect the current-voltage characteristics. In particular, it increases the peak of the current density and displaces the position of the maxima of the current dependence on the applied bias voltage. The effects of aluminum concentration and temperature are also presented. Finally, it is demonstrated that it is possible to have a symmetrical current for applying bias voltage in both directions by adjusting the thickness of the collector spacer.

  13. An Approach to Quantum Transport Based on Reduced Hierarchy Equations of Motion: Application to a Resonant Tunneling Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Atsunori; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2013-03-01

    The quantum dissipative dynamics of a tunneling process through double barrier structures is investigated on the basis of a rigorous treatment for the first time. We employ a Caldeira--Leggett Hamiltonian with an effective potential calculated self-consistently, accounting for the electron distribution. With this Hamiltonian, we use the reduced hierarchy equations of motion in the Wigner space representation to study the effects of non-Markovian thermal fluctuations and dissipation at finite temperature in a rigorous manner. Hysteresis, double plateau-like behavior, and self-excited current oscillation are observed in a negative differential resistance (NDR) region of the current--voltage curve. We find that while most of the current oscillations decay in time in the NDR region, there is a steady oscillation characterized by a tornado-like rotation in the Wigner space in the upper plateau of the NDR region.

  14. Reduction in dark current using resonant tunneling barriers in quantum dots-in-a-well long wavelength infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barve, A. V.; Shah, S. Y.; Shao, J.; Vandervelde, T. E.; Shenoi, R. V.; Jang, W.-Y.; Krishna, S.

    2008-09-01

    We report the use of resonant tunneling (RT) assisted barriers to reduce the dark current in quantum dots-in-a-well (DWELL) infrared photodetectors. Designed RT barriers allow energy-selective extraction of photoexcited carriers while blocking a continuum of energies. Over two orders of magnitude reduction in the dark current in the RT-DWELL device over a control sample without RT-DWELL at 77K has been demonstrated. Specific detectivity (D*) of 3.6×109cmHz1/2W-1 at 77K at λpeak=11μm with a conversion efficiency of 5.3% was obtained in the RT-DWELL device. D* for the RT-DWELL device is five times higher than that of the control sample.

  15. Capacitance estimation for InAs Tunnel FETs by means of full-quantum k · p simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnani, E.; Baravelli, E.; Gnudi, A.; Reggiani, S.; Baccarani, G.

    2015-06-01

    We report for the first time a quantum mechanical simulation study of gate capacitance components in aggressively scaled InAs Nanowire Tunnel Field-Effect Transistors. It will be shown that the gate-drain capacitance exhibits the same functional dependence over the whole Vgs range as the total gate capacitance, albeit with smaller values. However, as opposed to the previous capacitance estimations provided by semiclassical TCAD tools, we find that the gate capacitance exhibits a non-monotonic behavior vs. gate voltage, with plateaus and bumps related with energy quantization and subband formation determined by the device cross-sectional size, as well as with the position of channel-conduction subbands relative to the Fermi level in the drain contact. From this point of view, semiclassical TCAD tools seem to be inaccurate for capacitance estimation in aggressively-scaled TFET devices.

  16. Capping process of InAs/GaAs quantum dots studied by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Q.; Offermans, P.; Noetzel, R.; Koenraad, P.M.; Wolter, J.H.

    2004-12-06

    The capping process of self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs) grown on GaAs(100) substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy is studied by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy. GaAs capping at 500 deg. C causes leveling of the QDs which is completely suppressed by decreasing the growth temperature to 300 deg. C. At elevated temperature the QD leveling is driven in the initial stage of the GaAs capping process while it is quenched during continued overgrowth when the QDs become buried. For common GaAs growth rates, both phenomena take place on a similar time scale. Therefore, the size and shape of buried InAs QDs are determined by a delicate interplay between driving and quenching of the QD leveling during capping which is controlled by the GaAs growth rate and growth temperature.

  17. Digital-flutter-suppression-system investigations for the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Hoadley, Sherwood Tiffany; Cole, Stanley R.; Buttrill, Carey S.

    1990-01-01

    Active flutter suppression control laws were designed, implemented, and tested on an aeroelastically-scaled wind-tunnel model in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. One of the control laws was successful in stabilizing the model while the dynamic pressure was increased to 24 percent greater than the measured open-loop flutter boundary. Other accomplishments included the design, implementation, and successful operation of a one-of-a-kind digital controller, the design and use of two simulation methods to support the project, and the development and successful use of a methodology for online controller performance evaluation.

  18. Digital-flutter-suppression-system investigations for the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Hoadley, Sherwood T.; Cole, Stanley R.; Buttrill, Carey S.; Houck, Jacob A.

    1990-01-01

    Active flutter suppression control laws were designed, implemented, and tested on an aeroelastically-scaled wind tunnel model in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. One of the control laws was successful in stabilizing the model while the dynamic pressure was increased to 24 percent greater than the measured open-loop flutter boundary. Other accomplishments included the design, implementation, and successful operation of a one-of-a-kind digital controller, the design and use of two simulation methods to support the project, and the development and successful use of a methodology for on-line controller performance evaluation.

  19. Traveling-wave pulse on a superconductive active transmission line using resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klofaï, Yerima; Essimbi, B. Z.; Jäger, D.

    2013-10-01

    Analytic study and computer experiment investigations on a superconductive active transmission line using resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) are discussed. It is shown, based on nonlinear wave propagation effects, that the line supports pulse propagation appearing as pairs of kink-antikink profiles. This behavior is due to compensation between the effects of amplification and dissipation along the network.

  20. Experimental Results from the Active Aeroelastic Wing Wind Tunnel Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Spain, Charles V.; Florance, James R.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Ivanco, Thomas G.; DeMoss, Joshua; Silva, Walter A.; Panetta, Andrew; Lively, Peter; Tumwa, Vic

    2005-01-01

    The Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) program is a cooperative effort among NASA, the Air Force Research Laboratory and the Boeing Company, encompassing flight testing, wind tunnel testing and analyses. The objective of the AAW program is to investigate the improvements that can be realized by exploiting aeroelastic characteristics, rather than viewing them as a detriment to vehicle performance and stability. To meet this objective, a wind tunnel model was crafted to duplicate the static aeroelastic behavior of the AAW flight vehicle. The model was tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel in July and August 2004. The wind tunnel investigation served the program goal in three ways. First, the wind tunnel provided a benchmark for comparison with the flight vehicle and various levels of theoretical analyses. Second, it provided detailed insight highlighting the effects of individual parameters upon the aeroelastic response of the AAW vehicle. This parameter identification can then be used for future aeroelastic vehicle design guidance. Third, it provided data to validate scaling laws and their applicability with respect to statically scaled aeroelastic models.

  1. Mode-Specific Tunneling Splittings for a Sequential Double-Hydrogen Transfer Case: An Accurate Quantum Mechanical Scheme.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yinghui; Bian, Wensheng

    2015-05-21

    We present the first accurate quantum dynamics calculations of mode-specific tunneling splittings in a sequential double-hydrogen transfer process. This is achieved in the vinylidene-acetylene system, the simplest molecular system of this kind, and by large-scale parallel computations with an efficient theoretical scheme developed by us. In our scheme, basis functions are customized for the hydrogen transfer process; a 4-dimensional basis contraction strategy is combined with the preconditioned inexact spectral transform method; efficient parallel implementation is achieved. Mode-specific permutation tunneling splittings of vinylidene states are reported and tremendous mode-specific promotion effects are revealed; in particular, the CH2 rock mode enhances the ground-state splitting by a factor of 10(3). We find that the ground-state vinylidene has a reversible-isomerization time of 622 ps, much longer than all previous estimates. Our calculations also shed light on the importance of the deep intermediate well and vibrational excitation in the double-hydrogen transfer processes. PMID:26263255

  2. On a Quantum Model of Brain Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, K.-H.; Fichtner, L.; Freudenberg, W.; Ohya, M.

    2010-01-01

    One of the main activities of the brain is the recognition of signals. A first attempt to explain the process of recognition in terms of quantum statistics was given in [6]. Subsequently, details of the mathematical model were presented in a (still incomplete) series of papers (cf. [7, 2, 5, 10]). In the present note we want to give a general view of the principal ideas of this approach. We will introduce the basic spaces and justify the choice of spaces and operations. Further, we bring the model face to face with basic postulates any statistical model of the recognition process should fulfill. These postulates are in accordance with the opinion widely accepted in psychology and neurology.

  3. Quantum Tunneling of ^3 He in Solid ^4 He: A New Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, C.; Kim, S. S.; Candela, D.; Sullivan, N. S.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the analysis of the experimental values of the nuclear spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times for the tunneling of ^3 He as isotopic impurities in solid ^4 He. These two relaxation times cannot be described quantitatively using a unique correlation time although it is often presented as such in the literature. In this paper, we discuss how to distinguish the high-frequency portion of the spectral densities that determine the spin-lattice relaxation rates from the low-frequency components which determine the spin-spin relaxation rates.

  4. Matter waves and quantum tunneling engineered by time-dependent interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bludov, Yu. V.; Konotop, V. V.; Salerno, M.

    2010-05-15

    We report the possibility of steering gap solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates loaded in optical lattices by means of time-dependent nonlinearities, which allow one to control in a nondestructive manner both Bloch oscillations and Landau-Zener tunneling (i.e., Rabi oscillations) across band gaps. As an example we show how to move a matter-wave soliton in real and in reciprocal space from a lower to higher bands, avoiding dynamical instabilities. This opens the possibility of experimental access to gap solitons of higher bands and forcing of soliton motion through a lattice via the Feshbach resonance technique.

  5. Coulomb blockade and incoherent tunneling of Cooper pairs in ultrasmall junctions affected by strong quantum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, L. S.; Nazarov, Yu. V.; Haviland, D. B.; Delsing, P.; Claeson, T.

    1991-08-01

    We have fabricated and investigated submicron-size (0.01 and 0.04 μm2) Pb-alloy single Josephson junctions attached to high-resistance thin-film NiCr or Cr leads which provide the necessary conditions for a strong charging effect. When the Josephson coupling energy is less than the charging energy, we find a novel shape of the current-voltage curves, with a Coulomb gap at small voltages, and a current peak at larger voltages. A theory based on the concept of incoherent Cooper-pair tunneling has explained the data well.

  6. Novel triphosphate phosphohydrolase activity of Clostridium thermocellum TTM, a member of the triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme superfamily.

    PubMed

    Keppetipola, Niroshika; Jain, Ruchi; Shuman, Stewart

    2007-04-20

    Triphosphate tunnel metalloenzymes (TTMs) are a newly recognized superfamily of phosphotransferases defined by a unique active site residing within an eight-stranded beta barrel. The prototypical members are the eukaryal metal-dependent RNA triphosphatases, which catalyze the initial step in mRNA capping. Little is known about the activities and substrate specificities of the scores of TTM homologs present in bacterial and archaeal proteomes, nearly all of which are annotated as adenylate cyclases. Here we have conducted a biochemical and structure-function analysis of a TTM protein (CthTTM) from the bacterium Clostridium thermocellum. CthTTM is a metal-dependent tripolyphosphatase and nucleoside triphosphatase; it is not an adenylate cyclase. We have identified 11 conserved amino acids in the tunnel that are critical for tripolyphosphatase and ATPase activity. The most salient findings are that (i) CthTTM is 150-fold more active in cleaving tripolyphosphate than ATP and (ii) the substrate specificity of CthTTM can be transformed by a single mutation (K8A) that abolishes tripolyphosphatase activity while strongly stimulating ATP hydrolysis. Our results underscore the plasticity of CthTTM substrate choice and suggest how novel specificities within the TTM superfamily might evolve through changes in the residues that line the tunnel walls. PMID:17303560

  7. Quantum-corrected self-dual black hole entropy in tunneling formalism with GUP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anacleto, M. A.; Brito, F. A.; Passos, E.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we focus on the Hamilton-Jacobi method to determine the entropy of a self-dual black hole by using linear and quadratic GUPs (generalized uncertainty principles). We have obtained the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of self-dual black holes and its quantum corrections that are logarithm and also of several other types.

  8. The Particle inside a Ring: A Two-Dimensional Quantum Problem Visualized by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The one-dimensional particle-in-a-box model used to introduce quantum mechanics to students suffers from a tenuous connection to a real physical system. This article presents a two-dimensional model, the particle confined within a ring, that directly corresponds to observations of surface electrons in a metal trapped inside a circular barrier.…

  9. Asymmetric quantum-well structures for AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lin'an; Li, Yue; Wang, Ying; Xu, Shengrui; Hao, Yue

    2016-04-01

    Asymmetric quantum-well (QW) structures including the asymmetric potential-barrier and the asymmetric potential-well are proposed for AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs). Theoretical investigation gives that an appropriate decrease in Al composition and thickness for emitter barrier as well as an appropriate increase of both for collector barrier can evidently improve the negative-differential-resistance characteristic of RTD. Numerical simulation shows that RTD with a 1.5-nm-thick GaN well sandwiched by a 1.3-nm-thick Al0.15Ga0.85N emitter barrier and a 1.7-nm-thick Al0.25Ga0.75N collector barrier can yield the I-V characteristic having the peak current (Ip) and the peak-to-valley current ratio (PVCR) of 0.39 A and 3.6, respectively, about double that of RTD with a 1.5-nm-thick Al0.2Ga0.8N for both barriers. It is also found that an introduction of InGaN sub-QW into the diode can change the tunneling mode and achieve higher transmission coefficient of electron. The simulation demonstrates that RTD with a 2.8-nm-thick In0.03Ga0.97N sub-well in front of a 2.0-nm-thick GaN main-well can exhibit the I-V characteristic having Ip and PVCR of 0.07 A and 11.6, about 7 times and double the value of RTD without sub-QW, respectively. The purpose of improving the structure of GaN-based QW is to solve apparent contradiction between the device structure and the device manufacturability of new generation RTDs for sub-millimeter and terahertz applications.

  10. Techniques For Mass Production Of Tunneling Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W.; Podosek, Judith A.; Reynolds, Joseph K.; Rockstad, Howard K.; Vote, Erika C.; Kaiser, William J.

    1993-01-01

    Techniques for mass production of tunneling electrodes developed from silicon-micromachining, lithographic patterning, and related microfabrication processes. Tunneling electrodes named because electrons travel between them by quantum-mechanical tunneling; tunneling electrodes integral parts of tunneling transducer/sensors, which act in conjunction with feedback circuitry to stabilize tunneling currents by maintaining electrode separations of order of 10 Angstrom. Essential parts of scanning tunneling microscopes and related instruments, and used as force and position transducers in novel microscopic accelerometers and infrared detectors.

  11. Aeroservoelastic wind-tunnel investigations using the Active Flexible Wing Model: Status and recent accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas E.; Perry, Boyd, III; Tiffany, Sherwood H.; Cole, Stanley R.; Buttrill, Carey S.; Adams, William M., Jr.; Houck, Jacob A.; Srinathkumar, S.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Pototzky, Anthony S.

    1989-01-01

    The status of the joint NASA/Rockwell Active Flexible Wing Wind-Tunnel Test Program is described. The objectives are to develop and validate the analysis, design, and test methodologies required to apply multifunction active control technology for improving aircraft performance and stability. Major tasks include designing digital multi-input/multi-output flutter-suppression and rolling-maneuver-load alleviation concepts for a flexible full-span wind-tunnel model, obtaining an experimental data base for the basic model and each control concept and providing comparisons between experimental and analytical results to validate the methodologies. The opportunity is provided to improve real-time simulation techniques and to gain practical experience with digital control law implementation procedures.

  12. Four-electron model for singlet and triplet excitation energy transfers with inclusion of coherence memory, inelastic tunneling and nuclear quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yosuke; Ebina, Kuniyoshi; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2016-08-01

    A computational scheme to describe the coherent dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) in molecular systems is proposed on the basis of generalized master equations with memory kernels. This formalism takes into account those physical effects in electron-bath coupling system such as the spin symmetry of excitons, the inelastic electron tunneling and the quantum features of nuclear motions, thus providing a theoretical framework to perform an ab initio description of EET through molecular simulations for evaluating the spectral density and the temporal correlation function of electronic coupling. Some test calculations have then been carried out to investigate the dependence of exciton population dynamics on coherence memory, inelastic tunneling correlation time, magnitude of electronic coupling, quantum correction to temporal correlation function, reorganization energy and energy gap.

  13. Quantum-Mechanical Simulation of Gate Tunneling Current in Accumulated n-Channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Devices with n+-Polysilicon Gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Hideyuki; Matsuda, Toshihiro; Ohzone, Takashi

    2002-08-01

    The gate tunneling current in n+-polysilicon gate n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) in accumulation regime has been simulated quantum-mechanically. The two current components, due to hole tunneling from the accumulation layer on the p-silicon surface and due to electron tunneling from the accumulation layer on the n+-polysilicon gate, have been investigated for bulk and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) MOSFETs with various SOI layer thicknesses. For bulk MOSFETs, the electron current from the gate becomes much larger than the hole current from the silicon surface. On the other hand, as the SOI layer thickness (tSOI) decreases, the hole current increases, but the electron current decreases, and thus the hole current exceeds the electron current at a certain tSOI. The total gate current increases with decreasing tSOI (>2 nm). For extremely thin tSOI, the contribution of the electron current almost disappears. Moreover, the quantum-mechanical effects on the tunneling current in accumulated SOI MOSFETs have been discussed in detail.

  14. Aeroelastic modeling of the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Heeg, Jennifer; Bennett, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The primary issues involved in the generation of linear, state-space equations of motion of a flexible wind tunnel model, the Active Flexible Wing (AFW), are discussed. The codes that were used and their inherent assumptions and limitations are also briefly discussed. The application of the CAP-TSD code to the AFW for determination of the model's transonic flutter boundary is included as well.

  15. Robust Multivariable Flutter Suppression for the Benchmark Active Control Technology (BACT) Wind-Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.

    1997-01-01

    The Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) project is part of NASA Langley Research Center s Benchmark Models Program for studying transonic aeroelastic phenomena. In January of 1996 the BACT wind-tunnel model was used to successfully demonstrate the application of robust multivariable control design methods (H and -synthesis) to flutter suppression. This paper addresses the design and experimental evaluation of robust multivariable flutter suppression control laws with particular attention paid to the degree to which stability and performance robustness was achieved.

  16. Quantum critical points in tunneling junction of topological superconductor and topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Zheng-Wei; Kang, Da-wei; Wang, Zhao-Wu; Li, Liben

    2016-08-01

    The tunneling junction between one-dimensional topological superconductor and integer (fractional) topological insulator (TI), realized via point contact, is investigated theoretically with bosonization technology and renormalization group methods. For the integer TI case, in a finite range of edge interaction parameter, there is a non-trivial stable fixed point which corresponds to the physical picture that the edge of TI breaks up into two sections at the junction, with one side coupling strongly to the Majorana fermion and exhibiting perfect Andreev reflection, while the other side decouples, exhibiting perfect normal reflection at low energies. This fixed point can be used as a signature of the Majorana fermion and tested by nowadays experiment techniques. For the fractional TI case, the universal low-energy transport properties are described by perfect normal reflection, perfect Andreev reflection, or perfect insulating fixed points dependent on the filling fraction and edge interaction parameter of fractional TI.

  17. Description of sub-barrier heavy ion fusion in a semiclassical quantum tunneling model

    SciTech Connect

    Yahlali, N.; Diaz, J.; Sami, T.

    1996-04-01

    In this paper we apply the semiclassical method based on the Feynman path integral formalism to sub-barrier fusion of heavy nuclei. Cross sections are calculated and compared to experimental data and to coupled-channel calculations for different mass systems: {sup 32}S+{sup 24}Mg, {sup 58}Ni+{sup 64}Ni, and {sup 16}O+{sup 208}Pb. The semiclassical method and coupled-channel calculations give comparable results. It is found that the coupling produces a renormalization of the barrier that is responsible for the enhancement of sub-barrier fusion cross sections and a dissipative force along the classical tunneling path. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Tunneling into a quantum confinement created by a single-step nanolithography of conducting oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniv, E.; Ron, A.; Goldstein, M.; Palevski, A.; Dagan, Y.

    2016-07-01

    A unique nanolithography technique compatible with conducting oxide interfaces, which requires a single lithographic step with no additional amorphous deposition or etching, is presented. It is demonstrated on a SrTiO3/LaAlO3 interface where a constriction is patterned in the electron liquid. We find that an additional backgating can further confine the electron liquid into an isolated island. Conductance and differential conductance measurements show resonant tunneling through the island. The data at various temperatures and magnetic fields are analyzed and the effective island size is found to be of the order of 10 nm. The magnetic field dependence suggests the absence of spin degeneracy in the island. Our method is suitable for creating superconducting and oxide-interface-based electronic devices.

  19. Effect of transverse electric field and temperature on light absorption in GaAs/AlGaAs tunnel-coupled quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Firsov, D. A.; Vorobjev, L. E.; Vinnichenko, M. Ya. Balagula, R. M.; Kulagina, M. M.; Vasil’iev, A. P.

    2015-11-15

    The photoluminescence and intersubband absorption spectra are studied in GaAs/AlGaAs tunnel- coupled quantum well structures. The peak positions in the photoluminescence and absorption spectra are consistent with the theoretically calculated energies of optical carrier transitions. The effect of a transverse electric field and temperature on intersubband light absorption is studied. It is caused by electron redistribution between the size-quantization levels and a variation in the energy spectrum of quantum wells. The variation in the refractive index in the energy region of observed intersubband transitions is estimated using Kramers–Kronig relations.

  20. Observation of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a single Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta surface intrinsic Josephson junction.

    PubMed

    Li, Shao-Xiong; Qiu, Wei; Han, Siyuan; Wei, Y F; Zhu, X B; Gu, C Z; Zhao, S P; Wang, H B

    2007-07-20

    We report on the first unambiguous observation of macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) in a single submicron Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta) surface intrinsic Josephson junction (IJJ) by measuring its temperature-dependent switching current distribution. All relevant junction parameters were determined in situ in the classical regime and were used to predict the behavior of the IJJ in the quantum regime via MQT theory. Experimental results agree quantitatively with the theoretical predictions, thus confirming the MQT picture. Furthermore, the data also indicate that the surface IJJ, where the current flows along the c axis of the crystal, has the conventional sinphi current-phase relationship. PMID:17678315

  1. Observation of Macroscopic Quantum Tunneling in a Single Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ Surface Intrinsic Josephson Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shao-Xiong; Qiu, Wei; Han, Siyuan; Wei, Y. F.; Zhu, X. B.; Gu, C. Z.; Zhao, S. P.; Wang, H. B.

    2007-07-01

    We report on the first unambiguous observation of macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) in a single submicron Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ surface intrinsic Josephson junction (IJJ) by measuring its temperature-dependent switching current distribution. All relevant junction parameters were determined in situ in the classical regime and were used to predict the behavior of the IJJ in the quantum regime via MQT theory. Experimental results agree quantitatively with the theoretical predictions, thus confirming the MQT picture. Furthermore, the data also indicate that the surface IJJ, where the current flows along the c axis of the crystal, has the conventional sin⁡φ current-phase relationship.

  2. Interaction effects on the tunneling of electron-hole pairs in coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Hector M.; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H.; Ulloa, Sergio E.

    2001-03-01

    The transit time of carriers is beginning to be an important parameter in the physical operation of semiconductor quantum dot `devices'. In the present work, we study the coherent propagation of electron-hole pairs in coupled self-assembled quantum dots in close proximity. These systems, achieved experimentally in a number of different geometries, have been recently implemented as a novel storage of optical information that may give rise to smart pixel technology in the near future [1]. Here, we apply an effective mass hamiltonian approach and solve numerically the time dependent Schroedinger equation of a system of photo-created electron-hole pairs in the dots. Our approach takes into account both Coulomb interactions and confinement effects. The time evolution is investigated in terms of the structural parameters for typical InAs-GaAs dots. Different initial conditions are considered, reflecting the basic processes that would take place in these experiments. We study the probabilities of finding the electron and hole in either the same or adjacent quantum dot, and study carefully the role of interactions in this behavior. [1] T. Lundstrom, W. Schoenfeld, H. Lee, and P. M. Petroff, Science 286, 2312 (1999).

  3. Active Vertical Tail Buffeting Alleviation on an F/A-18 Model in a Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    A 1/6-scale F-18 wind-tunnel model was tested in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Actively Controlled Response Of Buffet-Affected Tails (ACROBAT) program to assess the use of active controls in reducing vertical tail buffeting. The starboard vertical tail was equipped with an active rudder and other aerodynamic devices, and the port vertical tail was equipped with piezoelectric actuators. The tunnel conditions were atmospheric air at a dynamic pressure of 14 psf. By using single-input-single-output control laws at gains well below the physical limits of the control effectors, the power spectral density of the root strains at the frequency of the first bending mode of the vertical tail was reduced by as much as 60 percent up to angles of attack of 37 degrees. Root mean square (RMS) values of root strain were reduced by as much as 19 percent. Stability margins indicate that a constant gain setting in the control law may be used throughout the range of angle of attack tested.

  4. Active Vertical Tail Buffeting Alleviation on a Twin-Tail Fighter Configuration in a Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.

    1997-01-01

    A 1/6-scale F-18 wind-tunnel model was tested in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Actively Controlled Response Of Buffet-Affected Tails (ACROBAT) program to assess the use of active controls in reducing vertical tail buffeting. The starboard vertical tail was equipped with an active rudder and other aerodynamic devices, and the port vertical tail was equipped with piezoelectric actuators. The tunnel conditions were atmospheric air at a dynamic pressure of 14 psf. By using single-input-single-output control laws at gains well below the physical limits of the control effectors, the power spectral density of the root strains at the frequency of the first bending mode of the vertical tail was reduced by as much as 60 percent up to angles of attack of 37 degrees. Root mean square (RMS) values of root strain were reduced by as much as 19 percent. Stability margins indicate that a constant gain setting in the control law may be used throughout the range of angle of attack tested.

  5. Quantum-classical transition and quantum activation of ratchet currents in the parameter space.

    PubMed

    Beims, M W; Schlesinger, M; Manchein, C; Celestino, A; Pernice, A; Strunz, W T

    2015-05-01

    The quantum ratchet current is studied in the parameter space of the dissipative kicked rotor model coupled to a zero-temperature quantum environment. We show that vacuum fluctuations blur the generic isoperiodic stable structures found in the classical case. Such structures tend to survive when a measure of statistical dependence between the quantum and classical currents are displayed in the parameter space. In addition, we show that quantum fluctuations can be used to overcome transport barriers in the phase space. Related quantum ratchet current activation regions are spotted in the parameter space. Results are discussed based on quantum, semiclassical, and classical calculations. While the semiclassical dynamics involves vacuum fluctuations, the classical map is driven by thermal noise. PMID:26066230

  6. Test Activities in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel and a Summary of Recent Facility Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stanley R.; Johnson, R. Keith; Piatak, David J.; Florance, Jennifer P.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) has provided a unique capability for aeroelastic testing for over forty years. The facility has a rich history of significant contributions to the design of many United States commercial transports, military aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. The facility has many features that contribute to its uniqueness for aeroelasticity testing, perhaps the most important feature being the use of a heavy gas test medium to achieve higher test densities compared to testing in air. Higher test medium densities substantially improve model-building requirements and therefore simplify the fabrication process for building aeroelastically scaled wind tunnel models. This paper describes TDT capabilities that make it particularly suited for aeroelasticity testing. The paper also discusses the nature of recent test activities in the TDT, including summaries of several specific tests. Finally, the paper documents recent facility improvement projects and the continuous statistical quality assessment effort for the TDT.

  7. Giant magnetic anisotropy and quantum tunneling of the magnetization in Li2(Li1-xFex)N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesche, Anton; McCallum, R. William; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; Jacobs, Jenee L.; Taufour, Valentin; Kreyssig, Andreas; Houk, Robert S.; Bud'Ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2014-03-01

    The magnetic anisotropy of 3 d transition metals is usually considered to be weak, mainly due to the widely known paradigm of orbital quenching. However, a rare interplay of crystal electric field effects and spin-orbit coupling causes a large orbital contribution to the magnetic moment of iron in Li2(Li1-xFex)N. This leads, not only to large magnetic moments of ~ 5 μB per iron atom but, also, to an enormous magnetic anisotropy field that extrapolates to more than 200 Tesla. Magnetic hysteresis emerges for T <= 50 K and the coercivity fields of more than 11 Tesla exceed even the hardest 4 f electron based ferromagnets. Li2(Li1-xFex)N not only has a clear and remarkable anisotropy, generally not associated with iron moments, but also shows time-dependence more consistent with molecular magnets. In particular for low iron concentrations x << 1 the spin-inversion is dominated by a macroscopic tunneling process rather than by thermal excitations. It is shown that the huge magnetic anisotropy makes Li2(Li1-xFex)N (i) an ideal model system to study macroscopic quantum effects at elevated temperatures and (ii) a basis for novel magnetic functional materials. This work is supported by the US DOE, Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  8. Deciphering the origin of giant magnetic anisotropy and fast quantum tunnelling in Rhenium(IV) single-molecule magnets

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets represent a promising route to achieve potential applications such as high-density information storage and spintronics devices. Among others, 4d/5d elements such as Re(IV) ion are found to exhibit very large magnetic anisotropy, and inclusion of this ion-aggregated clusters yields several attractive molecular magnets. Here, using ab intio calculations, we unravel the source of giant magnetic anisotropy associated with the Re(IV) ions by studying a series of mononuclear Re(IV) six coordinate complexes. The low-lying doublet states are found to be responsible for large magnetic anisotropy and the sign of the axial zero-field splitting parameter (D) can be categorically predicted based on the position of the ligand coordination. Large transverse anisotropy along with large hyperfine interactions opens up multiple relaxation channels leading to a fast quantum tunnelling of the magnetization (QTM) process. Enhancing the Re-ligand covalency is found to significantly quench the QTM process. PMID:26883278

  9. Deciphering the origin of giant magnetic anisotropy and fast quantum tunnelling in Rhenium(IV) single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets represent a promising route to achieve potential applications such as high-density information storage and spintronics devices. Among others, 4d/5d elements such as Re(IV) ion are found to exhibit very large magnetic anisotropy, and inclusion of this ion-aggregated clusters yields several attractive molecular magnets. Here, using ab intio calculations, we unravel the source of giant magnetic anisotropy associated with the Re(IV) ions by studying a series of mononuclear Re(IV) six coordinate complexes. The low-lying doublet states are found to be responsible for large magnetic anisotropy and the sign of the axial zero-field splitting parameter (D) can be categorically predicted based on the position of the ligand coordination. Large transverse anisotropy along with large hyperfine interactions opens up multiple relaxation channels leading to a fast quantum tunnelling of the magnetization (QTM) process. Enhancing the Re-ligand covalency is found to significantly quench the QTM process. PMID:26883278

  10. The Photovoltaic Effect of CdS Quantum Dots Synthesized in Inverse Micelles and R-Phycoerythrin Tunnel Cavities.

    PubMed

    Bekasova, Olga D; Revina, Alexandra A; Kornienko, Ekaterina S; Kurganov, Boris I

    2015-06-01

    CdS quantum dots (CdS QDs) 4.3 nm in diameter synthesized in an AOT/isooctane/water microemulsion and in R-phycoerythrin tunnel cavities (3.5 × 6.0 nm) were analyzed for photoelectrochemical properties. The CdS QDs preparations were applied onto a platinum electrode to obtain solid films. Experiments were performed in a two-section vessel, with one section filled with ethanol and the other, with 3 M KCl. The sections were connected through an agar stopper. It was found that illumination of the films resulted in a change of the electrode potential. The magnitude of this change and the kinetics of the appearance and disappearance of the photopotential, i.e., the difference between the electrode potential on the light and in dark, depended on the nature of the QD shell. The photovoltaic effect of CdS QDs in R-phycoerythrin, compared to that of CdS QDs in AOT/isooctane micelles, is three to four times greater due to the photosensitizing action of R-phycoerythrin. The photosensitized effect was markedly higher than the photoelectric sensitivity of R-phycoerythrin and had the opposite polarity. Changes in the potential upon turning the light on and off could be observed repeatedly. PMID:25935221

  11. Deciphering the origin of giant magnetic anisotropy and fast quantum tunnelling in Rhenium(IV) single-molecule magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2016-02-01

    Single-molecule magnets represent a promising route to achieve potential applications such as high-density information storage and spintronics devices. Among others, 4d/5d elements such as Re(IV) ion are found to exhibit very large magnetic anisotropy, and inclusion of this ion-aggregated clusters yields several attractive molecular magnets. Here, using ab intio calculations, we unravel the source of giant magnetic anisotropy associated with the Re(IV) ions by studying a series of mononuclear Re(IV) six coordinate complexes. The low-lying doublet states are found to be responsible for large magnetic anisotropy and the sign of the axial zero-field splitting parameter (D) can be categorically predicted based on the position of the ligand coordination. Large transverse anisotropy along with large hyperfine interactions opens up multiple relaxation channels leading to a fast quantum tunnelling of the magnetization (QTM) process. Enhancing the Re-ligand covalency is found to significantly quench the QTM process.

  12. Quantum teleportation over 143 kilometres using active feed-forward.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Song; Herbst, Thomas; Scheidl, Thomas; Wang, Daqing; Kropatschek, Sebastian; Naylor, William; Wittmann, Bernhard; Mech, Alexandra; Kofler, Johannes; Anisimova, Elena; Makarov, Vadim; Jennewein, Thomas; Ursin, Rupert; Zeilinger, Anton

    2012-09-13

    The quantum internet is predicted to be the next-generation information processing platform, promising secure communication and an exponential speed-up in distributed computation. The distribution of single qubits over large distances via quantum teleportation is a key ingredient for realizing such a global platform. By using quantum teleportation, unknown quantum states can be transferred over arbitrary distances to a party whose location is unknown. Since the first experimental demonstrations of quantum teleportation of independent external qubits, an internal qubit and squeezed states, researchers have progressively extended the communication distance. Usually this occurs without active feed-forward of the classical Bell-state measurement result, which is an essential ingredient in future applications such as communication between quantum computers. The benchmark for a global quantum internet is quantum teleportation of independent qubits over a free-space link whose attenuation corresponds to the path between a satellite and a ground station. Here we report such an experiment, using active feed-forward in real time. The experiment uses two free-space optical links, quantum and classical, over 143 kilometres between the two Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife. To achieve this, we combine advanced techniques involving a frequency-uncorrelated polarization-entangled photon pair source, ultra-low-noise single-photon detectors and entanglement-assisted clock synchronization. The average teleported state fidelity is well beyond the classical limit of two-thirds. Furthermore, we confirm the quality of the quantum teleportation procedure without feed-forward by complete quantum process tomography. Our experiment verifies the maturity and applicability of such technologies in real-world scenarios, in particular for future satellite-based quantum teleportation. PMID:22951967

  13. Quantum simulation of a heterojunction vertical tunnel FET based on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jiang; Cresti, Alessandro; Esseni, David; Pala, Marco

    2016-02-01

    We simulate a band-to-band tunneling field-effect transistor based on a vertical heterojunction of single-layer MoS2 and WTe2, by exploiting the non-equilibrium Green's function method and including electron-phonon scattering. For both in-plane and out-of-plane transport, we attempt to calibrate out models to the few available experimental results. We focus on the role of chemical doping and back-gate biasing, and investigate the off-state physics of this device by analyzing the influence of the top-gate geometrical alignment on the device performance. The device scalability as a function of gate length is also studied. Finally, we present two metrics for the switching delay and energy of the device. Our simulations indicate that vertical field-effect transistors based on transition metal dichalcogenides can provide very small values of sub-threshold swing when properly designed in terms of doping concentration and top-gate extension length.

  14. Transport signatures of Majorana quantum criticality realized by dissipative resonant tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Huaixiu; Florens, Serge; Baranger, Harold U.

    2014-06-01

    We consider theoretically the transport properties of a spinless resonant electronic level coupled to strongly dissipative leads, in the regime of circuit impedance near the resistance quantum. Using the Luttinger liquid analogy, one obtains an effective Hamiltonian expressed in terms of interacting Majorana fermions, in which all environmental degrees of freedom (leads and electromagnetic modes) are encapsulated in a single fermionic bath. General transport equations for this system are then derived in terms of the Majorana T-matrix. A perturbative treatment of the Majorana interaction term yields the appearance of a marginal, linear dependence of the conductance on temperature when the system is tuned to its quantum critical point, in agreement with recent experimental observations. We investigate in detail the different crossovers involved in the problem, and analyze the role of the interaction terms in the transport scaling functions. In particular, we show that single barrier scaling applies when the system is slightly tuned away from its Majorana critical point, strengthening the general picture of dynamical Coulomb blockade.

  15. Switchable tunneling mode for cylindrical photonic quantum well consisting of photonic crystals containing liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, C. A.; Yang, S. L.; Yang, T. J.

    2013-06-01

    We propose a cylindrical photonic quantum well made of photonic crystals containing liquid crystals, the properties of which are theoretically calculated and investigated by the transfer matrix method in the cylindrical symmetry system. Liquid crystals are introduced into the photonic quantum well structure as tunable defect layers. When the liquid crystals are pseudo-isotropic state and the azimuthal mode order of incident waves are m=0, there were two pass-bands around certain wavelength. When the liquid crystals are homeotropic state, the reflectance of pass-band at shorter wavelength decreases from 0.75 to 0.05 in the TM mode, but the reflectance does not change in the TE mode. When mode order m=1 and the liquid crystals are pseudo-isotropic state, the reflectance of defect mode stayed the same as m=0. However, the result is reversed while the phase of liquid crystals change from pseudo-isotropic to homeotropic state. The reflectance is the same as in the TM mode, but that in the TE mode decreases substantially from 0.75 to 0.05. The application of our structure to switching device is highly potential.

  16. Quantum decay of the supercurrent and intrinsic capacitance of Josephson junctions beyond the tunnel limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonenko, Daniil S.; Skvortsov, Mikhail A.

    2015-12-01

    A nondissipative supercurrent state of a Josephson junction is metastable with respect to the formation of a finite-resistance state. This transition is driven by fluctuations, thermal at high temperatures and quantum at low temperatures. We evaluate the lifetime of such a state due to quantum fluctuations in the limit when the supercurrent is approaching the critical current. The decay probability is determined by the instanton action for the superconducting phase difference across the junction. At low temperatures, the dynamics of the phase is massive and is determined by the effective capacitance, which is a sum of the geometric and intrinsic capacitance of the junction. We model the central part of the Josephson junction either by an arbitrary short mesoscopic conductor described by the set of its transmission coefficients, or by a diffusive wire of an arbitrary length. The intrinsic capacitance can generally be estimated as C*˜G /Eg , where G is the normal-state conductance of the junction and Eg is the proximity minigap in its normal part. The obtained capacitance is sufficiently large to qualitatively explain the hysteretic behavior of the current-voltage characteristic even in the absence of overheating.

  17. Some experiences using wind-tunnel models in active control studies. [minimization of aeroelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Abel, I.; Ruhlin, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    A status report and review of wind tunnel model experimental techniques that have been developed to study and validate the use of active control technology for the minimization of aeroelastic response are presented. Modeling techniques, test procedures, and data analysis methods used in three model studies are described. The studies include flutter mode suppression on a delta-wing model, flutter mode suppression and ride quality control on a 1/30-size model of the B-52 CCV airplane, and an active lift distribution control system on a 1/22 size C-5A model.

  18. Long-lived binary tunneling spectrum in the quantum Hall Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washio, K.; Nakazawa, R.; Hashisaka, M.; Muraki, K.; Tokura, Y.; Fujisawa, T.

    2016-02-01

    The existence of long-lived nonequilibrium states without showing thermalization, which has previously been demonstrated in time evolution of ultracold atoms, suggests the possibility of their spatial analog in transport behavior of interacting electrons in solid-state systems. Here we report long-lived nonequilibrium states in one-dimensional edge channels in the integer quantum Hall regime. An indirect heating scheme in a counterpropagating configuration is employed to generate a nontrivial binary spectrum consisting of high- and low-temperature components. This unusual spectrum is sustained even after traveling 5-10 μ m , much longer than the length for electronic relaxation (about 0.1 μ m ), without showing significant thermalization. This observation is consistent with the integrable model of Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. The long-lived spectrum implies that the system is well described by noninteracting plasmons, which are attractive for carrying information for a long distance.

  19. Normal metal tunnel junction-based superconducting quantum interference proximity transistor

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ambrosio, Sophie Meissner, Martin; Blanc, Christophe; Ronzani, Alberto; Giazotto, Francesco

    2015-09-14

    We report the fabrication and characterization of an alternative design for a superconducting quantum interference proximity transistor (SQUIPT) based on a normal metal (N) probe. The absence of direct Josephson coupling between the proximized metal nanowire and the N probe allows us to observe the full modulation of the wire density of states around zero voltage and current via the application of an external magnetic field. This results into a drastic suppression of power dissipation which can be as low as a few ∼10{sup −17} W. In this context, the interferometer allows an improvement of up to four orders of magnitude with respect to earlier SQUIPT designs and makes it ideal for extra-low power cryogenic applications. In addition, the N-SQUIPT has been recently predicted to be the enabling candidate for the implementation of coherent caloritronic devices based on proximity effect.

  20. Control Surface Interaction Effects of the Active Aeroelastic Wing Wind Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents results from testing the Active Aeroelastic Wing wind tunnel model in NASA Langley s Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The wind tunnel test provided an opportunity to study aeroelastic system behavior under combined control surface deflections, testing for control surface interaction effects. Control surface interactions were observed in both static control surface actuation testing and dynamic control surface oscillation testing. The primary method of evaluating interactions was examination of the goodness of the linear superposition assumptions. Responses produced by independently actuating single control surfaces were combined and compared with those produced by simultaneously actuating and oscillating multiple control surfaces. Adjustments to the data were required to isolate the control surface influences. Using dynamic data, the task increases, as both the amplitude and phase have to be considered in the data corrections. The goodness of static linear superposition was examined and analysis of variance was used to evaluate significant factors influencing that goodness. The dynamic data showed interaction effects in both the aerodynamic measurements and the structural measurements.

  1. Tunnelling in carbonic acid.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J Philipp; Reisenauer, Hans Peter; Hirvonen, Viivi; Wu, Chia-Hua; Tyberg, Joseph L; Allen, Wesley D; Schreiner, Peter R

    2016-06-14

    The cis,trans-conformer of carbonic acid (H2CO3), generated by near-infrared radiation, undergoes an unreported quantum mechanical tunnelling rotamerization with half-lives in cryogenic matrices of 4-20 h, depending on temperature and host material. First-principles quantum chemistry at high levels of theory gives a tunnelling half-life of about 1 h, quite near those measured for the fastest rotamerizations. PMID:27248671

  2. Probing DNA in nanopores via tunneling: from sequencing to ``quantum'' analogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2012-02-01

    Fast and low-cost DNA sequencing methods would revolutionize medicine: a person could have his/her full genome sequenced so that drugs could be tailored to his/her specific illnesses; doctors could know in advance patients' likelihood to develop a given ailment; cures to major diseases could be found faster [1]. However, this goal of ``personalized medicine'' is hampered today by the high cost and slow speed of DNA sequencing methods. In this talk, I will discuss the sequencing protocol we suggest which requires the measurement of the distributions of transverse currents during the translocation of single-stranded DNA into nanopores [2-5]. I will support our conclusions with a combination of molecular dynamics simulations coupled to quantum mechanical calculations of electrical current in experimentally realizable systems [2-5]. I will also discuss recent experiments that support these theoretical predictions. In addition, I will show how this relatively unexplored area of research at the interface between solids, liquids, and biomolecules at the nanometer length scale is a fertile ground to study quantum phenomena that have a classical counterpart, such as ionic quasi-particles, ionic ``quantized'' conductance [6,7] and Coulomb blockade [8]. Work supported in part by NIH. [4pt] [1] M. Zwolak, M. Di Ventra, Physical Approaches to DNA Sequencing and Detection, Rev. Mod. Phys. 80, 141 (2008).[0pt] [2] M. Zwolak and M. Di Ventra, Electronic signature of DNA nucleotides via transverse transport, Nano Lett. 5, 421 (2005).[0pt] [3] J. Lagerqvist, M. Zwolak, and M. Di Ventra, Fast DNA sequencing via transverse electronic transport, Nano Lett. 6, 779 (2006).[0pt] [4] J. Lagerqvist, M. Zwolak, and M. Di Ventra, Influence of the environment and probes on rapid DNA sequencing via transverse electronic transport, Biophys. J. 93, 2384 (2007).[0pt] [5] M. Krems, M. Zwolak, Y.V. Pershin, and M. Di Ventra, Effect of noise on DNA sequencing via transverse electronic transport

  3. Intermediate Asymptotic Quantum States and Resonant Tunneling in 2D Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C. S.; Satanin, A. M.; Joe, Y. S.; Cosby, R. M.

    1998-03-01

    We investigate the resonance structure of the electron transmission through the waveguide using the finite-size potential well as a model for an attractive impurity (Y.S. Joe and R.M.Cosby, J. Appl. Phys. 81, 6217 (1997)). In the short-range interaction limit the transmission amplitude manifests a Fano asymmetric shape: a paired resonance and antiresonance at energies near the edges of the highest bands. This is due to the interaction of the virtual impurity level with the continuum. When the finite-size of the impurity is considered, the multiple quasi-bound states are produced. In this case, the overlapping of the resonances is seen, depending on the size and/or depth of the well. The crossover from quasi-1D to 2D regime takes places when the width of resonances is comparable to the spacing between the adjacent subbands. We also discuss the problem of quantum erosion of conductance and provide an experimental implication of the considered effects. ^1 The work of CSK and AMS was supported by the Ministry of Education of Korea through grant No. BSRI-97-2431. AMS also acknowledges support from the Korea Science and Engineering Foundation and the Russian Basic Research Foundation grant No. 97-02-16923a.

  4. Tunnelling from black holes and tunnelling into white holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Bhramar; Ghosh, A.; Mitra, P.

    2008-03-01

    Hawking radiation is nowadays being understood as tunnelling through black hole horizons. Here, the extension of the Hamilton-Jacobi approach to tunnelling for non-rotating and rotating black holes in different non-singular coordinate systems not only confirms this quantum emission from black holes but also reveals the new phenomenon of absorption into white holes by quantum mechanical tunnelling. The rôle of a boundary condition of total absorption or emission is also clarified.

  5. Active load control during rolling maneuvers. [performed in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A.; Pototzky, Anthony S.; Hoadley, Sherwood T.

    1994-01-01

    A rolling maneuver load alleviation (RMLA) system has been demonstrated on the active flexible wing (AFW) wind tunnel model in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). The objective was to develop a systematic approach for designing active control laws to alleviate wing loads during rolling maneuvers. Two RMLA control laws were developed that utilized outboard control-surface pairs (leading and trailing edge) to counteract the loads and that used inboard trailing-edge control-surface pairs to maintain roll performance. Rolling maneuver load tests were performed in the TDT at several dynamic pressures that included two below and one 11 percent above open-loop flutter dynamic pressure. The RMLA system was operated simultaneously with an active flutter suppression system above open-loop flutter dynamic pressure. At all dynamic pressures for which baseline results were obtained, torsion-moment loads were reduced for both RMLA control laws. Results for bending-moment load reductions were mixed; however, design equations developed in this study provided conservative estimates of load reduction in all cases.

  6. Efficient charge transfer and field-induced tunneling transport in hybrid composite device of organic semiconductor and cadmium telluride quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Varade, Vaibhav Jagtap, Amardeep M.; Koteswara Rao, K. S. R.; Ramesh, K. P.; Menon, R.; Anjaneyulu, P.

    2015-06-07

    Temperature and photo-dependent current–voltage characteristics are investigated in thin film devices of a hybrid-composite comprising of organic semiconductor poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) and cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs). A detailed study of the charge injection mechanism in ITO/PEDOT:PSS-CdTe QDs/Al device exhibits a transition from direct tunneling to Fowler–Nordheim tunneling with increasing electric field due to formation of high barrier at the QD interface. In addition, the hybrid-composite exhibits a huge photoluminescence quenching compared to aboriginal CdTe QDs and high increment in photoconductivity (∼ 400%), which is attributed to the charge transfer phenomena. The effective barrier height (Φ{sub B} ≈ 0.68 eV) is estimated from the transition voltage and the possible origin of its variation with temperature and photo-illumination is discussed.

  7. Quantum size effects on spin-transfer torque in a double barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nonmagnetic-metal (semiconductor) spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daqiq, Reza; Ghobadi, Nader

    2016-07-01

    We study the quantum size effects of an MgO-based double barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nonmagnetic-metal (DBMTJ-NM) (semiconductor (DBMTJ-SC)) spacer on the charge current and the spin-transfer torque (STT) components using non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. The results show oscillatory behavior due to the resonant tunneling effect depending on the structure parameters. We find that the charge current and the STT components in the DBMTJ-SC demonstrate the magnitude enhancement in comparison with the DBMTJ-NM. The bias dependence of the STT components in a DBMTJ-NM shows different behavior in comparison with spin valves and conventional MTJs. Therefore, by choosing a specific SC spacer with suitable thickness in a DBMTJ the charge current and the STT components significantly increase so that one can design a device with high STT and faster magnetization switching.

  8. Efficient charge transfer and field-induced tunneling transport in hybrid composite device of organic semiconductor and cadmium telluride quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varade, Vaibhav; Jagtap, Amardeep M.; Anjaneyulu, P.; Koteswara Rao, K. S. R.; Ramesh, K. P.; Menon, R.

    2015-06-01

    Temperature and photo-dependent current-voltage characteristics are investigated in thin film devices of a hybrid-composite comprising of organic semiconductor poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) and cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs). A detailed study of the charge injection mechanism in ITO/PEDOT:PSS-CdTe QDs/Al device exhibits a transition from direct tunneling to Fowler-Nordheim tunneling with increasing electric field due to formation of high barrier at the QD interface. In addition, the hybrid-composite exhibits a huge photoluminescence quenching compared to aboriginal CdTe QDs and high increment in photoconductivity (˜ 400%), which is attributed to the charge transfer phenomena. The effective barrier height (ΦB ≈ 0.68 eV) is estimated from the transition voltage and the possible origin of its variation with temperature and photo-illumination is discussed.

  9. Atom Tunneling in Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Meisner, Jan; Kästner, Johannes

    2016-04-25

    Quantum mechanical tunneling of atoms is increasingly found to play an important role in many chemical transformations. Experimentally, atom tunneling can be indirectly detected by temperature-independent rate constants at low temperature or by enhanced kinetic isotope effects. In contrast, the influence of tunneling on the reaction rates can be monitored directly through computational investigations. The tunnel effect, for example, changes reaction paths and branching ratios, enables chemical reactions in an astrochemical environment that would be impossible by thermal transition, and influences biochemical processes. PMID:26990917

  10. Photo-catalytic Activities of Plant Hormones on Semiconductor Nanoparticles by Laser-Activated Electron Tunneling and Emitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-03-01

    Understanding of the dynamic process of laser-induced ultrafast electron tunneling is still very limited. It has been thought that the photo-catalytic reaction of adsorbents on the surface is either dependent on the number of resultant electron-hole pairs where excess energy is lost to the lattice through coupling with phonon modes, or dependent on irradiation photon wavelength. We used UV (355 nm) laser pulses to excite electrons from the valence band to the conduction band of titanium dioxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO) and bismuth cobalt zinc oxide (Bi2O3)0.07(CoO)0.03(ZnO)0.9 semiconductor nanoparticles with different photo catalytic properties. Photoelectrons are extracted, accelerated in a static electric field and eventually captured by charge deficient atoms of adsorbed organic molecules. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer was used to detect negative molecules and fragment ions generated by un-paired electron directed bond cleavages. We show that the probability of electron tunneling is determined by the strength of the static electric field and intrinsic electron mobility of semiconductors. Photo-catalytic dissociation or polymerization reactions of adsorbents are highly dependent on the kinetic energy of tunneling electrons as well as the strength of laser influx. By using this approach, photo-activities of phytohormones have been investigated.

  11. Photo-catalytic Activities of Plant Hormones on Semiconductor Nanoparticles by Laser-Activated Electron Tunneling and Emitting

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the dynamic process of laser-induced ultrafast electron tunneling is still very limited. It has been thought that the photo-catalytic reaction of adsorbents on the surface is either dependent on the number of resultant electron-hole pairs where excess energy is lost to the lattice through coupling with phonon modes, or dependent on irradiation photon wavelength. We used UV (355 nm) laser pulses to excite electrons from the valence band to the conduction band of titanium dioxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO) and bismuth cobalt zinc oxide (Bi2O3)0.07(CoO)0.03(ZnO)0.9 semiconductor nanoparticles with different photo catalytic properties. Photoelectrons are extracted, accelerated in a static electric field and eventually captured by charge deficient atoms of adsorbed organic molecules. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer was used to detect negative molecules and fragment ions generated by un-paired electron directed bond cleavages. We show that the probability of electron tunneling is determined by the strength of the static electric field and intrinsic electron mobility of semiconductors. Photo-catalytic dissociation or polymerization reactions of adsorbents are highly dependent on the kinetic energy of tunneling electrons as well as the strength of laser influx. By using this approach, photo-activities of phytohormones have been investigated. PMID:25749635

  12. Protease-activated quantum dot probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Emmanuel; Sun, Jiantang; Miller, Jordan S.; Yu, William W.; Colvin, Vicki L.; West, Jennifer L.; Drezek, Rebekah

    2006-04-01

    We demonstrate a novel quantum dot based probe with inherent signal amplification upon interaction with a targeted proteolytic enzyme. This probe may be useful for imaging in cancer detection and diagnosis. In this system, quantum dots (QDs) are bound to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) via a proteolytically-degradable peptide sequence to non-radiatively suppress luminescence. A 71% reduction in luminescence was achieved with conjugation of AuNPs to QDs. Peptide cleavage results in release of AuNPs and restores radiative QD photoluminescence. Initial studies observed a 52% rise in luminescence over 47 hours of exposure to 0.2 mg/mL collagenase. These probes can be customized for targeted degradation simply by changing the sequence of the peptide linker.

  13. Development of an Active Twist Rotor for Wind: Tunnel Testing (NLPN97-310

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Shin, SangJoon; Hagood, Nesbitt W., IV

    1998-01-01

    The development of the Active Twist Rotor prototype blade for hub vibration and noise reduction studies is presented in this report. Details of the modeling, design, and manufacturing are explored. The rotor blade is integrally twisted by direct strain actuation. This is accomplished by distributing embedded piezoelectric fiber composites along the span of the blade. The development of the analysis framework for this type of active blade is presented. The requirements for the prototype blade, along with the final design results are also presented. A detail discussion on the manufacturing aspects of the prototype blade is described. Experimental structural characteristics of the prototype blade compare well with design goals, and preliminary bench actuation tests show lower performance than originally predicted. Electrical difficulties with the actuators are also discussed. The presented prototype blade is leading to a complete fully articulated four-blade active twist rotor system for future wind tunnel tests.

  14. Analysis of a modified recessed active tunneling field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, HuiJung; Choi, Seongwook; Yoo, NakWon; Rhee, SeungMan; Lee, Myoung Jin; Park, Young June

    2016-07-01

    To enhance the on-current (I ON) of a tunneling field-effect transistor (TFET), we investigated the structures of a TFET with a recessed active (RA) region, known as the “RA-TFET”, using three-dimensional (3D) simulation. The analyzed structure is different from the recessed dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) channel in terms of the positions of the source and drain. The benefit of this structure is that the tunneling length remains unchanged as the depth increases so that the current can be easily scaled up, thereby maintaining the subthreshold slope (SS) and active area. Using an RA-TFET with a 100 nm Si depth, a 9.45 × 10‑7 A I ON is achieved with a minimum SS of 35 mV/dec; in addition, we propose RA-TFET modifications to mitigate the ambipolar characteristics and reduce the capacitance between the gate and the drain (C GD) by up to 40%.

  15. Perspectives of optical lattices with state-dependent tunneling in approaching quantum magnetism in the presence of the external harmonic trapping potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, Andrii

    2016-03-01

    We study theoretically potential advantages of two-component mixtures in optical lattices with state-dependent tunneling for approaching long-range-order phases and detecting easy-axis antiferromagnetic correlations. While we do not find additional advantages of mixtures with large hopping imbalance for approaching quantum magnetism in a harmonic trap, it is shown that a nonzero difference in hopping amplitudes remains highly important for a proper symmetry breaking in the pseudospin space for the single-site-resolution imaging and can be advantageously used for a significant increase of the signal-to-noise ratio and thus detecting long-range easy-axis antiferromagnetic correlations in the corresponding experiments.

  16. Power spectra and auto correlation analysis of hyperfine-induced long period oscillations in the tunneling current of coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harack, B.; Leary, A.; Coish, W. A.; Hilke, M.; Yu, G.; Payette, C.; Gupta, J. A.; Austing, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    We outline power spectra and auto correlation analysis performed on temporal oscillations in the tunneling current of coupled vertical quantum dots. The current is monitored for ˜2325 s blocks as the magnetic field is stepped through a high bias feature displaying hysteresis and switching: hallmarks of the hyperfine interaction. Quasi-periodic oscillations of ˜2 pA amplitude and of ˜100 s period are observed in the current inside the hysteretic feature. Compared to the baseline current outside the hysteretic feature the power spectral density is enhanced by up to three orders of magnitude and the auto correlation displays clear long lived oscillations about zero.

  17. A New General Tortoise Coordinate Transformation and Quantum Tunneling Effect of the Non-Stationary Higher Dimensional Vaidya-de Sitter Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhong-wen; Li, Guo-ping; Zhang, Yan; Zu, Xiao-tao

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we combine the Hamilton-Jacobi equation with a new general tortoise coordinate transformation to study quantum tunneling of scalar particles and fermions from the non-stationary higher dimensional Vaidya-de Sitter black hole. The results show that Hamilton-Jacobi equation is a semi-classical foundation equation which can easily derived from the particles' dynamic equations, it can helps us understand the origin of Hawking radiation. Besides, based on the dimensional analysis, we believed that the new general tortoise coordinate transformation is more reasonable than old ones.

  18. Power spectra and auto correlation analysis of hyperfine-induced long period oscillations in the tunneling current of coupled quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Harack, B.; Leary, A.; Coish, W. A.; Hilke, M.; Yu, G.; Gupta, J. A.; Payette, C.; Austing, D. G.

    2013-12-04

    We outline power spectra and auto correlation analysis performed on temporal oscillations in the tunneling current of coupled vertical quantum dots. The current is monitored for ∼2325 s blocks as the magnetic field is stepped through a high bias feature displaying hysteresis and switching: hallmarks of the hyperfine interaction. Quasi-periodic oscillations of ∼2 pA amplitude and of ∼100 s period are observed in the current inside the hysteretic feature. Compared to the baseline current outside the hysteretic feature the power spectral density is enhanced by up to three orders of magnitude and the auto correlation displays clear long lived oscillations about zero.

  19. Comparative study of macroscopic quantum tunneling in Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy intrinsic Josephson junctions with different device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, K.; Hamada, K.; Takemura, R.; Ohmaki, M.; Machi, T.; Tanabe, K.; Suzuki, M.; Maeda, A.; Kitano, H.

    2009-04-01

    We investigated macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) of Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) for two device structures. One is a small mesa, which is a few nanometers thick with only two or three IJJs, and the other is a stack of a few hundred IJJs in a narrow bridge structure. The experimental results regarding the switching-current distribution for the first switch from the zero-voltage state were in good agreement with the conventional theory for a single Josephson junction, indicating that the crossover temperature from thermal activation to the MQT regime for the former device structure was similar to that for the latter device structure. Together with the observation of multiphoton transitions between quantized energy levels in the MQT regime, these results strongly suggest that the observed MQT behavior is intrinsic to a single IJJ in high- Tc cuprates and is independent of the device structure. The switching-current distribution for the second switch from the first resistive state, which was carefully distinguished from the first switch, was also compared with respect to the two device structures. In spite of the differences between the heat transfer environments, the second switch exhibited a similar temperature-independent behavior for both devices up to a much higher temperature than the crossover temperature for the first switch. We argue that this cannot be explained in terms of self-heating caused by dissipative currents after the first switch. As possible candidates for this phenomenon, the MQT process for the second switch and the effective increase in the electronic temperature due to the quasiparticle injection are discussed.

  20. Expansion of access tunnels and active-site cavities influence activity of haloalkane dehalogenases in organic cosolvents.

    PubMed

    Stepankova, Veronika; Khabiri, Morteza; Brezovsky, Jan; Pavelka, Antonin; Sykora, Jan; Amaro, Mariana; Minofar, Babak; Prokop, Zbynek; Hof, Martin; Ettrich, Rudiger; Chaloupkova, Radka; Damborsky, Jiri

    2013-05-10

    The use of enzymes for biocatalysis can be significantly enhanced by using organic cosolvents in the reaction mixtures. Selection of the cosolvent type and concentration range for an enzymatic reaction is challenging and requires extensive empirical testing. An understanding of protein-solvent interaction could provide a theoretical framework for rationalising the selection process. Here, the behaviour of three model enzymes (haloalkane dehalogenases) was investigated in the presence of three representative organic cosolvents (acetone, formamide, and isopropanol). Steady-state kinetics assays, molecular dynamics simulations, and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy were used to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of enzyme-solvent interactions. Cosolvent molecules entered the enzymes' access tunnels and active sites, enlarged their volumes with no change in overall protein structure, but surprisingly did not act as competitive inhibitors. At low concentrations, the cosolvents either enhanced catalysis by lowering K(0.5) and increasing k(cat), or caused enzyme inactivation by promoting substrate inhibition and decreasing k(cat). The induced activation and inhibition of the enzymes correlated with expansion of the active-site pockets and their occupancy by cosolvent molecules. The study demonstrates that quantitative analysis of the proportions of the access tunnels and active-sites occupied by organic solvent molecules provides the valuable information for rational selection of appropriate protein-solvent pair and effective cosolvent concentration. PMID:23564727

  1. Coupled CFD/CSD Analysis of an Active-Twist Rotor in a Wind Tunnel with Experimental Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, Steven J.; Kreshock, Andrew R.; Sekula, Martin K.

    2015-01-01

    An unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes analysis loosely coupled with a comprehensive rotorcraft code is presented for a second-generation active-twist rotor. High fidelity Navier-Stokes results for three configurations: an isolated rotor, a rotor with fuselage, and a rotor with fuselage mounted in a wind tunnel, are compared to lifting-line theory based comprehensive rotorcraft code calculations and wind tunnel data. Results indicate that CFD/CSD predictions of flapwise bending moments are in good agreement with wind tunnel measurements for configurations with a fuselage, and that modeling the wind tunnel environment does not significantly enhance computed results. Actuated rotor results for the rotor with fuselage configuration are also validated for predictions of vibratory blade loads and fixed-system vibratory loads. Varying levels of agreement with wind tunnel measurements are observed for blade vibratory loads, depending on the load component (flap, lag, or torsion) and the harmonic being examined. Predicted trends in fixed-system vibratory loads are in good agreement with wind tunnel measurements.

  2. Wind Tunnel Testing of Microtabs and Microjets for Active Load Control of Wind Turbine Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooperman, Aubryn Murray

    Increases in wind turbine size have made controlling loads on the blades an important consideration for future turbine designs. One approach that could reduce extreme loads and minimize load variation is to incorporate active control devices into the blades that are able to change the aerodynamic forces acting on the turbine. A wind tunnel model has been constructed to allow testing of different active aerodynamic load control devices. Two such devices have been tested in the UC Davis Aeronautical Wind Tunnel: microtabs and microjets. Microtabs are small surfaces oriented perpendicular to an airfoil surface that can be deployed and retracted to alter the lift coefficient of the airfoil. Microjets produce similar effects using air blown perpendicular to the airfoil surface. Results are presented here for both static and dynamic performance of the two devices. Microtabs, located at 95% chord on the lower surface and 90% chord on the upper surface, with a height of 1% chord, produce a change in the lift coefficient of 0.18, increasing lift when deployed on the lower surface and decreasing lift when deployed on the upper surface. Microjets with a momentum coefficient of 0.006 at the same locations produce a change in the lift coefficient of 0.19. The activation time for both devices is less than 0.3 s, which is rapid compared to typical gust rise times. The potential of active device to mitigate changes in loads was tested using simulated gusts. The gusts were produced in the wind tunnel by accelerating the test section air speed at rates of up to 7 ft/s 2. Open-loop control of microtabs was tested in two modes: simultaneous and sequential tab deployment. Activating all tabs along the model span simultaneously was found to produce a change in the loads that occurred more rapidly than a gust. Sequential tab deployment more closely matched the rates of change due to gusts and tab deployment. A closed-loop control system was developed for the microtabs using a simple

  3. Temperature-dependent spin injection dynamics in InGaAs/GaAs quantum well-dot tunnel-coupled nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. L.; Kiba, T.; Yang, X. J.; Takayama, J.; Murayama, A.

    2016-03-01

    Time-resolved optical spin orientation spectroscopy was employed to investigate the temperature-dependent electron spin injection in In0.1Ga0.9As quantum well (QW) and In0.5Ga0.5As quantum dots (QDs) tunnel-coupled nanostructures with 4, 6, and 8 nm-thick GaAs barriers. The fast picosecond-ranged spin injection from QW to QD excited states (ES) was observed to speed up with temperature, as induced by pronounced longitudinal-optical (LO)-phonon-involved multiple scattering process, which contributes to a thermally stable and almost fully spin-conserving injection within 5-180 K. The LO-phonon coupling was also found to cause accelerated electron spin relaxation of QD ES at elevated temperature, mainly via hyperfine interaction with random nuclear field.

  4. Electron-phonon interaction in three-barrier nanosystems as active elements of quantum cascade detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tkach, N. V. Seti, Ju. A.; Grynyshyn, Yu. B.

    2015-04-15

    The theory of electron tunneling through an open nanostructure as an active element of a quantum cascade detector is developed, which takes into account the interaction of electrons with confined and interface phonons. Using the method of finite-temperature Green’s functions and the electron-phonon Hamiltonian in the representation of second quantization over all system variables, the temperature shifts and electron-level widths are calculated and the contributions of different electron-phonon-interaction mechanisms to renormalization of the spectral parameters are analyzed depending on the geometrical configuration of the nanosystem. Due to weak electron-phonon coupling in a GaAs/Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As-based resonant tunneling nanostructure, the temperature shift and rf field absorption peak width are not very sensitive to the electron-phonon interaction and result from a decrease in potential barrier heights caused by a difference in the temperature dependences of the well and barrier band gaps.

  5. Imaging of Endogenous Metabolites of Plant Leaves by Mass Spectrometry Based on Laser Activated Electron Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lulu; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Chen, Disong; Zhang, Juan; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    A new mass spectrometric imaging approach based on laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) was described and applied to analysis of endogenous metabolites of plant leaves. LAET is an electron-directed soft ionization technique. Compressed thin films of semiconductor nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were placed on the sample plate for proof-of-principle demonstration because they can not only absorb ultraviolet laser but also have high electron mobility. Upon laser irradiation, electrons are excited from valence bands to conduction bands. With appropriate kinetic energies, photoexcited electrons can tunnel away from the barrier and eventually be captured by charge deficient atoms present in neutral molecules. Resultant unpaired electron subsequently initiates specific chemical bond cleavage and generates ions that can be detected in negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer. LAET avoids the co-crystallization process of routinely used organic matrix materials with analyzes in MALDI (matrix assisted-laser desorption ionization) analysis. Thus uneven distribution of crystals with different sizes and shapes as well as background peaks in the low mass range resulting from matrix molecules is eliminated. Advantages of LAET imaging technique include not only improved spatial resolution but also photoelectron capture dissociation which produces predictable fragment ions. PMID:27053227

  6. Imaging of Endogenous Metabolites of Plant Leaves by Mass Spectrometry Based on Laser Activated Electron Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lulu; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Chen, Disong; Zhang, Juan; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-04-01

    A new mass spectrometric imaging approach based on laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) was described and applied to analysis of endogenous metabolites of plant leaves. LAET is an electron-directed soft ionization technique. Compressed thin films of semiconductor nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were placed on the sample plate for proof-of-principle demonstration because they can not only absorb ultraviolet laser but also have high electron mobility. Upon laser irradiation, electrons are excited from valence bands to conduction bands. With appropriate kinetic energies, photoexcited electrons can tunnel away from the barrier and eventually be captured by charge deficient atoms present in neutral molecules. Resultant unpaired electron subsequently initiates specific chemical bond cleavage and generates ions that can be detected in negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer. LAET avoids the co-crystallization process of routinely used organic matrix materials with analyzes in MALDI (matrix assisted-laser desorption ionization) analysis. Thus uneven distribution of crystals with different sizes and shapes as well as background peaks in the low mass range resulting from matrix molecules is eliminated. Advantages of LAET imaging technique include not only improved spatial resolution but also photoelectron capture dissociation which produces predictable fragment ions.

  7. Imaging of Endogenous Metabolites of Plant Leaves by Mass Spectrometry Based on Laser Activated Electron Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lulu; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Chen, Disong; Zhang, Juan; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    A new mass spectrometric imaging approach based on laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) was described and applied to analysis of endogenous metabolites of plant leaves. LAET is an electron-directed soft ionization technique. Compressed thin films of semiconductor nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were placed on the sample plate for proof-of-principle demonstration because they can not only absorb ultraviolet laser but also have high electron mobility. Upon laser irradiation, electrons are excited from valence bands to conduction bands. With appropriate kinetic energies, photoexcited electrons can tunnel away from the barrier and eventually be captured by charge deficient atoms present in neutral molecules. Resultant unpaired electron subsequently initiates specific chemical bond cleavage and generates ions that can be detected in negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer. LAET avoids the co-crystallization process of routinely used organic matrix materials with analyzes in MALDI (matrix assisted-laser desorption ionization) analysis. Thus uneven distribution of crystals with different sizes and shapes as well as background peaks in the low mass range resulting from matrix molecules is eliminated. Advantages of LAET imaging technique include not only improved spatial resolution but also photoelectron capture dissociation which produces predictable fragment ions. PMID:27053227

  8. Contributions of the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to the Testing of Active Control of Aeroelastic Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III; Noll, Thomas E.; Scott, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    By the 1960s, researchers began to investigate the feasibility of using active controls technology (ACT) for increasing the capabilities of military and commercial aircraft. Since then many researchers, too numerous to mention, have investigated and demonstrated the usefulness of ACT for favorably modifying the aeroelastic response characteristics of flight vehicles. As a result, ACT entered the limelight as a viable tool for answering some very difficult design questions and had the potential for obtaining structural weight reductions optimizing maneuvering performance, and satisfying the multimission requirements being imposed on future military and commercial aircraft designs. Over the past 40 years, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has played a major role in developing ACT in part by its participation in many wind-tunnel programs conducted in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). These programs were conducted for the purposes of: (1) establishing concept feasibility; (2) demonstrating proof of concept; and (3) providing data for validating new modeling, analysis, and design methods. This paper provides an overview of the ACT investigations conducted in the TDT. For each program discussed herein, the objectives of the effort, the testing techniques, the test results, any, signIficant findings, and the lessons learned with respect to ACT testing are presented.

  9. Protease-activated quantum dot probes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Emmanuel; Miller, Jordan S; Sun, Jiantang; Yu, William W; Colvin, Vicki L; Drezek, Rebekah; West, Jennifer L

    2005-09-01

    We have developed a novel nanoparticulate luminescent probe with inherent signal amplification upon interaction with a targeted proteolytic enzyme. This construct may be useful for imaging in cancer detection and diagnosis. In this system, quantum dots (QDs) are bound to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) via a proteolytically degradable peptide sequence to non-radiatively suppress luminescence. A 71% reduction in luminescence was achieved with conjugation of AuNPs to QDs. Release of AuNPs by peptide cleavage restores radiative QD photoluminescence. Initial studies observed a 52% rise in luminescence over 47 h of exposure to 0.2 mg/mL collagenase. These probes can be customized for targeted degradation simply by changing the sequence of the peptide linker. PMID:16039606

  10. Band structure effects on resonant tunneling in III-V quantum wells versus two-dimensional vertical heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Philip M.; Tarasov, Alexey; Joiner, Corey A.; Ready, W. Jud; Vogel, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Since the invention of the Esaki diode, resonant tunneling devices have been of interest for applications including multi-valued logic and communication systems. These devices are characterized by the presence of negative differential resistance in the current-voltage characteristic, resulting from lateral momentum conservation during the tunneling process. While a large amount of research has focused on III-V material systems, such as the GaAs/AlGaAs system, for resonant tunneling devices, poor device performance and device-to-device variability have limited widespread adoption. Recently, the symmetric field-effect transistor (symFET) was proposed as a resonant tunneling device incorporating symmetric 2-D materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), separated by an interlayer barrier, such as hexagonal boron-nitride. The achievable peak-to-valley ratio for TMD symFETs has been predicted to be higher than has been observed for III-V resonant tunneling devices. This work examines the effect that band structure differences between III-V devices and TMDs has on device performance. It is shown that tunneling between the quantized subbands in III-V devices increases the valley current and decreases device performance, while the interlayer barrier height has a negligible impact on performance for barrier heights greater than approximately 0.5 eV.

  11. Tunneling of redox enzymes to design nano-probes for monitoring NAD(+) dependent bio-catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Akshath, Uchangi Satyaprasad; Bhatt, Praveena

    2016-11-15

    Monitoring of bio-catalytic events by using nano-probes is of immense interest due to unique optical properties of metal nanoparticles. In the present study, tunneling of enzyme activity was achieved using redox cofactors namely oxidized cytochrome-c (Cyt-c) and Co-enzyme-Q (Co-Q) immobilized on Quantum dots (QDs) which acted as a bio-probe for NAD(+) dependent dehydrogenase catalyzed reaction. We studied how electron transfer from substrate to non-native electron acceptors can differentially modify photoluminescence properties of CdTe QDs. Two probes were designed, QD-Ox-Cyt-c and QD-Ox-Co-Q, which were found to quench the fluorescence of QDs. However, formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH) catalyzed reduction of Cyt-c and Co-Q on the surface of QDs lead to fluorescence turn-on of CdTe QDs. This phenomenon was successfully used for the detection of HCHO in the range of 0.01-100,000ng/mL (LOD of 0.01ng/mL) using both QD-Ox-Cyt-c (R(2)=0.93) and QD-Ox-Co-Q (R(2)=0.96). Further probe performance and stability in samples like milk, wine and fruit juice matrix were studied and we could detect HCHO in range of 0.001-100,000ng/mL (LOD of 0.001ng/mL) with good stability and sensitivity of probe in real samples (R(2)=0.97). Appreciable recovery and detection sensitivity in the presence of metal ions suggests that the developed nano-probes can be used successfully for monitoring dehydrogenase based bio-catalytic events even in the absence of NAD(+). Proposed method is advantageous over classical methods as clean up/ derivatization of samples is not required for formaldehyde detection. PMID:27179565

  12. Domino Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Peter R; Wagner, J Philipp; Reisenauer, Hans Peter; Gerbig, Dennis; Ley, David; Sarka, János; Császár, Attila G; Vaughn, Alexander; Allen, Wesley D

    2015-06-24

    Matrix-isolation experiments near 3 K and state-of-the-art quantum chemical computations demonstrate that oxalic acid [1, (COOH)2] exhibits a sequential quantum mechanical tunneling phenomenon not previously observed. Intensities of numerous infrared (IR) bands were used to monitor the temporal evolution of the lowest-energy O-H rotamers (1cTc, 1cTt, 1tTt) of oxalic acid for up to 19 days following near-infrared irradiation of the matrix. The relative energies of these rotamers are 0.0 (1cTc), 2.6 (1cTt), and 4.0 (1tTt) kcal mol(-1). A 1tTt → 1cTt → 1cTc isomerization cascade was observed with half-lives (t1/2) in different matrix sites ranging from 30 to 360 h, even though the sequential barriers of 9.7 and 10.4 kcal mol(-1) are much too high to be surmounted thermally under cryogenic conditions. A general mathematical model was developed for the complex kinetics of a reaction cascade with species in distinct matrix sites. With this model, a precise, global nonlinear least-squares fit was achieved simultaneously on the temporal profiles of nine IR bands of the 1cTc, 1cTt, and 1tTt rotamers. Classes of both fast (t(1/2) = 30-50 h) and slow (t(1/2) > 250 h) matrix sites were revealed, with the decay rate of the former in close agreement with first-principles computations for the conformational tunneling rates of the corresponding isolated molecules. Rigorous kinetic and theoretical analyses thus show that a "domino" tunneling mechanism is at work in these oxalic acid transformations. PMID:26027801

  13. Infrared observation of thermally activated oxide reduction within Al/SiOx/Si tunnel diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brendel, R.; Hezel, R.

    1992-05-01

    Electron-beam-evaporated aluminum/silicon oxide/silicon tunnel diodes with an initial oxide thickness of 1.3 nm have been annealed for up to 1 h at temperatures from 213 to 369 °C. They have been investigated by infrared grazing internal reflection (GIR) spectroscopy and current-voltage measurements. The measured IR spectra were analyzed by computer modeling. All spectral features could be explained self-consistently within a Al/AlOy/SiOx/Si layer model. In the as-deposited state less than 0.6 monolayers of Al—O bonds are formed at the Al/SiOx interface. A thermally activated reduction of the ultrathin oxide film by Al was observed. The changes in the current-voltage curves induced by slight annealing (1 min at 213 °C) are accompanied by changes in the insulator-bonding structure, which GIR is sensitive enough to detect.

  14. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: Comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment

    SciTech Connect

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J. Timothy; Champion, Paul M.

    2015-03-21

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical “gating” distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working

  15. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment.

    PubMed

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J Timothy; Champion, Paul M

    2015-03-21

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical "gating" distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working near

  16. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: Comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J. Timothy; Champion, Paul M.

    2015-03-01

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical "gating" distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working near

  17. Quantum Theory, Active Information and the Mind-Matter Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pylkkänen, Paavo

    Bohm and Hiley suggest that a certain new type of active information plays a key objective role in quantum processes. This chapter discusses the implications of this suggestion to our understanding of the relation between the mental and the physical aspects of reality.

  18. A parametric sensitivity and optimization study for the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model flutter characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rais-Rohani, Masoud

    1991-01-01

    In this paper an effort is made to improve the analytical open-loop flutter predictions for the Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel model using a sensitivity based optimization approach. The sensitivity derivatives of the flutter frequency and dynamic pressure of the model with respect to the lag terms appearing in the Roger's unsteady aerodynamics approximations are evaluated both analytical and by finite differences. Then, the Levenberg-Marquardt method is used to find the optimum values for these lag-terms. The results obtained here agree much better with the experimental (wind tunnel) results than those found in the previous studies.

  19. Ligand uptake in Mycobacterium tuberculosis truncated hemoglobins is controlled by both internal tunnels and active site water molecules

    PubMed Central

    Davidge, Kelly S; Singh, Sandip; Bowman, Lesley AH; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Carballal, Sebastián; Radi, Rafael; Poole, Robert K; Dikshit, Kanak; Estrin, Dario A; Marti, Marcelo A; Boechi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis, has two proteins belonging to the truncated hemoglobin (trHb) family. Mt-trHbN presents well-defined internal hydrophobic tunnels that allow O 2 and •NO to migrate easily from the solvent to the active site, whereas Mt-trHbO possesses tunnels that are partially blocked by a few bulky residues, particularly a tryptophan at position G8. Differential ligand migration rates allow Mt-trHbN to detoxify •NO, a crucial step for pathogen survival once under attack by the immune system, much more efficiently than Mt-trHbO. In order to investigate the differences between these proteins, we performed experimental kinetic measurements, •NO decomposition, as well as molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type Mt-trHbN and two mutants, VG8F and VG8W. These mutations introduce modifications in both tunnel topologies and affect the incoming ligand capacity to displace retained water molecules at the active site. We found that a single mutation allows Mt-trHbN to acquire ligand migration rates comparable to those observed for Mt-trHbO, confirming that ligand migration is regulated by the internal tunnel architecture as well as by water molecules stabilized in the active site. PMID:26478812

  20. Ligand uptake in Mycobacterium tuberculosis truncated hemoglobins is controlled by both internal tunnels and active site water molecules.

    PubMed

    Boron, Ignacio; Bustamante, Juan Pablo; Davidge, Kelly S; Singh, Sandip; Bowman, Lesley Ah; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Carballal, Sebastián; Radi, Rafael; Poole, Robert K; Dikshit, Kanak; Estrin, Dario A; Marti, Marcelo A; Boechi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis, has two proteins belonging to the truncated hemoglobin (trHb) family. Mt-trHbN presents well-defined internal hydrophobic tunnels that allow O 2 and (•)NO to migrate easily from the solvent to the active site, whereas Mt-trHbO possesses tunnels that are partially blocked by a few bulky residues, particularly a tryptophan at position G8. Differential ligand migration rates allow Mt-trHbN to detoxify (•)NO, a crucial step for pathogen survival once under attack by the immune system, much more efficiently than Mt-trHbO. In order to investigate the differences between these proteins, we performed experimental kinetic measurements, (•)NO decomposition, as well as molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type Mt-trHbN and two mutants, VG8F and VG8W. These mutations introduce modifications in both tunnel topologies and affect the incoming ligand capacity to displace retained water molecules at the active site. We found that a single mutation allows Mt-trHbN to acquire ligand migration rates comparable to those observed for Mt-trHbO, confirming that ligand migration is regulated by the internal tunnel architecture as well as by water molecules stabilized in the active site. PMID:26478812

  1. Coherent revival of tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Liang-Yan; Rabitz, Herschel

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a tunneling effect by a driving field, referred to as coherent revival of tunneling (CRT), corresponding to complete tunneling (transmission coefficient =1 ) that is revived from the circumstance of total reflection (transmission coefficient ≈0 ) through application of an appropriate perpendicular high-frequency ac field. To illustrate CRT, we simulate electron transport through fish-bone-like quantum-dot arrays by using single-particle Green's functions along with Floquet theory, and we explore the corresponding current-field amplitude characteristics as well as current-polarization characteristics. In regard to the two characteristics, we show that CRT exhibits entirely different features than coherent destruction of tunneling and photon-assisted tunneling. We also discuss two practical conditions for experimental realization of CRT.

  2. Resistance switching memory characteristics of CaF2/Si/CaF2 resonant-tunneling quantum-well heterostructures sandwiched by nanocrystalline Si secondary barrier layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, Yuya; Suda, Keita; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    A novel resistance switching memory using CaF2/Si/CaF2 resonant-tunneling quantum well heterostructures sandwiched by nanocrystalline Si (nc-Si) as secondary barrier layers has been proposed and the room temperature current–voltage characteristics of the basic resistance switching memory operation have been demonstrated. A resistance switching voltage of 1.0 V, a peak current density of approximately 42 kA/cm2, and an ON/OFF ratio of 2.8 were observed. In particular, more than 28000 write-read-erase cyclic memory operations have been demonstrated by applying pulsed input voltage sequences, which suggests better endurance than the device using a CaF2/CdF2/CaF2 heterostructure.

  3. Characterizations and Electrical Modelling of Sensory Samples Formed from Synthesized Vanadium (V) Oxide and Copper Oxide Graphene Quantum Tunneling Composites (GQTC) Applied in Electrotribology.

    PubMed

    Habdank-Wojewódzki, Tadeusz; Habdank, Josef; Cwik, Przemyslaw; Zimowski, Slawomir

    2016-01-01

    CuO and V₂O₅ graphene quantum tunneling composites (GQTC) presented in this article were produced and their sensory properties were analyzed. The composites were synthesised using two stage high-power milling process, which resulted in materials that have good temeprature and pressure sensory properties. Described production process defines internal structure of materials such that when used as sensor in the desired range, it exhibits a strong percolation effect. The experiment, with controlled changing physical conditions during electrotribological measurement, enabled analyzing of the composites' conductivity as a function of the sensory properties: applied temperature, pressure, tangential force and wear. The sensory characteristic was successfully modelled by invertible generalized equations, and used to create sensor capable of estimating temperature or pressure in the real time. The developed materials have the potential to be applied in the areas where miniaturization is essential, due to the materials exhibiting good sensory properties in mini and micro scale. PMID:26742044

  4. Characterizations and Electrical Modelling of Sensory Samples Formed from Synthesized Vanadium (V) Oxide and Copper Oxide Graphene Quantum Tunneling Composites (GQTC) Applied in Electrotribology

    PubMed Central

    Habdank-Wojewódzki, Tadeusz; Habdank, Josef; Cwik, Przemyslaw; Zimowski, Slawomir

    2016-01-01

    CuO and V2O5 graphene quantum tunneling composites (GQTC) presented in this article were produced and their sensory properties were analyzed. The composites were synthesised using two stage high-power milling process, which resulted in materials that have good temeprature and pressure sensory properties. Described production process defines internal structure of materials such that when used as sensor in the desired range, it exhibits a strong percolation effect. The experiment, with controlled changing physical conditions during electrotribological measurement, enabled analyzing of the composites’ conductivity as a function of the sensory properties: applied temperature, pressure, tangential force and wear. The sensory characteristic was successfully modelled by invertible generalized equations, and used to create sensor capable of estimating temperature or pressure in the real time. The developed materials have the potential to be applied in the areas where miniaturization is essential, due to the materials exhibiting good sensory properties in mini and micro scale. PMID:26742044

  5. Double capping of molecular beam epitaxy grown InAs/InP quantum dots studied by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ulloa, J. M.; Koenraad, P. M.; Gapihan, E.; Letoublon, A.; Bertru, N.

    2007-08-13

    Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy was used to study at the atomic scale the double capping process of self-assembled InAs/InP quantum dots (QDs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a (311)B substrate. The thickness of the first capping layer is found to play a mayor role in determining the final results of the process. For first capping layers up to 3.5 nm, the height of the QDs correspond to the thickness of the first capping layer. Nevertheless, for thicknesses higher than 3.5 nm, a reduction in the dot height compared to the thickness of the first capping layer is observed. These results are interpreted in terms of a transition from a double capping to a classical capping process when the first capping layer is thick enough to completely cover the dots.

  6. Experimental study on the contribution of the quantum tunneling effect to the improvement of the conductivity and piezoresistivity of a nickel powder-filled cement-based composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, B. G.; Han, B. Z.; Yu, X.

    2009-06-01

    The voltage-current characteristics of a nickel powder (NP)-filled cement-based composite (NPCC) and the variation of electrical resistivity of NPCC under compression are studied by using a four-pole method based on embedded loop electrodes. The generation of conductivity and piezoresistivity in NPCC is investigated by examining the morphology of NPCC by SEM and studying the variation of distance between NP particles under compression. Experimental results indicate that the electrical conductivity of NPCC is ohmic when the voltage is below 3.5 V. Although NP particles are dispersed in the cement matrix and they do not form a connected conductive network, NPCC has a low electrical resistivity of 2.29 × 103Ω cm without loading. A decrease of 0.042% in the fractional change in volume of NPCC under compression causes the tunneling distance to decrease 0.60-1.42 nm and the fractional change in electrical resistivity to reach 62.61%. It is therefore concluded that the improvement of conductivity and piezoresistivity of NPCC is due to the quantum tunneling effect.

  7. Chemical imaging of latent fingerprints by mass spectrometry based on laser activated electron tunneling.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-03-01

    Identification of endogenous and exogenous chemicals contained in latent fingerprints is important for forensic science in order to acquire evidence of criminal identities and contacts with specific chemicals. Mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful technique for such applications without any derivatization or fluorescent tags. Among these techniques, MALDI (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization) provides small beam size but has interferences with MALDI matrix materials, which cause ion suppressions as well as limited spatial resolution resulting from uneven distribution of MALDI matrix crystals with different sizes. LAET (Laser Activated Electron Tunneling) described in this work offers capabilities for chemical imaging through electron-directed soft ionization. A special film of semiconductors has been designed for collection of fingerprints. Nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were compressed on a conductive metal substrate (Al or Cu sticky tape) under 10 MPa pressure. Resultant uniform thin films provide tight and shining surfaces on which fingers are impressed. Irradiation of ultraviolet laser pulses (355 nm) on the thin film instantly generates photoelectrons that can be captured by adsorbed organic molecules and subsequently cause electron-directed ionization and fragmentation. Imaging of latent fingerprints is achieved by visualization of the spatial distribution of these molecular ions and structural information-rich fragment ions. Atomic electron emission together with finely tuned laser beam size improve spatial resolution. With the LAET technique, imaging analysis not only can identify physical shapes but also reveal endogenous metabolites present in females and males, detect contacts with prohibited substances, and resolve overlapped latent fingerprints. PMID:25647159

  8. Microseismic Monitoring of Strainburst Activities in Deep Tunnels at the Jinping II Hydropower Station, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, N. W.; Li, T. B.; Dai, F.; Zhang, R.; Tang, C. A.; Tang, L. X.

    2016-03-01

    Rockbursts were frequently encountered during the construction of deep tunnels at the Jinping II hydropower station, Southwest China. Investigations of the possibility of rockbursts during tunnel boring machine (TBM) and drilling and blasting (D&B) advancement are necessary to guide the construction of tunnels and to protect personnel and TBM equipment from strainburst-related accidents. A real-time, movable microseismic monitoring system was installed to forecast strainburst locations ahead of the tunnel faces. The spatiotemporal distribution evolution of microseismic events prior to and during strainbursts was recorded and analysed. The concentration of microseismic events prior to the occurrence of strainbursts was found to be a significant precursor to strainbursts in deep rock tunnelling. During a 2-year microseismic investigation of strainbursts in the deep tunnels at the Jinping II hydropower station, a total of 2240 strainburst location forecasts were issued, with 63 % correctly forecasting the locations of strainbursts. The successful forecasting of strainburst locations proved that microseismic monitoring is essential for the assessment and mitigation of strainburst hazards, and can be used to minimise damage to equipment and personnel. The results of the current study may be valuable for the construction management and safety assessment of similar underground rock structures under high in situ stress.

  9. Modernization and Activation of the NASA Ames 11- by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmak, Frank J.

    2000-01-01

    The Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) was modernized to improve performance, capability, productivity, and reliability. Automation systems were installed in all three UPWT tunnel legs and the Auxiliaries facility. Major improvements were made to the four control rooms, model support systems, main drive motors, and main drive speed control. Pressure vessel repairs and refurbishment to the electrical distribution system were also completed. Significant changes were made to improve test section flow quality in the 11-by 11-Foot Transonic leg. After the completion of the construction phase of the project, acceptance and checkout testing was performed to demonstrate the capabilities of the modernized facility. A pneumatic test of the tunnel circuit was performed to verify the structural integrity of the pressure vessel before wind-on operations. Test section turbulence, flow angularity, and acoustic parameters were measured throughout the tunnel envelope to determine the effects of the tunnel flow quality improvements. The new control system processes were thoroughly checked during wind-off and wind-on operations. Manual subsystem modes and automated supervisory modes of tunnel operation were validated. The aerodynamic and structural performance of both the new composite compressor rotor blades and the old aluminum rotor blades was measured. The entire subsonic and supersonic envelope of the 11-by 11-Foot Transonic leg was defined up to the maximum total pressure.

  10. A Systematic Approach for Computing Zero-Point Energy, Quantum Partition Function, and Tunneling Effect Based on Kleinert’s Variational Perturbation Theory

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Gao, Jiali

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an automated integration-free path-integral (AIF-PI) method, based on Kleinert’s variational perturbation (KP) theory, to treat internuclear quantum-statistical effects in molecular systems. We have developed an analytical method to obtain the centroid potential as a function of the variational parameter in the KP theory, which avoids numerical difficulties in path-integral Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics simulations, especially at the limit of zero-temperature. Consequently, the variational calculations using the KP theory can be efficiently carried out beyond the first order, i.e., the Giachetti-Tognetti-Feynman-Kleinert variational approach, for realistic chemical applications. By making use of the approximation of independent instantaneous normal modes (INM), the AIF-PI method can readily be applied to many-body systems. Previously, we have shown that in the INM approximation, the AIF-PI method is accurate for computing the quantum partition function of a water molecule (3 degrees of freedom) and the quantum correction factor for the collinear H3 reaction rate (2 degrees of freedom). In this work, the accuracy and properties of the KP theory are further investigated by using the first three order perturbations on an asymmetric double-well potential, the bond vibrations of H2, HF, and HCl represented by the Morse potential, and a proton-transfer barrier modeled by the Eckart potential. The zero-point energy, quantum partition function, and tunneling factor for these systems have been determined and are found to be in excellent agreement with the exact quantum results. Using our new analytical results at the zero-temperature limit, we show that the minimum value of the computed centroid potential in the KP theory is in excellent agreement with the ground state energy (zero-point energy) and the position of the centroid potential minimum is the expectation value of particle position in wave mechanics. The fast convergent property of

  11. Activation of molecular catalysts using semiconductor quantum dots

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Thomas J.; Sykora, Milan; Klimov, Victor I.

    2011-10-04

    Photocatalytic materials based on coupling of semiconductor nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQD) and molecular catalysts. These materials have capability to drive or catalyze non-spontaneous chemical reactions in the presence of visible radiation, ultraviolet radiation, or both. The NQD functions in these materials as a light absorber and charge generator. Following light absorption, the NQD activates a molecular catalyst adsorbed on the surface of the NQD via transfer of one or more charges (either electrons or electron-holes) from the NQD to the molecular catalyst. The activated molecular catalyst can then drive a chemical reaction. A photoelectrolytic device that includes such photocatalytic materials is also described.

  12. Influence of the technological parameters of growth on the characteristics of double tunnel-coupled InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Khazanova, S. V. Degtyarev, V. E.; Malekhonova, N. V.; Pavlov, D. A.; Baidus, N. V.

    2015-01-15

    A comprehensive analysis of double tunnel-coupled InGaAs/GaAs quantum well heterostructures is carried out. The real composition profiles of the structures are obtained by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectrometry. The resultant profiles are compared with the profile obtained by computer simulation. By solving the Schrödinger equation in combination with the Poisson equation, the energy states for quantum-confined heterostructures with initially specified and real composition profiles are calculated. The influence of a number of factors, such as the well width, barrier thickness, and the background doping level on the properties of the heterostructure is thoroughly analyzed. In this manner, the optical characteristics and their dependence on the growth technology and geometric parameters of the structures are studied. Such an approach makes it possible to refine the real geometric parameters of wells and barriers and to correct the parameters of the structure and growth technology in order to improve the optical characteristics.

  13. Tunnelling with wormhole creation

    SciTech Connect

    Ansoldi, S.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-03-15

    The description of quantum tunnelling in the presence of gravity shows subtleties in some cases. We discuss wormhole production in the context of the spherically symmetric thin-shell approximation. By presenting a fully consistent treatment based on canonical quantization, we solve a controversy present in the literature.

  14. Improving Efficiency of III-N Quantum Well Based Optoelectronic Devices through Active Region Design and Growth Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Nathan Garrett

    The III-Nitride materials system provides a fascinating platform for developing optoelectronic devices, such as solar cells and LEDs, which have the power to dramatically improve the efficiency of our power consumption and reduce our environmental footprint. Finding ways to make these devices more efficient is key to driving their widespread adoption. This dissertation focuses on the intersection of challenges in physics and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth at the nanoscale when designing for device efficiency. In order to create the best possible InGaN solar cell, a multiple quantum well (MQW) active region design had to be employed to prevent strain relaxation related degradation. There were two competing challenges for MQW active region design and growth. First, it was observed current collection efficiency improved with thinner quantum barriers, which promoted efficient tunneling transport instead of inefficiency thermally activated escape. Second, GaN barriers could planarize surface defects in the MQW region under the right conditions and when grown thick enough. A two-step growth method for thinner quantum barriers was developed that simultaneously allowed for tunneling transport and planarized V-defects. Barriers as thin as 4 nm were employed in MQW active regions with up to 30 periods without structural or electrical degradation, leading to record performance. Application of dielectric optical coatings greatly reduced surface reflections and allowed a second pass of light through the device. This both demonstrated the feasibility of multijunction solar integration and boosted conversion efficiency to record levels for an InGaN solar cell. III-N LEDs have achieved state-of-the-art performance for decades, but still suffer from the phenomena of efficiency droop, where device efficiency drops dramatically at high power operation. Droop is exacerbated by the polarization-induced electric fields in InGaN quantum wells, which originate from

  15. Tunneling Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Emil; Fujisawa, Sho; Barlas, Afsar; Romin, Yevgeniy; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Moore, Malcolm A.S.; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2012-01-01

    Tunneling nanotubes are actin-based cytoplasmic extensions that function as intercellular channels in a wide variety of cell types.There is a renewed and keen interest in the examination of modes of intercellular communication in cells of all types, especially in the field of cancer biology. Tunneling nanotubes –which in the literature have also been referred to as “membrane nanotubes,” “’intercellular’ or ‘epithelial’ bridges,” or “cytoplasmic extensions” – are under active investigation for their role in facilitating direct intercellular communication. These structures have not, until recently, been scrutinized as a unique and previously unrecognized form of direct cell-to-cell transmission of cellular cargo in the context of human cancer. Our recent study of tunneling nanotubes in human malignant pleural mesothelioma and lung adenocarcinomas demonstrated efficient transfer of cellular contents, including proteins, Golgi vesicles, and mitochondria, between cells derived from several well-established cancer cell lines. Further, we provided effective demonstration that such nanotubes can form between primary malignant cells from human patients. For the first time, we also demonstrated the in vivo relevance of these structures in humans, having effectively imaged nanotubes in intact solid tumors from patients. Here we provide further analysis and discussion on our findings, and offer a prospective ‘road map’ for studying tunneling nanotubes in the context of human cancer. We hope that further understanding of the mechanisms, methods of transfer, and particularly the role of nanotubes in tumor-stromal cross-talk will lead to identification of new selective targets for cancer therapeutics. PMID:23060969

  16. Tunnelling in van der Waals heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Artem; Novoselov, Kostya; Geim, Andre; Eaves, Laurence; Falko, Vladimir

    When graphene and other conductive two-dimensional (2D) materials are separated by an atomically thin insulating 2D crystal, quantum mechanical tunnelling leads to appreciable current between two 2D conductors due to the overlap of their wavefunctions. These tunnel devices demonstrate interesting physics and potential for applications: such effects as resonant tunnelling, negative differential conductance, light emission and detection have already been demonstrated. In this presentation we will outline the current status and perspectives of tunnelling transistors based on 2D materials assembled into van der Waals heterostructures. Particularly, we will present results on mono- and bilayer graphene tunnelling, tunnelling in 2D crystal-based quantum wells, and tunnelling in superconducting 2D materials. Such effects as momentum and chirality conservation, phonon- and impurity-assisted tunnelling will also be discussed. Finally, we will ponder the implications of discovered effects for practical applications.

  17. Dopant Diffusion and Activation in Silicon Nanowires Fabricated by ex Situ Doping: A Correlative Study via Atom-Probe Tomography and Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Hazut, Ori; Huang, Bo-Chao; Chiu, Ya-Ping; Chang, Chia-Seng; Yerushalmi, Roie; Lauhon, Lincoln J; Seidman, David N

    2016-07-13

    Dopants play a critical role in modulating the electric properties of semiconducting materials, ranging from bulk to nanoscale semiconductors, nanowires, and quantum dots. The application of traditional doping methods developed for bulk materials involves additional considerations for nanoscale semiconductors because of the influence of surfaces and stochastic fluctuations, which may become significant at the nanometer-scale level. Monolayer doping is an ex situ doping method that permits the post growth doping of nanowires. Herein, using atom-probe tomography (APT) with subnanometer spatial resolution and atomic-ppm detection limit, we study the distributions of boron and phosphorus in ex situ doped silicon nanowires with accurate control. A highly phosphorus doped outer region and a uniformly boron doped interior are observed, which are not predicted by criteria based on bulk silicon. These phenomena are explained by fast interfacial diffusion of phosphorus and enhanced bulk diffusion of boron, respectively. The APT results are compared with scanning tunneling spectroscopy data, which yields information concerning the electrically active dopants. Overall, comparing the information obtained by the two methods permits us to evaluate the diffusivities of each different dopant type at the nanowire oxide, interface, and core regions. The combined data sets permit us to evaluate the electrical activation and compensation of the dopants in different regions of the nanowires and understand the details that lead to the sharp p-i-n junctions formed across the nanowire for the ex situ doping process. PMID:27351447

  18. Chiroptical activity in colloidal quantum dots coated with achiral ligands.

    PubMed

    Melnikau, Dzmitry; Savateeva, Diana; Gaponik, Nikolai; Govorov, Alexander O; Rakovich, Yury P

    2016-01-25

    We studied the chiroptical properties of colloidal solution of CdSe and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with a cubic lattice structure which were initially prepared without use of any chiral molecules and coated with achiral ligands. We demonstrate circular dichroism (CD) activity around first and second excitonic transition of these CdSe based nanocrystals. We consider that this chiroptical activity is caused by imbalance in racemic mixtures of QDs between the left and right handed nanoparticles, which appears as a result of the formation of various defects or incorporation of impurities into crystallographic structure during their synthesis. We demonstrate that optical activity of colloidal solution of CdSe QDs with achiral ligands weakly depends on the QDs size and number of ZnS monolayers, but does not depend on the nature of achiral ligands or polarity of the solution. PMID:26832599

  19. High quantum yield graphene quantum dots decorated TiO2 nanotubes for enhancing photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Ailan; Xie, Haolong; Xu, Xinmei; Zhang, Yangyu; Wen, Shengwu; Cui, Yifan

    2016-07-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with high quantum yield (about 23.6% at an excitation wavelength of 320 nm) and GQDs/TiO2 nanotubes (GQDs/TiO2 NTs) composites were achieved by a simple hydrothermal method at low temperature. Photoluminescence characterization showed that the GQDs exhibited the down-conversion PL features at excitation from 300 to 420 nm and up-conversion photoluminescence in the range of 600-800 nm. The photocatalytic activity of prepared GQDs/TiO2 NTs composites on the degradation of methyl orange (MO) was significantly enhanced compared with that of pure TiO2 nanotubes (TiO2 NTs). For the composites coupling with 1.5%, 2.5% and 3.5% GQDs, the degradation of MO after 20 min irradiation under UV-vis light irradiation (λ = 380-780 nm) were 80.52%, 94.64% and 51.91%, respectively, which are much higher than that of pure TiO2 NTs (35.41%). It was inferred from the results of characterization that the improved photocatalytic activity of the GQDs/TiO2 NTs composites was attributed to the synergetic effect of up-conversion properties of the GQDs, enhanced visible light absorption and efficient separation of photogenerated electron-holes of the GQDs/TiO2 composite.

  20. Quantum Physics in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, I.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses a teaching strategy for introducing quantum ideas into the school classroom using modern devices. Develops the concepts of quantization, wave-particle duality, nonlocality, and tunneling. (JRH)

  1. Charge-tunnelling and self-trapping: common origins for blinking, grey-state emission and photoluminescence enhancement in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, M. A.; Fisher, A. A. E.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding instabilities in the photoluminescence (PL) from light emitting materials is crucial to optimizing their performance for different applications. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) offer bright, size tunable emission, properties that are now being exploited in a broad range of developing technologies from displays and solar cells to biomaging and optical storage. However, instabilities such as photoluminescence intermittency, enhancement and bleaching of emission in these materials can be detrimental to their utility. Here, we report dielectric dependent blinking, intensity-``spikes'' and low-level, ``grey''-state emission, as well as PL enhancement in ZnS capped CdSe QDs; observations that we found consistent with a charge-tunnelling and self-trapping (CTST) description of exciton-dynamics on the QD-host system. In particular, modulation of PL in grey-states and PL enhancement are found to have a common origin in the equilibrium between exciton charge carrier core and surface-states within the CTST framework. Parameterized in terms of size and electrostatic properties of the QD and its nanoenvironment, the CTST offers predictive insight into exciton-dynamics in these nanomaterials.Understanding instabilities in the photoluminescence (PL) from light emitting materials is crucial to optimizing their performance for different applications. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) offer bright, size tunable emission, properties that are now being exploited in a broad range of developing technologies from displays and solar cells to biomaging and optical storage. However, instabilities such as photoluminescence intermittency, enhancement and bleaching of emission in these materials can be detrimental to their utility. Here, we report dielectric dependent blinking, intensity-``spikes'' and low-level, ``grey''-state emission, as well as PL enhancement in ZnS capped CdSe QDs; observations that we found consistent with a charge-tunnelling and self-trapping (CTST

  2. An aeroelastician's perspective of wind tunnel and flight experiences with active control of structural response and stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, P. W.

    1984-01-01

    Active controls technology is assessed based on a review of most of the wind-tunnel and flight tests and actual applications of active control concepts since the late sixties. The distinction is made between so-called ""rigid-body'' active control functions and those that involve significant modification of structural elastic response or stability. Both areas are reviewed although the focus is on the latter area. The basic goals and major results of the various studies or applications are summarized, and the anticipated use of active controls on current and near-future research and demonstration aircraft is discussed. Some of the ""holes'' remaining in the feasbility/benefits demonstration of active controls technology are examined.

  3. Observing remnants by fermions' tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.Y.; Wu, H.W.; Yang, H. E-mail: iverwu@uestc.edu.cn

    2014-03-01

    The standard Hawking formula predicts the complete evaporation of black holes. In this paper, we introduce effects of quantum gravity into fermions' tunneling from Reissner-Nordstrom and Kerr black holes. The quantum gravity effects slow down the increase of Hawking temperatures. This property naturally leads to a residue mass in black hole evaporation. The corrected temperatures are affected by the quantum numbers of emitted fermions. Meanwhile, the temperature of the Kerr black hole is a function of θ due to the rotation.

  4. Active Control of Wind-Tunnel Model Aeroelastic Response Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 Under a joint research and development effort conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and The Boeing Company (formerly McDonnell Douglas) three neural-network based control systems were developed and tested. The control systems were experimentally evaluated using a transonic wind-tunnel model in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. One system used a neural network to schedule flutter suppression control laws, another employed a neural network in a predictive control scheme, and the third employed a neural network in an inverse model control scheme. All three of these control schemes successfully suppressed flutter to or near the limits of the testing apparatus, and represent the first experimental applications of neural networks to flutter suppression. This paper will summarize the findings of this project.

  5. Application of two design methods for active flutter suppression and wind-tunnel test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Abel, I.; Dunn, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    The synthesis, implementation, and wind tunnel test of two flutter suppression control laws for an aeroelastic model equipped with a trailing edge control surface are presented. One control law is based on the aerodynamic energy method, and the other is based on results of optimal control theory. Analytical methods used to design the control laws and evaluate their performance are described. At Mach 0.6, 0.8, and 0.9, increases in flutter dynamic pressure were obtained but the full 44 percent increase was not achieved. However at Mach 0.95, the 44 percent increase was achieved with both control laws. Experimental results indicate that the performance of the systems is not so effective as that predicted by analysis, and that wind tunnel turbulence plays an important role in both control law synthesis and demonstration of system performance.

  6. Hyperfine-induced hysteretic funnel structure in spin blockaded tunneling current of coupled vertical quantum dots at low magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Leary, A.; Wicha, A.; Harack, B.; Coish, W. A.; Hilke, M.; Yu, G.; Gupta, J. A.; Payette, C.; Austing, D. G.

    2013-12-04

    We outline the properties of the hyperfine-induced funnel structure observed in the two-electron spin blockade region of a weakly coupled vertical double quantum dot device. Hysteretic steps in the leakage current occur due to dynamic nuclear polarization when either the bias voltage or the magnetic field is swept up and down. When the bias voltage is swept, an intriguing ∼3 mT wide cusp near 0 T appears in the down-sweep position, and when the magnetic field is swept, the current at 0 T can be switched from 'low' to 'high' as the bias is increased.

  7. Hyperfine-induced hysteretic funnel structure in spin blockaded tunneling current of coupled vertical quantum dots at low magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, A.; Wicha, A.; Harack, B.; Coish, W. A.; Hilke, M.; Yu, G.; Payette, C.; Gupta, J. A.; Austing, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    We outline the properties of the hyperfine-induced funnel structure observed in the two-electron spin blockade region of a weakly coupled vertical double quantum dot device. Hysteretic steps in the leakage current occur due to dynamic nuclear polarization when either the bias voltage or the magnetic field is swept up and down. When the bias voltage is swept, an intriguing ˜3 mT wide cusp near 0 T appears in the down-sweep position, and when the magnetic field is swept, the current at 0 T can be switched from "low" to "high" as the bias is increased.

  8. Mn Doping Effects on the Electronic Band Structure of PbS Quantum Dot Thin Films: A Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, Andrew J.; Rimal, Gaurab; Tang, Jinke; Chien, Teyu

    A thorough understanding of the phenomena associated with doping of transition metals in semiconductors is important for the development of semiconducting electronic technologies such as semiconducting quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSC). Manganese doping is of particular interest in a PbS QD as it is potentially capable of increasing overall QDSSC performance. Here we present scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies about the effects of Manganese doping on the energy band structures of PbS semiconducting QD thin films, grown using pulsed laser deposition. As a result of Manganese doping in the PbS QD thin films, a widening of the electronic band gap was observed, which is responsible for the observed increase in resistivity. Furthermore, a loss of long range periodicity observed by XRD, upon incorporation of Manganese, indicates that the Manganese dopants also induce a large amount of grain boundaries. This work was supported by the following: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, DEFG02-10ER46728 and the National Science Foundation Grant #0948027.

  9. Charge-tunnelling and self-trapping: common origins for blinking, grey-state emission and photoluminescence enhancement in semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Osborne, M A; Fisher, A A E

    2016-04-28

    Understanding instabilities in the photoluminescence (PL) from light emitting materials is crucial to optimizing their performance for different applications. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) offer bright, size tunable emission, properties that are now being exploited in a broad range of developing technologies from displays and solar cells to biomaging and optical storage. However, instabilities such as photoluminescence intermittency, enhancement and bleaching of emission in these materials can be detrimental to their utility. Here, we report dielectric dependent blinking, intensity-"spikes" and low-level, "grey"-state emission, as well as PL enhancement in ZnS capped CdSe QDs; observations that we found consistent with a charge-tunnelling and self-trapping (CTST) description of exciton-dynamics on the QD-host system. In particular, modulation of PL in grey-states and PL enhancement are found to have a common origin in the equilibrium between exciton charge carrier core and surface-states within the CTST framework. Parameterized in terms of size and electrostatic properties of the QD and its nanoenvironment, the CTST offers predictive insight into exciton-dynamics in these nanomaterials. PMID:27088542

  10. Quantum Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieve, William C.; Horwitz, Lawrence P.

    2009-04-01

    1. Foundations of quantum statistical mechanics; 2. Elementary examples; 3. Quantum statistical master equation; 4. Quantum kinetic equations; 5. Quantum irreversibility; 6. Entropy and dissipation: the microscopic theory; 7. Global equilibrium: thermostatics and the microcanonical ensemble; 8. Bose-Einstein ideal gas condensation; 9. Scaling, renormalization and the Ising model; 10. Relativistic covariant statistical mechanics of many particles; 11. Quantum optics and damping; 12. Entanglements; 13. Quantum measurement and irreversibility; 14. Quantum Langevin equation: quantum Brownian motion; 15. Linear response: fluctuation and dissipation theorems; 16. Time dependent quantum Green's functions; 17. Decay scattering; 18. Quantum statistical mechanics, extended; 19. Quantum transport with tunneling and reservoir ballistic transport; 20. Black hole thermodynamics; Appendix; Index.

  11. Qualitative comparison of calculated turbulence responses with wind-tunnel measurements for a DC-10 derivative wing with an active control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, B., III

    1981-01-01

    Comparisons are presented analytically predicted and experimental turbulence responses of a wind tunnel model of a DC-10 derivative wing equipped with an active control system. The active control system was designed for the purpose of flutter suppression, but it had additional benefit of alleviating gust loads (wing bending moment) by about 25%. Comparisions of various wing responses are presented for variations in active control system parameters and tunnel speed. The analytical turbulence responses were obtained using DYLOFLEX, a computer program for dynamic loads analyses of flexible airplanes with active controls. In general, the analytical predictions agreed reasonably well with the experimental data.

  12. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... also need to make changes in your work duties or home and sports activities. Some of the ... Call for an appointment with your provider if: You have symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome Your symptoms ...

  13. Tunneling of squeezed states with an eye to evaporating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontou, Eleni-Alexandra; Haggard, Hal

    2016-03-01

    In this work we study how tunneling time depends on the squeezing parameter of quantum states. Squeezed quantum states are investigated for optical communications and appear in the emission from black holes. A surprising property of these states is reduced tunneling time. Treating Hawking radiation as a quantum tunneling process, we study the interplay of squeezing with the radiation process.

  14. Theory of activated transport in bilayer quantum Hall systems.

    PubMed

    Roostaei, B; Mullen, K J; Fertig, H A; Simon, S H

    2008-07-25

    We analyze the transport properties of bilayer quantum Hall systems at total filling factor nu=1 in drag geometries as a function of interlayer bias, in the limit where the disorder is sufficiently strong to unbind meron-antimeron pairs, the charged topological defects of the system. We compute the typical energy barrier for these objects to cross incompressible regions within the disordered system using a Hartree-Fock approach, and show how this leads to multiple activation energies when the system is biased. We then demonstrate using a bosonic Chern-Simons theory that in drag geometries current in a single layer directly leads to forces on only two of the four types of merons, inducing dissipation only in the drive layer. Dissipation in the drag layer results from interactions among the merons, resulting in very different temperature dependences for the drag and drive layers, in qualitative agreement with experiment. PMID:18764355

  15. Theory of Activated Transport in Bilayer Quantum Hall Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roostaei, Bahman; Fertig, Herbert; Mullen, Kieran; Simon, Steven

    2008-03-01

    We analyze the transport properties of bilayer quantum Hall systems at total filling factor ν= 1 in drag geometries as a function of interlayer bias, in the limit where the disorder is sufficiently strong to unbind meron-antimeron pairs, the charged topological defects of the system. We compute the typical energy barrier for these objects to cross incompressible regions within the disordered system using a Hartree-Fock approach, and show how this leads to multiple activation energies when the system is biased. We then demonstrate using a bosonic Chern- Simons theory that in drag geometries, current in a single layer directly leads to forces on only two of the four types of merons, inducing dissipation only in the drive layer. Dissipation in the drag layer results from interactions among the merons, resulting in very different temperature dependences for the drag and drive layers, in qualitative agreement with experiment. We conclude with predictions for future experiments.

  16. Theory of Activated Transport in Bilayer Quantum Hall Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roostaei, B.; Mullen, K. J.; Fertig, H. A.; Simon, S. H.

    2008-07-01

    We analyze the transport properties of bilayer quantum Hall systems at total filling factor ν=1 in drag geometries as a function of interlayer bias, in the limit where the disorder is sufficiently strong to unbind meron-antimeron pairs, the charged topological defects of the system. We compute the typical energy barrier for these objects to cross incompressible regions within the disordered system using a Hartree-Fock approach, and show how this leads to multiple activation energies when the system is biased. We then demonstrate using a bosonic Chern-Simons theory that in drag geometries current in a single layer directly leads to forces on only two of the four types of merons, inducing dissipation only in the drive layer. Dissipation in the drag layer results from interactions among the merons, resulting in very different temperature dependences for the drag and drive layers, in qualitative agreement with experiment.

  17. Fermi resonance in dynamical tunneling in a chaotic billiard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Yu, Hyeon-Hye; Lee, Ji-Won; Kim, Chil-Min

    2015-08-01

    We elucidate that Fermi resonance ever plays a decisive role in dynamical tunneling in a chaotic billiard. Interacting with each other through an avoided crossing, a pair of eigenfunctions are coupled through tunneling channels for dynamical tunneling. In this case, the tunneling channels are an islands chain and its pair unstable periodic orbit, which equals the quantum number difference of the eigenfunctions. This phenomenon of dynamical tunneling is confirmed in a quadrupole billiard in relation with Fermi resonance.

  18. Langley Research Center's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel: Testing Capabilities and Recent Modernization Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micol, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Description, capabilities, initiatives, and utilization of the NASA Langley Research Center's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel are presented. A brief overview of the facility's operational capabilities and testing techniques is provided. A recent Construction of Facilities (Car) project to improve facility productivity and efficiency through facility automation has been completed and is discussed. Several new and maturing thrusts are underway that include systematic efforts to provide credible assessment for data quality, modifications to the new automation control system for increased compatibility with the Modern Design of Experiments (MDOE) testing methodology, and process improvements for better test coordination, planning, and execution.

  19. Langley Research Center's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel: Testing Capabilities and Recent Modernization Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micol, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Description, capabilities, initiatives, and utilization of the NASA Langley Research Center's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel are presented. A brief overview of the facility's operational capabilities and testing techniques is provided. A recent Construction of Facilities (CoF) project to improve facility productivity and efficiency through facility automation has been completed and is discussed. Several new and maturing thrusts are underway that include systematic efforts to provide credible assessment for data quality, modifications to the new automation control system for increased compatibility with the Modern Design Of Experiments (MDOE) testing methodology, and process improvements for better test coordination, planning, and execution.

  20. Single Electron Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Steven T.

    2005-07-25

    Financial support for this project has led to advances in the science of single-electron phenomena. Our group reported the first observation of the so-called ''Coulomb Staircase'', which was produced by tunneling into ultra-small metal particles. This work showed well-defined tunneling voltage steps of width e/C and height e/RC, demonstrating tunneling quantized on the single-electron level. This work was published in a now well-cited Physical Review Letter. Single-electron physics is now a major sub-field of condensed-matter physics, and fundamental work in the area continues to be conducted by tunneling in ultra-small metal particles. In addition, there are now single-electron transistors that add a controlling gate to modulate the charge on ultra-small photolithographically defined capacitive elements. Single-electron transistors are now at the heart of at least one experimental quantum-computer element, and single-electron transistor pumps may soon be used to define fundamental quantities such as the farad (capacitance) and the ampere (current). Novel computer technology based on single-electron quantum dots is also being developed. In related work, our group played the leading role in the explanation of experimental results observed during the initial phases of tunneling experiments with the high-temperature superconductors. When so-called ''multiple-gap'' tunneling was reported, the phenomenon was correctly identified by our group as single-electron tunneling in small grains in the material. The main focus throughout this project has been to explore single electron phenomena both in traditional tunneling formats of the type metal/insulator/particles/insulator/metal and using scanning tunneling microscopy to probe few-particle systems. This has been done under varying conditions of temperature, applied magnetic field, and with different materials systems. These have included metals, semi-metals, and superconductors. Amongst a number of results, we have

  1. Controlling the optical bistability and multistability via tunneling-induced and incoherent pumping field in a triple coupled quantum dots at a wavelength of λ = 1.550 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmannavaz, M. R.; Nasehi, R.; Sattari, H.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2014-11-01

    The behavior of the optical bistability (OB), optical multistability (OM) and transition between them at a wavelength of λ = 1.550 μm, are investigate in a triple coupled quantum dots nanostructure with two consecutive tunneling-induced and an incoherent pumping field. It is found that OB, OM and transition between them can be accomplished by adjusting different values of intensity tunneling-induced and incoherent pumping field. We observed that with increasing intensity tunneling-induced and incoherent pumping field and probe wavelength detuning λ0 the bistable hysteresis loop becomes narrower which makes the cavity field easier to reach saturation. Switching OB and OM and vice versa is calculated by discussing the dependency of optical properties on the incoherent pumping and inter-dot tunneling rates between QD1, QD2 and QD2, QD3. This system with wavelength 1.550 μm, can be useful for provides a new experimental method for the development of new types of nano-optoelectronic devices for the realizing switching process.

  2. Optically active quantum dots in monolayer WSe2.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ajit; Sidler, Meinrad; Allain, Adrien V; Lembke, Dominik S; Kis, Andras; Imamoğlu, A

    2015-06-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots have emerged as promising candidates for the implementation of quantum information processing, because they allow for a quantum interface between stationary spin qubits and propagating single photons. In the meantime, transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers have moved to the forefront of solid-state research due to their unique band structure featuring a large bandgap with degenerate valleys and non-zero Berry curvature. Here, we report the observation of zero-dimensional anharmonic quantum emitters, which we refer to as quantum dots, in monolayer tungsten diselenide, with an energy that is 20-100 meV lower than that of two-dimensional excitons. Photon antibunching in second-order photon correlations unequivocally demonstrates the zero-dimensional anharmonic nature of these quantum emitters. The strong anisotropic magnetic response of the spatially localized emission peaks strongly indicates that radiative recombination stems from localized excitons that inherit their electronic properties from the host transition-metal dichalcogenide. The large ∼1 meV zero-field splitting shows that the quantum dots have singlet ground states and an anisotropic confinement that is most probably induced by impurities or defects. The possibility of achieving electrical control in van der Waals heterostructures and to exploit the spin-valley degree of freedom renders transition-metal-dichalcogenide quantum dots interesting for quantum information processing. PMID:25938570

  3. Mutational and Computational Evidence That a Nickel-Transfer Tunnel in UreD Is Used for Activation of Klebsiella aerogenes Urease.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Mark A; Wang, Beibei; Feig, Michael; Hausinger, Robert P

    2015-10-20

    Nickel-containing urease from Klebsiella aerogenes requires four accessory proteins for proper active site metalation. The metallochaperone UreE delivers nickel to UreG, a GTPase that forms a UreD/UreF/UreG complex, which binds to urease apoprotein via UreD. Prior in silico analysis of the homologous, structurally characterized UreH/UreF/UreG complex from Helicobacter pylori identified a water tunnel originating at a likely nickel-binding motif in UreG, passing through UreF, and exiting UreH, suggestive of a role for the channel in providing the metal to urease apoprotein for its activation; however, no experimental support was reported for the significance of this tunnel. Here, specific variants were designed to disrupt a comparable 34.6 Å predicted internal tunnel, alternative channels, and surface sites for UreD. Cells producing a set of tunnel-disrupting variants of UreD exhibited greatly reduced urease specific activities, whereas other mutants had no appreciable effect on activity. Affinity pull-down studies of cell-free extracts from tunnel-disrupting mutant cultures showed no loss of UreD interactions with urease or UreF/UreG. The nickel contents of urease samples enriched from activity-deficient cultures were decreased, while zinc and iron incorporation increased. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed size restrictions in the internal channels of the UreD variants. These findings support the role of a molecular tunnel in UreD as a direct facilitator of nickel transfer into urease, illustrating a new paradigm in active site metallocenter assembly. PMID:26401965

  4. [Effects of quantum nonlocality in the water activation process].

    PubMed

    Zatsepina, O V; Stekhin, A A; Yakovleva, G V

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic alterations of the magnetic flux density of the water volume, activated with structurally stressed calcium carbonate in micellar form have been investigated. The phase of the associated water was established to exhibit electrical and magnetic properties, recorded by in B&E meter in the frequency range of 5Hz - 2kHz. Alterations in water Eh (redox) potential and the magnetic flux density B testify to synchronous auto-oscillatory changes. This gives evidence of non-linearity of the relationship between auto-oscillatory processes excited in the water; and reflects the nonlocal in time the relationship between the states of water, manifesting in a change of water activity on the 1st and 2nd day in negative time. The mechanism of action of associated water phase is shown to be described by de Broglie concept of matter waves with taking into account delocalized in time states of phase of electron wave packet in accordance with the transactional interpretation of quantum physics. PMID:24749297

  5. ``Hybrid'' multi-gap/single-gap Josephson junctions: Evidence of macroscopic quantum tunneling in superconducting-to-normal switching experiments on MgB2/I/Pb and MgB2/I/Sn junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabello, Steve; Lambert, Joseph; Dai, Wenqing; Li, Qi; Chen, Ke; Cunnane, Daniel; Xi, X. X.; Ramos, Roberto

    We report results of superconducting-to-normal switching experiments on MgB2/I/Pb and MgB2/I/Sn junctions, with and without microwaves. These results suggest that the switching behavior is dominated by quantum tunneling through the washboard potential barrier, rather than thermal excitations or electronic noise. Evidence includes a leveling in the standard deviation of the switching current distribution below a crossover temperature, a Lorentzian shape of the escape rate enhancement peak upon excitation by microwaves, and a narrowing in the histogram of escape counts in the presence of resonant microwave excitation relative to that in the absence of microwaves. These are the first such results reported in ``hybrid'' Josephson tunnel junctions, consisting of multi-gap and single-gap superconducting electrodes.

  6. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.A. |

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  7. Water tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjarke, Lisa J.

    1991-01-01

    Some of the uses of water tunnels are demonstrated through the description of the NASA Ames-Dryden Flow Visualization Facility. It is concluded that water tunnels are capable of providing a quick and inexpensive means of flow visualization and can aid in the understanding of complex fluid mechanics phenomena.

  8. Optical Properties of Active Regions in Terahertz Quantum Cascade Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyksik, M.; Motyka, M.; Rudno-Rudziński, W.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Pucicki, D.; Kosiel, K.; Sankowska, I.; Kubacka-Traczyk, J.; Bugajski, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, AlGaAs/GaAs superlattice, with layers' sequence and compositions imitating the active and injector regions of a quantum cascade laser designed for emission in the terahertz spectral range, was investigated. Three independent absorption-like optical spectroscopy techniques were employed in order to study the band structure of the minibands formed within the conduction band. Photoreflectance measurements provided information about interband transitions in the investigated system. Common transmission spectra revealed, in the target range of intraband transitions, mainly a number of lines associated with the phonon-related processes, including two-phonon absorption. In contrast, differential transmittance realized by means of Fourier-transform spectroscopy was utilized to probe the confined states of the conduction band. The obtained energy separation between the second and third confined electron levels, expected to be predominantly contributing to the lasing, was found to be ~9 meV. The optical spectroscopy measurements were supported by numerical calculations performed in the effective mass approximation and XRD measurements for layers' width verification. The calculated energy spacings are in a good agreement with the experimental values.

  9. Help Students Tunnel Their Way to Math and Writing Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacMath, Russ

    1987-01-01

    A teacher describes how a cardboard box tunnel was used to capitalize on children's fascination with boxes. The finished tunnel offers opportunities for honing math and writing skills. Layouts for tunnels and related activities are suggested. (MT)

  10. Evidence for Dominant Role of Tunneling in Condensed Phases and at High Temperatures: Double Hydrogen Transfer in Porphycenes.

    PubMed

    Ciąćka, Piotr; Fita, Piotr; Listkowski, Arkadiusz; Radzewicz, Czesław; Waluk, Jacek

    2016-01-21

    Investigation of the double hydrogen transfer in porphycene, its 2,7,12,17-tetra-tert-butyl derivative, and their N-deuterated isotopologues revealed the dominant role of tunneling, even at room temperature in condensed phase. Ultrafast optical spectroscopy with polarized light employed in a wide range of temperatures allowed the identification and evaluation of contributions of two tunneling modes: vibrational ground-state tunneling, occurring from the zero vibrational level, and vibrationally activated, via a large amplitude, low-frequency mode. Good correspondence was found between the rates of incoherent tunneling occurring in condensed phase and the values estimated on the basis of tunneling splittings observed in molecules isolated in supersonic jets or helium nanodroplets. The results provide solid experimental insight into widely proposed quantum facets of ubiquitous hydrogen-transfer phenomena. PMID:26727277

  11. Interplay of Tunneling, Two-State Reactivity, and Bell-Evans-Polanyi Effects in C-H Activation by Nonheme Fe(IV)O Oxidants.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Debasish; Shaik, Sason

    2016-02-24

    The study of C-H bond activation reactions by nonheme Fe(IV)O species with nine hydrocarbons shows that the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) involves strong tunneling and is a signature of the reactive spin states. Theory reproduces the observed spike-like appearance of plots of KIE(exp) against the C-H bond dissociation energy, and its origins are discussed. The experimentally observed Bell-Evans-Polanyi correlations, in the presence of strong tunneling, are reproduced, and the pattern is rationalized. PMID:26824716

  12. User's guide for a revised computer program to analyze the LRC 16 foot transonic dynamics tunnel active cable mount system. [computer techniques - aircraft models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, J.; Barbero, P.

    1975-01-01

    The revision of an existing digital program to analyze the stability of models mounted on a two-cable mount system used in a transonic dynamics wind tunnel is presented. The program revisions and analysis of an active feedback control system to be used for controlling the free-flying models are treated.

  13. Can Outer Hair Cells Actively Pump Fluid into the Tunnel of Corti?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagadou, Brissi Franck; Mountain, David C.

    2011-11-01

    Non-classical models of the cochlear traveling wave have been introduced in attempt to capture the unique features of the cochlear amplifier (CA). These models include multiple modes of longitudinal coupling. In one approach, it is hypothesized that two wave modes can add their energies to create amplification such as that desired in the CA. The tunnel of Corti (ToC) was later used to represent the second wave mode for the proposed traveling wave amplifier model, and was incorporated in a multi-compartment cochlea model. The results led to the hypothesis that the CA functions as a fluid pump. However, this hypothesis must be consistent with the anatomical structure of the organ of Corti (OC). The fluid must pass between the outer pillar cells before reaching the ToC, and the ToC fluid and the underlying basilar membrane must constitute an appropriate waveguide. We have analyzed an anatomically based 3D finite element model of the ToC of the gerbil. Our results demonstrate that the OC structure is consistent with the hypothesis.

  14. Tunneling machine

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, L.L.

    1980-02-19

    A diametrically compact tunneling machine for boring tunnels is disclosed. The machine includes a tubular support frame having a hollow piston mounted therein which is movable from a retracted position in the support frame to an extended position. A drive shaft is rotatably mounted in the hollow piston and carries a cutter head at one end. The hollow piston is restrained against rotational movement relative to the support frame and the drive shaft is constrained against longitudinal movement relative to the hollow piston. A plurality of radially extendible feet project from the support frame to the tunnel wall to grip the tunnel wall during a tunneling operation wherein the hollow piston is driven forwardly so that the cutter head works on the tunnel face. When the hollow piston is fully extended, a plurality of extendible support feet, which are fixed to the rearward and forward ends of the hollow piston, are extended, the radially extendible feet are retracted and the support frame is shifted forwardly by the piston so that a further tunneling operation may be initiated.

  15. Promoting and inhibiting tunneling via nuclear motions.

    PubMed

    Császár, Attila G; Furtenbacher, Tibor

    2016-01-14

    Accurate, experimental rotational-vibrational energy levels determined via the MARVEL (Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels) algorithm and published recently for the symmetric-top (14)NH3 molecule in J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer, 2015, 116, 117-130 are analyzed to unravel the promoting and inhibiting effects of vibrations and rotations on the tunneling splittings of the corresponding symmetric (s) and antisymmetric (a) rovibrational energy level pairs. The experimental transition data useful from the point of view of the present analysis cover the range 0.7-7000 cm(-1), sufficiently detailed rovibrational energy sets worth analyzing are available for 20 vibrational bands. The highest J value, where J stands for the rotational quantum number, within the experimental dataset employed is 30. Coupling of the "umbrella" motion of (14)NH3 with other vibrational degrees of freedom has only a minor effect on the a-s tunneling splitting characterizing the ground vibrational state, 0.79436(70) cm(-1). In the majority of the cases rotation around the C3 axis increases, while rotation around the two perpendicular axes decreases the tunneling splittings. For example, for the pair of vibrational ground states, 0(+) and 0(-), the tunneling splitting basically disappears at around J = 25 for the (J,K) = (J,1) states, where K = |k| is the usual quantum number characterizing the projection of the rotational angular momentum on the principal axis. The tunneling splittings, defined as energy differences E(a) - E(s) of corresponding energy level pairs, as a function of J and K show a very regular behavior for the ground state (GS) and the nν2 bands. For the other bands investigated exceptions from a regular behavior do occur, especially for bands characterized by degenerate vibrations, and occasionally the data available are not sufficient to arrive at definitive conclusions. The most irregular behavior is observed for rotational states characterized by the k

  16. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  17. Helium ion-implanted InGaAsP tunnel junction current blocking layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongsheng; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2002-08-01

    We experimentally investigate and model He+-implanted InGaAsP tunnel junctions used for lateral current confinement in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). Prior to implantation, a 56-mum-diameter tunnel junction exhibits a peak-to-valley ratio of 2.2 and a differential resistance of 27 Omega at -2 V. After implantation at a dose of 3.3 x1013 cm-2, the current under reverse bias reduces by a factor of >107. Placing tunnel junctions close to the laser active region does not degrade the gain in the quantum wells. With He+-implanted tunnel junctions, mirrorless test VCSEL structures up to 50 mum diameter have uniform current distribution across the entire light-emitting apertures.

  18. Hydrogen diffusion and tunneling in KTaO3 from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Farsakh, Hazem; van de Walle, Chris G.

    2012-02-01

    The high proton conductivity in many perovskites has attracted interest for potential applications, such as in fuel cells. A promising approach to increase their conductivity at lower temperatures involves enhancing quantum-mechanical tunneling. In order to determine the role of tunneling for H in KTaO3 we employ first principles calculations for H interstitial atoms. We identify H binding sites and diffusion channels and calculate the associated activation energies. In addition, we analyze the effect of lattice relaxations on the diffusion barriers. Through calculating the 3D potential energy surface of H, we determine accurate H tunneling rates by numerically solving Schr"odinger's equation for H in the 3D potential energy surface. Finally, we examine lattice vibrations and analyze their role in assisting proton tunneling.

  19. Predicting pressure-dependent unimolecular rate constants using variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling combined with system-specific quantum RRK theory: a definitive test for fluoroform dissociation.

    PubMed

    Bao, Junwei Lucas; Zhang, Xin; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-06-22

    Understanding the falloff in rate constants of gas-phase unimolecular reaction rate constants as the pressure is lowered is a fundamental problem in chemical kinetics, with practical importance for combustion, atmospheric chemistry, and essentially all gas-phase reaction mechanisms. In the present work, we use our recently developed system-specific quantum RRK theory, calibrated by canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling, combined with the Lindemann-Hinshelwood mechanism, to model the dissociation reaction of fluoroform (CHF3), which provides a definitive test for falloff modeling. Our predicted pressure-dependent thermal rate constants are in excellent agreement with experimental values over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. The present validation of our methodology, which is able to include variational transition state effects, multidimensional tunneling based on the directly calculated potential energy surface along the tunneling path, and torsional and other vibrational anharmonicity, together with state-of-the-art reaction-path-based direct dynamics calculations, is important because the method is less empirical than models routinely used for generating full mechanisms, while also being simpler in key respects than full master equation treatments and the full reduced falloff curve and modified strong collision methods of Troe. PMID:27273734

  20. Deterministic generation of remote entanglement with active quantum feedback

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Martin, Leigh; Motzoi, Felix; Li, Hanhan; Sarovar, Mohan; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2015-12-10

    We develop and study protocols for deterministic remote entanglement generation using quantum feedback, without relying on an entangling Hamiltonian. In order to formulate the most effective experimentally feasible protocol, we introduce the notion of average-sense locally optimal feedback protocols, which do not require real-time quantum state estimation, a difficult component of real-time quantum feedback control. We use this notion of optimality to construct two protocols that can deterministically create maximal entanglement: a semiclassical feedback protocol for low-efficiency measurements and a quantum feedback protocol for high-efficiency measurements. The latter reduces to direct feedback in the continuous-time limit, whose dynamics can bemore » modeled by a Wiseman-Milburn feedback master equation, which yields an analytic solution in the limit of unit measurement efficiency. Our formalism can smoothly interpolate between continuous-time and discrete-time descriptions of feedback dynamics and we exploit this feature to derive a superior hybrid protocol for arbitrary nonunit measurement efficiency that switches between quantum and semiclassical protocols. Lastly, we show using simulations incorporating experimental imperfections that deterministic entanglement of remote superconducting qubits may be achieved with current technology using the continuous-time feedback protocol alone.« less